The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02946

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
JewIs]fo Ploridiami
ie 58 Number 29
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, July 19,1985
Fimd Shochtl By Mail $1 35
Price 50 Cents
alestinians' List Goes to Reagan
Irike
reat
Histadrut
[Hoped For
'ompromise
I Bv DAVID LANDAU
And HUGH ORGEL
{RUSALEM (JTA) -
idrut gave the govern-
until Tuesday to agree
compromise on its
pgency economic pro-
that would ease the
len of sacrifice imposed
page-earners.
trade union federation
oned its call for a general
i that was supposed to begin
ty so that negotiations could
nui' in a calm atmosphere.
drut Secretary General
Kessar met again with
lier Shimon Peres and
ce Minister Yitzhak Modai.
marathon sessions, which
l last week, were on two ma-
ues, wage erosion and mass
ils of public employees.
ut also objects to the im-
ntation of these measures
tree.
["HOUGH Kessar said that
ogress was made, media
es said both sides were in-
f toward agreement on the
Bues. Political pundits said
rere anxious to reach an ac-
[if possible before Monday
on.
that time, the Central
of Statistics released the
Dn figures for June. They
|ligh and could trigger a new
of wildcat strikes by the
nilitant unions which would
[an agreement even harder
(eve.
ernment sources said that
it has agreed in principle
sut three percent of the
t sector workforce will have
dismissed in the interest of
Ug economic collapse. But
re negotiating vigorously
how this will be
banted.
Cabinet decided at its
Sunday to include all
tinned on Page 6-A
A violent demonstration of citizens in against the government's announcement of
Jerusalem's Katamon neighborhood protests high price increases and budget cuts.
Saddened By His Actions
Hijack Victim Herzberg Says Now He
Finds Strength in Jewish Convictions
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
Richard Herzberg, the one
Jew among the four
Americans held separately
from the other hostages
after a TWA plane was hi-
jacked last month, said that
the ordeal has strengthened
his religious convictions.
The 33-year-old Norfolk,
Virginia insurance salesman, said
that he had always attended ser-
vices on the High Holy Days but
during his 17 days of captivity in
Beirut by the radical Shiite group
Hezbollah, he prayed constantly.
"It deepened my conviction that
there is a God," he said, adding
that prayer gave him the
"strength to just endure."
His wife, Susan, 28, said that
she always had planned to raise
their children in a traditional
Jewish home, and now with her
husband's deepened convictions,
this would be easier.
Nabi Bern
Is television a handmaiden
of Arab terrorism?
. Page 5-A
THE HERZBERGS were
returning from a honeymoon in
Greece when the plane was hijack-
ed enroute from Athens to Rome.
They appeared at a press con-
ference at B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional headquarters here, in part,
Herzberg explained, to thank the
American people and the Jewish
community here and in Paris for
their support during the hijacking.
Warren Eisenberg, director of
international affairs for B'nai
B'rith, said that after the hijack-
ing, Mrs. Herzberg's father, Ted
Deutsch, a member of B'nai B'rith
in Virginia Beach, Va., telephoned
B'nai B'rith to ask help in getting
information which the organiza-
tion sought to do on a daily basis.
Herzberg said that neither he
nor the other three Americans
who had been segregated were
mistreated by the Hezbollah. He
said he tried to convince them that
he was not Jewish and that his
father was German and his
mother Greek, something which
he said he was not now "proud" of
doing.
THE TWO terrorists, after hi-
Continued on Page 8-A
"hird World Women
They Politicize 'UN Decade' at Nairobi From Start
sy NANCY MILLER
JROBI, Kenya -
|) More than 500
an crammed into an
sized, striped Peace
on the campus of the
ersity of Nairobi to
ir a Palestinian
jlogist, an Israeli pro-
of women's studies,
an American Jewish
freelance journalist, and a
British Jewish Non-
Governmental Organization
(NGO) delegate sympathetic
to the Palestinian cause ex-
change their views on the
Middle East.
The program was one of hun-
dreds planned for the NGO Forum
'85 on women which began here
last Wednesday and ended
Wednesday (July 17). The
meetings of the NGOs, which in-
clude many Jewish organizations,
are meeting in conjunction with
the 12-day world conference en-
ding the United Nations Decade
for Women.
AFTER EACH panelist
delivered a 10-minute speech.
dozens crowded the podium to
comment. Many spoke in familiar
terms about the horrors of apar-
theid, racism, and Zionism. Yhan
Melou, a representative of the
General Union of Palestinian
Women, noted to the approval of
the meeting, that "Zionism is
racism. We do not say this
because we like to condemn
Continued on Page 2-A
U.S. Says
Meet Being
Prepared
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
stresses that if the United
States meets with a joint
Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation it will be to bring
about direct negotiations
between Israel and the
Jordanian-Palestinian
representatives.
"We are prepared to meet with
a group of Jordanians and Palesti-
nians if such a meeting would
clearly point toward that goal,"
Robert Smalley, a State Depart-
ment spokesman, said. "The
ultimate objective is to bring two
delegations together, an Israeli
one on the one hand and a joint
Palestinian-Jordanian delegation
on the other."
SMALLEY'S comments came
as he confirmed that Jordan has
sent the U.S. a list of Palestinians
from which the State Department
will decide whether any are accep-
table as the Palestinian members
of the joint delegation.
The Jordanian action was
revealed over the weekend by
King Hussein in Amman.
Secretary of State George Shultz
said in Australia that the U.S. has
received the names, "and we are
in the process of evaluating
them." Neither Shultz or Smalley
would reveal any of the names.
Smalley said he did not know
whether the Palestine Liberation
Organization had played a part in
selecting the list. But according to
reports, Hussein had received a
list from PLO leader Yasir
Arafat.
Smalley reiterated that the U.S.
would not accept members of the
PLO on the delegation. He quoted
Shultz who, at a press conference
last May during Hussein's visit to
Washington, said, "We are look-
ing for people of good will who are
Continued on Page 11 -A
King Hussein


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, July 19, 1985
Maureen Reagan Says
She'll Ward Off Third-Worlders
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Maureen Reagan of the
United States delegation to
the world conference ending
the United Nations Decade
for Women, pledges that
her delegation will do
everything possible to pre-
vent adoption of anti-Zionist
resolutions at the con-
ference which opened in
Nairobi, Kenya, Monday,
July 8.
If such resolutions are adopted,
Reagan said it will be up to her
father, President Reagan, to
decide what action the U.S.
delegation takes. But she in-
dicated that the delegation would
be reluctant to walk out as some
Jewish groups and members of
Congress have been urging.
SHE EXPLAINED that at
preparatory meetings for the con-
ference, "radical delegations"
sought to find what the "bottom
line" is for the U.S. that would
force it to leave so that these
delegations could try to have such
resolutions adopted. "We are not
going to leave," she said. "We
have important business to carry
out."
Reagan said that unlike the
earlier women's conferences in
Mexico City in 1975 which con-
tained the "Zionism is racism"
resolution, and in Copenhagen in
1980 which accepted a "radical"
resolution of the Palestinians, the
proposed Nairobi document con-
tains a catch-all proposed by the
Soviet bloc which includes anti-
Zionism among other "obstacles"
to the development of women.
The paragraph, which calls the
arms race the main obstacle, adds:
"Other major obstacles to the im-
plementation of goals and objec-
tives set by the United Nations in
the field of the advancement of
women include imperialism, col-
onialism, neo-colonialism, expan-
sionism, apartheid, racism,
Zionism, exploitation, policies of
force and all forms of occupation.
domination and hegemony, and
the growing gap between the
levels of economic development of
developed and developing
countries.
"WE WILL work to get it out,
we will argue against it, we will
vote against it," Reagan said.
"We will do whatever it is we can
do. I cannot guarantee you it will
never come up. I cannot
guarantee you it will not pass. I
can tell you that we will do our
best effort to see that its does
not."
Reagan said that when the U.S.
and other countries were unable
to vote for the Mexico City and
Copenhagen declarations it meant
that "a tremendous number of
women in the world" were not
part of those documents even
though "we had sweat blood" to
see that issues important to
women were in them.
She said to prevent this from
happening in Nairobi the U.S. is
proposing that the resolution deal-
ing with the "forward looking
strategy for women" be adopted
on a consensus vote and that
political issues be dealt with in
some separate manner.
"There has to be a place for
radical views to be heard,"
Reagan said. "There has to be a
place for political debates to take
place. But there also has to be a
forward looking strategy for the
next 15 years which deals with the
very best agreement of women
from all over the world with the
things we have in common and we
are working for and that doesn't
eliminate any group of nations or
any single nation simply because
one group has more votes."
AT THE SAME time, Reagan
said that unlike Mexico City and
Copenhagen, she sought in the
political debate to "exorcise those
extreme views and come up with
something positive in the middle."
She refused to take any position
on a long section in the proposed
document dealing with Palesti-
nian women which criticizes
Israeli policy. She said it was
something to be discussed at
Nairobi.
Women Politicize 'UN Decade'
From the Very Beginning
Continued from Page 1 -A
Zionism, but it is a fact."
Despite the jingoistic cant,
distressing as it was to the Jewish
and Israeli delegates, this meeting
was noteworthy for its orderliness
and self-control.
Thus, Charlotte Ettlinger, a
Swedish-born Jew who found
refuge in Norway during World
War II, was able to ask: "Why
aren't PLO people as nice to
Arabs as the Norwegians were to
the Swedes? The audience began
to hiss at this observation, but was
quickly hushed, as Ettlinger
continued:
"If someone comes to Sweden,
after five years he is a citizen,
unlike Palestinian refugees who
left Israel in 1948 and have been
denied citizenship by other Arab
countries."
DURING THE 1975 women's
meeting in Mexico City and the
1980 mid-decade conference in
Copenhagen, discussion of
Zionism, apartheid, and racism
dissolved into ugly free-for-alls.
Supporters of the U.S. as well aa
Israel were prevented from speak -
Tag ->r were so severely heckled,
that many left the podium in
tears. Parliamentarian rules of
order completely broke down then
and chaos ruled.
At the meeting here, however,
the women running the program
maintained discipline through the
often emotional, often bitter
statements.
Barbara Bick, the moderator,
strictly enforced time limits on all
speakers. Sonia Johnson took
names of those wishing to speak,
attempting to include as many
women from as many countries as
possible. Applause, booing, and
hissing were forbidden.
INSTEAD THE women were
told to wave their hands in ap-
proval or to turn their tumbs
down for disapproval. After every
fifth speaker, the group sang
songs of peace and sisterhood.
Both Bick and Johnson are
volunteer staff workers at the
Peace Tent, which was the host
for this event, and which has
become a focal point for the NGO
Forum'85.
According to Edith Ballantyn,
she and a small group of women
had organized the Peace Tent as a
place where women can come and
speak in complete freedom.
M-7-18-85
Asked about proposals to cut off
U.S. funds if the conference
becomes politicized. Reagan said
this is impossible since the money
the U.S. appropriated for the con-
ference has already been spent.
The delegation headed by
Reagan is the official U.S. delega-
tion to the conference which will
be run like all UN meetings with
each country having one vote. She
said that because it is an offcial
delegation, all policy decisions are
made by the Reagan Administra-
tion similar to U.S. participation
in other UN bodies.
AT THE SAME time, last
Wednesday, members of Non-
Governmental Organizations
(NGOs), which include many
Jewish organizations, met in
Nairobi and discussed at some
1,000 open informal workshops on
issues affecting women.
The 10-day NGO meeting
overlaps the official 12-day UN
conference which began July 15
and ends July 26 at the Kenyatta
International Conference Center.
Although NGO conference
delegates cannot vote at the UN
conference, they obviously hope to
influence some of the issues.
Reagan said her delegation will
probably have daily meetings with
the American NGO delegates.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi of Temple Emanu-El of Miami J
and Foundation chairman of the Jewish National Fundi
Greater Miami, reports on the progress of the JNF's Miami on
activities at JNF's national board meeting in New York. V/A
him is Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, executive vice president oj'JNF]
America.
Chicago's Mayor Washington Face
Tough Schedule on Israel Visit
TEL AVIV (JTA) Howard
Washington, the first Black
Mayor of Chicago, arrived in
Israel on a six-day visit as the
guest of the Foreign Ministry.
Washington, who has long been a
firm friend of Israel, was to meet
President Chaim Herzog and
Prime Minister Shimon Peres dur-
ing his stay here.
He was also to tour the
places in Jerusalem. Bethleh
and Galilee and attend the od
ing of the Maccabiah on M
before going on to Rome
Wednesday for an interview i
the Pope. While in Is
Washington was to meet witi
former Chicagoans now resides:
in Israel.
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M_7 10 oc


U.S. Contingent Steeled
Friday, July 19, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
To Offset Propaganda At 'Decade' Confab
By MARLENE GOLDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
More than 200 Jewish
women and men, represen-
ting major international
Jewish organizations are in
Nairobi, Kenya, this week in
an effort to prevent the
United Nations End of the
Decade Conference on
Women from becoming an
arena for anti-American and
anti-Israeli and anti-Zionist
propaganda.
Organizations in this country
and abroad have prepared a host
of programs and educational ac-
tivities to counteract the
nefarious propaganda expected at
the 10-day conference beginning
July 26 from Arab, Soviet and
Third World delegates. Prepara-
tions by the organizations have
been going on for some time so
that the strident anti-Israel
rhetoric and resolutions equating
Zionism with racism, which mark-
ed the previous two earlier
Women's Decade conferences in
Mexico City in 1974 and in
Copenhagen in 1980, do not occur
in Nairobi.
IN BOTH the Mexico City and
the Copenhagen conference,
discussions on the goals and
achievements of women all over
the world were sidetracked and
distorted by divisive political
rhetoric and anti-Israel resolu-
tions. But American and West
European delegates this year are
determined to keep the discus-
sions at the Nairobi conference
centered on the goals and
achievements of the Women's
Decade.
"The governments of the
United States and Western
Europe have insisted that the con-
ference avoid divisive political
issues more appropriately ad-
dressed in the UN's political
bodies," declared Richard Maass,
chairman of the Jacob Blaustein
Institute for the Advancement of
Human Rights of the American
Jewish Committee.
"Unfortunately, Arab and
Soviet bloc governments seem in-
tent on injecting into Nairobi the
issue of Palestinian women, singl-
ing it out for special attention
despite the many truly pro-
blematic situations women face in
many parts of the world."
TO AVOID having the issue of
Palestinian women turn into a
battering ram against Israel and
to place this issue in its proper
framework and perspective,
Maass announced the publication
of a book-length study on Palesti-
nian women in the West Bank and
the Gaza Strip, written by Dr.
Mala Tabory, a legal scholar and
social scientist.
The study, which will be
Maccabiah Games Open To
Ceremony of Great Glitter
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Some 50,000 persons pack-
ed Ramat Gan Stadium to
witness the colorful opening
ceremonies of the 12th Mac-
cabiah Games scheduled to
run through July 25. Some
4,000 Athletes from 39
countries will participate in
the Jewish Olympic contests.
The central theme of the two-
hour program was the ingathering
f the 12 tribes of Israel. The pro-
gram included a 30-minute show
featuring 1,000 performers danc-
ing, singing and wearing
costumes from Yemen, Morocco,
Ethiopia, the United States,
Israel and other cultures which
has gone into the Israeli melting
pot.
A GYMNASTIC display was
staged by 2,000 youths from the
Young Maccabia Youth Move-
ment, and parachutists jumped in-
to the center of the stadium
before the final fireworks display.
President Chaim Herzog, who in
his youth was a Maccabiah boxing
champion in his native Ireland,
declared the games officially
open.
The Maccabi torch wss carried
into the stadium by the 1972
Olympic Games seven gold
medallist Mark Spitz, accom-
panied by the 13-year-old
daughters of Amitzur Shapira,
Yosef Romano and Andrie
Spitzer, three of the 11 Israeli
athletes and coaches on the 1972
Israeli Olympic team who were
killed by Black September ter-
rorists in Munich.
Spitz, whose participation in
this year's Maccabiah was kept a
close secret until last week, made
his, international swimming debut
at the seventh Maccabiah in 1965
and went on from there to the
United States Olympic Team and
his world shattering Munich
Games victories.
distributed by the AJCommittee
to participants in the conference,
used a variety of sources, in-
cluding interviews with women in
the West Bank and Gaza, accor-
ding to Sidney Liskofsky, pro-
gram director of the Institute, to
challenge assertions made by the
UN Secretariat's Report on
Palestinian Women, the
background document for discus-
sion of this issue at Nairobi.
"The UN report," Liskofsky
said, "unfairly criticizes Israel,
and assumes Israel is always to
blame for unsatisfactory condi-
tions, real or imagined." The UN
report, he noted, "admits that it is
not the product of original or in-
dependent research. It relies on
prior UN documents, which
themselves reflect anti-Israel
bias."
THE AJCOMMITTEE In-
stitute's study found that:
Since 1967, infant mortality in
the West Bank and Gaza has drop-
ped by 50 percent, leaving it 400
percent lower than Saudi Arabia's
death rate.
Palestinian workers, men and
women, are free to join Israel's
labor federation, the Histadrut,
and a total of 31 unions operate
openly in the West Bank and
seven in Gaza.
Illiteracy among women in the
West Bank dropped by 26 percent
and in Gaza by 28 percent since
1967, putting these women ahead
of women in Algeria, Egypt, Jor-
dan, Saudi Arabia and Syria.
Health services and conditions
have undergone extensive im-
provement in the past 18 years,
and the West Bank and Gaza have
been freed of malaria.
In other activities by Jewish
organizations at the Nairobi con-
ference, the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, which sent
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10 delegates, will stage exhibits,
show films and distribute material
on themes dealing with education
of economically disadvantaged
people, combatting racism,
developing understanding among
peoples, and Israel's contributions
to black Africa.
ACCORDING TO the ADL,
this will be an effort to put the
Middle East and international
issues "into perspective and to
keep the conference focused on its
real agenda the achievements
of the UN Decade for Women in
relation to the issues and pro-
blems that concern women all
over the world."
The National Council of Jewish
Women (NCJW) is sending three
delegates to the conference who
will seek to enhance the situation
of women in the world, according
to Barbara Leslie, Non-
Governmental Organization
observer to the UN for the NCJW
and a delegate to the Nairobi con-
ference. "We are going with great
hope but we know it won't be
easy," she said.
Shirley Joseph, former NCJW
national vice president and a
delegate to the conference, said
the objective will be "to keep the
work of the conference from being
diverted by extraneous politiciza-
tion," as it was during the
Copenhagen conference where
women's issues were "distorted
by divisive political rhetoric and
irrelevant anti-Israeli
resolutions."
JOSEPH ADDED: "We are
particularly interested in involv-
ing women in decision-making
positions globally, and in including
women in economic development.
Too often, in underdeveloped
countries, as they become in-
dustrialized, the men go off to the
cities to work, and the women are
left at home to do back-breaking
labor on farms. We would also like
to see attention paid to sufficient
nutrition for women particular-
ly in view of their child-bearing
function."
The NCJW will also present its
Home Instruction Program for
Preschool Youngsters (HIPPY) at
a conference workshop on early
child care. HIPPY is designed to
train poor mothers to teach their
four-to-six year old children at
home skills needed for school
success.
A booklet, "Prepare Yourself
for the Women's Conference in
Nairobi," published by the Jewish
Women's Organization of Norway
in cooperation with the ADL was
presented to the 20 Norwegian
delegates at a meeting in the Oslo
Jewish Community Center and
was sent to 95 Norwegian par-
ticipants and to their counterparts
in Sweden and Denmark.
In Holland, a meeting for all
women conference participants
was called by the Center for Infor-
mation and Documentation on
Israel (CIDI) to prepare them on
the subject of the oppression of
Palestinian women.
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Arabs Play Brilliant
Peace Game
The Arabs are being positively brilliant
about their manipulation of "peace" in the
Middle East. When an Israel-Lebanon peace
accord was signed on May 17,1983 in Halde,
an accord hammered together with some
considerable massive U.S. diplomatic sup-
port, it took no time at all for the Arabs to
dismantle it notably, with an assist from
the Syrians, who had been "defeated" by
the Israelis in the war in Lebanon, doing the
major part of the dirty work involved. We do
not recall that there was much American
reaction to this Arab trump of our peace
card at the time.
Instead, more than two years later, the
United States is now contemplating a
meeting with a joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation to talk about direct negotiations
between Israel and the delegation's
representatives.
But it must be understood: Israel will not
be permitted to sit in on the discussions, but
the U.S. promises to keep Israel fully posted
on all steps in the negotiating process.
Thanks a lot.
King Hussein has already supplied the
Reagan Administration and the State
Department with a list of "suitable" Palesti-
nians, who allegedly are not members of the
Palestine Liberation Organization and who
will be likely delegate members.
Israel Excluded
But the distinction between a Palestinian
and a PLO delegation is an absurd con-
tradiction in terms, according to no less an
Arab leader than Egypt's Hosni Mubarak.
Not to mention the Israelis themselves,
who have said that there is no difference
between, say, the Palestine National Coun-
cil, with whom the United States is prepared
to meet for negotiations, and the PLO itself,
with which Israel vows never to negotiage.
This means that a peace accord negotiated
in 1983 between Israel and an allegedly
sovereign nation, Lebanon, was unaccep-
table to the Arabs for obvious reasons, while
an accord to be reached with the "Palesti-
nians," where Israel's initial participation
will not be permitted, is acceptable for
equally obvious reasons.
What can the Reagan Administration be
thinking? It reminds us of the TWA hostage
crisis, when the United States said that
neither we nor Israel must knuckle under to
the Shiite terrorists' demands at the same
time that the United States privately arm-
wrestled Israel for a pin to the table that
Israel must make the very concessions to the
terrorists that publicly we deplored.
Given such "diplomacy," there can never
be peace between Israel and the Arabs
not so long as Uncle Sam keeps making
Israel cry "Uncle!"
Honor to Dr. Baumgard
Miami rightly takes pride in the election
last month of Temple Beth Am's Rabbi
Herbert Baumgard as president of the
Synagogue Council of America.
The Council represents the rabbinic and
congregational branches of Conservative,
Orthodox and Reform Judaism. It serves
some 4 million congregants in the United
States.
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No more fitting a spiritual leader could
have been elected to this major, national
post. Rabbi Baumgard, who has inspired the
establishment and growth of Temple Beth
Am in South Miami to a congregation of
1,700 families, has a long and distinguished
record not only as a rabbi but as an active
community spokesman in the cause of inter-
faith and human relations.
The Synagogue Council of America acts as
the representative Jewish religious voice to
national and international Christian
organizations dealing with Jewish concerns
relating to social and humanitarian pro-
blems. The Council also represents the
Jewish religious community at the White
House, State Department, United Nations
and Congress.
A seminal writer of many books on Jewish
religious and philosophical subjects, Rabbi
Baumgard has also appeared both locally
and nationally on many television programs
dedicated to these subjects.
Add to these credentials his impressive
academic background at some of America's
most distinguished universities and Jewish
and even non-Jewish religious seminaries,
and Rabbi Baumgard, who holds an earned
doctorate from the Hebrew Union College
Jewish heritage
Jewish Institute of Religion, is uniquely
qualified to fill the presidential post to which
the Synagogue Council has just elected him.
Miami is not only proud of Dr. Baumgard
in our midst but, through him, of the honor it
shares in his new presidential duties.
..................ii
S. Africa Worried
U.S. Opposition Puzzles Them
Friday, July 19*1985
Volume 58
Number 29
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON The
South African Jewish community
is becoming increasingly concern-
ed about the strong vocal opposi-
tion to the South African govern-
ment by American Jewish groups,
which it fears could endanger that
community, a leader of South
African Jewry warned here.
"We appeal to them (American
Jewish organizations) to exercise
restraint and to realize that their
actions and expressions must in
no way jeopardize the integrity or
safety of our community." Dr.
Israel Abramowitz, former chair-
man of the South African Jewish
Board of Deputies, said in an ad-
dress to the B'nai B'rith public af-
fairs forum Friday. "Our local
community interests must be
taken into account."
ABRAMOWITZ, president of
B'nai B'rith in South Africa,
stressed he neither supported nor
spoke for the South African
government. But he said he was
reflecting the views of the South
African Jewish community.
He charged that South African
Jews believed there was an
"obsessional preoccupation" with
South Africa in the U.S. and much
of the anti-South African
manifestations here were made
for purely American political
reasons.
While no one denied the
"inalienable right" of American
Jewish organizations to speak out
on any issues. Abramowitz said,
South African Jews questioned
"why are they literally falling and
stumbling over themselves in
their zeal and enthusiasm to get
on the bandwagon of condemna-
tion and protestation."
HE ALSO questioned why
American Jewish organizations
believed it was speaking for world
Jewry and why Jewish groups felt
that they had to lobby Congress
on this issue. He implied that
many of the groups
demonstrating against South
Africa wanted a violent change
rather than the peaceful change
supported by the South African
Jewish community.
While Abramowitz had no
prescribed course for American
Jewish groups to follow, he
strongly urged them to maintain
contact and consultations with
South African Jewish organiza-
tions, which, he stressed, valued
their ties to world Jewry. He said
Football it fait becoming th world $ moil popular sport
Thp Nalai Mercu'v
he was very pleased that B'nai
B'rith president Gerald Kraft
would be visiting South Africa
this week.
As for the position of South
African Jewry, "we are obliged to
maintain a cautious stance,"
Abramowitz said. He said there
was always the danger of an anti-
Semitic backlash.
AT THE same time, he pointed
out many individual Jews have
been in the forefront of the human
rights struggle in South Africa.
The South African Jewish Board
of Deputies has also increasingly
spoken out on these issues, most
recently adopting a resolution op-
posing apartheid.
The resolution was adopted not
"in search of any accolades, nor to
please certain quarters of the
community, nor to meet the re-
quirement and pressures of
overseas and international Jewish
bodies," Abramowitz said. "We
have done so because we believe it
is the correct thing for a Jewish
community to do in line with
Jewish ethical and moral
principles."
Abramowitz added that the
resolution will also help meet the
charge that "Zionism is racism."
He said that the black community
in South Africa has been influenc-
ed by Arab propaganda and fre-
quently criticizes the Jewish com-
munity for its strong ties to Israel.
Abramowitz said that while
there is a "tremendous amount of
concern and anxiety" in the
Jewish community about the
future, most are optimistic that
change will come peacefully. He
complained that he has seen little
from the critics in the U.S. about
the reforms being made by the
South African government.
However. Abramowitz stress*
that the Jewish communit) -
future is tied to that of the while
community in South Africa am!
what is happening in Zimbabwe
leaves it uneasy. There, a Jewish
community of 7,500 has shrunk to
a few hundred, he said.
The 119,220 Jews in South
Africa make up 2.6 percent of the
white population and .04 percent
of the overall population.
Abramowitz said. He said the
Jewish community is a "declining
community" and the population
would have decreased since 1970
because of emigration to Israel,
the U.S., Canada, Britain and
Australia, if it were not for an in-
flux of Jews from Zimbabwe and
Israel.
THERE ARE an estimated
15,000 Israelis in South Africa. By
the end of the century the Jewish
population is expected to shrink to
64,000, Abramowitz said.
At the conclusion of
Abramowitz's talk. Warren
Eizenberg, director of the B'nai
B'rith International Council, ap-
peared to be responding to
Continued on Page 6-A
______


i-v\v,v\ .
Wmmsy- Jmdictwns About
U.S.-Israel Ties, Tough Tests
Face Both Parties'Allegiances
"bridayTJuty lS, 'l98o/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
By JOSEPH FINKELSTONE
London Chronicle Syndicate
Every one said how close
the relationship between
Israel and the United States
was Jewish leaders in
-New York, Washington and
^ the West Coast, pundits in
the press, officials at the
State Department, the Pen-
tagon and the White House.
It was almost a marriage,
not merely of convenience,
but of mutual warmth and
admiration.
Certainly, never since the
establishment of Israel has the
Jewish State found such
understanding, such deep elo-
~~>!|uent friendship, from the Presi-
.dent and his aides to the man in
the street. At the impressive,
newly-built Israeli Embassy on
the outskirts of Washington, Am-
bassador Meir Rosenne and his
staff all expressed joy at the vir-
tual alliance between Israel and
the Reagan Administration, back-
ed by Congress to an unparalleled
degree.
Yet, despite this, two Senators
have warned Israel not to become
overly euphoric about the relation-
ship and to recognize that some
facts do not tally precisely with
rthe expressions of eternal friend-
ship emanating from the White
House. Subsequent events appear
to have borne out their
predictions.
TRAUMATIC though the
Lebanese war was, with its
dramatic aftermath of the hijack-
ing o the TWA aircraft and the
American hostages, it has left no
permanent scar in Israel's rela-
tions with the American people.
Hyam Bookbinder, the American
"Jewish Committee's represen-
tative in Washington, argues per-
suasively that the criticism of
Israeli policies voiced by Rabbi
Arthur Hertzberg, of the
American Jewish Congress, have
made little lasting impact.
"Hertzberg is a pugnacious
fellow, and I like him his
criticism of Israel emanates from

Secretary Shultz
love but he does it a bit too
much," says Bookbinder. While
occasional criticism had also come
from such figures as Philip Klutz-
nick, former world president of
the WJ,-,-.and his successor,
Edgar Bronfman, these, too, had
not swayed American Jews.
Americans in general, and
American Jews in particular,
were less critical of Israel's incur-
sion into Lebanon than were
Europeans, though this might not
have been obvious from the
American press.
NOW, HOWEVER, such
leading papers as the New York
Times, the Washington Post and
the Los Angeles Times have
begun to reflect the general disen-
chantment with most of the Arab
world and the increasing admira-
tion felt for a stable, democratic
Israel. While still, and traditional-
ly, critical of Israeli policies, the
New York Times has referred to
Israel as an "ally."
There is a strange reluctance in
Government circles to discuss the
differences with Israel which per-
sist the status of Jerusalem, the
building of new settlements on the
West Bank. Ironically, it is
Israel's economic plight that pro-
vokes the greatest expressions of
concern and criticism.
Though the Israelis find this
highly irritating, and there are
brave words from Jerusalem that
Israel will not succumb to political
or economic pressure from
Washington, the truth is that
America's concern arises from a
genuine fear for Israel's survival
as a democratic state, able to aid
the free world.
From Secretary of State George
Shultz to his most junior official
there comes the same message:
"Israel is in grave danger of immi-
nent collapse as a viable power if
she does not rectify her
catastrophic economic position."
ONE LEADING official told
me: "Shultz is an economist, and
he takes a personal interest in
Israel's economic plight: nothing
appears to concern him more at
the moment. Every day, when he
arrives in the office, he asks for an
updating of the situation in
Jerusalem. He is not altogether
happy with what he hears. He
feels that the Israelis could do
more to become solvent. He really
worries about them."
Shultz has surprised the pundits
by becoming one of Israel's closest
friends, despite his former close
connection with major Arab
business interests. One Pentagon
official explained: "We fear that if
Israel fails to win the battle
against raging inflation, she will
have to make cuts in her ar-
maments. This in turn would af-
fect her fighting capabilities and
thus weaken us as well."
Before visiting the State
Department for talks with top of-
Joseph Sisco
ficials, I met two of the depart-
ment's most senior, and most
shrewd, former figures: Joseph
Sisco, who was Undersecretary of
State, and William Quandt, now
with the prestigious Booker In-
stitute, whose reports once great-
ly influenced President Carter.
Both spoke of the changes that
had taken place in the depart-
ment's perception of Israel's role
in the Middle East.
SISCO, in particular, was
delighted that the State Depart-
ment was no longer the home of
Arabists eager to please the
Arabs.
Neither man, however,
prepared me for the profound
change in State Department at-
titudes that had occurred since my
last visit. Listening to one influen-
tial official, I had to remind myself
that he was not a spokesman for
the Israeli Embassy Israel was
"the only real democracy in the
Middle East," the only "reliable
and stable ally." The same views
were repeated so often and by so
many different officials that it
became abundantly clear that a
dramatic, almost revolutionary,
perception of Israel had crystalliz-
ed in the State Department.
There were other signs of the
relationship's intimacy. One of-
ficial spoke frankly though,
alas, not for publication of the
precise role the United States had
played in rescuing Ethiopian
Jews. Another described how
closely America was monitoring
the harassment of Jewish
refuseniks in the Soviet Union and
the attempts to alleviate their
plight.
Everywhere, I persisted in pro-
bing the reasons why America
Ambassador Rosenne
should have become increasingly
appreciative of the Israelis while
the rest of the world, including
European democracies, continued
to display coolness, if not
callousness.
INVARIABLY, the answer was
the same: the Jewish State had
proven its democratic spirit and
reliability, while the Arabs, even
the most moderate and well-
meaning among them, had caused
considerable disappointment.
Saudi Arabia had not backed the
peace process sufficiently; Egypt
had not fulfilled its promise to
return her Ambassador to Tel
Aviv; Syria had persistently
torpedoed any peace move and
was collaborating with the Rus-
sians; Lebanon was indulging in
barbarous and unpredictable
behavior; and even that favorite
of the Western world, especially
the British, King Hussein of Jor-
dan, had not (up to then) emerged
with a definitive peace initiative
encompassing the Palestinians, in-
cluding the PLO leader, Yasir
Arafat.
In Congress and in the Ad-
ministration, the readiness to aid
Israel in every conceivable man-
ner is manifest. Even at a time
when Reagan and Congress are
competing in attempts to cut
government expenditure, a multi-
billion dollar aid bill for Israel was
passed with barely an opposing
voice. More significantly, and of
greater benefit, the Administra-
tion made every possible conces-
sion to provide Israel with the uni-
que advantages of a free-trade
area.
OBSERVERS animated either
by anti-Israeli (or anti-Jewish)
Continued on Page 11-A
Television A Handmaiden of Terrorism?
Nabi Berri Milked the Hijack Drama in Beirut for All It Was Worth
By CHAIM BERMANT
London Chronicle Syndicate
% I sometimes feel that it
wouldn't be a bad thing if
someone hijacked a televi-
sion crew, dropped the
whole jack pack of them
down a black hole
somewhere, and forgot
about them.
It has been the apology of jour-
nalism and journalists throughout
itV Jhe ages that they only mirror
^events. This is not completely true
even of us humble vendors in the
word trade, but it is largely un-
true of the electronics boys, for
once the cameras begin to whirr,
they, wittingly or unwittingly
(and, I often suspect, wittingly)
provoke the events they set out to
portray.
I remember arriving with a film
crew some years ago at a Glasgow
J shipyard which had been caught
up in some sort of sit-in or strike.
-There were a few pickets by the
"'main gate, but otherwise the
street was empty.
AS SOON as the first tripod
MMMHBBBOHBBMH krv ivr^-;;--::*:^-';:' %= w f 1
tw> ^__/s
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Nabi Berri UMBBHHH
was set up, however, the scene
changed. People appeared from
nowhere; the streets filled and
purposeful-looking young men
bobbed up in front of the cameras
to offer instant opinions on the ini-
quities of capitalism. We were
not, in fact, a news-crew, but had
we wanted a news story, we would
have brought one into being by
our very presence.
I suspect that the football
violence on the scale we have
witnessed in recent years is large-
ly a product of the television age,
and there would be fewer urchins
around to throw stones at troops
and police in the streets of Belfast
if there were no cameras around.
Britain has more video
recorders per head of population
than any other country in Europe
(which tells us something about
the state of Britain), and the
hooligan can not only attain a
passing sense of achievement by
seeing himself in action on a news
program, but can replay it on the
video for eternity. Violence can
make a man in his own eyes, at
least a celebrity: I am on
screen, therefore I am.
WHEN IT comes to interna-
tional hijacking, the scale is dif-
ferent, and the risks are greater,
but the principle is the same. A
successful hijack, or even a semi-
successful one, assures one prime
television time beamed out by
satellite over five continents.
CBS. NBC, ABC, BBC, ITN and
the rest may protest that they
were only reporting an event of
immediate public interest, but one
can be absolutely certain that the
hijacking of TWA flight 847 would
not have taken place if they had
not been around to report it.
As it was, from the time the air-
craft was seized, the world was
treated to a daily airing of real or
imagined Arab grievances; and
from June 16 one could hardly
switch on the television news
without receiving a party political
broadcast on behalf of Nabi Berri
and the Shia Amal.
Berri may not have actually in-
stigated the hijacking (he is, after
all Lebanon's Minister of Justice),
but he was clearly in collusion
with those who had and,
CoatiBMd i Page 9-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, July 19, 1985
Deadline Was Tuesday
Histadrut Continued To Hope for Gov't. Compromise
Continued from Page 1 A
government-owned companies in
the blanket three percent cut.
Modai had intended to exempt the
companies on grounds they were
governed by the profit motive and
should be left to take whatever
economic measures were
necessary to ensure their
profitability.
BUT ENERGY Minister Moshe
Shahal insisted that government
enterprises be included in the
austerity plan and his view
carried.
While negotiations continued,
the labor scene simmered. Egged
bus drivers walked off the job
Sunday throwing public transpor-
tation into chaos. Egged, a
cooperative with a monopoly of
inter-urban bus service, is seeking
to reduce expenses. The drivers
and other employees are fighting
the plan on grounds it would
drastically reduce their incomes.
Employees of the Israel Electric
Corp. resumed normal operations
Sunday after a week of partial
power cuts which blacked out
large areas of the country for as
long as three hours at a time.
They and other public service
employees who engaged in wildcat
strikes or job actions last week,
got a tongue-lashing Sunday from
President Chaim Herzog.
The strikes "hit the little man
... the medical patient on the
3>erating table, the pensioner,"
erzog said. He said it was, "in-
comprehensible" that a nation
which was capable of monumental
sacrifices in self-defense should
show such irresponsibility in
defense of the economy.
56% Say They're
Not Satisfied
TEL AVIV (JTA) A poll
published in Maariv showed that
56.6 percent of the respondents
were dissatisfied with the way the
unity coalition government is
handling political affairs. But
almost the identical number, 56.5
percent, expressed satisfaction
with the way defense and security
matters were being handled, ac-
cording to the poll taken by the
Modi'in Ezrachi Institute.
On political affairs, 32.6 percent
of the respondents were mildly
dissatisfied and 24 percent
"definitely not satisfied." of the
39.8 percent who indicated
satisfaction, only 2.8 percent were
"very satisfied. A similar poll
taken last March showed 62.3 per-
cent was happy with the way the
government was handling political
affairs and 32.3 percent were
unhappy.
With respect to defense and
security, 47.9 percent in the latest
poll was "fairly satisfied" with the
government's record, 8.6 percent
was "very satisfied" and 39.7 per-
cent was "dissatisfied." In the
March poll. 60.3 percent of the
respondents were satisfied and
36.8 percent dissatisfied.
South Africa's
Jews Concerned
Continued from Page 4-A
Abramowitz's charge that
American Jewish organizations
may be "naive," when he noted
that Americans have always
spoken out for what they believed
were moral issues.
He noted the Soviet Jewry issue
was primarily a moral issue and it
is one of many that American
Jews have supported on this
ground and not .mainly for
political reasons.
HERZOG HAS spoken out
several times in recent days to
urge public support of the govern-
ment's economic program. He ap-
parently feels no constitutional
constraint in lining up his
prestigious but non-political office
behind the government inasmuch
as the economic program was
adopted by a unity coalition which
represents a preponderant majori-
ty of the Knesset.
Peres, addressing local
authorities last Friday, admitted
that the government was being
forced to take measures to save
the economy that no trade union
would approve. He justified plans
to impose the economic program
by decree because the measures
were too urgently needed to allow
for time-consuming union negotia-
tions and debate in the Knesset.
Peres said the government has
tried wage-price package deals
but with only limited success
because after a point no agree-
ment could be sustained between
the principal parties, labor and
management.
General Strike Threatened
Despite Threat of Economic Collapse
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Some agree-
ment was reported at an economic sum-
mit meeting Sunday which lasted well in-
to the night. But Histadrut went ahead
with plans for a nationwide general strike
Tuesday, an indication it is far from
satisfied with the results so far of negotia-
tions over the government's emergency
economic program.
Sunday's meeting was attended by
Premier Shimon Peres and Finance
Minister Yitzhak Modai; Eli Hurwitz,
president of the Manufacturers Associa-
tion; Yisrael Kessar, Secretary General of
Histadrut; Haim Haberfeld, chairman of
its trade unions division; Moshe
Mandelbaum, Governor of the Bank of
Israel; and Attorney General Yitzhak
Zamir.
THAT ASSEMBLAGE of the coun-
try's top political, economic, business,
labor and legal leadership indicated the
urgency of the situation and the desire of
all parties to avoid either crippling strikes
or the postponement of measures the
government says are the only way to
avert economic collapse.
An understanding was said to have
been reached that wage-earners will
receive a 14 percent cost-of-living incre-
ment at the beginning of next month. But
there was no agreement on whether
workers in the public sector will be com-
pensated at that rate.
An agreement seemed to be in the mak-
ing on the scheduled mass dismissals of
civil service workers. It is said to provide
for a 60-day negotiating period between
the government and Histadrut to work
out terms and timetables. The govern-
ment had originally intended to dismiss
10,000 Civil service employees by decree.
Moshe Rivlin, world chairman
of the Jewish National Fund,
was elected to the Board rif
Governors of the Jewish Agen-'
cy at its recent annual
Assembly. In this position, he
will represent the World
Zionist Organization. Rivlin
was director-general of the
Jewish Agency from 1966 until
assuming the top JNF post in
1977.
New Tooth
Treatment
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
non-surgical method for treating
periodontal disease the main
threat to dental health for adults
beyond the age of 18 has been
developed at the Hebrew
University-Hadassah School of
Dental Medicine.
The method involves inserting a
plastic strip saturated with an an-
tiseptic agent into the "pocket"
between tooth and gum caused by
the periodontal disease. The an-
tiseptic is released from the film
over a period of days, and the
gums are then able to reattach
themselves to the teeth.
JEWISH
iwnoiw.
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
Trees are the ideal way
of saying ...
11
i
i
i
lsrael Needs Ttees
Cive Trees
Mazel Tov
Thank you
Well done
Condolences
New Baby
"Mazel Tov on your new baby
girt In her honor, 100 trees
have been planted in Israel."
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
"I have planted 13 trees for you
in Israel. May you all grow and
flourish."
Graduation
"Dear Nephew: May you always
stand tall in life as do the 10
trees I have planted in your
honor."
Wedding
"Congratulations on your
marriage. May it grow like the
500 trees that have been
planted for you in Israel"
Mother's Day
"Mom: I have planted 35 trees
in your honor, one for each year
that you've been my mother. I
love you."
In Memoriam
"A grove of 1,000 trees has been
planted in Israel to honor the
memory of your father."
GARDEN (100-999 tree*)
Plant a minimum of 100 trees and the name
you honor will be inscribed in the Book of
Gardens in Jerusalem. You receive a
distinctive certificate.
GROVE (1,000-1.999 trees)
Plant 1,000 trees and the name will be
engraved on a permanent plaque at the
central dedicatory wall of the forest. You will
also receive a beautiful certificate.
WOODLAND (2.000-4.999 trees)
Plant 2,000 trees and the name will be
permanently displayed on the central
dedicatory wall. The colorful certificate sent
to you will include all pertinent information
on your Woodland.
PARKLAND (5.000-9.999 trees!
Plant 5,000 trees and the name will be
engraved on a plaque at the central
dedicatory wall. You also receive a
prestigious Parkland Certificate.
FOREST (10.000 or more treesl
Forests have been planted to honor
Presidents. Prime Ministers, Heroes and
Martyrs of Jewish History. The name you
honor will be displayed prominently at the
entrance to the forest. You receive a
distinguished Forest Certificate to display
with pride.
ORDER FORM_____________
YES! I WANT TO HELP ISRAEL GROW
... WITH TREES
D A Garden (100-999 trees)
C A Grove (1000-1999 trees)
a A Woodland (2000-4999 trees)
? A Parkland (5000-9999 trees)
O A Forest (10,000 and over)
D A Liman (126,000 Special Project)
PLEASE PRINT
Enclosed is my contribution of $_
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln Rd., #353
Miami Beach, Florida 33139


Filling in Background
15 Guilty Verdicts Go to Jewish Defendants
Friday, July 19, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A

By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Guilty verdicts were handed
down by a Jerusalem
district court last week on
15 Jewish defendants from
the West Bank charged with
a series of violent acts
against Arab civilians and
membership in a Jewish
underground terrorist
organization.
The three-judge panel found
Menachem Livni, alleged
ringleader, Shaul Nir and Uzi
Sharbaf quilty of murder and at-
tempted murder in connecton
with the 1983 machinegun and
grenade attack on the Islamic Col-
lege in Hebron in which three
Palestinian students were killed.
Two other defendants, Yitzhak
Ganiram and Barak Nir, were con-
victed of attempted murder and
' manslaughter for their part in the
. attack.
THE VERDICTS, rendered 13
months after the trial began, end-
ed one of the most controversial
legal proceedings in Israel's
history. The defendants, all Or-
thodox Jews, including Gush
Emunim militants, had strong
support from religious and
rightwing nationalist elements in
Israel and among Jews abroad.
They claimed that whatever ac-
tions they engaged in were in
defense of Jewish lives and pro-
perty because the government
l allegedly failed to protect Jewish
* settlers from Arab terrorists.
But the judges, Yaacov Bazak,
president of the court, Zvi Cohen
and Shmuel Finkelstein, refused
to buy that argument. They re-
jected a defense motion to admit
as i videnpe examples accused ttid'-4res* a deterioration
of security for Jewish settlers in
the territory.
The terrorist gang was rounded
r up after a foiled attempt to bomb
four Arab buses in East
Jerusalem in March, 1984 and ex-
posure of a plot to blow up Islamic
COL Goes
Up Again
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
m of-living index rose by 14.9
percent in June, according to
figures released by the Central
Mureau of Statistics. It is the
Highest rise ever for the month of
June but about five percent lower
than the Finance Ministry, the
Hank of Israel and most
l "mists haii predicted.
" This is expected to take some of
team out of Histadrut
emands in its current negotia-
with the government over
'he emergency economic pro-
gram. Had the June price index
lopped 20 percent, the trade union
federation would have had a
Strong bargaining point for addi-
tional compensation for wage-
earners.
I* Finance Minister Yitzhak Modai
attributed the June rise to effects
of the second wage-price package
deal which the government has
replaced by its emergency pro-
gram to be in effect for the next
three months. The June figure in-
cludes price increases that were
partly the result of reduced price
support subsidies.
It does not, however, reflect the
sharp rise in prices at the beginn-
ing of July when subsidies were
slashed again and the Shekel was
^devalued. Those elements will be
manifest in the July price index,
to be released on Aug. 15. A 25
percent increase has been
forecast.
shrines on the Temple Mount in
East Jerusalem. Originally, 27
defendants were put on trial.
TEN OF THEM were convicted
earlier on the basis of plea-
bargained confessions and are
either serving sentences or have
completed their time. Two others,
Israel Defense Force officers, are
to be tried separately and are
presently free on bail.
Plea bargaining played a part on
the convictions of some of the re-
maining 15 defendants. A charge
of attempted murder was reduced
to causing grave bodily harm in
the June, 1980 car bombings
which maimed two West Bank
Arab mayors and blinded an
Israeli Druze border policeman
when he tried to defuse a bomb in
the car of a third Arab mayor.
One of the accused in that case,
Yitzhak Novik, said in court that
the verdict was unjust because "I
did what I did in order to protect
my family and neighbors." He
claimed that "it's been proven"
that the car bombings resulted in
a diminution of Arab terrorism in
the West Bank for two years.
FOUR DEFENDANTS were
convicted of attempted murder
for planting time bombs in the
chassis of four Arab-owned buses
on March 4, 1984. The bombs
were timed to explode while the
buses were making their rounds
through the crowded streets of an
Arab neighborhood in East
Jerusalem
The judges were divided over
whether the plan to blow up the
Dome of the Rock mosque on the
Temple Mount was a conspiracy.
Bazak held it was not because no
date was set for the attack. But
Cohen and Finkelstein ruled there
was a conspiracy because the
defendants acquired wired ex-
plosives, prepared bombs and
maintained surveillance of the
mosque.
Yehuda Etzion, described as the
No. 2 man of terrorist
underground, was said to have
been obsessed with the need to
"cleanse" the Temple Mount, an-
cient site of the Second Temple.
He considered the presence of
Islamic houses of worship there an
"abomination." He told the court
history would vindicate him
because the Dome of the Rock and
the Al Aksa mosque would, even-
tually, be removed.
THE COURT heard character
witnesses testify on behalf of the
accused. These included Gen.
Rehavim Ze'evi, former comman-
ding officer of the Central Com-
mand; Yahad Party Knesset
member Binyamim Ben-Eliezer;
and former Finance Minister
Yigal Cohen-Orgad of Likud. All
accused the present and past
governments of laxity toward
Arab terrorists in the West Bank
and failure to protect Jewish
settlers.
The trial, which began in the
spring of 1984, was suspended un-
til after the July Knesset elections
and resumed last September,
opened the court to charges of
favoritism toward the defendants.
Although bail was denied, the ac-
cused were allowed to mingle
freely with family and friends.
They were allowed to talk to
reporters during recess and had
access to telephones.
A minor scandal occurred last
month when the defendants, be-
ing transported from the cour-
thouse to jail, were permitted to
take a swim in the Mediterranean
enroute. The police officer in
charge was severely reprimanded
and demoted.
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THE SENTENCES were being
awaited with keen anticipation.
Life sentences are mandatory for
the men convicted of murder and
tough sentences seem likely for
the others. But most Israelis
doubt any of the convicts will
serve more than token time.
Israel's release last May of
1,150 Palestinian and other ter-
rorists serving sentences for
murder and other serious crimes
in exchange for three Israeli
soldiers held by Palestinian ter-
rorists in Damascus touched off
demands for the immediate
release of the accused Jewish ter-
rorists. The issue became hotly
political.
Premier Shimon Peres found it
necessary to ask Attorney
General Yitzhak Zamir for an opi-
nion. Zamir ruled that the legal
process must be followed through
to its conclusion and only after
sentences are pronounced can the
defendants apply for clemency.
President Chaim Herzog, who
alone has power to grant pardons,
said he would consider applica-
tions individually on their merit,
after sentencing.
ISRAEL
TOUR OF LEISURE $1082. piusAir
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THE GOLDEN CHAIN OF KEREN DOROT
FORGES A LINK OF LOVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
and Tradition By Making Available a Minimum
of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer. ..
Help restore the wastelands of Israel.
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The JNF gives life to the desert
And strength to Israel.
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538-6464


Saddened By His Actions
Hijack Victim Strengthened by Faith
Continued front Page 1 A
jacking the plane, asked if there
were any Israelis aboard. They
then asked for diplomats, military
personnel and Jews in that order.
Herzberg said that reading from
"Jewish sounding" names on
passports, they called his name
but couldn't pronounce it and so
forced Uli Derickson, the plane's
purser, to call out his name.
"I would do the same thing if so-
meone held a gun to my head,"
Herzberg said. The hijackers then
also took Richard Troutmann, Jr.,
of Norfolk, Va., because they
thought he was Jewish, although
he is a Catholic; Jeffrey Ingalls, a
Navi seabee; and Robert Brown of
Salem, Mass., a former Navy
man. Also taken was a man with a
Greek name who was released
after the Greek government
released a third hijacker captured
in Athens.
Another Jew aboard the plane,
Michael Brown, 27, of North
Miami Beach, who was also retur-
ning from his honeymoon, was not
taken because he did not have a
Jewish-sounding name and does
not look Jewish, according to
Herzberg.
BOTH THE Herzbergs said
that Derickson behaved heroically
during the incident, taking blows
meant for passengers. Mrs. Herz-
berg said that Derickson told her
that she had hidden Mrs. Herz-
berg's passport which contained
her marriage certificate signed by
a rabbi.
Mrs. Herzberg said she took off
a ring with a Hebrew inscription
which she hid. The hijackers found
the ring and searched for its
owner. They did find a woman
wearing a Magen David, and she
and her husband were beaten until
they were able to convince the ter-
rorists that they were Catholics.
The Herzbergs said they will
always have the trauma of the
ordeal with them. "We are just
normal people," Herzberg said.
"We got on the wrong flight." He
said, "I was never as happy as I
was on the day I got on that
flight." But now, he added, "I
don't sleep at night and she
cries."
MRS. HERZBERG said that
"no matter what their cause was,
it does not justify taking 36 hours
of my life away from me and 17
days away from my husband."
Mrs. Herzberg and the women
aboard the plane were released in
Algiers.
Herzberg said that during his
captivity with Hezbollah they
were first questioned at Hezbollah
headquarters similar to the way
the FBI questioned him when he
returned; He said they were then
taken to a cell in what appeared to
be a Hezbollah prison which con-
tained many Arab prisoners
whom they could hear being
beaten almost nightly.
Eventually they were given a
larger room with somewhat better
conditions, although he noted the
conditions were primitive.
He believes that Amal, which
held the other hostages, did not
know where the four were being
kept. He noted that after they
were taken to be interviewed by
the Red Cross they were followed
by a car which his captors eluded
in a high speed chase. He believed
the other car might have been
members of Amal trying to learn
their whereabouts.
HE SAID that he and his three
fellow inmates believed they could
escape, but they did not know
where they were and had no idea
how to get around Beirut if they
got out. They decided to put their
faith in negotiations, although
they agreed they would try to
escape if their captivity lasted two
to three months.
Herzberg said the worst day
was the last when first they
thought they were going to be
freed, and they heard incorrectly
on the radio that the other
hostages were in Damascus.
He said they were constantly be-
ing indoctrinated, and he began to
feel sympathy for the plight of the
Shiites which he likened to that of
South African blacks who are the
majority in their country while be-
ing kept downtrodden.
But he said he did not sym-
pathize with their methods of
fighting everybody, including
each other, to get their way.
HERZBERG refused to
criticize some of the hostages who
voiced support for their captors,
noting that each hostage had his
own experience. Herzberg also
would not criticize media
coverage of the event as some
have. "You all helped us" get
released, he said. He said that he
was afraid that in any future hi-
jacking the terrorists would not
allow the press in but would use
their own equipment to film the
event.
Eisenberg noted that several
years ago 130 persons were held
hostage by Hanafi Moslems in the
very room where last week's press
conference was being held. He
said this gives many staff
members of B'nai B'rith a "sense
of kinship" with the TWA
hostages.
JTA Services
Dr. JeaneJ. Kirkpatrick, former U.S. Ambassador to the United
Nations, being hooded by her husband, Evron (left), and Prof.
Moshe Many, president of Tel Aviv University, before receiving
an honorary Doctor of Philosophy degree from Israel's largest in-
stitution of higher learning. Dr. Kirkpatrick was cited for her ex-
traordinary service to the cause of democracy and America-
Israel relations. In tribute to Dr. Kirkpatrick, Dr. Many an-
nounced the creation of the Jeane J. Kirkpatrick Institute for
Public Leadership and Public Policy at Tel Aviv University.
Peres Says Israel Wants
To Better Soviet Ties
JERUSALEM (JTA) Premier Shimon Peres said
Monday that "Israel is seriously interested in reopening
diplomatic relations with the Soviet Union" and indicated
that the new Soviet leadership under Mikhail Gorbachev
could open the way for "a dialogue on all subjects with the
Russians."
PERES MADE his remarks to Edgar Bronfman,
president of the World Jewish Congress, during a meeting
here with members of the WJC Executive. "The Russians
were never our enemies," he said. Moscow broke
diplomatic relations with Israel during the 1967 Six-Day
War.
"With Gorbachev coming to power, there could be a
new opportunity we shouldn't overlook. We should attempt
to reach a dialogue on all subjects with the Russians,"
Peres said.
He praised the "most important job" the WJC is at-
tempting on behalf of Soviet Jewry and for Jewish life
behind the Iron Curtain.
BRONFMAN SUGGESTED that "The Prime
Minister's words are certain to have a salutory effect in
moderating East-West tensions. Such a reduction in ten-
sion and renewed dialogue between the superpowers would
be good for both East as well as Israel and the Jews," he
added.
Peres announced after the meeting an agreement to set
up a monthly satellite television hood-up to provide live ex-
changes between himself and diaspora Jewish leaders at
Bronfman's office in New York.
Two SLA Soldiers Are Killed
TEL AVTV (JTA) Two soldiers of the Israel-
backed South Lebanon Army (SLA) and eight Lebanese
civilians were killed Monday in a new suicide car-bomb at-
tack at the perimeter of the south Lebanon security zone
near Marjayoun.
The inspection point where the attack occurred has
been closed for the past week because of two earlier car
bombings which caused fatalities to SLA soldiers and
Lebanese civilians. Two Israeli soldiers were wounded in
the earlier attacks.
Eye-witnesses to the bombing said the vehicle used was
a Peugot-504, a make and model frequently used by suicide
bombers. It bore the emblem of the International Red
Cross. The driver was killed instantly in the blast.
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Ithiopian Jews Said To Have
tibodies to Certain Cancer Virus
roup of Ethiopian
lown as the Falashas
rovide some imper-
les about a virus that
>n linked to certain
bf cancer.
ernational scientific team
m that 37 percent of the
'alashas living in Israel
Itibodies to the human T-
hphotropic virus type I
|), a rate 200-300 percent
in reported in any other
n group.
IRESENCE of antibodies
that the individual has
cted by the virus and has
by developing an-
irhich can be detected in
ow very little about this
population studies have
st impossible because it
eh a small number of
id Martin Haas, Doctor
phy, associate adjunct
f biology at the Univer-
ornia, San Diego and a
cer Center researcher.
is eo Kthor of a paper describ-
_ Uir Bfindings which appears
.inJJ^e Hie 20 issue of Nature.
fators in this study are
BoMshai (PhD), of the Rarn-
Hdical Center in Haifa.
d Fred Jensen (DVM), of
[ Inc. in San Diego, Calif.
"WMOW have a population of
I'VKiu^pdividuals who can be
r.ionitoB," said Haas. "We hope
\> Hmofe about where this
virus comes from, how it is spread
M.and what the repercussions of in-
^jact H. We also hope to clone
U i Falasha HTI.V gene to con-
fet laboratory studies."
a immigrants to Israel, the
Hahas are under close medical
jgion by the Israeli public
Stem, so data could be
over the years to come,
Hilained.
TLV virus was first
in 1980. Three distinct
of the virus are known:
< I linked with adult T-cell
tel on Block
JSALEM (JTA) The
nent is planning to circum-
Shekel by lopping off
Government sources in-
unofficially that this will
at the end of the first
[month phase of the
hie emergency program.
lymphoma; HTLV-iI, about which
little is known; and HTLV-III,
associated with Acquired Immune
Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS).
HTLV-I is of interest to resear-
chers because of its strong
association to adult T-cell lym-
phoma (ATL), a rare form of
cancer which occurs at a higher
rate in certain communities in
Japan and the Caribbean. More
than 90 percent of the Japanese
ATL patients are infected by the
HTLV-I virus, and a similar
percentage of the Caribbean pa-
tients carry the virus.
Haas stresses that no proof ex-
ists that HTLV-I virus causes
cancer or any other disease. It is
not associated with AIDS. It ap-
pears to require prolonged, in-
timate contact or contact with an
infected individual's blood for
transmission. Antibodies to
HTLV-I have also been found in
healthy individuals.
The possible link between some
viruses and certain types of
cancer, including ATL, has been
an area of increasing interest to
scientists in recent years. By
following the Falashas, scientists
may answer some important ques-
tions about how a virus invades
healthy cells and causes them to
become cancerous; and why some
infected individuals are not af-
fected by the virus.
THE FALASHAS are an an-
cient Ethiopian tribe which is
believed to have migrated from
Israel to East Africa after the
destruction of the First Temple in
Jerusalem in the Sixth Century
BCE. They have been persecuted
for hundreds of years by the
Moslem and Christian Ethiopians
and led an impoverished existence
in primitive, disease-ridden moun-
tain communities where the life
expectancy, is 39 years for
women, 43 years for men.
In recent years, their persecu-
tion intensified and thousands
died. Thousands more fled to
Israel. They are not allowed to
leave Ethiopia and must under-
take a strenuous, clandestine
journey to escape to Israel, so
most of the relocated Falashas are
young and healthy, according to
Haas.
Since they are now receiving
medical attention in Israel and
their standard of living has been
improved, they should provide
valuable information about the
progress and transmission of the
HTLV-I virus, he said.
television Willing Handmaiden
'o Acts of Arab Terrorism?
nounce his captors for the
murderous thugs they are, he
could have used the opportunity to
keep his mouth shut and not in-
dulge in an instant appraisal of
Middle Eastern problems.
Again it might be argued that
he had no such option and that he
was being manipulated by Berri,
who was exploiting the fears and
miseries of innocent men to ad-
vance his political aims. But
weren't the media doing the same
to enlarge their viewing figures?
The newsmen on the spot have
their every instinct trained to
catch every moment of drama as it
takes place, and to get their
stories out whatever happens; and
they work under such pressure -
and, not infrequently, such
hazards that they have no time
to reflect on the consequences of
their work.
BUT WHAT of the men who
take their editorial decisions in
the calmer atmosphere of New
York or London, or their
overseers in the boardrooms? Can
they still be unaware that televi-
sion has become the handmaid of
terror?
tinued from Page 5-A
More, an accessory after the
not before it). But because
in-shaven, looks plausible,
English after a fashion and
it directly involved in ac-
pilling anyone, he assumed
t not only of a "moderate,"
n arbiter and savior,
in order to keep his face
the cameras, Berri milked
ma for all it was worth,
g this hostage one day,
it hostage the next. Most
of all was his parading of
onwell as "spokesman" on
of the hostages.
(ONE who has not been sub-
to the sort of torments suf-
|by the hostages has a right
ment on their conduct, but
I may be forgiven for sug-
r that Conwell's behavior
ss than heroic. He may, on
rst appearance, have been ac-
under duress, but he must
been aware that a fellow
inger had been bludgeoned
nsitivity and shot dead for
ime of being an American,
no one expected him to de-
Fridffi'yuiy'lfl, 1985/The Jewish FJoridian Page!_9-A_
The Bookcase
Two Diverse Novels About Jewish Life
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Manny and Rose. By Joan K.
Peters. New York: St. Martin's
Press, 1985. 309 pp., $15.95.
The Spanish Doctor. By Matt
Cohen. New York: Beaufort
Books, 1984. 344 pp., $16.95.
The plots of novels written by or
about Jews are widely diverse, as
indeed they should be.
Stereotypes to the contrary, Jews
differ greatly from each other,
and so there can be no uniform
plot to capture their essence in a
novel. Boy meets girl; boy loses
girl; boy gets girl just cannot app-
ly as a simple formula for novels
about Jews.
Accordingly, the two novels be-
ing reviewed here are very dif-
ferent from each other. They
share little in common except that
they both deal with Jews. Beyond
this, what they have in common is
a poignant sadness. Each one tells
a sad story and, perhaps, this is
one common characteristic of
novels about Jews. They have an
inevitable sadness because Jews,
no matter how different from
each other, all know the certainty
of sorrow and the dependability of
pain.
"Manny and Rose" is the sad
story of a 74-year-old Queens,
N.Y. accountant whose wife,
Rose, dies after a long illness. A
few months later, he follows her.
What happens between these two
deaths in the summer of 1975 is
the subject of the book. While
Manny, the accountant, and Rose,
his wife, give the book its title, the
central figure is really Ellen, their
married daughter, and her unhap-
py relationship with her father
and her husband.
Ellen has a guru and she spends
time in the commune of the cult,
mourning her mother and coping
with a disappointment in her job.
Her marriage is fragile, but it
holds together even though she
has two extra-marital sexual ex-
periences in the time between the
death of her parents.
Flashbacks tell the story of
Ellen's younger years and also
give an account of her parents'
lives. More vivid, however, are
two scenes from the time of the
novel's action. One is the shiva for
Rose during which family tensions
are exposed in a raw and piercing
Joan Peters
fashion. The other is Manny's fan-
tasy that Miss Liu, the nurse who
looked after Rose, might become
his wife's successor. He
deteriorates rapidly when it
becomes evident that this idea has
no basis in reality.
Although much of the writing in
the book is labored and tedious,
there is an occasional poetic flash.
The patient reader will be reward-
ed by a sad picture of a Jewish
family that rings painfully true.
"The Spanish Doctor" is also a
sad story, but it is set in a far dif-
ferent time and place. The scene is
Europe, primarily Spain, with
scenes in Italy and Russia. The
time is 1391 to 1445, the dark
period of the black plague. The
protagonist of the somber story is
Avram Halevi, a Marrano doctor,
whose adventures and loves con-
stitute a bizarre and gory tale of
intrigue and death.
Blood and sex rival each other
for attention as Avram's fortunes
wax and wane. Chilling accounts
of pogroms in Spain remind us of
the horrors which preceded the
expulsion of the Jews from Spain
in 1492. A continuing thread
which holds the story together is
the love of Avram and his
childhood sweetheart.
Their affection for each other
survives marriages to others and
many terrible hardships. Another
theme is Avram's Jewish identity
which slowly emerges through
devastating persecution and
despite his identification as a man
of science, opposed to all religion.
This well-written historical
novel familiarizes us with a
disastrous period of Jewish
history. It is a testament to how
Jews survived 500 years ago
despite persecution and
pestilence. It proves that the roots
of Jewish continuity, and of
Jewish sadness, run deep.
U.S. Names Pickering To Succeed
Samuel Lewis As Envoy to Israel
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Thomas Pickering, a career
diplomat, was confirmed by the
Senate last week as the new U.S.
Ambassador to Israel.
Pickering, 55, whose last
assignment was Ambassador to
El Salvador, was among a group
of envoys whose confirmation was
held up by a small group of conser-
vative Senators led by Sen. Jesse
Helms (R., N.C.).
He joined the foreign service in
1959 and served as U.S. Am-
bassador to Jordan from 1974-76.
Pickering will succeed Samuel
Lewis who ended an eight-year
term as Ambassador to Israel in
May.
Ambassador Pickering
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, July 19, 1985
MK Eshel Leading Israeli
Women's Contingent in Nairobi
By NANCY MILLER
NAIROBI, Kenya -
(JTA) Israeli Labor Party
Knesset member Tamar
Eshel is leading approx-
imately 40 women from
Israel at the Non-
Governmental Organiza-
tions (NGOs) gathering here
which is meeting in conjunc-
tion with the world con-
ference ending the United
Nations Decade for Women.
In addition, Eshel is
spearheading a group of Jewish
women from all over the world in
an attempt to avert the confronta-
tions that marked the earlier con-
ferences in Mexico City in 1975
which contained the "Zionism is
racism" resolution and in
Copenhagen in 1980 which ac-
cepted a "radical" resolution on
the Palestinians.
AT A MEETING in the Nairobi
Synagogue Community Center,
ADL Raps
Cartoons
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has condemned the publica-
tion of a series of "vicious anti-
Semitic cartoons" in the Jorda-
nian government newspaper AI
Dustur. In a letter to the Jorda-
nian embassy in Washington,
Abraham Foxman, the ADL's
associate national director, asked
the Jordanian Ambassador to
communicate to his government
the concern of the American
Jewish community.
The cartoons, Foxman said, use
repugnant caricatures to portray
Jews in the same manner as the
Nazis once did. "The fact that
such poison has appeared and has
been tolerated by your govern-
ment is very distressing," the let-
ter declared.
The reply, Foxman said, was far
from satisfactory. Jordanian Am-
bassador Mohamed Kama! said he
agreed that "defamation and
abuse should not be condoned or
accepted by decent people."
The Ambassador, however,
denied that the newspaper car-
toons were anti-Semitic, claiming
that they "were not directed
against Jews but against Israel
and Zionism." He then charged
that a section of the American
media is "under direct control and
influence of certain groups in the
American Jewish community."
Foxman pointed out that "the
false stereotype that Jews control
the media and the attempt to ex-
cuse anti-Semitism by calling it
anti-Zionism are both longtime
ploys of anti-Jewish
propagandists."
200 Jewish women and a handful
of men met to develop strategy on
how to handle hostility toward
Jews and Israelis. It was decided
to send groups of Jewish and
Israeli men and women to
workshops that could be potential-
ly explosive.
Many of these individuals have
attended pre-conference meetings
in Israel, Europe and the United
States that were specifically
designed to help them respond to
attacks.
Many Jewish women are par-
ticipating this time, Eshel said,
with the intention of offsetting
any attacks by Arabs, Com-
munists and other groups that are
not friendly to Israel.
Nonetheless, Eshel said she is
skeptical about the effectiveness
of these plans. Theory and reality
are worlds apart, she noted. Fur-
thermore, the PLO and other
delegations sympathetic to their
cause far outnumber those sym-
pathetic to Israel.
BUT ESHEL said it is impor-
tant for Israel to attend these con-
ferences. "If we didn't attend this
meeting, we would be doing the
best service to our enemies," she
said. "They want to oust us from
all meetings and to make us
pariahs. They want to question
whether we belong to the family
of nations. We have an opportuni-
ty to raise our voice, to give our
side of the story" by attending the
conference.
Jewish organizations
represented at the 10-day NGO
conference, which began last
week (July 10) and will overlap the
official UN Decade for Women
conference which began Monday
and ends July 26, include
Hadassah, Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, American
Jewish Committee, American
Jewish Congress,
Na'amat/Pioneer Women, Na-
tional Jewish Community Rela-
tions Advisory Council, National
Council of Jewish Women, WIZO,
the New Jewish Agenda, and
Jewish groups from Europe.
Meanwhile, the Jewish com-
munity here has opened its doors
to the Jewish delegates attending
both the official United Nations
Decade for Women conference
and the Non-Governmental
Organizations gathering.
IN ADDITION to volunteering
the synagogue as a meeting place
for all delegates, the community
has extended its hospitality to
those who have had difficulty fin-
ding accommodations.
This problem arose when the
Kenyan government overbooked
all of its hotels and then demand-
ed that NGO participants vacate
their hotel rooms for the official
UN conference delegates. The
NGO delegates were told they
would be placed in university dor-
mitories in Nairobi and in the sur-
rounding suburbs.
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All Seems Rosy
Friday, July 19, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Trudeau Gov't Rejected Move
But U.S.-Israel Tie Is Facing Tests Against Nazis Living in Canada
O -- ^ *-**- Rv RRN KAYFF.TZ nf th Criminal Cnde hv i
Continued from Page 5-A
bias or by unshakable ignorance
attribute Israel's unequalled stan-
ding in the American Administra-
tion, in Congress and in the White
House to the mysterious "all-
powerful" American Israel Public
Relations Committee (AIPAC).
In a society where pressure
groups are an intrinsic part of
political life, AIPAC of course
plays a vital role in winning sup-
port for Israel; but to claim, as
some European commentators do,
that it virtually controls the White
House and Congress through its
possession of funds is as insulting
to the American people as it is
ridiculous.
Reagan and his team warmly
admire the courage and
resourcefulness of the Israelis, a
view supported by the vast majori-
ty of the American people. They
would continue to do so even if
AIPAC did not exist, although un-
doubtedly this admirable
organization, does play a highly
useful role in marshalling support
at all levels.
FURTHER evidence of the uni-
quely close relationship between
the two countries is readily
available in the Pentagon. A
number of visits to this enormous
complex, with its 30,000
employees, revealed that the rela-
tionship between the U.S. and
Israel had become a military as
well as a political alliance. One
young colonel told me that he
traveled to Israel every week
"because our forces and those of
Israel are so closely intertwined
that we must keep in constant
touch."
Ajw'.siijgestioBs: tkat Defense.
Secretary Caspar Weinberger is
anti-Israel were strenuously re-
jected by one of the department's
senior officials, Dov Zakheim,
Assistant Undersecretary of
Defense. Dr. Zakheim, who
studied at the London School of
Economics and at St. Antony's
College, Oxford, is married to a
London girl and is a strictly Or-
I thodox Jew.
Fears that President Reagan's
I visit to the German war cemetery
Jat Bitburg, with its SS graves,
I would permanently damage his
Irelations with the American
'Palestinians'
List in D.C.
Continued from Page 1-A
Jy dedicated to non-violent
Negotiated solutions and truly
eady to strive for peace with
BUM."
THE U.S. will keep Israel fully
isulted on all steps of the peace
cess, Smalley said. But he
used to say whether Israel
Juld have any say in selecting or
ecting names on the Jordanian
tie U.S. has said it will accept
nbers of the Palestine Na-
Bal Council, who are not
libers of the PLO, on the
ation. But Israel considers
[members of the PNC as
nbers of the PLO.
dley could not give any time
for the U.S. decision to be
e. He said the U.S. hoped the
ptiations between Israel and a
nian-Palestinian delegation
I begin this year.
; U.S. approves members of
plestian delegation, Richard
hy, Assistant Secretary of
I for Near Eastern and South
Affairs, would head the
elegation for talks with a
Jordanian-Palestinian
tion. Murphy is not ex-
I to go to the Mideast until a
pi is made on the list of
lians.
Marshall Brepner
the two countries is due largely to
the emergency of the moderate
Shimon Peres as Prime Minister.
Should Yitzhak Shamir take over
the premiership in accordance
with the coalition agreement,
"there may be problems," one
State Department official
remarked.
SENATORS Arlen Specter and
Howard Metzenbaum, moreover,
believe that it is "highly
dangerous" to speak of a perma-
nent, undisturbed American-
Israeli alliance. Sen. Metzenbaum
said that he had perceived a
resurgence of anti-Semitism
following the Bitburg incident,
and he alleged that the Pentagon
had refused to allow Israel to test
a new tank while giving permis-
sion to the Saudis to do so..
Concern has also been voiced at
the White House's insistence on
selling sophisticated arms to the
Jordanians and on providing them
with more financial aid. This anx-
iety was reinforced when Hussein
brought off a diplomatic coup by
apparently persuading Reagan
and Shultz that he could present a
credible peace plan together with
Arafat.
Despite these negative factors,
however, the U.S. continues to
treat Israel as a worthy and
dependable ally. Unfortunately,
not all of Israel's leaders are
aware of the priceless and unique
asset they have in America's
friendship.
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA)
The Liberal-led government
of former Prime Minister
Pierre Elliott Trudeau con-
sidered and rejected a
large number of measures
proposed to help bring Nazi
war criminals living in
Canada to justice, it was
disclosed this week.
Trudeau's Cabinet in 1981 ruled
out any action after studying a
report by a special task force that
had examined all the options
available to the government. Most
were dismissed as unworkable for
a variety of reasons.
THE ONLY viable option, one
pressed for by the Law Reform
Commission and Jewish organiza-
tions in Canada was amendment
of the Criminal Code by new
legislation which would allow
Canada to try ex-Nazis and Nazi
collaborators for crimes they com-
mitted on foreign soil.
But the then Justice Minister,
Jean Chretien, was unhappy with
the concept of retroactive legisla-
tion and told the Canadian Bar
Association in 1982 that it made
him "nervous."
A source who sat in on the
Cabinet deliberations said such a
concept was counter to the rule of
law and might create a dangerous
precedent which "less than
democratic countries" might use,
for example, to pass laws against
minority groups, including Jews.
The issue was raised anew by
the Progressive Conservative
government of Prime Minister
Brian Mulroney
Tiffany house
Gracious Living for Senior Adults
Hyam Bookbinder
Jewish community and with Israel
havealso,proved erroneous. Prof.
Marshall Breger, the President's
adviser on Jewish affairs, said
that the controversy was being
allowed to subside and that
Reagan remained one of the
warmest friends Israel had ever
had.
The feeling persists, however,
that the present warmth between
PLANNING
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TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
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UUIE DAVIS ISNT READY FOR A NURSING
Westbrooke at Inverrary is a full service community
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Westbrooke at Inverrary has no entrance fee. The complex
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Westbrooke

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'Gentiles Only'
"Martha Washington Apartments. Gentiles On-
|" That's what a sign read on the Clay Hotel at
Espanola Way, Miami Beach, back in the
Dod old days."
The hotel's owner was sandblasting the grimy
ceo exterior walls last week when the sign was
neath coats of vanilla yellow and red paint.
'It was news to me," said Linda Polansky, who
! in the process of renovating the hotel that
Yed, in the days of Al Capone, as a prohibition
^htspot for gambling and dancing for tourists.
'It was actually a sign of the times," explained
ami Beach architect Randall Sender, who is
sing Polansky renovate the facility that was
finally built by N.B.T. Roney and William Whit-
en Roney was the developer of the old Roney
feza Hotel, watering facility for the once-great
and famous. Whitman's heirs today own the Bal
Harbour Shops.
In the beginning, the Clay Hotel was intended to
serve as the focus of a Spanish Village that would
feature apartments, small shops and cafes. That
was in 1922. But then came the 1926 hurricane
which destroyed those plans.
Polansky bought the hotel in 1979, intending to
preserve it and 20 adjacent stores. But it con-
tinued to attract transients and impoverished
refugees as it was. In 1982, Polansky turned it into
a youth hostel.
The "Gentiles Only" sign was the net result of
the attitude of Miami Beach developers Carl
Fisher and John Collins. In 1913, they began in-
cluding anti-Semitic clauses into their real estate
deeds.
kosher Inspector Must Be Tested
ibbi Manish Spitz will have to take a civil ser-
test to determine if he can keep his job as City
|Miami Beach kosher inspector. The job pays
p.OOO annually. Rabbi Manish has been filling
; post since last May.
this will be the first time since Miami Beach first
ught the job of kosher inspector into being that
rill be going civil service. In addition, Rabbi
will have to compete with other people in
er to keep the job.
personnel Director Ernie Barham explained that
City will have to devise an examination to be
en Rabbi Spitz or others who want to be tested
i the job of what Miami Beach, since last year,
I called a "code enforcement specialist." Accor-
; to Barham, the test will probably be given this
fall.
"If they want me to go in a room and take a test,
I'll take a test," said Rabbi Spitz. "I don't know
what it all means, if it's good or bad. I stayed out of
all those issues."
By "those issues," the Rabbi means the demand
for a test that became a new law tentatively passed
by the Miami Beach City Commission last week.
It all began as a result of a year-old dispute
betweeen Miami Beach and the City's Employees
Benevolent Association, which convinced a state
labor board last year that the job of kosher inspec-
tor should be filled by a union member."
Said Rabbi Spitz: "I don't know who sued, who
won, who lost. I just shlepped along."
Reagan Urged To Stand By Pledge
To Oppose Attacks On Zionism
2W YORK (JTA) -
Jewish women, four of
Im heads of major
srican Jewish organiza-
?s, sent a telegram to
sident Reagan stating
; they "have just learned
a resolution may be
jsed" at the United Na-
ps Women's End of the
cade Conference in
robi, Kenya, "defining
lism as an obstacle to
elopment, like racism
apartheid."
Rrnice Tannenbaum, chair-
of the World Zionist
inization -American Section
Its delegate to the conference,
[the telegram, which had been
by the five Jewish women
ers who had met with Reagan
lie Wbite House last August,
the President to reaffirm a
nitment personally made to
[five leaders that the U.S.
{at ion to the conference
Id walk out in the event that
[anti-Zionist resolution is
>ted.
THEIR telegram, the
Bh women urged Reagan "to
act the U.S. delegation to
out of any session if such a
ution should be presented
[to state that under the cir-
Btances the U.S. will not
[ice this UN program." The
| delegation to the conference
iirobi will be led by Maureen
i, the President's daughter.
statement released by the
House on August 16, 1984
"The President made clear
that the United States will
Bernice Tannenbaum
actively oppose any conference
agenda item which deviates from
important women's issues and
calls for the discussion of non-
germane, political issues, in-
cluding any agenda item that
could be used as a vehicle to
defame Israel. .
"In particular, the President
noted that the United States will
oppose any agenda item at the
Nairobi conference which
associates Zionism with racism.
If, despite our efforts, such an
agenda item is adopted, the
United States will have no choice
but to consider seriously cancell-
ing its participation in the
conference."
The telegram to Reagan was
signed by Tannenbaum; Frieda
Lewis, chairman, WJC-American
Section; Charlotte Jacobson,
president, Jewish National Fund;
Barbara Mandel, president, Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women;
and Midge Decter, executive
director, Committee for the Free
World.
CJC Asks Canadian Government To
Bring Nazi War Criminals To Justice
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) The
Canadian Jewish Congress (CJC)
has offered detailed, far-reaching
proposals for measures the Cana-
dian government could take to
help bring Nazi war criminals liv-
ing in Canada to justice.
The proposals were presented
on behalf of the CJC by Irwin
Cotler, a leading attorney and
professor of law at McGill Univer-
sity, to former Quebec Superior
Court Judge Jules Deschenes,
who constitutes a one-man com-
Ifewisln Floridia
il, Florida Friday, July 19,1985 Section B
mittee appointed by the federal
government to investigate
suspected war criminals living in
Canada and recommend legisla-
tion or other means to deal with
them.
One of Cotler's recommenda-
tions, submitted last Friday, was
to amend Canada's 1967 extradi-
tion treaty with Israel so that it
will apply to criminal acts commit-
ted before 1967, that is, during
World War II.
Another would have the Cana-
dian government seek the
cooperation of West Germany to
investigate and ext lite
suspected war criminals who were
not German nationals but commit-
ted their crimes in territory under
control of the Third Reich.
Editorial
Resolution Passed
When last April the Dade County Commission re-
jected a resolution offered by member Barry
Schreiber calling upon the County no longer to expend
funds to organizations which conduct their affairs at
the facilities of private clubs that discriminate against
persons on the basis of race, religion, sex or national
origin or ancestry, the community went to work to
make the worthy resolution more specific.
The Commission said no to the resolution because, in
the view of its members, the wording could be con-
strued in such a way as to work a hardship on groups
such as, say, B'nai B'rith or the Knights of Columbus
or the German-American Club, whose purposes for be-
ing are not to discriminate, but to advance the
charitable, educational and cultural values of their
heritage.
This is a whole heap different from restricted
private social clubs in Miami whose exclusive member-
ship policies cast aspersions upon the worthiness of
minority citizens.
Commissioner Schreiber put it aptly when he ex-
plained that "The efforts of the former are beneficial
to community health and harmony. The influences of
the latter are divisive and counter-productive to har-
monious relations in our community."
We agree. And so, apparently, did the Dade County
Commission on Tuesday. In the intervening time, with
the help of the Miami offices of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith and the American Jewish Com-
mittee, Schreiber recast the wording of the Apr. 16
resolution. Precisely three months to the day later, the
Commission on Tuesday voted "yes."
The new resolution emphasizes that the Commission
will restrict the expenditure of county funds to
organizations which conduct events at the facilities of
private social clubs "which have the intent or the effect
(italics ours) of denying services or excluding persons
from membership" on the basis of obvious
discriminatory policies.
This not only justly clears it all up. It also serves
notice to the bigots still operating in Greater Miami
that their bigotry will henceforward cost them.
Ethiopian Jews In Israel Protest
Against Having To Undergo
Formal Conversion Ceremony
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Ethiopian Jews in absorption
centers all over the country pro-
tested angrily Sunday against the
insistence by the Chief Rabbinate
that they undergo a formal con-
version ceremony immersion
but not symbolic circumcision.
The protestors declared this de-
mand constituted a grave insult
and questioned their authenticity
as Jews. They noted they endured
severe hardship and suffering to
get out of Ethiopia and find their
way to Israel. They are being
singled out as no other Jewish
emigre group and it is demeaning
to have their Judaism doubted,
they said.
MANY OF the immigrants
refused to attend their Hebrew
classes Sunday and others refused
to report for work. Activists said
the protests would continue for
three days. The Rabbinate claims
if. is only marginal, artificially fan-
ned by "certain" activists.
It is not clear how widespread
the protest is among the Ethio-
pian Jews, most of whom arrived
here through "Operation Moses"
between November, 1984 and
January, 1985 when the airlift
from Sudan was suspended
because of premature disclosure.
Last week, Sephardic Chief
Rabbi Mordechai Eliahu declared
that he and his colleague.
Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi Avraham
Shapiro, do indeed consider the
Ethiopians to be Jews. In fact, he
ii<(. the Rabbinate formally per
mitted the desecration of the Sab-
bath by Israeli officials involved in
Operation Moses.
Eliahu claimed that the formal
conversion requirement was in-
tended to correct any halachic
violations that may have affected
the newcomers or their families in
the past with respect to marriage,
divorce, conversion and other per-
sonal matters.
In practice, the Chief Rabbinate
will not permit the performance of
marriages involving an Ethiopian
spouse who has not undergone
formal reconversion.
Textile Workers
Are Dismissed
TEL AVIV -r(JTA) The
bankrupt Ata textile mill's nearly
2,000 employees have been in-
formed that their jobs were of-
ficially terminated as of June 28.
The giant industrial complex on
Haifa Bay, once the largest
employer in the Haifa area, was
officially closed by court order. A
last minute effort to sell it to a
foreign syndicate was rejected by
the Ministerial Economic Commit-
tee on grounds that the govern-
ment's investment under the deal
was too high.
The dismissed employees were
advised by the receiver that they
could withdraw money they had
contributed to the pension plan up
to June 28. But no mention
made of severance pay or fin.->
benefits the workers had hoi
g1 from the govi-rnmi


Pace2-B TW
Fliilfa*Tndj. Joty 1. 1
Beth Sholom Appoints
Dr. Weissberg Education Director
Presses: Sea Aasar Eocea-
oa Viee Tttmirm Dr Dand
TT i ad Sdtooi Bears Ctaer-
aaa Taaa Was winirf4 the
aaaoiataeat of Dr Le. =.
Wiiwfetrf m Director of Eawi
IYowot*heP.*=eiLe^
Fir Lrr^r
^7ndi/r Reelected President Of Temple Beth Sholom
Rraaoc un
az Sova Uaei hi..
Oerejoped %r*z zr-
; aScodent teacher pro-
f or potential afterrjooo s&d
Sehooi teachers for the
Sooth' Browvd Jewish Feder*
tc Edacatsoc Conanraee
Prior to monnf to FVanda eight
vears ago he was an iaatraetor x
the New York City Schools and
served x
areas. He aiso served as a youth
director m a Tesupie x Patersoc-
SJ.
a: a ma Aac-a. Ha*
as .*.- Mr A=2- -^r
- -att yaara
Bar Aaae=-j ataaaal Gearpa


Pasc-Preadeat 3f the Hjgh-Sae
12 SL- Asar ir^ --
Vfijtoc- >.h2ic.- Irnaf ?riatr >j?
*._. .-*.- Via. Jf jots s^sbe la:
Kkos 7~- i Hie-m c:eo~-r
Xa'amat Women
aarox-.a.
'Pathfinders' A New Group Of Givers
has" Bead
P i r
..-_r.s-.-i-:
.'__._
TW South Dede Branch of the
Greater M_____ JewaB Federaaoc.
has organized a group to develop
new givers a the So/XM and over
category. South Dade Branch
Board of Directors nxiidwis San-
di sad MDce Samoie wiE chair the
"Pathfinders' group.
The new Pathfinders committee
wiE recruit iiiissdini for the
grasp and these efforts wiD
culminate in an exclusive
event to be held
10.
"There is a tremendous sense of
excitement about the
Pathfinders.'' says Sand? Samoie
"It's a feeling of new beginnings
and new oppcrtucf.es for
hsssUmg tfass commur '
CwssswJHssl ssssswswl s are A_v__
Lioyd Brown. Chairman of the
South Dade Branch's Board of
Directors: Norman Lieberman.
South Dade Branch's Vice Chair-
man for Campaign. San je. Harte
President of Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Television and
member of die South Dade
Branch's board: South Dade
Branch board members Phyflis
Harte. Dr. Eugene Eisner. Tom
Boric. Nedra Oren. Norman Shaft
and Ellen MandJer-. Jean Lieber-
man: Sara Boric: Dr Mark Oren
and Bernard Mandier
BBYO Appoints Assistant Director
The B'nai B'ritb Youth
Organization !" the ap-
prAT.'jnent of Jerome K_ewe M '_".-*
pMxioa at Assistant Regional
Director. Mr. Kiewe wiD be
u_l>u___ii.i for the direction of the
BBYO Program in Gold Coast
Council, which encamps sees the
Palm Beach. Broward and North
Miami Beach areas. He wiD be
in his duties by WDham
Program Assistant.
complete the Double Masters pro-
gram at the Baltimore Institute
for Jewish Communal Service,
earning graduate degrees in
Social Work from the University
of Maryland School of Sooai
Work and in Judaic Studies from
the Baltimore Hebrew College.
Th.-*e
chapters c
Women N a. ______
.ffieers for _9_o-6. Tbey were
sworn m by Gerajd Schwartz. a>
::_____ associate cha_r____r
Friends of Pioneer
Women, Na'ama: and naaocal
rice president of the Amencas
Z_oc___ Federatioc-
Bertha Lsebmarx. a rice presi-
dent of the Pioneer Women Coa_-
eil of South Forida. was elected
president of ______.__. chapter
Others ______ "_-.. .-_-- ...: .:-.-:
Moflie Press and Mary Sairairs.
vice presidents. Beatrice PJflriri.
treasurer. Sophie Chernoff. finan-
cial secretary: Olga Guttznan. cor-
responding secretary: and C-ara
Orkin. recording secretary.
Kinneret chapter instai'ed P-^
Adoff as president. Other officers
are Bern- Citron. Sheva Beriand
and Doris Cantor, vice P'residents.
and Rae Home, correspondxg
secretar;.-
Pioneer Women Na amat s Chau
chapter inducted Era Kaufman as
president: Helen Weiss. Rose Ger-
shen and Jean Uffer. vice
prestdenU: Pauline Rubinstein.
corresponding secretary and Rose
Heine, recording secretary
Rabbi Reimer To Conduct Services
Kiewe is a former chapter
from the BBYO pro-
i in Baltimore and during the
six years has served in a
variety of BBYO staff positions in
Baltimore. Washington and nor-
thern Virginia. He is also a
founder and past President of
Heritage Lodge B'nai B'rith in
Baltimore
Mr. Kiewe earned his BA in
Social Work and Sociology from
the University of Maryland:
Baltimore County. He went on to
Beth David Congregation's se-
cond family service Friday. July
26 wiD be conducted by Rabbi
Jack Reimer. currently the
spiritual leader of Congregation
Beth El in La Jolla. California-
Rabbi Reimer. whose sermons
have often been included in "The
Best Jewish Sermons of the
Year.'' will also officiate at Shab-
bat morning services July 27.
The one-hour Friday family ser-
vice will begin at 7:30 p.m. in the
synagogue chapel, and will be
followed by a home-baked Oneg
Shabbat. Saturday morning ser-
vices at 9 will be held in the main
sanctuary- A Kiddush will follow.
Rabbi Reimer has edited a
number of scholarly works, in-
cluding. "Jewish Reflections on
Death." and "New Prayers for
the High Holidays." Before mov-
ing to California. Rabbi Reimer
served for 14 years on the pulpit
of Congregation Beth Abraham in
Dayton. Ohio.
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Historic Court Decision
Friday, July 19, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Judge Upholds Constitutionally Peres Concedes Israel's
Of An Eruv Under American Law Economic Crisis Grave
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Justice Aaron Goldstein of
Queens Supreme Court has
handed down the first court
decision in American
history upholding the con-
stitutionality of an eruv
under American law, accor-
ding to an official of the
Jewish legal agency which
served as attorney for the
sponsors of the eruv, a
device encircling a public
area in which Orthodox
Jews may carry objects on
the Sabbath.
Goldstein ruled last week that
the eruv was a valid accommoda-
tion of the religious needs of cer-
tain members of minority
religious groups and not a viola
tion of the First Amendment
separation of church and state.
THE DECISION came in a
lawsuit filed by Joseph Smith, a
resident of Belle Harbor in
Queens, against the City of New
York and the Community Eruv ol
Belle Harbor, organized by Rabbi
Jacob Reiner of Congregation
Ohab Zedek. Smith indicated he
planned to appeal.
Smith contended in his lawsuit
that the grant of permits to the
Eruv Committee by the New York
City Deparment of General Ser-
vice and Parks and Recreations
violated the church-state separa-
tion principle because public pro-
perty was involved in the
assembly of the Belle Harbor
eruv. .- -.....- : :
The Community Eruv organiza-
tion, which sponsored the
disputed eruv, was represented by
Nathan Lewin of Washington and
Dennis Rapps of the National
Jewish Commission on Law and
Public Affairs. New York City
was represented by Virginia
Waters of the Corporation
Counsel's office.
ATTORNEYS for the Eruv
Committee and the City moved to
dismiss Smith's complaint, con-
tending that the grants of the per-
mits did not constitute establish-
ment of religion but were a valid
accommodation to religious
practice.
The filing of the lawsuit by
Smith came against a background
<>f animosity by non-Orthodox
residents toward the 450 Or-
thodox families and four Orthodox
synagogues in Belle Harbor.
While eruvim are widespread
throughout the United States,
particularly in heavily Jewish
areas like many Brooklyn
neighborhoods, the Belle Harbor
eruv, which also covered Nepon-
sit, is on the western end of the
Rockaway Peninsula of Queens.
At the time Smith filed his
lawsuit, acts of vandalism against
the eruv were reported, and both
sides agreed to a moratorium on
the construction, pending the
court ruling.
FOES OF the eruv were
reported last March as fearing the
eruv would change the character
of the neighborhood by bringing
more Orthodox Jews in as
residents.
In a separate action before
Goldstein, a friends of the court
brief was filed on behalf of the
Union of Orthodox Rabbis of the
United States and Canada,
Agudath Israel of America, Na-
tional Council of Young Israel,
Rabbinical Council of America,
Rabbinical Alliance of America,
and the Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations.
Commenting on the court rul-
ing, Reiner said the Orthodox
community was "delighted"and
that he hoped it would now be
possible to proceed with comple-
tion of the eruv.
Home Of Alleged Terrorists
Demolished By IDF Unit
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
large unit of the Israel Defense
Force entered the Arab village of
Surif in the Judaean hills and
demolished two houses owned by
alleged terrorists who reportedly
have recently confessed to the
murders of an Israeli man and
woman. A third building was seal-
ed off, and a curfew was imposed
on the West Bank village.
The IDF acted in accordance
with the long established policy of
destroying the homes or shelters
of confessed terrorists. But the
early morning raid infuriated the
villagers because the two
suspects, though said to have con-
fessed, have not yet been brought
JVS Expands
Service To Elderly
The Jewish Vocational Service
announces the expansion of the
"Services to the Elderly" pro-
gram. Seniors living from Coral
Gables to West Kendall and south
will now be served by the
Homemaker Referral Program.
By providing companions,
homemakers and nurse's aides at
reasonable prices, Jewish Voca-
tional Service hopes to help main-
tain the elderly population more
adequately in their own homes
while improving their daily living
conditions.
Persons interested in learning
more about this program, or those
aware of people in need of suppor
tive services or people who would
like to work with the elderly, can
contact Esther Kessler, MS. at
the Jewish Vocational Service
South Dade Office.
WEAREA
Modern Orthodox Synagogue
Using a microphone, looking for a
successor to our Rabbi who has just retired
after 27 years of service.
With a membership of 500-600 families,
we are a vibrant congregation with a
Brotherhood, Sisterhood, NCSY, and Hebrew
School serving a heavily populated Jewish area.
We invite resumes from interested Rabbis
to be sent to:
Ner Tamid Greenspring Valley Synagogue
Attention: Mr. Bernard Koman,
Chairman of the Search Committee
6214 Pimlico Road,
Baltimore, Maryland 21209
Position available after holidays!
All resumes to be held strictly confidential.
to trial. The demolitions were car-
ried out without disturbances.
The murder victims were Meir
Ben Yair and Michal Cohen, both
of Beit-Shemesh, who were found
dead in a car parked in the Massua
forest, east of the Etzion bloc of
settlements. Both were married,
but not to each other, a situation
that led police to suspect a crime
of passion. Cohen's husband was
held as a suspect for several days
but was released when his alibi
proved out.
The police then turned their at-
tention toward terrorist gangs
known to be operating in the
region. Despite the arrest of two
suspects from Surif, security
forces continued their manhunt.
Infantry aided by helicopters com-
bed the area and several other
suspects were detained.
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres has
conceded that Israel's
economic crisis remains
grave and blames it in part
on the government's inabili-
ty to decide where to cut the
budget. Though substantial
cuts already have been
made they fall short of
original goals, he said.
Interviewed on television,
Peres spoke of the "empty purse
even emptier than I had
thought" when he took office last
September. But he insisted that
he was not seeking to blame
anyone. He also said there was a
bright side. An overseas task
force of major industrialists and
entrepreneurs are already achiev-
ing substantial success in opening
export markets for Israeli goods,
Peres said.
HE NOTED that a team of
American economic experts who
came here last month for a
meeting of the joint Israel-U.S.
economic council were en-
thusiastic about Israel's high
technology industries.
Peres reiterated his belief that
Israel's economic infrastructure is
solid. He noted that out of a na-
tional budget of $23 billion, $12
billion went to service the national
and international debt. He noted
that about $450 million has been
cut from the defense budget,
which he called a substantial sum.
However, "I will not support the
destruction of our defense,"
Peres, a former Defense Minister,
declared. He indicated that no fur-
ther reductions will be con-
templated in the defense budget.
He said the various ministries
have trimmed $200 million from
their budgets and government
price support subsidies have been
reduced by more than $900
million. But some of the govern-
ment's bold decisions have not
been implemented and others
turned out to be mishaps.
The government was determin-
ed to cut down the civil service but
instead the vast bureaucracy has
continued to grow, according to
the latest manpower statistics.
IN THE last three months,
about 20,000 civil service workers
were added to the payroll, despite
a freeze on hiring and the lay-off
of about 15,000 employes. The
drop in the unemployment rate
from 6.4 percent to 5.8 percent,
according to figures released by
the Central Bureau of Statistics,
is attributable to the rise in civil
service manpower. At present,
some 416,000 Israelis earn their
living in the public sector, a record
high since the State was founded
37 years ago.
Confronted with these
statistics, economic policymakers
said they are reminded of
Sisyphus, the legendary King of
Corinth who was condemned to
roll a heavy stone up a steep hill in
Hades only to have it roll down
again as it neared the top.
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Page4-B 71k
Friday. Jtrfy 19. 198S
Three Miami Rabbis
'Jffc jfe Meat" Splits Secular Israel Honored By Hebrew I
By PHILIP GILLON
ssppcrtec oy fc
.aocr >_*?_---
Prtme Mx-st-
Peres, and was ^cos*
- --
"White Meat." an issue oo
which. I suspect, diaspora
Jewry is sobdrc united, is
splramg the secularists of
Israel into two opposing
camps. "White meat" is the
Israeli eii|J>rtiitwn for pig
products, and I am sure that
Jews abroad are shocked
and distressed by the
thought of Israeli Jews
breeding and eating an
animal subject to so strong a
taboo, according to Jewish
religion and tradition.
Orthodox poctarar.* rare r^R
got the Kaeaet to approve o
bans aimed a pn Meting oe sa>
of port and allied prodacts
hi Israel extec-t x
"rxscar >ta5tiai Ik*
-----*-
r*rr. x-
= --: Later tai '-. --'.
- -. next v. "<* accredng
Tr.* !:.: si'-e t.-.* '
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act, Pen*, akhoagfc not
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what appear* to r. i 5=a~
to their i ilia,mi
At one tane pork was
~~> *** jtc t^rf4^*T TAr e*w ck*>
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a.-* >: rt j z*z< i xatter :f sav-
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traveled so exteEarreiy icr:ad.
they bare aeqezred a use for
is a sapie rtem of Europe and North Anerca.
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she vooxi se forced to CBagnfe
she 'under ed. "Do they id2 the
Tbey eerta." : cl -x.~r^. tz.-:
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The Israec pi^ s : incseaz
*rea=sre wi^.:t^ ^ *
V .-: : avee: IM :~: .- ticc
>iea. Kcdoici for the
aod eater ^ r>:r f:r tie
to
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M^mi rabbis were
. J by Dr. Alfred Gottaebalk.
MKier.-.':f ^e Hebrew Union
CiL.ere-Jewish Institute of
:c a: a recec: annoal hm-
eheee far assBani held in conjonc-
~rr tt the ai*ntJon of the
Saaira. 'xltnax :'. .V-r-r^r
The hueated tno were Rabb;
Hi..- V Br-s: rz:r.:.2..
*fcir :f Terrr< Israel A Greater
Star-- M-.rrae. E .sersta!. Temple
--i :-n. Gabta Hi
-^-*rt EA--^ir: Trr-.^-e Betr.
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i- :-i. -rri.- sjpport of
-.-^ ^r/itr-v i Year-Ir.-
i^ur ?-vn-~ T>_i sc-.a : -
Besides Hebrew stud>-. the rab-
binic students spend time working
on kiirwitiim. Tohmteerir^ as
tutors is underprivileged
neighborhoods, digging a: ar-
chaeological sites, and ger.-erally
being exposed to the fifcesi of
contemporary Israeli hfe arid
culture
During the Alumni Lur.:-- -
Dr. Gotucfasik preserted each
member of the President = Alumni
Circle with a cert::' i
gratitude for their leadership and
support of the Year-In-Urael
Program.
M I
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pieterj to csrtaw the bre*-rr ar>:
eoaaaDpbaa f park and afeed
seats A recent tesensaon pro-
graa saved that every day 400
paj arcasses are broaght to the
Tei Attt market: X' butchers x
the Cannei market specaaoae x
the sale of pork, bacon and ham. A
ragfit next to the oid Knesset, sets
bacon and hssm. So does another
x Reharta. dose to the bonnes of
the President and the Prone
The aignaiiali ii nit the pig
in Lsraei are so very
Ukra-Orthodox Arraham
lsraei and Rabbi Yk-
the sfsmlii of the
dad so in the Knesset.
the power of the taboo.
in Jewish
the
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ton eating pa?
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Rftad wtth Bavarian Craam and
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Friday, July 1% 1985/The Jewish Floridran Page &^B
Tames in News
*ascell Urges Reagan To Support Special Investigations
Congressman Dante Faacell
_)., Fla.) has co-signed a letter to
President Reagan urging his con-
Jnued support for the Justice
epartment's Office of Special
ivestigations.
The OSI was created in 1979 at
he urging of Congress to look in-
i the cases of suspected Nazi war
riminals living in the United
Itates. Where evidence warrants,
feportation proceedings are
nitiated.
Noting that the OSI has come
nder attack recently in some
iiarters, the letter seeks to reaf-
Irm congressional intent that its
fork should continue. Currently,
here are 351 investigations in
|rogress, 29 of which are pending
court.
"We are confident that you
kould agree that those who
erpetrated crimes against the
ews and other victims of Nazism
uould not be afforded the
rivilege of residence in our coun-
the letter to the President
ites.
I Fascell is chairman of the House
oreign Affairs Committee and
^rmer chairman of the Commis-
on on Security and Cooperation
Europe, which monitors com-
kiance with the Helsinki Accords.
'The Governments of the
United States and Western
Europe have insisted that the UN
lairobi conference avoid divisive
Dlitical issues more appropriately
idressed in the UN's political
lies; unfortunately, Arab and
Dviet bloc governments seem in-
ent on injecting into Nairobi the
Bue of Palestinian Women, singl-
jig it out for special attention
espite the many truly pro-
blematic situations women face in
my parts of the world," accor-
ding to Richard Maass, chairman
the Jacob Blaustein Institute
or the Advancement of Human
tights.
In anticipation of this possible
nanipulation of July's Nairobi
neeting, Maass has announced
tie publication of a book-length
tudy on Palestinian women in the
Vest Bank and Gaza, written by
)r. Mala Tabory, a legal scholar
Ind social scientist.
The study, according to Sidney
Liskofsky, program director of
tie Institute, challenges asser-
lions made in the UN
cretariat's Report on Palesti-
nian Women, the background
(document for discussion of this
fissue at Nairobi.
"The UN Report," Liskofsky
I said, "unfairly criticizes Israel,
[and assumes Israel is always to
blame for unsatisfactory condi-
tions, real or imagined."
NAACP president Benjamin
Hooks has paised Rabbi David
Saperstein's address on black-
Jewish relations at the organiza-
tion's convention in Dallas June
[27. saying it "added im-
measurably to our community's
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understanding of American
Jewry."
In a statement hailing Rabbi
Saperstein's speech, Hooks
declared that the NAACP
delegates returned to their com-
munities "strengthened in their
resolve to reach out to Jews as
friends and to re-forge our
historic alliance of decency."
In his address to the NAACP,
Rabbi Saperstein, director of
Reform Judaism's Religious Ac-
tion Center in Washington,
declared that almost all major
American Jewish organizations
supported goals and timetables in
affirmative action programs. He
said that failure to recognize this
fact was creating needless tension
between blacks and Jews.
A team of researchers at Tel
Aviv University, including the
first woman ever to head a faculty
at Israel's largest institution of
higher education, have succeeded
in producing an antibody that
would lead to more effective
diagnosis and treatment of breast
cancer.
The team consists of Prof. Iafa
Keydar, who earlier this year was
named dean of the University's
George S. Wise Faculty of Life
Sciences; Dr. Yehuda Shoenfeld,
professor of medicine at the
Sackler Faculty of Medicine; and
Dr. Amnon Hizi. of the depart-
ment of histology and cell biology
at Sackler.
Expanding on earlier research
with patients suffering from
tuberculosis, the team succeeded
in using cells from a woman with
breast cancer to produce what is
called a hybridoma.
Hybridomas were first
developed in the mid-1970's by
Dr. Cesar Milstein and Dr.
Georges Kohler, winners of the
1985 Nobel Prize in medicine.
Dramatizing the successful
melding of Jewish education and
high technology training, Golem
the Jewish Robot opened the re-
cent sixth commencement exer-
cises of the Bramson ORT
Technical Institute in Manhattan
by singing Hatikvah in a
mechanical voice that joined in
with the voices of the humans at
the ceremony.
In his commencement address.
Dr. Marvin J. Feldman, presi-
dent of the Fashion Institute of
Technology and a member of the
Bramson ORT Board of Trustees,
noted that "Jewish hi-tech is a
reality thanks to schools like
Bramson that continue the ORT
tradition of providing high
technology education and foster-
ing an appreciation of our timeless
Jewish heritage."
The Bramson ORT Technical In-
stitute, the only Jewish Technical
College in the United States,
recently sponsored a computer
contest at its Center for Com-
puters in Jewish Education at
which students from four New
York City yeshivas competed for
top honors in the All-Star Finals.
Rabbi Jack Stern, of Scarsdale,
N.Y., is the new president of the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis, the rabbinic arm of the in-
ternational Reform Jewish
movement.
Stern was elected and installed
at the 96th annual convention of
the CCAR in Minneapolis. More
than 600 rabbis from North
America and several foreign coun-
tries attended the convention,
which featured the theme, "The
Changing Worlds of the Rabbi."
Rabbi Stern, who succeeds Rab-
bi W. Gunther Plaut of Toronto,
has been spiritual leader since
1962 of Westchester Reform Tem-
ple in Scarsdale. For seven years
prior to that, his pulpit was Tem-
ple Emanu-El, Westfield, N.J.,
and he also was an assistant rabbi
in Great Neck, N.Y., and a stu-
dent rabbi in Battle Creek, Mich.
Stephen M. Peck, chairman of
the Executive Committee of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, has been elected chair-
man of the Board of Directors of
the Seminary.
Peck was elected at the Board's
annual meeting in New York City.
Howard M. Holtzmann, the
Seminary's outgoing chairman of
the Board, was named honorary
chairman.
More than three dozen
volunteer Jewish communal
leaders from throughout North
America will attend the fifth
Distinguished Leaders Institute
at Brandeis University July 21-23.
The Institute, under the chair-
manship of Robert Riesman of
Providence, R.I., and co-chaired
by Robert Adler of Chicago, will
focus on the theme: "The
American Jewish Experience:
The Forces That Have Shaped Us,
The Challenges We Face."
The Distinguished Leaders In-
stitute is an annual event which
brings together top-level Jewish
communal leaders with outstan-
ding scholars for three days of
study and discussion.
Jane Sherman of Detroit, co-
chairman of the Project Renewal
Committee of the Jewish Agency
for Israel, has been appointed na-
tional chairman for Project
Renewal, United Jewish Appeal
National Chairman f60Grass has
announced.
A member of the Jewish Agency
Board of Governors for the past
two years, Sherman has also been
chairman of the United Israel Ap-
peal Project Renewal Committee
and co-chairman of the UJA Pro-
ject Renewal Committee since
1979. She sits on the UIA Board
of Directors, the UJA Board of
Trustees and the UJA Campaign
Cabinet, and has just been named
a UJA National Vice Chairman.
In 1977, Sherman became the
first chairman of the UJA Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet,
organized to bring the younger
generation of American Jewish
women fully into national cam-
paign activity. She is currently a
member of the Executive Com-
mittee of the UJA National
Women's Division Board.
Prof. Iafa Keydar is part of a
team of researchers at Tel Aviv
University that has succeeded
in producing an antibody for
more effective diagnosis and
treatment of breast cancer.
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T\-------st
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, July 19, 1985
William Frost Elected
JTA President
NEW YORK (JTA) Martin
Fox, outgoing president and
chairman of the nominating com-
mittee of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, announces that William
Frost of New York City has been
elected president of JTA. Frost
succeeds Fox who has been presi-
dent since 1979. The announce-
ment by Fox came at the annual
meeting of the JTA Board of
Directors.
Frost, a graduate of Harvard
College, Yale Law School and the
Harvard Graduate School of
Public Administration, is an at-
torney and is president of the
Lucius Littauer Foundation.
Born in Larchmont, New York,
Frost is currently Honorary
Curator of Judaica of the Harvard
University Library, chairman of
the Board of Directors of the New
York Heart Association, trustee
of Radcliffe College, and a
member of the Public Health
Council of the State of New York.
FROST, formerly a Foreign
Service Officer of the U.S. State
Department in Yugoslavia,
Austria and Germany, is a direc-
tor of both P.E.F. Israel Endow-
ment Funds and the Istel Fund,
and is a trustee of the Society for
the Advancement of Judaism.
Frost's father, the late Charles
Frost, was a long-time director of
JTA.
Fox also announced the election
of three new directors. They are
Marshall Brachman, Fort Worth;
Norman Lipoff, Miami; and Alan
Marcuvitz, Milwaukee. Mark Seal,
a native of Montreal, was ap-
pointed executive vice president.
Fred K. Shochet, publisher of
The Jewish Floridian
Newspapers, is among those
returned to a new three-year term
on the JTA Board.
Brachman is president and
founder of Computerized Business
Systems. Inc., president of
Brachman Oil, vice president of
Marco Chemical Company, all of
Fort Worth. He received an MBA
from the University of Texas at
Austin. He is a regional chairman
and vice president of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC), vice presi-
dent of the Jewish Federation of
Fort Worth, and is a member of
the Board of Directors of both the
JWB and the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee. He
is also active in numerous local
charities and civic groups.
LIPOFF, an attorney, is a part-
ner in the Miami law firm of
Greenburg, Traurig, Hoffman,
Lipoff, Rosen and Quentel. He is a
graduate of the University of
Florida and New York University.
He is a national vice chairman of
the United Jewish Appeal, a
member of the executive commit-
tee and Board of Directors of the
Council of Jewish Federations,
chairman of the CJF Endowment
Development Division and a
member of the Board of Gover-
nors of the Jewish Agency and Tel
Aviv University.
Lipoff is a past president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and a former chairman of the
Combined Jewish Appeal of
Miami.
Marcuvitz, an attorney, is a
partner in the Milwaukee law firm
of Peregrine, Marcuvitz and
Peltin. He is a graduate of Brown
University and Marquette Univer-
sity Law School. He is a national
vice president of the CJF and
chairs the CJF Communications
Committee. He is a vice president
of the Milwaukee Jewish Federa-
tion and an officer of the Jewish
Community Foundation of
Milwaukee.
Hadassah To Honor
Author Elie Wiesel
NEW YORK Author Elie
Wiesel, whose powerful works on
the Holocaust have touched
millions of readers worldwide, has
been named winner of the 1985
Henrietta Szold Award of
Hadassah, the Women's Zionist
Organization of America, Ruth W.
Popkin, Hadassah national presi-
dent, announces.
Wiesel, also known for his
novels, essays, stories and other
writings on Jewish life, will
receive the award at the banquet
session during Hadassah's 71st
national convention Aug. 18-21 in
the New York Hilton Hotel.
"Henrietta Szold, Hadassah's
founder, personified the highest
ideals of Judaism and Zionism,"
Mrs. Popkin said in making the
announcement. "In his work, Elie
Wiesel speaks to us of the endur-
ing values of Jewish thought and
action that Henrietta Szold
represented and that have sus-
tained and inspired our people
across centuries of oppression and
dispersion.
"Elie Wiesel has become the
conscience of a generation," she
continued, "and speaks to us to-
day for the millions of Jewish
men, women and children whose
voices have been stilled by pre-
judice and injustice for all time."
HENRIETTA SZOLD Award
is presented annually to an in-
dividual or individuals whose lives
and work reflect the humanitarian
values of Hadassah's founder.
Previous winners include
former United Rations Am-
bassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick,
Elie Wiesel
Soviet Jewish refusenik and exile
Ida Nudel, former Israel Presi-
dent Yitzhak Navon, Sen. Hubert
Humphrey, Supreme Court
Justice William 0. Douglas, Presi-
dent Harry S. Truman, and Israel
Prime Ministers David Ben
Gurion and Golda Meir.
Pioneer Women
Kosher Luncheon
The annual Summer Kosher
Luncheon and Card Party of the
liana Chapter of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat will take place
Monday, July 22 at 11 a.m. in the
auditorium of Winston Tower 500,
Sunny Isles.
According to Lillian Hoffman,
president, proceeds will go direct-
ly to Israel for the Child Rescue
program.
Mildred Silverman is chairman
of the day. .
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Friday, July 19, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Mrs. Rose Goodman (seated left) alongside of
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz is shown with her
. children, grandchildren and great-grandchild
as they enroll the entire family for this year's
membership in Temple Ner Tamid. Mrs.
Goodman, together with her late husband, Lou
Goodman, were founders of Ner Tamid. Their
son-in-law, Lowell Fisher (top left), is the
chairman of the Board, pictured with his wife
Eleanore. Her granddaughter, Allison (top
right), is a member of the Board of Trustees,
and her daughter Lauren, is a lifetime
member of the Sisterhood.
Exhibit Of Ann Frank's Life,
Opens In New York
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) Forty
[years after the liberation of the
Nazi concentration camps where
I among the millions killed in the
I Holocaust was a young 16-year-
0 J| tahotK' diary would, later
[become world renowned, the life
[of Anne Frank is now recreated as
[the focal point of an exhibit that
| opened in New York, and
simultaneously in Amsterdam and
I Frankfurt.
The exhibit, "Anne Frank in the
I World: 1929-1945," provides
through some 800 photogrpahs,
some previously unpublished, and
[other archival documents a per-
I sonal history of the young Dutch
1 girl's brief life. It also seeks to
I present an historical portrait of
I events leading to the Nazis rise to
I power and life in Germany and oc-
|cupied Holland.
MANY OF the new
[photographs have been secured
from Dutch and German archives
through the efforts of the Anne
Frank Center in Amsterdam,
sponsors of the exhibition, and
from private collections, in order
to provide a glimpse into the life
the Frank family before and dur-
ing their hiding from the Nazis in
a small, secret annex in
Amsterdam.
The annex was discovered after
about two years by the Nazis in
August, 1944. All the inhabitants,
Anne and her family, as well as
four friends and two of the four
non-Jewish helpers were brought
to the Nazi death camps. Of the in-
habitants of the annex, only
Anne's father, Otto Frank, surviv-
ed. He died in 1980 in
Switzerland.
Max van der Stoel, the
Netherland's Ambassador to the
United Nations, told a breakfast
meeting with reporters last week
that Holland has traditionally sup-
ported the efforts of the Anne
Frank Center and its goals to
educate and fight against racial
hatred and religious intolerance.
THE EXHIBIT, to be viewed in
New York at the Union
.Theological Seminary through the
summer, is being hosted here by
the American Forum on Religion
and Politics, with the cooperation
of the American Friends of the
Anne Frank Center in New York.
A tour of the exhibit through at
least six major cities is expected
over the next two years.
Thomas Osborne, president and
co-founder of the American
Forum, told the breakfast that he
."views the exhibit as -a means of
alerting the American public to
the dangers presented by
religious and political discrimina-
tion and the continued need for
"religious institutions to be
vigilant" against threats of
divisiveness due to religion.
"By way of this exhibit,"
Osborne said, "we wish to teach
that the legacy of religious institu-
tions in the U.S. is one which em-
phasizes inclusiveness and work
for the common good of a
pluralistic society of many faiths;
to direct this concern to all the
American people, and in par-
ticular to the leaders of the Pro-
testant, Catholic, and Jewish
faiths, that the mix of religion and
politics in the United States, bas-
ed upon a tradition and respect of
religious and cultural pluralism be
reaffirmed."
THE EXHIBIT contains, along
with the 800 photographs are silk-
screened on transparent panels
and mounted in specifically
designed and constructed modular
units, several audio visual units
and a model of the secret annex
where Frank and her family hid
for two years.
Moreover, the exhibition, accor-
ding to Bauce van der Wal, presi
dent of the Ann Frank Center in
Amsterdam, seeks to present an
understanding of how Nazism
began and where Nazism drew its
massive and enthusiastic support.
"If we are serious about never let-
ting it happen again, there would
be a need to understand how it
happened," van der Wal declared.
The exhibit is divided into four
parts: Frankfurt, where Frank
was bom, during the twenties; the
rise to power of National
Socialism and the parallel rise to
power of Hitler; international
reaction to the Nazi regime and
events in occupied Holland; and
the aftermath of the war including
today's re-emergence of neo-
Nazism and Holocaust
revisionism.
In Washington, Sen. Carl Levin
(D., Mich.) and his brother, Rep.
Sander Levin (D., Mich.) moved to
designate June 12 the 56th an-
niversary of Ann Frank's birth
as "Anne Frank Day." As of to-
day, 27 Senators have added their
names to the resolution. In the
House, Reps. Thomas Daschie (D.,
S.D.) and Frank Horton (R., N.Y.)
have joined Levin in gathering
140 signal lire?, in support of a
similar resolution.
Suicide Car Bomb Attacks
Kill 12 Lebanese, Wound 2
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Israeli soldiers were slightly
wounded in the first of two suicide
car-bomb attacks in the south
Lebanon security zone last week
which killed 10 Lebanese civilians
and two soldiers of the Israel-
backed south Lebanon Army
(SLA). The drivers cf both cars
were killed instantly.
The Israeli soldiers were wound-
ed when a Peugot 504 car, ap-
parently driven by a woman, ex-
ploded at the border check post at
Ras Bayda on the coastal road.
The post is staffed by the SLA.
According to Israel Defense Force
sources, the Israeli soldiers were
there as instructors. Ten minutes
later, a car driven by a man was
stopped by SLA guards on the
road to Hasbiya in the eastern sec-
tor of the security zone. The
driver left the car to have his
papers examined.
Suddenly, he raced back to his
vehicle and triggered an explosion
which killed the soldiers and
civilians. Many of the latter were
in their own cars which were
struck by the blast as they waited
in line at the check post.
COMPANION/AID
Needed for 72 yr. old
woman mobile, in ex-
change for Free Room
and Board plus. Call:
382-1191 (Son)
Ruth Shack has been appointed
Executive Director of the Dade
Foundation, according to
Samuel L. Barr. Jr., chair-
man of the foundation. The
foundation administers com-
munity trust funds which are
tax deductible donations and
bequests from individuals or
corporations and distributes
grants to non-profit organiza-
tions in Dade County.
Community Corner
Dr. Alan J. Shnapier of Miami Beach has been elected presi-
dent of the medical staff of South Shore Hospital and Medical
Center, affiliated with the University of Miami School of
Medicine.
The Dade County Medical Association has recently honored
Wilbur J. Blechman, MD a noted Rheumatologist with the
Physician's Recognition Award.
Pauline (Mrs. Harry) Mildner has been appointed to the Code
Enforcement Board of the City of Miami Beach by unanimous
vote of the Beach city commission.
The U.S. Senate Tuesday approved the nomination of Stanley
Marcus as a new federal judge in the Southern District of Florida.
World News Briefs
BONN (WNS) The town of
Pforzheim in south Germany and
the government of the federal
state of Baden-Wuertemberg
have made available some $30,000
for the restoration of an old local
Jewish cemetery which had been
erected in 1846. The authorities
here hope to finish the restoration
work before next month, when a
group of former Pforzheim Jews
is expected to visit the town at the
invitation of the local
government.
NEW YORK (WNS) Julius
Berman, American Jewish leader
and immediate past chairman of
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organiza-
tions, has joined the Board of
Directors of the Jewish National
Fund. Berman is a trustee of the
Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of New York, a member
of the executive committee of the
Synagogue Council of America,
and honorary president of the
Union of Orthodox Jewish
Congregations.
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (WNS)
The Jewish Federation of
Rhode Island has endorsed the
idea of divestiture from any cor-
poration doing business in South
Africa which fails to adhere to
anti-apartheid standards. The ex-
ecutive committee of the Federa-
tion decried what it considered
the oppression of millions of
blacks, and said "the Jewish com-
munity cannot be indifferent to
the plight of any group anywhere
in the world that is denied its basic
rights."
NEW YORK (WNS) The
Parents of North American
Israelis has asked the Israel
government to drop its travel tax.
The action was taken at the PNAI
ninth annual convention. The
association has more than 3,000
families in 39 chapters, including
branches in Montreal and Toron-
to. Mrs. Sylvia Weissman of
Riverdale, N.Y., was named presi-
dent at the convention.
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
bombs exploded in Hadera and
Ashkelon but caused no
casualties. The charge in Hadera
went off in the town's central In-
dependence Square, while that in
Ashkelon had been placed at the
fence of the swimming pool of the
King Saul Hotel.
TEL AVIV (JTA) A bomb
exploded outside the Haifa district
court without causing casualties.
Another bomb nearby was safely
defused. The incident was the
third of its kind in Haifa and the
nearby suburb of Bat Galim in re-
cent months.
JWV Ladies Auxiliary
To Hold Luncheon
A luncheon in the home of Edith
Novins, president of the Depart-
ment of Florida Ladies Auxiliary,
Jewish War Veterans, will be held
on Sunday for her officers and
chairmen to discuss plans and
activities.
Sirra Academy
of Tfemple Sina weve got
Of North UwJu IT ALL!
Challenging teaching positions at excellent
salaries, in a progressive, liberal, exciting
environment. Openings for Fall "85 in Sunday
and Hebrew Schools; Day School and Early Childhood
Programs; specialists in various Arts; and Youth
Advisor. Call RABBI COOK at Temple Sinai of North
Dade, 932-9010.


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, July 19,1985
Foundation Launches Project To
Reinforce Jewish Identity
RYE, N.Y. (JTA) A
pilot project designed to
reinforce Jewish identity in
dispersed Jewish com-
munities of Scandinavia and
France was announced here
by the Memorial Foundation
for Jewish Culture.
According to Philip Klutznick,
Foundation president, the pro-
gram will be targeted for persons
25 to 45 years of age since they
are the "least involved in Jewish
communal life in Scandinavia and
France, yet they possess con-
siderable potential for the future
of Jewish life there."
The project was announced at
the beginning of the meeting of
the Foundation's Executive Com-
mittee here by Fritz Hollander of
Stockholm, co-chairmen of the
Commission of Dispersed Jewish
Communities.
THE GOAL of the project,
Klutznick said, "is to create a con-
tinuing group dynamic and inter-
change that will help the par-
ticipants deepen their knowledge,
understanding and commitment
to the Jewish community so that,
ultimately, they can be integrated
into the existing Jewish communi-
ty and assume leadership roles."
The project will take the form of
a series of video films that will
focus on "The Jew and His
World" from the perspective of
Jewish life in dispersed
communities.
The Memorial Foundation will
initiate the project with a pilot
Philip Klutznick
video film on "The Jew and the
Family."
Dr. Jerry Hochbaum, executive
director of the Memorial Founda-
tion, said, "to sustain these
dispersed Jewish communities,
the vital need is for adequately
trained and deeply motivated per-
sonnel. Here the Foundation has
already achieved notable success.
"IN OSLO and Helsinki, rabbis,
trained in Israel with Foundation
help, have in a short time revived
and transformed both the
religious and general Jewish life.
Oslo had not had a full-time rabbi
in almost 20 years. Israel-trained
Rabbi Michael Melchior came and
opened the first Jewish
kindergarten in Oslo since the
Holocaust, revitalized the after-
noon Hebrew school and reac-
tivated the Jewish youth groups.
"In Helsinki, Rabbi Ove
Schwartz has reorganized the all-
day elementary Jewish school, in
which close to 85 percent of all
Jewish youth in the community
are enrolled. Rabbi Schwarz serv-
ed not only as Helsinki's Jewish
spiritual leader but also as its
shohet, mohel, Jewish educator
and youth worker."
Service to dispersed Jewish
communities is one of the three
new directions the Foundation is
taking, Klutznick announced. The
other two new directions are in
the area of informal Jewish educa-
tion and the stabilization of the
Jewish family.
IN THE AREA of informal
Jewish education, the Nahum
Goldmann Fellowship will provide
an intensive experience in Jewish
learning and living at a three-
week summer institute in Europe
for the cultural advancement and
leadership development of a
carefully selected group of
outstanding young Jewish men
and women in Europe. Goldmann
was a founder and president of the
Foundation.
In its third new direction, the
Foundation announced that it will
develop a pilot program to reach
"unaffiliated American Jewish
families" through Jewish family
life education. The Foundation
will seek to implement a set of
programmatic recommendations
developed by Professor Samuel
Heilman of Queens College, utiliz-
ing appropriate "marketing"
techniques to penetrate these
types of Jewish homes.
Colpa Launches Attack To Reverse
Rulings On Wearing Yarmulkes
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The National Jewish Com-
mission on Law and Public
Affairs reports that it is ac-
ting on both the legal and
legislative fronts to win
reversals of rulings by the
Defense Department and
the federal Court of Appeals
barring the wearing of yar-
mulkas by members of the
Armed Forces while on
duty.
The issue remains valid despite
the fact that Rabbi Simcha
Goldman who, with the help of
COLPA, fought for years to re-
tain the right, as an Air Force
chaplain, to wear a yarmulke
while on chaplaincy duty, has left
the service. He is now a practicing
psychologist at Chabad House in
Los Angeles but did not resign his
Air Force Commission and is cur-
rently in the Air Force Reserve.
HE HAD been permitted to
wear his yarmulke while on duty
since 1977, when a new comman-
ding officer at the March Air
Force Base in Riverside, Calif.,
ordered Chaplain Goldman not to
wear his yarmulke while perform-
ing his duty as a clinical
psychologist at the base regional
hospital.
Threatened with disciplinary ac-
tion, Chaplain Goldman filed suit
in federal district court in
Washington on July 2, 1981,
which upheld his right to wear his
yarmulke on duty. In May, 1982,
the Air Force filed an appeal with
the federal Court of Appeals,
which upheld the Air Force ban.
COLPA then filed an appeal
from the circuit court ruling with
the Supreme Court, which is now
considering whether to accept the
case, Dennis Rapps, COLPA ex-
ecutive director said*
He also reported that a Defense
Department Study on Religious
Practices in the Armed Forces
recommended that uniformed per-
sonnel not be allowed to wear yar-
mulkes on duty.
THE STUDY was required by
legislation passed last year by
Congress under sponsorship of
Sen. Orrin Hatch (R., Utah) and
Rep. Stephen Solarz (D., N.Y.).
Allen Rothenberg, COLPA presi-
dent, said the COLPA officials
would meet at a date yet to be
determined with Hatch and
Solarz. Rothenberg said the pur-
pose of such a meeting would be to
determine a possible legislative
solution to the problem.
Rothenbeg said that Nathan
Lewin, COLPA vice president,
and David Butler, COLPA board
member, are representing
Goldman in his appeal to the
United States Supreme Court.
Rapps said the legal issue is
whether or, not in the absence of a
specific statute providing for
wearing of a yarmulke on duty,
the First Amendment's guarantee
of the free exercise of religion re-
quires the Defense Department to
permit the wearing of yarmulkes
on duty by observant Jews.
Israel, West Germany
Discuss Scientific Cooperation
Bv DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Israel
and West Germany are
discussing various avenues
of scientific and
technological cooperation,
including establishment of a
joint German-Israel in-
dustrial group which each
government would assist in
research to develop pro-
ducts that could be
marketed commercially.
Gideon Patt, Israel's Minister
for Science and Development,
spoke to reporters after a meeting
with his German counterpart,
Heine Riesenhuber. He said the
amount of aid and the timing
would depend on the results of the
research. But this was only one of
three major areas of scientific
cooperation they discussed, Patt
said.
HE SAID the two countries are
considering a meeting between
German and Israeli experts to
develop pilot projects to
demonstrate how various in-
dustries could benefit from the
allocation of resources to
research. Also on the agenda was
the possibility of creating a joint
foundation which would make
available financial assistance to in-
dustries conducting research.
Riesenhuber told Patt that
before proceeding, the legal and
financial implications have to be
studied. The two ministers also
discussed possible participation by
their respective countries in the
Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI),
popularly known as "Star Wars"
which the Reagan Administration
claims will provide a defensive
shield against nuclear attack, bas-
ed in outer space.
Patt said the issue of coopera-
tion in the field of nuclear
reseaach was not discussed during
his visit. He is scheduled to meet
with the Prime Ministers of two
federal states Bernhard Vogel
of Rhineland Palatinate and
Franz-Josef Strauss of Bavaria.
Nazi Ideology
Waning In
Austria Is
Disputed
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) A promi-
nent young historian has sharply
criticized a recent study which
claimed that Nazi ideology is on
the wane in Austria.
According to Dr. Gerhard Botz,
head of the Botzmann Institute
for Historical Social Science in
Salzburg, the findings are
"paliative" and based on "out-
dated" material. He noted that ac-
cording to the latest scientific in-
vestigations, it is not yet time, 40
years after the end of World War
II, to sit back and consider de-
Nazification an accomplished fact.
The study, presented here
recently, maintained the Nazi
ideology as a set of values and
political ideas, is virtually non-
existent in Austria today,
although Austrians admittedly
still score high when polled on
their attitudes toward specific
characteristics of
authoritarianism. The latter in-
clude anti-Semitism, xenophobia
and anti-parliamentarianism. But
the study insisted, these attitudes
too are declining, although only
gradually.
But Botz, one of the younger
generation of historians, cited
figures showing that significant
numbers of Austrians hold views
which were part of Nazi ideology.
He noted that 40 percent of the
population believes there dre bet-
ter and worse nations; 15 percent
still contend that Austria needs
more territory for "lebensraum";
and 21 percent would prefer
political decisions to be made by a
single, competent politician rather
than the long, complicated
democratic process.
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-6276
Division 02
Florida Bar No. 148946
Florida Bar No. 233099
IN RE: ESTATE OF ,
FREDERICK GOLDBERG.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of FREDERICK GOLDBERG,
deceased. File Number 85-6276, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse. Third
Floor. 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any objec-
tion by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on July 19, 1985.
Personal Representative:
ANNETTE GOLDBERG
630 S. Shore Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33141
LAWRENCE A. LEVY.
ESQUIRE
5904 East State Boulevard
Fort Wayne. Indiana 46815
Telephone: (219) 749-5000
Attorneys for Personal
Representative:
WILLIAM S. RUBENSTEIN,
ESQUIRE
717 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Suite 237
Coral Gables, FL 33134
Telephone: (305) 44-8995
19199 Jury 19.26, 1986
Sara Barli Herald, a partner
in the law firm of Fine Jacob-
son Schwartz Nash Block and
England, PA, has been elected
President of the Young
Lawyers Section of the Dade
County Bar Association. The
Section includes all members of
the Bar who are 36 years of age
or less.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-4596
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NATHAN LEVIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAWST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS IN-
TERESTED IN THE ESTATE.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
estate of NATHAN LEVIN,
deceased. File Number 85-4596. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which c 73-
W. Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The personal representative
of the estate is JERRY F. LEVIN,
whose address is 10 Brewster Road,
Way land, Massachusetts. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re
quired. WITHIN THREE M0N
THS FROM THE DATE I F THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the dark i
the above court a written statement
of any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in writing
and must indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address of the
creditor or his agent or attorney,
and the amount claimed. If the
claim is not yet due. the date when
it will become due shall be state. I If
the claim is contingent or ui.li-
quidated, the nature of the uncer
tainty shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall he
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the claim
to the clerk to enable the c
mail one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of thil
of Administration has been
are required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE I'ATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file an.
tions they may have that challenge
the validity of the decedent's will,
the qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: July
12. 1985.
JERRY F. LEVIN
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
NATHAN LEVIN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
BENNETT BOVARNICK, Esq.
7200 W. Camino Real,
Suite 310
Boca Raton. Florida 33433
or
Suite H-2
Black Oak Dr.
Nashua, N.H. 03072
19181 July 12,19,1985


I
. .. .
Friday, July 19, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
llic Notices
ITCE UNDER
IOUS NAME LAW
IS HEREBY GIVEN
undersigned, desiring to
business under the fic-
ne JUST DESSERT at
179th Street, Miami, Dade
Florida intends to register
|e with the Clerk of the
"ourt of Dade County,
NEIGHBORS
ESTAURANT, INC.
|AMES J. JAMIESON,
President
. VEGA
for Neighbors
ants, Inc.
^leria Avenue,
ables, Florida 33134
July 5,12.19,26,1986
IE CIRCUIT COURT OF
|f:leventh JUDICIAL
ICU1T, IN AND FOR
)E COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
IE NO. 85-11694 (CA 04)
fOTICE OF ACTION
I JACOBSOHN,
iff,
ACIO GOTERA and
i GOTERA, his wife,
id ants.
piFACIO GOTERA and
ISA GOTERA, his wife
> Justine Blvd.
nhurst, New York 11373
|ARE NOTIFIED, that an
i foreclose a mortgage on
ring described property in
punty, Florida:
orth V. of the East Vi of
fcheast '/ of the Southeast
Section 15 Township 53
snge 39 East lying and be-
ade County, Florida
i filed against you and you
(lired to serve a copy of
Itten defenses, if any, to it
Mack, Lewis & Allison,
Ts attorneys, whose ad-
111 N.E. 1st Street,
lorida 33132, on or before
[16, 1985, and file the
I with the Clerk of this
ther before service on
|8 attorneys or immediate-
ifter; otherwise, a default
ntered agaist you for the
banded in the complaint.
BSS my hand and seal of
I on the loth day of July,
lARD P. BRINKER
lerk of the Court
ly: D. C. Bryant
I Deputy Clerk
July 19. 26;
August 2. 9. 1985
ICE OF ACTION
JUCTIVE SERVICE
IPROPERTY)
CIRCUIT COURT
11TB JUDICIAL
II! IN AND FOR
fcOUNTY. FLORIDA
|ILY DIVISION
NO. 85-23658
FOR DISSOLUTION
! MARRIAGE
Bar No. 212229
MARRIAGE OF
l/ERA,
IRIA VERA,
?O VERA
Jnknown
I1IOTIFIED that an
Mutton of Marriage
gainst you and you
serve a copy of
lenses, if any, to it
3ENBERG, P.A.,
oniey, whose ad-
an Center, Suite
louth Dadeland
ni, Florida 33156,
I with the Clerk
yled court on or
11986; otherwise a
ritered against you
I for in the com-
be published
for four con-
the Jewish
and and the seal
piami, Florida on
1985.
BRINKER.
lit Court
Florida
WANT
l Clerk
|IG, P.A.
ner
rSuite 910
Boulevard
12.19. 26.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 85-1188C CC05
ACTION FOR DAMAGES
Florida Bar No. 221361
SUZETTE's FASHIONS, INC.,
Plaintiff
vs.
MAX LUGO and SYLVIA LUGO.
Defendants.
TO: Max Lugo & Sylvia Lugo
30 Locust Hill Drive
Yonkers. New York 10701
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an Action for Damages
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Silver & Silver attorney for the
Plaintiff, whose address is 150
S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326,
Miami, Florida 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before August
1st, 1985 otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27th of June. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, County Court
Dade County, Florida
By Yolanda Uribe
As Deputy Clerk
SEAL
Ira S. Silver
Attorney for Plaintiff
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 33131
(305) 374-4888
00000 July 5, 12, 19. 26, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-1889
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MICHAEL J. ZIZZI. JR.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ANCILLARY
ADMINISTRATION
The undersigned, as personal
representative of the above estate,
hereby gives notice that an an
ciliary administration for the
estate of the decedent:
a. Was commenced on February
26. 1985;
b. is now pending as case number
85-1889 in the following court: in
the Circuit Court, in and for the
Eleventh Judicial Circuit in the
State of Florida. County of Dade;
c. the name and residence ad-
dress of the ancillary personal
representative are: Marie Visear-
di. 38 Emerald Point. Rochester,
New York 14624,
d. and the nature and approx-
imate value of the ancillary assets
are: Real property in Dade County
Florida approximate value
$40,000.00 (undivided V? interest)
Executed this 2nd day of July.
1985.
MARIE VISCAROI.
as Personal Representative
KING. LEAVY & RABIN
Attorney for I\ rsonal
Representative:
6801 Sunset Drive. Suite 203
So Miami. Florida 33143
Telephone: (806) 666-6000
19183 July 12, 19, 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-27094
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GUIBERT JEAN-BAPTISTE,
Petitioner,
and
JULIE JEAN-BAPTISTE,
Respondent.
TO: JULIE JEAN-BAPTISTE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before August 2, 1985, otherwise a
default will be entered.
July 1, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C. P. Copeland
9173 July 5, 12,19,26, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-26292
(08)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GILMA C. DE MELCHOR,
Petitioner/Wife,
and
ALFONZO JIMENES,
Respondent/H usband.
TO: Alfonso Jimenes
(Address Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Henry Leyte-Vidal, Esquire, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 701 SW 27h Avenue, Suite
625, Miami. Florida 33135, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 2, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26th day of June, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Henry Leyte-Vidal, Esquire
701 SW 27th Avenue, Suite 625
Miami, Florida 33135
Telephone: (305) 541-2266
19159 June 28; July 5, 12,19, 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-27653
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GERARD GABOTON,
Petitioner,
and
REBER GABOTON.
Respondent.
TO: REBER GABOTON. Residence
unknown, you shall serve copy if your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS, Attorney, 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami, Florida,
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before August 9. 1985,
otherwise a default will be entered.
July 5, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C.P. COPELAND
19185 July 12,19, 26, August 2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Easy Blinds intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Luis Martinez
19166 July 5.12,19,26,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-5646
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SOLOMON M. HENDLER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION ..
The administration of the estate
of SOLOMON M. HENDLER
<:. rased, File Number 85-5646. is
ponding in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Si Miami, FL 33130.
The names and ddrWM of the
rsonal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any objec-
tion by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice
begun on July 19, 1985.
Personal Representative:
EDWARD E. LEVINSON
Myers, Kenin, Levinson,
Frank & Richards
1428 Brickell Avenue
Miami, FL 33131
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
KATHLEEN MARKEY
Myers, Kenin, Levinson. Frank
& Richards
1428 Brickell Avenue
Miami. FL 33131
Telephone: 371-9041
19193 July 19.26. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 84-39705
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No.: 349275
INRE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JULIO A. OLIVA.
Petitioner,
and
EMELINDA OLIVA,
Respondent.
TO: EMELINDA OLIVA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on A.
KOSS, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
P.A., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 4343 West
Flagler Street, Fourth Floor, Suite
404, Miami, Florida 33134, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 9, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 2 day of July. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT LAW,
P.A.
Attorneys for Petitioner
4343 West Flagler Street
Fourth Floor Suite 404
Miami. Florida 33134
Tel.: (305) 443-4343
19179 July 5, 12, 19.26. 1985
has
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-28359
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
FRANCISCA MERCEDES
CORDERO, a/k/a
FRANCISCA LOPEZ.
and
JOSE LOPEZ PAGAN,
TO: Jose Lopez Pagan
Padres Colon Edif. No. 209
Apartamento No. 4
Rio Piedras, PR 00925
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re
quired to serve a ropy of your writ
ten defenses, if anv. to it on
EMILIO C. PASTOR. ESQ.. at
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
Irrss is 155 South Miami Avenue,
Penthouse I Miami. Florida 33130.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before August 16. 1985; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in the
' complaint or petiton.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 10 day of July. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIO C. PASTOR. ESQ.
PH I 156 South Miami Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130
Tel.: (305) 3720088
Attorney for Petitioner
19191 July 12,19,26, August 2
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, W
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-25641
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CORDOVA-RODRIGUEZ.
NORMA
Petitioner,
and
RODRIGUEZ, GABINO S.
Respondent.
TO: Gabino S. Rodriguez
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on DEL
VALLE & NETSCH. P.A., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 200 Aragon Ave., Suite 4.
Coral Gables, Florida 33134, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
July 26th, 1985; otherwhise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 20th day of June. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
19157 June 28;
July 5, 12, 19, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTmOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GrVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
Chiquillas at 4960 East 8th Lane,
Hialeah, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Dixie Estrada
4960 East 8th Lane
Hialeah, Florida
Harvey D. Friedman
Attorney for Dixie Estrada
19187 July 12,19, 26, August 2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE 11TH CIRCUIT COURT. IN
AND
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO.: 85-28730
VENETIAN HEIGHTS,
INC., a Florida corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WAYNE FLOWERS AND
GEORGIANA FLOWERS, his
wife,
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
No. 090723
TO: WAYNE FLOWERS and
GEORGIANA FLOWERS
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose the mor-
tgage on the following described
property in Dade County, Florida:
Lot 1. Block I, od LIBERTY
FARMS, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 51
at Page 46, of the Public Records of| P A T E
Dade County, Florida; commonly
known as 1674 N.W. 68th Street,
Miami, Florida.
This action has been Sled against
you and you are required to serve a
Copy of vour written defenses, if
any. to it on MORTON H ZEMEL.
ESQUIRE, Attorney for Plaintiff.
whom addreat is 16666 N.E. 19th
Avenue. Suite 111. North Miami
Bench, Florida 33162. on or before
Agumit 23. 1966, :ind file the
origin*] with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or immediate!) thereafter,
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded
in the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Dade Countv,
Florida on this 18 day of July, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MORTON B. ZEMEL. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Plaintiff
16666 N.E. 19th Avenue, Suite lll|
North Miami Beach, Florida 33162
Telephone (305) 949-4237
19195 July 19. 26;
August 2, 9, 19851
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name MAZZIO'S PIZZA at
5500 W 16 Avenue, Hialeah Fla.
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Act Too, Inc.
Karl Ruhnke, President
19165 July 5,15- 26, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name American Truck
Parts & American Truck Supplies
at 7386 N.W. 72 Ave.. Miami, FL
33166 intend to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
American Truck Supplies Inc.
19157 June 28;
July 5. 12, 19, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-5662
Division 02
FLORIDA BAR NO. 019521
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MILDRED LIPMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of MILDRED
LIPMAN, deceased, File Number
85-5662, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. Third Floor.
The personal representative of the
estate is ARTHUR BENNETT,
whose address is 12545 S.W. 32nd
Terrace, Miami. Florida 33155.
The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
W> IBJECTION8NOT80FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
his Notice of Administration: Ju-
ly, 1986
ARTHUR BENNETT
a- Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MILDRED LIPMAN
Deceasec
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
JOSEPH DiBARTOLOMEO
ESQ.
8400 Bird Road
Miami, Florida 33155
Telephone: 226-2276
19190 July 12, 19.1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 85-27093
IN RE: The Marriage of:
CAROLL L. MOORE.
Petitioner,
and
IRA LEE MOORE,
Respondent.
TO: IRA LEE MOORE.
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave., Miami, Florida, 33136, and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before August 2, 1985, otherwise a
default will be entered.
July 1, 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C. P. Copela .1
July 5, 12, 19,26. "oi


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, July 19, 1985
<
Public Notices \
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CiYil Aetioa No. 85-11470 SP 05
ACTION FOR DAMAGES
JARTRAN INC..
Plaintiff,
vs.
GARY TEPPER.
Defendant.
TO: Gary Tepper
625 Shepherd Drive
Stone Mountain. GA 30083
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an Action for
Damages has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any, to it on Silver & Silver at-
torney for the Plaintiff, whose ad-
dress is 150 S.E. 2nd Avenue,
Suite 1326. Miami. Florida 33131.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on
before July 28, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 21 day of June. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, County Court
Dade County. Florida
By Cecilia Chio
As Deputy Clerk
Ira S. Silver >
Attorney for Plaintiff
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 33131
(305) 374-4888
19156 June 28
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. D4
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-27677
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Julv5 12 19.19851DJ RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN RAYNOR.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-5576
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JULIA PINHAS a/k/a
JULIA N. PENHAS
Deceased
NOTICE or
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Julia Pinhas a/k/a Julia N.
Pinhas, deceased. File Number
85-5676, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 W. Flagier Street,
Miami, Florida 33132. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
A-hom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
legunon July 12. 1985.
Personal Representative:
ISIDOR S. PINHAS
c/o Henry M. Waitzkin. Atty.
800 71st Street
Miami Beam. Florida 33141
Attorney for Personal
iiepresentative:
HENRY M. WAITZKIN.
Fla Bar No. 084038
800 7'st Street
Miami Beach. Flonda 33141
Telephone: (305) 865-0363
19182 July 12, 19. 1985
f
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name ONCOLOGY-
HEMATOLOGY ASSOCIATES
at 1688 Meridian Avenue. Suite
702. Miami. Flonda 33139 intends!
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
OLEG S. SELAWRY.
M.D.. PA.,
a Florida corporation.
Partner''
CARLOS .1. DOMINQUEZ.
M.D.. F.A.C.P., P. A.,
a Florida corporation
"Partner''
HARRY B. SMITH. Esq.
Attorney for Oncology-
Hemstology Associates -
19163 June 28: July 5.12.19. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
DN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. DM
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-26529
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARTHA C. RODRIGUEZ.
Petitioner,
and
JOSE A. RODRIGUEZ.
Respondent.
TO: Jose A. Rodriguez
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-;
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you'
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on MELVTN J. ASHER. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 825 South Bayshore Drive,
Suite 543. Miami. FL 33131. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
August 2, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27th day of June. 1985.
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By G. BARRERA
As Deputy Clerk
19168 July 5. 12, 19.26. 1985
Petitioner/Husband,
and
EVEADY RAYNOR.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: EVEADY RAYNOR
HUNTLEY P.A.
MANCHESTER SOMERSEI
JAMAICA, WEST INDIES
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage hat been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it on
JEROLD H. REICHLER. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is 1400
N.E. MIAMI GARDENS DRIVE,
SUITE 103, NORTH MIAMI
BEACH, FLORIDA 33179, and file
the original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before August 9.
1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this 5
day of July. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRLNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JEROLD H. REICHLER. Esq.
LAW OFFICES OF
JEROLD H. REICHLER
1400 N E MIAMI GARDENS
DRIVE SUITE 103
NORTH MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
33179
TELEPHONE: (305) 947-6225
19186 Julv 12.19, 26. August 2
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
. CA6E NO. 85-26843
IN RE: The Marriage of
JULE C. JENNINGS.
Petitioner,
and
PEARL JENNINGS,
Respondent.
TO: Pearl Jennings
8909 Helen
Detroit. Mich. 48211
A Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you in the above Court. You are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, on Sanford
Freed. Petitioner's Attorney. 19
West Flagier St., Rm. 404. Miami,
Fla. 33130 and file the original
with the Clerk of the above Court
on or before August 2, 1986, other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed in
the Petition.
DATED June 28. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
CLERK
BY: J. BYRON
Deputy Clerk
(CIRCUIT COURT SEAL)
19168 July 5, 12.19, 26. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-27309
FAMILY DIVISION
Florida Bar No. 049834
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ISRAEL DANNY SIRI,
Pe ti tioner /H usband
and
RONITLEVY
Respondent/Wife
TO: RONIT LEVY
199-80 Keno Avenue
HoUiswood. New York, 11423
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
JOSEPH W. MALEK. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 501.
Miami Beach. Florida. 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
August 9. 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this day of July 2, 1985
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSEPH W. MALEK, Esquire
360 Lincoln Road. Suite 501
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19178 July 5,12, 19,26,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DN THE CaCUTT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, EN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-27065
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
DVRE:
ROSA ROJAS.
and
HUMBERTO ROJAS,
TO: HUMBERTO ROJAS
145 Palisade Avenue
Engleweed, New Jersey 07631
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is Emilio C. Pastor, Esq. -
PH I- 155 South Miami. Avenue.
Miami. FL, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 9 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Flonda on
this 1st day of July, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Emilio C. Pastor. Esq.
PH I 155 South Miami Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130
Tel: (305) 372-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
19174Z July 5. 12. 19.26. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name BRICKELL
AVENUE PLANTSCAPES at
400 S.E. 2nd Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33131 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Brickell Avenue
Floral Company, Inc.
TALIANOFF & RUBIN
George J. Talianoff, P.A.
Attorney for Brickell
Floral Company, Inc.
2699 South Bayshore Drive 600-C
Miami. Florida "l 33
19167 .*- i io v fi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-5914
Division (04)
Florida Bar No.: 068319
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HARRY MOEL.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HARRY MOEL, deceased. File
Number 85-5914 (04), is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresed of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any objec-
tion by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on July 19, 1985.
Personal Representative:
RUTH LEE MOEL
Apt. 1505. Tower IV
18041 Biscayne Boulevard
North Miami Beach,
Florida 33160
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Theodore R. Nelson, Esquire
Nelson & Feldman. Esquire
1135 Kane Concourse. Fifth Floor
Bay Harbor. Florida 33154
Telephone: (305) 865-5716
19194 July 19,26. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-5052
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN WAX. a/k/a
HELEN BROWER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMUNISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID STATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of HELEN
WAX. a/k/a HELEN BROWER
deceased, late of Dade County,
Florida, File Number 85-5062 is
pending in the Circuit Court in and
for Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is
3rd Floor, Dade County Cour-
thouse. 73 West Flagier Street,
Miami. Florida 33130. The name
and address of the personal
representative of this estate is set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OK
THIS NOTICE (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Personal Representative:
WILLIAM KAUFMANN
633 NE 167 St., No. 1015
Miami. FI. 33162
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 12 of July,
1985.
I. JEROME GRAFF. ESQ.
633 N.E. 167th St.. Suite 1015
N. Miami Beach, Fla. 33162
Telephone (306) 661-3343
Attorney For Personal
Representative
19189 July 12.19, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Coiffure International
at 1561 ft Sunset Drive, South
Miami, Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida.
H & H Auto Services, Inc.
19176 July 5,12.19,26,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring.to engage in
business under the fictitious name
Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Physicians at 1750 N.E. 167 Street.
North Miami Beach, Fla. 33162 in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Marc J. Rosenblatt D.0. P.A.
19163 Julys, 12. 19,26, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-22848 CA-08
NOTICE OF ACTION
002481
CENTRUST SAVINGS BANK.
f/k/a DADE FEDERAL SAV-
INGS AND LOAN ASSOCIA-
TION OF MIAMI.
Plaintiff
vs.
NORMAN GERWITZ. et ux., et
al..
Defendants.
TO: NORMAN GERWITZ and
ETHEL GERWITZ, his wife
404 Fairfield Road
Fairfield. New Jersey 07006
CLASSIFIED
INSURANCE CORP.
1570 N.W. 14th Street
Miami. Florida
RUSSELL FAIBISCH
1575 N.W. 14th Street
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Foreclosure of Mortgage
on the following described
property:
Lot 5, Block 177. of MIAMI
SHORES. SECTION 8, according
to the Plat thereof, recorded in
Plat Book 43, at Page 67, of the
Public Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it,
on Sheppard Faber, Attorney for
Plaintiff, whose address is Suite
214, 1570 Madruga Avenue, Coral
Gables. Florida. 33146 on or before
Aug. 16. 1985 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's at-
torney or immediately thereafter
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court this 15 day of July,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By DC. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
19197 July 19, 26;
August 2.9.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE PROPERTY
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. UN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86 29169
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: IN THE MARRIAGE OF:
JUAN GARCIA-COSME.
Petitioner'Husband
and
MARIA ISABEL GARCIA.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: MARIA ISABEL GARCIA
1 Eltin Circle
Holyoke, Massachusetts 01040
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has beer, fied against you
and you are required to serve a copy
of vour written defenses, if any, to
it on MICHAEL J ALMAN, ES-
QUIRE, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 999 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida
33139. and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on or
before August 23, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consecutive
weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this Hi day of Julv, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MICHAEL J. ALMAN, ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 305-672-3100
Attorney for Petitioner
19198 July 19. 26;
August 2,9, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT >0R
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA -
PROBATE DIVISION'
File Number 85 5745
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SADE O. MARKS
I'eceasM
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING I
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATFI
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS IV l
TERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFID,
that the administration of
estate of SADE 0. MAM
deceased. File Number 85-57,
pending in the Circuit (
Dade County, Florida,
Division, the address of whichJl
West Flagier Street, Mi*
Florida. The personal repn|
tative of the estate is Wfcl
Marks. 38-37 Morlot A* I
Fairlawn, N.J. and Bernice Gel
200 E. 66th St., NY. NY
name and address of the i
representative's attorney an |
forth below.
All persons having claim |
demands against the estate i
quired. WITHIN THREE
THS FROM THE DATE OF!
FIRST PUBLICATION OF '
NOTICE, to file with the i
the above court a written su
of any claim or demand the;
have. Each claim must be n
and must indicate the tiasa i
claim, the name and address
creditor or his agent or attnfl
and the amount claimed
claim is not yet due. the date i
it will become due shall be statt
the claim is contingent or i
quids ted. the nature of the i
tainty shall be stated. If thee
secured, the security
described. The claimant
deliver sufficient copies of the o
to the clerk to enable the i
mail one copy to each
representative.
All persons interested cl
estate to whom a copy of this S
of Administration has been i
are required, WITHIN
MONTHS FROM THE D
THE FIRST PUBLICATION!
THIS NOTICE, to file any (
tions they may have that chi
the validity of the decedent's
the qualifications of the
representative, or the vei
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMASI
AND OBJECTIONS NOT i
ED WILL BE FORE!
BARRED.
Date of the first publkatn^
this Notice of Administration.i
19, 1985.
Wilbert Marks
Bernice Barb
As Personal Representative!
of the Estate of
SADE O MARKS
Dec*al
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Richard I. Kroop
Kwitney. Kroop*; ScheinbBI.rJ
420 Lincoln Road Suite i-
Miami Beach, Florida 33138
Telephone: 588-7675
19192
Julj 19 26.1*
NOTICE I'NDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GTVBI
that the undersigned, desiring |
engage in business under w*'''
Minus name 560 BILTM(J|
WAV PARTNERSHIP
Biltmore Way. Cora]
Flonda 33134, inti
said name with tfac Ctakl
Circuit Court of Dade C
Florida.
EDWARD,I McBRIDE
ALBERT H. SAK0LSK1
H. ALLAN SHORE. ESQl'IM
Attorney for
EDWARD J. McBRIDE
ALBERT H. SAKOLSKY
19180 July 12. J
August 2.1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA'J
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIT
that the undersigned, **"M
engage in business under WJ
titioTname BOSS OFFICE fi\
NITURE BOSS OFFICE*]
PLIES at 7929 S.W. J
Miami. Fla. intend to regisw'
name with the Clerk of theC*
Court of Dade County, Ftan
THE BOSS SUPPLIES
CORPORATION
By: JORGE PIN0N,
President
ROSA M. VEGA ,
Attorney for THE BOSS I
PLIES CORPORATION
218 Almeria Avenue,
Coral Gabies, Fla. 33134
19188 ***.
August 2.1*
<


tiling in Background
Labor Strife Diminishing
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
[The labor unrest seemed to
lease somewhat as the
'government and Histadrut
drew closer to a compromise
agreement on the govern-
ment's controversial
emergency economic
program.
The civil service workers union
cancelled, at the 11th hour, a
general strike by some 80,000
government employees that was
to have begun last Thursday. The
threat was removed after Premier
Shimon Peres, Finance Minister
Yitzhak Modai and Histadrut
Secretary General Yisrael Kessar
reached an understanding that
dismissal notices to 10,000
government workers would be
delayed.
THE NOTICES were to go out
at midnight July 11. The delay did
not mean that the jobs have been
saved or that massive strike ac-
tion has been averted. Histadrut's
strike coordinating committee
gave the go-ahead to the various
local unions Friday to proceed
with plans for a nationwide
general strike beginning Sunday
morning if the current talks with
the government fail to reach a
compromise.
The outstanding issues are the
erosion of wages and mass
dismissals. Kessar said, after a
meeting of the Histadrut Central
Committee in Tel Aviv, that labor
was as anxious as the'government
'WWUSMbanffe "econoihy-: it'
wants the economic program to
succeed and the workers are
prepared to carry additional
burdens as long as they are fair
and equitable and are determined
through negotiations rather than
imposed by decree.
The core of the conflict between
Histadrut and the government
has been the latter's plan to imple-
ment its economic program by in-
voking emergency regulations
that are a holdover from the
British Mandate regime.
FINANCE Minister Modai, who
drafted the emergency program,
told the Ministerial Economic
Committee that he was ready to
consider reduced wages as
substitute for large scale
dismissals as long as there was no
deviation from the basic goals of
his program. He said he would ask
the Cabinet to empower him to
postpone the dismissals.
His position indicated that the
Treasury realized that the pro-
spects of implementing its
economic measures were slim
without the agreement of
Histadrut. The latter has not pro-
posed an alternative economic
program, however, and apparent-
ly is not inclined to do so.
But Deputy Premier and Hous-
ing Minister David Levy, the most
outspoken critic of Modai's plan
suggested that the Cabinet may
have to reconsider it to avoid a
situation where it would remain a
paper plan, unenforceable. Levy
was one of seven Likud ministers
who voted against the program
two weeks ago and the only one
who continued to oppose it public-
ly after it was adopted.
DEPUTY Premier Yitzhak
Shamir, the Likud leader, sup-
ported Modai in the Cabinet
though he said the plan was far
from perfect. He continued to sup-
port it, saying there was no alter-
native. He urged the nation to
back the government's measures.
President Chaim Herzog, who
has no political role but can bring
to bear the prestige of his office,
also urged the populace to unite to
save the economy from collapse
even though it requires personal
sacrifices. He said he was confi-
dent a majority of the people ob-
jected to the rash of wildcat
strikes which disrupted public ser-
vices last week.
Mideast Not Prominent
Agenda Item During
Reagan-Gorbachev Talks
While it is just and legitimate to
protest and demonstrate, Herzog
said, he rejected acts that pushed
the economy toward "destructive
anarchy."
THE LABOR unrest of the past
week seemed to be simmering
down. Of the several unions that
walked out, only the Israel Elec-
tric Corp. workers continued their
job actions. For the second suc-
cessive day, power output was
reduced by 20 percent and
rotating power blackouts hit
various parts of the country.
These were supposed to last no
longer than 30 minutes at a time.
But most areas reported
blackouts of three hours'
duration.
The massive traffic jams
because of non-functioning traffic
lights worsened. Many factories
and shops were idle for the lack of
electric power, causing lost pro-
duction and lost customers. The
electric company workers said
they would not restore normal
power until the government
rescinds the emergency measures
invoked to implement its
economic program.
Obituaries
BURG, Sam, 73, Miami Beach, July 15. Ser
vices held in New York.
CYPERS, Ida. July 14. Interment in Los
Angeles.
GOLDBERG. Dr. Frederick. 70. Miami
Beach, July 14.
GROSS, Charles. Miami Beach. July 14.
Riverside.
BROWNSTEIN, Edith, 81 of Miami Beach.
July 10. Riverside.
COHEN. Leonard, North Bay Village.
Rubin Zilbert.
GELLER. Max. Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert. -
SCHERR. Irvin, of Miami Beach. Riverside.
COHEN, Norman L., 93, of North Miami
Beach. July 10. Riverside.
LIBIN, Ely, July 8. Services in Baltimore,
Md.
MENDELSOHN, Milton M.. 83 of Miami.
July 10.
SCHUCHMAN, Rochelle. 66 of North
Miami Beach. July 9. Riverside.
BRANDENBURG. Rae. Services were
held.
POSTMAN, Stuart P., 56 of Miami, July 11.
SONSKY. Louis, 83 of Miami. July 11.
FREEMAN, Joseph, 81 of North Miami
Beach. July 12. Levitt-Weinstein.
LONDON. Steven Michael, North Miami.
July 11. Riverside.
LUDWIG, Saul, Miami Beach, July 12.
Blasberg Chapel.
FOSTER, Harry. 79, of Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
PELL, Stanley, 63, of North Miami Beach.
July 13. Riverside.
KULOK-GINSBERG, Rae. of Miami Beach.
July 15. Riverside.
MANS, Benjamin. July 14. Riverside.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir does not believe the
Middle East will figure pro-
minently on the agenda of
President Reagan and
Soviet leader Mikhail Gor-
I bachev when they hold their
summit meeting in Geneva
in November.
Shamir noted, in an interview
with the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, that the Reagan Ad-
ministration has run into serious
1 difficulties in its efforts to revive
I the peace process on the basis of a
(joint Jordanian-Palestinian
negotiating team.
HE DID NOT appear to agree
with some non-governmental
observers who believe
Washington must make progress
in the Middle East before the
Geneva summit in order to resist
Soviet pressures to involve
| Moscow in the diplomatic process
there.
But according to Shamir, there
I are too many obstacles to pro-
gress. "There are differences bet-
ween the PLO and Jordan, within
the PLO itself and between the
Arabs and the Americans," he
said.
The basic Arab aim is to pro-
mote direct dialogue between the
U.S. and the Palestine Liberation
Organization, whereas the Ad-
ministration's goal is to pave the
way for direct talks between the
Arabs and Israel, Shamir pointed
out.
The Arabs, including Jordan,
balk at this. They insist on an in-
ternational peace conference on
the Middle East which would in-
clude not only the so-called
moderate Arab states but the
regional hardliners and the Soviet
Union as one of the five par-
ticipating permanent members of
the United Nations Security
Council, Shamir said.
HE SAID he has no idea
whether Richard Murphy, the
U.S. Assistant Secretary of State
for Near Eastern and South Asian
Affairs would be coming to the
region this month as planned.
Murphy's trip reportedly has
been postponed because the U.S.
has not been given a list of Palesti-
nians who would form part of the
joint delegation wit? Jordan. To
be acceptable to th U.S. and to
Israel they must hi e no known
connection with the >LO.

\S* 00<*/
111 ( t t
&&
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel. 261-7612
Friday, July 19, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Paul Faske, 70, Passes
Paul Faske, 70, of North Miami,
a Florida resident since 1946,
passed away Monday. Founder of
Neway Uniform Supply Co.
Member of Temple Adath
Yeshurun, Hope School,
Southwest Masonic Lodge, Miami
Consistery, Mahi Shrine, In-
terama Authority Board and
Democratic National Finance
Council. A 1976 Florida delegate
to National Democratic Conven-
tion; past Chairman of North
Miami Downtown Redevelopment
Committee; past President of
Founders Club and Life Trustee
of Mount Sinai Medical Center.
He served as President and Board
Chairman of Greater Miami
YMHA. Survivors include wife
Ruth, daughter Ronni (Gene) Gar-
field of San Francisco, and grand-
daughter Pamela.
Paul Faske
Services were held Wednesday,
12 noon at Levitt-Weinstein
Chapel
Alexander Kogan,
94, Passes
Alexander Kogan, a resident of
Miami Beach since 1937 died sud-
denly. He was 94 years old and in
good health at the time of his
death.
Before his retirement in 1947,
Mr. Kogan was a society furrier to
the "Carriage Trade." He is sur-
vived by his wife Rose; their sons,
Alexander, Jr. and Michael;
daughters-in-law, Carol and Ta-
tiana, grandchildren, Suzanne,
Eric and Alexandra and a son and
daughter by a former marriage.
Services were held in New York.
AIELLO. RoberU, 52, July 15. Riverside
BOJMAN. Alex, 67, North Mimi Beach.
Levitt-Weinstein.
BRUCKER. Bea, 85, of Miami Beach, July
15. Services in Westchester. N.Y.
GOLDFIELD. Claire R.. July 16. Riverside.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Ftery DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888

MAO<*e'

ie\
*l
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
0
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel. Inc.
I New York: (212)263-7600 Queens BM. 7h Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y.


Pf- 12-B Tn* Jewish FTondnD-Fnckj. Jrfy IS, 1965
Synopsis Of The Week* To rah Portion
tk.
fK< ^JttO
Gse
the
MATTOT

MATTOT VIom zformfc tne irfxsi hnadi nfikg the
lavs caoctrang vows He sent 12.000 armed met 2.00C from
each tribe* 10 war wsh the Mthiarrssa The expecauoc was
aaaassiaM Among those killed was Rasas m The tribea at
Rsubrn and Gad. who had large herd* of cauie. asked to be
allowed to settle on grazing land m TTsasjorbaa Moses
agreed, on rnndkxm that theae trim lead the other tribes
aocroaa the Jordan, and not return to Transjordan rand] all
their brother tries bad been prvsaJed for. Part of the tribe of
lianasaeh pII half of Gflead. and were granted at far
their territory.
Tare* aoes beyomd the Jordan, and three cities as
. Canaan, they $haD be cities of rtfugt"
S^mbers 35.14/.
MASE
MASE The portaon begins with a rlrtaiVri arrnnnt of the
various stations on the Israahtaa' route to the Promised Land,
from the time tney left Egypt until they reached the plains of
Moab. by the Jordan at Jericho. Instructions concerning the
apportionment of the land followed- "And ye snail inhere the
kind by lot according to your familirw to the more ye sbali
give the more mberkance. and to the fewer thou shah give
the leas inheritance, wheresover the lot faTfeth to any man.
that shaD be bis" '.Vumoers 33.54/ It was necessary that ail
the Canaamtes be expelled. "But if ye wiD not drive out the
inhabitant* of the land from before you. then shall those that
ye let remain of them be as thorns in your eyes, and as pricks
n your sides, and they shall harass you in the land wherein
ye dwell" '.Vumbers 3155a The portion gives specific
instructions concerning the boundary lines and bats the names
of the persons who should divide the land. The Israelites are
commanded to set aside 48 cities and surrounding lands for
the Levites. who have not been given territory as the other
tribea were. Reference is made to the cities of refuge where
the accidental murderer might fled for safety. The portion,
and book of Numbers, ends with an injunction prohibiting the
transfer of inherited land from one tribe to another through
hater-tribal marriage.
(The receeaShss eUrn Weakly Parties ef Ste Law is tiiiiX I
i OraaMc HisUri 1 ska JewiaS Harness." aSNaeky P.
. ns, aaSNsaeS ay swaaaaaa The veejeae is at H i
Mew Ysrfe, n.y. leeu. Ataaj* Se>HM is assesses ef mm satiety en-
IDF Planes Bomb Three
Palestinian Terrorist Bases
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) Israel
Defense Force aircraft last v.eek
carried out a bombing raid on
three Palestinian terrorist bases
near the northern Lebanese port
city of Tripoli. Accurate hits were
reported, and all Israeli planes
returned safely to their base, ac-
cording to an IDF spokesman.
Beirut Radio reported large
fires blazing in the targeted areas,
with many casualties. The
Lebanese reports linked the mid-
afternoon air att arks to the
previous day's car-bomb attacks
in the south Lebanon security
zone which killed 10 Lebanese
civilians and two soldiers of the
Israeli-backed South Lebanon Ar-
my (SLA). Two IDF soldiers were
also wounded in the suicide car
bombing attacks.
SUICIDE DRIVERS of bomb
iaden vehicles have till now all
oeen Shiite Moslems while the
members of the terrorist
organizations whose bases were
raided are usually Palestinians.
There has been, however, an in-
crease in recent weeks in the
number of terrorist attempts in-
side Israel and the West Bank and
Gaza Strip. The targets of the
raids were described by the IDF
spokesman as two terrorist bases
near N'ahr El Baida. some nine
kilometers northeast of Tripoli.
occupied by the faction of the
Palestine Liberation Organization
headed by Abu Mussa.
The target, consisting of a
series of one-story structures,
housed the headquarters of the
Abu Mussa faction and served as
the staging point for its members
going on terrorist raids. The other
target, t-vo kilometers northeast
of Tripoli, was described as a base
for the Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine-Generai
Command, led by Ahmed Jibril.
U.S. Should Move
Embassy To Jerusalem
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHIGTON (JTA) -
Evangelicals believe that the
United States should move its
Israel Embassy from Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem, according to Dr. Pat
Robertson, president of the Chris-
tian Broadcasting Network.
"Tel Aviv is not the capital of
Israel," he told 250 college
students attending the summer
seminars series sponsored by the
Political Leadership Development
Program of the America-Israel
Public Affairs Committee
AIPAC) here. "Jerusalem is the
rapital of Israel, arid has been all
the way back Xx> King Solomon."
ROBERTSON, who hosts the
television show, "The 700 Clui
-aid that evangelicals
acknowledge "the claim ot Israel
to the land, the integrity of the
State of Israel, the right to exist
in security in secure borders, but
we believe especially in
Jerusalem."
Noting that "in a spiritual
sense, I consider Jerusalem my
home," Robertson stressed that
"I don't see Jerusalem as an inter-
national city. I think that
Jerusalem should be under
Israel."
Robertson said the United
States mmust always stand with
Israel. "We pray that this nation
won't exchange principle, the
deeply-held principles that unite
our people together, for the expe-
diency of cheap available oil, or
for vacations free from terrorist
attacks," he declared.
Dole Urges
Freedom For
Soviet Jews
WASHINGTON Kansas Sen.
Boo Dose, i Rep. > atmg possible
mmltmMm ;',- jaansaasaj -*.a
oocs with :he new Soviet Umon
leader ship sees this as a ripe taw
for Piesaient Reagan to work for
the freedom of imprisoned Jews
and other dissidents in the USSR
As a result. Majority Leader
Dole this week introduced a new
Joint Resurulksi in the Senate
supporting United Stages efforts
m urging the release cf Anatcfv
Sharansky and "'aii other
prisoners of conseierxe" and
"long-term lefuwirwn,
Sen. Dole, introducing the
-.. sA.a. W;:- :r.e
laaaVafSior. ::" a. r.:.- tatB
Has '-* BssasMa1 awaajaa aSaBSaea
President Reagan and Genera:
Secretary (MutbaCi Gorbachev
Altr tius year
we w-3 see ar. jr.proveinent m the
status of Soviet Jews. Tbetr Tea:-
ment has InstoneaQy Deer. "Upgrad-
ed when retataocs between :he
superpowers are Jess nestle."
He continued. "I offer das
resolution as a plea to the Soviet
goverment and as a retr.imVr that
Americans are a peopie who ass*
strong romps warm for the op-
pressed, undying love for freedcer
and an unwavering intolerance of
the deprivation of basic God-grsee
rights.
Sen. Dole noted that the kssue of
Soviet Jewry is "mextricsbry link-
ed to the resolution of other issues
confronting our two nations. It re-
mains high on our agenda and
I am optimistic the rime is ripe for
a renewed dialogue on the
question."
Dole's resolution. S.J. Res. 161.
calls for the release of Sharansky.
Yosef Begun. Ida Nudel. \ladnnir
Slepak and thousands of others
who be said continue "to be kept
in the So%Tet Union against their
will." undergoing "great suffer-
ing and "harassment."
The resolution is similar to one
introduced in the U.S. House and
passed there as an amendment to
the foreign aid bill.
Beth Torah
Religious School
To Satellite
The Harold Wolk Religious
School of Beth Torah announces
satellite Hebrew School classes
will be held at Highland Oaks
Elementary School during the
1985-1986 school year. These
special classes for children ages
8-11 will be held in addition to
those which meet at Beth Torah's
main Benny Rok Campus.
Mrs. Schwartzberg, Educa-
tional Director of the Religious
School explained that. "As our
school population continues to
grow, we have felt the need to ex-
pand our facilities to meet the
needs of the community. Our goal
is to facilitate those skills which
will ultimately enable students to
serve as educated, active
members of the adult
community."
Hadassah Games Day
The Aliyah Chapter of
Hadassah will be having their an-
nual "Action in August" games
day on Thursday. Aug. 8 at 9:30
am at the Kendale Lakes Coun-
try Club. Highlighting the event
will be a continental breakfast and
luncheon.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:56 p.m.
AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Oar deal Drive
47-143S
Cantor Ian AApam
TUSSLE BETH AM
5*50 N. Kendea Dr.
S.I
Dr. Herbert I
BETH DAVID S.w 3rd-.
Slll!Slk>l'
>St*IMIa ,SS H
'utlSu>
: BETH-EL OF MOUTH BAY
Eta in n
BETHKOOESH
1101 S.W. 12 Am
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joseph Kriaasi
Hose Berttrt Executive
85*4334
Secretary
'*"" s- ix
TEMPLE EMAMU-EL
1701 Wi
.Cantor
- KJstn. Mtaei Director
I TastX bateswa* Uractor
*s<.
MtlaM'Sl.1
c***
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Ptnetras Drtva. MUm> Beach
532-4421
Cantor, Rabbi Sotomon ScMH
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ot<
137 N.E. 191tt St_ Miami. 573-5300
N. Kendall Dr 505-5055
Rabbi Haass* Bamat
DonaMPCasrvnwi
Q.Bomsteln
F rwttaSaVkn
Executes Dwsctor Phttp S Gc*Nn
i.awu
[TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Btd. Reform
Coral QibIsi 667 5867
B. OaanalaL Rabbi
i'i"
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St.. N. Miami, FL 33161
01-5606 Conaarvanve
Dr. rsrsei Jacobs. Rabbi _
Moans Frtadssr. Cantor (\
Dr. Joseph A. Oorrlnast. %'
"DO* EflMfttUS
Inrtng Jaret Exacutrts Dsractor
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Avs.. MB. FL 33130
TeL 53*4112
Rabbi Dr. Jahuda Msfcsr
Cantor Nissim Benyammi
oramieii
S*oo mntem 5 ml
^jjjwjjjjOjt.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W. 120m Street
238-2001 .-R.
Rabbi David H. Auerbech .-'
Cantor Howard Bandar
Cantor Saul
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tal 5344776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Shoahanah Raab. Cantor
fntmj mn*M T JO pm
smre, .s-SOW-
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abrsmowiu ^^
Cantor Murray Yatnsh ($ \
SmngMractdin ''"
Fnd km sesessa
a-Maaa
Sjlurttn m mne 7 45 5 -
TEMPLE NERTAJWD 666-6345
7902 Carlyle Ae.. 866 9833
Miami Beech 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovftz otnntm
Cantor Edward Klein .,-.
IMirKMllKMIIOp- -^
Saturday anteml4Sin
fnamy Ewwi at aoo pjn
Salufflay SeaSej at IKi m
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave.6 41st St 538-7231
os.ifONiciwNaw.uaai ____
MASSY JOIT. AUXMJAirr RASSI iSSSS
**. 0. CAMJUt. ASSSTANT RASSJ
CANTOS DAVIO CONVISai
fn*i reseat asm Mass mi *****
Saluraay 104S am
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Bf*d.
Or. Max A Upschttz. Rabbi
Randall Konejaburg, AssL Rabbi
Zvse Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L Brown, Exec. Director
OlilTw>K?li SMpm /
Satufda, SSI am. and 7 30p.m I
Sunday S a.m., i x p m
i
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave
Dow Rozertcwaig. Rabbi
SHAARAY TEF1LLAH
of Norm Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St
Norm Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARE TERLLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ave. 75 St.. 382-3343
Rabbi Warren Kasztl eodan. c^o*a
Fnday aaracaa 7 1S p m
Saturday S0 am. and mini
baiaraadon
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 AM.
North Deds's Reform tonontpation
Rakph P. Kingsiey. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkee. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Fttavf
SaxI
fclSp.m
llftJOa-m
TEMPLE ZK>N ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 /SJ-ft
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi I 3f?J
Benjamin Adler, Cantor ->
David Rosenthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Minyan umen 7 00 a m. Son JJ*f'
rndmytrnc^mpm SaBbaiw '
fnx* Ta.Hor cnapal Onao'o'o"0"
Saturday O0 am Saoba^ ".>
Ta.lla< Ctujpa)
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