The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02917

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement.. .Special Insert
Three Sections Miami, FloridaFriday, December 28,1984
By Mii BO Cents
Price 50 Cents
'84 Top Ten Stories
Featured Violence
'"ome. my fellow Arnbs! There s so much space on lop!"
mlomo Hillel
What Being Knesset's
New Speaker Means
B> SIMON DRIVER
ibeing elected Speaker of the
iventh Knesset Shlomo Hillel
nodes iver a parliament that
mbodies the realization of
vish *pirations for self-
teermiiiui ion through demo-
filic principles. This crucial
Bition crowns a career that
passes a lifeiong dedication
othe w11! being of his people.
Iraiji horn Hillel is a seasoned
rliarrn-'-.tarian who among
rous other things has
ned in Israel's cabinet on two
tcasion-.. developed Israel's ties
"l several African nations as a
*ign office diplomat, and
piperviMti the exodus of tens of
Continued on Page 8-A
MK Speaker Hillel
NEW YORK Anti-
Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith has issued its
annua** listing of the "10
most significant events af-
fecting Jews and demo-
cracy."
Among the international
events were the escalation of
terrorism that com the lift ol
I ndii a < iandhi, the choking off of
Jewish emigration from the
So\ iet Union, the airlift rescue oi
Ethiopian -lews to Israel, and the
ballot box revolution in
Argentina.
AMONG THE domestic
events cited were the lessons of
Jesse Jackson's candidacy in the
American elections, the lowering
of the wall separating church and
state, and the dwindling
following of the Ku Klux Klan.
Following is the ADL's full
listing.
The elections in the United
States and in Israel not so
much because of who the winners
and losers were, but because still
again democracy resonantly
attested to its own vitality.
Terrorism, fueled by both
political and religious fanaticism.
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher barely escaped death,
Prime Minister Indira Gandhi
didn't. Nor did Americans in
Beirut and Tehran and in the
blood-stained byways of in-
ternational terrorists. For the
most part, democracies boldly
wrung their hands.
In the Soviet Union, the
Continued on Page 14-A
BRITAIN'S PRIME MINISTER Margaret Thatcher narrowly
overted assassination in 1984. India's Indira Gandhi was less lucky.
41 Jewish Families
Reported to Have
Received Exit Visas
\Beautiful Geneva
Today, A City of Sheikhs, Oilionaires
By TAMAR LEVY
, GEN EVA (JTA) -
Geneva, the beautiful city
ln the Lake, home of the
*ague of Nations and now
Jjuropean headquarters of
R United Nations, has be-
Jme the favorite haunt of
althy Arabs, so much so
that many tourists com-
plain they don't feel they
are in Switzerland but in
some Middle Eastern city.
The influx of sheikhs, princes
and kings, mainly from the oil-
producing Gulf states, is greeted
with mixed feelings here. Many
Genevans say they no longer feel
at home in their native city. But
merchants and bankers are
delighted. The rich Arabs are
lavish spenders. They squirrel
away their money in numbered
bank accounts and have opened a
dozen Arab banks and some 50
financial institutions in Geneva.
THEY OPEN other offices,
send their children to Swiss
Continued on Page 8-A
NEW YORK (JTA) -
At least 10 Soviet Jewish
families from Moscow, all
long-term refuseniks, have
received exit visas to Israel,
the National Conference on
Soviet Jewry has reported.
The news, which the NCSJ
said it sees as a "small but signi-
ficant reversal in annual emigra-
tion trends," marks only the
second time in over eight months
that Jews from the Soviet capital
were granted permission to
emigrate. The first visas issued in
that city came in November,
when 12 Muscovite Jews were
permitted to leave.
Included in the report, and be-
ing confirmed by the NCSJ, is
news that an additional 30 fami-
lies from Tbilisi and one family
from Kaunus, in Lithuania, have
also received exit permits. AU are
long-term refuseniks, who have
sought emigration to Israel for
more than eight years.
Although the identities and the
size of each family are unknown
at this time, the NCSJ noted that
the total number could well
surpass the monthly emigration
average of 73 which has distin-
guished 1984 as the "worst year
for emigration in nearly 20
years." To date, only 805 Soviet
Jews have been permitted to
emigrate to Israel.
A spokesperson for the NCSJ
suggested that the "sudden
increase, most welcome by those
involved, may be intended as a
gesture of good will by the
Soviets" in advance of the meet-
ings scheduled for January
between Secretary of State
George Shultz and Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko. He added it is "hope-
fully the first step in a trend
which will continue well beyond
those sessions."
time to End Myth
Israel Was Not Created by UNationsRosenne
Washington -
Faeli Ambassador Meir
osenne declared here last
* that it is time to end
f* myth that Israel was
p*d by the United
rations.
Speaking before the closing
session of the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America's annual conven-
tion, Rosenne said that, in 1948.
five Arab countries invaded
Israel, and not one member of the
United Nations came to the aid of
Israel.
"ISRAEL WAS created by the
Jewish boys who gave their
lives," Rosenne said. The ZOA is
an 87-year-old organization with
more than 120,000 members
nationwide. Rosenne delivered
his remarks before a capacity
crowd at the Mayflower Hotel
here.
Also at the dinner a message
was read from President Reagan
to ZOA, and the Justice Louis D.
Brandeis Award was presented to
Abe Katz, philanthropist and
Continued on Page 12- A
Ambassador Rosenne


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 28,1984
Reaganites Say
Direct Talks Best Road to Peace
?>

By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration maintains
that the best way to
achieve peace in the Middle
East is through direct talks
between Israel and the
Arabs rather than the
international conference
called for in a join com-
munique by King Hussein
of Jordan" and President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt.
"We don't believe that such an
international conference will lead
to productive results," State
Department deputy spokesman
Man Romberg said. He said the
U.S. feels that the "most prac-
tical course is direct negotiating
between Israel and the Arab par-
ties concerned as envisioned by
the Camp David process
THE JOIST communique.
issued simultaneously in Cairo
and Amman after three days of
talks between Hussein and
Mubarak in Cairo, called for an
international conference under
the auspices of the United
Nations attended by "all parties
concerned, including the PLO."
Presumably. Richard Murphy.
Assistant Secretary of State for
Near Eastern and South Asian
Affairs, discussed this develop-
ment when he traveled the
Middle East earlier thi? month.
Hussein, in a speech to the Egyp-
tian Parliament, denounced the
("amp David agreements, while
Mubara. in his reply, made no
mention of them
The State Department
that in its view this meant th.it
Egypt Is "fully supportive of the
Camp David process
AS IS customary, largely for
security reasons. Romberg did
not give Murphy s itinerary. He
also did not outline the issues
Murphy plans to discuss, except
that of south Lebanon.
However, Romberg stressed
that while the U.S. wants to "be
helpful where we can" in the
current Israeli-Lebanese negotia-
tions for the withdrawal of Israeli
troops from south I U.S. is not a participant in the
negotiations and is not acting as
a mediator. Romberg denied
reports that Murphy is taking on
some of the role of a special
Mideast negotiator and will bo
more actively involved in the
negotiation- than he was on his
recent four-week fact-finding"
trip to the Middle i
Mi anwhile, Secretarj ol State
George Shultz and 1st
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
met in New York recently lor
bilateral discussions, after both
received honorary degrees from
Yeshiva I niversity.
*
Hebrew I niversity of Jerusalem President Don PatinkiniH
and Sam uel Rothberg flunk picture of Golda M, i> at cenmonk
during which the first Golda Meir Fellowship ardeda
the Hebrt w University in Jerusalem. Rothbt 'nationi
chairman of the Golda Meir Fellowship Fund
Charred Remains of 15 Rare
Torahs Interred on Mount of Olivej
ADL Leaders and Members Demonstrate
Against Apartheid in South Africa
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Braving a cold rain and
carrying placards denounc-
ing apartheid, more than 20
leaders and members of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith demonstrated
across from the South
African Consulate on Park
Avenue in Manhattan.
Among the demonstrators
were Kenneth Bialkin. the ADL's
national chairman; Nathan Perl-
mutter, national director:
Abraham Foxman. associate
national director: and Gary
Zaslab. chairman of the ADL's
New York regional board. The
demonstrators carried signs
reading "Freedom and Human
Dignity Knd Apartheid Now''
and Apartheid Denies Liberty '
The vigil and demonstration
began with the lighting of three
candles on a large menorah.
marking the second day of
Chanukah. In a written state-
ment issued at the demonstra-
tion. Bialkin and Perlmutter
said:
"No government can in truth
call itself free and democratic
while at the same time denying
millions of its citizens the basic
freedoms of a democracy. Yet.
this is the condition that exists
today in South Africa where
Black citizens are not accorded
the rights which we who live in
democratic societies take for
granted.
"We call on the Pretoria gov-
ernment to immediately begin
the implementation of substan-
tive, rather than cosmetic,
changes that will see its system
of racial separation dismantled
We are under no illusions about
this being an organized process.
but the transition toward a
change in which all South
Africans will have a voice in their
country's internal and external
affairs should begin in earnest."
The demonstration. which
lasted about 40 minutes, was
concluded without incident. A
large force of police was on hand
to maintain order.
Bj DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM IJTAI In
a rare and solemn ceremony
attended by thousands. 16
charrred and ruined Torah scrolls
were laid to rest on the Mount of
Olives Sunday. The scrolls were
destroyed in a fire before dawn
last Friday at the synagogue on
Mt. Zion. part of the facilities of
the Diaspora Yeshiva there.
Police have no firm clues to the
blaze. But the fact that damage
was caused to another Jerusalem
synagogue, the Rambam Syna-
gogue in the Old City, at the
precise same time, naturally has
given rise to suspicions of arson.
Among the scrolls lost on Mt.
Zion was an ancient Torah
reputedly bel ;hefan
German med Jar, I
Meir of Kothenburg
Mayor Teddy Kollek. whopij
sented a new sen II to theyesh
in replacement of a burnt ou
said there could be no levelling!
accusations unti firm eviden
was available All people of go
will were saddened by til
tragedy, the mayor said, bo|
Jews and Gentiles
Other mourners included iS
two chief rabbis. Deputy Premij
and Education and Cult in
Minister Yitzhak Savon (Laboj
Minister-Without Portfolio Yo
Shapira (Morasha), Kness
members, and religious and
leaders.
S
I
c
V
I
s
I
i
Temple Beth Sholom presents
Matt Haimovitz
Cellist
AVery Special
Concert
With Stephen Lazarus, P
Saturday,
January 5 at 8:00 pm
In the temple Sanctuary
4144Chase Avenue, Miami Beach
The 14 year old prodigv performs in
Miami lor the first time!
" Tht greaust talent I have ever taught"
- Leonard Rose
Program:
HAYDN: Divertimento in D Maior
SCHUMANN: Adagio K Allegro
FALLA: Suite Populaire Espagnol
FAL'RE: Elegie
BEETHOVEN: Seven Variations
on a Theme
BRAHMS: Sonata No. 1 in E minor
Tickets: $3.50
Students and Children: $2.00
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
4144 Chase Avenue,
Miami Beach
To older tickets by phone call
Dade: 532-3491.
Bro 523-6116
Ml: 9-S;SuK. 10-Soon

CharRH-Br-Phon* Hours.
All SJ~*.S*mr OUTLETS
Including All Jordan Marsh
Stores, Record Bar Surres,
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Records and I 'ihranons.
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XI 11.-M.M
M-l* 2k -4


Friday, December 28,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
News in Brief
Prelate Gets Good Neighbor Award
ByJTA Services
BOSTON Msgr. Jorge
Jejia. Secretary of the Vatican's
K^mission for Religious Rela-
ys with Judaism, was in
estnut Hill, Mass., earlier this
oth to receive the annual Good
Ejghbor Award of Mishkan
fefila, a Conservative congre-
atioii whose Brotherhood esta-
blished the award 25 years ago.
Mejia is the first Vatican offi-
J to be a recipient. The decision
! honor him followed a visit to
nelast June by Rabbi Richard
h'ellin. spiritual leader of
Mishkan Tefila. which included a
eting with Pope John Paul II.
Uellin had first met Mejia a year
irlier when both attended an
btemational interfaith meeting
i Boston.
The presentation was made in
lie presence of Boston's Arch-
Rjshop Bernard Law at the
nual (iood Neighbor Dinner
4. sponsored by the
|Mishkan Tefila Brotherhood and
ired by Benjamin Lipson. The
nests included Rabbi Henry
ilichelman. executive vice pre-
sident of the Synagogue Council
f America, the rabbinical branch
f Conservative Judaism in the
lu.s.
Mejia. in accepting the tribute,
derscored its significance when
enoted that Vatican officials are
leldom allowed to accept such
I honors
Lebanon Solution
|Needs Syria Rabin
TEL AVIV Defense Min-
ister Vu/hak Rabin believes that
i accommodation with Syria is
ssential to an agreement with
*banon that would permit the
nthdrawal of the Israel Defense
IForce from I-ebanese soil and
lensure the security of Israel's
(northern I orders.
According to Rabin. Syria
lds thi key to the dead-locked
llsrael-I.i i.anon military talks.
po in their third week at
liikura under the auspices of the
tmted Nations Interim Force in
*banon
Furthermore, the Israeli de-
fense chief told journalists at a
foreign Press Association
pncheon here last Friday, an ex-
nded role for UNIFIL in south
*banon after the IDF with-
aws is the paramount con-
sideration, superseding the
pisputc between Israel and
*banon over the role to be
played by the Israel-backed
with Lebanon Army.
Pale of Activists
pen Cause for Concern
NEW YORK The National
Conference on Soviet Jewry has
npressiil grave concern" over
V* conditions of three Soviet
F*ish activists and Hebrew
teachers currently awaiting trial,
Aleksandr Kholmiansky, Yuli
tdelshtein and Yakov Mesh.
Kholmiansky, arrested in July
for allegedly "possessing
tapons and ammunition," is
currently in the third month of a
hunger strike begun to protest
the beatings he received when he
arrived in prison.
Although a medical com-
mission which recently examined
Kholmiansky at the request of
Soviet authorities determined his
condition was "not life threat-
ening," medical experts have
noted in the past that such a
lengthy fast can produce irrever-
sible physical damage.
Rosenne Hopeful Talks
With Egypt on Tap
NEW YORK Meir Rosenne,
Israel's ambassador to the
United States, expressed hope
that negotiations between Israel
and Egypt on the outstanding
problems between the two coun-
tries will start in the near future.
Addressing a meeting of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organ-
izations here, Rosenne said,
however, that "the cold peace"
between Israel and Egypt which
started with the war in Lebanon
in June, 1982, still continues.
"We hope there will be a
change in the future." Rosenne
said, adding that he also hoped
that when the negotiations
between Israel and Egypt begin,
they will discuss the return of the
Egyptian ambassador to Israel
after a more than two-year ab-
sence and a resolution of the
border dispute over Taba.
The meeting of the presidents
conference was convened to
honor its immediate past
chairman, Julius Berman, who
was succeeded by Kenneth
Bialkin last July after serving
two one-year terms.
Costs of Living
Up 19 Percent
TEL AVIV The cost of
living index rose by 19.5 percent
during November, the Central
Bureau of Statistics announced
Friday. It was the first COL
index published since the start of
the three-month economic
package deal freezing prices and
wages, but it also covered price
increases in the two weeks before
the freeze agreement started.
The index announcement was
greeted with mixed feelings, al-
though there was general
satisfaction that it was below 20
percent.
While some economists and
business leaders saw it as herald-
ing a successful outcome of the
efforts to halt runaway inflation,
others said the comparatively
high figure indicated that manu-
facturers and merchants had
artificially raised their prices in
the days before the price freeze
halted such possibilities.
Tel Aviv Workers
Return to Their Jobs
TEL AVIV The 11-day
strike of Tel Aviv municipal
workers ended late Saturday.
DELUXE KOSHER
PASSOVER TOURS
Acapulco
COMCABANA
WBASSADOR BEACH
California
>CRATON PLAZA
Patm Springs
"SNEwTOimiR
'^wportBMOl
, Gorg|
W RATON &AVANNAH
Florida
FONTAMEBUIAU HUTON
INNrSBROOK Iff SORT
SEVILLE HOTEL
SHERATON BAL HARBOUR
aa Harbour
SANSSOUCI
NY. Area
TAMIMENT RESORT
Pocono MB. PA
HOST FARM CORRAL
Lancaster. PA
Hawaii
SHERATON MAKAHA
LAKE GENEVA RESORT
OLYMPIA RESORT
Puerto Rico
PALMASDELMAR
Spain
PEZESPADA
St. HAuartmn
GREAT BAY BEACH
Switzerland
HYATT REGENCY
ai
ATLAIJ
after weekend negotiations
resulted in the agreement of the
commercial banks to lend the city
council an additional two billion
shekels (some $3.3 million).
Sanitation workers agreed to
begin work during the night.
Latin American Reps
Air Regional Concerns
SAO PAULO Representa
tives of the principal Jewish com-
munities of Latin America reaf-
firmed the inviolability of human
rights and the democratic process
in addressing issues of Jewish
and general regional concern at
the three-day Annual Plenary
Assembly of the Latin American
branch of the World Jewish
Congress which just ended here.
The gathering brought
together Jewish leaders from
Mexico and Central America,
Argentina, Brazil, Chile. Peru,
Paraguay, Uruguay and Vene-
zuela to analyze the problems of
Latin America and their effect on
the life of the Jewish communi-
ties.
Prof. Manuel Tenenbaum,
director of the WJC Latin Amer-
ican branch, observed that "clear
to all the participants was the
increasing vulnerability of the
Jewish communities becoming
trapped by the various conflict-
ing situations on the continent of
a general nature." These conflicts
arise, he noted, from the region's
serious economic problems which
lead to indebtedness and its
adverse social effects.
Sol Kolodny (left) received Florida Atlantic University s
Distinguished Service Award during commencement
ceremonies on Dec. 14. He is seen earlier this year when he was
honored by the Society of Older Students. With him is Dr.
Harry Harmes, FAU associate vice president for academic
FRENCH
ITALIAN
CHINESE
AMERICAN
ISRAELI
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ORC.
Catering is
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49-4552
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Dinner: Sun.-Theirs. 4:00-9:30
EARLY BIRD SPECIALS
Weekdays 4:00-6:00
Sundays 4:00-5:30 1344 N E 163rd st
N.M.Beach
One Glorious Night
The Israel
Philharmonic
Orchestra
Zubin Mehta, Conductor
Montserrat Cabal le, Soprano
Thursday, March 7
at 8:15 pm
Miami Beach Theater of the Performing Arts
Special Gala Performance
For the benefit of the American Friends of the
Israel Philharmonic Orchestra and Temple Beth
Sholom of Greater Miami.
Program:
TAC: Symphony No. 2
PUCCINI: "V'ijsi D'ane"from Toxa
VERDI: "Ruoma vincuor" fromAida
PUCCINI: Selections from Manon Lescaut
VERDI: "Pace, pace, mioDio" from La Forza
del Destino
TCHAIKOVSKY Symphony No. 6 in
B minor. Op. 74 "1'aiheiiquc"
Tickets:
"isiuel^phFlharmonic gala"
$25. $35, $50, $60. Patrons $250. (Includes dinner
with Mme. Caballe, Mr. Mehta and the (Orchestra
after the comer! at the Pavilion Hotel).
Number
Price
Total
v ISA
Card *
MASTERCARD
Signature
AMI Kl \\ I \|-R| ss
Exp Date ____________
' Name
I Addicts
I Citv____
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TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM All StLet-a-Siat- OUTLETS ,"** f^*1' "' r*mI*! Bllh Sholom
4144 ('has* AotHtot, Including All Jordan Marsh
Miami Beach Stores, Record Bar Stores,
To order tickets by phone call Pouparma Flowers, Rh k\ \
Dade: 532-3491, Records and Vibrations
Bro: S23-6I16 CHARGE TICKETS BY
MR 9-5, Sun. 10-Hoon PHONE: Dade62S-S100,
Bro: 462-7900
M.ami Beach Theater of the K"KZk
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1700 Washington Avenue, Miami Beach
I Phone ^DaV
State
Apt
Eve
I PLEASE MAIL TO:
| 4144 Chase Avenue. Miami Beach. Florida 3314(1
nmMOKfaw imH (Mnwcdamlnf, rkuk uw
I
I


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, December 28, 1984
Iraq Defuses One
Mideast Myth
The Iraqi decision to restore full
diplomatic relations with the United States
explodes one of two dominant myths about
Israel-Arab relations. Ever since the
founding of Israel, the conventional
wisdom has been that too much American
support of the Israelis cannot exist side by
side with U.S. efforts to strengthen its
diplomatic ties to the various Arab
governments of the Middle East.
The Iraqi decision hence defuses one of
these myths. From the American point of
view, it is high time that we have learned
the lesson that much of the State
Departments conventional wisdom is pure
hokum especially as it relates to Israel.
Until this Iraqi decision, administration
after administration has almost always
sought to carefully limit its support for
Israel.
During Israel's history, the Israelis, for
example, have had to suffer arms em-
bargoes courtesy of one decision or another
not to "embarrass" the Arabs. At the same
time, there have also been severe
restrictions in terms of economic assistance
and even political support.
What the United States repeatedly did
was to avoid any finger-pointing on the
part of the Arabs that U.S.-Israeli frien-
dship can do little but put a damper on
relations with them.
The Iraqi decision, as pragmatic as it
may be in these hard days of its war with
Iran, nonetheless demonstrates to the
world that a vigorously-pursued U.S.
friendship with Israel, which is what has
surely existed over the last two-year period,
did nothing to dissuade the Iraqis from
bringing to an end their break with the U.S.
The Second Myth
Is At Least Clarified
The second myth governing worldwide
reaction to the Israel-Arab impasse is that
this impasse lies at the root of all Middle
Eastern problems.
One would have thought that, if nothing
else, the war between Iraq and Iran was one
hard reality militating against such a naive
view.
Whether or not it suits the best interests
of individual oil-producers is less
significant to this discussion than the fact
that it reflects on the Arabs willingness to
break ranks over many questions and even
to risk hostility among themselves.
The Iraq-Iran warts but one, extreme
example of the differences that keep the
Middle East constantly seething, Israel as
the "common enemy" apart.
Finally, even when it comes to Israel and
the so-called "Palestine question," there is
not only no unanimity of Arab opinion but,
in fact, outright factionalism among the
various governments. There are different
Palestinian organizations, each with its
own Arab nation phalanx of support. For
example, Yasir Arafat was betrayed by
Syria in Lebanon. Before that, he was
rousted out of Jordan by King Hussein
who more recently embraced him.
The combinations are endless. Iraq's
return to diplomatic civility with the U.S.
merely reminds us of all of these and
many more.
.
Jewish Florxdia
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OSI's Record
'Great Lengths' for Genuine Evidence
n-lJK OufO'tewl COunlry uOCWOQuet!
Friday, December 28, 1984
Volume 57
4 TEVETH 5745
Number 52
By NEAL SHER
The Office of Special
Investigations was formed
by Congress in response to
the outrage expressed by
Holocaust survivors and
others committed to the
pursuit of justice, such as
the Anti-Defamation
League, at Hitler's hench-
men living in the United
States.
Time has allowed some of these
Nazi war criminals to die peace-
fully as U.S. citizens and has
made our cases difficult under
any circumstances more com
plex and time-consuming to
investigate and prosecute.
MORE THAN 40 denatural-
ization and deportation cases
have been initiated by OS1 and
we are filing cases at a greater
pace than at any previous time
One long lasting and signi-
ficant effect of our litigation will
be the specific and unequivocal
findings made by U.S. courts
regarding the destruction of
European Jewry. This takes on
added meaning considering that
there are people who publicly
claim that the Holocaust did not
take place. The decisions ren-
dered in OSI s litigation will add
to the arsenal of evidence to
ensure that the truth of the Nazi
era never will be concealed.
Attacks on OSI have come, not
unexpectedly, from Holocaust
revisionists. But today a con-
certed and vigorous campaign by
segments of the Eastern
European emigre community is
questioning our methods.
THEIR STATED objective is
to halt OSI's utilization of
evidence from Eastern bloc
countries, particularly the Soviet
Union. Since many of our cases
involve crimes committed on
what is now Soviet territory,
evidence and witnesses are to be
found in the USSR.
Organizations, individuals and
the emigre press are calling for
Congressional hearings to in-
Neal Sher is director of the
Office of Special Investiga-
tions of the U.S. Department
of Justice. He is charged with
tracking down and prosecut-
ing Nazi war criminals living
in the United States.
vestigate alleged abuses by OSI.
Their claim: OSI and the Justice
Department are dupes of the
KGB. They argue that since the
Soviet System is so inherently
unreliable, no evidence in their
archives, no testimony of Soviet
witnesses can be trusted and.
therefore, the I .S. government is
]rsecuting Eastern Europeans.
Questions regarding the legit-
imacy ol government evidence
used in our courtrooms cannot be
treated lightly. True justice can
never be achieved if convictions
are obtained as a result of lies or
distortions.
THE TRUTH is that we go to
Kreat lengths to insure that any
evidence used is genuine and
trustworthy We know we are
bringing serious charges and
must prove them under our laws,
our rules, and our procedures.
We request the Soviets to
produce the originals of docu-
ments. These are subjected to
scientific testing, both by our
government and, if desired, inde-
pendently by the defendants.
Tests include extraction of ink
and paper samples to determine
authenticity. We also routinely
utilize handwriting experts, who
can identify defendants' signa-
tures on incriminating docu-
ments. In no case has a court or
expert concluded that any Soviet-
supplied document was forged or
illegitimate.
Our critics claim we are used
by the KGB to further Soviet
interests. But any propaganda
value the Soviets might glean
from reminding the West that it
has Nazi war criminals in its
midst would be destroyed totally
should fabricated evidence be un-
covered.
WHEN OSI attorneys and
defense counsel travel to the
Soviet Union to take testimony,
Soviet prosecutors do not know
in advance the questions that
either side will ask Nor do they
know what documents or wit-
nesses are available in the West
to corroborate the Soviet wit-
nesses.
Our experience with Soviet
witnesses confirms what one
would expect of any witnesses
testifying about traumatic
events: some suffer serious
memory lapses, some ire not
completely consistent
some can identify wartimi photos
of defendants
cannot, sum- BJ talk
generally, but hav< -hand
knowledge ol atroc
It i~ sometimi that
Sd\ iet h itnesses an s|
Soviet authorities
intimidated to giv(
testimony. A prime
witness independent
of Mikola KowalchuK Bj
whom denaturalization proceed-
ings were commenced in Phila-
delphia on the charge thai he had
been active with the Ukrainian
police during the Nazi occupa-
tion.
DURING depositions con-
ducted in the Ukraine, in the a
presence of Soviet prosecutors
and under conditions typical to
all OSI cases, Soviet witnesses
provided exculpatory testimony
regarding Kowalchuk. Viewing
that testimony with the same
critical eye that we view all other
testimony, it was found to be
credible and OSI dropped the
case.
This experience flies in the face
of the knee-jerk contention that
all Soviet witnesses are forced t>>
the KGB to provide only da mag- (
ing evidence against OSI s del-
endants.
On the other hand, many
defendants themselves have
authenticated and corroboratea
Soviet-supplied evidence often
from payroll records, housing
registration forms, etc, whicn
establish service in a military or
Continued on Page 14-A


Friday, December 28, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Does Green Party Parallel Pre-Hitler Politics ?
By DAVID KANTOR
' BoNN (JTA) -
frequent allegations of a
resemblance between the
Green Party, which has
won 10 percent of the po-
pular vote in recent na-
.j0nal and regional elec-
tions, and the rise of the
Nazi Party in the Weimar
IRepublic more than a half
century ago has irritated
leftwing Jewish intellec-
tuals who share the eco-
tOgicaJ and pacifist philo-
Lphy of the Greens.
Nevertheless, the parallels are
nig to many Germans,
ind non-Jews, because the
Greens manifest certain nation-
tendencies and are dis-
tinctly unfriendly toward Israel.
UNTIL RECENTLY, compa-
nion* were drawn by political
ipponents of the Green Party.
wiabh the ruling Christian
Democratic Union (CDU) and its
Bavarian counterpart, the
Social Union (CSU),
both conservative. But at the
Green Party's last convention.
-. V malogy was expressed
from within its ranks.
It came from Rudolf Bahro. an
ideological father figure of the
cirecns who complained that the
party's rise in recent years was
remarks triggered shouts of
protest, and Bahro undoubtedly
rfi it( d much of the high regard
I* enjoyed among the Greens.
But clearly, his outspoken crit-
icism sit a precedent which
cannot be ignored.
There have since been other
led in the party for a
(rank discussion of its ideologic-
ally nationalistic tendencies and
of its organizational structures
ihich bear an unpleasant kinship
tf those of the Nazis.
THE FIRST evidence of a
hostile altitude toward Jews
merged in 1981 when some
branches of the party circulated a
calendar containing anti-Semitic
;ropaganda. When the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency questioned
-his at the time, party officials
iitially tried to brush it aside.
Rut when evidence of the anti-
Semitic nature of the calendar
as produced, the same officials
repudiated the behavior of the
branches concerned. They main-
lined they could not be held
responsible for every incident
that occurred in the party which
as then new and growing at a
rapid pace.
During the war in Lebanon in
'"-. the Greens issued a strong
ami-Jew ish statement. They
urged the Bonn government to
ithdraw reparations money
from Jewish Holocaust victims
and make it available instead to
''< Palestinian and Lebanese
Wims of what they called a
Jewish made "holocaust."
AFTER THEIR election to the
Bundestag for the first time in
"arch, 1988, the Greens ad-
flitted that several top party
including a member of
the Bundestag, had Nazi records.
'*" "l the officials were dis-
but the others retained
their posit ions in the party.
" the summer of 1984, a dele-
tion of the (ireen Party visited
. express support for the
progressive List For Peace, a
pinion of Jewish leftists and
I b nationalists stand-
|K toreh ction to the Knesset on
Platform which called for the
Ration ol a Palestinian state.
1 '. for its annual con
I m Bonn last month, the
I *" the only party in the
I 'tag that did not send a
Native, although they
sd Concern over the
Party's nationalistic
irises parth from
Many Fear the Parallel, But 'Reformer'
Otto Schily Hopes Otherwise
Tough, Passionate Tug-of-War
By WOLFGANG WEBER
HAMBURG (DaD) The
national congress of the Greens political
party in Hamburg always promised to be
a tough and passionate tug-of-war. The
burning issue was whether they should
enter alliances with the Social Democrats
or continue with their politics of op-
posing.
The Greens are now the fourth party in the
Federal Republic, and in some areas even the
third party, following many election successes in
the States, at local government level, and after
the general election in 1983. The question is:
should they consider cooperation with other
parties as a way of sharing power?
EVENTUALLY AFTER hours of tough
discussion, the delegates reached a compromise
formula. The principle of alliances is not ruled
out, but a decision about forming alliances as a
policy has been deferred until 1986.
There was a clear majority in favor of a paper
h leaves decisions over coalitions and power-
sharing to the States and municipalities that
might be affected. That in fact is what has been
happening up to now Since the last municipal
elections in North Rhine-Westphalia, there have
been alliances with the Social Democrats in some
areas. A Green has even become a deputy mayor.
There has even been an attempt at State level
to cooperate, in Hesse. But it broke up only
recently because of a dispute over giving per-
mission to build a nuclear enrichment plant. It
was this disagreement and the subsequent
collapse of the alliance that heated the at-
mosphere at the congress.
The contest was between two groups the
"reformers" and the "fundamentalists." The
former, who include members of the Bundestag
Otto Schily and Joseph Fischer, favor in certain
circumstances cooperation with the Social
Democrats. The fundamentalists, who are equally
strong, demand that the party maintain its policy
of opposition, the sort of policy out of which
sprang the peace and protest movements.
WALTRAUD SCHOPPE, who is
spokesperson for the Greens in the Bundestag,
says that with the compromise, all options remain
open: coalition, toleration of a Social Democrat-
led government such as in the case of Hesse until
recently, or opposition
So the Greens have shunted their internal
dissent to one side and have given themselves
breathing space to consider the next moves.
However, the ruling parties in Bonn see things
somewhat differently. The Christian Democrats
ICDU1 say the Greens are just as muddled as thev
ever were. And the Free Democrats iFDP) sav "a
split in the Greens is possible.
Greens shunt differences aside and
take breather to consider future.
their anti-Western and anti-
American slogans which some-
times resemble the slogans of
neo-Nazi groups.
MANY GREENS regard
American troops in West Ger-
many as an occupying force
which makes it impossible for
Germany to express its own spe-
cific national interests. The U.S.
is largelv linked by them to a
"Jewish lobby" and its "aggres-
sive" client, Israel.
The natural sympathies ol
most Greens lie with the Third
World countries and the "libera-
tion movements." The Palestine
Liberation Organization is consi-
dered a liberation movement :
Zionism is regarded as an oppres
sive tool of Western imperialism,
especially of American interest -
While the Greens do not ques-
tion Israel's legitimacy as a
nation, they give the clear im-
pression that to achieve an
understanding with the Arabs
the Israelis must give up even
more than just the occupied Arab
territories.
THE TYPICAL (ireen atti
tude is that justice must be done
to the Palestinian refugees who
left the territory of Israel in 1948.
They are unaware of, or ignore,
the fate of Jewish refugees who
formerly lived in Arab countries
According to party spokesman
Heinz Suhr. the Greens have not
had time to debate the Arab-
Israeli conflict in any detail He
said such a debate was highly
desirable and would definitely
take place sometime in the
future. Suhr sharply denied that
the Greens have anti-Jewish or
anti-Israel attitudes.
Nevertheless. earlier this
month a so-called "strategic
paper" circulated among the
leaders of the Green Party de-
nounced Israel as "fascist and
terrorist" and referred to "terror-
ist policies" of Israel in south
Lebanon which allegedly include
random arrests and frequent
tortures in specially designated
concentration camps.
THIS SECRET document,
which was apparently leaked to
the press, has triggered a sharp
reaction by the israeli ambas-
sador. Yitzhak Ben Ari. and has
touched off an internal debate
between the "hardliners" and
"moderates" within the party A
party spokesman insisted that
the document was a "mere
suggestion" that was never ap-
proved. But the party has not
denied that all members of its
leading body had seen the "stra-
tegic paper" and had failed to
react.
Juergen Reents. a Green Party
member of the Bundestag who is
heading a party delegation to
four Middle East countries, said
in a telephone interview that he
did not see any reason to repu-
diate the authors of the document
since the party did not officially
accept it.
THE PRESENT trip to the
Mideast by the party's delega-
tion, which is composed of
hardline radical elements, is a
Sign that this faction is not
pleased by the earlier trip to
Israel last July by the more
moderate faction The earlier
delegation was headed by Otto
Schily a Bundestag member
who has won ,i reputation as a
pragma! ist and a realu-t
While Schily has sharply criti-
. in! Israeli policies he has also
gone out ol his way to denounci
anti-Semitic manifestations in his
party According to him. the
t ireen Parts is still organiza-
tionally fluid and has not yet tor
mallv and sharply identified its
political position on a number ol
~-u.s. including the Mideast,
and that some who identify
mselves as Greens h
damaged thi


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, December 28, 1984
No Confidence
Powerless Moves Defuse Splinter Bodies
wingers) lead you," Aloni,
Labontes She called '
Labor Party 'to end ^ 1
dangerous and dSJS
patriotism, this stupid 2S3
Award Recipient
Bruce B. Teicholz, American
ORT Federation vice presi-
dent and recently elected
member of the board of direc-
tors of the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee,
has received the American
ORT Federation Achievement
Award 'in recognition of his
founding and outstanding
chairmanship of the New York
ORT Scholarship Fund,' an-
nounces Alvin L. Gray, AOF
president.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Opposition Knesset
members from both the
right and left of the poli-
tical spectrum have reacted
to government policies on
the economy and on Leb-
anon with a string of no-
confidence motions. But
the parties they represent
are too small to pose a
threat to the Labor-Likud
government, and only a few
ministers attended the ses-
sion.
Motions of no confidence were
presented by Mapam, the Civil
Rights Movement (CRM), the
Progressive List for Peace and
the Hadash Communists, all. in
varying degrees, to the left of
center and by the rightwing
Tehiya Party. The protestors
acted out of vastly different
motives, particularly on the
Lebanon issue.
HAIKA GROSSMAN of
Mapam contended that the
government is not worthy of
Knesset confidence because of
rising unemployment that affects
young people in the development
towns and poses a threat to the
entire work force. She denounced
politicians who want to use
unemployment as a tool to cure
inflation.
Yuval Neeman of Tehiya
criticized the government for
failing to make use of the Labor
Party's good relations with
Histadrut to work out a "con-
venient economic plan." He also
injected a foreign policy note,
accusing Likud of failure to
prevent Labor Party leaders from
initiating political moves toward
Jordan and Egypt. Tehiya has
always opposed the peace treaty
with Egypt and wants no
dealings with Jordan.
Charlie Biton of Hadash
blasted Histadrut for its alleged
lack of zeal against unem-
ployment. He contended that the
wage-price freeze package deal
will not reduce inflation but
would only hurt wage earners
whose income already has
dropped by 20 percent. He was
apparently referring to a
requirement that wage-earners
forego one-third of their monthly
cost-of-living allowances for the
duration of the three-month
freeze.
SHULAMIT ALONI of the
CRM assailed the government on
another matte/; She accused the
Labor Party of coddling ex-
tremists, such as the
"provocateur" Rabbi Moshe
Levinger, leader of militant
settlers in the Hebron area on the
West Bank.
Levinger has spent the last two
weeks in a sit-down demon-
stration outside the Dahaishe
refugee camp to protest what he
claims is the government's failure
to take strong action against
Palestinian residents of the camp
who throw rocks at Israeli
vehicles. The government has
taken no steps to remove him.
"Don't let them (the right-
MATITYAHUPELEDoftM
Progressive List for V*\
charged that while tbeJ^
nn*K says it wants to puU*u*i
is doing everything J
Lebanon." As exan^ple^. M
SS ,18wpavmg new *h3
south Lebanon, building nl
detention camp near Tyre Z\
preparing the Israel DeJ
Force for another winter ^
Lebanon. "The IDF should
moved out before the wint-
begins," Peled said
Defense Minister Yitzhak!
Rabin replied that the basis fa I
the governments policy J
Lebanon was security for Israel,!
northern borders in return forl
withdrawing the IDF He alsol
criticized the Beirut government
for suspending the withdrawal
negotiations that began last week!
because Israel arrested four
Shiite Moslem militia leaders!
responsible for attacks on the
IDF.
"We proposed cessation of all]
hostilities during the
negotiations but were rejected,"
Rabin said. "We did not set this
proposal as a condition for'
continuation of the talks."
U.S., Israel Mum on Maneuvers
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The Israel Defense Force
and the U.S. Embassy here
have declined to comment
on reports that the Israeli
and U.S. navies are en-
gaged in a joint anti-
submarine exercise in the
eastern Mediterranean.
An IDF spokesman said that
"in principle, the IDF does not
report on movements and
exercises." The only previous
instance of U.S.-Israel military
cooperation, which occurred last
June, was the practice evacuation
by American helicopters of 46
"wounded' marines from a U.S.
Navy vessel in Haifa to hospitals
in Haifa and Tel Aviv.
AT THAT time, Washington
reportedly expressed displeasure
over the extensive Israeli press
coverage of the exe.Tise which
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also tested communications
between the U.S. Sixth Fleet and
Israeli authorities and the capa-
bilities of Israeli air traffic
control.
Sources here said U.S.-Israeli
military cooperation has been
kept secret. But foreign press
reports from Washington quoted
a Defense Department official as
confirming that the joint anti-
submarine exercise has begun.
According to the reports,
Michael Burch, assistant
Secretary of Defense for Public
Affairs, said the maneuvers in-
volved a task force accompany-
ing the nuclear-powered aircraft
carrier USS Eisenhower which
earlier had called at Haifa.
BURCH said the joint anti-
submarine exercises were small
and would last "a few days" and
that the Eisenhower was not dir-
ectly involved except as a base
for aircraft used in the practice
submarine hunt. One unidentified
Pentagon official reportedly said
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the Mediterranean in October as
a show of force in response to ter-
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Part of the Avraham Ticho collection of
Chanukah menorahs photographed 11 years
ago in the Ticho family study, when Anna
Ticho, the Jerusalem landscape artist, still
lived and painted there.
rtist Ticho
Menorah Lights Enchanted Him
By SIMON GRIVER
Dr. Avraham Ticho was a man
Iwho literally brought light into
the lives of others for, as an
[ophthalmologist, his knowledge
lofeye diseases enabled him to
[save ihi sight of thousands of his
mtients.
Fascinated as he was by sight
(and light, it is perhaps not
Jtarprising that during his
[lifetime he was motivated to
[imass almost 150 Chanukah
[menorahs one of the largest
Individual collections in the
Itorld. t'hanukah is after all the
Festival of Light at a time to
rejoice in this greatest of gifts,
which harks back not only to the
miracle in the Temple when one
day's supply of oil lasted eight
days, but to the third sentence of
Genesis when the universe was
illuminated by the divine
command, "Let there be light."
THE CHANUKAH
MENORAH symbolizes this
historical Jewish reverence for
light, while in modern times the
seven-branched menorah has
become a national symbol of the
Zionist enterprise and the Jewish
attempt to become a light unto
the nations from its ancestral
homeland.
Thus Dr. Ticho s passion for
Chanukah menorahs was no mere
hobby but a realization of his
deep love of Judaism. His
collection spanned five centuries
of Jewish Diaspora endeavor
from India and the Middle East,
to Russia, North Africa and
Western Europe. The entire
collection was bequeathed to the
Israel Museum and has been
included in their overall collection
of 500 Chanukah menorahs. But
Friday, December 28, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Ticho a menorahs have not lost
their separate identity. While 10
are on display in the Israel
Museum's central collection, a
representative sample of 30 of his
menorahs are exhibited in Ticho
House.
Indeed, if the name Ticho has a
familiar ring about it, this is
because his wife, Anna Ticho,
was the famous Jerusalem
landscape artist. Dr. Ticho died
in 1960 while his wife lived until
1980. On her death Anna Ticho
left their home to the Jerusalem
Municipality and after extensive
refurbishing their house, built in
1860, was opened to the public,
along with dozens of Anna's
drawings and Avraham's
menorahs, in May, 1984.
THE TICHOS were born in
Moravia (today Czechoslovakia).
Avraham completed his studies
in Vienna where he specialized in
ophthalmology at the Rudolph
Hospital. In 1912, he was sent by
the Frankfurt-based organization
Lem'an Zion to open an eye clinic
in Jerusalem. Anna, his cousin
and assistant, accompanied him,
and the two were married that
year. From 1919 onward.
Avraham headed the Ophthal-
mology Department at
Rothschild Hospital (later
Hadassah Hospital). Anna drew
the barren hills and dramatic
landscapes that surrounded her.
and together the Tichos were
active in the city's cultural life.
It is not known exactly when
Avraham began to collect
Chanukah menorahs. but it is
known that most of them were
purchased for modest sums from
new immigrants arriving in Israel
Continued on Page 10-A
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TradJtional Sin95
Friday Night Dinner <**
Phone 531-4114
100 ?Ul Slrii! Mumi Bnch Mi
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American Technion Society
As Technion-Israel Institute of Technology celebrates 60 years of service to Israel and the Jewish
People, the Greater Miami Chapter salutes some of those who have helped make the University
what it is todav: a world center for technological education, research and development.
Left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Grunhut with Mr. and
Mrs. .lack Katzman.
Left to right: Martin and
Gladys Gelb with Dr. Uzia
Galil, Technion chairman.
International Board of Gover-
nors.
Mr. and Mrs. Harry "Hap"
Levy.
Left to right: Al and Mildred
Isaacson with Dr. i'sia Galil.
Left to right: Technion President, Dr. and Mrs. Josef Singer
with Eve and Sam B. Topf. Mr. Topf is Southern Region
chairman, ATS. ____________^__
Bess and Louis Stein.
Mr. and Mrs. Murray Friedman,
Dr. Josef Singer with Vivian
Hyman.
Left to right: Ambassador Philip Habib with Peggy and
Norman Gorson,


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, December 28, 1984
Shlomo Hillel
Mitterrand Says Peres Far
More 'Open' Than PLO
What Being New Speaker Means to Him paris utaj -
President Francois Mitter-
rand said Sunday night
that Israeli Premier
Shimon Peres "was far
more open" than his prede-
cessors on the Palestinian
question, but "there has
been no similar step for-
ward by Yasir Arafat and
the PLO."
Continued from Page 1-A
thousands of persecuted Jews
from their native Arab lands.
The role of Speaker is modelled
on that of the British House of
Commons, though most demo-
cratically elected chambers, as in
America's Congress, have
speakers who act as chairpeople.
One significant difference, how-
ever, is that in the absence of the
president of Israel, the Knesset
speaker becomes acting presi-
dent.
THE KNESSET Speaker also
determines the agenda for
debates, though in effect he bows
to the government's wishes.
More crucially, however, during
debates the Speaker's gavel
decides what can and cannot be
said. If a member persistently
interrupts debates or does not
accede to the Speaker's demands
to cease a speech, the Speaker
may even call upon the Knesset
ushers to eject a member from
the hall. In Israel's parliament,
where unruly behavior and melo-
dramatic gestures are not un-
common, the ushers are regret-
tably called into action all too
often.
And as Hillel hinted in his ac-
ceptance speech, it is to be anti-
cipated that there may be those
in the current Knesset who will
attempt to ignore politeness and
protocol: "It is one of my duties
to protect the Knesset from as-
saults upon democracy." he
asserted. "including assaults
from within the Knesset itself."
This reference was clearly dir-
ected at Rabbi Meir Kahane, the
leader of the extreme right wing
racist Kach Party who is newly
elected to the Knesset and has
expressed the sentiment that
democracy in Israel is dis-
pensable.
A further theme of Hillel's ac-
ceptance speech was Arab-Jewish
co-existence within Israel, and
this was no doubt a response to
Kahane's intention of presenting
a bill to the Knesset proposing
the expulsion of all Israel's
Arabs. Hillel invoked the Bible's
injunction to protect and respect
minorities, and recalled that full
civil rights for all Israelis. Arabs
and Jews alike, was central to the
country's Proclamation ol Jnde-
pendence in 1948.
WHILE HILLEL is polite.
gentle and diffident in manner
ihe seemed extremely embar-
rassed by the excited congratula-
tion' he received from his col-
leagues after being elected
Speakerl. he is not a man to sit
quietly when his indignation is
roused No leniencv can be ex-
pected from him towards Kahane
or any other Knesset member
who attempts to disrupt or
threaten Israeli democracy, for
Hillel vigorously supports issues
he feels strongly about. Born in
Baghdad. Iraq in 1923. Hillel
came to Israel in 1930 and settled
with his family in Tel Aviv. After
graduating from the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem in econ-
omics and political science, he
moved to Kibbutz Ma'agan
Michael near Haifa where he
remained till 1958.
During the early fifties Hillel
supervised the mass exodus of
Jews from his native Iraq and be-
came deeply involved in helping
persecuted Jews in Arab lands.
Hillel also championed the cause
of Oriental Jews who had already
settled in Israel.
Entering the Knesset in 1952,
and as one of the few Oriental
Jews in the Mapai (the fore-
runner of the Labor Party)
hierarchy, Hillel became an out-
spoken critic of government
policy when he felt the hundreds
of thousands of Jewish im-
migrants who were then pouring
into Israel from Arab lands were
being given a raw deal. In parti-
cular he had a strained relation-
ship with Golda Meir, who was
then minister of Housing.
IN 1959 Hillel was dispatched
overseas to become ambassador
to Guinea and he also served as
ambassador to the Ivory Coast.
Upper Volta. Nigeria and
Dahomey. On his return to Israel
in 1963 he became director of the
Foreign Ministry's African
Department. During this period
Hillel developed an intimate
rapport with many African
leaders. His former adversary
Golda Meir was so impressed by
the manner in which he advanced
Israel's ties with Africa, that
when she became prime minister
she insisted on having Hillel in
her cabinet.
Consequently, in 1969. he be-
came minister of Police. He
retained this post until Labor's
electoral defeat in 1977 and
during this period also served as
minister of Interior for a brief
caretaker spell.
In opposition Hillel shocked
many of his Labor colleagues by
voting against the Camp David
Peace Treaty with Egypt. He
argued that while he did not
agree with the Likud's concept of
a Greater Israel, he felt that the
proposed autonomy for the
administered territories, and the
complete withdrawal from the
Sinai, would compromise Israel's
security. After the 1981 election
Rosenne Urges End to Myth
Israel Was Created by UNations
Continued from Page 1-A
Zionist benefactor, of Corpus
Christi, Tex.; and Jack
Lefkowitz, ZOA associate trea-
surer, of New York. The award
has been gi\ en in the past to such
notables f>3 Jacob Javits, Eliza-
beth Taylor. Louis Lehrman, and
Golda Meir
ROSENNE cited Britain's
recent decision to sell sophistic-
ated weapon systems to Arab
states as "an example of how all
Luropean countries recklessly
arm Arab countries." Rosenne
said that "this forces Israel to
maintain a balance of power,
which strains the Israeli
economy."
Rosenne also declared that in
recent weeks "newspapers have
been reporting the economy of
only one country: Israel." He
charged that the "dispropor-
tionate focus on Israel at the ex-
pense of other countries which
are also struggling economically
reflects hypocrisy in the press."
He said that Israel now spends
25 percent of its gross national
product on defense, as compared
to the 6.4 percent which the U.S.
spends.
Rosenne was optimistic, how-
ever, when he spoke of the recent
Free Trade Agreement passed by
the U.S. government on trade
with Israel. He said that the
agreement passed the Senate 97-0
and passed the House of Repres-
entatives by 416-6.
He was also optimistic that
just as Egypt came to sit and
negotiate peace with Israel, other
Arab countries will follow suit.
However, he said, this will only
come about if Israel remains
strong.
Delegates from across the
country unanimously reelected
Alleck A. Resnick of Baltimore to
a second two-year term as pres-
ident of the Zionist Organization
of America. The election took
place on the closing day of the
ZOA's annual convention.
Hillel stood as Labor's candidate
for Speaker but was narrowly
defeated by 61 votes to 56. How-
ever, this time around he won
comfortably 60 votes to 46.
HILLEL SUCCEEDS a long
line of esteemed Knesset
Speakers. The first Speaker,
Yosef Sprinzak, chaired the
Knesset from its founding to his
death in 1959. His carefully
deliberated decisions moulded
the written rules and unwritten
conventions of today's Knesset.
Kaddish Luz, who was Speaker
from 1959 to 1969, set the pattern
of moderation and impartiality
that subsequent Speakers have
adhered to. In recent years
Yitzhak Shamir, Yitzhak Herman
and Menachem Savidor have held
the Speaker's gavel. Hillel is sure
to be modest and unobtrusive in
his role as Speaker, but will
certainly not hesitate to take
whatever steps are required to
defend democracy in Israel.
registering gains in foreign
policy, particularly the Middle
Fast. He visited Damascus last "^1 dk
month where he met with Syrian "VW^
President Hafez Assad
Mitterrand, who met with
Peres during the Israeli leader's
three-day state visit to Paris last
week, said at a televised press
conference that he has no inten-
tion of inviting Arafat to Paris.
"Arafat leads a movement, a
clandestine army, not a state," he
said, adding. "I don't think such
a visit would be conducive to
peace."
The French president, whose
popularity is at a low ebb accord-
ing to political commentators, is
trying to improve his image by
"All concerned, Peres as well
as Jordan's King Hussein, said
they considered my meeting with
Assad to be a good thing. \|lt
terrand told the press conference.
He sought to deflect criticism
in some quarters that he is too
partial toward Israel bv recalling
that France had saved Arafat
and 4.000 of his men when they
were under seige in Beirut in the
summer of 1982 and again a year
later when they were cornered by
anti-Arafat PLO dissidents
Tripoli and northern Lebanon
in
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Hebrew University ha
awarded its first Golda Mei;
Fellowships to 27 scholars fron
Israel and eight foreign countries
at ceremonies marking the sixth
anniversary of the death of the
former premier.
My job is to help customers
arrange for and schedule installation of
telephone services. I talk to dozens
of people every day who have all kinds
of requests. Newcomers who want
service. Customers moving from one
residence to anodic
want to add spfcfctf)
present service. Aih
who want answers t
the recent changes
business. Its my rfc


Friday, December 28, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Kreisky, In Retirement, Still Defends His PLO Leanings
*r
By AVIVA CANTOR
VIENNA (JTA) -
Bruno Kreisky said here
that neither his relinquish-
ing of the Chancellorship of
Austria nor the murder last
year of Issam Sartawi, who
was considered a leading
moderate in the PLO, has
altered his position on the
Middle East in general and
the PLO in particular.
Sartawi was shot to death at
an international socialist confer-
ence in Albufeira, Portugal,
where he had gone to advocate a
dialogue between Arabs and
Israelis. A Palestinian group led
by Abu Nidal. an extremist who
broke away from the PLO on
pounds that it was too conserva-
tive, issued a statement in
Damascus claiming responsibil-
ity for the assassination.
KREISKY, whose words and
actions during his term of office
in support of the PLO often
caused considerable controversy
and consternation, especially
among Jews around the world -
including the Vienna Jewish
community and in Israel
government circles, expressed his
ideas about the Mideast and the
PLO in a meeting in his home
with a group of Jewish journal-
ists.
They were in Vienna covering
the photographic exhibit, film
festival and academic symposium
under the rubric of "The
Vanished World" of European
Jewry destroyed in the Holo-
caust.
In his interview with the
Jewish journalists, "Why should
I modify my position on the Mid-
east if nearly all the European
democratic governments accept
my view and when (President)
Reagan found out that the Pales-
tinian problem should be
solved?" the 73-year-old former
chancellor asked.
NOR HAS the murder of Sar-
tawi whom Kreisky described
as "one of my closest friends"
changed his views favoring a
Palestinian state and regarding
the PLO as the representative of
the Palestinian people.
The reason Sartawi's murder
did not alter his views, Kreisky
said, is that he did not share the
view Sartawi held in the last
months of his life, which was to
get a declaration from the PLO
that it is ready to recognize
Israel.
Kreisky told the journalists he
had opposed this idea because
Israel's Labor Party leader
Shimon Peres had said he was
"not interested at all" in such a
declaration. The PLO, Kreisky
continued, did not accept Sar-
tawi's idea because of Yasir
Arafat's position that recognition
of Israel is the PLO's trump card,
a position Arafat was willing to
give up if Israel recognized the
PLO.
KREISKY DID. however, tell
the journalists that he had ac-
cused Arafat of being "guilty to a
certain extent" of Sartawi's
murder because his refusal to
allow Sartawi to speak in favor of
his idea of a proclamation recog-
nizing Israel at the PLO National
Assembly in Tunisia last year
"gave the sign to Abu Nidal"
that Sartawi could be killed with
impunity.
While acknowledging that
Arafat does not represent all the
currents among the PLO,
Kreisky expressed the belief that
he represents an overwhelming
majority of the groups in the
overall organization, although
some "very tough" groups
oppose him.
The former chancellor also said
he accepted the claim of the
former mayor of the West Bank
town of Halhul, Mohammed Mil-
helm, who told him recently in
Zurich that "we in the West
Bank are behind Arafat." The
PLO, he concluded, "undoubt-
edly does represent the Palestin-
ians as far as a big majority is
concerned."
KREISKY emphatically
denied that he is an enemy of
Israel or of-the people of Israel
because what "I recognize is that
the Jews are a people insofar as
they live in Israel. As for Jews
outside Israel, if they want to be
a people, I am not opposed to
that. But I am not sure Jewry
can be declared a people a priori.
He said he defined Jews as a
"com*-.nity of destiny" whose
destinies are different, depending
on the course of history of the
countries they live in.
Dismissing charges of "Jewish
self-hate" that have been lodged
against him over the years.
Kreisky said he has "never re-
fused to be a Jew." He said he
plans to attend "in a demonstra-
tive way" the Vanished World
exhibit which has already had
20.000 visitors in its first week of
showing here to "show I am in
favor of it."
He described himself as
coming from "a very assimilated
family this is my way living" but had never denied
being of Jewish extraction.
Kreisky expressed pride in
what Austria had done to help
Soviet Jewish emigrants and his
role in it. He said that "if I were a
religious man wanting to enter
heaven, I'd give as one reason"
for admittance the faci I hill
300.000 Jews left the Kmirt
Union and passed through
Austria on their way to Isr-iei
and to other countries with us
protections, and that not a
single life was lost."
*r. People who
4 features to their
JkJ especially people
jto questions about
sin the telephone
fsponsibility to see
that these requests and questions are
taken care of to the customers satis-
faction. Its a responsibility Southern
Bell and I take seriously.
So I make sure everything on my
end is handled to the best of my ability.
That way I not only work for Southern
Bell, I work for mv customers as well.
Southern Bell
A BBJ.SOUTH Company
Already In Touch With The Future:


Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 28, 19841
Students Warn Against New
Menorah Lights Enchanted Artist 'Final Solution' in Soviet Union
Continued from Page 7-A
from all parts of the world. '
"Collecting thing9 is like a
disease." observes Irit Salomon,
curator of Ticho House. "Once a
person starts then they feel
compelled to make their
collection as complete as
possible."
The oldest lamp in the
collection is a menorah from 15th
Century Italy. It is made of brass
and has an austere, practical
design, with a definite Moorish
Spanish influence. Later Italian
lamps reflect the spirit of the
Renaissance with heretical
human statues often included.
The more orthodox Chanukah
lamps ot Central and Eastern
Europe did not make their ap-
pearance before the 18th Cen-
tury. Designs and craftsmanship
such as some 19th Century Ger-
man examples in pewter often
equalled the contemporary work
of Christian artisans.
LAMP DESIGNS were often
affected by architecture. One
Italian menorah is in the image of
a tower, while North African
lamps frequently are adorned
with the cupola motifs that are
popular as window frames. There
is a general consensus that good
taste in menorahs degenerated
after the middle of the last
century, and one of the best
examples of a gaudy over-
ornateness that is prevalent in
more modern times is a silver
Russian lamp that includes a
clock and silver flowers and
birds. This particular lamp was
sold to Avraham Ticho by a
Russian lady needing to raise
money for her daughter's
trousseau and dowry.
All the menorahs in the
collection, with the exception of
several 20th Century lamps, were
lit by oil. No doubt Avraham
Ticho regretted the stan-
dardization in designs brought
about by the modern era of the
wax candle and the candlestick
style menorah which ac-
companied it. But then the
Chanukah menorah is really
about sentiment rather than
aesthetics. Most Jews when
asked to describe their concept of
the ideal Chanukah lamp would
probably conjure up in their
minds a picture of that magical
menorah in their childhood home
that lit up their infancy.
And Dr. Ticho's collection, one
of the most comprehensive
collections of an item which is the
most popular piece of Judaica for
collectors of antiquities, bears
witness to centuries of Jewish
children across three continents
who were enchanted by those
flickering lights of Chanukah.
Hadassah Takes Emergency Action to
Aid Jewish Youth Rescued From Ethiopia
The National Board of
Hadassah. the Women's
Zionist Organization of
America. in emergency
session, has authorized a
grant of an additional
S200.000 over and above its
current levels of support to
Youth aliyah to provide for
absorption of Jewish
youths from Ethiopia now
arriving in Israel in record
numbers.
Ruth I'opkin. Hadassah
president, said that the national
board also agreed to a Youth
Aliyah request to utilize the
Erieda S. Lewis Seminar Center
at Hoshaya in the Galilee as an
emergency absorption center for
the Ethiopian youngsters.
The S200.000 allocation will
helo provide food, clothing and
other basic necessities for the
young Ethiopians, and help meet
the cost of programs to speed
their entry into Israeli society,
she added.
In addition. Mrs. Popkin
stated, the Hadassah-Hebrew
University Medical Center physi-
cians and support personnel will
provide medical services to the
Ethiopian youths.
Hundreds of young Ethiopians
are expected to be settled
temporarily at the Hoshaya
Seminar Center, which is now
nearing completion. The Frieda
S. Lewis Center named for the
immediate past president of
Hadassah who now chairs the
Hadassah Medical Organization
originally was envisioned as a
focal point from which young
people in the Youth Aliyah
program could learn more about
the Galilee region as a potential
permanent home.
Officials of Youth Aliyah a
department of the Jewish
Agency-World Zionist Organiza-
tion have estimated that the
Hadassah facility in Hoshaya
may be needed for at least three
years as an absorption center for
Ethiopian youth.
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NEW YORK (JTA) -
Stating that "we are witnessing
the contemporary form of a new
'final solution' of the Jewish
people in the USSR, a non-
physical genocide." the Center
for Russian Jewry and Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry have
asked President Reagan and
Secretary of State George Shultz
to raise the KGB's campaign
against unofficial Jewish
teachers in their upcoming
meetings with Foreign Minister
Andrei Gromyko. as well as
Soviet Jews' appeals for
"repatriation" to Israel.
In letters hand-delivered to the
White House and State Depart-
ment, the two Soviet Jewry
groups pointed out that "having
terminated emigration, the
Soviets are now further accel-
erating their attacks on the last
lifeline of Jewish survival, the
small Jewish self-study groups
and their teachers."
IN RECENT weeks four
Jewish religious-cultural per-
sonalities in Moscow and Odessa
have been arrested, the groups
noted. The four are Yuli Edel-
stein. Yakov Gorodetsky.
Alexander Kholmyansky and
Yakov Levin. The two groups
stated that the KGB had planted
a gun in Kholmyansky s apart-
ment and drugs in Edelstein's
apartment. This "ominous
development" follows "the
savage 12-year sentence imposed
last October on the distinguished
Jewish culturalist Dr. Yosif
Begun," the group's letter
pointed out.
The two Soviet Jewry groups
urged direct Washington-
Moscow negotiations for "a
comprehensive resolution" of the
Soviet Jewry issue, including
emigration, the Prisoners of Con-
science and a "clear articulation
of the principle of non-harass-
ment of the unofficial Jewish
study groups."
Meanwhile, the Student
Struggle for Soviet Jewry re-
ported that 18 Jews in three
Soviet cities sent an open letter
to Soviet President Konstantin
Chemenko pointedly declaring
that "we. as many other Jews,
are very worried by the current
worsening of persecutions aimed
at frightening us and curbing the
movement for repatriation to
Israel."
The open letter which, accord-
ing to the Student Struggle,
came after the arrests of the un-
official Jewish teachers, stated
that this, the hardening of the
prison conditions for POCs. and
the anti-Jewish drumbeat in the
Soviet media "prove to us that
Jewish life in the USSR, a multi-
national country, is nc longer
possible."
Rabin Refuses to Eject Hostile
Arabs from West Bank
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) De-
fense Minister Yitzhak Rabin has
flatly rejected demands by West
Bank settlers that he expel from
the territory any Arab involved
in hostile acts against Jewish
settlers.
Rabin met with a delegation of
settlers. They demanded tough
action against Arabs in the after-
math of last week's ambush of an
Egged bus south of Beersheba in
which four Jewish settlers and
the driver were wounded by auto-
matic fire. Two Arabs in a car
l>ehind the bus were also
wounded. The bus was bound fur
Kiryat Arba. near Hebron.
Violence continued when rocks
thrown bv Arab vouths smashed
the windshield of an Egged bus
on the Ramallah-Nablus road,
near the Jalazoun refugee camp.
Stones also cracked the wind
shield of an Israeli car near
Dahariye village. There were no
casualties in either incident.
Rabin told the settlers that he
had once favored expulsion in
such cases but has since changed
his mind. He also rejected out-of-
hand the settlers' contention that
an expanded Jewish presence in
the heart of the Arab town of
Hebron would Improve security
there Rabin said he had
originally l>een in favor of
building the Jewish suburb of
Kiryat Arba just outside Hebron
but always opposed Jewish
settlement in the town.
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Friday. December 28,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
UN Group Treated' to Vicious
Diatribe Against Jewish History
v
\
i \
j
i
....ister Shimon Peres greets Ruth
national president of Hadassah,
the recent visit of the Hadassah
Comment
el Silent on Hussein Communique
Golden Wreath Society of Major Donors
Mission in Jerusalem.
ByTAMARLEVY
GENEVA (JTA) A
United Nations seminar on reli-
gious tolerance was used as the
platform for an unprecedented
attack on Jews and Judaism by
the Saudi Arabian delegate who
said at one point that Hitler must
have had good reasons to want to
exterminate the Jews.
The 40-minute diatribe by Dr.
Maaruf Al-Mawalibi, was allowed
to continue uninterrupted. The
president of the seminar, Adam
Lopatka of Poland, did not react
to it and refused a request by the
Israeli delegate, Hebrew Uni-
versity Professor Eliezer
Ravitzki, that the seminar dis-
sociate itself from the attack.
Apart from Israel, only the
United States and Costa Rica,
among the 26 nations participat-
,VID LANDAU
5ALEM (JTA)
Jovernment has re-
from any official
to the joint
tque by King Hus-
Jordan and Presi-
>sni Mubarak of
/hich many offi-
lid privately was
tantamount to an Egyptian
repudiation of the Camp
David accords.
Senior officials here cited
mixed and contradictory
signals" from Cairo to explain
the governments deliberate
reticence. It was evident when,
cntrary to expectations. Deputy
Premier and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir avoided any
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MODERN JEWISH HISTORY: Studies in Jewish history
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Emergency buzzers in each apartment
ing, spoke out against the
Saudis remarks. But many of the
delegates privately expressed
shock after the session.
Al-Mawalibi's premise was
that the Jews should not wonder
why they were persecuted for
centuries because there must
have been good reasons. He
claimed it was prescribed in the
Talmud that a Jewish doctor was
allowed to treat non-Jews only
for experimental purposes.
In addition to the U.S., Israel,
Costa Rica and Saudi Arabia, the
seminar was attended by dele-
gates from Argentina, Brazil,
Canada, Egypt, Finland. Greece,
India, Ireland. Italy. Jamaica,
Japan, Kenya, Morocco,
Nicaragua, Nigeria, Pakistan.
Poland, Senegal. Thailand. Togo,
the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia.
reference to the joint commu-
nique in a foreign policy speech to
the Knesset.
THE COMMUNIQUE re-
leased simultaneously in Cairo
and Amman, followed a scathing
attack on the Camp David agree-
ments by Hussein in his address
to the Egyptian Parliament two
weeks ago. Officials here noted,
however, that Egypt's Premier
Kemal Hassan Ali said this week
that the communique was not a
deviation from Camp David but
rather an elucidation of Egypt's
interpretation of the Camp David
accords.
Hussein and Mubarak called
for, among other things, an inter-
national peace conference on the
Middle East under United
Nations auspices, based on Secu-
rity Council Resolution 242.
Israel maintains such a confer-
ence would be contrary to the
Camp David formula which
requires direct negotiations
between Israel and the Arab
states.
Another mitigating factor
noted by Israeli officials was the
weekend interview of Egyptian
Minister of State Butros Ghali in
the Jewish Chronicle of London.
Ghali proposed four-party talks
among Israel, Egypt, Jordan and
the Palestinians, a pattern close
to that envisaged by Camp
David.
ON THE other hand, there
have been hardline statements
from Mubarak's top political
aide, Osama El-Baz which have
heightened concern in Jeru lem.
Shamir's decision not to com-
ment on the joint communique
does not mean he intends to
ignore it, his senior aides said.
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.-*?* s
ftonfieai fnkKi fiTTiV l
Ejtryptian Hopes EEC Will
Pressure U.S. on Israel
Bi JEan COBDI
ATHENS rTAi -
h. ihali the foreign
EC v. prw-r*
L'aiied StatM v. -.i.-;^ i
e role in seeking
> soiutr/a U3 the Middle
-.
B .-.
, peace
ucirt !*OH -
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now that tfst esacti **
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In Toronto
Canadian Jewish Congress
In Mixed Reviews on CBC
TORONTO IJTAI -
The Canadian Jewish Con-
pMl, while strongly sup-
porting the license renewal
of the publicly funded Can-
adian Broadcasting Corp.
(CBC), has expressed some
concerns over its ethno-
cultural coverage and
hiring practices with res
\>\ to minority groups in
Canada
I r. a submission to the
( anaflian Radio and Tfelevisiwi
O/mmission iCRTCl, the or gam-
/.atior, rwyjmmfcnded that CBC
Television interpret its mandate
t/j plBJ a role in wnunntt that all
KhriooulturaJ groups liv in
harmony and equality with the
two rlominant cultures' in
Canada which are Anglo-Saxon
and French.
THE SUBMISSION provided
an analysis of instances where
the CJC found CBC wanting
They include coverage of events
of national importance to the
various ethnocultural com-
munities that have been covered
onlv during crisis periods or as
colorful backdrops to specific
events.
Also noted was the fact that
CBC accepted only eight people
,,\ h'jl) applicants for a highly
publicized minority training
program "Recruitment on a
grander -..- oo ^. at
-j.i>- :.',..*<. ::*. CJC
,-.-- and
It iwcoanm*x. '.r-at the CBC
should ." beyond reflecting the
halHniilsaalji f>f the various
ocultural communities
through skit, color or names anc
that a portion encrAJ-air>r
with turbans or Jom with
skullcaps for example, to appear
on camera.
THE CJC a^vv suggested what
the CBC could be doing to
counter anti-rr.inonty activity It
cited recent programs or, Nazi
war criminals and hate
propaganda as examples But it
believes the CBC could more fully
implement its stated policy of
challenging stereotypes not
only in the studio but outside in
the community at large
The brief praised the CBC
radio program Identities as an
excellent example of ethno-
cultural reporting It encouraged
the development of similar
programs on both English and
French language television
networks, but stressed that this
should not be the only niche for
ethnocultural programming.
A determined effort must be
made to cover the ethnocultural
communities on an on-going day-
to-day basis, but reporters must
be attracted to stories which
would serve as windows to the
real inner lives of those com-
munities the CJC brief stated.
Beautiful Geneva Is A City
Today of Sheikhs, Oilionaires
ConttnMd from Page 1-A
private schools and try to buy
villas Th latter is generally
frowned upon Switzerland has
Stricl laws limiting the purchase
i tats by foreigner!
rtheless. King Fahd of
Arabia owns three pal
country and Saudi Oil
Minister Sheikh Zaki Yamani has
and an apar -lent He
panda m re time In < vathan
in
Since '":' the luxurious
Geneva intercontinental H<
lusively lor A-
s are in \i
I he hotel staff and public
relations department speak
Arabic An Egyptian chef
prepares Middle I
European and American tourists
stopped coming The) M
. Switzerland thi i pei l
s hotel.
THE WAVE of Arab
has grown sj:
Lebanon put their
vacation retreats it of
l,unls In any e\ \lps
are higher. A visitor to Genevs in
July or August will tee
promenading alor,.-
.;. i heir traditional r.efiyas
owed by their1 .-s.
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Friday. December 28, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Frisco's Monument to.Holocaust
Stood There 4 Days Before Attack
Rabbi Arthur Schneier became the first
American religious leader to receive an
honorary degree from the 350-year-old
University of Budapest at ceremonies held
there Nov. 21. Rabbi Schneier, president of
the Appeal of Conscience Foundation and
spiritual leader of Park East Synagogue in
Manhattan, was cited for his leadership 'in
promoting mutual understanding and inter-
national cooperation among different peoples
of the world and contributing to the good
relations between the United States and
Hungary.' Left to right are Dr. Joseph
Fulop, rector of the university, who
presented the degree; Imre Miklos,
Hungary's Minister of Religious Affairs;
Rabbi Schneier; and U.S. Ambassador
Nicholas Salgo. Also participating in the
ceremonies were Deputy Foreign Minister
Ferenc Esztergalyos and leaders of
Hungary's Catholic, Protestant and Jewish
communities.
Wames in News
Peres at Hadassah Donors' Fete
Prime Minister Shimon Peres.
I speaking at a briefing for
members of Hadassah's Golden
Wreath Society of Major Donors
I in Jerusalem, cited lasting peace
I between Israel and her neighbors
land the nation's economic
|recovery as his government's top
[priorities for the coming year.
[The briefing took place during a
[mission of the Society led by
JRuth Popkin, Hadassah national
(president.
The Prime Minister said that
had invited President Hosni
Mubarak of Egypt to meet with
on Israel's border with
Egypt to discuss "warming up"
flations between the two
ountri. v
According to Peres. Mubarak
Md re-ponded positevely to his
pvitation and agreed to send a
ppenvoj to Jerusalem tor preli-
t talks with him and
f n Minister Yitzhak
amir
1. Kenen, one of American
w*t) prominent personalities.
beinj; honored by having a
iret of the Jewish National
id in Israel dedicated in his
ie
The I L. Kenen Forest will be
rated in American Indepen-
>nce Park, "flagship" of the
ajor recreational nature
Wvea being developed
">ughout Israel by JNF. Just
!tside Jerusalem, the park is the
'" of other forests already dedi-
** to prominent American
"ids of Israel.
ien, 79, helped establish
PAC. the only pro-Israel orga-
'Mion registered to lobby Con-
*s on behalf of close U.S.-
wli relations. He served as
"AC's founding executive
tor from 1952 to 1972, and is
organization's honorary
"rman.
Paul Cowan, author of "An
Phan in History" and a staff-
tor the Village Voice, wUl
? featured speaker at the
C. n ptudent Press Service's
l"nal Editors Conference
P) pec. 23-25 at the American
["n Congress in New York
addition to Cowan, rabbis
"am WeU. and Walter
Wurzburger, leaders of the
Orthodox Jewish community,
will debate on the subject of the
Jewish "underground" in Israel.
William Gray III, vice chairman
of the Congressional Black
Caucus, will be among the
panelists in a discussion of Black-
Jewish relations.
Pledging to seek "innovative
responses to the pressing
problems of our era," Selma
Weintraub of Hartsdale. N.Y.,
was installed this week for her
second two-year term as national
president of Women's League for
Conservative Judaism. Mrs.
Weintraub placed high on
Women's League agenda for the
next two years battered women,
the terminally ill. alcoholism.
Jewish singles, and day care cen-
ters
"We have recently been ex-
posed to a most unpleasant
Jewish dimension domeMic
violence." she told 2.0(H) dele
gates at the organization's na-
tional biennial convention in
Kiamasha Lake. NY. "There
may have been as many as
100.000 cases reported annually
in the United States, with the
vast majority unreported." she
said. "In earlier times, this
problem was rare for Jews."
The American Jewish Commit-
tee has called upon the South
African Government "to take the
necessary steps, starting with the
immediate release of trade union
leaders, to end finally the gross
violation of human rights
inherent in apartheid."
AJC President Howard I.
Friedman said it was "heart-
ening" to note "the major escala-
tion of public calls for such elimi-
nation of aprtheid" and to find
"bipartisan support and par-
ticipation" in recent declarations.
"There are understandable dif-
ferences over some proposals that
have been made to encourage
changes in South African
policies." Friedman declared.
"But there can be no differences
among advocates of basic human
rights on the need for all people of
conscience to speak out on the
moral issue involved."
Rabbi Feivel Wagner, spiritual
leader of the Young Israel of
Forest Hills, N.Y., has been
selected to chair the program of
the second annual midwinter
Torah Retreat of the National
Council of Young Israel in Feb-
ruary.
Harold M. Jacobs, president of
the National Council, announced
the appointment of Rabbi
Wagner to design "an intesive
Torah study program." The
retreat is scheduled for Washing-
ton's Birthday weekend, Feb. 15-
18, at the Homowack in Spring
Glen.N.Y.
Rabbi Wagner said the theme
of the program will be "The
Torah Confronts Society. Moral
and Lthical Dilemmas."
Actor Theodore Bikel and the
Chief Rabbi of Rumania, Dr
Moses Rosen, delivered principal
addresses at a major conference
designed to reinvolve Jewish
organizations in programming
activity on Yiddish language and
culture. Joseph Mlotek. acting
chairman of the World Jewish
Congress Commission on Yid-
dish, announced.
The conference, entitled
"Coming Home to Yiddish:
Yiddish and the American Jewish
Mainstream," brought together
representatives from more than
30 national Jewish organizations
for a full-day session on Dec. 9 at
the New York Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies.
The WJC co-sponsored the
conference together with the
Commission on Synagogue Rela-
tions of the New York Federa-
tion.
Josef Singer, president of the
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology, has been reelected to
a second term as president of the
International Council of the
Aeronautical Sciences. The re-
election vote, taken at the recent
ICAS Conference in Toulouse,
France, was unanimous (includ-
ing China and the Soviet Union).
The Congress also decided to
hold its first meeting in Israel in
1988, with the full agreement of
all its members, and no opposi-
tion from Eastern Bloc countries.
Prof. Singer was first elected
ICAS president in 1982.
SAN FRANCISCO -
(JTA) Less than four
days after its dedication,
San Francisco's monument
to the Holocaust, one of the
few memorials to the Holo-
caust on public property in
the United States, was
desecrated. Clean-up work
began immediately, accord-
ing to Peggy Isaak Gluck
of the Jewish Bulletin of
Northern California.
The target of the vandals was
the 11 white plaster bronze
figures created by sculpte*
George Segal, ten of the repre-
sentations prone and one, a man,
staring out of a barbed-wire en-
closure. Segal titled the work,
"The Holocaust."
THE MEMORIAL is located
in Lincoln Park, overlooking San
Francisco Bay. The desecration
took place apparently sometime
between Saturday night and
Sunday morning. The faces of the
ten corpses were found covered
with black and yellow spray
paint. The memorial was dedi-
cated in a solemn ceremony
attended by some 500 survivors
and relatives and friends.
The desecration discovery was
made by a security employe of
the American Protective Services
during a shift of guards in the
arounds-the-clock surveillance.
The guard on the midnight to 8
a.m. graveyard shift, the ap-
parent period of the vandalism.
was dismissed.
At about 9 a.m., the day shift
guard alerted his company, police
and representatives of the Jewish
Community Relations Council
(JCRC) of San Francisco. Rita
Semel, JCRC associate director,
said the security company was
taking "full responsibility" for
the damage.
Also found in black spray paint
on the back wall on two sides of
the massive monument were the
words, "Is this necessary?" The.
standing figure was not hit by
the vandals.
BECAUSE THE city public
works department does not work
on Sunday and was closed, a pri-
vate steam-cleaning company
was hired to remove the
daubings. Semel said every effort
will be made to restore the Segal
sculptures to their original state.
She also noted that private
security will continue around the
clock, and the city police depart-
ment also will continue to patrol
the area. Restoration cost was
estimated at $1,000.
The JCRC issued a statement
declaring that holocaust
memorials all over the United
States "have been assaulted by
vandals and grafitti, as have
other public structures, whether
by mindless youths or anti-
Semites. This is a form of terror-
ism and we will not be swayed by
it."
But Mayor Dianne Feinstein's
Committee-for a Memorial to thel
Holocaust, which includes Jews
and non-Jews, reiterated con-
cerns expressed when the site
wae-setefcted, an open area where
visitors could walk around it "to
become involved,"could remain
as is.
RHODA GOLDMAN, chair-
woman of the Mayor's Commit-
tee, said she was surprised that
the vandalism "happened so
quickly. It hurts all of us and
what hurts even more is that
people do this, whatever negative
feelings they have."
Segal, reached at his New
Brunswick, N.J. home, told the
Jewish Bulletin that the desecra-
tion was "ugly and brutal" and
that he personally felt "violated"
by the vandalism.
Three years of fund-raising
produced $500,000 for the memo-
rial and an additional $250,000
educational endowment. The
campaign was under the patron-
age of Mayor Feinstein, who
attended the dedication.
Ernest Michel, who survived
Auschwitz and is now executive
vice president of the United
Jewish Appeal in New York, said
in his dedication address that
what he had most feared in the
camps was dying with the world
not even knowing of the unen-
ding gassing and burnings of the
victims.
NOTING THAT books have
been written calling the Holo-
caust a "hoax," Michel said
memorials like the one in San
Francisco helped to keep the
truth alive.
Segal told the assemblage that
he had learned about the Holo-
caust from survivors, adding that
many kept quiet about their
terrible experience, not even
wishing to share those horrors
with their children. He started
work on "The Holocaust" two
years ago.
A reception was held after the
unveiling, with wine and bread
and other foods, a final act for
participants to mark the joy of
remembrances, and part of an
educational campaign whi?h the
memorial committee indicated it
hoped would help "assure that
the world will never countenance
such a tragedy again."
QROWARD
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 28, 1984,
OSI Director Analyzes Charges
Against the Agency
Continued from Page 4-A
paramilitary unit known to have
been involved in persecution and
atrocities.
BECAUSE members of such
units and those who served at
concentration camps are auto-
matically ineligible to immigrate
to this country, they concocted
false stories about their wartime
activities in order to obtain entry.
When confronted with the evid-
ence, many have conceded that
the Soviet-supplied documents
are in fact legitimate, especially
when their own signatures appear
on them.
OSI is not alone in utilizing
Soviet evidence in war crimes
cases. It is also used in West
German trials. Not once to my
knowledge has a West German
court found that the Soviets
supplied forged documents or
suborned perjury.
It is difficult to conceive of
even the KGB fabricating docu-
ment after document and suborn-
ing perjury from witness after
witness in OSI cases. To do so,
one would have to believe that
collaboration with the Nazis in
areas such as the Ukraine,
Lithuania, Latvia and
Byelorussia was a mere fiction
concocted by the KGB.
IN THE final analysis.
American law and procedures
provide ample opportunity to
uncover falsehoods and fabrica-
tions. Courts have ruled that
OSI *s procedure and evidence fall
squarely within our laws and
rules and have noted that
Soviet evidence was corroborated
by other evidence and testimony.
There is no reason to expect
that attacks against OSI will
subside. As we file more cases
and secure more orders of
deportation and denaturalization,
we can expect stepped-up opposi-
tion.
Will we uncover, investigate
and charge every person in the
U.S. who was involved in per-
secution or murdering during the
Nazi years? Obviously not. Will
we win all of our cases? Probably
not.
Will we continue to investigate
and prosecute? To this I respond
with an unqualified, resounding
"yes." Will we go wherever
necessary to find the evidence?
Of coaurse, that is our duty and
responsibility. There is too much
at stake. Too many people suf-
fered and died to give Hitler a
posthumous victory.
1984's Top Ten Stories Included
Many Violent Actions
Continued from Page 1 -A
cruel, tightening vise choking
Jewish emigration. Its leaders
hollowly speak of peace, but how
can peace flourish without if it is
suffocated within, the ADL
wonders.
The revolution by ballot in
Argentina. The military junta,
host to. accomplices in. and
Inside the U.S.S.R.
Photo collection for exhi-
bition. Especially needed
are pictures of children.
Please forward regular or
enlarged snapshots with
date, name and address
of subject and photo-
grapher to: Bill Saulson,
c/o RIVERSIDE, 1920
Alton Road, Miami
Beach, FL 33139.
Rabbi
San Francisco Bay Area
Synagogue with its own
Parish House seeks a
Full-Time Rabbi. Our 150
member Congregation
has mixed seating and
conducts a Complete
Traditional service. If you
are a Shomer Shabbos
interested in promoting
Traditional Jewish
Values and are organized
and self-motivated, please
submit your resume to:
RSF c/o Jewish Floridian
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Fla. 33101
.
standers-by to the repression and
murder of dissidents, was
democratically ousted in favor of
a democratic government.
The growing concern for
thousands of suffering black
Ethiopian Jews. Also the
worldwide response of com-
passion and food for all of
Africa's starving masses.
The U.S. government's and
Britain's notice to UNESCO that
its bias and mismanagement are
unacceptable. Contrary to the
rationalization of UNESCO's
apologists, this action, if it does
not strengthen the moral fiber of
UNESCO, at least lends
credibility to America's.
The lessons of Jesse
Jackson's historic presidential
candidacy, including the evidence
that a history of anti-Jewish
statements and a political
philosophy tolerant of Marxist
dictatorships can be made
politically palatable. So long,
that is, if it was couched in
ringing affirmations of devotion
to civil rights.
The wall separating church
and state lost height. It hap-
pened in Lynch v. Donnelly when
the Supreme Court ruled that
public funds were used con-
stitutionally to underwrite a
Nativity scene. How much
height? Related cases now in the
courts will tell.
The Ku Klux Klan paled. The
once-feared night riders who once
enjoyed awesome influence in
police departments, state legis-
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W- 1 J
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... I ,-'T / -J I
Friday, December 28,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
tennis champion Shlomo Glickstein lighting the torch at the eleventh Maccabiah
in 1981.
'85 Maccabiah
Games Will Be The Biggest Ever
has five big clubs boasting 20,000
members."
Over the years a gallery of
Jewish sporting "superstars"
have entered the Maccabiah.
They include names like Dutch
tennis ace Tom Okker and the
greatest Olympic sportsman of
all time, Marc Spitz. Many, like
Israel's American-born former
basketball captain Tal Brody.
have decided to make their home
in Israel after experiencing the
country during the Maccabiah.
And none other than President
Chaim Herzog himself was once
Maccabi boxing champion of
Ireland.
Boxing is no longer among
Maccabiah events. A new sport
in next year's games will be
hockey, while other events in-
clude rugby, softball, yachting,
karate, judo and wrestling, as
well as track and field athletics,
swimming, basektball and tennis.
For the less physical minded
there are bridge and chess
competitions.
IN THE 1981 Maccabiah. the
U.S. topped the medals table
with 73 golds, followed by Israel
with 59, South Africa 14, Britain
10 and Canada with 9. South
Africa would have done con-
siderably better but because the
Maccabiah is recognized by the
International Olympic Commit-
tee, South African sportsmen are
banned from many events.
Records were broken last time in
almost every branch.
By SIMON GRIVER
The countdown is on for the
12th Maccabiah Games which
will be held in Israel from July
15-25, 1985. In an era when
politics and sport are unhappily
mixed up. the coming Maccabiah
promises to demonstrate that the
spirit of sportsmanship which is
so frequently lacking in con-
temporary international sport, is
alive and well in the Jewish
Olympics
According to organizers
Michael Kevehazi and Arie
Rosen/wige. this Maccabiah will
be the biggest and best ever.
More than 4.000 competitors are
expetted to represent the Jewish
communities of 35 countries in 30
it sports. This Jewish
sportmg "extravaganza" will
open at Ramat Can's Kfar
Maccabiah stadium, where
million dollars have been
invested in renovations for the
occasion, with a spectacular show
of lasers.
The sporting events them-
ire scheduled to take place
lia in all parts of the
count r\ The closing ceremony in
em's Sultan's Pool will
-ound and light show in
cturesque and incredibly
setting beneath the walls
ipital old (it)
INNOVATIONS tor the 12th
ill include a youth
menl in which some 300
iportsmen will participate
vents And thousands of
Maccabiah veterans will also be
in Israel for an international
conference of those who took part
in the first six Maccabiah games.
The first Maccabiah was held in
1932. Then 309 athletes came
from 17 countries. The games
were such a striking success that
the second Maccabiah in 1935
attracted 1.700 competitors.
These became known as the
"aliya" games because many of
the participants stayed on in
Palestine, preferring not to
return to a Europe threatened by
Hitler.
The next Maccabiah was not
until 1949. the first to be held in
the independent State of Israel.
But the halving of entries to 800
reflected the tragedy that had
befallen the Jewish people in the
Holocuast. The number of
competitors has steadily climbed
since then 2.700 came in 1977,
3.500 in 1981 and the 4.000 mark
will be topped this time around.
FOR THE first time a team
from Zaire will attend the
Maccabiah. A Soviet team has
been invited but the offer will
certainly be declined in the
current political climate. It is
hoped that Romania will send a
team for the first time since 1935
and an invitation was sent
personally to President
i eaucescu.
Yet even it no Eastern
l uropean representatives are
nt, the games will be
tribute to international Jewish
unity. Indeed some pundits feel it
is a contradiction in identity for
Jews to come to Israel from the
world over to compete under the
various flags of their countries.
However, participants are housed
together without references to
countries of origin and no sense
of national rivalry is felt in the
Maccabiah.
Furthermore, spokesman Zv
Eyal stresses that the Maccabiah
movement is not about holding a
meet each four years. It is an
ongoing entity. In August, 1983
the European Maccabiah was
held in Antwerp, in February.
1984 there was a Latin American
tournament in Sao Paulo and this
coming August the American
Maccabiah takes place in Detroit.
Meanwhile, the Maccabiah world
movement is at work everywhere
promoting sport, cultural and
Zionist activity (the movement is
affiliated wit the World Zionist
Organization).
DR. ISRAEL PELED, chair
man of the Maccabiah World
Union, describes it as one of the
most important Jewish organi-
zations in the world. "Through ij
some 300.000 members maintain^
close ties to their Jewishness and"
he says. "In some
communities Jewish life revolves
around the Maccabi sports club.
In Perth. Western Australia, all
300 members of the community
belong to the club. Buenos Aires
A UNIQUE
VACATION IN
ISRAEL
On your next visit to
Israel, you may stay
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APARTMENT, A
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country for as low as
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1 Though competition was
fiercer than ever, genuine sports-
manship' was in evidence
everywhere. On the other hand
the level of sport could hardly be
compared to top international
standards. In part this is because
many of the world's top Jewish
stars, particularly in tennis,
prefer to enter big money
competitions rather than at-
tending the "no prize-money"
Maccabiah a poor reflection of
the way in which sport has
become commercialized in our
times.
Rivalry at the Maccabiah is
keen but not hostile and th<>
Maccabiah really has no "win-
ners" or "losers." Sportsmanship
thrives and Jewish youth has an
unforgettable experience in Isra-
el, on and off the field. For both
participants and spectators the
Maccabiah is a sporting event
which succeeds in generating a
spirit characterized by compe-
tition and solidarity alike for
lews all over the world
Entry Barred
JERUSALEM IJTAI
Israel has barred entry to Hri-
gitte Heinrich, a member of a
delegation of the West (ierman
Green Party planning to visit
Israel during their tour of the
Middle East. Heinrich reportedly
had been convicted in Germany
for cooperating with the Pales-
tine Liberation Organization.
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&
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Serving Most Dttetou Food at RmsonaMa PtUm
jo the Besutllul Son Hotel
FRIDAY NH3HT DINNER MUBT BE PAID BY SfMn.
ORGANIZATIONS: INQUIRE ABOUT
OUR FACILITIES FOR LUNCHEONS
538-5401
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Wo Specialize In
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For Information & Reservations. Call Alfred Stone
531 6886 '!
100 LINCOLN ROAD at Collins Ave Miami Beach. FL 33139


1 Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 28, 1984
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Renewed Iraqi-
American Ties:
The veiw From Jerusalem
By HARRY WALL
The official Israeli
I response to the renewal of
full diplomatic ties between
'the United States and Iraq
-as to issue a cautious
I endorsement, subject to
(Iraqi willingness to with-
draw fiom the Arab "rejec-
Itionist front.
The official Israeli response to
|ihe renewal of full diplomatic ties
[between the United States and
llraq was to issue a cautious
(endorsement, subject to Iraqi
liillinjrn' sa to withdraw from the
[\ra!> u'dionist" front.
Israeli policymakers, however.
lire ski ical as to the long-range
Implications in the Arab-Israeli
I conflict trom what is seen as a
liKticai diplomatic initiative by
|hghded
ISRAELI OFFICIALS note
I isfaction that Iraq's deci-
Ison coincides with a peak in
I sraeli relations. parti
Icularly the much touted and im-
I proved strategic cooperation.
[This indermines, say Israeli
[leaders, the traditional State
Department attitude that public
[support tor Israel is had only at
the expense of good relations
Lnth the Arab states. The Iraqi
initiative demonstrates that
[Washington can have it both
[nys strong ties with Israel
[and correct relations with the
tabs.
Israel is aware that the costly
Iwarwit' Iran has propelled Iraq
ltoproje< t a more moderate image
lie the West. Iraq's decision to
[restore diplomatic ties with the
US is a pragmatic move which.
|fcr the time being, supersedes
ologuul interests, such as
lading the reject ionist front
|igainst Israel.
Baghdad will be seeking U.S.
Ipressun on its allies, especially
[Europe, not to buy oil from Iran
|ind it hopes for increased Amer-
ican pressure on Israel and other
[nations believed to be selling
[arms and spare parts to Iran.
[Iraq can expect to purchase
[American technology, receive
[IS tichnical assistance and
[favorable treatment for building
in oil pipeline to the Red Sea
Port lit Aqaba, bordering on
/srael.
THE DIPLOMATIC cost to
[Iraq for these tangible gains is
[(datively small. It has curtailed
[the activities of Palestinian
[tororists. such as the late
[notorious Abu Nidal. operating
[out of Baghdad. And Iraq has
[toned down its virulent anti-
IIsrael rhetoric.
Iraqi leaders have been telling
[western officials that it recog-
g<9 the need for Israeli security
M has no objections to other
Arab states dealing with Israel.
Harry Wall is director of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith Israel office in
Jerusalem.
(This attitude, however, is for
foreign consumption only, since
Iraqi newspapers continue to
vilify Israel almost daily.)
Its rhetoric to American lead-
ers notwithstanding. Iraq con-
tinues to spearhead the diplo-
matic front against Israel at the
United Nations. The most recent
effort ocurred in November when
Iraq again sought UN censure of
Israel over the IDF bombing of
the nuclear reactor in Baghdad.
Such hostile diplomatic
maneuvers reinforce doubts in
Jerusalem over Iraq's "new
pragmatism."
FOR ISRAEL the major ques-
tion is, how long will this prag-
matic approach last? Once the
war in the Persian Gulf is over,
some Israeli officials are con-
cerned that Iraq's attention, and
its army of one million soldiers,
may be diverted to the eastern
front against Israel. Israeli intel-
ligence reports on several at-
tempts on the life of Iraqi Pre-
sident Sadam Hussein. Obser-
vers in Jerusalem note the pos-
sibility that, should Sadam
Hussein be removed, he could be
replaced by a regime more faith-
ful to extremist dogma.
Israel is aware that even in the
absence of a change of leadership
in Baghdad. American influence
jver Iraq is very limited. Shortly
after gaining normal ties with the
U.S.. Iraq resumed its attacks on
Iranian-bound tankers in the
Persian Gulf. This, following a
six-week respite and U.S. war-
nings to refrain from doing so.
Israel realizes that it is import-
ant for the U.S. to maintain
normal, steady relations with the
Arab world. If nothing else, the
value of American ties must be a
factor to take into the equation of
the Arab-Israeli conflict. This
consideration, after all, is what
most influenced Egypt's Sadat in
making peace with Israel and, to
a lesser extent, weighs in the
thinking of other Arab regimes.
BUT ISRAEL has few expec-
tations in the Arab world, and
certainly not from one of its most
intransigent enemies. Jerusalem
has adopted a wait-and-see atti-
tude toward this newly-found
Iraqi moderation. In the mean-
time, Israel hopes that the U.S.
will not furnish Baghdad with
military technology that could be
used to tip the war against Iran
in Iraq's favor. With the war in
the Gulf ended, such American
weaponry, say the skeptics, may
one day be used against Israel.
Hebrew Classes From CAJE
Community Ulpan Program,
""der the direction of Rabbi Nor-
*** 8. Lipson, adult education
Wor of CAJE, will commence
'" < and 8 in Dade and
*roward locations.
Claases for beginners, faltar-
jnate and advanced students
71" be held twice a week for two
nours each for seven weeks.
Miami Beach sessions will
w -Monday and Wednesday
^Nunp and Monday and
f\L "y evenng8 at the Jewish
community Center.
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center will offer
Monday and Wednesday mor-
ning and evening classes.
Congregation Bet Breira will
host South Dade morning classes
Mondays and Wednesdays, while
evening classes the same days
will be held at the South Dade
Jewish Community Center.
The Ulpan program is co-spon-
sored by CAJE, the Israel Aliyah
Center, the American Zionist
Federation and the Department
of Education and Culture of the
World Zionist Organization. Ben
Millstein is administrator.
Judge-elect Philip Bloom and former State
Representative Elaine Bloom are shown
becoming Fellows of Brandeis University at
an event at the Doral Beach Hotel. With
them at the hooding ceremonies are (left to
right f Rene Blum berg, chair of the
University Fellows; and Evelyn Handler,
president of Brandeis, who reads from the
documents citing the Blooms for their
service to the university. Also honored, with
the Distinguished Community Service
Award, was I. D. Shapiro of Atlanta and
Miami.
U.S. Representative Larry Smith has been
honored with an honorary fellowship from
Bar-Ilan University in Israel at a con-
vocation at the Diplomat. Shown with Smith
are (left to right) Peter Goldring, president of
Florida Friends of Bar-Ilan; Rabbi Carl
Klein, Hallandale Jewish Center; Rabbi
Emanuel Rackman, president of Bar-Ilan,
who presented the award; Rep. Smith; Rabbi
Frazin, Temple Solel; and Marge Saltzman,
convocation chair.
Honoring Lucille Chernin (second from left)
as Woman of the Year of the Greater Miami
Woman's Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged are (left to
right) Fred D. Hirt, executive director of the
Home; Harry Chernin; Myra Farr, president
of the auxiliary; and Judge Irving Cypen,
chair of the board of the Miami Jewish
Home. The Chernins, both Founders of the
Home, have donated the soon-to-open
Chernin Skilled Nursing Facility on the
Douglas Gardens campus.
Torch Relay From Israel to Miami Beach Via El Al
For the sixth year El Al
brought the flame from Israel to
light the Chanukah menorah in
front of Temple Emanu-El on
Miami Beach.
The flame was ignited at the
Tombs of the Maccabees at
Modein. Israel, carried to Ben-
Gurion Airport near Tel Aviv,
and flown by El Al to Miami as
well as to New York, Los Angeles
and other major American cities,
according to Shlomo Liehtman,
regional manager for the airline.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman lit the
giant wooden menorah in front of
the Miami Beach temple with
Miami's flame, which was carried
the last leg of the trip down
Washington Avenue by runners
in relays.
Cantor Yehuda Shifman led
the singing that followed, joined
by Mayor Malcolm H. Fromberg.
members of the city commission,
other city and county officials,
Israeli Consul General Yehoshua
Trigor, and some 300 who
gathered to watch the ceremony.
J Miami, FloridaFriday, December 28,1984 Section B


Page 2-B The Jewiah Floridian / Friday, December 28,1984
U.S. Rep. William Lehman meets with RabbiHaskellBernat of
Temple Israel on the steps of the U.S. Capitol. They discussed
the Ethiopian Jews and the plight of more than 6.3 million
Ethiopians facing starvation due to a years-long drought in
that African country.
Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation President Samuel I.
Adler shares a moment with
guest speaker Liv Ullmannn
at the 1985 CJA-IEF Camp-
aign opening dinner.
Celebrating the 60th year of Pioneer Women-Na'amat and
dressed for the occasion in 1920's costumes are (left to right)
Bella and Joseph Fisher and Sarah Brenner, all life members of
the organization. The luncheon honoring life members also
featured lighting the Hanukkah menorah. The Fishers won first
prize as the best couple in costume and Mrs. Brenner won first
prize as best individual costume.
Fourteen-year-old cello
prodigy Matt Haimovitz will
play on Saturday, Jan. 5, at 8
p.m. in the sanctuary of
Temple Beth Sholom. Judy
Drucker, cultural director of
the temple, reports that the
Israeli youth's appearance is
part of the on-going
celebration marking the 40-
year tenure of Rabbi Leon
Kronish at Beth Sholom.
Yivo Forum
Lectures
The Yivo Committee of
Greater Miami begins its 38th
year of weekly Yiddish lectures
on Jan. 2 at Temple Beth Sholom
at 1:30 p.m.
The opening lecture features
Prof. Arthur Lermer on "The
Transition From Epoch to
Epoch." "The Miracle of the
Eastern European Jewry," by
Dr. Heszel Klepfisz, will be Prof.
Lermer's source reference.
Misha Alexandrovich will
entertain with Yiddish songs.
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Shir Ami Land Approved
Temple Shir Ami of Kendall
has received approval to con-
struct a synagogue on land at
Sunset Drive and S.W. 125
Avenue, according to the
congregation's rabbi, Brett S.
Goldstein.
"This official sanction (by the
Zoning Appeals Board) will
enable us to move ahead with our
plans for a long-awaited struc-
ture." Rabbi Goldstein reported.
The first building of the three-
phase plan to be initiated in early
1986 will contain a social area to
seat 500 people. Later phases will
include a permanent sanctuary
and a school.
Temple Shir Ami, founded in
1981, has been meeting in the
facilities of St. Catherine of Siena
Catholic Church, congregation
president Louis C. Feuer ex-
plained. Rabbi Goldstein ex-
pressed gratitude for the patience
of the Christian congregation. An
end is now in sight for that
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
arrangement.
"Now we have
home of our own
he concluded!
approval for
Tennis Tourney to Aid Food Effort
Eddie Dibbs, tennis pro and
torunament veteran, has chal-
lenged woman tennis pros Jamie
Golder and Pam Casale to a
"battle of the sexes" during the
Capital Bank Seventh Annual
Knding Hunger Tennis Festival
Friday and Saturday at
Flamingo Park-Capital Bank
Tennis Center on Miami Beach.
About two dozen tennis stars
and celebrities have agreed to
participate in the fundraiser to be
held at the new Abel Holtz
Stadium in the park. The
stadium is named for Capital
Bank's chairman and president.
To help famine victims in
Ethiopia those attending the
event are encouraged to bring ap-
propriate food and other items to
be shipped bj the U.S ..\gencv
for International Developme
and distributed bj L'XICEF
Addis Ababi Ilolt-J
and organizer Racoli I.t-slee oi
End World Hunger. Inc.
The shopping list includes
wheat flour, vegetabli ->ii. wholeL
or non-fat dry milk, dried beans!
corn-soya milk mixture, anti-l
bacterial cream, aspirin, gauzel
and bandages, halzone tablets forl
water purification, multi-
vitamins (especially vitamin El.
eye ointment, oral rehydration
package. antibiotics, blankets |
and clothing.
The items will be packed into a I
12-foot truck donated by Budget
Rent-A-Car and truck and
contents will be airlifted to I
Ethiopia.
GRAND OPENING
AVENTURA MALL
The sensation of Miami Lakes and Kendall. Mr. Clyde's, is p'oud to
announce the opening of our third restaurant conveniently located at
the main front ground floor entrance of Aventura Mall. Clyde's is
noted for having a delicious and varied menu at very reasonable
prices. The beauty of our restaurants is a perfect compliment to our
fine food, and you'll enjoy our live entertainment and dancing till the
wee hours of the morning. We invite you to join us for our daily
"happy hour'' with complimentary buffet, as well as ou' takeout
service "Clydes on the Run." Come and experience Ci/c). s we
know you'll enjoy your visit!
Aventura Mall: 19575 Biscayne Boulevard. 932-3800 (Brwd 764 30401
Miami Lakes: 16780 N.W. 67th Avenue, 825-7141
Kendall: 7702 S.W. 88th Street (North Kendall Drive). 595 4141
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Roundtrip airfare Miami Tel Aw
Special Land Tours Available
Pricing available from other citiei.
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Traurig President of Opera Assn,
Friday, December 28,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Ohev Shalom Elects
H. Traurig has been
Ted" president of the Greater
j Opera Association by the
of directors at its annual
King
accepting the position Trau-
complimented the opera's
g and prior administration
i acknowledged the role of the
rent leadership in continuing
qualitv of service of the
"One of the opera's prin-
|"goals is to achieve greater
orate involvement in the
of the association," said
Krturig. a partner in the law firm
I Greenborg. Traurig, Askew,
an. Lipoff, Rosen and
hotel
The general manager of the
Greater Miami Opera is Robert
Herman and Robert M. Heuer is
assistant general manager. Other
officers of the association elected
at the annual meeting include Dr.
Adelio J. Montanari, first vice
president; Herman, vice presi-
dent for advocacy and develop-
ment; James M. Herron, execu-
tive vice president; Mrs. Arthur
F. Adams, vice chair of the
board; and E. Frederick
Halstead, treasurer.
New members of the board of
directors are Carlos Arboleya and
Miami Beach Mayor Malcolm H.
Fromberg. Elected to the execu-
tive committee were Dr. Horacio
Aguirre and Gilbert S. Kahn.
NCCJ Honorees Chosen
\i the 33rd annual
Ijrotherhood Awards Dinner of
I;, National Conference of
ristians and Jews to be held on
16 in the ballroom at Omni
Icternational, three Dade County
Ic'.izens will be awarded a silver
nedallion tor service that has im-
oved religious amity in the
nmunity.
Jewish honoree is Judge
ving C>pen, senior partner in
firm of Cypen, Cypen and
bin. Judge Cypen is chairman
ith? board of the Miami Jewish
ome and Hospital for the aged,
Founder of Mount Sinai
Center where he is also a
president and trustee, an
utive committee member and
Judaism 101'
Classes in basic Judaism for
lion-Jews and Jews will meet
|cnce a week for 15 weeks begin-
j in January. Rabbi Ted Feld-
lun. president of the Southeast
lEegion of the Rabbinical As-
lenbly of America, has an-
liounced the resumption of the
lasses, which teach basic philo-
Isophy of Judaism, the holidays,
It** life cycle, Jewish ritual ob-
|jtctsand the Jewish community.
Rabbi F.dwin Farber, chair of
Ilk committee planning the
losses, has scheduled the South
iDide classes for Wednesday
ights and the North Miami
l&ach sessions for Tuesday
loenings
\Dorothy Willis is the author
M lyricist of "Fanny and
Wfc," an original musical
[comedy which premieres
(**uary 12 at the Konover
\Hotel.
3 People Wounded In
Grenade Attack
iJjL AVIV (JTA> A
land grenade tossed at a bus
u a vegetable market sent
R people to the hospital for
GJSMnt of 8,int wounds and
l|oock. Police cordoned off the
Via in central Tel Aviv to search
L the assailants.
. ""{je bus was waiting at a stop
* Hashmonayim Street outside
wholesale vegetable market
E" a grenade was hurled over
wall- that surrounds the
Ket. Eyewitnesses said they
'* 'everal men running from
scene. All of the bus windows
PJ shattered, littering a wide
** with broken glass.
trustee of the Anti-Defamation
League, a board member and
former vice president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, and an active member of
many other organizations that
serve the local, national and
international community.
Dr. Willie C. Robinson, presi-
dent of Florida Memorial College,
is the Protestant award winner,
and Octavio Verdeja, a certified
public accountant and managing
partner of Verdeja, Iriondo and
Gravier, will be the Roman
Catholic recipient.
Ohev Shalom Congregation
elected new officers at its annual
meeting. The slate includes Leo
Hack, president; Isaac Ben-
mergui, Gideon Liviem, Adolf
Sicherman, and Louis Weiss, vice
presidents; Irwin Schwartz.
recording secretary; Michael
Diveroli, treasurer; and Samuel
Elbaum, financial secretary.
Rabbi Pinchas A. Weberman is
spiritual leader of the congre-
gation.
Robert H. Traurig
Bufman Production
Opens at Parker
"Little Shop of Horrors," a
prize-winning musical spoof of
the monster movies of the
Sixties, will be the second of
producer Zev Bufman's six-play
theatrical season. It opens New
Year's Eve, Monday, Dec. 31, at
8 p.m. at the Parker Playhouse in
Fort Lauderdale.
PASSOVER-1985
UNIVERSAL KOSHER TOURS INC.
PRESENTS
A TRADITIONAL AND KOSHER
PASSOVER HOLIDAY
AT THE "NEW"
($20 Million Beautification )ust Completed)
DIPLOMAT, FLORIDA
FROM
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Complete Clatt Kosher Holiday Program
From $859 to $1199 per person double occupancy
Plus 18% taxes and gratuities
For Additional Information Contact:
Universal Kosher Tours Inc.
5 Penn Plaza
New York, New York 10001
212-594-0836 800-221-2791
Exclusive Operator for DIPLOMAT, FLORIDA
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Store* with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Family Size, Rye or
Pumpernickel
$159
2-*.
If
loaf
Available at Publix Store* with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
For Your New Year's Party,
Bake and Serve
Gourmet
IHors d' Oeuvres
"fiy
95
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Miniature
Danish
$Q99
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Decorated for the New Year
Holiday Cup Cakes.. 6 u *189
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Great for Sandwiches
Kaiser Rolls................6 to, 79<
Kringle Coffee Cake ... 2&* *3"
Rugalach....................... ,b $399

Danish Cherry Strip.... each $189
Mini Powdered
Sugar Donuts...............Ifif !
Allow us to create for you a specialty dessert tray for your New Year's Party or special meal.
These trays are made from a delicious assortment of fresh Danish Bakery Delights. Ask your
bakery salesperson for details. ,------rr^-^ .
;. ^ Prices Effective
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3Sp Dec. 27th thru Jan 2nd. 1985
Quantity
Rights Reserved

^*>


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 28, 1984

The Hebrew Academy 371
Left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Adler, Mr.
Mr. Robert Marlin, Ms. Jackie Bowen. Mrs.
Florence Marlin, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Colon, and
Mr. Gary Marlin and guest.
tr. and Mrs. Roberto Duenas. Mr. and Mrs. Julio Mrs Rohert Turchin, Mr. and Mrs Hc'nnv L?n"I
stacio, Mr. and Mrs. David Dobm. '' -v I
Left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Jack Burstein, Ms.
Jackie Bowen, Mr. Robert Marlin, Mr. and Mrs.
Alexander Rosner.
Left to right: Dr. and Mrs. David Reinhard, Mr.
and Mrs. Seymour Reinhard, Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Reinhard.
Left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Milton Brafman. Dr.
and Mrs. Abe Rotbart, Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence
Ciment.
Left to right: Mr. Isaac Serure, Miss Bobbie
Serure, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Stern, Mrs. Judi
Saka, Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Saka
&
Left to right: Mr. Monroe Zalkin, Mr. Isaac Fryd,
Mr. Frank Tolin.

Left to right: Dr. and Mrs. Warren Tepper,
and Mrs. Norman Ciment, Comm. and Mrs. Bet
Grenald.
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Mescon, Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Gittelman, Mr. and Mrs. Jay Kaiser.
V\
Dr. and Mrs. Robert Galbut, Dr. and Mrs.
Galbut, Mr. and Mrs. Abraham Galbut.
DavM
Left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Jeffrey Klein, Mr.
Menashe Kadishman, Mr. and Mrs. Michael
Fischer.

li
Mr. Ron Dermer, Mrs. Yaffa Dermer,
Gertrude Shapiro. Mrs. Charlotte fiose and Mi-
Henry Stern.
Mr. and Mrs. Zvi Gold, Dr. and Mrs. Robert
Heller and Mr. and Mrs. Jack Cohen.
Mr. Stanley De Covney, Mrs. Carolyn Goode, Mr.
and Mrs. Kenneth Stowe.
Left to right: Mrs. Martha Schechet, Mrs. CM<|
Kadar, Mrs. Vivian Gluck, Mrs. Linda Bogin


Friday, December 28.1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
nual Scholarship Dinner
n
%
to right: Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Rosenblatt,
fy'r. and Mrs. Isadore Wollowick, Mr. and Mrs.
arles Merwitzer.
}-i
hir. and Mrs. Harold Broun, Mr. Steven Brown,
\Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kanter.
ILeft to right: Mr. and Mrs. Mauricio Gluck, Mr.
land Mrs. Alexander Rosner, Mr. and Mrs. Barry
\Bogin.
r
'^ft to right: Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Ben-Ezra, Mr.
w Mrs. Seymour Brief, Mr. and Mrs. Chaim
nend.
eft to right: Dr. and Mrs. Herbert Lerner, Mrs.
^irley Gross, Mr. and Mrs. Erwin Marshall
Left to right: Dr. and Mrs. Lee Goldberg, Dr. and
Mrs. Douglas Slavin, Mr. and Mrs. Scott Colish,
Dr. and Mrs. Norman Ditchek.
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Podhurst, Mr. and Mrs. Harry,
Lasko, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Lasko.
* r
*V4
Mr. and Mrs. Jean Nordmann, Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Sanders, Mr. and Mrs. Abe Resnick.
Left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rackman, Mr.
and Mrs. Howard Bienenfeld Dr. and Mrs. Jack
Miller, Mr. and Mrs. Michael Genet.
\Left to right: Dr. and Mrs. Joel Nagler, Mr. and
Mrs. Nathaniel Zemel, Mr. and Mrs. Max Rothen-
berg.
Mr. and Mrs. Hyman Chabner, Mr. and Mrs.
Bennett Silverman, Mr. Bob Behar and Mrs.
Dahlia Lipner.
\Mr. and Mrs. Gerald Ness, Dr. and Mrs. Elias
Herschmann, Mr. and Mrs. Jerome Bienenfeld and
, Mr. and Mrs. Irving Firtel.
Left to right: Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Shapiro, Dr. and
Mrs. Itzhak Retter, Dr. and Mrs. Randy Makov-
, sky. Dr. and Mrs. Mario Nanes.
Dr. and Mrs. Michael Kanner, Ms. Robin Stern,
Dr. and Mrs. Norman Turoff and Mr. and Mrs.
Ricky Turetsky.
jm.
a.

Left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Leo Hack, Mr. AI
Golden and guest, Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Benmergui,
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Maltz. .,
.........'.' '' -'"* '
Mr. arui Mrs. Michael Fischer, Drs. Joseph and
Joan Harris, Mayor and Mrs. Malcolm Fromberg.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 28,1984
Weddings
WEBER-WEINER
Suzanne Weiner, daughter of Paula and
Hyman Weiner of North Bay Village, was
married to Mark Alexander Weber, son of Carol
and Lenard Weber, on Thursday, Dec. 27.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Rabbi Irving Lehrman,
and Cantor Yehuda Shifman officiated at the
ceremony at Temple Emanu-El.
The bride, dressed in white satin, was attended
by Eva Weiner-Weiss. Bridesmaids were Carole
Amster, Shanni Weber, Rhonna W. Rogol,
Rebecca Gartner, Mindy Share and Dori Seltman.
Best man was Joseph Mark Weiner. Brian
Rogol, Marlon Weiss, Steven Zats, Steve
Maroon, Jim Blaney and Daniel Liebman were
ushers.
Mrs. Weber, a graduate of Florida State
University, is studying for her MS at Columbia
University and her MA at the Jewish Theological
Seminary.
Mr. Weber is completing the requirements for a
master's degree in business administration at
Columbia University. He is a graduate of the
University ef Pennsylvania.
Special guests at the wedding included Hyman
Chabnez, a cousin of the bride, who brought the
bride's parents from the Soviet Union on Dec. 27,
1959.
After the reception at Temple Emanu-El the
couple left for a wedding trip to Montego Bay
Upon their return they will live in New York City.
LEVINNASSI
The marriage of Victoria Nassi, daughter of
Ruth Nassi of North Miami Beach and the late
Leon Nassi, and Dr. Richard Levin, son of Eunice
and Leonard Levin of Providence, R.I., was
solemnized on Dec. 25 at Beth Torah Congrega-
tion.
Rabbi Max Lipschitz and Rabbi David Harary
officiated at the Ceremony.
The bride was attended by matron of honor Idel
Leibowitz.
The groom's best man was Dr. Robert Levin,
and ushers were Ira Nassi and Jeffrey Golumbuk,
with junior usher Jason Lee Nassi.
The bride is director of the Women's Division
at Combined Jewish Philanthropies of Greater
Boston. She has a bachelor's degree in criminal
justice, Phi Beta Kappa, from the University of
Florida, and holds a master's degree in Jewish
communal service from Brandeis University.
Dr. Levin is a psychologist in private practice
in Brookline, Mass., and is director of planning,
research and development at Jewish Family and
Children's Service of Greater Boston. He studied
for his bachelor's and master's degrees at
Brandeis University and received his doctorate in
counseling and human services from Boston Uni-
versity.
The wedding reception was held at Beth Torah
The couple will live in Brookline.
Mrs. Weber
' *
Martin Silver (right), executive vice president of Hebrew
National Kosher Foods, receives a plaque from Rabbi Tibor H.
Stern, national rabbinic chairman of Hebrew National, at the
recent Israel Bonds dinner in New York honoring Silver.
Goldberg Wins Award
Alvin Goldberg, executive vice president of Mount Sinai
Medical Center, has won the 17th annual Florida Hospital
Research and Education Foundation Award of Merit for'
significant contributions to the hospital industry.
Goldberg, who will retire at the end of the year after 16 years
with Mt. Sinai, is a past chair of the Florida Hospital
Association and of the South Florida Hospital Association.
Gifted Program
The Jewish High School of
South Florida has instituted i
program for gifted students. It is
being coordinated by Dr. Irving
Kay, physics instructor, and
supervised by Joan Gale, college
guidance counselor at the school.
Hebrew National
Exec. Honored
The Kosher Food Industry
Division of New York held a
special Israel Bond dinner
honoring Martin Silver, exec-
utive vice president of Hebrew
National Kosher Foods.
The dinner at the Essex House
in New York on Dec. 16 was
attended by leading executives
from management and labor and
officials of the Israeli govern-
ment.
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern, national
rabbinic chair of Hebrew
National Kosher Foods,
presented a menorah plaque to
Silver in recognition of many
years of service on behalf of Isra-
el Bonds.
Hebrew National is active in a
variety of Israeli and American
cultural and benevolent projects
and in efforts to further
traditional and religious values.
Young artists Compete
for Cash, Scholarships
In the fourth nationwide talent
search to be conducted by the
Miami-based National Founda-
tion for Advancement in the
Arts, approximately 150 of
America's most talented young
artists will be invited to Miami
Jan. 8-13, to vie for up to
$400,000 in cash awards, over S3
million in college scholarships,
and a chance to be named a U.S.
Presidential Scholar in the Arts.
During the series of individual
auditions, workshops and master
classes concluding the 1984-85
Arts Recognition and Talent
Search (ARTS), the young artists
will be judged by expert panels in
dance, music, theater, visual arts
and writing.
ay
MANTELL PLAZA
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Block To Be Robed Jan. 4.
Former South Miami Mayor
jack Block, elected circuit judge
m September, will be sworn in on
jan. 4 at noon at the Dade
County Courthouse.
Florida Secretary of State
fieortff Firestone will swear in
judge-elect Block. Gerald T.
\\etru rington, chief judge of the
circuit will officiate. Former pre-
sident of the Florida Bar Robert
piovd will bring greetings, and
ij, Harranco. president of the
pg(i( County Bar Association,
ak on behalf of that body.
Hialeah Mayor Haul Martinez
jnd I lade County Commissioner
Barbara Carey will address the
assembly.
The judge's wife, Shirley, and
their children Bart, Russell, Dr.
Keith, and Wendy will robe
judge Mlock.
Dr. Irving Lehrman of Temple
Emanu-El will offer an in-
vocation.
Judge Block is a graduate of
Business Note
Robin Helaine Stern of Miami
Beach recently completed the
Professional Sales Represen-
tative curriculum at Pfizer Lab-
oratories, after participating in a
four-part, training program
designed to prepare new sale
representatives for their work
vith medical professionals.
Friday. December 28.1984 / The Jewish Floridian ^PgeJ7-B
Judge Jack Block
Roman Dzindzichashivli, a
Soviet Georgian who emi-
grated from the Soviet Union
to Israel, is in the U.S. to play
50 chess opponents at once at
the Diplomat West on Satur-
day, Dec. 29, beginning at 11
a.m.
u
the University of Miami School
of Law who has practiced law in
Dade County since 1964. He
belongs to the American Judges
Association, the American
Arbitration Association and the
American Judicature Society.
His civic memberships include
the Knights of Pythias. Civic
Association of South Miami,
Keep Florida Beautiful. Inc.. and
Southwest Realtors Association.
He retired after 16 years as
mayor of South Miami.
Sleuth"at Grove
The third production for the
1984-85 season at the Coconut
Grove Playhouse introduces a
Tony-winning mystery, Anthony
Shaffer's "Sleuth.'' Patrick
Macnee ( "The Avengers") and
Jordan Christopher ( "Star 90,"
"Brainstorm"!, who performed
together in the play on Broadway
in 1973, will mystify South
Florida audiences, under the
direction of Jose Ferrer, from
Dec. 28-Jan. 20.
Shown planning the Jan. 9 lucnheon to benefit Women's Cancer
League projects are (left to right), co-chairs Melvyne Sommers
and Ann Koven and board chair Nancy Greene.
Cancer Fundraiser Jan. 9
The 26th annual fundraising
luncheon of the Women's Cancer
league of Miami Beach is set for
Wednesday. Jan. 9, in the Grand
Ballroom of the Fontainebleau-
Hilton.
Toby Friedland, president of
the league, has announced that
honorees on this occasion will be
Jerome and Thelma Joseph, Mt.
Sinai Founders. Mr. Joseph is a
life member of Mt. Sinai's board
of trustees, a member of the
executive committee, and serves
as vice president of the medical
center. Mrs. Joseph involves
herself in the Women's Cancer
League as a life member, and is
also a member of Mt. Sinai's
Auxiliary.
Chairs of the event are Morry
and Ann Koven and co-chair is
Melvyne Sommers; chairman of
the board for the league, Nancy
Greene, is also one of the plan-
ners.
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Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 28,1984


FLORIDA FRIENDS OF ALBERT EINST1
1 ITS OWN ALUMNUS OF THE YEAR CB
AT ITS 1984 DISTINGUISHED A
NOVEMBER 18, 1984 I
Dr. and Mrs. Norman Lamm are greeted by Mr.
and Mrs. Isidore Wollowick.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Jerome Joseph chat with Dr. and
Mrs. Charles Weiss.
YU President Dr. Norman Lamm presents
Benefactor Globe to M'riam and Sidney Olson in
recognition of their endowment of a chair in
cardiology at Einstein College of Medicine.
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Paskow congratulate Teena
and Charles Weiss.
Mr. and Mrs Harold Konover chat with Dr. and
Mrs. Norman Lamm.
Cal Kovens offers best wishes to Teena and
Charles Weiss.
(Standing left to right) Rabbi and Mrs. Haskell
Bernat, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Lapidus. (Seated left
to right) Dr. and Mrs. Fred Rosenbloom and Mr.
and Mrs. Nathan Gumenick were on hand to pay
tribute to Einstein and Dr. Weiss.
Sidney Olson presents special award to Teena
Weiss, "A Woman of Valor," while Einstein
southeast director Chaim H. Friend looks on.
Drs. Joseph and Joan Harris enjoy a laugh with
Miami Beach Mayor Malcolm and Arlene
Fromberg.
Ruth and ('haim Friend offer their congratulations
to honor Dr. Charles Weiss.
Florida Friends of Albert Einstein ('ollef Mk
Yeshiva Einstein President Dr. Norman Lai,.^rW
to Einstein alumnus Dr. Charles Weiss,
The Weiss Family; Richard, 14; Teena; Charles,
and Hillary. Hi; share a special moment.
Dr. and Mrs. Norman Lamm and the Hon. and
Mrs. Meir Rosenne. Ambassador Rosenne is a
longtime friend of Yeshiva University and Albert
Einstein College of Medicine.
Dr. and Mrs. Kip Amazon and Dr. and Mrs. Les
Rosen who were among numerous colleagues 0)
Dr. Weiss attended dinner.


KVidv
Friday. December 28, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
TEIN COLLEGE OF MEDICINE HONORS
GHARLES WEISS, M.D. (CLASS OF 1963)
ACHIEVEMENT AWARD DINNER
MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA
i^^^^fh
dicine Chairman Sidney L. Olson (left) and
t) present Distinguished Achievement Award
Mr and Mrs. Theodore Baumnttcr, longtime
Einstein supporters and benefactors, catch up on
ncic developments at College, from Yeshivu
President Dr. Norman Lamm.
Miami Beach Mayor Malcolm Frombcrg presents
Certificate of appreciation and key to City to Dr.
Charles Weiss, while Yeshiva President Norman
yZitrm looks on. Mayor Fromherg also issued
proclamation declaring November 18, 1984,
Albert Einstein College of Medicine Day on
Miami Beach.
Mr and Mrs. George Bergman were among the
"tuny friends of the honoree present
The Hon. Meir Rosenne. Ambassador of Israel to
the United States, and the evening's keynote
speaker, and Mrs. Rosenne; meet old friends
Lydia and Peter Goldring.
Dr. George Wise, who recently received honorary
doctorate from Yeshiva University, is welcomed
by Teena Weiss and Dr. Norman Lamm, President
of Yeshiva University.
Proud parents Mr. and Mrs. Philip Weiss with the
honoree.
Charles and Teena Weiss are congratulated by
Nietv and Gary Gerson.
UNIVERSITY
Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Sufnick chat with Dr. and
Mrs. Philip Samct.
Judy Drucker, Chaim H. Friend and Teena Weiss
look on, as Dr. Leon Kronish prepares to make
motzie.
Dr. Larry Robbins, who interned at Einstein, and
Mrs. Robbins, share memories with Teena and
Charles Weiss.
Einstein graduate Dr. Joseph Singer and Mrs.
Singer recall "the old days" at Einstein with YU
President Dr. Norman and Mrs. Lamm.
Alice Vinik, David Miller and Helen and James
Knopke get together at pre-dinner reception.
Ubert Einstein College of Medicine Founder
Sue BerkowiU (center) chats with Dr. and Mrs
Norman Lamm.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, December 28,1984
Elsa and Isaac Silberberg /center) are shown at the annual
Israel Dinner of State held at the Diplomat and sponsored by
the Cuban-Hebrew Division of the State of Israel Bonds
Organization. Presenting the Gates of Jerusalem Medallion to
the SUberbergs is Rabbi Yaakov Sprung (right) while Israeli
Consul General Yehoshua Trigor (left) looks on.
Prof. Bonia Shur
Beth Am Hosts
Prof. Shur
Prof. Bonia Shur, director of
music at the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion in Cincinnati, will give a
lecture accompanied by music.
'The Magic of Jewish Music," on
Friday, Dec. 28, following 8:15
p.m. services at Temple Beth
Am.
Prof. Shur appears as part of
the Beth Am Forum series, a gift
from Ethyl Light in memory of
George Light.
Irwin Field, chair of United Israel Appeal, and Harry A. (Hap)
Levy, elected to the board at the recent annual meeting of the
board of trustees of VIA, are shown conferring at the New York
meeting.
United Israel Appeal Elects
United Israel Appeal re-elected
Irwin Field of Los Angeles as
chairman during its annual
meeting of trustees this month in
New York City. UIA. the major
beneficiary of United Jewish
Appeal funds, announced the
allocation of $316,279,805 in
fiscal 1984 for programs of the
Jewish Agency for Israel, in-
cluding funds for Project
Renewal.
Field in his chairman's report
underlined the excellent relations
between UIA and the U.S.
Department of State, saying,
"Constructive contacts with *
Washington have led to fruitful
cooperation in the rescue of
endangered Jewish com-
munities."
Miamians elected to the board
of trustees of United Israel
Appeal were Michael M. Adler.
Herb Canarick. Norman H.
Lipoff, Forrest Raff el, and Harry
A. (Hap) I-evy.
Shown celebrating the gift of$l million made by Polly deHirsch
Meyer (right center) to the Diabetes Research Institute are
chairs for the Jan. 26 Love and Hope Ball (left to right) Donald
and Lola Jacobson, honorary chairmen; life chair Sonja
Zuckerman; Meyer; and chairs Kathy and Leon Simkins.
Friedman Investiture
Wetherington will preside at the
ceremonies. Rabbi Brett S.
Goldstein, vice president of the
Greater Miami Rabbinical
Association and spiritual leader
of Temple Shir Ami. will offer the
invocation.
Investiture of Ronald M.
Friedman as Dade County circuit
judge will take place on Thur-
sday. January 3rd, at noon at the
Dade County Courthouse.
Chief Judge Gerald T.
Hug Tanach Resumes
The winter session of Hug
Tanach. the advanced Bible
study group conducted by Rabbi
Jehuda Melber, will commence
Monday, Jan. 7, from 9:30 to
11:30 a.m. at Temple Beth
Raphael.
The 30-year-old group holds its
meetings in Hebrew, and is in the
midst of a study of the"Minor
Prophets." according to Rabbi
Melber.
The group is co-sponsored by
Moadon Ivri, headed by Dr. Jo-
seph Diamond, and CAJE.
Speaker at
Homecoming Sabbath
Annual Homecoming Sabbath
at Temple Emanu-El will be
observed Friday during 8 p.m.
services led by Rabbi Irving
Lehrman.
Student speakers who will par-
ticipate in the services include
Keith Grumer, a senior at the
Universal) if Miami Law School
and son of Mrs. Howard Grumer:
Lauren Oper, a senior at Cornell
and daughter of Eileen Oper and
Dr Arnold Oper; and Adam
Mihcon, a Vanderbilt sopho-
more who is the son of Mrs.
I^srer Mis he )
f
i ,>n t<>r *t Ml Shifman and
the temple choir under the direc-
tion of Shmuel Fershko will
provide music.
Judge Milton A. Friedman,
father of the new judge, and wife
Janyice will participate in the
robing at the investiture.
Judge Friedman has been
assigned to the criminal division
of the circuit court.
Sen. Jack Gordon (D., Miami
Beach) was the only state
legislator to address a key
session of the American
Enterprise Institute for Public
Policy Research's national
meeting on state government
efforts to improve American
education, held recently in
Washington, D.C.
HISTORICAL
MUSEUM
OF
SOUTHERN
FLORIDA
Group Leaders
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For Preferred Viewing!
"JEWISH LIFE IN AMERICA:
FULFILLING THE AMERICAN DREAM"
February 18-March 16,1985
The Historical Museum of Southern Florida
375-1625
Reservations made prior to January 15 will receive
an additional 5% discount.
E.Belle -M.Santos
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Tk kets $14.50 per person 'Sixk uil
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-Thurs 9:()() pm, Fri. & Sat. 9:00 pm
& 1!: 30 pm. and Sun 100 & 8:00
pm For reservations, call 865-8511
today. Tk kets also available at Bass
and Select-a-Seal outlets.
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Collins Avenue & 67th Street
RESERVE EARLY FOR A VERY
SPECIAL NEW YEAR'S EVE.
Tic kets $50 per person.
Includes tax \ gratuity, party
favors, bottle of champagne,
show and dancing with the
David Knight Band until...


Friday, December 28,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 1 IB
,at Mitzvah-
Elisa Blynn
Keith H. Simon
SHARON
i ELISA BLYNN
I and Elisa Blynn will be
j the Torah as B'not
fat Temple Beth Moshe
jay. Dec. 29.
Lin daughters of Michael
her Blynn will read from
fch as well as chant the
lvnn sisters are honor
at North Miami Jr.
tool in the Dade County
for Gifted Students.
[has won prizes at the
junty Youth Fair in art
try, and is a member of
High School Advanced
Pisa, also a member of the
d Hand, was a first-place
at the Youth Fair for her
Jtiits with frogs.
quests in attendance
will be brother Jeremy, great-
grandmother Mrs. Clara LaValle,
great-aunt Mrs. Louis Mann, Mr.
and Mrs. Steven Levy, Mr. and
Mrs. Alan Bekelman and their
sons, Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Levy,
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Biederman,
and Florence and Winnie West.
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Levy,
maternal grandparents, will
sponsor the kiddush after the
services in honor of the occasion,
and the twins' parents will host a
children's party in the evening.
MARC FREEMAN
Marc Freeman will celebrate
his Bar Mitzvah at Temple Ner
Tamid on Saturday, Dec. 29. at
8:45 a.m. in the main sanctuary.
Marc is the son of Alan
Freeman and Dale Freeman, who
will host the kiddush following
the services in honor of the oc-
casion.
fynopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
f'And they took their cattle, and their goods, which they
gotten in the land of Canaan, and came into Egypt,
and all his seed with him"
(Genesis 46.6).
VAYIGASH
flGASH JUDAH approached Joseph and offered
?lf as a servant in Benjamin's stead, as he was respon-
for the youngest son to their father. Unable to contain
^elf any longer, Joseph revealed himself to his dumb-
ck brothers. He bade them return to Canaan, gather
ther their families and possessions, and return to Egypt
the duration of the famine. At Beersheba God removed
lbs doubts as to the wisdom of this course of action; He
feared to Jacob with the words: "Fear not to go down into
3t; for I will there make of thee a great nation" (Genesis
|J. Jacob came to Egypt "with seventy souls." Joseph
them the land of Goshen to settle in. There they
rished and multiplied.
recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
["The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Won
Tsamir, sis, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 7s
in Lane, New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang it president of the
distributing the volume.)
INTERNAL MEDICINE, DIABETES,
THYROID DISEASE, ENDOCRINOLOGY
Hours By Appointment
D20 N.E. 163rd Street
luite 202
torth Miami Beach, Fl. 33162
"35)944-1555
2301 North University Dr.
Suite 203
Pembroke Pines, Fl. 33024
962 7766
ANDREA WEISBERG
Andrea Weisberg, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Jay Weisberg,
will be called to the Torah as a
Bat Mitzvah on Saturday, Dec.
29, at 9 a.m. at Beth David
Congregation.
Andrea is a graduate of
Solomon Schechter Day School
and attends Palmetto Jr. High
School in the 8th grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Weisber will host
the Kiddush following the ser-
vices in honor of the occasion,
and a reception at Beth David
that evening.
MATTHEW ACKERMAN
At Shabbat services on
Saturday, Dec. 29, Matthew
Ackerman will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah at
Temple Beth Sholom.
The son of Mrs. Nancy Acker-
man, Matthew is a student of the
Confirmation Class of 5747.
Rabbi Leon Kronish, Rabbi
Harry Jolt and Rabbi Paul
Caplan will officate at the ser-
vices.
KEITH SIMON
Keith H. Simon, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Murray Simon, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, Dec. 29, at
Temple Emanu-El. Rabbi Dr.
I rving Lehrman will officiate.
Keith is a student at Pinecrest
School in Fort Lauderdale in the
7th grade. He enjoys all sports
and has an extensive collection of
baseball cards.
Special guests at services will
include Keith's great-
grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. A.J.
Molasky. members of the temple
for many years. Grandparents
Maurice and Sylvia Frankel of
St. Louis, aunt Helene Frankel of
St. Louis, and great-great aunt
and uncle Ruth and Sid Holtz-
man of Los Angeles will also
attend.
A reception will be held in the
Friedland Ballroom of the temple
in honor of the occasion.
Advertising Sales
Ve're looking for energetic and
notivated people to work on our
lisplay advertising sales staff.
[f you have experience in sales
and/or advertising and are look-
ing for a growth opportunity,
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305-3734605
Synagogue
Listing
CandlelightingTime
5:20 p.m.
Theodore Bikel narrates the
\ documentary "Future Tech
from Technion," which took
the bronze medal in the 1984
International Film and TV
Festival recently in New York.
The 15-minute color film
celebrates the 60th an-
niversary of the Technion and
illustrates the role of its
graduates in Israel's science-
based industries.
"" 'FUNDRAISER---------
Distinguished Israeli medical
facility seeks quality represen-
tation in Miami-Palm Beach, to
develop local chapter and signif-
icant fundraising events. Write:
AMM c/o Jewish Floridian. P.O.
Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drlva
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Consarvatlve
Friday 8:15 p.m. Sal Mltivah Lori Nizel (USSR.
Btonlaalaua Bariiun In abaanlla).
Saturday 8:30 a.m. Bar Mitzvah: Adam Ehrilch
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbart
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
Jamaa L. Simon, Assoclat* Rabbi
Friday 8 p.m.
Saturday 9 1S a.m. B'nal Mltivah: Alan Jacobs
and Marc Walaa (Rabbi Simon officiating).
11:15 am B'nai Mitzvah. Marc Billings and
Scott Ooldbarg (Rabbi Baumgard officiating:
sarmon topic: "The Difficulty of Coming
Naar to People1 ')
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way: 2825 S.W 3rd Avenue f'S\\
South Dad. 7M0 S.W 120th Street I f /
RABBI DAVID H.AUERBACH -JS'
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Friday 8pm South Dade Chapel Services
Saturday 9 a.m Coral Way Sanctuary
B'not Mitzvah Metanie Feltzin and Andrea
Leigh Weisberg
temple betM-EL6PW6rTHbAV
VILLAGE (Conservative)
7800 Hispanola Ave.. conveniently
located just oft 79 St. Cswy.. --gj,
Rabbi Marvin Rose -JV '
Cantor Danny Tadmore V**'
Friday 9 p.m.
Saturday 9 a.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Waahlngton Avanua /
Miami Baach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Friday Kabbalat Sh.boat eervlce S p.m.
Late service 8 p.m. Annual Homecoming
Sabbath
Rabbi Lehrman sermon topic: 'Thou Shall
Taach Them Diligently Unto Thy Children
Saturday 9 am Rabbi Lehrman sermon topic.
Tha Weakly Portion
Bar Mitzvah: Keith Simon
Dally services 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Blank Chapel
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnatraa Drlva, Miami Baach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlft
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Donald P. Cashman
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Associate Cantor RacheJIe F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. Goldln
Friday 8 p.m. Downtown Rabbi Bernat sarmon
topic "Reagan II Tha Beginning ot
a New Reign"
Kendall. Rabbi Cashman sermon topic
"Bratty Little Brothe.s I Have Known
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Friday 8 15 p m
Saturday 9:30 a m. Bat Mitzvah Abby Shatanof
11:30a m. Bar Mitzvah Jack Osman
BETHKODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 859-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Friday 8:1S p.m. Rabbi Shapiro
sermon topic '198$: Year Of
Hope!"
Saturday 8:4$ a.m. and 5 p.m.
(fl
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chaee Ava. A 41 at St. 536-7231
DM. LEON KRONISH. RABBI Liberal
HARRY JOLT, AUXILIARY RABBI
PAUL 0. CAPLAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CONVISER
'Friday 8:18 p.m. Rabbi Jolt sermon topic:
''Good Bye, 1984"
[ Saturday 10:48 a.m. Bar Mitzvah: Matthew
'______ Ackerman
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
RABBI ISRAEL JACOBS
CANTOR MOSHE FRIEDLER
RABBI EMERITUS JOSEPH A. QORFINKEL
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR IRVING JARET
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTOR BARBARA SHULMAN
HEBREW PRINCIPAL ORLV ALEXANDER
Daily services 8 a.m. 5 p.m. ./fig.x
Friday 8 p.m. >W)<
Saturday 9 a.m. B'not Mitzvah: N.Je.'
Elisa and Sharon Blynn
Sermon 11 a.m.

TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
Friday services 7:30 pm
Saturday. 9:30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz /sRr*
Cantor Murray Yavneh w)
Morning services 8 am
Frl Isle service 8 IS pm
Saturday Morning services 9 am.
Saturday Evening services 7*45 pm.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ava.. M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nlsslm Benyamlni
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866 8345*
7902 Cartyte Ave.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz conservative
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally services 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
Friday 8 p.m.
Saturday 8:45 a.m.
Rabbi Labovitz and Cantor Klein aaaiatad
by the Temple Choir
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Baach
971-Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Baach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Baach Blvd.
Dr. Max A LipachiU, Rabbi
Randall Konlgsburg, Aaat. Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec Director
Dally Service* 7:30 a.m. and ,.<
5:30 p.m. f \
Friday late service 8 p.m. ,
Saturday 8:25 a.m. and 5:15 p.m.
Sunday 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m.
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ave. & 75 St.. 382-3343
Rabbi Warren Kaaztl Mod* omiorjoi
Fn eve 7 pm
Sat. 9.30 am. Sat afternoon 20 mm before
Sundown Morning Minyan Mon Thura 8:45 am
Tims.. Wad. I Fn 7 a., followed by class
in Camera Berachot iMemot.all
BETHYOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
643 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwalg, Rabbl
TEMPLE SINAI 16801 NE 22 Ava.
North Dado's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkea, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Friday 8 15 p m Rabbl Kingsley /ivilv
sermon topic: "Tha Revolt of I CO I
Job." College Homecoming I J '
Sabbath
Saturday 10:30 a.m. Bar Mitzvah:
Matthew Silvers
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave., Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovltch, Rabbi
Moshe Buryn. Cantor
Aron Kellon, President
Shabbat Services 8 30 am Sermon to 3*
Dally Minyan
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
6000 Miller Dr. rMma_.
2712311 Coneorvathw*
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbl
Benjamin Adlar, Cantor
David Rosanthal, *fc*N
Auxiliary Cantor '. jT,-
Friday 8 15 p m College Homecoming.
Sabbath
Saturday 9 a.m. Sabbath services.
Tattler Chapel


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. December 28. 1984
Community Come.
Temple Beth Sholom Brotherhood will hold a breakfast on
Sunday at 10:30 a.m. Dr. Henry Green, director of Judaic
studies at the University of Miami, will discuss Signals of
Culture: The Untold Legacy."
"The Silver Cord" by Sidney Howard is the next play at Ruth
Foreman Theatre, running Jan. 3 to Feb. 3. Wednesday through
Sunday at 8 p.m. with matinees on Wednesday and Thursday at
2 p.m.. Sunday at 3 p.m.
Pioneer Women-Na amat s Masada Chapter will meet Jan. 2
at 12:30 pjn. for a review of the book "Brothers" by Bernice
Reubens. Bertha Liebermann. president of the chapter, will
review this history of European Jews.
Temple Ner Tamid Men's Club will hold a breakfast on
Sunday. Jan. 6. in the Sklar Auditorium at 9:30 a.m.
Lakes Branch. National Council of Jewish Women, will hold a
membership meeting on Wednesday at 11:30 ajn. at Golden
Glades Masonic Lodge. Katherme Ruaaelf will sing, ac-
companied by Josepk Lewn at the piano.
Biscayne Chapter. Women's American ORT. plans its next
meeting for Thursday at noon at American Savings. Lincoln and
Alton roads.
B nai B'rith Lodge 1591 will hold a Forum on Friday at 12:30
p.m. in the 100 Lincoln Road social hall, with speaker Rabbi
David Raab of Temple king Solomon giving predictions for
1985.
The next meeting of Haim Yassky Chapter of Hadassah will
be Wednesday at Byron Hall at noon. Cults and Chabad House
will be discussed.
Sunday. Feb. 3. ADL s regional board meeting and Leonard
L. Abess Human Relations Award Luncheon will be held at
Omni The board meeting starts at 8 a.m.: luncheon is at 12
noon.
James Resten. New York Times and syndicated columnist,
will open Temple Emanu-El s Cultural Series Jan. 10 in the
sanctuary at 8 p.m.
Hadar Chapter of Amit Women will meet Jan. 3 at Byron Hall
at noon.
"An Interrupted Life" by Etty Hillesum will be reviewed by
Shirley Walk on Jan. 3 at 1:30 p.m. at the Miami Beach Public
Library' as part of the Great Jewish Books Discussion Group.
Eva Kaatean will conduct songs in several languages at the
Jan. 2 meeting of Chai Chapter. Pioneer Women-Na'amat. at 1
p.m. in the Financial Federal auditorium. Washington Avenue.
Beth Isrsjal Congregation will host Dr. Norman A. Bloom as
speaker in it* next cultural series lecture on Sunday at 10 a.m. at
the synagog**
Airman Gregory S. Sokoloff. son of Paul and Betty Sokoloff
has completed basic training at Lackland Air Force Base. Texas.
IN THE CIRCURji"? COURT C
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT INANDFOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.B4-451J4
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
LN HE The Marriage o;
MADELINE CHJMFILS
Wife-Petitioner
nd
AUGUST CHERFTLS
Huj band Respasttlent
TO AUGUST CMBHFILS
c-oDept d Injustice
Port Au Priam Haiti
NOTIFIED
other plead
"Dlasolutlor
Clerk
to Pen
EODORE
Blacayne
Street
or before
lac Pod
d.
YOU ARE
to file your A
ing to the Pe
of Marriage
and mail a
uoner I Atto
FISHER E
Bldg 18 W
Miami. Florida
the ll of Jan
tion wtllbe taAi
DATED
oer. l84
RICHARDP
Or cult
Court
By H
LAW OFf 1CU
THEODORE
Attorney tor P
aotocr
IB West Fksgler
Miami. FlorkI*
BT

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned desiring to
engage in busmen under the
fictitious name Kendall K-9
Academy at 18400 SW 202nd Street
Miami Florida 331S7 intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County Florida
Abel Monte jo
18538 December 28. 1864
January 4. 11 18.1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage IB business under the
fictitious name BJ A Associates
Secretarial Services at 741 East 27
Street. Hialeah. Fla. 33013 Intends
to register said name with the
CJerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Ettaabeth Jimenez
18542 December 28 18*4
January 4 11. 18.1888
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name Bayahore Con-
valescent Center at 18*so W. Dixie
Highway. North Miami Beach.
Florid* sotend to register amid
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County Florida
Medical Resource
Development Corp
1ABM December 28 .18*4
JH|irrT.U.18,lia
Dr. Daniel G. Miller (second left), founder
and first president of the Israel Cancer
Research Fund and film star Dustin Hof-
fman (right) were honored at the Funds
Tower of Hope Ball at the Pierre in New
York. Dr. Miller, president and medical di-
rector of the Preventive Medicine Institute-
Strong Clinic, received the ICRF's Tower of
Hope Award for his leadership as head of the
organization since its formation in 1975.
Hoffman was a special guest as the Fund
dedicated the Lillian Hoffman Fekoushu
Award in memory of the actor s late mothj
Participating in the award ceremonies vt
Dr. Yashar Hirshaut (left), president of thi
ICRF, and Leonard Goldstein, dinner chai,.
man and master of ceremonies. Hoffman)
head is shaved for his role in the Broadna\
production of Arthur Miller's Death of a
Salesman. '
Glueck
Carter
Two Promoted at
Jefferson Banks
Veteran bankers John W.
Carter and Charles H Glueck
have been elected executive vice
presidents of Jefferson National
Bank in Miami Beach and of
Jefferson National Bank at
Sunny Isles Their election was
announced by Arthur H
Courshon. chair of the board of
the banks, both owned by Jef-
ferson Bancorp.
Carter has been with Jefferson
National since 1963. and Glueck.
a 23-year veteran of banking in
Ohio, joined Jefferson National
two years ago.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned desiring to
engage it. business under the
flcUUous name POLLO LOKO at
8888 S W th Street Miami. FL
intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County Florida
EXPORT AMERICA INC
' A Florida corporation
186*7 December 2* 1884
January 4 11 :-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOFFLORIDA.IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 84-470(7
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE The marriage of
DIANA PATRICIA CANNADY
Wife
and
ROBERTCANNADY Husband
TO Mr Robert Cannady
1 Residence Unknown 1
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed and
commenced In this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses if any. to it
on Arthur H Lipson. attorney for
Petitioner whose address Is 801
N E l7th Street. North Miami
Beach. Suite 312. Florida 33162 and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
February 1st. 1A89, otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief prayed tor in the
complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the aeal
of said court at Miami. Florid* on
this 21 day of December. 1884
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florid*
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal 1
December 28. 18*4
JafJBary4.ll.JJ.il
JERUSALEM Jack and Ina Kay of Washington, DC.
pictured here with Mrs. Samuel Lewis (center), wife ofthel'S.
ambassador to Israel established the first Jewish hospice for
terminally ill patients in Jerusalem with a generous gift to
Hadassh. the Women's Zionist Organization of America. Mrs.
Kay announced the gift at a dinner honoring the Hadassah
Golden Wreath Society of Major Donors in Israel. The hospict
will occupy a site on the grounds of the Hadassah I nuersito
Hospital on Mount Scopus.
Public Notices
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 14.10414
D'.mon 04
IN RE ESTATE OF
THE:.MaSAMET
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of THELMA SAMET deceased
- (Number 84 10434 is pending in
the Circuit Court for DADE
bate I .. isiot.
I iress of which is 73 West
Miami. Florida
33130 The names and addresses of
rsonal representative and
the personal presentatue 5 at
torney are set forth below
All interested persons are
required to file ilh this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS Of
THE FIRST PI BLICATION OF
THIS .NOTICE ,li all claims
against the estate and (SI any
objection by an Interested person
to whom this noUce was mailed
that challenges the validity of the
will the qualifications of the
personal representative venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this NoUce has
begun on December 28. 1884
Personal Representative
ALVINM SAMET
2780 S W 30th A ve
Miami. Florida 33133
Attorney for Personal
Representative
HYMAN P GLABUT
GALBUT. GALBUT MEN IN
PA.
888 Waatungton Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida 11188
Telephone 872-3100
December 28. IBM
January 4 IBM
NOTICEOF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property'
INTHE CIRCUITCOuRTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDF0R
DAOE COUNTY FL0RI0A
Civil Action No U *?W
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar NO 2I5'S3 <
IN KK The Marl
IEAN-CLAUDE CET rE
Petitioner Hu.t
ALTAGRAC1 .TIRE
CBTOt TE
Respondent W ft
Ti 1 AlUgrace Louvi
RueGuernerN
v .
Haiti W :
YOl AREHERl
that an action for I
Marriage has beer I I a***
md you are requ
copy of your writ* "*
*v. to It on U "J
NAM attomev for PeW"*
hose address is IS1 ""
Street Miami. Florida 33131 UJ
file the original with in* CWJs
the above-styled Court or. or beW
January 28 1888. ***"'
default will be entered ****>"
for the relief demanded 1"
PeUUon ,ki,.Md
This notice shall be pi*W*
once ech week for WJJS
secuUve weeks In THE JEI-
FLORIDIAN ^.wssJ
WITNESS my h*nd ar.d U*"T
of said court at M*rn't^
County. Florid* on this-^d'*
December. 1884 _,-
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By LavemMcQuay
As Deputy Clerk
.Circuit Court Seal 1 T)MJI.
ROUTMAN R0L '"
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys tor Petitioner
181N.E 83ndStreet
Miami, Florid* BlM
TelephfltM (MS) TsT-oeW
jMuary4. ll.u


iblic Notices
Friday, December 28, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 84 44390
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
RE THE MARRIAGE OF
GLADYS URREA.
Petltloner-Wlfe.
id
[OMAR I'RREA.
Respondent-Husband
OM Ml I'RREA
I' s lenceunknown
il u:E HEREBY NOTIFIED
! ,;i BCtlOII for Dissolution of
nafie Iia teen filed against
and you are required to serve a
f of your written defenses. If
ny to It on ARMANDO
IITIERREZ, attorney for
ItOUoner, whose address Is 2153
joral Way. Suite 400. Miami.
hori'li 33148, and file the original
the clerk of the above styled
url n or before January 18th,
[: i.rwlse a default will be
I Intt you for the relief
In the complaint or
letltion
[ This notice shall be published
iH-e 8Ch week for four consec-
llve WMlM In THE JEWISH
10RID1AN.
WITNKSS my hand and the seal
(said court at Miami. Florida on
ills 17 day of December. 1884.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Herk, Circuit Court
I i.i.le County. Florida
By J. Byron
As Deputy Clerk
Icircull Court Seal)
JANDO GUTIERREZ.
[quire
kttorniv (orPetitioner
is]Coral Way, Suite 400
UUmi. Florida 33148
yiephune 358-0444
32 December 21. 28. 1984
January 4.11. 1B8B
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84 91 S
Division 01
IN RE ESTATE OF
tftcob Klein
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
bf Jacob Klein, deceased, File
(Number 84-9188. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
|Ron !,i Probate Division, the
laddre of which Is 73 West Flagler
|Street Miami, Florida 33130.
The name and addresses of the
personal representative and the
ersonal representative's attorney
I set forth below:
All interested persons are
equired to file with this court.
fuTHIN THREE MONTHS OF
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
IIS NOTICE in all claims
gainst the estate and (21 any
jobje>i lion by an Interested person
uhom notice was mailed that
Challenges the validity of the will,
ne qualifications of the personal
epresentatlve. venue. or
urUdlCtlon of the court.
All. CLAIMS AND OB-
IECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BKKIRKVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
Kim on December21. 1084.
Personal Representative:
RuthE Hecker Klein
910 West Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida
Jtt.'rney for Personal
Vpresentatlve:
ypen Cypenft Drlbln
BS Arthur Godfrey Road
il Beach. FL 33140
phone: (3051 532-3200
W December 21, 28. 1984
IN THECIRCUIT~COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO 84 45140
FLA. BAR No 02502*
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
IN RE. The Marriage of
IARIE THERESE COLBY,
Wife Petitioner
ind
ISHTON COLBY.
Husband-Respondent
"" ASHTON COLBY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
file your Answer or other
(leading to the Petition of Mar
ge with the Court's Clerk, and
Ball a copy of same to Petitioner's
Ittorney, THEODORE FISHER,
PQ 5050Blscayne Blvd.. No. 101.
nger Life Ins. Bidf.. M"iaml.
Ta 33130. on or before tne 11 ol
inuary, 1988, else Petition will be
ken as confessed.
DATED this 7 day of December
W84.
[RICHARD P. BRINKER. Clerk
Circuit Court Dade
County, Florida
By: H. Sotolongo
Deputy Clerk
AW OFFICES OF
[HEODORE FISHER
omey for Wlf e-Petltloner
JWJ Blscayne Blvd., No. 101
onger Ufe Ins. Bldg.
Wml, Florida 33187
e'ephone: (305)788-9623
PjTHEODORE FISHER
December 14, 21, 28,1184
January 4,1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name D A J Enterprises
at 1200 Euclid Ave. No 304 Miami
Beach FL 33139 Intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dominique Staszowskl
and Jaclnta Staazowskl
(Partnership)
18490 December7,14, 21,28, 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name PETER PAN
TRAVEL at 12155 Blscayne
Boulevard, Miami, Dade County,
Florida. Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
EXODUS TOURS, Ins.,
A Florida corp.
By: Michael Stolowltzky
President
BARRY C FI.F.ISHKR. Esq
Attorney for EXODUS TOURS.
INC.
18617 December 14.21.28,1984;
January 4. 1985
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA,IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. 84-4421 5
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
Fla.Bar No 264059
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EMILEJEAN.
Petitioner
and
ELAISE JEAN,
Respondent
TO: ELAISE JEAN
Anse-Rouge
Commune des Gonalnz
Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed and
commenced In this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to It
PETER C CLEMENT. ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1150 Kane Concourse,
Suite 400. Bay Harbor Islands. FL
33154. and file the original with the
clerk of the styled court on or
before January 4. 1985: otherwise
a default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 30th day of November. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal i
By E ONDARO
As Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Petitioner:
PETER C. Cl KMENT, ESQ.
1150 Kane Concourse. Suite 400
Bay Harbor Islana.' FL33164
Telephone: 1305) 881 PI"4
i40i December 7,14.11.28. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 84-4*314
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No 3*3081
,In Re: The Marriage of
JOSEPH PIERRE,
Petitioner-Husband.
JULIANA JOSEPH PIERRE.
Respondent Wife
TO: Juliana Joseph Pierre
Rue l-a Porte
Gonalves. Haiti, West Indies
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, If
any, to It on BRENT E. ROUT-
MAN, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 181 N.E. 82nd
Street, Miami, Florida 33138, and
file the original with the Clerk of
the above-styled Court on or before
January 18. 1988. otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the
PetlUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec
utlve weeks In THE JEWIS
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 14th day of December. 1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
H. SOTOLONGO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
181 N E 83nd Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Telephone: (306) 767-6800
18628 December 21.28,18*4;
January 4. 11,198!
CASE NO 84 01174
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Fla.Bar No. 37*711
ELIZABETH MALOFF.
Plaintiff,
vs.
TIBURCIO CARIAS CASTILLO
and DAISY CARIAS CASTILLO,
Defendant.
TO: TlburcloCarlasCastillo
and
Daisy Carlas Castillo
Residence unknown
YOU' ARE NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following property In Dade
County. Florida: Lot 30, Block 10,
MC ALLISTER TERRACE, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded In Plat Book 14. Page 49
of the Public Records of Dade
County, Florida, a-k-a 2821 S.W.
15th Street. Miami. FL, has been
commenced In this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to it
on Gregg Pessir Esquire, at-
torney for Plaintiff, whose address
is 1401 W Flagler Street, Suite 201,
Miami. Florida 33135. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before January
11. 1986, otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
prayed In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In The Jewish
Floridian
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this court on December 4,1984.
Richard P Brlnker
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: DC. Bryant.
As Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Petitioner:
Gregg Pessln. Esq.
1401 W. Flagler St
Miami, FL 33136
Telephone: 1305) 649-4411
1849i_ December 7 IHl ijti
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No 84-44305 F.C.
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 3*8014
In re the marriage of
WILBERTC. DAMUS
Petitioner
and
THERESE GEDEON DAMUS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Therese Gedeon Damus
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF. ESQ attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 833
N.E. 167 St North Miami Beach,
Florida 33162. on or before
January 11. 1986, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated: December5.1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
18501 December 14, 21. 28. 1984;
January 4.1985
N THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-9783
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ERNA SCHOTZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of Ema Schotz. deceased. File
Number 84-9783, Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which Is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 33130
The name and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below:
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative. venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 21. 1J84.
Personal Representative:
SYLVAN SCHOTZ
20 Island Avenue
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SPARBER. SHEVIN, 3HAPO
HEILBRONNER, P.A.
One Southeast Third Avenue
Miami, FL 38131
Telephone: (808) 858-7880
18630 December 21,28.1984J184S6
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84 45282
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
AMANDA BAILLARGEON
Petltloner-Wlfe,
and
PAUL BAILLARGEON,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: Paul Balllargeon
Residence and mailing
address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are reDHqulred to
serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on GEORGE
T. RAMANI, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 711
Blscayne Bldg.. 19 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
January lith, 1986; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 7th day of December. 1884.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Clartnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI. ESQ.
711 Blscayne Bldg.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida38130
Telephone: (306) 374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
18607 December 14,21, 28,1984;
Janaurv 4. 1986
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84 4089
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HELEN F. GOLDBERG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
A DM IN ISTRATI ON
The administration of the estate
of HELEN F. GOLDBERG,
deceased. File Number 84-6089, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which Is
Room 307. Dade County Court-
house. 73 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130.
The name and addresses of the
personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below:
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: 111 all claim*
against the estate and (3) any
objection by an interested persor
to whom notice was mailed thai
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue. or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 21. 1984.
Personal Representative:
Benjamin Goldberg
3675 N. Country Club Drive
Apartment 2409
North Miami Beach. FL 33180
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Abraham M. Mora
Blank. Rome, Comlsky &
McCauley
1666 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd.
West Palm Beach. FL 33401
Telephone: (806)686-8100
18529 December21. 28.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 84 45*09
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ELIZABETH COLLIER,
Petltloner-Wlie
and
KENNETH F. COLLIER,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: KennethF. Collier
c-o Spotlight Magazine
300 Independence Avenue
Washington. DC. 20003
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on MICHAEL
J. ALMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 999
Washington Avenue, Miami
Beach, Florida 33139. and file the
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before January
11, 1985; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami, Florida on
this 10th day December, 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
J. BYRON
As Deputy Clerk
l Circuit Court Seal)
MICHAEL J. ALMAN. ESQ.
GALBUT, GALBUT* MENtN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (3051672-3100
18514 December 14. 21,28. 1984,
__________________January 4.1986
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
| NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name VIMACAR CORP.
INC. at 4381 S.W 13 Terr Miami.
Fla. 33124 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
JoseM. Diaz
4381 SW13 Terr.
Miami. Fl. 33124
18821 December 21. 28. 1984;
__________________January 4.11. 1986
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No 84 43813
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
Bar No. 14S74I
IN RE: The marriage of
RAYMOND GONZALEZ.
Petitioner-husband,
and
SANDRAS GONZALEZ,
Respondent wife
TO: SANDRA GONZALEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY required to
file your answer to the petition for
dissolution of marriage with the
Ojrk of the above Court and serve
a copy thereof upon the peti-
tioner's attorney, Law Office of
HERMAN COHEN A MARTIN
COHEN. 622 S.W. 1st Street
Miami, Fla. 88180, on or before
January 4, 1988, or else petition
will be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of this Court, at Miami. Dade
County, Florida, this 28 day of
November. 1884.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By H. Sotolongo
Deputy Clerk
Dacambar7.14,21, 28.1884
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 64 5**0
Division 02
Bar No. 041128
IN RE: E3TATEOF
HENRY DWECK,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of HENRY DWECK. deceaaed.
File Number 84-5680. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Jurlsdlc
tlonof the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 28. 1984.
Personal Representative:
FANNY VELEZ
1530 West 22nd Street
Sunset Island No. 4
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LEONARD J. KALISH
Suite 100, Dadeland Towers South
9400 South Dadeland Boulevard
Miami. Florida 38186
Telephone: (805) 666-7801
18539 December 28. 1884;
January 4,1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engaage In business under the flc
tltlous name Custom Research at
number BOM S.W. 71 Place, in the
City of Miami. Florida. Intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Dated at Miami. Florida, this 10
day of December. 1884.
Phyllis Levy
6088 S.W. 71 Place
Miami. Florida 33166
Owner
Attorney for Applicant
JAY M. GOTTLIEB, ESQ.
P.O. Box 481214
Miami. Florida 83248
18841 December 28.1884
January 4.11.18.1886
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name SOPHIA
FASHIONS. INC at 238 N Miami
Avenue. Miami Fl 33132 Intends to
register said, name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Reglna I.acayo
6743 SW 92 Ave.
Miami. Fl. 33173
18520 December21.28. 1984;
January 4.11.'BUf
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE 1ITH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT UN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No 84 47243
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGI.EK FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
OF MIAMI, a I lilted States
corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
DOUGLAS MONTI EL ami
MARIT/.A MONTIEL, his wife;
SOUTHEAST hank N.A.; and
UNKNOW N TENANT.
Defendants
TO: IX)l GLAS MONTIEL and
MARITZA MONTIEL. his wife
Residence. Unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
DADE County. Florida: Lot 22. In
Block 35. of PART III. EIGHTH
ADDITION TO CALUSA CLUB
ESTATE* acc!4<" 'o the pi>
thereof, as recorded In Plat Book
109, at I'age Records of Dade County. Florida
has been filed against ynu and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to it
on Keith. Mack, Lewis and Allison.
Plaintiffs attorneys, whose ad-
dress is 111 N.E. 1st Street. Miami.
Florida 33132. on or before
February l. 1885. and file the ori-
ginal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or Immediately there-
after; otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 21 day of
December, 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk of said Court
By: S BOBES
as Deputy Clerk
18544 December 28 1984;
_____ J.-.rv.!-- I '' -185
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 64 M04
Oivision 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RECHA MAKINOWSKI.
a-k-a RENA MALINOWSK1.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of RECHA MALINOWSKI a-k-a
RENA MALINOWSKI. deceased.
File Number 84-6604. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the per-
sonal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: in all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested person
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECTIONS
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 28. 1984
Personal Representative:
K SHELLY PORGES
420 East 72nd Street. Apt 4C
New York. New York 10021
HENRY NORTON
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
Suite 1201,
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida. 33130
Telephone 374-3116
December 28. 1884;
January 4,1885
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COUR1
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO 84 45251
IN RE The Marriage of:
NAOMI PERDOMO,
Petltloner-Wlfe.
and
EDUARDO PERDOMO.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: EDUARDO PERDOMO.
Residence unknown,
shall serve copy of your Answer to
the PetlUon for Dissolution of Mar
riage upon GEORGE NICHOLAS
Attorney, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida. 33136. and file
original with Court Clerk on or be-
fore January ll. 1988. otherwise a
default will be entered
December 7, 1884
RICHARD BRINKER
By: H. Sotolongo
18815 December 14. 21, 28, 1984
January 4,1966


>
Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 28,1984
Public Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
CIVll AdlOn NO. M 45457
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 349275
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CARLOS CATALAN
Petitioner,
and
NANCY E ALVAREZ
fAZARES
Respondent
TO: Nancy E Alvarez-Cazarea
5 Norte 0188. San Gregorio
' 'vnla Las Dallas
LaGranja, Chile
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIEDJ|
that an action (or Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on A KOSS
ATTORNEY AT LAW. attorney!
for Petitioner, whose address la 101
N. W 12th Avenue. Miami. Florid;
33128. and file the original with th.
clerk of the above styled court on|
or before January 11. 1885.
otherwise a default will be entered!
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint orfl
petition.
This notice shall be published!
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO 64 31410 CA (01)
IMPERIAL HOUSE CON-
DOMINIUM. INC
Plaintiff.
-ve-
BARBARA 8TUDLEY.
Defendant
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(PROPERTY)
(Florida Bar No. 263673)
TO BARBARA STL'DLEY
Apartment No. 8-F
5256 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida
-or-
7024 Green Tree Lane
Miami I.akes. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a complaint to foreclose a cl-
aim of Hen for unpaid assessments
upon the following real property
located In Dade County. Florida,
and more particularly described
as follows:
Condominium Unit B-F of
IMPERIAL HOUSE CON-
DOMINIUM, INC. a condo-
minium, all as set forth in the
Declaration of Condominium and
exhibits annexed thereto and
forming a part thereof, dated April
5. l73. filed for record May 24.
1883. and recorded In Official
Records Book 8207. Page 303.
Public Records of Dade County.
Florida, as amended, Including all
of said court at Miami. Florida on appurtenances and the undivided
this 10th day of December, 1884
RICHARD P. DRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
T. CASAMAYOR
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A KOSS. ATTORNEY AT LAW.
P.A.
Attorneys for Petitioner
101 N. W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33128
Telephone 13061326-8844
18612 December 14, 21. 28. 1884
January 4,1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR/
OADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 14-1104
Division 02
IN RE ESTATE OF
LEWIS RANDELMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
A DMINI3TRATI ON
{TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
4GAJNST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
estate of LEWIS RANDELMAN.
deceased. File Number 84-8104
(02), Is pending In the Circuit Court
for DADE County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130 The per
sonal representative of the estate
la Barbara Randelman, whose
address Is 11601 SW 87th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33136 The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with thel
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must
be In writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed If the claim Is not yet due.
the date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured, the
curity shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
interest In the common elements of
said condominium a-k-a Apart-
ment 9-F. 6266 Collins Avenue.
Miami Beach. Florida
has been filed against you and you
are requrled to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to It
on CYPEN, CYPEN A DRIBIN.
Attorneys for Plaintiff, whose ad-
dress Is P. O. Box 402088. Miami
Beach, Florida, 33140, and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above-styled Court on or before
January 4, 1886; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the
complaint.
This notice shall be published
once a week for four consecutive
weeka In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
said Court at Miami, Florida, on
this 28th day of November, 1884.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. Bryant
Aa Deputy Clerk |
(CIRCU IT COU RT SE AL))
CYPEN. CYPEN A DRIBIN
Attorneys for Plaintiff
826 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (306) 632-3200
BY: MYLESG. CYPEN
18486 December 7.14, 21.28,1884,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO: 14 9124
IN RE. ESTATE OF
HELEN G DOWD.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
Estate of HELEN G DOWD. de-
ceased, late of Dade County.
Florida, has commenced In the
captloned proceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
AND REQUIRED to file any
claims and demands which you
may have against the Estate and
to file any challenge to the validity
of the Last Will and Testament
offered for probate, if any, or any
objection to the qualifications of
the Personal Representative,
venue or Jurisdiction of the Court,
with the Court. Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NOTICE
OR YOUR RIGHT TO DO SO
WILL BE forever barred.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under thel
fictitious name KING ARTHUR
?JCHAIR at 5601 N.W. 38th Avenue,
Miami. Florida 33142-2787 Intend to
register said name with the Clerk 1
of the Circuit Court of Dadej
County. Florida.
HERNANDEZ-MCGEEHAN
CORPORATION,
a Florida corporation
By: JamesF. Helman. President
DIBARTOLOMEO A DIBAR
TOLOMEO
Attorney for Applicant
8400 Bird Road. Miami. FL 33156
18525 December 21.28.1884.
_^____________January 4.11. 1886,
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED.
First publication of this Notice
on the 21 day of December. 1884.
EDWARD A. KELLY.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
HELEN G. DOWD.
Deceasedft-
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
RALPHM JONES
11741 W Biscay ne Canal Road
Miami, Fl. 33181
Telephone: (306) 806-1117
18528 December 21,28,1084
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN]
that the undersigned, desiring tol
engage In business under the
fictitious name VIDEO WATCH
Intend to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of*,
Dade County, Florida. 1
SAL A JUDYRONCI
10003 SW 78 Court
Miami, Fla. 33168
18482 December?, 14.
_____________________21,28.1884
ss^il^^nia'asr"
each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
they may have that challenge!s)
the validity of the decedent's will,
the qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue or)
Jurisdiction of the court.
all claims. demands, andj
Objections not so filed
will be forever barred.
Date of the first publication of
this NoUce of Administration
December atTl 884
BARBARA RANDELMAN
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
LEWIS RANDELMAN
Deceased!
lATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Lee J. Oslaaon, Esquire
Fromberg, Fromberg, Gross A
Shore
420 South Dixie Highway. 3rd Floor
Coral Gables. FL 33148
Telephone: (S06l 866-6822
18623 December 21. 28. 1984

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 14 9537
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ERIKA WEISS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the estate
of ERIKA WEISS, deceased. File
Number 84-8637. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
The name and addresses of the
I personal representative and the
personal representative's attorney
are set forth below:
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 84-44304 F.C.
FAMILY DIVISION
FLBAR1M0U
In re the marriage of
LIONEL SPRINGER
Petitioner
and
LLIETH SPRINGER
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LUethSpringer
Residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF, ESQ. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 833
N.E. 167 St. North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162. on or before
January 11. 1886, and file the
original with the clerk of this court
otherwise a default will be entered
against you.
Dated: Decembers, 1884
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
18502 December 14.21, 28, 1884;
January 4,1885
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FLORIDA
Case No 8*45459 FC
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
MARIA B. GONZALES ACOSTA
AND
MARIO ALBERTO ACOSTA
TO: Mario Alberto Acoeta
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
to file your Answer or other
pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mall a copy of
same to Petitioner's Attorney,
ELLIOT L MILLER, 825 Arthur
Godfrey Road, Suite 306. Miami
Beach. Florida on or before the 10
day of January, 1886 or else
Petition will be taken as confessed.
DATED this 10 day of December
1884.
Richard P. Brlnker.
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: T CASAMAYOR
513 December 14, 21.28. 1884
January 4,1886
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested person with the clerk of the above styled]
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. M 444*1
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
MARIO E CLAVIJO
COLMENARES.
and
ISABEL ABENOZA
FERNANDEZ.
TO: Isabel Abenoza Fernandez
Transversal 13. Numero
124-30. Apt. 418
Bogota. Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
than an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses. If
any, to it on Emlllo C Pastor,
P.A.. attorney for Petitioner.
whose address Is 155 South Miami
Avenue. Penthouse 1. Miami.
Florida 33130, and file the original
to whom notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the personal
representative. venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice haa
begun on December 21,1084.
HENRY NORTON
Personal Representative
Suite 1201 Blscayne Building
18 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative
HENRY NORTON. ESQ
Suite 1201 Blscayne Building
10 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida S31S0
Telephone: (306) 874-3116
18522 December 21. 28. 1884
court on or before January 11.
1086; otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint ori
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-:
secutlve weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal)
of said court at Miami, Florida 01'
this 3rd day of December, 1884.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByS BOBES
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIOC PASTOR. P.A.
PH 1 -166 South Miami Avenue
Miami, Florida33130
Tel: (305)372-0088
Attorney for Petitioner
18408 December 7, 14. 21. 28,1084
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 14-4950
Division (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HARRY FINKELSTEIN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
estate of HARRY FINKELSTEIN,
deceased, File Number 84-6060. Is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which Is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate Is
EDNA FINKELSTEIN. whose
address is 221 Meridian Avenue.
Miami, Florida. The name and
address of the personal
representative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have. Each claim must
be In writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim Is not yet due,
the date when It will become due
shall be stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim la secured, the
security shall be described. The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mall one copy to
each personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any obJecUona
they may have that challenge!s)
the validity of the decedent's will,
the qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS. AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
Decembers, 1084.
EDNA FINKELSTEIN
As Personal Representative
oftheEetateof
HARRY FINKELSTEIN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MAX R SILVER
Suite 1326,160 SE. 2nd Avenue
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (306) 374-4888
1*831------------rr>mh.r^ M Itjaj
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
' CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. M-41000
NOTICE OF ACTION:
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE:
NO PROPERTY
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of
PETRONA BASSI.
Petitioner,
v.
ERMANNO BASSI.
Respondent.
TO: ErmannoBassl. Respondent
Diagonal Tucuman 1204
Martinez. Argentina
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that an
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to it
on LAW OFFICES OF NORMAN
K SCHWARZ. P.A Petitioner's
attorney, whose address Is: 407
Lincoln Road. Suite 10-A, Miami
Beach. Florida. 33130. on or before
the 4 day of January. 1885, and file
the original with the clerk of this
court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the
Petition
DATED: on thla 27th day of
November, 1884
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Court
By: D.C.Bryant
as Deputy Clerk
18484 December 7.14, 21.28,1884
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE No. 84 44517
Florida Bar No 025024
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of
GEORGE REYNOLDS.
Huaband- Petitioner
and
EVELYN REYNOLDS.
Wife-Respondent
TO: Evelyn Reynolds
1646 Racine St.
Racine. Wisconsin
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
to file your Answer or other
pleading to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage with the
Court's Clerk, and mall a copy of
same to Petloner's Attorney.
THEODORE FISHER. ESQ., 6060
Blscayne Blvd.. No. 101, Conger
Life Ins. Bldg. Miami, Florida
33137, on or before the 28th of
January. 1886. else Petition will be
taken as confessed.
DATED this 18th day of
December. 1884.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
LAW OFFICES OF THEODORE
FISHER
Attorney for Husband-Petitioner
5050 Blscayne Blvd.. No. 101
Conger Life Ins Bldg..
Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone: (300)768-8623
18534 December 21.28,1884:
_________________January 4.11. MM
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTC.
DADE COUNTY. FLOtlS'
FHt Number 64-4110
_ Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LAWRENCE J HICKEY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTH.vn.i\
The administration of th. .- 1
Of LAWRENCE St!**.
deceased. File Number fKTJ
=Bc^ S5R8M
Florida 33130. ',ni1
The name and addresses n(tk.
personal repre,Pn-.-,t]vl. *
personal representative ,,,'.
are set forth belo* alIorn
All Interested person, lrp
required to file with this e"Ji
WITHIN THREE MONTHS]
THE FIRST PUBLICATION Z\
THIS NOTICE ,, J, ^
against the estate and ,2l !
objection by an Interested Knl
to whom notice was mailed C
challenges the valldit\ of the wui .
the qualifications of the perZ
representative. v,nue
Jurisdiction of the conn
ALL CLAIMS AND 0B
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice hu
begun on December 21.1984
Personal Representative
ABRAHAM A G MBIT
888 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33130
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
EDWINA.WILLINGKK
1656 Drexel Avenue.
Miami Beach, Florida 33130
Telephone: 13051338-5756
18531 December21 iau,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUfAIAMt LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name RGE Enterprises!
at 1288 N.E. 128th St. North Miami.
Fla 88161 Intends to register said!
I name with the Clerk of the Circuit
] Court of Dade County, Florida.
jj Ronald G Edwards
18610 December 21. 28. 1884.
January*. 11. li
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. M 451 59
NOTICE
BY PUBICATION
Florida Bar No. 370402
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LOUISANNE FRANCOIS
Petitioner,
and
INAKI FRANCOIS.
Respondent
TO: Inakl Francola
6210 N.W. 5th Avenue
Miami. Florida I
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that a petition for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed and
commenced In this court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses If any. to It
on LAWRENCE B. LERNER.
ESQ. attorney for Petitioner.
whose address la 1160 Kane Con-
course, Suite 400. Bay Harbo
Islands, Florida 33164. and file thel
original with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before January
11, 1085; otherwise a default wUlb
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 84 44315
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 143061
In Re: The Marriage of
BERNADETTE JOCELENE
ST JUSTE.
Petltloner-Wlfe.
and
ALESANDRE CLAMART
ST JUSTE
Respondent-Husband
TO: AleaandreClamari
St. Juste
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
any. to It on BRENT E ROUT-
MAN, attorney for PetlUoner,
whose address is 181 N K 82nd ,
Street. Miami. Florida 3313S. and
file the original with the Clerk of
the above-styled Court on or before
January 18. 1985. otherwise a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 14th day of December 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
H. SOTOLONGO
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal 1
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
181 N.E. 82nd Street
Miami. Florida33138
Telephone: (3061757-5800
18627 December21 28.1884.
January 4 11 1086
entered against you for the rellel
prayed for In the complaint o
petition.
This notice shall be published!
once each week for four consec-
utive weeka In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of aald court at Miami, Florida on
this 7th day of December, 1084.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Barbara Peres
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for PetlUoner:
LAWRENCE B. LERNER. ESQ.
1150 Kane Concourse, Suite400
Bay Harbor Islands, FL 33164
Telephone: (308) 864-0084
18606 December 14, 21, 28. 1884;
January 4.1080
UOTICst UNDCR J
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name SHAKEN EN-
TERPRISES at 10852 N Kendall
Dr. Miami. Fla 38178 Intends to.
register aald name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Douglas Fiedler
18483 December7.14,
21,28,1884
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY UI\EN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name of MOISES SIM
PSER, M.D. and MOISES SIM-
PSER. M.D.. FAAP. FCCP j
number 11860 SW. 66 Avenue, in
the City of Miami, Florida. Intends
to register the aald name with t
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Da
County, Florida. ,hU
Dated at Miami. Florida, thU
2lst day of November. 1884
MOISES SIMPSER
Attorney for Applicant
H. Allan Shore, Esq. .
Fromberg, Fromberg, iross
Shore, P.A. ..._
420 South Dixie Highway. Srfl 1 ^
Coral Oablea. FL 88148
Telephone: (306)686-6622
184*8 Dacamber7.i4,2i ,S ,i
A


Finance Ministry Working on Postfreeze
Plan to Prevent Resurgence of Inflation in 1985
Friday, December 28,1984 / The Jewiah Floridian Page 15-B
Herbert Gelernter, 77, Passes
By OIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
I A committee of senior
Finance Ministry officials
jn(j academicians is
lurking on plans to fore-
stall a feared resurgence of
hyperinflation when the
present wage-price freeze
package expires in
|January. Experts predicted
hat February would be the
Icritical month for the eco-
| nomy
They say it will be known by
\fcen whether the freeze put a
permanent brake on inflation or
whether it will burst out anew
once the wage price restraints are
lifted. The team preparing for the
post-freeze period consists of the
director general of the Finance
Ministry, Emanuel Sharon;
Deputy Finance Minister Adi
Amorai; and two economists,
Profs. Michael Bruno and Eitan
Rerglass. *
FINANCE MINISTER Yit-
zhak Modai maintains that a new
round of inflation after the freeze
is not inevitable. He said that
much depends on the behavior of
the public and predicted a
gradual but significant slowdown
in the inflation rate between now
and January.
According to Modai, the price
index for October, before the
freeze took effect, wil be very
high. The November index will
show an 18-21 percent inflation
rate, the December index bet-
ween 10-12 percent and the
January index between 7-9
percent, the first break in the
Davidovich
Tours
Florida
i
llv ARLEEN WOLF
America can now claim
Mme. Holla Davidovich
who. until her immigration
nx years ago, had been
regarded as Russia's fore-
most woman pianist. This
past summer, Davidovich
became an American
citizen.
This month audiences in
Miami. Tampa and West Palm
Beach were treated to per-
formances by the artist News-
lwk magazine has described as
'Russia's best-kept secret."
DAVIDOVICH says she
ihvays comes to Florida and
Miami with great pleasure. "The
public, the audiences are very
xl, and the places are very
beautiful."
Since her sold-out American
debut at Carnegie Hall in 1979,
Davidovich has been touring
extensively throughout the
*orld. and is teaching at New
York's Juilliard School of Music.
Speaking through a translator
in a mixture of Russian, English
and giggles. Davidovich said she
likes to come to Florida because
it's an easy trip from New York.
"It's wonderful that there's no
time change involved, and my
system won't get turned upside-
down. I always have to be chang-
ing my watch back and forth,
back and forth."
EARLY NEXT YEAR
Davidovich will have to make a
big adjustment to her watch.
She's returning for her third tour
of Japan. This time, she will per-
form with her son, violinist
Dmitry Sitkovetsky.
Davidovich immigrated to
America because of her son. He
had come here alone. "The Soviet
authorities." she said, "were
making it impossible for me to
have any chance of seeing him
again. They forbade me to per-
form abroad. They closed the
boundaries to me and I knew if I
stayed in the Soviet Union I
would never see my son again."
Fortunately for us, she came
here.

c
X&liefiH
eV?

**
A
i a
TOJJ
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel. 261-7612
double-digit phenomenon.
Avraham Shapira of the
Aguda Israel Party, chairman of
the Knesset Finance Committee,
has called for draconian measures
to restore economic health. He
urged the government to declare
a two-year emergency during
which all strikes would be banned
in the vital services sectors and
any minister who refuses to
accept budget cuts would be
replaced.
THE FREEZE meanwhile is
creating difficulties of en-
forcement. The press reported a
multitude of cases where mer-
chants are simply ignoring the
government-established
maximum prices. Several dozen
merchants were hailed to court
for violations.
Police action against black
market money changers has had
little effect, however, despite the
arrest of five dealers in Jeru-
salem. Illegal transactions in
foreign currency simply moved to
side streets and continued undis-
turbed.
Herbert Gelernter of Coral
Gables passed away on Dec. 25 at
the age of 77. He is survived by
his wife, Dorothy, children Leslie
Silverman, Susan Hiker and
Richard and five grandchildren.
He was the father of the late
Jeffrey Gelernter.
Mr. Gelernter was a founding
BRODIE. Mrs. Dora, of Miami Beach.
Services Dec. 20. Rubln-Zllbert.
FEINSTEIN. Ruth, of North Miami
Beach. Services Dec. 20. Blasberg.
GOLDSTEIN. Samuel, of North Miami
Beach. Services were held.
GREENFIELD, Alex. 93, of North
Miami Beach. Services Dec. 20.
TIEGER, Mrs. Juliet, of Miami Beach.
Services Dec. 20. Rubln-Zllbert.
ZEITZER, Evelyn, of Miami Beach.
Services Dec. 21.
SCHIFF, Harry, of Miami Beach.
Services were held. Rubln-Zllbert.
BOTHMAN. Lillian Herman, of Miami
Beach. Services were held. Blasberg
HUREWITZ. William, Services were
held.
LL'REY, Irene Lavlne. 77. of North
Miami Beach. Services Dec. 23.
Riverside.
SCHWARTZ. Benjamin, of Miami
Beach. Services Dec. 23. Rubln-Zllbert
W ALLEN, Herbert, 59. of Miami.
Bervlcei I lee 28. Gordon. Star of David.
BAER, Jerome W., 83, of North Miami.
eg Dec. 23.
member and a four-time
president of Temple Judea in
Coral Gables. He was a
prominent developer and active
in Coral Gables civic affairs.
Services were held Dec. 27 at
Temple Judea, with The
Riverside in charge of
arrangements.
GRANT, Thomas A 50. of Coral Gables.
Services were held. Riverside.
GREEN. Henry. 84, of Miami Services
Dec. 24. Gordon. Mt. Nebo.
ROSENSTEIN. Rose, of Miami Beach.
Services Dec 24.
BALLIS, Albert, of Miami Beach.
Services Dec. 26.
BERNSTEIN. Fanny. 97. of North Bay
Village. Services Dec. 24. Blasberg Mt.
Nebo.
FRIEDMAN. Lucy, 72. of Miami Beach.
Services Dec. 23. Riverside.
STREET. Harlan. 64. of Keystone Point.
Services Dec. 24.
HAAS. Helen S.. 80. of Miami. Sen-Ices
Dec. 28. Riverside
TKKVES. Morris, of North Miami
Beach. Services Dec. 26.
KOGOVIN. Abraham. 91, of North
Miami Beach. Services Dec is River
side.
STEIN Philip a o( Has Harbor Island.
8er\ Ices 1 lee 13 Bla I
ZEMLOCK Abraham Services Dei 14
^HOTLINE-,
TO JERUSALEM
In time oi illness, surgery or
crisis, special prayers will be
recited at the Western Wall and
at our Yeshiva in Jerusalem.
CALL 24 HOURS
(718)871-4111
A FREE PUBLIC SERVICE OF
The American Rabbi Meir
Baal Haness Charity
KOLEL AMERICA
132 Nassau St NY NY 10038
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observed with a minyon in our
Yeshiva Heichal Rabbi Meir
Baal Haness in Jerusalem.
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Rabbi Meir Baal Haness In
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Oak Park. Mi.-hiuan 48237
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Your First Call to Us will
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When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel. Inc.
New York: 1212) 26.1-7600 Queen-, Blvd \ taihKcl 1,.,,-m m,IK \v
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RUBIN-ZILBERT
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, Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Four Locations Serving
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' with
456-4011
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Main Office: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139


f

16-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 28,1984
How To Recognize A Jew
ByRABBI
ISRAEL JACOBS
The tenth man at the morning
minyan is sometimes difficult to
come by. This particular morning
the quorum had been completed
before I arrived. One of the
regulars discreetly pointed to i
man seated in the third row.
"I picked him up on my way tt
shul," he informed me. "Who u
he?" I asked. "Never saw him be
fore." he answered. "So how dia
you know he's Jewish?" "He
looked Jewish," the answer came
back matter -of- factly.
On the Lower East Side in New
York, where I attended a yeshiva.
pulling in a passerby for the
tenth man was a commonplace.
Almost everybody on the street
was Jewish. But there in North
Miami, where Jews are a
minority, that invitation to a
stranger to join the minyan set
me to thinking. How do you
recognize a Jew? Who is a Jew?
These questions have of late been
passionately debated both here
and in Israel.
SOME YEARS back. Albert
V'orspan wrote a book entitled,
"My Rabbi Doesn't Make House
Calls." He devotes a chapter to
the question, "How does one
identify a Jew?" It's not easy, he
argues. "We know what we are
not, but we can't agree on what
we are."
It is a problem. We can't go by
looks. Jews are tall, short, fat,
skinny, blonde and blue-eyed,
swarthy-skinned and dark-eyed.
Nor can religion define a Jew.
Too many are agnostics.
Names are not helpful either.
Kids named Joshua and Sarah
could be children of Evangelists,
and Launcelots and Tonys
yeshiva students. So, how do you
spot a Jew? With tongue in
cheek. Vorspan suggests: "A
Jew is someone who is continu-
ally going about asking, 'Who is
a Jew?'
MANY THINGS in life seem
abundantly clear at first blush.
Then you give them further
thought, and suddenly the ob-
vious becomes embarrassingly
confusing. This observation is
especially true of the Jewish
question. To cite an example:
The first Jew, Abraham, was not
even called a Jew. He was called a
Hebrew. And to complicate
matters, Abraham was initially,
Abram, which is derived from the
two Hebrew words Av Aram
the father of Syria. The man who
fathered the Jewish people began
as a local chieftain. Only later did
God change his name to Abra-
ham Av Hamon Goyim the
father of a multitude of peoples.
The name change represented his
promotion to a universal figure.
Hebrew is a transliteration of
Ivri, which means: One who has
come from the other side. Abra-
ham earned this title when he
crossed the Jordan river on his
way to Canaan from his home-
town in Mesopotamia. One rabbi
offers this explanation: Abraham
was called a Hebrew because all
the world was on one side and he
was on the other. The first Jew,
according to the latter version,
already set the pattern for his
descendants, who would find
themselves in a similar position
quite frequently.
So much for the first Jew, who
was called a Hebrew.
"Jew" is derived from Judah,
the fourth son born to Jacob and
Leah. Jacob, Abraham's grand-
son, as not very fond of Leah, to
say the least. He had been duped
into marrying Leah by his father-
in-law. Laban, a master swindler.
THE SWINDLE was not
Leah's fault. She had to do as she
was told. But there is no arguing
with feelings. Jacob resented her.
When Leah gave birth to her
fourth son. she hoped that having
presented her husband with four
Rabbi Israel Jacobs
healthy boys he would warm to
her. To show her appreciation,
Leah named her fourth son
Judah. which means "I now will
give thanks to God." That is the
origin of "Jew."
While the question of "Who is
a Jew" may be a hot issue to this
generation, it is worth noting
that the question did not concern
our grandparents too much.
Probably the question would
have sounded ridiculous to them.
You looked around and you knew
instinctively. Jews go to shul.
Jews keep kosher. Jews put on
tallit and tephillin. Jews observe
Shabbat. Jews are charitable,
moral. If you couldn't tell, you
had to be blind.
A centipede was asked how he
managed to move his hundred
legs in perfect sequence. Never
had the centipede given the
matter any thought. For the first
time the centipede began to think
about how it walked, which leg
moved first, which second, which
last. In no time one leg was
stumbling over the other until
the poor creature couldn't make
an inch of headway without
falling all over itself.
MAYBE THE better part of
wisdom dictates that we spend
less time worrying about who is a
Jew and concentrate on how a
Jew should live and live that
way.
That way we probably stand a
better chance of recognizing one
another.
Eruv Extended
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern, chairman of the Miami Beach Eruv
Commission, reports that the Eruv has been extended to include
the length of Collins Avenue from 20th Street to 46th Street
parallel to the Boardwalk.
Rabbi Stern added that the Eruv is in effect on the 41st Street
Bridge and on the Boardwalk itself. The Eruv is examined and
, updated regularly.
Founding officers of newly-organized South Dade Upbeat
Seniors of Temple Israel are (left to right) Pearl Kogan,
program chair; Norman and Betty Rosenberg, presidents; and
Cele Schachter, treasurer. Not shown is coordinator Girt
Bossak.
The North Shore Optimist Club's donation to Mount Sina
Medical Center's dental facility will pay for cleaning the teeth
of children who participate in the subsidized school lunch
program. Shown are Jessica, Xiomara and Andres Mendez with
dentist Mat hew Segal.
(Left to right) Elite Schneiderman, president of the South
Florida Arts Center; and Irving and Shirley Miller, hosts of the
kickoff for the working artists community in the planning stage
for Lincoln Road, are shown with plans for the center unveiled
at the fundraiser.
I
Miami Beach Mayor Malcolm Fromberg (right) installed of-
ficers of the Social Club of 5600. Shown with Fromberg are I left ^
to right) Betty Schwartz, vice president membership: Lillian
Levy, treasurer; Herb Peckman, vice president budget; Alice
Gold, vice president entertainment; and Eleanor Mansfield,
president.
Sam Topf, vice president of
the Americans Technion
Society, will speak at the
meeting of the Miami Beach
Zionist District on Jan. 21 at 1
p.m. at American Savings
auditorium on Lincoln Road.
Topf is the southern regional
chair of Technion.
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY COMES TO MIAMI
A parlor meeting for prospective students and their parents
STERN COLLEGE FOR WOMEN YESHIVA COLLEGE
* Academic Majors
*Student Life
* Financial A id Israeli Progra m.
*Admission Requirements
8:00 p.m.
Tuesday, January 8th
at the home of
Maria and Stan Frohlinger
1200 N.E. 172nd Street
N. Miami Beach
R.S.V.P.
(305) 661-9876
after 7p.m.


lecial Supplement Jewish Education pages 7-10

DECEMBER 1984
V
/
Super Week
anuary 28-January 31, 1985
BE A SUPER VOLUNTEER
Call the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
at 576-4000 today!


Page 4
Federation, December, 1984
Campaign
Campaign communique
The 1985 campaign haa moved
into the Hi-Rise Division with full
force and lots of momentum from
last year's highly successful cam-
paign. Last month Seacoast Towers
East, V, and South held an
organizational meeting, led by J.
Henry Brody. Past Hi-Rise chair-
men, Sidney Olson and Ben Botwi-
nick were in attendance. A commit-
tee was formed to work on the 1985
fundraising drive. It was decided a
brunch will be held on February 10.
Gerald K. Schwartz and Amy
Dean serve as chairman and vice
chairperson respectively of the
Attorneys' Division. The Division's
leadership luncheon, held on
November 30, was very productive.
An executive committee is in the
process of being established, and
basic policies of the Attorneys'
Division were discussed at the
luncheon. Jeffrey Berkowitz ad-
dressed the group about the up-
coming Young Leadership Cabinet
Mission to Israel in late February.
Admiral's Port Condominium held
a worker training program on
December 2. Nate Katzen chaired the
breakfast meeting, and Maxine E.
Schwartz was the guest speaker.
Maxine conducted an excellent
session, leaving the workers, en-
thused and eager to get to work on
the 1985 campaign.
Upcoming events in January
include the Attorneys' Division
Leadership Luncheon at Tuttles
Restaurant on Friday, January 11 at
noon; the Admiral's Port Pacesetter
Cocktail Party, a $500 minimum gift
event featuring guest speaker
Norman Braman, Wednesday,
c*>
v. .
Nate Katzen and Maxine E. Schwartz
at the Admiral's Port worker train-
ing program.
January 16, hosted by Mr. and Mrs.
Sol Kohl; and the Harbour House
Fundraising Brunch on Sunday.
January 20. In February. Seacoast
Towers will hold a Fundraising
Brunch in the Palace Playhouse at
Seacoast Towers East on Sunday the
10th at 11:00 a.m.
For more information about the
Attorneys' Division, Seacoast
Towers or Admiral's Port please
contact Midge Blumberg at 576-
4000,extension 356.
On Thursday, January 10 at 3:30
p.m. U.S. Senator Arlen Specter, a
Republican from the state of Pen-
nsylvania, will address a private
leadership group from Aventura-
Turnberry at the home of Hazel and
Herbert Canarick. Senator Specter is
a strong advocate for the State of
Israel, and he will be addressing the
group on Israeli-American relations.
He will also discuss impending
legislation related to foreign aid for
Israel.
Israel Amitai will be the special
guest speaker at the California Club
Community's 2nd Annual Dinner-
Dance on Sunday, January 13 at
5:00 p.m. The $250 minimum gift
event on behalf of the 1985 CJA-IEF
will be held at the California Country
Club. Lou Rones, the California Club
campaign chairman, will be the
event's honoree. Entertaiment will
be provided by Harry Bee, Lee Pines
and Sy Tepperman. Jerry Hyams is
the reception chairman, Lorraine
Weintraub is reception vice chair-
man. For additional information
contact Susan Marx at 576-4000.
extension 202.
The Accountants Divi.;
recently held a cocktail reception^
the Biscayne Bay Marriott Ml
event was attended by more thanim
members of the Division, and np.,i
iyoo UJA-IEF, an increase of Rn
percent from last year. Nanm
Rachlin was honored bv tho
Division and the guests heard fron
Yehuda Hellraan, the executive vird
chairman of the Conference oi
Presidents of Major Jewish!
Organizations. Albert Morrison Jrl
is chairman of the Accountants!
Division For additional information!
about the Division please contact!
Joe Imberman at 576-4000 pi I
tension 223.
Seen at the California Club Community Event, from
left. Herb Polow. Lou Rones, guest speaker Akiva
Baum, and.ferry Hvams
ITINERARY HIGHLIGHTS-ISRAEL
ISRAEL
Young Leadership Cabinet
Mission To Israel
February 24-March 5
Pre-Mission To Warsaw, Poland
February 21-24
Jeffrey Berkowitz, Region 5 Mission Chairman
ITINERARY HIGHLIGHTS-POLAND
WARSAW Warsaw Ghetto Memorial
Umschlagplatz at Stwaki Street where hundreds of
thousands of Jews were taken away by the Nazis to
extermination camps
Nozyk Schul, the only surviving synagogue in
Warsaw
Warsaw Jewish Cemetery
Jewish Historical Institute and Museum
Mila 18, headquarters for the Jewish Combat
Organization during the Warsaw uprisings
CRACOW Auschwitz
The Old House of Prayer in Kazimierz District, now
the Museum of Jewish History and Culture & oldest
preserved monument of Jewish sacral architecture
in Poland
The Pre-Mission to Warsaw and Cracow will be an experience you
should not miss.
Expand your knowledge...visit:
High Tech Industry
Israeli Defense Forte Base
Galilee Outposts
Kibbutzim
Golan Heights
Settlements
Jerusalem
Interaction with Israelis through:
Meetings with young members ol the Knesset
Home Hospitality with young Israel Leadership
Seminars on:
Israel Diaspora Relations
Holocaust to Rebirth at Yad Vashem
Updating the Middle East situation (including
fact-finding visits to Judea/Samaria on the Northern
Border)
Partnership in Action... visit:
Project Renewal Neighborhoods
Youth Aliyah Village
Absorption Center
Ethiopian Jews
Itinerary will enable an insight into many historical sites along the
way and for individuals to experience Israel in all its dimensions
SUBSIDIZED MISSION COSTS
Israel Portion Only Pre-Mission to Poland
$995.00
(coil lus.-il on departure Irom NY
add ilb7 lor Miami departure
$545.00
For reservations and additional information please call
Sara Schoninger
576-4000, ext. 215


Federation, December, 1984
page 5
anmatop
ipening Dinner launches 'Against All Odds' campaign
The 1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund/Project
Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign is off to
a record start, thanks to the partic-
ipation of nearly 1,800 individuals at
the Opening Dinner.
The major campaign event was held
December 6 at the Fontainebleau-
Hilton Hotel on Miami Beach. The
special guest speaker, Liv Ullmann,
made a moving presentation, recount-
ing her memories of the Jewish
struggle for survival during the days
of the Holocaust.
Norman Braman, the 1985 general
campaign chairman, indicated that the
Opening Dinner demonstrated the
unity that exists in Greater Miami
among all Jews. 'Tonight we estab-
lished a new record for an Opening
Dinner, and I'm certain this result will
provide the impetus for continued
success, as we attempt to do all we can
for Jews in need, locally, in Israel and
worldwide."
"**
Seated, from left. Paula Friedland DonaUSau^ers.IM, UUmonn
OMJF President Samuel 1, Adler and Bunny A die, Stan*W
Scharlin. tlowara n. ocviu.<, ^- *~- \n\AiP Fromtive Vice
man Norman Braman. Charlotte Brodie and GMJF Executive Vila
President Myron J. Brodie.
A record number of Campaign Opening Dinner attendees demon-
strated their commitment to the 1985 CJA-1EF, "Against All
Odds."
Imperial House residents seen with Dinner Chair Elaine Bloom
/standing, second from right).
Among the many groups represented at the Campaign Opening
Dinner, was Federation's Young Adult Division, the future leader-
ship of Miami's Jewish community.
Federation Vice President Aaron Podhurst (left) and Norman Braman.
-v, '.


.:-..
....... s,K


Page 6
Federation, December, 1984
women's Division
Highlights from recent
w.D. events
Women's Division Pacesetters recently held their first
Ruby 10 Luncheon at the home of Lin Arison. Pictured
above, from left, Lin Arison; Gloria Scharlin, Pacesetter
Trustee chairwoman; Mikki Futernick. WD president;
and Bunny Adler, national Lion ofJudah chairwoman.
Guardian Event
Eileen Silberman, left, and Paula
Levy share a moment with Guardian
Event guest speaker Congressman
Dante Fascell.
Robert Clary at
westview C.C.
Robert Clary, whose moving
account of his experiences during the
Holocaust was a major highlight of
Federation Wednesday, will be the
guest speaker at the Westview
Country Club Campaign Luncheon
on Thursday, January 31.
The luncheon, held annually on
behalf of the 1985 CJA-IEF cam-
paign will be held at the Country
Club. Clary, best known for his
portrayal as a prisoner of war on
television's "Hogan's Heroes,"
managed to survive the Holocaust
only through a stroke of good for-
tune. He makes frequent ap-
pearances to recount his personal
story in the hopes that such events
will not be forgotten, or allowed to
happen again.
Elaine Berkowitz, Elsie Howard
and Selma Newman serve as
chairwomen of the Westview
Country Club Campaign Luncheon.
For additional information contact
the Women's Division, 576-4000,
extension 231.
Fashions from Bereneka, Art to
Wear, were featured at the Guardian
event. Pictured above were models:
Bunny Horowitz, Maxine E.
Schwartz, Judy Adler and Elaine
Berkowitz.
Hold the Date!
Wed. Jan. 9 Leadership Training
Course
(six week session begins)
Thurs. Jan. 10 Campaign Steering
Committee
Mon. Jan. 14 Miami Beach Board
Meeting
South Dade Board
Meeting
Tues. Jan 15 North Dade Board
Meeting
Mon. Jan. 28 I Love Miami Session I
(4 week series begins)
Thurs. Jan. 31 Westview Luncheon
BPW $750 Event -
Grove Isle
Tues. Feb. 5 Southwest Dade Event -
Regine's
Mon. Feb. 11 Interfaith Day
Wed. Feb. 20 South Dade and Miami
Beach
Campaign Events -
Circle Gallery
BPW $250 Event -
Bonwit Teller
Mexico mission takes off Jan. 21
The Mission to Mexico departs SOON.' Pictured above, from left,
tin Henrietta Sostchin. Susan Stom: Terry Drucker. Saudi Helkiriii
and Mikki Futernick. Sostchin. Stoni' and lielkind serve as Mission
coordinators. Drucker is W.D. campaign chairuuman, and Futer-
nick, W.D. president. A meeting was held at the home of S
Stone to explain the exciting details of the mission which includi a
visit to the Jewish Community Center of Mexico City, a briefing
about Keren Huyesod. a performance by an Israeli dance troupe, ,:
visit to the Folklorica Ballet at the Palace of Fine Arts, and a tow
of the American Jewish synagogue. Space is still available, but
don't delay, this promises to be a memorable W.D. experience
bpw campaign
dinner at
Grove isle
The Business and Professional
Women of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will sponsor a $750
minimum gift dinner on behalf of the
1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund / Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign on Thursday
evening, January 31.
The event will be held at Grove
Isle, cocktails begin at 6 p.m. and
dinner is at 7 p.m. The special guest
speaker will be Maria Gil son, a
member of the United Jewish
Appeal's Young Women's Leader-
ship cabinet. Ms. Gilson, a Wash-
ington D.C. resident, is extremely
active in the national Jewish com-
munity and in American politics.
Gabriel a Landau and Michelle
Merlin serve as chairwomen of the
BPW $750 Campaign Event. For
additional information contact the
Women's Division, 576-4000, ex-
tension 231.
1 love Miami'
The Women's Division will offer a
special educational opportunity in
early 1985. According to Debbie
Edelman, the Division will sponsor a
four-part program "I Love Miami."
Edelman, who serves as the
chairwoman of the event, indicated
that this new initiative of the
Community Education branch of the
Women's Division, "will allow the
participants to learn about the
history of the Jewish experience in
Miami in a unique 'hands-on'
manner."
"I Love Miami" will include three
study sessions on January 28,
February 4 and February 12. The
last session, on February ,19, will
feature a tour of historical Jewish
sites in Greater Miami. Scheduled
speakers for the study sessions
include; Arva Parks, author of
"Miami: The Magic City;" local
newscaster Ralph Renick; Malvina
Leibman; Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
witz; Myra Farr and Sidney
Aronovitz, the nephew of Miami's
first Jewish mayor.
The February 19 tour will visit
several local synagogues Temple
Israel of Greater Miami, Temple
Emanu-El, Beth Jacob and the
original site of Beth David.
The lecture series will be held at
the Federation building, and the cost
for the four-part "I Love Miami"
program will be $25. For additional
information contact the Women's
Division at 576-4000, extension 231.
foi
T
Jewu
upon
(iene
ector
Jewi
Th
aian-
Tennis again
The North Dade Constituent
Board of the W.D. is holding theu]
annual tennis event on Februar_
20th at the Turnberry Country Clubj
The event will feature a tennis
tournament, art show, and fashion
show. The minimum contribution
attend this event is $200. Eventj
chairwomen are Sandi BelkindJ
Phylis Meiei, Binnie Rosen and
Nettie Weiner.
Agam, Agam,
Agam
Yaacov Agam, the internationally I
reknowned artist, will be the veryl
special guest at the Miami Beach I
and South Dade campaign events I
for donors, sponsors and patrons of|
the Women's Division.
The events will be held at the Circle I
Gallery, on Wednesday. February
20. Attendees will have the op-
Eortunity to meet Agam and to view
is work. The program includes a
talk by Agam and an autograph |
party.
Event participants will make Si
minimum gift of $200 to the 19851
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund / Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign. Monna Lighte
is the Miami Beach chairwoman of j
this event; and the South Dade
event chairwomen are Joan Bloom,
Amira Donsky and Marsha Faggen.
For additional information about
these events contact the Women s
Division at 576-4000. extension 231.
From generation]
to generation
On February 5, the Southwest
Dade campaign event will be held in
Regines at the Grand Bay Hotel. W
$52 minimum gift event will feature
a fashion show presented by B
and At Ease.
The theme of the fashion show wuj,
be "the generations;" cmW^j
mothers and grandmothers wiu
model together.
The chairwomen of the Southwest
Dade event are Fran Berrin
and
Heidi Friedland. For additional
information contact the Women'
Division office, 576-4000, extension
231.


Federation, December, 1984
page 7
JEWISH EDUCATION
Our resource for a
strong Jewish community
The history of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education
The survival of Israel and the
Jewish people tomorrow depends
upon Jewish education today,' says
Gene Greenzweig, executive dir-
ector of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education.
The Jewish community is beset by
'iianv problems for example,
eimi'iution, a high rate of inter-
barriage, and until most recently, a
Lfo population growth. The over-
ling issue that confronts the
Lencan Jewish community is
Isrvival.
Jewish education represents the
tare of American Jewry. The
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
k- made education its foremost
Leal priority, and in its statement
cesses the need "to strengthen and
[aise the level of Jewish education in
ik local community and promote
die maintenance and vigorous ap-
xion of the Jewish ethic and
Ijevish teachings as the foundation
the survival of the Jewish people
dof Judaism."
The Central Agency for Jewish
[Education (CAJE) is the major
umnunal agency in the field of
Jewish education in the South
Florida area. It began as the Bureau
[of Jewish Education of Greater
Miami on March 1, 1944. Although
the Jewish population of Miami was
ally about 25,000 at that time, a
communal agency for education was
mas an urgent need.
The Bureau's first director was Dr.
Abraham Gannes, who recently
wired as Director of the Depart-
ment of Education and Culture of the
.American section of the World
Zionist Organization.
Plans were adopted to widen the
xope of the Central Agency to in-
clude not only Hebrew schools of
Greater Miami, but also to include
youth and adult education. The
Bureau of Jewish Education would
H as a coordinating-advisory-
supervisory body rather than as an
'ency controlling the schools
lucationally, financially and ideo-
logically.
In 1949, Dr. Louis Schwartzman
usumed the directorship. During
(be 50s and 60s, the Bureau ex-
panded to meet the Jewish com-
munity's educational needs
licensing and placement of teachers,
teacher professional growth and
development programs, observation
md consultation with schools,
plication of resource materials,
establishment of a community
library, inter-school activities, an
accreditation program and the
establishment of minimal school
standards.
Over the past decade, one of its
major priorities has been the conti-
nuation of Jewish education beyond
br and bat mitzvah, a program
conducted in cooperation with nearly
aU the major synagogues and Jewish
youth organizations in the com-
munity. The other major priority is
Mcher enrichment and licensing;
"jer the past ten years there has
own an expanding range of courses
and seminars for teacher professional
^th and development. CAJE
Participates in Community Services,
" which the agency works with
Public and private schools in the
community; publications, in which
tne agency produces many teacher
resource pamphlets; the Adult
Education program, involving the
Jewish Community Centers and the
majority of synagogues; and an
extensive Hebrew Ulpan program.
The Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies approved an alloca-
tion of seed money for the establish-
ment of a Jewish High School in the
South Dade area and a year later,
The Jewish Junior High School, now
known as Brandeis Academy opened
its doors.
Also, CAJE established a new
department Relations with Other
Communities headed by Abraham
Gittelson, the associate director of
the Agency. This committee is
responsible for all Agency activities
with Jewish communities
throughout the state of Florida.
Today's Jewish leaders seen 20 years ago at the Interschool Student Council.
THE DAY SCHOOL DEPARTMENT
At the end of the 1982-83 year, the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
established Jewish education as its
top priority. Major budgetary in-
creases were approved for every facet
of Jewish education.
CAJE completed an in-depth
study of all of its programs in 1983-
84. The major capital needs pro-
jected for Jewish education received
the highest priority, including a
retreat site, a building for the Jewish
High School of South Florida in
North Dade, a building for Brandeis
Academy in South Dade, and one for
the eventual high school to be
established in that area.
Major allocations were awarded to
every facet of Jewish education,
including the day schools, Teacher
Fringe Benefits Program and the
Agency itself.
The Greater Miami Jewish
community, faced with the issue of
Jewish survival, has established
many outstanding educational
programs to encourage Jewish
identity and continuity: a well-
developed day school system; an
innovative Judaica High School; a
program to assist those who wish to
attend synagogue supplementary
schools, and the highly regarded
High School in Israel program,
among others.
Greenzweig adds, "Miami has
been able to be a lot more creative,
more innovative, and able to take
more risks than a lot of other cities,
because of its relatively short
history. This makes Miami an ex-
citing place for education."
According to Roberta Shevin,
president of CAJE, "It is the chal-
lenge of CAJE and the Federation to
reach out into the community to
enhance existing programs and to
develop new ideas in order to insure a
thriving Jewish future."
The Day School Department
(DSD) of CAJE represents the
Federation and CAJE in its
relationship with all day schools in
the community.
In the Greater Miami area, there
are thirteen day schools: six
Orthodox, two Conservative, two
Reform, two Interdenominational,
and one Traditional.
The day schools provide general
and Judaic studies subjects on all
levels of the school program.
All of the day schools other than
the Jewish High School, Brandeis
Academy and Bais Yaakov for Girls
offer preschool and elementary
programs, and seven offer junior
high school programs. There are
currently five schools offering high
school level courses, the major
courses being at the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy on Miami Beach and the
Jewish High School of South Florida
in North Dade. Orthodox day
schools tend to have more extensive
secondary education programs.
The DSD encourages teachers and
administrators to become licensed,
encourages schools to pay better
salaries to teachers, and has created
a salary scale.
The Day School Teachers'
Institute for Judaic and General
Studies coordinates and organizes
joint and interschool activities.
The Day School Department
conducts institutes which are at-
tended by 200 to 300 teachers.
Teachers can attend and receive
credit towards maintaining their
licenses for the National Board of
License.
The DSD also assists in personnel
placement throughout the day school
system.
The Department is directed by
Rabbi Menachem Raab.
The following are the day schools
of Greater Miami. Most of the
schools serve a broad geographic
area with a student population from
different sections of the community.
Some offer transportation and-or
lunch:
MIAMI BEACH
RABBI ALEXANDER S. GROSS
HEBREW ACADEMY (Orthodox)
2400 Pine Tree Drive
532-6421
Grades: Nursery-Kindergarten
through 9
OLGA AND MARGARET
WEISHAUS HIGH SCHOOL FOR
GIRLS OF THE HEBREW
ACADEMY OF GREATER
MIAMI
Grades: Girls, 10-12
BOYS HIGH SCHOOL OF THE
HEBREW ACADEMY
Grades: Boys, 10-12
LUBAVITCH EDUCATIONAL
CENTER (Orthodox)
1140 Alton Road
673-5664
Oholei Torah School: Boys.Nursery
through 8
Beth Chana School: Girls, Nursery
through 8
LEHRMAN DAY SCHOOL (Con-
servative)
727 77th St.
868-2771
Grades: Nursery-Kindergarten
through 8
LOUIS MERWITZER MESIVTA
HIGH SCHOOL (Orthodox)
1965 Alton Road
538-5543
Grades: Boys, 9-12
NORTH DADE
JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL OF
SOUTH FLORIDA (Community)
1890 N.E. 25th Avenue
935-5620
Grades: 9-12
SAMUEL SCHECK HILLEL
COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL
(Orthodox)
1900 N.E. 25th Avenue
931-2831
Grades: Nursery-Kindergarten
through 9
SINAI ACADEMY (Reform)
18801 N.E. 22nd Avenue
932-9010
Grades: Kindergarten through 5
TORAS EMES ACADEMY OF
MIAMI (Orthodox)
195 N.W. 156th Street (N K)
7902 Carlyle Avenue, Miami Beach
(1-8)
Grades: Nursery-Kindergarten
through 8
BETH AM DAY SCHOOL (Reform)
5950 N. Kendall Drive
665-6228
Grades: Nursery-Kindergarten
through 8
BETH DAVID SOLOMON
SCHECHTER DAY SCHOOL
(Conservative)
7500 S.W 120th Street
238-8766
Grades: Nursery-Kindergarten
through 6
BRANDEIS ACADEMY (Commu-
nity)
12401 S.W. 102nd Avenue
255-1335
Grades: 7-9
SOUTH DADE HEBREW
ACADEMY (Traditional)
11801 S.W. 74th Avenue
253-2300
Grades: Nursery-Kindergarten
through 6


page 8
Federation, December, 1984
PRE BAR /BAT MITZVAH PROGRAMS
Many students receive pre-bar / bat mitzvah training in afternoon an*
weekend school programs provided by synagogues throughout the
county. Twenty-six synagogues offer this type of program. The programs
with the largest enrollments are those run by Reform synagogues.
Federation's Synagogue Supplementary Scholarship Program has
aided many pre-bar / bat mitzvah age students by granting partial tuition
scholarships, based upon financial need, for enrollment in synagogue
supplementary schools two or more days a week.
The following are the synagogue schools offering weekend and af-
ternoon classes:
MIAMI
TEMPLE ISRAEL (Reform)
137 N.E. 19th Street
573-5900
TEMPLE TIFERETH JACOB (Conservative)
951E. 4th Avenue
887-9595
MIAMI BEACH
TEMPLE BETH EL OF NORTH BAY VILLAGE (Conservative)
7800 Hispanola Avenue
861-4005
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM (Liberal Reform)
4144 Chase Avenue
538-7231
TEMPLE EMANU-EL (Conservative)
1701 Washington Avenue
538-2503
TEMPLE MENORAH (Conservative)
620 75th Street
866-2156
TEMPLE MOSES (Orthodox)
1200 Normandy Drive
861-6308
TEMPLE NER TAMID (Conservative)
7902 Carlyle Avenue
866-9833
NORTH DADE
BETH MOSHE CONGREGATION (Conservative)
2225 N.E. 121st Street
891-5508
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION (Conservative)
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
949-2481
SEPHARDIC JEWISH CENTER (Conservative)
571 N.E. 171st Street
652-2099
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURAN (Conservative)
1025 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
947-1435
TEMPLE SINAI OF NORTH DADE (Reform)
18801 N.E. 22nd Avenue
932-9010
SOUTH DADE
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION (Conservative)
7500 S.W. 120th Street
238-2601
CONGREGATION BET BREIRA (Liberal Reform)
9400 S.W. 87th Avenue
595-1500
HOMESTEAD JEWISH CENTER (Conservative)
183 N.E. 8th Street
248-5724
KEYS JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER (Conservative)
Mile Marker 93.2 P.O.B. 116 Tavernier
451-0387
TEMPLE BETH AM (Reform)
5950 N. Kendall Drive
666-2536
TEMPLE JUDEA (Reform)
5500 Granada Blvd.
667-5657
TEMPLE OR OLOM (Conservative)
8755 S.W. 16th Street
221-9131
TEMPLE SAMUEL (Conservative)
9353 S.W. 152nd Avenue
382-3668
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL (Orthodox)
S.W. 154th Avenue and 75th Street
382-3343
TEMPLE SHIR AMI (Reform)
P.O. Box 161971
253-9666
TEMPLE BETH OR (Reconstructionist)
P.O. Box 169971
596-0766
TEMPLE ZAMORA (Conservative)
44 Zamora Avenue
448-7132
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER (Conservative)
8000 Miller Road
271-2311
inuaijt
BOW
Declining enrollments,
teacher shortage
issues of concern at caje
Two problems of major concern to the Central Agency for Jewish
Education are the drop in day school enrollment and the shortage of
qualified instructors.
During the past five years, there was a sustained growth in day
school enrollment, however, the day schools are now experiencing a
decline in enrollment, a result of the escalating cost of education and also
of the general trend towards assimilation.
Previously, the general deterioration of the public school system
resulted in increased enrollment of private schools. Today, however,
because of the fact that many of the public schools are improving,
parents now have a choice of where to send their children.
The average tuition for day schools is $3000 a year, and because this
is discretionary income in most families, day school education is not
always the number one priority in how to spend this income.
The three main sources of revenue for the day schools are tuition,
fund raising and allocations from the Federation. The number of
scholarships and subsidies offered for the various day schools is an in-
dication that financial considerations play a strong role in a family's
decision to send a child to day school.
Changes should start occuring in the future, based upon the fact that,
until recently, the Jewish community has had a below zero population
growth but now that trend is reversing.
Plans are being formulated to begin recruiting on a community wide
basis and efforts are being made to keep the tuition from climbing still
higher.
The Jewish community of South Florida has launched a campaign to
urge the enrollment of every Jewish child in a Jewish school, so that these
children understand their heritage and Jewish values.
The second major problem being addressed is the shortage of Jewish
education teachers. Several schools of higher education are closing the
departments which prepare these instructors, and only about half of the
students who do graduate with this certification actually teach. The
Jewish education teacher has not been thought of as a status profession;
one of the major reasons being that the wage scale has traditionally been
lower than that in other professions.
Another reason for the shortage is that this profession has been
traditionally dominated by women and today, women have many more
career choices than in the past.
This situation is expected to be remedied in the not too distant future.
Minimum wage scales are being established and greater fringe benefits
packages are being offered. This is seen as necessary to increase the status
of the profession. Also, programs of teacher recognition are being
established.
"We must make teachers aware that they are the greatest resource we
have," stated Gene Greenzweig, Director of the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.


Federation, December, 1984
Page 9
THE JUDAIC A
r HIGH SCHOOL
The Judaica High School, now in
its 13th year, was established to
retain students beyond bar and bat
mitzvah. It services areas from
South Miami to Boca Raton, and
even to other areas of Florida.
The Judaica High School works
with other Jewish communal
agencies,, both formal schools and
informal youth groups. Its purpose
t tr is to increase both the quality and
composition of a Judaic studies
program, and at the same time, to
attract and engage Jewish youth
through involvement with the youth
group network.
The Judaica High School operates
on many levels, from highly
structured formal classes, some of
which can earn students college
credit, to films, lectures and
discussion groups. The range of the
^^ curriculum covers such topics as Is-
V rael, Ethics, Philosophy, Hebrew
^^ Ulpan, Customs and Laws, and Arts
and Crafts.
The school operates on four dif-
ferent tracks: 1) the junior and
senior high school educational credit
program in cooperation with the
local synagogues and temples; 2) a
college credit program in cooperation
with Miami-Dade Community
College and Broward Community
College; 3) joint programs with di-
rectors and youth groups of the
community, and 4) an outreach
program for students in public high
school Judaica activities in the
community.
* The largest number of students
participate in the track affiliated
with the synagogues. The classes are
conducted in cooperation with each
of the existing synagogue programs.
Each synagogue has agreed to ac-
cept non-members into the program.
On the college credit track, all of
the courses are the academic
equivalent of on-campus college
courses and are credited toward the
various college degrees. The credit is
. (ransferrable to almost any college in
the country. Each course is taught
by state certified teachers who are
appointed by CAJE. A large number
of senior high school students who
have spent time on weekends and
after school studying topics like
Comparative Religion and Jewish
Short Stories also receive credit.
The Judaica High School has
provided to the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization and other selected syn-
agogue youth organizations,
speakers and film programs on such
topics as The Holocaust, Love, Sex
and Marriage, Jewish Humor and
Jewish Identity.
The Judaica High School program
has made many recent achievements.
The college credit program is one of
the major attractions for senior high
school students. The curriculum has
been revised so that each grade level
has both required and optional
coursework as to assure that a
student has a well-rounded program
of instruction during his par-
ticipation in the program. CAJE
participates in the Reading is
Fundamental (RIF) program and
has distributed over 5000 books to
students in the Judaica High School
program.
CAJE is now conducting a major
drive to convince the remaining syn-
agogues whose confirmation
programs remain on a 9th grade level
to upgrade their programs, ex-
tending confirmation through the
10th grade. They hope to retain teens
beyond confirmation through the
i college credit program.
"Learn-In" sessions for youth
groups continue to be an important
part of the informal high school
program.
Directors of the Judaica High
School are Rabbi Shimon Azulav,
High School Director, and Dr. Sandy
Andron, Youth Program Director.
EDUCATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER
AND LIBRARY
The Educational Resource Center / Library houses an extensive
collection of major text materials on Judaica; maps, charts, and posters;
periodicals of Jewish interest, a filmstrip collection and a sixteen drawer
vertical file of pamphlets and clippings on personalities, Jews in various
lands, Jewish education, Israel, and general information. The circulating
and reference sections are both in English and Hebrew.
The Educational Resource Center assists educators in the field of
teaching subjects such as Holocaust, Bible, Jewish Family, Israel and
many others. Assistance is also coming through bibliographies, reference
materials, articles and pertinent data on a variety of subjects.
The Center presents programs throughout the community at
Federation Towers, the Miami Beach JCC, and the Jewish Blind Guild.
A Teacher Center has recently been established which provides
educators with resources to design and produce a wide variety of teaching
aids.
The film library covers a range of subject areas including American
Jewry, the aged, Bible, history, holidays, the Holocaust, the development
of Israel and Zionism.
The library lends its films free of charge to public and private schools,
synagogues, and youth groups.
The Educational Resource Center/Library, located at 4200 Biscayne
Blvd., is open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday and Friday from 9:00 a.m.
to 4:00 p.m. The telephone number is 576-4030.
INSTITUTE FOR
JEWISH STUDIES
The main purpose of the Institute
for Jewish Studies (US) is the
preparation and the professional
development of teachers on all levels
of the Jewish educational process,
including early childhood, weekend
religious school, afternoon Hebrew
school, day school, Judaica High
School and Adult Education, and
programs for the lay and
professional leadership of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and its agencies. The US provides
counsel and guidance for Jewish
studies on an adult level in the
general and Jewish communities.
The Institute coordinates,
stimulates, and operates programs in
adult Jewish studies throughout
Dade and Broward Counties.
As part of its teacher training
programs, the Institute provides the
courses, workshops, and seminars
necessary for the attainment and
maintenance of the Early Childhood,
Hebrew Techer, Talmud, as well as
Sunday School/Weekend Teacher
Certificates.
The Institute conducts "Learn-
In" programs for the Women's
Division and the Young Adult
Division. These "Learn-Ins" provide
courses on a wide variety of Jewish
topics and are generally held four
times a year with six weekly sessions
each.
Another program reaching large
numbers of people in the country is
the Ulpan, which teaches the Hebrew
language through intensive study.
The Ulpan emphasizes oral language
skills taught with a special Ulpan
methodology. Beginner, in-
termediate, and advanced levels are
taught in all sections of Dade and
Broward counties. The Ulpan
program has been in existence for
eleven years.
CAJE also runs a Midrasha series
in cooperation with Federation, area
synagogues and the JCC's. The
series serves North and South Dade
and features well-known speakers
who discuss events and thoughts in
today's Jewish world. These
speakers include outstanding
scholars, writers and theologians.
Upcoming highlights of the
Midrasha series include: Dr. Jacob
Marcus, speaking on "American
Jewish History," at Temple Judea,
Thursday, January 10 at 8:00 p.m.;
Velvel Pasternak, presenting a
lecture on Chassidic music at the Bet
Breira Congregation, Tuesday,
January 15 at 8:00 p.m.; and Wolf
Blitzer, who will discuss "Israel-
American Relations" at Temple Beth
Am, Monday, February 25 at 8:00
p.m.
In the community, the CAJE
Institute for Jewish Studies staff
serves on the Holocaust Day
Observance Committee, the Yom
Ha-Atzmaut Committee, the Comm-
ittee on Services to the Jewish
Elderly, the Jewish Association of
Single Services, the Jewish National
Fund, the Department of Education
and Culture of the World Zionist
Organization, among many others.
Rabbi Norman S. Lipson is Direc-
tor of the Institute for Jewish
Studies.


Page 10
Federation, December, 1984
JEWISH EDUCATION = LIFELONG LEARNING
University of Miami, Barry u. offer
Judaic studies programs
Established in 1973, the Judaic
Studies Program at the University of
Miami offers undergraduate
students a wide variety of courses in
Jewish subjects. In addition to the
interdisciplinary courses offered
through other departments such as
the history and English depart-
ments, the Judaic Studies Program
has developed courses of its own.
Barry University has established a
Masters degree program in Jewish
Studies. It is also planned to make it
possible for students to get a double
Masters degree in Jewish Studies
and Social Work.
Informal learning takes place at
the Hillel Jewish Student Centers at
the University of Miami, Florida
International University Tamiami
Campus, and Florida International
University Bay Vista Campus. The
centers sponsor "Learn-Ins," Oneg
Shabbats. and religious and social
gatherings.
u. of M. adult
education
The Department of Judaic Studies
at the University of Miami and the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education are offering an extensive
adult education program in
cooperation with area synagogues
beginning in January.
"This is a decentralized outreach
program using resources in the
community and University ex-
pertise,*' stated Dr. Henry Green,
Director of Judaic Studies at the
UM.
"The goal of the program is to
go to the synagogues and com-
plement their programs with
University personnel or use their
personnel to teach the courses. The
adult education program is one way
of addressing the teacher shortage.
We need to provide a vehicle for
students to get the knowledge they
need to teach."
Not only for teacher credit, the
program will spillover into the
community for adults who want to
learn for their own personal
development.
The courses are offered by the
synagogues, which determine the
tuition. Part of the adult studies
program is subsidized to encourage
teachers to get accreditation.
Students can receive University of
Miami credit through the School of
Continuing Studies and the Judaic
Studies Program.
The following courses will be
offered in January:
"The Israeli Mosaic: Sephardim,
Ashkenazi, and Ethiopian Jews,"
Temple Judea. Instructor: Dr.
Henry Green.
"The Book of the Prophets," Beth
Torah. Instructor: Rabbi Menachem
Raab.
"The Sages" or "The Book of
Ruth" Instructor: Rabbi Stuart
Grant.
"The Talmud," Temple Samu-El.
Instructor: Rabbi Edwin Farber.
In February: "Turning Points in
Jewish History," Temple Samu-El.
Instructor: Rabbi Edwin Farber.
In March:
"Liturgy-Theology and Heresy in
Prayerbook." Temple Samu-El.
Instructor: Rabbi Haskell Bemat.
"Contemporary Jewish Thought"
Instructor: Professor Mark
Sweeney.
For more information, contact
CAJE 576-4030; Dr. Henry Green,
284-4375; or the individual syna-
gogues.
Jewish Film
Festival
The First Annual Jewish Film
Festival is being sponsored by the
Central Agency for Jewish Educa-
tion and the Judaic Studies Program
of the University of Miami.
This eight film series deals with
the Jewish people in crisis. Whether
spiritual or social in nature, these
crises make up the basis for the
Jewish experience.
The film series begins January 17.
The themes of the films run the
historical gamut from exorcism to
cults.
Educators who attend the festival
will be able to receive credits towards
CAJE accreditation. In the future,
students will also be able to receive
credits from the UM.
The subscription to the entire
series is $15 for the public and $10
for students. Individual tickets are
$3. They are available through the
Judaic Studies Department, 284-
4375: through CAJE, 576-4030; or
on the evening of the showing at the
Beaumont Cinema on the UM
campus. All films begin at 8:00 p.m.
January 17
"The Dybbuk." 1939, Polish
Exorcism, possession of a spirit, and
excommunication form this classic
tale of the supernatural. Filmed in
pre-World War II Poland, "The
Dybbuk" frighteningly tells the tale
of thwarted love and revenge.
January 31
"The Illegals," 1947, American
This is the only documentary film of
the Brayha the underground
railroad used to transport survivors
past the British into Palestine. The
drama centers on the separation and
reunion of two refugees and brings to
reality one of- the most incredible
periods of modern history.
February 14
"They Were Ten," 1961, Israeli
The first full length Israeli-produced
feature film depicts the founding of a
nineteenth century Palestinian
settlement and the confrontation
between Jews, Arabs, and Turks.
February 28
"Sallah, 1965, Israeli
A bitter-sweet story of a Sephardic
Jew's successful campaign against
the bureaucracy of the twentieth
century. The film pokes fun at Israeli
society and the immigrants and
thereby shows great insight into the
weaknesses and foibles of human
existence.
March 7
"I Was Born In Jerusalem," 1970,
Israeli
The history, architecture, and ar-
chaeology of Israel come to life
through extraordinary photography,
everchanging scenery, and moving
musical themes.
March 21
"The Wooden Gun," 1979, Israeli
Set in the 1950s in Tel Aviv, the film
focuses on rival gangs and their
vision of humanity, nationalism and
war.
April 4
"Lenny," 1974. American
The story of Lenny Bruce, a brilliant
comedian who is self-destructive, is
portrayed by Dustin Hoffman.
April 18
"Ticket to Heaven," 1982, Canadian
The film takes the viewer into the
frightening world of cults and back.
Based on Josh Breed's own expe-
rience, it offers a convincing look at
the process by which a well-educated
guestioning Jew is ensnared by a
alifornia cult.
Students from all of Greater Miami's Jewish Day Schools gather at
Federation annually for a cityuide spelling bee sponsored by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
azyf plans exciting Israel
programs year round
The Religious Department of the
American Zionist Youth Foundation
actively promotes religious Zionism
and Aliyah in a Torah framework. It
does this in the most direct and
successful way, by getting as many
young people as possible to ex-
perience Israel first hand.
The department offers a variety of
exciting programs. These provide
high school and college students
with opportunities to tour the length
and breadth of Israel, learn in a
variety of yeshivot or study in a
University, work on a religious
kibbutz or moshav, take an Ulpan, or
combine all of these to fully ex-
perience every aspect of a Torah life
in Eretz Yisrael.
A popular summer program for
high schoolers is the "Neurim"
firogram. Open to those who have
inished their sophomore year, it
includes kibbutz work, special
seminars and touring. In addition,
the participants are "adopted" by
kibbutz families and are able to form
close friendships with their peers.
The "Bet-El" program, open to high
school boys, offers a month of in-
tensive Talmud and Halacha study
at the Hesder Yeshiva at Bet-El.
Following this month, there are ten
days of work on the settlement and
both short and long term tours
throughout Israel.
A summer program for college
students is the Kabak program. I
On this program the participants
work on a religious kibbutz and are
"adopted" by kibbutz families,
thereby allowing them to participate
fully in kibbutz life. Seminars in i
Judaic studies are included in the
daily routine, and five full days of
touring conclude the program.
For those college students who
would like a summer of intensive
learning, the "Yarchei Kallah"
program offers men the opportunity
to attend Mercaz Ha Rav Kook or
Machon Meir, depending upon their
background in Judaic Studies.
Machon Ora is open to the women.
Six hours of kibbutz work and two
hours of Hebrew study make up the
daily schedule of those participants
in the Religious Summer Kibbutz
Ulpan. Short trips and intensive !
touring are also offered.
The religous department also i
offers long term programs to those |
high school graduates who would
like to spend more than a summer in
Israel.
"Shituf," a year long program
divided into three segments, offers
its participants a variety of ex-
periences. The first segment includes
work on a religious moshav and
regular seminars on Jewish topics.
The second segment entails either
learning in a yeshiva or attending a
seminar including Torah studies.
Holocaust studies and leadership
training. This second segment also
includes a week of "Gadna" training,
(youth army training) and a week of
work on a new settlement. The third
segment entails returning to the
moshav for work and special social
programming.
An exciting program now being
offered is the "Beerot Yitzchak, Bar
I Ian" program. This six month
program combines kibbutz work and
university study. The first month
consists of a half day of work at the
religious kibbutz Beerot Yitzchak
and a half day of ulpan. After this
month the participants attend Bar
I Ian University one day a week and
continue their kibbutz work and
ulpan study. College credit is
available.
In addition to sponsoring these
programs, the Religious Department
conducts special projects here in the
U.S. One of these projects is the
Chidon Tzionit Datit Contest on
Religious Zionism, which is intended
to increase the knowledge of the
history of religious Zionism and to
promote a greater understanding of
Eretz Yisrael.
To prepare for the contest, the
religious department of AZYF
published a study guide titled A
Century Of Torah Life In Eretz
Yisrael. Part one of the contest was
administered on a nationwide basis,
and those receiving sufficient scores
were invited to participate in part
two of the contest, which is being
conducted now.
Another project conducted by the
religious department is the
publication of Tzomet. The literal
translation of Tzomet is "in-
tersection," and this title aptly
describes this magazine which
provides a forum for discussion of
issues relevant to religious Zionist
Youth groups. Tzomet reaches the
memberships of Bnei Akiva, CAT-
YY, Ezra, NCSY, and Young Israel.
For more information about these
programs, please write to: AZYF
Religious Department, 515 Park
Ave., New York, NY 10022, (212)
751-6070.
ly
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Federation, December, 1984
Page 11
encies/Planning and Budget
ih a "Channeling" brightens
tukah spirit
fhneling" case manager Hai/ucl
jives Anna Fineman a gift for
Ik ah.
holiday season this year was a
one for over 200 frail elderly,
to the combined efforts of
[major retailers and the staff of
[ational Long-Term Care Chan-
Demonstration Project, a
)n of the Miami Jewish Home
lospital for the Aged,
roughout the holiday season,
solicitated by "Channeling"
I generously donated by Bur-
I, Jordan Marsh, Winn-Dixie,
lie Gardens, Chevron, Vicks and
others were distributed to
chronically ill, impoverished
>ften isolated older adults.
Channeling" clients are frail
By diagnosed as being in need of
ang home care who are being
named in their own homes with
aid of support services. The
Jewish Home is one of ten
nationwide that is sta'e and
rally funded to provide this
kane, cost-effective alternative to
itutionalization.
)r these individuals, "Channel-
has been the miracle that has
ed them to retain their in-
idence. They are in-
finals like 84 year old Anna
eman who lives in a Miami Beach
rement hotel. For Anna, who
jrs from severe arthritis, failing
sight and circulatory problems,
In the simple activities of daily life
like cooking, cleaning and bathing
have become too difficult to handle
alone.
"Mrs. Fineman does not want to
be put into a long-term care facility,"
noted her "Channeling" case-
manager, Raquel Wax. "Uprooting
her in that way could prove to be a
real setback for her. So, with visits
from a homemaker three times per
week to help her with personal care
and regular visits from a nurse who
monitors her health, we are helping
Mrs. Fineman to remain an active,
independent member of her com-
munity." Mrs. Fineman was the
recipient of a beautiful shawl
donated for Channukah by volunteer
Bess Szerlip.
Last year, according to "Channel-
ing" Project Director Barbara
Brodbar. over 450 elderly residents
of Miami were maintained in their
own homes by Channeling at 42
percent of the cost of long-term care.
Although funds for the research
program will end in 1985, the State
of Florida was so impressed by the
success and cost-effectiveness of
"Channeling" that it has ap-
propriated $500,000 in state funds to
continue the program.
Fred D. Hirt. executive director
of the Miami Jewish Home, feels
that the importance of alternative
care cannot be overstated. "In order
to provide for this rapidly emerging
'new majority,' said Hirt, "we
need to get a better understanding of
the aging process and create options
that were unheard of just a few years
ago. We must find ways to deliver
vital services to our elderly and
quickly."
Perhaps the best assessment of
the Home's "Channeling" program
comes from Anna Fineman who said,
"I am so grateful to "Channeling' for
giving me the chance to live the way
I choose for a little longer. My legs
don't hold me up any more and I
can't always see the things around
me. but I know that I am in my own
home. Thank everyone at 'Channel-
ing' for the lovely shawl and the
chance to celebrate another Chan-
nukah at home. Wish them all a
happy holiday from me!"
Hi AS announces 1985
scholarship competition
Continuing a tradition established
11 years ago, HI AS is inviting
applications for its 1985 Scholarship
Awards. The scholarships will be !
presented at HI AS' 105th Annual
Meeting, to be held in New York in
late March. In announcing the
awards, Robert L. Israeloff, HIAS
President, explained that each
carries a $500 stipend and that they
are given to HIAS-assisted refugees
who have settled here since 1976 and
have made special progress in their
adjustment to life in the United
States.
The HIAS Scholarship Awards
program is made possible through
the following participants:
THE RICHARD ALAN
SHAPIRO MEMORIAL FUND -
established by HIAS President
Emeritus Edwin Shapiro and family
in memory of Mr. Shapiro's son.
THE ANN S. PETLUCK
MEMORIAL FUND established
by Meyer Poses of New York, N.Y.,
in memory of his wife. Ms. Petluck
served as Director of HIAS U.S.
Operations for some 20 years. Her
efforts profoundly influenced the
Eractice of migration casework and
elped reshape U.S. immigration
law.
THE JUDGE MURRAY I.
GURFEIN MEMORIAL FUND -
established by the late Eva Gurfein
in memory of her husband, who
served as HIAS president from 1956-
57 and from 1960-67.
THE REGINA AND SAM
BERKOWITZ FUND established
by Enid and Leon Schwarzbaum of
North Woodmere, N.Y., in memory
of Mrs. Schwarzbaum's parents.
Applications and further infor-
mation may be obtained by writing
to HIAS Scholarship Awards,
HIAS, 200 Park Avenue South, New
York, NY 10003. Completed applica-
tions should be returned to HIAS,
postmarked no later than January
15, 1985. Award winners will be
notified no later than February 28,
1985.
iraduate students active
Hillel programs
( i
c
i
Iniversity of Miami Law
School students Robin
*rever, Cardozo Society
president, and Douglas
mdau, law school news-
paper editor-in-chief.
JWhy are students' at the
Iniversity of Miami School of Law
(tending lunchtime talks on inter-
kith dating? And for what purpose
lave medical students at the univer-
Ity initiated a brown bag discussion
tries on medical ethics? Jewish
raduate students are setting aside
:ie from their studies to explore a
ige of issues which are relevant to
their lives as young Jewish adults.
The demand for Jewish student
organizations among law and
medical students is not new, since
these groups have existed under the
sponsorship of Hillel at the Uni-
versity of Miami for several years.
Yet for the past several months
larger numbers of students have
participated in a variety of programs
planned by their representative
organizations.
The Cardozo Society represents
Jewish students at the University of
Miami Law School and is responsible
for the organization of social and
educational programs. With nearly
fifty paid members and numerous
supporters, it is among the most
successful student activities at the
law school. At a "Careers and
Cocktails" evening in November,
forty Cardozo members met with
thirty attorneys to exchange in-
formation on the practice of law in
South Florida. Robin Prever,
Cardozo Society president, and
chairperson of the event, feels that it
provided "insight into many areas of
legal practice, expanding on our
classroom knowledge of the pro-
fession. After exploring different
areas of the law, we can now make
better-informed decisions on a
career."
Prever, a third-year student and
the guiding force behind Cardozo,
joined the group after serving as a
legal intern at the Miami Beach
Jewish Community Center through
"My Brother's Keeper," the vol-
unteer service program at the Uni-
versity of Miami Hillel Foundation.
That experience convinced her that
exposure to Jewish values and tradi-
tions was needed at the law school,
and she agreed to help reestablish
the student group there. Students
have responded to Prever's leader-
ship, as attendance at this year's
programs demonstrates.
Another event sponsored by the
law students was Jewish Awareness
Week, a series of programs in
December which featured lecture,
films and discussions on the
Holocaust, Soviet Jewry, anti-
Semitism, intermarriage and Israel
and the Palestinians. A falafel sale
lent a festive air to the week and
brought it to the attention of the
entire law school. A United Jewish
Appeal campaign will be conducted
this year, chaired by Mario Bick. a
third-year student and a former
campaign co-chair at the University
of Florida.
HIAS the Hebrew Immigrant
Aid Society is the international
migration agency of the organized
Jewish community. HIAS is a
beneficiary of the UJA of Greater
New York and Jewish federations
across the country.
p & B initiates
child day care
study
The Planning and Budget Commit-
tee, through its Group Services
Subcommittee, has initiated a study
on Jewish child day care. Pictured
above is the chairperson of the Sub-
committee, Debra Grodnick, and
vice chairperson, Robert Kramer.
Thus far the most glaring need
identified by the Subcommittee is
for infant day care under Jewish
auspices, especially in the South
Dade area. The Subcommittee will
be meeting throughout the winter
months, and will submit a final
report to the full Planning and
Budget Committee in March, 1985.
Medical school activities are run
by the Maimonides Society. Smaller
in scope that its counterpart at the
law school, this organization focuses
primarily on Jewish values in rela-
tion to moral issues in medicine.
During the fall semester students
attended a weekly discussion group
on Jewish perspectives in bio-
medical ethics led by Hillel Director
Rabbi Mark Kram. For the spring
the group plans to address a series of
themes related to Jewish identity.
Counseling is often requested by
medical students who encounter
ethical dilemmas in their studies and
laboratory work. Rabbi Kram helps
them to confront their attitudes
toward the application of medical
procedures and technology, and to
discuss personal issues such as mar-
riage, career, and religious ob-
servance.
A fundraising campaign for the
United Jewish Appeal has been held
for several years, which enhances
awareness among medical students
of their responsibility toward this
Jewish community effort. Social
activities, sponsored jointly with the
law school, include holiday cele-
brations and mixers.


Page 12
Federation, December, 1984
j South Pade/Agencies
BIGGER and better Event
to sweep So. Dade on March 16
fv
&LEIDOSCOP"
YOUNG SHOW-GOBB SWIES
Last year more than 800 people
attended the South Dade campaign
event held at Miami Dade Com-
munity College which featured the
Commodores. Could this years
upcoming event ever top last year's
spectacular?
According to the event co-
chairmen, the answer is a definite
"yes". On March 16. 1966 the South
Dade Branch of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will stage its
BIGGER and BETTER event. Co-
chairmen Marlene and Richard Kohn
and Nedra and Mark Oren expect
more than 1.000 South Daders to be
on hand for the gala celebration
which will be held on behalf of the
1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign.
The event planners are busily
preparing for the big day. and details
concerning entertainment and cost
are now being finalized. Recruitment
chairmen for the BIGGER and
BETTER event are Joann and
Gerald Young and Ruth and Steven
Shere.
The members of the BIGGER and
BETTER event committee include:
Shelly and Steven Brodie. Marilyn
and Ron Kohn, Terri and Alan Perris
and Shelley and David Wolfberg.
For additional information about
this event you won't want to miss.
contact Jerfv Neimand at the South
Dade branch. 251-9334.
Sen.Specter to
speak Jan.10
US. Senator Arlen Specter (R-
Pa.i will be the special guest at a
wine and cheese reception in honor of
the 1985 South Dade Annual Event
table captains. Thursday. January
10. at 8:00 p.m. The reception, held
on behalf of the 1985 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund-Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign will be at the home of Dr.
and Mrs. Richard Levitt.
Senator Specter is an extremely
vocal advocate and supporter of the
State of Israel, and he is well versed
on the issues that concern the
national Jewish community.
For additional information about
this important event please contact
Jerry Neimand at 251-9334.
Avodah to perform
at So. Dade JCC
Avodah Dance Ensemhn n ill perform at the South Dade Jewish
Community Center's Gala Cultural Arts Event on Saturday.
January 19th at 8:15 p.m. Avodah. a Sew York based dance
company, integrates contemporary dance with the spirit of
Judaism.
Avodah, a New York based dance
company, will kick up their heels in a
contemporary display of dance
combined with the spirit of Judaism
at the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center's Gala Cultural Arts
Event on Saturday, January 19 at
8:15 p.m. at Miami Dade Com-
munity College theatre, located on
the South Dade Campus.
This major cultural event for the
South Dade JCC, a branch of the
Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida, follows three years of the
Center bringing outstanding Jewish
cultural programs to the South Dade
community.'
Avodah integrates contemporary
dance with toe spirit of Judaism.
Through powerful leaps and turns '
the dancers combine ballet and
modern techniques with playful
overtones. Avodah has performed
throughout the United States with
programs ranging from Judaic
themes to every day life drama, to
the comedy of Woody Allen and
Groucho Marx.
The troupe is composed of five
dancers, one of which is a Rabbi. Dr.
Jo Anne Tucker, founder of the
company, artistic director and
choreographer, combined her
professional training at the Julliard
School of Music and the Martha
Graham Studio with a PhD in
theatre.
Tickets are S50 for Patrons and
$25 for Sponsors which includes a
dessert reception. General admission
is S15. S10 tickets are available for
senior adults and students. Call 251 -
1394 for ticket reservations and more
information.
Children and parents alike will enjoy another season of theatre as the
South Dade Jewish Community Center (JCC) launches its second season
of Kaleidoscope a young showgoers series. Kaleidoscope is a unique
program designed for parents and their children 4-12 years old. providing
quality entertainment in the performing arts. Kaleidoscope premiered last
year with the help of a grant to the South Dade JCC, a branch of the
Jewish Community Centers of South Florida, from the Dade County
Board of County Commissioners. This year a grant from the Division of
Cultural Affairs. Florida Department of State will make three more
Kaleidoscope performances possible.
Fintasx Theatre Factory u ill perform "Comedy with a Tu i^t o] Lemon"]
and the Bits 'n Pieces Puppet Theatre u ill perform Pu-* in Bo n il,i~
year's Kaleidoscope a young shou goers' sen- pn -< nti i S Dade Jen i The first performance in the series will be "Puss in Boots,'' presented
by the Bits n' Pieces puppet theatre. It is a musical presentation with 9-
foot tall puppets that will delight children. Bits n' Pieces, from Tampa, is
considered one of the Florida state treasures. The performance is
scheduled for Thursday, Dec. 27 at 1 p.m. at the Universitv of Miami-
Knight Center Theatre, 400 S.E. 2nd Avenue.
"A Child's Musical Fantasy.'' presented by the Miniature Orchestra
of the Philharmonic Orchestra of Florida will be conducted by Clark
McAllister and is the second Kaleidoscope performance. The Miniature
Orchestra, scheduled for Monday. February 18 at 1:00 p.m. is made up of
10 musicians, representing the four major orchestral sections and has
delighted children throughout Dade and Broward Counties in such
productions as "Peter and the Wolf" and the "Carnival of .Animals A
special presentation has been planned for Kaleidoscope's performance_to
be held at Miami Killian Senior High School Auditorium. 10655 S.W. 97th
Avenue.
"Comedy with a Twist of Lemon" is the third and final show in this
year's Kaleidoscope series. A vaudeville-type production which blends
comedy, juggling, clowns and dance acrobatics in a zany show for
children. "Comedy with a Twist of Lemon" performed by the Fantasy
Theatre Factory is scheduled for Tuesday. April 9th at 1:30 p.m. at the
Museum of Science Auditorium. 3280 South Miami Avenue.
Tickets for Kaleidoscope are available at the South Dade JCC. 12401
S.W. 102nd Avenue. Series of three performances are S9 for children and
S13 for adults. Individual tickets are S4 for children and S5 for adults Call
the JCC at 251-1394 for reservations or more information.
J
Coffee House' revived in So. Dade
Bet Cafe marks the revival of the
"Coffee House" in South Dade
offering Jewish singles the best in
bright, new and vibrant en-
tertainment in an informal at-
mosphere.
Bet Cafe is sponsored by Temple
Beth Am and the South Dade Jewish
Community Center's Jewish Singles
Network. Entertainment, food and a
lively exciting place to relax makes
Bet Cafe the ideal place to meet new
people.
The Cafe will feature mimes,
vocalists, bands, poets, films,
dancing acts and anything Mhpt
and entertaining. In addition, the
Cafe s "open mic" provides an op-
portunity for the audience at random
to perform in Bet Cafe's amateur
hour. A different coffee and dessert
will be served each week.
Bet Cafe wul be open every other
Thursday evening, beginning
January 24, at Temple Beth Am,
5960 North Kendall Drive in Soutn
Dade, from 8:00-11:00 pjn. Anyone
interested in an audition or receiving
more information on Bet Cafe can
call Jodye at 251-1394.


Federation, December, 1984
page 13
Foundation/CRC
is your will up-to-date?
r
L
Harry Kramer
Born in Cedra, Poland in 1897, Harry Kramer came to the United States at the age
of 14 and settled in Springfield. Massachusetts. There he owned and operated a
bakery until 1936, when he moved to Miami. Never married, he developed a real
estate business and owned hotels in Miami and Miami Beach. Harry Kramer was
interested in supporting the Jewish community in South Florida and in Israel, and
before he died created a private foundation to provide ongoing support for {11 people
of the state of Israel (2) care of the sick and aged (3) education in South Florida and
(4) religious institutions in South Florida.
After his death in 1980, the Harry Kramer Memorial Fund was created. To date, it
has made two grants of $5,000 each to the Central Agency for Jewish Education in
support of teacher scholarships and one grant of $6,600 to support a special con-
sultant for Project Renewal in Or Akiva.
J
Harry .\ el son
Fredric Hoffman
By BARRY NELSON
And FREDRIC HOFFMAN
GENERAL
Many people believe that once a
will is executed, it need not be
revised unless a decision is made to
change certain bequests. But
changes in the tax law and / or
personal situations (e.g., divorce,
birth, death), or financial status may
result in an outdated or undesirable
estate plan, if a will is not revised.
This article includes a four-step
procedure you can utilize to
determine whether your will and
estate plan are up to date.
NON-TAX CONSIDERATIONS
Regardless of the size of your
estate, you should consider any
developments, such as the death of a
spouse or a divorce as events which
could warrant will revisions.
Although many jurisdictions, in-
cluding Florida, provide t^at a
divorce or dissolution of marriage
revokes a testamentary provision
made in favor of a divorced spouse, a
will may not contain an appropriate
alternative provision for the
distribution of property in such
situations. Additionally, the
designations of beneficiaries in
insurance policies and or in pension
or profit sharing plans are not af-
fected by such statutory provisions
and should be carefully reconsidered
alter divorce.
If a former spouse is listed as a
Personal Representative or Trustee,
you may wish to consider a new will
or a codicil appointing a different
Personal Representative or Trustee.
The birth of additional children or
grandchildren may also warrant will
revisions.
Notwithstanding changes brought
about by divorce, you should
periodically review your will to
confirm that the persons listed as the
ID guardians of minor children, (2)
personal representatives, (3)
trustees, and (4) beneficiaries, are
alive and that their responsibilities
and bequests remain in accordance
with your existing desires.
Even those with modest estates
should have a will prepared to ap-
point a guardian tor any minor
children. The consequences of not
designating a guardian become
apparent when the appointment is
left to the discretion of a judge and
various relatives believe they are
best suited to serve as a child's
guardian.
TAX PLANNING
CONSIDERATIONS
As a result of the unified estate
*&d gift tax credit for descendents
dying in 1984, no federal estate tax is
due unless the taxable estate exceeds
325,000. Accordingly, those with
combined (i.e., husband and wife)
amily wealth in 1984 of $326,000 or
less generally need not be concerned
about dederal estate taxes. Unless
the tax laws are amended, the unified
credit exemption equivalent will
increase annually until 1987 as
follows:
YEAR
OF DEATH
1984
1985
1986
1987 and after
EXEMPTION
EQUIVALENT
$325,000
$400,000
$500,000
$600,000
Example: Assume the combined
family wealth of a husband and wife
is $1,000,000 of which $500,000 is
held solely by the husband and
$500,000 solely by the wife. If the
husbands will leaves all of his
assets, either outright to his sur-
viving spouse or in trust and gives
the surviving spouse appointment
over the assets in such trust, then
because of the unlimited marital
deduction, there will be no federal
estate tax incurred in 1984 upon the
husband's death. However, the
husband would not have utilized any
portion of the $325,000 unified credit
exemption equivalent amount that
otherwise could have passed tax free
from his estate, either outright or in
trust.
With proper estate planning,
$325,000 could have been placed in a
trust (the "Family Trust") for the
benefit of his surviving spouse
during her lifetime, with proceeds
passing ultimately to their children
or other beneficiaries. The terms of
the trust could provide the surviving
spouse with the following benefits
during her lifetime: (1) all of the
income from the trust; (2) any
amount that the surviving spouse
needs for her health, education,
maintenance and support (or other
ascertainable standard); (3) the right
to demand and be paid by the trustee
of the trust the greater of $5000 or
five percent of the value of the
corpus of the trust estate annually
(noncumulatively); and (4) a special
power of appointment (e.g., a power
of appointment that is exercisable by
the surviving spouse in favor of
anyone other than the surviving
spouse, her estate, her creditors or
the creditors of her estate). If
properly drafted, the amount in the
FAMILY TRUST would not be
included in the surviving spouse's
estate. By 1987, the amount of
combined family wealth that can
generally pass free of federal estate
tax regardless of the estate plan
selected will be $600,000, assuming
that no taxable lifetime gifts were
made which would reduce this
amount.
DETERMINING THE VALUE
OF YOUR TAXABLE ESTATE
In determining the value of your
taxable estate, you should include
the face value of any life insurance
over which you have any "incidents
of ownership" as well as the value of
any retirement (i.e., pension and
profit sharing) benefits which would
be included in your taxable estate. In
light of the above tax considerations,
you should take the following three
remaining steps in reviewing your
estate planning documents.
1. If your combined family wealth
exceeds $325,000 ($400,000 in 1985)
you should determine whether your
estate planning documents were
redrafted after August 13, 1981, the
effective date of the Economic
Recovery Tax of 1981 ("ERTA"). If
you have a pre-ERTA will with
combined family wealth exceeding
$325,000 ($400,000 in 1985) you
should determine as soon as possible
whether it would be advantegous to
utilize the unlimited marital
deduction available under ERTA. If
so, your will should be amended
accordingly or new documents
should be prepared.
2. For those with combined family
wealth in excess of $325,000
($400,000 in 1985) it is generally not
advantageous to pass one's entire
estate to the surviving spouse.
Although use of the unlimited
marital deduction can avoid estate
tax on the death of the first spouse,
the net long-term effect of such a
devise is that fewer assets would
ultimately pass to other family
beneficiaries.
If in the example above, the
decedent's will did not provide for a
Family Trust and if all of the
husband's assets were to pass to his
surviving spouse, either outright or
through a trust that is included in
the surviving spouse's estate (e.g., a
trust that gives the surviving spouse
a general power of appointment)
then assuming that he dies in 1984,
his wife's estate would be increased
by an additional $325,000 and would
be subject to estate taxes upon her
death.
3. Even with properly drafted
post-ERTA wills providing for a
trust similar to the FAMILY
TRUST described above, a problem
can occur when all of the property is
owned in joint tenancy with the right
of survivorship (e.g., the family
residence, bank accounts, stock
certificates, etc.). Any assets owned
by spouses as joint tenants will pass
by operation of law to the surviving
spouse notwithstanding a contrary
provision in a will. As a result, even
with properly executed estate
planning documents, if assets are
substantially owned by the husband
and wife jointly, the surviving
spouse will receive a more sub-
stantial portion of the estate than
would otherwise be desired to
minimize the family's overall estate
tax.
The best way to prevent this result
is to split up certain joint tenancies
owned by the husband and wife.
Then, upon the death of the first
spouse, such assets will pass ac-
cording to the decedent's will rather
than to the decedent's surviving
spouse which would happen by
operation of law if the assets were
owned jointly by the spouses.
Inasmuch as no estate or gift tax
consequences result from transfers of
assets directly between spouses,
consideration should be given to
splitting certain joint tenancies.
Furthermore, it is typically
advantageous for estate tax pur-
poses for both the husband and wife
to have enough assets in their own
name to take advantage of the
unified credit available in their year
of death. Married couples with
combined family wealth in excess of
$325,000 should consider obtaining
professional estate planning advice
to determine the best method of
allocating assets between the
husband and wife.
CONCLUSION
This article is written to encourage
you to periodically review your
estate plan. Estate planning is not
limited to the wealthy; typically, the
only one who benefits from a poorly
planned estate is the Internal
Revenue Service. If you have any
doubts as to whether your will is up
to date, consider contacting your
attorney for an estate planning check
up.
The lessons
of Jonestown
Last month marked the an-
niversary of the Jonestown
massacre. On November 18, 1978,
followers of the self-appointed
messiah Jim Jones participated in a
fanatically orchestrated mass
murder-suicide ritual that ended in
the deaths of 913 people. Six years
after the Jonestown nightmare, the
memory of that scarcely believable
event has somewhat dimmed.
However, the emotional confronta-
tions forced upon the nation by this
tragedy still haunt us. while the
questions "how could it happen?"
remain etched on the public mind.
Leading authorities on the cult
and missionary phenomenon
estimate that between 2,500 and
3,000 of these groups operate in the
United States today representing as
many as three million people. Many
of these so-called "new religions"
grew out of the turbulent sixties.
Each denies that it is a cult of any
kind or that Jonestown stands for
more than a unique example of
apocalyptic insanity. Cult leaders
cite their Constitutional rights to
religious freedom as the cloak that
protects and even legitimizes their
activities. Many cult groups even
have the support of certain clergy,
attorneys, and politicans in their
resistance to government inves-
tigations. The hundreds of
documented cases of child
abuse,physical deprivation, harass-
ment, and conspiracy convictions
have only begun to bring the cult
phenomenon out from under the
protective shadow of religion and
into the arenas of human and legal "
rights where it belongs.
Continued on Page 15


Kdye m
Federation, December, 1984
Federation Cable Television
Kaleidoscope debuts in January
"Kaleidoscope" returns to the airwaves. The
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's answer to
P.M. Magazine debuts on JFTV, Thursday,
January 3 at 7:30 p.m. "Kaleidoscope" will
offer in magazine format, features on stories of
local interest, celebrity interviews with Jewish
actors, actresses and sport figures, profiles of
the movers and shakers of the Miami Jewish
community, as well as, in-depth talks with men
and women who play a prominent role in
national and international Jewish affairs.
The show will be hosted by JFTV's Suzanne
Lasky, who first made "Kaleidoscope" a
household word when it aired Sunday mornings
on a local network affiliate. Now airing every
Thursday and Saturday evening on JFTV,
Lasky promises that "Kaleidoscope" will retain
much of the charm of the old "Kaleidoscope,"
and "now it will be enhanced because the new
features will be shot on location, throughout
the Greater Miami area."
During the month of January, there are some
very special features that you won't want to
miss. Here's just a sampling of what can be
seen on upcoming shows.
David Brenner, well known comedian and
guest host of the "Tonight Show," recently
visited Miami and performed at Federation's
annual Pacesetter Dinner. In a two-part in-
terview with Lasky, Brenner recounts his early
childhood and his Jewish upbringing, and how
his formative experiences influenced his
development as a comedian. Brenner also
discusses his views on Israel, and his role as a
Jew in contemporary society.
Another "Kaleidoscope" episode will focus on
Chinese Jews. Sidney Shapiro, author of "The
Jews of China, "join? Lasky to discuss the lives
of Chinese Jews throughout the centuries.
Shapiro reveals that China once had a thriving
Jewish population, that was actively involved
in mercantilism. When unwanted in other parts
of the world, Jews were able to find a safe haven
in China.
GREATER MIAMI
JEWISH FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION, INC.
David Brenner
Robert Clary
watch JFTV on:
Storer (North Dadel Channel P-29
Storer (South Dadel
Ultra Com
Dynamic
Miami Cablevision
Americable
Channel 14
Channel 2
Channel 43
Channel 27
Channel 36
Many television viewers remember Robert
Clary as the crafty French prisoner of war on
"Hogan's Heroes." Few know, however that
Clary is a survivor of the Holocaust. Clary lost
most of his family at the hands of the Nazis
but he was able to survive the ordeal. For more
than 30 years he remained silent, but now
speaks openly on behalf of those who perished,
in the hopes that such terror will never occur
again. Clary discusses his memories of the
concentration camps with Lasky in a sensitive
and enlightening interview.
"Kaleidoscope" will also have a regular
feature entitled "Monev Talks." Rick Sherman,
a local economist, will provide viewers with
expert advice on investments, stocks, mor-
tgages, interest rates and other pertinent issues
that affect your pocket book.
Lasky feels that "Kaleidoscope" will offer its
viewers an opportunity to see their friends and
neighbors in a new light, as integral parts of a
vibrant and active Jewish community Lasky
and her JFTV staff are busy producing up-
coming segments of "Kaleidoscope,'' and they
welcome suggestions from all members of the
community who might have an interesting
story idea for the show.
Check the program guide on this page for
dates and times of "Kaleidoscope."


* Programming Schedule Greater Miami Jewish Federation Cable Television inc. JANUARY 1985*
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5-5:30 p.m. Eenies Kitchen Focus Eenies Kitchen Pillow Talk Pillow Talk Pillow Talk JCC:A Special i Place
5:30-6 p.m. Checkup/ Mt. Sinai Sunrise, Sunset Hello Jerusalem Checkup/ Mt. Sinai Focus Checkup/ Mt. Sinai Eenies Kitchen
6-6:30 p.m. we Remember The Holocaust The Molly Goldberg Show Eenies Kitchen Encounter vision Israel or Film Soeclai we Remember The Holocaust i
JFTV Bulletin Board
6:30-7 p.m. Still Small voice or viewpoint JCC:A Special Place Encounter The Molly Goldberg Show Sunrise, Sunset The Molly Goldberg Show The MOllV Goldberg Show
7-7:30 p.m. The Molly Goldberg Show Film Special (half hour) The Molly Goldberg Show Still Small voice or viewpoint Hello Jerusalem Kaleidoscope vision Israel or Film Snprlal '"
I 7:30-8 P.m. Pillow Talk Film Special (half hour) Pillow Talk Kaleidoscope Film Pillow
: JFTV Bulletin Board special raik I
I Subject to change i
rfcir- r*


Federation, December, 1984
calendar
THURSDAY, JANUARY 3
An Interrupted Life" by Etty Hilleeum, will be
reviewed at the Great Jewish Books Discussion
Group. 1:30-3:30 p.m. at the Federation. The book, a
moving account in diary form of life during the
Holocaust, will be reviewed by Shirley Wolfe, Direc-
tor of the Educational Resource Center of the
Central Agency for Jewish Education.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 4
Jass, the Jewish Association Serving Singles, late
Friday night singles service will be held at Beth
David Congregation, 7500 S.W. 120th Street at
10:00 p.m. Call Jodye at 251-1394 for more infor-
mation.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 5
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center,
Family Center, 4221 Pine Tree Drive, announces an
overnight camping trip to Quiet Waters Park. The
fee is $20 for members and $27 for non-members.
Included are snacks, breakfast, lunch, miniature
coif canoeing and lots of fun. For more information
call the JCC at 534-3206.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 6
The South Dade Jewish Community Center's Senior
Adult Golden Age Friendship Club Post will have its
New Year's Party 12:00-3:00 p.m. at Federation
Gardens. 10905 SW 112 Ave. Entertainment is by
Bill Victor's Trio. $1.50 members. $2.00 non-
members. Call Sherry Horwich, 251-1394.
MONDAY. JANUARY 7 and
TUESDAY. JANUARY 8
The Theatre Guild of the Temple Zion Israelite
Center will hold auditions for "Oklahoma" at 7:30
p.m. at the center. 8000 Miller Drive. Anyone in-
terested in working on the stage crew should also
attend. Call Jere Chait for further information, at
595-8777.
TUESDAY. JANUARY 8
An Israeli Dance Class for Senior Adults will begin
at South Dade Jewish Community Center, 12401
SW 102nd Avenue. 12:30-1:30 p.m. $8.00 for JCC
members. $12.00 for non-members for 8 sessions.
tall Jerry Horwich 251-1394.
WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9
Jewish History Class for Senior Adults begins at the
South Dade Jewish Community Center, 12401 SW
102 Avenue. 2:00-3:30 p.m. Call Sherry Horwich
251-1394.
WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9
A psychology class for Senior Adults begins at the
South Dade Jewish Community Center, 12401 SW
102 Avenue. 12:30-2:00 p.m. Call Sherry Horwich
211-1394.
WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 9
The Workmen's Circle. Miami Beach Branch 1059,
will hold their monthly meeting at 12:00 a.m. at the
Surfside Community Center, 9301 Collins Avenue. A
program of Sholom Aleichem stories in Yiddish and
English will be presented. Contact Sophie Noble at
865-2101 for further information.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 9
Spiritual Giants of the Past," a Biblical discussion
of various great Jewish figures will be held at the
Federation from 10:30-12:30. At this session.
Amos'' will be the subject. Dr. Jehuda Melber,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth Raphael will lead the
discussion. Contact the Central Agency for Jewish
Education at 576-4030 for further information.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 10
Fit "N' Fun for the over 50 begins at the South Dade
Jewish Community Center, 12401 SW 102 Aye..
10:15-11:15 a.m. $5.00 members. $7.50 non-members
for 4 classes. Call Sherry Horwich 251-1394.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 10
A public lecture will be presented by Abba Eban.
narrator of the PBS series "Heritage: Civilization
and the Jews" and former Israeli Ambassador to the
United States at 8:00 p.m. in the Ibis Cafeteria on
the campus of the University of Miami. Tickets are
$7.50 and can be purchased through Hillel Jewish
Student Center and the Judaic Studies Program of
the University of Miami, 606 Ashe Building,
University of Miami. For further information,
contact Rabbi Mark Kram, Hillel, 665-6948, or Dr.
Henry Green, Judaic Studies, 284-4376.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 10
The Jus tine-Louise Wise Chapter of the Ameican
Jewish Congress will meet at 9:00 a.m. for a day
outing to Singer Island, lunch and a riverboat cruiae.
For further details, contact Ann Pergament at 864-
1366.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 11
Dr. Laura Rom, psychotherapist will discuss
Family Crisis or a Challenge?" at the Adult
Forum Sabbath, following servicea at the Temple
Zion Israelite Center, 8000 Miller Drive. Services are
at 8:16 p.m. For further information, contact
Dorothy H. Grant at 271-2311.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 11
YAD Shabbat Dinner at Temple EmanuEl at 6:30
p.m. 118.00 per person (full dinner!. The evening s
guest speaker wfll be Donald Lefton. The topic is
"Endangered Jewish Communities: Challenges and
Responsibilities." Call 676-4000, eat. 290, for move
information.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 12
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center invites
all adults to attend a night out at the James Mas tin
Gallery. View this unique sculptors exhibit. The JCC
will meet at the Gallery at 7:30 p.m. located at 35
N.E. 40th Street, 2nd level. The tour and discussion
will begin with a wine and cheese reception. To pre-
register call 534-3206.
MONDAY, JANUARY 14
The North Dade Midrasha series presents Velvel
Pasternak, who will discuss "The Spirit of Hasidic
Music" at Temple Sinai, 18801 N.E. 22nd Avenue,
at 8:00 p.m. The series is sponsored by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, 576-4030.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 19
The Miami Beach JCC invites all theatre lovers to
the performance of "Sleuth" at the Coconut Grove
Playhouse at 8:15 p.m. Reserved tickets are on hand
for all JCC members and can be purchased for $16
for members and $20 for non-members. Included in
the fee is the show and a pre-show reception. Tickets
are available on a first-come, first-serve basis and
can be reserved by calling the JCC at 534-3206.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 22
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School
will hold its annual P.T.A. fashion show and lun-
cheon. The Fashion show is sponsored by Saks Fifth
Avenue. The luncheon is at the Fontainebleau Hotel
at 11:00 a.m. Contact the school office, 931-2831 for
further information and reservations.
WEDNESDAY. JANUARY 23
"Dinah and Tamar" will be the subject of the
"Spiritual Giants of the Past" Biblical discussion,
10:30-12:00 a.m. at the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard. Rabbi Norman S.
Lipson, Institute of Jewish Studies Director of the
Central Agency for Jewish Education will lead the
discussion. Contact CAJE at 576-4030 for further
information.
THURSDAY. JANUARY 24
The South Dade Jewish Community Center, 12401
SW 102 Avenue, presents a bicycle safety class,
from 4:00-5:00 p.m. This is a free class taught by
Metro Dade Police featuring a film and a talk on how
to care for yourself and your bicycle. Snacks will be
served. Free to the public. For more information call
David Goldman, 251-1394.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 24
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center,
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue, presents Jewish humorist
Rich Robbins who wil take a look at the Borscht Belt
comedians, Milton Berle, Shelley Berman, Buddy
Hackett, Jackie Mason and up through "The New
Brand" of Jewish comedians, Robert Klein, Billy
Crystal, Albert Brooks, and discuss how their Jew-
ishness becomes a factor in their comedy at 7:00
p.m. $25 members, $35 non-members for a 6 week
session.
THURSDAY. JANUARY 24
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center. 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue presents Jewish
Entertainers at 8:30 p.m. Many entertainers, folk
singers, comedians, actors, and producers are Jewish
and they discuss how their Jewishness is a factor in
their art expression. Performer-musician Rich
Robbins will also involve guests in some funny
"schticks." Call Marsha Engelman at 932-4200 for
more information. Cost is $25 for members. $35 for
non-members for the 6 week session.
THURSDAY. JANUARY 24
The South Dade Jewish Community Center presents
"Getting that Job." a workshop led by the Jewish
Vocational Service on job placement and deter-
mining career skills at 12401 SW 102 Avenue from
10:00-12:00 a.m. Call 251-1394 for reservations.
SATURDAY, JANUARY 26
Temple Adath Yeshurun, N.E. Miami Gardens
Drive, North Miami Beach is holding their annual
Games Night at 8:00 in the Social Hall of the temple.
$10.00 per person for chips, food, and drink. For
additional information and tickets please call the
office at 947-1435.
SUNDAY. JANUARY 27
SUPER SUNDAY! SUPER SUNDAY! SUPER
SUNDAY! SUPER SUNDAY!
MONDAY, JANUARY 28
The Miami Beach JCC is holding a special program
for children. "No School Holiday Mini Camp" for
children ages 6-12 years will begin at 9:00 a.m. and
run to 3:00 p.m. with extended care available from
8:00-9:00 a.m. and 3:00-6:00 p.m. A special day at
Malibu Castle Park is planned for the children. Meet
the Miami Beach JCC, 4221 Pine Tree Drive. The fee
is $12 for members and $16 for non-members. Brown
bag lunch. Call 634-3206.
MONDAY, JANUARY 28
"Insights into Music," a senior adult program will
explore and study and history of composers and
their music from 2:30-3:30 p.m., at the South Dade
Jewish Community Center. 12401 S.W. 102 Avenue.
$12.00 for JCC members, $16,00 for non-members. 8
sessions. Call Sherry Horwich at 261-1394.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 29
The Annual Membership Luncheon for the South
Florida Council of Pioneer Women-Na'amat will be
held at 12:00 a.m. at the Offices of the Council, 606
Lincoln Road. Suite 600. For reservations contact
538-6213.
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center,
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue is starting a new beginners
dance class as part of a regular Sunday W^lKMU
Dance Program. By popular request Moehom
Shemesh will teach a one-hour class from 7.00-B.w
p.m. The basic steps and routines will be em-
phasized. Registration starts December 16 Classes
EfTt Sunday^January 20. 1985. The 8 week session
is $20 for members, $30 non-members. Call 93^-4^uu
for more information.
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for February events is January 4. 1985
'Organization___________.--------------------------------
,Event------------------------------------------------------------
I
I
I
1
I
I
I
I
1
I
Place
Date.
I
I Your name
I
I Title______
Time
J| a.m. II p.m.
_Phone Nc.^
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MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
CllltS, continued from Page 13
Jewish communities throughout the country have
been responding to the threat posed by destructive
cults and missionary groups. The Committee on
Cults and Missionaries, an arm of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Community Relations Com-
mittee, was formed to counter the influences of these
deceptive groups in South Florida. The Committee
offers information and assistance to those people
who have either been touched themselves by the
cults, or are simply concerned with learning more
about this frightening phenomenon.
Dr. John Clark, Assistant Clinical Profe.
Psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and a le
authority on cultism, maintains that destructi
cults are usually first generation entities with living
self-proclaimed, messianic leaders. Their primary
goals are expansion through rapid, aggressive
conversion, and the amassing of large fortunes.
These goals are usually accomplished tnrough the
exploitation of members who often spend upwards of
50 hours a week in recruitment and fundraising acti-
vities.
Several cult and missionary groups have extended
their recruitment strategies into the various types of
media. The most worrisome of these is the use of
television. Cult leaders are cognizant of the influence
television exerts, especially on young viewers and
the elderly. Cult and missionary groups have
produced programs that convey their indoctrination
messages either blatantly or subliminally. The
programming covers the full spectrum of television
viewing choices including: cartoons, religious
services, soap operas, situation comedies, and com-
mercials.
Parents are infrequently available to monitor the
television viewing habits of their children who by
sheer volume are inevitably exposed to conversion-
oriented material. In the case of the elderly who
often live in isolation, there is no one available to
warn them that a primary purpose of these programs
in prostelyzation. While television viewing itself
presents few if any physical dangers, we must
remember that Jim Jones' beginnings were also
benign, and that he relied upon the innocent motiva-
tions of individuals who were seeking spiritual
fulfillment to gather strength and numbers.
Cults condoning actions similar to the brutality
inflicted upon the members of Jim Jones' People's
Temple continue to thrive. There exists in these
groups an inherent danger in both their conversion
methods and basic doctrines of deviancy. They can,
as did the People's Temple, become destructive for
destruction's sake, willing to harm other human
beings without thought, scruple, or rational reason.
As the sixth anniversary of the Jonestown
tragedy passes, we are deeply concerned that indi-
viduals be adequately informed of the dangers of
destructive cults and the harm they can inflict on an
entire society. As a community. we must continue to
confront the cult phenomenon in order to prevent the
factors that finally exploded Jonestown from ignit-
ing other disasters. Meg Greenfield stated it best in
the Newsweek magazine published the week of
November 18, 1978, "The strange metaphor ol
Guyana, is that the jungle is just across the street."
For further information contact Dr. Mindy Herah
Director, 676-4000.


Page 16
Federation. December, 1984
Entebbe sent a message
to terrorists around the world
*
June 211976. Air France #139. Tel Aviv to Paris.
Hijacked! Fear fills the cabin as the aircraft changes course. South,
over Africa, to Uganda. A nation then ruled by an admirer of
Adolf Hider, Field Marshall Idi Amin The hijackers and captors
are from the so-called Democratic Front for the Liberation of
Palestine. Soon there is a "selection." Non-Jewish passengers are
sent to Paris. The 105 Jews remain
It is a week of torment, fear and life at the point of a gun.
Secretly, in Israel, Operation Thunderball is
being planned and practiced around the dock.
July 4th, 11PM. Israeli soldiers swarm over
the airport at Entebbe. The terrorists are killed The
stunned hostages are aboard Israeli planes in less than
30 minutes after the rescuers arrived.
Entebbe showed us that free nations don't have to cower
to fanatics. Entebbe told the world that terrorists can be defeated.
And those who use terrorism today know that the fist of the Israeli
army is forever clenched, ready and willing to repeat the Miracle
of Entebbe, against all odds.

Against All Odds.
^* GIVE TOT! IK
___ GKKATKKMIAMIJKWISIIKKDKKAnONS "
t%5 COMI5INKDJEWISII AITKAI.ISKAKI. KMKKC.KNCY KUNI)
IKOJKCT RKNKWAI.-OK AKIVA CAMIIUGN
~w* HEATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION
4200 B.scayn Blvd Mum, Florida 33137-0100 (305) 576-4000


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