The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02886

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement in This Issue
Volum*
^-Number 21 Three Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, May 25,1984
I By Mail 80 Cants i
Price 50 Cents
Women
In Pulpit
'** Conservative
Rabbis Again
Ordain 'No'
fraeli paratroopers at the Western Wall in Jerusalem on June 7, 1967.
rabs Angered
By BEN GALLOB
KIAMESHA LAKE,
N.Y. (JTA) Conser-
vative rabbis voted late
last Wednesday at the
84th annual convention of
the Rabbinical Assembly
to reject for a second year
in a row the application of
Reform-ordained Rabbi
Beverly Magidson to
become America's first
woman Conservative rabbi
by convention vote, but
changed circumstances in
the Conservative move-
ment has made that issue
academic and no future
RA convention is ever
likely to vote on that issue
again.
Despite the backing of the KA
membership committee and that
of many Conservative leaders,
Magidson, of Clifton Park, N.J.,
received 230 votes in favor to 99
votes against her application, 22
votes short of the required 75
percent of the convention
majority needed to affirm her
application. At last year's RA
convention she failed in her bid
Continued on Page 7-A
Wiesenthal
Center
Despite Rauff s Death,
They'll Press Church Tie
Denounce Morocco's Friendship to Israel
U.S. Welcomes Hospitality... 14-A
RABAT (JTA) -
everal Knesset members
fho attended the first
rational conference of
loroccan Jewish commu-
nities which ended here last
reek, expess cautious
Jptimism that the event
ould herald a new Middle
past peace initiative
Qcouraged by King
Hassan of Morocco.
The conference drew some 500
participants and observers
representing the Moroccan
Jewish community and Jewish
communities in the United
States, France and other
countries. They included a 36-
member Israeli delegation, of
which 11 are members of the
Knesset representing both the
Labor Party and the Likud-led
coalition government.
THE ISRAELIS were invited
with the express permission of
Hassan, the first time a group of
Israeli parliamentarians have
visited an Arab League member-
state.
According to Meir Shitreet of
Likud, the most important result
of the conference could be to pave
the way fo a new peace initiative.
It would be welcomed by Israel if
it came from Morocco, he said,
adding that King Hassan's
Erestige will be enhanced in the
I.S. and among Jewish commu-
nities all over the world for
having the conference in hie
capital.
Yoaai Sarid, of the Labor
Continued on Page 8-A
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The Simon Wiesenthal
Center said that it will
continue to press the
Vatican to conduct an
investigation into church-
related activities in Italy
involving Walter Rauff, the
Nazi war criminal and
inventor of the mobile gas
vans, despite his death at
the age of 77 in Chile of a
heart attack.
"It does not put the matter to
rest," said Gerald Margolis,
director of the Los Angeles-based
Wiesenthal Center. He said the
Center will continue to urge Pope
John Paul II to open Vatican
archives and investigate what the
Center alleges was church aid to
Rauff after the war and help for
him in fleeing Europe to safe
haven in South America.
THE CENTER has just
released 43 pages of documents,
some of them previously clas-
sified by U.S. government intel-
ligence agencies, which provide
additional information linking
Rauff to important figures in the
Catholic church in Italy during
and after the war. Rauff told the
Chilean Supreme Court in 1962
that he was provided aid and
Walter Rauff


PaCftlR-R Tko Imifil. rU>J:---n_:j
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 26,1984
After Long Alliance
Herat, Liberal Parties At Beginning of End
t
By OIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Herut and the Liberal
Party appear to be on the
verge of ending their 20
year-old alliance over
Herut claims that the
Liberals are over-
represented on the Likud
election list.
The Herut Secretariat gave the
Liberal Party until this week to
accept fewer slots among the top
40 candidates Likud will present
to the voters on July 23. Herut
has proposed that the Liberal
representation be reduced from
15 to 12 "safe" seats with
another four candidates between
the 40th and 50th spots where
election to the Knesset is less
likely barring a Likud landslide.
THE HERUT formula would
reduce liberal representation
from 19 to 16 potential MKs.
According to Herut activists,
secret polls have shown that if
the Liberal Party stood for elec-
tion on its own it would win no
more than two Knesset seats.
Neither party has been tested
independently at the polls since
they entered into partnership in
Arabs Said To Be Forming
Own Political Party in Israel
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
An expert on Arab
affairs predicts that Israeli
Arabs, seeking a channel
for political expression,
may soon form their own
independent Arab political
party. Given Israel's Arab
population of close to
600,000, it would have the
potential to win 12
Knesset seats, according
to Avner Regev of the
Jerusalem Institute for
Israeli Research.
Regev discussed his two-year
study of Arab involvement in
municipal elections at a
symposium here. He said Arabs
could achieve their political goals
in two ways through the
National Committee of Arab
Mayors or by the development of
an Arab party to participate in
local and national elections.
HE SAID this would be the
outcome of a situation in which
Arabs feel frustrated because
they are unable to integrate into
the existing framework of the
political system. Israeli Arabs
are disenchanted with the
existing parties which court Arab
votes, mainly the Communist
Party which is currently strong
among the Arab electorate and
the Labor Party.
The Labor Party's Central
Committee, however, approved a
July 23 election list that contains
but one safe seat for an Arab
candidate.
Regev's thesis was challenged
at the symposium by Mayor
Mohammad Abu-Assbe of the
Arab village of Jatt, a member of
Mapam which is a partner in the
Labor Alignment.
He contended that Israeli
Arabs could achieve more by
working inside he existing poli-
tical parties than on their own.
He warned that an independent
Arab party would be isolated by
the Jewish political system, just
as the Communist Party is
isolated although it holds four
Knesset seats.
BINYAMIN Gur-Arye, the
Prime Minister's Advisor on
Arab Affairs, also warned that an
independent Arab party would
further alienate the Jewish
population from Israel's Arabs.
But an independent Arab
party may be in the making.
Arab radicals who split from the
pro-Moscow Hadash
(Communist) Party, have
reached an agreement in principle
with Israeli leftists, formerly of
the Sheli Party, on a joint list in
the upcoming elections. It will be
headed by Mohammad Miari of
Haifa, a lawyer and Arab nation-
alist. The No. 2 man will be Gen.
(res.) Matityahu Peled, formerly
of Sheli.
Nazareth lawyer Kamel Daher,
a member of the new group, told
the symposium that it offered
Israeli Arabs the only way to
achieve recognition as a national
minority with "more than just
equal rights."
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A
1965, first as Gahal and later
Likud. But each claims it can do
well alone.
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
reportedly objected to the Herut
ultimatum. He met with Liberal
ministers Moshe Nissim and
Gideon Patt in an effort to
resolve the crisis. Shamir was
said to have told them he did not
want to see Likud split. The
liberal Party Executive was
expected to convene later to
discuss the issue.
Deputy Premier David Levy
said on a television interview that
there was strong sentiment
within Herut to announce imme-
diately that the party would
stand alone in the upcoming
elections. But the Herut leader-
ship decided to give the Liberals
another chance, he said.
THE LIBERALS for their
part, flatly rejected a Herut offer
of a total merger. Liberal spokes-
men said this was a Herut ploy to
take over Liberal Party assets
and declared there was "no way
that the Liberal Party would
cover the debts of Herut."
The Liberals also let it be
known that they are negotiating
with former Defense Minister
Ezer Weizman for the creation of
a large centrist party with the
potential for at least 10 Knesset
mandates. Such a party could
hold the balance of power in a
future coalition government.
Weizman, who quit Herut
some years ago over policy dif-
ferences with then Premier
Menachem Begin, resumed poli-
tical activity recently when he
announced that he would stand
for election in July at the head of
a new party, Yahad (Together).
HE DECLINED to comment
on the possibility of an alliance
with the Liberal Party. He said
he would welcome in principle a
strong centrist liberal bloc. "This
is what I expected Likud to be
but since it did not fulfill the
expectations, we formed Yahad,"
Weizman said. He said he would
wait until the last minute before
publishing Yahad's election list,
a hint that a deal with the
Liberals may be in the making.
Some Liberals are upset over a
split with Herut. David Admon,
chairman of the party's Tel Aviv
branch, said, "I am not
concerned over the agreement
with herut but I am concerned
that if Likud does not continue,
we shall lose the government."
The Herut Central Committee
has scheduled a meeting to decide
whether or not to go to the polls
in July without the Liberals.
Correction
The Jewish Floridian profile of
James Abourezk, by Arthur J.
Magida, originally published in
The Baltimore Jewish Times, in-
cluded an account that he had
made "several overtures" to Sen.
Edward Kennedy during the 1980
presidential campaign to help
secure the release of the 52
American hostages held in Iran.
The article also stated that
Abourezk's offers were accom-
panied by demands for payment
for his services.
The Jewish Floridian has since
learned that this account is not
true. According to Jan Kalicki,
foreign policy advisor to Sen.
Kennedy, initiatives for
Abourezk to negotiate for the
hostages' release came solely
from Kennedy and his staff
not from Abourezk.
Also, the only funds involved
were for round-trip plane fare to
Iran. Abourezk had not re-
quested payment for his services,
nor had the Kennedy campaign,
staff or family offered any.
Begin, who has been in virtual
seclusion since his resignation
last August, has taken no posi-
tion on Likud's internal crisis. In
one of his rare interviews, he told
a Voice of Israel Radio reporter
that it was up to the party's
institutions to decide the issue.
SOME OBSERVERS believe a
split in Likud may well spell
defeat for the government party
if July. But the opposition ? *
Alignment has HSffJft
own, not much different in H*
from those of Likud "N
The Labor Party is ^_J
tanmaking room for newcoX?
the Alignment such ^
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Black Panthers and a ?$
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National Religious Party *
In order to secure safe seaufc.
them, ft ft asking fa ijjg
Alignment partner. Map^
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burden should not rest mU m
them. But the BShSS
Committee decided hstS
that it would oppose any chaZ
in the election line-up ^*
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Yahad Party
Weizman Spells Out His Position
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Former Defense Minister
Ezer Weizman spelled out
the positions of his new
Yahad (Together) Party on
key issues, the most
serious of which, he
stressed, is to rescue
Israel from economic
disaster. Addressing the
Foreign Press Association
here. Weizman maintained
that neither Likud nor the
Labor Alignment can win
sufficient votes in the July
23 elections to govern
alone.
His party, which he belives can
win up to 20 Knesset mandates,
would provide the crucial extra
weight that would allow either of
the major political parties to form
a strong, stable government. It
Israeli
Invited
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Prof. Shmuel Shoshan, a Hebrew
University scientist, has been
invited by the European Space
Agency (ESA) to submit
proposals for bio-medical experi-
ments in space related to the
phenomenon of weightlessness.
Shoshan, head of the Connec-
tive Tissue Research Laboratory
of the Department of Oral
Biology in the Hebrew
University-Hadassah School of
Dental Medicine, was a part-
icipant in a recent planning
meeting conducted by the ESA.
would give them the philosophy
and direction to get the country
"back on its tracks again,"
Weizman said.
WEIZMAN, who quit Likud
several years ago over policy dif-
ferences with Premier Menachem
Begin, charged that Likud has
failed in the economic field. Any
future government, he said,
would have to amend the tax
structure and encourage people
to work.
Weizman s political program,
as outlined, is a departure from
the traditional Herut policy.
Israel must leam to live with its
Arab residents and its Arab
neighbors, Weizman said, and
toward that end he said he was
ready to talk to any and all Arab
leaders, without prior conditions,
to achieve peace. "Even (PLO
chief Yasir) Arafat if he were to
abandon his Palestine covenant
which calls for the destruction of
Israel," Weizman said.
He maintained that Israel
must get out of Lebanon as soon
as possible. He said he had
always opposed the conduct of
the war in Lebanon. While there
might have been justification to
invade south Lebanon up to the
45 kilometer line in June, 1982,
Israel made a grave mistake by
thinking it could impose a regime
to its liking on a neighboring
country, he said.
WEIZMAN BELIEVES
Israel should recognize that Syria
has legitimate interests in
Lebanon and an Israeli with-
drawal should not be made
contingent on a Syrian
withdrawal. The Syrians
probably will not withdraw, but
they have always in the past
recognized the "red lines"
beyond which they would not
move and it is possible to reach
an unofficial agreement with
Damascus, he said.
According to Weizman, the
settlements on the West Bank no
longer serve any security purpose
"and we might even have to send
troops to defend them in case of
war."
No new settlements should be
built, though the existing ones
could be strengthened, he said.
He said that grandiose plans
such as building a railroad line to
Eilat should be abandoned while
the government struggles to put
its economic house in order.
WEIZMAN said that while
economic problems have top
priority on his party's platform,
its basic aim, as its name, Yahad
implies, is the unity of all
Israelis, "secular and Orthodox
Jews, Ashkenazim and
Sephardim." He added, "There is
lack of faith in government here
at present. We must restore that
confidence."
Weizman disclosed that he had
"tried to topple the Likud
government" at the time of the
Sabra and Shatila refugee camps
massacre in September, 1982, by
talking to the Liberal Party
elements in Likud. But nothing
came of it at the time. He did not
mention reports that he is again
talking to Liberal Party leaders
about the possibility of joining
forces in a new liberal centrist
party.
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Friday, May 26,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
C.O.L. Soars to Highest
Monthly Increase; Reports
Show 406 Percent Rise
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The cost-of-living index in
April soared by 20.6
percent, the highest
increase ever for that
month and the second
highest monthly increase
in Israel's history,
according to figures
released by the Central
Bureau of Statistics.
Economists warned that if
the present trend
continues, the inflation
rate for 1984 will reach an
unprecedented 406
percent.
The cost-of-living index rose by
263 percent during the past 12
months. In April, 1983, it was
13.3 percent. The all-time record
increase was registered last
October when the cost-of-living
rose by 21.1 percent, triggering a
sharp reversal of the Likud
government's economic policies,
including a 23 percent devalua-
tion of the Shekel and drastic
reductions in subsidies for food,
fuel and other basic commodities.
WITH ELECTIONS less than
two months away, the govern-
ment and opposition each blamed
the other for the alarming rise
last month which was much
higher than Treasury and bank
officials had forecast. Finance
Minister Yigal Cohen-Orgad said
the increase was largely due to
the failure of Histadrut to agree
to an economic package deal.
Histadrut and Labor Party
spokesmen charged that failure
of the government's economic
policy was responsible for the
runaway inflation. Finance
Ministry sources said the
increase was also due in part to
the government's efforts to
balance Israel's foreign trade
deficit and foreign currency
short-fall, efforts which they
claim are showing success.
The record inflation rate for
April apparently forced the
government to reverse its earlier
rejection of Histadrut demands
for payment of a special cost-of-
living allowance with May
salaries, due on June 1. Deputy
Premier David Levy said that
Cohen-Orgad has agreed, at his
urging, to an advance payment.
But by the time the workers
receive the payment, their
salaries will have lost one-fifth of
the original value.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 26,1984
Sakharov's Birthday
Was Not Happy
The South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry reminds us that Monday, May 21,
marked the birthday of Nobel Peace Prize
recipient Andrei Sakharov. It was not a
happy birthday. Sakharov has been on a
hunger strike since May 2. The Soviets,
on his birthday, revealed that the
distinguished scientist was transferred
from Gorky, the site since 1980 of his
perpetual exile, to a "clinic."
Why did Sakharov go on a hunger
strike? For months, he tried to obtain
permission from his Soviet oppressors for
his wife, Elena Bonner, to travel abroad
for medical treatment. She has suffered
three heart attacks in the past year, and
furthermore needs treatment for a serious
eye ailment. As usual, the official answer
has been Nyet.
Andrei Sakharov spoke out on behalf of
human rights when he could, and he
campaigned for the plight of Soviet Jews
as a member of the Helsinki Watch
Committee. It is for this reason for his
faith based on the belief that all mankind
has the right to be free that Sakharov
was silenced and sentenced to his
perpetual exile.
A distinguished American rabbi, active
professionally in human rights at the
American Jewish Committee, Marc H.
Tanenbaum. this week wondered whether
perhaps the furor that the Soviet
authorities have created by their boycott
of the Los Angeles Olympics "was not a
cynical effort to divert world attention
and pressure from the tragic plight of
Sakharov and his wife."
Rabbi Tanenbaum notes that about a
week ago he previewed a full-length TV
film due for premiere on HBO in
September. The film is based on the
heroic lives of Sakharov and his wife. In
it, speaking of Stalin, the renowned
scientist, this man who has been willing
to risk all and speak out for freedom, says
of the Soviets: "They are not different
from Stalin, only smarter."
Sakharov is slowly dying now. So is
Elena. They may well be gone in a matter
of days. The human rights community of
the world, the scientific community, the
community of humanity must never
forget them.
Jerusalem Day
Friday, May 30, is Jerusalem Day. The
celebration marks the reunification of
Jerusalem during the Six-Day War of
June, 1967. It is no wonder that we
choose again to publish on our Page One
that remarkable photograph of the first
soldiers to reach the Kotel, the Western
Wall of Old Jerusalem on June 7, 1967.
More than any other document of that
war, it shows the emotion, the hypnotic
feeling of reverence and awe for this
shrine of ancient Jewish hope throughout
2,000 years of exile and dispersion that
one day Jerusalem would be reunited and,
as former Prime Minister Menachem
Begin calls it, "the eternal capital" of
Israel.
There are those, the United States
among them, who are dedicated to
preventing this reunification and to
ignoring Jerusalem as Israel's "eternal
capital."
But on this Jerusalem Day, we must
stand united in the firm conviction that
nothing can change the emotion, the
hypnotic feeling of reverence and awe that
the soldiers show in the photograph on
our Page One.
That nothing will ever divide Jerusalem
again. Or separate it from the heart and
soul of Jews as Israel's "eternal capital."
MEMORIAL DAY 1984:
Let Us Now Honor Those Who Rest in Gallant Ranks
Monday is Memorial Day. It is on this
day that we remember those who live on
in our lives and in the life of our beloved
land. Many of us will mark the day by
visiting a national cemetery.
This honored tradition dates back to
the opening of the first National Cemetery
in 1862. Today, there are 108 located
in some of the most scenic regions of our
nation. Each of these shrines is a reverent
resting place for our nation's veterans and
their dependents.
President Reagan has said that "No
citizens will ever receive higher
commitment than to the hallowed ground
of our National Cemeteries. No greater
honor can be bestowed than to rest in the
gallant ranks of those who struggled to
preserve our spiritual and national values
for all posterity."
This is the true spirit of Memorial Day.
Let us pause Monday and remember
those who gave their all for all of us.
Leo Mindlin
Scenario for Exciting Mondale Campaign
THE LIKELIHOOD is that
Walter Mondale will make it at
the Democratic convention in
July, although given the party's
capacity for fratricide, it would
not be surprising were a blood-
letting to become the centerpiece
of what occurs there.
This will mean that a terribly
weakened Mondale enters the
lists against President Reagan in
November. There is really little
hope that Mondale can win in the
joust. Of course, there always are
miracles, but my own impulse is
to recall the two campaigns of
Adlai Stevenson against Dwight
Eisenhower in 1952 and 1956.
IT SIMPLY seemed inconceiv-
able that anyone, not just the
Hamletesque Stevenson, could
make a real contest of the
campaign against Eisenhower.
So it is, again, in 1984 in
Mondale's effort to unseat
President Reagan.
If this is, indeed, a given, then
there are several alternative
campaign methods that cry out
for attention in lieu of the road
Mondale is likely to take. At
worst, they would make a more
exciting contest out of what will
otherwise probably become a
GOP romp. And, who knows?,
they may even turn the romp into
a good fight.
At beet, they would address
some of the most serious issues
that otherwise both parties may
be relied upon to ignore. What all
this means is that Mondale must
avoid like the plague the old
stereotypes that popularly divide
Republicans and Democrats.
ISSUES ANALYSTS are
already preparing Reagan for
slick rejoinders to Mondale
assaults on the President's
performance thus far in the areas
of military spending, as well as a
growing Reagan preference for
combat commitments in the
world's trouble spots; foreign
policy; domestic and interna-
tional fiscal approaches to the
economy; and at-home social
issues such as abortion, public
prayer, conservation, and the
gender gap.
There are, of course, others,
ranging from natkJnal health
needs to Medicare and social
security, the latter aspects of the
domestic economy.
If, for example, Mondale
attempts to address any or all of
these and gets all wound up in
updating the old Hubert
Humphrey-New Deal charge that
Republicans generally, and
Reagan more specifically, don't
give a damn about the poor, then
the Democrats may be expected
to die at the starting gate.
NOT ONLY will Reagan have
all the appropriate answers,
which most people opposed to
"giveaway welfare" are inclined
to love; but such a debate can
only hasten the equation between
Mondale and Morpheus in the
same way that Ike Eisenhower
fastened on his characterization
of Stevenson as the troubled
young Dane of Elsinore.
For it has been amply demon-
strated that the President is the
teflon coated man par txctUtnc:
Continued on Page 13-A
^Jewish Floridian
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SUtSCaiPTlON AIS {local A-oal O-x
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Friday, May 25.1984
Volume 57
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23 IYAR 5744
Number 21


Friday, May 25,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Moonrise over Jerusalem.
May 30
Jerusalem Day Focuses on City's Expanswn
By SIMON GRIVER
This Jerusalem Day on
Wednesday, May 30,
marks five years since I
first came to live in Jeru-
salem. Five years is no
great length of time in a
city which is reputedly at
least 3,000 years old, but
in all those centuries it is
unlikely that there has
been another five years in
which the city has under-
gone so many physical
changes.
Since 1979, Jerusalem has
spread outwards at an unprece-
dented pace. Rocky hillsides have
been transformed into huge,
sprawling suburbs like Ramot,
Gilo and east Talpiot, where my
own apartment is located. To
some, these new neighborhoods
are hastily conceived, mono-
tonous, concrete slabs. Such de-
scriptions may be exaggerated,
but aestheticism has sometimes
been compromised for the sake of
economy.
IN THE last few years, con-
struction has pushed ahead of
outer-outer suburbs like Ma'ale
Adumim in the Judean Desert.
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek
is bitterly opposed to these new
settlements. He argues that it is
better to have a smaller Jeru-
salem with a clear Jewish
majority than a Greater Jeru-
salem stretching from Bethlehem
to Ramallah. which might even-
tually have an Arab majority. He
is against a policy which encour-
ages young couples to prefer
Ma'ale Adumim, since housing is
cheaper there than in Jerusalem.
This question is only one re-
minder of the deep divisions and
potential tensions that plague
Jerusalem. The city's Arabs
remain unanimously opposed to
the concept of undivided Jeru-
salem as capital of the State of
Israel. However, each year pro-
duces a more grudging accep-
tance that the peaceful co-
existence is preferable to a circle
of futile violence.
I am anxious, as a Jew, over
the growth of Jewish terrorism
and violence. There was the
attack by American immigrant
Allan Goodman on the Temple
Mount which killed two Arabs
and the recent spate of grenade
attacks on churches and mosques
by the TNT ("Terror against
Terror") organization which
culminated in an aborted attempt
to overrun the Temple Mount.
THERE WAS the murder of
Continued on Page 10-A
Newest Shopping Center
Cardo is Actually 1,400 Years Old
Entering the Old City of Jerusalem through the Lions Uate
on June 7, 1967, following the liberation of Jerusalem by tne
IDF in the Six-Day War. From left are Jerusalem
Commander Gen, Uzi Narhiss, Defense Minister Moshe
Dayan, and IDF Chief of Staff Yiuhak Rabin.
ByJCHESKY
Jerusalem's newest
shopping center is actually
1,400 years old. The
Byzantine Cardo,
unearthed during the
archaeological excavations
in the Jewish Quarter of
the Old City, has been
reincarnated as a modern
bazaar. Where original
Crusader shops were built
700 years ago on the
Byzantine axis of southern
Jerusalem, clothing, reli-
gious articles, books and
jewelry are now being
sold.
"We could have left it as an
ancient ruin," explains Jewish
Quarter archaeologist Prof.
Nahman Avigad, "but we felt the
best way to preserve the site was
to reopen it. Even though the
Cardo is a historical site, we felt
that it must find its place again
in the living city."
The 32.5-meter-wide
collonaded boulevard was rev-
ealed in 1975. Avigad's staff were
using a Sixth Century mosaic
map found on the floor of a
church in Maydva, Jordan.
THEY HIT the ancient Cardo
paving stones two meters down.
"We were convinced that the
map was accurate because many
of the buildings in the area had
used pieces of ancient columns in
their construction," the archaeo-
logist explained. "And we hit it
with our first trial pit."
Since many of the buildings
Continued on Page 11 A


Page 18-B Th.TpwiQh PUfy;,,, c^j_.. %m~%*>


.;,: I
Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 26,1984
Oswego, N.Y. Camp Plans
Holocaust Museum Exhibition
By ROCHELLE SAIDEL
ALBANY, N.Y. -
(JTA) The site and
experiences of the 982
refugees in the displaced
persons camp that was
located in Oswego, N.Y.
during World War II, the
only refugee camp in the
United States that
sheltered victims of the
Holocaust, will be a focal
point of the Holocaust
exhibit in the New York
State Museum in Albany,
it was announced by State
Senate Democratic Leader
Manfred Ohrenstein (D.,
N.Y.).
The DP camp, Fort Ontario,
was the subject of a discussion
here at the first meeting of the
advisory board of the State
Holocaust Memorial Resource
Center-Exhibit earlier this
month. Some 50 Holocaust
survivors, professors, teachers
and other concerned citizens from
throughout the state, have been
appointed to the board by
Ohrenstein.
ABRAHAM KARP, a profes
sor of Jewish studies at the
University of Rochester, a past
Mondale Eyes
Jewish Support
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Democratic Presidential hopeful
Walter Mondale has indicated
here that he expects support for
his candidacy from the American
Jewish community, even if, as
one interviewer suggested, he
"holds hands up with Jesse
Jackson" at the end of the Dem-
ocratic convention in San Fran-
cisco.
"Over the years, I have
demonstrated sensitivity on
issues of social justice and
foreign policy of concern to
Jews," said Mondale. a former
Vice President, in an interview
with editors and reporters of the
Washington Post. "I think I
enjoy their trust."
president of the American Jewish
Historical Society and now a
member of the advisory board,
described the DP camp as having
both "sunshine and shadows."
The sunshine, he said, was
provided by Jewish individuals
and organizations who cared for
the refugees. The shadows were
the Justice and State Depart-
ments.
The refugees, most of them
Jewish, were brought from Italy
to America by special order of
President Roosevelt in the
summer of 1944. While the
Oswego camp saved the lives of
982 refugees, conditions and
regulations in the camp were less
than ideal, Karp noted. They
were housed in army barracks
behind barbed wire, and had to
agree to return to their home-
lands after the war. Only the
intervention of President Truman
prevented their deportation,
Karp said.
HE NOTED that it was appro-
priate for New York State to
sponsor a Holocaust memorial
because, in 1777, New York was
the first state to grant Jews full
equality, and currently one of
every five Jews lives in New York
State. Because of the DP camp,
this state, more than any other
state in the country, was touched
by the Holocaust while it still
raged, Karp said.
A bronze sculpture commis-
sioned and created by Albany
artist Hy Rosen was unveiled by
the artist at the advisory board
meeting and presented to
Ohrenstein for the Holocaust
exhibit in the State Museum. The
two-foot high sculpture is based
on the famous photo of a small
boy in the Warsaw ghetto, with
hands raised and an SS gun
pointed at his back.
The State legislature has
appropriated $90,000 with which
to launch the State Holocaust
project, at Ohrenstein's request.
Individuals are also contributing
seed money through the Greater
Albany Jewish Federation.
Working with the Federation, the
New York State Department of
Education will be responsible for
the exhibit and resource center.
Both the exhibit and resource
center will enhance the new
Holocaust studies program that
the Education Department has
launched in secondary schools.
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A resolution recognizing the contributions
made by Jack Kassewitz to Miami-Dade
Community College is shown being pre-
sented to Mr. Kassewitz's widow, Ruth,
and other members of the family at the
early May meeting of the M-DCC District
Board of Trustees. Left to right are Jack
Kassewitz, Jr.; Sheila Kassewitz, a niece;
Dick Blower, Mrs. Kassewitz' brother;
Ruth Kassewitz; Daniel K. Gill, Board
chairman; and Dr. Robert H. McCabe. Af-
DCC president. Mr. Kassewitz, who died
on April 16, was a Miami News columnist
and vice-chairman of the Board of M-DCC.
A building bearing his name is on the Af-
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Friday, May 25,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Women in Pulpit
Conservative Rabbis Again Ordain Sturdy 'No'
Continued from Page 1-A
bv fewer votes.
THE APPLICATION of
.nnther Reform-ordained woman
XjrJan Kaufman of Washing-
D.C. has been approved by
L' appropriate RA committees
for consideration for convention
action. But her application was
tabled Both she and Magidson
STordained in 1979 by the
Hebrew Union College, the
Reform seminary branch in New
York City.
Ordination into the Conser-
vative rabbinate is by two
means: attendance at the move-
ment's Jewish Theological Semi-
nary of America (JTS) rabbinical
school, which leads to ordination
for successful applicants; or
admission by a 75 percent vote of
rabbis present and voting at an
RA convention.
A chronic shortage of rabbis
for Conservative pulpits has led
the RA in past years to accept
more than 500 applicants for RA
membership and Conservative
rabbinical status notably from
Reform and Reconstmctionist
seminaries. But until Magidson
made her unsuccessful bid for RA
W. Bankers
To Provide
Legal Aid
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
West Bank settlers, reversing an
earlier decision, have decided to
provide legal aid to suspected
members of a Jewish terrorist
underground currently under
investigation. About 50 leaders
of settlements in Judaea,
Samaria, Gaza and the Golan
Heights, met to consider the
matter.
Twenty-five suspects have
been taken into custody since
security forces foiled an attempt
to sabotage Arab-owned buses in
East Jerusalem April 27. Most
are said to be residents of the
West Rank and Golan Heights
and some reportedly are linked to
leaders of the Gush Emunim.
Rabbi Moshe Levinger, the
Gush leader in Hebron, was
arrested for questioning about
his alleged links to the under-
ground. He is still incarcerated,
reportedly in solitary
confinement.
Levinger, 48, the father of 11
children, is reported by the media
to be suspected of having had
advance knowledge of violent
acts against Arabs carried out or
planned by the underground. His
son-in-law was one of the first
suspects arrested when the
investigation began.
The meeting of the Council of
settlements in Judaea and
Samaria was to have been held at
Kibbutz Kfar Etzion. It was
moved to nearby Yad Shapiro
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membership at the 1983 RA con-
vention in Dallas, all of the
candidates voted on for RA
membership and status as Con-
servative rabbis had been men.
The vote reflected, in part, the
objections of Conservative rabbis
who believe that the only route to
the Conservative rabbinate
should be via the JTS rabbinical
school. But until last October,
women had been barred from
admission to the school since its
founding.
IN OCTOBER, after years of
heated debate, in which three
recent successive RA conven-
tions endorsed admission of
women to the JTS rabbinical
school, the JTS Faculty Senate
yielded and agreed to do so,
starting with the 1984-85 class in
the fall.
Another basic source of op-
position to women rabbis in the
Conservative movement, on
halachic principle, comes from a
strong group of rightwing RA
members and supporters in the
active rabbinate, who came in a
body to the RA convention which
ended last week to oppose the
admission vote on the two women
Reform rabbis. Those conser-
vative rabbis and scholars were a
major force over the years in
keeping the JTS rabbinical
school closed to women but are
now conseered a weakened force
in the movement.
The changed circumstances
which make an RA vote such as
last week's ever unlikely again is
not merely the fact that more
than 20 women have been en-
rolled in the JTS rabbinical
school for the coming fall term,
but, the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency was reliably told, one of
the members of the school's
entering class has earned suf-
ficient JTS credits so that,
barring unexpected develop-
ments, she will complete the
school's academic requirements
and be graduated next June and
thus achieve ordination as the
first Conservative woman rabbi
in American history. Her identity
was withheld by the JTA's
source.
ACCORDINGLY, the JTA
was told, when the RA meets in
convention next spring, the
woman will be a member of the
1984-85 rabbinical school grad-
uating class whose members will
be routinely voted into RA mem-
bership.
Magidson, who serves as "solo
rabbi" of a small Conservative
congregation, Beth Shalom, in
Clifton Park, said after yester-
day's vote that she was "not sur-
prised" but did have "deep
regrets" at being rejected for the
Conservative rabbinate a second
time.
She added she understood "the
sentiment" in the Conservative
movement that the movement
should wait for its first Conser-
vative rabbi to go through the
JTS rabbinical school qualifying
process. Magidson said that,
"had I been permitted to attend
classes" at the school, "I would
have gone to the Jewish Theolog-
ical Seminary."
RABBI Arnold Goodman of
Atlanta, the outgoing president
of the 1,200-member RA, said the
vote showed there was still "a
segment of our colleagues who
are committed to wait for the
first woman rabbi to be ordained
by the Seminary." He added that
the vote "further reflects the
existence of colleagues whose
interpretation of Jewish law leads
them to conclude that there are
still Jewish legal considerations
that stand in the way of women
being ordained as rabbis."
Rabbi Alexander Shapiro of
Congregation Oheb Shalom of
South Orange, N.J., the new RA
president, told the convention
that "the time will come when
Rabbi Magidson and her fellow
women rabbis will take their
place in our ranks and share with
us their insights, resourcefulness
and scholarship."
On another matter, the 600
rabbinical delegates, responding
to a call from Goodman, reaf-
firmed the stand of the RA's
Committee on Law and Stan-
dards rejecting any efforts to
weaken the historic rule that
Jewish identity can be paaaed on
to children only by a Ji
mother.
AT ISSUE was a statement
adopted at the 1983 Los Angeles
convention by the Central Con-
ference of American Rabbis, the
association of reform rabbis,
which recommended that chil-
dren of mixed marriages, whether
or not the mother was Jewish,
were to have "the presumption"
of being considered Jeiwsh if
with the consent of the intermar-
ried parents the children were
raised publicly as Jews.
In April, 1983, the RA Com-
mittee on Jewish Law and Stan-
dards voted 18-1 to reaffirm the
traditional view in Judaism that
the religion of a child is based
solely on the religion of the
mother, a position also held
throughout Orthodox Judaism.
In calling for the standing vote
of reaffirmation, Goodman
declared, "We will continue to
accept only the traditional view
that Jewish status is conferred
matrilineally, not patrilineally."
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Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board
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Pagel8-B The Jewish FlnriHin / 9*U
oi. \A~.. 10 1 net 1
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 25,1984
Arabs Angered
Denounce Morocco's Friendship to Israel
Continued from Page 1 A
Alignment, said he was
convinced that the Moroccan
King could play a key role by
inducing Palestinians and
Jordanians to join the peace
process. He saw the presence of
Israelis in Rabat as a first step
toward peace in the Middle East
and the promotion of a dialogue
between Arabs and Jews.
AHARON AbuHatzeira, the
Moroccan-bom leader of the
Tami Party, a partner in the
Likud-led coalition, noted that
the leader of the Israeli delega-
tion, Labor MK Rafael Edri, had
extended an invitation to Hassan
to visit Israel.
According to Abu-Hatzeira,
the Moroccan monarch is the
only Arab head of state apart
from the President of Egypt
who may be able to make such a
visit to initiate a general dialogue
between Arabs and Jews for
peace in the Middle East.
He said the Israeli delegation
had not suggested that the King
modify his positions on the Arab-
Israel dispute when it invited him
to Israel.
But observers here have cau-
tioned against expectations that
spectacular results will emerge
from the Rabat conference in the
near future. They noted in that
connection that relations between
Israel and Egypt are at their
lowest point since they signed
their peace treaty in 1979 and
that Syria still opposes the peace
process.
THE PRESENCE of Israelis
in the Moroccan capital has
already had sharp repercussions.
Syria has recalled its Ambas-
sador to Morocco and six Palesti-
nian terrorist groups, often in
conflict with each other, have
denounced what they branded
the dangerous and suspicious role
played by the Moroccan govern-
ment.
In the view of those organ-
izations, Morocco is the foremost
"reactionary" regime in the Arab
world, spawning "treason,"
notably its alleged sponsorship of
the Camp David accords.
The latter was an allusion to
the secret negotiations carriai
out m1 Morocco between u2
and Egyptian represent*^
which resulted in the l.t
President Anwar Sadat's visit Z.
Jerusalem in 1977. lSvunt>
T^ .Arb. groups that
issued the denunciation are the
Popular Front for the Liberation
of Palestine, headed by Geoee
Habash; the Popular Democrat*
Front for the Liberation of Pale8
tine, led by Nayif Hawatmeh th.
Popular Front for the Liberation
of Palestine-General Command
of Ahmed Jibril; the Popular
Fighting Front of Samir
Ghocheh; the pro-Syrian ai
Saika; and the El Fatah dis-
sidents opposed to PLO chief
Yasir Arafat.
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ATP AC'S Dine Says
Israel Was 'Engine' Behind Foreign Aid Bill
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA)
_ Thomas Dine, executive
director of the American
I Israel Public Affairs
1 Committee (AIPAC)
claims here that Israel
was the engine that passed
the foreign aid bill" in the
House of Representatives.
The measure, adopted by a
close 211-206 vote last Thursday,
wa9 controversial because it
contained aid for Central
America, Dine said in a briefing
it the office of the New York
Jewish Community Relations
Council Many Congressmen
I supported the bill because it also
contained an aid package for
Israel. Dine said.
HE NOTED in that connection
that 21 of the 31 Jewish members
of the House voted in favor of the
measure and the 10 who voted
against it did so because of the
controversy over Central
America.
The foreign aid bill includes
$2.5 billion in aid for Israel in
i5scal 1985. all of it in grants.
Dine noted that it is the first time
that the entire aid package for
Israel is in the form of grants. It
includes $1-4 billion in military
aid and $1-1 billion in economic
aid.
The Senate will consider its
own foreign aid bill early next
month and there is already a
move there to increase the aid to
Israel by $100 million, Dine said.
He stressed in his briefing that
relations between Israel and the
U.S. are "very strong" on the
legislative level and that "things
that are taking place in U.S.-
Israel relations now were
unthinkable only a few years
ago."
DINE SAID the good-will
toward Israel in the House was
further demonstrated recently
when an amendment to the
foreign aid bill introduced by
Rep. Nick Rahall (D., W.Va.)
vhich would have cut appro-
priations for development of the
Lavie, Israel's second generation
jet fighter plane, was rejected by
a vote of 379-40.
Another issue that points to
the strong relationship between
Washington and Jerusalem
today is the Free Trade Area
agreed to by President Reagan
and Premier Yitzhak Shamir on
November 29,1983.
Congressional action is
I required to provide the author-
> ization and implementation of the
project. AIPAC is "pushing very
hard" on this issue, Dine said. He
noted that there was opposition
to the Free Trade Area from
various business groups in the
I U-o.
Reagan and Shamir also
I agreed on strategic cooperation
between the U.S. and Israel.
Representatives of both countries
presently engaged in nego-
tiations on this and while both
tfveroments are "tight lipped,"
the negotiations are progressing.
Dine said.
THE AIPAC official also
Israel's Unemployed
Hanks on Rise
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
lUnemployment in Israel roae by
| percent from October, 1983 to
IMarch, 1984, according to figures
Faeased by the Central Bureau of
Statistics. There are 80,000
bless, or 5.7 percent of the work
[*ce. Unemployment six months
J stood at 66,000. The
rmnce Ministry declined to
spoke of pending legislation to Embassy there from Tel Aviv,
recognize Jerusalem as Israel's This matter enjoys broad bi-
capital and to transfer the U.S. partisan support in both houses
Friday, May 25,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Nevertheless, Dine said,
AIPAC will continue to press the
matter and will push for legisla-
tion even "if it takes a couple of
Congresses to pass such a
controversial issue."
Dine predicted that U.S.-Israel
relations will grow even stronger
toward the end of this year "in
kind, not only in rhetoric. We are
going to keep up the
momentum," he said.
of Congress, he said. But it is a
"controversial" issue and the
Administration is opposed.
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Page 18-B The Jewish FlnriHiar, p-;^.... u... m t.
Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 26,1984
i
'
Jerusalem Dau
Observance Focuses on Big Expansion
Continued from Page 5-A
Emfle Grunzweig, the Peace Now
demonstrator whose only crime
was his views. Emile was an IDF
parachute officer who paid for his
views with his life, and it seems
unlikely that it was an Arab who
threw the grenade which cut him
down. There have been, most re-
cently, the Arab terrorist bomb-
ing that resulted in the wounding
of 48 persons and, before that,
the unhappy bus attack in Jeru-
salem resulting in deaths and
serious injuries.
A similarly worrying phenom-
enon is the violence of ultra-
Orthodox extremists against
Jews who reject the outlook of
religious zealots. The war cry of
shab bass hab bos preceded
weekly stone-throwings on the
Ramot road, as if this has any-
thing to do with the real tradi-
tions of Judaism.
Other struggles surrounded
the archaeological dig on the site
of King David's city which it was
claimed was a former cemetery,
and the proposed sports stadium
in the northern suburb of
Shuafat.
Some ultra-Orthodox elements
struck at the heart of Jerusalem
democracy last September when
they physically attacked Mayor
Kollek as he left a synagogue
after Shabbat prayers. That he
was so overwhelmingly reelected
as Mayor shows how remote
these enclaves of fanaticism are
from the real Jerusalem. Most of
the very many Orthodox Jews in
Jerusalem deplore the extremism
and intolerance of the zealots,
whom they see as a noisy and
harmful element in Jerusalem.
French Jews
Mark Anniversary
PARIS (JTA) French
Jewry celebrated the 40th anni-
versary of the founding of the
Representative Council of French
Jewish Organizations (CRIF) by
members of the Jewish under-
ground in German-occupied
France in 1944 as a symbol of
their determination to survive
and rebuild the Jewish institu-
tions destroyed by the Nazis.
The principle ceremonies were
held in Lyon where Klaus Barbie,
the wartime Gestapo chief there,
is now in prison awaiting trial for
crimes against humanity. They
were attended, among others, by
the Archbishop of Lyon, Cardinal
Albert Decourtray, who stressed
his solidarity with the Jewish
people.
The
Mum
Million
Dollar
Kosher
IN A MORE optimistic vein,
tensions have abated between
Sephardi and Ashkenazi Jews
during the years I have lived in
Jerusalem, while socio-economic
disparities remain, the gap is
narrowing, partly through social
programs like Project Renewal
and partly through a general con-
sensus that integration is desir-
able. There are more and more
Ashkenazi-Sephardi marriages,
producing children to whom the
differences are meaningless.
The new suburbs have been
particularly helpful in breaking
down ethnic barriers as a cross-
section of Israelis move into
them. Both the fifth President,
Yitzhak Navon, and his suc-
cessor, Chaim Herzog, believe
that in this area of life Israel is
making progress. Jerusalem cer-
tainly is.
But it is not only the outskirts
of Jerusalem that have changed
in the last five years. Over the
years, the downtown area has
come closer to resembling the
center of a thriving capital city,
even if we have nothing like
Dizengoff or Kikar Hamelachim
in Tel Aviv. Several high rise
buildings have sprung up, and
Ben Yehuda street has become a
pedestrian mall filled with side-
walk cafes.
MANY JERUSALEMITES
are proud that the city is so un-
like Tel Aviv; others would wel-
come a more modern lifestyle.
Some think there is an unbridge-
able contradiction here, others
that Jerusalem in the 1980's can
use some changes but without
destroying its special atmos-
phere.
Elsewhere the city has seen
many other projects reach frui-
tion in the last five years. The
Hebrew University opened its
new campus on Mount Scopus.
Shaare Zedek moved to a lavish
new medical center on Mount
Herzl. The Bank of Israel was
completed, a building with
character rather than another
large block of offices. New parks
like the Liberty Bell Garden
further beautified the city, whose
greenness is already proverbial;
and a dozen or so hotels were
opened or are in the later stages
of construction, so that more
visitors can appreciate Jeru-
salem's scenic pleasures and
historical heritage. Some of the
hotels can even be proud of their
own architecture.
Even the timeless, walled "Old
City" has undergone a radical
change. The recently-recon-
structed Jewish Quarter has
restored a part of the city
destroyed during the Jordanian
occupation, which ended in the
Six-Day War of June, 1967. A
centerpiece of the Jewish Quarter
is the Cardo, a shopping precinct
built along an ancient Roman
thoroughfare.
With the burgeoning construc-
tion, Jerusalems population has
burst through the 400,000 barrier
since 1979 and now stands at
430,000. Municipal planners say
that the city's projected popula-
tion will be no more than 600,000.
THE CAPITAL'S diplomatic
population has, on the other
hand, shrunken considerably in
the last five years. The Jerusalem
Law of 1980 drove the 13 embas-
sies that were located in the city
down to Tel Aviv, though that of
Costa Rica has since returned.
The law stipulated what had
already been implemented
following the Six-Day War,
enabling the Arabs to spell out
how effective their diplomatic
pressure can be.
One Institution that remains in
Jerusalem is, as we have noted,
Mayor Teddy Kollek himself. Re-
elected last October for a fifth
term of office, he has served as
mayor since 1965. Kollek's
promotion of racial and religious
tolerance, his benevolent bullying
for the best interests of all Jeru-
salemites and his untiring efforts
to improve our quality of life
these don't change.
I may be biased, but in my
view, the fact that 65 percent of
Jerusalemites voted for Kollek is
the most optimistic sign that
during the coming five years
peace and harmony will prevail in
the eternal city.
Two Jewish Teens Arrested
In Anti-Semitic Graffiti Case _
NEW YORK (JTA) Two Jewish teenagers were
arrested recently and charged in connection with last"
month's anti-Semitic graffiti and swastikas daubing of
apartments in one of the buildings in Co-Op City, the
massive cooperative in The Bronx.
The boys, ages 14 and 15, attempted to collect
from police a $3,500 reward being offered by the Co-
Op's management for information about the vandalism.
The identities of the two boys were not released because
of their youth, police said.
A POLICE SPOKESMAN said the two had tried
to collect the reward, saying they knew who had daubed
the doors of some 51 apartments in Co-Op City. After
an investigation, it was determined that the teenagers
had lied to police, and they were subsequently arrested.
The two youths, arrested in their apartments in Co-
Op City, have been charged as juveniles with
conspiracy, criminal mischief and falsely reporting a
police incident. The youths are also suspects in other
similar incidents dating back to November, 1983. Police*
said the youths described their action as a "prank."
Yemen-Born Kessar Will
Take Over as Histadrut Chief
TEL AVIV (JTA) Yisrael Kessar, a 53-year-
old Yemen-bom Jew, was appointed by the Histadrut
Executive Committee as the new Secretary General of
the trade union federation. He was also named
chairman of the Hevrat Ha'ovdim, the Histadrut.
holding company and will head the Lavon Institute, the
research institute of Histadrut.
KESSAR, who was brought to Palestine from
Yemen by his parents at the age of two, succeeds
Yeroham Meshel who is retiring after nearly 10 years as
the head of Histadrut. Meshel had been grooming
Kessar for some time to take over the office. The
younger man served previously as Deputy Secretary
General and head of Histadrut's trades union
department. He also served for a time as Histadrut
Treasurer.
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Friday, May 26,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A

Cardo, a restored Jerusalem site which
used in commercial life during the
antine period 1,400 years ago and by
*y":*.""iii.i .in.,. ~ """" m
the Crusaders 700 years ago. The excava-
tions and the new shopping center on the
old site are now open to the public.
Shopping Center Is 1,400 Years Old
Dtinued from Page 5-A
the Jewish Quarter after it
aken from Jordan in 1967
intact. Avigad had to
t himself to open areas and
where the buildings were
nger sound and could be
:ed down. In all, about 185
\s of the Byzantine Cardo
excavated. The rest remains
Jewish Quarter housing.
the initial dig, a series of
n columns and capitals was
ered. As the dig proceeded
ward, the material was
suitable for reconstruction.
are stretch of ancient
mine vaulted shops was
rthed. In their ancient stone
were slots for wooden
s to support
flanked the
en two rows
found was
der bazaar.
OF. AVIGAD had anti-
d finding shops on the
|o because the Arabs, who
Red the Byzantines, "did not
such wide streets." But he
astonished to find the
ed Crusader market with its
stone entranceways. "This
e finest Crusader market
! found in Jerusalem," he
the porticos
open space
of
a
columns,
vaulted
<-.
says. "And we had no idea it was
there."
Until the Jewish Quarter dig,
historians had believed the
Byzantine Cardo was just a
continuation of the First Century
Roman Axis of Hadrian's Aeolia
Capitolina, built on the ruins of
the Jewish Jerusalem he sacked.
But the columns were Byzantine
Corinthian. The artifacts and
shards found under the Cardo
paving stones were mostly
Byzantine, with a few Roman
ones, indicating that the legions
had camped there, outside the
city walls.
Avigad believes the
Byzantines extended the Roman
street to connect the Church of
the Holy Sepulchre to other
churches to the south.
Another important find was an
ancient Israelite tower dating
from the Seventh Century BCE.
Alongside it were Babylonian
arrowheads, presumed to have
been shot during the destruction
of the first Temple. The Tower
was incorporated in a
Hasmonean Jewish wall
described by Josephus, the First
Century Jewish historian. This
proved that David's Jerusalem
was much larger than originally
thought.
DURING THE early stares of
the excavation, there were
discussions among Israeli
archaeologists over whether to
open the Cardo up to the public.
But Avigad's view prevailed. A
row of ancient Roman columns
was restored, and part of the
ancient Byzantine portico was
rebuilt to show how the street
had looked 1,400 years ago. The
Crusader shops, which were
intact, were cleaned up and
rented out, but only to businesses
that the Jewish Quarter Devel-
opment Company believed suit-
able. For instance, a pizza parlor
was denied a lease. The ancient
Israelite wall underneath was
kept exposed via a floodlit shaft
at the northern end of the Cardo
shopping mall.
One of the store-owners on the
Cardo, Gracia Roman, says she
sees herself as part of a historical
continuum, "like a grain of sand
or ancient clay, a part of the life
of the city.*' Gracia sells both
modern souvenirs and ancient
glass and some coins from the
time the Cardo was last function-
ing. "Besides being steeped in
history, being here makes me feel
young. When everything is 1,000
or 2,000 years old, what's 40
years?"
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Page 18-B The Jewish Flnr,H;a
r, IV;^,.., *-.. in lr\ry.
Page 12-A The Jewish Florklian / Friday, May 25,1984
Wiesenthal Center
Despite Rauff s Death, They'll
Press Church Tie
Continued from Page 1-A
shelter by the church.
In Israel, the reaction to
Rauff s death was a sense of
frustration that war criminals
continue to remain free without
being brought to justice for their
war crimes. "It is a pity that this
man will not be brought to
justice,'' said Avi Pasner,
spokesman for Premier Yitzhak
Shamir. "It is shameful. We hope
that other war criminals who are
still hiding will not escape their
punishment."
Gideon Hausner, chairman of
Yad Vashem and prosecutor of
Nazi war criminal Adolf
Eichmann at his 1961 trial,
express similar frustration that
Rauff never was brought to
justice. He said Rauff was one of
the privileged war criminals to
have died in his own bed,
escaping justice for many years.
RAUFF IS held responsible for
the death of an estimated 200,000
Jews in Europe who were killed in
the mobile gas vans he designed
which channelled exhaust fumes
back into the air-tight vehicles.
Known as "Black Ravens," the
vans were sometimes disguised
as Red Cross vehicles. They were
used primarily in the early stages
of the Holocaust before the
construction of Auschwitz and
other death camps which carried
out Hitler's final solution on a
larger scale.
Born in Kothen, Germany, on
June 19, 1906, Rauff joined
Mizrachi Bank Reports Huge
948 Million Shekel Loss in '83
By HUGH ORGEL
And GIL SEDAN
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The Mizrachi Bank, one of
the four largest in Israel,
announced a 948 million
shekel loss last year, the
equivalent of $5.4 million at
the current exchange rate.
This compared to a 1.3
billion Shekel ($7.7 million)
profit in 1982.
The annual balance sheet was
published last week. Bank
president Aharon Meir blamed
the red ink on the government's
economic and financial policies
which, he said, drained public
confidence in the Shekel and
drove investors and customers to
the U.S. Dollar. Israel's other
major banks will publish their
balance sheets in the next few
days and all are expected to show
a loss, according to banking
circles.
The banks have been trying,
without success, to persuade the
Bank of Israel and the Treasury
to reconsider their excess profits
tax policy so that banks can
present a better picture to
customers at home and abroad.
The banks claim government
policy has created liquidity
problems as depositors withdrew
Shekels to buy Dollars.
Public confidence in the banks
was severely damaged last year
by the sudden collapse in the
price of bank shares, a favorite
form of savings. This occurred
after the banks were forced by
financial exigencies to stop
shoring up the value of their
shares.
Israeli wage-earners are also
glum. While they will receive a
38.2 percent cost-of-living incre-
ment on their April salaries, it
will be eroded by the expected 20
percent rise in the consumer price
index for April.
Meanwhile, the value of the
Shekel continues to decline. The
Tel Aviv black market rate was
200 Shekels to SI, a 1.8 percent
devaluation over the weekend.
Hitlers Nazi police at the age of
31. He moved up to the rank ol
colonel in the SS and later served
in Tunisia and Italy before being
arrested in Milan where he was
the police chief in the war's last
stages. He was sent to the Rimini
detention center, but soon
escaped and at the end of 1946
went to Naples. In testimony
before the Chilean Supreme
Court, Rauff said he was aided in
Italy after his escape from Rimini
by a Catholic priest and sheltered
in "convents of the Holy See" for
some 18 months.
HE WAS reunited with his
family and travelled to Syria,
then to Ecuador in 1949 and
finally to Chile where he lived
since 1958. He maintained his
German citizenship. In 1963, the
Chilean Supreme Court rejected a
request for his extradition from
West Germany on the basis that
Chile's 15 year statute of limit-
ations had expired.
Rauff, who suffered from lung
cancer in recent years, had lived
primarily in Santiago and was
rarely seen in public. Last
February, Beate Klarsfeld, the
famed Nazi-hunter, was arrested
outside Rauff s home in Santiago
during a demonstration urging
the Chilean government to
extradite Rauff to West
Germany. Israel also sought his
extradition.
But despite the international
efforts to have Rauff brought to
justice, Chile President August
Pinochet would not act on the
requests. He maintained in an
interview last March that "the
highest court in the land decided
Rauff could stay." While he said
he regretted Rauff s actions
during the war, Pinochet said:
"But that was a long time ago. I
can't do anything about it once
the courts have decided."
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Friday, May 26,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
oJ^ndUn
Scenario for Exciting Mondale Race
Continued from Page 4-A
-utter how profound the
ministration blunders, even in
PLovering of scandal in the
C and public lives of his
inner circle. Reagan always
Tunscathed. He is called
to bear no responsibility for
of his decisions let alone
nns Why bother an electorate
tied to be so insensitive
charges of Reaganesque
jsitivity?
rfondale. then, is best advised
I ignore this. As a campaign
1 ano. it would not only be
ffective. Worse, it would be
i and sleep can be the only
Mondale should be fore-
ned to think Stevenson-
enhower again and stay away
a replay of those crushingly
jteresting campaigns.
ftffiN WHAT should
Udale do? For starters, he
Iht to address himself to
nd discussions of what are
.ly becoming the forgotten
triples of American idealism.
C is no doubt that our crass
Jsh for material things has left
[a cruel and barbarous nation.
[is in this licentious national
iavior that lies our capacity for
llence, our indifference to the
\t and our growing alienation
i the aging.
fa should address the sharp
ase in America's illiteracy,
functional and hard-core.
is not an issue to be toyed
_. only when politicians warn
[that we are losing out to the
aians in military superiority
ause our "students" (in these
the word should best be
ollees") are by contrast so
eperately poor in mathematics
the sciences. That's a
butnik era argument and a
d-endroad.
lather, he should make it clear
that American ilhteracy begins,
in fact, with a frightening inab-
ility to read, write and speak
English effectively. Worse, with
a lack of interest in these life-
giving skills as irrelevant to the
national preoccupation with sex,
food and fast cars. And that
these things pose a threat to
America far more dangerous than
Mr. Reagan dreams of at the
Kremlin.
I AM convinced that a whole
nation would stop and listen to
Mondale were he to deplore the
violence and ignorance of tele-
vision as a dominant and
inadmissibly seductive force in
this American illiteracy scourge.
Or were Mondale to take his
gloves off and give equal time to
the insanity of the media gener-
ally that have contributed to
turning the American social
system topsy-turvy so that it is
the still-inarticulate young who
set the patterns for our social
behavior in bad taste, intellectual
sloth, absurd commercial
(product) preferences, and
ignorance of our past history and
ideals.
Similarly, a Walter Mondale
who would criticize as
un American the growing attempt
to shoe-horn sectarian religious
practices into the body politic of
the nation on every level would
most assuredly earn him the
enmity of many.
BUT IT WOULD earn him the
enthusiastic support of others
schooled in the history of Europe
and of the wisdom of the
Founding Fathers who barred
this kind of intervention. Would
he win or lose more in such a
frank statement? That is hard to
say, but it is a risk he should be
prepared to take especially
Mondale, who with Sen. Gary
Hart had to sit silently by at
Two New Settlements
Subject of Plea for Inquiry
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Mice Minister Moshe Nissim
isked the Cabinet to recon-
|er the decision by the
pisterial Settlement Com-
ttee to establish two new
[tlements on disputed land in
West Bank. Attorney
neral Yitzhak Zamir has also
^rvened.
Nissim questioned the legality
he decision because ownership
he land allotted for the settle-
its has not been determined
Ithe courts The settlements, to
Jknown as Neriya and Yaarit,
[, slated for western Samaria.
sun's concern stems from
al cases in which developers
West Bank land to Israeli
omers who discovered later
p it did not legally belong to
\s a result of such scandals,
government tightened
controls over West Bank land
sales to protect buyers. But the
Ministerial Settlement Com-
mittee, chaired by Science
Minister Yuval Neeman, acted
yesterday, for the first time,
without ascertaining the legal
status of the land involved.
The committee also approved
three other new settlements
Hachlili near Hebron, Migdalim
in eastern Samaria, and Adam,
north of Jerusalem. These and
other settlements serve as
bedroom communities for Israelis
who live on the West Bank and
work in Israel. But financial diffi-
culties must be overcome before
they can be built.
Matityahu Drobless, co-
chairman of the World Zionist
Organization's Settlement
Department, said it would be
impossible to establish Hachlili
and Migdalim without more
government aid.
Police in S. Africa Investigate
Possible Arson at Jewish Site
[JOHANNESBURG (JTA)
Police are investigating the
sibility of arson in a fire that
Eot the Students Union
Bding in Witwatersrand
iversity after a week of clashes
een Moslem and Jewish
dents.
he blaze, which gutted the
ond floor of the building, is
Mved to have been started
("berately in the offices of the
Qth African Union of Jewish
"dents (SAUJS).
ouble began on the campus
N the Moslem Student Asso-
ciation distributed anti-Semitic
and anti-Zionist material in the
course of an Islamic Week
program. Subsequently, shots
were fired into the Moslem
Student Association's head-
quarters. This was followed by a
rash of anti-Jewish graffiti
sprayed on campus walls.
Feelings are running high
among the university's 4,000
Jewish students. The Zionist
Record, a Jewish weekly, has
taken the university authorities
to task for "bumbling inep-
titude" in handling the situation.
Columbia University in their
appearance with the Rev. Jesse
Jackson who used so important a
political occasion televised
nationally as to lecture the
universe on what Jesus said in
one Gospel or another.
In all of these considerations,
Mondale must also be prepared
to list as primary the need to
revamp the presidential election
process, which because of its
ever-increasing length, distracts
incumbent Presidents from the
genuine business of the nation for
far too long a time and which is
costly these days to the point of
obscenity, thus favoring the rich
an inequity all of the
Democratic hopefuls know better
than anybody.
Is this prescription a sound
guarantee for success? Of course
not, but Mondale's chances are
slender to begin with, or even
Hart's if I am wrong, and he
becomes the standard-bearer. Or
some other Dark Horse
compromise.
AMERICAN pragmatic
principles at the very least, then,
ought to suggest to Mondale that
discussing these dominantly
domestic issues might well earn
him an immortality for sheer guts
and Jeffersonian honesty that
not even a victorious candidacy
on Mr. Reagan's own terms will
mm.
And what are Mr. Reagan's
terms? Just watch the first of a
series of perhaps 100 commercials
in the cause of Reagan's reelec-
tion that began on national tele-
vision Monday. They are the
brainchild of Tuesday Team Inc.
of New York, an outfit chosen by
Douglas Watts, the '84 Reagan-
Bush media director, to bring
success to the GOP.
This is the outfit that
packaged for television such
commercials as the Pepsi
Generation, Gallo wines, insipid
Hallmark greeting cards,
Pepperidge Farms breads and
cakes, and the like. Ronald
Reagan comes out looking like all
of them rolled into one. The com-
mercials feature not a single poli-
tical issue seriously addressed.
THEY APPEAL to the
nation's ilhteracy they rely on
it and wouldn't move to change it
for the world. They appeal to the
nation's ignorance of language
and of essential concerns and
they wouldn't change any of that,
either. They package the
President precisely as he
packages himself.
When Mr. Reagan bid farewell
last week to Mexico's President
Miguel de la Madrid after almost
three days of meetings in Wash-
ington, the two leaders could
hardly have been farther apart on
the questions dividing them over
policy in Central America.
But actor Reagan, observing
the cameras all around,
attempted a grand farewell
embrace of state, which de la
Madrid clearly rebuffed. A
Mexican official explained:
" 'A PICTURE of de la
Madrid embracing Reagan at the
White House would send the
wrong signal to Latin
America,' the official said. 'It
would imply that we have caved
in to American pressures. That is
why de la Madrid did not want to
give Reagan an abrazo. Those are
reserved for leaders with whom
we have absolutely no dif-
ficulties.' "
But that is precisely what
Reagan aimed for the picture
opportunity to suggest other-
wise, not the honesty of the
natural condition of their dis-
agreement. His latest TV
commercials fit perfectly this
deliberate attempt to deceive.
For Walter Mondale, a presi-
dential campaign based on
shaking up the nation to older,
less opportunistic virtues would
be a saving grace.
Aura Herzog, wife of the President of Israel (left),
congratulates Masha Lubelsky, secretary-general of Na'amat-
Pioneer Women, at the 50th anniversary celebration of
'Na'amat' magazine, recently held in Jerusalem. 'Na'amat' is
an influential periodical on women's issues in Israel
Prosecution of Nazis Necessary To
Teach New Generations Rosenne
documents not only for the State
of Israel but also on "behalf of
the six million Jews, among them
more than one million children,
that died in the concentration
camps and the gas chambers."
But the Ambassador added
that "unfortunately an attempt
is being made to deny the Jewish
people the right to its history" by
claims that Jews were not really
murdered and gassed. He said in
the last years alone, there had to
be testimony in trials in Europe
to prove the Holocaust really
happened. Neal Sher, director of
the OSI, said the documents
include testimony of actual mass
urderers who provide "incredible
evidence of the horrors of the
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Israeli Ambas-
sador Meir Rosenne
stressed that Israel
executed Adolf Eichmann,
and the United States is
prosecuting Nazi war
criminals living here "not
for vengeance" but "to
leave the following genera-
tions the memory" of the
horrors of the Holocaust
and "the hope that it will
never happen again."
Rosenne's statement came as
he received from Attorney
General William French Smith
microfilm records of six cases
against Nazi war criminals
conducted by the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special Invest-
igations (OSI) which are to be
placed in the Yad Vashem Holo-
caust Memorial in Jerusalem.
The presentation was made at a
ceremony in Smith's office
attended by about 25 persons,
including
survivors.
SMITH
contained
onies and
forth in
several Holocaust
SAID the microfilm
"important testim-
documents that set
graphic detail the
destruction of European Jews at
the hands of Nazis and their col-
laborators. They will serve as
additional proof of what hap-
pened during the days of the so-
called final solution" and will
"remind us that it should never
happen again."
Rosenne, in expressing
gratitude to the U.S. govern-
ment, said he was accepting the
Mfubus-Eai
past."
SHER SAID that the OSI is
"unique" in the Justice Depart-
ment since it "goes all over the
world in search of evidence." He
said the first place it went to was
Israel where many Holocaust
survivors live and where Yad
Vashem proved invaluable in
providing needed documents and
evidence.
Smith paid a special tribute to
the many Israeli Holocaust
survivors who testified. "It is
painful for someone to have to
relive that terrible time," he said.
But he noted that "these
survivors have served as
important witnesses in many OSI
cases."
Mark Talisman, vice chairman
of the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council, noted that before the
OSI was established "there were
many who were fearful of starting
such an effort over so many years
because they were fearful it will
be better to leave these things
unsaid."
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Page 18-B The Jewi.^h FlnriHin / "rhiinr MpaJ
* o^e xt*-/\ i ne jewisn r loriaian / Friday, May 25,1984
U.S. 'Welcomes' Hospitality
Of Morocco to Jewish Confab
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State
Department said that the United States "welcomes the
hospitality of the Moroccan government toward the
international conference of Jews from Morocco that
included a 35-member delegation from Israel.
"THE CONGRESS of the Council of Jewish
Communities in Morocco is a bi-annual private event
organized by the leaders of Moroccos Jewish
community, who this year invited participants from
Jewish communities outside of Morocco, btate
Department spokesman John Hughes said.
"The Moroccan government, which has
traditionaUy maintained a good relationship with its
minority communities, has apparently played a
welcoming role to this internationalized meeting in aid
of fostering dialogue on a range of questions oi interest
to the countries of the region," Hughes concluded.
District Court Extends Order
To Detain Rabbi Levinger
JERUSALEM (JTA) The district court in
Jerusalem has extended for another eight days the
detention order against Rabbi Moshe Levinger, one of
the spiritual leaders of the Gush Emunim movement
and the Jewish settlers in the old Jewish quarter of
Hebron. Levinger had originally been ordered held in
custody for 48 hours, while he was interrogated by
police.
REPORTS HAD suggested he would be released
quickly. But the police apparently need more time for
their investigations, and the district court agreed that
he should continue to be held in custody. Levinger was
arrested for questioning about his alleged links to a
Jewish terrorist underground responsible for acts of
violence against Arabs in the West Bank.
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fames in Newsx
JNF Chief Inducted Into Academy of Arts
Friday, May 25,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Lte Jacobson. president
wish National Fund, is
woman who was in-
Ls year into the Jewish
of Arts and Science,
society of Jews who
lined distinction in the
tees and related fields,
^aham I. Katsh, presi-
de Academy, said Mrs.
fg unanimous election as
I was in tribute to her
Ished career and her
jedication to the Jewish
ly and the cause of
Hasten, an Indianap-
iiess and philanthropic
Id a long-time activist in
Jtinsky movement, was
,sly elected president of
I Zionists of America in
|City.
ektor, outgoing preei-
chosen to serve as
.oard chairman upon
sion of his second two-
at the head of the
ember Zionist orga-
Poland, Hasten spent
ears in deep Russia,
his family reached
Europe in the 1940's. He
in the Jewish under-
jggle for an indepen-
and developed a close
relationship with
Begin, then
^rof thelrgun.
Iwhat set of attitudes
litments does the con-
[ rabbi respond to his or
|and challenges? "The
the Rabbi" is the
the 95th annual con-
[the Central Conference
Rabbis at Grossin-
fork, from June 18-21.
I address will be by Dr.
ler Plaut of Toronto,
Hart N. Hasten was elected
president of the Herut Zion-
ists of America at a meeting
of the organization in New
York City.
CCAR president. "The Outward
World: Tikum Olan (the order-
ing of the Universe)" will be ad-
dressed by Dr. Arthur Waskew
of Washington, and Rabbi
Richard Levy of Los Angeles,
who have taken an active role in
their professional work.
New York City Mayor Edward
I. Koch, U.S. Congressman Jack
Kemp (R.. N.Y.), and pollster and
political analyst Louis Harris will
be among those addressing the
National Commission meeting of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith on May 30-June 3, at
New York's Grand Hyatt Hotel.
The annual meeting of the
Commission, the League's
governing body, will bring
together some 400 Jewish
community leaders from all
sections of the nation and abroad.
Lee MacPhail, Jr. a dominant
force in baseball for over 40 years
and currently chairman of the
Major League Player Relations
Committee, will receive the
eighth annual Sports Torch of
Learning Award from the Ameri-
can Friends of the Hebrew Uni-
versity on June 14 in New York's
Hilton Hotel.
The award, recognizing
achievements in the world of
sports along with wide-ranging
humanitarian activities, will be
presented at the annual sports
dinner of the American Friends,
held in memory of the 11 Israeli
athletes slain during the 1972
Munich Olympics.
The dinner will be chaired by
Sandford Weill, president of
American Express. Toastmaster
will be Howard Coeell.
The North American Aliyah
Movement will hold its annual
national convention June 22-24 at
Grossinger'8 Hotel in New York's
Cat skills.
Keynote speaker will be Yoaef
Ben Aharon, adviser to Prime
Minister Yitzhak Shamir, and
former assistant to the Foreign
Minister.
Among special guests to be
present is Yochanan Simon,
director of the World Aliyah
Movement.
The president of the National
Conference of Christians and
Jews has responded to new anti-
Catholic attacks on the Pope and
the Roman Catholic Church by
mobilizing the 76 NCCJ offices
nationwide and national level
religious organizations to con-
demn and counteract the distri-
bution of the literature by the
Tony and Susan Alamo Christian
Foundation.
Jacqueline G. Wexler, presi-
dent of NCCJ, termed the eight-
page pamphlet entitled "The
Executive
'rogram
Executive MBA is an exciting,
btive program designed to allow
fives to keep pace in their profes-
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Barry Executive MBA program
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John Lowary. Jt
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M. Candace Kane. Manager
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LY UNIVERSITY
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Joseph Terranova C L J
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Pope'8 Secrets," now being dis-
tributed by the Alma, Arkansas-
based foundation, "libelous and
irrational attacks on the Roman
Catholic Church."
Conservative rabbis expressed
grave concern that the failure of
the United States and the Soviet
Union to achieve some form of
nuclear disarmament agreement
has increased the dangers of a
'' nuclear catastrophe.''
Members of the Rabbinical As-
sembly, meeting in Kiamesha
Lake, N.Y., for their 84th annual
convention, called on both the
Reagan administration and
Soviet leaders to return imme-
diately to the negotiating table.
The RA members asked for bi-
partisan support in achieving
this goal.
"The commitment we have as
Jews to preserve life transcends
the petty politics and illusionary
machismo that has typified the
current administration," said
Rabbi Jack Moline, chairman of
the Rabbinical Assembly's Reso-
lution Committee and spiritual
leader of Congregation B'nai
Israel in Danbury, Conn.
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Jfew Latin- Jewish Hebraica Club Opens
Jewish Floridian Feature
v nr hundred Latin-Jewish families
u! joined Hebraica, according to
Ees Gorin, president, and the club
E to recruit another 400 from the
y^s 2,000 Spanish-speaking Jewish
| families.
Miami Hebraica, three-month old
JrhPrnmoFt outpost of a chain of Latin
SSn Jewish social and athletic
rrh heid open house recently at its new
pity at NW 207th St.
According to Gorin, 25 percent of the
dub's members come from Cuba, 25 per-
il-, from Colombia, 15 percent from
Areentina. and most of the rest from
Panama, Mexico, Nicaragua, Salvador,
LUruKuay. 1'eru. Chile and Venezuela.
TAbout 4 percent of the members are non-
Latin, native American Jews.
THEY COME from a variety of profes-
sions, including real estate, banking, law,
medicine, accounting, retail sales, and
manufacturing, said Gorin, and many are
active in the general Jewish community,
including Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation board members Isaac Sklar, Guil-
lermo Sostchin, Bernardo Batievsky, and
Alex Halberstein.
Gorin says the club differs from con-
ventional \merican JCCs in that it aims
to make social and athletic activities a
family affair.
"The club is a copy of Jewish clubs in
Latin America," said Gorin. "We aim to
be more family-oriented in our services,
as opposed to 'fast-serve sports' that you
find at American JCCs. We want there to
be something for everyone from children
to elderly to do when they come to
Hebraica.'
ON THE other hand, says Gorin, the
other 12 Hebraica clubs throughout Latin
America serve a purpose which the Miami
club is "blessedly spared."
"In Latin America, Jews need a place
where they can feel safe," he said. "In
the United States, you are on free terri-
tory, and there is plenty of liberty to go
around. But in South America, you need
a second home because of security needs,
anti-Semitism. and other social
problems. '
Meanwhile, the Miami club offers its
members the opportunity to preserve
their Latin-Jewish culture, including lan-
guage, dress, and culinary arts, outside
their native environment. The Latin-
Jewish symbiosis is perhaps nowhere
more evident than in food items prepared
by the Hebraica women's committee, in-
cluding such dishes as plantanos
tzimmes, pina colada kugel, malanga
iatkes. and guava strudel.
KITCHEN facilities are strictly kosher,
and Jewish holidays are respected,
though club facilities can be used on
Saturday.
Volleyball and tennis courts and soccer
fields on the 108-acre grounds of the club
are already in use, and golfers are anxious
10 inaugurate a nine-hole course which is
nearing completion. Ground for a 75- by
45-foot swimming pool has been marked
ff- A (,000 square-foot clubhouse boasts
a dining room that seats 400.
Diario, a newspaper of club happenings
and Jewish news from Latin America, is
.Published monthly at Hebraica by club
member Jose Hadida, a Miami architect.
The club has been recognized by the
world Maccabiah organization, and in two
Months, a representative from the orga-
nization's Israel headquarters is due to
stoP in Miami to help organize activities
at Hebraica.
'Step Up,' says Moises Gorin, president of Jewish Community Center is on a 108-acre
Miami Hebraica The New Latin American facility at NW 207th St.
All age groups play together at Miami
Hebraica. 'We aim to be more family-
oriented in our services,' says President
Moses Gorin, compared to American JCCs.
The club is a copy
of Jewish clubs
in Latin America
IT IS AN honor that they are coming
so soon after we opened," said Gorin.
"Most Jewish sports clubs must be open
for two years before they are recognized."
Gorin said Hebraica plans eventual ^ c affiliation with Maccabiah. WmmmR"plantanos tzimmes, pina colada hugel, malanga
Other officers of the club besides Gorin totfceSf and guava strudel
are Salomon Garazi, first vice president;
Robert Kassin, second vice president; Dr.
Isaac Cohen, secretary; and Jaime Esh-
kanazi, treasurer.
J Miami, FloridaFriday, May 25,1984
Section B


inejewiannoriaian/ Friday, Mav25. IftJU
i ne Jewish t londian / Friday, May 25, 1984
From the Pulpit
Yom Yerushalayim
By DR. IRVING LEHRMAN
Temple Kmanu El
On May 30, Jews throughout
the world will mark the observ-
ance of a new holiday on the
Jewish calendar, Yom Yeru-
shalayim, which celebrates the
reunification of Jerusalem 17
years ago.
When David succeeded Saul as
king of Israel, 3,000 years ago, he
converted the pagan city of Jebus
into Jeursalem, the city of peace,
the capital of his kingdom. Then
in the year 70 CE, the Romans
destroyed the second Temple and
reduced the city to ashes, forcing
its people into exile.
For 2,000 years, Jerusalem lay
waste and desolate, waiting for
her children to return. During
these years, no matter where
Jews lived, they never gave up
their claim to their ancient
capital, and in their dreams, in
their prayers, in their hopes, they
lived vicariously in the east.
IN THE words of Isaiah, they
proclaimed, "For the sake of
Zion, I shall not remain silent; for
the sake of Jerusalem, I shall not
rest."
In 1948, during the Israel War
of Independence, Jordan
snatched the Old City of Jeru-
salem from the British mandate.
For 19 years, it held the city
captive. Jordan desecrated its
synagogues, destroyed its ceme-
teries and used their tombstones
to build roads and latrines. Its
holy places were violated and
remained off limits for Jews and
Christians
As a result of the Six-Day War
in 1967. Old Jerusalem was liber-
ated, the city was reunited, and a
new era began. Under Israeli
control, the Kotel, the Western
Wall, has once again become the
center of Jewish worship and
aspirations, all the holy places
have been restored, and now
more than ever they are secure
and open and available for all
Jews. Christians and Moslems.
BUT SUDDENLY we find the
subject of Jerusalem on the front
pages of newspapers all over the
world. "Is it, or is it not the
capital of Israel?"
"Should it or should it not be
the location for embassies?"
Everywhere there are discus-
sions of Jerusalem's future.
Again and again, we hear the
slogan, "Jerusalem must be
returned." Returned? To whom?
To those who raped and pillaged
and destroyed the golden city?
Never.
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The future of Jerusalem will
not be determined by the Arab
world, or by the United Nations,
or even by Washington.
The observance of Yom
Yerushalayim is a declaration
and an affirmation that Jeru-
salem, reunited 17 years ago. will
never be permitted to be divided
again. It is a proclamation that
Jerusalem will continue forever
as the heart, the core, the center.
the capital of a restored and
rebuilt Jewish state.
JERUSALEM has a great
message for the Jew and for the
world. Accoding to our ancient
sages, there are two Jerusalems
one, Yerushalayim shel matah,
the actual physical Jerusalem;
and the other, Yerushalayim shel
ma-alah, the heavenly, the
spiritual Jerusalem.
In the 36 years of Israel's
statehood, we have seen the city
develop magnificently. Its trem-
endous population growth, its
vigor and vitality, its restored
splendor and grandeur are all a
joy to behold.
But even more significant and
inspiring is the heavenly
Jerusalem, which reflects the
moral and ethical values and
ideals which are the true goals
and aspirations of the entire
state.
On this Yom Yerushalayim.
Jerusalem reaffirms the spirit of
the ancient prophets and pro-
claims that this land of the Bible
shall truly be the embodiment of
the spirit of the Bible, that its
foundations shall be justice and
righteousness, brotherhood and
peace, so that in the words of
Isaiah: "Out of Zion shall go
forth the Law, and the word of
the Lord from Jerusalem."
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Friday, May 25,1984/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Ununt Sinai Medical Center s Auxiliary
E-s recently installed include (left to
Isabel Zimmerman, Ceil Ross Brock,
vice presidents; Teena Weiss, president;
Murray Sarlin and Norma Steel, vice presi-
dents.
Mount Sinai Auxiliary Officers
^
Mount Sinai Medical Center's
Auxiliary recently installed
Twna Weiss, for a second term in
^monies in the hospital s
Founder's Dining Room. Weiss
has been responsible for increas-
M the number of volunteers;
starting a physician's fundrais-
inu program that underwrites the
patient's Diversional Activities
Program; and spearheading im-
provements in the Gift and
Coffee Shops.
Vice Presidents include Mrs.
Ceil Ross Brock, Murray Sarlin,
Mrs. Norma Steele, and Isabel
Zimmerman.
Other elected officials, in-
stalled by Alvin Goldberg,
ScheckHMel School
Graduation
The Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School will hold
kindergarten graduation
exercises for 69 children on June
13, 7 p.m. in the school's
Friedman-Uhlar Auditorium,
according to Dorothy K. Gruen,
early childhood director.
Michael Scheck, president, will
preside and Rabbi Dr. Joshua
Tarsis, principal, will speak. Also
participating are Dr. Jerome M.
Levy, vice principal; Rabbi Jay
Neufeld. assistant principal, and
Marshall Baltuch, executive
director. Irving Canner, execu-
tive vice president, will present
the diplomas.
Kindergarten teachers are
Ruth Jacoby, Miriam Levy and
Rosalind Singer. Aides include
Mina Gonen, Lola Stolberg,
Esther Weinglass and Tova
Yemin.
The graduates are Jeremy Adler.
Eric Akst. Rena Baum. Shloml Ben-
Shmuel Nicole Besso, Melvyn
Braiman. Sammy Capuano. Marshall
Daniels. Andrew Seemar. David
Distenfleld, Isaac Kmano. Ronlt
Feldman, Leslie Fields. Jonathan
Frommer. Joshua Fuchs. Laura
&net. Alexis Gleltman, Joshua
Goldberg. Eric Goldmann. Michelle
Gorln, Aaron Gurland. Michelle Halm.
Simcha Herring, Adam Hlrsch. Jordan
Kaganos, Moris Khoudart. Zllla
Khoudart, Daniel Koonln. Debra Korn.
Gabrlelle Koslovsky.
Also, Aaron Kremer. Jill LefkowlU.
Joy Levine. Deborah Llchter. Aada
Uebesny. Danny Maleh. Jonathan
Melsels. David Mlldenberg, Jessica
Mllner, David Mime, Danielle
MUrachl. Robert MUrachl, Rachel
OvlU, Nlr Panlry. Amy Paul. Jacobo
PWer, Jesse Price, Jonathan Randall,
thel Rechtman. AvJ Renlck.
Matthew Roaenbaum. Lane*
~>enblum, Bradley Roaa. Richard
Routman. Rachell Rubinstein. Mari
SUa, David Santlnl. Jordan Savel.
Joshua Sawyer, Ronald SchvarUtman,
"anan Schwartxberg. Ronen Sellger,
Daniel Shelr, Karen Slef. Yonaton
sperber. Coby Stelger, Simon
nmlneiky, Joana Wagenberg and
Jason Wasaer.
executive vice president, include
Jane Purcel, recording secretary;
Rena Kriegel, corresponding
secretary; Selma Hammer,
assistant corresponding secre-
tary; Beatrice Katz, financial
secretary; Shirly Kaufman,
assistant financial secretary;
Edith Eichenhon, executive
treasurer; Ilsa Simonhoff,
treasurer; and nominating
committee chairman, Sally Spaet
Greenhouse.
The 2,500 member Auxiliary
provides volunteers and commu-
nity support for Mount Sinai,
raises funds for scholarships and
other causes, and maintains the
hospital's Gift and Coffee Shops.
Both the hospital and the Aux-
iliary celebrate their 35th anni-
versary this year.
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c 1984 Gehersl FooOs Copb*a(>on'


oc **rt
lnejeWMn *" > "day, May 25.19*1
Hage 4-7} The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 25, 1984
Rabbinical Association Elects
Rabbi Farber President
The Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami has elected Rabbi
Edwin Farber of Temple Samu-El
as its President for 1984-85. Also
elected were Rabbi Brett
Goldstein of Temple Shir Ami,
Vice President; Rabbi David
Saltzman of Aventura Jewish
Center, Secretary; and Rabbi
Carl Klein of the Hallandale
Jewish Center was re-elected
Treasurer.
Rabbi Farber succeeds Rabbi
Max Lipschitz of Beth Torah
Congregation, who served as
President during the past year
and who was commended for his
outstanding service. Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, Director of
Chaplaincy of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, serves as the
Executive Vice President.
Rabbi Farber was born in New
York in 1950 and moved to
Miami in 1957. He grew up in
Northwest Miami where he
attended Hebrew School at
Congregation B'nai Raphael and
continued in the Hebrew High
School of Greater Miami where
he graduated. He also graduated
from Norland Senior High.
Rabbi Farber is an active
member of the United Synagogue
Youth where he met his wife. He
attended the Joint Program
between Columbia University
and the Teacher's Institute of the
Jewish Theological Seminary
where he received a BA in
History and a Bachelors of
Hebrew Literature, with a major
Rabbi Farber
in Biblical Studies. During the
third year of undergraduate
work, he attended the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem and
during that year married Laurie
Penchansky of Miami Beach. In
his Rabbinical school career,
Rabbi Farber taught in the
Hebrew High School of the
Seminary. He entered the
Rabbinical School of the Jewish
Theological Seminary in 1972 and
received a Masters of Arts in
Judaica in 1973, graduating
Rabbinical School in 1976. He
spent his 3rd year at the Hebrew
,^8ualuUxtl^8 D/ Maury Marcus (right) on becoming the
174th bounder of the Miami Jewish Home are (left to right)
Arthur Mark, Lila Heatter, past President, Aaron Kravitz
and Mrs. Marcus.
Remember
the fun?
Come again to
Grossinger's.
Plan now for a spring or summer vacation in
the ('atskills. Crisp mountain air. Beautiful
scenery. Activities for all ages. And our famous
meals are as great as ever. Plus nightclub show
every evening. Big name stars. Comfortable,
spacious rooms. Swimming. Tennis. 27 holes of
golf. Guest speakers on a variety of interesting
topics. Health club. Aerobics. And much more.
Value-priced packages. Modified American Meal Plan from
July 6 through Labor Day.
Make your reaervationa today. See your travel agent or call
toll-free (8O0) 431-6300.
Thefirst family of hospitality

Grossinger. NY 12734
University in Jerusalem. Upon
graduation, Rabbi Farber was
named spiritual leader of Temple
Samu-El in Miami, where he is
presently serving as Rabbi.
Rabbi Farber served as Vice
President of the Rabbinical
Association this past year and
teaches learn-ins for the Women's
Division of Federation in South
Dade. He also coordinates the
Conversion Program for the
Conservative Rabbis of Dade and
Broward County. In 1981, Rabbi
Farber served as one of six
Superfans chosen from South
Florida for the Miami Dolphin
Football team, and he has served
on the Hillel Board since 1978.
Upon his election, Rabbi
Farber stated 'The most
important aspect of the Greater
Miami Rabbinical Association is
the opportunity it affords to
Rabbis for study and learning. I
hope to emphasize in our
programming for the year the
idea of Talmud Torah the
study of Torah by drawing upon
teachers within our own
organization as well as on a
national level.
"Of considerable importance is
the opportunity our organization
can provide for the constructive
exchange of ideas and opinions
on topics that effect the general
Jewish community, the com-
munity at large and our own indi-
vidual synagogues. The Asso-
ciation can serve as a center for
such discussion where Rabbis can
learn from their fellow Rabbis.
Finally there is the important
area of comradery. The oppor-
tunities for Rabbis to socialize
together and provide each other
with encouragement and
strength are precious few. It is
something our Association has
done in the past with great
success and I look forward to
continuing in that direction." he
added.
Maurice Berkowitz (left), chairman of the Florida Friend, i
Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law and Monroe E Pw
Dean, present the Distinguished Public Service Award
Broward County Commission Chairman Nicki E Gros^m,"
(center) at a recent dinner in her honor. The school isth
newest addition to the Yeshiva University family of u
undergraduate, graduate and professional schools
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M^"^g^B^ewish Flondian
Page
CT"
Bonds Elect Cooperman National Vice Chairman
i j m, Cooperman, Bay
islands, has been narned
I Campaign viie
ional f the Israel Bonds
f^'l-nn and Chairman of
feSesdents Campaign,
SaaSrS
J*! Honda and other
m resort areas.
v Israel Bond Organization
Hi loan proceeds from
Kb and institutions in
rfitod States. Canada.
and other countries for
imir development in Israel.
S i provided more than
nil Since 1951. more
than $6.5 billion in Bond funds
have helped build every aspect of
Israel's economy.
Cooperman. banker, realtor
and private investor, is also
chairman of the Florida Advisory
Council of the Israel Bond
Organization and president of
Temple Emanu-El. Miami Beach.
He was chairman of the Israel
Bonds Board of Governors in
New York and served as its
honorary chairman. A former
executive committee member and
treasurer of the Greater New
York Committee for State of
Israel Bonds. Cooperman was
also chairman of its cash collec-
tion committee and president of
its Israel Prime Ministers Club.
He visits Israel frequently on
behalf of Israel Bonds.
11
f^
SBh
p m h
t
Sidney Cooperman
An active participant and
leader in many phases of Jewish
life, Cooperman is vice president
and Southeast chairman of Boys
Town Jerusalem, a director of the
American Israel Public Affairs
Committee and a member of the
executive board of Ben Gurion
University.
In addition he has been a
director of Beth Israel Hospital
in New York, the Jerusalem
Mental Health Center and the
Havm Solomon Home for the
AI i'd in Brooklyn.
Adult Bat Mitzvah
Sophie Schenkel will become
Bat Mitzvah Friday evening at
Temple Adath Yeshurun, North
Miami Beach. She is 83. has been
a resident of North Miami Beach
for 30 years, and is a member of
the Abe Horowitz Jewish War
Veterans Ladies Auxiliary No.
682.
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Flagler Federal's Step-Ahead Money Market Account.
$2500-
$19,999 |
Average .
Monthly |
Balance .
875
Current Annual Rate
%
$20,000 I
and I
Higher I
Average I
Monthly '
Balance
A Higher Balance Earns a Higher Rate.
The FFfif Two-Step isn't a dance it's
Flagler Federal Savings & Loan
Associations new concept in money
market funds. It offers you more -a step
up in interest rate when your balance
is $20,000 or more. If your FFfif balance
is between $2500 and $19,999, you
will still get the regular high FFfif
interest rate. But during those lush
months when your FFfif balance soars
to $20,000 you get an extra step up in
interest rate. The FFfif two-step. It will
leave you dancing in the aisles on the
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is most convenient to you, call 377-1711
in Dade or 525-1557 in Broward.

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Flagler Federal Express.


""" """-"/ *nday,May25.1984
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 25,1984
Miller to Head Opti-Mrs Club
Installation Set for June 2
Barbara Miller was elected
president of the Opti-Mrs. Club
of Miami Beach. The installation
of officers will take place on June
2 11:30 a.m. at the Sheraton-Bal
Harbour Hotel. Mimi speriing
will be chairperson. Jen Olkin
will be io-chairperson "id M riel
West on will be th. instaUia*
officer.
Miller has been an active mem-
ber and board member of Opti-
Mrs. She was honor card chair-
person and liaison for Crisis Nur-
sery, corresponding secretary
and vice president.
Other officers are Edith Katz.
vice president; Betty Gottlieb,
treasurer; Rose Rothman, re-
cording secretary; Norma Kur,
corresponding secretary; Edith
Leibowitz and Dorothy Miller,
social secretaries.
The board of directors are
Sydelle Blatt, Dorothy Carmel,
Charlotte Chester, Ute DeBlasio,
Evette Fiur, Ida Mae Glickstein,
Miami Beach Holds
Memorial Day Service
The City of Miami Beach will
hold Memorial Day services on
May 30, 10:30 a.m. at the
Cenotaph, 11th St. and Washing-
ton Ave.. in cooperation with
American Legion Post No. 86.
Disabled American Veterans.
Jewish War Veterans, Veterans
of Foreign Wars. Miami Beach
Civic l.eaeue and Miami Beach
Elks Lodge. Major Sidney
I'isu : .i,ik I'ommander of the
American Legion Post No. 8.
chairman. Guest speakers will be
Mayor Malcolm H. Fromberg
and Col. James M. Snyder of
Homestead Air Force Base.
Farband 343 Meeting
The Chaim Weizman Karband
Labor Zionist Branch 343 will
hold their final meeting of the
season on May 30, noon, at the
American Savings Bank, Lincoln
and Alton Roads. The program
2J inclte Morris R
lecturer, Rose Luski ?
gina Bailen and He en sfi
accompanying on the piar
Lew corresponding "UJ
will host the meeting ^H
SPOLTER
Barbara Miller
Na'amat Chapters
Elect Officers
Officers of three North Dade
chapters of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat, the Women's Labor
Zionist Organization of America,
for 1984-85 have been announced
by Harriet Green, president of
the South Florida Council of Pio-
neer Women-Na*amat.
They were installed by Gerald
Schwartz of Miami Beach,
national vice president of the
American Zionist Federation and
life member of the Friends of Pio-
neer Women-Na'amat.
Aviva Chapter will be headed
for the coming year by a presi-
dium of Dorothy Goldman,
Beatrice Moss and Margot
Amstel. Gisela Gutter of North
Miami Beach was elected
honorary president.
Other Aviva officers include
Goldie Klein, treasurer; Rosa-
mond Schleifer, corresponding
secretary; and Sylvia Chase.
recording secretary.
Sabre Chapter elected Sylvia
B< l president. Three vice
I n -. '. t s v. ho were sworn in are
Annette llockman, Gertrude
Berson and Miriam Gross. Eida
Switzer was elected correspond-
ing secretary and Marilyn Tanny
was installed as recording secre-
tary
Atid Chapter will be headed for
the next year by Lois Abel, presi-
dent, and by vice presidents Terri
Shenberg, Paula Harris and
Cheryl Cooper. Jill Tandlich was
elected treasurer with Robin
McClain elected as both corre-
sponding and recording secre-
tary.
B'naiZion Elects
Temple B'nai Zion recently
held their installation of officers
for the year 1984-85. Rabbi Jacob
S. Green, spiritual leader of the
Temple, installed Belle Beesen,
as president.
Other officers include Ida
Sherman, vice president
membership; Ruth Tilker, vice
president fund raising; Shirley
Albert, vice president programs;
Rose Sigman. treasurer; Sarah
Kaplan, financial secretary; Pearl
Obstbaum, financial secretary
dues: Mickey Matlin, recording
secretary and Mina Althaus.
corresponding secretary.
Norma Henig, Beatrice Hirsch,
Beverly Hornreich, Helene Jack-
son, Carol Levenson, Eedee
Ogden, Jeff Olkin, Geri Peters,
Irene Pilzer, Anne Pines, Estelle
Renkoff, Helen Segal, Mimi
Sperling, Esther Steiner, Mitzie
Webster and Muriel Weston.
HUNDREDS OF LIGHTING
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A TRUE SEAFOOD ADVENTURE
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Where Flagler Meets S. IV./V. River Drive
The "Anchor" of Downtown Miami
MAKE PLANS NOW TO EXPERIENCE:
The Freshest Fish in Miami
41 Varieties of Delicious Seafood
Large Portions
"> "Old Miami'-style Fish Market
Authentic Market Place Atmosphere
Wide Variety of Beers and Wines
GOOD PRICES AND DELICIOUS FISH
Open 8-10. 7 Days-Take Out Available
360 WEST FLAGLER STREET 373-5515
EXPERIENCE A DINING ADVENTURE IN THE AUTHENTIC HISTORIC MIAMI
SEAFOOD RESTAURANT AND MARKET ON THE RIVER
Miami. Florida Discover an "OLD MIAMI"
Seafood Market Place and Restaurant in Downtown Miami
This authentic, old time and original fish
market and restaurant, located on the Miami
River, features the freshest South Florida fish
available anywhere.
This old restaurant has been unaffected by
sophisticated changes and remains a simple,
bustling fish house on the active Miami River.
Its popularity and success stems from quality
and freshness of product. The restaurant is
part of the company's commercial activity
The owner. David Swartz. is dedicated to
"showing off the best & freshest seafood his
company catches.
East Coast Fisheries menu is extensive.
There are over 41 varieties, most of which
are caught by the company's boats. The
restaurant is a seafood lover's paradise.
Some of the more unique items include
Seviche. Everglades Frog Legs. Grouper
Throats and Sea Trout Miami (a delicious
wine and cheese fish casserole). Famous
items include a savory Grouper Chowder
Florida Stone Crab Claws. Florida Rock
Lobster, fresh whole Snapper and Cracked
Conch, deeply fried.
Named after the birds which roost on their
docks, the restaurant features a daily Pelican
Special' for $5.95. Entrees range from $4 75
to $19.95. Additionally. East Coast Fisheries
offers a wide variety of imported and
domestic beers and wines and an excellent
Key Lime Pie.
The fish market atmosphere is unique and
exciting. From the first floor, or second floor
balcony seats, you can view fresh fish
arriving, and being cleaned. You hear the
bandsaw cutting lobster and crab legs, deep
fryers popping, and the loud din of a busy
restaurant. ECFis unique, exciting,
unforgettable, and a place you will be
anxious to tell others about!
George Lang, in Travel and Leisure
magazine compares East Coast Fisheries to a
five nng circus of activity and recommends
piedI Fresh Snapper. Miami Sea Trout. King
risn Steaks and the sweet nutty flavor of the
(jrouper Throats.
When you are in South Florida, make it a
point to visit East Coast Fisheries
The -ANCHOR "of Downtown Miami 360 W. Flagler St.. 373-5515


Shockett Heads Beach Kiwanis
*f*ff E Association,
W. !uited president of the
ffflSrfMtaS Beach,
"^fthe city's oldest service
|$iai Affiliates
(edicalJournal
Mount Sinai Medical Center
rnVSinai Journal of Medicine,
TnLlW Published solely by
rfsinai of New York. The
fi which is celebrating ita
T anniversary, became a
...innal publication when Mount
If New York was joined by
thIJ new affiliates: Cedars-Sinai
ulTical Center, Los Angeles;
Kt Sinai Medical Center of
B>' and Mount Sma.
Medical Center. Miami.
. Dr Philip Samet, Chief of
Motor, a18 as associate
foor Contributing editor from
Mount Sinai, is Dr. Marvin A
ickner. Director of Medical
dices' Members of the
editorial Board are: Doctors
federico Justiniani, Director of
Medical Education; Arkadi
Bywlin. Director of Pathology
Ud Laboratory Medicine; and
jManuel Viamonte. Jr.. Director
tfRadiological Services.
William E. Shockett
organizations.
Shockett, who also is past
president of the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce and of the
Miami Ski Club, succeeds
Stephen H. Cypen, also a Miami
Beach attorney who serves on the
board of governors of the Miami
Beach Chamber.
Other officers elected include
Martin Engels, second vice
president; Gary Cole, treasurer;
and Zeke George, Stu Graver,
Neisen Kasdin, Randy Marks,
Richard May and Father James
Murphy, members of the board of
directors.
Holdover directors include Ira
Ciller, Keith Kovens. Leon
Manne and Bob Schulte. Gerald
Schwartz is public relations
chairman of the club which was
established 45 years ago.
JWVHolds Services
The Harry H. Cohen Surfside-
Bay Harbor Post No. 723, Jewish
War Veterans and Ladies' Auxil-
iary, together with the Town of
Surfside, will sponsor the annual
Memorial day Services, May 28
at 10:30 a.m. at Veterans Park,
according to Harry Rubin, com-
mander. Ida Fox is auxiliary
president and Rollo Jacobaon is
chairman of arrangements.
Speakers at the event will be
Congressman Claude Pepper,
Ainslee R. Ferdie, past national
commander and Mayor Ben
Levine.
FOOD ALLERGIES CAN BE DANGEROUS
I ht Hri Ifchbit MyB*rt*n*l*fi
Daprasalosi Mental Dvflnaf OI'llW Constlpotlon Mwrrstd
0 hoblai .. And Much Mr I
Tkats) or* just a fw physical and psychological symptoms. CoH now to discover cytotomc
sling and nwtrihonol counseling (as soon on 4m AAarv Griffin Show) Hidden Food Allergies
may cows* any of m obova symptoms. Slop swfforingl
For Information and a Brochure Call M7 '900
FLORIDA ALLERGY CLINICS
16606 NE 3rd Ave Miami. Florida 33162 947-7900
So. Miami 665- .800 Naples (813) 597-2875
Ft. Lauderdale 5f>6 5966 W. Palm Beach 684-9100
Vision Travel Inc.
presents
An Opportunity to Tour Israel
with 2 Local Religious Leaders
July 2-16
Rabbi Edwin Farber
Temple Samu-EI
Second Timers Tour
featuring:
5 Star Hotels
Breakfasts & Hi Light Oinners
Jerusalem. Tiberias. Haifa. Eilat,
Sinai, Tel Aviv
July 16-30
Cantor Stuart Pittle
Congregation Bet Breira
First Time and Family Tour
featuring:
5 Star Hotels
Breakfasts & Hi Light Dinners
Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Golan.
Tiberias, Masada, etc.
For More Information or Reservations
Call 444-8484
TM
Receive
J Weekly f82sues
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Pagel8-B The Jewish Florjdiaa/ Fridav Mv...a
TageFl l'he Jewish Floridian Friday May 25, 1984
HIU.
Meeting at Temple Zion. (shown left to
right) are Simon Schwartz, immediate past
president of the United Synagogue of
America; Jay Ernst Kreutzer. president of
the Temple; Franklin D. Kreutzer. chair-
man, council of regional presidents and
national vice president, and Marshall
Wolke. national president, discussing plans
involving United Synagogue Youth for the
international
December.
Natanya Wins Chapter Award
\ at anya Chapter of Hadassah.
mi Beach Region, was
>rded the first prize as
Chapter of the Year 1983-84 at
the*^>pring Conference of Miami
Region of Hadassah.
Rose Goldberg was recently
installed as president for the year
1984-85 by Henry Nortman. past
president. Other officers include
Sylvia Weintraub. adm. vice
president: Mollie Weinberg. vice
president fund raising: Evelyn
Grosskopf. vice president
membership: Bea Sheriff, vice
Chai AMIT Holds
Charity Auction
The Chai Chapter of AMIT
Women will hold its annual
auction on June 3. at Temple Or
Olom. The early bird sale will
start at 4 p.m. and the auction
will start at 7:30 p.m. featuring
merchandise of every description.
Proceeds from the function is
earmarked for educational
projects and scholarships in the
schools maintained in Israel.
Chairpersons are Ann Slotskv.
Sadie Kane. Molly Beckerman.
Isabel Alexander. Pearl Wallen.
Molly Stein. Susan Feldman,
Mildred Gomez. Be Harris.
Jeanne Finkelstein and Bess
Sokol. chapter president.
QTHBIO
president programs: Bess Robin,
vice president education: Fay
Rosenbloom. treasurer: Hannah
Rottenberg. secretary member-
ship; Roberta I.owenthal.
recording secretary- and Sylvia
Berman. corresponding
secretary.
Beth Moshe Hosts
HorrowitzPost
The Abe Horrowitz Jewish
War Veterans Post No. 682 will
sponsor the Oneg Shabbot after
Memorial Day services, May 25
at 8 p.m. at Temple Beth Moshe.
Guest speaker will be Norton
Leff. past department com-
mander, past post commander,
and national executive chairman.
The post and auxiliary will
participate in Memorial Day
services on May 28. 11 a.m. at the
McDonald Center. North Miami
Beach. Bernie Chaney, post com-
mander, and Phyllis Shaw. presi-
dent of the auxiliary, will speak.
convention scheduled in
Florida JWVA Meets
The Dade County Council
Ladies Auxiliary. Department of
Florida JWVA. will hold the first
Council of Administration meet-
ing on June 3. 9:30 a.m. at
Temple Beth Tov. Evelyn L.
Ferdie. newly elected president
announced.
Ferdie was recently elected and
installed at the County Council's
annual convention. Other officers
are Tanya Levine. senior vice
president: Alice Brunner, junior
vice president: Anna Friedman,
chaplain: Mae Schreiber. patrio-
tic instructor: Leah Eisenman.
conductress: and Carol Gold,
treasurer.
Business Notes
Jorge L. Fernandez has been
elected as assistant vice
president of Jefferson National
Bank, and Lorraine Manweiller
as assistant cashier at Sunny
Isles branch, it was announced
by Barton S. Goldberg,
president.

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P.g*"e S*'Ss Cif
Fine Entertainment
at the Piano
Also violin playing
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OPENS AT 5 P.M.
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La Scala
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Our Italian cuisine is superb.
Our wines are exceptional.
Our candlelight is seductive.
Our service is impeccable.
Lunch Mon.Fri. Dinner Daily
12-2:30 pm 6-11:30 pm
All night covered & attended parking.
All major credit cards.
LEsplanade Mall 951 Crandon Blvd
Key Biscayne 361-2436
Services for Yeshurun Graduates]
Adath Yeshurun will honor its
1983-84 Hebrew High School
Confirmation class at Shavuot
services on June 7. The students
have completed two years of
study in the high school program
which involves a Judaica
curriculum for post-Bar and Bat
Mitzvah students.
The names of the Confirmands
are Robert Abcug, Alan Baum.,
Daniel Bergman, Leslie Berman,
Michele Carter, Debbie
Eisenberg, Eva Garfield, Jeffrey
Gothelf, David Kopelman, Mindy
Lerner, Michelle Levine, Jared
Lichstrahl, Felice Miller, Cindy
Morchelies, Debbie Plewinski,
Mindy Pollack, Seth Prezant,
Steven Riechelson, Julie Rosen,
Melissa Ross, Howard Rubin,
Brooke Selinger, Elayne Silver,
Dori Staller, Jason Steinman.
Lauren Tand. Daniel Zaidspj.
A special Kiddush wi], ,.
place following the sen ic1
|ynagogue in ffg^g
h.S'^?tbn services \
held Friday evening. Ju *""
students of the Haict;
Adath Yeshurun le,^
School, Rabbi Simcha Fr?
spiritual leader, and N
Fischer. education *T
announced. The students I
Stuart Abcug. WaySnj
Bradley BwEutma?* j*$
Cohen. Allen Israel n
Koch, Dara Ladis. Sn,,
[&"> Sejh Mandelbe
Michael Orlinskv L
Plewinski, Jason Steirm
Michael IJmans. 7,
Wertheimer and u-yf
Wigutow.
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Restaurant
& Cocktail Lounge
In I n forgettable Experience!
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I- ice Hens d'oeuvres in i he cocktail
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We have a guitar band .ill around the dinner table.
Pedro Milian. the proprietor,
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We Accept Maior Credit Cards
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Reservations 261-4444
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Pirlinj


Friday, May 25, 1984/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Pictured (left to right) at the Miami Heart Institute's Second
Generation Olympic celebration are Fana Holtz, Debbie
Fishbein, Betty Pollak, Claudette and Murray Candib.
Wolk School Graduation June 5th
/Jr. Norman Lamm, president of Yeshiva
University, and Yurika Mann, expert on
Israeli art, look over a few of the 35 pieces
of art given to the Yeshiva University
Museum by Joseph and Rebecca Meyerhoff
of Baltimore, in celebration of the 36th
anniversary of Israel. The Meyerhoff gift is
the largest single collection ever given to
the Museum.
UnderFire
Bill to Punish Anyone Denying Genocide
Or Claiming the Holocaust Was a Hoax
The students of Harold Wolk
Religious School will be
graduated and confirmed on June
5, 8 p.m. in the Main Sanctuary
of Beth Torah Congregation,
according to Dr. Max A.
Lipschitz, spiritual leader of the
Congregation.
Betty Weinberg, education
vice president and Miriam
Lorber, education director, will
present diplomas to the
confirmands and Abraham
Gittelson, Associate Director of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education will present
certificates. Barbara Wagner,
Sheryl Jaffe, Robert Lipson, 12th
grade students, will receive
Sunday School Teacher's Cert-
ification.
The graduating students are
Sheryl Jaffe, Wayne Keil, Cheryl
Max, Lazaro Sasson, Barbara
Wagner and the confirmands are
Stephen Feldstein, Elana Gillen,
Valerie Gordon, Ronnie
Issenberg, Samuel Jochananov,
Dina Krois, Steven Smith, David
Rosenberg, Lenny Steinman,
Ronit Zaila, and Eran Avidan.
A reception will follow the
services.
Junior Auxiliary Installs Officers
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A
government sponsored bill
that would penalize anyone
who denied Nazi genocide
or claimed the Holocaust
was a hoax came under fire
from both right and left-
wing elements on its first
reading in the bundestag.
It is also opposed by Jews
who see it as a watered
down version of legislation
first proposed by Chan-
cellor Helmut Schmidt
when his Social Democratic
Party (SPD) governed
West Germany.
One of the main points of con-
tention over the draft law is its
equation of Nazi crimes aginst
Jews with crimes by "other
totalitarian regimes" against
Germans. This is directed
primarily against the Soviet
Union and its Eastern bloc allies.
The law as written would make it
an offense to deny that genocide
was also committed against
Germans.
ACCORDING to Manfred
Schmidt of the SPD, the govern-
ment bill is a farce. He faulted
Justice Minister Hans Engelhard
for failure to specify what war
crimes the government has in
mind when it seeks to punish
individuals who publicly claim
those crimes were never com-
mitted.
Schmidt also charged that
Engelhard, a member of the Free
Democratic Party (FDP). a coali-
tion partner with the ruling
Christian Democratic Union
CDL'I, had been forced to make
far-reaching concessions to right-
w'ng elements in the govern-
ment. The original draft, aimed
Jt effectively combatting neo-
Nazi propaganda, loat its
character, he said.
But Eicke Goetz, of the
Christian Social Union (CSU).
the Bavarian partner of the CDU,
defended the draft law. He
contended that it would be a
mistake to penalize only those
Persons who deny crimes againt
Jews and not those who deny
^"nes against Germana.
^CORDING TO Goetz.
people who say the expulsion of
millions of Germans from
Eastern Europe after World War
II was "just an act of resettle-
ment" deserve the same penalties
as those who claim the Holocaust
never occurred. Otto Schilly of
the opposition Green Party, a
coalition of ecologists and
pacifists, objected to the law in
principle.
He said that while many of his
party colleagues support the idea
of tightening existing laws
against neo-Nazi propaganda, the
proposed new legislation reflects
a typical German belief that this
objective can be acheived by
imposing still more regulations.
Neo-Nazism should be opposed
by political, not legal means,
Schilly said.
The Jewish community is
urging Parliament to adopt the
original law proposed by the Sch-
midt government. They point out
that unlike the new version, the
SPD bill would have punished
not only written but verbal neo-
Nazi propaganda. The Jewish
community is also strongly
opposed to any comparison of the
Holocaust with crimes com-
mitted by other regimes against
Germans.
Esther Schneiderman began
her fifth year as President of the
Junior Auxiliary of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at a recent installation
luncheon at Douglas Gardens.
A resident of North Miami
Beach, Mrs. Schneiderman is an
active volunteer at the Home and
Past President of the Deborah
Health Foundation.
Joining Mrs. Schneiderman as
officers for 1984-85 were Gladys
Israel. Honorary Past President
and Fund-Raising Vice Presi-
dent; Jean Tesser, First Exec-
utive Vice President; Pearl
Solovei. Second Executive Vice
President; Helen Rechtschaffer,
Program Vice-President; Temi
Sherman, Vice President-Mem-
bership; Mae Cowan. Recording
Secretary; Bess Szerlip, Corre-
sponding Secretary; Sylvia Bach,
Communications Secretary;
Rena Ratner. Financial Secre-
tary; Ruth Abramowitz,
Treasurer; Lillian Namm. Parlia-
mentarian; and Monya Resnick.
Honorary Board Member.
The Munich-based neo-Nazi
weekly National Zeitung con-
demned the draft law as the
product of pressure on the
government from "Zionist
quarters." However, it praised
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's regime
for seeking to punish individuals
who claim that no crimes of the
magnitude of genocide were
perpetrated against Germans.
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One complimentary visit with this ad


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridiany F.ridav Mv J a inoi
PaP-PK-K Tl.nl.:.LPi- v .-.....
Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 25, 1984
m
An inaugural luncheon recently held at the Grand Bay Hotel honored
Florida International University's first Society of University Founders. In
photo at left are Gregory B. Wolfe, FIU president; Rita Perlman; David
Perlman, past president of the FIU Foundation; Kay Fahringer, current
president of the Foundation. Center photo shows President Wolfe greeting
In the United Nations
Key Biscayne residents Dolores and Albert Goodstein. Right is President
Wolfe welcoming Miami Beach resident Florence Hecht. Initiation of the
society signifies a milestone in FIU's growth and development, recognizing
persons who have given over $50,000 to the University, according to Dr.
Wolfe.
The Policies of Anti-Semitism
By HARRIS SCHOENBERG
Not since the days of
Adolf Hitler have the anti-
Semitic themes of the
genocidal Nazi propaganda
machine been aired in the
West with such impunity.
And, of all places, they are
being aired in the public
forums of the organizations
created to overcome the
Nazi legacy the United
Nations.
There are very few states, no
more than about 10 out of 158
UN members, that are involved,
in the perpetration of anti-
Semitism. In fact, in 1984 this
evil, which the UN was designed
to combat, is largely the work of
just two states the Soviet
Union and Libya. But a shocking
complacency among the repre-
sentatives of Western European,
Commonwealth, and other demo-
cracies permits the bigots to
deliver their incitements to
hatred in one forum after another
without interruption or objection.
The result has been pointed out
in a letter to UN Secretary-
General Javier Perez de Cuellar
by Israel's permanent repres-
entative to the UN, Yehuda
Blum: "There can be little
doubt," wrote Ambassador
Blum, "that the escalation of
anti-Semitic rhetoric at the
United Nations has been
PHONE
534-8600
ACCfFTING INSWANCI
F.C.S.
MmOms
NM pTMriptii
largely responsible for the
recrudescence of anti-Semitism
worldwide and for the resulting
numerous acts of anti-Jewish
violence in recent years."
ANTI-SEMITISM has been
around the UN for years. But it
was not until the adoption on
November 10, 1975 of the
infamous General Assembly
Resolution 3379 that the UN
gave official sanction to anti-
Semitism, as the great Soviet
human rights champion Andrei
Sakharov noted at the time.
Since that period, the problem
has grown dramatically.
It is well-known by now that
Ambassador Ali Treiki of Libya
accused Jews as a group in the
General Assembly on December
8, 1983 of owning the porno-
graphic operations of New York,
"exploiting the American people
and trying to debase them. If we
succeed in eliminating that
entity," the former Libyan
foreign minister concluded, "we
shall by the same token save the
American and European
peoples."
Among the assembled
delegates, only Ambassador
Blum and Constantin Dombalis,
representing the United States,
bothered to protest. To his credit,
Secretary-General de Cuellar
issued a statement the next day
in which he regretted "the use in
the General Assembly of epithets
and slurs of a racial, religious or
personal nature, even in the heat
Grand Openi
433-41 st Street
(ACROSS ROM TNI FOIGIIBTAWANT)
SALE ITEMS THIS LOCATION ONLY
of the debate." The Secretary-
General appealed to members "to
refrain from language unbec-
oming to serious international
debate."
BUT HIS APPEAL went
unheeded. At the February-
March, 1984 session of the UN's
, Commission on Human Rights,
the Soviet and Libyan delegates
engaged again in racist rhetoric
under the agenda item entitled
"Measures to be taken against all
totalitarian ideologies ..."
After alleging at length
common features of Zionism and
Nazism, the Ukrainian delegate
stated that whereas South
Africa's white majority used
apartheid to dominate the
Blacks, Israel with its theory of
the "chosen people" adopted a
policy by which those "belonging
to the Jewish race" dominated
the Arabs.
V.A. Zorin. the chief Soviet
delegate, whose speeches are
usually fine tuned to the Com-
munist Party line, repeatedly
stated that Zionism is related to
Nazism. He claimed Zionists
dwell at length on the victim-
ization of the Jews during the
Holocaust to obtain support and
to win sympathy.
The Libyan representative,
who spoke after Zorin, described
Zionism as a philosophy in which
the Jews claim to be the chosen
people of God.
The Byelorussian's speech wa;
similar to those of his Soviet col-
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leagues.
RESPONDING to these
"monstrous statements," the
B'nai B'rith representative at the
Commission session observed on
Feb. 23, that they "reveal the
tortuous thinking inspiring such
demented slanders."
Challenged by Israel's Ambas-
sador in Geneva, Ephraim
Dowek, Zorin was at pains to
stress that his attacks on
Zionism were in keeping with the
General Assembly resolution on
the subject.
Once again, only the United
States joined Israel in
condemning these attacks on the
Jewish religion and on the move-
ment of Jews to live freely in
their own land. U.S. Ambassador
Richard Schifter noted that
"anti-Semitism has now become
one of the established elements of
Soviet policy ..."
He referred very pointedly to
the anti-Semitic remarks in the
Commission by the Soviet and
Libyan delegates, differentiating
between opposition to the poli-
tical philosophy of Zionism and
attacks on the right of Jews, like
everyone else, to believe in and
promote a liberating political
philosophy of their own. Catal-
oging the various aspects of offi-
cially sponsored Soviet anti-
Semitism, Schifter concluded
that "there is no doubt that Jews
are today an outcast people in the
Soviet Union for no reason after
than that they were born Jews."
RETURNING to the subject
of Zionism and Judaism during
the religious intolerance debate in
the Human Rights Commission,
the Libyan delegate asserted that
Israel and the Zionists are
distorting the principles of Juda-
ism as part of a conspiracy
against the Moslem and Arab
world. He repeatedly cited pas
sages from the Bible, claiming
that sacred texts were used to
spread "racist Zionism." He
alleged that Jews treat each other
better than Gentiles. And he
made obscure allusions to
usurious practices.
Why these extremists of the
left and right use racist anti-
Semitic rhetoric is relatively easy
to explain. More than anything
else the UN is the leading agent
for legitimizing and delegitim-
izing political authorities in
contemporary international
affairs. Attacks on Israel degen-
erate into gutter anti-Semitism
as part of the process of and a
cheap shortcut to the deligit-
imization of Israel. Thus. anti-
Semitic bigotry is used to deny
Israels legitimacy and these
attacks are repeated so often that
the outrageous comet to be
accepted
What it is harder to expla
the silence of most of th< '
cradea I, among others, i
with a variet) of UN diploi
after the Treiki affair to learn
why they fail to respond to such
incitement to racial hatred. I
encountered a variety of excuses
even among the envoys repres-
enting democracies.
ONE REPRESENTATIVE
said that his delegation does not
take seriously such nonsense.
Another said the debates are too
boring to pay attention to what is
said. One said that his junior
officer on duty had no instruc-
tions to respond. Another said he
would reply only if his own
country were attacked. One
differentiated between the Secu-
rity Council, which he took
seriously, and the General As-
sembly, which he labelled "a
circus." Another said anti-
Semitism is deplorable, but his
delegation cannot allow itself to
get involved in polemics.
Someone suggested that bigotry
is allowed under the rules of
procedure, and someone pUp
shruged and said everyone is
attacked at the UN.
I came away feeling that these
stalwarts of Western democracy.
outside the United States, were
intimidated by the anti-Semites
and preferred to ignore their
vicious attacks on Jew s Whether
it was the fear of terrorism or
petropower that motivated them,
or something else, it is hard to
say. But they spoke of crude anti
Semitism as if it were merely a
diplomatic discourtesy.
During the annual debate in
the Human Rights Commission
on alleged Israeli violations of
human rights, many commission
members spoke against Israel
The last of this group, the repres-
entative of East Germany.
Herman Klenner, proposed that
the Security Council Invokesanc
tions. This" ultimate enforcement
actkm has never been invoked
against states practicing
genocide. Exercising his right of
reply. Ambassador Dowek o
Israel questioned the propriety of
allowing Klenner to speak on
human rights. In support of his
challenge. Ambassador Dowek
offered the Commission the
number 9756141.
Political Briefs
Celeste Hardee Muir, past
president of the Young Lawyers
Section of the Dade County Bar
Association, has announced her
candidacy for one of two'
proposed Dade County Court
judgeships currently pe"dmg
final legislative approval m
Tallahassee. Muir served as a law
clerk to United States District
Judge William O. Mehrtens from
1973-75.
Larry Rtvcr has announced hr*
candidacy for C* unty ConJf^
km of Mr '"!n
unty in Distri
rentlv held h>


Friday, May 25, 1984/The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Muss Family To Dedicate
The Alexander Muss
High School in Israel


By Barrie Brett
June 3. 1984, Stephen Muss and his family will dedicate
the Alexander Muss High School in Israel. Located in Hod
Ha'Sharon, a northern suburb of Tel Aviv, the school began
12 years ago with only 40 students and has grown to become
the Hrgest academic program in all of Israel...Over 700
students now enroll each year.
The one million dollar Muss family donation will ensure
the permanent location with a major campus to be completed
within three years.
A Family Remembers
Alexander Muss was a strong gentle man whose
charitable and civic deeds brought him a great deal of respect
and praia \s a major leader in the community, builder,
developer Alexander Muss housed thousands of people both
in New York and Miami Beach.
In 1962. he built the first Seacoast Towers Rental
Building on Miami Beach. Today, over 20 years later, that
building has been transformed into the new all suite luxury
hotel, appropriately named for him The Alexander Hotel.
In the short time since the hotel opened, November
1983. The Alexander has already enjoyed a reputation for
elegance, service and style. These positive thoughts are just
the reasons for building a hotel that would help honor the
name of Alexander Muss. And positive thoughts were a
major reason for the family's one million dollar donation to
dedicate The Alexander Muss High School in Israel ... to
honor this man in a way that would be both meaningful and
lasting.
And so on June 3rd, Mrs. Alexander Muss and the
children of Alexander Muss Mr. and Mrs. Stephen
Muss. Mr. and Mrs. Norman Lawrence and Mr. and Mrs. F.
Keshin will honor him by dedicating this educational campus
that will house and educate thousands of students The
Alexander Muss High School in Israel.
Mrs. Alexander Muss
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Muss
the Alexander cMuss
in1sr\cL
The Alexander Hotel
Dominique s Restaurant in the Alexander
Mr. and Mrs. Norman Lawrence
The Muss Family Decision
Stephen Muss, builder developer of Miami Beach's new Alexander Hotel, The
Fontainebleau Hotel, The Seacoast Towers Rental Apartment and The Towers of Quayside
has spent most of his adult life involved in various Jewish causes including The Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and The United Jewish Appeal in New York. Having travelled to
Israel numerous times, he has visited almost every Israeli institution. Since his father's
death in 1972, he and his family have wanted to honor the name of Alexander Muss. The
State of Israel and High School in Israel represent that link and just the right project to
honor his father's memory.
The Alexander Muss High School in Israel also has special meaning and some personal
involvement for Steve Muss. His daughter Heather attended The High School several years
ago. He was "impressed with the curriculum and the fact that young Americans spend eight
weeks of studying, understanding and re-establishing links to their past. It is important for
all children, no matter the religion to understand their heritage."
And so, he met with the high school's executive director, Rabbi Morris Kipper and his
staff. Steve Muss was again so impressed with their zeal and the fact that hundreds, and in
time, thousands of students would be attending High School in Israel that the Muss family
then decided that this would be the perfect way to honor Alexander Muss. "This would be a
most important sphere of education for nurturing high school students. The program
encompasses Jewish history, spanning the historical centuries, the Holocaust and the reason
for the existence of the State of Israel. Where else can you study about Masada on Tuesday
and visit Masada on Wednesday."
"We are very proud that the family name will be connected with this special academic
institution that will now be known as The Alexander Muss High School."
For Mrs. Alexander Muss, being at the dedication and seeing her husband s name in
front of the High School in Israel represents an emotional moment Tor her.
" I loved my husband dearly and am proud that his name will be perpetuated in such a
meaningful way."
Mrs. Cynthia Lawrence, daughter of Alexander Muss has a special fondness for this
way of honoring her father. Two of her own children experienced High School in Israel and
their lives were so enriched that this summer, she and her husband are attending the new
adult three week program at the High School in Israel. "This will be a wonderful way to see
Israel and learn more about our past. I am proud that our family and my father's name will
now be associated with this important institution."


Page 18-B
' HuiraH U
! i^h.e.Jey.'sh.Floridian,/ FHHav.Mn-J i>'
Some Personal Reflections...
Granddaughter Sherry
Muss "I nber my
grandfa* as a simple
man who was not at all
impressed with what he
had accomplished. This
is a wonderful tribute to
his memory, and I am
pleased that future
generations of students
will benefit from this
program. I hope
Sherry Muss
someday soon to ex- Muss High School in
perience the Alexander Israel first hand."
Stephanie Krone, of N.
Miami Beach, enrolled in the
High School in Israel in Sep-
tember of 1983. Her brother
and sister had previously at-
tended and Stephanie wanted
to study more about her
background.
This experience made her
feel that she was "a part of
history, a part of Israel, and
as a result a part of the
future."
"I came away a more in-
dependent thinker having
much more to think about
with a stronger sense of iden-
tity. I definitely recommend
Stephanie Krone
this experience to anyone
who wants to learn about
their heritage and grow
within themself." *
the Alcxandcr cMu*
htab School
JIHlSJftCL
David Sentner spent his 18th birth-
day in Israel and only recently
returned. At first, he wasn't in-
terested in going but was influenced
by bis sister and cousins who had
attended the school.
The experience changed his
feeling towards Israel and to those
around him. Before the trip, he felt
little, in fact, no connection to
Israel. Now, he feels closely tied to
Israel and to the people there. "I ,
have become more sensitive to t
people's feelings and I look at those
around me differently now."
Dana Cohen, of Miami Beach, at-
tended the High School the summer
of 1983. She had never really had
Sunday or Temple education. She
wasn't aware of the program until
some friends kept calling her to tell
her how terrific this program was.
She now spends a good deal of time
calling others to tell them about the
program, about history and about
herself.
"I think alot more about different
parts of my life. The experience
made me see more of a total picture.
I appreciate everything and
everyone in my life so much more.
The program is for everyone. If I
have a child, I hope that he or she
will experience this growth as well."
Granddaughter Heather
Muss attended the High
School several years ago
after a group of friends
told her how their ex-
perience in this school
had changed their lives.
The High School in
Israel actually changed
my outlook on life.
Besides getting credit
for learning that was
fun and exciting, my
own ideas and ways of
looking at the world
around me were
broadened. I share my
family's sense of pride
in having my grand-
Heather Muss
father's name associated
with this school."
Dormitory Lounge


rruxmy, may -*,
VYhatisthe
High School in Israel
The High School in Israel is an academic program that helps
' nrovide an understanding and knowledge of the history of
Israel. Students from across the United States meet to share
n this unique experience. In each 8 week session, 11th and
12th grade students live, eat and breathe the birthplace of
Western civilization and culture.
Over 400 hours of learning the elements of literature, ar-
cheology, comparative religion, philosophy and political scien-
ce .From Abraham to the present..."The History of Western
Man in 8 weeks."
Much of the program includes actual hands on experience.
When they say field trip, they mean field trip..from site to
site.from climbing historic Masada to holding class at the
City of David.
High School in Israel enhances the student's academic
career and is an ongoing program. Acceptance to this school is
done with the total cooperation of the student's home school.
Why Have
High School in Israel
"There are over 800,000 Jewish young people aged 5-17 in
the United States." Less than half receive Jewish education.
The High School in Israel takes 16 and 17 year old students
and helps develop their Jewish awareness, understanding,
consciousness, identity and roots that go back centuries. A
side benefit to the program is that, as a result, study skills im-
prove and college preparation is enhanced.
Who Attends
The program is for 11th and 12th grade students from public
and private schools who enroll for an 8 week session. These
are usually students not affiliated with Jewish youth groups
and Jewish schools.
A total composite of the student is taken into consideration
for admission, since this total growth experience affects them
not just academically but emotionally, and spiritually as well.
Felice Traktman, international director of admissions, heard
one student's comments, "As we go through 4,000 years of
history, it's like reading a novel and seeing a movie at the same
time."
//mil A
Felice Traktman
The Guiding Force
The guiding force behind High School in Israel is Rabbi Morris Kipper, who
founded the school 12 years ago.
As a Rabbi at Temple Judea in Coral Gables, Rabbi Kipper's religious
school program became so popular that students actually requested
homework. In lieu of attending confirmation class one year, Rabbi Kipper of-
fered a 3 week educational summer camp program.
At the end of the 3 weeks, the 9 students wanted to stay on and study fur-
ther. The next summer, these students scored 90% retention on an impromptu
test.
Rabbi Kipper realized that learning in the field had a lasting effect and in-
vestigated going to study in Israel, and bringing history alive to the students.
With the help of a Grant from the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, the
principal of Coral Gables High School, who offered elective credit for the
students and the Dade County Public School System, who approved the
academic program, Rabbi Kipper took 40 students to Israel the summer of
1972. Today almost 700 students a year attend, and High School in Israel has
become the largest academic institution in Israel.
According to Rabbi Kipper "This 8 week program for high school students
walks them through the history of Western Man. The results are amazing.
Academically, the students come away from this program better organized
and tend to be admitted into better colleges. Personally, the students seem to
discover their own identity and develop pride in themselves as human beings.
High School in Israel is just beginning. Before, we existed for 12 years
without a name. The Muss family has now honored us with a distinguished
and respected name that lends stature to this institution. The Alexander
Muss High School in Israel. We look forward to our growth."
Rabbi Kipper


Page 18-B The Jewish Flppdian / Frjdv Mov J a n-
Kajrt 14-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 25, 1984
Planning the Alexander Muss High School in Israel
Master planner Steve Sisskind of Hooker and
Sisskind and Associates, worked with the inter-
nationally famous Israeli Architect, Mr. M. Ben
Hcirin. "He's one of the best known and one of the
best architects in the world."
*
Together they drafted a master plan to increase
the capacity of the campus, upgrade the facility to
add- an esthetic level to landscaping and enhance
the living environment that would bring the level of
quality up to the Muss family standards.
New dorms, ten new classrooms, a new ad-
ministration building a multi purpose auditorium
ano synagogue, an audio visual and seminar room, a
nev* student union and a new library will be added
tc. the campus as well as housing for the staff. "The
creait all goes to M. Ben Horin who has been
working on this project for years."
ri'^B p'i
Jmula. *.' I
B Inr UMI 0>m*x

r
I. IK CHHI 1 Ulll Mtt fr I My. M* 1M O0-U"lt, U Mt
ScMDl Ir, hrwl.
I mm naw m j*9 p~i *p-mmt m m%\*m*.,
4*a M.. UiImM to i4ifaM< -Hh i*i'.f*..ii '. ill of tM ,rtMM
Un-, f*l V <* "" >"" ** -* "
srntmiM RM I K*w bm aMs*, imin< will* Alt I Mm M*r* f
UK ItoMM, r tr* 5ctal llrMi. t M >> !" i.ir !,!> f im Mwn .' p*u "f
(irinjirl *' tM LlN tktt "loM fro IMt MalriH.
It Mi for Mil MM. tMt I IM4IM rmr .Ulf lo M*t rlMUIjr
Hidfritm Mat /on to M prTMic* tf
Fourteen members of the Muss family, shown above from left, Mr.
and Mrs. Eric Rosenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Norman Lawrence, Mrs.
Alexander Muss, Miss Sherry Muss, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Rothstein,
Mr. and Mrs, Jeff Rosenberg, Mr. Howard Rosenberg, Miss Heather
Muss and Mr, and Mrs. Stephen Muss.
The Executive Board of Directors
Proudly Announce the Ground Breaking Ceremony
of Phase II of
the Alcxandcr cMuss
biqb^cbooL
jtfiSR\eL
tiOMT *ft* aomaw: f.pftNa
on June 3, 4:30 p.m. at the campus in Israel
(which will include the reference library, student union, classrooms, administration building, the chapel and two more dormitories)
This notice is to express appreciation to all of the
friends, alumni, and parents of alumni, and the
family of Alexander Muss, who made it possible to
turn the dream to reality.
Steven Aronow
Richard Goldstein
Paula Levy
Steve Simon
Donald I. Bierman
Nelson C. Keshen
Marcy Lefton
Jeffrey Lefcourt
Elayne Tendrich
Elaine Bloom
Harvey Friedman
Matthew Wohl
Shirley Brant
Myrna Golob
Dr. Samuel Meline
Harry Smith
Honorary President
President
Vice President
Vice President
Secretary
Treasurer
Member at Large
Member at Large
Vivian Brownstein
Samuel Harte
Irving Norry
Judge Mole Tendrich
Patricia Frost
Norman Lawrence
Ernest Rosenkrantz
Sheldon Weiss
i


Friday, May 25, 1984/The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
1

Community Corner
r rv of Cedars Medical Center will host their annual
Au on Junp 1 at the Marriott Hotel on the Bfly- Ber*
lunch*" n cooking demonstration.
Greene "' t>
Fantasy Theatre Factory will present 'Comedy with a
t of lemon" on May 29 at the Miami Jewish Home and
SSital for the Aged.
mival Cruise Lines received a 1984 Business in the Arts
d for its involvement with the Miami-based National
ftundation for Advancement in the Arts.
Harmony 1-odge, B'nai B'rith, will hold its meeting May
. 7,30 p.m at Pythian Hall, North Miami Beach. Guest
speaker will be attorney Frances M. Farina.
Dr Barry Silverman, Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, has
been elected president of the Miami Orthopaedic Society.
Dennis A. Gitlin, vice president of Prudential-Bache
Securities, will attend a tax sheltered product seminar to be
held in New York in June.
The Young Alumni Association of the UM and the College
of Arts and Sciences, will sponsor the play, "The Lunch
Hour" on June 11, at the Ring Theatre, Sandra Steenrod,
Alumni board member, announced.
The Bass Museum will present a recital featuring John
Wiener, clarinet, and Michael Ching, pianist, on June 3, at i
p.m.
Lincoln Chapter No. 1288, B'nai B'rith Women will hold a
meeting May 30, 11:30 a.m. at the Lincoln Road Club room,
Sylvia Kaslow, communications vice president announced.
Shirley Sacks will replace Benjamin Dinkes as coordinator
for the Volunteers for Israel at their Sunrise, Florida office,
with Dinkes having left May 18 for Israel to work in the
volunteer program.
Second Lt. Michael D. Rabin, son of Louis M. and Diane
B. Rabin. Miami, has graduated from U.S. Air Force pilot
training, and has received silver wings at Vance Air Force
Base. Okla.
Airman Edward B. Stiegiitz, son of Veronica L. Stieglitz,
I Miami, has completed Air Force basic training at Lackland
Air Force Base, Texas.
B'nai B'rith Lodge 1591 holds a weekly Forum every Friday
at 12:30 p.m. in the Social Hall at 100 Lincoln Rd. Speakers
and entertainment.
The Men's Club of Beth Kodesh will sponsor a breakfast on
June ;i. '.'in am. in the Elsa Kreutzer Auditorium, honoring
Joseph Krissel on his 70th birthday.
The Jewish War Veterans Post 243 will conduct memorial
sen ices tor Jewish veterans on May 27, noon, at the grave-
site of the Murray Solomon family at the Star of David
Cemetery
DONT LOOK
ANY FURTHER!
TRY ONE OF OUR FULLY PREPARED
FRESH FROZEN ENTREES
Eggplant Parmigiana
Mushroom Chow Mein
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o Kosher Restaurant
Supervision of ORC Cholov Yisroel
534 41st Street MIAMI BEACH
TEL-531-1511
Dr. Irving Lehrman (right) presents the
Israel Peace Award to Sheila and Tibor
Hollo for their leadership on behalf of State
of Israel Bonds at the Temple Emanu-El
semi-annual Dinner and Dance held this
week in the Friedland Ballroom of the
Miami Beach congregation. Sidney
Cooperman (left) president of Temple
Emanu-El, looks on. Rabbi Lehrman is
chairman of the board of governors of the
Greater Miami Israel Bonds Organization.
Mr. and Mrs. Hollo have served as officers
of the synagogue for many years.
Reagan Reads Rabbi's Words
NEW YORK (JTA)
When President Reagan
addressed the "Baptist
Fundamentalism '84" con-
vention last month in
Washington, he said he
"wanted to do something
different."
Addressing approximately
20,000 Christians, headed by the
Rev. Jerry Falwell, Reagan spent
the remainder of his time reading
an article stressing the impor-
tance of America as a nation
Two Israeli
Soldiers
Wounded
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Israelis soldiers were wounded
when their patrol came under
small arms fire from ambush
north of the Zaharani River in
south Lebanon. They were
evacuated by helicopter to
Rambam Hospital in Haifa.
Two bazooka shells were fired
at an Israel Defense Force patrol
north of Juyaeh in the western
sector of the front in Lebanon but
caused no casualties. A mine was
discovered and safely dismantled
by Israeli soldiers on a road near
Nabatiyeh that is frequently used
by the IDF.
Meanwhile, Israel continued to
reduce its military presence in
Sidon, the most populace town in
south Lebanon. The Saraya
building which until recently
housed the IDF's civil admin-
istration, was formally turned
over to a representative of the
central government in Beirut.
The building now serves as head-
quarters for the government's
southern provincial admin-
istration.
Chai AMIT Holds
Charity Auction
The Chai Chapter of AMIT
Women will hold its annual
auction on June 3, at Temple Or
Olom. The early bird sale will
start at 4 p.m. and the auction
will start at 7:30 p.m. featuring
merchandise of every description.
Proceeds from the function is
earmarked for educational
projects and scholarships in the
schools maintained in Israel.
Chairpersons are Ann Slot sky,
Sadie Kane, Molly Beckerman,
Isabel Alexander, Pearl Wallen,
Molly Stein, Susan Feldman,
Mildred Gomez, Be Harris,
Jeanne Finkelstein and Bess
Sokol, chapter president.
based on pluralism, where
citizens could take pride in their
particular religions, and yet work
together "when the time came to
help others, to comfort and to
ease pain."
THE OFFICE of the Fleet
Chaplain Commander of the
Sixth Fleet reported here that the
words were from an article
written by Rabbi Arnold Res-
nicoff, the Navy chaplain who
was present in Beirut at the time
of the truck bomb attack on U.S.
forces last October 23.
Resnicoff, part of a three-man
Jewish-Catholic-Protestant
chaplain team on the staff of the
Sixth Fleet Commander, had
arrived in Beirut days earlier to
lead memorial services for a
Jewish marine killed by sniper
fire.
On the morning of October 23,
he, along with Father George
Pucciarelli, a Navy Catholic
chaplain, was among the first on
the scene to begin rescuing and
comforting the wounded. The
article read by Reagan will
appear in the summer edition of
Outlook, the magazine of the
Women's League for Conserva-
tive Judaism.


Page 18-B
- Z- ^ewish Floridian/ Fridav Mw is ino.
/
Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 25, 1984
Historian of the Holocaust Says Former
Nazis Have Found Refuge in Buffalo
BUFFALO, N.Y. -
(JTA) A historian of the
Holocaust charged that
this city had provided
refuge for two accused Nazi
war criminals who, he said,
"may be considered of
major rank."
Charles Allen, Jr., who has
been investigating and writing
about Nazi war criminals in the
United States since the 1960's,
told a conference of the Upper
New York Region of Hadassah
that the Justice Department
"had targeted a member of the
medical facility at a Buffalo-area
university for possible denatur-
alization proceedings for having
allegedly concealed his compli-
cities in the persecutions of Nazi
Germany."
ACORDING TO AUen,
charges against this professor of
medicine, whom he declined to
identify to avoid hampering the
Justice Department's invest-
igation, "indicate his involve-
ment in medical experiments
carried out on inmates at a Nazi
concentration camp."
The Justice Department's
Office of Special Investigations
(OSI), charged with prosecuting
suspected Nazi war criminals in
the U.S., has been working on the
case for more than a year, Allen
said.
Allen, who was delivering an
address titled "The Holocaust's
Legacy: Do Justice," said he first
came across the charges against
the medical professor during his
research on the world-renowned
physiologist, Dr. Hubertus
StrughoW. In the mid-1970s,
Allen uncovered evidence that
Strughold helped formulate some
of the "scientific" concepts that
were carried out by others in
medical experiments against
Russian POWs and Jewish
prisoners in the Dachau
concentration camp from 1941 to
1942.
STRUGHOLD, who c me to
the U.S. in 1947 and was jj ltural-
ized in the early 1950s, Allen
said, became the chief medical
scientist of the U.S. Air Force, a
consultant to the National Aero-
nautics and Space Admin-
istration (NASA) during the
Apollo moon shots, and worked
as an informant for the CIA.
Allen, who indicated that he
would shortly publish his
findings on the Buffalo medical
professor, said the charges
against him were made originally
by professional colleagues in the
medical field who alerted Allen to
his activities in Buffalo.
Allen also told the Hadassah
conference that a long-time
Buffalo resident, whom he ident-
ified as Walter Dornberger, had
been a former Nazi Wehrmacht
General and operational
commander of the so-called
"German rocket scientists" at
the infamous slave labor tunnels
of Dora-Nordhausen where the V-
1 and V-2 missiles were built
"under conditions which
survivors ailed 'a hell worse
than Auschwitz'."
DORNBERGER AT first was
considered major war criminal
by the British, according to
Allen, but he was given over to
the Americans under a program
called Project Paperclip who
brought the Nazi General to the
United States along with Werner
von Braun to create the U.S.
rocket program for spa'."" travel.
Allen said Dornberger came to
the U.S. in 1949 and was natural-
ized in the early 1950'a.
Allen, who gave the Nazi
Party, SA and SS affiliations ol
von Braun, contended that both
he and Dornberger were "effec-
tively war criminals in every
respect" and that the "glamour"
and "honors heaped on both
Germans" were part of "the Cold
War hype" that "enabled the
United States to use Nazi war
criminals and collaborators to
'fight Soviet Communism'."
Allen called such usage of Nazis
"dangerous and sentimental
nonsense."
Dornberger, Allen pointed out,
became "an affluent and influen-
tial member of the military-
industrial complex," noting his
directorships in Bell Aircraft
Company, Northrop, Lockheed
and other defense corporations.
'Dornberger and von Braun
:reated the Nazi V-l and V-2
irograms on the backs of some
50,000 slave laborers, nearly
17,000 of whom were worked to
death" in the projects created by
these "men of science'," Allen
asserted.
DEALING WITH the tragedy
of the Holocaust, Allen called the
1943 Warsaw Ghetto uprising "a
truly revolutionary act," the first
civilian uprising against the Nazi
occupation of Europe, in which
"an extraordinary coalition of
Jewish fighters from the Com-
munist left to the Bundist right"
demonstrated what resistance
could mean.
He took to task certain
historians who perpetrated the
myth that "the Jews of Europe
went to their slaughter like
sheep." Not only the Warsaw
Ghetto fighters but "many other
Jewish-led partisans fought
successfully in the guerrilla war-
fare of World War II," Allen
said.
He also emphasized that
"commemoration of the
Holocaust martyrs implied
implementing the justice which
they themselves consciously
bequeathed us: racial and rel-
igious equality, human compas-
sion and peace. If you honor the
six million, then you must honor
their everlasting moral
instructions."
Following Allen's speech, a
woman from Buffalo rose and
said, to vigorous applause: "I
was in the Warsaw Ghetto. We
did fight back. Even after the
uprising. Wherever we could. We
survivors are not passive, not
paralyzed by trauma as many say
we are. We are activists, fighters
and committed to life."
Two MKs DemandProbe Into Killing
of Four Terrorists Who Hijacked
a Tel Aviv Ashke Ion Bus
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Two Knesset members
have demanded a full scale
inquiry into the circum-
stances surrounding the
killing of four terrorists
who hijacked a Tel Aviv-to-
Ashkelon bus on April 12
with the intention of taking
its passengers hostage.
Ehud Olmert of Likud and
Victor Shemtov of the opposition
Labor Alignment agreed that the
facts must be ascertained to
relieve Israel of suspicion,
implicit in foreign media reports,
that one of the terrorists was
murdered after his capture.
Defense Minister Moshe Arens
said in a radio interview that he
had no reason to disbelieve the
army's version of what occurred.
He said, however, that the
military is "routinely" examining
the incident and would submit a
full report to him shortly.
ACCORDING TO the army,
two of the terrorists were killed
instantly when troops stormed
the bus in the early hours of
Friday, April 13 to rescue the
passengers. A third terrorist died
of his wounds a short while later
and the fourth died on the way to
a hospital, the army said.
One Israeli woman soldier, Irit
Portuguez, 19, was killed in the
shootout and seven passengers
were wounded. The four
terrorists, all residents of the
Gaza Strip, were buried on April
15 under army supervision.
But an Israeli reporter from
the newspaper Hadoshot, who
was at the scene, said he saw one
of the terrorists, apparently
unharmed, being led away from
the bus handcuffed by two Israeli
plainclothes security men. The
reporter took a photograph of the
man.
According to reports in the
Israeli and foreign media, the
photograph was readily identified
by friends and relatives as Majdi
Abu Jama, 18, of Beni Shuheila
village in the Gaza Strip, one of
the four men who hijacked the
Egged bus.
THE ARMY claimed this was
a case of mistaken identity.
According to the official version,
a bus passenger initially
mistaken for a terrorist, was held
in custody for a while but
released after he established his
identity as a Jew travelling to
Ashkelon. A bus passenger who
was not immediately identified
was quoted as telling reporters
that he was arrested but let go
when he produced his identity
card.
Nevertheless, the implication
that one of the terorists was
taken alive and was killed while
in custody of the Israeli author-
ities persists. Olmert said today
that publication of the story
abroad before all the facts were
clarified has severely damaged
Israel's reputation.
Shemtov said the Israel
Defense Force would be well
advised "to put on the table all
the details regarding the death"
of the terrorists in order to clear
Israel of the "libel" that is being
spread around the world.
He added that "if some abera-
tion occurred, those responsible
should be tried." There is no
capital punishment in Israel.
Captured terrorists convicted of
murder are given life sentences.
HAVEAFABULOSTIME
IN A FABULOUS PLACE...
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fedding
Friday, May 25, 1984/The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
j&v.-
Rh'oda Shainberg
SHAINBERGBELFER
Rhoda Shainberg, daughter of
the late Mr. and Mrs David
Shainberg. Miami Beach, became
the bride of Joseph Belfer. son of
he late Mr. and Mrs. Belfer.
North Miami Beach, on May 20
at the Konover Hotel. Rabbi
SholomP-I-ipskar officiated.
The bride wore a white chan-
tillv lace gown. Sandy Belfer and
Reate Ward were bridesmaids
and best man was Stanley
Kadishin.
The bride is a freelance interior
jjjjgj ,<.as instrumental
b forming classes at the Shul of
Bal Harbour for continuing
ion and is also
wish Federation.
Utive Women.

Th, | Bently associ-
ated with \poUo Kare Coins,
North Miami Beach.
After a honeymoon to Israel
and England, the couple will
make their residence on Miami
Beach
Bond Dinner
Honors Luria
The National Catalog
Showroom Industry will pay
tribute to Leonard Luria. who
will be the recipient of the Prime
Minister- Medallion at a State of
Israel Honds tribute dinner on
May 30 at the Sheraton Bal
Harbour Hotel.
Luria, president and chief
executive officer of L. Luria and
Son is hung recognized for his
participation in civic and Jewish
com- mal groups. He has been a
leader of numerous committees
for the betterment of life in the
South Florida community and
the State of Israel.
I.uria is serving as dinner
chairman and Governor Bob
Graham is honorary dinner
chairman. Shirley Jones will
headline the event.
Pearlson Heads
Menorah Posts
Eliot Pearlson has been
appointed as Educational and
Youth Director for Temple
Menorah, according to Rabbi
Mayor Abramowitz, spiritual
leader of the Temple.
Pearlson, born and educated in
Miami, studied at Yeshiva
University in New York and
received his BA at the University
of Florida where he majored in
religious studies. He served as
director of the summer Judaic
programs at the Hillel Founda-
tion in Gainesville, was chairman
of its Jewish Awareness Com-
mittee and was also drama
instructor.
Pearlson has taught at the
Solomon Schecter Day School
and the Beth David afternoon
school where he served as advisor
to the USY.
"Eliot Pearlson possesses the
ingredients necessary for the
perfect educator. He has both the
dedication and the know-how to
create a meaningful program
from Jewish education both for
the young and the adult com-
munity. Rabbi Abramowitz
stated
Weekend
on the Ocean
3 DAYS/2 NIGHTS
SOC Efficiency Apt
^^ 3 persons
I i/ per week
SAO One Bedroom Apts.
^^ 5 persons
s140
56
per week
One Bedroom Apts.
On The Ocean
5 persons
I OO per week
Includes Maid Service
We Speak Hebrew
BELLA VISTA
APTS.
2 Blocks from Bal Harbow Stores
9341 Collins Ave.
864-7657
the Auxandcr eMu&s
biqbcbooL-
We Purchase Premature
ISRAEL
BONDS
Over Two Years Old
Immediate Payment
at Premium Rates
Call Collect
576-3286 (Dade)
467-2750 (Broward)
Pearlson will
Brvna Herman.
succeed Mr-
DON'T MISS OUR
ANNUAL SALE
MEN'S SHOES
MONDAY-SATURDAY 9 A.M.-5:30 P.M.
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ont Miss These
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SEHABLAESPANOL
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iPurkinfi In
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Phone: R65-016 I
Half Block Smith of Bal Harbour SI
\
where shopping is a pleasure 7days a week
open at 8:00 A.M.
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Apple
Fritters
4?1
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Serve Plain, Toasted or
with Fruit, Golden Loaf
Pound Cake
each
Available at Publix Stores with F resh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Hamburger or
Hot Dog
Rolls
8 59
0
Available at All Publix Stores
and Danish Bakeries.
Lemon Meringue Pie...... eacn$159
Available at Publix Stores with Fresh
Danish Bakeries Only.
Homestyle
White Bread.................... .oaf 69c
Filled with Raisins
Cinnamon Raisin Rolls.
6"cl- $159
pkg. I
18-oz.
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Elephant Ears.................3
for
1
Oatmeal Cookies............ bag M89
A Chocolate Lover's Delight
Gourmet Brownies......... i*g. $169
Delicious
Cheese Pockets.............4 for $1
Prices Effective
May 24th thru 30th. 1984
Quantity
Rights Reserved.


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian, Kririav MeJ.R,J00i
f-mmr ine-ui.imu x- Jjnuuui/f nuay, iviay *0, 1904
Daniel Levine (right) president of the Miami Beach Board of
Realtors, presented Beach City Manager Rob W. Parkins
with the Board's resolution commending the city's Year 2000
Plan. Year 2000 is a long-term planning effort designed to
determine the best possible growth plan for Miami Beach
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-23*4
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BEATRICE C. TURKEL,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL. PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the admini-
stration of the estate of
Beatrice C. Turkel. deceased.
File Number 84-2384. is
pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130
The personal representative of
the estate Is Miriam
Sheinberg Zatlnsky, whose
address Is 2121 N. Bayshore
Drive No. 710. Miami. Florida
33137. The name and address
of the personal represen
tatlve's attorney are set forth
below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate
are required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE, to file with the clerk
of the above court a written
statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each
claim must be in writing and
must indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address
of the creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not
yet due, the date when It will
become due shall be stated. If
the claim la contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim
to the clerk to enable the clerk
to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob- '
Jectlons they may have that
challenge! s) the validity of
the decedent's will. the
qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of
Administration: May 20, 1884.
Miriam Sheinberg Zatlnsky
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Beatrice C. Turkel
Deceased
ATTORNEY. FOR
PERSONAL- .
REPRESENTATIVE:
Kathleen Markcy
Myers. Kenln, Levlnaon,
Frank .
A Richards .:
1428 Hrlckell Avenue
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (SOB) 371-8041
17008 May 28. June 1, ISM
-------------NOTICE UNDER--------------
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
SOCIALIZING FOR SUCCESS
at number 8100 E. Oakland
Park Blvd.. In the City of Ft.
Lauderdale, Florida, Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
BUSINESS NETWORKING,
INC., a Florida
corporation
By: Barbara Hoff
By: Cindy Levine
Myers, Kerln, Levlnaon,
Frank A Rlc-htrds
By: Edward I. Levlnson
Attorney for Applicant
Barbara Hoff
Cindy Levine
17010 May 20:
June 1. 8. 10, 1884
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name S.J.S.
Import A Export at 20027 N.W.
32 Place. Carol City, Fla. 33156
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Harold Sookie
Guy Jobson
Derrick Stewart
16867 May 11, 18. 25;
Junel. 1884
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 84-18557
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FAITH WILLIAMS.
Petitloner-WIFE
and
IRA EUGENE WILLIAMS.
RespondntHUSBAND
TO: IRA EUGENE
WILLIAMS
Residence Address:
OTISVILLO FEDERAL
PRISON
P.O. Box 1000
Otisvtlle. NY. 03
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been slled
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it
on Bruce N. Crown. Esq.,
15480 N.W. 7th Ave.. Suite 206.
Miami. Florida 33168 Bar No.
252751 on or before June 22.
1884 and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Petitioner's
attorney or immediately
thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petit urn
DATED: May 22. 1884
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: S. Verzaal
as Deputy Clerk
17006 May 28;
______________June 1, 8, 18, 1884
------------NOTICE; UND^R
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
PALM TRAILER PARK at
12000 Northeast 16th Avenue,
North Miami. Dade County,
Florida Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
VIMARJOU CORPORATION
a Panamanian corporation
LUXURY, INC.
a Netherlands Antilles
Corporation
DALUR, INC.
a Panamanian corporation
MARTIN LINDENFELD
RICHARD SCHECHTER
ELLAS KOBROWSKI
BRITTON, COHEN. CASSEL,
KAUFMAN A SCHANTZ
By: MARWIN S. CASSEL,
ESQUIRE
Attorney for PALM
TRAILER PARK
17008 May 20;
----------------------June 1. 8. 16. 1884
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue Miami, Florida
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name THE
STOCKROOM at 008 South
Miami Avenue. Miami.
Florida Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
8886, Inc.
17012 May 26;
______________June 1. 8. 10, 1884
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
F.A.C.E., Inc. at 2810 N.W.
107th Avenue. A-22-A-23 Box
08. Miami. Florida 38172
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Freesone Automotive
Compliance Engineering, Inc.
17011 May 26;
June 1, 8, 16. 1864
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Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
4 good way off shall they pitch round about the tent of
(Numbers 2.2).
BAMIDBAR
baMIDBAR "And the Lord spoke unto Moses in the
lihTiifss ol Sinai, in the tent of meeting, on the first day of the
* ond month in the second year after they were come out of the
j**j Egypt! sa) ing: Take ye the sum of all the congregation
lf ,|. children of Israel, by th.-ir families, by their lathers'
. x ding to the number of nan;, s, ei erj mole, bj "heir
[a, ntj years old and upward, all thai ai e able to
wai in Israel ye shall m mber hem bj theii hosl 1, even
on' (Numbers l 1-3) i .elusive ol 1 le Levites,
Hoi numbered, the total sum (>i men ol militai
rhere follows a des.-ripti.in ol the IsraeliU
am. ,,;, ni- .inriiiK their journeys through the desert (here were
bur majoi ..mips, each of three tribes, one under the flag ol
Judah. one under the flag ol Reuben, one under the flag of
Ephraim. and one under the flag of Dan. The Levites camped
separately near the sanctuary; among the Levites. each clan had
a particular service to render in regard to the sanctuary.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon The Graphic History ol the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, S15, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis
Inbut.ng the volume.)
Friday, May 25, 1964/The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
Delray Beach Lake view
Greens, 1 Bedrm. IV2 Bath Adult Condo,
Screened Patio, Clubhouse, Heated Pool, Ten-
nis, Next to Golf Course, 2Vi Miles to Delray
Dunes Beach Park $37,000.
395-0019
55000*"
%3BW300K6W31KW5aX-
Pancoast Plaza
Apartments
\ Beautifully Furnished Efficiencies Facing
$ Ocean and Boardwalk! Good location across
{! the street from Roney Plaza Hotel.
Pool. Garden with lounges & Chairs. Free
i Parking. Near shopping.
531-6402
2421 Lake Pancoast Dr.
WIENER BASTIEN, M.D.
Announces the opening of his office
for the practice of
OPHTHALMOLOGY
DISEASES AND SURGERY OF THE EYE
805 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach
531-5545
8340 N.E. 2nd Ave.. Suite 243
Ameritirst Bank Bldg.
Miami, Florida 33138
758-7188 758-7189
Office Hours By Appointment
MEDICARE ASSIGNMENT ACCEPTED
ftleWaeWsWseWta^^
*
Announcing
The Opening of the office
Dr. Rowland W. Pritchard
ORTHOPEDIC SURGEON
Specializing
Surgical Treatment of Arthritis
WE ACCEPT MEDICARE AND
SUPPLEMENTARY INSURANCE ASSIGNMENT
300 Arthur Godfrey Rd.
Miami Beach
(Pinetree Dr.
entrance)
By Appointment Only
531-8731
Tishgart

Bar/Bat Mitzvah
BARRY TISHGART
Barry Michael Tishgart, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Tishgart,
will be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah on May 26, 9 a.m. at
Beth David Congregation.
The celebrant is a student in
the Hey Class of Beth David, vice
president of Beth David USY,
and is in the seventh grade at
Glades Junior High.
Mr. and Mrs. Tishgart will
host the Kiddush following the
services and a reception at Beth
David.
Special guests will include
grandparents, Hy and Marcie
Coverman and Edward and Rae
Tishgart.
JEANNETTE EGOZI
Jeannette Blanca Egozi will be
called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah on May 26 at Temple
Emanu-El. Dr. Irving Lehrman
will officiate.
The celebrant is a student at
Lehrman Day School. She has
been on the Rabbi"s honor roll,
Derech Eretz, and was on the
science gifted program.
A reception will be held at
Temple F,manu-El, Friedland
Ballroom. Special guests will
include grandparents. Roberto
Susi, Dori Susi. Blanca Egozi,
and great-grandmother,
Diamante Susi.
Emanu-El Day Camp
Registration Closes
Registration is under way for
the 1984 summer camp program
of Temple Fmanu-El, which will
be held at the Belle Lehrman
Youth Center of the Miami Beach
congregation. Miami Beach June
18to August 10.
Called "Summer Scene 1984."
the Monday through Friday
camp is open to lx>ys and girls
from three to 11 years of age,
including both members and non-
members of the synagogue
headed by Dr. Irving Lehrman.
Special activities instituted
this year include a computer
program for all ages and Friday
field trips. Pre-school youngsters
will have camp from 9 a.m. to 1
p.m., and kindergarten through
eighth grade students will follow
a 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. schedule,
according to Mitchell Kinzer.
camp director.
A counselor-in-training
program for students entering
the ninth grade also will be held,
Rabbi Lehrman said. Door-to-
door bus service is available, and
advance registration is required.
Registration deadline is May 31.
Dr. Amir Baron is director of
education, and Sidney
Cooperman, president of Temple
Emanu-El.
WANTED
Ritual Director/Sexton for
Conservative Synagogue
Must Be Qualified Torah
Reader. Able To Chant
Shacharis Services For
High Holidays. Call For
Appointment. Hallandale.
454-9100
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelightinq
Time: 7:45 p.m.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-14.15
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Fit., 8 15 pm. Worship Services
Sal.. 8:30 am. Shabbat Services
6 pm Mincha Service Shale Saudot
Sun., 8:30 am and 6:30 pm.
Monday thru Friday. 7:30 am and 6 pm
TEMPLE BETH AM Or. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon. Associate Rabbi
Frt., 8:15 pm. Rabbi Baumgard wilt apaak on
"Ara W* Happier Today Than Our Ancaalora
War* In tha Desert-'
B not Mltzvh ol Jill Baaaatt and
Caran R Idge
Sat., 15 am, Bar Mitzvah ol Joshua Hantt.
Sat, 11:15 am. B'nal Mltvah ol Rooert Jackaon
and Mlchaal Krtnzman.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION^
Coral Way: 2625 S.W 3rd Avenue '"*>
South Oade 7500 S W !201hStraat ( RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH i^L''
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Dsda Chapal
Fri 6 pm
Oneg Shabbat follows
Coral Way Sanctuary
Sat.. 9 am. Bar Mitzvah: Merrill OavM Hlger
Barry Mlchaal Tlshgsrt
Sat., 7:50 pm. Bat Mltnah ol
Slaphanla Michala Krleger
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Friday Sarvicas------6 pm
Saturday Sarvicas 8:45 am and 5 pm
Sunday Sarvicas 6 am and 6 pm
Dally Minyan Sarvicas 7:45 am and 6 pm
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler, Cantor
JP
lata Friday Eva. Sarvlca
8 pm
Sat. Morn Sarvlca
9 am
Dr. Irving Luhrman will preach at 10:30
Bal Mttnail ol Jeannette Egozi
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N. Miami, FL 33181
891 5508 Conservative
RABBI ISRAEL JACOBS
CANTOR MOSHE FRIEDLER
RABBI EMERITUS JOSEPH A GORFlNKEl
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR IRVING JARET
EDUCATIONAL DIRECTOR BARBARA SHULMAN
Daily services 8 a.m. 5 p.m. *',
Fri 6 pm. Worship Service Torah Sebbath
Sat.. 9 am. Shabbat Morning Services
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jelferbon Ave MB.. FL 33139
Tel. 538 4112
Rabbi Or. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nissim Benyamini
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41st St. 538-7231
DR LIONKRONISH RABBI Liher.il
HARRV JOLT. AUXILIARY RABHI
PAUL 0 CAPIAN. ASSISTANT RABBI
CANTOR DAVID CONVISER
Frt.. 8.15 pm, Sabbath Sarvicas
Sat 10:45 am
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Lipschitz, Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg. Asst. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Frt., 5:30 pm. S pm
Bat Mitzvah ol Michelle Qeber
Sal.. 7:30 pm
Bar Mitzvah ol James Raich
BETH YOSESEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwaig, Rabbi
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schif i
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
houses of Worship
Phone 576 4000
Rabbinical Association Office
HEBREW ACADEMY"
BETH EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Orive. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schilf
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
*.' |
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573 5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595 5055
Haskell M. Bernat. Senior Rabbi
Donald P. Cashman. Assistant Rabbi
Jacob G. Bornstein, Cantor
Rachelle Nelson, Student Cantor
Philip Goldin, Exec. Dir.
Frt.. 8 pm, Downtown, Rabbi Cashman will
epaek on "A Behind the Scene Look at Moses "
Kendall, Rabbi Bemat will epaak on
"No Retreat Irom Reason
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd.
Coral Gables
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frt.. 8:15 worship service
Sat.. 11:15 am. Shabbath Sarvlca
Reform
667-5657
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd Tel. 534 9776
DR. DAVIO RAAB. Rabbi
Danny Tadmore. Cantor
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz *:--,
Cantor Murray Yavneh S?
Morning Services8 am -.-_
Friday Evening Services6:15 pm
Saturday Morning Services9 am
Evening Services 6 30 pm
Saturday Evening Services 7:45 pm
TEMPLE NER TAMID 866-8345
7902 Cariyle Ave.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz conservative
Cantor Edward Klein
Daily Minyan at 8 am
Late Frt. night Service at 6:15 pm
Sabbath Service at
8.45 am. Sunday Minyan at 8 30 am
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
ot North Mi.imi Beach
9/1 Northejst 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung. Rabbi
SHAARfc TEFILLAH Cf KEN DAL I
1
Rdbbi Wanen Kaszti M
Fn. 9vo 7 ^.,n, For Tl-e Entire Summer
Sat 9:30 am. Eat alternoon 20 mm. belore
Sundown Morning Mlny in. Mon : Tnurs 8.45 am
Tues.. Wed 6 Frt., 7 am. lollowed by class
In Gemara Berachot (Memorial)
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Frt.. 8 15 pm. Sisterhood Sebbath
Sat., 10 30 am, B'nal Mitzvah ol
Joseph end Sablna Kepp
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi .j^.
Benjamin Adler. Cantor ft
David Rosenthal,
Auxiliary Cantor
^
1
Frt., 1:15 pm. Family worship service
Sat, am, Services. Tsiller Chapal
Mon.. 6 am. holiday Minyan aervlce
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
m
282 S University Or Plantation. Fl 33324
947 6094 Harold Wishna. executive director
Fienklln 0 Kroutzer. regional president
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park, 3785
NW 82 Ave.. Suite 210, Miami. FL
33166. 592 4792. Rabbi Lewis C
Littman. regional director


jagg L8-B_,^^,teyytbFi|ngriivi/uSy;;4 ,Arfr
TBjje ^.u-u ine jewisn rionaian rriday. May 25, 1984
Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84 16053
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THK MARRIAGE OF
HALIM ALL
Petitioner Husband,
and
AYOUB ALL
Respondent Wife.
TO: AyoubAli
U Sukeran St.
San Fernando, Trinidad. WI
YOl ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
vour written defenses, if any, to
it on GEORGE T RAMANI.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 711 Biscayne Bldg..
19 West Flagler Street Miami.
Florida 33130, and file the
Origin*] with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
i June 8. 1984; otherwise a
default will he entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH Fl.ORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 3 day of May.
1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKBR
As Clerk. Circuit Court
DadeCounty. Florida
ByCP COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal i
GEORGET RAMANI
711 Hiscayne Bldg
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida33130
1306 i 374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
16947 May 11. 18.25.
Junel, 19S4
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
SIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
inder the fictitious name
CORAL REEF CARDIOLOGY
ASSOCIATES, I'A at 9299
Jouthwest 152nd Street. Miami,
Florida 38181 intend to register
..ml name with the Clerk of the
'u:r! of I lade County,
la
BIERFELDa SEIOEL
M.D l' A
a
, icr \pptuanl
ihevin. Shapo ft
i nner i *
pl Building
itheasl rtilrd A\enue
Miami. FLonda
8843 May I, 11 18,36, 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
mg to engage in business
under the fictitious name
SHINE ON PRODUCTS at
1100 S.E. 9th Terrace Hla-
leah. Fl 33010 intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
GLENN A ESTROFF
Amerlcus Pascarella
16982 May 18. 25
June 1. 8. 1984
.
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME
STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
ss
The undersigned, under oath,
says; It la the Intention of the
undersigned to engage In a
business enterprise under the
fictitious rsynes of KENDALL
OPTICAL CENTER,
KENDALL OPTICAL 3ER
VICE located at 9000 SW 87th
Court. Suit,*130. In the city of
MIAMI. FLA 33156 Dade
County. Florida
Those Interested In said en
terprlae, and the extent of the
interest of each, la as follows:
MELSANDBERG
OWNER
imH______MaT.H,18,2JLi8^
ELlVENTItelRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 84-15551
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ANTONIO DERIV A I..
Petitioner-Husband,
and
M A YRELL DERIV AL
Respondent Wife
TO: MA YRELL DERIV AL.
Residence unknown, shall
serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 812 N W
13th Avenue. Miami. Florida,
88188, and file original with
Court Clerk on or before June 1.
IBM. otherwise a default will be
entered.
April SO. 1884.
RICHARD BRINKE R
BY: H Sotolongo
18SS8 May 4. 11, 18. SB. 1884
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
HOMESTEAD AUTO
RECYCLING A USED PARTS
at 1158 W. Mowry Drive.
Homestead. Florida, 33030
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
OsvaldoLaplnell
16961 May 11. 18.25; ,
Junel, 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
AL. KANOV & ASSOCIATES
at 7775 S.W. 126th Terrace,
Miami, Florida 33156 Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
AL. KANOR A ASSOCIATES
PAUL M. CUMMINGS
Attorney for AL. KANOV A
ASSOCIATES
16995 May 25;
June 1. 8. 15. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 8418478
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
NATIONAL WAREHOUSE,
INCORPORATED, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARTIN I. MILLER and
BETTY MILLER, a-k-a
Beatrice Miller his wife, et |
al..
Defendants.
TO EUGENE M
BROOKS, M.D..
PC. PROFIT
SHARING PLAN
1528 Tator Court
Bloomfleld Hills,
Michigan
YOU, EUGENE M.
BROOKS. M.D.. PC, Profit
Sharing Plan are hereby noti-
fied that a BUI of Complaint to
Foreclose a Mortgage on the
following described property,
to-wit:
Lot 9 and 10 In Block 38 of
Amended Plat of OCEAN
FRONT PROPERTY OF
MIAMI BEACH
IMPROVEMENT COMPANY. [
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded In Plat Book 5, at '
Pages 7 and of the Public !
Records of Dade County.
Florida
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your Answer or
Pleading to the Bill of Com- i
plaint on Plaintiff's attorneys.
KWITNEY. KROOP &
SCHEINBERG. P.A. .420 Lin-
coln Road. Suite 512. Miami
Beach. Florida. 33139. and to
file the original Answer or
pleading In the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on
or before the 22 day of June.
1984
If you fall to do so. Judg-
ment by Default will be taken
against you for the relief
demanded In the Bill of Com-
plaint
KINDLY GOVERN
YOURSELVES
ACCORDINGLY
DATED this 21 day of May.
1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Clarlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
17000 May 25;
JUIM 1, 8. 15. 1984 ,
__________________________________I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
FUTUREWORKS at 200 S.
Miami Ave Miami, Florida
33130. Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
The Downtown Investments,
Ltd.
16945 May 11. 18. 25;
June 1. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIOA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-4098
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROSE L WOLKIND,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of ROSE L. WOLKIND,
deceased. File Number 84-
4098, Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
-33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested
person to whom notice was
mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualm
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice
has begun on May 20. 1884.
Personal Representative:
HARRY B. SMITH
1111 Lincoln Road-8th Floor
Miami Beach. Florida 88189
SMITH A MANDLER. P.A.
Attorney for Personal
Representative
By: SAMUEL S. SMITH
1111 Lincoln Road-8th Floor
Miami Beach, Florida 8818B
(805) 878-1100
ihm May 38. June 1, 1884
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-147*9
Florida Bar No. 125058
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIE JOCELYNE
LEBRETON
and
JEAN CHARLES
LEBRETON
To: Jean Charles Lebreton
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on David E. Stone. Esq..
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1401 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33135
(3051 649-4411. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June S. 1984. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once iii weak for four con
CCUtive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
W ITNESS mj hand .uki the
seal ol said court al Miami
FlOl ida on this 4th da) ol Ma)
RICHARD H BRINKER
v-1 Ilerk, Cln ult Court
Dade County, Florida
ByCP COPBLAND
\ 1 ii-puly Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
1 >,i\ :il E Stone. Esq
win West Flagler Street
Miami. FL83130
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone (3051649-4411
16957 May 11. 18. 25;
Junel. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No.84-1 S652
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EDITH TRINIDAD,
Wife.
and
ROBERTO TRINIDAD.
Husband.
TO: ROBERTO TRINIDAD
134 Hale Avenue
Brooklyn. NY. 11208
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
It on Albert L. Carricarte, P.A ,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 3491 N.W. 7th Street,
Miami, Florida 33126, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before June 8th, 1984; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
peUUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this day of April 80,
1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L Carricarte, Esq.
2481 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 88136
Telephone: (SOB) 848-7817
Attorney for Petitioner
18887
May 4.11.18, 36. 1B84
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
Snoopy's Day Care Center at
3401 N.W. 213 Terrace, Dade
County, Miami. FL33169 Intend
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
WILLIE RAGIN
OVENIA RAGIN
KRAMER & GOLDEN. P.A
Attorney for Willie Ragln &
Ovenla Raglr,
16968 May 11.18, 25;
June 1, 1984
1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
H.M.M. COMPANY at 622 S.W.
l Street Miami, Fla. 33130
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Herman Cohen
Martin Cohen
Maria Cohen
COHEN & COHEN
Attorney for H M M Company
6228.W. l Street
Miami. Fla 88180
16944 May 11. 18.25.
Junel. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-18189
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VICTOR OMORUYI,
Petitioner-Husband,
and
THERESA OMORUYI.
Respondent-Wife
TO: THERESA OMORUYI,
(RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN) YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that an
action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It
on LAWRENCE M SHOOT.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 3000
Blacayne Blvd.. No. 315.
Miami. Fla 88187, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or
before June 22. 1W>4.
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be pub-
lished once each week for tour
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH Fl.ORIDIAN
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 84-15140
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SORAYA RODRIGUEZ
Petltloner-WIFE
and
JOSE M. RODRIGUEZ
Respondent-HUSBAND
TO:
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq., 15490
N.W 7th Ave., Suite 206.
Miami, Florida 33169 Bar No.
252751 on or before June 1. 1984
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either
before service on PetlUoner's
attorney or Immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Petition.
DATED: April 26, 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY C. P Copeland
as Deputy Clerk
16929 May 4.11. 18, 26,1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBx
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
CERAMICS UNLIMITED at
9716 Bird Road, Miami El
33165 intend to register said
name with the Clerk of th.
Circuit Court of Dade Count*
Florida. *'
CERAMICS UNLIMITED
INC.
Jane S. Tiller
President
Richard A. Golden. Esq
Attorney for Ceramics
Unlimited. Inc.
16842 May 4.11. 18. 25 ta84
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
KOSHER MAGIC at 1839
Miami Gardens Drive, North
Miami Beach. Fla. Intend to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
I i.id. Count) Florida.
Guelman Enterprises. Inc.
a Florida corporation
BY Chanoch Goelman.
a-k-a Henry Goelman
President
Abraham a Galbut, Esq.
Attorney for Applu anl
16848 May 11. 18, 25;
June 1. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
M'TUE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
ASTRAL POWER al 108 S W
ad, Miami Fla 8311
to regiatei laid name
with Ihe Clerk of the circuit
Court i>i I lade Count) Florida
Mariano Martinet
> > ner
16848 May 11. 18, 25;
June i 1884
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 18 day of May.
1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: B.J. FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAWRENCE M. SHOOT.
ESQ
3000 Blscayne Blvd. No. 315
Miami, Florida 33137
Tel. (308) 573-5010
Attorney for Petitioner
16993 May 25;
June 1. 8, 15. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO.84-142 71 FC.
(No. 135813)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
ISAIAH WALKER, jr. husband
and
CALLETTE W. WALKER,
wife
TO: CALLETTE W.WALKER
1339 BEDFORD AVE.
NEW YORK. NY..
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an acUon for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on ARTHUR H. LIPSON,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 801 NE 167 Street,
Miami. Fla. 33183. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June l, 1984; otherwise a
default will be entered against i
you for the relief demanded In '
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on this 80th day of
April. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D.C. Bryant
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18888 May 4, 11. 18. 26. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE is HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to .'linage In business
under the fictitious name
Homestead Washbowl Coin
Laundr) at 130* North Krome
Avenue. Homestead Florida
Intend to register said name
With the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
D AND L CO IN, INC
BY: 1-arry Harris
President
EricH Turetsky. Esq.
Attorney for
1) ANDL COIN. INC
2725 SW Third Avenue
Miami. Florida33129
16961 May 11, 18,25.
June 1.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 84-151*2
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
INES P. ROBLES.
WIFE
and
MIGUEL ROBLES,
HUSBAND
TO: MIGUEL ROBLES,
Residence Address'
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
BRUCE N. CROWN. ESQ
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue, Suite
208 Miami. Florida 33168 on or
before June l. 1884 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
PetlUoner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the PeUUon.
DATED: April 26. 1884
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By:S.VERZAAL
*a Deputy Clerk
16881 May 4, 11. 18.36, 1864
NOTICE OF ACTION 1
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIOA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 841744)
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EMMANUEL W. BASTIKN
Petitioner-Husband
and
JOSETTE BASTIEN
Respondent-Wife
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Fla. Bar No 363081
TO: Josetle Bastlen
599 Lowell Ave.. No 3
Cincinnati, OH 85330
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy
of your written delenses. if
any. to It on BRENT E
ROUTMAN. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
181 NE. 82nd Street. Miami.
Florida 33138, and (He the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or
before June IS. 1984.
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petlUon.
This notice shall be pub-
lished once each week for (our
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH Fl.ORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 14th day of
May, 1984.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Cln
Dade Count>
By H SOTOI.
Aa Deput) Cli
i Circuit Court Si
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Lam
Attorneys tor Petitioner
Attention Brent E Roul
Esq
im n E 83nd Street
Miami. Florida 33188
Telephone: (305i 757-5800
18988 MA) -
June 1. 8. 1884
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN ANDFOR
DADECOUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO 84 8479 29
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
Florida Bar No 125828
JULIO DE (jUESADA.
Plaintiff,
vs.
SEVERO E ESCOBAR
Defendant.
TO: SEVERO E.ESCOBAR.
Residence Unknown.
Last Known Address:
1926 Brickell Avenue.
Apt. 1406-D
Miami, FL 33131
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property
in Dade County, Florida
Lot 16. Block 67. SOTH CITY
MIAMI, according to the Plat
thereof, as recorded In Plat
Book B at Page 41. of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida
has been filed and commenced
in this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
Gulllermo Sostchln, Esq.
attorney for Plaintiff, whose
address la 1401 W. Flagler
Street, Suite 201. Miami
Florida 33136. and file thf
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June 1. 1884; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you tor the relief prayed in the
complaint or petlUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse-
cutive weeks In The Jewish
Florldlan.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this court on April 36.1884
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: D.C. BRYANT
ss Deputy Clerk
Attorney for Petitioner:
Gulllermo Sostchln. Esq.
1401 W Flagler No 201
Miami, FL 38186
(Phone) (306)840 4411
18893 May 4.11.18.36. 1884


Friday, May 25, 1984/The Jewish Ploridian Page 21-B
public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
JsTRUCTIVE SERVICE
C0H*HO PROPERTY)
mTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
!ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
KlT OF FLORIDA. IN
MC FOR BADE COUNTY
evil Action NO.I4-174M
JZ FOR DISSOLUTION
CTI0OF MARRIAGE
wBE THE MARRIAGE OF
Hiaband.
gaiEY SALCEDO PEREZ.
AB SALCEDO
PEREZ.
Residence Address
Unknown mrnli.f,Y
T0U ARE HEREBY
vJriFIED that an action tor
Uutlon of Marriage ha.
iTflled against you and you
. required to serve a copy
fS written defend.. If
"* to It on Albert L.
SJricarU. PA., attorney for
Mdoner. whose address U
m S W Street. Miami.
33128. and file the original
Vtth the clerk of the above
.tyled court on or before June
IS 1984 otherwise a default
,111 be entered against you tor
w relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be pub-
Urted once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLOR1D1AN.
WITNESS my hand and the
Ml of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 14 day of May.
MM
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A> Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Arden Wong
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal!
Albert L Carrlcarte. Esq.
Ml N.W 7th Street
Miami, Fla 33125
Telephone 13061 649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
IM83 May 18.28;
June 1. 8. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
TMEELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAOECOUNTV. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO 84 16398
DIRE THE MARRIAGE OF
I.I ISF FERRERO
PeUUonerHl SBAND
and
CARMEN FERRERO
Raspondenl-Vt IKE
rn CARMEN FERRERO
Reildeni < Address
RESIDENCE l NKNOWN
Vnl ARE NOTIFIED that
ar. action for dissolution of
arrtage has been filed
gainst you and you are re-
quired to serve .i copy of your
nllen defenses, If any. to It on
Bruit- N Crown. Esq 15490
N 7th Ave Suite 205 Miami.
Florida 3.1169 Bar No. 252751 on
or before June H. 1984 and file
the original with the Clerk of
IhisCourt either before service
on I'etitiuner's attorney or
immediately thereafter;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Petition
DATED May 7, 1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
'('rout Court Seal)
By ARDEN WONG
as Deputy Clerk
' May 11.18. 28;
June 1. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
Jirtng to engage In business
JKkT the fictitious name of
JOUR WASH MART at 11979
*. 17th Avenue. Miami.
florlda Intend to register said
"*me with the Clerk of the
Oftult Court of Dade County.
Florida
NORTH MIAMI COIN
LAUNDRY and DRY
CLEANERS, INC.
A FLORIDA
CORPORATION
rtRDIEAGOUZ
Attorney (or Applicant
~ May 11. 18. 28;
June 1. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
V(tT'TI0US NAME LAW
I QRtKFS ,S HEREBY
* lhal lne undersigned.
"''ring to engage In business
lcUBue flcUtl" name CAR
lsW\al PO Box 1-3801.
I,".- r'l"rida 33116. Intends
0.* *"r Mld name with the
lit* the C,rcuU Court *
I""'County. Florida
World Wide Stereo
T Centers Inc.
'wimy j Thomas. Pres
J' booth Dixie Highway
lami. Florida 33143
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name the
Highlander Coin Laundry at
1308 North Krome Avenue.
Homestead. Florida Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
HARRIS ASSOCIATES.
LTD.. A Florlda
Limited Partnership
BY: ERNEST E.HARRIS.
President of H.D.E.
Enterprises, Inc.,
General Partner
Eric B. Turetaky. Esq.
Attorney for
HARRIS ASSOCIATES. LTD.
2726 S. W. Third Avenue
Miami. Florida 33129
16949 May 11. 18.26;
June 1.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 64-17 js
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LUIS CAMPOVERDE
Petitioner
and
LAURA PEREZ DE
CAMPOVERDE
Respondent
TO: Laura Perez de
Campoverde
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if
any, to It on Mariano Sole,
Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 101 N.W. 13th
Avenue, Miami. Florida 33128.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before June 15. 1984;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be pub-
lished once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH KI.ORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 14th day of
May, 1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florlda
ByS VERZAAL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal l
A KOSS. Attorney at Law.
PA.
Attn: Mariano Sole, Esq.
Attorney for Petitioner
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Florlda 33128
Telephone (306)328-8844
16985 May 18. 25:
June 1. 8. 1984
I
May 4. 11. 18.25. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number M-2*24
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM H MUNDEN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of WILLIAM H.
MUNDEN, deceased, File
Number 84-2924. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florlda. Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 73 W Flagler Street. Miami,
FL 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested
person to whom notice was
mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre
sentatlve. venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice
has begun on May 18. 1984.
Personal Representative:
RODNEY WALTER
MUNDEN
7581 SW 37 Street
Miami. FL
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
BRUCE LAMCHICK
LAMCHICK. GLUCKSMAN
A JOHNSTON, PA
10661 N Kendall Dr Suite 217
Miami. FL 33176
Telephone: (30o. 596-6333
16977 Mav 18 28. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 64 39 5*
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NATHAN SCHEINFARBER
KAPLAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
. CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the admini-
stration of the estate of
NATHAN SCHEINFARBER
KAPLAN. deceased. File
- Number 84-8986. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate
| Division, the address of which
Is Room 307, 73 West Flagler
St. Miami FL 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate Is Eduardo
Schelnfarber, whose address
Is 1828 Lenox Ave Miami
Beach. Fla.. The name and
address of the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate
sre required. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THE!
NOTICE, to file with the clerk
of the above court a written
statement of any claim or
demand they may have. Each
claim must be In writing and
must Indicate the basis for the
claim, the name and address
of the creditor or his agent or
'attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim is not
yet due, the date when It will
become due shall be stated. If
the claim Is contingent or
unliquidated, the nature of the
uncertainty shall be stated. If
the claim Is secured, the
security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver
sufficient copies of the claim
to the clerk to enable the clerk
to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenge! s) the validity of
the decedent's will. the
qualification of the personal
representative, or the venue
or Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of
Administration: May 18. 1984
Eduardo Schelnfarber
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
NATHAN SCHEINFARBER
KAPLAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR
PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MANUEL ZAIAC
160 SE 2nd Ave Suite 610
Miami Fla 33131
Telephone: 388-4580
16970 May 18. 25, 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
EXIT SHOE SALON at The
Falls, 8888 Howard Drive.
Miami, Florida Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florlda.
CAPRICHO SHOES, INC.
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for
CAPRICHO SHOES. INC.
16971 May 18, 28;
June 1. 8, 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
( GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
LEXICON ADMINIS-
TRACION SERVICE at 2461
Brlckell Ave. Miami Fla. 33129
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County,
Florlda.
Jose L. Nazar
16997 May 26;
_____________June 1, 8. 16. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
FLORIDA TRANSPORT
COMPANY 82 at 13101 N.W. 14
Street. Miami, Florlda Intend
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
FLORIDA TRANSPORT
COMPANY 82
MEDLEY ENTERPRISE.
INC.
(d-b-a Tallow master)
SOUTHEAST U.S.
RECYCLING CORP.
FLORIDA TALLOW CORP
ROYALGREASE CORP.
(Charles Largay. Jr. I
Attorney for Florida Transport
Company 82
Aaron M Kanner, Esquire
32 Shore Drive North
Bay Heights
Miami. PL 38138
16932 May 1. 11. 18,25. 1984
notTCe under
fictitious name law
notice is hereby
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
VICTORIA BAKERY at 10988
S.W. 40th Street, Miami.
Florida. 33168 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Juan M. Echenlque
17002 May 25,
June 1, 8, 16. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 64-12 (CA14I
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI, a
United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LOURDES GOMEZ, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: LOURDES GOMEZ
and PAULA GOMEZ,
residence unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that
an action to foreclose a mor-
tgage on the following
described property In Dade
County, Florida. Unit 28-A, of
VILLA VENEZIA, a Con-
dominium, according to the
Declaration of Condominium
thereof, as recorded In Official
Records Book 11223. at Page
1101. of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florlda, as
amended: together with all
Improvements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon, has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on Keith. Mack. Lewis and
Allison. Plaintiff's attorneys,
whose address Is 111 N.E. 1st
Street. Miami, Florida 33132,
on or before June 1, 1984. and
file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's attorneys
or Immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on the 25th day of
April. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: D.C.BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
16924 May 4, 11. 18, 28, 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 63-34*10 CA 12
NOTICE OF ACTION
EDITH SPIEGEL.
Plaintiff,
v.
SOUTHERN SUNBELT
DEVELOPMENT CORP.,
Defendant.
TO: Joseph Segel
Address Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a second
mortgage on the following
property In Dade County,
Florlda: Lot 8, Block 58.
OCEAN BEACH ADDITION
NO. THREE, according to the
Plat thereof, recorded In Plat
Book 2. at Page 81. of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florlda. has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any,
to It on LAW OFFICES of
NORMAN K. 8CHWARZ.
P. A.. Plaintiff's attorney,
whose address Is: 407 Lincoln
Road. Suite 10-A, Miami
Beach. Florida 33139, on or
before the 18th day of June,
1984. and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court, either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorney or Immediately
thereafter: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Complaint.
DATED: this 11th day of
May. 1984.
RICHARD P BRINKER,
As Clerk of the Court
BY: B.J FOY
As Deputy Clerk
I.AW OFFICES OF
Norman K Schwan P A
Attorney fur Plaintiff
407 Lincoln Koad
Miami Beach. Kl. 33139
16981 Mav
me an.
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 14-1*527
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
PERCIVAL BLACK.
HUSBAND
i and
LORNABLACK,
WIFE
TO: LORNA BLACK,
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
in action for dissolution of
.marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
BRUCE N. CROWN. ESQ.
15490 N.W 7th Avenue, Suite
i206 Miami, Florida 33169 Bar
No. 282751 on or before June 15,
1984 and file the original with
the Clerk of this Court either
before service on Petitioner's
' attorney or Immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
Petition
DATED: May 8.1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(CircuitCourt Seal)
By: S. VERZAAL
as Deputy Clerk
16963 May 11.18.25
June 1.1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN ANO FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No.8* 1534*
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS AND LOAN
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI
a United States Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
GLORIA H MALUF, and
RACHDD MALUF, her
husband,
and UNKNOWN TENANT,
Defendants.
TO: GLORIA H. MALUF and
RACHID MALUF, her
husband
Carrera7 No. 3381
Bogota.
Colombia. South America
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED, that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the
following described property In
DADE County. Florida:
Condominium Parcel No. B
PH-3. GROVE ISLE, a Condo-
minium, according to the
' Declaration of Condominium,
recorded January 23, 1979. In
Official Records Book 10279. at
Pate 195. of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florlda; as
amended, together with all
improvements. appliances,
and fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
If any, to It on Keith, Mack,
Lewis ft Allison. Plaintiff's
attorneys, whose address Is ill
N.E. 1st Street. Miami. Florida
33132. on or before June 1. 1984.
and file the original with the
Clark of this Court either
before service on Plaintiff's
attorneys or immediately
thereafter; otherwise, a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the compallnt.
WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF THIS Court on the 27
day of April. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
BY: CP.COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
16935 May 4, 11. 18. 28. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cast No. 64-13*71 CA
Fla. Bar No. 07f62i
NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
JOSEPH W RARES.
Plaintiff,
vs.
LARRY BARTENFELDER
and CYNTHIA i
BARTENFELDER, his Wife,
DAVID E. RESNICK and
UNITED STATES OF
AMERICA. INTERNAL
REVENUE SERVICE.
Defendants.
TO: LARRY
BARTENFELDER
Residence Unknown
YOU. LARRY
BARTENFELDER. are
hereby notified that an action
to foreclose a mortgage on the
following property In Dade
County. Florlda. to-wit: LOT
9. BLOCK 12. CORAL BAY.
SECTION D. as recorded In
Plat Book 68. at Page 60. of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida a-k-a 13001
Miranda. Coral Gables,
Florida, has been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your answer
or pleading on Plaintiff's
attorneys. TAFFER ft
JACOBS. 3301 Northeast 2nd
Avenue. Miami, Florlda S313T,
and to tile the original answer
i or pleading in the Office of the
. Clerk of the Circuit Court on
or before the 32nd day of
June. 1984.
If you fall to do so.
Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the
relief demanded In the
Complaint.
KINDLY GOVERN
YOURSLEF ACCORDINGLY.
DATED this 16th day of
May. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Seal)
By: DC. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
16987 May 18. 28
June 1. 8. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
MARHYL GALLERIES at 1281
N.W. 173rd Terrace, Miami.
Dade County, Intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Maria Y.Ollpnant
HyltonG. Ollphant
Jerold H. Relchler, Esquire
Attorney for Applicants
1400 N.E. Miami Gardens
Drive. No. 103
North Miami Beach. Florida
33179
16921 May 4. 11.18,28, 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Custom Gifts by ellen at 7120
Collins Ave Miami Beach. Fl
33141 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Hide County.
Florida,,
Ellen Z m nerCrlatol
May 11, 18, 28;
iune 1. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 64 16452
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Bar No. 043 578
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
OLGA M. FERNANDEZ
Petltloner-Wlfe,
and
JOSE 1 FERNANDEZ
Respondent-Husband.
TO: Jose 1 Fernandez
13 Parker Street
Charlestown.
Massachusetts
02129
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
i Dissolution of Marriage has
i been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, If
any. to It on Malcolm Lewis
Kneale, Esq.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
1341 S.W. First Street. Miami,
Florida 33138. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or
before June IB. 1984;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be pub-
lished once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 11th day of
May. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
| Malcolm Lewis Kneale, Esq.
1341 S.W. First Street
Miami, Florida 33136
Attorney for Petitioner Wife
16980 May 18. 28;
June 1, 8. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
YOKO'S at 4041 Ponce De Leon
Blvd.. Coral Gables. Florida
33134 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
FRIENDLY
RESTAURANT. INC.
A FLORIDA
''MtPORATION
FERDIK i OOUZ
Attorney* 'or Applicant
1* 1) 11. 18,25;
June 1. 1984


iiSSfJi8"8 nl^SX.^ Pridian, FriAav M...10 iru.
Page 22-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 25, 1984
'
. -
Public Notice?
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No.H-MW
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
Ll'ZANGHEI..
Petitioner.
and
TRAV1AN ANOHKL.
Respondent.
TO: TRAVIAN ANQHEL
Centre Resldenclal
"Altamlra
Sur" TorTe"A,"
Apartment 2-A, ler. Pleo
Caracas, Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY
notified that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to
It on A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW, P.A.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
101 N.W. 12th Avenue. Miami.
Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June
1,1964; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of April,
1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: S. VERZAAL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. Koas, Attorney at Law, P.A.
101 N.W. 13th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Tel.: (306)328-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
16928 May 4. 11, 18, 28, 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 84-1744*
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BERTHONIS FENELON
Petitioner-Husband,
and
ERNESTINE FENELON
Respondent-Wife.
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Fla Bar No. 363081
TO: Ernestine Fenelon
Route 3, Box 78
Canton. Mississippi
39046
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses. If
any. to it on BRENT E.
ROUTMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
181 N.E. 82nd Street. Miami.
Florida 33138. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or
before June IS, 1984;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be pub
llahed once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 14th day of
May, 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROUTMAN AND ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
Attention:
Brent E. Routman. Esq.
181 N.E. 82nd Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Telephone: (SOB) 787-6800
10986 May 18. 26,
June 1. 8. 1984
*-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
TECHTRADE at 401 Coral
Way. Suite 208, Coral Gables.
FL 83143 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
TECHTRADE, INC.
BY:
RAFAEL A. SKVILLA
President
DEL-VALLE A NETSCH. PA.
Attorney for TECHTRADE
19878 MwrW, 38,
June l. 8. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
FOR CHILDREN at 8181 SW
168th Street, Miami, Fla.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Jay M. Rotberg
16990 May 28;
June 1. 8, 16, 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. M-18471
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
NATIONAL WAREHOUSE,
INCORPORATED, a Florida
corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARTIN I. MILLER and
BETTY MILLER, a-k-a
Beatrice Miller, his wife, et
al..
Defendants.
TO: Mares. Inc., a dissolved
corporation doing business as
Sasha Enterprises. Inc.
6921 N.E. 14th Terrace
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
YOU. Mares.Inc. a dis-
solved corporation doing busi-
ness as Sasha Enterprises,
Inc. are hereby notified that a
Bill of Complaint to Foreclose
a Mortgage on the following
described property, to-wlt:
Lot 9 and 10 In Block 38 of
Amended Plat of OCEAN
FRONT PROPERTY OF
MIAMI BEACH
IMPROVEMENT COMPANY.
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded In Plat Book 6, at
Pages 7 and 8. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your Answer or
Pleading to the Bill of Com-
plaint on Plaintiff's attorneys,
KWITNEY. KROOP A
SCHEINBERG. P.A..420 Lin-
coln Road, Suite 612. Miami
Beach, Florida, 33139. and to
file the original Answer or
pleading In the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on
or before the 22 day of June.
1984.
If you fall to do so, Judg-
ment by Default will be taken
against you for the relief
demanded In the Bill of Com-
plaint.
KINDLY GOVERN
YOURSELVES
ACCORDINGLY.
DATED this 21 day of May
1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Clarlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
16998 May 26;
June 1. 8, 16, 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Flit Number 84-37S3
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNE ELLEN MARKOFF
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of ANNE ELLEN
MARKOFF. deceased, File
Number 84-3763, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
Is Dade County Courthouse 73
W. Flagler Street Miami,
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal
representative and the
persona) representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested
person to whom this notice
was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Ju-
risdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVF.R
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice
has begun on May 28. 1984.
Personal Representative:
MICHAEL IRA ROSENTHAL
P.O Box 402099
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MICHAEL A. DRIBIN
CYPEN. CYPEN A DRIBIN
Florida Bar Number 206666
P.O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
(308) 532-8200
16992 May 28. June 1. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY j
GIVEN that the undersigned, I
desiring to engage In business l
under the fictitious name
SNELLING A SNELLING at
7866 Northwest 12th Street,
Miami. Florida 33126 Intend to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Sheila Lewis A Associates, Inc.
L.M. PLOUCHA
Attorney for Applicant ___
1693! May4.11.18.38.
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 1405173
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ERVING SMITH,
Petltloner-HUSBAND
and
STELLA SMITH,
Respondent-WIFE.
TO: STELLA SMITH.
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
BRUCE N. CROWN, ESQ.
15490 N.W. 7th Ave., Suite 205
Miami. Florida 33169 Bar No.
252751 on or before June 1, 1984
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either
before service on Petitioner's
attorney or Immediately there-
after; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Petition.
DATED: April 26,1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: ARDENWONG
as Deputy Clerk
16927 May 4.11,18,26.1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 84-17740
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 348014
in re the Adoption of
a minor child
By
HAROLD A MAE F. ROLLE
Petitioners
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ALFRED LOGAN,
residence unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for the adoption of
minor has been filed and you
are required to serve a copy
of your written objection, on I.
Jerome Graff. Esq., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address
is 633 N. E. 167 St., N.M.B.,
F). 33162. on or before June 22,
1984. and file the original with
the clerk of this court; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you.
RICHARD P. BRINKER By
Arden Wong
As Deputy Clerk
16989 May 18, 26;
June 1. 8, 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 14-1S122
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
DENISE TOUSIGNANT.
Petltloner-Wlfe
and
RODGER ADAM,
Respondent-Husband
TO: RODGERADAM
982 106 Avenue
Quebec Canada G9T 5L8
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on GEORGE T. RAMANI.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 711 Biscayne Bldg.,
19 West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June 1, 1984; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 26th day of
April. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By ARDEN WONG
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
George T. Ramanl
711 Blscayne Bldg
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone (306) 374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
16930 May 4, 11, 18, 26. 1984
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 84 10075
IN RE: The Marriage of:
DIEUDONNE FANORD,
Petltiner-Husband,
and
DOROTHY FANORD.
Respondent-Wife.
To: DOROTHY FANORD.
Residence unknown,
shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dla-
solutlon of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attor-
ney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami. Florida, 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before June 22. 1984. otherwise
a default will be entered.
May 16, 1984.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: B. J. Fox. D.C.
16991 May 28;
June 1, 8. IB. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Quick-Way Coin Laundry at
1308 North Krome Avenue,
Homestead. Florida intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
DANDLCOIN.INC. BY:
LARRY HARRIS.
President
Eric B. Turetsky. Esq.
Attorney for
DANDLCOIN.INC.
2725 S. W. Third A venue
Miami, Florida 33129
16950 May 11. 18.25;
Junel. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 14-1 SI70
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JORGE CHAUX.
HUSBAND
and
ADALJIZA CHAUX.
WIFE
TO: ADALJIZA CHAUX.
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
BRUCE N. CROWN. ESQ.
15490 N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite
206 Miami. Florida 33169 on or
before June 1. 1984 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition.
DATED: April 26.1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: C.P. COPELAND
as Deputy Clerk
16928 May 4. 11.18. 25.1984
I
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 8*17472
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SUSANA SILVA.
Wife.
and
JORGE SILVA.
Husband.
TO: JORGE SILVA
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if
any, to It on Albert L. Carri-
carte. PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
2491 N.W. 7th Street, Miami,
Florida 33128. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or
before June 16, 1984, otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be pub
llahed once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 14 day of May
1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Arden Wong
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L. Carrlcarte, Esq
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33126
Telephone: (306) 649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
*** May 18, 28;
June 1. 8. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY I
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
YEAR 2000 HAIRCUTS
DE8IGNED BY COMPUTER
at 8746 Coral Way, Miami,
Florida 33168 intend to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
YEAR 2000 HAIRCUTS
DESIGNED BY COMPUTER
BY: RUBEN LEVISMAN
Attorney for Applicant
DELVALLE A NETSCH.
P.A.
17003 May 28;
^______________June 1. 8. IB. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 84-18471
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
NATIONAL WAREHOUSE.
INCORPORATED, a Florida
corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
MARTIN I. MILLER and
BETTY MILLER, a-k-a
Beatrice Miller, his wife, et
al..
Defendants.
TO: EUGENE M. BROOKS
PENSION PLAN
1528 Tator Court
Bloomfleld Hills.
Michigan
YOU. EUGENE M.
BROOKS PENSION PLAN
are herebye BUI of Complaint
to Foreclose a Mortgage on
the following described pro-
perty, to-wit:
Lot 9 and 10 In Block 38 of
Amended Plat of OCEAN
FRONT PROPERTY OF
MIAMI BEACH
IMPROVEMENT COMPANY,
according to the Plat thereof,
recorded In Plat Book 6. at
Pages 7 and 8, of the Public
Records of Dade County.
Florida.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your Answer or
Pleading to the Bill of Com-
plaint on Plaintiff's attorneys,
KWITNEY. KROOP ft
SCHEINBERG. P.A.,420 Lin-
coln Road. Suite 812. Miami
Beach, Florida, 33139. and to
Ola the original Answer or
pleading In the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on
or before the 22 day of June.
1984.
If you fall to do so. Judg-
ment by Default will be taken
against you for the relief
demanded In the Bill of Com-
plaint
KINDLY GOVERN
YOURSELVES
ACCORDINGLY.
DATED this 21 day of May,
1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: Clarlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
10999 May 28;
June 1. 8. 16. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-3163
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ARTHUR V. MILLER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of ARTHUR V.
MILLER, deceased. File
Number 84-3183, Is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 73 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persona are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested
person to whom notice was
mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice
has begun on May 18, 1984.
Personal Representative:
ULY S. MILLER
3010 Marcos Drive No. R 406
Miami, Florida 33160
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JUDITH A. FRANKEL
Suite 306 928
Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Telephone: (306) 674-1313
16978 May 18. 26. 1984
|lM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL-V
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 14-14117
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 341014
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MICHELLE A. Wfljjam.
Petitioner *^ams
and
MICHAEL D. WILLIAMS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: MICHAEL r,
WILLIAMS, "
Residence unknown
YOUR ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution o(
marriage has been oiei
against you and you are
required to serve a copy 0|
your written defenses upon
I.J. GRAFF. ESQ., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address.
Is 633 N.E. 167 St N.MB
Florida 33162. on or before
June 16, 1984, and file the
original with the clerk of this
court; otherwise a default will
be entered against you.
May 9. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court I),
BY: ARDEN WONG
As Deputy Clerk
1< May 18. 25;
June 1, 8, 1984
NOTICEOF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE Cl RCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 84 15712
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
THELMA M. WALLACE.
Petitioner,
and
WALTER L. WALLACE.
Respondent.
TO: WALTER L. WALLACE
P.O. Box 887
Palatka. Florida 32077
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to
It on MELVIN J ASHER.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner.
whose address Is I860 S.W. 8th
Street, Suite 206. Miami.
Florida 33138. and (He the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June 1, 1984; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 1st day of May.
1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By S. VERZAAL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
16941 May 4. 11.18.25. 1984
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number I4-24J2
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NETTIE LYNCH.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of NETTIE LYNCH,
deceased. File Number 84-
2632, Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal
representative s attorney are
set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and 12) any
objection by an Interested
person to whom notice was
mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfl
cations of the personal repre-
entaUve. venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVErR
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice
has begun on May 26, 1984.
Personal Representative:
JUDITH R. BLOCK
219 Delancey Street
Philadelphia. PA 19106
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Robert M. Herman. Esquire
Blank. Rome. Comisky *
McCauley
4770 Blscayne Boulevard, I2tn
Floor
Miami, FL 33187
Telephone; (306) 673-6600
17001 May 26; June 1, 19S4


Consul Trigor Honoree
font Yerushalayim Day
Obituaries
Friday, May 25, 1984/The Jewish Floridian Page 23-B
General Yehoshua
r,iU be guest of honor at
ffirial observance of Yom
&yim (Jerusalem Day
J^pm in the offices of
KlSan Zionist Federation,
^C Miami Beach.
I A,, celebration of the 17th
rrv of the reunification
k. capital of the State
YSi is sponsored by the
[ IS Zionist Federation of
,h Florida in cooperation with
^Consulate General of Israel.
-jouartered in Miami.
iZowcement of the event
l^ade by Dde County
BJssioDer Barry Schreiber,
Jent, and by Harriet Green,
jnan'of the board of the local
JoftheAZF.
[fendd Schwartz of Miami
U, national vice president of
[American Zionist Federation,
i Yom Yerushalayim will be
xinsored by Greater Miami
jites of Hadassah. Pioneer
fcnenNa'amat. B'nai Zion,
Kt Zionists. Zionist Organ iza-
lof America. Amit (American
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
BADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO 84-iaSSO
IN RE THE M VRFUAOE OF
N
WIi
Rfspor
! [ED that
I
quired : your
| tu it
on Bmi Eaq
Uwmi. f Bar No
252751 on or i el m .lune 22.
:64 ar.: riglMl with
Die Clerk of this Court either
before ser\. i on ivtitloner's
morney or immediately
thereafter. othen* Ise a
default win hr entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition
DATED \t.r, N 184
RICHARD P lilUNKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
'Circuit Court Seal)
BY H Sotolongo
as Deputy Clerk
11006 May 25;
June 1, 8, 15. 1084
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-16323
Florida Bar No 739*1 s
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
ANAWNC8EB
Petitioner,
ind
MAKTO.SKINCSES.
Respondent
^O Marton Kineses
M2 SW 12th Ave.
Cslfc-ary. Alberto
Canada
Kmn>. ARE HEREBY
OTIFIfc.D that an action for
wssolution of Marriage has
ew filed against you and you
"* required to serve a copy of
'ourwnttendefenses.lfany.to
'onRAKAKLE J'ADIERNE.
itomey for I'etlUoner. whose
drs ,s ,437 s w F(r8t
*' M'aml. Florida 33135,
cfc.ru J I!* 0rlK'nttl wlln the
^"K of the above styled court
""or before June 8. 184;
^erw,se a default will be
Mlered against you for the
2 "'manded In the com-
Pl*ini or petition.
This notice shall be published
L"ch week ,or ,our con
21 *eefc. m THE
jnTOBSB my hand and the
FWm Sa'd COUrt at M'*m'-
Noridt on this 4th day of May.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
* Clerk, Circuit Court
Uade County. Florida.
By H. SOTOLONGO
As Deputy Clerk
^'cult court Seal)
^E.Padleme.Ei,.
T.t?iLriort(u"i
AnS^O':(,06>MM4"
** kwu.M.a;
June l.iiM
Mizrachi Women). Religious
Zionist Organization of America.
Labor Zionist Alliance and all
Zionist youth groups.
Observed as a Jewish holiday
throughout the world. Yom
Yerushalayim festivities also will
include representatives of area
synagogues and temples. B'nai
B'rith. El Al Israel Airlines,
Bank Leunri, Israel Discount
Bank, Bank Hapoalim, Jewish
National Fund. Histadrut, Israeli
institutions of higher learning
and the Tel Aviv Development
FudjI_________________
notice of action
constructive service
CNo Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 84 18*79
IN RE: TIM Marriage Of
TONY DECIUS a-k-a
THONY DECTUS.
I'etl tinner-Husband.
and
MARIE MAUDE DECIUS.
Respondent Wife
ACTON FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
(Fla. Bar No 363081)
TO: MARIE MAUDE DECIUS
4058 Rue Rlgaud
IVtlllonvllle.
Haiti. W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy
of your written defenses, if
any. to It on BRENT E.
ROUTMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
IH Northeast 83nd Street.
i. Florida 38188, ai I
the original with the clerk of
t)M above styled court on or
fore June 23 1984
others Id -.mil v. Ill
enl
relief d< m-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be pub-
llahi for four
coniei ul Ive THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this T2 day of May.
1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seali
ROUTMAN at ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
AttenUon: BRENT E
ROUTMAN, Esquire
181 N.E. 82nd Street
Miami, Florida 33138
Telephone: (305)757-5800
17004 May 25;
June 1. 8, 16, 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84 4221
Division 02
Fla. Bar No. 104MS
IN RE: ESTATE OF
NATHAN KLEIN, a-k-a
NAT KLEIN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of NATHAN KLEIN, a-
k-a NAT KLEIN, deceased.
File Number 84-4221. l
pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the addrese
of which la 3rd Floor, Dade
County Courthouse 73 W.
Flagler Street, Miami. FL
33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal
representatives attorney are
set forth below.
All Interested persona are
required to Hie with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested
person to whom noUce was
mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfl
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurtsdlc-
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
PubUcaUon of thla Notice
has begun on May 28. 1084
Personal Representative:
SIDNEY LEFCOURT
801 Alhambra Circle
Coral Gables. FL 88184
Attorney for Personal
RepreaentaUve:
RONALD M FRIEDMAN
170 Minorca Avenue. Suite
Coral Gables, TL SUM
Telephone: (MB) 4*8^00
tTOtrr May U. June l. MM
PATTERSON
Sarah, Miami Beach, passed away
May 17. A resident for the past 50
years, coming from Newark, N.J. Sur-
vived by husband, Adolph; daughter,
Janet Behm of Miami; son, Sheldon
Patterson of Dallas, Tex.; brother,
Milton Insdorf of NYC; sisters. Lillian
Harmelln of Roslyn. N.Y ; Florence
Schultz of Fort Lauderdale; and four
grandchildren. Services held May 20,
arrangements by Gordon.
BEIN
Selwyn Jack, 58, Miami, passed away
May 18. A resident for 33 years,
coming from Cincinnati Survived by
daughter. Terrl; mother. Fanny; and
sister, Honey Franklin. Services held
May 20, Riverside.
HERSCHFELO
Cella. 79, Miami. A resident for the
past S3 years, coming from England.
Survived by husband. Sam of Miami;
son, Philip of Miami: two sisters,
Mary Naftal of Baltimore; Helen
Forgham of Leeds, England; and three
grandchildren. Services held May 21,
Gordon.
EUSTER
Stephen I., Miami Beach, passed away
May 20. Survived by parents, Elayne
and Jay; sister, Cindy Rudln: brother.
Howard: grandparents, Relto and
Aaron Easter, and Rebecca LaToff
Services were held, Blasberg.
PACKMAN
Eleanor, 66. North Miami, passed
away May 20. A resident for the past
26 years, coming from St. Louis. Mo.
Survived by husband, Harry; two sons,
Roger of Bay Harbor Island; Bruce of
Miami; brother. Sterling Wlttner of
Atlanta; sister. Lillian Imber of St.
Louis; and two grandchildren. Serv-
ices were held May 21, Gordon.
SLOANE
Jerome Paul, artist, real estate con-
sultant and Investor, died May 13. A
resident of Coconut Grove, formerly
from New York Survived by daugh-
ters. Sarah Sloan of Ann Arbor, Mich..
Prudence Sloan of NYC. and mother.
Anne Slutzkln of Rldgewood, N.J.
Services held May 17 Arrangements
by Riverside
GROSSBERGER
Charlotte, 88, Miami, passed away
\l.iv :>'' \ i-'iil f"'
coming from Clevelaw d by
li hlld ststei Helei B
stem ol Miami and E lie k iplan of
.ere held May
[g, I ii bo
DAVIS Jack Miami Beach, May 12.
Riverside
DER. John Joseph M May 14, Levitt-
Welnsb 'avid.
FISCHMAN, Anna Ruth. May 13,
Riverside
VORT, Sadie (Sydl. North Miami
Beach. May 13 Menorah
ANT.MAN. Emanuel. 61. North Miami
Beach. Rubln-Zllbert
BORENSTEIN. Abraham. 73. Rubln-
Zllbert.
FREEMAN, Herbert, May 14. Rubln-
Zllbert.
KAPLAN. Pauline, 86, Miami Beach,
Rubin Zllbert.
SKVIRSKT, Mrs Sarah. 86. Bay
Harbor Islands.
HAMERMAN. Wolf, Miami Beach. May
4. Rubln-Zllbert.
BERGER, Slegmund. Bal Harbour,
May 8. Rubin Zllbert.
SEGAL. Lela, 60. Rubln-Zilbert.
SMITH. Raymond. Miami Beach. May
7, Riverside, Mt. Nebo.
MANN. Stanley Jay. 54, Key Biscayne.
May 6.
KORMAN. Sophia, Rubln-Zilbert.
KRENICER. Ellas. Miami Beach. May
5. Rubin-Zllbert.
WOLFMAN. Cynthia, Coconut Creek,
May 6. Riverside. Mt. Nebo
ADAMS. William J, 74, Riverside.
CANTOR, Annie Mollen. 93. North
Miami Beach. May 3, Riverside.
FALKIN. Cella. Miami Beach, May 7,
Rubln-Zilbert.
DUBLIN. George, Miami Beach, May
16. Rubin Zllbert
HELFER. Evelyn, Miami Beach,
Rubln-Zllbert
RAPP, Frances, May 17, Rubln-
Zllbert, Star of David
DIAMOND. Robert, Miami. May 17.
ESKIN, Regina, 84, Miami Beach. May
18, Riverside.
GROSSMAN. Gerard D., 72. Miami.
Riverside
SALKIN. Daniel, North Miami Beach.
May 20, Menorah.
BLITZ. Claire. 76, Miami Beach, May
18, Riverside
WILLIG, Samuel, 94. Miami Beach.
Riverside.
SCHITLMAN. Michael. 77, Miami
Beach, May 20, Riverside. Star of
David.
SCHWARTZENFELD, Sidney I., 84,
North Miami Beach, Riverside.
BENJAMIN. Anna, 89. North Miami
Beach, May 17.
GLAS8BERG. Doris, Miami Beach.
May 30.
LERNER. Herbert B. Miami Beach,
Blasberg.
ROSEN. Raye 8., 88. Miami Beach.
May 21. Riverside. Star of David
SUMMERS, Rose (Teddy). 75. North
Miami Beach. Levltt-Wetnateln, Star of
David.
COHEN, Mary, North Miami Beach.
May 22. Riverside.
GORENBERG, Betty. 71. Miami
Beach. Rubln-Zilbert.
FINKELSTEIN
Alex, 84, Lauderdale Lakes, oassed
away May 20. He had been a -sldent
of Lauderdale Lakes for 10 .ears,
formerly from New York. Survived by
wife, Miriam; sons, Ron Mlskln Y1U-
chak Zohar of Jerusalem; daughters.
Chana Rlvka Berlowito of .'urtch,
Switzerland; Blna Zimmerman of
B'nai B'roch. Israel; and .laxlne
Schwartz; brother, Bernard; Isters,
Esther Horden. Lee Relas. Molly
Mayers, Surte Roman and Anne irlck-
man. He was a member of 1 mpie
Beth Israel. Services held May 21,
Riverside. Interment at Star of 1 a/id
HALPERN. Herman. 67. North .llami
Beach, May 22, Levltt-Welnsteln -.tar
of David.
KAPLAN, David, 52. North Miami
Beach. May 22, Levltt-Welnsteln. Star
of David.
PARKER. Martin. Miami .each,
Rubln-Zllbert. _
SOLOMON. Beth, 87, Miami Beach,
May 20, Star of David.
STONE, Louie. DDS, 88. Bay Harbor
Island. May 21. Riverside
JANOWSKY. Lillian. 84. Miami Beach.
May 22. Rubin-Zllbert.
KAPLAN, Paul. 62. North Miami
Beach, May 22. Levltt-Welnsteln, Star
of David.
LAPIDUS, Jack, 80. Miami Beach,
May 22, Rubln-Zilbert.
SINGER. Lena. 81, Miami Beach,
Rubin-Zllbert
Jens*'
Through years ot dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
SglatUf &mm-al <^^
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN-
LARRIES. BLASBERG MICHAELC BLASBERG
funeral director
Past President Jewish Fune'a'
Directors ot America
'20SEVENTV-CIRST',-
865-2353
Fune'<*i Di'e-.to'
rAl H FLORIDA J.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd
18840 West Dixie Hwy.
Represented by S Levitt, F D.
New York: 12121 26.1-7600 Queens Blvd & 76th Rd., Forest Hills, N.Y
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL x
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
Miami Beach
Coral Gables
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
538-6371
The Only
Guaranteed
No. Miami Beach-Hallandale
BROWARD
456-4011
Pre-Arrangaments
with
No Money In Advance
Main Office: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139


X*&JLxnJfefeish Floridian, FHH m..,i ,,
Page 24-B The Jewish Floridian/Friday, May 25, 1984
Norton Tire Company is not only Florida's
largest Michelin dealer, largest BF Goodrich
dealer and largest Perilli dealer, but offers 13
more reasons why their stores are the best
place for you and your car.
1 SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.
' That's not just words, we put it in writ-
ing (read our 30-day money-back
guarantee). And if you're not satis-
fied with any purchase from us, we'll
do our best to make it right.
2 EXPERIENCE AND INTEGRITY. You'll like the
way we do business. And our experience and integrity will save
you money.
3 CERTIFIED MECHANICS. To better service you and your car, we have
expert mechanics, trained and certified by the National Institute for Ser-
vice Excellence, available at our stores.
A LOWEST PRICES. Our tire prices are the lowest... anywhere, anyplace,
^ anytime!
5 FREE 10-POINT SAFETY CHECKUP. No purchase necessary. Drive in
anytime and we'll check your tires, alignment, balance, brakes, shocks,
idler arm, muffler, battery, belts and hoses. Free.
fZ COURTEOUS TREATMENT. You can count on always receiving excel-
lent, prompt, courteous service at any of our stores.
y NO BAIT AND SWITCH. We carry complete inventories of all tires. The
low prices we advertise are always backed up by an ample supply of the
tires in our ads
O WE SOLVE PROBLEMS. If you have a problem with any purchase, con-
tact the store manager where the purchase was made. If he can't come
up with a solution, ask him for our special customer service department
number. Every possible effort is made to keep our customers happy.
Q CLEANLINESS. We offer clean, air-conditioned waiting rooms for the
convenience of our customers.
10 H,_TECH EQUIPMENT. We have modern, up-to-date equipment. Ihclud-
1 v ing the latest in hi-tech computer balancing, hi-tech alignment and spe-
cial tire changing equipment for protecting mag wheels.
HH CERTIFIED TIRE SPECIALISTS. Our stores are staffed with tire special-
ists trained and certified in the various features of each manufacturer's
tires and each automobile's specifications.
lO PURCHASING POWER. With 35 stores throughout Florida, we have the
strongest purchasing power of any tire company in the state. That's how
we are able to offer you the lowest prices.
|Q SIXTY YEARS UNDER THE SAME FLORIDA MANAGEMENT. Since
** our first store opened in 1924, our management policy has always been
the same: Give our customers quality products and keep them happy.
YOU GET MORE THAN JUST LOW PRICES AT
MICHELIN Iirelli
SAFETY CHECKS BRAKES EXPORTS
CERTIFIED MECHANICS WHOLESALE
m NORTON
CORAL GABLES
Bird & Douglas Road 446-8101
NORTH MIAMI
13360N W 7thAve 681-8541
N MIAMI BEACH
1700NE 163fdSt 945-7454
MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Hoad 672-5353
SOUTH DADE
9001 S Dixie Hwy 667-7575
CUTLER RIDGE
20390 S Dixie Hwy 233-5241
HI ALE AH/ PALM SPRINGS MILE
l27549lhSt 822-2500
MIAMI AIRPORT
N W 25 St & Milam Dairy Rd 593-1191
WEST MIAMI
Bird & Galloway Rds 552-6656
KENDALL DR./HKJATE SQUARE
l3872SW88thSt 387-0128
W. TAMIAMI TRAIL
12520 S.W 8th St 551-1141
HOMESTEAD
30100 S Federal Hwy 247-1622
HOLLYWOOD
497 S Stale Rd 7 987-0450
SINCE 192*1
TIRE CO.
Ejfflj]
IHFGoodrich YOKOHAMA
ALIGNMENT BALANCING SHOCKS
FRONT END SERVICE LUBRICATION
ALL STORES OPEN 7:30
DAVIE
St Rd 84 |ust west o Umv Dr 473-4700
FT LAUDERDALE
1740E Sunrise Blvd 463-7588
PLANTATION
381N Slate Rd 7 587-2186
PEMBROKE PINES
H wood Blvd iust west ol Umv Or 435-1383
TAMARAC
441 & W Commercial Blvd 735-2772
TAMARAC
N Umv Dr & McNab Rd 721-4700
POMPANO BEACH
3151 N Federal Hwy 943-4200
DEERFIELD BEACH
2265 W Hillsooro Blvd 427-8800
DELRAY BEACH
1 Llnton Blvd 272-1022
GREENACRES
3838 Jog Rd 968-1014
WEST PALM BEACH
515 South Dme 832-4181
LA?PARK/N.PAI-1' BEACH
532 N Lake Blvd 848-2544
TEQUESTA
Bridge Rd AfJldDixieHwy 746921:
FT. PIERCE
2604 South 4th St 464-8020
VERO BEACH
755 21st Street 567-1174
DAYTON A BEACH
907 Volusia Ave 255-7487
NAPLES
2065. E TamiamiTr 774-4443
FT MYERS
15135 McGregor Brvd 482-8880
,
MASTERCARD VISA AMERICAN EXPRESS DINER'S CLUB WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS


MAY 1984
46th Annual Meeting and Dinner

,ov



o<^
o*>\ _..,cv^ ...




I|i^

art**1*


4
. .,^,e..1.8-B ..JheJewis^Floridiag/FruUv. M... ,
pmmZz_______________________
a insi
Federation, May. 199*
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
May 25,1984 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Norman H. Lipoff
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee
Eli Timoner
contents
5
6
46th Annual Meeting to be held June 19 at Fontainebleau-Hilton
MISSIONS/CAMPAIGN 4
Exciting missions slated for tnis summer and fall ___
New innovative approach for 85 Aventura/TurnDerrv Campaign
CAMPAIGN
Photo highlights from recent CJA-IEF events
WOMEN'S DIVISION
Tallahassee mission links W.D. with state leaders
New W.D. president outlines her philosophy
W.D./UJA September mission offers unique Israel itinerary
Hold the date!
AGENCIES 7
Samuel Scheck Hillel community Day School epitomizes
educational excellence
JCC of Miami Beach Health Fair a big success
ISRAEL 36 8-9
Communitywide celebration and waikathon salute Israels
"Double Chai" birthday
SOUTH DADE / AGENCIES 10
CMJF South Dade Branch selects new officers and noard members
JVS Homemaker Referral Service expands into South Dade
volunteers a vital part of Federation work force
ISRAEL /PROJECT RENEWAL 11
insects become Israeli space pioneers
A Project Renewal community assists its twin community in
Connecticut
First conservative kibbutz in Israel founded
AGENCIES 12
Federation agencies sponsor Adopt a Grandparent program
Mt. Sinai Medical center offers new nigniy sophisticated
diagnostic test
JCC Summer program features teen travel
Jewish High School of South Florida offers scholarship program
bbyo Pennies Day at Atlantis will help remember the Holocaust
Shack to be recognized for her accomplishments at the JCC An-
nual Meeting
FOUNDATION 13
Financial tips to help provide funds for a college education
Foundation's women s Committee concludes spring seminar
series
<
FEDERATION CABLE TELEVISION
Terrorism probed on People you Should Know
JFT show to air in the Midwest
June program schedule
CALENDAR
14
15


Federation, May, 1964
Pages
Federation leaders to be honored
Samuel I. Adler
President
*.
Sorman Rraman
Vice President
Donald E. Lefton
Vice President
Joel Levy
Vice President
b'ven.1. Knviu
txcretarv
Election of new leadership and a tribute to three
outstanding current leaders will be the highlights
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 46th
Annual Meeting and Dinner on Tuesday, June 19
at 6 p.m. at the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel,
Miami Beach.
A full slate of Officers. Trustees and Board of
Directors members will be voted upon by the
meeting delegates. Samuel I. Adler, a Federation
vice president between 1975 and 1982, president of
Jewish Federation Housing, Inc. and a prominent
member of the Greater Miami Jewish community,
has been nominated to serve as Federation
president.
Other nominees for officers' positions are:
immediate past president, Norman H. Lipoff; vice
presidents, Norman Braman, Donald E. Lefton,
Joel Levy, Aaron Podhurst, Forrest Raffel and
Marilyn K. Smith; secretary, Steven Kravitz;
associate secretary, Helene Berger; treasurer, Cal
Kovens; and associate treasurer, Michael M.
Adler.
A complete list of nominees for Trustees and the
Board of Directors appears below.
The meeting will honor Norman H. Lipoff,
outgoing Federation president, Howard R.
Scharlin, general chairman of the 1984 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, and
Aaron Podhurst, chairman of Federation's
Community Relations Committee and general
chairman of the 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund.
Lipoff will complete a two-year tenure as
Federation president in June. Under his leader-
ship, Federation has furnished an ever increasing
variety of vital human services to persons in
Greater Miami, Israel and Jewish communities
around the world. He has served both the local
and national Jewish communities in a variety of
capacities: with the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation as Community Relations Committee
chairman, general campaign chairman and
chairman of the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies; with United Jewish Appeal as national
vice president and associate national chairman of
the Young Leadership Cabinet; and chairman of
the Council of Jewish Federation's Endowment
Fund Development Committee.
Howard R. Scharlin, general chairman of the
1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund/ Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign, will
be recognized for spearheading the most suc-
cessful campaign in Federation's history. He
previously served as chairman of Federation's
$100,000-$249,000 Pacesetter Division and its
Missions Committee. Scharlin currently serves on
the Board of Directors of the American Jewish
Committee.
Aaron Podhurst, general chairman of the 1983
campaign, previously served as vice chairman of
the campaign and as a chairman of the Pacesetter
Division. Podhurst, a Federation vice president, is
the former president of Temple Sinai.
The 1984 Stanley C. Myers Presidents
Leadership Award, given in recognition of out-
standing service to Federation and the local
Jewish community, will be presented at the
meeting. The award is named after Federation's
founding president, who currently serves as
chairman of Federation's Project Renewal
Commitee and whose ongoing involvement and
dedication to the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity continues to set an example for young
leaders.
Rabbi Edwin Farber, spiritual leader of Temple
Samu-El, will also be recognized as the incoming
president of the Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami.
In recognition of their achievements, Rabbi
Farber and the recipients of the Leadership Award
will attend the Council of Jewish Federations
General Assembly this fall.
Aaron Podhurst is chairing the meeting. The
Arrangements Committee includes Bunny Adler,
Nancy Lipoff, Dorothy Podhurst and Gloria
Scharlin.
All members of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation are invited to this important
gathering. The evening will begin with cocktails at
6 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m. There is a $40 couvert.
For further information and reservations, please
call Federation at 576-4000.
Elected Board Members
Bernardo Batievsky
Sabv Behar
Jack Bellock
Jeffrey Berkowitz
Herb Canarick
Tim Cohen
Myra Fan-
Harvey Friedman
Gary Gerson
Alfred Golden
Goldie Goldstein
Alex Halberstein
Kenneth Hoffman
Arthur Horowitz
Melvin Kartzmer
Ezra Katz
Jonathan Kislak
Alan Kluger
Jeffrey Lefcourt
Frances B. Levey
Jack H. Levine
Nancy Lipoff
Ellen Mandler
Sidney Olson
Howard R. Scharlin
Michael Scheck
David Schaecter
Gerald K. Schwartz
Maxine Schwartz
Elaine Silverstein
Guillermo Sostchin
Eric Turetsky
Philip T. Warren
Harry Weitzer
Appointed to Board by the President
Ted Arison
Theodore Baumritter
David Blumberg
Benjamin Botwinick
Jack Burstein
Dr. Sol Center
Terry Drucker
Dr. Jay Ellenby
Howard Frank
Dr. Phillip Frost
Dr. Harry Graff
Shepard King
Jay Kislak
Nan Rich
Barry Ross
Muriel Russell
Robert Traurig
Past Presidents Appointed to Board by President
L. Jules Arkin
David Fleeman
Leonard L. Abess
Shepard Broad
Samuel N. Friedland
Howard Kane
Sidney Lefcourt
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Stanley C. Myers
Harry B. Smith
Trustees
Aaron M. Kanner
Rabbi Leon Kronish
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Ralph Lev it/
Irving Norry
MendellM.Selig
William D. Singer
Fay Stein
Carl Weinkle
Esther Weinkle
Dr. George Wise
As Required in Bylaws
Chairman,
Chairman.
Chairman.
Chairman.
Chairman.
Chairman,
Chairman.
Chairman.
Chairman.
Chairman.
Administrative Committee
Building Operations Committee
Bylaws and Governance Committee
Campaign Steering Committee
Cash Committee
Communications Committee
Community Relations Committee
Federation-Agency Relationship Committee
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
Leadership Development
Chairman. Long Range Campaign Planning
Chairman. Multiple Appeals Committee
Chairman, Nominating Committee
Chairman. Planning and Budget Committee
College Student Representative
President, Rabbinical Association
Chairman, South Dade Branch. GMJF
President. Women's Division
Chairman, Young Adults Division
President. B'nai M nth Youth Organization
President, Central Agency For Jewish Education
President. Hillel Jewish Student Center
President, Jewish Community Centers of South Florida
President. Jewish Family and Children's Service
President, Jewish Vocational Service
President, Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
President, Mount Sinai Medical Center
Norman H. Lipoff
Immediate Past
President
Aaron Podhurst
Vice President
Forrest Raffel
Vice President
Marilyn K. Smith
Vice President
Helene Berger
Associate Secretary
Cal Kovens
Treasurer
Myron J. Broc
Executive Vice President
Michael M. Adler
Associate Treasurer


Page 4_____________
Federation Maw l*a*^
Federation. May, 1984
.
Mission/Campaign
community and Summer Family Missions
highlight 1985 program I
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation will sponsor a number of
missions to Israel in upcoming
months, providing a unique op-
portunity for participants to see
Israel in a way no tour or privately
arranged trip can encompass.
Joel Levy, a Federation vice
president who co-chairs Feder-
ation's Missions Committee
with his wife, Paula, distinguished
missions from individually planned
trips to Israel, noting "as an or-
dinary tourist, one only sees the
sights and attractions where the
sightseeing bus is scheduled to stop.
Hut on a Federation mission, par-
ticipants have an unparalleled op-
portunity to explore places and meet
people that most tourists never
dream of. A Federation mission is an
absorbing, intimate immersion into
the contemporary reality of life in
Israel. On a Federation mission you
just don't see Israel you 'ex-
perience' the Jewish state."
Each Federation mission is geared
toward a particular theme or group,
with missions planned for families,
singles, professional groups, com-
munity leaders and women's groups.
According to Paula Levy, "the
leaders of each mission spend hours
planning a meaningful experience for
participants, resulting in missions
which are tailored to meet the needs
and special interests of each group. I
believe that's why we see so many
mission participants making repeat
trips to Israel as 'missionaires.' '
Community Mission
The Community Mission to Israel,
October 14 October 24, will bring
together people from all professions,
ages and backgrounds. This
mission's goal is to experience the
land, history and the people of Israel
on a very personal basis so par-
ticipants can better understand the
relationship between American Jews
and their biblical homeland. Another
objective is to deepen participant's
understanding of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's relationship
with Project Renewal, emphasizing
our commitment to the people of Or
Akiva.
Micki and Sam Hochberg will lead
community missionaires to Israel.
Itinerary highlights will include a
gala welcoming presentation,
confidential briefings by top Israeli
government officials, tours of Israeli
military installations, a torchlight
ceremony atop Masada, walking
tours of Jerusalem's Old City and
the ancient bazaar, and an in-depth
look at UJA-funded human service
programs. The Community Mission
will provide participants with
realistic examples of how gifts to the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund-Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign benefit our
brothers and sisters in Israel.
Micki Hochberg speaks from
experience when she reflects upon
the good feelings that emerge when
visiting Or Akiva. "Visiting Or
Akiva leaves a participant with a
feeling that is hard to describe. On
each of my visits there, I have felt
the love and warmth that the people
of Or Akiva hold for their friends
from Miami. I've seen dramatic
improvements in every facet of life in
Or Akiva because of our Project
Renewal effort."
"A dental clinic stands on what
was once an empty plot of land. Once
the town was dotted with open
trenches for sewage, now there are
modern plumbing facilities. I've seen
the opening of neighborhood clubs,
the establishment of pre-
kindergarten programs and the
introduction of social and health
services. More Or Akivans are
?'.v-
* i- ''




5*
***w
*;-,<,

employed and juvenile delinquency
has dropped dramatically. More
importantly, I have seen the people
of Or Akiva learn to help themselves,
take pride in their community and
develop leaders who will maintain
and strengthen their neighborhood
in the years ahead," concluded
Hochberg.
Community Pre-Mission to
Hungary
Community Mission participants
will also visit Hungary on a pre-
mission, to depart Miami on October
9-14. "It is important for our
generations to see what is happening
to Jews in Eastern Europe. Our
presence will communicate to
Eastern European Jews that we care
about them and their livelihoods.
Each of us has an obligation to be
advocates for the rights of Jews
behind the Iron Curtain, to help
them rebuild, and to make certain
that they can openly practice their
religion," said Micki Hochberg.
Summer Family Mission
Federation's Summer Family
Mission, July 23-August 3, allows an
entire family to experience Israel
together. "On most missions, we find
the adults going by themselves, but
a family mission encourages parents
to explore Israel with their children,"
mentions Mission leader Barry
Ross, a current Federation Board
member, president of the Brandeis
Academy of South Florida, and
former national campaign chairman
of UJA's Young Leadership Cabinet.
Elaine Ross, vice chairwoman for
campaign in Federation's South
Dade Women's Division and co-
leader of the mission adds "the
purpose of the Summer Family
Mission is to bring the family
together so they may share a deeply
satisfying educational and religious
experience."
Family Mission participants will
have the opportunity to visit the
Israel Museum, tour the artists'
I colony in Safed. participate in a bar
j mitzvah ceremony, learn about the
people and progress in Or Akiva and
much, much more. In the evenings,
special programs are planned for
children, while parents will have the
opportunity to explore the vibrant
nightlife of Tel Aviv and Jerusalem.
"The Return" Mission
"The Return" Mission, June 20-
July 5, is designed expressly for
individuals who've been to Israel
before. According to Kenneth and
Linda Hoffman, two of the mission's
five leaders, prior to arriving in
Israel, participants will spend four
days in Prague, Czechoslovakia.
Mark Talisman, who played a key
role in bringing the "Precious
Legacy" collection to the United
States, will lead the Prague portion
of the mission. Talisman, one of the
world's leading experts on this
extraordinary collection of Judaica,
will assist mission participants in
developing a comprehensive un-
derstanding of the collection's
significance to the world of Jewish
art and culture.
Norman and Jean Lieberman, who
are also serving as mission co-
leaders, are active in Federation's
South Dade Branch and visited
Israel this year. Norman Lieberman
stresses the importance of "The
Return" Mission noting, "our
purpose in visiting Prague is to
renew our faith through an un-
derstanding of our courageous
ancestors. It is only because of their
sacrifices that we can make this
momentous journey," said
Lieberman.
Joey Smith, a mission co-leader,
reflected upon the mission's
significance. "Because each member
of this mission will have already
learned much about Israel on
previous missions, I expect the
emergence of a strong sense of unity
as we bridge our roots to our future
legacy in these critical times for Jews
in Eastern Europe and Israel."
Cuban Hebrew Mission
Federation will sponsor the Cuban
Hebrew Family Mission departing
from Miami on July 3. scheduled to
return on July 13. The itinerary will
include stops in Tel Aviv. Tiberias
and Jerusalem. Missionaires will
have the opportunity to visit and
meet the people of Or Akiva.
Federation's sister city in Israel.
which is a beneficiary of gifts made
to Federation's Project Renewal
campaign. The mission will be led by
Kstrella and Roberto Behar. Zelda
and Israel Bigelman and Aida and
Elias Mitrani.
Summer Singles Mission
The Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration also participates in UJA
sponsored missions. An upcoming
UJA mission is the summer Singles
Mission (July 22-August 1).
The Summer Singles Mission will
bring together Jewish singles from
all over the United States.
Approximately 500 individuals
participated last year, with Greater
Miami being represented by 70
singles. Fern Blum, chairwoman of
Federation's Young Adult Division
Mission Committee, will lead the
Miami delegation.
Since space is extremely limited on
all missions, it is suggested that
potential mission participants
contact the Federation Missions
Department as soon as possible to
insure space on the mission of their
choice.
The costs of missions vary, and
some require a contribution to the
1985 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign. If
you're planning a trip to Israel this
summer or fall, and you want to
explore Israel in a unique and
enlightening way. the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Missions
program will provide that un-
forgettable experience. For further
information, contact the Federation
Missions Desk, 576-4000, ext. 295.
Team Approach' for Aventura
Herb Canarick
Already laying the groundwork for
their role in the 1985 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund, the leadership of the Aven-
tura Turnberry community in
North Miami Beach has devised
some innovative strategies to boost
involvement and campaign results.
Herb Canarick, Aventura Turn-
berry general campaign chairman,
stressed that 'marketing'' will be a
key factor in the approach employed
in next year's campaign.
"We have been meeting regularly
with our top leadership in order to
implement a well organized, struc-
tured and businesslike operation for
the 1985 campaign," he said. "The
Aventura Turnberry campaigns
theme will be a team approach' with
new ideas and changes to meet our
$2 million goal."
Canarick explained that last
month Aventura Turnberry s
campaign leaders met with Neil
Cooper, United Jewish Appeal's New
Gifts chairman, to discuss plans and
new pilot programs for the 19&
campaign. He noted that Cooper told
the group about the importance ot
running a good campaign like a
successful business, with marketing
as an integral component.
In order to achieve their goals, a
pilot program entitled "Discovery
was initiated to secure the eomrnit-
ment of unaffiliated Jews
Aventura Turnberry. A newly |
established Identification Lom
mittee has been given the respon-
sibility of gaining commitments
from individuals who have not been
significantly involved *11
Federation.
For additional information about
this new program or the W
tura Turnberry campaign. Plea"
call Herb Canarick or Susan Marx"1
576-4000,


Federation. May log*
Pages
camealgn
Seen af fAe recenf Mercantile Division Dinner are, from left, Harold
Beck, Home Furnishings chairman; Tim Cohen, Mercantile Division
chairman; Steve Fishkin, Steve Marks, and Harvey Lang, Depart-
ment and Retail Stores chairmen. (Not shown, Howard Socol, Mer-
cantile Division chairman,)
Seen at the Builders Dinner, from left, Carolyn Miller, Leonard
Miller, and Builders, Real Estate and Allied Trades Division
Chairman Hank Green.
The Greater Miami Jewish Feaeration held its first combined Cuban
Hebrew and Latin American Hebrew Dinner to benefit the 1984
UA-IEF. From left are: GuilL'rmo Sostchin, general chairman of
\ the Cuban Hebrew Group; A ran Kelton, president of the Cuban
"(brew Congregation; and Jack Chester, chairman of the Cuban
Hebrew Pacesetter Division.
}he Young Business and Professional Campaign Cocktail Recep-
n attracted more than 400 participants. From left, David Gold-
e'tz, event chairman; Susan Sirotta, recruitment chairman; and
rjrtJ. Merlin, event chairman.
More than 400 members of the Builders, Real Estate and Allied
Trades Division attended their annual dinner on behalf of the 1984
CJA-IEF. From left. Greater Miami Jewish Federation President
Norman H. Lipoff, Pacesetter Division Chairman Michael M. Adler,
Guest Speaker Dan Cordtz, and 1984 General Campaign Chairman
Howard R. Scharlin.
Also on hand at the Builders Dinner, from left, Steven J. Kravitz,
associate treasurer of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
Michael Katz; and David Flee man, past president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
Seen at the Cuban Hebrew-Latin American Hebrew Dinner, from
left, Solomon Garazi, dinner chairman and president of Temple
Moses; Rafael Kravec, master of ceremonies; Rebeca Kravec; Aron
Kelton; Lecia Kelton; Elsie Halberstein; Alex Halberstein, chairman
of the Latin American Hebrew Group; Keta Sostchin; Guillermo
Sostchin; Lilian Behar, and Yoshua Sal Behar, secretary of the
Cuban Hebrew Committee. (Not pictured. Dr. George Feldenkreis,
one of the evening's speakers.)
Seen at the Young BAP reception are, from left, Bobbi Serure; and
event committee members Margie Blasberg and Terry Weiss.


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian / FrW-v m. i

Page 6
Federation, May, 1984
women's Division
WD leadership stages mission
to state capital
Women's Division President Maxine E. Schwartz presents a sculpture to
Florida's "First Lady" Adele Graham. Dorothy Podhurst (left) and Estelle
Segal (right) look on.
"Enlightening and educational.'
Those were the keywords often
expressed during the Women's
Division two-day mission to
Tallahassee, April 30-May 1. The
purpose of the mission, according to
Dorothy Sussman, the Mission
chairwoman, "was to obtain first-
hand knowledge of how our state
government functions, and to learn
how the legislative actions impact
upon Federation and its beneficiary
agencies."
The busy first day agenda in-
cluded an orientation by Elaine
Bloom, the director of the Gover-
nmental Affairs Committee of the
Florida Association of Jewish
Federations; a tour and luncheon at
the Governor's Mansion hosted by
Florida's First Lady, Adele Graham;
a briefing with Florida Secretary of
State George Firestone; tours of the
Capitol complex; and a dinner,
which featured special guest speaker,
Representative Elaine Gordon,
chairwoman of the House
Appropriations Subcommittee on
Human and Rehabilitative
Resources. Prior to the dinner,
Dorothy Sussman hostessed a wine
and cheese reception for state
senators and representatives.
Numerous legislative officials from
Dade County attended the reception.
During the afternoon luncheon at
the Governor's Mansion, the mission
participants viewed a film which
highlighted Florida's Community
Care for the Elderly programs. In
recognition of Mrs. Graham's
humanitarian concerns and advocacy
role she has assumed on behalf of
Florida's elderly, Maxine E. Sch-
wartz, president of Federation's
Women's Division presented Mrs.
Graham with a Yaakov Heller
sculpture depicting David playing
the harp for King Saul.
The mission's second day featured
participation in a legislative
workshop, highlighted by the
adoption of a resolution in the state
Senate calling for the citizens of
Florida to commemorate Holocaust
Education Week and the Days of
Remembrance for victims of the
Holocaust. Rabbi Solomon Schiff,
executive vice president of the
Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami, offered a special prayer to
open the Senate proceedings.
The resolution was proposed by
State Senator Peter M. Weinsteinof
Coral Springs, and an identical
resolution was sponsored by
Representative Michael Friedman of
Miami Beach in the House chamber.
L. Jules Arkin, chairman of the
Governmental Affairs Committee of
the Florida Association of Jewish
Federations and a former Greater
Miami Jewish Federation president,
was presented with the resolution.
Maxine Schwartz was called to the
Senate floor during the presentation.
The resolution received coverage
that evening on "Today in the
Legislature," a public televison show
broadcast statewide.
Following the Senate presen-
tation, Schwartz commented that it
was gratifying to see how attentive
and understanding the members of
Florida's Senate were as the
resolution was being presented. "The
growing awareness of our political
leaders concerning the horrors of the
Nazi Holocaust will help to insure
that such events will never occur in
the future," noted Schwartz.
After a luncheon with state
legislators, mission participants
were provided with additional in-
sights into the legislative process.
They spoke with Senator Jack
Gordon, Senate president pro
tempore and chairman of the Senate
Education Committee, who en-
couraged strong involvement on the
part of the Jewish community in
educational affairs.
The Tallahassee Mission was
attended by key leaders of the
Women's Division. They included
Maxine Schwartz, Women's Division
president; Dorothy Sussman,
Tallahassee Mission chairwoman;
Terry Drucker, Women's Division
Campaign chairwoman; Dorothy
Podhurst, vice president for
Leadership Development; Gail
Harris, vice president for Com-
munity Education; Amy Dean,
chairwoman of the Business and
Professional Division; Elaine Ross,
Campaign vice chairwoman, South
Dade; Micki Hochberg, vice
chairwoman of Community
Education, South Dade; Marilyn
Kohn, chairwoman, Southwest
Dade; Sandi Miot, chairwoman of
Campaign, Southwest Dade; Gail
Newman, secretary, South Dade and
Project Renewal chairwoman of the
Women's Division; Business and
Professional Board Member Barbara
Schwartz; South Dade Board
members Ellen Baum, Estelle Segal
and Joan Hayet and Emily Demar,
assistant director of the Women's
Division.
Beneath the
Codewords
By MIKKI FUTERNICK
1984-85 Women's Division
President
An organization dedicated to excel-
lence must deal with even create
codewords, for it must deal with
what's topical and the transitions
that are taking place in society. Our
Women's Division has always been
in the forefront of exploring new
ideas and methods to enhance our
ability to enrich the quality of
Jewish life. Our codewords have
traditionally been words like caring,
concern, and commitment. Words
that have their roots in Jewish
values. We are discovering that
management technology and Jewish
values can mesh and bring us even
closer to our goals. Discovery and
discourse lead to an exciting,
enlightened viewpoint and actions.
We are engaged in an exciting
decade, not because there are more or
different codewords to discuss, but
because beneath them lies funda-
mental change change that will
reshape the landscape of Jewish
organizational life.
I believe this is a time when some
individuals are searching not merely
for incremental improvement, but
also for ways to make their organ-
ization truly an engine for innova-
tion. It is a time when women are
genuinely engaged in search for
excellence and professionalism.
Today "a little better" is not enough.
Likewise, minor modifications of old
methods and orientation is not
enough.
The people for whom the new
codewords have meaning are those
who realize that any significant
improvement in their ability to
innovate requires a solid under-
standing of new technologies and
methods. They see unlimited poten-
Mikki Futernick
tial in human power and place no
bounds on their organization. Above
all, they are willing to experiment.
In this year, I look forward to
adding new codewords to our voca-
bulary. Words like participative
management, quality circles, strat-
egic planning, and productivity. I
want to make those terms common
to all of us because their underlying
principles will enable us to reach
more easily our goal of quality
Jewish survival.
There is room for every Jewish
woman in Dade County to join with
us in our exciting task. It has been
said, "the most exciting institutions
are headed by those who are excited
about their product." I am excited
by our product enriching Jewish
life. You can be also! Come and join
me!
WD/UJA Mission to visit
Budapest and Israel
Members of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Women's
Division will join women from
around the nation this September
during the United Jewish Appeal
National Women's Division Mission
to Israel. Amy Dean and Bunny
Adler are serving as the Miami's
Mission chairwomen.
Missionaires will visit Israel from
September 14-21. According to
Dean, the mission will provide
several unique opportunities for the
participants. "A women's mission
allows us to explore Israel in a
special manner. We'll meet women in
Israel who hold key leadership
positions as judges, politicians and
intellectuals. This mission will
permit us to learn about the way in
which Israeli women shape the
destinv of their country. In addition,
we'll have time to build new friend-
ships with our sisters in Israel,"
said Dean.
Bunny Adler stresses that a pre-
miss ion to Budapest, Hungary,
September 9-13, will be equally
important. "It's most critical that
we see for ourselves how Jews live
behind the Iron Curtain. I've been to
several Eastern European countries
over the years, and have observed
firsthand the plight of Jews in these
countries. We want our brothers and
sisters in Hungary to be assured that
they are not forgotten, and that we
hold a vital interest in their survival,
and support their fervent desire to
practice their religion openly and free
from fear."
Harriet Zimmerman, UJA
Women's Division national chairman
will lead the mission. Zimmerman
serves on the Board of Directors of
the Joint Distribution Committee,
the Atlanta Jewish Federation, the
American Jewish Historical Society,
and the Jewish Telegraphic Agency.
Additionally, she serves on the
Board of Governors of the American
Jewish Committee.
Mission highlights in Israel will
include a gala welcoming presen-
tation, confidential briefings by top
Israeli government officials, home
hospitality on a kibbutz, a torchlight
ceremony atop Masada, a visit to
Greater Miami's sister city Or
Akiva, a walking tour of Jerusalem's
Old City and ancient bazaar, and an
in-depth look at UJA-funded human
service programs. }
Space on the mission is limited, so
you should make your plans as soon
as possible. For additional in-
formation please call 576-4000.
Hold the date!
May 31 W.D. Executive Committee
Meeting GMJF
June 6 Parliamentary Procedures Course
GMJF
June 14 Campaign Steering Commitwe
GMJF
Sept 9-13 Women's Sub-mission to Hungiryj
Sept 14-21 Women's Mission to Israel
Oct 21 -31 Chazaka M ission to Israel
Nov 7 Women's Wednesday
For additional information, please call
the Women's Division at 576-4000


Federation, May, 1984
....
Page 7
&gencies
Fundamentals a priority at
Hiliel community Day School
The Samuel Scheck Hiliel Com-
munity day school, located in North
Dade. offers a curriculum that
combines excellent general education
with an extensive Judaic Studies
program. The school, with a current
enrollment of over 700 students, is
the largest Jewish Day School in the
Southeastern United States.
According to Marshall Baltuch,
the school's executive director, "In
a very short time our superior
scholastic achievements have
resulted in our being one of the few
private schools in our area to receive
% accreditation for our elementary and
secondary programs from the
prestigious Southern Association of
Colleges and Schools and the
Southern Association of Indepen-
dent Schools."
Located on a seven-acre tract
adjacent to the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center, the
Samuel Scheck Hiliel Community
Day School was opened in 1970. The
educational facilities, housed in four
buildings include two science
laboratories; a library-media center;
math and reading labs for remedial
and enrichment work, headed by
certified specialists; a computer lab;
complete physical education and
athletic facilities; and art and music
studios.
Dr. Joshua Tarsis, the principal,
elaborated on the school's
educational philosophy. "At Hiliel,
our priority is on the fundamentals.
Our teachers make certain that each
youngster is achieving to his or her
fullest in reading and mathematics.
In addition, we encourage students
to use all of their creative potential.
We are concerned with each
youngster's affective development,
as well as the child's academic
achievement."
Dr. Tarsis also outlined the
purpose of the Judaic Studies
program. "We give equal emphasis
to Hebrew education. Our Hebrew
JCC hosts Health
Fair 84
A youngster at the JCC Health Fair
The Miami Beach Jewish Commu-
, nity Center each year plays host to
* Health Fair, and this year was no
exception.
Holding a Health Fair with
various health screenings and tests
18 a wonderful way to serve our
community," stated Yvonne Lee,
supervisor of Older Adult Programs
for the Miami Beach JCC Senior
Adult Center. "Health Fair is great
for people who normally go to the
doctor only when they are ul. Here is
an opportunity for us to bring
together over 3,000 people of all ages
Reading specialist Charlene Koonin works with Hiliel Day School student
Malka Solomon during reading enrichment session.
and Judaic Studies curricula are
progressive, individualized and
based on each child's educational
background and experience. These
studies offer the maximum in Torah
education, modern Hebrew language
and literature." The Hebrew
teachers, all of whom are licensed
and certified by the Central Agency
for Jewish Education, provide
remedial classes in Hebrew for those
students with little or no Hebrew
background.
Judaic studies also serve to
reinforce the school's philosophy of
full commitment to the State of
Israel. Considerable time is devoted
to studying the people of Israel, its
history and cultural heritage.
Students conduct daily prayers and,
in the upper grades, congregate in
the student chapel.
The Samuel Scheck Hiliel Com-
munity Day School consists of a pre-
school early childhood program, an
elementary school (grades kin-
dergarten-5) and a junior high school
(grades 6-9). The 60 faculty members
are fully licensed and certified by the
State of Florida. Many of them have
advanced degrees, and all are
directly encouraged to further their
education. Class sizes are small, and
the junior high school program is
fully departmentalized.
Extracurricular and after-school
programs supplement the daily
school curriculum. The school's
athletic program has met with recent
successes, having captured the
Independent School's Athletic
League basketball championship,
and finished second in football.
After-school activities, offered at
minimal cost above tuition, include
Hebrew enrichment, choir, karate,
journalism, exerdance, arts and
crafts, needlework, Israeli dance and
dramatics.
Over the past 14 years, the Samuel
Scheck Hiliel Community Day
School has emerged as a leader
among the nation's day school in-
stitutions. Much of the crt-dit for
that success must be attributed to
the active involvement of the
school's officers. The board deter-
mines school policy and formulates
the school's educational goals.
Michael Scheck is president of the
Samuel Scheck Hiliel Commnity Day
School; Dr. Joel B. Dennis is
president emeritus; Irving Canner is
executive vice president for Finance;
Arthur Lipson is the treasurer and
Building chairman; and Barbara Ziv
serves as secretary.
The school's vice presidents in-
clude Helen Cohan, Rochelle Daniels,
Peshe Dennis, Gary Dubin, Dr. Lee
Duffner, Dr. Robert Ennis, Dr.
Walter Fingerer, Trudy Frankl,
Jacob Friedman, Ben Genad, Dr.
Stephen Gervin, Dr. Larry
Gilder man, Dr. Ira Ginsberg,
Herbert Gold, Eduardo Klinger,
Steven Kravitz, Irving Kuttle,
Dennis Lentin, Shelly Lipson, Jack
Saltzman, Raquel Scheck, Don
Solomon, Dr. Stanley Spatz, Ber-
nard Sultan, Joseph Teichman,
Betty Weinberg, Dr. Laurence
Weiss, Judge Arthur Winton and
Morton Zemel.
The Samuel Scheck Hiliel Com-
munity Day School is a member of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's family of agencies and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign. For additional in-
formation about the school please
contact Marshall Baltuch, at 931-
2381 or 524-8688.
to one site to test, monitor and
educate them."
According to Iris Berger, program
director for the Miami Beach JCC
Family Center, "Children from local
schools came in large groups. We
had educational booths from various
organizations on hand to handle
everything from eye care to hearing
tests."
The Miami Beach JCC planned
and coordinated the Fair this year in
cooperation with the Miami Beach
Rotary Club. Some of the educa-
tional booths were sponsored by
Project Sinai Mobile Van, Light
House for the Blind, The Optometric
Association, the local Fire and
Rescue Department and many other
agencies.
Health Fair is sponsored through-
out Dade County by Chevron USA,
Hospital Corporation of America,
University of Miami School of
Nursing, and WTVJ-Channel 4. The
Miami Beach JCC Senior Adult
Activities Center gathered seniors to
take part in tests designed to screen
for potential health problems. If
problems were detected, test takers
were counseled and referred for
treatment. The Health Fair per-
sonnel will follow up with those who
were referred for treatment within
the next three months.
The Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida are beneficiaries of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
Ifs Easy to feel Like a Million
Without Spending a Dime
At first glance, it's just a living room
filled with furniture. Or maybe it's
a garage filled with tools. Or a closet
filled with clothes.
It might not be worth much to you.
but to us its worth millions. Its worth
medicine and medical supplies lor
indigent residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital fa the Aged
Everything you donate to the
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is
tax-deductible. Of course, we will be
glad to pick up your merchandise at
your convenience. A licensed
appraiser is available upon request.
Call the Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops when you re-decorate your
home, clean out your garage and
straighten up your closets.
Its that easy. And you'll feel like a
million without spending a dime.
Call-
751-3988 (Dad*)
981-8245 (Broward)
In DadM 5713 NW. 27th Ave
In Browanfe 3149 Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Irving Cypen, Chairman of the Board
HaroW Beck. President
Aaron Kravitz. Chairman, Thrift Shop
Committee
Fred D. Hirt. Executive Director


Paste 18-R Th i.M.k m^M*..
Page 8
Federation, May, 1984
Israel 56
communitywide event celebrates Israel's 36th birthday
What a day! Thousands of Greater Miamians
gathered together Sunday, May 6 for Israel 36.
The giant Happy Birthday celebration began
with a Walkathon, held on behalf of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's 1984 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
Prior to the Walkathon, the throng of par-
ticipants observed a Yom Hazikaron ceremony
in commemoration of Israel's fallen soldiers.
Norman H. Lipoff, president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and Metro-Dade
Commissioner Ruth Shack, president of the
Jewish Community Centers of South Florida,
addressed the walkers in a moving ceremony
that emphasized the solemn meaning of Yom
Hazikaron.
After the ceremony, the Walkathon departed
from Temple Israel of Greater Miami in silence,
as Florida's governor, Bob Graham "led the
way." Graham was accompanied by several
local dignitaries including Congressman Larry
Smith, Miami Beach Mayor Malcolm From-
berg, Metro-Dade Commissioner Barry
Schreiber, Norman H. Lipoff, Ruth Shack, and
Israel 36 General Chairman Philip T. Warren.
David Rosenbaum, the Walkathon chair-
man, noted, "our walk was one of pride, dignity
and remembrance. The request for silence was
honored by all of the participants, and in doing
so each walker paid tribute to those brave men
and women who gave so much to establish and
preserve the State of Israel."
The Walkathon concluded at the Miami
Beach Convention Center, site of the Israel 36
Yom Haatzmaut celebration. The festive crowd
was treated to a variety of cultural, en-
tertainment and educational activities. A shouk
(Israeli style marketplace) gave the Convention
Center grounds the appearance of a bustling
Jerusalem market. The Israel 36 program was
coordinated by the Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida. The American Zionist
Federation, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, the Israeli Consulate and the
Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami joined
with the JCC in sponsoring the celebration of
the Israel's 36th birthday.
A ceremony at the Convention Center was
highlighted by a salute to Israel by Governor
Graham and proclamations declaring May 6,
"Israel 36 Day" by Miami Beach Mayor
Malcolm Fromberg and Metro-Dade Mayor
Stephen Clark. Consul General of the State of
Israel, Yehoshua Trigor, addressed the large
audience, offering greetings from the people of
Israel. Gerald Schwartz brought greetings from
the American Zionist Federation, of which he is
national vice-president. The ceremony con-
cluded with the presentation of awards to Israel
Independence Day Flag Contest winners by
Norman Lipson, of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education.
Philip T. Warren was pleased by the response
of the Greater Miami community. "Israel 36
represented the first time our community has
come together to celebrate the establishment of
the State of Israel. I anticipate that future
celebrations will be even larger, now that we
have set a precedent for having the community
gather in a central location like the Convention
enter. I would particularly like to thank the
JCC for making the day's event so successful,"
noted Warren.
Israel 36 concluded with an evening program
inside the Convention Center. Sponsored by the
American Zionist Federation, highlights in-
cluded guest speakers William Cohen, U.S.
Senator from Maine; General Yair Nafshi, of
the Israeli Army and local radio talk show host,
Barbara Studley. Norman H. Lipoff brought
greetings on behalf of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, while Consul General
Yehoshua Trigor spoke for the State of Israel.
The program, chaired by Barry D. Schreiber,
gresident of the American Zionist Federation of
outh Florida featured the presentation of
colors by the Jewish War Veterans and singing
by the Hebrew Academy Children's Choir. The
event was coordinated by Harriet Green,
Chairman of the Board of the AZF of South
Florida. Green also serves as national vice
pi. sidenl of Pioneer Women-Na'amat.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation President Norman II. Lipoff and Metro-Dade Com-
missioner Ruth Shack, president of the.Jewish Community Centers of South Florida, lead
a Yom Hazikaron memorial service to Israel's war dead.
Walkathon departs from Temple Israel of Greater Miami. Among the dignitaries
"leading the way" are Metro-Dade Commissioner Barry Schreiber, president of the
American Zionist Federation of South Florida, U.S. Congressman Larry Smith, Miami
Beach Mayor Malcolm Fromberg, GMJF President Norman H. Lipoff, Governor Bob
Graham and Metro-Dade Commissioner Ruth Shack, president of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida.
I
*
Miami '<
Lip
'hi! Im Fromberg presents Federal! President S'ot H
daring} b "Israel.% Day. '


Federation. Mav. i9aa
Page 9

Israel:i6 General Chairman Philip T. Warren
IsRcieL
Seen outside the Miami Beach Convention Center are: (from left) American Zionist
Federation Vice President Gerald Schwartz, Israel 36 General Chairman Philip T.
Warren, GMJF President Norman H. Lipoff, Metro-Dade Mayor Steven Clark, Consul
General of Israel Yehoshua Trigor, Metro-Dade Commissioner Barry Schreiber, president
of the American Zionist Federation of South Florida, and Metro-Dade Commissioner
Beverly Phillips.

Joyous celebrants dance a hora.

governor Bob Graham
Shajar, a Latin musical review, performed at Israel,'hi.


.ftp?.1.8"8 ... The Jewish Floridian/FrW.
Mc
IB inoi
page 10
Federation. May, 1984
south Dade/Aaen
New s. Dade Officers and Board
A slate of 1984-85 officers and
board members of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's South Dade
Branch has been selected and
confirmed, announced Federation
President Norman H. Lipoff.
Alvin Lloyd Brown, the current
vice chairman for campaign in South
Dade, has been named to serve as
chairman. Serving with him are:
Norman Lieberman, vice chairman
for campaign; Debby Grodnick, vie
chairman for community educatior
Judge Robert Newman, vi<
chairman for community servic
and planning; Paul Berkowitz, vi
chairman for leadership study ai
development; and Mikki Futernic
immediate past chairman of th
South Dade Branch.
Those who will serve ex officio 01
the board are: Sandi Miot, chairmar.
of Federation's Women's Division
Southwest Dade Board and Elaine
Ross, chairman of the Women's
Division South Dade Board.
Those selected for a two-year term
commencing July 1 are: Arnold
Altman, Rabbi David Auerbach
Shelly Brodie, Rabbi Mitchel
Chefitz, Helene Dubbin, Susar
Fuller, Bernard Goodman, Michae
Greenbaum, Leonard Hayet, Pau
Kade, Fran Levey, Dr. Robert
Marlin, Lawrence Metsch, Stanle\
Newmark, Dorothy Oppenheim.
Nedra Oren, Judge Steven Robinson,
Dr. Bernard Schecterman, Fran
Storper and Dror Zadok.
The following board members will
be completing their two-year term
during 1984-85: Robert Berrin, Bert
Brown, Sidney Fagin, Joan Fisher,
Morris Futernick, Sam Hochberg,
Kenneth Hoffman, Neil Littauer,
Ellen Mandler, Sydney Newmark,
Bill Saulson, Norman Sholk, Judge
Samuel Smargon, Barry White and
Barry Yarchin.
The following have been appointed
to complete unexpired terms of those
who left the board or have become
officers: Thomas Borin, Richard
Kwal. Sanford Miot and Laurie
Turner.
"Mikki, long known for her
devotion to the Greater Miami
Jewish community, did an out-
standing job increasing the level of
involvement in the rapidly growing
South Dade Jewish community,"
commented Lipoff. "I am sure that
Alvin. who this year directed the
most successful campaign ever held
in South Dade, will provide dynamic
leadership in this young and ex-
panding portion of our community.
He, as well as the other new
leadership, share the Jewish ideals
that benefit our people at home and
abroad."
Elderly services
in S. Dade
i
By PHYLLIS FERBER, MSW
Counselor, Elderly Services
The expansion one year ago of the
Jewish Vocational Service
Homemaker Referral Service into
South Dade is proving to be a
valuable service, meeting a real need
in the community. South Dade
covers a large area, with many
relatively isolated communities.
Within these communities we have
found small groups of elderly people
who are receiving few of the services
available to similar populations
residing in the cities of Miami,
Miami Beach, and North Miami.
We, in South Dade, function in a
similar manner to the Homemaker
Referral Service which began in
Miami Beach and which was
described in a previous issue of
Federation. Following our free initial
social service assessment with a
client, the Homemaker Referral
Service matches up a capable and
Alvin Lloyd Brown
...... :,._
r48* H* 1
1 m Mm
^mt ^fW
HHb^jfii^
Debby Grodnick
compatible worker. Thus, the nurse's
aides, homemakers, and companions
are not employed by JVS. They are,
however. carefully interviewed:
references are thoroughly checked;
and most importantly, they are
trained by our professional staff,
who sensitize them to the needs of
the elderly.
Our fees are reasonable. In fact,
they are substantially less costly
than private sources. The client pays
directly to the caregiver, who
provides quality care. They are able
to observe changes in the client's
functioning and report these changes
to the staff, who can then reassess
needs and make the necessary
changes in the service plan.
Our companions assist a client as
they would a friend. They can go for
walks, talk with clients, write letters,
run errands, and provide respite to
primary caregivers. The
homemakers provide the above
services, as well as assistance with
light household duties such as meal
preparation, shopping, and personal
laundry. The Certified Nurse's aides
are able to do all of the above, as well
as provide personal care assistance.
We believe that we have the most
caring and highly qualified workers
in the South Florida area. They are
well trained and have lengthy ex-
perience in the field of home care.
In this year, we have seen the
program grow, and we are certain
that as the community's awareness
of our existence increases, we will
continue to expand the Homemaker
Referral Service. For further
inquiries or referrals, call 235-9482 in
South Dade, or 672-2184/672-2185
on the Beaches.
The Jewish Vocational Service is a
beneficiary of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund.
Norman Lieberman
Judge Robert Newman
Paul Berkowitz
Mikki Futernick
wanted!
The residents of Federation
Gardens, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 110-unit South Dade
apartment building for low-income
elderly, would welcome donations of
Jewish books, plants, planters, a
television, a kiln and accessories, a
pool table and other items to help fill
their leisure hours.
Donations are tax deductible. For
further information, please contact
Joel Waldman or Bernie Sharkev ut
279-1708.
PEOPLEPOWER...
it makes Federation work!
The members of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Volunteer Service
fi.......... I.________ i ... l.. il,.;
*: nwiNm u/ me ureater Miami Jewish Federation s Volunteer aerw
Bureau, those people who selflessly give their time and energy to help tht
Jewish community, recently were honored at a special luncheon. Myron J.
Brodie, executive vice president of the GMJF, presented the volunteers with a
special award For information about becoming a volunteer, please call Gert
bchner, bureau director, at 576-4000.


Federation, May, 1984
pageH
[Israeli hornets orbit earth
All in the family
By JEFF SUSSMAN
U J A Press Service
AFULA, ISRAEL For the past
six months, synagogue congregants
here in the Jezreel Valley have been
praying with one less Torah scroll.
The reason, they say with pride, is
that the missing scroll is being used
by the Jews of West Hartford,
Connecticut, a gift from the Afula
residents after nine Torahs were
destroyed in a series of arson attacks
in Hartford area synagogues.
"KveryJew winces when a Torah
is destroyed maliciously," said
Afula's mayor, Ovadia Eli, who
presented the Torah to the Jews of
West Hartford. "But when it
happened to our friends, it was espe-
cially painful. For us, the Jews of
West Hartford are family."
Afula IlUt and Givat Hamoreh are
neighborhoods in Afula which have
been "twinned" to a cluster of
Connecticut Jewish communities,
including West Hartford, through
Project Renewal, the comprehensive
partnership in which diaspora
Jewish communities help Israelis in
distressed neighborhoods to improve
the quality of their lives.
"We have benefited a lot from the
relationship." said Eli, speaking in
Professor Yaakor Yishai. Israeli expert on hornets, will direct experiments
using hornets in the 19H6 space shuttle.
By JAMES CHESKY
TEL AVIV Hornets will be the first Israelis" in space. A Tel
Aviv University experiment utilizing live hornets is planned for blast ott
on the United States space shuttle in 1986. It will help determine the
effects of zero gravity on living things.
Hornets are the perfect space guinea pigs," says Tel Aviv
University Professor Yaakov Yishai. one of the world's leading experts on
hornets. "Thev are rather large insects and easy to handle. And although
outer space will probably affect them less than it does humans, we can still
observe whether they eat, and if there are any changes in their
metabolism. That might help us find out why 50 percent of all astronauts
suffer from space sickness."
Dr. Yishai wants to know whether the hornets will lay eggs in space
and whether the young will hatch normally. He also intends to study
reproduction under zero gravity. "Then there is the cuticula, or the skin ot
the hornet. It has a number of crystals. Some of them are silicone. which
also exists in bones. By studying the formation of the silicone crystals on
the cuticula of young hornets, we can learn about the growth processes in
space."
Instinct and Gravity
In his preliminary experiments. Dr. Yishai puts the hornets in
centrifuges, which can simulate changes in the direction and pull ot
Kravity. He has already discovered that the hornets have a built-in
mechanism that is more accurate than any of todays instruments in
measuring minute changes in those forces. "On earth, hornets build their
combs with the holes facing down. But even the smallest changes in
gravity are reflected in the direction and location of the combs, he says.
Therefore they can be used as an aid in measuring forces in space.
Satellite Technology
In addition to the ho'rnet program. Israel has also entered satellite
technology. The U.S. National Aeronautic and Space Association N AbA)
has just signed an agreement with Minister of Science and Development
Yuval Neeman for the construction of a laser ground station in Israel to
help measure the movement of the earth's crust. "It is one of about,25
stations being built by NASA around the world, Neeman explains.
The Israeli station is to be located on solid rock, along the Syrian-
African fault, where, Ne'eman says, Sinai is being torn away from Asia, in
a slow process that can take tens of millions of years, bince the area is
Prone to earthquakes, the station can help in understanding and
Predicting them.
An Israeli Satellite
An Israeli Satellite is also in the planning stages. A private company
s currently raising the $150 million it will cost to build it. The satellite,
which should be operational within three years, will be sent into space via
the U.S. shuttle. According to Neeman, the satellite will be purely for
communications and have no military value. It is expected to save Israel
at least $10 million a year in foreign currency now spent on satellite
services supplied by American communication companies.
Minister Yuval Neeman says that since the Israeli space agency was
formed last year, only about $30,000 in public money has been spew.on
"ejects. Next year, the budget is expected to increase nanifo- HWJM
'opes to have the capability to build and launch its own satellite within
light years. ___^_________________________---------
Hebrew during an interview in his
home here. "Now the two neigh-
borhoods have health facilities,
community centers, libraries and
employment programs. But it goes
much deeper than that. The
American Jews want to be involved
in our town. They want to under-
stand our problems. Thev want to be
our friends.
"And we feel the same way," he
quickly added. The relati nship is a
two-way street. When we heard
about the arson and saw photo-
graphs of the burned synagogues,
the people came to me and said
something must be done.
"We know the people of West
Hartford could have bought their
own Torah." he said. "But this was a
way for us to show we care about
them too."
He paused. "A Torah is a perfect
way of saying this." he continued.
"It is the greatest gift that the
people of Israel ever received. It
holds us together as Jews."
Reflecting on his visit to West
Hartford, Eli, who has been in office
sue years, said he was deeply moved
by his visit. "I felt as though I was
visiting family," he said.
Kibbutz lifeconservative style
Eli and Judy Havivi (bottom row in T
Kibbutz Hannaton.
Judy and Eli Havivi are Conserva-
tive Jews currently living in Phila-
delphia. Eli is the director of Camp
Ramah in the Poconos. Judy is a
Jewish educator. Four years ago, the
Havivis and some of their friends,
mostly seminary students, started to
discuss the possibility of making
aliyah. Being Conservative, observ-
ing the laws of shabbat and kashrut
was a top priority.
In September 1983, after four
years of living room discussions,
planning and preparation, 33 Amer-
ican, Canadian and BritishConserva-
tive Jews joined 30 Israelis and
established the first Conservative
kibbutz in the Galilee. The 30
Israelis who will live on Kibbutz
Hannaton are 18-year old boys and
girls doing their military service by
working to set up new settlements.
Kibbutz Hannaton, presently under
construction, was created to bring
non-Orthodox religious values into
the kibbutz movement, enabling
members to examine religion in a
new light (most kibbutzim are not
religiously affiliated).
Kibbutz Hannaton will be located
in the lower Galilee, 10 kilometers
from Nazareth. All future Hannaton
residents are now living on Kibbutz
Kfar Hachoresh, training for life on
the new kibbutz. Located 10 kilo-
meters from the site of Hannaton,
Kfar Hachoresh also has overall
responsibility for the physical,
economic and social planning of
Hannaton and for the guidance of
the new kibbutz and its members
during the early formative years.
shirts) are seen with other members of
"Although Kfar Hachoresh is not
a traditional kibbutz, kosher meals
are provided for our members by way
of a small kosher kitchen," Judy
said. "Members of our group will live
on this kibbutz for one year, learning
the formal and informal structure of
kibbutz society on all levels, and
being trained to work in all areas,
including children's houses, cotton
fields, laundry and the bakery."
"After one year, this first group
will settle on Kibbutz Hannaton,
Eli continued. 'A second group*
including Judy and myself, wdl
make aliyah in September and spend
six months to a year in training at
Kfar Hachoresh. Our goal is to send
a group over every six months,
eventually hoping to have about 500
residents."
The economy of Kibbutz Han-
naton will be based on printing,
sheep raising for milk, agriculture,
and a Conservative Zionist educa-
tional center. "We hope to create a
Hebrew language center and to hold
seminars for high school students
and their parents. The educational
center will serve many groups in
Israel and the diaspora.'
"Kibbutz Hannaton will give
conservative Jews an outpost in
Israel," Eli said.
For more information about
Kibbutz Hannaton, please call the
Israel Programs office at 576-4000,
contact Judy and Eli Havivi, (215)
438-3773, or write Garin Nitzan,
United Synagogue of Anv ica, 155
Fifth Avenue, New York. N.Y.
10010.


Page 18-B The Jewish FlnrMi. / bwj
0* M#**> 1 O 1 f\r\
Page 12
Federation, May, 1
Agencies
A 'Grand' new program
Alma Neska captured the heart of her "adopted granddaughter," Helen Sinai.
William Schneider was crying. Not tears of sadness, but tears of joy.
Never married and alone in the world, he suddenly found himself, at age
85, a grandfather, thanks to the "Adopt a Grandparent"' program.
His new "granddaughter," Jill Reinauch, is a student at Ran-
som/Everglades School, whose involvement with the University of
Miami's Hillel Student Center brought she and Schneider together. "My
natural grandfather died several years ago, and this is my way of filling
the void he left in my life, while helping someone else," said Jill.
The "Adopt a Grandparent" program is co-sponsored by Hillel and
the National Long-Term Care Channeling Demonstration Project
(Channeling), a division of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged at Douglas Gardens. All 15 elderly participants are clients of
Channeling, a federal research project designed to determine the cost-
effectiveness of maintaining frail elderly in their own homes through
community services and family support.
The "Grandparent" Program was a simultaneously conceived idea,
according to Mindy Kram, activities coordinator at the Hillel Center.
"The linkage of the two projects happened very naturally," she explained,
"since Channeling had the clients who needed support and friendship, and
we had the young people who wanted to help. The students are par-
ticipants in "My Brother's Keeper" Program which provides professional
internships in social services, public relations, counseling and other areas
and is sponsored by the HUlel Student Center and the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
"The main purpose of the 'Adopt a Grandparent' Program is to
counteract the debilitating effects of loneliness and isolation all too
common to elderly persons who have outlived family and friends or are
separated by long distances," said Barbara Brodbar, director of Chan-
neling. "But at the same time, the companionship and telephone
reassurance provided by the surrogate 'grandchildren' enhances the
students' insight into aging and the older adult," she added.
The new "grandparents" and "grandchildren" met for the first time
on March 21st at the University of Miami's Hillel Student Center. Some,
like Miriam and Lou Glickman, already have natural grandchildren, but
they live in New York. And as Mrs. Glickman expressed, "the more the
merrier ... All of our grandchildren are welcome." She and Mr. Glickman
were "adopted" by David Levinson, a UM sophomore and one of the
founding members of "My Brothers Keeper."
Seventy-six year old Lily Maltz, a shy, cheerful lady despite the
constant pain she suffers from scoleosis and arthritis, said the
get-acquainted party reminded her "of Disneyland, a fairyland where for
a short while you leave the realities of life." Swept up in the emotion of
meeting her new granddaughter, she exclaimed, "Just being around
young people like this is exhilarating. It restores my faith in human
beings.
Mt. Sinai opens nmr center
Mount Sinai Medical Center ushered in a new era of diagnostic
procedures when it broke ground recently for the new Mary Ann and
James L. Knight Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) Imaging Center.
The Center was made possible through the gift of Mr. Knight,
chairman emeritus of The Miami Herald and a member of the board of the
Knight-Ridder Newspapers, and his wife, Mary Ann. Their $5 million
contribution is the largest Mount Sinai has ever received from in-
dividuals, according to Cal Kovens, president of the Medical Center.
"We are enormously grateful to the Knights for their community-
spirited generosity. The new NMR technology will enhance Mount Sinai's
position as one of the nation's leaders in body imaging," Kovens said.
NMR is one of the great advances in medicine, comparable to the
development of the microscope and X-rays, according to Dr. Manuel
Viamonte, Mount Sinai's Director of Radiology. With the help of NMR,
physicians^can make earlier diagnosis of disease and the need for ex-
ploratory surgery may be reduced, all without the potentially damaging
effects of mdiation. Particularly exciting is the expectation by clinicians
that they may soon be able to pinpoint early metabolic changes that could
indicate cancerous tissue.
NMR scanners utilize giant magnets 50,000 times stronger than the
earth's magnetic field. This magnetism causes certain atoms in the body
to align themselves parallel to the field, while radio waves then force the
atoms to fpin off course. Computers are able to reconstruct a TV image of
the body- Structure, chemistry and blood flow based on the magnetic
responses of the hydrogen atoms within the patient.
Mount Sinai Medical Center is a beneficiary of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
JCC Teen Travel
offers summer fun
Summer is a time of new ex-
periences. For the teenager who
would benefit from the growth that
comes with travel, the Jewish
Community Center Summer Teen
Travel Program is a golden op-
portunity for a young person to
become more independent and enjoy
the company of peers. Teen Safari
offered by the South Dade JCC and
the Michael-Ann Russell JCC also
offers children the opportunity to
travel right in sunny South Florida.
Teen Travel Trip is a 31-day
journey which departs on June 26
and returns on July 26. Campers will
travel by air conditioned bus to
Chattanooga, Chicago, Denver,
Rocky Mountain National Park,
Yellowstone National Park, Salt
Lake City, San Francisco, Los
Angeles, Pheonix, San Antonio,
Houston, New Orleans, Tallahassee,
and then home. The fee is $2,200 and
is all inclusive.
This summer's travel experience is
staffed by mature young adults,
experienced in camping and
knowledgeable about teenagers. All
are over 21 years old. Staff members
are selected for their ability to relate
to teenagers and their sound
judgement. All teenagers entering
7th through 11th grade are eligible
for this program, and enrollment is
limited to a maximum of 39 youths
and is on a first-come, first-serve
basis.
Teen Safari camp is an ex-
traordinary opportunity for older
campers to combine the excitement
of three local trips each week to
unusual and educational
destinations, as well as, fun
recreational activities. The two
remaining days will be spent on site
at the JCC in a program which will
highlight special events and in-
dividual interests. The South Dade
Teen Safari Camp is open to teens in
grades 5 through 8. The Michael-
Ann Russell Teen Safari Camp is
open to all teens in grades 7 through
9. The trips, based on weekly
themes, include such places as radio
stations, sports centers, parks,
restaurants, hotels, the court
system, and behind the scenes at a
local hospital, and television station.
There will also be "just for fun"
activities such as boating, skating,
bowling and more.
For more information and a free
brochure on Summer Teen Travel
call Jerry Libbin at 534-3206. For
information on Teen Safari Camp in
North Dade call Myrna Loman at
332-4200, in South Dade call Ed
Rosen at 251-1394.
The Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida are beneficiaries of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
Jewish High School
offers scholarships
A $60,000 scholarship program for
1 the 1984-85 academic year was
announced by Mrs. Ellie Katz,
executive vice president of the
Jewish High School of South
Florida.
The scholarships, which will range
from $200 to $2,400 per student, will
' be awarded to worthy students who
are unable to afford the full tuition of
$3,400 per year.
"We are delighted to offer these
scholarships to serious-minded
students who wish to take advantage
of our intensive academic and Jewish
heritage programs," she said.
The Jewish High School of South
Florida is located at 18900 N.E. 2nd
Avenue on the grounds of the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center in North Miami
Beach. It was founded in 1981, under
the auspices of the Central Agency
for Jewish Education, and receives
support from the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
The school has received
widespread acclaim for its sophis-
ticated computer program which
includes robots. Its students have
received college credits for its ad-
vanced courses in chemistry,
tmysics, mathematics and
anguages.
bbyo Pennies
Day at Atlantis
June 3 is officially BBYO
PENNIES DAY at Six Flags
Atlantis water theme park in
Hollywood. The program is designed
to help the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization in its Six Million
Penny Project to commemorate
those Jews who perished in the Nazi
Holocaust. Special discounted
tickets are on sale now at the BBYO
office. Prices are $7.50 plus 100
pennies for adults and $5.50 plus 50
pennies for children under 10.
BBYO has been collecting pennies
for four years. The purpose is to
visually show the enormity of the
number six million. To date, over one
million pennies have been collected.
When they reach their goal of six
million, BBYO youth will go through
an allocations process and distribute
the monies among various national
and local Jewish charities and a
Holocaust memorial.
Six Flags Atlantis has graciously
donated one of its fountains to
BBYO, on June 3, and all monies
tossed in will be donated to the Six
Million Penny Project.
BBYO would like to promote this
as a family fun day and open ticket
sales to the community. Teens,
parents, and young children are
invited to come out and have a grand
time on the water slide and other
exciting attractions. Please call 925-
4135 for ticket information.
BBYO is a beneficiary of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
JCC Annual
Meeting to
honor Shack
Plans are set for the Jewish
Community Centers of South Florida
1984 Annual Meeting on Wed-
nesday, June 13 at 7:45 p.m. The
meeting will take place at Temple
Israel, 137 N.E. 19th Street, Miami.
This year, the JCC's will welcome
a new president. The Annual
Meeting will be a tribute to Metro-
Dade Commissioner Ruth Shack.
who has served as president of the
JCC's for the past three years: at
this year's event the JCC s will
toast'' her as outgoing president.
Election of the Board of Directors*
and officers for the coming year will
be followed by a gala dessert
reception.
The Annual Meeting wUl showcase
from various JL1
presentations
will
programs. The presentations
include children's programs, senior
adult programs as well as an overall
showcase which will highlight u*
"story of the Centers."


Federation, May, 1984
PagelS
naation
jvering the cost of college education
ByDENNIS R.TURNER
The cost of college education is one
the lar8e9t expenditures for
ilies today, especially if several
Uildren attend college. Anticipating
1 high and increasing costs,
parents and grandparents
rin thinking of earmarking funds
Jthis purpose while their children
.relatively young.
Because the expenditure is a major
,e accumulation of funds for a
hjld's college education is often
,upled with tax savings motives. A
foperiv structured program can
Wult in income, gift and estate tax
saving while providing significant
uni|, for .1 child's college education.
i be achieved in a number of
nays, most ol which involve shifting
income and or assets to the
iiidren. A few of these methods are
outright gifts, trusts, the use of a
lamily business and the ownership of
appreciable real estate. While one or
more of these alternatives may seem
desirable for the parent who wishes
to provide funds for his or her child's
education, none of them should be
utilized without careful planning and
professional advice.
OUTRIGHT GIFTS
Probably the most common form
of providing funding for a child's
college education is by outright gifts,
either during college years or prior to
college, and accumulated for a
desired period of time. If properly
structured, outright gifts of up to
$20,000 per year per child can result
in little or no gift or estate tax
liability. Since the gifted" property
is owned by the child who is
probably, in a significantly lower tax
bracket than the parent, the income
tax on the property's earnings will be
substantially less than the parent's.
Due to the legal prohibition
against ownership of property by a
minor, a legal guardianship or a
custodian account under the
Uniform Gift to Minors Act could be
established for the child to provide
college funds. If. for example, a
married parent donates $20,000
annually to a child's custodial bank
account, beginning when the child is
age 10, the account will contain
5180.000 in principal when the child
is 18. Significant amounts of
compounded interest will also ac-
cumulate in the account. If all
pnncipal and accumulated income is
turned over to the child at age 18. he
or she presumably may use these
ninds for college. All amounts were
donated by the parent to the account
tree of gift tax. and if the account has
een properly structured, none of the
"mas will be included in the
donating parent's estate upon
Tremature death. Finally, the child
fas paid income tax on the earnings
"I the account at his or her (presum-
ably) lower tax bracket.
TRUSTS
|f a parent wishes to avoid
ou right ownership and control of
TiT Ldes'gnatea funds by the
, ~he Parent may establish a
rust. Tax rules applicable to most
'rusts will allow the parent to with-
"old management and control of the
irust assets by the child at age 18
"iwiout adverse tax consequences.
depending upon the type of trust
uized. assets may be turned over
0 the child at age 21 or withheld for
a longer period of time.
'As with outright gifts, most trusts
y be planned to avoid gift and
siate tax consequences to the
wnor. Trust income, which can be
axl to the child or the trust, may
'kuXpended for the benefit of the
JJid while attending college, thus
roviding funds for tuition, books.
10usmg. board, etc.
A special type of trust called a
Afford Trust allows a parent to
gain control of trust funds, but still
a some income tax benefits. If
^SLft%


Dennis R. Turner
the parent creates such a trust with
$30,000, assuming interest rates
remain constant at, for instance 10
percent, the $3,000 per year income
from the fund is paid and taxed to
the child for a period of 10 or more
years to be utilized for college related
expenses. At the end of the 10th
year, the original principal amount is
returned to the parent, who will then
be subject to tax on its income. If the
child has not completed the college
education when the trust is set to
terminate, it can be renewed for
another 10 year period. The income
can be accumulated in a separate
account for the child rather than paid
to him or her in pre-college years.
Once the child enters college, the
account may be utilized by the child
as a supplement to annual trust in-
come payments.
CHARITABLE REMAINDER
TRUST
For philanthropically motivated
donors, this type of trust enables an
individual to provide income to a
child for his or her education while
also providing a gift to the Jewish
community.
A charitable remainder trust for
this purpose may be created by
contributions over a long period of
time, or with a lump sum. If a parent
or grandparent chooses to create this
type of trust with a one time contri-
bution he or she would, of course,
obtain a charitable contribution
deduction in the year of the gift. If
smaller contributions are made over
a longer period of time, a deduction
would be taken each year a contri-
bution is made. In either case, the
trust can be established while the
child is young or immediately before
the child enters college. The trust
can be established to either allocate a
definite percentage of principal to be
paid to the child each year (charit-
able remainder unitrust) or to pay a
definite amount of income each year
(charitable remainder annuity trust).
Any amount earned through such a
trust prior to the college years could
be distributed to a guardianship or a
custodial bank account for the child
until he or she became of college age.
Once the child enters college he or
she would be able to benefit from the
principal and income from the
custodial account as well as the
income from the trust.
Once the child's education is
completed, the trust would be ter-
minated and the principal distrib-
uted to the charitable beneficiary.
The parent would receive an income
tax charitable deduction for a signi-
ficant portion of the amount
ultimately distributed to the charity.
If carefully planned, the entire
transaction can be gift and estate tax
free.
As an example of how a typical
charitable remainder trust operates,
suppose that the parent establishes a
unitrust for the child shortly before
entering college in the fall of 1984.
The parent transfers $30,000 to the
trust, which is scheduled to ter-
minate in June of 1988 when the
child is anticipated to graduate.
During its four year life, while in-
come is being earned on the original
$30,000 principal, the trust is
required to pay an amount equal to
10 percent of the value of the
Crincipal to the child on a quarterly
asis. He or she presumably will use
the funds to defray educational and
living costs while at college. At the
end of its four year life, the trust is
required to distribute its remaining
funds to the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies. Of the initially
funded amount of $30,000, the
parent obtains an income tax charit-
able deduction in the year of creation
of the trust for approximately
$20,000. Additionally, the payments
to the child during the four year
period, which consist of trust in-
come, are taxed to the child, effec-
tively "shifting" income from the
parent to the child. If the parent
transfers appreciated property to the
trust instead of cash, depending
upon the circumstances of the
donation, an additional tax savings
may result from the avoidance of
capital gains taxes.
The charitable remainder trust is
an innovative way of easing the
burden of college costs. Not only is
the child assured of financial security
while attending college, but charit-
able organizations, such as the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
can receive much needed financial
support. At the same time, the
philanthropic parent receives
welcome tax savings.
FAMILY BUSINESS
Where the parent owns his or her
business, as soon as the child is old
enough to provide useful labor, he or
she may be employed by the
business. This enables the business
to pay money to the child which
presumably will be accumulated for
use later in defraying the child's
college education. These funds may
be accumulated either in a guardian-
ship or custodial account. In ad-
dition, the business receives a deduc-
tion for amounts paid as taxable
wages to the child. Compensation to
the child should be reasonable,
taking into consideration the child's
age and ability to perform the job.
The employer must also comply with
all other laws applicable to the
employment of children.
REAL ESTATE
The purchase of a home, apart
ment house or condominium for the
child while attending college can
provide benefits to him or her, and a1
the same time, save the parent signi
ficant amounts of income taxes. For
example, the parent may purchase
duplex apartment in the town whe
the child is attending college. Th
child may reside on the premises, a<
as a building manager for the paren
at a reasonable salary, and colk-
rent from other student tenants,
significant write-off can be obtained
for a portion of the investment.
Greater tax benefits may accrue to
the parent if a fair market rental,
which is income taxable, is charged.
The amounts paid as mortgage
interest, real estate taxes, manage-
ment fees to the child, and main-
tenance are tax deductible, as well
as depreciation. The parent has not
only obtained a reliable tax shelter,
but has also legally shitted taxable
income to the child. Reasonable costs
of trips taken primarily to inspect
the property (and at the same time
visit the child) should be deductible.
If the property is sold, a certain
amount of depreciation must be
recaptured, which will result in
ordinary income. Of course, after any
recapture, gain will be taxed at long
term capital gains rates, assuming
the property is held for at least a
year. There is presently a proposal in
Congress to reduce this holding
period to six months.
Again, you should consult your
own personal financial advisors as
to the most suitable plan for your
family. For further information,
please call the Foundation office at
576-4000.
Foundation women get
tips on saving estate taxes
The Foundation Women's
Committee concluded its spring
seminar series with a discussion on
estate planning and administration.
The last of a three-part series on
financial awareness for women, this
session was attended by 25
Federation women. Donald Tescher,
attorney with Schwartz and Nash,
discussed important techniques one
can use in planning the distribution
! of one's assets while saving estate
taxes.
Rachel Sommer, attorney,
i discussed some important aspects of
; administering an estate when a
I relative dies. "Probate is not a dirty
1 word" Ms. Sommer noted, but
proper planning is essential. For
i example, one needs to think about
! "who has access to the safety deposit
box."
Seminar Co-Chairwomen, Bluma
Marcus and Ellie Ganz, commented
that the response to the seminars
had been very enthusiastic.
Recognizing that women are
becoming sophisticated in their
appreciation for sound money
management, the Foundation
Women's Committee is making
plans to conduct more seminars on
investment and estate planning
issues in the fall. For information
Seminar Co-Chairwomen
Ellie Ganz and
Bluma Marcus
about future seminars, please
contact Penny Marlin at the
Foundation office, 576-4000.
a*i


Page 18-B The Jewish FlnriHi / EWt...
U... to tnr> .
Page 14
Federation. May, 1984
JFT examines 'Atrocities of the PLO'
jft shows air
in other cities
Although Jewish Federation Tele-
vision (JFT) has only been on the air
since January, JFT will offer its
locally produced programming to
cable television stations across the
nation. Suzanne La sky, JFT
Director of Operations / Program
Manager announced that several
documentary and interview
programs will be supplied to WJUF,
Chicago's Jewish Federation
broadcast outlet.
"I feel this development will bring
JFT to the forefront, as we can now
expand our audience base in several
large city television markets.
Because we have such an active
Jewish community, many cultural
and educational events are always
occurring. Now we have the op-
portunity to share our noteworthy,
quality programming with Jewish
television stations in other large
cities," noted Lasky.
WJUF of Chicago will broadcast
the JFT-produced "People You
Should Know," an interview show
that focuses on the "Atrocities of the
P.L.O." exhibit that was displayed
recently at the Israel 36 celebration
at the Miami Beach Convention
Center. The show is the subject of
this month's Newsmagazine Cable
TV page feature story.
Fortunately, a small child's doll was the only casualty when the pre-kindergarten in the Galilee town of
Migdal Ha 'Emk was destroyed by PLO shelling.
A decorative tin can which holds
candy. A child's plastic toy
telephone. A carton of cigarettes and
a fire extinguisher. These simple,
commonplace items are transformed
into implements of death and
destruction by PLO terrorists,
resulting in needless human suf-
fering.
Acts of terrorism seem far
removed from our daily lives, yet
they remain a grim, constant reality
for the people of Israel and Lebanon.
You'll be shaking your head in
disbelief as you watch Jewish
Federation Television's (JFT)
"People You Should Know" program
airing during the month of June.
In an interview with JFT Director
of Operations, Suzanne Lasky,
Milton Levinson of the B'nai B'rith
Anti-Defamation League highlights
the "Atrocities of the PLO" exhibit,
brought to this country with ADL
funding, to educate American
citizens about the wanton acts of
terrorism perpetrated by PLO forces.
Levinson, a former resident of Miami
Beach who now serves in the Israeli
Defense Force as a paratrooper,
further explained the significance of
the exhibit.
"We wanted to bring physical
objects to show people in the United
States who are not touched by
terrorism, the horrific outcomes. Our
initial purpose was to use the exhibit
as a successful lobbying device in
opposing the sale of arms to Jor-
dan," said Levinson. Levinson
mentioned that Senator Paula
Hawkins of Florida urged other
members of Congress to visit the
display, after she spent more than
twenty minutes holding a mutilated
powdered milk can that had been
exploded with a time-bomb device in
an Israeli food market.
Levinson offered several items of
grim evidence during the show.
What once was a garbage can at-
tached to a street lamppost was
blown beyond recognition by the
force of a grenade blast. A jagged
and gun-powder laden paint can
housed a plastic explosive. "The
problem," mentioned Levinson, "is
we never know where the PLO will
strike next. Any object can be the
hiding place for a grenade, time-
bomb or plastic explosive." Levinson
also indicated that PLO terrorists
hold little regard for their own
welfare. "The PLO terrorist is
suicidal, he would be willing to lose
his own life in committing these acts
of terrrism if need be," noted
Levinson.
Levinson also showed Russian-
made rockets that barraged the
villages of Northern Israel, near the
border with Lebanon, practically on
a daily basis. "Because the shellings
were so constant, these rockets were
virtually household items."
Levinson supplemented the visual
evidence with unique insights into
the PLO mentality. He chronicled
the life and behavior of PLO
terrorists that he has encountered
during his service with the Israeli
Army. One telling photograph shows
a young Lebanese child positioned
Den ind a sub-machine gun.
The "Atrocities of the PLO"
exhibit was brought to the United
States primarily through the efforts
watch JFT on:
Storer (North Dade) Channel P-29
Storer (South Dade) Channel 34
UltraCom Channel 2
Miami Cablevision Channel ll
Dynamic Coral Gables Coming
soon
Americable South Dade -
Coming soon
of Greater Miami residents Dr.
Morton Freiman and Dr. Robert
Wolfe. Freiman conceived the
exhibit following the explosion of a
bus in Jerusalem which resulted in
severe injuries to friends of his
family.
The exhibit was recently on
display at the Israel 36 celebration
held at the Miami Beach Convention
Center.
* Programming Schedule
Greater Miami Jewish Federation cable Television inc.
JUNE 1984
5-5:30 p.m.
5:30-6 p.m.
6-6:30 p.m.
6:30-7 p.rr
Monday
Eenies
Kitchen
Tuesday
we
Remember
check up/
Mt. Slnal
FOCl"
Still
Small
voice
Sunrise,
Sunset
Hayom
JCC:
A Special
Place
Wednesday
Eenies
Kitchen
vision
Israel
Israeli
Diary
people
YOU
Should
Know
Thursday
Checkup/
Mt. Slnal
Israeli
Diary
Still
Small
voice
Eenies
Kitchen
Friday
vision
Israel
Focus
Sunrise,
Sunset
Encounter
Saturday
People
YOU
Should
Know
Hayom
Encounter
Checkup/
Mt. Slnal
Sunday
JCC:
A special
Place
Eenies
Kitchen
Vision
Israel
we
Remember

Subject to change


page 19
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Way. june 2
I Yivniella. former lead soprano with
k i i meli National Opera, will perform
IS at the South Dade Jewish
W Center, 12401 SW 102
-up The concert begins at 8:00 p.m.
IS, are $5 per person. Please call
12^94for more information.
yHUDAY.JUNE9
lib Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Lunity Center singles group (ages
52 is sponsoring an evening on the
Iktfk Quee"- feturinK dinner and
I Seeing. The Jungle Queen leaves
II Everglades at 7:00 p.m. The cost is
lot SO ner person. For more information.
Ecall Marvin at 932-4200
IjUNDAY.JUNElO
L Jewish High School of South
Iftsida will hold a cocktail party to
E* Us scholarship fund from 5:00 to
Bun., at the Versailles Hotel, 3425
Icollins Avenue. For more information,
e call 935-5620.
i, JUNE 10
Lite Miami Beach Jewish Community
fCeoter Annual Meeting will be held from
11-30 to 4:00 p.m. at the Center, 610
jEsputola Way. Miami Beach. The
lasting will feature a special tribute to
iGerald K. Schwartz, outgoing president
la! the Miami Beach JCC. For more
Information, please call 673-6060.
I SUNDAY. JUNE 10
I fl Young Adult Division of the Greater j
I Miami Jewish Federation will hold its |
J usual installation brunch. For more !
[information, please call Anita Press at
J 5T6-4000.
[WEDNESDAY. JUNE 13
[Tie Jewish Community Centers of
[South Florida Annual Meeting will be-
I held at 7:45 p.m. at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami. 137 NE 19th Street. lllftftt
I Miami. For more information, please call
ISTS-1660.
THURSDAY. JUNE 14
The Young Adult Division of the Greater
I.Miami Jewish Federation presents "The
(Front" as part of its 1984 film series. The
(film, starring Woody Allen and Zero
iMostel. is a comic satire of the 1950's
{communist witch hunts. "The Front"
Ibegins at 7:00 p.m. at the Federation
building, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard.
(Tickets are $4 at the door. For more
information, please call Nate Geller at
I576-400O.
|TUESDAY.JUNE19
The 46th Annual Meeting of the Greater
(Miami Jewish Federation, honoring
outgoing President Norman H. Lipoff,
1983 General Campaign Chairman
Aaron Podhurst. and 1984 General
Campaign Chairman Howard R.
Scharlin. will be held at the
Fontainebleau Hilton. Cocktails begin at
MO p.m.. dinner at 7:00 p.m. the
convert is $40 per person and dietary
*s will be observed. For reservations
JJ>d more information, please call
Federation at 576-4000.
THURSDAY. JUNE 21
JJ* Young Adult Division of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation will present
Kuablan" at 7:00 p.m. at the
[deration building, as part of its film
Pfnes Tickets may be purchased at the
"w for $4. For more information, please
1 Nate Geller at 576-4000.
NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE COMPOSITE PRICES
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1MB SI. MS as.
TAX ADVISORY ALERT
TO EVERYTHING THERE IS A SEAS0N-AND THIS IS IT
This is the lime for hard logic Simply put here n is.
Many people have been blessed with increased stock values with high percentages.
Perhaps you didn't have one ot the top performers, but again you may have some real
appreciated gains in the equities you hold.
No one really knows it we are at the "lop of the gain" but let's suppose there is a correc-
tion due Why not take the following suggestion seriously.
SET UP A PERSONALIZED. PHILANTHROPIC FUNO with the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies This
fund will bear your name or the name of anyone else you wish to designate You can establish the
Fund by contributing your appreciated stock or other property to the Foundation and by com
p/eting a simple form
YOUR TAX ADVANTAGE
'An income tat deduction may be taken this yeai since contributions to your Fund are treated
as qifts to a public chanty
The fan market value ol your appreciated long term securities is deductible up to J% or your
contributing ta* base
'Their is no r.ix on income wtrhin your Fund
'No l.m returns or reports need to be filed on your Fund
' Yiiu may continue to contribute lo Ihe Fund enabling you to make larger contributions during
high income years .mil especially alter a wmill.ill
WHAT CAN THE FUND DO?
Recommendations from you lor disbursements of income and/or principal to recognized
charitable purposes are acceptable IN 1M3 GRANTS IN EXCESS Of S3.000.000 WERE DISTRIBUTED TO
CHARITIES RECOMMENDED BY FUNO DONORS
'All qranis require-approval by Ihe foundation which reserves the right to determine il the
recommended beneficiaries are consistent with the Foundations charitable purposes
All checks going out have the name ol the Fund on them Example "The Harry and Arlene Stem
Philanthropic Fund
REMEMBER Capital gams are avoided on the transler ol appreciated stocks to set up a Philanthropic
Fund
Don't m$SS out on this opportunity lo bank your gams
For further information please call Joseph Imberman at the Foundation Office. 576-4000 tor details
on how to effect the transfer ot those appreciated securities, and of course, consult your own tax
advisor b_i
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
of the Greater Miami Jewish FederaMn
4200 Bocavne Boulevard. Marm. H. 33137 J
5764000 a
18
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is a tRr-
UMite for Jewish Community Calendar
l^ae Print or Type)
The deadline for July eventa u June 8,1964
Ofganizetion___________________________
Event
Place
Date
.Time.
_() a.m. (I p.m.
Your name
Title
Phone No..
j
Mail to
FEDERATION
Public ReUtione Dept.
S5* M* Jewish Federation
W B18cayne Boulevard
Mmi. Florida 33137 '
1
j
I
I
I
I
looking for a job?
jvs can help
Jewish Vocational Service has a
variety of positions for qualified
people.
Who are the qualified people and
what jobs are available? The
qualified people run the gamut
mid- to upper-level professionals
and executives who have specific
skills. Diverse positions include
attorneys, paralegals, accountants,
insurance underwriters, purchasing
agents, administrative assistants,
legal, insurance and/or executive
secretaries, information systems
managers, programmers, electrical,
construction and project engineers,
zoning administrators, public
relation directors, advertising and/-
or marketing managers, interior or
fashion designers, space planners,
retail executives, etc., etc., etc.
Jewish Vocational Service has
the jobs. The employers are waiting
for our response. We can help you
market yourself and utilize your
particular skills. To start the ball
rolling toward a new career, please
call Virginia Conn, Professional
Employment Specialist, at 576-
3220.
The Jewish Vocational Service is
a member of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's family of
agencies and a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.________________


C IO
""rvuvrfttiunT miaf f" W*
The neighborhood's not what
it used to be
...thanks to Project Renewal.
When Doron and Bracha arrived in
Israel, they lived in a tiny apartment in a
decaying neighborhood. Doron worked
as an unskilled laborer. The pay was
low. The hours long. The differences
between the society they came from
and modern-day Israel made it difficult
for the children to adjust in school. And
Bracha was isolated in a new country
where she could neither read nor write
the language.
Today, thanks to communities like
ours and people like you, Doron and his
family and more than 300,000 other
Israelisincluding 200,000 children
living in Israels older immigrant
neighborhoods, are finding a place
for themselves in the mainstream of
Israeli society.
As a result of a Project Renewal
training program, Doron now works as
a supervisor in a machine shop. His
family lives in a newly constructed
housing project in a rehabilitated
Renewal neighborhood. The children
are helped by special extracurricular
tutoring, social and cultural programs.
And Bracha, who has learned to read
and write Hebrew through Project
Renewal's Tehila program, is now able
to help the children with their
homework.
Project Renewal strengthens the fabric
of Israeli society.
Project Renewal renews hope.
Project Renewal restores pride.
Project Renewal links American Jewry
with the people of Israel.
Give to Project Renewal. The neighborhood depends on us.
Please send your check today
1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund/
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
576-4000
-* -fc


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