The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02952

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
jdlewislb Flor idiami
Volume 58 Number 35
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, August 30,1985
F'tdShocntl 8yMa.il> 3S Pt'\C6 50 COOtS
la of the seven right-wing MK's (Member* of Knesset) who occupied the flat in
1,1 -)< are escorted out of the apartment at S a.m., on Tuesday, Aug. 20. From
left. Yuval Ne'eman, Geula Cohen, Rabbi Eliezer Waldman, Dov Shilansky, Ger-
shon Shafat and Benny Shalita. (The seventh MK was Rabbi Haim Druckman.)
Change
If Color
Helms Vows He'll Seek
U.S.-Israel Defense Pact
Unity Gov't Rocked
As Settlers Evicted
?n. Jesse Helms
obe
hged
'Christian'
Nation Letter
Griddled
By AVIVA CANTOR
JEW YORK (JTA) -
pp. Patricia Schroeder (D.,
plo.) is calling upon
reasury Secretary James
Bker to investigate the ac-
uities of a self-described
Continued on Page 6-A
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Visiting
United States Sen. Jesse Hels (R.,
N.C.) told reporters at a news con-
ference that he will initiate a
defense agreement between the
United States and Israel that
would include military airstrips,
joint research and development,
and cooperation in other fields.
Helms, who at one time was
regarded as highly critical of
Israel, has recently changed his
views and now said that Israel
should incorporate the West Bank
and Gaza Strip into Israel.
He said that after visiting
"Judaea and Samaria he fully
agreed with the position that the
area is not only important to the
defense of Israel but also is part of
the nation's heritage. According
to Helms, the American people
should realize that Israel is the
"only reliable ally of America in
this area which is anti-
Communist, with impeccable
moral principles."
He said that many Americans
might believe that a defense
agreement with Israel might
mean U.S. troops would have to
fight in the Jewish State. "But
thjit is not so," he said. "I have
met Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and understand that Israel
does not need or want American
Continued on Page 2-A
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A new dispute in the na-
tional unity government is
threatening to further
deteriorate the relationship
between Labor and Likud
Cabinet ministers. The
argument revolves around
the takeover and subse-
quent eviction of a group of
Kiryat Arba settlers and six
Likud Knesset members
from an apartment in the
Arab marketplace in central
Hebron.
The clash between Labor and
Likud began over a week ago as
each accused the other of
misinterpreting the legality of
Jews buying and then settling into
apartments in the Arab quarter of
Hebron.
Labor leaders argued that it
contravened the law of Israel
which prohibits the purchase by
Jews of real estate on the West
Bank unless it is first approved by
the Defense Ministry. Likud
leaders contended that Jews have
a right to settle anywhere in Eretz
Yisrael. Labor led the day when
the group of Kiryat Arba settlers
were evicted from the Hebron
apartment and, following that,
when the MKs left the apartment
after they were ordered to do so
by the army.
THE DISPUTE continued to
simmer last week after the apart-
ment was emptied and sealed off
by the army but erupted into a
war of words when Likud's
Minister Without Portfolio Ariel
Sharon accused Premier Shimon
Peres and the Labor Party of con-
ducting a "White Paper" policy
similar to that of the British Man-
datory government when it bann-
ed the purchase of land by Jews
from Arabs. Furthermore, Sharon
accused the Labor Party of lying
about the land purchase policy
adopted by the government of
Premier Menachem Begin.
Speaking to former members of
the Irgun Zvai Leumi several days
ago, Sharon declared that Labor
is "refusing to ratify Jewish land
purchases because they say this
was the decision of the Begin
government in 1979. This is a lie
and hypocrisy.
"They know full well that the
Begin government never intended
to prevent Jews from buying
houses or land anywhere. There is
no basis for this hypocritical
pretense. But according to Peres
and (Defense Minister Yitzhak)
Rabin, they are religiously im-
plementing Likud decisions."
SHARON ALSO charged that
"anybody not present at Cabinet
sessions cannot imagine the
outright hatred for Jewish set-
tlements on the part of Labor
ministers.
Health Minister Mordechai Gur,
in an angry response, denounced
Continued on Page 7-A
Louis Farrakhan
nti-ZionistProf.
Stony Brook Denies Dube Tenure for His Teachings
By BEN GALLOB
I official of the Suffolk,
'division of the
nerican Jewish Congress
s praised the decision of
State University at
Stony Brook to deny tenure
to Prof. Ernest Dube, who
teaches that Zionism is
equated with racism, and
said the division had decided
to combat Dube's teachings
with a corrective guidebook.
Steven Israel, director of the
division office in Commack, told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency in
a telephone interview that,
though the university had denied
Dube tenure, Dube had indicated
he would teach two more
semesters under his contract.
Israel said the furor erupting
within the Jewish community over
Dube's teachings, including a
denunciation by Gov. Mario
Cuomo, apparently had not chang-
ed Dube's approach and that the
Continued on Page 12-A
Farrakhan,
Rabbi Kahane
Called 'Cancers'
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Calling both Louis Far-
rakhan and Rabbi Meir
Kahane "cancers on the
body politic," the
Washington representative
of the American Jewish
Committee is urging black
leaders to denounce Far-
rakhan in much the same
way that Jewish leaders
have denounced Kahane.
Speaking before the Hadassah
national convention here, Hyman
Bookbinder said that Black
Muslim leader Farrakhan and
Kahane had no common goals but
had "much in cbmmon in their
basic intolerance and their basic
rejection of the democratic pro-
cess." Bookbinder added:
"One major difference that has
surfaced in the reaction to these
two political cancers (is that)
Continued on Page 10-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1985
One Down, One More Harassment, Vandalism
Myth-Maker to Go
By RON CSILLAG
MONCTON, New
Brunswick (JTA) If the
attorney general of this
Canadian province gives his
consent, Malcolm Ross may
soon be joining the company
of Ernst Zundel and Jim
Keegstra.
Once again, Canadian Jews
may be put through the same
courtroom dramas that surround-
ed convicted hatemongers Zundel
and Keegstra. as Ross. 39, the
author of several books alleging
the Holocaust never happened
and that an international Jewish
conspiracy is afoot, has had a for-
mal complaint filed against him by
a private citizen.
Earlier this year, Zundel, a
Toronto publisher and landed im-
migrant from West Germany, was
found guilty about publishing lies
about the Holocaust after an
emotionally-wrenching eight-
week trial in which many say the
Holocaust itself was on trial. He
was sentenced to 15 months in
jail. He is appealing both the
sentence and the conviction, and
is also appealing a deportation
order.
KEEGSTRA WAS recently
found guilty of wilfully promoting
hatred of Jews through his 12
years of teaching junior high
school students in Alberta that
there is an international Jewish
conspiracy to take over the world
and that Jews are evil. During
testimony, Keegstra said the
Talmud encourages Jews to kill
Christians.
Late last month, Dr. Julius
Israeli, a retired chemistry pro-
fessor and Orthodox Jew living in
Newcastle, a town about 180 miles
north of here, filed a complaint
with the local Royal Canadian
Mounted Police (RCMP) against
Ross, the East Coast director of
the Christian Defense League of
Canada, a rightwing fundamen-
talist group, some of whose
members attended both the
Keegstra and Zundel trials.
Israeli alleges that Ross is pro-
Helms Will Seek
U.S.-Israel Pact
Continued from Page 1-A
troops to fight here." Helms was
in Israel on a private visit
together with Sen. Chic Hecht (R.,
Nev.).
moting hatred of Jews through
the publication of three books
written by Ross "Web of
Deceit," "The Real Holocaust,"
and "Christianity and Judeo-
Christianity," which apparently
allege that the Holocaust was a
Jewish hoax and that there is a
Jewish conspiracy to take over the
world. Israeli is also basing his
case on letters to the Editor of
The Moncton Times-Transcript
and to a local weekly, letters writ-
ten by Ross and alleging a Jewish
conspiracy.
ISRAELI FILED the com
plaint asking Ross be charged
under section 281 of Canada's
Criminal Code, the same section
under which Keegstra was charg-
ed and convicted. The section, a
rarely used provision, prohibits
anyone from making statements,
other than in private conversa-
tion, that wilfully promote hatred
against any identifiable group.
Israeli, a 52-year-old Rumanian
who escaped the Nazi onslaught
by fleeing into southern Tran-
sylvania, said he filed the com-
plaint because he was "sick" of
seeing Ross get away with ques-
tioning the number of Jews killed
in the Holocaust and alleging a
worldwide Jewish Com-
munist/financial conspiracy.
The majority of Israeli's family
was deported to Auschwitz, and
Israeli himself was liberated by
Soviet troops in 1945. Israeli said
that in 1978. he tried to file
charges against Ross for "Web of
Deceit." but he said the attorney
general told him the words
"wilful" and "hatred" in the
Criminal Code were too nebulous
around which to build a strong
enough case.
BUT THIS time. Israeli is citing
the precedent set by the convic-
tion of Keegstra. "It's not a legal
precedent, but it is an historical
one," said Israeli of the Keegstra
case. "I'm not afraid of this."
Ross, he added, "is a sick man. He
has a phobia about the Jews."
Israeli said he filed the com-
plaint as a private citizen and not
on behalf of any group. He said
Keegstra had referred to Ross'
works as "references" and source
material several times during his
trial. "The law now should have
no more problems with the words
'wilful' and "hatred.' Israeli
said.
The Newcastle RCMP confirm-
ed to a Moncton newspaper last
month that it had received the
complaint by Israeli and that it
On Steep Rise for Canada's Jews
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) Acts of harassment and
vandalism against Jews in Canada increased by
more than 162 percent between 1983 and 1984, ac-
cording to a report by the B'nai B'rith's League
for Human Rights.
The annual review of anti-Semitism released last
week, says there were 126 anti-Semitic incidents
reported to the League last year compared with 48
such incidents in 1983. In addition, a public opinion
survey on Canadian attitudes toward Jews and
other minorities found that, for the second year,
the level of prejudice is highest among people who
have little contact with minority groups.
ALMOST ALL the incidents of vandalism and
harassment which are reported to the League
by individuals and social agencies occurred in
metropolitan areas in the provinces of Quebec and
Ontario, the report said. Ontario reported 32 cases
of anti-Semitic harassment and 18 cases of van-
dalism. Quebec had the highest number of anti-
Semitic acts, with 27 incidents of harassment and
40 of vandalism.
The incidents ranged from a spate of swastika
daubings in Montreal late last year to four bomb
threats against Jewish organizations in Ontario
The dramatic rise in reported incidents may be the
result of a greater willingness to report such acts
"We may have to wait till we get the 1985 results
to see if there is a pattern occurring here or
whether this year's findings are just a blip on the
screen." said Alan Shefman, a B'nai B'rith
spokesman.
A poll conducted by the Conseil de Reserche m
L Opinion Publique for the League, which examin-
ed the attitudes of 2,000 Canadians towards Jews
Poles and Italians, found that people who have lit-
tle contact with minorities often feel that the three
groups "have too much influence." The poll
financed by the Secretary of State for
Multiculturalism, was first conducted last year and
is to be conducted annually.
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would be investigated. The Moun-
ties passed the complaint along to
the province's Justice Depart-
ment's policing section and to the
director of special prosecutions,
officials of which say they are
familiar with the case, and who in
turn passed the file on to the
Moncton police department.
CPL. RAY LE BLANC of the
Moncton police force confirmed
that the file will eventually find its
way to the city's police. He said
the police will be examining Ross'
books. "The basic question is.
what's in the books and whether
they're detrimental in any way."
Leblanc said. "There will have to
be a lot of interpretation."
He said that if the police find the
complaint has merit, the file
would be passed back to the
Justice Department and eventual-
ly to New Brunswick's attorney
general. Femand Dube. the pro-
vince's main law enforcement of-
ficer, who would make the final
decision on whether to charge
Ross. Leblanc said the police in-
vestigation would take several
weeks.
As for Ross, he has been a
teacher since 1968 at Moncton s
Magnetic High School, where he
now instructs mentally handicap-
ped children. A Moncton school
board official said the board has
never received a complaint about
Ross bringing his views into the
classroom and that they have no
knowledge of Ross ever teaching
his beliefs.
ORGANIZED JEWISH
response in Canada to Israeli's
complaint has been lukewarm at
best. Irwin Lampert, chairman of
the Canadian Jewish Congress'
Atlantic Region, said he questions
"the wisdom of prosecution at this
time. As a private citizen. Mr.
Israeli has the right to file a
grievance. This is not something
supported or not supported by the
Congress. We've never been ask-
ed to support it." Concerning
Ross letters to the editor.
Lampert said the best thing to do
is simply ignore them.
Prof. Bernard Vigod. head of
the Atlantic Region of B'nai
B'rith's League for Human
Rights, said he supports "the
spirit" of Israeli's complaint.
However. Vigod said he has reser-
vations about whether the case is
strong enough to obtain a convic-
tion. "The law itself was touch
and go even when the evidence
(against Zundel and Keegstra)
was overwhelming. With this
case, we have our doubts about
the ability to obtain a conviction."
Privately, some Jewish leaders
in Canada say the community may
not be able to withstand being put
through an emotional wringer
again and that there are reserva-
tions about pressing charges
against Ross because of the
possibility of his being found not
guilty.
.......-MJt>-85 .....------
Selective Arab, Jewish Student
Meetings Will Be Allowed
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Council for State Religious
Education has partially yielded to
the pressure of Education
Minister Yitzhak Navon. and has
decided to allow selective
meetings between Jewish and
Arab students.
The Council's decision was the
latest development in the con-
troversy over an earlier directive
by Yaacov Hadani. the director of
the division of religious education
in the Ministry of Education, ban-
ning such meetings on the
grounds that they would lead to
mixed marriages. Navon later in-
structed the division not to
distribute this directive.
Under the Council's new deci-
sion, only meetings between
Jewish and Arab students of the
same gender and in the upper
classes will be allowed. They wC
be strictly educational, after
thorough preparations acceptable
to both Jewish and Arjt i
educators.
The Council held a four-hour i
session in which views were ex-
changed with Navon. Council
members repeated the fears about
intermarriages expressed recerc-
ly by Hadani.
Navon told the Council that the
entire educational system must be
involved in education for
democracy. Though he respected
the sensibilities of- the Orthodox
community, he said, he was noi
prepared to exclude the state
religious education network from
programs designed to enable Jews
and Arabs to learn about each
other.
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Assassinated Diplomat's Father
Was Hanged in Iraq for Zionism
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Albert Atrakchi, the Israel Em-
bassy administration attache in Cairo who was
assassinated last week on his way from his home in th*
Mahdi suburb to the Embassy, was the sonof anTraoj Jew
STL" lraq< t?er S16 Six"Day War for tata Zionist
and like his father Yaacov, Albert was a faithful and
dedicated servant of the State," Foreign Minister Yitzhak
bnamir said at his graveside.
ALBERT ATRAKCHI, who was laid to rest in the
military section of the Kiryat Shaul cemetery, had served
,jn the Israel Defense Force for 10 years before beine
posted some months ago to the Embassy in Cairo as an ad
mmistrative attache.
Israeli correspondents in Cairo report that the EevD-
tian police have been working strenuously and efficiently in
the search for Atrakchi"s murderers. They have already
found the red Fiat car which the assailants drove and in
which they made their getaway after the shooting, together
with the weapon they used in the attack.
OSANA ALI, the owner of the car, has been arrested
and police have found fingerprints both in the car and on
the weapon.
An organization calling itself the "Egyptian Revolu-
tion has claimed responsibility for the attack and said that
it had previously carried out an attack on Zvi Kedar, shot in
the hand in Cairo over a year ago in a little-publicized inci-
dent. The group said it was carrying out attacks on "agents
of the Israeli intelligence service" in Cairo.
Atrakchi's Wife, Second
Wounded Diplomat, Recuperating
Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) The
body of Albert Atrakchi, the ad-
ministration attache at the Israel
Embassy in Cairo slain by gunmen
in Cairo on Aug. 20, was brought
back to Israel aboard an El Al
plane early the next day. He was
buried in Tel Aviv.
Also aboard the plane which
brought his coffin were his wife,
I Hana, and Mazal Menache,
another Israeli woman employed
at the Embassy, who were wound-
led in the attack on the car in
|which the three were driving from
ltheir home in the Mahdi quarter of
Jairo to the Embassy.
liana was not aware that her
husband was killed in the assault.
Their two-year-old daughter was
arned back to Israel in the arms
an Embassy employee.
THE TWO WOMEN were
Iperated on at the Sheba Hospital
i Tel Hashomer. liana Atrakchi
nffered a bullet wound in her
heek near her nose, while
enache had bullet wounds in her
chest. The condition of both is
reported stable. An Israeli
Foreign Ministry doctor had been
flown to Cairo and returned with
the two injured women.
Some hours after the return of
Atrakchi's body and the injured
women, Egyptian Tourism
Minister Wajih Shindi arrived in
Israel for an offical three-day visit
at the invitation of Israeli Tourism
Minister Avraham Sharir, who
met him at the airport.
Shindi said the Egyptian
government would spare neither
time nor energy to track down the
assailants who, he thought, had
been intent on sabotaging the
Israel-Egyptian peace process
which would, however, continue
unabated.
Police in Cairo, meanwhile, de-
tained Osana Ali, an Egyptian,
whose car is suspected with hav-
ing been used in the killing of the
Israeli diplomat. Police report
that Ali's car was found abandon-
ed in the Mahdi section of the
Egyptian capital, where the at-
tack took place.
Richard Murphy, U.S. Assistant Secretary of
State, meets with Prime Minister Shimon
Peres in his office in Jerusalem on Aug. 15.
Arriving from Amman, Murphy indicated
(JTA/WZN News Photo)
that there has been no real progress in Jorda-
nian and Palestinian attitudes towards peace
negotiations.
Likud Fears 'Designs' of Unity Gov't.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
machinery of the Labor-Likud
coalition government was creak-
ing again after angry comments
by spokesmen for both wings of
the coalition. The renewed tension
stemmed from statements by
Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai
of Likud, and a response by Uzi
Baram, secretary general of the
Labor Party.
Modai reportedly asserted that
the coalition government would
not complete its scheduled term.
He reportedly also said that the
Labor Party did not intend to
honor the agreement to hand the
premiership over to the Likud in
mid-term.
Baram, in response, surprised
Israelis by a confirmation of
Modai's prediction. Baram said
the current nature of relations
between Labor and Likud could
lead to a situation in which the
Labor Party would not fulfill the
coalition agreement.
"A few months ago, when I was
asked, I said we would definitely
honor the coalition agreement,"
Baram declared. "This was at a
time when the government func-
tioned normally. But now, when
there is total political paralysis,
when we cannot wait for a whole
year without progress in the
political sphere, the entire issue is
doubtful."
He added: "Therefore, we shall
have to decide whether we go
ahead with the coaliton agree-
ment." Baram refused to com-
ment on whether the Labor Party
intended should the agreement
with Likud come apart to call
for early elections or to try to
form a narrow-based coalition.
Absorption Minister Yaacov
Tsur (Labor) also repeated his
doubts about the durability of the
coalition. He said there was con-
siderable justification for early
elections, rather than handing
over the leadership to Likud. In a
interview on the Voice of Israel
Radio, Tsur said there was a
lessening of the number of issues
on which the coalition partners
agreed, and no foundation for any
political cooperation.
Likud MK Sarah Doron rejected
the idea of any change in the
agreement, asserting that early
elections would jeopardize Israel's
economic austerity plan and
throw the economy into turmoil.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1985
Is Unity Gov't. .
Shaking Apart?
Disputes of such magnitude that they rock
the Unity Government are really nothing
new. The latest of these involves seven
Members of the Knesset who illegally pur-
chased from an Arab and then occupied an
apartment in Hebron.
The dispute centers on a West Bank land
purchase policy adopted by the government
of Menachem Begin. According to that
policy, land purchases require official ap-
proval from the Ministry of Defense, which
the seven MK's did not have. On Aug. 20,
they were therefore evicted. This is how
Prime Minister Peres and those who support
him see it.
But Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
Minister Without Portfolio Ariel Sharon
argue that Peres and his Laborites appear to
be misinterpreting the Begin land policy
which they now declare is the law of Israel.
Sharon has frankly called the Peres position
"a lie and hypocrisy."
This sort of salty talk is not uncommon in
Sharon. His testiness is to be expected. But
Shamir, who is also Deputy Premier and
who is scheduled to take over as Prime
Minister when the Laborites and Peres com-
plete two years in office, was not much bet-
ter than Sharon as a Likud advocate.
"Nothing makes you more angry than a
Jewish settlement," he told Peres.
Peres To Be Praised
Given such hostility felt on both sides, it is
not surprising that the rancor has become
sharper yet. But, as we see it, the fate of the
apartment and its occupants in Hebron has
little to do with any of this undiplomatic
behavior. Far more to the point is what it
symbolizes.
At issue are the political distinctions bet-
ween Labor and Likud specifically, the of-
ficial attitude toward Arabs as each inter-
prets it, whether they be Israeli or occupied
territory Arabs. For Peres, the need is to
adopt and pursue a moderate approach with
an eye toward acccommodation between
Jews and Arabs. Without this, as Peres sees
it, there may well be no Israeli future at all.
For Shamir and Likud, the policy appears
to run somewhere short of the extremist
position of Meir Kahane, who would simply
boot all Arabs out of the country and the ter-
ritories, Israeli or otherwise, and the
religious zealots for whom the law govern-
ing land policy is frequently what Orthodox
interpretation proclaims it to be.
In this instance, Prime Minister Peres and
his minions are to be praised for the position
they have taken. Israel can have no claim to
being a free and democratic nation if it does
not adhere to the law whether adherence
is deemed helpful or harmful to immediate
interests at the moment.
For the Likud and its minions, it would be
well that they understand that those who ad-
voate defiance of this even-handed view of
the law and justice court the destruction of
the nation.
Likud Won't Split
These considerations apart, a sanguine ap-
proach to the political implications of this
latest Unity Government crisis might well
advocate what seems likely in any case a
Jewish Florkdiar*
,-M-..JiSi-|krtl|M
rmin k shochet
IXO HINDU*
SUZANHt SHOCMTT
l.n.,u.iiiMi......t-
In,.I -r -" nwrun
split-up of the coalition arrangement on the
basis of Health Minister Mordechai Gur s
response to Sharon's provocative denuncia-
tion of Peres.
Let those, said Gur, who do not agree with
the Peres implementation of the Begin
government's land policy, quit the govern-
ment. Or of Peres, himself, who told Likud s
Shamir that ministers who accuse the
government of lying or hypocrisy cannot at
the same time continue to be members ot
that government.
This may serve to cool some of the hot
tempers that take such delight in challeng-
ing the integrity of Unity rule at least in
this instance. The reason is simple. Likud
would not readily quit and risk a general
election. Whatever some polls may indicate
about the growing strength of Kahane^s
Kach forces an indication of the nation s
developing conservatism Likud would not
be likely to emerge as the winner, and its
role as a Unity partner would disappear,
leaving the party considerably weakened.
Responsibility of the Press
Criticism Is Beside Point of the Prirwipk
Friday. August 3y. 1985
Volume 58
13 ELUL 5745
Number 35
By WARREN PHILLIPS
There is much criticism and
debate in our country today
over the performance and
the sense of responsibility of
the press. I don't believe the
issue of individual perfor-
mance, or even the issue of
individual responsibility, is
as important as a better
understanding of the func-
tion of a free press in a
democracy.
When the Founding Fathers
provided for a free press, when
Jefferson and, before him. John
Milton, and, later, John Stuart
Mill argues for press freedom,
they certainly never assumed the
press would always perform well
and act responsibly, would always
know the truth and tell the truth.
In light of the low-quality sheets
of their day, they assumed we
would have to suffer a goodly
share of fools and rogues in the
press.
BUT THEY believed that
through diversity, out of the vast
welter of conflicting ideas that
would be put before the public, the
truth would emerge. And that it
would emerge more effectively
than through any efforts to im-
pose standards of truth from the
outside or through any other
means yet devised. The evidence
over 200 years at the local cour-
thouse level as well as at the more
cosmic levels of Vietnam and
Watergate is that truth does in-
deed emerge in this fashion.
Our professional raison d'etre is
the pursuit of truth that is suc-
cessful through the diversity of its
pursuit, if not through the perfec-
tion or responsibility of each and
every individual pursuer.
The Founding Fathers certainly
did not expect individual perfec-
tion, and we certainly have not
delivered perfection. Careless er-
rors in the press are cited by
numerous critics and also can be
found listed daily in the correc-
tions and Letters to the Editor
columns.
Charges of base motives are
made frequently, as are allega-
tions of bias. This charge of bias,
of slanting and distorting the
news, is not a new criticism
either.
FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT
and Adlai Stevenson, the former
in the 1930*s and the latter in the
1950's, both denounced what they
labeled "The One-Party Press."
meaning, of course, the
Republican Party press. Their
I*
Warren Phillips is publisher of
the Wall Street Journal, which
was the recipient during the Na-
tional Commission meeting of
ADL s Hubert H. Humphrey First
Amendment Freedoms Prize. This
article is excerpted from his accep-
tance address.
comments reflected the tradi-
tional criticism that newspapers
are guilty of an establishment
bias, set by owners and adver-
tisers a right-wing bias. Yet, in
contrast, the most frequently-
heard complaints in recent years
allege bias from the left.
Or do they?
Just before Watergate,
Newsweek polled the public and
found that 45 percent believed
that reporting on the Nixon Ad-
ministration out of Washington
was "slanted."
But that group divided almost
equally into those who thought the
media were prejudiced against the
administration (23 percent) and
those who believed the media was
prejudiced in its favor (22 per-
cent). In other words, nearly half
of America thought the press
slanted the news, but they were
split down the middle on which
way we were slanting it.
COULD IT be that bias
sometimes is in the eye of the
beholder? Do we sometimes have
slanted readers'.'
People are so committed, so in-
volve, o agitated in this ajfe of
change and controversy and ins-
tant communications that many of
them look for newspaper accounts
of events from Nicaragua w
South Africa to reinforce and
agree with their own views, even
their prejudices. If they don t get
that, they often feel the press is
not credible.
In 1959. Walter Lippman told
the National Press Club that tne
inescapable job of the Washington
correspondent was to make >
meaningful picture out of w
jumbled jigsaw puzzle pieces urn
were the bits of daily raw nes.
But he hastened to add that w
analogy was imperfect, w
job." he said, "is harder than *
implies. In real life, there is notjs
there is in every puzzle, one p*
ture and one picture only m
which all the pieces will eventual'!
fit."
Collectively, U.S. newspapers
have vastly improved the extej
and quality of their coverage|0W
the past quarter century ana *
the conscientiousness with "
they approach their response
to be both accurate and fair. i"*V
have improved the educatg
level and professionalism ot uw
staffs. They have stressed <
and balance as never before^ in.
have gone on an orgy- ot *
examination and self-critic?"
that exceeds anything e>
done in the past.
WE MUST do even more*'
must do more to prevent^our w*
ing in the future, as we often ha
Continued on Pa*e H'A
L"AUit^ii&&&i'
HI
. i32^6**55^'SfcTV'r,


Themselves Seem to Shy
Away from 'Jewish'TV Sitcoms
Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridiari Page 5-A
By MICHAEL ELKIN
Jewish Exponent
She was a woman besieg-
ed by family and
problems.
A simple woman.
But the world refused to
leave Molly Goldberg alone.
Husband Jake the tailor. The
world hung on his shoulders like
a had suit. Could he fashion a suc-
cessful career in the Bronx, or
would he be relegated to misspent
hours sewing Molly's apron?
Son Sammy. All they asked
I from him was nachas. But couJd
I he deliver?
AND MOLLY could Molly
survive the move to the suburbs?
Or would the trek from 1038 E.
J Tremont Ave. to Haverville be too
jolting for a woman whose whole
life had been spent sitting by the
same windowsill poking her nose
|into her neighbors' business?
And what about the sex?
The story that had to wait until
mow to be told, the story that has
fchocked and startled millions over
Tthe years we bring you "Molly
Goldberg and Her Changing
Jewish TV Neigborhood."
"YOO-HOO, Mr. Mick Belker."
'Good morning, Mrs.
joldberg."
"Nu, what are you doing down
here in such an outfit, dressed as
\ rabbi."
"Shh, not so loud, Mrs.
oldberg. I'm undercover try-
ng to catch this hairbag selling
\refe disguised as kosher
hiekens."
m
"Well, corte right ups'tain. <&
[our mother just called. She has
nis question about an insurance
olicy."
"Ah. Mrs. Goldberg, do I have
Judd Hirsch portrayed Jewish
taxi-driver Alex Rieger in the
long-running series, 'Taxi.'
,"Yes, yes, you have to. What
ind of son would you be if you
Idn't?"
[Growling, Mick heads up the
airs. "Here, hold this careful-
. Mick Belker barks, handing
arney Miller his gun.
:MOpATIliNjtf for a second.
'Godtf enough." "
Molly watches as Alex collects
his fare from Rhoda ("You'll take
a 10 percent tip and like it"), who
hops into Jacoby's car and takes
off. As Mick gets into a heated
argument with his mother on the
phone in Molly's apartment. ("No,
Ma, I can't come over now for
soup"), Molly surveys the scene,
letting out a huge sigh.
"I just don't know what this
Jewish neighborhood is coming
to," she says, closing the window.
' How times have changed."
Indeed, times have changed for
television's series portrayal of
Jews since the late 1940s and
mid-'oOs, when Molly Goldberg
arid her family faced problems
that evolved from the immigrant
experience and conflicts between
first- and second-generation Jews.
Today's television Jew is iden-
tified more by an attitude, style of
speech or caustic wit than by the
character's sense of Jewishness or
Judaism. Just when you start to
suspect that a Maude is Jewish, a
Christmas tree crops up in the
background.
As Archie Bunker would have
said, "You can always tell a Jew
easy just look at the yamaha on
his head."
Those yamahas are missing
today.
Interviews with actors, direc-
tors, writers, producers and net-
work honchos reveal that the Jew
protrayed on television series to-
day has at once grown and
regressed from those halcyon
days of the early '50s. The
stereotypical characterizations
the whining inflection, the beard-
ed family sage, the hunched-over
acquiescent husband have, in
the main, given way to a blander
Jewish persona. Today, the Jew is
a product of video assimilation
a byproduct of the melting pot
with much of the uniquely Jewish
qualities boiled away.
OCCASIONALLY, an
undeniably Jewish character or
theme will be woven into a series:
Archie Bunker, a Protestant, cop-
ing with his niece's Bat Mitzvah
("All in the Family/Archie
Bunker's Place"); a Dr. Fiscus ex-
plaining the meaning of Passover
to friends at the hospital ("St.
Elsewhere"); Arnold's decision to
convert so he can have a Bar Mitz-
vah like his Jewish friend and get
gifts ("Diffrent Strokes"); and
Simka querying Alex on the
rituals of kashrut ("Taxi").
But these instances of overt
Jewish identification have proved
to be exceptions.
Why has the TV Jew been
homogenized? Why has his
religion become a guessing game?
Why have some characters
started out Jewish (Dr. Alexrod of
"St. Elsewhere") and lost their
religion along the way?
(Remember his gift of a ham to
Mrs. Hoffnagle?)
Surprisingly, say many of those
interviewed, the problem may lie
with Jews themselves the
Jewish writers, directors and pro-
ducers who help decide what
viewers will see.
"A large part of the problem
stems from the fact that many of
the people making (programming)
decisions are Jews," says Dr. Eric
Goldman, director of the JWB's
Jewish Media Service in New
York. "They do not want to be
bothered or hassled by the Jewish
community. 'Bridget Loves Ber-
nie' was a good example."
IT SURE WAS. "Bridget
Loves Bernie" was an example of
the tsuris a network can en-
counter when dealing with a
touchy Jewish topic.
The CBS sitcom featured an in-
termarriage in which Meredith
Baxter portrayed Bridget
hntTfZf? ^ Fv1Uf m** Mandl> has difficulty believing
that a bag lady guest star Tammy Grimes) is really thi fairy god-
mother of a sick young boy whom she has brought into St Eliaius
Hospital on NBC-TV's 'St. Elsewhere.' Dr. Fiscus oZecxpZ-
KfJS Ju d m ft* p0p?Zar series- 6otA ** lost their
Jewish religion somewhere along the way.
Theresa Mary Coleen Fitzgerald
to David Birney's Bernie
Steinberg. This 1972 television
adaptation of theater's "Abie's
Irish Rose" caused a storm of
Jewish protest and lasted only one
season. Jewish network ex-
anything, lady, he's not Jewish.
And, to tell you the truth, I don't
get dates so often that I can afford
to be late."
"You're not going to see Peter
Gunn, are you?" a baritone voice
booms from the sidewalk.
"The only Jewish
characters you used
to have on TV were
sweet, saintly and
wishy-washy. It was
difficult to get fully
dimensional charac-
ters done."
Writer
Shimon Wincelberg
ecutives will not soon forget that
brouhaha.
"What am I going to do with
this? I sit behind a desk," Barney
says, the gun dangling from his
hand. "What do I know from
kosher?"
"Exactly," Molly tsks-tsks,
shaking her head.
"Excuse me," shouts a driver
hanging out the door of his cab.
"Can I help?" Molly yells down.
"Maybe. My name's Alex
Rieger, I'm new in the
neighborhood," says the cabbie.
"I've got a passenger here wants
to go to Brownsville. I'm lost."
"I'll say," says Molly.
THE PASSENGER puts her
head out the window. "Hey, lady,
enough with the wise cracks. How
about just giving us the
directions?"
what's your name, my
"And
dear?"
"Rhoda. Rhoda Morganstern.
Look. I don't mean to be rude, but
we're in a hurry. I have a date
there waiting for me don't say
"Who's that?" queries Rhoda.
"Jacoby.''
'Yeh, Jacoby, Peter Gunn's my
date. So what?"
"You can come with me. I'll
take you to him."
"Why should I go with you,
Jacoby? How do I know I'll be
safe? My mother told me never to
take a ride with a man who
doesn't have a first name ... Do
you have a first name?"
"Yeh. Lieutenant."
Indeed, says Goldman, Jewish
programmers and writers, aware
of the Jewish community's sen-
sitivity to the way they are por-
trayed in media, shy away from
creating Jewish-related series.
"They don't want to be
bothered," he says.
Joel Siegel. critic for ABC-TV's
"Good Morning America" and
New York's WABC-TV, agrees.
The Jewish community can exert
pressure on programmers, he
says. "There is a fear of that in
Hollywood. And the TV stakes
Continued on Page 13-A
frold Gould portrayed what one television viewer called the
Wisculated' Jewish father of Valerie Harper in the TV series,
voda. Many viewers still believe Harper is Jewish. 7 guess it's
ind of backhanded compliment,' she says.
Today's Jew is a by-product
of television's assimilation.


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1985
Probe Urged
'Christian' Nation Letter-Writer Assailed
Continued from Pge 1-A
Christian activist in his
department who wrote a
California attorney that
"the U.S. is a 'Christian na-
tion' as more than 85 per-
cent of adult Americans
consider themselves
'Christians.' '
The activities of the Treasury
employee. Christopher Sundseth.
came to light when a postcard
sent by Gerald Leib of Mountain
View. Calif., to the Education
Department received a reply from
Sundseth which Schroeder
described as "of a threatening
nature."
SUNDSETH subsequently told
news media that he "and a small
network of friends in government
jobs" are involved in a letter-
writing campaign to "anti-
religious zealots." Schroeder ask-
ed Baker to look into Sundseth"?
activities to check if his "pen pal
club meets on government time,
uses government facilities or is
the unauthorized recipient of
government documents."
The case began when Leib
wrote to Tom Tancredo. the
Education Department's regional
representative in Denver. His
postcard protested Tancredo's
mailing to Christian schools in his
area, earlier this year, a speech
saying goodlessness had taken
over "this Christian nation." The
speech had been written five
years earlier by former Moral Ma-
jority leader Robert Billings, then
an Education Department official.
Leib wrote Tancredo that "the
U.S. is not now and never has
been a Christian nation, as Bill-
ings claims" and that as a "non-
Christian" he was "upset at his
(Billings) blatant preference for
the Christian religion." Leib is
reportedly Jewish.
TANCREDO NEVER replied
to the postcard, but Leib did
receive a letter from Sundseth. a
Deal Lets Fatah Leader Go;
He May Return in Three Years
i
Bv GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
An unprecedented deal was
worked out over the
weekend between the
Israeli authorities and
Khalil Abu-Ziad. described
as as a senior Fatah leader
in East Jerusalem and
whom the authorities have
been trying to deport since
Aug. 8.
The deal provides thaf Abu-
Ziad would leave the country last
week voluntarily for a period of
three years, promising not to
engage in any anti-Israeli ac-
tivities. If he keeps his part of the
arrangement, the authorities com-
mitted themselves to allow him to
return after three years.
ONCE THE agreement was
signed, the authorities cancelled
their deportation order, issued by
Gen. Amnon Shahak. head of the
Military Command. Abu-Ziad. for
his part, took back his appeal to
the High Court of Justice against
the deportation order. He was
also released from his detention
and allowed to meet with his wife
for 48 hours, before leaving for
Amman.
The authorities maintain that
Abu-Ziad is involved in terrorist
and subversive activities and that
he maintains contact with people
active in Fatah, both inside and
outside the administered ter-
ritories. They charge that his East
Jerusalem book store is a meeting
place for Palestine Liberation
Organization activists.
Abu-Ziad had served a 10-year
prison sentence for his Fatah ac-
Sao Paulo
Leader Named
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) -
Business executive Bruno Levi of
Sao Paulo, Brazil, has been
elected chairman of the Latin
American section of the Interna-
tional Council of B'nai B'rith He
succeeds Dr. Isaac Frenkel, an at-
torney from Santiago, Chile.
Levi, who was born in Trieste.
Italy, in 1924, has lived in Brazil
since 1939. A member of B'nai
B'rith since 1968, Levi is presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith District 25
(Brazil), president of the Regional
Council of Sao Paulo and vice
president of B'nai B'rith's
Regional Council.
tivities. He was first arrested on
suspicion of Fatah activities in
September. 1979. He was releas-
ed, then rearrested two months
later, charged with heading a ter-
rorist cell, and with receiving and
distributing Fatah funds in the
territories.
ABU-ZIAD. who has been
under house arrest since 1982. ap-
pealed the deportation order to
the military review board which
recommended that Shahak recon-
sider his decision to have Abu-
Ziad deported. While the review
board said there was "legal and
justified reason" for the deporta-
tion order, it said there "is
nothing to link him directly with
terrorist attacks."
"Therefore, we recommend that
the Military Commander recon-
sider whether under the cir-
cumstances and considering the
role of the petitioner in Fatah,
deportation is necessary in view of
its extremely drastic and serious
nature." the review board said.
The board's recommendation took
defense officials by surprise in-
asmuch as the Board had until
then been considered a rubber
stamp for the approval of such
decisions by the area commander.
The High Court ordered a stay
of the deportation pending a
renew. The deportation, if im-
plemented, would have amounted
to the first such action under a
Cabinet decision to take strict
measures on the West Bank to
combat a wave of anti-Jewish ter-
rorism. In 1980. the Supreme
Court approved the deportation of
two West Bank Arab mayors.
political appointee of the Reagan
Administration who works as a
GS-13 special assistant at the
Inter-American Development
Bank at the Treasury Depart-
ment. He wrote:
"This country was founded by
Christians who were escaping the
same kind of small minded tripe
you espouse. The framers of the
constitution attempted specifical-
ly to anticipate those of your ilk
who would try and abridge the
very rights of freedom to worship
guaranteed us by that document."
Calling Leib "a truly amazing
but pathetic creature" whose
"knowledge of this country's
history and structure of govern-
ment is minimal at best." Sund-
seth concluded in his P.S.: "When
you die, you will be giving account
to Jesus Christ, your creator, who
happens himself to be a Christian.
I hope you are prepared ."
SUNDSETH. who wrote the
letter to Leib on his personal sta-
tionery from an address in Alex-
andria. Va.. is a former director of
the Adolph Coors Company's
political action committee. He was
a fundraiser, rice chairman for
finance, for President Reagan's
1980 campaign in Colorado, and
received the appointment to his
Treasury position last year. His
mother. Carolyn Sundseth. is a
White House public liaison officer
with evangelical and fundamen-
talist Christians and conservative
women.
In various interviews with the
press recently. Sundseth said that
"in my free time I'm a Christian
activist ... I didn't give up my
right to express my opinion when
I came to government." He said
he had written 120 to 150 letters
in the past few years, mostly
criticizing editorials.
"I don't think what I said in my
letter conflicted with the essence
of Mr. Reagan's beliefs. "It's a
Biblical injunction to warn peo-
ple" about eventually facing Jesus
Christ, "so I warned the guy. I'm
saying nothing different from
what is in the Bible."
Sundseth also told reporters
that he and a small network of
friends in government jobs "write
a lot of letters ." He and his ac-
tivist friends, he said, use the
Freedom of Information Act
(FOIAt "to find letters of anti-
religious zealots .*en scheduled in-
to the circumstances under which
Albin was left alone for a few
minutes, contrary to standing
police regualtions. while his inter-
rogators left the room for
consultations.
His widow reportedly stated
through an attorney that she was
convinced Albin did not jump from
the police station window of his
own accord. His friends said,
"Micky was a fighter. He would
have fought any charges against
him."
1&&
iMMMfW
**
,0t,Condmonma
^.SEVri
n.Mt
^OAYSniNHTS$349s.-=
"V*
Florence Altman. a geriatric nurse from New York, lends a hand
at the Malben Old Age Home in Netanya as part of the active
retirees wlunteer program run by the B'nai B'rith and Aliya
Department of the World Zionist Organization.
Zagreb Jews Need Assistance
To Identify Cemetery Burial Sites
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Leaders of the Jewish community
in Zagreb. Yugoslavia, have writ-
ten to the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee with a re-
quest that the international relief
agency help it to identify people
whose family or friends are buried
in the Karlovac Jewish Cemetery.
According to the letter, receiv-
ed on Aug. 14. the Jewish com-
munity has negotiated with the
local council of Karlovac for "the
renewal of the Karlovac Jewish
Cemetery."
In line with this, "it has been
agreed that the grave- : Jewj
with survivors willing to pay the
regular fee for maintaining the
graveyard will be taken ca
but those of others, with no living
survivors, will be exhumed and
reinterred in a commur.a.
inside the newly encl -
the Jewish cemetery."
The letter signed bj Erich
Stern, secretary, and Dragan
Volner. president, asks that those
interested in this matter should
contact the community of tfr-
Jevrejska Opcina. Palmoticen
Ulica 16, 41001 Zagreb.
Yugoslavia, before Oct. 30.
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After Murder, Wounding
Cabinet Reviews Security Situation
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Cabinet reviewed Sun-
day the deteriorating securi-
ty situation in the ad-
ministered territories,
following the murder Satur-
day of an Israeli in
Tulkarem and the serious
wounding of another Israeli
in the town of Jenin in the
north of Samaria. A curfew
imposed after the attacks in
Tulkarem, some 15 miles
west of Nablus, and in
Jenin, some 20 miles north
or Nablus, was lifted for two
hours Sunday afternoon to
allow local residents ^o pur-
chase food.
Forty-year-old Andre Aloush of
Netanya was buried Sunday after
he was shot in the back with a .38
caliber pistol shortly after he
entered a jewelry store in the
center of Tulkarem.
Aloush, who had been accom-
panied into Tulkarem by his wife,
brother and sister-in-law, was
shot at very close range. He died
on his way to the hospital. His
assasin disappeared into a crowd-
ed street.
IN JENIN, four hours later, Uri
Ovad of Tiberias was shot three
times in the back with a .22 caliber
pistol. He was in serious condition
with a bullet lodged near his spine.
His assailant escaped.
Initial investigation did not
show any obvious link between the
two attacks. But the Palestine
Liberation Organization claimed
responsibility for both attacks.
The PLO Wafa news agency in
Tunis said that two Palestinian
combat units killed two Israeli
secret service officers.
The Cabinet meeting Sunday
Former SS War Criminal
Honored by Veterans in Austria
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) Walter
Radar, a former SS Major and
convicted war criminal, whose
cordial reception by Austrian
- Defense Minister Friedhelm
Frischenschlager earlier this year
after an early release from an
Italian prison had triggered a
storm of protests in Austria and
abroad, has been honored by an
SS veterans organization in
Carinthia. This was reported by
the Austrian newsmagazine.
Profit.
According to the report, Reder
was awarded the Golden
-.Honorary Medal of the
Kameradschaft IV, an organiza-
tion described by the book,
Rechtsextremismius in Oesterreich
("The Extreme Right in Austria")
as a leading voice of the extreme
right. The ceremony took place in
a restaurant in Klagenfurt, the
capital of Austria's southernmost
province, Carinthia.
THE MAGAZINE reported
that Reder, after his return to his
native Austria, had been accom-
modated in a garrison outside of
v lenna and later was hidden in a
Roman Catholic monastery. The
abbot of the monastery, however,
has denied this report.
Reder is now living in Krumpen-
u Carinthia, in an apartment
belonging to Wilhelm Gorton, a
member of the Austrian Parlia-
ment representing the conser-
vative opposition Volkspartei
People's Party) which sharply
criticized the warm reception ex-
tended to Reder by
Frischenschlager.
The criticism sparked a
parliamentary motion of non-
confidence in the government,
which failed to pass. Despite the
official attitude of the
Volkspartei, the party could not
stop Gorton to provide Reder with
a home and a job.
Austria had promised the
Italian authorities that Reder
would be kept in custody until his
sentence was to end in July, six
months after he was released and
returned to Austria. Since July
14, Reder has regained his full
freedom.
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Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Unity Gov't. Rocked by Rancor
As Hebron Settlers Are Evicted
took place amid growing public
presure to step up security
measures in the territories, in-
cluding collective punishment, if
need be. At least a dozen Israelis
have been killed by Arabs in the
West Bank within the past year.
Last month, three residents of
Afula. in the Jezreel Valley, were
killed. The murders at that time
increased pressure on the Cabinet
to take specific measures to step-
up security and to implement the
death penalty for terrorist
murders.
INSTEAD OF dealing with the
issue of new legislation to imple-
ment the death penalty for ter-
rorist murderers, the Cabinet
decided that it will use all existing
procedures to combat the growing
wave of Arab terrorism, including
administrative detention and
deportation of those persons who
incite anti-Israel violence and
others who endanger the security
of the state.
But at the Cabinet meeting,
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
came under implied criticism for
the security situation in the ad-
ministered territories when
former Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon asked how many people
have been deported, how many
homes have been demolished,
what actions have been taken
against instigators and anti-
Israeli organizations in the
territories.
Deputy Premier David Levy
said entirely new measures must
be taken against Arab terror, in-
cluding capital punishment. This
is a continuous war. Levy said,
which has now entered a new
dimension. The issue of added
security measures will be further
discussed this week at a session of
the 10-member Inner Cabinet. In
the meantime, the security forces
continued a wide ranging man-
hunt for the assailants involved in
the attacks.
Continued from Page 1-A
Sharon as a liar and suggested
that if he did not agree with Peres
implementing decisions of the
Begin government then "he and
his like" should quit the govern-
ment. Peres, himself, said he
could not think of any other exam-
ple of a minister who had de-
nounced his own government the
way Sharon did.
The public charges by Sharon
had been preceded by an attack by
Deputy Premier and Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir at last
Sunday's closed-door meeting of
the 10-member Inner Cabinet.
During its discussion about the
Hebron apartment, Shamir told
Peres: "Nothing makes you more
angry than a Jewish settlement.
You are conducting a White Paper
policy."
In an effort to calm tempers and
charges and countercharges on
both sides, Peres and Shamir met
last Friday at the Premier's
private residence. Peres told
Shamir in no uncertain terms that
the Likud ministers could not
label the present government "a
White Paper government," or ac-
cuse it of lying, and at the same
time continue to be members of
the government.
PERES STATED that Likud
and Labor agreed to form a na-
tional unity government based on
mutual consent and respect. If
Likud has decided that it is time to
dismantle the government, it
should be done on the same basis
and not on the basis of character
assassination and distortion of
policies. Peres said.
Shamir told Peres that he was
not interested in dismantling the
coalition and that he, too, believed
that all possible steps should be
taken to stop ministers from in-
sulting each other.
The meeting on Friday, con-
trary to previous meetings bet-
ween Peres and Shamir, was
described as matter of fact and
strictly business-like, with no
smiles wasted. Political commen-
tators said following the meeting
that its value was that it
prevented an immediate collapse
of the national unity government.
'Go' for Jet Plane
TEL AVIV (JTA) The In-
ner Cabinet has voted in favor of
continuing development work on
the Lavie fighter plane and its
subsequent production. The
10-man Cabinet voted 8-2, with
Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai
and Minister-Without-Portfolio
Ezer Weizman voting against.
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Phone 538-6464


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1985
Chavez Asks Jews:
4Just Don't Eat the Grapes'
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Cesar Chavez has urged the
American Jewish communi-
ty to support the United
Farm Worker's boycott of
California table grapes.
"Just don't eat the grapes,
that's all you can do," the 58-year-
old president of the UFW said
during an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency here.
He noted the Jewish com-
munity's strong support for the
grape boycotts in the 1%0's and
1970's, and recalled that during
the last boycott, an Orthodox rab-
bi in New York declared that
"scab grapes" are non-kosher.
THE JEWISH organizations
have come out in full support of
the UFW table grape boycott, the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis (CCAR), the association of
American Reform rabbis, and the
Jewish Labor Committee, a
fraternal organization.
The Jewish Labor Committee's
executive director, Martin Lapan,
said in a statement that the Com-
mittee "strongly urges" the
Peres Meets Zulu
TEL AVTV (JTA) Prime
Minister Shimon Peres has told
Zulu chief Gatsha Buthelezi that
Israelis prayed for equal rights in
South Africa and for co-existence
between all the ethnic groups
there. Peres met with the head of
the Zulu tribe for the second time
during Buthelezi's week-long visit
to Israel.
Jewish community to refrain from
purchasing grapes until the union
achieves a fair settlement of its
grievances.
Noting its past support for the
UFW, the Committee accused the
grape growers of "renewed ex-
ploitation," and said, "We urge
the Jewish community to once
again protest farm workers ex-
ploitation by boycotting non-union
grapes."
The CCAR, at its 96th annual
convention in Minneapolis last
June, endorsed a resolution call-
ing for full support for the grapes
boycott, urging its members and
congregations "to support the
boycott until the workers are ac-
corded all rights and benefits to
which they are entitled."
THE CCAR, as did the Jewish
Labor Committee, sharply criticiz-
ed Governor George Deukmejian
of California, accusing him of
"undermining" the Agricultural
Labor Relations (ALRB), a state
enforcement agency. The UFW
has charged the governor with the
"systematic purge" of the Board.
The UFW boycott of table
grapes was declared last year in
response to what the UFW charg-
ed was Deukmejian's lack of en-
forcement of the 1975 state farm
labor law. Chavez charged that
the governor's appointees to the
ALRB have dismissed hundreds
of farm worker charges without
investigating them and "in viola-
tion of the internal procedure for
dealing with cases."
Some of the outstanding issues
between the growers and the
UFW include a demand by the
workers for a fair marketing
agreement, for fair and free elec-
tions, that the growers bargain in
good faith and that there be a ban
by the growers on five of the some
27 pesticides used in the grape
fields. Chavez said. These five, the
UFW contends, are harmful to the
workers.
RABBI JOSEPH GLAZER.
executive vice president of the
CCAR, said the rabbinic group is
pushing for rabbis in California to
pressure the governor to recon-
sider his handling of the farm
workers and "we're confident
we're going to get the support -
enormous support for the
boycott."
Glazer, in a JTA interview, said
the "Jewish ethic on labor is clear-
ly stated in the Bible." He said the
"whole concept of tzedaka makes
us particularly sensitive to the suf-
fering and degradation these peo-
ple have undergone through the
years."
According to Glazer, the Jewish
community should provide a plat-
form for farm workers to address
congregants on the urgency of the
current boycott. But also, he said,
American Jews should not buy
table grapes until "they are
kosher Until the people who
stoop and squat and go through all
kinds of hell out there in the fields
are treated right, those grapes are
treif."
Glazer recalled that it was Or-
thodox Rabbi Haskell Lookstein
of New York who issued a state-
ment during the last grape
boycott in the 1970's in which he
said that as far as he was concern-
ed, grapes picked under boycott
circumstances "are non-kosher."
Samuel Lewis (left), former U.S. envoy to Israel, has been ap-
pointed Senior Dayan Fellow at Tel Aviv University. Am-
bassador Lewis will spend four months at the University during
the 1985-86 academic year lecturing on the political and military
history of the modern Middle East. Shown with Lewis it Pro}.
Moshe Many, TA U president, at ceremonies during which he was
awarded an honorary PhD degree by the University.
Medal Features Holographic Disk
NEW YORK (JTA) A new
medal from Israel, designed by
Yaacov Agam, an innovative
Israeli-born artist, features a cen-
tral holographic glass disk, which
bears the inscription: "And there
was light," in English on one side
and Hebrew on the other. The
medal, commissioned by the Israel
Government Coins and Medals
Corporation, appears to be the
first use of holography on a
government issued coin or medal.
When held to the light, the
holographic disk reveals a three-
dimensional Star of David, which
Agam noted in an interview with
the New York Times, is intended
to symbolize "the Jewish people's1"
unique role in the world to raise
sparks and make them holy to
bring the light out from its hidden
place."
Master of Arts
in Jewish Studies
"Fix A Time For The Study Of Torah"
Shammai (Ethics Of The Fathers 1:15)
CLASSES BEGIN WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4th
AMERICAN JEWISH COMMUNITY (RJS 612) will focus on
the religious movements, secular trends, and social organization
which combine to create the Modern Jewish Community in
America. The course will be given on Monday evenings, 6:30-
9:30 in the Andreas Building, Room 110. The instructor will be Dr.
Jeremiah Unterman.
BIBLICAL JUDAISM (RJS 601) will analyze significant as-
pects of the religious views expressed in the Hebrew Bible such
as creation, the relationship of God to humankind, law and cove-
nant, repentance, redemption and messianism. The course will
be given on Tuesday evenings, 6:30-9:30 in the Andreas Build-
ing, Room 110. The instructor will be Dr. Jeremiah Unterman.
JEWISH ETHICS (RJS 634) will examine the principles of
Jewish ethics and their applications to such pragmatic issues as
parent-child relationships, the elderly, marriage, divorce, abor-
tion and tzedaka. The course will be given on Wednesday eve-
nings, 5:45-8:45 at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, 4200
Biscayne Boulevard. The instructor will be Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
RABBINIC JUDAISM (RJS 641) will concentrate on the basic
concepts and values of Rabbinic Judaism such as the relation-
ship of God to Israel, the primacy of the Oral Torah, the pattern of
Jewish life, and the meaning of rituals and customs. The course
will be given on Thursday evenings, 6:30-9:30 in the Andreas
Building, Room 109. The instructor will be Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
HEBREW STUDIES I (RJS 401) is an introduction to Hebrew
as a written language. The class will practice understanding and
using the written language. Progressive grammatic explanations,
vocabulary, and syntax will be emphasized. The course will be
given on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, 9:30-10:50 in the
Andreas Building, Room 110. The instructor will be Dr. Rachel
Abramowitz.
GENEROUS SCHOLARSHIP AID IS AVAILABLE FOR QUALIFIED STUDENTS.
AUDITORS WILL BE GRANTED A 50% DISCOUNT.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT
THE JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AT 758-3392, Ext 524.
BARRY UNIVERSITY
11300 NORTHEAST SECOND AVENUE
MIAMI SHORES, FLORIDA 33161
'


AtHadassah Confab
Cuomo Links U.S., Israeli Survival
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Gov. Mario Cuomo told
almost 3,000 delegates to
the 71st Hadassah national
convention that in the conti-
nuing Middle East crisis
"what is at stake is not only
Israel's survival but also our
own."
Speaking at a special session of
the gathering, Cuomo said that
"Israel's enemies recognize better
than many Americans do that
attacks on Israel are also attacks
on the interests of the United
States.
"The terrorists who murder
Israel's children and athletes and
diplomats and those who give
these terrorists the means to do so
- understand that, ultimately,
their goals transcend the
Mideast," Cuomo said.
IT IS critical that our govern-
ment affirm the basic nature of
the confrontation in that region of
the world," the Governor said. "It
is not Jew against Arab it is
those who cherish democracy as a
way of life against those who
would destroy democracy as a
way of life."
Cuomo called for the United
States "to make it clear that
Israel will have the economic
stability and the weapons with
which to defend itself" and "that
so long as Israel's enemies con-
tinue to deny her right to exist
and continue to prepare for war,
Israel will maintain an absolute
military superiority."
The Governor said that the
strains of ensuring her security
places tremendous strains on
Israel's economy. "A nation of
idealists of poets, scholars and
scientists is forced to divert its
attention and its resources to the
ceaseless necessity of defending
itself."
"It is a crushing burden fiscally
and economically, and a draining
one spiritually," Cuomo stated,
"but there is no alternative." As
long as the threat to Israeli
democracy continues," he said,
"the United States must help
Israel to solve the problems which
Struggle Over
Tiny Faction
TEL AVIV (JTA) The op-
posing groups in the Herat Cen-
tra! Committee followers of
Herut leader and Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
those of Deputy Premier David
'vv both declared themselves
'satisfied with a ruling by the
Herut Party's Central Court on an
appeal by Levy supporters against
a yote to incorporate the tiny
La'am faction in the party.
The court ruled that the Central
Committee's decision, which the
supporters of Levy claim was
forced through in an illegal vote at
uje end of a stormy session by
shamir, was valid, but could be
overturned by another Central
Committee meeting if this were
raBMted by 175 members.
, Shamir's supporters were
jubilant that the court had
declared the La'am incorporation
egal, even though Shamir, seizing
leadership of the stormy session
tob a powerless official chairman
Avraham Schechterman, had con-
ducted a hasty vote by a show of
lands amid total pandemonium.
The dispute over the conduct of
we vote to incorporate the La'am
"on stems from the faction's
"e'y small, though strident
iRfk for Shamir over Levy,
,7 hPs to oppose Shamir for
nerut leadership when new
Knesset elections are held.
Gov. Mario Cuomo
result from having to shoulder a
military responsibility that
belongs to us all."
CUOMO ALSO strongly de-
nounced what he termed the "po-
tent and dangerous force" of anti-
Semitism, and the "twisting of
the truth" by Israel's adversaries
who equate Zionism with racism.
He pointed out that the decade-
long campaign to link Zionism and
racism "is an operating principle
of one of the world's two super-
powers, the Soviet Union." The
Governor said that to let such a
distortion go unchallenged is to
accept "the first supposition of
totalitarianism that words
mean whatever those in control
want them to mean that
separate is equal, that slavery is
freedom, that the purposes of
history require mass murder and
genocide."
Elie Wiesel, too, warned that
anti-Semitism is on the rise. Ad-
dressing the banquet session of
the Hadassah convention, where
he was presented with 1985
Henrietta Szold Award for
distinguished humanitarian ser-
vices, he said that "anti-Semitism
thrives and is spreading in
Western democracies as well as in
the Communist world, and is
becoming increasingly violent."
He also cited his own experience
- following his outspoken
criticism of President Reagan's
trip to a cemetery in Bitburg, Ger-
many where Waffen SS soldiers
are buried earlier this summer
as evidence, that people are
becoming more secure in their
hatred towards Jews.
FOLLOWING THE Bitburg in
cident. Wiesel said he received
numerous letters filled with hate
and threats, which the author
described as not unusual. What is
unusual, he added, is that "for the
first time their letters were signed
names and addresses."
"Anti-Semitism is on the rise in
our country as well," Wiesel said.
He noted that recent polls indicate
that Israel is losing ground in
American public opinion. Tradi-
tional left-wing supporters of
Israel dislike the country's at-
tempts at becoming a stronger
and more secure nation, he
observed, and added that ex-
tremists of both the left and the
right have established a rare com-
mon ground in their opposition to
Israel.
"Our own government," said
Wiesel, "has threatened Israel
with economic reprisals for its
position Israel is the only na-
tion in the world which is
threatened militarily by her
enemies and politically by her
friends."
THE HENRIETTA Szold
Award is named for Hadassah's
founder and is presented annually
to an individual or individuals
whose lives and works reflect
humanitarian values. Wiesel was
presented with the award by
Freida Lewis, immediate past
president of Hadassah and cur-
rent national chairman of the
Hadassah Medical Organization.
Almost 3,000 Jewish women
representing 385,000 members in
1,700 chapters throughout the
United States attended the four-
day Hadassah national convention
which closed at the New York
Hilton last week.
Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page y-A
Spain Says It Will Formally
Recognize Israel by Autumn '86
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Spain has announced that it will
establish formal diplomatic relations with Israel before
autumn 1986. Spanish Foreign Minister Francesco Fer-
nandez Ordonez said that Spain's formal recognition "will
be extended within one year, at the most." Ordonez was
answering questions during an interview with a private
radio station in Madrid, "Radio Cope."
The minister, who according to diplomatic sources in
Madrid was speaking with the backing of Premier Felipe
Gonzalez, said that Spain's formal entry into the European
Economic Community, which will become final on Jan. 1,
"compels Spain to act" on this question.
FELIPE GONZALEZ, an associate of Israeli Premier
Shimon Peres within the Socialist International, has
repeatedly promised Israel before coming to power that he
will establish diplomatic relations between the two
countries.
Since he assumed power three years ago he has
reiterated these promises, saying privately, however, that
he has to wait "for an opportune moment."
Spain is heavily dependent on Arab investments. A
large Arab community has settled in southern Spain
especially in the Marbella area, boosting the province's
economy and helping relieve unemployment. In spite of the
lack of formal relations, Israel has a diplomatic mission in
Madrid.
Its head, though he has no official status, enjoys most of
the privileges normally given an Ambassador.
More Atlit Detainees Are Released
TEL AVIV (JTA) One hun-
dred and one detainees were
released from the Atlit military
detention camp and taken in three
buses to Ras Bayda, a tiny coastal
settlement some 10 miles south of
Tyre, and handed over to Red
Cross representatives who
transported them to Tyre, Sidon
and other destinations inside
Lebanon.
The detainees, Shiite Moslems
and a number of Palestinians,
were among the more than 700
whose release was demanded in
June by the Shiite hijackers of a
TWA jet. Some 250 detainees are
still in the Atlit camp, awaiting
their release.
These are the last of about 1,200
who were transferred there last
April after Israel dismantled its
Ansar prison camp in south
Lebanon when the Israel Defense
Force withdrew. Between April
and today, close to 1,000 de-
tainees were released in a series
of stages.
The Shiites who hijacked the
TWA jet held 39 Americans
hostage for two weeks to back
demands for the release of the
Atlit detainees. Israel freed 300
detainees two days after the
release of the hostages on June
20, and 100 more on July 24.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1985
Cracow to Fete
First Bar Mitzvah in 35 Years
NEW YORK (JTA) -
On Sept. 7, the Jews of
Cracow, Poland, will
celebrate their first Bar
Mitzvah in 35 years. The
Bar Mitzvah boy will be Eric
Strom, an eighth-grader
from Stamford, Conn. Eric,
his family, and their rabbi
will make the journey to
Cracow because of a request
from the leader of the
Jewish community there:
"Send us a Bar Mitzvah.
Send us life," the Cracow
Jewish leader said.
That was in April, when a group
of Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies trustees and leaders
visited Cracow on a UJA-
Federation Campaign of New
York trip. "I asked what we could
do for the community," says
Lester Pollack, of Rye, N.Y., vice
president of the Federation and
chairman of the mission. "I
thought we would be asked for
money or food."
BUT THE Cracow Jewish
leader asked for a Bar Mitzvah, so
Eric will read the Haftorah in the
15th Century Remu Synagogue,
the oldest in use in Poland and the
only one in operation in Cracow.
There are only about 200 Jews
in Cracow now, the remnant of a
pre-war community of 60,000. It
is an aging population, averaging
73, and a needy one. There is no
Dreyfus Once Again Splits
French Gov't. Leaders Apart
X
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Alfred
Dreyfus, who once split
France in two, is now driv-
ing a wedge between two
French ministers, both
Defense Minister Charles
Hern and Culture Minister
Jack Lang are in favor of
honoring Dreyfus with a
statue, but Lang wants it at
the French military
academy, Ecole Ministere,
while Hernu favors the site
of the former Ecole
Polythechnique which
Dreyfus attended.
Lang, himself Jewish, ordered
the sculpture last year. French
Jewish painter, Tim, a part-time
sculptor, planned a 10-feet high
bronze sculpture which, he says,
will be ready in about six months.
Lang announced that he plans to
have the monument erected in the
main courtyard of the military
academy in the heart of Paris.
Hernu, a fellow Socialist, an-
nounced that he is in favor of such
a statue but that he wants it
Hebrew Univ.
Given Plaque
JERUSALEM (JTA) Dr.
William Mayer, U.S. Assistant
Secretary of Defense for Health
Affairs, presented a plaque to of-
ficials of the Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical Center in Ein
Karem formally recognizing the
Center's cooperation in making its
medical resources available to the
American military last April after
the U.S. military installation in
Beirut was bombed by terrorists.
The presentation followed a
tour of the Medical Center by
Mayer as part of "continuing
cooperative efforts in medical
care, including research between
the U.S. and Israel," according to
a statement released by U.S. and
Israeli officials here.
The two nations reached a for-
mal understanding in December,
1983 on "the mutual use of
medical facilities in the event of
urgent or disastrous cir-
cumstances, including the use of
medical resources and hospitaliza-
tion in Israel," the statement said.
Mayer praised Medical Center
officials for the "generous" offer
of its facilities and resources. The
agreement provides the United
States with an alternative to
airlifting injured members of the
military and other personnel for
treatment at U.S. facilities in
Europe.
erected somewhere else. One of
the sites he reportedly suggested
is the former site of the Ecole
Polythechnique, a top level
military engineering school which
Dreyfus attended. Hernu publicly
argued that no one will see the
Dreyfus statue as the academy
grounds are closed to the general
public. One of his spokesmen said
Hernu wants the statue to be on
view in a public place where "as
many people as possible" can see
it.
The French press, without
citing any formal sources, claim
that Hernu opposes the Ecole
Miljtaire site "because he does not
want any trouble in the army."
These sources, reports said, fear
that a Dreyfus statue at the
academy might revive old pas-
sions which were generally believ-
ed dead and done forever.
Dreyfus was accused of "high
treason" in 1894 and sentenced to
life imprisonment and deportation
to the French penal colony of
Devil's Island. He was
rehabilitated in 1906 after the
Socialist Party and numerous in-
tellectuals, including writer Emile
Zola, waged an energetic cam-
paign on his behalf.
His original trial and his ensuing
rehabilitation split France at the
time into two: the pro- and the
anti-Dreyfusards. Hernu
reportedly fears that nearly a cen-
tury later passions have still not
subsided.
rabbi, no religious education. The
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee (JDC), provides
food and other necessities for the
people, but they haven't for years
had a birth or a wedding to
celebrate.
To partly meet that need, the
mission participants got together
upon their return to the New York
area, and found Eric. For Eric,
who will become 13 on Sept. 7, the
rite of passage to manhood and
responsibility offers both an unex-
pected adventure and extra work.
His family came to this country
from Poland, several generations
ago. "I never thought I'd have my
Bar Mitzvah in Poland, just like
my ancestors," he said.
TO PREPARE for the Bar
Mitzvah in the Remu Synagogue,
Eric has had to study an extra
portion of the Prophets for a half-
hour each day. He will read one
Haftorah in a service in Stamford
a week earlier and the added Haf-
torah in Cracow, before the Polish
congregants. Also making the trip
are his parents, Marjorie and
Barry Strom; his sister, Holly, 9;
and his two grandmothers and one
grandfather.
There will be one other rarity
for the members of the Cracow
synagogue: a woman, Rabbi Emi-
ly Korzenick, spiritual leader of
The Fellowship for Jewish Learn-
ing in Stamford, will make the trip
with her husband. Korzenick lives
in Scarsdale, N.Y. Edward
Blonder, of Stamford, and his two
daughters will also make the
journey. Blonder is a native of
Poland and a Holocaust survivor.
He will serve as interpreter.
It shapes up as a spiritual uplift
for the people in Cracow and a
thrill for Eric, according to his
mother. "Mostly," she said, "Eric
realizes he is in for a week of head-
patting and cheek-pinching."
Eric's father, she continued, "can
barely remember his own Bar
Mitzvah, but we know for sure
Eric will never forget his."
ERIC HAS invited the Cracow
Jewish community to a birthday
party after the ceremony. He and
his party of 12 will lunch at the
JDC kosher kitchen in Cracow.
They will visit the Auschwitz and
Birkenau concentration camps
sites. They will journey to War-
saw and see a performance of the
Yiddish Theater there, and the
group will visit the towns from
which came the ancestors of Eric
and other members of the party.
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Farrakhan, Kahane Called
'Cancers on Body Politic'
Continued from Page 1-A
Jewish leadership both in Israel
and in the United States has said
no to 'Kahaneism' ... but the
response to Farrakhan in the
black community has been too lit-
tle and too weak."
FARRAKHAN, leader of the
black group known as the Nation
of Islam, charged Bookbinder, is
"an open, hateful anti-Semite .
(who) has openly declared war
against the 'gutter religion' which
is (the Jewish) faith, and would
presumably approve of any kind of
action against us."
And Kahane, the American-
born politician who heads the
Kach Party in Israel, which is
committed to the ouster of all
Arabs from Israel, is, in com-
parison, "an open, hateful bigot
.. (who) insists that he is the only
true defender of Judaism and of
Israel," Bookbinder said. But
Kahane's policies, continued
Bookbinder, "if implemented,
would rob Judaism of its most
precious values."
Both men, Bookbinder said, are
supported primarily by young peo-
ple who feel "anger and frustra-
tion at their respective situa-
tions," but, he stressed, "if it is
not proper to justify Farrakhan's
racist ranting because there are
indeed very serious problems fac-
ing America's blacks, it is similar-
ly not proper to accept Kahane's
racist ran tings because Israelis do
indeed have critical problems at
home and terrorist horrors facing
them every day."
TURNING TO the reactions of
the Jewish and black communities
to the two men, Bookbinder noted
Hyman Bookbinder
that 12 major national Jewish
organizations joined in a state-
ment denouncing Kahane for
"racism" and "demagoguery,"
but, he said, "there has been no
comparable response from na-
tional black leadership at least
not publicly."
"I am sure that the overwhelm-
ing majority of black leaders and
black public officials reject Far-
rakhan and what he stands for,"
said Bookbinder, "but they make
a serious mistake if they think
they can fight him by silence. Can
you imagine the impact that would
result from a statement com-
parable to the one the Jewish com-
munity issued that would be sign-
ed by the NAACP, the National
Urban League, the National
Council of Negro Women and the
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference?"
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^
Criticism of Press Irrelevant
To the Freedom Principle
Friday, August 30, 1985/Tbe Jewish Floridian Page 11 -A
Continued from Page 4-A
the past, to anticipate, to
|>reshadow for our readers some
' the major trends in society.
It is distressing to look at our
overage in the 1960's of Nor-
fcern racial tensions and later of
timpus unrest. We overlooked
he smoldering fuses and moved
i on those stories only when the
icplosions came.
I Many papers not all failed
1 the 1970's to alert their readers
I the energy shortage that was in
e making even before the oil
ycott. Most failed equally in the
80's to alert readers to the
(itch to an oil glut.
Even those of us close to the
fene failed to prepare our
kders for the financial crisis
kt shook New York City in the
nO's and had such wide ripple
fects. In the 1980's the crisis in
Social Security System was
ong the issues not sufficiently
teshadowed for our readers.
hie failure to anticipate such
lor news developments is one
|the most crushing criticisms
deserve to be levelled at the
formance of the press. But
K8 have chosen to focus on
br alleged weaknesses,
thing on bad faith and malice,
1 are not nearly so valid.
JAM distressed to see the pro-
bation of these charges of bad
and their expression in a
of lawsuits, in new govern-
It efforts to choke off the flow
pformation. in all kinds of ef-
forts to intimidate the press to
forego certain kinds of news
coverage.
George Washington didn't sue
when, in 1795, a New York jour-
nal called him "infamously nig-
gardly" in his private business
and said he was a "most horrid
swearer and blasphemer" despite
his religious pretensions, or when
the Philadelphia Aurora said he
had legalized "corruption," was
guilty of political degeneracy"
and was the "debaucher of a na-
tion." Jefferson didn't sue when
the New England Palladium call-
ed "plagiarist."
Lincoln didn't sue those who
wrote about him as a baboon, nor
Franklin Roosevelt, those who
said he knew about Pearl Harbor
before it happened.
That is because they shared
James Madison's view of the
press' shortcomings. Mr. Madison
summed it up this way: "Some
degree of abuse is inseparable
from the proper use of everything,
and in no instance is this more
true than in that of the press. It
has accordingly been decided .
that it is better to leave a few of
its noxious branches to their lux-
uriant growth than, by pruning
them away, to injure the vigor of
those yielding the proper fruits."
The alternative would be a doc-
trine of control and orderliness
which the drafters of the Bill of
Rights rejected.
My faith is firmly with Mr.
Madison and his doctrine.
issian Hebrew Teacher Sentenced
'o Three Years in Labor Camp
purpose of the three-year
sentence was apparently meant to
ifltimithte Jewish activists.
Only days before his arrest,
Zelichonok had issued critical
public statements to the Deputy
Director of the Leningrad Post
Office and the Head of the
Foreign Relations Department at
the USSR Ministry of Com-
munications. In a detailed ac-
count, he called the persistent
Soviet interference with his mail a
"very grave violation of internal
and international law."
Among the letters used as a
pretext against Zelichonok is one
addressed to Israel's President
Chaim Herzog. Asked during the
pretrial investigation how one's
private letters can be used as
evidence against him, the Len-
ingrad Deputy Procurator
responded that "writing to a
friend may be private, but not so
writing to the President of
Israel."
EW YORK (JTA) Roald
honok, a 49-year-old Hebrew
Her fnnvtfeejfogradr'H'ho Itt^
it to emigrate to Israel since
i has been sentenced to three
in a labor camp on charges
egedly "defaming the Soviet
and social system," it was
ed here by the National
Irence on Soviet Jewrv
))
erial cited as evidence in the
gainst Zelichonok included
erview he had given to a
an tourist, as well as "let-
ritten to policy makers in
fest" which contained infor-
i about the Soviet Union.
Mie-day trial, during which
>nok was permitted to
reely with his wife, Galina,
friend, Vladimir Lifshits,
ned by the NCSJ as "sur-
liberal and democratic"
ired with the usual Soviet
Bceedings. However, the
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1986
Stony Brook Univ. Denies
Prof. Tenure for Teachings
Continued from Page 1-A
division expected Dube to teach
his "myths" about Zionism when
he resumes his course on "The
Politics of Race" when the
academic year begins Sept. 3.
DUBE, 56. a South African-
born professor in the university's
African Studies Department, in-
dicated he had been informed of
the tenure denial decision on Aug.
2. based on a vote of support for
granting of tenure by two faculty
members but a rejection by the
humanities dean, the university
provost, and John Marburger, the
university president.
The controversy began in the
summer of 1983 when Selwyn
Troen. a visiting professor from
Ben Gurion University in the
Negev. sent a letter to the univer-
sity, accusing Dube of teaching
"personal ideology and racial
biases."
A faculty committee eventually
cleared Dube of charges that his
teachings violated academic
ethics, but the decision failed to
satisfy Dube's critics. The issue
was revived this year when the
university began tenure delibera-
tions on Dube, ending with the
decision to deny him tenure.
ISRAEL TOLD the JTA that
he and Lawrence Epstein, presi-
dent of the Suffolk AJCongress
and head of the English Depart-
ment at Suffolk Community Col-
lege, prepared the eight-page
printed guidebook, ordering 500
copies.
In a formal statement, the
department said that, in a "myths
and facts" format, the publication
was designed to "correct the
distortion and inaccuracies com-
monly made about Zionism, some
of which are contained in Prof.
Dube's public lectures and
writings." Israel said the publica-
tion is also being offered as "an
alternative reading lesson for
students" enrolled in the Dube
course.
Stressing that the AJCongress
deliberately remained uninvolved
in the tenure dispute out of
respect for the principle of
academic freedom, Israel said the
division's lay leadership had decid-
ed, after some internal debate, not
to ask the university to ask Dube
to refrain from teaching his con-
troversial course, again out of
respect for academic freedom.
ISRAEL SAID the decision to
act "within the context of
academic freedom," was to
prepare a guidebook. It is entitled
AFS 319, the title of the disputed
course, "Supplementary Course
Material."
Asked how the copies of the
guide would be distributed, Israel
said the publication will be adver-
tised in the university student
newspaper, offering it either at
the university Hillel office, which
is to receive 200 copies or at the
American Jewish Congress'
regional office.
State Dep't. Denies Murphy's
Mideast Trip Was Failure
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) A
State Department spokesman re-
jected an assessment that the re-
cent trip to the Mideast by
Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
was a failure.
"We certainly don't regard it as
a failure," Charles Redman, the
Department's deputy spokesman
said Friday. He noted that the
Mideast peace process was "by its
very nature" going to be in-
cremental and it's unlikely that
there will be dramatic
breakthroughs.
BEFORE MURPHY left for a
six-day visit of Israel, Jordan and
Egypt, the State Department had
indicated that he would meet with
a joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation if the United States
could be assured that the meeting
would lead to direct negotiations
between the Arab delegation and
Israel. But Murphy was unable to
budge King Hussein of Jordan
from his insistence that peace
negotiations be held in the context
of an international conference.
Redman reiterated Friday that
"the process, however, continues,
and we are considering the next
steps." He added that Murphy,
who is consulting with State
Department officials on an assess-
ment of his trip, is in California
where he has to meet with
Secretary of State George Shultz.
There was no indication that Mur-
phy would also see President
Reagan, who, like Shultz, is vaca-
tioning in California.
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Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Jews Themselves Appear To Shy Away from Jewish TV Sitcoms
Continued from Page 5-A
ive become too high."
ICherney Berg, producer of
he Goldbergs," understands
it sensitivity. His hit show was
the same time praised and
(iticized. "Most of the criticism
me from Jews," he says. "They
in't want to make waves."
Today's Jews often share that
ne fear, says noted actor
ferschel Bernardi. "There is the
lief on the part of Jewish pro-
cers and writers not to make
ives," he says, explaining why
Ire is no real interest in the
kiness to portray "real" Jews.
[Psychologically, Jews are
aid to be depicted," says Dr.
1 J. Fink, chairman of the
irtment of psychiatry at the
ert Einstein Medical Center's
khern Division and medical
fector of Einstein's Philadelphia
fchiatric Center. He, too, feels
ey don't want to make waves."
MEMBERS of a minority,
fs are disproportionately
k-esented in the higher echelons
Itelevision network decision-
fing-
liis is one important reason
see relatively few shows
bted to Jews and/or Judaism,
NBC-TV Entertainment
fcident Brandon Tartikoff
cause so many Jews are
fid the camera."
^nny Solms, a well-respected
vood comedy writer ("The
(1 Burnett Show," "Rhoda")
bs. "Many Jews are writers
sroducers," he says.
present Jews as objects of
V would mean that these
j Jews would have to resort to
faying stereotypes. "You
portray Jews as cheap and
ley-grabbing. These
otypes are so ugly and un-
says Solms.
isa televisio^t,-ex6cuU4i> fr'P/k writing about Jews. I receiv-
jjust want to accept their per
success quietly, adds
nan. "The Jews in the
ess do not want to draw at-
rn to themselves.
safe to do an occasional
it about Jewish topics,"
3oldman. "It could be just
of 30 segments done dur-
That adds a certain
less to the program."
Instance ... "I remember a
>*H where there was a bris.
was a 'Quincy' about
! survivors, and an 'All in
lily' where Archie gave a
I at the funeral of a- Jewish
Even 'Have Gun Will
had two or three Jewish-
phows, as did 'Gunsmoke'
pnanza.' "
ION WINCELBERG
|those segments clearly.
erg, one of Hollywood's
pnted, respected and pro-
ers, was instrumental in
ng Judaism to the wild,
"The only Jewish
i you used to have on TV
et, saintly and wishy-
*ys Wincelberg. "It was
get fully dimensional
iracters done."
erg changed all that
(introduction of Nathan
to "Have Gun Will
11957 series that ran six
Richard Boone as the
Paladin.
in Shotnoff was
(abrasive, self-confident
out his Jewishness,"
Mberg. The writer also
j the type of character
nsey" (1972 to 1974),
i also starred Richard
I also is proud that "I
He first black outlaw
(Have Gun'). After
was opened up for
Ithe openings were
kn canyons. "Actors
IPersoff and David
that unless they
ed seven Writers Guild Award
nominations; six were for Jewish
characters."
The '60s and '70s provided room
for creativity, a welcome entice-
ment for a writer such as
Wincelberg, who admits "I like to
break new ground." In the past
decade, however, the oppor-
tunities have been fewer.
"In the last 10 years, I have
been more cautious," he says.
Is it time to throw caution to the
wind? "We have gone through a
million cycles," says actor Bernar-
di of the ways Jews have been
depicted on television. "Jewish
characters are shown as either the
butt of humor or as heroes
never as real people."
When a producer does make an
attempt at reality, at "making
waves," he may find himself
drowning in the effort. Actor Ber-
nardi cites Norman Lear,
eminently successful producer of
such series as "All in the Family"
and "Maude," as a mogul willing
to take risks.
A DECIDEDLY Jewish Murray
Klein, portrayed by Martin
Balsam, was introduced as Archie
Bunker's business partner when
"All in the Family" evolved into
"Archie Bunker's Place." The
character never really jelled. As
far as the new series was concern-
ed, it "was not very popular,"
says Bernardi.
"Look, it's an old story. The
depiction of the Jew in any
cultural medium can never be nor-
mal the identity is too loaded.
He is always shown living in rela-
tion to the Gentiles, never to
himself."
That should not be so surpris-
ing, argues Allen Lichtenstein, an
assistant professor of television
and radio at Brooklyn College.
Lichtenstein has done extensive
research on the topic of the way
Jews are depicted on television.
"Television does not portray
characters realistically." he says.
The medium instead opts for
"cardboard characters."
Look at Mick Belker of "Hill
Street Blues," says Lichtenstein.
"He is a tough guy, almost an
anti-stereotype" of the Jew. "Yet,
he is a stereotype of a tough
cop. He is the reversal of the
Jewish character when compared
to (fellow cop Henry) Goldblume,
who is portrayed as cerebral,
humanistic. But Belker is no more
realistic."
One has to understand the
dynamics of commercial television
to know why so few Jews or
Jewish issues are depicted.
"Television is going after mass
audiences," says Lichtenstein.
"Jewish issues are not perceived
as particularly interesting to the
mass audience. What you get is a
homogenized American who hap-
pens to be Jewish."
PRODUCERS are not in-
terested in in-depth portrayals.
"You end up with shallow
characters," Lichtenstein says.
"Anything beyond that, they shy
Continued on Page 15-A
Bookcase
Chief Rabbi 'Naive' in New Book
Producer Norman Lear of 'All
in the Family'is acknowledged
as one of television's leading
trend-setters where the Protes-
tant Archie Bunker copes with
his niece's Bat Mitzvah as he
argues that 'You can always
tell a Jew easy just look for
the "yamaha" on his head.'
worked on accents, there was no
room for them to play Jews."
Producers had certain quotas
for characters. "They rationed
you: one Jewish character a year,
one black a year," says
Wincelberg.
TODAY, he notes, such restric-
tions have been dropped. "At one
time, there was a ghetto mentali-
ty. Today, there is a lot less of it.
There is still, however, a feeling
that you have to homogenize
characters. The producers make
you feel that they are doing you a
great favor by throwing you a
bone."
The bones thrown Wincelberg's
way have been meaty. "I have had
a relatively easy time selling
stories," he says. "I was able to be
more adventurous. I did my best
By MORTON I. TEICHER
If Only My People...':
Zionism in My Life. By Sir Im-
manuel Jakobovits. London:
Weidenfeld and Nicolson,
1984. 280 pp.
The distinguished author of this
book is the Chief Rabbi of the
United Hebrew Congregations of
the British Commonwealth of Na-
tions. This automatically makes
him one of the leading Orthodox
rabbis in the world. However, his
distinction is not only dependent
on his status and role. He achiev-
ed his lofty position because of his
personal attainments.
His story is a heart-warming
one since he started out as a teen-
age refugee from Germany in
1936. He studied for the rabbinate
at Jews' College and Yeshiva Etz
Chaim in London. By the age of
26, he became the rabbi of the
Great Synagogue, Duke's Place,
London. Two years later, he mov-
ed to Dublin when he became the
Chief Rabbi of Ireland, and ten
years aftr that, he took the posi-
tion as the first rabbi of the Fifth
Avenue Synagogue in New York.
In 1967, after eight years in
New York, he was installed in his
present position as the British
Chief Rabbi.
I REMEMBER how deeply im-
pressed by Rabbi Jakobovits I was
when I had the privilege of
meeting him briefly during his
period in New York. I told him of
my great esteem for his outstan-
ding book. "Jewish Medical
Ethics," which was published in
1959. It remains a classic con-
tribution, having been the first
comprehensive treatise on the
subject. Rabbi Jakobovits has
maintained his interest in this
field and is a widely respected
authority on medicine in Jewish
law.
In his current book, he mentions
using this expertise to agitate
against abortions in Israel, in-
dicating that they violate Jewish
law. He was also involved in the
dispute about autopsies in Israel.
The focus on Israel and Zionism
is kept up throughout the book. It
contains many lenghty quotations
Rabbi Immanuel Jakobovits
from Rabbi Jakovovits' speeches
and letters dealing with various
issues affecting Israel. He con-
stantly reiterates his interest in
the spiritual aspects of Israel and
Zionism, but he was inevitably
plunged into the political and
secular problems of Israel. His
pronouncements often stirred up
controversy, and he claims that
the book is an effort "to set the
record straight" since, according
to him, he was "widely
misunderstood, or
misrepresented."
THERE IS a surprisingly naive
quality to Rabbi Jakobovits' ef-
forts to separate religion and
politics in Israel and Zionism. At
the very outset of his service as
the British Chief Rabbi, the Six-
Day War took place, and Rabbi
Jakobovits visited Israel. He
describes the joyous Israeli reac-
tion to victory as "un-Jewish."
This was clearly a political judg-
ment, since what worried him
were such issues as the plight of
the Arab refugees and Israeli
domination over Arabs. Indeed,
he writes of "my constant,
perhaps obssessive, preoccupation
with the Arab refugee."
His concern about "the spiritual
malaise affecting Israel" led him
to write to a number of Israeli and
American leaders in the hope of
organizing an effort to deal with
this problem. It is surely in-
genuous to think of such an effort
as non-political.
Later, when he hailed the ap-
pointment of a religious Minister
of Education in Prime Minister
Begin's cabinet, he was certainly
commenting on what was a
straight political decision. Similar-
ly, his comments on the Lebanese
war, the Camp David agreements
and the "Who is a Jew" argument
can hardly be characterized as
non-political.
RABBI JAKOBOVITS staun-
chly defends his right and the
right of all Diaspora Jews to voice
dissent and criticism about Israeli
policies. He successfully makes
out an excellent case for his point
of view. He insists that there were
severe strictures which he placed
himself on his own freedom to
speak out because of his position,
but his speeches, statements and
letters to the editor tend to deny
his claim to special restraint. In a
glaring contradiction, he writes
about withholding an article from
publication as evidence of his
restraint and then proceeds to
publish excerpts from it in this
book.
Incidentally, what he does give
us from this article only whets our
appetite for more, since the article
is an ingenious attempt to show
how contradictory views about
Israel can be equally valid. He
handsomely achieves his objective
by placing the opposing views
alongside of each other in two col-
umns, clearly demonstrating the
correctness of his thesis.
This particular passage is
especially well-written, but that
may be equally said of the entire
book. Rabbi Jakobovits has a gift
for words and for clear expres-
sion. There is no mistaking his
point of view, and whether or not
one agrees with him, one cannot
help but admire his felicitous use
of the English language.
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30. 1985
Israeli Researchers
Create Nursing Robot To Aid Disabled
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Researchers at the Faculty
of Mechanical Engineering
of the Technion-Israel In-
stitute of Technology are
devising a nursing robot
that will run errands, fetch
objects, serve and even cook
in response to verbal com-
mands, it is reported by the
American Society for
Technion.
When Johan Borenstein of the
Robotics Department issues a
firm two-word command: "Sink-
move," the robot model wheels
across the room on its way to the
sink. And when Borenstein issues
the next instruction: "Home-
move," the model returns to his
side.
RESEARCH IN progress aims
at the development of a
sophisticated nursing robot,
capable of performing various
tasks for the physically-disabled
opening or closing a cupboard,
window, or door, replacing a video
cassette, or preparing simple
dishes.
The nursing robot will comprise
at least three major components:
a self-propelled, computer-
controlled carriage, the robot
mounted on it, and a fixed source
of radiation either infrared or
laser beams to serve as a per-
manent reference point for the
system's frequent orientation.
The carriage, equipped with
sensors to help it avoid or over-
come obstacles, will move in
response to voice signals from the
patient. Spoken commands will
activate the robot arm and ac-
tivate numerous possible tasks.
A direct telephone link will
enable it to dial a number on re-
quest or if an emergency occurs
and help is needed. The robot will
"see" with an "eye" very similar
in design to a camera rangefinder.
IN SPITE of this system's ex-
tensive capabilities, it is expected
to be relatively inexpensive. Its
developers' target retail price is
$10,000, and it is hoped that the
project will be completed by the
end of 1986.
"Israel is an ideal place for the
development and export of robotic
systems." notes Prof. Yoram
Koren, head of Technion's
Robotics Laboratory, "because
software is at the heart of the
system and we have a fund of the
right sort of expertise in this
field."
Early prototype of nursing robot at Technion's Robotics Lab.
Summit Conference Proposed
To Help Stem Tide of Religious Fanaticism Spread Worldwide
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Rabbi Arthur Schneier,
president of the Appeal of
Conscience Foundation, is
proposing a summit con-
ference of religious leaders
from throughout the world
to help stem the spread of
religious fanaticism which is
causing intolerance, terror
and persecution.
"The purpose of such a con-
ference would be. not to discuss
theology but rather tolerance and
respect for differences how to
seek it, how to teach it, how by
precept and example, to practice
it," he told reporters at a
breakfast meeting at the National
Press Club.
"The growing polarization of
faiths and peoples and nations
that afflicts our world today
thrives on intolerance," Schneier
declared. "We need ways to stop
it. It leads to bloodshed. We need
ways to prevent it."
SCHNEIER SAID that the Ap
peal of Conscience Foundation,
which seeks to promote religious
freedom throughout the world,
would set up a 12-member steer-
ing committee by the end of the
year to organize the conference
.vhich he hopes would be held in
1986.
"I believe such a religious sum-
mit is urgently necessary, now
more than ever," he said. "From
it, I would hope, will come a cry
demanding a halt to the killings
and bombings and acts of ter-
rorism that are being carried out
daily in the name of religion."
He added that if the conference
succeeds, it "could become a per-
manent institution in the interna-
tional political landscape, meeting
perhaps once every five years, to
deal with new issues and speak
out on new crises that arise."
Schneier. an Orthodox rabbi
who is spiritual leader of the Park
East Synagogue in Manhattan,
said that there is a religious
revival throughout the world part-
ly because of "the fear of nuclear
destruction." While he welcomes
this trend, he said it has also
sparked an increase in religious
Sharif Okayed
LONDON (JTA) Egyptian-
born film actor, Omar Sharif, and
two major American companies
have been removed from the Arab
blacklist of individuals and firms
created as part of the Arab
boycott directed against I*e).
Rabbi Arthur Schneier
fundamentalism which he noted
always means "less tolerance."
SCHNEIER critcized United
States foreign policy for failing to
take account of this trend, the
most glaring example being Iran.
"We paid too much attention to
the military and economic position
and strengths of the Shah without
truly understating the power and
the potential force of the mullahs
and religion," he noted.
Islamic fundamentalism is also
becoming a threat in Egypt,
where the murder in Cairo of an
Israeli diplomat last week is "only
the tip of the iceberg," and in
Malaysia, Schneier said. He
stressed that this polarization and
intolerance is affecting all
religions, including Judaism.
"In Israel, Meir Kahane is
reported to be winning recruits
among young people for his own
brand of religious fundamentalism
and political extremism," he said.
Asked about Kahane's proposal
to expel all Arabs from Israel,
Schneier replied that it was a
"radical simplistic solution"
which is rejected by the govern-
ment and people of Israel and
"certainly by Jews all over the
world." He said such a policy
would not only be harmful, but no
nation lives in isolation and noted
that the transfer of mass popula-
tion has "never succeeded."
SCHNEIER WAS also critical
of Black Muslim leader Louis Far-
rakhan, who he said belongs to
"that historical breed that thrives
on prejudice, on divisiveness, on
intolerance." He said Farrakhan
"is really a danger and should not
be ignored." Farrakhan "should
be condemned, isolated and in-
sulated before he spews forth
poison into our American
bloodstream," Schneier said.
On South Africa, Schneier said
religious leaders should use their
moral pressure against its apar-
theid racist policies. He rejected
the charge made by the Rev. Jerry
Falwell, head of the Moral Majori-
ty, that Bishop Desmond Tutu,
the Black South African leader
and 1984 Nobel Peace Prize win-
ner, is a phoney. Schneier alsq
said that religious revival is going
on in the Soviet Union and the
Peoples Republic of China. He has
visited the Soviet Union 19 times
since 1966, the latest being last
May. He noted that it was his im-
pression that the new regime
headed by Mikhail Gorbachev has
not yet decided its policy on
religion.
SCHNEIER STRESSED that
religious leaders cannot divorce
themselves from the political pro-
cess. He welcomed the stand on
political issues taken by the
Catholic Bishops and Jewish and
Protestant organizations.
,. ,"L>ving in,$\SJluclear age and
'"not to echo sowwFw the moral
issues is a gross neglect of respon-
sibility, of religious duty," he
declared.
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W8 Themselves Appear
nued from Pane 13 A
Dm."
illy, the more successful a
ecomes, the more the
is fleshed out. "Only
|show is on for a while,"
litenstein, "can you look
things, can you find
tig substance." Writers
to stave off viewer
by introducing in-
|ng nuances to the
rs.
fs can infuse their
rs with an ethnicity that
8e or be ignored by the
|Bernardi, who has per-
> Tevye in productions of
[on the Roof on Broad-
all over the world, is pro-
Bi remembered by televi-
ences for his portrayal of
by in the popular "Peter
feries from 1958 to 1961.
Jacoby Jewish? To me he
laughs Bernardi. "He
Opposed to be; he had no
ackground. But I used
nyself to play him."
!D, other actors have
their backgrounds to
ethnicity of their roles
Bruce Weitz, who por-
scruffy Mick Belker on
Is "Hill Street Blues,"
kere is a purity about
^blemished by the ragtag
which he works. That
terns from a Jewish
dedication and
nee appeal to me," says
It Belker. "He's a
elker, I am beholden to
Ish traditions," says
\\ker is "an extremely
and a man dedicated
na. "He's an efficient
who has a tender heart
Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
To Shy Away from Jewish TV Sitcoms
Brandon Tartikoff, president
of NBC Entertainment, takes
the position that most of the
Jews in TV are behind the
camera. That is why there are
so few shows left that are
devoted to Jews or Judaism.
They don't want to make
waves.
That would also be the way to
describe the haimish title
character of "Barney Miller," a
police show with a seemingly
endless life in TV syndication.
Barney had all the qualities one
aspires to," says Hal Linden of his
alter ego, who headed a motley
crew of detectives for eight televi-
sion seasons beginning in 1975.
"There was a certain talmudic
side to Barney, to his philosophy
and the manner in which he handl-
ed things.
"When (program creator) Dan-
ny Arnold and I first discussed the
part, I didn't want to make
Barney an ethnic character. But
we finally agreed that Barney
should be Jewish." That sense of
Jewishness, the Solomonesque
manner in which Barney Miller
handled his often clashing crew of
detectives, came through in the
writing, the actor says.
THE WRITING and Judd
Hirsch's Jewish sensitivities
also helped give shape to Alex
Rieger of "Taxi." "Originally, the
character was called Alex
Taylor," Hirsch remembers, "but
I had it changed to Rieger
which was the name of my friend
from junior high school." Alex is
also the name of Hirsch's son.
"I wanted Alex to be a Semitic
character; being named Rieger
does not put him in the position of
being white bread."
Sometimes, however, a white-
bread actor can add zest to a
corned-beef character. Such was
the case with "Rhoda" and its two
leading female stars, Valerie
Harper and Nancy Walker.
Neither actress is Jewish,
though the respective roles they
played as Rhoda and the mother
who loved her certainly were. In-
deed, many "Rhoda" junkies still
think Harper is Jewish. "I guess,
it's a kind of backhanded compli-
ment," she says.
"Rhoda" in many ways typified
televison's approach to Jewish
characterizations. The family's
Judaism was hinted at but not
delineated. "Rhoda was Jewish in
the sense that the majority of the
population in the world would
regard her as having traits. To
Jews, however, those traits are
not necessarily Jewish," says
Lichtenstein.
TV CRITIC Joel Siegel thinks
Rhoda's Jewishness may have
gotten chopped up in one of the
food processors she received for a
wedding gift.
Ah, the wedding. "Rhoda
wasn't married by a rabbi," says
Siegel. "There was no mention of
religion at the wedding." And her
husband Joe Gerard, played by
David Groh was not depicted as
Jewish.
"I think someone made a deci-
sion not to have a Jewish wed-
ding," says Siegel. Such a decision
was a safe one, he says. "It's like
when they made Archie Bunker a
Protestant," an unrealistic choice
since "there are only about 11
Protestants in Queens," the New
York home of "All in the Family."
"It's safer that way," says Siegel.
Jeffrey Fuerst, assistant
curator of the Museum of Broad-
casting in New York, also is in-
trigued by "Rhoda." He talks
about Martin Morgenstern, the
father portrayed by actor Harold
Gould.
"If (Molly Goldberg's husband)
Jake was a cutter in someone
else's factory, then (the character
played by) Harold Gould owns
that factory," says Fuerst. "They
are of the same ilk."
That is not necessarily a good
thing. Fuerst sees in both Jake
and Martin "an emasculation of
the father figure." He also thinks
that "Rhoda's parents were a bit
of both. They didn't evolve. They
were much more grandparent
figures than characters."
"Rhoda" had some not
altogether positive things to offer,
what with heavy doses of guilt on
each episode. Audiences may well
wonder, "is that what it means to
be Jewish in America?
TURNING THE channel back
to "Hill Street Blues" comes to
grips with Belker and Goldblume.
He is the spiritual son of Molly
Goldberg.
"He is more a reflection of a
liberal America to be Jewish.
Goldblume is a caring Democrat
because he comes from a history
of 5,000 years. His actions are
those of a big-hearted liberal.
Indeed, Goldblume may be a
symbol for what is happening to
American Jews today.
One contemporary program
which comes close to the Jewish
family at work and play is not that
at all. The "Bill Cosby Show,"
NBC-TV's series about a black
family of high achievement with a
physician dad and an attorney
mom, seems to show warm family
elements once ascribed to "The
Goldbergs."
Three Rockets
Fired Into
Galilee Area
TEL AVIV (JTA) Three
Katyusha rockets were fired in
two separate incidents Saturday
and Sunday into the Galilee
panhandle from south Lebanon.
There were no casualties, but
some damage as one of the
rockets landed in a field and
started a brush fire. Three
Katyusha rockets have landed in
the Galilee since the Israel
Defense Force withdrew from
Lebanon earlier this year.
Katyushas aimed toward Israel
have been discovered by the
Israel-backed South Lebanon Ar-
my (SLA) inside the security zone
in south Lebanon. SLA soldiers
dismantled them before they were
used. Meanwhile, police bomb
squad units dismantled last Fri-
day morning two explosive
charges near Ashkelon before
they caused any damage.
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. August 30. 1985
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>ok for Youngsters Jewish Heroism During Holocaust Slated
uri Artist Barbara Genet Combines Ag Theme for International Contest
istration, Text to Teach Hebrew
Barman Barbara Genet is
[author of a new book,
-Poo-Ach Means Ap-
to be published in
tember by Alternatives
teligious Education, of
Iver.
be book is an innovative in-
uction for children, ages 3-8,
lebrew letters and words,
strong graphics, each color-
two-page spread is designed
i to teach and entertain young
ers.
IE FURRY caterpillar crawl-
bn the vine, the toy boat bobb-
fat sea, the clown offering
Isful of balloons these are
ng 29 everyday objects that
identified in Hebrew, both in
^iteration and in English
ilation.
p. Genet is both author and il-
lator of "Ta-Poo-Ach Means
le." She received her training
\e Stella Eliks Tyler School of
i Arts of Temple University in
bdelphia.
le is the wife of Saul Genet,
1 this year, the youngest of
three children packed her
I, leaving another empty room
pe house. "The best way of
ng with the void was to con-
[her room into my studio," ex-
ks Mrs. Genet.
Barbara Genet
AFTER BEING a full-time
homemaker. mother and wife, she
has returned to her art on a pro-
fessional basis and ventured into
assorted art-related projects.
In addition to her writing and il-
lustration, Mrs. Genet is also a
designer of Jewish New Year
greeting cards and silkscreened
pictures of Jewish interest. Her
acrylic paintings have been
displayed at galleries.
student begins work on the entrance to a new 'Garden of Eden'
^Hiidassah's Seligsberg/Brandeis Comprehensive High School,
garden's design featuring an 'apple' tree with out-sized
tit and sculptures of Adam, Even, and the serpent was
rated by students as part of a project to create the 'ideal' school
vironment undertaken by the school's Graphics Department.
Special Tribute To Dante Fascell
Theme Of Labor Day Picnic
. special tribute to thirty years
tireless and effective represen-
l"n in the Congress of the
lited States is the theme
Ipted by Congressman Dante
cell's Annual Labor Day Pic-
Committee. The picnic will
kin be held at Tropical Park.
f Bird Road (40th Street) and
Palmetto Expressway on
nday, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m.
ricnic committee chairman
pn Joffre states, "We believe all
/people Dante Fascell has serv-
|in his 30 years in Congress will
i us in paying special tribute to
i this year to celebrate 30 years
[representing all of us in the
\ House of Representatives.
ngressman Fascell has long
fen known to the people he
Vs as paying special attention
to the problems they have that he
can help them with as their Con-
gressman. We are all very proud
that as Chairman of the House
Foreign Affairs Committee that
the people of the Unites States are
finding out what an outstanding
effective public servant and leader
Dante Fascell is for our nation.
Congressman Fascell has
always wanted the Annual Labor
Day Picnic to not only pay tribute
to the working people of America
but to be a picnic where the whole
family can have a good time
together. The picnic committee
has once again come up with what
we believe is a pinic that will not
only provide free food and
refreshments but good clean
entertainment and fun for
children of all ages."
Gil Samsonov was recently in
Miami to publicize the Interna-
tional Project on Jewish Heroism
during World War II. Born into a
pioneering clan of farmers, Sam-
sonov is a sixth-generation Israeli
and heir to a long tradition of
Jewish nationalism in the Land of
Israel.
His forbears arrived in what
was then Turkish Palestine in the
mid-19th Century and founded
one of the first modern Jewish set-
tlements in the country, Zichron
Ya'acov. His great-great grand-
father was the mukthar (mayor) of
Jaffa whose children helped found
settlements which have become
cities and farming centers in
modern Israel.
AFTER GRADUATING from
high school. Samsonov entered
the Naval Combat officer's school,
and served five years in the Navy.
He completed a BA in political
science with honors in two years,
and is now completing a Master's
degree in international relations.
Currently, he is executive
diretor of the International Pro-
ject on Jewish Heroism in World
War II. The project involves every
Jewish school or institution of
higher education in the world and
is designed to emphasize the role
of Jewish soldiers, partisans and
ghetto fighters during the years
of the Nazi Holocaust.
Most recently, it has completed
the production and screening of a
Gil Samsonov
nine-week television presentation,
which was shown on national
television in Israel.
A contest on Jewish heroism
during World War II is part of the
undertaking and is both an educa-
tional project and a means of com-
munication in which thousands of
young people in Israel and
throughout the Diaspora take
part. During the Holocaust, many
acts of heroism were performed
by Jews, who took up arms
against the Nazi enemy.
"TODAY, when various
elements have been attempting to
deny the Holocaust, it is especially
important that there always be a
fresh cycle of teen-agers who
relive these experiences in a way
that they will never forget," says
Samsonov. "Ingrained in their
memories will be the memory of
those Jewish who fought and died
while defending Jewish honor in
the ghettoes, the forests, and the
towns, in uprisings within the con-
centration camps.
The television broadcast, "We
Were There With Them," is a
nine-part series in which 54
teenagers from schools
throughout Israel took part.
In addition to this part of the
project, national contests will be
held as high school students study
the material involved. The best
students will go to Israel for the
international contest.
Part 3 of the project will be a
trip organized for Jewish youth
from Israel and the Diaspora to
the locations in Europe at which
Jews suffered and fought. At
Auschwitz, some 2,000 Jewish
teen-agers will participate in a
memorial service.
Slogan for the trip, as well as
for the entire contest, will be:
"And thou shalt tell thy son" (Ex-
odus 13:8).
Information can be obtained by
contacting the Israel Aliyah
Center at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
U.S. Secretary of Transportation Elizabeth Dole
To Receive JNF 4Tree of Life' Award
NEW YORK U.S. Secretary
of Transportation Elizabeth Dole
will receive the Jewish National
Fund's prestigious "Tree I I
award at a dinner Sept. 12 at the
Sheraton Centre here.
Co-chairmen of the evenl are
Rita E. Hauser. a partner
Stroock and Stroock and Lavan in
New York, and Jackie Presser.
president of the International
Brotherhood of Teamsters in
Washington. Dr. Joseph P. Stern-
stein, past president of the Zionist
Organization of America, and a
member of JNF's Board of Direc-
tors, will be guest speaker.
Announcing the award,
Charlotte Jacobson, president of
the Jewish National Fund of
America, praised Mrs. Dole's
record of public service.
The "Tree of Life" award,
JNF's highest honor, is given in
recognition of outstanding profes-
Elizabeth Dole
s i o n al, community, and
humanitarian leadership.
Secretar e, thi i ion's
eighth Secretar) il a sporta
tion, i President
Reagai r thi abini ost in
February. iy83. Previously, she
served .sunn to the Presi-
dent for Public Lia i
former Federal Trade < ommis-
sioner, a former Deputy Special
Assistant to the President, and a
former staff assistant to the
Assistant Secretary of Health.
Education and Welfare. During
the 1980 Presidential campaign,
she served as chairman of Voters
for Reagan-Bush.
In 1972. Mrs. Dole received the
Arthur S. Flemming Award for
Outstanding Government Service
and, in 1974. Time Magazine
chose her as one of America's 200
"Faces of the Future."
She is married to Senate Majori-
ty Leader Robert Dole of Kansas.
Zulu Chief Encouraged By Peres9
Rejection Of South Africian Apartheid
TEL AVIV (JTA) South
African Zulu Chief Gatsha
Buthelezi told a press conference
here, before returning home from
a week's visit to Israel, that he felt
"very encouraged" by what he
said was Premier Shimon Peres'
complete rejection of South
Africa's apartheid policies.
He said that Peres' stand, ex-
pressed during their meeting in
Jerusalem, "contradicts the im-
age projected for various reasons
that Israel does not feel as strong-
ly as it should about apartheid."
BUTHELEZI SAID he hoped
Israel would exert "optimum
leverage" through diplomatic
channels to pressure South
African President P. W. H na in-
to making reforms. He said that
both Peres and Deputy Premier
and Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir had been "open to all sug-
gestions." but he would not say
whether he had discussed specific
measures to that end. The Zulu
Chief added that he had not been
surprised by the depth of Israeli
opposition to apartheid, "given
the long history of suffering of
Jews."
He said that Israeli experts will
soon visit Kwa-Zulu, the
homeland of the Zulu tribe, to
assess possible avenues for Israeli
assistance to South African
blacks, concurrently to its
diplomatic ties with the white
regime.
The Zulu leader has been an
outspoken critic of the armed
struggle by South African blacks
against the Pretoria regime, and
has espoused nonviolent,
democratic means of bringing
about change. He had repeatedly
attacked the outlawed and exiled
African National Congress and
the United Democratic Front for
playing an "unholy duet of
violence" against blacks in South
Africa. The United Democratic
Front is the principal opposition
group within the country.
"dfewlslfo Floridia
Miami, Florida Friday, August 30,1985 Section B
i


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Frklay, August 30. 1985
Until Dinner Is Served
Hungry Hospital Patient
Holds Nurse 'Hostage'
Jewish Floridian subscriber Anne Sheldon
recently made history at Baptist Hospital.
Her mother. Mrs. Sarah Kahn of Miami Beach,
became the first patient ever to hold a Baptist
Hospital nurse hostage. As doctors might say. the
following true story is making rounds throughout
the medical facility.
Mrs. Sheldon tells this account of what happened
in Room 232-D to her 77-year-old mother, who only
five days earlier had a benign tumor removed from
her lung.
"MY MOM'S dinner was somewhat late one
evening, and she really got upset." Mrs. Sheldon
explained. "So when a nurse walked, into her room
to ckeck on her, mom shouted. 'You will not leave
this room until my dinner arrives. I am holding you
hostage.' "
Tongue-in-cheek as Mrs. Kahn was. the nurse
took her quite seriously.
"Almost to tears." added brother Stan Jackson.
"At least that's mom's version of the story. Ac-
tually, the nurse was glad to see her capable of be-
ing upset and active. That's a pretty good sign the
patient is recovering well.
"MOM'S A gentle person, unless she thinks
she's being mistreated. Then you better duck."
Five minutes later. Mrs. Kahn was eating her
Kosher dinner.
"And both she and the nurse were laughing
toeether." added her daughter.
Roberta S. Goldberg and Merry 11 Rosenfeld have recently jm
Mount Sinai Medical Center. They are in the Employm
Development Department. Roberta is a "Making Things Be".
coordinator and an instructor. Rosenfeld will be working on Pro.
gram Development, Secretarial Workshops and Classrwm]
Training.
Barry U. To Offer Master Of Arts In Jewish Studies Peres Convenes Meeting On Taba
Barry University is offering a
Master of Arts in Jewish Studies
with classes beginning Wednes-
day, Sept. 4. Courses will include:
American Jewish Community,
Biblical Judaism, Jewish Ethics,
Rabbinic Judaism and Hebrew
Studies.
Barry University will also offer
this fall a new graduate program.
The MA in University Studies is
targeted at career persons who
desire professional advancement
and personal enrichment.
Students can chart their choice
of courses in the 36-credit pro-
gram. By selecting required
groups of courses from the
various graduate programs at
Barry, participants will ex-
perience a dovetailing of learning
in liberal education and career
enhancement.
An orientation and methods
seminar is required in the
bell weather program. A final pro-
ject and report complete the
work, rather than a comprehen-
sive exam. Seven years are per-
mitted from the date of initial
enrollment to complete degree
requirements.
More than 30 colleges and
universities across the country of-
fer the new master's program in
general or liberal studies accor-
ding to Dr. Andre Cote, dean of
the School of Arts and Sciences at
Barry University.
Large enrollment in the pro-
grams throughout the nation in-
dicates the high interest in earn-
ing a non-specialized master's
degree. The program is a natural
advancement for persons who
have completed a bachelor's
degree in professional studies.
Diabetes Research Institute
Organizes Women's Auxiliary
The first organizational
meeting for the Diabetes
Research Institute Women's Aux-
iliary is slated for Friday, Sept. 6,
10 a.m., at the home of Lynne
Baron. The first order of business
will be to plan a membership
brunch.
Baron of Miami Beach and Jane
Goldberg of North Miami Beach,
board members of the foundation,
have taken a leadership role in
organizing the women's auxiliary
for the Diabetes Research In-
stitute Foundation.
Baron and Goldberg see a
women's auxiliary as a way for
the diabetes foundation to
broaden its base. "We need to find
women of all ages and from
various areas of town to get in-
volved in the fund-raising ac-
tivities of the foundation, and the
auxiliary could be the answer,"
said Baron.
"With the addition of a women's
auxiliary, we could handle many
more projects," commented DRI
Special Events Director Jill
Shapiro.
Hebrew Academy PTA Installs
New Officers, Welcome New Parents
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy Women and
Parents' Teachers Association
will jointly install new officers and
welcome new parents at a lun-
cheon on Wednesday, Sept. 11, at
noon at the home of Mrs. Shirley
Gross, Miami Beach. Mrs. Itzhak
Retter will chair the event.
Michael Fischer, executive vice
president of the Academy will
serve as installing officer. Rabbi
Harvey Silverstein newly ap-
pointed principal of the Elemen-
tary Department of the school will
speak on "New Beginnings in
Outstanding CitiZen*ewish Education for the New
Nominations
Open For
)
South Dade Council of B'nai
B'rith Lodges/Units is seeking
nominations for the 1986 Dade
County Outstanding Citizen
Award.
The award is presented to a
civic minded man or woman judg-
ed to have contributed the most in
the community during 1985-86, or
in previous years. The award
selection is baaed on civic con-
tributions and the individual's
desire to improve the quality of
life in the community.
Nominees must represent a
recognized civic, social, charitable
or social group.
Harry Yablin JS receiving
nominations. The deadline is Dec.
31.
Year."
Taking office will be Mrs. Dahlia Lipner,
Hebrew Academy Women, president. Linda
Bogin. Ahuva Retter and Pam Turetaky.
Presidium PTA; Mrs. Seymour Reinhard.
immediate past president, vice president
and recording secretary; Mrs Gertrude
Shapiro, honorary life president, chairman
of the board and thrift shop chairperson,
vice president, treasurer.
Also serving are Mrs. Barbara Goren.
Mabel Kopp. Lillian Chabner. Ruth Firtel.
Frances B Schnur. Lillian Silverman. TUlie
Yates. Helen Ciment, Bonnie Slavin. Estelle
Furst, Celia Isaacson. Mrs. S. Louis
Schwartt. Linda Bogin. Shirley Gross. Ger-
trude FeWmsn. Sadye Pedis. Helen Ciment.
Gita Galbut. Rita Galbut.
Hebrew Academy Women s Board
Members at Large: Fannie Gulden. Arlene
Reinhard, Ahuva Retter, Belle Kohn. Bessie
. Suasman. Tola Block, Yfl Dermer, and
Alex Bosper.
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres has con-
vened a high level consultation in
a renewed effort to move ahead
toward resolution of the continu-
ing dispute between Israel and
Egypt over Taba, a tiny strip of
beachfront on the border just
south of the Israeli port of Eilat.
on the Gulf of Aqaba.
Peres consulted with Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin. Minister
in the Prime Minister's Office
Ezer Weizman and Avraham
Tamir. director general of the
Premier's office.
Peres reportedly sought H
reach an agreement with Deputji
Premier and Foreign Ministej
Yitzhak Shamir to discuss the
Taba controversy in the Cabinetl
toward passing the issue for inter
national arbitration.
The Voice of Israel r
reported that at the meeting tin
Cabinet Ministers reviewed ana
pert's document, which indicate
that the Israeli case in the Tab*
controversy was not without its
merits. Both Israel and Egypt
claim it as their own.
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Rabbi Abramowitz Returns To Pulpit,
Ruth Stern Director Early Childhood
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz will
frelcome Ruth Stern at the tem-
]e's opening late Friday night
ervices on Friday evening. He
till also honor Mrs. Barbara
losenblatt for her two decades of
ervice to the Temple Menorah
eligious School.
J Mrs. Ruth Stern is the new
lirector of Early Childhood
Education, Harvey Abramson,
president, announced.
Mrs. Stern, succeeding Mrs.
Barbara Rosenblatt as head of the
^re-School Department is a licens-
i educator and has been working
the field of Early Childhood for
|ver 25 years.
Mrs. Stern, who was educated
11 Belfast, Ireland and received
ker education degree from
loward College, has served as
'resident of the Jewish Council of
Carly Childhood Educators.
Joel Gray, chairman of Temple
Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Poll Shows Koch Party Would
Gain If Elections Were Held
TEL AVIV (JTA) A public
opinion poll taken by the Pori
Research Institute and published
in Haaretz shows that 10.6 per-
cent of those who voted for the
Likud in the last Knesset elections
would now cast their ballots for
the extremist Kach Party of Rabbi
Meir Kahane.
The poll showed that while
Labor and its supporters would
maintain their majority, winning
36.1 percent of the vote down
slightly from the 37.1 percent
gained in the elections the
Likud would decline from 31.9
percent at the elections to 22.8
percent today.
Rightwing parties Kach and
Tehiya would increase their
strength from 5.2 to 16 percent.
The main increase would be in the
Kach Party, jumping from 1.2 per-
cent at the voting over a year ago
to nine percent today. Tehiya
would increase from four percent
to seven percent.
But another poll published in
Maariv and taken by the Modi'in
Ezrachi Institute shows little
change during the past two mon-
ths. This poll gives the Labor
Alignment 53 seats if elections
were held now, the Likud 30,
Tehiya seven and Kach five seats.
Other parties would hold their
present representation, with very
minor differences.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Menorah's school board announc-
ed that Mrs. Bryna Berman has
accepted to serve as Co-chairman
Ruth Stern
of the School Board and will work
in close cooperation with Mrs.
Ruth Stern.
iabbath Dinner At Temple Menorah
A temple-wide Friday night din-
ker will be sponsored by Temple
Menorah, Friday evening, accor-
ding Mrs. Harvey Abramson,
president.
The Friday night dinner which
(mII be conducted by Rabbi Mayer
Vbramowitz will afford members
knd friends of Temple Menorah
he opportunity to greet each
other following the summer vaca-
tion. They will also have an oppor-
tunity to meet and chat informally
with the rabbi, the president, the
Educational director, the cantor,
and the officers of the
congregation.
An Oneg Shabbat, featuring
Israeli singing and dancing will
follow the late services.
JVS Creates New Service
The Miami Jewish Vocational
Service announces the expansion
H the Community Services
Department with a new service
ailed "Teen Between" to provide
Vocational and career planning for
he Learning Disabled Jewish
dolescent.
Utilizing an individual ap-
proach, counselors will provide
amprehensive exploration of
fcareer values, interest and
Abilities as well as offer specific
fcareer information including
Available options for vocational
training as well as local and out-
of-state boarding schools and col-
leges. Supportive and informa-
tional group counseling will also
be provided.
Mrs. Arleen Rosenthal, MSW
will coordinate the "Teen Bet-
ween" program. Mrs. Suzanne
Scott, MEd will work as a part
time vocational counselor.
JVS is a beneficiary agency of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion and the United Way of Dade
County.
Boys Town Jerusalem Gets
$300,000 Aid Grant From U.S.
George Feldenkreis, chairman
of the board of Universal Na-
tional Bank announced
Secretary of State George
Firestone will be a featured
speaker Friday, Sept. IS, at the
10 a.m. dedication ceremonies
of the Universal National Bank
Building, under construction
adjacent to the current site of
the bank located at 17701 Bis-
cayne Boulevard.
NEW YORK (JTA) Boys
Town Jerusalem has been award-
ed a $300,000 U.S. government
grant from the Agency for Inter-
national Development (AID) to ac-
quire new technical equipment for
its College of Applied Engineer-
ing, it is announced by Joe
Nakash, president of the Boys
Town Jerusalem Society.
"The grant brings the AID fun-
ding Boys Town has received
through the Office of the
American Schools and Hospitals
Abroad to $1,350,000," Nakash
said. "Boys Town was awarded
$800,000 in 1982 toward construc-
tion of the college's new academic
building, scheduled for completion
next spring, and a second grant of
$250,000 in 1983 for technical
equipment for the college."
ATTORNEY Samuel
Rabinowitz of Philadelphia, presi-
dent of Boys Town's Mid-Atlantic
Region, and Lois Krebs, the
region's executive director,
represented Boys Town in obtain-
ing all three grants.
Rabinowitz said their acquisi-
tion "demonstrates the U.S.
government's recognition of Boys
Town as a model education center
that fosters American ideas and
practices abroad, as well as its
positive assessment of the col-
lege's emerging impact on the
technological growth and develop-
ment of Israel's economy."
He said the College has
graduated over 400 students with
degrees as mechanical and elec-
tronics engineers and technicians
who have taken positions in
Israel's high-tech industries, voca-
tional high schools or armed
forces with responsibility for
critical defense systems.
The majority of those students
are the children of underpriviliged
immigrant families who first at-
tended Boys Town's High Schools
of Electronics or Precision
Mechanics, two of the eight in-
stitutions it maintains on an
18-acre residential campus in the
Jerusalem suburb of Bayit Vegan.
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Page 4-B The Jewish FToridin/Frida.y, August 30, 1985
Local Author Publishes A Book On 'Fund Raising'
Cottage Press has announced
the publication of "Fund-
Raising." The new work is a prac-
tical "How-To" guide for both
professional and volunteer fund-
raisers.
The author. Elton J. Kerness. is
an experienced practitioner of the
art of fund-raising as the current
Campaign Vice President of the
United Jewish Appeal Federation,
responsible for an annual cam-
paign of S700.000.000.
Kerness has just accepted the
post as executive director of the
Greater Miami Jewish Com"iunity
Centers.
During his 20-year career in the
field, he has helped organize
operating annual and capital cam-
paigns that have generated close
Elton J. Kerness
to SI billion.
In his new book. Kerness shares
not only his special knowledge of
how to raise funds, but also his
deep commitment to the concept
of people giving to help people.
His educational background in
business and social work combine
in the book to provide both a car-
ing and sawy approach to fund-
raising.
The book includes step-by-step
plans for implementation of
Kerness' national award-winning
fund-raiser '"Super Sunday." In
addition, two other successful
fund raising campaigns "Buddy-
Up-Day" and "Fourteen Days In
June" are described in detail.
The book will be available na-
tionally after Oct. 1.
1,000 U.S. Students in Israel Sign
Petition on Jordan Arms
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Over 1,000 American
Jewish students, studying
for a year at Israeli colleges
and high schools, expressed
their concern for Israel's
defense by signing a peti-
tion calling on the U.S. to
refrain from selling arms to
Jordan, it is reported by the
American Israel Public Af-
fairs Committee (ATPAC).
The petition was later
delivered to Sen. Edward
Kennedy (D., Mass.) who
sent it on to Secretary of
State George Shultz.
The petition drive was organiz-
ed by a dozen student activists, ac-
cording to AIPAC. The petition
stated: "We, the undersigned
American students, oppose the
sale of America's most
sophisticated weapons to Jordan
or to any other country that has
not recognized Israel's right to ex-
ist and endorsed the Camp David
peace process."
THE PETITION was circulated
over the entire country in less
than a week's time by students at
Tel Aviv and Hebrew Universities
who had participated in Israel-
based Political Leadership Train-
ing Seminars sponsored by
AIPAC.
The activists said they found
willing signers not only in the
large university programs at
Haifa, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.
but also in yeshivot and the "High
School in Israel" program at Hod
Hasharon. Signers included
residents of all 50 states.
The petition organizers
designated AIPAC interns
Lauren Strauss of Brandeis
University and Julie Bergman of
the University of Pennsylvania to
present the petition to Kennedy.
Kennedy and Sen. John Heinz (R..
Pa.) have introduced a resolution
in the Senate opposing arms sales
to Jordan as long as Jordan "op-
poses the Camp David peace
process."
It is unusual for American
students to engage in political ac-
tion from Israel. "Normally, the
students wait until they return to
the States to get involved in
Lewis Named First Senior Dayan
*
Fellow at TAU's Dayan Center
TEL AVTV (JTA) Former
U.S. Ambassador to Israel
Samuel Lewis has been named the
first senior Dayan fellow at Tel
Aviv University's Dayan Center
for Middle East and African
Studies and will spend four mon-
ths at the Center during the com-
ing academic year, TAU has
announced.
Lewis will lecture at the Center
and do research for a book during
his appointment under the Dayan
Fellowship program, which was
established to support research on
the political and military history
of the modern Middle East and
Israel's place in the region. The
former Ambassador who served in
Israel for eight years is also af-
filiated with the Foreign Policy
Institute at Johns Hopkins
University.
The Dayan Center, headed by
Prof. Itamar Rabinovitch, is
TAU's major framework for
research, study, publication and
related academic activities con-
cerned with the modern Middle
East and Africa. Moshe Dayan's
personal archives, drawn from the
years he served as Israel's Chief
of Staff. Defense Minister, and
Foreign Minister, are housed at
the center.
Dr. Irving lehrmanj
Temple Emanu-El
Proudly Announces The Opening Of
The New
Lehrman Day School Building
727 77th Street, Miami Beach
One of the Finest Facilities in South Florida
REGISTER NOW FOR FALL TERM
Elementary and Junior High Program
Early Childhood Dept. Academically Oriented
Fully Licensed Teachers
Hebrew Classes
Enriched and Gifted Programs
Hebrew Instruction
Expanded Library and
Audio Visual Dept.
Magnificent New Science Lab
Kosher Hot Meal Daily
Transportation Available
Tmpl Office
538-2503
We Welcome Your Visit and Registration Inquiry
9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily at the Lehrman Day School'
and from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Temple Office
Day School
866-2771
Dr. Eliezer RachmUewitz (left), head of the Hematobjgy DepaA
ment at Hadassah Hebrew University Medical Center, chats viA\
Fatma and her father in the Hematology Clinic at r/nMejJ
Government Hospital in this West Bank settlement. Fatma yM
patient at the Clinic which is visited each week by a tear*?1
Hadassah physicians who work with their Arab colleaguetkl
treat blood diseases among the West Bank's Arab populatim
Cases requiring more advanced treatment are transferred to ti> j
Hadassah Medical Center in nearby Jerusalem.
Egypt Cancelled Restrictions On
Egyptian Tourists Coming To Israel
political activism. This year, they
wouldn't wait." said Jonathan
Kessler. head of AIPAC's
Political Leadership Development
Program.
THE STUDENTS involved in
the petition drive reported that
they were excited by their ex-
perience. "In circulating this peti-
tion, we raised consciousness."
said one. "There are now over one
thousand students returning to
hundreds of American campuses
committed to blocking this
transfer of weapons."
"This is the high point of my
Israel experience,"' another
declared. "The AIPAC seminars
have shown us how to translate
what we've been experiencing in-
to political action."
TEL AVIV (JTA) Egyp-
tian Tourism Minister Wajih
Mohamed Shmdi. who arrived in
Israel for a three-day visit, told a
press conference in Jerusalem
that he had assured Premier
Shimon Peres during a meeting
that Egypt had cancelled all
restrictions on Egyptian tourists
coming to Israel, now that the
Israel Defense Force has left
Lebanon.
In meeting with other Israeli of-
fcials, Shindi told his Israeli
counterpart. Tourism Minister
Avraham Sharir. that he would
try to equalize the balance of
.tourism between the two coun-
tries but noted that a far smaller
percentage of Egyptians trmnli
abroad than Israelis. Israel ayjj
some 34,100 Israelis visited Egypt
last eyar. while only 4.600 Egv^
tians travelled to Israel.
At a meeting with Depun
Premier and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir. Shindi expressec
concern at a recent drop in tl*
number of Israelis visiting Egypt
as a result of the imposition of i
travel tax on Israelis traveling k
other countries. He pointed out
that a weekend in Cairo would
cost an Israeli only about $150.
but the Israeli traveler would have
to pay another $200 just to cross
the border.
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Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
? '/ *
I ri*,,\
r a ..-.
I Thomas Pickering, newly-appointed Am-
\bassador of the United States to Israel,
[presents his credentials to President Chaim
Herzog in Jerusalem. Pickering succeeds
former Ambassador Samuel Lewis.
Lower Electric Bills
Expected In October
Customers of Florida Power and Light Company can expect
lower electric costs beginning in October if the Public Service
Commission approves a utility request to lower its fuel charges.
The PSC is scheduled to rule Aug. 30 on FPL's semi-annual fuel
cost projections, which would result in a net $2.46 reduction in a
typical residential bill. A 1.000 kilowatt-hour monthly bill would
change from $85.29 to $82.83 for the period October. 1985
through March. 1986.
The fuel portion of that bill would amount to $25.99 the
lowest cost to FPL customers for fuel since 1983.
Primary cause of the projected drop in fuel expenditures is
lower energy demand from customers. This enables the utility to
rely more on nuclear generation and "coal-by-wire" power to
meet a greater percentage of the energy needs, thus reducing its
purchases of oil. an FPL official said.
Despite record temperatures and accompanying heavy energy
usage this summer. FPL already has marked 19 days in 1985
when it did not burn a single barrel of oil to meet customers elec-
tric needs. The utility is projecting that its energy generation mix
will include only 10 percent oil-fired power for 1985.
The proposed changes incorporate a 50-cent increase in the
energy charge portion of the 1,000 kwh bill to reflect adjustments
in costs primarily associated with the company's conservation
programs and its "oil backout" program to reduce oil usage by
importing electricity.
FIU Researcher Develops Memory
Enhancing Interview Technique
lot'
An interview technique which
dramatically improves witnesses'
recall and can be taught by in-
vestigators with minimal training
has been developed by a resear-
cher at Florida International
^University.
Ron Fisher, associate professor
psychology, and colleague Ed
iGeiselman from the University of
I California at Los Angeles, design-
led the technique known as the
[cognitive interview which has
l^een proven successful in several
I laboratory studies*. vi<\. -.
The National Institute of Justice
I and the National Science Founda-
tion recently renewed a grant to
make possible research and
"testing of the cognitive interview
" in field studies.
Fisher will be working with the
Metro-Dade Police Department,
as well as the local FBI office, to
begin a test of the interview
techniques. He will also meet with
officials from the Dade State At-
'orney's office to see if the techni-
que can be useful to prosecutors.

forcement personnel.
Findings also conclude that the
cognitive interview is as effective
as hypnosis without any of the
drawbacks sometimes associated
with hypnosis, such as sug-
gestibility to leading questions.
This techinque allows greater
efficiency, requires less time to
learn and is easier to implement.
Fisher's interest in contacting
the FBI is primarily in interview-
ing hostages, witnesses, or
anyone else who is requested to
recall information about a crime.
The technique is based solely on
memory theory and is effective in
most crime scenarios where there
is a willing, motivated victim or
witness, especially when memory
loss is a factor.
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The cognitive interview elicits
approximately 20 to 30 percent
more correct information than
does a standard interview con-
ducted by experienced law en-
Miamians To Attend Israel Bond
Leadership Conference In Detroit
PAKS
Kosher Poultry, Turkey & Duck
Nine South Floridians will join
delegates from across the country
when they convene in Detroit for
the 1985 Israel Bond Leadership
Conference Sept. 5-8. The con-
ference will allow Israel Bond
leaders to discuss the upcoming
winter campaign and emphasizing
the importance of Israel Bond
purchases for the Jewish State.
Leading the Miami delegation
are Philip T. Warren, general
campaign chairman for the
Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization, and Executive
Director Howard Klein. Joining
VVarren and Klein will be Sidney
uooperman, Ron and Glenda
Krongold, Larry and Roberta
Gotlieb and David and Mona
Abramowitz.
On the agenda during the four-
day conference will be, among
other activities, speeches, by U.S.
Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan and
H.E. Meir Rosenne, Israel's Am-
bassador to the U.S. Other events
will include the presentation of
achievement awards to com-
munities with outstanding 1984
Bond results; campaign
wrkshops; Women's Division ses-
sions; and a special New Leader-
ship Division program.
Israel Finance Minister Yitzhak
Modai will address the delegates
at a gala dinner, which will be a
highlight of the conference, on
Saturday evening, Sept. 7.
"As Israel seeks to overcome its
economic crisis. Bond leaders
from throughout the U.S. and
Canada will be planning to pro-
vide increased loan funds for the
nation's continued development,"
said Warren of the need for an
Israel Bond Leadership Con-
ference. "Bond proceeds are
urgently needed, particularly for
jobs in development towns with
high rates of unemployment, for
Israel's high technology in-
dustries, and for the continued up-
building of the nation's
infrastructure."
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1985
Robin Eisenberg, New President Of
Council Of Childhood Educators
Robin Ledgin Eisenberg,
Education and Early Childhood
Director of Temple Beth El, Boca
Raton, was installed as president
of the 400 member Jewish Council
of Early Childhood Educators of
South Florida at the Annual All-
Day Professional Growth In-
stitute of the organization held
this past week at Temple Beth
Shalom, in Hollywood.
Serving with Mrs. Eisenberg
for the coming year will be area
vice-presidents Judy Kuritz, Tem-
ple Israel of Greater Miami (South
Dade); Anita Koppele, Temple
Beth Sholom (Miami Beach); Har-
riet Spitzer, Beth Torah Con-
gregation (North Dade); Linda
Harris, Ramat Shalom Synagogue
(Broward and Palm Beach Coun-
ties); and as Treasurer, Arlene
Lasko, Temple Sinai of North
Dade; Secretary, Judy Balletta,
Lehrman Day School; and
Shulamit Gittelson, immediate
past president.
Mrs. Eisenberg has a Masters in
Education from the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion in Los Angeles. Prior to
her present position in Boca
Raton, she was educational direc-
tor at Kehillath Israel, Pacific
Palisades, California and Con-
gregation Schaarai Zedek in Tam-
pa and served as administrative
assistant at Kneseth Israel in
Allentown, Pa.
At the Institute veteran
teachers who had served in Jewish
early childhood education in South
Florida for ten years or more
were honored. Recognized for ten
years of ECE teaching were Mad-
dy Biondo, Temple Beth Am;
Johanna Bronsztein, Beth Torah
Congregation; Gail Davis, Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami;
Trudy Edell, South Dade Hebrew
Academy; Phillippa Feldman,
Lehrman Day School, Jacquelyn
Fine, Temple Judea; Marion
Libow, Beth Moshe Congregation;
Lorraine Pearl, Bet Shira Con-
gregation; Amy Schwartz, Adath
Yeshurun; Anita Shulman, South
Dade Jewish Community Center;
Michele Sobel, Temple Beth Am.
Those honored for 15 years in-
cluded: Betty Baker, Temple
Menorah; Chi-Chi Berman, Tem-
ple Beth Am; Sylvia Bott, Temple
Judea; Cindy Korenvaes, Temple
Judea; Mollie Scholl, Temple
Menorah; Paula Tabachnikoff,
Temple Zion Israelite Center; and
for 18 years, Barbara Rosenblatt,
Temple Menorah; and for 20
years, Bemice Bimberg, Adath
Yeshurun; Joyce Frand, Beth
Torah Congregation; Sandy
Kramer and Marcia Leventhal,
Temple Beth Am; Marilyn Tan-
ney, Lehrman Day School.
Teachers honored for 25 years,
Gilda Ceppos, Temple Beth Am;
Ellen Heilig, Temple Beth Ahm
(Hollywood); Edith Seif, Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami;' and
for 30 years, Ruth Stern, Temple
Menorah.
At the recent international women's con-
ference marking the conclusion of the UN's
Decade of Women, Constance Kreshtool (left),
president of the National Federation of Tem-
ple Sisterhoods, and Norma Levitt, NFTS
honorary president, are assisted by a Kenyan
schoolgirl as they plant a tree as part of the
'Woman Forest' project. The project is con-
ducted by the Green Belt Movement, whose ma-
jor sponsors are the National Council of
Women of Kenya; the Loreto Sisters, a
Catholic teaching order; and the National
Federation of Temple Sisterhoods.
Hillel Opens With Record 750 Students
Heinz Eppler, president of the American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee, who recently led a delegation from the JDC to
eastern Europe, is shown in Warsaw, Poland laying a wreath of
flowers on U* siteofMila 18, the street address that held the main
quarters of the Warsaw Ghetto fighters' organization. The large
paving stone is now part of a small park. With Eppler (left to
right) are Ruthe EppUr; Ralph I. Goldman, executive vice jrresi-
dent emeritus of JDC; Saul B. Cohen, JDC executive vice presi-
dent; and Akiva Kohane, country director for Poland.
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The Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
munity Day School of North
Miami Beach has opened for the
1985-1986 school year with a
record enrollment of 750
students, announced Marshall
Baltuch, executive director.
Hillel will be under the direction
of its new Principal, Rabbi
Wallace Greene, PhD. Dr. Jerome
M. Levy is the vice principal and
Dorothy K. Gruen is director of
the Early Childhood program
which consists of a complete
nursery program for three and
four year olds, as well as four full
kindergarten classes. Rabbi Jay
Neufeld is the Assistant Principal
for Judaic Studies. This year, an
addition has been made to the
faculty with the appointment of
Mrs. Sandee Cole, Curriculum
Cabinet Approves
FTA Accord
With U.S.
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Cabinet has approved an agree-
ment with the United States to
padually lift all trade restrictions
between the two countries over
the next 10 years, a Cabinet state-
ment said.
J?le Free Trade Agreement
(FTA) is the first of its kind bet-
ween the U.S. and another coun-
try. It is expected to increase
Israeli exports to the U.S. by $200
million in the next two years ac-
cording to Industry Ministry
officials.
Before the agreement, Israel
paid up to 40 percent customs on
its imports to the U.S. and
American luxury goods to Israel
were subject to duties of ud to 90
percent. U.S. officials said
bilateral trade totalled $3.6 billion
m 1984 and was expected to
quadruple m a few years.
IAPJ? 8ned in April by
"ft Minister Ariel Sharon
wiUSpT^ Representative
William Brock. President Reagan
said at the time that the agree-
ment underscored the closenTss of
the U.S. and Israel and America's
Specialist.
Michael Scheck, president,
noted that the Samuel Scheck
Hillel Community Day School is
accredited by the Southern
Association of Colleges and
Schools, and is a member of the
National Commission on Torah
Education and the Southern
Association of Independence
Schools.
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Service for singles of all ages will be at the Aventura Jewish Center.
Rabbi David B. Saltzman announced. 935-0666
Happenings Singles is having a Singles Party on Friday, Sept. 13, at
9 p.m., at the Diplomat Hotel. There will be dancing and live band. For
more information call Sharon Silver 385-1255.
Jewish feminist group is seeking new members. The group meets
every three weeks for discussion, study, and support. For informa-
tion call 253-7400 or 661-8549 (day only).
The Southeastern Florida Holocaust Memorial Center is asking sur-
vivors, liberators, and protectors of the Nazi Holocaust to call the
center for further information on how they may share their testimony.
Typists who are willing to transcribe these testimonies are urgently
needed. If interested, call 940-5690.
New offices of the Florida Region of the American Committee for
the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel are now located at the
Skylake State Bank Building, 1550 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive, Suite
405, North Miami Beach. The new number is 940-7377.
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization is seeking volunteers to serve as
advisors to local teen chapters. You must be at least 21 years old and
enjoy working with youth. For more information call 253-7400.
Quantum Singles is sponsoring a day workshop entitled "How To
Attract And Connect With The Opposite Sex." Sharon Silver, M.S.
Ed., Lifestyle Educator will conduct the workshop on Saturday, Oct.
5 at 10 a.m., in the Holiday Inn Airport Lakes, Miami. For details call
Lynne at 385-4321.
Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Hadassah Chapters
Hadassah members in Bicentennial Park
await the signal to release their helium
balloons together with hundreds let off from
atop One Biscayne Tower in downtown Miami
last Sunday at the Dade County kick-off of
Hadassah's statewide "2002" membership
campaign. Israel Consul General Yehoshua
Trigor and Metro Mayor Stephen P. Clark
joined the local celebration, which coincided
with similar events in cities across Florida,
all emphasizing the campaign's theme, "The
Sky is the Limit!"
Forte Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will hold the next
meeting on Monday, Sept. 9, at
1200 West Avenue Auditorium at
1 p.m. The program will feature
Orit Simhoni, Occupational
[ Therapist.
The Hannah Senesch Chapter of
Hadassah will hold their first lun-
cheon meeting at noon, Tuesday,
| Sept. 10, at the Shelbome Hotel.
The Aliyah Chapter of
Hadassah will hold the first
meeting of the year Tuesday,
Sept. 10, at 7:45 p.m. at Temple
Israel South, A fashion show wiU
be featured. Cheese and desserts
will be served.
The Bay Harbor Chapter of
Hadassah has moved their
meeting place to Bay Harbor
Islands Town Hall.
The next meeting will be held
Monday, Sept. 9 at noon, in the
Terrace Council Chambers.
The Menorah Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its first open
meeting of the season, on Mon-
day, Sept. 9, at 12:30 p.m. at Tem-
ple Israel, 99th and Kendall Drive.
Refreshments will be served and
members and friends are invited.
The new officers will be introduc-
ed via a musical skit written and
directed by Donna Linden, and
performed by the Menorah
Minstrels. President, Mrs. Eve
Zinner is serving for the third con-
secutive term.
membership is open and Program
Vice President Paula Sernaker
said refreshments will be served.
The Henrietta Szold Chapter of
Hadassah, Miami Beach, will hold
their regular meeting on Monday,
September 9, at 1 p.m. at the
Hadassah Building.
Hatikvah Chapter of Hadassah
will have its first meeting of the
year on September 12. "Focus on
Fashion" will be the program
theme and members will model
fashions. The meeting starts at
7:30 p.m. at Nob Hill West on
Kendall Drive.
Ko'ach, Chapter, Miami Beach
Region of Hadassah, formed
specifically for the younger career
woman, will meet Monday even-
ing, September 9 at 8 p.m. in the
Four Freedoms House, according
to President Jackie Hechter.
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig, director
of the Talmudic University of
^florida, will be guest speaker.
Toby Celnik, membership vice
president, announced that
Southgate Chapter of Hadassah
will hold the first regular meeting
of the season on Monday, Sept. 9,
at 1 p.m. in the Terrace Room.
The program will include a
candlelighting ceremony and a
talk on the High Holy Days.
Rabbi Dov Bidnick, Associate
Director for the American Com-
mittee for Shaare Zedek Hospital
in Jerusalem, will be the guest
speaker at the next general
meeting of the Naomi Chapter of
Hadassah. He will speak on
Jewish Traditions.
The meeting will be held on
Monday, Sept. 9, at the Tamarind
Apartments Clubhouse, North
Kendall Drive at 8 p.m.
Yeshiva U.
Expands
Seminar Series
The 1985-1986 "Issues of our
Times" seminar series, sponsored
by Yeshiva University, announces
the program will be expanded to
the Broward and Palm Beach
County areas.
Rabbi Warren Kasztl, the newly
appointed field director for the
Max Stern Division of Communal
Services, explains, "This is one of
many services Yeshiva University
will be offering the Broward and
Palm Beach county areas. The
"Issues of our Times" seminar
series begins its fourth year. The
lectures will take place the first
Tuesday of each month, starting
in November at Congregation An-
shei Emuna, Delray Beach.
RETIREMENT...
NOT ALWAYS AS WE EXPECTED IT TO
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If you, or someone you know needs help,
call and talk with a mental health profes-
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all natural and are said to help
stimulate circulation. A
researcher in Israel has report-
ed that minerals from the Dead
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1985
Names in News
Annenberg Named First Chairman
Walter H. Annenberg has been
named first chairman of the new
Moses Aaron Dropsie Research
Institute in Near Eastern and
Judaic Studies, it is anounced by
the president of Dropsie College.
Dr. David M. Goldenberg.
Board of Trustees of Dropsie
College in May voted unanimously
to chart a new direction for the
College which has won an interna-
tional reputation for its high level
of scholarship.
Annenberg, who has been
honorary chairman of the Dropsie
College Board, was elected to a
three-year term as chairman of
the board of the new institute.
Annenberg founded the An-
nenberg School of Communica-
tions and developed its educa-
tional programs at the University
of Pennsylvania in 1959 and at the
University of Southern California
in 1971.
Former U.S. Ambassador to
Israel, Samuel W. Lewis, has
been appointed chairman of the
Board of Overseers of the Harry
S. Truman Research Institute for
the Advancement of Peace at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
it is announced by Fred S. Lafer,
president of the American
Friends of the Hebrew
University.
Lewis, who was awarded an
honorary PhD degree at the
Hebrew University in June,
retired this year after 31 years
with the U.S. Foreign Service and
is now Diplomat in Residence at
the Foreign Policy Institute of the
Johns Hopkins University's
School of Advanced International
Studies in Washington.
At the time of his retirement,
Lewis was the dean of the
diplomatic corps in Israel, having
served eight years as U.S.
Ambassador.
Lewis succeeds Ambassador
Max M. Kampelman, head of the
U.S. Delegation on Arms Control
Negotiations, as chairman of the
Institute.
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions has announced the appoint-
ment of George A. Kessler to its
staff as associate director of the
Endowment Development
Department.
The Council, located in New
York City, is the national
organization serving all the
Jewish Federations of North
America through consultation,
program planning and assistance
in all the primary activities in
which Federations are involved.
Neal Myerberg, director of the
Council's Endowment Develop-
ment Department, said that
Kessler "brings a wealth of
knowledge and experience in the
field of endowment development
to the Council." During the last
nine years, he was executive vice
chairman of the Associated
Jewish Charities of Baltimore's
Legacy and Endowment Fund
which is chaired by Louis J. Fox.
B'nai B'rith Yout* Organization
has named televis- n and film star
Leonard Nimoy the recipient of
its 1985 Sam Beber AZA
Distinguished Alumnus Award.
Nimoy is an AZA alumnus.
The award, named in honor of
the founder of AZA, the male
component of BBYO, is given an-
nually to the alumnus who has
achieved national stature and
made "a significant national con-
tribution" to the Jewish communi-
ty, the general community, or his
chosen profession.
The award was presented to
Nimoy during the organization's
international convention Aug.
15-21 at the B'nai B'rith Perlman
Camp in Starlight, Pa.
Two $2,000 scholarships have
been awarded through the
auspices of the American Zionist
Youth Foundation, it is announc-
ed by Eli Zborowski, chairman.
Scott Copelmnd of Hull, Mass.,
who will spend his junior year at
Hebrew University in Jerusalem,
has been awarded the Charlotte
Jacobson Israel Scholarship nam-
ed in honor of the American
Zionist leader who now serves as
president of the Jewish National
Fund.
The second award will be given
in the name of the American
Association for Ethiopian Jews,
headquartered in Chicago. The
Recipient of the award is Joan
Chase of Rutland. Vt.
A delegation representing
Israel's Disabled War Veterans
presented Maestro Leonard
Bernstein with a gilded statuette
on Sunday in Tel Aviv to mark the
67th birthday of the noted com-
poser and conductor.
The ceremony took place during
the final rehearsal of the Israel
Philharmonic Orchestra prior to a
four-week world tour conducted
by Bernstein, which will take the
IPO to West Germany, Japan and
the United States.
Jewish and black groups in 18
major cities are developing a
growing number of cooperative
community programs in a
grassroots movement to
strengthen black*-Jewish ties and
improve social and economic con-
ditions, it was reported this week.
Rabbi Alexander M.
Schindler, president of the Union
of American Hebrew Congrega-
tions, said that Reform
synagogues had launched more
than 80 separate projects in
cooperation with black community
and church groups across the
country.
These programs served as
models at a meeting in
Washington last May attended by
18 pairs of Jewish and black
leaders from 18 cities with na-
tional leaders of the UAHC and
the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People,
including Rabbi Schindler and
Benjamin Hooks, NAACP
president.
The conference was sponsored
by the Kivie Kaplan Institute of
Washington, D.C., which is
operated jointly by the UAHC and
the NAACP.
Dr. Lucjan Dobroazrcki,
historian of Jewish life in Poland
before and during the Holocaust,
has been named to hold the Eli
and Diana Zborowski Professorial
Chair in Interdisciplinary
Holocaust Studies at Yeshiva
University during the 1985-86
academic year.
The Chair is named for the
Forest Hills, N.Y., couple who are
its patrons. The Chair is part of a
multi-phased endeavor at the
University, which also includes
graduate and undergraduate
courses on the Holocaust cor-
relating the perspectives of a
variety of disciplines.
Dr. Dobroszycki will offer five
seminars to faculty members,
students and staff members of the
University during the fall
semester. During the 1986 spring
semester, he will teach a course on
the Holocaust for undergraduate
and graduate students.
Dr. Ian Froman, co-founder
and executive director of the
Israel Tennis Centers Associa-
tion, is the winner of this year's
Cappy Award at the Jewish
Sports Hall of Fame annual induc-
tion ceremonies held at the
Hebrew University of Jerusalem's
Mount Scopus campus.
The award, presented for
outstanding contributions to
sports and physical fitness, is
named for the late Cappy
Greenspan of Los Angeles, who
along with her husband. Bud
Greenspan, was a noted producer
of sports documentary films.
Last year's winner of the award
the first time it was awarded
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was Dr. Hillel Ruakin, head of
the Howard and Mary Edith
Cosell Center for Physical Educa-
tion at the Hebrew University,
who was master of ceremonies at
this year's induction event.
Syracuse, N.Y. business and
community leader Daniel A. Her-
mann, has been named the 10th
annual Torch of Learning Award
recipient of the Pharmaceutical
Division of the American Friends
of the Hebrew University.
Hermann will receive the award
at a tribute dinner on Sept. 12, in
the Grand Ballroom of the New
York Hilton.
Jody Powell, who was White
House Press Secretary during the
Carter Administration, will
deliver the evening's keynote
address.
Art Simon
Guest Speaker
Art Simon, of the Florida House
of Representatives will be the
guest speaker at the Quarterly
Membership Meeting of the Dade
County Medical Association Tues-
day, at North Shore Medical
Center at 6 p.m.
Rep. Simon, the author of the
recently passed Malpractice
Legislation will speak on "Medical
Malpractice."
Congressman Bill Green (R.,
N. Y.) will be presented with the
American ORT Federation
Community Achievement
Award at an AOF testimonial
dinner set for Oct. 15 at the
Sheraton Centre in New York.
Funds raised at the dinner will
establish the Congressman BUI
Green ORT Scholarship Fund,
which will provide assistance
to ORT students around the
world.
KBPA Announces 1985-86 Officers
The Kendall Business and Pro- takin over treasurer.
fessional Association announced
officers for the ensuing year are:
Roy Granoff, president; Ms. Dee
Anna Dowdle, vice president; Ms.
Terry Packar, secretary; with out-
going president Edward Anchel,
The board of directors includes:
Howard Aberman, Mel Baron,
Ms. G. Jodie Facciolo, Paul Her-
zog, Bryan Nemeroff, and Harry
Roisman.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
cordially invites the community to our
SELICHOT SERVICE
Saturday, September 7th, 11:30 p.m.
7400 S.W. 120th Street
Come and be inspired by the words and magnificent
music of our sacred Liturgy. Services conducted by
Rabbi David Auerbach, Cantor Howard Bender and the
choir under the direction of Helen Benyunes.
Membership inquiries invited ph. 238-2601.
BETH TORAH
CONGREGATION
WELCOMES YOUR APPLICATION FOR TIC MI SCHOOL YEAR
GHERMAN-RANCE EARLY CHILDHOOD CENTER
"Bright Beginnings' 1 month-2 yrs. 2 4 3 Year OW Classes
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For more information, call Beth Torah Congregation, 1051
SSrMaaTfi B^cn "vard. North Miami Beach, Florida
7-7528. Open House Sun., Aug. 25,10 a.m.-noon.


Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
- '
Wedding
w KLEIMANWOLF
Karen Joy Kleiman, daughter of Judith and
Elliot Kleiman of Hollywood, became the bride of
Andre Eric Wolf, son of Mr. and Mrs. Morton Wolf
of Bent Tree, Georgia, on August 3. Rabbi Robert
Frazin officiated the ceremony. The ceremony and
reception were held at the Doral Hotel on the
Ocean.
Attending the bride was Maid of Honor, Debi
Kronengold. Bridesmaids were Letty Evans,
sister of the groom, Amy Cherry, Julie Silver and
Kimberley Concors. Attending to the guest book
were cousins Carolyn Scher and Denise Shouger.
Morton Wolf, father of the groom, served as best
man, with M. Scott Kleiman, brother of the bride,
Kenneth Evans, brother-in-law of the groom, Ar-
thur Criden and Stephen Goodloe serving as
ushers.
The bride wore a floor length Candelight Cole
gown with high neck and long sleeves made of
alancon lace bodice with a sheer sweetheart yolk.
The bodice was reembroidered pearls and irides-
cent sequins. A full silk taffetta skirt trimed with
alancon lace applique, bordered with alancon lace
on the hem of the skirt and cathedral train.
The bride was entertained at parties hostessed
by cousins Mrs. Howard Katzen (Barbara) Mrs
Norton Pallot (Gloria) and Mrs. I. Ronald Pallot
(Gloria). Parties were also given by Mrs. Marcea
Levin, Mrs. Sandra Kronengold, Mrs. Phyllis
Grand Mrs. Carole Cherry, Mrs. Nan Schwart-
zenfeld, Mrs. Sharon Moskowitz, Mrs. Sassi
Feltman and Mrs. Lynn Berkowitz.
Mrs. Andre Wolf
The groom's parents hosted a pre-nuptial dinner
at the Doral Country Club for the wedding party
and the out-of-town guests.
The bride is a graduate of the University of
Florida with a degree in Business Administration
and is a member of Alpha Epsilon Phi.
The groom is a graduate of the University of
Florida, member of Pi Lambda Phi and is currently
attending Mercer University School of Law.
The couple will reside in Macon, Georgia while
the groom completes law school following a honey-
moon in St. Thomas.
Community Corner
Lori Freedline Daoud has been elected president of the Miami
Beach Ladies of Elks Lodge 1601. She is a former police officer of
the City of Miami Beach, and is secretary of the Police Athletic
League.
ORT of Greater Miami Men's Chapter will hold a general
meeting on Sept. 10, at 1 .p.m. in the new auditorium of Morton
Towers.
Pvt. David B. Moss, son of James C. and Margaret A. Moss,
Miami, has participated in a special task force deployment to the
U.S. Military Academy, West Point, N.Y.
Erick C. Gulke, son of Paul H. and Meiling Gulke, Bay Har
bor Island, has completed training in fundamental military skills
at the Army ROTC basic camp at Fort Knox, Ky.
The I. R. Goodman Chapter of Hadassah will hold its first
meeting of the Hadassah New Year on Sunday, Sept. 8, at 1 p.m.
at the Hadassah Region Office, 541 Lincoln Road.
Dr. Myron T. Ginsberg, director of the Cerebral Vascular
Disease Research Center of the University of Miami School of
Medicine, was awarded a Jacob Javits Neuroscience Investigator
Award. These awards were established by Congress to honor
Senator Javits.
Rabbi Dr. David Raab,
spiritual leader of Temple
King Solomon, will resume ser-
8 ON Saturday, when he will
preach on "I Need A Rest
From My Vacation." Rabbi
Raab has just returned from
on extensive trip.
Sho8hanah Raab, wife of Rabbi
Dr. David Raab, has been ap-
-*pointed as Cantor of Temple
King Solomon for the High
llolydays and the entire year,
according to an announcement
by President of the Congrega-
tion, Morris Klotz. This is the
first time in the history of the
United States to have a
husband-wife, Rabbi-Cantor
combination.
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Apricot Coffee Cake.... each $169
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Plain or Seeded
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Aug. 29 thru Sept. 4,1985
SttM"
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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, Auguat 30, 1985
Local Synagogues To Participate In
Israel Bond High Holy Day Appeal
In a show of support for the
State of Israel, many synagogues
in the Greater Miami area will
take part in a massive nationwide
High Holy Days Appeal effort by
more than 1,100 congregations in
the U.S. and Canada to help
mobilize funds to assist Israel
overcome its current economic
crisis. The High Holy Days Appeal
will also help provide jobs in
development towns and raise
Research and Development funds
for high technology industi ies.
Participating congregations in
the Miami community include:
Adath Yeshurun, Bet Breira,
Beth Am, Bet Moshe, Beth
Sholom, Beth Torah, Temple
Emanu-El, Temple Israel, Temple
Judea, Temple Menorah, Temple
Ner Tamid, Temple Sinai, Hebrew
Academy and the Aventura
Jewish Center.
The theme of this year's Appeal,
"If not now, when?", taken from
Rabbi Hillel, dramatizes the
urgency of providing loan funds in
this year of the economic crisis.
"Our goal is to obtain a Bond
purchase from every family in
every participating congregation
in this community," said Philip T.
Warren, general campaign chair-
man for the Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization.
"Unemployment is rising in
Israel, especially in the develop-
ment towns. The people of Israel
are making great sacrifices.
Travel is restricted; wages for
government jobs have been
frozen; the value added tax has
been increased, as have rents for
tenants in public housing.
"In the face of this grim picture,
every friend of Israel is called on
to help the nation achieve
economic recovery and return on
the road to progress," added
Warren.
Congress Approves a Commiss ion to
Protect Landmarks In East Europe
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Congress has approved
legislation creating a com-
mission to protect
cemeteries and other land-
marks in Eastern Europe
which are associated with
the religious or ethnic
heritage of American
citizens.
The measure was proposed by
Rep. Stephen Solarz (D., N.Y.), a
member of the United States
Holocaust Memorial Council, and
introduced in the Senate by Sen.
Edward Kennedy (D., Mass.).
"If we permit the decay and
deterioration of the years or
destruction wrought by hostile
and uncaring governments to
undermine the cemeteries,
monuments, or historic buildings
associated with the foreign
heritage of U.S. citizens, all of us
will lose an important part of our
root," Solarz told the House.
SOLARZ WAS also a member
of the Council's predecessor
group, the U.S. Holocaust Com-
mission, which recommended
measures to protect the
cemeteries after it heard a plea
from Rabbi Zvi Kestenbaum of
Brooklyn, New York.
"The Commission found that
many cemeteries in Eastern and
Central Europe were being
destroyed by weather and decay
or by hostile actions," Solarz said.
"Without vigorous action by our
government we risk losing a vital
part of our heritage."
Solarz added that "for nearly 50
years the sacred grave site of our
ancestors have been abused, ig-
nored, vandalized and often
destroyed." He noted that in
Poland, for example, the last re-
maining wall of the Warsaw Ghet-
to was torn down in the
mid-1970's.
BEFORE World War II there
were 800 Jewish cemeteries
there, of which only 434 remain,
only 22 of them in decent condi-
tion. Conditions are the same in
other Eastern Bloc countries.
"Cemeteries, monuments and
historic buildings are often the
last visible reminders of the com-
munities our emigrant ancestors
left behind," Solarz added.
The Commission will be made
up of 21 members, seven ap-
pointed by the President and
seven each from the Senate and
House. The Commission's first
task would be to publish a list of
landmarks abroad associated with
the heritage of U.S. citizens.
It would then have the State
Department seek assurances from
the governments where these are
located that they will be preserved
and protected. The Commission
will also sponsor and support
demonstration projects to
preserve and protect the
landmarks.
Rabbi Yaakov G. Rosenberg (left), vice chancellor of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of America, award. David Hermelin, na-
tional chairman for State of Israel Bonds, a certificate of
membership in the Seminary's Chancellor's Council at a recent
Centennial fund-raising meeting at the home of Milton and Dawn
Gilman of Detroit, Mich. Chancellor's Council is a nationwide
honor society of men and women who share a special devotion to
the Seminary.
Three Famous Jews Have Become
The Issue of A Public Controversy
Argentine Gov't. is Taking Steps to
Eradicate Terrorism, Social Injustice
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) -
Using the expression "never
again" so familiar to Jews, Argen-
tina's Undersecretary of Human
Rights, Dr. Eduardo Rabossi,
assured B'nai B'rith that his
government is taking painstaking
steps to "eradicate institutional
instability, violence, terrorism
and social injustice."
At a session of the International
Council of B'nai B'rith (ICBB),
Rabossi said he saw "no reason
for the President or any public of-
ficial to belong to a specific
group." Presently Argentina's
Constitution requires the Presi-
dent to be a Roman Catholic, thus
barring Argentine Jews, Pro-
testants and others from full
citizenship.
THOUGH THE human rights
secretary stopped short of
spearheading the drive for
reform, he indicated personal
sympathy and noted that ad-
vocacy was building for change.
Rabossi described the difficult
legislative efforts to "reject state
terror which affects the social
morale of the country." The steps
Lawmakers Urge Reagan To Publicly
Affirm His Support For The OSI
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
President Reagan has been urged
by 92 members of the House of
Representatives to publicly affirm
his support for the activities of the
Justice Department's Office of
Special Investigations (OSI), the
unit responsible with tracking
down and litigating against alleg-
ed Nazi war criminals in the
United States.
In urging the President to
"publicly express your support"
of the OSI, the letters signed by
79 Democrats and 13 Republican
Congressmen, said, "We are con-
fident that you wouW agree that
those who perpetrated crimes
against the Jews and other vic-
tims of Nazism should not be af-
forded the privilege of residence
in our country. That is why we so
emphatically support the work of
the Office of Special
Investigations."
The Congressional letter was in-
itiated by Rep. Gary Ackerman
(D., N.Y.) and co-signed by 91 of
his colleagues in response to a
growing campaign directed
against the OSI, established in
1979. The campaign has involved
some Eastern European emigre
groups that have charged, among
other claims, that the OSI col-
laborates with the Soviet Union's
KGB, according to Ackerman.
taken include abrogating the
amnesty of former military rulers
who are now on trial for massive
human rights infringement and
crimes and the strengthening of
penalties for advocating anti-
Semitism and other forms of
bigotry.
Stating that in a democracy free
speech is a fundamental matter,
he stressed that the government
is behind the protection of the
religious and cultural rights of all
Argentines. In this vein, he sug-
gested that the job of the govern-
ment is to build the people's con-
fidence in using democratic in-
stitutions to redress their
grievances.
RABOSSI, a philosophy pro-
fessor by profession, spelled out
the process of research, judicial
and legislative action necessary to
construct a system of rule of law
vital to democracy.
"Torture is a crime that must be
treated like murder," said
Rabossi, indicating that the
documentation of the crimes
against those who disappeared
has been published by the Na-
tional Commission on the Disap-
peared in a volume entitled
"Never Again," which has sold
more than 220,000 copies in
Argentina. The work is scheduled
for publication abroad.
B'nai B'rith complimented his
government for the strong stand
it took against extremism by
working against the Zionism-
equals-racism language that was
expunged from the final document
of the Nairobi women's con-
ference. That language would
have perpetuated a lie, stimulated
anti-Semitism and denied the
Jews the right to an independent
state.
THE ICBB, chaired by Philip
Lax, is holding executive commit-
tee sessions in Buenos Aires with
leaders from North America,
South America and Europe.
Gerald Kraft, president of B'nai
B'rith, who visited South Africa,
Brazil and Uruguay, meeting with
heads of state, is also attending.
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Three
famous Jews, all of whom
have been dead for years,
have become the center of a
public controversy. The
French Minister for Culture
has commissioned statues of
Leon Blum, Pierre Mendes-
France and Alfred Dreyfus
but has not yet found what
he believes to be suitable
sites to erect them.
rhe Minister, Jack Lang, charges
the Mayor of Paris with obstruc-
tion, but the Mayor, Jacques
Chirac, says his opposition to the
chosen enplacements is due strict-
ly to technical and municipal
reasons.
THE STATUE of Blum, who
served twice as French Prime
Minister, first as head of the
Popular Front before World War
II and again in 1946, was commis-
sioned last year and is now ready.
Lang had planned to have it set in
the Leon Blum Square, close to
the Place de la Republique, which
is a traditional Jewish area.
Chirac, who is also one of the
main Gaullist contenders for the
presidency, has barred this plan.
The Paris City Hall says that the
entire square is currently being
redesigned in view of massive
traffic and several building sites
in the area. The renovation will be
finished in 1986, according to the
city spokesman, when the statue
could be erected.
Socialist political sources quoted
by the local press say Chirac does
not want the statue of a Socialist
leader, and one still popular with
the masses, on the eve of next
year's legislative elections. The
site chosen by Lang is right across
the city's 11th District Town Hall,
which is headed by a Gaullist
mayor close to Chirac. The 10-feet
high bronze statue is already on
display on a temporary location in
the gardens of the Louvre
Museum of National Art.
ANOTHER controversial
statue is that dedicated to
Premier Pierre Mendes-France.
Lang wants it erected on a central
Paris Avenue, Chirac has not yet
decided where and when the
statue will be set. Mendes-France
was also a Socialist and the cur-
rent administration of President
Francois Mitterrand often refers
to him as a spiritual and intellec-
tual guide. The Gaullist and cen-
trist opposition fears that a statue
dedicated to him would eventually
benefit the Socialist coalition.
The statue of a third Jew, that
of Capt. Alfred Dreyfus, who was
accused of high treason and
rehabilitated nearly a century
ago, is the subject of a split bet-
ween Lang and his fellow Defense
Minister Charles Hernu. Lang
wants the statue erected within
the French military academy,
L'ecole Militaire, while Hernu
favors the site of the former Ecole
Polytechnique, an engineering
school Dreyfus attended.
The usually reliable weekly, Le
Canard Enchaine, quoted Hernu
as having told his aides that it
would be unwise "to put before
the army's eyes the symbol of its
past mistake."
THE MITTERRAND Ad-
ministration has commissioned
some 200 statues and many of
these have not yet found a proper
site. The City Hall is reportedly
reluctant to allocate a site along
one of Paris' main avenues to poet
Aragon, a life-long member of the
French Communist Party, or to
philosopher Jean Paul Sartre, the
symbol in France of anti-
establishment thinking.
Socialist circles point out that
right wing writers or politicians,
honored by the government, have
all found choice spots: former
President Georges Pompidou on
the City's Central Avenue des
Champs Elysees, and former
Foreign Minister Robert
Schumann in an elegant residen-
tial district.
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Friday, August 30, 1985/THe Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
xopeis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. thou goest forth to battle and seest among the cap-
nan of goodly form and wouldest take her to thee to
(Deuteronomy 21.10-11).
KI TETZE
JE "When thou goest forth to battle against thine
and the Lord thy God delivereth them into thy hands,
carriest them away captive, and seest among the cap-
iroman of goodly form, and thou .. wouldest take her to
rife; then thou shalt bring her home to thy house And
i if thou have no delight in her, then thou shalt let her go
[she will; but thou shalt not sell her at all for money"
ny 21.10-14). "If a man have a stubborn and rebellious
sill the men of his city shall stone him with stones, that he
tteronomy 21.18-2). The body of a hanged man "shall not
ill night upon the tree, but thou shalt surely bury him the
for he that is hanged is a reproach unto God; that thou
It thy land" (Deuteronomy 21.2S). "Thou shalt not see thy
p ox or his seep driven away, and hide thyself from them;
Halt surely bring them back unto thy brother"
nomy 22.1). "Thou shalt not take the dam with the young;
Jt in any wise let the dam go, but the young thou mayest
thyself (Deuteronomy 22.6-7). "When thou buildest a
*, then thou shalt make a parapet for thy roof, that thou
t blood upon thy house, 'if any man fall from thence"
iy 22.8). "Thou shalt not plough with an ox and an ass
Thou shalt not wear a mingled stuff, wool and linen
(Deuteronomy 22.10-11). The man who "lays wanton
f" against his wife shall be chastised by the elders of the ci-
fbastard shall not enter into the assembly of the Lord"
onomy 2S.S). "If brethren dwell together, and one of them
have no child, the wife of the dead shall not be married
linto one not of his kin: her husband's brother shall go in
p, and take her to him to wife, and perform the duty of a
fi brother unto her. And it shall be, that the first-born
i beareth shall succeed in the name of his brother that is
Weuteronomy 25.5-6). "An Ammonite or a Moabite shall
>r into the assembly of the Lord;. because they met you
j bread and with water in the way, when ye came forth out
[>t: and because they hired against thee Balaam the son of
jm Pethor of Aram-na haraim, to curse thee Thou
at seek their peace nor their prosperity all thy days
. Thou shalt not abhor an Edomite, for he is thy brother,
lit not abhor an Egyptian, because thou wast a stranger in
\. The children of the third generation that are born unto
ay enter into the assembly of the Lord" (Deuteronomy
[Finally, the portion ends with a reminder of eternal enmi-
Ist a dread foe: "Remember what Amaleh did unto thee by
as ye came forth out of Egypt" (Deuteronomy 25.17).
counting ol the Weakly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
he Graphic History of tht Jewish Htrltago," edited by P. Wollman
J*1S, published by Shengold. Tha volume is available at 75 Maiden
|ew York, N.V. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
I the volume.)
. v.rt
Pioneer Women/Na'amat
portance of the Upcom-
Bloly Days." will be the
I guest speaker. Rabbi
Jelber at the Sunday,
loon meeting of the Kin-
Jhapter of Pioneer
la'amat to be held at
ler Tamid.
luski, recitationist, will
jin Yiddish.
pig to Rita Adoff. presi-
tibers and guests are en-
Ito attend.
i of officers for the
sason will take place at
|esday, Sept. 4 meeting
Bada Chapter of Pioneer
la'amat. The 12:30 p.m.
twill take place in the
fices, 605 Lincoln Road.
Margot Bergthal. treasurer of
the South Florida Council of the
organization, will install the
officers.
Bertha Liebniann, president of
Masada. said refreshments will be
served and the session is free and
open to the general public. She
will discuss the High Holy Days
which begin Sept. 15.
"Safetalk," a slide presentation
by Florida Power and light, will
highlight the Tuesday, Sept. 3,
noon meeting of the liana Chapter
of Pioneer Women/Na'amat to
take place in the auditorium of the
Winston Tower 600, Sunny Isles.
Lillian Hoffman, president of li-
ana, said a mini-lunch will be
served.
j'emple Zion Israelite Center
jpoints Education Director
M. Exelbert, president
Zion Israelite Center,
I the appointment of M.
|verman, as full-time
j director.
lilverman will serve as
| of religious schools and
ally responsible for all
ation programming, in-
pung singles and couples
ning and singles of all
amming.
|a master of Hebrew Let-
College of Jewish
i served on faculty and
Segregations in Chicago,
puver. His most recent,
Jition was educational
n>r the religious schools
T)avid, prior to joining
Eion Israelite Center's
nal staff.
M. Kaupi-Silverman
Gordon
Bar Mitzvah
JASON GORDON
Jason Todd Gordon, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Barry Gordon (Ellen)
will be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Monday, September 2
at Temple Emanu-El.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman will
officiate.
Jason has been on Rabbi's
Honor Roll and Derech Eretz
many times. He is sales manager
for the Yearbook. Jason will be
"Bal Korah" this year helping to
prepare other students for
Bar/Bat Mitzvah. He is a member
of Kadima.
Special guests include great
grandmothers, Jenny Painin and
Tillie Goodman; grandparents,
Phil and Mindy Silverman and
many relatives from out of town.
A reception will be held in the
Friedland Ballroom.
DAVID RESNICK
David Resnick, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Jimmy Resnick (Lidia), will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah Saturday August 31 at
Temple Emanu-El.
Dr. Irving Lehrman will
officiate.
David is a student at Hebrew
Academy where he is entering the
eighth grade. His activities in-
clude football and tennis and he
was "Best All Around Camper" at
Camp Blue Ridge.
Special guest include Mr. and
Mrs. Jacobo Litwak, great grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Abe
Resnick, grandparents and Mr.
and Mrs. Peisa Rok,
grandparent.--.
A reception will be held at Tem-
ple Emanu-El.
MITCHELL ROSS
Mitchell Ross, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Howard Ross will be called to
the pulpit as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at Temple Sinai.
Shekel To Undergo
Technical Change
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Cabinet has acccepted a proposal
to introduce a technical change in
the value of the Shekel by remov-
ing the last three zeros from the
face value of the currency. The ex-
change rate last weekend was
1,480 Shekels to the U.S. dollar.
New notes and coins went into
circulation on Wednesday. In an
interim period until January 1,
both the old and new Shekels will
be valid in the market.
Finance Minister Yitzhak Modal
said at a press conference that the
purpose of the change was purely
technical. He said that as a result
of inflation, calculations have
become too complicated. The new
Shekel would allow for simplifying
calculations in the purchase of
goods, homes, cars and other com-
modities which now have price
tags with six or seven digits.
Five years ago the Shekel was
introduced in a similar way, by
removing a zero of the original
Israeli pound. The law authorizing
the issue of the new Shekel went
before the Knesset for approval
on Tuesday.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:26 p.m.
ADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Lai* Frl. Service* 0:15 p.m.
Dally Minyan 7:30 a.m. and 8.30 p.m
Sat. 8:30 am
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214 _,
Barry J. Konovllch, Rabbi ftt)
Moshe Butyn, Cantor VW.''
Sergio Grobler. President
Sholem Epelbaum, President,
Religious Committee
Shabbat Sarvica* 8 30 a m Salmon 10 30
Daily Minyan
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 667-6667
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Frl av*. 8:15 p.m. Rabbi Jamas L. Simon
will spsak on lha mama "It A Wild. Wild
World.1'Sat. Morn 11:15 .m Rabbi Harbor!
M. Baumgard will apaak on th* thama "Saxual
Discipline." Bat Mltnah Ellaaa Stslnbsrg.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL ,%*.
1701 Washington Avenue \ W)
Miami Beach "*
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Bergar
Yehuda Shlfman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabbat Sanies 8 00 ajn
Tample Family Sanrlca
Saturday aarvlc* 9:00 a.m.
Or. Inring Lahrman. Rabbi will prsack) an Mm
wsskly portion ol lha Slbla
Sat.: bar Mltnah David Raanlck. Ma*. Bar
Mitzvah Jason Todd Gordon
Dally ssrvicsa In th* Blank Chaps! st
a.m. and 7 p m
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schift
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue ^
Dr. Sol Landau, ;' fit)
Rabbi Emeritus v*t
Rev. Milton Freeman,
Ritual Director
Frl. ava. 5:30 In ths Cnapai.
Sat. fcOB am Kldduah following ssrvlsss.
M*nchah*t7:3Sp.m
Sun. 1:00 a.m. 8 5:30 pm
Mon. t Th ma 7 30 a m a 5 30 p.m
Iuaa.. Wad. Frl. 7:4* a.m. a 5:10 p.m.
TEMPLE BETH-EL OF NORTH BAY
VILLAGE (Conservative)
7800 Hlapanola Ava., conveniently
located just oft 79 St. Cswy.
Rabbi Marvin Rom
Cantor Danny Tadmore
Friday asrvlcsa 8 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Piont Asrcrm Conoragalion
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D. Perlrrwrter
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Associate Cantor Rachelle F. ntstson
Executive Director Philip S. Goldln
Director of Education
And Programming Jack L. Sparks
Frl. ava. 8 00 p.m. Downtown: Or. Jack L.
Sparka, Cantor Jacob G. Bornataln. KsndaM:
Rabbi Rsx 0. Psrtmstsr. Canter
Rachalia Nalson.
BETH KODESH
Conservative
1101S.W.12AVS. 858-6334
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krlssel
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
Sllchoa Midnight Ssrvlcs Saturday. *
Sspt. 7 Bullat Suppsr 11:15 p.m.
tv)
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Isrsal Jacobs, Rabbi ._.
Moshe Friedler, Cantor ( JBS'i
Dr. Joseph A. GorUnkel, VX'
Rabbi Emeritus
Irving Jaret, Executive Director
Friday arvles 7 p.m
Saturday 845 a.m. ssrvlcs
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jaffarson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuds Melber
Cantor NiSSim Benyamini
Daily Minyan
Sabbath ssrvlcs* 8 15 a.m.
A Spaciai rata for msmbsrship Including
_______tickala loi lha High HolyDays_______
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120th Street _
238 2601
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Meisels
Friday Evsnlngat 800a m
Saturday Morning al 930 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ava. 41st St 538-7231
DR. LEON KRONISH, Liberal
HARRY JOLT, AUXILIARY RABBI
PAUL D. CAPIAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR OAV1D CONV1SER
Friday 8i5pm Rabbi Harry Jolt sstmon
Saturday 10:45 S.m.
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5857
Michael B. Elsenstat, Rabbi
, Friday asrvlcsa 8:15 p.m. !
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9778
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Saturday Ssrvicsa 9:30 a.m.
High Holyday tlcksts available
Ssllchos Ssrvlcs*. Sspt. 7th 9:00 p.m.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ^-
Cantor Murray Yavneh (
Morning ssrvicsa 8 am
Friday lata avaning sarvice
8:15 p m
Saturday 9 a m end 7 45 p.m
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866-8345
7902 Cariyle Ave., 866-9833
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz conssnatim
Cantor Edward Klein
Dslly istvic*s 8 a m and 6:30 pm
Saturday aarvlca* 8:45 am
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
a*^saa""""
SHAARiTEFILLAH OF KENlMyLCj
S.W. 154 Ave. 8, 75 St., 382-334S I
Rabbi Warren KasztI Moosm Csatsatv
Friday ssrvlcs* 7 15 p.m. &!*
Saturday 9 30 am and 20 mini
bslors undown
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Upschltz. Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg, Asat. Rabbi
Zvee Aronl. Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dslly ssrvicsa 7:30 a.m.. 5:30 p.m. /SIN
Saturday 8:25 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. |B|
Sal. Bar Mltnah ol Ronald Davlclovic Vj '
Sunday a a.m., 5:30 p.m.
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ava.
Dow Rozencwalg. Rabbi
TEMPL6SINAI 18801 NEi
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 83
Julian i. Cook, Associate Rat
Irving Shtilkes, Cantor
Barbaras. Ramsay. Admlnist
Ssrvicsa Friday 7:30 p.m.
Saturday *srvlcsa 10:30 s.m.
^TaaaaBBBaBBBaBaBBBBBl
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CE(
8000 Miller Dr Conser
271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi {
Benjamin Adler, Cantor
David Roeenthal, Auxiliary Cantor

Fri. 8:15 p.m Sabbath ava **rvlc*T
Chapsl, Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro. Onsg to
loiiow Sat COO a.m. Sabbath *srvlcs* Tsltisr
Chapsl. Bst Mltnah: Eric Jossph Eistbatt
Kldduih to lollow. Sunday Msmbsrship Opsn
Hous* 10 a.m.-noon. Rsllglous
School Rsglstratlon
3
V
y
!


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1985

IDF forces prevent MK Rabbi Meir Kahane
from recently entering the Kasbah in Hebron,
which was under curfew due to the stabbing of
Ya'acov Reiter, a 45-year-old immigrant from
the U.S. (JTA/WZN News Photo)
By CHARLES ALLEN, JR.
EAST BERLIN, East
Germany (JTA) Two
major Gedenkstatten
(remembrance memorials)
have recently been put in
place here, the capital of the
German Democratic
Republic (GDR), that
specifically commemorate
the great Jewish leader,
philosopher and mathemati-
cian, Moses Mendelssohn
(1729-1786), and those
"thousands of Jews" who
were deported from Hitler's
Berlin to their deaths in
Auschwitz and
Theresienstadt.
A striking, haunting group of
figures men, women and
children, 13 in all, in varying size
and attitude has been erected
on a large marble slab on the site
of what formerly was Berlin's
home for the aged in the Great
Ghetto.
The July 13 issue of the GDR's
Communist newspaper, Neues
Deutschland (New Germany), of-
ficial organ of the Socialist Unity
Party (SED), prominently
featured a picture of the sculpture
by the late artist Will Lamert,
under a two-column headline,
"Remembrance of the Jewish
Victims."
_ IN PART, the story reads:
"This group of figures serves to
remind us of what took place on
the Grosse Hamburgstrasse when
thousands of Jewish citizens were
deported to the fascist extermina-
tion camps.
"These figures have bee placed
on the spot where once stood the
oldest Jewish cemetery,
destroyed by the Nazis in 1943.
Only the grave of Moses
Mendelssohn and a few stones are
left here.
"Today this is a place of both ad-
monition and remembrance. The
Gestapo used the home
(1942-1943) for the elderly as a
collection point for the Jews'
death-transportation to
Auschwitz and Theresienstadt."
On the day that this reporter
visited the site, fresh flowers had
been placed at the base of the
memorial. One bouquet, covered
with a vivid red sash, read in both
German and Yiddish, "Forget this
Not! Never fascism Again!"
SOME 50 paces to the left of the
Jewish Victims Memorial was a
large plaque to the memory of
Mendelssohn. Under an engraving
of Mendelssohn's bust vras the
following quotation: V
"Seeker of truth, lover of beau-
ty, working for the common good,
doing one's best."
This was followed by, "Moses
Mendelssohn, philosopher and
friend of Lessing, Founder of the
first Jewish School in Berlin. He
was bom 6 September 1729 and
died in Berlin on 4 January 1786."
The GDR is already planning
elaborate ceremonies for the 1986
celebration of the 200th anniver-
sary of Mendelssohn's death.
Both Gedenkstatten were
erected by "the city government
of Berlin in cooperation with the
Jewish Gemeinde (Community) of
the GDR."
MENDELSSOHN of course
was the founder of what became
the Reform movement in
Judaism. There are plans for the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations to send represen-
tatives to the GDR to participate
in the Mendelssohn celebrations,
starting with the High Holidays of
1985 and continuing through
1986.
An official of GDR's Anti-
faschiste Aktion Komite, the
country's single-most prestigious
organization of resistance fighters
during the Nazi period, told me in
detail of the relationship between
Lessing, the German philosopher,
and Mendelssohn. Lessing's play,
Die Juden (1749), had portrayed a
"noble-hearted Jew" that caused
much negative criticism, I was
told. In Mendelssohn, Lessing
found the "embodiment" of his
own "lofty bourgeois ideals," said
my companion. .
In rather detached terms, I was
told, "Lessing influenced
Mendelssohn who in turn led the
Jewish people of Germany into
bourgeois assimilation."
MY COMPANION, himself a
Jew and raised in a religious
home, expressed "no problems
whatsoever" fpth devout Jews
of whom there are very few in the
GDR. As for himself, a survivor of
the camps and a Communist," I
am an atheist but I think it impor-
tant to study, appreciate and
honor Mendelssohn for his con-
tributions to humanity," he said.
While there is not an overt trace
of anti-Semitism in the GDR or,
most certainly, no single expres-
sion of neo-Nazism (indeed, it is
forcefully ^utlawed), many
visitors to the GDR remain skep-
tical of how deep is such a commit-
ment. There are inconsistencies,
most by omission.
In the several handsomely il-
lustrated and moving brochures
marking the 40 years of the libera-
tion of Sachsenhausen, Buchen-
wald, Ravensbruk, and
Brandenburg-Gorden concentra-
tion camps, there is but one
reference to Jews as victims
categorically singled out by the
Nazis.
IN THE Buchenwald com-
memorative booklet published
in the milliohs in German,
English, French and Russian
there appears on page 8 the
following:
"We honor all victims of
fascism, our Communist and
Social Democratic comrades, our
fallen comrades from the
resistance put up by the Roman
Catholic and Protestant churches.
The flowers of our wreaths stand
in tribute to thousands of people
of the Jewish faith who were
driven to their deaths in Buchen-
wald by the racial madness of the
Nazi hangmen."
In the other camp com-
memoratives, there is no such
language. Some critics in the
West see such omission as tanta-
mount to anti-Semitism.
This is vigorously denied by
many in the GDR, especially the
leadership of the Anti-Fascist
Committee. In conversation with
its leadership, I was told that
Hitler's victims were honored by
nationality.
AT THE Ravensbruk concen-
tration camp memorial site an
especially moving place of
memory where more than 90,000
were murdered, mostly women
and children there are plans
now for extending special
memorials to the "peoples of 20
nations who suffered here."
When I asked if a special
memorial for the Jewish victims of
Ravensbruk might be included,
there was an expression of uncer-
tainty and a reassertion of the
customary procedure regarding
nationality.
I then pointed out that modest
yet nonetheless specific com-
memoration of the Jews were
already in place at Buchenwald
and Sachsenhausen, I also pointed
out by way of questions the patent
inconsistencies in the com-
memorative booklets.
"Die Endlesung" (the Final
Solution), I noted, "was a
deliberate fascist genocide which
precisely singled out the Jews of
Europe, and surely that had a
great role to play in the massive
terror which the great resistance
fighters battled until victory over
fascism was accomplished. Is it
not proper to acknowledge this
basic fact for the sake of what was
best in the anti-fascist
resistance?" There was no
disagreement, but there was an
uncomfortable discomfiture on
the matter yet to be fully resolved
Commission Accepting Applications
For Two Dade Judgeships
Qualified persons interested in
serving as a Dade County circuit
or county court judge must submit
their application to the 11th
Judicial Circuit Nominating Com-
mission by 5 p.m.. Sept. 6. accor-
ding to Jerome Shevin. chairman
of the Nominating Commission.
The nine-person Commission,
whose members are appointed by
Governor Bob Graham and by The
Florida Bar. must submit the
names of not less than three per-
sons to the Governor tor each
vacancy in the 11th Circuit, which
encompasses all of Dade County.
"We will evaluate, select, and
submit to the Governor proposed
nominees for one circuit judeeshm
and one county court judmhip
Dade, which were created Z
unded by the Florida Le^
tL ear- Shev,!n exPlai<*J
The Commission has revived.
number of requests for applJM
t.ons and we encourage any other
qualified interested attorneys Z
judges to apply for one of the new
ly created posts, which ar<- fUnd^
and effective as of January l
1986. '
Application forms mav be , tamed from the office of: Jerome'
H. Shevin. chairman of rhe uIn
Judicial Circuit Nominating
Commission.
Flagler Federal Appoints
Tuckerman Marketing Director
Moses Mendelssohn and Jewish Victims
of Nazism Memorialized in East Germany
Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association announces the
appointment of Rick Tuckerman
as Marketing Director.
Mr. Tuckerman has served
Flagler, for the past 3lk years as
Advertising Manager. Before
coming to Flagler, he was an ac-
count executive with Hume.
Sindelar and Associates.
Mr. Tuckerman has his Bachelor
of Business Administration
Degree from Temple University,
Philadelphia, Pa.
He is a member of the Greater
Miami Chamber of Commerce and
also sits on the Marketing Com-
mittee of the Florida League of
Financial Institutions.
Mr. Tuckerman resides in the
Kendall area with his wife,
Belinda.
Rick Tuckerman
Group Says Saudis Will
Resume Use Of Oil Weapon
- X
...
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Saudi Arabia will resume within
two years use of'its oil weapon
against the western world,
members of a mission of the Coun-
cil for a Secure America told a
press conference here.
The CSA advocates policies aim-
ed at assuring the survival and
growth of America's domestic
energy industry and a broader-
base of American support for
Israel.
Mack Wallace, co-chairman of
CSA, noted that Sheik Yamani.
the Saudi Arabian oil minister,
had declared two years ago that
Saudi Arabia planned to use its
petro-weapon in 1987. Wallace
said the oil minister was looking
at the same figures "as we do."
The CSA brought together, in
the United States, two groups
which share a concern that
America's commitment to Israel
be able to withstand the tests of
current economic energy
pressures and future energy
crises and who agree that con-
tinued domestic energy produc-
tion is the only way to assure that
American security would not be
held hostage to oil from overseas
sources.
He said the "unique coalition"
between the American Friends of
Israel, a Jewish group, and a
group of oil men in Texas was
organized to give energy-
producing states more power in
Congress.
He said that while the oil men
joined the partnership for
economic reasons, the Jews joined
because they felt such a coalition
was a prerequisite to assuring
United States independence from
Arab oil pressures.
Ciskei Government Severs
Commercial Relations With Israel
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
government of Ciskei, the South
African puppet state or homeland
which is not recognized by any
other country in the world, in-
cluding Israel, has halted all its
commercial relations with Israel
because of alleged corruption.
The Israel government had
always expressed dissatisfaction
and reservations about the com-
mercial relations of private
Israeli companies and individuals
with Ciskei, but took no official
steps t halt them.
In large notices placed in Israel
newspapers, the Ciskei govern-
ment announced that "as from 31
' ,1985- Messrs. jTsef
Schneider and/or Nat Rosen-
wasser no longer represent the
government of Ciskei, either as
trade commissioners or in any
capacity whatsoever."
Atlantic Towers to
Merge Waldman
The 165-room Atlantic Towers.
4201 Collins Ave., will become
Waldman Hotel II merging two
Miami Beach properties leased
last year by Martin and Jeff
Weiner, a father and son realty
team from Tamarac. The
135-room Waldman Hotel. 4299
Collins Ave., always has been
kosher. "So we're going kosher all
the way," said Martin Weiner.
The conversion of the Atlantic
Towers into Waldman Hotel II is
scheduled to become effective for
the current High Holy Days.


Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
^ublic Notices
NOTICE UNDER
. FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned, desiring to
i in business under the fic-
tioui name REGINA'S OF
IlAMI INC. D/B/A REGINA'S
IaSIIIONS INC. at 116-118 N.E.
Vd Ave Miami Fla. 33132 intends
.1 register said name tlerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Manuel Lacayo, Jr.
|9266 August 23.30;
September 6.13, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
F THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL
km MY OF FLORIDA IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
I GENERAL JURSIDICTION
DIVISION
. CASE NO. 85-23604 CA-14
loTICE OF ACTION
002481
Ientrust SAVINGS BANK.
I. KM
AUE SAVINGS & LOAN
[SSOCIATION,
| Plaintiff
Anthony bello, et ux.. et !.,
Defendants.
.: ANTHONY BELLO and
I ELSIE BELLO, his wife
I Residence Unknown
If alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against, and
all parties having or claiming
to have any right, title or
interest in the property
herein described.
You are hereby notified that an
iction to foreclose a mortgage on
following property in Dade
bounty, Florida:
Lot 1 in Block 20, of GLADE-
HND HEIGHTS, according to
le Plat thereof, as recorded in
'lat Book 115, at Page 86, of the
ublic Records of Dade County,
"lorida.
us been filed against you and you
required to serve a copy of
'our written defenses, if any, to it
in Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
14. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
September 27, 1985, and file, the
original with the Qlerk of this cofcA
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 20 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19271 August 23, 30;
September 6,13,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-7094
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EDNA GRACE BOLES
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
"f Edna Grace Boles, deceased,
Hili Number 85-7094, is pending in
|the ( ircuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
ire.-,s of which is 73 West Flagler
St., Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
-horn this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 23, 1985.
Personal Representative:
Marguerite Bright Nagel
142 S.E. Creatwood Circle
Stuart, FL 33497
Attorney for Personal Repre
sentative:
Paul R. Stanton
^VHIisch. Metzger & Stanton, P.A
61 Almeria Avenue. Suite 200E
.'oral Gables. Florida
Telephone: (305) 445-7954
19264 August 23, 30. 198.'
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number is si44
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRIETTE WE1NQARTEN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of HENRIETTE
WEINGARTEN. deceased, File
Number 85-584*. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which Is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative
and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested person
to whom this notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualiflcatlona of the
personal representative, venue,
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 18, IMS.
Personal Representative:
Paul Fred Welngarten
8 Fairway Circle North
Manhasset, New York 11030
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ROBERT M. HERMAN. ESQ
Blank. Rome, Comlnsky and
McCauley
4770 Biscayne Boulevard,
12th Floor
Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone: (3081 573-5600
19258 August 16.23. 30;
September 8, MM
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Caae No. 85-34722 FC (14)
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
ALVA W. HOLMES
Petitioner
and
RENEE F. HOLMES
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RENEE F. HOLMES
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I .1
GRAFF, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 633 N.E.
167 St., North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162, on or before Oc-
tober 4, 1985, and file the original
with the clerk of this court other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
August 21. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19272 August 23.30;
September 6, 13, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-31026
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
GABRIEL LALINDE,
Petitioner,
and-
PURA LALINDE RODRIGUEZ,
Respondent.
TO: PURA LALINDE
RODRIGUEZ
Last Known Residence
1635 17th Street NW
Washington. D.C. 20009
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed and com-
menced in this court and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 825 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 543, Miami, FL 33131, and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 30, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 29 day of July. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19233 Augt2.9..28.M66
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-31125
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ALFRED DOVER,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
MICHELLE DENISE DOVER,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Michelle Denise Dover
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on An-
tonio Torrent, Jr., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 701
S.W. 27 Avenue, Suite 625, Miami,
Florida 33135, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 20,
1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 14 day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Antonio Torrent, Jr.
Rossano. Torrent & Leyte-Vidal,
P.A.
701 S.W. 27th Avenue, Suite 625
Miami, Florida 33136
Attorney for Petitioner
19261 August 23,30;
September 6,13,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-4517
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARTHA JULIA CORNOG
DAVIS, a/k/a Julia Cornog Davis,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MARTHA JULIA CORNOG
DAVIS, a/k/a Julia Cornog Davis,
deceased, File Number 85-4517
(01), is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an intersted person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB.IKl
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 23. 1985.
Personal Representative:
Ann Davis Schofield
19810 Franjo Road
Miami, Florida 33157
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Alan H. Miller, Esq.
10700 Caribbean Blvd. Suite 317
Miami. Florida 33189
Telephone: (305) 238-1080
19270 August 23, 30, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name of SUZUKI PIANO
SCHOOL OF SOUTH FLORIDA
at 12241 S.W. 103 Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33176 intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
SARAH NEHAM SALZ
SIMON J. SALZ
RITA F. NORTON
Attorney for Applicants
Suite 1201. 19 West Flagler St.
Miami. Florida 33130
(305)374-3116
19267 August 23. 30;
September 6, 13. 198.1
IN THE CIRCUIT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Caw No. 85-29043 CA 27
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY.
DAVIN & COMPANY, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
HENRY EVANS and DANE
EVANS, his wife; NIXON DESIR
and FELICITE DESIR a/k/a
FELICITE ALEXIS (DESIR),
and the unknown spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, creditors, or
other parties claiming by, through,
under of against them; SCHMIDT
INDUSTRIES, INC.. a Missouri
corporation; and SOUTHLAND
INSURANCE COMPANY, a
Florida corporation,
Defendants.
To: Nixon Desir and Felicite Desir
a/k/a/ Felicite Alexis (Desir).
whose residences are unknown,
and the unknown parties who may
be spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all parties
claiming interest by, through,
under or against said Defendants,
who are not known to be dead or
alive, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title, or
interest in the property herein
described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in Dade
County, Florida: Lot 8, in Block 6,
of VENETIAN DEVELOPMENT
SUBDIVISION, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded in Plat
Book 45, at Page 87, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Barry S. Yarchin, Esquire, of
Rosenthal & Yarchin, P.A., At-
torneys for Plaintiff, Suite 800,
3050 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before
September 20, 1985, and to file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorneys or immediate-
ly thereafter; otherwise, a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on August 15, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19263 August 23. 30;
September 6,13,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-27119 CA-31
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORT-
GAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
JUAN M. ALMEIDA, et ux., et
al
Defendants.
TO: JUAN M. ALMEIDA and
JUDITH ALMEIDA, his wife,
Residence Unknown, if alive, and
if dead, all parties claiming in-
terest by, through, under or
against, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida: LOT 18,
BLOCK 1, LAKE MARKS AT
WESTWIND, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
120, AT PAGE 50. OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, has been fil-
ed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Shep-
pard Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida, 33146 on or before
September 6, 1985. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 1st day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19242 August 9. 16. 23. 30. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-34076
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
MERLEANE PATRICIA
POWELL.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
NEVILLE A. POWELL.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Mr. Neville A. Powell
c/o St. Mary's Hospital
1998 St. Marks Avenue
Brooklyn, New York
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on AR-
NIE S. MUSKAT, ESQUIRE, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 999 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach, Florida 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
September 20, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 15 day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. SEIFRIED
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARNIE S. MUSKAT, ESQUIRE
GALBUT, GALBUT & MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 305-672-3100
Attorney for Petitioner
19262 August 23. 30;
___________September 6,13,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-24430 (' A-01
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK. F.S.B., f/k/a
Community Federal Savings and
Loan Association,
Plaintiff
vs.
WAYNE W. NEAL, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: WAYNE W. NEAL
137 E. Enid Drive
Key Biscayne, Florida 33149
TO: SARAH NEAL, Residence
Unknown, if alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by,
through, under or against SARAH
NEAL, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida: Private Dwelling
Unit No. 4-D-4 in COSTA DEL
SOI.. CONDOMINIUM NO. 1. a
Condominium Building according
to the Declaration thereof, as
recorded in Official Records Book
8716. Page 450, together with all
appurtenances thereto, including
its percentage of undivided in-
terest in the common elements and
common surplus of said con-
dominium, as set forth in the
Declaration and amended by
amendments to Declaration of
Condominium, recorded in Official
Records Book 9101. at Page 1134.
as amended by amendment as
recorded in Official Records Book
9124. at Page 543, and as amended
by amendment recorded in Official
Records Book 9487, at Page 517 of
the Dade County Public Records,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue. Coral
Gables. Florida, 33146 on or before
September 6. 1985. and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 1 st day of August.
1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Al I 'lerk of the Court
By D.C. BKVANT
Al Deputy Clerk
19241 August 9, 16.28,30, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. IS 29374 C A 04
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and
existing under the laws of the
United States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
LEON JOE SHI PMAN. et al..
Defendants.
TO: HOME MORTGAGE OF
SOUTH FLORIDA, INC a-k-a
HOME MORTGAGE OF SOUTH
FLORIDA, Address Unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action lor Foreclosure of Mor
tgage on the following described
property: Lot 1, In Block 13,
AMENDED PLAT OF Blocks 1
to 20 inclusive. BAY VISTA
PARK, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
10. at Page S. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It, on Stuart
Gitlitz, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida, 33146 on or before
September 13, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 12th day of
August, 1985.
RICHARDP.BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19254 August 16. 23, 30
September 6, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cast No.1530*39 CA 20
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON. WHATLEY
DAVIN COMPANY, A Florlds
corporation,
Plaintiff,
v.
CLAUDE R. SNELLOROVE,
JAIME A. SIERRA, and the
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or oUier
parties claiming by, through,
under or against him: JANE E.
SIERRA: and LESLIE
ESTATES HOMEOWNERS'
ASSOCIATION NO. S. INC.. a
Florida corporation.
Defendants.
To: Jaime A. Sierra, whose
residence is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses. heirs. devisees,
grantees, assignees, lienors,
creditors, trustees and all
parties claiming Interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendant, who are not known to
be dead or alive, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or Interest In the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property In Dade
County, Florida: Lot 2. In Block
S3, of LESLIE ESTATES
SECTION FIVE, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded In
Plat Book 96. al Page 70. of the
Public Records of Dade County.
Florida, has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defense, if any. to it on Barry S.
Yarchin. Esquire, of Rosenthal
and Yarchin. PA.. Attorneys for
Plaintiff. 3050 Biscayne
Boulevard. Suite 800. Miami.
Florida 33137, on or before
September 13. 1985. and to file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or im-
mediately thereafter: otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on August 12, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
\ By D.C. BRYANT
' Deputy Clerk
192S5 August 16. 23.30
September6,1S85
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names METRO GLASS &
WINDOW: METRO GLASS &
MIRROR; METRO GLASS at
4150 NW 7th St.. No. 206. Miami.
FL 33126. intends to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
METRO GLASS
& MIRRORiv
IIMl NW 7th St.. No. 206
Miami. PL 88186
1921- August 9, 16, li-'t. 80,1985


?
Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1985
Public Notices

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-33275
NOTICE OF ACTION
002411
ENSIGN BANK, F.S.B.. Ike
Community Federal Savings and
Loan Association,
Plaintiff
vs.
BOBBIE L OVERSTREET. et
al..
Defendants.
TO: Bobbie L. Overstreet
611 Edgewood Terrace, No.
701
Washington, DC. 20017
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mor
tgage on the following described
property: Lot 8, in Block 6, of
PERRINE GARDENS SUB
DIVISION NO. 5, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 103. at Page 13, of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida, has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Shop
pard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214.1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or
before September 13, 1985 and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or Im i
mediately thereafter, otherwise |
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the j
seal of this Court this 12th day of I
August, 1985.
RICHARDP BRINKLR
As Clerk of the Court
ByGWEND.ZEIGLER
As Deputy Clerk
19253 August 16, 23, 30
September6,1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-35651
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARIA E. ADRIANO.
Petitioner, |
and I
MANUEL E. ADRIANO. I
Respondent.
TO. MANUEL E. ADRIANO.*
Residence unknown, you shall'
serve copy of your Answer to the!
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,.
Attorney. 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and ,
file original with Court Clerk on or
before October 4, 1986. otherwise
a default will be entered.
August 27, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: GWEN D. ZEIGLER '
19281 August 30; I
September 6. 13,20,1985 '
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF |
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, m AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION I
DIVISION ,
CASE NO. 85-14019 (CA 29)
AMENDED NOTICE
OF ACTION
ERWIN JACOBSOHN,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JACK UCHITEL, et al..
Defendants.
TO: All parties claiming interests
by, through, under or against, HY
UCHITEL, deceased, and all other
parties having or claiming to have
any right, title or interest in the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida: The Nor-
thwest V of the Northeast "A of the
Southeast A and the East V. of the
Northeast % of the Northwest It
of the Southeast V4 of Section 15
Township 53 South, Range 39
East, lying and being in Dade
County, Florida, has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Keith,
Mack, Lewis & Allison. Plaintiffs
attorneys, whose address is 111
N.E. 1st Street, Miami, Florida
33132, on or before September 20.
1985, and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either before
service on Plaintiffs attorneys or
immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court on the 14th day of
August, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19265 August 23,30;
September 6,13,1985
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA Di
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-31016 CA-24
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT
GAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America.
Plaintiff
vs.
MARIA E. KELLEY. et al..
Defendants.
TO: ISAAC A. STEELE III and
LORRAINE K. STEELE, his
wife. 4242 Spring House Lane.
Norcross, GA 30092
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper
ty: Lot 3, Block 1. of BRENDA
ESTATES, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
67, Page 52, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida, has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it, on Shep-
pard Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables.
Florida, 33146 on or before
September 6, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 1st day of
August. 1985.
- RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19240 August 9, 16,23,30.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OFl
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-34265 CA-17
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
AMERICAN SAVINGS
BANK, f/k/a FRANKLIN
SAVINGS BANK.
Plaintiff
vs.
ROBERTO NODAL,
et ux. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ROBERTO NODAL
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 4. Block 3, of PRINCETO
NIAN SUBDIVISION SECTION
ONE, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
102, at Page 29. of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it,
on Sheppard Faber. Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
September 27, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
this Court this 26 day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19279 August 30;
September 6,13, 20,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NoPreperty)
IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 84-lUCO CC 06
ACTION FOR DAMAGES
Florida Bar No. 221S61
DORAL HOTEL, INC.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JOSE RIBAS and ADRIANA
CANTWELL f/k/a ADRIANA
RIBAS,
Defendants.
TO: JOSE RIBAS
7090 Crisford, Apt. 1
St Charles Apartments
Baltimore, Maryland 21208
TO: JOSE RIBAS
8918 Collins Avenue
Apartment No. 6
Miami Beach, FL 33154
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an Action for Damages
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Silver & Silver attorney for the
Plaintiff, whose address is 160
S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326,
Miami. Florida 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 26, 1985 otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, County Court
Dade County, Florida
By FLORA GONZALEZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Ira S. Silver
Attorney for Plaintiff
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 374-4888
19275 August 30;
September 6,13.20,1985
PRIVATE FOUNDATION
REPORT
The Annual report of the private'
foundation, The Selma Schechter'
Foundation, Inc., required to be fil-
ed under Section 6056, Internal
Revenue Code, is available for
public inspection at its principal of-
fice. 2000 So. Dixie Hwy., Suite
103. Miami, Fla. 33133, for inspec-
tion on business days between 10
a.m. and 4 p.m. by any citisen upon
request within 180 days after the
date of this publication.
J. Jerry Schechter
Principal Manager
19277 August 30.1985
ttJ THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-26292
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RODOLFO MARCHESE,
Petitioner,
and
BRIGIDA MARCHESE,
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
Fla. Bar No. 142876
TO: BRIGIDA MARCHESE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and that you are
required to serve a copy of your
Response or Pleading to the Peti-
tion upon the Petitioner's at-
torney. RONALD S. LIEBER
MAN, P.A., at 8900 S.W. 107
Avenue, Suite 206. Miami, Florida,
and file the original Response or
Pleading in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court, on or before
the 27 day of September, 1985. If
you fail to do so, a Default Judg-
ment will be taken against you for
the relief demanded in the
Petition.
Dated at Miami. Dade County,
Florida, this 26 day of August,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: D. C. Bryant
19278 August 30;
September 6.13.20,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 85-34858 (16)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FLA. BAR NO. 434434
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GREGORY P. COLEMAN,
Petitioner,
and
PAULINE B. WILLIAMS a/k/a
PAULINE B. COLEMAN,
Respondent.
TO: Pauline B. Williams a/k/a
Pauline B. Cole man
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on KEN-
NETH C. BRONCHICK. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT, P.A., 300 Biscayne
Boulevard. Suite 315, Miami FL
33137, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 4. 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Kenneth C. Bronchick, Esq.
LAWRENCE MICHAEL
SHOOT. P.A.
300 Biscayne Boulevard. No. 315
Miami. FL 33137
Attorney for Petitioner
19274 August 30;
September 6.13,20.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names METRO MIRROR;
METRO WINDOW & GLASS;
METRO WINDOW & MIRROR at
4150 NW 7th St., No. 206, Miami,
FL 33126, intends to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
METRO GLASS
* MIRROR INC.
4150 NW 7th St.. No. 206
Miami, FL 33126
i247 August 9. 16.23,30, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 86-2*828 FC 15
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NESTOR J. MARTIN
and
MARIA A. MARTIN
TO: Maria A. Martin
9220 S.W. 45 Terrace
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on A. KOSS,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 4343 West
Flagler Street, Suite 404, Miami,
Florida 33134, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September 27,
1986; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21st day of August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS. ESQ.
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT LAW.
P.A.
4343 West Flagler Street
Suite 404
Miami. Florida 33134
Telephone: (306) 443-4343
Attorney for Petitioner
19273 August 30;
September 6.13,20.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage tn business under the
fictitious name HIGH VOLTAGE,
at 18837 West Dixie Highway,
North Miami Beach. Fla. 33180
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
EMOTIONAL OUTLET. INC.
19257 August 18.23, 30;
Septembers. 1968
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name E. GRAFTON
EXPORT LIMITED INC.
(D.B.A. INTERNATIONAL
WINES A SPIRITS) at 2400 W 8
Lane, Hlaleah, Florida 33010,
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
ESTEBAN GRAFTON
President
1240Crane Ave.
Miami Springs. FL 38188
1250 August 18. 23. SO;
September*. 1886
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 86-36011 (20)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
JOSEFINA BAUTISTA
RODRIGUEZ
Petitioner,
and
JOSE IGNACIO RODRIGUEZ
Respondent.
TO: Jose Ignacio Rodriguez
11905 S.W. 112th Avenue
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it. on R.A. del
Pino, Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1835 West
Flagler Street No. 201. Miami,
Florida, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 4, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 22nd day of August. 1985.
RICHARD. P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GOMEZ, FENTE & DEL PINO.
P.A.
1835 West Flagler Street No. 201
Miami, Florida 33136
Phone: (305) 541-1800
Attorney for Petitioner
19276 August 30;
September 6,13,20, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH JUDICIAL CIRCUIT,
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL ACTION NO:86-346S
FC2fJ
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
N A DINE MIGUEL
and
EDDY L. NADINE
TO: Eddy L. Nadine
Residence Unknown
A Petition for Dissolution of
your Marriage has been filed in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, on Alec Ross, attorney
for Petitioner, at 16400 N.E. 19
Ave., Miami, Fla. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before October
4. 1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
Dated in Miami on August 20,
1985.
, RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk, Dade County, Florida
By K. SEIFRIED
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19269 August 23.30;
September 6.13.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
NO. 014494
IN RE: The marriage of:
CARMEN ADDERLY
LAMARRE.
PetlOoner-wlie.
and
NICO LAMARRE.
Re spondent-husband,
YOU. NICO LAMARRE,
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the petition
for dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court and
serve a copy thereof upon the
petitioner's attorneys. Law
Office of HERMAN COHEN k
MARTIN COHEN, 822 S.W. 1st
Street, Miami. Fla. 33130, on or
before September 20. 1888, or
else petition will be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami, Dade
County. Florida, this August 12,
1988.
RICHARDP. BRINKER.
Clerk, Circuit Court
By F. J.Foy
Deputy Clerk
19258 August 16. 23, 30:
Septembers, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name CERTIFICATE IN-
VESTORS SERVICE at 3233
Mary Streeet, Coconut Grove, FL
33133 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
FINANCIAL REAL ESTATE
CONSULTANTS, INC.
By Peggy Bit-Icy. President
WELLISCH, METZGER &
STANTON, P.A.
Paul R. Stanton, Esq.
Attorney for Financial Real Estate
Consultants, Inc.
161 Almeria Avenue, Suite 200E
Coral Gables. FL 33134
Telephone: (306) 445-7954
19268 August 23,30;
September 6, 13, 1985
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
CASE NO: 85-337 S2(1J)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN PAULIMA HYPOLITE.
Petitioner,
and
SADIE HYPOLITE.
Respondent.
TO: SADIE HYPOLITE.
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attorney.
612 Northwest 12th Ave Miami,
Florida, 33136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
September 20, 1985, otherwise a
default will be entered.
August 14,1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
19259 August 16. 23. 30;
Septembers, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names METRO DOOR;
METRO WINDOW at 4150 NW
7th St.. No. 206, Miami. FL 33126,
intends to register said names with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
METRO GLASS
& MIRROR INC.
4150 NW 7th St.. No. 206
Miami. FL 33126
19249 August 9,16,23,30,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER: 85 6909
DIVISION: 04
IN RE:ESTATE OF
VERA B. PEARL.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
No. 090723
The administration of the Estate
of VERA B. PEARL, Deceased.
File Number 86 6909, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Dade County,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the Personal Represen-
tative and the Personal Represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with the court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims against the
Estate and (2) any objection by an
interested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the Will and Codicil, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue or jurisdic-
tion of the Court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this notice has
begun on August 30, 1985.
ALBERT SINE.
Personal Representative
MORTON B. ZEMEL
Attorney At Law
16666 N.E. 19 Ave.
N. Miami Beach, Fl. 33162
305 949-4237
Attorney for Personal
Representative
19280 August W.
September 6, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name HOLY LAND
IMPORTS Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
ALL AMERICAN
TRADING COMPANY INC.
a Florida corporation
By: Be la Florentln.
President
NelsonC. Keshen. Esq. ^
Attorney for Corporation
8906 S.W. 87 Avenue,
Suite 209
Miami. FL 38176
Telephone: 596-1538
19262 August 18, 23.30
Septembers, 1886


Rabbi Morris Skop, 80, Passes
First Rabbi of Temple Judea
Li Morris Skop, 80, the first
Eo serve Temple Judea in
[Gables and three other
Florida congregations, died
in Oakland Park. He had
with cancer and diabetes.
hi Skop's first assignment
fts ordination in 1937 was at
j's only Jewish congrega-
hi'v Shalom.
949, Rabbi Skop came to
[to be the first religious
lof the Jewish Center of
Babies, now called Temple
Twelve years later, he left
Judea to form Temple
tiirah in South Miami, to
tie needs of the growing
[population in South Dade.
66, Rabbi Skop moved to
no Beach to lead yet
new congregation, Tem-
klom.
Rabbi Morris Skop
>F Officer Acquitted of
dng Excessive Violence
iv HUGH ORGEL
AVIV (JTA) -
^rael Defense Force's
afantry and paratroop
. Brig. Gen Yitzhak
chai, was Sunday ac-
of charges of im-
conduct and ex-
i violence in the inter-
of two terrorists
ed during the freeing
is they had hijacked
hose passengers they
hostage,qyer., a, year.,
-man disciplinary inquiry
Jion reported that it ac-
lordechai's explanations
had been urgently
to take exceptional
i to obtain "real time" in-
)n to ascertain the
>uts of a reported ex-
large left aboard the bus
fcy were removed.
[OF the four terrorists
; over the bus were killed
|was stormed by a crack
Jnit commanded by
ii near Ashdod, on its
ird the Egyptian border.
' two were seen being led
i the bus, to a nearby in-
Dn center set up in a tent.
^hai had admitted that he
Bl-whipped the two ter-
fut two earlier investiga-
lissions one civilian
lilitary had found that
|actually died as a result
ttn their skulls from rifle
|ing the storming of the
tun them and prevent
ler shooting.
lier commissions reports
submitted to the At-
eneral. They said that
could not be held
le for the actual deaths
t, but suggested that fur-
fctigations should be held
licions of his improper
id the use of excessive
SY GENERAL, Yit-
hir handed the reports
1 IDF's Judge Advocate-
lit denied reports that he
Mordechai should be
rial. IDF reserve Maj.
|im Nadel was subse-
ppointed as a one-man
iry board and in-
the evidence. He ques-
dechai last Friday. His
published by the IDF
Sunday.
ig to his findings,
had used "reasonable
[obtain "vital and im-
formation" and to pre-
vent danger to other people. He
was acting during the first few
minutes of the terrorists inter-
rogation after their capture, try-
ing to discover what had happen-
ed to a grenade and booby-
trapped suitcase which had been
in their possession on the bus, the
inquiry found.
A grass-roots movement for
Mordechai's release of any suspi-
cions had grown in recent days.
Even politicians who have pro-
tested against excessive violence
welcomed the acquittal verdict,
saying that the year-long inquiry
had publicized many ''mysteries"
and these had finally been
disproved by the disciplinary
court. Mordechai had been in line
for promotion for some time, but
this had been postponed until the
end of the investigations. His pro-
motion to the rank of Major
General is now expected within
days, and Mordechai will be in line
for promotion to a senior IDF
post.
The Army and the police must
now decide how to act with
reference to the other soldiers and
policemen involved in the inci-
dent, against whom the earlier
commission had proposed
disciplinary action.
A native of Cleveland, where he
belonged to the YMCA, as a kid,
Rabbi Skop was a past president
of the Florida Association of Rab-
bis and the Greater Miami Rab-
binical Association. He attended
Ohio State University, Harvard
Graduate School and the Jewish
Institute of Religion in New York
City.
He served as a civilian Chaplain
during WWII at Orlando Air
Force base. Homestead Air Force
Base, Biltmore Hospital and
Veterans Hospital in Coral
Gables. He was a 32nd degree
Mason and a member of South
Pompano Kiwanis club and B'nai
B'rith.
After his retirement four years
ago, Rabbi Skop started yet
another congregation out of his
Pompano home, B'nai Moshe.
Though ill, the rabbi conducted
Sabbath services Friday.
Besides his wife Rachel, sur-
vivors include two daughters,
Shirah Penn and Adena
Konigsburg; two sons, Ray and
Eli; two brothers, David and Ar-
thur; a sister, Myrtle Rutberg;
grandchildren, Meryl Heilberg,
Adam Penn, Michael W. Skop,
Bonnie F. Skop, Hal S. Skop,
Monique Skop and Neal Franklin
Skop.
Services were held Wednesday,
at Star of David Memorial Chapel
in North Lauderdale.
Shiva will be observed at the
family's home.
RAYVIS
David A., 77 of Miami passed away August
22. Mr. Rayvis had made his home here for
the past 48 years, coming from
Philadelphia. Mr. Rayvis was the co-owner
of Hill's Store for Men. a certified public ac-
countant graduating with honors from the
Wharton School of Business, a past presi
dent of Shalom Lodge-B'nai B'rith, a
Trustee in the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith and a pioneer member of Beth
David Synagogue. Mr. Rayvis is survived by
his wife Vivian; his son, Myron (Jean)
Rayvis of Miami; his daughter, Carol
(Leonard) Oreenbaum of Miami; his sister,
Sylvia (Moe) Schatzman of Miami and 4
grandchildren. Services were held with in-
terment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
KATZ. Norman. 71. Services were held.
BEINER. Sylvia, of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert. Mt. Nebo.
DESIND, Irving. 76, of Eastern Shores,
August 26. Levitt-Weinstein.
FARBER. Sylvia. 82. of Bay Harbor Island,
August 25. Blasberg Chapel.
KAGAN, Wolf. 69. of North Miami Beach.
August 26. Riverside.
ZWECHKENBAUM, Pearl. 85, of Kendall,
August 26. Services were held with inter-
ment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
BLUMBERG, Samuel M of North Miami
Beach, August 20. The Riverside.
GREENSPAN. Bertha, 83 of Bay Harbor,
August 21. The Riverside.

i";*o ill! 4 6
&'&
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261-7612
Friday, August 30, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
/ Lelchuk, First
Bay Harbor Manager
Jerome Lelchuk, who spent a
total of 30 years in Bay Harbor
Islands government, died August
23 of cancer. He was 64.
In 1949, Bay Harbor Islands
adopted a strong manager form of
government and Mr. Lelchuk was
appointed and served until 1957.
He oversaw the building of Broad
Causeway and a new sewer
system for the community.
"He enjoyed working with peo-
ple and trying to improve society,
generally," his brother Sheldon
said. "He was always concerned
with the next person's plight."
So Mr. Lelchuk didn't leave
Town Hall for long. In 1958, he
was appointed to fill a vacant seat
on the seven-member council.
SCHEMER
Maurice, of North Miami passed away
August 20. Mr. Schemer had made his home
in South Florida for the past 60 years com-
ing from Jacksonville. He is survived by his
son Steven (Esther) Schemer of Miami; a
daughter, Arline Schemer of Denver. Colo.;
a brother. Isadore of Miami; sister Fannie
Siegel of Boca Raton and a grandson Daniel.
Services were held.
LELCHUK
Jerome M of Miami. Fla.. passed away
August 21. He had been a resident of South
Florida for 40 years coming from
Milwaukee. Wis. He is survived by his wife,
Bettie Jane; son, Steve (Sherry); grand-
children, Juliette and Danielle; brothers.
Herbert (Vivian) and Sheldon (Florrie)
Lelchuk and many nieces and nephews. Mr.
Lelchuk was affiliated with Temple
Menorah and Temple Beth Moshe. He was
formerly Senior Vice President and current-
ly served on the Board of Directors of the
American Savings and Loan of Florida. He
was President of the Northshore Kiwanis
and was a member of B'nai B'rith and
Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Mr.
Lelchuk was the first Manager of the town
of Bay Harbor Islands, a position which he
held for many years and later served as
Councilman and Vice Mayor. Services were
held August 22 at the Riverside North
Miami Beach Chapel.
GORDON
Clare. 84 of South Miami passed away
August 22. Mrs. Gordon was a pioneer Mia-
mian coming from Jacksonville in 1920.
Mother of the late Frank E. Solomon, she is
survived by a son. Circuit Court Judge
Harold (Muriel) Solomon of South Miami
and daughter-in-law. Esther Solomon of
Tucson, Arizona. 5 grandchildren and 4
great-grandchildren. Services were held.
After that, he was elected to five
consecutive four-year terms. He
resigned in 1977.
In 1964, Mr. Lelchuk joined
American Savings and Loan
Association Florida. Over the
next 20 years, he worked in
several positions, retiring last
year as senior vice president and
corporate secretary. He remained
on the board of directors of the
savings and loan until his death.
In addition to his brother
Sheldon, survivors include his
wife, Bettie Jane; a son, Steve;
another brother, Herbert; and two
grandchildren.
Services were held last Friday
at the Riverside North Miami
Beach Chapel.
RAYVIS, David A., 77 of Miami. August 27.
A resident of Miami for the past 48 years.
coming from Philadelphia.
WOLF, Gussie of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
BERNSTEIN. Charlotte, 80 of Miami
Beach, August 24. The Riverside.
RIBNER. Eleanor of Miami, August 21.
The Riverside.
ROTHSTEIN. Sam (Duke), 76, of North
Miami Beach, August 23. The Riverside.
KOHLKOPF, Sally B. of Miami Beach,
August 23. The Riverside.
VICTORSOHN. Bertha (nee Agman). July
30. Services in New York. The Riverside.
YOUNG, Richard Allen. 53 of Miami.
August 23. The Riverside.
BASS. Milton. Services held in Woodbury.
L.I.
STEINMETZ. Jerichem of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
FOR SALE
two gravesites and
two vaults at Lakeside
Memorial Park. For
more information call:
856-4056
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
Through years ot dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN''
LARRIES. BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
M*sl President Jewish Funeral
Dneciois oi America
'?UbtVENtr FIRST STREET
Fun..
Dii
8652353
MiAMi BtA(,H MOHlDA
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented ly Riverside Memorial Chapel. Inc.
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd.. Forest Hills. NY.


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 30, 1985
THEBMESFFISHWEVERl
It's the story of a new
restaurant that.wefe the
first to admit, is a product
of an active imagination.
Quite frankly, you've never
seen anything like it.
Picture, for example,
a restaurant that keeps on
hand more kinds of fresh
seafood than vouve ever
even heard of
NE. BIST STREET
TW SHOWS
AT CONCORDE
CENTRE
NGSPIAS1
LOEHMANNS
PIAZA
\ F. IHTH STREET
Imagine a menu that,
along with such a great
variety of fish,also offers
vou twentv delicious wavs
to enjoy each one. In styles
that come from as near
asNewOrleans.andasfar
as the South Pacific.
Finally, just imagine
a restaurant so concerned
with freshness.you'll find
a fresh seafood'market
inside the restaurant. It*s
no wonder this is the best
seafood vouve tasted.
Welcome to the new
Big Splash.The Seafood
Emporiumltsexactlvwhat
youd expect from Rocky
Aoki.who brought vou the
famous Benihana of Tbkvo
Japanese Steakhouses.
You might have to
follow the map to find it.
But once you have eaten
there.yoiillprobablvwalk
away with some great fish
stories of vour own.
Qprd^^Aimbmu0imr. WOK KEJmAtmi^Nl^AHamtBeaehm 9^8886


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