The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02944

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
V
"Jewislb IFloridlia-jni
Volume 58 Number 27
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, July 5,1985
fn4 cm By Mail I 35
Price 50 Cents
At the 1985 National Jewish Book Awards
cerenumy, Blu Greenberg (left), president of
the JWB Book Council, chats with award-
winning authors, David Wyman, for 'The
Abandonment of the Jews: America and the
Holocaust 1941-19*5' (Pantheon), and Joan
Peters, for 'From Time Immemorial: The
Origins of the ArabJewish Conflict Over
Palestine' (Harper & Row).
Midstream Maelstrom
Writer Alleges Pope Is A 'Marxist;'
Assassination Attempt Was 'Coverup'
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) A
controversy over an article
*"\i the World Zionist
Organization's magazine
Midstream, which sug-
gested that the attempt on
the life of Pope John Paul II
was part of a KGB plot to
"camouflage" his Marxist
leanings, is developing into
a bitter battle between the
magazine's editor, who
wrote the article, and a
longtime member of its
editorial board.
Rabbi Arthur, Hertzberg, an
editorial board member for 10
years, said in an interview that
the article could only serve to
damage Christian-Jewish rela-
tions, "making the process of
^negotiations and discussion bet-
en the Roman Catholic Church
bid the Jewish community more
iifficult."
HE DESCRIBED the article U
rd," and accused Midstream
An indispensable element
in the Pope's espousal of
implicit Marxism is
obviously the need for
camouflage .'
Joel Carmichael
editor Joel Carmichael of editorial
irresponsibility, a view that is ap-
parently shared by Milton Kon-
vitz, chairman of the editorial
board. "The question is not
editorial freedom, but editorial
responsibility," Konvitz said.
Hertzberg, a vice president of
the World Jewish Congress and
former president of the American
Jewish Congress, repeatedly em-
phasized in the interview that this
is not an ideological battle or a
personal confrontation between
the rightwing Carmichael and
Hertzberg, who describes himself
as being on the left of the political
scale.
But Carmichael has retorted
angrily, charging in an interview
that Hertzberg was responsible
for the controversy and that he
had sought out the New York
Times as a springboard for bring-
ing the controversy to pro-
minence. Carmichael also has
charged that Hertzberg is seeking
his removal from the magazine, a
post he has held for 10 years.
Continued on Page 9 A
Israel Lets
300 Go, Rest
In Few Weeks
By GIL SEDAN And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) The 10-member Inner
Cabinet has approved the release of 300 of the 735 Shiite
Moslems held prisoner in the Atlit detention camp, Israel
Radio reported. There was no official statement by the In-
ner Cabinet which consists of five Labor and five Likud
senior ministers.
ISRAEL HAS insisted repeatedly over the past two
weeks that its planned, phased release of the Shiites, cap-
tured in Lebanon, was in no way linked to the American
hostage crisis in Beirut. According to officials here, the 300
Shiites would have been freed earlier had it not been for the
hijacking of TWA Flight 847 on June 14 and the taking of
hostages. The 39 American hostages were released
Sunday.
It is assumed that the remaining 450 Shiite detainees
will be sent back to Lebanon during the next few weeks.
THE OFFICIAL line in both Jerusalem and
Washington is that no "deal" or promises were made to the
hijackers for the release of the Americans. Premier Shimon
Peres Monday praised President Reagan for his handling of
the hostage crisis.
He said he was very happy to learn that the Americans
had left the "uncertain land" of Lebanon. He added that
the danger of terrorism would continue to be confronted in
a determined manner.
Leaders Assured
There Was No Pressure
From Washington
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An official of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Ma-
jor American Jewish
Organizations said Sunday
that the Reagan Ad-
ministration did not exert
pressure on American Jews
to press Israel to release the
same 700 Shiites held at the
Atlit prison camp.
"There was no government
pressure on American .lews to
pressure Israel," said Yehuda
Hellman. executive vice president
of the Presidents Conference.
"And there was no pressure of
American Jews on Israel whether
government inspired or
autonomously inspired."
Hellman was responding to an
inquiry from the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency about a
Continued on Page 3-A
Nation on Strike
Prices Going Up in Attempt To Beat Inflation
HUSALEM (JTA)-
rhe Cabinet adopted an
mergeney economic pro-
gram Monday, the im-
mediate effects of which will
be soaring prices for most
nsumer goods and reduc-
"mpensation for
workers.
Opposition by Histadrut was in-
stantaneous. The powerful trade
union federation called a 24-hour
general strike Tuesday that vir-
tually paralyzed the country.
Histadrut leaders charged that
the new measures will create
severe hardships for wage
earners but only minor inconve-
nience for the well-to-do.
THE ECONOMIC program is
essentially the work of Finance
Minister Yitzhak Modai. He had
determined support from Premier
Shimon Peres who kept his
('abmet in session all day Sunday
and into the early hours of Mon-
day morning until the program
was adopted by a majority but far
from unanimous vote. Peres
hinted he would resign if it were
not adopted.
Opposition to it cut across party
lines. Seven Likud ministers
voted against the program pro-
Continued on Page 10 A
Yehuda Hellman
/


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, July 5, 1985______
Ex-Mossad Chief
Harel Refuses Verdict Mengele Died in Brazil
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Isser Harel, who as former
head of the Mossad was in-
strumental in the capture of
Nazi war criminal Adolph
Eichmann in 1961, insisted
here that the Auschwitz
death camp Doctor Josef
Mengele is still alive despite
the conclusions of a report
issued in Brazil that a
skeleton exhumed from a
graveyard there was un-
questionably that of
Mengele.
There was no official govern-
ment response. But a Justice
Ministry spokesman said Israel
was waiting to review the report
of forensic experts involved in the
investigation. Israel police force's
top Naii-hunter, Menachem
Russak, said in Brazil that he
agreed with the findings of the
experts.
The Simon Wiesenthal Center
in Los Angeles, meanwhile, said
in a statement that they agreed
with "reasonable scientific cer-
tainty" that the remains found in
the cemetery in Embu, Brazil
were those of Mengele. the so-
called "Angel of Death," and chief
physician at Auschwitz where he
conducted inhumane medical ex-
periments on camp inmates.
THE REPORT issued in Sao
Paulo by a team of international
forensic experts from the United
States, Brazil and West Germany
concluded that the bones exhumed
from the graveyard were those of
Mengele. The American delega-
tion issued a separate report con-
cluding that the bones were those
of Mengele "within a reasonable
scientific certainty."
Fewer Israelis
Go Abroad
JERUSALEM (WNS) The
economic crisis seems to have its
effect as less Israelis are going
abroad. Some 42,000 Israelis left
Israel in May, a drop of 22 percent
compared to the same period last
year. This drop was recorded even
before the doubling of the travel
tax to $300 at the end of May. It is
likely that the statistics for June
will show an even larger drop.
The U.S. Justice Department
has said that it supports the con-
clusions of the international group
of experts. "Based on the infor-
mation available from the forensic
examination, these experts have
concluded that the body exhumed
by Brazilian authorities is in fact
Josef Mengele.
"Representatives of the United
States government took part in
the examination of the remains
and concur in the conclusion. It is
my sincere hope that this will be
the final chapter in a tragic and
horrible part of world history. We
should never forget the horrible
crimes." Attorney General Edwin
Meese III said in a statement
issued in Washington.
THE EXPERTS told a news
conference that their evidence
was not based on one test but on
an overwhelming accumulation of
data and the tact that all the
evidence was consistent with the
assumption that the body was that
of Mengele. One test involved
comparison photos of the exhum-
ed skull with other pictures of the
Nazi war criminal.
Furthermore, beyond the skull
comparison and a comparison of
other areas such as the eyes,
mouth, nose and chin, there was
the fact that the tests discovered
that the bones were of a white
male of medium build between 64
and 74 years of age. The height
was that of a man in life calculated
at 174 centimeters or about 5 feet.
10 inches. Mengele's SS file listed
his height as 175 centimeters. The
body was also right-handed, as
was Mengele.
The experts indicated that den-
tal tests failed to provide con-
clusive evidence that the body was
that of Mengele. although
reconstruction of the jaw and
teeth concluded that the body
found in the grave had a wide
space between the upper incisors
an unusually wide gap that was
one of Mengele's distinctive facial
features.
NEVERTHELESS. Harel of
the Mossad recently told a Voice
of Israel interview that he was not
convinced the exhumed body was
that of Mengele and suggested
that the great effort being ex-
pended to prove that Mengele was
dead was a sure sign that he was
still alive.
Harel asked why the Mengele
family did not come forward to
tell the world that the war
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criminal had died in 1979 when
pathologists could have easily pro-
ven the dead man was in fact
Mengele. He also asked why did
they decide to confirm the elder
Mengele's death at this time, let-
ting Jews and other Nazi-hunters
search in vain for Mengele.
The report brought to a conclu-
sion two weeks of intense in-
vestigatory efforts and tests by
experts of the body found in Em-
bu under a grave of Wolfgang
Gerhard, the identity that
Mengele is said to have assumed
in 1975 while living in and around
Sao Paulo, sheltered for many
years by two couples. Notebooks
and letters said to have been
Mengele's have been found and
handwriting experts confirmed
that they were authentic. Mengele
drowned at a beach near Sao
Paulo on Feb. 7,1979 at the age of
nearly 68.
HAREL SAID in the interview
that he believed efforts to create
an impression that Mengele had
died were caused by recent
reawakenings of public interest in
Mengele, particularly the recent
public trial in Jerusalem.
He said that stories of an inter-
national conspiracy of Nazi war
criminals are a great exaggera-
tion. They tend to live in isolation
in Latin America, he said, in close-
ly guarded homes. "You don't
need an international conspiracy
to make it hard to catch them," he
said. "A local one is sufficient."
Brooklyn District Attorney
Elizabeth Holtzman said that she
is satisfied with reports that
Auschwitz death camp Doctor
Josef Mengele is dead, but warned
that "many other Nazi war
criminals are still alive, both her
and abroad, and the world must
not rest until they are brought t
justice."
Holtzman. who as a member of
Congress until 1980, was in
strumental in getting the Justice
Department to track down Nazi
war criminals living in the U.S.,
referred in her statement u>
possibly conclusive evidence that
a body exhumed in Brazil is the re
mains of Mengele who reportedly
drowned in 1979.
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FAJ**U-. !
I Leaders Assured
I ^ There Was No U.S. Pressure on Israel
Friday, Jul^ 5. 1985/The Jewish Florjdian Page 3-A
Continued from Page 1 A
Washington Post report in which
an unidentified "well informed
White House official" was quoted
as suggesting that American Jews
pressure Israeli Premier Shimon
Peres to release the Shiite de-
tainees it holds in order to
facilitate the release of the
American hostages in Beirut.
"WE FIGURE that Peres can
read our minds." the official was
quoted as saying. "Peres knows
what is happening here. He can
understand the delicacy of the
situation." The official was also
quoted as saying that "certainly
there are enough people over here
of the Jewish faith who can read
. who must be telling people
over there (in Israel) 'for God's
sake, look what you're doing to
public opinion' in the United
States.
Jewish leaders here were clearly
concerned that Israel's position on
the release of the Shiite detainees
could result in a backlash of anti-
Israel or anti-Jewish sentiments.
A Washington Post-ABC News
poll last week suggested that
American public support of Israel
might be weakening due to the im-
passe over the hostage drama.
Nonetheless, the Washington
Post quoted a senior White House
offical over the weekend as
describing the words of his col-
league as an "unfortunate
remark." but he did not elaborate.
The Post also reported that
representatives of some six
leading American Jewish groups
had been contacted by the White
House and assured that the White
House official's comment does not
reflect the views of the President.
This however could not be in-
dependently confirmed at press
time.
REAGAN HAS during the
hostage drama repeatedly assured
Israel that it will not ask
Jerusalem to bow to the demands
of the hijackers and release the
Shiite detainees. In fact, Reagan,
in response to a reporter's ques-
tion in Chicago, said he would not
ask Israel to give into the
demands of the hijackers.
"I only know that none of us,
any country, can afford to pay ter-
rorists for crimes that they're
committing because that will only
lead to more crime." Reagan said.
Taba Issue Makes Split
In Unity Gov't. More Certain
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Deep divisions between the
Labor and Likud partners in
the national unity coalition
government have become
more pronounced, leading
to speculation that its days
are numbered.
The present cleavage is over
how to approach a settlement with
Egypt on the Taba issue, the tiny
strip of beach south of Eilat which
both countries claim. Deputy
Premier and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir, the Likud leader,
is sharply at odds with Premier
Shimon Peres who believes a solu-
tion of the Taba dispute is the key
to an overall rapprochment with
Egypt and eventual peace talks
with Israel's other neighbors.
SHAMIR MADE his position
Wear in a hard-line speech to the
Jewish Agency Assembly here
He accused Egypt of trying to
ivoid repairing relations with
Israel. He blasted King Hussein of
Jordan for "radicalizing" his own
: OSJtioM OH negotiations.
iVres is prepared to accede to
>pt's demand that the Taba
dispute !* put to arbitration.
>'hamir insists that conciliation
must be the first step, with .ir
i it ration only a last resort.
Moreover. Shamir maintains that
:he economic crisis should l>e the
p'vernment's top priority and
nfal can wait.
I-ast week the Inner Cabinet
five Labor and five Likud
ministers deadlocked on a mo-
tion to follow the course on Taba
recommended by Peres. A tie vote
kills the motion. Peres and Shamir
met privately afterwards but were
unable to resolve their dif-
ferences. They agreed to meet
again in a few days.
SOURCES CLOSE to Peres
Jf the Premier regards a settle-
ment with Egypt both crucial and
timely and will not allow himself
to be neutralized in the manage-
ment of foreign policy. The
sources said he is not ready to
precipitate a crisis with Likud at
this time but is prepared for a
showdown if his efforts to reach
an agreement with Shamir fail.
Peres believes he has good
reason to expect that flexibility on
Taba an agreement in principle
to go into arbitration will lead
to a summit meeting between
himself and President Hosni
Mubarak of Egypt. If his inter-
pretation of signals from Cairo is
correct, the meeting will result in
a package deal encompassing all
oustanding differences between
the two countries including nor-
malization of relations and the
return of the Egyptian Am-
bassador to Tel Aviv.
Sources here recalled that
Shamir himself had always in-
sisted that the Taba dispute be
settled in the context of an overall
package.
THEY SAY the Egyptians are
showing signs that they want to
further the process. Trade with
Israel is picking up gradually.
anti-Israel propaganda in the
Egyptian media has become
somewhat less strident recently,
and a long series of bilateral
agreements have been concluded
At a meeting of the Lalnir
Party's Knesset faction. Peres
I rived solid support for his ap-
proach to Egypt, formalized in a
resolution adopted by the faction.
The Presidents Conference,
meanwhile, welcomed Sunday's
release of the 39 American
hostages taken on June 14 when
the TWA flight 847 was hijacked
enroute from Athens to Rome and
said, "It seems clear that the
hostage crisis, far from disturbing
relations between Washington
and Jerusalem, in fact drew them
closer together in common refusal
to surrender to terrorism."
"PRESIDENT Reagan wisely
rejected the terrorists' demands
and refused to pressure Israel to
release the Shiite detainees as
Amal had demanded." the
Presidents Conference said in a
statement issued here. "If there is
any lesson to be learned, it is that
freedom loving countries must
stand together in the war against
terrorism in which they find
themselves the targets."
"During the period ahead, we
believe America and Israel will
work even more closely together
on the common agenda of preven-
ting and punishing terrorism."
the Presidents Conference said.
"The American-Israeli alliance to-
day is stronger than ever."
In Israel. Presidents Con-
ference Chairman Kenneth
Bialkin echoed the statement
issued here that Israel-U.S. rela-
tions had not been damaged by
the hijacking-hostage episode.
"Perhaps at the margwis there
was some difference of view as to
who is trying to get who to blink
first but that's part of the give
and take." Bialkin said.
BIALKIN conceded that there
had been communications pro-
blems early on. but spoke of har-
mony during the later stages of
the crisis. He voiced criticism of
the Reagan Administration for
focusing on its view that Israel's
detention of the Shiites here was
contrary to international law and
thereby centering media attention
on them rather than on the hijack
victims.
He said that if there was an im-
pression of damaged relations in
the media, it was for the Ad-
ministration as well as for the
Jewish leaders to work to repair
them. Bialkin spoke to reporters
after meetings with Premier
Peres and Deputy Premier and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
He added that he hoped the
release of the hostages had been
obtained without an American
pledge not to retaliate. If such a
pledge had been given it ought
not to be considered binding, he
urged.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Ftoridmn/Priday, July 5, 1985
Remembering Hijacking
On Independence Day
Whatever the agonizing details of the
TWA hijacking that occurred on June 14. all
of us are grateful that it has ended happily
for our American hostages when they began
their flight home from Damascus on Sunday.
Except for one American sailor killed by
the terrorists, who dumped his beaten body
out on the runway of the Beirut airport.
This is an agonizing detail that must not
be forgotten, especially now that we are
celebrating our nation's July 4 In-
dependence Day this week.
What will emerge with increasing anguish
during the weeks ahead is that the after-
math of the hijacking must inevitably be
even more of a trial for the American spirit
than the terrorist deed was in the first place.
The Reagan Administration is to be con-
gratulated, with several notable glitches
along the way, for the cool way in which it
handled the crisis. The successful return of
the hostages is that cool's own best reward.
But in the spirit of Independence Day, we
cannot honestly say that we behaved in ex-
emplary fashion in our efforts to bring the
crisis to an end. The clearest example of this
is that, abetted by the miserable media who
with increasing arrogance practice their
loathesome brand of checkbook journalism,
the hostage crisis was turned into a
theatrical presentation and an Israeli rather
than an American problem.
Especially those who encouraged a
grassroots campaign of snide anti-Israel and
anti-Semitic innuendo as the crisis wore on,
suggesting as they did that it was the duty
of American Jews to bring pressure on
Israel to release the 700-odd Smite prisoners
incarcerated at Atlit, did this nation and its
free people litle honor, less justice and no
service whatever.
War on the West
As we see it, what lies ahead is the pro-
bability of growing air travel piracy leveled
against Western civilization generally and
America specifically. Monday's terrorist
bombings in Rome and Madrid already well
illustrate the point and heighten our fears.
For the fact is that, though our hostages
have been returned, the Arab terrorism pro-
ves the point it had in mind from the beginn-
ing: we are a nation unprepared to shout
"Enough!" and to punish the perpetrators.
Those who like the President himself
declare that we can punish only those
responsible for their acts of terrorism and
not "innocent" people into the bargain miss
the point entirely. What will inevitably be
the growing campaign of air terrorism
against us is in fact a war against us, and the
national resolve and national declaration
needed from the United States today re-
quire an acceptance of that fact.
Once accepted, the nation must be
prepared to punish those lands that en-
courage terrorism, finance terrorism, train
terrorists and hide terrorists in their midst
once their acts have been perpetrated.
Short of this, we merely set our country
up for newer and ever more fanciful attacks
upon it, our people and our property.
We may revel in the return of our
hostages this week, but we must also be
determined that hijackings shall not occur
again.
Jewish Florida* r>
oniamirT-iiniiiL.iiiiii nma ph
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No American should ever forget our flag
burned by the terrorists on the runway of
the Beirut airport last weekend in an act of
contemptible defiance on that very same
runway where the body of Robert Dean
Stethem, an American sailor, was dumped
after the terrorists murdered him so
brutally.
No American on Independence Day should
feel comfortable that there were hostages
who shook hands with the terrorists on their
release, and who still speak of the "inten-
tions" of the terrorists as if it were our na-
tion fault that the hijacking occurred in the
first place that, in short, the terrorists
need to be "understood."
There is no understanding terrorism. It is
a major weapon in the arsenal of war being
waged today in the Middle East against
Western civilization as a whole. Those who
fail to see this still have terrible lesson-
ahead to learn.
Leo Mindlin
Amputation May Be U.S. Policy
Friday. July 5, 1985
Volume 58
16TAMUZ5745
Number 27
PRESIDENT Reagan is the
"Great Communicator." But this
is an encomium manufacture*! on
Madison Avenue and circulated b]
its handmaiden, the media, and
the media are dedicated in
America to the exaltation of
mediocrity. In the marketplace, in
which the President places such
great trust, he was an absolute
bust.
Rely on Hollywood, the most
seductive of all of the world's
marketplaces, to make the proper
assessments economic if not
necessarily intellectual or artistic:
there. Mr. Reagan was a country
bumpkin overshadowed by Roy
Rogers and Tom Mix. Anyone of
any intelligence who has heard the
President speak must be put off
by his breathy voice and his
halting delivery a delivery crip-
pled by the fact that he has
nothing to say. The Great Horse
Silver communicated more effec-
tively than he was ever able to
manage.
"GREAT Communicator?" Of
what? He is a sheer blabbermouth,
as the hostage situation in
Lebanon certainly demonstrated.
His unconscionable eruption
against the terrorists last Friday,
in which he called them names
that certainly suit them, never-
theless stalled the hostages'
return. In this, what did the
"Great Communicator" achieve?
The answer is that it achieved
no more and no less than anything
else that results from Mr.
Reagan's blabbermouth erup-
tions. In the end, these eruptions
have shown the President to be a
provocative poseur, full of proper
pompous purpose but endowed
with little capacity to put his ac-
tions where his breathy threats
were voiced.
Even where there are no
threats to be made even when
he permits himself a moment of
lofty principle there is no fibre
of intellectual honesty in it we can
trust. A case in point is his
September. 1982 "peace in-
itiative," which came on the heels
of the Israeli invasion of Lebanon
on the preceding June 6.
IT IS NOT merely that the in-
itiative shows a willful disregard
for the Camp David accord of
1979 and that it proposes to
change the rules long after Israel
has already lived up to the ac-
cord's most painful stipulation
the return to Egypt of the Sinai
Peninsula. What is worse, Mr.
Reagan's formula ignores, on the
basis of sheer State Department
bigotry and media sensationalism,
what had in fact been achieved by
the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in
the first place.
TWO THINGS were achieved:
(1) the destruction and displace-
ment of a PLO infrastructure and
presence in Lebanon so massive
and complex, that not even
Israel's "best friends." among
them the United States, were will-
ing to acknowledge it and still
seem unwilling, even today, to
acknowledge it; (2) Assad of
Syria's stranglehold on that part
of Lebanon not controlled by
Yasir Arafat was finally broken.
Sadly, merely momentarily
broken.
The Israelis had virtually
dessimated Assad's air force, and
they began chasing his ground
units back on the highway toward
Damascus into Syria. But as a
consequence of U.S. State Depart-
ment pressure and the pleas of the
"moderate" Arab leaders in
Washington, joined by those of
our chickenhearted allies in
Europe who had been signatories
in 1980 to the Venice Declaration
the EEC's own lethal attempt
to compromise Camp David
President Reagan began to
pressure Israel to let up on the
beleaguered Syrians.
Above all the French, who know
by first-hand experience a good
deal about the need for it. led the
campaign that Israel must permit
Assad to "save face." It was a
campaign later extended to
Arafat himself not only while
Arafat was being chased from
Beirut by the Israelis, but also
later in Tripoli where he briefly
regrouped and from which in Ux
end he left in defeat as a COnqtK r
ing hem, courtesy of the r
THE RESULT 0* ill this
that. the Israelis reduced thi
pressure on the fleeing Sj
instead of going home, the I
Syrians simply diverted
direction toward the Bekaj
where they are installed todaj
powerful military and political
presence revivified by Assa:
masters, the Kremlin.
So what the "Great I
municator" achieved back at the
end of 1982 was to assure Syria's
control of Lebanon after the
Israelis would finally leave thi-
time undiminished in their power
by any PLO claims to control over
the country, as well. It is precisely
this gnm reality that faces the
United States today. Especially
now, it is a reality not even the
usually ostrich-like State Depart
ment or the Administration can
deny.
Sunday's transfer of the
American hostages to Damascus
before their return home indeed
has as its central meaning the A>
facto recognition of Assad's
primacy in Lebanon. It is a sane
tification of Mr. Reagan's blabber
mouthing after the fact, and a
clear example of why. in this role.
the President is so dangerous.
The danger of the President'i
hideous habit apart, he adds to it a
seamy, dishonest side as well
What does it add to the distinction
of this "Great Communicator"
that he has clearly lied in Mi
repeated assertion that he would
not pressure Israel into giving up
the 700-odd Shiite prisoners at
Atlit in exchange for the
American hostages because that
would be knuckling under to the
hijackers' demands and that it
would serve neither Israel nor the
United States well to do that?
THE FACT is that the pressure
on Israel from Washington to do
just this to knuckle under for
the United States was
unbearable almost from the begin
ning. with ugly anti-Semitic mini
campaigns launched in the always
obliging media to help these cam
paigns on their way.
With all this as background,
what faces America and Israel as
a consequence of the way in which
the President handled the hostage
crisis absolutely boggles the im
agination. The hijackers have
already proved the principle if
proof were needed after the bomb-
ing of our.Embassy in Beirut -
that this nation has little limit to
its capacity to bear national
humiliation just so long as a
"Great Communicator" raves on
about his retaliatory intentions
Continued on Page 9-A
M-7-5as


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Police Gave Rabbis
Tough Time During
Demonstration
By ALLEN MEYEROWITZ
Operation Redemption, the series of mass peaeeful arrests
at Russian diplomatic offices in the United States has
spread trom New York to Washington. Rabbi Allan
Meyerountz Sonet Jewry chairman of the Rabbinical
Assembly. Here, he desscribes his latest experience m this
cause.
Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 6-A
On June 10, 21 rabbis
from around the U.S. raced
to Washington to
demonstrate at the Soviet
Embassy. Our purpose was
clear: to stand in solidarity
with the 24 and one
Lutheran minister arrested
May 1 at that very site, who
faced possible jail sentences
and stiff fines the next day
for their attempt to
demonstrate support and
love for Jews in the USSR.
We came because we felt that
something is inherently wrong
with a judicial system which pro-
secutes rabbis and ministers who
demand freedom for Soviet Jews,
but dismisses the cases of those
gallant people arrested at the
South African Embassy. While we
wholeheartedly support efforts to
end apartheid, we equally detest a
double standard. Jewish suffering
or national aspirations should
never be slighted by official
Washington without a swift, vocal
response.
BUT LITTLE did we realize
that we would become the object
of official indifference to our
cause. The Washington police
were polite, but from the first
meant business. They handcuffed
us from behind. Many of our men
in their 60s continually complain-
ed of the pressure on their
shoulders and chests. They stuff-
ed us into paddy wagons and
drove us 50 miles an hour through
Washington streets, frequently
taking curbs with reckless
al>andon.
Without the use of our hands.
we were spinning like tops, fre-
quently piling up on each other
like linebackers tackling a
fullback. Add to that the heat,
sweat and noxious odor of the
vans exhaust, and we knew we
were not in for VIP treatment.
Our arrival at the police
precinct was friendly enough. One
Jewish policeman first saw us and
exclaimed. "Oh no, they're
persecuting my people again."
But the sergeant meant business.
Too much noise or conversation,
too much of anything would mean
a night or two in jaU, he told us.
Never did he allow us to use a
phone.
WHILE THE Jewish officer
and his friends gave us water and
access to a men's room and candy
machine, the "vacation" part of
our journey was about to end.
Brought to the Washington
Superior Court, we were treated
like any hardened criminal. Little
did it matter that we stopped to
pray mincha
For three hours, we were holed
up in a 40- square foot cage, unable
to use the phone, contact our
lawyer, sit. drink, eat or even use
the bathroom. We felt like tigers
in a cage.
The only break from this
monotony was a body search. The
comb I accidentally left in my
Continued on Page 11 A
In a 'first' in American legislative history. 11,
elected officials, including a Congressman,
are arrested as they stage a sitdoum in front of
the Soviet UN Mission. The action was part of
Operation Redemption, a series of mass
peaceful arrests at USSR facilities in New
York, sponsored by the Student Struggle for
Soviet Jewry and Long Island Committee for
Soviet Jewry. Since January, over SS5 have
been arrested, including 145 rabbis. Among
the legislators removed by the police were Rep.
Major Owens of New York and New Jersey
Assembly Speaker Alan Marcher.
Our Aging Population
For Them, Religious Ties Are Important
NEW YORK To what
degree do the elderly iden-
tify with their ethnic and
religious backgrounds? How
important are ethnic factors
in the ability of the elderly
to cope more effectively? To
what extent are the services
now provided in care of the
aged culturally sensitive?
Answers to these and related
questions were supplied by a
group of experts at a Conference
on Ethnicity and Aging at the
Americans Jewish Commitee's In-
stitute on Human Relations. The
meeting was sponsored by AJC's
Center on Ethnicity, Behavior
and Communications, headed by
Joseph Giordano and its Institute
for American Pluralism.
Among the conclusions:
The elderly population of the
United States, the fastest grow-
ing category in the country, is not
a uniform mass. Its members have
widely varied ethnic backgrounds
that must be recognized in pro-
viding for their special needs.
There is increasing recogni-
tion that ethnic and religious
origins have a significant in-
fluence on an individual's sense of
well-being. This is particularly im-
portant for the elderly, who often
look to their cultural background
to help them cope with the stress
of aging.
REPORTING ON his study of
75 Jewish elderly in the Boston
area, entitled "Ethnic Identity
and Psychological Adjustment to
Old Age: A Jewish Case Study,"
Dr. Jack M. Saul, a prominent
psychologist, stated that social in-
volvement that was ethnically
oriented was related to greater
life satisfaction and higher self-
esteem.
In contrast, he added, "social
activity and activity in general
showed little relation to these
measures of psychological adjust-
ment, indicating that it was the
ethnic aspect which was the
Continued on Pag* 11-A
Kissinger Warned Nixon
Existence of Israel Is Not At the Center of Intense Arab Radicalism
By KENNETH JACOBSON
In the first volume of his
memoirs, Henry Kissinger
reported giving President
Nixon a memorandum in
Dr. Kissinger
which he explained the roots
of Arab radicalism. The
Kissinger memorandum
dismissed the idea that any
specific action by Israel is
critical in determining Arab
radicalism.
Rather, he said, Arab
radicalism stems from the fierce
conflict between tradition and
modernity, secularism and
religion, the West versus the
East. He in effect said that even if
Israel did not exist or had the
most conciliatory policy im-
aginable, Arab and Middle East
radicalism would be alive and
well.
And, Kissinger noted, if the
United States is to maintain a con-
structive policy to combat Arab
radicals, towin over the would-be
moderates to our side, to weaken
the Soviets who are the main
beneficiaries as well as catalysts
of radical activity, then it is
crucial to understand the pro-
found roots of radicalism in Mid-
dle East life.
KISSINGER'S incisive
memorandum comes to mind as
America grapples once again with
the aftermath of the dilemmas
thrust upon it by the fanaticism of
Middle East radicalism with the
just-resolved hostage crisis in
Kenneth Jacobson is director
of the Middle Eastern Affairs
Department of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith.
Beirut. Not to say that there are
any easy solutions.
As President Reagan is painful-
ly learning, the United States can
have the most resolute intentions.
But when faced with the decision
to satisfy those ideological
prescriptions with the immediate
risk to American life, it is quite a
different matter. As galling as it
must be to the Preseident to be
compared in his handling of the
crisis to his predecessor, the com-
parison is unmistakable. And
what one of us, thrown into the
same position, would act
differently?
Indeed, the State of Israel,
which has been repeatedly cited
by those such as Secretary of
State Shultz as the model for the
Western world in its no-nonsense
dealing with terrorists, recently
gave up 1,000 prisoners, including
terrorists. It had determined after
a year of trying that there was no
other way to save the lives of
three Israeli soldiers who were be-
ing held as prisoners of war.
WHAT Kissinger said to Presi-
Nizon some years ago pro-
President Nixon
vides the framework of
understanding. There is a great
deal of attention being focused on
the hijackers' demand that Israel
free the 700 Shiite prisoners. And,
indeed, ultimately that has proved
be the key to resolving the pro-
blem. But make no mistake about
it: that was not the cause of the hi-
jack and it was not truly the main
goal or achievement by the Shiite
hijackers.
Let us recall that Israel had an-
nounced that it was going to free
the Shiite prisoners prior to the hi-
jacking and that it had already
freed a number.
If the aim of the hijackers had
simply been to rescue their
brethren, all they had to do was
wait a few more days. But. as
Kissinger wrote, to look to any
specific action by Israel dr the
U.S. as a cause of Arab and
Islamic radicalism is to misunders-
tand it.
INSTEAD, the Shiite hijackers
are inspired by the Ayatollah Kho-
meini, by the series of anti-
Western, anti-American violent
incidents beginning with the
hostage crisis in Teheran in
1979-80, followed up by the series
of attacks on U.S. Marines. They
are trying to prove to all in the
Middle East that the future is
theirs that the West, the U.S.,
Judeo-Christian civilization,
capitalism are all impotent in
the face of Arab and Islamic
Continued on Page 11 A
Lesson must be learned in
today's world of terrorism.


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, July 5, 1986 ____
^^ i i i' i i "
'Devastating'Decisions
High Court Upholds Separation Rule
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) A
Jewish expert on legal
issues affecting observant
Jews described as
"devastating" two decisions
of the U.S. Supreme Court
Monday both by 5-4 votes,
holding unconstitutional
two programs by which, at
public expense, remedial
educational services had
been brought to pupils of all-
day religious schools on the
premises of the schools.
The majority ruling held in both
cases that "even a praiseworthy,
secular purpose of providing for
the education of school children
cannot validate government aid to
parochial schools when the aid has
the effect of promoting a single
Teachers
On Strike
Year's End
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israeli school year ended Sunday
in the heat of labor strife which
has plagued it for the last few
months and could affect the
resumption of classes when the
summer vacation period is over.
Elementary school teachers,
members of a Histadrut union,
were on strike, forcing the schools
to close. They said they would
engage in partial work stoppages
until last Friday and another full
strike on Sunday, the last day of
school. High schools were not af-
fected. Their teachers belong to a
rival union independent of
Histadrut.
The teachers' action means that
pupils in the lower grades will end
the term without their certificates
of completion. The teachers said
they will not participate in
preparations for the next school
year. One issue is the dismissal
notices the Education Ministry
sent to more than 1,000 non-
tenured teachers. They have not
been rescinded.
The Ministry said they were
forced by budgetary constraints
and maintained that they could
have been avoided had the
teachers' union agreed to forego
part of their salary and working
conditions demands for one year.
religion or religion generally or
when the aid unduly entangles the
government in matters religious."
The general decision was that the
programs have the principal effect
of advancing religion in violation
of the Constitution.
DENNIS RAPPS. executive
director of the National Jewish
Commission on Law and Public
Affairs (COLPA), which had filed
friends-of-the court briefs in both
cases, said the Supreme Court had
upheld decisions of federal Courts
of Appeal in the Second and Sixth
Circuits. The briefs were prepared
by Nathan Lewin of Washington.
COLPA vice president.
In one case, the Second Court of
Appeals had invalidated a pro-
gram under Title 1 of the Federal
Elementary and Secondary
Education Act of 1965. Under
that program, the federal govern-
ment provided funding for local
public school boards to arrange
remedial mathematics and
reading courses to all
educationally-deprived children in
low income areas.
As part of the Title I program,
the school boards provided public
school teachers to teach the
remedial classes at the parochial
schools, including yeshivas, in the
same way that such services were
provided to public school children.
Under this arrangement, public
school teachers taught the
remedial courses on the premises
of the non-public school.
RAPPS SAID that, although
there had been no evidence, in the
nearly 20-year history of the pro-
gram, of any mingling the con-
tents of the religious programs of
such schools with the Federally-
funded remedial programs, the
Supreme Court accepted the Cir-
cuit Court of Appeals ruling that
the mere potential of such mingl-
ing rendered the entire program
unconstitutional.
He said the effect of the in-
validation of TiUe I will be severe
for children attending Jewish
religious schools. He said it ap-
peared, in the light of the
Supreme Court rulings Monday,
that the only constitutional
method of providing the federally-
funded remedial services by public
school teachers would be off the
premises of the religious school.
Rapps said this would mean that
the non-public school students
would have to be transported to a
neutral or public school site to
receive the remedial teaching dur-
ing the school day or after hours.
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HE POINTED out that, since
transportation is extremely time-
consuming, this did not appear to
be a viable option, adding that the
students would hesitate to leave
their regular classes in the non-
public school during the regular
school day. Since most such
students currently attend classes
until around 5:30 p.m., remedial
programs could not realistically be
scheduled after that hour, he said.
In addition, he asserted, the
cost of transporting the students
to such neutral sites have been
estimated as involving about 40
percent of the total allocation of
federal funds for the remedial
services.
In a parallel case in Grand
Rapids, Michigan, Rapps
reported, the impact on Jewish
religious schools is indirect
because no students in Grand
Rapids parochial schools had been
directly benefitted by the
remedial programs under Title I.
Also there appear to be no Jewish
day schools in Grand Rapids.
NEVERTHELESS, COLPA
intervened in that case on the
premise that the principle of
whether supplementary publicly-
financed educational programs
may be conducted under the con-
trol of public school personnel is of
major importance to observant
Jews, Rapps said.
He explained that if non-Jewish
private schools are denied that
benefits of such federally-financed
programs, they are effectively ex-
cluded from such help from educa-
tional benefits offered to the rest
of the student population, because
of the religious beliefs of the
parents of non-public school
students.
He said that in the Grand
Rapids program, enrichment pro-
grams for mathematics, reading,
art, music and physical education
were provided to non-public
school students on parts of the
public school premises set aside
for the time needed to implement
the aid programs. Rapps said
COLPA had filed friend-of-the
court brief8 in both cases on
behalf of major national Orthodox
organizations.
Ali Speaks
For Shiites
At Atlit
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
700-odd Shim- Moslem prisoners
in the Atlit detention camp have a
real champion. He is Muhammad
Ali, who held the world
heavyweight boxing title from
196447 and 1974-78.
Ali arrived in Israel last week
"to arrange for the freeing of the
Muslim brothers imprisoned by
Israel." He said he would be
discussing the release of "all 700
brothers" with the "very highest
level in the country."
But Israeli officials have politely
declined to enter the ring. Israel
does not intend to negotiate
through boxing champion Muham-
med Ali but will welcome him
warmly as a private guest, a
Foreign Ministry spokesman said.
He said certain preparations
have been made to make Ali's stay
in the country as pleasant as
possible but did not elaborate. The
former champ was expected to be
received by Deputy Foreign
Minister Ronnie Milo, a Likud
MK, but no other official meetings
have been scheduled for him.
Asked at the airport if he would
also try to obtain the release of
the American hostages held by
Shiites in Beirut. Ali replied, "I
didn't come here for that."
Dr. Jay S. Sky lev, associate professor of med%eine and pedutinr,*
and associate director of the Diabetes Research Institute at th>
University of Miami School of Medicine, is the recipient ofth*
1985 Distinguished Achievement Award from the American
Society of Contemporary Medicine and Surgery 'for his
distinguished contribution in the field of diabetes mdiitui
Presenting the award is ASCMS President Dr. Michael E
DeBakery. president of Baylor Medical College, while ASCMS
Chairman Dr. Leon O Jacobson. emeritus dean of the Unxtrr
of Chicago, looks on.
Plea for Jewish Czech Cemeteries
cording to Rabbi Moshe Sherer.
president of Agudath Israel of
America. The appeal was made to
Suja by a Jewish delegation which
met with the envoy in the Cnrh
embassy.
WASHINGTON (WNS) -
Ambassador Stanislav Suja of
Czechoslovakia has been asked to
intervene with Csech officials to
assure the preservation of Jewish
cemeteries i Czechoslovakia, ac-
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*


V. '.-
V
.
Bereaved Parents Stunned
Told Accident Was God's Decision
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Rapidly escalating religious-
secular tensions in Israel
which have politicians and
sociologists worried were
further inflamed last week
when an Orthodox Cabinet
Minister claimed the deaths
of 19 Petach Tikva school
children in a train-bus colli-
sion was an act of divine
retribution for Sabbath
desecrations in Petach
Tikva.
The remark by Interior
Minister Yitzhak Peretz of the
tiny Shas Party brought im-
mediate demands for his ouster
from the bereaved parents. It will
be the subject of a parliamentary
question to which Premier Shimon
Peres will have to reply in the
Knesset. It has been denounced
not only by political figures of left
and right but by many rabbis and
religious scholars.
PERETZS LINKAGE of a
tragic accident to divine wrath
was backed by the Shas Party's
spiritual mentor, the aged Rabbi
Eliezer Shach. head of the
Ponevezh yeshiva in Bnei Brak.
who said Peretz spoke as a rabbi,
not a government minister.
But Rabbi Yiarael Lau. Chief
Rabbi of Netanya, admonished his
Orthodox colleague. No one can
know the workings of divine
justice he said. Prof. Ephraim Ur-
bach, an eminent Talmudist who
heads Israel's prestigious
Academy of Sciences, spoke
Conservative Asks End to Plan
To Give 'Mixed' Father Parent Role
MINNEAPOLIS (JTA)
Reform rabbis were urg-
ed here at their 96th annual
convention by a leading
Conservative rabbi to drop
their plan on recognizing
both the mother and father
in a mixed marriage as
parents of a Jewish child.
The Reform rabbis were asked
by Rabbi Alexander Shapiro,
president of the Rabbinical
Assembly, the association of Con-
servative rabbis, to return to the
traditional Jewish position, ac-
cepted by Orthodox and Conaer
vative Judaism which holds that a
child is a Jew only if his or her
mother is Jewish.
The plan has been called
"patrilineal" transmission of
Jewish identity because it would
not consider whether either the
mother or the father is Jewish, if
cither of them is. Shapiro, in an
unusual appearance at a CCAR
cnnvenUon. cautioned the Reform
rabbis that if "patrilinealism re-
mains in place, then Conservative
rabbis might have to question the
Jewish status of someone from a
sister movement, and we will be
confronted with a cleavage in
Jewish life which can threaten the
survival of the Jewish people both
here and in Israel."
HE SAID, "our understanding
>f the reality is that patrilinealism
is not considered by you to be a
blanket notion; rather it assumes
that the Jewish child will find
modes of affirmation of his
Jewishneas."
Rabbi Jack Stem of Scarsdale.
NY was elected CCAR presi
dent, succeeding Rabbi W. Gun-
ther Plaut. of Toronto.
Shapiro called for Conservative
and Reform Judaism to form a
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joint commission to deal with the
problems of intermarriage "in
those areas where cooperation is
possible."
He said intermarried couples
face many problems, such as basic
tensions in such a union;
educating children Jewishly; the
stress of parents and grand-
parents; and the involvement of
an intermarried couple in the
Jewish community.
Rabbi Shapiro said if such a
commission was set up, he hoped
"it could function under the com-
mon banner of matrilinealism on
the one hand while simultaneously
seeking to reach out to every child
born of a mixed marriage in a con-
text which is open, sympathetic
and deeply understanding of the
human issues that are involved."
HER REPEATED a proposal
he had made at an unprecedented
appearance earlier this year at the
annual convention of the Or-
thodox Rabbinical Council of
America, asking the CCAR to par-
ticipate in establishing a Bet Din
(Jewish Law Court) "that will con-
vert according to Halacha; a Bet
Din created for the sake of the
unity of the people of Israel with a
model prototype structured first
in America and ultimately carried
into effect in Israel itaelf."
He said he was optimistic that,
given patience and time, such a
Bet Din could be established. He
said he felt "cautious optimism"
in the fact that the Rabbinical
Council has not outrightly re-
jected his Bet Din proposal.
scornfully of Peretz's "Toto (foot-
ball pools) theology." He was
referring to the fact that many
Shas voters spend their Sabbath
throwing rocks at people driving
to football matches.
Non-religious personages have
denounced Peretz's remarks as
primitive and unfeeling. The Or-
thodox minister was referring to
the protracted controversy over
the Petach Tikva municipality's
permission to a local cinema to
keep open Friday nights. The
movie house has been the scene of
frequent clashes when religious
zealots have tried by force to keep
patrons from entering the
theater.
THE PETACH Tikva con-
troversy is only one of many in-
volving the right of Israelis to
decide for themselves whether or
not to abide by religious struc-
tures. There have been violent
demonstrations in Tel Aviv for the
past several Saturdays over a
cultural event at the Habima
Theater.
In Haifa, there is a controversy
over whether the recenUy reac-
tivated cable subway ascending
Mt. Carmel will operate on Satur-
days. A bitter dispute in
Jerusalem concerns whether a
municipal seimming pool in the
suburb of Ramot will be open on
Saturdays.
Only a week ago, the Knesset
was thrown into an uproar when a
bill forbidding the raising and
marketing of pork in Israel passed
its first reading. The bill was sup-
ported by the Labor-Likud coali-
tion to appease their religious
coalition partners. Opponents said
the measure was an infringement
on individual rights.
The religious-secular struggle
over whether Orthodox religion
will dominate Israeli life has been
going on since the State was
founded. Sociologists warn it is
heating up now and will polarize
the country.
Birthday Party
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
founder and longtime head of the
America-Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC). I.L. Kenen.
was honored here last week with a
grove planted in his name in the
U.S. Independence Forest near
Jerusalem. Jewish National Fund
Chairman Moshe Rivlin and .INF'
U.S. President Charlotte Jacob-
son were among the many guests
at the ceremony, which marked
Kenen's 80th birthday.
Reaerva Now For The
HIGH HOLY DAYS& SUCCOTH
Traditional Services Will Be Conducted By
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Far Utaartatiaii : 531-5771
Your Hosts. Michael Lefkowltl 4 Al*> Smilow
Friday, July 6, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Reform Rabbis Refuse Plaut's
Plea To Quit Friday Eve Prayers
MINNEAPOLIS (JTA)
- Delegates to the 96th an-
nual convention of the Cen-
tral Conference of
American Rabbis rejected
strongly by a voice vote a
proposal made by the CCAR
president, Rabbi W. Gun-
ther Plaut, that the late Fri-
day evening service, long
established in Reform
Judaism, be eliminated "as
the centerpiece of Reform
religious expression."
The outgoing CCAR president
proposed that Reform rabbis en
courage congregants to observe a
traditional Sabbath dinner at
home on Friday evening and then
attend worship services on Satur
day morning.
MANY OF the delegates ex
pressed vigorous objections to the
idea in a debate following the
Plaut address. When the matter
came to a vote, the strength of the
opposition shocked Plaut so much
that a motion was approved to
refer his proposal, without recom-
mendation, to the CCAR Commit-
tee on Reform Jewish Practices.
In proposing the elimination of
Friday evening service, a Reform
staple for more than 100 years,
Plaut said low attendance at Fri-
day evening services indicated
that "our people are telling us
something by their very absence."
Many of the delegates disputed
Plaut's analysis.
He said he opposed having the
rabbis expend their energy "on
the self-defeating exterprise of
organizing Friday night services
measured not by its intensify of
prayer but by the number who
come to attend it."
HE PREPOSED also that the
synagogue should be redirected
into a "bet midrash" (house of
study) where Jews go to study. He
emphasized that Jews should lead
a life of good deeds and thus the
chief good deed im\t:vnh> is not
"come to the synagogue" but
rather to "lead a Jewish life."
JEWISH
FlMaD
KEREN KAYEMETH LEISRAEL
THE GOLDEN CHAIN OF KEREN DOROT
FORGES A LINK OF LOVE
FROM GENERATION TO GENERATION
Invest in strengthening Jewish Consciousness
and Tradition By Making Available a Minimum
of $1,000. to the Jewish National Fund
Establish a Keren Dorot
1. You designate the recipient who will receive
$100. each year for a period of 10 years for
every $1,000 made available to the JNF
2. You will help restore the land of Israel
through the JNF reclamation project, while
renewing through the years the bonds and
affection with all your loved ones, who will be
the recipients of this magnificent project.
3. Join the Scroll of Honor... be a Pioneer. .
Help restore the wastelands of Israel.
Help build the roads
Help reclaim the land for new settlers
Help the Mitzpim in the Galilee
4. The JNF needs you but you need
the JNF much more
The JNF gives life to the desert
And strength to Israel
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Jewish National Fund
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538-6464


.-*
Serious Criticism Voiced
Of Vatican Notes on Viewing Jews
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) A
Jewish ecumenical group
has vented serious criticism
of a new Vatican document
on Catholic-Jewish relations
published in Rome which it
considers a retrogression
from the historic Nostra
Aetate (Our Times) that
emerged from Vatican
Council II in 1964 and the
December 1 1 974
"Guidelines and Sugges-
tions for the Application of
the Declaration Nostra
Aetate."
The criticism by the Interna-
tional Jewish Committee on Inter-
religious Consultations was more
in regret than anger. It referred
to a document, "Notes on the Cor-
rect Way to Present the Jews and
Judaism in Preaching and
Catechesis in the Roman Catholic
Church."
The Notes, three years in
preparation, are the work of the
Vatican Commission on Religious
Relations With the Jews, headed
by Johannes Cardinal
Willebrands.
THEY WERE presented at a
Vatican press conference by the
Rev. Father Pierre Duprey and
Msgr Jorge Mejia, vice president
and secretary respectively of the
Commission, and appeared in the
Vatican organ, L 'Ostervatore
Romano. According to a state-
ment by the IJCIC, the Notes fail
to acknowledge the religious
significance of the State of Israel
to the Jewish people and refer on-
ly briefly and superficially to the
Holocaust.
The IJCIC member organiza-
tions are the American Jewish
Committee, the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, the Israel
Interfaith Committee, the World
Jewish Congress and the
Synagogue Council of America,
the umbrella organization of
Reform, Conservative and Or-
thodox Judaism in the U.S.
The statement expressed the
UJA Hits
23% Increase
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
United Jewish Appeal has record-
ed a 23 percent increase in
pledges toward its 1986 target of
$745 million, the largest ever for a
single year, UJA chairman Alex
Grass told the Jewish Agency
Assembly meeting here.
Grass said about $48 million has
already been raised to fund
"Operation Moses," the immigra-
tion of Ethiopian Jews to Israel.
Leon Dulzin. chairman of the
Jewish Agency and World Zionist
Organization Executives,
reported that Project Renewal,
the rehabilitation of slum
neighborhoods, should be com-
pleted in this decade. He said the
Jewish Agency would allocate
about $1 million this year for the
vocational training of youngsters
in development towns.
Jewish Agency Treasurer Akiva
Lewinsky told the Assembly that
in the last five years the Agency
has invested about $300 million in
welfare and educational projects.
He said a special effort was made
to improve the quality of life in
Galilee settlements.
The Agency allocations were
supplemented by government
funds.
Kabbi Schindler
IJCIC's "disappointment over
what we perceive to be the
repressive spirit and formulation
about Jews, Judaism, the Nazi
Holocaust and the meaning of
Israel." The Notes gave "little
recognition of how the Jews con-
ceive of themselves," the state-
ment said.
IT WARNED that the Notes
"may undermine the gains we
have achieved through dialogue,
joint study and joint action in re-
cent years. For this reason, we
are all the more dismayed that
unlike Nostra AetaU itself and the
1975 Guidelines which affirmed
the duty of Catholics to consider
the Jews a living people," the
Notes were published "without
prior consultation with the Jewish
community."
Rabbi Mordecai Waxman,
IJCIC president, said he has sent
a cable to Cardinal Willebrands
asking for clarification and con
sultation on the Notes. The IJCIC
statement said the Notes were
"totally inadequate in providing
Catholics with sufficient
guidelines on how to teach, preach
and understand" the Holocaust
and the creation of Israel, the two
events that have "decisively
shaped the way Jews define
themselves."
The statement cited as an exam-
ple Paragraph 25 of the Notes
which states that "The existence
of the State of Israel and its
political options should be en-
visaged not in a perspective which
is in itself religious, but in their
reference to the common prin-
ciples of international law."
The IJCIC statement observed
that "even within this narrow
frame of reference, nothing is said
about Israel's right to exist or in
the justice of her cause." The
statement said that in the context
of the Vatican's Notes, "Modem
Israel is emptied of any religious
significance for Christians," and
"even Israel's profound religious
significance for Jews" is mention-
ed "in such a recondite fashion as
to be unrecognizable."
THE STATEMENT found that
"equally grievous is the vague,
passing and almost gratuitous
reference" to the Holocaust and
observed that "the absence of a
strong statement on the
Holocaust is particularly painful."
The passage referred to says
that "Catechesis should help
in understanding the meaning for
the Jews of the extermination
during the years 1939-1945 and its
consecuences."
The IJCIC declared that the
Notes aimed at remedying "a
painful ignorance" among
Catholics "of the history and
traditions of Judaism," but the
text of the Notes does not remedy
that "painful ignorance" because
"neither Jewish history nor
Jewish traditions are explored in
the Notes or even referred to as
having an independent value. In-
deed, the history and traditions of
Judaism are appropriated by the
Church."
The Notes allude to the
"negative" relations between
Jews and Christians "for two
millennia but offer nothing of this
history. How can Jews and
Judaism be presented in Catholic
teaching and preaching without
some acknowledgement of the
historical expressions of Christian
animosity?" the statement asked.
THE NOTES were also the sub-
ject of comment by Rabbi Alex-
ander Schindler. president of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregation, the association of
Reform synagogues. The UAHC
is not a constituent of the IJCIC.
Schindler observed that this
latest Vatican document "rein-
troduces a note of religious trium-
phalism." He added that "Any ef-
fort to improve understanding
between the two faiths requires,
above all, mutual respect. Each
faith must learn to see the other
as it defines itself."
Schindler said little progress
could be made toward better rela-
tions "if one sees the other as be-
ing denied the means of salvation,
and as somewhat lesser in the
eyes of God. It is equally disap-
pointing that the new Vatican
document makes such short shrift
of the Holocaust, and that it ig-
nores the religious significance on
the rebirth of the State of Israel."
The Reform leader added that it
was "a pity" that the 20th an-
niversary of No$tra Attate
"should be marked by this ap-
parent retreat from the historic
step forward taken by the Second
Vatican Council." Nostra AetaU
declared specifically that the
Jewish people must not be held
responsible for the crucifixion of
Jesus.
Two Rabbis Plan To Marry,
Both Will Serve in S. Florida
Rachel Hertzman of Louisville, who was ordained a
Reform rabbi last June 1, plans to serve as a rabbinic assis-
tant for youth and education at Temple Kolami in Planta-
tion and also as outreach coordinator for the southeast
council of the Union of American Hebrew Congreations
(UACH), the association of Reform synagogues.
RABBI HERTZMAN also is planning an October wed-
ding to Rabbi Rex Perimeter of Omaha, and both will be
serving synagogues in the southeast Florida area. Rabbi
Perimeter will be assistant rabbi of Temple Israel in Miami.
Bankrupt Ata's End Bleaker
As Cabinet Nixes Combine Takeover
Bv HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Months of dogged efforts to
save the bankrupt Ata tex-
tile mills and the nearly
2,000 jobs they provide end-
ed when the Ministerial
Economic Committee voted
for a second time to reject
plans to sell the complex to
a syndicate of American and
Swiss investors.
The sale has been pushed
strongly by Minister of Commerce
and Industry Ariel Sharon and
Moshe Shahal. the Minister of
Energy and Infrastructure. They
argued that the cost of shutting
down the mills, including
severance pay for its workers,
would exceed the costs of keeping
them running.
THE AGREEMENT for sale.
signed earlier this month by
Sharon and the foreign principals,
called for an investment of about
$45 million in private capital. The
government was to pay Ata's
creditors, notably the Bank Leumi
and write off its own loans to the
industry in return for an under-
taking by the investors to operate
the mills for at least 10 years and
boost its exports.
But the econnomic ministers
refused to ratify the sale on June
16 by a vote of 9-3, on grounds
that the costs to the government
were badly underestimated.
Shahal and Sharon forced the full
Cabinet to take up the issue at it
regular weekly meeting Sunday,
to no avail. The Cabinet referred
the mater back to the Ministerial
Economic Committee which
upheld its earlier decision to reject
the sale, this time by a vote of 8-2.
Ironically, the government
which appointed a receiver for
Ata after it defaulted on its debts
last year, was eagerly seeking a
private buyer to prevent mass
unemployment in the Haifa area
where Ata was the largest single
employer.
THE LATEST deal, engineered
by Sharon, seemed to be the most
promising. But Treasury
economists maintained that it
placed too heavy a financial
burden on the government and
would set a bad precedent for
other economically troubled
enterprises.
The budget contains no provi-
sions to save Ata. It will now be
up to the Knesset Finance Com-
mittee to find the S9 million or
more estimated to compensate the
dismissed workers.
Ifs Easy to Feel Like a Million
Without Spending a Dime
At first glance, its just a living room
filled with furniture Or maybe it's
a garage filled with toots Or a closet
filled with clothes
It might not be worth much to you.
but to us its worth millions Its worth
medicine and medical supplies for
indigent residents of the Miami Jewish
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Everything you donate to the
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Call the Douglas Gardens Thrift
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Aaron Kravitz Chairman. Thrift Shop
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Fred D Hirt. Executive Director


JJULUL- 1.


------ !.!,*
(>n. James M. Gavin, liberator of the Wob-
belin concent ration ramp, receives the Simon
Wiesenthal Center's Scroli of Honor on behalf
of all the American soldiers who liberated the
Nari concentration camps from CBS 60
Mm utes' Diane Sawyer at a recent function in
Sew York.
Midstream Maelstrom
Writer Alleges Pope Is A 'Marxist'
Continued from Page I A
Hertzberg said he will seek Car-
michael's removal from the
magazine.
THE ARTICLE. "The
Kingdom of God and the KGB,"
pubuhad as the lead article in the
May issue, claimed that the
Vatican had issued only a "very
mild" condemnation of "liberation
theology," a movement incor-
porating Marxist teachings
popular in Latin America. This
mild condemnation is part of an
attempt to conceal the Pope's
Marxist leanings. Carmichael
^alleged.
The Pope "has never of course
butually endorsed Marxism," Car-
tiuchael wrote. "The Pope cannot,
falter all. be a Marxist." The
19 year-old Carmichael also
piloted from recent comment* by
Ihe Pope in which he suggests a
ieed for a fairer and more
quitable system of distribution of
wealth among the masses.
"An indispensible element in
the Pope's espousal of implicit
Marxism is obviously the need for
pmouflage." Carmichael said. "It
this need for camouflage that
(nay help explain the apparent at-
tempt on his life" in May. 1981 at
Ft. Peter's Square in Rome by a
Turkish terrorist, Mehmet Ali
^gca. an attack "well nigh univer-
sally attributed to the KGB and its
{Bulgarian) puppets."
CARMICHAEL. in the inter
>ew. defended his article. He said
did not regard it as controver-
sial but as a scholarly work at
empting to interpret recent
Rabbi Hertzberg
political events. "I don't think the
Pope himself is an outright sup-
porter of Marxist doctrine." he
said.
But, according to Carmichael,
the Pople has never supported
Israel and also failed to issue a
condemnation of Friar Leonardo
Boff. who was finally reprimand-
ed by the Vatican for his advocacy
of liberation theology. He admit-
ted that the article has its "short-
coming," but felt it is Midstream's
responsibility to alert the Jewish
community of this new
"phenomenon."
Midstream, with a circulation of
some 15.000, is published by the
Theodor Herzl Foundation of the
Synagogue at European Airport
BRUSSELS (JTA) The first synaoggue at any
.uropean airport was dedicated at Brussels International
irport Sunday by the Minister of Communications. Her-
man de Croo. who said it symbolized Belgium's respect for
reedom of religion, especially at an airport which is a
"ssroads of people of all faiths.
THE 50-SEAT SYNAGOGUE is located in the main
?rminal near the Catholic and Protestant chapels, the
(uty-free gift shops and VIP lounge. It was built in
?sponse to requests by the Jewish community to which the
ommunications Ministry and the airport authority readily
greed.
Brussels Airport is an important transit center for
itfhts between the United States and Israel.
WZO. A statement of purpose
says the magazine is committed to
"free inquiry" and hopes to "offer
critical interpretation of the past,
searching examination of the pre-
sent and afford a medium for con-
sidered and independent opinion
and for creative cultural
expression."
IT IS NOT intended to serve as
an official organ of the WZO.
although interviews with Hert-
zberg and Konvitz suggest that no
organization can totally
disassociate itself from a
magazine it publishes. Kalman
Sultanik, chief New York ex-
ecutive of the ZOA and a member
of the Midstream board, sup
ported the magazine's
independence.
He said Midstream is an
"independent journal. Even the
editor has a right to express his
own opinion. It is a signed article.
Mr. Joel Carmichael expresses his
own opinion, not the opinion of
the editorial board or the World
Zionist Organization. And we are
open to opinions to the contrary,"
Sultanik said in a telegram from
Jerusalem.
But for Hertzberg to allow the
article's conclusions "to stand in a
responsible Zionist journal gives
the Zionist movement a black
eye." The issue, Hertzberg said,
"is not him or me. The issue is the
article. I refuse to let him make
this into a leftwing. rightwing
Zionist fight."
HIS RIGHTWING convic
tions are his own business," said
Hertzberg, "and I have not run
after him because of his plitical
views. But he has the right as an
editor to print whatever he wants
provided that it is responsible.
This is editorially irresponsible."
The editorial board is expected
to discuss the controversy created
by the article's publication at its
next editorial board meeting,
scheduled for September. Konvitz
said the editorial board does not
review articles prior to publica-
tion, and that no one on the
editorial board had read the Car-
michael article prior to
publication.
Konvitz said in a telephone in-
terview from Cornell University
where he is professor emeritus
that the article does not speak for
the WZO and that it represents
the personal opinions of the
author, "who happened to be the
editor."
Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Leo Mindlin
How Amputation of Israel
May Become U.S. Policy
Continued from Page 4 A
but does nothing to put teeth into
his threats.
It has proved one more thing:
that the "(treat Communicator"
has no limit either so far as his
capacity is concerned to force
others to suffer sacrifice in the
American cause. The hijackers
now know that Mr. Reagan is not
above demanding things from
Israel to pull our chestnuts out of
the fire. Next time there are
American hostages, what might
their price of "us" be for their
freedom?
THESE ARE some likely
possibilities: that Israel abandon
Jerusalem forthwith. Or the West
Bank without condition. Or the
Golan Heights. Or that it return to
the pre-1967 borders, a principle
to which our best "moderate"
Arab friends, notably the Saudi
Arabians, voraciously subscribe.
So far, the record appears to
show that any single one of these
would meet with the appropriate
American demand of Israel that it
knuckle under. Far fetched? Was
not the Beirut hostage crisis far-
fetched on June 13, one day
liefore it occurred?
Besides, isn't Mr. Reagan sym-
pathetic to many Palestinian
demands of Israel already on
record? Isn't he prepared to deal
with Palestinians as ofntnv and
might indeed have already done so
alter the visit to Washington of
King Hussein had the hostage
crisis not interrupted everything
else?
THIS ATTITUDE is, after all
in line at the moment now that the
hostages have shaken hands with
their terrorist captors in
photographs for the press and
that so many of the hostages are
busy blaming the United States
for the crisis. It is. the hostages
tell us now. our fault that we do
not understand the terrorists'
purposes and that the TWA flight
was hijacked in the first place.
From a nation that helped save
a defeated Syria's face, nothing
should be surprising. From an
American President who did
nothing to protest Syria's destruc-
tion of the peace agreement bet-
ween Israel and a Lebanon
litierated from both Assad and
Arafat in the end Israel's
greatest triumph in Lebanon and
the greatest tragedy then
because the peace agreement KNU
destroyed anything is possible.
The "Great Communicator" is
Inith omniscient and omnipotent
More simply, his teflon-coating re-
mains intact.
Israel May Be Heading For
Showdown With Shiites Rabin
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin warned that Israel
may be heading for a
showdown with the Shiite
Moslems in Lebanon
because extremists in that
community appear to be
taking control.
Addressing a symposium at Tel
Aviv University on the aftermath
of the war in Lebanon, Rabin ex-
pressed concern that units of the
Shiite militia, Amal, loyal to their
leader. Nabih Berri, may not be
able to withstand the extremists
in their ranks.
The latter, believed responsible
for hijacking TWA Flight 847 on
June 14, are holding 40 of its
American passengers hostage in
Beirut. Berri. who is Justice
Minister in the Lebanese govern-
ment a government most
observers agree exists only on
paper has undertaken the role
of go-between in the hostage
crisis.
ALTHOUGH the hijackers have
demanded that Israel release
more than 700 Shiite prisoners in
the Atlit detention camp in ex-
change for the hostages, many
observers here and abroad believe
this is not the central issue.
The hijack crisis "is in effect a
test for Amal and its leadership in
their rivalry with the extremist
elements," Rabin said. He observ-
ed that it came at the "least op-
portune time" as far as Israel's
relations with the U.S. and Amal
are concerned.
The hijackers' demands have
been addressed to Washington
with the intent to force the
Reagan Administration to
pressure Israel to free the Atlit
detainees. Both the U.S. and
Israel have maintained publicly
that they will never make conces-
sions to the hijackers or ask
anyone to do so.
RABIN NOTED that Israel has
had little trouble with Amal in
south Lebanon since April 1. At
tacks directed at the Israel
Defense Force in the security zone
near the international border
caused no military or civilian
fatalities, he said. But the leader
ship struggle within the Shiite
community could worsen the
security situation and could even
result in an Amal alliance with the
Palestine Liberation Organization
which it has fought bitterly in re-
cent weeks, Rabin said.
The Defense Minister appeared
to reject the idea expressed by
many Israelis that the release of
1,150 convicted Palestinian ter-
rorists last May 20 in exchange
for three Israeli soldiers held by
terrorists in Damascus was a con-
tributory factor in the TWA
hijack.
Rabin noted that Beirut has
long been a haven for aerial hi-
jackers. The TWA hijack was in
fact the eighth by Shiite ex-
tremists since March, 1983. he
pointed out.
RABIN ALSO said there were
"clear signs" that the Syrians are
thinning out their military forces
in Lebanon though he could not
say to what extent. Syria occupies
about two-thirds of tbe country. A
year ago, Israel insisted it would
not withdraw the IDF" from
Lebanon unless the Syrians pulled
their army out simultaneously.
But Israeli policy changed
radically. The unilateral
withdrawal of the IDF began last
year and the position in Jerusalem
was, if the Syrian want to remain
mired in the deadly swamps of
Lebanon, "let them enjoy it."
The symposium was conducted
at Tel Aviv University's Dayan
("enter for Middle Eastern and
African Studies.
Hammer Group
Eyes Oil in Israel
JERUSALEM (WN'S) The oil
exploration group belonging to
American oil magnate Armand
Hammer will invest some $19
million in their search for oil in the
Negev In'ginning this month.



Page IO-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. July 5, 1985
Prices Going Up in Israel's
Attempt To Curb Inflation
Continued from Page 1 -A
posed by a Likud Finance
Minister. The most outspoken op-
ponent was Deputy Premier and
Housing Minister David Levy,
who charged that the new
measures would only fuel
inflation.
But Deputy Premier and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir,
leader of Likud, voted for the pro-
gram. Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin, of the Labor Party, abs-
tained on grounds that the
defense budget could not sustain
further cuts. But he refrained
from voting against a Labor-it*
Premier's program.
Peres had made it clear however
that once adopted, the economic
program must be supported
publicly by every minister in the
Labor-Likud unity government
He amid he would expect anyone
who could not go along to submit
his resignation.
Peres admitted after the
marathon Cabinet session that for
the next three months, at least
the public will bear a heavy
economic burden. But he
predicted there were good pro-
spects that runaway inflation,
long the scourge of the economy,
will be beaten down.
HE URGED the public, in ef-
fect, to bite the bullet for the short
term. Without the harsh measures
adopted, the economy would be
sliding toward collapse and there
would be no way out of the infla-
tionary spiral, he said.
The government predicts that
after a period of three months
during which inflation may rise to
record highs, the economy will
stabilise and inflation will be
brought down to low single digits. a
This, according to proponents of
the plan, will set the stage for
revived economic growth and ex-
pansion, easing the burden on
wage-earners.
Although an undisclosed
number of government employees
will have to be dismissed because
of curtailed government spen-
ding, mass unemployment will be
avoided, supporters of the plan
said.
THE GOVERNMENT claims
its new measures will reduce
government expenditures by $1.1
billion, considered a minimum to
cool down inflation. But some
economic experts argued that the
real cuts will amount to only
$300-$400 million and that the im"
proved government balance sheet
will really reflect more and
heavier taxation which will in turn
refuel inflation.
Histadrut was enraged because
the government will impose its
economic austerity program by in-
voking emergency regulations
that are a hold-over from the
British Mandate regime. Accor-
ding to Histadrut Secretary
General Yisrael Kessar, this is the
first time in Israel's history that
these regulations were invoked.
He blasted the Cabinet for agree-
ing to them without prior negotia-
tions or consultations with
Histsdrut
The major elements of the new
economic program include an 18.8
percent devaluation of the Shekel.
This, plus the "creeping devalua-
tion" of the Shekel during the
past week, adds up to a 30 percent
$250 Million Aid
Going: To Jordan
WASHINGTON (WNS) -
The Senate voted to authorize the
$250 million economic aid for Jor
.ian requested by the Reagan Ad-
ministration. But it will be spread
over 27 months, rather than the
15 months the Administration
requested.
Yisrael Kessar
devaluation. The rate of the
Shekel against the Dollar will be
1.500 toll.
MASSIVE CUTS in govern-
ment price support subsidies
decreased by the new program
sent the price of subsidized con-
sumer goods soaring between
45-75 percent The price of bread
was up 75 percent; cooking oil 60
percent; milk and dairy products
65 percent; frozen meat and
poultry 45 percent; eggs 65 per-
cent; and petrol by 27 percent.
The government also approved
a general price rise of 17 percent
on other items. The prices of
about 100 non-subsidized products
will rise between 25-30 percent.
All prices, wages and salaries
will be frozen for a three-month
period. Wages will be cut by three
percent in the public sector. Civil
servants, with few exceptions,
will not receive overtime pay and
fringe benefits for the three
month period.
Independently employed per-
sons will have to increase their ad-
vance tax payments by 8.3 per-
cent at the start of the tax year.
But the value-added tax (VAT)
will be lowered from 17 to 15
percent.
Histadrut contends that real
wages will be eroded by about 30
percent. It ordered a 24 hour shut-
down of all economic activity, pro-
duction and services for Tuesday.
This means that effective at 6 a.m.
local time, July 2, airports and sea
ports were closed down. Radio
and television were blacked out
except for brief hourly news
bulletins and the regular, twice
daily newsreels.
THE GENERAL strike shut
down bakeries. Bread was in short
supply even on Wednesday when
the strike ended because I taking
resumed only at 6 a.m.
Supermarkets and other food
chains and retail outlets were clos-
ed for 24 hours. Hospitals and
essential services were maintain-
ed on an emergency Sabbath
schedule.
Labor strife will continue
beyond the general strike. The
Histadrut teachers union to which
elementary school teachers
belong, gave statutory notice of
their intention to strike in protest
against threatened dismissals
under the new economic program.
The school term ended Sunday,
but teachers are needed to help
prepare for the new school year
that begins after the summer
vacation.
MEANWHILE, workers who
have been occupying the bankrupt
Ala textile mills on Haifa Bay
demonstrated angrily outside the
mill gates. They burned tires,
blocking traffic on the Haifa-Acre
highway. The Ministerial
Economic Committee last week
refused to ratify the proposed sale
of the mills to a syndicate of
American and Swiss investors.
Ata. which was ordered shutdown
a month ago, appears doomed,
and with it the nearly 2.000 jobs it
provided.
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Aging U.S. Population
Religious Origins Strong Tie for Them
Continued from Page 5-A
critical factor."
Moreover, he noted, any in-
tellectual investment in study and
understanding of the cultural and
religious heritage of the ethnic
group was related to "signs of
greater vitality, intactness, and
relatedness as observed by
outsiders."
A disposition to conceal one's
Jewish identity. Dr. Saul pointed
out, the extent to which one was
uncomfortable with public
references to Jews, with the ex-
pression of Jewiahness in public,
and heightened concern for what
non-Jews felt about Jews, "was
shown to relate to high self-
denigration and low self-esteem."
SHOWN AT the conference
was a half-hour film produced by
Dr. Saul with Pauline Spiegel. En-
titled "The Challenge of Aging:
Jewish Ethnicity in Later Life,"
the film poignantly conveyed the
struggle of Jewish elderly to
maintain their ethnic and religious
traditions as they also faced the
vicissitudes of old age.
Kissinger
Explained
Radicalism
To Nixon
Continued from Page 5-A
radicalism unfettered.
Freeing the Shiite prisoners in
Israel is not the issue, since, as
noted, they would have been free
without this operation. Freeing
the Shiite prisoners through in-
timidation. humiliation,
unrestrained criminality that is
the goal of the hijackers, of the
Shiite radicals, of the Iranians
who support them.
By so doing, they seek to
weaken both the U.S. and Israel in
the Middle East, for there is no
Western position in the region
without these two parties In the
process, they also seek to in-
timidate conservative Arab
rvtfimes. such as that of King Hus-
lein, into abandoning any
thoughts of peace.
A JORDANIAN quotient added
to that of Egypt. Israel and the
U.8. would be a further setback to
the radical position. And ultimate-
ly, if the radicals succeed, it is the
Soviets who are the great
beneficiaries.
To recognize the radical thrust
is not to solve the problem, but it
docs provide the framework
through which to approach it It
ans continuing to seek a
greater international commitment
It'ter terrorism. It means that
" l U.S. should reinforce its policy
Mrafesak cooperation with
as the best demonstration
"I its intent to protect it* interest.
And it means that the U.S.
should continue to seek a wider
Arab-Israeli peace based on
recognition of Israel and direct
negotiations without precondi
tions. as was the case with Anwar
Sadat.
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Commenting on the film,
Elizabeth W. Markson. director of
social research, Boston University
Gerontology Center, said:
"The program illuminates not
only important aspects of Jewish
identity, but provides insight on
the multi-faceted ways in which
ethnic identity shapes the lives of
older people. More than a piece
about Jewish identity, 'The
Challenge of Aging' is a program
about ethnic heritage as a source
of strength, anguish, activity, con-
solation and conflict.
"As Dr. Saul states in the narra-
tion, ethnicity is a part of
ourselves that never has to be
lost, regardless of the other losses
we experience throughout our
lives. Suitable for general au-
diences as well as for those in-
terested in Jewish culture and in
aging, 'The Challenge of Aging'
brings home the point that we are
all ethnics."
ON THE subject of "Counseling
Euro-American Elderly and Their
Families," Giordano outlined the
problems of four elderly in-
dividuals Polish, Irish, Italian
and Jews and how their mental
depression, isolation and irritabili-
ty could be alleviated by skillful
counseling.
Ethnicity, said Giordano,
"reflects shared values, attitudes,
perceptions, needs, modes of ex-
pression and behavior that are
generated by experiences within
the family and community over
generations. Transmitted in an
emotional language, it answers
conscious and unconscious
psychological needs for security,
identity and historical
continuity."
Many studies. Giordano said,
demonstrate the powerful in-
fluence of ethnicity on the ex-
perience and perception of pain,
on beliefs about symptoms and
causes of illness, on attitudes
towards doctors and therapists,
and on expectations of treatment.
"While we must avoid rigid
stereotyping." he said, "it is im-
portant for practitioners to
recognize that members of par-
ticular ethnic and religious groups
may share distinctive values.
Although not all Italians have
tight family relationships, not all
Poles suffer in silence, and not all
Irish are deeply religious, Italians,
for example, are probably more
like each other than they are like
the Irish or Poles or other ethnic
groups."
IRVINE M. LEVINE. director
of National Affairs and the In-
situte for American Pluralism,
chaired the session.
Among other participants in the
discussion, besides Dr. Saul and
Giordano, were Sulecka Cabrera-
Drinane. executive director of the
Institute for Puerto Rican Elder-
ly; Theodora Jackson, deputy
director, New York State Office
for the Aging; and Peter R.
Strauss, senior partner, Strauss
and Wolf, specialists in legal pro-
blems of the elderly.
According to Strauss, the
strengthening of ethnic and
religious bonds was particularly
important because of shortcom-
ings in governmental support
systems.
"As the number of the elderly
has grown dramatically," Strauss
stated, "there has been a tremen-
dous increase in long-term chronic
illness. This imposes immense
economic and psychological
burdens on families the spouse,
children or other close relatives."
CITING THE failure of
Medicare to provide, among other
things, for custodial care of those
for whom it was essential, Strauss
asserted that the American
Jewish Committee study underlin-
ed the need for group support
born of ethnic and religious tradi-
tions to fill the void left by the
absence of government aid.
"The breakdown of traditional
responsibility in the past decades
has been a serious problem,"
Strauss added, "and the time has
come for a revitalization of the
former sense of what we owe to
each other beyond what the
general community is able or will-
ing to provide."
Jackson asserted that "the
black experience in America, im-
pacted by slavery, racism and op-
pression, has by nature required
the development of coping
mechanisms that may be well ap-
plied toward a successful agency
process.-"
The black family, she said,
"stresses strong values in shar-
ing, obedience and authority,
respect for the elderly and
religious beliefs. Their values, at-
titudes and preferences must be
taken into account if services are
to be responsibe to the Black
elderly."
CABRERA-DRINANE noted
that "for Puerto Ricans and other
Hispanic elderly, maintaining
their native language is extremely
important in contributing to a
more positive sense of their ethic
identity "
In the area of health and mental
health services, she added, "the
issue of language may be a ques-
tion of life and death. If the pro-
fessional and the elderly person
cannot communicate adquately.
the diagnosis will be incorrect and
treatment inadequate. The need
for professionals to be sensitive
and knowledgeable about the
Puerto Rican and other Hispanic-
cultures is extremely important in
the helping prOOSM
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.MCLUDES 2 FULL ^ 538-5721
:
Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Police Gave Rabbis
Tough Time During
Their Demonstration
Continued from Page 5- A
pocket almost inspired a strip
search. Next we were thrust for
20 minutes into a cell with drug
addicts and alcoholics, who were
amused by our presence, but made
repulsive remarks and obscene
gestures, and applications for a
few unsecured loans.
Finally, five hours and 45
minutes into the venture, we were
taken into two new cells, "lux-
uriously" equipped with benches
and a hole in the floor for bodily
functions.
HUNGRY, tired, wondering
what happened to our lawyer and
supporters, we talked Torah.
thought about our brethren in
Soviet prisons, and began better
to understand their plight. Here in
Washington, we could spend the
night in jail, and it would be very
unpleasant. In the USSR, how
many times are Jews arbitrarily
picked up, held for weeks at a
time, beaten, put in solitary or in a
cell with rapists and murderers?
Here in Washington Superior
Court prison, we felt out of touch
with reality and very lonely. In
the Soviet Union, how much more
intense are those feelings? How
does Joseph Berenstein, whose
eye was gouged out in prison, or
Yuli Edelstein, who is beaten
regularly in the labor camp, spend
each waking moment pondeirng
their fate and detachment from
normal human life?
Here in Washington, we rejoic
ed in each other's ckevruta,
fellowship, and the belief we were
doing something important. Does
Rabbi Moshe Abramov, a
prisoner, have anyone to share
Torah with?
MORE THAN six hours after
our arrest, we were allowed a
glimpse of our lawyer. We got the
impression the government was
dragging its feet in dealing with
us. But we were soon to be re leas
ed without bond, the date to be set
for trial.
Late that night, we returned to
Florida. North Carolina. Penn-
sylvania, New York, Virginia and
Maryland. Weary, sweaty,
hungry, we certainly got more
than we bargained for, a tought
taste of Capital justice.
But to a man. we swore that it
was worth it. And if need be. we
would be prepared to spend
another six hours or even 60 days
in jail to get our message of
freedom across. Time is running
out on the Jews of the USSR. We
cannot remain silent. And we will
be back.
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Support Comes From All Over The Nation
f^U.S. Memorial Museum Campaign Surges Ahead
WiSHIWr.TAM m_ u___
T
i
WASHINGTON The
U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Museum Campaign, "A
Campaign to Remember,"
has moved into high gear in
its progress toward meeting
its financial goals for the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Museum in Washington.
The campaign now has raised
more than $13 million in gifts and
pledges, an increase of $3 million
since only April, Dr. David Weins-
tein, national campaign director,
reports.
Dr. Weinstein said, "We are ex-
cited by the campaign's progress
and support from all sectors of
American life, which should
enable construction of the
Museum to begin in the fall."
THE "CAMPAIGN to
Remember" is the volunteer-led
fund-raising activity of the U.S.
Holocaust Memorial Council. The
Council, an independent Federal
agency, was given the mandate by
Congress to create a living
memorial museum honoring the
six million Jewish victims of the
Holocaust and the millions of
others who died at the hands of
the Nazis.
Outside Israel, the U.S. will be
the only country with a national
Holocaust museum. Elie Wiesel,
author, human rights activist and
survivor of the Holocaust, is chair-
man of the Council. Co-chairmen
of the campaign are Miles Ler-
man. of Vineland, N.J., and Sig-
mund Strochlitz, of New London.
Conn., both Holocaust survivors.
I'resident Reagan is honorary
chairman of the Campaign.
THE COUNCIL has set the spr
mg of 1989 as the target date for
completion of the Museum, which
will be built on Federal land near
the Mall and the Washington
Monument. It will be constructed
entirely with private donations, as
required by law.
Within five years, the campaign
expects to reach its total fund-
raising goals. Thirty milion dollars
is needed for constructing the
27S.0O0-sq.-ft. facility; $45 million
for equipping the Museum,
creating exhibits, installing com-
puter systems, and acquiring ar-
chival, artifact, film and library
collections; and $25 million for an
endowment fund to cover
maintenance and operating costs.
The Museum is being planned as
living. American institution that
will serve visitors of all ages and
m>kgrounds. It has the support of
people from all sectors of
American life religious,
business and civic leaders.
'tennis; government officials,
and many others.
THE AMERICAN labor move-
ment, through individual
ibers as well as the leader-
ship, is actively participating in
the campaign. The Christian com-
ity, as individuals and institu-
tions, is offering support. Non-
Jewish ethnic Americans, such as
'he Armenians, are contributing
to the effort.
The 6.V member Council reflects
this broad support. Its member-
ship includes 10 members of Con-
gress, who are Senators Paula
Hawkins. Bob Kasten. Frank
uitenberg. Mack Mattingly and
1 iaiborne Pell, and Represen-
tative Robert Garcia. S. William
(!reen, William Lehman. Stephen
Solan and Sidney Yates.
The nation's governors are now
."lively working to support the
-urn. During May the first
"f a series of events spon-
sored by governors was held On
28, Massachusetts Gov and
Michael Dukakis held the
statewide dinner, the largest
inner ever to be held in the State
House.
The evening before, Texas Gov.
Mark White hosted a small invita-
tional dinner in the governor's
mansion. Each event raised $1
million for the Museum.
MRS. DUKAKIS, a member of
the Holocaust Memorial Council,
is coordinating the effort to
organize support from the gover-
nors. She announced that she has
commitments from more than 30
governors to host a major event
for the campaign. The goal for
each event is $1 million.
Other major functions have
been led by A. N. Pritaker in
Chicago, Father Timothy Healy,
president of Georgetown Univer-
sity in Washington, and Norman
Bernstein in Washington.
The major focus of the cam-
paign at this time is the establish-
This preliminary architectural design of the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum has been
reviewed by the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
ment of Campaign Steering Com- Council, and is now undergoing the reviews
mittees, planned in 25
*"""*" "" a*a't Administration Clarifies Position
required by the Federal government. The
Museum will be built entirely with private
donations on Federal land near the Mall in
Washington.
the country.
To date. Steering Committees
have been created in Boston.
Washington, Philadelphia,
Chicago, Atlanta. North Dakota,
South Carolina, Los Angeles, San
Francisco/Oakland and Texas.
Additional committees are in the
process of formation in six cities.
IN EACH area, 20 corporation
or individuals, Jewish and non-
Jewish, are asked to serve on the
Steering Committee and to make
contributions over a five-year
period.
In addition, plans are underway
for corporate, foundation, and
labor activity on behalf of the
campaign.
Progress has also been made
recently on the -design of the
Museum. After being reviewed by
the Council, the preliminary ar-
chitectural design is now going
through the necessary reviews re-
quired by the Federal govern-
ment. The Museum site has been
cleared for the expected beginn-
ing of construction in the fall.
Both an educational center and
a museum memorial, the facility
will include a 10.000-sq.-ft. Hall of
Remembrance, as well as spaces
for a library, an archives, an
auditorium and classrooms. There
will be some 80,000 square feet of
space for both permanent and
changing exhibitions.
THE MUSEUM will serve
regional and local Holocaust
centers through its outreach pro-
gram, which will include lectures,
seminars, teacher training, cur-
riculum development, classes and
film series, as well as traveling
exhibitions.
The Museum will also provide
archival materials to other institu-
tions, and will make its informa-
tion resources available by com-
puter to colleges, research
centers, museum and other in-
stitutions worldwide
On Mideast Peace Talks
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Reagan Administra-
tion says that its major ob-
jective in the Middle East
was to find a "mechanism"
to bring about direct talks
between the Arabs and
Israel.
"The bedrock of the American
position is to obtain a mechanism
which will lead to progress in the
peace process and certainly lead
to direct talks between the Arabs
and the Israelis," State Depart-
ment deputy spokesman Edward
Djerejian said.
He was trying to clarify the
United States' position after
President Reagan indicated,
following his two-hour meeting
with King Hussein of Jordan, that
the United States was moving
away from its opposition to an in-
ternational conference to
negotiate a peace settlement.
Hussein had stressed to reporters
that he needed the "umbrella" of
an international conference in
order to conduct negotiations with
Israel.
THE SITUATION became fur
ther ambiguous when Secretary of
State George Shultz, at a dinner
for Hussein, in praising the King
for his efforts to advance the
peace process, talked of negotia-
tions within an "international con-
text." Djerejian pointed out that
Reagan has said that the U.S. has
"differences" with Hussein over
such an international conference
and that those differences would
be discussed with the King before
he left Washington. Djerejian
stressed that the U.S. is keeping
in close touch with all the parties
concerned on these developments.
The spokesman conceded that
one major difference over an in-
ternational conference is U.S. op-
position to the participation of the
Soviet Union. Hussein made it
clear that the Soviet Union would
be a participant, since his Feb. 11
agreement with Palestine Libera-
tion Organization leader Yasir
Arafat calls for an international
conference which would include
the five permanent members of
the United Nations Security
Council.
"We have said on many occa-
sions that if the Soviet Union
Three S. Floridians Aim High
For Gold Medals At 12th Maccabiah
Michael Classman
Diver Kim Engel. swimmer
Michael Classman and tennis
player Jamie Colder will be South
Florida favorites to win gold
medals for the United States at
the 12th Maccabiah Games to be
held July 15-25 at Ramat (Jan,
Israel. Engel, Glassman and
(iolder are among 13 South Flori-
dians representing the I'nited
States team, consisting of more
than BOO athletes.
Engel, 18, of Coconut Grove, is
currently ranked among the top
five divers nationally and top ten
in the world. Because the Mac-
cabiah Games are representative
of outstanding Jewish athletes
from around the world. Engel is
considered a very strong favorite
to win a gold.
Glassman. 16, of Hollywood, is a
strong competitor on the basis of
being the third-highest ranked
swimmer nationally in the breast
stroke. Glassman will be the
youngest swimmer to compete on
the U.S. men's swimming team.
Professional tennis player
Jamie (iolder, 81, of Fort Laaoer-
dale, is currently ranked among
the top I'M) in the world. Although
(Iolder is ranked third among the
best Jewish players in the world,
she will be a strong favorite to win
a gold medal by being the highest
ranked player at the 1985 Mac-
cabiah Games.
THE OTHER South Floridians
on the U.S. team will be yachter
David Himmel. Miami; gymnast
Melissa Kutcher, North Miami
Beacii: swimmer Amy Leib. Plan-
tation; golfer Rene Leoni. North
Miami Beach; University of Miami
tennis star Ronni Keis; rugbj
player Ira Schwartz. Miami; rifle
shooter Ira Schwartz. Miami;
basketball player Sara Shlagman.
North Miami Beach; yachter
Richard Silverman. Miami; and
volleyball player Michele Thorner,
West Palm Beach.
Barry Gurland of North Miami
Beach, who chairs the Florida
chapter of the U.S. Committee
Sports For Israel, will be team
coordinator of the U.S. team.
demonstrates a willingness to play
a constructive role in the Middle
East peace process, we would
welcome that development,"
Djerejian said. "However, so far
we are seeing no evidence that the
Soviets are prepared to play such
a role."
DJEREJIAN SPELLED out
some steps the U.S. believes the
Soviets should take if it wants to
demonstrate that it can be con-
structive. He said these include
resumption of full diplomatic rela-
tions with Israel; the end of Soviet
anti-Semitic propaganda; improv-
ing the treatment of Soviet Jews,
including the right to emigrate;
the exercise of Soviet influence to
reduce arms supplies to Iran by
Soviet friends and allies; ending
Soviet arms supplies to militia
groups in Lebanon, and desisting
from efforts to obstruct positive
moves expanding the peace pro-
cess in the region.
On the role of the PLO, Djere-
jian noted that Hussein said that
his willingness to negotiate with
Israel as part of a joint Jordanian-
PLO delegation comes not only
from the Feb. 11 agreement but
from the King's recent talks with
the PLO, which includes the
organization's acceptance of UN
Security Council Resolutions 242
and 338.
But the Department spokesman
added that the I'.S. still required
the "PLO clearly and unequivocal-
ly to accept U.S. conditions which
are the acceptance of the two
resolutions and Israel's right to
exist." He said this acceptance
must be "explicit and public," and
if it comes "we will begin a
substantial dialogue with that
organization."
AT THE SAME time, he said
U.S. acceptance of the PLO does
not mean the PLO can be ac-
cepted as the Palestinian
representative in a joint delega-
tion with Jordan for negotiations
with Israel, since all the concern-
ed parties must agree to the
negotiating partners.
In listing the conditions for the
U.S. to talk to the PLO, Djerejian
did not mention a renunciation of
terrorism which was listed by a
senior Administration official who
briefed reporters on the Reagan-
Hussein meeting. Djerejian said
Continued on Page 2-B
(Jewish Floridia
Miami, Florida Friday. July 5.1985
Section F


v > -j -, ---.
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, July 5, 1985
Miamian Gears Up
For International Race
He started the engine and
shifted his lifelong dream into
reality. The crowds at Hialeah
Speedway that day in 1979
witnessed the transformation.
They also witnessed the accident.
At 80 miles per hour, the stock
car driven by Jon Leavy. a
26-year-old native Miamiam,
smashed into a wall. His dream
wasn't shattered. Jon learned
from the accident and raced on to
become the Speedway's Rookie of
the Year. Over 200 major stock
car races later, Jon Leavy will be
representing the United States in
the Hot Rod Championship of the
World.
THE INTERNATIONAL
event will be held Saturday and
Sunday in Ipswich, England. In
addition to the United States and
England, other countries that are
scheduled to compete in the World
Championship include Italy, Ger-
many and France. They have been
qualifying all season for the event
that began last weekend with a
preas and practice day.
As the current point champion
in his racing division. Jon is ready
for the championship. His
strategy for the 75-lap race, which
will be televised in England, is to
keep it like a poker game. Accor-
ding to Jon. "I'll play my cards
like in poker, then I'll surprise
them."
The stock car Jon will be driving
is being provided by the race pro-
moters in England, Spedeworth
International Limited. "This
means." said Jon, "that I'll be sit-
ting on the opposite side of the
car. However, the car isn't as fast
as the one I race. I'll have the ad-
vantage of having more time than
the. other drivers to think and
react."
IN ADDITION to being provid-
ed with a car for the World Cham-
pionship, the United States
representative and University of
Florida graduate has an oppor-
L
t
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1
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o
re
THINK YOU
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tunity to win prize money, and his
air fare and hotel accommodation
are complimentary. That's a real
boost considering the expense of
racing cars. According to Jon,
"When I add up the cost of my
car, entry fees and maintenance,
it comes to over $50,000 a year."
The thrill of racing doesn't pay
bills, but sponsors help. He is
quick to add. "Nothing can
replace the emotional support that
I receive from my wife, Donna,
and friends."
Jon is eager to win the Hot Rod
Championship of the world and
ready to race up the ladder to a
successful career in stock car com-
petitions. He hopes that he will be
able to race in the Miami Grand
Prix.
Ferdie Reelected
To JWV
Policy Committee
Ainslee R. Ferdie, Coral Gables
attorney, was reelected to the Na-
tional Policy Committee at the
Florida Convention of Jewish War
Veterans on June 10. Ferdie is a
past National Commander, and
President of the Cosngressionally
Chartered Jewish War Veterans
National Memorial in
Washington. He is a member of
Murray Solomon Post 243.
Also elected were Alex Green-
wald of Miami. Commander of
Norman Bruce Brown Post 174 to
the National Executive Commit
tee. and Immediate Past Depart
ment Commander Abe Baker of
West Miami Post 223 to the Na-
tional Executive Committee, and
Howard Melnick; to a two year
term as Department Trustee.
Melnick is Immediate Past Dade
County Commander and member
of Murray Solomon Post 243. Ber-
nard Chaney. Commander of Abe
Horowite Post 682 of North
Miami Beach, was elected to a one
year term as Department Trustee.
Appointed by newly installed
Department Commander Al
Danheiser were: Past Department
Commander Norton Leff of Post
682. as Department Budget Chair-
man; Leon Liebman Post 682.
Quatermaster; Al Constantine.
Post 243 Department Patriotic In-
structor; Norman T. Levine. Post
223 Commander of the Honor
Guard; Fernand Kantor. Post 223
Department Hospitalization
Officer.
JWV Auxiliary
Receive Awards
Tanya Levine, president of the
Dade County Council Ladies Aux-
iliary. Jewish War Veterans, ac-
cepted awards for Americanism,
cultural, community relations,
legislation, hospital and mental
health, at the Department of
Florida Ladies Auxiliary. JWV
Convention.
Administration
Continued from Page IB
the U.S. position on terrorism is
well known, and the U.S. has
taken the lead in combating inter-
national terrorism.
He added that there could not
be a peace process going on if ter-
rorism existed. Djerejian also
noted that Hussein said that
negotiations should be conducted
with Israel in a "non-belligerent
manner" which the Jordanian
Embassy later corrected to a
"non-belligerent environment"
which Djerejian implied would
rule oat a continuation of
terrorism.
I
Jon Leavy and his stock car will race this weekend m Ipswich. England.
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r
I v'vX
Michael Scheck Reelected
President of Hillel Day School
U4j, juiy o, laoo/ine Jewish f londian rage 3-B
New B'nai B'rith Unit Formed
Michael Scheck of North Miami
Beach has been elected to serve as
President of the Samuel Scheck
Hillel Community Day School for
his 13th consecutive term.
The day school has an enroll-
ment in excess of 700 students
serving the North Dade and
Broward areas.
Michael, who will begin his Bar
Mitzvah year as President,
together with his wife Raquel are
founders and active members of
Hillel's Executive Board since the
school's inception 15 years ago.
The school is named after his
father, the late Samuel Scheck. in
whose memory the Hillel Com-
munity Day School buildings are
dedicated.
Scheck serves on the Board of
Directors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and is a
member of the Board of Directors
of the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center in North
Dade. Professionally. Scheck is
President of the Sweet Paper
Sales Corporation.
Other officers elected to serve
with Scheck on the Executive
Board for 1985/86 academic
school year are: Irving Canner,
A new B'nai B'rith unit to be
called Bar-Bench Unit, whose
membership will consist of only
judges and attorneys has been an-
nounced by Miami Beach Mayor
Malcom Fromberg and former
Chief Justice Arthur England, Jr.
with the assistance of Alfred
Golden and Jack Glick.
Richard Essen, long time ADL
leader activist, has been elected
president pro-tem until a charter
has been granted.
Programs of interest in legal
matters, as well as serving the
aims of B'nai B'rith are already
being planned, Essen said.
Fromberg and England,
together with such community
leaders as Aaron Podhurst, Mar-
tin Fine, Judges Salmon,
Goldman, Robinson, Barad, Levy
and many others, believe that this
organization will fill a void and
will contribute a great deal to the
general and Jewish community.
For further information call
Alfred Golden 531-1151 or Jack
Glick 931-1468. There is still time
to be listed as a charter member.
Michael Scheck
executive vice president and
Finance chairman, Mrs. Morton
(Judy) Zemel. secretary. Arthur
Lipson. treasurer and Building
chairman, and Dr. Joel B. Dennis,
president emeritus.
Shevin Appointed To Judicial
Nominating Commission
Jerome Shevin. a principal in
the Miami law firm Sparber.
Shevin, Shapo and Heilbronner.
PA., has been elected Chairman
of the Nominating Commission
for the 11th Judicial Circuit.
Shevin will hold the post until
June 30. 1986.
The nine-person commission,
whose members are appointed by
(iovemor Bob Graham and by the
Florida Bar. nominates can-
didates for vacant County Court
and Circuit judgeships in the 11th
Judicial Circuit, which encom-
passes all of Dade County.
"When a judgeship becomes va-
cant, the Commission advertises
for applicants, screens and inter-
views them, and recommends
three qualified names per vacancy
to the Governor, who appoints one
f them to serve until the next
scheduled election," Shevin said.
"This term should be unusually
active for the Commission." he
said "The Florida Legislature has
created and funded two new
judgeships. one for the County
Court and one for the Circuit
Court. In addition, a third vacancy
will occur in the fall."
Shevin. a native Miamian.
received his law degrees from the
Jerome Shevin
University of Miami, where he
also received a Bachelor of Arts
Degree, cum laude.
Temple Israel Holds Graduation
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
announces the list of the Confir-
mands in its 1985 class. The class
celebrated it* Confirmation as a
"mhined class, representing both
the downtown and the Kendall
facility.
The list of Confirmands for the
j ear includes:
S*-th Becker. Tract Bresiow. Krrvrst
Huurlla, Dean Cohan. Marc CordtiveT. Sara
Coats*. Jeffrey Elliot, Stephanie Erber.
Ifeniei Kirrai, Jeffrey Firestone. Jeffrey
Furst. Stacy GMckman. Andrea (roldbery.
kimberly Goldberg, I>bvkJ C.reen. Michelle
Hahamovitch.
Also. Laalke Hawser David Herechfeld.
Mirhele King. Man- luaoff. Andrew Jacoba.
: -iurrn Kilmer. David KunU. David U-vine.
.laser, Miller
Alao. Kohin UroviU. Steven Katner. Wen
I) Koaen. Jonathan Koaenn. Lon Roatchan.
l-aune Sacks. Jennifer Schaffel. Kevin
Schoh. Gary Silverman. Elaine Stain. Mar
tin Wolfe, and Sharon Wolf son
The Temple Israel Nursery
School graduation, class at the
Kendall facility, included:
Danielle Adeiman. Daniel Birghenthai.
Mark Burri, Adam Caolan. Adam Cordover.
Scott Dareff. Adam Eckstein. John Eder.
Allison Elmer. Yooi Epstein. KrystaJ
Frasee. Derek Greenfield. Craig Hartman.
Kevin Hearn Sara Hrarn. Todd Hoffman.
Sarah Jacoba, Javier Johnson. Kenee K in-
ner. Jason Knstall. Lauren Labott. Kachel
Levin. Jennifer Miller. Lauren Oransky.
Janathan Rogers. Heather Shapiro. Eric
Sofge. Melissa Sxulaiteyn. and Joey
Weiner
The school is under the direction
of Judy Kuritz, and accepts
students from age two and one
half years of age to age five.
Nursery School teachers are
Minette Brown, Lynne Katz. Lor-
raine Mirowitz and Diane
Zemnick.
Konover Features
Yiddish Performers
Argentinian Yiddish Theater
performer Yaki joined by Lydia
King, South Florida Yiddish stage
actress are featured at Konover
Hotel's Club 54 with perfor-
mances Thursdays. Saturdays and
Sundays.
MORTGAGEE'S

AUCTION
Selling By Order of Federal National Mortgage Association
125 HOUSES & CONDOMINIUMS
LOCATED IN DADE & BROWARD COUNTIES
July 16 7:00 p.m. Miami, FL
Sale Site: Hyatt Regency Hotel
Adjacent to Miami Convention Center
I-95 South at Biscayne Blvd.
* EXCELLENT FINANCING AVAILABLE
Fannie Mae, The World's Largest Mortgage Lender has chosen the
modern auction method to liquidate all current Real Estate owned in
Dade and Broward Counties.
Hudson and Marshall, Inc. is pleased to have been selected to sell
these properties for the highest dollar bid during this 3 day liquidation.
All properties sell individually with no minimum starting bid required.
Although the properties sell subject to the confirmation of Fannie Mae,
it is their intention to sell each property for the highest dollar bid
regardless of price.
The Following Properties Soil TUESDAY, JULY 16, 7:00 P.M. HYATT REGENCY
HOTEL MIAMI Adjacent to Miami Convention Center. I 95 South at Biscayne Blvd.
HIALEAH
101. 1551 West 42nd Slieel.
2an.. I' bain. 1.129SF
101.1035 Waal 44tn PL. UO303
2BR.2beth. 1.1Q2SF
Ml "50 IVW 40 Sirs* U4441
.i OR. 2 bain. 1.320 ST
10*. 1730 Waal 40 Street. U0440
3 OR 2 bam. 1.205 SF
108 964 SE 3rd Place.
Dupiei 0 rooms 3 bains
MIAMI
100.10317 NW 9m SI. C.r. 0107
i OR. 1 barn. 027 SF
107 1O*OOSW100A,UOA3O5
2 OR 2 bain. 900 SF
100.1000002 SW 103rd Straw
OupMa. Total 10 rms. 2 bath
100. 1i205SW189tt> Terrace
2BR 1 bam 903 SF
110.11251 SW 177 Street
3 BR. 2 bath. 1.010 SF
111.11311 SW 124th CI.U**
Btdc 17 3 BR. f* bam.
2.00% SF
112. '2331 SW250tn Strast
3BR 2 bath. 1.234 SF
113.12400 SW 0 Tarracs
3 BR. 2 bath, 1 400 SF
114. 13233 SW 95 Avenue
3 BR. 2W bath. 1.530 SF
RAM0LEWOO0 Condom, moms
Excellent location with aasy
accass to lha north snd
downtown'
110.13701 Kandall Laos*.
UO8101 1 BR. 1 balh. 752 SF
110.13701 Kandall Lasts.
UM103 1 BR. 2 bath. 900 SF
117.13701 Kandall Lakas.
UOB104-3 BR. 2 bath. 1 107 SF
110.13701 Kandall Lakes.
UB107-3BR. 2 bath. 1.167 SF
110.13701 Kandall Lakas.
UOBi'O- 3BR. 2bam 1 107
130 13701 Kandall Lakes.
ueS2021 BR. 1 bath. 740 SF
131. 13701 Kandall Lakas.
U082O4-3 BR. 2 bath. 1.107 SF
122.13701 Kandall Lakas.
Ue8206- 2 BR. 2 bath. 1.000 SF
123. 13701 Kandall Lakas.
0862073BR.2bam. 1.103 SF
124. 13701 Kandall Lakas.
LS7S2O02 BR. 2 bath. 930 SF
12a. 13701 Kandall Lakas.
U0B210-3 BR, 2 bath. 1.107 SF
130.13701 Kandall lakes.
LS7B303-2 BR. 2 Dam. 696 Sf
137 13701 Kandall Lakas
LSJB305-2 BR. 2 bath, i .009 SF
12*. 13701 Kandan Lakaa.
UtBSOe 2 BR. 2 bath. i 032 SF
12a. 13701 Kandall Lakes,
ueB307-3BR. 2 bath 1.167 SF
ISO. 13701 Kandall Lakas.
UOB404-3BR. 2 bar 16>SF
131.13701 Kandall Lakas.
JSB407- 3BR 2bat-
133.13701 Kandan Lakas.
O*4O0-3BR.2bsm 1.167 SF
133.13701 Kandan Lakas.
UeB4i1-3BR.2bath 1.107 SF
134.13701 Kandall Lakas.
UtVMIS1 BR.2bam *6SF
131. 14052 SW 54th Sir pel
2 BR. i bath. 037 SF
130.15400 SW 01 Circle LN.
L102-2BR.2balh <>62SF
137.15006 SW B2nd Circle Lana.
U84-9-2 BR. 2 bath. 030SF
130.15000 SW 82nd Cir cle Lana,
J*2 -3BR. !> bath i 454 SF
The following Properties Sail WEDNESDAY, JULY 17, 7:00 P.M. HYATT REGENCY
HOTEL MIAMI Adjacent to Miami Convention Cantor, 1-95 South at Biscayne Blvd.
MIAMI
301.16034 SW 100 Coon
3 BR. 2 bath. 1261 SF
303.20730 SW 120 Court
3 OR. 2 bath. 1.400 SF
304 21374 NW 40th Orele Court
2BR.ibeth. 775SF
300.2440 SW 115 Avenue. UeB
3 BR. 2 bath, 1 705 SF
306.2441 NW 13th Straw LNP66
2BR. 1 bath. 616 SF
307.2441 NW 13th Street. U470
2BR, i bam. 716 SF
303.2441 NW 13th Street. LM76
2 BR. 1 balh. 606 SF
300.2530 NW 13th Street
uePH3- 2 BR. 2 bath. 935 SF
210 2561 NW 13th Street Ot19
2BR, 1 Bam 650 SF
211.2087 SW 16 Teraca U017
1 BR. 1 bath. 402 SF
212 3041 NW 101h Avenue
2 Units. Total 3 BR. 2 bath.
1.512 SF
211 321 NW 100th Avenue. u*3
2 BR '' i bath 1.120 SF
214 3618 NW 102 Strast
2 BR. i bam. 007 SF
218 4401 NW 100th Terrace
3BR. 1 bath, 1.173 SF
218 4541 SW 133rd Avenue
3BR 2 bath. 1,988 SF
217.4790 NW 5tn Strast
3 BR. 2 balh. 1.7B3SF
218 513 NW 100m Avenue.
JA4B-2BR IV. bath. 1.050SF
218 53 NW 52nd Strast
4BR. ibath. 1.273 SF
230.050 NE 140th Strast.
U0308A-2 BR. 1V, bath, 883 SF
221 6900 NW 4th Court
Duptea. 6 rooms. 2 balh
222 "'4 NE 74th Street
2 BR Dam. 1 030 SF
233. 7701 Cam.no Real. UeA-415
1BR. 1 bath. 712 SF
234 TTXCamino Real LKSF313
2 BR 1 bslh 804 SF
228 8101 Carmno Reel LMC103
2 BR. i bslh 804 SF
227 8432 SW 30th Street LW4
2 BR 2 balh. 797 SF
338 998 NE 90th Street
3BR 3", bam. 2.857 SF
MIAMI BEACH
238 2457 Collins Avs Lkf10026
1 BR. 1 v, oath. 001 SF
NORTH MIAMI
230 770 NE 123rd Street
4 BR. 2 bath. 2.000 SF
331.940 NE 149th Street
3 BR 2 Dam 546 SF
NORTH MIAMI
BEACH
233.18001 North Bay HO 0*502
2 BR 2 hath 980 SF
233 75 NE 174 Drive
4 BR.2 balh 2,175 SF
OPA LOCKA
234 2053 All Babe Avenue
Quadrapiei. Total 4 BR. 4 bath.
2036 SF
238 4676 NW 185m Street
4 BR. 2 bath. 505 '
SWEETWATER
3M. 11048-50 SW 2nd Street
Duple*. 7 rooms. 2 bslh
AUCTION INFORMATION
SALE SITES: The auction tor all Dade County propafliee unit be held July 16 6 17 al 7:00 PM at the Mysti Mouse Motel, adjacent BM M.ami
Convention Canter. 1-88 South si Biscayne Blvd All Broward County properties will be sold on July 18. TOO PM at the Pier 00 Motel in Ft
Lsuderdale. 2300 S E 171h Street Caueeway
AUCTION HEADQUARTER* Hudson snd Marshall auction representatives on duly July 5-17tn at the Miami Hyatt Mouse Hotel, phone (308)
388-1234. Ask tor Hudson snd Msrshaii Room Representatives slso on duty si Pier 60 Motel in Ft Lauderdsle July 12 18th Phone 1306)
111 0880 ask lor Hudson and Marshall Room
Offi) HOUSE INSPECTION: All Dade County properties will be open lor inepection Irom 1O00 AM till 4 00 PM on July 0 4 7 All Broward
County properties will be open lor inspection from 10 00 AM UN 4 00 PM Jury 13 4 14
AUCTION REGISTRATION: Regielrstion and linancing prs-qualification lor each auction begin. 2 hours prior to sale time. Please come eerly
to avoid delsy Certified lunds in the amount ol 83.000 must be shown si the lime ol regististion (See terms lor more details I
TERMS: Psy 10H of bid pries down st the suction of which 83.000 must be in certified funds made payable lo CHICAGO TITLE INSURANCE
COMPANY Balance of purchase price due SI closing arittiin 10 to 30 days after date of sale Closing dates to be scheduled st the mclion
FINANCING TIRasS 90S financing available to owner occupants 80S financing available lo investors 30 years find rale and Adiuetabie
Rate Mortgages svsilsble. Attractive interest ratea lo be announced at the auction
LOAN CHARGES: Total loan 6 closing charges psyabie by the buyer, .including owner s title insurance snd loan origination feel will not e
ceed 3% ol the sales pries Normal prepaid and pro-rated items srs the responsibility of the buyer
BROKER PARTICIPATION is invited
A SIM/LA A SALE WILL M HELO JUL t M IN fT. LAUDltDALt CM.L FO* DT*ILS HUOSON AND MARSHALL. INC.. L......1 Reel
e..,..!.7usHwT.n.,.i.eu. fl INFORMATION CALL TOLL FREE 1-800^1-9400
HUDSON AND MARSHALL [ INC.
REALTORS AND AUCTIONEERS I
717 NORTH AVENUE MACON, GEORGIA 31211 K
TELEPHONE M2 743 1511 f


"itv W .
-JI J -1 .

Pge 4-B The Jewish IHoridian/Friday, July 5, 1965
Kirkpatrick Gets A Rousing
Welcome On Arrival In Israel
JERUSALEM Am-
bassador Jeane Kirkpatrick
got a rousing welcome when
she landed in Israel on a
week-long visit that includ-
ed a rare personal meeting
with former Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, briefings
by top government officials
and a concert by the New
York Philharmonic led by
Zubin Mehta in Tel Aviv's
Hayarkon Park.
The former U.S. Ambassador to
the United Nations was the guest
of the Israeli government and was
being accompanied on much of her
visit by the current Israeli envoy
to the UN, Benjamin Netanyahu.
Kirkpatrick's itinerary was ar-
ranged by Harry Walker, a fre-
quent visitor to Israel whose inter-
national lecture bureau has signed
the ex-Ambassador to an ex-
clusive contract. Walker, who
recently returned from Israel,
said Begin himself requested the
meeting with Ambassador
Kirkpatrick.
Kirkpatrick was accompanied
by her husband, Evron
Kirkpatrick. On their agenda
were meetings with Prime
Minister Shimon Peres, Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir. Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin, and
former Defense Minister Moshe
Arens.
The scheduled also included a
guided tour of Jerusalem by
Mayor Teddy Kollek. including a
visit to the Western Wall and the
Great Synagogue, dinner at the
Presidential residence as the
guest of President Chaim Herzog,
and s meeting with the Knesset
Rabbi Arthur Schneier, president of the Ap-
peal of Conscience Foundation (left), held talks
with Prime Minister Milka Planinc of
Yugoslavia during her state visit to the U.S.
in June. They discussed ways in which the
religious communmities of both countries eat
help strengthen U.S.-Yugoslavian relation.^
and exchanged rnews on major internationn.
issues.
<3
Jeane Kirkpatrick
Committee on Defense and
Foreign Affairs, chaired by Abba
Eban.
Highlights of the visit included a
flight over northern Israel in an
Israeli Air Force plane and a lec-
ture she agreed to give at Tel Aviv
University, which announced the
establishment of the Jeane J.
Kirkpatrick Institute for Publaic
Leadership and Public Policy in
her honor.
Mrs. Kirkpatrick also was
scheduled to take part in a
graveside memorial service on the
yahrxeit of Yonathan Netanyahu,
brother of Israel's current UN
Ambassador, who died in the
Entebbe rescue mission July 4,
1976.
Great Artists Series Revised Schedule
A revised schedule for the
J985-86 Gala Eighteenth Anniver-
sary season of the Great Artists
Series, including Gershwin's
"Porgy and Bess," Metropolitan
Opera tenor Jose Carreras, and
violinists Itzhak Perbnan and
Isaac Stem, has been announced
by Temple Beth Sholom cultural
director Judy Drucker.
"We are moving back to the
Miami Beach Theater of the Per-
forming Arts this season," ex-
plained Mrs. Drucker. "due to the
postponement of the rebuilding
project
"Our artists this season typify
the world-class talent that the
Great Artists Series has been br-
inging to the forefront for 17
years. With this Eighteenth An-
niversary season that tradition of
excellence will be beautifully con-
tinued," Drucker added.
The season starts Saturday,
November 2, with a George Ger
shwin Night.
faA&iort fafhioi.
CARMEN BREY
ol coial gables, mc
INTERNATIONAL COLLECTION
SILKS & UNUSUAL FABRICS
FINE COTTON WOOL NOVELTIES* VOGUE PATTERNS
ALL FABRICS FOR WEDDING EXPERT CONSULTATION
RETAJL WHOLESALE WE ACCEPT MAJOR CREDIT CARDS
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call lor transportation
se hible espanoi
2440 Ponce De Leon Bivd
Coral Gables. Fia 33134
I1 Block South ot Miracle Milei
Concord Plaza
Adult Only Area
Colonial Plaza
Pamily Area
1 & 2 bedroom, garden apts., A/C, pool, shop-
ping, temples, school, cable TV. Rental.
941 N.E. 169 St
North Miami Beach
Rental Agent Nancy
947-4192
Dr. Irving Lehrman
Temple Emanu-El
Proudly Announces The Opening Of
The New
Lehrman Day School Building
727 77th Street. Miami Beach
One of the Finest Facilities in South Florida
REGISTER NOW FOR FALL TERM
Elementary and Junior High Program
Early Childhood Dept. Academically Oriented
Fully Licensed Teachers
Hebrew Classes
Enriched and Gifted Programs
Hebrew Instruction
Expanded Library and
Audio Visual Dept.
Magnificent New Science Lab
Kosher Hot Meal Daily
Transportation Available
538*2503
We Welcome Your Visit and Registration Inquiry
9 a m to 3 p.m. dairy at the Lehrman Day School
and from 9 e.m. to 5 p.m. at the Temple Office
866-2771
?
Everybody Would Uke to Get a
Long-term Rate On a Short-term CD.
That's Why Your Shirt Sleeve Banker
Is Offering 8.50% On This 12-month CD.
Usually you have to commit your money
tor a good long time to get a good interest
rate Not at Ensign Bank
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ENSIGN BANK

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It you want the benetits ol a long-term
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call (305) 887-5511
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>
Women Rabbinical Candidates
Hold First Meeting On Status
Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B /
NEW YORK (JTA) Thirt>
women rabbinical students from
three Jewish seminaries have met
to discuss some of the challenges
and concerns they face in the first
such meeting since the Reform
movement began the process of
ordaining women as rabbis more
than a decade ago.
The conference, held at th>
Jewish Theological Seminary, was
attended by women '-andidates
from the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion,
which trains rabbis for the
Reform movement; the
Hcconstructionist Rabbinical Col-
lege in Philadelphia; and the JTS.
which ordained the first Conser-
vative woman rabbi in June.
Loti Forman. JTS rabbinical
candidate and conference coor-
dinator, said. "Women see the im-
portance of building bonds bet-
ween each other and our
movements. We are working to
strengthen these bonds."
Some of the candidates reported
they see themselves functioning
as rabbis in the role of resource
people rather than experts in all
fields. The candidates also
discussed the issue of removing
gender-specific references to God
in prayers. Another such con-
ference is planned for this fall.
Forman said.
Beth David Sisterhood To Host First Meeting
The ,,new" Beth David
Sisterhood is hosting its first open
meeting Wednesday. July 10 at 10
a.m. in the synagogue board
room, to discuss the calendar for
the coming year. A brunch will l>e
served.
Like its congregation, the
Sisterhood of Beth David has
planned a number of changes.
Meetings, traditionally held only
on weekday mornings, will alter-
nate this year to include evenings
so that working women and
mothers of young children can ac-
tively participate.
Another new approach is shared
responsibility, starting at the top
with co-presidents Lillian Beer
and Carol Simon. "Women today
are involved in so many different
activities." Beer explained, "they
feel more comfortable if they can
tackle a job with a willing
partner."
The Mountain States Council of the Jewish
National Fund honors William K. Coors
(third from left), chairman of Adolph Coors
Company, with its Tree of Life award May H.
Pictured are (left to right) Michael M. Katz,
President of the Mountain States Council of
the Jewish National Fund; Jack Grynberg.
dinner chairman; Coors; and the evening's
guest speaker, syndicated columnist George
Will.
Gerald K. Schwartz
Temple Israel
Elects Officers
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
elected Gerald K. Schwartz presi-
dent for the ensuing year.
Officers also serving will be
Vice Presidents: Kurt Enfield, Ar-
thur Green, Thomas L. Green,
Nathan S. Gumenick. Ethel S.
Lee. Robert M. McClaskey, Jr.,
and Norma A. Orovitz. Serving as
Secretary is Kenneth D. Rosen,
and Treasurer, Henry E. Wolff.
Jr.
Miami Beach Post 85 of the
American Legion has awarded
City Commissioner Alex
Daoud its Citation for
Meritorious Service. An-
nouncement of the award was
made by Sid Pasternak, com-
mander, and Maurice Wein-
man, adjutant of the Beach
unit of the nation's largest
veterans' organization.
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publix Bak.n.t op.n at 8:00 A.M.
VKMIlbto tt PuMbt St<*# With
' Freah Daniah Bakarfes Only.
Supar
Cookies
JfiEE!
When you buy one doz. for 1.29
AvaaaMe at PuMx Stor with
Freeh Danish Bakeries Only.
Fitted with Assorts* Fruits
Fruit Tarts
45
Available at PuMx Storss with
Frssh Danish Baksrfas Only.
Hamburger or
Hot DogBuns
-49
AvataMs) at AH PuMx Stores
and Danish Bakarias.
ech
S-J69
Cherry Cheess
Coffee Cake..............
Try this Delicious New Item
Banana Bran Muffins.
Lemon Meringue Pie.... sast$ 129
Prices Effective
July 4th thru 10th, 1985
SM
It's the little things that make
the difference at Publix.
McCain*
COOKBOOK
COLLECTION
This week's feature
VOLUME 10
Luscious
Low-Cost Cooking
1.79-
Watch for
New Books Weekly



*"** "**^*'-.'-~*^Mmr-
^>-r ,1 ij^Mi^g ,-uj -, __
Le# w Blanche Shukow, National Hadassak fund-rawing coor-
diantor chairman of Hadassah National Convention to meet at
the New York Hilton Hotel Aug. 18-21. Center is Ruth W. Popkin,
national president, who will make her annual report at opening
plenary session. Right is Thelma Wolf, convention co-chairman,
who will coordinate special events and workshops. Mrs. Wolf is
National American Affairs chairman. About 3,000 delegates and
guests are expected to attend.
Community Calender
1985-86 Equity Professional Season at the Ruth Foreman
Theatre is now accepting reservations for the Preview of the
Season Opener "Kuni Leml" which comes to the Ruth Foreman
Theatre directly from New York. "Kuni Leml" has been awarded
the Outer Critics Circle Award for Best Off-Broadway Musical!!
Members of Mount Sinai Medical Center's House Staff were
honored recently at a Certificate of Completion Ceremony.
Michael Grata. MD, 25, was named Medical Intern of the Year.
A. J. Daond. immediate past president of the Miami Beach
Jaycees, has been invited to Fujiaawa. Japan July 13-15 to par-
ticipate in the 25th anniversary celebration of the Sister Cities
relationship between the Florida and Japanese municipalities. He
is an active member of Temple Beth Sholom.
Foundation Announces Name Change
Now entering its fourth season,
the JND Concert Foundation.
Inc., sponsor of te Prestige Series
of performing arts, has announced
a change of name, effective
immediately.
As the Concert Association of
Greater Miami. Inc.. "We will
reflect a greater identification
with all the arts." according to
Samantha Klein has been ap-
pointed Cultural Affairs Pro-
ducer at WPBTIChannel t,
public television in South
Florida. She will be responsible
for producing programs in all
areas of the arts.
President Judy Drucker. The
Prestige Series has presented
famed musicians as well as emi-
nent dance companies in past
seasons.
"After three seasons the board
of directors unanimously decided
the new name should emphasize
the broader scope of our ac-
tivities," commented Drucker.
The board of directors for the
Concert Association of Greater
Miami includes I. Stanley Levine
and Gary Gerso.
All performances for the
1985-86 season will be held at the
Dade County Auditorium.
JFCS Workshops
"Positive Parenting." a four
week workshop for parents with
children ages three to 11, will
begin Monday from 7 to 8:30 p.m.
at Jewish Family Service of
Greater Miami. The program will
teach parents how to be successful
in establishing discipline, motiva-
tion and self-esteem, and how to
enjoy their children more.
"The Divorce Dilemma." a five-
week workshop for separated or
divorced adults begins Wednes
day at the Jewish Family Service
of Greater Miami, from 7 to 8:30
p.m. and will help participants
learn new coping strategies, solu-
tions to legal and financial pro-
blems and how to adjust to sirurle
life.
PtlVSflCflflU referral to over 300 doctors
r&ferraJ 868-2728
dCrVICv first appointment within 2 days
-------------------^(D.
acon^-tvaerviceof CjpittNClS
on Miami Beach iHOSnTAUjjML
Na'amat Women
Three North Dade chapters of
Pioneer Women/Na 'mat, the
Women's Labor Zionist Organiza-
tion of America, have installed of-
ficers for 1985-86. Swearing in
was held at a luncheon at the
Doral Beach Hotel in Miami
Beach, with Gerald Schwartz, na-
tional vice president of the
American Zionist Federation as
installing officer.
Schwartz, who also serves as
associate national chairman of
Friends of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat. is the husband
of Felice Schwartz, vice president
of the Pioneer Women Council of
South Florida.
A viva Chapter elected three
women as a presidium. They are
Margot Amstel. Dorothy Goldman
and Beatric Moss. Other officers
of Aviva include membership vice
president Jean Steasel, treasurer
Dorothy Goldman and Goldie
Klein, financial secretary- Sylvia
Chase and Regina Lewis were in
stalled as corresponding
secretaries, with Rosamund
Schleifer as recording secretary.
Sabra Chapter elected Sylvia
Bergman as president. Other of-
ficers include Annette Hockma:i
and Gertrude Berson. vice
presidents: Ethel Greenberg.
treasurer; Eida Switzer. cor-
responding secretary and Marilyn
Tanney, recording secretary.
Atid Chapter officers taking the
3ath from Schwartz include Lois
Abel, president; Nancy Higgins
uid Karen Zuri. vice presidnts;
Terri Shenberg. treasurer; and
Robin McClain, corresponding
and recording secretary.
Norms Orovitz
New Book
By Norma Orovitz
"Smart Shopping on Florida's
Gold Coast" is the title of a new
book by Norma A. Orovitz.
The book deals with South
Florida's major off-price districts,
food "factory" outlets, ladies' ap-
pare), and long-distance bargains
by mail, among others.
Jewelry, china, silver, crystal,
handbags and luggage, perfumes
and cosmetics are additional shop-
ping categories the book deals
with.
Orovitz is "Smart Shopping"
columnist for The Miami News
and consumer reporter on "Am
South Florida" for WTVJ, Ch. 4
Previously, Orovitz was a special
feature writer for The Jewish
Floridian.
The new book is published by
Pineapple Press. Officially releas-
ed on Monday, it is available at
chain and independent
bookstores, as well as at many
newsstands.
Gordon Roofing mmmmt
and Shoot Metal
Works, Inc.
1450N W. 21*1 Street
Phone 325-8287
Hat r your roof rrpairrd nou.
you uill taut on a ntw rooflalrr
'SatistactOfy Wofkby
Experienced Men"
David Schneider. El Al's
General Manager for North
America, addressing the an-
nual staff conference of the
Jewish National Fund of
America in New York. Israel's
national airline has an une-
qualled security record, which
has drawn much attention in
light of the recent spate of
airliner-related terrorism, he
said. Schneider noted that the
17 JNF missions to Israel this
year will travel on El Al. The
missions program it directed
by Dr. Samuel I. Cohen. JNF's
executive vice president.
Schneider urged American
Jewish organizations and in-
dividuals to weigh the advan-
tages of flying El Al. pointing
out the occasionally higher
ticket price reflects the costs of
maintaining the highest stan-
dards of air passenger safety.
Seminar To Be Held At Brandeis
Rabbi Norman Lipson of the
Central for Jewish Education in
Miami has been selected as one of
24 young professionals who will
participate in the first Sherman
Seminar for Jewish Professional
Leaders, which will be held at
Brandeis University. July 17-19.
The Seminar will examine "The
Challenge of Change in the Jewish
World." demographic, political,
and organizational changes in
Jewish life and their impact on
communal agencies and leaders.
The Sherman Seminar is coor
dinated by Brandeis' Benjamin S.
Hornstein Program in Jewish
Communal Service as part of its
Program in Continuing Education
for Jewish Leadership, and ii
made possible by a gift fmn. '.:.<
George and Beatrice Sherman
Family Charitable Trust
The participants in the Seminar
were selected from 50 oandidau -
nominated by their respective
agencies as young profes.-
displaying exceptional pron
Jewish communal leaders They
come from a wide range of agei
cies including Federations, .lew is)
Community Centers, community
relations and Zionist organiza-
tions, and the synagogue and
eduealkmal fields.
For Sale $53,000.
Or Rent $450.00
1331 Lincoln Rd., 5th floor, corner of West Ave
Condominium 1 y* bath, 1 BIG bedroom plus
den. Kitchen with space for table and chairs
Big terrace. Pool. Call for information:
861-0392
Temple Beth El
Of North Bay Village
Announces availability of our
Social Hall and Kitchen to
Kosher Caterers seeking a
Facility for Small and Medium
Functions.
Please call our President,
Irving Bunis
861-4005
Oi
_


f 1
^"
Diaspora Jewry Said
To Be Shrinking
r naay, July 5, lV86Tl'he Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Diaspora Jewry is shrinking
rapidly and by the year 2000
will number only eight
million compared to 9.7
million Jews who presently
live outside Israel, accor-
ding to Minister of Labor
and Welfare Moshe Katzav.
Bj 2025. the end of the first
marter of the next century, there
'could be as few as five million
JeWI left in the diaspora. Katzav
earned in the course of an ad-
Iran to the Zionist (ieneral Coun-
which ended a week-long
eetiflf here He said the forecast
vai based on scientifically con
luctwl studies by demographic ex-
:-rXs at his ministry.
THE CAUSE of the shrinkage
*ill not be aliya to Israel but the
roeioo of Jewish population by a
low birth rate, assimilation and in-
i.-rmarnage. Katzav said. He
-tressed the contrasting
demographics of diaspora Jewry
.rid Israel.
Today, children under age 14
o-mprise only 15 percent of
iK>ra Jews compared to 30
percent of the Jewish population
in Israel. Projected to the year
2000, the difference will be 12 per-
cent to 26 percent respectively, he
said.
Katzav. one of the younger
generation of leaders in the Herat
branch of Likud, noted further
that the Jewish population abroad
is aging rapidly while the opposite
a true in Israel where births out-
i.timber deaths and intermarriage
is virtually non-existent.
HE SAID the negative
temographic trends in the
'ierard A. Kaiser, M.D., past
president of the American
Heart Association of Greater
Miami, has been elected
president-elect of the American
Heart Association, Florida Af-
filiate. Dr. Kaiser was elected
at the annual state meetina of
the Heart Association held in
early June.
diaspora go hand-in-hand with
what he called the "lamentable"
state of Jewish education abroad.
A high proportion of disapora
Jews receive no meaningful
Jewish education at all. Katzav
said.
"The crisis is much more urgent
than people tend to realize. Whole
communities will disappear. What
has been preserved over centuries
of suffering is in danger of fading
away. Every Jew in the world is
duty-bound to ask himself what
his life's purpose is as a Jew."
Katzav said.
His own prescription is aliya.
"Philanthropic contributions are
no substitute for aliya." the Likud
minister said. He sounded the
long familiar criticism of Zionist
leaders in the diaspora who fail to
heed their own preachings by not
settling in Israel. The rising
generation in Israel is not
prepared to accept the traditional
position of diaspora Zionist
leaders, he said.
ONE OF a long series of resolu
tions adopted at the close of the
Zionist General Council meeting
urged overseas Zionist leaders to
set a personal example by im
migrating to Israel. Other resolu-
tions called for strengthening
Zionist youth movements and the
recruitment of olim; a wide rang-
ing program in Israel and
overseas for the resumption of
Jewish emigration from the
Soviet Union; and for action to
reduce "drop outs" Jews who
decide to settle elsewhere than in
Israel after leaving the USSR.
The resolutions also called on
the government to make aliya
more attractive by alloting State
lands to immigrants on which to
build They addressed the other
side of the aliya coin yerida
the emigration of Israelis to per-
manent residence abroad The
resolutions maintained that the
drain of brains and manpower can
be stemmed by offering ap-
propriate housing and work
facilities for Israelis, especially
the young generation.
The resolutions called for
strengthening Zionist education
abroad and recommemded im
plementation of a decision by the
29th World Zionist Congress to
allocate funds for this purpose to
the Conservative and Reform
movements in the interests of
Jewish religious and cultural
pluralism.
ANOTHER MAJOR gathering
of Israeli and overseas Jews, the
annual General Assembly of the
Jewish Agency opened here.
President Chaim Herzog, just
returned from a visit to his native
Ireland, was on hand to greet the
600 delegates, observers and
guests.
The Assembly is the supreme
body of the Jewish Agency. Half
its members are appointed by the
World Zionist Organization. 30
percent by the United Jewish Ap-
peal and 20 percent by the United
Israel Appeal-Keren Hayeaod.
ATTENTION ROOMMATES!!
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SO DRY
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Anti-Perspirant
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2oz.
1.49
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BRECK
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Normal
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21 oz. $2.39
SCHICK
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Deodorant
Regular
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Sun
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PERSONALTOUCH
RAZOR REFILLS
FOR WOMEN
WrsonalTouih
8 txurt iiiii> km vmimis
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Riqht Anqle
Toothbrushes
1.19
IL*


' ", 7 h i | mi i >! n i i, ,
Tradition Appears In June
Tradition, a new board game
created by three Houston
housewives, will start appearing
in major department stores this
month.
Business Note
Curtis W. Chittenden has been
elected vice president, assigned to
the commercial loan department,
by Jefferson National Bank. His
election was announced by Barton
S. Goldberg, president. He also
was elected vice president of Jef-
ferson National Bank at Sunny
Isles, according to president Nor-
man M. Giller.
Jerry A. Jacobs has transferred
to the Miami office of Kidder.
Peabody and Co.. Inc., from the
company's Fort Lauderdale office
where he worked for two years.
IN THE CIRCUIT COl'RT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-57IK
Ilivimiin 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
El'LA MAE TOMACELLI.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of EULA MAE TOMACELLI.
deceased. File Number 85-5718. is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and ad
dresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
PnbHcatioti of this Notice has
begun on July 5. 1985.
Personal Representative:
NORMAN L. TOMACELLI
Apt. 12. 1027 Coffins Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal Rep-
sentative:
HYMAN P GALBUT. ESQ.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, FL 3S139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
Fla. Bar No. 027363
19160 July 5. 12. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NePraaarty)
DO THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CW1 ActJaa No. 86-11884 CO*
ACTION FOR DAMAGES
Florida Bar No. 221351
SUZETTE's FASHIONS. INC.,
Plaintiff
vs.
MAX LUGO and SYLVIA LUGO,
Defendants
TO: Max Lugo A Sylvia Lugo
30 Locust Hill Drive
Yonkars. New York 10701
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an Action for Damages
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Silver A Silver attorney for the
Plaintiff, whose irldrtes is 150
S.E. 2nd Avenue, Suite 1326.
Miami. Florida 33131, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before August
1st. 1985 otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 27th of June. 1966.
RICHARD P. BRJNKER
As Clerk, County Court
Dade County. Florida
By Yolanda Urine
As Deputy Clark
SEAL
Ira S. Silver
Attorney for Plaintiff
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 83131
(305) 374-4888 "
00000 July 5. 12. It. X. 1*85
The game is baaed on 3.000
questions of fact, trivia and
humor, all of which have Jewish
roots.
The six categories of Tradition
questions are Yiddish, proverbs
and more, customs and holidays,
history, geography and politics,
Israel, ancient and Biblical
history, and arts, sciences, enter-
tainment and sports.
The game emanates from Jopco.
Inc.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DX THE CIRCUIT COl'RT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-23658
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 212229
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
GUSTAVO VERA.
Husband,
and
CARMEN MARIA VERA.
Wife.
TO: GUSTAVO VERA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for Dissolution of Marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on ROSS ROSENBERG. P.A..
Petitioner's attorney, whose ad-
drees is One Datran Center. Suite
910. 9100 South Dadeland
Boulevard. Miami. Florida 33156.
and file the original with the Clerk
of the above styled court on or
before August 9. 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the Jewish
Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 2 day of Jury. 1985.
RICHARD P BRISKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC. BRYANT
'' As Deputy Clerk
(COURT SEAL)
ROSS ROSENBERG. PA.
Attorney for Petitioner
One Datran Center-Suite 910
9100 South Dadeland Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33156
(306)667-1000
19177 July 5. 12.19.26. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 84-39705
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No.: J49275
INRE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JULIO A. OLIVA.
Petitioner.
and
EMELINDA OLIVA,
Respondent.
TO: EMELINDA OLIVA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on A.
KOSS. ATTORNEY AT LAW.
PA., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 4343 West
Flagler Street. Fourth Floor. Suite
404. Miami. Florida 33134. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 9. 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 2 day of Jury, 1985.
RICHARD P BRISKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clark
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT LAW
PA.
Attorneys for Petitioner
4343 West Flagler Street
Fourth Floor Suite 404
Miami. Florida 33134
Tel.: (306) 443-4343
19179 Jury 5. 12. 19.26. 19S6
jcnerson naiiK
Presents Awards
Jefferson National Bank has
presented awards to three
students of Miami Beach's
Nautilus Junior High School,
culminating the fourth con-
secutive year in which Jefferson
has adopted Nautilus under the
Dade Partners program spon-
sored by the Dade County School
Board.
The students received United
States Bonds for their prize-
winning essays on "Why I Would
Like a Career in Banking.'" accor-
ding to Adele Mann, senior vice
president of Jefferson National
Bank.
Limor Leib was presented a
$100 bond for first place, with Jill
Slatko receiving a $50 bond for se-
cond and Lucinda Greenaway a
$50 bond for third place.
Barton S. Goldberg, president
of Jefferson National, said "The
hank's continuing participation in
this program is paying handsome
dividends' in the number of
students who are aiming towards
careers in banking. We believe
Dade Partners to be one of the
most meaningful vocational ac-
tivities carried on by our local
schools."
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaaeer 85-6765
Division (04)
IN RE:ESTATE OF
SARA N. SHER
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of SARA N.
SHER. deceased. File Number
85-5765. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Btreet.
Miami-. Florida; 33;9f> TH*' ccj-' :!
personal representatives of the
estate are: ELAINE BARBARA
LAZARUS. 675 Fairway Drive.
Miami Beach. Florida 33141 and
HARVEY BERNARD SHER.
2742 BeaucJerc Road. Jacksonville.
Florida 32207 The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tatives attorney are set forth
helow
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re
quired. WITHIN THREE-
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have Each claim must be
in writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount claim-
ed. If the claim is not yet due, the
date when it will become due shall
be stated. If the claim is contingent
or unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one ropy to each per-
sonal representative
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative's), or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO-
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of toe first publication of
this Notice of Administration: July
5, 1986.
ELAINE BARBARA LAZARUS
Co-Personal Representative
HARVEY BERNARD SHER
Co-Personal Representative
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES:
MAX R. SILVER
SILVER 4t SILVER
Suite 1326. 150 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Maimi. Florida 33131
Telephone: (306) 374 4888
19162 June 7. 14. 1986
Southern Bell Introduces
New Pricing Plans
Southern Bell will implement three new pricing plans effectiv-
July 1.
Customers will be allowed three calls per month for Local
Directory Assistance. For each call to "411" after the initial
three, customers will be charged 25 cents. The charge had been 15
cents per call over six calls monthly. For each "411" call,
customers will still be able to obtain two listings.
"The rate of 15 cents set in 1978 never really covered the cost
of a local Directory Assistance call. The new rate of 25 cents will
be closer to the cost of this service." says Gary Allington.
Southern Bell spokesman. "All Florida telephone companies are
implementing this new local Directory Assistance charging plan."
"We also will begin charging for each call for long distance
directory assistance within Florida." says Allington.
AT&T already charges 50 cents for each call to long distann; *
directory assistance outside of Florida. All telephone companies
in Florida will charge 25 cents per call for instate long distant-* .*'
directory assistance.
"If you call 1 plus (305. 813 or 904) plus 555-1212. you will be
charged 25 cents for each call under the new pricing plan. W.
simply can no longer provide "free" long distance directory
assistance." Allington explains.
"Customers who use these services are the ones who should pav
for them," Allington says. "There's no subsidy to help pay for
these services any longer. Eighty-five percent of the calls to direc
tory assistance are made by 15 percent of our customers. Those
customers who generate the calls should pay for them."
"These changes will increase our revenues to help offset the
loss of $26 million from the expiration of the surcharge billed tn,,
AT&T during 1984. In fact, less than 50 percent of the $26 million
reduction is being made up in these rate changes. We still face
three serious problems in Florida rate restructuring, increased
depreciation and inadequate earnings. These problems need to be
addressed during 1985." Allington concludes.
'Art Expre88ions/85'
All Seniors over 62 are invited
to submit a design that will
become the poster and program
cover for "Art Expressions/85."
at the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center, 12401 SW 102nd
Avenue. Deadline for receipt of
poster is July 20. Cash prtM of $25
to winner. For contest rules and
more information call Vicki Busch
at 251-1394.
. ,, NOTICE UNDER
FlCTrnOUS NAME LAW -. <: CM
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
Jiat the undersigned, desinng to
-ngage in business under the fic-
titious name Physical Medicine and
Rehabilitation Physicians at 1750
N E 167 Street. North Miami
Beach. Fla 33162 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida
Rosen Blatt. DO PA.
19163 July 5. 12. 19. 26. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinng to
'""gage in business under the fie-
Uuous name MAZZIO'S PIZZA at
5500 W 16 Avenue. Hialeah Fla
intends to register said name with
toe Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Act Too. Inc.
Karl Ruhnke. President
19166 July 5. 12. 19. 26. 1985
, NOTICE UNDER.
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinng to
ngage in business under the fie
Uuous name Coiffure Interns
Uonal at 1561V, Sunset Dnve
South Miami. Florida intend to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty. Florida
HAH Auto Services Ine
19176 Jury 5. 12. 19. 26. 19*5
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Neater 85-54O0
Division 01
Fla. Bar Ne. 20071J
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ATANASIO F PEREZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ATANASIO F PEREZ, deceas
ed. File Number 85-5400. is pen
ding in toe Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Division,
toe address of which u 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130 The names and iiiri noses
of the personal representative and
toe personal representative's at
torney are set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claim.
against toe estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the vailidty of the will,
toe qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on July 5, 1985
Personal Representative
YRENE PEREZ
4296 West 1 lth Lane
Hialeah. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ARNOLD L. LIEBERMAN. PA
370 Minorca A veaue. Suite 5
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone: aaWaMM
19170 Jery6.12.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nasaber 86-5717
Ihviaioa 03
IN RE ESTATE OF
MARGARET HILLENBRAND
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of toe estate
of MARGARET HILLEN
BRAND, deceased. Kile Number
85-5717. is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, toe address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
repreaentaUve's attorney are set
forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: ill all claims
gainst toe estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challengea the validity of the wiUj
toe qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or juriadic
t ion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on Jury 5. 1985.
Personal Representative:
CHARLES HILLENBRAND
Apt. 7A. 240 Collins Ave
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal Rep
sentative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT, ESQ
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (306) 672-3100
Fla. Bar No 027363
''' July 5. 12. 1986


>ublic Notices
notice or action
tONSTRUCTIVE 8ERVH E
(NO PROPERTY)
! THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
C'.IK ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
IlND FOR DADE COUNTY
The Marriage of:
L KIA MARTINEZ.
! A IMBORN,
L MARIA MARTINEZ
wUtfOMfi
flNER SCHWAMBORN.
espondent
REINER SCHWAMBORN
MOOSWEG 12
..) KOLN 80
West Germany
i)I' ARE HEREBY
t;TIFIED that a Petition for
olution of your Marriage has
i'. filed and commenced in this
and you are required to
a copy of your written
rnaea, if any. to it, on CARLOS
MENDEZ. Esq., Attorney for
utioner. whose address is 200
49th Street. I'ialeah. Florida.
1)2. and file the original with
| Clerk of the styled Court on or
I rv July 19. 1986; otherwise a
: will be entered against you
relief prayed for in the com-
: or petition.
ki- notice shall be published
each week for four eon-
jve weeks in THE JEWISH
UDIAN.
TNESS my hand and the seal
I Court at Miami. Florida, on
13th day of June. IMS
(ICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Jy GWEN D ZEIGLER
As Deputy Clerk
LOS M. MENDEZ. Esq
49th Street
l. Florida 33012
for Petitioner
June 21. 28.
JulyS. 12.1986
Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B

'NOTICE OF ACTION
KSTRUCnVB SERVICE
(Na Prsuarty)
kTHE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
)E COUNTY. FLORIDA
trtioaNa .84-11470 SP 06
ION FOR DAMAGES
LAN INC..
untifl.
TEPPER.
at
Tapper
Shepherd Drive
one Mountain. GA 90083
IB ARE HEREBY
PIED that an Action for
haa been filed against
I you are required to serve a
r>f your written defensea, if
it on Silver A Silver at
1 for the Plaintiff, whose ad
| is 150 S.E. 2nd Avenue.
1326. Miami. Florida 33131.
' the original with the clerk
above styled court on or
July 28. 1986; otherwise a
will be entered against you
| relief demanded in the corn-
er petition.
notice shall be published
each week for four con-
v. weeks in THE JEWISH
UDIAN.
r\K SS my hand and the seal
court at Miami. Florida on
lay of June. 19HR
li' HARD P BRINKEK
^s Clerk. County Court
I hide County. Florida
By Cecilia Chk
As Deputy Clerk
SiKer ,
B) for Plaintiff
IE fad Avenue
11326
Florida 33131
71 ; -
June 28. July 5. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
riTIOLS NAME LAW
riCE IS HEREBY GIVEN
e undersigned, desiring to
n buaineaa under the fJe-
name EL MERIDIAN!)
|"i|'r magazine intend to
sr said name with the Clerk
I Circuit Court of Dade Coun
i-nda.
Pedro E. Perez Mejides
June 21.28.
JulyS. 12. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naasber 86-6466
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IRVING YOUNG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of IRVING YOUNG, deceased.
File Number 86-6466 (04), is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which Is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or junsdic
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJ EC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 28. 1986
Personal Representative:
Kenneth Young
2200 East Hallandale Beach Blvd
Apartment 503
Hallandale. FL 33009
Attorney for Personal
Representative.
NELSON A FRIEDMAN, PA
1135 Kane Concourse.
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
19156 June 28. July 5. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
< TITIOU8 NAME LAW
Hi K IS HEREBY GIVEN
Ke undersigned, desiring to
>n buaineaa under the fie
Name Easy Blin.U intends
tut said name with the
f the Circuit Court of Dade
Flonda.
Luis Martinez
July 6. 12. 19.26.198.-.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-23160
FLORIDA BAR NO. 0260S6
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE The Marriage of
FRITZ DOLCE.
Husband Petitioner.
and
JEANETTE A. DOLCE.
Wife. IF say i hi list
TO Jeanette A Doles
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney.
THEODORE FISHER. ESQ.
6060 Biscayne Blvd.. Suite 101.
Conger Life Insurance Bldg .
Miami. Florida 33137. on or before
the 12th day of July. 1986. else
Petition will be taken as confessed
DATED this 6th day of June,
1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER. Attorney
for
Husband/Petitioner
5050 Bisrayne Blvd Suite 101
Conger Life Ins Bldg
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone (306) 758-9523
19127 June 14, 21. 28; July 5. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION-
IS THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CAM NO. 85-26843
IN RE The Marriage of
JULB C JENNINGS
Petitioner,
and
PEARL JENNINGS.
Respondent.
TO: Pearl Jennings
8909 Helen
Detroit. Mich 48211
A Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you in the above Court. You are re-
quired1 to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. on Sanford
Freed. Petitioner's Attorney. 19
West Flagler St.. Rm. 404. Miami.
Ha. 33130 and file the original
with the Clerk of the above Court
on or before August 2. 1985. other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief prayed in
the Petition.
DATED June 28. 1985
RICHARD P BRINKER
CLERK
BY J BYRON
Deputy Clerk
(CIRCUIT COURT SEALl
19169 Jill) 6 1- I" -' '
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-27309
FAMILY DIVISION
Florida Bar No. 04*834
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ISRAEL DANNY SIRI.
Peti tioner'H usband
and
RONIT LEVY
Respondent/Wife
TO: RONIT LEVY
199-80 Keno Avenue
Holliswood. New York. 11423
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on
JOSEPH W MALEK. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
350 Lincoln Road, Suite 501.
Miami Beach. Florida. 33139, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
August 9. 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this day of July 2. 1985.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
JOSEPH W. MALEK. Esquire
360 Lincoln Road. Suite 601
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19178 July 5. 12, 19. 26. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-27065
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ROSA ROJAS.
and
HUMBERTO ROJAS.
TO: HUMBERTO ROJAS
146 Palisade Avenue
Engteweed. New Jersey 07631
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is Emilio C. Pastor. Esq. -
PH I- 155 South Miami. Avenue.
Miami. FL. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 9, 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand
Bfl in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall he published
once each week for four con
eeuthre weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said OOUrt a* Miami. Flonda on
tin.- 1st day of July. 1985.
RICHARD P BRINKEK
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By J BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
.it Court Seal)
Emilio C. Pastor. Esq
PH I 155 South Miami Avenue
Miami. Flonda 33130
Tel.: (305) 372-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
19174Z July 5. 12. 19. 26. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name BRICKELL
AVENUE PLANTSCAPES at
400 S.E. 2nd Avenue. Miami,
Florida 33131 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Flonda
Rrickell Avenue
Floral Company, Inc
TALIANOFF A RUBIN
George J Talianoff. PA.
Attorney for Bnckell
Floral Company. Inc.
MM South Bavshore I>nve 600 C
Miami. Flonda Mill
19187 July 5. 12. 19.26. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Namber 86-6788
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MOSES TEPLICKI
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra
tion of the estate of MOSES
TEPLICKI. deceased. File
Number 85-5788. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Divisio. the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is Carlos Teplicki. whose ad-
dress is 20310 N.E. 2nd Avenue.
North Miami Beach. Florida
33179. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the secunty shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration: July
5. 1985.
Carlos Teplicki
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Moses Teplicki
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATP/E:
Richard I. Kroop
Kwitney. Kroop & Scheinberg,
PA
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach. F'lorida 33139
Telephone: (305) 538 7575
19175 July 5. 12.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinng to
enirage in business under the fic-
titious name JUST DESSERT at
69 N.E 79th Street, Miami, Dade
County. Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
NEIGHBORS
RESTAURANT. INC.
BY: JAMES J JAMESON,
President
ROSA M VEGA
Attorney for Neighbors
Restaurants. Inc.
218 Almeria Avenue.
Coral Gables. Flonda 33134
19164 JulyS. 12. 19.26. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desinng to
engage in business under the fie
titious name BELLA F'EMINA in
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
LESANCO. INC..
a Florida Corporation
By Bela Florentin,
Nice President
Nelson C Keshen. Esq.
Attorney for Lesanco Inc.
19130 June 14. 21,28 Julv5. 198;>
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CA8E NO. 86-23161
FLORIDA BAR NO. 026026
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
SAMSON JEAN BAPTISTE,
Husband/Petitioner,
and
MELODY JEAN BAPTISTE,
Wife/Respondent.
TO: Melody Jean Raptiste
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney.
THEODORE FISHER. ESQ.
5060 Biacayne Blvd., Suite 101.
Conger Life Insurance Bldg .
Miami. Florida 33137. on or before
the 12th day of July. 1985. else
Petition will be taken as confessed.
DATED this 6th day of June.
1985.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER, Attorney
for
Husband/Petitioner
5050 Biacayne Blvd.. Suite 101
Conger Life Ins Bldg
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone: (306) 758-9523
19128 June 14.21, 28; July 5. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 86-1829
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
THERESA LAURIENTE.
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: MARY RAMELLI. sister
if alive, and/or dead, her
(them) known heirs,
devisees, legatees or
grantees and all persons
or parties claiming by
through, under or against
her (them) Residence unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Compromise and Pay Claims and
Petition for Order to Sell Real
Estate haa been filed in this court
You are required to serve written
defenses to the petition not later
than July 29, 1986. on petitioner's
attorney, whose name and address
are:
MICHAEL J ALMAN.
ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
and to file the original of the writ-
ten defensea with the clerk of his
court either before service or im-
mediately thereafter. Failure to
serve written defenses as required
may result in a judgment or order
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion, without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on June 17, 1985.
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
As Clerk of the Court
By DIOSDADA CANCIO
As Deputy Clerk
19140 June 21. 28;
July 5. 12.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 86-19576 Div. 18
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PLBLICATION
Bar No. 345741
IN RE The Marriage of:
STASIA WILLIAMS,
Petitioner/wife,
and
CALVIN WILLIAMS.
Respondent/husband.
YOU. CALVIN WILLIAMS,
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the amended
petition for dissolution of marriage
with the Clerk .if the above Court
and serve a copy thereof upon the
petitioner's attorney. Martin
Cohen. Esq.. 622 S.W 1st Street.
Miami. Fla. 33130. on or before Ju
ly 19. 1986. or else petition will be
confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami. Dade County.
Flonda, this 11th day of June.
1985.
RICHARD P BRINKER,
Clerk, Circuit Coun
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
Deputy Clerk
19133 June 14. 21. 28; July 5, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-22724
FLORIBA BAR NO. 025026
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ROLLIN BERTHIL
Husband/Petitioner
and
D'ANDREA AYTES BERTHIL
Wife/Respondent
TO: D'Andrea Aytes Berthil
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney.
THEODORE FISHER, ESQ.
5050 Biscayne Blvd.. No. 101. Con
ger Life Ins. Bldg.. Miami. Florida
33137. on or before the 12th of Ju
ly. 1985, else Petition will be taken
as confessed.
DATED this 4th of June. 1985
RICHARD P BRINKER, Clerk
Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
By: Barbara Perez
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER. Attorney
for
Husband/Petitioner
5050 Biscayne Blvd.. No. 101
Conger Life Ins. Bldg
Miami, Flonda 33137
Telephone: (305) 758-9523
19122 June 14. 21. 28; July 5. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-22723
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Mamage of
MARLENE HOMICILE
Wife/Petitioner
and
ARINKS HOMICILE
H usband/Respondent
TO: ARINKS HOMICILE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney.
THEODORE FISHER. ESQ.
6060 Biacayne Blvd.. No. S-101
Conger-Life Ins Bldg., Miami.
Florida 33137. on or before the
12th of July, 1985. else Petition
will be taken as confessed.
DATED this 4th day of June.
1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER. Clerk
Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Perez
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER, Attorney
for
Wife/Petitioner
5060 Biscayne Blvd.. No. S-101
Conger Life Ins Bldg.
Miami. Flonda 33137
Telephone. (305) 758-9523
19123 June 14. 21. 28; July 5. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COl'NTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-23158
FLORIDA BAR NO. 02602C
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE The Mamage of
ERSULIE SEMEAS DESIRE
a/k/a
Odette Semeas iH-sir
Wife/Petitioner
and
WILLIE DESIRE
Husband/Respondent
TO: WILLIE DESIRE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE H E K t B i
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney,
THEODORE FISHER. ESQ..
5050 Biacayne Blvd.. Suite 101.
Conger Life Insurance Bldg..
Miami. Flonda 33137. on or before
the 12th day of July. 1985. else
Petition will be taken as confessed
DATED this 6th day of June.
1985
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
of Dade County. Flonda
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER, Attorney
for
Wife. Petitioner
5050 BkURM Bl-.i Suite 10]
Conor Life Ins Bldg.
Miami. Flonda 33137
Telephone: (305) 758-9 .23
19125 June 14. 21. 28; uly 5. 1985


Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nwbtr 85-4040
DivisiaaOl
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REBECCA ABROMSON.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
Hie administration of the estate
of Rebecca Abromaon, deceased.
File Number 86-4040. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagier
Street. Miami. FL 33130 The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative'!! attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (11 all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice ha*
begun on June 28. 1986.
Personal Representative:
MAURICE ABROMSON
37 Alexander Road
Newton. MA 02161
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Sparber, Shevin, Shapo k
Heilbronner. P.A.
One Southeast Third Ave.
Miami. FL 33131
Telephone: (306) 368-7990
19164 June 28: July 6. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Kile Nasiber 85-5828
DivisiaaOl
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SELMAFTNE,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of SELMA FINE deceased. File
Number 86-6828. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dad* County.
Florida, Probate Divuuo. the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse 73 Wast Flagier
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on Jury 6. 1986.
Personal Representative:
ABRAHAM GRUNHUT
1366 Biamtx Drive
Miami Beach. Florida SS14I
Attorney for Personal
Rsprsssntstivs,
RAPHAEL K. YUNES
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone (306) 538-6216
19171 July 5. 12. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-270*3
IN RE: The Marriage of:
CAROLL I. MOORE.
Petitioner,
and
IRA LEE MOORE.
Respondent.
TO: IRA LEE MOORE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar
nage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before August 2. 1986. otherwise a
default will be entered.
July 1. 1986
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C. P. Copeland
19172 JulyS. 12. 19. 26. 1M6
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuaber 84-597*
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNIE JACKSON,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ANNIE
JACKSON, deceased. File
Number 84-6979. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 Wast Flagier
Street. Miami. Florida. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
* NATHANIEL RAMSEY, whose
iddress is 14720 Monroe Street.
Richmond Heights. FL 33176. The
tame and address of the personal
representative's attorney are act
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or ii**nrxl they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
drees of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed
If the churn is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
June 28. 1986.
NATHANIEL RAMSEY
as Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ANNIE JACKSON.
Deceased
SILVER k SILVER
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
150 S E 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (306) 374-4888
By MAX R. SILVER
19158 June 28; July 5, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name OLGA BOUTIQUE at
8770 SW 24 St Miami 33166 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dad* County. Florida.
DIGNA O. LORENZO
8770 SW 27 St Miami Fl. 33166
19137 June 21.28:
July 5. 12. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name ONCOLOGY
HEMATOLOGY ASSOCIATES
at 1688 Meridian Avenue. Suite
702. Miami. Florida 33139 intend?
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
OLEG S. SELAWRY.
M.D.. PA.,
* Florida corporation.
"Partner"
CARLOS J. DOMINQCEZ.
M.D.. F.A.C.P P A..
a Florida corporation
"Partner"
HARRY B SMITH. Esq
Attorney for Oncology
Hematology Associates
19163 June 28; July 6. 12. 19. 1986
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-27094
IN RE: The Marriage of:
GU1BERT JEAN BAPTISTE,
Petitioner,
and
JULIE JEAN-BAPTISTE.
Respondent ___
TO JULIE JEAN-BAPTISTE,
Residence unknown, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney, 612 Northwest 12th
Ave.. Miami. Florida. 33136. and
file original with Court Clerk on or
before August 2. 1986, otherwise a
default will be entered.
July 1, 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: C. P. Copeland
19173 July 5. 12.19. 26. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-2*2*2
<)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GILMA C DE MELCHOR.
Petitioner/Wife.
and
ALFONZO JIMENES.
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Alfonso Jimenes
(Address Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Henry Leyte-Vidal. Esquire, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 701 SW 27h Avenue. Suite
626. Miami. Florida 33136. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 2. 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26th day of June. 1966
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Henry Leyte-Vidal, Esquire
701 SW 27th Avenue. Suite 625
Miami. Florida 3313S
Telephone: (306) 541-2266
19159 June 28, Jury 5. 12. 19. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Ac tie* No. 86-26086
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Fls Bar N. 263049
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ISIS TERESA DOMINGUEZ
Petitioner'Wife
and
DIEGO ENRIQUE ESTELA
Respondent/Husband
TO: DIEGO ENRIQUE ESTELA
Respondent/Husband
Residence 1'nkown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage ha* been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
DAVID M. SOSTCHIN. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
2550 North University Dr.
Sunrise. Florida 33322. and file the
original with the clerk ot the above
styled court on or before August
2nd. 1986; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 18 day of June. 1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. Byron
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID M SOSTCHIN. Esq.
2660 North University Dr.
Sunrise. Florida 33322
Telephone 306-749-0888
Attorney for Petitioner
19161 June 21.28; Jury 6.12. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-231*2
FLORIDA BAR NO. 028O26
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
JEANNETTE BROWN.
Wife/Petitioner
and
JAMES BROWN.
Husband. Respondent
TO JAMES BROWN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner** Attorney.
THEODORE FISHER. ESQ.
5060 Biscayne Blvd.. Suite 101,
Conger Life Insurance Bldg
Miami. Florida 33137. on or before
the 12th day of July. 1986. else
Petition will be taken a* confessed
DATED this 6th day of June.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Ocrix
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER. Attorney
for
Wife/Petitioner
5060 Biscavne Blvd.. Suite 101
Conger 1-ife Ins Bldg.
Miami. Florid* 33137
Telephone: (306) 758-9623
19124 June 14.21. 28; Jury 5. 1985
DM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-23169
FLORIDA BAR NO. 026024
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
CHENET TELFORT,
Husband/Petitioner
and
YDOXIE TELFORT.
Wife/ Respondent
TO YDOXIE TELFORT
34 Rue Cspois la mort.
Port de Paiz. Huuti. W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney.
THEODORE FISHER. ESQ.
5060 Biscayne Blvd.. Suit* 101.
Conger Life Insurance Bldg..
Miami. Florida 33137. on or before
the 12th day of July. 1986. else
Petition will be taken as confessed
DATED thai 6th day of June.
1986.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER. Attorney
for
Husband/Petitioner
5060 Biscayne Blvd.. Suite 101
Conger Life Ins. Bldg.
Miami. Florida 38137
Telephone (306) 758-9623
19126 June 14. 21. 28. Jury 5. 1985
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTIOU8
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA)
ss:
COUNTRY OF DADE)
The undersigned, under oath,
ays; It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in s
business enterprise under the fic-
titious name of J. D. NAVARRO
"UN MILLON DE TRAJES
PARA USTED" located at 30042
SW 153 PL Homestead. Zip
33033 in the city of Miami-. Dad*
County. Florida.
Those interested in said enter
pnae. and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
JOSE D NAVARRO
MARLENE NAVARRO
LUIS A. NAVARRO
19132 Juml4.21.28.
July 6. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-26641
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CORDOVA RODRIGUEZ.
NORMA
Petitioner,
and
RODRIGUEZ. GABINO S
Respondent.
TO Gabino S. Rodriguei
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve s copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any. to it on DEL
VALLE k NETSCH. PA., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 200 Aragon Ave., Suite 4,
Coral Gable*. Florida 33134. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
July 26th. 1986; otherwhi.se s
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once aach week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 20th day of June. 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
19157 June 28;
July 5. 12. 19. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. LN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Artiaa N*. 86-26063-12
IN RE The Marriage of
JACQUES FRED CHER.
and
BERNADETTE CHER.
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: BERNADETTE CHER
Boulevard Rue 19 and 20
Number 2
Cap Hatien. Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
GEOFFREY W PINES, attorney
for Petitioner, whose sddreas is
250 Giralda, Coral Gabies. FL
33134. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before July 26. 1986. other-
wise s default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 18 day of June, 1986
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Laaunane Marcond
A* Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEOFFREY W PINES
250 Giralda
Coral Gables. FL 33134
19150 June 21. 28; July 5. 12.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
THE ELEVENTH JUDK .
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. *.|
AND FOR DADE COUNTY'
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-26629
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARTHA C. RODRIGUEZ,
Petitioner,
and
JOSE A RODRIGUEZ.
Respondent.
TO Jose A. Rodrigues
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dissolu
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a cogy r*
your written defenses, if any. to ::
on MELV1N J. ASHER. ESQ (fj
tomey for Petitioner, whose sd
dress is 826 South Bayshore Drive
Suite 543. Miami. FL 33131. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
August 2. 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the ml
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 27th day of June. 1986.
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clark. Circuit Court
Did* County. Florida
By G. BARRERA
A* Deputy Clerk
19168 Jury 6. 12. 19. 26. 19k
NOTICE UNDER
FICTTTIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring U
engage in business under the fir
titious name EVERGLADES
ROOFING at 2320 SW 9 St. Apt I
Miami Fl 33135 intends u
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun
ty. Florida.
LAZARO GARCIA
19146 June21.28;
July 5. 12. 19 .
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name American Truck
Parts k American Truck Supply at
7386 N.W. 72 Ave.. MiamT Fl
33166 intend to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
American Truck Supply Inc
19157 Jun.2,.
Jury 6. 12. 19, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name American Truck
Part* k American Truck Supplies
st 7386 N.W. 72 Ave.. Miami. Fl.
33166 intend to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
American Truck Supplies Inc
19167 June 28.
July 5 12. 19, 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
*>* be undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name Martinet and
Associate* at 7244 SW. 22 St
Miami FL 33156 intends to
rg**ter said name with the Clerk
ot Uie Circuit Court of Dad* Coun
ty. Florida.
Emeteno Richard Martinet
19146 Jun*21.28;Julv5. 12 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION-
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-22966 (13)
MARC BROXMEYER.
Petitioner
vs
FLAGSHIP NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI BEACH, as Trust'
etal.
Respondent*
NOTICE OF ACTION
Fla. Bar No. Of 7864
TO
FLAGSHIP NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI BEACH, a* Trustee
1111 Lincoln Road Mall
Miami Beach. Florida
JOEL SUSS MAN, a* Trustee
6346 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida
CLIFFORD Y PIERCE
820 41st Street
Miami Beach. Flond*
SLZETTE BROXMEYER
2516 NE. 182nd Street
Ojus. Florida
and all unknown parties claiming
any interest, by through, under or
against the said FLAGSHIP NA
TIONAL BANK OF MIAMI
BEACH, as Trustee. JOEL
Sl'SSMAN. as Trustee. CLIF
FORDY PIERCE and SUZETTE
BROXMEYER. if alive, or if dead
whether a* spouses, heir
devisee*, grantees, assignees.
I tenors, creditors, trustees, or
other claimants, as to all of whom
residence is unknown, and all
unknown parties having or claim
ing to have any right, title or in
tersst in the promissory notes
described in the Petition
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to re-establish lost pro
misaory note* ha* been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your writf-
defenses. if any. on MARVIN I
MOSS. P.A. Petitioner's At
torney. whose address is 1090
Kane Concourse. Bay Harbor
Islands. Florida 33154, on or
before July 12. 1986. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court, either before service on
Petitioner's attorney, or im
mediately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
PetiOon.
WITNESS ray hand and seal of
this Court on this 5th day of June.
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
as Clark of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19121 J 1*. Ji. m July 6. 1986


Tames in the News
iesenthal Center Pays Tribute
To American Soldiers
Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Beth David Founder,
Nathaniel Zalka
mark the 40th annivaraar)
tin- defeat of Nazi (jermam. the
on Wiesenthal Center paid
| te to the American soldiers
liberated European .lewry
^m Hitler's tyranny at its an-
il dinner in New York.
>i:ine Sawyer, of CBS1 60
iiites, served as mistress of
monies, and Martin S. Davis.
trad M dinner chairman of the
Jotional tribute attended by
re than 700 people.
fhe dinner reunited surivors
their liberators who had not
each other for 40 years.
M Anti-Defamation League of
n B'rith has labeled remarks
at the NAACP's convention
lias by David Saperstein, CO-
of the Religious Action
it of the Union of American
hew Congregations, as
ionising" and "purposefully
nding."
supporting the NAACP's
n.'iiil quota position. Rabbi
rstein said that AI >I. was out-
^p with the Jewish communi-
ty opposition to preferential
lent in affirmative action
fams.
lhan lVrlmutter, national
>r of the Anti-Defamation
ue declared that "Kissing
lidei isn't the way to
then relationships it's an
[and familiar snivel.
rstanding between groups
[l come from patronizing: it
from an honest and
d exchange of views. For
-.iferstein to criticize AIM.
rationalizing Jesse
in's anti Semitism is sadlv
....
American Jewish Congress
ft ia concerned that waste.
uion and inefficiencies in
rj spending are weakening
rfense efforts and pose a
'< the natmn's economy.
"lutK.n passed by the
n's executive commit-
released by its president.
|ore R. Mann, declares:
fully recognizing the im-
Ke "f an adequate defense.
deeply concerned about the
and inefficiencies inherent
Administration*! military
resolution notes that the
It -ize of the military budget
put urgently needed reduc
the Federal deficit and
)re "poses a threat to the
economy and the quality
if its citizens "
Chaim Elata. former
ntist of Israel's Ifinistr)
ad Infrastnicture. tuu
acting president <>f
1 in University of the
who is also rector of the
Drill serve as president
August. 1986. according
ert H. Arnow of New
r urman of the I'niver-
<>ard of (iovernors.
ng his election as rector
gust. Elata was called on
the tough decisions need
balance the University
|while retrenching for the
academic year followinig
| cutbacks in government
1 of universitiea.
I Goldman, director of the
rk based Americans For a
srael, leveled harsh
against the foreign
of the Shimon Peres
lent during his remarks at
I annual conference of the
of Advanced Strategic
litical Studies held in
The appointment of Judith
Frede Love as vice president
for development of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of
Amenta is announced by the
Seminary. Mrs. Love is
heading the Seminary's cam-
paign to raise $50 million by
June. 1987 in honor of the
Seminary Centennial. Monies
are needed for maintenance,
scholarships, and to complete
the building fund for the neu-
Ivan F. and Seema Boesky
Family Library, which crowns
the Seminary's Broadway
eamput "n Momingaiai
Heights. N.Y.
"Israel's problem during the
currant administration is that it's
become weak in dealing with its
belligerent neighbors. They have
painted themselves into a
negotiating corner, which says
you are the guilty party and that
through concessions, you can br-
ing about peace." said Goldman
during his address
"Therefore, we've seen retreat
and surrender Retreat from
Sinai. l>ebanon. the willingness to
negotiate Judea and Samaria, and
the recent prisoner for hostage
exchange," he said. "This policy
of weakness will only lead to a lot
of bloodshed "
"The package seems new. but
the ingredients are old." said
Prof. Yehuda Bauer, head of the
Yidal Sassoon International
i enter for the Study of anti
Semitism at the Hebrew Univerai
tj of Jerusalem, in warning of the
ever present danger of anti
Semitism.
Prof Bauer, speaking last week
at a symposium at the Hebrew
University following the dedica-
tion of the Sassoon Center, said
that the outbreak of violent anti-
Semitism does not require a man
of people who openly advocate
such a policy, but merely a highly
motivated, violent core groups,
combined with an indifferent or
moderately anti-Semitic society
facing a crisis situation.
This was the situation in Ger-
many in the 1930s, he noted. La
tent anti-Semiticsm can swiftly
become murderous anti-Semitism
in such a crisis, he said.
Dr. David Gordis. executive
vice president of the American
Jewish Committee, will deliver
the keynote address at the
Federation of Jewish Men's
Clubs' 53rd convention scheduled
for the Concord Hotel, Kiamesha
Lake, N.Y.. August 11-15.
Convention delegates will also
hear an address by MK Abbs
Ebsn. who will be the co-
recipient, along with Public
Television WNET/Thirteen. of
Federation Distinguished Service
Award.
A constitutional authority has
warned a Senate Judiciary Sub-
committee that proposed amend-
ments to permit prayer in the
public schools would "substantial-
ly alter the existing relationship
between governement and
religion." The change, he said,
would run counter to the intention
of the nation's founders.
Norman Redlich. dean of the
New York University Law School
and chair of the Commission on
Law and Social Action of the
American Jewish Congress, told
the Subcommittee on the Con-
stitution of the Senate Committee
on the Judiciary that the amend-
ments, if enacted, would be
"disruptive and divisive" to the
public schools and "educationally
unsound."
Redlich noted that while the
Constitution is not "immutable,"
the Bill of Rights, which
guarantees religious liberty and
separation of church and state,
has never been amended. "That is
because, no doubt, the Bill of
Rights of the Constitution oc-
cupies a special niche in American
political thought," the law school
head noted.
"The withdrawal of the Israel
Defense Forces from Lebanon will
;igain make the Galilee region
more vulnerable to terrorist at
tack, compelling Israel to reshuf-
fle its national priorities and give
immediate attention to the
Galilee's needs." said Dr. Samuel
I. Cohen, executive vice president
of the Jewish National Fund of
America.
Cohen stressed the need for
bolstering and strengthening the
region at a meeting of 75 national
and regional executives attending
JNF's staff conference in New-
York
Cohen reported that JNF will
intensify its ongoing program of
land reclamation for the establish-
ment and expansion of mitzpim.
hilltop village outposts, and for
high-technology industries.
suitable for the area's rugged ter-
rain New forest areas will be
planted, and road construction
will Ik- accelerated to link the
mitspim and outlying communites
with each other anil with Israel's
rnainstrea
Afl million bequest for scholar
ships to Brandeis University from
the estate of the late Marion
Radgik of New York City has
been announced by Brandeis
President Evelyn E. Handler,
who lays threatened cuts in
federal aid may make students
more dependent on private
philanthropy.
"While debate continues in
Washington over shortsighted
proposal to diminish the federal
partnership in higher education, it
is incumbent upon the educational
community to build programs that
can help bridge the widening gap
between need and resources,'
Handler said.
"A central issue in the debate if
the reliability of resources. There
is no substitute in the private sec-
tor for the traditional federal com-
mitment. Nevertheless, gifts and
bequests such as that recently
received from Mrs. Radgik's
estate permit access to education
to young people whose potential
would be lost without it."
Nathaniel Zalka. who build one
of South Florida's first wholesale
food distributorships died Tues
day. He was 84.
Born in London. Mr. Zalka came
to the United States as a young
child with his haberdasher father.
Reared in New York City, he
came to Miami in 1926.
His first wife, Agnes, died in
1966.
He established the food
wholesale business. Certified
Poultry and Egg Co. He built the
company into a major distributor
of poultry and cheeses to Miami
Beach hotels and restaurants.
Mr. Zalka sold his company to
Sun C:ty Industries after his
retirement in 1967.
Mr. Zalka was one of the
founders of Beth David Congrega-
tion and became its president in
the 1940s. He was also instrumen-
tal in forming the Greater Miami
Jewish Cemetery Association.
Survivors include his wife, Ed-
na; daughters Sheila Kline and
Mildred Hipsman; and six
grandchildren.
Services were held Wednesday
at the Riverside Alton Road
Chapel.
KASTKSHAIM
George, of Miami Beach passed away June
27 He is survived by his wife. Beverly; sons
Seth and Michael, mother Anne and sister
Alice Kruger Mr Kastenhaum was a prac-
ticing attorney in Dade County for the past
35 years Masher* Chapel
MARS
William (Bill). 52 of North Miami Beach
passed away June 28. He is survived by his
wife Beverly, sons Rick and Gary and
daughter Faith Member of Beth Torah Con
IfTvirntion North Miami Beach and founder
of Temple Adath Yeshurun North Miami
Beach Levitt Weinstein
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
PL-OTKIN
D>ra. K.'l. of Miami passed awa> June L".t
Mrs IMotkin had made her horn, here for
the paxt 43 years coming ft1'" She
I* survived by her daughter Hdei Morril)
Scholl of Pembroke PbsM Interment at Mt
N.-t.. I JMDStaf)
POX, Sarah. X.r. of Miami Beach JtUM 88
Kiversi.le
0L1CKJSN, I'earl. tiy. of Miami. .'.
STERNUBB, Alvin 8., 61, "f Miami. June
'-"y Riverside.
[IRANOKF. Murray W, >f Mian; June 88
Riverside.
BF.RR. Milton R. 77. of North Miami
KubinZilbert
HART. Irene. 68. of North Miami. June 80
ROBINSON. Rose, of Miami Beach. June
29. Riverside.
BARON. Rose. 73. of North Miami Beach.
June 26. Riverside.
CANTOR. Philip, of North Miami Beach
REINER. Pauline Services in New Jersey
ALDERMAN, Mildred. 75. of North Miami
Beach. June 27. Riverside
GEWANTER, Steven Marc, of Miami
Lakes. June 27 Riverside
KLEINMAN. Frances. 74. June 28.
Riverside.
REGAN, Ethel. 74. of North Miami Beach.
June 28. Riverside.
STEIN. Alex, of Miami. June 26. Services in
Chicago. Ill
TUCKER. Harold. 59. of Miami. June 27.
CANTOR. Beatrice. 57. of North Miami.
June 26. Riverside
GELLER. Jack. 81. of North Miami Beach.
June 25 Levitt-Weinstein
HECHT. (Barth) AdeJe. 90. of Miami. June
25 Interment at Star of David.
KLEIN, Fneda. 89. of Miami June 26
LOGIN. Leo of Miami Beach Rubin Zilbert
KELLER. Jeanne. 87, of Miami Beach
June 30 Riverside Mt Nebo
RARBACK. Paul. North Miami Beach
Riverside
ROCKMAN. Samuel S.. Miami Beach. June
29 Services in New Jersey
KOSENKRANZ. Joseph. Miami Beach.
Jure 30. Riverside.
ROSENSTEIN. Arthur, of Miami Beach
Ruoin ZUbert.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do I
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
AMonument. Inc.
7610 Northeast 2nd A.enue
Phone 759-1669
Through years ot dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Honda
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE ASSURED PLAN
LARRIES BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
*UNfc"AL DlRfcOOR
.... 4 || | .

8652353

... ... ..
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Hiver*ide Memorial Chapel, Inc
New York: (212)263-7600 Queens Blvd. A 76th Rd.. Forest Hills. N.Y


Hal aHBBa


mm

Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, July 5, 1985
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "And Balaam taw Israel and said How
goodly art thy tints, O Jacob, thy dwellings 0 kmWmT
(Number* 24.2-5).
BALAK
BALAK Hearing of the Israelites' victory over the
Amorites. Belak. king of Moab. became frightened. Jointly
with the elders of Midian. he sent messengers to Balaam, the
son of Beor, urging him to curse Israel. Balaam was both a
soothsayer and a prophet, and it was believed that his curse
would lead to the defeat of the Israelites. But Balaam.
hearkening to the voice of God. twice refused to accompany
Belak s lueasangeTii on the hostile mkoon. Finally God said to
Balaam: "Go with the men; but only the word that I shall
speak unto thee, that thou shah speak" (Numbers 22.35). En
route to Balak. an angel warned Balaam. Whan he arrived, ha
had Balak build seven altars and make appropriate sacrificial
offerings preliminary to Balaam's cursing Israel. Bat when
the time came. Balaam gave the Israelites his blessing instead
of his curse. This reversal was repeated three times. Moabit*
and Midianite women seduced some of the Israelites,
persuading them to worship the idol Baal of Peor. As a result,
a plague broke out in the Israelite camp. The plague oaased
only whan Phinehas stabbed an Israelite man to death for
consorting with a Midianite woman.
asrttea st Me tew ts ssfcsclsa
aw JwrnUm Harness." Was by P.
T*e wasi m swjNaaw si M
w srssMssf st ate seetety
Montreal Jews Denounce New
School Law As Discriminatory
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
Jewish leaders have strongly
criticised a new law which they
claim discriminates against
Jewish parents of children atten-
ding Protestant schools in Greater
Montreal by denying those
parents the right to vote on
School Board decisions even when
they are elected board members.
At a meeting here, held under
the chairmanship of Bernard
Finestone, chairman of the Cana-
dian Jewish Congress Quebec
region, the new legislation was
sharply attacked by Claude Ryan,
official education critic for the
Liberal Party in the Quebec
Assembly; Herbert Marx. Liberal
Assembly member from Montreal;
Mildred Khokxmy. representing
the CJC; and Jean Pierre Proul
from the newspaper. Ls Devoir.
Despite several CJC telegrams
of protest. Bill 59 was enacted in-
to law on June 4. Finestone said it
was "particularly odious, since it
removes the basic democratic
right of representation based on
taxation."
He said the CJC had informed
the Quebec government that the
new law, "by discriminating on
the basis of rekjion," waa in direct
contravention of its own charter
of Human Rights and the Cane-
dian Law of Rights and
Freedoms, which explicity ban
such discrimination. He said that
if the law is not amended, the CJC
will consider filing a complaint
with the Quebec Human Righs
Commission.
Education Minister Francois
Gendron, who had been invited to
speak at the meeting, was unable
to do so, but did not send a
representative to explain the pro-
vincial government's position on
the new law.
Bat Mitzvah
HEIDI PERLMAN
Heidi Elaine Periman, daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. Samuel D.
Periman. will be called to the
Torah as Bat Mitzvah Saturday,
July 6 at 9 a.m. at Bet Shira
Congregation.
The celebrant is a student in the
Pre-Confirmation class.
She attends Palmetto Junior.
High School where she is in the
8th grade.
Heidi plays the clarinet in the
Palmetto Junior High Band. She
enjoys swim ing and most of all en-
joys being with bar AppaJoosa
horse. Rock and Step.
Dr. and Mrs. Periman will host
the Kiddush luncheon following
the services in honor of the
occasion.
Special guests will include
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Ben
Halpern and Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Sitkin. Aunts and uncles. Dr. and
Mrs. Todd Halpern. Mr. and Mrs.
Norman Cohen. Mrs. Sharon
I'natin, and cousins Dana and
Amy Unatin, Rachel and Jody
Halpern, Bari Nan and Maria
Cohen.
JUDITH BALM AN
Judith Ann Bauman, daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Bauman
was called to the Torah as Bat
Mitzvah on May 25 at Temple Ner
Tamid.
The celebrant is a student in the
Temple Ner Tamid Religious
School.
She attends Nautilus Jr. High
School where she is in the 7th
grade. She is a member of the
science club, chorus, drama and is
an honor student. She enjoys dan-
cing, ice skating and swimming.
A Kiddush was held following
the services in honor of the occa-
sion and a reception at the
Konover Hotel Club 54.
Special guest included Raymond
Mahlmann and Adele Bauman n.
grandparents.
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Fi
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
ntON-KendeNDr. asHafaJ
SM1sralS67aSS7 Senior Rabbi
TEMPLE EMAMU-EL
171 W-lwsalsa MM
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH EL CONO R EG A TK3N
2400 Pineiros Ochre, MMsM wWmm
532*421
Center. Readl tnlnmnn SehHI
rtmgsrmmTMpMi *< i
BETH DAVID
2S25SW.3rd
CONGREGATION
<
Rttual Director
temple irro n or wohtmiav
village (Conservative)
7100 Hlspsnols Aee.. conveniently
located leal off TBSl. Cewy. ,^j.
Rabbi Marvin Rose W)
Cantor Danny Tadmora )
nsSsTair
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ol Greater Miami
137 N.E. MMiSI.. Miami. $73-t0O
SO H Kendall Dr 505-50S5
Senior Rebbt Haakoll M Bernal
Cantor Jacob G Borne loin
Executive Dtroctor RMMp OoM4n
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Grenada Btvd Relorm
Coral Gables 6S7SBS7
Machasl B. EatensUt. Rabb*
BETH KODESH
1101 SW 12 Ave
060 0331

TEMPLE ME NOR AM
20- 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowlli ^f-
Centor Murray Yavnoh \)
Xiwmlia
innaajimiii
snSaa\
auM'Hia
lilt BeTH UoEUP
222S NE 121 St. N. Miami. FL 331*1
1-5506 Conservative
Dr. Israel Jacobs. Rabb.
Moshe Friedler. Cantor /fir,
Dr. Joseph A GorHnkel. <%>
Habbi Emeritus
Irving Jsret. Executive Director
Jnjm.-
TEMPLE BETHSHOLOM
Chase A 41 st SI. 53S7231
oa iioh kmonism. aossi i saaal
MASftYJOlT AUIIIIAAT RABBI
Ul 0 C*HAN ASSISTANT lli
CANTO* 0AVI0 CONVtSf N
rnTfciiAj* aw apaj eat mmsM
Saturday 10/ AS m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jetlerson Ave.. M.8.. FL 33130
Tel. 53S4112
Rabbi Dr. Johuds Melber
Cantor Nlsslm Benyemlnt
DbSiShii
llMllMWCMlli..
A SokW r.l tm m.ibi..hl>
Ssssa rat av> rose Hajy ssai
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
10 Lincoln Rd Tel. 534 9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoe ha neh Raab. Cantor
MS
ra.
TEMPLE NER TAMID
702 Cartyle Ave ,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene LabovtU
Cantor Edward KMn
-a
1 Klein f
utaatSsa. ^'
>.
SM AARAY TEFILLAH
o4 North Miami Beech
71 Northeast 172nd St
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaaaov Sprung. Rabbi
SMAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. ISA Ave m 75 St 362 3343
Rabb. Warren Kaartl
BETM TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION M7 7526
1051 N Miami Beach Blvd.
Or Mai A Lipschltz. Rabbi
Randall Konlgsburg. Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Aronl. Cantor
Harvey L Brown. Eaec. Director
n,.m.Tir.x+m. \W)
III" SJOpm -Aa
SatwejyaXA-AV
aalam i"
MSaai
JHlfi
TEMPLE SINAI ISSOI NE 22 Ave
North Dads's Reform Congregation
Ralph P Klngsley. Rabbi 932 W10
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabb.
Irving Shulkes. Canto'
Barbara S. Remssy. Adminlttratc
FrMar
Salwdai
|ll>*
I 10 JO m
Oaay
SaajreaykSt
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
43 Meridian Ave
Doer Roieacwaly. Rabbi
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1 TOO Michigan Awe.. Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214 _
Berry J Konovltch. Rabbi ff*V
Moahe Buryn. Cantor Jf
Sergio Grobler. President
Sholem Epelbaum, President -
Religious Committee
Shabbai Safmcat S 30 m Sarmon 10 JO
Daily I"
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
000 Miller Dr. Conservative
2712311 ->:
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi v
Benlamln Adler. Cantor
David Roeenthel. AuxHIary Cantor
<*

(iiiaeijai I
TaatarCtia.il
Sal I m S^kka* S
MaO
_7aja.iaafi.4TWi
artatsliMilevaaar***
^-_
MaBavji
TaaSarCaaoai
tatat* at <
aaSia-aia.
BET SHIRA CONGREGATION
7500 S.W 120th Street ^_
23B-2B01 ('*
Rabbi David H. Auerbach '^
Cantor Howard Bender
Cantor Saul Motsete
f near IvaaMa) al *?-_
Sal amrraa

Full Text
I "i .. *
Friday, July 5, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Gen. James M. Gavin, liberator of the Wob-
h>lm concentration ramp, receives the Simon
Wirsenthal Center's Scroll of Honor on behalf
of all the American soldiers who liberated the
Nazi concentration camps from CBS 60
Minutes' Diane Sawyer at a recent function in
New York.
Midstream Maelstrom
Writer Alleges Pope Is A 'Marxist'
Continued from Page 1 -A
Hertzberg said he will seek Car-
michael's removal from the
magazine.
THE ARTICLE. 'The
Kingdom of God and the KGB."
published as the lead article in the
May issue, claimed that the
Vatican had issued only a "very
mild" condemnation of "liberation
iluology," a movement incor-
porating Marxist teachings
popular in Latin America. This
I mild condemnation is part of an
'attempt to conceal the Pope's
Marxist leanings. Carmichael
^alleged.
The Pope "has never of course
actually endorsed Marxism." Car-
TiK'hael wrote. "The Pope cannot,
ifter all. be a Marxist." The
>9 year-old Carmichael also
juoted from recent comments by
m Pope in which he suggests a
Seed for a fairer and more
suitable system of distribution of
ealth among the masses.
"An indispensible element in
ie Pope's espousal of implicit
larxism is obviously the need for
ini.'ullage." Carmichael said. "It
this need for camouflage that
lay help explain the apparent at
pmpt on his life" in May, 1981 at
it. Peter's Square in Rome by a
Turkish terrorist, Mehmet Ali
iflp*> *" attack "well nigh univer-
sity attributed to the KGB and its
Bulgarian) puppets."
CARMICHAEL. in the inter-
iew. defended his article. He said
did not regard it as controver-
Ral but as a scholarly work at
?mpting to interpret recent
Rabbi Hertzberg
political events. "I don't think the
Pope himself is an outright sup-
porter of Marxist doctrine," he
said.
But, according to Carmichael,
the Pople has never supported
Israel and also failed to issue a
condemnation of Friar Leonardo
Boff. who was finally reprimand-
ed by the Vatican for his advocacy
of liberation theology. He admit-
ted that the article has its "short-
coming." but felt it is Midstream's
responsibility to alert the Jewish
community of this new
"phenomenon."
Midstream, with a circulation of
some 15,000, is published by the
Theodor Herzl Foundation of the
'Synagogue at European Airport
BRUSSELS (JTA) The first synaoggue at any
European airport was dedicated at Brussels International
lirport Sunday by the Minister of Communications, Her-
man de Croo, who said it symbolized Belgium's respect for
reedom of religion, especially at an airport which is a
rossroads of people of all faiths.
THE 50-SEAT SYNAGOGUE is located in the main
?rminal near the Catholic and Protestant chapels the
utv-free gift shops and VIP lounge. It was built m
response to requests by the Jewish community to which the
Communications Ministry and the airport authority readily
'Breed.
Brussels Airport is an important transit center for
pghts between the United States and Israel.
WZO. A statement of purpose
says the magazine is committed to
"free inquiry" and hopes to "offer
critical interpretation of the past,
searching examination of the pre-
sent and afford a medium for con-
sidered and independent opinion
and for creative cultural
expression."
IT IS NOT intended to serve as
an official organ of the WZO.
although interviews with Hert-
zberg and Konvitz suggest that no
organization can totally
disassociate itself from a
magazine it publishes. Kalman
Sultanik. chief New York ex-
ecutive of the ZOA and a member
of the Midstream board, sup
ported the magazine's
independence.
He said Midstream is an
"independent journal. Even the
editor has a right to express his
own opinion. It is a signed article.
Mr. Joel Carmichael expresses his
own opinion, not the opinion of
the editorial board or the World
Zionist Organization. And we are
open to opinions to the contrary,"
Sultanik said in a telegram from
Jerusalem.
But for Hertzberg to allow the
article's conclusions "to stand in a
responsible Zionist journal gives
the Zionist movement a black
eye." The issue, Hertzberg said,
"is not him or me. The issue is the
article. I refuse to let him make
this into a leftwing. rightwing
Zionist fight."
"HIS RIGHTWING convic-
tions are his own business," said
Hertzberg. "and I have not run
after him because of his plitical
views But he has the right as an
editor to print whatever he wants
provided that it is responsible.
This is editorially irresponsible."
The editorial board is expected
to discuss the controversy created
by the article's publication at its
next editorial board meeting,
scheduled for September. Konvitz
said the editorial board does not
review articles prior to publica-
tion, and that no one on the
editorial board had read the Car-
michael article prior to
publication.
Konvitz said in a telephone in
terview from Cornell University
where he is professor emeritus
that the article does not speak for
the WZO and that it represents
the personal opinions of the
author, "who happened to be the
editor."
Leo Mindlin
How Amputation of Israel
May Become U.S. Policy
Continued from Page 4-A
but does nothing to put teeth into
his threats.
It has proved one more thing:
that the "Great Communicator"
has no limit either so far as his
capacity is concerned to force
others to suffer sacrifice in the
American cause. The hijackers
now know that Mr. Reagan is not
above demanding things from
Israel to pull our chestnuts out of
the fire. Next time there are
American hostages, what might
their price of "us" be for their
freedom?
THESE ARE some likely
possibilities: that Israel abandon
Jerusalem forthwith. Or the West
Bank without condition. Or the
i i< >lan Heights. Or that it return to
the pre-1967 borders, a principle
to which our best "moderate"
Arab friends, notably the Saudi
Arabians, voraciously subscribe.
So far. the record appears to
show that any single one of these
would meet with the appropriate
American demand of Israel that it
knuckle under. Far-fetched? Wit
not the Beirut hostage crisis far
fetched on June 13. one day
before it occurred?
Besides, isn't Mr. Reagan sym-
pathetic to many Palestinian
demands of Israel already on
record? Isn't he prepared to deal
with Palestinians as of now and
might indeed have already done so
after the visit to Washington of
King Hussein had the hostage
crisis not interrupted everything
else"
THIS ATTITUDE is. after all.
in line at the moment now that the
hostages have shaken hands with
their terrorist captors in
photographs for the press and
that so many of the hostages are
busy blaming the United States
for the crisis. It is. the hostages
tell us now. our fault that we do
not understand the terrorists'
purposes and that the TWA flight
was hijacked in the first place.
From a nation that helped save
a defeated Syria's face, nothing
should be surprising. From an
American President who did
nothing to protest Syria's destruc-
tion of the peace agreement bet-
ween Israel and a Lebanon
Migrated from both Assad and
Arafat in the end Israel's
greatest triumph in Ix'hanon and
the greatest tragedy there
because the peace agreement MNH
destroyed anything is possible
The "'Great Communicator" is
both omniscient and omnipotent
More simply, his tenon-coating re-
mains intact.
Israel May Be Heading For
Showdown With Shiites Rabin
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin warned that Israel
may be heading for a
showdown with the Shiite
Moslems in Lebanon
because extremists in that
community appear to be
taking control.
Addressing a symposium at Tel
Aviv University on the aftermath
of the war in Lebanon, Rabin ex-
pressed concern that units of the
Shiite militia. Amal. loyal to their
leader. Nabih Berri, may not be
able to withstand the extremists
in their ranks.
The latter, believed responsible
for hijacking TWA Flight 847 on
June 14. are holding 40 of its
American passengers hostage in
Beirut. Berri. who is Justice
Minister in the Lebanese govern-
ment a government most
observers agree exists only on
paper has undertaken the role
of go-between in the hostage
crisis.
ALTHOUGH the hijackers have
demanded that Israel release
more than 700 Shiite prisoners in
the Atlit detention camp in ex-
change for the hostages, many
observers here and abroad believe
this is not the central issue.
The hijack crisis "is in effect a
test for Amal and its leadership in
their rivalry with the extremist
elements." Rabin said. He observ-
ed that it came at the "least op-
portune time" as far as Israel's
relations with the U.S. and AmaJ
are concerned.
The hijackers' demands have
been addressed to Washington
with the intent to force the
Reagan Administration to
pressure Israel to free the Atlit
detainees. Both the U.S. and
Israel have maintained publicly
that they will never make conces-
sions to the hijackers or ask
anyone to do so.
RABIN NOTED that Israel has
had little trouble with Amal in
south Lebanon since April 1. At-
tacks directed at the Israel
Defense Force in the security zone
near the international border
caused no military or civilian
fatalities, he said. But the leader
ship struggle within the Shiite
community could worsen the
security situation and could even
result in an Amal alliance with the
Palestine Liberation Organization
which it has fought bitterly in re-
cent weeks, Rabin said.
The Defense Minister appeared
to reject the idea expressed by
many Israelis that the release of
1,150 convicted Palestinian ter-
rorists last May 20 in exchange
for three Israeli soldiers held by
terrorists in Damascus was a con-
tributory factor in the TWA
hijack.
Rabin noted that Beirut has
long been a haven for aerial hi-
jackers. The TWA hijack was in
fact the eighth by Shiite ex-
tremists since March. 1983. he
pointed out.
RABIN ALSO said there were
"clear signs" that the Syrians are
thinning out their military forces
in Lebanon though he could not
say to what extent. Syria occupies
about two-thirds of the country. A
year ago. Israel insisted it would
not withdraw the IDF from
Lebanon unless the Syrians pulled
their army out simultaneously.
But Israeli policy changed
radically. The unilateral
withdrawal of the IDF began last
year and the position in Jerusalem
was. if the Syrian want to remain
mired in the deadly swamps of
Lebanon, "let them enjoy it."
The symposium was conducted
at Tel Aviv University's Dayan
Center for Middle Eastern and
African Studies.
Hammer Group
Eyes Oil in Israel
JERUSALEM (WNS) The oil
exploration group belonging to
American oil magnate Armand
Hammer will invest some $19
million in their search for oil in the
Negev Uginning this month.


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Serious Criticism Voiced
Of Vatican Notes on Viewing Jews
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) A
Jewish ecumenical group
has vented serious criticism
of a new Vatican document
on Catholic-Jewish relations
published in Rome which it
considers a retrogression
from the historic Nostra
Aetate (Our Times) that
emerged from Vatican
Council II in 1964 and the
December 1, 1974
"Guidelines and Sugges-
tions for the Application of
the Declaration Nostra
Aetate."
The criticism by the Interna-
tional Jewish Committee on Inter-
religious Consultations was more
in regret than anger. It referred
to a document, "Notes on the Cor-
rect Way to Present the Jews and
Judaism in Preaching and
Catechesis in the Roman Catholic
Church."
The Notes, three years in
preparation, are the work of the
Vatican Commission on Religious
Relations With the Jews, headed
by Johannes Cardinal
Willebrands.
THEY WERE presented at a
Vatican press conference by the
Rev. Father Pierre Duprey and
Msgr. Jorge Mejia, vice president
and secretary respectively of the
Commission, and appeared in the
Vatican organ, L 'Oaaervatore
Romano. According to a state-
ment by the IJCIC. the Notes fail
to acknowledge the religious
significance of the State of Israel
to the Jewish people and refer on-
ly briefly and superficially to the
Holocaust.
The IJCIC member organiza-
tions are the American Jewish
Committee, the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, the Israel
Interfaith Committee, the World
Jewish Congress and the
Synagogue Council of America,
the umbrella organization of
Reform, Conservative and Or-
thodox Judaism in the U.S.
The statement expressed the
UJA Hits
23% Increase
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
United Jewish Appeal has record-
ed a 23 percent increase in
pledges toward its 1986 target of
$745 million, the largest ever for a
single year, UJA chairman Alex
Grass told the Jewish Agency
Assembly meeting here.
Grass said about (48 million has
already been raised to fund
"Operation Moses," the immigra-
tion of Ethiopian Jews to Israel.
Leon Dulzin. chairman of the
Jewish Agency and World Zionist
Organization Executives,
reported that Project Renewal,
the rehabilitation of slum
neighborhoods, should be com-
pleted in this decade. He said the
Jewish Agency would allocate
about $1 million this year for the
vocational training of youngsters
in development towns.
Jewish Agency Treasurer Akiva
Lewinsky told the Assembly that
in the last five years the Agency
has invested about 1300 million in
welfare and educational projects.
He said a special effort was made
to improve the quality of life in
Galilee settlements.
The Agency allocations were
supplemented by government
funds.
Rabbi Schindler
IJCIC's "disappointment over
what we perceive to be the
repressive spirit and formulation
about Jews, Judaism, the Nazi
Holocaust and the meaning of
Israel." The Notes gave "little
recognition of how the Jews con-
ceive of themselves," the state-
ment said.
IT WARNED that the Notes
"may undermine the gains we
have achieved through dialogue,
joint study and joint action in re-
cent years. For this reason, we
are all the more dismayed that
unlike Nostra AetaU itself and the
1975 Guidelines which affirmed
the duty of Catholics to consider
the Jews a living people," the
Notes were published "without
prior consultation with the Jewish
community."
Rabbi Mordecai Waxman,
IJCIC president, said he has sent
a cable to Cardinal Willebrands
asking for clarification and con-
sultation on the Notes. The IJCIC
statement said the Notes were
"totally inadequate in providing
Catholics with sufficient
guidelines on how to teach, preach
and understand" the Holocaust
and the creation of Israel, the two
events that have "decisively
shaped the way Jews define
themselves."
The statement cited as an exam-
ple Paragraph 25 of the Notes
which states that "The existence
of the State of Israel and its
political options should be en-
visaged not in a perspective which
is in itself religious, but in their
reference to the common prin-
ciples of international law."
The IJCIC statement observed
that "even within this narrow
frame of reference, nothing is said
about Israel's right to exist or in
the justice of her cause." The
statement said that in the context
of the Vatican's Notes. "Modern
Israel is emptied of any religious
significance for Christians," and
"even Israel's profound religious
significance for Jews" is mention-
ed "in such a recondite fashion as
to be unrecognizable."
THE STATEMENT found that
"equally grievous is the vague,
passing and almost gratuitous
reference" to the Holocaust and
observed that "the absence of a
strong statement on the
Holocaust is particularly painful."
The paasage referred to says
that "Catechesis should help
in understanding the meaning for
the Jews of the extermination
during the years 1939-1945 and its
consecuences."
The IJCIC declared that the
Notes aimed at remedying "a
painful ignorance" among
Catholics "of the history and
traditions of Judaism," but the
text of the Notes does not remedy
that "painful ignorance" because
"neither Jewish history nor
Jewish traditions are explored in
the Notes or even referred to as
having an independent value. In-
deed, the history and traditions of
Judaism are appropriated by the
Church."
The Notes allude to the
"negative" relations between
Jews and Christians "for two
millennia but offer nothing of this
history. How can Jews and
Judaism be presented in Catholic
teaching and preaching without
some acknowledgement of the
historical expressions of Christian
animosity?" the statement asked.
THE NOTES were also the sub-
ject of comment by Rabbi Alex-
ander Schindler, president of the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregation, the association of
Reform synagogues. The UAHC
is not a constituent of the IJCIC.
Schindler observed that this
latest Vatican document "rein-
troduces a note of religious trium-
phalism." He added that "Any ef-
fort to improve understanding
between the two faiths requires,
above all. mutual respect. Each
faith must learn to see the other
as it defines itself."
Schindler said little progress
could be made toward better rela-
tions "if one sees the other as be-
ing denied the means of salvation,
and as somewhat lesser in the
eyes of God. It is equally disap-
pointing that the new Vatican
document makes such short shrift
of the Holocaust, and that it ig-
nores the religious significance on
the rebirth of the State of Israel."
The Reform leader added that it
was "a pity" that the 20th an-
niversary of Nostra Attate
"should be marked by this ap-
parent retreat from the historic
step forward taken by the Second
Vatican Council." Nostra AetaU
declared specifically that the
Jewish people must not be held
responsible for the crucifixion of
Jesus.
Two Rabbis Plan To Marry,
Both Will Serve in S. Florida
Rachel Hertzman of Louisville, who was ordained a
Reform rabbi last June 1, plans to serve as a rabbinic assis-
tant for youth and education at Temple Kolami in Planta-
tion and also as outreach coordinator for the southeast
council of the Union of American Hebrew Congreations
(UACH), the association of Reform synagogues.
RABBI HERTZMAN also is planning an October wed-
ding to Rabbi Rex Perimeter of Omaha, and both will be
serving synagogues in the southeast Florida area. Rabbi
Perimeter will be assistant rabbi of Temple Israel in Miami.
Bankrupt Ata's End Bleaker
As Cabinet Nixes Combine Takeover
Bv HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Months of dogged efforts to
save the bankrupt Ata tex-
tile mills and the nearly
2,000 jobs they provide end-
ed when the Ministerial
Economic Committee voted
for a second time to reject
plans to sell the complex to
a syndicate of American and
Swiss investors.
The sale has been pushed
strongly by Minister of Commerce
and Industry Ariel Sharon and
Moshe Shahal. the Minister of
Energy and Infrastructure. They
argued that the cost of shutting
down the mills, including
severance pay for its workers,
would exceed the costs of keeping
them running.
THE AGREEMENT for sale.
signed earlier this month by
Sharon and the foreign principals,
called for an investment of about
|45 million in private capital. The
government was to pay Ata's
creditors, notably the Bank Leumi
and write off its own loans to the
industry in return for an under-
taking by the investors to operate
the mills for at least 10 years and
boost its exports.
But the econnomic ministers
refused to ratify the sale on June
16 by a vote of 9-3, on grounds
that the costs to the government
were badly underestimated.
Shahal and Sharon forced the full
Cabinet to take up the issue at it
regular weekly meeting Sunday,
to no avail. The Cabinet referred
the mater back to the Ministerial
Economic Committee which
upheld its earlier decision to reject
the sale, this time by a vote of 8-2.
Ironically, the government
which appointed a receiver for
Ata after it defaulted on its debts
last year, was eagerly seeking a
private buyer to prevent mass
unemployment in the Haifa area
where Ata was the largest single
employer.
THE LATEST deal, engineered
by Sharon, seemed to be the most
promising. But Treasury
economists maintained that it
placed too heavy a financial
burden on the government and
would set a bad precedent for
other economically troubled
enterprises.
The budget contains no provi-
sions to save Ata. It will now be
up to the Knesset Finance Com-
mittee to find the $9 million or
more estimated to compensate the
dismissed workers.
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751-3988 (
In
In
5713 N.W. 27th,
3149 HaUandale Beach Btvd
Irving Cypen Chairman ol me Board
Arthur P*arlman. President
Aaron Kravitz, Chairman. Thrift Shop
Committee
Fred D Hkt. Executive Director