The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02918

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
I
dfewislfo Flor idliami
Volume 58Number 1
Two Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, January4,1985
By Mail no Cams
Price 50 Cents
Cabinet Expected To
Decide On Lebanon
Troop Redeployment
Donations of cash and goods have been re-
ceived by the American Jewish Joint Dis-
tribution Committee (JDC) since it opened
its mail box for Ethiopian Famine Relief on
November 1. All goods received to date have
been shipped to Ethiopia and distributed to
needy people in the famine affected areas in
the north; additional shipments are being or-
ganized.
JERUSALEM (WNS) -
The cabinet is expected to
decide early this year on a
phased redeployment of the
Israel Defense Force in
south Lebanon unless there
is a breakthrough con-
sidered highly unlikely at
this point in the Israel-
Lebanon military security
and_ withdrawal talks .at
Nakura. informed sources
have said here.
The form the redeployment is
expected to take, according to the
sources, is a partial pullback of
the IDF from the Awali River
line in the western sector of the
front but no immediate corre-
sponding movement in the
eastern sector, where the IDF
faces Syrian forces.
After the partial redeployment
is effected, policymakers will
assess the new situation before
recommending any further moves
southward by the IDF. the
sources said.
The Nakura talks, which re-
cessed for two weeks, are due to
be resumed on Jan. 7. The Israe-
lis have made it unequivocally
clear that if by then the Lebanese
persist in rejecting Israel's pro-
posals, there would be "nothing
more to talk about" from Israel's
point of view.
Aid To Ethiopia
*^
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) A
shipment of 4.5 tons of food was
flown last week from JFK Inter-
national Airport here on El Al
planes to Israel and from there
will be sent to Ethiopia, a
spokesman for the Israel Con-
sulate said.
The shipment, part of the Is-
raeli government's assistance to
famine stricken Ethiopia, con-
sists of donations arranged by
Israel's Consul General in New
York, Naphtali Lavie.
According to the spokesman,
the commercial value of the
shipment is about $100,000. It
included over 100,000 portions of
protein-enriched concentrated
food and supplemental vitamins.
The food portions are soya-based
in order to avoid known adverse
affects on famine victims.
Lavie and Ambassador Aharon
Ofri of the Israel UN Mission met
with the Ethiopian Ambassador
to the UN, Berhanu Dinka, and
formally informed him of the Is-
raeli assistance. Dinka, the
spkesman said, "gratefully
acknowledged this humanitarian
gesture."
Meanwhile, in Israel, the
Magen David Adorn is under-
taking a mass fund-raising
program to aid the victims of
famine in Ethiopia. The cam-
paign by Magen David Adorn is
in addition to the official Israeli
government aid to the
Ethiopians.
PLO Leader
Assassinated
Fouad Kawasmeh, 48, a
former mayor of .Hebron on
the West Bank, .was as-
sassinated on Dec. 29 in
front of his home in Am-
man, Jordan, b.v two men
with silencer-equipped pis-
tols, according to Jordan-
ian government officials
and the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization.
The victim was a moderate
PLO leader considered a staunch
supporter of Yasir Arafat, and
had been elected in November to
Continued on Page 15-A
Knesset Acts to Curtail
Kahane's Activities in Israel
TEL AVIV (WNS) -
Police blocked Rabbi Meir
Kahane and a band of his
Kach Party followers from
enterine the Arab village of
Taibe in central Israel.
They acted in compliance with
a motion adopted by the Knesset
limiting the Kach leader's parlia-
mentary immunity to prevent
him from visiting Arab villages
where his presence would be
provocative and likely to cause
public disorder.
Kahane, who has vowed to
defy the ban, was halted at a
police roadblock seven miles from
Taibe. He did not argue with the
police, and returned to his car
and drove away. A busload of his
cohorts, following his car, was
stopped at Kfar Saba, some
distance southwest of Taibe.
Police found the vehicle's lights
were not working properly and
ordered the driver to return to Tel
Aviv.
Kahane, who was elected to the
Knesset last July on a platform
calling for the expulsion of all
Arabs from Israel and the oc-
cupied territories, stated that his
purpose in visiting Taibe and
other Arab villages was to exhort
the residents to emigrate from
Israel, and persuade Jewish
women married to Arabs to
desert their husbands.
The Knesset voted 58-36 by
secret ballot in favor of the
limiting motion which was sent
to the plenum with a strong
positive recommendation from
the Knesset's House Committee
after eight public hearings on the
issue. Political observers ex-
pressed surprise at the relatively
large number of MKs who voted
against the motion.
*
Following Long Illness
Marilyn Smith, Local and National Leader, Passes
Marilyn K. Smith, a vice president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, a
member of the Board of Directors of the
United Way of Dade County and an active
community leader for more than 25 years,
died Tuesday in Miami, at the age of 48. A
the past 40 years. She graduated from
Miami Beach High School, and she at-
tended the University of Miami.
Mrs. Smith held numerous high-ranking
positions in the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and in national organizations.
At the time of her death, she was a vice pre-
sident of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, a post she had held since 1982. She
was the founder of the Young Women's
Division of Federation, and served as pre-
sident of the Women's Division in 1975-76.
At the national level, she was a board mem-
ber of the Council of Jewish Federations, a
member of the Executive Committee of the
national Women's Division of the United
Jewish Appeal, and a member of the Cam-
paign Policy Board of the United Jewish
'* Appeal.
In addition to Mrs. Smith's local in-
volvement with the Federation and the
United Way, she served as a trustee of the
National Foundation for Advancement in
the Arts and as a member of the Miami
Opera Guild. She was also active in
Hadassah, the League of Women Voters,
the South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry, the National Jewish Resource Cen-
ter and the YIVO Institute.
Other posts she held in the Miami
Federation included chairman of the
Planning and Budget Committee, and
membership on the Community Relations
Committee, the Administrative Committee
and the Communications Committee. She
also chaired Federation's Task Force on the
Single Parent Family. Ms. Smith was
always active in Federation's annual Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign, having served as vice
chairman of the 1983 Campaign, as a
member of the Campaign Steering Com-
mittee, and as the 1982 chairman of the
Pacesetter Dinner.
Her leadership and contributions to the
local and national Jewish communities were
recognized through various awards she re-
ceived during the past two decades. Most
recently she received the Hannah G.
Solomon Award from the National Council
of Jewish Women. She was the 1968 reci-
pient of the Stanley C. Myers Presidents'
Young Leadership Award, and along with
her husband, Harry, she received the 1981
Community Service Award from Brandeis
University, and an honorary degree from
the Hebrew Union College in 1976. She was
robed as a Fellow of Brandeis University in
1983.
"Marilyn Smith was, without a doubt,
one of the most dedicated leaders of our
greater Miami Jewish community," said
Samuel I. Adler, president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. "She created and
leaves with us a legacy of caring and com-
mitment that has improved the quality of
Jewish life in Greater Miami. She was a
woman of action who cannot be replaced,
and we will sorely miss her."
Marilyn Smith is survived by her
husband, Harry B. Smith, an attorney and
outstanding community leader; her three
children, LouAnn, Joey and David; her
mother, Inez Krensky; and her brother,
Herbert Krensky, an attorney.
Funeral services were held Thursday at
Temple Beth Sholom, with arrangements
by Riverside Memorial Chapels.
Marilyn K. Smith


Page 2^A
The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 4,1985
if '' i i' *
A Vigil For Soviet Jews
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Overcast skies
and chilling winds set the
mood for a Soviet Jewry
solidarity hunger vigil and
demonstration held on the
East steps of the Capitol.
The day-long hunger strike
by 20 Washington-area
rabbis and a demonstration
by about 100 people were in
solidarity with the 100 or
more Soviet Jewish refu-
seniks who are now con-
ducting hunger strikes in
the Soviet Union to protest
the KGB's campaign of in-
creased religious harass-
ment.
Recently, the homes of
prominent refuseniks were
searched by Soviet officials who
were looking for alleged drugs
used for "Jewish rituals," with
Jewish ritual objects being
ripped open and old women
struck. Several Hebrew language
and Jewish culture teachers have
also been arrested on false
charges and others threatened
with arrest, according to the vigil
co-sponsors, the Jewish Com-
munity Council (JCC) of Greater
Washington and the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
REV. CHARLES Bergstrom,
Reagan Optimistic That Moderate
Arab States Are Moving Toward
Negotiations With Israel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Reagan
has expressed optimism
that moderate Arab states
are moving toward nego-
tiations with Israel and
said the United States will
"do everything we can to
hopefully encourage this"
trend.
"I think that there has been
some trust built up by moderate
Arab states in the United States
a^WJ intermediary," Reagan said
dMf% interview with The
" Washington Times released by
the White House.
But the president stressed that
the U.S. is "not trying to
negotiate the peace" between Is-
rael and the Arab states. "They
have to negotiate the peace," he
said.
REAGAN SAID that
"Syria still is the stumbling
block. But even so, now there is
the negotiation going on with
regard to removal of Israel's
troops from Lebanon." This was
an apparent reference to Syria
not interfering with the I?rael-
Lebanese negotiations and thus
by implication approving of the
talks.
In addition to this Syrian
inaction, the president gave as
reasons for believing there is a
move toward negotiations
Jordan's restoration of
diplomatic relations with Egypt,
which he said "kind of
strengthens Egypt's position as
being accepted back in the Arab
community even though it has
the peace treaty with Israel"; the
resumption of U.S.-Iraqi
diplomatic relations last week
which were broken by Iraq in the
wake of the 1967 Six-Day War;
and the holding of the Palestine
National Council meeting in
Amman rather than Damascus.
"I think these things are all
leading toward the possibility of
getting the Arab states to agree
to negotiate," Reagan said. "You
see, they've been sitting there
with the position that they refuse
to recognize Israel's right to exist
as a nation. Well, you can't
negotiate with someone until
that's removed."
REAGAN ADDED that
Egypt has negotiated peace with
Israel and that King Hussein of
Jordan is now saying that
"Jordan can't be alone" but
needs the other Arab states "to
come together on this and enter
into negotiations."
The president added that the
PLO is now "taking on the
radical factions in their own
midst that were pro-Syrian." But
he did not mention that PLO
officials in Amman so far have
rejected Hussein's pleas that
they move toward negotiations
with Israel.
executive director of the Office of
Governmental Affairs of the'
Lutheran Council in the U.S.A.,
declared, "We want to be as
supportive and helpful as
possible. May our voices be heard
where changes can be made."
Rep. Jack Kemp (D., N.Y.)
declared, "There is an inex-
tricable link between the freedom
of people throughout the world.
Today you are giving a new
meaning to the word
'Solidarity.' Kemp told the
gathering, "By standing here on
the steps of the Capitol, not as
Republicans or Democrats or
people of one particular political
philosophy, expressing our
concern for men and women
behind the Iron Curtain, and
particularly those refuseniks
being denied their basic human
rights, we are expressing concern
that was all too lacking in the
1930s and which many people
have said, over and over again,
including our president, must
never happen again on the face of
the earth."
Kemp also said, "There cannot
be better relations between the
United States and the Soviet
Union until the Soviet Union
begins to recognize their cam-
paign of anti-Semitism and
human rights is linked to all of
the talks between the United
States and the Soviet Union.
DR. EUGENE FISHER,
executive director of the
Secretariat of Catholic-Jewish
Relations of the National Con-
ference of Catholic Bishops,
stated that "anti-Semitism must
be condemned in whatever forms
and wherever and whenever it
appears .... we wish to speak
out today together with other
Christians and the Jewish
community to protest attacks
against the teachers of Hebrew
now taking place in the Soviet
Union."
William Keyersling, Wash-
ington representative of the
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry, told the gathering that
later this month there will be 300
similar demonstrations
throughout the United States.
"These demonstrations will not
only send a message to the
Soviets, but also to the Jewish
community in the Soviet Union,"
Keyersling said.
Keyersling added that "these
kinds of demonstrations continue
to give hope and revive the spirit
of those in the struggle."
Situation of Ethiopian Jews
Worsening; Israel, U.S. Urged
To Make Concerted Aid Effort
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An urgent appeal was
issued here for Israel and
the United States govern-
ment to step up.relief and
rescue efforts for the Fala-
shas, Ethiopia's Jewish
community, whose situa-
tion has worsened due to
the devastating drought
that is sweeping North
Africa.
More than 10,000 Falashas are
believed to have fled their homes
in Ethiopia, according to ac-
tivists in this country on behalf
of the Falashas. Thousands have
remained in their country and
continue to be subjected to
discrimination and other forms of
harassment from the Ethiopian
population.
ELI ROCKOWITZ, vice
president of the American
Association for Ethiopian Jews,
in making the plea for a concerted
effort to save the Falashas, also
urged world Jewish organizations
to work together in this endeavor
because. Rockowitz explained.
"If that is not done now, they're
finished."
Reports from international
relief groups say dozens of
Ethiopians have died each day
from the severe drought afflicting
Ethiopia and vicinity. Many who
have died in the camps are buried
quickly and this has caused some
dispute on the actual number of
additional precarious situation.
They tend to live in isolated
groups, according to Rockowiu,
and they cannot let their Jewish-
ness be known for fear of
retribution. The AAEJ official
asserted that Falashas fear
carrying out Jewish burial
services for their dead.
ROCKOWITZ, speaking at a
news conference at the Central
Synagogue Community Center at
Manhattan, was joined by two
Ethiopian Jews who recently
escaped from their homeland.
They described years of brutal
treatment, harassment and
torture at the hands of the
Marxist government in Addis
Ababa.
The two men, both middle
aged, did not use their real names
during the meeting with menv-^
bers of the Jewish media. They
were identified as Yuri Ben Gad
and Rachamin Ben Joseph in
order to protect family they left
behind in Ethiopia when they fled
last summer.
Their rescue was aided by the
AAEJ. They now live in Israel at
the absorption center of Pardes
Chanah.
BEN GAD spoke in Amharic,
the Ethiopian language that was
translated into English by Ben
Joseph. Both Falashas have been
teachers of Hebrew and leaders in
Ethiopia's Jewish community.
Both had been arrested by thf,
government security and Ben
Gad was tortured for teaching
Hebrew and for "treason."
. "My.life has been dedicated to
teaching Ethiopian Jews their
people who have died. \~ heritage," Ben Gad said, noting
But the Falashas in the refugee that he had been trained in Israel
camps, where as many as 600,000 m the 1950s for several years, and
Ethiopians have fled, face an then returned to Ethiopia.
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''riday, January 4,
Fewish Floridian Page 3-A
Behind the Headlines
k-'
Major Contribution To A Complex Issue
T
*
By CHARLES ALLEN, JR.
On Nazi war criminals living
nong us: there's good news
nd there's not-so-good news,
""irst, the good news. Allan Ryan,
Jr., former head of the Justice
apartment's Office of Special
Investigations (OSI), which
prosecutes suspected Nazi war
riminals, has checked in with a
lseful book that without
i^stion makes a major con-
tribution to this complex issue.
"Quiet Neighbors" (Harcourt,
[Bruce Jovanovich, New York,
11984) tells an often-gripping
story of how he and his young
lOSI team pursued, prosecuted,
Idenaturalized and, in some in-
stances, deported actual Nazi war
criminals living in the United
[States.
The book focuses on several
key trials which were by no
means ever quiet affairs but
which have made important,
historic contributions at several
levels immigration,
naturalization of our law. They
were told of course from Ryan's
perspective as the nation's chief
prosecutor of individuals who
embody literally unresolved
remnants of the Holocaust itself.
Ryan takes the reader step-by-
step through the massive,
complex attempts to fix the guilt
of such cases as Archbishop
Valerian Trifa, the Rumanian
.fascist, self-admitted pogromist
iWho sat on the governing board
of the prestigious National
[Council of Churches of Christ in
America; John Demjanjuk,
known as "Ivan the Terrible"
when he kicked off the diesel
engines of the gas chambers of
Treblinka before making his way
to Cleveland, Ohio; Andrija
Artukovic, the single greatest
gfcnocidist in our midst, former
Interior Minister of Nazi-
occupied Yugoslavia who has
been here since 1948.
The major cases are told with
invaluable instruction by the
author. When "Quiet Neighbors"
8ticks to its legal last, as it were,
the results, the insights are of a
high order. Ryan rejects (as has
this reviewer) the "great con-
spiracies" approach wherein
"Odessa" operations deep within
jthe government are portrayed as
"smuggling" genocidists en bloc
into the United States.
-|tHe properly underscores a
^mdamental reality: "Nazi war
riminals came here through
he H>enly-deliberated public
olicy of this country, formulated
Congress (in the 1948
3isplCe(l Persons Act) and
tdmlBJstcreii by accountable
fficiaJe And it Ls the more
'isturtring because the proof (of
towtlwv got here) is abundant.''
' "\;h/argument is not novel of
F and Ryan acknowledges
me of the writings which have
He cites the well-known
ome remark by one of the
of the Displaced
Act, the then-powerful
Virginia Senator William
fy" Revercomb: "We
live this DP problem all
we could work out some
t would keep out the
Of course that was
what the first DP Act
r gently, Ryan points out
how Certain "major" Jewish
leadjWcreated a public relations
front: I the Citizens Committee
pr Displaced Persons (CCDP) -
gandize the DP Act to
Their effort produced "a
backfire,'' Ryan correctly
which 40 percent of the
visas were set aside for
countries (from which
irtionate number of war
came to the U.S.) and
most Jewish DPs
ra
no
DP
the
*
The peculiar mentality that
contributed to this bitter irony is
revealed in an American Jewish
Congress memo secretly cir-
culated inside the CCDP: 'a
calculated risk should be taken'
that Nazi collaborators would
receive some of those (DP Act)
visas. This is 'unavoidable (the
AJCongress memo said) if a
haven were to be found in this
country for any really significant
number of displaced Jews.' "
At this point, however, Ryan
conspicuously fails to consider
the implications of such cynical,
unprincipled opportunism within
its broader context. Such an act
was not random but rather
consistent with that "leadership"
before, during and even after the
Holocaust. Indeed, only the Jew-
ish War Veterans among the
"major" organizations took an
open, active and unequivocal
position against the presence of
Nazi war criminals in America.
Regrettably, "Quiet Neigh-
bors" is elsewhere marked by
parallel limitations, contextual
weaknesses and curious
omissions that make for some
problems. Herein lies the not-so-
good news about Ryan's efforts.
Whenever he tries to go beyond
the trial lawyer's story he tells so
well, he quickly encounters
materials that prove too much for
him. Even while attempting to
sketch historical or political
contexts for his cases, there is a
paucity of historical command of
the materials or naive
generalizations that do not for a
moment stand up to scrutiny.
Time and again, in making his
case against Trifa or the Arrow
Cross criminal of Hungary, he
resorts to contrasting the
"moderates" of Marshal Ion
Antonescu's Rumania and of
Admiral Nicholas Horthy's
Hungary. Other than for tactical
moments, these forces of fascist
nationalism were in continuous
collusion with the openly avowed
Hitlerites to the very end of the
war. To characterize successive
prime ministers of wartime
Hungary as "moderate" and to
call that author of Hungary's
" n c ;. ? r a 1 i s m'' (meaning
capitulation to Hitler Germany),
Count Bela Teleki, "an anti-
Nazi" is bizarre nonsense.
Ryan's limited grasp of the
times leads him into such
flagrant errors as putting the
Dora-Norrlhausen slave tunnels
(for V-l and V-2 rocket
production) in Austria when of
course they were located in
eastern Germany. He states that
Latvia is "largely Catholic" and
Lithuania "largely Protestant"
when in fact their respective
religions are precisely the op-
posite.
His otherwise useful chapter
on Artukovic is woefully in-
complete and misleading. One
would not know from it that both
this mass murderer and his
terrorist Ustashi enjoyed the
support of the Roman Catholic
Church; that Cardinal Spellman
was among Artukovic's
petitioners for congressional
relief; that the Croatian Catholic
Union spearheaded a national
defense campaign for Artukovic.
One might also conclude that
Cardinal Stepinak, primate of
Croatia (as an archbishop), was a
stout companion of Yugoslavia's
doomed Jews and an anti-Nazi
when in fact he was neither.
Ryan is never reluctant to take
credit; even sometimes when
credit is not quite due. He rightly
underscores the importance of
the U.S. Supreme Court's
sustaining the reversal of the
trial judge's original finding in
behalf of the Treblinka death
camp guard, Feodor Fedorenko.
Thus the OSI case was vin-
dicated. He neglects to relate
that the aide to the U.S. Solicitor
General who originally recom-
mended that the Fedorenko loss
at the trial level not be appealed
was then-Deputy Solicitor
General Allan Ryan, Jr. This
prompted ironic comment by law
journals at that time.
Ryan makes a great to-do
about protecting a Hungarian
criminal who came to the U.S. He
gives him the pseudonym,
"Count Josep Magyar," while
reciting his case as an example of
the "humane" considerations
that often enter into such prosec-
utions. Ryan's "Magyar" was in
fact a violently provocative
fascist by the name of Count
Miklos Serenyi who was exposed
by the anti-Nazi Hungarian press
in the 1950's, some of whose
exposures are cited by Ryan.
The former OSI chief also
defends his decision not to re-try
the case of one Frank Walus,
originally ordered denaturalzied
in 1978 for allegedly having
Continued on Page 13-A
Barry University
11300 NORTHEAST SECOND AVENUE
MIAMI SHORES. FLORIDA 33161
PHONE: (305) 758-3392
Masters in Jewish Studies
The M.A. Program in Jewish Studies at Barry University
announces the following Spring semester courses
(starting January 15):
RJS 642 TALMU DIG LITERATURE: Studies in the development and
interpretation of selected portions of Rabbinic literature
during the Talmudic period.
Instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir Monday evenings
6:30-9:30 P.M.
RJS 620 ANCIENT JEWISH HISTORY: Studies in Jewish history
from Biblical times until the formation of the Babylonian
Talmud.
Instructor: Dr. Jeremiah Unterman Tuesday evenings
6:30-9:30 P.M.
RJS 611 MODERN JEWISH HISTORY: Studies in Jewish history
from the Emancipation through the establishment of the
State of Israel.
Instructor: Dr. Yehuda Shamir Wednesday evenings
6:30-9:30 P.M.
RJS 634 JEWISH ETHICS: An analysis of Jewish law and ideology
on such issues as war, the death penalty, abortion,
euthanasia, business dealings, charity and the role
of women.
Instructor. Dr. Jeremiah Unterman Thursday evenings
6:30-9:30 p.m. at the Jewish Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
GENEROUS SCHOLARSHIP AID IS AVAILABLE
TO QUALIFIED STUDENTS
FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:
The Jewish Studies Office
758-3392, extension 524 or 530
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Page4-A TW
Friday
4.1986
Butler's Bully Boys!
The New Danger
Ajxu-Scmitism and racism on varying
levels of virulence have always been a part
of the American experience. In i
times, other forms of bigotry
to job this areas of hatred. From the 17th
Century witch-hunts in Massachusetts to
today's reaction against massive waves of
latin an migration, the American people
have never been far removed from some
form of prejudice, simmering or frankly
hysterical.
The arrest of a hard core of the neo-Nazi
Brudtr Schiceigen movement in western
Idaho last week is of a different order
because anti-Semitism is of a different
order. Jew-hatred encompasses as par-
ticipants many of those very people who
are. themselves. victims of bigotry in other
forms.
Just about every day reports reveal to us
new incidents of anti-Semitism in various
Latin American countries. And especially
today. there is a deterrnined effort being
mounted to help strengthen anew the old
biack-Jewish coalition that has eroded over
the years because of the gyring of black
anti-Semitism.
Other examples abound of victim -turned-
perpetrator. One must not forget the
Catholic-Protestant impasse within
Christianity itself. On a so-called "benign
level, the American people witnessed this in
the 192 presidential election pitting
Herbert Hoover i Protestant against New
York's Gov. Al Smith I Catholici. with
Smith losing because of his religious
persuasion.
And then there was the 1960 campaign,
which brought John F. Kennedy to the
Southern Baptist Convention in Dallas to
plead with its constituency not to repeat
the political bigotry of 1928 and not to
deny him Baptist votes solely because he
was a Catholic. He would not. he was forced
to vow in a moment of personal
humiliation, if elected turn the reins of
American power over to the hands of the
pope and the Vatican.
Behind the Success
Anti-Semitism is different. It is the
religion of the Jews that turns the baying
dogs to bark and snap and bite all the
harder. Paradoxically. as we have said,
those among the tormentors are. as likely
as not. themselves victims of hatred in
another context.
All of this is important to understand
because of the Bruder Schweigen Order,
also known as the White American
Bastion. This so-called neo-Nazi movement
is so very intimidating because of the
extent of its successes thus far. As we see
it, the successes derive from two things.
First, the organization has learned much
from the operations of international
terrorist organizations that have become so
sophisticated in their methods that their
immediate objectives are no longer
necessarily individuals but national in-
stitutions.
Richard Butler, chief honcho of Bruder
Schweigen, thus dissociates himself from
the violent actions of the organization,
including the slaying last June of Alan
Berg, the Jewish radio talk show host in
Denver, whose popularity was particularly
widespread because he billed himself as
"the man you love to hate." Butler at-
tributes the assassination to Bruder Sch-
ejewish Floridian
who have since departed
his cha:----- in:c.nr. :*. ertheiess to do
mo-re z^iZct- -..- tj-s e zhi&r =utuai cause.
This Zii'-'.^m x sjooa^oc recalls the
'.*'-.*- '.err:ruses ~ 'Jsust recen; heyday
:: ea-. e _r c=ee- perse r.a :z^a ;^*c :':r zh* nz t- ;c.a :;ng effect
of it. Or the Irak Bprtrf i .Army.
cutting its bczrzil swath :oday agamst the
Brush m Belfast wade coarinmrtg to raise
huge ?.:> ::' = :c**y rrrc unsuspecting
Ajr-rr-jCAus :.: ix zz*z '. ?-\ < :xzipa;gr: at
-c same ::t-jt :^iz :z iecicres :he use of
violent actions
The Silk of Religion
There is =cce :cccx rsascc Jor
Butier s success ihu far H* las icce
beyond the zr^r.^z^^ :c sect w-.uh zze more
radical eiemen'.s :f hus zec-Nisz mc*f<*EUrEu
Butler s Br*de~ 5-:*;_r.sirt. Irzer s ii<: =c
in the silk of hi* 7 z ur:=. :: ,' i*--i~ 7htjsc
Christian. In tins way is zrz#*n-r~.',:r.~
activities are twice-recui:'. <. rricz 5 .Urr s
ver>- real and -- zo-socous nzecz :y ret
another surrogate z*zzzz i-s A_- =.-
Nations arrr.;. Ht z- ruuze -5 _-_r-:-
seem kosher to the cr.5-_i-ze:-. jzs t> -r
I n : he poz^jlz _-c : r_s 5 h:" s 3u: jer to
be more Christian rei-^.-:-us :har. political,
social and economic It .s t.-ere:';re uxeiy
to gain him far more popular ard far wider
public support. Since anti-Semitism is at
its root a uniquely religious phenomenon,
Butler can hope for broader sympathies.
Many Americans, disaffected in any case
by today's hard times, will be inclined to
join Butler in laying their problems at the
feet of Jews than were it clear to them that
ha ultimate victim is the United States
itself.
The thrust of FBI activity in this maiiei
b spurred by the success thus far of the
various bank and armored truck robberies
staged by Butler's surrogate outfits. It is
nor Butler's philosophy that particularly
offends anyone after all, the IRA
demonstrates how terrorists can be suc-
cessful using this method of operation.
Butier. too, can lay claim to be a great
liberator.
In the end, assuming that Butler and his
works are as dangerous as they are, the
nation and its institutions must make clear
that it is not a bunch of "mere" bank
robbers they are after, but of terrorists out
on a binge to bankroll what they believe to
be their ultimate takeover of the United
States.
The nation and its institutions must
show an understanding that Bruder Sch-
weigen is Adolf Hitler, not Robin Hood,
and that they condemn and deplore the neo-
Nazi beast because intimidation of any
group of Americans must be regarded as
intimidation against all.

Proposals Pending for Sweeping
Cuts in Government Expenditures
Friday. January 4.1966
Volume 58
11TEVETH574S
Number 1
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM iJTA. Fi-
nance Minister Yitzhak Modai
has promised to present the
Cabinet within two weeks, with
proposals for sweeping cuts in
government expenditures that
will ehmmate entire areas of
government activities.
His pledge, to the Knesset Fi-
nance Committee, was welcomed
by economic experts who have
insisted all along that Israelis
will have to face further deep and
painful retrenchment if the
country s grave economic crisis is
to be solved. They have warned
that without drastic fiscal
measures during the breathing
space allowed by the three-
month wage-price-tax freeze
package that took effect this
week, the economic recovery
program cannot succeed.
Modai s promise was greeted
with skepticism by at least one
member of the Finance Commit-
tee, former Finance Minister
Yoram Aridor who charged that
earlier Cabinet decisions to slash
the budget have never been im-
plemented.
THE PRICE FREEZE, mean
while, was bedeviled by uncer-
tainty and confusion. It had
hardly taken effect when the
Ministry of Commerce and In-
dustry was forced to publish a re-
vised list of the maximum prices
allowable on some 400 household
staples which are said to acocunt
for about 80 percent of the
average family's monthly
budget.
The original price list, pub-
lished Tuesday, was assailed by
retailers and consumers alike for
alleged errors. In some cases, re-
tailers claimed they were already
selling many items at lower
prices than those on the govern-
ment's list.
Consumers protested that the
frozen price of many goods was
much too high while merchants
complained that others were too
low and would cause them undue
hardship. The discrepancies ap-
parently were corrected in the re-
vised price list published.
JUSTICE MINISTER Moshc
Nissim, acting Minister of Com
merce and Industry in the ab-
sence of Ariel Sharon who is in
the U.S., is furious with the tele-
vision media for having reported
that an early price list prepared
by the government was
"destroyed" at the demand of
manufacturers who threatened to
walk out of the price feeze agree-
ment Nissim called the report
blatantly false, demanded a
retraction from the media and
threatened legal action if it was
not forthcoming.
THE TREASURY has an
nounced another "adjustment.
It will apply the freeze to the
price of imported goods,
originally excluded, although not
directly. This means that import
duties and taxes will be frozen at
the rate of 527 Shekels to SI. The
Shekel was pegged at that rate
for the duration of the freeze as it
applies to local prices quoted in
dollars.
Importers will thus pay lower
taxes on the goods they import
during the freeze But they will
continue to pay real dollars for
the imports and this, it is said,
will be the importers' contribu-
tion or "sacrifice'' to the freeze
package.
The Treasury acted to forestall
a trend among importers to slow
their business to a crawl on
grounds that they cannot realize
a profit when they* must pay for
their foreign goods at prevailing
market prices but can sell them in
I srael only at the frozen pnee
There has been much criticism
as well of the government s ap-
parent retreat under pressure
from Histadrut over the pnee ot*
fuel and other subsidized items
Modai has hoped to exclude those
items from the pnee freeze and
allow them to rise, albeit sloly
and under strict supervision by
the Treasury But Histadrut
Secretary General Yisrael Kesar
accused the government of
reneging on the original freeze
package agreement which he said
applied to all' items.
The situation is still not clear
Energy Minister Moshe Shahal. a
Laborite. said that there ould
be no rise in the price of fuel this
month but refused to comrtjt
himself for December. He main-
tained that the government had
the right to raise the pnee of
stems it subsidizes, contending
that strictly speaking this was no
an increase but an "adjustment"
to keep such items in line with
the failing value of the Shekel
against foreign currencies.
*


Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A,
Savage
3 Synagogues, 15 Torah Scrolls Set to the Torch
Early Friday morning, Dec. 14, three
major sites across Jerusalem were set
ablaze. Within a half hour of each other, the
synagogue on Mount Zion and the Old
City's Rambam and Katamon shuls were
savagely attacked.
In all the incidents, the Holy Arks were ignited
first. The most extensive damage occurred on Mount
Zion where fifteen Torah scrolls were destroyed. This
synagogue, which is part of the Chamber of the
Holocaust Museum, was designated in 1948 as a
memorial to the 6,000,000 Jewish souls who perished
by the Nazis. For each of the European communities
destroyed, a commemorative plaque was placed.
AUTHORITIES estimate that 20,000 people
turned out to mourn the ashes of the Holy Scrolls
and to follow them to their burial place on the Mount
of Olives.
Rebbeim from all over Israel came to eulogize the
destruction. They included the Gerrer Rebbe; the
Belzer Rebbe; Rabbi Moshe Shapira, Chief Rabbi of
Israel; Rabbi Kollitz, Chief Ashkenazi Rabbi; Rabbi
Meshash, Chief Sephardi Rabbi; former President
Yitzhak Navon; Rabbi Menachem Porush, Member
of Knesset; Rabbi Goldstein, Rosh HaYeshiva of
Diaspora Yeshiva.
The ashes were placed in clay urns, sealed and
carried to the cemetery by the Chevra Kadisha
(Burial Society).
The Rebbeim of Israel called on World Jewry to
band together to restore this holy site. Thousands of
dollars have been pouring in to the Chamber of the
Holocaust on Mount Zion.
The Israeli police are continuing the investigation
of this unprecedented act of violence.
Jewish Chaplain Travels Far,
Wide To Fill His Duties
< By ALBERT W. BLOOM
FRANKFURT, West Ger-
many A parachuting chaplain-
rabbi needs no further credentials
whenever he delivers a Shabbat
or Yom Tov sermon "from on
high."
Chaplain Avi Weiss, 33, an
army major and an Orthodox
rabbi from California with smicha
(ordination) from Yeshiva Uni-
versity, New York, is in such a
position.
Before being assigned here at
one hub of U.S. Headquarters for
Europe (USAEUR), Chaplain
I ^IVeiss made 27 parachute jumps
with the famed 82nd Airborne
Division as an infantry battalion
chaplain at Ft. Benning, (la.
"With the paratroops, jumping
is the key to being with the
people of your unit. It's like
medicine; you take it and you are
one of the boys." Rabbis among
warriors.
- SCARED? "You are always
scared when you jump. I'm still
scared when I jump. I did it be-
cause I enjoyed duty by being
with my unit."
An eight-year veteran. Chap-
lain Weiss is still a "jumping
chaplain," but in a different way
these days during his two-year
tour in West Germany which
he will probably extend to a third
year.
It's different over here and
challenging in the Frankfurt
sector, where Chaplain Weiss is
jumping from a thou.sand-and -
one duties and obligations a
chaplain has especially a
Jewish chaplain whose "con-
gregation(s)" are scattered far
and wide, from the teeming city
to remote duty stations.
Rabbi Weiss is one of the eight
Jewish chaplains assigned to
Europe. Each one is especially
selected and officially endorsed
by the JWB Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy (JWB-CJC),
the agency acting as the
American Jewish community's
representative to the U.S. De-
partment of Defense in a unique
relationship.
JWB-CJC is a unifying force
and sets an example for the
civilian American Jewish
community by bringing all wings
of Judaism together to make
decisions in harmony for the
benefit of Jewish men and women
in the Army, Navy and Air
Force.
Weiss keeps on the jump in the
Frankfurt area, where the
military, the military-civilian
community of family and em-
ployees, and the West German-
Jewish community interface
daily. This is a proving ground
for human relations. And it tests
Chaplain Weiss' energy, fortitude
as well as the good-natured
cooperation of his family wife,
Elcya, and children.
"The kids wonder what he's
doing home when he's home,"
Elcya laughed.
Living in a military-city-
within-the-city of Frankfurt
enables Rabbi Weiss to use the
effective volunteer lay leader
system which military chaplains
are encouraged by JWB-CJC to
develop.
Thus religious services, reli-
gious school (which opened its
new semester for both children
and parents when we were there),
adult education, and social
At his headquarters in Ramsteim, West Germany, Col Alston
R. Chace (left), command chaplain for U.S. Air Force Europe,
goes over activities with Chaplain Morris Faierstein. Chaplain
Chace, an Episcopation, sends Copt Faierstein roaming as far
as Norway on vitations to his 300-400 Jewish constituents in
the Air Force and attached civilian communities of Western
Europe. Note Jewish Chaplaincy pennant (left).
20,000 Jews gather to mourn the destruction of the Mount Zion synagogue.
The Chevra Kadisha (Burial Society) sorts through the remains of the Holy Scrolls on
Mount Zion.
services are part of an extended
program.
RELATIONSHIPS with the
West German Jewish community
find Rabbi Weiss reading the
Torah for a synagogal minyan
and assuming a role with the
Frankfurt "Gemeinde."
In addition, there is the
Army's 300-bed, 97th Corps
General Hospital in Frankfurt,
where Chaplain John Magalee
cooperates with chaplains of all
faiths to ease the pain of the sick
and injured.
Says Magalee on the chaplain's
role in hospitals: "God produces
the illness and He's got to be part
of the healing team."
In the military, "It is a mis-
take to think that you are a reli-
gious leader in the normal reli-
gious sense," Chaplain Weiss as-
serted.
The problems are often much
more humanly involved, he said.
"How do you handle a situation
like this? A young wife is dying
of cancer. Her paratrooper hus-
band breaks his leg in his 127th
jump. They are the parents of
two young children.
"In the military, you are a
social worker, a facilitator of
Jewish services, a custodian of
funds, an ecumenical spokesman;
you wave the American flag and
the religious pennant.
"WHEN I WAS jumping with
paratroops, I spent about 90 per-
cent of my time on duty with non-
Jews." Each chaplain is a chap-
lain for soldiers of all faiths when
on duty.
"Further, in military Jewish
society, life is often very assimi-
lated. One can be as observant as
he chooses in military life, but he
or she has to work at it harder
than he or she would in civilian
life. The Jewish chaplain has to
meet every such need."
A chaplain-rabbi in the mili-
tary "poskens" (hands down
interpretations of Jewish reli-
gious law) for all types of Jews in
the service. Those types vary
widely. Both rabbi and service-
man or woman have to be flexible
to solve religious problems in the
military.
Marriage, a brit-milah at a post
far away from the chaplain's
station. Bar and Bat Mitzvah.
Continued from Page 12-A
He is still scared when he jumps,
but his work demands he meet the test.
>-> '^s ^Ar^-;>.^. jj*j


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. January 4. 1986
Judge Blanche Kay, who serves on the Tel
Aviv Magistrate's Court in Israel, makes a
point during a speech given in front of local
judges and attorneys at a luncheon hosted
by Dade Circuit Court Judge Amy Steele
Donner (center) at the Miami Marriott
Hotel Judge Kay was in South Florida as a
guest of the Greater Miami Israel Bond
Organization to promote the sale of Israel
Bonds, which help alleviate Israel's current
economic problems. Also listening to Kay is
M. Ronald Krongold, left, a local attorney
who doubles as the national vice chairman-
at-large of Israel Bonds, and Howard Klein,
executive director of Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization.
SeaiullCKOSHEl^
^TEAKjnOUSE
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Female Judge Finds Equality In Israel
t^Wngmsw
"I was a Jewish girl from Iraq
who went to Israel to become
equal. In Israel, we (men and
women) believe we are one," says
Judge Blanche Kay, who recently
visited South Florida from Israel
where she serves on the Tel Aviv
Magistrate's Court.
Judge Kay visited Dade
County in an effort to help in the
State of Israel Bond drive during
Operation Maccabee. The
national Operation Maccabee
campaign is an effort to sell
Israel Bonds, with the money
from the purchase being used to
help alleviate Israels current
economic problems, and help
create a stronger Israel through
the building of bridges and other
projects.
Kay's visit was termed a suc-
cess as she provided an insight to
the Jewish state's problems
through her appearances as a
guest speaker at many functions.
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including a luncheon hosted by
Dade Circuit Judge Amy Steele
Donner with local judges and
attorneys in attendance.
"Equality in Israel begins at
18 as both boys and girls join the
army," related Kay. "Israel has
the most progressive laws for
working women of any country.
We had women who worked on
the roads before most nations
did."
After serving in the army
herself, Kay received her law
degree cum Laude from Hebrew
University. She practiced law as
a private attorney after gradua-
tion, and has also been associated
with the Ministry of Defense and
the Tel Aviv District Attorney's
office.
"Picking a judge in Israel is a
unique process." says Kay of her
position. Judges are selected in
Israel by a public committee
which consists of nine members.
Sitting on the public committee
is the minister of justice, who
serves as chairman: the chief
justice: the president and two
other judges of the Supreme
Court: two members of the bar;
two members of Knesset; and one
member of the cabinet, the latter
three serving as the political
figures on the committee. All
judges receive a life appointment
until the age of 70.
According to Kay, potential
judges are interviewed by the
public committee in accordance
to the application and must have
practiced law for a specified
amount of time, depending on
which court you want to serve on.
"The Supreme Court sits as
the final and highest court of
appeal and also as the highest
court of justice," Kay adds. "We
call it the conscience of our
nation, since we do not have a
written constitution and this is
our safeguard. Our Supreme
Court is open to any application
of any person who feels that he
has a grievance against the
government."
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Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
\
Subtitles Can't Help
This Yiddish 'Mama'
1
By SUSAN BIRNBAUM
Perhaps taking its cue from the
current spate of opera per-
formances using English sub-
titles, a Yiddish play has opened
at New York's Town Hall boast-
ing what it calls "full English
subtitles a first on Broad-
way." At least half of this claim
is disputable, as the translations
projected by slide on double
screens for the production of "Oy
Mama! Am I In Love!" are
neither full nor continuous and
include objectionable terms,
leaving entire portions of
dialogue and song untranslated,
a failure which may be under-
standable when confronted by
the inane story-line conjured up
for this musical.
Based on a book by Moshe
Blum, the plot of "Oy Mama!" is
a wholesale affront on the Jewish
experience of the early 20th
century, when the impossibilities
of continuing any semblance of
safe or normal life in Eastern
Europe forced more than two
million Jews to flee, the majority
arriving at America's shores
under considerable hardship and
facing intense scrutiny at Ellis
Island, including the shame of
some immigrants' not having the
requisite minimum allowance
enabling them to debark or
remain.
THE SHALOM THEATRE
production of an almost three-
hour musical extravaganza is
almost three hours too long. It is
based on the tale of two families
interconnected in the ahtetl, one
of which becomes an amnesiac
once posted to New York and the
good life, which here includes an
exceedingly lengthy Charleston
(dance) wedding and Yiddish-
speaking "greenhorns" bedecked
in ostrich feathers and practicing
tennis while waiting for an errant
bride.
The substitute bride, childhood
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playmate of the cuckolded
groom, is waiting her turn to
leave the song-filled ship with her
mother, outdoing "Yentl's" ora-
torio onboard a ship bound for
the Golden Land. In "Oy
Mama's" repertory, penurious
immigrants sing and dance while
the ship's crew makes announce-
ments over a loudspeaker system
calling for the lucky passengers
whose relatives have come a-
calling.
This scenario is rendered more
tasteless by slide projections of
Ellis Island and immigrant
scenes on the Lower East Side,
while nouveau-rich partygoera
who have exchanged then-
Yiddish names for New York
monikers become melodramatic-
ally concerned with gallstones
and drinking tea at the sweat-
shop.
ONCE "HEIMISH" landsmen
become guileless but willing to
try anything in their quest for
upward mobility, arranging shot-
gun "business" marriages,
trumped-up scenes of infidelity
with the American goal of
divorce, and lavish dance and
song numbers to accompany
these proceedings.
A wealth of good talent, in-
cluding many youthful actors, is
wasted, particularly the popular
Mary Soreano, Yankele Alperin
and Eleanor Reissa. Composer
Ed Linderman and Lyricist
Yakov Alper have assembled
some hummable tunes, and
translations, when available,
even include thoughtful rhymes
which might prove popular in
English, but they are set against
such a dissolute backdrop that it
might be a good idea to rewrite
an entirely new play around the
music and send "Oy Mama!"
back to the hardships of Czarist
Russia, to be tried for treason.
JTA Feature Service
GRAND in Name
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Directly across from Publix, Jordan Marsh,
Burdines & hundreds more!
Luxurious, spacious air cond. apts.
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Airifljwd. lobbies and hallways
On-premTses Temple & Social Club
Security, pable TV & 24-hour on-site mgnt.
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1561 N.EJ67th St. N. Miami Beach
Open Mon.-Fri. 9-5 or by appt.
Phone: 947-6093
Professional on-site management by MP Realty, Inc.
JWB Convention for Jewish Community
Center leaders will be at the Fontainebleau-
Hilton, Feb. 1-3. Lester Pollack (left) is chair
of the convention and will head a committee
to implement recommendations that come
from it. Dr. Alvin I. Schiff (center), executive
vice president, Board of Jewish Education of
Greater New York, will be scholar'in-resi-
dence. Prof. Jonathan Woocher (right) of
Brandeis University will be featured at an
advanced leaders round table during the con-
vention.
.
Recreational Activities
and Care Work
Hand in Hand
An important part of nurs-
ing and rehabilitation is
making the residents' stay
as enjoyable as possible.
At Washington Manor we
provide 24 hour nursing
care along with indoor
and outdoor activities,
speech, physical and
respiratory therapy, diet
control and day care
facities.
ashington Manor
f ?yNursing & Rehabilitation Center, Inc.
For more information stop by or call Washington Manor
4200 Washington Street, Hollywood. Florida 33021
Broward: 981-6300 Dade: 626-2646


Meet New CJF President, Shoshana S. Cardin
By BORIS SMOLAR
(Editor-in-chief emeritus,
JTA)
Meet Shoshana S. Cardin, the
first woman president of the
Council of Jewish Federations,
the central body of all the
organized Jewish communities in
the United States and Canada,
embracing more than 95 percent
of the entire Jewish population in
these two countries.
She was elected president un-
animously by more than 2,500
delegates foremost leaders of
about 800 Jewish communities in
the U.S. and Canada at the
annual CJF General Assembly,
the largest Jewish cnvocation in
the world the "parliament" of
the communities which sets
policies on major issues of
concern to North American
Jewry.
The organized Jewsh commu-
nities, known as Jewish Federa-
tions, are raising more than $600
million a year for local, national
and overseas Jewish needs. They
are the financial backbone of
Jewish social welfare, health and
education of American Jewry.
Virtually every major Jewish
need and responsibility is on their
agenda. More than half of the
funds they raise go for human-
itarian purposes in Israel through
the United Jewish Appeal, and
for needy Jewish communities in
other countries oversees through
the American Jewish Joint Dis-
tribution Committee.
Mrs. Cardin, affectionately
called by her first name by all
those who know her and of her
wide range of Jewish and civic
activities, was born in Tel Aviv.
She was raised in a home atmos-
phere of Jewish totality. Her
father, S. Shubin, was a Hebrew
teacher in Russia. He left the
country for Palestine soon after
the Bolsheviks came to power. In
Palesttine he joined a kibbutz. In
the 1930's the family came to the
United States and settled in
Baltimore, where the father was
elected president of the local
Labor Zionist organization. He is
a lover of Hebrew and Yiddish;
both languages are still spoken at
home. He writes articles for the
Hebrew journal, Hadoar.
published in New York, and
wrote Yiddish articles for the
Jewish Daily Forward. Mrs.
Cardin also speaks Hebrew and
Yiddish.
Upon settling in Baltimore,
Shoshana as a youngster con-
tinued her education in city
schools, in the Baltimore Hebrew
College, and later in Johns
Hopkins University. She is a
graduate of the University of
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California, a Fellow in Organiza-
tional Community Development
at Johns Hopkins Unive-
s. hwpqhh65 5 s e received her
Masters Degree in Planning and
Administration from Antioch
University. She was a teacher in
secondary public school in Balti-
more in 1940-1960, and served
later as trustee? of Antioch Uni-
versity and of the Baltimore
Hebrew College.
A charming woman of valor,
Shoshana is married to Jerome
Cardin, an attorney who is chair-
man of the National Leadership
Council of the Jewish National
Fund. She has an enviable record
both in Jewish leadership and in
civic activities. She serves with
distinction in both the Jewish
community and the general
community. She is in the fore-
front of enhancing the quality of
Jewish life in the United States
and Canada, of helping in the
building of Israel and in the
saving of Jews from the Soviet
Union. She is deeply dedicated to
the Jewish precepts of social
justice.
She is the recipient of the Con-
gregational Certificate of Merit;
was presented with a Certificate
of Distinguished Citizenship by
the state of Maryland; was
honored by the city of Baltimore
and proclaiemd "Outstanding
Citizen" of the city. The list of
her services in various fields of
civic affairs is too long to be
given in this space.
Among these services are or
were being on the Maryland
State Employment and Training
Council, on the Board of Health
and Welfare Council of Central
Maryland, on the advisory com-
mittee of Maryland's State Board
for Higher Education, on the
Maryland Commission for
Women where she served first as
chairwoman and later as Com-
missioner. She also held leading
positions in the national women's
movement, and is one of the
founders of the women's publi-
cation "Women Together."
Her philosophy on Jewish ac-
tivities is rooted deeply in the
saying of all sages that "Jews
carry responsibility for each
other" ("Kol Israel Areivim Zeh
B'Zeh"). She accepts the dif-
ference of views and attitudes by
Jewish organizations of various
ideologies but insists that they be
within the totality of the Jewish
mmunity.
"Diversity Within Unity" is
her motto. Jewish groups, she
says, must act in a spirit of unity
whenever this is required.
This explains perhaps why she
is active in Jewish organizations
of different ideologies impacting
often on each other. She con-
siders herself a Zionist but is also
actively participating in non-
Zionist organizations and in
agencies embracing all elements
of Jewry, regardless of their
diversity in ideas. She is, for in-
stance, active in the National
Council of Jewish Women, a
highly respected group of non-
Zionist women, as well as in the
Pioneer Women Na'amat, the
organization of Labor Zionist
women. She is devoted to the
United Jewish Appeal and the
Israel Bond campaigns em-
bracing all elements in the
American Jewish community,
but also in the campaign of the
Jewish National Fund, a purely
Zionist body.
Illustrated of her totality of in-
terest in Jewish activities is the
fact that she is the recipient of
awards from the American
Jewish Committee, American
Jewish Congress, the National
Council of Jewish Women, the
Jewish War Veterans, and a
variety of other national Jewish
organizations. The B'nai B'rith
Women presented her with the
"Women of the Year Award."
She also received the coveted
Elkan Myers Award given by the
Baltimore Jewish Charities and
Welfare Fund of Baltimore of
which she is now chairman of the
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Israeli Ambassador to the U.S.
Israeli Foreign Minister
Israeli Delegate to the U.N.
President of the Weizmann Institute
TOPIC:
The Middle East: An Agenda
For U.S. Policy in the 80's."
Thursday, January 10,1985
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI,
IBIS CAFETERIA 8:00 P.M.
Admission: $7.50 pick up tickets at
U.M. Hillel (1100 Stanford Dr., 665-6948)
or Judaic Studies (606 Ashe Bldg., 284-4375.)
Sponsored by: U.M. Hillel, Judaic Studies
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Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A%
Board. The Jewish Historical
Society of Maryland inducted her
into the local Jewish Hall of
Fame.
With the election of Shoshana
Cardin as top leader of the
organized Jewish communities in
the U.S. and Canada, U.S. Jewry
can serve as an example of
making no distinction in its
national leadership.
When the Democratic Party
placed Geraldine Ferraro on its
ticket as candidate for vice presi-
dent in the elections last
November, it was considered by
many Americans as a break-
^n
*Sa
Wim
, mffii
7
through for women's liberation;
it encouraged talk of the possibil-
ity that with the marching of
tune a woman may even be
elected president of the United
States. Equality of women re-
ceived a strong boost, even
though the Democratic Party did
not win in this election.
In the American Jewish
community, the unanimous
election of Mrs. Cardin did not
come as a breakthrough.
Equality in leadership was the
tradition of the American-Jewish
community long before there was
a women's liberation movement.
fe*
*pS^'
JM^*...-^^
($*?*,*
There are today about 20
women serving as presidents of
local Jewish Federations in the
larger communities. There are
women presidents of synagogues.
There are women in the leader-
ship of the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
and in other central Jewish
bodies. The president of the
National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council
which is the roof organization of
the most important 11 national
Jewish organizations and 111
local Community Councils is
Jacqueline Levine. The president
of the JWB, a national body
serving 275 Jewish Community
Centers and YM-YWHAs in the
U.S. and Canada and is also
the government-accredited
agency for serving the religious
and cultural needs of Jews in the
U.S. armed forces is Esther
Leah Ritz of Milwaukee. The
president of the Jewish National
Fund in the U.S. is Charlotte
Jacobson who is also on the
boards of numerous Jewish orga-
nizations in this country.
Shoshana Cardin resides in a
community which has distin-
guished itself by providing the
\
>*,

.. -~
M -...
largest number of presidents ot
the CJF during the last 45 years.
These Baltimorians are Sidney
Hollander (1939-45); Louis J.
Fox (1966-69); Irving Blum
(1972-73) whose full term of
presidency was ended prema-
turely by his death; and Gerold
C. Hoffberger (1978-78) who is
now chairman of the Board of
Governors of the Jewish Agency.
Shoshana is the fifth Baltimorian
to hold this high position, and the
first woman president in the 51
years since the formation of the
Council of Jewish Federations.
Jewish Telegraphic Agency

\
., .-
jj> y Ck: \ *****
*.
"V.
\ .. \ it


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The Jewish Kl
ly, January
The Christianization Of The Public Schools
Dr. James E. Wood is dir-
ector of J.M. Dawson Studies
in Church and State at Baylor
University in Waco, Tex. This
article was excerpted from his
address to the Intergroup
Relations Committee of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'naiB'rith.
By JAMES E. WOOD. JR.
The public school has
long been a battleground in
American church-state re-
lations. These conflicts
have been primarily the re-
sult of persistent and
zealous efforts aimed at
Christianizing the public
schools and eliminating the
secular character guarant-
eed by the First Amend-
ment.
Religion and education form a
continuing dilemma in American
church-state relations. On the one
hand, the role of religion in the
public schools has been ad-
judicated on the basis that the
tax-supported public schools are
subject to public policy and
therefore governed by the
Establishment Clause of the
First Amendment.
ON THE other hand, the use of
public funds for religious schools
has been repeatedly ruled as
violative of the Establishment
Clause since such use constitutes
aid to religion and the en-
tanglement of church and state in
a program of education.
That the U.S. Supreme Court's
most far-reaching decisions on
church and state should have to
do with the public schools is both
historically appropriate and
judicially significant, since the
public schools' role is crucial to a
free and secular state and
pluralistic society.
The American public school
and our tradition of church and
state represent two distinct
contributions to the world.
Founded as a secular state, the
United States was the first
nation in history constitutionally
to prohibit the establishment of
religion and to guarantee the free
exercise of,religion
THOMAS JEFFERSON first
conceived of public schools, free
and tax-supported. In 1817,
Jefferson specifically advocated
that free common schools be non-
sectarian. By the 1830s, his
concept began to take root in the
states. Massachusetts educator
Horace Mann influenced the
state legislatures to pass laws
prohibiting sectarian practice,
including the use of sectarian
textbooks, in tax-supported
schools.
Gradually, their vision for free
public schools, tax-supported
without sectarian control, spread.
Meanwhile, during the latter
decades of the 19th Century,
waves of immigrants, par-
ticularly from Ireland and
southern, eastern and south-
eastern Europe, greatly increased
the multifaith character of
American society.
By the late 1870's almost all
state constitutions expressly
divorced religion from the public
education system and state
courts widely espoused church-
state separation for the public
schools.
DESPITE THIS, phenomenal
gains in church membership in
the first half of this century,
accompanied by renewed
demands for devotional Bible
reading and school prayers, saw
the waning of church-state
separation in the schools. The
first "released time" program of
religious education in the public
schools began in 1913 in Gary,
Ind.
By 1948. all but two states had
such released time programs.
When the U.S. Supreme Court
ruled in 1962 against devotional
Bible-reading and prescribed
prayers in the public school,
church membership in the United
States had climbed to more than
63 percent of the total
population.
The view of America as a
Christian state transplanted to
the New World by the Colonists
has persisted even without
establishment and in spite of
constitutional provisions and
Supreme Court decisions ex-
pressly against it. The notion
lives on in the American ethos
aided and abetted by both the
political and religious right.
AMENDMENTS to the
Constitution have been proposed
since 1962 ranging from
abridging of the First Amend-
ment to insure state sanction and
support of religion to statements
declaring the United States to be
a Christian nation. Congress has
enacted laws to change the
Pledge of Allegiance to include
"under God," to require that "In
God We Trust" appears on all
currency and to declare the
phrase, "In God We Trust," as
the nation's motto.
Since 1962, the extreme
vilification and abuse of the
Supreme Court by right wing
political and religious leaders has
made evident the fact that the
concept of America as a Christian
state is fervently and widely held
by millions of Americans in the
20th Century.
The notion of the Christian
state reinforced with a fusion
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of Americanism with Christianity
from the New Religious Right
threatens the secular status of
America and of the public
schools.
AMERICAN PUBLIC edu-
cation is under frequent and
serious attack by those who
charge that the public schools are
dominated by "secular
humanism." The charge is in-
creasingly being made the basis
of a wholesale indictment of
American public education.
While "secular humanism" is
condemned as incompatible with
the guarantees of the First
Amendment, at the same time
the case is argued for the
viability of parochial schools,
justifying their right to public
funds.
The charge of "secular
humanism" is deeply rooted in
the notion that neutrality on


religious questions is identified
with secularism and therefore
destructive of all traditional
religious and moral values.
THIS PEJORATIVE use of
the term is offered by many as
the explanation for deterioration
in academic achievement and
moral values in the public
schools. The alleged teaching of
"secular humanism" is widely
used as a rationale for parochial
and Christian day schools.
"Secular humanism" remains
largely undefined by those roost
prone to employ it. A non-
religious or secular humanism
does not mean, let alone require,
the rejection of Judeo-Christian
religious and moral values.
Unfortunately, the attack on
secular humanism is all too often
a thinly-veiled attack on
Continued on Page 14-A
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Task Force On Jewish Alcohol Addiction
(JTA) The biggest problem
regarding addiction to alcohol
and drugs among Jews is the
denial by the Jewish community
that the problem exists, ac-
cording to Jewish leaders who
met recently at Fort Lauderdale
to establish a task force to act on
the problem.
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from Dade, Broward and Palm
Beach counties included rabbis
and Jewish social service group
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experts, and representatives from
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Al Golden, president of the
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would believe the number of Jew-
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Ivan Goldberg, administrator
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Goldberg added that about 30
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stressed that it was "important
that both professional and lay
people should be aware of the
facilities available" to help Jew-
ish addicts. Several rabbis at the
meeting, which was organized by
Rabbi Albert Schwartz, director
of the Fort Lauderdale Jewish
Federation Chaplain Commission
and coordinator of the task force,
said they had been unaware of
the extent of the problem nor of
the help available.
There are 300 Alcoholics
Anonymous meetings in Broward
County each week, said Sherwin
Rosenstein, executive director of
the Jewish Family Service of
Broward County, "but none are
held in Jewish places."
Goldberg, noting the reluc-
tance of some Jews to join in AA
meetings because they think such
groups are Christian-oriented,
said synagogues should un-
dertake sponsorship of AA
groups. He also proposed that
retreats should be planned for
addicts and their families, such
as those held twice a year by the
New York-based Jewish
Alcoholics, Chemically-
Dependent Persons and
Significant Others, which grew
out of a taak force of the Feder-
ation of Jewish Philanthropies of
New York.
Barbara Goldberg, director of
education and information
services at the Center for
Recovery, said a wealth of
speakers, many of them
recovered addicts, is available to
provide expert information to
Jewish groups.
Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Darmstadt City Council To Fund
Building of First Synagogue
tinted the project, explained,
"We are fed up with paying lip
service to the suffering of the
Jewish community in our town.
It is high time to take action and
we intend to do j ust that.''
The projected opening of the
synagogue is November 9, 1988,
when Jews in Germany and
throughout the world will be
marking the 50th anniversary of
Kristallnacht, the first nation-
wide episode of carnage against
German Jews organized by the
Nazi regime. _____
BONN (JTA) The city
council of Darmstadt has decided
to provide funds to build the first
synagogue in that Hessian town
since Nazi mobs destroyed the
two old synagogues there during
the infamous Kristallnacht
nearly a half century ago.
It will serve the 120 surviving
Jews in Darmstadt and several
other small Jewish communities
in the southern region of the
State of Hesse. Ruediger Breuer,
a Darmstadt official who ini-
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** 10-A The Jewish Mondian / t noav. januarv 4. ivtto
Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 4, 1985
Jewish Chaplain Travels
Far To Fill His Duties
Continued from Page 5-A
intermarried couples, "part-
Jewish" individuals, rocky
family relationships, families
where wife or husband "wants to
be" Jewish and the other does
not almost all of these are
problems like the ritual circumci-
sion first mentioned far from the
chaplain's home office and far
from a close-knit Jewish commu-
nity at home and are only a
few examples of how complicated
Jewish socio-religious issues can
be in a military setting.
THEN THERE is the nagging
question of reconstituting Jewish
life in West Germany after the
Holocaust serving on that
blood-soaked soil of persecution
in a protective role to help keep
Western Europe free.
Once in West Germany itself,
the issue is different. It is no
longer theoretical or academic.
You can push it aside, agonize
over it, debate it within or
without your own mind and
heart, or you can forget it for the
time.
Some "over here*' say we make
too much of it "over there."
There is "a new generation," a
"new Germany." a "new democ-
racy." "new problems," a "new
threat" from the superpower to
the east.
- Yet, you still look closely at
any West German over 60. You
leave unspoken the question.
"What were you doing 'then'?"
Many are likely to reply, if at all,
"I was on the Russian front."
That response could come from
your barber on a U.S. military
base.
"IN GERMANY, I don't think
of German history as part of my
role here at all in terms of my
functions as an American chap-
lain. I could have been sent to
Italy or to some other country
just as easily," Chaplain Weiss
said.
"Troops who are asked the
question about Germany do not
see it as their role to deal with the
problem on a personal basis.
" I do not speak of it from the
pulpit. But it is certainly still an
issue. We must think about it
more. Some people try to avoid it.
Some choose not to think about it
at all."
German life in Frankfurt is
comfortable and prosperous with
upper middle class patterns. The
commercial and fiscal capital of
the country, Frankfurt is often
jokingly called "Bankfurt."
Rebuilt, you would not recog-
nize it from the heavy pasting it
took from Allied air and ground
forces during World War Two.
The rubble is gone. Streets, sub-
ways and parks are sleek and
clean.
YET THE American military,
dependent families and civilian
employee components can live
side by side with the West Ger-
man population and hardly notice
one another. People are polite,
sometimes friendly, sometimes
even warm. But there is a dis-
tance. Yet. there are numerous
examples of close individual rela-
tionships.
America's chaplains have
learned to function in many mili-
tary and social settings over the
centuries since 1775, when the
Continental Congress provided
for the first Army chaplains.
Chaplain Weiss would like to
see more and more Jewish
citizens serve their country in the
armed forces and thus step up the
need for more Jewish chaplains
as a visible sign of citizen
serivice.
"We have our full fair share of
chaplains. We are about three
percent of the population in the
U.S. and perhaps less than one
half of one percent of the popula-
tion in the military services. W
have to show the flag.
"Every person who lives in
America has a responsibility to
support the military with some
form of service. It is just like
taxes," Chaplain Weiss believes.
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A Major Contribution
To A Complex Issue
Continued from Pag* 3-A
concealed bis past as a Gestapo
agent. On appeal, the case was
sent back to test purportedly new
evidence claimed by Walus. Ryan
admits that the appeals court
"did not reverse (the Walus
decision) outright" but he, as
chief prosecutor, determined that
Walus was innocent. Notwith-
standing this exoneration, the
fact remains that the "new"
evidence was never examined at
trial.
During his OSI days, Ryan
forcefully (and properly)
cautioned agaisnt throwing
around fanciful numbers in
considering just how many Nazi
war criminals found haven in the
U.S. "No one will ever know," he
told me during a 1981 interview
in which he would not venture
beyond the "some 480" in-
dividuals accused of a Nazi past
in the OSI files. He also
(properly) pointed out that "fully
one-third are deceased."
The OSI figures happened to
tally with the hard data I have
used over the years. I always
have shared Ryan's admonitions.
But now, in "Quiet Neighbors,"
Ryan suddenly bursts forth with
the assertion that "nearly 10,000
Nazi war criminals came into
America" after the war. How
does he make a quantum jump
from a solid 480 "substantial
suspects" to nearly 23 times that
number? He gets the 10,000
figure by "estimating" at least
two-and-a-half percent of the
nearly 400,000 persons who came
in under the DP Act. While doing
this, he condedes "such estimates
are hardly scientific." Indeed!
Yet today, Ryan and his
publishers do not hesitate to
state as fact that "10,000 Nazi
war criminals entered the U.S.
after the war." Ryan's most
curious position is his attitudes
toward U.S. intelligence agencies
and their use of Nazi war
criminals. Knowledgeable critics
find his steadfast denials of such
usage strange in the face of the
developed evidence. "Quiet
Neighbors" reflects these often
fiercely held anomalies of the
author.
He told The New York Times
(July 16, 1983) that with
"maybe" one exception "back in
the 50*8" there were "no cases at
all" of war criminals knowingly
allowed into the country for
intelligence reasons. That denial
is all the more striking because
exactly one month later, Ryan
issued his worthy report on Klaus
Barbie and his use by U.S.
Army's Counter-intelligence
Corps (CIC).
Immigration records show that
Barbie entered the U.S. on
several occasions in the 1960's
and 1970's. He did so using an
alias and enjoying a preferential
visa of a Bolivian diplomat. The
State Department knew this.
Evidence gathered by this writer
and others indicate Bolivian
intelligence sources linking
Barbie to the CIA in Latin
America.
"Quiet Neighbors" also
touches on other cases in which
CIA, State Department and FBI
usage are indicated. Take for
example Ryan's handling of the
Latvian war criminal, Edgars
Laipenieks. This alien resident of
San Diego, California, was
sentenced to death in absentia by
a 1962 Latvian war crimes
tribunal. Thanks to Ryan's OSI,
Laipenieks today faces depor-
tation after an appeals board
upheld the OSI's excellent case
against him.
Ryan notes that Laipenieks
"volunteered his service to the
CIA" in 1960 "after" he entered
the country. He then proceeds to
aver that at the bottom the
Latvian was "not amenable to
deportation" under 1976's
existing laws, and so the
Immigration and Naturalization
Service (INS) had to drop
proceedings regardless of
allegations that the CIA blocked
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them. The author goes further to
assert that he did proceed in 1979
under the new provisions af-
fecting deportation through the
so-called Holtzman law.
There are some vital pieces
missing to this story which on its
face seems unexeptionable.
Investigator Bob Dorn of the San
Diego Evening Tribune and I
uncovered the fuller CIA-
Laipenieks connection. These
materials were widely published,
available to Ryan who used only
a selective portion (and indeed
without proper credit). It was
Dorn who secured the CIA-
Laipenieks correspondence
dating back to 1975. Moreover,
CIA director William Colby told
Dom these letters showed "that
apparently the CIA did intervene
on its former agent's (Laipenieks)
behalf."
I interviewed Laipenieks'
former secret police superior,
then living in the U.S. and a self-
described former CIA agent. He
told me that Laipenieks entered
the U.S. first on a tourist visa in
1947. He also said Laipenieks
first began working for the CIA
in the early 1950's after having
become a naturalized citizen of
Chile. Together and separately,
he told me, they were used to run
"disinformation" operations
among Latvian emigres in the
U.S., Western Europe, Latin
America and the Far East. Ryan
knows full well the evidence on
Laipenieks and the CIA. His
failure to examine it vis-a-vis
OSI's own prosecution of the
Latvian criminal is curious.
There is also the example of
Count Otto von Bolshwing, the
SD agent who worked with Eich-
mann to implement the Final
Solution, who undoubtedly ran
Trifa and other Iron Guardists in
Rumania and who in California in
1982 died admitting his Nazi
past. Ryan admits that von
Bolshwing was "hired" by "U.S.
intelligence officials" in 1949;
i.e., five years before coming
here. Yet Ryan continues the
fiction that his entry and usage
had no relationship, one to the
other. Nor does he ever so much
as utter the name of the agency
which used him.
Before his death, von Bolsh-
wing was not so bashful,
boasting to the press (and to the
court in secret sessions) that he
had been employed by the CIA.
Ryan's curious ambiguities on
Nazi war criminals and American
intelligence seriously weaken his
otherwise important con-
tributions in "Quiet Neighbors."
Get the book, read it, use it
but watch it!
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Egypt Says Mideast Peace Requires
An Immediate Israeli Withdrawal
frem All Occupied Territories
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Egypt maintains
that a solution to the Arab-
Israeli conflict requires an
immediate Israeli with-
drawal from all occupied
territories and says that it
supports "in particular"
the need to include the
Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization in any solution
to the conflict.
Addressing the General
Assembly debate on "The
Situation in the Middle East,"
the Egyptian ambassador,
Ahmed Tawfik Khalil, said that a
solution in the Middle East
should be based on the right of all
states to exist in peace within
their internationally-recognized
boundaries and the return of all
occupied Arab territories, in-
cluding Jerusalem and the Golan
Heights.
"Let us make room in the
Middle East for the Palestinian
people," he declared, "so that
they too can establish their own
state and join the community of
nations."
Claiming that the Palestinian
problem is the core and cause of
the Middle East conflict, the
Egyptian diplomat said,
however, that there is a
unanimity of view in the world
that the conflict should be
resolved by a peaceful means. He
said that Egypt has "blazed a
trail for peace" in the Middle
East and vowed that it would
continue to work toward peace.
He was referring to the peace
treaty with Israel signed in 1979.
In the course of the Middle
East debate, the Soviet Union
blamed Israel and the United
States for the lack of peace in the
region. Ambassdor Oleg
Troyanovski said Israeli
aggression is to blame for the fact
that the Middle East conflict has
not yet been settled. He said the
U.S. shared equal responsibility
for the situation because it
provided the military and
economic aid that enabled Israel
to pursue this "adventurous
cause."
The Soviet Union, he con-
tinued, was ready to cooperate
with all who sought a con-
structive solution to the problem
and the establishment of a just
and lasting peace in the area.
On Nov. 29, the UN observed
the international Day of
Solidarity with the Palestinian
People, established by resolution
of the General Assembly in 1977.
The observance marked the 37th
anniversary of the UN decision to
partition Palestine into Jewish
and Arab states.
There was a special meeting of
'the Palestinian Rights Commit-
tee and statements by the presi-
dent of the General Assembly,
Paul Lusaka of Zambia, and UN
Secretary General Javier Peres
de Cuellar. Four films were
shown on the situation of the
Palestinian people. An exhibition
on Palestinian rights, organized
by the PLO, opened at the UN.
Meanwhile, the 15-member
Security Council met to extend
the mandate of the United
Nations Disengagement
Observers Force (UNDOF) on
the Golan Heights for another ix
months until May 31, 1985.
According to the report of the
secretary general, Israel and
Syria agreed to the extension,
and it was approved
unanimously.
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^rikptMn ''T&'jvwittrtTjrkams "rntstt. ftnamy--,
."TXV/
The Christianization of
the Public Schools
1*A
freedom and _
Modi of the myth baa bees
predicated by those who seek to
mate the public schools more
reapooarve to their own particular
. rslagioue values rather than
reaaaiB acfaooie m which a secular
or noi>-relig)oua approach to the
tody of history, science,
Covernment, and literature
prevails Quite property man and
human values should be the focus
of public education, just aa God
and religious vaiuee are the
natural focus of religious
education in the home, churchae.
mnei synagogue*
AMERICA'S public schools
are naceaaarily committed to
human values, human achieve-
ments, and human capabilities, in
which the activities, intereata,
and historical development of
man are central That is why
public achoola enjoy the support
of public fund*, while parochial
achoola, committed to a par-
ticular religious world view, are
denied those fund*
In several major decisions, the
Supreme Court has denied the
permissibility of state spon-
sorship of religion in the public
schools. In McCollum v. Hoard of
hdocation (J94>M, the court
declared that 'released time,"
that is. setting aside a portion of
h day for religious education is
unconstitutional asm though
attendance in these classes might
be on a purely voluntary basis
Four years later, the court in
Zorach v. Clausen declared
constitutional the practice of
"dismissed time," essentially the
same program except that it was
maintained off the public school's
grounds.
In 1962, the court ruled in
Engel v. Vitale that the state-
sponsored prayer program of the
New York State schools was
unconstitutional. The cqurt
declared that government may
not require prayer in the public
achoola, even when on a
"voluntary" basis "It is neither
sacrilegious nor anti-religious,"
the court said, "to say that each
separate government in this
country should atay out of the
business of writing or sanction-
ing official prayers ..."
THE FOLLOWING year,
faced with widespread Bible-
reading exercises in the public
schools, the court ruled in
Abington School District v.
Schempp that such practices and
the recitation of the I-ord's
Prayer are unconstitutional.
Since then, more than 200
proposals have been introduced
in Congress to overturn the
Supreme Court's decisions.
Recent efforts, led by Sen. Jesse
Helms of North Carolina, have
been directed toward limiting by
purpose, primary effect and
excessive entanglement. The law,
he ruled, was "a religious crusade
coupled with a desire to conceal
this act" and that it was an
"unprecedented intrusion in the
school curriculum ."
HAVING TO face the
Supreme Court's ruling of un-
constitutionality, religious
fundamentalists adopted a new
tactic in the 1970s: the teaching
of creationism along with
evolution. Such legislation has
been introduced in at least 21
states. Encouraged by the
national swing to the right in the
1980 elections- and strongly
supported by the New Religious
Right, local school districts and
state legislatures have been
under considerable pressure to
enforce the teaching of "scientific
These efforts have met with
resistance from some education
agencies sad particular ly in the
courts. Following the 1975 action
of the Indiana Commiaaaon on
Textbook Adoption approvktg a
creationist biology textbook, a
state court ruled that the
commission' action "both
advanced particular religious
preferences and entangled the
state with religion and therefore
violated both state and federal
constitutions."
The Christianization of the
public achoola has become a
mmyor force in American politics.
With an agmda largely or-
chestrated by the New Religious
Right, these efforts are supported
by millions of Americana, both
within and without our com-
munities of faith. As a result, the
public schools have become a
battleground for key political
issues, the resolution of which is
crucial not only to the public
schools and to public policy, but
also to the nation's future as a
free and pluralistic society.
Meanwhile, scapegoating the
public schools has virtually
become a national pastime as a
way of explaining many of the
causes of the nation's social ills,
particularly by those most
resistant to demands of a secular
state and to the dynamics of a
pluralistic society.
In a key case, McLean v.
Arkansas Hoard of Education,
the Arkansas creation-science '
law was struck down in January.
1982. by a U.S. district judge,
who ruled that it violated the
'/institutional provision for the
separation of church and state.
The judge found the Arkansas
law failed all three tests of the
Establishment Clause: secular
congressional statute the
Supreme Court and all federal
district courts from hearing cases
involving "voluntary prayers in
the public schools and public
buildings." Thusly, the place of
prayer in the public schools
would be determined by the
states and local communities.
Proposals passed in the
present Congress provide for the
right of student-led religious
groups to meet in the public
schools before or after regular
school hours on the basis of
"equal access."
During recent months, district
courts in Alabama, New Jersey
and Tennessee have ruled against
legislation providing either for
sanctioned prayer or a moment of
silence.
THOSE DECISIONS have
been strongly denounced by both
the political right and the
religious right, more recently
identified as the New Religious
Right, a group primarily linked
with religious fundamentalism
found largely outside of
America's mainline
denominations. Significantly, the
strongest support for the
Supreme Court's decisions has
come from the major religious
denominations of America, both
Christian and Jewish.
The controversy over
"scientific creationism" is still
another example of attempts to
Christianize the public schools.
The crux of the controversy is not
over the teaching of the Genesis
account of creation, which is
clearly permissible and has never
been seriously questioned in the
courts, but rather over the
demands of religious fundamen-
talists that creationism be taught
as science and given equal time
with evolution.
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|_MF 1/4/85


U.S. Won't Embark On Mideast
Peace Effort In The Near Future
Friday, January 4,1985 /The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
By DAVID LANDAU
HAIFA (JTA) The
Reagan Administration will
not embark on a new Mid-
east peace effort in the near
future in part for fear of
upsetting the delicate
balance in the Israeli gov-
ernment.
This was the prediction voiced
here by Lawrence Eagleburger,
who recently retired as the State
"Department's senior Mideast
policymaker. His view was
disputed by Ambassador Sol
Linowitz. who was President
Carter's special envoy to the
inconclusive Israel-Egypt talks
on Palestinian autonomy in 1980.
THE TWO men spoke at a
day-long seminar on Israel-U.S.
ties at Haifa University. The
. university's president and the
moving spirit behind the event
is Ephraim Evron, formerly
Israeli ambassador to the U.S.
Kagleburger said the U.S. ought
to know that there were times "to
shut up" and the present was
one such time.
Hut both Linowitz and Labor
MK Abba Eban warned that
ongoing inaction could be dan-
gerous, and both urged Washing-
ton to revive its peacemaking
efforts. Linowitz advised that
there should be a resuscitation of
the autonomy talks, and said he
was convinced the still-outstand-
ing issues, such as land rights
and water rights, could be re-
solved.
Eban dismissed the autonomy
talks in 1979-81 as "desultory"
and urged that Washington build
on the new Israel government's
readiness to withdraw from
Lebanon as a first stage towards
regional progress.
FORMER DEFENSE Secre-
tary James Schlesinger, who is
remembered in Israel as the man
who organized the vital Yom
Kippur War arms airlift, said
that to ask if Israel was perceived
in Washington, and especially in
the Pentagon, as an asset or a
liability was "the wrong
question."
Fundamentally, he argued,
American foreign policy was
founded on moral considerations:
only policies which were broadly
supported by public opinion as
"right" proved viable and long-
lasting.
And support for Israel's secu-
rity and survival fell squarely
into that category and accounted
for the sturdy basic strength of
the Israel-U.S. relationship, the
former Defense secretary (and
later Secretary of Energy under
Carter) contended.
Moderate PLO
Leader Assassinated
Continued from Page 1-A
the executive committee of the
PLO, the governing body of that
group, at a meeting called by
Arafat in Amman.
Also injured in the attack were
two passersby, a reporter for
Petra, the official Jordanian news
agency, and his wife. Shafik
Obeidat was treated for a hand
wound and released, and his wife,
Rasmiyyeh, remained hospital-
ized with a leg wound.
A PLO statement carried by
Petra said Kawasmeh was "as-
sassinated by the hands of
treason," implying that some in
the PLO suspected the killing
was carried out by PLO dissi-
dents.
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An anonymous telephone caller
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news agency Agence France-
Presse claimed that the Palestin-
ian terrorist group Black Sep-
tember had assassinated
Kawasmeh. The caller, saying he
was telephoning from Rome, said
Black September was responsible
"for the death of the Jordanian
cop Fouad Kawasmeh, who
plotted against the revolution for
the benefit of Arafat and Jor-
dan's King Hussein."
Kawasmeh was elected mayor
of Hebron in 1976. He was a
former teacher and an agricul-
tural engineer. The Israelis ex-
pelled hur, in 1980, and he moved
to Jordan rnvn He was elected to
the executive committee when
the Palestine National Council,
the top policy-making body of the
PLO, met in Amman over op-
position from pro-Syrian fac-
tions.
A PLO spokesman said that
Kawasmeh was coming home
from the PLO office when two at-
tackers who were waiting for him
opened fire.
The PLO statement reported
by Petra said Kawasmeh, "the
martyred leader, was one of the
symbolic examples of the Pales-
tinian national struggle, who
contributed an effective role in
the national leadership inside the
occupied territories which com-
pelled the Zionist leadership to
expel him in 1980."
The statement also accused Is-
raeli officials of having tried to
assassinate Kawasmeh in the
past.
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American Silence Is
Subject Of New Book
By GAD NAHSHON
On August 19,1982, Arthur H.
Goldberg dismantled the
American Jewish Commission on
the Holocaust -which was
established in September 1981.
Its goal was to expose the
behavior of American rJews
during the Holocaust era and to
see whether there was, in fact, a
conspiracy of silence. This com-
mission, which included
representatives of all Jewish
organizations, actually disin-
tegrated. Its director, Seymour
M. Finger, professor of political
science at the Graduate Center of
the City University of New York,
told me then that the reason for it
was the hypersensitivity of the
Jewish establishment. "I don't
understand the fear of exposing
the truth," he said. "People make
mistakes. We are not God
himself." It was clear that this
establishment is not able to
assess its past behavior.
The rise and fall of this com-
mission reinforces the notion that
the subject of the Holocaust
should not be politicized and that
it must remain in the realm of the
academic, pure scientific and
objective world.
David S. Wyman's book, "The
Abandonment of the Jews:
America and the Holocaust,
1941-45" (Pantheon Books, New
York), belongs, more than any
other contribution, to the
historiography of the Holocaust.
In the last decade this
historiography tends to stress
the issue of the free world's
pattern of behavior toward the
Jews in the years 1933 to 1945,
essentially, the rescue of Jews.
Wyman, a noted scholar and
the author of "Paper Walls:
America and the Refugee Crisis
1938-1941" (1968). is a son of a
Protestant minister who defines
himself as an admirer of Israel.
He has written an excellent
detailed account of America's
behavior during the years of
destruction.
\\ ynum exhausted, almost, all
available sources. He
documented the American silence
and the abandonment of the Jews
who were gassed by the Nazis.
His most original conclusion is
the notion that this country could
in reality have rescued millions of
Jews. It simply refused and
declined to do so: "It was not the
lack of workable plans that stood
in the way of saving many
thousands more European Jews,
nor was it insufficient shipping,
the threat of subversive agents or
the possibility that rescue
projects might hamper the war
effort. The real obstacle was the
absence of a strong desire to
rescue Jews." But, in 1944,
Wyman tells us, 25,000 Greeks
were rescued and, ironically, were
taken to Naseirat, a British camp
near Gaza, Palestine.
In his preface, Wyman argues,
"The Nazis were the murderers
but we were the too-passive
accomplices." Essentially, this
book is a discussion of these
"accomplices" who were too
passive, too indifferent to the
plight of the Jews and too slow to
help them.
Wyman introduces all of them
to us: (A) President Roosevelt.
(B) The State Department. (C)
The Army and its OSS. For
example, Wyman points out, "In
April, 1944, the OSS obtained the
first detailed account to reach the
West of the mass murder of Jews
at Auschwitz. The OSS did
nothing with it." (D) Jewish
consultants and intimate friends
of Roosevelt, such as Judge Sam
Rosenman. Some even tried to
disarm efforts to rescue Jews or
pressure to do so. (E) The
American Congress. Jwish
congressmen were silent. Others,
such as Sol Bloom, prevented any
effort to mobilize the Congress
for rescue operations.
Wyman points out only one
rare exception to this rule:
Emanuel Celler, the congressman
from Brooklyn. Other "ac-
complices" were (F) The entire
American media. (G) The
churches. Wyman views the
Holocaust, also, as a Christian
tragedy. He illuminates us, "The
bystanders most capable of
helping were Christians." And he
goes on with his "J'accuse," "At
the heart of Christianity is the
commitment to help the helpless,
yet, for the most part American
Christian churches looked away
while the European Jews
perished."
As to the behavior of the
American Jewish community,
Wyman concludes, "Along with
the lack of unity, American Jew-
ish efforts for rescue were
handicapped by a crisis in
leadership." It should be stressed
that Wyman rushes to accredit
and to describe anyone who made
some effort to rescue Jews. He
even, partly, saves the reputation
of Rabbi Stephen Wise who is
recently being blamed for
America's abandonment of the
Jews.
But, sad to say, Wyman
writes, the Jewish leaders of that
era did not break out "... of
business as usual vacations
were, seldom, sacrificed."
The American Jewish com-
munity had to transform itself, in
this era, into a national massive-
effective rescue machine in order
to challenge the American
silence. It failed to do so.
The Zionists, Wyman tells us,
contributed relatively to rescue
efforts. more than their non-
/.ionist Jewish counterparts, but
t'ven they failed to develop the
necessary degree of awareness.
V\yman follows the main thesis
of the Israeli writer S.B. Beit-Zvi
when he explains, "Most Zionist
resources continued to be
concentrated on the postwar goal
of a Jewish State in Palestine. In
1943 the pattern persisted as
rescue remained a secondary
priority." Sad to say, the Zionist
movement did not change its
coup.* "Their insight into the
past and their dedication to the
future bumpered their vision of
the present "
Wyman does not fail to
illuminate the activities of the
Irgun's mission to the United
States, better known as the
'Bergson Group." The 'com-
.nander' of this small group was
Hillel Kook, who used the alias
Peter Bergson, undoubtedly a
magician of public relations.
Bergson and his devoted soldiers
were the first ones to break the
ice. They tried to challenge the
mainstream. "The Bergsonite
Emergency Committee tried to
fill the gap in the rescue cam-
paign. Its work was vital in
finally bringing the War Refugee
Board into existence." But, "The
Bergson group was anathema to
most established American Jew-
ish leadership."
As a result, for example, even
Jewish newspapers did not report
to their readers on the group's
"We Shall Never Die
Remember Us!" a play which was
staged in Madison Square
Garden in 1943. More than 40,000
people came to demonstrate their
solidarity with the dying Jews.
Roosevelt, of course, declined to
send a short message.
It is hard to predict whether
history repeats itself but
Wyman, in the preface to his
book, confesses: "My com-
mitment to Zionism and to Israel
has been confirmed and increased
by the years of study of the
Holocaust. I look upon Israel as
the most important line of
defense against anti-Semitism in
the world."
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
The Phylis and Norman Meier Holocaust
Memorial, to be dedicated in ceremonies
Wednesday and Thursday is a 60(hsquare-
foot hammered copper wall relief in Beth
David Congregation's main sanctuary.
Holocaust Memorial To Be Dedicated
The Phylis and Norman Meier
Holocaust Memorial, designed by
Holocaust survivor Lazlo Buday,
will be dedicated in ceremonies
Jan. 9 and 10 in the main sanc-
tuary of Beth David Congrega-
tion.
Robert Clary, actor and Holo-
caust survivor, will be the guest
speaker at 8 p.m. ceremonies Jan.
9. The 600-square-foot hammered
copper relief mural occupies the
back wall of Beth David's sanc-
tuary. Facing it. Clary will relate
his own experiences as a French
Jew in Nazi concentration camps,
liberated from Buchenwald in
1945. "Thirty years from now,"
Clary explains, "there will be no
eyewitnesses to the Nazi
genocide. What is happeninK
today is frightening There are
academicians claiming that the
Holocaust is a hoax ... it is our
responsibility to inform the world
... so that it never happens
again.''
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz, spir-
itual leader of Beth David, added,
"It will remind us and our
children of that infamous period
in Jewish history and assure
us that it will never happen again
. not to us or to any people."
The Jan. 10 event, at 8 p.m. at
Beth David, will mark the begin-
ning of the fortieth anniversary
of the 1945 liberation of the Nazi
death camps, according to Goldie
R. Goldstein, executive vice pre-
sident of the Holocaust Memorial
Center at FIU's Bay Vista
Campus. Rabbi Lipschitz will be
one of the main speakers.
Cosponsors of the Jan. 10 dedi-
cation event are Czenstochov and
Vicinity Social Club of Greater
Miami, David Ben-Gurion
Culture Club, Holocaust Sur-
vivors of Boca Raton, Holocaust
Survivors Friendship Club of
Deerfield Beach, Holocaust Sur-
vivors of the Palm Beaches,
Holocaust Survivors of South
Florida, New American Jewish
Social Club, Radomer Relief Club
of Greater Miami, Workman's
Circle Branch 679, Yiddish
Cultural Circle of Point East, and
Children of Holocaust Survivors
of Southeast Florida.
Gladys Israel (third from- left) is congratu-
lated at a luncheon honoring her as Woman
of the Year, by the Junior Auxiliary- of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged. Sharing the moment with her are (left
to right) Jean Tesser, luncheon chair; Judge
Irving Cypen, chair of the board of the
Home; Esther Schneiderman; and Fred D.
Hirt, executive director of the Home.
Yeshiva Principals'
Convention
From Jan. 23-27 educators and
Torah scholars from around the
country will gather in Miami for
the Ninth Curriculum Conference
of the National Conference of
Yeshiva Principals. The con-
ference has been organized by
Torah Umesorah, an organization
of yeshiva-day schools.
Local educators participating
will include Rabbi Mordecai
Shapiro of Beth Israel
Congregation, Rabbi Chaim
Feuer of Ohr Hachaim
Congregation, Rabbi Yochanan
'.weig of Mesivta High School,
and Gene Greenzweig, executive
director of CAJE.
The conference committee
membership includes Miamians
Mrs. Shirley Gross, Rabbi Jay
Neufeld and Dr. Joshua Tarsis.
Brandeis U. Honors Brin
With Endowed Lectureship
WALTHAM, Mass. (JTA)
Brandeis University plane to
honor a leading figure in the his-
tory of the English-Jewish press
Dr. Alexander Brin, the late
editor and publisher of the
Boston Jewish Advocate with
an endowed lectureship in his
name. Brin, a leader in journal-
ism, public education and
humanitarian causes for more
than 50 years, died in 1980 at the
age of 87.
Evelyn Handler, Brandeis pre-
sident, said the Alexander Brin
Lectureship in the Social
Sciences will be designed to per-
petuate Brin's deep interest in
social science issues and in new
ideas which have a national social
impact. The lectureship was ini-
tially endowed by the late Joseph
Ford, a founding Brandeis
trustee and long-time friend and
admirer of Brin.
Brin first won prominence in
1913 as an 18-year-old reporter
covering the case of Leo Frank
for the old Boston Herald. Frank,
29, a pencil firm superintendent
in Atlanta, was accused and con-
victed of murdering a 14-year-old
female worker. After his convic-
tion, Frank was lynched in 1915
by a mob motivated by a vicious
anti-Semitism sweeping Georgia.
dfewislhi Floridlia
Miami, FloridaFriday, January 4,1985 Section B


H.,4,
Hajti-fc 7Y >r Fjorjdt f
-som* imnamry 4. 1
From The Pulpit
The Fear Of Quiet


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hfauli u* *ittt e-. 'y jroex
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A-Ore&an. it si. larger of fjtszj!
mtMstf t>*.a**i detun? at t
^n aatil bit: j*4 iw ruri
M^Hd ji-*jC if- wswziu*jt wxi
TlMr DMXAjn 'A T!*S}*~T. hi*: A
ucfc th. ** *x* f*x>y aJl'jr'X
th* iuxu/7 of rtrt I* kl)d
wAxu/jr, Our urttao tavirrjoruen.
m ffAl'j'Ari by lb* I MkdtMAn*. HflHpr (t KkD* <>ur
'**Jj*t m>j pouK/n* our toub. Id
'/ 'sAUfXivt: UuiXJury w art
Irtwo v> '.h* Isjrusjn a *n uxuDterruptod lio*
ir, th* miumuk duUMDdc, where
our% m the only footprint and
where the K/und* are of ai'oce
But aiae. it ia only a fantaay
K/ njtjrnnn bring* anew a
'.louded i,'/rtx/jri a atlfltng *'.
mr/f>here, and a cacrjphony that
ma^ueradea aa the music of
modern life *">ur aenaea are
rxxnharded t/> the point of
duilneaa "We have eye* but we
d'y n/X ae*. we have eara but we
do MC braf
U'jt even if we could
precipitate out all the irritant*
and pollutant* in our aocietal
Miajoon, I doulbt we would. In
eaenf> we f*d more mntottblf
with the urban noiae than
without it.
I pa**d a young man on the
atret yeaterday who appeared to
Ciaaeaa two head* One proved to
a huge portable radio growing
out of hla ahoulder. I noticed him
becauae he waa intent on
aerenading the entire neigh-
borhood l*he muaic, if one may
call auch ahrieking muaic, made
me wince, aa human beinga are
Amos: Lecture
The prophet A mo* will be dia-
cuaaed by Rabbi Akiva Brilliant
in the Wedneeday lecture of the
CAJK wwim "Spiritual CJianta of
the Paat," at 10:30 a.m. at the
Miami Beach Public Library.
Rabbi Brilliant ia epiritual
leader of Temple Zemora in Coral
Oablea and holda a doctorate in
Hebrew lettera. The Spiritual
Oianta aeriee ia coordinated by
Diana Kaiaman
aVtn ol ym.
nut vonnnf"
oz'wr amc you wfl. nt
juk fmt. '
i
=otiOu=^ac i auet
t"-oo. Barrj .' JLvt*'t.i
a-.id vor.urvji Cii*jeit ."uKvenc
y pataitijr n:rr vj at qiu'j-.-i at
warn : read?
rut ncut.
*Vm CUC at Qt C* Ht "mum ;
-tl7 ausaMg urni I augaaas^ec
jar. jKrrmpt nt nac t poaxeriu.
uxKonacaTut dwc -: tit nocicec.
Tnar. nt wet anualri einuc of
muet
Be walsec etr> c ui-jucnir_
'junvempunjci unor int e-
&uBH'jt uf it* itiweroc ae^nitut
4-" ** tirtuc of oiuk" Ir at
inr v. "^1n<"1^' our mneraoa
** It int iiuiat crautec out
bj our ajajajajaj t r> of BT^ractnuj
ajajajejpjaj
'^j-.jyt rut t aej
-Vji : iorpK mt wt pieac
Tut ainKi: iapjajlI =ir> ^t
iam*r ou: n rteunj n wj-_jc
bTgnvej ui u. aeanx. "** uarnrn
otsa.' M -j+. iwjx aaxt ouraert'et
T_r our owx vaougsu ir int
;rvmfiM'jt of j.tik
Youth Benefit From
AMIT Mission
Sixvutt **0*rt of AM 17
i*. -, ? A n ?r. ".i >--. -. c
large**. Zaozuti*. wxtj*-. \ orgar.-
uav/'. rtjoent-'j re*, jrraac frvrr
-' '--.' linage* a.-,c -.'^..- ia'^x.^et
tor e<3uc*t aag Etiaoptax Je^-it..-.
refugee children. Is additaac. the
maaeaon group at^jfec :.'* broad
,-x.trum of educauona. anc ao-
caal problem* that Iarael face*
today and the accompliebmaota
of AMIT Women in meeting
theee
The group aa AMIT Kfar
fiatya Youth Village m Raanajaa
and AMIT Youth Village in
Petach Tikvah which are abaorb-
mg numerou* Ethiopian Jewish
children and aaw how they had
the barest knowledge of ch-iuza-
tion and modern society. The
children, many of them chronic-
ally malnourhed. are now being
Violinist Ruggiero Ricci will
appear with the Greater
Miami Symphony on Sunday,
January 13, in the Miami
Beach Theater of the Per-
forming Art*, beginning at 3
p.m.
^ doChaaV nouaec tsziz eo-ucaixc
oy AMIT sTeaaaa
Ml were oef>:> move:
-neae croiorer: who caii ut tnar
aj _-.-.,. njochen 5iatc
Fneda C KaMd. nauona. pre-
sJiMi -y a.m:7 sTaaasj ~-^..
are without iamihee. aepara'^ec
from aB that thej' neve known
;*-. they are adapung wet to
thesr new environment." Witt
the expectec jrfluz of rttn^Kmyjt
of Ethiopian Jews to Israel. Mrs
Kufesc announced the eetablisb-
ment of the AMIT Women
Ethiopian Beta-Yisrael Rescue
Project, a fund raiamg campaign
among its more than mjSSt
members
The 16 members of the mission
represented Maw York City. Long
Island. Detroit. Phoenix, and
Rochester. NY In-depth discus-
sions were held with Mayor
Teddy Kollek of Jerusalem lead-
ing members of the Knesset and
officials from the Education and
.Social Welfare ministries.
Dade Natives in
the Armed Forces
Air Force airman first class
Arthur R. Stein, son of Myra M.
Stein of Miami, has arrived for
duty at Mather Air Force Base in
California. Stein is a security
specialist with the 320th
Bombardment Wing who was
formerly stationed in England.
Steven I. Hershokowitz, son of
Roslyn L. Hershkowitz of North
Miami Beach, has been promoted
to the rank of senior airman in
the Air Force. He and his wife,
Robin, daughter of Henry L.
Lieberman of Opa Locka and
Helaine J. Lieberman of North
Miami Beach, are at Aviano Air
Base in Italy.
Temple Zion To
Cast 'Oklahoma!'
Casting calls and try-outs for
Temple Zion Israelite Center's
community theatre production of
Oklahoma!" will be held Jan. 7,
8, and 10 at the temple.
Actors, singers, dancers, stage
hands, set designers and others
on and back stage will be chosen
from 7:30 to 10:80 p.m. each day.
JERUSALEM A F-p-.ses P.~'.-. Popkzn defti. nateim
p~esiden: v' Haoabch. recetiet a gold pin from D' S;-..f.
sSnaeMr^aasVS*] of the Hadatsah Mez.:^.
Orffmmmtetmtm, during oerr,^iorae$ honoring member* tf tat
Huacibzr-HetTu Unz: e~s:r> Medicoi Center staff uKc havt
u-} rhei'potti M'l Poptim wason hone :; -..-.:
p-ekr*.: :'u nhem Lf Penchas made the unannol*.:-'-
prehenzcT.z r :'Ji comment. You yourself haie g::en
BavJaaaal --:-: :----. -:' .eorj of de:oted seriux. We hat*
decidfz :: cj. zrz o- ; p:~. z.i '.-...
Goldstein Memorial Lecture
Hosts Perlmutter
Pri':iT ?rrr.:ver trer.::-. -.
Wtmttm of the Jewish C numrr CouncL of Mecronoiaax
Bostor. wil ot the ruest speaker
at tat Sandra C Goiristesr Jew-
is Puahc .Affairs Forum on
Monday. Jan 1-4. at aocc at the
Greaser Miam; Jewish Feder-
ation.
?t-_r;.-.ter 5 t:c: saV
luacaeor w be Jews and
Biacjts M>tht and Realities
He will analyze the issues and
oersonalities that have drvided
3iacxs and Jews. iwhiHinp
affirmative action. Jesse
Jackson. Louis Farrakhan. Israel
and the PLO Perlmutter will
discuss opDortuniues for better
reiaisans. cooperative acuity
and coalition building between
the two communities
Perlmutter is a weekly
columnist with Boston's Jewish
Asm -::.( and his arocies on
Soviet Jewry. church-tate
issues. Black-Jewish n I
Israel and the Middte East have
appeared in Commentary. Mid-
Stream. The Christian Caatar]
Orthodox Jewish Liie. anc thl
Christian Science Monitor He
has lectured at Boston
University. Harvard and
Brandeis.
The Sandra C Goldstein Jew-
ish Pubbc .Affairs Forum iec: B1
series was established in men rj
of Sandy Goldstein, a devoted
and enmmitted member of
Miami's Jewish community' The
forum is sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation s Chazak and Lender snip
Development Programs. Jim
Baros is chair of the series and
Jack H. Levine is Leaders tup
Development Committee chai:
Meetings of Hadassah Chapters
Several Hadassah chapters
have scheduled early week meet-
ings.
Stephen Wise Chapter has
scheduled an eye bank luncheon
for Monday at 11:30 a.m. at the
Ocean Pavilion. A speaker on
visual impairment will be
featured, according to chair
Betty Schaffer.
A monthly board meeting is to
be held by Henrietta Szold
Chapter at noon Monday at the
Hadassah Office on Lincoln
Road. President Florence Green-
berg is in charge.
On Tuesday at noon Hannah
Senesch Chapter will meet for
lunchon at the Shelborne. At 7:45
p.m. Aliyah Chapter plans a
meeting at Kendalltown Club-
house, with guest Walter Dart-
land, Dade consumer advocate.
On Monday, Jan. 14, Morton
Towers Chapter plans a regular
meeting at 11:30 a.m. at Ameri-
can Savings. The chapter's
Youth Aliyah luncheon is sched-
uled for Jan. 29 at 11:30 a.m. at
Temple Emanu-El.
Sandy Peyton, talk show
hostess on radio and television,
Yeshiva Students
in Miami
The Rabbinical Seminary of
America, Yeshiva Chofetz
Chaim, in New York has sent six
rabbinical students to Miami
through mid-January to teach
high school students, speak to
ynagogue groups, and to
oversee a public evening Torah
tudy, a Bail Medrask, Sunday
through Thursday from 8 to
10:30 pm at Yeshiva Toms
Chaim on Miami Beach.
will speak to Naomi Chapter's
Jan. 14 meeting at 8 pm at
Tamarind Apartments
Clubhouse.
Renanah Chapter of Hadassah
will meet at the Miami Beach
Jewish Community Center on
Jan. 14. A board meeting will
convene at 10:30 am. followed by
a mini-luncheon at 11:30 and a
general meeting at noon. The
speaker will be Barbara Doering.
a color and wardrobe analyst and
coordinator, who will discuss
"Total You." Harriet Cohen will
preside.
Delight Child/grandchild
with a Letter of Knowl
edge. A timeless gift.
Send for FREE brochure
Knowledge: P.O. Box
7657, Phoenix. AZ 85011.
Rabbi
San Francisco Bay Area
Synagogue with its own
Parish House seeks a
Full-Time Rabbi. Our 150
member Congregation
has mixed seating and
conducts a Complete
Traditional service. If you
are a Shomer Shabbos
interested in promoting
Traditional Jewish
Values and are organized
and self-motivated, please
submit your resume to:
RSF c/o Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101


, # *
, a r
*.

Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewjsh Floridian Page 3-B
Netanyahu Says American Mideast Policy
And Israel's Position Have Changed
TORONTO (JTA) -
Israel's war in Lebanon and
America's exposure to
Arab terrorism in Lebanon
have had decisive influ-
ences on America's Middle
East policy and are part of
recent developments which
have "fundamentally
altered" Israel's interna-
tional position, Binyamin
Netanyahu, Israel's
Ambassador to the United
Nations, said here.
Two other recent developments
which have affected Israel's in-
ternational position are the
decline of Arab oil power,
matched by a parallel decline in
Arab financial power, and the
decline of the PLO which, after
the war in Lebanon, now "leads a
fragmented and divisive exist-
ence," Netanyahu said.
FOCUSING ON Americas
present perception of the Middle
East in general and of Israel in
particular, he told the more than
2,000 delegates attending the
53rd General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations,
that the terrorist attacks against
U.S. military installations and
armed forces personnel in Beirut
"was the first time that America
as a country was so tragically
exposed to Arab terrorism."
This experience, Netanyahu
pointed out, had "a profound
effect on the public at large and
on policymakers in Washington.
Leading American statesmen
have come to recognize what Is-
rael knew and argued all along:
that terrorism is a new form of
warfare aimed at all the demo-
cracies and that it must be
vigorously resisted, if necessary
with military means."
This new American recogni-
tion, "so new that some in Wash-
ington still have difficulty in
grasping it, has profound im-
plications for Israel's continuing
war against terror, as it does for
the rest of the world," Netanyahu
leclared.
BUT LEBANON contributed
Binyamin Netanyahu
n another way to a change of
American perception, he said.
'All the facile remarks about the
centrality of the Palestinian
problem to the Middle East
conflict' were shown up as hollow
before a splintered Arab world,
the murderous infighting within
the PLO and the ceaseless strife
of faction against faction, tribe
against tribe, in Lebanon."
Continuing his analysis,
Netanyahu said that in "this
more sober grasp of the Middle
East, America learned that it had
overestimated the mettle of the
non-radical regimes and under-
estimated the blind fanaticism of
both the Soviet-backed radicals
and the Moslem fundamentalists.
In these shifting sands, America
found its alliance with Israel the
only point of real stability and
strength. That alliance is now
being further enhanced through
strategic cooperation between the
two countries."
Israel's "reinvigorated part-
nership" with America has pro-
found implications beyond the
two countries, Netanyahu ob-
served. It shores up the position
of the non-radical Arab states
that are too weak or too fright-
ened to fend for themselves and
also creates opportunities to
solve Israel's difficult economic
problems.
THE PRINCIPAL cause of
the economic problems, he said,
"is our crushing expenditure on
unavoidable defense outlays. For
we cannot be expected to be the
only country aligned with the
West, and at the center of conflict
at that, to carry such a financial
burden. South Korea does not.
NATO does not. Even Japan,
rich as it is, does not. Yet from
Europe to Japan, America will
not find another ally more willing
and competent to defend itself
and in so doing to defend
Western interests."
Netanyahu pointed out that
the U.S. and Israel continue to
differ on the issues of the West
Bank settlements and arms sales
to Arab regimes, but that the two
countries differ "as respectful
allies, committed to defending
our common interests in the
region."
The Israeli diplomat stated
that for Israel, "this is a time of
great opportunities. More than at
any moment in its history, the
international situation, at times
so bleak, offers tremendous pos-
sibilities for us."
GIVEN THE new situation, he
said that two notions "which
have been etched into our poli-
tical thinking during our long
history as a stateless people"
must be re-examined. The first,
Netanyahu said, "is the belief
that the whole world is against
us. It is not. Of the world's many
nations, some are against us,
some are not, and some are
decidedly for us."
The second notion, he conti-
nued, is "that our diplomacy can
produce a messianic era of peace,
an end-of-days in which we would
finally relax our vigil. This will
not happen ... In world affairs
there are no Hollywood endings
nor Jewish Disney worlds. The
only sustainable peace is the one
that can be constantly, tirelessly
defended. Both the history of this
century, and the nature of the
regimes that now confront us,
show that this sober assessment
is more relevant than ever."
Sculpture at
Lowe-Levinson
Sculptor Susan Miller's work
in marble, bronze and fiberglas
will be displayed at Temple Beth
Sholom's Lowe-Levinson Art
Gallery Jan. 5-29, along with an
exhibit of paintings, prints and
etchings of Hannah and
Abraham Yakin, which opened in
December. An opening reception
will be held on Jan. 13 from 5 to 7
p.m. at the gallery.
JCC Films
The Miami Beach Jewish
Community Center has launched
its 6th season of free films and
commentary, "Broaden Your
Horizons." Among the films
which will be shown in the Senior
Center Auditorium on the first
and third Tuesdays of each
month at 2:30 p.m. is Charlie
Chaplin's classic "The Great
Dictator."
Excetience
through tradition
Tki tkm Juw hm I mtl H
1:
.
DANCE CAST of 45
MIAMI BEACH THEATRE
OF THE PERFORMING ARTS
I '00 WASHINGTON AVE MIAMI BEACH
SAT. FEB. 9, 8:30 PM
SUN. FEB. 10, 2:30 & 8:00 PM H
MON. FEB. 11, 2:30 A 8:00 PM
TUES. FEB. 12, 2:30 A 8:00 PM
PRICES: $17-$14-$1 2
Directed & Choreographed by
GAVMLEVI
TICKETS ON SALE AT
ARIE KADURI AGENCY
16123 N.E. Ilth A. N. Miami Bead)
Select-a-Seat Outlets A
JORDAN MARSH Stores:
CHARGE BY Dade: 625-5100
PHONE: Brow.: 462-7900
THEATRE BOX OFFICE
673-7302
(Starting January 13)
FOR INFO.. RESERVATIONS and
GROUPRATES 949 0212
..SHALOM 8S WILL APPEAR AT THE"
WEST PALM BEACH AUD.
TUES.. FEB 26. Mit 2:30-Eve. 8 PM
FOR INFOHMATIDN COIL 683-6012
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Freshly Baked
French Bread
.69
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Old Fashioned
Boston
Cream Cake
$199
7-inch *
size
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Like Homemade, Chewy
Fruit Bars
12.M
19
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Filled with Spicy Apples, Delicious
Danish Apple Strip.......each $189
Family Pack
Cake Donuts...............
s?n*
Delicious with Any Meal
Zucchini Muffins........6 *>, $ 129
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Onion Bagels.............6 tor 99*
Prices Effective
January 3rd thru 9th. 1985


-*v3*
-!.....*,.!
'''' t
irtLar'
r? 4 is#ie
JWB Commission Wants
BrodieSuckno Nuptials
More Educi ion In JCCs
A

BtBDJOaij/jb
ori restart C the JWB
** Jew aw. O'.assBBsssaty
uca iif ii iwiafc
a* a Jtwj^jF ?r'*j&it
JewiS* t-j-.'m +<&+
atuusset atc v*^u* as*:
I HI sag
*-atx* :>eex Kju JWB pnav
*a*si>. r/n ujc 2/XK
Je-wiSfc **>rt rscervad the
*eport wfcjcx te* -x^arv: chai-
fetsagx* u* ivwuu. rrjaaammtiy
mom* f**; >; JWB v, stu
tr* *r. e-.er. more #J*r.
trre OMC/vasesst of creatr.e
J*rw*r. 'w..' ._-.,. She tu at*
'-*i ***: ;>*->r F'/j/i o-f s>
Vork v. r***: i '.otz-matM* on
*K*T.'Jf.*K. V. .--**. Urn
challenjp:
Morton M*/y>.
'.tjhttxju. k*s: u*
%*****!* >.rr.p|| a* that they
the impact of %k3g*-
with the potential to
arv: lortdy Jew ash corn-
bit Ha ***J the j*wfc
ty wj the JbwM
peop* fMM a cram and declared
we *r* u; a war for J*w*>h
Mnl
Arthur Rot man JWB
executive vita president, who was
'i/n.n>txK*/T. director, saad the
Jewaah Center was "in the fort-
front of the battle for Jewish
continuity, for which he acid it
* partarularfy and uniquely
ecjug/ped
The commission' define: r./n of
Jewaah education asserted that
the goal* of such education are
to help" Jews develop and rein-
force positive Jewish identity and"
participate intelligently in Jewish
In that context, the report
declared, the Jewish community
center has both opportunities and
obligations, including "stimulat-
ing people to be more aware of
and to deepen their sense of
Jewish belonging and responsibi-
lity; motivating and assisting
them in their pursuit of Jewish
knowledge, and helping give
expression to Jewish beliefs,
practices and values."
Declaring that Jewish Com-
munity Centers are "committed
to working with all systems of
Jewish education and elements
within the community concerned
sBBjB esisaxacmg
sayatrira eaver-pnae. -_n
report ^npotitc q-jg^er yf
-vrjeizciCiacr^a txrvug* wars.
-t* **=r^r> *_r.-_ic easac** ^nar
oxauxa pocetxja. sac
'JOKJK Wit "ww-rri
it ryj*. yg-ivrja ant
at laraes.
Oas
WsWMs.il
wjr eiataacaaa sag
use I M i *rmrt* irjr
wjtfc aty
aaad capacity
It eaaaed ob center* to gr.e
pnonty to :he recrzjtoent Msec
taoc aaC Oer. *opmer:*. of Tuaiiaed
ax*: experermc coaaaasauty
*der* who dks stand and
support the Center Jem At
adacataon aasseavr. ^^g tha*.
tJae JWB shoujcl help eecter* v.
do that.
Another focusec oc professaoD-
al staff commitment and compet-
ence, dedarmg that the Center
exec-utr.*: and key executive staff
grve ieadershsp to the goal of
setting the appropriate climate
and develop effective Jewish
programs and services."
The recommendation said that
ucfa Center executives should
give such leadership "to this
effort by setting a personal
example, by luring Jewishiy
committed staff and by con-
tinuously upgrading their Jewish
education levd. Center boards
make this possible by the
development of personnel policies
and salary scale* designed to
attract, retain and stimulate
quality professionals."
. In a recommw>data>p on inter-
agency cooperation and support,
the study declared that centers
"tend to be encouraged or con-
strained in Jewish education
programming by the stance of
the local Federation, synagogue
and Jewish education leader-
ship." Jewish Center leaders
"must interpret the Center's role,
be aware of community history
and be sensitive to the interests
and capabilities of other insti-
tutions."
In discussing enhancement of
community awareness, the report
asserted that community percep-
tion of the Jewish Center "as a
Jewish educational instrumental-
ity tends to be uneven and
require* the conscious attention
Temple Emanu-El Hosts Reston
James Keston, New York
Times and syndicated columnist,
will open Temple Cmanu-EI's
Cultural Series Thursday, Jan.
10, at 8 p.m. in the sanctuary of
the temple, according to temple
president Sidney Cooperman.
Huston's appearance is the first
'if four lectures coordinated by
Kabbi Irving I^shrman and
chaired by Ron Wayne. Reston is
Yivo Topics
Prof Kugene Orenstein will
speak on David Bergelaon, Soviet
Jewish writer, at the Yivo Com-
mittee lecture in Yiddish on
Wednesday, Jan. 16, at Temple
Beth Sholom at 1:30 p.m. Rose
Lusky will present dramatic
readings.
On Jan. 23 Yaakov Blank will
address the Yivo Committee on
"The Literary Heritage of Chaim
Nachman Bialik," and Cantor
Moshe Buryn will provide
musical entertainment.
Dr. Israel Knox will be the
guest speaker to the group on
Jan. 30. His topic will be "The
Kthical and Spiritual Values in
Jewish Literature." Emil Gure-
vitz will sing after the lecture.
a two-time Pulitzer Prize winner
and has also won the Overseas
Press Club Award three times for
his interpretation of international
news. He has been a regular on
the op-ed pages of the Times and
many other papers for many
years. In addition he is the
author of three books and he and
Mrs. Reston are co-publishers of
a tiny weekly on Martha's
Vineyard.
Na'amat's
Chapters
Ida Kovalaky, cultural chair of
Kilat Chapter of Pioneer Women
Na'amat, will deliver an address
on the meaning of Tu B'Shevat,
"The New Year of Trees." at the
chapter meeting Monday at 1
p.m. at Financial Federal. Faye
Brucker will preside and Paul
Yanofsky will entertain with the
mandolin.
liana Chapter will explore the
topic, "Sex and the Senior
Citizen." at a Tuesday meeting at
11:30 a.m. in the auditorium of
Winston Tower 100. President
Lillian Hoffman will introduce
speaker Laura Fink, RN. Mildred
Silverman is program chair.
.: -x
UK SCBC?
%aj m aae JCC
"xar* a -*sc*jE*i>ibri
'jtxa v. iyj*_ tr.c.-_jo=r.a. arc
Israex rrr- nrnr^t
Jewist eeaeataaa pcogiaxt
omeappaseaK. the report
JWB anuauC heap Irrat Qa
v. =^r. iztts? ,"'*j; *<- .-a-^i--fc
rgpctsf>.T |aj Igj prvmxaag
xdorrraKj-r -jl etarj^f Fjccsaa>
f^i. progrx= anc by grviag
MQersBap sz and to the devt&-
opc*n: \z>-. C-at- -za-jcx. r.'. z*rm
moocss as>d prxotypes
JW B and JCCs works* wxh
Jewtah aiharatKBi eosxeerparu a:
dsneiop more bbbjbbbs
t--t iMjm at a
F strengihczung Jewist
yr**p%z^-^ and
that JWB. through u Israe-:
office, should hetp Jewh centers
"optimize thesr use of Israel as a
training. progrx.T.rr.rr^ and
Jewish educaurjc resource
In its rerominmriation on
funding, the study neid that
l. gsj. fee ar. t J esrial v. ea:-. -
programs are rarely self-
supporting and frequently
recjuir* supplemental funding. '
which a called "a worthy chal-
lenge to center boards and to the
leadership of Federations. The
JWB should explore the
development of a contnent-wide
endowment program that would
enable centers to fund experi-
mental programs and develop lay
and staff training initiatives."
A consistent theme of the
study and its recommendations
was that JWB was willing and
able to help implement the
recommendations.
tJeuUh Telegraphic Agency)
Shown under the canopy at their December 15 wedding are
Deborah Ellen Brodie and Leslie Howard Suckno, Mrs. Suckno
is the daughter of Myron and Charlotte Brodie. The bride's
father is executive vice president of the Greater Miami Jeuish
Federation. Mr. Suckno is the son of Abraham and Sonia
Suckno of Mountainside, N.J. After a wedding cruise the couple
are at home in Plantation.
"What
other coffee
would I
choose?"
Euqene Drucker,
Violinist
Terfomwig in concert
demands o stood/ band and
o imoc* sft-oke. Extra coffem
w lea* thing I need to
interfere wh my music. Thofs
wbvldrinkSonkaT
Sanka
It lets you
be your oest.
v



The Contributions of
Moses Maimonides
Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
By ABBA LEITER
Maimonides' halachic guide
included the daily duties of the
Jew for the entire year. All of the
rituals are covered in great detail.
The problems of mankind in his
day and in general are given the
Jewish halachic response. Such
matters as child support, women
learning Torah or occupying
positions of communal leader-
ship, intermarriage, hygiene and
diet, are all treated.
In addition, the laws of the
Messiah, the restoration of
Kingship in Israel and the
Temple service are gone into in
an exceptionally detailed and
comprehensive manner. Al-
though these laws related to the
prayers and dreams of our people,
they are included together with
the laws of daily living, because
they, too, dealt with reality
the reality of the future.
In terms of what Maimonides
undertook and achieved, there
would never be another indi-
vidual work that would rival the
comprehensiveness of his
Mishneh Torah. It was a massive
work a thousand chapters and
almost 15,000 sub-chapters.
Maimonides' Mishneh Torah was
a monumental edifice which
would give rabbinic Judaism a
pre-eminence and acceptance as
the authoritative voice of Jewry.
Since it was written, hundreds
of commentaries and thousands
upon thousands of essays and
explanations have been written
on virtually every phase of the
Mishneh Torah, as is fitting to a
constitution of a people.
Throughout Jewish legal litera-
ture, the view of the Mishneh
Torah is brought as a proof text
whose word is final. It had a
major impact on the accepted
Jewish legal codes which followed
it, The Tut and, later, the
Shulhan A Ruck or Code of
Jewish Law.
Even today, the Mishneh
Torah is virtually the centerpiece
of every major Talmudic dis-
course delivered by the Deans of
the Yeshiva world. The work is
alive and still full of vigor even
after 800 years!
Maimonides begins the
Mishneh Torah with a section on
religio-philosophical and moral
teachings. They serve both as the
foundation as well as goals of the
precepts which we are com-
manded to practice. He concludes
the Mishneh Torah with the Mes-
sianic era, when peace and
harmony will prevail, and Israel
will be free to occupy itself with
the pursuit of that which is
highest and most appropriate to
it the knowledge of God and
the practices which emulate His
ways. The entire theme and
purpose of this work is to help
Israel turn in that direction in all
its endeavors, and to guide it
unfalteringly towards that end.
Around the time that he com-
pleted the Mishneh Torah,
Maimonides married the sister of
a very influential Jew. From this
union, a son and daughter were
born. The daughter died as a
young child. The son, Abraham,
born 1186, would eventually
succeed his father and become
the recognized spiritual leader of
the community. He was also a
great philosopher, rabbinic
scholar, and a prominent physi-
cian in his own right. His works
shed light on and amplified
Maimonides' views in a great
number of areas.
In this same period,
Maimonides was appointed to be
the official physician of El Fadil,
vizier of Saladin, the most power-
ful man in Egypt. This new posi-
tion allowed Maimonides to use
his influence for the betterment
of his fellow Jews. Through his
efforts, the Jews were enabled to
return to Jerusalem after the
Saladin recaptured it from the
Franks in 1187.
As a physician, he not only
ministered to patients, but also
wrote extensively on a variety of
medical topics. Maimonides
stressed proper diet and exercise.
He maintained that a great deal
of illness came from overeating.
He felt that one should limit
one's intake so that the stomach
should be filled one third full of
solid food, one third liquid, and
remain one third empty. In the
summer, he felt one should limit
oneself to two thirds of the above
intake.
He counseled avoiding medic-
ation except in extreme cases.
This was based on the view that
the constitution of the individual
was best equipped to resist ill-
ness if left to its own devices, in
the vast majority of cases. In his
later years, his medical practice
would occupy a major portion of
his time. This was clearly spelled
out in a famous letter by him to
one of his students, in which he
complained of his inability to find
time to study or counsel with the
people of the community except
on the Sabbath day.
A poem praising the skill
Maimonides achieved in his
medical art was composed by al
Said ibn Sena al Mulk, one of the
great Arab poets of bis day. The
text is as follows.
Galen's art heals only
the body,
But Abu-Amrun's,
the body and the soul.
His knowledge made him
the physician of the
century.
He could heal with his
wisdom, the sickness
of ignorance.
If the moon would submit
. to his art
He would deliver her of
her spots,
At the time of the full
moon, cure her of her
defects
And at the time of her
conjunction, save her
from waning.
Maimonides completed his last
major work, The Guide to the
Perplexed, around 1190. This
religin philosophical treatise was
not addressed to the same au-
dience u whom the Mishneh
Torah had bean addressed. The
latter was for all Jews, whereas
the Guide was directed to the
intelligentsia of Jewry. Many
sensitive and truth-seeking Jews
had been left deeply perplexed by
the almost universal acceptance
of the views of Aristotle as the
absolute truth. Aristotle's posi-
tions raised serious doubts in
their minds regarding the basic
principles of Judaism, as well as
numerous difficulties with the
Biblical text itself.
At the outset, the Guide
defines the terminology of the
Bible. Maimonides explained
that there are figurative or
hidden meanings, in addition to
the literal meaning of Biblical
terms. In many instances, the
figurative or hidden meaning is
the meaning of major conse-
quence. After clarifying the lan-
guage of the Bible, the concepts
which this language were used to
convey were then sharply
defined, and their philosophical
correctness convincingly demon-
strated. Using this approach,
Maimonides discusses the
problem of the use of anthro-
pomorphic terms in the Scrip-
tures at great length, and ex-
pounds the Biblical-Rabbinic
view of God's incorporeality in a
most profound manner. He goes
on to explain his radical view of
Jewish monotheism and that our
knowledge of God Himself, is
limited to a negative one i.e.
knowing what He is not.
Regarding God's activities, we
have a knowledge thereof via the
Attributes of His Actions.
Alongside this, Maimonides
develops the concept of Imitatio
Dei (imitating God's ways)
within the Jewish tradition in a
most comprehensive fashion.
Thematic in the Guide is the
view of Maimonides regarding
the relationship between religion
and philosophy. To Maimonides
they were two component parts
of a single whole, the twin off-
spring of reason, as it were. To
perceive them as two separate or
opposing disciplines would only
lead to insurmountable difficul-
ties, nonsensical views, and
unacceptable opinions.
Maimonides' logical step by step
method served to remove the
bulk of the questions and doubts
of the perplexed, as well as the
alleged contradictions between
religion and philosophy.
In certain crucial areas
Maimonides demonstrated than
the philosophy of the Bible was
superior to the philosophy of
Aristotle. Although Maimonides
had the highest regard for Aris-
totle as a thinker, he only ac-
cepted his views where their
truth could be convincingly
demonstrated. By way of
example, Maimonides rejects
Aristotle's theory that the world
is eternal. This rejection is not
based on the Scriptural narrative,
but rather because the philo-
sophical arguments against the
eternity of matter were stronger
that the arguments against a
creation in time "ex nihilo."
Likewise, Maimonides' strong
rationalistic approach would not
accept any proofs supporting
religious doctrines unless their
truth could be clearly demon-
strated and confirmed by a
rigorous and uncompromising
critical analysis. Thus he demol-
ished the Muslim philosophers'
faulty philosophical proofs for
the religious doctrine of creation
in time "ex hihuo." He main-
tained that a true religious
doctrine would be eventually
undermined (with a consequent
loss of the faithful), if its philo-
sophical underpinnings were
faulty.
Maimonides concluded that
creation in time "ex nihilo" was
beyond man's power to prove
with his reason alone. It is be-
cause of this that it must be
revealed to us by a Divine
Revelation through the medium
of His prophet and Holy
Scripture.
The Guide also delineated in
detail the basic principles of
Judaism such as Providence,
Prophecy, the Prophecy of
Moses, the Immutability of the
Torah, in addition to the discus-
sion of God's existence and omni-
science. Maimonides also made
an original contribution to Aris-
totelian philosophy through his
enumeration of 26 basic axioms
of that philosophy.
In the latter part of the Guide
the precepts are categorized, and
the universal principles upon
which the law is based are for-
mulated. The maintenance of
sacrificial rituals in the Jewish
religion is explained in a modern
critical manner. It would be an
issue hotly debated for centuries
to come. Adherents and op-
ponents would also argue over
Maimonides' views regarding the
nature of the soul, Immortality,
and the doctrine of Resurrection.
The Guide concludes on the
theme of "Imitatio Dei." Unlike
Aristotle and his "Unmoved
Mover" God, for whom "Imitatio
Dei" involves only contemplation
for Maimonides it is a pattern-
ing of one's activities and views
after a G-d who is intimately in-
volved with humankind.
The great Jewish philosophical
and theological works of the
medieval period all show what a
powerful impact the Guide had
on subsequent Jewish thought.
The first and main concern of
such great Jewish thinkers as
Albo, Crescas, Gersonides and
Abravenal, was the correct
understanding of the Guide's
view.
Among the great Christian
medieval thinkers, the Guide had
a major impact. Saint Thomas
Aquinas quotes certain
Maimonidean views and incor-
porated them in a thematic
manner in his major work,
Summa Theologica. The Guide
was also quoted by the great
Christian Scholastics Albertus
Magnus, Duns Scotus, Alex-
ander of Hales, and William of
Auvergne. Later great philo-
sophers such as Leibnitz and
Spinoza, the great philologist
Joseph Justin Scaliger, and
mystics Nicholas of Cusa and
Reuchlin quote Maimonides as a
source, and extol him.
During the Enlightenment Pe-
riod such great Jewish thinkers
as Moses Mendelsohn and
Solomon Maimon both learned
philosophy from the Guide and
incorporated many of its themes
into their own systems of
thought.
The Guide states that the
Torah established rational and
ethical imperatives in addition to
the juridical ones, as both
foundation and goal of the prac-
tice of the precepts, and that they
are inextricably entwined. Thus
Maimonides states, "Every
commandment from among these
613 commandments exists either
with a view to communicating a
correct opinion, or to putting an
end to an unhealthy opinion, or to
communicating a rule of justice,
or to warding off an injustice, or
to endowing men with a noble
moral quality, or to warning
them against an evil moral
quality. Thus all commandments
are bound up with three things:
opinions, moral qualities, and
political civic actions." (Guide
III, 31) And in a similar vein,
"Therefore it says with reference
to the returning of a pledge: 'And
it shall be zedakah unto you.' For
when you walk in the way of the
moral virtues, you do justice unto
your rational soul, giving her the
due that is her right." (Guide III,
53) This inseparability of actions
(mitzvos) and ideals is a leitmotif
in the Guide.
No other individual after the
Talmudic period has had such an
all-pervasive effect on Jewish
thought, law, and practice as
Moses Maimonides. Virtually
every line of his works is brought
and discussed or cited as a source
for a new approach by some later
thinker, commentator, or legal
authority. Even today, learned
volumes, articles and mono-
graphs on Maimonidean studies
continue to well forth unceas-
ingly. They are the tribute of the
ages to this creative genius.
Perhaps his works have had
such a captivating effect upon us
because they were more than just
books. They were indeed the
autobiography of their author,
and as such a guiding force and
inspiration of incomparable
value.
It is his perfection intel-
lectual, moral, and religious
that vivifies every section,
chapter and paragraph of these
most excellent works by this
most excellent of men. As such,
Maimonides and his works have
been studied, admired and ac-
cepted as the "golden mean" of
Judaism for 800 years without
any sign of abatement.
Maimonides' life of devoted
service to God, to his fellow Jews
and to humanity at large as a
healer both of the body and of the
spirit came to an end in
December, 1204. He was brought
to his final resting place in
Tiberias, Israel.
What was said about him
during his lifetime became his
epitaph for the ages among his
people. It is brief, but unique in
its esteem: "From Moses until
Moses, none has arisen who can
be likened unto Moses."
(Jewith Telegraphic Agency)
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'
Community Cornei
i. itu fCouciIL B'?li B'ri'h Women will hold an annual
luncheon for the benefit of the Bnai B'rith Women's Children s
Home in Israel on Jan. 9 at 11:30 a.m.
Rho Pi Phi pharmacy fraternity schedules a seminar on Jan. 6
startuig at 8 a.m. at Home Savings Building in Hollywood. Dr.
Marshall Abel, a neurologist, Dr. P.R. Grondin, a heart surgeon,
and Dr. Steven Vernon, a pathologist, will lead the speakers
program.
"The Plight of the Stepmother" will be the topic at the Jan. 16
step-hamily Association meeting at 7 p.m., Michael-Ann
Kussell Jewish Community Center.
Rabbi and Mrs. Meir Felman continue with the third lecture
on outstanding Jews of the Middle Ages at 10 a.m. on Wed-
nesday at the Miami Beach JCC. Maimonides and marrano
women of valor will be discussed.
B'nai B'rith 1591 meets on Friday at 12:30 p.m. in 100 Lincoln
rtoad to near Gary Eisenberg speak about "The Danger of Cults
to Jewish Youth."
On Wednesday Temple Menorah Sisterhood will meet at the
temple social hall at 12:30 p.m. Cantor Murray Yavneh will sing
liturgical selections.
B'nai B'rith Women, Friendship Chapter 1715, will present
"Tax Talk" Sunday, Jan. 13. at 1 p.m. at Surfside Community
Florida Friends of Dropsie University will meet at Lancelot
Hall, Bay Harbor Island, on Thursday at 1 p.m. to hear Rabbi
David B. Saltzman of Aventura Jewish Center. Chair of the day
is Lillian Dorison.
The creative writing class at the Sunrise Club begins a new
trimester Wednesday at 1:30 p.m. in Cardrcom A. Girt Boesak
teaches the class sponsored by Miami Palmetto Adult
Education Center.
Workmen's Circle Branch 1059 plans a program on Sholom
Aleicfaem, narrated in Yiddish and English, on Wednesday at
noon at the Surfside Community Center.
The next Forte Forum topic will be "Decline and Revival:
Recurring Patterns in Jewish History," a talk by Dr. Robert
Sandier delivered on Tuesday at 1 p.m. Elsie Rubin is director of
the forum, in its 18th year.
Aventura Jewish Center presents a Bible seminar on Thur-
sdays from 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. led by Rabbi David B. Saltzman.
The Book of Kings is the topic.
The South Dade JCC has a creative drama group sponsored
by Miami Palmetto Adult Education Center starting Tuesday at
2 p.m. geared to senior adults.
Bnai Zion Miami Beach Chapter will hold its next card game
parties on Sunday, Jan. 6 and Jan. 20, at 1 p.m. at the Cadillac
Hotel.
South Dade Upbeat Seniors of Temple Israel will hear Bea
Dine* and her collection of traditional and modern Jewish music
at a Monday meeting at the Kendall facility of the temple,
beginning at noon.
CAMP and RESORT FOR SOYS & GIRLS 6-1
YOUR MOUNTAIN OF FUN Where Spring
Comes ft Spends the Summer
ONLY 2 HOURS NORTH OF ATLANTA
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All Water Sports in Our Own Twin Spring Fed Lakes
e White Water Canoeing e Mt. Trail Hikes Tennis
e Arts & Crafts Sailing Skiing e Gymnastics and
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Dietary Laws Observed Shabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times
Accredited Member American Camping Association
Your Camp Directors
COACH J.I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS 4 SHILA WAL0MAN
STAN & BARBARA MINTZ
a
Miami Beach Phone 305-538-3434 or Write
P.O. Box 2888. Miami Beach. Fla. 33140
LIMITED ENROLLMENT
Shown at a recent Florida Friends of Yeshiva
University "Issues of Our Times" seminar
on Miami Beach are (left to right) Dr.
Matthew Zuckerman, chair of Florida
Friends; Rabbi Yaacov Sprung, seminar
chair; guest speaker Rabbi Benjamin Blech,
assistant professor of Talmud at Yeshiva
whose topic was "Jewish-Christian Cults;
How We Can Cope"; and Chaim H. Friend
director of Yeshiva's southeast region.
Miami Beach Mayor Malcolm H. Fromberg
presents the city's Certificate of Apprecia-
tion to Dr. Lawrence Rob bins for unselfish
actions in saving the lives of other human
beings. On several occasions, Dr. Robbins
has jeopardized his own safety to save the
lives of others. During an explosion at a
Miami Beach restaurant several years ago
the doctor applied first aid to major burn
victims at the risk to himself. During a
skiing holiday in Colorado, Dr. Robbins
recognized a cardiac arrest in a man at the
lift line. He administered immediate resus-
ciation and heart massage to save the
stranger's life. Robbins was selected by the
Florida Medical Association as the first to
receive the Harold S. Strasser Good
Samaritan Award. Also shown at the pre-
sentation are Robbins' mother, Florence; his
wife, Marjorie; daughter, Jessica; and
brother-in-law, Marcus FrankeL
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Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
. "And Israel stretched out his right hand, and laid it upon
Ephraim's head, who was the younger, and his left hand upon
Manasseh's head"
(Genesis 48.14)
VAYEHI
I VAYEHI Jacob lived in Egypt 17 years. On his death bed,
he blessed his sons, predicting the destiny of the tribes that
[were to descend from each of them. Ephraim and Manasseh,
I Joseph's two sons, were included in the roster of Jacob's
[sons, the heads of future tribes. Jacob died; the Egyptian
[physicians embalmed his body, after the custom of the
Icountry. Jacob was buried in the land of Canaan, in the Cave
lof Machpelah, together with his ancestors. Joseph continued
Ito provide for his brothers after their father's death. Before
Ihis own death, Joseph made his brothers swear that when
|they returned to Canaan they would take his bones with them
to the Promised Land, Joseph died; meanwhile, his embalmed
Jigdy was placed in a coffin, awaiting the return to Canaan.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and bated
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P Woll-
man-Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 7s
Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. loose. Joseph Schlang is president of the
I society distributing the volume.)
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
1
army and Sadie' Comedy
Premiere at Konover
I'Fanny and Sadie," an original
psical comedy, will premiere at
Konover Hotel on Jan. 12.
production stars Lillian Lux
J Fanny, an independent feisty
pian who must, against her
have a live-in companion,
lie, played by Lucille Dobrin.
The book and lyrics are by
3thy Willis, a Tamarac
(idem, who modeled Fanny
er her mother, a widow who
fcessfully reared 13 children
jle-handedly. Michael Fein
ii the music, which is ar-
;ed and orchestrated by
Irty Jay, and Ron Headrick is
f director of the new play.
-ux is known for her work in
Idish theatre, but she has ap-
ed in many English-language
luctions such as "Fiddler on
| Roof," and the prize-winning
Mama and the General."
jsr->?nd her husband, Pesach
Wrstein. raised two children,
Ban and Michael. Mike
lstein made his mark as the
tkm of the Broadway musical
flK| SUPERVISION
"Fanny" Lillian Lux
"Barnum."
Dobrin is a local actress, a
veteran of nine years as perform-
er and composer on the popular
children's television show
"Arthur and Company."
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trips, mountain climbs, soccer, drama and dance, gymnastics, Go
Karting, Crafts, Computer Classes and all athletics.
OPEN HOUSE
MIAMI families and prospective staff are cordially invited to attend
an enlightening color slide presentation of our exciting programs
and meet the Director, Lou Weinberg.
>JtMDAY, JANUARY 6,1985
1:30 P.M. to 4:30 P.M.
Bricked Bay Club
2333 Brickell Ave.
(Encounter Room)
Lobby level
759-9454
Counselor Applications Accepted
Call Collect or Write
Lou Weinberg Director
2333 Brickell Ave., #1512
Miami, Fla. 33129
758-9454-858-1190
Joseph Moncarz Rochelle Moncarz
JOSEPH AND
ROCHELLE MONCARZ
Joseph Jacob and Rochelle E.
Moncarz, twin children of Mr.
and Mrs. Abraham Moncarz, will
be called to the Torah as B'nai
Mitzvah on Saturday, Jan. 5, at
Temple Emanu-El. Rabbi Irving
Lehrman will officiate.
Joseph and Rochelle are stu-
dents at. the Lehrman Day School
in the eighth grade. Both have
won Dade County Youth Fair
awards, Rochelle for a poem and
Joseph for an art project. She is
interested in music, dancing and
aerobics; his hobbies include
playing the organ, science and
computers.
Special guests will include
their sister, Cindy, a Lehrman
graduate, grandmother Sara
Moncarz, and aunts, uncles and
cousins.
A reception in honor of the
occasion will be held in the Fried-
land Ballroom at the temple.
ARLO And ZACHARY
RAPPAPORT
Arlo and Zachary Rappaport,
sons of Dr. and Mrs. Michael
Rappaport, will be called to the
Torah at Temple Ner Tamid on
Saturday at 8:45 a.m.
Arlo and Zachary, students at
Nautilus Jr. High School, will be
honored after services at a
Kiddush sponsored by their
parents.
Amit Women
Chapters Meet
Amit Women chapters open
the year with meetings.
Hatikvah, Miami Beach, will
hear Sophie Primak review Molly
Picon's autobiography on Thurs-
day at Kneseth Israel social hall
beginning at noon with luncheon.
Shalom meets Tuesday for
luncheon at 11:30 a.m. followed
by two Israeli films and a candle
lighting ceremony. The Club
Room at 100 Lincoln Road is
meeting headquarters.
A luncheon at noon at Young
Israel for new and paid-up mem-
bers is set for Monday by Galil
Chapter. Lana Goldberg will
review "My Mother Golda," by
Menachem Meir.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business' under the
fictitious name Kendall K-9
Academy at 18400 SW 202nd Street.
Mtarrrt. Florida SS18T. Intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court or Dade
County, Florida.
Abel Montejo
18036 December 28, 1884,
___________January 4. n, 18,1988.
NOTICE UNDER
FlCTITIOUf-NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name RGB Enterprises
at 1298 NE. 128th St. North Miami.
Fla SS161 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Ronald G. Edwards
18819 December 21, 28, 1884;
_____________January*, ll, 191P
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business undef the
fictitious name POLLO LOKO at
86S6 S.W. 8th Street, Miami. FL
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
EXPORT AMERICA, INC.
(A Florida corporation)
185S7 December 38,1984;
January 4.11.18,1988
(Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:25 p.m.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Qerdons Drlvo
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Friday 8 15 p.m. Sisterhood Shabbat:
"300 yaara ol Jw in Amarlcs"
Saturday 8:30 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Harbart
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Jimsi L. Simon, Assoclste Rabbi
Friday 7:30 p.m. Family Service
Rabbi Simon sermon topic. "New
Yaar'a Resolutions That Are Easy
to Break
Saturday 11:15a.m. Rabbi Baumgard
sermon topic: "And Joseph Wept."
B'not Mitzvah Dabra Scnrier and
Jennifer Matey
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral way 2*26 S.w. 3rd Avenue /
South Dad* 7S00 S.W. 120th Street it
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH ^&/
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Friday 8p.m. So. Dada Chapal: Services;
9:45 p.m. Late Singles Service sponsored by
JASS
Saturday 8 a.m. Coral Way Sanctuary. Services
Bar Mitzvah: Joshua Lawrence Goldberg
TEMPLE bETH-EL OP NoftTH 6AV
VILLAGE (Conservative)
7800 Hispanola Ave., conveniently
located just oft 79 St. Cswy., s>x
Rabbi Marvin Rose ''w)
Cantor Danny Tadmore "-*
Friday 9p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ava. 858-6334
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Friday 8:15 p.m. and Saturday 6:45
a.m. Quest Rabbi Barnard Silver
Services Saturday S p.m.
(>
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N. Miami, FL 33181
691-5508 Conservative
RABBI ISRAEL JACOBS
CANTOR MOSHE FRIEOLER
RABBI EMERITUS JOSEPH A. QORFINKEL
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR IRVING JARET
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTOR BARBARA SHUUfAN
HEBREW PRINCIPAL ORLY ALEXANDER
Daily services 8 a.m. 5 p.m.
Friday 8p.m. Rabbi Jacobs sermon
topic: "To Pray Or Not To Pray"
Saturday 9 a.m., sermon 11 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ava., M.B., FL 33139
Tal. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nlssim Benyamlnl
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chaaa Ava. A 41 at St. 536-7231
DR. LEON K RONISH. RABBI Liberal
HARRY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBI
PAUL 0. CAPLAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CON VISER
Friday 6:15 p.m. Rabbi Jolt sermon topic:
"Welcome. 1965"
Saturday 10:45 a.m.
8ETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Lipschltz, Rabbi
Randall Kontgaburg, Asst. Rabbi
Zvac Aroni, Cantor
Harvay L. Brown, Exec. Director
Dairy Services 7:30 s.m. and
5:30 p.m. f!
Friday late service p.m.
Saturday 8:25 s.m. and 5:15 pm
Sunday 8a.m. and 5:30 p.m
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ava.
Dow RoiancwaVg, Rabbi
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Bath Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Baach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch, Rabbi
Moafve Buryn. Cantor
Aron Kelton, President
Shebbal Services 6.30 s.m. Sermon 10:1a
Dally ftHnyan
TEMPLE EMANU-EL _
1701 Washington Avenue ,'*y(
Miami Baach v$',
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi .
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shif man, Cantor
Friday Kabbalat Shabbat Service 5:30 p.m.
Late Friday service 8 p.m.. Rabbi Berger
sermon topic: "Alive In 1985"
Saturday 9 a.m. Rabbi Lahrman's sermon
will be on the weekly Torah portion.
B'nai Mitzvah: Joseph Jacob and
Rochelle E. Moncarz
Dally services 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetrae Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schift
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Qraatar Miami
Miami's Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell M. Bemat
Assistant Rabbi Donald P. Cashman
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Associate Cantor Racheile F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. Goldin
Friday 8 p.m. Downtown: Rabbi Cashman
sermon topic: "Judaism Without Chanukah
Kendall. Rabbi Bernat sermon topic:
"The Best of All Possible Yaara"
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Friday 8 15pm
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tal. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab, Cantor
Friday services 7:30 pm.
Saturday. 9:30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Morning services 8 a.m.
Friday late service 6:15 p.m.
Saturday Morning services 9 a.m.
Saturday Evening services 7:45p.m.
w
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866 8345"
7902 Cartyto Ave.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz conservative
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally services 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Friday 6 p.m.
Saturday 8:45 a.m.
Rabbi Labovitz and Cantor Klein assisted
by the Temple Choir
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ava. A 75 St.. 382-3343
Rabbi Warren KaSZtl Modern Orthodoa
In en 7 pm.
Set. 9:30 am. Set. afternoon 20 mm before
SunCown Momma Mmyan Mon. Thurs 6:45 am
Tues.. Wed. 4 Fri.. 7 a., followed by class
in Gemara Berachot (Memorial!
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ava.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Klngeley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Adminlatrator
Friday 7:30 p.m. Family Worship '\N
Service. Jodl Dorn on guitar. Rabbi < Vp I
Klngaley will bless children v -5,
with January birthdays.
Saturday 10:30 a.m. Bar Mitzvah:
Michael Ross
TEMPLE 2ION ISRAELITE CENTER
SW*' Conaarv.tr*.
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benjamin Adler. Cantor
David Rosanthal, '4&Y
Auxiliary Cantor >J&
Frtday 1:1 S p.m. Family Sabbath Eve Services.
Rabbi Shapiro will Mesa children with. January
birthdays.
Saturday 9 a.m. Services. Teitler Chapel
Mlnyan 7 a Jt\.. Mon.. Thurs.. Teitler Chapal
TJs.



rw 1 fte JPwish Mnnrliar. / hVM,
I...
Page 8-B The Jewiah Floridian / Friday, January 4,1986
Dershowitz in Miami
Prof. Alan Dershowitz, civil
liberties lawyer and Harvard law
professor, will be the guest
speaker at the Florida Friends of
Yeshiva University's next
"Issues of Our Times" seminar.
The seminar is scheduled for
Monday at 8 p.m. at the Konover
Hotel. Dershowitz's topic will be
"Separation of Church and
State."
Dershowitz is frequently in the
news and has been interviewed
by most major television and
radio shows. His column is
syndicated in some 50 news-
papers, and he has produced five
books, including "The Best
Defense," as well as many
scholarly and popular articles. As
a teacher his specialties are
constitutional and criminal law.
Alan Dershowitz
Israel Bonds to Honor Gabas
Moe Rosenman ofSeaford, N. Y., vice president and treasurer of
L. Rosenman Corp., and Michael Eustace of Babylon, N. Y.,
business agent of the United Association of Plumbers Union
Local 2, were honored as 1984 Men of the Year by the Plumbing
and Heating Industry Chapter of the American ORT
Federation at the chapter's annual dinner dance held recently at
the Sheraton Centre, New York. Some 400 supporters gathered
to raise scholarship funds for the children of ORT. Left to right'
are Leonard Meyerson, chapter vice president, scholarship
chairman and president, SAM Plumbing Company, Inc.;
Rosenman; Eustace; and Morris Olshina, chapter president
and executive secretary of the Joint Plumbing Industry Board
The Greater Miami Israel
Bond Organization and Temple
Sinai of North Dade will recog-
nize Herman and Dora Gaba at a
special breakfast at Wiener
Social Hall of the temple on Sun-
day.
New York natives, the Gabas
are longtime supporters of the
American Jewiah Congress, Sinai
Academy and the Miami Heart
Institute.
Dora Gaba is a life member of
Hadassah and the Hope School of
Miami Beach, and has been a
volunteer in many other Jewish
and secular organizations for
more than 50 years. She gave
more than $25,000 of the pro-
ceeds from her cookbook, "From
Dora With Love," to the Garden
City Jewish Center in New York
and other charities.
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Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B

Public Notices
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name STUDIO ONE 83 at
2860 N.W. 183rd Street. Miami,
Florida, Intends to register said
name with the Cleric of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Abramson k Lapldus, PA.
1330 South Dixie Hwy.
Suite 380
Coral Gables, Florida 33146
(3061667-3888
BENNET LAPIDUS, ESQUIRE
Attorney for
E It E Enterprises, Inc.
a Florida Corporation
2828 N.W. 183rd Street
Miami, Florida
18M7 January 4,11, 18. 28,1885
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
OAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 4-10103
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HATTIE ROTH,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of rlATTOE ROTH, deceased. File
Number 84-10103. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for DADE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is Dade County
Courthouse. T3 West Flaglor
Street. Miami, Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of the
personal representatives and the
personal representatives' attorney
are set forth below:
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: 11) all claims
against the estate and (3) any
objection by an interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representatives. venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 4. 1085.
Personal Representatives:
Theodore R. Nelson, Esq.
1135 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 331S1
Sun Bank of Miami
Trust Department
Attn: Mr. Stephen C. Mlnana
Trust Officer
9600 Collins Avenue
Hal Harbour Branch
Bal Harbour, FL 38184
-Attorney for Personal
Representatives
NELSON A FELDMAN. P.A.
1138 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33184
Telephone: (308) 868-8718
18548 .Ianuary4.11.1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84 47848
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN KE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GEORGINA TORRES
SOMARRIBA,
Petitioner-Wife,
and
FELIX SOMARRIBA
Respondent-Husband
TO: FELIX SOMARRIBA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
hat an action for Dissolution of
Carriage has been filed against
ou and you are required to serve a
fcopy of your written defenses. If
to It on JEROLD H.
CICHI.ER, attorney for Petl-
oner. whose address Is 1400 N.E.
Ilaml Gardens Drive. Suite 103,
liorth Miami Beach. Florida 33179.
nd file the original with the clerk
the above styled court on or
efore February 1. 1988; otherwise
default will be entered against
for the relief demanded In the
Dmplalnt or petition.
This notice shall be published
nee each week for four consec-
II ve weeks In THE JEWISH
)RIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
said court at Miami, Florida on
Ms day of December 31.1884.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Hilda Sotolongo
As Deputy Clerk
Jlrcult Court Seal)
*W OFFICE OF
EROLDH. REICHLER
l N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
Mte 103
Brth Miami Beach, Fla. 33179
klephone: (308) 847-6226
tomey for Petitioner
82 January 4, 11, 18, 26.1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION 14-till
Filt No. 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANTONIO RUSSO a-k-a
ANTHONY RUSSO,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
estate of ANTONIO RUSSO a-k-a
ANTHONY RUSSO, deceased, late
of Dade County, Florida,. File
Number 84-8811, Is pending In the
Circuit Court In and for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which la 3rd Floor,
Dade County Courthouse. 78 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The personal representative
of tMs estate Is CELIA HABER-
MAN, whose address Is 1080 16th
Street, Miami Beach. Florida
33139. The name and address of the
attorney for the personal repre-
sentative are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against this estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must
be In writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim Is not yet due.
the date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk of
the above styled court to enable
the clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualifications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
DATED at Miami. Florida on
this 14th day of December. 1984.
CELIA HABERMAN
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ANTONIO RUSSO a-k-a
ANTHONY RUSSO
Deceased
First publication of this notice of
administration on the 4th day of
January. 1985.
LAW Offices of
JOSEPH W. MALEK
-;-> < Lincoln Road. Suite 601
M.. nl Bearh. Florida 33131
Telephone: (308) 538-4431
Attorney Tor Personal Repre-
sentative
18554 January 4,11,1085
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action NO. 84 47920
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 343061
IN RE: The Marriage of
PROPHET PRINCE
Petitioner-Husband,
-and-
GLADYS PRINCE,
Respondent-Wife.
TO: Gladys Prince
Residence Unknown.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to it on BRENT E. ROUT-
MAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 181 N.E. 82nd
Street. Miami. Florida 33138. and
file the original with the Clerk of
the above-styled Court on or before
February 1. 1985; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Dade
County, Florida on this 31st day of
December, 1884.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
LAVERNMcQUAY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
181 N.E. 82nd Street
Miami, Florida 33138
Telephone: (305)787-6800
18666 January 4. 11, 18. 28. 1985
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84 10430
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ETHEL VALLEAU
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
estate of ETHEL VALLEAU,
deceased, File Number 84-10480. Is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which Is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida. The personal represen-
tative of the estate Is PAULETTE
DAVIS, whose address Is 1748
Northwest 121st Street, Miami,
Florida 33167. The name and ad
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must
be in writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and *
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim Is not yet due,
the date when it will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mall one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenges the
validity of the decedent's will, the
qualification of the personal repre-
sentative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS, AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
January 4,1886.
PAULETTE DAVIS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ETHEL VALLEAU
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
STANLEY M. PRED. Esq.
1616 Northwest 7th Street -
Suite 106
Miami, Florida 33128
Telephone: 642-5300
18561 January 4, 11. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 84-47874
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 1*3011
IN RE: The Marriage of
DANIELLE TIPPENHAUER,
Petitioner-Wife,
-and-
JERALD TIPPENHAUER,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: JERALD TIPPENHAUER
3184 Westchester Avenue
Bronx. NY 10461
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses. If
any. to It on BRENT E.
ROUTMAN or LLOYD M.
ROUTMAN, attorneys for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is ROUT-
MAN & ROUTMAN ATTORNEYS
AT LAW. 181 N.E. 82nd Street,
Miami, Florida 33138, and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before February
1st. 1885: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this day of December 31.1084.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By J. Byron
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
181 N.E. 82ndStreet
Miami. Florida 33138
Telephone: (306) 787-8800
18883 January 4,11,18,26.1888
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number M-M04
Division 02
IN RE": ESTATE OF
RECHA MALTNOWSKI
a-k-a RENA MALTNOWSKI,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of RECHA MAI.INOWSKI a-k-a
RENA MALINOWSKI, deceased.
File Number 84-6604, la pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL. CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 28,1884.
Personal Representative:
K. SHELLY PORGES
420 East 72nd Street, Apt. 4C
New York, New York 10021
HENRY NORTON
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
Suite 1201.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida, 33130
Telephone 374-3116
18838 December 28,1984;
January*, 1988
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT UN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No. 84-47243
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
OF MIAMI, a United States
corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
DOUGLAS MONTIEL and
MARITZA MONTIEL. his wife; v
SOUTHEAST BANK. N.A.; and
UNKNOWN TENANT.
Defendants.
TO: DOUGLAS MONTIEL and
MARITZA MONTIEL, his wife
Residence: Unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
DADE County, Florida: Lot 23, in
Block 38. of PART BI. EIGHTH
ADDITION TO CALUSA CLUB
ESTATES, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded In Plat Book
108, at Page 81, of the Public
Records of Dade County, Florida
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to It
on Keith, Mack, Lewis and Allison,
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose ad-
dress Is 111 N.E. 1st Street. Miami,
Florida 33132, on or before
February 1, 1886, and file the ori-
ginal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately there-
after; otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 21 day of
December. 1884.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk of said Court
By: S.BOBES
as Deputy Clerk
18844 December 28. 1884;
January 4,11, 13, 1886
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name E.M.I. Com-
mercial Products at 12280 S.W. 131
Avenue. Miami, Florida, 33186.
Intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Abramson A Lapldus, P.A.
1320 South Dixie Hwy.
Suite 280
Coral Gables. Florida 33146
(308)667-3888
BENNET LAPIDUS. ESQUIRE
Attorney for
Robert Friedman Associates, Inc.
a Florida Corporation
1675 Bridgewood Drive
Boca Raton, Florida 33434
18848 January 4. 11, 18. 26. 1886
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, dealrtng to
engage In business under the
fictitious name Handy Home
Center at 18824 N.W. 7th Avenue,
Miami. Florida Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Associated Hardware
Investment Corporation
18610 December 14, 21, 28,1884
January 4,1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. S4-4S282
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
' OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
AMANDA BAILLARGEON
Petitioner Wife,
and
PAUL BAILLARGEON.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: Paul Balllargeon
Residence and mailing
address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are reDHqulred to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to It on GEORGE
T. RAMANI, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la 711
Blscayne Bldg.. 18 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
January 11th, 1888; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 7th day of December. 1884.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI. ESQ.
711 Blscayne Bldg,
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida33130
Telephone: (308) 374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
18807 December 14, 21. 28, 1984;
Janaury_______4._______1086______
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-5440
Division 02
Bar No. 041120
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HENRY DWECK,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HENRY DWECK, deceased.
File Number 84-8660. is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
AU Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE. (1) aU claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 28,1984.
Personal Representative:
FANNY VELEZ
1530 West 22nd Street
Sunset Island No. 4
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LEONARD J. KALISH
Suite 100, Dadeland Towers South
9400 South Dadeland Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33156
Telephone: (305) 666-7601
18539 December 28. 1984:
January 4,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name VIMACAR CORP,
INC. at 4381 S.W. 13 Terr. Miami.
Fla 33124 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
JoseM. Diaz
4381 8W 13 Terr.
Miami. Fl. 33124
18521 December 21. 28. 1984;
Janiiarv4.11. 1985
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 84-4S2S1
IN RE: The Marriage of:
NAOMI PERDOMO.
Petitioner-Wife.
and
EDUARDO PERDOMO.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: EDUARDO PERDOMO.
Residence unknown,
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of Mar-
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida. 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or be-
fore January ll. 1988, otherwise a
default will be entered.
December 7.1984.
RICHARD BRIN KER
By: H. Sotolongo
18515 December 14. 21. 28.1884
January 4.1988


Page 10-b '"fatHm\
Public Notices
iruari 4 "lss5
NOTICEOF ACTION
COWSTRuCTlrfE SEIVKE
no MOftrrr,
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUD4CIA4.
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FM OAOE COUNTY
Ov* AOa He B* Wg
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMAIIIMf
Fkare br N* 34*27$
IN RE THE MARRIAGE or
carlo* Catalan
p
NANCY E ALVAREZ-
' AZARES
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
mmca u mn
"TV
a.- a
SKnura. Ser ivies a: ":
toMl HNucAf. rm. nni
V.
Ott of i
CkMt
TO
IXMUI
La Green. Chi^e
:'-. AIM]
TOC ARE HEREBTSCmfin Highway
toss ac action tor DtaeoajUoa ot p-v^rt-la
Ims keen n< egSUSI
you Art r^Urt< toj
serve a copy of your UUeu
dtfe&aea a any to It on A KOBE.
ATTOR.NET AT LAW. Attorney
tor Petitioner whose address la 101
N. W lath Avii. Miami. Ftor
tat. And fite the ongttal with tnei
dark of the above styled court oc
January 11. if
otherwise a default will be entered*
against you (or the relief
a the eosnpkunt
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE a HEREBY GIVEN
that the unrhrsfcjind iMaliHit to
engage ic In iii aider the
fW-QMrni it Bayahore Coo-
a.w.r" Chataf *: IMH L-jc*
North Miami Beach.
Florida awiinl to register said
name with the Clark of the Czrcntt
Court of Dad* County Florida
Medical Resource
Development Corp
1AS4G December 28 ike*
January 4. 11 1A IBM
Tina notice shall be DubUanedJ
see each week tor tour e
utlve weeks la THE JEWISH
FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami Florida on
OOi day of December 1*44
RICHARD P BRISKER
Aa Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
T CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
'Circuit Court Seal;
A KOBE ATTORNEY AT LAW
PA
Attorney! tor Petitioner
101 N W 12th Avenue
Florida a 128
Telephone '300 325-8844
1AB12 December 14.21.36 19**
__________ January 4 19SM
INTMECIRCUUlT COURT I
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO S4 sm
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
.: RE The Marriage -.!
MADELINE CHERFILS.
Wife-PetlUoner
and
AUGLST CHERFILS.
Husband-Respondent
TO AUGUST CHERFILS
c-o Dept de la Justice
Port Au Prince. Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTTFIEDl
to file your Answer or other plead-
ing; to the Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage with the Courts Clerk,
and mall a copy of same to Peti-
tioner a Attorney. THEODORE
USHER. ESQ.. 210 Blscayne
Bldg 19 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida S3130. on or before
the 11 of January. 11*5 else Peti-
tion will be taken aa confessed.
DATED this 7 day of Decem
oer. ISM
RICHARD P BRISKER. Clerk
Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
By H Sotolongo
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OK
THEODORE FISHER
Attorney for Petitioner
2l Blscayne Building
10 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida33130
Telephone I 3001 374-5191
BY THEODORE FISHER
1850* December 14. 21, 28.1984
January 4. 19851
4
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 64-4JI40
FLA. BAR NO.02SO2*
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE. The Marriage of
MAR IE TH ERE8E COLBY.
Wife-Petitioner
and
A8HTON COLBY,
Husband Rpapamt
TO: ASHTONCOLBY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTTFIE
to file your pleading to the Petition of Mar '
rtage with the Court's Clerk, andt
mall a copy of same to Petitioner's
Attorney, THEOOORE FISHER.
ESQ.. 0090 Blscayne Blvd.. No. 101.
Confer Life Ins. Bldg.. Miami,
Fla. 34130. on or before me 11 of
January. 1985. else Petition will tx
taken as confessed.
DATED this 7 day Of December
7,1984
RICHARD P BRINKER, Clerk
Circuit Court Dade
County. Florida
By: H Sotolongo
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF
THEODORE FISHER
Attorney for Wife Petitioner.
5OS0 Blscayne Blvd No. 10.
Conger Life Ins Bl f.
Malml. Florida Ml jr
Telephone. (306, 708-9023
BY THEODORE FISHER
18508 December 14. 21.28, 198
I January 4.198i
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOR DAOC COUNTY
Civil ACTMM Ne. 84-47M7
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE The marriage of
DLANA PATRICIA CANNADY.
Wtfe
and
ROBERT CANNADY Husband
TO Mr Robert Osztnady
Residence U nknown .
TOC ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition tor Dissolution of
Mrr;ag* has been died and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on Arthur H Lipson. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la 801
N E i7th Street North Miami
Beach Suite 112 Florida 33142 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
February 1st. 1986 otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed for In the
complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 21 day of December. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
By CLARINOA BROW N
As Deputy Clerk
' Circuit Court Seal I
18043 December 28 1984
January 4. 11. 18. 1980
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 14-104J4
Division 04
OI RE ESTATE OF
THELMA SAMET
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of THELMA SAMET. deceased.
FUe Number 84-10434. Upending In
the Circuit Court for DADE
County. Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 The names and addresses of
the personal representative and
the personal presentatlve's at-
torney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with "his court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE Hi all claims
against the estate and '2, any
objection by an Interested person
to whom this notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 28. 1984
Personal Representative:
ALVIN M SAMET
2780S.W. 30th Ave.
Miami. Florida 33133
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMANP GLABUT-------
GALBUT. GALBUT MEN IN.
P.A.
999 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida SUM
Telephone: 073-3100
18845 December 38.1984
January 4. 1988
INTHC CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
CMAcres Ne es-esjH
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMAIIIA6C
IN RE THE MAR?-A 3E CF
GLADYS URREa
Pecaonrr-wae
and
OMAR URREa
P.i spandiaS-lnakwas
TO OMAR URREA
Residence
that ac a-ttaar. for
Marr-age .--as i**r. fi>2 ar_-s-
you and you are reouired serve a
copy of your wrmec dele
any. to rt on ARMANDO]
GUTIERREZ attorney fcr
Petmcoer whose address is 21 S3
Coral Way Sun* M. Hxasbx
Florida 13148 and SJ* the or-g-rn.
with the clerk of ale abort scried,
court oa or before January 18th.
1MB otherwise a default win he
at ami against you for the rebef]
demanded hi the cotnaiatnt
petition
This nooce shall be
once each week for four
utlve weeks hi THE JEW IS
FLO RID UN
NOTICE UNOEI
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE E HEREBY OTTER
iestrtr-g to
Jot." BM
S Z ARTHUR
CKA3- s: SMI N W SBtfe Avenue
Ma.-. r,:-ii3-nc-7-r aMWBIi
rtfjur sajd asat wrtE aie Ork
-t _-* C-jessE Cwarl -.'. Z+de
Os-.i Floods
HERN AND EZ- MCG EE HAN
CORPCRATTON
a Flonde. corpora aoc
By James F Hss=ab. Pressdec:
DiBARTOLOMEO A DlflAR
TOLOMEC
- ;: a=:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOmr ** ^-"- P-^*i Ma.-: FU D"J
:-ec=!>err 28 1*84
.-..:: 19M
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
IN ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIOA
CaseNe a4~4MS*FC
^i RE THE MARRIAGE OF
maria b 3-jnzales acosta
m.apjo alberto acosta
fTO Mario Alberto Acosta
Resadt-c* laaevr.
TOL" ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
file your Answer or other
to the Petition tor
of Marriage with the
iOMs CSerk and mail a copy of
-same to Pessoner t Attorney
ELLIOT L MILLER. 923 Arthur
WITNESS my band asd the sea- iQattJnry Road. Suite
of said court at Miami Florida 00!^^ r^n,, ^ hmlon ^ 10
[day of January 1MB or else
iPettuor:-I be takes as confessed.
i DATED this 10 day of December
11984
Richard P Bnnker.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By T CASAMAYOR
December 14. a. 28.1984
January 4 1980
this IT day of December 1984.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
By J Byron
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal
ARMANDO GUTTERREZ
Esquire
Attorney for Penooner
2153 Coral Way. Suite 400
Miami Florida 33146
Telephone 308-0444
18532 December 21 36
January4.11.
18011
1984
liei
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Cast No. 84-44104 F.C.
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 34*014
In re the marriage of
LIONEL SPRINGER
Petitioner
and
ILIETH SPRINGER
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO Llleth Springer
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve s copy of
your written defenses upon I. J
GRAFF. ESQ attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 833
N E l<7 St North Miami Beach.
Florida 33182. on or before
January 11 1986 and file the
original with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you
Dated December5. 1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
18502 December 14 21.28.1984.
January 4,1985
H
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engaage In business under the fic-
titious name Custom Research at|
number 00M o.W. 71 Place, in the
City of Miami, Florida. Intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 10
.4 of December, IBM.
Phyllis Levy
5059 S.W 71 Place
Miami. Florida 33156
Owner
Attorney for Applicant
JAY M. GOTTLIEB. ESQ.
P.O. Box 431214
Miami. Florida 33243
18541 December 28.19M
January*. 11.18,1980
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
Civil Action No. M-48314
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 343081
In Re: The Marriage of
JOSEPH PIERRE.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
JULIANA JOSEPH PIERRE.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: Juliana Joseph Pierre
Rue La Porte
Gonalves. Haiti. West Indies
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Maniage has been Bled against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of- your written defenses, if
any. to It on BRENT E. ROUT-
MAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address U 181 N.E. 82nd
Street. Miami. Florida 33138. and
file the original with the Clerk of
the above-styled Court on or before
January 18. IBM; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 14th day of December. 19M.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
H. SOTOLONGO
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal a
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
181 NE 82nd Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Telephone: (300)707-5800
18028 December 21.28. 1984;
January*. 11.1986jj
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(Ne Property)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action Ne. 84-47144
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
Florida Bar No 215'53
IN RE The Marriage of
JEAN-CLAUDE CETOUTE
Petitioner-Husband.
and
ALTAGRACE LOUVERTURE
CETOUTE
Respondent-Wife
TO Altagrace Louverture Cetoute
Rue Guerner No 50
St Michel de L Attalaye
Haiti. W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to It on LLOYD M. ROUT-
NAM, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 161 N E 82nd
Street. Miami Florida 33138. and
file the original with the Clerk of
the above-styled Court on or before
January 25 1986 otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
Petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Dade
County. Florida on this 24th day of
December. 1964
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Laverr, McQuay
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal 1
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
181 N.E 82nd Street
Miami. Florida 33136
Telephone: I305i 757-5800
18546 December 28. 1984 ;
January 4. 11. 18.1986
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil A Con N*. 84-4740*
FAMILY DIVISION
X RE The Marriage of
EDGARD JOSE
GONZALEZ
PeOOoner.
and
TOLANDA GONZALEZ.
Respondent
TO Yolanda Gonzalez
88-15 Dongar. Avenue
Apt No 4-A
bsshurs". NY 11372
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution oft
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses. If
ar.y to lr. to HELMS J ASHER
ESQ attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is I860 S W 8th
Street Suite 208. Hiaml. FL 33136.
and file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 1 1989 otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded fat the
complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami Florida on
this 27th day of December 1984
RICHARD P BRISKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWS
As Deputy Clerk
< Circuit Court Seal 1
18560 January 4.11. 18,28.1965
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE No 14-44517
Florida Bar No 07 so 24
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
IN RE The Marriage of
GEORGE REYNOLDS,
Husband- Petitioner
and
EVELYN REYNOLDS.
Wife-Respondent
TO Evelyn Reynolds
1645 Racine St.
Racine. Wisconsin
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
to file your Answer or other
pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mall a copy of
same to Petioners Attornev
THEODORE FISHER. ESQ., 5050
Blscayne Blvd.. No 101. Conger
Life Ins Bldg. Miami. Florida
33137. on or before the 25th of
January. 1965. else Petition will be
taken as confessed.
DATED this 18th day of
December. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
CLARINDA BROW N
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF THEODORE
FISHER
Attorney for Husband-Petitioner
5050 Blscayne aivd No. 101
Conger Life Ins Bldg .
Miami. Florida 33137
Telephone (305.758-9523
16534 December 21. 28. 1984
__________________Janaary4.il. 198?
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(Ne Property, '
INTHE CIRCUITCOORTOfi
THE ELEVENTH JUDlCli^
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FlORIDi
Civil Action Ne 84-443U
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION I
OF MARRIAGE '
Florida Bar No Ulotl
In Re The Marriage of
BERNADETTE JOCELENF
ST JUSTE.
Petitioner Wife
and
ALE SAS DRE CLAMA RT
ST JUSTE
Respondent Husband
TO' Alexandre Clarr.ar.
St. Juste
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIF
that an action for Dissolution]
Marriage has been filed ajah
you and you are required to sen
copy of your written defenses j
any. to It on BRENT E Rov\
MAN attorney for Petit]
whose address is 161 N E
Street Miami. Florida 33138.1
file the original with the Clerk j
the above-styled Court on or beta
January 18. 1986. otherwise
default will be entered against v
for the relief demanded in
Petition.
This notice shall be publl
once each week for four co
utlve weeks m THE JsTRgs
FLORIDDVN
WITNESS my hand and the ml
of said court at Miami. Florid* a
this 14th day of December. 1984
RICHARD P BRISKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
H. SOTOLONGO
As Deputy Clerk
1 Circuit Court Seal 1
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
181 NE 82ndStreet
Miami. Florida33138
Telephone: 1300)757-6800
18527 December 21. 28. 1Wi|
'nuar> 4 11 II
B]
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name SOPHIA
FASHIONS, INC. at 238 N Miami
Avenue. Miami Fl. 33183 Intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Reglna Lacayo
6743 SW 92 Ave.
Miami. Fl. 33173
18020 December 31. 38.1984;
______________January*. 11. IBM
t.r.'-^ r.f ,*****'
...... aeiawissHSw
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name PETER PAN
TRAVEL at 12156 Blscayne
Boulevard. Miami, Dade County.
Florida. Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
EXODUSTOURS.Inc..
A Florida corp.
By: Michael Stolowltzky
President
BARRY C. FLEISHER. Esq
Attorney for EXODUS TOURS.
INC.
18617 December 1*. 21. 38.1984
January 4.19* :M
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84 15159
NOTICE
BYPUBICATION
Florida Bar No. 17*402
IN RE: The Marriage of.
LOU IS ANNE FRANCOIS
Petitioner
and
INAKI FRANCOIS.
Respondent.
TO: Inakl Francois
6310 N.W. 6th Avenue
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed and
commenced in this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on Lawrence b. lerner,
ESQ.. attorney for PeUt loner
whose address Is 1100 Kane Con
course, Suite 400. Bay Harbor
Islands. Florida 33164. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before January
11.1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week tor four consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 7th day of December. 1984* ft
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Barbara Perez
Aa Deputy Clerk
1 Circuit Court Seal 1
Attorney tor Petitioner:
LAWRENCE B. LERNER. ESQ.
1160 Kane Concourse. Suite 400
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 33164
Telephone: (306) 864-9934
18506 December 14,21, 38, 1984;
January 4.1BS6
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT0
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action Ne. a.4S40t
IN" RE THE MARRIAGE OF
ELIZABETH COLLIER
Peutioner-Wlfe _
and
KENNETH F. COLLIER
Respondent-Husband
TO: Kenneth F. Collier
c-o Spotlight Magazine
300 Independence Avenue
Washington. DC 20005
YOU ARE HEREBY N0TIFIC|
that an action for Dissolution
Marriage has been filed agait
you and you are required
serve a copy of your wrltt
defenses, if any. to it on MICHA
J ALMAN. attorney fort"
Petitioner, whose address is Ml
Washington Avenue. Miam.H
Beach. Florida 33139. and die UB
original with the clerk of ti-.e abovtfl
styled court on or before Januanfl
11. 1985. otherwise a default willbt|
entered against you for the rellei
demanded In the complaint 01.
petition.
This notice shall be publish**
once each week for four consecj
utive weeks In THE JEW
FLORIDLAN
W ITNLSS my hand and the
of said court at Miami, Florid!
this 10th day December. 19M
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
J.BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal 1
MICHAEL J. ALMAN, ESQ
GALBUT. GALBUT A MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (3051672-3100 A'8m
18514 December 14. 21.28. lrS; _
______________________fnimry 4, 19M
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CaseNo.M-4430SF.C.
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR NMII
In re the marriage of
W1LBERT C. DAMUS
Petitioner
and
THERESE GEDEON DAMUS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Therese Gedeon Dam us
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that sn
action for dissolution of marriag
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I, J
GRAFF. ESQ. attorney M';
Petitioner, whose address Is wl
N.E. 187 St. North Miami Beach.
Florida 33163. on or before
January 11. 1986, and file IM I
original with the clerk of this court .
otherwise a default will be entereO rf
against you.
Dated: December6,1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
18801 December 1*. 31. 28, lW|
January* 19J
W A" S~V..... .


Grossman Joins
Riverside in WPB
Henry Grossman has been ap-
ointed community relations
jnsultant for Riverside
(emorial Chapels in Palm Beach
ounty. Riverside president
lfred Golden has announced.
Jrossman will work with William
Saulson, vice president, and
jlian Almeida, manager of the
liverside West Palm Beach
.pal.
A 35-year veteran of the New
fork City school system as
acher, counselor, and principal,
Sssman has continued his
iblic service as a civilian vol-
iteer with the Israel Defense
force, from which he has recently
^turned.
He founded the Community
Relations Committee of the
ewish Federation of Palm Beach
aunty. His Jewish communal
ctivities include positions as
sard member of the Jewish
Community Day School, the
Jewish Federation of Palm Beach
County, and the Community
Action Council. He is president of
his condominium association, a
member of the board of the
Education Foundation of Palm
Beach County, a member of B'nai
B'rith and the American Jewish
Committee, co-chair of the
Federation-UJA campaign for
Century Village, a member of the
board of Cen-Tech, and an ad-
viser to the Palm Beach Board of
Education.
Golden welcomed Grossman on
behalf of Riverside's officers and
staff, saying, "Henry Grossman
exemplifies the spirit of com-
munal service that motivates our
people. He will assist us in caring
for families at need, in fuller
participation in Jewish affairs,
and will be available to address a
variety of topics through the
Riverside speakers bureau."
Beth Sholom: Dr. Kmines
On Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Dr.
rscar Kraines, former professor
law at NYU and Zionist ac-
|vist, will address Temple Beth
tiolom's "Coffee, Culture and
snversation" series at the
fm pie.
Kraines is the author of articles
Rare, Used
Book Sale
The Miami Beach Book Fair
rill be held at the Marco Polo
lotel Jan. 18 and 19. Out-of-
rint, unusual and rare books will
I displayed by dealers, and early
iime novels" now sold for much
bore than ten cents will be
atured. Visitors' books may be
upraised at an evaluation booth.
Art Auction
Oi. 2 Extends
| WPBT, Channel 2, has added a
th day to the fine art and
ltique portion of its annual
^ndraising auction. The auction
Hair Jan. 23-27.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
.Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
on American and Israel con-
stitutional law and the author of
books on modern Israel and 16th
century Germany. His topic
Sunday will be "Judaism on
Trial: Germany 1769," according
to Rabbi Harry Jolt, auxiliary
rabbi in charge of the adult
education series.
Gordon on Senate
Committees
State Senator Jack Gordon
(D., Miami Beach), reelected to a
four-year term in 1984, was
named chair of the Senate Trans-
portation Committee, where
Metrorail financing is expected to
be a topic in the spring legislative
session. Gordon was also ap-
pointed to membership in the
Appropriations, Commerce,
Health and Rehabilitative Serv-
ices, and Rules and Calendar
committees.
kK
urj 0o<*
&*
*V
a e t t a d 6
$*&
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel. 261-7612
Rabbi Mordechai Hal per in
Jewish Law
in Medicine
Rabbi Mordechai Halperin, di-
rector of the Dr. Falk Schlesinger
Institute for Medical-Halachic
Research at the Shaare Zedek
Medical Center in Jerusalem, will
address an audience of rabbis and
doctors on Jan. 6, 10 a.m., at
Temple Moses.
Rabbi Halperin, who is also a
medical doctor and a Ph.D., lec-
tures on medicine and halacha
(Jewish law) at the Hebrew Uni-
versity Medical School in Jeru-
salem.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
7610 Northeast 2nd Avenue
Phone 759-1669
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN".
LARRIE S. BLASBERG MICHAEL C. BLASBERG
FUNERAL DIRECTOR
.Past President Jewish Funeral
Directors of America
720 SEVENTY-FIRST STREET
865-2353
Funeral Director
MIAMI BEACH FLORIDA 3314 '
Friday, January 4,1985 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
BRENNER, Joseph, 71, of North Miami
Beach. Services Dec. 24.
FELDMAN, Harry, formerly of North
Miami Beach. Services Dec. 26. Rubin
Zllbert.
SCHNEIDER, Mlchele Susan, of Miami
Beach. Services Dec. 28. Blasberg.
SOLOMON, George. 87, of North Miami
Beach. Services Dec. 24. Riverside.
AUERBACH. Bertha, of North Miami
Beach. Services Dec. 27. Riverside.
BANK, Sheldon, 56, of Miami. Services
Dec. 27. Gordon. Star of David.
KORNBLUTH, David, of North Miami
Beach. Services were held. Rubln-Zll-
bert.
WOLF, Philip. 88. of Bal Harbour. Serv-
ices Dec. 31.
COHEN, Ralph L.. of Miami Beach.
Services were held.
GOLDSEGER. Mrs. Goldle. Services
Dec. 31. Rubln-Zllbert.
GROSSMAN. Roslyn A., of Miami
Beach. Services Jan. 2. Riverside.
TANENBAUM, Joan P.. 46. of Bal Har-
bour. Services Jan. 2. Riverside.
WISSER, Arnold (ArtieI. 70, of North
Miami Beach. Services Jan. 2. River-
side.
Obituaries
MERTNGOFF, Mrs. Bertha Yvonne.
Services Dec. 27.
NOBLE, Jacob B.. 69, of Aventura.
Services Dec. 28.
GALLAS, Florence, of Miami. Services
Dec. 28.
FRUITSTONE, Ruth E.. 66. of Coral
Gables. Services Dec. 28. Riverside.
GLEIZER, Abraham I., of North Miami
Beach. Services Dec. 28. Rubln-Zllbert.
HAFTEL, Helene, of Miami Beach.
Services were held. Blasberg.
HILL, Judith Ann, 36, of North Miami
Beach. Services Dec. 30. Riverside.
MARGOLIUS, Hans. 82. of Miami.
Services Dec. 30. Gordon. Mt. Nebo.
IVONE, Rose. 84. of Miami Beach.
Services Dec. 31. Blasberg.
SUSS. Sidney, 78. of Miami. Services
Dec. 30. Riverside. Star of David.
SILBERMAN. Alan M 35. Services
were held.
GOLDBERG, Charles, of Miami Beach.
Services Jan. 2. Rubln-Zllbert. Mt.
Nebo.
Secured Family Protection
Pre-Arranged Funeral Plan
gOBDON
TUNEML HOyvlE
Serving The Jewish Community Since 1938
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130
Phone: 858-5566
James B. Gordon, F.D.
Ike Gordon, F. D.
Harvey Gordon, F.D.
Allan Brestin, F.D.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel. Inc.
New York rf-'iJ) 21.1-70OO Quoins Blvd eV"MhKd..Fii*lHill*.N.Y
Our prices
are always
up to 25% less.
As a result, the following
is a complete list
of the services we do
not include:
l.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Sinai &
Funeral Home. Inc.
Orthodox Conservative Reform
100 South Dixie Hihway/Hallandale/456-3900
Serving Broward and surrounding counties


Pgel2-B The Jewish Floridijm Friday. Jnn^v 41
NO OTHER
COUNTRYOflM
MAKE
THIS OFFER.
JERUSALEM. FOR 6 DAYS.
Or Tel Aviv Choose one. Only Israel offers the timelessness of
Jerusalem. And the pulsating excitement of Tel Aviv. But vou must
fly now. An offer this good won't last forever.
Until February 28,1985 El Al Israel Airlines gives you its
"Sunsation" vacation package to Israel. lockage price includes
round trip airfare from Miami, six days/five nights in a first class
hotel, including breakfast and a Hertz Rent-A-Car for five days.
And El Al is the only airline that flies direct from Miami to TelAviv.
Choose from the Basel Group Hotels, or for an extra $100, the
deluxe Laromme Jerusalem Hotel, the Tel Aviv or Jerusalem Hilton.
You can alwavs add extra days. (lockage not available 12/14/84 thru
1/5/85.)
$111.* ELAL GIVES YOU EILAI
Just $111 and we'll give you round trip airfare from Tel Aviv
to the beautiful Red Sea resort of EUat.
Plus three nights at the fabulous Laromme Hotel. We also
include two sumptuous buffet breakfasts and one delicious conti-
nental breakfast. Plus a complimentary drink on arrival. This spe-
cial package is available thru March 15,1985. (Not available 1224 M
thru 15 85.) The deluxe Sonesta Hotel is also available tor $144.
$249* ISRAEL AND CAIRO.
An El Al exclusive thru March 15,1985. Now the airline of
Israel Hies vou round trio from Tel Aviv to Cairo to spend three fab-
ulous days in Egypt at the beautiful Ramses Hilton. All for onlv
This package also includes being met at the airport bv English
speaking representatives and transfer to and from the Ramses.
Now you can have it all. Israel and Cairo in one magical trip.
Only Israel and El Al can make these offers, but onlv for a
limited time. Don't miss out, call tcxiav.
For more information call your travel agent or El Al toll free at
I For a free, detailed color brochure on our packages, write El Al
Israel Airlines, Tour Bnxrhure, PO. Box 10777, Long Island Citv,
New York 11101.
Name
Address.
City____
-. State.
Zip
L_
The airline of Israel.
A
m
;
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