The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02908

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement.. .Special Insert
Miami. Florida Friday, October 26,1984
B Ma** HOC?"'*
Price 50 Cents
children in Latin America are among the 150,000
irouna the world aided by the Joint Distribution
I i JDC devotes nearly a quarter of its budget of over
I n a year to Jewish education. In 19H3. the figure
i to $10,409,000.
tudy Shows
Strong Jewish Ties
Mean Less Divorce
HAM. Mass. -
\ clear relation-
ts between the rate
e and the commit
lews to .Judaism.
rig to Prof. -Jay
N'emzer of the
for Modern Jewish
at Brandeis Uni-
y.
ed his conclusion on
one nt the largest
population surveys nfanv
American Jewish community
the 1981 Greater New York
Jewish Population Study, con-
ducted bj Steven M. Cohen and
Caul Ritterband
Brodbar-Nemzei said the data
from the polling of more than
t.(XH) .Jewish households in New
York City showed that Jews with
the strongest ties to Judaism and
to the Jewish community also
have a lower probability of ever
having been divorced
DIVORCE AMONG American
Continued on Page 8-A
U.S. Sees No Need
For Moratorium
Conflicting Reports Page3-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA The Reagan
administration asserted
that Israel could postpone
repayment of $500 million
in debt to the I'nitd Sti
without asking for Ameri-
can approval, although the
administration feels this
step will not be necessary.
Under the law which provided
1' s loan aid to 1st
M .itr payment il \ it wed as
neci ssary," State I ieparl
deputy spokesman Alan Rom-
berg said. He added that this
would mean additional inten si
CHSts
RO.MBKRG IS trying to clear
up the confusion that occurred
when Israeli Premier Shimon
Peres was reported as telling his
Cabinet that during his visit to
Washington recently the ad-
ministration agreed to a post-
ponement of the repayment for
three months
dHi.istration officials. said no
agreement was made, although
several means of dealing with Is-
rael's economic problems were
discussed.
Romberg pointed to a state-
ment made by Secretary of State
George Shultz. en route to
Toronto, when he was asked
about the Israeli statement.
ShultZ noted that Israel's cash
flow problem is "immediately
benefited" by the administra-
tion's agreement to provide Isra-
el with the 81 billion in
economic grants for !i*s" "up
from in the beginning of the
fiscal year which started Oct 1
rather than through the regular
quarterly allocations
"THE BASIC cash position is
vastly unproved by that very
fact, and so we will Ux>k at the
flow of funds and go in for that
analysis,'' Shult/ said I think if
the strong steps are taken
(control the economy) as Mr
Peres outlined there shouldn't be
any problems.''
Secretary Shult/
Shultz added that "various
ways" were discussed with the
Israelis "in which any potential
problem may be met. And of
course, loan repayments is one
way to get at cash flow. And
there are some other ways. Rut
my own opinion is that it won't
be necessary to take additional
steps
Honiln-rg refused to disuc s
any ol the suggestions that the
administration may have made
during Peres visit. However,
administration officials noted
that the exist' no ol the
prov ision in the law to delay k>an
repayments was [minted out to
the Israelis. Hut they stressed
that there was no agreement that
this would be done.
If the payment is delayed for
three months the new Congress
would then be in session and
additional aid to Israel is ex-
pec ted to be approved.
\Lebanon Exit
Unity Gov't. Aiming for 'Political Settlement'
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel has made it clear
" official statement that
eeks a political -
accord in south
one that would
de security
not mei
redeployment of military
forces. The statement was
issued by Premier Shimon
Peres' office after a meeting
between Peres and U.S.
Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger.
Vfter two days ol met tings
with Peres and Defense Minister
Yitzhak Habin Weinberger left
for Amman. Jordan Before
coming to Israel, he visited Cairo
to talk to officials. Peres was
accompanied at his meeting with
w, inberger by Habin and
Deputy Premier and Fi i
Minister ~! itzhak Shamir
THE OFFICIAL statement
was plainly intended, among
other things, to end speculation
here regarding possible differ-
ences between the three top
ministers over the government's
Lebanon policj
Weinberger, in remarks to the
tit >tl Israel's desire to
utinued on Page .'. \
In Miami
Hunger
Strike For
Refuseniks
uth FIi
ference on Soviet Jewry,
with strung support from
area I agogues ant!
organizat: ici-
pate in a nationwide last
and inundate the Soviet
Embassy in Washington
with phone calls protesting
the incarceration ol Aleks-
ander Kholmianskv and
Yuli Edelshtein.
Refuseniks Kholmianskv and
Kdelshtein are Moscow Hebrew
teachers who have been im-
prisoned on trumped-up charges
Allegedly, the KGB planted a
piston in Kholmianskv's apart-
ment and drugs in Kdelshtein's
apartment Kholmianskv has
been on ? hunger strike since
Sept. 13 in protest over the
spurious charges
OVER 40 refusenik activists
began a rotating hunger strike
last Friday to protest the arrest
Continued on Page 6-A
Defense Mmi-a r Rabin


UftC lU-l)
Fage 14-B The Jewish Flondian. Friday, October 26. 1984
Unity Gov't Aims for 'Political
Settlement' in Lebanon
get
Continued from Page 1-A
out of Lebanon, provided
to a realistic and forthcon
approach from Damascus
es clof
the
circles dose to Peres argued.
"threat" of
a
adequate security measures could
be obtained. The Israeli state- partial pullbark mmlvZ^?
ment said Israel s conditions the Israel Defense Forte 1J?^
included that Syria would not ad-
vance further south than its
Camels, those great ships of the desert, are
multiplying by three now that their fertility
rate has been boosted through hormones by
scientists at the Ben-Gurion University of
the Negev in Israel. Dr. Dan Cohen director
of veterinary research at BGU and head of
the camel fertility project, beUeveg that
Israel can become an exporter of camels
Which are unchallenged as work ammalsin
the area. Camels can be economically bred
and fed cheaply on plant stalks and other
agricultural wastes.
In Ancient China
Jewish Grave Found in Fujian
from the
Dyansty
earthed in
Quanzhou
also men-
official Yuan
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An ancient undecorated
tombstone among several
ancient Yuan
(1271-1368) un-
the 1950's near
in Fujian pro-
vince probably marked a
Jewish grave, according to
Sidney Shapiro, an Ameri-
can-born scholar who has
lived in China for 37 years.
Shapiro said in an interview
with the Xinhau News Agency at
his home in Beijing. 'The stone is
an indication of a Jewish
presence during the
Dynasty. They are
tioned in
documents."
HE TOLD Xinhau that
"Judaism is opposed to graven
images' and has no special
decorations or markings on its
tombstones. The other stones
(unearthed near Quanzhou) are
all engraved with various
religious phrases and symbols,
such as those of the Nestorians.
Catholics and Moslems."
Shapiro, who began studying
China's ancient Jews and
collecting essays of Chinese
scholars on the subject in 1982.
said that studies by Chinese
scholars reveal Jewish traces in
China prior to the Tang Dynasty
iH1^-90Ti in various parts of
China Most Chinese scholars, he
noted, believe Jews began to
arrive in China in large groups
during the Tang Dvnasty and the
Song Dynasty (960-12791.
coming mainly by sea with Arab
B'nai B'rith
Organizes
Book Club
2
I
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The formation of a B'nai B'rith
Jewish Book Club, a collabora-
tion with the Jewish Book Club
of New York, has been announced
by Gerald Kraft. B'nai B'rith
president. He said it will be part
of the agency's commission on
adult Jewish education.
The book club will offer books
on subjects of Jewish interest,
according to Abe Kaplan of
Birmingham. Ala., chairman of
the adult education unit. He said
all areas of Jewish learning and
creativity will be among the
offerings of the new club, includ-
ing Judaism. Jewish history and
culture. Israel, Zionism and the
full range of Jewish contributions
to civilization.
Kaplan said there would be
fiction, poetry and books for both
children and young adults.
and Persian merchants.
A 1489 tablet discovered in
Kaifeng in Central China states
that a group of Jews arrived in
that city during the Song
Dynasty. A 1512 inscription of
the same Jewish community sets
the date in Han (206-220). At
present. Shapiro said in his in-
terview, Chinese archaeologists
are seeking more traces of old
Jewish communities.
THESE FINDINGS, and
more, are detailed in a book
translated and edited by Shapiro
called "Jews in Old China
Studies by Chinese." It includes
12 essays by Chinese scholars
and is scheduled for publication
later this month by Hippocrene
Books in New York.
The book is the first of its kind
in China. Shapiro said. He
thanked the Chinese Social
Sciences Academy, and Chinese
scholars such as the noted ar-
chaeologist Xia Nai and historian
Wong Dujian, for their support
and cooperation.
Shapiro began his translations
of the works of Chinese scholars
with a treatise by the late
Chinese historian Chen Yuan
11S80-19711. a pioneer in research
on Jews in China. Chen Yuan had
been the director of the History
Institute of the Chinese Academy
of Social Sciences. Chen's tract
inspired Shapiro and provided
leads to further research. He
travelled to 11 cities and six
provinces and consulted many
Chinese historians and ar-
chaeologists Several wrote
special articles for inclusion in
Shapiro's book.
INTEREST IN Chinese Jews
in Western countries began in the
17th Century. Shapiro noted.
Sinologists have since written
about 200 essays. But their
studies were mainly based on
reports by missionaries such as
Mateo Ricci, and were generally
confined to the Jewish com-
munity in Kaifeng.
Shapiro. 69. a former New
York lawyer, came to China in
1947 and becmae a Chinese
citizen in 1963. He has been with
the Foreign Languages
Publishing House for more than
30 years, and has translated
many Chinese modern and classic
novels into English. Last June he
became a member of China's top
advisory body, the National
Committee of the Chinese
People's Political Consultative
Conference.
Shapiro said he developed an
interest in the history of China's
Jews not only because of his own
Jewish background but also due
to the urgings of his foreign
friends. "Living in China for
nearly 40 years, I was em-
barrassed to know so little about
them," he told Xinhau. "My
paternal grandfather fled to the
United States from Czarist
Russia in the late 19th Century to
escape the pogroms against the
Jews."
Shapiro is currently in the
United States to lecture on his
book and to exchange views with
American scholars.
present deployment.
Israel also seeks undertakings
from Syria, probably tacit, to
prevent terrorist incursions
southwards toward the border.
The Israeli statement envisaged
a deployment of the United
Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (UNIFIL) along a wider
and deeper front than at present.
Reports from Beirut said the
Lebanese government was ready
to hold military talks with Israe
under UNIFIL auspices. Israel
has already signalled its agree-
ment to such talks. But Peres
and Rabin stressed at the
Cabinet meeting that the ses-
sions would not be regarded as a
revival of the long-dead Mixed
Armistice Commission, created
under the 1949 armistice accords.
THE SPECULATION over
Israel's Lebanon policy followed
statements by Peres, in the U.S.
and here, that the Cabinet might
decide soon on a partial with-
drawal from the Western sector if
the Syrians refuse to each agree-
ment on an overall withdrawal-
and-security accord.
Circles close to Rabin said they
felt such talk was not conducive
11 1
dig in deeper on the eastern
of south Lebanon, where
tillery threatens Damask *
would encourage the Syrians'
agree to the security provis
that Israel requires.
Well-placed sources said
the partial option was a real on
nothing came of the efforts
reach wider agreement.
American sources, meanwh
expressed caution about a "k
profile" U.S. "shuttle-til
mediation" at this stage
sources told reporters here tl,
Washington considers the tin
right for low-key diplomacy
its representatives in the vi
Mideast capitals.
THE SOURCES indict^
that the tendency toward autioi
was not linked to the President*
elections but stemmed sold
from the State Department
assessment of the best wav
U.S. can be helpful at this t
The sources said the
Department's top Mideast ia
Assistant Secretary of Staf
Richard Murphy, probablyJ
return to the region within i
month for further "probing rf-'
forts." They were careful noti
term his projected visit a ir.ea
tion effort.
We've joined
hands to serve the Jewish
community better.
<**,


^.


..

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M-1026 84


T Conflicting Reports
I No Sound Info on Peres' Economic

'M By DAVID LANDAU
i^-..- (Jerusalem)
I And DAVID FRIEDMAN
(Washington)
Israel's economic crisis
dominated its relations
with the United States last
week and gave rise to
confusion as to whether
Premier Shimon Peres ob-
tained hard commitments
from the Reagan Admin-
itration during his Wash-
ington visit or a series of
contingency measures pro-
posed to help Israel put its
economy in order.
Conflicting reports emerged
from Jerusalem and Washington
over an alleged U.S. offer of a
moratorium on the payment by
Israel of $500 million in debts
[which fall due during the next
hree months. The initial report
as broadcast by Israel Radio's
ashington correspondent.
Reports later in the day said
Peres, at a special Cabinet meet-
convened to discuss his
American trip, confirmed the
pffer. Clarifications, if not an out-
right denial, came promptly from
Washington.
Peres as Baid to have stressed
khat the idea advanced to him by
(Administration and Congres-
sional leaders was that before the
Ihree months elapsed, the new
Congress would almost certainly
v 0 million in addi-
jnnal aid to Israel, effectively
ancelling the debt before the
loratonum expired.
\(( ORDING TO the story
I Israel, Peres said
I iy Premeir
t who aceompa-
: nt his meetings
i rious
doubts about the offer because of
the adverse impact a debt mora-
torium could have on Israel's
credit standing in the world's
money markets.
But. according to the local
report, Peres said he was reas-
sured by the Americans that
Israel needn't worry about its
credit-worthiness in light of the
public expressions of confidence
m Israel by the Administration,
including President Reagan
during his White House meeting
with Peres.
The Ameicans pointed out fur-
thermore that the world was well
aware of Israel's economic
troubles so there was no point
trying to conceal them.
Moreover, Israel's immediate
cash needs will be met by the
Administration's agreement to
pay the entire $1.2 billion in
economic aid for fiscal 1985 in a
lump sum now rather than in the
usual quarterly installments.
This money is a grant and need
not be repaid.
THE STORY from Washing
ton was somewhat different.
Reagan Administration sources
said that talk of a moratorium on
due debts which eventually
would be cancelled was inac-
curate.
State Department deputy
spokesman Alan Romberg noted
that under the law which
provided U.S. loan aid to Israel
"there can be late payment if
viewed as necessary'' with, of
course, added interest charges.
In short. Israel was told that a
90-day deferent of payment was a
technical feasibility. But the Ad-
ministration made it clear that it
did not believe Israel should take
idvantage I this if it could at all
manage to do without a deferral.
American sources said that
A ashington's consent to provide
wingsemotpayso-
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id news. If you're 55 years or over let us
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ir travel agent or call us directly at SeaEscape.
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the $1.2 billion economic aid pac-
kage immediately should afford
Israel's economy the relief it
needs, provided that the Jeru-
salem government follows
through promptly with requisite
economic measures of its own.
With repsect to Peres' discus-
sions with Administration offi-
cials, Romberg indicated that
deferred payment of the $500
million debt was one of severl
contingency proposals discussed
to deal with Israel's economic
problems but no agreements were
reached.
HE CITED Secretary of State
George Shultz's statement in
response to the reports from
Israel. Shultz noted that Israel's
cash flow problem is "imme-
diately benefited" by the "up
front" payment of the $1.2 billion
grant.
"The basic cash position is
vastly improved by that very
fact, and so we will look at the
flow of funds and go in for that
analysis." Shultz said. He added,
"I think if the strong steps are
taken (to control Israel's
economy) as outlined by Mr.
Peres there shouldn't be any
problems."
Talks in D.C.
Shultz went on to say that
"various ways" were discussed
with the Israelis "in which any
potential problems may be met.
And of course, loan payments is
one way to get a cash flow. And
there are some other ways. But
my own opinion is that it won't
be necessary to take any addi-
tional steps." Administration
spokesmen refused to discuss any
of the suggestions it might have
made to Peres.
IN JERUSALEM, a ranking
government aide said Tuesday
night that the government has
not said outright that it would
avail itself of the possible deferral
of the $500 million debt repay-
ment but was "studying" the
question.
The inter-ministeriaJ economic
team is hard at work to come up
with a viable economic program.
It is clear here that the U.S.
demands that the Israelis take
vigorous measures to slash
government expenditures and
tackle inflation which is presently
running at the unprecedented
annual rate of 900-1,000 percent.
The government and the public
were shocked Monday when the
Central Bureau of Statistics
reported that the cost-of-living
index soared by 21.4 percent in
September, the largest monthly
increase since the Bureau started
keeping records in 1961.
Workers will be paid a 17
percent c.o.l. increment at the
end of this month, representing
80 percent of last month's rise in
the price index. But there are
mounting demands for weekly
payment of salaries. Workers
complain that by the time they
get their monthly pay checks,
their value has declined by 20-25
percent. JTA Services
Celebration
Ban Denied
TEL AVIV (JTA) De-
fense Minister Yitzhak Rabin re-
jected an appeal last week by the
Peace Now movement to ban a
Simhat Torah celebration in
Hebron planned by Gush
Emunim activists in support of
suspected members of a Jewish
terrorist underground presently
on trial.
Peace Now warned that the
celebration, including the tradi-
tional Hakafot parade with
Torahs through the town on
Thursday, would be "pure provo-
cation" to the Arab majority in
Hebron. But Rabin maintained
that the celebration was not
illegal and could not be banned.
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No Role for U.S.
In Lebanon Now
The Peres unity government is getting
set, or so the Prime Minister says, to come
up with a withdrawal plan for the Israel
Defense Forces in Lebanon. The number of
escalations and additions to the original
requirements for withdrawal, as Peres sees
them, meanwhile continues to mount, and
so it is impossible at any given time to say
just what it is that will get the unity
government to acquiesce to a final plan.
We are not inclined to quote presidential
spokesman Larry Speakes on anything, for
Speakes speaks for we know not whom, his
official title notwithstanding. Nevertheless,
the other day. he said something brief and
to the point, which is not his usual way:
what made it even more significant was
that what he said appeared to be a mirror
image of a statement by Secretary of State
Shultz.
We are not quite sure, said Shultz, just
what it is the Israelis have in mind or on
what basis they will finally agree to leave
Lebanon. In essence, that is what Speakes
said. too.
All of which is even more significant in
light of the fact that the United States has
since declined to accept a mediator's role
among the contending parties once the
Israelis present their withdrawal plan. We
can readily understand this; the American
experience in Lebanon was an agonizing
one.
Does this mean that the Reagan
Administration is saying "a plague on both
your houses" to the contending parties?
You can bet that is not true. What Speakes
and Shultz merely suggested was that
there is no role for the United States to play
at this time. The cards have yet to be
placed on the table: the game has yet to
begin.
How the Game Is Played
The second and final Reagan-Mondale
debate Sunday night can give us an insight
into just how the Middle East game is
played. The President, speaking of
American goals in Lebanon when our
Marines were deployed in Beirut, said that
they were there to prevent a sixth war
between Syria and Israel in what seemed
like one more, inevitable confrontation
between them.
Mr. Reagan was good enough to add that
one couldn't blame the Israelis for their
incursion into Lebanon in the first place.
given the repeated bombing of their nor-
thern border by PLO terrorists for years
before. The Israelis entered Lebanon, said
the President, and chased'' them all the
way up to Beirut
How kind ot him to clear up the record
and to exonerate the Israelis from blame
when, during the Operation Peace for
(ialilee. the Administration lambasted the
Israelis every day. Remember the phony
photo that the President kept on his desk of
an "armless-' Arab child "victim" of
Israel's bombings?
The Middle East game is to rewrite
history. When the Administration came
into the Lebanese picture. Israel had
already dessimated Syria as a military
force and cornered the PLO in Beirut. What
the Administration did in Lebanon was to
demand of Israel safe return back along the
Damascus Highway for Syria's flight
'Jewish Florxdiar*
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home. And safe exit from Lebanon for
Yasir Arafat and his terrorists that would
not humiliate them.
What the U.S. hence achieved was the
senseless waste of Israel's achievement in
the cause of reestablishing an independent
Lebanon. Syria made a right turn south-
ward on the Damascus Highway into the
Bekaa and parked there. The Soviets sent
their agents and promptly replaced the
Syrians' dessimated forces and equipment.
Yasir Arafat went up to Tripoli and finally
left Lebanon. But today the Palestinians
are back again in ragged fora
As lor the U.S. We lost hundred-
hundreds of Marine- in Beirut. And wi
home
So much tor the rewriting of hist'
Leo Mindlin
Hart Talks. Does Nothing for Mondah
Friday, October 26,1964
Volume 57
30 TISHRI 5746
Number 43
IT SEEMS thai President
Reagan has attracted the voting
interest of the nation's 18-to-25
population. The most obvious
example ot this is the vociferous
cadre of his supporters on a
and university campuses across
the country
This is a surpriM W e are
barely a dozen years away from
Kent State, the ultimate symbol
of the dissent of America's young
people against our failed war in
Southeast Asia. Young people on
campuses have been traditional
critics of the Fat Cat Establish-
ment.
What makes their current love
affair with President Reagan
unique? It is unique by
definition; young people have
moved from criticizing what
Harry Truman used to call the
"pirates of power" to
unabashedly embracing them.
THIS IS all the more
paradoxical because the pirates
plunderers of the nation's
resources behind the protective
hulk of government are more
likely to send off the young to
war than those political forces
that seek moderation and
compromise in our foreign affairs.
They are more likely to have to
fight in such wars and to die in
them
One probable reason for the
failure of the 18-to-25 voter to see
that he contributes to the rise in
his own \ ulnerabilitj 1- that he is
less
knowledgeable, indeed
literate that: those oi his group
who came before him This
the fact that so many
more ol them attend colleges and
universities today than ever
before
They may be. as they are proud
to call it, more street-smart"
than their forebears, but that is a
material assessment and hard I v
the same thing.
THE TRUTH is that they
know little or nothing about our
nation's history. traditions,
political-social structure or socio-
economic order.
They would know even less if
we were to attempt, say. to single
one of them out and ask: "Look,
you're doing a complete about-
face. You're going from the
liberal camp straight into the
conservative. What are your
reasons?" He simply wouldn't
understand, let alone be able to
make a practical defense of his
move.
All of this is important for two
reasons. One is that the Reagan
camp is counting on the 18-to-25
vote more to deprive the
Mondale forces of that vote,
where it might otherwise go, than
to add to its own already rich
electoral coffers.
The second reason is an article
thai Sen Garj Han
Aril ten I
Time- in which h<
ol ttie nation
into trie Republii a .
'disturbing.
Hart, who man. I I
presidential nomination
and was narrow
Mondale. looks tor no prol
metaphysical reasons to
the drift. Instead, he pan -
the Fat fat belief that lor '
people to vote Repubh.
their self-interest, whill voting
Democratic is not
MORE IMPORT AM Hart
declares that "I strongly disagree
with this analysis and predict a
far-different voting pattern
among new, young voters this
November." In fact, he praises
them somewhat beyond their
worth as political savants-
Hart says of them that "They
believe in giving the free-
enterprise system a chance, but
want to see polluters regulated
They have compassion for others.
but want a government that
works efficiently. They are for a
strong defense, but are ab-^
solutely opposed to a nucletf
build-up that threatens our
security.''
In this sentimental Hart view
of the integrity of the nations
youth, he appears to be wret-
Continued on Page 13-A


Friday, October 26, 1984. The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Finally": Novelist Heller Tackles A Jewish Theme
By ARTHUR J. MAGIDA
copyright Baltimore Jewish Times
Reprint 6y Special Arrangement
Joseph Heller used to be asked
why he hadn't written a Jewish
novel It was probably a logical
question for a successful
American novelist with Hebraic
gem After all. people like Philip
[Roth and Saul Bellow and
Bernard Malamud had grappled
in print with "the Jewish ex-
Iperience in America." Some
wrote of anything else.
, C' went the frequent question
jat Heller's readings, should he be
[anv different from the rest of the
lliterar) pack"
In his first book. Catch-22.
had tried to make some
nt of the Army. Maybe he
could make some sense out of
being Jewish in the land of the
garment industry. JAPS, and
Judaic upward mobility.
HELLER TOOK these
questions to heart and. four years
o gave us Good As Gold, a
,j> w. bitter, jaundiced attack
on trie Jewish family and Jewish
neo-conservatives.
But Heller hand't milked the
experience for all it was
worth Maybe the Jewish ex-
perience in America, but not the
Jewish experience. Heller's new
book. God Knows, is all about
being Jewish. It's also about love
and romance and the struggle for
and the struggle to live.
It's about faith, faith in God and
taith in self, and the longing to
(have back one's youth, a time
when the simple answers seemed
I itisfy the complex and nasty
questions that baffle us as we get
Stder.
G /-. vi is about the David
of the Bible, an unlikely subject
for a man whose previous three
I.....r were more contemporary
and topical.
Before Cod Knows, Heller
wrote out of his own time and.
often, out of his own experience.
Mis 60 missions as a bombardier
in World War II gave him
enough anger and distress to
produce Catch-22.
"HIS STINT as promotion
director for Time gave him
king Happened, a mordant
comment on the bureaucracy of
the corporation. His cynicism
about politics and academics
gave him Good As Gold. Nothing
but inspiration and "the desire to
write a love story" gave him God
1 thought I might write a love
story because I didn't know what
one was, Heller told me. "From
there my mind somehow went to
David. I had some knowledge of
David and Bathsheba. But I
Mthony and Cleopatra. The few
episodes I remembered from
Davids life seemed to lend
themselves to a novel that might
or might not be a love story, a
novel that could be both funny
and deadly serious."
Heller hadn't touched the Bible
in years He opened it up "and
was absolutely ecstatic" at the
treasures he had found. "There
were treasures of two kinds. One
was the number of adventures
and episodes in David's life. The
other was the elements of tragedy
and grief."
Heller will probably always
--late Cod Knows with
tragedy and grief. After writing
the first three chapters of the
book, he was struck with
<'Uillain-Barre syndrome. a
bizarre form of paralysis that
strikes without warning. Each
year, about 19 people per million
Ket the disease, which invades
the nervous system when the
tdy's immune defenses backfire.
EARLY IN December. 1981.
Tw ^ac* trouble swallowing.
1 he next day, his arms were weak
and he was tired. He was checked
JJ)to the intensive care unit at
Vw York's Mt. Sinai Hospital
that afternoon. Within 10 days,
he could barely move.
'Catch-22' Author's Triumph:
From Paralysis to Achievement
"I hid from myself the fact
that I was seriously ill. I did it by
denying the amount of anxiety I
felt in intensive care. The first
night I was there, the man next
to me died. Every few days,
somebody would die. After three
or four days, I was scared stiff
without realizing it. I was afraid
to go to sleep, but I was dying for
sleep. My eyes kept falling shut,
but 1 kept snapping my head up.
I felt if I fell off to sleep. I would
never wake up."
Heller was assured by a
psychiatrist that he was not
psychotic. "If I had any different
reaction to being there." he was
told, "then there was reason to
worry. Consciously, I was not
afraid of dying or of permanent
paralysis. Unconsciously, I
suppose I was scared stiff."
FRIENDS VISITED Heller.
Mel Brooks, said Heller, "was
drawn just by the sheer horror of
the disease." Dustin Hoffman
brushed Heller's teeth for him.
He soon returned with a list of
Guillain-Barre symptoms he
was afraid he, too, would get it.
"Mario Puzo felt Ul just
walking into intensive care,"
Heller said, "and wanted to leave
immediately."
Heller left the hospital five
months later. A friend and a day
nurse cared for him, first at his
small Manhattan apartment and
then at his Easthampton home at
the tip of Long Island. It ". -^n't
until 14 months after contracting
the disease that he was able to
stand up by himself.
"I call myself 100 percent
recovered," Heller said, "but the
doctors don't. Tremendous
atrophy sets in with the disease. I
doubt if there's a muscle that's
fully recovered." Heller still
doesn't have full use of his
tongue and left arm.
By the summer of 1982, Heller
was able to resume writing God
Knows. There is a "grotesque
similarity," he said, between
certain scenes in the book and his
bout with Guillain-Barre. "It was
not lost on me that I was in a
similar position as King David. I
was confined to bed, unable to
take care of myself. I can in-
terpret that as God giving me a
warning. Or as God giving me a
punishment. Or it was purely
coincidental."
HELLER DENIES that the
illness influenced the book. He
had already written note cards
with dialogue and description for
God Knows, the "signposts" he
needs before tackling the actual
writing of a book. And he denies
that the illness had any per-
manent effect on his personality.
"I was told by friends during the
long period of rehabilitation that
I was a more patient, more
likeable person than before. Now,
more and more, I hear from
friends the comment. He must
be all better. He's his old self
again.' "
Did Heller learn anything from
his paralysis? "Only that you
should have lots of major medical
insurance."
Heller knew little about the
Bible before he begar God
Knows. "And," he claims. "I
know very little more now."
The latter statement is a
modest one. After spending four
years with the Bible, Joe Heller
can rattle off the names of
prophet after prophet, warrior
after warrior, concubine after
concubine: Adonijah. Abishai.
Abishag the Shunammite. Zadok
the young priest. Barzillai the
Gileadote. Unlike Adam and
Esau and Noah and I-ot and his
unfortunate wife, these are not
household names.
THE OSMOSIS of 48 months
of reading and re-reading and
indexing and cross-indexing the
characters and the incidents of
David's life have given Heller a
familiarity with the Old Testa-
ment that could make a Biblical
scholar envious.
There is a certain incongruity
about sitting in the Jockey Club
of the Ritz Carlton in
Washington and discussing the
Bible with Joseph Heller. It is
not a literary atmosphere. It is
certainly not a religious atmos-
phere. Not with those $1,000
suits on all the gents and enough
jewelry on the women to break
the bank at Monte Carlo.
But. then, there is a certain
incongruity to Heller. He doesn't
quite belong here. Although he
hasn't lived in Brooklyn since
1942. the old neighborhood is still
very much with him. It's in his
accent. It's in his laugh.
BUT HELLER doesn't seem
uncomfortable among the
bourgeois blandishments of the
Ritz Carlton: give him good
service and fine cooking and a
certain hushed elegance, and. like
any sensible man he'll gladly
accept. But his collar is open and
his jacket lapel is twisted just a
bit behind the neck. His khaki
pants are a tad crumpled and, in
a room where everyone else is
probably wearing Bally shoes, his
sneakers are overly casual.
Heller has done well as a
novelist. He lives among writers
and painters in Easthampton.
His home is a converted far-
mhouse with a swimming pool
and several acres and a great deal
of privacy. His conversation is
littered with the names of such
friends as Mel Brooks, Carl
Reiner, Tony Curtis, Kurt
Vonnegut, Tom Brokaw, Mary
McCarthy. But the names of
lesser known friends also crop up
in the same conversation:
"Speed" Vogel. Marvin Winkier,
George Mandel, Julius Green.
Most are old friends from the old
neighborhood. Most have
nothing to do with show business
or literature.
"As I get older." Heller said.
"I feel most comfortable with my
own past." A few years ago.
Heller said he didn't think he
"deserved all the money" his
books had earned. It puts me
into a social class for which I
have very little sympathy,"
THAT ALSO holds true today.
"I'm still not comfortable with
rich people. But." he smiled.
"I'm not comfortable with poor
people, either. Go figure."
As a boy, Heller lived in the
Coney Island section of
Brooklyn. It was "a wonderful
neighborhood to grow up in.
There were so many kids.
Everywhere you went, there were
Continued on Page 13-A
'getting older, I feel more
comfortable with my past.'


u j.:.j: #-**..'*A""v"^ry--3^r-w-M**.-,
Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday. October 26,1984
Calif. Joins Fold
Law to Protect Jews Against Post-Mortem Procedures
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A bill to protect observant
Jews in California against
autopsies and other Jew-
ishly-unacceptable post-
mortem procedures has
been signed into law gy
Gov. George Deukmejian of
California, becoming the
third such law in the United
States, Agudath Israel of
America reported here. The
first state was New York
and the second New Jersey.
The California law establishes
procedures whereby persons 18
years of age or older can execute
a "certificate of religious belife,"
stating their religious opposition
to post-mortem proedures.
If, upon such a person's death,
a relative or friend notifies the
coroner for the area that the dead
person had executed a certificate
of religious opposition, and
produces the certificate within 48
hours after informing the
coroner, the coroner may not per-
form the post-nortem procedure.
EXCEPTIONS applying in the
three states permit the medical
examiner to proceed with an
autopsy if there is suspected or
known homicide, or a suspected
or known public health hazard,
such as a communicable disease.
Dr. Irving Lebovics and
Peres to Meet With Mitterrand
In Paris on 2-Day Visit
PARIS (JTA) Israeli Premier Shimon Peres
will pay a two-day visit to France on Dec. 10 for meetings
with President Francois Mitterrand, Premier Laurent
Fabius and other members of the government, it was
announced here.
It will be the first official visit to France in 23 years
by an incumbent prime minister of Israel. The last visit
took place in 1961 when Premier David Ben Gurion came
to Paris as the guest of President Charles deGaulle. Peres,
at that time Deputy Minister of Defense and a personal
aide to Ben Gurion, was a member of the official party.
NO DETAILS of Peres' forthcoming visit have been
released and they are reportedly still being worked out.
He is expected to be Mitterrand's guest at a luncheon or
dinner at the Elysee Palace and to meet twice with the
French president and to hold a press cupference.
Hunger Strike for Refuseniks
In Miami Joins National Drive
Continued from Page 1-A
of their fellow refuseniks. These
40 refuseniks have also sent a
strong appeal to the Central
Committee of the Communist
Party in the Soviet Union. South
Florida area synagogues and or-
ganizations, in addition to
phoning the Soviet Embassy,
began a rotating daily fast
Monday to support the refuse-
niks' efforts.
SFCSJ is urging everyone to
join in the fast and to phone the
Embassy at (2021 347-1437 or
628-7551. Callers are asked not to
use abusive or threatening
language and to appeal to the
Soviets to drop the charges
against Kholmiansky and Edel-
shtein.
The mobilization is in response
to a national call to action by the
Union of Councils for Soviet Jews
in Washington and will focus
attention on the latest develop-
ments in the continued harass-
ment and persecution of Soviet
Jews.
loixtlxgeLte JLowex-s
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Stanley Streitel, co-chairmen of
the Los Angeles Agudath Israel
Commission on Law and Civic
Action, described as instru-
mental in drafting the measure
and directing efforts for its pas-
sage in the California Legis-
lature, had the support of a broad
range of Jewish organizations,
including Orthodox congrega-
tions, Jewish Federations in Cali-
fornia, the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. and the
California chapter of the
American Civil Liberties Union.
David Zweibel. Agudath
Israel's government affairs
director, said the new law was
"an important first step" which
would, "in large part, redress the
law's insufficient sensitivity to
the constitutional rights of
citizens whose religious prin-
ciples forbid post-mortem pro-
cedures in the absence of extra-
ordinary circumstances."
BUT, Zweibel added, the Cali-
fornia law does not afford the
same degree of protection to
observant Jews as do the laws in
New York and New Jersey, which
ban performance of autopsies
even if the dead person had not
signed a "certificate of religious
belief" and which apply to ob-
servant Jews under the age of 18.
He said the California law,
despite its shortcomings, repres-
ented "a major breakthrough"
for what he called the growing
Orthodox Jewish community on
the west coast.
Howard J. Levine will be
guest of honor at the Amer-
ican ORT Federation Jewelry
Industry Chapter dinner
slated for Nov. 13at the Plaza
Hotel in New York Hubert
Pliskin is dinner chairman
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Friday, October 26, 1984 The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
AJComm. to Present
Black-Jewish Front Urged in Philly Top Award to Miamian
PHILADELPHIA
,JTA) A call for the res-
toration of a united Black-
Jewish action front to work
together for improved mi-
nority conditions was made
iere Oct. 16 at special cere-
monies at Independence
Hall marking "A Day of
Social Concern" sponsored
by the Social Action Com-
mittee of the Rabbinical
Assembly. The Assembly
represents 1,200 Conserva-
tive rabbis internationally
and claims to represent 1.5
E. German
Arabs Moving
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A spokes-
man for the West Berlin muni-
cipality has expressed grave
concern over the recent influx
from East Berlin of Palestinian
and Lebanese Arabs expelled
from Sweden last week. He said
West Berlin could not tolerate a
situation in which persons who
do not qualify for the status of
political refugees nevertheless
enter the city and settle there.
The expellees landed at East
Berlin's Schoenefeld Airport and
entered the West by using public
transportation between the two
sections of the divided city. There
is no passport control on the west
side of the Berlin wall and anyone
allowed to leave by the East
Berlin authorities can do so
without being questioned.
million Conservative Jews
in this country.
The call said that despite their
differences, Jews and Blacks
must restore the coalition of the
1960s and work together in such
areas as education and job oppor-
tunities, urban renewal and the
restoration of the ecological
health of the nation's environ-
ment.
"WE IN the Jewish commu-
nity are repelled by racial and
religious bigotry of any kind and
are frightened at a spectre of anti-
Semitism, particularly that
echoed in the current political
campaign,'' asserted Rabbi Alex-
ander Shapiro, president of the
Rabbinical Assembly. "We must
not permit the statements of
either a Jesse Jackson or a Rev.
(Louis) Farrakhan to prevent an
alliance of Blacks and Jews
working together for the social
improvement of all minorities in
America."
A similar declaration was made
by Marshall Wolke. president of
the United Synagogue of
America, representing Conserva-
tive Judaism's 850 synagogues.
He said, "We reaffirm the
historic Jewish commitment to
civil rights, which is underscored
by the positive contact existing
between the Black and Jewish
communities, while deploring the
demagogic utterings of Black
extremists and the resultant
distortion of Black-Jewish rela-
tions.
"We encourage and support all
efforts to reestablish a viable,
productive relationship between
our two communities, both
religious and secular, and call
upon our rabbis and affiliated
synagogues to intensify their
efforts to this end.''
In urging renewed Black-
Jewish ties, the Rabbinical As-
sembly and the United Syna-
gogue asked their 1,200 rabbis
and 850 congregations to initiate
a variety of programs aimed at
forging a closer grass roots
understanding between Blacks
and Jews.
RECOMMENDATIONS
made were: pulpit exchanges
with Black churches, adult
education forums, articles in
synagogue and church bulletins,
use of Anglo-Jewish and Black
publications, formation of local
Black-Jewish dialogue groups
and discussions on local TV and
radio programs.
In his message, Shapiro called
for the convening of a national
meeting of Jews and Blacks, at
the earliest possible moment. He
stressed that such a gathering
must include the widest possible
spectrum of representation from
both the Black and Jewish
communities.
At the Independence Hall cere-
monies, the Rabbinical Assembly
honored veteran civil rights
leader Bayard Rustin for his dis-
tinguished service to humanity
and presented him with a
mounted shofar containing the
inscription, "Masterbuilder of
human rights for all people."
Mayor Wilson Goode and Rabbi
Max Housen, president of the
Philadelphia Board of Rabbis,
also participated in the program.
In addition to Black-Jewish rela-
tions, the Conservative Jewish
leaders convened at Temple Beth
Zion-Beth Israel to discuss the
question of nuclear disarmament
and ecological problems.
The Institute of Human
Relations of the American Jewish
Committee will present its
Institute of Human Relations
Award to James W. Apthorp on
Wednesday, Oct. 31, at the
Pavillion Hotel, Miami Center.
Former Florida Gov. Reubin
O'D. Askew will serve as
honorary chairman of the event.
Chesterfield Smith, the American
Jewish Committee's 1984
Learned Hand Award recipient,
will serve as chairman.
A graduate of Florida State
University, Apthorp has served
as chairman of the Greater Miami
Chamber of Commerce and as
vestryman of St. Stephen's
Episcopal Church. He has also
participated in the Environ-
mental Task Force, among other
community endeavors.
The American Jewish Commit-
tee's Institute of Human
Relations Award is presented to
leaders of the business and civic
community throughout the
country who have demonstrated
"their profound commitment to
preserving our democratic
Heritage." Apthorp is president
of Palms Corp., a Deltona
subsidiary.
The Institute of Human Rela-
tions was created by the
American Jewish Committee to
serve as a research center for
intergroup and interreligious
affairs. It conducts inves-
tigations into social phenomena
affecting the future of a stable
society under the auspices of the
American Jewish Committee.
THE PURITY BEGAN
3500 YEARS AGO!
Geologists report that the pure and
delicious spring water emerging from the
Mountain Valley Spring today in Hot
Springs, Ark first entered the ground as
rain about 3500 years ago Salt free
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or office.
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M MOT SPRING!
SUNDA Y, DECEMBER 16,1984
Ou ts tanding En tertainmen t
Ambassador Moshe Arens, Former Israel Minister of Defense
Former Israel Ambassador to the United States
Konover Hotel, 5445 Collins Ave., Miami Beach
12,-OONoon
Kosher Cuisine
For Reservations: Jewish National Fund, 420 Lincoln Rd, Miami Beach, Florida 538-6464


I **A^* ^* A v>
;c.'cy*7^v-Jt/t/.--., *.ww.
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday. October 26, 1984
Surprise Votes
Israel Beats Iran's Ouster Move
By YITHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The General
Assembly overwhelmingly
rejected an Iranian prop
osal to expel Israel from the
world body. The vote was
80-41 with 22 abstentions.
This was the third consecutive
year that Iran attempted and
failed to have Israel suspended
from the General Assembly by
introducing an amendment to
reject its credentials. Israel's
credentials came up for aprpoval
before the 39th session of the
General Assembly along with the
credentials of 126 other countries.
THE IRANIAN motion was
defeated after Denmark intro-
duced a countermotion not to
deal with it. The same procedural
maneuver was responsible for the
defeat of a similar Iranian motion
last vear. It was undertaken then
by Norway. The vote at that time
was 79-43 in favor of the Nor-
wegian move with 19 absten-
tions.
The voting Oct. 17 in the
General Assembly produced
some surprises. Iraq, the arch
enemy of Iran with which it has
been at war for more than three
years, abstained. Jordan and
Lebanon absented themselves
from the hall during the vote.
Egypt, as it did last year, op-
posed the Iranian amendment by
supporting the Danish move.
The 41 votes for the Iranian
proposal came mainly from Arab
and Communist bloc countries
headed by the Soviet Union.
Most of the abstentions were by
Third World countries.
ISRAEL'S Ambassador to the
UN. Binyamin Netanyahu, who
spoke after the vote in what was
his first appearance before the
General Assembly since his
appointment as ambassador
three weeks ago. called Iran's
failure "a resounding and
dramatic defeat."
In his brief remarks, the Israeli
envoy said. "The attempt to deny
Israel her credentials was not
Local Townfolk Happy to Have
Former Nazi Soldiers in Midst
BONN iJTAI Several
hundred former members of the
SS Polizei Panzer Grenadier
Division and their families ended
a two-day "reunion' in the
remote Bavarian town of Mark
Theidenfeld amid charges that
they were propagating Nazi ideas
and traditions.
The Organization of Per-
secutees of the Nazi Regime and
many other groups organized a
protest that brought some 800
demonstrators to Mark
Theidenfeld on Saturday to
denounce the reunion as an at-
tempt to revive and legitimize the
spirit of Nazi Germany.
But the local townsfolk appar-
ently were quite willing to have
the ex-SS men in their midst. The
reunion has been a tradition in
the town for the past 30 years.
The reunion drew another
sharp protest from the Mayor of
the Greek town of Distomon.
Giorgos Sfountouris. who
recalled that members of the SS
Polizei Panzers massacred 218
Greek residents on June 10. 1944
when Nazi armies were occupying
Greece.
merely one more attack on Israel.
It was an attempt on the very life
of this body."
Netanyahu warned that the
UN "is in danger of becoming a
mere spectator on the sidelines of
serious diplomacy. Most signi-
ficantly, it is losing perhaps it
has already lost its hold on the
imagination of the world's
people."
He charged that the attempt to
suspend Israel from the General
Assembly would destroy the
principle of universality which is
a cornerstone of the UN and
would deal "a mortal blow to the
UN."
NETANYAHU declared. "It is
a hopeful sign that the great
majority of members understood
the implications of the Iranian
move and have rejected it. Yet. it
is sad that some have enthu-
siastically espoused the cause
that could well lead to the demise
of the UN and sadder still that
others acquiesce in an attempt
they know is unspeakably
wrong He concluded. "Those
who enter this house must be
prepared to live by its rules and
above all by the fundamental
principle of universality."
Addressing a press conference
after his appearance at the
General Assembly. Netanyahu
expressed hope that next year,
which is the 40th anniversary of
the UN, "we will not be faced
with the same spectacle" against
Israel.
He said, in response to a ques-
tion, that contrary to last year,
there were no anti-Semitic at-
tacks during the debate on
Israel's credentials. Jews were
attacked in last year's debate by
Libya and the USSR.
Netanyahu said he could not
reconcile the Soviet vote in favor
of the Iranian motion with
Moscow's recent call for an in-
ternational peace conference on
the Middle East.
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NJTV .
VWres-
Cm
Statr
Z'P.
Pv>n.
Study Shows Strong Jewish Ties
Mean Lower Divorce Rate
Continued from Page 1-A
Jews parallels a rise in the
divorce rate of the general
population, but despite the in-
crease in divorce among Jews,
research has shown that Amer-
ican Jews are less likely to
divorce than other groups. Prof.
Brodbar-Nemzer asserted that
the lower rate of divorce among
Jews stems from Judaic tradi-
tions that stress group commit-
ment and values of family sta-
bility and cohesion.
The 1981 study showed that
the lowest rate of divorce among
Jews is among Orthodox Jews,
with a slight increase in the rate
for Conservative Jews. He said
Reform Jews divorce at twice the
rate of Orthodox Jews. Jews who
do not identify with any of the
major Jewish denominations
divorce at four times the rate of
Orthodox Jews.
The Brandeis scholar said a
similar pattern was found bet-
ween observance of ritual and the
divorce rate. Those Jews who
were highly observant had the
lowest divorce rate, with the rate
increasing as the number of
rituals observed decreased. The
study also showed that Jews who
are synagogue members are half
as likely to have been divorced,
he asserted.
THE STUDY also analyzed
the ethnic component of Jewish
identity, because Jewishness
describes identification with an
ethnic group, as well as with a
religion, he declared.
Kthnic identification was
divided into categories which
included friendships with Jews,
placing a value on living in
Jewish neighborhoods, belonging
to Jewish organizations and
contributing to Jewish causes.
Brodbar-Nemzer said it was
found that Jews who had Jewish
friends, or who felt it was import-
ant to live in Jewish neighbor-
hoods, or who belonged to Jewish
organizations were less likely to
have ever been divorced. In fact .-JL.
he said, Jewish ethnic identifica-
tion was accompanied by lower
divorce rates even among Jews
who reported little religious
behavior.
HE SAID IT was clear that
there is a direct relationship
between the extent of a person's
Jewish commitment and a
disinclination toward divorce. It
is likely that this relationship
results from pre-existing atti-
tudes toward the family and
family stability, in spit*T
perhaps, of participation in
secular life that includes pulls in
the opposite direction.''
He argued that the lower
divorce rate among Jews
"reflects an attempt to redress
the balance on the side of group
survival."
New UNIFIL Mandate
UNITED NATIONS -
(WNS) The UN Security
Council has extended the
mandate of UNIFIL for another
six months until April ': '.;''
The vote was 13-0. with
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Friday, October 26,1984. The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Names in News: Jewish Singles to Climb Masada
Jewish singles will climb the
heights of Masada, discover the
Old City of Jerusalem and ex-
plore pioneering life in the settle-
ments of the mountainous Galilee
when they visit Israel with the
Sixth National United Jewish
Appeal Hatikvah Mission this
December.
Geared for single men and
women between the ages of 22
and 40, the mission will visit
Israel on a specially planned en-
counter with the country and its
people Dec. 20-30, according to
Lawrence S. Jackier of South-
field, Mich., chairman of UJA
Overseas Programs.
In recognition of her efforts on
behalf of Ida Nudel, a long-term
refusenik and former Jewish
Prisoner of Conscience in the
Soviet Union, Jane Fonda was
presented with the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry (NCSJ)
Solidarity Award at its Leader-
ship Assembly in Washington
Monday night.
The award, a silver and Incite
menorah designed by noted artist
I.udwig Wolpert. whose works
are included at the Jewish
Museum in New York, bears an
inscription from the writings of
Hannah Senesh which reads:
Blessed is the Match Consumed
in Lighting a Flame" a refer-
ence to the value of one indiv-
idual's efforts toward the greater
good.
At an awards dinner where she
was honored, conference partic-
ipants listened as Fonda spoke of
Nudel's spirit.
Political activity is a matter
of survival it is not only a
right, but an obligation,"
Thomas A. Dine, director of the
\merican Israel Public Affairs
i "mmittee, says in the newly-
published Fall 1984 issue of
Women's League "Outlook."
1 luring this season of ap-
proaching presidential and other
elections, Dine"s article admon-
ishes American Jews to be
politically aware and involved.
(erring to AIPAC. he says. "If
it ical activity means survival.
then the pro-Israel lobby in
W ashington is the key to that
survival."
In an article entitled "The
MPAC Link." Dine describes
the history and accomplishments
of the pro-Israel lobby that he
heads. He considers AIPAC's
two "core" issues to be funding
of U.S. military and economic as-
sistance for Israel and opposing
arms sales to Arab countries that
arc hostile to Israel.
The Jewish tradition sanctions
abortion in qualified special cases
-uch as rape or incest, but it un-
'quivocally rejects abortion on
demand, according to a noted
authority on family issues.
David M. Feldman. rabbi of
I he Teaneck Jewish Center, N.J.,
chairman of the New York Fed-
eration on Jewish Medical
Ethics, and author of "Marital
Relations, Birth Control, and
Abortion in Jewish Law," offers
this overall conclusion in an
analysis entitled "Jewish Views
on Abortion." Prepared for the
American Jewish Committee's
William Petschek National
Jewish Family Center, the report
has been released in New York.
A U.S. Supreme court decision
to hear a case involving a refusal
by village officials of Scaradale,
N.Y. to erect a nativity display
on public property is being
praised by the American Jewish
Congress.
Theodore R. Mann, president
of AJCongress. said the orga-
nization is gratified that the high
court has agreed to hear the case
and hopes it will find that "muni-
cipal officials may not be com-
pelled, against their judgment, to
grant permission for such reli-
gious installations in our public
Bsafca "_______
Jane Fonda was presented
with the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry Solidarity
Award at the organization s
Leadership Assembly
Washington Monday night.
in
The case arose out of the
refusal of Scarsdale officials to
agree to a demand by a group of
residents that a creche be erected.
A federal district court upheld
the village officials, but the
decision was reversed by a federal
appeals tribunal. The village
officials then appealed to the
Supreme Court.
The National Endowment for
the Humanities has awarded a
grant of up to $116,886 to the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion for a two-
year project: the preparation of
the first 14 volumes of a complete
edition of all the Yiddish works of
Sholem Aleichem, it is announced
by President Alfred Gottschalk.
Prof. Herbert H. Paper of the
HUC-JIR Cincinnati faculty, and
Prof. Chone Shmeruk of the
Hebrew University in Jerusalem
will direct the project as chief co-
editors, with the collaboration of
a number of scholars from
Canada, Israel, and the United
States.
A highly important ingredient
in the research plan is the coop-
eration of Avraham Lie, director
of the Sholem Aleichem House in
Tel Aviv, whose Sholem Alei-
chem Archives will be placed at
the disposal of the editors.
Leaders of the Israel Cancer
Research Fund will gain first-
hand insights into progress being
made in seeking cures for cancer
during an 11-day mission to
Israel the first in the Fund's
history it is announced by
Dr. Yashar Hirahaut, ICRF
president.
The mission, headed by Dr.
Hirahaut, will be chaired by Bea
Brown of Hillsdale, N.J., a vice
president of the Fund.
Participants will depart from
Kennedy International Airport
via El Al Israel Airlines on Nov.
14 and return to New York Nov.
25. During their mission, dele-
gates will meet with ICRF-
funded Fellows and Career De-
velopment Award recipients of
Hadassah Medical Center, Jeru-
salem; Ben Gurion University of
the Negev, Beersheva; Weiz-
mann Institute, Rehovot; and
Technion, Haifa.
Mark E. Schluseel of South-
field, Mich, has been elected
president of the Jewish Educa-
tion Service of North America.
He succeeds Fred Sichel of
Thomas A. Dine, director of
the American Israel Public
Affairs Committee, warns
Jews to be politically aware
and involved. His article on
the subject appears in the Fall
issue of the Women's League
Outlook.'
Han tan Valley. N.J. who headed
the agency since its inception in
September, 1981.
/\N.
JNOUNCING
Israef's i$th Oianukka commemorative-' coins.
AN HISTORIC &
VERY LIMITED ISSUE
You must reserve-'by November 1&, i$g4.
ISRAEL'S 1984 HANUKKA
COMMEMORATIVE COINS
In H81 o unique Hanukkiya, or
Hanukka lamp, was presented to the
Yad Vashem Museum in Israel. It had
been fashioned from scrap metal in the
infamous Theresienstadt ghetto during
the second world war.
Israel's 15th Hanukka Commemora-
tive Coins offer homage to the victims of
Theresienstadt, to a heroic and tragic epi-
sode at the time of the Holocaust.
The coins are being issued in denom-
inations of one shekel and two shekel, and
are limited to one silver Proof 2-shekel
coin and two silver B. U. 1-shekel coins to
each collector. Reservations postmarked
after November 16, 1984 cannot be ac-
cepted. So share this historic occasion by
placing your order today.
! 350 Fifth Avenue. New York. NY 10118
Please reserve the following N84 H.inukka Commemorative coins
"1
Quant (. inn Metal Diameter Weight
2 Shekel Silver k 50 V in m 28 8 R
1 Shekel Silver 8 50 30 mm 14.4 g
Legal tender issued by the Bank of Israel
NAME______________
Please l*nnt
ADDRESS .
CITY.
STATE.
ZIP.
Reservations must he postmarked bv November In. I*t4 to assure confirmation
ot vour itidrr You vs ill receive vour order lorm and price lo confirm vour option
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"The Spirit of Israel
f>


.L" iT"^J*VM'J0B2!S*
Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, October 26. 1984
NoOneHurP
GOP Pollsters Caught in Dirty Tricks
Israel's Soaring Inflation Paralyzes
Computers Which Can't Cope
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK -(JTA) -
A telephone polling script
used by a company hired by
the National Jewish Coali-
tion, to solicit information
from Jewish voters in New
York and California left
some red faces in the Coali-
tion when it was revealed
last week that persons
hired by the firm to
telephone Jews had falsely
identified themselves by
using the name "Good-
man" or other Jewish-
sounding surnames in the
script.
Richard Fox. a Philadelphia
businessman and chairman of the
National Jewish Coalition,
acknowledged that the incident
was improper but asserted that
there was no intent to mislead."
The Mondale-Ferraro campaign
committee had no official
position on the incident, a
spokesperson said.
"WE ASSUME responsibility
for not monitoring the company"
hired to conduct the polling. Fox
said in an interview with the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
"The practice was not intended
to hurt, nor was anyone hurt in
the process." He said that the use
of false surnames by the com-
pany has ceased.
The episode was revealed last
week by the Westsider. a weekly
newspaper published in New
York City. In the issue which ex-
posed the tampering of the politi-
cal telephone solicitations,
prominently featured on the front
page, the Westsider also issued
an editorial endorsement of
Walter Mondale for President,
assailing President Reagan on a
wide range of issues.
The script had the telephoners
identify themselves, in at least
one case, as "Harry Goodman,"
representing the National Jewish
Coalition and asked respondents
how they intended to vote in next
month's Presidential elections. If
the answer was "Reagan." they
were thanked and asked to tell
family and friends to vote
Republican, according to the
Westsider report.
FOR THOSE respondents
undecided, they were asked a
series of questions to determine
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which issues were most im-
portant to them. The choices
were economy. Israel defense,
church-state, and anti-Semitism.
The responses were marked so
that follow-up mailings on the
appropriate subject could be
arraanged. the Westsider said.
The article, by-lined Jan
Bartelli with Jeff Kisseloff. de-
tailed how the reporters were
paid $4 an hour to call Jews in
New York and California from
the offices of Telephone Access, a
private polling firm hired to
conduct the polls.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Com-
puters at Israel's financial cen-
ters can no longer cope with
soaring inflation. The electronic
chips function but the screens on
the display terminals can contain
only 15 digits, hardly enough for
the billions of Shekels that repre-
sent relatively modest sums of
money.
The Bank of Israel and the
commercial banks are con-
sidering abolition of Agorot. This
is small change 100 Agorot
equal one Shekel represented
by two digits to the right of a
decimal point. But bank experts
say they also may have to shave
some zeroes from Shekels to
adjust to the limitations of the
computers.
The number of zeroes increases
in inverse proportion to the value
of the Shekel's purchasing power
That value dropped by 21.4 per-
cent last month, the amount bv
which the cost-ofliving index
rose. It was the highest monthly-
increase since the Central Bureau
of Statistics began publishing its
monthly COL index in Septem-
ber. 1951.
Using that month as a 100
base, the COL index in Septem-
ber, 1984. reached 1,098.437. H
10.000-fold increase in prices over
33 years, the basic index is used
to compute mortgages, life in-
surance premiums and other
long-term loans linked to the
price index.
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_ I
N.J. Kosher Caterer
Sells Meat Containing Pork Products
NEWARK, N.J. -
(JTA) A New Jersey
kosher caterer has admitted
to possession for sale of
food containing pork, in
violation of a state law,
under an agreement nego-
tiated by the New Jersey
Division of Consumer
Affairs.
Attorney General Irwin
Kimmelman negotiated a consent
order between the consumer
affairs division and Richfield
Regency of /erona, the kosher
caterer. The catering firm admit-
ted it had a quantity of tortellini
containing pork in its freezer last
July 21. A spokesman told the
Jeish Telegraphic Agency the
non-kosher food was turned up in
'a routine check by state in-
spectors.
THE CONSENT order was
signed on Oct. 1 by James Barry,
consumer affairs director, and
Herbert Goldblatt for the caterer.
Under that order, Barry said,
Richfield Regency admitted
violation of the state's kosher
food regulations by having in its
freezer 12 15-ounce sealed pack-
ages of tortellini containing pork.
The caterer agreed to and paid
a $5,000 penalty and $1,000 in
costs to the State of New Jersey.
Richfield Regency agreed to
comply with all appropriate
regulations and also agreed to
continue having rabbinical
supervision to assure compliance
with the consent decree.
The catering firm agreed to
Exhibit of German Youth Affairs
In Nazi Era Said To Boomerang
BONN (JTA) An
exhibition in Frankfurt
portraying with authentic
artifacts and documents
ihe life of German youth
during the Nazi era has
drawn criticism from some
Jewish quarters. Its
purpose, according to the
directors of the municipal
museum, is to depict how
> ouths were seduced by
Nazi propaganda and
symbols. But, some ob-
servers contend, it may be
counter-productive. It has,
in fact, become a magnet
lor neo-Nazi groups from all
over the Federal Republic.
Jewish critics have not ex-
pressed their specific objections
in public. The articles displayed
give a comprehensive picture of
the (Jermany of the 1930'ss and
His Those who mounted the
xhibition apparently wanted it
i" speak for itself and accord-
ingly, explanations and clarifica-
tions are rare. The display is
there without much commentary.
FOR THAT reason, many
argue, it could revive nation
alistic sentiments and serve as a
means for present-day Germans
to identify with the Nazis. Neo-
Nazi groups have already come to
the museum on pilgrimages and
Been delighted with the exhibi-
tion.
Dr. Juergen Steen. a museum
official, told an interviewer that
he was guided by the purpose of
showing the young generation
and the general public how the
Nazis achieved their popularity
with German youth a half cen-
tury ago. But. he added, the
exhibition also stresses the
contemporary youth movements
which rejected Nazi ideas or even
actively opposed Nazi rule.
permit inspections by state
inspectors at all times when
either the principals, their agents
or employees are on the premises
and at work regardless of
whether the place of business is
open to the public. Richfield
Regency also is known as Rich-
field Caterers, Inc., Barry said.
BARRY SAID, "We will con-
tinue to enforce the kosher food
regulations to assure that New
Jersey consumers who seek
kosher food get what they pay
for." The spokesman said this
was the first time a violation had
been charged against Richfield
Regency.
Under a law signed by Gov.
Thomas Kean, the division in-
spects stores, restaurants and
caterers which advertise the
availability of kosher products,
to assure compliance with rules
regarding the methods by which
such products must be kept,
prepared for sale, displayed and
sold.
The regulations, which became
effective last April 2, make it a
violation of the state Consumer
Fraud Act to sell, expose for sale,
serve or possess any food falsely
represented to be kosher.
Friday, October 26,1984. The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
First Jewish Woman Holds
High Post in Mexican Gov't.
MEXICO CITY (JTA) Clara Jusidman de
Bialostotzky, a prominent sociologist with a doctorate in
economics, has become the first Jewish woman to hold a
high post in the Mexican government.
SHE NOW HEADS the Instituto Nacional Del
Consumidor (INCO), Mexico's institute of consumer
affairs. Bialostotzky was appointed by Minister of
Commerce and Industry Hector Hernandez Cervantes
who praised her abilities.
She has held several offical posts in other govern-
ment ministries and agencies. He duties now are to
control prices and services.
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Pagel2-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, October 26,1984
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way,tom.\*u. ^g-ra:,waaa wa*
Z^o Mindlin
Hart Talks Good Game, Does Nothing for Mondale
Continued from Page 4-A
chedly off base, attributing to
them the self-denying morals of a
prophet, when sociologists every-
where say of them that they are
crass materialists who suffer
from the twin diseases of instant
gratification need and "me, me,
me
AT THE same time, it must be
conceded that Hart is an in-
gtinctive politician with a high
>v,i isex quotient I. and his ob-
ionfl about the 18-to-25
are iust as likely pragmatic
xtreme.
arly thinking of himself and
tut lire. Hart says of these
people that they are
: 10 the luture. They're
rned about issues that will
the quality of life in the
Bd the environment.
the nuclear freeze, and the strug-
for minorities' and women's
\n,i so, he wonders. "What
will they do in 1984? Ronald
an docs not deserve their
support. Walter Mondale does.
lit has earned it. and our future
demands it."
GILDING HIS sentimental
view of the 18-to-25 voter, he
declares that the Reagan cam-
SEN HART.......................A Self Starter
paign by contrast has made "an centered and self-indulgent, that
entirely wrong assumption" they care nothing for others."
about them "that they are self- As we are meant to believe
Hart sees it, the Republicans
suffer from these very same
qualities, and so they are "merely
projecting (their) own
values." Once, he says, "young
voters recognize this, I believe
they will reject the Republican
ticket."
Recalling his own campaign.
Hart characterizes these voters
this way: "The youth I worked
with in my campaign understand
the difference between skepticism
and cynicism, between true
opportunity and sheer greed.
They know our society is not
made up of 250 million greedy-
individuals and that we won't
become better off one person at
a time."
In the end. Hart predicts that
young voters "will choose the
national interest and the common
good over the narrow politics of
short-term personal gratifi-
cation" and that their "fateful
choice" in November is between
"an Administration that is
blatantly manipulative and con-
temptuous of them" and "a
government prepared for new
solutions and new ideas."
THIS IS all gam bully. Sen.
Hart has written a splendid piece
for the New York Times for which
he has probably been well-paid.
But even if he received little or no
monetary recompense, the over-
riding fact is that in it he con-
tinues his campaign for the next
Democratic presidential
nomination in 1988. That appears
to be his top priority.
If Hart truly believes what he
has written, at least as much for
the young as for a Mondale
victory, why isn't he out there in
the hustings urging the 18-to-25
voter back into the Mondale fold?
Far from helping the Mondale-
Ferraro ticket, in his New York
Times piece, he is merely ex-
ploiting it
And keeping himself at a safe
distance from what now appears
likely to be losers into the
bargain With his high SQ. he
appears to be preserving his com-
municative powers over the
nation's young voter for a time
that will be beneficial to no one
but himself.
How is Sen. Hart, in this
serious indictment against him,
different from the young people
for whom he purports, long
distance, to speak? He has at
least given up instant grati-
fication for "me, me, me."
Finally: Novelist Heller Tackles A Jewish Theme
Continued from Page 5-A
huge numbers of kids. And we
wen always joking around. The
same kind of joking that I now
the streets of New York
among black kids and Puerto
kids not the white
e> Island was full of poor
ern Kuropean .lews Heller's
Isaac, had fled Russia in
l"en years later, his secorui
ph, was born. A socialist
Isaac discouraged his
ironi practicing religion
fi was no more religious
: e but less secure about it.
II d his sibling- brother
: sister Sylvia never
synagogue Yet Lena
id I hem put on their best
- on the Sabbath Heller
hers intentionally em-
he street. Hey Ma. throw
am sandwich."
SAAt HELLER drove a
truck tor a bakery, He
n his earl> forties when
w ,i- ti\ e s ears old. The
' In-- Heath was a bungled
peration. His mother later
im that he had gotten the
from the cake at the
i ry.
Marvin "Ueansy" W inkier
ays Heller is 'exactly the same
now as when he was a kid
ssible." Winkler. now a
candj manufacturer in Santa
Monica, shared the same playpen
when he and Heller were each
about one year old. "He used to
wet my carriage." he said. As
Heller and his bladder got
older, his "genius" became more
apparent. "There was always no
room for error when talking with
Joe." said Winkler. "He's a sweet
fellow, but he's always been
slightly impatient."
"About five of our friends in
Coney Island were writing when
we were kids," Winkler said.
There must have been some-
thing in the air that produced so
many writers."
Heller is the only one of his
crowd of Coney Island writers
who made it big. "When Catch-22
caught on," Winkler remem-
bered, "Joe handled it well. He
always knew he was a genius."
IN FIRST grade, Heller
brought home a note for his
mother to meet with his teacher

JOSEPH HELLER
AT THREE SCORE
AND ONE
Three books and a near-fatal
paralysis away from Catch-22,
novelist Heller has turned to
his roots for comfort. But was
King David a k vetch ? Only
the writer knows for sure.
at P.S. 188. "We were all
terrified." said his sister Sylvia.
Then 12 years old, Sylvia met
with the teacher because his
mother was still uncertain of her
English. The teacher complained
that Joe never listened in class
and always looked bored. The
teacher occasionally tried to
catch him, but he always knew
the answers to her questions.
"All we could do," she said,
"was tell Joe to try and look as
though he was paying attention."
When he was 16 years old,
Heller delivered telegrams for
Western Union for four hours
every day after school. He earned
about $6 a week. Decked out in
the Western Union outfit of the
day khaki pants and shirt, a
cap and jodhpurs and riding
his bike around New York, Heller
"felt gallant and rakish.
Sometimes I didn't take the
uniform off until long after I got
home."
With about 30 other boys.
Heller would change into his
uniform at a central Western
Union office. There, he had his
first brush with anti-Semitism.
"The conversation among those
guys was so blatantly anti-
Semitic I couldn't believe it."
One of two Jewish messenger
boys, Heller "couldn't tell them I
was Jewish or they would have
beat the heck out of me."
HELLER SIGNED up for the
Army Air Corps in 1942. He was
19 years old. His mother said
farewell to him at the local trolley
stop, dry-eyed and collected.
Years later, his sister told him
that their mother had collapsed
with tears as soon as he was out
of sight. She had to be helped
home.
Heller spent three years in the
Army. He saw one year of
combat with a squadron of the
12th Air Force on the island of
Corsica. "I enjoyed it," he said,
"until my 37th mission."
Returning to Brooklyn at the
end of the war. Heller met and
married Shirley Held. He briefly-
attended the University of
Southern California at the same
time as another humorist. Art
Buchwald. The two never met at
use.
"I didn't like USC at all."
Heller said, "and didn't par-
ticipate in campus life. It was
heavy with fraternity life which
was anathema to me. I 'm the sort
ol guy who quit the Boy Scouts
at the age of 10."
HELLER AND Shirley
returned to the Fast Coast, where
he got a BA from New York
University. He earned a master's
degree from Columbia, attended
Oxford University tor one year as
a Fulbright Scholar, taught for
two years at 1'enn State, then
returned again to New York.
Days were spent in the ad-
vertising department of. suc-
cessive^, tirrn l^ook. and
McCall's Nights were spent
writing a book
Heller had written many short
stories back in Coney Island and
in college. Several were published
in Esqm>r and the Atlant;,- By
the time I got to college." he said,
"I knew I was imitating other
short story writers. I had nothing
to say.'
Heller didn't write again until
he was almost 30 years old. Then,
"I got the idea that maybe I
could write a novel. That came
from reading a good number of
novels and thinking I could do at
least as well. Following that. I
needed a subject. The subject
was Catch-22."
IN THE beginning, when
Joseph Heller writes a book,
there isn't the word: There is the
line. Each of his four books have
come to him not in the form of
sweeping, full-blown themes,
such as "war" or "peace" or
"love" and "death," the sort of
stuff that would tantalize
someone like Dostoevski or
Woody Allen. Instead, each of his
books start with one meager line.
"I think," he said. "I
daydream. Lines come to me. If
they lead to a subject, I begin
exploring."
The line that came to Heller is
the first line that appears in
Catch-22: "It was love at first
sight." It's a common enough
line. The next line that came is
the second line of Catch-22: "The
first time Yossarian saw the
chaplain he fell madly in love
with him This is not a common
enough line.
For the eight years Heller
worked on Catch-22. one line
followed another By 1961. he had
a book. But contrary to the myth,
he didn't necessarily have a best-
seller. The first reviews for
Catch-22." he said. were in-
sulting dismissals. They weren't
even condescending dismissals.'
Heller recalls the reviewer in the
Sunday New York Timi >
snickering that Catch-22 gasp-
for want of craft It's not even a
novel.'
"The New Yorker magazint
he said, "was even more seven
THE REVIEWS wounded
Heller. He had thought Catch-2i
would strongly appeaJ to a sma!
group of people who were as
interested in literature as I wa-
it's not an easy book to read and
it s not designed to he easy
thought I was writing a book li-
the obscurantist tradition of
people like Faulkner."
The catch in Catch-22 was the
ultimate double-bind. A concern
for one's safety in the face of
dangers that were real and im-
mediate.'' wrote Heller, "was the
process of a rational mind." Orr.
"a grinning pygmy with pilot's
wings and thick, wavy, brown
hair parted down the middle."
was crazy. He could be grounded.
"All he had to do was ask: and as
soon as he did. he would no
longer be crazy and would have
to fly more missions. Orr would
be crazy to fly more missions and
sane if he didn't, but if he was
sane ha had to fly them."
Such double-binds abound in
Catch-22. Chief White Halfoat,
an Indian from Oklahoma, told of
his family's exploitation by the
oil companies: "Every place we
pitched our tent, they sank an oil
well. Every time we sank an oil
well, they hit oil. And every time
they hit oil, they made us pack
our tent and go someplace else.
We were human divining rods.
Soon every oil company in the
world had technicians chasing us
around."
THE HALFOAT family
Continued on Page 7-B


1 "fee 1U-U

-^ I
Candidates' Aides Aim at Jewish Vote
By BORIS SMOLAR
With only a few days left
before going to the ballot
boxes to cast a vote for
either of the two competing
candidates for the pres-
idency of the United States,
Democratic and Republican
campaigners are working
feverishly to win Jewish
voters to their side in the
belief that Jewish votes can
play a marginal role bet-
ween victory and defeat for
either Walter Mondale or
President Reagan.
The ratio of voters is higher
among Jews than among the
other parts of the population.
While Jews constitute less than 3
percent of the American popula-
tion, their votes in the 1980
elections were almost twice as
high close to 5 percent nation-
wide. The ratio was even higher
in the primary voting. One
percent equals about 750,000
votes. In New York, about a third
of all voters in the Democratic
primary were Jews.
In key cities with a substantial
number of Jewish residents such
as New York, Los Angeles,
Newark, Philadelphia, and
Chicago. Jewish votes could
make the difference between
victory and defeat for candidates
running for president since
Jewish voters are concentrated in
these Electoral College states.
Most of the other white voters
voted for Gerald Ford in the 1976
elections, but about 4 of 5 Jewish
voters cast their ballots for
Jimmy Carter. As a result. Carter
took New York, and with it. the
presidency.
UNTIL THE mid-1970s
Democratic presidential candi-
dates could count on receiving at
ieast two-thirds of the Jewish
votes. I'his pattern was broken in
when Carter was beaten by
iitagan: only 45 percent of the
Jewish voters last their ballots
tnr Carter; 40 percent voted for
Heagan. and 15 percent voted for
John Anderson, the independent
candidate. A plurality of men
voted for Reagan, with about
three-quarters of them residing in
predominantly Orthodox Jewish
election districts. The majority of
Jewish women voted for Carter.
Democrats hope that the 1980
vote was an aberration. Many
Jewish voters were dissatisfied
with Carter for anti-Israel actions
of his administration.
Republicans prefer to view the
1980 voting by Jews as a trend.
They assert that Jews in the
United States are more and more
inclined to vote Republican. They
are especially interested in the 15
percent of the Jewish votes which
Anderson received. Were these
Jewish voters basically dis-
affected Democrats who will
return to the party in this year's
election, or have they severed
their traditional affiliation and
moved to the Republicans?
Some politicians. political
scientists and commentators may
speak of the existence of a
"Jewish vote," but there is no
organized Jewish vote. There are
striking contrasts between dif-
ferent kinds of Jewish voters.
JEWISH VOTERS do not
make up a single-issue bloc. They
are no longer a monolithic poli-
tical community, as they were a
generation or two ago. A plural-
ity of them consider themselves
"middle-of-the-road." The
remainder cttuieta of about two
"liberals" to every "con-
servative."
In the elections this year, un-
predictability of Jewish voting
patterns coupled with demo-
graphic changes could alter
Jewish responses to political
events. The majority of Jewish
voters still live in Northeastern
and Midwestern metropolitan
areas, but more and more Jews
are moving West and South to
the "Sun Belt." Even in older
areas, urban concentrations are
breaking up as Jews move to the
outer suburbs or satellite small
towns. Consequently, the number
of districts where Jews consti-
tuted a strong element in voting
may decline. However, Jews are
still a significant factor in Amer-
ican politics. They are involved at
all levels of political activity.
Jewish leaders believe that the
ultimate patterns of Jewish
voting will depend on the candi-
dates' positions on a few key
issues. They point out that, this
year, extremist wings in both
major parties supported posi-
tions that most Jews see as inim-
ical to Jewish interests. Jewish
organizations are disturbed by
the emergence of anti-Semitism
in the Democratic primaries and
of the party's failure to oppose
racial quotas in its platform: also
by the prominence given to those
who would move American
foreign policy in directions harm-
ful to Israel. Although these
forces did not win in the nomina-
tion for president, they have
pledged to use their leverage to
influence the nominees.
JEWISH LEADERS are also
disturbed by trends in the
Republican Party, especially by
the dominance of a powerful
group of fundamentalists who
seek to put religion in politics.
Jewish voters are urged by lead-
ing Jewish organizations to
repudiate the extreme positions
of both Democrats and Rep-
ublicans.
The issues concerning equal
opportunity and affirmative
action policies have major im-
plications for Jews as individuals
and organizationally for their
impact on the climate of inter-
group relations. The two parties
have sharply different positions
on these issues.
Leaders of major Jewish
organizations emphasize that
these and other key issues in
which Jews are deeply interested
will have a lasting impact on the
Jewish community; that they
will affect the political atmos-
phere for years to come after this
year's elections are over; that
their communal and societal
effects will have only begun after
the 1984 elections are over.
DESPITE THE fact that Jews
constitute a higher ratio of voters
than others in the American
population, there are still hun-
dreds of thousands of eligible
Jewish voters who are not regist-
ered to vote. This is because the
Jews are a highly mobile group,
and when people move, many of
them neglect to register.
The Jewish Community
Relations Council of New York
estimates that in the New York
area there are today some 325,000
eligible Jews who are not regis-
tered as voters. This is almost 25
percent of all eligible Jewish
voters in the region. The situa-
tion is similar in other sections of
the country. A large proportion
of the non-registered Jews are
young people. The American
Jewish Congress initiated last
month a national campaign to
stimulate registration of Jews
who are not registered.
Zionists Unified
RIO DE JANEIRO (JTA)
Zionist unity has been rees-
tablished in Brazil after seven
years of bitter quarreling bet-
ween the various factions of the
movement. A united National
Executive Council representing
all Zionist groups was elected.
NNI
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-655
and let me quote yo
rates Also local moving &
ong distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. o
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_____tot Miami)
SILENCE
in the Face of Anti-Semitism .
unthinkable in America Today?
WRONG!
THE REPUBLICAN RESPONSE
The 1984 Republican Party
Convention Platform:
'The Republican Party reaffirms its support
of the pluralism and freedom that have been
part and parcel of this great country. In doing
so it repudiates and completely disassociates
itself from people, organizations,
publications, and entities which promulgate
the practice of any form of bigotry, racism.
anti-Semitism, or religious intolerance."
Speeches at the Republican National
Convention August 23,1984:
"... in the party of Lincoln, there is no
room for intolerance and. not even a small
corner for anti-Semitism or bigotry of any
kind."
"Discrimination based on race, religion, sex
or age will never be tolerated by this
President nor this Vice President. And
furthermore, we condemn the vicious anti-
Semitism of Louis Farrakhan and the ugly
bigotry of the Ku Klux Klan."
THE DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE
The 1984 Democratic Party
Convention Platform:
Speeches at the Democratic
National Convention July 19,1984:
would Hubert Humphrey have remained SILENT while his party platform was
approved at San Francisco without a single word condemning anti-Semitism?
LET YOUR VOICE BE HEARD ON NOVEMBER 6th
NATIONAL JEWISH COALITION
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Tflews in Brief
Ex-CIA Man Wants Nazi
Criminal to Stay in U.S.
By JTA Services
NEW YORK In a blatant apologia for the utilization of Nazi
iwar criminals by the United States, Ray Clines, who was the number
|two man in the Central Intelligence Agency from its inception until his
(retirement in 1969, said that accused Nazi war criminal Arthur
iRudolph's role in a slave labor camp should be overlooked in return for
Ihis later contributions as a missile scientist in the American space
|program.
Clines said in answer to a question by Ted Koppel, host of ABC-
,/V's "Nightline" program which aired Oct. 18, that Rudolph and
(others who may have murdered thousands of innocent victims during
IWorld War II had paid their debts to society by providing security
land technology gains for the American government.
[Sharon Opens Political Hornet's Nest
JERUSALEM Industry and Commerce Minister Ariel Sharon
lopened a political hornet's nest this week by expressing opposition to
[government plans to base an Israeli withdrawal from south Lebanon
|on the deployment of united Nations Interim Force in Lebanon
lUNIFIL) troops in that area and by attacking government plans to
I improve the quality of life for Arabs in Judaea and Samaria.
In a sharp attack on the withdrawal plans. Sharon told Radio
llsrael that "this government will survive only if it concentrates on
(economic problems and on condition that it avoids action on other
Ideas' where differences between Likud and Labor cannot be bridged.
ifl. warned that Likud did not agree to a national unity government to
[serve as a cover for Labor's defense and foreign affairs plans, which he
[described as "disastrous."
[illegal Hitler Silver Medals Surface in Vienna
VIENNA Illegal silver medals bearing the face of Adolf Hitler
[haw surfaced in Vienna, the Austrian newspaper Kurier. reports.
1 'he medals, being sold for 200 schillings ($101, show the Third
1 -eagle and the motto of the Third Reich, "Ein Volk. Ein Reich.
|Fin Fuehrer lOne People. One Government, One Leader) on the
teversi side Austrian police have not yet been able to establish the
of tl 8M medals.
[Morocco Bars Entry of Two Israelis
PARIS Israeli writer and philosopher Aharon Amir has
teturned to Israel after Morocco denied him entry to attend an in-
ternational conference in Marrakesh. Amir and another Israeli, writer
and Jerusalem Deputy Mayor Andre Chouraqui. had been invited to
the World Conference on Poetry by its chairman, former Senegalese
|1':> -uient Leopold Senghor.
Morocco's refusal to grant them entry visas, in spite of earlier
promise! seen here as a definite break with past Moroccan policy
and is interpreted as a gesture to Libya with which it signed an
I e last month.
|Jewish Leader Named to UN Delegation
PARIS The chairman of the French section of the World
Jewish Congress. Sen. Michel Dreyfus-Schmidt, has been named by
France to its delegation at the United Nations General Assembly
t currently meeting in New York.
A close associate of President Francois Mitterrand, Dreyfus-
schmidt has represented Belfort in the Senate since 1980.
[Shultz Vows U.S. Aid for Soviet Jews
WASHINGTON Secretary of State George Shultz pledged
' the I'nited States intends to build a "new, more constructive
eriod in Soviet-American relations" following President Reagan's
recent meeting with Soviet Foreign Minister Andrei Gromyko, it will
pmtinut to stress the plight of Soviet Jews and other human rights
Issues
I hope that no one, either in the Soviet Union or in this country.
f ) entertains the idea that once negotiations are underway, the
IJnited ^'ates will refrain from raising our human rights concerns,"
Shultz lold the Leadership Assembly of the Naitonal Conference on
vie! Jewry INCSJ) at the Capital Hilton Hotel.
UComm. Hails Vatican Tie Possibility
NEW YORK The American Jewish Committee has welcomed a
f'port that the Vatican "favors the diplomatic recognition of Israel."
The statement was issued by Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum, director of
nternutional relations for the Committee, who said the agency's
tomment was based on an NBC news report from Rome that the
atican now favors such a move.
l'anenbaum, who until recently had been the AJCommittee's
tlir^ tor of interreligious affairs and who is presently in charge of the
"ommittee's relationship with the Vatican, also said "as we have
nformed Vatican authorities during a number of conversations in
ecent years, the establishment of diplomatic relations between the
joly See and the State of Israel would be a significant contribution to
|he cause of peace and reconciliation in the Middle East." On Monday
{he Vatican denied that it favors closer relations with the Jewish
State
3eres: Hussein's Refusal Not Last Word
BONN Israeli Premier Shimon Peres believes King Hussein's
etusal so far to enter peace negotiations with Israel is not his last
"oro and indicated there would be wide scope for bargaining once
egotiations between Israel and Jordan get underway, according to an
nterview with the Israeli leader published in the mass-circulation
ve!>t derman news magazine, Der Spiegel.
Peres also remarked that experience shows that the outcome of
ace negotiations always differs from the initial positions of the
mies involved, Der Spiegel reported.
>uth Africa's Foreign Minister to Visit
JERUSALEM Foreign Minister Pik Botha of South Africa is
cheduled to visit Israel next month, but Israeli officials said that the
Mit will be a private one in which he will see holy sites. He is slated to
"ive here Nov. 4 on his way to West Germany. Although the visit is
t considered official, Botha is expected to meet with Deputy
remier and Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir.
The newspaper Maariv reported that Israeli officials were con-
rrned tn*t attempts to renew diplomatic relations with Black African
ptions would be harmed bv Botha's visit. Shamir said last week after
haTh"'8 frt talks at the United Nations that Israel's relations with
hird WorM countries, especially in Black Africa, were improving
[
mtn h ': wvpw.i i>mk ij
. !AI1 ENDS [IFIT V." I'M I'V.V
VV| :,',:<; 0U1 OUK 111 WUI I! AKH UUII V1KC

'This has befallen us. Of it we tell constantly
as we pour out our hearts subdued and
grieving.' This is the inscription on 'The Last
March,' a Holocuast memorial. The
sculpture, a smaller version of the memorial
at Yad Vashem in Jerusalem, was dedicated
last Sunday at the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America in New York City.
Uruguayan Jews Assail Anti-Zionist
Plank Of Leftwing Party Platform
MONTEVIDEO -
(JTA) The Uruguayan
Jewish community has
condemned an anti-Zionist
clause contained in the par-
ty platform of a political
group seeking office in the
upcoming national elec-
tions, the World Jewish
Congress reports.
Dr. Nahum Bergstein, presi-
dent of the Central Jewish Com-
mittee, the representative body
of Uruguayan Jewry and the
VVJC affiliate here, declared at a
press conference that the effort to
link Zionism with racism was
"intrinsically false, is an insult to
our community, disturbs the
peaceful coexistence of the
citizens of this country, and
unleases anti-Semitic feelings."
THE ATTACK on Zionism
was included in the political
program of a group called the
Popular Movement, a splinter
faction allied with the Com-
munist Party in a larger coalition
of leftwing groupings called the
Broad Front.
As Uruguay moves toward
critical national elections slated
for November 25. the various
parties and political groupings
have begun their electoral
campaigns by issuing political
manifestoes. That of the Popular
Movement equates Zionism with
racism in a clause on national
liberation.
The clause states: "Uruguay
must show full solidarity with the
liberation struggle of peoples
that are still subjected to political
or economic domination. Self-
determination of peoples must
always be defended. Racism
(segregation, Zionism) must be
denounced and confronted."
BERGSTEIN TOLD the press
conference that the defamation of
Zionism, "in its goal of
delegitimizing Israel, denies the
Jews the right of self-
determination that all other
peoples have and. in this sense, is
discriminatory."
He added. For years we Jews
have had no illusions concerning
the true intentions and aims of
the anti-Zionist explosion. But
the identification of Zionism with
racism, forged in the United
Nations under the pressure of the
Arab countries and the Soviet
bloc, is in reality a neo-racism
that shows the ugly face of anti-
Semitism, which is one of the
most despicable manifestations
of racism."
According to the Latin
American branch of the W JC, the
news conference was carried by
nearly all the mass media of
Montevideo press, radio and
television.
Weinberger Reportedly Sympathetic
To Israel's Military Requirements
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger is reported to
have shown a sympathetic
interest for Israel's pro-
posals in the military
sphere after a day of talks
with Defense Ministry of-
ficials and senior officers of
the Israel Defense Force
here last week.
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Secretary Caspar Wein-
berger is reported to have shown
a sympathetic interest for Isra-
el's proposals in the military
sphere after a day of talks with
Defense Ministry officials and se-
nior officers of the Israel Defense
Force here last week.
The discussions are said to
have covered American support
for production of the Lavie, Isra-
el's second generation jet fighter
plane, and aid for Israeli arms
purchases, including the possible
supply of the U.S. Army with
certain Israeli military hardware.
WEINBERGER was briefed
on Israel's view of the military
situation in the Arab world by
IDF intelligence chiefs. It was
understood, however, that the
issue of Lebanon was not raised
in any detail.
The U.S. defense secretary was
here for intensive discussion with
leaders of Israel's defense
pstahlishment He ronferr^ with
Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin
and went to Jerusalem for a
meeting with Premier Shimon
Peres with whom he met only
recently in Washington. He also
toured the Ramon air base in the
Negev. built by U.S. engineers
for the Israel Air Force to replace
airfields given up in Sinai.
Rabin is reported, meanwhile,
to have agreed in principle to
start talks between the IDF and
the Lebanese army on security
for Israel's northern borders
should the IDF be withdrawn
from south Lebanon.
THE TALKS would be held
under the auspices of the United
Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (UNIFIL). This was
proposed by the Lebanese
government during the recent
visits of U.S. Assistant Secretary
of State for Near Eastern and
South Asian Affairs. Ricnard
Murphy, and Brian Urquhart.
Deputy Secretary General of the
U.N.
The Israelis want the talks to
include representatives of the
South Lebanon Army (SLA),
commanded by Gen. Antoine
Lahad, which Israel supports and
expects to play a security role in
the south after the IDF pulls out.
Israel is also agreed to a security
role for UNIFIL which
represents a change from the
position of the former Likud-led
government.
The latter mistrusted UNIFIL
but the new unity coalition
headed by Peres appears to have
relaxed Israel's objections to the
international force.
Workmen's Circle Conference
The Southern Region of Workmen's Circle will hold its 65th annual
conference at the Seville Hotel Oct. 26-28.
Delegates from the southeastern U.S. will gather to hear featured
speakers Congressman Claude Pepper and State Rep. Michael
Friedman. Other officials will include Stanley Arkin, Miami Beach
commissioner; Herbert Magidson, national president of the Jewish
Labor Committee; and Rebecca Patt, national organization director of
Workmen's Circle.
"sJewislhi Floridia
Miami, FloridaFriday, October 26.1984
Section R


.......- r.unaian rnaav. ucr^Pr .m ,u*
.'......
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, October 26,1984
From the Pulpit
No Wall9Between Church and State
Pacesetters to Hear
David Brenner
By RABBI
ISRAEL JACOBS
Temple Beth Moahe
Is a teacher who devotea a few
moments of the day to verbal or
silent prayer illegaly intruding
religion into the public school
system? Is he or she violating the
constitutional rights of students?
Does the president of the
United States have the moral or
legal right to encourage the
nation to turn to religion for
moral guidance?
The debate is becoming more
acrimonious by the day. As is
usually the case when emotion
substitutes for reason, more heat
is generated than light. Opposing
camps line up for mortal combat
as if the other side is a more
ominous threat than an invading
horde.
Religionists are charged with
undermining the Constitution.
The opposition is tagged as athe-
istic anti-God Communists.
NEITHER SIDE is neces-
sarily evil. Neither side neces-
sarily harbors Machiavellian
thoughts. Neither side is neces-
sarily in a conspiracy to ban rel-
igion or cancel our liberties. It is
quite possible to find people of
integrity and intelligence on both
sides who are committed to the
Constitution and to church or
synagogue. There is merit as
there are dangers to both sides.
The First Amendment reads:
"Congress shall make no law
respecting an establishment of
religion or prohibiting the free
exercise thereof; or abridging the
freedom of speech, or of the press,
or the right of the people to peti-
tion the government for a redress
of grievances."
Nowhere does the Amendment
state that church and state must
be separated. That may or may
not be the wisest and safest
course. But to insist that the
framers of the Constitution
intended to raise an impenetrable
wall between church and state is
to grossly misrepresent what
they had in mind.
CLEARLY, they did not in-
tend to make it illegal for a
teacher to mention God in the
classroom, put the Ten Com-
mandments on display, allow a
club with a religious orientation
to use a classroom after school
hours, say a prayer before a foot-
ball game, or grace over a meal.
Rabbi Jacobs
or for a president to publicly
express his belief that there are
religious ideals that can be of
value in serving our country as
moral guidelines.
We may think it best that
there be a wall between church
and state; apparently, the found-
ing fathers did not, because they
did not legislate such a wall.
What they feared was an all-
powerful federal government that
might be tempted to jettison the
basic rights of religion, speech,
press and assembly, and they
acted to protect those rights.
The "establishment of relgion"
clause was meant to prevent the
establishment of a national
church that would be officially
recognized as the State church
and put other churches in a sub-
ordinate position. That prompted
the First Amendment. It was not
intended to deny the state, its
public institutions, or the pres-
ident any religious expression.
ALLOWING PRAYER, silent
or verbal, in school could en-
courage an overzealous teacher to
exploit the moment and impose
his or her particular beliefs. On
the other hand, emptying the
school day of all religious content
sends another kind of message
subtle but no less troublesome.
Namely, that religion is irrelev-
ant and has no place in the real
world.
Religion itself needs to be
defined before the sides can
rationally argue the pros and
cons of introducing it into state
occasions or the public school
system. Isaiah in his denuncia-
tion of the na tion provides this
definition of religion: "Is this the
fast I have chosen? Is it to hang
your head, to grovel in sackcloth
and ashes? Is that what you call
fasting, a fast that the Lord
would accept?
"This is my chosen fast: to
loosen all the bonds that bind
men unfairly, to let the oppressed
go free, to break every yoke.
Share your bread with the
hungry, take the homeless into
your home. Clothe the naked
when you see him, not to tum
away from people in need."
That is Isaiah's definition of
religion. In Deuteronomy, the
prime ideal of religion is defined
as: "Justice, justice shall you
pursue, that you may thrive and
occupy the land that the Lord
your God is giving you." These
are religious doctrines. In fact,
for Judaism these are the most
critical of all religious doctrines.
THOSE WHO insist on an
absolute separation of church and
state would have to. if they are to
be consistent, prohibit the courts
from practicing these principles
and the schools from teaching
them because they would in effect
be practicing and teaching
Judaism.
Life would be a delight if our
options were always between two
goods. Unfortunately, most of
the time we have to choose
between the lesser evils. Both
sides of the debate would do us
all a favor, including themselves,
if they were to argue the issues
rather than personalities.
Actually, that approach is
generally to be preferred in any
argument. It is even possible to
learn from those with whom we
differ. And it has been known to
happen for people after hearing a
convincing argument to switch
sides.
NOSEBOWI. SUNDAY 1984
TO THE 50 MEN OF PLEDGE CLASS 84
AND THE BROTHERS OF PI LAMBDA
PHI, CONGRATULATIONS ON ALL OUR
VICTORIES PAST, PRESENT, AND
FUTURE.
BROTHER ANDREW BURGER
j CONCORD PLAZA
I
941 N.E. 169th St. North Miami
1 Bedroom Garden Apartments
with patios and balconies
:; Quiet Area Close to shopping and!
ftemples SENIORS WELCOME' Cable TV,|
I minutes to Expressways No pets
947-4192
The Pacesetter Dinner
with cocktails at 7 Pm
dinner at 8. Michael M Adle*
.I
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's annual Pacesetter
Dinner, an event open to con-
tributors of a minimum of
$10,000 to the 1985 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Emergency Fund-
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Cam-
paign, will be held Thursday, j-. g^
Nov. 8, at the Fontainebleau- rOSt-ijVQU, LOUr
Hilton.
chairman of the Pace*
Division, Steven J. Kravitzi.
chair, and Maxine Schwart,
dinner chair.
Comedian David Brenner will
be the guest artist. In addition to
his performing career. Phila-
delphia-born Brenner is the
author of "Soft Pretzels with
Mustard," a book containing
anecdotes of Brenner's life from
his childhood to the present.
Now a resident of New York
City, Brenner has been honored
by the American Guild of Variety
Artists as male comedy star of
the year, and by fellow per-
formers as "Last Vegas comedy
star." He has been featured on
Home Box Office in three one-
man specials.
At ML Sinai
A postgraduate
residency course will be heU
Mount Sinai Medical Center *
Oct. 29 to Nov. 16. ThtaSa
educational program will 3
courses in nine spwjaj,'
Director of the program ,s -
(eorgeS. Wise, a member,:
board of trustees and the nJ
cutive committee at Mount Su-.J
Marvin Sackner. Frank '
Moya. Arkadi Rywlin, Arthur('
Shapn-o. and Manuel Viam0n
Jr., are the physicians .__
vising
program.
physicians supa,
the mini-residenc
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's &123's
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
'i
ABC'S & 123s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee"
are tasty
pasta alphabet
letters and
numbers covered
with a nch tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it. getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez'

-What
other
would I
choose?'
::


,_.
Erika Good
Ballerina
lb be a a* bo""""
tokes corKenrrotio"
and pracion. And
too much coffein W
doesn't hip Th*'
w^yldrinkSanko.,
^9-Me.C^,*,^


Wlli^Wl^^^TCTS Morgan Page.l-H
I
State Representative Elaine
Gordon (D., Miami) has been
named by the Mental Health
\. ition, Florida Division.
to receive the Maxine Baker
Human Services Legislative
Award, presented annually to
a Florida legislator who has
made a significant contribu-
tion to human services issues
throughout his or her legis-
latu e tenure.
*k til's Davidson
Award Seeks
Nominees
Florida International Univer-
sity will award a prize of $50,000
ami a copy of a sculpture sym-
bolic of the prize to one who
"through principles, actions and
idea- has contributed in signif-
icant ways to the emergence and
growth of creative harmony
amoni; individuals, culture and
civilizations
- "Named lor its founder Jordan
Davidson, Miami humanitarian
and poet who died at 86 in Au-
gust, the humanitarian award
was last given in 1983 to Elie
\\ iesel. With the cash award goes
a replica of the sculpture
designed by Yera Frasilova Scott
which was unveiled at the univer-
sity by president Gregory B.
Wolfe Ocl 22. The prize will be
awarded periodically by FIU.
Rosenkrantz
1984 TES Award
Vetta Rosenkrantz will receive
the 1984 TES Award from Dr. Ir-
ving l.ehrman. rabbi of Temple
Kmanu-Kl. at the membership
luncheon of the Sisterhood
Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. in the
Friedland Ballroom. SLssterhood
president Sandra Lang reports
that a musical program. "From
Israel with Love" will feature
Cantor Yehuda Shifman accom-
panied by Shmuel Fershko,
1 'temple music director.
Rabbi I^ehrman will present
pins to new life members at the
luncheon, according to chairman
Helene Wiener.
1
I Maureen Meeks, new execu-
\ttve director of the Miami
teach Board of Realtors, will
sp officially welcomed at a
Idedication ribbon cutting at
\tne new Board headquarters,
Y'20 Lincoln Road on Tuesday
I < 5 p'm' Miami Beach Mayor
I Malcolm Fromberg will
Ipreside.
Jewish Community Leader Dormer Endorsed
Long active in leadership posi-
tions in the legal, general and
Jewish communities, Amy Steele
Dormer this week continued her
countywide campaign to fill the
Dade Circuit Court Judge seat
vacated by the retirement of
Rhea Pincus Grossman.
Donner, a candidate to receive
her graduate master of lawa
degree from the University of
Miami School of Law, earned a
Juris Doctor degree from the U-
M, and finished in the top 10 per-
cent of her class.
She has been endorsed by
hundreds of civic, legal and busi-
ness leaders in the countywide,
non-partisan race to be decided
Tuesday, Nov. 6.
Donner supporters include
Norman Broad, former Miami
Beach Mayor Harold Rosen, Rep.
Arthur Simon, Rep. James
Burke, Miami Beach Commis-
sioners Alex Daoud and Bruce
Singer, Hugo Black, Jr., Sen. Joe
Gersten, Commissioner George
Valdez, North Miami Beach
Mayor Marjorie McDonald,
former North Miami Mayor
Howard Neu, Robert H. Traurig
and Hialeah Mayor Raul Mar-
tinez.
Campaign chairman for
Donner is Arthur Pearlman,
leader of Mount Sinai Medical
Center and the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged.
Executive committee chairman is
Arthur H. Courshon, national
honoree of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
Other Donner executive
committee members include
Miami Beach Commissioner
Stanley Arkin, American Zionist
Federation vice president Gerald
Schwartz, Leonard Abess,
Former Judge Jason Berkman,
George Berlin, Jerome C. Berlin,
former Judge Irving Cypen,
former Rep. Murray Dubbin, Mel
Frumkes and Gary R. Gerson.
Donner also won the endorse-
ment of Barton S. Goldberg,
Jerrold Goodman, Seth Gordon,
Pioneer Women-Na'amat leader
Harriet Green, Beach Commis-
sioner Ben Grenald, State Rep.
Barry Kutun, Surfside Commis-
sioner Eli Lurie, Raul Masvidal,
Mrs. Baron de Hirsch Meyer.
Pa Poi Adv
An Open Letter From Rabbi Kronish
About Amy Steele Donner
Most endorsed Most qualified for Judge
Almost twice the legal experience of her opponent


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, October 26,1984
Jewish Scientist Is A
Nobel Prize Winner
Eban Cites Three Goals For Israel
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Cesar Milstein, one of three im-
munologists who won the 1964
Nobel Prize in Medicine, began
his scientific career in Argentina
where his father, a Jewish im-
migrant from the Ukraine,
settled in 1897. Among the
honors he received prior to the
Nobel Prize, Milstein was also
the recipient four years ago of the
Wolf Prize in Medicine from the
Wolf Foundation in Israel.
The other two winners of the
$190,000 Nobel Prize were
Georges Koehler, 38. of the Basel
Institute of Immunology in
Switzerland, and Niels Jerne. 72.
professor emeritus at the insti-
tute. The prize, announced by the
Karolinska Institute in
Stockholm, will be divided
equally among the three
recipients.
Their research into the body's
natural defense against disease
and their development of a
revolutionary new technique for
producing antibodies "opened up
Mystery of
21,000 'Jews'
In Mexico
By CHAIM LAZDEISKI
MEXICO CITY (UJAI -
Are there more than 20,000
persons in Mexico who regularly
observe Jewish religious customs
and traditions but nevertheless
recognize Jesus as the "son of
God"? Or do the census-takers of
the government's department of
statistics simply lump all non-
Catholics and non-Protestants
together as "Jews'0
These are two explanations
given to account for the discre-
pancies between the latest census
and the figure believed by Jewish
mmunity leaders to represent
i he true number of Jews in
Mexico
According to local rabbis and
irganizations
of Mexican Jewry, there are
10 pi ad icing Jews in
Mexic< it figure has not
i hanged over tne last five years
Hut the last official census taken
- said there are 61.000
peopli of the Judaic faith" in
"try
Je'. here explain the
a tendency of
lexicans who are neither
Catholic nor Protestant to
. es Jews. Many
them belong to sects that
serve trie Jewish Sabbath, fast
Vom Kippur, circumcise their
male infants but at the same time
Knowledge Jesus as the Savior.
The 1960 census reported
100.000 Jews' or people of
"Mosaic faith" in Mexico. Jewish
circles tend to discount that
figure and attribute it to lack of
experience on the part of the
census takers. The latter, the
Jewish circles say, did not know
how to deal with people who
declared they were neither
Catholics nor Protestants or
members of other sects. They
simply registered them as
"Jews."
Talmud and Hebrew
at Temple Samu-El
Temple Samu-El will introduce
its adult education series Tues-
day with registration at 7:45 p.m.
The classes will cover reading
Hebrew, the life cycle of the Jew
from birth to death, and an intro-
ductory course ai Talmud dealing
with the scholar and teacher of
the Roman era. Rabbi Akiba The
six-week courses begin at 8 p.m.
completely new fields for theor-
etical and applied biomedical
research," the Karolinska Insti-
tute said. Antibodies are chem-
icals that the body's immune
defense system produce to attack
viral, bacterial or other molecular
invaders of the body.
Milstein was born in Bahia
Blanca Oct. 8. 1927. He was
educated in the University of
Buenos Aires and received his
PhD from Cambridge University
in 1960. Before settling in
England in 1963, he was asso-
ciated with the National Institute
of Microbiology in Buenos Aires
from 1961 to 1963.
According to reports in the
Argentine press, he left the insti-
tute in an act of solidarity with
its director who had been dis-
missed by the government which
followed the coup against Pres-
ident Frondizi The Milstein
family was active in Jewish com-
munity life and was identified
with Jewish causes. Since 1963.
Milstein has been associated with
Cambridge and now heads its
division of protein and nucleic
chemistry.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Abba Eban, Israel's former
foreign minister, told guests at a
dinner celebrating the 60th anni-
versary of the Weizmann Insti-
tute of Science that the Jewish
State's new national unity
government has the possibility of
attaining three goals within the
next two years: recovery of the
economy, "extrication" from
Lebanon, and reform of the elec-
toral system to "prevent future
deadlocks."
Eban. who was the Weizmann
Institute's second president, was
guest speaker at the Jubilee
Dinner of the American Com-
mitee for the Weizmann Institute
of Science. Over 1.000 guests,
including 37 noted scientists
Nobel laureates and representa-
tives of some of the world's
leading educational and scientific
institutions attended the
dinner at the Waldorf Astoria
Hotel here
CONDEMNING THE cut
backs in government aid to
higher education occasioned by
Israel's economic crisis includ-
ing a 600 percent inflation rate
which is "a total degradation of
the social fabric" Eban said
the country's prospect of econ-
omic recovery 'depends largely
on the development of science-
based industries."
Weizmann Institute president
Prof. Michael Sela, noting the
threat posed to scientific research
and technology in the country
because of "economic chaos and
dire financial straits high-
lighted the fact that these are the
very areas where Israel's inde-
pendence, "future flowering and
greatest potential lie."
Dr. Frank Press, president of
the National Academy of Science^
brought greetings to the dinner*
guests on behalf of the world
scientific community. Paying
tribute to the Weizmann Insti-
tute "not only a national jewel
but an international one" he
noted: "It is a pillar of scientific
endeavor. And through its ac-
complishments, its role in Israeli
life, and the role of Weizmann
scientists in leading the country,
it has set an example for all of us,
of what world science should be i
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(. .-, ..
Bereavement Counseling Seminar Oct. 31
Friday, October 26, 1984. The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
A seminar on "Bereavement
Counseling" will be held at
Mount Sinai Medical Center
.Wednesday. Oct. 31. as part of a
-'series entitled "Interface Bet-
ween Medicine and Religion." It
co-sponsored by Mount Sinai
dicnl D nter, the Habbinical
'. of Greater Miami
munit) < 'haplaincy
he i i reater \1 iami
ition.
Si i.' .....idence will be
ibbi Jacob I loldberg, director,
Bereavement
Counseling Program of the
federation of Jewish 1'hilan-
thropiea oi New York and the
Sew York Hoard of Rabbis and
director of the Commission of
Pastoral Bereavement Counsel-
ing. Rabbi Goldberg has given
educational programs in New
'lurk and elsewhere to clergy of
all faiths on the subject of
bereavement counseling. He will
lecture on "The Role of Clergy in
Coping with Bereavement."
Additional presentations will be
ade on The Role of Medicine in
w Coping with Bereavement" by
', r. Ivo Fix. chairman of the
department of Radiation Onco-
logy at Mount Sinai Medical
Center, and I)r Brian Weiss.
chairman, department of
Psychiatry, Mount Sinai Medical
Center
The seminar chairman is Rabbi
Solomon Schiff. executive vice
president, Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami and
director of chaplaincv. Greater
Engagement
WEINBERGERSCHULMAN
Mr and Mrs. Morton
Weinberger of Miami announce
-^ the engagement of their daughter
Cyndi to Hen Schulman. son of
Mr. and Mrs. David Schulman of
Knglishtown. N.J.. and Hut-
chinson Island.
Cyndi and Ben are graduates
of Brandeis Cniversity and they
are attending the University of
Florida School of Law. The
couple plans a December wed-
ding.
- .
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Miami, Fla. 33101
Rabbi Jacob Goldberg
Miami Jewish Federation, who
described the course as one
designed to provide clergy and
health care professionals with
methods and approaches to deal
with persons requiring help in
bereavement counseling and or
psyi hological help in this area.
\lso participating
inar will be Alvin Goldberg,
president, Mount
R-N B S V. Habbi
Edwin Farber, Rabbi Brett S.
Goldstein, Re\ I ieorge E. G
bout, l)r Joseph Harris. Re\ I
Luther Jones Rabbi Carl Klein.
C. William Kipp. MSW. LCSW,
George Krell, Ms, LCSW, Nancy
Oehler, ARM', Rabbi Max A.
LipschitZ, Rabbi Harold Richter
and Rabbi Albert B. Schwartz
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44 Somewhere There Must Be A
Doctor Who Practices
Modern Medicine the
Old-Fashioned Way!
u
RICHARD A. WEISS, D.O., an
M.D. Board-certified Osteopathic
Physician specializing in Internal
Medicine and Family and Older-
Adult Practice, is pleased to an-
nounce the relocation of his practice
and the formation of a new medical
association in the Sky Lake area of
North Miami Beach.
Medicare Assignments Accepted: Par-
ticipant in AARP Health Programs; Private
(an- HMO South Florida Group Health &
AV-Med, Area PPO's; Private Insurance and
Worker's Camp. Insurance. On-staff at 7 Ana
Hospitals.
,JA\ NORTH MIAMI BEACH MEDICAL GROUP
1400 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive, Suite 200
North Miami Beach, Florida 33179
24-Hour, 7-Days Telephone (305) 940-2311
Warmth, Compassion and
the Best Medical
Attention Available.
in a count) < .
Horm
rom left, Miami Bi u '/..
ial i ice
B'rith : Fromberg Aiami Beach
t nited Way of Hade County, Marjorie Huron wife o/ Garcia-
Pedrosa ana former assistant public relations director
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, and Jose Garcia-Pedrosa,
Dade Police Endorse
Jose Garcia-Pedrosa
The fir9t Independent-candidate for county wide public office
ever to qualify for the general election in Dade County. State
Attorney nominee Jo9e Garcia-Pedrosa has won the en-
dorsements of the Dade County Police Benevolent Association
and numerous Fraternal Order of Police lodges.
Garcia-Pedrosa, endorsed by such officials as former Mayor
Harold Rosen, Mayor Malcolm Fromberg, Dade County Bar
Association president A. J. Barranco, Zionist leaders Felice and
Gerald Schwartz, former Circuit Court Judges Irving Cypen and
David Popper, former Sen. Paul Steinberg, Mount Sinai and
Jewish Home leader Arthur Pearlman, Jerrold Goodman.
Surfside Mayor Ben Levine, Murray Candib. and Martin Fine
gained new support throughout the community.
In its announcement of support for Garcia-Pedrosa. the PBA.
which represents more than 3,700 law enforcement officers in
Dade, said:
We are convinced that Mr. Garcia-Pedrosa represents the
only hope this community has to once again be a place where
criminals fear the criminal justice system. Right now. under the
incumbent, Janet Reno, criminals laugh at the chaos and
confusion rampant in Ms. Reno's office.
"The victims of crime and the police officers who apprehend
those committing crimes are not laughing,'' the Police
Benevolent Association concluded.
Pledging full endorsement for Sen. Jack D. Gordon tDem.,
Miami Beach) in his campaign for re-election Nov. 6 are, from
left, State Rep. Barry Kutun. former Speaker of the House who
won re-election without opposition; Miami Beach Mayor
Malcolm H. Fromberg; Sen. Gordon, national vice president of
the American Jewish Congress; and Rep. Ron Silver, who also
won re-election without opposition.
Herald. News Back
Sen. Jack Gordon
The Miami Herald and The Miami News this week repeated
their strong recommendations that Sen. Jack D. Gordon (Dem.,
Miami Beach) be re-elected in District 35 at Nov. 6 general
elections.
Gordon, who won renomination by a landslide in the
September primary, is chairman of the Senate Education
Committee.
Son of the president of Detroit's largest Conservative
synagogue, Gordon is national vice president of the American
Jewish Congress, past president of the Greater Miami Chapter
of the American Friends of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem,
an active member of Temple Beth Sholom and a strong sup-
porter of Pioneer Women Na'amat.
.4my Steele. past president
of Women's American ORT
and former vice president of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Young
Women's Division, has won
endorsements from The
Miami Xews, Jewish Times.
Florida Chapter of SOW and
the Home Xews.
Donner Increases
Judges hip Lead
With a strong lead in the primary which garnered her more
than 49 percent of the vote in the countrywide, non-partisan
campaign for the vacant Circuit Court seat. Amy Steele Donner
this week gained impressive new support in her bid to clinch
victory in the Nov. 6 general election.
Donner. who has nearly twice the legal experience of her
opponent, has been endorsed by The Miami News. Home News,
Jewish Times and Miami Times.
Donner is a Founder of Mount Sinai Medical Center and of
Temple Beth Sholom, and is an active member of Hadassah,
Pioneer Women-Na'amat, Brandeis University and a past
president of Women's American ORT. She also served as vice
president of Federation's Young Women's Division.
P<1 Pol Adv bvGe

*ftC X\J-LJ
i iim iMUf iun
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridia Friday. October 26. 1984
Seattle-Raised Woman Becomes
First Solo Rabbi In Canada
WINNIPEG (JTA) -
A 29-year-old mother of an
infant son is the first
woman rabbi in Canada to
head her own congregation.
Though women rabbis have
long ceased to be a novelty
in Canada, they have been
taking posts as assistant or
associate rabbis.
But Rabbi Tracy Guren Klirs
is spiritual leader of Temple
Shalom here which has 60
families. Klirs. originally from
Seattle, is married to Elisha
Guren Klirs. an assistant profes-
sor of psychology at Winnipeg
University.
SHE OBTAINED the AB
degree in Yiddish Literature at
Business Notes
Doral Hotels Corporation has
announced that Christoper C.
Perks has joined the corporation
as executive vice president of the
Doral Hotels of Florida. He was
formerly with Omni Inter-
national.
Arthur A. Surin, general
manager of the Fontainebleau-
Hilton and president-elect of the
Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce, has been named
"civic leader of the year" by the
Civic League of Miami Beach.
He will receive the honor
Sunday, Nov. 4, at 11:30 a.m. at
the Eden Roc, when Billie Kem
will be installed as president of
the League at the 49th annual
installation brunch and dance.
Doris F. Greaner has been
promoted to assistant cashier of
Jefferson National Bank, presi-
dent Barton S. Goldberg has
announce.d She will be assigned
to the main office.
Kahane to
Speak At
Inverrary-Chabad
On Monday. Nov. 5, at 8 p.m.
Rabbi Meir Kahane. founder of
the Jewish Defense League, will
be the guest speaker at the 1984-
85 Forum Series of Synagogue of
Inverrary-Chabad. This will be
Rabbi Kahane's first public ap-
pearance in Florida since his
elect tin to the Israeli Knesset.
Ein Karem Meets
Ein Karem Chapter of Hadassah
will meet at Star Lakes
Auditorium Nov. 13 at noon for
its annual social for paid-up
members. Heading the program
will be recording artist Madeline
Kern, report chair Belle Scall and
Dues Secretary Selma Becker.
Blanche Avrich and Dena
Greenfield are the presidium of
the chapter.
Tennis For
Scholarships
The scholarship fund and the
athletic program will be the
winners of the third annual
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy Doubles Tennis
Tournament, scheduled for
Sunday at the Capital Bank-
Flamingo Park Tennis Center.
Children from 10 to 16 years and
adults from 17 up can compete
for trophies in the doubles
matches which will begin at noon.
the University of Chicago and
then attended the Hebrew Union
College i HIT), the Cincinnati
division of the HUC-Jewish
Institute of Religion, the Reform
institution and rabbinical
seminary.
Born in the province of British
Columbia, Klirs and her family
moved to the United States,
settling in Seattle. There, by her
account, she grew up in an at-
mosphere with a strong sense of
Jewish identity but without
many traditional religious ob-
servances
As she grew up, she said. "I
became increasingly interested in
Judaism. Jewish and Hebrew
studies, Israeli and Jewish
culture. I found there was so
much to offer." adding that "1
knew I would feel most comfort-
able if I could have a career with
a very high Jewish content."
Klirs said her family was sup-
portive of her career choice of the
rabbinate but she believes they
do not 'fully understand it.
because they are not religious
people"
IT WAS not her choice to enter
the rabbinate via Reform. She
said that it was more a matter of
falling into it Having decided
on a rabbinical career, she applied
for admission to the only two
schools then accepting women
rabbinical candidates the
Reform and the Reconstruc-
tionist Rabbinical College.
Both accepted Klirs applica-
tion but she chose the HUC
While her classmates applied for
assistant rabbinical posts, her
goal was that of a solo congrega-
tion She said. I am somewhat
independent^ I like a small at- /Left t0 rignt, ^feyer and Rose M\ersandEsteUe Weisbergat
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Friday, October 26, 1984. The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Jewish Novel from 'Catch-22' Author
Continued from Page 13-A
.became
w boom."
a walking business
It received invitations
from some of the best hotels
just for the amount of business
we would drag into town with us.
Some of those invitations were
mighty generous, but we couldn't
accept any of them because we
were Indians and all the best
hotels that were inviting us
wouldn't accept Indians as
guests."
Despite extensive advertising
^y his publisher for Catch-22, it
* was eight months before Heller
was asked for an interview. It
was one year before the book's
rights were sold to the movies. It
wasn't until 1970 nine years
after publication that the movie
was released.
By then Catch-22 had finally
begun to sell. Its account of
trying to keep one's sanity in the
middle of an insane situation
war dovetailed with the
national frustration and con-
r fusion and rage over Vietnam,
teller left advertising to become
a Distinguished Professor of
English at the City College of
New York, a position with a title
that flattered his ego and with
enough flexible time so he could
do more writing.
THE PHRASE, "Catch-22,"
has entered the language. It has
been used in at least one Supreme
Court decision. It has earned
Heller a certain literary im-
mortality (as well as a very
handsome buck). He is invariably
introduced as the man who wrote
Catch-22. not as the man who
wrote Something Happened or
Good As Gold. Heller denies that
- "tie feels captive to Catch-22. "No,
it's made life easier for me. It's a
very proud achievement. My
next book might be a sequel
about some of the characters in
Catch-22."
When Heller's second book.
Something Happened. was
published in 1975, he finally felt
secure enough to leave teaching
and spend all his time writing.
Something Happened is a more
mature book, a more interesting
i- book than Catch-22. It is also a
less entertaining book
Many people say that nothing
happens in Something Hap-
pened. That is the black joke of
the book. Nothing much does
happen in the maw of the cor-
poration where Something
Happened is set. The book is
coupled to the slow, tedious pace
of life in the world of offices and
memos and titles that imply that
someone is an assistant to
someone who isn't too far up the
corporate ladder and will always
May just about where he is.
.L,> BOB SLOCUM. the non-hero
of Something Happened, is Jew-
ish, Heller confided to me. "I
didn't identify him as Jewish
because I didn't want him to
sesa on that. And discerning
people know that Yossarian (in
' atch-221 is Jewish, too. His
compassion for other people is
I rj Jewish."
Heller si>ent half as long on his
Kl book as he had on his
previous two only four years
As Gold was Heller's foray
nto "the Jewish novel Much of
did nol endear him to the Jew-
-h community. He wrote in a
nickering, combative way about
'"wish family in Coney Island.
hat gets extraordinary
i-ure from non-stop bickering,
ompetitive preening, audacious
ragging and talented put-
lowns.
er claims that the Gold
family was not based on his own
T family Much of the Gold's
pastiness, he said, came from his
pagination; some came frpm his
'luddy Mel Brooks' stories of his
wn childhood.
(loud As Gold deviated from
Heller's regular story-telling. His
previous books were cynical; the
same incidents came up again
and again, told from a different
Heller's God is
a practical joker
on a cosmic scale.
vantage or with a new wrinkle.
Good As Gold has a traditional
plot.
WITH God Knows. Heller
returns to writing books "the
way my mind works best." God
Knows is more commentary than
novel. Told by the 70-year old
King David from his deathbed,
it's a collection of cantankerous,
curmudgeonly jokes and set-ups
about the Bible. It's the Old
Testament playing the Keith-
Albee vaudeville circuit:
burlesque jokes about Sarah and
Abraham and all the multitudes
their seed produced. One can
almost see King David coming
out on stage just after Bums and
Allen wTap up their act. Fat cigar
in hand, his regal wit has 'em
rolling in the aisles. He might not
be much of a monarch, but give
the guy a few howlers and he's
dynamite.
Heller's David is not the
Bible's David. He's cranky and
jealous. Michelangelo, he says,
did a better job with his statue of
Moses than he did with him.
Shakespeare stole his best plots
from him.
His son, Solomon, was a dolt, a
numbskull. Thinking he was
being fair, not shrewd, he was
"dead serious when he proposed
cutting that baby in half, that
putz. "
BUT DAVID is also sad.
Bragging about his military
victories, all he longs for is to lie
once again with Bathsheba;
sounding off about his political
coups, he still mourns the death
of several children. King of all Is-
rael, David is not a happy man.
It is obvious that Heller had
fun with the Bible, especially its
language, which can be seen as
either poetic or clumsy,
depending on your mood.
Reminiscing about his first
dalliance with the beauty
Bathsheba, aged King David
remembers with delight, "Oh,
boy. did I cleave to her!"
King Saul, furious at his son
Jonathan for meeting with David
behind his back, calls him "a
confusion to his mother's
nakedness." The phrase, which
Heller lifts directly from the
Bible, makes little sense to
Jonathan.
"David," he says, "you're
smart, maybe you can figure it
out."
David, stumped, has about as
much luck with the words as
most modern readers of the Bible.
God Knows is not about
religion. Heller said. "The Bible
is not about religion until you get
very, very far past where I go
with David. There's almost
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nothing about religion in the Old
Testament. The most they did in
the way of prescribed religious
practices was to sacrifice a lamb
every now and then."
"DAVID BRINGING the Ark
of tl.e Covenant to Jerusalem
seems as rr. ich an act of
demagoguery as anything else
an excuse to have a parade. The
religious and spiritual element
doesn't come in until you reach
that period of the prophets that
more or less corresponds to the
threat of the Babylonians and the
Jews' capture by them. Then,
there's much more talk about
God."
There isn't too much talk of
God in God Knows, either. When
Heller does bring Him into the
book, He turns out to be as much
of a second banana as David.
Always with the jokes, Heller's
God is a practical joker on a
cosmic scale. Asked by Moses
one day whether he is a good
God. God thunders:
"Where does it say I have to be
good? Isn't it enough I'm God?
Don't waste your time
daydreaming, Moses. I ordered
Abraham to be circumcised when
he was already a grown man.
Was that the act of someone
who's kind?"
DAVID GRIPES that the
Chosen People got a bum deal.
God promised the Jews "a land of
olive trees and honey." "That's
what he promised and that's all
he gave us, along with a com-
plicated set of restrictive dietary
laws that have not made life-
easier. To the goyim he gives
bacon, sweet pork, juicy sirloin,
and rare prime ribs of beef. To us,
he gives a pastrami. In Egypt, we
get the fat of the land. In.
Leviticus, He prohibits us from
eating it."
One can hear Heller, not
David, kvetching here. Heller
eagerly admits that one of his
"favorite exercises" is eating. He
is horrified by anything that
restricts anyone's diet.
One can also hear Heller when
he has God saying, "If you want
to have sense, you cant' have a
religion." Four years with the
Bible and King David have not
made him more religious than
before.
"I CAME AWAY with no new
wisdom," he said. "I believe
there's an innate wish to believe
there's a compassionate diety.
But you can view God as a myth,
a fairy tale or a legend. I have no
respect for the Bible other than
as a work of literature. I certainly
don't regard it as the word of
God. I know as much about God
as anyone on earth. Which is to
say, there's no way to knev
anything about him. Go figure."
Until recently, Heller was
"indifferent" about being Jewish.
"My tolerance as a liberal," he
said, "made me try to recognize
no ethnic barriers. Now. I feel
more comfortable not about
Judaism, but about being Jew-
ish. It's something I not only
want to acknowledge, but want
to embrace. Maybe that's what
happens as you get gloser to the
grave."
Heller insists that there is little
of him in God Knows aside from
"the humor and irony and
sentiment." But his King David
is not unlike Heller. He is a man
who has done it all and seen it all
at least all that could be done
and seen in the Middle East of
the 10th Century, BCE. At three
score and ten years, Heller-is a
man searching for some sense in
his Ufe. "I want my God back,"
David says ruefully, "and they
send me a girl."
LYING FEEBLE and im-
potent, the most beautiful virgin
in Israel tries to give him
comfort. Warmth he gets, but not
satisfaction. That can come only
from his God.
Heller is now three score and
one years old. In the last four
years, he has been divorced,
paralyzed and written a new
book. Always a private person,
he has become more of a
- homebody. He is now living with
' the nurse who helped bring him
back to health.
It is a little difficult to accept
Heller's claim that he learned
- nothing from the Bible. Wisdom
works in strange ways, even if
it's just the hoary words of an
ancient book that a writer such as
Joseph Heller says is hokum.
Heller opens God Knows with an
inscription that he found in the
Bible: "But how can one be warm
alone?"
"WHEN I found that in the
Bible," Heller said, "I exulted.
That's how I feel. As one gets
older, one sees even one's most
intimate friends less frequently.
But one still does need comfort
and companionship."
The catch for Joseph Heller
may be that God does know more
than he thinks, that there might
be some cosmic scheme out there
that takes care of people even
of best-selling writers
Go figure.
Miami Beach
Community Concert
Association
John Bitter. President Letty Greene. Executive Director
SEASON 1984-1985
IVAN DAVIS, Pianist
Monday. November 26. 1984
NORTH CAROLINA DANCE THEATRE
Monday. December 10, 1984
AARON ROSAND. Violinist
Monday. January 14, 1985
MAZOWSZE FOLK BALLET OF POLAND
Thursday. February 7. 1985
BUCHAREST PHILHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA
Tuesday, March 12.1985
CANTERBURY TRIO
Tuesday. April 16, 1985
COMMUNITY CONCERT ASSOCIATION
Suite 230. 1000 Lincoln Mall. Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone 538-2121 between 10 and 3 o'clock
MEMBERSHIP $25 to $65 FOR THE SERIES
AH Concert* at the Miami Beach Theatre of the Performing Arts.


1 11r .icu i vi. .. i
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, October 26, 1984
i Great Kecipes for Today's Low Raisin Prices
ilaid u name
fans eductions
Su \ Fresh I tour
cups :-: -. iently
purchase and <;ort lots of raisins u'wdl lor baking double
es, breads and cakes and freezing them for
future enjoyment
Here are two recipes that not only will please the family, but
will be pleasing to the pocketbook.
SOUR CREAM RAISIN DROPS
4 cups Sun-Maid Raisins
5 and one-third cups all-purpose flour
1' i tsps. baking soda
1V tsps. salt
1' a tsps. nutmeg
1 and one-third cups butter or margarine, softened
1 cup sugar
1 cup packed light brown sugar
212 tsps. vanilla
1 egg
1 cup sour cream
2 tbsps. grated orange rind
Place Sun-Maid Raisins in large bowl. Cover with boiling
water and let stand 10 minutes. Drain and pat dry with paper
towels. Set aside. In separate bowl, stir together flour, baking
soda, salt and nutmeg. Set aside. In another large bowl, cream
butter and sugars together. Stir in vanilla, egg and sour cream.
Stir in flour mixture, about a cup at a time, until thouroughly
mixed. Add Sun-Maid Raisins and orange rind. Drop by
rounded teaspoons onto lightly greased cookie sheet, placing
about 2 inches apart. Bake at 375 degrees for 12 to 15 minutes.
Makes about 7 dozen.
,1
iL
Three tall h rve recipes f<
tin Ki
m .
i
\ EGETABLE KASHA SKI I in


I cup shredded carn>;-
'< cup chopped onion
; cup Parkay margarine, melted
Dash of pepper
Chopped parsley
Combine groats and egg; cook, stirring constantly, over low-
heat until grains are dry and separated. Add water, vegetables,
margarine and pepper: mix well. Cover: simmer 10 minutes.
Sprinkle with parsley.
Six to eight servings.
l-'/j cups matzo farfel
11 cup chopped green pepper
i cup chopped onion
EGGPLANT FARFEL CASSEROLE
Parkay margarine
4 cups cubed peeled eggplant
1 16-oz. can tomatoes, cut up
1 15-oz. can tomato sauce
'/ Tsp. dried oregano leaves.
crushed
1 8-oz. pkg. Philadelphia Brand
cream cheese, softened
1 egg, beaten
In large skillet, saute 1 cup
farfel, green pepper and onion in
14 cup margarine until vegetables
are tender. Stir in eggplant,
tomatoes, tomato sauce and
oregano. Cover; simmer 15 to 20
minutes or until eggplant is
tender. Combine cream cheese
and egg. mixing until well
blended. Layer half of vegetable
mixture, cream cheese mixture
and remaining vegetable mixture
in l-1;-quart shallow baking dish
Top with combined remaining
farfel and 2 tablespoons
margarine, melted. Bake at 360
degrees. 20 to 25 minutes or until
thoroughly heated.
8 to 10 servings.
Variation: Substitute 1'-
quart casserole for shallow
baking dish.
APPLE RAISIN MUFFINS
4 eggs
1 and one-third cups milk
12 cup vegetable oil
2 cups sugar
2 cups all-purpose flour
2 2 cups unprocessed bran
1 Tbsp. plus 2 Tsps. baking powder
1 Tsp. salt
2 Tsps. cinnamon
11 Tsp. each cloves and nutmeg
2 cups peeled, cored and shredded tart cooking apples
2 4 cups Sun-Maid Raisins
Combine eggs and milk in mixing bowl. Beat until well
combined. Stir in oil and sugar. Set aside. In separate mixing
bowl combine flour, bran, baking powder, salt, cinnamon, cloves
and nutmeg. Stir to thoroughly combine dry ingredients. Add
milk mixture and stir until combined. Stir in apples and Sun-
Maid Raisins. Line muffin pans with paper bake cups; fill two-
thirds full. Bake at 400 degrees F. for 15 to 20 minutes, or until
done. Makes about 32 muffins.
To Freeze:
Wrap batches containing 4 to 6 muffins each in freezer wrap
Freeze up to 6 weeks. Allow to defrost at room temnersmr..
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Kraft real mayonnaise
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Combine shredded cabbage, fruit, celery and enouah
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Friday, October 26, 1984. The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Belgian Foreign Minister Holds
90-Minute Meeting With Arafat
BRUSSELS (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Leo Tindemans'
90-minute meeting with Palestine
Liberation Organization chief
Ya>ir Arafat in Tunisia last week
does not point to a shift in the
Belgian position toward the PLO,
according to officials here.
W rule Tindemans was the first
Belgian minister to meet Arafat,
Belgium adheres to the position
ted by the 10 member-states
of the European Economic Com-
munity lEECI of which it is a
bar. That position calls for
: inian self-determination
and the assoiation of the FLO in
Middle East peace talks.
Belgium has taken a more
reserved and cautious position
with respect to the PLO than
some other EEC states, notably
France. Italy and Greece.
Although Tindemans and Arafat
described their meeting as in-
structive and constructive, the
joint communique issued by
Tindemans and Tunisia's Prime
Minister Mohammed Mzali at the
end of Tindemans' official visit to
the North African country con-
tained no reference to the PLO or
its possible role in negotiations.
The communique affirmed the
urgent need for a just solution to
the Middle East conflict, called
for Israeli withdrawal from the
occupied territories and upheld
the right of Palestinian self-
determination "with all that
implies." The communique also
noted that Belgium supports the
right to self-determination within
the context of the principles
stated by its EEC partners.
Tunisia, an Arab League
member-state, officially supports
the position that the PLO is the
sole representative of the Pales-
tinian people. But the PLO is
split between Arafat loyalists
and dissidents who. with Syrian
backing, ousted Arafat from
Lebanon earlier this year. Tunisia
has given him haven for the time
being.
Taking time out for a picture after viewing the exhibit "A
Century of Zionist Immigration to Israel" at Temple Beth
Shalom are (left to right) Mr. and Mrs. Neal Amdur. Barton S.
Goldberg, Mrs. Massin, and artist Eugene Massin.
Receive
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And, in every issue, in addition to covering
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rc iu-u nmjuwirnmirawn.. _____........
PagelO-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, October 26, 1984
Pictured at a planning session for the biennial Southeast Area
Leadership Conference of Pioneer Women-Na'amat are I left to
right) Harriet Green, national vice president; Bebee Pullman,
chair of the day; Mildred Weiss, national board member and
Southeast area liaison to new clubs; and Sylvia Snyder,
workshop chair and national board member. The conference,
Oct. 30-31, will feature Israel Consul General Yehoshua Trigor
and State Sen. Jack Gordon.
Community Corner
Dr. Edward F. Gehret has been appointed principal of the
Feinberg-Fisher Community Education Center, Miami Beach.
Dr. Sol Landau of Mid-Life Services Foundation will lead a
seminar on "Work and Love" on Wednesday.
Claude Pepper will receive the 1984 Honorary Greybeards
Exhausted Rooster Award from the Greater Miami Jaycees at
its annual dinner on Nov. 29 at the Hyatt Regency.
Sunday's Isaiah Chapter of American Red Mogen David for
Israel meeting at Jade Winds Condominium will hear Benjamin
A. Lewis speak, at 9:30 a.m.
Temple Beth Sholom Brotherhood will sponsor a blood bank
Sunday from 9:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Silverman Auditorium,
and donors will be guests of the Brotherhood for breakfast
starting at 10:30. Confirmands of the class of 5744 will give a
report on their Israel pilgrimage.
An all-day cruise to the Bahamas is planned by liana Chapter,
Pioneer Women-Na'amat, for Sunday, Nov. 4. according to trip
chairman Mildred Silverman.
There will be a Halloween party at the Treasure Isle Con-
valescent Home Wednesday at 2 p.m. with a costume contest for
the 176 residents of the Home.
Aliyah Chapter of Hadassah will hold Nostalgia Night.
Saturday at 8 p.m. at the Calusa Country Club, with 1950s and
60s dances, a costume contest, and a live 'DJ.'
State Rep. Art Simon (D., Kendall) has been nominated by
the Dade delegation House members to serve as chair of the
delegation for the 1985 session of the Florida Legislature.
Second YI Torah Awards
Four members of the Young
Israel of Sunny Isles will be
honored at the second annual
Torah Awards breakfast on
Sunday at 9 a.m. The four are
Harry Gartner, president of the
Young Israel. Hillel Price, vice
president: Max Wein, chair of the
finance committee: and Charles
Skupsky, immediate past presi-
dent. Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin.
Young Israel coordinator, will
officiate.
A CORNER OF
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Friday, October 26, 1984. The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
. "Go forth from the ark, thou, and thy wife"
NOAH
(Genesis 8.16)
NOAH Noah was commanded to build an Ark for shelter
from the Flood that would overwhelm the earth. In the Ark
he placed his wife and three sons, Shem, Ham, and Japheth,
together with their wives; also two of each species of creature
on earth, one male and one female to perpetuate the species
(seven were allowed for the species that were ritually clean).
The Flood that covered the earth drowned all living things
except those in the Ark with Noah. After a year, the waters
receded and the earth dried. Noah let all the creatures out of
the Ark, that they might be fruitful and multiply on earth.
He sacrificed in thanksgiving to God. God, for His part,
promised Noah that He would never again send a flood that
would destroy the earth. The sign for this agreement, or
covenant, is the rainbow. Men increased and spread over the
world: in the land of Shinar they sought to build a tower
whose peak should reach to heaven. Here, they thought to
concentrate all the earth's population. But God, irked at
man's presumption, confused their speech. Previously all men
had spoken one language. Now they spoke various languages;
not being able to understand each other, they could not work
together, and the building of the Tower of Babel ceased
Terah, the father of Abram, came to Ha ran.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. won
man-Tsamir, tis, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75
Maiden Lane, New York, NY. 1003a. Joseph Schlang is president of the
society distributing the volume.)
Bat Mitzvah
TRACEY ALBERT
At Shabbat Services on Satur-
day, Tracey Albert, daughter of
Dr. and Mrs. Gerald Albert will
be called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah at Temple Beth Sholom.
Rabbis Leon Kronish, Harry Jolt
and Paul ('apian will officiate.
Tracey is a student of the Con-
firmation Class of 5747.
CAJE Book Review
The annual Great Jewish Book
Discussion Group series will
begin on Thursday at 1:30 p.m.
in the Miami Beach Public
Library auditorium, when the
medieval Hebrew romance, "The
Tales of Sendebar," edited by
Morris Epstein, will be reviewed.
The series was founded by
Samuel Reiser, who continues as
consultant and advisor.
Rabbi Norman Lipson, director
of adult education for CAJE, will
lead the dicussion. He coord-
inates the series along with Dr.
Diana Reisman and Abraham J.
Gittelson.
EEC Seeking Role In Renewed
Middle East Peace Efforts
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) With
the new Israeli unity
government in place, there
is an opening now for re-
newed Middle East peace
efforts in which the Euro-
pean Economic Community
nations would like to take
an active part, West
Germany's Foreign
Minister Hans-Dietrich
Genscher has told Egyp-
tian Foreign Minister
Abdel Esmat Meguid in a
conversation at the United
Nations in New York, it
was reported here.
He conveyed a similar message
at a separate meeting with UN
Secretary General Javier Perez
de Cuellar, according to reports.
He has also accepted an invita-
tion from his Syrian counterpart.
Farouk Al-Shara, to visit
Damascus in the near future.
German diplomatic sources said
the visit is in line with Genscher's
hope to reactivate the Middle
Fast diplomatic involvement of
the EEC countries.
ACCORDING TO Genscher s
aides, the Foreign Minister did
not specify what the European
community would do. But he
made it clear that the Europeans
prefer to advance existing "real-
istic efforts" toward a resolution
of the Middle East conflict rather
than formulate a peace plan of
their own.
Sources in Bonn said the
European foreign ministers have
recently discussed the issue and
instructed their aides to prepare
alternative drafts for diplomatic
action.
The language Genscher used in
reference to existing peace efforts
suggested to observers here that
the EEC. or at least West
Germany, would back elements
of President Reagan's September
I, 1982, peace plan and of the
plan advanced by King Fahd of
Saudi Arabia. Both are viewed
here and in other major Western
European capitals as realistic and
even-handed.
GENSCHER'S TALKS with
Meguid also served to prepare for
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak's visit to Bonn from
Oct. 30-Nov. 2. Mubarak report-
edly will seek new West German
commitments for massive
economic aid and credits for the
possible purchase of several
nuclear power stations. West
German companies are compet-
ing with American and French
manufacturers of nuclear plants
for the multi-billion dollar order.
In his talk with the Syrian
Foreign Minister, Genscher is
said to have stressed that the role
played by Damascus in Lebanon
and in the Middle East generally
puts special responsibility on
Syria. He also told the Syrian
diplomat, as he had the Egyp-
tian, that now that Israel has
formed a new government, the
time is ripe for the Europeans to
renew their diplomatic activity in
the Middle East.
Meanwhile, in a written state-
ment on the Jewish New Year,
Genscher pledged that Bonn will
continue to cooperate closely
with Israel and support its efforts
to solve its economic crisis and
advance peace prospects in the
region. He stressed that the Bonn
government will do anything it
can to contribute toward a broad
and lasting peace in the Middle
East.
Ami Shamir is the artist-sculptor who created the stained glass
window s,'The Heavens' and 'The Earth, which now grace the
new synagogue at B.-Uan University in Ramat Gan, Isr...
Shamir designed each of the 6,000plates m the two windou .
hand.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting
Time
6:32 p.m.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Daily Mlnyan
7:30 am. 6:00 pm.
Sit.: 7:00 pm.
Frl, a 15 pm. Sickii Bat Miuiih
Shoshana Battarman Set. 8:30 am. Sarvlcaa
Bar Mitzvah Richard Padowitz
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6867 Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Frl.. 8 i s pm. Rabbi Baumgard aarmon topic
"Why Do the Good Die Young?"
Sat .9:1! am. Bar Mitzvah Cralg Megrem
(Rabbi Simon officiating); 1115 am. B'nal
Mitzvah. Bradlay Qoldman and Scott Kendall
(Rabbi Baumgard officiating, aaftr.on topic
What's New about the Old Flood Story?")
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way 2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue /
South Dede 7500 S.W. 120th St reel <
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH *
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Frl 6 pm, South Dada Chapaf Family Service.
Sat.,tarn. Coral Way Sanctuary Sarvlcaa.
Bat Mitzvah Danlalla Lalgh noun
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin Executive Secretary
rVt
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 SI. N. Miami. FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
RABBI ISRAEL JACOBS
CANTOR MOSHE FRIEOLER
RABBI EMERITUS JOSEPH A GORFINKEl
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR IRVING JARET
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTOR BARBARA SHULMAN
HEBREW PR.NCPAl ORlV AlEXAN0ER
Daily services 8 a.m. 5 p.m /
Fri.8pm.RabD> Jacobs \V'
Sermon topic "The Great *JO*
Dabata: Did it halp?"
Sal. 9 am. Bat Mitzvah Michala Taatiai
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B.. FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nlsslm Benyamini
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave & 41st St 538-7231
OR LEON KRONISH. RABBI Llbaral
HARRY JOLT. AUXILIARY RABBI
PAULO CAPLAN ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CONVISER
Fn..8 15pm Rabb1 Jolt aarmon topic
Pra Election Raflactiona Sat. 10 45 am.
Bat Mitzvah Tracay Albert
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Lipschitz, Rabbi
Randall Konlgsburg, Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown. Exec. Director
Frl. 8 pm. Late Service Bat
Mitzvah Haldl Schaatfar.
Sat., 6:25 am. Service Bar
Mitzvah Howard Barnataln

KTH YOSEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwalg, Rabbi
CUBAN HEBREW CONGREGATION
Temple Beth Shmuel
1700 Michigan Ave.. Miami Beach
534-7213 534-7214
Barry J. Konovitch. Rabbi
Moihe Buryn. Cantor
Aron Kelton, President
'Jiebbat Sarvlcaa 6.30 a m. Sermon ." 30 a.m.
Dally Mlnyan
TEMPLE EMANU-EL ^
1701 Washington Avenue T M }
Miami Beach '-*L.-/
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Auxiliary Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Yehuda Shifman, Cantor
Frl. Kabbalat Shabbat. 6 pm. Sat. 9 am.
aarmon 10:30 am. Dr. Lehrman will preach
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami s Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat
Assistant Rabbi Donald P. Cashman
Cantor Jacob G. Bornsteln
Associate Cantor Rachelle F. Nelson
Executive Director Philip S. Goldin
Frl.. 8 pm Downtown: Rabbi Caahman
aarmon topic "la It Futile to Fight the
Flood?"
Kendall Rabbi Bernat aarmon topic
"Rollum's Unlvaraal Robots '
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 867-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Friday. 6:15 pm.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Guaat Cantor- Matua RadzlvHover
Thurt. Ylxkor 9:30 am.
(TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
IRabbl Mayer Abramowltz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Morning Sarvlcaa6 am
Saturday Morning Service* 9 am
Saturday Evening Services 7:45 pm
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866 8345
7902 Cartyte Ave. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz con.....t,,.
Cantor Edward Klein
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
tSHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ave. & 75 St., 382-3343
Rabbi Warren Kasztl Modern onrmooi
Fn eve 7 pm
*at 9 30 am. Sal afternoon 20 mm before
> ndown Morning Minvan Mon Thurs 6:45 am
ues.Wed A Fn 7 a followed by class
n Gamara Berachot .Memorial!
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P Klngsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Frl. 8:15 pm, Services
Sat.. 10 30 am
Cf)
TEMPLE ZION ISRAELITE CENTER
8000 Miller Dr. Coneervethre
271-2311 ^eervathre
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benjamin Adler. Cantor
David Rosenthal. ;'*$M
Auxiliary Cantor vj>'
Frl 8:15 pm and Sat 9 am. Sabbath services
Frl., 8 15 pm. Rabbi Shapiro sarmon topic:
'An Historic Challenge Sat .9 30 am. Bar
Mitzvah: Michae Jay Cohan


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, October 26.1984
Jewish Presence In Asia Declining
Botwinick Chairs Technion Dinner
Suburban League Fashion Show
By SUSAN BURES
Susan Bures is editor of
The Australian Jewish
Times
SINGAPORE The
ient Indian
munity, its ori
00 j
ivhich endowed sch
and hospitals and partic-
ipated in all aspects of In-
dian life, is almost extinct.
And it is Australia which is as-
suming the mantle of regional
responsibility where, the confer-
ence agreed, international Jewish
organizations have not been
active in the past. The APJA
president Isi Leibler, who also
heads the Australian Jewish
umbrella organization, the
Executive Council of Australian
Jewry, warned that given the role
the nations of Asia, particularly
such significant powers as the
People's Republic of China and
Japan are already playing, and
are certain to play in the 21st
century, world Jewry ignores the
region at its peril.
Singapore Jewry, once 4.000
strong, intimately linked with the
development of this island state,
which in the person of David
Marshall gave Singapore its first
chief minister, now numbers less
than 300 people.
THE JEWISH presence in
\sia. which came in the main
with the European trading links
iriea n?o. is now token if it
Kists at all. Tl n or
still ol v. irs and mi


er the causi
the rebirth of these
communities in some areas
through the same trade links
which formed them in the past,
many, if not most, of the Jewish
communities in Southeast Asia
appear doomed.
Their populations have fallen
below the critical mass necessary
to ensure their natural continu-
ance. The young Jews are either
assimilating, moving to larger
Jewish centers like Australia or
the United States, or making
aliya to Israel.
What is left in some commu-
nities is a geriatric core, overlaid
with a pitifully small number of
young to middle-aged, most of
whom realize they must move on.
or move their children on. to
retain any semblance of Jewish
identity.
THESE DEVELOPMENTS
were reported here on Sunday at
the Asia Pacific Jewish Asso-
ciation (APJA) conference at-
tended by leaders from 10 Asian
and Pacific Jewish communities.
Hirt At White House Signing
Fred D. Hirt. executive
director of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged,
attended the Oct. 16 signing of
the Older Americans Act at the
White House as a representative
of the American Association of
Homes for the Aging, of which he
is a member. The association's
members are non-profit nursing
homes, retirement homes and
health-related services nation-
wide.
"As advocates and providers
of community-based, long-term
care services, we at the Miami
Jewish Home are particularly
pleased that this year's revisions
of the Older Americans Act made
this system of care a high
priority.'' said Hirt. He noted,
"In March the Miami Jewish
Home, in conjunction with the
Area Agency on Aging, will
sponsor the first national con-
ference to focus specifically on
the design of a comprehensive
system of community-based long-
term care for the elderly."
Hirt applauded revisions in the
law which will increase in-home
and day services for the victims
of Alzheimer's disease and their
families. The first day "respite"
Fred D. Hirt
program in Dade County for
Alzheimer's sufferers was opened
earlier this year by the Douglas
Gardens Outpatient Mental
Health Center, a division of the
Miami Jewish Home.
They represent communities
ranging in size from 250 in Thai-
land to 75,000 in Australia.
In view of these developments,
the \I\J-\ conference should
resembii I wake, with
leaders mourning I hi den
p-pi

What
it ion to continue.
I here was a clear sense that,
while aliya was the preferred, and
in many ways the only, long-term
solution lor the smallest commu-
nities, the onus was on the
current leaders to provide suf-
ficient Jewish education and
Jewish identity for their young so
they would not be lost totally to
Judaism.
DESPITE THEIR smallness
in absolute terms, and the
relative decline for some commu-
nities from their once inflated
numbers. the leaders have
decided not to despair but to plan
for the future in cooperation with
the other regional communities.
Australia, which at most inter-
national Jewish conferences is
the small relative, here looms
inordinately large. For a commu-
nity of 60 families, such as
Manila, the 75.000-strong Aus-
tralian Jewish community seems
like paradise.
INTME CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-8138
IN RE ESTATE OF
HARRY FEINBAl M
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of HARRY FEINBAl'M.
deceased. File Number 84-813*.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for DADE County Florida
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal represen-
taUve s attorney are set forth
below
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE 111 all
claims against the estate and
i2i any obJecUon by an inter-
ested person to whom this
noUce was mailed that chal-
lenges the validity of the will.
the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 19. 1984
Personal Representative
ABRAHAM A GALBCT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Michael J Alman
Galbul. Oalbut & Menln. PA.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone (3051 672-3100
October 19. 26.1984
4>
cJewislfo Floridia
Florida's Most Complete English-Jewish Weekly
ACT NOW! Enjoy the Next Issuei
Hi.

I I I I I I I I I I I I I I > I MM IlllllllllllllllllllilllllllllllllllllUllllllllllllllllll
Name:
iiiiiini
W6 Wcjlllt to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we may |
keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world. Enclosed
please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
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Regui iiions provide subscriptions to be paid m advance
.iiii^j^iifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiriiiiiiii'i'i'i'Miiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii'iiiii'iii'i'iii'iii^'i'iiiii'i'i^iiii'iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiifl;
Jay Leshaw. President of the
American Technion Society's
Greater Miami Chapter, an-
nounced that Benjamin Bot-
winiik will he dinner chairman
for the chapter's National Dinner
b. Ik Id at the Fontainebleau-
,u \..\ Botw inick has
jcrved on the ^merii in l"tvhnon
Sock tj Ore it
Board ol Directors for
Gui si speakt r foi the evi n(
will be Israeli Ambassador to the
is Meir Rosenne. l)r Josel
Singer, president of the Tech-
nion, will also attend, along with
\TS National ("resident Martin
Kellner.
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 14-4918
Division 01
IN RE ESTATEOF
ORAYCE KOHL,
[Hi eased
NOTICEOF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of ORAYCE KoMI
del eased, File Number M 4918.
i- ponding in the Circuit Court
tor Dade County. Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
Which is T:i West Flakier Street.
Miami. Florida 33130 The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative
attomev ..reset forth below
All Interested persons .ire re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THKKF. MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: Hi all
claims against the estate and
<21 any objection by an Inter
ested person to whom this
notice was mailed that chal-
lenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the per
sonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS \NI>
OBJKCTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Publication of this NoUce has
begun on October 19. 1984
Personal Representative
Frances McDonald
38 Azalea St
Paramus, New Jersey 07862
FredJ Kohl. Jr
1S48 East 38th Street
Brooklyn, New York 11234
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
CYPEN. CYPEN A DRIHIN
PO Box 402099
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone 1306 i S32-3200
Bv Michael A Drlbln. Esq
18391 October 19. 38, 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84 35144
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
ALBERTO A RODRIGl'EZ,
Petitioner
and
AMANDA RODRIGl'EZ. a k a
AMANDA I.ONDONO
Respondent
TO: AMANDA RODRIOUEZ
a-k-a
AMANDA i.ondono
218 Washington A\
CEDARHURST,
N Y 11518
vin ARE HEREBY
NOTTFIEI i thai .in ai lion fur
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a i opy ol
your written defenses If any in
n on CARLOS M MENDEZ
Esq Attome) for Petitioner
whose address Is 8988 W 4th
Avenue Hialeah, Florida,
and file the original w Ith
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before Novembei i
1984. otherwise a default win
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks in THE
JEWISH FI^OKIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of Sep-
tember. 1964.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
CARUISM MENDEZ. Esq
2986 W 4th Avenue
Hialeah. Florida, 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
18383 October B. 12:
19.28.1984
Technion supporters on the
dinner committee include Stuart
Ames. Robert Bakerman.
Stanle\ Burnett. Florence
Baskin. Yehuda Ben-Horin,
George Bergmann, Marshall H
in, Mr
i inir
.in,
Murra\ M u Marl
Gelb, Gary Gerson, Jerrold F
<,,,. dmai rman Gors
\braham \ Grunhut, Al Isaac
s<>n. Melvin .1 Jacobowitz, Jacob
Katzman, Morris Kirsh. -Ion
Kislak, Shirley Knox. Keith
Kovens, Rabbi Irving l.ehrman.
S Michael Levin. Harry (HapI
Levy. Hank I.uria. Stephen
Nagin. Goodwin Salkoff. Dr. Ar-
thur Shapiro. Sol C, Shave. Law-
rence M. Shoot. Milton Sirkin.
Louis Stein. Sen. Paul Steinberg.
Sam B. Topf. Harvey M.
Weidenfeld. Norman Weinstein
and Hy Wiener.
Public Notice
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84 8464
DIVISION 02
IN RE ESTATEOF
CLARA ROMANS
Deceased
NOTICEOF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE ANI> ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
yOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the admin
Istratlon of the estate of
CLARA ROMANS deceased
File Number 84-8468. Is pending
in the Circuit Court for DADE
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130 The
personal representative of the
estate Is JOSEPH ROMANS
and ROM ANA C VEC8EY,
whose address Is 8501 S W 27th
Lane .Miami. Fla and 19800
Bel Alre Drive. Miami. Fla
respectively The name and
address of the personal repres-
entative's attorney are set
forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
ONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PCBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE, to file with
the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim
or demand they may have
Each claim must be In wrlUng
and must Indicate the basis for
the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his
agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim Is
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated If the claim Is contlng
ent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainty shall be
stated If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver suf
til lent copies of the claim to the
Clark to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal
represnetatlve
Ail persons interested in the
estate to whom copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF Till-:
FIRST PI BLICATION OF
this notice lo file any
objections the) maj have that
challenge the validity of the
lent a win the quallfli .i
twins of the personal repres-
entative, or the venue or juris-
diction of the i ourt
ALL CLAIMS DEMAND8
\.M> OBJECTIONS Not SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
I late of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
October 28 1984
JOSEPH ROMANS and
ROMANAC VECSEY
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
CLARA ROMANS
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
PAULR. STANTON.ESq
WELLISCH. METZGERft
ST ANTON, PA
181 AlmerlaAve .
Suite No. 200-E
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone (308)440 7904
1840J October 38:
November 2. 1984


Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(No Properly)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action NO. 14-37*71
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
Florida Bar No. Ml SI
In Re: The Marriage of
ISAEL ARCHANGE MER-
TULIEN.
PeUUoner-Husband
-and-
I.ARIA JOSEPH MER
Tri.IEN,
Respondent-Wife.
TO I-aria Joseph Mertullen
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
beef! filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
it on BRENT K ROUTMAN or
LLOYD M ROI TMAN, at-
torneys for Petitioner. whose
addren la ROUTMAM &
ROl'TMAN ATTORNEYS AT
\\\ 181 N K BJnd Street.
, Florida 93138. and file
riginal with the clerk of
ed Court nn or
November ifi I9H4.
-wise a default will be
ti ed against you tor the
demanded in the
Petition
This notice shall he published
Once each week for four con
seCUtlve weeks in THE
IEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
ll i ol said court at Miami,
Dade County. Florida on this
12th da) of< ictober, 1984
RICHARDP KRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal'
Routman A Routman
Attorneys at I.aw
Attorneys for Petitioner
- n E 82nd Street
Miami, Florida SS138
Tide phone i 306 I 757 5800
18382 October 19,38:
November 2 H. 18N4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
IVEN that the undersigned,
ng to engage In business
the fictitious name
'.. laon Hinise.it I53D \ y. |28Ul
Ireel North Miami Florida
U nda u i eglsti r said
with the Clerk ol
LNNr LI.W ESI Ml N l"S
i .
iem

I

NOTICE OF AC1 ION
CONSTRUCT!, I SL KVICE
I No
INTHl tlKC^IT COURT
OF THE I 1TH JUDICIAL
C IRCUI 1 IN AND FOR
3E COUNTY FLORIDA
Civil Acnon No 84 38758
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARrt IAGE
Florida Bar No ."85153
Man
N
\\\ IOSEPH

tEBY
.....tlon for
has
re I I to serv'i
es. if any, I
BRENT E ROI 1 MAN 01
LOYD M ROI TMAN. at
..- for Petitioner win..-,
is ROUTMAN
ROUTMAN ATTORNEYS AT
W 181 N E -2nd Street.
Miami, Florida 33138, and file
the original with the Clerk of
the above styled Court on or
before November 26, 1984.
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse
utlve weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
al of said court at Miami,
Hade County. Florida on this IB
day of October. 1884
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By ARDEN WONG
As Deputy Clerk
iClrcult Court Seal)
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
181 N.E 82nd Street
Miami. Florida SSI88
Telephone: (806)787-8800
18*00 October 38;
November 3. 9,16,1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
GOURMET BAKERY at 848
N.W 108 Avenue. Miami.
Florida 33172 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Edgardo Suarez
"OT3 Octobers, 12;
IB. 28,1B84
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
OPVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name A
Precious Present Intend to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
DadeCiMintv Florida
LlbbyKlrschand
Nancy Ponn
Simon Schlndler and Hur.-:
Attorney for I.ibby Klrsrh and
Nancy Ponn
Octobers
19.26. :wm
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-391 09
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
HAI.IM AM.
Petitioner Wife,
and
AYOUBALJ,
Respondent Husband
TO Ayoub All
81 Sukeran St
San Fernando. Trinidad
WI
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses. If any, to
It on GEORGE T RAMAN I.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 711 Biscayne Bldg .
1H West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 38180, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above Styled court on or before
November 80, IBM otherwise a
ill will be entered against
ir the relief demanded in
the omplalnt or petition
This notice shall he published
once each week for four con
itivi a eeks In THE
JEWISH FLORID .".
. .. ...
al M
laj
RICH \RD r BRINKER


\N'
prk
rt Si

Vttumej
, .-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84 82 82
Division 03
IN I'. I- K-
NAHP VRN
Decei
NOTICEOF
ADMINISTRATION
lh, administration ol the es
, VH PARIS
-..-,! File Number M 8385
riding in the I Ircult i
i,r l lade Count) Florida
I H\ islon the address ol
which Is .3 W esl Flagler Street,
Miami Florida 88180 The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (II all
claims against the estate and
121 any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom this
notice was mailed that chal-
lenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 18.1984
Personal Representative:
BERNARD PARNES
713 Collins Ave Apt. 41
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Galbut. Oalbut A Menln. PA.
B99 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida SSI 38
Telephone: (806)873-8100
18898 October 19.88,1984
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-83**
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSARIO ORANDEPPIKNO,
Deceased
NOTICEOF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER ;
PERSONS INTERESTED IN ^ tV
THE ESTATE: VflpV*
YOU ARE HEREBY *,"
NOTIFIED that the admin-
lstratlon of the estate of
ROSARIO GRANDEPPIENO,
deceased. File Number 84-8399.
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which Is Third Floor. Dade
County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
33130 The personal repres-
entative of the estate Is
CHARI.ES GRANDE, whose
address is 1728 Everst Park-
way. Cape Coral. Florida 33804
The name and address of the
pei-sonal representative's
attorney are set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
ONTHS FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE to file with
the < l.rk of the above court a
w i Itten statement o( any claim
or demand they may have.
Each claim must be in writing
and must indicate the basis for
the claim, the name and ad-
dress of the creditor or his
agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated If the claim Is conting-
ent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal
represnetatlve.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any
objections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's win, the quaiifica
tions of the personal repres-
entative or the venue or Juris-
dll tlon of the court
ALU CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
\NI> OBJECTIONS nut so
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
I late publication of
xdministratlon
October26 iwm
.. E 9 IRANDE
itlve
ol thi
- VRIOGRANDEI i':i Nl
SEN '.
II
\ M K NI

i ictober36;
N .ember2 191
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND f OR DADE COUNTY
Civ I Action NO 84 2250:
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
Ol \" AR R I AGE
il AH MARIA
,\ iMIREZ
i
p I BEN IAMIN RAMIREZ
Vve
Nai
YOt ARE HEREBY
i IED that ..-. a< I m for
ilutlon of Marriage has
een filed against you and you
,i. required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, Many, to
|| ,,n ill ADAI.UPK MARIA
IO N Z A L E Z RAMIREZ,
Petitioner whose address Is
7ii N W 12 St Homestead,
Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
Styled court on or before
November 2. 19H4. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8th day of
August. 1B84.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By I. DIAZ
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
MARIA GUADALUPE
GONZALEZ RAMIREZ
700N.W.12SL
Homestead. FL SSOSO
Telephone: (306)248-4083
18366 October 8,13,
19. 36.1984
Friday, October 26,1984. The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GTVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
Barry O. Levy d-b-a Metro
Courier and Process Servers at
1634 NE 147 Street Miami Fla.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Barry G. Levy
Attorney Peter Clement
18368 Octobers. 12.
19. 26.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
ONE OF A KIND WOOD
DESIGNS at 2460 S W 28th
l-ane Miami. Fi 33133 Intend
too register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
INGENUITY, INC
By MARC SOLOMON.
PRESIDENT
MARC POSTBLNEK, Fsy
Attorney for !Nc;FNU!T\
INC
407 Lincoln Road Suite 10-B
Miami Beach FL881S9
3061938-7310
18386 October 12. 18,26.
November 2.1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-37401
(NO. 125811)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE The Marriage of:
CARMEN P KNOWLES,
Wife
and
ALPHONZO KNOWLES,
Husband
TO Alphonzo Know .es
P.O Box Mackey Street
Nassau, Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on AR
THURH 1.IPSi in attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
901 N K 167th street. No.
Miami Beach. Florida. 33162.
3061 653-3030. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
Novembei 16 1984 otherwise a
sntered against
you for the relief prayed for in
WITNESS my hand and the
,,,- al m
... d

IN T ril DADF C DA
I'kOBATE DIVISION
t Is Nun .-! 1180
>n 0'
MARY I
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
......
k .

tor I >.. I ro
which IS
rhe
person .. and
the pi lentattA c
attorney are -i I lorth below
All Interested persons are re
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREK MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
of THIS NOTICE (11 all
claims against the estate and
12i any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom this
notice was mailed that chai
lenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 26. 1984.
Personal Representative
Elisabeth M Wendt
4654 Pauling Avenue
San Diego. California 92122
Personal Representative:
Henry Norton
IB West Flagler St Suite 1301
Miami. Florida33180
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida
Telephone: (306)374-3119
18406 October M;
Novembers, 1984
Hammer to Discuss
Jewish Emigration
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
American oil magnate and
renowned art collector Armand
Hammer will raise the plight of
Soviet Jewry with President
Konstantin Chernenko when he
meets the Soviet leader in
Moscow.
He was asked to do so here in
Jerusalem by Deputy Premier
Yitzhak Shamir who spoke of the
intensified persecution ot Zionist
activists and refuseniks in the
USSR.
Hammer, who spent part of his
early career in post-revolutionary
Russia, is persona grata with the
Kremlin indeed one of the few
Western personalities of his
stature and eminence who can
claim this distinction.
IN THE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-7743
Division 04
Bar No. 282480
IN RE ESTATE OF
Juan Bautlsla Mendez
Deceased
NOTICEOF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of Juan BauUsta Men
AM deceased. File Number 84-
7783. Is pending In the Circuit
Court for DADE County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which Is 73 W
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repres-
entative and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE 111 all
claims against the estate and
i2i any objecUon by an Inter
ested person to whom this
noUce was mailed that chal-
lenges the validity of the will
the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative venue, or
jurldictlon of the court
UX CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT so FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Publication of this Notice ha*
begun on October26 i8H4
Personal Representative
Margarita Moi
70 \\ est 40th Pla< '
il,. sal

-
S
NOTICE OF AC1 ION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
I So Property I
IN 1 HE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE I1TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOP
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
Case No 83 41104FC 23
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 34308'
rhe Man
\ '. ; I
Petit]
,' \
t-WII
. v
.
, IV. N
VRE HERI
FIEI that .-
m iiuUon ot Man
(lied agali I you
red 1 ipy ol
your w ritten defense ~ If any, to
n on BRENT F. ROU'I MAN or
IJ.OYD M RH I MAN al
lorneyi for the Petitioner
whose address is ROl'TMAN It
ROUTMAN ATTORNEYS AT
LAW. 181 N E 82nd Street,
Miami. Florida 33138. and file
the original with the Clerk of
the above-styled Court on or
before November 26. 1984.
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
PetlUon.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four conse
cuUve weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and seal
of said court at Miami. Dade
County. Florida on this 22 day
of October, 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk .Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
ROUTMAN A ROl'TMAN
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
Attorneys for Petitioner
181 N E 82nd Street
Miami, Florida 33138
Telephone: (3081 T67-6800
18403 October M
November X. 9. 16.1984


. ufec lu-u iiieuewi&ii riunamn. trinnv ifinwiu
rage 14-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, October 26, 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 13-3*414 NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
VI.
TIMOTHY C GREEN and
SHARON E. GREEN, his wife,
fk a SHARON E. SHIKANY;
FLORIDA NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI,
Defendants
TO: TIMOTHY C GREEN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that
an action to foreclose a mor-
tgage on the following
described property In Dade
County. Florida: Lot 2. Block
16. of FOURTH ADDITION TO
CALL'S A CLUB ESTATES,
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded In Plat Book 103 at
Page 97. of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida, has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your wTltten defenses. If any. to
It on Keith. Mack, Lewis &
Allison Plaintiffs attorneys,
whose address Is 111 N.E. 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 33132.
on or before November 9. 1984.
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or Immediately
thereafter. otherwise, a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on the 4th day o(
October. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By. DC BRYANT
' Deputv Clerk
18378 Octobers. 19.26.
Novembers IBM
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERALJURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO 84-31148
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs
GEORGE RODRIGUEZ, et al .
defendnata.
TO LOUISE COHEN
residence unknown, If alive,
and if dead, to all of the
unknown heirs. devisees,
grantees. assignees.
Iienholders. creditors, trustees
or otherwise, claiming by,
through, under or against the
said LOLTSE COHEN, and all
other parties having or
claiming to have any right, title
or interest in and to the
property under foreclosure
herein
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that
an action to foreclose a mor-
tgage on the following
described property in Dade
County. Florida Condominium
Unit No 50, of MANGO HILL
CONDOMINIUM NO 3, a
Condominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, dated January 17, 1978
and recorded January 26. 1978.
In Official Records Book 9927.
at Page 1198. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, as amended, together
with the Mortgagor's undivided
share in the common elements
appurtenant thereto, and
together with the parking
space assigned thereto, has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
it on Keith. Mack. Lewis &
Allison. Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address is ill N.E 1st
Street. Miami. Florida 33132.
on or before November 9. 1984.
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter. otherwise. a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on the 4th day of
October im
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By D C. Bryant
Deputy Clerk
18377 October 12. 19. 26,
November 2.1984
Public Notice
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names
CHANTRES. CHANTRES-
FARES TINTORER1A and
CHANTERS-FARES DRY
CLEANERS DE LUXE at
Dade County. Florida Intends
to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
J 4 J DE LUXE
DRYCLEANING. INC
6361 Sunset Drive
South Miami. Florida 33143
18372 October 8.12;
19, 26. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADECOUNTY
CASE NO 8137107
DIVISION: (13)
GENERALJURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF CORPORATION
NOT FOR PROFIT
IN RE: DISSOLUTION OK
HARRY SIMONE
FOUNDATION INC.,
A Corporation Not Kor Profit
To all Creditors and all persons
having claims or demands
against said non-profit cor-
poration
You and each of you are
hereby notified that a petition
for dissolution has been filed in
this cause and you are required
to present any claims and
demands which you, or either
of you, mav have agalsnt
HARRY SIMONE FOUN-
DATION, INC a Elorlda non-
profit corporation, by filing the
same in this cause in the office
of the Clerk of the Circuit Court
in and for Dade County
Florida on or before the 2nd
day of November 1984. other
wise the petition heretofore
filed In this cause will be
granted
Dated at Miami Florida this
12th day of October 1984
RICHARD E. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida
By DC BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
18389 October 19. 26. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In buslnes
under the Fictitious name
LISETTE'S FASHIONS at 220
Espanola Way Miami Beach
FL 33139 intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
ADAD HERNANDEZ
AURORA DIAZ
18384 October 12. 19.26.
November 2.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 14-37044
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA VICTORIA
PAREDES.
Petitioner,
and
LUIS FERNANDO PAREDES.
Respondent
TO. Louis Fernando Paredes
5201 N W Geneva Way
Apt 308
Miami, Fla 33166
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
it on TED E TSOUPRAKE.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 220 Miracle Mile
Suite 222. Coral Gables. Florida
33134. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November
26 1984. otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORID IAN-
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 16th day of
October, 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
i circuit c urtReal)
Ted E Tsouprake
- Miracle Mlle-Sulte222
Coral Gablea. Florida 3313-i
Attorney for Petitioner
18304 October 10. 26.
November 2. 8, 1084
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 14-34455
Florida Bar No. 370271
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CLAIRE GORDON.
Petitioner.
and
OSBAND GORDON,
Respondent.
TO: OsbandGordon
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an acUon for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on Richard A Golden, at
tomey for Petitioner. *hose
address Is 12000 Blscayne
Blvd.. Suite 203. North Miami.
FL 33181. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 2. 1984; otherwise ,<
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four .on
secutlve weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 26th day ol
September. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
iCircuit Court Seal I
KRAMER 4 GOLDEN. PA
12000 Blscayne Blvd. Suite 203
North Miami. FL 33181
Telephone: c3051 899-1800
Richard A Golden
Attorney for Petitioner
18360 Octobers. 12. 19, 26. 1984
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 84 34191 F.C.
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 348014
In re the marriage of
NORMAN LESHNER
Petitioner
and
JOANN LESHNER
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO JOANN LESHNER.
4135 Mark land St..
Philadelphia. Pa
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses upon: I J
GRAFF. ESQ attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
633 N E 167 St N M B
Florida 33162, on or before
November 9. 1984. and file the
original with the clerk of this
court otherwise a default will
be entered against you
DATED October4. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By DC Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
18379 October 12. 19.26.
November 2. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
Am rtcan Southern Textile
Company at 12845 NW 46
Avi nue. Opa Locka. Fla In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Textile Ventures. Inc
Palmatex. Inr
Attorney Myers. Kenln.
Levinson. Frank and Richards
18402 October 26;
November 2, 9. 16.1984
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
OFTHE HTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERALJURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO 84-37323
Fla Bar No 54034
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
JOSEFA GONZALES
Plaintiff,
vs
STEPHEN D RUDDEL, a
single man and OM1CRON
INVESTMENTS. INC., a
Florida corporation.
Defendants
TO STEPHEN D RUDDEL,
a single man
Kf.sidence Unknown
YOl ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Complain! to
Re-establish 1-ost or Destroyed
Instrument, has been filed and
Instituted in this Court, which
action affects your Interests in
said lost or destroyed Instru
ment. and you are required by
law to serve a copy of your
written defenses If any. on
PHILIP MEDVIN Esquire.
Attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address Is 2625 Ponce de I.eon
Boulevard. Suite 280. Coral
Gables. Florida 33134. and file
the original with the Clerk of
the above styled Court, on or
before the 16th day of
November, 1984. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint.
This notice shall be published
Once each week for four con-
e< utlve weeks In the Jewish
Floridian
WITNESS my hand and seal
of said Court, at Miami.
Florida, this 12 day of October.
19K4
RICHARDP BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
18300 October 19. 26.
November 2,9,1084
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 84-37391
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
TEDDY ROSENTHAL.
Petitioner-Husband
and
RAHEL ROSENTHAL,
Respondent-Wife,
TO: Rahel Rosenthal
47 Hlllel Street
Haifa. Israel 33727
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on Joseph W Malek, Esq..
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is Suite 501, 350 Lincoln
Road. Miami Beach. Florida
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November
26. 1984. otherwise a default
will be entered agams! you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 16th day of
October. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
Joseph W Malek
350 Lincoln Road. Suite 501
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone ( 305' 538-4431
Fla. Bar No 049834
18395 October 19.26.
November 2. 9. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in bUSli
under the fictitious name IS A
Distributing intends to reflater
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Ella Polyak
18361 Octobers. 12. 10. 2ft. 1084
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 14-38393
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE
NORMA ALVAREZ.
Petitioner Wife
and
HECTOR ALVAREZ
Respondent Husband
TO: HECTOR ALVAREZ
1770 East Tremont Avenue
Bronx. New York
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on LESTER ROGERS. PA.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Suite 200. 1454 N W
17th Avenue. Miami. Florida
33125. and file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled
Court on or before November
26. 1984. otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
Petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse-
cutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Dade County. Florida on this 17
day of October. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
AsClerk Circuit Court
Dade County, Honda
By ARDEN WONG
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal i
LESTER ROGERS P A
Suite 200
1454 N W 17th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
18398 October 26.
November 2. 9. 16. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
CIDSA at nubmer 14880 NE
10th Court In the Clty.of North
Miami Florida, Intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Dated at Miami Florida, this
10th day of October. 1984
Charles F Denton
SanfordS Faunce
Attorney for the Applicant
Room 40B42NW 27th Avenue
Miami. Florida, 33126
18388 October 10, 28;
November 2. 0. 1084
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84 8398
DIVISION 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CORNELIA TOOMBS
a-k-a CORNELIA
MABEL TOOMBS,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the admin-
istration of the estate of
CORNELIA TOOMBS. a-k-a
CORNELIA MABEL
TOOMBS. deceased. File
Number 84-8398, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
Is Third Floor. Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. FlorIJa SS1S0
The personal representative of
Ul estate Is RUTH A
TOOMBS, whose address is
3321 S W. 107th Avenue. Miami
Florida 33165 The name and
address of the personal repres
entatlve's attorney are set
forth below-
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
I1NTI1S FROM THE DATE OF
THE FIRST PI BUCATION
OF THIS NOTICE to file with
the clerk of the above court a
written statement of any claim
or demand they may have
Each claim must be in writing
and must indicate the basis for
the claim, the name and ad
dress of the creditor or his
agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
slated If the claim is contlng
ent or unliquidated, the nature
of the uncertainty shall be
stated If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver suf
flclent copies of the claim to the
, lerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal
represnetative
All persons interested 111 the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required
WITHIN THREE months
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATIO OF THIS
NOTICE, to file any objections
thev may have that challenge
the' validity of the decedent s
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative, or the
venue or jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration
October 26, 1984
RUTH A. TOOMBS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
CORNELIA TOOMBS. a-k-a
CORNELIA MABEI.TOOMBS
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
JOSEPH DIHARTOl.OMEO
F B No 010521
8400 Bird Road
Miami. Florida 33155
Telephone 130ft i 226 2276
18397 October 26:
November 2. 1084
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN thai Ihe undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
Caribbean Communications at
-Ml N.W 81 it Street. Miami.
Florida intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
CARIBBEAN CELLULAR
MOBILEPHONE
OF FLORIDA, INC
BY Lawrence Shedd
President
ATTEST
HV Paul Klugerman
Be< relary
Ih:!M odober 12. 19.26.
November 2. 1084
NOTICEOF
TERMINATIONOF USE OF
FICTITIOUSNAME
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned Is
no longer engaged In buetneei
under the fictitious names ol
CHANTRES CHANTRES
FARES TINTOREKIA and
CHANTRES FARES DRY
CLEANERS DE LUXE, and
will no longer be responsible
for any debts of any person
(kilng business thereunder
This termination of use of ficti-
tious name is effective as of
October 1. 1984
MASTER CLEANERS
OF MIAMI. INC.
1646-48 S.W 8th Street
Miami. Florida 33138


Friday, October 26, 1984. The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Book Reviews At Temple Sinai
Temple Sinai of North Dade
ivill host a book review and dia-
ussion group led bv Robert
ndler. professor of English lit-
trature at the University of
Miami, a specialist in Jewish lit-
erature, beginning on Nov. 1 and
Continuing on the first Thursday
of the month through May 2 at
7:30 p.m. in the temple library.
Books and stories to be consid-
ered will include works by such
major contemporary Jewish
writers as S. J. Agnon. Sholom
Aleichem, and Isaac Bashevis
Singer. The group will also read
and discuss Bernard Malamud's
The Fixer," Elie Wiesel's
"Night," and Chaim Potok's
"My Name is Asher Lev."
Independence In Aging Renewed
Independence in Aging," an
leducational seminar sponsored
fbv the Douglas Gardens Friends
' ,f Aging, will be held on Friday,
fj0v, 2 at the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged,
beKinn^Kat 10:30 a.m.
*e'


tJVe
Featured speaker Dr. Martin
Faletti, research director of the
Stein Gerontological Institute,
will explain innovations in
science and technology that are
expected to lead to renewed inde-
pendence for older adults.
ce^co
oe*
0 *. i
KSS0
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 No'thvvsi 3'd Si'eei
Tel 261 761?
Obituaries
AUGUST, Louis. 70. of Miami Services
Oct. 18. Gordon Mt. Nebo
MOVER. Barbara Ann, 54, of North
Miami Beach. Services Oct. 21.
VM il.I -M AN Adolph. 80, of North Miami
Beach. Services Oct. 21. Riverside.
GREENBAUM. Ethel L.. of Miami.
Services Oct. 21. Riverside.
HERMAN. Eve. of North Miami Beach.
Services were held.
I.IEBMAN. PrtscUla. of North Miami
Services were held.
LEOPOLD, Sally Altman. Services Oct.
21. Riverside.
SLOANE, Florence L.. of Golden Beach
Services Oct. 21 Riverside.
WIDES, Al. of North Miami Beach
Services Oct. 21.
FRANKEL. Harold, 80. of Miami
Beach. Services Oct 21. Riverside.
SILVERSTEIN. Betty, of North Miami
Services Oct. 21.
BROWN, Minerva F 82. of North Bay
Village. Services Oct. 22 Riverside. Me.
Nebo.
FRIEDLAND. Sophie of Bal Harbour
Services were held Riverside
GOLDSTEIN. Adele. of Miami Beach
Services Oct 21. Rubln-ZUbert. Mt.
Nebo.
GURMAN. Yudes. of Miami Beach
Services were held Rubln-ZUbert.
LEFTOFF. Morris. Services Oct. 21.
Riverside
R1CKLIS, Esther, of Miami Beach
Services Oct 21 Rubin Zllbert
RUBENSTEIN, Gilbert, of Miami
Beach Services Oct 22 Mt Nebo.
SCHOTZ. Erna. 84 Services Oct. 21
Rubln-ZUbert
SCHUHMAN. Mrs Ray, of Miami
Beach. Services Oct. 22. Rubln-ZUbert.
SINGER, Glsela, of Miami Beach
Services Oct. 22. Rubln-ZUbert
WEISS. Sidney, 81, of Bal Harbour
Services were held.
MILLER, Ralph. 77, of Miami Beach
Services Oct. 22 Riverside. '
s Services were held. Rubln-ZUbert.
BLEECKER, Rose Serlvces were held.
Rubln-ZUbert.
BERGER. Samuel, of Miami Beach
Services Oct. 24. Blasberg. Mt. Nebo
GLASKIN, Samuel M 63. of Miami.
Services Oct. 24. Riverside.
CORVINE, Maury, of Miami Beach
Services were held. Rubln-ZUbert
GREEN, Fay Services were held.
Riverside.
KOLTMAN, Max. of Miami Beach
Services were held Rubln-ZUbert.
ROSE, Mac, of North Miami Services
Oct. 26.
SILVERFINE. Claire. Services Oct. 24
Riverside
OTIC
Ralph, on Oct. 19 Survived by nephews
and many friends, he was the founding
president of Temple Beth Shalom. Serv-
ices Oct. 21. Riverside
BROOKS
Abraham, of Miami Beach. Survived by
children Gussle and George Wolpert
and Hyman Estroff. five grandchildren,
three great-grandchildren, he was an
Athens, Ga., native who came here In
1961. ServlcesOct. 21. Rubln-ZUbert.
COHEN
Beatrice, 93. of Miami Beach, on Oct 17
A 30-year resident, coming from New
York City, she is survived by daughter
Frances Lomaskln, grandchildren Mlra
and Marshall Platt and Mark and Amy
Lomaskln. and four great-grandchil-
dren. ServlcesOct. 21. Gordon.
PERCH
Allan, 31, of Cooper City, on Oct. 18. A
29-year resident, he came from Haiti
more and Is survived by his wife Bar-
bara, daughter Renee, parents Morris
and Elite Perch, four brothers and a
sister. ServlcesOct. 21. Gordon. Star of
David
BENNETT
Samuel, 77, of Miami, on Oct. 19 He
came here 22 years ago from East Lans-
downe. Pa., and Is survived by wife
Sylvia, children Nancy and Herbert
Welnfeld, sister Sara Shut*, three
grandchildren and many nephews
ServclesOct 21 Gordon
LEIBMANN
Jack S 83, on Oct. 18. A Tampa native
who lived in Miami for 36 years, he Is
survived by daughters Amy Sue and
Ceclle Andrea, sister Muriel Tropp. and
nephew Robert Tropp He was an at-
torney and a World War II veteran
ServlcesOct. 22.
PUDER
Clara. 81. of North Miami Beach Sur
vlvors Include husband Meyer,
daughter Beatrice Slade. son Bernard,
and four grandchildren She was a South
Florida resident for 33 years, coming
from Newark, N.J., and was acUve In
Hadassah ServlcesOct. 22. Riverside.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL $L
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
Miami Beach
Coral Gables
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
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No. Miami Beach Hallandale
BROWARD
456-4011
538-6371 Pre-Arrangements
with
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Main Office: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
Through years of dedicated service.
we have become the largest Jewish
Kamily owned and operated
Kuneral Chapel in Florida
gUuLy &tu*J WafiJ
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH THE ASSURED PLAN
LARRIES BLASBERG MICHAEL C BLASBERG
t tta
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i Amu i
.-,-. rREEl
865-2353
V AM Bl H 1"*'DA
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
" 532-2099
Broward County
532-2099
Represented by Riverside Memorial Chapel Inc.
New York: Oi2 263-7600 Queens Blvd ( 76th Rd Forest Hills, N Y
We've cut costs,
not corners.
We took a good hard look at funeral costs. Like many people, we
didn't like what we saw.
So we've done something about it
Now you can save up to 25% on the cost of any funeral. Without
any loss of service or dignity
Sinai &
Funeral Home. Inc.
Orthodox Conservative Reform
100 South Dixie Highway/Hallandale/456-3900
Serving Broward and surrounding counties


Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday. October 26, 1984
Help Start A Revolution!
Mm /^//W/,y A one of many stations to &***** economic u*oe. ^ftet uniting fa
/no/,***/, /t/ea^e 4mM U one* uUiA y*m tafyeu, accountant, famity, anu*nd. & mm saw
evetyone //ayiee Ma/Me <*Jmeucan tfewisti community &6*m*d'& 6*t So/teti*,,.
4ntu4c/4n fai /uiitiri/tation anc/ *m mS^mheSum tfrtc. ate tex-atea* at t/te endoftftis ftio/tc It was 1,824 years after the fall of Masada
when Theodore Herzl predicted a Jewish
Homeland. In his pamphlet, The Jewish
State, Herzl wrote, "We do not depend on
the circulation of old commodities,
because we produce new ones." The state
of Israel has overcome many domestic
and foreign problems because of in-
novated ideas. Our forefathers would call
Israel's economic status a mere wink in
the history of the Jews. We cannot close
our eyes to the fact that the repercussion
will echo through time.
My plan is a very simple one and is shared
by others. It comes right down to goods
and services. We must import a wide
variety of Israeli products and export
technology and knowledge. The market
place for Israel is 4,000,000 consumers
across the board, as compared to the
United States market of 250,000,000. If a
small percentage of that can be captured,
it will cripple the runaway inflation.
As you know, America has been
discussing a free trade zone with Israel.
Many products now are duty-free, and
more will soon follow. There are many op-
tions in doing business with Israel. The
following is a small portion of what
Burger International Trading, Inc.
(B.I.T.) has to offer:
1. Kibbutzim willing to buy technology
and know-how to form new industries
2. Kibbutzim willing and anxious to make
specific products on buy-back terms
3. Development towns searching for
private industries
4. Land Developing
5. Locating specific products to import to
America
and much more.
My name is Andrew Burger and I am
President of B.I.T., Inc. I was born in
Miami, Florida, and have been very active
in the Jewish community for a number of
years. After living in Israel, I have come
to know her extremely well. I have a great
number of friends in all channels of
Israeli society. My personal connections
consist of Kibbutzim, Moshavim,
Development towns, private industries,
government officials and others. The
main reason for starting my company
was to help myself and others to begin
doing business with Israel. To do
business with Israel is good business and
I'm not asking for charity.
The time has come for an economic rever-
sal. Any business or persons getting in-
volved now while the economy is below
any acceptable standard, will rise to the
highest peaks after the recovery.
The work ethics and product quality are
very high, but Israel still needs a helping
hand. There are many people who are
reading this proposal who are specialists
in their fields. Your knowledge, applied
properly, will increase productivity and
standards in parallel industries. The will
for help is waiting on the Israeli side, but
the wave of knowledge and experience
has not hit yet.
If you are a big business, small business,
retiree, youth, or an employee and you
want to help, please act now. Send a
description of any ideas and your
capabilities to the address below. I will
consolidate the ideas and proposals into
different groups. I will also coordinate
groups and plan a first meeting of the
minds." After the first meeting the direc-
tion will be obvious. If you have anything
at all to add to the bandwagon, you're
more than welcome to jump on.
Burger International Trading, Inc.
P.O. Box 526171 Miami, Florida 33152-6171
(305) 593-9370 Telex #9103331914
For Appt. or Info)


*- *'.~ : ,
; H I^HB^HHH I
OCTOBER 1984
Against All Odds
We are the link .
If we break with the past and
do not take care of one
another, we who have
struggled against all odds for so
long will have no future.
Support the 1985 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund/Project
Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign.


n~V*frc i1u".ujcu>*'.b ** l6i'.r,.,vir,.'.v?a.:. e"."
Page 2
Federation, October, 1984
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
October 26.1984 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
President
Samuel 1 Adler
Executive Vice President
vlyron J. Brodie
Thairman. Communications Committee
li Timoner
contents
CAMPAIGN
Braman outlines needs behind 85 campaign
liv unmann special guest at Campaign Opening Dinner
Brenner to entertain at gala Pacesetter Dinner
Young Leadersnip Mission a nistoric first
Super Sunday Super week slated for Jan. 27-31
CAMPAIGN
vanguard Division plays nost to Sen. Kennedy
Campaign Communique
WOMEN'S DIVISION
Terry Drucker praises Division s campaign efforts
Pacesetter Luncheon orings new look to Lion of Judan pin
Federation Wednesday set for Nov. 7 at Fontaineoieau-Hiiton
WD Trustees/Pacesetters to hold Lion of Judah Luncheon
PROJECT RENEWAL / AGENCIES 6
Miami teenagers experience Or Akiva
Memories of Pygone yontifs
American communities have a stake in Project Renewal
Through Five Windows, Israeli play at Knight Center
JVS Community Services
JEWISH EDUCATION / AGENCIES 7
Heorew Academy Olends technology and tradition
U of M professor sets priorities for Judaic Studies Program
New staffer at Federation information Service
CAMPAIGN STEERING COMMITTEE 8&9
SOUTH DADE/ PLANNING & BUDGET / AGENCIES 10
South Dade New Gifts effort expands
Presidential election addressed at community forums
New and old faces at South Dade office
JCC organizes Jewish Book Month ceiedrations
Planning and Budget Committee has Pusy year ahead
SOVIET JEWRY/AGENCIES 11
Days grow darker for Soviet Jews
Pernicious cults coerce the elderly
Millet update
FOUNDATION 12
Charitable giving oenefits are many and varied
Foundation launches fail seminar series
ISRAEL/AGENCIES 13
JDC sponsored housing offers companionship for young and old
Ethiopian Jews confront culture shock in Israel
Newshaliach in town
JVS pow Program exceeds expectations
J
FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION
Yoo-hoo Molly s Pack
Holocaust liberator recounts tale of terror
Hello Jerusalem joins jftv fall lineup
November program schedule
CALENDAR
14
15


Federation, October, 1984
Page 3
| campaign
A message from the
campaign chairman
^
hi lira mart
Iderly Jews in Miami Beach who
cannot afford decent food or housing.
Young Jews, the leaders of
tomorrow's community, thirsting for
the knowledge of a Jewish education.
Russian Refuseniks and Ethiopian
Faiashas seeking a life of freedom in
a nation where they can openly
practice their religion. Israeli im-
migrants beginning a new life in our
homeland. The indigent and elderly
in Israel who cannot afford the
basics of life.
Hundreds of thousands of people,
irom many lands and all walks of life.
They are young and old, have dif-
nt skin colors, and speak many
languages. Yet, despite their many
rences, they have a common,
ancient link.
They are all Jews. And if there's
any hope of a better life for them,
they need our help. Because if we,
their fellow Jews, do not help them
who will?
The 1985 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign is our community's way of
reaching out and assisting Jews at
home and throughout the world. It
will test our ability to provide the
maximum level of support to meet
the totality of worldwide Jewish
needs.
As we begin our 1985 campaign,
there are no choices. Campaign
funding is the only source available
to meet the needs of our fellow Jews.
This year, the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
must raise $25 million in order to
meet the needs that exist in Greater
Miami, in Israel and around the
world.
This year, the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation has adopted as its
campaign theme, "Against All
Odds.'' Throughout our nearly 6,000
year history, in the face of un-
believable adversity and tragedy, we
have survived and flourished
"Against All Odds." And if we, as a
united Jewish community, come
together and demonstrate our
collective strength and commitment,
we can raise $25 million "Against All
Odds." At stake is the quality of life
and sustenance of the Jewish people.
The people of Israel, who are
making tremendous personal
sacrifices to assure their security and
achieve a comprehensive peace in the
Middle East, have to cope with a
staggering 400 percent annual in-
flation rate. The economic crises of
recent years have forced major cuta
u the Israeli government's budget
for social programs. The Jewish
Agency's human service programs,
funded by Federation / U J A
campaigns, must play a greater role
an ever before in meeting the needs
of people living on marginal incomes.
In our Greater Miami community,
a third year of reduced federal and
state subsidies for social service
programs is seriously hindering our
ability to meet the needs of growing
lists of clients. Due to the limited
resources at our disposal, this year
we were unable to fund many worth-
while services that are needed in our
community: a teen group for the
educable mentally retarded; Sunday
transportation for the elderly to the
Jewisn Community Centers; ex-
pansion of day school funding;
therapy for the mentally impaired
elderly, and expanded outreach
services to the elderly.
We must intensify our com-
mitment to our Project Renewal
sister city of Or Akiva, an im-
poverished community which has
undergone a marvelous trans-
formation since it began its
relationship with our Jewish com-
munity three years ago. Or Akiva
now has new medical, day care and
community facilities, and its citizens
have a fresh sense of pride and
optimism about their community's
future. However, the pledges and
cash we have collected for Project
Renewal have not kept pace with our
commitment to the community. We
must increase our Project Renewal
effort to insure the continuation of
the rehabilitation process of Or
Akiva.
The success of our campaign will
be a statement of Jewish unity and
resolve against the forces that seek
to de-legitimize Israel and intimidate
and silence the Jews of the free
world. We are the source of hope for
Jews living in lands of oppression.
Your meaningful gift your
personal decision to accept
responsibility for your fellow Jews
will enable us to attain our goal and
secure a better life for Jews
everywhere. AGAINST ALL ODDS
we will succeed.
Norman Braman
General Campaign Chairman
Opening Dinner
set for Dec. 6
Liv Ullmann, celebrated screen
and stage star, will be the featured
speaker at the Campaign Opening
Dinner of the 1985 Combined Jewisn
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Cam-
paign, Thursday, December 6 at
the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel on
Miami Beach.
The gala event, attended by 1,660
persons last year, will kick off the
Greater Miami Jewish community's
effort to provide maximum support
for human service programs serving
Jews in Greater Miami, Israel and
other communities around the world.
"Considering the drastic economic
changes in Israel and the urgent
needs for building a stronger Jewish
community locally, we're depending
on the members of the Greater
Miami Jewish community to make a
record showing at the Opening
Dinner, so we can begin the 1985
campaign with a massive demon-
stration of support for our fellow
Jews," said Norman Braman,
general campaign chairman. "The
Opening Dinner will spearhead a
campaign that clearly represents the
commitment of our people that
Jewish survival is a continuing
challenge that must be met,
AGAINST ALL ODDS." .
For more information and
reservations call Federation at 576-
4000.
Brenner at Pacesetter Dinner
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Pacesetter Dinner, the
annual gala event open to con-
tributors of a minimum of $10,000 to
the 1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund Project
Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign, will be
held Thursday, November 8 at the
Fontainebleau-Hilton on Miami
Beach.
David Brenner, the highly popular
comedian and talk show personality,
will be the special guest artist for the
evening. A native of Philadelphia,
Brenner is one of America's best
known celebrities. In addition to his
performing career, Brenner is also
the author of "Soft Pretzels with
Mustard." The book, which contains
anecdotal accounts from Brenner's
youth to the present, has been a best-
seller in various parts of the United
States.
Now a resident of New York City,
Brenner's career achievements have
received extensive recognition. He
has been honored by the American
Guild of Variety Artists as "Male
Comedy Star of the Year." He has
also received the "Las Vegas
Comedy Star" award from his fellow
performers. His versatility and
wealth of material has prompted
Home Box Office to feature Brenner
in an unprecedented, three one-man
specials.
David Brenner
The Pacesetter Dinner begins with
cocktails at 7 p.m., dinner at 8 p.m.
The couvert is $65 per person and
dietary laws will be strictly ob-
served.
Michael M. Adler is chairman of
the Pacesetter Division; Steven J.
Kravitz is co-chairman; Maxine E.
Schwartz will serve as Pacesetter
Dinner chairman. Fcr additional in-
formation about the Pacesetter Din-
ner, contact the Federation at 576-
4000.
itinerary announced
for Young Leadership Mission
Jeffrey Berkowitz, a member of
Federation's Board of Directors, has
announced details of the UJA Young
Leadership Cabinet Mission to Israel
and Poland. Berkowitz serves as
Region 5 Mission Chairman.
The mission, scheduled for
February 24-March 5, 1985, will
bring together hundreds of
America's young Jewish leaders, and
will provide intellectual and cultural
enlightenment for all its par-
ticipants. The itinerary will include
visits to Israeli high technology
sites, tours of the Galilee set-
tlements, VIP inspections of Israeli
Defense Force bases, and trips to
Project Renewal locations including
Miami's sister city of Or Akiva.
Berkowitz indicated that a number
of seminars will be held during the
mission focusing on "Israel-Diaspora
relations"; "the Holocaust to
Rebirth" at Yad Vashem; and an
update on the Middle East situation,
including a fact-finding seminar to
Judea/Samaria on the northern
border.
Berkowitz stressed that the visits
participants to see, first hand, how
our partnership has benefited the
people of Israel. "We'll have the
opportunity to witness the transition
of Or Akiva from virtual ruins to a
modern neighborhood. Stops will
include a visit to the Youth Aliyah
village; an absorption center; and a
community school that is educating
a large number of Ethiopian Jews, '
noted Berkowitz.
Prior to the Israel part of the
mission, a pre-mission has been
planned to Poland, February 21-24.
The itinerary includes visits to
Warsaw and Cracow. Participants
will tour the Warsaw Ghetto
Memorial, the Jewish Historical
Institute and Museum, and Nozyk
Schul, the only surviving synagogue
in Warsaw.
The Young Leadership Cabinet
Mission will certainly be a highlight
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1985 Missions
Program. For additional information
about this important event contact
Sara Schoninger at 576-4000, ext.
215.
to Project Renewal sites will allow
Get ready for Super Sunday!
Super Sunday and Super Week, the largest outreach program to the
Greater Miami Jewish Community on behalf of the 1985 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund have been scheduled for January 27, 1985
at Temple Israel of Greater Miami, 137 NE 19th Street.
Super Week, an event that will encourage wider participation of the
Jewish community to insure maximum outreach, will begin Monday,
January 28 and continue through Thursday, January 31.
"Super Sunday and Super Week offers every Jew in Dade County the
opportunity to make their strongest possible commitment to fellow Jews
who need our assistance in Greater Miami, in Israel and worldwide," said
Norman Braman, general campaign chairman of the 1985 CJA-IEF. "We
have established a goal of $25 million for this year's campaign, and it
presents a challenge that we must attain, AGAINST ALL ODDS. I'm
certain that our Jewish community will respond with great generosity
during Super Sunday and Super Week."
Last year more than 3000 volunteers helped raise $1.3 million for the
1984 CJA-IEF Campaign during Super Sunday and Super Week. Super
Sunday Chairmen Charlotte Held, Judge Robert H. Newman, Susan
Sirotta. Barry S. Yarchin. and Super Week Chairman William Saulson
expect record participation this year.
Individuals or groups interested in volunteering for Super Sunday and
Super Week should contact the Greater Miami Jewish Federation at 676-
4000. Mark the days on your calendar, January 27-31. Help us to reach our
goal, one that we must attain, AGAINST ALL ODDS.


Page 4
Federation, October, 1984
Campaign
vanguard Event, featuring Sen. Kennedy, launches '85 CJA-lEF
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Demonstrating their coiaatffcaeafc to their fellow Jews,
members of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Van-
guard Division recently launched the 1986 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign at a meeting that gave the campaign one of its
most successful starts. Norman Braman, 1985 General Cam*
paign Chairman, indicated that 80 individuals who made a
minimum gift of $25,000 to the 1985 campaign attended the
event U.S. Senator Edward Kennedy (D.-Mass.) was the
featured guest speaker at the Vanguard Division meeting.
Aaron Podhurst, a Federation vice-president and chair-
man of the Vanguard Division was pleased by the large
turnout at the meeting. "Our 1985 campaign presents a
critical challenge for all members of this Jewish community.
The positive response ax*& commitment of our Vanguard
Division should help stimulate a record campaign, as we
renew our efforts to assist Jews in Greater Miami Israel tmd
around the world."
Seen at the Vanguard Meeting are (from left) irma JBraman, Xorman
Braman, 1985 general campaign chairman; Dorothy Podhurst; Aaron
Podhurst, Vanguard Division chairman; Bunny Adler and Federation
President'Samuel 1. Adler.
^Sen-JLenneiy is presented with >*( of " thr Ymnuard Dlvn-ian, by Teffrey Berkountz and'
femmmmni afrhe Pacesetter Division:

arffc

\ SzQOjtXX)
'aeclKe
'' -?-v%r W* "**"' '" '.'' '*; ** '-'
fe The tiSSm^ytpGnttii* Cemsh*Appeal ^ra
V*m& at A^tura-Tuj*berry in ftajjOi-Miami Beach-have'Seta 2 million
5/mfllaMi for Tifcnberry
ipeara. residents at Turnberry 1.-
^aig<* heMBaid. "This year. ^re^fidMt$Elfc Jt
'-the Jewjsli ibommunity at Aventura will make its own .meaningful com- I i
. mitment." '* .'_ "*** ~ ..
A new strategy will be used in the campaign programming at A ventura,
j building breakfasts, 'the mainstay of past 'campaigns, have been
; eliminated. Instead, a single $100 minimum gift reception.at the Garden
! Room at Turnberry Country Club will be held on March 10.
As in past years. Turnberry residents will have their own function in
late January, and the A ventura Leadership Gifts Reception, a-$l,000
minimum gift event, wil be held on February 13.
Canarick also announced the appointment of key leadership for this
year's campaign. Frank Beckerman will again serve as Turnberry general
chairman and the following persons will serve as A ventura building
' chairmen: Gert Bressler, Coronado; Seymour Goldstein, Bonavista; Dr
: Martin Gooze. Eldorado; Mickey Karzen, Ensenada, and Stanley
; Whitelaw, Biscaya.
i

Sen


"-'fit ^W&*f^
" 1 f-&:y<:
biding
, tf.
For more information, please call Susan Marx at 576-4000.
Events scheduled at California Club
, Q?UrRnue Sl chairman of the California Club campaign on behalf of the
jy5 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, said that the
community's leadership has designed a campaign agenda to increase the
presence and awareness of Federation.
The following events have been scheduled in conjunction with the
campaign:
Kick-off Social on Wednesday, November 14, featuring speaker
Akiva Baum who will discuss an Israel-related topic.
Local Agency Mission on Wednesday, December 12; an inside
glimpse of Federation's local beneficiary agencies. This event is being
chaired by Ben Rabinowitz.
California Club Community Federation Dinner on Sunday, January
13. A S250 minimum gift event being chaired by Jerry Hyams and
Lorraine Weintraub.
neity an/} Joseph Hali&lcrn%i
i **; ; : i .<' v
';. ^AUew&ts* mil be^ji ^Calin^i^im^jGlu'b.
-v ^ggOftfys <** CallfoHUaCkibtike^'ve Committee 4
toakfastLel^hip mBtogion^pCT^icba4is.nd Loot*
ibifrel wB^ewe^^viWtoAhri^^i.'-i^ ? ^^
^otmbre^iTOationj^ee^^
^suraftce^isiononttfemove* ;* '*;,-. *? *
^fc2ft5 SSr*1 yeys othmitedactivjy. Federrtions Inaura^e Division
severaT recent meetings and is formtrtatihg an actionSlan en- -
.SSf^S?S SLTFederation s?*^*!
i*JS!Ll*S5E he,(*a' ,uncheon meeting in August, attended bJ-60 in-
EKr^^rwSSfr Which ^ture? guest speaker BUI Gunter.
ChHirT-n )gom.miSSi0ner f *** State of FtoridaTlt is being led by
mtweTnerP ^ Md Co"Chain Arthur Jacowitrtnd Nor
toe-Jther^d S*aS!M?A5 leaders m the "Stance industry to come
safd 'ThU pfZ ?""thC bet^rme"t of our Jewish community Riemer
o?enerIv that nur n n? verd,ue.' and is xpected with this resurgency
caJu^tv^ntuTan^^nfT/26'1 mto two COI"Ponent groups, property and
S^Vs"aS^i{.,n8U,a,,Ce' and -ecutivePcoPmmTttee w,ll
WorkTr^aJes\7aeiniLCUrreTLy slated for the "Pcoming months are
Wednesday Deremhg,Qn Thursday. November 15: a breakfast on
b- anjI anr IrSSZSZ'v*. mi,ss!\to ,srael fror" February 24 to March
o. and an Insurance Person of the Year" Dinner on Wednesday. March
For more information, please call Lisa Imberman at 576-4000.
Admirals Port ready for 85 CJA-IEF
meeting\dmrrfhSeP19?5CC^iTi,iUr|, 5 ^rth Miami has scheduled several
Under WEhJSSW. EmergenCy W
Federation's High-RiseD^ion.tstyearTais^ ^ f
PaLtueTEblo^wtne^rF ^"^^ "5?*^. Member 2;
Wednesday, FeKry 6 y' Ja"Uary 9: and a GeneraI Meetin8 "
For more information, please call Midge B.umberg at 576-4000.
H
on


Federation, October, 1984
page 5
ns Division
campaign Chairwoman's message
_
Terry Drucker
L'Shana Tovah! I cannot believe
that a entire campaign year has
passed, and I am beginning my
second year as campaign chair-
woman of the Women's Division. I
am very proud of our first year's
accomplishments, and I am looking
forward to the implementation of
changes that have been developed as
a result of last year's campaign. We
have increased the minimum gift in
our donor category from $125 to
$200; in our sponsor category from
I to S365: in our patron category
from $500 to $750 and in our
factor category from $1,000 to
50. We are also planning a
lion to Mexico City as a
factor event. This year will also
a a Pacesetter category which
represents a $10,000 gift. An affair is
ig planned in December and the
Lion "f Judah pin will have a colored
stone for its eye symbolic of this
category.
On October 2. our Leadership
nstitute was held at the Miami
Virport Hilton; this was the official
off of the Women's Division
paign; 79 of our most able
met !<>r a day of education
i arning techniques involved
face to face solicitations. It was
m extremely successful and in-
alive day. having raised
000. Face to face solicitations
will be emphasized this year, and I
ini confident that our women are
more than ready to tackle this goal.
This year, the Women's Division
unpaign goal is $4.4 million. This
goal will have to be reached, now
more than ever, because of the more
than $1 billion budget reduction by
Israel. The social programs funded
by Federation, here and abroad
cannot be permitted to be
'liminished. Our dollars support
>rograms in Israel such as im-
rant absorption, youth aliyah,
igriculturaJ programs and higher
educational facilities. In Miami, the
local JCC's hot meal programs, day
schools, family counseling services
and many other agencies. These
lifeline services must remain open
and visible, and this can only result
from maximum giving.
It is with great pride that I
continue my time and commitment
with Federation. I was never as
proud or confident in this com-
mitment as when I returned from
Prague and Israel. It was an
emotional experience and somewhat
bittersweet to visit a city where
Jewish people once prospered. This
once vibrant city of hundreds of
thousands of Jews has been
decimated to a mere handful. The
sadness and frustration I felt when
leaving Prague didn't end when I
arrived in Israel; but I was more
firmly convinced than ever in the
strength of our Jewish people, a
people of "the book" who raise
society to a level it could not reach
alone. I feel so lucky to be born a
Jewish woman, and as long as I'm
able, I will do everything in my
power to insure the best possible life
tor every Jewish man, woman and
child.
Terry Drucker
Campaign Chairwoman
WD Trustees /
Pacesetters to
be honored
The Women'8 Division Lion of
Judah Luncheon has been scheduled
for Monday, November 19. The
event, which honors Pacesetters and
Trustees of the Women's Division,
will be held in the Dining Galleries of
the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel on
Miami Beach.
Barbara Gordon, author of the
best-seller "I'm Dancing as Fast as
I Can," will be the special guest
speaker. Gordon, a resident of Miami
Beach will share her unique life
experiences at the gathering which
begins at 11 a.m.
The Lion of Judah luncheon is held
annually for Women's Division
Trustees, those women who make a
minimum gift of $5,000 to the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign. The Trustee
trademark is the distinctive Lion of
Judah gold pin with a precious stone
setting, which, incidentally, has been
adopted by several Federations
around the nation.
"We're extremely pleased that
Barbara Gordon will join us for the
Lion of Judah Luncheon. I'm certain
that our new Pacesetter and Trustee
women will find her talk
enlightening. In addition. the
Dinning Galleries of the Fon-
tainebleau will add a special touch
of class to our event. The setting is
exquisite and will make the entire
day a most memorable one," said
event chairwoman Joan Morrison.
Gloria Scharlin is Chairwoman of
the Pacesetters and Trustees
Division. Sue Helfman is
Pacesetter Trustee Co-
Chairwoman.
pacesetter
Luncheon
set for Dec. 5
The Women's Division is pleased
to announce its 1st Annual
Pacesetter's Ruby "10" Luncheon in
recognition of those women making
their own personal contribution of
$10,000 or more to the 1985 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund / Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign.
Lin Arison will host a beautiful
luncheon at her home to honor the
Pacesetters on Wednesday,
December 5. Additionally, women
Pacesetters will receive special
recognition as the diamond in the eye
of their Lion of Judah pin is replaced
with a magnificient ruby stone.
For additional information and
reservations for the Pacesetter
Luncheon please contact
Federation's Women's Division at
576-4000.
Record attendance expected as
Federation Wednesday,
b&p Night feature viorst
Judith Viorst, contributing editor to Redbook Magazine and author
of the best-seller "Love and Guilt and The Meaning of Life, Etc.," will join
Robert Clary and Deborah Lipstadt as guest speakers at Federation
Wednesday, November 7 at the Fontainebleau-Hilton. Miami Beach.
The daylong event, sponsored by the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Women's Division, will focus on a number of issues that
confront members of the Jewish community on a daily basis. Viorst will
present a humorous approach to life's most common dilemmas. She is
noted for taking everyday experiences and transforming them into a
meaningful, charming and humorous commentary on human life. Viorst
will also be the special guest of the Business and Professional Women at a
Community Education Night on the evening of November 7. The wine and
cheese reception will also be held at the Fontainebleau Hotel beginning at
7 p.m.
Robert Clary, best known for his role on television's "Hogan's
Heroes," is a survivor of the Holocaust. Feeling that it was "pure luck"
that he did not meet the fate of six million other Jews, Clary now feels the
need to share his experiences.
Deborah Lipstadt is an assistant professor of Jewish Studies at the
University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). At Federation Wednesday,
Lipstadt will offer her expertise to present life from a Judeo-feminist point
of view.
Renata Bloom and Elaine Richman, Federation Wednesday Chair-
women, have developed a program that promises to raise the Jewish
consciousness of the event's participants and to create among them a
greater sense of awareness regarding the Jewish community in Greater
Miami.
Gail Harris is vice-president of Community Education. Lisa Treister
and Sberyl Gold are Co-Chairwomen of the Business and Professional
Women's Community Education Night. Ray Ellen Yarkin is Business
and Professional Vice Chairwoman.
Federation Wednesday begins with coffee and registration at 9 a.m.
The program and luncheon are from 9:30-2:00. There is a $35 registration
fee. For more information contact the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Women's Division at 576-4000.
.....-............... f /- ..........
i rsity; Dorothy Podhurst, i Slikki Futernick, Women's Diuision president: anil Marilyn Smith.
Women's Division past president.
Hold the Date!
Monday, October 29 M.B. Constituent Board Meeting
North Dade, South Dade and
Southwest Dade Constituent
Board Meetings
FEDERATION WEDNESDAY
and B&P Professional Women
Community Education Night
Campaign Steering Committee
Lion of Judah Luncheon
HAPPY THANKSGIVING
Guardian Luncheon
Miami Beach Campaign Kick-off
B&P Women Campaign Kick-off
Executive Committee
North Dade Campaign Kickoff
So. Dade and S. W. Dade
campaign kickoff.
Pacesetter-Ruby "10" Luncheon
Campaign Steering Committee
Women's Division Mission to
Mexico City
For additional information about Federation's Women's
Division please contact 576-4000.
Tuesday. October 30
Wednesday, November 7
Thursday, November 8
Monday, November 19
Thursday, November 22
Tuesday, November 27
Wednesday, November 28
Thursday, November 29
Monday, December 3
Tuesday, December 4
Wednesday, December 5
Thursday, December 6
January 22-24,1985


IftJ^rY iU'U,nL .'I'^.'Mill1 i-.M.r.niHn / ..<,,
Page 6
Federation, October, 1984
Project Renewal/Agencies
JCC teens visit Or Akiva
Own a special piece of Israel
Hillary
Saviti.
Alpirn. Joshua Li pp. Jill
, This summer, Or Akiva, a small
Israeli community of 8.000 persons
] located along the Mediterranean
i between Tel Aviv and Caesaria.
i learned a little more about American
1 Jewish life.
Or Akiva. Miami's Project
Renewal City played host to three
Miami teens who were chosen to
participate in the Summer Teen
Exchange program. As part of the
ongoing commitment between
Miami and Or Akiva. the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and the
Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida selected the three teens to
spend the summer in Israel. Project
Renewal is a partnership linking
American Jewish communities
directly to Israeli neighborhoods
"sister cities." It provides financial
assistance, moral support and direct
involvement with residents of
, Project Renewal cities.
Jill Savitt, Joshua Lipp and
Hillary Alpirn, the three exchange
students all of high school age,
I worked in a summer day camp as
counselors to children and as aides to
other counselors for three weeks.
Prior to their stop in Or Akiva, the
three Miami teens toured the
country with a group of American
teens. Upon arrival in Or Akiva, each
was placed in the home of an Or
Akiva family.
"Cultural enrichment is the
concept behind the Israeli Teen
Exchange Program. It was created
to give Miami teens a clearer under-
standing of life in a redevelopment
town in Israel," said Neal J.
Menachem, president of the Jewish
Community Centers of South
Florida.
"I saw evidence of Miami's
contribution to Or Akiva every-
where. The Community Center had
pictures of Miami on the walls. The
city seemed to be growing and many
of the residents were wearing tee-
shirts that said "Miami loves Or
Akiva." said Alpirn.
"A couple of summers ago. Miami
hosted two Or Akiva teens. Rami
and Rifka. They were placed with
Miami families during the summer
and based on the success of these
two summer programs we anticipate
this exchange program to grow in
the next few years." said Miriam
Zatinsky. executive director of the
Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida.
As part of the exchange program,
the three teens must develop a
project here in Miami to benefit Or
Akiva teens. Each of the three teens
are actively involved in a youth
group, and plan to get their groups
involved in the project.
"After speaking and living with
many of the children in Or Akiva, we
decided on a project that we feel is
great." said Lipp. Part of the project
calls for our youth groups to send
"Surprise Fun Packages monthly
to Or Akiva and to raise enough
money to sponsor a couple of teens to
come to Miami," he added.
"The three teens were chosen for
their demonstrated leadership quali-
ties, their scholastic record, their
volunteer service to the JCC's, and
other youth service agencies and
their commitment to develop a
project," said Menachem. "This
project has been a true exchange
program where Or Akiva teens share
in our American Jewish life and
Miami teens gain insight into a bit of
Israeli culture and lifestyle."
When yontif was yontif
"I was IT years old when we left the shtetl in 1913. Along with our new-
found freedom, we also developed a certain cynicism. When it came to the
High Holidays, we lost some of our devotion."
Feigel Cohen is one of many residents of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged who remember the High Holidays in a different
time and place. Her sentiments are echoed by many other residents of the
Home.
Centenarian Bertha Arkush can still recall the aromas emanating from
mother's kitchen. "Soups and baking cooking for a week before yontif.
The excitement of the High Holidays is something I still miss. In those
days. Shabbos was Shabbos and yontif was yontif."
Lillian Rosenwein. descended from six generations of rabbis, called it "a
feeling of awe." She said, "we children would huddle together in fear of
God when my father cried and prayed for a good year on Yom Kippur.
Atonement was taken seriously then. More than 80 years ago when Iwas
a child in Lithuania, "shlogn kaporeS' was very commonly practiced
among the orthodox. A rooster was sacrificed for a man and a chicken for a
woman. They took the birds to the shocket who slit the (birds') throats in
order that their sacrifice would take the sins off the heads of the people.
The fear that God watched us kept people from doing wrong. We felt that
God was there all the time, watching, balancing the good against the bad.
It made families and communities stronger. It made it more difficult to do
wrong."
Dora Badash. who is 85. also noted the "lack of real significance in the
way people celebrate the new year now. When the holidays have real
meaning for people, they get a sense of the stages in their lives.
Everything has a purpose and a reason for being. We used to be contented
with fewer material things and the things we did have had more meaning
to us. An appreciation of God and things eternal makes material things
less important. That is as it should be."
A highly assimilated Jew, Emma Israel spent her childhood in England
and came to the U.S. in 1913 at age 12."We were not raised in a religious
environment or for that matter, a Jewish community. Yet the holidays
were always important. Mother always cooked holiday foods, especially
cholent and candied orange peels. My father, a tailor, saw to it that we
always had new clothes twice a year; on Pesach and Rosh Hashanah.
Even though I did not learn the religious significance of these holidays
jntil I came to the U.S. and went to chedar, I understood that these were
special days for us as Jews. It means a lot to me that I can continue to
tnjoy the Jewish traditions and worship during the High Holidays here at
Douglas Gardens."
Participation in the inner workings of the city or village that your
Federation has chosen for Project Renewal leaves you with the heady
feeling that you own your own special piece of Israel.
That is exactly how you might think after a visit to your twin city in the
Jewish State.
Ask any one of the 500 American Jewish leaders who recently par-
ticipated in the first National Campaign Opening Conference in Israel of
the United Jewish Appeal-Community Campaign.
In Project Renewal, American Jewry joins with Israel "in a sweeping
physical, social, cultural and economic program" for human betterment
for those Jews whose lives have been uprooted elsewhere and who are
finding new homes in Israel.
In Project Renewal, there are direct and formal contractual links
between Renewal neighborhoods in Israel and Jewish communities in the
IS which commit themselves not onlv to raise funds for the project, hut
also to lend their time, energy and skills as working partners with neigh-
borhood residents.
So says the story of the partnership of American Jewry and the Jewish
Agency lor Israel This explanation becomes amazingly "simple a
visit your own twinned neighborhood and see the transformuti. of a
garbage dump into a fine and useful park.
Next, you are mobbed by children who want to express their thanks for
tennis and basketball courts that your efforts made possible.
A meeting follows with the townspeople on future Project Renewal
plans and goals. From then' you go to a Classroom where comput
iuM been unboxed for use by the youngsters in the village. Yon see thai
your participation will make these children ready for future competition in
the high-technology world.
At that point, you are vv disked off by your hostess, who appears to : r. i
. j duty,
will be back.
ayes of emotion engulf you as goodbyes are exchanged and vou hear
"thanks and "thanks" and "thanks for having come into these pe< -pie s
lives,
You leave satisfied, however, knowing that you have accomplished that
special kind of rrutzvah helping someone help himself.
New play depicts
diverse Israeli life
Rina Padue as Masouda
"Through Fiie Windows."
in
A new play about Israel,
"Through Five Windows," is coming
to the James L. Knight Center for an
exclusive one night engagement.
Thursday, Nov. 15, at 8 p.m. It is
sponsored by the Cultural Arts
Department of the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Center, a
branch of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida.
Through Five Windows," an
original theatrical work on the rich-
ness and diversity of Israeli life,
depicts how five women of totally
different backgrounds, experiences
motivation, aspiration, and points of
view come to share the identity of
being Israeli.
The play, which recently finished a
successful London run, is a "collate
of monologues." What the five
characters have in common at the
start is that their husbands are in the
Israeli Reserves together. The year is
HKW, and the wives are packing their
husbands bags and complaining.
The rest of the play, built around
flashbacks, is a search for reasons,
t-me of the questions the play seeks
to answer is, "When, if ever, do you
stop being an immigrant and start
being an Israeli?"
After the show, there will be an
opportunity to discuss the play with
the cast and comment on the issues
it raises. For more information and
ticket prices call the Jewish Com-
munity Center at 932-4200 All
seating is reserved.
JVS community
Services
The Jewish Vocational Services
Community Service Department is
offering a variety of group
presentations and community
workshops this fall.
Included in the programming are
two college night workshops where
local experts will discuss such topics
as: criteria to be used in the college
selection process and how to become
more knowledgeable about available
financial aid. The South Dade
workshop was recently held at the
Jewish Community Center on
October 23. On Tuesday, October 30
at 7:30 p.m. the North Dade college
night workshop will be held at the
Michael Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center.
In addition to our youth
programming, Jewish Vocational
Service is offering two group
"programs" in our South Dade
facility, located at 8353 S.W. 12th
Street. On each Thursday morning
from 10 a.m. to noon, self help
group entitled "Women in Tran-
sition" will be held in this facility
Such topics as skills assessment,
effective resume writing, marketing
your beat self, and the interviewing
process will be discussed. On Fridays
from 10 a.m. to noon, a career
development workshop will be held
where individuals who are unsure cf
precise career goals will have an
opportunity to learn more about
their skills, personality and oc-
cupational interests.
For more information please call
Beth Wald at Jewish Vocational
Service, 576-3220.


Federation, October, 1984
Page 7
-*

Jewish Education/Agencies
Hebrew Academy integrates old and new
A computer laboratory, media
center and a science laboratory for
elementary level students. A course
in comparative journalism. A course
hat integrates world history and
. :sh history. A full range of
varsity sports.
For an institution that regards
Jf as a "traditional Yeshiva day
school," the Rabbi Alexander S.
ss Hebrew Academy of Greater
Miami certainly doesn't conform to
he convent ional mold.
While the school is committed to
providing a quality Jewish education
vhich teaches the observance of
itual commandments and the
;i \ elnpment of ethical attitudes, it
has an equally strong commitment
progressive, quality secular
education. And judging from the
performance and achievement of its
students, who range from nursery to
--th grade, the school is succeeding
in meeting its goals.
According to statistics compiled
by the World Zionist Organization,
the school has the highest per-
centage in the country of students
who pursue post-high school
education in Israel. In the area of
general academics, last year's
seniors averaged 1270 on their
Scholastic Aptitude Test (SAT)
scores, compared to a national
average of 850.
"We work very hard on in-
tegrating Judaic and secular
studies,'' said Rabbi Yossi Heber,
principal of the Academy's high
school. "The dynamism of the
present day school movement is
something most people don't know
about. We've never compromised the
public school goal of turning out
students who become productive
citizens in American society."
A school with modest beginnings,
the Hebrew Academy was founded in
1947 with four students, in
classroom space rented from the
local YMHA. Today, the school has
more than 600 students and
educational facilities housed in two
buildings on Pine Tree Drive in
Miami Beach. Although the in-
stitution is an orthodox day school,
approximately half of its students do
An elementary level science class at the Hebrew Academy.
not come from orthodox households.
The school has a fleet of 15 buses
that transport students daily from
E)ints as far away as Fort
auderdale and South Kendall.
Outlining the philosophy of the
school's Judaic Studies program.
Rabbi Heber said the curriculum
aims to "inculcate a love of the land
of Israel, the people of Israel and the
Torah of Israel We emphasize
cultural topics in Judaism and strive
to make it relevant and important to
today's students. The curriculum is
built around the idea of making it
enjoyable and constructive for their
lives."
Instruction in Hebrew begins at
kindergarten and continues until
fluency is achieved, Rabbi Heber
noted. In the more advanced classes,
discussions on current events or
contemporary Hebrew literature are
conducted in Hebrew. "They are
very fluent in Hebrew when they
leave here," he added.
In addition, students attend a
Shabbat service every Friday, and a
special "Yeshiva track" in Talmudic
studies is offered for sixth graders
and up. Rabbi Heber noted that the
school has a very close relationship
u of M Judaic
Studies: 'relevant
& career oriented'
Dr Henry Green
^ Established in 1973, the Judaic
Studies Program at the University of
Miami is an interdisciplinary
program dealing with the creative
cultural experience of the Jewish
people during their 4,000 year
history. The non-theological
program offers an academic ex-
ploration of the multi-faceted
historical record of the Jewish people
in the context of the development of
Western Civilization.
Students pursuing a major in
Judaic Studies can receive a BA
degree and choose more than 40
courses from a number of inter-
disciplinary departments: Judaic
Studies, Arabic, English, Hebrew,
History, Music, Philosophy, Politics
and Public Affairs, Religion and
Sociology. The curriculum offers
study opportunities in the areas of:
classical Judaic traditions and
culture, the historical experience of
the Jews, Jewish literature and arts,
languages, social structure of Jewish
communities, geo-politics of the
Middle East, and the Holocaust.
"What I imagine is the eventual
establishment of a college of
Judaica," said Dr. Henry Green, the
new director of the Judaic Studies
Program. "I want to offer courses
that are contemporary, relevant and
career oriented.'
Before moving to Miami recently.
Dr. Green studied and taught in
Canada. Israel. France and Britain.
He served for three years on the
faculty of the National Council of
Jewish Women's Research Institute
for Innovation in Education, where
he co-authored a book entitled
"Research In Action."
Green believes that a greater
"outreach" effort should be made to
get groups in the community in-
volved with the program: high
school students, Jewish day school
and supplementary synagogue
teachers, and adults. He noted that
scholarships are available and
college credit courses will be offered
at community day schools. Addi-
tionally, an adult education program
is being developed which will offer ;
college credit courses through local
synagogues and other community
groups, and teachers will be eligible
for grants for Judaic Studies
courses.
"What we're doing is using the
resources of the Greater Miami
with the Jewish Agency for Israel:
its principals serve as advisors to the
agency on Jewish education in the
diaspora, and 15 seniors are now
studying in Israel at Jewish Agency
institutions.
One of the innovative "ex-
tensions" of the classrooms at the
Hebrew Academy is its media center,
which contains books, records,
cassettes, filmstrips, and different
types of audio-visual equipment.
Many students make their own
filmstrips or transparencies, along
with a cassette soundtrack. The
media center will soon be getting
several new additions: reading and
language arts laboratories, and
Viewtron, the Knight-Ridder
computer data base service that
provides instant information on
thousands of subjects.
The computer laboratory is
equipped with 15 IBM personal
computers that were given to the
Hebrew Academy; the school was
one of 84 across the nation to be
selected by the Educational Testing
Service to receive the computers as a
gift from IBM. Students are taught
the history of computers, computer
literacy, programming in the Basic
and Pascal languages, and use
software for instruction in various
community to offer Judaic courses to
a wider audience," Green explained.
Green would also like to develop
stronger departmental links witn
Israel in three ways: give students
the opportunity to study at a major
university in Israel: give faculty
members the opportunity to par-
ticipate in an exchange program with
Israeli universities: and conduct
joint research projects with Israeli
institutions.
"What I envision as an initial joint
project is a program focusing on the
plight of Jewish immigrants coming
to the U.S. and Israel," Green said.
"This would provide a comparative
context regarding the question of the
integration of immigrants into the
society."
In the area of cultural activities.
Green has organized a Jewish film
festival, to be co-sponsored by the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education, which will begin this
January at the Beaumont Cinema on
the university campus. He is also
trying to arrange an exhibition of
archaeological artifacts from Israel
at the Lowe Art Museum.
"For modern day Jews, the ways
they can identify with their Jewish-
ness can be ethnic or religious," he
said. "We have to provide avenues
that all groups can relate to."
The Judaic Studies Program is a
beneficiary of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergecy
Fund Campaign. For more in-
formation, please call 284-4375.
courses. They are also writing
programs for Hebrew instruction
and have converted Apple programs
in Hebrew instruction to be com-
patible with the IBM equipment.
A full physical education program
is part of the regular curriculum, as
well as an art and music program
taught by highly-trained
professionals. A wide variety of
extra-curricuiar activities are of-
fered, which include community
service projects conducted in con-
junction with Federation agencies.
The school's 85 faculty members
are fully certified by the State of
Florida Department of Education,
and 70 percent have earned or are
working toward post-graduate
degrees. It has an open admissions
policy complemented by a program
of testing that enables the for-
mulation of a personalized program
for every student. A staff of
professional guidance counselors and
a remediation specialist attend to the
students' special needs. More than
50 percent of the students receive full
or partial scholarships to defray
tuition costs.
"The Hebrew Academy has a
commitment of excellence and to the
integration of all aspects of
education," said Michael Fischer,
the school's executive vice president.
"We instill in the students the
seriousness of study and the serious-
ness of purpose."
The other principals at the
Academy are: Shirley Gross,
principal of Judaic studies at the
elementary school; Erwin Marshall,
education administrator for secular
studies at the elementary school;
and Jessica Schultz, education
administrator for secular studies at
the high school.
Dr. David Reinhard is the school's
president and Jack Burstein is its
chairman.
The Hebrew Academy is a member
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's family of agencies and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. For
additional information about the
School, please call 532-6421.
New staffer at
Federation
information
Service
The Federation Information and
Referral Service has employed
Phyllis Hochberg as a part-time staff
member in its community Outreach-
Resource Maintenance Program.
Among Hochberg s respon-
sibilities will be those of viewing and
getting first-hand information about
various community resources so that
the Information and Referral Service
can provide more complete in-
formation to its clients.
Also, she will be contacting
professionals within the community,
who see people in crisis situations, to
let them know about Federation's
Information and Referral Service. In
this way, this program can be made
more readily available to those in
need.
The Federation Information and
Referral Service is a program
through which people in the com-
munity who need assistance or in-
formation can obtain it quickly and
easily by calling the Federation
number, 576-4000, and speaking with
Martha Cohen.


Page 8
Federation, October, 1984
5 Campaign Steering committee
Harvey Friedman
Chairman Special Gifts
Mikki Futernick Barton ColdOerg
President Women s Division cnairman Bankers Division
Alfred Golden
Co-Chairman SpecialCifts
Or Elliott Cordon
Co-Chairman. North Dade
Dentists Division
Merschei Green
Co-Chairman Builders
Real Estate and Allied Trades
Alex Malderstein Chinoti -
Co Chairman Co ClUimiM i p>
Latin American Division
Sheldon Guren
ManKluoer
Richard Kwal
Jeffrey lefcourt
Marry A. iMapi levy
Forrest Raf fel
Howard* ScharMn


Federation, October, 1984
Page 9

Louis Berlin
Co Chairman, Chazak
Or. Jack Berne
Chairman. North Dade
Dentists Division
Herb canarick
Chairman,
Aventura Turnberry
Sidney Cooperman
Chairman,
westview Country Club
Terry Drucker
Chairman. Women s Division
Or Jay Blenbv
Chairman. Physicians and
Osteopaths Division
Alvin fntin
Co-Chairman. Chazak
Held Jerome Hyams Arthur jacowitz
.ir Jp. t ?undav Chairman. California Club Co Chairman insurance Div
Community Reception
nofiurst Stephen Riemer lou Rones
tang ard Division Chairman, insurance Division Chairman.
California Club Community
f>
...
/
RoseKlausner Steven I Kravitz
Chairman California Club Co-Chairman Pacesetter Oiv
Community Canongate
Joel Levy
Co Chairman. Missions
Paula levy
Co Chairman. Missions
Norman Lieberman
Chairman
South Dade campaign
Hlpn Rose
Chairman, Young Adult
Division campaign
William F. Saulson
Chairman Super Week
Gerald K Schwartz
cnalrman. Attorney s Dtv.
Maxine E. Schwartz
Chairman. Worker Training
Cnalrman. Pacesetter Dinner
J. Allen Siegei
Co Chairman Builders Div


k. ">"" iueutiWMnpM
">"" -.,...-
Page 10
Federation, October, 1984
South Dade/P&B/Agencies
s. Dade New Gifts
effort expanded
Ellen Mandiei
As part of its continuing effort to
involve more of South Dades Jews
with the organized Jewish com-
munity and the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, the New Gifts
Committee of Federation's South
Dade Branch has expanded the scope
of its activities.
Ellen Mandler. chairman of the
New Gifts Committee, announced
that three subgroups to the com-
mittee will be sponsoring different
functions in the community. An
existing group will sponsor its fourth
event on Oct. 27. a hayride and
square dance. The event is being
chaired by Stanley and Shelly
Rosenberg, Norman and Jean
Lieberman. and Ken and Linda
Hoffman.
"'We have a large Jewish com-
munity, and we'd like to make it a
closely knit Jewish community,"
Mandler said. "We would like to
make unaffiliated Jews more aware
of the wonderful things Federation is
doing in the community."
In the near future two additional
New Gifts groups will be formed; one
group will hold social activities
similar to those sponsored by the
existing group, while the other will
sponsor events that will be more
intellectually oriented. Another
group, which will have an emphasis
on leadership development, is being
formed.
The members of the New Gifts
Committee are: Thomas and Sara
Borin. Mel and Ellen Brazer. Richard
and .Joyce Grossman, Sam and
Phyllis Harte. Ken and Linda
Hoffman. Richard and Gail Kwal,
Norman and Jean Lieberman,
Stanley and Shelly Rosenberg, and
Mike d Sandi Samole.
re information on the New
Gift- ..mmittee and its activities.
plea-,. all the South Dade
Federation office at 251-9334.
Political theme
at Community
Education events
The Community Education
Department of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's South Dade
Branch will be sponsoring a
"Political Analysis of Campaign '84"
on Tuesday. October 30 at 8 p.m.
Guest speaker at the event, the
first of the South Dade Community
Education Series, will be Federation
Vice President Donald E. Lefton.
Lefton. a leader of the Greater Miami
Jewish community, has also served
as national vice chairman of the
National Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Council, national
vice chairman of the National
Conference on Soviet Jewry,
president of the American Friends of
Hebrew University, an executive
committee member of the American
Israel Public Affairs Committee,
advisory board member of the Joint
Distribution Committee, and
chairman of the Florida
Congressional Committee.
On Tuesday. November 27 at 8
p.m. the Community Education
Department will be sponsoring an
evening with U.S. Congressman
Dante Fascell. who will be discussing
the presidential election and foreign
policy.
Both events will be held in the
Social Hall of the South Dade Jewish
Community Center, 12401 S.W.
102nd Avenue. Admission is free.
Sharon Azoulay is chairman of the
Community Education Series.
Deb by Grodnick is South Dade vice
chairman for Community Education.
For more information, please call
the Federation's South Dade Branch
office at 251-9334.
New director and
staffer at
S. Dade office
Jerry Neimand, former assistant
director of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's South Dade Branch,
has been named director of the South
Dade Branch and Judy Eitelberg has
been hired as its new campaign
associate.
Neimand's appointment, which
was made in August, follows the
resignation of Director Michael
Meyer, who accepted the executive
director position at the Orlando
Jewish Federation. Prior to joining
the staff of the Miami Federation in
1981, Neimand was director of the
Berkshire Federation of Pittsfield.
Massachusetts and the Greater
Portsmouth Federation in Virginia.
Neimand served as a campaign asso-
ciate on the Miami Federation staff
before he became assistant director
?qoo Soulh Uade Branch in June.
1983.
Originally from New Jersey
Eitelberg is the former assistant
director of the Women's Division of
the South Broward Jewish Federa-
tion and worked with the Hillel
btudent Centers at Florida Interna-
tional University and Miami Dade
Community College. She holds a
degree in social work from Ohio
btate University and worked for the
Uade County Department of Human
Kesources for ten years.
"I'm very excited about working
with the South Dade Jewish com
munity, she said. "With my expe-
rience in community education and
leadership development activities I
hope to join forces with those
working to organize this young and
dynamic Jewish community."
JCC celebrates
Jewish Book Month
The 59th Annual Jewish Book
Month, sponsored bv the Jewish
Welfare Board UWBi Jewish Book
Council begins in mid-November and
runs through December. The yearly
celebration is traditionally a lime
when Jewish Community Centers,
schools, synagogues, libraries and
Jewish organizations throughout the
country stage special programs to
focus attention on the latest books of
Jewish interest.
Locally, the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida I JCC I will
celebrate National Jewish Book
Month with a variety of exciting and
entertaining programs with guest
speakers and book sales scheduled at
the JCC s three centers in Dade
county.
The South Dade JCC. 12401 S.W.
102nd Avenue, will hold their Book
Fair from November 14-19, Opening
Day at the Michael-Ann Russell
JCC. 18900 N.E. 25th Avenue, will
be mid-November.
At the Miami Beach JCC, 4221
Pine Tree Drive, they have scheduled
a one-day Book Fair. December 9th.
On Wednesday. November 14 at 8
p.m.. South Dade JCC will begin its
Book Fair with opening speaker,
John Bier man. author of the best
seller. "Righteous Gentile: The
Story of Raoul Wallenberg," a great
hero who saved more than 30,000
Hungarian Jews from the Nazis and
then was captured by the Soviet
army and imprisoned: and
"Odyssey," recently published in
October 1984, the unknown story of
500 European Jews who escaped in
1940 and their survival. Admission
for members is $3.00 and $4.00 for
non-members.
On November 15, Book Fair con-
tinues with a morning of en-
tertainment for children featuring a
puppet show and a special Oneg
Shabbat for children.
On Sunday, November 18,
starting at 12 noon there is more
celebration in South Dade with
Festival Day. Entertainment, food,
rides, games, books, American
Author.John Merman will appear a I
a JCC Book Month event.
*
Balalaika Co. courtesy of PACE, and
the Beth Americans 80-member
children's choir from Temple Beth
Am will perform.
Monday. November 19 at 11:30
a.m., the fair ends with a Women's
Day Luncheon featuring Ruth
Gruber. author of "Raquela A
Woman of Israel" and "Haven
The Unknown Story of 1,000 World
War II Refugees." Ruth Gruber is
the only foreign correspondent to
cover the historic voyage of the ship
EXODUS. The subsequent movie
and book were based on her novel.
Tickets are $25 for patrons and $18
for sponsors and includes a buffet
luncheon. For more information call
Marsha Botkin, 251-1394.
On December 9, the Miami Beach
JCC. 4221 Pine Tree Drive, welcomes
readers and browsers to its Book
Fair and Sale from 10 a.m.-4 pm. In
addition to a large selection of
literature, toys, games, collectables
and Chanukah gifts on sale, the day
will end with a family barbeque JCC
style. For more information call
Jerry Libbin, 534-3206.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC.
18900 N.E. 25th Avenue, will hold
their Jewish Book Fair mid-
November. Visiting authors will
discuss their latest works along with
a variety of other programs
scheduled to highlight this week long
event in North Dade. For more
information call Myrna Lohman at
932-4200.
Federations p&b Committee
ready for banner year
ffi^ftJIiuSX "'"i 5"^' %"<- Committee. Front 7Z,
respective chair and vk"chair of F^Lf second term the
Committee. f Federation s Planning and Budget
identTffe8PItheni"jfwTsh ^SS^SSff^S^V wit,h its Committees.
erviceton^ttoin^^kSnStne,rf,, fouta*8 Programs and
designs delivery systemsi to 1 recommendations to SBor^Vfn P?gramS and servi* It makes
and organizations shoufri 1 f directors concerning which agencies
Api^FlsrJl^^F^";"?*^"- torn the Combined Jewish
ergency t und and the amount of these allocations.
--------------------._____________________ Continued on Page 15


Federation, October, 1984
page 11
VI
wrv/Agencies
et officials bent on
[roving Jewish culture
Elderly fall prey to cults
litter truth is that while the
Immunity remains virtually
gates are forcibly closing
Jewry. The Jews in the
je locked in a desperate
Ffor survival and we must
iilly and quickly if we are to
brothers and sisters from
enocide."
the assessment of Hinda
chairman of the South
Conference on Soviet Jewry
, a committee of the Greater
Jewish Federation's Com-
telations Committee. Cantor
Soviet Jewish emigration
I twenty year low. with only
i allowed to leave the Soviet
the first eight months of
as the Soviet government
.its state-sponsored anti-
and stepped up its attacks
Jewish cultural activists
to be repatriated to Israel
Ittii with their families.
ing to Cantor. The arrests
lebrew teachers during the
months are a clear in-
that Soviet authorities have
their campaign against
jlture and education.'- She
[following incidents.
landr Kholmiansky, of
, was arrested on July 25 and
for trial in September on
j>f "mailbox tampering" and
more serious charges
from house searches made
|nt to his arrest. In late
KGB agents searched the
it Aleksandr shares with his
, and allegedly "found" a
id undeveloped film of two
^ne with a Jewish subject.
isky is being held in a
prison.
nprecedented move, Yacov
ky. of Leningrad, was
nd ordered, without a trial,
for two months of "correc-
bor," after refusing to
he KGB with information
his employment,
tember 4, Yuli Edelshtein,
w. was arrested and his
bsequently was searched.
cuts confiscated items left
visitors, as well as a tin of
and a "box of stones."
^fc no charges were made,
I authorities claimed they
K mi in the stones and ac-
reigners of coming and cor-
ewish youth with medieval
ystical drug rituals."
is being held in a Moscow
Levin, of Odessa, was
August 12, on unspecified
[five days before he was to
bed. His fiancee, Yehudit
ischy, has petitioned the
[authorities on his behalf,
that "the KGB has carried
threat to imprison Yacov
of his refusal to testify
veil-known Refusenik Yakov
July.
[Nepomnischy, the rather of
I Levin's fiancee, Yehudit,
to Moscow in mid-
er of this year and gave an
[to two travelers from the
who were in the USSR.
ilph P. Kingsley, of Temple
ft North Dade, and Rabbi
[Ballon, of Temple Emanu-El
luderdale, were able to bring
rk's message from the Soviet
[It has been translated from
ian to the English language
below as vivid proof of
ttrrendous conditions with
fur Soviet brethren are forced
ichday.
out;
to]
is Mark Nepomnischy from
\appealing on behalf of Yacov
appeal to the government of
Israel to help him because Yacov
Levin considers himself to be a
citizen of Israel and he is entitled to
?et help from the government of
srael. Help all Jews in Russia who
want to get out of here. The ones who
want to stay should be able to study
their culture and their language.
"I appeal to all Jews of the world
to institute a day in defense of Soviet
Jewry. Every Jew in the world will
do something for Soviet Jews. Some
will pray, some will demonstrate, but
all will do whatever they can to help
us. If I am arrested because I signed
the same letter as did Yacov Levin, I
also think I am entitled to the same
help from the government of Israel.
"I want the Russians to reconsider
all of the old cases and there are a lot
of them. You should understand here
in the Soviet Union we cannot
protest anything about our situation
in newspapers, radio, or in demon-
strations. It should be demanded
from the Soviet government to get
the answers to our letters about
repatriation. We wrote this letter,
but it is dangerous to us because we
can be arrested at any time. This is
why we are appealing to the Jews of
the world to help us.
"About Yacov Levin, he was
under constant surveillance for three
and a half years. Now they are in-
criminating him for anti-Soviet acti-
vity. This is absurd His only ac-
tivity is to be a Jew. I appeal to
former prisoners of Zion who are
fortunate enough to be in Israel and
relatives of present prisoners of Zion
to tell the world the real situation
that people are serving prison terms
just for their desire to be Jews. All of
these trials have to be stopped.
"My family has been refused for
five years, during which we suffered
a lot. There were three searches in
my apartment. We were called to
KGB several times and told to stop
studying Hebrew, celebrating
Jewish holidays and shabbat.
Colonel Krasnov, the head of the
Jewish Affairs Department of the
KGB, threatened me to be in-
troduced to Anatoly Shcharansky
who is a known prisoner of Zion
imprisoned for many years. He
means he was going to send me to
the same place, and many similar
threats.
"Yet what Yacov Levin was told
was beyond what we were told
before. When they learned that
Yacov Levin wants to marry my
daughter, he was told he would not
marry her but he would be put in a
cell with homosexuals and criminals
and she would be raped in front of his
eyes. It is a big risk for me, but
nothing could be worse. My
daughter is not allowed to emigrate,
not allowed to get married. I could
have kept quiet, but what will I
achieve? Only the death of my
family.
"I beg you to help my daughter to
leave, get married, and live a normal
life."
Hinda Cantor urges the entire
Greater Miami Jewish Community
to speak out on behalf of Soviet
Jewry. "Time is running out. Each
day the situation for Soviet Jews
worsens. We cannot afford to be
silent. We must make our voices
heard by seizing every opportunity
to express our outrage to Soviet
officials at the continued intimida-
tion, harassment and imprisonment
of Soviet Jews."
For further information on the
frograms and activities of the South
lorida Conference on Soviet Jewry,
call 576-4000.
Cults and radical missionary
groups present a serious threat to
the individual, the family and the
community. Extensive media
coverage of the cult phenomenon has
resulted in increased public aware-
ness of the dangers posed by these
destructive groups. Many people
now know that the typical cult
recruit is a white middle class young
person between 15 and 30 years of
age, bright, lonely, searching. A
statistic not as widely known is that
the elderly are also extremely
vulnerable to the deceptive practices
of cults and are being targeted in
increasing numbers.
Experts on the cult problem in-
dicate that the elderly are falling
prey to the cults' promises of
companionship, free meals and care-
taking assistance. However, once
recruited, the elderly often find their
actual experiences include being
coerced into giving away property,
cash and life sustaining social
security checks.
The Committee on Cults and Mis-
sionaries, an arm of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
munity Relations Committee, was
formed to counter the influences of
these deceptive groups in South
Florida. The Committee offers
assistance to: individuals who are in
or have left a cult; family and friends
of those affected by cult or mis-
sionary group activities; and con-
cerned parents, groups and
organizations who want to know
more about cults and missionaries.
The Jewish Exponent reported in
its July 6, 1984 issue that in Phila-
delphia's Overbrook Park area,
members of a well known group are
volunteering to work without pay in
the yards of elderly residents in order
to gain access to them for conversion
purposes. Dr. Phillip Abramowitz,
Director of the New York Com-
munity Relations Council's Task
Force on Missionaries and Cults,
reports that in Flushing, New York,
cult members are offering to clean
the homes of elderly people for no
charge. Once befriended, the elderly
are highly susceptible to the sophis-
ticated indoctrination techniques
employed by this group. Many
instances of cult members preying on
the elderly in hospitals, and in
nursing and retirements homes are
also being reported.
In Miami, similar events have
been occuring. One major cult group
is known to have established a
i mission on Miami Beach where there
! is a large elderly population. Another
cult active in South Florida is ser-
' ving free meals to the elderly on
Miami Beach.
Community awareness is the first
line of defense against the influence
of destructive cults. The elderly in
particular must be cognizant of their
vulnerability to these groups'
sophisticated recruiting efforts.
There are several protective steps
that can be taken: exercise caution
: with strangers who are excessively
! or inappropriately friendly: do not
accept invitations to meetings,
workshops or dinners that have
, unclear purposes; know the name of
the sponsoring group, its beliefs and
affiliations and exactly what will
happen at the event; question
groups and individuals that insist
that its members associate only with
other group members; and avoid
groups that apply pressure to donate
large sums of money, sign over
income checks or give the group
power of attorney.
The Committee on Cults and
Missionaries will provide further
information to help people who are
themselves or know someone who is
threatened or affected by cult or mis-
sionary group activity. Please call
Mindv Hersh at 576-4000. ext. 358.
Hillel update
More than 60 college student
leaders from 15 South Florida
campuses converged on the
Collonnades Beach Hotel in Palm
Beach Shores recently for a weekend
of leadership training experiences
sponsored by Hillel Foundations of
Florida. The fourth Annual Leader-
ship Development Weekend was ori-
ginally funded by a special grant
received from the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
The activities, which occupied the
three day program included Jewish
experiential programs, leadership
skill sessions, and opportunities to
practice the planning and develop-
ment of actual campus events. The
final step in the process had students
from each campus assembling to
plan activities for their own student
groups.
Providing leadership for this
weekend program were Richard K.
Goldstein of the Florida Area Office,
Rabbi Mark Kram and Lynn
Grossman from the University of
Miami unit, Lyn Light Geller and
Laurie Naturman from the South
Dade unit, Pam Silton from the
North Dade unit and Nancy Tobin
and Jenifer Fischer from the
Broward-Palm Beach Hillel unit.
Also participating in the program
were Madeline Feldman from the
Washington office of B'nai B'rith
Hillel Foundations and Debbie
Feldman, Southern Region Coor-
dinator for the University Service
Department of the American Zionist
Youth Foundation.
A new full time program for
Jewish college students in North
Dade was begun this semester by
Hillel Jewish Student Centers of
Greater Miami, according to its
president, William F. Saulson.
Funding for the program was
provided through a supplementary
grant of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
The new North Dade Hillel unit
will serve students at Florida
International University's north
campus, Miami Dade Community
College North, Barry University
and Southeastern College of Osteo-
pathic Medicine.'
To coordinate this program, Hillel
has employed Pam Silton who has
come to Miami after serving on the
staff of the Jewish Federation of
Greater Orlando. Pam is a trained
social worker who has also worked in
the Jewish community center field
and in Israel.
Anyone interested in the social,
cultural, educational, religious, and
social service activities of Hillel in
North Dade may contact Pam Silton
by calling the Hillel Area Office. 661-
8649.


Page 12
Federation, October, 1984
Foundation gifts offer
income options
Pooled Income Fund
Did you know that you can receive
income from a charitable contri-
bution? Jewish Federation's Pooled
Income Fund allows you to do just
that and to take a current deduc-
tion from your federal income taxes
at the same time. If you transfer ap-
preciated securities, you also save by
avoiding capital gains taxes.
Here's How the Fund Works
1. You make a gift of cash, stocks,
bonds or other property to the
Foundation which becomes a part of
the assets of the fund.
2. Citibank N.A., as trustee of the
fund, invests and manages the assets
contributed to the fund.
3. On a quarterly basis, the income
from the fund is distributed to the
beneficiaries designated by the donor
in proportion to the gift invested.
4. Upon termination of the life
income interest, the principal of your
gift is transferred to the Jewish
Community Trust Fund of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation to
help meet community needs.
A Charitable Mutual Fund
The Pooled Income Fund can be
thought of as a charitable mutual
fund. Individual donors from more
than twenty Federations across the
country are now participating,
forming a fund whose market value
as of December. 1983, was $2.23
million. Yield to beneficiaries, which
varies with the yearly reevaluation of
the portfolio, is currently approx-
imately 10 percent.
Consider the following benefits of
participating in the fund. First, you
create a lifetime income for yourself
and or others) while providing a
lasting gift to the community. By
".ransferring low yielding securities
you may actually increase your
income. Second, you receive an
immediate federal income tax
deduction for the value of the
remainder interest that the Founda-
tion will receive in the future. The
amount varies with the age of the
income beneficiaries. Third, you pay
no capital gains tax on the transfer
of appreciated property. And finally,
you are free from worry about
distributions of income (as they are
made automatically by the trustee)
or reinvesting matured Certificates
of Deposit.
For Example
Sam Cohen, aged 65, has a Certi-
ficate of Deposit of $10,000 which
will mature shortly. He turns over
the $10,000 to the Jewish Federation
Pooled Income Fund, retaining the
life income interest for himself.
Assuming that he is the sole bene-
ficiary, he would receive a quarterly
income of $250 for the rest of his life
and a current income tax deduction
of $2260.
Other Life Income Producing Plans
Charitable remainder annuity
trusts and unitrusts are other
vehicles for creating life income for
yourself, your spouse or others while
at the same time providing for the
continuing needs of our community.
The checklist of Charitable
Giving Benefits summarizes the
advantages to donors of the various
types of gifts that provide a legacy
to the Jewish community.
The Foundation offers personal-
ized computer models indicating the
specific tax and income advantages
of the pooled income fund and other
life income plans. A confidential
individual analysis based on in-
formation about your age and in-
come needs is available at your
request.
Interested in More Information?
' off the Foundation office at R7G-4OO0 or return the coupon below:
TEAR OFF AND RETURN
FoumluHim nf.lcnlsh I'hllanthropUs, 4&H) Blscayae lloulevard, .//ami. // :i:ii:i7
I wmild like nii'ii. inluniuitUnt .;/
Jewish Federation s Pooled Income Fund
Other Foundation Life Income Plans
A personal Philanthropic Fund
A bequest to the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Restricted Funds Memorial Funds
IcnfotcntiulcnsultuUimulnmttin ^v,ft tux untl income
> -I fink In r,. !\ in, ,-
_
ADDRESS
"ElEPHONE
*%
VH
i
/
Sondra Reiff Iriffht) with State Senator Given Margolis, a featured speak-
er at Foundation's recent women's seminar.
A Checklist of Charitable Giving Benefits
POOLED
INCOME ANNUITY LEAD OUTRIGHT
FUND TRUST UNITRUST TRUST GIFT
Income Tax
Deduction
No Tax on Gain
When Gift Made
Increase Income
By Making Gift
No-Cost or Low-
Cost Management
Provide for
Spouse, Heirs
Mainly
Heirs
Suitable for
Smaller Gifts
Add to from
Time to Time
Less
Deduction
Tax Exempt
Payments
Maybe
Maybe
Fixed
Payments
Inflation
Hedge
2nd Annual women's
financial seminar
a smashing success
Investing in real estate, develop-
ing a personal financial plan and ele-
ments of estate planning were topics
discussed at the Foundations recent
seminar. A Women and Her Money.
II. Co-chairwomen Fllie (Ian/, and
Judy Applestein noted that response
to the day from the 75 women who
attended was very positive and
indicates a desire for more in-
formation on wills, trusts and in-
vestments.
State Senator and successful
businesswoman Gwen Margolis
acknowledged that while the real
estate market in I Jade Count v is
depressed, there are still oppor-
tunities for upgrading on residential
property. When considering an
investment in income property, one
must carefully evaluate the return on
the equity invested and the need tor
management ol the property.
Margolis cautioned.
In addressing the question 'How
much will be enough. Judy
Applestein. Certified Financial
Consultant, emphasized the need for
looking at one's total financial
picture To help evaluate one's
current and future needs in the light
of changing tax laws and infla-
, tionary economic expectations,
choose qualified professional ad-
visors with whom you have personal
rapport, she advised. Other issues
discussed were antenuptial
agreements, the advantages and dis-
advantages oi jointly held property
and various types ot investments.
Norman Lipoff, noted tax attorney
and immediate past president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
discussed the tax advantages ol a
variety ot trusts that can be used in
creating one's persona] estate plan.
Mr Lipoff discussed the Qualified
terminable Income Property
IQTIP) Trust and others such as the
charitable remainder trusts and the
pooled income fund that can be used
to provide lifetime income and sub-
stantial tax deductions. decent
changes in the actuarial tables have
increased the tax benefits to women
it certain types oi trusts
.
. ana Judith Applestein, seminar speaker and co-chairwoman.
i-
'*;
v uiiinueci on Page 15


Federation, October, 1984
page 13
i
housing is like one big family
w_
i1* f' _j38Bir^^*,'v^k.
r *-htc rm t
>** 2 r ** S
^^
one big family," says Clare dePicciotto of the senior citizens and
families living together in a JDC-supported housing project.
By DAVID HOLZEL
ISRAEL "Here, sit
re a drink," Clare dePic-
il, said happily. "Then we'll
lide. You'll like visiting here,
as much as I like living
She .raised her eyebrows,
the wrinkles around her
I-poured a Coke from her
rator for herself and her guest
can to tell her -story. Some of
ibeut her early years in parj8>
with her husband in Egypt
arrival inxjsrael in 1967
i-i-therSuez jjfcu\ More was
wer-lifein
MBOlefth
and how his
ivjft
ns. and
.ouC
in
bath*.
cy sum-
way in-.
ies with
ts above. A
nurse is always on call and
fully-equipped clinic on the
There is also a recreational
led the Club Room Mrs.
tto won Id rather -talk about
? Room.
she says proudly, en-
Club Room. "It's so clean
Just like the apartments,
nice tables and comfortable
>me of my friends play the
lere. We watch television
You can cook here, or wait
leone while your laundry is
ichine next door."
&s, social activities and
lipment for the facility are
ShmL the Association for
and Development of
0 the Aged, thanks in part
>re than $2 million allocated
by the Joint Distribution
lpports $11.3 million worth
is in Israel, much of it
1 help the aged, chronically
tally and physically handi-
and others who are dis-
ced. JDC has a $46.5 million
[for its work in over 30
L virtually all of it provided
rican Jews through UJA-
ty campaigns.
her past two
ed Housing
iiatis in*Gilo, a
"".I" am happy
1ikp being with
I, who have also
'-and know what
'bjo. Bull also
/ounger families
ottpssjj^nf 60 senior"
s devejhprnent, which
main tain.,yEheir inde-
with special.'^services and
'"on their income.
und floor
Mrs. dePicciotto wasn't interested
in general statements. "If you want
to know what it is like here, it is
good," she interrupted "We are one
big family. Some of us make things
(handicrafts) and give them to the
children. We go to their school plays
and they like hearing us clap tor
them. -We see them later and tell
-them- how .goodthey are and_ they
smikvfJomec-f usbaby-sft
"It Ws good_%that there is a place
'^isF()rpeo^J|^kB4le., she said.
> still do things tor myself, but
it "is irnpfctantto haveothers
I."She parsed. "We nave to
.&"'$! "harder year
like.this' for
"I:
Ik
Miami gets new
aliyah shaliach
If you ask Uri Cohen, the new
director of the Israel Aliyah Center
in Miami, to trace the development
of the aliyah movement, he'll
probably smile and tell you that
Abraham started it all a few
thousand years ago.
Biblical precedents aside, Cohen, a
native Israeli who comes from Jeru-
salem, is anxious to do all he can to
encourage and assist Florida Jews to
emigrate to Israel. The Aliyah
Center, which is supported by the
World Zionist Organization, offers
information and assistance for short
or long-term programs in Israel, as
well as resettlement for those who
wish to make a new life for them-
selves in the Jewish State.
"After meeting Jews from all over
the world, I really believe it's our
place it's where we can really live
as" Jews in our homeland," said
Cohen, who recently moved to Miami
with wife, Eti, and their two
children, H ilia and Ziv. "I hope I can
pass on this feeling."
After being educated at the Civil
Servant Commission,' I a special
'school of civil service which qualifies
the highest officials in the Israeli
government, .Cohen served as the
shaliach (emissary) in -Santiago,
Chile from 1970-74 and Was in charge
of the Betar,Youth.Movement for all
of South America Upon his, return to
Israel, he became -bead of the Betar
Movement from 1975-7'/ apd served
fiMJpgtjML
tor^Ethappian Jfews to adjust
Ccan't plan too far'yjn d-s
_ JJomiafctftSaid,." We don't. ^
i#Jtio w many Ethiopian Jews are
'coming, or when; or their state of ,
' health. And' there are constant.'
surprises." .!*-"y- "V
''The.onexertainty,"ne said, is that
the challenge is formidable to help ,
these' Jews, who are black and have
been" recognized by -Israel's chief
. rabbis as Jewish, to adjust to a
complex modern world after life in a
primitive society.
Dominitz said these Jews must
not only learn Hebrew, marketable
skills and how to negotiate bureau-
cracies, but also adjust to the shock
of a new culture that includes air-
planes, automobiles and indoor
plumbing.
His department has been sur-
prised, he noted, by so many of these
immigrants being children unac-
companied by parents.
Five absorption centers have been
set aside for these youngsters, to
meet their special needs and provide
more intensive education.
Many teenagers, he notes, have
moved along to residences of Youth
Aliyah, which, like the immigration
and absorption department, is
funded mainly through contributions
by American Jews to UJA com-
munity Federation campaigns.
sto three
aSeputy
Council for
Informal E eaiiiust&s
Mm
e* ^Hot
"*' fflO!
_ and
Beech'
icus;.the.
Advisory
and
Uri Cohen
mittee for Project Renewal, and the
President's Advisory Council on
Social Affairs and Absorption
Matters.
In 1977, Cohen served as director
of the Social Integration Department
of the Immigrant Absorption
Ministry and than' served as the
minister's regional director in charge
of Jerusalem and Che South, fie has ^
.also been actively involved in the"
struggle for Soviet Jews and the ir
absorption, helping to establish the
system of social integration for new
own '(immigrants) .through com-
munity centers all around Israel.
The new director, who will be
serving a two-year tour of duty, aaid
he-has-met manv South Florid ians
.who have made aliyah, and they are
now forming a social organization.
He" also pointed out that-there are
^several resources area residents can.:
Jake advantage fjf to learn about;
"emigrating to Israel, the
Councfl of SoutfcV Florida,
"^"chugf*" {groups
8 of pec
-to make ahyahlTasni
Center:
*
i
-.-**
*
n
*&
; tog -^ .
Iram's mii^^fet^l"v'
_ Jfe a succtfcTauringjtheofi- ,**- \
intl slow dowps ire the *an & '
pOxe pix^am'dffyorictand.the jobs wfere allin Jthe VV 7*
?*-: y # .j^jj- -, ; ..... '- fSJgfe..'. ....1 ,V randCondomumrms ,tf,yLfr*. '*** .#6peKnt *^*7a
/ottoM **> .* r-.-%.;; --
-J:'"'i.
'towIj*1*6
was thtft i
I season;,
, mertinu! nofin' 'fl

Telephone Sales ~- 4 percent
Maintenance >+ *' '. -S ', A percent
Though the "Show Birds" were gone,^the Miami ajid MiamiSBaach
hotels hired switchboard operators, house officers, van drivers and at "least
one social activities director. The sales were down in the stores, but notall
that far down in sporting goods stores which hired a number of our people.
Medical offices always doing business in this area hired secretaries,
home health aides and a podiatrist's assistant.
While it is conventionally thought that the upper years are a time for
part-time employment, the seniors in fact sought full-time jobs by two to
one. They needed and wanted money. They also wanted jobs close to then-
homes or at least close to their bus lines. And, by in large, they wanted
daytime work.
The POW project consists of: one project director who also super-
vises an employment service for the handicapped; a part-time bookkeeper;
and a full time job-counselor / developer. Fortunately, every department
of JVS became actively involved in tnis program. The Job Developers at
the Main and South Dade Branches provided client referral and job leads.
The rehabilitation workshop staff donated valuable time to interview non-
English speaking participants. And the JVS Nutritional Service on Miami
Beach did everything possible to make interviewing at their facility a
regular occurrence.
What was not a surprise was that the older workers were very good at
holding on to their jobs once they secured them. The continued permanent
hire rate was very high. Whether the program will continue to be funded
by the State of Florida through the administration of the South Florida
Employment and Training Consortium is not certain. The administration,
however, is hopeful based on the excellent success rate thus far. It looks
forward to continuing the fine quality service delivery of the program to
both the employers and the elderly.
The Jewish Vocational Service is a beneficiary of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
r


farm I A U TL
page 14
i^ie u.ejv jsji rionniun / h i
Federation, October, 1984
Federation Cable TV
Molly Goldberg
returns!
MOLLY'S BACK! Jewish
Federation Cable Television has
launched its Fall season, and the
Molly Goldberg Program has helped
stimulate an unprecedented viewer
response. According to JFTV
Director of Broadcast Operations
Suzanne Lasky, her office has been
deluged with calls requesting more
information about the Molly
Goldberg Program and other JFTV
shows.
"JFTV is emerging from its
developmental phase and we now
hope to offer quality shows for all
cable viewers in this community. The
Molly Goldberg Program is just one
example of the service JFTV is
offering Greater Miami.'' noted
Lasky.
JFTV began airing the Molly
Goldberg Program in early Sep-
tember. The show, originally
broadcast in the early 1950s, stars
Gertrude Berg as Molly, the
matronly mother whose wit and
wisdom always seemed to prevail
during Goldberg family crises. JFTV
will air 39 episodes of the show in the
upcoming months.
Some of the episodes of "Molly"
that should delight all JFTV viewers
include:
DREAMS Molly's neighbor,
Mrs. Van Ness. starts to practice
psychology on the local neighbors
including Molly who becomes an
immediate "women's liberation''
advocate, with hilarious results.
ENGAGEMENT Sammy
becomes engaged to his old girlfriend
Dora. However, all is not well as
Molly and Dora's mother are upset
because Sammy doesn't believe in
getting Dora an engagement ring.
Lasky is anxious to hear from
JFTV viewers about their reactions
to the Molly Goldberg Program and
any other JFTV shows. She
welcomes calls or letters, so to
contact JFTV write to Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Cable
Television. 4200 Biscayne Blvd.,
Miami, 33137 or call 576-4000.
JFTV

GREATER MIAMI
JEWISH FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION. INC.
ww II vet remembers the Holocaust
Of the six million Jews who perished at the hands of the Nazis during
the Holocaust tewer than 4.000 were executed at a small concentration
camp in Ohrdruf. a town near Colonge. For Arthur Marshall, his memories
of Ohrdruf remain as an affirmation of the cruelties that mankind is
capable of perpetrating on his fellow man.
On thi^ month s JFTV show. "We Remember." Marshall recounts his
role as a liberator of the Ohrdruf camp during the final days of World War
II. Serving under General Patton. Marshall's unit entered Ohrdruf on
April ti. 1945. i' German soldiers stationed in the camp executed ap-
proximately 75 prisoners as the American troops smashed through the
gates of the encampment. Once the camp was secured by the American
forces, the job oi sorting out the carnage, arranging for the burial of the
dead, and caring for the emaciated survivors was left to the Americans
under Marshall's command.
The impact ot this "We Remember" show is that Marshall, now a
Miami Shores resident, has remained silent and not revealed his ex-
periences for nearly forty years. In this extraordinary interview with
JFTV s Suzanne Lasky. for the tirst time. Marshall accounts for what he
saw, how he reacted and what actions he took that fateful day at Ohrdruf.
Marshall had maintained a wall of silence, partly due to the advice of
an army colleague, but primarily because he claims he didn't know where
to go. or with whom to speak about the events he witnessed at Ohrdruf.
Marshall explains, toward the end of the interview, that he has chosen to
talk now. owing in part to his advancing years, and in the hopes that his
revelations will prevent such events from ever occuring again.
Marshall, in recounting his ordeal, paints a picture of strong human
emotions. His feelings about Ohrdruf. even today, include reactions of
shock, anger and disbelief. He supplements his oral testimony with
several photographs taken at Ohrdruf. visual evidence of the horrors he
and others confronted in the camp. His photographs are now incorporated
into the Holocaust Memorial at Yad Vashem.
Marshall will leave each "We Remember" viewer with the feeling that
his experiences are simply a microcosm of events that humans must
endure all too often. He has spoken because he feels that the average
person, living in comfort and general well-being, doesn't comprehend the
stark reality of events that occured just a generation ago.
This episode of "We Remember" traces the impact that Holocaust
events played in the life of one man, but the lessons he learned will provide
a deeper understanding of the human tragedy for each and every viewer.
Consult the JFTV program schedule on this page for dates and times of
"We Remember."
'Hello Jerusalem'
premieres
"Hello Jerusalem," Israel's
Weekly Television Magazine, can
now be seen twice weekly on JFTV.
Produced by Kastel Communica-
tions Ltd., the Israeli equivalent of
"20^20" features segments on Israeli
sports, fashion, the sciences, art.,
archaeology, 'Mediterranean-style'
cuisine, animated 'funnies,' and
tourist attractions in Israel.
"Hello Jerusalem" shows the
Israel behind the headlines through
the day-to-day life of her people and
her places. The show also presents
topics of worldwide interest through
special features and interviews with
prominent Israeli citizens. JFTV
joins other cable television networks
in presenting "Hello Jerusalem" to
more than nine million households in
the United States.
The Kastel Communications
group has at its disposal a wealth of
directors, scriptwriters and other
seasoned media professionals who
are constantlv coming up with new
ideas for the programs. "Hello
Jerusalem" features many inter-
esting vignettes that make the
program fast-paced, informative and
above all. entertaining.
A sampling of "Hello Jerusalem"
segments includes: "Miami Beach
East." a visit to the sunny seaside
resort of Netanya. which has at-
tracted American senior citizens and
retirees. These American couples,
who relocated in Netanya, relate
their special experiences.
Check the program guide on this
page for dates and times of "Hello
Jerusalem." Once you tune in to this
innovative program, you won't want
to miss a single episode.
watch JFTV on:
Storer (North Dadel Channel P-29
Storer (South Dadel
Harte-Hanks
(Formerly Ultra-Corn)
Miami Cablevision
Americable
Dynamic
Channel 15
Channel 2
Channel 11
Channel 36
Channel 43
-CLIPANDSAVE
Programming Schedule
Greater Miami Jewish Federation cable Television inc.
NOVEMBER 1984*
5-5:30 p.m.
5:30-6 p.m.
6-6:30 p.m.
6:30-7 p.m.
Monday
Eenies
Kitchen
Check up/
Mt. Sinai
we
Remember
Tuesday
FOCUS
Sunrise,
Sunset
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
7-7:30 p.m.
7:30-8 p.m.
Small
voice
or
viewpoint
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Pillow
Talk
JCC:A
Special
Place
Film
Special
(half hour)
Film
Special
(half hour)
Wednesday
Eenies
Kitchen
Hello
Jerusalem
Hello
Jerusalem
Thursday
Check up
Mt. Sinai
Pillow
Talk
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Encounter
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Pillow
Talk
Friday
Pillow
Talk
Focus
Encounter
Eenies
Kitchen
vision
Israel
or
Israeli
Diary
People
You Should
Know
SiiWj^tectijinge
Sunrise,
Sunset
Saturday
People
you Should
Know
Still
Small
voice
or
Viewpoint
Vision
Israel
or
Israeli
Diary
Sunday
JCC: A
Special
Place
Eenies
Kitchen
Pillow
Talk
Hello
Jerusalem
Hello
Jerusalem
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Pillow
Talk
Film
Special
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Checkup/
Mt. Slnal
we
Remember
CUP AND SAVE -
b_L


Federation, October, 1984
page 15
I*
N
Av
lendar
| OCTOBER 28
,ii Beach JCC Singles Group will present
and Free," a lecture on nutrition and
[1:30 a.m. at the Miami Beach JCC, 4221
)rive. A bagel brunch will follow the dis-
. cost is $3.50 for members and $5.00 for
s. For more information, please call
4-3206.
I OCTOBER 28
Idelssohn String Quartet will perform at
[as part of Temple Beth Am a 1984-86
Lries. For more information, pleaae call
\, OCTOBER 30
doI students and their parents are invited
Tollege Night, an opportunity to meet
. counselors and professors to aid in the
'college courses, financial aid, selecting a
[Jewish activities on the college campus.
by the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Center and co-sponsored by the Jewish
[Service, the event begins at 7:30 p.m. at
.1-Ann Russell JCC. 18900 NE 25th
here is no fee. For more information.
Mark Sykes at 932-4200.
[ OCTOBER 30
> art appreciation lecture, given by
:her, will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the
Russell Jewish Community Center,
E5th Avenue. The growth and develop-
vish manuscripts, bibles, ketubbot, and
be discussed. Individual lectures are $4
$5 for non-members. For more in-
ill the Cultural Art Department of the
4200.
)AY, OCTOBER 31
Banne O'Laughlin. president of Barry
Jamiss Sebert, director of the Miami
Bport Agency; and Madeleine Blais, staff
9pic Magazine will be featured speakers
\en in Power" symposium, sponsored by
Hal Council of Jewish Women-Miami
lay from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at
Sholom on Miami Beach. The program
Be community and will be an NCJW paid-
it. Admission for guests is $7.00, which
I box lunch. For more information and
B. please call 576-4747.
^Y. NOVEMBER 3
Norman Braman will host a Young
and Professional Wine and Cheese
Ion behalf of the Greater Miami Jewish
\s 1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Fund Campaign, at 8:00 p.m. Akiva
B.eli military expert, will be the guest
^ninimum gift of $1000 to the 1985 CJA-
tured. For more information, please call
Bt 576-4000.
NOVEMBER 4
Dade Hebrew Academy will hold its
ker at 6:00 p.m. at the Caluaa Country
I call 358-5550.
I NOVEMBER 6
rimak will review Paul Cowen's "A
|jewish Identity" at the Forte Forum
ps at 1:00 p.m. in the Forte Towers
1200 West Avenue, Miami Beach. For
oat ion, please call Elsie Rubin at 673-
rAY, NOVEMBER 7
Wednesday, formerly Women's
I the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
^vision annual community education
(held at the Fontainebleau-Hilton today
i. to 2:00 p.m. Judith Viorst, author of
Jit & The Meaning of Life, Etc.;" Robert
I and Holocaust survivor; and Deborah
Hsistant professor of Jewish Studies at
- He the guest speakers. The cost is $35 per
Hch includes a kosher lunch. For more
H please call the Women's Division at
. NOVEMBER 8
at i
ths
ISA1
Bter Miami Jewish Federation's
Knner, the annual gala event open to
of a mininmim of $10,000 to the 1986
Hewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
rill be held this evening at the Fon
lilton. Comedian David Brenner will be
kuest. Cocktails begin at 7:00 p.m.,
180 p.m. For more information, pleaae call
at 576-4000.
8AT m. NOVEMBER 10
Tj Hrael of Greater Miami and the Miami
{* mh Community Center present Trivia
ening of light-hearted, mind stretching
t, 7:30 p.m at Temple Israel, 137 NE
The cost is $60 per couple, which in-
BW deU dinner and dessert buffet. CaU
Reservations.
TU* IAT.NOVEMBER1S
HiJJ H*ch Mayor Malcolm Fromberg will
2"" ^Development of South Pointe" at the
~") lecture series at 1.00 p.m. in the Forte
i" korium, 1200 West Avenue, Miami
ore information, please call Elsie Rubin
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Visit Miami's finest art and cultural center, view
"Silk Roads," an exhibit of Chinese art, and then
tour the new Historical Museum on an Art Safari
begins at 9:30 a.m. and concludes at 3:30 p.m. For
more information, call 932-4200.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
The Brandeis University National Women's
Committee, Miami Beach Chapter, will hold its first
meeting of the season at noon today, at Lancelot
Hall, 10350 West Harbor Drive, Bay Harbor Island.
A study group showcase will be presented. For more
information, please call 865-8003.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
Women will sponsor a "Imraa" luncheon at noon at
Tower Suite. 4101 Pine Tree Drive. For more in-
formation, please call 532-6421, extension 234.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14
Akiva Baum, Isreli military correspondent, will be
the guest speaker at "Israel Update," the first
annual California Club Community Event. The
discussion begins at 8:00 p.m. at the California
Country Club, 750 NE 195 Street. There is no
couvert and no solicitation of funds. Refreshments
will be served. For more information, please call
Susan Marx at the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, 576-4000.
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 16 THRU MONDAY,
NOVEMBER 19
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center 20-
40 Singles Group will take a cruise to Nassau on the
fun ship Carnivale. A welcome cocktail party is
scheduled. The price is $299 per person, plus $17
port charge. Make your reservations early by calling
the JCC at 534-3206.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20
The Accountants Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will hold a cocktail reception on
behalf of the 1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, at 6:00 p.m. at the Biscayne Bay
Marriott, 1633 North Bayshore Drive. Yehuda
Hellman, executive director of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American Jewish
Organizations, will be the guest speaker. For more
information, please call Joe Imberman at
Federation, 576-4000.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20
Mendell Selig will discuss "Israel: Is Peace
Possible?" at the Forte Forum lecture series at 1:00
p.m. in the Forte Towers Auditorium, 1200 West
Avenue, Miami Beach. For more information, please
call Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 27
Robert Sanchez, member of the editorial board of
the Miami Herald, will discuss "The Next Four
Years in the White House" at the Forte Forum
lecture series at 1:00 p.m. in the Forte Towers
Auditorium, 1200 West Avenue, Miami Beach. For
more information, please call Elsie Rubin at 673-
1979.
EVERY TUESDAY
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center at
610 Espanola Way, offers clases in lip reading for the
hearing impaired from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Enrollment is open to everyone. The fee is $2.50 per
week; however, in cases of need, the fee can be
waived. For more information, please call 676-6060.
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH
The Aventura Jewish Center will offer a 13 week
course in reading Hebrew. Please call Rabbi David
Saltzman at 935-0666 for more information. The
Aventura Jewish Center will also offer a 13 week
course for people who can read Hebrew but desire to
upgrade their skills. Please call Rabbi David
Saltzman at 935-0666 for more information.
Rabbi David Saltzman of the Aventura Jewish
Center will offer a seminary on the Book of the Early
Prophets. Please call 935-0666. for more information.
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
(Plsase Print or Type)
The deadline for December evenU is November 9, 1984
Organization
Event_____
Place
Date_
_Time_
_() a.m. 0 p.m.

Your name
Title_____
.Phone No..
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Federation's P&B committee
ready for banner year
Continued from Page 10
Smith has been an outstanding leader of
the Greater Miami Jewish community for the
past 25 years, having served as president of
Federation's Women's Division, vice chairman
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund. and a member of
Federation's Board and Executive Committee.
She is also a member of the Board and
Executive Committee of United Jewish
Appeal's Women's Division and National
Campaign Policy Board, and serves on the
Board of Directors of the Council of Jewish
Federations.
Kislak was a leader of the first Chazak
Mission to Israel in 1980, is a member of the
United Jewish Appeal Young Leadership
Cabinet and is Florida chairman of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He is this
year's recipient of the Stanly C. Myers Young
Leadership Award and will be honored at the
1984 General Assembly of the Council of
Jewish Federations in Toronto next month. He
has also served on the boards of several
Federation beneficiary agencies, including the
Jewish Vocational Service.
In addition to its regular functions in-
volving Federation's relationship with its
beneficiary agencies and distribution of funds
from its annual campaign, this year the
Planning and Budget Committee will be
carrying out several exciting projects:
Implementation of the recommendations
made by the Long Range Planning / Capital
Needs Committee; its agenda of programs,
services and major capital projects will serve as
a blueprint for providing communal services to
the Greater Miami Jewish community for the
next decade.
Full implementation of the modified
budgeting system for beneficiary agencies.
A study of day care services in the local
Jewish community will be conducted by the
Group Services Subcommittee.
A study of available health services, with
particular emphasis on services for the elderly,
will be conducted by the Individual and Health
Services Subcommittee.
The Subcommittees of the Planning and
Budget Committee and their respective
chairpeople are:
Education, Culture and Religion Sub-
committee Sandi Samole, chair; Sanford
Miot, vice chair.
Group Services Subcommittee Debbie
Grodnick, chair; Robert Kramer, vice chair.
Jewish Community Centers Subcommittee
Gwen Weinberger, chair; Stanley Gilbert,
vice chair.
Individual and Health Services Sub-
committee Jack H. Levine, chair; Michael
Olin, vice chair.
Non-Local Services Cubcommittee
David Perkins, chair; Ellen Mandler, vice chair.
Agency Administrative Practices Com-
mittee Jesse Caselhoff, chair; Daniel
Spivack, vice chair.
Educational Scholarships Subcommittee
Samuel Harte, chair; Kenneth Hoffman, vice
chair.
^ Israel Programs Subcommittee Linda
Minkes, chair.
Hillel Day School
sponsors dinner dance
The Samuel Scheck Hulel Community Day
School, 19000 N.E. 25 Avenue, North Miami
Beach, will pay tribute to a very special couple.
Dr. and Mrs. Lee Duffner, at the school's 15th
Annual Dinner Dance, Saturday evening,
November 10, Beth Torah Congregation,
Deakter Hall, beginning with a reception at 8
p.m.
The Duffners have been active members of
the Executive Board and Board of Governors
since the inception of the school, and chaired
one of the prior dinner-dances.
Dr. Duffner has served in many capacities on
the Executive Board as Registration Vice-
President, Education Vice-Presicent, Executive
Vice-President, and currently as Personnel
Vice-President and member of the Steering
Committee.
Mrs. Duffner has been an active member of
the P.T.A. Board for many years, having
served as P.T.A. Treasurer for several terms,
and as Chairperson of various projects such as
wine sales, candy sales and Passover food sales.
For reservations and further information,
please call the school office at 931-2831.


u0_ ft .. M'^^USi' ri(inninn .nn. .
Page 16
Federation, October, 1984
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Page 14
Federation, October, 1984
Federation cable TV
Molly Goldberg
returns!
MOLLY'S BACK! Jewish
Federation Cable Television has
launched its Fall season, and the
Molly Goldberg Program has helped
stimulate an unprecedented viewer
response. According to JFTV
Director of Broadcast Operations
Suzanne Lasky, her office has been
deluged with calls requesting more
information about the Molly
Goldberg Program and other JFTV
shows.
'JFTV is emerging from its
developmental phase and we now
hope to offer quality shows for all
cable viewers in this community. The
Molly Goldberg Program is just one
example of the service JFTV is
offering Greater Miami," noted
Lasky.
JFTV began airing the Molly
Goldberg Program in early Sep-
tember. The show, originally
broadcast in the early 1950s, stars
Gertrude Berg as Molly, the
matronly mother whose wit and
wisdom always seemed to prevail
during Goldberg family crises. JFTV
will air 39 episodes of the show in the
upcoming months.
Some of the episodes of "Molly"
that should delight all JFTV viewers
include:
DREAMS Molly's neighbor.
Mrs. Van Ness. starts to practice
psychology on the local neighbors
including Molly who becomes an
immediate "women's liberation"
advocate, with hilarious results.
ENGAGEMENT Sammy
becomes engaged to his old girlfriend
Dora. However, all is not well as
Molly and Dora's mother are upset
because Sammy doesn't believe in
getting Dora an engagement ring.
Lasky is anxious to hear from
JFTV viewers about their reactions
to the Mollv Goldberg Program and
any other JFTV shows. She
welcomes calls or letters, so to
contact JFTV write to Greater
Mi
Te
M
JFTV

imi Jewish Federation Cable
ision, 4200 Biscay ne Blvd..
,33137 or call 576-4000.
ev
GREATER MIAMI
JEWISH FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION, INC.
ww II vet remembers the Holocaust
Of the six million Jews who perished at the hands of the Nazis during
the Holocaust tewer than 4.000 were executed at a small concentration
camp in Ohrdruf. a town near Colonge. For Arthur Marshall, his memories
of Ohrdruf remain as an affirmation of the cruelties that mankind is
capable of perpetrating on his fellow man.
On this month s JFTV show. "We Remember." Marshall recounts his
role as a liberator of the Ohrdruf camp during the final days of World War
II. Serving under General Patton. Marshall's unit entered Ohrdruf on
April r>. 1945. The German soldiers stationed in the camp executed ap-
proximately 75 prisoners as the American troops smashed through the
gates of the encampment. Once the camp was secured by the American
forces, the job of sorting out the carnage, arranging for the burial of the
dead, and caring for the emaciated survivors was left to the Americans
under Marshall's command.
The impact of this "We Remember'' show is that Marshall, now a
Miami Shores resident, has remained silent and not revealed his ex-
periences for nearly forty years. In this extraordinary interview with
JFTV's Suzanne Lasky. for the first time. Marshall accounts for what he
saw. how he reacted and what actions he took that fateful day at Ohrdruf.
Marshall had maintained a wall of silence, partly due to the advice of
an army colleague, but primarily because he claims he didn't know where
to go. or with whom to speak about the events he witnessed at Ohrdruf.
Marshall explains, toward the end of the interview, that he has chosen to
talk now. owing in part to his advancing years, and in the hopes that his
revelations will prevent such events from ever occuring again.
Marshall, in recounting his ordeal, paints a picture of strong human
emotions. His feelings about Ohrdruf, even today, include reactions of
shock, anger and disbelief. He supplements his oral testimony with
several photographs taken at Ohrdruf, visual evidence of the horrors he
and others confronted in the camp. His photographs are now incorporated
into the Holocaust Memorial at Yad Vashem.
Marshall will leave each "We Remember" viewer with the feeling that
his experiences are simply a microcosm of events that humans must
endure all too often. He has spoken because he feels that the average
person, living in comfort and general well-being, doesn't comprehend the
stark reality of events that occured just a generation ago.
This episode of "We Remember"' traces the impact that Holocaust
events played in the life of one man, but the lessons he learned will provide
a deeper understanding of the human tragedy for each and every viewer.
Consult the JFTV program schedule on this page for dates and times of
"We Remember."
Hello Jerusalem'
premieres
"Hello Jerusalem," Israel's
Weekly Television Magazine, can
now be seen twice weekly on JFTV.
Produced by Kastel Communica-
tions Ltd., the Israeli equivalent of
"20-20" features segments on Israeli
sports, fashion, the sciences, art.,
archaeology, 'Mediterranean-style'
cuisine, animated 'funnies,' and
tourist attractions in Israel.
"Hello Jerusalem" shows the
Israel behind the headlines through
the day-to-day life of her people and
her places. The show also presents
topics of worldwide interest through
special features and interviews with
prominent Israeli citizens. JFTV
joins other cable television networks
in presenting "Hello Jerusalem" to
more than nine million households in
the United States.
The Kastel Communications
group has at its disposal a wealth of
directors, scriptwriters and other
seasoned media professionals who
are constantly coming up with new
ideas for the programs. "Hello
Jerusalem"' features many inter-
esting vignettes that make the
program fast-paced, informative and
above all, entertaining.
A sampling of "Hello Jerusalem"
segments includes: "Miami Beach
East." a visit to the sunny seaside
resort of Netanya, which has at-
tracted American senior citizens and
retirees. These American couples,
who relocated in Netanya, relate
their special experiences.
Check the program guide on this
page for dates and times of "Hello
Jerusalem." Once you tune in to this
innovative program, you won't want
to miss a single episode.
watch jftv on:
Storer (North Dade) Channel P-29
-CLIP AND SAVE
Storer (South Dadel
Harte-Hanks
(Formerly Ultra-Corn)
Miami Cablevision
Americable
Dynamic
Channel 15
Channel 2
Channel 11
Channel 36
Channel 43
* Programming Schedule
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Cable Television inc.
NOVEMBER 1984*
5-5:30 p.m.
5:30-6 p.m.
6-6:30 p.m.
Monday
Eenies
Kitchen
Checkup/
Mt Sinai
Tuesday
Focus
Sunrise,
Sunset
Wednesday
Eenies
Kitchen
Hello
Jerusalem
we
Remember
6:30-7 p.m.
7-7:30 p.m.
Small
voice
or
viewpoint
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
7:30-8 p.m.
Pillow
Talk
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
JCC:A
Special
Place
Film
Special
(half hour)
Film
Special
(half hour)
Hello
Jerusalem
Thursday
Checkup/
Mt. Sinai
Pillow
Talk
Friday
Pillow
Talk
FOCUS
Encounter
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Pillow
Talk
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Eenies
Kitchen
Vision
Israel
or
Israeli
Diary
People
You Should
Know
Encounter
Sunrise,
Sunset
Saturday
People
you Should
Know
Still
Small
voice
or
Viewpoint
Sunday
JCC. A
Special
Place
Eenies
Kitchen
vision
Israel
or
Israeli
Diary
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Hello
Jerusalem
Hello
Jerusalem
SuJ>2ect_tochaoge_
Pillow
Talk
Film
Special
Pillow
Talk
The
Molly
Goldberg
Show
Checkup/
Mt. Sinai
we
Remember
* i
CUP AND SAVE-


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FILES


Federation, October, 1984
page 15
lendar
I, OCTOBER 28
ni Beach JCC Singles Group will present
n and Free," a lecture on nutrition and
|ll: 30 a.m. at the Miami Beach JCC, 4221
mrive. A bagel brunch will follow the dis-
he co9t is $3.50 for members and $5.00 for
ers. For more information, please call
34-3206.
|, OCTOBER 28
ndelssohn String Quartet will perform at
as part of Temple Beth Am's 1984-85
eries. For more information, please call
(, OCTOBER 30
hool students and their parents are invited
College Night, an opportunity to meet
__ counselors and professors to aid in the
EFcollege courses, financial aid, selecting a
I Jewish activities on the college campus,
by the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
[y Center and co-sponsored by the Jewish
U Service, the event begins at 7:30 p.m. at
ael-Ann Russell JCC, 18900 NE 25th
There is no fee. For more information.
| Mark Sykes at 932-4200.
(, OCTOBER 30
sh art appreciation lecture, given by
eicher. will be held at 7:30 p.m. at the
nn Russell Jewish Community Center,
25th Avenue. The growth and develop-
Jewish manuscripts, bibles, ketubbot, and
til be discussed. Individual lectures are $4
ers. $5 for non-members. For more in-
call the Cultural Art Department of the
fc-4200.
PAY. OCTOBER 31
Jeanne O'Laughlin, president of Barry
Jamiss Sebert, director of the Miami
ssport Agency; and Madeleine Mais, staff
|l'ropic Magazine will be featured speakers
nen in Power" symposium, sponsored by
tnal Council of Jewish Women-Miami
lay from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at
^th Sholom on Miami Beach. The program
the community and will be an NCJW paid-
vent. Admission for guests is $7.00, which
box lunch. For more information and
is, please call 576-4747.
iY. NOVEMBER 3
id Norman Braman will host a Young
and Professional Wine and Cheese
on behalf of the Greater Miami Jewish
as 1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Fund Campaign, at 8:00 p.m. Akiva
raeli military expert, will be the guest
minimum gift of $1000 to the 1985 CJA-
Ijuired. For more information, please call
rat 576-4000.
.NOVEMBER 4
kth Dade Hebrew Academy will hold its
per at 6:00 p.m. at the Calusa Country
Be call 358-5550.
f, NOVEMBER 6
iPnmak will review Paul Cowen's "A
Jewish Identity" at the Forte Forum
hes at 1:00 p.m. in the Forte Towers
1200 West Avenue, Miami Beach. For
lation. please call Elsie Rubin at 673-
)AY. NOVEMBER 7
an Wednesday, formerly Women's
r, the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
I Division annual community education
held at the Fontainebleau-Hilton today
m. to 2:00 p.m. Judith Viorat, author of
luilt & The Meaning of Life. Etc.;" Robert
ftr and Holocaust survivor; and Deborah
assistant professor of Jewish Studies at
| be the guest speakers. The cost is S35 per
ich includes a kosher lunch. For more
please call the Women's Division at
kY. NOVEMBER 8
Ireater Miami Jewish Federation's
[Dinner, the annual gala event open to
Of a minimum of $10,000 to the 1986
| Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
will be held this evening at the Fon-
'lilton. Comedian David Brenner will be
guest. Cocktails begin at 7:00 p.m.,
tOO p.m. For more information, please call
i at 576-4000.
kY. NOVEMBER 10
srael of Greater Miami and the Miami
ish Community Center present Trivia
'vening of light-hearted, mind stretching
rot, 7:30 p.m. at Temple Israel. 137 NE
The cost is $60 per couple, which in-
'her deli dinner and dessert buffet. Call
reservations.
NOVEMBER 13
ch Mayor Malcolm Fromberg will
'Development of South Point*" at the
lecture series at 1:00 p.m. in the Forte
itorium, 1200 West Avenue, Miami
re information, please call Elsie Rubin
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Visit Miami's finest art and cultural center, view
"Silk Roads," an exhibit of Chinese art, and then
tour the new Historical Museum on an Art Safari
begins at 9:30 a.m. and concludes at 3:30 p.m. For
more information, call 932-4200.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 13
The Brandeis University National Women's
Committee, Miami Beach Chapter, will hold its first
meeting of the season at noon today, at Lancelot
Hall, 10350 West Harbor Drive. Bay Harbor Island.
A study group showcase will be presented. For more
information, please call 865-8003.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
Women will sponsor a "Imma" luncheon at noon at
Tower Suite, 4101 Pine Tree Drive. For more in-
formation, please call 532-6421, extension 234.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14
Akiva Baum, Isreli military correspondent, will be
the gue9t speaker at "Israel Update," the first
annual California Club Community Event. The
discussion begins at 8:00 p.m. at the California
Country Club, 750 NE 195 Street. There is no
couvert and no solicitation of funds. Refreshments
will be served. For more information, please call
Susan Marx at the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, 576-4000.
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 16 THRU MONDAY,
NOVEMBER 19
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center 20-
40 Singles Group will take a cruise to Nassau on the
fun ship Carnivale. A welcome cocktail party is
scheduled. The price is $299 per person, plus $17
port charge. Make your reservations early by calling
the JCC at 534-3206.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 20
The Accountants Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will hold a cocktail reception on
behalf of the 1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, at 6:00 p.m. at the Biscayne Bay
Marriott. 1633 North Bayshore Drive. Yehuda
Hellman, executive director of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American Jewish
Organizations, will be the guest speaker. For more
information, please call Joe Imberman at
Federation, 576-4000.
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 20
Mendell Selig will discuss 'Israel: Is Peace
Possible?" at the Forte Forum lecture series at 1:00
p.m. in the Forte Towers Auditorium, 1200 West
Avenue, Miami Beach. For more information, please
call Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 27
Robert Sanchez, member of the editorial board of
the Miami Herald, will discuss "The Next Four
Years in the White House" at the Forte Forum
lecture series at 1:00 p.m. in the Forte Towers
Auditorium, 1200 West Avenue, Miami Beach. For
more information, please call Elsie Rubin at 673-
1979.
EVERY TUESDAY
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center at
610 Espanola Way. offers clases in lip reading for the
hearing impaired from 10:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.
Enrollment is open to everyone. The fee is $2.50 per
week; however, in cases of need, the fee can be
waived. For more information, please call 576-6060.
THROUGHOUT THE MONTH
The Aventura Jewish Center will offer a 13 week
course in reading Hebrew. Please call Rabbi David
Saltzman at 935-0666 for more information. The
Aventura Jewish Center will also offer a 13 week
course for people who can read Hebrew but desire to
upgrade their skills. Please call Rabbi David
Saltzman at 935-0666 for more information.
Rabbi David Saltzman of the Aventura Jewish
Center will offer a seminary on the Book of the Early
Prophets. Please call 935-0666, for more information.
Listing for Je wieh Commit nity Calendar
(Pleas* Print or Type)
The deadline for December events la November 9. 1984
Organization
Event _____
Place
Date_
_Time_
.0 a.m. 0 p.m.
Your name
Title_____
.Phone No..
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Federation's P&B committee
ready for banner year
Continued from Page 10
Smith has been an outstanding leader of
the Greater Miami Jewish community for the
past 25 years, having served as president of
Federation's Women's Division, vice chairman
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, and a member of
Federation's Board and Executive Committee.
She is also a member of the Board and
Executive Committee of United Jewish
Appeal's Women's Division and National
Campaign Policy Board, and serves on the
Board of Directors of the Council of Jewish
Federations.
Kislak was a leader of the first Chazak
Mission to Israel in 1980, is a member of the
United Jewish Appeal Young Leadership
Cabinet and is Florida chairman of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith. He is this
year's recipient of the Stanly C. Myers Young
Leadership Award and will be honored at the
1984 General Assembly of the Council of
Jewish Federations in Toronto next month. He
has also served on the boards of several
Federation beneficiary agencies, including the
Jewish Vocational Service.
In addition to its regular functions in-
volving Federation's relationship with its
beneficiary agencies and distribution of funds
from its annual campaign, this year the
Planning and Budget Committee will be
carrying out several exciting projects:
Implementation of the recommendations
made by the Long Range Planning Capital
Needs Committee; its agenda of programs,
services and major capital projects will serve as
a blueprint for providing communal services to
the Greater Miami Jewish community for the
next decade,
s Full implementation of the modified
budgeting system for beneficiary agencies,
s A study of day care services in the local
Jewish community will be conducted by the
Group Services Subcommittee,
s A study of available health services, with
particular emphasis on services for the elderly,
will be conducted by the Individual and Health
Services Subcommittee.
The Subcommittees of the Planning and
Budget Committee and their respective
chairpeople are:
Education. Culture and Religion Sub-
committee Sandi Samole, chair; Sanford
Miot. vice chair.
Group Services Subcommittee Debbie
Grodnick, chair; Robert Kramer, vice chair.
Jewish Community Centers Subcommittee
Gwen Weinberger, chair; Stanley Gilbert,
vice chair.
Individual and Health Services Sub-
committee Jack H. Levine, chair; Michael
Olin, vice chair.
Non-Local Services Cubcommittee
David Perkins, chair; Ellen Mandler. vice chair.
Agency Administrative Practices Com-
mittee Jesse Caselhoff, chair; Daniel
Spivack, vice chair.
Educational Scholarships Subcommittee
Samuel Harte, chair; Kenneth Hoffman, vice
chair.
* Israel Programs Subcommittee Linda
Minkes, chair.
Hillel Day School
sponsors dinner dance
The Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day
School. 19000 N.E. 25 Avenue, North Miami
Beach, will pay tribute to a very special couple.
Dr. and Mrs. Lee Duffner. at the school's 15th
Annual Dinner Dance. Saturday evening,
November 10, Beth Torah Congregation,
Deakter Hall, beginning with a reception at 8
p.m.
The Duffnere have been active members of
the Executive Board and Board of Governors
since the inception of the school, and chaired
one of the prior dinner-dances.
Dr. Duffner has served in many capacities on
the Executive Board as Registration Vice-
President, Education Vice-Presicent, Executive
Vice-President, and currently as Personnel
Vice-President and member of the Steering
Committee.
Mrs. Duffner has been an active member of
the P.T.A. Board for many years, having
served as P.T.A. Treasurer for several terms,
and as Chairperson of various projects such as
wine sales, candy sales and Passover food sales.
For reservations and further information,
please call the school office at 931-2831.