The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02913

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement.. .Special Insert
eJewislli Floif idiara
/olume 57-Number 48
Three Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, November 30,1984
ByMUiiMOnts
Price 50 Cents
Here 'a A Switch
PLO Says Israel, Syria Are in Cahoots
To Keep Palestinians from Homeland

AMMAN, Jordan -
Yasir Arafat, ostensibly
still chairman of the Pales-
tine Liberation Organiza-
tion, attempted to solidify
his hold on the PLO over
the weekend by giving the
boot to the Syrian-backed
speaker of the organization
at the meeting of the Pales-
tine National Council here.
Khaled Fahoum was voted out
of office 207-7, with 47 ab-
stentions, as a result of Arafat's
politicking. Arafat conceives of
Fahoum as siding with pro-
Syrian factions who oppose his
continued leadership of the
organization that was splintered
by Israel's Peace for Galilee
operation launched in Lebanon in
June, 1982.
BOTH FAHOUM and PLO
factions supported by Syria had
aimed to block the meeting in
Amman, and when they failed,
Fahoum boycotted the Palestine
National Council's deliberations.
In Damascus, Fahoum has called
the meeting "illegal," charging
that it is being held without a
quorum. He has called the
meeting 'a tragicomedy."
But Arafat loyalists here said
that 257 members of the 379-seat
Council present in Amman
demonstrated that the at-
tendance marked a victory for
Arafat's leadership of the PLO,
and that four additional members
who had arrived in time for the
beginning of the deliberations
last Friday brought the number
of pro-Arafat members to 261.
IN DAMASCUS, the pro-
government newspaper, Tishrin,
said that Arafat had falsified
names on the members' list to
"cover up the lack of a quorum "
After ousting Fahoum, the
Council elected Sheikh Abdel
Hamid al-Sayeh to a three-year
term as new speaker. Two top
Arafat aides meanwhile
welcomed Jordan King Hussein's
proposal for Middle East
negotiations. At the same time,
they vowed that the PLO would
continue its active warfare
Continued on Page 11-A
Inflation Threatens Israel's Security
anessa
1980 Story
Belies Her
Boston
Testimony
By ROBERT E.SEGAL
l-Mr Bumble, one of
karle;. Dickens's most
loted characters, con-
Wed thui "the law is a
M idiot Describing the
litics of Vanessa Red-
ave. The Boston Globe
Ijpnl 1982) concluded
ht the iiritish actress "is
pnudc-, headed twit," a
lrd which is sometimes
fined 'a silly, annoy-
|person a fool."
fo* thet she has held center
e in a three-week trial in
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Israel's economic
crisis "could pose as serious
a threat to the security of
Israel as any hostile neigh-
bor in the region" unless
swift, effective measures
are taken, a Senate Foreign
Relations Committee report
warned this week.
American foreign assistance
can help Israel cope with its dif-
ficulties and can mitigate but
cannot by itself arrest Israel's
problems of hyper-inflation, labor
unrest, low productivity, declin-
ing revenues, growing unemploy-
ment and sluggish exports," the
report said. It called for "major
domestic economic reforms" and
the SI.5 billion budget cut now
being applied by Israel's unity
government led by Premier
Shimon Peres.
THE REPORT was prepared
by two staff members of the
Senate committee. Michael
Kraft, a Near East subcommittee
specialist, and Gerald Connolly,
who specializes in economic aid
issues, after visiting Israel and
interviewing United States and
Israeli officials in Israel and
Washington.
Coincidentally. it was released
shortly after two teams of Israeli
officials completed two days of
talks at the State Department on
increased U.S. aid to Israel.
One team, led by Emanuel
Continued on Page 2-A
Vanessa Redgrave
which she sought $5 million from
the Boston Symphony Orchestra
for cancellation of her contract as
narrator for Igor Stravinsky's
"Oedipus Rex," Miss Redgrave
seems to have justified the
Globe's description but to have
failed to prove the law is an ass.
In U.S. District Court in
Boston, with Judge Robert
Keeton presiding, the actress was
awarded $100,000 but lost in her
fight to holdlthat her civil rights
had been violated.
Continued on Page 14-A
Decision Due Soon
Will U.S. Quit UNESCO in December?
By MICHAEL ADLER
America is on the point
of making good its year-old
threat to withdraw from
UNESCO the United
Nations Educational.
Scientific and Cultural Or-
ganization. A United
States pull-out would throw
the organization into crisis,
since the Americans supply
a full quarter of its $200
million budget.
America is on the point of
making good its year-old threat
to withdraw from UNESCO -
the United Nations Educational.
Scientific and Cultural Organiza-
tion. A United States pull-out
would throw the organization
into crisis, since the Americans
supply a full quarter of its $200
million budget.
It would also mark a turning
point in a process begun in the
1970s, when Eastern bloc and
Third World countries tried to
Continued on Page 9-A
to Trip to Damascus
Mitterrand Raises Question of Syria's Jews
By EDWIN EYTAN
JPARIS (JTA) -
fsid.nt Francois Mitter-
ud has raised the issue of
"a's Jews with President
ez Assad on his trip to
"wscus for a three-day
wl visit that began
Monday. He also pressed
Assad for a firm commi-
tment to respect th stat
quo in Lebanon once Israeli
troops are withdrawn from
that country, sources here
said.
Mitterrand asked Theo Klein,
president of the Representative
Council of Major French Jewish
Organizations (CRIF), for a full
briefing on the situation of
Syria's 6,000 Jews before his
departure for Damascus.
CRIF, along with the World
Jewish Congress and the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, was an organizer of the
international conference on
Syrian Jewry held here recently.
The conference urged Mitterrand
to ask Assad to allow Syrian
Jews to emigrate to Israel.
IT WAS learned, meanwhile,
that Jacques Attali, a senior
adviser to the French President,
Continued on Page 6- A
President Mitterrand


IV/-I I UM_MMBMm.*i -..._-.
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. November 30, 1984
But U.S. Needs Assist
Inflation Said To Threaten Israel's Security
Continued from Page 1-A
Sharon, director general of the
Finance Ministry, discussed with
a U.S. group led by W. Allen
Wallis. Undersecretary of State
for Economic Affairs, the pre-
liminary plans for the joint U.S.-
Israeli economic group which will
work out how the U.S. can best
help Israeli's economic recovery
program
The joint group, which was es-
tablished during the meeting
between Peres and President
Reagan at the White House in
October, is expected to have its
first meeting here in December.
THE OTHER discussion at
the State Department was on
security assistance, and was led
by Gen. Menachem Meron.
director general of the Israel
Defense Ministry, and William
Schneider Jr., Undersecretary of
State for Security Assistance.
Israel is receiving $2.6 billion
in military and economic aid, all
of it a grant, in the current fiscal
year. While the Israeli govern-
ment has not yet worked out its
specific request for the 1986 fiscal
year, the Senate report notes that
during his visit to Washington.
Peres said Israel will need
another $1.5 billion in economic
aid for its recovery program.
Kraft and Connolly go over the
background of Israel's difficulties
in their report. "Israel'seconomic
problems did not develop over-
night and cannot be cured
quickly." the report notes. "They
can be traced to a number of
factors, including the costs of
developing a new country in three
decades and the heavy defense
and debt burden resulting from
military aid loans since the
October 1973 war.
"Defense spending, while a
major element, is not by any
means the only important reason
for Israel's economic problems.
Israel's economic difficulties are
also deeply rooted in an elaborate
system of indexed wages, subsi-
dies, and social welfare programs.
Israel's political system of pro-
portional parliamentary repres-
Envoy is Jewish
GENEVA (JTA) Joseph
Amsalem. the newly-appointed
Ambassador of the Central
African Republic to the United
Nations here, is a Jew who was
born in Fez. Morocco. A resident
of Switzerland, he has been active
in business in the Ivory Coast
and the Central African Republic.
entation also has contributed to
the problem of enabling small
political parties to fight budget-
cutting measures affecting their
constituencies."
IN ADDITION to the $1.5
billion budget cut. the report
stresses the need for structural
reforms, especially "the elaborate
indexation machinery," and
"further agreements on price and
wage controls."
The report notes that "many-
experts also believe change is
needed in existing law requiring
the Bank of Israel to print
enough money to cover the
government's spending deficits.
Such practices have proved
highly inflationary in the past
seven years. There have also
been suggestions that Israel
either introduce a new currency
or peg the shekel on a one-to-one
basis with the dollar, the report
points out.
Hut the report warns that
there will be a heavy Cost to the
Israel social fabric and to Israel's
own security as some of the
needed reforms are implemented.
Reductions in subsidies are likely
to increase inflation. Social
service cutbacks will hit hardest
on lower income groups, espe-
cially Israelis from North African
and other Arab countries. Arab
workers from the West Bank and
the Gaza Strip also will be af-
fected by an economic slowdown
Increased social tensions are
likely, along with rising unem-
ployment and emigration of
young Israelis, higher prices and
labor unrest and decreased
productivity. If the situation
continues to drift, however, and
an economic collapse results, the
ultimate consequences for the
country and the individual Israeli
could be much worse."
THE REPORT also points out
that there "is a question of how-
far and fast a vigorous dem-
ocracy can impose drastic econ-
omic reforms. The standard of
living inevitably will drop. Econ-
omic sacrifices will have to be
shared by all segments of the so-
ciety."
As for the U.S.. the report
suggests that the practice started
this year of expediting economic
aid during the beginning of the
fiscal year, rather than quarterly,
may have to be continued. An
emergency aid package, which
might include some relief for
Israel's $9.5 billion debt burden
to the U.S.. one-third of its for-
eign debt, "could prove decisive
s
8
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in turning around the Israel
economy." the report says.
The report sees the Free Trade
Area (FTA1 between the U.S. and
Israel as a more favorable
alternative to other programs
that now allow 90 percent of
Israeli goods into the U.S. duty
free. The report points out that
economists believe that it will not
have any significant short-term
boost for the Israeli economy.
But the report adds that the FTA
would "further symbolize U.S.
confidence in the long-range
resilience of the Israeli economy,
and its export industries."
THE REPORT also urges the
U.S. to take "additional military-
trade and cooperation measures
which might lessen U.S. defense
expenditures in the Mediter-
ranean, while utilizing Israel s
maintenance and production and
capabilities."
One recommendation appears
to be an indirect warning against
expected Reagan Administration
proposals to sell arms to Saudi
Arabia and Jordan. "In consider-
ing proposed sales of sophis-
ticated weapons to Arab
counries. such as advanced
fighter planes and missiles, the
U.S. also should take into greater
account whether the quality and
quantities are such that they
might be ultimately used against
Israel, thus prompting Israel to
buy more equipment as a precau-
tion." the report warns
"A major factor in Israeli de-
fense spending is its concern that
the additional sophisticated Aral
equipment may inflict highei
casualties on the smaller Israel
forces."
THE REPORT was submiited
to Sen. Charles Percy (R., 111.I.
the outgoing chairman of the
Foreign Relations Committee,
and Sen. Claiborne Pell ID.. R 1
the ranking minority member of
the committee, to provide the
committee with background
enabling it to consider Israel's
situation when requests are sub-
mitted.
The outgoing Congress was
considered one of the most pro-
Israel in history, and the new
Congress, including many of the
new Senators and Representa-
tives elected this month, is ex
Leader
nessee.
pec ted to be equally sympathetic
to Israel. But a problem could
develop if Percy, who was de-
feated for reelection, is replaced
as chairman by Sen. Jesse Helms
(R.. N.C.), who has opposed all
foreign aid and has made many
numerous anti-Israel statements.
Helms promised his constit-
uents that he would remain as
chairman of the Senate Agri-
culture Committee where he can
protect the tobacco farmers of
North Carolina. But he is under
strong pressure from the con-
servative right to take the foreign
relations post. If he does not. the
chairmanship will go to Sen.
Richard I.ugar (R.. Ind.l consid-
ered a supporter of Israel. If
I.ugar is elected Senate Majority
Leader. Sen Charles Mathias
IR-, Md.) would get tk.
IN ADDITION. ^
three new members 0 M
gn Relations Comnritt?^
will be Republicans u
Percy and Senate K
Howard Baker TV
who retired, jrf"
Democrat, replacing Se7
Tsongas of Massachusetts
also retired. "'
In the House Foreign Ark
Committee, there will beonlvL
change, a replacement for d1
Larry Winn ,R.. \*+\
member of the Mideast suK
mittee, who retired.
A major loss for steerim.
rael s aid packages through (
gress was the defeat of R-l
Clarence Long id. u/1
chairman of the House Ar
priations subcommittee
foreign operations \\hfle
successor, Rep. David Obevi
Wise), is expected to su'pn
continued aid for Israel he isr
expected to play the leaders^
role in support of Israel
I-ong
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M-liaO*


Friday, November 30, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
v
s
ft
Joseph Heller (left), best-selling novelist and
author of Catch-22.' 'Something Happened'
and 'Good as Gold,' discusses the Jewish
theme of his latest book, 'God Knows,' with
Page One' radio's executive producer.
Richard Trank. Heller also recounted his
dramatic recovery from the debilitating
illness, Guillain-Barre Syndrome, about
which he is presently writing his first long
work of non-fiction. The 'Page One' radio
news magazine, produced by the Simon
Wiesenthal Center, can be heard locally on
WINZ-AM 1940) Sundays at 8:06 a. m.
\Names in News
Teen Suicide Under UAHC Scrutiny
\ r. nwide program to stem
lh. epidemic" of suicide among
lew i ^ h teenagers will be
Bunched by the Union of
pnerkan Hebrew Congregations
: the semi annual meeting of its
oard ct trustees in Miami Beach
30-Dec. 2, it was announced
week by Charles J.
Rothschild. ix>ard chairman. The
L'AHC is composed of 770
eform synagogues with 1.3
nillion members.
Some 200 board members from
broughout the United States
i Canada are expected to
i the meeting in the
pheraton Hal Harbour Hotel on
he theme. "Saving Our
phildren
Rabbi Alexander M. Schindler,
president, will disclose
lor the new UAHC
ram in an address to the
Reform Jewish leaders at Sab-
bath services Friday evening.
Rabbi Schindler will analyze
some of the causes of the rise in
teenage suicide nationallv from 8
to 27 per 100.000 over the past 20
vears.
Thirty-four coaches and
managers have been selected for
the teams that will represent the
United States in the 12th World
Maccabiah Games in Israel from
July 15 to 25. 1985. according to
Robert E. Spivak, general chair-
man. U.S. Maccabiah Commit-
tee, and Alan Sherman, all sports
chairman.
Appointments were made
based on the recommendations of
the various sportschairmen and
approved by Spivak and Sher-
man. More selections will be
made in the near future.
The Maccabiah Games, which
are held every four years in the
year immediately following an
Olympic year, pit Jewish athletes
from all over the world in
competition similar to that of the
Olympics. More than 4,000
world-class athletes from 38
countries, including 500 from the
U.S., are expected to compete in
the upcoming Games in some 32
sports ranging from basketball to
swimming.
The National Interreligious
Task Force on Black-Jewish
Relations notes "with profound
sorrow" the passing of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Sr.
Dr. King was a leader in the
struggle against all forms of
racism and anti-Semitism, "and
his was a powerful voice in behalf
of justice and compassion in our
society," says the Task Force.
"We remember with gratitude
that he was an inspiration to and
a gifted teacher of his son, Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr."
Dr. King brought "a prophetic
presence to all segments of this
country, and his leadership and
wise counsel will be sorely missed
in the critical days ahead."
Forty to 50 percent of Jewish
marriages are now inter-
marriages, and in two thirds of
those marriages, a Jewish man
will marry a non-Jewish woman.
These statistics were cited by
noted psychologist Dr. Matti
Gershenfeld speaking to the
B'nai B'rith Women National
Executive Board meeting in
Washington as part of BBWs
new program, "The Image of the
Jewish Woman: Myth and
Reality."
"One in five Jewish couples
today will not have any
children." she continued. "This,
along with the fact that the Jew-
ish birth rate has long been the
lowest in the world, that over 50
percent of American women are
now in the work force, that
divorce is on the rise, and that
there is erosion of traditional
Jewish values in this country all
add up to a dwindling American
Jewish population."
Dr. Claude Enim, an Irovy
Coast opththalmologist who
heads the Samaritan Clinic in
Abidjan, has completed two
weeks of study in new techniques
in eye surgery at the Hadassah-
Hebrew University Medical
Center.
Dr. Enim, a graduate of Leeds
University, who specialized in
ophthalmology at Morfields
Hospital in London, visited
Hadassah to learn the latest
techniques in intra-ocular lens
implantation, vitrectomy, and
laser surgery from Dr. Hanan
Zauberman, head of the Medical
Center'8 Ophthalmology Depart-
ment.
Hadassah's physicians and
surgeons have been instrumental
in developing quality eye care in
several African nations. Dr.
Zauberman has made three visits
to the Ivory Coast to consult
with his colleagues in the field
and to perform demonstration
surgery
The Koach Campaign, a special
fund-raising drive to improve the
opportunities and rights of Isra-
eli women, has been launched by
Pioneer Women-Naamat
throughout the United States.
"The technological revolution
in Israel is rapidly leaving Israeli
women behind," said Harriet
Green, national vice president of
Na'amat fund-raising. The Koach
Campaign will be used to
establish urgently-needed
retraining programs and to
expand Na'amat-Pioneer
Women's legislative advocacy
programs for equal rights. Mrs.
Green said. Na'amat-Pioneer. the
largest women's organization in
Israel, is the sister group of
Pioneer Women-Na'amat.
A major study, "Israeli
Women and Technology."
commissioned last year by
Na'amat-Pioneer Women,
provided the impetus for the
Koach Campaign. According to
the report, up to 300.000 Isreli
working women face certain
unemployment in the next decade
unless they are immediately
retrained in the technological
skills which are in increasing
demand in the Israeli workplace.
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86 P>ool BlencUd Scotch Wh.sy C 1963 Tnt Paooiogton CotporaHon. N Y

R\\ the nachas
fit to print.
Never let it he said that the Jewish commu-
nity in Glasgow is a quiet one. There .ire nine
shuls, two Hehrew schix>ls and five youth orga-
nizations. And if you think all this activity is
enough to make headlines, you're nght.
Because Glasgow even has a weekly newspaper
which records and celebrates the various
marriages, births and bar mitrvahs!
Reading this gixxi news is apt to bnng more
than just a smile to one's lips. Quite
often it bnngs the taste of fine scotch
whisky to one's lips, too. In America,
such news is often greeted with JikB
Rare Scotch. Its flavor, created by
skillful blending perfected over the
centuries, has made it this country's
most popular scotch. And, it we may
be permitted a bit of editorializing,
has amply justified its reputation as
the scotch that whispers
]&B. It whispers.

. <


Pge*-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. November 30, 1984

,
No Question Where
Egypt's Mubarak Stands
Whether or not Anwar Sadat was an
opportunist turned martyr by circumstance
is a question that will never be decided.
When Sadat was assassinated, the answer
to this question went to his grave with him.
What can never be known among other
things, therefore, is just how Sadat would
have acted once the Sinai Peninsula was
returned to him. Would he have, as his
widow. Janine Sadat, these days continues
to insist, continued the struggle for a just
settlement of the Israeli-Arab dilemma?
Such speculation apart, there can be no
question about Sadat's successor. Hosni
Mubarak. In the case of Mubarak, the
evidence of his words and actions is clear.
And it is to this issue that a former
president of Israel who is deputy premier
today. Yitzhak Navon. addressed himself
at the recently-concluded General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish
Federations.
Peace Ended Little
Israels economy appears to be coming
apart at the seams under the strains of
runaway inflation, among other reasons,
because its peace with Egypt has cost the
nation dearly. This includes the return to
Egypt of Jewish settlements in the Sinai,
military installations and oil fields there
captured during the 1967 Six-Day War
in the case of the oil fields, it was the
Israelis who drilled for them and caused
them to produce profitably.
For its part, under Hosni Mubarak, what
has Egypt done in the cause of peace with
Israel? To begin with. Mubarak called
home his Ambassador to Tel Aviv, in
contravention of the Camp David accord,
when Israel launched its Operation Peace
for Galilee in Lebanon in June, 1982. Since
that time, he has done nothing to send him
back.
At the same time, in the more than two
years since then, the media in Cairo have
whipped up anti-Jewish, anti-Israel and
anti-Zionist hysteria. Articles in the
newspapers say Israel is a cancer in the
Middle East that needs to be removed.
Other articles call the Israelis blood-thirsty
and characterize this as a traditional part of
Judaism.
Said Navon at the CJF Assembly.
"These things we were used to before the
peace, but we thought that peace would put
an end to it."
New Ties of Dissent
As Navon implied, and we agree, a cold
peace with Egypt is better than no peace at
all. Still, the Mubarak direction is clear.
Mainly, its goal is to reestablish Egypt as
leader of the Arab world so far as Western
political interests are concerned.
To achieve this aim. Mubarak now courts
a resumed Egyptian friendship with
Jordan's King Hussein, whose shallow,
gutless role in the Middle East is a prime
source of Arab discontent with Israel
rather than a force determined to bring
peace with Israel as Mubarak
presumably says he would like to achieve.
As Mubarak moves to mend his ties to
Amman. Baghdad and Beirut, there can be
Jewish Floridiai
fO Sea9:m M*
Eton*..* t*ur

little doubt of what is he has in mind. Seen
in these terms, the old guessing game
about what Anwar Sadat might have been
doing these days were he still alive appears
to be moot.
Except that today's Realpolitik so far as
Israel is concerned stems from its ex-
pectations when Sadat was still president
of Egypt. It is these frustrated ex-
pectations that have fired its economic
crisis and brought a freeze in relations with
Cairo that is not bound to get any better.
Leo Mindlin
Susan Shapiro's 'Me'Spree Splatter Us All
Friday. November 30.1984
Volume 57
6KISLEV5745
Number 48
SUSAN SHAPIRO is theoret-
ically correct, but I wish she
hadn ; done it Shapiro is the
Randolph. Mass high school
student who refuses to salute the
flag. recite the Pledge of
Allegiance or sing the national
anthem In fact, she won't even
stand in silence as a sign of her
isent She sits through both
monial occasions
Shapiro s explanation for her
behavior is that America is a
nation of people In her view it is
they who make the country it
is not the flag, and it is not the
Star Spangled Banner
I suppose by extension she
means that the emblem of one's
patriotism lies in the way in
which Americans respect one
another and. for its part, the way
in which the government respects
the people. Saluting the one,
reciting the other, singing the
national anthem all these
things solicit individual
statements of respect for the
power, the majesty, the prin-
ciples of government
BUT FLAGS and pledges and
the Star Spangled Banner.' I
guess Shapiro might say. don't
reverse the process They don't
stand for the obligation that the
forces governing America must
feel in acknowledging their
allegiance to the power, the
majesty, the principles of the
people Indeed, the pnmacy of
the people
What we are meant to deduce
from the national hoopla that
Shapiro has raised is her
awareness that the personal
rights of individual Americans
are being increasingly eroded bv
the growing strength and
inaccessibility of monolithic
government and by that
rnment's indifference to
them.
In short, somewhere along the
line. Shapiro might argue, we are
being ed by a system
that makes of the people a horse
which is now destined to draw the
\emmental cart Whereas, in
the spirit of Jefferson, and in
term* of the strictest consti-
tutional intent, it is the govern-
ment which ought to draw the
people according to their best
interest
I AM merely extrapolating
here perhaps I am giving
Shapiro too much credit for
having thought it all out quite
this far and in quite this way
After all. she has been quoted as
declaring that she is apolitical,
which is a peculiar state of in-
nocence for a young person to be
in who presumes to make sophis-
ticated statements about
symbols of allegiance
For the fact is that men have
always lived by symbols in
religion, in nations, in political
and social movements, in
fraternal organizations ranging
from sports teams to institutions
of learning to philanthropic
causes All have and in the
past have had their costumes,
their colors, their codes, their
songs of camaraderie and
common ideals.
In the medieval period, even
families announced to the world
their unity and singularity in the
heraldry of crests and shields -
emblems in their da> of the right!
of the individual \er the
monarchic dray-horses : alleged
community inter* woel
those who madi f the*
heraldic emblem- ai
claims to power
tamilies staked their
s) mbols
THFRE IS liti im for
argument tha:
mankind hist, rj sj -
too frequently i -an the
things they symbolized More,
indeed, than in the excesses ot
government of pledges and
flags and anthems I h abuse
has been especially unbearable
and characteristic in the case*
religious institutions purporting
to speak for God
But none of this denies the
heightened significance ot
symbols to us. And so it is
acknowledgement of Americas
allegedly evil power over us when
we rise" to recite the Pledge of
Allegiance to the flag and to sing
the national anthem ialthough I
am saddened bv our ill-conceivw
choice of the "Star SpangW
Banner.' an old English drunK
song, and the rather belligerent
words of Francis Scott Key as
emblematic of America i
Furthermore, a U S Supreme
Court decision in the case t)l "est
Virginia Board of Education;
Barnette assures Susan MiapiW
of her right to sit it out In that
case, a nation whose govern-
mental power she envisions *-'
encroaching on individual human
rights guarantees her that sne
Continued on Page 13-A


Friday, November: 30,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 6-A
Helmut Schmidt, Valery Giscard dEstaing, Francisco Cossiga,
Jimmy Carter, Margaret Thatcher and Roy Jenkins.
The Summit Seven, June 22-23, 1980, where the Venice
Declaration was proposed Left to right are Pierre Trudeau,
Venice Declaration
It Still Rattles Those Rusty Chains of Peace
By ERIC MOONMAN.
i Chronicle Syndicate
During the past decade,
policies as far as they affect
he Middle East have
Irogresst'd by a series of
jtops and starts. There
hve been some significant
kcisions made by the for-
fen ministers or by the
rarliament as a whole
phich have aroused world
terest The Venice
) ration, for instance,
pa- one such move.
main, however, there
mi tie formulated on the
;' which could attract
ther of Israel or of
ponents. Nonethe-
great deal of
work being done in
il u ea resulting
nd of-
ficials knowing Israel better.
AN ESSENTIAL starting
point in examining Europe's
contemporary relations with the
Middle East is the statement
Issued by the leaders of the EEC
following the Bonn summit on
March 22, 1983: They argued
that the principles which underlie
their approach to wider peace
negotiations, as set out in more
than one previous statement,
remain valid.
The statement concluded: "A
lasting peace can only be built on
the right to a secure existence for
all states in the region including
Israel, and justice for all the
peoples, including the right of the
Palestinian people to self-
determination with all that this
implies Negotiations will
hav< to embrace all the parties
erned including the Pales-
inian ; a I the PLO will
have to b asa with
The EEC leaders also gave
their support to President
Reagan's initiative of September
1. 1982, which they said indicated
"a way to peace." and the Arab
Summit at Fez which, in their
view, demonstrated a readiness
for it.
CLEARLY, the Bonn state-
ment differs only marginally
from the 1980 Venice Declara-
tion. But the reference in both
statements to PLO involvement
in talks was unambiguous and
totally unacceptable to Israel.
In the early 1980s with Lord
Carrington both at the Foreign
Office, and chairman of the EEC,
the Venice Declaration was
hawked around European
capitals without any tangible
success rhis might explain the
quail' negative response to the
Bonn policy "initia-
policy statements fall
|Devil in Human Form
Jean-Marie Le Pen Frighten* Everyone
short of being even-handed or
even fair to Israel. The 1980
Declaration was unacceptable to
Israel because the sacrifices and
compromises called for fell only
upon Israel. Moreover, Israel was
asked to negotiate with a terror-
ist organization a demand
inconsistent with a guarantee of
its securiity and one which would
be rejected by any European
government in respect of Euro-
pean terrorists.
The agreement on Middle East
policies at the EEC Prime Min-
isters' conference in Stuttgart
(June. 1983) represented a some-
what more realistic attitude
towards Israel. It was decided
that the embargo on the aid
package for Israel imposed at the
council meeting in Brussels m
June. 1982 after the Israeli incur-
sion into Lebanon, should be
lifted
\\ th thi -in.nop. 0\ Greece
which I i relations with the
PLO, the Community heads
voted to ailow aid in a financial
proti col already agreed to bedel-
ivered to Israel The effect was to
restart official contacts between
Israeli delegations and the EEC.
ALL THESE initiatives,
papers and plans are formulated
by the Foreign Ministers, and
just occasionally by the Commis-
sioners themselves. There was no
actual hard-headed initiative
from the Parliament itself during
the whole of the last decade. It is
not so surprising, but it does
revealthe inability of the EMPs,
however enthusiastic and deter-
mined they are. tu take seriously
the need to restructure and
reform the way the parliament
runs. A nuisance value and a
sounding board for Europe it
may be. a legislative chamber, it
is not.
There are some issues where
individual EMPs have used the
Order Paper to express concern
and demand action The Arab
boycott is a case in point Often
the action has been simultane
with campaigns in a particular
intrj such as h tie con-
ducted in Holla
A significant development
Continued on Page l.VA
B> EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS For
tan) u s and non-Jews in
pance and tor countless
jews abroad, Jean-Marie
r Pen, the leader of
trance extreme right wing
fational Front, is the devil
'human form.
"e 'nghtens everyone, or
early everyone. The political
Ptablishment, both the left and
P traditional right, is
tightened because he plucks
Ft"i indiscriminately from all
prties The trade unions are
tightened because he seeks to
eak their influence. The im-
migrant workers are frightened
cause he wants to have them
expelled.
LE PEN and his movement are
a powerful new force on Prance's
political scene The National
Front garnered 1 1 percent of the
popular vote in last summer's
national elections for the
European Parliament and has
been gaining electoral strength in
various parts of the country The
Front managed to get 10 seats in
the European Parliament as a
result of the elections.
But no group is as frightened
of I-e Pen as most of France's
Jews. Nothing he can say or do
has up till now alleviated their
deep-seated conviction that an
extreme rightwing movement is
sooner or later fated to become
anti-Semitic.
Le Pen himself, a jovial giant
with a Ixximing voice, has always
been careful not to say anything
which could be even vaguely-
interpreted as anti-Semitic or
arti-Jewish. He proclaims
himself a friend of Israel, and a
member of the Jewish com-
munity, a respectable business-
man and former anti-Nazi
resistance fighter, ran on his
ticket.
ON THE other hand, many of
the people who supported him in
the past, in his long struggle for
political recognition, were openly
and often vehemently anti-Jew-
ish. Le Pen has since broken with
most of these early supporters
who now. to use their own words,
Continued on Page 10-A
'Friend' of Israel has a circle of
anti-Semitic supporters.
Lord Carrington and West Germany's Chancellor Helmut Kohl.
Carrington, both at Britain's Foreign Office and as chairman of
the EEC, was an enthusiastic spokesman for the Venice
Declaration,


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 30, 1984
On Trip to Damascus
Mitterrand Raises Question of Syria's Jews
College Prof. Win
Take JDC Post
NEW YORK -
UTAI -
Continued from Page 1-A
did not accompany Mitterrand to
Syria. This was apparently
Mitterrand's decision to avoid
provoking the Syrians with
whom delicate issues were raised.
Attali is a Jew with close ties to
Israel and the French Jewish
community.
An Elysee Palace spokesman
and the Syrian Embassy here
said that Damascus had made no
request, formally or indirect, for
the exclusion of Attali. The
Syrian Ambassador, Yussef
Chakkour. told the French news
agency, Agence France Presse.
"we had no prior contacts with
the Elysee on this subject. The
Presidential Office forwarded us
the list of the president's party,
and we automatically approved
it."
Attali has accompanied Mit-
terrand on all of his past official
visits abroad, including last
summer's trip tomoscow. Klein
was also a member of the presi-
dential party in the Soviet
capital, at Mitterrand's in-
vitation. On that trip, Mitterrand
raised the issue of equal rights for
Soviet Jews with the Kremlin
leaders.
HIS TRIP to Damascus was
the first by an incumbent French
France's Chief Rabbi Sirat
Finally Gets Visa for Soviet Visit
PARIS (JTA) Chief
Rabbi Rene Sirat of France has
received a formal invitation to
visit the Soviet Union and plans
to go next spring if he gets a
visa.
The invitation, which said it
was extended by "rabbis in the
Soviet Union." was delivered to
Sirat by a Soviet diplomat. The
diplomat told reporters that the
Soviet authorities would do
everything they can to facilitate
his trip and his stay in the USSR.
Sirat was invited to the Soviet
Union by the Chief Rabbi of
Moscow in 1981. shortly after his
election as Chief Rabbi of France.
Sirat told the Jewish Tele-
jrraphic Agency at the time that
he planned to visit Moscow "as
soon as circumstances permit."
meaning as soon as he received
visas for himself and his party.
He applied several times during
the last three years for a Soviet
visa, without success.
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president since Syria, a French
mandate between the two world
wars, was granted independence
40 years ago. Sources here said
Mitterrand wants a binding
promise from Assad not to alter
the present deployment of Syrian
troops in Lebanon or to try to
occupy positions evacuated by
Israeli troops when they with-
draw.
The matter of Syrian Jewry is
in fact a sensitive one. The recent
international conference. at
which speakers accused Syria of
holding its Jewish community
"hostage." drew an angry denun-
ciation from Assad. In a
Damascus radio interview, he
denied there was anti-Semitism
in Syria and accused the con-
ference of meddling in Syria's
internal affairs.
It was announced, meanwhile,
that two former French Prime
Ministers. Jacques Chirac and
Jacques Chaban Delmas, will
visit Israel early next month,
shortly after Mitterrand returns
from Syria. They are scheduled to
leave on Dec. 9 and will meet in
Jerusalem with Premier Shimon
Peres. Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir and Defense Minister
Yitzhak Rabin.
Two other ranking French
leaders visited Israel onlv
recently former President
Valery discard d'F.staing and
former Prime Minister Raymond
Barre. They, along with Chirac
and Delmas are seeking
nomination to head the opposi-
tion to Mitterrand's Socialist
Party in France's next general
elections.
Saul Cohen, president
College, the ESVAS
University system, is t2*&
to become executive vice
of the Amerii
Join Distribution Comm^
-~ _---- mwhuvi vice km.1
dent of the America* ,51
Joint Distribution ComnH
Cohen, who has headed (2
College since 1978. will bmJ
Ralph Goldman, whowf""
next March.
Goldman will
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viet Repression
Moscow Pushes Aggression Abroad
Friday, November 30, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
NEW YORK The
loviet Union is resorting to
Lreased repression at
|ome and aggression
Load including sup-
lort for worldwide terror-
C, as it loses ground in
\e East-West struggle,
Urding to Max M.
fampelman. former chief
\ S. delegate to the Madrid
onference on European
curity.
. The Brezhnev Doctrine of
Litarv intervention, he said, is
>ing used to justify the presence
120.000 troops in Afghanistan
bid" Soviet destabilizing" ef-
Xn m the Mideast and is a
[harbinger of even more dan-
terous Soviet meddling in
fentral America."
DELIVERING the first an-
fc,al Benjamin R- Epstein
Bemorial Lecture honoring the
farmer national director of the
|tntiI>efamation League of B'nai
nth. Kampelman presented his
,.,.. ent of East-West rela-
in a wide-ranging speech
[.;,,: The Faith of a Democrat.'
Scholarship
Plan
SEW YORK -- (JTA) A
holarship plan for use in any
immer college-age program
fared by the American Zionist
buth Foundation has been
eated in honor of Sidney
einer, H nai /.ion president and
Ii AZYF trustee, according to
li Zborowski, AZYF board
hairman
Max Kampelman
It was delivered in the audit-
orium of the League's national
headquarters here and attended
by some 250 community leaders.
Kampelman praised Epstein s
a leader "for dedicating his life to
furthering human relations." The
League's national director from
1947 to 1979. Epstein died in
1983.
Kampelman. chairman of New
York's Freedom House and a
prominent Washington attorney,
said that a "correlation of forces
has moved against the Soviet
Union," adding:
The credibility of its system
as a viable alternative has ended
for sensible people. The gas has
largely escaped from its ideo-
logical balloon The Soviet
elite clearly must be concerned
that its thought control will dis-
integrate, probably sooner rather
than later."
CITING SOVIET difficulties
with economic self-sufficiency,
lagging technology, the credi-
bility of its propaganda and
disaffection of its youth,
Kampelman said the Soviet
leadership "reacts to the signs of
inevitable change with more
repression and aggression."
The Soviet Union, he said, "is
today the major threat to our
security and values an aggres-
sive society seeking, with its
massive military and police
power, to expand its influence;
and a repressive society deter-
mined to defend its totalitarian
control, whatever the human
cost."
Kampelman said, "We must
not permit our dedication to
peace mistakenly to intefere with
our perception of reality. The
Soviet system," he went on,
punishes men and women who
seek independence of religious
and political thought by commit-
ting them to psychiatric insti-
tutions. The Soviet government
officially sponsors anti-Semitism.
It trains and finances terrorists
all over the world in its efforts to
destabilize all who are not allied
with it."
REFERRING to the Mideast
and Central America. Kam-
pelman said. "Israel has become
increasingly and dangerously
isolated as a result of a deter-
mined Soviet-assisted Arab poli-
tical onslaught the 'Zionism
is racism' slogan spreads its
poison all over the world."
In El Salvador, which he
visited six months ago as
cochairman of an American
delegation to observe elections in
that country. Kampelman cited
the "presence" of the Palestine
Liberation Organization among
guerrillas who threatened to kill
voters. This was part of the
Kremlin's overall design to "gain
a foothold at our southern flank."
he said.
Kampelman told his audience
that despite the magnitude of the
Soviet threat to the West, "the
imperatives for survival in the
nuclear age require us to persist
through military strength,
through dialogue, through crit-
icism, through negotiations in
the search for understanding,
agreement, peace." He said that
"our task patiently and with per-
severance is to persuade the
leadership of the Soviet Union
that it is in its best interest to
permit a humanizing process to
take place within its society."
AMERICA, he asserted, "will
not and should not tolerate any
proposals which will undermine
American power relative to the
massive Soviet arms arsenal. The
American people, and we Jews
who are a part of them, cherish
what we have built here and do
not want to lose what we have
achieved."
Admitting that United States
foreign policy is sometimes
characterized by '"fits and
starts." Kampelman went on to
declare:
"Our country is the last best
hope in this world for human
dignity and freedom. We have
imperfections, but we are com-
mitted to self-government. The
peoples of the world know this
and place their hope in us. Our
obligation is to be true to our
responsibilities."
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Friday, November 30, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Decision Due So on
Will U.S. Quit UNESCO End of December?
Continued from Page 1A
isolate Israel by taking politics
Jevond the UN .General
Assembly. UN agencies which
had previously not been political
were turned into ideological
battlegrounds.
INK SCO was a prime example
of this Anti-Israel attacks in
UNESCO in the 1970s have
[turned into a wider anti-Western
[ offensive in the 1980s.
THE U.S. WITHDRAWAL,
announxil in December of last
I vear for Dec. 31, 1984, would be a
reaction to this politicization.
UNESCO was founded in 1945
intellectual cooperation
ml the world. In the
it opened up a political
voting for sanctions
h1 and excluding her
from its electoral groups.
Viewing this as a perversion of
the organization's charter, the
United States suspended its
budgetary contributions from
1974 to 1976.
Although the U.S. had
resumed its contributions, the
situation had worsened by 1980.
At a UNESCO general con-
ference in Belgrade, funds were
allocated for the creation of a
"free" Palestinian University
and to help "liberation move-
ments" like the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization to increase
their propaganda efforts
Emotional debates at the
Belgrade conference reached a
frenzy with a surprise visit from
the PLO leader, Yasir Arafat,
who spoke against Israel and her
"foreign protector." the United
Librarians Say They 'Caved In;'
Cancel Talk by Holocaust Revisionist
LOS ANGELES
UTA) The California Li-
brary Association has
revoked its decision to pro-
vide a forum at its state-
wide convention next
month for rightwing pub-
lisher David McCalden who
claims the Holocaust was a
hoax.
The CLA acted, according to
its executive director Stefan
Moses, after angry protests from
the Simon Wiesenthal Center
here. I hi- American Jewish Com-
mittee and various other Jewish.
Christian and interfaith orga-
nizations
THE PLAN to allow
McCalden to display his material
at the convention and to address
it under the auspices of a so-
called Truth Mission*' was de-
nounced by Mayor Tom Bradley
and tht- Log Angeles City Council
and by leaders of the California
State Legislature.
"It's .ill over, we caved in. We
have agreed to cancel both the
program and Mr McCalden s
right to exhibit his material,"
said Moses, who is Jewish
The CLA, backed by the
American Civil Liberties Union,
had argued that McCalden had
the right to present his views and
material to the convention's
3,000 delegates in the interests of
"intellectual freedom" and free
speech.
Rabbi Marvin Hier. dean of the
Wiesenthal Center, and Neil
Sandberg. Western regional
director of the AJCommittee.
accused the CLA and ACLU of
confusing the issues of intellec-
tual freedom and free speech with
common sense. Sandberg re-
marked. "The extent of commu-
nity outrage ... is a testimony to
the kind of community which Los
Angeles has become."
McCalden has been long asso-
ciated with anti-Semitic and
white supremacist groups and
with the California-based Insti-
tute for Historical Review.
States, for an hour and a half.
THESE anti-Israel attacks at
UNESCO, which has 161
members, were merely a prelude
to an offensive against such basic
Western values as freedom of the
press and freedom of enterprise.
UNESCO proposals have
included the drawing up of a list
of mass media organizations
violating UNESCO guidelines on
the press: the setting up of a code
of "the rights of peoples" which
is more state-oriented than a code
of "the rights of individuals,"
and studying the drafting of a
code of conduct for multi-national
corporations.
America's objections are
locused on two matters: the so-
called New World Information
Order (NWIOl backed by the
director-general of UNESCO.
Amadou Mahtar M'Bow, and the
organization's budget.
America and most of her allies
have bitterly attacked the NWIO
as an attempt to bridle a free
press. Edmund Hennelly. who
headed the United States
delegation to the UNESCO
general conference in Paris last
year, said then that America was
becoming increasingly distres-
sed by the philosophical under-
pinning of many UNESCO
programs which emphasize the
power and welfare of the state
rather than the rights and welfare
of the individual."
THE SOVIET UNION and
developing nations support the
NWIO as a means of correcting
what they see as an imbalance in
the flow of news which, they
claim, is now dominated by
Western-based media. A Soviet
resolution at the conference
called on member states to "take
the necessary action to ban use of
the mass media to build up world
tension and disseminate ten-
dentious and slanderous
messages which sow the seeds of
alienation ..." Reacting to the
resolution, one Western delegate
said that it would be difficult to
find a more "barefaced plea for
state control of the media."
The budget dispute is more
clearcut. The United States feels
that UNESCO is poorly managed
and wasteful. The U.S. General
Accounting Office, which has
been investigating UNESCO,
said in a draft report that nearly
30 percent of UNESCO's
programs were duplicated. A poll
of employees shows that only 3
percent think that UNESCO
includes well-qualified people and
that promotions are based on
merit.
UNESCO's executive board
met recently in a last-ditch effort
to meet U.S. demands for reform.
The U.S. had called for a zero-
growth budget. The board
adopted a recommendation that
the budget for 1986-1987 be set at
some $150 million the same
level as the 1984-1985 budget,
adjusted only for inflation and
currency fluctuations.
However, Gregory Newell, the
U.S. Deputy Secretary of State
for International Organizations,
said at the board meeting that
the chances of the U.S. not
leaving the organization were
"rather slim."
The Reagan administration
seems to have decided that what
started with Israel in the 1970s
has become too big a matter for
compromise. The West itself, not
only Israel, is the object of dis-
crimination and by a shame-
fully managed organization fed
mainly by money from the West,
at that.
Neither UNESCO nor the
United Nations functions in a
vacuum, so that the stakes may-
be higher still. Here may lie the
key to America's determination
to carry out her withdrawal
threat.
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"Kt A \s-x*

k*. v*-
me ucwisn r lunuian r naay, iNOvemt>er 3U. iy**4
Jean-Marie Le Pen
This Great 'Friend' of Israel Is Surrounded by Anti-Semitic Circle
Continued from Page 5-A
"hate his guts" and consider him
a traitor who has "sold out to the
Jews."
Obtaining an interview for the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency was
easy. Le Pen was actually
delighted to grant it. "So many
things have been written about
me. so many lies spread, that I
am glad to have the opportunity
to explain myself." he said.
It is obvious that he cares what
Jews in France and abroad think
of him. He is aware that they
wield a certain political influence
but he also cares for personal
reasons He feels, at least this is
what he says, that he has been
"unfairly" treated and wants to
set the record straight.
THIS REPORTER asked Le
Pen point blank, as soon as we
sat down to conduct the in-
terview, if he was anti-Semitic
He did not appear to be troubled
in the least, not even ill at ease
On the contrary, he burst out
laughing, his huge frame
shaking, and he said.
"At least I must say you don't
waste time beating round the
bush. If anti-Semitism means
hatred, persecution or even the
slighest anti-Jewish discrimina-
tion. I am definitely not an anti-
Semite and am violently opposed
to anti-Semitism. If it means,
however, that I have to like
(artist Marc I Chagall's paintings,
support I the late French Premier
Pierrel Mendes-France s anti-
colonial policies or approve of
Simone Veils abortion laws. 1
plead guilty: I am against all
three.
"I don't want to be influenced
in my political choices by the
personality of the people in-
volved (President Valeryi
Giscard D'Estaing picked out
Simone Veil, who was then
completely unknown, and named
her his Health Minister and
pushed through Parliament his
law legalizing abortion because
she was a woman, because she
was Jewish and had been
deported to Auschwitz.
"IT WAS A clever plan, but 1
am not forced to play according
to the rules he has laid down. 1
attacked her policies then, and I
accuse her and her backers, all
those in favor of abortion, of
wanting to carry out a genocide
of France's unborn babies."
This accusation levelled at a
woman who had known genocide
at first-hand in a Nazi con-
centration camp where she lost
most of her family, struck most
of France's Jews as being in poor
taste at the best and outrightly
anti-Semitic at its worst. Le Pen
does not accept this accusation.
"I have run against her during
the municipal elections and again
more recently during the
European ones. I shall probably
run against her and her party
again I have attacked her as a
political opponent and I shall do
so again
I DONT WANT to know
whether she is a man or a woman,
white. Jewish and formerly
deported 1 take none of these
factors into consideration and I
think it would be unjust to be
accused of anti-Semitism because
of this. To put it frankly, it would
be racism the other way around.
"Some people accused me with
being anti-Semitic because I
often clashed in Parliament with
Mendes-France who was Prime
Minister of France at the time
when I was a young. 28-year-old
deputy 1 attacked him not
because he was Jewish but
because he had signed the
Geneva agreements which spelled
out our abdication in Asia and
provided for our withdrawal from
Indochina
LE PEN. 56 but looking
younger, is a typical northern
"Aryan.' with thick blond hair,
blue eyes and an iron grip Today-
he lives in an elegant white stone
mansion on a hill overlooking
Paris in Saint Cloud, the gift of a
wealthy political admirer.
He was born, however, in a
small, wind-swept fishing village
in Brittany. Trinite-Sur Mer.
with 1.500 inhabitants, three
churches and 300 fishing boats.
His father was a fisherman and a
resistance fighter on the side His
boat sank while on a secret
mission to England in 1944
Le Pen said. Just to show you
how wild some accusations or
beliefs are. some 10 years ago
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film director Louis Malle invited
me for dinner. As we sat down he
told me he needed my help in
shooting a film dealing with the
German occupation of France.
Lucien Lacombe. Earnestly he
told me. You. who were a Nazi
SS officer, can give us a hand in
helping us portray the Germans
in the film!'
"I TOOK a deep breath and
nearly hit him. When my father
died at sea in 1944. I was 16. I
inherited two guns and 600
bullets hidden at home and joined
the anti-Nazi resistance. I was a
full-time member of a fighting
network, the Saint Marcel, which
often carried out military actions
against the Germans.
As for my father, his name is
engraved in our village
monument for the war dead. But
legends have long life and many
still continue to portray me as a
former Nazi, an SS or at least a
pro-German collaborator.''
After the war. Le Pen. a war
orphan, was granted the status of
national waif" and awarded
several scholarships In 1946.
while studying law at Paris
University, he was elected presi-
dent of the Law Students I'nion.
a body traditionally to the ex-
treme right of the political
spectrum. As soon as he
graduated, he volunteered for
military service in Indochina and
served for two years as a combat
lieutenant with the Foreign
Legion paratroopers. France's
elite force in the war.
IT WAS in Indochina that he
had his first contacts with the
press. His anti-Communism was
so strong that the French high
command, impressed with his
zeal in fighting "the world
Communist conspiracy." ap-
pointed him political editor of the
expeditionary corps paper. La
Caravelle.
Back in France, he became a
fixture in the Paris Latin
Quarter, organizing meetings and
demonstrations in favor of
France's continued commitments
in North Africa and Vietnam and
protesting any compromise
solution. He had no money and
no politcal organization to back
him. but everybody on Paris'
Left Bank seems to have seen
him or at least heard of him. He
made many enemies but also
recruited his first followers.
While Le Pen lectured in Paris,
in the far-flung provinces a small
town grocer. Pierre Poujade, was
organizing the 'little people."
His platform, simple and
calculated to gain wide support,
was no more taxes. Most of his
party's slate in the then forth-
coming Parliamentary elections
were, however, small business-
men He wps delighted, therefore,
when a mutual friend introduced
him to Le Pen. a hero and intel-
lectual
POU JADE'S party won a
large popular vote and Le Pen
was elected in his old haunt, the
Latin Quarter He was one of the
youngest deputies in the French
National Assembly, violently
anti-government and supporting
strongly nationalist ideas Six
months later he took a leave of
absence to volunteer for military
service with his old Foreign
I-egion regiment now fighting the
FLN rebels in Algeria.
Le Pen recalled. It was
September 1956 and we were
practically immediately flown out
to Cyprus to spearhead the Suez
operation It was there during the
lighting that I met my first Isra-
?lis. Some became personal
friends."
After Suez, back in Algiers. Le
Pen and his regiment gained
notoriety in repressing the revolt
His opponents said that he
personally arrested hundreds and
used inhumane methods, in-
cluding torture, to extract infor-
mation. Le Pen wrote.
"Terrorists cannot enjov tk.
benefits of the laws of war tC
have violated them and must
suffer the consequences fa
bombings and for murderii,.
innocent civilians."
Back from the Algerian
fighting, he served for a few mors
months in Parliament but his
relations with his former leader
Poujade went from bad to worse
In the next elections he ran as an
independent and was beaten
FOR CLOSE to 20 vears jf
terwards he lived in a son of
political desert He lectured
before half empty halls, anc
published a monthly sneet reac
by a few hundred people
Extremist element- -..-y :n cling
to him and Le Pen now admits
that "I had to do with what
found Beggars cant b
choosers."
To make a living, as he ne\er
practiced law, he set up a
record firm specializing in war
songs and marches His
"hit" was an alburr. VVehf*
macht War Songs v.Uowed b\
'Marches of Nazi Germany a;
War." When reminded he a<
not apologetic:
Publishing b >ks r selling
records does not involvi
emotional or an ir.tellectua.
approval of the idi
Do you know what my next best
selling record was' Le Pen asks
and starts looking or. his book
shelves for "Haganar. Songs
and the Songs <>: thi Palmach
He also boasts [hat he has
records on which u cai
the voices of Jabot at a
public meeting in Par.- .-.nd Ben
Gurion reading Israel's
I federation of Indt pei
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.


Arab Youths Killed
Violence Grips W. Bank Again
Friday, *Jovember.80,1984/ The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
PLO Says Israel, Syria Aim To Keep
Palestinians from Homeland
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH OBOEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
_ Two Arab youths were
fatally wounded by Israeli
troops during stone-throw-
ing melees in Ramallah and
Bir Zeit in the West Bank
less than 24 hours apart.
Six other young Arabs were
wounded, and an Israel De-
fense Force officer was
injured by a rock.
Abdellah Baker, 20. a student
at the Ramallah Industrial
School, was shot in the chest and
died while undergoing surgery at
a local hospital. A second
Ramallah youth suffered a thigh
wound
Sharif Khalil Taibe. 23. a
student at Bir Zeit University,
was shot to death, and five other
students were wounded when
IDF troops opened fire to quell
rioting on the campus. Taibe and
Baker were the first West Bank
demon-trators killed by Israeli
forces since last Jan. 28 when a
17-year-old Nablus youth was
fatally shot by the IDF.
Maj. Gen. Amnon Lipkin,
commander of the central region,
said the disturbances at Bir Zeit
began as clashes between
students who support Palestine
Liberation Organization chief
Yasir Arafat and anti-Arafat
students.
THE VIOLENCE was ap-
parently triggered by the Pales-
tine National Council meeting
convened by Arafat in Amman.
Jordan. The meeting is opposed
by anti-Arafat dissidents within
the PLO, backed mainly by
Syria. West Bank Palestinians
generally are pro-Arafat but a
strong minority oppose him.
especially among students.
According to Lipkin. fights
broke out among students on the
Bir Zeit campus and spilled onto
the adjacent roads. Employes of
the West Bank civil adminis-
tration's public works depart-
ment engaged in road repairs
were stoned, and stones were
hurled at passing Jewish
Blaustein Foundation Gifts
Assist Yale Univ.'s Jewish Chair
NFW HAVEN (JTA) -
The establishment of two en-
dowed professorships in Judaic
Studies at Yale University has
been ; idi |*>ssible by a major
gift from the Jacob and Hilda
Blaustein Foundation of Balti-
more according to A. Bartlet
"> .lie president.
Giamatti said the Jacob and
Hilda Blaustein chair in Hebrew
Language and Literature will he
b senior faculty member
and that the university seeks a
distinguished scholar for the
chair fxix-cted to be named in
-
The second chair is the Jacob
and Hilda Blaustein Professor-
ship in Judaic Studies, specific-
ally tor \ isiting scholars who will
hold the title for the term of their
Yale appointments.
Isn ai Schorsch, professor of
Jewish History at the Jewish
rheological Seminary of
America is the first scholar to
hold this Chair. During the
current semester. Prof. Schorsch
is |ri\ ing a course for undergra-
duates and a faculty seminar
Giamatti said the Blaustein
F'oundation gift is the largest
single gift to the $7.4 million
Judaic Studies Development
campaign at Yale. The campaign
has topped the S7 million mark
and is seeking funds to under-
write a curatorship of the uni-
versity's Judaic collections and
library.
Started in 1980. Judaic Studies
is an interdisciplinary program in
the undergraduate college and
the graduate school. The
program was designed to make
use of the university's consider-
able resources, which include the
university's rare and extensive
Judaica collections, as well as
courses in the literature and rel-
igious studies departments and
at Yale's divinity school.
This year there are eight un-
dergraduates majoring in Jud-
aica Studies and more than 600
students enrolled in the history,
literature, religious studies and
language courses which consti-
tute the program's field of study.
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vehicles.
Barricades of rocks and
burning tires blocked the roads.
IDF troops sent in to remove
them were surrounded by rioters
and opened fire to extricate
themselves, Israeli sources said.
One officer was struck in the head
by a rock. According to the
sources, only two of the wounded
Arab youths were hit by IDF
bullets. The others were injured
by rocks thrown by fellow
students, the sources said.
ACCORDING TO some ob-
servers, not identified, the
demonstrations were carefully
planned in anticipation of IDF
intervention. They noted that
buckets of water were readied to
smother tear gas bombs which,
as expected, the IDF fired before
resorting to bullets.
Lipkin proposed that Bir Zeit
University be closed, as it has
been many times in the past after
campus disturbances. No arrests
were made but IDF units were
interrogating students in an
effort to identify the ringleaders.
The outbreak in Ramallah
followed a pro-Arafat rally.
Hundreds of Arab youths at-
tacked IDF" soldiers with rocks.
The fatal shooting of Taibe
occurred when a group of soldiers
was surrounded by about 50
stone-throwing youths in the
center of town. The soldiers fired
into the air but as the rocks
continued to fly, they opened fire
on the attackers, according to Is-
raeli sources.
The situation was reported
quiet elsewhere on the West
Bank following the clash in
Ramallah.
Continued from Page 1-A
against Israel.
In a speech to the Conference,
host King Hussein urged an
international meeting under UN
sponsorship, with the PLO as a
hill participant, that would
address an Israeli exchange of
"territory for peace."
Hussein's talk in effect called
for implementation of UN Res.
242, which Salah Khalaf, Arafat's
security adviser, and Khalil
Wazir, second-in-command to
Arafat, promptly and simul-
taneously rejected.
WHATEVER the surface
bravado generated in Amman, it
has been generally observed that
the PLO is a wasted organ-
ization, a powerless shell of the
once mighty force that vowed to
push Israel into the sea. And its
growing misfortunes have been
attributed largely to the result of
the Israeli war against the Pales-
tinians that ousted them from
Lebanon.
From the PLO's point of view,
whatever truth may be found in
this, the reason is that "Syria
and Israel fight us together for
their own interests." This is the
belief of Ahmed Abdel Rahman,
top spokesman for Arafat. "They
are both against a Palestinian
state," he flatly declares.
However strange this analysis
may seem, the fact is that
although Syria and President
Hafez Assad may pay lipservice
to both Arafat and his PLO, they
fear the possibility of Palestinian
power and independence no less
than do the Israelis.
DESPITE Rahman's own
assessment of the alleged Syrian-
Israeli tie, "Our decision is to
keep the PLO as the repre-
sentative of the Palestinian
people. If anyone wants to know
about the Palestinians, he must
come to the PLO not to Syria,
not to any Arab country."
From his vantage point at the
Palestine National Council's
deliberations in Amman, the
Palestinians' "parliament in
exile," Rahman declares that the
trouble today is that "Assad is
against armed struggle" against
Israel. "Why," asks Rahman,
"doesn't Syria want to leave Is-
rael in the mud? Why not leave
them in the mud not for one
year, but for 10 years?"
M
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WC 1U-H____, i,^ ......... _
Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. November 30,1984
Sunny Isles Young Israel
Arranging Israel Study Scholarships
Young Israel of Sunny Isles in
Miami Beach is arranging to
provide $500 scholarship grants
for high school seniors who want
to spend a year studying in
Israel.
Harry Gartner, Young Israel
president, explained that the
scholarships are being granted
with the sponsorship of the Na-
tional Council of Young Israel
and the World Zionist Organiza-
tion Torah Education Depart-
ment. The grants are being of-
Nazi Unmasked
WASHINGTON UTAI -
The Justice Department filed suit
in Federal District Court in
Boston Friday to revoke the
citizenship of Matthew Katin. a
resident of Norwood. Mass.. for
having concealed his Nazi past
when he gained admission to the
United States under the Dis-
placed Persons Act shortlv after
World War II.
According to Neal Sher.
director of the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special Inves-
tigations. Katin. now 70. served
in the Lithuanian Schutzmanns-
chaft. an auxiliary police organi-
sation set up by the Nazis in
occupied Lithuania.
fered for study at the Machon
Gold Institute for Women or the
Bet Midrash Le-Torah for Men,
both in Jerusalem.
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin of
Young Israel is serving as coord-
inator of the project. High school
seniors interested in applying for
these scholarships should send a
request for an application to
Rabbi Dobin. Young Israel
Scholarships. POB 6194. Miami
Beach. 33150.
All requests must be ac-
companied by a long stamped,
self-addressed envelope. Deadline
for applications is Feb. 1. 1985.
The institutions in Israel, ex-
plained Rabbi Dobin. have
designed special programs for
American students, and each has
a proven record of excellence.
They offer the best features
found in other Israeli institutions
of higher learning, with Israeli
and America-born teachers of the
highest calibre. All students who
are enrolled in the program can
receive full credit from many
American colleges and uni-
versities. "
Applicants will be notified by
April 1. 1985 if they have been
granted a scholarship. In some
instances liberal additional
grants are available from the
Israeli institutions as well.
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Conditions Listed
Merchants To Do Business on Sunday
By JANICE ARNOLD
MONTREAL (JTA)
Sabbath-observing own-
ers of small stores in
Quebec have been given the
right to conduct business
on Sundays under certain
conditions. A new provin-
cial government regulation
permits observant Jews to
open their shops on Sunday
if they close Friday before
sundown and all day Satur-
day. They must have no
more than three employees
working in the store on any
dav it is open.
For almost a decade, the
Canadian Jewish Congress has
been pressing the Quebec
government for a change in its
business hours legislation which
would recognize the right of Jews
to conduct their business accord-
ing to their religion.
HOWEVER, the CJC is not
satisfied with the new regulation
for several reasons It believes
there should be no restriction on
the number of employees work-
ing. It has also asked the govern-
ment to put into law a general
principle of tolerance toward any
group which does not observe the
traditional Christian sabbath.
The CJC has argued that forc-
ing a Jew to close down his busi-
ness on Sunday, despite being
shut down on another day of the
week, is an infringement of
freedom of religion and con-
science as guaranteed under the
Canadian Charter of Human
Rights, part of the Constitution
signed in November 19M. B'nai
B'rith's League for Human
Rights has called it discrim-
inatory.
The CJC is also unhappy with
the fact that the new regulation
requires that business owners
apply to the government for
permission to open Sunday and
obtain a letter of recommenda-
tion from the CJC But CJC offi-
cials say their organization is not
a central religious authoru> : -
the Jewish O mmunuy and that
it does not want to. nor it is
nvesi eating thi
ces mercl ants
THE CJCQUEBE<
..... .

.
assertedly been made even more
absurd by the fact that, because
the regulation does not specify
Jews, it is conceivable that other
groups, such as the Seventh Day
Adventists who observe the same
sabbath, will have to come to the
CJC for a recommendation for
the exemption.
A member of the opposition
Liberal Party in the Quebec
National Assembly (legislature).
Herbert Marx, who is a consti-
tutional lawyer and the party's
justice critic, said the Quebec
government should clear up the
matter once and for all and take it
to the highest provincial court,
the Quebec Court of Appeal.
In the neighboring province of
Ontario home of the largest
number of Jews in Canada its
Court of Appeal, by an
unanimous decision of five
justices, ruled in September that
the Lord's Day Act does not
apply to observant Jews The
Lord's Day Act. passed in 1908.
is federal legislation which pro-
hibits just about every type of
commercial activity on Sundays
However, each province has the
right to pass legislation making
exceptions to the Act.
THE ONTARIO court judg
ment was based on sections of the
Canadian Charter of Human
Rights dealing with both freedom
of religion and the principle of
multiculturalism (an expression
used in connection with the many
ethnic and religious groups which
make up Canada's population!
In June, the Quebec government
passed a bill amending its exist
ing commercial hours law. While
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more types of small store* to
now allowed to open seven dan. i
week, the new legislation ik I
includes much higher finesT
those who do business illegally
Where fines used to be littfc
more than nominal, first offer*.
now carry fines of $200 to 5,ooo
Subsequent infractions within I
two years of the first offense wffl
be punishable by fines oft4Q0ta
$10,000. w
In the past, a gentleman
agreement'' existed between CJC
and the Quebec government
under which charges again*
Sabbath-observing Jewish
businessmen found with their
stores open on Sunday were
waived. However, complaints
still came to the CJC from store
owners charged and it wasoftens
rigamorale to reach the Attorney
General to have them quashed
"It's been a long hard battle.
said a CJC official
New Quota Low
NEW YORK IJT.M-Onh
29 Jews were granted exit visas
from the Soviet Union in Octo-
ber, the lowest monthly Jewish
emigration in more than 20years
the National Conference or.
Soviet Jewry reported The figure
brings the total number of Sot id
Jews permitted to emigrate
during the first 10 month) of
1984 to 760.
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Friday, November 30,1984 / fog Jewish FJoridiap Pg, 13-A
, change in leadership of the Council of Jewish Federations
took place at the CJF General Assembly in Toronto as
Shoshana Cardin of Baltimore became the first woman
president of the Council in its 52-year history. She took over the
leadership reins from Martin E. Citrin of Detroit who completed
his three-year term.
Leo Mindlin
Susan Shapiro's 'Me' Spree
Splatters Jews Everywhere
Continued from Page 4-A
can, with impunity, spurn the
Pledge, the flag and "O, say can
you see" as a statement of her
dissent
THEN, if Shapiro's principles
are correct, even though the data
on which she has developed her
principles are inaccurate, why do
1 wish she hadn't decided to set
Randolph. Mass. on its ear, and
the rest of the country, too?
The reason is that Shapiro's
sitting it out is an insult to the
national consciousness and an
unnecessary insult at that. It
says that no one else in the land
is interested in human rights but
Susan Shapiro. It leaves the
unhappy impression that Susan
Shapiro knew from the start that
her dissent would be taken as
insulting
\- member of what
sociologists today call the "me
generation.'' a symbol if ever I
sa oni Shapiro and her cause
'-ngaged in a kind of
Ideologn al partying, both a term
and a practice unique to her age
hich she gains instant
gratification by
ru,'ht cross to (Jncle
irr rhin
r"K ME, the principle is
somehow lost in personal op-
portunism. Uncle Sam stands
unharmed, while Shapiro's
knockout blow has done little
more than to send her off to the
isolation of the Randolph leper
colony.
Because she is Jewish, the
result of Shapiro's "me" spree
splatters us all in a kind of anti-
Semitic counter-offensive from
which few emerge unsplattered
ourselves. The ugly behavior of
Randolph, Mass. may be un-
pardonable, but it is just as
unpardonable in Susan Shapiro,
who has made of more respon-
sible Jews yet another symbol of
contempt they hardly need. If she
truly believes that the people are
America, then it is Americans she
offends in her peculiar dissent.
For whose rights is she in the end
struggling?
It is not from Shapiro's fight
that I flinch I flinch from the
purposeless violation of the
principle of conservation of
minority energy: when your
ammunition is limited, you only
fight the worthwhile battles. But
Shapiro's battle is not only not
worth the slenderness of her
cause. The fact is that her cause
is all wrong.
Boston U. Prof Lectures
At Cracow University
BOSTON (JTA) Prof.
Hillel I cvine. a Jewish historian
j>n the faculty of Boston
university, has been invited to
'ture on Jewish history at the
Jagiellonian University in
Iracow during the current
"cademic year. Boston Univer-
"ty announced.
Levine, who has accepted the
invitation, will deliver a series of
lecture* entitled "The Sociology
! Hope: Studies in Jewish
History" in which he will assess
e intellectual and social history
?' Polish Jewry against the
background of Polish history.
He is also scheduled to speak
Tl the Pontifical Institute in
k Lacow on "The History of Jew-
S1V Rituals" and, during the
'Pring semester, will lecture at
I1* Utholic University in Lublin
id act as a consultant to the
v,9h Museum in Cracow.
Uvine, a Harvard-educated
,0lgi8t and historian, noted
that for the first time since World
War II. Polish universities have
begun to acknowledge the
subject of Jewish history. During
his stay in Poland he will suggest
ways in which Judaic studies can
be integrated into different
curricula in that country.
"There is a small but growing
number of Poles, particularly
those of the post-war generation,
interested in the history of Polish
Jews who once constituted 10
percent of the Polish
population," Levine said. "I am
honored to offer these courses
and to be able to restore to Polish
historiography some knowledge
of the Jewish past."
Levine has been a member of
the faculties of Harvard, Yale
and the Hebrew University in Je-
rusalem. He has served as
Deputy Director of the United
States Holocaust Memorial
Council in Washington and
organized the Center for Judaic
Studies at Boston Univeristy.
U.S. Jewish Agenda
Must Change Way of Doing Business
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
TORONTO (JTA) -
Martin Citrin, the outgoing
president of the Council of
Jewish Federations, said
here at the close of the 53rd
CJF General Assembly
that the Federations must
reassess "'our historical
ways of doing business" in
order to meet the chal-
lenges and dangers facing
North American Jewry and
Israel.
Citrin was to have delivered his
address at the opening plenary,
but he adjourned the session
before it began, following a pro-
longed boisterous demonstration
by 40 young people on behalf of
Ethiopian Jewry.
SHOSHANA CARDIN of
Baltimore, who was born in Tel
Aviv, was unanimously elected
president of the CJF. She became
the first woman president in the
52-year history of the CJF.
Addressing more than 2,000
community leaders from the
United States and Canada,
visitors from abroad and guests.
Citrin said that "we are moving
into the time when more and
more we have to be related and
respond to the issues in our lives
on behalf of being one national, or
if you will, one continental North
American Jewish community.
He noted that there must be
more emphasis on "the collective
interests of the North American
Jewish community." This, Citrin
said, "will mean a new look at
things like pooling our resources,
creating new linkages, gearing up
to react to crisis, streamlining
and reallocating our human and
financial resources on the basis of
national and international prior-
ities to a greater extent than ever
before."
CITRIN, who was presenting
his "thoughts and perspectives
on the major goals of our North
American Jewish community"
after three years in office, made it
clear that the old way of doing
business zealously guarding
"local autonomy in setting
priorities and objectives" is no
longer adequate to meet current
and developing problems and op-
portunities.
Citrin listed four major dev-
elopments which underline and
determine "our total Jewish
communities' changing needs
and priorities:
"Today, 80 nations are
ranged against us and make
no mistake they are against us
as Jews and not just those of us
who live in Israel.
"Today, one of the two world
superpowers stands opposed to
everything our people stand for.
' "Today, the position of in-
fluence and affluence that our
people have achieved in these and
other free nations is fuel, on the
one hand, for those who seek to
curb or threaten our hopes, and
on the other hand, the sun of our
success here has melted the
mortar of adversity that bound
us together in the past and made
us strong and unified us.
"But today also that same
influence and affluence incrases
our capacity to deal with our
adversaries and exploit our
opportunities."
AS A RESULT, Citrin stated,
"We cannot deal with the
enemies of our people and the
enemies of our nation of Israel, or
with the in-gathering of our
Jewish exiles, or the uplifting of
our disadvantaged, or the
spiritual and cultural enrichment
of our people each Federation
unto itself." The former local
Federation autonomy in setting
priorities and objectives has
become obsolete, he said.
"No responsible Federation
leader would say that his or her
own Federation could begin to
deal adequately with building
meaningful relationships with
Israel and effective community
relations totally within the
borders of that community and
without support, assistance and
involvement with other federa-
tions throughout North America
and other Jews throughout our
countries and continents and
indeed the world," Citrin
declared.
He emphasized that he was not
calling for an end to "our plura-
listic society, or the merger of all
Jewish institutions and organiza-
tions, but rather a recognition
and understanding of this subtle,
yet critical change in the dynamic
of how we must work together in
the future as opposed to how we
have worked together in the
past."
CITRIN underscored that the
time has come "when each re-
sponsible member of our North
American Jewish community
must realize our essential inter-
dependence and must come to
grips with what this means to us
in our local Federations and in
our national organizations."
He listed "four great goals of
our North American Jewish
community, four pillars of pur-
pose that are the foundation of
our work together." These are:
" "To build and strengthen
the religious and cultural values
of our tradition (to) insure our
continuity in the generations
ahead.
' "To make our Jewish
community an ever more positive
force for peace and prosperity for
our country, and justice, oppor-
tunity and fulfillment for all who
live there.
' "To strive for freedom from
oppression, bondage, ignorance
and want for Jews everywhere
an end to Jewish prisoners,
whether economic prisoners or
political prisoners, whether in
Odessa or Addis Ababa, whether
in Teheran. Hatikva or The
Bronx.
' "Our goal, or more accurate-
ly stated, our prayer, our resolve
is to see a safe, secure, flourishing
State of Israel."
CITRIN declared. "There are
obviously shadings of difference
among us on the interpretation of
these goals, but we all face
generally in the same direction of
these major concerns and we all
march if not to the same tune,
at least to the same theme in our
journey to hopecT-for realization
of these aspirations."
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* huuj tV*0Uli/01 UU, 130i
Redgrave's 1980 Story
Belies Boston Testimony
Continued from Page 1-A
THE MANAGEMENT of the
Boeton Symphony Orchestra
suffered not only financial loss
but, in the minds of many, a
diminution of its reputation for
sound judgment. It came as a
surprise to learn through the
testimony of the BSO's counsel,
Robert E. Sullivan, that when the
management engaged Miss
Redgrave for six performances, it
had been unaware of her political
views and the bomb threats and
picket lines she had often en-
countered. Doesn't somebody in
that front office read the papers
or watch television?
Yet the insensitivity thus dis-
played falls short of the intel-
lectual gaps that characterized
the furor of 1980 when Miss Red-
grave was chosen to essay the
role of Fania Fenelon, an Ausch-
witz survivor, in the TV feature.
"Playing For Time.''
During those stormy days,
Arthur Miller, one of Jewry's
most distinguished playwrights
and the author of the TV script,
actually defended Miss Red-
grave's love affair with the
Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation by stating the actress
"absolutely does not know the
meaning of anti-Semitism.'' She
backs the PLO and opposes Isra-
el. Mr. Miller said, because this is
her way of spelling out her hatred
of capitalism.
THIS BRINGS us to money
matters as connected with the
"Oedipus Rex" affair. Miss Red-
grave, despite her contempt for
capitalism. described her
financial troubles by asserting
through her lawyer. Daniel
Kornstein, that she had been
unable to obtain an acting part
for 14 months. At that point.
BSO attorney Sullivan advanced
the information that in the 2'
years preceding the scrapping of
her "Oedipus" contract, she had
earned $500,000 as compared
with the II,600.000 she had
pocketed in the 2'/2 years since
the cancellation.
The record shows that Saudi
Arabia alone each year provides
Yasir Arafat, PLO terrorist
leader so much admired by Miss
Redgrave, with $85,500,000.
Surely some of this moolah could
have helped the actress produce
her three documentaries for the
PLO.
There are other reasons for
puzzlement. "I have never said
there is no room for Israel or that
it should be wiped off the face of
the map," Miss Redgrave stated
on the stand in the Boston court.
Yet in a Nov. 2. 1980, Beirut
interview with the magazine.
"Monday Morning," Miss Red-
grave was quoted thus:
"I DON'T think there is any
room for a state of Israel ... I
believe the state of Israel must be
overthrown The state of Is-
rael was established in the in-
terest of imperialism, aggression,
death the very methods used
by the fascist German regime
against the Jews."
Airing some of her views on
CBS. Miss Redgrave opined.
"We know something about the
human race that we didn't know
before: and it's not good news."
For once, she was correct. A part
of the bad news is that she urges
the PLO to continue slaughtering
Israelis, she holds the Camp
David accords in contempt, and
she may recall that she appealed
for the overthrow of Anwar
Sadat, a martyr for the cause of
peace.
Israel, Lebanon Talks Bog Down;
Lackluster Session Key to Deadlock
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
and Lebanese military teams
continued their talks at Nakura
under United Nations auspices.
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But the search for an agreement
was sidetracked by Lebanese
charges that the Israelis were
undermining the negotiations for
the withdrawal of the Israel
Defense Force from south Leb-
anon and security for Israel's
northern borders.
In the latest development, the
head of the Lebanese delegation.
Gen. Mohammed Al-Haj. ac-
cused Israel of reneging on agree-
ments reached at previous ses-
sions. The Israelis rejected the
charge, and the talks recessed to
allow them to formulate an of-
ficial reply.
According to Al-Haj. Israel
has backed off from its earlier
agreement to allow the Lebanese
regular army to deploy in several
areas to be evacuated by the IDF
on grounds that those areas are
too close to the border. Al-Haj
also demanded a detailed map of
all Israeli deployments in south
Lebanon, an exact date for the
start of the IDF withdrawal and
a timetable for the pull-out of
Israeli troops.
The Israeli delegation present-
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the northern sector between the
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proposed that the region be
staffed by the United Nations
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Lebanese regulars were also de-
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Israel has been insisting all
along, however, that the zone
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the South Lebanon Army (SLA)
commanded by Gen. Antoine
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supported by Israel. The
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Friday, November 30, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Venice Declaration Still Rattles Rusty Chains of Peace Effort
Continued from Page 5-A
took place through the efforts of
Dr Ronny Naftaniel, director of
,l urael Information Center in
TV Hague. Within the past
month, a bill has been approved
in the Dutch Parliament for
mandatory registration of foreign
boycotts. The main points of the
new Act are:
All companies are obliged to
inform the Minister of Commerce
about the boycott applications
thev have received. If the
companies do not register, they
can be punished by six months'
imprisonment or a fine.
Companies do not have to
register whether they have given
in to a demand but the Ministry
is entitled to inquire.
The registration is not
limited to the Arab boycott but
to all who threaten the Dutch
economy
IT IS THIS type of thinking
that needs to !* demonstrated by
the EEC Foreign Ministers in
considering trade discrimination.
The law also obliges branches
from Dutch companies in foreign
countries to register.
A committee, working closely
with the Ministry, will be estab-
lished to which companies and
citizens can complain against the
practices of boycott regulations.
The case for extending the
Dutch Act of Parliament to other
parliaments throughout the EEC
cannot be overstated. Efforts are
being made by Israel's Foreign
Office with the help of coordinat-
ing in each European country.
like the ABC committee in
Britain, to work out more defi-
nitive strategies in dealing with
the EEC For too long the EEC
and their corresponding govern-
ments have referred enquiries to
the other party rather than take a
direct initiative. One German
KM I' told me. "It's all part of the
ted Brussels buck-
passing drill."
v ither question which has
troubled Israel's relations with
the EEC is the community's
growing membership. The ten
- will soon be 12. The dif-
ficulties are shown by the most
recent admission. Greece, a
country with an ambiguous for-
eign | except in its rela-
tions with Turkey and Israel. The
is understandable, the
: is purely opportunistic.
GREECE'S chairmanship of
C council of ministers did
little create a climate of con-
fident among Israelis. Indeed
Greeci a Middle East policies
have caused some confusion
among its EEC partners.
Lasi year, the Israeli Govern-
ment mindful of these develop-
ment- sent David Kimche,
director general of the Foreign
Ministry, to build some bridges
and to alert Greece to the dangers
of using the presidential chair too
often in favor of the Arabs in the
Middle Fast debate.
Around that time, a Greek del-
egation went to Israel to sign the
renewal of a cultural agreement.
as well as another for the ex-
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"MSCKCHTW
change of information between
state news agencies. The visit
was, as usual, kept secret by the
Greeks for fear of Arab reactions.
Nevertheless, all this was a far
cry from the Greek Government's
attitude towards Israel barely
one year earlier when Andreas
Papandreou, the Prime Minister,
embraced Yasir Arafat and the
local PLO office was raised to
equal status with Israel's diplo-
matic representation.
THE SIX MONTHS' pres-
idency did little to advance Mid-
dle East policies and Israel for
her part received no support from
the EEC President.
The EEC. like the rest of the
world, has largely ignored the
other ingredient in Middle East
instability, namely the Iraq-Iran
war. A number of EMPs have
raised questions on the conflict,
but no initiatives have been
taken by the Commission and the
parliamentary debates have been
sparse and ill-informed. This
contrasts with the amount of
time devoted to the introduction
and follow-up to the Venice
Declaration.
Yet the Iraq-1 ran conflict
constitutes a major long term
crisis. The two countries have
been engaged for over four years
in the longest and most destruc-
tive war in the Middle East. The
combination of Iraqi expansion-
ism and Iranian Islamic funda-
mentalism threatens to unleash
dangerous forces which could
engulf the whole region. More
than 250,000 have been killed so
far.
The virtual silence at all levels
in the EEC on the Iraq-1 ran war
also reveals the uneasiness felt by
politicians and civil servants
alike in making any criticism of
the Moslem peoples. Yet the
fundamentalist Moslems do
present a very serious threat not
only in this part of the world but
elsewhere.
THE ISSUES confronting
Israel and the Jewish communi-
ties in Europe over the next
decade are clear.
Firstly, it is important that
they learn from previous ex-
perience and plan for the likely-
policy shifts within the EEC as
Spain and Portugal increase the
membership from 10 to 12. State-
ments by these governments on
Middle E.ast affairs have not been
particularly sympathetic to
Israel. What we have learned,
therefore, from the way the EEC
policy-making works, is that it
reflects the prejudices of all
member governments.
Following closely on the ad-
mission of Greece to the EEC. the
even-handed approach towards
Israel has shifted to a position of
ambiguity at best, and con-
demnation as a routine. It is not
an inevitable scenario, at least if
the Jewish communities them-
selves take a closer interest in the
politics of the EEC and their own
national government decisions
and the World Jewish Congress
the most likely group to
produce a relevant strategy on
the lines mentioned here main-
tains its responsibility for
European coordination.
Secondly, the Euro-Arab dial-
ogue, dormant for the past few
years, now looks as if it will be
revived. That is not a matter
which need be challenged by
Israel, but a comparable upgrad-
ing of the Euro-Israel dialogue
should be sought. A personal ini-
tiative by the Israeli Prime Min-
ister would be welcome, rather
than reliance on the approaches
hitherto made by Israeli Knesset
members or through various
ambassadorial exchanges.
THIRDLY, campaigns on
specific issues are still the most
effective way of explaining to
EMPs the concerns felt by Jews
in Europe, especially about
Soviet or Arab government acti-
vities directed against Israel.
Many EMPs have been im-
pressed by the tone and the
educative nature of campaigns
dealing either with the question
of human rights in the Soviet
Union, the Arab boycott,
women's rights in the Middle
East or international terrorism.
For instance, the proposals for
dealing with terrorism put
forward by EMP George Donnez
of the Parliament's legal affairs
committee over the past year are
worth supporting and cam-
paigning for in Britain. His plan
is to create a European criminal
court to deal with terrorists. He
also wants the Commission to
propose directives for the sup-
pression of terrorism in member
states and to establish common
principles for extradition between
them.
Donnez suggested that the
court could have a similar
composition to the European
Court of Justice. The new court's
powers could extend to all terror-
ist crimes in which extradition
might be necessary, or only to
those cases where a member state
was unwilling or unable to ex-
tradite a person accused of
terrorism. We are likely to hear
more of this proposal in the next
few years. But only if there is an
informed and alert public opinion
observing the intention and the
performance of the European
Parliament in action That should
be ours, the public's goal, for the
next decade.
1
slS
IF YOU
ARE 62
OR OVER
PLAN TO
ATTEND
THE
COURT AT
PALM-AIRE
PREVIEW
THURSDAY
DECEMBER 13th j
10:00 am OR
2:00 pm
If you have reached the age of 62. and have worked hard all
of your life to maintain a certain lifestyle and a feeling of inde-
pendenceIf you want the years ahead to continue to bring
you peace of mind in an atmosphere of beauty, dignity and
securityIf you are looking for a way of life that assures you
that you can continue to have all of these thingsand the
companionship of others f/ho share your dreams & goals
. Then you owe it to yourself to set aside Thursday.
December 13, 1984, at either 10:00 am or 2:00 pm.
Please join us tor coffee and cake at the Preview of the
Court at Palm-Aire at Palm-Aire Spa Hotel. 2501 Palm-Aire
Drive North, Pompano Beach.
Seating is limited so please reserve early by filling out the
attached coupon or calling (305) 975-8900.
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f 1984 Lite Care Communities Corporation


"J "v>oiuuw uu. uns
o*je io-/\ Ine Jewish r- loridian Friday. November 30. 1984


Endowment for Kovens Center Marked
By GERALD SCHWARTZ
More than $1,876,000 has been
contributed by Greater Miami
)'. to an endowment fund
established for the new Kovens
renter for Health Systems
Management at Tel Aviv Univer-
rftv named in honor of Mr. and
Mrs Cal Kovens. Miami Beach
business and civic leaders.
Announcement of the strong
start towards a goal of $3 million
was made by Kovens Saturday
nieht at a dinner in honor of him
and his wife held in the Grand
Ballroom of the Fontainebleau
Hilton Hotel which attracted
hundreds of South Florida's fore-
most philanthropists.
Principal speaker at the black-
tie event was Dr. Moshe Many,
president of Tel Aviv University,
who lauded the Kovens for their
contributions to the Israeli insti-
tution and other Jewish educa-
tional and health facilities.
Kovens. president of Mount
Sinai Medical Center and vice
president of Temple Emanu-El,
said, "I am proud of my com-
munity for its response not only
to the Kovens Center, but also to
the success of such endeavors as
the just-completed United Way
of Dade County campaign. I
thank the Mount Sinai Board of
Trustees for their support of
myself and Arthur Pearlman in
our endeavors."
Dr. George S. Wise of Miami
Beach, life chancellor of Tel Aviv
University and its first president,
served as chairman of the dinner
and introduced Dr. Many and
Kovens.
Alan King, entertainer who has
been a supporter of Israeli pro-
jects for most of his life, joined in
the tribute to the Kovens.
Dr. Many said of Dr. Wise,
"To paraphrase Churchill, never
have so many owed so much to
one man. as we of Tel Aviv Uni-
versity do to Dr. Wise. And since
he is responsible for bringing the
university and Cal Kovens toge-
ther, our debt continues."
Kovens said the new Center,
which is the only one of its kind
in the world other than one
established by the University of
Pennsylvania, will begin offering
courses leading to a Master's
degree in February. 1985. Facul-
ties of the School of Business and
School of Medicine will provide
staff for the Center. Penn-
sylvania and Tel Aviv univer-
sities will exchange students and
teachers, he said.
Dr. Many invested Kovens
with the President's Medal of Tel
Aviv University, which granted
him an honorary doctor of philo-
sophy degree last summer in
Israel. Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi
of Temple Emanu-El, offered the
invocation and added praise to
the Kovens family.
Tin Greater Miami Jewish Federation
.....f/v held its annual Pacesetter Dinner on
behalf of the 1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund-Project Renewal-Or
Aki\ a Campaign. The event was held at the
Fontainebleau-HUton on Miami Beach before
a record number of participants. Pictured
Heft to right) are Michael M. Adler.
Pacesetter chairman; Samuel I. Adler,
(1MJF president; Maxine E. Schwartz.
Pacesetter Dinner chairman; Norman
Braman, 1985 general campaign chairman;
and Steven J. Kravitz, Pacesetter co-
chairman.
United Synagogue Honors Kreutzer
Franklin I). Kreutzer. Miami
attorne) will be honored by the
Southeast Region, United Syna-
gogue ni America, at its biennial
convention l>eing held Nov. 30
Dec 3 in Savannah. Ga.
Kn utzer has served four years
as president of the Region and is
currently a national vice pres-
ident and chairman of the Council
of Regional Presidents.
I he Southeast Region consists
of 75 ( onservative congregations
m Florida, Georgia. Alabama.
Mississippi, Ixiuisiana. Ten-
North and South
Carolina, and Puerto Rico.
1 he i hi me of the convention is
\ I onservative Agenda for
Survival in the 21st Century,"
Franklin I). Kreutzer
Streisand Center Announces
Third Contest for Students
LOS ANGELES (JTAI -
I he Streisand Center for Jewish
Cultural Arts at the Hillel of the
University of California at Los
Angeles has announced it is
accepting applications for the
third annual Streisand Film
Award for student film-makers.
The awards will honor both the
"jest proposal for a film on a
Jewish theme and the best
i-ompleted film on a Jewish
theme. Two first prizes of $1,000
to and two 9econd prizes of
saw each will be presented to the
!Vnne;s by a leading member of
tr* Hollywood film community
n*xt Mar. 3. Proposals and films
m"st be received by Feb. 8 and
l(>ntestants must be students
'urrently enrolled in a university
Prgram.
The Streisand Center operates
'""er auspices of the Hillel
Jewish Student center at UCLA.
It was established in 1981 with
an endowment from Barbara
Streisand to provide the best in
Jewish artistic expression to the
campus and the community.
In addition to bringing a va-
riety of Jewish artists, writers
and performers to Los Angeles,
the Streisand Center established
the fellowship program to en-
courage the work of young
Jewish artists in film. Informa-
tion is available from the
Streisand Center at UCLA Hillel.
900 Hilgard Avenue. Los Angeles
90024.
and will feature speakers and
workshops discussing issues
ranging from the implementation
of ritual and holiday updates to
computers to the participation of
women in synagogue life.
More than 200 delegates from
throughout the Region will parti-
cipate in the weekend of prayer,
study and synagogue affairs.
Speaking to the plenary sessions
will be Marshall Wolke. Chicago,
national president of United
Synagogue, and Rabbi Benjamin
Z" Kreitman. national executive
vice president. The scholar-in-
residence will be Dr. Morton
Siegel, director, department of
education of United Synagogue
Kreutzer will serve as chair of
the biennial convention of United
Synagogue to be held next
November at the Concord Hotel
in New York. In addition he
serves on the national personnel
committee and is vice chair of the
1984-1985 Development Cam-
paign.
Saturday evening he will be
honored for the innovations he
has brought to the Region during
his presidency. Synagogue board
orientation sessions, increased
awareness of leadership develop-
ment, and greater youth involve-
ment have been hallmarks of
Kreutzer's administration.
Harold Wishna serves as
executive director of the
Southeast Region and Bruce
Klasner is youth director at the
Region's offices in Plantation.
eJewislb Floridia
Members of the 1985 Federation Allied Jewish Appeal College
Campaign discuss their roles as student leaders on their
campuses. Participants are (standing, from left) Mark Salzberg
of Miami, Swarthmore College; Cindy Steinschriber, deputy
leadership development coordinator of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee; Sharon Singer, Temple Unviersity;
and (seated, from left) Sheryl Gold, Rosemont-Villanova; and
Diane Lerner, University of Pennsylvania. Photo: Scott
Weiner.
Quilt Lecture, Exhibit
"Dazzling geometries." a quilt
exhibition by fiber artist Carol
Wien, author of The Great Amer-
ican Log Cabin Quilt Book, will
open with a reception at 7 p.m.
Wednesday, followed by the
author's lecture and slide pres-
entation at 7:30 p.m. on "The
History of Patchwork Quilts in
America." at the Coral Reef
Branch Library. The exhibition
Continues through Jan 9.
Spain-Israel Link
Gets Closer
Miami, Florida Friday, November 30.1984 Section B
NEW YORK Israel
and Spain are moving
closer to establishing
diplomatic relations as
unofficial links and con-
tacts intensify, according
to an American Jewish
leader who visited Spain
earlier this month.
Abraham H. Foxman.
associate national director of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and head of the League's
International Affairs Division,
said. "The exchange of ambas-
sadors is only a matter of time
and we are confident that no un-
expected hitches will develop."
Foxman, who met with leaders
of the Spanish Jewish com-
munity, the Spain-Israel
Friendship League and an Israeli
representative during his week-
long visit, said the two nations
"have reached the point in the
past year where unofficially
they have virtually full-fledged
relations on the economic, cul-
tural, scientific and political
fronts."
ALTHOUGH the Spanish
government has thus far not
named a date, the nation's news-
papers forecast the imminent
establishment of diplomatic ties.
Public opinion. Foxman noted, is
solidly behind such a move
including political leaders, trade
union representatives. Spanish
intellectuals and the academic
community.
What Socialist Prime Minister
Felipe Gonzales referred to as a
"rapprochement" between Spain
and Israel following the end of
the Franco regime was most
clearly evident in a meeting last
year rxiween King Juan Carlos
and Israeli diplomat Shmuel
Hadas. according to Foxman.
Hadas is the Israeli represent-
ative to the World Tourist
Organization, which is head-
quartered in Madrid. Hadas, a
veteran Israeli diplomat who has
served his country in Mexico,
Colombia and Bolivia, was
Israel's representative to the
Madrid Conference on Security
and Cooperation.
SPAIN AND Israel tun
inaugurated nir links with
and El '
two countries. El Al and the
Israeli government tourist
organization have opened offices
in Madrid, and Foxman said he
was "gratified" by the fact that
some 60.000 Israelis visited
Spain in 1983. almost double the
total in 1982. Last year. 1.200
Spaniards toured Israel.
On the government level.
Spain's Minister of the Interior.
Minister of Transport and the
Minister of Public Health have
visited Israel in recent years.
Israel has also invited Spanish
national and local government
officials, as well as journalists,
clergymen, trade union leaders,
academics and technical special-
ists to visit Israel.
The two countries. Foxman
said, have signed agreements for
scientific cooperation and the ex-
change of teachers. Israel has
also participated in trade fairs,
including agriculture and elec-
tronics.
THE ADL official said that in
recent months the Israeli
Chamber of Commerce has set up
offices in Madrid and Barcelona,
and Spain has established a
Chamber of Commerce office in
Tel Aviv.
Trade relations are increasing.
In 1983. two-way trade amounted
to some $80 million and is ex-
pected to show a hefty increase
for 1984. Foxman said.
Enrique Mugica. a member of
the Spanish parliament and the
Socialist Party Executive Com-
mittee, has predicted that
"during this Parliamentary ses-
sion relations with Israel will be
made official." Some sources say
he may be appointed Spain's first
ambassador to Israel.
"IT'S NATURAL that Spain
and Israel should finally estab-
lish diplomatic relations.-'
Foxman noted. "For a thousand
years, Spain's history has been
intertwined with that of the
Jewish people. After all. Spain
was the birthplace of Sephardic
Jewish culture."
A Spanish newspaper. Duaro
Diario 16, recently said that
Spaniards "must not forget I
in 1992. 500 year* will h
Jew


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 30,1984
News in Brief
Paraguay Launches Mengele Hunt
By JTA Services
NEW YORK Paraguay has
begun what was described here as
a thorough nationwide inves-
tigation to locate Josef Mengele,
the infamous war criminal and
chief doctor at the Auschwitz
concentration camp responsible
for the murder of tens of
thousands of Jews during World
War II.
The investigation will be
conducted by police authorities in
Paraguay under the Ministry of
Interior, according to Elizabeth
Holtzman. Brooklyn District
Attorney, who just returned from
a three-day visit to Paraguay as a
member of a delegation of four
persons who travelled there
under the sponsorship of the
International Network of
Children of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors.
Furthermore, Holtzman told
reporters Paraguayan officials
have also agreed to allow foreign
observers to monitor the inves-
tigation and will allow for written
questions to be submitted to the
government about the
whereabouts of Mengele. who is
believed to be living in Paraguay.
Trifa Appeals Portugal's
Decision to Oust Him
PARIS Archbishop
Valerian Trifa has appealed to an
administrative court in Lisbon
the decision by the Portuguese
government not to grant him res-
ident's status and to have him
expelled. Trifa's attorney
charged that the government's
decision was taken "solely on the
basis of newspaper reports."
Trifa. the 70-year-old former
head of the Rumanian Orthodox
Church in America, went to
Portugal on a deportation order
from the L'nited States. That
concluded a nine-year legal effort
in the IS to deport Trifa for
lying t" conceal his part in the
persecution of Jews and
collaboration with the Na
during World V\ ar II.
Trifa was a leading figure in
the fascist Rumanian Iron Guard
and acted as editor of an anti-
Semitic newspaper that ad-
vocated persecution of Jews in
Rumania from 1936 to 1941. Trifa
is also accused of leading a
pogrom against the Jews in
Rumania that resulted in the
deaths of dozens of Jews.
Renewed U.S. Ties to Iraq
Not Harmful to Israel
WASHINGTON The
Reagan administration, in an-
nouncing Monday that the U.S.
and Iraq are resuming diplomatic
relations, stressed that the move
will not be harmful to Israel
"It has no effect on our
relations with Israel which
continue to be stronger than
ever," a senior administration
official said in briefing reporters
on the move which took effect
immediately.
The resumption of relations,
which were broken by Iraq
following the 1967 Six-Day War,
was announced after Iraqi
Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz met
with President Reagan at the
[fit] SUPERVISION
Valerian Trifa
While House He had met earlier
with Secretary of State George
Shult/ at the state Department
and with Vice Presiden* George
Bush at the White House.
Kahan Inquiry Report
Opened tor Inspection
JERUSALEM Attorney
General Yitzhak Zamir is willing
to let third parties inspect a
secret addendum to the 1983
Kahan Commission report and
answer questions as to their
pertinency in the libel action
former Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon has brought against Time
magazine. The trial opened in
New York earlier this month.
Zamir. who previously rejected
a request by Time to examine the
documents. was reported
Monday to have proposed that
the panel of three prominent Is
raelis agreeable to both sides in
the case be given access to the
addendum and be questioned by
Time's law j era
proposal, to the Federal
District Court in Manhattan, is
in line with a Cabinet ruling that
a personality acceptable to the
rnmenl and to Time maj
answer specific questions n
to the documents.
Sharon contends in his
million libel suit that a Time
article last year defamed him by
intimating that he encouraged
the Christian Phalangist militia
in Lebanon to massacre Pales-
tinian civilians in two West
Beirut refugee camps in Sep-
tember, 1982 to avenge the
assassination of Lebanon's Presi-
dent-elect. Bashir Gemayel. the
Phalangist Party leader.
Former SS Officer May
Get Light Sentence
BONN A former SS officer
accused of complicity in the
deaths of at least 15.000 Jews in
the Polish city of Lodz during
World War II, may get off with a
relatively light sentence after a
trial that lasted five-and-a-half
years, one of the longest in post-
war Germany.
The State Prosecutor in Bocum
demanded an eight-and-a-half
year prison sentence for Helmut-
George Krizons, 68, who was
commander of the guards posted
in the Lodz ghetto in 1942.
GLATT KOSHER
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According to the prosecution.
Krizons ordered at least 15.00
Jews deported ;o the Kuklmhof
concentration camp in full
knowledge that they would be
killed in the gas chambers. He
personally selected the victims
for deportation and organized the
transports, the prosecution said.
A verdict is expected shortly
But the prosecution was forced
to drop its original charge that
Krizons himself murdered '-'4
Jews because of conflicting
testimony by survivors During
the trial, the jury made mon
than 40 trip-- to Israel, Poland.
Argentina and Australia to
interview witnesses who could
not or would not come to Ger-
many to test if}
Arafat to Visit Britain
By End of the Year
LONDON Yasir \ratat.
Palestine Liberation Organ
;/ai ion chief, is to paj hi-- first
visit to Britain before the end ol
the year to attend the launching
of a new biography of him by n
British journalist
On at least three previous
occasions in the past ID years.
Arafat has been expected in
Britain, but on each occasion the
visit was cancelled following
prot.-sts about the terrorist
nature of the FLO There was a
similar reaction several days ago
from the Israel Embassy which,
answering a press inquiry, ex-
pressed "incredulity" over the
PLO leader's forthcoming visit.
An embassy spokesman said it
seemed "most unlikely that at a
time when Britain was trying to
enlist the support of the inter-
national community in its stated
aim ol combatting terrorism, the
chiel oi an organization eng
in widespread terror should be
allowed to set toot in th( I lilted
Kingdom, which ii
ene ol l'l
The \rafal .
coincide with .1 Lond

addressed by the Re\ Jesse
Jackson, one ol the I 'emocratic
Party's would-be candidates in
the recent I S presidential
election
Cabinet Discusses Cuts
In Military Budget
TEL AVIV The Cabinet
met Sunday to discuss the
sensitive issue of budget cuts in
the defense establishment. The
five-hour session was held in the
underground "War Room" at
army General Headquarters here,
a venue deliberately selected by-
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin.
Rabin reportedly made it clear
that any cuts in the defense
budget that may be decided
would require a reduction of
military activities including
research, planning and
production and the day-to-day
activities of the Israel Defense
Force.
Although no details emerged
from Sunday's meeting in the
War Room, one minister, not
identified, was heard to remark
later that "If it comes down to
guns or butter, I would have to
say that guns come before butter.
You can do without butter. It's
more healthy anyway."
JDC Given Okay
For Feeding Stations
NEW YORK A recent
communique received from the
American Jewish Joint Distri-
bution Committee representative
in Ethiopia advised that the
overseas relief agency had
received permission to operate
feeding stations in the Gondar
region, according to an an-
nouncement made by JDC exec-
utive vice president Ralph
Goldman.
Jeb Bush, right, son o{ Vice President George Rush ami
president of the Dude County Republican Party, poses uM
members of the South Dade New Leadership D'ii sion of Ik
of Israel Bonds Organization, which spi ocktajl
party at which Bush was the special guest Wit vt f
right: David Abramowiti, M I: KrongM
National \'eu Leadership Chairman, and SI
5 isrs -or ./;, 1 1 ent
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<*i>, i uni nr jewisn r ronuian
r a^c u-^
Sidney Shapiro: Jews in Old China
By GORDON LIGHT
in melting pot Miami, we have
Cuban Jews. We've heard of
fen Jews. There Is large
jimunitv in Kthiopia that ae-
|nts f,,r'African Jews.
; Chinese Jews?
Cccording t<> a new book
Cm in Old China, a Jewish
imuniiv flourished between
7tn and 12th centuries in
t was ihen China's major
rhe work is a series
i that group's cultural
- and legacy by
storians
.\l)DlN(i authenticity to the
dentity of its corn-
translator. Sidney
B Chinese Jew. almost
linly the world's only living
he was born in
klyn. likes to use Yiddish
- and looks like the
|ni\ jollj Jewish grandfather
is makes his strange story
o stranger.
In Miami this week to promote
book. Shapiro spoke of his
long fascination with China
.inning when he studied the
piage at Columbia and Yale
the 0 1 Bill. Before the war,
d been a lawyer, but he didn't
t to go hack to that career in
erica So there was nothing to
vent him from traveling to
na for $300 on a month-long
ghter trip
m\ ing in Shanghai, he found
self in the middle of a revolu-
Dead peasants lay in the
Hs .very morning to be
ked up by garbage trucks, and
police were making indis-
inate arrests. Yet he found
people in the arts and
atrical communities he mixed
h extraordinarily interesting
friendly Kspecially so was
Itresa and editor. Fengzi (or
mix), whom he later married.
IT WAS that marriage and his
with an American law firm
t induced him to stay, along
h one other important motiva-
D: curiosity
|"The aftermath of the revolu-
n was fascinating." he remem-
I wanted to see where it
going."
|Shapiro went to Peking, where
gradually became involved
h translating. He estimates he
translated 14 novels and
dreds of short stories in his
er Mis most notable work.
t:. now at least, was "Outlaws
the Marsh." a famous 14th
tury novel about 12th century
laws.
IChinese society remained a
looming one for him, even
^ing the potentially divisive
e of the Korean War. With the
lers of his two countries
>ng each other. Chinese
nds reassured him. saying.
e make distinctions between
individual and the country."
MADE his own distinction
1963 when he decided to take
nese citizenship. The choice
relatively easy.
had a happy home, a family
a wife and daughter I loved,
work 1 considered good and
tractive," Shapiro says.
evertheless. the change effec-
l> prevented him from visit-
fanerica until relations
'ed between the two nations.
er President Nixon's visit
9,1 "I was the first Chinese
en to apply for a tourist visa
"sit the United States," he
proudly. Since then, he has
back here six times.
here have been many cultural
Istments for Shapiro to make
is 37 years in China. He dealt
one, his nostalgia for the
pne of his native Brooklyn, by
fing his own bagels.
~ IDEA for that came
his mother visited him in
JJ!nd comPlained that the
fed bread she'd been given
lacked a crust. He took to toast-
ing it for her and found that,
molded into the proper shape, the
result was a remarkably good-
tasting bagel.
His creation received national
attention a few years ago when
the New York Times did a story
on it. along with a picture of
SI tiro, lh-' doling grandfather.
feeding Chini American
Ida agel.
1 hoi h he 1-. I he only prac-
Jew. Shapiro says there
Si. in .. 140 families in the
Kaifeng area who know they are
of Jewish descent ["heir ances-
were merchants and sailors
from the Arabian countries who
came here m the Diaspora.
The scholarship that produced
his book is especially important.
he says, because it is of strictly
Chinese vintage.
"BOOKS IN Knghsh have
always been done before by mis-
sionaries or American Sino-
logists. Hut Chinese historians
understand and have better
access to records. They can read
between the lines."
Shapiro, who is on a six-month
promotion tour of the U.S.. was
brought to Miami by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
and Rabbi Norman Lipson. its
director of adult education.
Sidney Shapiro
Florida Region
American Committee for the Weizmann Institute of Science
Jubilee Dinner Dance
Saturday, December 8,1984
Fountainbleau Hilton Hotel
Morris Broad, Dinner Chairman
Guest Speakers
Robert Merrill
Celebrated Baritone
Prof. Michael Sela
Honoring
Roselyn and Arnold Meyer
American Committee Weizmann Institute of Science
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309 Miami Beach, FL 33139
For Information Call: Bernice Stander, Executive Director (305) 538-3090

r^ -"-


*J t "oouiuoi uu, uns
Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. November 30. 1984
Anti-Semitic Literature
Abounds in Argentina
BUENOS AIRES (JTAI -
Newsstands and bookstores in
the central streets here continue
to be replete with anti-Semitic
literature including Nazi
publications, an internal report to
the Executive of the World
Jewish Congress states.
The report, prepared by the
secretariat of the WJC Latin
American branch, states that the
government of President Raul
Alfonsin "is categorical in
denouncing these symptoms
which it considers part of an
effort toward the destabilization
of the democratic regime .
Nevertheless, the publications
continue, visible to all"
THE JEWISH press and the
news bulletins of the DAI A. the
central representative body of
Argentine Jewry, have begun the
task of cataloguing anti-Semitic
and Nazi publications. The list is
disturbing, the WJC report says.
There are about 10. and they are
very open about their anti-
Semitic views.
As an example, the report
notes that the latest issue of the
magazine, "Information on
Masonry," states on its cover.
"Zionism: Alfonsin its Servant."
and is subtitled "Hitler was
Right."
One of the items in the magaz-
ine states "... and just as
Zionism demanded reparations'
from Germany amounting to
thousands of millions during
more than 30 years a booty
which was split, as good partners
in plunder with (Winston)
Churchill and the English homo-
sexual oligarchy, as well as with
Roosevelt and his gang of Yankee
gangsters now the Argen
tinian Zionists, in agreement
with Israel and the American
Zionists, are preparing the
methodical looting of the Argen-
tinian people, to get reparations
for the 1.500 supposed .lews pre-
sumed disappeared."
Another of the anti-Semitic
publications. "Harbarie (Bar-
barism) Aluarte Nacional"
(National Rulwarki which defines
itself as Peronist, states that it
expects "a true national revolu-
tion" and blames Jews for all
evils
BUT THESE are not the sole
disturbing symptoms within the
prevailing euphoric climate of the
new democratic regime in
Argentina.
During a recent mass honoring
the victims of the struggle
against guerrilla warfare, a
Catholic priest spoke against
"pornographic democracy.-'
young boys marched in black
capes, and the participants
among them military cadets in
uniform sang refrains such as
"It will finish, the Radical' syna-
gogue will finish!" (Alfonsin
heads the Radical Party of
Argentina).
Rabbi Charges Jews
Ignore Homeless
ROCKVILLE CENTRE. NY.
(JTA) A Conservative
rabbi has asserted that he has
found many Jews "un-
sympathetic and unsupportive"
concerning the plight of poor and
homeless Jews, feeling "these
unfortunates should go to the
designated social service
agencies. both Jewish and
secular."
Rabbi Barry Schwartz,
spiritual leader of B'nai Sholom
here, made the charge in a recent
issue of his synagogue bulletin,
declaring that the rapidly
Chanukah Party
West Miami Auxiliary No. 223.
Jewish War Veterans."will hold
an annual Chanukah party and
meeting on Thursday at 8:15
p.m. at the home of Auxiliary
president Thelma Potlock. Tanya
Levine will chair the event, and
Ix>rraine Meyers will present a
musical program.
Dade County Council JWVA
president Evelyn Ferdie will pay
an official visit to hear reports
from Shirley Achtman on fund-
raising and Lee Rubin on com-
munity relations.
Mi. Sinai 35th
Mount Sinai Medical Center
plans several events to mark the
hospital's 35th anniversary
Dec.4.
Beginning at 10 a.m. the
Miami Beach Symphony will
entertain with music from the
40 s and 50 s. while a five-foot
long cake in the shape of the
building is served, and informal
modeling of nurse's uniforms
from 1242-1925 will take place.
A time capsule will be buried,
not to be opened until the year
2000.
Among the guests at the anni-
versary will be an estimated 100
of the approximately 50.000 born
at the hospital. Mayor Steve
Clark's children, two staff physi-
cians, several sets of twins, and
at least one mother-daughter pair
are among those expected to
attend
growing problem" of homeless-
ness has emerged "as a major
societal tragedy."
He added, "There is also a
frightening number of Jews all
over America and especially in
New York City who are poor and
homeless. Many of these
homeless suffer severe illness and
are in desperate need of
assistance." He charged that "to
date, society's response is simply
putting a temporary dressing on
what has become a large festering
wound"
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will
deliver "A Message to the
Synagogue Dropout" at
Temple Xer Tamid to mark
the opening of late services at
8 p.m. Friday evening. Rabbi
Labovitz will be joined by
Cantor Edward Klein and the
temple choir in conducting the
service. The late services will
continue until Passover.
New Slate for
Taxpayers'Assn.
The Miami Beach Taxpayers'
Association has elected officers
for 1984-85. according to re-
elected president Donna Jacobs.
Other officers are vice presi-
dents David Lewin. Stanley
Sutnick, and Dr. Leonard L.
Weil, secretary Jeanne Garrard.
and treasurer Margaret H.
Mactye.
Directors include Joy
Alschuler. Minette Benson. A.J.
Cristol. A.J. Daoud. Lois Dobrin.
Leon Firtel. Phyllis K Fisch.
Barton S. Goldberg, Robert Z
Greene. Nathan S. Gumenick.
Paul Kalv, Sherman Kaplan.
Keith Kovens, Charles B. King.
Jr.. Meyer Kotler, William T.
Kruglak, Robert M Levy,
Hyman Mallv, Linda Polansky,
Emma Reynolds Melvin
Richard. Bettj Schwartz, Gerald
Schwartz. Harold ,1 Segal.
Egmont Sonderling and Walter
B Wilson, Jr
ACROSS FROM 163rd ST.
Directly across from Publix. Jordan Marsh.
Burdines & hundreds more!
Luxurious, spacious aircond. apts.
from $430 a mo.
Air cond. lobbies and hallways
On-premises Temple & Social Club
Security, cable TV & 24-hour on-site mgnt.
WINDSOR TOWERS
1551 N.E. 167th St. N. Miami Beach
Open Mon.-Fri. 9-5 or by appt.
Phone 947-6093
Professional on-site management by MP Realty, Inc.
Concord Plaza
Adult Only Area
Colonial Plaza
Family Area
1 & 2 bedroom, garden apts., A/C, pool, shop-
ping, temples, school, cable TV. Rental.
941 N.E. 169 St.
North Miami Beach
Rental Agent Nancy
947-4192
'Cults' Topic of
Yeshiva Seminar
Jewish-Christian Cults: How
We Can Cope" is the topic of the
Florida Friends of Yeshiva Uni-
versity's second "Issues of Our
Times" seminar, scheduled for
Monday evening, at 8 p.m. at the
Konover Hotel
The speaker is Rabbi Benjamin
Bleoh. assistant professor of Tal-
mud at Yeshiva. Dr. Blech parti-
cipated in the 1982-83 seminar
series
Kabbi Blech. who has given
more than a hundred talks in the
U.S., Israel and Europe and has
authored numerous articles, was
awarded th.- "Outstanding
American Educator Award" in
19::.
This year S seminar series, the
third annual, has been expended
to five lectures in response to the
popularity of the program, which
Dr. Benjamin Hlerh
presents gue-' |
subjects ot current Ji.
terest
naoari
MANTELL PLAZA
APARTMENT HOTEL
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24 hr. security & switchboard, shopping & maid se--
vice. Laundry facilities & pool on premises. Lg. care
room & entertainment.
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(off Collins)
538-1821
AN-NELL HOTEL
KOSHER
7(H) Euclid Avi'.. Miami Beach
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Includes .'{ Meals Daily Maid Service
Entertainment Free Dancing Lessons
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864-3475
^s^^s^^sf^st^st Strictly Orthodox
Congregation Agudath Achim
at STAR LAKES CONDOMINIUMS
19255 North East 3rd Avenue
North Miami Beach, Florida
Invites You To Reside and Worship With Us
APARTMENTS AVAILABLE
FOR PURCHASE OR RENT
Close To Kosher Bakeries and Butchers. Condo
Plus Transportation Available
Write to us at above address or call:
MR. G. HILLELSOHN (305) 652-5947
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For Information
We will be of great assistance in showing yu
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STEIN-SHERWOOD
i-ranrine Alisa Sherwood and Kenneth Mar-
w II Stein were married on Nov. 25 at Beth Israel
by Rabbi Avraham Korf.
Mrs Stein, the daughter of John Joseph
Sherwood of Asheville N.C.. and the late Marilyn
I na I'ram Sherwood, wore an old fashioned
^rv Victorian all-lace dress with a high collar.
[.re'ruffle, long sleeves and a drop waist, with a
fweeu length train. Her matron of honor was
Kadie Shavin Sharp, and bridesmaids were
Susan Nancy, and Diane Sherwood. Sarah and
fVendv Reynolds. Linda Shead. Noreen
Schneider. Alyssa Siegel. and Esther Kaplan.
The groom, son of Adeline Stein of Coral
Gables and the late David Stein, was attended by
best man Steven Jurysta. Ushers were Eugene
and Scott Sherwood. Michael Stein, and Mark
Greene.
The bride obtained her bachelor's degree in
social work from Tel Aviv University and her
masters degree from Yeshiva University
Wurzweiler School of Social Work. She is the
former executive director of the Asheville Jewish
Community Center.
Mr Stein is a graduate of Florida International
University, has his master's degree in public
administration, and will obtain a master's degree
x social work in April. He is a social worker with
hi Dade County Department of Human
H, sources.
\li.r a wedding trip to Negril and MontegO
Ha\ Jamaica, the couple will live in Miami.
Wedding
Friday, November 30, 1984 The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Koslow Honor Law Grad
Arlene S. Koslow. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Silver of
Miami Beach. ha9 graduated from the Woodrow Wilson College
of Law in Atlanta and received the Juris Doctor degree magna
cum laude. Arlene was presented the Dean's Award for out-
standing services to the school as editor-in-chief of the Woodrow
Wilson Journal of Law and the Harrison Company Award for
being salutatorian of the 1984 graduating class.
She was recognized by the Georgia Association for Woman
Lawyers as the 1984 Woodrow Wilson Outstanding Woman
Law Student. In addition, she was presented five book awards
at the graduation ceremonies for attaining the highest grade in
each of five subject areas.
Arlene and her husband Harold live in Atlanta with their two
daughters.
Birth
Dade County Court Judge Harvey Goldstein, wife Barbara
and children. Liana and Glenn, announce a new addition to their
family.
Alisha Esther (5 pounds. 14 ounces) arrived after a two-hour
awake and aware' delivery at South Miami Hospitals Birthing
Room.
Grandparents are Dr. and Mrs. Abe Bolker of Brickell (Point
View).
Mrs. Stein
Holiday Mail
from Temples
il ,11 \--IH
| I I
help
Sei
ttei

- .11
.....

na si
n pro\ idini
the holidaj
Vltei he Association
letter t<> its member
ng their cooperation,
knowledged thi-. el
Association's letter to
ir i ibbis stated, At a
we .ire so involved
lealing with
of church and state,
have an opportunity
n ot church and
ieve tins is a unique
or the religious
IS to cooperate with the
tor the good ol the
declared Rabbi
Bident ol the
: and spiritual leader
Samu-El, and Rabbi
Schifl executive vice
nl ol the Association and
i ol chaplaincy, Greater
Jewish Federation.
Chanukah Lights at ZOA
Chanukah candles will be lit by
Albert Shulman. vice president,
at the Dec. 9 meeting of Brandeis
District, Zionist Organization of
America, at 1:30 p.m. at the
N"rth Shore Civic Center.
Intertainment will be provided
by Kstelle Hoberman on the ac-
cordion. Rose Shapiro is in
charge of arrangements.
I'Moment' Founder
at Temple Sinai
Leonard J. Fein, founder and
I emw>r of Moment magazine, will
"w-uss "Bringing Up the Jewish
uiiid: A Reconsideration" at
' vTKl^mi ^""S the weekend
tWov. 30-Dec. 3.
Itli^'i Fein ^^ed a project for
WL 0n of American Hebrew
congregations called "Reform is
lanri a 8tudy of the attitudes
Uh pra?icea of Reform Jews,
d a frequent lecturer at syn-
IKT" and Fed FREE TICKETS!
$500 $1,000 $2,500


F5
Dolphins vs. CowDoys
Monday December 1 0 P M.
Ben Sherman

Susan Scalice
Ralph hendiei
i
ires
Jean McConville
Muriel Zimmei
tine
Mari

Juan Urbano
Sylvia Goldman
Shore

. ,
Publn Bakeries open .it 8 00 A M
N /"
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Plain or with Seeds
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oaf ^J ^#
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Available at Publix Stores with
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and Danish Bakeries.
Serve Warm with Butter
Bran Muffins......
pkC9 99
Dolphinmania Tickets are Getting Scarce.
But There's Still Time to Win!
All Winning Tickets Must be Claimed
by December 31st. 1984.
Danish Pecan Ring....... eachs 1"
Baked in It's Own Pan
Coconut Cake..............each $189
Prices Effective
Nov. 29th thru Dec. 5th. 1984
Publix Food GiftCertificates


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian Fridav. November 30. 19S4
Historian Gilbert at Omnibus Series
Sunday Omnibus Lecture1
9 of Temple Beth Sbolom
i Sou Florida Conft i
Soviet Jewry, part of tht
Mian h Federa-
:. 9 Community Relations
nittee. are co-sponsoring a
lecture by Man in Gilbert, author
and historian, on Dec. 2 at 10:30
a m at the terr;
Gilbert, whose topic will be
So> iet Jewry Crisis N *.' is
the official biographer of Winston
Churchill and has also published,
in the field of Jewish history.
Exile and Return." Final
Journev: The Fate of the Jews
under Nazi Rule. and Au-
schwitz and the All
Atlas of the Holocaust, Gil-
bert's most recent work, includes
330 maps which trace the fate of
Jewish communities under the
Nazi regime, describing the
resistance of more than a thou-
sand cities, ghettos, and shtetls
throughout Europe. He co-au-
thored the script of the film
"Genocide." narrated by Orson
Welles and Elizabeth Taylor.
This is the second in a series of
five lectures in the Omnibus
series, according to cultural
director Judv Drucker

I
BBG President to Visit So. Fla.
B'nai B'rith
tional President
will be visiting
BBG and B'nai
Girls Interna-
Betsy Winnick
South Florida
B'rith Women
chapters, special events, and
meetings with vouth leadership
Dec 12 through 22
Winnick. of West Haven.
Connecticut, holds the highest
office of the B'nai B rith Girls.
She has been actively involved
for the past six years with BBG
and has held various leadership
positions on all levels, including
that of founding member of her
chapter
i
v.
*
Betsy Winnick
Martin Gilbert
AventuraJeicish
Center Seminar
A Bible seminar directed by
Rabbi David B. Saltzman will be
held at Aventura Jewish Center
on Thursday. Dec 13, begining
at 9 V) a.m., followed by a course
in beginning Hebrew at 10:30.
Robert Herman of the Greater Miamx Open Asjociotfj
Barbara Gillman, and Mexican-.feu ish irt "'io.Yipl
man are shown at the artist's pre- 'eception J
Gillman s gallery The shou benefited the opera issociatm.
Potter, Israelis at Lowe-Levinson
The Lowe-I-evinson Art Gal- be shown thr andthel
lery of Temple Beth Sholom will
mount two new exhibits begin-
ning Dec 5, according to cultural
director Judy Drucker Miamiam
Ellie Schneiderman' pottery will
paintings, prints and etchingsof|
Hannah ami Abraham Yikat
Jerusalem will be on displitl
through Jar.
Receive
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Friday, November 30, 1984 / The Jewish Flondian
rage i-d
Man in and Rhoda Bernstein and Berne and given the Tower of David Award for their
Mollv Weiaer will be honored at a brunch in work for Israel Bonds by former Israeli
tin Garden Room of Turnberry Isle Country ambassador to the U.S. Simcha Dinitz.
Club on Sundav, Dec. 9. The couples will be
f.
1 anning session for the upcoming annual
membership luncheon of the South
. Council of Pioneer Women-Xa'amat.
'tided for Monday, Dec. 17 at the
r Hotel, brings together, from the
\largot Bergthal, treasurer of the South
I rida Council: Sarah Matlin. president of
Club II; Lillian Hoffman, president of the
liana Chapter; Sally Gersten, president of Hi
Rise Tikvah and Katherine Lippman, presi-
dent of the Golda Meir Club. "The Way We
Were Fashions of the Roaring 20's,"
celebrates the birth of the organization in
1925.
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Miami Jewish Home's
Founders Pass
200 Mark At Gala
It was promoted as an
"Evening in Paradise" for
the Founders of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged, but the
Founders turned it into a
night to remember for the
Home as well. Over a dozen
current and newly an-
nounced Founders pledged
close to a million new dollars
toward the capital expansion
of the Douglas Gardens
campus.
The annual gala, chaired
by Miriam and Sidney Olson,
was held on Nov. 3 at the
Doral Hotel on Miami Beach
in celebration of the second
anniversary t Founders of
the Miami Jewish Home.
Over 180 benefactors and
guesta danced to the music
of Ted Martin and his 10-
piece orchestra amid lush
surroundings of palm trees
brightly colored parrots and
tiki hut^
The biggest surprise of the
evening came from Founders
President Sidney Olson who,
along with his wife Miriam,
announced a gift of S500.000
to endow the new Douglas
Gardens Hospital. The hos-
pital will be located in the
Harry Chernin Skilled Nurs-
ing Building which is sched-
uled for completion in the
Summer of 1985.
Olson, who is well-known
locally for his philanthropic
involvement as a vice-pres-
ident of Mt. Sinai Medical
Center and a director of both
the Miami Jewish Home and
the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies in Miami, has
also received international
recognition from Yeshiva
University and Shaare Zedek
Hospital in Jerusalem,
among others.
In announcing the gift.
Olson said. "Miriam and I
have long been active in
health-related issues, but our
interest deepened to a more
personal level when we be-
came involved with the
people at Douglas Gardens.
Beyond the excellent skilled
nursing services, we found a
love and caring exceeding
anything we ever expected.
This is our way of expressing
appreciation, and ensuring
that, for older adults in need,
Douglas Gardens will be
there."
On the heels of the Olson's
announcement, well-known
Miriam and Sidney Olson
philanthropist Polly
deHirsch Meyer, who along
with her late husband en
dowed the Baron and Polly
deHirsch Meyer Building at
Douglas Gardens. intro-
duced her guest. A. Jeffrey
Barash. as the 188th
Founder. The enthusiasm
grew as. one after another,
guests joined the ranks of
Founders: Eva Abrahamer.
Norman Braman. Dorothy
Drexler. Helen Fisher. Rose-
mary Gelvan. Ruth Gevirtz.
Sydney Levison. Carolyn
Miller. Jack Millstein. Irene
Resnick. David Schaecter
and Natalie Weisman.
The evening was capped
off with a telegram from
news correspondent Barbara
Walters in New York who
asked that she too be signed
on as a Founder of the Miami
Jewish Home.
By the end of the "Even-
ing in Paradise,' Founders
had passed the 200 member
mark with pledges totaling
over $13 million toward the
Miami Jewish Home's five-
year. $21 million capital
expansion program.
Each Founder received a
limited edition sculpture en-
titled "Tradition of Caring"
which was commissioned by
the Miami Jewish Home to
recognize the unique contri-
bution and commitment of
Founders, as well as a special
medallion signifying their
membership.
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PERSONALIZED GIFTS
CONSIGNMENTS
1809 N E 164th Street Tel 940-5115
Sun. 12-4, Mon. Thurs. 9:30 4:30, Fri. 9:30 1:30


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 30, 1984
An 'Evening In Paradise' For Foi
Officers for 1984-85: (bottom left to right): Louis Stein, Secretary: Polly deHirsch Meyer.
Vice-President; Sidney Olson, President: Helen Rechtschaffer. Vice-President: Ed Shapiro,
Vice-President: (standing left to right) Jack Chester, Vice-President: Belvin Friedson, Vice-
President: B.B. Goldstein, Vice-President: Arthur Pearlman, Treasurer: Harold Beck, Chair-
man of Development Fund; and Harry Chernin, Vice-President. (Not pictured Lila Heatter.
Immediate Past President: Larry Singer, Assistant Secretary: and Barbara Friedson Hornsby.
Assistant Treasurer.)
Xiety and Gary Gerson, Muriel and Sidney Rudolph. Rose and Meyer
Emanuel and Bertha Fass with guests Rate and Harold Caster.
Bert and Marilyn Sager, Lucille and Belvin Friedson, Cecily and Han.
Jayne and Harry Achter. David and Sylvia Braun. Joan and Max Sporn.
. .:._.. ... v^ fM
*1 Bjjr 3
W>' 1 fP 1
^H Ki /H E^SF" fit* 9MN 1 a*.
kt^^Y E >3& Jl -
Sidney and Miriam Olson with Lucille and Harry Chernin.
Beatrice and Maury Marcus with guests Sally and Marvin Shochet.
Butht h m lUmck. and Lester and Eva Abrahamer.
Michael and Sarah Zimmerman with Wendy and Jeffrey Harash


Friday, November 30, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Dunders Of Miami Jewish Home
?
Estelle Weisberg. Philip Benjamin and Martha Farbstein (guest).
Irving Cypen, Polly deHirsch Meyer, Harold Beck.


i age iu-d ine jewisn r lonaian rnaay, November 30, IP84
Women's League Luncheon
Women's League for Israel.
Florida Region, will hold a
"Chain of Life" luncheon Mon-
day. Dec. 10, at noon at the
Sheraton Bal Harbour.
Guest speaker will be Jac-
queline Abelman. director of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPACl. She is a
former aide to Sen. Jacob Javits
of New York and Sen. Arlen
Specter of Pennsylvania.
Chairs of the day are Sybil
Rothbaum and Martha Hessel.
who announce that Charlotte
Cooper will entertain the group.
Violinist H, riryk Szeryng will
appear :n concert with the
Orchest- Miami conducted
by Claudio Scimone on
Tuesday at S:15 p.m. at the
Theatre of the Performing
Arts. This performance is the
second of the Great Artists
series presented by Temple
Beth Sholom.
Beth David Workshops
Beth David Congregation
continues its adult education
program with workshops on
understanding feelings and
expectations, the right place to
live, sharing responsibility
among children, and senior
citizen concerns. The groups will
be led bv Sharon Picker. Karen
Brown. Phyllis Ehrlich, PhD. and
Elliot Stern Workshops will be
held on Thursday. Dec. 6 and 13.
at 8:15 p.m. at the South Dade
facilitv.
GREAT LOCATION
Spacious 1 & 2 BR Apts. Cenltal
Air. Pool. Rec. Room & Social
Club. Walk to 163rd St. Mall
Adults No Pets. Bristol House
Apts 949-2976.
Jacqueline Abelman
Na'amatNews
The annual brunch and pre-
Chanukah musical of liana
Chapter. Pioneer Women
\a amat, will he held Sunday at
a.m. at Winston Tower 500,
Sum-.'. Isles
sident Lillian Hoffman
Is that proceeds of the event,
turing entertainment from
Vlichael Lorn, will go to Child
in Israel.
The chapter will hold the reg-
lar monthly meeting <>n
Tuesday at 12 at Winston Tower
li1 when a hake sale is planned.
I Chapter plans a musical
i ..uiukah program for its
Monday meeting at 1 p.m. at the
Tides Hotel. Faye Brucker is
president, and Ida Kovalsky will
chair the program.
A fashion show is planned for
Chai Chapter's December meet-
ing on Sunday at 1 p.m. at the
Tides. Eva Kaufman, program
chair, will do the commentary
and will present awards to life
members. Helen Weiss will
pri'side.
Herut Pioneers Plan
Anniversary Event
Harry Hurwitz. advisor on
Diaspora Jewry to Yitzhak
Shamir, will be the guest speaker
at the fifth anniversary meeting
of the Herut Zionists of Florida
on Dec. 2 at 2 p.m. in the theatre
of the Konover Hotel.
Joseph Morley and Sam Roth-
kopf. chairs of the event, have
announced that Yuri Cohen,
newly appointed shaliach and
member of the Herut Executive
in Israel, will be welcomed by the
group
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K-tplid MicMing
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040 71 ST., MIAMI BEACH -66-4220 866-3780
In Assoc. with Dr Harold H Weiner
Coi i Discount to readers ot The Jewish Florldlan.
Visa and Master Charge Accepted.
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128 oz.
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Friday, November 30, 1984 The Jewish Floridian Page 1 IB
wpsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
In,/ 'x dreamed, and behold n ladder set up on the
and the top of it reached to heaven;
^1 c >d asi ending anil descending on it"
26 12)
VAYETZE
BE On his way to Haran. Jacob lay down to rest
ice where God appeared to him in a dream, promising
Kth him and to give the land to him and his seed after
sine the next morning. Jacob lifted the stone on which
slept, and set it up as a pillar. He called the place
meaning house of God," and vowed to serve God
hen he returned to his father's house The Lord would
God. In Haran Jacob worked twenty years as B
. for Laban seven years tor his, first wife, Leah.
ear-- for his second Wife, Rachel, and six years for the
.His wives gave him their maid servants Bilhah and
fa wives. Jacob's four wives bore him ll sons: Reuben,
Levi, Judah. Dan. Naphtali, Cad. Asher, Issachar,
and Joseph; he also had one daughter named Dinah.
I direction, Jacob returned home to his father's
)n the way he met the angels of God,
counting of the Weekly Portion ol the Law is extracted and based
Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P Woll
ir, SIS, published by Shengold The volume is available at 75
ne. New York, NY 1003S Joseph Schlang is president of the
tnbuting the volume.)
ican Doctors for Israel to Meet
lorida Chapter of the
ivsicians Fellowship
le in Israel will hold a
organizational meet-
jsday. Dee. 12. at 7:30
olfson Auditorium.
li Medical Center.
l'I M. Clazier. nation-
al secretary of the group will
speak, and a short film on Israel
will be shown, according to Dr.
Arkadi M. Kywlin. past national
president and director of labora-
tories at Mount Sinai. Dr. Isaac-
Knoll is president of the South
Florida chapter.
irectory Assistance
Improvement
t time you call dir-
istance in Dade and
unties, an operator will
it inquiry. But don't be
if a recorded voice del-
swer
Hange is due to a ne*
B directory assistance
in Audio Response
Directory assistance
alter finding the in-
requested by the cus-
acthate a feature that
h announces the
Bthe i jstomet allowing
r^Btoi to answer the next
The number will be an-
uio ,n a \oii- similar
^Tat ic announcements
^fcforni customers about
^Ktei! or changed tele
HimhiT'. It customers
^ests tor two listings or
^Bs. they must advise the
^Hat the beginning of the
"The Audio Response System
allows directory assistance oper-
ators to concentrate their efforts
on finding the numbers
requested.-' said Gary Allington.
Southern Bell spokesman. "The
result will be more efficient use of
our available forces. From a cus-
tomer's standpoint, the machine
announcement should make the
telephone numbers easier to
understand, since the quality and
tone of the announcement will be
con- istent
Director} operators in Miami
handled about 7 million requests
in 1983. Allington said that the
Audio Response System is ex-
pected to save the companj ap-
proximately 20 percent on dir-
ectory assistance expenses each
year, mostly in reduced operator
costs He emphasized that the
system will not affect the com-
pany's regular operator force
because of personnel planning
efforts.
Parties Receptions
All Occasions
HI
Her Knowledge. Will furnish Waitresses. Waiters, I
Jartenders to serve your food, drinks and clean up. ;
. experience. Realistic prices. k
PARTY SERVICE
Dade 823-2090 or 888-7291 I
Broward 944-6396
e e mi e mt mi
BarMitzvah
STEVEN DAVID DIAMOND
in David Diamond, s<
Sinn Diamond and Robert
Diamond, will be called to the
as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at Temple Emanu-EI
Mrs. Diamond is a longtime
member of the temple choir.
Steven is a student at Nautilus
Junior High in the seventh grade.
He enjoys (ireek mythology and
astronomy and is interested in
computers and the space
program.
Special guests will include
Steven s sister Lisa, a Lehrman
Day School graduate. Mr. and
Mrs. Sol Kaplan of Memphis,
Tenn.. Mr. and Mrs. Allen Dia-
mond of St. Louis, Mr. and Mrs.
Archie Diamond of Palm Beach,
and Mr. and Mrs. Morris Rubin-
stein of Jerusalem.
A reception in honor of the
occasion will be held at the Roney
Pub.
HARLAN ARBEITER
TRACEY STERNBERG
On Saturday morning Harlan
Arbeiter. son of Mr. and Mrs.
Toby Arbeiter. and Tracey
Sternberg. daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Herbert Sternberg. will be
called to the Torah as B'nai
Mitzvah at Temple Sinai of
North Dade.
V.
Dr. Edward Zemel has been
named director of Dade
I mm u no-Diagnostics, Inc.. a
South Dade allergy and
immunology laboratory He is
a specialist in immunology
Jewish Trivia
in Book, Game
Seven categories for a total of
1.400 questions are asked in
"Trivia Judaica." a new book and
soon-to-be-issued game, featuring
questions that range in difficulty
from the ridiculously easy to the
sublimely difficult.
Current events, arts and cul-
ture, people, religion, history,
language, and geography are
covered, and the answers are
always on the next page. Written
by Ian Shapolsky and published
by the American arm of
Steimatzky Ltd. of Israel, "The
Jewish Trivia and Information
Book Trivia Judaica" is in its
second printing, and a second
volume and a Jewish Trivia
Game are forthcoming.
P
.1
A".
K&S BOOK S**9*
Featuring Child Development Books
Award Winners
Educational Toys and Games
FROM PRE-SCrtOOL THROUGH YOUNG ADULT
1849 NE. MIAMI GARDENS DR.
NORTH MIAMI BEACH
TELEPHONES: 937-BOOK
937-2665
THE FIRST QUALITY
CHILDREN'S ROOK STORE
IN NORTH MIAMI REICH
cift onmncATis available
NEW.
DARIN'S
Kari-Ma Baby
FOft THt HOUOAVS
(Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting Time
5:11 p.m.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Dally Minyan 7 30 am. and 5 pm
7 30 pm. Waicoma New Members ShaDbat
Sal 8 30 am. Bat MilJvah
Eddy Riachalson
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon. Associate Rabbi
Fn 8 '5 pm. Rabbi Baumgard sermon topic
"Rabbi. I> tha Bible True?"
Sal 11 15 am. Rabbi Baumgard sermon
topic Is God in This Piece9" B'nai MiLrvah
Erin Bloom and Sherna Glass
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way 2625 S W 3rd ven. ''*JV
South Dada 7500 S W 120th Straw! V '
RABBI DAVID H.AUERBACH 3S"
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Frl 8 pm Services South Dade Chapel
Sat Coral Way 9 am. Bar Mitzvah
Michael Steven Buckner (Robert Verbukh.
USSR, inabaentiai
TEMPLE BCTH-EL 6P N,6RtH,6AY"
VILLAGE (Conservative)
7B00 Hispanola Ave conveniently
located just off 79 St. Cswy. /g>.
Rabbi Marvin Rose -Sp
Cantor Danny Tadmore x-i''
Fn 8 pm
Sat 9 am
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Fn 8 15 pm. Rabbi Shapiro aarmon
topic: United Nations A Constant
Menace1
Sat 8 45 am and 5 pm
SIS*.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N. Miami. FL 33181
891 5508 Conservative
RABBI ISRAEL JACOBS
CANTOR MOSHE FRIEDLER
RABBI EMERITUS JOSEPH A GORFINKEL
EXECUTIVE lllREC'OR IRVING JARE"
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTOR BARBARA Srn..MAS

Daily services 8 am 5pm /SS>
Fn 8 pm
Sat 9 am. Rabb< Jacobs sermon
top-c Where Do Angels Come From''
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. MB. FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nlssim Benyamini
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41st St. 538-7231
DR. LEON KRONISH. RABBI Liberal
HARRY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBI
PAUL D CAPLAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVIO CONVISER
Frl 8 15 pm
Sat. 10 45am
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Llpschltz, Rabbi
Randall Konlgsburg, Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec Director
Dally services 7:301111. 5 JO pm
Sat 8 25 em S 15 pm
Sun. am. 5 30 pm
Frl. late service 8 pm
m
(
BETH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwalg. Rabbi
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Both Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovltch, Rabbi
Moshe Buryn, Cantor
Aron Kelton. President
Ssee*al Service
JO em Sermon 10 30 i
Dally Minyan
I-
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Mawell Be-ge
Yehuda Shifman. Cantor
Fn Kabbalal Shabbat 5 pm
6 pm. Or Lehrman sermon topic
Rediscover the Jew.sh Boo* .
tn honor ol Jewish Book Month
Sat 9 am Dr Lehrman sermon topic
The Weekly Portion ol The Bible
Bar Mitfvah Steven Diamond
Daily services 8 an, and 5 pm. Blank Chap.1'
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
M am, s P'O'-'-r*' Q*>'9"v> Coig'pdf,on
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell M Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Donald P. Cashman
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Associate Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. Goldin
Fn 0 pm. Downtown Rabbi Cashman sermon
topic Jewish Book Month.
Kendall Rabbi Bernai sermon topic
Beginnings and Ends ol Life
Abortion Revisited
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B Eisenstat, Rabbi
Fn 8 15 pm
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVIO RAAB. Rabbi
Shoshanah Raab. Cantor
Friday services 7 30 pm
Saturday 9 30 am
[TEMPLE MENORAH
?820 751 h St., Miami Beach 33141
|Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz ,:"-.
Cantor Murray Yavneh I Kj
Morning services 8 am.
Fn late service 8 '5 pm
Saturday Morning services 9 am
Satu-day Evening services 7 45 pm
TEMPLE NERTAMID 866 8345"
7902 Cartyle Ave.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz conservative
Cantor Edward Klein
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
tSHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ave. ft 75 St., 382 3343
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modem o.thodo.
Fn. eve 7 pm
Sat 9 30 am Sat afternoon 20 mm be'ore
Sundown Mom Minyan Mon Thur*6:45am
Tues Wed a Fn.. a., followed by class
In Gemara Berachot iMamonali
[TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North. Dado's Reform Congregation
IRalpn P Klngsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
(Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
r
Frl 1 15 pm
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
aaWMIIJarOr. Conaorv.,re.
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi
Benjamin Adler. Cantor __
lOavM Rosenthal fWt
Auxiliary Cantor \3v'
Mmyen Services 7 am, Mon. and
Thura. Teiiiei Chapel
Frl 8 15 pm. Sabbath Eve services
Sat. 9 am. Sabbath Services-Teitlei Chapel


i nvP i,i'n'""*7n" "JWISfTF Irtfi/f ion T?ov NOVM"hr HI) 1 Vi*^ ^.^
Communitv Corner
.fc.~i* ." -*o_.n: i

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Jews, Christians Protest
Soviet Treatment of Jews
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- .*.. carcpae :>._. Mood*} eooa -'. -*.- Bet;> kzc
Nofaan P^**o*n? xatnixB rf Ute gnmf laaenbe ^Pvmti
Israe> ,.-.:-.. -. Or. Baeaah
Bet '! -.*.-.* peaaa -.**__.- c L*<
1 9 m v. S .; pd i". the '^~p** Elaote Snumin ^
.: the c ram
AJex Deooci Man Bead ^otBenanooar w_ a.;
Miaou Beach Lodge : B aai B rids .-. ?>___;. i". .- 4r the
..:-,- Road B>_ic__uj mtratocad
Sj Maurice Ufiaman -..-..---a .-..
Beach
i; .. ;. -. L-r i tin *.-. C "-P<*r ol H*casft*_. -_
bave a inarting tea r.--.r.*;. ?*z* bocia. H A Caai-^aas p*a;.
31 h* perfcrniec
P.a-, s.% Pares: casks a: PJetr. Torah w_ meet j: January 'x.
*.<*zf.zz: -r* oaja, prevjamg training fc* parents erf cr.: ages one ramith througr three years. .Naacr Riea. eaair aa-
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S *- "''uin.


Friday, November 30, 1984 The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
iblic Notices
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
|NTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
ANDFORDADECOUNTY
Civil Action NO. 64-427*7
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
,Rr IHEMARRIAOEOP
lALEKIK ANDERSON.
IptUtloner-Wif*.
\ IANDERSON
Respondent Husband
lerson
a, ,| ,. el nsnown
REBV NOTIFIED
ir Dissolution ol
u been filed against
I in required to serve a
r u ntten defense-, if
i IEROLD H
| attorney for
., .,-. address is i*oo
i iem I n Ive Suits
1. h FI. .13179.
|l(ilf Ul< I -lltn U16 clerk
court on or
I ber Met, iom.
, ill will be entered
gainst you for the relief
, in in.- complaint or
.
I This notue shall be published
nee each week for four consec-
week! in THE JEWISH
DIAN
I WITNESS my hand and the seal
J said court at Miami. Florida on
jlisl9dav <>f November, 19S4
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
[lade County, Florida
B) Clarlnda Brown
Ai Deputy Clerk
cult Court Seal i
A OFFICES OF
lEROLPH REICHLER
Ittomey (or Petitioner
00 N.E Miami Gardens Drive,
bite 103
orth Miami Beach. Florida 33179
Hephone I 3051 947-6228
|470 November 23. 30;
December: 14. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
ANDFOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-41093
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
RK Thi Marruujeof
P 1 BARTON,
ner v\ ife
kid
: YNBARTON,
Husband
|0 la rton
street, Apt 112
tei Mass 01604
HEREBY NOTIFIED
tor Dissolution of
II been filed against
required to ser\ e a
1AM
'
written defenses. If
GEORGE t
rnej lor Petitioner,
- 71! Bl
F lagler
SO and fiU' the
lerh "f the
m or befon
: *m other*
ded in the

shall be published
*eek tor four .
In THE JEWISH
\
n sess hand and U i
il Miami, Florida on
} I November, 1984
P BRINKER
Vs Clerk Circuit Court
aunty Florida
xri.NDABRown
>- I 'eputy Clerk
' Seal i
mey for Petitioner
' RAMAN]
IBli ayi .-Hidg
'st Flakier Street
Florida 33130
'Phone i305) 374-4340
November*. 16. 23, 80.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
WJTIIJE IS HEREBY GIVEN
the u.derslgned. desiring to
p in business under the
name C1E Towing
rylce at 6496 West 12th Avenue.
-ear,. Florida 33012, Intends to
ier said name with the Clerk
M circuit Court of Dade
My, Florida
Jesus D Alvarez. Jr.
November 23. 30.
_________December 7.14.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
OTICB IS HEREBY GIVEN
the undersigned, desiring to
tte In business under the flctl-
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number MUSS
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE (>l
BRANDON RICHARD STKELE
1 let-eased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THK ABOVE ESTATE
AND ALL OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN THK ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that the administration of the
estate of Brandon Richard Steele.
deceased. File Number M St
pending In the Circuit Court tor
Dade County, Florida Probate
Dl\ laton Ul< : which IsT.'l
Weal Flagler St Miami Florida
3313(1 The co-personal
..... tati an
ele and Janice
Kramer Steele. whose ::
27575 S W 182nd v.. M:aml. FL
33031 The name and address of the
personal representatives attorney
are Ml forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required WITHIN THREE
MONTHS from THK DATE OF
THK FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE to file with the
clerk of the above court a written
statement of any claim or demand
they may have Each claim must
be In writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name and
address of the creditor or his agent
or attorney, and the amount
claimed If the claim Is not yet due.
the date when It will become due
shall be stated If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall be
slated If the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described The
claimant shall deliver sufficient
copies of the claim to the clerk to
enable the clerk to mall one copy to
each personal representative
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a opy of this
Notice of Administration has been
mailed are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any obJecUons
they may have that challengeisi
the validity of the decedent s will,
the qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
Will. BE FOREVER BARRED
Date of the first publication of
thi Notice of Administration
Movember23 ihm
Robert 11 Steele
Janli Kramer steele
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
Brandon Rl< hard steele
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSON \l.
REPRESENTATIVE
I a Turtletaub Eaq
9656 So Dixie Hw> Ste 307
Miami FL33156
Telephone
\ ven ber 23 30.1964
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE No 84 40651
IN RE The Man; I
EDI 'I M'.D I'M I JOSEPH,
Petltloner-Husl
\ 1
M UUESILFICAJOSEPH,
Respondent-Wife
TO MARIE SILFICA. JOSEPH
164 T St I J.
Cap-Haitian. Haiti, you shall
serve copy of your Answer to the
Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE NICH-
OLAS Attorney. 612 V W 12th
Avenue. Miami. Florida. 33136.
and file original with Court Clerk
on or before December 7, 1984.
otherwise a default will be entered.
November 2.1984
RICHARD BRINKER
BY ARDEN WONG
18433 November9.16.
23 30. 1984
t> name of Mayfalr Apartments
number 445
>T
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE llth JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN ANDFOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 84.47384
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
Florida Bar No 285153
In Re The Marriage of
CESSA N FRANCIS
>ner Husband.
-and-
CELESTE ROSE FRANCIS
Respondent I*.
TO CELESTE ROSE FRANCIS
2-B 1 lorsel A. enue
Kingston S Jamaica w 1
YOl ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
il an a< tlon for Dissolution of
!. filed against
vo : u; 1 you ar.- require
copy ol \our written defenses II
.on to it on BRENT K ROl'T
M \N or LLOYD M ROUTMAN
attorneys for Petitioner, whose
address is ROUTMAN & Rol T
MAN ATTORNEYS AT UW. 181
N I -.'nil Street. Miami. Florida
- and file the original with the
Clerk of the abo\e styled Court on
before December 21. 1984.
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief dem-
anded In the Petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consecu-
tive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Dade
County. Florida on this 15 day of
November. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
iCIrcultCourtSeall
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
181 N.E 82nd Street
Miami. Florida33138
Telephone I305i 757-5800
18465 November 23, 30;
December 7,14.1984
Anastasla In the
of Coral Gables. Florida.
P'-nda to register said name with
1 lerk of the Circuit Court of
deCounty, Florida
-lated at Coral Gables. Florida.
31t day of October, 1984
Evelyn Monahan
Laura Arnold
y. Grundwerg ft Vann
"mey for Applicants
South nixie Highway
la HO
'Gables, FL33146
Novembers, 16:
28, 30.1984J.
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case NO 84 40537
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
GKHAIJ.HNE HARGRAVE
Petitioner
and
LENSON HARGRAVE
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO LENSON HARGRAVE. 2933
W. Vermont St, Phoenix. Az 85017
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
action for dissolution of marriage
has been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses upon: I.J
GRAFF. ESQ attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 633
N.E. 167 St N.M.B. Florlds 33162.
on or before December 7, 19*4. and
file the original with the clerk of
this court otherwise a default will
be entered against you
November 1, 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
Hv S HOMES
As Deputy Clerk
18431 N ove mbe r, 9, 16:
23.30,1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
Civil Action N 84 41858
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
Florida Bar No 785153
IN RE The Marriage of
JEAN CLAUDE HKRNADIN.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
SI S \N A SABATINI HKRNADIN
Respondent-Wife
T< 1 Susana Sabatlnl Hemadin
Calls Llbertad i960
Cordoba 600
RepubllCB Argentina 9 A
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been Hied against
you and you are required to serve a
ropv of vour written defenses. If
any to II on LLOYD M ROI T
m w attorney for Petitioner
- .-; n k g3nd
Street Miami Florida 33138 and
die the original with the Clerk 01
ve styled Court on or before
mber 21 1084 otherwise
default w ,11 be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the
Petition
This notice shall be published
oni e each week for four con-
fer ut He weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of s;ud court at Miami. Dade
County, Florida on this 13th day ot
November. 1M
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
1 lade County. Florida
iCIrcultCourtSeall
By: C.P COPELAND
is Deputy Clerk
ROUTMAN ROUTMAN
Attorneys at l.aw
Attorneys for PeUtloner
181 N E. 82rld Street
Miami, Florida 33138
Telephone: 13051 757 -5800
18466 November 16. 23,30;
December 7.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVF SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action No. 84-42919
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No 285153
In Re: The Marriage of
CLENA CHARITE DUCTANT,
Petitioner-Wife,
-and
DOLER DUCTANT
Respondent -Husband
TO DOLER DUCTANT
Residence unknown
YOl ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
thai an action for Dissolution of
ige has been filed against
you and you are required to si
copj Ol vour written defenses. If
any to it on I.I.oYD M
ROUTMAN attorney for
Petitioner whose address Is 1M
N I -L'nd Street. Miami. Florida
33138, and file the original w 1th the
clerk of the above styled court on
or before December 21st. 1984
otherwise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
utlve weeks In THE JEWIS
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 20 day of November. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
iCIrcultCourtSeall
ROUTMAN ft ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
181 N.E 82nd Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Telephone: (305i 737-5800
18471 November 23. 30:
________December 7.14,1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84 41 747
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
LIDIA CLAUDIA DOMINGUEZ.
and
JOSE ENRIQUE DOMINGUEZ
TO: JOSE ENRIQUE
DOMINGUEZ
YOl ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses, if
My, to It on HARVEY D
FRIEDMAN. attorney for
Petitioner, and file the original
with the clerk of the above styled
court on or before December 27,
1984. otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec-
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 16day Ol November. 194
RICHARD P BRINKER
\s Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
1 Circuit Court Seal I
I .AW OFFICES OF HARVEY D
FRIEDMAN
420 Lincoln Road Suite 379
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 1 3051 631-0391
Attorney for Petloner
18459 November 16,23, 30:
December 7.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious names 1 CRUISE
CENTER 2 CRUISE SHOP 3
CRUISE STORE 4 CRUISE
BOUTIQUE 5 CRUISE EX
CHANGE 6 AIL CRUISES at 305
ALCAZAR AVE. CORAL
GABLES. FLORIDA 33134. Intends
to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
PURCEU. TRAVEL. INC
By SUZANNE PURCELL
18439 November 9,16, 23, 30,1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the ficti-
tious name Jullen Reed at 2060
S.W. 77 Ct Miami, Fla. 33168 In-
tends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Ramon Peres Dorrbecker
18443 November 9.16. 23. 80.1964 I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name LAURITA
RESTAURANT at 7033 N W S6th
Avenue. Miami, Florida 33147.
intends to register said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Isldra L Alvarez
18449 November 18, 23. 30:
December 7,1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 64-41*81
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE. OF
JENATHUL FAW /.I Y A JAMEEI.
Petitioner-W Ife
and
NIZAM MOHAMMED JAMEEI
!'.--1 -indent- Husband
P 1 N izam Mohammed Jameel
"I Crlpps Road
1 lalle
Sri Lanka
YOl ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required I lervea
copv of vour written defenses II
to 11 on DAVID S BERGER
attorney for Petitioner whose
address Is HUH Washington Avenue.
Miami Beach Florida 3S130. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or I
December 21 1984 otherw lac a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four 1
utive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami. Florida on
this 13th day of November. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
ICIrcultCourtSeall
DAVIDS BERGER
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (3051872-3100
18467 November 16. 23. 30:
December7. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Property)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 64-41 IS*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 3*3061
In Re The Marriage of
ALEUS JOSIRIN.
Petitioner-Husband,
-and-
AL1TA JOSIRIN.
Respondent-Wife.
TO ALITA JOSIRIN
Bombardopolls. Haiti
West Indies
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that an action for Dissolution of|
Marriage has been filed against
you and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses. If
any" to it on BRENT E ROUT
MAN attorney for Petitioner
whose address is 181 N.E 82nd
Street. Miami Florida 33138. and
file the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or before
1 'her. 21 1984: otherwise a
default will be entered against j ou
for the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four consec
Utlve weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the seal
0l said court at Miami. Florida on
this 13 day of November, 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal!
ROUTMAN* ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorney for Petitioner
181N E 82nd Street
Miami. Florida33138
Telephone (80S) 757-5800
18458 JiAember 16.23, 30
December?. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
ANDFOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 64 3*921
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RF MEDARDO VILLA PINO
Petitioner
and
C
iREGORLA SILVER A DE VILLA
SII.VERA Dr-
Respondent
TO OREOORIA
VILLA
RESIDENCE I NKNi >w n
YOl ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED
that .i.ition of
Marriage has been filed aga
ind you are require 1 ti
ol your wrlttei H
anj to it on JORG R op.ta
attorne) for Petit whose
address is ORTA i fc.SSOC I
2001 Coral Wa> Mian.: Flor
and file the irtglnal wltl
clerk of the abi ourl m
or before 1 ie< ember ~ 1084
otherw lae a default w ill be entered
nst you lor the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall he published
once each week for four COnsei
Utlve weeks in THK JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the seal
of said court at Miami Florida on
this 5th dav of November. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
ICIrcultCourtSeall
ORTA ft ASSOC PA
JORGER ORTA
2091 Coral Way
Miami, Florida 33145
Attorney for Petitioner
18434 November 9. 16.
____________23. 30.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name of MB FASHIONS
at 1644 W. 31st Place, In the City of
Hlaleah. Florida. Intend to register
the said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
Dated at Hlaleah. Florida, this
10 day of November, 1084.
NUMBER ONE STORE, INC.
MARION BURSON
President
STEVEN SIEGLER
Secretary-Treasurer
Attorney for Applicant.
JOSHUA D BASH. ESQ.
1926 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 33020
(305)040-1200:022 1400
18472 November 28, 80;
December 7,14.1084
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name Klmberly Flowers,
at 10664 NW Fountalnbleu Blvd..
Miami. Florida 33172. Intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Klmberly Promotions, inc.
18455 November 16. 23. 30
December 7.1084
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO 64 403*6
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States Cor
poratlon.
Plaintiff,
and
rvtlTTRR KRENTZIEN and
EGI.EE KRENTZIEN his wile, a-
k-a DIETER KRENTRIF.N and
EGLEE KRENTRIBN his wife, et
al .
Defendants.
TO DIETER KRENTZIEN and
EGI.EE KRENTZIEN, his wife, a-
k-a DIETER KRENTRIEN and
EGLEE KRENTRIEN.hU wife,
AltoAlegre. Torre C 1-B
C. Bello Monte
Caracas. Venezuela
YOl ARK NOTIFIED that an
action to foreclose a mortgage on
the following described property in
DADE Countv Florida Unit 536,
In KEY colony no :i CON-
DOMINIUM according to the
Declaration recorded August 21,
18) in Official Records B
IB) the I ibllc
Records of Dade County Flor
as amended together with all
,mpr vei appliances and
t.xiures located thereon, has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a cop> of you
written defenses. If any. to tt on
Keith, Mark. Lewis ft Allison.
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose ad-
dress Is 111 N.E. 1st Street Miami.
Florida 33132, on or before
December 21. 1084. and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or Im-
mediately thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against you
for the relief demanded in the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal of
this Court on the 14th'da*/, of
November. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: L.E.R. SINCLAIR
Deputy Clerk
18462 November 23. 30;
December 7. 14.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious names 1) Electronic Pro-
tective Security; 21 The Security
Corner; 3) Security Systems; 41
Defensive Electronics; at 2330
Ponce de Leon Blvd.. Coral
Gables. FL 33135 Intend to register
said names with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
David Rafky
Donald Cooper
Howard Davis
18445 November 0, 16,
23,30.1084
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUISNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name Glober Ijibs Mfg..
at 13295-A NW 107th Ave. Hlaleah
Gardens. Florida 33016. intends to
register said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Rene Gonzalez
18461 November. 23.30:
December 7. 14.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the ficti-
tious name Wicker World at 11180
W Flagler Street. Sweetwater.
Florida 33174 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Olga Astenclo
18425 November 9. 16
23.30.1984


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BARBARAK SVCARMAN
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RICHARL BRINKER
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December T 14 n IBM
NOTICE UN0ER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
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NOTICE .S0E8
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Docemter' 14*1


Dr. Freeman Passes
Friday, November 30,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
L. Joseph Freeman an ear
le and throat specialist, died of
nrer at 69 Nov. 22, one day
U a laboratory at Jackson
lomorial Hospital was named in
honor. Dr. Freeman par-
ried m the first stapes
obilizat'on more than 20 years
an operation to cure deaf-
fcss
[in Miami, where he moved in
li4 after service in the U.S.
Lnv Medical Corps during the
L and a period of practice in
E York. Dr. Freeman affiliated
irsol Lebanon Hospital.
Tf',,, he was president of the
Idical !'"''ri1 and chief of tni"
I tafl therein 1971-72 and
I74-7J
IvKOFF
Pa, Harbor Island,
' N 15 He came trom
I mple
nple Fmanu El Sur
- children
. '. irel and
matl i" and
.........eti
II ." Col
Dorothy Schne'
> Nov
JiOTLINIL^
TO JERUSALEM
In time ol illness surgery or
crisis special prayers will be
recited at the Western Wall and
at our Yeshiva in Jerusalem
CALL 24 HOURS
(212)871-4111
A FREE PUBLIC SERVICE OF
The American Rabbi Meir
Baal Haness Charity
KOLEL AMERICA
132 Nassau SI NY NY 10038
V k. V A. ./ / j .A
MtdMuyoth. Yirtor 4 YorQeil
rtunul with a minyon in our
YtiWva Heichal Rabbi Mtlr
Baal Han*si In Jerusalem
CALL
(212)871-4111
mmimanr Kolel America
flat* Meir Baal Haness In
YoerWill
|0rder Our Pushka A Segula For Good
Heal'f Happiness And Success
Besides his widow, Ann Cassel
Freeman, Dr. Freeman is sur-
vived by four daughters, Jane
Freeman Schoenholt and Linda
Kurihan of New York, Elizabeth
Freeman of Savannah, Ga., and
Kathryn Treadwell of Ridgefield.
Conn., and a sister and a brother.
FREEMAN
Joseph, WD., of Miami Died Nov 22 at
his home in Wiami. Survivors include
his wife. Ann Cassel Freeman, 4
daughters Jane Freeman Schoenholt.
Linda Kurihara, Elizabeth Friedman
and Kathryn Treadwell, sister Leah
Freeman and a brother Harry
Freeman Funeral services were held
Nov 23 at the chapel Interment was in
Wt Nebo Cemetery Riverside Guar
dian Plan Chapel
DREXLER. Joseph ;. of North Wiami
Beach Sevres Nov 23
EISENBERG. Mitchell L of Wiami
Services Nov 23 Riverside
.'FR Mrs Eva. 80. of Wiam,
Services Nov 21 Riverside Star of
I
v
'. I North /
Nov 23 Riversic:
'.
grefnvnalD Benjamin, 86. of
i Nov 23 R.vervae
. Gordon. 60. 0' N
Nov 23
ide
JACOBS Wrs Jean NatKin. of Miami
Beach Services Nov 27 Rubin Zilbert
GARVETT. Pearl 87 of Miami Beach
Services Nov 25 R.verside
GOLDSTEIN Charles. 82 of Wiami
Beach Services Nov 26 Riverside
KUSTiN. William. 84. of North Wiami
Beach Services were held
GOLDBERG. Jacob 88, of Hialeah
Gardens Services were held
LITWIN, Tillie. of Bay Harbor island
Services Nov 26 Biasberg
PARISH. Sylvia 69. of North Miami
Beach Services Nov 26
STRAUS. Sara. 71. of North Miami
Beach Services Nov 27 Gordon
WORANTZ. Edward. 76. of North
Miami Beach Services Nov 27
RASKIN, Mrs Ruth Wester, of Wiami
Beach Services Nov 27 Rubin Zilbert
WEIN, Wartin, of North Wiami Beach
Services Nov 23
KRASSOW, Eileen G 45, of Coral
Gabies Services Nov 28
F \>* Irving i Itchlel, of Miami Beai h
Sen l< ei were held
M \ki;t LIES Irene, Of Miami Heaih
in Riverside
BROWN : u -i' hi Bay Harbor Ben
:,,-. \n\ ii Blaaberg
COHEN Herman ol North M
!< .
1:1 BIN Gertrude I ''
\ i. relde
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosad Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
.'MMIKireenfleld Kd
iiak Perk, Michigan 18237
(313) 543-1622
Hebrew Memorial Chapel
of Greater Detroit
Efficient, Reliable. Traditional
with
Dignity and Understanding
Complete Shipping Service From Florida \rea
Your First Call to Us will
Handle All Funeral Arrangements
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
>ade County
532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel. Inc.
gev*Vork:i-'l.'i j(,|.7(.(K)gu'( nsiiiwl \ Wh Kcl. Forest HilU NY
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL $
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
Miami Beach
Coral Gables
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
538-6371
The Only no Miami Beach-Hallandale
Guaranteed BROWARD
Pre Arrangements
with
456-4011
No Money In Advance
Main Office: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
We've joined
hands to serve the Jewish
community better.
Schwartz Brothers Forest Park Chapel
and Jeffer Funeral Homes are now represented
by Riverside in South Florida.
Thai means we have joined through our association with Riverside Memorial
Chapels in honoring The GUARDIAN PLAN- insurance funded prearranged funeral
program.
And through Riversides seven chapels located in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach
counties, we'll continue to provide caring and economical services between South
Florida and the New York Metro|>ohtan area And as always, our services are rendered
according to the high standards demanded by .Jewish tradition.
Schwartz Brothers Forest Park Chapel and Jeffer Funeral Homes honor
The GUARDIAN PLAN. XRX*
insurance funded prearranged funeral program
through their association with Riverside Memorial Chapels.
Seven chapels in Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties. Serving the New York Metropolitan area
Please send me, at no obligation, more information concerning the GUARDIAN
PLAN insurance funded prearranged funeral program.
Name---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Address.
City------
State
Home Phone.
Mail to: Guardian Plans, Inc.,
P.O. Box 96
Winter Park, Florida 32790
Business Phone.
Zip.
Or call toll free
1-800-432-0853
____ __ Jfa.ij30_


*= 4-VTM.
..a.r ageHlW>tfJ"-^liirjWPIsrh'rt'BHaiiif-Fraty: Sovemfer 3U. 1984
ol2Tt^
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NOVEMBER 1984
iAtmefo
<$4>cem6 6, J984
6:30ft.nt.


Page 2
Federation, November, 1984
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
November 30. 1984 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
President
Samuel I. Adler
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman. Communications Committee
Eli TimoPL-r
Contents
6
(
t
i
1
/
S
S
I
CAMPAIGN 3
Record attendance anticipated at Campaign Opening Dinner
Super Sunday Super week slated for January 27-31 at
Temple Israel
CAMPAIGN 4
David Brenner performs to record Pacesetter Dinner audience
Campaign communique
WOMEN'S DIVISION 5
viorst Clary upstadt make Federation Wednesday memorable
Women s Division plans mission to Mexico City in January
Pacesetter Luncneon slated for December 5
Hold tne date!
AGENCIES 6
RaPPinicai Association exec sets a precedent
volunteers needed at Federation
Jewisn studies program at Barry university offers new courses
New JVS meals program launcned 0y Federation Gardens
Jewisn Book Montn crossword puzzle
AGENCIES/ISRAEL 7
New unified prayerbook for Jewisn armed services members
From gourmet to fast food, Israel is a gastronome s deiignt
PROJECT RENEWAL / OR AKIVA 8 & 9
Or Akiva a transformed city, thanks to Miami
Olim ^a\/e night to remember in Or Akiva
School programs targeted for improvement
Dental care receives extra emphasis in Or Akiva
CRC/AGENCIES 10
South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry plans activities
on behalf of Soviet Ref useniks
Martin Gilbert. Refusenik expert to lecture at Betn Snoiom
Street Proofing Your Child ; JCC workshop a must for parents
Israel Programs Office offers help for trips to Israel
SOUTH DADE / JEWISH EDUCATION 11
Soutn Dade branch initiates welcome wagon for new residents
Brandeis Academy reinforces old traditions and new knowledge
Miami students attend Hiiie' conference in Washington D c
Calling all Mt. Sinai babies: Help celebrate 35th anniversary
FOUNDATION
Tax planning strategies by Steven m Habib, cpa
Foundation honors its benefactors
AGENCIES
Adolescent suicide focus of JFCS parent worksnop
Mid-life issues group to meet in South Dade
Local agencies join forces on behalf of elderly
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops need your donations
JVS adds new staffers to meet community needs
JVS Project Task Meet vaiene. a special person in
a special program
CABLE TELEVISION
Kenny Schneider Show features unique works of art
JFTV to provide service announcements for local agencies
December program schedule
CALENDAR
12
13
14
15


campaign
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Campaign Opening Dinner on
behalf of the 1985 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/Project
Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign, will be
held Thursday, December 6 at 6:30 p.m.
at the Fontainebleau-Hilton, Miami
Beach.
Dinner Chairman Elaine Bloom announced that Liv
Ullmann, an award winning actress and noted author, will
be the special guest speaker at the event. In addition to her
distinguished stage and screen career, Ullmann has been ex-
tremely active in efforts to support refugee relief services
around the world, and she is a vice president of the Inter-
national Rescue Committee.
Liv Ullmann has grown intimately involved with issues
related to the welfare of world Jewry, and she is a strong ad-
vocate for the State of Israel," noted Bloom. Ms. Ullmann's
grandparents were honored by the Israeli government for
having provided safe refuge for scores of Jews during the
Holocaust.
Those who attend the Campaign Opening Dinner
make a $1,000 minimum gift to the 1985 CJA-IEF cam-
paign. Bloom said that record attendance is anticipated at
the gala event, which provides a strong start to the Greater
Miami Jewish communitys effort to furnish social services
to needy Jews in Miami, in Israel and worldwide.
The Campaign Opening Dinner must be a mass state-
ment of our total unity and commitment to help our fellow
Jews." said Norman Braman. 1985 general campaign
I chairman. "We have established a $25 million campaign goal
in 19H5, and we must depend upon every Jew in the Greater
Miami community to help us reach our goal, "Against All
Odds."
The vice-chairmen of the Campaign Opening Dinner are:
Anne Ackerman, Arnold Altman, Jack Bellock, Adolph
Berger, Helene Berger, Louis Berlin, Dr. Jack Berne, Hazel
Canarick, Tim Cohen, Irving Cypen, Amy Dean, Terry
Drucker, Myra Farr, Mark Friedland, Harvey Friedman,
Mikki Futernick, Al Golden, Elliot Gordon, Alex Halber-
Btein, Sam Harte, Charlotte Held, Gert Kartzmer, Steven
Kravitz, Jeff Lefcourt, Norman Lieberman, Ellen Mandler,
Sandy Miot, Marlene Olin, Elaine Richman, Ellen Rose,
Maxine E. Schwartz, Guillermo Sostchin, Maryanne Witkin,
and Kenneth Witkin.
Bloom encourages those individuals interested in atten-
ding the Campaign Opening Dinner to make their reserva-
tions promptly, so as to assure their table for the event.
Cocktails will be served at 6:30 with dinner at 7:30 p.m. The
couvert is $45 per person and dietary laws will be strictly ob-
served.

Norman Braman
FILL IN TODAY AND RKTl RN
SIGN-UP NOW FOR SUPER
SUNDAY/SUPER WEEK
Nam*
Address
Oty Zip
Home Phone Businew Phone
1 will be representing:
(Organisation. Synagogue. Agency Vouth Group.
Federation Women s Division)
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
SUPER SUNDAY* SUPER WEEK*
January 27. 1985 January 28-31. 1985
I'll do my part as a I'll join you on
phone volunteer Monday. January 28
non phone volunteer Tuesday. January 29
9-11 am 3 5 pm Wednesday. January 30
10-12 noon 4-6 pm Thursday. January 31
11-1 pm 5-7 pm 9-12 pm
12 2 pm 6-8 pm 2-8 pm
1 -3 pm 7-9 pm You may volunteer for
2-4 pm all or part of any session
You may volunteer for -
one or more sessions IJAh
^.^^?-**
I will need day care C^^M^St^^
services (Ages i please1) J^3
Number of children arfafc^^S^^^*
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
137 N E 19th Street. Miami
This is my first Super Sunday
Super Sunday exec,
committee sets
plans in motion
The first Executive Committee
meeting for Super Sunday Super
Week was held November 8. The
committee, still in formation,
consists of representatives from
many local organizations and
agencies.
This year the theme of Super
Sunday revolves around the idea of
the SUPER volunteer and the
SUPER day that the volunteers
create. Special features of Super
Sunday will be an expanded Day
Care Center, drawings of door prizes
and other incentives for volunteers.
Volunteers are now being recruited
to fill both phone and non-phone
positions. Sign-up cards will be
placed in area synagogues in the
next few weeks. Speakers are now
available to deliver Super Sunday
presentations at area meetings to
promote the day and to recruit
volunteers.
Chairmen of Super Sunday are
Charlotte Held, Judge Robert H.
Newman, Susan Sirotta, and Barry
S. .Yarchin. William F. Saulson is
chairman of Super Week.
The following people are members
of the Super Sunday Executive
Committee:
Dr. Amir Baron, Arthur Bassman.
Emily Birnbaum, Grace Blasberg,
Aliza Brenner, Norman Chussitt,
Maurice Donsky. Tern.' Drucker,
Ellyn Elkins, Sidney Fagin, Debbie
Feldman. Jeanne Finkelstein, Louis
C. Fischer, Rabbi Simcha Freedman.
Joel Friedland, Jodie Friedman,
Sandra Sparber Friedman. Al
Golden. Philip S. Goldin. Sylvia
Laeser Goldsmith. William Gralnick,
Sue Graubert, Alex Green wald,
Claire Greenwald, Rabbi S. Grant,
Sylvia Herman, Robbie Herskowitz,
Norma Jay. Ira Kahn, Orly
Kimelman, Rabbi Morris Kipper.
Bruce Klasner and Dr. Isaac Knoll.
Also Alex Kotlechkov, Rowena
Kovler, Pauline Kraus, Steven J.
Kravitz. Helene Lanster, Suzanne
Lasky. Michael Leinwand. Fran B.
Levey, Shlomo Lichtman, Rabbi
Norman Lipson, Niece Matalon.
Elias Mitrani. Aida Mitrani, Stan
Newmark. Herbert Puvus. Herb E.
Polow, Michelle Rapchik. Ron
Romaner. Ellen Rose, Ginny
Rosenberg, Barbara Rothenberg,
Roy Sager, Milton Samuels. Gerald
K. Schwartz. Gene Segal. Gilad
Shafran. Laurel Shapiro, Pauline
Sher, Fran Storper. Lisa Synalovski,
Solomon Weine-r, Terry Weiss and
lack Werksman.
For more information, contact 576-
1000, ext. 216.


Page 4 Federation, November, 1984
Campaign
Pacesetter Dinner draws record attendance
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Pacesetter
Dinner, the annual gala event open to contributors of
$10,000 to the 1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign, was
held at the Fontainebleau-Hilton on November 8.
Special guest, comedian and author David Brenner, per-
formed to the largest crowd ever to attend a Pacesetter Din-
ner "We had record attendance, said Maxine E. Schwartz.
Pacesetter Dinner Chairman. 'Our Pacesetters truly demon-
strated their support and solidarity to our 1985 Against All
Odds campaign.'
Honored guests from Federation's beneficiary agencies
gave emotional presentations, explaining how they are
helped by Federation allocations, and how much more help is
greatly needec.
"For every Jew in Miami that we can help, there are
three that we cannot." stated Norman Braman. General
Campaign Chairman.
Michael M. Adler is Pacesetter chairman. Steven J.
Kravitz is co-chairman.
5pi the Pa esetter Dinnet rman Bramai v
rtz i iddress the au al it thi they rect e fron
.: From left H- n. parti' p.......
/". 5 Hot K her '' \utril Pr Esther Schm JC(
pre 1. Do ( Pr 'gram \ ,.- liraman. Mo net Scl irtz
JVS Pr t To '.' '' H '
ana 11 : ta r t hi I. :
Young Adult hi' ision tin mbt rs en ut the Pacesetter Dinner tfrom
Mana S ho hat, Ed Shohat, Tati Katz, Ecru Kutz. Helene Cohen Tim
Cohen.
Campaign communique
i -
Federation's Special (lifts Division recently held a worker training lun-
cheon. Participating were I from left): Richard Zinn, Norman Sholk, Gail
Newman and Norman Rachlin.
Key leadership seen at Pa esetter Dinner ifrom left) M
Pacesetter Division Chairman. Samuel I Adler, GSIJI
Maxine E Schwartz. Dinner Chairman. Norman Braman .' I.//'
General Campaign Chairman. Stei en ./ /\ra itz
Co-Chairman.
Partii ipating in th< Pacesetter Dinnei
Handler. Hazi Herb Canai I ntui
'man. Ben} ''-
Seei I I Pacesetter i
Friedland Norman Braman, Steit Muss, Maureen Muss
Jerry Robins, Sue Helfman, Richard Helfman. iSeati
Kronish, Rabbi Leon Kronish, I mm Bmman. Susan Shpii

Herbert Canarick, a Federation
board member and Aven-
tura Turnberry 1985 campaign
chairman, recently led the dun
munity Mission to Israel, with his
wife Hazel. While in Israel. Canarick
met with SLmcha Uinitz. a member of
the Knesset and former Israeli
Ambassador to the United States.
Canarick and Dinitz discussed a wide
range of issues including the
economic crisis confronting Israel:
the situation on the West Bank, and
the plight of Ethiopian Falashan
Jews, who are currently experiencing
the ravages of the African drought
and continued oppression by the
Ethiopian regime.
The chairman of Federation's
1985 Special Gifts campaign is
Harvey Friedman. Friedman and Co-
Chairmen Arnold Altman and Al
Golden have recruited the following
as captains: Louis Berlin. Ellen
Brazer, Bert Brown, Myra Farr,
Aaron Farr. Marvin
Martin Goodman, Char!- Held.
.Martin Kasper, Jerry Lelcnuk.
George Malin. Lawrence Metscn.
Michael Nachwalter Stanley
Newmark. Edward Shohat Norman
Sholk. Harold Vinik. Salomon
Wainbergand Richard Zinn
These captains have each
recruited five workers who ha"
attended worker training and na\?
made card selections for the 19N
campaign. All workers must cover
their cards by December 6
For additional information
about the Special Gifts campaign-
contact Marty Barasch at o.MUW-
extension 274.
The Insurance Division of
Federation held its first workersaie-
training session on November b i"
facilitator, attorney Alan J- KI"*\,
a member of the Board of Director8
and the Young Leadership Cabinet.
discussed the needs of the w
campaign.
Continued on Page 10


Federation, November, 1984
Page 5
women's Division
Federation Wednesday,
B & P Night smashing successes
November 7 will long be remembered as a banner day for
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Women's Division.
More than 1,100 women gathered at the Fontainebleau-
Hilton on Miami Beach for Federation Wednesday.
The overflow audience was treated to a daylong experience that
covered the full spectrum of human emotion and intellectual pursuit. Most
vivid were the moving words and recollections of Robert Clary, noted
BCtor and a survivor of the Holocaust. In his half-hour talk. Clary re-
counted his struggle for survival during the dark days of the Holocaust.
His haunting portrayal of life in war torn Europe, and his accounting of
the human misery in the concentration camps left the audience stunned.
Best selling author Judith Viorst shared her wit and wisdom with the
Federation Wednesday participants, and she was at her best, transform-
ing everyday experiences that we all share into charming and humorous
commentaries on life in the 1980s. Deborah Lipstadt. assistant professor
of Jewish Studies at the University of California. Los Angeles, offered
some critical insights on the role of the Jewish woman in contemporary
America.
Wednesday evening, Viorst was the special guest of the Business and
Professional Women at their Community Education Night, also held at
the Fontainebleau-Hilton. The wine and cheese reception provided B&P
women with the opportunity to meet with Viorst in a more intimate
setting.
According to Kenata Bloom and Elaine Richman, Federation Wed-
nesday Chairwomen, the event clearly demonstrated the high level of
community involvement among the Jewish women of Greater Miami. The
ultimate goals of Federation Wednesday were to raise the Jewish con-
ciousness of the participants and create among them a greater sense of
awareness regarding this Jewish community. Judging by the record
response to Federation Wednesday, the Women's Division has ac-
complished these goals and much more.
iiness and Professional Women I i wine ami cheese recep-
;< vial gm >/. Juilt th \ ioi -: N< i n at thi event are ifrom left/. Ray
Yarkin, BPW Community Education vice chairman; Sheryl Gold,
niit\ Education \'ight co-chairwoman: Amy Demi. Women's
"i: parliamentarian, Judith Viorst. Lisa Vreister, Community
n \'ight co-chairuoman, Phyllis K. Harte, BPW chairwoman;
.. Citron, a member of Community Education Xight planning
Robert Clary (center), guest speaker at Federation
Wednesday, joins (from left) Elaine Richman and
Refiata Bloom. Federation Wednesday co-chair-
women; Coil Harris, vice president of Community
Education; and Mikki Futernick, Women's Division
president.
Adios, Miami,
Hola Mexico!
Fiesta and friendship will be the
themes for the Women's Division
Mission to Mexico. This unique
mission will depart Miami, Monday,
January 21. The itinerary includes
tour full days and three nights in
Mexico City. Visits are scheduled to
Judaic and historical sites through-
out this sprawling city.
The mission will also provide the
opportunity for participants to be-
come intimately familiar with the
traditions and lifestyles of Mexico
City's Jewish community. More than
34,000 Jews currently live in Mexico
City.
Those women who are interested
in participating on the Mexico mis-
sion are invited to attend a mission
briefing party at the home of Susan
Stone on Monday, Dec. 10 at 8 p.m.
The cost of the mission is $400, with
a deposit of $100 refundable before
January 10. A minimum contribu-
tion of $1,250 to the 1985 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign is respectfully requested
for participation.
Sandi Belkind, Henrietta Sostchin
and Susan Stone serve as Mission
coordinators.
For further information about the
Mission to Mexico contact the
Women's Division, 576-4000, exten-
sion 237.
Ruby "10"
Luncheon to be
eye-catching
event
There will be a new look in the
Lion of Judah pin. Gloria Scharlin.
chairwoman of the Women's Divi-
sion Pacesetters, has announced that
the diamond eye of the pin will be re-
placed with a magnificent ruby
stone.
The setting for this occasion will
be the 1st Annual Pacesetter's Ruby
"'10" Luncheon at the home of Lin
Arison on Wednesday. December 5.
Pacesetters will be recognized for
making their personal gift of $10,000
or more to the 1985 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign.
The Lion of Judah pin is the
distinctive trademark of Women's
Division Trustees and Pacesetters.
The gold pin, with precious stone
settings, has been adopted by
several Federations across the
United States.
For additional information and
reservations for the Ruby "10"
Pacesetter's Luncheon please
ontact Federation's Women's Divi-
sion at 576-4000.
The Women's Division recently held its Lion of Judah Luncheon at the
Fontainebleau-Hilton. The event paid tribute to neu Pacesetters and
Trustees of the Division. Pictured above at the gala event are (from left/:
Terry Drucker, Women's Division campaign chairwoman; Gloria
Scharlin, Pacesetter Trustee chairwoman; Mikki Futernick. president of
the Women's Division: Joan Morrison. Pacesetter Trustee event chair-
woman; and sitting. Barbara Gordon, special guest .speaker: and Sue
Helfman. Pacesetter Trustee co-chairwoman.
Hold the Date!
Monday, December 3
Tuesday. December 4
Thursday. December 6
Monday. December 10
Wednesday, December 12
Thursday, December 13
Thursday, December 20
Tuesday, January 1
Wednesday. January 9
Thursday, January 10
Monday, January 14
Tuesdav, January 15
\.D. Campaign Kick-Off
S.D. & S.W. Campaign Kick-Off
Ruby "10" Luncheon home of Lin Arison
Campaign Steering Committee
Opening Dinner
Mexico City Mission Briefing
home of Susan Stone
Mission Returnee Program
M.B. Special Event
S.D. Special Event
Executive Committee Meeting
Campaign Steering Commit tee
HAPPY NEW YEAR!
I .eldership Training Course
(begins 6-week sessionl
Campaign Steering Committee
M.B.& VI). Board Meetings
S.D. Board Meeting


cc m-a^.j .

.k* Ull I < IIM
Page 6
Federation, November, 1984
Agencies
Rabbi Schiff to chair
Clergy Dialogue Croup
Appearing at the transferring of the garel of chairmanship of the NCCJ
Clergy Dialogue Group from left t<> right, Frank ./. Magrath. NCCJ
Florida Regional Director, the outgoing chairman. Mortsignor Bryan O.
Walsh. Executivt Director. Catholic Community Services. Archdiocese
of Miami: the incoming chairman. Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Director o\
Chaplaincy. Greater Miami Jewish / in ant Executive Vice
Pr, the Rabbinical Association oj Greater Miami, and Arch-
p Edward A McCarthy, a former chairman of the group. Arch-
[ret dioi esei f Miami.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff. Director of Chaplaincy. Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and Executive Vice President of the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami, was selected to succeed Monsignor Bryan O. Walsh,
Executive Director, Catholic Community Services, Archdiocese of Miami,
as Chairman of the Clergy Dialogue Group of the National Conference of
Christians and Jews.
It was observed by Richard F. Wolf son. chairman of the NCCJ Florida
Region and Frank J. Magrath. NCCJ Florida Regional director, that this
is the first time that an Orthodox rabbi has served as an NCCJ Clergy
Dialogue chairman.
The dialogue group is the oldest such group consisting of ministers,
priests and rabbis in the United States and has been meeting on a regular
basis for 20 years. The purpose of Clergy Dialogue is to explore common
faith heritage, as well as to deal in areas of sharp theological and
philosophical differences.
The announcement concerning the Chairmanship of Clergy Dialogue
being assumed by Rabbi Schiff was made by Richard Wolfson and Frank
Magrath. Both expressed appreciation and delight as to this selection of
Rabbi Schiff and noted that "Rabbi Schiff brings a background of
dedicated community service to this NCCJ leadership role." They further
stated that "Rabbi Schiff symbolizes in Dade County the very essence of
positive ecumenical and interfaith relations."
The gavel of chairmanship was turned over on September 19 at the
group's first fall meeting hosted by Monsignor Walsh at the Archdiocesan
Pastoral Center.
we Need You!
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Department of Volunteer
Services is seeking new volunteers for its hard-working staff. Volunteers
provide the various Federation departments with a wide variety of backup
services, including mailings of fundraising materials and invitations for
special events, and participation in special programs and projects.
Volunteers play a key role in the flow of information generated by the
divisions of the Federation.
"Many of our volunteers form long-term friendships." stated Gert
Schner, Director of Volunteer Services. "They love being together and
seeing each other on the same day every week. There is a great spirit of
camaraderie.
"Volunteers are rewarded with the satisfaction of doing something
for Israel and for Miami." continued Schner. who emphasized that time
and days of service are totally flexible.
If you can volunteer any amount of time, or know of someone who
can. please contact Gert Schner at 576-4000. extension 251.
Upcoming missions announced
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation has scheduled several missions
for 1985. If you are interested in receiving information about any of the
following missions contact Missions Coordinator Sara Schoninger at 576-
4000. extension 215.
YOUNG LEADERSHIP CABINET MISSION
TO ISRAEL
PRE MISSION TO WARSAW.
POLAND
SUMMER FAMILY MISSION-
TO ISRAEL
FALL COMMUNITY MISSION
TO ISRAEL
-MISSION (ITINERARY
BE ANNOUNCED)
\ZAKA MISSION TO ISRAEL
CH AZAK MISSION TO ISRAEL
FEBRUARY 24-MARCH 5, 1985
FEBRUARY 21-24
JULY31-AUGUST9, 1985
OCTOBER 15-25, 1985
OCTOBER 1014
OCTOBER, 1985
NOVEMBER, 1985
Barry university
offers
coursework
The Master of Arts Program in
Jewish Studies at Barry University
announces the following Spring
semester courses (starting January
15):
Talmudic Literature (RJS 642) -
Studies in the development and
interpretation of selected portions of
Rabbinic literature during the
Talmudic period. Instructor Dr.
Yehuda Shamir. Monday evenings.
6:30-9:30.
Ancient Jewish History (RJS 620)
Studies in Jewish history from
Biblical times until the formation of
the Babylonian Talmud. Instructor
Dr. Jeremiah Un term an. Tuesday
evenings. 6:30-9:30.
Modern Jewish History I RJS 6111
Studies in Jewish history from the
Emancipation through the establish-
ment of the State of Israel.
Instructor Dr. Yehuda Shamir
Wednesday evenings, 6:30-9:30.
Jewish Ethics (RJS 6341 An
analysis of Jewish law and ideology
on such issues as war. the death
penalty, abortion, euthanasia,
business dealings, charity, and the
role of women. Instructor Dr.
Jeremiah Unterman. Thursday
evenings. 6:30-9:30 at the Jewish
Federation of Greater Fort
Lauderdale.
For additional information about
the Jewish Studies Program contact
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman at 758-3392.
New meal site at
Federation
Gardens
Staff of the Federation I, i-;. ris nt
meals program, includ .
Director Stir, Weisbei
third from left), join
portrait' on th,
inaugural dux.
A congregate meal penec
on November 5, 19*: deration
Gardens. The initial ;
vide meals thret- r. witfe
participants having ion ol
purchasing up to .:itionai
meals a week. The cost
per meal.
JVS will employ a r. -
work four hours a day .,
vise the meal site cm i-> I:
is planned to utilize the services of
volunteers living in the building, to
serve the food and clean up after the
meal.
Frozen meals will he delivered
once a week from the JVS kitchen to
Federation Gardens Meals will be
heated in the ovens at Federation
Gardens and served directly to the
participants.
For more information about this
program contact JVS Nutritional
Project Director Steven \\ eisberg at
673-5106.
Crossword Puzzle
For Jewish Book Month -1!
Created for the JWB Jewish Book Council
by Joy L. Wouk
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Federation, November, 1984
page 7
Agencies/Israel
Unified pra yerbook for
Jewish members of
armed forces prepared
Eating your way through Israel
A Historic First: For the first time in American Jewish history, a unified
nraverbook for Jewish personnel in the U.S. armed forces and Veterans
Administration has been prepared by Orthodox. Reform and Conser-
vative rabbis under the aegis of JWB's Commission on Jewish Chap-
laincy. Rabbi Max Routtenberg (left). Conservative Rabbi and one of
three editors, calls attention to the press sheets of the neic prayerbook.
/, to right: Rabbi Routtenberg; Reform Rabbi Barry H Green, chair-
man JWB Chaplaincy Commission; Esther Leah Ritz. JWB president:
Orthodox Rabbi Hcrschcl Schacter. past Chaplaincy Commission chair-
man, and Rabbi David Lapp, director Chaplaincy Commission. Photo:
Rita Grotte.
NEW YORK, N.Y. For the first
time in American Jewish life,
Orthodox, Reform and Conservative
rabbis have prepared a unified
prayer book for Jewish members of
the U.S. armed forces and patients in
Veterans Administration hospitals.
The historic announcement was
made this week by Rabbi Barry H.
Greene, of Short Hills, N.J., chair-
man of the JWB Commission on
Jewish Chaplaincy, under whose
aegis the common prayer book was
prepared.
There has been a JWB prayer
book for Jewish personnel of the U.S.
armed forces for many years," Rabbi
Greene said. "But this prayer book
has hud two services, one traditional,
'.lie other, liberal. Last issued in
I958, this edition is in short supply.
The Religious Education
Advisory Group (Jewish) of the
Armed Forces Chaplain Board asked
the Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy of JWB to form an edi-
torial committee that would create
a prayer book for Jewish personnel
in keeping with the needs of a new
generation of Americans.
The Chaplaincy Commission
leaders felt that one service accept-
able to all Jewish personnel would be
our goal. We selected three distin-
guished scholars Rabbis Leonard
Kravitz, Gilbert Klaperman and
Max Routtenberg representing
the Reform, Orthodox and Con-
servative rabbinate, respectively,
and asked them to concentrate their
efforts on developing a unified
prayer book.
"This was not an easy task. The
Hebrew text was taken from the
prayer book prepared by the late
rabbi, Dr. David de Sola Pool. The
F.nglish text was taken largely from
the Shaarey Tefila ("Gates of
Prayer") prayer book.
The new unified prayer book was
two years in the making. The three
editors were able to resolve their
theological differences so that the
prayer book reflects unity."
"What were some of the problems
the editors faced?" Rabbi Rout-
tenberg, the Conservative member of
the editorial committee, was asked
during an interview.
"Resolving theological differ-
ences," he answered, "such as on the
questions of resurrection, sacrifice,
anthropomorphism and angelology.
The compromise we reached was that
we would respect the traditional
Hebrew text but we would feel free to
use a modern and poetic transla-
tion."
Rabbi Herschel Schacter, Ortho-
dox scholar and former chairman of
JWB's Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy, said, "I want to empha-
size that this prayer book is designed
exclusively for use by U.S. Jewish
military personnel and those in the
V.A. As far as civilian Jewish life is
concerned, it is not a breakthrough,
since each religious group has its
own prayer book."
To the question. "Why is the new
prayer book important?" Rabbi
Schacter answered, "The signi-
ficance is that we were able to reach a
consensus. The new prayer book is a
demonstration of unified consensus.
It will redound to the credit of JWB
and its Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy. It will also stimulate a
greater respect for classic Jewish
prayer."
Rabbi Schacter added. "The
Hebrew text of the new prayer book
is, of course, traditional. The English
is not an exact translation but a free
rendition of the Hebrew."
Rabbi Routtenberg noted that the
new prayer book is enriched with
many more personal prayers than
the existing prayer book contains.
"Examples of these personal
prayers are for the about-to-be-
married couple and the Bar and Bat
Mitzvah and those that reflect the
reality of Israel," he said.
Rabbi Greene, who is also chair-
man of the Central Conference of
American Rabbis (CCAR-Reform)
delegation to the JWB Chaplaincy
Commission, added, "Except for
references to G-d, the new prayer
book is non-sexist."
JWB President Esther Leah Ritz
said, "The Commission on Jewish
Chaplaincy of JWB has always
fascinated me. Here are Orthodox,
Reform and Conservative rabbis
working together for the Jewish well-
being of our personnel in the U.S.
military and hospitalized V.A.
patients.
"The publication of this new, uni-
fied prayer book, a most significant
achievement, is the latest in
JWB/CJC's endeavors along this
line."
The preface of the new prayer book
commends "the Editorial Com-
mittee" for producing "one common
book of worship, readings and in-
spiration for use by the U.S. Armed
Forces as well as in Veterans Hos-
pitals."
"This prayer book is not intended
for the general use of the civilian
population," the preface adds. "Its
shortened and compact form has
been designed specifically for
military congregations. Jewish
By BARBARA SOFER
Once upon a time tourists raved
about the scenery and complained
about the food. But then the ugly
duckling of Israeli food turned into
foie gras. Today Israel can boast
about the variety and quality of her
food. Whether you prefer Middle
Eastern, Eastern European,
vegetarian or continental food, you
will find a wide choice of restaurants
in Israel. And you can eat in the
intimacy of a small restaurant by
candlelight, in the lively outdoor
markets, in a kibbutz cafeteria, or in
the great outdoors.
Breakfast is a great way to start
the day in Israel. The Israeli break-
fast is based on the indigenous,
widespread habit of starting each
day with a proper vegetable salad.
The classic Israeli salad is made from
finely and evenly chopped tomatoes,
cucumbers, green peppers and
onions, seasoned with salt and
pepper, lemon juice and oil. It is
generally accompanied by eggs,
cheese, (cottage, cream and hard)
pickled fish, black and green olives,
lots of fresh bread, tea and coffee.
Israeli hotels have created glorious
variations on the breakfast theme.
At the King Solomon Sheraton in
Jerusalem, for instance, each guest
uses 15 pieces of china and tableware
for breakfast. She can choose from
one of the hot dishes pancakes,
french toast and omelettes as well
as partaking in the buffet. On the
buffet table are two kinds of juices,
olives, three varieties of herring,
three types of yellow cheese, yogurt,
danish pastry, donuts, cooked figs,
apricots, peaches, prunes, chopped
apples, fresh bananas, oranges and
grapefruit, butter, jam, honey and
margarine. Across town at the
Jerusalem Hilton you can choose
from no less than a dozen different
cheese or cheese spreads and half a
dozen kinds of pickled fish. The Tel
Aviv Sheraton has a "squeeze your
own juice" counter. And at the King
David Hotel in Jerusalem you can
have homemade croissants and
brioches, omelettes elegantly served
at your table, salmon or trout and
fresh orange juice with a bottle of
chilled champagne.
Of course, if you are strictly a
cornflakes person, no one is going to
force you to have such a vitamin-rich
breakfast. You might even want to
indulge in cake and coffee at one of
the many attractive cafes, tucked
into corners all over the country.
Most cafes have at least a few tables
outside to take advantage of Israelis
terrific weather. You can sip ex-
presso or American coffee on fancy
Dizengoff, the Tel Aviv fashion
district, or choose a quiet cafe on a
quaint Jerusalem street.
For most Israelis lunch is the main
meal of the day. Feel safe venturing
into the numerous soup and grill
restaurants. As early as nine in the
morning you will see hungry working
folks enjoying bowls of hearty soup,
often with a plate of humus, (chick-
pea paste) on the side. For as little as
a dollar you get a large bowl of meat
soup with kubeh, the meat-filled
burgul balls which the Jews of Iraq
and Kurdistan brought to Israel.
Many of these popular restaurants
offer simple, moderately priced meat
dishes.
Israel is a vegetarian's paradise.
The fast food restaurants feature
fried chickpea balls (falafel) or
spinach-filled borekas, (triangular
pastries resembling turnovers). In
addition, a number of excellent
vegetarian restaurants have opened,
featuring salad bars. There is even a
vegetarian cooperative settlement.
Moshav Amirim, with a vegetarian
guest house. Israel's marvelous
fruits and vegetables, which have
made Israel the greengrocer of
Europe, are the raw materials for
these creative meatless kitchens.
You can get lunch or dinner at
Israel's international restaurants;
more choices are made available
every week. Choose from a British-
style dining experience with pressed
duck or a joint of lamb, a Japanese
restaurant featuring a teppanyaki
open grill, or a number of other
Eastern style restaurants. For haute
cuisine there are also excellent
choices. For example, an in-
ternationally famous cook blends
Middle Eastern and French fare into
Israeli nouvelle cuisine. And. these
restaurants are kosher.
Do you love fresh fish? Catch your
own or order it at one of the
numerous restaurants on the Sea of
Galilee and in the southern port of
Elat.
No good meal is complete without
a good glass of wine, and Israel's
wineries have won awards for their
products.
Bon appetit and B'tayavon!
service personnel are encouraged to
Eiossess a more complete prayer book
or their personal devotions and
study.
"We pray that this prayer book
will be a source of inspiration to
Jewish personnel and a bond to their
faith, homes and families while they
are in the military service. May it
also be a means of strengthening
loyalty to Jewish tradition, both
during and after service in the
Armed Forces of the United States."
The Armed Forces Chaplain Board
of the U.S. Department of Defense
coordinated all the technical aspects
of production of the unified prayer
book and underwrote its printing.
The Commission on Jewish Chap-
laincy of JWB is the sole Jewish
ecclesiastical endorsing agency
which accredits qualified rabbis for
service as chaplains and approves
Jewish military personnel for service
as lay leaders.
The JWB Commission is made up
of representatives of the Rabbinical
Council of America (Orthodox), the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis (Reform), and the Rabbinical
Assembly (Conservative).
JWB is the U.S. Government-
accredited agency to serve the reli-
gious, Jewish educational, and
recreational needs of U.S. Jewish
military personnel, their families,
and V A hospital patients.
At the same time, JWB is the
leadership network and central
service agency for 275 Jewish Com-
munity Centers, YM-YWHAs and
communal camps serving one million
Jews in the U.S. and Canada.
It serves the Jewish educational
and cultural needs of North Amer-
ican Jewry through the JWB
Lecture Bureau, the JWB Jewish
Book and Music Councils, the
Jewish Media Service JWB, and
projects related to Israel.
JWB is supported by Jewish
Federations, the UJ A-Federation
Campaign of Greater New York,
JCCs and YM-YWHAs and JWB
Associates.


fi ...... ^ 1IIUJ
Page 8
Federation, November, 1984
Project Renewal /Or Akiva
Miami makes it happen an update on Or Akiva
Project Renewal began in 1977 as a joint program of diaspora Jewry,
the Jewish Agency for Israel, and the Israeli Government. The goal of the
project is the comprehensive physical and social rehabilitation of dis-
tressed neighborhoods in Israel, thereby upgrading the quality of life of 10
percent of the Jewish population in Israel, constituting about 35,000 fami-
lies with some 200,000 children.
Project Renewal evolved as a response to the plight of that segment
of the Israeli population, largely Sephardic, which arrived in Israel with
little or no money, formal education, or marketable skills. The initial
expectations and dreams of these people fell victim to a cycle of poverty
analogous to disadvantaged populations everywhere: inadequate housing,
poor education and few employment opportunities which in turn led to
frustration, delinquency, alienation and hopelessness. Project Renewal is
no less than an attack by Israel and world Jewry, in partnership, against
the "social gap" that poses an internal threat to Israel's stability and
progress.
A PROFILE OF OR AKIVA
The town of Or Akiva is an outgrowth of Ma'abara Caesarea, only one
kilometer east of the ancient city of Caesarea located on the Mediter-
ranean coast. Ma'abara is a place of transient housing. It is in the center of
the country, almost midway between Haifa and Tel Aviv.
In April 1951. at the crest of the mass immigration to Israel, fifteen
families from Rumania were brought directly from the ship to "Ma'abara
Caesarea.'' Following the Rumanians were scores of families from Iran,
Iraq, Egypt. Syria, Libya and Morocco. Before long, the Ma'abara had a
population of 2,000.
Here, the people were placed in wooden or aluminum shacks which
were dubbed by their occupants the Vunder Top" (a top-of-the oven cake
panl. In the summer they were infernos and in the winter they were cold.
There was no electricity, there were no comforts, no roads, and no drinking
water Drinking water was finally piped in from the nearby village of
Binyamina. But the pipe was laid above ground and when the water
reached the Ma'abara it was hot
More and more immigrants arrived, this time from North Africa. By
the end of 1952 the Ma'abara was overcrowded with a population of 3,000
and many were children.
In 1953, the population oi Ma'abara Caesarea reached 3.500
inhabitants, on both sides of the road: the shacks and barracks were on
one side, quasi-farm dwellings on the other. The Ma'abara committee
demanded "self-rule." After months of haggling with the Ministry of the
Interior, municipal status was granted. A fitting Hebrew name was then
sought.
Jack Bellock, a Federation board member, stands beside a dilapi-
dated structure prior to renovation.
Rabbi Akiva was one of the outstanding Tanaim (Sages) and the
foremost Talmudic scholar of his time (50-135 C.E.) At an advanced age,
he was arrested by the Roman rulers and in the dungeons of Caesarea, was
tortured to death by having his flesh torn from his body with steel combs.
He bore his sufferings with endurance and fortitude and died a martyr's
death, fulfilling the devout precept of: Thou shall love the Lord thy G-d
with all thy heart and with all thy soul Even if you must pay for it
with your life." The Government committee on name-giving gladly ac-
cepted the name, and Ma'abara Caesarea became the town of Or Akiva
(The Light of Akiva).
Or Akiva is now a town of 8,500 and a melting pot of people from
nineteen different exiles. The Afro-Asian communities are the dominant
components. The two largest single communities are Moroccan and
Rumanian. The demographic composition is as follows:
50 percent North African principally Moroccan
25 percent East European primarily Rumanian
20 percent Middle East Caucasus Mountains Kafkazi
5 percent Israelis, others
Age Distribution:
0-14 35.9 percent
15-24 20.7 percent
25-64 36.1 percent
over 65 7.3 percent
19.8 percent of households have
seven (7) or more persons.
The unfortunate conditions that existed in the Ma'abara were slow to
disappear, and evolved into many of the physical and social problems now
confronting Or Akiva. They are compounded by the geographic location of
the town, as Or Akiva is located east of Caesaria. sandwiched" between
An example of a Project Renewal renovation effort in Or Akiva.
the old and new Tel Aviv Haifa roadways. This location leaves very
little room for expansion, growth and development. In addition, the
town's geographic proximity to the tourist areas and villas of Caesarea
emphasize the social and economic distance felt by the residents of the
town today.
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Miami's Project Renewal accomplishments since 1981 have had a
tremendous positive impact on many significant and fundamental aspects
of dailv life for the residents of Or Akiva. The accomplishments are a
result of Miami's ability: II to press for action on the part of the Israeli
bureaucracy; 2) to enable Or Akiva residents to be more self-reliant and
assertive, and .'ii to furnish ideas and financing for desperately needed
programs and facilities that otherwise would not have developed and
flourished. The results of Miami's contributions appear not only as
physical improvements but also as socio-economic advancement and
constructive attitudinal change.
The following accomplishments, while far from an exhaustive list,
amply demonstrate the improvements in Or Akiva in a number of areas:
Health Services
A dental clinic and a family health center have been constructed and
equipped to provide Or Akiva residents with primary health care that was
previously unavailable to them.
Environmental Improvement
Open drainage ditches have been covered, sewer and water systems
have been improved, and debris that had accumulated over two decades
has been cleared. Project Renewal has sponsored a cleanup contest that
awarded prizes to residents and building committees which beautified
their property. Housing construction and renovation has meant newer and
larger living quarters for families in overcrowded and substandard
housing units.
Music and Cultural Enrichment
A music program has reached hundreds of youths and is one of the
sources of pride in Or Akiva. The program has attracted residents from
neighboring communities as well and therefore has enhanced the image of
Or Akiva. both within the municipality and throughout the region.
Public Facilities
A Community Center and Day Care Center have been constructed
and equipped in order to give Or Akiva residents a focal point for com-
munity activities and an opportunity for adults to gain educational and
social advancement while their preschool children get a much needed head
start. A sports and recreational program provides creative and enjoyable
leisure time pursuits for those who otherwise might lean toward anti-social
behavior.
.

Aaron and Myra Farr proud to be the first Miamians to visit Or
Aktva's new "Hab\ House. "


m^^^
Federation, November, 1984
Page 9
Education
problem^of Or ABvI"!S *,*h pri?ty Miami'8 PP* to the
demenur! srh5 1Accomplishments include the construction of a new
elementary school and the enrichment of existing school Droerams a
SSST Sr8tfS ^flr1 ^help Cllildren leara' ^>gnSe dSoi
EroSam -ft ff* and a ^^prehensive adult education
KSSSteSoKSSf. fefuJfuagB and manyother ski118-Further-
IsSS hZ e ment,has led to a ^ater commitment on the part of the
iSSSrSSt TC\ l? ^pr0Ve trainin for teachers d School ad-
ministrators. Assistant kindergarten teachers now enrich the educational
.. .-program for youngsters just beginning their formal education.
^Human Resources
Miami and Or Akiva have risen to the spirit of the Project Renewal
ideal in creating many programs to bring the two communities together on
a personal basis The pen pal and the exchange program between children
01 all ages have led to true friendships. The human dimension of Project
Renewal is perhaps best illustrated by the sight of the children of Or
Akiva proudly wearing Miami t-shirts and greeting missions from Miami
with enthusiasm.
The Project Renewal program has included a citizen participation
process in which residents play an important role in deciding how Israeli
government and Project Renewal funds will be spent in Or Akiva. People
"^ T" Wuei\ both disadvantaged and acquiescent have received skills
through the leadership training program which enable them to become
^..^spokespersons for the plight of their families and that of their neighbors.
1 he alienated youth program has had an impact in Or Akiva, a com-
munity with a reputation for a severe delinquency problem. Neighborhood
clubs and vocational training provide residents with marketable skills and
organized and constructive activities.
Project Renewal has been demonstrated elfective in Or Akiva. The
(ireater Miami Jewish community can point not only to physical evidence
of its contributions to the rising quality of life, but also to the improved
image that Oi Akiva holds of itself.
t:
' I < (*
I
Students in Or Akiva hai e access to microcomputers in their educational
program.
Or Akiva hosts olim party
Last summer, the Aliyah Council of South Florida and the
Association of Americans and Canadians in Israel and the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, co-sponsored a dinner party for Florida Olim. The
event took place in the recreation building of Or Akiva, Miami's Project
Renewal city. More than 100 Olim from Florida attended this "first of its
kind" event.
"** In addition to a delicious home cooked dinner, prepared by the
residents of Or Akiva, there was Israeli dancing, a concert performed by
the Youth Symphony Orchestra of Or Akiva and a welcoming address by
the Mayor of Or Akiva. Florida Olim from all parts of Israel joined
together to enjoy the food, friendships and festivities. The event was a
great success and the Aliyah Council expects to sponsor similar events in
the future.
CMJF's Project Renewal-Or Akiva delegation:
Stanley c. Myers, chairman; Shirley Spear, L. William
Spear, Mort Teicher.
Educational initiatives take
shape in Or Akiva
Smiling faces abound in an Or Akiva day care facility.
Or Akiva Youth Symphony Orchestra performing at Florida Olim party
in Or Akiva,
Shortly after the State of Israel
was created in 1948, waves of im-
migrants arrived from all corners of
the earth. People from 19 different
countries arrived in the small settle-
ment called Or Akiva. They brought
with them little education, and little
experience or interest in the process
of formal education. Unfortunately,
this condition has led to learning
problems that are evident in this
generation of children. In order to
deal more effectively with the issue
of improved education, Or Akiva was
one of the fortunate nine communi-
ties to be selected for inclusion into
the "ABC A Brighter Child
Program."
The program's overall objective is
to promote children's development
by guiding all parties responsible for
their care and education. The basic
principles of intellectual develop-
ment and behavior patterns of
children are applied in a formal
structure in order to improve the
children's ability to learn from new
experiences, including their ability to
absorb, process and express informa-
tion in a manner which enables them
not only to function normally but
also to adjust and learn from
changing situations in the future.
Therefore, not only the children, but
also parents, child care workers,
kindergarten teachers, school
teachers, administrators and oper-
ators of parent programs, have been
included in the program. Learning
and environmental planning and
educational programs to cover
children beyond the ABC Program
are being created. Contact among
the various officials who are respon-
sible for early childhood programs
has been promoted thereby facilitat-
ing a long-term solution to the
problem.
This year, the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, under the
guidance of the Project Renewal
ommittee headed by Stanley C.
Myers, has allocated over $37,000 in
the Project Renewal budget for this
program. Over $14,000 has been
spent previously in order to bring
"ABC" into Or Akiva for the benefit
of its citizens.
The awareness of the importance
of early childhood education and
Erograms formulated to improve
laming at that crucial stage of
development are a recent pheno-
menon in Israel. It should be noted
that professionals are still unsure of
exactly which development-related
factors are responsible for young
children's growth, in that some
children seem to learn faster and
develop socially in a more appro-
priate manner than others. The ABC
Program seeks to influence children
not only while they are in the
program, but also after they have
left it, thus creating a lasting benefit
for the State of Israel. Families and
other significant individuals have
therefore been included in a multi-
year program to improve the
children's chances of success. This
will include a transition stage from
daycare to kindergarten and thn
from kindergarten to first grade.
The methods used focus on infants
and their mothers and are somewhat
experimental. They will be applied to
a broader target population once it
has been completed and evaluated.
The program now includes infants
between the ages of six to 12 months.
There are three stages of the
program which include initial
evaluations, applications of educa-
tional programming, and a final
evaluation. Or Akiva has now com-
pleted its first year of the program
and is looking forward to its con-
tinuation. In fact, several families
have already been provided with
guidance and study days in which
parents and children are observed
and then evaluated.
Dental care a
priority in
Or Akiva
The goal of the Dental Care
Project in Or Akiva is to bring all
residents to an improved level of oral
hygiene by providing regular dental
care and preventive maintenance,
with special attention to the
childrens' needs. The efforts of a
volunteer from Miami, Dr. Edward
Galler. brought the critical nature of
dental care in Or Akiva to the at-
tention of the Miami community.
His unselfish and continuing efforts
have inspired the creation of this
program which will make a lasting
impact on the citizens of Or Akiva.
One of the specific target
populations are the youth, especially
those between the ages of 3 and 18,
which represent about 2,000 in-
dividuals or approximately one
quarter of the population of Or
Akiva. It has been observed that
they do not now practice adequate
oral hygiene, and that the results are
unpleasant and unnecessary. Under
the program currently being
discussed, Kupat Holim (a public
health agency), will administer the
program using equipment that has
been purchased by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and will
occupy a building that has been
developed through Project Renewal.
Miami is being asked to i -ider an
appropriation of at least 6108.000
over a 3-year period for the program.
This figure may be increased once
additional components to improve
dental care for senior citizens have
been included.


1 -V
page 10
Federation, November, 1984
CRC/Agencies
sfcsj mobilizes
community
The South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry (SFCSJ), a committee
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Community Relations Com-
mittee, has mobilized the local com-
munity in a series of round-robin
hunger strikes and protest telephone
calls to the Soviet Embassy in
Washington in a show of solidarity
and support with Soviet Jews facing
intensified anti-Semitism and per-
secution.
The action, which is part of a
nationwide manifestation of solidar-
ity with the more than 170 hunger
strikers in 10 cities in the Soviet
Union, comes in the wake of reports
of new arrests and intensified Soviet
efforts to eradicate the teaching of
Hebrew and Jewish culture, and the
practice of the Jewish religion in the
Soviet Union.
Since October 22, the SFCSJ has
been coordinating 25 area
synagogues, organizations and the
religious school teachers of South
Florida in rotating fast days to coin-
cide with the hunger strikes under-
way by Jews in the Soviet Union
who are protesting the pending trials
of Aleksandr Kholmiansky, Yuli
Edelstein and Yakov Levin all
Hebrew teachers, and the more
recent arrests of Yakov Mesh and
Mark Nepomniascksy, Jewish
cultural activists. (These cases were
detailed in last month's edition of the
Federation Newsmagazine.)
In declaring the strikes, Hinda
Cantor, Chairman of the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry,
stated that the action is meant as
"an expression of the spirit of unity
that bonds us with Soviet Jews in
every moment of their anguish." The
significance of the fasts was noted by
Cantor, who explained that "from
time immemorial. Jews have used
this spiritual weapon as a force to
persuade public opinion and those
responsible for provoking injustice.
There is no greater cause for fasting
than what is currently happening to
Jews in the Soviet Union."
The second phase of the South
Florida Conference's Solidarity
Hunger Strikes will run from
November 18 to December 18, with
participating synagogues and organ-
izations pledging to fast for a second
time. In addition, petitions and post
cards will be circulated throughout
the community calling for Soviet
officials to release the Hebrew
teachers and cultural activists and
drop the charges against them.
"We will continue our fight for
Soviet Jews until their government
allows those who wish to emigrate to
do so and those who remain be al-
lowed to live freely as Jews. We
know we will not win every battle,
but we will not lose everyone either.
These battles must be fought be-
cause we know deep in our beings
that we are helping to prevent
another Holocaust because this
time we know what is happening and
we will not be silent," Cantor con-
cluded.
The entire community is urged to
join with the SFCSJ in its efforts.
For further information, call 576-
4000.
Campaign communique
Continued from Page 4
Kluger outlined effective
methods of approaching people for
both financial support and volunteer
services, and the workers practiced
these theories through role play.
Steven Reimer is Insurance
Division chairman, co-chairmen are
Norman Weiner and Art Jacowitz.
For further information on the
Insurance Division contact Lisa
Imberman at 6/6-4000, extension
216.
Lecture will feature jcc workshop to benefit
Ref usenik expert parents and children
Martin (iilbert
For more than a decade. Women's
Plea for Soviet Jewry observances
have been an important yearly
national event, uniting the
leadership of National Jewish
Women's organizations as a com-
munity to reaffirm their continuing
concern and commitment to Soviet
Jewry in their struggle for freedom.
This year the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry has
changed the format of Women's Plea
because of a unique opportunity to
hear a very special speaker.
On Sunday, December 2. 1984, at
10:30 a.m. the SFCSJ will join with
Temple Beth Sholom in co-
sponsoring the Sunday Omnibus
Lecture series featuring Martin
Gilbert. The lecture will be held at
the temple, 4144 Chase Avenue.
Miami Beach.
Martin Gilbert is known to many
in this country and abroad as an
authority on the subject of Soviet
Jewry. He is an outstanding speaker,
widely acclaimed as a modern
historian and is the official
biographer of Winston Churchill. His
most recent book, The Jews of Hope,
was written after a visit to the Soviet
Union in which he established
personal relationships with many
Refuseniks.
The South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry was honored to have
Professor Gilbert write the
Introduction to Volume XI. Case
Histories of the Refuseniks. 1984 Is
Here: Free Soviet Jews, published.
September 1984.
The community is invited to join
with the SFCSJ and Temple Beth
Sholom to hear and meet this true
friend of Soviet Jewry. Tickets are
available at a cost of $3.50 each and
can be obtained through Temple
Beth Sholom by calling 532-3491.
Lou Rones, California Club
Community Campaign Chairman
has announced the names of area
chairmen for 1985, they include:
Jerry Hyams, reception chairman;
Leroy Raff el and Forrest Raff el,
advisory chairmen; Phil Ross, Azure
Lakes; Helen Maislen and Zelda
Solomon, co-chairmen, Azure Lakes;
Jack Gellman and Rose Klausner,
Canongate; Marilyn and Harold
Less, Cedar Glenn; Jerome Altman
and Ben Rabinowitz, Chant illy.
Sidney Korber, Cocowood; Shankey
Raffel, Country Club; Dr. and Mrs.
Sylvan Lewis, Greenbrook; Sandy
and Lou Tobier, North Lake Village;
Lorraine Weintraub, Private Homes;
Jane and Jerry Schulman,
Quatraine; Herbtrt E. Polow and
Harvey Berman. Royal Oaks;
Bernice and Irving Fernbok, San-
dpiper; Herbert Lelchuk, Skylake
Villas; and Ruth and David Bennett,
Summertree.
The California Club Community
has scheduled two events of special
interest in the upcoming months a
local mission to visit Federation's
beneficiary agencies on December
12; and the California Club Annual
Federation Dinner, January 13.
Contact Susan Marx at 576-4000,
extension 202 for more information.
Denny Abbott, Executive
Director of the Adam
Walsh Resource (enter.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center (JCC), a branch
of the Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida, joins with the Adam
Walsh Resource Center on Wednes-
day. Dec. 12 at 7:30 p.m. to bring
parents an informative workshop on
"Street Proofing Your Child." The
Michael-Ann Russe'l is sponsoring
this workshop in the hope that
parents will learn ways of protecting
their children and keeping them safe.
The workshop, facilitated by
Denny Abbott, Executive Director
of the Adam Walsh Resource Center
will focus on myths and facts about
assault on children, simple and effec-
tive self protection techniques for
children, safety with strangers,
missing children legislation, the
judiciary system, protection and
prevention techniques.
Denny Abbott's major work
achievements in the area of child
protection are numerous, including
the establishment of a computerized
data bank on missing children which
served as a prototype for the State
system.
The Adam Walsh Child Resource
Center, Inc., was originally formed in
1973 under the name Broward
County Committee for Child
Advocacy. It was organized by a
group of volunteers as a result of the
1970 White House Conference on
Children and Youth. In 1975 it was
funded under the Youth Services
System grant from the Law Enforce-
ment Assistance Administration
(LEAAi. This grant lasted five
years. In 1977, the name was
changed to Child Advocacy, Inc.
Funding for the agency has been
primarily through federal grants. In
1977, the Center was awarded a
three-year grant under the LEAA
Project Diversion, and in 1980 was
one of 22 projects nationally funded
for three years under the Youth
Advocacy Initiative (through the
Office of Juvenile Justice and Del-
inquency Prevention.) Under this
project a staff of 20 were involved
with the three components of the
agency: legal, evaluation, and com-
munity organization.
In 1981, Reve Walsh founded the
Adam Walsh Outreach Center for
Missing Children. This agency was
formed to assist other parents of
missing children. Child Advocacy
had already become involved in the
missing children problems by
planning a computerized system for
use in South Florida. In January,
1982, the two organizations joined
forces and became the Adam Walsh
Child Resource Center. John and
Reve Walsh are members of the
Board of Directors.
The JCC workshop, "Street Proof-
ing Your Child" in cooperation with
the Adam Walsh Resource Center is
open to the entire community and is
free to JCC members and $2 for noru
members. All who wish to parti-
cipate can do so by calling either
Judy Shapiro or Bennett Bramson at
the JCC at 932-4200. Reservations
are required for this workshop and
seating is limited.
It
I
Israel Programs
opens door
for visits
to homeland
Nothing is quite as effective as
"turning on" Jews to their faith and
heritage as the singular experience of
a trip to Israel. And the Greater
Miami Jewish community is for-
tunate to have a center which
provides assistance to persons in-
terested in visiting Israel or par-
ticipating in Zionist activities.
For more than 14 years, the Israel
Programs Office, a beneficiary
agency of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, has served the South
Florida community as a valuable
resource center offering information
about Israel.
The office encourages young
people in the community to take
advantage of the many programs in
Israel, which include work, study,
volunteerism and touring.
"Any Jew who visits Israel, our
people's homeland. returns a
changed person," said Linda
Minkes, chairman of the Israel
Program Office. "The experience of
visiting Israel and learning aobut the
state, the central focus of con-
temporary Jewish life, is a vital key
to develop Jewish identity and
commitment."
The activities of the Israel
Programs Office are managed by
Gilad Shafran, one of Miami's five
shelichim (Israeli emissaries).
Shafran provides professional
consultation and assistance to in-
dividuals, groups and organizations
concerning Israel-oriented programs
and activities. A native Israeli,
Shafran became one of the com-
munity's shelichim last year.
Shafran noted that the primary
group served by his office is Jewish
college youth; students are among
the most likely individuals to visit
Israel.
"Of course, we prefer to have*"
people make Aliyah, but we know
only a few choose to do so. Never-
theless, the impact of visiting Israel
is usually quite dramatic it in-
creases a person's identity and he
begins to understand the centrality
of Israel in Jewish life."
The Israel Programs Office makes
speakers available to groups that are
interested in learning more about
Israel. A regional coordinator and
student volunteers also organize
many Zionist activities on college
campuses throughout the**
southeastern United States. The
office's staff can help organizations
develop Israel-related programming.
For more information, please call
the Israel Programs Office at 676-
4000.


Federation, November, 1984
page 11
h Pade/Jewish Education
The
ari
>m' program
:hed in
lade
ere's a "welcome wagon"
_varm hello to newcomers in ,
[Dade Jewish community,
luth Dade Branch of the
liami Jewish Federation
, a "Shalom" program
kelp ease new residents into
lized Jewish community.
Ilast spring, the Shalom
is devising various
to make the newcomers
[at home in South Dade.
trying to help acclimate
j>le in the community in
fthe full range of activities
to Jews," said Shelly
chairman of the Shalom
,. "We really want them to
they're part of the com-
immittee is using a dual
to find and welcome new
Brodie said. First, it is
rything it possibly can to
^corners in the community,
or that requires research in
eas. In addition to sifting
public records that list
of homes in the region, the
is in touch with
es and other Jewish
ions who can help them
residents. Second, the
. is sending volunteers to
Une visits to new members of
Dade community,
w program will provide a
f services, including home
, newcomer parties, and
iat will inform the "new
the neighborhood about the
it their disposal in the area,
.me visitation, a Federation
will bring a bag of Jewish
a challah. small bottle of
. shabbat candles. Efforts
>eing made to provide a trial
;ion to a Jewish newspaper
imers.
lhalom program is seeking
rs in the community who
trained for home visitations
organizing of events.
,lly, the committee seeks
ions of items for home
_nd information about
srs in the community,
iore information about the
program, please call Judy
at 251-9334.
Miami students attend Hillel
conference
extremely challenging and rewar-
ding," reflected Headmaster Samuel
Lasko, who has more than 20 years
of teaching and administrative
experience in the field of Jewish
education. "The South Dade Jewish
community can be proud that the
school was established this is an
independent Jewish junior high
school created by the community,
and it relates to the entire com-
munity. I extend an open invitation
to anyone who would like to come
visit us."
The Brandeis Academy (formerly
the Jewish Junior High School of
South Florida) was conceived in the
late 1970s by an ad hoc committee of
the Central Agency for Jewish
deis
emy:
son
ity education
its third year of operation,
jdeis Academy of South
.mains unique in the area of
ray school education: it is
[tion's only independent,
lity-based junior high school
not affiliated with another
1 or a synagogue,
on the campus of the
Dade Jewish Community
>n SW 102nd Avenue, the
73 students (grades 7-9) are
. in a program that places an
pmphasis on Judaic and
studies. The academy's
and varied curriculum
the development of sound
ibits, communication skills
itery of fundamentals in
and mathematics,
lly, the school offers a full
. elective courses, selective
programming, and teacher
both Hebrew and general
A professional guidance
ir provides support to
, students and families.
past two years have been
Education, which determined that an
independent junior high school was
needed to complement the Jewish
High School of South Florida located
in North Dade. That vision was
realized in August, 1982, when the
school was dedicated for its first
incoming class.
Noting that the school has no
formal affiliation with any religious
branch in its Judaic studies
curriculum, Lasko said that students
come from Reform, Conservative and
Orthodox households. "The
curriculum takes a very traditional
approach one that parents are ex-
cited about.'' he said, adding that
the students regularly conduct
prayer services and holiday
celebrations.
After its first year of operation,
the school received accreditation
from the Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools, a tremendous
accomplishment in so short a time. A
team of eight education professionals
from the University of Miami
Gradaute School of Education and
Allied Professions designed the
general studies curriculum for the
school. The Judaic curriculum was
developed by Lasko, in conjunction
with fellow staff members and the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education. The school has a faculty
of 18 teachers.
"Brandeis Academy is attempting
to provide a total education for the
Jewish child." stated Alan Jacoby,
president of the Academy. "We hope
to attract students by offering
advanced Jewish education and
training. We also offer quality
secular education."
In the past two years, the school
has grown in several areas: a new
building with three additional
classrooms and an auditorium was
opened this year and several elec-
tees have been added to the
curriculum, including art, typing,
computers, Spanish, history of the
Holocaust, the American Jewish
community and Jewish short stones.
Additionally, the school has an
active extracurricular sports
program: they are part of a private
league and have intramural teams.
Any school in its first few years
of development will be challenged by
special problems and concerns, said
Lasko. "But we have successfully
met these challenges, and we have
become one of the forces in South
Dade helping to build a cohesive
Jewish community."
Alan Jacoby stated, "Our future
goals are to be a strong viable junior
h,Kh school, and to ultimately
become the feeder school for a Jewish
High School in South Dade.
For more information on the
Brandeis Academy, please call 265-
1336. The Brandeis Academy of
South Florida is a beneficiary of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation s
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fui A Campaign.
On a crisp, bright Sunday after-
noon in late October, Jewish college
students from across the country
converged on Washington, D.C. to
attend Washington 3, the third na-
tional Jewish student conference on
public policy issues. This event, held
Oct. 21-24 at the National 4H Con-
ference Center, was sponsored by the
national office of the B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundations in association
with the International Council of
B'nai B'rith and B'nai B'rith
Women. Co-sponsors were AIPAC.
the University Services Department
of the American Zionist Youth
Foundation, the Student Coalition
for Soviet Jewry and the University
Programs Department of the United
Jewish Appeal. f
Among the two hundred particip-
ants were ten students from Florida
universities. They came to hear
experts discuss recent developments
in United States-Israel relations, the
formation of the new Israeli govern-
ment, the status of oppressed Jewry
in the Soviet Union and Ethiopia,
and the current status of American
domestic and foreign policy. The
purpose of the conference was to
introduce students to a range of
views on major issues of concern
within the American Jewish com-
munity and to develop strategies for
students to address these issues
from their own campuses.
Robin Kerzner, a delegate from the
University of Miami, returned to
school as a newly elected member of
the B'nai B'rith Hillel Student
Secretariat. Robin, a junior, also
serves as a Senator in the Under-
graduate Student Body Govern-
ment. As the Southeast regional
delegate to the national Secretariat,
her goals are "to maintain com-
munication among the more than
twenty affiliated colleges and
universities in the region, and to
transmit the concerns of Florida
students to the Secretariat." Robin
is already at work on two Secretariat
programs: a newspaper advertising
campaign to commemorate the
United Nations mandate to establish
the State of Israel and the adoption
of Soviet Jewish Refuseniks by
student groups.
Barri Stewart, a Florida Atlantic
University senior, was chosen to be a
Florida delegate after she led a
successful UJA campaign at her
school last year. "The conference,
was a good education in politics and
an opportunity to meet the best
Jewish student leaders in the
country. It opened a new world for
me and helped to rekindle my in-
terest in Hillel here on campus,' said
Stewart.
Also attending Washington 3 were
Maxine Aiken of the University of
Florida, Gary Grossman and Vicki
Tave of Florida State University,
and Aaron Duncan, Wayne
Firestone, Audrey Glover, Todd
Goldman and Nicole Marks, all of
the University of Miami.
Washington 3 is one of several new
programs developed by national
Jewish organizations for college
students within the past few years.
These activities, including con-
ferences organized by the American
Zionist Youth Foundation, AIPAC
and the United Jewish Appeal,
provide an opportunity for parti-
cipants to increase their knowledge
of Judaism and contemporary
Jewish issues, and to develop their
skills as campus leaders. Students
return from these programs excited
and informed, and with a sense of the
broader Jewish community. They
then translate their enthusiasm into
programs wV' evolve many more
students tl ould reach other-
wise," stated University of Florida
Hillel Director Gerald Friedman.
The Hillel Foundation of South
Florida is a beneficiary agency of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation s
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign.
Robin Kerzner and \\a\n,' Firestom
University of Miami students, r< iev
the program for the Washington 3 ( on
prog
ference.
Mt. Sinai
celebrates
35th anniversary
Help Mount Sinai Medical Center
celebrate its 35th Anniversary on
Tuesday, Dec. 4 at 10 a.m. on the
west side of the hospital's Young
Presidents Club Child Care Center.
Special festivities for the morning
include the 50-piece Miami Beacn
Senior Symphony, a giant cake in
the shape of the Medical Center's
buildings that will be cut and served,
the burial of a time capsule contain-
ing an item from each of the hos-
pital's 50 departments and informal
modeling of antique nursing uni-
forms.
The hospital is trying to locate the
60,000 babies born there so that they
can join in the celebration. All indi-
viduals born at Mount Sinai are
requested to call Public Relations at
674-2600 if they are able to attend
the anniversary party on Dec. 4.
Each will receive a free color portrait
of their face on a baby's body.
The morning-long festivities are
free and open to the public.
Answers to crossword Puzzle for
Jewish Book Month 1984

iBootiCoii"


"Vw*.,iVtW**""*l'fZl 'iamr%mr% niAwnun / mvm-i* m/m*
Page 12
JII IUVI
Federation, November, 1984
1984 tax planning strategies
By STEVEN M HAB1B.CP A
''.:.-. tne I me Is of recjong ; a
tax ..:'...:;. for I984 Depending on your
: trtk .. a* ".ai situation t be folk in g
rateejjea san bets
METHOD OF ACCOUNTING
Most individual! oaa the Bash rr.ethod of
accounting and ;_-..-.; n income
*.-.-.-- luct expenses when paid
reducing your rrenl tax
iefer receipt : ii r
ment ::' your expenses
must tx *hen deferring m me I avoid
nstruci eipt rule the
i me '.. recognized ii the in me is in
j arc '."..-.
'.' si taxpayen irill find time
their expenses since they contz syment
Accelerating s payment wiU generally reduce
..- tax ..a'.--".; Ar. rr\.et.: rs me
deductk ru ii J ire -bject to the Alternative
Minimum Tax If an expense it pa.c with a
credit care .: ... be considered paia in the year
the item is charged
DEDUCTIONS
WORKING COUPLES Are allowed a
deduction of 10 percent of the lower earning
spouse's "qualified earned income The qual-
ified earned ..-.come is limited to 830.000 and
results in a maximum deduction of $3,000. In
order to qualify, a joint return must be filed.
MEDICAL The Tax Equity and Fiscal
Responsibility Act of 1982 TEFR.-V increased
the floor on the medical expense deduction from
3 percent to 5 percent of adjusted gross income
AGIl Since it will be more difficult to exceed
the new floor, consideration should be given to
either accelerating or deferring medical ex-
penses 'when it is possible If you bunch"
your medical expenses, you may exceed the
floor m one year rather than fall below the floor
in two years
The Tax Reform Act of 19-4 ITRA permits a
deduction for certain lodging iup to S50 per
nighti in connection with specialized medical
treatment away from home
( HARITABLE CONTRIBUTIONS -
Charitable contributions of appreciated
property held for more than one year isix
months for property acquired after June 22.
1964, see discussion under capital gains and
Losses) may result in a substantial deduction
while avoiding the recognition of gain on the
appreciation. Examples of property that
qualify tor this treatment are land held for
investment stocks, bonds, clothes and most
household goods. The deduction is generally
the lair market value of the property on the
date of the contribution and is limited to 30
percent of AGI. You may elect to reduce the
deduction by 40 percent of the appreciation of
the property and become suoiect to the 50
percent .imitation rather than the 30 percent
limitation. Cash contributions to most qualified
charities are limited to 50 percent of AGI. Any
excess over the limitations may be carried
torward for five years.
For example: Joe Moss owns land he pur-
chased for investment purposes in 1975 for
Bl0,000. The land is currently worth $50,000.
Joe is considering selling the land and then
gifting the proceeds to the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies. Let's compare the
results of a gift of the property to the charity
with a sale of the property followed by a cash
contribution. We are assuming that Joe is in
the maximum tax bracket and his contribution
is 30 percent of his AGI.
Tax havings on Charitable
Contribution
<:>()'-< of 850.000)
Tax on Appreciation
($40,000 x 2"
NET TAX SAVING
i,IH 'it
eiaeajj
"MKIPU'V.-
$25,000 $25,000
18,000)
S 25,000 < 17,000
\ote xhe TRA of 1984 requires donors
lo obtain an appraisal of certain donated
property and to a'.tach certain substantiation
to their redu-as for contributions made after
1984. If you are considering donating ap-
preciated property that otherwise does not
require an appraisal you may want to donate it
Sf en M. Hat I
in 1984 rather than 1985 in order to avoid the
added expense of an appraisal i Appraisal fees
are tax deductible*.
CAPITAL GAINS AND LOSSES
Long-term capital gains are given a 60
percent deduction while short-term gains are
not and are therefore taxed at ordinary income
rates. Capital losses may be used to offset
ordinary income by up to $3,000 and the
balance can be carried over indefinitely It
takes two dollars of long-term capital loss to
offset one dollar of ordinary income Short-term
losses offset ordinary income on a 1 for 1 basis
The TRA of 1984 changed the holding period
rules to permit long-term capita, gain tri
ment for assets held for more than six months
This rule appiies to assets a ._..-: after J
22, 1984 and before January 1 I -
STOCK You should Keep some rules in
mind relative to the sale of securities. Firs: .:
you sell part of your holdings m a corporation
acquired at various times, you must compute
your gain or loss using the cost basis of the
shares purchased first An exreption to the
first-in first-out ruie exists where you instruct
your broker to sell a specific stock certificate
b> identifying the certificate number Second.
losses sali of securities are not dec
tible if you purchase similar securities ithin 30
days from the sale date T.-. rities that
during th<
sidered worth! n tax
year.
If you own a stock that has appreciated, and
. want to "lock-in" the gain but do not wa
recogmzi i h i a
techni ailed ig short ... x
can do just thai S mph sell the
stock short while retaining ;-..-. .-
If the stock goes up. you Will have a '
the long position and a ;..i
position, and vice versa In 198c ....J
-:. rt sale \ ; ielh ering i -.- rig
\ .-: fit is ret gnized '
ALTERNATIVE MINIMUM ] ,\ ]
Taxpayer- with large I ng-tenr -... f
ge tax credits or
bject :' the Alu .! I
i AMI The tax is compui |
per ent n j jt adjusted grrs-
is your tax prefi
I deductions and -
for returns and J r .. I
inter
f 10 percent of AGI
asualty ----- in i ./ ....
are permitted deducti as S
real estate taxes an .
.-ctions are not allowed for '. '
and these expenses should be def< ..
possible when you are subject : \\'.~ ; -.
AMT exceeds your net regular tax ha: ...:. i
must pay the larger amour.:
RETIREMENT ARRANGEMENTS -I
Aside from the obvioti- advantage oil
retirement arrangements _
your retirement), they also pi |
deduction and a tub star errs : income!
Individual Retirement Arrangen i ts IRA
can be used by all individuals with
income, even if they are coven mother!
plan. The maximum deduction I ir. IRA is I
$2,000 or $2,250 for a spousal IRA where there
is a bi n-working spouse. An IRA may beI
:ed up until April 15. 1985 s i in :ec:de
whether or not you want to mai -;l
contribution when preparing j irn Setf
-.dividual* are permitti i peni
Ke gh P.jr. with deducts ns : ..: I .000 in
1 184 T.-.. plan, unlike an IRA -.-.
: prior to the year
funding may take place by the du
return.
GIFTS lifts : in
property can spread the tax I
bracket family member- thus the
overall family tax bill Gifts : apj lating
ets will reduce Uu Ion r'sestati lenerallj
ip to SI per donet
.: your sp as* ns< nts eifl
-; litting without incurr..-.,; a gift
gifts exceed the annual .-
. n gift tax b;
. be unified :- In is 5
1984 wl sfersof S3-:
.
. w........ .--._
ix-free transft l *
r moi nformal .-.-.:
th the F ind i

!
Foundation pays tribute
In its short twelve year history, the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies has received approximately six million dollars in bequests from
caring individuals who have left a legacy of love to the Jewish community
They are:
I
Milton Bauchuer
Daniel Brody
Benjamin Broegol
E. Franklin Carson
Etta Evaas
Ethel Feldmao
William Feldman
Erna Gillia
Morris Greenfield
Shirley GreeBfield
Harry Harrison
These legacies enable the Foundation
respond to the changing needs of our
emergencies.
In order to express appreciation for these important gifts received
during the past year, the names of people who have provided such
testamentary gifts will be inscribed on a handsome memorial display.
To further honor these individuals, a special memorial service will be
held on Tuesday, December 11 at 5:00 p.m. at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation building. 4200 Biscayne Boulevard. The Foundation invites all
fnends and relatives of the individuals to attend this service. For further
information please call the Foundation office at 576-4000.
Erna Karpfen
Arthur M. Leopold
Moe Levin
Howard Maier
Laurette Maier
Blanche Swift Morris
Myron Ret sky
Bernice Rothman
Roee Schioas
Samuel Shiger
Fred Wolkowhz
to fund creative programs that
community as well as to meet


Federation, November, 1984
page 13
gendes
idolescent years
topic of JFCS
larent workshop
I In response to the growing con-
Lm about adolescent suicide, the
fewish Family and Children's
Lrvice (JFCS) will present a three-
Jfession workshop for parents en-
vied. "The Stormy Passage:
Bnderstanding Your Adolescent.'"
The workshop will be held at two
cations and is open to the public.
, South Uade it will be presented at
he Jewish Community Center,
|240l S W. I02nd Avenue, on three
ansecutive Mondays, Nov. 26, Dec.
land Dec. 10 from 7:30 to 9 p.m. In
Xorth Dade the workshop will be
presented at the JFCS North Dade
Office. 2040 N.E. 163rd Street, on
see consecutive Wednesdays, Nov.
8, Dec. 5 and Dec. 12 from 7:30 to 9
b.m.
Workshop sessions will focus on
dentifying normal developmental
lilestones, recognizing difficulties,
v intervention, improving
parent ing skills, effective com-
limitation, and encouragement and
kupport.
ling the workshop in North
/ade will be Kandi Adler. MSW.
inical staff member of the JFCS
liami Beach Office. Adler is skilled
, value-- education and specializes in
idolescent therapy groups.
> Rosenthal. MSW. a clinical
I nember of the JFCS South
badi i >ffice, will conduct the
p in South Dade Her
xperience includes the treat
Kent oi teens and conducting
assertiveness training.
for the three-session work
$25 per person Pre-
t ration is required due to
| ating. To register, call the
S Prevention Department. 445-
0
lid-life issues
iroupat JFCS
A Mid-Life Issues Group will be
)rmed in December by the Jewish
and Children's Service
JFCS) to help adults in mid-life
Understand the emotional and
physical changes that can occur and
kow to cope with them. The group
fill meet on Tuesdays from 7:30 to
>:00 p.m. at the JFCS South Dade
Wfice, 8905 SW 87th Avenue, Suite
101.
Primary goals of the group will
delude adjusting to physical
Ganges, re-establishing relation-
ip8 with children and parents on
adult level, re-evaluating career
cisions, understanding the process
renewal in mid-life, and finding
ulfillment in increased leisure time.
Conducting the group wil be
lobert Newman, L.C.S.W., South
fade district director for the JFCS,
id Emily Rosenthal, M.S.W..
lical staff member.
For more information, call the
[FCS South Dade Office, 279-6611.
JCC and JFCS
enrich lives
of elderly
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center (JCC), a branch
of the Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida, and the Jewish
Family and Children's Service
(JFCS) are reaching out in North
Miami Beach to meet the needs of
the elderly. Through the teamwork
of the JCC and JFCS, elderly
residents can create a positive en-
vironment that will enrich their lives.
Whether someone needs help in
coping with the anxiety of growing
older, in obtaining a network of
social services, or an opportunity for
increased physical activity after an
illness, these two agencies can help.
Both JFCS and JCC staff social
workers are specially trained to
provide skilled, quality care to older
adults.
"Meeting the needs of senior
adults through group programming
is one of our goals,'' said Gad
Weissberg, Director of Older Adults
Services at the JCC. "Aging implies
retirement, which can mean many
things to people. It is a time to enjoy
life and to do those things one
always wanted to do. to pursue
avocational interests or even a new-
career. Creative and purposeful use
of programs at the JCC can provide
these opportunities."' added
Weissberg. JCC classes and
programs range from Aquafitness in
the large indoor pool to educational
and health maintenance programs.
In addition to special programs
and classes, many health and
physical education activities help
keep seniors active and alert. Senior
ride, a JCC transportation project,
provides tree transportation to and
from the JCC. however. 24-hour
registration is required tor pick-up.
Homebound elderly can receive
shopper service from the JCC for
groceries, or other services such as
homemakers and nurses aides. JFCS
can provide personal counseling
visits to the homes of clients who
may have physical or health
limitations.
Community resource information
and education is another valuable
part of the JCC and JFCS services in
North Miami Beach. If you need to
find agencies to assist you, to
determine your benefits for certain
available programs, the JCC can
assist seniors through a referral
service known as the Community
Resource Information Center. JFCS
staff social workers are always
available to provide lectures and
workshops to community
organizations on topics to promote
positive living and planning for the
future.
Further information on the ser-
vices provided by these two agencies
can be obtained by calling either the
JCC Senior Adults Department at
935-2440 or the North Miami office of
JFCS at 949-6186.
The Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida and the Jewish Family
and Children's Service are members
of Federation's family of agencies
and beneficiaries of the Combined
Jewish Appeal- Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign.
Douglas Gardens
thrift shops
seek donations
Looking for an end-of-the-year tax
deduction? How about making a
donation to the Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops, a division of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged?
Before you discard good used
furniture, appliances and household
goods, call the Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops. They turn those resal-
able items into vital dollars that buy
life-giving medicines and medical
supplies for the indigent residents of
the nursing home and hospital.
Over 60 percent of the residents of
the Miami Jewish Home are depend-
ent upon the generosity of others for
what are, to them, basic necessities
of life. Drugs, eyeglasses, hearing
aids, dentures and orthopedic shoes
are just some of the items provided
with your help.
Giving to the Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops is the smart way to
give. Not only will you be helping
those who cannot help themselves;
you will be making a tax-deductible
gift that will be picked-up from your
own home.
The Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops are located at 5713 NW 27th
Avenue in Miami and 3149
Hallandale Beach Blvd. in
Hallandale. To arrange for door-to-
door pick-up call the Thrift Shops at
751-3988 in Dade. 981-8245 in
Broward.
The Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged is a member of
Federation's family of agencies, and
a beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Cam-
paign
New faces at
JVS, Miami
With the expansion of programs at
the Jewish Vocational Service, and
in an effort to meet community
needs, Pat P. Fine, President of the
agency, and Eugene Greenspan,
Executive Director, are proud to
announce additions to the JVS staff.
Sylvia Laeser Goldsmith has been
promoted after 21? years as the
Homemaker Referral Service
Coordinator to a new position as
Administrative Assistant. Mrs.
Goldsmith has an M.Ed., and will
assume general administrative
duties and work in public relations
with JVS.
Claire Perlin. M.S.W., has
assumed the position of Homemaker
Referral Service Coordinator. She
will provide the continuation of this
service of matching companions,
homemakers, and nurses aides with
senior citizens in the South Beach
and North Beach areas. Ms. Esther
Kessler, M.S., will provide similar
Homemaker Services on a part-time
basis to the South Dade area as the
Elderly Services Counselor.
Ms. Sherrie Klayman, M.S.S.W.,
has recently accepted the position of
Work Adjustment Counselor in the
JVS Vocational Rehabilitation
Department. She has an extensive
background in rehabilitation
counseling and sheltered workshop
training from New Albany, Indiana.
Mr. Lou Cohen has a vast business
background, and will be putting his
experience to use as the Contract
Procurement Specialist for the JVS
sheltered workshop. He will be
reaching out to business and in-
dustry in an effort to provide work
for handicapped individuals within
the JVS workshop.
Please contact our various
departments via JVS Central
number, 576-3220, to receive the
personalized assistance we strive to
provide.
JVS Project Task
Valerie Kaufman on the job.
By AL BIALOS
Valerie Kaufman is a very special
person involved in a new pilot
project of the Jewish Vocational
Service. She is one of a group of
handicapped individuals enrolled in
PROJECT TASK and training at
the Miami Veteran's Administration
Medical Center. They are sponsored
by the Florida Office of Vocational
RehabUitation. This project is the
result of a cooperative effort by local
rehabilitation agencies to pool their
irees and provide a unique voca-
tional training experience.
The V.A. Medical Center offers its
outstanding facilities as a training
resource. The Florida Office of
Vocational Rehabilitation sponsors
the clients, and the Jewish
Vocational Service is proud to have
been designated coordinator of the
program and provides an on site
rehabilitation specialist.
Jim Ford, Valerie's supervisor and
chief of the Building Management
Service says, "she is an outstanding
worker, cooperative and takes pride
in her work, Valerie's ambition is to
find a permanent job in a hospital or
nursing home laundry.
The training Valerie and the other
PROJECT TASK trainees are
receiving will enable them to obtain
meaningful employment and
maintain themselves as independent,
productive citizens of our com-
munity. PROJECT TASK has
become the prototype, resulting in
national legislation that makes all
Federal agencies potential training
sites for the handicapped.
There are many areas of training
at the medical center for TASK
trainees. Programs can be
designated to meet the individual
qualifications and objectives of each
person.
For more information about
PROJECT TASK contact the
Jewish Vocational Service, TASK
Coordinator at 324-4455, Extension
3514.
The Jewish Vocational Service is a
beneficiary of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund.


u*:r i i i-
^e'M '

r-eaeranon, Novemoer, isrea
Cable Television
Local artist displays
work on jftv
The experiences that local artist
Kenny Schneider had growing up in
New York's Catskill Mountains and
on Miami's South Beach have
significantly influenced his art and
film. Schneider shares his work with
JFTV host Suzanne Lasky on "The
Kenny Schneider Show."
Primarily in oils and acrylics,
much of Schneider's work is three-
dimensional mechanical art
animated and motorized. For
example, "New York Rhapsody,"
currently being exhibited at Miami's
Museum of Science, is a vibrant
cityscape, in which Schneider utilizes
six motors to move crowds of
animated people in different
directions along the backdrop of 8th
Avenue. In another work, we see
Schneider himself, in animated form,
dancing in his house. Artist Eugene
Massin is the animated subject of a
piece entitled, "Portrait of an Artist
as a Video Arcade Game."
A major segment of the program is
the viewing of Schneider's cinema
verite film "Chicken Soup." made in
1969. The film follows the delightful
Ana Schecter, probably the
prototype for Jewish bubbas
everywhere, as she demonstrates,
from plucking to serving, the fine art
of Jewish chicken soup cooking. In
her cotton housedress, she patters
around the kitchen, explaining in a
non-stop monologue of broken
English and Yiddish, the difference
between cooking Gentile chickens
and Jewish chickens. To Schecter,
making chicken soup is serious
business. She's proud of her recipe
and she kvells as she serves the
finished product to her husband.
The Schecters were "friends of
friends of friends" of Schneider's,
and were veterans of 40 years in the
Kosher poultry business in New
York. Upon meeting Ana. Schneider
*TTr
Work by Kenny Schneider entitled
"What are you' A snowbird?"
hot<> b\ S'ina Barriga.
knew immediately that she would be
the perfect subject for the film.
Schneider's concept for the film was
based upon childhood memories of
watching the shechet butcher the
chickens at his family's small
Catskill Mountain hotel.
In fact. Schneider shot the
opening scenes of "Chicken Soup"
on his knees to convey a child's
perspective.
Among it's many showings,
"Chicken Soup" was presented at
the Museum of Modern Art in New
York as part of the 50th annual
salute to American comedy, and. at
the Whitney Museum. The film has
also been the subject of study in
several university anthropology
classes, including one at Temple
University.
To Kenny Schneider, art is a way
of life and this way of life is
fascinating viewing on "The Kenny
Schneider Show" on JFTV. Consult
the December program guide on this
page for dates and times.
GREATER MIAMI
JEWISH FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION. INC.
watch JFTV on:
Storer I North Dadei Channel P-29 I i 1 i
Storer (South Dadei Channel 15 1 1
UltraCom Channel 2
Dynamic Channel 43
Miami Cablevision Channel 11
Americable Channel 36
Special!
"Lights" is a fantasy adventure, animated Hannukah special
produced in Israel by Jerusalem Productions. "Lights" has been ac-1
claimed by a wide range of media professionals and educators. It it
narrated by Judd Hirsch (star of "Taxi") and includes the voices of
Leonard Nimoy and Paul Michael Giaser. The program explores the
struggle of keeping a minority identity in a majority culture it is 11
parable about the right to be different. "Lights" will be presented oa
JFTV December 24 at 7:30 p.m. and on December 26 at 5:30 p.m.
jftv initiates community
bulletin board service
Beginning in December. JFTV will be producing "Community
Bulletin Board" which will broadcast the public service announcements
for beneficiary agencies of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
"This is a wonderful opportunity for organizations to air their an-
nouncements," said Suzanne Lasky, Director of Broadcast Operations.
We have perceived a definite need for this service."
Organizations should submit the public service announcements
approximately 3-4 weeks in advance. They should contain all pertinent
factual information, however, the announcements will be rewritten and
edited when necessary. Agencies may also submit V videotapes
For further information, contact 576-4000. ext. 342.
*
:
programming Schedule Greater Miami Jewish Federation Cable Television inc. DECEMBER 1984*
Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday Sunday
5-5:30 p.m. Eenies Kitchen Focus Eenies Kitchen Checkup Mt. Sinai Pillow Talk People you Should Know JCC: A Special i Place
(Dec 22 only) Kenny Schneider Show
5:30-6 p.m. Checkup/ Mt. Sinai Sunrise Sunset Hello Jerusalem Pillow Talk FOCUS Vision Israel or Israeli Diary Eenies Kitchen
(Dec. 25 only) Lights
6-6:30 p.m. we Remember The Holocaust Tne Molly Goldberg Show Hello Jerusalem Eenies Kitchen Encounter Checkup/ Mt. sinal Pillow Talk
JFTV Bulletin Board
6:30-7 p.m. Still Small voice or Viewpoint JCC:A Special Place Encounter The Molly Goldberg Show Sunrise, Sunset The Molly Goldberg Show The Molly Goldberg Show
7-7:30 p.m. The Molly Goldberg Show Film Special (half hour) The Molly Goldberg Show Still Small voice or Viewpoint Hello Jerusalem Pillow Talk vision Israel or Israeli Diary
I 7:30-8 p.m. Pillow Talk Film Special (half hour) Pillow Talk people you Should Know Hello Jerusalem Film Special we Remember The Holocaust
(Dec. 24 only) Lights (Dec 20 only) Kenny Schneider Show JFTV Bulletin Board
I -suBject to change
I


alendar
Federation, November, 1984
page 15
SATURDAY. DECEMBER 1
irk. Miami Beach Jewish Community Center,
ffamily Center, 4221 Pine Tree Drive, announces an
bvernight camping trip at Camp Quiet Waters Park.
rhe fee is $20 for members and $27 for non-members.
included are snacks, breakfast, lunch, miniature
Jwolf canoeing and lots of fun. For more information
El 534-3206.
ATURDAY, DECEMBER 1
he Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center, 18900 N.E. 26th Avenue, will hold a Games
Sight at 8:00 p.m. This will be a spectacular evening
tjth prizes, drinks, food and more. Tickets are $25
Each which includes all the above. For reservations
tall Sandy at the JCC. 932-4200. Proceeds will go to
fcenefit the many programs of the Jewish Com-
munity Center.
fclSDAY. DECEMBER 2
] -, Association of Parents of American Israelis will
told its installation of officers at 1:00 p.m. at the
Greater Miami Federation, 4200 Biscayne Blvd.
Contact Ethel Graubard at 864-0392.
IsfNDAY. DECEMBER 2
The South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry will
loin with Temple Beth Sholom in co-sponsoring the
Sunday Omnibus Lecture Series featuring Martin
filbert, authority on the subject of Soviet Jewry,
nd author of the book, The Jews of Hope, at 10:30
i.m. at the Temple, 4144 Chase Avenue, Miami
each. Tickets are $3.50 and can be obtained by
tailing 532-3491.
IMONDAY. DECEMBER 3
_The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center,
Family Center, 4221 Pine Tree Drive announces the
[beginning of all winter classes on December 3rd
Jcontinuing to March 1st. For children, there will be
classes in tennis, ceramics, karate, ballet and drama.
Teens can sign-up for stained glass instruction and
aizz-aerobics. Adults can join bridge, calligraphy,
Hebrew, current events series, nutrition classes and
[more Computer classes for all ages and levels are
available. For more information call 534-3206.
[TUESDAY. DECEMBER 4
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center,
iFamily Center, 4221 Pine Tree Drive, will have a
IGlemby Beauty Clinic demonstration at 7:30 pjn.
[Two volunteers from the audience will get a new hair
Istyle and make-up ideas will be demonstrated.
Coffee and cake will be served. The cost of this event
I is S3 for members and $5 for non-members. Pre
egistration is mandatory. Call 534-3206 for more
Information.
[TUESDAY. DECEMBER 4
|Rabbi Lewis Littman will discuss "Jewish Writers
earch for Values" at the Forte Forum lecture series
jft 1:00 p.m. in the Forte Towers Auditorium, 1200
|Wesi Avenue, Miami Beach. For more information,
ileasecall Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
[TUESDAY. DECEMBER 4
[The Torah Luncheon Club will celebrate 25 years of
existence at 12:15 p.m. in the Pearlman Room of
[Temple Emanu-El, 1701 Washington Ave. Please
Trail 538-2508 for reservations.
WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 5
[The Status of the Elderly in Israel" will be the
(topic of a lecture to be held at the Michael-Ann
Kussell Jewish Community Center Auditorium,
|C900 N.E. 25th Avenue at 7:30 p.m. The guest
peaker is Simon Bergman, Professor of Social Work
pnd Gerontology in Israel and the United States.
|The lecture is offered to the public with no charge for
dmission. Contact Max Rothman at 940-5550.
[THURSDAY. DECEMBER6
The Justine Louise Wise chapter of the American
Jewish Congress will hold its regular meeting at
|2:30 p.m. at the American Savings and Loan
Association Bank Building, at Alton and Lincoln
' ads. There will be a guest speaker. Please call Ann
fergament at 864-1355.
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 6 and 13
The Adult Education Series of Beth David
Pongregation will present a seminar on "You and
our Aging Parent," 8:15 p.m. at Beth David
outh, 7500 S.W. 112 Street. For more information,
ontact Abe Benyunes. 271 -4711.
THURSDAY. DECEMBERS
[he Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Campaign
ening Dinner, the annual event open to con-
nbutors of a minimum of $1000 to the 1985
pombined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign, will be held at the Fontainebleau-Hilton.
\ctress and author Liv UUmann will be the special
wst. Cocktails begin at 6:30 p.m., dinner at 7:30
Lm For more information, please call 576-4000.
SATURDAY. DECEMBER 8
Rabbi Akiva Brilliant will be the guest speaker at
the Hannukah meeting of the Torah Chapter of
Hadassah, 12:30 p.m. at Harris Hall at Temple
Zamora. For more information, contact Dorothy
Spec tor, 667-9901.
SUNDAY. DECEMBER 9
The Men's Club of Temple Emanu-El will host the
annual "Ask the Rabbi" breakfast with Dr. Irving
Lehrman. The breakfast will be at 9:30 a.m. in Sirkin
Hall at Temple Emanu-El, 1701 Washington Ave.
Please call 538-2503 for reservations.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 9
The Ben Gurion Chapter of Hadassah will host a
bazaar and white elephant sale, at Gallahad Dade,
Building B. 19380 Collins Ave., from 10:00 a.m. to
4:00 p.m. Contact Eve Gross, chairman, at 932-8775.
TUESDAY. DECEMBER 11
The Foundation Memorial Service to honor the
memory of Legators to the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will be held at 5:00 p.m. in the Board
Room of the Federation building, 4200 Biscayne
Blvd., immediately following the Board meeting.
Contact Penny Marlin 576-4000, ext. 352 for further
information.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 11
Commissioner Ruth Shack will discuss "What's
New in Dade County" at the Forte Towers
Auditorium, 1200 West Avenue, Miami Beach. For
more information, please call Elsie Rubin at 673-
1979.
WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 12
The monthly meeting of the Workmen's Circle,
Miami Beach Branch 1059 will be held at 12:00 p.m.
at the Surfside Community Center, 9301 Collins
Ave. Contact Sophie Noble at 865-2101 for in-
formation.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 12
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center's Early Childhood Development Program
and the Adam Walsh Resource Center join to bring
parents an informative workshop called "Street
Proofing Your Child," 7:30 p.m. at the Katz
Auditorium in the Michael-Ann Russell JCC, 18900
N.E. 25th Avenue. Reservations required. Call Judy
Shapiro at 932-4200.
WEDNESDAY. DECEMBER 12
The annual organizational meeting of the South
Florida Chapter of the American Physicians
Fellowship for Medicine in Israel will be held at the
Wolfson Auditorium of Mount Sinai Medical Center
at 7:30 p.m. For additional information please call
Dr. Isaac Knoll. 672-3601.
THURSDAY. DECEMBER 13
The Ein Karem Chapter of Hadassah. will host the
Hadassah Medical Organization luncheon at 11:30
p.m. at Beth Torah Congregation, 1051 North Miami
Beach Blvd. Please call Ann Field at 651-6536.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16
As part of the "At Home Study Series." Beth David
Congregation will present speaker Rabbi David
Auerbach who will discuss "Religion in American
Society" at 8:00 p.m. at Beth David South. 7500
S.W. 112 Street. Call 238-2601 for details.
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for January events is December 7.1984
Organization
Event ______
Place
Date^
^Time^
Your name
Title______
Phone No.,
MAILTO:
FEDERATION
Communications Department
Ureater Miami Jewish Federation
(200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
.0 a.m. (I p.m.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center, 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue, announces a Day
Camp reunion for children and parents to re-socialize
and re-acquaint with friends and staff, from 1:00
p.m. to 3:00 p.m. The JCC will present a slide show
and nostalgic review of a fabulous summer at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC. For more information call
Myrna Loman, 932-4200.
SUNDAY. DECEMBER 16
The Florida Council of Amit Women will hold its
annual Reshet Cocktail Party at the home of Mr. and
Mrs. Isaac Benmerqui, 98 Lagorce Circle at 2:00
p.m. For further information, please contact Jeanne
Finkelstein, at 531-5344.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 16
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center, 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue announces a
Chanukah Open House and Winter Program
Registration, from 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Free to
JCC members. Celebrate the holiday with ap-
propriate food, dreidels: meet the staff and register
for winter programs. For more information call
Myrna Loman, 932-4200.
MONDAY. DECEMBER 17
The South Council of Pioneer Women Na'amat will
hold its annual Life Membership Luncheon at 12:00
p.m. at the Konover Hotel. Celebrating 60 years
since the birth of the organization, the theme of the
luncheon is "The Way We Were in the 1920s."
Donation is $7.50 and reservations can be made by
calling 538-6213.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 18
The PTA of Lehrman Day School and Temple
Emanu-El Family League will sponsor the annual
Chanukah Torch Relay-Ceremony and Block Party
at 5:30 p.m. on the steps of Temple Emanu-El, 1701
Washington Ave. The community is welcome. There
is no charge. Call 538-2503 for information.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 19
Cantor Yehuda Shifman of Temple Emanu-El will be
accompanied by 12 professional musicians and the
adult and children's choirs, in a program entitled,
"Yehuda and Friends Chanukah Concert" at 8:00
p.m. This is the first in a concert series to be
presented in the main sanctuary of Temple Emanu-
El. 1701 Washington Ave. For tickets and prices call
538-2503.
SUNDAY. DECEMBER 23
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center, 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue announces the 8th
Annual 10K Chanukah Run at 8:00 a.m. Fee $6.00 or
$8.00 after December 19. This is a two mile fun run.
There is no charge. T-shirts, trophies, refreshments
will available. For race application and more in-
formation call 932-4200.
FRIDAY. DECEMBER 28
All children ages 3-12 years are invited to join the
Miami Beach Jewish Community Center for two
weeks of excitement, fun and friends from December
28 through January 4. Camp runs from 9:00 a.m. to
3:00 p.m. with extended care available 8:00 a.m. to
9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. Outings this
year wiU include: Metro Zoo, Everglades Safari
Park, Homestead Air Force Base, Ruth Foreman
Children's Theater, C.B. Smith Park and more.
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center, 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue announces Israeli
Dancing every Sunday. 8:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m
Instructions by Moshani Shemesh. Cost $2.00
members, $3.00 non-members. Call 932-4200 for
more information.
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center,
4221 Pine Tree Drive announces a Children's Swim
Team. Train with friends at the Surfside Community
Center swimming pool with a professional swim
coach. Classes meet four days a week. Monday
through Thursday, 5-6 p.m. $40 for members and
$50 for non-members for a 10-week session. Call
Jerry at 534-3206 for more information.
The Jewish Family and Children's Service will
present a workshop for parents entitled, "The
Stormy Passage: Understanding Your Adolescent"
at 7:30 p.m., December 3 and December 10 at the
South Dade JCC, and, on December 5 and December
12, 7:30 p.m., at the JFCS North Dade Office, 2040
N.E. 163rd St. Contact Fawn Reiner Allen. 445-0555.


Federation, November, 1984
I
I
i
I
...there's never been a partnership like it. American
Jewish communities like ours, twinned with Israeli
communities in needreaching out, working together, sharing the
responsibility for the physical and social rehabilitation of Israel's older
immigrant neighborhoodsthat's Project Renewal.
The Jewish partnership for life needs you. Give generously to your 1985
Project Renewal Campaign.
Support The Greater Miami Jewish Federation'*,
1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign
Against All Odds.


Full Text
Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. November 30. 1984
Anti-Semitic Literature
Abounds in Argentina
BUENOS AIRES (JTAI -
Newsstands and bookstores in
the central streets here continue
to be replete with anti-Semitic
literature including Nazi
publications, an internal report to
the Executive of the World
Jewish Congress states.
The report, prepared by the
secretariat of the WJC Latin
American branch, states that the
government of President Raul
Alfonsin "is categorical ir.
denouncing these symptoms
which it considers part of an
effort toward the destabilization
of the democratic regime .
Nevertheless, the publications
continue, visible to all "
THE JEWISH press and the
news bulletins of the DA I A. the
central representative body of
Argentine Jewry, have begun the
task of cataloguing anti-Semitic
and Nazi publications. The list is
disturbing, the WJC report says
There are about 10. and they are
very open about their anti-
Semitic views.
As an example, the report
notes that the latest issue of the
magazine. 'Information on
Masonry." states on its cover.
"Zionism: Alfonsin its Servant."
and is subtitled "Hitler was
Right."
One of the items in the magaz-
ine states "... and just as
Zionism demanded reparations'
from Germany amounting to
thousands of millions during
more than 30 years a booty
which was split, as good partners
in plunder with (Winston)
Churchill and the English homo-
sexual oligarchy, as well as with
Roosevelt and his gang of Yankee
gangsters now the Argen-
tinian Zionists, in agreement
with Israel and the American
Zionists. are preparing the
methodical looting of the Argen-
tinian people, to get reparations
for the 1.51X1 supposed Jews pre-
sumed disappeared
Another of the anti-Semitic
publications "Harbarie (Bar-
barism) Aluarte Nacional"
(National Bulwarki which defines
itself as Peronist. states that it
expects a true national revolu-
tion" and blames Jews for all
evils
BUT THESE are not the sole
disturbing symptoms within the
prevailing euphoric climate of the
new democratic regime in
Argentina.
During a recent mass honoring
the victims of the struggle
against guerrilla warfare, a
Catholic priest spoke against
"pornographic democracy.''
young boys marched in black
capes, and the participants
among them military cadets in
uniform sang refrains such as
"It will finish, the Radical' syna-
gogue will finish!" (Alfonsin
heads the Radical Party of
Argentina).
Rabbi Charges Jews
re Homeless
Ignoi
ROCKVILLE CENTRE. NY.
(JTA) A Conservative
rabbi has asserted that he has
found many Jews un-
sympathetic and unsupportive"
concerning the plight of poor and
homeless Jews, feeling "these
unfortunates should go to the
designated social service
agencies. both Jewish and
secular
Rabbi Barry Schwartz,
spiritual leader of B'nai Sholom
here, made the charge in a recent
issue of his synagogue bulletin,
declaring that the "rapidly
Chanukah Party
West Miami Auxiliary No. 223.
Jewish War Veterans, will hold
an annual Chanukah party and
meeting on Thursday at 8:15
p.m. at the home of Auxiliary
president Thelma Potlock Tanya
Lev in e will chair the event, and
Lorraine Meyers will present a
musical program
Dade County Council JWVA
president Evelyn Ferdie will pay
an official visit to hear reports
from Shirley Achtman on fund-
raising and Lee Rubin on com-
munity relations.
Mi. Sinai 35th
Mount Sinai Medical Center
plans several events to mark the
hospital's 35th anniversary
Dec 4
Beginning at 10 a.m. the
Miami Beach Symphony will
entertain with music from the
40s and 50s. while a five-foot
long cake in the shape of the
building is served, and informal
modeling of nurse's uniforms
from 1242-1925 will take place.
A time capsule will be buried,
not to be opened until the year
2000.
Among the guests at the anni-
versary will be an estimated 100
of the approximately 50.000 bom
at the hospital. Mayor Steve
Clark's children, two staff physi-
cians, several sets of twins, and
at least one mother-daughter pair
are among those expected to
attend.
of homeless-
as a major
growing problem"
ness has emerged
societal tragedy."
He added. There is also a
frightening number of Jews all
over America and especially in
New York City who are poor and
homeless. Many of these
homeless suffer severe illness and
are in desperate need of
assistance." He charged that to
date, society's response is simply
putting a temporary dressing on
what has become a large festering
wound."
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will
deliver "A Message to the
Synagogue Dropout" at
Temple Xer Tamid to mark
the opening of late services at
S p.m. Friday evening. Rabbi
Labovitz will be joined by
Cantor Edward Klein and the
temple choir in conducting the
service. The late services will
continue until Passover.
New Slate for
Taxpayers' Assn.
The Miami Beach Taxpayers'
Association has elected officers
for 1984-85. according to re-
elected president Donna Jacobs.
Other officers are vice presi-
dents David Lew in. Stanley
Sutnick. and Dr Leonard L.
Weil, secretary Jeanne Garrard.
and treasurer Margaret H.
Mactye.
Directors include Joy
Alschuler. Minette Benson. A.J.
Cristol. A.J. Daoud. Lois Dobrin.
Leon Firtel. Phyllis K. Fisch.
Barton S. Goldberg. Robert Z
Greene. Nathan S. Gumenick.
Paul Kalv. Sherman Kaplan.
Keith Kovens. Charles B King.
Jr.. Meyer Kotler. William T.
Kruglak. Robert M Levy,
Hyman Mally. Linda Polansky.
F.mma Reynolds Melvin
Richard. Betty Schwartz. Gerald
Schwartz. Harold J. Segal.
Egmont Sonderling. and Walter
B Wilsnn.Jr
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North Miami Beach
Rental Agent Nancy
947-4192
'Cults' Topic of
Yeshiva Seminar
"Jewish-Christian Cults: How
We Can Cope'' is the topic of the
Florida Friends of Yeshiva Uni-
versity's second "Issues of Our
Times" seminar, scheduled for
Monday evening, at 8 p.m. at the
Konover Hotel.
The speaker is Rabbi Benjamin
Blech. assistant professor of Tal-
mud at Yeshiva. Dr. Blech parti
cipated in the 1982-83 seminar
MTies.
Rabbi Blech, who has given
more than a hundred talks in the
! S Israel and Kurope and has
authored numerous articles, was
awarded the "Outstanding
American F.ducator Award" in
1971
This year s seminar series, the
third annual, has been expended
td five lectures in response to the
popularity of the program, which
Dr. Benjamin Bled
presents guest speakers on mam
subjects of current Ji ,
terest
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C**t R 1(1-1
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 30, 1984
News in Brief
Paraguay Launches Mengele Hunt
By JTA Services
NEW YORK Paraguay has
begun what was described here as
a thorough nationwide inves-
tigation to locate Josef Mengele,
the infamous war criminal and
chief doctor at the Auschwitz
concentration camp responsible
for the murder of tens of
thousands of Jews during World
War II.
The investigation will be
conducted by police authorities in
Paraguay under the Ministry of
Interior, according to Elizabeth
Holtzman. Brooklyn District
Attorney, who just returned from
a three-day visit to Paraguay as a
member of a delegation of four
persons who travelled there
under the --punsorship of the
International Network of
ihildren of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors
Furthermore. Holtzman told
reporters Paraguayan officials
have also agreed to allow foreign
observers to monitor the in\ i -
tigation and will allow for written
questions to be submitted to the
government about the
whereabouts of Mengele. who is
believed to be living in Paraguay.
Trifa Appeals Portugal's
Decision to Oust Him
PARIS Archbishop
Valerian Trifa has appealed to an
administrative court in Lisbon
the decision by the Portuguese
government not to grant him res-
ident's status and to have him
expelled. Trifa's attorney
charged that the government's
decision was taken "solely on the
basis of newspaper reports."
Trifa. the 70-year-old former
head of the Rumanian Orthodox
Church in America, went to
Portugal on a deportation order
from the United States. That
concluded a nine-year legal effort
in the U.S. to deport Trifa for
lying to conceal his part in the
persecution of Jews and
collaboration with the Nazis
during World War II
was i leading figure in
the fascist Rumanian Iron Guard
and acted as editor of an anti-
Semitic newspaper that ad-
vocated persecution of Jews in
Rumania from 1936 to 1941. Trifa
is also accused of leading a
pogrom against the Jews in
Rumania that resulted in the
deaths of dozens of Jews.
Renewed U.S. Ties to Iraq
Not Harmful to Israel
WASHINGTON The
Reagan administration, in an-
nouncing Monday that the U.S.
and Iraq are resuming diplomatic
relations, stressed that the move
will not be harmful to Israel.
"It has no effect on our
relations with Israel which
continue to be stronger than
ever," a senior administration
official said in briefing reporters
on the move which took effect
immediately.
The resumption of relations,
which were broken by Iraq
following the 1967 Six-Day War,
was announced after Iraqi
Foreign Minister Tarik Aziz met
with President Reagan at the
SUPERVISION
Valerian Trifa
White House He had met earlier
with Secretar\ of State George
Shultz at the State Department
and with Vice Presides' George
Bush at the \\ hite House.
Kahan Inquiry Report
Opened for Inspection
JERUSALEM Attorney
General Yitzhak Zamir is willing
to let third parties inspect a
secret addendum to the 1983
Kahan Commission report and
answer questions as to their
pertinency in the libel action
former Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon has brought against Time
magazine. The trial opened in
New York earlier this month.
Zamir. who previously rejected
a request by Time to examine the
documents, was reported
Monday to have proposed that
the panel of three prominent [a
raelis agreeable to both sides in
the case be given access to the
addendum and be questioned by
Time law yers
The proposal, to the Federal
District Court in Manhattan -
in line with a Cabinet ruling that
a personality a< i to the
governn me ma\
iwer specific questions related
to the documents.
Sharon contends in his
million libel suit that a Time
article last year defamed him by
intimating that he encouraged
the Christian Phalangist militia
in Lebanon to massacre Pales-
tinian civilians in two West
Beirut refugee camps in Sep-
tember, 1982 to avenge the
assassination of Lebanon's Presi-
dent-elect. Bashir Gemayel. the
Phalangist Party leader.
Former SS Officer May
Get Light Sentence
BONN A former SS officer
accused of complicity in the
deaths of at least 15,000 Jews in
the Polish city of Lodz during
World War II, may get off with a
relatively light sentence after a
trial that lasted five-and-a-half
years, one of the longest in post-
war Germany.
The State Prosecutor in Bocum
demanded an eight-and-a-half
year prison sentence for Helmut-
George Krizons, 68, who was
commander of the guards posted
in the Lodz ghetto in 1942.
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According to the prosecution,
Krizons ordered at least 15,00
Jews deported .o the Kuklmhof
concentration camp in full
knowledge that they would be
killed in the gas chambers. He
personally selected the victims
for deportation and organized the
transports, the prosecution said.
A verdict is expected shortly
But the prosecution was forced
to drop its original charge that
Krizons himself murdered 24
Jews because of conflicting
testimony by survivors During
the trial, the jury made mon
than 40 trip- to Israel. Poland.
Argentina and \ustralia to
interview witnesses who could
not or would not come to Ger-
many to testil
Arafat to Visit Britain
By End of the Year
LONDON Yasii V
Palestine Liberation Orgi
./.it ion chief, is to paj hi- first
visit to Britain before the end of
the year to attend the launching
of a new biography of him by a
British journalist.
On at least three previous
occasions in the past 10 years.
Arafat has been expected in
Britain, but on each occasion the
visit was cancelled following
protests about the terrorist
nature of the PI.O. There was a
similar reaction several days ago
from the Israel Embassy which,
answering a press inquiry, ex-
pressed "incredulity'' over the
!'!.(I leader's forthcoming visit.
An embassj spokesman said it
seemed "most unlikely that at a
time when Britain was trying to
enlist the support of the inter-
national community in its stated
aim ot combatting terrorism, the
chlet ol .in 01
in v
set foot in the I nil
Kingdom, which it-'
: I
The Anita! visil is ex|
with
t he I
ied by the Re\ Jesse
lack-on. one oi the Democratic
Party's would-be candidates in
the recent I S presidential
election
Cabinet Discusses Cuts
In Military Budget
TEL AVIV The Cabinet
met Sunday to discuss the
sensitive issue of budget cuts in
the defense establishment. The
five-hour session was held in the
underground "'War Room" at
army General Headquarters here,
a venue deliberately selected by
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
Rabin reportedly made it clear
that any cuts in the defense
budget that may be decided
would require a reduction of
military activities including
research. planning and
production and the day-to-day
activities of the Israel Defense
Force.
Although no details emerged
from Sunday's meeting in the
War Room, one minister, not
identified, was heard to remark
later that "If it comes down to
guns or butter, I would have to
say that guns come before butter.
You can do without butter. It's
more healthy anyway."
J0C Given Okay
For Feeding Stations
NEW YORK A recent
communique received from the
American Jewish Joint Distri-
bution Committee representative
in Ethiopia advised that the
overseas relief agency had
received permission to operate
feeding stations in the Gondar
region, according to an an-
nouncement made by JDC exec-
utive vice president Ralph
Goldman.
Jeb Bush, right, son of Vice President George Bush and
president of the Dade County Republican Part. wm
members of the South Dade New Leadership I) ,t^
State of Israel Bonds Organization, which spans,,:.
parry at which Bush was the special guest. With B .
to nght: David Abramowitz, M Ronald
National \'eu Leadership Chairman, and Shelley
Sokol, host- for thei i -it.
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STEIN-SHERWOOD
Krancine Alisa Sherwood and Kenneth Mar-
u u Stein were married on Nov. 25 at Beth Israel
Kgogue by Rabbi Avraham Korf.
Mrs Stein, the daughter of John Joseph
Sherwood of Asheville. N.C.. and the late Marilyn
ieona L'ram Sherwood, wore an old fashioned
orv Victorian all-lace dress with a high collar,
{'ruffle, long sleeves and a drop waist, with a
weep length train. Her matron of honor was
Kadie Shavin Sharp, and bridesmaids were
Susan Nancy, and Diane Sherwood, Sarah and
Wendy Reynolds. Linda Shead. Noreen
Schneider, Alyssa Siegel, and Esther Kaplan.
The groom, son of Adeline Stein of Coral
Gables and the late David Stein, was attended by
best man Steven Jurysta. Ushers were Eugene
and Scott Sherwood, Michael Stein, and Mark
Greene.
The bride obtained her bachelor's degree in
social work from Tel Aviv University and her
masters degree from Yeshiva University
Wur/.weiler School of Social Work. She is the
former executive director of the Asheville Jewish
Community Center.
Mr Siein is a graduate of Florida International
I Diversity, has his master's degree in public
administration, and will obtain a master's degree
in social work in April. He is a social worker with
the Dade County Department of Human
Resources.
\ftei .1 wedding trip to Negril and Mont ego
H,,\ Jamaica, the couple will live in Miami
Wedding
^^^^^^^T^I^I^^^i^Jev^hnoridiari Page 5-B
Koslow Honor Law Grad
Ariene S. Koslow. daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ben Silver of
Miami Beach, has graduated from the Woodrow Wilson College
of Law in Atlanta and received the Juris Doctor degree magna
cum laude. Ariene was presented the Dean's Award for out-
standing services to the school as editor-in-chief of the Woodrow
Wilson Journal of Law and the Harrison Company Award for
being salutatorian of the 1984 graduating class.
She was recognized by the Georgia Association for Woman
Lawyers as the 1984 Woodrow Wilson Outstanding Woman
Law Student. In addition, she was presented five book awards
at the graduation ceremonies for attaining the highest grade in
each of five subject areas.
Ariene and her husband Harold live in Atlanta with their two
daughters.
Birth
Dade County Court Judge Harvey Goldstein, wife Barbara
and children. Elana and Glenn, announce a new addition to their
family.
Alisha Esther (5 pounds. 14 ounces) arrived after a two-hour
awake and aware' delivery at South Miami Hospital's Birthing
Room.
Grandparents are Dr. and Mrs. Abe Bolker of Brickell (Point
View).
Mrs. Stein
Holiday Mail
from Temples
... kssoci il i
*'il : irticipa i
el] tru
Servici
i
hoois
da '
-
ii
Keinai I
l! ...: '
pri i\ iding
ce ni the holiday
hi Kssi c iation
t- I a lei ter to us member
_ their cooperation,
P knowledged tins ef-
i Association's letter to
h abbis stated, At a
In den we are so involved
I issues dealing with
P church and state,
have an opportunity
?' Lion "t church and
I
eve I ius is a unique
I for the religious
p s to cooperate with the
for the good i>t the
declared Rabbi
j n -uiellt nt the
| ind spiritual leader
""i-mp Samu-El, and Rabbi
Schiff, executive vice
P the Association and
" >t chaplaincy, Greater
i wish Federation.
fhanukahLightsatZOA
(hanukah candles will be lit by
Mhert Shulman, vice president.
M the Dec-. 9 meeting of Brandeis
'strict, Zionist Organization of
jmerica. at 1:30 p.m. at the
*>rth Shore Civic Center.
Entertainment will be provided
}' Kstelle Hoberman on the ac-
ordion Rose Shapiro is in
Prge of arrangements.
Moment' Founder
it Temple Sinai
Leonard J. Fein, founder and
?ltor of Moment magazine, will
hi)?8 'Bringing UP the Jewish
aua- A Reconsideration" at
npie Sinai during the weekend
ov. 30-Dec. 3.
* Fein headed a project for
union of American Hebrew
wgregations called "Reform is
* erb. a study of the attitudes
C Prac>'ce8 of Reform Jews.
F a frequent lecturer at syn-
uea and Federation func-
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Dolphins vs. Cowooys
lay December 17th. 9:00 P M

Ben Sherman Jean McConville Juan Urbano
Susan Scalice Muriel Zimmerman Sylvia Goldman
Ralph Hendiei in Foitmo 'ifiore
ires N M.n


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Publi Bakeries open at 8.00 A.M.
------------\ /------------------
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Plain or with Seeds
Italian Bread
^3 ^/
~\ s
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Topped with Creamy Chocolate
Eclairs
Available at Publix Stores with
Fresh Danish Bakeries Only.
Light and Delicious
Glazed Donuts
6 69c
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Serve Warm with Butter
Bran Muffins......
6-cl.
pkg.
99<
Dolphinmania Tickets are Getting Scarce.
Bui There's Still Time to Win!
All Winning Tickets Must be Claimed
by December 31st. 1984.
Danish Pecan Ring....... eachS1"
Publix Food GifyCertificates
T*etr*'K!
? MwrM h.
.. I
,
" -> KN MM ->"*'
-. Mopbt '

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^ rage J-n
Sidney Shapiro: Jews in Old China
By GORDON LIGHT
I melting pot Miami, we have
.Cuban Jews. We ve heard of
Hian JW. There is a large
imuniiv in Kthiopia that ac-
unts for African Jews.
But Chinese Jews?
According W .a new ***
ill in Old I hina. a Jewish
mmunitv flourished between
7th and 12th centimes in
hal was then Chinas major
rhe work is a aerie
that group's cultural
and legacy by
iana
tDDING authenticity to the
identity of its com-
0jer inslator. Sidney
hapiro is a Chinese Jew. almost
world's only living
he was born in
Jrookh/n. likes to use Yiddish
lions, and looks like the
irtJv, jolh Jewish grandfather
is makes his strange story
>\en stranger.
[n Miami this week to promote
Shapiro spoke of his
fe-long fascination with China
ginning when he studied the
inguage at Columbia and Yale
kn the G I Bill. Before the war.
led been a lawyer, but he didn't
lant to go back to that career in
America Si there was nothing to
irevent him from traveling to
'hina for 8300 on a month-long
reighter trip.
Arriving in Shanghai, he found
biimself in the middle of a revolu-
lon Dead peasants lay in the
treets every morning to be
ncked up by garbage trucks, and
he police were making indis-
Timinate arrests. Yet he found
he people in the arts and
neatrical communities he mixed
iith extraordinarily interesting
jid friendly F.specially so was
in actress and editor. Fengzi (or
'hoenixi. whom he later married.
IT WAS that marriage and his
ob with an American law firm
hat induced him to stay, along
ith one other important motive-
ion: curiosity.
The aftermath of the revolu-
lon was fascinating,'' he remem-
>ers I wanted to see where it
as going."
Shapiro went to Peking, where
e gradually became involved
nth translating. He estimates he
las translated 14 novels and
wndreds of short stories in his
areer His most notable work.
til now. at least, was "Outlaws
f the Marsh," a famous 14th
entury novel about 12th century
utlaws
Chinese society remained a
Welcoming one for him, even
During the potentially divisive
ime of the Korean War. With the
oldiers of his two countries
iMing each other, Chinese
riends reassured him. saying.
we make distinctions between
he individual and the country."
HE MADE his own distinction
ni 1963 when he decided to take
hinese citizenship. The choice
'as relatively easy.
I had a happy home, a family
nth a wife and daughter I loved,
fld work I considered good and
instructive," Shapiro says.
Nevertheless, the change effec-
ivery prevented him from visit-
JK America until relations
hawed between the two nations.
After President Nixon's visit
1971, I was the first Chinese
"izen to apply for a tourist visa
0 visit the United States." he
a.vs proudly. Since then, he has
w" back here six times.
There have been many cultural
ijustments for Shapiro to make
B his 37 years in China. He dealt
jw> one, his nostalgia for the
"sine of his native Brooklyn, by
ia"ing his own bagels.
J THE IDEA for that came
|ner> his mother visited him in
t> J"? comPhined that the
^mea bread she'd been given
lacked a crust. He took to toast-
ing it for her and found that,
molded into the proper shape, the
result was a remarkably good-
tnsting bagel.
His creation received national
attention a few years ago when
the New York Times did a story
on it. along with a picture of
iro, the doting grandfather,
feeding his Chim American
gTcinddau. agel
i hoi h hi' is the only prac-
tu { Jev SI there
st. ire il 1 li' families in the
K who know they are
of Jewii ;< descent ["heir ances-
tors were merchants and sailors
th< Arabian countries who
here in the Diaspora.
The scholarship that produced
his book is especially important,
he says, because it is of strictly
Chinese vintage
"BOOKS IN English have
always been done before by mis-
sionaries or American Sino-
logists. But Chinese historians
understand and have better
access to records. They can read
between the lines."
Shapiro, who is on a six-month
promotion tour of the U.S., was
brought to Miami by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
and Rabbi Norman I.ipson. its
director of adult education.
Sidney Shapiro
Florida Region
American Committee for the Weizmann Institute of Science
Jubilee Dinner Dance
Saturday, December 8,1984
Fountainbleau Hilton Hotel
Morris Broad, Dinner Chairman
Guest Speakers
Robert Merrill
Celebrated Baritone
Prof. Michael Sela
Honoring
Roselyn and Arnold Meyer
American Committee Weizmann Institute of Science
420 Lincoln Road Suite 309 Miami Beach, FL 33139
For Information Call: Bernice Stander, Executive Director (305) 538-3090


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