The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02939

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement. Special Insert
Em 58 -Number 22
Three Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, May 31,1985
By Mail HO Cents
Price 50 Cents
W
New Struggle Over
Prisoner Exchange
A

V5**f
ROF. JACOB ISHAY
18. Project
Israeli To Help Rocket
Hornets Into Space
SL AVIV When 180
Rental hornets are
*eted into Earth's orbit
ng the summer of 1986,
Aviv University Prof.
ob Ishay is convinced
! is no chance that they
'escape inside the space
little.
toey will not sting the
t\
irfPtodi Lavi* has been
director general of
knViJ,, He succeeds
Z,*^ "ho mil retire
Wf" SO years in that
astronauts with their poisonous
venom. No, they will not create a
space nightmare worthy of
Hollywood scriptwriters inside
the tight confines of the orbiting
space vehicle.
The hornets, says Ishay, their
caretaker, will be contained
securely inside a metal locker.
THE HORNETS will be sent in-
to space for a study of how they
adapt to near-weightless condi-
tions an environment in which
gravity is a thousandth or less of
that on Earth. By studying the in-
sects' behavior, Ishay hopes to
learn how humans can cope better
with space sickness, an unusual
malady that has caused more than
one-third of the astronauts to suf-
fer from headaches, nausea and
weakness.
Ishay, a professor of en-
tomology at Tel Aviv University,
met with University of Penn-
sylvania bilogists recently to
discuss his research.
He said Oriental hornets were
being used because of their
unusual ability not found in
humans or other mammals to
detect tiny amounts of gravitation
and react to them.
AMONG THE questions Ishay
hopes to answer as a result of his
hornet mission are these:
Will the hornets build combs,
similar to a bee's honeycomb, in
Continued on Page 11-A
Bv HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
new controversy is raging in
Israel over eight soldiers
traded for more than 4,000
Palestinian and other Arab
terrorists in two prisoner
exchange deals over the
past 18 months.
Israel secured the return of
nine of its men. all captured in the
early days of the Lebanon war.
Eight were taken prisoner
without offering resistance, and
demands have been made that
they be court-martialed. Six of the
men, held prisoner by Syria, were
returned to Israel in November,
1983 in exchange for 3,000 Arabs,
mostly Palestinians.
THREE WERE returned last
week. They had been held captive
in Damascus by the Popular Front
for the Liberation of Palestine-
General Command, a pro-Syrian
Palestinian terrorist organization
headed by Ahmed Jabril. Israel
obtained their freedom by turning
loose 1,150 terrorists serving
prison sentences in Israel, in-
cluding mass murderers serving
life terms.
The chief education officer of
the Israel Defense Force released
a fact sheet critical of the soldiers'
behavior. Likud MK Pinhas Golds-
tein formally demanded court
martials. The soldiers have
responded by accusing the IDF of
placing new recruits with inade-
quate training in places of ex-
treme danger in Lebanon.
Two of the soldiers released,
Yosef Groff and Nissim Salem,
and six others released in 1983
outnumbered their captors, accor-
ding to unofficial reports. Alleged-
ly, they were resting under a tree
near Bahamdoun in Lebanon
when they were approached, in
Hebrew, to hand over their
weapons which were stacked
nearby.
THE THIRD soldier, Hezi Shai,
was captured while trying to
escape from his wrecked tank and
has not been faulted for his
behavior.
The controversy has divided the
country which is already split over
the government i wisdom in free-
ing omf of the most notorious
terrorist! of the past two decades
and allowing H00 of the prisoners
to return to their homes in the
West Bank. Gaza and Israel.
The IDF" said that it would not
Continued on Page 3-A
Pardon on Tap?
Peres Asks Legal View
Of Jewish Underground
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Shimon Peres ask-
ed Attorney General Yit-
zhak Zamir last Thursday
for a legal opinion with
respect to the release of
alleged members of a
Jewish underground ter-
rorist network on trial or
already convicted for crimes
of violence against Arabs in
the West Bank.
Peres asserted his position that
the executive branch of govern-
ment must not interfere in the
judicial process and remained
firmly against linking the fate of
the Jewish suspects to the freeing
of 1,150 Arab terrorists in last
week's prisoner exchange.
However, he maintained that
there are a number of issues
which require legal clarification.
PERES' QUERY to Zamir ap-
peared to open the door to the
possibility of compromise with the
rightwing and religious elements
who are clamoring ever more
vigorously for the release of the
Jewish suspects now that the
government has turned loose con-
victed Arab killers in exchange for
three Israeli soldiers held captive
by Palestinian terrorists in
Damascus.
In all, 27 alleged Jewish ter-
rorists are involved and a distinc-
tion must be made between those
still on trial and others convicted
and sentenced. One of the former
Prime Minister Peres
was, in fact, convicted as a result
of plea bargaining that reduced
the charges against him.
Under the law, the President is
the only person empowered to
grant amnesty in a criminal case.
President Chaim Herzog announc-
ed that he would not consider the
matter until all of the suspects are
tried. An aide to the President,
Ami Gluska, said Herzog would, in
any case, hear each request for
clemency separately rather than
grant a general amnesty for all
those convicted.
The Attorney General may, of
course, order a stay in the pro-
ceedings against the suspects
presently on trial here. He is not
Continued on Page 12-A
After N.Y.,N.J.
Florida's Jewish Population Third
The third largest percentage of Jews in
state population in the United States now
live in Florida. They rank only behind
New York and New Jersey as the first
and second largest Jewish populations
respectively.
This is the conclusion of the 1985
American Jewish Yearbook to be publish-
ed in June, which reports that Florida's
Jewish population showed the greatest
gain of any state in the country in 1984.
THE JEWISH population in Florida
has jumped from 479,180 to 558,820. Fur-
thermore, Jews now make up 5.2 percent
of the total state population. And, in addi-
tion Florida is one of nine states in which
the Jewish population is above the na-
tional average of 2.5 percent.
According to the Yearbook's statistics
the total Jewish population in the Unites
States is 5.817 million, and all but 6 per-
cent are Jewish by birth.


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 31,1985
Officials Agree
'Many' Released Arabs Pose Threat
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Officials here are in general
agreement that a "security
threat" is posed by many if
not all of the 600 Palesti-
nians allowed to return to
their homes in the ad-
ministered territories and in
Israel after last week's
prisoner exchange.
But some officials saw the
threat as long-term rather than
immediate. The security forces
are considered quite capable of
handling it. All of the 600 under
Israeli jurisdiction are being sum-
moned to military government
headquarters to be given tem-
porary identification cards and a
clear warning that any reversion
on their part to terrorist or other
hostile activities will be met with
swift and severe punishment.
SIMILAR WARNIGS are be-
ing given the families of the freed
prisoners and their known former
associates. The 600 comprise
more than half of the 1,150
Palestinians and other prisoners
Israel exchanged for three of its
soldiers held by the Damascus-
based Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine-General
Command, a terrorist organiza-
tion headed by Ahmed Jabril. The
balance went to Lebanon, Syria or
Libya after they were released.
Israel has engaged in such lop-
sided prisoner exchanges in the
past. But the latest one is unique
in that some of the most notorious
terrorists of the past two decades
were turned loose from Israeli
prisons where many were serving
life sentences for mass killings of
civilians.
It has triggered a serious na-
tional debate in which not only
hardliners of the far right but
many moderates are questioning
the wisdom of negotiating with a
terrorist gang in the first place
and accepting its demands for the
release of convicted murderers.
SHLOMO GOREN, coor-
dinator of government affairs in
the administered territories, said
in a radio interview that there was
a "definite possibility" of a threat
to security. Referring to the con-
victs who have returned to their
homes in the territories, Goren
said. "This is a group of people
who did not finish serving their
sentences in jail and they are
definitely liable to form to a cer-
tain extent, a security threat.
Most definitely."
But Goren said the security
forces could cope with the situa-
tion satisfactorily. He noted that
the freed men were told that they
now have a chance to lead a nor-
mal life and some may in fact try
to.
Knesset Member Binyamin Ben-
Eliezer of the Yahad party,
himself a former coordinator for
the territories, said the at-
mosphere of elation in the West
Bank and Gaza which greeted the
returned prisoners "could un-
doubtedly encourage attacks and
a wave of political subversion in
the future."
HE ADDED, "In terms of their
need to reorganize after their toil
of many years, I would imagine
that their feeling is hard. I have
no doubt that they will cope and I
hope that some of those being
released will preserve peace and
quiet ... I hope that the lesson
they learned in prison over many
years will lead them to conclude
that it is best not to repeat the
mistakes of the past and to try to
curb their activity.
But Ben-Eliezer admitted that
he spoke "with a great many
reservations. I doubt that this is
what will happen."
Goren said he did not believe the
release of terrorists would im-
prove the political situation in the
territories in a way that would
lead to political negotiations over
their future status. But, he stress-
ed, the prisoner exchange should
be seen as independent of any
political process.
GOREN SAID the government
would continue its current policy
aimed at improving the quality of
life of Arabs in the territory
regardless of the presence among
them now of convicted terrorists.
There were differences of opi-
nion among other officials. Some
maintained that lessons were
learned by many years spent in
prison. Others said that prisoners
who had been local commanders
of El Fatah before their incarcera-
tion would continue to act as
behind-the-scenes organizers of
terrorism. El Fatah is the ter-
rorist wing of the Palestine
Liberation Organization loyal to
PLO chief Yasir Arafat.
Absolutely unequivocal in their
attitude toward the prisoner ex-
change are the Gush Emunim, the
most militant of the Jewish set-
tlers in the West Bank. Long
before the exchange they were
agitating for the expulsion of all
hostile Arabs from the territory
and they are now renewing their
demands for the death penalty for
terrorists.
ONE GUSH EMUND>! leader,
Elyakim Haetzni, told a Voice of
Israel Radio reporter that the set-
tlers are collecting the names and
addresses "of the murderers who
are now among us and invite fur-
ther information about them for
the purpose of self-defense.'*
Asked what the list would be us-
ed for, Haetzni replied, "If you
walk in the street and you see one
of them by your side, I would ex-
pect you to walk on the other
side." It was not clear what
Haetzni may have been hinting.
On the Arab side there was, not
surprisingly, a totally different
reaction. Mohammad Wattad, a
Knesset member of Mapam, told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that he felt the release of the
prisoners should not be an occa-
sion to lament the fact that
murderers were freed but rather
to create a political atmosphere
that would give momentum to
political negotiations.
A similar viewpoint was ex-
pressed by Aziz Shehade, an Arab
lawyer who was active on behalf
of the prisoners. His brother,
Munir Shehade, 30. was among
the El Fatah terrorists released
last week after serving close to six
years of a sentence imposed in
1979.
Senate Passes Resolve Urging
Paraguay To Investigate Mengele
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
A sense of the Congress
resolution calling on
Paraguay to launch an "im-
mediate investigation" into
f the whereabouts of Nazi
war criminal Josef Mengele
g was passed unanimously by
the Senate.
The resolution urges the
2 Paraguayan government to ascer-
i tain whether the notorious Nazi
2 fugitive is still living in the South
g American country of which he was
a citizen for some twenty years,
and if so, to arrest him and ex-
tradite him to West Germany,
Israel or Poland all of which
have sought to bring him to
justice.
* Wanted for the murder of hun-
f dreds of thousands of Jews at the
r Auschwitz-Birkenau concentra-
tion camp, and for the gruesome
medical experiments he conducted
on inmates of the camp, Mengele
enjoyed Paraguayan citizenship
until 1979, when the government
revoked it under international
pressure.
THE RESOLUTION also calls
upon the U.S. government to
"enlist similar efforts on the part
of other regional governments,"
should a Paraguayan probe fail to
locate the German fugitive, and
requests that the President sub-
mit a report to Congress by Oc-
tober 15, of this year, detailing
Paraguay's efforts to apprehend
him, the degree to which other
countries have cooperated and the
final results of the investigation.
Sponsored jointly by Senators
Daniel Moynihan (D., N.Y.), Arlen
Specter (R., Pa.), Edward Ken-
nedy (D., Mass.), Alfonse
D'Amato (R., N.Y.), and
Claiborne Pell (R., R.I.), the
resolution was passed as an
amendment to the foreign
assistance authorization bill. It
follows an announcement by
Israel, the U.S. and West Ger-
many that the three countries are
coordinating efforts in the
worldwide search for Mengele.
In a statement, Moynihan said
the findings of the President's
report "surely will be instrumen-
tal" in determining how much, if
any, foreign aid would be provided
to Paraguay next year.
M-ft-31-85
Toby Lerner Ansin received the 1985 Mid-Life Sendees Foun
tion Award at a reception in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Saul G!o|
mann. Left to right are Ted Spak, member of the Board |
Trustees; Toby Lerner Ansin, and Dr. Sol Landau, pres
and executive director of Mid-Life Services.
Japan Lectures Israel
On Release of Okamoto
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israel has undergone
painful and humiliating experience of being lectured to bjj
foreign country about the evils and dangers of surrendfj
ing to Palestinian terrorists' blackmail.
The Ambassador of Japan, Shozo Kadota, called
Director-General of the Foreign Ministry David Kimchel
inform Israel of his country's "regret" over the release
Kozo Okamoto, who killed 27 people in a terror attack j
Ben Gurion Airport in 1972.
OKAMOTO ARRIVED in Libya from Geneva
reportedly collapsed at the airport and was taken to|
hospital.
Kimche, in response, said Israel itself "regretted th
its action had "caused concern and unease in Tokyo.
was certainly not Israel's intention .. Israel had no ch
in light of its humanitarian effort to secure the relea
of its three prisoners ..."
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Friday, May 31, 1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
New Struggle Over
Shamir Seeks Underground Releases Exchange of Prisoners
By DAVID LANDAU
. JERUSALEM (JTA) -
[Deputy Premier and Likud
[leader Yitzhak Shamir has
(taken the lead in the rising
[chorus of voices emanating
[from rightwing political
circles urging for the
| release of the members of
[the Jewish terrorist
[underground following the
{exchange of Palestinian
[prisoners for three Israeli
soldiers held by a Damascus-
|based Palestinian terrorist
I group.
, The exchange itself, mean-
I while, has come under a good deal
I of criticism but much of it is
[muted, with politicians hesitating
I to take a public stand against the
[complex prisoner exchange dur-
ing which Israel set free some
|l,100 Palestinians and others,
Ijmong them some of the most
notorious terrorist mass killers in
lite prison population for as long as
two decades.
SHAMIR, who is also the
Iforeign Minister, went public
ith his demand for the release of
i Jewish terrorists who are
trial in Jerusalem for a series
violent acts against Arab
lians on the West Bank dating
mi 1980 and conspiracy to blow
Islamic shrines on the Temple
- at a session of the
(t's Foreign Affairs and
ity Committee. These ses-
are nominally secret, but in
S non-sensitive subjects in-
My leak out at once.
Shamir said that since the
defendants some of
im have already been sentenc-
- were prepared publicly to ex-
tm remorse over their crimes
1 undertake to desist from such
ion in the future, it would be
>th right and proper to reprieve
Deputy Premier Shamir
*rr..
Coronary Center
I JERUSALEM (JTA) A
Mnter for Prevention of Risk
fMtors for Coronary Heart
sease has been established at
'Hebrew University-Hadaasah
dical School in Jerusalem. The
'center will bring together a
tnoer of researchers on heart
**se. which is the primary
s of death in Israel and the
"stem world.
This was particularly the case
now that scores of the most
heinous Arab criminals had been
set free. He made it clear that he
would take up the matter with
Premier Shimon Peres and was
demanding a debate in the
Cabinet or the inner Cabinet.
COMMERCE MINISTER
Ariel Sharon made similar
remarks to journalists in Haifa.
He said that while wholly disap-
proving of the actions of the
members of the Jewish terrorist
underground, he .supported the
release.
Sources close to the Premier
said that he was not in favor of
releasing the underground
members at present. The sources
said this reflected the views of all
the Labor Party Ministers in the
Cabinet.
However, if the issue should
come before the Cabinet, inform-
ed sources predicted that those in
favor of releasing the
underground members would win
the vote.
They pointed out that Yigal
Hurwitz of Ometz and Yosef
Shapira of Morasha had long been
advocating the reprieve of the
Jewish underground members,
and they would be joined in a vote
by Yosef Burg of the National
Religious Party and Yitzhak
Peretz of Shas thus creating a
majority, assuming all or most of
the Likud members would support
the reprieve.
ou.tl-xga.te Towers
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Free Bus Service
TECHNICALLY, Peres could
block a Cabinet debate by in-
sisting that the issue be dealt with
by the 10-man inner Cabinet
where the five Likud members
and five Labor members would
presumably square off against one
another and result in a deadlock.
If Peres took this course, though,
it could provoke a crisis in the
coalition government.
A second technical question con-
cerns the process of reprieve or
release if eventually a decision is
taken in this favor. The alleged
underground members who have
already been jailed could be
reprieved by the President of
Israel at the recommendation of
the Justice Minister. But for those
still on trial, only a decision of the
Attorney General to drop the
charges against them could bring
about their immediate release.
The Attorney General, Prof.
Yitzhak Zamir, is entirely
sovereign in this respect, and
need not take account of any deci-
sion by the Cabinet. Shamir told
the Knesset committee that if the
political support was there, the
technical-legal way would surely
be found to release the men.
IN THE CABINET, it is
reliably understood that only one
minister, Likud-Liberal member
Avraham Sharir, expressed
strong reservations over the
terms of the exchange when they
were reported to the ministers in
April. The ministers were not re-
quired to vote: the decision was
taken by the inner Cabinet, where
the vote was unanimous, and
merely reported to the full
Cabinet. Sharir reportedly press-
ed for a vote nevertheless, but he
received no support for his
demand.
Meanwhile, the Supreme Court
ruled that the 20 alleged members
of the Jewish terrorist
underground on trial must remain
in custody and refused their bail
request. Their appeal came before
the court because they have been
in custody for a full year.
Many of the wives and children
of those held in custody, joined by
friends and well-wishers, began a
hunger strike in an encampment
Continued from Page 1-A
opposite the Knesset, in an effort
to lobby for public and Knesset
support for their release.
THE TRIAL for the
underground members is drawing
to a close with summation ad-
dresses by counsel expected soon.
In the Jerusalem District Court,
defendant No. 1, Menachem Liv-
ni, said it was shameful for the
state to continue with the trial in
the wake of release of the Palesti-
nians against whom the Jewish
defendants had sought to act in
self defense. "The injustice cries
out to heaven," Livni told the
court and later repeated this to
reporters outside.
The debate over the Jewish ter-
rorists, which is quickly becoming
a left-right confrontation, has to
some extent focused public debate
away from the prisoner exchange
itself. But there is nevertheless a
discernible undercurrent of
distress, dissatisfaction and disap-
proval over the terms of the ex-
change which seems to cut across
party lines and affect Israelis of
all political hues.
While there is much understan-
ding for Defense Minister Yitzhak
Rabin's repeated assertions of
"Ein Brera" (no choice), many
persons nevertheless feel that the
price was too high especially
the decision to allow some 600 of
the released criminals to remain
in Israel, the West Bank and
Gaza.
IN THE Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee, Likud
Liberal MK Pinhas Goldstein
spoke with bitter disparagement
of two of the three Israelis releas-
ed in the exchange Yosef Groff
and Nissim Salem. The third was
Hezi Shai. Goldstein said that
Groff and Shai, who with six
Israeli POWs who were released
in the November, 1983 exchange
were captured without resisting,
should be court-martialed.
Several Knesset members
presented motions for the agenda,
but the Committee acceded to a
government request that no
debate on the prisoner exchange
be held last week. Monday, the
government itself opened a debate
on the issue with a formal state-
ment to the Knesset.
place the eight soldiers on trial.
One of them, Rafi Hazan who was
part of the 1983 prisoner ex-
change, said in a radio interview
that the IDF sent new recruits
who had hardly fired a weapon
before, to Lebanon where they
were assigned to guard and obser-
vation duties in exposed positions
without proper instructions. He
said that because of the mistakes
of their commanding officer, he
and his comrades had no choice
but to surrender.
THE MOTHER of one of the
soldiers claimed that then-Chief of
Staff Gen. Rafael Eitan had told
her they were lucky they hadn't
tried to resist because all would
have been killed on the spot. The
IDF said, meanwhile, that it
would draft new instructions for
soldiers faced with similar cir-
cumstances in the future.
West Bank
Town Curfew
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The
West Bank town of Halhoul was
placed uner curfew as a large
scale manhunt got underway for
the attackers of an Egged bus in
the vicinity.
A woman passenger suffered
slight injuries from flying glass,
but no one else was hurt when the
bus came under automatic fire
between Hebron and Halhoul. The
bus, enroute from Jerusalem to
Kiryat Arba, sustained con-
siderable damagae.
The attack was linked to the
date, May 15, which, by the
Western calendar is the day after
Israel proclaiming its in-
dependence in 1948. The last at-
tack on an Israeli bus in the West
Bank occurred on Mar. 30, "Land
Day," when Arabs protested the
confiscation of Arab-owned land
in Galilee by the Israeli authorities
in 1976.
Jewish settlers, outraged by the
attacks and the failure to capture
the perpetrators, held an
emergency meeting during which
they accused the security forces of
laxity.
There arc a lot of sound reasons for
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 31,1985
Prisoner Exchange
Pot Boils Over
Israel has always prized its IDF and
been willing to make massive prisoner of
war exchanges with its neighboring Arab
nations for just a handful of Israeli
soldiers.
Such was the case last week when Israel
traded 1,150 Arab prisoners for three IDF
soldiers. But whereas in the past these ex-
changes have been points of pride and
honor, last week's enterprise has netted a
veritable hornet's nest of political struggle
and nationwide debate.
The Unity Government is now divided
over the exchange along the predictable
lines of Labor and Likud. It is not that
either side of the division opposed the ex-
change per se. After all, as late as in
November, 1983, a similar exchange netted
six IDF held prisoners in Syria who
returned home after Israel gave up 3,000
Arabs, mostly Palestinians, confined in the
Ansar detention camp in south Lebanon.
But this time, among the 1,150 Arabs
released last week, almost all are terrorists
who were serving prison sentences in
Israel, including mass murderers serving
life terms for crimes committed in Israel.
Additionally, of the 1,150, it is reliably
estimated that some 600 have been allow-
ed to return to their homes in Israel, in-
cluding the West Bank and Gaza.
Vast Security Dimensions
There are few who will argue that the
fate of the three Israeli soldiers held cap-
tive in Damascus by the Popular Front for
the Liberation of Palestine should have
been ignored under these circumstances.
But this is the first time that massive
numbers of those Arabs for whom they
have been exchanged will now ostensibly
be free to resume their terrorist war
against the country from within.
The security dimensions of this exchange
simply stagger the imaginations of those
both in government and in Israel's popula-
tion at large. Furthermore, a collateral
issue suddenly focuses on Israeli
underground terrorists who were conduc-
ting a private war against Israel's Arabs in
retaliation for Arab terrorist acts in the
country when they were caught and charg-
ed with their own terrorist crimes.
Prime Minister Peres' Unity Government
is now being shaken by growing demands
that the Israeli terrorists, 27 in number, be
released either from serving the balance of
their sentences already pronounced upon
them or from continuing on trial for their
alleged terrorist acts.
The pressure, coming from the rightwing
opposition, argues that since Israel has just
voluntarily turned loose 1,150 convicted
Arab killers, why should Israel's
underground "warriors" be punished ac-
cording to a separate set of principles of
justice?
Last week, Prime Minister Peres seemed
prepared to stare the right wing opposition
down. This week, reports suggest that he
is seeking a legal opinion on the possible
release of alleged Jewish underground
terrorists.
It seems to us that the pressure is based
on specious reasoning. Are the 600 Israeli
Arabs returned to their homes a massive
OfrKf-lfLAKT lNriU*.ll-nilllll
PUOK.MOCHTT
auiANffi sHocHn
E>mnUa>
Ml III Watlr tnr FnrfM
n. uinrum
1 r o ,%m rm. mm
MJM
security risk? That is doubtedlessly true.
But this does not excuse an across-the-
board pardon for Jewish terrorism.
What should have been thought out more
clearly in the very beginning were the con-
sequences of the prisoner exchange. The
reaction after the fact, emotional though it
may be, is in the end an irrelevancy. If it
was all right to make the exchange in the
first place, it is not now wrong because
some Jewish terrorists are already being
punished, and others may be punished as
their trials proceed. This, too, is an
irrelevancy.
Nor is the exchange wrong after the fact
because Arab terrorists go free, while
Jewish terrorists are expected to suffer
the consequences of their criminal deeds.
This is not an irrelevancy; it lies at the
core of what democracy, in this case
Israel's democracy, is all about.
Should the Unity Government succumb
and let the Jewish underground go, it
would not solve the remaining Arab ter-
rorist security risk. But the government
would be committing a genuinely fatal er-
ror, not only with respect to what justice is
all about, but in terms of the judgment of
Idoriimlndrftthurts^
but-dontchoKeme/'
m >&
an entire civilized world which, we are
more than certain, would be as condem-
natory as it could possibly be. And rightly
so.
Florida Takes No. 3 As Leading Jewish Center
California has always impressed South
Florida as being the state where Jewish
concentrations of population would make
us the third largest in the nation behind
similar Jewish concentrations in New York
and New Jersey.
But now that encomium has in fact gone
to Jews in Florida, which means South
Florida, the state's demographics being
what they are. It does not take much
shrewdness of observation to note the
massive expansion of our Jewish communi-
ty over the past decade. Indeed, expansion
in South Florida has been the key ex-
perience here as a general rule.
The American Jewish Committee's 1985
Yearbook, due for publication in June, will
show that Florida is one of nine states in
the Union in which the Jewish population
is above the national average of 2.5
percent.
According to the 1985 Yearbook's
statistics, Florida's Jews today constitute
5.2 percent of the total state population for
a total of 558,820 Jews, up since the Year-
book's 1984 statistics showed a total of
479,180 Jews.
That is a significant rise under any cir-
cumstances. With California now out of
the running, perhaps Florida may yet over-
take New Jersey as No. 2. As for New
York, well that doesn't seem to be a
realistic possibility in the near future. Not
in anybody's book, not even the American
Jewish Committee Yearbook for 1986,
sight unseen.
Decade of Women
Meeting With Third World Bigotry
____llliai -iiiniWIMl IM ILOCl AfMI inl Fndm MCX ">"" ( MWM
Jwn S3 90 Oul ol to**, counuy. upon
Friday, May 31,4985
Volume 58
11 SI VAN 5745
Number 22
By ELINOR MALI'S
The slanderous equation
of Zionism with racism was
first made ten years ago in
Mexico City at a conference
that ushered in the United
Nations proclaimed Decade
of Women. The decade-
ending conference takes
place this summer in
Nairobi, Kenya, and Jewish
women in Israel are prepar-
ing themselves.
They are discussing issues
direc 'y related to women and to
the t. ?mes of the conference,
while a. the same time debating
and deciding on tactics to combat
the onslaught of anti-Israel, anti-
Zionist and anti-Semitic pro-
paganda that they have come to
expect at these UN sponsored
gatherings.
THEMES FOR the Decade of
Women have been global and
diverse. They are equality,
development and peace, with this
year's workshops including ones
on employment, education and
literacy, health and emergency
situations such as famines or
floods. Although an issue like na-
tional development seems distant
from women's day-to-day lives,
changes in irrigation techniques,
for example, can affect them in
concrete ways.
In many developing countries,
women gather the water and most
probably gain credit from this ac-
tivity. Modernizing these systems
by instituting new ways of
distributing water can disrupt and
possibly destroy these women's
social patterns of congregating
around the water hole. More im-
portant, these women may lose
whatever prestige they accrued
from their water-carrying work.
The major concern in Israel,
however, is that as in the past at
Mexico City and the mid-decade
conference in Copenhagen the
discussion will be diverted to
criticizing and challenging Israeli
government policies and prac-
tices. "There isn't a single subject
that cannot be twisted around to
attack Israel," said Ivria Levine,
president of the National Council
of Women's Organizations in
Israel.
HER ORGANIZATION is ac
tively preparing for the event in
Nairobi. The Council is an um-
brella organization representing
various affiliates such as Women's
International Zionist Organiza-
tion (WIZO); Na'amat, Working
and Voluntary Women's Move-
ment; and Emunah, the National
Religious Women's Organization.
"We agree that we don't work
on issues where there might be
divergence, such as abortion," ex-
plained Levine. "We all unders-
tand that we don't agree and that
the chances of us voting the same
way are minimal." The aim of the
thirty-year-old association "with
its multi-organizational non-
partisan structure is to represent
the women of Israel in interna-
tional women's forums.'' such i
the one in Nairobi.
Levine stated that the Sov
train women activists in develq
ing countries, the eastern blocai
the Arab world to participate i
feminists but whose real purpo*
is to attack Israel. She does havj
some suggestions for combarunl
"enemy tactics." Spokeswomj
must have expertise in Oiea
fields, for only when Israel
women establish expertise on
particular topic will they be Iisti
ed to on other matters.
"IF THEY try to show pic
of refugee camps, we can say I
we have bigger things to seuu*
our literacy program that benen
many women, or our educaw
material to abolish sex stereow]
ing in schools."
The representatives must
be fluent in the official langus
of the conference so that uiey
"stand up, argue and face
challenge" when neces^J
Levine added that reporting _
press conferences are impor^l
given that many people don UJ
tend the conference but seem-
ly televised news reports wr*
explosive situations are favor**
In Copenhagen in WJ*
anti-Israel attacks were
virulent that Jewish women wj
other delegations JJ'Jgl
realize that they couldntatto
ignore them. As a result, there i
much greater awareness
necessity for Jews in l*n*
Continued on Page 1*A


Friday, May 31,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
\lden Years Turning Into Tarnished Silver Hopes
By PHIL JACOBS
r^-wW BaUxmore Jevuk Times
CjZtlat Righ* R^rved
"Come grow old along
nth me, the best of things
ijtttobe."
'Most adults over the age
Lf 65 would probably agree
nth this verse from "Rabbi
Ezra," by Robert
owning. Indeed, Rosalie
director of the
viand Department of
says that about 90
.. of all older adults
taking good care of
emselves and enjoying
Jing.
I The big question, according to
_..j and other experts in her
is what about the other ten
jercent?
I Marty never thought he'd be
t of that ten percent. At age
he was in good health and
^markably good spirits even
terhe lost his wife to cancer. He
moved into a one-bedroom
ier Park Heights apartment
was planning trips to New
fork and London.
[EACH MONDAY he'd take art
at the JCC, and on
Ifcdnesday he worked as a Jewish
limily and Children Service
olunteer. His volunteer duties
lere to provide company for
, despondent men at the Con-
I House.
I this came to an unexpected
lit about a month ago whan doc-
diagnosed Marty's sudden
lach pains as colon cancer.
i now he lives with what he
ills his "time bomb." Once high
I and seemingly invincible,
ty now seems frail and
htened. He wonders what
lent wrong.
|'First of all, I never realised
at I was old." he said, clutching
I black cane and sipping water
pough a straw. He complains
at his lips are always parched.
I did things that I did ten to 15
ago without any problem
I hit 65. It's funny, I used to
f to the two ladies who lived
Wairs from me as being old.
were five years younger
i me. Age isn't chronological.
show you feel and how you act.
|g old is the same as being
% as long as you can keep on
pg."
ST KURLAND and Sarah
*r, two JFCS social workers,
1 their clients could keep on
" But they realize that it's
ning more and more difficult,
said that illness -
or emotional is the
one problem among the
Indeed, depression and
"mess have undermined the
later years in much the
!*ay as physical disorders.
n Medicare situation is
aPs the best of what
ommganin- problem
tong thin the attention of
social and home care
* To cut costs, the federal
wnment groups its payments
^""B. to illnesses or DRGs
J? Rev'ew Groups). The
Ifift W>H cover hospital
*S exPenses according
L**? ft* covers a 1 ength
' "i the hospital.
'that length of stay exceeds
"edule, Medicare makes it
a patient to stay
**> the result: more peo-
X he number of people
hitting 65 seems to increase
yearly. But the big question
is, are these good years or
are they just an extension
of misery?"
_--------------------?------------------------
pie, especially older adults, are
sent home too early.
SARAH MILLER can tell you
stories about heart attack patients
returning home to their third floor
walkup apartments. She can also
tell how the families react.
"We're seeing 350 clients a
month," she said. "And what
we're finding is that it is rough go-
ing out there. Families are being
forced into caregiver roles, and in
some cases it puts a huge strain on
the normal family life."
"You have to remember that
families are smaller, and there are
more women working," Miller
said. "But the most important
t Oometimes you hear,
that's for old people," she
said. "Well, if it's for old
people it's for everybody.
aspect of all of this is that people
are living longer."
The irony of ironies is that
millions of our elderly live longer,
but do not find much quality in
that living.
"I WOULDN'T mind being a
senior citizen if my wife hadn't
passed away," said Louis Rose,
74. "I'm in constant care myself. I
was real sick with a stomach pro-
blem. And I have to tell you, it's
not a pleasure being by yourself.
We were so close. We did
everything together."
"Life could be better if I was
well," said Sophie Kronenberg,
82, who lives two blocks from
Rose. "Doctors can be so insen-
sitive. I was once told I'd be lucky
if I died. I've been alone since my
husband died of a brain tumor.
God doesn't give you more than
you can bear, though. You get us-
ed to everything. I thank God I
can do for myself."
In 1983, there were 27.4 million
people 65 years or older in the"
U.S., or about 11.7 percent of the
total population. The number of
Photo: Craig Terkowiti
older Americans increased by 1.7
million or 6 percent since 1980,
compared to an increase of three
percent of the under-65 popula-
tion. However, the older popula-
tion itself is getting older. In
1983, the 65-74 age group (16.4
million) was more than seven
times larger than in 1900. The
75-84 group (8.5 million) was 11
times larger and the 85 plus group
(2.5 million) was 20 times larger.
Now people reaching the age of 65
can expect to live an average of
16.8 more years.
"The number of people hitting
65 seems to increase each year,"
Abrams said. "But the big ques-
tion is, are these good years or are
they just extension of misery?"
THE MISERY? It's all over the
place. Donna looked forward to
spending the golden years with
her sister, Sarah. Donna, 62, now
takes odd jobs to keep Sarah, 71,
in a nursing home. Sarah has
Alzheimer's Disease.
"We had money saved up that
we worked all of our lives for,"
said Donna, wringing her hands.
"I've lost almost all of it. I need it
to pay her bills. When I lose all of
it except for $2,500 then maybe I
can get Medicaid."
Then there's Barry, who is too
weak to do anything but watch TV
and read the newspaper. His big
outing is a visit to the
Reisterstown Road Plaza. He's
lucky, though, his son and
daughter-in-law bring the grand-
children over at least once a week.
The colorful toys in his living
room seem out of place next to the
older, frayed furniture.
"Growing old is not what I
thought it would be," Barry said.
"I wanted to do so much more. I
take walks, but I have to watch
myself. I have heart trouble."
Barry also has trouble coping
with loneliness; the problems of a
broken heart. After his wife died,
his life, he said, "stalled."
YOU MIGHT SAY that
Jerome's life "stalled," too. In
this case, the able-bodied 70-year-
old was taking care of his wife,
Mildred, a multiple sclerosis suf-
ferer. He would dress her, feed
her, bathe her, prop her up in a
chair to watch television and then
put her to bed. The doctors came
and went, all pretty much
acknowledging that there was
nothing more they could do.
The final straw came when
Mildred suffered a stroke.
Aphasia garbled her speech. After
communicating for 45 years of
marriage, she was reduced to ex-
pressions in her eyes. When she
did speak, the words were usually
inaccurate. She'd call a pizza a
"peacock." She forgot her son's
first name.
"There's a lot of people out
there like that," Abrams said.
"These people and their families
need managing, they need help.
You need a cadre of support ser-
vices. The state has just got to im-
prove its services and we're work-
ing on that. I think almost
everyone knows someone elderly
who is suffering or feeling
hopeless."
Abrams is also concerned that
not everyone who needs help is be-
ing reached.
"I think you have to remember
that most older people are doing
well," she said.
"BUT THERE are those who
obviously are having problems.
Besides health problems, they
worry about a freeze in their
social security cost of living in-
creases. You know. Social Securi-
ty was supposed to be a supple-
ment, but so many people are
making it their whole existence."
Marty, who needs his Social
Security check to make ends
meet, recounted a scene at a local
pharmacy not long ago. "I was in
line behind an old man. He had put
in orders for two prescriptions.
The total was ove: $50. When he
found out the bill, hs only had one
of them filled. He said he needed
the rest for food."
Still most of the older people in-
terviewed said that being over 65
was better now than ever, largely
because of Medicare and social
security benefits.
"Every older person should give
silent thanks to LBJ (President
Lyndon B. Johnson) for
Medicare," Marty said. "Despite
all of our problems, I think the
government is doing good by old
people."
BELLE GOLDSMITH, 68,
would carry it one step further.
She believes that life in general is
better for old people. Goldsmith
feels she didn't truly start living
until she reached 50. That was
when she started singing in a JCC
folk group. Next came a health
club membership and then her
membership as a clown in Clowns
of America.
She calls herself the spirited
clown philosopher, and she spends
a great deal of her life cheering up
others at the Northwest Senior
Center.
"It's so much better to be over
65 in 1985," said Goldsmith.
"There's so much to do and so
much to give. Just because you're
over 65 doesn't mean it's time to
start thinking about dying. It's
the exact opposite. It's time to
grow. I can't wait until I'm 80 or
90, so I can prove that you can be
happy at that age."
GOLDSMITH, who has an in-^.
fectiously positive attitude and ah *^
Continued on Page 13-A "*


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. May 31,1986
New Cardinal
Dachau Was 'Compelling' Experience
NEW YORK Wearing
a red skullcap he had been
given as he entered the
sanctuary, Cardinal John J.
O'Connor told some 2,500
members and guests of Sut-
ton Place Synagogue last
week that his visit to
Dachau was "the most com-
pelling experience of my
life."
Cardinal O'Connor, who flew
to Rome last week for his in-
vestiture as a Prince of the
Church, was warmly received by
the Jewish audience in the open-
ing event of the synagogue's
Jewish Town Hall series. It was
his first appearance in a
synagogue since becoming
Archbishop of New York over a
year ago.
ASKED BY Rabbi David B.
Kahane of Sutton Place
Synagogue to comment on the
results of President Reagan's visit
to Germany, O'Connor replied:
"Perhaphs some good did come
from it after all. President
Reagan seems to have understood
more deeply the agony of the
Jewish people. But we must con-
tinue to make clear to him that it
was a mistake to go to Bitburg
and that the horror of the
Holocaust must never be
forgotten."
The Catholic leader called the
Holocaust "a mystery that can
never be washed away, any more
than the Crucifixion can be wash-
ed away. Let it be seared into
every heart and every being, so
that each of us will remember to
Lessons
Are Ignored
Cardinal John J. O'Connor of New York accepts a red yarmidke
from Rabbi David B. Kahane of the Sutton Place Synagogue
before joining him on the 'bimah 'for wide-ranging dialogue in the
synagogue's Jewish Town Hall series. The meeting occurred
prior to O'Connor's vestiture as Cardinal by Pope John Paul II
in ceremonies at the Vatican last Sunday.
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
lessons learned from the Lebanon
war are not being applied to the
Israel Defense Force, State Com-
ptroller Yitzhak Tunik charged in
a report highly critical of the
General Staff and the defense
establishment.
The 90-page report expressed
concern about the cumulative ef-
fects on the IDF's operational
capability as a result of defense
budget cuts and the war in
Lebanon and the General Staffs
lack of emphasis on the lessons
learned. According to Tunik, the
chief of Staffs demand that every
change in training programs must
be brought to him personally for
prior approval makes the process
cumbersome.
He found that the General Staff
has neither set priorities nor pro-
vided the wherewithal for the
lessons to be incorporated into
doctrine. Although the IDF has
been increased in size, its training
budget has been reduced with pro-
found effects on the quality of the
army, particularly its reserve
forces, the comptroller said.
He criticized the shortage of
simulators which would allow
reservists to train at their bases '
rather than going into the field for
training in tanks and other expen-
sive heavy equipment. The report
quotes the head of the IDF's Man-
power Division that the already
serious problem of skilled man-
power will worsen because of
budget cuts and competition form
the civilian sector of industry.
The report found no coordina-
tion between the army and the
education system to solve the
growing lack of qualified, skilled
technical manpower. It recom-
ments the creation of a national
body to deal specifically with the
need for skilled manpower in the
armed forces.
look at every other human as so-
meone made in the image and
likeness of God," he said.
IN RESPONSE to a question
on the effectiveness of demon-
strations for Soviet Jewry,
Cardinal O'Connor replied,
"These demonstrations are
tremendously important because
their ultimate impact is in
Washington. We must make it
consistently clear that concern for
Soviet Jewry in this country is a
serious matter, and that our
government must respond. This is
a valid and legitimate way to in-
fluence the makers of foreign
policy -- and we must never
falter."
The Cardinal had greeted mar-
chers from the steps of St
Patrick's Cathedral during the
Soviet Jewry solidarity day
demonstration on May 5.
On Catholic-Jewish relations,
Cardinal O'connor said he was
"gratified but not satisfied" at the
progress made since the Vatican
Council acted 20 years ago in issu-
ing Nostra Aetate.
"We have come far, but there is
still far to go" in strengthening
understanding between Jews and
Catholics, the Catholic prelate
said, adding:
"WE CATHOLICS have a ma-
jor responsibility to stop playing
games and come to grips with the
reality of our teaching. If we are
really to be Catholics, we must
recognize the value, the authen-
ticity and the reality of Judaism.
"Catholicism flowered out of
Judaism, Catholicism is rooted in
Judaism. To be a closet hater of
Jews, or to discriminate against
Jews, is profoundly sinful. That is
the lesson of Nostra Aetate and
that is what we must emphasize in
our own teachings."
On the issue of religion and
politics, in which the leader of
New York's Catholic community
has been a controversial figure,
Cardinal O'Connor said he felt
it was his duty as a priest "to
teach and preach."
HE CONTINUED: "We cannot
stop teaching and preaching at
election time because there is
always an election going on in this
great democracy of ours. If what I
say disagrees with a candidate's
position on an issue, I will not and
cannot be silent simply because
there is an election.
"THAT DOES not mean that I
favor or oppose any political can-
didate. But I do have the right to
say that certain ideas are, in my
judgment, bad for the body politic
or violations of fundamental prin-
ciples of my faith.
"The clergyman does not lose
his rights as a citizen when he
enters the church. Indeed, it is his
right and obligation to express his
views, so long as he makes clear
these are his personal views and
not the views of the church.
"Telling the clergy not to speak
out at election time is the Soviet
way, not the American way," he
declared.
Border Police Officer Dismissed
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Police Minister Haim Barlev has
approved the recommended
dismissal of Border Police officer
Meir Lavie for allowing prisoners
in his custody to stop off for a
swim while enroute from a cour-
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Canada Inquiry Commission Hears
Testimony on Nazi Criminals
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA) -
A Federal Commission of
Inquiry into Nazi war
criminals living in Canada
heard testimony here from
representatives of Canadian
Jewry, law enforcement and
immigration officials and an
attorney for local Ukrainian
organizations which object
vehemently to evidence
against war criminals from
Soviet bloc sources.
The one-man commission, con-
sisting of former Quebec Superior
Court Justice Jules Deschenes,
was told by Mc Gill University law
professor Irwin Cotler that there
is evidence that Canadian im-
migration officials "however in-
advertently," facilitated the entry
of Nazi war criminals into Canada
after World War II.
THAT ASSERTION was con-
firmed by Randolph Schramm,
Assistant Commissioner of the
Royal Canadian Mounted Police
(RCMP), and George O'Leary,
chief of the Immigration Depart-
ment's Guidelines Division, who
also appeared at the hearings at
the Queen Elizabeth Hotel.
Cotler, a prominent jurist and
legal consultant, testified on
behalf of the Canadian Jewish
Congress, along with Alan Rose,
the CJC's executive vice presi-
dent. He cited as an example
Helmut Rauca who was ex-
tradited to West Germany in 1983
to face trial on charges of com-
plicity in the murders of 11,000
Lithuanian Jews.
Rauca, who died before the trial
began, lived openly in Canada for
20 years under his own name,
Cotler pointed out. He said, "If no
criminals are brought to justice
there will be those who say there
were no crimes."
LEADERS OF Canadian Jewry
are urging the commission to
recommend legislative measures
that would lead to the
denaturalization, deportation and
prosecution of war criminals in
Canada. Rose called their
presence in the country "a moral
stain" and made an impassioned
plea for action against those "guil-
||K| SUPERVISION
ty of the most terrible crimes mi
the history of barbarisn;."
He said "War criminals shouj
not be allowed to receive as J
perverse reward for their acts, thel
Canadian citizenship I
of us. There an I
dwelling amongst us I
be brought to justic.-. I
that the Canadian government]
"lack of initiative in pursuingtsJ
matter over the 11 .,^1
been a major disappointment to|
the Canadian Jewish Congress"
SCHRAMM testified that the!
RCMP did not begin serious in|
vestigations of alleged Nazi warl
criminals in Canada until 1982 -I
20 years after an official policy on
war criminals was promulgated on l
September 26, 1962. He said thel
RCMP officers had been in-1
structed not to conduct investiga-l
tions unless they received explicit I
instructions to do so from RCMP |
headquarters in Ottawa.
He attributed this to concern 1
that individuals and organizations I
seeking to trace and punish warl
criminals would try to use thel
RCMP as an investigative agency!
for their own purposes. He said
that policy was revised in July,!
1975, to allow investigation of im-l
migration violations in cases I
where extradition was possible,!
through diplomatic channels or by I
request from a foreign police force I
with which the RCMP had good]
relations.
Schramm said it was not until
1982 that the RCMP began in-
vestigating leads provided by 1
private citizens about alleged Nan |
war criminals in Canada.
O'LEARY testified that all Ger-1
man nationals were officially
denied entry into Canada until
1950 but after that date the rules
were gradually eased and
automatic rejection of former
Nazi party members and the ban
on former members of the SS and |
Waffen SS was removed in 1955.
But even before 1950, thel
screening was "patchy." O'Leary i
said, because the Canadian
government was anxious to
receive new immigrants. After |
1955 there was no screening; ap-
plicants for admission to Canada
were judged on their own merits,
he told Deschenes.
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Friday, May 31, 1986 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
following Bitburg
W. German, Jewish Leaders Seek Reconciliation
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Following the gradual
atement of the furor and
tiest that flared over
resident Reagan's recent
sit to the West German
ilitary cemetery at Bit-
g, West Germany's Am-
,sador to the U.S. and
Jjers of B'nai B'rith In-
*mational have offered
jestures of reconciliation
jeween West Germany and
merican Jews.
"Let us build a solid, long-term
isis for our relationship so that
bidden eruptions like the painful
lebate of the last few weeks can
t avoided,'' Ambassador Gun-
uOT van Well urged the B'nai
B'rith Board of Governors in an
iddress on "The German-Jewish
ielationship After Bitburg" at
heir annual meeting.
[QUOTING FROM a con-
atory speech by West German
esident Richard von Weiz-
icker delivered following the
,.:burg visit. Well stressed his
wuntry's commitment to keeping
ilive the memories of the
Holocaust.
But he also appealed for the
Strengthening of the German-
nerican Jewish relationship as a
leans to enhance the awareness
mong Germans of the Jewish
iltural life that thrived in Ger-
any before Hitler's rise to
ewer, and the shared cultural
Jid spiritual heritage of Germans
I many Jews in this country.
The reestablishment of dialogue
md the rebuilding of ties has been
less successful with American
Pevry than with Israel, the Am-
dor said. Citing the efforts
|f figures such as the late Israeli
rime Minister David Ben Gurion
I Leo Baeck, the late German
Jewish leader who, on returning
cm the Theresienstadt concen-
ation camp, was the first to call
ir the reinstitution of B'nai
B'rith in Europe, Well said:
"THEIR OBJECTIVES and
ftandards remain valid for us.
"hey knew that it was not possible
imply to carry on where the past
pt off. But this did not prevent
Tm, on the basis of a shared
cultural heritage, from talking to
each other, from establishing
German-Jewish relations in a slow
process of getting closer to each
other.
This process has been more in-
tensive with Israel than with
American Jewry. We would wish
that the troubling painful discus-
sion of the last few weeks leads
American Jews to join us in new
determined efforts to establish
closer links between the Federal
Republic of Germany and
American Jewish communities."
During a meeting with
reporters that followed the Am-
bassador's address, B'nai B'rith
Internaional executive vice presi-
dent Daniel Thursz said that
unlike Israel, "The American
Jewish community has not yet
come to terms with
reconciliation."
"THERE HAS been sort of an
intellectual iron curtain and
we have not dealt with it," Thursz
said, observing that many
American Jews still refuse to visit
West Germany or to buy its pro-
ducts." In a crazy kind of way,
Bitburg, I think, can begin that
process," Thursz suggested.
On the visit to Bitburg itself and
the bitterness that the controver-
sy aroused. Well maintained that
the favorable German response to
von Weizsaecker's speech best
reflected public opinion in this
country. Weizsaecker stressed in
his speech that no German who
lived through the period of World
War II can claim to have been
unaware of what was being done
to the Jews, and he warned that
"there can be no reconciliation
without remembrance."
The German Ambassador said.
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in a question-and-answer session,
that some anti-Semitic comments
picked up by the press in Germany
in response to the Jewish protests
against the Bitburg visit
represented the sentiments of a
small minority.
"THERE HAVE been a few ex
treme reactions of a limited sort,
but it does not reflect the basic
feeling of the country. That basic
feeling I think is reflected by the
response to von Weizsaecker's
speech," Well said.
In his meeting with reporters
Well avoided commenting on
whether the visit to Bitburg
should have been cancelled early
on, but he said. "I certainly would
have thought that we could have
avoided some of the
misunderstandings." He declined
to specify what he thought the
misunderstandings were and how
they could have been avoided.
Despite Argentine Democratic
Change, Anti-Semitism on Rise
members of the community."
Goldberg noted that during a re-
cent soccer game a Nazi banner
with a swastika was raised. "All
this does not just happen. It is a
well-orchestrated campaign
undertaken by anti-democratic
sectors and this is why society as a
whole must forcefully react to
such incidents." He added: "We
know that anti-Semitic organiza-
tions are active in Argentina."
The Jewish community has also
been shaken by the non-
fulfillment of the planned visit of
President Raul Alfonsin to Israel,
the WJC further reported. Since
the beginning of the year it had
been understood that the head of
the Argentine government would
visit the Jewish State in June
either before or after his presence
in Geneva to address the Interna-
tional Labor Organization.
HOWEVER, hardly had Alfon-
sin ended his American tour when
the Foreign Ministry announced
that "it had never been foreseen
that the President would make an
official visit to Israel," which in
turn led to a statement by the
Israeli Ambassador that "the in-
vitation (to visit Israel) had been
accepted" but no definite date had
been set.
Third World expectations about
Argentine diplomacy evidently
prevailed in this matter, and in
particular, considerations concer-
ning United Nations votes and the
role which Argentina believes it
can play among the non-aligned
countries.
Jewish Jewish National Fund
{VnS2(*1 (Keren Kayemeth Leisrael)
Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
SUPPORT THE JNF
BUENOS AIRES -
(JTA) A year-and-a-half
after the democratic change
in regime in Argentina, the
recurrence of anti-Semitism
and the weakening of
Argentine-Israeli relations
have come to be major con-
cerns of Jewish communal
leadership here, the World
Jewish Congress reports.
According to the Latin
American branch of the WJC, the
Jewish community remains one of
the most enthusiastic supporters
of the Alfonsin government, but
its enthusiasm has been tempered
by its concern with not only rising
anti-Semitism in the country but a
perceptible shift away from Israel
by Argentina in its Middle East
policy.
THESE JEWISH fears were
expressed during a meeting bet-
ween the Minister of Interior, An-
tonio Troccoli, and represen-
tatives of the DAIA, the represen-
tative body of Argentine Jewry
and the WJC affiliate here.
Following the meeting, the Presi-
dent of the DAIA, David
Goldberg, told reporters:
"There is an anti-Semitic escala-
tion in the country, with a clear
anti-democratic connotation,
which finds expression in attacks
against synagogues, Jewish
schools and cultural centers, graf-
fiti in central streets, and
anonymous telephone and written
threats against leaders and other
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, May 31, 1985
Historic Confab
Jews, Blacks Eye Mutual Concerns
Bonn Examines Making Illegal
Efforts of Nazi Revisionists
By
DR. HERBERT BAUMGARD
An historic conference was held
May 5-7 in Washington for 80
black and Jewish leaders from all
across the country under the
auspices of the Kivie Kaplan
Human Relations Institute, a joint
instrumentality of the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People (NAACP). the
oldest and largest civil rights
organization, and the Union of
American Hebrew Congregations
(UAHC), the central body of 800
Reform synagogues in America.
Among those in attendance
were Leroy Thompson, president
of the Opa-Locka chapter of
NAACP, and myself.
FOR TWO DAYS, beginning on
May 5, the 10th anniversary of
Kivie Kaplan's death, national and
regional staff of the organization,
together with black and Jewish
leaders from 18 target cities, ex-
amined issues of mutual concern
and discussed ways to strengthen
ties between the two
communities.
Among issues of shared concern
are the destruction of social pro-
grams by the Reagan budget, the
attempted dismantling of civil
rights enforcement by the U.S.
Justice Department, threats to
separation of Church and state,
the security of the State of Israel,
and the desperate need for job
programs, especially for minority
young people.
We came together for this con-
Increased
Capital
TELL AVIV Bank fuer Ge-
meinwirtschaft AG (BFG) of
Frankfurt and Bank Hapoalim
have invested 28 million Deutsche
Marks to increase the capital of
Israel Continental Bank Ltd., it
was announced here.
The West German bank, one of
the largest in that country, has in-
vested ten million Deutsche
Marks and Bank Hapoalim, one of
Israel's two major banking
groups, 18 million Deutsche
Marks in the joint venture which
was established in 1974 to
facilitate Israel's growing
worldwide trade.
Dr. Herbert Baumgard is
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Am in South Miami. Dr.
Baumgard has written this ar-
ticle for The Jewish Floridian.
ference at a time when events of
great significance to us were tak-
ing place. Together, we spoke out
against the evil of apartheid in
South Africa and against the
persecution of Jews in the Soviet
Union. Together we opposed
President Reagan's visit to
Bitburg.
ON MAY 7, we and the entire
Kivie Kaplan Conference
demonstrated at the Justice
Department to bear witness to our
profound opposition to the
systematic effort of the Justice
Department to unravel civil rights
enforcement, to gut affirmative
action programs which are func-
tioning smoothly in Indianapolis
and many other communities with
the full support of city officials
and the community.
For the Administration to im-
pose its blind ideological obsession
upon American cities against their
wishes is dangerous and
repressive. It is certain to open
old wounds, to kindle conflict and
tension, and to undermine good-
faith plans patiently and carefully
negotiated over many years in
scores of communities.
We found that black-Jewish
cooperation in local communities
continues and expands
throughout America. The NAACP
and the UAHC agreed on a pro-
gram of action to be implemented
through the Institute which will
include:
A joint legislative program
dealing with South Africa,
economic justice, church-state
separation and many other issues;
An effort to develop programs
to send black and Jewish
youngsters to Africa and Israel on
specially prepared educational
missions;
A plan to bring black and
Jewish young people together in
joint programmatic activities;
Continued strong support for
affirmative action, including pro-
grams utilizing goals and
timetables; and
A plan to extend and expand
Black-Jewish dialogue in local
communities utilizing the model
we used at our conference.
At the close of the "conference,
the participants unanimously
agreed that, upon returning to our
communities, we would commit
ourselves to accelerating black
and Jewish cooperative endeavors
on local, state and national levels
to effect societal change.
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WOLFGANG WEBER
BONN (DaD) Since
the few survivors were
freed at the war's end in
1945, the genocide of six
million Jews by the Nazis
has been a proven fact.
Legal rulings in the Federal
Republic of Germany brook
no doubt on this point.
Yet individual right-wing ex-
tremists and small groups of neo-
Nazi fanatics still publicly deny
that Jews were murdered or seek
to make light of the fact. Some
have already been found guilty
and sentenced in German courts,
but only if a suit was filed against
them by an individual or in-
dividual Jewish citizens.
LEGAL provisions are now
planned, and keenly debated, to
more actively discourage what has
come to be styled the Auschwitz
lie.
The idea of making it an indic-
table offence to claim that Jews
were not systematically gassed at
Auschwitz and other concentra-
tion camps was first launched by
the Schmidt government and has
been retabled by Chancellor
Kohl's three-party coalition of
Christians and Free Democrats.
Political parties in the Bonn
Bundestag are agreed that Jewish
survivors of the Nazi concentra-
tion camps must be spared the ig-
nominy of having to file rival
lawsuits on behalf of the dead i
it were.
are not
POLITICIANS
agreed whether publicly disraC
or making light of Nazi eenociri.
''
should

genocide
m future automatical
rank as a criminal offence as unr
ed by the Jewish community
particular.
Opponents of this idea say that
legal provisions and lawsuits are
ill-suited to gain acceptance of
historic truth. Education, par-
ticularly at school, is the only way
people can be persuaded to'come
to terms with the past
Besides, they argue, making the
Auschwitz lie a criminal offence
that is not just actionably but
mandatorily actionable, will mere-
ly provide right-wingers with a
welcome opportunity of gaining
publicity in court cases.
HEINZ GALINSKI. head of I
the Jewish community in Berlin
(West), says there can be no argu-
ing, politically speaking, with peo-
ple who simply don't want to|
know better. He stakes
"political and moral claim" to I
making it an offence to dispute or
challenge the facts of the Nazi |
Holocaust.
Genocide of the Jews as practic-
ed by the Nazis was something
unique, he argues, and cannot be
put on a par with other acts of |
violence. It calls for special
counter-measures.
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Friday, May 31,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 31, 1985
Lavie To Take Over UJA
Operations from Retiring Vinitsky
NEW YORK Am-
bassador Naphtali Lavie,
Israel's Consul General in
New York, has been named
director general of United
Jewish Appeal operations in
Israel commencing Sept. 1.
Lavie succeeds Chaim Vinit-
sky who will retire after 50
years of distinguished ser-
vice as the United Jewish
Appeal's representative in
Israel.
The announcement was made in
Los Angeles by UJA National
Chairman Alexander Grass and
President Stanley Horowitz. "The
UJA has conducted a worldwide
search for an outstanding Jewish
statesman and leader to direct our
activities and operations in
Israel." they said jointly.
"We are gratified that Naphtali
Lavie will bring his considerable
talents to an exceptionally
challenging assignment. His ap-
pointment marks a new phase in
the interaction of the United
Jewish Appeal and its widespread
American Jewish constituency
with the people of Israel, and we
are confident that he will do an
outstanding job," they said.
LAVIE WAS introduced to the
United Jewish Appeal national
vice chairman at an officers
meeting held last week in Los
Angeles.
"Through United Jewish Ap-
peal," said Lavie, "American
Jews express their solidarity with
other Jews and with the values of
our tradition. I have long admired
the United Jewish Appeal's
magnificent accomplishments and
commitment to Jewish causes,
and consider it a privilege to serve
in this new capacity."
Lavie, the son of a rabbi, was
bom in Poland. He spent the war
years in Nazi concentration camps
and was freed from Buchenwald
in 1945. Immediately thereafter,
he and his brother went to Israel.
In 1946, he joined the Haganah
and fought in Israel's War of In-
dependence. After the establish-
ment of the State, he was sent to
Eastern Europe to assist in bring-
ing Jewish refugees, including
many children, to Israel.
BEGINNING A career as a
journalist, he later served for 14
years as news editor and senior
correspondent for Haaretz, one of
Israel's leading newspapers.
At the request of Moshe Dayan,
he served as spokesman and ad-
visor to the Minister of Defense
and he continued in that same role
when Shimon Peres succeeded
Dayan as Defense Minister. In
1977. Lavie was appointed
spokesman of the Foreign
Ministry and Advisor to the
Foreign Minister on Public Af-
fairs, serving Moshe Dayan and
his successor, Yitzhak Shamir.
Lavie participated directly in all
phases of the peace negotiations
between Egypt and Israel.
In 1981, he was appointed Con-
sul General of Israel in New York.
In this demanding assignment, he
was an articulate advocate of
Israel's cause before diverse au-
diences, including world
statesmen, visiting dignitaries.
New York's Jewish community
and the media.
AS DIRECTOR-GENERAL of
UJA's operations in Israel, Lavie
will direct a wide range of ac-
tivities including programs of
overseas missions, public rela-
tions, Project Renewal, and
leadership seminars. In addition,
he will serve as the representative
of the national chairman, presi-
dent, and other leaders of the
United Jewish Appeal.
Lavie is the author of the first
biography of Moshe Dayan,
published in 1968. He is married
to the former Joan Lunzer of Lon-
don. They are the parents of four
children.
Israel, WZO Offers Million
Reward for Info on Mengele
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Justice Minister Moshe
Nissim announces that the
Israel government and the
World Zionist Organization
will jointly offer a $1 million
reward for information that
would lead to the capture,
arrest and trial in Israel of
Josef Mengele, the
notorious Auschwitz death
camp doctor.
In making the announcement in
the Knesset, Nissim observed that
the capture of Mengele is now
more important than ever because
of a world-wide trend to play
down and even forget Nazi
crimes. This was an indirect
reference to President Reagan's
visit to the Bitburg military
cemetery in West Germany where
members of the Waffen SS are
buried along with other German
war dead.
THE WEST German govern-
ment has already offered a
$300,000 reward for information
as to Mengele's whereabouts.
Million dollar rewards for the
same information have been of-
fered by the Los Angeles-based
Simon Wiesenthal Center and by
the Washington Times, a conser-
vative newspaper.
Mengele, who performed in-
human, crippling and frequently
fatal medical experiments on
Auschwitz inmates, earning him
the title "Angel of, Death," is
reported to be living in Paraguay,
under the protection of the
military government there.
The U.S. Department of Justice
has said it will make a major effort
to track down Mengele, in
cooperation with the Israeli
authorities.
NISSIM SAID anyone will be
eligible for the reward except
employes of the Israeli govern-
ment or any other government or
of public bodies in Israel. A
reward committee has been set up
whose findings will be final and
not subject to appeal.
The members of the committee
include Nissim, Knesset Speaker
Shlomo Hillel, Justice Moshe Lan-
dau, former President of the
Supreme Court; Moshe Etzioni,
president of the WZO's Supreme
Court; and former Attorney
General Gideon Hausner, who
prosecuted Nazi war criminal
Adolf Eichmann in 1961.
Earlier, Nissim sharply criticiz-
ed Reagan without mentioning
the President by name. He said:
"We were recently witness to
declarations of reconciliation and
conciliation toward those who car-
ried out the greatest atrocities
since the dawn of mankind. If the
leader of the free world, the head
of the greatest friend fo Israel,
can say that the members of the
German Wehrmacht were the vic-
tims of the Third Reich to the
same extent as the concentration
camp inmates, this hair-raising
declaration should shock any
civilized person."
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hembers of the Jewish Women's Political
mfarus meet in Washington far a status
hfwrt from their congregational represen-
Em on pending legislation. From left are
Kep. Larry Smith, Marian Spear, Evelyn
Schengrund, Doris Drexel, Betty Shalloway,
Rep. Dante Fascell, Hermione Spahn, Jody
KimmeU, Carolyn Kimmell, Rep William
Lehman.
-Device Smuggling?
Israel Fears for U.S. Aid Future
By YORAM KESSEL
(Jerusalem)
I And WOLF BLITZER
(Washington)
Lmdon Chronicle Syndicate
is desperately try-
play down an alleged
t to smuggle krytrons
devices which can be
i the manufacture of
weapons out of
i|. United States and into
Future U.S. aid to
could be seriously
Israeli Defense Ministry
|kesman has confirmed that a
in number" of krytrons
! brought to Israel between
) and 1983. but stressed that
Jhad been used in the research
pment of conventional
ions only.
HE SPOKESMAN said that
e of the krytrons had been us-
ed, while others were still in stock.
None had been sent out of Israel
again for use by other countries,
Newsweek, claimed in a report.
Shimon Peres, the Israeli Prime
Minister, denied that Israel had
been involved in any plot to smug-
gle krytrons out of the U.S.
The extremely close U.S.-Israeli
relationship meant that Israel did
not have to use clandestine means
to obtain such high-technology
devices.
The man allegedly involved in
the secret plot is an Israeli film en-
trepreneur and businessman, Ar-
non Milchan, who is well-known
for having conducted various
arms deals.
MILCHAN DESCRIBED as
ludicrous attempts to create an
impression that he had been in-
volved "in some sort of fantasy
secret nuclear arms deal."
Newsweek said that, when
Milchan was contacted in Paris,
House Approves Free Trade
Area Over 10-Year Period
I WASHINGTON (JTA) The House has approved
rsw vote the bill establishing a Free Trade Area bet-
VEi ^ the U"S- The m' which would eliminate
i ana other trade barriers in phases over a 10-year
, was also approved unanimously last week by the
ate finance Committee.
Je agreement was signed in a ceremony April 22 by
former Oof ommerce and Industry Ariel Sharon
lE d LS- Trade Representative William Brock.
*Ee erf aigan submitted it immediately to Congress
nas 60 days to approve it.
he insisted that he knew nothing
about the alleged plan.
He said that his family's
business in Tel Aviv, Milchan
Brothers, might be involved, but
he himself had had no association
with the company for 12 years.
The case could have serious im-
plications for Israel. An amend-
ment attached to the pending
Foreign Aid Bill would cut off all
U.S. financial assistance to any
country found guilty of attemp-
ting to smuggle out of America
material involved in the produc-
tion of nuclear weapons.
IRONICALLY, that amend-
ment was introduced by
Representative Stephen Solarz
(D., N.Y.), who is one of Israel's
best friends in Congress.
Another amendment, the
Helms-Hecht amendment, seeks
to require the U.S. State Depart-
ment to include Jewish settlers on
the West Bank and in the Gaza
Strip in the foreign aid allocation.
In specific terms, it would order
the $17 million due to be alloted to
American private, voluntary
organizations working on the
West Bank and Gaza Strip to be
available for Jews as well as
Palestinians on a percentage
basis.
IN THE PAST, the U.S. has
always opposed any financial
assistance for Jewish settlement
in the occupied territories.
Israel's hopes of co-producing
three diesel -powered submarines
with the U.S. have suffered a ma-
jor setback, after the House of
Representatives Armed Services
Committee approved an amend-
ment barring any U.S. financial
subsidy for such foreign projects.
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Friday, May 31,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Israeli To Help Rocket
Hornets Into Space
Continued from Page 1-A
the same manner they do on
earth? Or will these combs be
larger, smaller or built at a dif-
ferent angle?
Will space travel affect the
hornets' unusual capability to con-
vert sunlight into electricity? On
Earth, this capability provides
power for their natural air-
conditioning units, which help
them survive in the 110-degree
heat found near the Dead Sea.
Will the hornets work
together, as they do on Earth, or
will they become disoriented and
abandon their cooperative
instincts?
Will the hornet's unhatched
young, or pupae, still emit a
"hunger signal" a rhythmic
beat emerging from the comb
when they are hungry in space?
I shay, 54, said the hornets were
expected to be sent up sometime
between July and October, 1986.
His shuttle project will mark the
first time that the Israel Space
Agency and the National
Aeronautics and Space Ad-
ministration (NASA) have col-
laborated on a space mission.
ISHAY SAID the hornets
would be enclosed in a box about
the size of a large typewriter case
that will be stationed on the mid-
deck, near the front of the space
shuttle.
He said 10 hornets would be
enclosed in each of 18 compart-
ments inside the metal locker. The
temperature will be kept at about
84 degrees a condition the
hornets are used to in their
natural habitat of the Middle
East, East Africa and India.
"We are using Oriental hornets
because they are the only species
of hornets that builds a comb in
laboratory conditions and without
a queen," he said. "Within four to
six days after they are sent up, we
expect them to have built a
comb."
ORIENTAL hornets normally
attach their comb to the roof of a
small chamber in the ground and
then build downward, toward the
center of gravity. In laboratory
experiments, they have been able
to detect as little as a thousandth
of Earth's gravity, Ishay said.
Ishay believes that the insects
will build their combs in a similar
fashion in the space shuttle. He
will test his hypothesis in a
number of ways.
Some of the hornets will be
housed in darkness and others will
be bathed in light to see whether
light affects the way they build.
THE HORNETS also will be
placed inside three different-
shaped containers box-shaped,
egg-shaped and domed-shaped
to see where they attach their
combs.
Ishay said he was not worried
that the hornets would die in
space, becuase of their unusual
abilities to adapt. In laboratory
experiments, they have survived
up to 500 times the gravity found
on Earth, he said.
Contrary to the case on some
past shuttle flights, NASA of-
ficials are not requiring the Tel
Aviv University professor to
remove the hornets' stingers
event though the venom of 40 to
50 Oriental hornets is potent
enough to kill a person.
"Oriental hornets are one of the
most dangerous types of
hornets," Ishay said. "But don't
worry. There is no chance that
they will be able to escape."
Reprinted by permission of
the Philadelphia Enquirer
Jerusalem
Largest City
TEL AVIV (JTA) In the 18
years since reunification,
Jerusalem has become the largest
city in Israel with the largest
Jewish population, according to
data released by the Central
Bureau of Statistics.
At the end of 1984, the popula-
tion of Jerusalem stood at 445,000
of whom 320,000 are Jewish and
about 125,000 non-Jewish. The
population of Tel Aviv-Jaffa as
323,000 of whom 313,000 are
Jews.
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me. Esther. 635-6554
and let me quote you
rates Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
fms
:s Summer at
Get away to
a summer ful of fun and unlimited
recreation: golf, tennis, swimming, boating
and Ashing. There's day camp for the kids plus an
activity-filled teen program. And all through the summer.
Monday to Friday, well be conducting Computer Education
Seminars. Full American Plan- three meals daily
JULY 4th WEEKEND. July 4-7
Starring Helen Roddy-July 6.
SOAP OPERA WEEKEND, July 12-14
Meet and get autographs of soap stars John
Gabriel (Dr. Seneca Beaulac of RYAN'S HOPE).
Janice Lynde (Laurel Ch'apln of ONE LIFE TO
LIVE) and Candy Early (Donna of ALL MY CHILDREN). Theyll
perform In a musical revue on Sat. night. Also appearing: Kim
Zlmmer (Reva Lewis of GUIDING LIGHT). Chris LcBlanc
(Kirk McColl of AS THE WORLD TURNS) and syndicated soap
opera columnists Dorothy Vine and Sell Groves.
-LET THE GOOD TIMES ROLL" SINGLES WEEKEND
July 18-21, Starring "MEMBERS ONLY"
HAPPY TOGETHER "85 TOUR
Featuring The Turtles. Gary Lewis and The Playboys. The
Buckinghams. and The Grass Roots. Also appearing
Thurs..7/l8-TheMarvelettes. Fri.. 7/19- the Clovers. Special
parties and programs for singles.
OTHER STARS SHINING THIS SUMMER AT GROSSINC,ER"S:
Sha-Na Na-July 27
Allen fli Rossi -August 17
The Spinners Augnsi 24
Pearl Balky-Sept l
80.


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 31, 1986
Peres Seeks Opinion
About Underground
Continued from Page 1-A
likely to do so under the
circumstances.
SINCE THE Likud component
of the unity coalition government
is strongly backing the rightw-
ingers' demands for release of all
of the alleged Jewish terrorists,
such a move by the Attorney
General would be interpreted as
compliance with a government in-
itiative, in effect executive in-
terference in the judicial process.
Peres, addressing high school
students in Rishon Le Zion,
stressed that such interference
would endanger the entire judicial
system which must operate free
from executive or political
pressures. But many Likud
Knesset members and several of
the Labor Party have cited
precedents for government in-
tervention in criminal
proceedings.
They recalled that in 1948 the
government requested a halt of
proceedings in the trial of Jewish
terrorist suspects in the assassina-
tion of the Swedish diplomat.
Count Folke Bernadotte. In 1956.
the government intervened
similarly to halt the trial of
soldiers who participated in the
massacre of Arabs in Kafer
Kasem.
PERES TOLD the students in
Rishon LeZion that the State
must have both a head and a
heart. It must be sensitive to the
fate of every person, he said. But
if the State does not use its head
to honor principles, it may find
itself acting counter to national in-
terests, the Premier said.
Deputy Premier and Education
Minister Yitzhak Navon, Herzog's
immediate predecessor as Presi-
dent of Israel, warned that if the
government decided to grant
amnesty to the Jewish terrorist
suspects, the panel of three judges
hearing the case might resign
from the judiciary in protest.
He warned that any such deci-
sion would subject Israel's judicial
system to ridicule. Clemency for
the Jewish defendants would
mean an end to democracy
because a democratic state cannot
exist without an independent
judicial system, he said.
A similar statement was made
by Knesset Speaker Shlomo Hillel
who warned against giving in to
internal blackmail after having
given in to external blackmail, a
reference to last Monday's
prisoner exchange.
AT THE OTHER end of the
political spectrum, the rightwing
opposition Tehiya Party demand-
ed the immediate release of the
Jewish suspects and the death
penalty for terrorists. Tehiya
claimed that the government
would bear responsibility for
bloodshed caused by a renewal of
Arab terrorism resulting from the
prisoner exchange.
Meanwhile, Menahem
N'euberger, one of the defendants
on trial, pleaded guilty to con-
spiracy to blow up Islamic shrines
on the Temple Mount in East
Jerusalem and conspiracy in the
car bombings that crippled two
Arab mayors in the West Bank in
June, 1980.
As a result of his deal with the
prosecution, charges of member-
ship in a terrorist organization
and attempts to cause serious
bodily harm were dropped.
Neuberger will be sentenced at a
later date. The prosecutor said he
would demand an appropriate
sentence, adding that the bitter
controversy made it incumbent on
the court to play an educational
role by taking a clear position on
crimes of this nature.
State Dep't. Still Studying
Palestinian Delegation Makeup
BY DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
The State Department
said that it was looking into
ways the U.S. could meet
with a joint Jordanian-
Palestinian delegation,
although it conceded that
the major problem is the
"composition" of the
Palestinians in the
delegation.
At the same time, State Depart-
ment deputy spokesman Edward
Djerejian stressed that such a
meeting would be an "exploratory
Vice President George Bush
and former Congressman
Herbert Tenzer wUl receive
honorary doctoral degrees at
the academic convocation of
Bar-Ilan University at the New
York Hilton June 5, it is an-
nounced by Jane Stern, presi-
dent of the University's
American Board of Overseers.
process" aimed at bringing about
direct negotiations between the
Arabs and Israelis. Djerejian
noted at one point that the
Palestinians in the delegation
would be "non-PLO Palesti-
nians," but he refused all com-
ment on how the U.S. would
determine if any of the delegates
were members of the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
HE INDICATED, however,
that the participants may be
members of the Palestine Na-
tional Council which sets policy
for the PLO but includes members
from the West Bank and Gaza.
Djerejian stressed that the U.S.
believes that "public discussion
will not be helpful" at this time.
Richard Murphy, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
during his recent visit to the Mid-
dle East, met with Palestinians
from the West Bank and Gaza and
apparently sought to persuade
them to provide non-PLO
members for the joint delegation.
The Palestinians reportedly said
the PLO was the spokesman for
all Palestinians.
The U.S. apparently believes
that if the Palestinian delegates
are chosen from the West Bank
and Gaza, it will overcome objec-
tions to any possible membership
in the PLO both for a meeting
with the U.S. and for later hoped
for negotiations with Israel.
HOWEVER, King Hussein of
Jordan and PLO chief Yasir
Arafat, in their Feb. 11 joint
agreement, seek an international
conference which would include
the five permanent members of
the United Nations Security
Council and not direct talks with
Israel. A Jordanian-Palestinian
delegation is seeking meetings
with all five powers.
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Friday, May 31,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
South Lebanon Exit Proceeds;
Katyushas May Return Soon
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The Israel Defense Force's
withdrawal from south
Lebanon, the dangers that
tJoud the immediate future,
recriminations over the
past and sharp criticism of
Israel's war motives by an
IDF commanding general
dominated political
-mdiscourse last week.
)"" Gen Ori Orr. commander of
the northern front, who is
overseeing the IDF pull-out. told
nsidents in the border town of
Kiryat Shemona that Israel's
notjves when it invaded Lebanon
B June. 1982 were badly flawed.
ACCORDING TO Orr.
evicting the Syrians from that
country or effecting a change of
government in Beirut were not
good enough reasons to go to
wr. Irresponsible wars should be
avoided at all costs, he said,
adding that "only when we are
out of Lebanon will we be able to
judge if the other war aim of
miking life more secure in Galilee
wuindeed achieved."
But another senior military
[personality, former Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon, a hero of
Itbe Yom Kippur War, continued
I to blame opponents of the war in
Lebanon for the present situation
[there Sharon, now Minister of
nmerce and Industry, charged
a press conference in Haifa
lier in the week that the total
struction of the terrorist in-
Wructure could have been
bieved but for political op-
sition at home.
They didn't let me finish the
i there." Sharon declared. He
out for blame the Peace
govement and Parents Against
n nee as groups that opposed
(war in Lebanon and are now,
alleged, using war casualties
porpolitical gains.
SHARON LAUNCHED a
ersonal attack on Labor MK
Eban. chairman of the
esset's Foreign Affairs and
juity Committee, who was a
fling opponent of Sharon's war
oucies. He categorized Eban as
wftwing politician" who
[never fought here and has
ays sought personal gain from
igedies."
The former defense chief called
* a commisson of inquiry to
o* into home front opposition
the war when the IDF was
"Ming in 1-ebanon. It was a
commission of inquiry, the
Kahan Commission, which found
Sharon indirectly responsible for
the Sabra and Shatila refugee
camps massacre in 1982. forcing
him to resign as Defense Minister
early in 1983.
The pace of the IDF's with-
drawal from south Lebanon was
discussed by Premier Shimon
Peres, speaking to high school
students in Upper Nazareth last
week. He said Israeli soldiers
would be out of Lebanon "far
quicker than many people think"
because "we are dealing with
matters of life and death, both as
regards our own soldiers and as
regards the residents of Galilee."
Although no one has given a
deadline for completion of the
withdrawal, Orr said it could be
completed by the beginning of
June. He stressed that the with-
drawal was being conducted in
orderly fashion.
EQUIPMENT and structures
are being dismantled and
transported back to Israel, not
being destroyed of left behind "as
if we were leaving as a defeated
army. We are marching out with
heads held high, we are leaving
like an army that has itself
decided it has no business being
there," Orr said.
He made the point that one
reason why the IDF's withdrawal
can be speeded up is an
assessment that Shiite terrorism
will not spill over the border into
Israel after Israeli troops have
left. But Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin, addressing the
Foreign Affairs and Security
Committee during the week, said
Lebanon today is a more serious
focal point of terrorism then it
was before the war. He warned
there was no certainty that the
Palestine Liberation
Organization would not return
there to join Shiite terrorists
against Israel.
Orr, too, acknowledged
that"there are Palestinians in
Beirut, Tyre and Sidon and it is
likely that they will attempt to
attack us from there." He said
the IDF would do everything in
its power to ensure that the PLO
artillery infrastructure that
existed in Lebanon before 1982
will not be rebuilt.
BUT HE repeated a warning
he has given several times in
recent months that the residents
of Galilee towns cannot expect
that no Katyusha rockets will
ever again fall on them. That
would be unrealistic, he said.
Letter to Editor: Ongoing
Saga of Bet Shira Joy
'"TOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I nave been reading your ar-
ESj MttprW concerning the
^offcthDaWd Congregation.
IfL' have not been a member
" Miami community for the
* years and therefore can-
, your sadness about
evolutlon of ^ cgu8i
2*1 our separate ways, I can
T112? of P^ound joy at
ucephon of our newJ fJon-
*"ion Bet Shira.
few*'Pioneered anew Con-
W2ll5nag0ue we all
LwkSlSfiSthat Beth
r period in Miami.
fe< dwelling on all the
otrWti*1 to the creation of
KSn^WW why not
JW dwell in The Jewish Flori-
n articles that urge every
ioS:woman "*chUd in
EJJ^.to affiliate with the
kaboV.K "" choice? Let'8
*ut the importance of being
Jews and growing together as a
Jewish community not apart.
Let's discuss the merits of all the
fine synagogues and their pro-
grams here in Dade County and
why every Jew should join at least
one of them.
The Beth David-Bet Shira divi-
sion is not a division at all, but it is
a creation of two Jewish houses of
worship serving two different
communities. I personally hope
that our Jewish family at Beth
Shira can work together with the
Jewish family at Beth David. We
need to be together as Jews. We
need to grow together and create
one united Jewish family in Dade
County.
Let's build such a community
that has everyone involved in
synagogue life and offers all the
pleasures and satisfaction that
comes from being associated with
a Jewish and congregational
family.
THOMAS A. BORIN
Education Vice President
Bet Shira Congregation
LOUIS ROSE: 'I wouldn't mind being a senior citizen if my ivife hadn't passed away.'
Golden Years
For Aging: Turn to Tarnished Silver
Continued from Page 5-A
instant smile on a beautiful young-
looking face, doesn't like some of
the perceptions younger people
have about the elderly.
"Sometimes you hear, "That's
for old people,' "Well, if it's for
old people it's for everybody."
Goldsmith said she realized that
there are despondent old people,
and she said that having a good at-
titude is essential when trying to
survive.
"We are what we are, because
of what we were when we were
younger," Goldsmith said.
Goldsmith is one of the reasons
why the Northwest Senior Center
is anything but "old." People play
cards, eat together, chat, sing and
make friends.
SUSAN HIRSCH, director of
the Northwest Senior Center,
knows that growing old isn't
always a happy experience.
"With older people you don't
make it better, you make it the
best it can be," she said. "Then
you manage it. People have to
understand that some older peo-
ple have lost a spouse, maybe
some of their friends have died,
their brothers and sisters may not
be there. They have less social
support, and they don't have then-
jobs. Imagine going to work every
day of your life and then waking
up one morning with nothing to
do."
Hirsch said that the number of
elderly Americans actually mak-
ing it successfully is more like 60
percent. She said that there are
about five percent of the elderly in
nursing homes, five to ten percent
frail, needing help, and a final ten
to 15 percent who aren't frail, but
who are hanging in barely.
"I'm concerned that the middle
of the middle class is paying for
everything without any sort of
help," Hirsch said. "I think they
represent a gray area, and I think
that gray area is going to expand.
My sense is that Social Security
will be experiencing a number
crisis in the future. We don't seem
to be terrific in planning for our
futures."
THE FUTURE could be in-
teresting, especially for the
children of the 1940's and '50's,
the people better known as the
"baby boomers." By the year
2015, he majority of the surviving
baby boomers will enter into a
stage known as "senior boomers."
By then it is estimated that the
U.S. senior population will con-
stitute more than 20 percent of
the U.S. population. The worry is
that if many people aren't making
it financially now on the current
Social Security system, what will
life be like in the next century?
U.S. Census Bureau statistics
indicate that by 2030, there will be
about 65 million older persons, or
2% times their number in 1980.
"America is getting older,"
Abrams commented. "At the
same time, families are getting
smaller and women are working.
health expenditures for older peo-
ple, followed by physicians and
nursing home care. In 1984, the
over-65 group was projected to
represent 12 percent of the U.S.
population, but account for 31 per-
cent of total personal health care
expenditures. This comes to $120
billion or $4,202 per year for each
older person. This is more than
three times the $1,300 spent for
younger persons."
What does all this pay for? Bas-
ed on data from the U.S. National
Center for Health Statistics, the
B
>y the year 2015, the
majority of the surviving
baby boomers will
enter into a stage known
as senior boomers.
We've got a big boom on longevi-
ty. We're overcoming disease.
People are living into their 80's.
But in many ways, while we're ad-
vancing medically, we're not
prepared as a society to accept all
of these older people."
"I GUESS the biggest thing
with old people is loneliness,"
Marty said. "I don't think young
people understand what it's like to
step out of society on your last day
of work."
Indeed, Hirsch said that as a
society, Americans haven't struc-
tured many options for interac-
tion between the ages.
When there is interaction, it's
usually with children or grand-
children. A 1975 census study
showed that 18 percent of all 65
and older people live in the same
household with a child. Another
55 percent lived within 30 minutes
of a child, and three fourths had
seen a child within the previous
week.
Income and health seem to be
the two largest concerns of the
elderly. Median incomes for older
men averaged $9,766 and $5,599
for women. The poverty rate in
1983 for older Americans was
14.1 percent. But this, in-
terestingly enough, was less than
the rate for younger people (15.4
percent). However, 22 percent of
the older population was con-
sidered poor or near poor.
HOSPITAL EXPENSES ac
counted for the largest share of
menu is dismally complete, rang-
ing to 46 percent for arthritis to
eight percent for diabetes.
The elderly in the Jewish com-
munity come to about 11 percent
of the population. But because of
Medicare and its DRGs, services
are taxed and spread thin.
"People with chronic illnesses
are so vulnerable," Dr. Lucy
Steinitz, director of JFCS, said.
"There are more cases and we've
had to restrict our home care. It's
sad, because not enough attention
is being paid to the psycho-social
issues that go along with words
like cancer and heart attacks."
SOPHIE DOESNT know from
psycho-social issues. She's in her
80s and has had a colostomy. She
wants to make you lunch. It
makes her so happy. No one has
eaten with her in days.
"It's not so bad," she said with
strength and a smile. "I walk out-
side when I can. I don't fall down,
because I know God is behind me
to catch me."
"I have cancer, and I'm deter-
mined to fight it," Marty bravely
said. I believe a man can be
destroyed but not defeated."
Marty then went to his bookcase
and pulled down Ernest Hem-
ingway's "For Whom the Bell
1 OlIS.
"Listen to this," he said, "It's
what the character Anselmo said
It's what I believe.
"I'm an old man who will live
until he dies."


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, May 31, 1985
Austria's Former
Chancellor Kreisky Puts
Off His Visit to Israel
Bv REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) -
Former Chancellor Bruno
Kreisky announced here
that he has postponed in-
definitely his scheduled visit
to Israel, which was to begin
last week, because his safe-
ty could not be guaranteed
following the disclosure of
his involvement in the ex-
change of three Israeli
soldiers for hundreds of
Palestinian terrorists who
were among the 1,150
prisoners released by Israel.
Kreisky told a news conference
that he has spoken with officials of
the International Center for
Peace in the Middle East, spon-
sors of the visit, and they in-
dicated that the prisoner ex-
change had raised mixed feelings
in Israel, and they feared possible
assassination attempts against
the former Austrian leader in
Israel.
THE CENTER'S officials
feared rallies against Kreisky, and
that he would become the object of
hatred and be held responsible for
the release of the terrorists, he
told reporters.
But while Kriesky disclosed
some of his involvement in the
prisoner exchange, he insisted he
had nothing to do with the selec-
tion of who would be released
from the Israeli prisons. He recall-
ed that he had been asked more
than two years ago by families of
Israeli soldiers captured in the
Lebanon war to help gain their
release.
In a series of talks, his special
emissary to the Mideast, Herbert
Amery, a former Austrian Am-
bassador to Greece, succeeded in
mediating a first exchange of six
Israeli prisoners for more than
4,000 Palestinians, Kreisky said.
In another series of talks,
Amery and Kreisky established in-
direct contacts between Israeli
authorities and Ahmed Jabril,
head of the pro-Syrian Popular
Front for the Liberation of
Palestine General Command,
which held the three Israeli
soldiers, the former Chancellor
said.
HE ADDED that it had been
the Libyan leader, Muammar
Quadafi, who convinced Jabril to
meet Kreisky during a visit to
Damascus last October.
In December, 1984, Kreisky
wrote a letter to Israeli Premier
Shimon Peres and to Jabril
presenting a compromise on
which both sides agreed. "I only
suggested the ratio of exchange,"
Kreisky disclosed. "I have nothing
to do with the selection of those
prisoners which the Israelis hand-
ed over."
Kreisky said he had been
scheduled to meet with Palesti-
nian leaders and deliver speeches
at Bir Zeit University on the West
Bank, and to lecture at the Tel
Aviv and Jerusalem Universities.
He refused to provide reporters
with any other possible dates
when the visit to Israel may be
rescheduled.
I
Benjamin Netanyahu, Israel Ambassador to
the United Nations, addresses participants in
a preparatory seminar for the Nairobi
Women's Conference which will take place in
July. Beside Netanyahu are seated (left to
right) Mrs. Sara Doron, Member oi'Kne^
and chairwoman of the Coalition; Mrs. flu,
Jaglom, president, World WIZO; and Mr
Michal Modai, chairwoman, Warld. WIZ^
Executive.
Women Prepare for International Year Bigotry
Continued from Page 4-A
outside the country to plan
strategy together.
"THE DELEGATES must be
very well informed on political
issues," Levine said. She is
waiting for information from the
foreign ministry to send to these
other Jewish women most of
whom have two basic concerns.
They want to know about Israel's
relationships with South Africa
and the status of Arab women in
Israel.
Levine is sending the material
produced here in English, French,
Spanish and German to Jewish
women's organizations
throughout the world. The infor-
mation contains figures on the
status of Arab women in Israel
compared with Arab women
elsewhere so that representatives
in other delegations can "act as
agents to pass on information
from the foreign ministry."
Other strategies may also prove
helpful. Last January in Tel Aviv,
there was a preparatory seminar
for the Nairobi conference. Pam-
phlets on social service statistics,
education in Israel and the ad-
ministered territories, and one en-
titled "What is Zionism?" were
distributed and discussed.
AN EXTERNAL safeguard this
year is that all presentations have
to be cleared prior to the con-
ference. Speakers have to indicate
their geographical area, their f
of expertise and discussion
when they register as r
ticipants. Levine herself was to|
in the United States and wasr.
ning to see the president of the!
ternational Council of Women!
elicit her support, as well as i
of her Mexican and Hisn
American colleagues.
The momentum is gatheril
Even though the lack of fundsl
send delegates to the conferej
may provide a stumbling bid.
the will to unite and cooperate)
ists. A potentially powerful i
tion seems to be emerging
may help to put the scuni
equation of Zionism and racism j
rest.
An important announcement...
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f


Friday, May 31,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 16-A
Chick Publications
I Urges 'Support Your Local Jew'
Despite Senate Approval, Genocide
Convention Still Hamstrung on Hill
Chick Publications, with a
Inost office box number in
gno, Calif., and ad-
ministrative offices in
Cucamonga, is an
evangelical group that
publishes fundamentalist
Christian tracts produced
by Jack T. Chick. The basic
message: "Accept Jesus
Lfjhrist as your own personal
Ford and Savior and you
|will reign w'}t\ Him
Ithroughout eternity."
The widely-distributed pro-
lalytizing tracts bear such titles as
"Support Your Local Jew," "The
Ipissover Plot?," "The Beast,"
|"King of the East," "Creator or
|Liir'"
IT WAS "Support Your Local
found in public places,
rtich brought complaints and re-
5 for information to the Anti-
ation League. The tract
includes by stating that "If
u'rea Jew... Jesus wants to be
Lord and Messiah Don't
i in your sins... Become a Mes-
lunic Jew." "The Passover
lot?" tract concludes by saying
at "Those who reject Him
pesus Christ). .. will be cast into
? Lake of Fire."
| Jack Chick, who "dreamed up
i comics for Christ," as one
|few York newspaper article said,
i a former illustrator for an air-
t company, who is said to have
[experienced rebirth through
Christ at age 24" and to
Bve developed "the ministry of
Chick Publications as time
This article, based on information provided by the Anti-
Defamation League's Research Department, was prepared
by Gerald Baumgarten, assistant to the director of the
department.
"Comic books defaming the
beliefs of Catholics, Jews, Mor-
mons and adherents of Eastern
religions among others are
being sold by the thousands in
evangelical Christian bookstores
across the United States"
reported the Los Angeles Times
in a 1981 article.
The March 13, 1981 issue of
Christianity today published an
article headlined "Jack Chick's
Anti-Catholic Alberto Comic Book
is Exposed as a Fraud." Other
newspapers around the country
have printed similar exposes.
IN OCTOBER, 1981, the Los
Angeles Times reported that
Canada's Customs and Excise
Department banned two Chick
"comic books" "Double Cross"
and "The Big Betrayal" -
because of their anti-Catholic con-
tent. The action marked the first
time Canadians used a customs
law usually directed against por-
nography to ban material offen-
sive to religious views.
In 1982, Jack Chick resigned
from the Christian Booksellers
Association after a delegation
from the association visited him to
discuss complaints they'd
received.
In a subsequent letter to
bookstores. Chick said he was
resigning because "the whore of
Revelation 17 and 18 (a reference
to the Catholic church) has quietly
moved into the CBA and will
quietly seduce you and your power
will be gone."
ication, "Alber- ,N ^ chjck p^^^
began circulating a tract entitled
"Are Roman Catholics Chris-
tians?" It declared, "The Bible
never mentions nuns, monks or
popes ... It was all cooked up by
the Roman Catholic institution to
razzle-dazzle their followers,
along with the statues, candles
and religious costumes The
peope love it. Only their leaders
really understand the religious
double talk and psychology used
to control their 700,000,000
members." The tract went on to
state: "This monster (the Roman
" Ms been described by a
'atholic weekly as "a blatantly
Mi-Catholic comic book, denoun-
ing the Catholic Church as an
Mi-Christian religion, (which) is
png circulated in Christian
stores throughout the United
Mm."
I SINCE 1981. a number of ar-
about Chick Publications
I the defamatory nature of its
selytizing booklets and comic
ks have appeared in the
toeral circulation press, as well
i in the Catholic press.
Herut Zionists Rap Rabbis
For Blacklist of 51 MK's
U'EW YORK Hart N.
V(SSn' President of the
".WV-member Herut Zionists of
iT103, organization, has issued
Ronglv-worded statement call-
K or the repeal of the resolution
F we Rabbinical Assembly of
Wa ,t0 "blacklist" 51
jjbers of the Israeli Knesset
^speaking in certain
wncan synagogues.
He believe that this recom-
T"**, Hasten said, "will
WrerrZ !? CaUSe a deeP and
""us division between the
Fonse 'Srae' and Ameri<*'s
Lilr,t,ve Jewish
teNACAL,!;ED on *
K^aTon^,'10 "^
^Zionists of America is the
hJk'S* M'n>8ter-Designate
MfeVii amir- Industry and
KTiS*: A** SharoZcT
Others mSter David ^vy.
"i we 51 government
representatives whom the Rab-
binical Assembly "blacklisted"
from speaking or receiving
awards in more than 800 Conser-
vative Jewish synagogues
throughout the U.S. Herut-USA
plays an active role in arranging
for many of the Israeli Knesset
members to visit communities
throughout the U.S.
The resolution by the Rabbinical
Assembly came after 51 members
of the Israeli Knesset voted last
January to amend Israel's Law of
Return in a way that would grant
immediate citizenship to con-
verted Jews only if they had con-
verted according to halacha.
HASTEN SAID that members
of the Knesset "enjoy the basic
and fundamental right to vote
their conscience on each and
every issue before the
Parliament."
He added that "to 'blacklist', or
for that matter, to seek to punish
in any way whatsoever,
democratically-elected represen-
tatives for voting their conscience
is not only wrong, but in this case
will serve only to isolate
America's Conservative Jewish
community from the voices of a
significant portion of the Israeli
electorate."
Catholic Church) is still passing
itself off as a 'Christian'
organization."
In 1984, a widely circulated
tract entitled "Holocaust" charg-
ed that "The inquisition (the
Holocaust) in Europe was master-
minded by the Jesuits Only
this time instead of Dominican
monks wearing robes, the Vatican
used the Gestapo wearing Nazi
uniforms." It added, "It is a
documented fact that the Gestapo
was run by the Jesuits, and that
Hitler was a faithful Roman
Catholic simply following the laws
set forth in the Council of Trent."
In a Los Angeles Times article
on Chick Publications, Jack
Chick's secretary was quoted as
saying, "We have no ministers on
our staff at all ... He (Chick) is
strictly an artist and publisher.
He's never been to a seminary or
had Bible training, but he wanted
to be a missionary years ago."
By JUDITH KOHN
WASHINGTON (JTA)
Sen. Jesse Helms (R.,
N.C.) has withdrawn his op-
position to Senate ratifica-
tion of an international trea-
ty against genocide, as the
Foreign Relations Commit-
tee in a vote of 9-8 approved
it for the sixth time in 36
years.
But, in another turnabout, five
long-standing supporters of the
Genocide Convention abstained in
the committee vote, in protest
against reservations that had
been attached to the ratification
bill to overcome conservative
opposition.
THE COMMITTEE approved
eight conditions addressing con-
servative concerns over what they
considered a threat to the United
States sovereignty.
The two reservations vigorously
pursued by Helms, who was able
to block ratification on the Senate
floor last autumn, are the limita-
tion of World Court jurisdiction in
cases of alleged genocide or at-
tempted genocide brought against
the United States; and the
precedence of the United States
Constitution over the Genocide
Convention.
Supporters of the ratification
have argued that these conditions
dilute the spirit of the treaty,
which has been signed by 96 coun-
tries. The Soviet Union and
Eastern bloc nations have ratified
the convention, with reservations,
and consequently some West
European countries do not
recognize those nations as
signatories.
THE REAGAN Administra-
tion, which came out in support of
the convention last September,
has recently come out in support
of reservations, and Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
Chairman Richard Lugar (K .
Ind.) has said he would vote
against the convention on the
Senate floor if the conditions were
not adopted.
The vote on the reservations
was divided along party lines,
with the exception of Sen. Ed-
ward Zorinsky (D., Neb.) who
voted in favor, and Sen. Charles
Mathias (R., Md.) who opposed the
reservations.
Sen. Christopher Dodd (D.,
Conn.), who opposed the condi-
tions, abstained in the final vote
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Pagel6-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday. May 31,1986
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CUTLER RIDGE...............20390 S. Dixie Hwy. 233-5241
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DEERFIELD BEACH .......2265 W. Hillsboro Blvd. 427-8800
FT. LAUDERDALE ...........1740 E. Sunrise Blvd. 463-7588
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VISA. MASTERCARD. AMERICAN EXPRESS. DINERS CLUB


ORT Women Biennial Convention
Begins This Weekend
Dude South Region of Women's
I American ORT is sending a
delegation of 23 women to the
pktrict VI Sixth Biennial Conven-
tion May 31 at the Hyatt Palm
Beaches. Palm Beach. The delega-
I Son will be led by President Lois
llmanuel. chairman of Executive
[Committee, Laurel Shapiro and
[Convention Delegation Chairman.
I Norma Goldstein.
"Technology With Tradition"
I will set the theme at the Conven-
ts. Four hundred delegates
[representing more than 26,000
[members from seven
I Kwtheasterr. states, Alabama,
IFlorida. Georgia, Mississippi,
North Carolina. South Carolina
and Tennessee will be in
attendance.
This weekend convention is a
"first" for District VI and will in-
corporate a Sabbath Service on
Friday evening and a Bar Mitzvah
Twinning on Saturday morning.
"Twinning presents an opportuni-
ty for a Soviet child to become a
Bar or Bat Mitzvah by proxy.
Technology With Tradition' will
be felt throughout the convention
as the delegates rededicate to
traditional values and prepare for
living in the 21st century." Mrs.
Emanuel said.
Chairman for the convention
will be Zelda Magid, Correspon-
ding Secretary and Chairman of
the Promotions Sub-Committee of
District VI. Joining her as Co-
Chairmen are Selma Biller and
Jean Zugman. After coming to
North Miami Beach in 1975, Mrs.
Magid joined District VI as
Capital Funds and Golden Circle
Chairman and started the District
on major fund-raising. Ms. Biller,
Clearwater, presently serves as
chairman of the District Organiza-
tion Sub-Committee. Ms.
Zugman, Hollywood, serves as
treasurer of District VI.
A modern day Ruth the Moabite, Osnat Ben Zacharia, is seen
here outside her 'temporary' home in Anatot. near Jerusalem.
Osnat, an immigrant from England and a recent convert to
Judaism, is awaiting the completion of her new home.
ShavuothA Festival
Foundation Women Plan Reception j^r Honoring Converts
The Women's Committee of the
[Foundation of Jewish Pilan-
jthropies of the Greater Miami
[Jewish Federation will hold a
hpecial reception on June 12 to
Ihonor those women who have
[made a commitment to make a
(lifetime or planned gift to the
Foundation.
Slated to begin at 4 p.m., the
Iprogram will be held at Burdines
llfavfair. second floor. Included is
i preview of fall fashions and ac-
leessories, followed by a wine and
cheese reception.
"The 75 women who are to be
honored have made an important
commitment to the future of our
community, helping to ensure that
Jewish values and traditions will
be passed on to their children and
Jewish institutions will be
preserved for future genera-
tions," said Ellie Ganz, chair of
the Women's Committee. "This is
the first time that the Foundation
will hold an event of this kind and
we are very proud to be honoring
these women," added Nancy
Lipoff, past chair of the Women's
Committee.
Co-chairing the Burdines event
are Etta Barnett and Gertrude
Kartzmer. The other members of
Rabbi Goldstein To Celebrate His
Tenth Year In Rabbinate
Rabbi Brett Goldstein will
ledebrate his tenth year in the
iRabbinate with special guest
lipeaker Isaac Bashevis Singer at
Temple Shir Ami's Fundraising
Gala Saturday evening at the
King's Bay Yacht and Country
Chib.
'The evening will have special
meaning for many reasons. It's a
*lebration of beginnings the
tort of a building fund for our
longregation's permanent home
d the commemoration of the
ginning of my rabbinical life ten
re ago. When you include Isaac
hevis Singer, the most revered
rewish writer of our times, you
111 have created a memory to be
wished for years to come,"
"nmented Goldstein.
[TTie young rabbi became well
"awn m the Miami Jewish com-
mity for his leadership as chair-
n of the Greater Miami Jewish
BSE?0.'8 Task Force on CuJts
PW4). In 1981, he founded the
"W Reform Jewish congregation
West Kendall with a dozen
""ms- Today, Temple Shir Ami
over 200 families and holds
M aLl toe meeting facilities
SL Catherine of Siena Church.
[Rabbi Goldstein began his
BE, StudjeS at Wealeyl
[CT, ,nd equated from
""few Union College in 1975,
Rabbi Goldstein Singer
where he was ordained a rabbi. Ht
first served Temple Bnai
Avraham in Portsmouth, Ohio
(1973-74) and moved to Miami in
1975, where he served at Temple
Israel until founding Temple Shir
Ami in 1981. He is president of
the Greater Miami Rabbinical
Association.
Isaac Bashevis Singer received
the Nobel Prize for Literature in
1978 and holds numerous literary
awards, including two National
Book Awards. He is a member of
the American Academy and In-
stitute of Arts and Letters. Mr.
Singer is best known for his na-
tional best seller, "Collected
Stories," published in 1982.
The Gala Fundraising dinner
takes place at 7:30 p.m. at the
King's Bay Yacht and Country
Club. Chairperson for the event is
Robin Rollnick, to be assisted by
Paula Linden and Iris Price.
Ellie Ganz
the Women's Committee are Eva
Abrahamer, Florence Abrams,
Bunny Adler, Judith Applestein,
Betty Cooper, Amy Dean, Eva
Feig. Mikki Futernick, Ceil
Greenspon, Charlotte Held, Nan-
cy Lipoff, Meryle Loring, Bluma
Marcus, Pat Papper, Gloria Raf-
fel, Anita Robbins, Marvis
Schaecter, Maxine Schwartz,
Jackie Traurig, and Ray Ellen
Yarkin.
Ends Hunger Strike
NEW YORK (JTA) In
response to appeals from the
Chief Rabbis of Israel, Boris
Begun, son of Soviet Prisoner of
Conscience Iosif Begun, has
ended a 46-day hunger strike,
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry said it learned. The
19-year-old Begun fasted to
protest increasing measures to
isolate his father from his family,
and the failure of Soviet officials
to answer concerns about Iosif's
health. In violation of Soviet
law, Begun's family has
repeatedly been denied the right
to visit him at the camp, with
officials declaring no meeting
will be allowed before late 1985.
h onTaJT^l 0f the Jewi*h community
^C ^ueliliTami Jew^h Federation, where
> rZ?rJWa* elected t0 serv a second
f^taSlrZ Al1? ** the *tin3. the
b^dz 12,.My*< Presidents' Leadership
hyT,u' I'^mted to Susan Sirotta,
^'y.ndEzrn Katz. These awards
are presented each year to young leaders who
have shown extraordinary dedication to
Federation, its beneficiary agencies, the CJA-
IEF Campaign and the overall Jewish
munity: Shown above, from left, during the
award presentation, GMJF Founding Pr
dent Stanley C Myers, GMJF President
Samuel I. Adler, Sirotta, Turetsky, and Katz.
By SIMON GRIVER
Judaism, unlike most
religions, has never
featured the missionary zeal
for seeking converts. Never-
theless, there has always
been a steady trickle of in-
dividuals who desire to
become Jewish, and these
proselytes have always been
welcomed into the fold with
open arms.
Ruth, the Moabite girl who con-
verted to Judaism is recalled at
Shavuoth through the reading of
the megilla. Consequently, this
festival has become associated
wit'i those Gentiles who have
chosen to throw their lot in with
the Jewish people.
Rabbi Avishai Doum, head of
the Jewish Agency's Conversion
Ulpanim, stresses that the pro-
selyte is a fully-fledged Jew who
must if anything be respected
more than somebody who is born a
Jew. This is especially true in
modem times when such a large
percentage of Jews are complete-
ly ignorant of their heritage.
"WE CONVERT about 300
people each year," says Rabbi
Doum. "And in total in all of
Israel I estimate that some 400
Gentiles become Jews each year.
About 70 percent of the converts
are women, and maybe two thirds
of these women seek conversion
because they intend marrying a
Jewish boy."
Indeed, Ruth herself converted
to Judaism so that she could
marry a Jew. Typical of such a
modern day Ruth is Osnat Ben
Zacharia who completed her con-
version in August, 1981 and mar-
ried her husband, Yosef, a captain
in the IDF, the following month.
She was born as Jane Hubble in
Birmingham, England, and first
visited Israel in 1978, spending a
spell as a volunteer on Kibbutz
Nirim.
"Israel had always held a
fascination for me," explains
Osnat. "First, because my mater-
nal grandfather was Jewish, and
my mother had always worked
with Jews in London. When we
learned about the various
religions in school, I was especial-
ly interested in Judaism. Then the
Yom Kippur War increased my
sympathy for Israel."
AFTER 1978 Osnat returned to
Birmingham, but finding it dif-
ficult to get appropriate employ-
ment and missing Israel, she
decided to return in 1979. On her
second day back in Israel, she met
her husband-to-be on the
Jerusalem-Tel Aviv bus, and
within a month they had decided
that they wanted to marry, and
thus Osnat would be required to
convert.
In total it took Osnat 20 months
to convert, and she had to make
seven appearances before the
Beth Din before they approved
her conversion. "I was determin-
ed to go through with it," she
- recalls. "I think the Rabbinate are
far more suspicious of potential
converts who have Jewish boy
friends. Others on my course who
wanted to convert for the sake of
converting passed through much
more quickly."
Osnat now describes herself as
traditional rather than Orthodox,
though of course her conversion
was an Orthodox one. "I believe
that the Jewish people are all one
family," she says, "and that it is
how we are inside that counts,
rather than our outside religious
deeds. This was an opinion tbat I
vented many times to the rabbis
during my conversion course."
The conversion courses encom-
pass the full range of mitzvot that
a Jew must perform. Other
reasons cited by Rabbi Doum for
the desire to convert to Judiasm
are a love of Israel and a high
sense of self-awareness indicating
that Judaism is a path worth
taking.
ARIEL IVRI who grew up near
Zurich, Switzerland falls into this
category. "I had lived in many
countries like Canada and
Greece," he says, "but I felt most
comfortable in Israel. I liked the
people and the lifestyle. Having
decided that I was going to
become Israeli, I felt that to do
that properly and really become
one of the people I need to convert
to Judaism."
Ariel is now a psychology
undergraduate at the Hebrew
University. His parents do not ful-
ly understand the step he took but
are prepared to accept it if it
makes him happy. Osnat, who
now has two children, and works
for Bank Leumi is in a similar
situation.
Rabbi Doum reports that many
who apply for conversion are re-
jected, either because it is not
something that they seem to be
taking seriously enough, or
because it is felt that they are not
so much attracted to Judaism as
running away from something
else.
Rabbi Doum estimates that 95
percent of those who convert to
Judaism in Israel remain in Israel.
And certainly for both Osnat and
Ariel, they are proud to assert
that they are Zionists and an in-
tegral part of the Jewish State.
Like Ruth the Moabite, who after
being widowed came with her
mother-in-law Naomi to Eretz
Israel where she married her hus-
band's kinsman Boaz, these
modern converts have also made
their home in Israel.
dfewislh Floridia

Miami, Florida Friday, May 31,1985
Section


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 31,1985
Marshall H. Berkson Universal National Bank Names^
Elected President By George Feldenkreis Chairman
South Shore Hospital
Miami Beach business leader
and philanthropist Marshall H.
Berkson, chairman of the
board of South Shore Hospital
and Medical Center, has been
elected president of the
organization which is affiliated
with the University of Miami
School of Medicine.
The hospital added a
10-storv, glass tower
building at 600 Alton Road
adjacent to its medical care
facilities at 630 Alton Road
last year, and has become one
of the nation's foremost
centers for geriatric care and
research because of its loca-
tion, facilities and medical
personnel.
Berkson, who earned an
MBA degree at the University
of Chicago after receiving a
bachelor of science in business
administration degree from
DePaul University, is a combat
veteran of World War II.
He is a co-founder of Ther-
mal Industries of Florida, Inc.,
a company known today as TIF
Instruments, Inc. Berkson was
president of Thermal In-
dustries, which became
publicly-owned along with
Miami Air Conditioning Com-
pany and other subsidiaries. In
1969, he retired from active,
participation but remains as,
one of the largest stockholders
of TIF Instruments, Inc.
Berkson remains active in
real estate investment and con-
sulting, has served as an officer
of Fairfax Broadcasting, Inc.,
which owned AM and FM radio
stations in Palm Beach, i
Past presides* of th Palm-
Hibiscus-Star Islaads Pro-
perty Owners Association,
Berkson served on the Com-
mittee on Juvenile Problems
of the City of Miami Beach, as
chairman of the University of
Chicago Alumni Committee
here, as chairman of the Op-
timist Club of Miami Beach
athletic committee and has
coached numerous youth
sports teams.
Currently a member of the
board of directors of the
American Technion Society, he
formerly served on the board
of the Florida-Israel Chamber
of Commerce and as a member
of the Panel of Consumer Ar-
bitration of the Better
Business Bureau of Greater
Miami.
Berkson was a basketball
teammate of George Mikan,
Marshall H. Berkson
known as the Player of the
Century, when DePaul
dominated national cage
circles.
During World War II, he
completed the ASTP (Army
Specialized Training Program)
engineering program at North
Central College in Illinois,
before being sent overseas
where he earned three bronze
battle stars as a combat infan-
tryman in the European
Theater of Operations. He was
appointed a lieutenant colonel
by the Governor of Florida in
1953.
Berkson is listed in Who's
Who in the South and
Southwest, Who's Who in
World Jewry, won the
Westinghouse Award for
Outstanding Businessman in
1962 and was elected to the
Presidents Council of the
American Institute of
Management.
He is married, and he and his
wife, Lila, live in Miami Beach.
They have been residents here
since 1950. He is a former
member of the Peoples Na-
tional Bank of Commerce Ad-
visory Board, and has been ac-
tive in numerous chambers of
commerce, builders associa-
tions and other organizations.
Berkson said South Shore
Hospital and Medical Center
"will continue its role of ser-
vice to the community through
patient care and research, with
our relationship to the Univer-
sity of Miami School of
Medicine central to South
Shore's continued, planned
development."
Dr. George Feldenkreis, 49,
president of three major impor-
ting companies headquartered
in Miami, has been elected
chairman of the board of
Universal National Bank and
of Universal Bancorp, Inc., a
publicly-held bank holding com-
pany based in North Dade.
Feldenkreis is president of
Car f el. Inc., importer of
motorcycle and automobile
parts. He is president of
Supreme International Cor-
poration, largest importer of
guayaberas shirts in the
world and largest wearing
apparel import company in
Florida.
He also is president of Dia-
mond Electronics, Inc., which
imports and distributes elec-
tronic consumer products in
Florida and Latin America.
Feldenkreis is a director of
Foreign Parts Distributors,
Inc., which specializes in sales
of Vokswagen and Japanese
car parts and accessories, and
is the largest such firm in
Florida.
Universal National Bank
opened in September at 17701
Biscayne Boulevard, at the
entrance of Point East Con-
dominium complex in North
Dr. George Feldenkreis
Dade. A three-story perma-
nent bank building will be
constructed on the same site
in 1985, Feldenkreis said.
A graduate of Havana
University with a Doctor of
Law degree, Feldenkreis is the
recipient of the Brandeis
University Distinguished Com-
munity Service Award, the
Ben-Gunon Award of State of
Israel Bonds and is a former
member of the board of direc
tors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
The United States Depart
ment of Health. Education and
Welfare in 1972 presented him
the Lincoln-Marti Award for
valuable cooperation rendered
the Cuban refugee program of
the Federal government, and
"for extraordinary and
meritorious performance of
civic duty in the United States
of America."
A member of Temple
Menorah of Miami Beach, the
Rabbi Alexander S. Grou
Hebrew Academy and other
civic and religious organiza-
tions, he was a member of the
Hispanic Heritage Committee
board of the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund and of
Israel Bonds. He was presi-
dent of the Cuban Hebrew
division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation for six
years, and initiated its highly
successful fund raising
programs.
He and his wife, DoriU,
live in North Miami.
Universal National Bank Salutes
Jack Hanish At Monday Birthday Party
Jack Hanish, North Dade
civic arid business leader, will
be honored Monday, June 3, at
2 p.m. by Universal National
Bank at an open house party to
be held in the bank's offices at
17701 Biscayne Boulevard, at
the entrance to Point East.
Hanish, marketing director
of Universal National Bank
since its opening last year,
will be feted by area govern-
mental and community of-
ficers, according to George
Feldenkreis, chairman of the
board of the rapdily-growing
bank.
Monday will mark Hanish's
85th birthday, and the
longtime leader of organiza-
tions ranging from B'nai B'rith
to area chambers of commerce
will be saluted as one of the na-
tion's foremost bankers active
at his age. He has served as
president and as vice president
of three other North Dade
banks since beginning his bank-
Jack Hanish
ing career 21 years ago.
Hanish moved here in 1964
after retiring as a Quaker
State Oil distributor in York,
Pa. But a few months in the
Donner, Hecht, Kramer Lease Key Office
Space In New Downtown Building
The 14-story office building
under construction at 33 S.W.
2nd Ave. in downtown Miami
has been named the Profes-
sional Savings Bank Building,
following leasing of its pen-
thouse and first floors by Pro-
fessional Bancorp and its
subsidiaries.
Announcement of the nam-
ing of the building and of the
lease was made by William I.
Donner, partner in DKH Pro-
perties, Ltd., developers of
the building fromerly known
as The Taj. Other principals
in DKH Properties, Ltd., are
Sidney Kramer and Alan R.
Hecht, attorney and certified
public accountant.
Donner and Daniel K. Gill,
chairman of the board of Pro-
fessional Bancorp, said th
lease accounts for 7,500 square
feet of the 85,000 square feet
available in the building which
is strategically located next to
the downtown Metrorail sta-
tion, the Dade County Cour-
thouse, the new Metromover
system, Center for the Fine
Arts, Federal Building,
Historical Museum of South
Florida and the new main
branch of the public library.
Some 27 percent of the Pro-
fessional Savings Bsnk
Building has been leased, in-
cluding the floors taken by
the prime tenants. Profes-
sional Bancorp is the holding
company of Dixie National
Bank and Thomas D. Wood &
Co., mortgage brokers.
Gill said the majority of the
first floor will house a banking
lobby, while the building's pen-
thouse, complete with terrace
and garden, will have offices
for Professional Bancorp and
subsidiaries.
"We believe downtown
Miami is a most important area
for our development and
growth. This office will comple-
ment our operations in Coral
Gables and suburban Dade
County," Gill said.
Professional Savings Bank is
expected to take occupancy in
December, 1985, according to
the announcement by Donner
and Gill.
Governor Bob Graham, left, and Senator Jack D. Gorki*
(Dem.-Miami Beach) listen at the State Capitol Budding J
Tallahassee as Gerald Schwartz, right, makes a PointdZt
ing a conference on tourism. Schwartz, past wee P1*"*
and current governor of the Miami Beach Chamber rftJJ
merce, has served as campaign coordinator for Sen. yfr*
during his past two successful election campaigns. Gorw*
is national vice president of the American Jewish CoW*7
and Schwartz is former national chairman of Israel #<>*"
for B'nai B'rith.
sun were enough, and he soon
developed banking skills
which saw his rapid promo-
tion to key positions in major
financial institutions.
Dade County Commissioner
Barry Schreiber and Sam B.
Topf, members of the board of
Universal National Bank, said
"Jack Hanish is a unique leader
who has demonstrated his love
of his people, his country, his
community and the State of
Israel. This tribute is richly
deserved."
Individuals attending the
Monday birthday party for
Hanish may receive free, mint
uncirculated State of Israel
coins. The new 5-shekel
coins, minted in Jerusalem,
were flown here by El Al
Israel Airlines for the salute
to Hanish, according to
Universal National Bank
directors Gary Dix, i
chairman Larry Perl, Moises
Chorowski and president
Robert Brunner.


Friday, May 81,, 1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
p* M,t,ci fl1'n"
Synagogue Life President Abe Resnick
Runs for Beach Commission Open Seat
Miami Beach civic and
religious leader Abe Resnick,
president of the Holocaust
Memorial Monument Commit-
tee inc., has announced his
andidacy for the open seat on
the Miami Beach city commis-
sion in the November, 1985
election.
Resnick will be honored for
i lifetime of service to the
Jewish people, the State of
Israel and his community
Tuesday, June 18, at a 5 to 8
p.n. cocktail reception at the
Carillon Hotel, according to
Allen Fuller, chairman of the
erent.
Reservations for the tribute
to Resnick may be made by
telephoning his campaign coor-
dinators, Gerald and Felice
Schwartz, at 538-0385.
Reinick recently wan suc-
cessful. together with Beach
Vice Mayor Ben Z. GrenaM,
in securing the next (1987)
national conference of the
American Gathering and
Federation of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors. They
led a Beach delegation to
Philadelphia, site of this
year's widely-publicized
conference.
Founder and life president of
Congregation Ohr Chaim in
Miami Beach, Resnick has
served as a member of the City
of Miami Beach Planning
Board, as a director of the
Mount Sinai Medical Center
Foundation and is a member of
the B'nai B'rith Latin Lodge.
He is a founder and member
in Miami Beach of the
Association for the Welfare
of Soldiers in Israel, founder
ud director of the Miami
Beach Developers Council,
Abe Resnick
and a director of the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy of Miami Beach.
Resnick is a member of the
Masons, director of the
Southeastern Florida
Holocaust Memorial Center,
Inc., and regional chairman of
the American Gathering and
Federation of Jewish
Holocaust Survivors.
After fleeing a Nazi concen-
tration camp in Lithuania, he
continued his escape and joined
first the Partisans and later
became an officer in the Rus-
sian Army which liberated
Berlin from the Nazis. When
the Communists began their
persecution of Jews after the
war, he fled to Cuba, where he
became a successful builder
and developer.
When Castro took power,
Resnick was among the first
to move to Miami Beach,
establishing his residence in
William E. Shockett
Elected Vice Mayor
Miami Beach civic leader and
attorney William E. Shockett,
a partner in the Florida and
Philadelphia law firm of Cohen,
Shapiro, Polisher, Shiekman
and Cohen, has been elected
vice mayor of the City of Miami
Beach. Shockett took office
% 4, and will serve for six
months until the November,
1985 general election.
He was elected city com-
"issioner in 1983 by a two-to-
on* margin over two op-
POMnta. Shockett, current
President of the Kiwania Club
|Miami Beach, it paatpresi-
* of the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce. He
wo served as president of
Miami Beach Bar
foeution and of the Miami
i Club, a 2,000-member
wruuzation.
Shockett was honored at a
communitywide testimonial
*y a, m the Fleur de Lis
fc Hote?" Fntaineb,e*U
Announcement of the event
W made by Stephen H.
Vypen. Miami Beach > aorney
^business leader, wlserv
w m chairman of the tribute.
A resident of Miami Beach
5* the p.st 32 year.,
"of the Miami Beach At-
ey8 Division for both the
UnUed Way 0f Dad. County
uL Ih* Grter Miami
jgfa* Federation'. CM*
'* campaigns.
In 1977, Shockett was
honored by the Civic League of
Miami Beach as the city's
"Civic Leader of the Year." In
1979, the Learning Disabilities
Foundation, Inc. honored
Shockett "for distinguished
service to the organization and
the community."
Shockett has served as a
member of the City of Miami
Beach Charter Review
Board, is a member of the
prestigious Young Presidents
Club of Mount Sinai Medical
Center and for three years
was chairman of a grievance
committee of the Florida Bar.
He recently was elected a
Trustee of the Universtiy of
Miami School of Law Alumni
Association.
Shockett was graduated
from Miami Beach Senior High
School in 1956, earned a BBA
degree in accounting at the
University of Miami in 1960,
and four years later a Juris
Doctor degree from the U-M
School of Law.
He was elected president of
the Greater Miami Alumni
Club of Alpha Epsilon Pi
fraternity, of which he was an
officer while at the University
of Miami. He is an Honorary
Life Trustee of the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce,
serves on the Chamber Board
of Governors, is a member of
B'nai B'rith and the American
Zionist Fedration. He has serv-
ed on the Big Gifts Division of
Federation.
the United States in 1960.
From 1962, he has created a
record of successful con-
dominium developments in
South Florida. He is married
to Sara Litwak. and they have
two married sons, James
Resnick and Dr. Lionel
Reanick aa well as four
grandchildren.
At the age of 61, Resnick has
decided to devote his full time
to the City of Miami Beach as a
full-time city commissioner,
Fuller said.
Community Leaders Endorse
Alex Daoud for Beach Mayor
Alex Daoud, dean of the
Miami Beach City Commission,
announced his candidacy for
Mayor before scores of the
community's foremost civic,
business, government and
religious leaders who promptly
announced their full endorse-
ment for his campaign in the
November, 1985 election.
Daoud, twice elected Vice
Mayor of Miami Beach, is
chairman of the board of the
American Federation of
Senior Citizens Miami Beach
Chapter. Head of a Beach law
firm, he has won the General
Chappie James Americanism
Award of the Miami Beach
Jaycees, and finished third in
the State of Florida annual
speech contest after winning
the area, county and South
Florida titles of
Toastmasters International.
Legal counsel for organiza-
tions ranging from Hadassah's
Miami Beach region for wills
and bequests to Pioneer
Women/Na'amat, Daoud is an
active member of the American
Zionist Federation and has
served on key committees of
the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged.
Endorsing Daoud aa he
began his campaign to unseat
Malcolm Fromberg were
former Mayors Norman Ci-
ment and Dr. Leonard Haber.
Also on hand to support
Daoud was Marilyn Meyer-
son, wife of former Mayor
Murray Meyerson; Barbara
Capitman, president of the
Miami Design Preservation
League and founder of Miami
Beach's famed Art Deco
District.
Daoud also won the en-
dorsements of Russell Galbut,
past president of the Miami
Beach Taxpayers Association;
former Commissioner Hyman
Galbut; Capital Bank vice
president Daniel Holtz; Ivy
Korman, president of the
Miami Beach Jaycees acting as
an individual; and Bea Sen iff-
man, widow of Moe Sen iff man.
president of the Tenants
Association of Florida and
Miami Beach Retirees.
Others supporting Daoud
include Larry Feingold,
member of the Beach VCA;
Gerald Schwartz, past presi-
dent of the Miami Beach
Lodge of B'nai B'rith; Hal
Hertz, member of the Miami
Beach Personnel Board;
Clara Fischer, Roney Plaza
leader; Anselm Vigil,
Democratic executive eom-
mitteeman from Miami
Beach; and Dan Horton, of-
ficer of the South Florida
Council of AFL-CIO.
Daoud was endorsed by
Joseph Drucker, past exalted
ruler of the Miami Beach Elks;
Johnny Wayne, Seacoast
Towers Rental Apartments
program director; Sid Gerah,
Morton Towers leader; Dr.
Richard Chervony, past Jaycee
president; George Nieves,
president of the Condominium
Association; and Mike
Schneider, member of the
Miami Beach Convention
Center Expansion Authority.
In his news conference an-
nouncing his race for mayor,
which was covered by all local
television and radio stations
and newspapers, Daoud said:
We have just witnessed what
has been termed Black Monday
for the City of Miami Beach.
The tragic mismanagement
which resulted in the halt of
construction on the rebuilding
of the Theater of the Perform-
ing Arts and the judicial deci-
sion striking down our issuance
of county bonds to finance the
much-needed expansion of the
Miami Beach Convention
Center delivered a double blow
to our community.
Against that backdrop, and
in view of a whole series of
errors by the Fromberg Ad-
ministration ranging from
the fiasco of the construction
of the boardwalk to the delay
in completing the new
marina,' from the move to fire
our lifeguards to the closing
of the South Shore Library, I
today am announcing that I
am a candidate for Mayor of
Miami Beach.
This has been an administra-
tion that has put projects
before people, and now has
been shown unable to even
handle its projects. Mr.
Fromberg, you have an edifice
complex. Alex Daoud also
wants to develop Miami Beach,
including not just South Pointe
but North Shore and Lincoln
Road and Washington Avenue.
But I do not want to ignore
the needs of our year-round
residents. Under Fromberg,
crime has gone up, code viola-
tions have increased, the tax
base has diminished, our
taxes have increased
dramatically and services
have been reduced.
The administration is ripe
with cronyism and conflicts of
interest, and I shall point out
the issues as the campaign
develops. Before taking ques-
tions from the media, permit
I me to introduce some of those
who are at this announcement
in support of my candidacy.
Miami Beach Honors
Commissioner Grenald
Miami Beach City Commis-
sioner Ben Z. Grenald was
honored at a communitywide
tribute Tuesday at Embers
Restaurant. Harry and Pauline
Mildner were co-chairpersons
of the event which honored the
former Vice Mayor "for a
lifetime of distinguished and
dedicated leadership and ser-
vice to our city."
Grenald, who owns
Moderne Pharmacy at 555 Ar-
thur Godfrey Road, is a
graduate of the University of
Kentucky with a Bachelor of
Science degree and a PHG in
Pharmacy Science. He also
holds a Doctor of Pharmacy
Degree awarded by the Na-
tional Association of Retail
Druggists (NARD). He also
was graduated from the
University of Louisville with
a degree in Packaging
Engineering, under a course
sponsored by the U.S.
Government in the speed
scientific school division.
He served as a major in the
United States Army Reserve
and a lieutenant commander in
the United States Navy
Reserve, where he was a line
officer. Grenald moved to
Miami Beach from Louisville in
1945, and opened 38 retail
drug stores. He also heads a
cosmetic and pharmacy com-
pany headquartered in Miami
Beach which does business in
all 50 states and in eight
foreign countries. He holds
more than 150 trademarks,
patents and copyrights and is a
Florida State "consultant
pharmacist."
Grenald has received a Full
Fellow designation in the
American College of
Apothecaries, highest honor
in professional pharmacy,
holds a Florida real estate
broker's licence and is mar-
ried to the former Selma
Minden. They have two
children and four
grandchildren.
A member of the Jefferson
National Bank Advisory
Board, Grenald is an active
member of the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce, Tem-
ple Emanu-El, the Civic
League of Miami Beach, B'nai
B'rith and numerous other
civic, religious and service
organizations.
Recently, he led the city's
successful effort to secure
the 1987 national convention
of the American Conference
of Holocaust Survivors. He
has been deeply involved in
support of the State of Israel
since its independence was
proclaimed in 1948.
Grenald won election handily
in his first try for public office
in 1983, filling the seat vacated
by Dr. Leonard Haber. He is a
former member of the city of
Miami Beach VCA.


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, May 31, 1985
Hebrew Academy Names
Rabbi Silberstein Principal
Rabbi Harvey Silberstein has
been named as Principal of the
Elementary School of the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy, Mauricio Gluck, chair-
man of the Board of Education of
the Academy, announced.
Rabbi Silberstein, currently
Principal of the Hebrew Day
School of Lakewood, N.J.,
developed a student produced
television show that was both
technical and Judaic. An expert in
second language instruction, Rab-
bi Silberstein has introduced state
of art teaching of Hebrew as a se-
Beth Sholom
Children
Presents Play
The play "I Never Saw Another
Butterfly" will be presented
following the family service at 6
p.m. by all-star cast of children
from the Beth Sholom School For
Living Judaism. The play, a
documentary account of a child's
experiences while a prisoner in
the Nazi concentration camp of
Terezin is under the musical direc-
tion of Cantor David Conviser,
and Eve Conviser and the direc-
tion of Jay W. Jensen. The cast in-
cludes Yvette Lowenthal, Jeremy
Haft and Amanda Green.
Rabbi Silberstein
cond language.
Born on the lower East Side of
New York City, graduated from
Yeshiva University, Rabbi
Silberstein studied at both the
Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theological
Seminary and at the Mesifta
Tifereth Jerusalem, where he
earned his "Smicha" as a rabbi in
1971.
Rabbi Silberstein's career as an
educator has taken him from
Houston, Tex. to Buffalo, N.Y.,
where he served as Principal of
the Kadimah Day School for six
years.
Eilat Chapter To
Honor Fathers
"Fathers of the Year" will be
honored at a pre-celebration of
Father's Day at the 1 p.m., Mon-
day, meeting of the Eilat Chapter
of Pioneer Women/Na'amat to be
held in the auditorium of Financial
Savings and Loan Association,
755 Washington Ave.
Sam Leifer and Max Beck, both
members of Friends of Pioneer
Women/Na'amat will be honored
for the service and contributions
to the organization. Friends have
adopted a national campaign to
raise $50,000 to found an
Equestrian Center in Israel at the
Beba Idelson High School in
Kanot. The center will house Ara-
bian and half-Arabian horses.
Ida Kovalsky will deliver a
recitation of her poem in dedica-
tion to the Fathers. Frieda
Levitan has arranged a musical
program for the special occasion.
Faye Brucker, president, said
the meeting is free and open to
the public.
South Shore Hospital Auxiliary
Elects Officers And Board Member^
Anna Kramer, Barbara Mel
Callion, Ruth Rosenwasser, BettJ
Schwartz, Hortense Sch
and Celia Siegel.
Community Calender
Norton Leff, past commander of the Abe Horrowitz Jewish
War Veterans Post No. 682, and past department commander,
and national executive chairman, will be guest speaker at Temple
Beth Torah at 8 p.m., on Friday evening.
A new sculpture titled "Hokusai's Wave," by artist Jack
Yungernuui, has been donated to the City of Miami by Mr. and
Mrs. Sidney Feldman of Bal Harbour. The work is now on
display at the Terrace Level of the City of Miami/University of
Miami James L. Knights International Center.
A North Miami Beach resident made the University of South
Florida team which won the district competition and will compete
June 8 on the national level in the advertising contest sponsored
by the American Advertising Federation (AAF).
Bonnie Kesaler was selected by classmates to be one of the five
presenters to orally represent the USF student AAF chapter in
this year's competition. USA competes in a district covering
Florida and the Caribbean. In Washington, Kessler and her team-
mates will challenge the other 14 district winners.
Minie Rhine, president of South Florida Women's Committee
of Shaare Zedek Medical Center in Jerusalem announced that
plans have been made for their Annual Gala Luncheon to be held
Wednesday, January 22.
Saturday, June 1, Cedars Medical Center in cooperation with
the American Cancer Society, is sponsoring a panel discussion
and screening of skin cancer in the hospital's Seminar Center.
This program will last from 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and cover the
cause, detection and treatment.
An exhibition of art-photos by Israeli art photographer Farag
Peri titled "Israel My Homeland" will be held Sunday through
Tuesday from 12 noon to 9 p.m. at the Social Hall of Tower Forty-
One, Miami Beach.
The Sephardic Jewish Center of North Miami Beach will hold an
Oneg Shabbat Dinner Friday, June 7 following services at 7 p.m.
Sarah Maya and Michele Allovche are in charge.
Prescott Travel Presents:
THE
Israel-London Connection
With
Yehuda ShWman
depart from New York
City on October 13,1985
(2 weeks)
this deluxe tour will
include intimate solo
concerts by Yehuda and
ensemble at key points
including Masada-
Western Wall-Seaof
Galilee, etc.
For detailed brochure
call toll free:
1-800-321-3861
Ask for Dee
Louis C. Feuer
Feuer Elected
Temple President
Louis C. Feuer was reelected
president of Temple Shir Ami of
Kendall. Feuer is a director of the
Foster Medical Division of Avon
Products and has served as chair-
man of the board of Shir Ami for
two years.
Helene (Mrs. John) Owen and
Ruth Roney were installed as co-
presidents of the Auxiliary of
South Shore Hospital and Medical
Center, affiliated with the Univer-
sity of Miami School of Medicine.
They were sworn in at a luncheon
at the Doral Beach Hotel by Dr.
William Zubkoff, executive direc-
tor of the Miami Beach hospital.
Mrs. Owen moved up from the
position of first vice president,
replacing Mrs. Sara (Lewis) Ruts
tein, who took over the post of
parliamentarian and life chairman
of hospital volunteers, Mrs. Roney
will serve a second term as co-
president.
Mrs. Owen, who has served as
president of the Miami Beach
Garden Club, was co-chairperson
of the luncheon with Mrs. Esther
Bright, who was installed as vice
president for life membership.
Other vice presidents who took
office include Mollie Peal, Lucy
Madariaga, Dorothy Ash and
Monica Heftier. Elected officers
include Jay Greenlaw, treasurer;
Beatrice Goodman, recording
secretary; Gladys Austrian,
Financial Secretary; Betty Uller,
corresponding secretary; Peggy
Lewis, social secretary. Mrs.
Beatrice Brodie will serve as
honorary life president and Mrs.
Betty Pinks as honorary vice
president. Past presidents who
will serve in a special cabinet in-
clude Ingrid Fine, Anna Singer,
Melvyne Sommers, and Sara
Ruts tein.
Additional members of the
board of directors installed are
Reve Kapit, president's aide; Pep-
py Fields, goodwill ambassador;
and Florence Flederman and
Florence Mahler, chairpersons of
volunteers. Also installed as
members of the board are Lila
Berkson, Betty Brandt, Claire
Brotman, Esther Faber, Belle
Berlin, Pauline Fink, Dolores Gor-
don, Anne Kirschtel, Doris Lamb,
NrvH
Marshall H. Berkson. president!
and chairman of the board A
South Shore Hospital and Medical!
Center, praised Mrs. Roney aJ
Mrs. Rutstein "for a year of great-l
ly increased community!
awareness of South Shore in thcl
entire community, and for
dedicated and devoted leadership I
of an indispensable arm of cw|
hospital and medical center."
Rabbi Kingsley
Installs Officers
The Brotherhood of Temple
Sinai of North Dade installation of
Officers was to have taken plat,
on Thursday evening at Soren's I
Cafe in North Miami Beach. The
Installation was conducted by I
Temple Sinai's spiritual leader
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley.
Retiring from office after two|
years will be Peter Gelbwaks.
Replacing him as the new:-,
elected President will be Dr. Alar.
Metzger. Elected with Dr. Met'
zger are: Jonathan Sussman and
Erick Fass, vice presidents; Irv-
ing Leopold, secretary; Barry
Hauser, treasurer.
Royal Palm Hotel
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Area Broadcaster Elected
UM Alumni Trustee
Friday, May 31,1985 / The Jewiah Floridian Page 5-B
Goldie Rosenberg Celebrates 100th Birthday
Audrey R. Finkelstein, area
broadcaster and volunteer, has
been elected by the University of
Miami Alumni Association to
serve on the University's Board of
Trustees for a three-year term.
Mrs. Finkelstein, who earned
her AB degree in 1938, previously
served three years as ex-officio
member of the board after serving
as 1982 president of the General
Alumni Association.
At the UM she was the founding
president of Alpha Epsilon Phi
and was its Outstanding Alumna
of the Nation; a charter member
of Mortar Board, president of the
UM Women's Guild, a member of
Omicron Delta Kappa honorary
society, former president of the
UM Women's Commission; 1981
Alumni Homecoming Chair. She
created the successful "Alum-
nites" lecture series and Alumni
College weekend and received the
Association's Outstanding Service
Award in 1980 and the UM Order
of Merit in 1971.
In the areas of public service,
she has played a leadership role in
numerous community and na-
tional agencies, including serving
as chair of the Dade County Com-
munity Relations Board, national
vice president of Girls Scouts
U.S.A. and as an officer and direc-
tor of United Way.
She conducts a weekly radio in-
terview program, "Straight
Talk," was president of the
Greater Miami chapter of Women
in Communications, and has an
extensive background in the field
of communications.
Honored by the many organiza-
tions she has served, she has been
named Dade County Outstanding
Citizen and Woman of the Year
and was selected by the Governor
as one of 14 Outstanding Women
in Florida.
It's not easy to get Goldie Rosenberg to tell you
about her first job, and how much she earned.
Events which were important 87 years ago take on
vague forms when you get to be 100.
Despite some gentle prodding and considerable
meandering, you feel as though you're holding a
bucket of water. You can see small eddies, you
know it's full and heavy, but nothing much is hap-
pening. Suddenly, the bucket springs a leak,
there's a big gush, and Goldie recalls all.
She was thirteen when she went to work as an
apprentice milliner in the garment center, the
Lower East Sids of New York City, at the munifi-
cent salary of $1 a week. She was an apt pupil. She
quickly learned the trade. She liked her bosses; her
bosses liked her. But she represented a risk for
them. She was too young for working papers. She
was thirteen years old. And very small.
There was an exciting routine for unexpected
labor inspector visits. "Hide, Goldie, hide. Get in
the big box!" The floor lady would help her into a
large cardboard box. Her co-workers would cover
her with ribbons and remnants, caution her not to
sneeze.and close the box. Later: "Okay, it's safe,
Goldie. Come on out now."
Goldie Rosenberg, whose actual birthdate is
June 27, will be honored by the South Dade JCC on
Wednesday, June 5, at 10:30 a.m. in the social hall.
One hundred children of the JCC children's
department, the staff, fellow students in
Rosenberg's drama and singing classes, her
teachers and the entire Senior Adult Department
will pay tribute to her.
"The uniqueness of Goldie," stated Sherry Hor-
wich, Senior Adult supervisor, "is that despite her
age and some physical problems, she continues to
play an active role in her Creative Drama class and
choral group."
Girt Bossak, drama instructor, reports that she
rarely misses a class. "She lives for her activities
and maintains a zest and humor, as well as an at-
titude and graciousness, which is uncommon
among senior adults." G.B.
MATURE live-in compan-
ion, housekeeper, Yiddish
speaking, for alert elderly
lady, references required.
758-1583
YOUTH Movement needs
college age person work
with elementary & high
school age Israel expe-
rience preferred 1 year
commitment 947-0637.
The 1985-86 officers of the Junior Auxiliary of
the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged jnrUirad *>i are (seated left to right) Lillian Namm,
Parliamentarian; Helen Rechtschaffer, Vice
President; Esther Schneiderman, Honorary
Past President and Chairwoman of the
dominating Committee; Jean Tesser, Presi-
dent; Ruddy Goldberg, Executive Vice Presi-
dent;/standing left to right) Evelyn Kopelman.
Vice President; Gladys Israel, Vice President
and Honorary Past President; Ceil Baker-
:-.-J&tq,Merman,-Trmmnr; ftw-Sewter,. W
responding Secretary; Pearl Solovei, Ex-
ecutive Vice President; May Cowan, Recor-
ding Secretary; (not pictured) Rena Ratner,
financial Secretary; Monya Resnick
Honorary Board Member; Sylvia Bach, Com-
munications Secretary.
The Lehrman Day School
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Early Childhood Dept. Academically Oriented
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 31, 1985
Synopsis Of The Weekly Torah Portion
. "Ye shall bless thechildren of Israel, ye shall say unto
them: The Lord bless thee, and keep thee"
(Numbers 6.23-24).
NASO
NASO The number of Levites between 30 and 50 years of
age eligible to worship and minister in the tent of meeting
was 8,580. All those persons considered unclean either
beause they were lepers, or had a discharge, or had touched a
corpse were expelled from the camp. Thereafter, follow the
regulation affecting adultery and the Nazirites; and the
account of the various offerings made by the princes of the
tribes after the tabernacle was finally constructed.
(The recounting Of til* Weekly Portion Of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Won
man-Tsamir, SIS, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 7S
Maiden Lane, Now York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the
society distributing the volume.)
Commencement And Confirmation
At Beth Torah Friday Evening
The ninth grade students of the
Harold Wolk Religious School will
be confirmed on Friday evening at
8 p.m. in the Main Sanctuary. Dr.
Max A. Lipschitz, spiritual leader
of the congregation will charge
them with a reaffirmation of their
faith.
The School's seventh grade
students will be graduating on
Friday night June 7. Both classes
will be conducting the Friday
night services under the direction
of their teachers and Rabbi Ran-
dall Konigsburg, Assistant Rabbi
of the Congregation.
Harold Friedman, Education
Vice President, Harvey Brown,
Executive Director and Rhea
Schwartzberg, Education Direc-
tor, will present the students with
their diplomas, certificates and
awards.
Ninth grade cnfirmands include Audrey
Barak. Michael Evans. Gail Gottlieb. An-
drea Grossman. Elise Keil. Aoan Kronstadt,
Brian Krutchik, Natalie Libow. Barbara
Max. Kenny Weisberg, Joey Yativ, Cory
Zigier. Tracy Kronowitz.
Seventh grade graduates are Alexander
Brodsky, AUon Cohen. Jordan Halem. Jacob
Nae, Michael Krauss, Cary Arak. Lynn
Shankin. Jeffrey Evans, Jay Jawitz. Jason
Krois, Careen Praachnik, Banai Feldstein,
Steven Gorin, David Keil, Jodie Weinstein,
Steven Hurwitx, Lonny Bernath, Aaron
Classman, John Hager, Keith Kimmel,
Brian Pomeranc, and Micheal Rosengaus.
Special receptions for confir-
mands and graduates and their
families will be held following the
services in Deakter Hall.
Rabbi Lehrman To
Conduct Youth Service
Dr. Irving Lehrman. spiritual
leader of Temple Emanu-El,
Miami Beach will conduct a
special youth service on Saturday
morning, June 1, at 9 a.m. in the
Main Sanctuary.
Boy Scout Troop No. 65 will be
honored for their community
service.
Largest Class To Graduate
From Hillel School
The largest ninth grade class of
the Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
munity Day School, North Miami
Beach, will graduate at their com-
mencement exercises on June 6,
7:30 p.m., in the school's
Friedman-Uhlar Auditorium.
Twenty-five students, who have
completed their studies in the
ninth grade will be graduated, ac-
cording to Dr. Jerome M. Levy,
Vice Principal.
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CHIROPRACTIC
CLINIC
9404 S Dine Highway
Miami. Florida
666-8883
OaCal
24 Hours
Day
The President of the Hillel
School, Mr. Michael Scheck, will
preside over the ceremonies. He
will be assisted by Dr. Jerome M.
Levy, Vice Principal; Rabbi Jay
Neufeld, Assistant Principal
Judaic Studies, and Mr. Marshall
Ha.lt.uch, Executive Director.
Diplomas will be presented to
the following graduates by Dr.
Miles Kuttler, Educational Vice
President.
Tal Almog. Brett Bier, Adam Brown,
Ronit Fefer, William Feldman, Esther
Frankl. Michelle Gaber. Talia Harel, Jordan
Herzberg, Seth Kaplan. Sheera Karch,
Melina Klinger, Stuart Kloda. Joel Laufer,
Stacy Levy, Jason Rogozinaki. Ian Roth.
Michelle Roth. Adam Schreiber. Daniel
Serber. Michael Shuman. Tamir Spitxer,
Jay Tarsis. Harry Teichman. and Robert
Weinglass.
Awards will be presented to
outstanding students who have
excelled in different areas of
Judaic and Secular studies.
The class valedictorians are
Shera Karch (General Studies),
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Gary
Karch of Hollywood and Michelle
Roth (Judaic Studies), daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Leon Roth of North
Miami Beach. The class
salutatorian is Jordan Herzberg,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Herz-
berg of North Miami Beach. The
yearbook will be presented by Jay
Tarsis to this year's honorees
Judge and Mrs. Arthur Winton.
Melina Klinger, Student Council
President will present the class
gift.
A collation will follow the
ceremonies.
GREAT LOCATION
spacious 1 i ] m Apts.
central Air, Pool, Rec. Room
a Social Club, walk to 163rd
St. Mall. Adults no Pets.
Bristol House Apts.
949-2976_______
Adath Yeshurun Religious School
To Graduate Twenty Students
Miami Beach resident Lisa
Stern has been honored by her
classmates at Stern College for
Women (SCW) for exemplary
character, personality, and
service to the community. The
daughter of Carol Schneider of
North Meridian, Lisa has been
awarded the Lisa
Wachtenheim Memorial
Award for her activities as
chairwoman of the 'Bihur
Cholim' at SCW. A sociology
major, she will begin graduate
studies this fall at Yeshiva
University's Wurzweiler
School of Social Work.
Bar Mitzvah
ALLAN URMAN
Allan William Urman, son of
Reuven and Sofia Urman will be
called to the Torah as Bar Mitzvah
on June 1 at 8:30 a.m. at Temple
Adath Yeshurun, 1025 NE Miami
Gardens Drive. North Miami
Beach.
The celebrant is a student in the
Adath Yeshurun Religious School
and is active in the Junior Choir at
the Synagogue.
He attends John F. Kennedy
Junior High School where he is in
the seventh grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Urman will host
the Kiddush following the services
in honor of the occasion.
HEATH LEWIS
At Shabbat Services on Satur-
day, June 1, W. Heath Lewis, son
of Mrs. Jeril Young Lewis and
Stuart Lewis, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah at Temple
Beth Sholom, Miami Beach. Rab-
bis Leon Kronish, Harry Jolt and
Paul Caplan will officiate.
Heath is a student of the Confir-
mation Class of 5747.
Gold Coast BBYO
Elects Officers
Members of the B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization elected their
slate of officers to represent the
600 youth in Gold Coast Council
BBYO at the recent Gold Coast
Council Convention.
AZA. the boy's branch of
BBYO. elected Ed Capp of Planta-
tion, president; Darren Frost of
Plantation, vice president; Jeff
Moshe of Plantation. Membership
vice president North; Jason Good-
man of Pembroke Pines. Member-
ship vice president South; and
David Dunay of Boca Raton,
secretary.
BBG, the B'nai B'rith girls,
elected as their officers Ilyssa
Kraus of Plantation, president;
Stacy Steiner of Plantation, Pro-
gram vice president; Lisa Stein-
man of Coral Springs, Member-
ship vice president North; Sheryl
Sandburg of North Miami Beach,
Membership vice president South;
and Kerith Stern of Pembroke
Pines, secretary.
Twenty students will graduate
from the Hai Class of Adath
Yeshurun Religious School at
special services on Friday even-
ing, June 7. This is the culmina-
tion of five years of Jewish
Studies. Many of these students
are post Bar and Bat Mitzvah
youngsters, Simcha Freedman.
Director of Education, Stuart
Markowitz and their teacher,
Aaron Schwarzbaum, decided to
continue their Jewish Education.
Students include David Aelion. Shoshana
Batterman, Garett Herman. Dahlia
Chesnoff, Robert Geller, Marc Gendler,
Miriam Graff, Joshua Halperin. Lee Hen-
drickson. Marni Lichstrahl. Bonni Mailer,
Peter Mendelson, Michelle Metzger, Lisa
Paniry, Edward Riechelson, Rochelle
Rubin. Gregory Rosen, Ron Sas, Brenda
Seinberg, Rebecca Steiner, and Alan
Tempkins.
At the conclusion of this special
Hai Class Graduation Service, the
Adath Yeshurun "Good Citizen-
ship" award will be bestowed
EXECUTIVE SECRETARY
Prestigious non-profit organiza-
tion, knowledge of word-process-
ing, office North Miami Beach.
9-5, excellent benefit package.
Call 538-3090
upon Rebecca Steiner for highest
grades and participation in the
Hai Class and involvement in
synagogue and community. A Kid-
dush will follow the service.
On Saturday, June 8, at 12:15
p.m., Adath Yeshurun Religious
School will host its annual Junior
Congregation Banquet for those
students who have attended
Junior Congregation services on a
regular basis.
Students include Francine Babischkin,
Sean Babischkin, March Babischkin,
Heather Brooks, Elia Chesnoff, Daniel
Cohen. Joshua Cohen, Dahlia Chesnoff.
Robert Franco, Daniel Friedman, Gareth
Fink. Lawrence Franco. Steven Gross,
Miriam Graff. Stephanie Goldberg, Lee
Hendrickson. Seth Kohn, Deena Lieberman.
Todd Morchelies, Joshua Moses, Bonni
Mailer, Michelle Metzger, Lisa Paniry. Elan
Radiinsky, Michelle Rubin, Rochelle Rubin,
Alison Silverman, Sarah Samuels. Marc
Silverman. Marc Silverman, Natan
Samuels. Joshua Silverman, Beth Sulzer,
Brenda Seinberg, Joshua Steiner. Rebecca
Steiner, Alan Urman. and Heather Yeckes.
Auction And Open House
At Lehrman Day School
A gala Auction and Open House
on Sunday, June 9. will celebrate
the completion of the newly
renovated and expanded campus
of the Lehrman Day School at
727-77 Street, Miami Beach.
Jay Horowitz, who with his
wife, Hedya, is co-president of the
Family League of Temple Emanu-
El, will be the auctioneer. A vast
array of exciting and unique items
will be offered.
Auction merchandise may be
previewed at 7 p.m., with the auc-
tion starting at 8 p.m.
Starting at 7 p.m., students of
the Lehrman Day School will con-
duct tours of the school.
A flea market, open at 7 p.m..
sponsored bv the 8th grade
students, wili feature new and
unusual merchandise.
The Lehrman Day School pro-
vides education in both general
and Jewish studies for Grades 1
through 8; a preschool academic
program is offered for ages 2-6.
The school is under the guidance
of Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual
leader of Temple Emanu-El, and
Lawrence M. Schantz, Chairman
of the Board of Education.
Dr. Amir Baron is Director of
Education and Rowena Kovler is
Principal of the Lehrman Dav
School.
The P re School and
Kindergarten is under the direc-
tion of Principal Philippa
Feldman.
Temple Emanu-El Confirmation
Following the 1985 Service last
Saturday students and their
parents joined Dr. and Mrs. Irving
Lehrman, for a luncheon in the
Friedland Ballroom.
Students who participated in
the Confirmation Service are:
Matthew David Albin. son of Dr. Eric
Albin and Ms. Linda Zimmerman; Brigette
Bard, daughter of Mr. and Ms. William I.
Bard; Karla Dascal, daughter of Mr. and
Ms Charles Dascal; Elisabeth Abby
Feldman, daughter of Mr. and Ms. Michael
Feldman; .larky Gutt Flint, son of Mr.
Salomon Gutt and Ms. Miryam Flint Posner.
Also. Marc Granoff, son of Mr. Robert and
Ms. Miki Granoff; Darren Greenwald, son of
Mr. William and Ms. Monique Greenwald;
Lizette Gurman, daughter of Mr and Ms.
Mendel Gurman; Jonathan Eli Harris, son of
Drs. Joseph and Joan Harris Gregory'
Kaplan, son of Mr. and Ms. Moises Kaplan.
Eric Kassin, son of Ms. Miriam Kassin.
Sisterhood
Luncheon
Temple Adath Yeshurun
Sisterhood. North Miami Beach, is
holding its annual Donor and In-
tallation Luncheon on June 2. at
12:30 p.m.
Officers to be installed are
Trudy Lechner. President;
Marilyn Ladis. Fundraising Vice
President; Tina Cohen, Member-
ship Vice President; Karen Mor-
chelies, Cultural Vice President;
Beverly Silverman, Youth Vice
President; Sandy Moskowitz.
Treasurer; Judy Wilensky, Cor-
responding Secretary; and Ann
Frei, Recording Secretary. Outgo-
ing President, Barbara Rosen.
Beth David
Confirms 15
Beth David announces the con-
firmation of its Religious School.
Students included are Julianne Alweiss,
Scott Budner. David Buckner, Steven Foor,
Matthew Gatof, Saul Kredi, Alyse
Horowitz, Jennifer Lefcourt, Adam
l.uhtiger. Shari Perlman. Robert Philipson.
Michael Portnny. Billy Schild. James
Schwehel. and Andy Wainberg.
Dana Gabnelle Kaye, daughter of Mr. and
Ms Hal Kaye Nathan Kfir. son of Mr. and
Ms. Morris Kfir; Peter William Klein, son of
Mr. and Ms. Fred Klein, Jorge Matz, son of
Mr and Ms. Isaac Matz; Shanna Muhtar.
daughter of Mr and Ms. Ike Muhtar
Also. James Nieman. son of Mr. and Ms
Gilberto Nieman; Lisa Julie Niven, daughter
of Dr. and Ms. John Niven; Irwin Ray. son
of Mr. and Ms. Jose Raij; Steven Todd
Prager, son of Mr. and Ms. Prager; Ari
Schantz. son of Mr and Ms. Lawrenei-
Schantz; David Slingbaum. son of Mr
Michael and Ms. Carol Slingbaum, Meredith
Sonaon, daughter of Mr. Stephen Sonson
and Ms. Barbara Ceesi
Also. Lisa Lee Steinberg, daughter of
Sen. and Ms. Paul Steinberg; Elizabeth
Week, daughter of Mr. and Ms. David Week
Daniela Swaebe. daughter of Mr. Richard
and Ms. Lili Swaebe; Michael Scott Takiff.
BOB of Mr. and Ms. Raymond Takiff; Harry
Taubenfeld. son of Mr. and Ms. Isaac
Taubenfeld; Robert Joseph Weiss, son of
Mr. and Ms. Samuel W,
J. Jeffrey Campbell, Chairman
and Chief Executive Officer of
Burger King Corporation, will
be the guest of honor at a Na-
tional Industry Dinner being
held in association with State
of Israel Bonds on June 20, a I
the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in
New York.
----------


1 -
The law firm ofPayton, Rachlin P. A. recently hosted a cocktail
reception for the Attorney's Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. The event, held on behalf of the 1985 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign, featured
_ rk Londner, commentator for Channel 7, as the guest speaker.
~hawn above, from left, David Deehl, Richard Rachlin, Londner,
Harry Payton, and Josh Marcus.
Friday, May 31, 1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Teenage Volunteers Needed
Vacation is a wonderful time and it is even better when you
have the opportunity to help others. Mount Sinai Medical Center
is looking for teen age volunteers, at least 14-years-old, who wish
to offer a little of their time to work in such areas of the hospital
as transport, service aid and the Child Care Center.
Orientation will take place in Mount Sinai's Wolfson
Auditorium, on Friday, June 21, at 9:30 a.m. You can come or call
in advance for an appointment to interview with Diana Arcen-
tales, Assistant Director of Volunteer Services, at 674-2080.
Gerald K. Schwartz (left),
chairman of the Attorney's
Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, shares a
moment with Richard Payton,
one of the hosts of the At-
torney's Division Cocktail
Reception held recently on
behalf of the 1985 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
Jewish Day School
In Tampa
Seeking Full-Time Hebrew Teacher, and
Part-Time Kindergarten Aide.
If interested in either position, please call:
813-875-8287
m
a irs teacher Henry Small and batik and painting instructor
Carol Chanin attend to the creative needs of the 60 children
n the Temple Beth Sholom School of Fine Arts. Arts and
crafts executed by their students, aged 4-12 will be on view at the
temple's Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery through June 9.
Dan Meridor To Speak
At Beth Torah
Mr. Dan Meridor, member of
the Israeli Knesset, will be the
guest speaker at Beth Torah Con-
gregation, North Miami Beach, on
June 1.
Mr. Meridor currently serves as
a Member of the Israeli Knesset
from the Herat Party. As a
iber of the Likud Coalition,
representing the Parliament's
largest political grouping, Mr.
Meridor plays an active role on a
number of important government
Mies, including the Foreign Af-
fairs and Security Committee and
the Judicial Committee of the
Knesset.
During his military service. Mr.
Meridor served with the Israeli
Tank < lorpa in which he now holds
erve officer rank.
s500 Publix
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With Each New Subscription
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 31,1986
Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-21S45
NOTICE BY PUBUCATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELVIA M GONZALEZ.
Petitioner,
-and
GEOVAN VELEZ,
Respondent.
TO: GEOVAN VELEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed and commence in
this court and you are required to
nerve a copy of your written defenses,
if any to it on MELVTN J. ASHER.
ESQ.., attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 825 South Bayshore Drive.
Suite 543. Miami. FL 33131, and file
the original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July 5. 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this 29
day of May, 1985.
RICHARD P BRISKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
19111 May31;June7. 14.21. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-4020
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BETTY SELIGSON
NOTICE Or ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of Betty Sehgson. deceased, File
Number 86-4020 CP 02. is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida. The personal
representatives of the estate are
Melvin M. Seligson and Sametta
Richter, whose addresses are 17290
N.E. 17 Ave North Miami Beach, FL
and 7410 Pennfield Court, Pittaburg,
PA. The name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons hsving clsims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file with the clerk of the above court
a written statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each claim
must be in writing and must indicate
the basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount claimed. If
the claim is not yet due, the date when
it will become due shall be stated. If
the claim is contingent or unli-
quidated, the nature of the uncertain
ly shall be stated. If the claim is
secured, the security shall be describ-
ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
cient copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mail one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad-
ministration has been mailed are re-
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to file any objections they may have
that challenge the validity of the dece-
dent's will, the qualification of the per-
sonal representative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: May 31,
1985.
Melvin M. Seligson
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Betty Seligson
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Ferdie and Goux
717 Ponce de Leon Blvd.,
Suite 216
Coral Gabies, Florida 33134
Telephone: (306) 446-3667
19112 May 81; June 7,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name HPT at 3580 N.W
62nd Street. Miami, florida S3142 intend to
register said name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County, Florida
High Production Technologies. Inc.
Stanley M. Pred
Attorney for High Production
Technologies Inc.
19080 May 24. 31; June 7, 14. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name J.
4 J. CABINETS A APPLIANCES at
8816 S.W. 129 Street, Miami intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
John Villeins
Neater Mendez
Nelson C. Keahen. Esq.
Attorney for J. a J. Cabinets
8905 S.W. 87 AVenue No. 209
Miami. FL 33176
19096 May 31. June 7, 14.21.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File NabsMT 86-3382
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN SUSSMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate ol
BENJAMIN SUSSMAN. deceased.
File Number 85-3382 (04). is pending
in the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are required
to file with this court. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST
ITBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction
of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun
on May 31. 1985.
Personal Representative:
IRENE SUSSMAN
1001 91st Street
Bay Harbor Islands. Florida 33154
Attorney for Personsl Repre
sentative:
NELSON a FELDMAN. P.A.
1136 Kane Concourse
Bsy Harbor Islands, Florida 33154
Telephone: (306) 866-6716
00004 May 31: June 7, 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-21530
IN RE: The Marriage of:
WILSON NEREUS,
Petitioner,
and
YOLANDE A. NEREUS,
Respondent.
TO: YOLANDE A. NEREUS.
Residence unknown, you shall serve
copy of your Answer to the Petition
for Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attorney. 612
Northwest 12th Ave.. Miami, Florida
33136, and file original with Court
Clerk on or before July 5, 1986. other-
wise a default will be entered.
May 23. 1986.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: CLARINDA BROWN
19098 May 31. June 7. 14.21.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-21252
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
OLATUNDE FAFOWORA.
Petitioner/Husband,
and
TOYIN FAFOWORA.
Respondent/Wife.
TO: TOYIN FAFOWORA
No. 10 Lewis Street
Lagos, Nigeris
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFID
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve s copy of
your defenses, if any, to it on
GEORGE J. BOLTON, ESQ.. at
tomey for Petitioner, whose address
is 2320 N.E. 171st Street. North
Miami Beach. Florida 33160, and file
the original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June 28,
1986: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
23rd day of May, 1986.
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By USAMARIE MARCANO
As Deputy Clerk
GEORGE J. BOLTON, ESQ.
Florida Bar No. 007335
2320 N.E. 171st Street
North Miami Beach, Florida 33160
Telephone: (806) 949-8341
Attorney for Petitioner
19100 May 31; June 7.14,81. 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
m THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND K)R DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION No. 85-21063
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JUAN J. CENTENO
Petitioner,
and
ROSA M. CENTENO
Respondent.
TO: ROSA CENTENO
1160 West 79th Street
Apt. No. 247-B
Hialeah, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed and commenc-
ed in this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it, on CARLOS M.
MENDEZ, Esq., Attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 200 West
49th Street, Hialeah, Florida 33012,
and file the original with the Clerk of
the above styled Court on or before
June 28. 1986; otherwise s default will
be entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week, for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said Court at Miami. Florida, on this
22nd day of May. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: CP. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, Esq.
200 West 49th Street
Hialeah, Florida 33012
Attorney for Petitioner '
00003 May31;June7. 14.21, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
BHK COLLECTIONS at Villa A
10250 Collins Avenue. Bal Harbour,
Florida 33154, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit Co-
urt of Dade County, Florida.
Barbara H. Klein
John H. Gerken, Esquire
Attorney for Barbara H. Klein
D/B/A BHK COLLECTIONS
00002 May 31; June 7. 14, 21. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
thte undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious namets)
PAY PHONES INCORPORATED,
COIN PHONES INCORPORATED
PUBLIC TELEPHONE CORPORA-
TION, intends to register said name(s)
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Jose L. Nazar
00001 May31:June7. 14.21. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name AB-
CO Computers, Inc., at 1853 N.E.
163rd Street, North Miami Beach.
Florida, intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County Florida.
Disks N' Bytes, Inc.
Harvey D. Friedman, Esquire
Attorney for Disks N' Bytes, Inc.
19092 May 31; June 7. 14,21,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
ITALY JEWELRY at 12560 SW 8 St.
intend to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Enterprises And Investments
Group Inc.
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ
Attorney at Law
Hemisphere International Center
2163 Coral Way. Suite 400
Miami, Florida 33145
19096 May 31. June 7, 14,21,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious names
Exclusively Yours, 24 Caret Escort,
Always Yours. Blondes Only. Dial A
Blonde. College Co-ed, Anytime Any
Place, Platinum Escorts, Call Us
First, Princess Escorts st 9100 S.
Dadeland Blvd. Miami, Florida in-
tends to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
O.CM. Enterprises. Inc.
Attorney for O.CM. Enterprises,
Inc.
Marvin B. Seidman Esq.
Suite 901
9100 S. Dadeland Blvd.
Miami, Florida
Phone: 666-8900
19094 May 31. June 7. 14,21. 1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
Dallas Park Plata, Inc. intend to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
The Downtown, Inc.
19104 May 31, June 7, 14, 21, 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring tt> engage in
business under the fictitious name Roberto Asian. D/B/A Aries Driving
School, st 5926 West 16 Ave..
Hialeah. Florida 33012. intends to
register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Roberto Asian
19093 May 31; June 7, 14,21,1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
W THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT Or FLORIDA, DM
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 86-218(4 (10)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CARMEN ROSA MENA RONDAN
and
JOSEPH ANTONIO RONDAN
TO: Jose Antonio Rondan
Calle Dies NO. 1364
Puerto Nuevo.
Puerto Rico 00920
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any to it on
MAX A. GOLDFARB, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is 19 West
Flagler St.. Miami, Florida 33130, and
file the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before July 5.
1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this 29
day of May, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By T. Casamayor
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MAX A. GOLDFARB
19 West Flagler St.
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
19110 May3i:Jun'e7.K^1.1985, '
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 85-21867
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
FLA BAR NO. 005150
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ANTONIO MEDINO
PETITIONER
AND
MARIA TERESA MEDINO.
RESPONDENT.
TO: MARIA TERESA
MEDINO
(RESIDENCE UNKNOWN)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
the Petition seeks an award that cer-
tain property owned by you and Peti-
tioner, ANTONIO MEDINO, as
tenants by the entirety, located at
3011 N.W. 14 Avenue, Miami, Dade
County, Florida, and more particular-
ly described as:
Lot 16. Block 20 WEST END
PARK AMMENDED. according to
the Plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 6. at Page 142 of the Public
Records of Dade County. Florida
to the Petitioner as a special equity
and/or equitable distribution and you
are required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on to
HOWARD HILL BENNETT.ES
QUIRE, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 19 West Flagler
Street, No. 520, Miami. Florida 33130.
and file the original with the Clerk of
the above styled Court on or before
July 5th. 1985. otherwise a Default
will be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the Petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this 29
day of May. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk of the
Circuit Court,
Dade County. Florida
By Clarinda Brown
DEPUTY CLERK
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
Howard Hill Bennett. Esq. '
19 West Flagler Street
No. 520
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone; 379-1886
19109 May 31; June 7.14.21,1985
NOTICE UNDER
ncrrnous name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name IN-
SURANCE STORE at 12805 South.., v ...
Dixie Highway. Miami, Florida 33166
intend to register said name with the *
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
INSURANCE STORE, DiC.
CYPEN. CYPEN a DRIBIN
Attorneys for Applicant
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (306) 532-3200
19071 May 17. 24,31. June 7. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
SHOE VICE at 319 N.W. 25th St.,
Miami, Fla. intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
CATALDJA SHOE CORPORATION
319 N.W. 26th St., Miami, Fla
ROSA M. VEGA
Attorney for CATALINA SHOE
CORPORATION
218 Almeria Avenue,
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
19062 May 17, 24,31, June 7, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-4634
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM A. SANCHEZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of
WILLIAM A. SANCHEZ, deceased.
File Number 85-4634, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are required
to file with this court. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction
of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun
on May 31, 1985.
Personal Representative:
MARGARET BODNAR
4395 Pine Tree Drive
Miami Beach. FL 33140
STEPHEN H. CYPEN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
CYPEN, CYPEN A DRIBIN
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (305) 532-3200
By: MICHAEL A. DRIBIN.
ESQUIRE
19103 May 31. June 7, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-328
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JOHN ANTHONY CANALEJO,
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of
JOHN ANTHONY CANALEJO,
deceased, File Number 85-328, is pen-
ding in the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the personal
representatives and the personal
representatives' attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are required
to file with this court, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested person
to whom this notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative(s), venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
OFREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun
on May 31. 1985.
Co-Personal Representatives:
Mrs. Wanda Canalejo
580 East 31st Street
Hialeah. Florida 33013
Mr. Donald Canalejo
1085 West 66th Street
Hialeah. Florida 33013
Attorney for Co-Personal Repre-
sentatives:
LAW OFFICES OF JEROLD H.
REICHLER
1400 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
Suite 103
North Miami Beach. Florida 33179
Telephone: (306) 947-6226
19101 May 31, June 7,1985


V
Friday, May 31, 1985 / The Jewish Ploridian Page 9-B
[c Notices
CU1T COURT FOR
NTY. FLORIDA
J DIVISION
aber H5-409O
on 03
!0F
Irren,
idministration
iRSOSS HAVING
lEMANDS AGAINST
[estate and all
ons interested
JE.
IEREBY NOTIFIED
fctration of the estate
.BARREN, deceased,
4090-03. is pending in
for Dade County,
f Division, the address
Vest Flagler Street.
|33130 The personal
of the estate is
RREN. whose addre-
Biacavne Point Road,
|Flonda 33141. The
of the personal
ornev are set forth
hiving claims or
the estate are re-
THREE MONTHS
ItE OF THE FIRST
lOF THIS NOTICE.
of the above court
ent of any claim or
have. Each claim
[ and must indicate
urn. the name and
ditor or his agent or
! amount claimed. If
kt due. the date when
fce shall )>e stated. If
ntingent or unli-
of the uncertain-
[I the claim is
' shall be describ-
shall deliver suffi-
k claim to the clerk to
|to mail one copy to
resentative.
ested in the estate
of this Notice of
been mailed are
1 THREE MONTHS
; OF THE FIRST
f THIS NOTICE.
ons they may have
validity of the dece-
ations of the
iivt- or the venue
he court.
DEMANDS. AND
SO FILED
ER BARRED.
I publication of this
tstrstion: May 24,
Warren
esentative of the
ate of
. WARREN.
Deceased
1 PERSONAL
VE:
, Esquire
^rg, Gross & Shore.
hway. 3rd FL
146
><622
May 24,31.1985
04 THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORID/
CASE NO. 85-20763
FAMILY DIVISION
FLA. BAR 3*8016
IN RE: The Adoption Of
a MINOR CHILD
By: VICTOR O. IGBINOBA
Petitioner
NOTICE OF ACTION
JOSEPH CLAYTON POWELL.
residence unknown,
YOU ARE NOTIFIED THAT AN
ACTION FOR THE ADOPTION OF
A MINOR has been filed and you are
required to serve a copy of your writ-
ten objection, if any, on I. JEROME
GRAFF, ESQ., Attorney for
Petitioner, at 633 NE 167 St., North
Miami Beach, Florida 33162. on or
before June 28. 1986 and file the
original with the Clerk of this court:
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
DATED: May 21, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
By GWEN D ZEIGLER
As Deputy Clerk
19085 May 24, 31; June 7, 14, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CMC No. 85-20762
FL BAR 368016
In re the marriage of
INEZ A. MARTINEZ
Petitioner
and
MANUEL A. C. RODRIGUEZ
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MANUEL A. C. RODRIGUEZ,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac
turn for dissolution of marriage has
been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written
defenses upon: I. J. GRAFF. ESQ. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose address
is 633 N.E. 167 St N.M.B. Florida
33162. on or before June 28, 1985, and
file the original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
May 21, 1985.
Clerk of the Court
By Gwen D. Zeigler
As Deputy Clerk
19081 May 24, 31, June 7, 14, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 85-1342
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
WILLIAM W. CRONE.
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate of
WILLIAM W. CRONE, deceased,
File Number 85-1342, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal represen-
tative and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are required
to file with this court WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
(1) all claims against the estate and (2)
any objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction
of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun
on May 24. 1985.
Personal Representative:
LOUIS K.LESPERANCE
Suite 305. 200 S.E. First St.
Miami. Florida 33131
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT. ESQ.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305) 672-3100
19090 May 24. 31, 1985
I Ml
' COURT FOR
FLORIDA
IVISION
*r 85-1890
on 03
)F
Deceased
!OF
UTION
of the estate of
ed, File Number
in the Circuit
Florida, Pro-
dreis of which is
thouse, 73 West
JGarni. FL 33130. The
es of the personal
the personal
ley are set forth
ons are required
court, WITHIN
OF THE FIRST
THIS NOTICE:
t the estate and (2)
| interested person
was mailed that
gty of the will, the
the personal
ue, or jurisdiction
\D OBJECTIONS
XD WILL BE
ED.
I Notice has begun
kapo A
Ave.
-7990
esentatives:
ELAND
\NKK1.
IAMER
Trankel
re Road
10901
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 84-20741
FAMILY DIVISION
In Re: CHANGE OF NAME
of a Minor Child
By PATRICIA E. BUTLER
Petitioner
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: SELVYN BARTON,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an ac
tion for the Name Change of a Minor
has been filed and you are required to
serve a copy of your written objection,
if any. on I. JEROME GRAFF, ESQ.,
attorney for Petitioner, at 633 NE 167
St., N.M.B.. FL. 33162, on or before
June 28, 1985. and file the original
with the clerk of this court; otherwise
a default will be entered against you.
May 21. 1985.
BY Gwen D. Zeigler
As Deputy Clerk
19082 May 24, 31;
June 7, 14, 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-20182
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA DEL CARMEN
RODRIGUEZ.
Petitioner,
and
ARIEL MARTINEZ.
Respondent.
TO: ARIEL MARTINEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses,
if any. to it on MELVIN J. ASHER,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 825 South Bayahore Drive.
Suite 543. Miami, FL 33131. and file
the original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June 21,
1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this
16th day of May, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
May 24, 31. 19851 (Circuit Court Seal)
I 19075
May 24.31;
June 7, 14. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 86-15368
FLORIDA BAR NO: 256511
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JOSEPH ROBERTO SIRGO
Petitioner,
vs.
ANA IBIS PANLINO,
Respondent
NOTICE FOB DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: Ana Ibis Panlino
Calle Ensanche Ozama, No. 34
Santo Domingo.
Republics Dominicana
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Dissolution of your
Marriage has been filed and commenc-
ed in this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any to it on ROGELIO A.
DEL PINO, ESQ.. Attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is GOMEZ,
FENTE A DEL PINO, P.A., 1835
West Flagler Streert, Suite 201,
Miami, Florida 33135 and file the
original with the Clerk of the above
styled Court on or before June 28,
1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published once
each week for four consecutive weeks
in THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami, Florida on this 21
day of May. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L.E.R. Sinclair
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
R. A. del Pino, Esq.
1835 West Flagler Street
Suite 201
Miami, Florida 33135
Telephone: (305) 541-1800
Attorney for Petitioner
19091 May 24. 31; June 7.14, 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-1*177
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JULIO ROVAINA, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: JULIO ROVAINA
Hotel Parador Manaure
Via Carretera
Fabrics de Cemento
Chichirivichi, Etdo. Falcon
Venezuela, South America
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an ac
tion to foreclose s mortgage on the
following described property in
DADE county, Florida: Unit 403, in
Building I, of THE PENINSULA AT
INTERNATIONAL GARDENS, a
Condominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium recorded
in Official Records Book 11779, Pages
2177 through 2290, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida, as
amended. The above description in-
cludes, but is not limited to, all ap-
purtenances to the condominium unit
above described, including the un-
dividied interest in the common
elements of said condominium, has
been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on Keith, Made,
Lewis A Allison, Plaintiffs attorneys,
whose address is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami. Florida 33132, on or before
June 14, 1985, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiffs attorneys
or immediately thereafter; otherwise,
a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of this
Court on the 9th day of May, 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: STEVEN M. BOBES
Deputy Clerk
19065 May 17. 24.31; June 7, 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO.: 85-20061
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIE CAMILLE BERNARD
Petitioner-Wife,
vs.
JOSEPH L. BERNARD,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: JOSEPH L. BERNARD
1067 New York Avenue
Brooklyn, New York
shall serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of Marriage
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS, At-
torney, 612 N. W. 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida. 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or before
June 21, 1985, otherwise a default will
be entered.
20th May. 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk
By: L. E. R. Sinclair
19079 May 24. 31; June 7. 14. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
BABYLAND CANASTTLLA at 3354
Palm Avenue, Hialeah, Florida 33012 in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
RICARDO Al (1ST A
50 percent
MIRIAM ACOSTA
50 percent
TED E. TSOUPRAKE LAW OFFICE
Attorney for Parties
220 Miracle Mile-Suite 222
Coral Gables, Fla. 33134
19078 May 24.31;
June 7,14,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
F.D.G. ENTERPRIZES at P.O Box
1809, HOMESTEAD. FL 33090, in-
tends to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Amalio Fuentes
19076 May 24,31;
June 7, 14. 1985
notici or ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-ltSM
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
FUrMaBar No. 170110
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARGARET PAMELLA DHANA,
Petitioner-Wife,
and
WILLIAM DHANA,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: WILLIAM DHANA
Post Office Box 327
Montego Bay I
Jamaica, West Indies
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on JEROLD H.
REICHLER, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1400 N.E. Miami
Gardens Drive, Suite No. 103, North
Miami Beach, Florida 33179, and file the
original with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before June 14, 1986; other-
wise a default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published once each
week for four consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said
court at Miami, Florida on this 8th day of
May. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By L.E.R. SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Jerold H. ReichJer. Esq.
Law Offices of Jerold H Reiehler
1400 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive, Suite
103
North Miami Beach, Florida 33179
Telephone: (306) 947-6225
19069 May 17,24.31; June 7.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 85-18695 CA23
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
Fla. Bar No. 128023
LILLY BUENO, Individually and sur
viving spouse of Samuel Bueno,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ANY AND ALL PERSONS KNOWN
OR UNKNOWN WHO MAY CLAIM
AN INTEREST IN A STOCK CER-
TIFICATE EVIDENCING OWNER-
SHIP IN APARTMENT 305 OF
SHERBROOKE APARTMENTS,
Defendants.
TO: ALL KNWON OR UNKNOWN
PERSONS
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a verified Complaint to
Reestablish Lost Cooperative Stock
Certificate on the following described
stock certificate: Apt. 306 at the Sber-
hroke Apartments Cooperative, Cer-
tificate No. 58 for one (1) share in the
Sherbrooke Apartments Cooperative,
has been filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to the Complaint
on Plaintiffs' attorneys, KWTTNEY,
KROOP A SCHEINBERG, P.A., 420
Lincoln Road, Suite 612, Miami
Beach, Florida 88139. and to file the
original Answer or Pleading in the of
fice of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
on or before the 14th day of June,
1986.
If you fail to do to. Judgment by
Default will be taken against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint.
KINDLY GOVERN
YOURSELVES ACCORDINGLY.
DATED this 8th day of May, 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: L.E.R SINCLAIR
Deputy Clerk
19068 May 17,24,31; June 7.1986
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
NO. IS-17*40
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN RE: THE ADOPTION OF:
A MINOR BY PETITIONER
TO: ALBERTO GUERRERO
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a Petition for Adoption has
been filed and commenced in this
Court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any. to It on ROSA M.
VEGA. ESQ., Attorney for
Petitioner, whose address) is 218
ALMERIA AVENUE, CORAL
GABLES, FLORIDA 33134; and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
June 7th, 1965; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the complaint
of petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida, on
this 2nd day of May, 1*85
I Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
ROSAM VEGA. ESQ
218 Almeria Avenue
Coral Gables, FL 33134
Attorney for Petitioner
19044 May 10.17, 24. 31.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious names
1. Nissan South 2. South Nissan at
17930 S. Dixie Highway. Miami,
Florida 33167 intend to register said
names with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
South Datsun, Inc.
Ronald Esserman. President
Stephen Raskin
Attorney for South Datsun. Inc.
19072 May 17, 24.31;
June 7. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
iHisiness under the fictitious name MON
TYS AI'TO REPAIRS at 2131 NW 139th
St. Bay 11 Opa Locka Fla 33054 intends
to register said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade Count)
Fionas
Milton McGregor
19077 May 24. 31;
Jl'ne7. 14, 1985
NOT.CE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 85-18907
ACTION FOB DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ESTHER CARMEN OLMO.
Petitioner
and
LAURO OLMO.
Respondent
TO: Mr. Laura Olmo
Avenida Fleming
2155 Martinez
Buenos Aires. Argentina
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to it on EMILIO C.
PASTOR, attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is PH I 155 South Miami
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33130, and file
the original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June 14th. 1985;
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published once each
week for four consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of said
court at Miami. Florida on this 8th day of
May. 1985.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Emilio C. Pastor, P.A.
PH I 155 South Miami Avenue
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
19060 May 17. 24. 31. June 7. 1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the
undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
Major 5 intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court ..f
Dade County, Florida
SiH Gutman
19086 May 24, 31; June 7. 14. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 15 11424
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CONSELINA CLAYTON HILL.
Petitioner Wife,
and
AARON E. HILL.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: AARON E. HILL
c-o Dolores Campbell
WhithormP.O.
Westmorland, Jamaica
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
i copy of your written defenses, if
any. to It on GEORGE T.
RAMANI. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address la 711 Biscayne
Bldg.. 18 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 38130, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June Tth.
1*88; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 8th day of May, 1*86.
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
GEORGE T RAMANI
711 Blscayne Bldg
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (3061374-4340
19063 May 10. 17, 24,31.1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, dealrtng to
engage In business under the
fictitious name of CONTINENTAL
WORLD TRAVEL at number 12101
South Dixie Hwy. In the City of
'Miami. Florida Intends to register
the said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
10th day of May. 1986
CONTINENT Al. WORLD
TRAVEL INC..
a Florida Corporation
By: Marilyn Holland
Manianllla, President
Nelson C. Keahen. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
05 S W. 87 Ave Suite 20*
Miami. FL 33178
1*038 May 10,17. 24.31.1*86
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name
SG&H. Limited at 970S South Dixie
Highway, Suite 310, Miami, Florida
33156 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
SG&H ADVERTISING, INC.,
a Florida Corporation
by Suzanne G. Hamilton
''resident
Nelson C. Keshen. Ban
MOS S.W. 87 A.V4WM
Miami. FL 817fl
19070 May 17.24. 31..Inn.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. May 31. 1985
Public Notices
NOTICE UNDER
ncrmoi s name law
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that thef
tt mgac*
the fietitjous name
SEED MACHINING SERVICE it
M66 W Okeecncbt* Road Bay
Hr1-' Gardens, Floras. 33016 swnd
aid name with the Clerk of i f\tvf
Ike Cim Court of Dade Comty
Fiona*.
S t RD CORPORATION
Ada R Laasr. President
:--. May 17.24.31.
June 7.19661
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN]
that the undersigned, desiring tc
engage In buslnea under the
fictitious name Outlerre
Adverstlslng A- Sales at 1530 NW 3Cf
St Miami FL 33143 Intend tc
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
MARIA MORENO
Lull Carlos Outlerrei
19049 May 10 17 34 31 195l
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. I5-1M31
FLA BAR NO 25*511
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
RAFAEL ENRIQUE
MOBCARELLA
Petitioner
vs
ARGENIDA JULIAO
Respondent
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO ARGENIDA JULIAO
Carrera38.No 80-80.
Barranqullla Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBYl
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Naaeer 85-4549
DlTUtOB 04
Oi RE ESTATE OF
ETHEL REITER a/k/a ETHEL
PEARLMAN i k a ETHEL,
NOTIFIED that a Petition foi secured, the security shall be descnb-
DlsaoluUon of your Marrlafe hai ed. The claimant shall deliver suffi-
been filed and commenced In thli dent copies of the daim to the derk to
enable the derk to mail one copy to
each personal representative
All persons interested in the estate
to whom a copy of this Notice of Ad
once each week for four (4) con-
cutlve weeks In the
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said Court at Miami. Florida onf
this 12th day of April. 18B8.
I Circuit Cou rt Seal)
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: L.E.R SINCLAIR
As Deputy Clerk
Rogello A Del Pino. Esq.
L83B W Flagler Street. Suite 301
Miami. Florida33136
Telephone I306i 641-1800
Attorney for Petitioner
19042 May 10, 17, 24.31. 1985
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AGAINST
THE ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS INTERESTED
01 THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the estate
of ETHEL REITER s/k/s ETHEL
PEARLMAN s/k/s ETHEL
LEVTNE. deceased. File Number
85-4649, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of which is
73 West Flagler Street. Miami. Dade
County. Florida 33130
The personal representatives of the
estate are EDWARD REITER and
CHARLES WILLIAM LEVINE.
whose sddrrssn arc 16S0 NE 191 St
North Miami Bead-, and Chard)
Farms. Box 329. Senile. Florida
32090, respectnrer/. The name and ad-
dress of the personal representatives
attorney sre set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are re-
quired, WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
to file with the derk of the above court
i written statement of any daim or
demand they may have. Each daim
must be in writing and most indicate
the basis for the daim. the name and
rtitrsss of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount eUnwH If
the daim is not yet doe. the date when
it will become doe shall be stated. If
the daim is contingent or unli-
quidated, the nature of the uncertain-
ty shall be stated. If the daim is
Court and you are required to|
serve a copy of your wrltt
defenses. If any. to It on ROGELIOi
A DEL PINO. ESQ Attorney for
Miami. Florida 33136. and file the
original with the Clerk of the above
styled Court on or before June 7.
1986: otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint o
petition
This notice shall be published /enue or jurisdiction of the court
quired. WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE,
to foe sny objections they may have
hat challenge the validity of the dece-
lent's will, the qualifications of the
icrsonal representative's), or the
IN THE CTBCUTT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 86-17972 CA17
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
Pla. Bar No. 1X8023
ED FURMANSKI and ROSE FUR
MANSKI. his wife.
Plaintiffs,
vs.
FINANCEAMERICA CORPORA
TION, formerly G.A.C. Finance Cor
porabon of Miami No. 1, etc.. et al.,
Defendants.
TO: JOHN. A ORTUZAR
and BELEN ORTUZAR
Residence Unknown
YOU. JOHN A ORTUZAR snd
BELEN ORTUZAR are hereby
notified that a Complaint to
Reforedoae a Mortgage on the follow
ing described property, to-wit: Lot 6,
in Block 31, OCEAN BEACH ADDI
TION NO. 2, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded in Plat Book 2, at,
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
JEWlSHf, OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of this
Notice of Administration: May 31.
1985
EDWARD REITER and
CHARLES WILLIAM LEVINE
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
ETHEL REITER s/k/s
ETHEL PEARLMAN a/k/a
ETHEL LEVINE.
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
GEORGE J. BOLTON,ESQ.
2320 NE. 171st Street
North Miami Beach, Fl 33160
Telephone: (305) 949-8341
19107 May 31. June 7. 1985
----------NOTICE Of ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. IS-14710 FC 24
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ALEXANDRA ALPERIN.
and
GENNADY ALPERIN
TO: MR. GENNADY ALPERIN
3M Ocean Parkway
Apartment 8A
Brooklyn, New York
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED;
that an action for Dissolution
Marriage has been filed agalnittj
you and you are required to serve
copy of your written defenses, la]
any, to It on ARNTJC S. MUSKAT,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 909 Washington Avenue.
Miami Beach, Florida, and file the,
Page 56 of the Public Records of Dade! original with the clerk of the above!
county, Florida, has been filed against styled court on or before June 14,
you and you are required to serve a 1985; otherwise a default will be
copy of your Answer or Pleading to
the Complaint on Plaintiffs' attorneys,
KWITNEY, KROOP 4
SCHEINBERG. PA, 420 Lincoln
Road, Suite 612, Miami Beach, Florida
38189, and to file the original Answer
or Pleading in the office of the Clerk
of the Circuit Court on or before the
14th day of June, 1985.
If yon fail to do so. Judgment by
Default will be taken against you for
the relief demanded in the Complaint.
KINDLY GOVERN
YOURSELVES ACCORDINGLY.
DATED this 8th day of May. 1986.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: L.E.R. SINCLAIR
19067 H^WJ1A\^>,"??2"
entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec
uUve weeks la THE JEWISH)
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the ieal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 7th day of May, IMS.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By L. E.R.Sinclair '
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ARNIE S MUSKAT. ESQ.
GALBUT. GALUBUT A MENIN
909 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
May 10,17. 34, 31,1986
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name CONTINENTAL
WORLD TOURS at number 12101
South Dtode Highway In the City of
Miami. Florida, intends to register
the said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
10th day of May. 1985
CONTINENTAL WORLD
TOURS. INC.
a Florida Corporation
By Marilyn Holland
Msnianllla. President
Nelson C Keshen. Esq
Attorney for Applicant
8906 S. W 87 Ave Suite 308
Miami. FL 33176
19041_________May 10,17, 24, 31
tftfj
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 35-18851
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Floras Bar Number 170310
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
HORACE KERR.
Petitioner Husband.
and
AVIS KERR.
Respondent-Wife.
TO Mrs Avis Ken-
OS Thompson Street
Montego Bay. Jamaica
WEST IN DIES
TH YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action forf
Dissolution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you arel
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
JEROLD H REICHLER. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1400 N E Miami Gardens Drive.
Suite 103. North Miami Beach.
Florida 33179. and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before June 7. 1986
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 3rd day of May. 1986
I Circuit Court Seal i
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC.P COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
JEROLDH REICHLER
Attorney for Petitioner
1400 NE Miami Gardens Drive,
Suite 103
North Miami Beach. Florida 33179
19048 17 34.31.1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nsaber 86-4437
DtlUNM
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
JOSEPH RASKIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION
The sdministration of the estate of
JOSEPH RASKIN, deceased. FUe
Number 86-4637. is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address of which
is 73 West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130 The names snd ad
dresses of the personal representative
and the personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All interested persons are required
to file with this court. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE:
(1) all claims against the estate and (2)
sny objection by an interested person
on whom this notice was served that
challenges the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdiction
of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has begun
on May 31. 1986.
Personal Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative:
MICHAEL J. ALMAN, Eaq.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 38139
Telephone: (806) 672-8100
19108 May 31; June 7,1985
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In buslnea under the
fictitious name EXOTIC BIRD
NEST at 400 SW 123 Ave Miami
Fl. 33184 Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
JOSE MORADO
MIGUEL LOMBANA
19061 May 10, 17, 34,31, 1086
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY"
CTVTL ACTION NO. 86-217*0
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
EN RE:
GERARDO M GONZALEZ,
and
EVTDIA EL1A RAMOS GONZALEZ
TO- EvKha Eha Ramos Gonxalex
710 Entre Panduto Gomes
y Aroyesteran
Habana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of Mar-
riage has been filed against you and
you are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses, 0* sny, to it on
Manuel Diner. PA, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address is 160 S.E. 2nd
Avenue. Suite 1326. Miami. Florida
33131. and file the original with the
dark of the above styled court on or
before Jury 5. 1985; otherwise s
default wul be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the complaint
or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
28th day of May. 1985
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By J BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
Manuel Diner. PA
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue. Suite 1326
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone (305) 358-7880
Attorney for Petitioner
19106 May 31. June 7. 14.21. 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO: 86-1*786
EN RE. The Marriage of:
CELANIE LAGUERRE WILSON.
Petitioner,
and
ARNOUS WILSON.
Respondent.
TO: ARNOUS WILSON, Residence!
unknown, you shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 Nor-
thwest 12th Ave., Miami. Florida.
33136. and file original with Court
Clerk on or before June 21st 1985.
otherwise s default will be entered
May 14. 1985.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: CLARENDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
19074 May 17. 24.31;
__________________ June 7, 1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
Civil Action Number-S-133S4
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar Number 173313
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CATHERINE RETD.
Petitioner-Wife.
and
GLENFORD RETD.
Respondent-Husband
TO GLENFORD REID
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dlaaosutlon of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses. If
any, to It on JEROLD, H
REICHLER. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 1400
NE. MIAMI GARDENS DRIVE
SUITE 103, NORTH MIAMI
BEACH. FLORIDA 3317*. and file
the original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or befOre
June 7. 1986: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the complaint
or petition
THIS NOTICE shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS MY hand and the>eeal
of said Court at Miami. Florida on
this 3 day of May. 1985
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CP COPELAND
AS DE PUTY CUE RK
LAW OFFICES OF
JEROLD H REICHLER
Attorney for Petitioner
1400 N E Miami Gardens Drive.
No 103
North Miami Beach.
Florida 33179
19045________May 10.17. 24, 31,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 35-10273 FC 18
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
DOLORES GERSTEL.
Wife-Petitioner,
and
ARMANDO GERSTEL.
Husband-Respondent
TO: ARMANDO GERSTEL
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOnFIEC
that an action for Dissolution oi
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses. II
any. to It on EUGENE J WEISS
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 407 Lincoln Road
(PH-NEi. Miami Beach. Fla.
33139, and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before June 14. 1966; otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WTTNES8 my hand and the seal
of aald court at Miami. Florida on
thla 7th day of May. 1986
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByL. E.R.Sinclair
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EUGENE J. WEISS
407 Lincoln Road (PH NE)
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
19056 May 10,17.20.31,19BS
NOTICE UNDER
nCTTTIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that
the undersigned, desiring to engage in
business under the fictitious name of
COMMODITY BUSINESS
SYSTEMS at 1440 Kennedy
Causeway, North Bay Village, Florida
83141 intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Commodity Accounting Systems, Inc
CARL A. SCHMTTT. ESQ.
Attorney for COMMODITY
ACCOUNTING SYSTEMS. INC.
19064 May 17,24,81, June 7.1966
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 86-21439
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
EN RE The Marriage of
JOSEFENA CAPORALE.
Petitioner,
and
EDGARDO SANTAGOSTTNO.
Respondent
TO: Edgardo Santagostino
c/o Domingo Santagostino
Bolivia 4660. Capital No. 1419
Buenos Aires, Argentina
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of Mir
nage has been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written defenses,
if any. to it on MELVEN J. ASHER.
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 825 South Baysbore Drive.
Suite 643. Miami. Florida 33131. and
file the original with the derk of the
above styled court on or before July 5.
1985. otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
WETNESS my hand and the seal of
said court at Miami. Florida on this
24th day of May. 1985.
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
19099 May 31; June 7.14.21, 1985
notice ami
FICTITIOI S suif,
NOTICE IS
the undersigned :ean_,
business under -_-. SasJ,
1 Volkswagen Soak 281
3. Honda Booth Sorat I
16165 S Du* H 33157 intend to regsXen
with the Clerk of the C
Dade County. FVmoa.
South Motor Compos.
County
RoaM EiseraaA. |
Stephen Raskin
Attorney for South Motor (
of Dade County
19073 May':" U 31
NOTICE l-Mui .
FlCTTflOl S SAJB uJ
NOTICE IS HEPiBYovTvJ
undersigned. >
biwnioo under in. &
SMALLEST GUN SHOPsmo
ENTERPRISES 084*23
AND PAWN BBCP !iaf
Avenue. Mmr. fl 33;|j
register said ratne wnt a* _
Circuit Court il Ita, Coat, |
Wfiotat E-terp-sa |
By Joanne G Ceolo I
19063
NOTICE INDEi
Ficnnots sake i
NOTICE IS HEREBY G'
the undersgneo aeannji
business under the Scat
DORIS PRODUCTIONS tt :|
31 Street. Hiaiear.. Franks
tends to register said tiara i
Clerk of the Circuit Com i
County. Fionas.
Eloru Argons Vuhv
19105 May 31 Jan.;
notice nan
PICTTTIOl S NAME I
NOTICE IS HEREBY GUI
the undersignea lesnngtoo
business under Iho S
HPT it 3580 NW 52nd I
Miami. Florida 33142 mu
register said nar.e with the C
the Circuit Court of Dtdt (
Florida.
High Productmr. TeehsoiotjJ
Stanley M Pred
Attorney for High Producaa |
Technology Inc
19080 May 24 3:, June"
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name MARIETTA
JEWELRY at 8141 West 8 Ave
Hlaleah PL 33013 Intends tc
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade|
County. Florida.
by
AMERICAN P R
CORPORATION
MANUEL DE QUESADA
Vice President
19060 May 10. IT, 34,31, ta*J
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In buslnea under the
fictitious name ANNAS GIFTS at
17618 Collins Ave. Miami Beach
Fl.. 33100 intends to register aald
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
ANNA PA WIN KAO
19009 May 10.17, 34, 31,1966
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In buslnea under the
fictitious name Buslnea And
Meeting Travel Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Business And Meeting
Travel. Inc.
19066 May 10,17. >0,81.1080
IN THE CIRCl IT C0lTT(
DADE COl-NTY. FL0R
PROBATE DIVI
File Somber U-3271
Diviiios 1021
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IVY E CORANE
Deceased
NOTICE OF ADMIMSTRAlj
TO ALL PERSONS
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS AC
THE ABOVE ESTATE
OTHER PERSON? INTER
EN THE ESTATE
Y0L- ARE HEREBY SO
that the administration i
of Ivy E Corane.
Number 85-3274 < pendingmll
cuit Court for Dade Countj, I"
Probate Division thesdrirjooll
is 73 West Fisper Strwt
Flonds 33131 Tr.rptnonit
tative of the oottU -
whose addrr-
rac." Miami. Florida 33157
and address f the personal f
tauve's attorney are set f
All persons having til
demands iga-nst the
rquired. WITHIN THREE!
FROM THE DATE OF THE I
PUBLICATION OF THIS W
to file with the dork of thei
a written suterr.rnt of any i
demand they rr.a> have.
must be in writing and mi
the basis for the claim, the I
address of the creditor or fc
attorney, and the amount I
the claim is not yet due, thed
it will become due shall b i
the claim is contingeni
outdated, the nature of thei
ty shall be stated If 1st i
secured, the security shsU be*
ed. The claimant shall
dent copies of the claim to wo
enable the clerk to mail oner
each peaonal representsutt
All persons at*W8M8JlJ
to whom s copy of this I
ministration has been n
quired, WITHIN THREE-
FROM THE DATE OF TH
PUBLICATION OF TrSS
to file any objections they J
that challenge the validity i
dent's will, the quslifieatiao'
personal representative, or *
or jurisdiction of the _
ALL CLAIMS. PEMaNJ
OBJECTIONS NOT
WILL BE FOREVER 1
Date of the first i
Notice of Administration:
1986.
ERICH J i
As Personal Repr
of the Estste of
IVY E. C0RANK,
Attorney for W*
osotative:
Bv: MAX R SILVER
SILVER AND SILVER
Suite 1326, 150 S.E. 2nd A*
Miami, Florida 33131


Beach Hurricane And Fire
Defense Hold Final Meeting
-, meeting of the City of
?Beach Hurricane and Fire
L, Committee in advance of
.^hurricane season will be
LSay,May31,at9a.m. in
Ivor's Conference Room on
;Jorth floor of Miami Beach
rHall-
planning session will be
y just one day before the of-
Ei start of this year's hurricane
according to Gerald
Ku chairman of the com-
. for the past eight years.
^mittee members and media
] be briefed on the city's exten-
contingency plans for a
atial or actual hurricane.
inbers of the committee include
, dtv manager, city attorney,
. chief and fire chief as well
110 citizens appointed by the
mayor.
Schwartz estimates that more
than 80 percent of Miami Beach's
population never has experienced
a hurricane.
Individuals who will require
assistance from the police or fire
departments to reach bus pick-up
points in case an evacuation of
Miami Beach is required are re-
quested to register now with the
nearest fire station, Schwartz
said.
Locations of the 1985 bus pick-
up points, hurricane shelters on
the mainland and other evacua-
tion plans will be outlined at the
meeting. The last hurricane to hit
Miami Beach touched shore 20
years ago, and massive building
has taken place since then.
Obituaries
llJnn. Miami. May 2~. Riverside.
JEN Hilda B., Miami Beach, Resident
1*6 wars. Survived by son Elliot of Fort
1 kit and granddaughter Tiffany of
___I, Hiine Services today. Blasberg.
gVTN,Allan RubinZilbert.
HUG. Marjorie S Atlanta. Ga. May 27.
EK. Roae. 81. North Miami, passed
t)(iy27. Resident for 41 years. Surviv-
Ibjhusoand, Edward A sons Donald and
sand Daughter Jane.
P1R0. Erma. 70, Miami Beach.
JDNOW, Marion B 67. Miami.
iE. Selma. Miami Beach. Services in
Jcney. RubinZilbert.
|L, Amos E.. 95. Miami Beach.
S.Dorothy. RubinZilbert.
AN. Clara, 87, Miami Beach, May 26.
M for 35 years. Survived by Joseph
, Morton S. (Anna). Nrman (Sandy),
I Park. Fla., and Sarah N. Marcus,
BUS, Blanche. North Miami Beach.
I Abut,
CK, Betty. Miami Beach. Rubin
ODY, Pauline, Miami Beach. Services in
rJersey RubinZilbert.
iTER, Irving. Miami Beach. Rubin-
ken
WEIN. Martin, 70, Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
AXELROD. Monte Nathan
KALLEN, Milton, 89. of North Bay Village.
May 21 Riverside.
TIERMAN. Sylvia, 76. Miami, May 21.
Resident of Miami for 42 years. Survived by
son Harvey (Dianne), Miami, and daughter
Sydell Goldstein,, Miami.
FREIBRUN, Edward. 78, North Miami
Beach, May 22. Levitt-Weinstein.
GOLD, Sylvia, 79, North Miami Beach, May
21. Levitt-Weinstein.
KR1SKY, Jules. North Miami Beach
FINTZ, Roberta. 40, Miami, May 23. Resi
dent of 26 years. Survived by husband Leon,
sons Jack and Samuel.
SCHWARTZ, Abraham (Al), Miami Beach.
EPSTEIN. May 21 Riverside.
SEGAL. Anna, 89, North Miami Beach.
Levitt-Weinstein.
ADELSON, Sarah. North Miami Beach,
May 26.
COHEN, Seymour (Cy). Miami, May 26.
Resident for 37 years. Survived by wife
Elaine, son Richard (Joan), daughter Allison
Lynn Cohen, Miami.
FELDMAN, William. 75, Miami. May 24.
Menorah Chapels.
SUCHMAN. Betty, Miami Beach. May 27.
Blasberg.
KAUFMANN, Barry Alan, 30, Miami May
25. Riverside.
JWV Auxiliary Elects
Levine President
Tanya Levine has been elected
president of the Dade County
Council Ladies Auxiliary Jewish
Veterans for the coming year. The
first meeting of the Administra-
tion is Sunday morning, June 2, at
Temple Beth Tov. The meeting
will follow a 9 a.m. breakfast by
the West Miami Ladies Auxiliary
No. 223, honoring Levine.
Jewish Cabbie
Shot Dead
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Jerusalem area police are holding
two suspects and seeking a third
in connection with the murder of
David Caspi, a Jewish taxi
driver from Neve Yaacov, who
was shot through the head Apr.
19.
The 33-year-old Caspi, a
resident of Neve Yaacov,
operated the cab in partnership
with his brother. The blood-
splattered vehicle with its
headlights on was found by an
Arab resident who called police.
Caspi's body was found nearby.
His brother insists he was slain
by terrorists. He was not robbed.
Friday, May 31,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel. Inc.
New York:'Ji-'i .'<>' 7i>ik>Uiu'i ii-iiiwi '^ whK .'HMIKireenfield Rd
I Oik Park. Michigan JN2.J7
CM 3) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient. Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
Complete Shipping Service Prom Honda \rr.i
Your First Call to Us will
Handle All Funeral Arrangements
RUBINZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL &
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Marc Rubin, F.D.
Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Four Locations Serving
B The Jewish Community
Miami Beach *
The Only
Coral Gables
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
538-6371
Guaranteed
Pre-Arrangements
with
No. Miami Beach Hallandalel
BROWARD
456-4011
No Money In Advance
Main Office: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
fOTL/NE_
TO JERUSALEM
In time of illness, surgery or
rii. special prayers will be
"'ted at the Western Wall and
rtMr Yeshiva in Jerusalem
CALL 24 HOURS
(718)871-4111
IjFREE PUBLIC SERVICE OF
fk American Rabbi Meir
Baal Haness Charity
tOLEL AMERICA
I KNiiwuSi .NY NY 10038
Mishnayoth, Yizkor & Yortzeit
5*2 Metchal Rabbi Meir
w Haness in Jerusalem
__ CALL
ime,Kolel America
"Mi Meir Baal Haness In
four Will
'^Phk."ASnI.F.rC.l
E5: Htppine,, And Succ.t"
COMPLETE CEMETERY SERVICES FOR TWO
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Our Deluxe
Mausoleums Include
Two Crypts Side By Side
Two Bronze Markers
Two Caskets
Do it now the easy way with low monthly payments
Southern Memorial Park and Mausoleums
15000 NE West Dixie Highway
North Miami, Fl 33161
Send this ad with your name and address, or call 947-7
$200.00 Discount with presentation of this ad.
PRECONSTRUCTION PRICE


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. May 31, 1965
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
7:50 p.m.
ADATHYESMURUN
1025 NE Miami Garden. Drive
North Miami Beach M7 1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpam Conearvatlve
Bar mah: ana aatajaaj
mturam, 7 30 pjn. Bar MMIr Brad lioiODan
Saturday BJOajK .Bar WMft Allan ww
Fnday naaM arta asnaaaa 7:15 p.m rW Ba
Lun..clad by Alas* CHaa
Da>>v BMayan 7 M a.m. and X p m
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5850 N Kendall Or. Baumgard
S. Miami 887 8887 Senior Rabbi
Jamee L Simon. Aaaociata Rabbi
rteeyfcispja.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Carai Way 2B2S S >e twwi '"?'i
Souf Dada'SOO S W JOWi Siraai V W /
RABBI DAVID HAUERBACH ---
CANTOR WILLIAM W LIPSON
Friday ( BJ*.
TfUPLPSPTMPLorWoBTMBIV
VILLAGE (Conservative*
7800 Hispanola Ave conveniently
located just oil 79 St. Cswy. t^>.
Rabbi Marvin Rosa S)
Cantor Danny Tadmore '->
Friday 7 PJA.
? a.m.
BETH KODESH
ConaarvatNa
1101 S.W. 12 Ava. 858-6334
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Cantor Joaaph Krtaaei
Rom Barlln: Executive Sacratary
M Bsaaday p.m. ^a*.
rEMPLEIETMUosr,E
2225 NE 121 St. N. Miami. FL 33181
891 5506 Conservative
Or. Israal Jacobs. Rabbi
Mosha Fnedler. Cantor
Or. Joaaph A. Qorttnfcel,
Rabbi Emeritus
Irving Jaret, Executive Director
m
ff)
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shilman. Cantor
Friday p.m. Kaoeaiat Shabbat
Saturday a.nv Veui Sarrtca.
Or. lawn... mm ptaacK
Dally tamcaa In ma Blank Chapal at
MOimmlMOpm
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-8421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schilt
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ol Graatar Miami
10 am i Po"M' flaro-r- Jo*5'*ga' -
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573 5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Hashed M Barnat
Assistant Rabbi Donald P Cashman
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Aaaociata Cantor RachaNa F. Naieon
Exacutiva Director Philip S. Goldin
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eiaanstat. Rabbi
Friday SIS p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534-9776
OR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
Friday aervteea 7:30 am.
Saturday* 30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ,---..
Cantor Murray Yavnah ( ^ff)
atarMne aarvleaa S am
Friday lata a*anmg aarvtca
k1Sp.ro.
Saturday a.m. and 7:S p m
Friday 7:1 i p-m. mataBaW
Sal.aiam. Bar
ma
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1546 Jefferson Ava.. M.B., PL 33136
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr Jehoda Mel bet
Canter Nlsslm Berryamlni
DaWyktmyan
ttfajS
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ava. A 41 at St. 538 7231
dm. icon women, mm
HAAVtV JOLT. AUXI4.IABV P.AB.I
PAIR 0 C API AN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTO" DAVID CONVtSt*
Lmaral
Frl ava. fc3S pja. Baltli Laan Kmntah, Harry
Jon S Pa* iCaaSar. a .m a.u liaeaV.
a luBaaadby Play Sat 10:*g a.m.
Bar BmSiaH W. riaae. Laada
ETM TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1061 N. Miami Baach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Llpschltz, Rabbi
Randall Konlgsburg, Asst Rabbi
Zvaa Aronl. Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec Director
Saturday Bar Mltzvah Jaaon Krola .-_".
OaMyaanrleaa 7:30 a.m.. 5:30 p.m. I fX I
Saturday MS a.m. and 7 30 p.m *?'
Sunday a.m S:30 p.m.
BETH VOSEPM
CHAIN CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Martdton Ava
0ow Roiancwalg, Rabbi
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth ShmueI
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Baach
534-7213-534 7214 aajB,
Barry J. Konovltch, Rabbi f
Moerte Buryn, Cantor
Sergio Grobler, President
Sholem Epalbaum. President -
Religious Committee
Shabbal Sarvica* 8 30 a m. Sarmon 10 30
Daily Mlnyan
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866-8345
7902 Carlyle Ave., 866-BB33
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovttz
Cantor Edward Klein
Daay aarvleaa I a m and ( p m
Saturday :*S a m. Sarvlcaa
Mayor Clark
Installs Sunflower
Society Officers
Dade County Mayor Steve
Clark installed the newly elected
officers of the Sunflower Society,
at a luncheon held at Tumberry
Yacht and Racquet Club.
The new slate officers, who will
be serving one year terms are:
Dr. Connie Morrow. president; Sylvia
Barash. executive vice president: Mana
Bloom, vice president membership. Pearl
Gureviu. vice president finance: Carol
Jacobs, vice president public relations:
Beverly Mariow, Ben-ice Martinez. Graciela
Midoio. Joan Thompson and Nora Swan.
vice president fund-raising. Hilda Milstein,
treasurer. Myrna Hacker, recording
secretary: Dorothy Ritterman. financiaJ
secretary. Mae Feltiin. social secretary:
Matilde Tropp and Trudy Loeb. correspons
ing secretary. Lorraine Turtle, historian:
Florence Shubin. parliamentarian: Sy
Bloom. chairman men's committee: Hildene
Potashmck. life membership chaimsn.
Shulemeit Klein and Bea Street, com-
munications chairmen: and Nancy Pollack.
Esq.. legal counsel.
Beth David
Graduation Set
Beth David Religious School
Graduation will take place at ser-
vices Friday, June 7, at 8 p.m.
Graduates are Andrew Abel.
Michael Allen. Jacques Bentolila.
Joshua Goldberg. Alexis Hersh.
David Hollander, Michelle
Kaplan, Ronnie Lipof, Glenn
Markowitz, David Markus, Todd
Miller, Heidi Perlman, Robert
Pincus, Jodi Segal, Alison Shevin,
Steven Singer, Kimberly
Strochak, and Lisa Tendrich.
The Day School Graduation will
follow on Sunday, June 9, at 4
p.m.
Graduates are Shah Bayer,
David Behar, Kessem Chartor,
Tali Cohen, Seth Friedman,
Alisha Golman, Tamme Graham,
Jason James, Matthew Mandel,
Ari Oberstein, David Schur, Deb-
by Simon, and Nadine Swartz.
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ol North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
661-1562
Yaako* Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 1S4 Ava. 75 St.. 382-3343
Rabbi Warren Kaertl
Friday MS p.m
Saturday 30 a m and M nwna
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dede's Reiorm Congregation
Ralph P. Klngeley, Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Aaaociata Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramaay. Administrator
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
271*2311** r' ConBervatlve
Or. Norrnan N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benjamin Adlar. Cantor _
Da vld Rosent h a I .'')
Auxiliary Cantor -W,
U lay ax Man. and Thar*. 7 a.m. Frl fc1S Ml
Rabbi Snap*, aarman. Canter BaMamm
Adlar arlll chant ma IHanjv Sat :30 a m
Sabbath nrwcat.Bal tamii. CalaWa Nieai
I
n5g?
J
Pictured at the Sunflower Society installation a r I j
Mayor Clark and Sylvia Barash.
ISSSammrmmm J
A M^~m cZa, TV 6 Refrigeritof
_J^J Jill fX*" Conditioned
c^f,omdividu.lD*.
RiboMlcalSup^*"'0"
Resident aS.srHji.cr.
SSWiinights $349
^. ,arHTSi;OAYS/3 NIGHTS $-f|5 ^
imcluoes 2 Ria liEALS_ 395.538-5721
Ou, at 0 CoutY C- *** "%5 JACOBS 0
9LU0SSJ.
80VWMALK HOTEL
assssa
parp'5
pa>P*'5
rJDW occ
where shopping is o pleasure 7doys o \
nd DanlehBakaritis.
Maple Walnut
Coffee Cake.................mmH1*
Stogie Layer
Orange Cake................e***!98
Chocolate Covered
Mini Donuts...............
at PuMx Stores with Fresh
artaaOnly.
^1"
Sour Dough
English Muffins.............p*. 49*
Topped with an aeeortment ol deecious IrutU
Tropical Fruit Pie..........e-n'3"
Mini Bagetettes.......12 99*
Prices Effective
May 30th thru June 5. 1985.
bsfn'VSctCftiCN
=&&
COOKBOOK
COLL13CTION
This week's feature
VOLUME 5
Family-Style
Cookbook
1.79.-
Watch for


MAY 1985
Young Leadership Council
Reaching Out in New Directions
Public
Relations
Committee
Young Leadership Sets Future Agenda
(See special section, pages K-9).


*x^
Federation, May 1985
Contents
CAMPAIGN S
Operation Buddy Up Day photo highlights
Enlist now for June phone blitz
MISSIONS / SOUTH D ADE 4
Take off for Israel on a Federation Mission
in south Dade
WOMEN'S DIVISION 5
WD installs new leaders at annual luncheon
A message from Dorothy Podhurst
Doral CC to host campaigner recognition day
New members join UJA Young Women's Leadership Cabinet
Hold the Date
FEDERATION FORUM / AGENCIES 6
incoming Rabbinical Association president focuses
on intermarriage
JVS offers assistance for corporate growth
jvs clears the air
JCC senior adult department and nursing homes join forces
for elderly
AGENCIES 7
Local college graduate honored by Bnai B'ritn
Alternatives to care in the nursing home
Teena Ellen Weiss begins third term as president of
Mount Sinai Auxiliary
SPECIAL SECTION YOUNG LEADERSHIP COUNCIL 8&9
ISRAEL 37 PHOTO HIGHLIGHTS 10& 11
FOUNDATION ANNUAL REPORT 12 & 13
FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION / AGENCIES 14
Kaleidoscope offers new features in coming month
Program guide
Help for bulimics
BBYO to honor its chapters on June 9
CALENDAR
JCC offers afterschool programs throughout Dade county
15
This material was prepared for The Jewish Floridian Supplement May 31,1986 by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation 4200 Biscayne Boulevard Miami. Florida 33137
President Samuel I. Adler
Executive Vice President Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee EliTimoner Newsmagazine Editor MarkFreedman
Director of Communications Nicholas Simmonds Assistant Editor Beth Rubin


Federation, May 1985
Page 3
ampaign
BUDDY UP DAY SUCCESS SPURS CAMPAIGN
CAMPAIGN CLOSING BLITZ
Greater Miami Jewish Federation staged its first "Buddy Up Day" on
May 7.43 teams visited prospects at their places of business, attempting to
dose cards in the $300 and over category.
According to Charlotte Held and Harvey Friedman, "Buddy Up Day"
oxhairmen, the event was a major success. 167 cards were covered,
representing $360,000 in pledges to the 1985 campaign. Twelve of these
gtfte were in the "Pacesetter" Division ($10,000 and over).
"We've established an important precedent by demonstrating to our
Jewish community that even late in the campaign, a major fund raising
event can be enormously successful in Miami," Friedman noted. "Buddy
Up Day" served as the centerpiece of a two month long "campaign closing
blitz" in Miami which includes weekly phonathons, and will culminate with
a week long phone blitz in mid-June.
The highly successful day culminated with a "victory celebration" t
the Grand Bay Hotel, hosted by Don Lefton. At the reception, prizes d-
onated by local businesses were awarded to "Buddy Up Day" participants
in various categories such as "largest new gift," "most cards covered, and
"toughest day for a Buddy Up team." "We concluded the day on an upbeat
note, and our success should insure that 'Buddy Up Day' will become an in-
tegral part of future campaigns," Charlotte Held noted.
According to the 1985 General Campaign Chairman, Norman Braman,
the entire "Spring Blitz" effort will result in a campaign closing by June 30,
with all cards covered, representing more than 32,000 gifts to Federation's
1985 campaign.
[" i
Buddy Up Day co-chairmen Harvey Friedman and Charlotte Held welcome
the "troops" to General Headquarters.
f
iktB.
J
uddy Up Day morning orientation session and breakfast at Federation
lyed to a full house.
Sign up for the June Phone BLITZ!
Our team, the 1985 CJA-IEF. has the ball.
$21 million down, $3 million to go.
As a seasoned veteran of the 1985 CJA-IEF, we need your expertise in
closing all of our uncovered cards. Each campaign quarterback is being asked
to man the phones during the Fourth Quarter Phone Blitz. We need the entire
team to help us close the 1985 CJA-IEF. With your help, our team will be
victorious.
p ,Please Jin us for the Fourth Quarter Phone Blitz June 10-13 at the
federation Building, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard.
Monday. June 10
Tuesday, .June 11
Wednesday, June 12
Thursday. June 13
MORNING SESSION
9:00 a.m.-12:00 noon
Host Group
No morning session
No morning session
High-Rise Division
Women's Division
EVENING SESSION
4:00 p.m.-7:30 p.m.
Host Group
Beneficiary Agency
Board & Staff members
GMJF Board of
Directors. Federation
Leadership, and UJA
Cabinets
Trades & Professions
Latin/Cuban Divisions
Bram0riUL^ sess'ons include breakfast; evening sessions include dinner, featuring
n champagne. Prizes will be awarded at each session.
Ill ifum CLIP AND RETURN
ILL JOIN THE WINNING TEAM.
S'GN ME ON FOR_______________________________
Name
.. (date and session)
Phone
(business!
"^" be representing
eency.etc.)
""urn this to:
.(residence)
. .(Division,
For
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
June Phone Blitz
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
DM)re ""formation call 676-4000. extension 202.
Harvey Friedman discusses Buddy
Up Day tactics with the 43 Buddy
Up Day teams. In all, more than 90
Federation volunteers joined in the
day's effort.
GMJF Campaign Director Ken
Bierman congratulates Charlotte
and Harvey for a job well done at the
"victory celebration" held at the
Grand Bay Hotel
Incoming GMJF Board member
Sam Harte and JVS President Pat
P. Fine seen preparing for Buddy Up
Day.
Larry Metsch (left) and Richard Zinn
recount their Buddy Up Day ex-
periences for Harvey Friedman at
the Grand Bay.


Page4
Federation, May 1985
Missions /South Pade
Missions offer trips
to Israel in a special way
A visitor to the Shrine of the Book at the Israel Museum looks at fragments
of Isaiah from the Dead Sea Scrolls.
The Missions Committee of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation is
sponsoring three exciting and in-
depth missions to Israel in the sum-
mer and fall of 1985: the Summer
Family Mission, scheduled for July
10-22; the UJA National Summer
Singles Hatikvah Mission planned for
July 21-31; and the Community Mis-
sion slated for October 15-25.
Lois and AJvin Entin and Dahlia
and Steven Oppenheimer are leading
the Summer Family Mission, the
highlight of which will be the Mac-
cabiah Games, also known as the
"Jewish Olympics." The Games,
which are the third largest interna-
tional athletic competition, are held
every four years in the summer
following an Olympic year. They pit
Jewish athletes from all over the
world in competition similar to that of
the Olympics. Participants on the
mission will have an opportunity to
view the spectacular opening
ceremonies of the games on July 15.
Other points of interest on the
Summer Family Mission will be visits
to an Israel Defense Forces Base, the
artist colony at Safed, the Project
Renewal City of Or Akiva, an absorp-
tion center for Ethiopian Jews, the
Israel Museum, Madasa and the Dead
Sea. In addition, travelers will also
enjoy a bar-b-que dinner and evening
cruise on the Galilee in Tiberias and a
concert at Jerusalem's Conservatory
of Music. They will experience home
hospitality with Israeli families and
will participate in confidential brief-
ings by top government officials.
"There is no better way for a family
to visit Israel together than on the
Summer Family Mission. They will
share rich experiences and will
remember these experiences for a
lifetime," said Steven Oppenheimer,
Mission leader.
From July 21-31, Joey Smith will be
leading the UJA National Summer
Singles Mission to Israel.
The Singles Mission provides young
singles with the opportunity to share
the rich experiences of a visit to the
Jewish homeland with others who
have similar values and lifestyles.
More than 2,500 singles have par-
ticipated in past UJA Singles
Missions.
Participants in the Summer Singles
Mission will meet with Israeli citizens
from many aspects of Israeli society
soldiers and students, profes-
sionals and pioneers. They will visit
Or Akiva, Galilee kibbutzim, the
Negev, Tel Aviv and Jerusalem. In
addition, members of the mission will
visit Israeli industry, participate in an
archaelogical dig, and study major
economical and political issues with
Israel's young leaders.
For those participating in their
first mission, an optional four-day
pre- mission to Paris is planned. Paris
is home of the largest and most active
Jewish community in Europe. The
pre-mission to Paris includes visits to
the Pletzel, home of the Jewish
Quarter of Paris, and the Temple
Victoire.
An optional sub-mission to Prague
is scheduled for those who have
previously been on a UJA mission to
Israel. Prague was once home of the
largest Jewish community in the
world. The city was the source of
"The Precious Legacy," the collec-
tion of rare Judaic treasures salvaged
from the Holocaust period. In
Prague, visits will be made to the
Alte-Neue Shule (which was built in
1290 and is still being used today),
and to Terezin, the largest concentra-
tion camp in Czechoslovakia.
Mission Leader Joey Smith said,
"The Summer Singles Mission is a
never-to-be forgotten trip. Speaking
from experience, I know that par-
ticipants depart Miami as friends and
return as a family, knowing that they
have shared some of the most special
and unique experiences that they will
ever have in their lives."
The cost of the trip is $1,800 per
person from New York City. The ex-
cursions to Paris and Prague are
$475 and $750 respectively. An in-
terest free-payout plan will be
available for those who qualify.
In the fall, Marsha and Jerry Olin
and Elly and Ted Wolff will be
leading the Community Mission. The
mission, slated for October 15-25, is
being called the Bar Mitzvah mission
because it is the 13th Community
Mission sponsored by Federation.
Throughout the ten days in Israel,
travelers will visit sites of Israeli in-
dustry and meet with the country's
leaders to explore issues of major
importance.
Highlights of the 1985 Community
Mission will include visits to the
Israeli Defense Force Base and
MASH unit, Galilee outposts and the
Golan Heights, Hadassah Hospital,
Yad Vashem, the Israel Museum,
Museum of Diaspora, kibbutzim, the
Old City of Jerusalem and Or Akiva.
An optional pre-mission to Paris is
planned for October 10-14. While in
Paris, participants will meet with the
Chief Rabbi of France and with the
Israeli Ambassador to France and
will visit the Jewish Quarter and the
Jewish art museums. A special
feature will be a cocktail reception
with the President of the Jewish
Federation of Paris. Mission
members will also experience Shab-
bat services at the Copernic
synagogue, followed by an Oneg
Shabbat and dinner.
"Most tourists are never able to see
Israel the way they can on a mission.
Our Community Mission is a unique,
in-depth experience, not just a tour of
a country. Of course, every important
site and city will be visited, but those
who choose a mission see so much
more. This is a once-in-a-lifetime ex-
perience for members of the com-
munity to experience the life and
spirit of Israel," said Mission LeadJ
Ted Wolff. wader|
Participants on the Summer Fami-I
ly Mission, Summer Singles Mission I
and Community Mission are expected!
to make a meaningful pledge to thel
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's!
1986 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israeli
Emergency Fund-Project Renewal!
Or Akiva Campaign.
For more information on the Sum-1
mer Family and Community Mis-I
sions, contact Sara Schoninger at I
576-4000, extension 215. For infer!
mation on the Singles Mission, con-l
tact Marsha Kolman at 576-4000 ex!
tension 290.
in South Dade.
Seen at a session of the South Dade
Branch Leadership Development
Group (standing from left): Ronald
Kohn, co-chair of the Leadership
Development Group; Dr. Stanley
Rosenberg; Shelly Rosenberg; guest
speaker Gene Greemweig. the
executive director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education; and
seated from left; Susan Beitner; and
Leadership Development Group co-
chair Marilyn Kohn. Michael and
Cathi Graham hosted the session in
their home. Greemweig spoke on
"Zionism and the Birth of Israel."
Leadership Development Group participants seen at the Graham home.
Members of the South Dade Branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Federal
pose for a "family portrait" at a combined Board Institute and meeting heux
the home of Jean and Norman Lieberman.


Federation, May 1985
Pages
luj/pmen's Division
(D Tenth Annual installation caps record year
4fe
~I ',
i




i.
Gloria Goldreich, author of 'Leah's Children,' was the guest speaker at the
Vomen's Division 10th Annual Installation Luncheon held recently at the
fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel Goldreich (center) is seen above with event
Chairwoman Sue Graubert (left), and the 1985-86 Women's Division President
orothy Podhurst.
iding tht inth Annual Installation Luncheon were newly elected constitu-
ent board chairwomen. Shown above, from left, Elaine Ross, South Dade; Deb-
he Edelman. North Dade; Adria Rasken, Miami Beach; and Judy Adler,
wuthuest Dade. Not pictured is Maryanne Witkin, Business and Professional
Vomen.
Campaigner Recognition Day
Celebrating its record breaking
1985 campaign, the Women's Divi-
ion will hold a Volunteer Campaign
:ognition Day on Thursday, June
i^at the Doral Country Club, 4400
' 87th Avenue. In addition, there
be a 1986 campaign kick-off,
icluding card assignments for next
ar s effort on behalf of the Combin-
} Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
und.
AH Women's Division board
members are invited to attend as
'ests of the Women's Division.
'here will be something for
'eryone; swimming, tennis, golf, ex-
cising and bicycling," said Dorothy
IK"rst, W.D. president. "It's go-
ing to be a day of fun and excitement
as we recognize our 1985 volunteers
and gear up for 1986."
"By choosing our card assignments
for 1986 in June, we are getting an
unprecedented jump on next year's
campaign," said Gail Newman, WD
campaign chairwoman. "I am confi-
dent that 1986 will be another record
breaking year for the Women's
Division."
The day of fun begins at 9:30 a.m.
at the Doral. Lunch will be served at
noon. Green fees and golf cart rentals
are additional. For reservations and
additional information, please call the
Women's Division at 576-4000, ext.
231.
ft members join Young women's
federship cabinet
LN'ne women from the Greater
area have been invited to serve
t UJA Young Women's Leader-
PliSMnet (YWLC) for the
FW year. They are: Maureen
7' Nancy Berkowitz, Lois
Iktal BaJ",bara Kipnis, Susan
[Jkrg Elizabeth Litowitz, Sandi
Q ^ C- Meyers, and Ellen Rose.
2* Jabinet- comprised of
fimmilrJcareer women as well as
til?. Passional volunteers,
Mitil ?ro,ven local leadership
7i the nat>onal UJA arena.
nI!f esentative group of dynamic
J8 and fundraisers develops
ttnoTk an,d PPrtunities to reach
untry ish women across the
The primary focus of the YWLC is
to identify, motivate, educate and in-
volve today's women in the UJA net-
work of international support ser-
vices. In addition to national ac-
tivities, Cabinet women also maintain
a high level of local community
involvement.
In addition to this year's new ap-
pointees, the following women from
Miami will also remain on the Cabinet
for the upcoming year: Judy Adler,
Barbara Aronson, Amy Dean, Phyllis
Harte, Wendy Kravitz, Marlene Olin,
Susan Sirotta, Maryanne Witkin, and
Ray Ellen Yarkin.
The luncheon occasioned the installation of new executive officers for 198&86.
Seen here from left: Gail Newman, vice president for Campaign; Terry
Drucker, vice president for Leadership Development; Robbie Herskowitz, vice
president for Community Education; Sandi Miot, parliamentarian; Charlotte
Held, chairwoman of the Nominating Committee; andJudi Billig, secretary.
A message from the
incoming president
agencies and our Federation. I
want us to be involved in planning
for more interaction with Latin
women within the Women's Divi-
sion. We must continue to build
bridges with our efforts in the
non-sectarian community being
visible, helping to promote good
relationships, supporting events,
and helping Miami to fulfill its
potential in becoming one of the
great cities in the United States.
Everyone cannot be involved to
the same extent, but every Jewish
woman in Dade County should be
committed to the survival of the
State of Israel and the growth and
maintenance of our local agencies.
It is the responsibility of every
Jew to be emotionally and finan-
cially accountable. We cannot set-
tle for less.
The view from the bridge is lofty
and full of optimism. Let us use
our vision to strengthen bonds and
associations, to expand horizons,
to gain new perspectives, and to
make Miami a city we are proud to
call our home.
Dorothy Podhurst
President
Women's Division
Dorothy Podhurst
Miami is an exciting city in
which to live and to be Jewish.
There is an atmosphere of growth
evolving, a spirit of "let's move
ahead," and a genuine desire to
experience the finest cultural and
educational offerings. There are
more than 250,000 Jews in Miami,
and we live in every part of Dade
County from Golden Beach to
Perrine, from Ojus to Homestead.
We in the Women's Division
have a unique opportunity to unify
this diverse geographical spread.
We have evolved into constituent
boards of women from all parts of
Miami North Dade, South Dade,
Southwest Dade and Miami
Beach. In addition, we have a
Business and Professional
Women's Board. These local
boards have enabled us to enjoy
friendships while doing our impor-
tant work. Yet, there is plenty of
opportunity to come together in
large city-wide events, such as
Federation Tuesday, I Love
Miami, and our Learn-Ins.
My goal as president is to con-
tinue to build bridges through my
work in Federation. What do I
mean? I want to see better work-
ing relationships between our local
Hold the Date
Thur. June 6 Volunteer Recognition/
Campaign Kickoff
Doral Country Club
Thur. Aug. 29 WD Executive
Committee/Campaign
Steering 10:00 a.m.
Thur. Oct. 3 Leadership Institute
Tues. Nov. 5 Federation Tuesday
Fontainebleau Hilton
Sat. Dec. 7 Campaign Opening
Dinner Fontainebleau
Hilton


Page 6
Federation, May 1985
Agencies
intermarriage and the Jewish future
By RABBI
BRETT S. GOLDSTEIN
President of
the Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami
Love and intermarriage
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
The story is told of a small group of
youngsters gathered around the
playground at school. "What religion
are you?" one of them is asked "I'm
Christian," he answers.
The question is posed to each of the
participants, and at last the conversa-
tion turns to the child who is the pro-
duct of his parents' intermarriage.
The only thing that he can do is to
answer the question, "What are you?'
with the reply: "I am nothing."
Needless to say, the effects of such a
non-affilliation can have a
devastating impact on the life of a
young person. Intermarriage con-
tinues to exact a heavy toll, and there
is every indication that this problem
will become even more acute.
Experts in Jewish studies indicate
with consistency that a decade from
now, the American Jewish communi-
ty will have dwindled significantly
that a falling Jewish birth rate and a
deterioration of Jewish identity will
hasten assimilation. Ironically, the
factors that have contributed to inter-
marriage are, in themselves, positive
factors: the disintegration of ethnic
neighborhoods, the expansion of
academic and economic opportunities
for Jews, and a breakdown of historic
prejudice. Make no bones about it:
the values that most of us support
universalism, equality, and
brotherhood make the question of
intermarriage a difficult one to
confront.
What does Jewish tradition tell us
about intermarriage? The law is
and always has been clear. A
Jewish marriage is one that takes
place between a man and a woman
who have demonstrated allegiance to
Judaism by one of two ways: as a
result of birth, or through conversion.
Traditionally, one's Jewishness is
determined maternally (although the
reform movement now accepts
patrilineal descent). The initial
reason for maternal determination is
attributed to the fact that the
religious identity of a child's natural
father may be in doubt. When a mar-
riage did occur between a Jewish
woman and a non-Jewish man, any
children born of that union were con-
sidered Jews though the marriage
itself has no legal status. In the case
of a Jewish man and a non-Jewish
woman, the children born of that
union were considered non-Jews;
their religious status can only be rec-
tified by subsequent conversion. Lest
) DOtOTHV J GAITER
6; Til, M#*altf i Ctfiio-ia.' aoartf
IN WINNIPEG. Canada. racml-
I) the parent* of a young Jewish
woman placed an obituary for her
in the tocal newspaper requeuing
thai "no condo-
lences be sent
or memorials be
maoe "
The young
wonur, *as not
dead Bui she
was deac to her
parents, dis- ___
owned Vcjus* '4V|HP^T *
she had marrieC *^B
a non-Jew
About half ol waiter
Ame-lcaa Jews marry outside the
faith The issue of intermarriage Is
so problematic thai II is on the
agenda of almost e>er> national
rabbinic bod>. says Rabbi Solo-
mon Schiff. executive vice presi
dent of the Greater Miami Rabbin-
lea' Association
Intermarriages are considered so
destructive of Judaism that the
rabbinical associations of the three
main branches of Judaism
Orthodox. Conservative and Re-
form have discouraged their
rabbis from marrying interfaith
couples Rabbi Schiff says
Copynsrhi 1HH5 Miami Herald
I"ublishing Co Reprinted with
permission.
"There's the feebng thai we
wenl too far to the left, became
loo liberal." aays Rabbi Brett
Goldstein of the Reform Temple
Shir Ami In Kendall The Union of
American Hebrew Congregations'
national outreach program, which
enends a hand to the non-Jewish
spouse, makes some rabbis feel
"uncomfortable because it Is pros-
elytizing and that's anathema to
Judaism." he said
There is no monolithic way of
dealing with It." Rabbi Herb
Tobin assistant executive director
of the Jewish Federation of South
Broward. aays "We struggle with
it No one has facile answers
There's a collective agony "
Intermarriage contributes to a
diminution of Jewish culture, iden-
tiiv. and population, some rabbis
aay Some studies bear thai out
and some don't
ANN Lynn Lipton. Jewish-edu-
cation director for the Jewish
Federation of Palm Beach County,
says. "While I can understand the
sad n-is thai permeaies this event
in a Jewish famil>. the reality is
thai many intermarried couples
choose to have a Jew-ish home to
bring up their children in Juda-
ism She says 30 percent of the
people who marry Jews convert to
Judaism, but leas than 2 percent of
Jews who marry non-Jews relin-
quish Judaism for another faith
Upton teaches classes for people
considering conversion and leads a
vuppon group for interfaith cou-
ples
Rabbi Pinches Webermen. presi-
dent of the Miami Beacb Orthodox
Rabbinical Council, says 11 matters
whether the woman in Winnipeg
had renounced Judaism. "If the
child abandons and disowns the
faith, thai could be reason to
abandon her" he says. "Bui as
long as the child still maintains the
faith, she should still be shown
lose Even in Fiddler or thi Roof.
Tevye relents a little and wishes
his daughter, who has married a
Christian, well when the> leave
town
According to a study by the
American Jewish Congress, by Use
year 2000 there will be one-half
million fewer Jew* la America
There are about S.S million Jews
In America today Intermarriage.
Jews' sow b.nh rale, the large
number of late-marrying career-
oriented Jewlah women, and di-
vorce all contribute to that projec-
tion The decline is expected even
though nearly 10.000 Americans
convert to Judaism each year
Egon Mayer, a sociologist at
Brooklyn College, reports that
when the non Jewish spouse la a
mixed marriage does not convert,
the likelihood that the children of
such a union will intermarry
Jumps to 92 percent, compared to
45 percent when a parent con
veru About 45 percent of children
in families where both parents are
Jewish by birth also Intermarry
THE biblical admonition against
interfaith marriage is found in
Deuteronomy 7:3. In that passage,
before the Jews cross the Jordan
River God instructs them not to
marry non-Jews "for they will
turn awa> th> sons from follow-
ing me. that they may serve other
gods "
That prohibition was strictly
observed la Eastern Europe many
years ago when the Jewish com-
munity was isolated from and
discriminated against by the non
Jewish community "Because the
community banded together as a
matter of security for the total
group, anyone who would go
outside the group and fraternize or
marry was really doing this with
the enemy in many cases." Rabbi
Schiff explains
Fortunately we live in a world
today where Jews do not necessar-
ily consider those who are not
Jewish their enemies As barriers
fall and people mingle. In the
normal course of life some will fall
in love and marry Rather than
lose a practicing Jew and a
possible future convert, isn't It
better to open doors to interfaith
couples rather than shut them'1
there be any doubt about the import
of the religious declaration, we need
only refer to the groom's words to his
bride; "Be consecrated to me accor-
ding to the faith of Israel." Thus, in
the traditional framework, there can
be no marriage without clear indica-
tions that both partners are Jewish.
There are today reform rabbis who
will officiate at the marriage of a Jew
and a non-Jew when there is
reasonable assurance that any
children from the marriage will be
raised as Jews. It is also required that
the maintenance of a Jewish home
and a Jewish education be provided
as well. The Central Conference of
American Rabbis (the body of reform
Jewish leaders) has, in fact, stated
that "if children of intermarriages
are raised as Jews, they are to be con-
sidered Jewish without formal con-
version." Reform rabbis accord each
other the personal right to officiate at
intermarriages, but here, I should
also add an important qualification:
within the past several years, the
C.C.A.R. has urged its members NOT
to officiate at such ceremonies and to
weigh very heavily the possible out-
come of personal interpretations.
There is also an additional caveat to
consider: neither Orthodox nor Con-
servative Judaism will recognize the
validity of an intermarriage perform-
ed by a liberal rabbi. Hence, tradi-
tional Jewish branches will continue
to view the children of such unions as
non-Jewish at least, until such time
as a conversion is performed. It is
reasonable to expect, then, that such
a child might encounter difficulties in
later life when contemplating mar-
riage to a more traditional Jew.
These reasons, as well as a shift to
the right on the part of reform rabbis,
have resulted in a decreasing number
of rabbis who will consider intermar-
riage as an option today. It is my per-
sonal belief that at least for the next
four to five years, we will continue to
witness a more traditional slant in the
liberal movements of Judaism with
the clear effect that intermarriages
performed by rabbis will be on the
wane. Ours is the hope that at the
very same time these changes take
place, commitment to preservation of
Jewish practice in the home and fami-
ly life may be strengthened. Therein
lies our people's greatest hope for
survival.
JCC volunteers
Link up' with
nursing home
residents
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center's Senior Adult
Department volunteers have begun a
program of visiting isolated Jewish
elderly who reside in a local nursing
home.
The JCC volunteers visit the nurs-
ing home twice a month and provide a
variety of services, including in-
dividual room visitation, limited exer-
cise, singing, dancing, piano playing
and distribution of handcrafted gifts.
As part of the visits, special time is
devoted to Jewish Holiday
celebrations.
Volunteers state that their par-
ticipation in the community project
has enhanced their "self-worth". In
addition, this "Mitzvah" (good deed)
aids in contributing to the quality of
life for nursing home residents. The
isolated elderly feel the Jewish com-
munity has not forgotten them, and
this project provides an opportunity
for the residents to reconnect with
the community and with caring
volunteers.
If you would like more information
on this Networking Program or other
Senior Adult activities call the JCC at
935-2440.
JVS corporate
growth
By JULIETA GARCIA
The Corporate Service Department!
of the Jewish Vocational Service I
Miami, is an extension of the JV$I
Rehabilitation Department. This in-l
novative service is geared to assist inl
surance carriers, physicians, at|
torneys, and private industry by ap-l
propriately evaluating the vocational!
needs of their clients. The highly trail
ned staff provides individual evaluaJ
tions, work adjustment, and job!
placement assistance for rehabilital
tion clients who have been involved inl
such incidents as partial or total!
disability, workers compensation,!
emotional disability, and!
rehabilitative alimony. 'Prompt!
reports and expert court testimonies!
are provided by JVS' experienced!
rehabilitation professionals.
The services of this Department!
are bilingual, in an effort to break!
down interpersonal barriers, as wefll
as being accessible to wheelchair bl
ound people and those with hearingl
loss. All client plans are indi\idualizl
ed and are performed to insure the!
most accurate assessment and careerl
direction for each person. For in-l
stance, the client is generally!
evaluated within an industrial workl
setting in an effort to reintroducel
him-her to the work world, and tol
minimize any anxiety related to fac-l
ing a real work situation. In addition,!
Corporate Service clients participate!
in such diverse activities as aptitude!
and personality testing, work stress!
tolerance evaluation, physical]
capacities and tolerance evaluation,!
transferability of skills, job availabili-l
ty and job placement, via the mostl
current objective and scientific!
measures.
For Corporate Service personnell
the final goal is to help the client ret-1
urn to the world of work with easel
and confidence.
Currently, this Jewish Vocational I
Service program is growing as anl
important community service. If youl
are interested in exploring this fur-1
ther, please contact Ms. Crosby,!
Rehabilitation Department Coor-I
dinator, at JVS, 576-3220.
JVS receives
'Clean Air Award'
During 'Clean Air Week: April I
29-May 3,' the Jewish Vocational ber-1
vice was honored as one of the reci-1
pients of the 1985 'Clean Air Award I
for stopping smoking in t
workplace. The award ceremony tooK
place at a breakfast at the Omnil
Hotel. The affair was sponsored Ml
the American Lung Association am
Dade-Monroe, Inc., and the Soutnj
Florida Auto Truck Dealers!
Association. I
This award was presented to JVS
because of a six day smoking cessa-
tion class conducted at JVS recent I
by Jackson Hospital staff. Ten Jva
staff members participated in tne or
and one-half hour sessions dunr*
their lunch hour. The results oi *
program have been remarkawe-
cleaner air and improved healtn.
The administrators of'JVS *jj
commended for initiating this heai
program on behalf of the start, in*
dition, the participants were t
gratulated for their outstanding*
fort. The merits of such a progr*
will be a cleaner environr
staff and clients.
a t" ,l
onment W


Federation, May 1985
Page7
agencies
u. of Miami student garners
I B'nai B'rith award
\David Levinson (left) B'nai B'rith award winner seen at Hillel "Adopt-A-
IGrandparent" party.
Last month, David Levinson, a
[graduating senior at the University
of Miami, received the Outstanding
iHillel Student Award of the Florida
[Association of B'nai B'rith at its an-
[r.uai conference in West Palm Beach.
[This honor was given in recognition
of his contribution to Jewish student
llife at Hillel and on campus during his
three years as an undergraduate. For
David, this award has a special
significance because he achieved it
I not through academic merit or com-
Imunity service but for doing what he
[enjoyed most being an active and
[committed Jewish student.
The B'nai B'rith honor is awarded
[annually to a male and a female stu-
dent who have made an impact in
[Hillel ami iii campus through involve-
ment in a variety of activities. David
[Levinson shared" the award with Bari
[Stewart, a Pembroke Pines resident
[who is graduating from Florida
[Atlantic University.
David, one of several candidates for
the award, was selected because he
Ibecame involved in an unusually wide
Irange of activities, from academic to
[special action to the purely social.
[David, a pre-med student with a keen
[interest in his heritage, completed a
[major in chemistry and Judaic
[studies. He was elected to Phi Beta
[Kappa for his academic record, and to
[Mortarboard, the national service
[Honor society, for extra-curricular
[achievements at the university.
David reserved some of his best ef-
rts for Hillel. and especially for
iwunteer service programs, Israel-
leiated activity, the Federation-
KSu Jewish APPeal campaign, and
ohday celebrations and social
invents. He was one of the students
r^weated "My Brother's Keeper"
ItLV n *nt 'eadership conference in
| "e,: of hls freshman year, and he
Eftr Hillel director Rabbi
Iminio, m and the university ad-
E n to imPlement the pro-
laW lnteniships in Federation
Ifcr 25 and Secure its acceptance
f* academic credit.
David served
cruise ship, was initiated under his
leadership and has become one of the
favorite events on the regional Hillel
calendar.
Reflecting on campus life, David is
concerned primarily with the ques-
tion of Jewish identity. He views
Hillel as a major resource for
students at a school where it is easy
to remain uncommitted. He hopes
that increasing numbers of students
will take advantage of its programs
and the opportunity through Hillel to
expand the boundaries of their
Jewish awareness. David credits Rab-
bi Kram and assistant director Lynn
Grossman with helping him to
recognize his skills as a leader and
urges incoming students to seek out
these opportunities at Hillel.
For the present, David has left his
home in Miami Beach for New York
City, where he is preparing to enter
the New York University School of
Medicine in September. His part-time
employment as a technician at
Jackson Memorial Hospital and as a
teacher's aide at the Westlab School
have confirmed an interest in
pediatric medicine, the specialization
he intends to pursue. He is looking
forward to beginning his professional
training and awaits the day when he
will become a practicing physician.
While David will miss Hillel, he will
have the gift of creating Jewish com-
munity which he learned here. And
Hillel will remember its 1985 award
winner for some time to come.
Project independence:
broader vistas
Abe Leventhal loves the view from
the balcony overlooking Collins
Avenue. With a sweep of his hand, he
can show his guests all of Miami
Beach, his domain, below. Mr. Leven-
thal has watched the changing scene
beneath him for the past 17 years; he
could not imagine living any place
else.
Yet. Mr. Leventhal, who is 84 years
old and lives alone, suffers from
numerous chronic illnesses. Although
trail and unable to care for himself,
he does not want to be in a nursing
home. For Mr. Leventhal and hun-
dreds who live in the community,
"Project Independence" can be the
answer to their prayers the crucial
link that allows them to remain vital
and independent in their own homes.
Project Independence is an offspr-
ing of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged's Long-term
Care Channeling Demonstration Pro-
income brackets. Under current state
guidelines, Channeling can no longer
serve these people, but Project In-
dependence, can now give them the
kinds of care they need."
In addition to providing clients with
home visits and telephone contact.
Project Independence case managers
will develop individualized service
plans to meet the needs of the elderly
in their care. Such services as:
housekeeping, home-delivered meals,
skilled nursing, respite care, mental
health care, day care, escorts, compa-
nions, physical, occupational and
speech therapy, transportation and
nutrition assessment can all be ar-
ranged through Project In-
dependence caseworkers.
Today, thanks to Project In-
dependence, Mr. Leventhal has a
housekeeper four hours per day, six
days a week. She makes sure he has
his meals, helps him bathe and dress.
FT
r^
Abe Leventhal enjoys the view of Miami Beach from his balcony apartment.
ject. For the past three years. "Chan-
neling" has been proving that effec-
tive, organized use of community ser-
vices can prevent the need for institu-
tionalization for many of our frail
elderly. However, since March 1985,
changes in state and federal funding
have altered the program's eligibility
criteria to allow only those clients
who fall into the lower income
brackets to be served. Project In-
dependence was designed to continue
serving clients in the middle and up-
per income brackets on a private-pay
basis.
"In screening clients for Channel-
ing services," noted Channeling
Director Barbara Brodbar, "we
learned that those in the higher in-
come brackets need the same kinds of
at-home services as those in the lower
and keeps his home a clean, pleasant
place in which to live. Seven frozen
kosher meals are delivered to Mr.
Leventhal, an orthodox Jew, each
week. Two times a month, a physician
makes at-home monitoring visits. All
of these services are supervised and
coordinated by a senior case manager
who visits Mr. Leventhal regularly
and is in contact with his family who
live out-of-town.
"Having my own home is my life,"
said Mr. Leventhal. "If not for this
program, I would not be able to re-
main here. It's that simple."
If you or anyone you know needs
the services offered by Project In-
dependence, call Ms. Silvia Fer-
nandez. Senior Case Manager, Pro-
ject Independence, at 751-3095.
Mount Sinai Auxiliary installs president
v
as the campus
resentative for the University
CiCe%DePartment of the
Jjencan Zionist Youth Foundation
two years, educating his
^tes toward Israel and en-
erp others to *** and ^udy
I.,?? annual "Cruise to Haifa/'
israeh-style evening aboard a
Mount Sinai Medical Center's Aux-
iliary recently installed Teena Ellen
Weiss for a third term as president at
ceremonies in the Medical Center's
Founder's Dining Room. Mrs. Weiss,
best known for encouraging people to
get involved, has been responsible for
starting a physician's VIP Auxiliary
Membership (Very Important Physi-
cians) that underwrites the patients'
Diversional Activities Program and
TV Bingo; installing a Resell-A-
Bration thrift shop at the Medical
Center and spearheading improve-
ment in the Gift Shop, including a
payroll deduction plan for employees.
Working beside the president will
be five vice president*, including
those who are back for another con-
secutive term: hardworking and
dedicated Mrs. Ceil Ross Block and
Murray Sarlin, a very involved
leader; Mrs. Norma Steele, a long
time Auxiliary member; Dr. Judy
Holland, a devoted Auxiliary
member; and a newcomer to the
ranks, Mrs. Shirley Kaufman, who
brings many new ideas to the job.
Other elected officials, installed by
Mount Sinai's chief executive officer
Raymond S. Alexander, include
Naomi Sarlin, recording secretary;
Rena Kriegel, corresponding
secretary; Selma Hammer, assistant
corresponding secretary; Beatrice
Katz, financial secretary; Janet Bier-
man, assistant financial secretary;
Edith Eichenhon, executive
treasurer, Ilse Semondoff, treasurer;
and Alice Ruby, nominating commit-
tee chairman.
The 2,500 member Auxiliary pro-
vides volunteers and community sup-
port for Mount Sinai, raises funds for
Osteoarthritis and Osteoporosis
research and maintains the hospital's
Gift Shop, and Resell-A-Bration.


Page 8
Federation, May 1985


Young Leadership council
New structure intends to strengthen
community outreach
Acting upon the recommendations of the Task
Force on Young Leadership and with the approval of
the Board of Directors of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, two organizational structures will come in-
to existence on July 1st, the Young Leadership Council
and the Human Resources Development Committee.
The Task Force was chaired by Jack H. Levine, a member of the UJA
Young Leadership Cabinet and Chairman of the Federation's Leadership
Development Committee. "Miami," he said, "is once again pioneering in the
development of innovative and creative leadership development models that will
serve as examples for the rest of the country. Over the years," Levine noted,
"thousands of Jews have become contributors to the campaign and have been
brought into active involvement with the critical Jewish issues of our time. Many
have become leaders of the Federation and the Jewish community. Building upon
this foundation, the new Young Leadership Council will reach out to every young
Jew in Dade County, married and single, between the ages of 22-40 to invite them
to become members of the Council and to participate in its vital work of Jewish
commitment, involvement and action."
Norman H. Lipoff, as president of the Federation, in June of 1984, appointed
the Task Force and charged it with the responsibility of reviewing the Federa-
tion's young leadership activities and recommending any changes that would
serve to improve and expand the then existing program offerings. In addition to
its Chairman, Jack H. Levine, serving on the Task Force were: Michael M. Adler,
Barbara Aronson, Scott Barnett, Saby Behar, Helene Berger, Jeffrey Berkowitz,
Richard Berkowitz, Paul Berkowitz, Steve Brodie, Michael Browarnik, Tim
Cohen, Helene Cohen, Ken Cohen, Amy Dean, Larry Elbrand, David Goldweitz,
Gene Greenzweig, Phyllis Harte, Ken Hoffman, Ezra Katz, Norman Lieberman,
Fran Levey, Robert Merlin, Jeff Newman, David Perkins, Ellen Rose, Susan
Sirotta and Eric Turetsky.
The Task Force recommendations contain three major components: the
establishment of a Young Leadership Council, the restructuring of campaign-
related activities by creating a broad-based young leadership Campaign Commit-
tee; and the formation of a Human Resources Development Committee to replace
the Leadership Development Committee. Both the Young Leadership Council
and the Human Resources Development Committee will be standing committees
of the Federation's Board of Directors.
Another member of the Task Force, Richard Berkowitz, Miami Area Chair-
man of tide UJA Young Leadership Cabinet, indicated that "the Task Force
received input from a broad base of Federation constituent groups with a young
leadership development component including the Young Adult Division, the
Young Couples Group, the UJA Young Leadership Cabinet, the UJA Young
Women's Leadership Cabinet, the South Dade Board, the Business and Profes-
sional Women, and senior Federation leaders. I believe," Berkowitz continued,
"that by involving representatives of all of these groups in the deliberations of
the Task Force, we were able to develop a structure that will result in new young
leadership programs, fine-tune existing ones, and in the process, avoid duplica-
tion of efforts in sponsoring Federation activities."
Specifically, seven new committees will operate under the aegis of the Young
Leadership Council. A concise description of each committee can be found in the
boxed feature on this page.
A final recommendation of the Task Force on Young Leadership that was ap-
proved by the Federation Board was the creation of a new Human Resources
Development Committee to replace the existing Leadership Development Com-
mittee. Samuel I. Adler, president of the Federation has appointed Donald E.
Lefton, a Federation vice president to chair this most important committee. Mr.
Lefton's first responsibility will be to organize a Task Force responsible for
developing a broad range of Federation and community-wide programs and ac-
tivities designed to bring the most capable people possible, regardless of age, into
the campaign as well as the Federation and agency decision making process. "A
major focus of this committee," Mr. Lefton said, "will be recruitment, training
and placement in order to bring into our communal system individuals who have
the special sense of mission and the special talents that leadership requires."
To launch the new Young Leadership Council and to install the members of
its Board, a Champagne Brunch will be held on Sunday, June 2nd. The event will
take place at tile Biscayne Bay Marriott Hotel and will begin at 11 a.m. In addi-
tion to a sumptuous brunch and the formal part of the program, there will be a
swing band playing the sounds of the '40's.
To learn more about the Young Leadership Council and the Human
Resources Development Committee, please contact the Young Leadership Coun-
cil at 576-4000. Ext. 290.

M
It
->
Stacey Goldweitz, Tammie Wolofsky and
David Goldweitz
Your opportunity to pan*
1. The UJA Washington Young Leadership Conferenc
2. A dynamic and expanded campaign direc: I at yc
age that is expected to raise over one nvllion
Campaign.
3. The Sandra C. Goldstein Jewish Public An airs V
that will present some of the most outstar.oj^g^
issues of concern to the Jewish community.
4. A series of special young leadership missions to Isrj
5. Social and outreach programs, some designed for
couples.
YLC committee
YOUNG LEADERS*^
Jack H. Levine, Chair
Ellen Rose. Vice-Csair
The Campaign Committee, will be responsible lor
coordinating and integrating YLC Campaign efforts
for the CJA-IEF Campaign. Serving on this commit-
tee will be the chairman of each trade and profession
young section, two representatives of the Business
and Professional Women, two representatives of the
UJA Young Leadership Cabinet, two representatives
of the UJA Young Women's Leadership Cabinet and
other young leaders with a primary interest in the
CJA-IEF Campaign.
The Community and Political Involvement Com-
mittee, will be responsible for helping members of the
YLC to better understand issues of local, national and
international concern to the Jewish community by en-
couraging and coordinating: (a) attendance at the bi-
annual UJA Young Leadership Washington Con-
ference, (b) participation in missions to New York.
Washington and Tallahassee, (c) participation in the
projects and programs of the Federation's Communi
ty Relations Committee, and (d) participation in
volunteer and community service opportunities in
Federation-funded agencies..
The Couples Committee will be responsible for con-
ceiving, initiating and implementing social and
membership outreach and retention programs for
YLC couples. These programs shall also serve as an
introduction for new couples to the YLC and the
Federation, and provide opportunities for married
people to socialize with peers with whom they feel
comfortable.
The Missions to Israel Committee will be responsi-
ble for organizing and implementing at least three an-
nual missions to Israel for members of the YLC: a
Young Singles Mission, a Young Couples Mission and
a Young Leadership Mission.
Tne Pr
responb
raise the
trengfter!
A major:
mittee sh;
the ofgai
Great* 1
baMh M
world an
tion. I) at
YLClift
munal de
ment idu
the YLC
religic I a
herita e c
The Pul
ble fir
newsl tte
YLC ho
under ake
develc ) ai
neede to
coursi e ir
The iin;
ceivin i
YLC i err
jntrod ictii
Feder tioi
pie t( so
comfo tab


Federation, May 1985
Kage
r:
Young leadership seen at Super Sunday orientation
session.
lsher, Michael Novak and Zena Inden
Hrfpate in 1985-86
erence. March 2-4,1986.
at voung people under forty years of
llion doiiars for the 1986 CJA-IEF
lirs I oram: An evening lecture series
^gbfekr- in Jewish life, speaking on
*
lo Israel.
d for singles and others designed for
:ee structure
NCIL
Chairman
e-Cbairman
The Program and Education Committee will be
spoasible for educational programs designed to
ise *"e level of Jewish consciousness and s-
Ti^rBien the Jewish commitment of YLC members.
major focus of programs undertaken by the com-
ittM shall be to help participants better understand
1 "fpJniza,!,)n and needs of American and
**f M'ani; Jewish communities, issues of concern
p9*-'.eni|K)rary Jewish community, including
rtif^Huet Jewry and Jews in other parts of the
indiand the structure and function of the Federa-
m. 11 addition, in order to provide members of the
la J ith the iierspective required for effective com-
inal decision-making, the committee shall imple-
int jducatumal programs designed to strengthen
1U. members' knowledge of Judaism as a
lip' i and a way of life, and of the history and
nta :e of the Jewish people.
1 he Public Relations Committee will be responsi-
l h pr? WM tier designed to inform the members of the
.( iiwut the programs, projects and activities
der aken by the YLC. The committee shall also
wac i any other promotional material and methods
" to describe the work of the YLC and to en-
arai e involvement by potential participants.
I be unglen Committee will be responsible for con-
u~ Lj^ltlating and implementing social and
Ci eioutreacn retention programs for single
~J*er8. These programs shall also serve as an
* raon for new singles to the YLC and the
'" "on and provide opportunities for single peo-
rnfo S'8 ^ ^^ peCrS with Whm thCy fee'
Sanford Freedman and MichaelJoblove
Jack H. Levine, Chairman of the
Young Leadership Council
Susan Neshick, Howard Stone, Mark Friedland, Lyn
Pont and Ellen Rose seen at a recent campaign event.
Ellen Rose, Vice-Chairman of the
Young Leadership Council
Jack Levine, Phil Baum, Denny Wold and Robert
Merlin.
Members of the Nominating Committee of the Young Leadership Council
at a recent meeting.
seen


Page 10
Federation. May 1985

Israel 37 Highlights JCC celebrations
Israel's 37th An-
niversary Celebra-
tion brought
together thousands
of Miami residents
throughout Dade
County on Sunday,
April 21, at all three
branches of the
Jewish Community
Centers of South
Florida: The
Michael-Ann Russell
JCC, The South
Dade JCC and the
Miami Beach JCC.
The day-long
events expressed
the joy that Jews in
Miami felt with
Jews in Israel and
throughout the
world.
According to
Harry A. (Hap)
Levy, Chairman of
the Board of the
JCC's of South
Florida, "Miami was
just one of
thousands of com-
munities celebrating
this joyous occasion.
The JCC's are pleas-
ed to sponsor such
events as "Israel
37." The community
involvement in
"Israel 37" was
tremendous and
generated much en-
thusiasm, making
the three individual
celebrations
unique."
A full day of
festivities took place
at each Center.
Parades and Mar-
ches kicked off the
celebration in North
Michael-Ann Russell JCC Teen Groups march in
"Israel 37" Parade, proudly displaying the JCC
Banner. Hundreds of teens came out to celebrate.
Dressed in their "Israel 37" garb, JCC leadership
from all branches united in spirit to celebrate. Pic-
tured here (left to right) Gary Y. Holtzman, Pres-
ident MARJCC, Forrest Raff el, JCC Board of Direc-
tors, Miriam Zatinsky, Executive Director and
Richard Zadanoff, Chairman, "Israel 37", North
Dade.
u*
Torahs and Flags led the way of the 1'/? mile "March
of Blessings at the South Dade Jewish Community
Center's Celebration.
e
Highlighting the Miami Beach
Celebration was a visit from Nobel Prize
winning author, Isaac Bashevis Singer,
autographing his books.
uct:
Mayor Malcolm Fromberg presented JCC
President Dr. Ronald Shane with a
proclamation declaring April 21, "Israel
37" Anniversary Day on Miami Beach.
Dade and South
Dade. The Miami
Beach celebration
was highlighted by a
visit from Isaac
Bashevis Singer,
Nobel prize winning
author. Other events
included non-stop
entertainment, ex-
hibits, games, Israeli
and authentic Mid-
dle Eastern food
and a Shuk, an
Israeli-type market
place where
celebrants could pur-
chase everything
from Ketubahs and
Tallit to dates and
jewelry.
The "Israel 37" -
Yom Ha'atzmaut
celebration was a
multi-dimensional
event designed to
enhance the
knowledge and
understanding of the
land, the history,
the art and the peo-
ple of Israel.
In addition to the
festival on Sunday,
the Miami Beach
celebration also in-
cluded an Israeli
Museum exhibit en-
titled, "Yesterday's


Federation, May 1985
f -rr.,
Page 11
Michael-Ann Russell JCC
uth Dade JCC
Miami Beach JCC
JL ;
j~v
*1*m
olphin Defensive Back William T. Judson,
hecial appearance in North Dade to sign
ns for young "Dolfans. "
The ceremonial opening of the South Dade March
featured four Shofar Blowers playing in harmony.
ial Music Band Shachar entertained the
ie crowd with exciting Israeli music.
Israeli born, Dror Zadok, chairman of this year's
South Dade Celebration shares his joy in wishing
Israel a happy 37th birthday with celebrants at the
opening ceremonies.
J
X
of people joined the march down Miami
)rive to the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Center honoring "Israel's 37th"
A traditional Israeli-style bonfire, "KumziU", cap-
tured the warmth and spirit of the "Israel 37"
Celebration at the South Dade Jewish Community
Center.
Salutes the
Glory, Today's
Pride/' The exhibit,
which brought
Israel's rich and
diverse history to
life, featured pain-
tings, sculptures,
jewelry and artifacts
by American and
Israeli artists such
as Agam, Rubin,
Ben Shalom, and
Orbach.
Recalling Israel's
joy and pain, a col-
orful mural by
elementary school
students from
schools in Golan,
Jerusalem and
Kiryat Arba, Israel,
portrayed Judaism,
customs and daily
life from a younger
perspective.
This year's Israel
Independence theme
was "A Salute to
the Builders of
Zion." The three
event chairmen
were: Richard
Zadanoff, Michael-
Ann Russell JCC
(North Dade),
Douglas Miller, MD,
Miami Beach JCC,
and Dror Zadok,
South Dade JCC.
"Israel 37" was
coordinated by the
Jewish Community
Centers of South '
Florida, in coopera-
tion with the
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
builders of Zion
of South Flondi


Pagel2
Federation, May 1985
Foundation reports 22% growth
Following a pattern of continued healthy growth, the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies increased its asset base by 22.5 percent or $5,085
million during the 1983/84 fiscal year. Charitable distributions to local and
national institutions from Foundation assets exceeded $4 million.
TOTAL FJP ASSETS COMPARED TO
DISTRIBUTION FOR LAST 3 YEARS
$30 000 000
S2S.000.000
S20.000.000
S15.000.000
$10 000 000
$5 000 000
RSCAL YEAR ENDING &30 i.m 1.702
$2 $19,423,639 2.618 186


$3,339,810 S3.019.841 $4,005,189
n n
1982 1983 1984
B TOW ASSETS D TOTAL DISTRIBUTIONS
PHILANTHROPIC FUNDS
The majority of these assets, or approximately $23.8 million dollars exist
in philanthropic funds, 175 of which have been created by donors within our
community since the inception of the Foundation 13 years ago. Many im-
portant supporters of the Jewish community have created these funds at a
time of significant financial transactions in their personal lives or in those
of businesses in which they are involved. By gifting stock (either public or
private), real estate or cash, a charitable deduction may be taken in the year
of the gift and a carry-forward of five years can be provided. Capital gains
taxes, which normally would occur on the sale of the asset are avoided, and
the donor is able to create an endowment fund which provides a source of
income to accomplish many philanthropic objectives. In fiscal year 83/84, 17
new philanthropic funds were created and assets totaling $4,128 million
were added to new and existing funds.
PHILANTHROPIC FUND DISTRIBUTIONS
Total distributions from the Foundation's philanthropic funds in the
1982/83 fiscal year amounted to $3,019 million. This compares to $4,005
million dollars distributed in the 83/84 fiscal year.
Many local and national charitable institutions and programs benefit
from the existence of such funds. While most allocations from philanthropic
funds are directed to Jewish institutions, many local organizations such as
the United Way of Dade County and the University of Miami have been
recipients of grants over the years. In addition, at the suggestion of the
donors, gifts are also made to charitable organizations in numerous other
cities across the country.
Continuing a long time partnership, the Federation campaign received
$2,151 million dollars allocated from philanthropic funds in 1983/84. In
December '84, in an attempt to provide as much cash as possible to the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, philanthropic fund
donors were canvassed and suggested distributions totaling $961,000 to the
campaign. With the advent of Operation Moses, the United Jewish Appeal's
effort to rescue and resettle Jews from Ethiopia, philanthropic fund donors
again responded generously at the request of the community.
PHILANTHROPIC FUND
DISTRIBUTION BY CATEGORIES
reuaous minisiw
SOCIAL SERVICES
>*W.2M\
EDUCATION AND CULTURE
YOUTH SERVICES
AND RECREATION
JEWISH FEDERATION
IN OTHER COMMUNITIES
HEALTH SERVICES
GMJf
JEWISH COMMUNITY TRUST FUND
The Jewish Community Trust Fund (JCTF), or the unrestricted end
ment of the Greater Miami Jewish community, has grown significantlvni
the past year. Legacies and testamentary gifts provided by cariiw'
dividuals added $1,756 million to this fund in 1983/84. Income earnedont
assets to the Jewish Community Trust Fund have funded a number of
portant projects in the local Jewish community over the last several yea
Under the Federation's new modified budgeting process, JCTF income i
reviewed with all other sources in evaluating a variety of overall commu
ty needs. The following allocations were made during fiscal 1983/84 ont
recommendation of the Planning and Budget Committee:
1) Jewish Community Centers of South Florida
a) Community Care for the Elderly j^qq
b) Mini Park at Miami Beach JCC 5209
2) Jewish Family and Children Service
a) Crisis Response for the Elderly {19 g
3) Central Agency for Jewish Education
a) Teacher Center J49,
4) Community Chaplaincy Service
a) Hospice Services {28
5) University of Miami Graduate School of International Studies
a) Exchange Program with Tel-Aviv University $25 0
6) Brandeis Academy
a) Spanish Language Program $ 7 7
7) Barry University
a) Support for Judaic Studies Program $25,0
8) Council of Jewish Federations
a) Alternate Track Program $20,1
TOTAL JCTF ASSETS COMPARED TO
DISTRIBUTION FOR LAST 3 YEARS
S5.000.000
S4.500.000
S4.000.000
S3.500.000
S3.000 000
S2.500.000
S2 000 000
S1.500.000
S1.000.000
$500,000
$4,644,278
FISCAL YEAR ENDING &30

$2,762,053
S2.281.895
1^
EEE = $242,857 m

$145,400 S268.346

1982 1983 1984
TOTAL ASSETS TOTAL DISTRIBUTIONS
INVESTMENT COMMITTEE
The Investment Committee of the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropa
has the responsibility for managing the assets of the Foundation and i
recommending investment policy necessary to achieve the Foundation's 0
jectives in the community. The Committee follows the rule that "apruda
fiduciary" must exercise in the selection of investments and has been v
successful in managing the assets of the Foundation in a way which I
maximized income while maintaining safety of principal values. The Co
mittee has seen fit to invest in U.S. Treasury securities and variousajf
cies of the federal government, certificates of deposit in local savings!
loan associations and banks, and in some instances, out of town banks-
substantial investment in floating rate Bonds of the State of Israel isj
held. During the past year the average yield on investments was
percent.
The income earned by assets invested for the Jewish Community
Fund is utilized by the Jewish community. On a yearly basis the Investn
Committee certifies the amount of projected income available to the P
dation for charitable distributions.
JOINT VENTURES
One of the most significant events of the past year has been a n?*J0
enterprise between the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies and FedeB
tion's local agencies. This historic venture provides donors with the o_pp"
buiutjr iaj nuuve meiiine anu testamentary guts designate" iv. 1
fields of interest or programs within our participating agenc
Agreements have been signed with eight such agencies providing for
marketing and management of endowment funds restricted to_ specific 1
grams and/or Droieots. To riate tho follnwinar na-pncips have joined tnef
........' ll"f) ****v* iiiuiia^cuiciu Ul CT11UV/WIIICI1L ILillliO ICOtil^^u "*
grams and/or projects. To date, the following agencies have joineu u
gram: Central Agency for Jewish Education, Hfllel Jewish Student tew
of Greater Miami, Jewish Vocational Services, Jewish F^"lly.-
Children's Service, Jewish Community Centers of South Florida, *
ander Muss High School in Israel, Samuel Scheck Hillel Community
School and the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy.
Priority needs have been identified in the areas of education, pr
for the handicapped and elderly, Jewish culture and scholarship and
Programs can be endowed in honor or memory of a person designat
the donor. Never before have donors had the opportunity to restnct
gifts in this manner and insure the continuity of vital services w
community.


Federation, May 1985
Page 13
NEW MEMBERS APPOINTED TO FOUNDATION'S EXECUTIVE
COMMITTEE
Four members of the Foundation's Board have been appointed to its Ex-
ecutive Committee. Norman H. Lipoff, immediate Past President of the
Creater Miami Jewish Federation, Chairman of the Counsel of Jewish
Federations' Endowment Development Team and partner in the law firm
of Greenberg, Traurig, Askew, Hoffman, Lipoff, Rosen & Quentel, is a new
addition whose unique, long term expertise in the field is most welcome.
Jules Arkin, prominent attorney, a past president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and former president of Financial Federal Savings and
Loan has also joined the Foundation Executive Committee this year.
Simeon Spear, partner in the accounting firm of Spear Safer Harmon &
Co and an active member of the Jewish community, is also joining our Ex-
ecutive Committee this year.
We are also pleased to announce that Shepard Broad, Chairman of the
Executive Committee of American Savings and Loan Association, and a
lone time Foundation Board member is now co-chairing our Foundation's
Investment Committee with Arnold Ganz.
PROFESSIONAL ADVISORY COMMITTEE
Another significant event has been the expansion and restructuring of
our Foundation's Legal and Tax Committee. The new committee known as
the Professional Advisory Committee, is chaired by Martin Kalb, promi-
nent tax attorney with the law firm of Greenberg, Traurig, et al. With sub-
committees on Legal Affairs, Tax, Publications, Regulations and an overall
Steering Committee, the Professional Advisory Committee advises and
assists the Foundation in a variety of matters. This year the Committee has
been restructured in an effort to involve other professionals in the areas of
insurance, finance and real estate.
A NATIONAL PERSPECTIVE
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies has shared with other legacy
and endowment programs a remarkable history. Taken together the assets
of all legacy and endowment programs held by Federations across our coun-
try now approximate one billion dollars. This remarkable outpouring of sup-
port for the future of the Jewish people is unmatched by any other charity
nationally. We are proud that our community has experienced growth at
the rate of approximately 20 percent a year and want to again extend to the
families, individuals and professionals involved our heartfelt thanks. Many
hours of volunteer time are spent assisting the Foundation in a variety of
ways critical to our management and marketing and we would like to say a
warm word of thanks to all those serving on the Foundation's numerous
committees. This debt of gratitude is extended to members of the Board of
Trustees, Professional Advisory Committee, Investment, Women's and
Development Committees.
We end our report by noting with sadness the recent passing of Marilyn
K. Smith, a board member of the Foundation, and a unique and dedicated
individual whose significant contributions to the Jewish world serve as an
inspiration to us all.
A special fund in memory of Marilyn K. Smith has been established within
the Foundation to endow an annual "Judaic Lecture Series."
Board of Trustees
Melvin L. Kartzmer, Chairman
Bunny Adler
*I.. Jules Arkin
I. Jerry Bloom
Benjamin Botwinick
"Shepard Broad
Irving Cypen
Ivan Faggen
Dr. George Feldenkreis
David Fleeman
Irving Frankel
Dr. Phillip Frost
"Arnold Ganz
KIli- Ganz
Gary Gerson
Goldie Goldstein
Joseph Handleman
Martin Kalb
'Shepard King
Jay I. Kislak
'Sidney Lefcourt
Donald Lefton
Shirley Lester
Harry A. Levy
'Nancy Lipoff
Norman H. Lipoff
Stanley C. Myers
Jeffrey E. Newman
Irving Norry
Sidney Olson
Forrest Raffel
Anita Robbins
Howard R. Scharlin
Kenneth J. Schwartz
Philip M. Segal
George Simon
Harry B. Smith
'Simeon Spear
Donald R. Tescher
Sydney S. Traum
Dr. George Wise
Allan Yarkin
Foundation Executive Committee
kl.wm L. Kartzmar
Chairman
L Julaa Arkin
Snap* rd Broad
CoChalrman
Inaoatmant Commlttaa
Df. Philip Froat
Arnold Qaru
Co-Chairman
Invaitmant Commltlaa
Martin Kalb
Shopard King
Jay I. Klalak
Sldnay Lafcourt
Nancy Lipoll
Chair Dotfoiopmant
Commit!
Norman M. Llpoft
SMnayOlaon
Forraat Hartal
Harry B. Smith
Slmaon Spaar
Women's Committee
Ellie Ganz, Chair
Eva Abrahamer
Florence Abrams
Bunny Adler
Judith Applestein
Etta Barnett
Betty Cooper
Amy Dean
Eva Feig
Mikki Futernick
Ceil Greenspon
Charlotte Held
Gertrude Kartzmer
Nancy Lipoff
Meryle Loring
Ellen Mandler
Bluma Marcus
Pat Papper
Gloria Raffel
Anita Robbins
Marvis Schaecter
Maxine E. Schwartz
Jackie Traurig
Ray Ellen Yarkin
Professional Advisory Committee
Investment Committee
'Martin Kalb, Chairman
Arthur Appleman
Jeffrey Karash
Scott Bamett
Albert Beer
Richard Berkowitz
Robert Billig
Richard Breit
Alvin Brown
Robert I. Chalnick
David Darlow
Barry B. Diamond
Michael Dribin
Ivan Faggen
Lynn Fromberg
Gary Gerson
Dennis Ginsburg
Barry Gurland
Barry Hersh
Fredric Hoffman
Lewis Horowitz
Monte Jackel
Joel J. Karp
Alfred Katzin
Shepard King
Steven Lapidus
David Lawrence
Sidney Lefcourt
Norman H. Lipoff
Howard Lucas
Neal Menachem
Steven Messing
Jeffrey Newman
Jack Orkin
Richard Preston
Ellen Rose
Barry Ross
Jay Rossin
Stuart Rothchild
Steven Sadel
Philip M. Segal
Richard Skor
James Sloto
Harry B. Smith
Rachel Sommer
Bryon Sparber
Glenn Spear
Simeon Spear
Robert Steinberg
Sol Stiss
Harold Tannen
Donald R. Tescher
Bernard Tinkoff
George Trager
Sydney Traum
Eric Turetsky
Dennis Turner
Morton Weinberger
George Weinstein
Melvin Weinstein
Joseph Weiss
A. B. Wiener
Arnold Ganz, Co-Chairman
Shepard Broad, Co-Chairman
Adolph Berger
Irving Cypen
William Foor
Charles Ganz
Solomon Garazi
William Gordon
Joseph Handleman
Kenneth Hoffman
Joseph H. Kanter
Jay I. Kislak
Marina Shank Klein
Sidney Lefcourt
Shirley Lester
Robert Loring
Leo Pomerance
George Simon
Simeon Spear
Paul Sussman
Development Committee
Nancy Lipoff, Chair
I. Jerry Bloom
Mort Deckelbaum
Herman Gaba
Ceil Greenspon
Charles Held, Jr.
Martin Kalb
Joseph C. Imberman
Director
Gabriel* Landau
Sidney Lefcourt
Norman Lieberman
Ellen Mandler
Philip M. Segal
Allan Yarkin
Penny Marlin
Assistant Director
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Samuel I. Adler
President
Myron J. Brodie
Executive Vice President
'Eiacutm Committaa
Staanng Committca


Page 14
Federation, May 1985
Cable Television/Agencies
Kaleidoscope special features
In June and July, "Kaleidoscope," the JFTV produced news magazine
show, host i by Suzanne Lasky, continues to bring insightful views on
Jewish happenings in the South Florida area.
June begins with a look at the festivities commemorating Israel's 37th
birthday and also a poignant interview with Victor Herman author of Sir
Countries to the United States.
Thurs., June 6th at 7:30 p.m.
Sat., June 8th at 7:00 p.m.
Tues., June 11th at 7:30 p.m.
Continuing in June, Suzanne Lasky interviews Cantor Rachelle Nelson
as she tells you about her role as Dade County's first woman cantor, and in
this segment a thought provoking interview with United States Senator
Arlen Spector (R-Pa.) who elaborates on his views towards Israel and the
Middle East.
Thurs., June 13th at 7:30 p.m.
Sat., June 15th at 7:00 p.m.
Tues., June 18th at 7:30 p.m.
Stay tuned to JFTV as we bring you funny man David Brenner with
some serious words about Israel and his Jewish upbringing. Brenner was
the featured guest entertainer at the Federation's Pacesetter Dinner last
November. Also, Sidney Shapiro discusses his book, Jews in China, a collec-
tion of new writings by Chinese scholars on Chinese Jewry, which at one
time was a thriving community, although now it has been reduced to just a
handful.
Thurs., June 13th at 7:30 p.m.
Sat., June 15th at 7:00 p.m.
Tues., June 18th at 7:30 p.m.
In the last week of June, "Kaleidoscope" will present the second part of
the David Brenner interview, and highlights from a moving speech by actor
and Holocaust survivor Robert Clary who is best known for his role in
"Hogan's Heroes." Finally a touching encounter with Alexandra
Finkelstein, a Refusenik, who after waiting 13 years, is now living in Israel.
Thurs., June 27th at 7:30 p.m.
Sat., June 29th at 7:00 p.m.
Tues., July 2nd at 7:30 p.m.
To start July, "Kaleidoscope" will be at Temple Emanu-El's Holocaust
Memorial ceremony featuring Nazi-Hunter Beate Klarsfeld who was in-
strumental in the capture of Klaus Barbie, "Butcher of Lyon" and is cur-
rently involved in the search for Joseph Mengele "The Angel of Death," the
infamous physician at Auschwitz.
Thurs., July 4th at 7:30 p.m.
Sat., July 6th at 7:00 p.m.
Tues., July 8th at 7:30 p.m.
Self Help group
forms for bulimics
The Eating Disorder Program of
Jewish Family and Children's Service
of Miami (JFSC) is now offering a
Bulimia Support Group for in-
dividuals with this serious emotional
problem. The group meets the first
and third Monday of each month from
5 to 6 p.m. at the JFCS North Dade
Office, 2040 N.E. 163rd Street,
North Miami Beach.
Bulimia is an eating disorder
characterized by compulsive binge
eating, which is followed by self-
induced vomiting and/or excessive
use of laxatives to control weight.
The group is conducted by JFCS
Clinical Social Worker Susan Eps-
tein, M.S.W., and is a self-help forum
for members to discuss their fears
about gaining weight, guilty feelings
about eating and how their problem
affects relationships with others.
Members also share personal ex-
periences with each other in order to
provide emotional support for over-
coming Bulimia.
A fee of $5 per session is charged
by JFCS, a non-profit social service
agency funded by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and United Way
of Dade County. For further informa-
tion about the Bulimia Support Group
or the Eating Disorder Program, call
949-6186.
BBYO recognition!
breakfast on
June 9
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
volunteer advisors will be honored
guests on June 9, at the annual Ad-
visor Recognition Breakfast to be
held at Hillel House. Advisors are
thanked and recognized for their
hours of work and dedication to the
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization pro-
gram. The breakfast is sponsored by
the Greater Miami Adult Board and
B'nai B'rith South Dade Council.
Program awards will be given to
deserving chapters in the areas of
Community Service, Religious
Heritage, Social, Athletic. Cultural,
Recreation, B'nai B'rith Girls (BBG)
Sisterhood, and B'nai B'rith Girls
Creativity. All BBYO chapters are
encouraged to program in the above
areas during the year. Athletic
trophies will be awarded to winners
of the season's athletic leagues.
BBYO is the largest Jewish youth
group in the world serving teens in
grades 9-12. For membership infor-
mation call 253-7400 in Dade and
925-4135 in Broward.
watch jftv on:
Storer (North Dadel
Storer (South Dade)
Harte-Hanks
Dynamic
Miami Cablevision
Americable
Channel P-29J
Channel 14
Channel 2
Channel 43
Channel 11
Channel 36
JFTV

GREATER MIAMI
JEWISH FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION, INC.
-CLIP AND SAVE
Programming Schedule
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Cable Television inc.
JUNE 1985*
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
5-5:30 p.m.
Eenies
Kitchen
FOCUS
Eenies
Kitchen
Film
Special
Aleph
or
Film
Special
Pillow
Talk
JCC:A
special
Place
5:30-6 p.m.
Checkup/
Mount
Slnal
Sunrise
Sunset
Hello
Jerusalem
Checkup/
Mount
Sinai
FOCUS
Film
special
Eenies
Kitchen
6-6:30 p.m.
we
Remember
The
Holocaust
6:30-7 p.m.
Still
Small
voice
or
viewpoint
7-7:30 p.m.
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
7:30-8 p.m.
Pillow
Talk
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show v
JFTV
Bulletin Board
JCC:A
Special
Place
Encounter
Aleph
or
Film
Special
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Kaleidoscope
with
Suzanne
Lasky
Film
Special
Eenies
Kitchen
we
Remember
The
Holocaust
Checkup/
Mount
Sinai
we
Remember
The
Holocaust
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Sunrise
Sunset
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
still
small
voice
or
viewpoint
Hello
Jerusalem
Kaleidoscope
with
Suzanne
Lasky
Film
Special
Kaleidoscope
with
Suzanne
Lasky
JFTV
Bulletin Board
Encounter
Film
Special
&2 CLIP AND SAVE-
amn


Federation, May 1985
Page 15
leu
llUBDAY, JUNE 1
ujajni Beach Jewish Community Center is spon-
S r a trip to the Coconut Grove Theater to see
Jrica's Sweetheart," a comedy about the love af-
!"between Al Capone and the American public
tout the gangster's rise and fall. Tickets are
s for members and $20 for non-members, which in-
s the show and a wine and cheese reception. For
ons, please call the Miami Beach JCC at
BAY, JUNE 2
npagne brunch will be held at 11:00 a.m. at the
~TC Bay Marriott, 1633 North Bayshore Drive,
trsting the inauguration of the Young Leadership
jcflof the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. The
I is $18 per person. All current YAD and Young
pies Group members in good standing will
tically be considered members of the Young
ship Council. For more information, please call
,Koiman at 576-4000.
DAY, JUNE 2
Association of Parents of American Israelis will
oratri-county luncheon at Tower 41 Restaurant
| noon. For more information, please call Ethel
I at 864-0392.
ESDAY. JUNE 4
, Jim Pitisci, a psychotherapist specializing in
jrital and sex therapy, will lead a discussion on sex-
[intimacy in relationships at the South Dade JCC,
01SW 102nd Avenue, at 7:30 p.m. The fee is $2
Imembers, $3 for non-members. For more informs
(.pleasecall 251-1394.
ESDAY. JUNE 4
|forum, sponsored by the South Dade JCC
en's Department, will be held at 7:30 p.m.,
after school programs for kindergarten
en through grade sue. For more information
ut the forum, to be held at the South Dade JCC,
01 SW 102nd Avenue, please call Phillis Klau at
1-1394.
SDAY, JUNE 4
Hillel Jewish Student Centers of Greater
ni will honor Alfred Golden at its Third Annual
illation Dinner at the University of Miami Hillel
ndation, 1100 Stanford Drive, Coral Gables. The
speaker is Rabbi Stanley A. Ringler, national
tor of Community Affairs, B'nai B'rith Hillel
ndations, Washington, D.C. For additional infor-
ton please call 661-8549.
IdNESDAY, JUNE 5
lopen house forum will be held this evening at 7:30
>t the South Dade Jewish Community Center,
pi SW 102nd Avenue. Discussions will be held on
school day care in our community and time
gement for today's working parent. Admission
1 and refreshments will be served. For more in-
iuon, please call 251-1394.
IDNESDAY, JUNE 5
[Step&mily Association of America, Inc., South
r? :aPter' will present an open discussion,
Irvij m StePfamilies" at the Jewish Family
RUM) s Service, 2040 NE 163rd Street, Suite
I" 7:30 p.m. The fee is $1.00 for members, $2.00
pon-members. For more information, please call
DNESDAY. JUNE 5
kw/rvu"0"*1 Growth Month, the Jewish Fami-
fw uiildren's Service of Miami is sponsoring a
entitled "Health and Body Image." Kathie
Einstein. M.S.W., will discuss critical eating
2 "* as Anexoria Nervosa, Bulimia and
orewa. The workshop begins at 7:00 p.m. at the
Mami Jewish Federation, 4200 Biscayne
o A nominal fee of $5 per person will be
"e-registration is required due to limited
i^ii^ca? information and reservations,
' oil 445-0555.
r^DAY, JUNE 6
jgl Scheck HUlel Community Day School will
K2 Sft Sch0l graduation at 7:30 p.m. in
l*TM,*r Auditorium, 19000 NE 25th
E rW ShS Beach- ^ PMfc invited to
f1 Please call 931-2831 for reservations.
DaY,JUNE9
featttfaavL* ce'ebration of children, will be
I Avenul u. M,chal-Ann Russell JCC, 18900 NE
nJ*. .beginning at 2:00 p.m. with children
*i j" gymnastics, ballet, karate, tennis,
lAianS T*-. theater performances and
h for S dmner bein 6:00 p.m. Reser-
|5th thTLi *"* quired and must be in by
olta SSg1" free> banquet cost is $5
' fSiSiSmSS^12 For"" Mor'
TUESDAY, JUNE 11
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School will
hold its kindergarten graduation at 7:00 p.m. in the
Friedman-Uhlar Auditorium, 19000 NE 25th Avenue,
North Miami Beach. The public is invited to attend.
Please call 931-2831 for reservations.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12
Ranch" Adler, M.S.W., will discuss "Effective Com-
munication Techniques" at a workshop sponsored by
the Jewish Family and Children's Service, beginning
at 7:00 p.m. at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
4200 Biscayne Boulevard. A fee of $5 per person will
be charged, and reservations are required. Please call
445-0555 for reservations and more information.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 12
The Women's Committee of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will be hosting a reception at the Burdines
Mayfair store from 4 to 6 p.m. Women who have sign-
ed and indicated their intention to provide a lifetime
or deferred gift to future generations will be honored.
Burdines will be presenting a show featuring fall
fashions and accessories. For more information,
please contact Penny Marlin at 576-4000, ext. 352.
SATURDAY, JUNE 15
The Jewish Singles Network is sponsoring its first
"fundraiser," "A Night at the Races," at the South
Dade Jewish Community Center, 12401 SW 102nd
Avenue at 7:30 p.m. A $5 gate fee includes one free
pass to the concession stand. For more information,
please call 251-1394.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 19
"Stress in the Workplace" will be the topic of a
workshop led by David B. Saltman, L.C.S.W.. beginn-
ing at 7:00 p.m. at the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard. A fee of $5 is required
as well as pre-registration. For reservations and in-
formation, please call 445-0555.
MONDAY, JUNE 24 FRIDAY, JUNE 28
The Jewish Teachers Institute of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education will sponsor two classes for
teachers for professional growth. "Song of Songs"
from 9:00 a.m. to noon. Dr. Yehuda Shamir will
discuss modern and traditional interpretation
through the use of commentaries and midrash, as well
as secular biblical scholarship. "Midrash The Rab-
binical Bible" from 1:00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. Rabbi
Menachem Raab will discuss types, structure and
style of Midrash, its purpose in elucidating the biblical
text and its development into one of the most
fascinating of biblical interpretations. For more infor-
mation, please call 576-4030.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 26
Susan Rubin, L.C.S.W., will lead a workshop entitled
"Assertiveness in the Workplace" at 7:00 p.m. at the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, 4200 Biscayne
Boulevard. A fee of $5 is required as well as pre-
registration. For reservations and information,
please call 445-0555.
THURSDAY. JUNE 27
Alan Walsh will teach a brush-up photography course
at 7:30 p.m. at the South Dade Jewish Community
Center, 12401 SW 102nd Avenue. The fee is $2 for
members, $3 for non-members. For more informa-
tion, please call 251-1394.
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH AND THIS
SUMMER
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center,
18900 NE 25th Avenue, offers swimming for all ages
and abilities starting at 6 months of age. Register any
time. For more information, please call 932-4200.
The Early Childhood Department of the South
Dade Jewish Community Center, 12401 SW 102nd
Avenue, is offering a "Summer Creative Creeper"
class for children 6 months to a year and their
parents. This class will run from June 26 through
August 14. The fee is $40 for members, $50 for non-
members. For more information, please call
251-9334.
"Caring for Infants and Toddlers What Works,
What Doesn't," will be the topic of the Wednesday
morning discussion group at the South Dade JCC.
There are eight sessions in the series, beginning on
June 26. The fee is $2.40 per session, $16 for the
series for members, $5 per session for non-members.
Pre-registration is required. For more information,
please call 251-1394.
Registration is now underway for the Miami Beach
Jewish Community Center-Hebrew Academy Sum-
mer Day Camp. Camp begins on June 24 and runs
through August 16. For more information, please call
Iris Berger, camp director, at 534-3206.
Join the Miami Beach Jewish Community Center's
teens in an American Youth hosteling adventure.
Travel to Boston, Massachusetts and bike through the
Cape Cod area. This trip is open to all 9th-12th
graders and will begin on August 16 and continue
JCC provides
creative enrichment
after school
It's 3:00 p.m. on Wednesday, the bell has rung
signalling school's out for the day. Most children
return home, "plop" their books down and turn on
the television while heading toward the kitchen for a
handful of chocolate chip cookies and a tall glass of
milk. Then off they go back to the TV until the next
bell rings "The come and get it bell!"
Although formal educational enrichment may stop
at three p.m. and "I Love Lucy" re-runs begin at
four, creative enrichment for many youngsters enroll-
ed in JCC Afterschoo! Programs open up a world of
activities, over 100 classes weekly each afternoon
beginning around 2:00 p.m. and ending at 6:00 p.m.
Afterschool Programs are held at all three branches
of the Jewish Community Centers of South Florida:
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center,
The South Dade Jewish Community Center and the
Miami Beach Jewish Community Center.
Fun, friends and frolic await the hundreds of
youngsters from K through 6th grade who participate
in the program.
Innovative programs and a professional faculty
with a rich and diverse background ensure a high
level of excellence in the programs. Class sizes are
limited to provide quality instructor, student
experiences.
Classes from Musical Rainbow, where creative
movement, drama and painting are fused to music
from classical to rock and roll, to computers, where
children are taught the necessary skills to sustain and
grow in today's world while still having "fun with
computers."
Jewish holiday and Shabbat celebrations add to the
child's understanding of his rich and colorful Jewish
heritage. Holiday celebrations provide opportunity
for song, dance and story telling passing on customs
and traditions.
A special Open House Forum for Afterschool Pro-
grams will be held for the community to discuss
Afterschool-Day Care Programs in the South Dade
area on Wednesday, June 5th at 7:80 p.m. at the JCC,
12401 S.W. 102nd Avenue. Admission is free and
refreshments will be served. Join other concerned in-
terested parents for this informative forum. (Call
David at 251-1394 for details).
For more information on the JCC Afterschool
Enrichment Classes, call the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center at 932-4200 or the Miami
Beach Jewish Community Center at 534-3206 or the
South Dade Jewish Community Center at 251-1394.
through August 25th. Call the Center at 584-3206 for
a brochure or come to the Center at 4221 Pine Tree
Drive.
A mini-camp for children grades K through eight
will be held at the South Dade JCC from August 19
through August 30. The cost is $75 per week for
members, $90 per week for non-members. For more
information, please call 251-1394.
Beginning on June 17, the Michael-Ann Russell
JCC will sponsor a two-week long swim program for
children aged one year through 10 years. There are
eight 30 minute lessons from Monday through Thurs-
day, 4:00 p.m.-4:80 p.m. The fee is $20 for members,
$30 for non-members. For more information please
call 982-4200.
Every Sunday night is Israeli Dance Night at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC. For more information
please call Marsha Engelman at 932-4200
f
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
' (PtaaM Print or Type
The deadline for Summer events is June 6.1985
Organization___________________________
Event_________
---------^
Place
Date.
_Time_
Jl a.m. () p.m.
Your name
Title
_ Phone No.
MAILTO:
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137


Federation, May 1985
0' Child of Israel...
dry your tears, this is your home,
we will comfort you.
<>
wmmm
?>*-
AGAINST ALL ODDS
THEY ARE HOME
Support the
1985 Combined Jewish Appeal/Israel Emergency Fund
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign
Nor ma a Braman, General Campaign Chairman
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137
Samuel I. Adler, President
Myron J. Brodic, Executive Vice President
fl


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