The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02943

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
JewisHa ]Fl]rac|isyra
|#_ Number 26
Three Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, June 28,1985
PMMtMM By Mail 00 Cent*
Price 50 Cents
[rael Releases 31 Prisoners
But Insists There Must Be No Link to Demands of Shiite Hijackers
JERUSALEM Ij
VMues to maintain that
. of the 40 American
es in the hands of
t8l Shiite elements
nng the hijacking of a
A flight from Athens is
^American problem that
""""'.....*!
Reagan: U.S. Hit Because of Ties to Israel 2-A
Rabin, Navon Clash Over Hostages 8-A
Jewish Leaders Satisfied TWA Is Blameless 15-A
Rabin: U.S. Musn't Shirk Responsibility 15-A
cannot be resolved by an
Israeli action.
In this case, the action would be
Israel's release of some 700
Lebanese prisoners it captured
and is still holding. This is what
the hijackers are demanding, in
addition to a new condition voiced
by Nabih Berri, leader of the Amal
militia and negotiator for the
hijackers.
Berri said in Beirut on Monday
that the United States must
withdraw its naval forces now lin-
ed up along the Lebanese coast, or
there can be no exchange of
American hostages for Lebanese
prisoners.
IN THE face of these cir-
cumstances, Israel Sunday an-
nounced that it would release 31
Continued on Page 3-A

Economic Plan Fails;
New Program Eyed
(Cartoon: Gvntcr Ryw Mannheimtr Morgen)
\Taba Struggle
May Precipitate Crisis
In National Unity Gov't.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
like eight month-old Labor-
Itikud national unity coali-
|tn government may have
I moved a step closer to
(dissolution after Premier
Shimon Peres and Deputy
Premier and Foreign
(Minister Yitzhak Shamir,
|the Likud leader, failed to
agree on how Israel should
resolve its border dispute
with Egypt over the Taba
I region.
The two men met privately and
[ "greed to meet again on the mat-
[ ter in a few days. The crux of their
' pute is whether Israel should
accede to Egypt's insistence that
the Taba issue be settled by inter-
national arbitration a course
now favored by Peres or
whether conciliation should be
tried first, as urged by Shamir.
PERES BELIEVES that by ac-
quiescing to Egypt's wishes on
Taba, the way will be cleared to
resolving all outstanding bilateral
issues between the two countries
including normalization of rela-
tions and the return of Egypt's
Ambassador to Tel Aviv.
Shamir and his Likud colleagues
see Peres' approach as a retreat
and "sellout" by Israel. Article 7
of the 1979 Israeli-Egyptian peace
treaty provides for conciliation
and arbitration to settle disputes
Continued on Page 6-A
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Treasury has conceded
that its economic "package
deal" the wage-price
freeze in effect since last
March has collapsed but
did not say what will replace
it.
Finance Minister Yitzhak
Modai said on a television inter-
view that the freeze would not be
replaced by another similar
package after its nominal expira-
tion date at the end of July. He
hinted that new economic
measures would have to be taken
but did not elaborate.
However, Modai made it clear
that whatever the government
does it intends to control
economic policy and will not give
its partners, labor and manage-
ment, the right of veto as has been
the case in the last two package
agreements.
THE CURRENT DEAL, which
replaced one instituted in
November. 1984 that expired in
February, 1985. was worked out
between the government,
Histadrut and the manufacturers
and employers associations. It
foundered against new demands
for wage and price hikes by labor
and business to offset soaring in-
flation. Those demands were
backed by a recent rash of strikes,
work-stoppages, slowdowns and
shutdowns in both public and
private sectors.
The government is treating the
economic crisis as its top priority.
Gad Yaacobi
Gad Yaacobi. the Minister of
Economic Planning, presented
Premier Shimon Peres with a five-
year economic program aimed at
vigorous economic growth by
1990, led by export industries.
But Yaacobi's plan calls for pain-
ful belt-tightening in the im-
mediate future.
It envisages a 1.9 percent reduc-
tion in public spending over the
next two years, a 5.8 percent
decrease in investment and a 12
percent rise in exports, but a two
percent decline of living standards
in each of the next two years.
According to the plan, rapid
economic growth will be resumed
in 1987 when the gross national
Continued on Page 13-A
In Spy Case
Walker Has Long History
Of Ku Klux Klan Connections
NEW YORK Irwin
Suall, director of the Fact-
Finding Department of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, declared this
week that John A. Walker,
Jr., who has been charged
with military spying for the
Soviets since 1968, may
have had a relationship in
the past with KKK leader
Bill Wilkinson. A check of
ADL's files reveals that
Walker had actually served
in 1980 as the Virginia state
organizer for Wilkinson's
Invisible Empire, Knights of
the KKK, Suall reports.
Continued on Page 7-A
To the End
Mengele Was Unrepentant About His Nazi Atrocities
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN-(JTA)-If Josef
Mengele is in fact dead, the
notorious Auschwitz death
^np doctor died unrepen-
*ant. according to
documents published in the
Experts Say Nazi Is Dead
3-A
diaries, were made available "on
loan" to the West German
authorities by Mengele's son. Rolf
Mengele, a lawyer in Frieburg. A
spokesman for the State Pro-
junch-based weekly Bunte of jjg, indicated they are
ustrierte. authentic.
Th<* documents, includine According to historians who
studied the documents, Mengele
never regretted the atrocities he
committed at Auschwitz and
believed throughout his life that
Nazi racial theories justified his
activities.
THEY INCLUDED the selec-
tion of inmates for the gas
chambers and fatal or crippling
medical experiments on
thousands of others. Mengele is
held responsible for the deaths of
at least 400,000 Auschwitz
prisoners, most of them Jews,
which earned him the sobriquet,
"Angel of Death."
The Mengele papers were also
published by a rival weekly, the
Hamburg-based Stern which ob-
tained them from the same source
Continued on Page 3-A
Dr. Josef Mengele
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement. .Special Insert


. ~ *a<"..___
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 28,' 1985
Reagan Says
Ties to Israel Led to Hijacking
By THEO STONE
WASHINGTON (JTA)
President Reagan said
last week that the reason
the United States is singled
out as a target for terrorism
is due in part to its strong
ties with Israel.
"We seem to be a target also,
I'm quite sure, because of our
friendship and support of Israel,"
Reagan said in response to a ques-
tion during a nationally televised
news conference from the East
Room of the White House.
"So it just seems to be that
there is an anti-Americanism that
is rampant there on the part of
those who don't want peace with
Israel and who have consistently
over the years, committed teror-
rist acts against the Israelis," the
President added.
REAGAN, in a statement at the
outset of the news conference,
dominated by the current hostage
crisis in Beirut, indicated that he
would not pressure Israel into
making concession with the hi-
jackers who are demanding that
Israel release some 700 Shiite
Moslems it now holds in return for
the release of some 40 Americans
held in Beirut.
"Let me further make it plain to
Herzog, Fitzgerald Clash Over
Unsettled Conditions in Lebanon
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
Visiting Israeli President
Chaim Herzog and Irish
Premier Garett Fitzgerald
clashed sharply over the
situation in south Lebanon
where Irish troops play a
prominent role as members
of the United Nations In-
terim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL).
They also differed over the
Palestinian issue, with Fitzgerald
insisting on the need for the
Palestine Liberation Organization
to be involved in a settlement.
AT A LUNCHEON in honor of
Herzog and his wife, Aura, Fit-
zgerald said, "our people have
neither understood nor been able
to accept the manner in which
Israeli forces, and militias sup-
ported, armed and advised by the
Israeli Army, have harassed and
at times physically attacked, the
UNIFIL forces, including the
Irish contingent."
He urged Israel to use its in-
fluence with the local Lebanese
militias to enable UNIFIL to
carry out its mandate unhindered.
Fitzgerald dissociated Ireland
from the virulent rhetoric and un-
justified attacks mounted on
Israel at the United Nations, but
affirmed that the UN properly us-
ed could make a significant con-
tribution to peace.
On Arab-Israeli relations, he
declared Ireland's backing for the
policy of the European Economic
Community of which it is a
member.
IT ALSO maintains that all the
peoples of the Middle East have a
right to justice. This appllies to
the Palestinian people and in-
cludes their right to self
determination.
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Describing the PLO as the
acknowledged voice of the over-
whelming majority of the Palesti-
nians, particularly those in the
territories occupied by Israel since
1967, he added that the PLO was
showing increasing interest in
negotiations and that the PLO-
Jordanian accord was a most
helpful development.
In his reply, circulated before
the luncheon, Herzog defended
the role of the local militias, who
have been involved in clashes with
UNIFIL forces and said that
many incidents would have been
avoided had not Lebanon, incited
by Syria and the Soviet Union, re-
jected Israel's proposal for
UNIFIL to be given a wider and
more flexible role. ..-....,
NEVERTHELESS, while
defending the South Lebanese Ar-
my, Herzog said that Israel deeply
regretted a number of incidents
that occurred in the area.
"I want to emphasize again," he
repeated, "how deeply our
government regrets some of the
incidents which occurred and
which are the result of a cruel at-
mosphere of suspicion and hate.
They in no way reflect an attitude
towards the countries providing
the various contingents in
UNIFIL." He also praised
Ireland's role in UNIFIL and
described Lt. Gen. William
Callaghan, its Irish commander,
as a personal friend.
the assassins in Beirut and their
accomplices wherever they may
be that America will never make
concessions to terrorists Nor
will we ask nor pressure any other
government to do so" the Presi-
dent said, in an obvious reference
to Israel.
The President was asked why
the U.S. does not "lean on Israel"
in order that the Israelis expedite
release of the 700 Shiite detainees
which Israel has already said it
was intending to soon release.
ACCORDING TO Reagan, "the
linkage has been created that
makes it impossible for them and
for us. There was no question"
that Israel was going to release
the Shiites it now holds, he said,
adding that "it has now been tied
to where such a movement would
be in effect giving in to the ter-
rorists. And then, as I say, who is
safe?"
"That's all terrorists have to
know is that they can succeed and
get what they want. It's the same
as the customs in single kidnapp-
ing crimes in our country here, in
which we known that if possible
you try to resolve the situation
without paying the ransom,"
Reagan said.
Nevertheless, the President did
say that he thought the Israelis
were in violation of international
law when the they took the Shiite
Moslems from Lebanon into
Israel. "It's my understanding,"
the President said, "that taking
them (the Shiites) across the
border from their own country
and into another country is a
violation of the Geneva accords."
REAGAN was also asked
whether he had received "any
assurances" from Israel'that they
would release the Shiite detainees
if the hostages were released. The
President said, "We have not
dealt with them on that. As I say,
we have not interfered in any way
with them in what they're doing."
On efforts to revive Middle East
peace efforts, the President prais-
ed King Hussein of Jordan in
seeking a negotiating process, ad-
ding, "I have to commend him for
his courage and willingness to do
what he is doing in trying to bring
about direct negotiations between
the Arab states and Israel and the
Palestinians to try and get a peace
a lasting peace in the Middle
East. So we are doing everything
we can also to be of help to him."
i I
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A group of 120 immigrant children from Ethiopia paid their M
visit ever to a dentist when they were examined and treated at 7
Aviv University's School of Dental Medicine. This newly-arriv,
Ethiopian girl says 'Ah' as Prof. Haim Sarnat instructs her]
'open wide.' Her younger brother (right) seems apprehensive
youngsters, who live in the Kiryat Tivon Absorption Center tied
Haifa, were individually examined and received tooth brush
along with instruction in proper dental care.
Jerusalem Disaster Averted
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The chance discovery of [
large explosive device near an open-air market south of Td
Aviv averted what might have been a major disaster witl
injuries to civilians and possible loss of life. But two sma
bombs exploded in Jerusalem later.
ONE OF THEM injured a woman at a bus stop in thJ
suburb of Ramot. The other exploded in the French Hill
area without causing casualties or damage.
Police in Tel Aviv credited a cleaning man on his early
morning rounds at the market with the discovery of a larg
bomb. A second large bomb was found by police in a searc
of nearby buildings. Each bomb was timed to denonate dur-1
ing the peak shopping hours. Both were safely defused.
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fengele Dead
Brazilians Say Search Is Over
Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Mengele Was Unrepentant
About His Nazi Atrocities
Icirt PAULO, Brazil -
'^ no doubt. The bones
ngele's. This is the
son of a team of foren-
perts who pronounced
Te40-vear search for
Josef Mengele, the
nous Auschwitz con-
ation camp "Angel of
has come to an end.
"experts said last Friday
'believe that the skeleton ex-
i from a Brazilian cemetery
jhree weeks ago are
, those of the Nazi
"We are certain," said
i Teixeira, the head of a
team that engaged in
,ertensive forensic examina-
(Mengele's remains.
be degree of certainty is very
. much more than 90 per-
t" Teixeira declared. "Bones
h'tlie."
IS AMERICAN team sent by
j(US Justice Department and
t Simon Wiesenthal Holocaust
win Los Angeles agreed. "It
t opinion that this skeleton is
I of Josef Mengele within a
sonable scientific certainty,"
_ Lowell Levine, a New
i forensic dental expert. "It's
.(sic). There's no way it's not
Ifeisic)," he emphasized.
I fiie announcement here Friday
fetaixed a tumultuous news con-
rence that pronounced the final
1 on the last of the most im-
Joseph Mengele
1938 photo
portant of the Nazi leadership
under whose aegis more than six
million Jews perished in the Hitler
era. The announcement cor-
roborated the fact that the man
who is said to have drowned in a
swimming accident in 1979 was
Mengele himself.
A week before the forensic
teams came to their conclusions,
handwriting experts declared that
letters and notes taken from the
home of an Austrian couple here
were written by Mengele. Earlier
evidence showed that Mengele
had lived in Brazil for nearly 20
years without detection.
ACCORDING TO Rabbi Marvin
Hier, dean of the Wiesenthal
Center in Los Angeles, "There
\lsrael Releases 31
But Insists No Link
Exists To Hijackers
Continued from Page 1-A
|[iisoners. Radical Shiites prompt-
B responded that this would not
I be enough for them to return the
I hijacking hostages.
. But Israeli officials declared
I ten Sunday that its release of the
|31 prisoners had nothing
J whatever to do with the TWA
I flight brought to Beirut on June
[14 following its takeoff from
I Athens.
Ignoring the Israeli move, Berri
told CBS News, "I want the
|"00-plus."
. Israeli officials did not link their
I release to earlier statements that
I the government here had intend-
m short order following Israel's
wacuation from Lebanon, but
that such a release now posed a
[problem: how to do so without
Imaking the Shiite hijackers
I Wieve that Israel had bowed to
[heir international blackmail
because it did not want to offend
| the United States.
THE EXPLANATION Sunday
I *s that the release of the 31
0ROWARD
Qaper *
Packaging
FREE
DELIVERY FLORIDA
MIAMI 944 7077
0ROWARD
Qaper 4
Packaging
prisoners is a test of the actual
strength of Berri as a presumable
negotiator for the freedom of the
American hostages between the
United States and the hijackers.
The Israelis are saying that they
want to determine if Berri is real-
ly in control of the situation as he
says and also to provide the
United States with greater
negotiating maneuverability.
The release of the 31 prisoners
was announced by Prime Minister
Shimon Peres and Defense
Minister Yitzkah Rabin. They em-
phasized in their announcement
that the release was decided upon
in accordance with Israeli law.
Said Rabin: Any detainee is
guaranteed by Israeli law an ap-
peal to a "special committee
which is headed by a district
judge, and these people ... ap-
pealed." According to Rabin,
regarding some of those who ap-
pealed, "we came to the conclu-
sion that we'll not be able to con-
vince the committee, and
therefore we decided to release
them.
RABIN EMPHASIZED that it
was not possible at this point to
release any more prisoners
because that would erroneously
tell the Shiites that there was a
linkage between this release and
their hijacking demands.
Rabin's statements were made
on CBS-TV's "Face the Nation."
Peres spoke on NBC's "Meet the
Press," and explained that the
decision to release the 31 was
made "a few weeks ago and pass-
ed through our legislative
process."
For his part, Berri told CBS
that once Israel let go the 760
prisoners, he could guarantee that
all 40 Americans would be releas-
ed. He said that some of the
hostages had been taken swimm-
ing Sunday, adding: "It is as if
they were on holiday."
are a number of questions, but we
are basically prepared to accept
that there is a high probability this
is Mengele."
Levine noted that "The odds are
astronomical that another person
would have these characteristics
(of the skeletal remains). "In fact,
that person probably hasn't been
born yet."
Said Menachem Russek, in-
vestigator for the Israeli police in
charge of Israel's search for
Mengele, "You heard the opinion
of the experts. I have to respect
their opinion."
Russek said he was not angry
about the outcome of the case.
"Angry, no," he observed, "but a
little bit disappointed."
Using a technique developed in
West Germany, scientists
superimposed photos of Mengele
on photos of the exhumed skull in
order to match featues. The com-
parison showed that the photos
and the skull "coincided exactly,"
according to the Braizlian forensic
team.
"It was most convincing," said
Ellis R. Kerley, an American an-
thropologist. "The contours of the
skull and the photos were in com-
plete agreement. Everything fit in
with the outline of the
photographs."
OTHER identification means
included photo comparisons of
Mengele taken in 1938 and 1956
and then studied in relation to
photos of him taken in the 1970s;
teeth comparisons based on 1938
dental records and the 10 teeth
taken from the Brazilian grave;
comparisons involving the gray-
ing, dark brown hair found with
the skeleton which matched
samples of hair found in a glasses
case taken early last week from
the home of Wolfram and
Liselotte Bossert, the Austrian
couple who had befriended
Mengele.
The tests also confirmed
Mengele's known motorcycle acci-
dent as well as other injuries listed
in his 1938 medical records. The
skeleton had an old, healed frac-
ture of the right hip; a fracture of
the right thumb; and an old injury
of the right collar bone.
Continued from Page 1-A
as Bunte, according to the
authorities.
Stern purchased the documents
from Wolfram and Liselotte
Bossert, an elderly couple of
Austrian origin who said they
sheltered the fugitive Mengele at
their home near Sao Paulo, Brazil.
It was the Bosserts' claim that
Mengele died in 1979 in a swimm-
ing mishap that caused Brazilian
authorities to exhume the remains
of a man buried near Sao Paulo
under the name Wolfgang
Gerhard, presumed to be
Mengele.
ROLF MENGELE insists that
they are. He said he was notified
in 1979 of his father's death. The
Mengele family, which operates
an agricultural machinery factory
in Guenzburg, Bavaria, admitted
that it sent money periodically to
Mengele during the more than 30
years he lived in South America
after evading justice at the end of
World War II.
It has been reported that the
money was delivered either by a
courier employed by the Mengele
family or by family members
themselves. This led the mass cir-
culation daily Bild to remark
editorially that the police of all the
countries looking for Mengele
must have been asleep. By wat-
ching the Mengele family they
could have found the fugitive, Bild
said.
"The work (of the police) was
done sloppily and unprofessional-
ly. Not only in Germany but in all
other countries. Forget it? No.
Explanations of the responsible
authorities are overdue," Bild
declared."
But many observers here say
the failure to track Mengele down
by keeping an eye on his family
was not the result of police
negligence so much as a lack of
political will to investigate the
matter properly.
Gush Emunim
Newsmen Say They Must
Apologize for Attack
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Jerusalem Journalists Association
has demanded that the Gush
Emunim apologige publicly for a
physical attack on television
reporter Menashe Raz during a
mass rally they organized in Tel
Aviv.
The rally, which drew a crowd
of about 40,000 to Malchei Yisrael
Square in Tel Aviv, was billed as a
demonstration of support for 20
alleged members of a Jewish ter-
rorist underground currently on
trial for acts of violence agaisnt
Arabs in the West Bank and
others already convicted and serv-
ing sentences.
But it degenerated into angry
polemics against Attorney
General Yitzhak Zamir and the
news media, especially television,
which Gush Emunim speakers ac-
cused of bias against Jews and in
favor of Arabs. Raz was roughed
up by the crowd, and his camera
was smashed after a speaker
shouted from the rostrum,
"Menashe Raz may his name be
blotted out is here. Israel televi-
sion ought to be burned down."
The Journalists Association said
if an apology is not forthcoming
within 48 hours the media will
boycott the Gush Emunim.
At least one of the speakers at
the rally, MK Avner Sciaky of the
National Religious Party, express-
ed disgust at the behavior of the
demonstrators. He said he would
not have attended had he known
the demonstration would have
clearly racist overtones, a
reference to the denunciation of
all Arabs as terrorists.
Likdu MK Michael Eitan, who
left the rally before his turn to
speak, said he did so because it
was taken over by Kach activists.
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age t-A
me Jewish yioHdJan/Friday; June 28, 1985
M
No Sadness Now
I That Mengele Is Dead
We must join the crowd and accept the
verdict. Even Rabbi Marvin Hier, dean of
the Simon Wiesenthal Center for the
Holocaust in Los Angeles, concludes that
Dr. Josef Mengele is dead. This is the pro-
nouncement of the various teams of forensic
experts that examined the exhumed remains
of a skeleton in Brazil that were alleged to
be Mengele's. Death, it was said, came
following a stroke while Mengele was swim-
ming in 1979.
There may be cause for sadness that
Mengele beat the rap that he was not
brought to the bar of justice for his
murderous crimes as the "Angel of Death"
at Auschwitz concentration camp during the
Hitler era.
His Bones on Parade
But sadness may not be the proper
response. He was arrogant, yes. To the end
of his days, according to the notes and
papers in his personal effects found in
Brazil, he believed in the hideous principles
of Nazism and was convinced that he had
done nothing wrong.
There are victims of his still alive today
who recall him standing before lines of arriv-
ing Jews at Auschwitz where he pointed
with a calm and almost disinterested hand
either right or left, signifying life or death
for those passing him by.
On the other hand, it is Mengele who has
now been paraded for the past three weeks
before a watching world in a most ap-
propriate fashion for a man himself once
preoccupied with the deaths of others. His
bones have been permitted no rest. His
grave has been violated and opened, and his
remains have been examined, poked and
prodded down to hair and a handful of teeth
in his coffin, for experts to analyze and final-
ly to declare him Mengele's skull in their
hands passed from one to another that
this was the criminal.
Like Shakespeare's Yorik in Hamlet, like
Shelley's Ozymandius, the mighty have
turned to the bits and pieces of their own ab-
surd past a rag, a bone, a hank of hair
signifying nothing while those who come
after Mengele know him for what he was
and can take solace in the fact that justice
was done.
Irony of His Teeth
We are most taken by the irony in the
forensic statement of Lowell Levine, the
American dental expert at Sao Paulo who
confirmed that the remains are Mengele's.
Said Levine: the gap between his two upper
front teeth, so clear in the photos of him and
in the skull, was not only "distinctive, but
fairly rare in whites."
What a final statement! This fabricator of
a woud-be Nazi master race by his cruel and
vicious experiments at Auschwitz this ad-
mirer of "perfect" Aryan features should
be distinguished by dental qualities un-
characteristic of whites, let alone of
"supreme" Aryans.
Let there be no sadness.
'Shalom' to Lichtman
Shlomo Lichtman is completing three
years as head of operations of El Al Israel
Airlines' offices here. In July, the communi-
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-Jewish Florxdian
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ty will wish Lichtman well at a farewell
function as he returns to Israel and a new
position at El Al's head office at Lod
Airport.
During Lichtman's stay in Miami, he over-
saw the substantial increase in El Al traffic
resulting from the airline's Miami-Tel Aviv
connection and the record number of Jumbo
747 flights. It was also in this period of time
that non-stop flights from Miami to Tel Aviv
were introduced.
Lichtman can be proud of El Al's more
than 50 percent increase in tourist traffic
originating in the area and to the develop-
ment of Miami as a point of transfer for
tourists going to Israel from South and Cen-
tral America.
Lichtman began his career with El Al as a
manager of its Jerusalem office. As he
prepares to bid farewell to Miami and to
return to new responsibilities at Lod Air-
port, he is approaching his 25th anniversary
with the company.
Now Miami must say Shalom! to Lichtman
and wish him still greater successes with El
Al and his new duties in Israel.
Cantor Lipson Retires
Cantor and Mrs. William Lipson will be
honored at a farewell service on Saturday
morning at the Beth David Congregation
sanctuary on Coral Way. Cantor Lipson is
retiring from the active cantorate and from
his position as cantor and music director of
Beth David. The community wishes Cantor
Lipson well.
Since his arrival in Miami in 1955 to take
up his post at Beth David, Cantor Lipson has
been the center of a flurry of creative activi-
ty in the cause of the cantorate and of his
responsibilities at Beth David, where he
developed an intense music program both
for the Religious School and for the con-
gregation at large.
This included a children's choir which par-
ticipated in Sabbath services and a training
program for hundreds of students to per
form liturgical portions of the service on
various religious and congregational
cultural occasions.
For these and other achievements in his
profession, Cantor Lipson was awarded an
honorary Fellowship in the Cantors In-
stitute of the Jewish Theological Seminary
of America. As well, he is the author and
editor of a published volume of cantonal
recitatives of distinction.
Beth David will miss Cantor Lipson's lyric
baritone voice and his commitment to the
congregation. So will all of Miami who were
privileged to hear his voice in prayer.
Exchange Rate of 400-to-l
It Has Precedents in Past History
Friday. June 28,1985
Volume 58
9TAMUZ 5745
Number 26
By CHAIM BERMANT
London Chronicle Syndicate
The prisoner exchange has
caused anger and dismay in
Israel and bewilderment
elsewhere. It is not without
precedent. In 1979, Israel
released 66 Arabs, including
25 convicted terrorists, in
exchange for one Israeli. In
the present instance, the
exchange-rate has increased
six-fold to 400-to-l, but we
live in inflationary times
and the principle is the
same.
Israel has always insisted that
she will not bargain with terror.
She has, however, not only
bargained with terror, she has
caved in to it. And the high price
she is paying lies not in the
numbers it would have been im-
material had she released 3,000 or
even 30,000 Arab prisoners but
in the fact that the Arabs know (or
think) that they can now engage in
terrorist incursions against Israel
with something like impunity.
NO DOUBT the Israeli Govern-
ment is well aware of this, and I
presume, as do many others, that
it had good reasons, apart from
the obvious ones of humanity, for
agreeing to the terms, and my
misgivings in the affair arise not
out of the fact that it caved in to
the Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine, but that it may
yet cave in to the Popular Front
for the Subversion of Israel.
I refer to the demands led by
Herut and the Religious parties
that tht Jews on trial for terrorist
activities against the Arabs,
together with those who have
already pleaded guilty, be
pardoned.
That the Religious parties
should have made such a demand
does not surprise me, for they
have yet to come round to the
view that crimes against Arab
lives and property are crimes at
all, hut I expected more of Herut
leader Yitzhak Shamir.
I am not one of Shamir's more
fervent admirers, but I thought he
had outgrown his terrorist past
sufficiently to have a respect for
the rule of law; but he evidently
has none, and it was left to the
broken figure of Menachem Bepn
to speak up for legality.
THE PEOPLE whom Shamir
and others would like to set free
have been indicted from crimes
not only against Arabs, but
Continued on Page 12-A


Friday. June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
mites Really Quite Moderate
mt Fear Militants Among Them
. j, MURIEL MOULTON
L an intercommunal
JaMt in one southern
wnese village several
5 ago, a 15-year-old
. boy was critically
ded. He was flown in
il army helicopter to
, Rambam Hospital
cal care unavailable
"Lebanon. A few days
jr still in the intensive-
tunit and fighting for his
b he pleaded to see his
ther.
rmhisonly son," said the boy,
_y doesn't my father come?"
|lfce Israel Defense Forces
,*esman insists the way was
fcrfor Taiser Salem's father to
|t. but the man never came.
_ -In cases like this, the families
Ite afraid." explains the
Kverend Ibrahim Simon, direc-
Kr uf the Baptist Center in Haifa
Kjch assists the families of south
llrtianese patients in Israeli
hospitals. "To come here, they
Inmld have to seek cooperation
lijih the Israeli forces. If this
ISiiitt family didn't come, in my
cpinion. they are afraid to show a
Iconnection with Israel."
J THIS STORY is typical. Taiser
IiKovered and returned to his
Itilage. but the fear that kept the
father from the bedside of his
lekken son runs like a bloody
liread through the pattern of
Irelitions between Israel and the
Shite villagers of south Lebanon.
There are 600.000 inhabitants in
lie region, an area of 2.700
square kilometers south of the
Avali River. Some 80 percent of
Like population is Shiite Moslem.
Most of them live in small, often
Iprimitive villages. When Israeli
Imops crossed the border in June.
11982 to drive the Palestine
lliberation Organization out of the
I region. Shiite villagers greeted
I them with showers of rice and
[flowers. Three years later, Israel
withdrew from south Lebanon
under a battery of bloody attacks.
Some of those same villagers par-
ticipated or acquiesced in the
assults. Why has Israel failed with
south Lebanon's indigenous
population?
Amos Dolev, a researcher at
Haifa University who has observ-
ed all phases of the Israeli
presence in the region, remarks
that "terrorists do their work and
disappear into the villages. The
villagers live in fear of them. Most
of the Shiites are really very
moderate people. I don't think
they want a jihad (holy war)
The fear is not without founda-
tion. In the final months of 1984,
at least 18 Shiite villagers were
murdered, suspected of
cooperating with Israel. From the
beginning of this country's
presence in the region, retribution
has been a constant and explicit
threat. Initially, the victims were
mostly members of the Israeli-
backed local militias.
After the IDF began its
withdrawal atacks against
villages accelerated, extending,
on the slimmest threads, to
anyone suspected of even the
Syria plays many factions
one against the other.
against Israel. They want to live
in their villages, cultivate their
fields and orchards and be left in
peace. But they are under a terri-
ble pressure of fear."
SINCE JUNE, 1982, Israel has
made concerted efforts to win the
support of the Shiite population
through such community
assistance programs as paving
village roads and building
agricultural access routes, but has
failed to counteract the internal,
anti-Israel pressure.
"They are deadly afraid of con-
tact with us because of the threat
of execution by the militants," ex-
plains Dolev, whose experience in
Lebanon brought him into contact
with all levels of the local popula-
tion. "Shiites I met in 1982
treated us like saviors because we
chased out the PLO, but the
gratitude was always mixed with
a sense of fear." That fear has
prevented villagers from accep-
ting Israeli aid in their com-
munities. One source, which can-
not be named, claims 2.426 tons of
prepared asphalt and 665 tons of
cement were delivered to 40
villages. None of it was accepted.
most self-serving connections
with Israel.
DOLEV RECALLS that "as
early as 1978, during the Litani in-
cursion into south Lebanon, there
were attempts to establish rap-
port with the Shiites, but they
didn't want it. You have to
understand," he explains, "that in
Lebanon, every groups has its
own militia and its own patron. In
the eyes of the Shiites, we are the
patrons of the Christians. The
Shiites have a modus vivendi with
the Christians, but they have
sharply conflicting interests, and
the Shiites have their own patrons
- Syria and Iran."
Syria is playing each group
against the other, according to
Dolev, and might succeed in
establishing a kind of equilibrium.
"But." he says. "Syria has no
scruples like Israel. To achieve
their aims, they will go into a
village and kill everybody as an
example."
Emphasizing that the gratitude
of the Shiites of ridding them of
the PLO as genuine. Dolev recalls
that "in 1982 I met some Shiites
who came all the way to Beirut to
thank us. They were from
Nabatiyeh. which usually has a
population of about 35,000. All
but 5,000 had fled to escape from
the PLO. When Israel invaded, all
the people returned. And El
Hiyam, another Shiite town, was
completely deserted during the
PLO occupation. After we chased
out the PLO. about 20,000 people
came back to their homes there.
And that's all the Shiites wanted
from us."
ONE OF the Israeli-sponsored
benefits the Shiites have been
Continued on Page 14-A
Another Rough Period
U.S., Israeli Relationship Faces Tough Debate Over Hussein's Package
London Chronicle Syndicate
The U.S. Israeli relation-
ship has been steadily im-
I proving for many months
and may currently be better
than ever before, but it is
about to go through vet
another rough period. That
was the consensus among
both American and Israeli
King Hussein
specialists in the aftermath
of separate visits to
Washington by Jordan's
King Hussein and Defense
Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
Senior U.S. officials are making
it clear that they were very pleas-
ed by what they heard from Hus-
sein. In contrast, they are ex-
pressing their deep disappoint-
ment in Rabin.
Hussein truly impresed the Ad-
ministration in what U.S. officials
insisted was his willingness to
take risks for peace. "Kin Hussein
has taken some important in-
itiatives that are positive, that
move in the direction of peace,
that move in the direction of
direct negotiations, that employ
the word 'non-belligerency,
Secretary of State George Shultz
said. _
THE SECRETARY pointedly
rejected efforts in the U.S. Senate
to bar new arms sales to Jordan
until it formally enters into direct
negotiations with Israel. To
greet those moves (of the King) by
the Senate sticking its fiiKe{" ,n
his eye doesn't seem to me to be a
particularly good thing for the
United States to do, Shultz
added.
Rabin, during his talks here.
Defense Minister Rabin
demonstrated what the
Americans considered to be an
overally rigid stance regarding
some proposed tactics to promote
direct Israeli-Arab peace
negotiations.
U.S. officials, in fact, said the
Defense Minister appeared to be
taking a more hardline posture on
these issues than Prime Minister
Shimon Peres. In fact, they said
Rabin reminded them more of his
immediate predecessor, Likud
Minister without Porfolio Moshe
Arens, than the Prime Minister.
U.S. officials were most con-
cerned about Rabin's decision to
oppose publicly and privately any
new U.S. arms sales to Jordan,
preliminary U.S. dialogue with a
joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation, and some form of an
international "umbrella" for
peace talks to help protect Hus-
sein's flank in the Arab world.
"He's a genuine hawk," an
American official said of Rabin,
conceding personal surprise. "We
were expecting to hear something
else."
RABIN, for his part, said open-
ly that he was leaving Washington
still very much concerned about
the U.S. position on several
issues. There was no effort to con-
ceal these differences.
Throughout his subsequent speak-
ing tour in Cleveland, Boston,
Chicago and New York,
moreover, he was very tough in
reaffirming this concern a
posture which merely further ir-
ritated the Administration. He
was especially outspoken in rejec-
ting U.S. arms sales to Jordan,
warning that they might eventual-
ly be turned against Israel.
The Americans, therefore, were
quickly losing hope that Peres,
Minister without Portfolio Ezer
Weizman and some other more
dovish Labor Ministers might still
be in a position to overrule Rabin,
Arens, Foreign Minister Shamir
and the Likud Ministers. "It
doesn't look good," one informed
U.S. diplomat said.
Other U.S. officials expressed
fear that the long-standing feud
between Peres and Rabin, dating
back to the mid-1970s when Rabin
was Prime Minister, and Peres
was Defense Minister, was
threatening to resurface. There
was fear in Washington of
paralysis in the peace process
resulting from a governmental
crisis in Jerusalem.
THE AMERICANS see an
historic opportunity being missed
unless a flexible and forthcoming
response is made by the U.S. and
Israel to Husein. "We've missed
too many chances in the past,"
one of them said.
The major problem separating
U.S. thinking from that of Israel,
as reflected by Rabin, is over
Continaed

Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 28, 1985
Students from Yeshiva University and the
university-affiliated Rabbi Isaac Elchanan
Theological Seminary present a copy of the
Yeshiva University Haggadah to Dr.
Norman Lamm (second from right),
president of the university. The Haggadah
was published by the Student Organization
of Yeshiva with the cooperation of Koren
Publishers in Jerusalem. The text, edited by
the students, contains commentaries from a
variety of ancient and modern sources, as
well as articles by leading scholars, including
Dr. Lamm and Rabbi Joseph B. Soloveit-
chik, Leib Merkin Distinguished Professor of
Talmud and Jewish Philosophy at RIETS.
Parents Given Chance To Discuss Guilt
SMITHTOWN-N. Y. -
(JTA) Parents of
homosexual children, most
of them Jews, are being pro-
vided with an opportunity
by a Jewish social service
agency to meet to discuss
their feelings of anguish and
guilt. The program, believed
to be unique, is conducted
by Mrs. Shiiley Melzer, a
social worker on the staff of
the Jewish Community Ser-
vices of Long Island.
She reported that during
counseling sessions with some
parents, the agency, which has its
headquarters in Rego Park,
recognized there was a need for
such parents to share with other
parents their feelings of guilt and
pain and learn to deal with these
feelings in a constructive way.
WHEN IT was decided to test
such a program in the Smithtown
office, its availablity was made
known by a variety of means. Mrs.
Melzer said more than 25 persons
made inquiries and interviews
were held which resulted in for-
mation of two counseling groups.
Each group met for 90 minutes
weekly in eight consecutive ses-
sions. There were two couples and
five women in one group and
seven women in the other group.
The agency reported that nearly
two-thirds of the parents were
Jews.
Mrs. Melzer said pie parents
talked about their anger and
disappointments with their
children. They also talked about
how they learn to live with and
continue to love and accept their
children as individuals even
though the children live a lifesyle
abhorrent to most of the parents.
MRS. MELZER reported that
as the meetings proceeded, the
parents began to talk freely for
the first time and gained comfort
and strength from each other. She
said some friendships were form-
ed among parents during the ses-
sions which continued after the
final session. She said it was the
feeling of the participating
parents that the counseling was
helpful in easing their pain regar-
ding their homosexual children.
She said that for some of the
parents, relationships between
parent and child and between hus-
band and wife improved.
She said another group is now
being formed in the JCSLI
Smithtown office.
Before the start of the project,
Morton Moskin, JCSLI president,
said that "many more requests for
help in dealing with issues related
to homosexuality are coming to
the attention of this family agen-
cy, than in any prior year."
MELVIN FRANKEL, JCSLI
executive director, commented
that in many situations in which
parents learn "their child prac-
tices homosexuality behavior,"
they experience emotions "that
can range from acceptance, to
apathy, to hysteria and distress."
The Smithtown program is sup-
ported by the Federation
Keep him alive
until we bring
him home
Thousands of Jews are still trapped inside Ethiopia.
This precious remnant of the Jewish community is feel-
ing the devastating effects of famine. We must provide a
lifeline of support until they can join our people in
Israel.
Your contribution of $100 will help feed a Jewish family
for a month. $250 will take care of all their needs for a
month.
I
I
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I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I WANT TO HELP. Here is my tax-deductible
contribution of $---------------------------to save Jewish lives
in Ethiopia.
Name
Address.
City____
.State.
Zip.
North American Conference on Ethiopian Jewry
200 Amsterdam Avenue. New York. NY 10023
New Vof > Slate RetKJentaa A copy of our financial report it avaiubie Irom NACOEJ ai the aodreu above or the Ne Yorti SUM Deoartment ol State
Office of Cnanhei Registration Albany. NY 1J231 ^^ MJFMS
Taba May Precipitate Crisis
In Israel's Unity Gov't.
Continued from Page 1-A
that cannot be resolved by
negotiations. Likud's view is that
arbitration is a last resort if con-
ciliation fails. Labor interprets
Article 7 as allowing the parties to
choose one or the other method.
Sources close to Peres said he
had "not threatened" but had
"made clear to Mr. Shamir the
seriousness with which he viewed
the matter." The sources said he
stressed to Shamir that if there
was no progress on Taba, the
government would in effect be
"paralyzed in terms of foreign
policy" and that he (Peres) "would
not countenance" a paralyzed
government.
IN LABOR PARTY circles the
crisis atmosphere was palpable
after the Peres-Shamir meeting.
Criticism of Likud, hitherto muted
in the interests of preserving the
unity coalition, was freely voiced.
Labor sources recalled that
Shamir had opposed the Camp
David accords and the peace trea-
ty with Egypt and charged that
"those opposed to peace are now
trying to destroy it."
The Labor sources rejected
Shamir's contention that the unity
government should concentrate
on solving Israel's economic crisis.
"Those who destroyed the
economy ought not to lecture us
about how to rebuilt it," they said.
Peres and other Labor leaders
have in the past gone out of the
way to avoid blaming Likud for
the country's economic troubles
although many economists and
neutral observers have attributed
them to the policies of the past
Likud governments.
TABA IS a tiny strip of beach
on the Gulf of Aqaba, claimed by
both Israel and Egypt. ln J
has neither strategic
economic importance. But I
and Likud politicians attach,
significance to how the disc
resolved. While Peres
leading to a general rappn
ment with Egypt and a po,
opening to broader peace
Israel's other Arab neiehb
Shamir fears Taba could od
avenues towards diplomatic
gress which his Likud Party L
not necessarily wish to travel.
At an angry meeting of
Likud Knesset faction last nign
Deputy Foreign Minister Ron
Milo, a close confidant of Shaml
denounced Labor's position <
Taba as "the start of a total se!
out of national assets."
Peres met with leaders of tim
small religious factions, the M
tional Religious Party anl
Morashe. Although they have onl
six Knesset seats between then
they could be pivotal to the form
tion of a Labor-led government 1
replace the unity coalition.
AIDES TO Peres said
delivered an impassioned spw
on Taba. The Premier was quoU,
as saying: "I will not sit in this oft
fice and wait around to hear if thl
others are about to veto anythin,
I want to do. The entire govern
ment decided to go for a packag
deal with the Egyptians involvin
full normalization in return foil
Taba. If Taba is ours, let's prove it!
at arbitration. If it isn't, then why
have they (the former Likud.
government) burdened us with itl
I will not countenance a govern-!
ment that has no power ofl
decision-making. If this becomes al
government of national paralysis!
it will unify the entire Arab worldl
against us. It is my duty as a Jewl
and as a man of conscience to do|
all I can to prevent war."
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In Spy Case
Walker Said To Have KKK Ties
Continued from Page 1-A
Walker's Klan ties had been lin-
gered by Norman Olshanaky,
the direct01" of ADL's Virginia of-
fice after Walker appeared on a
-lo call-in program in Norfolk in
juuary, 1980. Although Walker
lad supplied only his first name on
the program, ADL learned that
the KKK post office box he asked
' interested listeners to write to
was rented in his name.
ADDITIONAL investigation by
ADL in 1980 turned up the fact
that Walker was at the time
secretary-treasurer of Walker
Enterprises. Inc. The-then presi-
dent of that firm, Arthur Walker,
has been charged with passing
classified documents from the
defense contracting firm where he
is employed as an engineer, to his
brother John, knowing that he
' "intended to deliver or transmit"
them to the Soviet Union.
On the Norfolk radio talk show
on which John Walter was the
guest, he said he had served with
KKK Imperial Wizard Wilkinson
on a submarine while they were
both in the Navy. He also stated
that Jews can't belong to the Klan
because "they owe allegiance to a
foreign government."
During the period in which
Walker served as Virginia
organizer for the Invisible Em-
pire, there was an active KKK
recruitment drive at the Norfolk
Naval Base. That, along with
evidence of Klan activity in other
branches of the military services,
was the basis for a systematic ef-
fort by ADL to spur the Depart-
ment of Defense to undertake cor-
rective measures, according to
Suall.
On July 26, 1979, citing the
evidence of Klan efforts to in-
filtrate the military, Suall said,
Nathan Perlmutter, national
director of the ADL, called on
Secretary of Defense Harold
Brown to investigate and take ap-
propriate action. The following
month, Chief of Naval Operations
Admiral Thomas B. Hayward
issued a general order requiring
ship commanders to deal effec-
tively with racist activity in the
Israel, China Do Business
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) There are no diplomatic rela-
tions between Israel and the Peoples Republic of China, but
the two countries are cooperating on a variety of projects.
Maariv reports that more than 60 Israeli firms are cur-
rently involved in establishing enterprises in China or are
in the final stages of agreements with the Chinese
authorities.
THE PROJECTS include an airfield and 10 hotels,
solar energy plants and agricultural development involving
Israeli know-how, capital and technology. The Chinese pro-
vide the manpower and land and do the actual construction,
Maariv said.
Two Israeli experts have just been granted visas by the
Chinese and will travel there on their Israeli passports.
Others have gone to China on non-Israeli passports. Many
Israelis hold dual nationality for business purposes.
Navy.
ABOUT THE same time, Justin
Finger and other members of the
Civil Rights Division staff met
with Deputy Assistant Secretary
of Defense M. Kathleen Carpenter
for a full discussion of the problem
of Klan recruitment in the
military.
One month later, the Distric
Naval Commander in Norfolk
issued an off-limits declaration
prohibiting Naval and Marine per-
sonnel from participating in off-
base demonstrations where
violence was likely to result The
result of the order was to limit a
Wilkinson-organized demonstra-
tion a few days later in Virginia
Beach to what the press described
as "an audience made up chiefly of
hecklers and riot-ready police."
In November, 1980, Perlmutter
again wrote Secretary of Defense
Brown, citing, inter alia, Bill
Wilkinson's military recruiting ef-
forts and stating that ADL
believes "it is critically important
that the Department (of Defense)
undertake a thorough investiga-
tion of Klan activity among
members of the armed forces."
THE FOLLOWING month
ADL received another visit from
Carpenter and a letter setting
forth the Department's policies.
"Legally," she wrote, "we cannot
prohibit military personnel from
joining the KKK. We can,
however, take action to insure
that their KKK activities do not
materially interfere with our
military mission or otherwise pose
a clear danger to the loyalty,
discipline or morale of military
personnel." She then listed some
of the concrete steps taken to im-
plement that general policy.
A similar exchange took place in
1981 with Carpenter's successor.
Deputy Assistant Secretary
Sharon B. Lord, who wrote
Finger assuring him that DOD's
policies regarding the KKK were
continuing under the new
administration.
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11may, 3Pite-gcT,Tbeu?rne-bc?ii)ty Leningrad Refusenik Zelichonok
Charged With 'Defaming State'
NEW YORK (JTA) Len-
ingrad refusenik Roald Zelichonok
was arrested on June 11 and
charged with "defaming the
Soviet State" in reaction to ap-
peals and letters he wrote to the
West, including a recent plea to
participate in the Human Rights
Expert Conference in Ottawa, ac-
cording to the Coalition to Free
Soviet Jews.
Zelichonok, an electrical
engineer and Hebrew teacher who
has been active in pro-emigration
and Jewish culture circles since
1978, had encountered harass-
ment by the KGB beginning in
1980 when he was ordered to stop
teaching Hebrew, the Coalition
said.
The 48-year-old refusenik has
continually been persecuted with
Jewish books and private letters
being confiscated from his home,
an anti-Zionist documentary being
aired in Leningrad last November
accusing Zelichonok of taking
bribes from "Zionist" tourists
from abroad, and ultimately his
arrest.
Herbert Kronish, chairman of
the Coalition, said, "The pace of
arrests and imprisonments is in-
creasing at a frightening level.
"When coupled with the bleak
emigration figure of 51 for May,"
Kronish noted, "it becomes clear
that the Soviet government is
waging a brutal battle against
Jewish religion, culture, and
emigration."
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2. You will help restore the land of Israel
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a a
rael's Prisoner Exchange
Did It Lead To Shiite Hijacking?
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Deputy Premier and Educa-
tion Minister Yitzhak
Navon, former President of
Israel, has clashed with
Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin over Navon's conten-
tion that there was a casual
relationship between
Israel's prisoner exchange
deal with a Palestinian ter-
rorist group last month and
the hijack-hostage crisis in
Beirut.
Navon, like Rabin a leader in
the Labor Party, maintained in an
Army Radio interview that
Israel's release on May 20 of 1,150
convicted Palestinian terrorists in
exchange for three Israeli soldiers
captured in Lebanon and held by
the Popular Front for the Libera-
tion of Palestine-General Com-
mand, a Damascus-based terrorist
group headed by Ahmed Jibril,
may "logically have encouraged"
the hijack of a TWA airliner by
Lebanese Shiite terrorists on June
14.
RABIN, who was a central
figure in the prisoner exchange
negotiations, rebutted Navon's
contention. He told the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee that there have been
nine aircraft hijacks perpetrated
by Shiite gunmen since March,
1982, so there could be no casual
relationship between the latest hi-
jack and the Jibril deal.
Navon was the only member of
the 10-man inner Cabinet five
Labor and five Likud ministers
who opposed the prisoner ex-
change. He said the government
"ought to have had the moral
strength to tell the families (of the
three captured Israeli soldiers)
that there is a line beyond which
we could not go." According to
Navon, the prisoner exchange
"warped our criteria."
BUT NAVON hinted that his
position would be different if and
when the Cabinet were called
upon to decide whether to release
Buses Okayed
For Yeshiva
Students
NEW YORK (JTA) A bill
to provide school bus transporta-
tion for yeshiva and other non-
public school students in New
York City on days when public
schools are closed was approved
by the New York State Assembly
Education Committee. An iden-
tical measure was approved by the
State Senate earlier this month.
Shmuel Prager, general counsel
for the Agudath Israel Commis-
sion on Legislation and Civic Ac-
tion, said the measure was drafted
by attorneys for the commission
and the New York State Catholic
Conference.
Prager noted that the Assembly
committee approval was a "major
action" toward the enactment of
the measure into law. The
Legislature does not have a con-
ference committee to iron out dif-
ferences in versions passed by its
two chambers. Senate and
Assembly versions must be iden-
tical. Approval by the full
Assembly and by Gov. Mario
Cuomo would make the measure
law.
Praeger said the New York City
Board of Education does not have
private school bus transportation
for non-public school students on
days public schools are not in ses-
sion.
jr**&
Yitzhak Navon
more than 700 Shiite guerrillas
captured in Lebanon and present-
ly held in the Atlit detention camp
near Haifa in exchange for some
40 American airline passengers
being held hostage by the hi-
jackers in Beirut. This is the
primary demand of the hijackers.
Navon said if there were "direct
approaches" the Cabinet would
weigh them, "taking into account
the specific facts in the case." The
approaches would have to be
made by the U.S., however. Israel
would not act without an
American request, Navon said.
The U.S. has made no such out-
ward request of Israel so far, and
the Reagan Administration
stressed that it would not ask
Israel for any concessions to the
hijackers. Rabin told the Knesset
committee that Israel is sticking
to its official position of non-
involvement in the hijack crisis,
since it has received no requests
from the U.S. or the International
Red Cross with respect to the hi-
jackers' demands. He noted that
the hijackers "address" their
demands to Washington.
NAVON'S VIEW that last
month's prisoner exchange was a
contributory factor in the hijack-
ing is shared by a growing number
of Israelis. More and more Israelis
of all political persuasions are now
maintaining that the lopsided
prisoner exchange was one of the
worst mistakes Israel ever made
and will have grave consequences
in the future.
Although the exchange deal was
implemented by the Labor-Likud
national unity coalition govern-
ment, Likud leader Yitzhak
Shamir, Deputy Premier and
Foreign Minister in that govern-
ment, is now trying to place the
onus on his Labor partners.
At a meeting with leaders of the
religious party, Morasha, Shamir
said "perhaps the government
went too far," adding that had
Likud been the sole governing
party of Israel, the prisoner ex-
change would not have taken
place.
LABORITES, for their part,
contend that it was the Likud
government, headed by Shamir,
that contracted the basic prin-
ciples of the exchange before the
.unity government took office last
Septembmer and there was little
choice but to go through with the
deal.
Specifically, Labor claims that
the Likud government agreed not
to "veto" the names of any
Palestinians terrorists submitted
by Jibril, who he wanted released
in return for the three Israeli
soldiers he was holding in
Damascus.
The Likud government also
agreed that the terrorists, once
freed, could return to their homes
in the West Bank, Gaza Strip or
even in Israel if they had been
legal residents at the time of their
arrests, the Laborites say.
As a result, terrorists serving
life sentences for murder were
freed and about 400 of them
elected to return to their homes in
Israel or the administered
territories.
THE SITUATION with the
Shiite prisoners at Atlit is dif-
ferent. They are not terrorists but
guerrillas captured in Lebanon
where they were attacking Israeli
troops in the process of withdraw-
ing. They were not tried or con-
vinced of any crimes. It was, in
fact, Israel's intention to release
them once the withdrawal of the
Israel Defense Force from south
Lebanon was completed.
The Israelis say they would have
been freed by now had it not been
for the tense situation that
developed in the south Lebanon
security zone after the Israel-
backed South Lebanon Army
(SLA) detained 21 Finnish
soldiers of the United Nations In-
terim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL). The soldiers have since
been released.
Begin Delighted That Arlozoroff
Affair Finally Laid To Rest
JERUSALEM (JCNS) -
Menachem Begin, Israel's Former
Prime Minister, has greeted with
undisguised delight the verdict of
a State Inquiry Commission set up
three years ago, which last week
published its report clearing two
activists in the Revisionist Move-
ment of all suspicion regarding
the murder in 1933 of Haim
Arioso roff.
Arlosoroff, then director of the
Jewish Agency's political depart-
ment, was a bright young star in
Mapai when he was murdered
while strolling with his wife.
Sima, of the Tel Aviv seafront.
In its report, stretching over
more than 200 pages, the three-
man Commission, headed by
David Bechor, a former Supreme
Court Justice, cleared Avraham
Stavsky and Zvi Rosenblatt, but
also ruled that from evidence
available it had been unable to
determine who had carried out the
murder and whether it was a
political assassination, as the
Labor movement long claimed.
One of the three, Prof. Eliezer
Berkovits, expressed the opffj
that the murder was a conspirai
covered up by Mandate polici
with the two Revisionists beind
set-up by the authorities in adl
vance of the murder. The third
member of the Commission wj
Max Kennet, former president of
the Tel Aviv district court.
Although, in the following year I
charged with the murder Stav
sky, Rosenblatt and Abbat
Achimeir, all leading figures jnl
the extreme Right-wing Briti
Habiryonim organization were!
eventually acquitted for lack off
evidence, the issue remained al
cause cekbre for decades with
Labor leaders continuing to main-
tain that it hadn't actuallv carried
out the murder, the Revisionist
right had incited it. The Revj.
sionists countercharged that
Mapai was fomenting a "blood
libel.
None of the three men is still '
alive. Their families are thrilled,
with the verdict. They sav that at'
long last their names have been
cleared.
How to Choose
Your Drinking Water
Mountain Valcy comes from a natural spring lo-
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Mountain Valley, bottled constantly for 112 years. o
the only water popular across the nation.
The main minerals are calcium and magnesium,
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Some peopk have been drinking it for 50to 70years
Where is
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bit
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How does
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bit
well-known?
What
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A glass dome covers the spring. All bottling is in
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Friday, iJune 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
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.OPS .
Ponrefi-A in.-
T__ ft
Festive Occasion
Herzog Turned It Into Lecture
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
DUBLIN (JTA) -
President Chaim Herzog of
Israel, on his five-day state
visit to Ireland, changed
what his hosts regard as a
mainly ceremonial occasion
into a platform for forceful-
ly putting Israel's case on
Middle East and world
affairs.
Departing from the non-
controversial style of most Israeli
heads of state, the President used
a State dinner at historic Dublin
Castle to launch into the kind of
lengthy speech reminiscent of his
period as Israeli Ambassador to
the United Nations.
His purpose was to counter
what he termed the lack of
perspective and distortion of the
picture presented about Israel and
about the Israeli-Arab conflict.
PRESIDENT Patrick Hillery of
Ireland, Premier Garret Fit-
zgerald and other members of the
Cabinet listened in polite silence
as Herzog applied to the Palesti-
nian issue the Irish government's
own formula for rejecting the use
of terror and murder in Northern
Ireland.
He also dwelt at length on the
positive links between Israel and
her neighbors, as well as the good
relations between Jews and other
communities inside Israel in con-
trast to the conflicts sweeping
other parts of the area from
Afghanistan and the Gulf to
Sudan and the Western Sahara.
He reminisced about his
childhood and early youth in
Ireland and stressed repeatedly
the historical parallels in Israel's
and Ireland's struggles for in-
dependence and their common
devotion to the democratic
system.
"I GREW UP in the throes of
Mediterranean-Dead Sea
Project Said To Be Dead
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
Mediterranean-Dead Sea canal, a
hydro-electric project en-
thusiastically backed by the
former Likud-led government, is
dead. The Ministry of Energy and
Infrastructure concluded that it
was no longer feasible, due in
large measure to lack of funds,
and ordered a halt to preliminary
work which has already cost some
$15 million.
The original idea was to use the
more than 1,000 foot drop from
sea level to the Dead Sea to
generate electric power. The
canal was supposed to revolu*
tionize Israel's energy systems!
On that basis, the Israel Bond
Organization raised substantial
funds overseas.
But Israel's economic crisis
overwhelmed the plans. The $15
million spent was for an ex-
ploratory tunnel in connection
with a proposed power station.
The study required an additional
$2 million which the Energy
Ministry, suject to new budgetary
constraints, refused to invest.
Premier Shimon Peres has sug-
gested that the monies be diverted
to the development of two new
technological zones, one in Galilee
and the other in the Negev.
the Irish struggle in which part of
the Jewish community was involv-
ed," Herzog said. "I personally
had the privilege of participating
in the struggle for our in-
dependence in Israel and I was
very considerably influenced by
our experiences in Ireland in the
early formative days of the
Republic."
The President adopted his high
profile because of the Irish
Republic's key position on the
political map. Besides being an ac-
tive member of the United Na-
tions and the European Economic
Community, it is influential in the
Third World and has its diaspora
of some 40 million Americans and
five million Australians of Irish
extraction.
Before the visit, there had been
speculation that Herzog might
press for the establishment of an
Israeli Embassy in Dublin. But
this now seems incidental to the
grand themes adopted in his ma-
jor speech here, the first of four
which he made over three days.
HE WAS also influenced by the
fact that apart from a trip to
Holland some 30 years ago, this
was the first full State visit by an
Israeli President to any Western
democracy.
Hillery, addressing the 220
guests at Dublin Castle dinner,
devoted his speech almost entirely
to the achievements and
patriotism of Ireland's small
Jewish community and to Irish-
Israeli relations.
Ireland and Israel have long
histories, he said. "Our cultures
and traditions are rich and an-
cient. As independent nations we
are relatively young, but we share
a deep respect for the democratic
system which we cherish. Your
visit," he told Herzog, "reminds
us of the bonds of friendship and
goodwill which exists between
Israel and Ireland."
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Prof. George Bernard Dantzig (left), professor of operatio,
research and computer science at Stanford University, a w&rh
renowned mathematician; and Barnett Rosenberg, professor
chemistry at Michigan State University, an internationally a*.
claimed chemist and biophysicist, were recipients of the I9tjl
Harvey Prize of the Technion Israel Institute of Technology
at award ceremonies on June 19 at the Institute's Haifa cami
PLO, Palestinian Delegation
In Paris for High Talks
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) A Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation which in-
cludes two ranking officials of the
Palestine Liberation Organization
arrived here Wednesday for talks
with Foreign Minister Roland
Dumas and officials at the
Elygsee Palace.
The delegation is headed by Jor-
dan's Deputy Prime Minister,
Abdel Wahab el Majali. The senior
PLO officials in the group are
Joweid Ghossein, a member of the
PLO's executive committee, and
Khaled el Hassan, who heads the
Palestine National Council's
(PNC) commission on foreign
affairs.
The delegation is briefing
French officials on the peace pro-
posals of King Hussein of Jordan.
It was established on the basis of
an agreement concluded between
Hussein and PLO chief Yasd
Arafat on Feb. 11 for talks with
the U.S.
But the Reagan Administration
has still not clarified its position]
insisting that the Palestinian com]
ponent of the delegation must not!
include known members of the
PLO. Israel is fiercely opposed t_
Hussein's initiative which calls foil
an international conference wit
the participation of the five per]
manent members of the United
Nations Security Council and the
Plo.
But Dumas informed the NaJ
tional Asembly last week thatl
France is willing to receive the!
delegation. A joint Palestinian-!
Jordanian group led by Arafatl
visited Peking last month. PLOl
officials here said other delega-l
tions similar to the one due herel
next week will visit Italy and Bri-|
tain during the summer.
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\Orthodox Leader
Demands Jewish Terrorists' Release
Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
EEC Parliament Calls for Meeting
With Jordan-Palestinian Delegation
CPRINGGLEN, NX -
WrL Harold Jacobs,
"Sdent of the National
ci] 0f Young Israel, has
jed on the government of
Ce) to release the
L ers of the Jewish ter-
underground, some
"have already been con-
jgd of violent attacks
-inst West Bank Arabs.
[Lbs, in addressing delegates
siding the plenary session of
Young Israel Convention
r made he plea while noting
i! Israel has released hundreds
i Palestinian terrorists, many
-ancted of anti-Jewish violence
IJte administered territories, in
K prisoner exchange last month
fcthree Israeli soldiers held by a
lyestinian terrorist group.
I 'WHEN HUNDREDS of con-
lirted terrorists and murderers
|k freed to walk the streets of
|fcw! again, those brave Jews
liiohave taken up arms to defend
[;: homes and families from at-
tack must certainly be let free,"
|feobs said. "It is time for the
| Israeli government to release all
I those settlers who have been ar-
Iwted for so-called terrorist ac-
I trrity, regardless of their legal
jolt or innocence."
At its final plenary session, the
I convention passed a resolution
I irging the Israeli government "to
The State of Israel cannot
afford to betray its most
committed citizens ..."
Harold Jacobs
release all Jewish settlers con-
victed or accused of retaliatory
acts against Arab targets." The
resolution was approved by a
three to two margin by the 250
delegates.
Also approved by the delegates
was a resolution expressing un-
qualified support for whatever ac-
tions deemed necessary by the
Israeli government to secure the
release of the passengers aboard
the hijacked TWA aircraft, and to
combat international terrorism.
THE RESOLUTION also urg-
ed the U.S. to use all means at its
disposal to protect and rescue
those airline passengers who are
its citizens and under its protec-
tion. The resolution also urged the
U.S. to take the "most stringent
possible measures" against the
Shiite hijackers and against all
groups and governments which
aid terrorism.
Jacobs also said that Judaea,
Samaria and the Golan Heights
"are no longer just areas on a
map, desolate and populated sole-
ly by Arabs. Today these are
vibrant Jewish communities con-
taining the homes of tens of
thousands of Israel's finest and
most dedicated men, women and
children."
"Just as we refuse to abandon a
Young Israel community in the
Bronx or Crown Heights, so too
will we stand by the Young Israel
communities in Chispin, Kiryat
Arba, and particularly in the Old
City of Jerusalem, which we will
never give up again," he said.
"The State of Israel cannot af-
ford to betray its most committed,
most idealistic and most capable
citizens or to trade away for emp-
ty promises or temporary advan-
tage its long term security and its
best hope for the future," Jacobs
asserted.
By YOSSI LEMPKOWICZ
STRASSBOURG (JTA)-
The Parliament of Europe has
called on the 10 member states of
the European Economic Commui-
ty to meet as soon as possible with
a joint Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation to hear its views on the
Middle East process.
The resolution was adopted by
the Parliament as the 10 EEC
Foreign Ministers prepared to
meet in Luxembourg to consider
the issue, among others on their
agenda. They are expected to
discuss how and when the current
President of the EEC, Italy's
Foreign Minister Giulio Andreot-
ti, will meet with a delegation of
Jordanains and Palestinians
which has yet to be put together.
The formation of such a delega-
tion was agreed to in principle by
King Hussein of Jordan and
Paletine Liberation Organization
chief Yasir Arafat last Feb. 11 in
Amman. EEC officials said the
ministers are still waiting to find
\Bialkin Again
Second Term At Conference Helm
NEW YORK Kenneth J.
1 Bialkin has been reelected chair-
tman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish < trganizations, it was an-
I winced this week. He will serve a
lucond one-year term beginning
I July 1
Bialkin. 55, is national chairman
Uthe Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith and a senior partner
in the New York law firm of
I Willkie. Farr and Gallagher.
An adjunct professor of law at
| New York University Law School
for the past 17 years, he is a board
member of the Municipal
I Assistance Corporation for the Ci-
ty of New York and first vice
president of the New York County
I lawyers' Association.
Lebanon Cost
Going Up
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM -(JTA) A
: Hebrew University economist
I said that the cost of the Lebanon
j war was two or two-and-a-half
times higher than the official
figures indicate.
The defense budget places the
cost of the three year venture into
Lebanon at $1.6-$1.8 billion. But
according to Prof. Haim Barkai,
^$4.5 billion is closer to the
mark.
He said, at a symposium, that
fte cost included about $700
million for military reservists call-
ed, to duty and another $100
million in lost tourism. He said the
build-up of the Israel Defense
Force cost tens of millions of
dollars and was due to a parallel
^"ld-up of the Syrian army
because of the Lebanon war.
The war had other adverse ef-
fects on the economy. Israel's
foreign debt rose from $13 billion
1981 to $19.4 billion in 1984,
*hile the growth of the gross na-
tional product decreased by three
Percent, Barkai said.
Kenneth Bialkin
Bialkin is a trustee-at-large of
the Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of New York and vice
chairman and a director of the
Jerusalem Foundation, establish-
ed by Mayor Teddy Kollek of
Jerusalem.
A graduate of the University of
Michigan and Harvard Law
School, he is a former editor of
The Business Lawyer and served
for five years as chairman of the
Federal Regulation of Securities
Commitee of the American Bar
Association. He also chaired the
ABA Section on Corporation,
Banking and Business Law.
Bialkin is married to the former
Ann Eskind. They have two
children and live in Manhattan.
'^^Stvnnw
With day camp for the kids, a
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seminars, everyone enjoys Grossinger's in the
summertime. Full American Plan three meals daily.
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jamce Lynde [Laurel Chapin of ONE LIFE TOUVE) and
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perform in a musical revue on Sat. night. Also: Kim Zimmer
[Reva Lewis of GUIDING LIGHT). Chris LeBlanc
I Kirk McColl of AS THE WORLD TURNS) and soap
columnists Dorothy Vine, Seli Groves and Toby Goldstein.
"LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL"
SINGLES WEEKEND, July 18-21
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out who will compose the delega-
tion. Its purpose in seeking a
meeting with EEC leaders is to
get backing for an international
peace conference on the Middle
East with the participation of the
five permanent members of the
United Nations Security Council
and the PLO.
Israel and the U.S. are firmly
opposed to such a framework for
peace talks and insist that the Jor-
danians and non-PLO Palestinians
negotiate directly with Israel. But
France, a permanent member of
the Security Council, has agreed
to receive a joint delegation.
Israeli Premier Shimon Peres,
while opposed to an international
conference, has called on perma-
nent members of the Security
Council to support direct Arab-
Israeli peace talks. Peres has
taken cognizance of Hussein's
need for some international
framework for talks with Israel
which he refuses to undertake
alone.
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rage 12-A The Jewish Floridian/FViday, June 28, 1985
Tough Talk Ahead
Over Hussein's Peace Package
Coatiaued from Pge 5^A
Arab, especially Jordanian and
Palestinian intentions. The Ad-
ministration has made clear that it
senses a dramatic, even historic,
change toward Israel emerging
among "moderate" Arabs, in-
cluding even PLO leader Yasir
Arafat
They have interpreted Arafat's
silence in refusing to disassociate
the PLO from Hussein's public
remarks in Washington as
representing a major step for-
ward. A year earlier, U.S. officials
said, Arafat would have publicly
condemned Hussein for merely
hinting that the PLO now was
prepared to embrace UN Security
Council Resolutions 242 and 338
as a basis for peace negotiations.
But that did not occur after Hus-
sein's summit with President
Reagan at the White House.
THE ADMINISTRATION is
clearly inching forward toward
the start of substantive talks with
the PLO. The first step will in-
volve a return visit to the Middle
East by Assistant Secretary
Richard Murphy for preliminary
discussions with Joredanians and
non-PLO Palestinians. But the lat-
ter will have the blessing of
Arafat and will primarily be
charged with finding exact
language which will lead to
U.S.-PLO relations. Whether that
ever materializes remains to be
seen.
There is also a fundamental dif-
ference between the Americans
and most Israeli ministers, again
reflected by Rabin, over Jordan's
radiness to enter into direct
negotiations with Israel. Shultz
and other U.S. officials believe
Hussein demonstrated such an in-
tention while in Washington.
White House and State Depart-
ment spokesmen, for example,
have repeatedly quoted from Hus-
New Sports Center
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
new sports center, donated by the
Jewish community of In-
dianapolis, was inaugurated June
15 at the development town of
Beit Shemesh, near Jerualem.
sein's public remarks while in
Washington. Hussein had said
that the was committed to move
to "negotiations among the par-
ties to the conflict between the
Arab side, a Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation, with Israel
on the other side." That, U.S. of-
ficials said, was a clear statement
in support of direct negotiations.
"WE INTEND to support that
effort, and the President told
King Hussein that he, the King,
would be able to count on the
United States for assistance in ad-
dressing problems which Jordan
may face in those areas," White
House spokesman Larry Speakes
told reporters. Other U.S. officials
subsequently suggested that that
meant a new U.S. economic and
military aid package for Jordan,
including advanced jet fighters
and surface-to-air missiles.
In the midst of all of this,
therefore, the Administration's
plan to sell such weapons to Jor-
dan is going to create one of those
clearly "no-win" type of situa-
tions for Israel and its supporters
in the American Jewish
community.
Once again, as in the 1981 Saudi
AWACS confrontation, Israel is
going to face the prospect of
either quietly standing back while
new. offensive weapons are pro-
vided to an Arab confrontation
state, or risk poisoning the very
positive state of American-Israeli
relations.
But Israel's options are really
limited. Realistically, there is no
way any Israeli government can
sit this fight out on the sidelines.
There are clear constraints within
which Israel is going to have to
operate.
THE FACT is that the pro-
Israeli political community in
Washington, led by the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee
(AIPAC), has already gone full
speed ahead against any Arab
arms sales to Jordan. There are,
as a result, some 69 Senators who
have co-sponsored a resolution op-
posing such sales until Jordan
enters into direct talks with
Israel.
If Jordan is interested in obtain-
ing U.S. arms, they say, let it
simply begin negotiations with
Israel. Egypt signed a peace trea-
ty with Israel, and no one in
Washington now opposes U.S.
weapons sales to Egypt. But Jor-
dan first wants the weapons, ac-
cording to U.S. officials, as an in-
dication of U.S. good faith.
It needs the arms, they added,
in order to stand up to serious
challenges from Syria, radical
Palestinians and other Arab rejec-
tionists under the influence of
Libya's President Muammar
Quadaffi, and Iran's Ayatollah
Khomeini. But Congress is still
strongly opposed, and is prepared
to take legislative steps to block
such sales.
"WE BELIEVE that any
legislation of this type would pre-
judge and impose new ihibitions
on moves toward peace." said
Speakes at a White House press
briefing. "We recognize that Jor-
dan has legitimate security con-
cerns and requirements and that
there is a relationship between
feeling secure at home and con-
ducting an active, assertive
foreign policy."
The question, however, is how
far the President is personally
prepared to go to push a safe
through.
The battlelines, thus, have been
drawn. The fight has been shaping
up for many months. AIPAC and
othe pro-Israeli forces have been
very active for some time in pro-
moting the anti-Jordan resolution.
Until very recently, the Ad-
ministration did not seek to ac-
tively counter that lobbying cam-
paign even though they knew it
was underway.
But since Hussein's visit, the
Administration seems to have
emerged as a true believer in Hus-
sein's commitment to peace.
Senior U.S. officials, therefore.
are prepared to undertake a full
court press against Israel and the
pro-Israeli community in
Washington on this issue.
Unfortunately, a bitter period of
recriminations and allegations is
in store for all concerned, with the
ultimate loser being the peace
process.
$500 Publix
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I Accept Your Introductory Offer.
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Precedent in Past for Lopsided
Prisoner Exchange After Lebanoi
Continued from Pag* 4- A
against the most fundamental
laws of Israel. Tne argument that
they had only acted in self-defense
is laughable. They have the most
powerful and effective army in the
Middle East to defend them, and
they murdered and maimed inno-
cent, unarmed civilians for no bet-
ter reason than because they were
Arabs.
What is being argued is that
because the government felt com-
pelled to yield to Arab blackmail,
it should somehow redress the
balance by yielding to Jewish
blackmail, as if a wrong can
somehow be made right by exten-
ding its scope.
Now, I would have a grudging
sympathy with this view if the
demands for an amnesty were ex-
tended to include all criminals in
Israeli jails, whatever their
crimes. It would be an interesting
and probably unique social experi-
ment and would enable Israel to
reconsider its whole prison system
which, I understand, is in any case
on the brink of collapse.
BUT THAT is not what people
are demanding. They want only
the release of Jewish terrorists, as
if the man who kills an Arab is
somehow a lesser criminal than
the man who keeps a brothel,
steals a car or robs a bank.
I am dismayed that the idea of
an amnesty should have been con-
sidered at Cabinet level at all
because what raises Israel above
her neighbors is not only the fact
that she has free parliamentary
elections, but that no one hitherto
would have dreamed of interfer-
ing with due process of the law. It
is the courts, not the Knesset,
which are the ultimate guarantors
of liberty, and if any group in the
community cannot look to them
for justice, then all are at risk.
One can, of course, understand
the public frustration and anger
which have led to cries for an
amnesty, but leaders are expected
to keep their heads at a tin,*,
others are losing theft
pve m to demands Jfcfc
know to be unjust.
AMNESTIES genenUyfc,
the prerogative of the hT
rtate, and if the politician,
not be ahve to their
sibihties, I believe that Pw
Heraog will be alive to hT
that he would reC,
countenance any such m^J
evenat the cost ofaconsH
to that. Israel is an extJ~]
volatile country, and theL
r^rn of one moment are forgot,
the next. I like to think thatb^
time the trials are over, the puh
will have recovered their sens**
and the politicians their nen
sufficiently to realize that a cou
try m which the rule of law is ,
sacrosanct is a country in whirl!
isn t worth living.
The arrest and trial of i
Jewish underground have be
widely held as a triumph f,
Israel s democracy and the fore.
of law and order. The release
those found guilty would be
betrayal.
Verdict Due
In Terror Case
JERUSALEM A verdict |
the trial of 20 alleged members o
a Jewish terrorist undergrouni
charged with crimes of violenci
against Arab civilians on the Wesi
Bank is expected to be handed
down in several weeks.
Both the prosecution and
defense summed up their case]
last week. Dorit Beinish. a Deputy
State Attorney, declared that tha
defendants must be treated d
regular criminals and thei:
political motivations should noti
considered a factor.
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. '
Friday, June 28, lS85m>e Jewish FToridian Page 13-A
*
c
Our Readers Write: Federal
Aid to Israel Needs Updating
of the country's leading oncologists par-
v^.-j {n the annual awards luncheon of the
^Canter Research Fund held last week in
. York. Left to right are Dr. Yashar Hir-
)tui ICRF president; Dr. James t.
hud director of the Comprehensive
'Center. Mt. Sinai Hospital, N.Y.,
keynote speaker; Dr. Daniel G. Miller, ICRF
founder and president-emeritus; and Dr.
Frederick P. Siegal, head of hematology
research, Long Island Jewish Hospital, who
announced a record $593,000 in grants to
Israeli scientists for innovative studies in
seeking the causes and cures of cancer.
)ouble Standard
Deplored in Arrested Rabbis' Case
Bv THEO STONE
IWASHINGTION (JTA)
Thirty-three Con-
jssmen have signed a let-
addressed to Attorney
ieneral Edwin Meese III
Jong him why the U.S. At-
lorney for the District of
Mumbia is prosecuting 24
ibis and one Lutheran
lister who where ar-
_ last month for pro-
sting in front of the Soviet
sy.
The letter, which is dated June
|l, 1985 and was sent on the sta-
ler)' of the House Judiciary
jimittee, was signed by the en-
* committee with the exception
(three members. It asks the At-
ney General why the rabbis and
(minister are being prosecuted.
he 25 men and women were ar-
jted on May 1 and accused of
mating a law which prohibits
lesting within 500 feet of
|kissy
I THE RABBIS, who were pro-
1 dramatize the plight of
| wry. were using the
! technique which has proved
imccesful in the anti-apartheid
a the South African Em-
issy Whereas more than 2.000
have been arrested at
the South African Embassy on the
same charges as the rabbis, the
U.S. attorney has decided not to
prosecute the South African
protesters.
The letter said, "these members
of the clergy were protesting the
difficult plight and discriminatory
treatment of Jews in the Soviet
Union. Like the more than 2,000
people who have demonstrated in
front of the South African Em-
bassy, the 24 rabbis and one
Lutheran minister's demonstra-
tion was peaceful and did not
disrupt the conduct of business at
the Embassy."
The letter asks Meese, "Why
has the government decided to
prosecute these members of the
clergy when it has dropped the
charges against all of those who
have done the same thing at the
South African Embassy?"
THE LETTER goes on to say,
"The behavior of both groups was
identical. Absent of a sound ex-
planation, the decision to pro-
secute in these cases appears to be
arbitrary and discriminatory.
Even if the Soviet Union has re-
quested prosecution, we believe
that the decision whom to pro-
secute an.i whom not to prosecute
for exercising their First Amend-
ment rights to demonstrate
should not depend upon the re-
quests of representatives of
Supreme Court Agrees To Hear
Case Involving Service, Yarmulke
Bv THEO STONE
|WASHINGTON (JTA)
The Supreme Court has
-jreed to decide for the first
|me whether an Orthodox
lew may wear a yarmulke
Irhile on duty in any of the
llnited States armed forces.
J The case centers around Rabbi
limcha Goldman who, while on ac-
he duty in the U.S. Air Force,
ps ordered to remove his yar-
Vulke. Chaplain Goldman had
krved in the Air Force for three
fears when a new base com-
pander ordered him, on pain of
fisciplinary action, to remove his
ikull cap.
Before his stint in the Air
"orce, he had served as a chaplain
In the Navy for several years, a
eriod during which his wearing
his yarmulke was not challenged
K' his superiors. After leaving
r'avy service, he obtained a doc-
lrate in psychology and enlisted
I" the Air Force to serve as a
psychologist
AFTER THE warning from the
P* base commander, Goldman
filed suit in the federal district
Furt in Washington in 1981 and a
pension in his favor was handed
flown in 1982. A circuit court of
appeals reversed that ruling,
upholding the authority of the Air
Force. An appeal was filed with
the Supreme Court, which is ex-
pected to hear the case during the
fall 1985 term.
The defense has been handled
by Nathan Lewin, a vice president
of the National Jewish Commis-
sion on Law and Public Affairs
(COLPA). Lewin has argued there
is a constitutional right to wear a
yarmulke under the freedom of
religious expression clause of the
First Amendment, and that this
does not interfere with the
military functions of the wearer.
Lewin declared that the
Defense Department has argued
that any variation in the uniformi-
ty of the military dress code would
result in disintegration of morale
and discipline in the armed forces,
a position sustained by the appeals
court.
LEWIN SAID the case
represents the broader problem
between exercise of religious
belief and laws which appear to be
prohibiting the exercise of those
religious beliefs.
Goldman quit the Air Force but
retained reserve status He is now
a practicing psychologist at
Chabad House in Los Angeles.
foreign governments."
The office of the Attorney
General has refused comment on
the Judiciary Committee letter.
Meanwhile, the Rabbinial
Assembly has also sent a telegram
to Meese protesting what the rab-
binical group charged was the
denial of "basic rights" by the
police to a group of 21 rabbis ar-
rested outside the Soviet
Embassy.
ACCORDING to the RA, the
organization of 1,200 Conser-
vative rabbis, the 21 rabbis ar-
rested on June 10 were in-
carcerated for sue hours and were
not allowed to meet with their
lawyers for five hours. "They
were also denied the right to make
telephone calls, have food or
water, (and) decent bathroom
facilities," the RA said in the
telegram.
"Moreover, many of these
leaders in their 60's were forced
to remain standing for a three-
hour stretch while kept in a tiny
cage." the telegram said. "These
men suffered the indignity of body
searches and were kept in a cage
with drunks and drug addicts
while incarcerated in the
Washington Superior Court."
"We strongly object to this
denial of basic rights to a group as
distinguished and significant as
these 21 rabbis. Furthermore, we
vow to promote additional
peaceful demonstrations and ar-
rests if necessary until Soviet
Jews will be allowed the freedoms
guaranteed in the Helsinki
Accords,"
The telegram was signed by
Rabbi Alexander Shapiro, RA
president, and Rabbi Allan
Meyerowitz, RA Soviet Jewry
chairman.
EDITOR. The Jewish Fhridian:
1 want to take this opportunity
to update the community on the
status of foreign aid to Israel for
1986. The federal budget, which
includes this aid, is now in Con-
ference Committee where the
House and Senate Conferees will
attempt to settle the differences
between the two versions of the
budget.
Earlier in the budget process. I
took the initiative of boosting aid
to Israel. The Senate not only
authorized my recommended *s
billion aid package for Israel in
1986, but also my recommenda-
tion for an additional $1.5 billion
in emergency supplemental
assistance this year in order to
help Israel out of its current
economic crisis. These funds
represent America's strong com-
mitment to protecting Israel s
security and will hopefully help
produce a lasting peace in the
Middle East.
Because of our commitment to
Israel and overall U.S. strategic-
interests in the Middle East, it is
vital that Israel remain militarily
and economically stable. As you
know. Israel is now in the throes
of a severe economic crisis with
dangerously low cash reserves,
enormous trade and budget
deficits, and a staggering annual
inflation rate. U.S. assistance is
an essential element in the Israeli
government's fight to control its
economy.
As ranking Democrat of the
Senate Budget Committee and a
member of the Conference Com-
mittee now underway. I am deep-
ly concerned that we provide ade-
quate aid to protect one of our
closest and most important allies.
I want you to know that I will do
all I can to protect my aid package
as it continues moving through
the budget process.
LAWTON CHILES
United States Senate
(Florida. Democrat)
Rewritten Metro Resolution Barring
Funds Will Likely Pass July 16
Metro Commissioner
Barry Schreiber believes
that a second version of a
resolution tabled by the
Dade County Commission
on Apr. 16 will now pass.
Arthur Teitelbaum, director of
the Florida office of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, and William Gralnick, of
the Miami office of the American
Jewish Committe, helped rewrite
the resolution.
The resolution aims at pro-
hibiting giving county funds to
groups meeting at private clubs
that restrict membership on the
basis of race, religion or sex.
The Commission said "no" the
first time because its language
was too broad. Included among
private clubs are social clubs
whose purpose is purely to
preserve a cultural heritage
Jewish or German or Polish, for
example.
ACCORDING TO the first
resolution, this would have in-
advertently punished such
organizations, whose purpose is
not to discriminate against any
specific race, religion or sex, but
merely to advance their particular
heritage.
"The resolution is clearer this
time," according to Schreiber,
who will place the redraft on the
Commission agenda on July 16.
The resolution now refers to
"private social clubs" to
distinguish between restrictive
clubs founded for a purely social
purpose and those that aim to
preserve their heritage.
Teitelbaum declared, "We've
clarified it so that it's un-
mistakably relating to restricted
private clubs. It doesn't affect
clubs designed to enhance a
religious or cultural identity.
We're quite optimistic that this
resolution will pass."
Economic
Plan Fails
Continued from Page 1-A
product will begin to rise at an an-
nual rate of 5.5 percent until 1990.
IN THIS PERIOD, exports are
expected to rise at an average an-
nual rate of 13.6 percent and in-
dustrial output by seven percent
annually. The prognosis is based
on the assumption that subsidies
for exports and basic commodities
will be eliminated.
The program was prepared by
the Economic Planning Authority
which Yaacobi heads. Yaacobi a
Laborite, told reporters he hoped
the government would adopt it
despite the fact that the chief
economic portfolios are held by
Likud ministers. The grave
economic situation demands a
cohesive economic program, not a
system of extinguishing fires here
and there, Yaacobi said.
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~- w
Page2-A The Jewish Floridian/FYM.,, t.
ic oewisn r londian/Friday, June 28, 1985
Moderate Shiites Fear Israel
Because of Militant Movements
Continued from Page 5-A
willing to accept is the services of
the hospital at Marjayoun.
Located in the narrow security
strip along Israel's northern
border, the hospital serves most
of the southern region.
Closed by the 1975 civil war, the
hospital reopened with Israel's
assistance in 1978. It has since
grown to provide comprehensive
and sophisticated medical services
for some 10,000 civilians monthly.
Dr. Alexander Coret, an IDF
Medical Corps member, will serve
as hospital director until the local
staff is ready to take over. Coret
insists he doesn't know the
percentage of his Shiite patients.
"This hospital serves a population
of some 500,000 people and many
of them are Shiites. When a sick
Peres Asked To
Reject Appeal
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Workmen's Circle called on
Premier Shimon Peres of Israel to
reject an appeal by Leon Dulzin,
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization and Jewish Ex-
ecutive, that he raise with Presi-
dent Reagan the issue of denying
refugee status to Soviet Jews who
leave the USSR with Israel visas
but do not settle in Israel.
Barnett Zumoff, president of
the Workmen's Circle, said in a
letter to Peres that "the Dulzin
appeal is narrow and assaults the
right of Jews to freely emigrate
wherever they choose."
"We understand fully Duban's
concern and even his reasons,"
Zumoff wrote. "At the same time,
Soviet Jews who want to leave
should be able to do so without
moral or legal restraints. Those
who choose to remain should be
able to do so without harassment
or curtailments of Jewish cultural
or religious rights permitted to
other citizens. This has been the
historic and consistent desire of
both JewB and non-Jews concern-
ed with the problem."
He added that "The conscience
of Jews dedicated to rescuing our
less fortunate brothers and sisters
must be united on one though:
freedom full freedom of
choice to emigrate, to travel, to
resettle."
person comes to us we don't ask
his religion."
SHIITE RELUCTANCE to be
associated with the Jewish state is
revealed starkly in the failure of
the Israeli-backed South Lebanese
Army to attract a significant
number of Shiite recruits. Despite
the financial advantages enjoyed
by SLA soldiers in a region suffer-
ing from acute unemployment,
and an intensive recruitment
drive among Shiites, the force re-
mains 68 percent Christian and
less than 14 percent Shiite.
The SLA, which is responsible
for security in a strip several
kilometers wide and some 120
kilometers long contiguous with
Israel's northern border, was
recently divided into ethnic units.
Each unit is assigned to an area
predominantly populated by its
own community.
Nazeh el Hadj, Shiite com-
mander of the SLA base near El
Hiyam village, points out that his
soldiers "know they are protec-
ting their own people" and can be
expected to do a good job. But, he
concedes, "some men are leaving
to be in their homes and protect
their families." The SLA reached
a strength of approximately 2,500
a year ago. By mid-March 1985, it
had lost 13 percent of its soldiers.
ACCORDING TO Dolev, most
Shiite terrorist attacks against
Israeli soldiers during the
withdrawal period "are a sort of
competition among Shiite groups
who want to control the area, and
we are the target by which to
measure their success."
Dolev says, however, that "the
Shiites know we're not their
enemies. After we leave, they will
become very busy among
themselves. The competition," he
points out, "is between
pragmatists like Nabih Berri,
head of El Amal, the largest
Shiite political group, and the
religious fanatics. Each side is try-
ing to establish its power. The
villagers are mostly illiterate and
simple people, and there will be
terrible fighting and suffering
after we leave."
There is, in this, a grave irony.
The Shiite villagers of southern
Lebanon, by yielding to terror-
induced fear of coopeation with
Israel, have strengthened the
very forces which threaten to tear
apart the peaceful existence they
sought to protect.
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Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
/
fik
i r
Rabin Says U.S. Must Take
Responsibility for Hijackers
/
-a
>-
4
V. *0
i | a state visit to /sraei, Bofei Ladawa
Ei, wife of Mobutu Sese Seko, president of
\ paid a call on a Na'amat day nursery
I Aviv. Mrs. Mobutu (center) is shown
i part in a folk dance with some of the
.en. At left is Ziva Lahat, whose hus-
\Shlomo, is mayor of Tel Aviv. Right is
Masha Lubelsky, secretary general of
Na'amat, whose programs on behalf of
children, women and young people receive ma-
jor American support from Pioneer Women-
Na'amat, which xs celebrating its 60th an-
niversary this year.
aders Satisfied
TWA Didn't Pick 'Jewish' Names
r KEVIN FREEMAN
YORK (JTA) -
fican Jewish leaders
ted from a meeting
enior TWA executives
Igovernment officials
need that TWA flight
Innel on board hijacked
r 847 did not par-
ite in aiding the Shiite
bm hijackers in a selec-
brocess which led to the
ration of some six
fngers with "Jewish
ling surnames" from
Ither passengers.
i have no reason to believe
[the TWA crew comported
elves in anything less than a
isional, courageous and ex-
, manner," the National
.i Community Relations Ad-
r Council said in a statement
on behalf of the organiza-
I which participated in the
|ng-
tithing in their reported
rior would appear to have put
lives of Jews, those with
lh sounding names or any
passengers in greater
Irdy."
|K TWO-HOUR meeting
]at TWA offices here was re-
1 by senior TWA officials to
I concerns in the Jewish com-
ity that the flight crew of the
ked aircraft, now in Beirut,
lected passports from the
fengers and given the hi-
brs those passports with
sh sounding surnames. These
engers were taken from the
.e and are reportedly being
I by the Party of God, the fun-
lentalist Shiite group that is
! to have organized the
ping.
i a related development, Ken-
i Bialkin, chairman of the Con-
nee of Presidents of Major
erican Jewish Organizations,
!ed President Reagan for
sing "to yield to terrorist
nds" and said the hijacking
perscored "the importance of
1 as our country's strong and
ble ally in the region."
[n a telegram sent to the White
puse, Bialkin also condemned
he cruelty of the terrorists and
t racism and hate that
Itivate" the hijackers "in singl-
ing out passengers with so-called
Jewish-sounding names and
holding them separately. We
know that you (Reagan) and all
Americans share our pain over
this vicious selection process, with
its echoes of Auschwitz and the
Holocaust," said Bialkin, who was
just reelected to a second one-year
term as Presidents Conference
chairman.
TWA OFFICIALS maintained
that the flight attendants aboard
the aircraft tried but failed to
dissuade the hijackers from
separating the passengers from
those thought to be Jewish. A
spokesman said the attendants
were able to convince the hi-
jackers that some of those they
thought were Jewish were either
German or Swedish.
Uli Derickson, the flight's
purser told a news conference in
New York that the gunmen
ordered her to collect passengers'
passports and give them those
with Jewish sounding surnames.
She stated that she did not single
out any names.
Sally McElwreath, TWA staff
director of corporate communica-
tions, said. "The hijackers were
going through the passports and
saying, 'This is a Jewish name,
this one sounds like a Jewish
name.' At some point she
(Derickson) said things like,
'that's Swedish, that's a well
known Swedish name.' She did
not nominate passengers."
DERICKSON'S performance
was also defended by Jerry
Cosley, TWA vice president of
corporate communications.
"Throughout the entire painful
episode she tried to persuade the
hijackers that they couldn't iden-
tify a person by *heir name, and
she resisted at every point. Her in-
terest was to protect every
passenger by every means and
guile at her disposal."
The Jewish organization that
participated in the meeting with
TWA and government officials,
were the NJCRAC, American
Jewish Congress, American
Jewish Committee, Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and the Jewish Community
Relations Council of New York.
The unidentified government of-
ficials who participated in the
meeting are said to have par-
ticipated in the debriefing of
Derickson for several hours.
"THE REMAINING American
hostages and TWA flight crew
clearly are in great jeopardy and
our uppermost goals continue to
be the prompt and safe release
and until then their safety and
well being," the statement said.
"Noting the intense hostility of
the hijackers to the United States,
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Israeli Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin stressed that
while Israel has always plan-
ned to release the some 700
Shiite prisoners it is
holding, if the United States
wants it to do so as a means
for freeing the American
hostages captured aboard a
TWA plane it must make
such a request of Israel. He
said the request would then
have to be considered by the
Cabinet.
"What do you expect Israel to
do?" Rabin said in an interview on
ABC-TVs "Nightline," the first
American television interview
given by an Israeli Cabinet
member since the plane was hi-
jacked enroute from Athens to
Rome.
"You (the U.S.) say we are not
to give in to the demands of ter-
rorism. We are not going to give
in to any blackmail. But we want
you to do so even without asking
you to do so," Rabin said.
THE DEFENSE Minister was
apparently responding to Presi-
dent Reagan's press conference
statement last week that the U.S.
will not meet the demands of ter-
rorists and will not ask other na-
tions to do so.
Rabin repeatedly said that
Israel is committed to release the
prisoners, but would give no
timetable. He repeated this in a
talk before Nahal Army units and
said some of the prisoners would
U1C 111JC*V_I\C-1 O W MIC ^i"WU Israel, and hence, by their already .have been released if it
____...^.J !.. tn I,,,...- .... iKm^a ...n*n '.%** f*w tkii rahawtt inninpnt
perverted logic, to Jews or those
they believe to be Jews, we believe
hostages so identified by hijackers
continue to be at a particular
risk."
"But to repeat, and be as clear
as possible, we believe, on the
basis of available information,
that members of the TWA crew
did not single out or otherwise
jeopardize their passengers and
apparently did much to mitigate
the terror and brutality of the
situation," the statement
concluded.
were not' for the recent incident
between the South Lebanon Army
and the Finnish unit of the United
Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon.
In his television interview,
Rabin stressed that the hijacking
problem was an American one
since the hostages were
Americans who were hijacked
aboard an American plane. "The
United States government has to
make up its mind to what they
want to do," he said. "It's first
and foremost their decision."
TVE NEVER tried to avoid
responsibility" both as Premier
and now as Defense Minister,
Rabin added. "I expect the United
States to do the same."
He said that while Israel for the
past 17 years has experienced ter-
rorism more than any other coun-
try, both inside and outside its
borders, it cannot advise another
country what to do. "The govern-
ment of a country is responsible
for whatever happens to its own
people regarding whenever they
are caught by terrorists," he said.
"No one else can make the
decision ."
Rabin said that Israel has devis-
ed its own policy and "we have
never hesitated to use" the
military option "even at the cost
of lives to our own people, soldiers
and civilians alike." Rabin noted
he was Premier when Israel
rescued the hostages held at
Entebbe, Uganda.
But Rabin stressed that Israel
never hesitated to "make a deal"'
when it was necessary. He defend-
ed the decision to release 1,150
terrorists for three Israeli soldiers
which has come under heavy
criticism. He said he did not have
the "moral right" to tell the three
soldiers and their families and any
future soldiers who may be cap-
tured to "go to hell because of a
principle."
AS FOR THE Shiite prisoners,
Rabin said Israel made it clear
when they were taken in March
that they would be released after
Israeli troops withdrew from
Lebanon, and the security danger
is lessened along Israel's border.
But he said there are still security
problems and neither the
Lebanese government nor the
Shiite organization of Amal will
discuss it.
Rabin rejected Reagan's conten-
tion that by bringing the prisoners
into Israel, Israel violated the
Geneva Convention. He said the
men being held wounded and kill-
ed Israeli soldiers, but since Israel
had not set up a military govern-
ment in Lebanon, it did not try
them in a military court as it does
terrorists on the West Bank and
Gaza.
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\feddy Kollek, Jerusalem Mayor,
To Receive 1985 Peace Prize
B WOLFGANG WEBER
FRANKFURT (DaD) -
nth his popularity and
at political experience,
could long since have
become a government
Lister in the State of
llsrael.
However, whenever questions
|ir asked on this point, Teddy
IKolIek emphasizes that this is by
Wmeans a career objective worth
luriving for.
ffhat value is a ministerial
Lit compared with my job?", he
Ipoerally replies. After all, Kollek
lt mayor of just any city, such
IsTel Aviv or Chicago, but of the
lust important, the most holy of
|il cities: Jerusalem.
THIS IS WHY Kollek has re-
I Binned true to his city and thus
110 himself.
k0n Oct. 13, the mayor of
Jem will receive the 1985
Ipeace Prize of the German Book
I Trade. The prize endowment com-
[mittee explained its decision by
pointing out that during his 20
lyears as mayor of Jerusalem,
I'Kollek had "via his daily courage,
I his often unconventional decisions
lind his convincing humanity made
lit possible for Israelis and Arabs
I- Christians, Muslims and Jews
I- to live together in peace in this
|dty-"
The prize-winner will receive
|the award, which is endowed with
H25.0OO, in the Paulskirche (St.
d's Cathedral) in Frankfurt.
Kollek, 74, who was born in
IVienna and immigrated to
IPalestine in 1934, became mayor
lof Jerusalem in 1965, two years
[before the Sue-Day War in 1967,
during which the Israeli army cap-
Itured the eastern part of the city
lar.d thus reunified Jerusalem.
SINCE THEN, Kollek has
lahvays viewed himself as the
|nayor of the whole of Jerusalem,
Its the advocate and helper of all
its citizens, Israelis and Arabs
Mb.
Kollek has been unceasingly
Teddy Kollek
beating the big drum in Europe
and America on behalf of his
"Jerusalem Foundation."
During his period in office,
whole quarters of the historical
old city Jewish and Arab
have been redeveloped, Arab
hospitals built, the sewage
system, which had remained un-
changed for centuries, moderniz-
ed, the medieval city wall
restored, and numerous ar-
chaeological excavations carried
out.
THE ENERGETIC mayor is
particularly proud of one thing: in
today's reunified Jerusalem, all
religions and denominations have
unimpeded access to their places
of worship.
Nevertheless, Kollek feels that
the question of lasting peace bet-
ween Jews and Arabs will remain
a task for generations to come, "It
will take 100, perhaps 200 years,
before Jerusalem grows together
into a true community."
Israel Will Be Target Of
Islamic In Holy War
NEW YORK -- Israel will
be the initial target of an
Islamic holy war against
Jews and Christians
throughout the world unless
Moslems "abandon their
traditional way of thinking
and adopt modern concepts
of peaceful coexistence."
This warning by Bat Ye'or, an
authority on the relations between
Islam and the other major
religions, is an attempt to alert
the peoples of the western world
to the long range threat posed by
Islamic ideological concepts of
Jihad (holy war) to conquer and
convert non-Moslems.
HER BOOK, "The Dhimmi:
Jews and Christians Under
Islam," originally published in
France, has just been released
Lichtman To Return To Israel;
Assumes New El Al Post
I Following three years of service
regional sales manager of El Al
Airlines, Shlomo Lichtman
be returning to Israel next
nnth ti take up his new post at
1 head office of El Al at Lod
on.
I During Lichtman's tour of duty
*k, there was an unprecedented
wth in demand for travel to
l&ael especially reflected in
utantiallv increased traffic on
1 Al.
^According to Lichtman, this
nwth was facilitated by El Al's
liami Tel Aviv connection. In the
bree year period since his arrival
we from New York, where he
rved a three-year hitch as well,
I Al has flown a record number
"Jumbo 747's and has also in-
duced non-stop Miami-to-Tel
W flights filled with both in-
mdual and group passengers.
To provide even better ser-
"*," said Lichtman, we have im-
"oved and expanded our airport
pities to assist our passengers
. in particular, speed group
"eek-ms and seat selections.
"We have achieved one of the
ghest records of 'on-time' per-
^nances in the industry, and our
board services are being con-
'uously upgraded."
BCuman is especially proud
'Miami has developed as a
' of transfer for tourists going
">rael from South and Central
** "We have developed
^"c at its source, rather than
elv handling existing traffic."
A series of farewell receptions
Shlomo Lichtman
will say Shalom to Lichtman early
in July. His successor, Israel
Keren, will take over Lichtman's
duties as of July 15, a post which
also covers El Al operations
throughout Florida, as well as in
South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama
and Mississippi.
Lichtman, who began his career
with El Al as manager of the
airline's Jerusalem office, is ap-
proaching his 25th anniversary
with the company. Even as he is
preparing to leave Miami,
Lichtman is especially pleased to
note that "during the coming
winter, El Al will double our
capacity by operating two flights
a week between Miami and Tel
Aviv, hopefully one with the exic-
ting B767."
here in English translation. She
told a meeting of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith that Jews must ally with
Christians and modern Moslems
in a combined effort to prevent "a
continual Jihad" that may
ultimately lead to "nuclear
confrontation."
She went on to say that the
essential element of such a cam-
paign is understanding of Arab
mentality and the concept of the
dhimmi, the Jews and Christians
living under Moslem domination
who are considered inferior
because they have not accepted
conversion.
She explained that as a Sephar-
dic Jew born and raised in Egypt,
as well as a historian of "the 13
centuries of Moslem oppression of
Christians and Jews," she is more
aware of and sensitive to the
danger of Jihad than the Western
communities of both non-Islamic
religions who are ignorant of their
past.
"WHILE dhimmis were allow-
ed to live among Moslems un-
converted," she pointed out that,
at best, they were only tolerated
as a "protected" group with no
human rights and only those
limited political, judicial and
economic rights that were conced-
ed by the various rulers.
"If those limits were broken,"
she said, "violators could be killed
or expelled." In this connection,
she indicated that "anti-Semitism
does not have the same resonance
it's a different context."
Nor, she added, is it a matter of
"Arab nationalism a concept
launched by Christians seeking in-
tegration" because it is rooted
in the theology of followers of an
all-embracing faith who believe in
seeking wholesale conversions to
Islam through Jihad.
Ye'or emphasized her belief that
the only way to deal with this
medieval mentality is to develop a
dialogue with Moslems that would
encourage modern tendencies
that have manifested themselves
and reinforce the trend to peace
with Israel initiated by Anwar
Sadat.
ACKNOWLEDGING the dif-
ficulty of establishing such a
dialogue, she stressed that
Moslem traditionalists "interpret
the emergence of Israel as a
rebellion of dhimmis" and the in-
trusion of Western values into
their domain.
Therefore, she contused,
"Jews must be punished by death
and a Jihad must be launched to
Continued on Page 2-B
Peres Warns Ties to Egypt May
Worsen If Taba Goes Unresolved
By JTA Services
JERUSALEM Premier Shimon Peres warned the Knesset
Foreign Affairs and Security Committee last Monday that if there is no
agreement on arbitration over Taba, Israel's relations with Egypt
would deteriorate. Peres said he could not negotiate with Egypt over
the terms of the arbitration unless there was first an Israeli decision-in-
principle to accept arbitration.
Peres' remarks followed his failure last week to push through the
Inner Cabinet his proposal that Israel agree to Egypt's longstanding de-
mand for arbitration over Taba. The Premier proposed that Israel agree
to arbitration as part of a package deal, worked out in prior diplomatic
negotiations, involving a return to normalization between the two
countries.
ADL Opposes Museum Funding
NEW YORK The Los Angeles office of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith reported last Monday the "unanimous opposi-
tion" of the four California regional ADL offices to a grant pending in
the California legislature for $5 million in state matching funds to
enable the Simon Wiesenthal Center to build a "Museum of Tolerance."
Rabbi Marvin Heir, head of both the Wiesenthal Center and
Yeshiva University of Los Angeles, which houses the center, has assail-
ed foes of the expected state grant to help build the museum as part of a
$10.5 million expansion project.
The campaign has already raised more than $10.5 million in private
donations. But the grant measure, SB337, has created concern among
Jews about its constitutionality and its public policy implications.
Liberals Vote for Herut Merger
TEL AVIV The Liberal Party voted last Friday to merge with
Herut, but according to a formula proposed by Finance Minister Yit-
zhak Modai which was bitterly opposed by some of his ranking Liberal
Party colleagues.
The 217-187 vote taken early last Friday morning after a grueling
18-hour debate was for gradual merger of the two components of Likud
to be implemented over a considerable period of time. It represented a
significant victory for Modai over his principal rivals for party leader-
ship Avraham Sharir, Gideon Patt and Moshe Nissim, the ministers
of tourism, science and justic respectively.
They had demanded a much swifter merger of the Liberals with
their larger partner and maintained that Modai's proposal would never
to accepted by Herut.
Czechs Asked to Preserve Cemeteries
WASHINGTON Ambassador Stanislav Suja of Czechoslovakia
has been asked to intervene with Czech officials to assure the preserva-
tion of Jewish cemeteries in Czechoslovakia, according to Rabbi Moshe
Sherer, president of Agudath Israel of America.
The appeal was made to Suja by a Jewish delegation which met with
the envoy in the Czech Embassy. Sherer headed the delegation which
inlucded representatives of the Committee to Preserve the Jewish
Cemeteries of Slovakia. The delegation was accompanied by Rep.
Stephen Solarz (D., N.Y.).
MKs Worried About U.S. Public Opinion
JERUSALEM Israeli lawmakers are growing increasingly sen-
sitive to the temper of American public opinion with respect to the 40
U.S. hostages held by Shiite Moslem in Beirut who demand that Israel
free 766 Shiites in the Atlit detention camp. The concern here is that
Israel, by not complying will be held responsible for the hostages' fate.
Israel released 31 of the Atlit prisoners last Monday and returned
them to Lebanon in a move it insists was in no way linked to the hostage
crisis. When Premier Shimon Peres appeared before the Knesset's
Foreign Affairs and Security Committee to brief its members on the
release, committee chairman Abba Eban reminded him that Israel's
primary asset "for decades" has been sympathetic public opinion, and
Israel must always be conscious and alert to this.
Other committee members spoke critically of Defense Minister Yit-
zhak Rabin's remarks on the ABC-TV "Nightline" program on Wednes-
day, June 19, in which he insisted that the hijack of TWA Flight 847 was
purely an "American problem."
U.S. Comments on 'Jewish' Hostages
WASHINGTON The State Department's Office for Counter-
Terrorism said it was "repugnant and reprehensible" for the hijackers
of TWA Flight 847 to have separated "Americans of the Jewish Faith"
from the other hostages "because of 'Jewish-sounding names' or sup-
posed 'Zionist links.' "
But that statement, which gave the impression that the U.S. was
confirming that the hostages with Jewish-sounding names are in fact
Jewish, was promptly clarified by another State Department
spokesman who said the original statement was merely quoting a wire
service report.
Bomb Blast Injures 8-year-old
JERUSALEM An eight-year-old boy was badly injured last Mon-
day when an explosive charge went off near a bus stop in a Jerusalem
suburb. He was identified as Alon Hananya.
The incident occurred in Neve Yaacov, the northernmost part of the
post-67 new Jewish suburbs ringing the capital.
Police said the bomb was hidden in rocks near the bus stop.
dfewislfo Floridia
Miami, Florida Friday, June 28,1985 Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish FToridJMyTriday, June 28. 1985
CBS to Feature
A Discussion i
Capital Punish]
Teiev
Religious and community leaders gather at a recent Interfaitk
program at Temple Israel of Greater Miami in celebration of the
VXh anniversary of the Nottre Aetate declaration at the second
Ecumenical Council conference in the Vatican in 1965. Shown at
the celebration are (left to right) William A. Gralnick, Southeast
regional director of the American Jewish Committee, which join-
ed Temple Israel in conjunction with the Archdiocese of Miami in
hosting the tOth anniversary celebration; Edward A. McCarthy
Archbishop of Miami; Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat, senior rabbi.
Temple Israel; Gerald K. Schwartz, president. Temple Israel;
Sister Noel Boggt. Interfdith Commission of the Miami Ar-
chdiocese; Msgr. Bryan 0. Walsh, Ecumenical Commission of the
Archdiocese; and David Mesnekoff, American Jewish Committee
president Workshops, services and programs were held both at
Temple Israel and St Martha's Catholic Church.
Family Service Agency Elect Officers Ben Gurion Airport Ultra Modern
Inatallauon of 1985-86 officers
for the Board of Directors of the
Jewish Family Service of Greater
Miami, formerly known as Jewish
Family sad Children's Service,
took place at the agency's recent
65th annual meeting.
Elected to serve as president for
a second term is Dorothy
Podhurst, who has served on the
JFS Board since 1980 and was
recently elected as president of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Women's Division.
Other officers elected to second
terms are Vice Presidents Jeffrey
Newman, Ethelda Kirsh, and
Secretary Sue Samuels.
Newly elected are Treasurer
Melvin Beck, DDS. a JFS past
president and Assistant Treasurer
James Feltman.
Dorothy Podhurst
Holy War
restore dhimmihood.'
Continued from Page IB
Noting, however, that there
were other traditions and new in-
terpretations of the Koran which
contradict the devout fundamen-
talist Islamic allegiance to Jihad.
Ye'or urged a greater focus on
Arab history among Western
Jews and Christians as the basis
for working with Moslems to ac-
celerate modernization and the
thrust among them towards
greater democracy and peace.
She went on to say that those
who are considered "western in-
fluenced" are also regarded as
enemies by the fundamentalists
such as Khomeini for whom this is
one of the factors for persisting in
the war against Iraq.
THE POINT, she said, is that
Jews and Christians in Moslem
countries are seeking "not tolera-
tion but equality."
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVTV (JTA) Im-
provements at Ben Gurion Air-
port in Lod. near Tel Aviv, make
it one of the safest and most
modern airports in the world, ac-
cording to Arieh Grozbord. chair-
man of the Israel Airports
Authority.
A major advance was the
replacement of the old control
tower, dating back nearly 50
years, when there was virtually no
commercial air traffic, by a new
164-foot high tower containing
the newest and most sophisticated
equipment. In the old tower, the
equipment was 30 years old.
Now. a long range radar, a com-
puter terminal and computerized
communications systems enable
air traffic controllers to track air-
craft at a distance of 165 miles
about 20 minutes flying time from
the airport and to reduce the
distance separating them from 9.9
to 4.9 miles while maintaining the
same margin of safety. This
means more aircraft can land
within a given time frame.
The only problem that remains
unsolved is the constant noise of
arriving and departing jets which
has residents of the densely-
populated area around the airport
up in arms.
The CBS letevjsio. -_-A,H
program. For Oar I
feature a dMeossior. .atl,
punishment on Sunday i
over WTVJ. Ch i
entitled To Witness Be^I
I s." will feature ran .- per
thres on capital p-.-.-..~.entr
tered by prison chag
religious leaders -
guidance and corr.r
facing the death sentence.
Rabbi Solomon Sdriff, direcuj
of chaplaincy of the GreaJ
Miami Jewish Federa:: r. vfl;
pear on the program A.so inu.
viewed will be Lou BranUevJ
former president o: the Flor
State Senate: Biao : p.
Cerveny. of the Episcopal Dio
of Florida; and Bihop Jo,,
Snyder. of the Catholic Diocese i
St. Augustine.
The "To Witness Between Us"
program will examine what occur-1
red when the United
Supreme Court ruled ir. 1976 i__
states could determine whether to I
reinstate capital punishment, and!
Florida remtroduced the deathl
penalty, thereby placing over 20o|
prisoners on Death Row.
The Federation chaplaincy ser-L
vice, which Rabbi Schiff heads I
was established in 1966 by the I
Federation in cooperation with]
the Rabbinical Association of I
Greater Miami. Part of the servia
includes visiting with and
ministering to the needs of in-
mates in prisons throughout^
South Florida
States!
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
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from
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f HlL^ Dasta aJPhaDe'
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V^N' numbers covered
with a nch tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a dehaous hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish And so
will the adults' Either way you
serve it. getting the children to
eat is as easy as AJeph Bez!
Initial Office Visit
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Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
'Blitz Week' Highlights
Federation Closing Campaign
Dr. Fred Rosenbloom, Cal Kovens, Chairman of the Board of
Mount Sinai Medical Center; Barton S. Goldberg. Mr. Goldberg
succeed* Dr. Rosenbloom as Chairman of Mount Sinai's Young
Presidents Club.
Rabbi Glass New Director
Of Brandeis Academy
Alan Jacoby, President of
Brandeis Academy, has announc-
the appointment of Rabbi
"Herbert Glass as the new Director
of Brandeis Academy.
"We are very pleased to have
such a respected educator as Rab-
bi Glass to head our school," said
Jacoby. "Rabbi Glass's creden-
tials and abilities will bring an ad-
ded dimension of educational ex-
cellence to both the secular and
Judaic programs of our school."
Rabbi Glass holds a Masters
Degree in Clinical School
Psychology from City College
Graduate School of Education and
I is currently working toward his
Doctorate in the EdD Program,
Florida International University,
Department of education.
Rabbi Glass participated in the
Kollel Program of the Rabbinical
Seminary of America in
Jerusalem and holds degrees in
Pastoral Counseling and Teacher
Training and Educational
Methodology from Torah
I'mesorah.
Morris Soble of Chicago has
Wn elected president of the
hnericah Jewish Historical
wciety at the national con-
lerence of the Society held in
Baltimore. Soble is a promi-
"ent businessman and has been
a long-time supporter of
ndtural organizations in his
wine city, including the
Chicago Symphony, the AH In-
,h(te, and the Museum of
science, and Industry.
Bet Shira
Congregation Day'
With the declaration on July 1
*s "Bet Shira Congregation Day"
ty Mayor Steve Clark," the first
Conservative Synagogue
established in 8 years in South
j*de officially opens. Rabbi David
" Auerbach will be the spiritual
A 7:30 a.m. service marks in-
auguration of daily services.
The first president is Richard C.
M'lstein.
Brandeis Academy opened in
September 1982 to serve as the
community Jewish Junior High
School for the South Dade area
and is a beneficiary of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
Norman Braman, the 1985
general chairman of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, has announced
that Federation's "Blitz Week
Phonathon" resulted in nearly
1.000 gifts to the campaign.
"Our week long effort on behalf
of the Jewish community was ex-
tremely successful," Braman in-
dicated. "Our campaign closing
has provided the impetus to close
the 1985 CJA-IEF at a record
level."
"Blitz Week" was staged June
10-14, and involved many Federa-
tion volunteers, as well as Federa-
tion staff, and Federation
beneficiary agency volunteers and
staff members. "I'd like to extend
my thanks to all the individuals
who participated in the 'Blitz
Norman Braman
Temple Zion Installs Officers
Rabbi Herbert Glass
Michael M. Exelbert. local
educator, was installed as presi-
dent of Temple Zion Israelite
Center.
He's served (two terms) as wor-
shipful master of the Miracle
Masonic Lodge, followed by four
years as president of the South
Dade Hebrew Academy.
Exelbert, a Yeshiva graduate,
recipient of several scholastic
awards in Hebrew language, hold
memberships in Omicron Delta
Kappa, Order of Omega and Iron
Arrow at the University of Miami,
where he received his Master of
Education in Special Education.
He's a senior staff ad-
ministrator of the Dade County
School System, heading the Mer-
rick Education Center (home in-
structional program), which ser-
vices home-bound and profound
yougsters and students.
Also installed were the
members of his executive board,
and general board members.
EXECUTIVE BOARD Executive
Vice President, Alan Fisher; Education
Vice President, David Boas; Membership
Vice President, Lester Rosenberg;
Religious Vice President, Mack Pawliger;
Ways and Means Vice President, Keith
Agress; Youth Vice President. Robert
Rosen: Treasurer. Joseph Zipper; Recor
ding Secretary, Al Landskroner; Cor-
responding Secretary, Arnold Altman;
Legal Secretary, Andrew Parish; and Im-
mediate Past President, Marshall H. Cohen.
BOARD OF DIRECTORS Sharon Boas,
Jere Chait, David Cohen, Honey Cohen,
Lewis Fishman, Sari Friedman, Gerald
Laub, Martin Wasserman, Nancy Propp,
Harvey Rashkind. Elias Rimland. Harold
Rosenfeld, Harriette Rothman. Robert
Sirull, and Joel Vogel.
Sisterhood Presidents Lisa Horton and
Natalie Rosenberg; Men's Club President.
Sheldon Bott and Theatre Guild President.
Jere Chait.
Week Phonathon.' The members
of our Jewish community have
clearly demonstrated that our
campaign efforts can be extended
into the late spring with positive
results," Braman noted.
He continued, "Since Jewish
needs in Greater Miami, in Israel
and worldwide are greater than
ever, our campaign must
endeavor to meet those needs. It's
really a year-round job, and dur-
ing 1985, our community respond-
ed in a generous and selfless man-
ner. I firmly believe we have ac-
complished a great deal that we
can be very proud of this year."
Among Federation volunteers
covering the greatest numbers of
pledge cards during "Blitz Week"
were: Pola Yarmus and Isail
Wagenberg in the Cuban-Hebrew
and Latin-Hebrew Divisions; Irv-
ing Stessel and Sy Reisman, Hi-
Rise Division; Charlotte Oliver
and Sue Samuel from \.%kp
beneficiary agencies; Howard
Hollander and Harold Vinik from
the Trades and Professions Divi-
sions; and Clare Rotenberg and
Salomon Wainberg during the
phonathon session open to all cam-
paign divisions.
Federation staffers closing on
the greatest numbers of gifts in-
cluded, Marty Barasch, Anette
Lipko, Midge Blumberg, Anita
Rawman, Rita Coker, Sender
Kaplan and Ira Mogitz.
"I think that our campaign clos-
ing effort has created a great deal
of mementum for the 1986 CJA-
IEF," Braman said. "Through
our efforts we added to our corps
of talented volunteers, and we
generated a new community
awareness regarding the Federa-
tion campaign."
Our dinner was by candlelight.
The dessert was by citylight.
Cup after cup.
The coffee was Brim.*
Fill your cup to the rim
With the richness of Brim.
brim brim brim
GENERAL
ci9eSGwwf Foods CorpocMon FOOOS



Page 4-B The Jewish FloridanTridaj. Jane 28. 1985
Behind The Headlines
Peres' Peace Proposals In Knesset
Seen As Positive Signal To Jordan
Community Corner
By DAVID LAM) AI
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres has
sent some positive signals to
Jordan and the Palestinians
in his political statement to
the Knesset, outlining
Israel's ideas for peace
negotiations, informed
soureed said.
reflected the potioca.
eaSer mbmJi be ^perases as aead
of a Labor-Liar: -ar.cca. -r_r.
government, the sources saji
One -sf the posttrv* eieaser.*
- i-; -.e Prwnier'j i11 Cum
^cai a>c Uanvaj prescribed
oy die Canp David agreementi
for the adasatistered '.emtones
_: -:*: -.?: fa^esatttaf.
aotooomj. He also referred
psaeiee' v. "_; gMSflaBBSl I
adoption of iu own policy toward
Jewish settlements in the ter-
ritories. He encouraged authentic
Palestinian representatives from
the territories to participate in the
peace process.
HIS REFERENCE to "its own
pobcy" with respect to set-
tlements wss seen as a reminder
that since taking office last
September, the Peres govern-
ment has established no new set-
tlements in the West Bank. "The
government has adopted its own
pofacy vis-a-vis the quality of life in
the territories and regarding the
settlements," Peres said. "Tms
pobcy takes into account not only
Israel's prerogatives but also the
feelings of the inhabitants of the
territories."
Informed sources explained that
the refeence to "autentk" Palesti-
nian representatives from the ter-
ritories was intended to en-
courage West Bank moderates
such as Mayor Elias Freij of
Bethlehem and Hikmat El-Mash
o! Nab!us that even if other
estinians are brought into the
tiating process by the U.S..
<-l will insist that they too join.
: ie tenor of Peres' remarks ad-
ssed to King Hussein of Jordan
-e also notably positive. The
mier took pains not to dismiss
th<- possibility that Hussein's
ratner vague pronouncements in
Wa-'.ington last month may have
indeed opened new paths toward
peace as the Reagan Ad-
ministration has contended.
WHILE PERES reiterated
Israel's opposition to the U.S. sale
of advanced weapons to Jordan,
he linked those objections to Jor-
dan's positions toward the peace
process and the fact that it main-
tains a state of belligerency with
Israel. Peres appeared to be urg-
ing the Jordanian long to be more
forthright and unequivocal in his
diplomatic moves while not oppos-
ing Jordan's arms requests from
the U.S. per se.
Peres did not gloss over the
"debate" Israel is having with
Washington on "the composition"
of the projected joint Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation. But, as in
his letter to Secretary of State
George Shultz last week, he stop
ped short of outright rejection of
all members of the Palestine Na-
tional Council as possible
negotiating partners. The U.S. is
willing to negotiate
with PNC
Temple Beth Am
Concert Series
Temple Beth Am will be offer-
ing four concerts next season
featuring artists soprano Marvis
Martin, Sequoia String Quartet,
violinist Peter Zazofsky, perform-
ing with pianist Mjphele Levin,
and Richard Goode, pianist.
men who are not known members
of the Palestine Liberation
The position most
expressed by I Aitn
u that the PNC and
are one and the same.
Maet of Peres' statement was
devoted to anderscoring ins deter
rsawariiiii to move ahead on the
biateral front with Egypt before
veataraaj into the broader peace
process involving Jordan and he
PiiMiiiiiii
IN REMARKS addressee
Presadec: Hose: Mubarak of
Egypt. Peres declared. The
reaoanksi of the problems bet-
ween as does not constitute only s
coatributior. to the past, bat is
Jm .-. -_-* satan :' s Boatra rtioa
to the future. This is not only a
contribution to Egypt-uvlsraeii
relations but also a contribution to
the peace moment.
Informed sources said Egypt is
now the most urgent item on
Peres' pobcy agenda. He intend-
ed, they said, to bring a "package
tsaL-
K. Brsatfwav. surgeon, has recently been re-elected to
the AMA Board of Trustees for s two-year term, at the AM
nual Meeting held in Chicago.
Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami has r^-+ .--_
certificate of verification as the first Level H trauma center in
Dsde County^s proposed trauma network, joining Jackson
Memorial Medical Center which was recently certified as a Level I
center.
Brandets University National Women's Committee Sort}
Dsde Chapter is collecting used books for the annual book m
the East end of Sky Lake Mall every Friday afternoon from noon
to 3 p.m. for the benefit of the Brandets University Libra.-
*** *""*". the Tabs border
to the inner cabinet for
approval in the next few weeks.
The inner cabinet is composed of
five Labor and five Likud
aaeaan
Peres is expected to press hard
for a decision in favor of interna-
aona. arbitration to resolve the
Tabs dispute. This has long oeen
demanded by Egypt while Israel
favored conciliation. In return for
Israel's acquiesence on that issue.
Egypt would be expected to
re:- _; aaaassssat is Td Aw.
and thaw out the "cold peace ____________________________________________
generally.
JLi Si b^ieTe ^ Friedman Elected State BB President
settlement of busters! issues with ,v
A Consumer Exchange meeting on Women's Health :
be held Friday. June 28. from 9 to 1130 am. -
auditorium on the 10th floor A the South Shore H
Center. Miarr- Beach.
Egypt, leading to a summit
meeting between himself and
Mubarak, would create a positive
ifmoiphert in broad sections of
Israeli public opinion which would
make it easier to attempt talks
with a Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation in quest of a com-
prehensive peace settlement.
Kenneth Fnedmar. N
nvic leader, was elected president
of the Florida State Association of
B'na. B'rith at its recent conven-
tion in Palm Beach, representing
over 160 lodges. President-elect
Bill Raner is also from North
Kenneth Friedman currently
serves as
Skjrlske-Higl u
Homeowners Assoca~
President of S* -
Miami, vice president I
Miami Bea.:.-. -.:.-
member of the Hope Center He is
also coach of an Optinust Baseoai:
teas.
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days o week
PuMi Bakeries open st 800 A.M.
Try That Wsttnctrvely
Wffarant Pie
Cherry
Crumb Pie
$929
each bj
AvaaaMe at PuMx Store* with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Packed wrrh Goodness
Peanut Butter
Cookies
^FREE!
Whan you buy one doz. for $1.56
Available at Pabtx Storaa with
Fraah Danish Bafcaftaa Only.
Hamburger or
Hot Dog Rolls
49
8-ct
pkg.
Available at AM Pubtx Storaa
Danish
Available at Publix Storaa with Fraah
Danish Bakeries Only.
Sweet, Extra Moist
Gourmet Brownies....... **. $159
Made wttfi the Freshest Ingredients
Golden Loaf
Pound Cake..................^$149
Cheese Ring..................^M69
Prices Effective
June 27 thru July 3.1985
Kaiser Rolls................6 m
Mini Bagelettes.......12
fOf
69*
99*
>lCnll*8
COOKBOOK
COLLECTION
This week's feature
VOLUME 9
Book of
Italian Cooking
I f W ach
Watch for
No* Books Wccklv
"


'Senegal: African Thorn
In Israel's Side'
Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Bv ABRAHAM H. FOXMAN
And ABBA COHEN
Senegal's record of
unremitting hostility toward
Israel is comparable to that of
the most extreme Arab states.
Indeed, while Israel maintains
contacts in varying degree with
the majority of African countries
lincluding those which are
openly hostile), under the
present regime of Senegalese
President Abdou Diouf, Israeli
initiatives have been rejected
even at the most informal and
unofficial level.
President Diouf and other
Senegalese officials have
declared, time and again, that
Senegal has absolutely no in-
tention of resuming diplomatic
relations with Israel, now or in
the future.
SENEGAL HAS been in the
I*" forefront of efforts to alienate
Israel from Black Africa. In
early 1982. Saudi Arabian
leaders were reportedly assured
by President Diouf that his
country would vigorously oppose
renewed Israeli attempts to gain
diplomatic acceptance by
African states that broke off
relations after the 1973 war.
Several months later,
President Diouf pledged to Arab
League Secretary General Chedi
Klibi that Senegal would work to
block any renewal of diplomatic
relations between Africa and
Israel and that his country
would seek to persuade African
states to link the issue of South
Africa with that of Israel.
In the past several months
there have been reports of
discussions between Senegal and
the Arab League to establish a
joint program to combat Israel
infiltration" of Black Africa.
And. in March of this year,
Senegal initiated the formation
of an African-Arab in-
terparliamentary committee that
will be devoted to addressing the
Israeli "threat'* in Africa.
SENEGAL HAS even at-
tempted to create strains bet-
ween Israel and those African
countries that have chosen to
reestablish ties. Early this year,
for example, in a move
characteristic of hostile Arab
states, President Diouf
pressured the Zairian govern-
ment not to invite the Israeli
Ambassador in Kinshasa to the
official welcoming ceremonies for
President Diouf's visit to Zaire.
Senegal has been active within
the Islamic world as well. As a
member of both the Islamic
Congress organization and the
Muslim Solidarity Conference,
Senegal has participated in the
adoption of virulent anti-Israel
resolutions, including those that
call for "Jihad," or Holy War,
against the Jewish State.
Senegal's relations with the
Palestine Liberation
Organization have also deepened
over the last three years. In
June. 1982, in an exchange of
letters with PLO terrorist leader
Yasir Arafat. Diouf pledged
continued support for the
"restoration of Palestinian
rights."
SENEGAL ALSO proposed a
separate UN seat for "Palestine"
occupied by the PLO. Since that
time, Senegal-PLO solidarity has
been emphasized during two
meetings with Arafat in Dakar
and in Tunis.
It should be noted, in this
regard, that in 1967 Senegal was
the first Black African state to
grant official recognition to the
PLO. Senegal's founder and first
president, Leopold Senghor, once
described as a "champion of the
PLO," encouraged the terrorist
organization at that time to open
an office in Dakar.
Even at the UN, where anti-
Israel animus is rifle, Senegal
stands out. At every op-
portunity. Senegalese
representatives fiercely condemn
Israeli policies and actions. In
Senegal's position as chairman
of the UN Committee of the
Exercise of the Inalienable
Rights of the Palestinian People,
it has played a prominent role
indeed, a leading role in ef-
forts to vilify, castigate and
discredit Israel.
HOSTILITY, however, has
not always marked Senegal-
Israel relations. During the
1960's, in fact, ties between the
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two countries were cordial.
Cooperative agreements were
signed on a wide range of issues,
including agricultural
development, air transport,
youth training programs and the
modernizing of industrial in-
frastructure. Israeli agronomists
shared their renowned expertise
in the cultivation of arid lands
with Senegalese farmers.
Israeli doctors were dispat-
ched to the African country
during the yellow fever epidemic
of 1966 and Israeli medical
teams went into the Senegalese
countryside to set up first aid
programs for villagers living in
remote areas.
In the political realm also,
Senegal sought an active role in
Arab-Israeli mediation. In 1972,
for example, Senegalese
President Senghor headed a
delegation of four African
leaders who hoped to help heal
the Middle East conflict.
The 1973 Yom Kippur War
was the turning point in Israel-
Senegal relations. Senghor took
an openly pro-Arab stand during
the hostilities and. under Arab
pressure, broke relations with
Israel.
IN THE following years,
despite a number of meetings
with Israeli leaders (as well as
one with American Jewish
leaders) and rumors of an
opening restoration of ties,
Senega] continued to pursue an
increasingly pro-Arab posture.
The change in Israel-Senegal
relations is a reflection of several
factors.
Senegal has severe economic
difficulties. It is heavily
dependent on Middle East oil
imports and has sought Arab
bank loans to aid in develop-
ment, relief and other economic
programs.
Some observers see the pro-
Arab stance as a vehicle by
which Senegal can achieve its
ambition to become the leader of
the non-Arab Islamic world and
a powerful and influential actor
in African-Arab affairs. Others
view the change in policy as a
way to pacify Senegal's Muslim
population, estimated at over 90
percent of the country and which
includes several fundamentalist
sects.
FINALLY, with the
replacement of President
Senghor, a Christian, with
President Diouf, a Moslem, in
1981, Senegal's policy tilted even
further to the Arab side.
The much-hoped-for recon-
ciliation between Black Africa
and Israel will be almost certain
not to include Senegal, at least
in the near future, at least under
the present regime.
Bishop Closes Austrian Church That
Perpetuates 15th Century Ritual
By REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) -
Reinhold Stecher, the
Bishop of Tyrol, is staunchly
holding the line against
parishioners who demand
the reopening of a local
church that embodies in its
traditions and decorations
the medieval ritual murder
libel against the Jews.
The church, in Rinn, a tiny com-
munity outside Innsbruck in the
Austrian Tyrol, is called Judens-
tein (Jew's Rock). The Catholic
cult that worships there was of-
ficially banned by the Vatican in
1961. But pilgrims continued to
converge on Rinn several times a
year.
BISHOP STECHBR en-
countered fierce protests when he
ordered the church closed last
Sunday. Parishioners and
pilgrims collected more than 3,000
signatures on a petition deman-
ding its reopening. Several hun-
dred reportedly threatened to
leave the Catholic Church if the
Bishop refused.
The church in Rinn perpetuates
a legend that Jewish merchants,
in 1462, killed a three-year-old
Christian child, named Andreas or
Anderle, to use his blood for ritual
purposes. There is no historic
basis whatever for the blood libel
which is depicted in paintings in
the church. Followers of the cult
believe the child Anderle is an in-
termediary in delivering prayers
to God.
Bishop Stecher declared, during
a Corpus Christi procession, that
he would not tolerate the defama-
tion of Jews and had the church
padlocked. He is standing tough
against mounting pressure.
Sources close to the Bishop in-
dicated the church would remain
closed until "certain circles"
demonstrate insight and a will-
ingness to listen to reason.
ACCORDING to the Bishop,
the large majority of the worship-
pers are not anti-Semites or neo-
Nazis, though he admits there are
such tendencies in the surroun-
ding region. He said the legends
of ritual murder by Jews were
part of the centuries-old campaign
of the Catholic Church against
Jews which brought unspeakable
sorrow to the Jews and disgraced
Christians in the judgment of the
world.
The Bishop noted in a pastoral
letter that even if most of the in-
habitants of Rinn are not anti-
Semites, it is they who uphold a
tradition of defamation.
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 28, 1985
Miami Heart Institute's Second Generation "Midway Madness"
affair which was chaired by (left to right) Dr. and Mrs. David
Galbut and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Stone. Committee members Dr.
and Mrs. Ron Blankstein, Dr. and Mrs. Mare Epstein, Gail and
Jeff Gidney. Phyliis and Jerry Gross. Dr. and Mrs. Marty
Grossman. Elsie and Gene Howard, Dr. and Mrs. Richard
Pollak, Dr. and Mrs. Jerry Stolzenberg. Attending the third an-
nual event were table patrons Dr. Malcolm Dorman. Joan and
Henry Gherman, and Cary Robinson. Claudette and Murray
Candib were joined by Maria and Ray Floyd and Dr. and Mrs.
Gene Sayfie. Pictured below are (left to right) Miami Beach
Mayor Malcolm Fromberg and wife, Arlene, with Miami Heart
Institute's Administrator. John Lauri. and Dr. and Mrs. Paul
Swaye.
J
Concord Plaza
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ADL Reports Farrakhan Brings
Anti-Semitism To Larger Audiences
Friday, June 28. 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Miamian In Maccabiah Games
NEW YORK Black
Muslim minister Louis Far-
rakhan is bringing his anti-
Semitism to new and larger
audiences, according to a
report made public by the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
The League said that since his
initial involvement in Jesse
'Jackson's Presidential campaign,
Farrakhan has appeared before
friendlv crowds on college cam-
puses and in other public forums.
The report was presented at a
session of the League's 72nd an-
nual National Commission
meeting at the Grand Hyatt Hotel
by Nathan Perlmutter, ADL's na-
tional director.
IT SAID that since the beginn-
ing of the year, speeches by the
wad of the Chicago-based Nation
|*tf Islam have attracted crowds
numbering "7,000 in Detroit on
Jan. 19. 7.000 at the Atlanta Civic
Center on Jan. 26; 7,500 at the
Convention Hall Civic Center in
Philadelphia on Feb. 2; 1,000 at a
church in Memphis on Apr. 13."
The analysis, prepared by the
Research and Fact Finding
Departments of ADL's Civil
Rights Division, updated the
agency's June, 1984 report of Far-
rakhan s "20-year record of
racism, anti-Semitism and
intimidation."
It pointed out that the black
community is not of one mind
about Farrakhan. On the one
hand, the report said, black au-
diences have often applauded him
enthusiastically.
ON THE other hand, "there
have been many clear repudia-
tions of Farrakhan's anti-
Semitism by the black communi-
ty," including statements by such
prominent black leaders as
Bayard Rustin, chairman of the A.
Philip Randolph Institute; Ben-
jamin Hooks, executive director of
the N'AACP; Mayor Kenneth A.
Gibson of Newark, N.J.," former
heavyweight boxing champion,
Muhammad Ali; journalist, Tony
Brown; syndicated columnist,
Carl Rowan; Michael Meyers, ex-
ecutive director of the Roy
Wilkins Memorial Foundation;
John Jacob, head of the National
Urban League; former Urban
j"League head Vernon Jordan; Ohio
Congressman Louis Stokes; New
York City Police Commissioner
Benjamin Ward and many other
black religious and political
officials.
The report said, "Farrakhan
cloaks his anti-Semitism in
religious symbolism, innuendo
and threats."
as examples, it cited remarks
made at Northeastern University,
r^eost.m. and SUNY Old Westbury,
VY.. in April and at the Kennedy
Center. Washington, D.C., early
n May.
PERLMUTTER, in his discus-
sion of the report, included details
of the remarks. He said that in his
talk on the SUNY campus, Far-
rakhan charged Jews with
threatening Jesse Jackson's life
and killing Jesus Christ and said
they would be "punished and die"
'or those acts. In his speech to
1.500 students at Northeaatero
University, he attacked Jews with
such statements as:
"Those people who call
themselves Jews, you have failed
w.m your covenant. .
Jews have not been in bon-
dage in any place called Egypt
under any king named Pharaoh.
It s not a real story ..
"You (Jews) are hurting
yourselves. You're blinded by
your own arrogance, you will br-
"g on yourselves what you dread,
"on t be too pushy or you'll stir
what's really in the hearts of those
wiwplay like they love you."
ennedv Center, Far-
Louis Farrakhan
rakhan told a preponderantly
black audience that Jews "are
masquerading as the people of
God" and that "there is no
trusting the chosen people." In
the same speech Farrakhan also
repeated his threats to Jews, call-
ing them a "generation of
vipers."
The ADL report noted that in
other recent campus appearances
Farrakhan:
Attracted "1,000 enthusiastic
students at the predominantly
black Lincoln University in Penn-
sylvania" on Feb. 11;
Had an audience of 5,000 at
the University of Houston's
Hofheinz Pavilion in February;
"At the invitation of a local
black fraternity" had an audience
of 2,000 on Mar. 28, at the Univer-
sity of Kansas.
The ADL report said that as he
crisscrossed the country with his
message combining hatred of
Jews, Zionists and American
society in general with the pro-
mise of a better life for blacks
through "economic self-help,"
Farrakhan received "massive
media attention" which enhanced
his notoriety and heightened his
public profile.
IN TALKING to black groups,
the ADL report said, his revi-
sionist claim that blacks, not
Jews, are the "true Israelites of
biblical prophecy" was "strikingly
similar" to the right-wing ex-
tremist "Identity" movement's
belief that northern European
"Aryans" are the "Chosen
People."
Farrakhan's apperances on
campuses have not been without
controversy, according to ADL.
At San Diego State University,
for example, Farrakhan cancelled
a scheduled apperance in the fall
of 1984 when Jewish and other
students protested the appropria-
tion of student fees for his $2,500
remuneration, plus expenses.
At the University of Atlanta in
March, several Farrakhan "Fruit
of Islam" security guards were ar-
rested following an altercation
after they tried to search campus
guards. Farrakhan did not show
up.
THE ADL report said that Far-
rakhan's anti-Semitic speech-
themes "have been echoed in The
Final Call," the Nation of Islam's
publication, which has called upon
its readers to stand up to "this
Jewish bully that rules America
and the world from behind the
scenes, while they subject our peo-
ple all over the world to brutal
oppression."
The League pointed out that
Golden Shores
ORT Installs
Golden Shores, a newly formed
chapter of Women's American
ORT installed officers at the home
of Miriam Zadanoff in North
Miami Beach. Officers are: Arlene
Feldman, president; Myra Son-
shine, Carolyn Stein, Marsha
Umlas, vice presidents; Shirley
Stracher, financial secretary;
Karen Golen, secretary; and
Audrey Solomon, treasurer.
"Farrakhan's consistent ex-
tremism and anti-Semitism were
epitomized" this February by his
participation in the Nation of
Islam's annual commemoration of
the birthday of WD. Fard.
Fard was an Arab immigrant to
the U.S. who inspired Elijah
Muhammad to found the
American Black Muslim move-
ment. The event featured Muam-
mar Khaddafi whose keynote ad-
dress was relayed by television
satellite from Libya. Khaddafi,
who provided an interest free loan
of $5 million to the Nation of
Islam several months later, urged
blacks to "destroy white
America."
A symposium on "International
Zionism" at the celebration
brought together the discredited
Prof. Arthur Butz of Nor-
thwestern University, a leading
Holocaust revisionist; Haviv
Schieber, an Israeli who has
l>ecome a pro-PLO propagandist;
Kwame Toure, the former Stokely
Carmichael, head of the anti-
Zionist All African Peoples
Revolutionary Party. Other
scheduled participants included
representatives of the PLO's
Palestine Information Office and
of the Arab League.
THE REPORT said Farrakhan
in his "non-stop speechmaking
has blended the preacher's call to
self-respect and self-help with the
demagogue's call to scapegoating
and suspicion. His audiences hear
him describe how they can im-
prove their lives and whom to
blame for their misfortunes. His
message provides a promise of a
better life through pride and
economic independence, but also
supplies devils to hate whites,
Jews, Zionists and American
society."
It observed that "the message
has become all the more troubling
because of the large crowds he has
drawn and because of the support
and sympathy for Farrakhan ex-
pressed by some respected
elements in the black community
implying a degree of legitimacy
and acceptance for a philosophy
infected by the poison of hate. In
view of this, Farrakhan and the
Nation of Islam remain of serious
concern because of the dangers in-
herent in public appeals to bigotry
and racism."
Brian Heller of Miami, after
countrywide competitive tryouts
held in New York and California
has been chosen as one of the 12
members of the basketball team
that will represent the United
States in the 12th World Mac-
cabiah Games in Israel, July
15-25, Robert E. Spivak, U.S.
Maccabiah Committee General
Chairman and Alan Sherman, All
Sports Chairman announced.
Brian is a graduate of Miami
Palmbetto High School where he
starred on the basketball team.
He was named to the National
Honor Society, as well as the
Science Honor Society. English
Honor Society and Social Science
Honor Society. He was recognized
by the Gentlemen of Sports for his
combined academic and athletic
achievements.
Brian attended Virginia Tech
where as a Freshman he made the
academic Deans List and was a
member of their National Invita-
tion Tournament basketball team
which made it to the finals at
Madison Square Garden in New
York. He transferred to the
University of Miami as a
sophomore and again earned
Dean's List honors. Brian will be
playing for Coach Bill Foster's
University of Miami Hurricaines
in the upcoming basketball
season.
According to basketball coach
Bob Kaufman of Killian High
School, Brian is the first local
player to make the Maccabiah
team since the inception of the
games in 1932.
The World Maccabiah Games,
which are held every four years in
the year immediately following an
Olympic year, pit Jewish athletes
from all over the world in competi-
tion similar to that of the Olym-
pics. More than 4,000 world-class
athletes from 38 countries, in-
cluding 500 from the U.S., will
participate in the upcoming Mac-
cabiah Games. They will vie for
medals in some 31 sports, ranging
from basketball to swimming.
What makes Arthur's
so special these days?
Sunday. Monday. Tuesday.
Free special home-baked dessert and
beverage with every entree. 50% off
bottles of fine California wines.
Wednesday through Saturday.
Great jazz in Arthur's lounge.
Every day.
Arthur's legendary
prix fixe dinners -----
from $9.95 TMLT
complete, from UEbJ
5-7:30 j>.m.
Res. 371-1444
M
rthur's
eating house
Secured valet parking. Bisc Blvd. & 15th Si.
s500 Publix
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~.

1 Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian/Frirfctr J~ x
Pagw8-B The Jewish FtoridanTriday. June 2S, 1985
JWV Ladies Elect Officers
TV Doaf Co**** C
.:
.-ke>?*- Senator Betty
Rafter of the Florida
m Lamyert tnstaiied its
taaao.' rnstaiiatuyn Ittn-
Castor. President Pro
Truwrt of the Senate. '.*" mod the iaifafla
turn. Pvra-rw Levy MiUer. Treasurer; Cindy S. Lederman.
Viet President: Maru R-Xkenberg, Secretary;
Senator Betty Castor: Ellen Leesneid. Presi-
dent: Sandy Karian. past-President.
Peres Says Lesson of Lebanon
War Is That It Was Mistake
B' HUGH OBGEL
TELAVTV (ITA) -
Premier Shimon Peres said
zbai the most important
.essor. Israel learned from
the Lffrer*** war is that it
was a mistake. The most
serious mistake, he said in
an interview with the Cana-
dian Broadcasting Corp.
(CBCu was the expansion of
the war far beyond the
nwmittti objectives announc-
ed when the Israel Defense
Force invaded Lebanon on
June 6. 1962.
3ocec 3i*: as tuniiiiiw tad
said cite fiaai [ iwi would take
M Xc aOCOw^OttSOCQ S ImUD d^SK
Booths. A anaE cadre of IDF of-
5een renamed m Lebanon as
mob and adrtsors to the Iarael-
badnd Sooth Lebanon Arm;
SLA) m the aeeorkf bek ja
oorth ok the wil rt BasaW ooeoer
ISRAEL HAS maun! the
r*: -x. send the IDF back mto
_#c*.-an -,: **. -rrs. n-. "^rr
threat to IaraeTs border to
waca Bagc. ue*top. unoe a
r**z ha* been ebanaiea. the
IDF wotad withdraw
Peres told the Canadiac r
reporters. The bask fcaao B
that if yoa aaske wp run tmnc and
Menachezr Begin and
i pcacoed and executed by ther
Its idTnalj man i il ob^.ti*e
was todrrre Paiesone Uberaboc
OraawaaOoc terrorms beyond ar-
DQery and rocket range of Israel
towns and thereby
"peace for GaHee."
BlTTHKronoasIDFi
ed northwards to Beaut and its
ubjtctiiii were expanded to the
total destroctjor of the PLO and
the estabhshaneat of a friandry
Christian-led gorernaent in
Beirnt. Whfle the PLO aftnry m-
frassraetare wa destroyed and
PLO fighters were forced to teave
Bea-tK. Israel's political ubjeuiies
were not reabsed.
The war cost Israel 654 sokhers
kawd and S.000 wounded and
several baton dollars of the na-
tional wealth it could Hi afford
The Lebanon war b acknowiedg-
ed to be reapnnwhie in no
for Israels
crass. The PLO has
iTfir**' to Lebanor. and the
government in Beirut is
ilnainiii il by Syria winch con-
onoes to occupy two thirds of the
OOBtttrT-
Wars are easy to start but dif-
ficult to wind up." Peres said
Asked under what circumstances
the IDF would reenter Lebanon.
he said. "We are not looking for
any permanent presence in
Lebanon. We have s function*;
responsibility. That is the
Na amat Women
Three Miami Beach chapters of
Pioneer Women Na amat. the
Women's Labor Zncust Organoa
Don of America, hare installed of-
ficers for 1965-D6. They were
sworn in at ceremonies held at the
DeaoTille Hotel by Gerald
Schwartz, national rice b, I'linVnt
of the American Zionist Federa-
ooc awj associate national chair-
man of Friends of Pioneer
Women Na'amat.
The Department of Florida
Ladies Auxiliary. Jewish War
Veterans. mstsHed State Officers
and Committee Chairmen for the
coming year at their State Con-
vention." Istslting Officer was
Past Department President Mae
Schresber of Kendall. Inducting
Department President. Edith
Norms of Kendall and a member
of South Dade Auxiliary No.TTS.
Sensor Vice President LOhan
Weintrawh of Boyntoc Beach.
Junior Vice President Rita Sasiaw
of Boyntor Beach. Chapiaic Pear!
Tyler of Pembroke Pines.
Patriotic Instructor R. Shirley
Soone Cassemerry. Conductress
Pauline Duke of North Mam
Beach. Treasurer Past Depart-
ment President Ceil Zocker of
Pembroke Pines. Historian Abb
Seidier of Jtir_ Guarc Esther
Pow of DeerfieiG Beach. Cor-
respccdmg Secretary Charlotte
y inler :>: Miam:. Recording
Secretary Phylhs Shaw of North
Bay VCiage. Musician Donna
L.-':-r. ::" Mali [>adt
The Department of Florida is
.nwynd of four Count)- Councils
throughout the State, represen-
ting 35 auxiliaries.
President Novins has been hv-
Edith Nwnas
ing in the KendaL
for over 15 years. She.
South Dade AuxHary and twice .
served as their president. Her
community interests include life
membership in Hsdassah.
Brandeis Women and B'rx
B'rith.
Student Speaks At Touro Commencement
Euat Chapter officers
mdude Fare Brucker.
Abb Cohen and Rose
presidenu: Helen Sassower.
measurer and fmannai secretary
Barbara Greenberg. correspon-
dmfr secretary: and Gokhe Robms-
tein. recordmg secretary.
Golda Mexr Chapter named
Ki^*r_-ir L.rc.-r^r. is pnss-ien:
\"ice presidents **+'i4 imhaie
Vera Gorfine. Chure Ba-aoar. and
Sophie Kern per. Dora Haipem
was included as treasurer Rose
Shapiro, financial secretary: and
Mollie Krichev. recording
One of the top students in his
dass, Jeffrey Kan of Miami
Beach, was a closing speaker at
Touro College's Eleventh Annual
Commencement held at the end of
Mav in MfnhaTT"
A finance major. Katz wiZ be a:
:yi^g Hn Yrx 'J-~r~.-\
School of Law in the fall. In his
f areweC address. Katz rased the
issue of how to iive as an Orthodox
Jew in a secular society. "We
must always comport ourselves. '
he said, "in a manner which wiC
inspire respect."
Beta Ideaon Chapter installed
Irene Raezkowski as president for
the commg year. Other officers m-
ciude Florence Becker and Esther
Weinstesn. nee preaoects. Saixna
Meyerson and Rose Lochter
treasurers; Frances Singer finar-
cia! secretary. Ann Gross,
coorespooding secretary: and
Anne Hanken. recording
secretary
you
t't be natnid to expand it
if the ceoortaarv araes. L'
the
work decided oc before it started.
it would have been a quite osefui
and sueceasfui operaaon.
Bnt the awante it I
of a war and has of an <
taj it hated acre than foar days
"We are not tmning to be sta-
tioned somewhere or have a
Surely not
We are not looking
the waters
of Lebanon or the poetics of
Lebanon. We shaC act or react on-
and people." Peres said
MEANWHILE, two groups
canned i lajiniawairj for firing
two Katyusha rockets from the
Lebanese seiut ay bek into IsraeL
The rockets, ahned at an Israeli
an
OVERLOOKING PLAZA VENETIA MARINA
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July 1 thru July 5
Prim* Rib Dinner *7.95
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BRUCE RUBIN ASSOC.
2655 Le Jeone RtL.
Coral Gables. FL 33134
Irving Lahrman
Temple Emanu-El
Proudly Announces Th* Opening Of
The New
Lehrman Day School Building
727 77th Street. Miami Beach
One of the Finest Facilities in South Florida
REGISTER NOW FOR FALL TERM
Elamantary and Junior High Program
Early Childhood DapL Acad-mrcally Ortantwd
FuHy Ucansad Teachers
Enriched and Gitted Programs
Hebrew instruction
Expanded Ubrary and
Audio Visual Dept.
Maonmcont New Science Lab
Kosher Hot Meal Daily
Transportation Available
Wa
9
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Your Visit and Ragistrabon Inquiry
to 3 pjn. dairy at trw LanrmanOay ScrxxX
rrom 9 ajn. to 5 pjn. at the Tnaapln Office
866-2771


Friday. June 28. 1985.Tbe Jewish Floridian Page S-B
Wedding
Mr MvkBoccr

FTNKEL-BURGER
Barrage af Elise Abby Panto) and Mr
Jeffrey Burger too* piace June 23 at Be v.
Torah Congregation. Rabbi Rait- Gthti
afBeaatod
7->e bride ._ vr of Herbert an-: I
Finke. of Sfcazn. granddaughter of Joseph and
" ~mi :' tBmm mi mjmt i.--. bit
Fmkei of M;am; Beach. She was attended by
sster Reoee Fmkei. u maid of booor. and
bridesmaids Lusa Burger Maria Morims. Sanwoa
Isr*-e V -eenberg Margare: Blanthoroe.
and Lesoe Fuentes. Her dress, by Pracilla ::'
Boston, was a long ivory silk raffetta. tr -
alencon iaee. She wore a crown of aieocoo with a
aalflnTw| Vf..
Mr Burger b the son of Dr Robert and Debbie
Burger of North Palm Beach, grandson of CaVM
anwger "-' ^4*< ':.-_- arjd Mrs Lovhl Harm* ::'
Flint. Michigan. He was amended by his brother
A-ar. Burger as test nan. and ushers Jeff
Sdaaanaa. Stew Carr. Paul Gantber. Mike Fieids.
Jeff Moss, and Larry Katx
__ Ar. accounting graduate of the University of
rushed an x-
ternship at Laventhoi and Horatn He wiL be at-
tending graduate school at Florida Intemationai
Daxoanaay, special-rrg hi Intemaaonai Taxation.
Mrs Burger : r--- j attended tbe University
:' S: itr. F.: an. ana m |laaaaajj v F :--.ii Inter-
national Un:vers v. studying Occupatioaal
Therapy.
FoiJowmg the wedding recepooc the coupie
honeymooned in Coiorado. They will reside in Ken-
ij. ~'-" (M ratan
4f il/C Meetf/itf
.Viamt BwA residen: Band E. Kane celebrates kit lOOtk birth-
day June SI. hanng received a prestigious award at last month s
American Heart Association $ Annual President's Dinner. One
of the Heart Association's most active volunteers. Mr. Kane was
awarded for ku t\reiex$ efforts \n roUecting funds for the Heart
Association's Heart Month campaign. Hanng lost ku wife and
one of kis two tons to heart disease, he hat dedicated hit life to
helping raise money to fight the nation's number one killer. A suc-
cessful portrait artist for man* years, Mr. Kane still is active
with his artwork.
Television Experts Express Concern Of TV On American Family
NEW YORK Three teievswc
experts expressed deep i saw u
had on the American fanaly at a
of the American
The three paoeasa. Thomas
Cocoe. a leetarer at paychrwTgi a:
Harvard Medical School and a
suinaor to the "Today" snow
Donald D Wear. Jr.. we preav
ient for pohcy for CBS. and
-"arvn Snakier, execmne pro-
taeer of -IV Cosby Show, of
fered positive and negative
oa "How the
Portrays the Fiaot
E Robert GowaYind, cnairmar.
of the AJC's WiTawm H Petsehea
National Jewtsr Famcy Center
moderated the pane dMcvwmrc.
At the wnrinr. the first Family
'Center v: n- ;r*r:ec :.:
The Cosby Show "
SNEIDER. who accepted the
award, said. "In teievtaoc we
T^eed to develop a htde more sense
f play and joy of I
af the faaaiy The Cosby
hvj broaght aboat that fe
3efore The Cosby Show- there
-rr^* anteceoerij. ret ana1 *.r Dean*
edy. The closest ptufiaau was AE
the Fanwhr' bat it didn't have a
sense of play "
:.*h
What distaigmsbes
m the others that
aoa are part of the show. You
sever hear any of oar Idas making
fun of each other, or treating each
:her croefly. They rl have saV-
-3g nvasnes th"iqj^
"I agree with the pabnc that
The Cosby Show* has broken new
grosmd. I do thank The Cosby
Show' a departure from 'AC m
*e Famiy.' We are very different
oar appriimLh. 'Al in the Fana-
ly' pot down each other. Right
" -^w m America, people are core -
g back home, and that a what
The Cosby Show' is al
* IN ASSESSING the
efc-rmkm has n 1111. Cotth? sssd.
"iTrrrn nai i Ik iinl 1,1 mh 11
- the oid days you woaki have no
'ien what your father dsd Later
too wosad know from what yon
Now. yon as a chad
from'
1 Peat asks a chid "How do you
oow *r the dald responds. I
saw Ron
Hr .-..-znuec 7>iay; :r_:
may oe more seasreve than the
parent. Tbe '.l-jear aboat sex. AIDS, ajeoboi. and
naoear wnr roogh teievuKC,
Because the chad knows =>:ce
asthorrr. beeaks :-. tecween
------- ->-_i-.-_-i5:.
rar t*-* r-e-r ~-i c -
at<50.-*.c :*;: .:' r l-:r^~ ::-
cruoec bj a.-r_ri '-ii: -
beeasse ods kr:- a;- .:
jsoes -. xesn : rrAir _--
:r:-r--.:- :: tr.: = r-ic-rx: r
- -'_ ;. 7--r- i*i.r .:
i_> ^-- _r" :-c.e=j and
--.-- -_; 4"
nates.
SNEIDER AGREED with Coc-
de's assessraen: "--i: tetevnaoc
-i.: ._;- -- : ?- u-.-r Baal
part. -,lil i-issba not deeng a very
: t:rtra;.7uv ro: farL
.- va.jes B.'. -J-.-i r^ii-:-_- :un>:
sack v tae ag*---: arg-_-
If dM paale
She added. T ~ ;*-' :f a fanu-
ty. everyone that works on Tbe
Cosby Show a part :>f a family.
we don't have to go to the
for our stones. Our
Be from the unresolved
of oar day They are the
a go back to a:
the end of the day.'"
Caawaensxng on the media's
rote. Wear said. The media have
two different kinds of respon-
swifities to the family- First is the
manner in which farnibes are por-
trayed m the metha. Tbe second is
the'extent to which media are us-
ed by the famny as a resource in
their daily bvea. In both cases, the
media have a reapoosabihty to be a
realistic and constructive
mflwence-
PRESENTING the purpose
of the panel. Goodkmd said. The
AJCi Famiy Cesster is puma ray
interested m articaUrmg the im-
portance of fasnOy far coawnanal
stability. Jewish cunt aw at i. and
banana fdanaanect. Famwy vasaes
anchor the individual ma sense of
reapoasanshty and commitaacsK to
others. The famiy m short serves
as a poweiful anthaatr to the
cottare of imi i iiaasni which it a
strong current of American
Oat
the
idea of family AJC decided to
~xk at the portrayal of family oc
network teievhaon. Following tbe
;<2:ccat>:-c jf xir recent report.
Fa.- ananssg Ingredsnat
- TV Family Fare.' AJC ieaders
ar-t staff have been meeting
mm\ network executives
a.-.-: :tr*r< i5s-:o-ated nitt tansri-
We have commun:catet jut
anaannl anal laaVannl I aaTVal ii a
primary communications awsaaani
and therefore, has unique oppor-
tunities to enhance tbe image and
thereby tbe value of family among
oar young people "
In presenting the first Wuhant
Petschek National Jewish Famiy
Cantti Award to "The Coabr
Show." Rita Greenland, a
menwifr of AJC's Jewisfc Com-
munal Affairs Coninuanon. said.
"We sahite its cc*tribution to an
enhanced image of tbe American
famiy. and hope the show's
positive impact wQ2 encourage
farther efforts by the uetwi to
portray positive family values.'
SECURITY, COMFORT,
INDEPENDENCI.no
Ejtjoy Hie Good Life
m
11001 Cowans Ave Sanasy Isks
1st. MM Reach R. 33140
,305)932-1800
\
f naosTtw f Of
wrtal HHI
Inciud;
ManMba/awf
' IscoJ
froai
fdryfarnhsho..
aWthfahoth&
'.SVC
BlTlAJ#are G4MUUUlTcH)TlJUriTtAT1
f% rT## lafTWanawarTWB nWTw**aM tQmWQtR
an tsnan a> (3t$) W lWt, or anai she,
r
i
i
i
i______
IrHOM L
1M01
R. 33144
#11
He added, "In order to i
avenues of i


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 28, 1985


Underground Issue To Cool With Peres'
Request For Legal Opinion On Reprieves
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres' for-
mal request to Attorney
General Yitzhak Zamir for a
legal opinion on the
possibility of reprieve for
members of an alleged
Jewish terrorist
underground is expected to
take some of the heat out of
the issue which threatens a
confrontation between the
Labor and Likud com-
ponents of the national uni-
ty coalition government.
Peres* written request was
received by officials at the At-
torney General's office who said
that work on a legal opinion was
begun before the request arrived
after an informal discussion
betwen Peres and Zamir earlier.
LEGAL OBSERVERS expect
Zamir to preclude the idea of
dropping charges against the
Jewish defendants presently on
trial or awaiting trial. Of the 27
persons accused of membership in
a Jewish terrorist underground
responsible for acts of violence
and conspiracy against Arab
civilians in the West Bank over a
four-year period, 10 have been
tried and sentenced, most of them
after plea bargaining. One man
has completed his sentence and
has been released. Two army of-
ficers are awaiting trial.
The remaining defendants are
being tried in Jerusalem district
court by a panel of three judges.
The release on May 20 of 1,150
Palestinian prisoners, many of
them serving life sentences for
murder, in exchange for three
Israeli soldiers held captive by a
Palestinian terrorist group in
Damascus, triggered demands
from Jewish settlers in the West
Bank and other militants for the
immediate release of the defen-
dants and the Jews already
convicted.
Likud politicians, including
Deputy Premier Yitzhak Shamir,
have gone on record in favor of
reprieve or amnesty for the accus-
ed Jews. Shamir stressed that this
should be done through the chan-
nels provided by law.
FORMER PREMIER
Menachem Begin helped defuse
the tension surrounding the issue
when he said in a newspaper inter-
view that he felt a reprieve should
be considered, but only after the
defendants were tried and
sentenced.
That has been the position, too,
of President Chaim Herzog whose
exclusive prerogative it is to
weigh reprieve. Herzog swiftly re-
jected the contention by some
legal sources that he could exer-
cise that prerogative before
sentences are passed.
He has let it be known that he
would consider applications for
reprieve only after the judicial
process has run its full course
meaning after trial and sentenc-
ing. He is supported in this by
Justice Minister Moshe Nissim, a
Likud Liberal.
Herzog has made it clear,
moreover, that he would be
prepared to entertain application
for clemency on an individual
basis only, as is standard practice.
He has said he would not consider
a collective reprieve for the entire
group of accused, as some of their
supporters are demanding.
BUT THERE is strong opposi-
tion in leftist circles for any kind
of clemency as a quid pro quo for
the controversial prisoner ex-
change. The opposition Mapam
and Citizens Rights Movement
(CRM) have introduced motions in
the Knesset for the creation of a
commission of inquiry into the
Lebanon war. This apparently is
intended to embarrass Likud if it
presses for clemency for the alleg-
ed Jewish terrorist underground
members.
There is strong sympathy
within the Labor Party for this
tactic. But Premier Shimon Peres
is opposed to such an approach.
He has indicated that he personal-
ly does not favor an official in-
quiry into the Lebanon war, at
least at this time. He is
understood to be urging the Labor
Knesset faction to allow its
members to vote their conscience
when the Mapam and CRM mo-
tions come up Wednesday.
It is almost certain that a
Knesset decision to set up an in-
quiry or even a Labor vote en-
bloc for such a proposal would
spell the end of the unity coalition
government. Shamir, the Likud
leader, has made that clear.
Peres wants to keep the coali-
tion alive for the present.
Moreover, he is said to feel that an
inquiry would focus attention on
individuals responsible for the
Lebanon war and thereby deflect
what Peres believes should be the
political blame for the war from
attaching to the entire LikuH
party.
At the recent Dedication ceremony of the MDA Bloodmobile, pic-
tured, standing (left to right) to the left of the inscription,
Southeast District President, Murray Kaye and Rabbi Jacob S.
Greene, and to the right of the inscription (left to right) Blood-
mobiU donors, Irene and Jack Kwartner, and their friends, Ger-
trude and Mike Shuler, Temple President, Max Kreiger, and
Ruth and Harry Giber. (Outside of the Temple B 'nai Zion, Miami
Beach).
ARMDI Convention Set
In Jerusalem July 2-4
There will be approximately 30
Floridians from throughout the
state attending the National 45th
Anniversary Convention of the
American Red Magen David for
Israel in Jerusalem from July 2 to
4. Highlight of the convention will
be the laying of the cornerstone
for the new Magen David Adorn
National Blood Center in Ramat
Gan.
Plans for the Convention and
Tour of ARMDI were jointly an-
nounced by ARMDI National
Chairman. Joseph Handleman of
Miami, and ARMDI National
President, Louis Rosenberg, at
the organization's headquarters in
New York City.
Another highlight of the
Southeast District's contribution
to Israel's blood service needs was
the recent contribution of a MDA
Bloodmobile to Israel for the col-
lection of blood donations in the
field and the transfer of blood to
the MDA Central Blood Bank in
Jaffa or to its extentions in Haifa
and Jerusalem.
Temple Israel Elects Officers
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, recently held election of
officers and Board of Trustees for
1985-86.
Joining the Board for the first
time are Herbert Dolgoff, Connie
Glassman, Harry Payton and
Renee Templer. Retained on the
Board of Trustees are:
Jo Anne Bander. Michael A. Berke,
Maurice Cromer, Irvine J. Denmark.
Herbert Dolgoff. Kamon B. Fisch. Connie
Classman. Jerome Granger, Roy I. Hellman
and Robert K. Levenson.
Also. Sylvan H. Meyer. Janice S. Miller.
Jeffrey E. Newman. Sidney L. Olson. Dr.
Emanuel Papper, Harry Payton. Neil Schaf-
fel, Leon J. Simkins. Reneee Templer and
Nada Willis.
The Advisory Council consits of
past Presidents and is most
helpful in giving input and advice
to the current Board, Schwartz
said.
For Sale $53,000.00
Or Rent $450.
1331 Lincoln Rd., 5th floor, corner of West Ave I
Condominium -11/2 bath, 1 BIG bedroom plus
den. Kitchen with space for table and chairs.
Big terrace. Pool. Call for information:
861-0392
Newly-Remodeled Lehrman
Day School Open For Registration
Main entrance of Lehrman Day School at 727-77th Street,
Miami Beach.
As a result of an extensive renovation program, the Lehrman
Day School has been greatly expanded, not only in its physical
plant, but also in its curriculum, making the School facilities and
program stand out in South Florida.
The Lehrman Day School provides the highest quality of educa-
tion in both general and Jewish studies for Grades 1 through 8; a
pre-school academic program is offered for ages 2-6.
Under the guidance of Dr. Irving Lehrman. spiritual leader of
Temple Emanu-EI, and Ms. Joseph W. Malek. Chairman of the
Board of Education, the individualized curriculum enables each
child to proceed at his or her own pace, in secular and Jewish
studies, even without prior Jewish education.
The religious program, which is designed to enhance and
develop Jewish identity, teaches modern Hebrew. Jewish history
and Bible, holiday observance and Bar and Bat Mitzvah
preparation.
The secular program features an enriched English Arts pro-
gram stressing creative writing and composition, debate and
language arts programs, a unique college-level science laboratory,
computer center, and a new library and media center, plus a com-
pletely updated and revised curriculum under the guidance of the
University of Miami.
This combination of religious and secular education assures the
development of a well-rounded Jewish child.
Dr. Amir Baron, Director of Education for nine years, stressed
the pursuance of excellence in all areas utilizing the newest
methods and the latest technology.
Rowena Kovler, Principal of the Lehrman Day School, em-
phasized that the intellectual and spiritual growth of each child is
encouraged by the fully experienced and licensed teachers in at-
tendance. Maturing progressively in an environment that en-
courages participation on all levels, children gain confidence and
form fine characters, enabling them to develop to their highest
potential.
The Pre-School and Kindergarten, under Principal Philippa
Feldman, offers an academically-oriented program, closely super-
vised by accredited and experienced Early Childhood Department
teachers. Emphasis is placed on individualized reading and
language development, as well as communication skills. A special
program for this age group involves the students in Jewish ex-
perience and values, the goal of which is to develop the child in a
happy and healthy environment.
Daily hot Kosher meals are offered and transportaton is
available. For a visit to the new facilities, call 538-2503, at the
Temple Emanu-EI office or the School at 866-2771.
vss
i
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866-2771
Dr. Irving Lehrman flanked by President of Temple
Emanu-EI, Sidney Cooperman and right, Lawrence
Schantz, former head of Board of Education.
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Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
.S. Favors Conference To
Settle Mideast Conflict
JVID FRIEDMAN
hNGTON (JTA)
leagan Administra-
ears to be moving
tn its opposition to
National conference
ite a settlement of
le East conflict.
lice was disclosed when
leagan, in replying to
rom reporters after his
lieeting with King Hus-
dan, said that while the
u.'s has differences
ein over a conference,
is being discussed with
Mans. The Administra-
Laintained up until now
llement can only come
prect negotiations bet-
and the Arabs.
^N, in his prepared
fter his White House
lid that on the basis of
lent he signed with
liberation Organization
kir Arafat on Feb. 11,
recent talks with the
an and the Palestinians
to negotiate a peace set
vithin the context of an
rial conference" based
pertinent United Na-
kolutions, "including
Council Resolutions 242
Inse to questions, Hus-
hat "we need an inter-
lbrella to offer us an
ly to negotiate." He
lat in this context, there
iirect negotiations bet-
I Jordanian-Palestinian
and Israel.
Administration official,
feporters later, said that
antinues to believe that
Itional conference would
['setback" to the peace
ice it would essentially
il theater," a stage for
IE ADDED that
I is static." He said the
ition understands Hus-
Bsire for international
kr whatever agreement
prge from a negotiating
is opjK)sed an interna-
ference, particularly one
ies the Soviet Union, as
|.S. in the past. Reagan
comment when asked
^sible Soviet particiap-
lussein made clear that
iternational conference,
or in his agreement with
juld include the five per-
nettihers of the Security
the U.S., Soviet Union,
Jreat Britain and the
lepublic of China.
also seemed to stress
iternational conference
i that this would not be
time he would negotiate
el. When asked about
pointed to the 1973
Conference without ex-
>n. This conference
I without any results. But
Administration official
that it led to the two
ements between Israel
j>t and the agreement bet-
and Israel on the
Rights.
SIN repeated his asser-
the PLO now accepts
ttns 242 and 338 through
pal backing of all UN
is in the Hussein-Arafat
Isked about this, Reagan
I the U.S. has not changed
pon for dealing with the
enior Administration of-
i the U.S. still wants a
plicit acceptance of the
two Security Council resolutions
from the PLO as well as accep-
tance of Israel's right to exist and
an end to terrorism.
Both Reagan and Hussein
stressed that .this might be the
"last chance" to seek peace in the
Middle East. Reagan explained
that the conditions "have nevei
been more right than they art
now" and might not be so again.
He said Hussein has taken
"courageous steps forward"
which the U.S. hopes "can lead to
direct negotiations based on
United Nations Security Council
Resolutions 242 and 338 by the
end of the year. And we'll do our
part to help bring this about."
Hussein, saying that this was a
"unique opportunity for peace,"
declared that an "active and
balanced role of the United States
is an essential element."
REAGAN SAID the U.S. goal
is a "just, lasting and comprehen-
sive peace which satisfies the
legitimate right of the Palestinian
people and provides for the securi-
ty of all states in the region, in-
cluding Israel."
Hussein said a "just, com-
prehensive and desirable peace in
the Middle East should secure the
legitimate rights of the Palesti-
nian people, including the right of
self-determination within the con-
Attacks Continue
Against IDF
TEL AVIV (JTA) Military
activity continues in the south
Lebanon security zone three
weeks after the Israel Defense
Force officially completed its
withdrawal. Three Katyusha
rockets were fired at IDF troops
in the Shakif el-Hardoun region of
the zone.
The IDF responded by firing
eight mortar shells in the direc-
tion of the rocket-launcher,
Lebanese sources reported, and
IDF infantry aided by helicopters
searched the area for the at-
tackers. But the IDF had no com-
ment on these operations. Its
policy apparently is to play down
reports of Israeli forces still active
inside Lebanon.
Two soldiers of the Israel-
backed South Lebanon Army
(SLA) were wounded by mortar
fire in the security zone. Small
arms fire was also aimed at an
SLA position near Hasbaya.
SLA commander Gen. Antoine
Lehad said meanwhile that he did
not think the security situation in
south Lebanon would be affected
if Israel released more than 700
Shiite guerrillas, demanded by the
hijackers of TWA Flight 847 in ex-
change for the American hostages
they are holding in Beirut.
The Shiites were captured in
Lebanon and transferred to the
Atlit detention camp near Haifa
after the IDF withdrew from
south Lebanon. According to
Lehad, "Generally, we find that
once a man has spent time in
detention he does not return to
terrorist activity."
Relations between the SLA and
the United Nations Interim Force
in Lebanon (UNIFIL) have im-
proved since the SLA freed 21
Finnish UNIFIL soldiers it seized
three weeks ago. UNIFIL is now
allowing SLA units to pass
unhindered through its check
points. Previously it would try to
disarm the SLA men because the
UN force does not recognize the
Israel-backed militia.
text of a Palestinian-Jordanian
confederation."
Reagan also stressed that the
U.S. recognizes Jordan's
economic and security needs and
will do what it can to help it. Hus-
sein would not respond when ask-
ed if he had discussed arms with
Reagan.
The willingness by Hussein and
Reagan to answer questions from
reporters after their statements is
unusual. Usually after a visit by a
foreign leader with the President,
the two make statements and then
the foreign leader departs the
White House without answering
any questions from the press.
The Women's Committee of Jewish Family Service of Greater
Miami recently installed 1985-86 Officers at its annual member-
ship luncheon. Shown from left are Frances Giller, vice president
for publicity; Birdie Nemeroff, immediate past-president;
Madelyn Merritt, president; and Sally Krone, vice president for
fundraising, awarded a plaque in special recognition ofherfun-
draising efforts. New officers not pictured are Hilda Werblow,
vice president for membership; Beverly Heller, secretary; and
Rose Seltzer, treasurer.

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rage iz-a ine Jewisn r londian/l-Yiday, June 28, 1985
Symposium Stresses Vitriolic Soviet
Campaign Against Jews, Judaism, Israel
Kosher Surplus Cheese Has Been
Distributed To Needy Jews
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An array of anti-Jewish pro-
paganda, including
"satirical" cartoons
equating Zionists with Nazis
to a feature length
"documentary" portraying
Jews who wish to leave the
Soviet Union for Israel as
"traitors," was presented
here at an all-day sym-
posium on Soviet anti-
Zionism and anti-Semitism.
The symposium, co-sponsored
by the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry and the Jacob Good-
man Institute of the Zionist
Organization of America, was
described as a "response to the
vitriolic campaing in the USSR
which vilifies the Jewish people,
the Jewish religion, Zionism and
the State of Israel."
"Anti-Semitism in the form of
anti-Zionism and anti-Israel pro-
paganda is repeated in the Soviet
Union with increasingly frequen-
cy, permeating all aspects of the
media," according to Dr. Joseph
Sternstein, NCSJ vice chairman
and former ZOA president, who
chaired the symposium.
"It reverberates with families
themes geared toward
discrediting individual refuseniks
and Soviet Jews as a whole, and
delegitimizing Israel as the
historic Jewish homeland," Stern-
stein added.
THE SYMPOSIUM, held at the
Jacob and Libby Goodman ZOA
House here, opened with a screen-
ing of "Hirelings and Ac-
complices," a 27-minute
"documentary" broadcast on Len-
ingrad television in November,
Israeli Economic Financial
Figures Face Legal Action
By HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Some of Israel's top
economic and financial
figures in both public and
private sectors have been
officially notified that they
may be incriminated by the
findings of the special com-
mission of inquiry into the
collapse of bank shares in
October, 1983.
Among 16 individuals to whom
letters were sent are two former
Ministers of Finance, the incum-
bent Governor of the Bank of
Israel, the country's central bank
and one of his predecessors, and
three former directors general of
the Finance Ministry. Similar
warning letters were sent to 11
commercial banks, among them
the largest in Israel.
THE LETTERS are mandated
by law if the commission reaches
the conclusion that some or all of
the persons and institutions in-
volved in the collapse might face
legal proceedings as a result of its
findings.
The collapse of bank shares
stocks issued by banks caused
severe financial losses to
thousands of investors. Bank
shares were a favored security
among Israelis. But the sharp
devaluation of the Shekel and
rumors of further devaluations,
triggered a mass sell-off of bank
shares in order to purchase
Dollars. The banks have been ac-
cused of taking questionable
measures to inflate the value of
their shares and concealing infor-
mation from the public.
One purpose of the warning let-
ters is to allow the recipients time
to prepare defense against
charges that might be brought
against them. They are allowed to
cross-examine witnesses and to
testify in their own behalf when
the next stage of the inquiry
begins, probably in September.
INDIVIDUAL recipients of the
warning letters include former
Finance Ministers Yigael Hurwitz
and Yoram Aridor; Yaacov
Neeman, Ezra Sadan and Ben-
Ami Zuckerman, all former direc-
tors general of the Treasury;
Moshe Mandelbaum, Governor of
the Bank of Israel, and a
predecessor, Arnon Gafni; Galia
Maor, the Bank Examiner of the
Bank of Israel and .her
predecessor. Oded Messer; and
Meir Het, chairman of the Tel
Aviv Stock Exchange.
The leading bankers notified of
possible charges against them are
Ernest Japhet of the Bank Leumi,
Giora Gazit and Ephraim Reiner
of the Bank Hapoalim, Raphael
Recanati of the Discount Bank,
Aharon Meir of the Bank
Hamizrachi, and David Shoham,
former managing director of the
Israel General Bank.
Reagan Again Defends Bitburg
Visit As 'Morally Right Tiling'
WASHINGTON (JTA)
President Reagan has
again defended his con-
troversial visit to the Ger-
man military cemetery in
Bitburg, saying it was the
"morally right thing to do."
From the very first, I felt it was
the morally right thing to do, and
I'm pleased that I did it," Reagan
said in response to a question dur-
ing his nationally televised news
conference from the East Room of
the White House last week.
"And it was a worthwhile ex-
perience over there, and I began
to get my reward when I spoke to
10,000 young teen-age Germans
and at the end of that heard
10,000 young Germans sing our
national anthem in our language."
THE PRESIDENT told
reporters that his visit to the
cemetery was never intended as a
"forgive and forget thing. It's up
to someone else to forgive, not us,
if there is any forgivenesses, and
certainly we must never forget."
The President also said:
"I was amazed and its 40
years now of friendship that has
followed all that hatred and the
evil of the Holocaust and of
Nazism to learn that the Ger-
mans, not only have they preserv-
ed the horrible camps and main-
tained the museum with the
photos all blown up of the worst,
most despicable things that hap-
pened there, but they bring their
school children every year and
show them and say, "This must
never happen again.' "
1984.
The film seeks to unfold a
Zionist "conspiracy operating in
concert with the Central In-
telligence Agency and influential
"powerbrokere" of the American
Jewish community, according to
the NCSJ. One segment of the
film focuses on several leading
Soviet Jewish activists, identified
as "traitors who betray their
country in return for material
rewards from the West."
Sternstein described the film as
a "quasi-documentary, which
vividly reflects the Soviet pro-
paganda line equating Soviet
Jews who seek to emigrate with
anti-Soviet behavior.
A resolution was approved at
the symposium urging the "Anti-
Zionist Committee of the Soviet
Public," a government-sponsored
group which has figured pro-
minently as an outlet for Soviet
anti-Jewish propaganda since its
inception in April, 1983, to "stop
the spread of lies and group
hatred as a violation of interna-
tional law and standards."
THE RESOLUTION also
deplored the Committee's "cons-
tant campaign of slander as a
serious threat to the status and
security of Jews everywhere" and
pledged to further "expose the
heinous anti-Jewish campaign in
the Soviet Union," calling upon
Western public opinion and
governments to do the same.
A persona] account of Soviet
anti-Semitism was provided
through a videotaped interview
with Alexandra Finkelshtein, a
former refusenik who, after a 12
year struggle, was permitted to
emigrate to Israel in December
1983.
Participants at the symposium
sought to examine the effect of
anti-Zionist and anti-Semitic pro-
paganda on Jews and non-Jews in
the USSR and beyond Soviet
borders, as well as the historic and
current perspectives of anti-
Jewish sentiments.
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-4040
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REBECCA ABROMSON.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Rebecca Abromson, deceased,
File Number 86-4040, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, FL 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 28, 1986.
Personal Representative:
MAURICE ABROMSON
37 Alexander Road
Newton. MA 02161
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Sparber, Shevin, Shapo &
Heilbronner, P.A.
One Southeast Third Ave.
Miami, FL 33131
Telephone: (306) 368-7990
19164 June 28; July 5.1985
NEW YORK (JTA) More
than 100,000 pounds of Kosher
cheese has been distributed, in the
fifth such program of the
Metropolitan New York Coor-
dinating Council on Jewish Pover-
ty, to more than 22,000 needy
New York Jews and their families,
according to Menachem
Shayovich, president of the Coor-
dinating Council.
He said the cheese was allocated
to more than 33 grassroots com-
munity agencies, which included
Jewish community councils,
senior citizen centers, Jewish Ys
and kollels.
The project was the Coor-
dinating Council's fifth since the
federal government's program of
distribution of surplus foods was
started.
Joseph Sonnenreich, chairman
of the Coordinating Council
Board, said the cheese, packed in
five-pound blocks, was produced
by the World Cheese Company
and again included a special ship-
ment of Cholov Yisroel cheese,
Business Notes
Howard B. Lenard, City At-
torney of the City of North Miami
Beach, has been appointed by the
President of the Florida Bar as
Vice Chairman of the Government
Lawyer Committee for the up-
coming year.
International Medical Centers,
the state's largest HMO (Health
Maintenance Organization) has re-
tained the Gerald Schwartz Agen-
cy as its public relations agency of
record.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name EVERGLADES
ROOFING at 2320 SW 9 St Apt. 3
Miami Fl. 33135 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
LAZARO GARCIA
19145 June 21.28:
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-21252
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
OLATUNDE FAFOWORA.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
TOYIN FAFOWORA
Respondent/Wife.
TO: TOYIN FAFOWORA
No. 10 Lewis Street
Lagos, Nigeria
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your defenses, if
any, to it on GEORGE J.
BOLTON, ESQ., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 2320 N.E.
171st Street, North Miami Beach.
Florida 33160, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before June 28, 1986;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 23rd day of May, 1986.
(Circuit Court Seal) .
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LISAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
GEORGE J. BOLTON, ESQ.
Florida Bar No. 007335
2320 N.E. 171st Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33160
Telephone: (306) 949-8841
Attorney for Petitioner
19100 luygj.
June 7,14,21.1985
made from a rabbinically specially
supervised milk, to meet the
needs of the Hasidic and yeshiva
community.
He added that the program
"clearly demonstrates the
necessity for special efforts if the
needs of the observant Jewish
community are to be met. The
need for this program has been
demonstrated by its growth: our
first distribution was only 37,000
pounds serving 7,400 families."
He said the Coordinating Council
had recently been named by the
New York State Office of General
Services to act as the distributor
of surplus kosher cheese for New
York State.
The cheese project is one of the
Coordinating Council's efforts to
provide emergency food for
Jewish poor families. The Coor-
dinating Council also provides
emergency food vouchers to
families in crisis situations by
means of special grants from the
Federal Emergency Management.
Agency and the New York
Department of State. Shayovich
said the Coordinating Council's ef-
forts have shown that "hunger in
the Jewish community is a very
real and pressing problem."
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-5979
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNIE JACKSON,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ANNIE
JACKSON, deceased. File
Number 84-5979. is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is NATHANIEL RAMSEY, whose
iddress is 14720 Monroe Street,
Richmond Heights. FL 33176. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due. the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claima/it shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per- r.
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
June 28, 1986.
NATHANIEL RAMSEY
as Personal Representative ''
of the Estate of
ANNIE JACKSON,
Deceased
SILVER ft SILVER
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
160 S.E. 2nd Avenue
Suite 1326
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (306) 374-4888
By MAX R. SILVER
19168 June 28; July 5, 1985


c Notices
hE OF ACTION
JjCTIVE SERVICE
PROPERTY)
Ircuit COURT OF
fcENTH JUDICIAL
|OF FLORIDA, IN
I DADE COUNTY
Marriage of:
RTINEZ,
DRN.
I MARTINEZ
JHWAMBORN,
; SCHWAMBORN
h3G 12
&LN80
rmany
IRE HEREBY
(that a Petition for
pf your Marriage has
I commenced in this
|rou are required to
of your written
ny. to it, on CARLOS
Esq., Attorney for
Jrhose address is 200
et, Hialeah. Florida,
Rle the original with
he styled Court on or
|9, 1985; otherwise a
I entered against you
prayed for in the com-
Ition.
shall be published
veek for four con-
ks in THE JEWISH
I my hand and the seal
I at Miami. Florida, on
} of June. 1985.
i P. BRINKER
i Circuit Court
County, Florida
EN D. ZEIGLER
eputy Clerk
JMENDEZ. Esq.
Street
Kda 33012
I Petitioner
June 21,28;
July 5,12,1985
Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
; OF ACTION
&CTIVE SERVICE
i Property)
COUNTY COURT
J AND FOR
HlNTY, FLORIDA
l No. 85-11470 SP OS
| FOR DAMAGES
NC.
PER,
pper
herd Drive
puntain, GA 30083
RE HEREBY
j i hat an Action for
f- been filed against
Bre required to serve a
written defenses, if
Silver & Silver at-
Plaintiff. whose ad-
S.E. 2nd Avenue.
diami, Florida 33131,
priginal with the clerk
styled court on or
28, 1985; otherwise a
I entered against you
(demanded in the com-
Btion.
shall be published
I week for four con-
>ks in THE JEWISH
i my hand and the seal
: at Miami, Florida on
pf June, 1985.
ID P. BRINKER
k, County Court
bounty, Florida
J Cecilia Chio
[Deputy Clerk
Plaintiff
I Avenue
Ida 33131
June 28. July 5,1985
ICE UNDER
iOUS NAME LAW
|1S HEREBY GIVEN
del-signed, desiring to
ness under the fic-
le EL MERIDIANO
nagazine intend to
I name with the Clerk
|t Court of Dade Coun-
i E. Perez Mejides
June 21,28;
July 5,12,1985
ICE UNDER
IOUS NAME LAW
IIS HEREBY GIVEN
dersigned. desiring to
ainess under the fic-
|THE OPTIMA GROUP
lister said name with
e Circuit Court of Dade
I International
nstruction Co.
June 7.14,21,28,1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nuiber 85-5455
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IRVING YOUNG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of IRVING YOUNG, deceased,
File Number 85-5455 (04), is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagier Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and addresses
of the personal representative and
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 28, 1985.
Personal Representative:
Kenneth Young
2200 East Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Apartment 503
Hallandale, FL 33009
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON & FRIEDMAN, P.A.
1136 Kane Concourse,
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33154
Telephone: 865-5716
19155 June 28, July 5, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-23160
FLORIDA BAR NO. 025026
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
FRITZ DOLCE,
Husband/Petitioner,
and
JEANETTE A. DOLCE.
Wife, Respondent.
TO: Jeanette A. Dolce
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney.
THEODORE FISHER, ESQ.,
5050 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 101,
Conger Life Insurance Bldg..
Miami, Florida 33137, on or before
the 12th day of July. 1985. else
Petition will be taken as confessed.
DATED this 6th day of June,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER. Attorney
for
Husband/Petitioner
5050 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 101
Conger Life Ins. Bldg.
Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone: (305) 758-9523
19127 June 14,21, 28; July 5.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVU. ACTION NO. 85-228M
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
ROBERT WHITE, Husband
and
EVELYN WHITE, Wife
TO: Mrs. Evelyn White
3688 Eagle Woods Circle
Lithonia, GA 30058
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed and commenced
in this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Arthur H.
Lipson attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 801 N.E. 167th
Street. Suite 312 North Miami
Beach, Florida 33162. Tel.: (306;
653-3030 and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court on
or before July 12. 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petiton.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this 5
day of June, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By GWEN D. ZEIGLER
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal)
19119 June 7.14.21.28,1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-4305
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FLORENCE FINE
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of FLORENCE
FINE, deceased, File Number
85-4305 (03). is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for DADE County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
personal representatives of the
estate are Robert Fine and Susan
Gold, whose address c/o
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross &
Shore, 420 S. Dixie Hwy., Coral
Gables, FL 33146. The name and
address of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons havign claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
June 21, 1985.
Robert Fine and Susan Gold
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Florence Fine
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
H. Allan Shore, Esquire
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross
& Shore
420 South Dixie Highway,
3rd Floor
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
Telephone: (305) 666-6622
19144 June 21. 28. 1985
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 85-4501
DIVISION 03
(Florida Bar No. 032230)
IN RE: ESTATE OK
ELIEZER COHEN a/k/a
LAZARUS COHEN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of ELIEZER
COHEN a/k/a LAZARUS
COHEN, deceased, late of Dade
County, Florida, File Number
85-4501 (03) is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court in and for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 21 day of
June, 1985.
Personal Representative:
SAMUEL COHEN a/k/a
SAMUEL BERNARD COHEN
71-28 Yellowstone Blvd
Forest Hills, New York 11375
Moses J. Grundwerg
Of Law Offices of
HAYS, GRUNDWERG & VANN
28 West Flagier St.,
Suite 800
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (306) 379-8435
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
19148 June 21, 28, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-5255
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IMRE FABRITZKY,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration of
the estate of IMRE FABRITZKY.
deceased, File Number 85-5255, is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which is 73
West Flagier Street, Miami,
Florida 33130.
The personal representative of
the estate is VERONIKA
FABRITZKY, whose address is
12035 NE 2 Avenue, Apt. 417,
North Miami, Florida 33161. The
name and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
June 21. 1985.
VERONIKA FABRITZKY
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
IMRE FABRITZKY
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEISS
407 Lincoln Road, Penthouse
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 534-4721
19149 June 21.28.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-23161
FLORIDA BAR NO. 025026
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
SAMSON JEAN BAPTISTE.
Husband/Petitioner,
and
MELODY JEAN BAPTISTE.
Wife/Respondent.
TO: Melody Jean Baptiste
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney,
THEODORE FISHER, ESQ.,
6050 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 101,
Conger Life Insurance Bldg.,
Miami. Florida 33137. on or before
the 12th day of July. 1985, else
Petition will be taken as confessed.
DATED this 6th day of June.
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER, Attorney
for
Husband/Petitioner
6050 Biscayne Blvd.. Suite 101
Conger Life Ins. Bldg.
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone: (305) 758-9523
19128 June 14.21, 28; July 5.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84 9574
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX WAILAND.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Max Wailand, deceased. File
Number 84-9574, is pending in the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is Dade County
Courthouse 73 West Flagier
Street, Miami, FL 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person to
whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 21, 1985.
Personal Representative:
BELLA WAILAND
251 174th Street
Miami Beach, FL 33160
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SPARBER, SHEVIN, SHAPO
& HEILBRONNER. P.A.
One Southeast Third Avenue
Miami, FL 33130
Telephone: (305) 358-7990
19141 June 21, 28, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-22724
FLORIBA BAR NO. 025026
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ROLLIN BERTHIL
Husband/Petitioner
and
D'ANDREA AYTES BERTHIL
Wife/Respondent
TO: D'Andrea Aytes Berthil
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney,
THEODORE FISHER. ESQ.,
5050 Biscayne Blvd.. No. 101, Con-
ger Life Ins. Bldg., Miami, Florida
33137, on or before the 12th of Ju-
ly, 1985. else Petition will be taken
as confessed.
DATED this 4th of June, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Perez
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER, Attorney
for
Husband/Petitioner
5060 Biscayne Blvd.. No. 101
Conger Life Ins. Bldg.
Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone: (305) 758-9523
19122 June 14, 21. 28; July 5, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-1829
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
THERESA LAURIENTE.
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO: MARY RAMELLI, sister
if alive, and/or dead, her
(them) known heirs,
devisees, legatees or
grantees and all persons
or parties claiming by
through, under or against
her (them) Residence unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Compromise and Pay Claims and
Petition for Order to Sell Real
Estate has been filed in this court.
You are required to serve written
defenses to the petition not later
than July 29. 1985, on petitioner's
attorney, whose name and address
are:
MICHAEL J. ALMAN,
ESQUIRE
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
and to file the original of the writ-
ten defenses with the clerk of his
court either before service or im-
mediately thereafter. Failure to
serve written defenses as required
may result in a judgment or order
for the relief demanded in the peti-
tion, without further notice.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on June 17, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER, Clerk
As Clerk of the Court
By DIOSDADA CANCIO
As Deputy Clerk
19140 June 21,28;
_________________July 5 12 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 86-19576 Div. 18
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Bar No. 345741
IN RE: The Marriage of:
STASIA WILLIAMS,
Petitioner/wife,
and
CALVIN WILLIAMS,
Respondent/husband.
YOU. CALVIN WILLIAMS,
residence unknown, are required
to file your answer to the amended
petition for dissolution of marriage
with the Clerk of the above Court
and serve a copy thereof upon the
petitioner's attorney, Martin
Cohen. Esq., 622 S.W. 1st Street,
Miami. Fla. 33130, on or before Ju-
ly 19, 1985, or else petition will be
confessed.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court, at Miami. Dade County,
Florida, this 11th day of June,
1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Clerk, Circuit Court
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
Deputy Clerk
19133 June 14.21, 28; July 5, 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-22723
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARLENE HOMICILE
Wife/Petitioner
and
ARINKS HOMICILE
Husband/Respondent
TO: ARINKS HOMICILE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney,
THEODORE FISHER, ESQ.,
5050 Biscayne Blvd., No. S-101
Conger-Life Ins. Bldg., Miami,
Florida 33137, on or before the
12th of July, 1986, else Petition
will be taken as confessed.
DATED this 4th day of June,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
By: Barbara Perez
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER. Attorney
for
Wife/Petitioner
5050 Biscayne Blvd., No. S-101
Conger Life Ins. Bldg.
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone: (305) 758-9523
19123 June 14. 21. 28; July 5, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-23158
FLORIDA BAR NO. 026026
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ERSULIE SEMEAS DESIRE,
a/k/a
Odette Semeas Desir,
Wife/Petitioner
and
WILLIE DESIRE
Husband/Respondent
TO: WILLIE DESIRE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney,
THEODORE FISHER. ESQ.,
5050 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 101,
Conger Life Insurance Bldg.,
Miami. Florida 33137, on or before
the 12th day of July, 1985, else
Petition will be taken as confessed.
DATED this 6th day of June,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER. Attorney
for
Wife/Petitioner
5050 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 101
Conger Life Ins. Bldg.
Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone: (306) 758-9623
19125 June 14.21.28; July 5.1986


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, June 28, 1985

;
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION 03
FILE NO. 85-2882
IN RE: ESTATE OF
STEPHEN G. BAYER A/K/A
STEPHEN GEORGE BAYER,
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAISNT THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tion of the estate of Stephen G.
Bayer, A/K/A Stephen George
Bayer, deceased, late of Dade
County, Florida, File Number
85-2882 is pending in the Circuit
Court in and for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 3rd Floor, Dade
County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The personal represen-
tatives of this estate is George
Kevin Bayer and George Joseph
Bayer, whose address is 25
WoOAiB Lane. Manhasset, NY, 59 \
Shelter Rock Road, Manhasset,
New York. TV name and address
of the attorney for the personal
representative are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against this estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim of the clerk of the above styl-
ed court to enable the clerk to mail
one copy to each personal
representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
DATED at Miami, Florida on
this 14 day of June, 1985.
George Kevin Bayer and
George Joseph Bayer
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Stephen G Bayer, A/K/A/
Stephen George Bayer,
Deceased
First publication of this notice of.
administrate on the 21 day of
June, 1985.
Of Law Offices of EUGENE J.
WEISS
407 Lincoln Road. Penthouse
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: 305/534-4721
Attorney for Personal
Representative
19143 June 21, 28. 1985

- V
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fie
titious name ONCOLOGY
HEMATOLOGY ASSOCIATES
at 1688 Meridian Avenue, Suite
702, Miami, Florida 33139 intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
OLEG S. SELAWRY,
M.D., PA.,
a Florida corporation.
"Partner"
CARLOS J. DOMINQUEZ,
M.D.. F.A.C.P., P. A,
a Florida corporation
"Partner"
HARRY B. SMITH, Esq.
Attorney for Oncology
Hematology Associates*
19153 June 28; July 5, 12,19. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-4349
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCES K. WHITE,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the administra-
tic in of the estate of Frances K.
White, deceased. File Number
85-4349 (01), is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, FL 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the estate
is Coconut Grove Bank, whose ad-
dress is 2701 South Bayshore
Drive, Coconut Grove, Florida
33133. The name and address of
the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MON-
THS FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk of
the above court a written state-
ment of any claim or demand they
may have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the basis
for -the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed.
If the claim is not yet due, the date
when it will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If the
claim is secured, the security shall
be described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim in the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each per-
sonal representative
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO FIL-
ED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration.
June 21. 1985.
Coconut Grove Bank
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Frances K. White
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
H. Allan Shore, Esquire
420 South Dixie Highway,
Third Floor
Coral Gables. FL 33146
Telephone: (305) 666-6622
19142 June 21, 28, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name OLGA BOUTIQUE at
8770 SW 24 St. Miami 33165 in-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
DIGNA 0. LORENZO
8770 SW 27 St. Miami Fl. 33165
19137 June 21,28,
July 5, 12. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Classic Developers in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Cavlnc
Robiel, N.V.
19114 June?. 14.21,28, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fictitous
nam(s) Aranbus Co, Aranbus Import
and Export Co. and R.C.C. Invest-
ment Co. at 3866 SW. 128th Avenue.
Miami, Florida, intends to register
said namejs) with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Gilbert Arango
Sole Owner
3855 SW. 128th Avenue
Miami. Florida
KARLICK, DROESE & BUCKLEY
Attorney(s) for Gilberto Arango
1454 N.W. 17th Ave., Suite 200
Miami. Florida 33125
19117 June 7, 14,21.28, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-26292
(08)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GILMA C. DE MELCHOR.
Petitioner/Wife,
and
ALFONZO JIMENES,
Respondent/Husband.
TO: Alfonso Jimenes
(Address Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Henry Leyte-Vidal, Esquire, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 701 SW 27h Avenue. Suite
625, Miami, Florida 33135, and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 2, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 26th day of June, 1985.
RICHARD P. KK1NKEK
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By T. CASAMAYOR*
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Henry Leyte-Vidal, Esquire
701 SW 27th Avenue, Suite 625
Miami, Florida 33135
Telephone: (305) 541-2266
19159 June 28; July 5, 12.19, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name Martinet and
Associates at 7244 SW 22 St.
Miami FL 33155 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Emeterio Richard Martinez
19146 June 21.28; Jury 5. 12.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-25085
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FU Bar N. 253049
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ISIS TERESA DOMINGUEZ
Petitioner/Wife
and
DIEGO ENRIQUE ESTELA
Respondent/Husband
TO: DIEGO ENRIQUE ESTELA
Respondent/Husband
Residence Unkown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
DAVID M. SOSTCHIN, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
2560 North University Dr.
Sunrise, Florida 33322, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before August
2nd, 1985; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18 day of June, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. Byron
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID M SOSTCHm. Esq.
2660 North University Dr.
Sunrise, Florida 33322
Telephone: 306-749-0888
Attorney for Petitioner
19151 June 21. 28; July 5, 12, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT DM AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-23162
FLORIDA BAR NO. 026026
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
JEANNETTE BROWN,
Wife/Petitioner
and
JAMES BROWN.
Husband, Respondent
TO: JAMES BROWN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney.
THEODORE FISHER, ESQ..
5050 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 101,
Conger Life Insurance Bldg.,
Miami, Florida 33137, on or before
the 12th day of July, 1985. else
Petition will be taken as confessed.
DATED this 6th day of June,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER, Attorney
for
Wife/Petitioner
5050 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 101
Conger Life Ins. Bldg.
Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone: (305) 758-9523
19124 June 14. 21, 28; July 5, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-23159
FLORIDA BAR NO. 026026
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
CHENET TELFORT,
Husband/Petitioner
and
YDOXIE TELFORT,
Wife/Respondent
TO: YDOXIE TELFORT
34 Rue Capois la mort,
Port de Paix, Hiaiti, W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED to file your Answer or
other pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mail a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney,
THEODORE FISHER, ESQ.,
5050 Biscayne Blvd.. Suite 101,
Conger Life Insurance Bldg.,
Miami, Florida 33137, on or before
the 12th day of July, 1985. else
Petition will be taken as confessed.
DATED this 6th day of June.
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER. Attorney
for
Husband/Petitioner
5050 Biscayne Blvd., Suite 101
Conger Life Ins. Bldg.
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone: (305) 758-9523
19126 June 14. 21, 28; July 5. 1985
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTIOU8
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA)
ss:
COUNTRY OF DADE)
The undersigned, under oath,
says; It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the fic-
titious name of J. D. NAVARRO
"UN MILLON DE TRAJES
PARA USTED" located at 30042
SW. 153 PL. Homestead, Zip.
33033 in the city of Miami-, Dade
County, Florida.
Those interested in said enter-
prise; and the extent of the in-
terest of each, is as follows:
JOSE D. NAVARRO
MARLENE NAVARRO
LUIS A. NAVARRO
19132 June 14,21,28;
July 5,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name American Truck
Parts & American Truck Supply at
7386 N.W. 72 Ave., Miami. Fl.
33166 intend to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
American Truck Supply Inc.
19157 June 28;
July 6,12,19.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85 6349
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
J. GERALD LEWIS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of J. GERALD LEWIS, deceased,
File Number 85-5349. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
St., Miami, FL 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any ob-
jection by an interested person on
whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 21. 1985.
Personal Representative:
LOUISE F. LEWIS
11 Island Avenue, Apt. 601
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
KATHLEEN MARKEY
Myers, Kenin, Levinson, Frank
& Richards
1428 Brickell Ave., Suite 700
Miami. FL 33131
Telephone: (305) 371-9041
19139 June 21,28, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-26063-12
IN RE: The Marriage of
JACQUES FRED CHER.
and
BERNADETTE CHER,
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: BERNARDETTE CHER
Boulevard Rue 19 and 20
Number 2
Cap Hatien, Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any, to it on
GEOFFREY W. PINES, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
250 Giralda, Coral Gables. FL
33134. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled court
on or before July 26. 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demand-
ed in the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 18 day of June, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Lisamarie Marcond
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEOFFREY W. PINES
250 Giralda
Coral Gables, FL 33134
19150 June 21.28; July 5, 12.1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the fic-
titious name BELLA FEMINA in-
tend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
LESANCO, INC.,
a Florida Corporation
By: Beta Florentin,
Vice President
Nelson C. Keshen, Esq.
Attorney for Lesanco Inc.
19130 June 14,21,28; July 5,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-25641
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CORDOVA-RODRIGUEZ.
NORMA
Petitioner,
and
RODRIGUEZ. GABINO S.
Respondent.
TO: Gabino S. Rodriguez
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NO-TT
FIED that an action for Dissolu-
tion of Marriage has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on DEL
VALLE & NETSCH. PA., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 200 Aragon Ave., Suite 4,
Coral Gables. Florida 33134, and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
July 26th, 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition. j,.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 20th day of June, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
M. CRISTINA DEL-VALLE,
ESQ.
FLA. BAR NO. 336084
DEL VALLE- & NETSCH. PA.
200 Aragon Avenue. Suite 4 ,
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone: (305) 441-1020
Attorney for Petitioner
19152 June 28;
July 5, 12, 19. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
Dallas Park Plan, Inc. intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
The Downtown, Inc.
19104 May 81. June 7.14,21.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-22955 (13)
MARC BROXMEYER,
Petitioner
va
FLAGSHIP NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI BEACH, as Trustee,
et al,
Respondents
NOTICE OF ACTION
Fla. Bar No. 057054
TO:
FLAGSHIP NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI BEACH, as Trustee.
1111 Lincoln Road Mall
Miami Beach. Florida
JOEL SUSSMAN, as Trustee.
6345 Collins Avenue .
Miami Beach, Florida
CLIFFORD Y. PIERCE
820 41st Street
Miami Beach, Florida
SUZETTE BROXMEYER
2515 N.E. 182nd Street
Ojus, Florida
and all unknown parties claiming
any interest, by through, under or
against the said FLAGSHIP NA
TIONAL BANK OF MIAMI
BEACH, as Trustee. JOEL
SUSSMAN, as Trustee, CLIF-
FORD Y. PIERCE and SUZETTE
BROXMEYER, if alive, or if dea.'.,
whether as spouses, heirs,
devisees, grantees, assignees,
lienors, creditors, trustees, or
other claimants, as to all of whom
residence is unknown, and all
unknown parties having or claim-
ing to have any right, title or in-
terest in the promissory notes
described in the Petition.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to re-establish lost pro-
missory notes has been filed
against you and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, on MARVIN I.
MOSS, P.A.. Petitioner's At-
torney, whose address is 1090
Kane Concourse, Bay Harbor
Islands. Florida 33154. on or
before July 12. 1985. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court, either before service o\
Petitioner's attorney, or im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Petition.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on this 5th day of June,
1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
as Clerk of the Court
By T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
19121 June 14,21,28; Jury 5,1986


Friday, June 28, 1985/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
[aught of AIDS Disease
is Jewish Homosexuals
Iben gallob
bwing number of
bf members from
fas traumatized the
*ay community and
[efforts by members
[vide counseling,
hd other helping ser-
Ivictims and families
Is. The report on the
bf AIDS appears in
(lmer, 1985 issue of
J the newsletter of
Hd Congress of Gay
Lesbian Jewish
itions, with interna-
leadquarters in San
CO.
Newsletter lists 23 af-
I groups, most of them
Id as congregations. The
Cority have only a P.O.
Tress. All but three are in
_i cities. One of the three,
ety for the Protection of
I Rights, is in Tel Aviv.
fcng that the tragedy of
[has become "all too
I in constitutent groups,
t listed the deaths of eight
s of Beth Simchat Torah
i'ork City and two deaths
nbers of Beth Chayim
im of Los Angeles. This
jly not a complete bating
hs of Jewish gays and les-
imong the total of 9,000
fisted in the United States
IBERS of Sha'ar Zahav in
ancisco became stunned
iless when member
[Feldman told a board
that he had AIDS. A
board member said this
ar us the start of a time of
ror and fear.'
Ire he died, Feldman started
Insive consciousness-raising
\ign, a former board
fr said. He seemed "tireless
effort at educating the com-
presumably the
Bxual community "about
precautions, the need to
or research funding and the
ance of creating a caring
gational community to sup-
Dth the AIDS patients and
vorried well," defined as
rt risk for AIDS, for which
has yet been found.
The report said "the topic of
AIDS surfaces at almost every
gathering of member groups,"
from the one in Tel Aviv to the
one in Seattle, Tikvah Chadasha.
The report said women members
of the Seattle congregation "are
also becoming involved in a
regional blood drive."
A member of Beth Simchat
Torah reported that "our
synagogues has been noticeably
affected by the ravages of this
dreadful epidemic," adding that
"prayers for the sick, during Fri-
day night services, keep us all
aware of the harsh reality."
SUCH JEWS have special pro-
blems, in addition to those of
hetersexual victims. The report
declared that "not all AIDS pa-
tients can comfortably share their
illness with friends or family. The
prejudice that is so often directed
towards AIDS patients, and the
conflict when families may not
previously know of a patient's
homosexuality, heap an additional
burden onto the shoulders of the
ill."
This reaction moved Lloyd
Moss, a member of Beth Chayim
Chadashim and chairperson of the
Spiritual-Religious Advisory Com-
mittee for an AIDS project in Los
Angeles, and fellow members to
organize a conference held last
March "to develop holistic,
faithful responses to persons with
AIDS, their families, friends and
congregations."
The advisory committee is made
up of 28 clergypersons "from
most major denominations," in-
cluding Rabbi Janet Marder,
spiritual leader of Beth Chayim
Chadashim. The report said the
committee "strives to understand
and develop ways to address the
spiritual needs of AIDS patients,
friends and families." Delegates
to the March conference examin-
ed such issues as God and disease,
homosexuality from theological
perspectives, and appraoches to
congregational leadership" and
assisting patients with household
chores like shopping and
cleaning."
"Doctors in the congregation
are searching for treatment,
social workers are handling the
psychological trauma to patients,
lovers and families," the report
said.
. Mt. Nebo Cemetery
| crypts, choice location. Can be purchased
t attractive price. Contact:
G. LASENSKY
Jewish Federation of Orange County
12181 Buaro
Garden Grove, Ca. 92640
(714) 530-6636
Mount Sinai's
Ivor Fix
Dies In Crash
Ivor Fix, who built Mount Sinai
Medical Center's Radiation On-
cology Department from a one-
man operation into a top therapy
center, died June 21 of injuries
from an automobile accident. He
was 60.
Twenty years ago. Dr. Fix
became chairman of Mount Sinai's
radiation therapy department for
the treatment of cancer patients.
He was its sole employee.
Dr. Fix was born and raised in
South Africa. He began his
medical studies at the University
of Witwatersrand in Johannesurg.
Since 1966, he had volunteered
his time to teach at the University
of Miami Medical School. In 1968
he began going every other week
to a clinic in Immokalee, where he
provided free medical treatment
to area indigents. For the past 12
years Dr. Fix had been treating
cancer patients in the Bahamas,
again free of charge.
Dr. Fix's many affiliations in-
cluded memberships on the board
of directors of the Dade County
Chapter of the American Cancer
Society and the Papanicolaou
Cancer Institute.
Survivors include his wife,
Karin; daughter, Gail; sons, Alan
and Brett; and father, Samuel.
Memorial services were held
June 26 at the Wolfson
Auditorium at Mount Sinai, under
the direction of the Riverside
Alton Road Chapel.
Rabbi Leon
Goldberger Passes
Rabbi Leon Goldberger, of Ner
Tamid Synagogue on Miami
Beach died Sunday. He was 85
Rabbi Goldberger joined Ner
Tamid Synagogue in 1963, and a
few years later began working as
ritual director of the synagogue.
He held that post until 1980, when
he retired.
Rabbi Godberger was a member
of Labor Zionist Organization,
Yiddish Culture Winkle,
Histadrut and Jewish National
Fund.
Survivors include his wife,
Rivka; two daughters, Marsha
Dorman of Dallas and Aliza
Shevrin of Ann Arbor, Mich.
Services were held at Riverside
Normandy Isle Chapel.
ROSENBERG
Miriam. 70, Miami. June 24 A resident for
45 years. Survived by daughter. Julie of
Lansing. Mich.
SEGAL
Phoebe. 84. Winter Park. June 22 A resi
dent of Miami for 45 years. She is survived
b\ two sons, Fred (Harriet! Segal of Miami
and Mike (Patricia) Segal of Winter I'ark.
Pit daughter. Mary Segal of Rochester
S Y
HAKSII.Y
Sarena, 82, North Miami Beach June 20 A
resident for 80 years. Survived by husband,
Harry: sons, Myles (Margarita) and Robert
Services private.
Rt'BIN
Donald F.. 80. of Miami. June 21 A resident
for 40 years originally from Boston. Mass.
He was one of the first contributors for the
construction of Mt. Sinai Medical Center.
He is survived by his wife, Esther: and
daughter. Eleanor Rubin Cnstol (A. Jay) of
Miami Beach. Services private.
STEIN
Ida. 89, of Miami, June 24. A resident for 35
years she is survived by a daughter. Pauline
Marks: sons. Abraham Maloff; Louis Stein
and Sam Stein. Mrs. Stein was a member of
Temple Emanu-EI and Douglas Gardens.
Services were held at Riverside Normandy
Drive Chapel with interment at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
CUTLER, Elisabeth, 90 of Miami Beach
June 25. Riverside.
LOGIN, Leo of Miami Beach. Rubin-Zilbert
WEINSTEIN, Jean. 79, June 22.
COFSKY, George, 76. of Miami. June 20.
JOSEPH. Sol of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert. Mt. Nebo.
ROSENBLUM, Irene. Rubin Zilbert.
SILVERSMITH, Claire of North Miami
Reach Kubin-Zilbert.
TEITELBAUM, Kay of North Miami
Beach June 2ii Riverside
ZARET8KY, Harry. North Miami Beach
FELDMAN. Louis, North Mum Bead)
June 19. Menorah Chapels.
GLEZER, Max. Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert
HATOFF. Genevieve, North Miami. Rubin-
ZUberl
WHITESTONE. Rose, Miami Beach
Kul.mZilbert.
GREEN. David, June 22. Riverside. Star of
David Cemetery-
OLING. Lucy. 87, North Miami Beach. June
2:1 I.evitt-Weinstein.
STRAUSS, Evelyn, Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
S1LVERMAN, Robert, North Miami, June
24. Blasberg Chapel.
SCHWE1GER. Mae KaU. North Miam
Beach, June 22. Riverside.
RENNERT, Israel Elya, 86. Miami Beach
June 22.
HEIMAN, Albert (Al). 90. of Miami Beach
June 21. Services in Chicago.
CARSTEN. David D., 75. of Miami June
22. Riverside.
GAUL. Morty. 81. of Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert. Star of David Cemetery.
GOLDEN, Edith S. Services in New Jersey
Rubin-Zilbert.
HARRIS. Irwin, 69, of North Miami Beach
June 22. Riverside.
KAPLAN. Louis, 77. of North Miami. June
21. Levitt-Weinstein.
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Page 16-B The Jewish Ftandaan/FndMj, Jane 28. 1985

Law On Circumcision Proposed
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Reform leaders have sharp-
ly attacked a proposed
amendment to the New
York Pubbc Health Law
which, according to the bill's
sponsor, seeks to inform
parents of new born
children that a circumcision
performed by a doctor or
other "non-rehgious pracfj-
cioner may not satisfy the
religious requirements of
any faith.''
The amendment is a "violation
of the principle of chareh-state
separation and in direct conflict
Tith Jewish law." according to
fUfcbi Bernard Zaotowitz. director
of the New York Federation of
Reform Synagogues. Zlotowitz
said Reform leaders have engaged
t> a statewide effort aring defeat
of the meaiurt in the State
Aaaembr/ Standing Committee.
BUT THE bill's sponsor.
SfcsldoB Siher (D.. Manhattan)
claimed that the Reform leaders
were taking the bill oat of contest
and that it is not an attempt to
discriminate against non-
Orthodox mohaiim or ritual cir-
cumeisers. as Zotowitz has charg-
ed. According to Silver, the bill's
purpose is purely
'' informational. **
The amendment, as proposed
before the Committee, reads in
part that "no arcumseisjon shall
be performed by any non-rehgioas
practitioner on any minor without
written consent by at least one
parent or legal guardian. Such
written parental consent shall
contain a statement that such cir-
cumcision is a purely medical pro-
cedure and does not satisfy the
religious requirement of any
faith."
Zlotowitz has termed the pro-
posed bill "outrageous." and said
that the "state has no business
adopting any legislation defining
what may or may not satisfy
religious requirements. Such an
amendment is clearly unconstitu-
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
And Motet smote the roch with his rod twice; and
water came forth abundantly"
(Numbers 20.11).
HUKKAT
Hl.KKAT The portion begins with "the statute of the
law of the red heifer, whose ashes shall be kept for the
congregation of Israel as a water of sprinkling ... a
purification from sin" {Numbert 19.9). At the outset of then-
fortieth year in the wilderness, the children of Israel reached
the desert of Zin and halted at Kadesh. There Miriam died
When the water gave out. God instructed Moses and Aaron
to gather the Israelites before a rock; Moses was to speak to
the rock, and it would gush water. But Moses, irrsted at the
people's complaints, struck the rock with his rod. For this
lack of faith in the divine power, Moses and Aaron were
punished with never being able to enter the Promised Land
From Kadesh chldren of Israel moved on to mount Hor.
where Aaron died. Thence they circled the land of Edom. and
arrived at Trans Jordan from the east, defeating the forces of
Sihon. king of the Amoritea and Og, king of Baahan.
(The waSSwSsa oi Mm Waafcry Portion at ttt Law > extracted and baind
upon -The Orapnlc HMwy at **a Jewish Marifana." edited fry P. Wollmarv
Ttamir. si i. published fry SkanaeW. The volume Is available at 7s Maiden
Lane. New York, MY. IMl Joseph Schlana Is president of the society dis-
tribution the relume j
oonei and a blatant effort to
disci edit non-Orthodox Jewish
mohamim. And it is in dicrect con-
flict with Jewish law which states
that 'anybody may perform a
circumcision.
ZLOTOWITZ charged that the
"true purpose of the amendment
"is to bring the power of the state
into play against non-Orthodox
mohaiim by making it a|.~*ar that
only so called rehgious yracti-
boners by which he (Silver)
means Orthodox "*"l; may
perform circumcisions."
But Silver told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that he seeks
simply to have hospital staff in-
form parents or guardians that
the circumcision is being perform-
ed for medical purposes and thus
does not come under religionis
edict.
Municipal
Workers
End Strike
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
80.000 local government
employees who had been on strike
throughout the country for three
days returned to work last Thurs-
day, except from those in Safed.
Beth Shean and local religious
councils.
Municipalities in the three ma-
jor cities began making efforts to
clear away the garbage which had
piled up in the streets. Mayors
hoped they would clear the
backlog by last weekend.
Meanwhile, motorists continued
their search for gas for their cars
in the face of a refusal by most gas
station owners to obey temporary
orders by local labor courts to
unlock their pumps.
Back-to-work orders were
issued to 160 of the same 450
privately-owned filling stations.
But the gas station owners
association sent its members
round to stations which opened of
their own accord or on the orders
of the courts, persuading virtually
all of them to close down again.
s500 Publix
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Synagogue
Listing
Candlelight in. Time
7:59 p.m.
AUaVTH YESMUftUN
TEMPLE BETH AM Or. Herbert
5*50 N. Kandati Or. Bauaagard
S Mtam*4S7 M7 Sanaa* Rate'
L Simon. Aaaocaata Rabbi
n
Otrac-,,
IMil I llHH,
HCiaeWACAOEMY
*TM-ElCOaiOREGATiC H
24IM Pwaatrao Drrvn U a .
Cantor. Rabbi IbMmm Scftrti
BETH DAVIOCONQREGATION
cww war x
* Ban. rae s ijaatSvant
RABBI OAVIO M AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
**
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Or Qraatar Miami
i%n *- -
137 NE. 11ft St.. Miam. '73.5903
MO M. Kandall Or.. 59^5055
Sartaor Rabbi Haaharl W Samit
Aaaiatant Rabbi Oonead P Cashman
Cantor Jacob G. Bomsttm
AawocaaMCanawRaerwna- Naboc..
Eaaculrva Dwactor Philip S Goldin
TeUpie BETh1 El flPUflHTHBAV
VILLAGE (Consarvatrvo)
7*00 Hiapanoia Aa conveniently
located tart oil 7* St Cawy. ^.
RabOi Marvin Roaa '}
Cantor Danny Tadmora
BETH KODESH
Conaarvathrs
1101S.W.12AVS.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Canter
RoaeBanwc
858-8334
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Brvd
CoralGabaaa
Michani B. Eiaanatat. Raoo
I";-
Ralorm
S7 5657
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
110 Lincoln Rd. Tat. S34-9776
DR. OAVIO RAAB. Rabbi
Shoahanah Raab. Cantor
Joseph KrhMrt
rtan: Eaacutrvn
Secretary

tem'ple 6ETM U<5ShE
2225 NE 121 St. N. Miami. FL 33181
'1-5508 Conaarvativt
Or. laraal Jacobs. Rabbi
Moshn Fnadlar. Cantor
Or. Joaaph A Godinhai.
Rabbi Emaritus
Irving Jarst. Exacutiva Oiractor

Friday 7 am Saturday a aj. awaba
TEMPLE MENORAH
*20-7Sth St.. Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayar Abramowitz ~
Cantor Murray Yavnah ^
Frtda, laia xarung im.
I'ipi
Saturday 1 m and 7 45 p m
TEMPLE NER TAMIO Ml m
7902 Carlyln Avn = -; 9833
Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Euosrta Labovitz ca-wiin
Cantor Edward Klain g,
Pan* nrricn a a** and tH pjn *
Saturday umen i u
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jatfaraon Ava.. MB. PL 3313*
Tat. 538-4112
Rabbi Or. Jahuda Maibar
Cantor Nlasim Banyamini
OatfyMMyan
SaOOatfl MmcM a 15 m
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
ChaaaAva 8 41 at St 538-7231
pa LfON ONiSH >ll| LMWal
MAMarJOlT AUIILIAMT RABBi
AUl 0 : API AN ASSISTANT AAaB.
CAMTOM OAVIO convisch
Friday t5p m Race Harry Jolt annnon
Saturday 10-s am
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Baach
71-Northaaat 172nd S!
North Miami Baach
851 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabb
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ava A 75 St 382 3343
Rabbi Warran Kaartl hmw .-o.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION B47-7SM
1051 N Miami Baach Blvd
Dr Max A LipschiU. Rabbi
Randall Konigaburg, Aaat. Rabbi
Zi Aroni, Cantor
Harvay L. Brown, Exac. Oiractor
Oaay
SaaarSayaaa
7:JOa.m..SJ0pj. f"S\
a-m.wir:30p... '_>)
III 111 W -ft-'
BETH YOSEPH
CUjM Or1ho 843 Martdian Ava.
Dow Roznncwaig, Rabbi
Friday WUCM MS p m
Saturday a JO *.m. and mm
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ava
North Dado's ITrtorrn Congragat'on
Ralph P Klngaiay. Rabbi 93.90'C
Julian I. Cook. Aasooata Ri"
Irving Shuikaa. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramaay. Admimirtor
Friday Mmcai a: 1S p.m
Saturday mtMcm 10:30 a n
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Millar Dr. Consarvallv*
271-2311 -9S
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi i>
Banjamin Adaar, Cantor
David Roaanthal. Auxiliary Cantor
Friday klS aun. tUltaiWl Efa S**
Pr. Norman H. thanlrs nnl arfleUtt and
aanak. Sat aao ajn. Saaanm SanK
B.I aWUiall Zava Klaln
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Tnmpln Bath Shmunl
J'?L*',cn*0-n Ava.. Miami Baach
534-7213 534-7214
Barrv J. Konovltch. Rabbi (
Moans Buryn, Cantor *
Sarolo Grotolar, Praaidant
Sholem Epalbaum, Praaidant
Religious Commlrtas
Stiab6 Da.ly Mmyan


JUNE 1985
America s most mixed chorus. English, Spanish, Spanglish,
French, Yiddish and Creole.
Greater Miami, 3 million strong. The first international American
We 3IY city. A part of the fastest growing Jewish community outside
of Israel.
A rare blend. Cafe Cubano, corned beef on rye and apple pie. The
We 2UTC city of the future, but our collective past contains lessons we cant
afford to forget
A community which has absorbed enormous social shocks in
We arc the past five years. And turned more than one crisis into an
opportunity, against all odds.
A community which has shown its compassion. Determined to
We arc find a future where the forces to bring us together willbe greater
than those which would tear us apart
are one.
*erm

/ISH FEDERATi


aim; Jtwisn rionoian/hnrta l.m oo i/w>.-
Page 2
Federation, June 1985
Contents
ANNUAL MEETING /CAMPAIGN 3
47tti Annual Meeting occasions election of new officers
and board members
Norman Braman details 1985 campaign achievements
MISSIONS/CAMPAIGN 4
Community Mission to Paris and Israel set for October
Federation staff joins in campaign closing effort
WOMEN'S DIVISION 5
Call Newman outlines campaign strategy for WD
Federation Tuesday scheduled for November 5
Photo highlights from campaigner Recognition Day
Hold the date
SOUTH DADE 6
1985-86 officers of South Dade Board installed
Leadership outreach expands programming efforts
New campaign division formed
Shalom program offers warm welcome to new South Daders
ACENCIES 7
Jewish Family and Children's Service changes its name
South Dade JCC fall cultural arts program has something
for everyone
Art program at mjhha works miracles for elderly
ISRAEL FEATURES 8&9
Special section focuses on contemporary Israel
AGENCIES/JEWISH EDUCATION 10
B'nai Brlth Hillel Foundations honor Al Golden
Jewish High School of South Florida challenges student body
bbyo offers summer leadership programs
JCC initiates daycare programs for infants and toddlers
ACENCIES 11
Aliyah council stages successful conference
JCC jottings
National Council of Jewish women offering call POLICE'
banner
GOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS / CRC 12
Florida Association of Jewish Federations has impact on
legislative session
Legislative workshop cosponsored by Florida Federations
Summary of 1984-85 Community Relations Committee activities
YOUNG LEADERSHIP COUNCIL 13
Premier YLC event attracts capacity crowd
FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION 14
Cablegrams
Kaleidoscope features certain to cure summer rerun blues
Program guide
CALENDAR 15
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
June 28,1985 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
President
Samuel I. Adler
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Newsmagazine Editor
Chairman, Communications Committee Mark Freedman
Eli Timoner
Staff Writers
Director of Communications Ruth Korenvaes
Nicholas Simmonds Beth Rubin
On the cover: The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion recently participated in the Miami Herald
75th Anniversary ads competition. Ads which
promoted South Florida as a good place to work
and live were considered for publication by <*
screening committee. This months cover first ap-
peared in the June 4th issue of the Miami
Herald. Space was provided by the Miami
Herald on the op-ed page at no cost to
Federation.
.


Federation, June 1985
page 3
47th Annual Meeting
highlights year
of achievement
Nearly 200 leaders of the Jewish community attended the
47th Annual Meeting of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
on May 22. The meeting, held at the Federation building, occa-
sioned the election of 1985-86 officers and Board of Directors
and the presentation of the Stanley C. Myers Presidents'
Leadership Awards.
A full slate of officers, trustees and Board of Directors was elected by
|*nMin delegates. Samuel I. Adler was elected to serve as Federation
president for a second term.
Other officers elected at the Annual Meeting include: Norman H.
Lipoff. immediate past president; Norman Braman, Cal Kovens, Donald
Lefton. Joel Levy, Aaron Podhurst and Forrest Raff el, vice presidents;
Steven J. Kravitz, secretary; Helene Berger, associate secretary; Nancy
Lipoff, treasurer; and Michael M. Adler, associate treasurer.
The 1985 Stanley C. Myers Presidents' Leadership Award, given in
recognition of outstanding service to Federation and the local Jewish com-
munity, was presented to Ezra Katz, Eric (Ricky) Turetsky and Susan
Sirotta. The award is named in honor of Federation's founding president
who currently serves as chairman of Federation's Project Renewal
Committee.
In his remarks to annual meeting attendees, Adler focused on the sus-
tained growth of Miami's Jewish community. "All of the good work in this
community results from your great sense of caring about who we are, and
what we are. When I travel to other communities, I'm proud to say that I
use Miami as a yardstick for measuring the accomplishment of others,
because we have progressed remarkably in building a unified Jewish
community."
Adler also paid tribute to Norman Braman for his efforts as general
chairman of the 1985 CJA-IEF campaign, and he announced that Federa-
tion Vice President Aaron Podhurst will serve as the 1986 general cam-
paign chairman.
Amy Dean, chairman of the Attorney's Division, served as chairman of
the 47th Annual Meeting.
Campaign update from the general chairman
(Above) The 47th Annual Meeting of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
featured the presentation of the Stanley C. Myers Presidents' Leadership
Awards. Seen at the podium during the presentation, from left. Federa-
tion 's Founding President Stanley C. Myers, GMJF President Samuel I.
Adler, and award recipients Susan Sirotta, Ricky Turetsky, and Ezra
Katz. (Below) GMJF President Samuel I. Alder seen addressing a capacity
audience at the Annual Meeting.
Norman Braman
It's my great pleasure to report
rfat this year's campaign was a
tremendous success by the close of
ff campaign, we expect to raise
?<:2,750,0OO for the regular cam-
paign, a new record for the Greater
iami Jewish community. Our
Jeaal effort on behalf of Operation
oses already exceeds more than $1
P^'on, and another $700,000 has
?"*n contributed to the Project
Kenewal-Or Akiva Campaign.
ik?"8 *?** we adopted the campaign
f, "Against All Odds," and in-
*"> we have overcome the odds,
'"together, our efforts to support
Jewish needs here in Greater Miami,
in Israel and worldwide will approach
$24.5 million. To put this remarkable
accomplishment in the proper
perspective, due to the dedicated ef-
forts of our community, we will sur-
pass the 1984 campaign by nearly $2
million, and will have increased the
total number of gifts to the campaign
by 2,000.
Our record achievement cut across
all the campaign divisions and events
that, taken as a whole, make up the
CJA-IEF. Two divisions, the At-
torney's and Insurance, held first-
time dinner events that were ex-
tremely successful. Last December,
we staged our largest opening dinner
ever, raising more than $5 million. In
January, our major community-wide
outreach efforts, Super Sunday and
Super Week, netted $2 million, while
nearly 3,000 volunteers participated
in the massive phonathons.
Our Women's Division, which gains
an increasingly higher profile in the
campaign each year, reached it's goal
of $4 million, and continued to offer a
wide range of innovative community
outreach programs. The Women's
Division has always been at the
forefront in setting the trend for
other Jewish women across the coun-
try, and this year was no exception.
In 1985, it introduced the "Ruby 10,"
a special honor for women making a
minimum gift of $10,000. Women
making such a gift have a ruby stone
placed in the eye of the "Lion of
Judah" pin.
In South Dade, a community that is
experiencing rapid growth of its
Jewish population, the campaign is
thriving. In March, the South Dade
branch staged its "Bigger and Better
Event," attended by more than 500
people. In 1986, South Dade is plan-
ning more events in the hope of at-
tracting new prospects to participate
in the Federation campaign. An am-
bitious new gifts program has been
established, and it has already been of
great benefit to our Federation.
I am also encouraged by the con-
tributions of our Young Leadership
programs. In 1985, Young Leader-
ship campaign events established
new giving records, highlighted by
the successful Young Leadership Mis-
sion to Poland and Israel, which saw
an astounding 300 percent increase in
campaign gifts.
Our Missions Program continues to
be an integral component of the
overall campaign. I am happy to
report that all of our 1985 missions
established unprecedented levels of
giving, while at the same time pro-
viding mission participants with an
opportunity to see Israel in the best
way possible.
Part of our success in 1985 is at-
tributable to a series of events that
were firsts for Miami. This spring we
instituted a "Campaign Closing
Blitz," in order to close the campaign
by June 30. The centerpiece of this ef-
fort was "Buddy Up Day" held on
May 7. On this day, close to 100 in-
dividuals ventured out into the com-
munity, and in face-to-face solicita-
tions, were able to close more than
150 gifts in the $300 and over
category, including 12 pacesetter
gifts. Our spring efforts also included
"The Spring Ring." and a final "4th
Quarter Phone Blitz" in mid-June.
The phonathons involved many of our
campaign divisions, beneficiary agen-
cy board and staff members and
Federation staff. In 1985, we've pro-
ven that productive fund raising ef-
forts can be conducted well into late
spring, and of course, this benefits
our entire Jewish community.
Although the campaign begins with
its leadership, the final results are
dependent on the efforts of the hun-
dreds of workers who reach out into
the community. Many different types
of people were part of this campaign
both young and old, professionals,
housewives and retirees. I've had the
privilege of meeting and working
with many of you during the course of
the campaign. You represent all
segments of our wonderfully diverse
Jewish community, reflecting a varie-
ty of viewpoints and concerns. But
our common bond as Jews transcends
all of our differences. We are guided
by our sense of responsibility to help
our fellow Jews, and our unity shapes
the destiny and direction of our
people.


'vrw.^ii rinnninn/H^irtnii a.. rto .-.---
Page*
Federation, June 1985
rrmaign
Community Mission gathering momentum:
Join us for a never-to-be-forgotten experience
Upcoming Community Mission participants at a recent parlor meeting
where mission details were discussed. Seen, from left, GMJF President
Samuel I. Adler; 1986 CJA-IEF General Campaign Chairman Aaron
Podhur8t; Mission Leaders Ted and EUy Wolff and Marsha and Jerry Olin;
and Women's Division President Dorothy Podhurst.
Federation leadership will set the
pace for the exciting Community Mis-
sion to Paris and Israel October
10-25. The trip, called the "Bar Mitz-
vah Mission" because it is the 13th
Community Mission sponsored by
Federation, will be led by Marsha and
Jerry Olin and Elly and Ted Wolff.
According to Aaron Podhurst,
Federation's 1986 campaign chair-
man, this mission will be indespensi-
ble in helping reach the $25 million
CJA-IEF campaign goal.
"The Community Mission will help
set the tone for the 1986 campaign, '
Podhurst said. "Mission participants
return with a stronger sense of com-
munity and commitment. With that
revived commitment on the part of
each of the campaign workers, our
$25 million goal becomes more easily
attainable."
Podhurst said that mission par-
ticipants come back to our communi-
ty very enthusiastic about the CJA-
Make the difference
Federation's Volunteer Service Bureau wants you to be part of
its "labor of love."
Meet with our wonderful group of dedicated volunteers and
nosh and kibbitz. And help our community while you're at it. By
collating multi-page bulk mailings which would cost Federation
about $600,000 a year, you perform an invaluable service to our
Greater Miami Jewish community.
Beginning in October, we'd like you to be part of our team.
Please return the form below or call Gert Schner at 576-4000, ext.
261.
Make our $25 million goal for the 1986 CJA/IEF
campaign a reality.
You are the difference.
Dear Gert:
I want to help make the difference.
NAME:
ADDRESS:
PHONE:___
JAM AVAILABLE:
(days and times)
Return form to: Volunteer Service Bureau. Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscay n* Boulevard. Miami. Florida 33137
IEF campaign. Not only does this
prompt them to do their jobs well, but
also, it encourages other volunteers
to become involved. "The enthusiasm
is infectious," mentioned Podhurst.
"Through participation in the Com-
munity Mission, individuals will see
first-hand how pressing are the needs
of Israel, and will gain an enhanced
understanding of the significance of
our campaign effort for the United
Jewish Appeal." Podhurst said.
Podhurst added that he hopes each
of the 1986 campaign division
chairpersons and committee
members will join him on the mission.
The mission begins with five days
and four nights in Paris, the "city of
lights." In Paris, as in Israel, accom-
modations will be the finest available.
While in Paris, mission participants
will visit the city's Jewish Quarter,
attend a special reception with
Israel's ambassador to France, visit
with the chief rabbi of France, ex-
plore Jewish art museums and still
have ample time to enjoy the city's
vibrant night life, elegant cuisine and
world-famous museums, including
the Louvre.
"Beginning with the Sheheyanu,
the traditional ceremony upon enter-
ing Jerusalem, participants will ex-
perience an Israel they could not
know by merely seeing the country as
ordinary tourists," said Mission
Leader Ted Wolff.
"A mission is an in-depth ex-
perience, not just a tour of a country.
This is a once-in-a-lifetime adventure
for community members who want to
experience the true life and spirit of
the homeland," he said.
While in Israel, "Bar Mitzvah Mis-
sion" participants will see Jerusalem
in depth; meet with political and
military leaders; visit an Ethiopian
absorption center in Netanya; inspect
an Israeli Defense Force base where
they will receive a sensitive military
briefing; make a special visit to Or
Akiva. the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Project Renewal si
city; tour the excavation site of an old
synagogue; visit Yad Vashem.
Diaspora Museum and Hada-
Medical Center; learn about life i
kibbutz and visit with its mem:
and enjoy a dinner cruise on thr
beautiful Sea of Galilee.
Of course, no trip to Israel would be
complete without visits to Masada.
the Dead Sea. Ein Gedi, Haifa, Safed.
the Jordan Valley, the Negev, and a
Shabbat spent at the Western Wall.
In order to encourage new
Federation leadership, Sid Cooper-
man is organizing a group of
Westview Country Club members to
participate in the mission.
Space is still available on the mis-
sion. The cost is $2,600 per person.
For those choosing the Israel portion
only, the cost is $2,000. A minimum
family gift of $1,800 to the 1986
Federation CJA-IEF campaign is re-
quired. First-time mission par-
ticipants are elegible for a $600 sub-
sidy. For more information, please
call Ellen Brazer at 576-4000, ext.
215.
Federation staffers assist
in campaign closing blitz
Federation professional staff
members recently volunteered a por-
tion of their day to participate in the
CJA-IEF campaign "closing blitz."
Staff members from all Federation
departments manned the phones in
the day-long effort.
The results were outstanding. Staf-
fers closed on 316 cards representing
more than $51,000 in total gifts.
Campaign Associate Ira Mogitz, who
closed on 26 cards said, "I enjoyed
working on the phones. I feel that our
professional staff works in partner-
ship with the lay community, and this
is just another example of that
positive relationship which has
developed during the 1985
Ira Mogitz
campaign."
Campaign Associate Marty
Barasch closed on the greatest
number of cards, 32 in all. and
Women's Division Director Debbie
Pollans was third, closing on 21
cards.
Members of the Federation staff pose for a victory shot after a productive morn \ no
on the phones.


HJUyrjr,6n, june 1385
Page 5
A message from the 1986
campaign chairwoman
Gail Newman
*- Miami is a very interesting
city and I am fortunate to be
able to lead the Women's Divi-
sion campaign in just such a
place. With over a quarter of a
million Jews spread
geographically over several
miles it necessitates our
dividing the city into specific
areas. However, all of the
workers in these distinct
geographic areas work towards
a common goal and through
their involvement have
developed lasting ties and close
friendships. At the Federation
building, North and South meet
East and West in order to
facilitate involvement, and in-
volvement is the key issue.
Commitment and rewarding
experiences follow closely
behind.
The Women's Division cam-
paign offers us the opportunity
to become an integral part in
the raising of necessary dollars
that are spent not only in Israel
but right here in our own com-
munity to enhance the quality
of Jewish life. We serve as an
important part of the general
campaign, raising approx-
imately 18 percent of the
dollars, which represent almost
10,000 gifts.
Though our efforts are
challenging and sometimes ex-
hausting, when the big picture
is complete and the bottom line
is reached the fruits of our
labor touch many areas of the
country as well as abroad.
I am looking forward to a
very exciting, eventful year,
one in which we will reach out
in many areas to raise the
dollars that will fund all of our
agencies. My goal is to broaden
the base by involving all of you.
There is great satisfaction in
knowing that one person does
make a difference. The time is
now, join us and make that
difference.
Gail Newman
Vice President for Campaign
Women's Division
Photo highlights from
Campaigner Recognition Day
Gail Newman, right, incoming vice president for campaign, seen presenting
award to 1984 and 1985 Campaign Chairman Terry Drucker at Campaigner
Recognition Day.
*een at Women's Division Campaign Recognition Day, standing, from left,
Linda Hoffman, Elaine Ross, Liz Litowitz, Barbara Aronson, and Adria
M*m. Seated, from left, Helen Berne, Terry Drucker and Lenore Eltas.
|*w women all served as campaign chairs in 1984 or 1985 with Terry
rucker.
Federation Tuesday to feature
Nora Ephron and Norman Lear
Writer Nora Ephron and Nor-
man Lear, best known as the pro-
ducer of TV's "All in the Family,"
will be special guest speakers at
Federation Tuesday, announced
Anne Sheldon and Sue Graubert,
Federation Tuesday chairwomen.
The event, slated for Tuesday,
November 5 at the Fontainebleau-
Hilton, is the largest annual com-
munity education program spon-
sored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Women's
Division. Robbie Herskowitz
serves as vice president of com-
munity education.
Norman Lear is an outspoken
advocate of secular rights and is
very active with the group "Peo-
ple for an American Way." Nora
Ephron is the author of
Wallflower at the Orgy, Crazy
Salad, and Scribble, Scribble, all
being collections of her jour-
nalism. The former wife of
Washington Post reporter Carl
Bernstein, Ephron wrote the
screenplay for the film SiUcwood
and is currently working on the
screenplay based on her first novel
Heartburn.
"I am extremely excited to have
Norman Lear and Nora Ephron as
guest speakers for Federation
Tuesday," said Anne Sheldon. "I
hope everyone will join us on
November 5 for what promises to
be the biggest and best Federation
Tuesday in Women's Division
history," said Sue Graubert.
Nora Ephron
Federation Tuesday will run
from approximately 10 a.m. to
2:30 p.m. and will include a full
program and lunch. An early
registration price will be offered
when tickets go on sale after the
summer. Please look for more
publicity throughout the summer
in your local synagogue and in the
Jewish Fhridian.
Please contact the Women's
Division at 576-4000, extension
231, for more information about
Federation Tuesday.
Hold the Date
Thursday, August 29 Combined WD Executive And Campaign Steering Committee 10:00 a.m.
Monday, September 9 ND and MB Constituent Board Meetings
BPW Board Meeting
Tuesday, September 10 SWD and SD Constituent Board Meetings
Wednesday, September 11-Thursday, September 12 W.D. Regional UJA Seminar Fort Lauderdale
Wednesday, September 18 Pacesetter/Trustee Meeting 10:00 a.m.
Thursday, September 19 Federation Tuesday Planning Meeting 10:00 a.m.
Thursday, October 3 Leadership Institute Omni
Wednesday, October 9 Federation Tuesday Planning Meeting 10:00 a.m.
Thursday, October 10-Thursday, October 24 Community Mission Paris/Israel
Thursday, October 17 BPW Leadership Parlor Meeting
Monday, November 4 BPW Community Education Night
Tuesday, November 5 Federation Tuesday Fontainebleau Hilton
Thursday, Dec. 5 Rubi 10 Luncheon
Monday, Dec. 9 Lion of Judah Luncheon


r-euer diion, June 1885
South Pade
South Dade elects new officers and board
1985-86 officers and board
members of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's South Dade
Branch have been elected and install-
ed, announced Federation President
Samuel I. Adler.
Alvin Lloyd Brown has been re-
elected for a second term as board
chairman. Serving with him are Paul
Berkowitz, vice chairman for leader-
ship outreach; Norman Lieberman,
vice chairman for campaign;
Lawrence Metsch, vice chairman for
community education; and Judge
Robert H. Newman, vice chairman
for community services and planning.
"I am delighted to have been re-
elected as chairman," Brown said. "I
look forward to a productive and
rewarding term with the officers and
board."
Judy Adler and Elaine Ross,
representative* of the South Dade
Women's Division, will serve ex of-
ficio on the 1986-86 board.
Elected for a two-year term on the
board are: Robert Berrin, Thomas
Borin, Mel Braxer, Carol Cantor,
Sidney Fagin, Mikki Futernick, Deb-
by Grodnick, Phyllis Harte, Sam
Harte, Dr. Robert Karl, Nelson
Keshen, Richard Kwal, Ellen
Mandler, Sanford Miot, Sydney
Newmark, Dr. Stanley Rosenberg,
William Saulson, Norman Sholk,
Barry White and Daniel Zelonker.
Appointed for a one-year term are:
Sharon Azoulay, Howard Cherna,
Jay Gamberg, Sandi Miot, Sandi
Samole and Dr. Alan Swartz.
Alvin Lloyd Brown, Chairman
Appointed to complete unexpired
terms are: Yoshua Sal Behar, Dr.
Eugene Eisner and Myron Samole.
Completing their two-year terms
during 1985-86 are: Arnold Altman,
Rabbi David Auerbach, Shelly
Brodie, Rabbi Mitchell Chefitz,
Stanley Gilbert, Bernard Goodman,
Leonard Hayet, Paul Kade, M.
Ronald Krongold, Frances B. Levey,
Dr. Robert Marlin, Gail Jaffee
Newman, Nedra Oren, Judge Steven
Robinson, Dr. Bernard Schechter-
man, Fran Storper and Dror Zadok.
Seen at the South Dade Branch Installation, standing, from left. South Dade
Branch Director Jeremy Neimand, Norman Lieberman, Paul Berkowitz, and
Lawrence Metsch. Seated, from left, Alvin Lloyd Brown and GMJF Executive
Vice President Myron J. Brodie.
Program expands
leadership outreach

V- -afc
Federation'! South Dade Branch has expanded community outreach
With a program implemented by its board's Leadership Outreach Com mi t-
\tk unoWr the chairmanship of Paul Berkowitz.
the program, a series of 13 educational seminars, trains and en-
courage* individuals to become qualified board and committee members of
Federation, synagogue boards, agencies and other community institutions.
Hie seminars cover a wide range of topics, progressing from the early
history .of the Jewish experience to the modern structure of our own
Greater Miami Jewish community.
"Before you educate people about the Jewish community structure, you
have to get them familiar with their own Jewish identities,' Berkowitz ex-
plained. "This way, they will be committed to using that knowledge for the
benefit of the community."
The group currently participating in the series is led by Marilyn and
Ronald Kohn. Another group will soon be formed to begin the sequence of
seminars.
For more information about the Leadership Outreach Committee, call the
South Dade Branch at 251-9334.
\
\
"'
I I,
Paul Berkowitz, Vice Chairman
for Leadership Outreach
Norman Lieberman, Vice Chair-
man for Campaign
Lawrence Metsch, Vice Chairman
for Community Education
Judge Robert H. Newman, Vice
Chairman for Community Services
and Planning
Shalom welcomes newcomers
The campaign for "South Dade
Shalom," the Jewish "welcome
wagon" in that area, was officially
launched in October with posters,
flyers, newspaper ads and an-
nouncements in organizational
newsletters. "Shalom" Chairman
Shelly Brodie expects the campaign
to take off this month with the begin-
ning of home visits to newcomers in
the area.
The objective of the program is to
make initial contact with newcomers
and to encourage their participation
in Federation and other organiza-
tions within the South Dade Jewish
community.
Members of each household visited
by "Shalom" will be given a beautiful
gift basket with wine, Israeli candies,
Shabbat candles, a mezzuzah, a
booklet providing useful information
about the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity. Beginning in September,
each new family will be given a free,
three-month membership to the
South Dade Jewish Community
Center and a trial subscription to The
Jewish Floridian. "Shalom"
volunteers will explain the role of
Federation and various Jewish
organizations within the community
in order to help newcomers find their
way to an active and meaningful
Jewish life.
"It might not occur to new
members of the community to call
Federation for information," said
Chairman Shelly Brodie. "But when
we take the initiative and call them,
they are generally thrilled and have
quite a few questions. The response
has been excellent."
If you are new to the South Dade
area or know of someone who would
appreciate a visit from "Shalom," call
the South Dade branch at 251-9334.
So. Dade forms
campaign
division
The Campaign Committee of South
Dade's board, under the leadership of
Norman Lieberman, has organized a
?roup to develop new givers in the
5,000 and over category.
The group will solicit new gifts and
will encourage current givers to in-
crease their gifts. The culmination of
the group's efforts will be a black-tie
affair to be held in early December at
the home of Mr. and Mrs. Philip T.
Warren.
For more information please con-
tact Jerry Neimand at the South
Dade Branch, 251-9334.
.T*


Federation, June 1985
Page7
Family service agency changes name
Jewish
Family
Service
OF GREATER MIAMI
The Jewish Family and Children's
Service, a Federation beneficiary
agency, will now be known as Jewish
Family Service of Greater Miami
(JVS) announced Dorothy Podhurst,
agency president. The announcement
came at the agency's 65th Annual
Meeting held in early June.
The new name reflects the agency's
contemporary outlook toward keep-
ing up with the times, says Podhurst.
"We are constantly changing in order
to better serve the growing needs of
our clients within the Jewish com-
munity," she explains. "Therefore,
we felt our name should reflect these
changes.
"Since we recognize children as an
integral part of the family, and not
separate from it, we felt the word
children was not necessary in the
name. Additionally, our expanded
services are provided at five branch
offices throughout Dade County .
hence the change to the broader ser-
vice area of Greater Miami,"
Podhurst concluded.
JFS was established in 1920 as the
Jewish Welfare Bureau and was
Dade County's first philanthropic
organization. Today it serves 10,000
clients each year, providing family,
individual, marital and group counsel-
ing; information and referral ser-
vices; family life education; preven-
tion workshops; Eating Disorder Pro-
gram; Family Lifeline, Senior Crime
Watch and other programs for the
elderly.
South Dade jcc sets cultural arts plan
This fall will mark the beginning of
the South Dade Jewish Community
Center's new cultural arts season.
Last year was its "Season To Shine"
and this year's program looks even
brighter. The Cultural Arts Commit-
tee, chaired by Freda Greenbaum.
has put together an exciting array of
programs for adults and children.
The series will kick-off on
November 10 with the Annual Jewish
Book Fair, keynoting the works of
world-renowned Jewish authors an
outstanding selection of adult and
children's literature. The fair will
open with Festival Day, featuring a
fun-filled variety of games, rides, and
other special events, and will run
through November 14, ending with
the Women's Day Luncheon which
1U1 feature a noted female author.
Beginning in December, the
Cultural Arts Committee will present
a very special program for young
theater-goers. Entering its third
season, KALEIDOSCOPE A
Young Show-Goers Series is a pro-
gram designed to introduce children
between the ages of 4 and 10 to the
performing arts through a series of
three outstanding cultural programs
that parents and children can enjoy
together on school holidays.
In its past two seasons,
KALEIDOSCOPE has presented a
variety of shows ranging- from the
classic Peter Pan and A Showcase of
Dance to a concert by the Miniature
Orchestra of the Philharmonic Or-
chestra of Florida, and a hilariously
funny vaudeville-type comedy show.
This year, on December 26, the pro-
gram will open its season with the
spectacular Bits 'n' Pieces Puppet
Theatre's 9-Foot puppets in a produc-
tion of "Rip Van Winkle." On
February 18, KALEIDOSCOPE will
present The Sorcerer's Apprentice,
starring nationally-known children's
entertainer Marshall Izen. Its final
production will take place on March
31 with Michelle Valeri's Dinosaur
Rock a lively musical story about
these fascinating pre-historic
creatures.
Finally, on February 8 ,the South
Dade JCC's Major Cultural Event
will spotlight entertainer Mike
Marshall Izen "The Sorcerers Mike Burstyn star of Broadway
Apprentice" musical "Barnum"
Burstyn, of Broadway's hit musical
Barnum and winner of two "Obies"
(Israeli Oscars), in a cabaret-style
evening at the elegant Mayfair House
in Coconut Grove.
Please hold the dates for these
events presented by the Cultural Arts
Committee of the South Dade JCC,
which continues to bring the South
Dade Jewish community the very
best in cultural entertainment.
For more information call Marsha
Botkin at the South Dade JCC,
251-1394.
Unique art program at
Douglas Gardens
inosaur Rock" a lively musical story about prehistoric creatures.
Marie Goldman hand crafting a ceramic box in the Artist Program.
Marie Goldman's world was becoming smaller. Parkinson's disease,
osteoarthritis, heart disease and numerous other ailments kept her
wheelchair-bound, made communication with others difficult and caused
her to be severely depressed. Slowly, Ms. Goldman was withdrawing from
life. Then she rediscovered art.
Marie Goldman is 86 years old and a resident of the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas Gardens. As a participant in the
Home's artist-in-residence program, she has rekindled a long-lost interest
in ceramics. The results have been nothing short of miraculous. In addition
to having regained a great deal of mobility in her hands from working with
clay, she has also rediscovered a less tangible aspect of herself ... her
spirit.
Begun in 1982, the artist-in-residence program is unique to Douglas
Gardens, which has received two consecutive grants from the Florida
Department of Cultural Affairs for this purpose. The success of the original
program, which featured a professional painter, motivated the board of
directors to make the program an ongoing one. Eventually, the Home
hopes to establish an elder crafts collective where works by seniors
throughout the community will be available to the public.
Edward Shapiro, chairman of the community planning and policy com-
mittee noted that, "By establishing a professional crafts program here on
campus, the artist can give elderly participants a keener sense of their own
creative abilities and of art appreciation. The artist-in-residence program",
he continued, "promises to open new vistas for older adults and foster a
new awareness among the general public with regard to aging and
creativity."
Painter/Ceramist Laurie Julia, the Home's artist-in-residence this year,
has the qualifications to do just that. Ms. Julia taught fine arts for 11 years
at City University of New York and has had extensive experience teaching
the elderly in homes, hospitals and day care centers.
Having "set up shop" on the Douglas Gardens campus in November 1984,
Ms. Julia has been working with nursing home residents, tenants of Irving
Cypen Tower, adult day care center participants and the community-at-
large in a series of classes, lectures, exhibits and workshops.
The success of the program can only be measured by the response of the
participants. For Marie Goldman and others like her, art has greatly im-
proved the quality of their lives. "It (art) helps my attitude and made me
want to live again," said Ms. Goldman. "By creating something, I feel that I
still have value." Added artist Laurie Julia, "Isn't that the feeling shared
by creative people of all ages?"


Page 8
Federation, June 1985
Joining heaven and earth
SOLAR ENERGY TECHNIQUE. Arnold Goldman adjust
his unique and efficient solar energy creation, a steel pipe in
a glass-enclosed vacuum that conserves oil's heat. Goldman
sold a thriving U.S. business and moved to Israel where he
founded a solar energy company, Lux.
UJA Prta* Service Photo by Kirrn Beraun
By LESLIE KLINEMAN
UJA Prew Service
JERUSALEM Thousands of
years ago in Biblical times, Jacob
dreamed of a ladder joining
heaven and earth. The Bible tells
us that Jacob "called the name of
the place Beth El," the house of
G-d, but that the actual name of
the city was Luz.
Four years ago, Arnold
Goldman had a dream about con-
necting heaven and earth through
solar energy, and he formed a
company to make his dream come
true. He called his company Luz.
Goldman's vision was to harness
the energy of the sun to power
some of the earth's industry.
Although he is not the first person
to nurture such a dream, his many
innovative ideas are helping this
growing field to develop its ex-
citing potential.
Goldman, a 42-year-old elec-
trical engineer, made aliyah from
Los Angeles in 1977 with his wife
and five children. He is among the
thousands of prominent Jews in
Israel today whose transition into
Israeli life was aided by the Jewish
Agency, the main beneficiary
agency of the United Jewish Ap-
peal/Federation Campaign.
In Israel he spent two years in
independent research deciding
how his considerable energies and
talents could contribute to Israel's
economy and advancement. He
decided solar energy was the
answer.
Investors and the Israeli govern-
ment provided the funds that
Goldman and a small group of
bright believers needed to form
Luz. The result was a parabola-
shaped mirror solar collector that
concentrates sunlight on a vacuum
tube filled with oil.
The oil reaches temperatures of
550 F and circulates through a
heat exchanger to provide steam
for a direct industrial process or to
drive a generator. The entire unit
is controlled by a computer and a
sun sensor that drive a motor
which, in turn, adjusts the collec-
tor to the exact angle of the sun,
he explained.
Although other companies use a
similar design, what is unique is
the oil-filled steel pipe sealed in a
glass enclosed vacuum. Each sec-
tion of this tube is joined in a com-
plex process to hold the vacuum
and compensate for the different
expansion rates of the steel and
glass, an efficient method of con-
serving the heat of the oil.
Another important Luz innova-
tion is the concept of selling
energy rather than equipment to
clients, just as a utility company
sells energy. This involves a com-
plicated arrangement with a
limited partner who buys the
equipment from Luz and takes ad-
vantage of tax credits offered by
the American government. It
makes solar energy financially
feasible.
International attention in the
energy field focused on this Israeli
pioneer this winter in California,
where construction began on the
world's largest Solar Electric
Generating System (SEGS II),
which will provide power to 25,000
homes by next year.
Interior Secretary Donald P.
Hodel participated in the dedica-
tion of the plant, a 33 megawatt,
$92 million project in Daggett, 138
miles northeast of Los Angeles.
The plant is adjacent to SEGS I,
which supplies energy to 10,000
Southern California homes by a
13.8 megawatt, $62 million in-
stallation that Goldman
conceptualized.
In Southern Israel, Goldman's
solar units are cooking french fries
and in North Carolina, they are
dyeing fabrics.
Luz is still in its developmental
stages, but it is showong concrete-
ly how Israel, the U.S. and other
countries can obtain energy in-
dependence through an unlimited
energy source. For Goldman and
others, the sun is the key the
ladder that can join heaven and
earth.
Israel Study
institute offers
adult program
The Israel Study Institute's
Adult Program In Israel offers an
exciting and stimulating 17-day
experience in Israel.
Adults from all walks of life, of
all ages, and from various cities,
will participate in the October
13-30 session.
Four thousand years of history
are brought to life as participants
learn and travel throughout the
entire State of Israel.
Students are accommodated in a
five-star hotel in Tel Aviv for the
entire stay, thus eliminating the
continuous burden of packing and
unpacking. Overnight stays in
Jerusalem and in a Galilee kibbutz
are included in the itinerary.
Further information and
brochures may be obtained by call-
ing the ISI Executive Office at
576-3286. Gloria Friedman is the
national director of admissions for
the Adult Program in Israel.
ISI also sponsors the Alexander
Muss High School in Israel, the
largest academic program in
Israel for foreign high school
students, as well as the Educators
Program in Israel.
Breaking ou
ByLESLI Kl
UJA Pi h!
"Round, round \d
where she stoi w*
JERUSALEM Aliza doesn't fat
well-known children's rhyme jus th
goes round and round the povert cy
Mother to daughter, father to w
deprivation to deprivation ur 'ss
the cycle is broken.
Yossi, Aliza's father, is both vi(
son of poor, uneducated imr gr
"without." Without adequate a en
positive self-image. Without the i soi
cycle.
BEAN BAG FUN. Two-year-old Aliza
center in Jerusalem. The game helps Aliza,
taged family, become more aware of tovth, i
more than 130 supported in part by the Anu
which receives most of its funds frop At
Jewish Appeal/Federation Campaign.
But in community centers through
Development Program is helping hi
learn, think, play and see themselves i:
is giving them the tools to build a bett<
cycle.
Innovative community center pro
ported by the American Jewish Joint
which receives virtually all of its $49.5
Jews contributing to the United Je
paign. JDC aids over 130 community i
tional programs in Israel and more tli
"We believe that in order for achi
fullest, help must start as eajly as j
developer of the program. "By the i
children are part of a community pent
important to understand that a child's
of interaction with adults."
In countless informal ways the t
with the children, helping them to re
self-worth; to understand their senses,
to communicate and express themseh


Federation, June 1985
Page 9
ie poverty cycle
j
KLINEMAN
hli Service
fi round she goes,
-| nobody knows."
't ing or dance, but she's part of the
is the same. At two years of age she
rt cycle, caught up in its sad refrain.
o 30V generation to generation
ir iss the pattern is changed, unless
victim and a part of the cycle. The
4grant parents, Yossi grew up
a ention and home life. Without a
sources to break out of the poverty
i ] lays the bean bag game at a community
ll za, who is from a financially disadvan-
>u h, sound and sight. The center is one of
e, immcan Joint Distribution Committee,
4i leriqin Jews contributing to the United
-VIA Pnm Serriw Photo by Karen BeniUn
ottghout Israel, the Early Childhood
ig hundreds of children like Aliza
Ives in a different way. The program
better life and a chance to break the
r Projects such as this one are sup-
oint Distribution Committee (JDC),
M9.5 million budget from American
d Jewish Appeal/Federation Cam-
nity centers in Israel, and has addi-
>rt than 30 other countries.
a child's potential to develop to the
s passible," said Margot Pius, a
the age of one and one-half, these
oenter nursery program. It is very
lild's first development is the result
the trained staff members interact
to recognize their individuality and
nses, their needs and their feelings;
nselves.
Soft bean bags and resonant coffee cans filled with different
materials help children develop body senses and awareness of weight,
size, proportion and are fun. Crawling enhances awareness of body
parts and verbal expression and sparks laughter. A quiet moment
with a teacher during the toddler's diaper change strengthens a per-
sonal relationship that helps develop the child's caring about others.
Lunchtime with all its tumult and mess is a time for sharing,
group socialization, development of coordination and, for many of
these children, their only hot, nourishing meal that day.
"We start with the children, but the parents are integral to the
program," Ms. Pins said during a brief break in her duties. "The com-
munity center framework allows for parental involvement. Drawing
a parent in is not always easy, particularly the fathers, but this may
be the key to the child's personal and social growth."
When Aliza started in the program, she was totally silent, very
nervous and withdrawn. Her father Yossi never brought her to the
center, until he was forced to do so by his wife's illness. Then he
noticed a broken door at the center and repaired it. He liked the at-
mosphere and began to come more often. The psychologist drew him
into conversation with Aliza.
This became a weekly session, quick and informal, but contact
just the same. Yossi now brings Aliza to nursery each day. They're
developing a close relationship and she is thriving from his attention.
She is happy, talks and participates. Yossi still has many problems,
but his relationship with Aliza has changed and she's improving as a
result.
The Early Childhood Development Program is building a bridge
across social, economic and family gaps, so children like Aliza won't
have to go round and round the poverty cycle any more.
SEEKING WORK IN ISRAEL. Asher Kashri is one of many Israelis who lost
their jobs during the continuing national economic crisis. He is concerned but
hopeful about being able to support his wife and daughter at their home in
Kiryat Shmona, in Israel's Galilee. The Jewish Agency, which receives most of
its funds from United Jewish AppeaUFederatum Campaigns, plans to build
high-technology-based communities in the Galilee, but needs additional funds.
Such communities will alleviate unemployment and improve Israel's ability to
compete in other countries. -M ** s pa<*o t &? to
By WENDY ELLIMAN
UJA Press Service
KIRYAT, SHMONA, ISRAEL
Asher Kashri was born in
Teheran in 1952. He was a civil
engineer when the Islamic Revolu-
tion came, and he left everything
when he fled from Iran to Israel.
He met Karen, recently arrived
from Paris, at the absorption
center in Netanya, where they
both studied. They married late in
1981 and moved to this develop-
ment town, principally known as a
main target for years of Katyusha
rockets fired by Palestinian
Liberation Organization terrorists
from nearby Southern Lebanon.
"With my beginner's Hebrew, I
couldn't find a job in civil
engineering around Netanya,"
says Asher. "We thought we'd
have a better chance in a develop-
ment town where it's also far
cheaper to live."
The Kashris were, however,
disappointed. All Asher could find
was factory work. By then he was
a father, and he needed the job.
"The pay was poor, and the work
they gave me could've been done
by a robot," he says. "But it was a
living."
During the cold winter of
1984-85 here at Israel's northern
border, the factory itself strug-
gling in Israel's economic crisis
fired 10 percent of its workers.
Asher was one of them. "In the
two months that I've had no job, I
go to the employment office dai-
ly," he says. "It's startling how
quickly and completely being
unemployed changes your life
everything seems so hopeless. I
fight hard against a sense of utter
worthlessness. I'm willing to
retrain I'm willing to do
anything. But what I end up doing
is worrying."
Asher Kashri is one of more
than 100,000 Israelis unemployed
today. In Kiryat Shmona alone
there are about 400 persons or 8
percent of the work force
registered as unemployed; a
number that has inexorably crept
upward in the past several
months.
Shimon Asor, head of the town's
Manpower Development Unit,
said the real figure is much higher.
"Add to the number who are
registered (for unemployment in-
surance) all the housewives look-
ing for work for the first time
because families can no longer
manage on one salary, and you can
tremble at that number," he said.
Unemployment, it seems, may
succeed where the Katyusha
rockets failed in driving people out
of Kiryat Shmona. The town's
population has been steadily drop-
ping from its high of 20,000 to
17,000 today.
Kiryat Shmona's future will de-
pend on attracting outside help.
Such towns depend on aid from
the government and Diaspora
Jews. American Jews can help
through the Jewish Agency, which
will build high-technology-based
settlements in the Galilee, Israel's
northern region, if funds are
available. American Jews can also
help by contributing to Project
Renewal, such as in San Fran-
cisco, which is "twinned" to
Kiryat Shmona.
The United Jewish Ap-
peal/Federation Campaign pro-
vides two-thirds of the Jewish
Agency's $400 million regular
budget for a wide range of pro-
grams and services all across
Israel. The campaign raises addi-
tional funds for Project Renewal
as a separate category.
"In a way, the desperate job
situation in Kiryat Shmona is a
measure of the town's success,"
said Deputy Mayor Shmuel
Ochana. "The town was built in
1949 and largely populated by un-
skilled North Afrian immigrants.
Its economy was built for them,
based on textile factories and
metalworks and almost three
quarters of the town's first-
generation wage earners work in
unskilled jobs. But Kiryat
Shmona's second generation in-
cludes many engineers and
technologists familiar with com-
puters and electronics. Educa-
tionally, they've advanced far
beyond their parents and
there's no work for them in Kiryat
Shmona."
A quarter of Israel's
unemployed are age 25 or
younger. One of them is 23-year-
old Meir Waknin. His family
brought him to Kiryat Shmona
from Morocco a few months after
he was born, and he and his nine
brothers and sisters grew up here.
"I studied in a Youth Aliyah
school where we learned the
basics of aircraft mechanics," he
said, referring to one of the types
of schools in Israel supported by
United Jewish Appeal/Federation
campaigns. "From there, I joined
the Air Force and became an
aeronautical mechanic. The day I
got my diploma, my parents came
to the base. They were so proud.
They couldn't stop hugging me.
But that was two years ago, and
since then I have disappointed all
of us. There's no work in my field
around Kiryat Shmona, and I
haven't found another kind of job.
As the eldest son, I should be con-
tributing to the family income, but
Continued on Page 15


me uewi.xii nnnmoKii.'.rf__
I r-. n _
Page 10
Federation. June 1985 .-?
/-
Hillel installation dinner
honors Al Golden
Federation Board Member and President of the Hillel Jewish Student Centers of
Greater Miami William F. Saulson, left, seen with B 'nai B 'rith Hillel Founda-
tions Honoree Al Golden at installation dinner.
The B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations
of Greater Miami held its annual din-
ner on June 4, 1985 at the University
of Miami Hillel Foundation in Coral
Gables. The occasion marked the in-
stallation of the Hillel Community
Board and unit boards for campus
programs.
The dinner was a tribute to Al
Golden, former chairman of the board
of Hillel Foundations of Florida and
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundations of
Greater Miami. Golden has supported
the creation of services for Jewish
students on college campuses
throughout South Florida for nearly
20 years, dating back to his arrival in
Miami. He was recently appointed to
serve as a National Hillel
Commissioner.
William F. Saulson, Hillel Board
president, called the event "an even-
ing to express our thanks to a
dedicated friend of Hillel." He con-
tinued, "We are delighted to
acknowledge Al's past record of ser-
vice, and we look forward to con-
tinued progress as Al represents
South Florida Hillel programs on the
National Commission."
The keynote speaker at the dinner
was Rabbi Stanley A. Ringler, na-
tional director of community affairs
and development, at B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundations in Washington,
D.C., who spoke on "Jewish Leader-
ship: A Challenge for Our Time."
Ringler is a former Florida Area
Hillel director and Hillel director at
the University of Miami. A menorah
was presented to Golden by Paul
Rosen, past president of Hillel Foun-
dations of Florida and of the Greater
Miami Foundation. Also on the pro-
gram were greetings from Jonathan
Kislak on behalf of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and from Marvin
Beckerman for the Florida Associa-
tion of B'nai B'rith. Master of
ceremonies was Louis Berlin, outgo-
ing chairman of the North Dade Hillel
Unit Board.
A special acknowledgement was
made to Brenda Shapiro, chair-
woman of the recently disbanded
Board of Trustees, for her efforts
during the past two years. Barry
Yarchin made the presentation.
The Hillel Community Board of-
ficers for 1986-86 are William F.
Saulson, re-elected as president;
Barry Yarchin, vice president; Meah
Rothman Tell, secretary; and Joan
Peppard, treasurer. The board
members are Bert Brown, Jerome
Catz, Rabbi Edwin Farber, Kenneth
Feldman, Judge Ronald Friedman,
Mikki Futernick, Stanley Gilbert,
Zena Inden, E. Joseph Kaplan, Al
Landskroner, Frances Levey, Max
Mickelson, Tim Mescon, Lois Helen
Mondres, Carole Romer, Jeffrey
Samek, Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Bren-
da Shapiro, Ira Sheskin, Rabbi James
Simon, Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff,
Peter Tell, Judianne Traum, Sydney
Traum, Jeremiah Unterman, Barrett
Weinberger and Richard Weiss.
The Hillel Unit Boards will be
chaired by E. Joseph Kaplan, re-
elected to the South Dade group;
Jeremiah Unterman, North Dade;
and Tim Mescon, University of
Miami.
The Hillel Foundations of Florida is
a member of Federation's family of
agencies and a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
Jewish High
School offers
advanced
courses
The Jewish High School of South
Florida will be offering an array of
advanced high school and college
courses in order to better serve its
students.
In the Science Department, the
Jewish High School will be joining a
handful of schools in the city that are
offering "Physics II," a course that is
suitable for students entering into a
career in the sciences. The course is
entitled "Theoretical Physics" and is
being taught by Dr. Irving Kay,
formerly a teacher at South Broward
High School. Dr. Kay has been
teaching physics exclusively for over
a decade, and has been at the Jewish
High School for three years. He is
recognized as one of the most
knowledgable physics teachers in
South Florida.
In addition to the "Honors
Chemistry" course, which is typically
offered in most high schools in the ci-
ty, the Jewish High School will be of-
fering "College Chemistry" for the
first time. This advanced chemistry
course has as a prerequisite, "Honors
Chemistry," and is being taught by
Ms. Dina Grosnoff. Ms. Grosnoff has
been teaching at the Jewish High
School on a part time basis for a year
while teaching at Miami Community
College. She will be joining the
Jewish High School on a full time
basis next fall.
Two additional advanced courses
are being offered at the school and
are being taught by Dr. Judy Vogel.
Dr. Vogel is providing instruction in
College Algebra and in Fortran. Dr.
Vogel is the chairman of the com-
puter department and will be offering
for the first time, in addition to the
"Advanced Placement Computer
Course" that was offered this past
year, a course in "Fortran." Dr.
Vogel has worked in industry,
writing programs prior to her joining
the staff of the Jewish High School.
Both Ms. Grosnoff and Dr. Vogel
will be participating in a computer
training seminar conducted by ORT-
London in order to extend their
knowledge of computers. Ms.
Grosnoff is completing a Masters
degree in computer science at Nova
and joins Dr. Vogel as a part time in-
structor in the computer department.
In addition to these courses, the
Jewish High School offers college
credit courses during the school
hours in Hebrew, English, Economics
and Psychology.
Students of the Jewish High School
who have excelled at their studies are
eligible for earning up to one year of
college credit during their 11th and
12th grade years.
"Those of our graduates who are
presently in college have been very
Eleased with the benefits of their col-
!ge credit program undertaken
while at Jewish High" said principal
Rabbi Louis Herring. "It not only
gives them advanced placement at
college and saves them college tui-
tion, but also opens up a wider range
of elective course opportunities in
their senior year at college."
The Jewish High School of South
Florida is a member of Federation's
family of agencies and a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund.
BBYO announces
summer
leadership
programs
Members of the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization (BBYO) will take advan-
tage of international summer leader-
ship programs. BBYO offers the op-
portunity to attend the Israel Sum-
mer Institute, which includes ex-
periencing Israel for 40 days of ex-
citement, education, and involve-
ment. Others will take part in the
Kallah program which is a unique op-
portunity to explore the whole spec-
trum of Jewishness.
Kallah is a personal experience in a
group setting. Each participant is
challenged to question and probe
what being Jewish means. Par-
ticipants in the International
Leadership Training Conference
(ILTC) are offered the opportunity to
attain leadership skills which can be
used at home, in BBYO, after high
school and for a lifetime. ILTC is a
full-spectrum program combining
facets of every BBYO approach to
leadership development. A Kallah
and ILTC program will be held at
B'rith Perlman in Starlight,
Pennsylvania.
The Chapter Leadership Training
Conference (CLTC) is the perfect op-
portunity for the newer BBYO
member who has aspirations of mov-
ing up the BBYO leadership ladder.
CLTC combines the aspects of per-
sonal leadership skills with an
understanding of how BBYO
operates. This program is held at
B'nai B'rith Beber Camp in
Mukwonago, Wisconsin.
Miami members will join BBYOers
from all over the world to participate
in the International Convention, '"*
August 15-21. The theme, "The
Game of Life is Hard to Play," will in-
clude sessions with keynote speakers,
fun, elections.and decisions which
will affect next year's program.
Members who remain at home dur-
ing the summer participate in infor-
mal and relaxed get-togethers with
other BBYOers. Fall plans are in the
works during this time.
Teens interested in becoming in-
volved in BBYO should contact
253-7400 in Miami and 581-0218 in
Fort Lauderdale. Call now to become
involved in the excitement of the fall
program.
The B'nai B'rith Youth Organiza-
tion is a member of Federation's
family of agencies and a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund.
JCC
infant /toddler
daycare begins
Beginning September 3, the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center's Early Childhood
Development Department will offer
an Infant/Toddler Day Care Program
in North Dade.
The Infant/Toddler Day Care facili-
ty will be staffed by a registered
nurse and well-qualified teachers
from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Thursday, and 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. on Fridays.
Children two months to two years
will be accepted into the program. If
you are expecting a child soon, you
can register now and the JCC will
reserve a space. Limited space is
available. For more iformation con-
tact Judy Shapiro at 932-4200.


Agencies
Aliyah council sponsors
:hird annual conference
Federation, June 1985
Page li
kird Annual Aliyah Council Conference participants seen in workshop session.
The third annual Aliyah Con-
jrence, sponsored by the Aliyah
auncil of South Florida, Inc., was
eld on Sunday, May 19 at Temple
|eth El in Hollywood. Over 100 peo-
gathered at this event to learn
mt the possibilities of living in
pracl, and to learn about the various
sort term programs available there.
lie theme of this year's conference
"Experience Israel, For a
lonth, For a Year, For a Lifetime."
The subjects covered in the various
forkshops were: short term Israel
rograms, Kibbutzim, Moshavim,
etirement, initial absorption,
usiness and professional oppor-
tunities, education and family living
experience.
Ella Levine, a former "refusenik,"
now serving as a shlicha from Israel,
was the keynote speaker. County
Commissioner, Barry Schreiber and
Israel Consul General, Yehoshua
Trigor also spoke to those attending
the conference during the lunchtime
activities. Bob and Shane Wolf co-
chaired the conference. Morris Futer-
nick is President of the Aliyah Coun-
cil of South Florida.
The Aliyah Council of South
Florida is a member of Federation's
Family of agencies and a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund.
ICC jottings
B.E.S.T. TAKES OFF AT JCC
Babysitting Effectiveness Standards Training (B.E.S.T.) is a special
course, to be offered this fall at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC, designed for
teens in grades 7-12 who want to work as babysitters. The Center is located
at 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue. Parents can now feel at ease knowing that
babysitters are certified B.E.S.T. graduates.
B.E.S.T. sitters will be tested and certified on topics such as respon-
sibility, sensitivity, liability, first aid, diapering, feeding and diet,
disciplinary problems, emergency procedures, time management, educa-
tional games and recreational activities, selling themselves as babysitters
and salary. All students who successfully complete the course will receive a
certificate of completion and a babysitter's manual.
The ten-week class, which meets twice weekly, will feature experts in
areas of child care, law enforcement, psychology and education. In addition,
a once-a-week practicum working with children in the JCC's Infant Day
Care, Early Childhood and Afterschool Programs will provide students
with actual experience.
The class begins October 16 and enrollees must possess a minimum of a
"C" grade average in conduct and all scholastic work, in addition to letters
of recommendation from three teachers or guidance counselors. Class size
is limited to 15 students per semester. The JCC will compile a babisitting
referral list of B.E.S.T. graduates for the community.
Class fee is $35 for JCC members and $50 for non-members. For more
information call Bennet Bramson at the JCC, 932-4200.
JCC'S GEAR-UP FOR FALL
As summer approaches and many activity programs seem to slow
down, JCC staff members begin working hard to plan an exciting array of
programs for fall.
"For each Jewish Community Center, the Michael-Ann Russell, South
Dade and Miami Beach, serving people from birth to 100 years of age and
providing programs on such a diverse level can be quite a challenge," noted
Myrna Loman, program director at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC. "In our
children's department alone, we offer more than 95 different classes week-
ly. Beginning in the fall, our Early Childhood Development Department
will offer an infant day care program designed for single or dual parent
working families," Loman added.
"Gearing up for fall is an exciting time," noted Gary Bomzer, assistant
director at the South Dade JCC. "In our programming for adults, we try to
offer a variety of classes that provide them with the knowledge to sustain,
grow and cope in today's advanced society while also enriching their lives
with a unique blend of their Jewish heritage through cultural arts pro-
grams and workshops," noted Bomzer.
Teens on Miami Beach now have a new program in which they can take
part. The Miami Beach JCC's Teen Department offers fun and exciting ac-
tivities for this age group. "The teen years are full of discovery and
challenges," noted Iris Berger, Program Director on Miami Beach.
"Meeting new friends, growing and preparing for the future is where the
Center can play a vital role." A variety of programs from socials to college
preparation programs and computers will be offered for the teens this fall.
Look for the new Jewish Community Centers' Fall Program Guide to
be published in September. The booklet will list all activities at each branch.
For more information call 576-1660.
WISH FAMILY LIFE CENTER
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center's Jewish Family
|fe Center can help improve the quality of life for today's single and dual
rent families. JCC experiential programs provide enrichment, meet
rial needs, address issues of family involvement, offer guidance, counsel-
?, and recreational activities to assist family members with a variety of
rncerns and interests.
The fall schedule includes family "fun Sundays," Jewish holiday
Drkshops, support groups, classes and more. The Michael-Ann Russell
'C works closely with a variety of community agencies to facilitate
^wth and enrichment of today's changing families. Among the JCC's
operative partners are the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, Jewish
imily Services, Jewish Vocational Services, Central Agency for Jewish
Jucation, United Way of Dade County, Miami-Dade Community College
mily Life Center, Big Brothers and Big Sisters of Greater Miami, The
utheast Step Parenting Association, and the Adam Walsh Child
source Center, as well as area temples, schools and municipalities.
This fall's programs include: Behavioral Management for Children, Ef-
Itive Grandparenting. Psychology of Mid-Life Crises, "The Brady
Vjch", Single Parent to Step Parent, "The Transition of the 80's", Fami-
Vun Days-Canoeing, Theatre and Single Parent Family Day.
For more information, call Bennet Bramson, director of Youth and
lily Services, at 932-4200.
K LAUNCHES MEMBERSHIP CAMPAIGN CONTEST
"Brighten Your Day at the JCC" is the theme of an exciting new
Embership campaign designed to increase visibility of the Michael-Ann
ssell Jewish Community Center's 17 acre, full-service facility located at
H)0 N.E. 25th Avenue.
i The campaign, which includes brochures, t-shirts, posters, bumper
Ickers and balloons, was launched at the JCC's Annual Meeting on Sun-
K, June 2. As part of the promotion, a contest to win a portable TV and
Frighten Your Day" t-shirts is in full swing.
1 To enter, simply display a "Brighten Your Day at the JCC" bumper
r^ker on your car. If your car is chosen you will win a "Brighten Your
W" t-shirt and you'll be eligible to win the TV in a separate drawing.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC, the Miami Beach and South Dade JCCs,
f J places for Jews of all age to meet others who share their interests in
Nth and fitness, Jewish culture, fine arts and social programs. There is
Nething for everyone. Each JCC is constantly growing to better serve its
immunity. Join us and "Brighten Your Day at the JCC." For more infor-
mation call Barbara at 932-4200.
ncjw offers assistance to
stranded motorists
"CALL POLICE" banners are now available in Miami
from the National Council of Jewish Women, Greater Miami
Section. The banners, for motorist's use in emergencies, carry
the message "CALL POLICE" in nine inch tall, highly visible
lettering, and can be affixed to the inside of a vehicle's rear
window. By using the banner, stranded motorists can summon
help without having to leave their vehicles and subject
themselves to dangerous traffic conditions or depend on
strangers for assistance. These banners may prevent car trou-
ble from becoming car tragedy.
"CALL POLICE" banners may be purchased by organiza-
tions and corporations at special group rates as well as by the
general public. For further information, contact the NCJW of-
fice at 576-4747, weekdays from 9:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
HIGHWAY EMERGENCY
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Larger quanluier available upon requeit


\e\
^-M~- ~.K-^.-*.. -~^-,..w*
Governmental Affairs /CRC
. r
Governmental Affairs committee
has impact on legislative session
The Government Affairs Commit-
tee of the Florida Association of
Jewish Federations (FAJF), with the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation as
a major participant, was very actively
involved during the 1985 Legislative
session in matters affecting our local
Jewish communities and their
agencies.
In addition to hosting annual
events in Tallahassee, which give
Jewish community leadership an op-
portunity to interact with members
of the Legislature, the FAJF ensures
that issues of Jewish concern are con-
tinuously communicated to ap-
propriate state officials through the
efforts of our Government Affairs
Director Elaine Bloom, a former
member of the Florida House of
Representatives and longtime ac-
tivist in the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and numerous Jewish
community organizations locally and
nationally.
L. Jules Arkin a former president
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, is chairman of the FAJF
Government Affairs Committee and
Lois Chepenik, former Women's Divi-
sion president of the Jacksonville
Jewish Federation, is currently presi-
dent of the FAJF. Each Federation
community (now 14) has a propor-
tionate share of members serving on
the statewide Government Affairs
Committee. Members representing i
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
are: Samuel I. Adler, Jeffrey
Berkowitz, Norman Braman, Murray I
Dubbin, Marshall S. Harris, Myra
Fair, Martin Fine, David B.
Fleeman, Jonathan N. Kislak, Donald
E. Lefton, Harry A. (Hap) Levy, Nor-
man H. Lipoff, Leonard Luria, Ellen
Mandler, Leonard Miller, Sanford B.
Miot, Kenneth Myers, Aaron
Podhurst, Anna Mae Ross, Samuel
Smith, Eli Timoner and Robert
Traurig.
The focus of the FAJF Government
Affairs Committee activities relating
to action of the State Legislature is
primarily concerned with funding for
human services, particularly those
services of interest to our statewide
network of agencies.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion has particular concern for the
level of funds provided by the State
Legislature for services to the elder-
ly, mental health, child care, families
at risk and other social programs.
With respect to protection of con-
stitutional rights, the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation sought a correc-
tion in the Evidence Code in order to
reinstate the concept of privileged
communications for the clergy. The
bill, HB 136, passed the Legislature
and was signed by the Governor.
The major effort of the FAJF
Government Affairs office in the area
of constitutional issues this year has
been to avoid a U.S. Constitutional
Convention by persuading Florida to
withdraw its call for Congress to con-
vene a Constitutional Convention
ostensibly for the purpose of passing
a balanced-budget amendment, in lieu
of similar Congressional action. The
FAJF has been working with a very
broad-based coalition of organiza-
tions and religious bodies in an at-
tempt to repeal Florida's 1976 call for
such a gathering. This effort was
nearly successful in April. There are
currently 32 states which have called
for a Convention. If two more join the
request, Congress must begin the
process which, legal experts seem
agreed upon, could not be limited to
any one issue, thereby placing the en-
tire U.S. Constitution, including the
Bill of Rights, in jeopardy.
These efforts will be continued by
Federation leaders throughout
Florida, so that a successful result
can be achieved the next time the
Legislature comes into session. For
further information on these issues,
please call your Community Relations
Committee office, 576-4000.
Legislative workshop cosponsored
by Florida Federations
The annual Tallahassee Legislative
Workshop co-sponsored by the
Florida Association of Jewish
Federations, the Association of
United Ways of Florida awi^the
United Protestant Appeal, was held
on May 7th. The Florida Association
of Jewish Federation's Government
Affairs Director, Elaine Bloom, coor-
dinated the activities which included
work sessions with state officials, at-
tendance at legislative committee
meetings and sessions, and a lun-
cheon reception for members of the
legislature and their staff.
During that day's legislative ses-
sions, special Holocaust Memorial
Resolutions were adopted by the
House and Senate recognizing the
40th Anniversary of the destruction
of Nazism in Europe. These resolu-
tions were developed in conjunction
with the Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center, a
beneficiary agency of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
Representative Elaine Gordon,
sponsor of the House Resolution,
spoke of Florida's concerns that this
chapter in history must never be
repeated. She introduced several in-
dividuals, survivors of the Holocaust,
the liberators of the concentration
camps and those righteous people
who risked their own lives as protec-
tors of people threatened by the
Nazis.
During the moving presentation,
several members of the House of
Representatives offered their
thoughts, including Representative
Fred Lippman of Hollywood.
Messages of remembering,
understanding and teaching were
deeply impressed on all those in the
House chambers, in the gallery and
those listening throughout the
Capitol over the sound system.
Among those representing the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation at
the event in Tallahassee were Ed-
ward Rosenthal, Director of the Com-
munity Relations Committee of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
Steven Weisberg of the Jewish Voca-
tional Service, Dr. Phyllis Ehrlich of
the Jewish Family and Children's
Service, and community leader Anne
Ackerman.
From left, Mr. and Mrs. Ignatz Berezin of Tallahassee, representing Holocaust
survivors; Lois Chepenik of Jacksonville, President of Florida Association of
Jewish Federations; Elaine Bloom. Government Affairs Director of the Florida
Association of Jewish Federations; Representative Elcine Gordon, Speaker Pro-
Tern; and Don Weddower, Director of Florida's Division of Blind Services,
representing those who liberated the concentration camps.
Update on CRC activities
Under the chairmanship of Aaron
Podhurst, 1985 was a productive and
rewarding year for Federation's
Community Relations Committee
(CRC), which works on a broad range
of national and international political
and social problems.
Early in the year, CRC was host for
a consultation on church/state issues
with Federations from around
Florida. The consultation reflected
the high priority placed by Jewish
communities on the separation of
church and state. In keeping with
those concerns, the CRC issued
"Guidelines on Religion and the
Public Schools" to school and public
officials, community leaders,
organizations and agencies. These
guidelines were developed to main-
tain religious neutrality and help pre-
vent discomfort for non-Christian
students.
As President Reagan prepared to
visit Bitburg Cemetery in West Ger-
many, the CRC, in conjunction with
the Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami, the National Conference of
Christians and Jews and the local
American Jewish Congress, mobiliz-
ed the community for a May 5th
community-wide, interdenomina-
tional memorial ceremony to honor
all who perished during the
Holocaust.
The ceremony was highlighted by
the laying of a wreath of white roses
by denominational representatives, a
Holocaust survivor, public officials
and veterans' groups. "White Rose"
was the name of a group of German
anti-Nazis who opposed Hitler's
regime. Most members of the group
were executed because of their
activities.
The Domestic Concerns Sub-
Committee, under the chairmanship
of Rabbi Haskell Bernat, rallied a ma-
jor community call for action against
the U.S. Treasury Department pro-
posal to reduce income tax deduc-
tions on charitable contributions. The
sub-committee and the CRC also
strongly opposed the Orange Bowl
Committee s use of the Indian Creek
Country Club for it post-game event
because of the club's discriminatory
policy against Blacks, Jews and other
minorities.
The Domestic Concerns Sub-'
Committee also adopted a strong
position against apartheid in South
Africa and in support of the Anti-
Aparthaid Act of 1985, now pending
in Congress. If adopted, the act will
prohibit new loans to, and in-
vestments in, South Africa. It will
also ban the sale of Kruggerands, ban
computer sales to that nation and call
upon the President to seek similar ac-
tion by other nations.
Under the chairmanship of Jeffrey
Berkowitz, the CRC's Middle East
and Foreign Jewry Committee issued
strong statements and "Action
Alerts" to community leaders on
issues affecting Israel. Of particular
importance were the Foreign Aid
Bill, which produced record aid for
Israel, and the Free Trade Area
legislation, which established a com-
merce zone where all commercial
transactions between the U.S. and'
Israel would be duty-free. Ethiopian
Jewry was also a major topic of con-
cern to the sub-committee, and it was
kept informed as to the progress of
"Operation Moses" as security
precautions allowed.
Under the chairmanship of Helene
Cohen, the CRC's Cults and Mis-
sionaries Sub-Committee published
an educational brochure and newslet-
ter on the dangers of cults and mis-
sionary groups for distribution to key
individuals and community organiza-
tions. It also established a speakers'
bureau for the same purpose. In addi-
tion, the sub-committee took suc-
cessful action to prevent a major cult
group from receiving a large Federal
grant under false pretenses.
Under the chairmanship of Hinda
Cantor, the South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry, an arm of
the CRC, spearheaded an eight-week,
rotating hunger strike. The hunger
strike was intended to show solidari-
ty with Soviet Jews who were on
hunger strikes to protest curtailed
emigration, stepped-up harrassment
and persecution, and the arrest and I
imprisonment of Soviet Jewish
cultural activists. The growing pro-
blems of Soviet Jews were
highlighted throughout the year with
a continuous flow of "Action Alerts"
with each new arrest and trial of a
Soviet refusenik.


Federation, June 1985

Page 13
hip Council
iung Leadership council launched
inaugural event
, r-

-
< M

m Jg
H. Levine (left) receives congratulations from Michael M. Adler upon
tie's installation as chairman of the Young Leadership Council.
Sunday, June 2, the Greater
hi Jewish Federation launched
few Young Leadership Council
at a sumptuous Champagne
ch at the Biscayne Bay Marriott
that featured the installation
Council's 40 member Board.
st 300 young leaders attended.
foung Leadership Council is an
|ative and exciting program to
intensively involve young men
(women in the work of the
ption and the organized Miami
" i community.
Barnett, chairman of the
made the opening comments
Mcomed everyone. "The most
ant people here today are all
few people to begin the activities
(rand new organization."
hael Adler, serving as Installing
(r of the Board, recalled the ear-
innings of the Young Adult
on and now, the future of the
Leadership Council.
11 look back over the changes in
Imposition of the Young Adult
Dn, I remember when we first
1st following the Yom Kippur
fc> form a group that would be
solely for the younger
ers of the Miami Jewish corn-
Two major issues we ad-
were whether our group
even affiliate with Federation
mother we would be a part of
^mpaign process. It seems silly
think about it, but those were
fesues during that time period."
er continued, "Today our new
Leadership Council has an ac-
ting list of some 3000 people,
Dtential for even more. If you
round the room, we have 300
here who woke up early on a
fry morning to identify with this
I group. These are the true
of the young Miami Jewish
ftunity. We have a showcase
Mzation which communities from
ker the country strive to
i National Chairman of the UJA
Leadership Cabinet, I have
Pe opportunity to speak before
(community leadership groups. I
^7 proud that I come from a
fumty with the most innovative
wnming. I am also proud to say
lour Federation has the con-
ce m its future leadership to
lover the mantel of responsibility
Pon merit rather than age," con-
N Adler.
P' H. Levine, newly installed
Paa of the Young Leadership
Council Board, urged everyone to en-
courage their friends to join the new
Young Leadership Council. He
challenged those present to become
more actively involved.
"I want to be sure that all members
of the Young Leadership Council
understand that, in terms of their in-
volvement, the door is wide open.
Because of the size of our member-
ship we ask, however, that you each
take some initiative indicate to us
your willingness to participate and
your areas of interest and we will do
everything we can to help in all possi-
ble ways. Just take the first step
walk through the door."
Richard Berkowitz, newly installed
Chairman of the Young Leadership
Council Campaign Committee, stated
that one goal will be to establish a
structure which will enable us to in-
tegrate and coordinate campaign ac-
tivities with the entire Federation.
"What we are doing individually and
collectively is in the highest and best
calling of our faith and of society. It is
time that we celebrate giving it is
time to celebrate our givers and it
is time to celebrate and particularly
honor those who ask."
Berkowitz added, "The Committee
will focus on the celebration of giving
and Todah Rabah, thanking and
honoring those who truly do sustain
the community. It is time for us to
assume the mantel of leadership and
grasp it firmly. It will be our innova-
tions, development and growth which
will propell Federation into the next
century. It is time for us to cultivate
our peers and make them com-
prehend that our collective endeavors
address a critical omnipresent need."
Mr. Berkowitz concluded with the
words of our beloved Marilyn Smith.
"There are a vast number of other
things I'd love to do but for me, right
now, the action is here as a volunteer.
It is my choice and it is my pleasure.
Don't be misled. It's not all altruistic,
or payment of 'Jewish dues.' Where
else can one find the potential for
such outstanding personal enhance-
ment; the superb opportunity to risk,
to learn and grow; the occasion to
participate in raising funds and
rendering decisions that impact
Jewish life here, in Israel and in the
world at large? Where else can one
feel so congruent, working in a pro-
fessional capacity with no monetary
compensation for something so
positive and important as the
perpetuation of the dreams and
values of the Jewish people?"
The NEW Young Leadership Council
invites YOU to join in a variety of
programs and activities during 1985-86.
The YLC needs individuals to serve on
the following committees:
Campaign Program and Education
Couples Public Relations
Missions To Israel Singles
Community and Political Involvement
Name:__________________________Phone____________
Please indicate your preference^) by checking above. Return this
form to:
The Young Leadership Council
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
SOMETHING IS BOUND TO
HAPPEN TO THE MAXIMUM
TAX RATE WHAT WILL IT
BE?
Although no one can be sure of the final
outcome, a change is certain.
Now is the time to take steps
to be sure that you get the most
from your charitable contribu-
tions under existing tax laws.
You can use your appreciated
assets to set up a philanthropic
fund with the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies today
that will bank your savings and
allow you to spread out your
charitable contributions for
many years to come.
Do it now. Maximize your tax benefits before pro-
posed capital gains tax changes are made.
For more information please call or write the:
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
(305) 576-4000
Melvin L. Kartzmer
Chairman
Joseph C. Imberman
Director


4

Page 14
Federation, June 1985
Cable Crams
MOUNT SINAI DONATES VAN
JFTV crews will no longer have to go on assignment in separate cars
with hundreds of pounds of equipment crammed into the back of hatchback.
By agreement between Federation and Gary Gerson,president of Mount
Sinai Hospital, the hospital has donated a van for JFTV use.
"The van came just in the nick of time," said Samuel Harte, JFTV's in-
coming president. "We had been using a hatchback that belonged to one of
our employees, but she sold it. Mount Sinai has come to our rescue once
again."
Mount Sinai and JFTV have had a close relationship since the station's
inception one and one-half years ago. One of the first shows aired on the
station was "Check Up/Mount Sinai," and the hospital has given JFTV its
continued support since.
JFTV MOVES
We always knew that JFTV would eventually go places, and soon it will
take the phrase literally. The TV station will move into its new and larger
home in the Federation Annex, located next door to Federation's main
building.
The new broadcast facility, created especially for JFTV, includes a
studio where the station will eventually be able to tape shows, a control
room and offices for staff.
The new facility can't yet boast of complete and sophisticated produc-
tion equipment like it's next-door neighbor Channel 10, but the new
building will allow JFTV to substantially increase its capabilities.
NEW SHOW AIRS ON JFTV
JFTV welcomes "Aleph," a weekly program dealing with various
topics of Jewish concern such as international politics, American youth in
Israel, Soviet Jewry, Jewish humor, music and community programs.
"Aleph" is produced in Boston by the Corporation for Jewish Broadcasting
and Moshe Waldoks, PhD, professor of Jewish Affairs at Clark University.
JFTV OFFERS LOCAL SPOTS TO NATIONAL PROGRAM
JFTV will be a major contributor of programs to a TV magazine featur-
ing happenings in Jewish communities throughout the United States, JFTV
President Samuel Harte announced.
The program, still in the planning stages, will be a collage of segments
produced by Federation television stations in cities all over the country.
Features will be submitted to the Council of Jewish Federations, which will
combine them to produce half-hour installments of the magazine and
distribute them to cable and commercial television stations.
Impetus for the TV magazine came out of a meeting held last
September between representatives of the Council of Jewish Federations
and individual Federations in Miami, Chicago and Los Angeles.
The following companies have shown their support of JFTV by becom-
ing grantors:
Signature Catering "The Molly Goldberg Show"
Menorah Chapels "Hello Jerusalem"
Grimberg Medical and Dental Center of North Beach "We
Remember the Holocaust," "Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky" and
"JFTV Bulletin Board."
Kaleidoscope features
for July and August
In July and August JFTV continues to take a lively look at happenings
in the South Florida Jewish community with "Kaleidoscope," the JFTV-
produced news magazine.
July 11, 13 and 16:
(see schedule
below for times)
July 18, 20 and 23:
July 25, 27 and 30:
August 1, 3 and 6:
Sammy Davis Jr. discusses his life as a Jew.
Political and Foreign Policy Consultant
John F. Rothman talks politics.
Tay Sachs Disease will be the topic of conversation
with Dr. Paul Tocci, Director of the biochemistry
lab at the Mailman Center, University of Miami.
Michael Klein discusses geneology.
Actress Liv Ullmann talks about her grandfather
at Dachau.
Tom Dine, executive director of the American
Israeli Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) joins
"Kaleidoscope."
Animator Frank Gladstone talks about his art.
Author Jean Powers Soman discusses her book
"Your True Marcus," a collection of letters from a
Jewish colonel during Civil War.
GREATER MIAMI
JEWISH FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION, INC.
Watch JFTV on:
Storer (North Dade) Channel P-29
Storer (South Dade)
Harte-Hanks
Dynamic
Miami Cablevision
Americable
Channel 14
Channel 2
Channel 43
Channel 11
Channel 36
* Programming Schedule Greater Miami Jewish Federation cable Television inc. JULY & AUGUST 1985*
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5-5:30 p.m. Eenies Kitchen Film special Eenies Kitchen Film special Aleph or Film special Hello Jerusalem JCC:A Special Place
5:50-6 P.m. Check up/ Mount Slnal Film special Hello Jerusalem Check up/ Mount Slnal Film special Eenies Kitchen
JFTV Bulletin Board
6-6:30 p.m. we Remember The Holocaust The Molly Goldberg Show Eenies Kitchen we Remember The Holocaust Check up/ Mount Slnal We Remember The Holocaust
JFTV Bulletin Board
6:30-7 p.m. Still Small voice or viewpoint JCC:A Special Place Film special The Molly Goldberg Show Film Special The Molly Goldberg Show The Molly Goldberg Show
7-7:30 p.m. The Molly Goldberg Show Aleph or Film Special The Molly Goldberg Show Still Small voice or viewpoint Hello Jerusalem Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky Film Special
I 7:30-8 p.m. Pillow Talk Kaleidoscope with Suzanne Lasky Film Kaleidoscope with Film special Pillow Talk
**. Suzanne Lasky JFTV Bulletin Board
I Subject to change -1
r
____


lendar
Federation, June 1985
page15
tSDAY, JULY 11
[South Dade Jewish Community Center's
sh Singles Network will be sponsoring a
rB Night at the Center, 12401 SW 102
hue, beginning at 7:30 p.m. Bring your own
fe. Cheese fondue and chocolate fondue will
frved. Cost is $4.00 for members, $5.00 for
nembers. For more information, please call
at 251-1394.
ISDAY, JULY 11
Istepfamily Association of America, Inc.,
h Florida Chapter, will present an open
.ssion, "Dealing with 'Step' Laws" at the
Bh Family and Children's Service, 2040 NE
. Street, Suite 307 at 7:30 p.m. The fee is
i for members and $2.00 for non-members,
nore information, please call 949-6186.
h)AY, JULY 14
ISouth Dade Jewish Community Center will
I a bar-b-que swim party for singles over 40,
aning at 4:00 p.m. at the Center. The cost is
i for members, $6.00 for non-members. For
i information, please call Jodye at 251-1394.
IDAY, JULY 21
[Jewish Singles Network of the South Dade
|sh Community Center is having a Summer
Dance at 7:30 p.m. at the Sheraton
Irhouse, 3900 NW 21st Street. The cost is
i per person, which includes dancing to the
ts and sounds of Les Burke and his big
en Videos. For more information and reser-
ins, please call Jodye at 251-1394.
WAY, JULY 28
kr-b-que dinner and swim night will be held
he South Dade Jewish Community Center,
ttl SW 102 Avenue, beginning at 4:00 p.m.
[cost is $5.00 for members, $6.00 for non-
nbers. For more information, please call
[re at 251-1394.
JDAY, AUGUST 18
Michael-Ann Russell JCC Singles Depart-
kt is hosting a summer fling dance at the
lomat Hotel Track Room, from 7:30 to mid-
lit. The cost is $7.00, which includes a live
i, munchies, prizes, and cash bar. For more
Irmation, please call Marilyn Krohngold at
[4200.
(dNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4
Avima Lombard, professor of Early
dhood Education, School of Education, the
rew University of Jerusalem, will present a
re to the Judaic Studies Program of the
fersity of Miami on "The Israeli Home-
uction Program for Pre-School Youngsters
PY)." All early child educators are especial -
vited to attend. For time and location, call
4375.
tOUGHOUT THE SUMMER
Registration for the Michael-Ann Russell
fish Community Center Teen Football league
I be held from Sunday, September 15 through
jrsday, September 19. For more information,
call Mark at 932-4200.
\he Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
iter and the Jewish Family and Children's
rice are offering a young widow and
Sowers support group, designed for those
ier the age of 45. Topics include: the grieving
bcess, loss, finances, family, decision making,
png and more. The cost is $30 for members,
for non-members. For more information,
se call Marilyn at 932-4200.
faXer exercise classes for people 60 years and
Br will be offered at the South Dade Jewish
nmunity Center, 12401 SW 102 Avenue,
|m July 7 through August 11,10:00-11:00 a.m.
1 cost is $15 for members, $20 for non-
|mbers. Registration must be complete and
Id for by July 1. For more information, please
V Sherry Horwich at 251-1394.
he South Dade Jewish Community Center
space available in its Mommy and Me pro-
beginning September 3. For more infor-
ation, please call Arlene Greenberg at
U-1394.
A Wednesday morning discussion group on
caring for infants and toddlers begins on
September 4. For more information and
registration details, please call the South Dade
Jewish Community Center at 251-1394.
A creative creepers program for babies six
months to one year will begin on September 4 at
9:15 a.m., at the South Dade JCC. The program
is designed to provide parents with an
understanding of their infants growth and
development and will assist in establishing a
positive interactional relationship between
parent and child. For more information, please
call Arlene Greenberg at 251-1394.
A creative writing class for senior adults is be-
ing offered at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC
every Tuesday morning from 9:30 to 11:30.
There is no charge for the class. For more infor-
mation, please call Esther Landsberg at
935-2440.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC is offering a
Suzuki violin-talent education program in the
fall, starting the week of September 9. For more
information, please call 932-4200.
The Judaic Studies Program of the University
of Miami will offer 18 courses in its fall 1985
undergraduate program, beginning Monday,
September 9. These include, among others, Bi-
ble, Modern Israel, Hebrew, Zionism, and The
U.S. Jewish Community. All courses are ac-
credited by CAJE. For information, call
284-4375.
Israeli folkdancing with instructor Yusi
Yanich 9:30 a.m. Mondays and Wednesdays at
the Surfside Community Center, 9301 Collins
Avenue; 1:00 p.m. Tuesdays at Seacoast Towers
South, 5101 Collins Ave., Miami Beach; 9:30
a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays at the South
Shore Center, 833 Sixth Street, Miami Beach;
1:30 p.m. Wednesdays at the McDonald Center,
17051 NE 19th Avenue, North Miami Beach;
1:00 p.m. Thursdays at Morton Towers North.
1500 Bay Road, Miami Beach; 10:00 a.m.
Fridays at Jade Winds Condo, 1720 NE 191st
Street, North Miami Beach. For more informa-
tion, phone 685-1783.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center, 18900 NE 25th Avenue, offers swimm-
ing for all ages and abilities starting at 6 months
of age. Register any time. For more informa-
tion, please call 932-4200.
"Caring for Infants and Toddlers What
Works, What Doesn't," will be the topic of the
Wednesday morning discussion group at the
South Dade JCC. There are eight sessions in the
series, beginning on June 26. The fee is $2.40
per session, $16 for the series for members, $5
per session for non-members. Pre-registration is
required. For more information, please call
251-1394.
Join the Miami Beach Jewish Community
Center's teens in an American Youth hosteling
adventure. Travel to Boston, Massachusetts and
bike through the Cape Cod area. This trip is
open to all 9th-12th graders and will begin on
August 16 and continue through August 25th.
Call the Center at 534-3206 for a brochure or
come to the Center at 4221 Pine Tree Drive.
A mini-camp for children grades K through
eight will be held at the South Dade JCC from
August 19 through August 30. The cost is $75
per week for members, $90 per week for non-
members. For more information, please call
251-1394.
Every Sunday night is Israeli Dance Night at
the Michael-Ann Russell JCC. For more infor-
mation, please call Marsha Engelman at
932-4200.
Newsmagazine
deadlines for
1985-1986:
The Federation newsmagazine does not pub-
lish in the months of July, August and Septem-
ber. Beginning with the October, 1985 issue of
Federation, the supplement will be inserted in
the Jewish Floridian on the FIRST FRIDAY
of each month. In accordance with this change,
the deadline for submission of calendar items,
press releases, etc. and the 1985-86 publication
dates are listed below.
DEADLINE PUB I.
ISSUE FOR ITEMS DATE
October. 1966 SepUmber 11 October 4
November, 1966 October 9 November 1
December, 1966 November 13 December 6
January, 1986 December 11 January 3
February, 1986 January 16 February 7
March, 1986 February 12 March 7
April, 1986 March 12 April 4
May,1986 April 9 May 2
June. 1986 May 14 June 6
All materials for publication in the news-
magazine should be submitted to:
Editor, Federation Newsmagazine
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscay ne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Liating for Jewiah Community Calendar
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for October events is September 12.1985
Organization__
I
Event
Place
Dale^
Time
.(I a.m. (I p.m.
Your name
Title_____
_Phone Nc._
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Communications Departmenl
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Israel
Continued from Page 9
all I've done is live off it. I'm ashamed, but I feel
cheated as well."
Rina Davkar is another member of Kiryat
Shmona's home-grown generation. Her parents came
to Israel from India in the early 1950's, and 21-year-
old Rina is the third of their seven children, all born in
Kiryat Shmona.
"I finished the army a year ago. and went to study
special education in Jerusalem," she said. "I shared
an apartment with an old lady, who gave me the room
rent-free in return for looking after her. 1 earned
money doing housework for the neighbors. Then this
year tuition skyrocketed, and there was no way I
could pay it. So I came back to Kiryat Shmona. plann-
ing to live at home, work and save money to go back
to school next year. But there aren't any jobs here.
I'm so terribly afraid for the future. I feel my chance
in life slipping away from me and I don't know how to
stop it."
"Unemployment in Kiryat Shmona will get worse
before it gets better," said Deputy Mayor Ochana,
who also noted that the town includes 250 Ethiopian
Jewish immigrants soon to be seeking their first jobs
in Israel. "But we must not stop planning for the
future. What we have got to do is create sophisticated
industries for our young people."


Someone pays the price .,
until you pay your pledge
Please Send Your Check Today.
1985 Combined Jewish Appeal/Israel Emergency Fund
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign
Norman Braman, General Campaign Chairman
<>
4 +
4*00&sc*yftBoitlv.Lrd. Miami, Florida 33137
A Ma*
Myron 4. Brodie, Execut.ve Vice President


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