The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02950

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
ewis.
IFloridliajni
Volume 58 Number 33
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, August 16,1985
Frtd Shochtt By Mill *1 35
Price 50 Cents
Helms
Says He Will
Seek Israel-U.S.
Defense Pact
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Visiting United States Sen.
Jesse Helms (R., N.C.) told
reporters at a news conference
that he will initiate a defense
agreement between the United
States and Israel that would
include military air strips,
joint research and develop-
ment, and cooperation in other
fields.
Helms, who at one time was
regarded as highly critical of
Israel, has recently changed his
views and now said that Israel
should incorporate the West
Hank and Gaza Strip into Israel.
Me said that after visiting
Judaea and Samaria he fully
agreed with the position that the
area is not only important to the
defense of Israel but also is
of the nation's heritage.
According to Helms, the
American people should realize
that Israel is the "only reliable
ally of America in this area
which is anti-Communist, with
impeccable moral principles."
He said that many Americans
might believe that a defense
agreement with Israel might
mean U.S. troops would have to
fight in the Jewish State. "But
that is not so," he said. "I have
met Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin and understand that
Israel does not need nor want
I American troops to fight here."
(Helms is in Israel on a private
{visit together with Sen. Chic
jllecht. (R.. Nev.).
Revive Peace Efforts
Murphy Returning
To Mideast
Early prototype of nursing robot at Technion 's Robotics Lab.
See Robot Story ... Page 3-A
5 Mormons Pledge:
No Missionary Work At Center
JERUSALEM (WNS) -
The president of the Mormon
Brigham Young University,
Prof. Jeffrey Holland, in a
written pledge handed to Mayor
Teddy Kollek, promised there
would be no missionary activity
in the educational center it is
constructing next to the Hebrew
University on Mt. Scopus. The
center is to be an extension of
Brigham Young University.
The construction of the
Mormon center has come under
large-scale attack by Orthodox
fadassah National Convention
Focus On Jewish Life
luman Rights and Zionism
NEW YORK Prominent figures in the fields of human
[rights, world Zionism and Jewish life will be among the
(featured speakers at the 71st annual National Hadassah
Convention Aug. 18-21 in the New York Hilton Hotel.
They will join New York Governor Mario Cuomo, New York City
iMayor Ed Koch, Israel Ambassador Meir Rosenne, Senator Arlen
[Spin it (R) of Pennsylvania and writer and Holocaust authority Elie
vViesel in speaking at the event which is expected to attract 3,000
delegates representing 385.000 members of the women's Zionist
organization in 1.700 chapters throughout the United States and
[Puerto Rico.
Under the general theme. "I Lift My Lamp" from the Emma
Lazarus poem inscribed on the Statue of Liberty the convention
delegates will explore the vital role of the American Jewish woman in
American Zionism and in American Jewry's ongoing partnership with
the people of Israel.
Speakers on human rights and Zionism include Morris Abram,
National Chairman of the National Conference on Soviet Jewry;
Hyman Bookbinder, Washington representative of the American
Jewish Committee; Ann F. Lewis, National Director of Americans for
)emocratic Action; Dr. Norman Redlich, Dean of the New York
Jniversity Law School; and Dr. David Sidorsky, Professor of
Philosophy at Columbia University.
Hadassah's programs and services in Israel will be discussed by Dr.
Samuel Penchas, Director-General of the Hadassah Medical
Organization; Eli Amir, Director-General of Youth Aliyah; Charlotte
lacobson, President of the Jewish National Fund in America; and Dr.
1'amar Brosh, former Director of Israel's National Institute of
Technical Training.
circles, including the two Chief
Rabbis of Israel, who have
warned that its real purpose was
to try to convert Jews. The
charge was vigorously, denied by
Mormon representatives, among
them Dr. Ellis Rasmussen,
former Dean of Religious
Education at Brigham Young,
following a press conference in
July by eight Christian
denominations which also oppose
the center.
The construction of the center
was approved in 1977 by the
Likud government of Premier
Menachem Begin, and by the
Jerusalem municipality. Located
on five acres of land, the center
will contain housing and catering
services for nearly 200 students,
as well as classrooms and an
auditorium. The purpose of the
center, Rasmussen said in July,
was to enable Mormon students
to get to know Israel.
JWV 90th
Convention
The Jewish War Veterans 90th
National Convention will be held
Aug. 18-25. at the Hyatt
Orlando in Kissimmee, Fla.
Samuel Greenberg, National
Commander of the Jewish War
Veterans of the U.S.A an-
nounced that his organization,
the nation's oldest active
veterans' organization, will
award a special Medal of Merit
to Ms. Uli Derickson, crew
member of TWA's Flight No.
847. The award, to be presented
at the convention, is "in
recognition of Ms. Derickson's
courage in the face of grave
personal danger.
National Commander
Greenberg noted, "Our 90th year
is a celebration particularly
appropriate for us to give such
an award to Ms. Derickson.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian
Affairs, is going to the Middle
East, apparently in an at-
tempt to revive the peace
process following the failure of
the Arab Summit in
Casablanca, Morocco last
week to support the peace
efforts of King Hussein of
Jordan.
The State Department an-
nouncement of the Murphy trip
did not mention the summit and.
as read by Deputy spokesman
Charles Redman, had an op-
timistic tone to it. Murphy is
going to the Mideast "to consult
further on how best to move the
peace process forward," Redman
said. He said Murphy will be
visiting Israel, Egypt and
Jordan and there was a
possibility that the trip could be
extended to other countries.
But Redman stressed that "no
final decision has yet been made
on Murphy meeting with a joint
Palestinian Jordanian delegation
since the U.S. has still not
approved any of the Palestinians
on a Ust sent it by Hussein as
members of the Palestinian
delegation.
"As we have constantly said,
we are prepared to take part in
such a meeting if arrangements
can be mutually agreed and if
the meeting clearly leads to our
objectives of direct negotiations
between the parties," Redman
said. "It remains our conviction
that only through a negotiated
settlement can a just and lasting
peace between Israel and all its
neighbors be achieved."
(In Israel, meanwhile, Hana
Siniora, editor of the East
Jerusalem Arabic newspaper A
Fajar and named as one of the
West Bank Palestinians to the
joint delegation. told reporters at
the Foreign Press Association
here that the delegation will
meet with Murphy before the
end of the month. Siniora did not
provide additional details. He is
scheduled to soon leave for
Jordan. Another Palestinian
representation from the ad-
ministered territories, Fayez
Abu Radhme. of Gaza, is already
in Jordan.)
A senior State Department
official briefing reporters later
said one of the "options" for this
trip was that Murphy could meet
with the joint Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation if the
obstacles could be overcome. But
he conceded, that Hussein is still
insisting that the U.S. talk to
members of the Palestine
Liberation Organization, which
the U.S. refuses to do and which
is why the list has not been
approved. Most of the names on
the list, which was drawn up by
PLO chief Yasir Arafat, are
members of the PLO.
Israel Radio reported last
week that Deputy Secretary of
State John Whitehead told
Israeli officials in Jerusalem that
Hussein stressed to him that he
would not change any of the
names on the list. State
Department officials refused to
confirm this. The official briefing
Continued on Page 7-A
America's New Ambassador to Israel, Thomas R. Pickering
(left), made his only appearance before a Jewish audience prior
to taking up his post in Tel Aviv in an address to the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organizations.
He was introduced by Kenneth J. Bialkin (right). Conference
chairman, as "a man we believe will be a worthy successor to
Sam Lewis."


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Page 2-A The Jeaisn FtacknatWrriday. August 16. 1965
Cabinet Discussions on Treasury
Proposal to Dismiss Some
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JERUSALEM -JTAi -
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Reagan's
Seven
Dilemma Over The Other
Hostages In Lebanon
President Ronald Reagan and
his senior advisers are currently
wrestling with a wrenching
problem familiar to Israeli
leaders. There are seven
Americans still being held
captive in Lebanon. Some of
them have now been missing for
more than a year. U.S. officials
are not even sure that all of them
are alive. There does not appear
to be any quick release in sight.
The families of the seven
Americans in recent days have
embarked on a major campaign
, aimed at focusing governmental
and news media attention on
their loved ones. In interviews,
they make a very emotional and
dramatic plea for help. As a
result, there is automatically
heightened pressure on the
Reagan Administration to try to
I respond.
By all accounts, a similar
I effort made in Israel by the
families of the three Israeli
I soldiers recently released in
[exchange for the more than 1,000
I Palestinian prisoners, including
many convicted terrorists, was
lindeed very instrumental in
convincing the Israeli leadershp
o accept the lop-sided and
ontroversial terms. It even-
tually proved impossible for the
Israeli government to resist that
kind of internal pressure from its
pwn citizens. The same kinds of
pressure are being exerted in
Washington.
Thus, some of the family
nembers want the Reagan
^ministration to make con-
essions in order to secure the
please of the American captives
Ii Lebanon. They are primarily
oncerned with the fate of their
elatives. This is to be expected.
long-tern) foreign policy con-
siderations for the United States
' not really considered.
Most specificallyc $h.ey want
Washington to lean "heavily on
Kuwait to free 17 persons,
nostly Iraqi Shi'ites but in-
cluding three Lebanese, con-
ricted last year of bombing the
TS. embassy there. These
risoners are sought by the
ostages' Lebanese captors,
resumably elements of the
hadowy Islamic Jihad.
Indeed, the hijackers of the
VA airliner in June had
iitially demanded the release of
lie prisoners in Kuwait in their
rst set of conditions for freeing
He passengers and crew
embers. It was only after
luwait made clear its refusal to
Jpitulate that the hijackers
the matter of the then
0-plus mostly Shi'ite detainees
ling held at the Atlit prison
[.side Haifa. Mrs. Lucille
the wife of Cable News
twork correspondent Jerry
himself a former U.S.
Ptive in Lebanon for nearly
year, reflected this readiness
(accept the terrorists' demands
fen she said that the Kuwaitis
uld release the prisoners.
8 are relatives of people
ng held" in Kuwait "who
it their relatives back," she
"This is war and in war you
change prisoners."
The American family members
derstandably feel frustrated
he lack of progress in freeing
relatives. They want to sit
with Reagan personally to
cuss the issue. But he is
uctant to do so.
were almost hourly news
bulletins broadcast on television
This has certainly not been the
case with the other seven -
both before and after the TWA
incident.
Administration officials insist
that the United States is doing
everything possible to locate and
ffje the seven. "The
Administration has not and will
not forget our missing citizens
nor will we rest until they are
safely reunited with their
families,'' White House
spokesman Larry Speakes said
on July 31. "We have the
deepest sympathy for the suf-
fering of their families. No
political goals can justify the
inhuman treatment being ac-
corded these innocent victims."
But what Speakes and other
U.S. spokesmen did not say was
that there remains a very basic
difference between these seven
Americans and the freed TWA
hostages. What is well un-
derstood by U.S. officials but
largely unspoken in public are
the different circumstances
surrounding the capture of the
two groups of Americans.
For one thing, the TWA
passengers were businessmen or
tourists on route from Athens to
Rome and then, for most of
them, to New York and home.
Without warning, their plane
was commandeered and their
lives threatened. No one had told
them to worry about travelling
aboard a U.S. commercial
airliner leaving Athens. The U.S.
Government. before the
hijacking, had not issued any
travel advisories about Greece.
But the same certainly cannot
be said about the situation in
Lebanon. As State Department
spokesman Charles Redman
pointed out on July 30, the
-United States has long been
aware that Americans are
particularly vulnerable in the
chaos of Lebanon. "Our first
travel advisory for that country
was issued in 1975," he said.
"The current travel advisory,
which remains in force, dates
from February 1984. No one can
assume immunity from
terrorism. We continue to urge
Americans to avoid travel to
Lebanon."and those still present
in the country to take advantage
of opportunities to leave.
Thus, the seven Americans
being held in Lebanon, before
they were kidnapped, were very
much aware of the dangers they
faced by merely being in that
:ountry. They were by no means
;he first Americans captured by
-he various militias in Lebanon.
Unfortunately, there has been
l long history of such assaults,
ncluding the assassination of
.he President of the American
University of Beirut, Malcolm
Kerr. Who was murdered shortly
after he arrived in the Lebanese
capital. Three of the Americans
being held in Lebanon are af-
filiated with the American
University. Yet they decided
for whatever professional, moral
or personal reasons to accept
the risk of remaining in Lebanon
even after Kerr's death.
real reason to suspect trouble.
None of this, of course, means
that the U.S. should ease in its
efforts to free the seven. These
people should be brought home
as quickly as possible. But it
does help to explain partially
why there is such a different
emphasis in Washington's
course of action.
There is a second major
difference as well. During the
TWA affair, there was an ad-
dress with which Washington
could deal. The Amal leader.
Nabih Berri, had assumed
responsibility for the welfare of
the captives. He was vulnerable
to pressure. An arrangement,
therefore, could be made.
But that is not the case with
the seven. No one has come
forward to claim specific
responsibility. The Syrians insist
that they are trying to help but
can't do much. Even the Shi'ite
spiritual leader Sheik
Mohammed Hussein Fadlallah
told "The Washington Post" on
July 31 that his own efforts to
free the Americans have been
fruitless. He denied any links to
the captors.
Meanwhile, the waiting game
continues. The White House
maintains that it will not give in
to terrorists' demands. "We will
not make concessions to
terrorists." Speakes said last
week. We will not ask other
governments to do so. Conceding
to terrorists would be tan-
1 amount to caving in to black-
mail. We believe such con-
cessions would only encourage
terrorists throughout the world
to think these tactics can suc-
ceed and would lead to the
taking of more hostages."
But the U.S. is still groping
for some solution. "Our refusal
to concede to terrorists does not
mean, however, we're unwilling
to talk," Speakes continued.
"We have been and continue to
be in contact with numerous
individuals and governments in
the region in an effort to free
these individuals. We believe
that quiet diplomacy is the best
way to proceed and believe that
detailing our efforts to obtain
their release would be coun-
terproductive."
That is not what the families
want to hear. So the public
pressure from them mounts.
Some U.S. officials fear that that
is exactly what the terrorists are
counting on to eventually win
the release of their comrades in
Kuwait. But for the time being,
there seems to be little that the
Reagan Administration can do
to halt that pressure or to free
the seven Americans.
By the Washington
correspondent of the
Jewish Chronicle
Friday, August 16. 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
New Israeli Nursing Robots
To Serve the Disabled
Researchers at the Faculty of
Mechanical Engineering of the
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology, are devising a
nursing robot that will run
errands, fetch objects, serve and
even cook in response to
verbal commands.
When Johan Borenstein of the
Robotics Department issues a
firm two-word command: "Sink-
move," the robot model wheels
across the room on its way to the
sink. And when Borenstein
issues the next instruction :
"Home-move," the model
returns to his side.
Research in progress aims at
the development of a
sophisticated nursing robot,
capable of performing varied
tasks for the physically disabled,
i.e., opening or closing a cup-
board, window, or door,
replacing a video cassette, or
preparing simple dishes.
The nursing robot will
comprise at least three major
components: a self-propelled,
computer-controlled carriage, the
robot mounted on it, and a fixed
source of radiation either
infrared or laser beams to
serve as a permanent reference
point for the system's frequent
reorientation.
The carriage, equipped with
sensors to help it avoid or
overcome obstacles, will move in
response to voice signals from
the patient. Spoken commands
will activate the robot arm and
activate numerous possible
tasks.
0
A direct telephone link' will
enable it to dial a number on
request or if an emergency
occurs and help is needed. The
robot will "see" with an "eye"
very similar in design to a
camera rangefinder.
In spite of this system's
extensive capabilities, it is
expected to be relatively
inexpensive. Its developers'
target retail price is $10,000 aiuT
it is hoped that the project will
be completed by the end of 1986.
"Israel is an ideal place for the
development and export of
robotic systems," notes Prof.
Yoram Koren, head of
Technion's Robotics Laboratory,
"because software is at the heart
of the system and we have a
fund of the right sort of ex-
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"K1- *V-1J
iiie uewisn r lonciian/Knrlav Anmiot 4 1Q8*
Page 4-A
The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 16, 1985
people in the right place to allow his return g
to the U .S. Rudolph was forced to leave the g
country last year to avoid prosecution for g
his participation in brutalizing slave g
laborers at a Nazi rocket factory in World g
War II. |
Rudolph's past activities are |
noteworthy. He was head of the production |
of V-2 rockets in a factory attached to the g:
Dora-Nordhausen concentration camp
where a third to one half of the 60,000
prisoners died because of inhumane
working conditions. But Rudolph later
came to the U.S. as part of a group of
rocket specialists and eventually headed
the Saturn V rocket program that produced
the rocket which brought the Apollo
astronauts to the moon.
Regardless of his past work for NASA,
where he received its highest awards, the
efforts by his colleagues are indeed
troubling, though it becomes especially
disturbing in view of the rehabilitation
efforts and the channels through which his
colleagues have made their voices heard.
One channel is said to be the White House
Communications Office, where some
suggest Rudolph supporters may have an
ally.
The Confused Purposes
Some members of the American Jewish
community seem to be at least a little bit
ambivalent about the separation of church-
state principle at the same time that the
rest of us applaud, for example, the recent
Supreme Court session that issued a
resounding affirmation that it will not
allow the Constitutional separation wall to
be bulldozed.
In one case involving the principle, the
High Court said that an Alabama law that
permitted voluntary silent prayer in public
schools could simply not be justified in
light of the Constitutional prohibition
involved.
Promptly, there were mutterings from
_nong some Jews that a moment of silent
prayer, provided k ws not sectarian, could
do no harm to a wet-trained Jewish youth
who would, of course. stick to the last of his
Hebrew school education. Provided in this
instance of those who seek to get around
thiags is unfortunately too often spelled to
read"*:"
But this would not warrant sufficient
concern did members of the Orthodox
community not promptly voice its
displeasure, in the loudest terms possible,
over another High Court ruling, this one
involving the constitutionality of programs
that provided public school teachers to
parothial schools, including yeshivas. The
court warned: no more.
To which these members of the com-
munity responded with the scathing
criticism that the ruling would be
devastating" to their Jewish eduational
metheds, thus to some extent confusing the
general public because the American
Jewish Congress went all out in hailing the
Court's rejection of the program.
Divide and Conquer
The public, of course, has little un-
derstanding of the distinctions between a
Jewish civil libertarian organization and
Jews who are Orthodox. It is not that we
are worried about public understanding so
much as that there is cause for concern
stemming from the ancient practice of
divide and conquer.
When on so significant an issue as
church-state separation significant in
the sense that it is part of the lifeblood of
American Jewish security some Jews
voice in loud tones opinions that seem to
question the intelligence of the separation
principle, in effect all of us are weakened in
our support of it. So too, ultimately, is the
principle itself.
We must not, for example, forget the
same Supreme Court's ruling in the
Paw tucket, R.I. case last year involving
the constitutionality of a Nativity scene as
part of a municipal Christmas celebration.
In that case, the Court ruled that the
Constitution "affirmatively mandates
accommodation, not merely tolerance of all
religions."
Since, patently, the principle is in oc-
casional jeopardy it would be the better
part of discretion for us not to divide the
impact of our occasional victories.
White House Must Speak
An ongoing, though discreet effort is
underway in Washington where former
colleagues of NASA scientist Arthur
Rudolph are working to convince the right
The Voice of Buchanan
That office is run by Patrick Buchanan,
an increasingly powerful figure in the
Reagan White house and past opponent of
the Justice Department's Office of Special
Investigations, the unit responsible with
forcing Rudolph to depart the U.S. Prior to
joining the White House, Buchanan, as a
syndicated columnist, wrote that he found
no "singularity" about the Holocaust that
would justify maintaining the OSI unit.
Buchanan also denounced the OSI,
before he joined the Reagan White House,
for accepting Soviet-supplied evidence in
proceedings against accused Nazi war
criminals. He told Allan Ryan, a former
ejewisli Floridiart
OmCS**nANT-IIONI MK.IIIi- Hi Mill
PO m171.
PUOKSHOCHTr LBOMINDLIN
H>I
OSI director, in a 1982 television interview
that "you've got a great atrocity that
occurred 35-45 years ago, okay? Why
continue to invest put millions of
dollars into investigating that? I mean,
why keep a special office to investigate
Nazi war crimes? Why not abolish your
office?"
Buchanan's hostility toward the OSI and
his view that it should be abolished has
never been repudiated nor has he in any
way since joining the White House staff
enunciated his support for the President's
policy of supporting the work of the OSI.
In view of the ongoing efforts to
rehabilitate Rudolph, an effort underway
by his former German colleagues here in
the United States, the White House official
ought to firmly announce where he stands
on the critical issue of support of the OSI.
Between You and Me
The Apartheid Issue
UZANNESHOCHIT
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AMW-U SO Oul Friday, August 18,1985 29 AB 5745
Volume 58
Number 33
By BORIS SMOLAR
American Jewish
organizations, while opposing
apartheid and the recent
escalation of violence against the
black population there, are
divided on the question of
economic sanctions against the
government of South Africa.
Under legislation passed June
5, in the House of Represen-
tatives by a bipartisan majority
of 295-127, an immediate ban
would have been imposed on
loans by American banks to the
Republic of South Africa and
government-run corporations,
except those providing/education
and housing on a non-
discriminatory basis.
The House legislation would
also have banned the sale of
computer and of nuclear
equipment, supplies, material
and technology to the South
African government. New in-
vestment by American
businesses in South Africa and
the sale of its coins here would
have also been prohibited, but
these sanctions could be waived
if certain steps were taken to
dismantle the apartheid system.
The Senate Foreign Relations
Committee voted 16 to 1 to ban
only bank loans and to consider
deferring for 18 months the
banning of new investments by
U.S. business firms. A House-
Senate conference committee
later reached a compromise for
milder sanctions.
Supporters of sanctions
sought a vote by the full Senate
on July 31, three days before
Congress adjourned for its
August recess. Their effort failed
and the Senate adjourned
without voting on the com-
promise bill.
President Reagan and his
Administration remain opposed
to sanctions. Reagan may use
his Presidential right to veto any
economic sanctions bill.
However, supporters of sanc-
tions in both Houses command
the two-thirds majority needed
to override a veto.
THE JEWISH STAND: The
most important national Jewish
organization supporting the anti-
apartheid legislation passed by
the House is the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Counril (NJCRAC). The um-
brella organization of 11 national
Jewish groups, it plans jointly
coordinated action to deal with
developments of concern to
Jews. Affiliated with the
NJCRAC are also 113 local
Jewish Community Councils.
The NJCRAC believes that
the measure passed by the
House represents the soundest
and most constructive approach
toward mobilizing U.S. influence
to dismantle apartheid. When its
position favoring the House
sanctions bill was presented to
its national executive committee,
eight of its member agencies
went on record as supporting it:
the American Jewish Congress,
Jewish War Veterans of the
U.S., Jewish Labor Committee,
the central bodies of the Reform,
Conservative and Orthodox
congregations, the National
Council of Jewish Women, and
Women's American ORT.
Three of the NJCRAC
national member agencies The
American Jewish Committee, the
Anti-Defamation League of
Bnai Brith, and Hadassah -
did not participate in the voting.
The American Jewish Com-
mittee, at its annual meeting list
May, adopted a resolution ex-
pressing abhorrence of apartheid
and supporting "appropriate
proposed U.S. Federal legislation
that would influence the South
African white government to
dismantle its apartheid policy.
The resolution expresses
support for legislation that
would: 1) ban U.S. bank loans to
entities owned and controlled by
the South African government
unless and until the government
makes substantial progress
toward the elimination o
discriminatory practices; 8
restrict exports earmarked tor
use by the South African
military and police; 3) requut
that U.S. companies operating I
South Africa with 10 or more
employees face U.S. government
sanctions if within two ye"
they failed to comply with non
segregation of the races id
work facilities as well as
eating and comfort facilities, ano
if they did not introduce equ*
and fair employment practw
for aU employees and incM*
the number of blacks and oow
non-whites in management *
supervisory positions.
In a subsequent statement,
the AJCommittee called up*
the South African government*
lift the state of emergency ano
move "without delay "*
abolition of apartheid.
It seems however that with"
the AJCommittee there
influential elements who""T
urging the agency to foUo
policy of President Keag
especially with regard to m
ctions. Top leaders J w
actual
AJCommittee said priv
the agency did not
Continued on Page B-A


Rare Judaica May
Be Exhibited
In U.S. Next Year
Friday, August 16, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
By RABBI PHILIP HIAT
Four years ago, Dr. Philip
Miller, librarian of Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion in New York, and I were
invited to Poland to seek out im-
portant Judaica that had survived
the Holocaust.
That pilgrimage resulted in the
exhibit, "Fragments of
Greatness," and initiated a conti-
nuing quest to uncover and
display publicly in the U.S. other
hidden pockets of Jewish ritual ob-
jects and manuscripts left behind
by our ancestors. The success of
"Fragments of Greatness" paved
the way for our current work at
the Vatican.
AFTER AN extensive period of
negotiations, the U.nion of
American Hebrew Congregations
received an invitation from the
Vatican to view Judaica that has
been seen previously only by a
handful of scholars. As a result of
our trip, a selection of the Vatican
[collection may be exhibited in
1986 for the first time in the
| United States.
Our delegation to Rome was
headed by Rabbi Alexander
Schindler, president of the
UAHC. Dr. Walter Persegati,
[secretary of the Vatican museum,
W^.^PP.?!gn.?r..MfiiWSfcan. official

with the Commission for Rela-
tions between Catholics and Jews,
joined us as we examined various
tombstone inscriptions dating
back to the second century of the
Common Era.
With the exception of one small
inscription, all of these were
chiseled in Greek, the dominant
language of that period. Yet many
of the tombstones were heavily
decorated with Jewish symbols -
the menorah, the lulav (palm
branch), the etrog (citron), and, in
one case, a matzoh. possibly in-
dicating that the person had died
at Passover.
WITHIN THE Vatican's ongo-
ing exhibit of Judaica, we viewed
a Spanish Torah, a Megillah, two
candelabra from the apartment of
Pope Paul VI, one of a pair of
tefillin, and a silver filigreed
Megillah case.
The next day, Father Leonard
Boyle, prefect of the Vatican
library, accompanied us as we
toured the manuscript collection.
With the help of our two
specialists, Dr. Miller and Dr.
Michael Singer, associate pro-
fessor of Jewish history at HUC-
JIR in Los Angeles, we selected a
dozen manuscripts and printed
books for closer examination. One
of the items, was .a. .12th .CwtuxY.
emm\m
moc
Dr. Philip Miller (left) and Rabbi Philip Hiat
examine amient Jewish burial tablets at the
Vatican Museum.
Torah written on leather in the
tradition of North Africa.
We read codices of the 12th,
13th and 14th Centuries, produc-
ed in Rome, Spain and Germany
- the Spanish codex distinguish-
ed by its exquisite illuminations.
Also on display was the first Son-
cino Bible, printed in 1488, and
the Bomberg Bible, printed in
Venice in 1522 with the permis-
sion of the Vatican authorities.
We also saw the famous
Samaritan tri-columnar bible (in
Hebrew, Arabic and Samaritan)
with commentary written in
Palestine, and the Polyglot Bible
(1514-17) in Hebrew with transla-
tions in Arabic, Aramaic, Arme-
nian, Coptic and Ethiopian.
THE LIBRARY'S collection of
gilded glass some pieces intact,
others fragmented includes a
2nd CentuiyCE pfe* that depicts
the Temple of Solomon. We also
were shown seven ancient oil
lamps decorated with engraved
menorot.
What did all this signify? First,
that Hebrew, along with Latin,
Greek and Arabic, was, in former
times, not only respected but
venerated, that the mark of a
scholar was his command of any
or all these languages. For exam-
ple, in 1701, a Vatican library
scribe took some 30 of Pope Cle-
ment XI's sermons and translated
them into Hebrew, completely an-
notated and vocalized.
As of this writing, Dr. Persegati
has received clearance from the
director general of the Vatican
museum to release its Judaica for
exhibition in the United States.
We await final world on the
material in .the Biblioteca-
Apostolica. ; i;v- ---..?.
THE VATICAN must be com-
mended for having worked so
hard to bring about this exhibi-
tion, and, above all, for having
preserved our Jewish heritage,
making it possible to fill gaps in
our knowledge of the past.
Included in our delegation were
Dr. Maury Leibovitz, benefactor
and patron of special projects in
Jewish history and president of
the Knoedler Gallery; Spencer
Partrich, of Detroit; Rabbi Dan-
nell Schwartz, of Detroit's Temple
Beth-El; and Father Joseph Fen-
ton, Office of Communications,
U.S. Catholic Conference.
Rabbi Philip Hiat is assis-
tant to the president of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations for Special
P'TOjeets. ~,-
Jitigua and Barbuda Issue Postage
Stamp Honoring Maimonides
Antigua and Barbuda
lave issued a postage stamp
lepicting Moses ben
laimon, better kjiown as
laimonides, whose 850th
irthday is being celebrated
1985.
Official date of release of the
jtamp-was-June-17, and it was
lesigned and printed by the-
Vmise of Questa in multicolor
ftnography.
[Maimonides was born in Cor-
fcba, Spain on the day before
fessover in 1135. His worldwide
pputation stems from his role as
religious leader, physician,
hilospher and scholar.
' THE TIME Maimonides
as 13 and became Bar Mitzvah,
e city of Cordoba was overrun
a sect of Moslems who would
(lerate no other faith in their do-
Bin besides Islam.
Rabbi Maimon and his family,
along with most of Cordoba's
Jews, were forced to flee. For the
next ten years, they wandered
from one town to another in
southern Spain, unable to remain
long because of the continuing
conquest of the Moslem sect which
had originally forced them out of
Cordoba.
During this, period of upheaval,
the young Maimonides continued
to study and refine his
philosophical skills. In 1159, his
family and other Jews from
southern Spain managed to settle
in the city of Fez, then the capital
of Morocco.
Religious intolerance once again
forced them to flee after a brief
five-year stay. On their way to
Egypt, young Maimonides visited
the Holy Land. There, they made
special pilgrimages to the cities of
Hebron and Jerusalem.
Just a few months after arriving
in Egypt, tragedy struck the fami-
ly when Rabbi Maimon passed
away. Support of the family was
now assumed by a younger
brother named David. For a while,
all went well as David became a
successful jewel merchant who
specialized in importing precious
gems from India.
ON A business trip to India,
David was caught in a storm and
drowned when the ship wrecked
in the Indian Ocean. He was car-
rying the entire family fortune
with him at the time.
In order to support the family.
Maimonides began to practice
medicine. His reputation
developed to such a point that he
was eventually appointed to serve
as the personal physician of both
the Grand Vizier and Sultan of the
Egyptian caliphate.
850TH
ANNIVERSARY
OF THE BIRTH OF
MAIMONIDES
ANTIGUA
AND
BARBUDA
"-, .--iijjsa^
and Now: In 'Then'photo (left) are seen
s Citadel and part of the Old City walls
r3/ after the Six-Day war of 1967. 'Now'
photo (right) shows this same view, but with
lush green landscape added.
In addition to the extensive
medical practice that he carried
on, Maimonides found the time to
compose very important works of
philosphy.
Among his most significant
scholarly achievements are the
publication of Mureh Neiruchim
and Mishnah Torah. Among
students of Jewish religious
philosophy, his contributions are
considered unique.
Of him, it has been said, "From
Moses (the Lawgiver) to Moses
(Maimonides), there arose none
like Moses (Maimonides).
AT THE AGE of 68,
Maimonides passed away. In addi-
tion to his activities as physician
to the royal court of the caliphate
and composer of prized
philosphical works, the son of
Maimon was also the Chief Rabbi
of the Egyptian Jewish
community.
Antigua and Barbuda is a
former British colony situated in
the Leeward Islands of the Carib-
bean. The stamp honoring
Maimonides is available as a $2
issue. A special souvenir sheet,
with floral design decoration at
the border, has a $5 face value.


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 16, 1985
Austria to Return Jewish
Art Stolen By the Nazis
VIENNA (JTA) The
Austrian government has agreed
to return to Jewish ownership all
artworks that were confiscated by
f "the Nazis from Jews during World
* War II. the World Jewish Con-
gress reported.
Agreement on the return of the
art was reached here in a meeting
between Austrian Foreign
Minister Leopold Gratz and WJC
Secretary General Israel Singer.
Austrian Chancellor Fred
Sinowatz telephoned them during
their meeting to express his sup-
port for the return of the art to
Jewish ownership. He confirmed
that this was the understanding
he had reached in a private
meeting with WJC president
Edgar Bronfman last Jan. 29.
THE CONFISCATED art was
given to Austria by U.S. military
forces in 1955 on condition that
Austria make "every effort to
return the works to the extent
they had not already done so" to
Apartheid
Issue
Cootinued from Page 4 A
oppose the NJCRAC's position
but "did not associate itself with
it" because the AJC has already
adopted an anti-apartheid
resolution in May. They in-
dicated that they could not join
in supporting the NJCRAC
position before their next annual
meeting because of the
possibility of new discussions
taking place at that time.
The Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith, in a policy
statement, reaffirmed its op-
position to apartheid as a
particularly abhorrent form of
racial discrimination. It sup-
ported U.S. legislation that
would require American com-
panies operating in South Africa
to comply with American fair
employment practices but takes
no position on the economic
disengagement issue at this
time.
Hadassah condemned apar-
theid as a system which denies
the most bask human rights to
the overwhelming majority of
the population simply because of
their color or race. However, the
Hadassah statement liMfcsd
itself to urging the U.S.
government and democratic
governments everywhere "to
help find and implement a
peaceful and democratic method
by which the inhumane system
of apartheid will be eliminated
from South Africa."
STAND OF Sooth African
Jewry: What about the Jewish
organizations in South Africa?
What is their stand on the
apartheid issue?
There are about 120.000 Jews
living today in South Africa,
most of them born there. They
are bemg considered as part of
the "white" population by both
the noo Jewish whites and by
the blacks and enjoy full rights
as "whites."
The South African Jews feel
they are in a sensitive position
and cannot afford to antagonize
the non-Jewtan white population.
The community's attitude
toward apartheid was expressed
m a cautious resolution by its
representative body, the South
African Board of Jewish
Deputies. It called upon the
community "to cooperate in
securing the immediate
amelioration and ultimate
removal of all unjust
discrimination based on race.
creed or color."
the original owners or heirs. The
art had been stored in a
monastery near Vienna since
1955. But many paintings and
other items were removed for
replacement in museums and
other Austrian institutions.
Despite contradictory com-
ments by Austrian officials during
the past few months. Singer said
that Sinowatz and Gratz made it
clear that the agreement covers
all the works of art. including
those currently in state museums.
Sinowatz told Singer that he
would ask the Parliament, when it
reconvenes, to pass a law
establishing that all the objects
looted by the Nazis were the pro-
perty of and are to be returned to
the rightful Jewish owners.
Under the agreement, a com-
plete list of the artwork is to be
made available and disseminated
through the media so that rightful
owners and their heirs may file
claims, after a six month period.
Artworks for which rightful
claimants cannot be determined,
will pass to the ownership of the
International Jewish community
with the proceeds to be divided
among Jewish Holocaust sur-
vivors living in Austria and
u-ound the world.
ACCORDING TO Singer.
Sinowatz said the recent meeting
was to clarify- and reaffirm the
understanding he reached with
Bronfman in view of "some
bureaucratic foot-dragging" since
their meeting six months ago
Singer added that Sinowatz has
instructed Finance Minister
Franz Vranitsky and Science
Minister Heinz Fisher to proceed
"with all due speed" in expediting
this matter.
Bronfman announced that the
Committee for Jewish Claims on
Austria, under the chairmanship
of Rabbi Israel Miller, would be
the agency responsible for all
technical arrangements and pro-
cedures on behalf of the Jewish
community.
Baker Urged to Investigate Official
Whose Letter Invoked 'Christian Nation'
By AVIVA CANTOR
NEW YORK (JTA) Rep.
Patricia Schroeder (D.. Call
called upon Treasury Secretary
James Baker to investigate the
activities of a self-described
Christian activist in his
department who wrote a
California attorney that "the
U.S. is a 'Christian nation' as
more than 85 percent of adult
Americans consider themselves
'Christians'."
The activities of the Treasury
employee. Christopher Sundseth.
came to light when a postcard
sent by Gerald Leib of Mountain
View. California. to the
Education Department, received
a reply from Sundseth which
Schroeder described as "of a
threatening nature."
Sundseth subsequently told
news media that he "and a small
network of friends in govern-
ment jobs" are involved in a
letter-writing campaign to "anti-
religious zealots." Schroeder
asked Baker to look into Sun-
dseth s activities to check if his
"pen pal dub meets on gover-
nment time, uses government
facilities or is the unauthorized
recipient of government
documents."
The case began when Leib
wrote to Tom Tancredo. the
Education Department's
regional representative in
Denver. His postcard protested
Tancredo s mailing to Christian
schools in his area, earlier this
year. a speech saying
godiessness bad taken over
"this Christian nation." The
speech had been written five
years earlier by former Moral
Majority leader Robert Billings,
then an Education Department
official.
Leib wrote Tancredo that "the
U.S. is not now and never has
been a Christian nation, as
Billings claims" and that as a
"non-Christian- he was upset
at his (Billings) blatant
preference for the Christian
religion." Leib is reportedly
Jewish.
Tancredo never replied to the
postcard, but Leib did receive a
letter from Sundseth. a political
appointee of the Reagan
Administration who works as a
GS-13 special assistant at the
Inter-American Development
Bank at the Treasury Depart-
ment. He wrote:
"This country was founded by
Christians who were escaping
the same kind of small minded
tripe you espouse. The framers
of the Constitution attempted
specifically to anticipate those of
your ilk who would try and
abridge the very rights 0f
freedom to worship guaranteed
us by the document."
Calling Leib "a truly amazing
but pathetic creature" whose
"knowledge of this country's
history and structure of
government is minimal at best,"
Sundseth concluded in his P.S.-
"When you die, you will be
giving account to Jesus Christ
your creater, who happens
himself to be a Christian. I hope
you are prepared.
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Murphy Returning
To Mideast
Friday, August 16, 1985/The Jewish Floridlan Page 7-A
Continued from Page 1-A
reporters said Murphy will be
talking to Palestinians in
Jerusalem and Amman as he has
done on all his previous visits to
the Mideast. He refused to say
whether this would include any
of the persons on Hussein's list.
The official said another
obstacle is Hussein's insistence
that peace negotiations must be
held in the context of an in-
ternational meeting which will
-include the five permanent
members of the United Nations
Security Council. The U.S.
rejects it and particularly op-
poses including the Soviet Union
in the peace process because it
has no diplomatic relations with
Israel, among other reasons.
The official had no assessment
on recent reports that the Soviet
Union is moving toward
diplomatic relations with Israel,
except to note that the USSR
, ,-i- interests in the Mideast and
-is apparently trying various
options.
The official stressed that the
most important issue to be
resolved before Murphy can
meet with a joint delegation, is
that the talks have to lead to
direct negotiations between
Israel and Jordan and the
Palestinians.
However, Israel is opposed to
any U.S. meeting with the joint
delegation before direct
negotiations are held. Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir
reaffirmed this in a speech last
Friday, charging that the U.S.
was falling into a trap since the
only purpose of the meeting was
to bring about U.S. recognition
of the PLO.
Meanwhile, the U.S. had no
assessment about the Arab
summit which only a week ago
the State Department has called
"a significant event" which it
hoped will provide backing for
Hussein. "In so far as the
(summit) communique enhances
the prospect for negotiation, a
peaceful resolution of differences,
it obviously has our support,"
Redman said.
But the Administration may
be showing its resentment of the
failure of at least one country,
Saudi Arabia, to support the
peace process at Casablanca by
not having Murphy visit it on
his upcoming trip- Saudi Arabia
is usually part of the itinerary
for any such trip.
The Saudis may have
prevented the summit from
achieving the hopes the U.S. had
for it when King Fahd did not
attend, just downgrading its
importance. Instead Fahd sent
his Foreign Minister, Crown
Prince Abdullah, who reportedly
prevented any condemnation of
Syria. Syria which opposes the
Hussein peace effort did not
attend the Casablanca con-
ference along with Libya,
Algeria, South Yemen and
Lebanon.
Young Judaea Reunion Marks Close
of Group's 75th Anniversary Year
NEW YORK Alumni of
Young Judaea, one of the
nation's oldest and largest
Zionist youth organizations, will
be reunited during the Hadassah
national Convention Aug. 18-21,
for a celebration marking the end
of the group's 75th anniversary
year.
The reunion, scheduled for
1:30 p.m. on Sunday in the
Trianon Ballroom of the New
York Hilton Hotel, is expected
to attract former members of the
H adassah-sponsored
organization from throughout
the United States, according to
Rosalie Schechter and Bess
Rothbaum, Co-Chairmen of the
Young Judaea 75th Anniversary
Celebration.
ooooeoooooo
ijewish Jewish National Fund
5VnBoL' i Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
SUPPORT THE JNF
i
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PLANT TREES IN ISRAEL
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Plant as Many Trees as You Wish
($5 Per Tree)
18 TreesChai
25 TreesCluster
36 TreesDouble Chai
50 Trees-Jubilee
75 Trees-Arbor
100 Trees-Garden
300 Trees-Orchard
1000 Trees-Grove*
Holiday Greetings
Birthday
Anniversary
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Wedding
Graduation
In Honor
In Memory
Get Well
Good Wishes
New Baby
New Year
Special Occasion
In Gratitude

* Dedication Ceremony in Israel and a
Special Plaque in the Forest is Included
Establish an Annuity with the JNF
Remember the JNF in your Will
Link your Name Eternally with
the Land of Israel
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln Rd.. Suite 353. Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone 538 6464
WERE LOOKING OUT
FOR MORE THAN
JUST YOUR ELECTRICITY
FPL introduces Radio Watch. It's similar
to most neighborhood crime watch programs
but has the added advantage of utilizing
FPUs resources.
All FPLs 3,000 radio dispatched vehi-
cles are on the lookout for crime, suspicious
activity, accidents and emergencies.
Our drivers have been specially trained,
in cooperation with local police depart-
ments, to observe and report. Obviously,
they have no police power but will function
as an extra 3,000 pairs of eyes to aid you.
At FPL we believe that crime is every-
body's concern. And since we're part of
"everybody" we want to do what we can.


n------in n nw_ t l ra> raa nr)r.
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 16, 1985
Leningrad Hebrew Teacher
Given Three-Year Sentence
NEW YORK Roald
Zelichonok, a 49-year-old Hebrew
teacher who has sought
emigration to Israel since 1979,
was sentenced to three years in
the Soviet Gulag on charges of
allegedly "defaming the Soviet
state and social system," the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry (NCSJ) learned.
Evidentiary materials in the case
against Zelichonok reportedly
included an interview he had
given to a Canadian tourist, as
well as "letters written to policy-
makers in the West" which
contained information about the
Soviet Union.
The one-day trial, during
Prof. Yehuda Ben-Shaul, a
prominent biologist and vice-
rector of Tel Aviv University
since 1983, has been elected
rector by the University
senate, tie succeeds Prof.
Yoram Dinstein, who served a
five-year term.
,
I
., : ; :;:
which Zelichonok was permitted
to speak freely with his wife
Galina, and his friend Vladimir
Lifshits, was viewed by the
NCSJ as "surprisingly liberal
and democratic" as compared
with usual Soviet legal
proceedings. However, the
purpose of the three-year labor
camp sentence meted out at the
trial's conclusion is seen as a
means of intimidating Jewish
activists, and convincing them
that speaking out to the West
does not pay off, the Conference
added.
Only days before his arrest,
Zelichonok had issued critical
public statements to the Deputy
Director of the Leningrad Post
Office and the Head of the
Foreign Relations Department at
the USSR Ministry of Com-
munications. In a detailed ac-
count, he called the persistent
Soviet interference with his mail
a "very grave violation of in-
ternal and international law."
Among the letters used as a
pretext against Zelichonok is one
addressed to Israel President
Chaim Herzog. Asked during the
pre-trial investigation how one's
private letters can be used as
evidence against him, the
Leningrad Deputy Procurator
responded that "writing to a
friend may be private, but not so
writing to the President of
Israel."
Zelichonok is the eighth Soviet
Jewish Hebrew teacher to be
imprisoned since June 1984 in an
ongoing crackdown which the
U.S. State Department has
condemned as "a tragic and
needless obstacle to constructive
relations between the U.S. and
the USSR."
Star Wars Official Suggests Israel's
Defense Can Benefit From The Sgstem
seek to become involved in
"civilian aspects" of Bui
research. He said that Premie
Shimon Peres and DeXZ
Minister Yitzhak Rabin *Z
favorably disposed to Israeli
participation.
Abrahanson said Israeli n
ticipation in the SDI could coveT,
broad range of areas, include
some of the more conventional J
plications of some of the advanced
technology, meaning improvi*
missiles making missiles moil
effective.
Temple Beth Moshe
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The director of research
and technology for the
United States Strategic
Defense Initiative (SDI),
commonly dubbed "Star
Wars," suggests that the
development of a nuclear
defense program in space
could have a direct impact
on Israel defense
capabilities against conven-
tional weapons.
Asked in a WORLDNET
satellite interview with European
and Israeli journalists whether the
SDI, in which the U.S. has invited
Israel to participate, could also
serve to intercept short range
missiles in the Middle East, Lt.
Gen. James Abrahanson, director
for the SDI organization, an office
of the Defense Department, said
that some of the very short range
tactical missiles that threaten
Israel as well as Europe are "a
very difficult problem."
BUT HE ADDED, "I believe
that as we are successful with
that, then it can contribute not on-
ly to the nuclear strategic
defense, but also to the many,
many conventional threats that
are indeed facing many of our
allies in different ways than they
are threatening the United
States. But I think the answer is
yes, simply and clearly yes. Ad-
vanced technology can be applied
not only in the strategic arena,
and that is one of the benefits of a
participative program."
Israeli participation in the SDI
has been a topic of debate in the
Knesset since Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger extended the
invitation also proposed to
NATO allies and Japan and
Australia last month. Israeli
Minister of Science and Industry
Gideon Patt has endorsed the
idea, recommending that Israel
To Hold Open House
Temple Beth Moshe in North
Miami will hold an Open Hous*
in the Clara and Seymour Smoller
Ballroom Sunday morning, from
10 a.m. until 12 noon, to advise
members of its extensive
program of religious, social and
cultural activities. Rabbi Israel
Jacobs is spiritual leader of the
temple. .,
Dr. Irving Lehrman
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
Of Greater Miami
1701 Washington Avc, Miami Beach
announces its
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
in the Theater of the Performing Arts
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN WILL OFFICIATE
Cantor Yehuda Shifman will Chant Assisted by the Temple Choir
under the Direction of Shmuel Fershko
Temple Office
538-2503
MEMBERSHIP INQUIRES
INVITED
n.'o>.'.
^^^^^^^^^T^O>
Master of Arts
in Jewish Studies
"Fix A Time For The Study Of Torah"
Shammai (Ethics Of The Fathers 1:15)
CLASSES BEGIN WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4th
AMERICAN JEWISH COMMUNITY (RJS 612) will focus on
the religious movements, secular trends, and social organization
which combine to create the Modern Jewish Community in
America. The course will be given on Monday evenings, 6:30-
9:3Q in the Andreas Building^ Room 110. The instructor will be Dr.
Jeremiah Unterman.
BIBLICAL JUDAISM. (RJS 60T) will analyze significant as-
pects of the religious views expressed in the Hebrew Bible such
as creation, the relationship of God to humankind, law and cove-
nant, repentance, redemption and messianism. The course will
be given on Tuesday evenings, 6:30-9:30 in the Andreas Build-
ing, Room 110. The instructor will be Dr. Jeremiah Unterman.
JEWISH ETHICS (RJS 634) will examine the principles of
Jewish ethics and their applications to such pragmatic issues as
parent-child relationships, the elderly, marriage, divorce, abor-
tion and tzedaka. The course will be given on Wednesday eve-

GENEROUS SCHOLARSHIP AID IS AVAILABLE FOR QUALIFIED STUDENTS
AUDITORS WILL BE GRANTED A 50% DISCOUNT.
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT
THE JEWISH STUDIES PROGRAM AT 758-3392, Ext. 524.
BARRY UNIVERSITY
11300 NORTHEAST SECOND AVENUE
MIAMI SHORES, FLORIDA 33161
nings, 5:45-8:45 at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, 4200
Biscayne Boulevard. The instructor will be Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
RABBINIC JUDAISM (RJS 641) will concentrate on the basic
concepts and values of Rabbinic Judaism such as the relation-
ship of God to Israel, the primacy of the Oral Torah, the pattern of
Jewish life, and the meaning of rituals and customs. The course
will be given on Thursday evenings, 6:30-9:30 in the Andreas
Building, Room 109. The instructor will be Dr. Yehuda Shamir.
HEBREW STUDIES I (RJS 401) is an introductidn to Hebrew
as a written language. The class will practice understanding and
using the written language. Progressive grammatic explanations,
vocabulary, and syntax will be emphasized. The course will be
given on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, 9:30-10:50 in the
Andreas Building, Room 110. The instructor will be Dr. Rachel
Abramowitz.
:
'


V .v.'* '-.i
V


'.' V. /.

Friday, August 16, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
The Bookcase
Books On Israel
Is The U.S.-Israel Honeymoon Over?
By MORTON I. TEICHER
The Israel-Arab Reader: A
Documentary History of the
Middle East Conflict Edited
by Walter Laqueur and Barry
Rubin. New York, Facts on
File Publications, 1985. 704
pp., $21.95.
Israel's Lebanon War by Ze'ev
Schiff and Ehud Ya'ari, New
York, Simon and Schuster,
1984. 321 pp., $7.95 (paper
back).
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Making books on Israel is a
growth industry. The odds are
that production will continue to
rise. The two books under review
show that this prediction is a safe
bet.
The Israel-Arab Reader, now in
its fourth edition, has been revised
and expanded to include the
period from Anwar Sadat's visit
to Israel in November, 1977 to the
truce agreement between Israel
and Lebanon in May, 1983.
When the Reader was originally
published in 1969, it primarily
consisted of 42 "documents"
treaties, letters, reports, white
papers, resolutions, speeches and
articles. Retained in this new edi-
tion, they provide a useful
reference source. They also give a
chronological account of Arab-
Israeli relationships, beginning
iwith statements by early Zionists
and by early Arab nationalists at
the end of the 19th and the begin-
ning of the 20th Centuries.
The first section of the Reader
takes us to the establishment of
the British Mandate by the
League of Nations in 1920. The
second section covers the British
rule over Palestine which lasted
until the State of Israel was pro-
claimed in 1948. The
"documents" in this section in-
-i^ude excerpts from reports of the
various investigating committees
and commissions which periodical-
ly attempted to find solutions to
the Arab-Israel dispute.
The third section deals with the
period beginning in 1948 and,
quite properly, opens with Israel's
Proclamation of Independence. It
is followed by the draft constitu-
tion of the PLO as evidence of the
editors' evenhandedness. The
next section focusses on the time
just after the Six-Day War and in-
cludes an article by I.F. Stone,
once the darling of many liberal
Jews. He lost favor and credibility
with his vicious attacks on Israel.
There is an excellent refutation of
his Jewish self-hating stance by
Marie Syrkin, whose article
originally appeared in Midstream.
Pk.Part V moves from the end of
the Six-Day War to the beginning
of the 1973 Yom Kippur War and
Part VI goes to the end of the
Yom Kippur War. The final sec-
tion covers Camp David and the
war in Lebanon.
Each Section has an introduc-
tory note which is too brief to be
useful. What is useful about the
book, however, aside from the for-
mal documents, are statements by
notable figures in Middle East
politics such as Theodor Herzl,
Chaim Weizmann, Vladimir
Jabotin8ky, Gamal Abdel Nasser,
Abba Eban, Golda Meir, Yitzhak
Rabin, Moshe Dayan, George
Habbash, Anwar Sadat,
Menachem Begin, Jimmy Carter,
Andrei Gromyko, Yasir Arafat.
Hosni Mubarak, Ariel Sharon,
Yitzhak Shamir and Ronald
Reagan. Strangely missing is
David Ben-Gurion. The
statements which are included
and the other material combine to
make this a useful addition to the
ever-burgeoning library of books
on Israel.
Far more limited in scope is
Israel's Lebanon War, written by
two Israeli journalists. This book
concentrates on the war in
Lebanon and is essentially a
diatribe against Ariel Sharon. The
authors accuse him of deception
and of having pulled off a "one-
man coup." One of the lesser
epithets thrown at him is "naive
romantic."
In a rare display of mildness,
Schiff and Ya'ari call the Israeli
attack on Lebanon "misguided."
They do acknowledge that it caus-
ed the PLO to suffer a "stunning
blow" in destroying their
Lebanese base and in removing
their artillery from range of the
Gallilee. However, they believe
that the negative consequences
outweight the gains and they con-
clude that Israel is now "sadder
but wiser about the limits of what
force can achieve."
There is a remarkable contrast
between these books, the first
leaning over backwards to be
balanced and the second leaning
over forward to be biased.
New Israel Fund
NEW YORK (JTA) The
New Israel Fund, one of the first
North American Jewish philan-
thropies to target Israeli donors,
will spearhead a major fundrais-
ing effort in Israel, according to a
recent proposal. "The New Israel
Fund has always been a partner-
ship between North American and
Israeli Jews," declared Jonathan
Jacoby, executive director of the
Fund.
You're invited for play
think you'll stav.
' Play tennis Relax
Try our Tiki Bar &
patio restaurant &
enjoy free beverage
for two* Swim* Jog
' View our various
apartments
(It's our way of showing off our lifestyle)
For reservations call Rental Office
HARBOUR HOUSE
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A property of VMS Realty. Inc. W U
London Chronicle Syndicate
WASHINGTON For
slightly more than two
years, the U.S. and Israel
have enjoyed a honeymoon
of sorts. Their relationship
has been blessed by an ex-
traordinarily close intimacy.
The outward signs of this ex-
cellent state of relations included
the dramatic enhancement of
U.S.-Israeli strategic cooperation,
the signing of an agreement
establishing a free trade area bet-
ween the two countries, record
levels of U.S. economic and
military grant aid for Israel, a lack
of any major fights on outstanding
diplomatic issues at the United
Nations and elsewhere, the delay
in major new U.S. arms sales to
the Arabs, Israel's agreeing to the
establishment of U.S. radio
transmitters in Israel for use by
the Voice of America, Radio Free
Europe and Radio Liberty, the
U.S. invitation to Israel to par-
ticipate in the Strategic Defense
Initiative, commonly known as
Star Wars, and many others.
THERE WERE several
reasons for this improved rela-
tionship, which officials in both
Washington and Jerusalem have
repeatedly insisted was now bet-
ter than ever before.
The April, 1983 signing of the
Israeli-Lebanese security agree-
ment effectively removed
Lebanon as a sore point between
the two countries. Secretary of
State George Shultz, who was per-
sonally instrumental in arraging
that deal, quickly became irritated
with the Arabs when it crumbled
in the face of Syrian pressure.
The bombing of the U.S. Marine
headquarters in Beirut angered
the Americans even further.
Earlier, Shultz had been disap-
pointed by Jordan's refusal to im-
mediately get aboard President
Ronald Reagan's September 1,
1982 Arab-Israeli peace initiative.
There was widespread resent-
ment in Washington around the
same time about Saudi Arabia's
refusal to play a more cooperative
role in promoting direct Arab-
Israeli peace talks,
SHULTZ, who has emerged as
a very strong supporter of Israel
since succeeding Alexander Haig
in June, 1982, made no secret of
his irritation with the Egyptians
either. He had expected Egypt to
return its Ambassador to Israel
shortly following the signing of
the ill-fated Israeli-Lebanese
security agreement. He thought
he had such a personal commit-
ment from President Hosni
Mubarak. But the envoy is still
missing from Tel Aviv.
Domestic American politics
most certainly played a role in im-
proving U.S.-Israeli relations.
There was, after all, a presidential
election in November, 1984.
Historically, American govern-
mental attitudes are more
favorably inclined toward Israel
before rather than after an
election.
Israeli politics also played a role,
especially since Shimon Peres
became Prime Minister. He is
Washington's preferred Israeli
leader; there is no real love for the
Likud. Why weaken Peres and his
Labor colleagues? Shultz and
other U.S. officials have wanted
to strengthen them in advance of
any new elections in Israel.
The fact that there were no
serious peace negotiations under-
way removed a potentially ir-
ritating element in the bilateral
relationship. U.S. and Israeli of-
ficials, during these past two
years, did not have to face up to
the fact there is still a major dif-
ference of opinion between
Washington and Jerusalem on
such issues as a final territorial
settlement involving Israeli
withdrawals from the West Bank
and Gaza Strip. Those differences
could be skirted under the rug for
the time being.
BUT NOW, U.S. and Israeli of-
ficials in Washington agree, there
is indeed a greater prospect for
some strains to surface in the rela-
tionship. It is by no means in-
evitable, but certainly very
possible.
For one thing, there are serious
U.S. hopes for getting the peace
process off the ground in the com-
ing months. That, almost certain-
ly, will create some tensions bet-
ween the two countries.
Secondly, the Administration is
seen as still very determined later
this year to push forward with a
new advanced arms sale to Jordan
and Saudi Arabia that will
automatically spill over to create
problems between the U.S. and
Israel.
Already, there are some public
spats involving the peace process.
Israel is very nervous about the
U.S. efforts to open preliminary
discussions with a joint Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation in the com-
ing weeks, assuming that a list of
acceptable Palestinians can be
assembled.
ISRAEL, moreover, is also
uneasy with Washington's will-
ingness to find some sort of inter-
national cover for future Arab-
Israeli negotiations, as demanded
by Jordan's King Hussein during
his recent visit to Washington.
No serious observer in the U.S.
capital believes that the honey-
moon of the past two years is go-
ing to be replaced by an all-out
confrontation. The two countries
will manage to avoid a real colli- *
sion course. There are simply too
many built-in factors in the rela-
tionship which will almost
automatically preclude such a
possibility.
But there is still, at the same
time, enough leeway for some
serious deterioration to develop.
Much, of course, will depend on
the attitude of the more moderate
Arab states, especially Jordan. If
King Hussein can get his act
together by demonstrating a
readiness to sit down across the
negotiating table with Israel
with or without the blessing of the
PLO the stage will be set for
some problems in American-
Israeli ties.
For the time being, Israeli
diplomats, American Jewish
leaders and others are not inclined
to see Reagan's colon cancer as
resulting in any major change in
the overall U.S. strategy of deal-
ing with the Middle East. For all
practical concerns, Reagan had
delegated much of the policy con-
siderations to Shultz long before
his operation at the Bethesda
naval medical center.
WHITE HOUSE Chief of Staff
Donald Regan has assumed a
more important role in the day-to-
day running of the Administra-
tion, but he is not all that familiar
with the nuances of Arab-Israeli
diplomacy. Shultz, backed by Na-
tional Security Adviser Robert
McFarlane, is still the key player
in Washington as far as this issue
is concerned.
Shultz is healthy and prepared
to do whatever is possible to see
some progress in the peace pro-
cess before the end of this year.
Until now, Shultz was unwilling
to overly upset officials in
Jerusalem, especially if the Arabs
were not even serious in opening
direct talks with Israel. Why em-
bark on a public rift with Israel for
no reason? But if the Arabs are
sincere, Shultz will be willing to
Continued on Page 11-A
E\ery Sunday Is Mother's Day
At The Marriott
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The whole family
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Morriott
1201 N.W. LeJeune Road, Miami. Florida 33126 (305) 649-5000
MIAMI
AIRPORT


t\ innr
Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 16, 1985
Is The U.S.-Israel Honeymoon Over?
Continued from Page 9-A
take some bolder U.S. action in
trying to advance the process.
ACCORDING to his aides, he
still has a bitter taste in his mouth
from the Lebanese experience.
Shultz will want to see real
evidence of an Arab change of
heart before once again putting
U.S. prestige and influence on the
line.
The Secretary, until now, has
also been anxious to give the na-
tional unity government in
Jerusalem an unhindered oppor-
tunity to face up to Israel's
economic crisis without overly
worrying about the future of the
West Bank and Gaza an issue
which could easily topple the coali-
tion. Why create such a crisis if
real negotiations are only moot?
But there is today a widespread
sense in the State Department,
shared by Shultz, that Jordan,
backed by Egyptian President
Mubarak, is very serious about
peace. King Hussein is seen as be-
ing in a relatively stronger posi-
tion via-a-via the PLO than before
the war in Lebanon in 1982 and
the PLO's subsequent expulsion
from that country. He thus can do
things today which he could not do
before, according to U.S. officials.
BUT TIME, they insist, is runn-
ing out. The U.S. must take the
lead now to get the ball rolling
before it is too late. Israel, despite
its economic headaches and other
domestic problems, must also be
prepared to bite the bullet.
Hussein, according to U.S. of-
ficials, is still not prepared to act
independently. He needs PLO
support in order to push ahead.
The fact that PLO Chairman
Yasser Arafat is cooperating with
Hussein in submitting Palestinian
names for a joint Jordanian-
Palestinian negotiating delegation
is encouraging to the Americans.
The PLO might not be listed
among Washington's most
favorite groups. But U.S. Middle
East specialists appear convinced
that Hussein very much needs the
support of the PLO to make
enough concessions on the West
Bank which might even remotely
satisfy a Labor-led coalition
government in Jerusalem.
"The PLO can indeed make con-
cessions which Hussein cannot,"
one U.S. official said. That's why
the Americans were not all that
upset by the highly visible PLO
role in putting forward Palesti-
nian candidates to the joint
delegation.
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Friday, August 16, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
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ililee
The Top Priority
For The JNF
the
BY DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
lie Galilee is top priority with
says Moshe Rivlin.
lirman of the Jewish National
bd. "We have undertaken
' really huge projects there
recent years. But we have
adjust the pace of our
i ;i 'pment efforts to the pace
country as a whole, and
means economic problems
ring us down.
. I in noted that part of the
s purpose is to establish
?ish ownership over Galilee
l wherever possible. But he
I'mphatic in dismissing any
\rab connotation. Land was
i imes purchased from Arab
its. always with strict legal
jnety, he said.
metimes there were land-
langes between the JNF and
owners: a tract in one
ion in return for a similar
somewhere else. Otherwise
JNF worked on Jewish-
k not in the possession of
>ne.
' chairman stressed, too,
much of JNF's forestry and
j building work in the Galilee
directly beneficial and
|h appreciated by Arab
ileans as well as Jews.
Kvlin termed much of the
work in the hilly, stony
llee "land creation." Each
he said, the JNF readies
7,000 dunams of land for
llcment. and another 6,000
ams are planted as forest-
"For Kibbutz Kfar Hanassi
," Rivlin says, "we recently
timed 1.000 dunams of land
is now lush farm soil."
!>e Forestry work is always
kned with recreation and
ism in mind. Thus, said
tin. some of the Galilee
^lopment towns are now
ed by a belt of green "which
lerally changed the quality
in these places."
iong the major longer-term
schemes is a develop-
of the northeastern banks
Sea of Galilee, to be
out in conjunction with
fcrnment ministries and with
(kibbutzim and moshavim of
area.
me infrastructure exists
already: the JNF's Jordan
a scenic site on the banks
c river north of the Sea of
Galilee one of Palestine's
beauty spots since time im-
memorial: Kibbutz Ein Gev with
its cultural center, restaurant
and camping grounds: and
Kibbutz Haon with its ostrich
farms, open to visitors. Rivlin
says this region could grow into
a major tourism center for Israeli
and foreign visitors.
The JNF's heavier work,
laying the groundwork (literally)
for and blazing the paths
(literally) to new settlements has
focused for some years now in
the Galilee on the Mitzpim or
hilltop settlements which began
to go up in the mid-70's. To date
there are about 40 of these
dotted around the entire region.
Rivlin emphasizes the success
of the scheme whereby specific
areas of the Galilee have been
linked to JNF communities
abroad. Thus, the Negev area of
settlements and industrial en-
terprises is tied to JNF
Australia; Tsalmon to the east is
tied to Canada; the area around
Golani Junction to South Africa;
and the area north of Migdal
Haemek to Great Britain.
The Australians in particular
are displaying intense interest
and involvement in every facet
of the JNF's work in their
region.
Rivlin says the issue of Arab
vandalism against JNF forests
and facilities in the Galilee
"must be seen in its proper
proportions." The miscreants are
few in number, and the damage
they do, though irksome and on
occasion locally devastating, is
not widespread.
He notes that the phenomenon
is certainly not new. Back in the
1936-39 disturbances, the JNF
was singled out for attack.
Rivlin says that for every
misguided young nationalist who
smashes a JNF commemorative
plaque in a forest, there are
hundreds of Arab Galileans who
enjoy weekend and holiday visits
to the forests. "They are among
our most satisfied customers,"
he says.
Of late. Arab local authorities
in the Galilee have been seeking
to raise money abroad to
plant trees. "It just shows how
successful our work is," says
Rivlin.


Rabbi Amram Amselem, spirtitual leader of
Temple Moses and the leading force behind
the success of the Keren Kayemeth Leisrael
(Jewish National Fund) Latin Department is
seen here being congratulated by Mordecai
Dayan, Co-World Chairman of the Jewish
National Fund in charge of South America
and Spanish speaking countries in the world,
Nily Falic, Director Keren Mayemeth
Leisrael (Jewish National Fund) Latin Dept,
Ambassador Mose Dayan, Israel's
Ambassador to Guatemala, and Zev W.
Kogan, President Jewish National Fund
Southern Region.
World General Zionist Organization
Conference Set For Dec. 15
A conference of the World
(ieneral Zionist Organization will
be held in Miami on Dec. 15.
Mordecai Dayan, World Co-
Chairman of the Keren
Kayemeth Leisrael. Jewish
National Fund, will be a featured
speaker according to Dr. Zev W.
Kogan. President of the Jewish
National Fund Southern Region.
The Keren Kayemeth Leisrael.
JNF. Latin Department is being
organized to promote Jewish
National Fund activities among
the Latin communities in Miami.
South America and worldwide.
"Great promise for the ex-
pansion and future work of the
JNF is assured," said Dayan.
Keren Named El Al
Regional Manager
El Al Israel Airlines has
announced the appointment of
Israel Keren as Regional
Manager, Southeastern United
States, Central and South
America. Keren replaces Shlomo
Lichtman who is assuming a new
position in the airline's
headquarters offices in Israel
after six years in the United
States.
Keren says the expanded
responsibilities of the Miami
office are a result of
reorganization of the airline's
infrastructure and renewed focus
on the potential of Central and
South America traffic through
Miami.
Keren's territory includes all
of Central and South America,
except Brazil, Argentina and
Mexico where El Al maintains
offices. Keren says the objectives
of the Miami-based office is "to
increase traffic to the point
where larger aircrafts
required on our twice
flights between Miami
will be
weekly
and Tel
A --J
fzx-
i -,

Israel Keren
Aviv and to continue our in-
volvement in the community."
To this aim, Arturo Sapunar
has been added to the regional
staff. Active in the Spanish
market. Sapunar will promote
sales in Central and South
America.
According to Keren, his office
will seek close cooperation with
Latin carriers to create at-
tractive packages which will
stimulate traffic through the
Miami gateway to Tel Aviv with
stopovers in Miami.
This is Keren's second tour of
duty in the United Stales. He
was El Al's District Manager in
Houston, Texas, from 1967 to
1973. He has been with El Al for
27 years and was Deputy
Director and Commercial
Manager for Israel before
moving to Miami in July.
El Al Israel Airlines operates
Monday and Wednesday con-
necting flights to Tel Aviv from
Miami and nine non-stop 747
jumbo flights a week from New
York.
Israel's First
Free Enterprise
Town Built
By JILL KLINE
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
A town based on free-
enterprise is being built by
the people who will live and
work in it, the first town of
its kind in Israel. Kfar
Vradim, Rose Garden City,
is an area included in the
comprehensive regional
development of the Western
Galilee's hilly parts.
It is being constructed along
the ridge of a mountain offering
breathtaking views and clean air.
Soon it will be a town that planned
free enterprise employment op-
portunities even before the first
foundation was laid it was
designed together with a high-
tech enterpreneurs center.
KFAR VRADIM is situated
near the Tefen Industrial Zone,
which is expected to offer the
residents of Rose Garden high-
tech industrial jobs. The Israeli
government has not invested
anything in Rose Garden City, and
is not providing any assistance;
however it did give the land,
which is being paid for now.
"The township's economic
future depends on the industrial
base at Tefen, which is geared
toward export-oriented
businesses," said Stef Wer-
theimer, the 57-year-old Israeli in-
dustrialist responsible for the
creation of Rose Garden City. He
wants it to be an example that
others will follow to be known
for what it produces and sells, and
not what it spends.
More than 1.500 families are
committed to moving to Kfar
Vradim in the next five years. The
first 23 families moved into the ci-
ty last year, each in houses they
themselves built; another 120
houses are under construction.
The 15-year master plan envi-
sions a total population of 3,000
families, or about 15,000 people.
A plot ranges from a half dunam
to a dunam and a half.
Townhouses cost between $60,000
and $80,000, and larger homes
cost more than $100,000 (not in-
cluding the land).
THE HALLMARK of Wer
theimer's philosophy is "less in-
Continued on Page 11-B
International University President
Jory B. Wolfe (second from left) admires
}culpture entitled "The Holocaust." The
Jture was presented to the university by
Southeastern Florida Holocaust
tonal Center, Inc., in honor of Wolfe's
wetum-of a three-year term as president
center. Pictured with Wolfe (from left)
are Goldie Goldstein, executive vice
president of the Holocaust Center; Harvey
Abramson, attorney, president of Temple
Menora and the donor who made the
presentation possible; and Dr. R hel
Abramowitz, the sculptor, herself a
Holocaust survivor, ana board member.
Photo by Robert Heller.
dfe wisli Floridia
Miami, Florida Friday, August 16,1985 Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 16, 1985
Early Childhood Teachers Attend
Professional Growth Institute
"Children We are the
World" will be the theme of the
Semi-Annual All-Day
Professional Growth Institute of
the Jewish Council of Early
Childhood Educators to be held
on Tuesday. Aug. 27. at Temple
Beth Shalom. Hollywood, from 9
a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Nursery and kindergarten
teachers in the synagogue and
day schools and Jewish Com-
munity Centers of Dade.
Broward and Palm Beach
counties will attend the program,
highlighted by over 50
workshops on various aspects of
early childhood education for the
over 250 teachers who will
participate in the institute-
Robin Eisenberg. president of
the JCECE and Director of
Education at Temple Beth El.
Boca Raton, noted that "The
All-Day Institute provides the
early childhood educator not
only with an opportunity to
attend workshops and seminars.
but also the chance to meet in
collegia 1 fellowship and realize
that each teacher shares the
same problems and the same
mwnMH of joy and success.
The Institute, is co-sponsored
by the Central Agency for
Jewish Education.
Workshop leaders will include
university faculty members,
staff of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, associates of
the Jewish Family and Children
Service, staff members of the
Dade and Broward Public
Schools and teachers and
directors in Jewish early
childhood education.
The program of the day will
feature greetings by Shirley-
Cohen. ECE Director of Temple
Beth Shalom. the host
congregation and by Rabbi
Morton Malavsky. spiritual
leader of the congregation.
In addition, the incoming slate
of officers of the JCECE. now
marking its 30th year will be
installed at the luncheon.
Officers serving with Mrs.
Eiseberg. president, include:
Nice-presidents Harriet Spitzer
(North Dade I: .Anita Koppell.
(Miami Beach): Judy Kuntz
(South Dade) and Linda Harris
(Broward): Secretary Judy
Balletta and Treasurer. Arlene
Lasko. Serving as immediate
past president is Shulamit
Gittelson.
The JCECE. the professional
organization of Jewish early-
childhood instructors, was
founded in 1954 and serves to
enhance the professional status
of the early childhood educator
and elevate Jewish early-
childhood programs. Its
membership includes over 400
teachers from South Miami
through West Palm Beach.
JWV Auxiliary Off To Convention
Edith Novtns. president of the
Department of Florida Ladies
Auxiliary. Jewish War Veterans,
will represent the state of
Florida at the JWV national
convention in Kissimmee.
August 18 through 25.
Bernie Chaney. commander of
the Abe Horrowitz Post No. 682
Jewish War Veterans, and
Janice Alter, president of the
Ladies Auxiliary', will represent
the Post and Auxiliary at the
national convention.
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Sunday's cleanup of Flagler
Memorial Island was so
successful that the Kiwanis
Club of Miami Beach will
undertake a similar operation
every six months, according
to Vice Mayor William E.
Shockett, president of tht
service organization.
AFL-CIO President Lane Kirkland and Secretary Team
Thomas R. Donahue sign petition to Soviet leade' Sfikk
Gorbachev demanding the USSR abide by terms of the IS
Helsinki agreement, and permit Soviet Jews to emigrate. _
Seidman. director of the federation's Department
Occupational Safety. Health and Social Security, and Evely,
Dubrow, vice president and legislative director of the I __
Garment Workers, look on. Seidman is chairman oftheJewii
Labor Committee in Washington. Dubrow is a national vk
chairman. The JLC is sponsoring the petition drive for Sow
compliance.
Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association appointed
Morton Goldstein, Branch
Manager of the Alton Road
Branch at 1050 Alton Road.
Miami Beach. Goldstein
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than 12 years experience in
the industry.
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lehind The Headlines
Friday, August 16, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
A Major Archaeological Find
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The very first houses built in
Jerusalem have been unearthed
in the Kidron Valley, just
southeast of the Old City walls.
Hebrew University ar-
chaeologist Yigal Shilo, coming
to the end of his eighth and last
season's dig at the City of
David, last month struck
bedrock and exposed on the
bedrock neat little homes built
3,000 years ago.
His team of local students and
overseas volunteers are now
smashing through a section of a
later wall to discover whether
these first houses the
beginning of settlement in the
city 1,000 years before King
David were surrounded by a
protective wall or were merely a
village-like complex open to the
surrounding hillsides.
The unearthed houses com-
prise walls with built-in benches
protruding from them and
surrounding a central living
area. Shilo told reporters that
such construction is common in
this proto-urban phase in
Palestine the early Bronze
Period contemporaneous with
the Patriarchs.
He noted that much older
dwellings have been discovered,
in Jericho and elsewhere. But the
exciting aspect of the Kidron
Valley settlement, close to the
Siloam spring, is that it marks
Community Calendar
The cultural committee of the Cuban Hebrew Congregation,
Miami Beach, will present Lea Koenig and Zwi Stolper in a
humorous Yiddish musical show on Sunday evening, August 25
The show titled "A Happy New Year To All Jews" will begin at
8 p.m. in the Olemberg Ballroom of the congregation.
Morris Steinberg, a resident of Miami since 1946 will be 93 on
August 11. A birthday party in celebration of the special oc-
:asion was given at the home of his grandchild.
Airman Randy W. Schwartz, son of Mr. and Mrs. William R.
Schwartz has graduated from the U.S. Air Force aircraft
maintenance course at Sheppard Air Force Base, Texas.
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the start of uninterrupted
settlement in Jerusalem from
3,000 years ago to the present
day.
Archaeologists have not been
able to trace a continuous proto-
urban development in Jericho or
in the other more ancient sites:
there is an unexplained lacuna
between the prehistoric remains
and the more modem ruins.
Shilo said it was natural for
the first, nomadic settlers to
choose a site close to the source
of fresh water even though
this was not the highest or best
protected site in the area.
Subsequent development of
Jerusalem tended to take place
higher up the slope so that
the City of David itself, ex-
tensively excavated by Shilo and
his team in recent years, sits
several hundred feet above the
Kidron Valley houses. Later still,
under Solomon, the Temple was
built still higher in what Shilo
termed Jerusalem's acropolis.
The two sections of the city, the
original City of David and the
acropolis, were linked.
Shilo's finds in the city of
David are gradually bein in-
corporated into an archaeological
park, with the help of Mayor
Teddy Kollek's Jerusalem
Foundation.
Opened only recently, and still
far from completion, the park
already promises to become one
of Jerusalem's most attractive
tourist sites, for local and
overseas visitors. Thoughtful
landscaping has contributed to
effective exhibition of the ex-
cavated structures against a
backdrop of unobtrusive modem
concrete butresses relieved by
green gardens.
Among the most arresting
finds are a six-story stepped
stone structure, built along the
slope of the hill. Under this,
Shilo found, veritably intact,
houses of the Davidic Period,
Continued on Page 4-B
Gerald Schwartz, president of the Gerald Schwartz Agency,
receives a plaque in appreciation of his firm's designation as a
corporate member of the Young Presidents Club of Mount Sinai
Medical Center. Making the presentation are Martin Gelb (left),
past president of the Young Presidents Club and Edward
Shapiro (right), past president of the Miami Beach hospital.
Schwartz heads a Miami Beach-based public relations,
marketing, fund raising and advertising agency.
Temple Moses Sephardic Congregation
Hosting Convention of FESELA
address.
During the year various ob-
servances will be taking place
throughout the world in memory
of the 850th birtsti anniversary of
Moses Ben Maimon,
Maimonides, who was born in
Cordova, Spain.
Temple Moses Sephardic
Congregation of Florida, located
on Normandy Isle, Miami Beach.
is hosting a Convention of the
Sephardic Federation of Latin
America (FESELA). Delegates
from Latin American countries,
Argentina. Uruguay, Brazil.
Peru, Chile, Venezuela,
Colombia. Panama, Mexico as
well as representatives from New
York, Canada and Israel will be
attending.
The convention will conclude
Sunday with the unveiling of a
plaque by the City of Miami
Beach at 4 p.m. as a tribute to
Moses Maimonides. The un-
veiling will take place at Temple
Moses with Mayor Malcolm
Fromberg delivering the keynote
So. Bade ORT
Plan Reunion
The Dade South Region of
Women's American ORT is
seeking former ORT students
who reside in the South Florida
Area to plan and attend a
reunion. Laurel Shapiro,
President, and Linda Kahn,
Chairman Executive Committee
are in charge of the event.
SonKq. The first name
decaffeinated coffee.

K
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Kosher
be your best
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m u th-_ i----:_u rii__:J_-__
i i *...
*\ % nop-
Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. August lb.
-
Hadassah Zionist Youth commission A Major Archaeological Find
Announce Administration Changes
Sylvia Herman, newly elected
Chairman of the Florida
Hadassah Zionist Youth
Commission announces the
return of Lisa Synalovski as
Regional Director of Young
Judaea, and the appointment of
Mindy Lessetn as Assistant
Regional Director. Also retur-
ning this year is Zeev Shafrir as
the Regional Shaliach. and
Michelle Rapchik in the new
position of Regional Coordinator.
Mrs. Synalovski was an active
member of Young Judaea
throughout her Junior and
Senior High School years. She
attended Regional Junior Camp
in North Carolina as a camper.
After compVting high school.
Mrs. Synalovski attended the
Young Judaea Year Course
Program in Israel. She has
earned an Associate of Arts
degree with honors, from
Broward Community College.
Mindy Lessem was also an
active member of Young Judaea
throughout her school years and
followed the sa-ne routine with
the camps and Israel program,
but upon her return to the US.
she attended the University of
Florida from which she received
her degree.
Zeev Shafrir came to the
United States from Israel. Zeev
was raised on KibbuU Rosh
Hanikra. and now is a member of
Moshav Maor. Zeev was
educated on Kibbutz, and on
completion of his .Army service,
studied Drama and Production
at the "Seminar Hakibbutxim"
and Tel Aviv University. He
worked for the Education
Department and Moshav
Movement in Israel.
Michelle Rapchik was an
active member of United
Synagogue Youth for eight years
and was an active member of
The Chosen Children.'- a Miami
based Jewish singing group. She
has an extensive Yeshiva
background. She attended the
Lehrman Day School of Temple
Emanu-el and the Hebrew-
Academy of Greater Miami. She
is currently a senior at the
University of Miami where she
plans to earn her degree as a
major in Psychology-Judaic
Studies.
High Holy Day Services For Students
South Dade Hillel will sponsor
High Holy Day services for
students, faculty, and staff at
Barry University. Florida
International University. Miami
Dade Community College, and
Southeastern College of
Osteopathic Medicine. Services
this year will be conducted by a
guest student Rabbi. Ms. Marjie
Slome. a fourth-year student at
Hebrew Union College. Ms
Slome will be assisted by can-
tonal soloist. FIU student
Stephanie Shore
Services for both Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur will
take place at the FIU-Tamiami
campus.
High Holy Days
Package
tosh Hashanah Sept. 15. 16, 17
Yom Kippur Sept 24, 25
DeJuxe accommodations for 5 nights
8 kosher meals including a sumptuous
break-the-tast buffet of traditional
ririk-arifs prepared under the supervision
of our Mashgiach. Nathan Hershberg
Rabbi Arnold Lasker and Cantor Yehuda
Mandel officiating
Tickets for Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur services
$345 ^$400^:
Extended packages available
All tax and gratuities included.
For reservations call -""2-5600
te
I'll N. University Drive. Plantation. Florida
Continued from Page 3-B
complete with pillars, plaster.
and even indoor latrines And in
some cases correspond to actual
Biblical names.
But the centerpiece of the
archaeological park is without
doubt Warren's shaft, the huge
and eerie tunnel leading down,
under the ground, from the City
of David to a point deep within
the bowels of the rock, whence
the ancient Israelites could draw
water from the Siloam. un-
detected by potential enemies.
The tunnel is named after an
American naval officer and
explorer. Capt. Charles Warren,
who first discovered it more than
a century ago. He entered it
from below, that is from the
Siloam. and managed to make
his way through the accretion of
silt and rubble almost till the
top.
Subsequently, the shaft was
once again clogged with rubbish
and rubble, and Shilo and the
Jerusalem Foundation employed
South African mining engineers
to help clear it. and an Alpine
climber to transverse the vertical
section from the Siloam to the
place where the Israelites drew
their water.
(The fact that the key stretch
was narrow and vertical made
the shaft ideally secure from
enemy invaders."
Shilo explained that modern
geological research has proved
the shaft was in part a natural
formation coinciding as it
does with the coming together of
two different layers of rock. Ihe
upper layer is the more porous,
and aeons of water seeping
through it created a tunnel
which engineers working for the
kings of Judah later enlarged.
Now. the shaft is well lit and
airv which does not detract
from the visitor's sense ot ad-
venture. Access is through a
restored Turkish house which
the Jerusalem Foundation, under
Shilo's meticulous guidance, has
wrought into a small but
fascinating museum of the entire
excavation.
Florida Power and Light Meter Installer Richard S'aylor places
a Radio Watch decal on a bucket truck at the utility's South-
west Miami Service Center. Similar to neighborhood crime
watch programs. FPL's Radio Watch uses radio-dispatched
utility workers in 35 counties to report emergencies, accidents,
crimes and suspicious activity to local police.

BETH TORAH CONGREGATION
BENNY ROK CAMPUS
1051 No. Miami Beach Blvd. North Miami Beach, FL 33162 Tel. 947-7528
SPutubiy, tS&upuU25, 4986
40:00 42:00 noon
ADULT EDUCATION
COMPLETE YOUTH PROGRAM
YOUNG MARRIEDS CLUB
MR. & MRS. CLUB
SENIOR CITIZENS
BAR & BAT MITZVAH
BRIGHT BEGINNINGS
2 months-2 years
EARLY CHILDHOOD
2 years-Kindergarten
HAROLD WOLK
RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
JUDAICA HIGH SCHOOL
CONFIRMATION
WEDDINGS
RELIGIOUS SERVICES DAILY
HIGH HOLIDAY SEATS STILL AVAILABLE
YOUNG MARRIED REDUCED FEES
ML MAX A UPSCHITZ. Rabbi
RANDALL J. KOMGSBl RG Ami Rabbi
RHEA SCHWARTZBEKG. Ed Director
SHVLAMIT GITTELSON. Earl j Childhood
HARVEY L BROWN. Exec Director
ZVEE ARONI. Cantor
DAVID BROOK. Youth Director
ROBERT WHITEBOOK. Prwidcnt
WE STOP ROOF LEAKS
AIRS
COMMERCIAL
RESIDENTIAL
To
ALL DADE ROOFING CO.
247-5718


Weddings
SUAYA-NEWMAN
Friday, August 16, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
I
r The marriage of Lila Suaya, daughter of Mr.
and Mrs. Elias Suaya, and Dr. Stewart P.
Newman, son of Mr. and Mrs. Irving Newman of
North Miami Beach took place at Beth Torah
Congregation Aug. 10, with Dr. Max A. Lip-
schitz. Rabbi officiating.
Attending the bride was Ms. Yvonne Suaya,
her sister, maid of honor. Bridesmaids were Mrs
Judy Newman, Mrs. Sandra Newman, and Mrs.
Eileen Kramer.
The groom was attended by his brother Jeffrey
Newman, best man: Dr. Michael Newman,
brother of the groom; Dr. Bryce Epstein, and
Jimmy Forman, ushers. In the wedding
procession also were David Suaya and Emilio
Suaya.
The bride, a recent graduate of the University
of Miami has been accepted to Law School at the
University of Florida.
Dr. Stewart Newman, a Phi Beta Kappa
graduate of Tulane University earned his Degree
in Medicine at the University of South Florida
He is now in his second year of residency
speciauzing in obstetrics and gynecology at the
University Medical Center in Jacksonville.
Out of town guests included the bride's two
grandmothers from Argentina, Mrs. Blanche
Bergman. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Wolfe, the grooms
uncle and aunts from New York, Mr. Alan
Newman from New Jersey, Mr. and Mrs. Miklos
blezack from Montreal plus many other friends
and relatives from around the world.
Following a honeymoon in Spain the couple will
reside in Jacksonville.
JCCNames Children's Director
Sharon Mine, long-time art
specialist has been named
director of children's programs
at the South Dade Jewish
Community Center announced
Edward Rosen, JCC Center
Director.
Hint-, a graduate of the State
University of New York at
Binghamton, N.Y. received her
Bachelor of Arts degree in
English and Literature in 1970.
In her position with the South
Dade JCC Hine will be
responsible for all children and
family programs at the Center-
including day care, mini-camps,
holiday celebrations and no-
school holiday activities.
KLIEMANKOLE
Mindy Michelle Klieman, daughter of Marshall
Klieman of Los Angeles and Charlotte Klieman of
Miami was wed to Robert Alan Kole. son of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Kole
Engagement
HABERMANSUCHER
% William Sucher of Bay
Harbor Islands announces the
engagement of her son, Brian
Lawrence Sucher. to Debbi
Haberman, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Leo Haberman of Montreal,
-Quebec. Mr. Sucher is also the
son of the late William Sucher.
The couple will be married in
the spring in Montreal and will
reside in Montreal.
Na'Amat Women
Officers of two additional
chapters of Pioneer Women-
Nil 'amat have taken office for
the 1985-86 year. They were
sworn in by Gerald Schwartz,
national vice president of the
American Zionist Federation and
associate national chairman of
Friends of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat.
Charlotte Cohen was inducted
as acting president of Sharon
I Chapter. Other officers of the
^!iami-based unit installed are
Ethel Kurlander, treasurer;
I Beatrice Berman, financial
secretary; and Libby Sobelman,
corresponding secretary.
liana Chapter of Sunny Isles
elected Lillian Hoffman as
president. Frances Johnson and
Mildred Silverman were sworn in
as vice presidents with Sylvia
Kates as treasurer and financial
secretary and Adeline Medinets
as recording secretary. Silver-
'yiin also will serve as
Sprresponding secretary.
Beth Torah To Hold
Open House Sunday
Beth Torah Congregation of
North Miami Beach will hold an
open house, Sunday, Aug. 25, 10
a.m.-noon, on the Synagogue
campus for newly arrived
families in the area according to
Executive Director Harvey L.
*own. Directors, Rhea Sch-
wartzberg of the Hebrew School
and Director Schulamit Git-
telson, Early Childhood, and
David Brook, Youth Director,
will be on hand.
Arthur and Pearl Kole of Redondo Beach,
California on May 11.
The wedding took place at Temple Menorah in
Redondo Beach with Rabbi Steven Denker of
Chicago, the groom's cousin, officiating.
Maid of Honor was Lisa Klieman, the bride's
sister. Attending the groom as best man was
Stewart Kole, the groom's brother.
Following a honeymoon in Hawaii, the couple
are residing in Redondo Beach.
FILTERED BY NATURE
3500 YEARS!
Geologists report that the pure and
delicious spring water emerging from the
Mountain Valley Spring today in Hot
Springs, Ark., first entered the ground as
rain about 3500 years ago. Salt free.
Moderately hard. Delivered to your home
or office.
Dade
Broward
696-1333 563-6114
c^VIountaiii^ey^ter
FROM HOT
IRK.
^ where shopping is o pleasure 7doys a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
--------S73-
yv^W-'ji
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Old Fashioned
Boston Cream
Pie
$|99
each
>> ..' "
Available at Publix Stores with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Serve with a Glass
of Ice Cold Milk
Fruit Bar
Cookies
12 99
0
f.
o p 7. >>>- ./E ""*
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Freshly Baked
English Muffin
Bread
loaf
69
0
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Butter Streusel
Coffee Cake.................ach$169
Powdered Sugar
Mini Donuts................... bag 99*
Top with Strawberries or Peaches, Golden Loaf
Pound Cake..................each$149
Quantity Rights Reserved
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Light and Delicious
Glazed Donuts...........8 to, 99*
Prices Effective
August 15 thru 21.1985 .
Mrtairs
COOKBOOK
COLLECTION
This week's feature
VOLUME 19
Book of
Merry Eating
and
VOLUME 20
International
Cookbook
91.79-
Witch for
New Books Weekly


.- -------:_u ct|-----:.!___ ii
> -------------i. n
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 16, 1985
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. .. "Thou shalt set the blessing upon mount Gerizim, and the
curse upon mount Ebal"
(Deuteronomy 11.29).
RE'EH
RE'EH "Behold, I set before you this day a blessing and a
curse: the blessing, if ye shall hearken unto the commandments of
the Lord your God, which I command you this day; and the curse,
if ye shall not hearken" (Deuteronomy 11.26). When the Israelites
enter Canaan, six tribes are to stand upon Mount Gerizim and
bless all those who will keep God's commandments, and six tribes
are to stand on Mount Ebal and curse all those who will disobey
God's commandments. Sacrifices are to be offered only in the
place that God shall choose. He who wishes to offer a meat
sacrifice which he may eat, and lives too far from the proper place
of offering may slaughter the offering in his own house, but it will
not be considered a sacrifice. He must be careful not to consume
any of the blood. Those who incite others to idolatrous acts are to
be exterminated. The portion goes on to state the rules defining
purity and impurity in regard to animals, fish and foul the basic
ritual dietary laws. The portion also contains the rules regarding
tithes, money moratoria, a prohibition on interest, and regula-
tions regarding the Hebrew slave, the first-born of animals, and
the three pilgrim festivals.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage/' edited by P. Wollman
Tsamlr, Sis, published by Shengok) The volume is available at 7* Maiden
Lane,-New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president ol the society dis-
trlbuting the volume.)
The Miami-based National
Parkinson Foundation has
named Arnold Pfeffer as its
Chief Executive Officer,
according to Foundation
President Nathan Slewett. As
CEO, Pfeffer will oversee NPF
administration, fundraising
and development.
Israel Thanks UJA For Operation Moses
NEW YORK (JTA) In a
special gesture, the government
of Israel has officially thanked
"the officers and staff of United
Jewish Appeal of America" for
"successful completion of the
Operation Moses campaign" that
has raised $62.5 million.
The gesture came in the form of
a plaque presented to UJA na-
tional chairman Alex Grass and
UJA president Stanley Horowitz
at a recent meeting here of the
UJA national officers. It was
presented by Minister Elyakim
Rubinstein-Migdal, Deputy Chief
of Missions in Israel's Embassy in
Washington, and it was issued on
instructions from Vice Premier
and Foreign Affairs Minister Yit-
zhak Shamir, representing the
government.
Although high Israeli officials
have often thanked UJA leaders
and others in Jewish life for their
contributions to Israel, the preen-
tation of a tangible symbol at a
formal gathering is rare. It
recognizes the enormous achieve-
ment of UJA in exceeding an am-
bitious goal of raising $60 million
from Thanksgiving Day, 1984 to
March 31, 1985, to provide funds
to aid the initial absorption in
Israel of thousands of Ethiopian
Jews.
UJA OFFICIALS have
reported that $52.4 million of the
pledges have been paid, and that
payment and additional pledges
are still being made every day.
They also report that other UJA
fundraising continues to be strong
despite the contributions to
Operation Moses, and that the
1985 Regular Campaign is up to
$567 million, a card-for-card in-
crease of 12.3 percent and a dollar
gain of $63 million over the 1984
Regular Campaign.
The plaque read, "Presented to
the Officers and Staff of the
United Jewish Appeal of America
in recognition of their distinguish-
ed community leadership and il-
lustrious example of the highest
order of fraternity in the suc-
cessful completion of the Opera-
tion Moses Campaign." It was
signed by Shamir who had re-
quested UJA to seek to raise $60
million in four months which
was tantamount to requesting one
of the most ambitious fund-raising
campaigns in a limited time
period.
Rubinstein-Migdal, in presen-
ting the plaque said, "I express
the deep, heartfelt appreciation of
the people of Israel for your
special effort on behalf of Jewish
fraternity of the highest degree,
in the framework of Operation
Moses. We are grateful to you.
We are proud of you."
GRASS RESPONDED, "In a
larger sense, this award belongs
to the thousands of American
Jews across the country, organiz-
ed into communities and federa-
tions, who have done their share
to help our brothers and sisters
from Ethiopia begin to realize
their age-old dream, their redemp-
tion in Israel. And it is also the
people of Israel, who have
heroically made possible and
welcomed this aliyah in pressing
economic times, who are deserv-
ing of recognition."
Rabbi Winter
Regional Director
of NCSY
Rabbi Ari Winter, a
professional youth director, has
been appointed regional director
to- the Southern Region of die
National Conference 6f
Synagogue Youth (NCSY)
according to Rabbi Raphael B
Butler, NCSY national director
He will serve as a liaison bet
ween the region and its com
munities, revitalizing and ex
panding the programming of the
existing network of NCSY
chapters in that region, which
includes Florida, Georgia,
Louisiana, Texas, South
Carolina, and Arkansas. Rabbi
Winter will monitor and evaluate
each chapter's activities and
programs, and guide the local
NCSY chapter advisors.
He received a bachelor's
degree in psychology from
Adelphi University, Long
Island, New York, and his
rabbinical ordination in
Jerusalem. Rabbi Winter spent
the last four years studying in
Jerusalem at the Mir Yeshiva
and at Machon Harry Fischel.
The NCSY-OU Southern
Region maintains offices on
Miami Beach.
L.
liana Dayan, Chief Correspondent of Zahal
(Israel's Defense Forces in the Knesseth),
visits Miami Beach on her tour of American
radio and TV stations. She is the daughter of
Mordecai Dayan, Co-World Chairman of
Keren Kayemeth Leisrael (Jewish National
Fund). She is welcomed on her visit by
(pictured at right) Mr. and Mrs. Fred
Shochet, Publishers of the Jewish Floridian;
(top left to right) liana Dayan, Consul
General of Israel, Yehoshua Trig-zr', and Nily
Falic, Director Keren Kayemeth Leisrael
(Jewish National Fund) Latin Dept.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelight ing Time
7:39 p.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
LateFrl Services*:ISp.m
Dally Minyan 7:30 am and 6:30 p.m
Sal. 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM
5950 N. Kendall Dr.
S. Miami 6674607
Dr. Herbert Baumgard
Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Frt. fell pjn. MM Herbert M.
B*umg*>d will iput
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue ew
Rabbi So) Landau (Wtf
Rev. M11 ton Freema n, v 3E-
Rltual Director
Frt. *v* 5:30 In she Chapel.
* Mlu. Wefcea lejaeaeaj m
IwUtuillku
Men. a TtHM 7:30 ..*.. 1*0 p-m.
Tue... Wed Frt. 7:4e a.m. S: p.m
TEMPLE BETHEL OF NORTH BAY
VILLAGE (Conservative)
7800 Hlspanola Ave., conveniently
loc a ted I us t off 79 St. Cs wy.
Rabbi Marvin Rom
Cantor Danny Tadmore
Friday aetvlcea p.m.
_______ Saturday 9 a.m.
KODESH
JETHKODES
COTItfjWkVttv^
8586334
1101S.VY.12Av*.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Krissel
Rose Berlin: Executive Secretary
#
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel nm
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach
534-7213-534-7214 "
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi *V-
Moan*) Buryn, Cantor S w)
Sergio Grobler, President
Snolem Epelbaum, President
Religiou* Committee
Shabbat Services 30 a m Sermon in in
Daily Minyan
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Beroer
Yehuda Shlfman, Cantor
Maurice Klein, Ritual Director
Gerald Taub, Executive Director
Kabbalat Shabtoat Set vie* *:00 p m
Temple Family Service
Saturday service 9-00 a m
Dally servicea in the Blank Chapti
at a.m. and 7 30 p m
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Ptnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlft
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
aaam/'* Wgassr Rttom ConenpaHon
137 NE. 19th St., Miami. 5735900
9090 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskeii Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Rex D Perimeter
Cantor Jacob G. Bomsteln
Associate Cantor Racheile F Nelson
Executive Director Philip s. Goldin
Director of Education
And Programming Jack L. Sparks
Friday service* S.-00 p.m
Downtown: Rabbi Haekell M. Bemat
Cantor Jacob Bomatein
Kendall: Rate* Hex Perimeter,
Sololal Use Seaool
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Elsenstat, Rabbi
Friday eervlceet:15p r
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St., N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs, Rabbi _
Moehe Frtedler, Cantor r\
Dr. Joseph A Qorflnkel. vSK'
Rabbi Emeritus
Irving Jaret, Executive Director
Friday services 7 p.m.
Saturday t:4S a.m. service.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Mel bar
Centor Nissim Benyamini
Dally Minyan
Sabbath lervtce* *:1S am
* Special rate for memberahlp including
_______tickets lor the High Hoiy Osys
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.VV. 120th Street
236-2601
Rabbi David H. Auerbach
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Meisels
Friday Evening at 9:00 p.m
Saturday Morning at 9 30 a i
I)
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. 4 41st St. 536 7231
OR LEON KRONISH RABBI
HARRY JOLT. AUXIIJMV RABBI ''
PAUL D. CAPLAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CONVISER "
Friday (: 1S om Rabbi Hairy Jolt eermon.
Saturday 10:45 am
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.*' "
&!!S&MB Randall Konfaaburg, Aast. Rabbi
ZveeAroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Daily aervicea 7:30 a.m., 5:30 om raatt
S.tu.d.,.2!,.m.nd7MpPnT (f)
Sunday (am. 5:30 p.m X-X'
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwaig. Rabbi
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Shoeharvah Raab, Cantor
Friday aervloaa 7:30 pm
Saturday. 9:30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-7Sth St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abremowltz -
Cantor Murray Yavneh (
Mwmng service* ( am
Friday late evening eervic*
:15 pm
Saturday 9am and 7:45 p.m
TEMPLE NERTAMID 66*6345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 66*9833
Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz contamthe
Centor Edward Klein ,.,
Dally services 9 s.m and 9:30 p.m -
Saturday services *:45 am
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.VV. 154 Ave. 6 75 St., 382-3343
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modem omwdo.
Friday services 7.IS p.m
Saturday 9:30 a.m. and 20 mint
belore sundown
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
Reform
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Service* Friday 7:30 p.m
Saturday service* 10 30 m
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
271-2311 j
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi (
Benjamin Adler. Cantor
David Roeenthal, Auxiliary Cantor
Fri. 9:15 p.m. Sabbath eve service Teltler
Chapel. Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro
Onog to follow
Sat. 9*X> a.m. Sabbath service* Teltler
Chapel KMdueh to follow
s
4


400 Mark Jabotinsky's
45th Yarzheit
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
In commemoration of the
45th yarzheit of Vladimir
Ze'ev Jabotinsky, founder of
the World Union of Zionist
Revisionists in 1925, more
than 400 people gathered at
the Roosevelt Hotel here,
according to Hart Hasten,
president of the Herut
Zionists of America (HZA),
which sponsored the event,
to "remember the greatness
... the spirit of the man
who sent a stateless people
on the path of
independence.'
Deputy Premier and Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir of Israel,
leader of the Herut movement
which is based on Jabotinsky's
teachings and philosophy, sent a
statement from Jerusalem which
declared, "On the 45th anniver-
sary of Ze'ev Jabotinsky's death,
we recall his life's work, his deeds,
his teachings, and his
achievements which changed the
character of our people and the
course of our history. He put us on
the path to statehood and
sovereignty, and what we do to-
day is in keeping with his
philosophy which has triumphed."
PROF. HERMAN CARMEL,
author and lecturer, told the
meeting, "It is impossible to im-
agine the Zionist movement
without his (Jabotinsky) ideas and
dynamism." Carmel noted that
Jabotinsky's soul "shines with in-
creasing radiance from the;.
distance of time-."
Yoram Aridor, former Israeli
Finance Minister, told the au-
dience that Jabotinsky "was a
statesman without a state, a
k soldier without an army, a leader
without a people. There is no
doubt that his personality chang-
ed Jewish history. He taught us to
believe in our own power not
to give up our rights because if
Jews waive Jewish rights no one
will give them what we ought to
have. what we will not claim
for ourselves."
Aridor also stressed that
Jabotinsky "taught us to be proud
Jews to respect others, but also
to respect ourselves, our own life,
and our heritage ... We are pro-
ud to call ourselves the disciples of
Jabotinsky."
FORMER Israeli Premier
Menachem Begin, once the leader
of Betar, the youth movement
founded by Jabotinsky, declared
in a statement from Jerusalem,
"Ze'ev Jabotinsky taught us to
love our people, fight for its
liberation, defend its dignity,
believe in our inalienable rights to
Eretz Yisrael, to do justice. There
are eternal values: they live today
after the greatest events,
tragedies and achievements of the
past 45 years, and they shall live
forever."
Prof. Howard Adelson, past
president of the United Zionist
Revisionists and honorary presi-
dent of the HZA, called upon the
audience to rededicate themselves
to Jabotinsky and defined Jabotin-
sky's "great message" that
"weakness will not yield success
and appeasement will not win."
Leslie J. Klein, has been ap-
pointed chairperson for the
American Jewish Congress's
Southeast Region's Commis-
sion on Women'8 Equality. An
advocate for women's rights,
she is a member of NOW; has
served on the Board of Con-
gregation Bet Breira; and is
presently Vice President and
past board member of Breira's
Sisterhood.
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Friday, August 16, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
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45 N.E. 1st Avenue. Miami. Florida
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6ozS1.49
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'1*1.- I
;-L r^i_.
II___4T*..
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, August 16, 1985
Gregg Schwartz Named Associate Of Law Firm
Professional Notes
Gregg R. Schwartz has been
named an associate of Fin ley.
Kumble, Wagner, Heine,!
Underberg, Man ley and Casey,
the nation's second largest law
firm. Announcement of his
association was made by J.
Michael Nifong, partner in the
Miami office.
Schwartz previously was with
the firm of Simon, Schindler and
Hurst, and served as assistant
city attorney of North Miami.
He is the son of Miami Beach
public relations executives Felice
and Gerald Schwartz.
A graduate of the University
of Florida, with honors, and of
South Texas College of Law,
Schwartz was a Federal Law
Clerk in the United States
District Court for the Southern
District of Florida for more than
two years.
Schwartz also attended the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill and the University
of Miami School of Law. He was
a member of the Savant
Honorary Leadership Fraternity,
Zeta Beta Tau fraternity and
Delta Theta Phi. legal fraternity.
Gregg R. Schwartz
He is co-chairman of the media
relations committee of the
Young Lawyers Section of the
Dade County Bar Association
and is a member of the Sports
Action of the Greater Miami
Chamber of Commerce. He has
judged moot court competition
at the University School of Law
and was a member of the
University of Florida Research
Team on Civil Rights.
Schwartz was graduated from
Miami Palmetto Senior High
School, where he played on the
varsity baseball and basketball
teams.
In law school in Houston.
Schwartz was selected for Law
Review and filed the third best
brief of 96 competitors in the
Leroy Jeffers Moot Court
Competition at South Texas,
which won the national moot
court title when he attended the
Texas law school.
Schwartz is a member of the
Texas Bar, Federal Bar and
Florida Bar. He lives in East
Kendall and was bom in Miami
Beach.
Women, Including Jewish Women,
Slowly Winning Political Office
By BEN GALLOB
Women are moving into
positions of elective political
power in the United States and
they include Jewish women but
the pace is alow.
A report in a recent issue of
Women's World, the publication
of B'nai B'rith Women, noted
that, in 1973, there were no
women Governors. Currently,
Kentucky and Vermont have
women Governors and the
Governor of Vermont is the first
Jewish woman Governor in
American history Madeleine
Kunin.
Five women are second in
command as Lieutenant
Governors and, again, one is a
Jewish woman Missouri
Lieutenant Governor Harriet
Woods.
The report asserted that both
are representative of a trend
which started in the early 1970's.
when the feminist movement
began to take form. In 1973,
there were 425 women in State
legislatures and at present there
are 1.067, including a number of
Jewish women.
Kunin described it as "a very
slow and cautious revolution."
She added that "the real surge is
going to come from State
legislatures and that's where a
lot of (feminine) talent and
ability is being groomed."
Woods said she had seen "a
growth and development in
politics and women emerging
from the back seat role of
working on campaigns, licking
envelopes and doing the can-
vassing, to more prominent roles
where they are winning seats in
Legislatures and the Congress in
greater numbers."
Both .women served in their
State Legislatures. Kunin was
active in the Vermont
Legislature for six years, during
which she served as Democratic
Whip and chairperson of the
House Appropriations Com-
mittee before she was elected
twice as Lieutenant Governor.
Woods was a member of her
local City Council for eight
years, serving on the Missouri
State Transportation Com-
mission and State Highway
Commission before becoming a
State Senator in 1976.
Kunin said she sometimes
suspected "I had to run twice."
She explained she had not
planned it that way "but run-
ning a good campaign in a tough
race" for governor in 1982
"established my credibility.
Women do have to prove that
they are serious candidates and I
think I achieved that."
Woods said she was not as
well-known in 1982 but her race
for the U.S. Senate "gave me the
name recognition I needed to
make my run for Lieutenant
Governor successful." Generally
considered a likely loser, she
came within "a hairsbreath" of
winning. With her election in
1984, she became the first
woman elected to statewide
office in Missouri .<,
"You cannot assume any
automatic support from my
gender," said Kunin. "Just
because I am a woman does not
mean that I automatically get
the support of women." She said
she believed there is "a lot of
willingness to not look at gender
as a factor, but to look at you for
the job you can do and that is
what you really want to
achieve."
According to the report,
Woods is considered by some
observers to be a possible
candidate for the seat being
vacated by Sen. Thomas
Eagleton in 1986. In response,
she said she had never "made it
a secret that I would love to be
in the U.S. Senate some day.
But right now I'm con-
centrating" on being Lieutenant
Governor, "to continue the work
that I have done in bringing
government closer to the people
and making it more responsive
to people's needs.'
A Showcase In Democratic Pluralism
By
DR. MARC H. TANENBAUM
Maoi, HAWAII
I am writing this column from
the Island of Maui, in Hawaii.
James Michener, the novelist,
has called the eight islands of
Hawaii "an earthly Paradise."
He was not exaggerating.
Hawaii's lush, scenic splendor
is an endless collecton of picture
postcards. But Hawaii's human
garden of diverse ethnic and
religious groups is as impressive
as its variety of foliage. Judging
from my own first-time ex-
perience here I wonder whether
most Americans appreciate what
a showcase of successful
democratic pluralism functions
daily in this 50th State of the
Union.
Look at the composition of
Hawaii's population. While some
21 percent are pore or partv.
Polynesian, the ext largest
ethnic groups are Japanese, then
Caucasians, Filipinos, Chinese,
Koreans, Samoans, and some
Puerto Ricans and blacks. Yet
with all that diversity, there is
striking unity of purpose.
Take, for example, the ob-
servance of Hiroshima Day. On
Aug. 3, all the Christian
churches, Buddist temples, and
Jewish synagogues issued a joint
pastoral letter on world peace.
To mark the 40th anniversary of
the dropping of the atomic bomb
on Hiroshima, Hawaii's temples,
churches, and synagogues held
a commemorative ceremony at
Pearl Harbor's main gate. The
diverse religious leaders united
in reminding the world that the
war which began here in Pearl
Harbor ended in Hiroshima.
Ironically, it is Hawaii, this
Paradise of the Pacific, that calls
today on all people to commit
themselves not just to pleasure,
but rather to work for a world
freed from the threat of nuclear
destruction.
W.NSSeven Arts Feature
Richard G. Herman of Miami
will be among the 100 first
year students entering the
Southeastern College of
Osteopathic Medicine in
North Miami Beach. Herman,
a Phi Betta Kappa, graduated
from the University of Florida
in 1985. He holds a BS degree
in zoology.
Ronald Shane, MD, has been
elected president of the medical
staff of Mount Sinai Medical
Center of Greater Miami for a
two-year term. Dr. Shane, a
consulting nephrologist, has been
a member of Mount Sinai's
'medical staff for 24 years. He is a
founder of the medical center and
a member of the Young
Presidents Club.
Other officers elected are:
Daniel Nixon. MD, first vice
president; Joel S. Dokson, MD,
second vice president; and
medical executive committee
representatives Stuart Gottlieb,
MD, Charles Gratz. MD, Lloyd
S. Goldman, MD. William Shaw,
MD, Jerome Jacobs, DDS, and
Noel Zusmer, MD.
The Seitlin and Company
Insurance Agency has been
awarded the Aetna Commercial
Insurance Division 1985 Great
Performance Club Award.
The Aetna Life and Casualty
Company presented the award to
Seitlin president Steve Jackman.
Seitlin and Company is
celebrating its 40th year of
business in Miami and moved
recently to the Koger Center at
8125 NW 53rd Street.
Business Note
The Leonard Abess Sr. family
regained majority ownership of
the City National Bank Cor-
poration. The family now owns
approximately 85 percent of the
company's stock.
Leonard Abess Jr., president
of the bank holding company,
said the purchase represents a
significant step toward rein-
stating City National's
traditional business direction
and philosophy.
"City National is back home,"
said Leonard Abess Sr., who co-
founded City National in- ^944.
and is chairman of the parent
company. "The holding company
and City National Bank of
Miami are firmly in hand and
positioned for the future."
Lori Fein, has been appointed
Director of Marketing and
Planning of North Miami
General Hospital.
Prior to her appointment, Ms.
Fein was Director of Public
Affairs and Communications at
Southeastern Medical Center for
more than three years.
Ms. Fein is Vice President of
the North Dade Chamber of
Commerce and Secretary of the
South Florida Hospital Public
Relations and Marketing
Association.
Byron S. Cherkas, CPA, a
member of the firm of Cherkas,
Stein and Sherrin, PA, has been
reappointed by the American
Institute of Certified Public
Accountants to a management
advisory services committee.
The members of the committee
will co-author technical
publications for use by the CPA
professionals in the United
States.
Norman M. Giller, president
of Jefferson National Bank at
Sunny Isles, has been ap-
pointed to the State of Florida
Department of Regulation
Committee on Construction
Collapses. Giller, who also is
vice chairman of the board of
Jefferson Bancorp, Inc., heads
i Miami Beach-based ar-
chitectural and planning firm.
AsHstan^n, f iTnL-Commander ***"* Thomas Smith,
dnnntoHh, a! iltache f the U.S. Embassy in Tel Aviv,
donated blood to Afogen David Adorn, Israel's only National
bo^d^ZZnSmitk' whofsPeaks "^perfect Hebrew, said the
blood donation was part of his thank you to the country for the
ARMniZZ Wklfh he and his fam"y ha< been deceived.
mWanMnA^?1* '."tf0??8 the instruction of a new $12
million MDA National Blood Services Center in Ramat Gan



Friday, Aujfust. 16, .1985/The Jcwjit) F!.>/-jduyi Page H-B,;
llic Notices
YTH CIRCUIT COURT
[COUNTY, FLORIDA
NO. 85-29493 (13)
he Marriage of:
1KKKK
\NCES PIERRE,
Bent.
|Y FRANCES PIERRE.
unknown, you shall
I of your Answer to the
ifor Dissolution of Mar-
I GEORGE NICHOLAS,
612 Northwest 12th
ni, Florida, 33136, and
I with Court Clerk on or
ust 23, 1986, otherwise
rill be entered.
B985.
UiD BRINKER
I1. CASAMAYOR
July 26;
August 2, 9. 16. 1985
&TICE UNDER
riOUS NAME LAW
IS HEREBY GIVEN
ndersigned, desiring to
business under the
us name TOWER
MIS GROUP at 431
Bodfrey Road. Miami
brida 33140, intends to
Ld name with the Clerk
Ircuit Court of Dade
orida.
^E J. WOLLOWICK
(owner)
iin Levinson Frank
|for Applicants
1 Avenue. Suite 700
rida 33131
E. Levinson
July 26;
August 2. 9, 16, 1985
ICE UNDER
IOUS NAME LAW
| IS HEREBY GIVEN
dersigned, desiring to
siness under the fic-
lofN.E.W.S. at 12974
kvenue, in the City of
, intends to register
with the Clerk of the
of Dade County,
1ST, WEST, SOUTH,
MNGCO, INC.
LVER
' Applicant
[2nd Avenue, Suite 1326
)33131
st 2,9.16.23.1985
ICE UNDER
BUS NAME LAW
S HEREBY GIVEN
idersigned, desiring to
L business under the fic-
Show Bar at 544
[Avenue, Miami Beach
register said name
: of the Circuit Court
^ty, Florida.
I F. Foster
| Rosa F. Foster
st 2,9,16,23,1986
! OF ACTION
UCTIVE SERVICE
JCUIT COURT OF
BNTH JUDICIAL
OK FLORIDA, IN
I DADE COUNTY
m No. 86-31026
IY PUBLICATION
riage of
.INDE.
)E RODRIGUEZ,
A L A LI NDE
; Residence
| Street NW
, D.C. 20009
IEREBY NOTIFIED
for Dissolution of
been filed and com-
I court and you are re-
a copy of your writ-
if any, to it on
ASHER. ESQ., at-
titioner. whose ad-
outh Bayshore Drive,
ni, FL 33131, and
I with the clerk of the
court on or before
1985; otherwise a
entered against you
prayed in the com-
tion.
my hand and the seal
. at Miami, Florida on
lof July, 1985.
ID P. BRINKER
k, Circuit Court
Sounty, Florida
(J. BYRON
quitv Clerk
_J Seal)
ugust2,9, 16.23.1985 I
. NOTICE OF ACTION. -
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-31288
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
DIANE L. HERMAN,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
DONALD HERMAN.
Respondent/Husband.
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: DONALD HERMAN
71 N.E. 59th Street
Miami, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
SAMUEL S. SOROTA, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
16300 N.E. 19th Avenue, North
Miami Beach, Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
September 6, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 30 day of July. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
SAMUEL S. SOROTA. Esquire
16300 N.E. 19th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Florida
Telephone: (305) 944-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
19236 August 2,9, 16,23,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-29765
(21)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARGARITA CAFFI,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
JOSE E. CAFFI,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: JOSE E. CAFFI
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriagae has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Luis Vidal, Esq., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 1840
West 49th Street, Suite 105,
Hialeah, Florida 33012, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 23, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18th day of July 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Luis Vidal, Esq.
1840 West 49th Street, Suite 106
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
19204 July 26,
August 2,9,16,1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 85-29491 (28)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
CHRISTIANA ST. FLEUR,
Petitioner,
and
CLAUDE ST. FLEUR
Respondent.
TO: CLAUDE ST. FLEUR,
Residence unknown, shall serve
copy of your Answer to the Peti-
tion for Dissolution of Marriage
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS, At-
torney, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami. Florida. 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before August 23, 1985, otherwise
a default will be entered.
July 17, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: T. CASAMAYOR
19203 July 26;
August 2, 9, 16, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-6296
Division 02
Florida Bar No. 148946
Florida Bar No. 233099
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FREDERICK GOLDBERG,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of FREDERICK GOLDBERG,
deceased, File Number 85-6296, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse. Third
Floord, 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representatives' attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any obec-
tion by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
rerpesentative(s), venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
liegun on August 9. 1985.
Personal Representatives:
ANNETTE GOLDBERG
630 S. Shore Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33141
LAWRENCE A. LEVY.
ESQUIRE
5904 East State Boulevard
Fort Wayne, Indiana 46815
Telephone: (219) 749-5000
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentatives:
WILLIAM S. RUBENSTEIN,
ESQUIRE
717 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Suite 237
Coral Gables, FL 33134
Telephone: (305) 448-8995
19245 August 9.16.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-27119 CA-31
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL HOME LOAN MORT-
GAGE CORPORATION,
Plaintiff
vs.
JUAN M. ALMEIDA, et ux., et
al.,
Defendants.
TO: JUAN M. ALMEIDA and
JUDITH ALMEIDA, his wife,
Residence Unknown, if alive, and
if dead, all parties claiming in-
terest by, through, under or
against, and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
Dade County, Florida: LOT 18,
BLOCK 1, LAKE MARKS AT
WESTWIND, ACCORDING TO
THE PLAT THEREOF, AS
RECORDED IN PLAT BOOK
120, AT PAGE 60, OF THE
PUBLIC RECORDS OF DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA, has been fil-
ed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on Shop
pard Faber, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables,
Florida, 33146 on or before
September 6, 1986, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 1 st day of August,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19242 August 9,16,23,30, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name R.T.R. Distributors at
11246 SW 166 Terr. Miami Fla
33157 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
Alfredo Mendez
Ricardo Araujo
19231 August 2, 9, 16. 23, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83-6314 (03)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JORGE G. CORDON
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of JORGE G.
GORDON, deceased, File Number
83-6314 (03), is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is Ligia I. Gordon, whose
address is c/o 420 S. Dixie
Highway. 3rd Floor, Coral Gables.
FL 33146. The name and address
of the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challengers)
the validity of the decedent's will,
the qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
August 9, 1985.
Ligia I. Gordon
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Jorge G. Gordon
I Lipp1C(Vl
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Jeffrey A. Kern, Esquire
Fromberg, Fromberg,
Gross & Shore. P.A.
420 South Dixie Highway, 3rd
Floor
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
Telephone: (305) 666-6622
19239 August 9,16,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No.85-30373
IN RE: The Marriage of
DOMINGO MARTINEZ,
Petitioner,
-and-
MARTHA MARIA MARTINEZ,
Respondent.
TO: MARTHA MARIA
MARTINEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 826 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 543. Miami, FL 33131, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
August 30, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 24 day of July, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19215 July 26;
August 2, 9, 16, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION-
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 85-28421
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CARLOS HERNANDEZ,
Petitioner/Husband,
I and
IRENE HERNANDEZ,
Respondent/Wife.
TO: IRENE HERNANDEZ
Residence Address:
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on HERBERT SEIDEL. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
13899 Biscayne Boulevard, North
Miami Beach, Florida 33181, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
August 23, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall l>e published for
four consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
17davof Julv. 1985,
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By: D.C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HERBERT SEIDEL
13899 Biscayne Boulevard
North Miami Beach. FL 33181
Telephone: (305) 945-7444
Attorney for Petitioner
19201 July 26;
August 2. 9. 16. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 84-46614
' NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRDVGE OF
RENE V. MARTINEZ,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
ZOILA REYNA RIVERA
Respondent/Wife.
TO: Zoila Reyna Rivera '
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Henry Leyte-Vidal, Esquire, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 701 SW 27th Avenue.
Suite 625, Miami, Florida 33135,
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before August 30, 1985; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 25th day of July. 1985.
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Petitioner:
Henry Leyte-Vidal, Esquire
701 SW 27th Avenue, Suite 625
Miami. Florida 33135
Phone (305) 541-2266
19221 August 2, 9. 16.23, 1985
| NOTICE OF ACTION
j CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
i IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-30701 FC (08)
PETITION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE: The Adoption of:
S.A.R., a/k/a BABY WHEELER.:
a minor.
TO: BRIAN TISSUE
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Adoption has
been filed in reference to the adop-
tion of a baby girl born May 31,
1985, in Ft. Pierce, St. Lucie Coun-
ty, Florida, to the natural mother,
MICHELLE ANN WHEELER.'
You have been named on the
Background Information on Pro-
spective Adoptive Child form fur-
nished to the Department of Health*
and Rehabilitative Services as the
natural father of Baby Wheeler,
this form completed by
MICHELLE ANN WHEELER.
Should you request to contest this
adoption, you may do so by filing
your written defenses/responses
with the Clerk of the above styled
Court with a./:opy to ALAN S.
KESSLER, aM^ney for the Peti-
tioners, whose Waddross is The
Roney Plaza, Suite M-8. 2301 Col-
lins Ave., Miami Beach, Florida
33139, on or before the fith dl
September, 1985, the time set for
the final hearing of adoption in this
matter. %.
Should you request to'feunXMt this
adoption, you may also do so by con-
tacting the Department of Health
and Rehabilitative Services, Adop-
tion and Related Services, 3rd
Floor. 1150 S.W. 1st St.. Miami.
Florida 33128 (Attention: Donna
Silverman).
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consecutive
weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal this
26th day of July. 1985.
ALAN S. KESSLER
ALAN S. KESSLER, ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioners
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Telephone: (305) 538-4421
19228 August 2,9, 16,23, 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86 30136
IN RE: The Marriage of:
DORCILIAN LOUISDOR.
Petitioner,
and
SANDRA LORELEI LOUISDOR,
Respondent.
TO: SANDRA LORELEI
LOUISDOR.
Residence unknown, you shall serve
copy of your Answer to the Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attorney.
612 Northwest 12th Ave., Miami,
Florida, 33136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
August 23, 1985, otherwise
default will be entered.
July 22, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19210 July 26;
August 2.9. 16, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 86 30*06
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
BAR No. 014496
IN RE: The marriage of:
SONNETTE SAINTAL.
Petitioner/wife,
and
JEANNOT SAINTAL,
Respondent/husband,
YOU, JEANNOT SAINTAL, are
required to file your answer to the
petition for dissolution of marriage
with the Clerk of the above Court
and serve a copy thereof upon the
petitioner's attorney, Law Office of
Herman Cohen & Martin Cohen,
622 S.W. 1st. Street, Miami, Fla.
33130, on or before August 30,
1986, or else petition will be
confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami, Dade County,
Florida, this 26 day of July, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRIKER.
Clerk, Circuit Court
By C.P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
.'19226 August 2, 9, 16, 23, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name BISCAYNE WINE
MERCHANTS at 12963 Biscayne
Boulevard, North Miami, Florida
33181, intends to register such
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
WHAT AN IDEA, INC.
BY: JAN STTKO
President
19218 August 2,9,16,23,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name V & M Auto Seat
Cover at 1910 NW 29 St. Miami
Fla 33142 intends to register said
name with the Cle'k of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Robert Ricard
19205 July 26
August 2, 9, 16, 1985


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Kriday. August lb, iyo
Public Notices I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-6817
Division 02
FLA. BAR No. 205656
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MERNA FREED
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of MERNA FREED, deceased,
File Number 85-6817, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Stree, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per
so rial representative and the per
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice
begun on August 9, 1986.
Personal Representative:
FRIEDA LAMPERT
KING'S POINT
694 Normandy 0
Delray Beach, Florida 33445
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Michael A. Dribin, Esq.
Cypen, Cypen & Dribin
P.O. Box 402099
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
19243 August 9, 16, 1985
has
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 15-2*374 CA-04
NOTICE OF ACTION
0024*1
FEDERAL NATIONAL
MORTGAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and
existing under the laws of the
United States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
LEON JOE SHI PMAN. et al..
Defendants.
TO: HOME MORTGAGE OF
SOUTH FLORIDA, INC. a-k-a
HOME MORTGAGE OF SOUTH
FLORIDA, Address Unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mor-
tgage on the following described
property: Lot I, in Block 13,
AMENDED PLAT OF Blocks 1
to 20 inclusive, BAY VISTA
PARK, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
10. at Page 5, of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It, on Stuart
Gitlitz, Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address Is Suite 214, 1570
Madruga Avenue, Coral Gables.
(Florida. 33146 on or before
September 13, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 12th day of
August, 1985.
RICHARDP BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C.BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19254 August 14, 23,30
September 6,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names METRO DOOR:
METRO WINDOW at 4150 NW
7th St.. No. 206, Miami, FL 33126,
intends to register said names with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
METRO GLASS
& MIRROR INC.
4150 NW 7th St., No. 206
Miami, FL 33126
19249 August 9.16.23.30.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85 31297
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MYRTLE ROSE SUCKIE,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
RAINFORD SUCKIE.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: RAINFORD SUCKIE
20 Maiden Lane
Kingston 4. Jamaica
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on SAMUEL S. SOROTA. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
. dress is 16300 N.E. 19th Avenue,
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162,
and file the original with the clerk l1
of the above styled court on or'l
before September 6, 1985; other-i
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 30 day of July, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
SAMUEL S. SOROTA Esquire
16300 N.E. 19th Avenue
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
(305) 944-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
19235 August 2,9,16, 23,1985
(
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names METRO MIRROR
METRO WINDOW & GLASS
METRO WINDOW & MIRROR at
4150 NW 7th St., No. 206. Miami.
FL 33126, intends to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
METRO GLASS
& MIRROR INC.
4150 NW 7th St., No. 206
Miami, FL 33126*
19247 August 9, 16,23,30.19851
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No.85-30639 CA 20
NOTICE OF ACTION
STOCKTON, WHATLEY
DAVIN COMPANY. A Florlds
corporation.
Plaintiff,
v.
CLAUDE R. SNELLGROVE;
JAIME A. SIERRA, and th
unknown spouse, heirs, devisees,
grantees, creditors, or other
parties claiming by. through,
under or against him; JANE E.
SIERRA; and LESLIE
ESTATES HOMEOWNERS'
ASSOCIATION NO. 3, INC.. a
Florida corporation,
Defendants.
To: Jaime A. Sierra, whose
residence Is unknown, and the
unknown parties who may be
spouses, heirs, devisees,
grantees, assignees, llenors.
creditors, trustees and all
parUes claiming Interest by,
through, under or against said
Defendant, who are not known to
be dead or alive, and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title, or Interest In the
property herein described.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
acUon to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property In Dade
County. Florida: Lot 2. In Block
53, of LESLIE ESTATES
SECTION FIVE, according to
the Plat thereof, as recorded In
Plat Book 96, at Page 79, of the
Public Records of Dade County.
Florida, has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defense. If any. to It on Barry S.
Yarchln. Esquire, of Rosenthal
and Yarchln. PA.. Attorneys for
Plaintiff. 3OS0 Blacayne
Boulevard, Suite 800. Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before
September 13, 1985. and to file
the original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or Im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on August 12,1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
By DC. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
19285 August 16. 23.30
Septembers. 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN'
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious names METRO GLASS & \
WINDOW; METRO GLASS &
MIRROR; METRO GLASS at!
4150 NW 7th St.. No. 206, Miami. I
FL 33126. intends to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit'
Court of Dade County, Florida.
METRO GLASS
& MIRROR INC.
4Ni NW 7th St.. No. 206
Miami, FL 33126
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT COURT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-28421
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
CARLOS HERNANDEZ,
Petitioner/Husband,
and
IRENE HERNADEZ,
Respondent/Wife,
TO: IRENE HERNANDEZ,
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if any, to
it on HERBERT SEIDEL. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 13899 BISCAYNE
BOULEVARD NORTH MIAMI
BEACH, FLORIDA 33181. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 23, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petitio.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 17 day of July, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HERBERT SEIDEL
13899 BISCAYNE BOULEVARD
NORTH MIAMI BEACH,
FLORIDA 33181
(305) 945-7444
Attorney for Petitioner
19209 July 26;
August 2, 9.16,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-6356
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MATILDA LEWIS,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Matilda Lewis, deceased. File
Number 85-6356 (03), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33131. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 16, 1985.
Personal Representative:
EDGAR LEWIS
8425 S.W. 91st Street
Miami, Florida 33156
Attorney for Personal
resentatjve:
Seymour D. Keith, Esquire
111 N.E. First Street
Suite 500, Miami, FL 33132
Telephone: (305) 358-7605
19251 August 16,23, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-244
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BARBARA MOVER
Rep-
19248 August 9.16,23,30,1985 '
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-5149
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATEOF
JACK BUCKSBAUM,
Deceased
NOTICE
TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
The administration of the
estate of JACK BUCKSBAUM.
deceased. File Number 855149
01. is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida. The names and
addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representatives' attorney are set
forth below.
All persons are required to file
with the clerk of the above court,
WITHIN THREE CALENDAR
MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE (1) all claims against
the estate in the form and
manner prescribed by Section
733.703 of the Florida Statutes
and Rule 5.490 of The Florida
Rules of Probate and Guar
dianship Procedure.
ALL CLAIMS AND
DEMANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 16,1985.
Personal Representatives:
SEYMOUR BUCKSBAUM
2376 Legion St.
Bellmore. NY. 11710
ALVINL. BUCKSBAUM
l42SuttonPI.
South Lawrence, L. I. N Y 11559
SAMUEL R. BUXBAUM
2000 Lin wood Ave.
Fort Lee, N.J. 07024
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentatives:
SAMUEL I. LEFF
LEFF. PESETSKY 8. ZACK,
PA.
1367 N.E. 162nd St.
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33162
Telephone: (305) 945 7501
August 16, 23,1V85
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of BARBARA MOVER, deceased.
File Number 85-244, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street Miami, Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (?) any ob-
jection by an intersted person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 9, 1985.
Personal Representative:
JOY J. MOVER
1380 Miami Gardens Drive,
Suite 100
North Miami Beach. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SAMUEL S. SOROTA
16300 N.E. 19th Avenue
North Miami Beach. Florida
Telephone: 944-3900
19238_________August 9,16.1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-20411
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LEBON JEANTEL.
Petitioner,
and
CYNTHIA D. JEANTEL,
Respondent.
TO: CYNTHIA D. JEANTEL,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before August 23. 1985. otherwise
a default will be entered.
July 17, 1985.
RICHARD P BRINKER,
CLERK
BY: L.E.R. Sinclair
As Deputy Clerk
19200 July 26;
August 2, 9,16, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name R.P.R. Distributors at
11246 SW 166 Terr. Miami Fla
33157 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
Alfredo Mendez
Ricardo Araujo
19231 August 2,9,16,23, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-31016 CA-24
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
FEDERAL NATIONAL MORT-
GAGE ASSOCIATION, an
association organized and existing
under the laws of the United
States of America,
Plaintiff
vs.
MARIA E. KELLEY. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: ISAAC A. STEELE III and
LORRAINE K. STEELE, his
wife, 4242 Spring House Lane,
Norcross, GA 30092
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described proper-
ty: Lot 3, Block 1. of BRENDA
ESTATES, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book
67, Page 52, of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida, has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it, on Shop
pard Faber. Attorney for Plaintiff,
whose address is Suite 214. 1570
Madruga Avenue. Coral Gables.
Florida, 33146 on or before
September 6, 1985 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiffs attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 1st day of
August, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
19240 August 9, 16, 23, 30, 198r
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-33275
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK. FSB, f-k a
Community Federal Savings and
Loan Association.
Plaintiff
vs.
BOBBIE L OVERSTREET, et
al..
Defendants.
TO: Bobbie L. Overstreet
611 Edgewood Terrace. No.
701
Washington. D.C. 20017
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mor
tgage on the following described
property: Lot 8, in Block 6. of
PERRINE GARDENS SUB
DIVISION NO. 5. according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 103, at Page 13. of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida, has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on Shep
pard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or
before September 13, 1985 and
file the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or im
mediately thereafter, otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 12th day of
August, 1985.
RICHARDP.BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
ByGWEND ZEIGLER
As Deputy Clerk
"253 August 16, 23. 30
September 6,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name HIGH VOLTAGE
at 18537 West Dixie Highway.
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33180
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
EMOTIONALOUTLET. INC.
'9257 August 16. 23. 30;
Septembers. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-6837
Division 02
IN RE:ESTATE OF
JOHN BASIL McNEELY
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of JOHN BASIL McNEELY,
deceased, File Number 85-6837, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this couirt,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 9, 1985.
Personal Representative:
JAMES EDWARD McNEELY
36 Main Street
Port Washington, NY 11050
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
CYPEN, CVPEN & DRIBIN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
By: IRVING CYPEN
19244 August 9. 16, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-24430 CA-01
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
ENSIGN BANK. F.S.B., f/k/a
Community Federal Savings and
Loan Association,
Plaintiff
vs.
WAYNE W. NEAL, et al..
Defendants.
TO: WAYNE W. NEAL
137 E. Enid Drive
Key Biscayne, Florida 33149
TO: SARAH NEAL, Residence
Unknown, if alive, and if dead, all
parties claiming interest by.
through, under or against SARAH
NEAL. and all parties having or
claiming to have any right, title or
interest in the property herein
described.
You are hereby notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property in DADE
County, Florida: Private Dwelling
Unit No. 4-D-4 in COSTA DEL
SOL. CONDOMINIUM NO. 1, a
Condominium Building according
to the Declaration thereof, as
recorded in Official Records Book
8716, Page 450, together with all
appurtenances thereto, including
its percentage of undivided in-
terest in the common elements and-'
common surplus of said con-,
dominium. as set forth in the
Declaration and amended by
amendments to Declaration of
Condominium, recorded in Official
Records Book 9101. at Page 1134.
as amended by amendment as
recorded in Official Records Book
9124. at Page 543. and as amended
by amendment recorded in Official
Records Book 9487, at Page 517 of
the Dade County Public Records,
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to \\.
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney fo*.
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214. 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables, Florida, 33146 on or before
September 6. 1985, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
either before service on Plaintiffs
attorney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court this 1st day of August
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT "
As Deputy Clerk
19241 August 9, 16, 23.30.1985


Friday, August 16, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Obituaries
: at the Ibenat Distribution Center in
tdar region of Ethiopia ladle out
high energy food supplement, to
[suffering from the prolonged effects
Ethiopian famine. The Faffa, a for-
rains and cereals that can be served
as porridge or baked into bread, was made up
especially for the needs of starving children
under age five. The JDC is delivering 35 tons
of Faffa a month, enough to feed 5,000-
10,000 children a day.
Free Enterprise
)E CIRCUIT COURTOF
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
ICUITIN AND FOR
I COUNTY. FLORIDA
iMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
[PUBLICATION
NO.0M4M
lie marriage of:
!N ADDERLY
IE.
er-wlfe,
(ARRE,
dent-husband.
NICO LAMARRE.
i unknown, are required
Lir answer to the petition
ilntion of marriage with
I of the above Court and
|copy thereof upon the
pr's attorneys. Law
HERMAN COHEN &
i COHEN. 822 S.W. 1st
llaml. Fla. 33130, on or
Bptember 20. 1085, or
an will be confessed.
BS my hand and seal of
at Miami. Dade
florlda. this August 12,
kRD P. BRINKER.
rk, Circuit Court
F. J.Foy
[Deputy Clerk
August 16, 23. 30:
.Septembers. 1885
CIRCUIT COURT FOR
jCOUNTY, FLORIDA
DBATE DIVISION
[Number 15 SI44
Division 01
STATE OF
ITE WEINGARTEN.
Deceased
TICEOF
INISTRATION
illustration of the
Of HENRIETTE
IITEN, deceased, File
t-5844. Is pending In the
for Dade County,
robate Division, the
which Is 73 West
eet, Miami. Florida
i names and addresses
Iraonal representative
personal represen-
|ttomey are set forth
(rested persons are
file with this court.
1REE MONTHS OF
' PUBLICATION OF
TICE: (1) all claims
estate and (2) any
t an Interested person
notice was mailed
ges the validity of the
qualifications of the
ppresentatlve. venue,
an of the court.
IIMS AND Oil
NOT SO FILED
JRF.VER BARRED,
of this Notice has
llgust 18.1885.
I Representative:
fred Welngarten
uray Circle North
t. New York 11030
r Personal
live:
.HERMAN, ESQ.
ne. Comlnsky and
I Boulevard,
133137
|t08) 573-5900
August 16.23. 30:
Septembers. 1B85
Continued from Page IB
terference by the government in
the daily life of its citizens." Wer-
theimer, a former Knesset
member, is founder and president
of ISCAR, an Israeli factory in the
Tefen Industrial Zone, which
makes and exports hard metal in-
dustrial products.
He is the driving force behind
ENTREPARK, also part of the
Tefen Industrial Zone, which
helps young, high-tech industries
get on their feet. With Kfar
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name HOLY LAND
IMPORTS Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
ALL AMERICAN
TRADING COMPAN Y INC.
a Florida corporation
By: BelaFlorentln.
President
NelsonC. Keshen. Esq.
Attorney for Corporation
8905 S.W. 87 Avenue.
Suite 209
Miami, FL 33176
Telephone: 560-1538
18252 August 16, 23,30
Septembers, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name E. GRAFTON
EXPORT LIMITED INC.
(D.B.A. INTERNATIONAL
WINES & SPIRITS) at 2400 W 8
Lane. Hlaleah. Florida 33010.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
ESTEBAN GRAFTON
President
1240 Crane Ave.
Miami Springs, FL 33188
19250 August 16,23, 30;
September 6,1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85 30137
DORCILIAN LOUISDOR. and
ISMAELIE COOK.
Plaintiffs,
-vs-
SPENCER COOK.
Defendant.
TO: SPENCER COOK,
Residence unknown, you shall serve
copy of your Answer to the Com-
plaint to Determine Paternity and
Change the Surname of the Child
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS. At-
torney. 612 Northwest 12th Ave.,
Miami. Florida. 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before August 23, 1985. otherwise a
default will be entered.
July 22, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19206 July 26;
August 2, 9. 16. 1985
Vradim located nearby, the com-
panies at the industrial park will
have a ready work force to meet
their needs.
Ninety-two percent of the pro-
spective residents are salaried
employees; the majority are pro-
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
CASE NO: 8S-337 52(U>
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JEAN PAULIMAHYPOLITE.
Petitioner,
and
SADIE HYPOLITE.
Respondent.
TO: SADIE HYPOLITE.
Residence unknown,
you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attorney.
612 Northwest 12th Ave.. Miami.
Florida. 33136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
September 20, 1985, otherwise a
default will be entered.
August 14.1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: T. Casamayor
19259 August 16.23, 30;
Septembers, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-4758
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BESS ALEXANDER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
..The administration of the
estate of BESS ALEXANDER,
deceased. File Number 86-6758.
is pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
73 West Flagler St., Miami,
Florida, 33130 The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an interested person
to whom this notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue,
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 16.1985.
Personal Representative:
ROBERT ALEXANDER
7 Lowood Lane
Oreenvllle.
South Carolina. 26605
Sandra mirkus
11 Noel Lane
Mutton town.
L.I. New York. 11753
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT. ESQ.
696 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla.. 33138
Telephone: (305)672-3100
Fin Bar. No 027363
18280 August 16. 23. 1985
Sylvia Braun, 72
Sylvia Braun. 72. died August
1 at her Coconut Grove home.
Mrs. Braun was a charter
member of the Technion Institute
in Tel Aviv. Israel and was a
major contributor to the Jewish
Theological Seminary in New
York. She participated as well in
the Sisterhood of Beth David
Synagoj^ie. Hadassah and was a
Founder of the Miami Jewish
Home for the Aged.
She is survived by her husband
David Braun: her daughter
Arlene (Bobbles) Smoley.
granddaughters. Hay ley and
Jennifer; her sister Rae Gold-
berg: and brothers Donald Grant
and Fred Garfinkle. Services
were held at Beth David
Synagogue.
KAPLAN
Services for Jeffrey Solomon Kaplan
19. a Miami Dade Community Colleg<
student were held August 11 at River
side Alton Road Chapel. He is survived
by his parents Leon and Ronne. a sister.
Mini and brother Allen.
COHEN, Bernard, 58, of Westhampton.
N.Y. and Miami. August 11. Services
held In Westhampton.
GABERMAN, David. Dr.. 89. of North
Miami Beach. August 10. Levitt
Weinsteln.
NEILINGER. David. 84, of Miami
Menorah Chapels. Mt. Nebo.
RUBENSTEIN. Fannie, of North Miami
Beach.
EVANS. Beatrice, Rubln-Zllbert.
FOGEL. Richard. 37. of North Miami
Beach. August 12. Levitt-Weinsteln.
MISHELL, Beatrice. 78. of Bal Har
hour. August 5. Riverside.
FINI.EY. Blanche. North Miami Beach.
August 6.
ROSENTHAL. Rose M. of North Miami
Beach, August 8. Menorah Chapels.
BLUTSTEIN. Ethel, 84. North Miami
Beach Riverside.
KARGER, RaynaDeCosta.83, of Miami
Beach, August 6. Riverside.
YUCHTMAN. Clare D. of North Miami.
August 8. Blasberg.
KAUFMAN. Samuel. 79. of Miami
Beach. August 10.
PRINCE. Milton, of Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert
BROWN, William, of North Miami
Beach.
MOLITZ. Harry C. August 10.
NAOER. Irving S.. 78. of Miami, August
11. Riverside.
TOI.ILA, Suzanne. 82. of Miami. August
II.
HAMMER
Isadore, of Miami Beach. He is survived
by his wife Belle, sons Dr. Emanuel F.
I il.i Hammer of New York. David A.
Hammer of Taipei. Taiwan and
daughter Saralyn (Geraldi Picker of
Wayland. Mass Mr Hummer was
President ol Chaim Wetzman Branch
Farband. Treasurer of Hlatadrut. Board
member of United Jewish Appeal.
mmbr of Jewish Federation, past
President of the Jewish Culture Circle
..hi ,. member ol Temple Emanu-El.
Services were held at the Kubin-Zllbert
Memorial Chapel.

$M
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel. 261-7612
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented l>> Kiverside Memorial Chapel. Inr
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd. & 76th Rd., Forest Hills. N.Y.


Page 12-B Tbe Jewish FTondiatt Friday. August 16. 1985


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