The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02873

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
freater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement.. .Special Insert
"dTewIslb IFloiridliaio
Volume 57Numbw 8 Thr Sections
\The Wau We Were
Miami, FloridaFriday, February 24,1984
,^;jFndShochtl
ByMailBflOnls
Price 50 Cents
MEMORIES: In photo above, Chief Israeli
negotiator David Kimche signs the Israeli-
Lebanon accord on May 17, 1983 in the
Lebanon Beach Hotel at Halde, Lebanon, as
Maj. Gen. Avraham Tamir looks on. Below,
chief Lebanese negotiator Antoine Fatal
affixes his signature.
U.S. Envoy to Israel
Gemayel Does
ItHe Quits
On Accord
Warning Against Abrogation............See Page 7-A
Warplanes Strike in Retaliation.........See Page 14-A
BEIRUT President
Amin Gamayel has done it.
Last Friday, he bowed to
Syrian pressure and scrap-
ped the pact with Israel
signed last May. He also
presented a new eight-point
peace proposal.
Said Gemayel on television:
"We are expecting through this
plan a new era with the Syrians.
We are ready. We hope that we
could reach best relations with
our brothers the Syrians.
Everyone here would like to reach
this new era."
GEMAYEL SAID on
television that he was at the time
not fully aware of the reaction to
his decision either in Israel or
Syria but "if I have to choose
between the (Israeli-Lebanese
troop withdrawal) agreement and
national untiy for sure I prefer I
choose national unity."
Syria had been leading the
vigorous Arab opposition to the
May 1983 accord. In an attempt
Continued on Page 18-A
At Least 50
'Times' Says U.S. Held
Meetings With Palestinians
NEW YORK A New
York Times report declares
that the United States has
been in protracted secret
negotiations with the Pal-
estine Liberation Organiza-
tion for at least nine
months.
According to the Times object
of the negotiations was to get the
PI.O to recognize Israel's right to
exist.
But only last week Secretary
Affront
of State George Shultz repeated
the long-standing American
policy supported by previous
presidential administrations not
to talk to the PLO until Israel's
right to exist was agreed upon by
the Palestinians as a precondition
to such talks.
THE NEW York Times
declares that the U.S. has been
using an intermediary John
Edwin Mroz of New York. He
conducted talks with the PLO
until June 1982 when Israel
invaded Lebanon. It was at that
point that the PLO abruptly
ended the talks.
The 35-year-old Mroz heads the
Institute for East-West Security
Studies in New York and he told
the Reagan Administration that
Continued on Page 2-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
U.S. Ambassador
Samuel Lewis said here
that he regards Jerusalem
las the capital of Israel and
knows it is an "affront" to
Csrael to have the U.S.
Embassy in Tel Aviv rather
than in Jerusalem. It
should have been moved
there in the 1950s, Lewis
said.
The U.S. envoy made his
remarks to 70 American Jewish
leaders representing the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations
at a dinner at the Jerusalem
Hilton. He explained that over
the years it had become difficult
for the U.S. to transfer its em-
bassy to Jerusalem because of
the belief that the move would
harm the U.S. ability to make
peace in the Middle East.
The situation could be resolved
eventually only through a peace
agreement that included a section
on Jerusalem Lewis said. The
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee was scheduled to hold a
hearing this week on a resolution
by Sen. Daniel Moynihan (D.
N.Y.) asking that the embassy be
moved to Jerusalem.
The U.S. has up to now refused
to recognize Israeli sovereignty
in Jerusalem which it regards as
an issue subject to negotiation.
This caused embarrassment on
many occasions when ranking
American officials have refused
to meet with Israel government
officials who have their offices in
East Jerusalem. No American
official has visited East
Jerusalem in other than a private
capacity-
LEWIS DENIED charges
made to the visiting Americans
Sen. Moynihan's Bill.. .See Page 3-A
by Deputy Premier David Levy
that the U.S. failed to consult
with Israel on its moves in
Lebanon. "We don't always do it
so well" he said referring to
consultations. "We have done it
well or better with Israel than
with any of our other friends he
added.
Responding to a question
Lewis said the U.S. plans to
"underscore" to West Germany
the significance of the deep
feelings expressed during the
visit of Chancellor Helmut Kohl
to Israel against the proposed
sale of German arms to Saudi
Arabia. He said the U.S. could
not oppose the sale because Saudi
Arabia was its main arms pur-
chaser.
Ambassador Lewis
i '


rage Y-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, February 24, 1984
^^^ ii i i i i
Affirmative Action
Barbie Collaborator
-^
Chile Urged to Extradite Rauff
On Government Pension
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith has
called on Chile's Minister of
Interior, Sergio Onofre
Jarpa. to act affirmatively
on the request of his
country's Jewish commu-
nity that Nazi war criminal
Walter Rauff be expelled
from Chile. During World
War II, some 250,000 Jews
were murdered in Europe
by the movable gas vans
invented by Rauff.
In a cablegram to the Chilean
official Abraham Foxman
ADL's associate national director
and head of its international
Affairs Division said that "world
public opinion and international
law demanded that Walter Rauff
be brought to justice for his
crimes against humanity. Now
the Jewish community of Chile
has appealed to you asking for
the expulsion of Rauff. We .
urge that you using the powers
of your office respond affirm-
atively to the request of the
Comite Representativo de Enti-
dades Judias de Chile the
representative organization of
Chilean Jewry.
Did U.S. Hold Fifty
Meetings With PLO?
Continued from Page 1-A
the United States must recognize
the PLO if the PLO is to be ex-
pected to recognize Israel.
According to Mroz a closing
point came in May 1982 when it
appeared that the PLO was
finally prepared for mutual and
simultaneous recognition but the
June invasion of Lebanon ended
it.
ACCORDING to the Times
there were upward of 50 meetings
between Mroz and Yasir Arafat
beginning in August 1981 and
ending with the invasion. Mroz
said the talks ecompassed some
400 hours.
The Times also says that in
September 1982 the date of the
Reagan "peace initiative Shultz
attempted to revive the talks
with Arafat who had by then fled
to Tunis after being knocked out
of Beirut by Israeli operations
there but Arafat refused to meet
Mroz.
Alexander Haig was secretary
of state at the time the talks
began and he is reported to have
joined President Reagan in
approving Mroz as an inter-
mediary in the talks after Arafat
suggested they be begun.
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FOXMAN ALSO cabled West
German Justk Minister Hans
Engelhard calling on his govern-
ment ot request that Chile expel
Rauf so that the Federal Republic
of Germany could bring him to
trial there. Engelhard replied
that his government "is now
investigating what measures can
be taken or solution found"
regarding Rauffs expulsion or
extradition to the Federal
Republic Foxman said.
Meanwhile Foxman disclosed
a number of other developments
in connection with Rauff:
B'nai B'rith of Chile acting
on behalf of B'nai B'rith Interna-
tional presented a letter to
Interior Minister Onofre jarpa
urging him to favorably consider
the request of the government of
Israel that Rauff be expelled.
Leaders of the Peruvian
Jewish community met in Lima
with Chilean Embassy officials to
also call for Rauffs expulsion for
his "crimes against humanity."
They told the Chilean diplomats
that the statute of limitations
does not apply to such crimes.
There has been increasing
support from the non-Jewish
community of Chile to expel
Rauff with demonstrators
outside his home calling him a
"Nazi assassin" and demanding
he be tried for war crimes.
Foxman said that because the
government forced thousands of
Chileans into exile for political
reasons many in Chile the war
criminal Walter Rauff or those
deprived of their nationality and
forced to live outside of Chile?"
Awards To
Six Writers
MEXICO CITY (JTA) -
The 1983 Fernando Jeno Awards
for literary achievements will go
to six writers and poets from
Israel the United States
Canada Argentina and Mexico
it was announced here by the
panel of judges representing the
Cultural Commission of the
Central Jewish Committee of
Mexico.
The recipients of the $500 prize
are Israeli writers Yosef Oren of
Rishon LeZion and Zeev Mili-
Kowsky of Kibbutz lion; Yehuda
Elberg a novelist from Montreal;
poet Eliezer Aronowsky for-
merly of Havana and now a
resident of Miami; Dr. Marcos
Aguinis an Argentine Jewish
writers who is a member of the
Argentine government; and Dr.
Jaime Laventman of Mexico.
They are being honored for works
in Yiddish Hebrew and Spanish.
AMSTERDAM -
(JTA) A collaborator
with Nazi war criminal
Klaus Barbie has been re-
ceiving a Dutch resistance
pension of 100,000 Guilders
(about $33,000) a year for
the past 10 years, it was
disclosed here.
The disclosure has prompted a
further investigation into the
wartime activities of Guillaume
Meertens and a decision by the
pension authority to suspend
payment pending its outcome.
Meertens who lives in Spain is
believed to have collected over
one million Guilders to date. He
may be forced to refund the
amount if it is proven that he
deliberately misled the pension
fund.
THE PENSION came to light
in the course of an examination of
Barbie's activities in Nazi-
occupied Holland during World
War II before he was transferred
by the Gestapo to Lyon France
He is now awaiting trial there for
crimes against humanity. 1}.
examination was conducted bv
Paul Brilman special prosecutxi
investigating war criminals b
Holland. m
Meertens was arrested by the
Germans in the early days of the
occupation for anti-Nazi K.
tivities. While in prison at
Scheveningen he agreed to work
for his captors. He was released
and for about a year thereafter
supplied Barbie with information
about Dutch resistance groups.
Prize to Swede
TEL AVIV |JTA l A
British-born Swedish architect
has won the first Wolf Founda-
tion Prize for architecture it was
announced here. Ralph Erskine
born in Britain in 1914 and now a
Swedish citizen won the
S100 000 prize for his funda
mental contribution to con-
temporary architecture.
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Jose Ferrer Presents A WHOLE NEW ACT
1983-84 Season:
That's American Entertainment
A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM
Book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart
Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
December 2-25 (Previews November 29, 30. December 1)
CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF
By Tennessee Williams Directed by Jose Ferrer
Featuring Lois Chiles (from the smash TV hit Dallas! and
Terence Know (From TV's St. Elsewhere)
^____________January 6-29 (Previews January 3-5)_______________
ARSENIC AND OLD LACE by Joseph Kesselring
February 10-March 4 (Previews February 7-9)
LIFE WITH FATHER By Howard Lindsay & Russel Crouse
_____________March 16-April 8 (Previews March 13-15)
A SOLDIER'S PLAY By Charles Fuller
Performed by New York City's Negro Ensemble Company
April 27-May 20 (Previews April 24-26)
Gtntrous Groups Discounts Available to Parties o!
10 or More. Sample the l.avo' of the Grove with the
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Contradictoru Policy
Study Slams U.S. on Jerusalem
WASHINGTON
"U.S. policy toward the
status of Jerusalem is
riddled with contradic-
tions," claims. *f
American Israel Public Af-
fairs Committee. "It is a
policy which from its very
inception never corre-
sponded with Jerusalem's
changing reality."
In an eye-opening study
entitled "U.S. Policy Toward
Jerusalem the Capital of Israel."
AIPAC researcher Sara M.
Averick traces the history and
examines the inconsistencies
found in Washington's present
policy.
FOR EXAMPLE, in no other
country in the world is the
American embassy located out-
side the administrative capital.
Even the American Embassy to
communist East Germany is
located in East Berlin although
the U.S. does not recognize
Berlin as the capital of the
German Democratic Republic.
Thus says AIPAC. "the
United States has one consistent
rule for the rest of the world,
including a member of the
Warsaw Pact, and another un-
justified rule for Israel, a friend
and ally."
Other inconsistencies include
the fact that Washington has.
since 1967 espoused the principle
of an "undivided" Jerusalem,
refusing to acknowledge the
reality that the city is already
unified. Moreover, the U.S.
insists that the city be both
united and yet subject to nego-
tiations implying that even west
Jerusalem could be handed over
to the Arabs.
THE STUDY also analyzes the
development of this policy,
breaking it down into three
stages. For 19 years between
1948 and 1967 Washington
refused to acknowledge the parti-
tion of the city between Israel
and Jordan choosing instead to
support "a completely imaginary
alternative" internationali-
zation.
Moynihan Bill Would Require
U.S. Recognition of Capital
WASHINGTON S.2031 is
the number of a bill introduced
into the United States Senate by
Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan
(D., N.Y.) on Oct. 31, 1983. The
bill urges "To require that the
United States Embassy in Israel
be located in the city of Jeru-
salem."
The bill urges that "it (be)
enacted by the Senate and House
of Representatives of the United
States of America in Congress
assembled" that "Notwithstand-
ing any other Act, the United
States Embassy in Israel and the
residence of the American
Ambassador to Israel shall here-
after be located in the city of
' Jerusalem."
Seventeen Democrats and
eight Republicans are co-signers
of Moynihan's Jerusalem bill.
Republicans include Sens.
Specter, Pa.; Boschwitz, Minn.;
Cohen, Maine; Hecht, Nev.;
Packwood, Ore.; D'Amato, N.Y.;
Danforth, Mo.; Humphrey, N.H.
Democrats include Sens.
Moynihan, N.Y.; Kennedy,
Mas.s.; Huddleston, Ky.;
Johnston, La.; Tsongas, Mass.;
Bentsen, Tex.; Zorinsky, Neb,;
Dodd, Conn.; Lautenberg, N.J.;
Levin, Mich.; Exon, Neb.; Long,
La.; Dixon, 111.; Hollings, S.C.;
Cranston, Calif.; Metzenbaum,
Ohio; Biden, Del.
After Jerusalem was reunited
in June 1967 until 1969 the U.S.
declared its commitment to a
united city whose status was
"subject to negotiations." Since
1969. America has designated
East Jerusalem "occupied
territory implicitly conceding
U.S. recognition of the legality of
the 1949 partition boundary
dividing the holy city.
"A change in this anomalous
and anachronistic policy is long
overdue." concludes AIPAC.
"For more than three decades,
U.S. policy has avoided the
reality that Jerusalem is. has
been and always will be the
capital of Israel."
THE STUDY reveals that
most Americans accept this
reality. Drawing upon public
opinion polls AIPAC shows that
a sizeable majority of Americans
not only supports Israeli control
over a unified Jerusalem, but also
believes that Jerusalem should be
recognized as the capital of
Israel.
The monograph was released in
anticipation of forthcoming
hearings on legislation to move
the U.S. Embassy in Israel from
Tel Aviv to Jerusalem. Thomas
A. Dine, AIPAC's executive
director observes that "senti-
ment has been building among
many members of the United
States Senate and of the House of
Representatives to end this
affront to the Jewish State and to
bring U.S. policy in line with the
reality that Jerusalem is and will
remain the capital of Israel... It
is time for the U.S. to recognize
the capital of the Jewish State as
such and move the American
Embassy in Israel to Jerusalem."
The American Israel Public
Affairs Committee is the only
American organization registered
to lobby Congress on legislation
affecting Israel. AIPAC is sup-
ported by private donations from
more than 48 000 members.
"U.S. Policy Toward Jerusa-
lem, the Capital of Israel" is the
sixth in the series of "AIPAC
Papers" analyzing various
aspects of the U.S.-Israel rela-
tionship.
The Star
'New Chapter9
Dulzin Hopes Chernenko Will
Reopen Jewish Immigration Doors
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
Jewish Agency and World
Zionist Organization Executives,
expressed the hope that the
selection of Konstantin Cher-
nenko to succeed Yuri Andropov
as head of the Soviet Communist
Party will reopen the emigration
door for Soviet Jews.
"Let's hope that perhaps a new
chapter with regard to Jews and
the possibility of Jews to leave
and come to Israel will be
written," Dulzin told the some 70
persons participating in the four-
day mission here of the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations
at a dinner for them which he
hosted at the Jerusalem Hilton.
Dulzin based his hope on the
fact that Chernenko was "close"
to the late Soviet President
Leonid Brezhnev. He noted that
during Brezhnev's regime some
260,000 Jews left the USSR, of
whom 165,000 settled in Israel.
However, whatever happens
"we will not give up the
struggle," Dulzin declared. He
said the World Presidium for
Soviet Jewry has scheduled
March 7-13 for a worldwide
mobiliization for Soviet Jewry.
Dulzin said support of Soviet
Jewry is one of the three major
items on the agenda for world
Jewry. The first is to secure the
safety and development of the
State of Israel, he said. The other
"is to keep the Jewish people
alive." He noted that no matter
what happens in Israel, the Jews
here will remain Jews but in the
diaspora no one can be certain
that their grandchildren will be
Jewish.
Dulzin said to prevent this,
education and aliya must be
stressed. He urged that more
children be sent to Israel on the
various education programs. He
announced a new program to
involve communities directly in
aliya.
Another suggestion to prevent
assimilation was made today by
Tourism Minister Avraham
Sharir when he addressed the
Presidents Conference in an open
air meeting at the Citadel of
David in the Old City. Noting
that only a small percentage of
American Jews have ever visited
Israel, Sharir said more must be
encouraged to come to
strengthen their identity with
Israel and the Jewish people. He
said the majority of people who
visit Israel "leave as friends."
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IHHJ^T UUWHJy &tt 1^0*
Israel's Anger With Gemayel Seems Entirely Justified
Israel's anger at the Gemayel govern- (
ment's scrapping of the Israel-Lebanon
accord worked out so carefully last May 17
is both justified and understandable.
It brought an instant retaliatory military
operation last Sunday, when Israeli
warplanes pounded three Lebanese villages
in attacks upon guerrilla strongholds. Two
of these atcacks were against targets east
of Beirut. The other was against the
southern Lebanese town of Damour.
Since the fatal change in the balance of
power in Lebanon and what appears to be
the imminent demise of the Gemayel
regime, it has been clear that Palestine
Liberation Organization terrorists are once
again filtering back into Lebanon to add to
the confusion in that hapless nation divided
by ancient enmities among Shiite and Suni
Muslims on the one hand and Maronite
Christians on the other.
All of this civil war has been com-
pounded in its problems by the Alawite-led
Syrian activity against Gemayel to get
him to abrogate his accord with Israel. In
this five-pronged struggle, the PLO plays
the role of sixth wheel a wheel Syria's
President Assad sent careening out of
Tripoli and rolling toward a second PLO
exile in almost as many years the first
having been Israel's destruction of the
PLO's forces in Beirut at the start of the
war.
All of these complexities apart, Israel
must now deal with the arrogance of a
situation that finds a duly-signed political
instrument between itself and another
Arab nation scrapped as a result of the
inspired warfare by a second Arab nation.
With the stark image in Israel's mind of
the absolutely unbelievable behavior of
Egypt's Hosni Mubarak in Washington
last week, which now suggests the
abrogation of the Camp David accord itself,
no wonder the Israelis sent their jets out
storming in a warning to the Lebanese:
Abrogated accord or no abrogated accord,
Lebanon cannot return to its previous
status of a staging area of terrorism
against northern Israel.
Israel Bond Function
Former Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
has a long and distinguished history of
service to Israel. During the course of his
career, he has held key military and
diplomatic posts, including Ambassador to
the United States.
Now, Mr. Rabin will help formally launch
the 1984 Israel Bonds campaign at an
International Inaugural Dinner slated for
Mar. 1 at the Fontainebleau Hotel.
The dinner will mark the beginning of the
Israel Bonds President's Club, which will
represent purchasers of $100,000 or more in
State of Israel Bonds. Attending the
gathering on Miami Beach will be Jewish
communal leaders who will converge here
from North and South America, as well as
from various European countries.
This will be a stellar opportunity for
Miamians who are in the vanguard of Israel
Bond activities to hear this distinguished
Israeli leader. Mr. Rabin, in addition to bis
many other career contributions to his
country, also played an important role in
planning many of the military operations in
which the State of Israel has been engaged
for the past 30 years. He served as Chief of
Staff in the 1967 Six-Day War and
Floridian

tXO HINDU*
UXAMKC SHOCHCT
^. i m n. i sn rate
currently occupies a leading role in Israel's
Labor Party.
For those attending, the result should be
an important wrap-up and bird's eye view
of Israel's present-day situation.
For Miamians, there is a special reason
to be present. The dinner occasion will
launch the 1984 Tribute to Rabbi Leon
Kronish, spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Sholom, who is scheduled to receive the
famed Golda Meir Leadership Award.
Because of his illness, the Award will be
presented to him at a later dinner in his
honor when he recovers. But by their
presence, Miamians will also be sending
Rabbi Kronish a message of love and hope
for his speedy return to health.
Rep. Fascell's Tragedy
We join with all of South Florida and,
indeed, the nation in extending to Rep.
Dante Fascell, his wife and their family our
heartfelt condolences on the death of their
young son in an automobile accident.
Surely, nothing can be more heartrending
than for parents to be witness to the death
of their children.
An ironic twist to this tragedy is that
Rep. Fascell had just been installed into
one of the highest seats of power that a
legislator in our national government can
be privileged to occupy when several weeks
before he was named chairman of the
House Foreign Affairs Committee.
We pray that Rep. Fascell's devotion to
the constituency he has served with such
distinction all of these decades helps him
and his family overcome their tragedy .1
We pray that the love they have so
profoundly earned from South Floridians
goes a long way toward helping them bear
their grief.
The Effort to Cosmetize Assad
Friday, February 24. 1984 21 1 ADAR 5744
Volume 57 Number 8
NOW THAT President Reag-
an has decided to move the
Marines from Beirut to naval
vessels off the shore of Lebanon,
there will be an increasing public
relations effort to show Syria as a
possible partner in the solution of
the problem that divides the
various factions of ultimate
Lebanese sovereignty.
The Rev. Jesse Jackson's
crude efforts to present President
Hafez Assad as a responsible
leader anxious to do business
with the United states if only
those darned Jews weren't in the
way as a political hurdle in a
Eresidential election year is
ardly what I have in mind. But
there are variations on the
Jackson theme, including degrees
of the same approach.
FOR ONE thing, President
Assad wants this image of
himself as an Arab leader who,
above all, can be counted on to
keep his word we have already
been hearing about Assad's
alleged reliability for some
months now. It is a convenient
way for the Administration to
rationalize the President's new
and violent reversal of his
Lebanese policy.
Already, we see the result of
the reveral. The Israeli bombings
Sunday in the Damour area were
greeted with the kind of
judgmental cable and network
television reporting that was
totally absent when the Shiites
and Christians were laying waste
%
I Leo
I
ggjadUg
to Beirut in their own struggle for
power a struggle that cable
and the networks found essen-
tially boring up until that time.
Only Israeli bullets kill.
Apparently, no one else's in
Lebanon does. Furthermore, in
the view of these journalistic
minds, the hell with the Gemayel
decision to scrap the Lebanese
accord with Israel to which the
Reagan Administration was the
godfather. The Reagan reversal
of policy must inaugurate our
newest experiment in Middle
Eastern humanitarian ism' with
Israel, of course, as scapegoat.
BUT A State Department
report submitted jointly to the
House and Senate Foreign
Relations Committee in
February, 1983 suggests that we
ought not to be so positive about
the Syrian role in Lebanon or
about Assad as a mild-mannered
Clark Kent, now that the Marines
are being instructed to turn tail.
For instance, the 1983 State
Department report, with respect
to Syrian torture, declares that
"There have been numerous
credible reports of torture being
used (in Syria), primarily during
arrest and interrogation peri-
ods commonly used methods
of torture in recent years include
beatings, whipping of prisoners
suspended in tires, beatings on
the soles of the feet, cigarette
burns, sexual molestation and
electric shocks."
Perpetrators of this govern-
ment policy are members of
Syria's Special Services." which
is a modernized version of the
Nazi Gestapo run by President
Assad's brother, Riffat Assad
DURING 1982, the report to
the Senate and the House by the
State Department, ever ready to
rationalize Arab excesses, never-
theless declares that "the Syrian
regime continued to suppress
freedom of speech, press,
association and assembly and to
limit participation in the political
system. It pursued dissident
elements, carried out cordonand-
search operations without judi-
cial safeguards large-scale
arrests, in many cases causing
persons to 'disappear.' and
continued to engage in torture
and other brutal practices."
Continues the report: "For the
third straight year, anti-regime
activity by the Muslim Brother-
Continued on Page 17-A


[Conventional Wisdom'
Gives Downfall of Arafat Too Mitch Importance
By ABBA COHEN
There is a "conventional
isdom" spouted almost
flexively by the media
,at the downfall of Yasir
xafat as PLO strongman
ill dim whatever hopes
lere might be for Arab-Is-
leli peace and for the
^solution of the Pales-
inian problem. According
this evaluation, Arafat is
,n as a "moderate"
illing to pursue the diplo-
atic course in achieving
alestinian aspirations
hile the Syrian-backed
bels are "extremists"
on violence and blood-
,ed. Keeping Arafat
[float, therefore, is in the
terests of all concerned
aelis, Palestinians and
mericans.
But deeper analysis shows a
lore clouded picture. It shows
first of all, that in the real
orld there is little difference
tween Arafat and the rebels he
;hts. Indeed, the distinction
16 frequently hears between
;,() "moderates'* and "ex-
emists" is a difference in style
in substance, in rhetoric not
policy. Extremism has been
guiding principle of both
(rafat and those who oppose
|im Both have reaffirmed their
immitment to the PLO
barter's call for "the liberation
; all of Palestine," that euphem-
tic way of saying the annihila-
1011 of Israel (and Jordan as
ell).
Both have reconsecrated them-
elves to the "armed struggle"
With PLO Chairman Yasir Arafat now ejected from
Lebanon for the second time, many in the media and in the
world of politics are giving him royal treatment and
proclaiming him as a moderate and peacemaker. Abba
Cohen thinks otherwise and sees in Arafat's possible
demise some hope for conciliation and movement on the
issue of the Palestinians Cohen is assistant director of the
Middle Eastern Affairs Department of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai B'rith.
trians in a Jerusalem square,
travelers on the Tel Aviv coastal
road, and diplomats around the
world. It brings to mind the
hundreds of bombings,
shootings, assassinations, and
hijackings that were carried out
under that "moderate" who
proclaimed, "We don't want
peace. We want war, victory.
Peace for us means the des-
truction of Israel and nothing
else," and who called upon his
comrades "to adopt the most
violent means against the U.S.
and her interests in the region."
Where does one find moderation
here?
Moreover, reason for satis-
faction over Arafat's downfall
only intensifies when we realize
how much he has hurt the Pales-
tinians themselves. Indeed, the
recent history of the Palestinians
is one replete with suffering
precisely because Yasir Arafat's
"leadership" has time and again
rejected the path of compromise
and pragmatism. In the tradition
of his predecessors who said no to
the Palestinian state provided for
in the 1947 UN partition plan,
Arafat has said no to the
which, unmasked, means the
bombing of Israeli border towns
and the murder of innocent men,
women, and children. Both
continue to embrace the Qad-
dafis, Khomeinis, and Andropovs
of the world, all in the name of
"revolutionary brotherhood," the
code words for endemic anti-
Americanism and for the export
of terror and subversion to all
parts of the globe. To the press,
Arafat spewed conciliation
yes, many were taken in by his
rhetoric but when oppor-
tunities arose, and he was called
upon to back his statements with
actions, he betrayed his own
fanaticism.
The murder of Israelis only a
few short weeks ago on a Jeru-
salem bus, brazenly claimed by
both Arafat's "moderates" and
Abu Musa's "extremists,"
starkly demonstrates once again
that even today there is no
meaningful distinction between
these bloodthirsty factions. It
reminds us that Israelis continue
to live daily under the threat of
PLO murder and violence.
IT COMPELS us to recall that
it was Arafat's PLO that mur-
dered children at Maalot,
Olympians at Munich, pedes-
\lsrael Ballet Theatre
They'll Appear in Miami Mar. 31
Numerous national organizations are booking
theater parties for the 1984 tour of the Israel
Ballet. The tour includes 43 cities.
Among them is Miami, where the Israel Ballet
will appear on Mar. 31 at the James Knight
International Center.
The 1984 tour begins at the City Center in New
York City on Mar. 5, and will include works by
Balanchine, the company's artistic director, Berta
Yampolsky, and other well-known
choreographers.
Coordinating bookings in Miami for groups and
individuals is Larry Tarnofsky. Among national
organizations that have already booked for the
43-city tour are Hadassah, the Jewish National
Fund, the American Diabetes Association, and
Adelphi University.
During its last visit to the United States, the
company helped such groups raise more than $20
million nationwide.
promises Camp David held out
and to the prospects Jordaman-
PLO cooperation might have
yielded.
He has brought his people no
closer to indeed, further away
from the realization of their
dreams. They remain homeless
and dispersed, more so now than
ever before. They continue to
languish in refugee camps, forced
by their Arab brethren to live in
squalor and wretchedness. And
all the while, their bitterness and
frustration grow.
PALESTINIAN hopes depend
on realistic, pragmatic leader-
ship, one that abandons illusory
visions and maximialist ideology.
True movement by Arafat
towards peace could have created
a new dynamic in Jerusalem and
Washington that any Israeli or
American government would
have found impossible not to
respond to. But at every oppor-
tunity for compromise, at every
chance of alleviating Palestinian
misery in some way, Yasir Arafat
has zealously clung to incoherent,
implausible, and extreme posi-
tions. He has brought the Pales-
tinians no satisfaction in the real
world, only tragedy and self-des-
truction. Why, then, do we so
mourn his decline?
And while it is therefore
unlikely that things could get
worse without Arafat, there is
nonetheless a chance that things
could get better. Thus, many
Continued on Page 11-A
Original SS Records
Give Best Account
Of Verbelen's Past
By CHARLES ALLEN, JR.
The most accurate re-
cords thus far released on
the Nazi past of Peter Jean
Verbelen come from the
original SS documents
housed at the BDC (Berlin
Document Center) now
under American-West Ger-
man control in West Berlin.
The recently declassified mate-
rials on the SD (Sicherheits-
dienst, a security intelligence
unit) officer who worked against
his fellow Belgians contain
largely W-3 and S-3 personnel
files on Verbelen, not the opera-
tional Counter Intelligence Corps
dossier of the 430 CIC Detach-
ment of the USFA (United States
Forces, Austria) which "ran"
Verbelen even after the four-
power occupation of Austria. The
CIC "precis" reports of the SS
documents at the BDC provides
the key facts.
The CIC "precis" dated Au-
gust 15, 1956 just before the
CIC discharged Verbelen from its
services states that "In 1931
SUBJECT (Verbelen, a-k-a
Alfred Schwab) completed his
high school education in Stutt-
gart, Germany." What was a
Belgian student doing at a
German gymnasium (the
equivalent of an American two-
year college)?
THE NEXT information about
the recently returned student
crops up in late 1933 when he had
already become active in fascist
organizations upon resuming
study at Loewen University of
Belgium.
The earliest descriptions of the
Army records show he was an
"extreme nationalist,"
"Flemish" and "of the Roman
Catholic faith," typical charac-
teristics of most pro-Nazis in the
Low Lands before the Nazi inva-
sions.
(Most significantly, CIC docu-
ments in the latter years that do
not cite the B DC-originated
materials describe Verbelen as
having "no religious affiliation."
One must ask why this reference
was changed during the course of
the CIC's obviously escalating
use of Verbelen.)
In 1935, a small but fanatic
band of avowed national
socialists whose specialty was
armed thuggery (and whose
composition was entirely
Catholic) was formed called the
German-Flemish Working
Community (Duitschen-Vlaam-
sche Arbeidsgemeenschap).
ITS ACRONYM, Dervlag (The
Flag) was its popular name. It
actively assisted the Nazi cause
even before the invasion. During
the German occupation, Dervlag
bacame a major collaborators
group with some 50,000 members
by 1941.
Verbelen was one of its ranking
youth leaders. Dervlag modeled
itself after the Hitler Jugend
(Hitler Youth). Its goal was "the
complete Germanization of
Flanders." Its rallying cry was:
"There is only one leader: Adolf
Hitler, no other!"
Verbelen was, according to the
BDC-derived documents in U.S.
Army intelligence files, deeply
"involved in the Flemish
Separatist (pro-German) move-
ment" and was even encouraged
"to run for the Belgian Parlia-
ment on the Separatist ticket but
refused because of his youth."
A MEMBER of the NSDAP
(Nazi Party) before the Wehr-
macht smashed into Belgium,
Continued on Page 10-A
The Israel Ballet will appear in Miami at the; James Knight International Center on Mar.
131. Local coordinator is Larry Tarnofsky.
Flemish Thugs Actively
Assisted the Nazi Cause


I
Seeks Bid from Soviets
By DAVID LANDAU
GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
has indicated in the Knes-
set that Israel favors or
at least would not oppose
French efforts toward
the establishment of a
United Nations peacekeep-
ing force in and around
Beirut to replace the multi-
national force presently
composed of American,
French and Italian troops.
Britain withdrew its small
contingent.
Shamir noted in reply to
questions that the Soviet Union
could play a positive role in the
French initiative inasmuch as
the dispatch of a UN force to
Beirut would require Soviet
approval as a member of the
Security Council.
SHAMIR ALSO said in
response to questions that Israel
is willing to consider a dialogue
with the USSR on relations
between the two countries and on
the Middle East situation in
general. His gesture toward
Moscow was apparently
prompted by the death of Yuri
Andropov and his replacement
by Krnstantin Chernenko as
Gene, al Secretary of the Com-
munist Party.
But Shamir made it clear that
No Bombs
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
residents of Kiryat Shemona, the
upper Galilee development town
once a frequent target of terrorist
rockets from Lebanon, had a rare
treat last week. The Israel
Philharmonic Orchestra gave its
first concert there, under the
baton of violinist Pinhas Zucker-
man. The IPO played works by
Bach, Handel, Vivaldi and
Beetuoven.
Israel Wouldn't Oppose UN Force in Beirut
according to Rabi
strategic importance
Middle East. But
warfare continued
overall Mideast
was blocked.
ha
in
as lo,
there
peace
\
\
A
Prime Minister Shamir
up to now there have been no
sings of any improvement in
relations between Israel and the
Soviet Union. Israel is constantly
on the look-out for possibilities of
an improvement he said.
France has been circulating a
draft resolution among the 15
members of the Security Council
calling for a UN peacekeeping
force in and around Beirut. It has
done so as the Lebanese army
appeared to have collapsed under
a new onslaught by Druze and
Shiite militias, backed by Syria
and as the U.S. prepared to with-
draw its 1 600 Marines from
Beirut airport to snipe of the
Sixth Fleet off the Lebanese
coast.
THE ANTI-GOVERNMENT
forces have seized West Beirut.
The Druze and Shiite fighters
have since linked up on the coast
road south of the city and the
situation of the Lebanese army
supporting President Gemayel is
now considered untenable.
France has asked for close
consultation among Security
Council members on the text of
their resolution with a view to
opening debate immediately. But
a major obstacle emerged in the
form of conditions set by the
USSR. The Soviet Ambassador
to the UN Richard Ovinnikov
reportedly told Security Council
President Sardar Shah Nawaz of
Pakistan that Moscow would
agree to a strong UN
peacekeeping role in Beirut if
some conditions were met.
One was the prior pullback of
U.S. naval forces off the
Lebanese coast a pledge that
they would not return to within
firing range of Lebanon and a
guarantee of non-interference in
Lebanon's internal affairs.
American and British officials
object vehemently to the Soviet
pre-conditions which they see as
"total capitulation."
ISRAELI polio-makers are
watching developments in
Lebanon with mounting concern.
A redeployment of the Israel
Defense Force in south Lebanon
has been under discussion at the
top levels of government for the
past week. It was the subject of a
Cabinet meeting but no decisions
have been taken as yet.
At issue is the nature and
extent of the redeployment. Some
ministers want the IDF to with-
draw to the Zaharani River which
lies south of its present lines
along the Awali River. Such a
move would end the difficult task
of policing the Lebanese coastal
towns of Sidon and Tyre where
the risk of casualties is greatest.
Leaders of the Labor Align-
ment opposition demand the
total withdrawal of the IDF from
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Go straight for the value.
fjrcs sub)t to change without notice and to government approval
Lebanon while rightwing
members of the coalition and
other hardliners insist that
Israeli forces remain permanently
in south Lebanon.
THE OVERRIDING con
sideration is the protection of
Galilee from renewed bombard-
ments by terrorist forces. It was
reported that Druze commanders
have promised their IDF con-
tacts that the Palestine
Liberation Organization would
not be allowed to operate freely in
Druze-controlled areas.
The Druze were said to have
acknowledged the presence of a
few PLO fighters in their ranks
but promised they would be sent
back to the Syrian-controlled
Bahamdoun-Aley area well to the
north of the Israeli border and
would not be permitted to
establish themselves any further
south.
Former Premier Yitzhak
Rabin a leader of. the Labor
Party said that he favored a
total pullback of Israeli forces
from Lebanon leaving local units
and a re-inforced United Nations
Iterim Force in Lebanon
(UN1FIL) to stand guard in the
south. He said Israel should
strive for working arrangements
with local Shiite Moslems
Christians and the UN.
RABIN, a former Chief of
Staff maintained that President
Reagan's decision to withdraw
the Marines from Beirut was a
"positive change" that marked
an end to the period of delusions
with which both the American
and Israeli governments had
regarded Lebanon. That country
Rabin's
coincide in
view
part
seemed
Jordan in Washington last
Hussein reportedly
President Reagan at' a W
House meeting that Lebanon
not the main w---
I
mill
Palestinian
priority.
According
problem
Jinsi
problem desert
Middle EastT He in3tStJ
to Rabin
government had the
IM
pulling the IDF
southerly lines in
local
made
options 4I
back to nonl
Lebanon A
pulling it out altogether 0l
security arrangements J
. He maintained that >|
partial pullback would beagrjJ
mistake because the IDF wrjd
then remain in Lebanon J
definitely
A
view
COMPLETELY opposj,!
was expressed bv forme'
Chief of Staff Gen Rafael EitJ
at a meeting of his newly.fotnjj
political movement Tsomei J
Tel Aviv. Eitan insisted thattl,|
IDF must remain permanentlvgl
occupation of South Lebanon:'!
the towns and cities of Galill
to be protected.
"It's not just a matter a'|
Kiryat Shmona Nahariya
Misgav Am he said referrugl
to towns close to the
border. "II the IDF
Lebanon Carmiel and Safadl
(towns further southl will alsoWl
threatened by Katyushas."]
According to Eitan "the _
has no one in south Lebanon L
can depend upon if we are ml
there physically." He compawl
the presence in Lebanon til
Israel's occupation of the Goitl
Heights to protect rivilkl
settlements in the valley.
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Before the Blow
Shamir Advised Gemayel Not to Quit on Treaty
Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
_ Premier Yitzhak Shamir
has warned that a unilater-
al abrogation by Lebanon
of its May 17 agreement
with Israel "would be, first
and foremost, a blow to
Lebanon's own sovereign-
ty, to its people and to their
chances of freeing them-
selves from the Syrian
grip"
Shamir who spoke at a Knes-
set dinner marking the end of the
four-day mission of the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations
said Israel will not "renounce our
signature nor our readiness to
carry out the terms of that agree-
ment bilaterally." But he
stressed that no matter what
happens "we shall now protect
our interests and ensure the
security of our northern border."
Shamir also warned that Israel
"will not tolerate any attempt at
reestablishing in Lebanon a
terrorist base of operations
against Israel or against Israelis
in southern Lebanon."
TURNING TO Egypt he said
that "apparently the Egyptian
government has decided to
sacrifice its relations with Israel
for the sake of reintegration into
the Arab fold." He was referring
to what he said Egypt had been
calling the cold peace with Israel.
Shamir called on the Egyptian
government "to go back to the
path of peace and to the spirit of
Camp David. We are ready to
resume contacts with Egypt to
discuss all pending issues to
renew the peace process and the
autonomy talks. We hope that
the U.S. government will exercise
its influence on Egypt for the
purpose of advancing these
objectives."
Discussing the Soviet Union
Shamir expressed the hope that
the election of Konstantin Cher-
nenko as the new leader of the
USSR would mean a reexamina-
tion of Soviet policy toward the
Middle East and toward Soviet
Jewry.
"THEY COULD make a sub-
stantial contribution to the
stability and peace of this vital
region of the world by stooping
the supply of vast quantities of
the most sophisticated weapons
to Israel's enemies." Shamir said.
He said the Soviet Union
should now "show greater under-
standing of Israel's nationap
aspiration and legitimate
striving."
He also urged Chernenko "to
recognize the right of Jews to
repatriation in their homeland
Eretz Yisrael and to open the
gates for their exit."
He declared that "let us
resolve tonight you the leaders
of American Jewish organi-
zations and we representing the
government of Israel to revive
the struggle on behalf of our
brethren in the Soviet Union and
to pursue it with the utmost
vigor until the Soviet authorities
will again open the gates and let
our people go."
Julius Berman chairman of
the Presidents Conference said
the purpose of the same 70-
member delegation's mission was
to demonstrate that Jews are
"one people that cannot be
divided by physical barriers or by
the actions of any tyrant."
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Jewish National Fund Strengthens Israel
Strengthen the Jewish National Fund



Page 8-A The Jewish Florfcttan / Friday, February 24,1984
Filling in Background
Mubarak Hung ToughIn Washington
tiative as the best means toward
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President
Reagan, King Hussein of
Jordan and President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt
emerged from a luncheon
meeting at the White
House with Reagan
declaring that the Middle
East conflict "must be
resolved by negotiations
involving an exchange of
territory for peace."
Jewish Leaders in Jerusalem
Say Mubarak Violated Camp David
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Conference of
Presidents of Major Amer-
ican Jewish Organizations
denounced Egyptian
President Hosni Mubarak's
statement at the White
House last week as
violating the spirit of Camp
David.
"President Mubarak's latest
public statement in Washington
blaming Israel for the continuing
turmoil in Lebanon calling on
the United States to negotiate
with the terrorist PLO and
omitting any reference to either
Camp David or the peace treaty
gives still further grounds for
fear that the peace treaty is
unravelling" the Presidents
Conference said in a formal state-
ment yesterday.
THE SOME 70 persons at-
tending the four-day Presidents
Conference learned of the
Mubarak statement and imme-
diately wanted to express their
outrage. They unanimously
approved the statement before
beginning their day-long
sessions.
"We call on President
Mubarak publicly to declare his
country's continuing commit-
ment to the Camp David frame-
work and its peace treaty with
Israel and to work in accordance
with those commitments." the
statement said.
"And we urge our own
country as a full partner in the
peace process to insist that
Egypt fulfill its treaty obliga-
tions towards Israel as the
foundation for a just and lasting
peace in the Middle East."
AT THE Defense Ministry in
Tel Aviv after the group had
been briefed privately on security
problems Defense Minister
Moshe Arens also voiced concern
about Egypt's attitude. He noted
that Israel had given up the Sinai
in return for a "piece of paper"
with a commitment for "long-
term peaceful relations."
He said Israel was not sure
that commitment was being kept.
He said that because of this
Israel now had to take into
consideration Israel's southern
border and the fact that Egypt is
undergoing large-scale new arms
buildup.
Arens noted that Egypt was
receiving almost as much
military aid as Israel from the
U.S. which it would not be
getting if it had not signed the
peace treaty. He said Israel
Agency Budget
JERUSALEM tfTAl -
The budget of the Jewish Agency
for the coming fiscal year will
total $467 million if proposals by
treasurer Akiva Levinsky are
approved by the Agency Board of
Governors meetmg here this
week. Agency chairman Leon
Dulzin gave the budget proposal
breakdown as follows: *360
million for the regular agency
budget: *48 million for Project
Renewal; and 459 million for the
smftion.
would not be concerned about the
military buildup if Egypt was
keeping its commitments under
the peace treaty.
AS FOR the northern border
Arens was pessimistic about the
future in Lebanon. He said Israel
must maintain its "security
zone" there. "By the looks of it
this is what we will be doing for
some time he said.
Earlier in Jerusalem Labor
Party chairman Shimon Peres
told the American Jewish leaders
that he was worried that
Mubarak was putting his
prestige behind the PLO. He said
PLO leader Yasir Arafat was not
a moderate but had brought
tragedy to his people and had
prevented peace.
Peres called for the beginning
of negotiations with Jordan
based on a "package of peace."
This package should include
talks with Jordan and the Pales-
tinians based on UN Security
Council Resolution 242 and 338.
He said Israel should not reject
the Reagan initiative despite its
disagreement with some of its
points. He said Egypt and Israel
should begin a new negotiations
on autonomy.
In addition. Mubarak urged
the United States to open a
dialogue with the Palestine
Liberation Organization through
Yasir Arafat and Hussein ex-
pressed his appreciation for the
three-way talks and his own
private meeting with Reagan.
A SENIOR Administration
offical who summed up the talks
later stressed however that
there had been no breakthrough.
"No decisions were taken and no
new plans were made that was
not the purpose of the meeting "
he said.
The official also dissociated
Reagan from Mubarak's call for a
U.S. dialogue with the PLO
observing that "You can't
control statements by a depart-
ing chief of state and you cer-
tainly don't endorse it by
standing there."
He reaffirmed that the U.S.
stands by Security Council
resolutions 242 and 338 as the
framework for Middle East peace
and declared "We have no in-
tention of negotiating with the
PLO."
The official said that Reagan
had assured his guests that he
will not "shy away from the
peace process during this election
year He (the President) made
clear the need for moving for-
ward." The official refused to
elaborate however on Reagan's
remark about exchanging
territory for peace.
IN HIS REMARKS to the
press after the luncheon meeting
which lasted well over an hour
Reagan said he and his guests
had "discussed in detail the
opportunities for progress in the
Middle East." He stressed his
September 1 1982 peace ini-
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progress and blamed the situa-
tion in Lebanon on "outside
forces."
Mubarak had the most to say
to reporters at the White House.
He maintained that the key to a
solution in Lebanon is "the
prompt and unconditional with-
drawal of Israeli forces" from
that country. He held Israel's
invasion of Lebanon to be "the
cause of the problem" and
warned that the partition of
Lebanon "must be prevented at
any cost." He suggested an
expanded and reenforced peace-
keeping role for the United
Nations in Lebanon. He also
insisted that the Palestinian
problem must be addressed
"without delay."
Mubarak who met with Arafat
in Cairo last December after the
PLO chief was ousted from
Lebanon by Syrian-backed
Palestinian dissidents told
Reagan 'The Palestinian people
The Aif Cc8't'C-fd
--M"1! to Cp "upport tan
understanding. There is no at
stitute for a direct dialogue with
them through their chosen rem?
sentatives. the PLO." P*
HE ^GCESTED that the
SSfC S S4 "^ Art?
whom he described as "a rwoon
sible leader who has demon
strated tremendous couraat
under the most difficult circum
stances."
Hussein said after the meeting
that he "carries back the impres
sion that Egypt and the U.S. are
willing to contribute their'fan
share in the search for peace."
The senior Administration
official described the three-way
talks as "very lively and
animated ... an airing of con-
cerns and views about the need to
renew the focus in the Middle
East." He said the purpose of the
meeting had been to discuss
where the situation in the region
as a whole and in Lebanon stands
today and what can be done to
reactivate the peace process.
The official said the three
leaders had agreed on the need to
broaden peace negotiations to
include Jordan and that Hussein
is "looking for a framework to
enter the negotiations."
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News Analysis
Andropov Death Will Change Little
Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
By DR. WILLIAM KOREY
The death of Yuri
Andropov and the sc-
ission of Konstantin
Chernenko as the top leader
of the Soviet Communist
Party is unlikely to bring
any basic change for the
immediate future in policy
toward the Soviet Jewish
community.
During the course of the past
year, it is now clear, basic
Communist Party decisions have
been largely taken by the
[wlitburo as a collective group
and it is more than likely that the
forthcoming transitional period
will also be marked by the collec-
tivity of decision-making. Each
key member of the Politburo
represents a crucial and major
interest group in Soviet society.
CAUTION IN terms of
decision-making and, especially
in terms of changes in the
existing policy line will respect to
most areas is certain to be the
prevailing made.
This flows from the collective
character of decision-making, the
predominantly gerontological
feature of the leadership, and the
fact that, in the current state of
American-Soviet sharp tensions,
no one will be inclined to seek a
hasty and significant modifica-
tion of the Party line.
Moreover, it is probable that
the entire Party leadership of the
politburo, given its awareness of
Andropov's long and terminal
illness, carefully considered and
very likely planned all possible
steps to take account of a variety
of changing circumstances. While
clashing interests and struggles
for power were undoubtedly
occurring, they were carefully
shielded from public view.
WITH REFERENCE to
Soviet Jewry, Party policy as
elaborated by the collective
leadership under Andropov and,
no doubt to be continued for the
time being, under Chemenko, the
new General Secretary, com-
prises for areas:
A veritable shut-down on
emigration but with a trickle
allowed exodus. The trickle
serves a variety of purposes. It is
a "demonstration" that the
USSR is adhering to the Helsinki
accord. It is also convenient
lever to use against refuseniks:
One of the most beautiful
resorts anywhere salutes
the glorious celebration of
the Holiday of Liberation.
Passover
Mon. April 16-Tues. April 24
Cantor Irving Rogoff
and the
Nevele Symphony Choir
conducted by
Clifford Nadel
Services Sedarim
Dr. Chaim
Israel Etrog
will offer a program of
lectures and conduct
seminars during the holiday.
mnu
ESenvUIe. New York 12428
Hotel 914 647-6000
Sec your Travel Agent
Dr. William Korey is director
of policy research of the B 'nai
B'rith International Council
and an expert on Soviet policy
and the situation of Soviet
Jews.
"be quiet, and, in due course, you
too can emigrate."
An intensifying clampdown
on the study of Hebrew and
Jewish history by "ulpanim" or
other private and informal
means. This is accompanied by
modest, largely inconsequential
gestures suggesting concessions
with respect to culture in Yid-
dish.
A serious effort to limit and
restrict, although not totally
sever, the contacts and rela-
tionship between Soviet Jews
and Jews of the West. This is
being accompanied by an effort,
unprecedented in the last several
decades, to laud in the press
persons with obviously Jewish
names who have served
"patriotically" or otherwise the
Soviet cause.
A broadening, "anti-
Zionist" media campaign with
distinctve, though at times
blurred, features of anti-Jewish
stereo-typing and bigotry. The
campaign has been institu-
tionalized, provided official
sanction, and given extensive
local casting with the creation of
the "Anti-Zionist Committee of
the Soviet Public."
TO THE extent that the of-
ficial Soviet policy toward Soviet
Jewry is largely a function of the
rlationship between the USSR
and the West, mainly the U.S.,
with the Jews held, as it were, as
hostages to that relationship, no
significant alleviation of the
Soviet Jewish plight can be
expected in the near future. No
serious experts on Soviet affairs
anticipate any immediate
thawing in the current frigidity of
the U.S.-USSR relationships.
Still, the new Soviet leader,
beyond the immediate transi-
tional stage, may seek to provide
his Administration with a more
popular base by initiating
"peace" gestures or responding
to "peace" gestures from the
West. Such gestures of responses
would evoke strong positive reac-
tions withing the Soviet public
(and elsewhere).
Under circumstances of a
renewed, even if limited, dialogue
with the West, particularly in the
area of arms (especially nuclear
arms) control, an improvement in
the condition of soviet Jewry,
most notably with respecto to
emigration, should and would not
be excluded.
IN THIS respect, Chernenko's
most recent statement on East-
West relations, which appears in
an introduction to a newly-
published translation of his
speeches and articles, is encour-
aging. He wrote that "we are in
favor of active and fruitful
dialogue with nations living
under different social systems
than ours, the United States and
Britain in particular." Chernenko
added that it was "more im-
portant than ever" to intensify
efforts for mutual understanding
with the U.S.
Of the entire 12-man top Soviet
leadership, only Chernenko, the
73-year-old former principal aide
to Leonid Brezhnev, has ex-
pressed himself publicly on the
subject of emigration. For a time,
submerged by Andropov, he re-
couped much of his powers with
the worsening illness of the
former and now enjoys eminence
as the dominant "Old Guard"
figure. Thus, his views have
considerable pertinence.
These can be gleaned from an
excerpt from Chernenko's book,
"Human Rights in Soviet
Society," published in 1981 by
Novosti:
"AS FOR emigration, the
relevant Soviet legislation and
rules are fully in accord with the
International Covenant on Civil
and Political Rights, which says,
among other things, that the
right to go abroad may be limited
in certain cases where it is neces-
sary to protect national security,
public order, public health or
morals or the rights and freedom
of others.' In some cases, the
permission to emigrate may be
postponed until the applicant's
close relatives have settled their
affairs, including material
matters.
"A decision on the application
for permission to emigrate may
be postponed in the case of
persons possessing state secrets
or those who have recently
undergone training in important
military fields. Upon the expira-
tion of the established time limit
for secrecy, the application for
emigration is reconsidered. We
have no other causes for not
allowing emigration.''
While narrow and restrictive in
its interpretation of international
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human rights and law, it none-
theless, on an overall basis,
avoids a totally negative
response to the issue of emigra-
tion rights. Even as Brezhnev
took special pride in the Helsinki
Final Act without, however,
giving any focus to its "reunion
of families" features, so, too, can
it be expected that Chernenko,
like his late protector, and unlike
Andropov, will give at least up
service to the Helsinki acord.
Indeed, in the above-mentioned
work, Chernenko makes favor-
able reference to Helsinki.
LIKE BREZHNEV, too, the
new General Secretary chose in
his "human rights" work, to
denounce anti-Semitism as a
"nationalistic aberration" which
is "alien to socialism." Brezhnev
had condemned anti-Semitism in
this manner, extremely rare for a
Party leader, at the 26th Party
Congress in February, 1981. The
condemnation had no doubt been
a response to the sharp criticism
to which the USSR had been
subjected in the area of anti-
Semitism at the Madrid Confer-
ence of Helsinki signatories.
Brezhnev may also have been
fearful about the upsurge of espe-
cially virulent anti-Jewish propa-
ganda and activity within the
USSR which could produce
unmanageable and dangerous
consequences. JTA Feature
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4


3 Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 24,1984
i
11
J
91
ii
P
c
n
o
b
Original SS Documents
They Tell Verbelen's Story Best
Continued from Page 5-A
Verbelen belonged to its AO
(Ausland Organization) com-
prised of citizens living in
countries outside of the Third
Reich.
In fact, according to a BDC-
originated document dated June
19, 1956, "SUBJ (Verbelen) was
forming a Flemish Sturmbrigade
(armed commando) when the
occupation of Belgium took
place" so as to assist the Nazi
invaders of his own homeland. In
further fact, Verbelen had
become a trained Fifth Columnist
after attending gymnasium in
Stuttgart.
His treason in behalf of the
Third Reich brought him ever-
increasing responsibilities. A CIC
telex dated February 10, 1966
noted (again from the SS records
at the BDC): "Verbelen worked
closely with the SS and SD
during the German occupation
. from 1940-1943 (Verbelen)
was a captain and recruiting
officer for the German Lange-
mark." The identification of
Verbelen as a captain is in error.
He never rose higher than a first
lieutenant.
WHEN THE Germans swept
over Belgium they found Ver-
belen busily recruiting volunteers
for what became the Belgian
legion that comprised elements of
the Viking Division of the
notorious Waffen-SS, a further
confirmation of his Fifth Column
role.
Verbelen's Nazi fanaticism can
be measured against the fact that
only the most committed Flemish
volunteers served in the Waffen-
SS, most were disillusioned by
SS savageries. But Not Verbelen
or his followers of Dervlag. They
did not flinch.
After recruiting for the
Waffen-SS. Verbelen was
promoted. "From 1943-1945.
Verbelen became a member of the
SD Hauptamt (headquarters) in
Belgium and the head of the
Frauenespionage (Women's Es-
pionage Group)" in the nation's
capital, according to the CIC
records. These records, based on
captured SS documents, then
underscore his main contri-
bution: "His main task was to
counteract the Resistance Move-
ment within Belgium."
WHAT DID Verbelen do to
"counteract" the Resistance? He
specialized in running a net of
informers and "turned" members
of the anti-Nazi underground
against their comrades. He
organized and, undoubtedly,
participated in raids or "sweeps"
on known or suspected
Resistance fighters.
According to Belgian sources,
Verbelen often participated in
wiping out villages suspected of
harboring underground mem-
bers. His name is linked to the
atrocities committed at Menseel-
Kiesegem village in 1944 when all
males over the age of 12 were de-
ported to death camps on
suspicion of hiding Allied pilots.
The standard weapon used by
the German SD and its gestapo
to break Resistance and Partisan
fighters who were captured was
torture. The SS dungeons in
Belgium used medieval and
modern devices. The Nuremberg
war crimes trials produced
evidence about the mechanical
flogger used by the SD in the
Lowlands and France.
The victim in Verbelen's
case, always a woman or a young
girl, according to the war crimes
charges sustained against him in
1947 was shackled against an
upright board. A machine was
then calibrated to the exact
number of lashes needed to kill,
and turned on while SD agents
waited casually for their victims
to "confess."
VERBELEN'S chief task"
against the Resistance neces-
sarily had to bring him into an
intimate working relationship
with another up and coming SD
officer who also used the same
SD methods, working out of the
identical SD headquarters in
Brussels as did Verbelen and
eventually while hiding from
war crimes trials that condemned
him to death as was the case with
Verbelen worked for the same
employer, the Counter Intel-
ligence Corps (CIC) of the U.S.
Army.
Verbelen's fellow SD colleague
in Belgium was none other than
Klaus Barbie, according to
evidence from both SS and U.S.
Justice Department studies of
Nazisources. To be sure, ac-
cording to the 1983 Justice De-
partment report on Barbie he
preferred to force Resistance
fighters to undergo more
primitive tortures, like the "door
treatment," as the underground
called it.This involved placing
the victim's hand in the door-jam
while the door was repeatedly
opened and shut.
Barbie's own SS personnel file,
located at the BDC. stated that
"Since May of 1940. Barbie has
been deployed abroad (Holland,
Belgium, France)" (BDC, Barbie
Shamir in Brussels Seeks
Assist to Protect Exports
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir of
Israel arrived in Brussels
for a four-day visit, during
which he met with the
Foreign Ministers of the
European Economic Com-
munity (EEC) and
members of the EEC's
governing council, accord-
ing to Israeli diplomatic
sources in Brussels.
Shamir reviewed with the 10
EEC member-states the
measures they plan to take to
protect Israeli exports to
Western Europe after Spain and
Portugal become full members of
the EEC. The meeting between
Shamir and the EEC officials
took place within the framework
of the joint EEC-Israel Com-
mission which has not met since
the summer of 1982.
THE ENTRY of Spain and
Portugal into the European
market would seriously hurt
Israeli agricultural exports to
Europe since it does not have the
free tax status which Spain and
Portugal will have with their
entry into the EEC.
Shamir also discussed the
situation in Lebanon with French
Foreign Minister Claude
Cheysson who is also the current
president of the EEC's Council.
He was Cheysson' dinner guest
at a banquet Monday night.
Last Wednesday Shamir left
for Holland where he chaired a
conference of Israeli
Ambassadors to Western Europe
and later conferred in The Hague
with Dutch Premier Rudolph
Lubbers. According to un-
confirmed reports in both
Belgium and Holland Shamir
was to meet with King Baudouin
and Queen Beatrix of Belgium.
File. September, 1944).
The Justice Department
report. "Klaus Barbie and the
U.S. Government," concluded on
the basis of Nazi evidence (P. 8,
Vol. 1) that Barbie has been
"assigned in Belgium .
probably sometime between July
1941 and May 1942" when both
Barbie and Verbelen, yong Ober-
sturm fuehrers, spent every
working hour for 10 months
crushing the Belgian Resistance
from SD Brussels headquarters
out of Section IV of the RSHA
(Reichssicherheitshauptamt), the
Reich Central Security Office,
SS.
As for Verbelen, a 1966 CIC
report stated "When Belgium
was liberated, Verbelen withdrew
with German forces, leaving his
wife and two children behind.
Unable to reach Verbelen to take
revenge on him, members of the
Resistance murdered Verbelen's
family."
Reagan, Shultz Split Over
Meaning of Gemayel Abrogation
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Reagan
Administration's attitude toward the Israel-Lebanon May
17 accord appeared to be schizophrenic this week as Presi-
dent Reagan and Secretary of State George Shultz offered
diametrically opposed views.
REAGAN, at a question-and-answer session with
reporters at a White House breakfast was asked if his
Administration would be willing to accept abrogation of
the accord if that were a condition for the survival of
President Amin Gemayel's government in Lebanon. The
President replied:
"I have to say with regard to the agreement, since we're
not a party to it, we did help and encourage the develop.
ment of it; we're not a party to it, so there's no way that
we should have a position one way or the other on whether
it is abrogated or not. That is up to the parties involved.
And, no, it would change our position that as long as
there's a chance for peace there we're going to keep
striving."
SHULTZ, at hastily called press conference at the State
Department later in the day, told reporters, "We continue
to support the May 17 agreement. Those who would
dispense with this agreement must bear responsibility to
find alternative formulas for Israeli withdrawal" from
Lebanon.
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Miami International Mall. Miami. 593-0394.
2655 LeJeune Road. Coral Gahles. 441-8880.
8784 Sunset Drive, Miami. 274-6142.
Dadeland Shopping Center. Kendall. 665-4571
13701 S.W. 88th Street. Kendale l.akes. 387-Solo.
15101 S. Dixie Highwav. Miami. 253-3705.
Cutler Ridge Mall. Cutler Riilge. 253-9827.
28875 S. Federal Highway. Homestead. 247 Ml
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Fridav. February 24.1984 /The Jewish Floridian Pre 18-A
Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
'Conventional Wisdom' Gives Decline of Arafat Too Much Importance can deal and leverage with which
Continued from Page 5-A
have observed that the downfall
L( Yasir Arafat will be ac-
companied by the disintegration
of the PLO into a disunited
hodgepodge of feuding factions,
deprived of the capacity to act
efficiently or coherently. PLO ex-
tremism will, therefore, no longer
find it so easy to block the road to
peace or to prolong Palestinian
misery, to threaten governments
or to spread terror. A PLO that is
ineffective and in disarray will
hopefully no longer be counted in
seriously as a factor in Middle
East calculations.
Furthermore, with a divided
,nd weakened PLO, those in the
Palestinian community who
realize the impact that Yasir
Arafat's leadership has had on
their lives and who wish to
abandon the errors of the past,
might now be emboldened to
come forward and take charge of
their fate.
LESS SUBJECT to PLO hit-
squads and bullying, West Bank
leaders can proclam loud and
clear that they refuse to unneces-
sarily suffer as pawns in a power
game that the Saudis and other
Arabs are playing. As for the
reluctant King Hussein, who has
repeatedly allowed the threat of
PLO subversion to block his
participation in peacemaking, he
may now finally feel encouraged
to join with these new,
enlightened Palestinian leaders in
negotiating a settlement with
Israel.
Those who fear greater Syrian
influence in PLO affairs as a
result of Arafat's decline may
find that the PLO will be so
weakened that this increased
influence will mean very little in
practical terms. Or they may find
that enhanced Syrian control
over PLO politics might even
improve the chances for accom-
modation.
Indeed, unlike Arafat who has
accomplished nothing for his
people and who therefore has
little to lose by remaining hostile
to Israel, Hafez Assad, the ruler
of a sovereign state with very real
concerns (that is, strategic,
economic, territorial), has every-
thing to lose by refusing to come
forward. Assad, in fact, is
considered by both Israel and the
U.S. as a shrewd, practical leader
with whom, unlike Arafat, they
have been able to bargain in the
past and with whom they might
be able to strike a deal in the
future.
Palestinians would finally have
an "address" from which they
they can bargain.
With Arafat there has only
been extremism and despair;
without him, there is some hope
for conciliation and movement.
POC May Face New Term
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Former Soviet Jewish Prisoner of
Conscience Grigory Goldshtein. a
physicist from Tbilisi may face a
new three to five year prison
term, according to information
obtained by the National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry (NCSJ).
Accused of taking advantage of
his position at the Central
Bureau of Statistics, he was
informed that his file was trans-
ferred to a local prosecutor. The
NCSJ reported that Goldshtein
protested the move with a de-
tailed letter to the First Secretary
of the Georgia Republic's
Communist Party.
In another development, the
NCSJ reported that Iosif Begun
the Hebrew teacher and Jewish
activist who was sentenced last
October to seven years imprison-
ment to be followed by five years
of internal exile for "anti-Soviet"
activities has been transferred to
a "corrective labor camp" in
Perm some 600 miles east of
Vladimir where he was serving
his prison sentence. No further
information is availble at this
time.
ICAP
Perhaps you've never thought of
yourself as a leader-someone
who has the power to affect the lives
of others In powerful and unforget-
table ways.
Maybe It's time that you did.
Because you have it within you to
lead the way to freedom for Jews
in Russia who want to see their
children grow up free in Israel or
America.
You have it within you to keep the
spirit of Jewish brotherhood burning
brightly wherever our people are
oppressed anywhere in the world.
And to help the people of Israel
move onward toward fulfilling the
destiny that has been the dream
of our fathers in distant lands
throughout history.
You can make such a difference to
so many people in so many ways.
It is up to you.
Lead the way.
Support the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation s
1984 Combined Jewish Appeal -
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign
We Are One.



rage iz-a i ne Jewish floridian / Friday. February 24,1984
Newsman Retires
JT As Kayston Presided Over the Turbulent Years
NEW YORK (JTA) John
Kayston, retiring executive vice
president of the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, was
presented with a plaque at the
annual JTA Board of Directors
meeting in Atlanta for his 48
years of "outstanding and
dedicated service to promoting
the dissemination of Jewish news
around the world."
Martin Fox, JTA president, in
presenting the plaque to
Kayston, praised him for his
many years of service to the JTA.
To work in one job for 48 years
is quite rare in our society
today."
OTHER COMMENTS from
Hoard members included Philips
Siomovitz. editor and publisher
of The Jewish News of Detroit
and JTA vice president. In a
letter to the Board he wrote that
Kayston "is a pioneer in Jewish
journalism who has earned every
blessing and honor that can be
accorded him."
Board member Hy Vile of
Kansas City stated: "Dedication
and sincerity such as demons-
trated by John Kayston are far,
far too rare on the public scene
Following the meeting,
Kayston expressed some
thoughts on the world he helped
to shape. He expressed his belief
that the past half century "is the
most momentous period in
Jewish history. The two most
important events during that
period which profoundly affected
Jewish life," he said, "were
Hitler's murder of six million
Jews, the Holocaust, and the
birth of the State of Israael"
THERE IS general agreement,
Kayston observed, that the JTA
played an important and vital
role during these turbulent years
in collecting and disseminating
news affecting Jewish lives
everywhere. Little is known,
however, of some behind-the-
scenes stories in which JTA was
Martin S. Fox (left), president of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, presents John Kayston, retiring JTA executive vice
president, with a plaque in recognition of 'fV* ?f J*
standing and dedicated service to promoting the dissemination
of Jewish news around the world.'
involved.
One such story, Kayston
recalled, was the deportation of
Boris Smolar,. then JTA's chief
foreign correspondent, from
Berlin in 1937. He went to Nazi
Germany in 1933 to stay for a few
days to do a series of articles on
the plight of the Jews in Ger-
many and stayed for four years.
"His stay there was fraught
with danger. Propaganda
Minister Joseph Goebbels
alluded to this when he said that
Smolar was a 'courageous man'
for daring to send out reporters
about the Nazi regime. "
Kayston also recalled that in
1945, immediately after the
Allied victory in Europe and the
liberation of the concentration
camp inmates, JTA was able to
obtain lists of survivors in
various countries under Nazi
occupation and sent them for
distribution in the United States
and other countries so that
relatives could get in touch with
the survivors.
Ther is no question, Kayston
said, "that the excellent
reporting of Smolar, JTA's chief
foreign correspondent during the
1920's and 1930s, from Europe
and the Middle East helped to a
large extent to establish JTA's
credibility with the general
media."
KAYSTON ALSO reported to
the Overseas News Agency
(ONA), founded in 1940 as a
subsidiary of the JTA. AT that
time, some of the daily
newspapers which subscribed to
the JTA news service, especially
The New York Times, felt they no
longer could use the "Jewish
Telegraphic Agency" slugline,
because the name was too
"parochial" and implied biased
news reporting.
Partly as a result of this, Jacob
Landau, founder of the JTA and
its managing editor, enlisted the
help and expertise of such
prominent journalists as Herbert
Bayard Swope and William Allen
White in establishing a general
"non-Jewish" news agency. Hy
Wishengrad. JTA editor at the
time, became editor of the ONA
and Victor Bienstock its chief
foreign correspondent.
Within a year, ONA news was
carried by more than 50 daily
American and Canadian
newspapers. Its reporters and
correspondents included out-
standing journalists and writers
such as Theodore White, Meyer
Levin, David Schoenbrun, Elie
Abel, and Gabe Pressman.
ONA'S CORRESPONDENT
in Stockholm was Willy Brandt
(later to become Chancellor of
West Germany) who used the
assumed name of Karl Frahm. He
made several undercover trips to
Nazi Germany in the early 1940s
and was the first correspondent
to report on Hitler's "final
solution" of the Jewish question,
the Nazi slaughter of European
Jewry.
"Throughout all my 48 years
with JTA," Kayston said, "JTA
had to fight for its independence.
Hardly a day passes when one or
another Jewish organization, or
some political faction in Israel,
does not want to dictate to JTA
editors how to run the agency
and what news to print and which
stories to suppress. JTA's inde-
pendence and its impartial
reporting are its most valuable
asset. If it should ever deviate
from this policy, it would lose its
effectiveness."
Ift Easy to Feel Like a Million
Without Spending a Dime
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filled with furniture. Or maybe it's
a garage filled with tools. Or a closet
filled with clothes. -
It might not be worth much to you.
but to us its worth millions. Its worth
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Christians
Flee To
Israeli-Held
Territory j
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Some
8 000 Lebanese Christians fled
across the Awali River and
passed through Israel Defense
Force checkpoints at the nor-
thern approaches to Sidon over-
night an Israeli army spokesman
said. The refugees fleeing frcin
the fighting in and around
Beirut included a number of
Lebanese soldiers who had aban-
doned their weapons and fled
from the fighting.
Bridges over the Awali River
normally closed after dark were
kept open all night to allow the
refugees from villages around
Damour and the western slopes
of the Shouf mountains to crots.
Some of the refugees told Israel
Radio that Druze and Palestinian
units had cut off Beirut from the
south.
The IDF sent an armored
patrol north of the Awali River as
far as Damour a few miles short
of the Beirut airport. The patrol
composed of tanks and armored
personnel carriers was intended
to demonstrate the IDF presence
in the area and as a signal to the
Druze and Shiites not to press
their attack along the coastal
road. But the Druze and Shiites
took no heed of the patrol.
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ISRAELI Dim
SPECIAL
Thursday, March 1 8:00 p.m.
i
1
I
I
Ariel Sharon
Stanley Rosenblatt
See Miami Attorney Stanley Rosenblatt's exclusive in-
terview with former Defense Minister, Ariel Sharon, a/>
his home in Israel. Sharon describes in graphic terms how
American blunders led to the deaths of our Marines in
Lebanon. He explains why the media treatment of the
Sabra and Chatila refugee camps in a blood libel against
the Jewish people.
Wpb*2


?r*i
Blamed
>r Worsening Mideast Situation
,VER
>N -
of State
blamed
vio-
worsening
, affirmed
the May
[el-Lebanon
security
pledged
"material
Lebanese
s circum-
emarks at an
Iconference at
nt as reports
[indicated a
I Lebanese ar-
tist Syrian-
Bhiite Moslem
Bsibility that
r3emayel may
J abrogation of
las the price of
Ion toward
iliation in
support the
It the Sec-
essed. "Those
ise with this
u- the respon-
Iternative for-
withdrawal"
lid.
tCT to the
ct as a whole
and violence have utterly failed."
he said. "There is no possibility
that groups refusing to accept
the existence of Israel will ever
achieve anything. Those who
refuse to face this reality are
helping perpetuate the explosive
flow of current events. The
absence of negotiations per-
petuates injustice and anger. We
believe it is time to move for-
ward. President Reagan's
commitment remains solid and
the American people will whole-
heartedly support progress
toward peace."
Shultz was equally vehement
in rejecting the idea of a U.S.
dialogue with the Palestine
Liberation Organization urged
last week by President Hosni
Mubarak of Egypt in remarks
following a luncheon meeting
with President Reagan and King
Hussein of Jordan at the White
House.
Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Florklian Page 13-A
Levy Says Only Israelis
Can Make Decisions
For Life in Israel
(JTA) The
arize in physics
5e presented to
[and an Oxford
their separate
ing contribu-
f experimental
physics," the
iced here.
in, of the Uni-
lia in Berkeley,
wn of TRW,
and Sir
of Oxford
bare the $100,00
Secretary Shultz
Shultz reiterated that President
Reagan's September 1 1982
peace formula based on Security
Council Resolution 242 and the
Camp David agreements "was
and remains the most hopeful
workable and feasible approach
to a solution to the Palestinian
problem. There is no other ap-
proach that will get anywhere "
Shultz said.
He added "There is no
military option. No other
mediator has recovered one inch
of Arab land" an apparent
allusion to U.S. mediation of the
1979 peace treaty between Israel
and Egypt and its mediation
through his own personal inter-
vention in May 1982 of the
Israel-Lebanon withdrawal
accord.
Shultz also made it clear that
there is no chance for Middle
East peace without Arab accept-
ance of Israel.
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"Conditions for any diagogue
between the PLO and the United
States have been very clearly
stated many times Shultz said.
"The PLO should recognize
Resolution 242 and should state
its recognition of the right of the
State of Israel to exist and under
those circumstances the U.S. will
conduct discussions with the
PLO."
SHULTZ acknowledged that
the situation in Lebanon has
deteriorated. "In Lebanon we
face a new situation brought
about by military pressures
against the legitimate govern-
ment he said. "This Syrian-
sponsored violence against the
government has presented us
with difficult choices in veiw of
the legislation and other con-
straints under which our forces
are operating.
"We are nonetheless
proceeding to provide material
support for the Lebanese armed
forces as circumstances permit to
respond to those who attack or
threaten the safety of our per-
sonnel and to redeploy our
Marine detachment on the ships.
The longer term problems in
Lebanon can only be solved by
political means."
Shultz appeared lukewarm
toward current French efforts to
persuade the Security Council to
send a United Nations force in
Beirut to replace the multi-
national force presently con-
sisting of American French and
Italian troops.
"There is activity at the UN to
agree on a UN role in Lebanon "
Shultz said. "A UN presence
would be useful throughout
Lebanon particularly for such
purposes as protecting the Pales-
tinian refugee camps. Beyond
this a significant UN role pre-
supposes a return of stability, a
balance of forces and some
measure of political accord."
JERUSALEM -
(JTA) Deputy Premier
David Levy has told
visiting American Jewish
leaders that the only people
who can make decisions for
Israel are those who live
here.
Speaking in Hebrew at a
luncheon to the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations Levy
stressed that while Israel is
constantly being criticized it has
no other choice but to pursue the
policies it is following.
He was critical of the Reagan
Administration for not keeping
Israel informed on the meetings
in Washington between
President Reagan and King
Hussein of Jordan and Egypt
President Hosni Mubarak.
LEVY TALKED about the
critical need to close the social
gap in Israel. He said while there
was an imperative need to im-
prove the economy there could
be no solution which created
large-scale unemployment.
Earlier the Presidents Con-
ference heard in separate
sessions Trade and Industry
Minister Gideon Patt and Energy
Minister Yitzhak Modai declare
that Israelis need to cut their
standard of living to improve the
economy. Patt said that while
Israel's inflation was high it was
not really 200 percent but ac-
tually 25-27 percent in dollars.
He said that it is difficult to
cut the budget because 28 per-
cent went for defense and 38
percent is allocated to servicing
the foreign debt. However. Patt
said there was a "good chance" if
the present trend of the past few
months continues that Israel
could cut its annual debt of $3-4
billion by $1 billion because of an
increase in exports.
PATT ARGUED that in the
future Israel must concentrate on
high-technology exports because
it cannot reduce its unfavorable
trade balance by exporting only
"pantyhose" and "bathing
suits." He said a meeting will be
held in May in which repre-
sentatives of major firms will be
brought here to interest them in
investing in Israel.
He said he had been told by
foreign company heads that they
see Israel as a good place to
locate their companies because of
its "political stability."
Patt stressed to the Americans
that while Israel would now be
getting all of its military and
economic aid from the U.S. as a
grant it returns all this money to
the U.S. because it makes all its
purchases there.
The Presidents Conference
delegation met with Labor Party
leader Shimon Peres and then
with Defense Minister Moshe
Arens and other Defense
Ministry officials. They visited
with President Chaim Herzog on
and wound up their visit with a
dinner at the Knesset Thursday
nigh to which was addressed by
Premier Yitzhak Shamir.
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Kge
r&ujSJSFIoriaii/Friday, February 24, 1984
jfefa Pound Lebanese
Angry Mood Seizes Israel
Congressman William Lehman (D., N. Dade) introduces his
campaign chairperson, Anne Ackerman.
Lehman Announces He'll
Run for House Seat Again
Declaring that he is
"better able to 9erve the
people of Dade County now
than ever before,"
Congressman William Leh-
man (D., N. Dade) has
formally announced his
candidacy for reelection to
the U.S. House of Repre-
sentatives from Florida's
17th District, which in-
cludes most of North and
Northeast Dade County.
Lehman has held the seat
since 1973.
"Serving in Congress is a
demanding job but it has been
tremendously satisfying for me "
the six-term Congressman said.
"I have deeply appreciated the
trust and support that my
constituents have given me over
the years and I am looking
forward to once again put my
record before the voters of the
17th District.
"It has been a privilege to
serve the people of Dade for so
long in this capacity Lehman
continued. "The seniority system
tmi tuinomki hoth
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in Congress rewards Congress-
men who serve for several terms
and I feel that I am now in a
strong position in Congress to
make a difference on major issues
that are of concern to Dade
County South Florida and the
nation."
MOST IMPORTANT of these
Lehman said is the arms buildup
and the possibility of nuclear
war. "Everything else we do is
meaningless if we don't get
nuclear weapons under control '*
said Lehman one of the original
sponsors of legislation calling for
verifiable nuclear freeze. "We
have more than enough bombs
and missiles to blow up the world
many times over and we need to
stop wasting tax dollars on the
production testing and
deployment of any additional
nuclear weapons."
Lehman is chairman of the
House Transportation Appro-
priations Subcommittee and is
credited with bringing more than
$700 million in federal funds into
Dade County for construction of
Metrorail and the downtown
people-mover as well as for
improvements in Dade's bus and
road systems. He is also a
mber of the Foreign
Derations Subcomittee which is
iponsible for funding U.S.
foreign aid programs. Lehman
has used that position to push for
strong U.S. suport for Israel.
Rep. Lehman's second major
committee is the House Select
Committee on Children Youth
and Families where he is
chairman of the Committee's
Task Force on Prevention Stra-
tegies. "Our children are our
nation's most valuable asset"
aid Lehman a former Dade
school teacher and chairman of
the Dade County School Board
"and yet the United States has
one of the highest premature
birth and infant mortality rates
in the industrialized world. We
need to put more emphasis on
preventing health problems faced
by expectant mothers and young
children so that we can avoid the
tremendous expense and personal
grief caused by the neglect of
these problems."
Lehman has been honored with
100 percent ratings from such
groups as the Children's Defense
Fund and the National Council
on Senior Citizens. He has also
received special commendations
from such diverse groups as
Bread for the World for
"disntinguished service against
hunger;" the Dade-Monroe
Chapter of the American Lung
Association for his support of
cancer prevention treatment and
research; and the Concerned
Citizens of Northeast Dade who
presented him with their first
Humanitarian Award.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
In the wake of President
Amin Gemayel's abroga-
tion of Lebanon's May 17,
1983 withdrawal and
security agreement with
Israel, the mood here is one
of anger. Interviewed on
Israel television's Arabic
program. Premier Yitzhak
Shamir warned that
abrogation of the pact
would "hurt Lebanon more
than Israel."
He reiterated that with or
without the agreement Israel
would take all necessary steps to
protect its northern borders.
As if to underscore his mood
Israeli warplanes were sent
Sunday to pound three Lebanese
villages which Israeli officials
described as guerrilla strong-
holds. Two of the villages were
situated east of Beirut. The third
was located near the southern
Lebanese town of Damour.
Reports from Beirut said that
Gemayel has signed a peace plan
worked out by Saudi Arabia
which calls for abrogation of the
May 17 agreement and for the
replacement of the multinational
force in Beirut by a United
Nations force. The eight-point
plan has been sent to Damascus
for approval by Syria which is
expected.
IN WASHINGTON,
Administration officials con-
firmed that Gemayel has signed
the new plan but according to
White House spokesman Larry
Speakes. "We have problems
with certain elements of the
plan." He would not elaborate.
Earlier Shamir repeated what
he told the Knesset that Israel
would not oppose the French
efforts for a new UN force in
Lebanon to replace the MNF. He
stressed however that the UN
would not protect Israel's nor-
thern border. Israel would require
better means for that and did not
consider a UN force equipped or
motivated to prevent the return
of Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization fighters to south
Lebanon.
According to Shamir however
a UN force could be helpful as a
buffer between the Israel Defense
Force and the Forces of Syria and
its allies now concentrated
further north.
SHAMIR SENT a stern
warning to the Druze in Lebanon
not to act counter to Israel's
interests unless they wanted to
find themselves in direct conflict
with the IDF and their Israeli
Druze brethren serving in the
IDF.
There is also concern in
government circles over reports
that a considerable number of
PLO fighters are incorporated in
the Druze forces which are
winding up their successful
offensive against the Lebanese
army.
The Druze have joined up with
Shiite Moslem militias in the
southern suburbs of Beirut.
According to some reports PLO
elements have deployed in
villages only a few kilometers
north of the IDF lines along the
Awali River in south Lebanon.
Israeli sources have reported
however that the Druze renewed
their pledge that the Pift
not be permitted to <**?
in the area and that i
fighting ceased the
would be transferred"
north to the Baha
district in the Shouf mom
In Washington Stawi
ment deputy spokesmj
Romberg said the US '
reports that PLO mju
reinfiltrated into Beirut.
aware of reports of
filtration can't confirm"!
here but the reports are J
turbing and we take the]
very seriously Romberg J
Ben-Porat Still in Cabinet
TEL AVIV (JTA) The resignation m
Cabinet of Minister Without Portfolio Mordechal
Porat took effect on Tuesday, Jan. 31. at the end'
mandatory 48-hour period since he handed his lei
resignation to Premier Yitzhak Shamir. BenPon.
said that he remains a member of the coalition]
though he has given up his Cabinet post and is askjq
Knesset for recognition as a one-man faction.
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wa
m
Less Politicization
Dulzin Pushes for Radical Changes in WZO
Washington Post has
ted Democratic presiden-
candidate Jesse Jackson
ng Jews 'Hymies' and
York City as 'Hymie-
.' Jackson says, 'I do not
any recollection of that
rk. I do not remember
\ng it.'
Institute
Inaugural
tW YORK Ivan J.
fcck. board chairman of Jacob
iman Institute for Middle
Research and Information,
ired here the Institute's
irural to be "the beginning of
Decial national educational
to provide acurate informa-
and understanding of
lism as the historic
ement of the Jewish people
elf-determination."
[he Institute," said Novick,
also be an important
irce for students, academi-
i and organizations who need
lent data on Zionism, anti-
ism and related subjects."
ByDAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Leon Dulzin, chairman
of the Jewish Agency and
World Zionist Organization
Executives, is pushing for
radical changes in the
structures of the WZO,
providing for less politi-
cization and a greater role
for Zionists who are ac-
tually intent on making
aliya.
Dulzin told reporters here this
week that the changes if realized
would be his "greatest achieve-
ment" as chairman of the organ-
ization.
HE SAID there were think
tanks in Israel Europe North
America and South America all
considering the central problems
of the Zionist structure and all
working towards solutions that
would revamp the movement as
it approaches its centenary.
Dulzin himself is serving as
chairman of all four of these think
tanks to give cohesion and
continuity to their deliberations.
He said he hoped there could be
practical results within a year-
and-half or two years well in
time for the next Zionist
congress.
He outlined four key issues:
Membership of the WZO: It
was widely agreed he said, even
by the political parties them-
selves that membership ought
not to be on the basis of party
allegiance but on a personal
basis. Anyone signing the Jeru-
salem Program ought to be able
to become a member of his or her
Zionist federation and of the
World Zionist Organization.
Realization movement:
Since the Zionist idea had by now
won the support of most of
organized Jewry it was neces-
sary to establish a realization
movement as an autonomous
entity within the broader WZO.
This would comprise people who
were realistically planning their
aliya. This movement would have
a set percentage of the power and
influence hitherto divided up
between the Zionist political
parties within the WZO.
That percentage Dulzin said
would doubtless be a matter for
negotiation. But he believed the
principle of a realization
movement with its own right to a
place in the WZO sun was widely
accepted.
Democratization: In recent
years Dulzin said elections were
often dispensed with in favor of
coalitions and backroom arrange-
ments. But this brought the
WZO into disrepute and he
sought greater popular demo-
cratization.
Minimal Mitzvot: That is
practical commitments for those
who were not contemplating aliya
but nevertheless were members
of the broader WZO and ought to
be obliged to translate this
membership into meaningful
actions. Dulzin spoke of learning
Hebrew and giving one's children
a Jewish education as two prime
examples of such minimal
mitzvot.
DULZIN EXPLAINED that
these various reforms were hard
to implement because at present
the Zionist parties held all power
in the WZO and the reforms
basically called for a diminution
of their power.
Similar ideas had been floated
the past before Zionist
in
Congresses he noted but they
had always failed. This time the
process had gotten under way in
the wake of the last Congress
and with plenty of time before
pressures began building up prior
to the next Congress. Dulzin was
hopeful therefore that this time
the process would indeed lead to
major changes.
Rosenne Guest of Honor
At National Prayer Breakfast
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Israel's Ambassador to the
United States Meir Rosenne was
guest of honor of the Third
National Prayer Breakfast in
Honor of Israel here. He was pre-
sented with a proclamation on
behalf of the "five million-plus
Bible-believing Christians" in
America, affirming the strong
bonds between the U.S. and
Israel.
The event, at the Shoreham
Hotel, was sponsored by the
Religious Roundtable, headed by
E. E. McAteer of Memphis,
Tenn. The 4,000 persons at-
tending included many delegates
to the annual convention of the
National Religious Broadcasters,
members of Congress, White
House officials, rabbis and
Christian clergymen and
representatives of major Jewish
organizations with headquarters
in Washington.
The sponsoring group, which
has honored Israel at two pre-
vious Prayer Breakfasts, claims
to be the largest assembly of
Christian leaders in the U.S.
ADDRESSING the gathering
in a hall decorated with blue and
white bunting, Israel's national
colors, and Stars of David,
Rosenne declared: "If we stand
together, it is not because there
are strategic interests that are
common to the U.S. and Israel. It
is because we fight for the same
ideals."
He paid tribute to American
soldiers who fell in Europe during
World War II "who fought
exactly the same fight as the
Jews in the Warsaw Ghetto. If
the world is free today, it's
thanks to America and those who
didn't give up. Whoever thinks
you can break our spirit or divide
America and Israel doesn't
understand anything in modern
history."
The proclamation presented to
Rosenne reaffirmed America's
commitment to Israel's security
and urged both the Executive
branch and Congress to pursue
strategic cooperation with Israel
in the interests of peace. It also
deplored anti-Semitism as incom-
patible with the Christian Gospel
and urged Middle Eastern
nations to renounce terrorism
and to embrace the legitimacy of
Israel.
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Protests Mount Against
SS 'Totenkopf Reunion
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) -
Protests are mounting
against the annual reunion
meeting of former members
of the Waffen SS
"Totenkopf" (Death's
Head) Division, planned for
Mar. 30 in the town of
Oberauld, State of Hesse.
But while various organ-
izations and trade unions are
urging the State Minister of
Interior to ban the rally on
constitutional grounds the
community of 3.500 seems less
disturbed by the prospect of SS

John L. Loeb Jr will be the
first recipient of the annual
Humanitarian Award of the
Hebrew Benevolent Society of
Charleston, S.C., the oldest
Jewish charitable society in
the U.S. Founded in 1784 in
Charleston, the Society will
cite Loeb for his achievements
and contributions to society
and the nation. Loeb was the
United States Ambassador to
Denmark from 1981 to 1983
and served as a U.S. represen-
tative to the 38th Session of
the United Nations General
Assembly.
veterans in their midst than they
are fearful of possible demons-
trations by anti-Nazi groups.
THE LOCAL authorities
members of the ruling Christian
Democratic Union (CDU). have
rented a public hall to the ex-
Nazis. Hotel and restaurant
owners are looking forward to the
influx of 50Oodd SS veterans and
their families.
They are concerned however,
that their town's image as a
tourist resort will be tarnished by
protestors. They recall in par-
ticular the thousands of people
who protested against the
meeting of a different group of
Waffen SS veterans in the town
of Bad Hersfeld last summer.
Dieter Pfalzgraf chairman of
the Oberaula Community
Council told reporters "There
are many who think that they
should protest here and make a
circus like in Bad Hersfeld. We
are not going to introduce
controls on who comes to this
place. Fortunately 100 000
people come here each year and
none of them ever resorted to
violence. We have no means to
keep anyone from coming."
ACCORDING TO "The
Volunteer" a magazine
published by HIAG the um-
brella organization of former
Waffen SS members the
"Waffen SS comrades" met in
Oberaula in 1982 and 1983 and
were very well received by the
local population.
This was borne out by the
reply of a 54-year-old resident
when a reporter reminded him
that the "Totenkopf Division
regularly served in concentration
camps during the Nazi era and
was assigned to "special
missions" against the Jewish
population in Eastern Europe.
"This does not disturb me
particularly. I do not see any
problem in their coming here,"
the man said.
The tolerant attitude toward
the SS veterans may stem in part
from Chancellor Helmut Kohl's
recent description of HIAG as
nothing more than a social club
for mutual assistance. The
members of the "Totenkopf"
Division have registered this year
as a society of people who want to
spend their vacation together in
Oberula. That may be have been
done to ward off protest
demonstrations such as occurred
in Bar Hersfeld.
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SL
J
French Nazi Collaborators
Released After 20 Years
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Three
French Nazi collaborators whose
death sentences were commuted
to life imprisonment by President
Charles de Gaulle have been
released after serving 20 year
prison terms, the Justice
Ministry confirmed.
The life sentences of Jean
Barbier, Jacques Vasseur and
Joseph Cortial were reduced to 20
years by de Gaulle's successor,
former President Georges
Pompidou. A Justice Ministry
spokesman said that "after com-
pleting their sentences there no
was possible reason to keep them
in jail."
Barbier, now 64, was sentenced
to death in 1966 for having led
the French gestapo faction in
Grenoble. He had also been a
member of the Waffen SS and
served on the Russian front
during World War II. He was
arrested in 1963 after hiding out
for 17 years under a false name.
He was released from prison last
August.
Vasseur and Cortial, also in
their middle-sixties, were origi-
nally sentenced to death for
serving as gestapo agents. As
such, they arrested Jews and
resistance fighters for deporta-
tion to death camps.
Likud Bows to Demand
For Debate on Jewish Quarter
[capacity as president of the Appeal of
nee Foundation, Rabbi Arthur
r had a private audience at the
recently with Pope John Paul II at
they had a 'warm and candid ex-
of views on such major issues as
is freedom, interreligious cooperation,
international relations and human rights.
The Foundation is an interfaith organization
working on behalf of religious throughout
the world. Rabbi Schneier is also chairman of
the World Jewish Congress, American
Section, and spiritual leader of Park East
Synagogue in Manhattan.
\o Mindlin
e Effort to Cosmetize Assad
lilined from Page 4-A
lama resulted in harsh
by government forces.
ppression of the 1982
[was particularly severe,
in the destruction of
rts of the city, the death
sink of people (personal
International
figures place this mild-
l assessment at 100,000-
the injury of many
of religion, a sup-
ght in Assad's Syria,
better. Says the report:
man government is
by members of the
| sect, a minority (10
Df the population, which
ninantly Sunni Muslim.
J hold a disproportionate
[prominent political and
positions, and Sunni
Christian, Druze and
itizens face varying de-
I discrimination The
vish community, now
approximately 3,500-4,000
persons, exists under close
governmental scrutiny and is
denied political participation."
THIS CLOSE "scrutiny"
includes the hideous case of Mrs.
Lillian Abadi, a Jewish Syrian
who was murdered in Aleppo on
Jan. 4. At the time of her murder,
she was pregnant. Murdered with
her were her two young children.
All were savagely mutilated
Mrs. Abadi's stomach, for
example, had been ripped open.
In totality, an Amnesty
International report, on the basis
of which some of the State
Department report was written,
in discussing human rights
violations in Syria, argues that
"There is overwhelming evidence
that thousands of Syrians not
involved in violence have been
harassed and wrongfully
detained without a chance of
appeal and in some cases have
been tortured; others are
reported to have 'disappeared' or
to have been the victims of ex-
|Herzog Wins High Marks
tor Cooling Lines in Play
[VIV (JTA Presi-
aim Herzog won high
Orthodox religious
his intervention with
lagement of a Haifa
kr the deletion of certain
a play that offended
t-nsihilities.
was taken sharply to
vriters, academics and
for allegedly abetting
censorship. None of the
[or other Orthodox
In who were praising
hd seen or read the play,
ksiah Affair," by British
r>t Martin Sherman. The
with the 17th Century
^iah, Shabtai Zvi.
removed from the play
sillusioned follower of
[Zvi curse God. But
Jne, in which a character
existence of God, was
left intact.
Aharon Megged, chairman of
the Israel branch of the PEN
Club, the international
association of authors and
writers, sent a telegram to
Herzog denouncing his inter-
ference and accused him of
supporting elements who seek to
restrict freedom of expression.
Herzog used the occasion of a
meeting with the foreign press
corps to reply. He said he had
intervened only after establishing
that both sides in the controversy
wanted him to. He said the
management of the theater,
which is owned by the Haifa
municipality, can now say they
did not bow to "religious black-
mail" but were simply respon-
ding to a request by the Presi-
dent to avoid polarization in the
community.
trajudicial killings carried out by
the security forces," meaning
Riffat Assad's bully-boys.
For its own obvious purposes,
the Reagan Administration only
last week still clinging to the
May, 1983 Israel-Lebanon ac-
cord, is now willing to cut
Lebanon away as significant to
Middle East peace.
THIS MEANS that the
Reagan Administration is
prepared to condemn Israel for
taking the position that the
accord is central to its own
perspective of peace in the area.
The reporting on television
already amply reflects this
reversal in policy trend in the
form of a renewed anti-Israel
bias.
What must not be forgotten in
this regard is Amnesty Inter-
national's argument that the
Syrians are of late guilty of "2S
methods of ill-treatment and
torture reported by former
detainees, including electric
shocks, burnings, whippings with
braided steel cable, sexual
violations and the forcing of
detainees to watch relatives
being tortured or sexually
assaulted."
For example, one 15-year-old
boy "had been whipped and .
his interrogator had threatened
to gouge out his eyes if he did not
reveal his father's whereabouts."
ACCORDING to Amnesty
International, all of this is carried
out in "a sound-proofed torture
chamber in Aleppo equipped with
'torture tools,' including elec-
trical apparatus, pincers,
scissors, a machine used for
sexual violation and an im-
plement for ripping out
fingernails."
Aleppo, of course, is where
Mrs. Abadi met her brutal end.
Israel has just cause for its
concern about the Syrians in
Lebanon even if the Reagan
Administration no longer shares
this concern. Israel has just cause
if only from this point of view. It
is, after all, part of what sent its
forces into Lebanon in the first
place.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) The Likud-led coalition
suffered an unexpected defeat when the Knesset voted 48-
46 in favor of an opposition motion to hold a full-scale
debate on the government's plans to expand the Jewish
quarter in Hebron.
DEPUTY PREMIER DAVID LEVY, speaking for
the government, urged the Knesset to drop the motions.
He said plans to extend the Jewish quarter into what is
presently an open air vegetable market would be carried
out without moving any of the Arab vendors against their
will. But Likud MK Dror Seigerman voted with the
opposition and former Minister-Without-Portfolio
Mordechai Ben-Porat, who has just resigned from the
Cabinet, abstained.
An angry dispute broke out, meanwhile, between
Labor Alignment dove Yossi Sarid and Geula Cohen, of
the ultra-nationalist Tehiya Party over Jewish acts of
violence against Arabs on the West Bank that have gone
unpunished.
SARID MAINTAINED that the security authorities
know who planted the bombs that maimed two Arab
mayors in 1980 but are unable to prosecute the offenders
for lack of evidence. He said evidence was lacking because
of the non-cooperation of Jewish settlers in the territory
and inadequate intelligence in the settlements.
Cohen accused Sarid of defaming the settlers. She
said she did not believe Jews were involved in the bom-
bings but added that if Jewish terrorists are found, they
should be brought to justice because they "are the enemy
of settlements."
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I


FRANZ JOSEF STRAUSS
Strauss' Trip to Syria
Dismays Bonn Gov't.
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) -
Franz Josef Strauss' unan-
nounced, unofficial trip to
Syria has dismayed the
Bonn government and
raised speculation as to the
precise intentions behind
the conservative Bavarian
leader's visit to Damascus
for talks with President
Hafez Assad.
Strauss heads the Christian
Social Union the ruling party in
Bavaria and a close ally of
Chancellor Helmut Kohl's
Christian Democratic Union
(CDU). But Kohl was reported to
have been surprised and angered
on his return from the funeral of
Yuri Andropov in Moscow, to
learn of Strauss' self-appointed
mission.
AIDES TO Strauss said he
was responding to a personal
invitation from Assad at a time
when contacts between
Damascus and the West are at an
extremely delicate stage owing to
the situation in Lebanon and the
unresolved Arab-Israeli conflict-
They refused to say whether
Strauss considered his mission to
be an attempt to mediate bet-
ween the United States and
Syria. He had not been asked to
undertake such a role.
There are also rumors that
Strauss may be trying to open
the way for weapons sales to
Syria by Bavarian based arms
manufacturers. Sources here
recall that he initiated joint
Franco-German arms sales to
Syria several years ago a deal
approved by the Bonn govern-
ment at the time because it in-
volved weapons systems jointly
produced by France and West
Germany.
But according to many ob-
servers the Bavarian leader's
venture into personal diplomacy
in the Middle East may be an
attempt to undermine the posi-
tion of Foreign Minister Hans-
Dietrich Genscher a leader of the
small Free Democratic Party
(FDP) which is the CDU's coali-
tion partner.
GENSCHER HAD served as
Foreign Minister in the Social
Democratic Party (SPD)-FPD
coalition headed by former
Chancellor Helmut Schmidt.
When the SPD was unseated by
the CDU in last year's elections.
Strauss sought to replace
Genscher as Foreign Minister
and was angered when Kohl
refused to appoint him. He has
since been pressing for a govern-
ment shuffle that would reduce
the influence of the FDP which
represents a liberal element in
Kohl's coalition.
Spokesman for the SPD op-
position said today that Strauss'
trip to Syria and his other foreign
policy activities damage West
Germany's reputation and are a
burden on relations with other
countries. The Foreign Ministry
made it clear that Strauss had,
not been assigned any mission on
the government's behalf.
Bows to Syria
Gemayel Does It
He Quits on Accord
Continued from Page 1-A
to save his tottering government
Gemayel has worked out an
eight-point peace proposal:
Implementation of the
"Security Plan." which calls for
separation of Lebanon's warring
factions. It was first proposed
last December before Druze and
Shiite militias drove the
Lebanese army from West
Beirut.
Cancellation of the accord
with Israel of May 17. 1983
which called for simultaneous
withdrawal of both Syrian and
Israeli troops from Lebanon.
A plan for security arrange-
ments in southern Lebanon.
Foreign Minister Elie Salem
declares that "Lebanon accepts
that Israel would not withdraw
from Lebanon until there are
security guarantees for its
northern border.
An agreement calling for
internal Lebanese reforms that
would be discussed at an all-
parties conference in Geneva.
Agreement with Syria to
withdraw Syrian forces, which
occupy about 60 percent of
Lebanon today and which have
been supporting the Druze and
Shiite militias against the
Gemayel government.
A declaration on simulta-
neous withdrawal of both Israeli
and Syrian forces. Each side
declares it will not withdraw uni-
laterally.
A plan to form a "Govern-
ment of National Unity" in
Lebanon, which would take into
account the shift in power, where
a Moslem majority now exists.
Salem declares that this govern-
ment would have to include
opposition leaders to Gemayel
and his regime.
Finally: there can be no
partial acceptance of the agree-
ment. All eight stipulations must
be agreed upon as a whole or it
will be all scrapped.
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* -.


Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 19-A
^
AY "YES" TO ISRAEL
at the
International Inaugural Dinner
State of Israel Bonds
YEHOSHUA TRIGOR
CONSUL GENERAL OF ISRAEL
Vebfuuviy 11, 1984
Vean T-tUend& o& lM**t\
Once again gmave uncertainty lte& In the huWie oh
the Middle Ea&t. I can pAoml&e you that l^nael wilt
nemaln 6t/wng and &tand {yOm to enbune that alt oh Its
citizens can Live, hueely and without heat.
At thu time., It become* IncAea&lngly Important jJoa.
all Jews to exptuus soltdaAlty with Unael and let the
would know that Jews In AmeAlca once again can be counted
on. I uAge you to show this support by attending the State
oh Israel Bond Inaugural Dinner, on Thursday evening, Match
the 1st, at the Fontalnebleau Hilton Hotel. The special
guest that evening will be Yitzhak Rabin, the hormer. Prime
)Klnlster oh Israel.
Remember., March 1st, Is the day to expness solldartty
with Israel, and the Jewish people. A leuxge attendance will
be a tangible and meanlnghul demonstration oh support. I
look horward to meeting you at that time.
Vouks sincerely,
Yc&o %Us+*-~ tsUj
Yitzhak Rabin
Thursday, March 1st 6 p.m
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel
For Immediate Reservation call...
531-6731


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fresTVarns Against Further
Tian Advances in Lebanon
Leli Labor Party Chairman
hon Peres told a gathering of
than 600 supporters of
that Syria will have to
the consequences" of
t troop deployment into
hem Lebanon, and warned
Israel needs no country's
Lission to defend its borders.
I was in Miami to address
18th Annual Mid-Winter
ierence of the Israel
adrut Foundation.
Labor Party leader
s that the Soviet-backed
, are more interested in
ng a formidable standing of
in Middle East affairs than
(Ctually taking over or oc-
fing Lebanon. He expressed
that such jockeying for
on doesn't lead neighboring
bt away from its peace ac-
(with Israel and that Egypt
f'remain a force for peace in
I Middle-East, not for the
smissing any suggestion
fpLO leader Yassar Arafat is
Moderate," Peres warned that
PLO is a tragedy to the
a danger to Israel and an
cle on the road to peace."
ifat is not interested in a
tiated peace. Since becoming
eader of the PLO 16 vears
he has never taken an
ii: position of peace-making
een the Arabs and ourselves.
Ihas rejected all political
jings and satisfied himself by
innocent people, old and
former Israeli Defense
ster also warned that Syria
; be contained in its advances
l south. "We do not need the
lission of Syria, nor the
ent of the Lebanese govern-
to defend ourselves, as we
capable; to keep a watching
Shimon Peres
eye on the southern part of
Lebanon, so the northern part of
Israel will no longer and not
again be endangered by terror-
istic forces."
"We do not want to become the
policeman of Lebanon, nor the
policy-maker of the Lebanese
destiny," Peres explained. "We
do not have the slightest am-
bition to gain an inch of her
territory, nor a drop of her
waters. Nor do we want to
become an influential spirit in her
policies."
"Our sole purpose," he added,
"is to stop the shelling of our
kibbutzim, our towns and
villages, which was initiated from
the southern part of Lebanon by
the PLO. We shall do what is
necessary to achieve the defense
of our country."
ii, Florida, Friday, February 24,1984
Section B
Women's Division
of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
accordance with the By-Laws of the Women's Division of the
eater Miami Jewish Federation, they require that the names of the
rent nominating committee shall be published in order to see
unimedations for nominees for office, we submit that:
Tat Feldman
ferry Weiss
liki Granoff
fue Fields
knnette Aerensen
Fran Storper
Judy Applestein
kdria Rasken
-nata Bloom
ie H elf man
indi Miot
Lmy Dean
-ydia Goldring
larlene Olin
f Uy Wolff
larilyn Kohn
larilyn K. Smith
lelene Berger
lancy Lipof f
Chairwoman
Business & Professional
Women Chairwoman
Miami Beach Chairwoman
North Dade Chairwoman
South Dade Chairwoman
Southwest Dade Chairwoman
Business & Professional
Women Member at Large
Miami Beach Member at Large
North Dade Member at Large
South Dade Member at Large
Southwest Dade Member at Large
Business & Professional
Women Alternate at Large
Miami Beach Alternate at Large
North Dade Alternate at Large
South Dade Alternate at Large
Southwest Dade Alternate at Large
Past President of Women's Division
Past President of Women's Division
Past Nominating
Committee Chairwoman
will accept recommendations mailed to them at the
Women's Division,
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Flordia
prior to March 15,1984
Anglo-Israeli Lord Tells
Story of Famous Family
By DAVID BITTNER
Jewish Floridian Staff
For three generations, the unassuming
Viscounts Samuel, British peers despite
themselves, have been ruled less by a
spirit of noblesse oblige than obliged
noblesse.
Viscount Herbert Samuel, Liberal
Party leader and ally of the British
working classes, agreed to become a peer
in 1937 only because he thought it might
give him the opportunity to work from
within to abolish the House of Lords.
Viscount Edwin Samuel found himself
embarrassed by his peerage when he
settled in pre-state Israel and became
involved in the Socialist Party and the
kibbutz movement.
VISCOUNT DAVID SAMUEL, the current
bearer of the title, is a neuro-scientist at the
Weizmann Institute who prefers to be called
"Professor" and rarely visits Parliament when he
is in London.
"In fact," said Prof. Samuel, who was in Miami
last week, "the last time I put on my robes and
took my seat in Lords, it was just to show off for
my daughter. She'd just finished her service in
the Israeli army, and I think it was the first time
in a long while that I'd seen her in a dress!"
Prof. Samuel spoke here on behalf of the
American Committee for the Weizmann Institute
at a luncheon at the Standard Club and at a
cocktail reception at the Turnberry Isle Yacht
and Racquet Club.
Prof. Samuel agreed to shed some light on the
subject of his famous grandfather, the first
Viscount Samuel, who was appointed in 1920 by
King George V as the first High Commissioner of
mandatory Palestine. He said he disagrees with
historians who believe Samuel won the ap-
pointment because imperialists in the British
Foreign Office thought a Jew could be counted on
to stand two steps to the right of the King.
"NO, I 'ttBSPT' think they had anything that
devious in mind," said Prof. Samuel, "nor do 1
think my grandfather was that kind of character.
I'm not saying he didn't make mistakes, but
Prof. David Samuel
these were based on a failure to gauge the fier-
ceness of the Arab opposition. For instance, he
appointed an extremist as Mufti of Jerusalem,
but only because he thought he would be able to
persuade him once in office to conciliate with the
Jews. And he endorsed the Peel Commission,
which proposed partitioning Palestine along lines
favorable to the Arabs, but in 1939 after he had
left office he fought the White Paper, and in 1948
he strongly backed the creation of Israel.
"It meant a great deal to my grandfather to be
the first Jew in 2,000 years to rule the land of
Israel. He was enormously touched by the crowds
Continued on Page 2-B
Arthur Goldberg Recalls
Career, Jewish Involvement
By DAVID BITTNER
Jewish Floridian Staff
Arthur Goldberg, labor lawyer, jurist,
diplomat, looked back on a long career of
public service and Jewish involvement
during an exclusive interview with the
Jewish Floridian this week. Goldberg
was in Miami to join New York Mayor
Edward Koch and Israeli Labor Party
leader Shimon Peres in addressing the
national Israel Histadrut Conference.
Goldberg recalled his earliest service
of mutual Jewish and American interests
came during World War II, when he
served as head of the labor division of the
U.S. Office of Strategic Services.
Goldberg used the post to establish
intricate clandestine operations with
antifascist Europeans behind Nazi
lines.
"I SUSPECTED THERE was a large amount
of anti-Hitler sentiment in Europe," said
Goldberg, "particularly among German ex-
patriates and prisoners of war, and that some of
these could be relied upon as non-professional
spies for the U.S.
"Hitler accommodated us in the task. German
Social Democrats had 'politically unreliable'
stamped on their papers."
According to Goldberg, resistance fighters in
France who formed a network to keep art
treasures out of the hands of the Nazis were "his
boys," also.
In 1961 Goldberg came out of private labor law
practice to become President Kennedy's
Secretary of Labor. In arbitrating a wide range of
labor-management disputes, Goldberg, the first
Jewish president of the American Bible Society,
Arthur Goldberg
said he took inspiration from the story of Exodus.
"This was the first general strike in history,"
said Goldberg. "It was a great labor dispute. The
Jews had bad working conditions. Moses was the
first great union leader."
In 1962 Goldberg began his tenure on the
Supreme Court by refusing to take the oath of
Continued on Page 6-B
J


-SJXyT!
TSS-f^K;
r.-H-iajS^WeKTrf
euiuoi; i-*, i&6t
Anglo-Israeli Lord Tells
Story of Famous Family
Bar-Ilan Founders Honored at Gala
Ten local families will be Foundation has been des'
honored as Presidential Founders preserve the wort., <.~1T*edto
Continued from Page IB
who gathered to acclaim him when he took his
first stroll from British headquarters to worship
at the Great Synagogue."
According to Prof. Samuel, when his grand-
father accepted his title, he chose to retain his
own last name bucause it was Hebrew and chose a
new name with a Jewish association Mt.
Carmel, where the Samuel family had bought land
for the JNF. "Thus he became Viscount Samuel
of Mt. Carmel." said Prof. Samuel. "He could
have called himself the Viscount of Jerusalem,
but it would have sounded pretentions."
ASKED TO COMPARE his grandfather with
Benjamin Disraeli, Prof Samuel rose happily to
the point.
"My grandfather had three reasons for not
admiring Disraeli." he said. "They were that
Disraeli was an arch-conservative, a debauchee.
and. of course, an apostate. I might agree that my
grandfather was the Jew Disraeli would have
liked to be, but not so much because Disraeli
would have regretted having to convert to enter
politics. Disraeli had mystical notions about
Christianity and was sincere about it. I think the
reason Disraeli would have envied my grand-
father is that whereas Disraeli had to push his
way into society, my grandfather was able to
move with great ease in the highest circles."
His own experience in British social life has
been unmarked by any problems, said Prof.
Samuel, recalling especially his days at Oxford
and Cambridge. "The anti-Semitism of earlier
days no longer seemed to be present when I
became a student there in 1939," he said. Prof.
Samuel added that life at Oxford was very much
the way it is depicted in Brideshead Revisited,
Evelyn Waugh's famous 1944 novel about the
decline of an upper-class Anglo-Catholic family.
"ALL ABOUT YOU at Oxford, you saw the
effete young men of the aristocracy," he said.
"You also saw that the days of the landed gentry
were coming to an end."
Interestingly, Prof. Samuel believes it may
have been his own family that provided the in-
spiration for another popular novel of the 1940s
about an upper-class Anglo-Jewish family C.P.
Snow's Conscience of the Rich. "I wondered as I
read the book if Snow's March family were really
the Samuels." he said. "Actually I think they
may have been a composite of us and our cousins,
the Swaythlings and the Montagus. I didn't like
the book because of its portrayal of Jews as
playing a pushy' role in English economic life."
Prof. Samuel this year won fame for his
discovery of substances in egg yolk that may be
used in the treatment of memory impairment
caused by Alzheimer's Disease. In the past he has
been involved in researching the treatment of
mental disorders such as depression and mania
and neurological ailments like Parkinson's
disease.
by the Florida Friends of Bar
Han University at their annual
Dinner Dance gala to be held
March 4 at 6:30 p.m. at the
Sheraton Bal Harbour Hotel,
according to E. Peter Goldring.
Florida Friends President.
Dr. Emanuel Rackman,
President of Bar-Han. will
present special awards to the
Presidential Founders who are
Philip and Sarah Belz, Shimon
and Lucy Deitch, Leonard and
Beatrice Diener, David Fleeman,
and Morris and Sarah Friedman.
Also Seymour and Shirley
Friend, Peter and Lydia
Goldring, Jerrold and Jane
Goodman, the Family Rohr of
Bogota, and Felix and Jeanette
Stark.
A special feature of the dinner
program will be the establish-
ment of the Isaac Bashevis
Singer Foundation at Bar-Ilan
University, as well as a special
celebration honoring the 80th
birthday of the Noble Laureate,
who will be present at the
festivities.
The Isaac Bashevis Singer
iv.
preserve the works of thf
Yiddish and English0Lfe
will sponsor academic Z*
create a Yiddish aw3^
writing and will provide^,6*
ships to graduate sturW *
Yiddish studies at the
sity.
President of the
Board of Overseers /ffg
Ban University is Jane e<>
Honorary Dinner Chairm^
Yehoshua Trigor ConS*1 "
of Israel for the St^K
National Chairman of the Yu
dish Chair is Shimon Deitch *
Hon. Norman Ciment fn.
Mayor of Miami Bead!' X
ving as Dinner Chairman. 2
Co-chairmen are Lvdia GoldZ
and Philip Warren.' Uoldnj<
GalilAMIT Women
wmIiWomenGalil ChP
^.11 hold a meeting March 5*
12:30 p.m. at Young lsr^
Synagogue at which there wfflk
a Give Away Auction."
.M.fcnthe ch*Pter wilihoM
a MoesChittim-card party,
12.30 p.m. at Young \sttt
synagogue.
Wanted:
Executive Director
North Miami Beach established Traditional
Conservative Synagogue seeking Executive
Director with synagogue experience. Forward
resume to Howard Ullman, 115 Northwest
167th Street, Miami, Florida 33169.
CD'S COMING DUE?
CONSIDER
TAX
0Z# FREE
U monthlyi
INCOME
A member of the Sears Financial Network
DEAN WITTER
Worth asking about.
MEL DAUM SR. VICE PRES.
1035 Kane Concourse Bay Harbour
DADE BROWARD
Raie subject to cnange 467-6230
Art Historian Speaks
Micky Teicher, an art historian
with special expertise in Jewish.
Eskimo and African art and the
first person to earn a masters
degree in the new Jewish Studies
piogram at Barry University,
will be guest speaker at Temple
Beth Sholom's next "Coffee,
Culture and Conversation"
program Sunday morning at 10.
Miami Boat Show Opens
The 43rd annual Miami
International Boat Show opens
Feb. 24 at the Miami Convention
Center and will feature $87
million worth of boats, engines
and marine accessories displayed
by 700 international and national
exhibitors.
TING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's &123s
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
ABC s& 123s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee'
are tasty
pasta alphabet
letters and
numbers covered
with a nch tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it. getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
israelie Safe Mfg. Co.
of
Tel Aviv Israel
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ine Schwartz will be the
ree at Temple Sinai of
h Dade's annual Com-
d Jewish Appeal Cam-
n. The campaign will
with a brunch March 11
synagogue at 9:15 cm.
will be the third annual
percent solicitation cam-
n within Temple Sinai.
ithe
Temple Emanu-El
Clubs Plan Events
Temple Emanu-El's annual
"Ask the Rabbi" Men's Club
Breakfast will be held Sunday at
9:30 a.m. at the temple. Dr.
Irving Lehrman, Temple Emanu-
El rabbi, will answer questions on
topics of general and Jewish
interest at the breakfast.
At a meeting Feb. 29 at 2 p.m.
of the temple's Forty-Niners
Club, Dr. Yehuda Shamir,
professor of Judaic Studies at the
University of Miami and Florida
international University, will
speak on "Different Faces of
Alienation in Modern Jewish
Short Stories."
Diabetes Ball
The Diabetes Research
Institute Foundation's "Love
and Hope Ball" will take place
Feb. 25 in honor of the organ-
ization's tenth anniversary. Life
Chairman of the Ball is Mrs.
Harry (Sonja) Zuckerman, and
honorary chairmen are Mr. and
Mrs. Stephen Muss. Mr. and
Mrs. Leon Simkins are also
chairmen, and Mrs. and Mrs.
Jerry Rothbart are co-chairmen.
Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Dade South ORT Luncheon
he Dade South Region of
."s annual "Love and
ghter Luncheon" will be held
27 at 11:30 a.m. at the
Ire Isle Club in Coconut
ye. Co-chairmen of the event
are Norma Goldstein, Barbara
Grossman, and Susan Kurzban.
Dade South Region President is
Loisbeth Emanuel, and Chair-
man of the Executive Committee
is Laurel Shapiro.
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a
Dr. Edmund Sonnenblick (third from left),
occupier of the Sidney L. and Miriam K.
Olson professorial chair in cardiology at the
Albert Einstein College of Medicine of
Yeshiva University, was introduced to
members of Miami's medical community at a
recent brunch in his honor at Westview
Country Club, hosted by Mr. and Mrs.
Olson. From left to right: Dr. Philip Samet,
Dr. Gordon Miller, Dr. Sonnenblick, Mr.
Olson, Dr. Philip Frost and Dr. Carlos
Dominguez.
Amendment 1 Debate
A debate on Amendment 1,
also known as Proposition 1 or
the Tax Cut Referendum, will be
sponsored Feb. 29 at 10 a.m. at
Florida International University
by the American Jewish
Congress and FIU Hillel.
Mike Block, co-author of the
amendment, will speak on its
behalf, and the opposing position
will be taken by Ron Book, vice
president of Florida's Future,
Inc., a non-profit organization he
and Gov. Bob Graham founded
to fight the amendment.
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Philip & Sarah Belz
Shimon & Lucy Deitch
Leonard & Beatrice Diener
David Fleeman
Morris & Sarah Friedman
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Peter & Lydia Goldring
Jerrold & Jane Goodman
Sam & Charlotte Rohr
Felix & Jeanette Stark
For Reservations and Information: Tel. 6 73-4275
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a- r vu^
Community Corner
"Bloomers," the story of a mother and daughter set against
the background of a lower-class Jewish retirement home in
Miami Beach, will be aired Feb. 28 at 10:30 p.m. on WPBT
Channel2.
Temple Samu-El has announced that enrollment for its Early
Childhood Education Program for the 1983-84 school year is now
open.
LDy Meier, author of The Auschwitz Album, will address the
congregation of Temple Samu-El Feb. 24 at Sabbath eve ser-
vices, setting the theme for Legacy Week-end. An Oneg Shabbat
will be held in her honor following services.
Biscayne American ORT will hold its next meeting March 1 at
noon at the American Savings and Loan Bank, Lincoln and
Alton Roads.
Temple Beth Am will host Al Vorspan, vice president of the
Union of American Hebrew Congregations, March 1 at 8 p.m. as
pert of the South Dade Midrasha Lecture Seies. Mr. Vorspan
will speak on "Jews and the '84 Election."
Rho Pi Phi International Pharmacy Fraternity will hold its
Third Seminar presentation of the year at the Home Savings
and Loan Building in Hollywood March 4 at 8 a.m.
Michael T. Solomon, son of Beatrice Solomon of Miami, has
been promoted in the U.S. Army to the rank of captain. Solomon
is at Fort Riley, Kan., with the 121st Signal Battalion.
Army Private Lance M. Fauer, son of Lenny N. and MaxJne J.
Faner of North Miami Beach, has completed training as an
Army military police specialist under the one station unit
training program at Fort McClellan, Ala.
Hannah Kahn will read from her just published collection of
poetry called "Time, Wait," at a poetry evening Feb. 24 at 7:30
p.m. at the Coral Gables Branch Library sponsored by Books
and Books and the Friends of the Miami-Dade Public Library.
State Representative Barry Katun, chairman of the tax and
finance committee of the Florida House of Representatives, will
speak at the Kiwanis Club Feb. 23 at noon at the Roney Plaza
Pub restaurant.
Sharon Talk Aired
An interview with Ariel Sharon
conducted in December by
Stanley Rosenblatt will be aired
March 1 at 8 p.m. on WPBT-
Channel 2's "Israeli Diary." In
the half-hour segment Sharon
talks about the 1983 Palestinian
refugee massacre, the PLO and
Syrian strongholds in Lebanon,
and the American military in-
volvement in Lebanon.
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Seminary Presents
n, Gershon D. Cohen,
Chancellor of the Jewish Theo-
S Seminary of America, wdl
ff keynote speaker at the
Seminary's Florida Awards
Sesentation and Dinner-Dance
be held March 4 at Temple
Emanu-El.
nr Cohen will present the
Seminary Awards to the guests
of honor at the dinner. Receiving
the National Community Service
Award will be David and Sylvia
Braun of Beth David Congre-
gation; Hal Kaye, vice president,
Temple Emanu-El; and Haim
Weiner of Beth Torah Congre-
gation and Temple Emanu-El.
Rabbi Ralph Simon, spiritual
head of Congregation Rodfei
IZedek, Chicago, will receive the
Rabbi Max Arzt Distinguished
I Rabbinic Service Award, and
Isaby Behar of Beth Moshe
[congregation will be the
[Seminary's first recipient of its
|New Generation Ward.
I The SEminary will make five
lother award presentations March
15 at the Eden Roc Hotel when the
Jewish Educators Assembly
Awards, Degrees
Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Pave 6-B
Barry Ross, founding presi-
dent of Brandeis Academy,
ormerly the Jewish Junior
igh School of South Florida,
ill be honored March 8 at
''alusa Country Club at the
cademy's second annual
cholarship Dinner. Mr. Ross
as been involved in many
ommunity activities, most
ecently as a member of the
"oard of Directors of the
4iami Jewish Federation and
n the Executive Committee
f the Central Agency for
ewish Education.
THE SALMON THAfS SO
GOOD ITS WRAPPED IN
GOLD!
IN THE
SEAFOOD
TREASURE CHEST
SWEEPSTAKES
Here s your chance to win your
self a fabulous prize A Seafood
Treasure Chest filled with a
bounteous selection of our
finest premium canned salmon
500 WINNERS will be selected
lust send us a label (or far.
simile) from a can of our sal-
mon or any other product from
the fine family of premium
brands of Wtiitney-Fidalgo Sea
foods Inc Enclose together
with your name and address
and that of your grocer's, to
Seafood Treasure Chest Sweep-
stakes, Box 568. Anacortes.
Washington 98221
Enter as often as you wish
Ltmit one prize per family Void
where prohibited by law Entries
must be postmarked by May I.
1984 Drawings will be made on
May 16.1984 All winners will be
notified by mart_
C 1*3 wmw, Fk|(o St.fcmh Ik
Conservative Rabbis Lecture
In Southeast Region Series
Dr. Gershon D. Cohen
takes place. Receiving the
honorary degree of Doctor of
Pedagogy will be Walter
Ackerman, Shane Family
Professor of Education at Ben
Gurion University of the Negev;
and Louis Newman, recently
retired director of the Bureau of
Jewish Education in Boston.
Also Elliot Schwartz, execu-
tive director of the Bureau of
Jewish Education in Rhode
Island; Irving H. Skolnick,
director of Curriculum Develop-
ment and Testing for the Board
of Jewish Education of Metro-
politan Chicago; and Abraham
A. Spack of Pale wood. N.J., an
educator and administrator.
Harriet Green of Coral Gables,
National Na'amat Vice Presi-
dent of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat, recently attended a
meeting of the organization's
national leaders in New York
City.
New Orleans Symphony
The New Orleans Philharmonic
Symphony Orchestra will per-
form on March 4 at the Miami
Beach Theater of the Performing
Arts, as part of the Great Artists
Series sponsored by Temple Beth
Sholom. The orchestra's music
director, Philippe Entremont,
will conduct, as the orchestra
plays pieces by Brahams, Mozart
and Tchaikovsky.
The second annual Outreach
Program of the Conservative
Movement will be highlighted by
eighteen lectures throughout the
Southeast Region of the United
Synagogue of America.
The program, which is
sponsored by the Southeast
Region of the United Synagogue,
the Southeast Region Rabbinical
Assembly, and the Jewish Theo-
logical Seminary, will include the
following lecturers: Rabbi David
Auerbach, Beth David
Congregation, President,
Southeast Region; Rabbi
Benjamin Z. Kreitman, Execu-
tive Vice-President, United
Synagogue; and Dr. Neil
Gillman, Associate Provost, the
Jewish Theological Seminary.
Also Rabbi Jerome Epstein,
Director of Regional Activities,
United Synagogue; Gershon D.
Cohen, Chancellor, the Jewish
Theological Seminary; Dr. Mayer
Rabinowitz, Dean, Graduate
School of the Jewish Theological
Seminary; Dr. Morton Siegel,
Director, Dept. of Education,
United Synagogue; Dr. Irving
Lehrman, Temple Emanu-El;
Rabbi Yaakov G. Rosenberg,
Vice Chancellor, the Jewish
Theological Seminary; and Rabbi
Paul Freedman, Director, Dept.
of Youth Activities, United
Synagogue.
The development of the lecture
series was initiated by Harold
Wishna, Executive Director,
Southeast Region, United
Synagogue; and Franklin D.
Kreutzer, President, Southeast
Region, United Synagogue.
Represented on the program
committee are Rabbi Auerbach
and Robert Novack of the
Seminary's Miami Office.
YIVO Plans Events
Dr. Berl Frymer will be guest
speaker Feb. 29 when YIVO
Committee meets at Temple Beth
Sholom at 1:15 p.m. Moshe
Buryn will give a special concert
with Mimi Retskin at the piano.
March 7 at Temple Beth
Sholom as part of the YIVO
series, Dinah Halpern wQl give a
recital with excerpts from
modern Yiddish literature.
Birthday Luncheon
Rose Shapiro, past president of
Temple Zamora Sisterhood, will
host a luncheon in honor of her
birthday Feb. 29 at noon at
Temple Zamora.
Does your cracker go to pieces
when it meets cream cheese?
It's easy to imagine spreading
delicious cream cheese on something
besides a bagel.
But it's a lot harder to do.
Croissants crumble. Chips chip.
And it's terrible to see what hard
cream cheese can do to an
innocent piece of toast. Just terrible
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very easy to spread.
Even on something as delicate as
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1799 Clinton, towa 52734.
1M300 2t2707


M. Okt; D-D
ine Jewish Mondian/Friday, February 24,1984
Arthur Goldberg Recalls
Career, Jewish Involvement
Folksinger TraversPei
At Freedom Rally pl
Continued from Page IB
office on the Christian Court Bible that Justices
since the days of Thomas Marshall have used.
"Brandeis, Cardozo and Frankfurter did," he
said, "but I used my own Hebrew Bible."
HE ADDED THAT he objected to filling the
Court's "Jewish seat" and said President
Kennedy had to talk him into taking Felix Frank-
furter's place.
"Why just one Jew?" said Goldberg. "In
Hoover's day there were two Jews on the Court.
Now, that appeals to me. The same goes for
having one Catholic, one black, one woman. The
Court should be truly representative of America,
not engage in tokenism."
Goldberg, who established a reputation on the
Court for advocacy of the rights of the accused,
said the assassinations of the 1960s never
changed his views on criminal rights this
despite the fact that he himself was on Sirhan
Sirhan's list of intended victims.
"The FBI showed me Sirhan's dairy," said
Goldberg. "It said, 'Meet Goldberg at airport at 4
a.m. Kill him. Then kill Kennedy.' So it came
close to home. And Sirhan's guilt in Kennedy's
assassination was as plain as your TV screen. But
I'm glad Sirhan got the full benefits of our legal
system, including the right to legal represen-
tation."
Goldberg authored the 1964 Escobedo decision,
in which the Court ruled that every accused
prisoner has the constitutional right to be advised
by a lawyer during police interrogation.
GOLDBERG SAID HIS views on society as
the breeding ground of criminals haven't
changed.
"Discrimination and poverty make criminals,"
he said. "What we need to do is make the climb
up the social ladder easier. Fill up the jails with
the poor and the desperate and you just make
hardened criminals."
Goldberg called Florida one of the worst of-
fenders among states when it comes to "filling up
cell blocks" with the victims of social injustice.
In 1965 Goldberg resigned from the Supreme
Court to become the U.S. Ambassador to the
United Nations. The high point of his career at
the UN came during the 1967 Arab-Israeli war,
when he argued the American position for a
ceasefire without previous Israeli withdrawal.
Goldberg said that when he resigned the
ambassadorship because he opposed the war in
Vietnam, President Johnson never challenged
him to explain his support of Israel but not the
President's Vietnam policy.
"Johnson understood they were separate situa-
tions, or at least my view that Israel, unlike
Vietnam, was a stable, democratic country that
didn't have to be bolstered by the United States,"
said Goldberg.
GOLDBERG SAID HE has no regrets about
leaving the Court and the UN for a private life of
teaching, writing and occasional diplomatic
pointment.
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"Once you've left, you've left," he said.
"There's no going back." Besides, Goldberg isn't
sure he could have acted as UN Ambassador
during Henry Kissinger's pontificate as Secretary
of State.
"I've never been apologetic about being a Jew
and identifying with Jewish causes," he said.
"Some other Jews don't feel that way. I would
have locked horns completely with Henry
Kissinger during the Yom Kippur War. All along
he was more concerned about Realpolitik than
Israel. It was Nixon who made the decision to fly
Israel the materiel it needed then, not Kissinger."
Goldberg, who authored much legislation to
protect the rights of naturalized citizens, says he
hopes that when the Constitution is amended
someday to allow the foreign-born to become
President, it won't be for the benefit of the former
Secretary of State.
Still, Goldberg said he is moved by a "sense of
fairness" in evaluating world leaders, and twenty
years after he criticized The Deputy for at-
tacking Pope Pius XII's record during the
Holocaust, he sticks to the position he took then.
"IT WASN'T BECAUSE of Vatican II or for
the sake of Pope John XXIII that I said what I
did then about the Church," said Goldberg. I
don't say Pius was a courageous man. But I
thought the play was overdone and made some
charges that the historical evidence doesn't
support. And how can we accuse the Pope of
compliance with the Nazis when FDR himself
didn't open the doors of America to the Jews?"
If Goldberg would criticize any Pope, it is John
Paul II, whom he accusses of failing to speak out
against Soviet anti-Semitism in the interest of
protecting Catholic interests in Eastern Europe.
"I told him that to his face in front of an
American Cardinal," said Goldberg. I don't
believe in anything besides directness. The Pope
didn't say anything. He just said to the Cardinal,
'We'll have to talk this over later.' "
It was during his last official mission for the
United States that Goldberg got his chance to
plead the plight of^toviet Jewry to the Russians,
themselves. In 19^Goldberg headed the U.S.
delegation to the Belgrade Conference on the
Hplsinki Pact.
When Goldberg broached the subject ef human
rights to the Soviets, he said, they accused him of
trying to meddle on behalf of the U nited*>t ates in
internal Soviet affairs and even brUhght up
"Zionist abuse of human rights" even though no
mid-east issues were supposed to be discussed at
the Conference.
"My reply was that the UN Charter made
Soviet treatment of the Jews international
business, and that if Israel wasn't perfect, it was
still basically a democratic country, unlike the
USSR." he said.
Since 1978 Goldberg said he has practiced
international labor arbitration and represented
American companies abroad in expropriation
disputes.
Folksinger Mary Travers, of
Peter, Paul and Mary fame, will
be the featured performer at
"Freedom Rally '84," a commu-
nitywide rally on behalf of Jews
in the Soviet Union, March 11 at
2 p.m. in Peacock Park, Coconut
Grove. The rally is being
sponsored by the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry, a
committee of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Community
Relations Committee.
"On March 11, at this most
important gathering, we will be
sending a clear message to the
government of the Soviet Union
that we will not rest until we win
freedom for every Soviet Jew,"
said Hinda Cantor, chairman of
the South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry. "If we fail to show
our concern for our fellow Jews
and outrage at the Soviet
government's wanton disregard
of human rights, the situation
will get even worse. Also, we
must do everything we can to
make our Administration deal
with the issue of Soviet Jewry
whenever they negotiate with the
Soviet government."
In 1983, Soviet Jewish
emigration hit a low point of
11,315. Annually, the figure has
grown smaller: 51,000 in 1979.
21,000 in 1980, 9,400 in 1981 and
2,688 in 1982. American Jewish
organizations involved with
Soviet Jewry have found that
Mary Travers
public pressure and medu j
posure are the most effect*
means of responding to own
sive Soviet policies, a factortk
has led to similar rallies in m
communities.
Travers recently spent tM
Israel and the Soviet (j9
where she personally met a
many Refuseniks. those Jm
who have been denied exit 2
A song she penned, S
Survivor," has become thei
them of the Soviet Jen
movement.
ADL Officers Installed
Alfred Golden recently in-
stalled the Regional Board of
Directors and Officers of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith. Those elected to serve are
Jonathan I. Kislak, chairman;
Jerome C. Berlin, executive vice-
chairman; Professor Barbn
Bader, Arthur J. England, Jt.
Arthur Pearlman, Arden i
Siegendorf, vice-chairmen; a.
Jerome B. Homer, treasurer.
Mr. Golden is president i
Riverside Memorial Chapels.
KOSHER COOK
Cook for kosher institution. Full-time. North
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1800 N.E. 168 Street

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Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
High Rise Division Plans Varied Events .
Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat, se-
nior rabbi of Temple Israel,
has been elected to the Rab-
binic Board of Alumni Over-
seers of Hebrew Union Col-
lege-Jewish Institute of
Religion. A graduate of
Columbia University, Rabbi
Bernat was ordained at
Hebrew Union College and re-
ceived the master's of Hebrew
letters degree in 1961
Ko'ach Hadassah Meeting
Ko'ach Hadassah will hold a
50th anniversary Youth Aliyah
luncheon and celebrate the
chapter's 7th anniversary at a
luncheon Sunday at 12:30 p.m. at
the Costa Brava.
Entertainment will be provided
by Doreen Stuart, accordionist,
and Sally Sebastian, vocalist.
The Greater Miami Fed-
eration's High Rise Division
Campaign, on behalf of the 1984
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund-Project-Or
Akiva, has scheduled several
events for the coming weekend.
Bay Harbor residents will have
a bagel and lox breakfast on
Sunday at the Lancelot Hall
Recreation Room. Elaine Bloom,
director of the Government
Affairs Office of the Florida
Association of Jewish Fed-
erations, will be the guest
speaker. Jack Kasdan is the
general chairman. Gladys Israel
is associate chairperson and Ted
Nelson is honorary chairman.1
Stratford House will have a
breakfast on Sunday at 9:30 a.m.
Edith Pisk and Aaron Miroff
serve as building co-chairpersons.
Aventura-Coronado's annual
brunch will be held on Sunday, at
10 a.m. Dora Roth, rep-
resentative from Israel's Prime
Minister's office, will be the guest
speaker. Gertrude and Simon
Bressler will be honored.
Del Prado residents wil have a
breakfast on Sunday, at 10:30
a.m. Steven J. Kravitz, Fed-
eration Board member, will be
the guest speaker.
Bonavida Aventura's annual
brunch will be held on Sunday at
noon. Dora Roth will be the guest
, speaker.
CONDOS FOR SALE
LAST REMAINING UNITS IN
CONDOMINIUM DEVELOPMENTS
AVAILABLE AT FAR BELOW
MARKET PRICES
532-1170 DAYS
674-8189 NIGHTS
Buv
nd.....$450.00
Berrand... $204.25
ugerrand. $103.00
ugerrand. .$ 41.25
> Peso... $476.50
I Crona $378.25
[Leaf.... $400.50
SI.......$728.00
90% $ 7,625
Sail
$401.50
$206.25
$105.00
$ 43.25
$479.50
$381.25
$401.50
$763.00
$ 7,975
)LD COINS UNCIRCULATED
[Brokerage Buying & Sailing
EDERAL
RECIOUS
METAL
iposltory Corporation
[ 250 N.E. 17th Terr.
i Total Bank opp. Omni
379-5772
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Fla. Toll Free 800-327 9266
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
DANISH
BAKERY
.
All Publix Bakeries open at 8:00 A.M.
Italian
Sfogliatelle
79c
Plain, Heavy
Cheesecake
$029
each ^J
(Topped with Freeh
Strawberries $4.29 each)
Prices Effective
February 23rd thru 25th,
1984- a- v.
Butter Streusel
Coffee Cake
$]59
Delicious
Bluel
Muffins
$139
1*0.
Quantity
Righto RMarved.


=V**-i*i a."
-. en -
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 24, 1984
Gilbert to Head University Office
Rabbi Herbert Friedman,
President of the American
Friends of Tel Aviv University in
New York, has announced the
appointment of Miami native
Robert C. Gilbert as Director for
the Miami region.
After attending the University
of Florida in Gainesville for two
years, Gilbert went to Israel to
pursue studies of Middle East
history and politics and in-
ternational relations at Tel Aviv
University. At the university he
served as a research assistant in
the Shiloah Center for Middle
Eastern and African Studies.
Upon his return to Miami in
1981 Gilbert helped establish and
open Israel's newest Consulate in
the U.S. As Press and Infor-
mation officer of the Consulate,
Gilbert acted as liaison between
the Jewish communities of
Florida and the Israeli Foreign
Ministry.
He is working toward the
degree of Juris Doctor at the
University of Miami School of
Law.
Temporary offices for the
American Friends of Tel Avi\
University have been established
Robert C. Gilbert
at: 999 S. Bayshore Drive, Tower
One, Suite 1202, Miami, 33131.
Dr. George S. Wise, long-time
resident of Miami, is president of
the University.
Creative Writing Class
A course in creative writing
sponsored by Dade County
Schools and the Palmetto Adult
Education and Community
Center is being offered ever)
Sunday at 10 a.m. at Federation
Gardens. The course is made
possible also through the
cooperation of Federation
Gardens and the South Dade
Jewish Community Center.
Wise HadassaJh Meets
The Stephen S. Wise Chapter
of Hadassah will hold a luncheon
March 5 at the Ocean Pavillion
Mezzanine at 11 a.m. Guest
speaker will be Mrs. Jean
Feinberg, past president of the
Miami Beach Region.
Hadar AMIT Women
Hadar Chapter of AMIT
Women will meet March 1 at
noon at the 1st Nationwide
Savings and Loan Association
Auditorium for its annual "Freeh
Air Fund Luncheon," sponsored
by Martha Rosenfeld.
THE CHEFS
SPECIALTIES
Duck ALa
Orange
Veal Kidney
Rack of Lamb
Frog Legs
A Various
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448-8984
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Extensive
Wine Ust


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You can purchase the
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Weekdays 4:30-6:00
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Miami Beach
538-4552
We have the best corned beef sandwich
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Now enjoy breakfast, lunch & dinner in our
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Enjoy Seafood, Spanish & Cuban dishes
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We have a guitar band all around the dinner table.
Pedro Milian, the proprietor,
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We Accept Major
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8488 S.W. 8 St.
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Reservations 261-4444
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and
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Chow Mcin
Fresh Fish Entrees
Quiche Florentine
Falafel Chumus
Pirogen Blintzes
and of course PIZZA!
All available for take out
o Kosrw Reatouront
Supervision of ORC Cholov Yisroel
534-41st Street MIAMI BEACH
TEL-531-1511


New Chief Glassman Pledges
Increased Police Visibility
Miami Beach's new Police Chief
Glassman briefs members of the force.
Ken
Meeting of Dropsie Friends
Dr. Charles G. MacDonald,
professor of International
Relations at Florida Interna-
tional University, will be guest
speaker at a meeting of the
Florida Friends of Dropsie
University March 8 at noon at
the First Nationwide Savings
Auditorium.
Dr. MacDonald s talk will
focus on "The United States and
the Middle East New
Challenges."
Mrs. Miriam Shindler is
chairman of the event.
Dr. Charles G. MacDonald
Psychiatrist Speaks
Dr. Fred Seligman, associate
professor of Psychiatry and
Pediatrics at the University of
Miami School of Medicine, will
speak Feb. 27 at 7:30 p.m. at the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center on early
childhood and adolescent
behavior.
Dr. Seligman is Director of
Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
at the University of Miami and
Chief of Child and Adolescent
Mental Health Services at
Jackson Hospital.
Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Miami Beach's elderly residents are
people who live in fear, says the city's
new police chief, Ken Glassman, and it
will be one of the objectives of his ad-
ministration to negate some of that fear
by providing more personal contact be-
tween policemen and citizens.
"The crime rate in the city has ac-
tually gone down in recent years," said
Glassman. "But that hasn't changed
peoples' perceptions, and that's why we
need a new program of police visibility in
the city."
As part of this new program, Glass-
man said he intends to get patrolmen out
of their cars for at least part of their shift
and have them get to know shopkeepers
and other members of the public on an
intimate basis.
"RESIDENTS HAVE told the police they'd
like to see more patrolmen, but not in vehicles,
and this is our response to that," said Glassman.
Glassman also said he plans to establish a new
police office in uptown Miami Beach and that he
will use a mobile unit "an office on wheels"
to make an assessment of needs and to determine
the best location for a permanent facility.
The new police chief hinted he may want to
toughen existing gun control laws in Miami
Beach, but said local regulations will never be
totally effective until there are state and national
laws to back them up.
"For instance," he said, "cooling off periods
before you can buy a gun are no good when you
can cross the state or county line to a place where
no such laws exist. But certainly I am in favor of
gun control. I don't see how the same people who
worry about registering automobiles can't see we
should also worry about registering items that are
intended to inflict harm on human beings."
GLASSMAN, 37, is a Miami Beach native who
became interested in law enforcement through
serving with the military police in Vietnam.
"When I got out of the service it was the time
of rioting and campus unrest," he said. "I was
advised by army career counselors that there was
an opportunity for police work in all the big cities.
I applied and was accepted at the Miami Police
Academy and went through their training
program."
Glassman holds an Associate of Arts Degree in
Police Science from Miami Dade Community
Collge and received a Bachelor of Applied Arts
Degree in Criminal Justice from Florida Atlantic
University in 1976. He has periodically returned
to school for courses in civil disobedience
training, drug enforcement, accident in-
vestigation, police management, and dignitary
protection.
THIS LAST preparation may come in handy
soon when Glassman makes a decision on whether
to accede to the demands of visiting Arab sheiks
for police escorts usually reserved for presidents
and other high-ranking dignitaries.
Glassman, who is a member of Temple Beth
Am in Cooper City, says he attributes part of his
interest in helping others through police work to
his religious training, remembering especially
Hillel's famous maxim about "not being only for
oneself."
Glassman is married and has two children.
SIMPLE LOGIC
(A COMPARISON)
LEADS YOU TO BUY FROM
LARGE LEASE COMPANIES
ADVERTISE THEIR USED
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CUTLASS SUPREME FOR
P.V. $9880
PEXI SELLS YOU ANEW
1984 CUTLASS SUPREME
Mly equipped Including tilt steering
& cruise control for only *Q70n
THAT IS SIMPLE LOGIC!
VISIT PEXI AND FIND OUT WHY
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ANNUAL SPRING GALA CULTURAL EVENT
SATURDAY, MARCH 10 8 O'CLOCK P.M.
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11011 Southwest 104th Street
Dessert Reception To Follow The Concert
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Call 251-1394*
From the art ofKlezmer to the classics
"He stands without a peer today."
-Zubin Mehta
Giora Feidman in Concert
J


Retirement Living at
Carlyle on the Bay
Makes Dollars and Sense
For many people on fixed
income, especially senior
citizens who often must choose
between saving and sacrificing,
any financial decision comes at
a great price.
In the face of our strained
economic climate today,
genuine bargains are hard to
find. But they do exist if people
are determined enough to look
below the surface and examine
refilled, monitor weight and'
other vital signs and to oversee
special diets as prescribed by
residents" attending physicians.
One of the most noticeable
benefits of living at the Carlyle
occurs twice a day: lunch and
dinner, both of which are in-
cluded in the rent
Those meals are provided for
every resident every day, and
t!ere is no extra cost regardless
in the bedroom and in the batl
room, to alert the nurse:
station in the event of a medical
problem that demands imme-
diate attention.
Residents of the Carlyle
continue to maintain their own
independent lives. No one living
in the building requires daily
medical attention, and all of the
residents enjoy the secure,
pleasant and comfortable en-
The Carlyle is a 10 story apartment building that seems more like a hotel
vironment.
Because residents receive so
much support from the Carlyle
itself, many who need simple
assistance with daily chores can
thus eliminate the burden of a
paid companion or part-time
housekeeper to take care of food
shopping, meal preparation,
cleaning and transportation.
In terms of dollars and cents,
that makes a lot of sense! It can
actually represent a saving of
$400 or more each month.
Rent for the one-bedroom
apartments at the Carlyle starts
at $1,195 per month. An addi-
tional person in an apartment
costs only $300 extra, reducing
the fee for each person to about
S750 a true bargain, consid-
ering the quality of living and
the fact that we are talking
about two meals daily, and the
other services such as maid
service, transportation and
entertainment.
An intangible benefit of the
Carlyle lilestyle is the environ-
ment and atmosphere itself. A
strong sense of community and
companionship greets new
residents.
The professional staff are all
alert, conscientious people who
are sensitive to the resident*
needs.
They look for daily contact
with each resident, and watch
for changes in eating habits
skin tone or weight signs of a i
resident's change in health. If ;
these indications are noticed
the Carlyle staff will contact the
appropriate resident's family
and physician.
For those elderly people still
living in other apartment
buildings or retirement centers
who want to move to the Carlyle
but can't because of obligations
to their current residence, the
Carlyle will even reimburse new
residents for any security
deposit lost when breaking their
lease at the old address.
All things considered, what
may appear to be a higher
monthly rental fee at the
Carlyle is actually not only
competitive but, more likeiv
than not, less expensive with
more com tort, convenience and
o\urall benelil at no exua cost
than comparable retirement
housing any where in South
lloridu.
Thai':- u cuse where lileslyW
inul-.es tl'illal> micl sense
For information call: 371-3035.
actual costs versus benefits
gained.
fJMt*** fofc ^ejuungte. the
bargain at the Carlyle on the
Ba\ retiement apartment hotel,
located at 1900 N. Bay shore
Drive in Miami.
One-bedroom apartments in
the three year old, 10 story
building are leased on an annual
basis. At first glance, the
monthly rental fee for the
waterfront units may appear to
belong in the "luxury housing"
category. (See comparative
chart of fees-benefits below).
"We actually do consider the
Carlyle as a luxury residence,"
stated Elliot Messing,
president.
But we keep the rent in the
affordable' range anyway!"
Supporting his statement.
Messing explained that the
Carlyle offers and includes quite
a few things in the rent which
are not available at other water-
front high-rise apartment
buildings or, if they are offered,
they are available at a premium
rale.
Services provided with
Carlyle's yearly lease include
two meals daily, weekly maid
service, a van and chauffeur for
transportation to area shop-
ping, banks, beauty shops and
doctors appointments as well as
for special events and outings
and individuals requests; a 24-
hour-a-day doorman; and an
active activity program featur-
ing live entertainment twice a
week. movies, discussion
groups, arts and crafts with all
materials provided at no
additional fee.
The Carlyle also has a
luensed nurse on duty at all
times, in case of medical of
emergencies.
\s an Adult Congregate
Living Facility" (ACLFl,
licensed and regulated by the
Florida State Department of
Health and Rehabilitative
Services (HRS), the Carlyle can
have a nurse on the premises to
make doctors appointments for
=idents, have prescriptions
of how much food a person may
consume. In fact, the evening
meal includes a seven course
dinner.
A typical evening menu
would offer a choice of meats,
chicken or fresh fish, and
feature entrees such as boiled
beef flanken, corned beef with
cabbage, cornish stuffed hen,
prime rib of beef, roast leg of
lamb, brisket of beef, and baked
filet of whitefish. Lox a.
bagels are served for Sunday
Brunch.
Residents at the Carlyle like
to tell their friends that they
enjoy the best kosher-style food
in South Florida. Meals are
served by waiters and
waitresses. Fresh flowers adorn
each table in the dining room,
and table cloths are used for
dinner.
Because the Carlyle does
cater to elderly people, all meals
are salt-free and special diets
are prepared without any addi-
tional fee. Giving that little
extra is a standard practice at
this building.
"Our residents can have as
much food as they'd like,"
Messing said. "They can even
have a second entree if that's
what they want."
the kitchen operation is
overseen by Stanely Wroth, a
South Florida restaurant
pioneer who owned and
operated the Concord Cafeteria,
a Miami Beach landmark,
before closing the establishment
last year.
Worth makes certain that
residents have a balanced meal
by including juice, soup, salad,
vegetables, and dessert in addi-
tion to entrees.
Each apartment in the
Carlyle is equipped with a full
kitchen, wall-to-wall carpeting
and individually controlled air
conditioning and heating. These
apartments. overlooking
liiscayne Bay. compare- with
other modern luxury water-
tront properties.
All apartments at the Calyle
have two emergency switches,
Monthly rental includes lunch and dinner daily plus weekly maid service, transportation
to shopping and doctors, fulltime activities, 24 hour doorman and 24 hour licensed nurse.
Retirement Housing Cost Comparison
Monthly Rent:
Food, Lunch &
Dinner daily:
Transportation to
Shopping, Doctors, etc.:
Social Activities (live
entertainment, movies,
arts and crafts, etc.):
Part-time Housekeeper
(4 hours a day)
Carlyle on the Bay
$1,195
Included
Included
Included
Not Needed
24-hour-a-day emergency system
monitored by on site
24-hour-a-day licensed nurse Included
Total Monthly Cost $1,195
Monthly Savings $395
Based on average of six comparable apartment buildings
Typical Apartment
$525*
$325
$60
$80
$600
Not Available
$1,590


Friday, February 24, 1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
.. -e than 60 area realtors attended a seminar sponsored by the
Community Associations Institute (CAI), Greater Miami
Chapter, and the KendaU-Perrine Board of Realtors. From left
are: Edward Bramson, CPA, President, CAI: Karen Friedman,
CAI Seminar Coordinator; James Accursio, KendaU-Perrine
| Board of Realtors; and seminar speakers Anthony KaUiche,
Esq., property manager Sue Carpenter and insurance agent
I George Bofill.
ENJOY OUR PURIM PARTY
Saxony
at the'
Hotel
4 Days & 3 Nights 5 Days & 4 Nights
Mar. 16 to Mar. 19 Mar. 15 to Mar. 19
per person
C^^ doubleocc
)UK plus tax & tips
M25
INCLUDING MEALS
par person
double occ
plus tax & tips
Gala Purim Party & Show Come Sample Our Delicious
Hamentoshen 2 Kosher Meals Dally 3 on the Sabbath
Private Olympic Pool Tennis Courts
538-6811
Phone:
On The Ocean at 32nd Strut*. Miami Beach
Your Hosts, the BERKOWTTZ FAMILY
Deauville
Deauville
Deauville
GRAND OPENING
118,990
COMPLETE OCEANFRONT RESORT HOTEL
WITH FULLY FURNISHED UNITS
OPEN DAILY 10 AM TO 9 PM
Deauville
Tennis &
Beach
Club
67m STREET ON THE OCEAN MIAN* BEACH FLORIDA 33141 865-6000 7214888 (BROWARDI
Subject to verification & credit approval 25% down, 7 years. 13 T% Intereet, 50V. down, 7 yaara. 12%% Intetaat piua par undivided teaeenold inter* at
Most people think
they nave
to wait
weeks
to see a
specialist!
... .., ^...... '.i
DOCTOR'S APPOINTMENT LINE
At North Shore Medical Center we know that when you have a
medical problem you want to see a doctor right away. You want a doctor
that comes highly recommended. And you want the peace of mind that
comes with qualified medical treatment.
North Shore's Doctor's Appointment Line makes it possible for our
neighbors who do not have a physician to get a first appointment
with a doctor within 24 hours.
Participating physicians an all acme members of the Ninth Snore Medical Center Staff.
Specialty include Allergy Cardiology l^-rmatology Ear. Nose & Throat Endocrinology. Diabetes.
Th\nnd Disease Family c* General Practice Gastrotnterolagy Gyneeology. Obsutna Hemaiologv
Infertility Internal Medicine Neurology. Epilepsy Oneolop Ophthalmology Oral Surgery
i Irthopedtci Pediatrics Pediotric Endrocrtnotogy Plastic Surgery Psychiatry 'Pulmonary Diwas.
i 'rology Surgery General, Colon & Rectal Hurra Cardi lascular, Head & Neck. Vascular.
HERE'S HOW IT WORKS
Call 835-6104 Monday through Friday 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. when you
want to make an appointment with a doctor.
Briefly explain your medical needs to the Doctor's Appointment Line
representative, who will then offer the names of three local physicians in the
medical specialty you require.
When you make your choice, the representative will arrange the first
appointment then call you back promptly to confirm the time and date.
The Doctor's Appointment Line is not intended to replace
emergency room cases that need immediate attention. You should go directly
to the North Shore Emergency Department, open 24-hours, 7 davs a week,
or the hospital emergency room nearest to you tor treatment.
North Shore Medical Center
On 95th Street, 2 block* Wett of 1-95. (305)835-6104 Cloeer Than You Think!


'"-.
Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 24,1984
Judge and Mrs. Robert Grover
Beth Israel Honors
Judge and Mrs. Grover
Judge and Mrs. Robert Grove
will be honored for their civic and
religious contributions at Beth
Israel Synagogue's 29th annual
dinner Sunday at 6 p.m.
Judge Grover, a former Miami
Beach municipal judge, is a
senior partner in the law firm of
Grover, Chnent, Weinstein,
Stauber and Friedman. He is an
honorary trustee of Beth Israel
Synagogue, where he volunteers
his professional expertise in legal
matters, and is active in Big
Brothers of Miami.
Mra. Grover is active in the
children's ward at Jackson
Memorial Hospital and the
Easter Seal School and has been
involved in Mizrachi, ORT, and
Beth Israel Sisterhood.
Children's Hospital
Honors Marie Osmond
Marie Osmond will receive the
Miami Children's Hospital
Foundation's Humanitarian
Award at the President's Ball
March 3 at 8 p.m. at the Omni
International Hotel.
Ball chairman is Electra
Spillis, assisted by Linda Altman
and Brenda Zakheim working
closely with David Walters,
Foundation president.
Serving as coordinators for the
gala are Levanne Warren,
Maureen Bassett, Mary V.
Palmer, Fanny Singer, Karen
ullen. Hollis Beck, Kathleen
Wilder, Sheila Resnick, Guly
Rodriguez-Torres, and Donna
Cerniglia.
"Gala for Hope"
Benefits Parkinson's
A "Gala for Hope" to benefit
the Parkinson Foundation will
lake place Sunday at the Omni
I iternational Hotel.
As in the past 23 years, Bob
Hope will headline a cast of
entertainers, and Dick Clark will
be Master of Ceremonies.
Chairpersons for this year's
Gala are Mr. and Mrs. Harold
Beck, Dr. and Mrs. John Berger
and Mr. and Mrs. Sidney P.
Schreer. Mr. Schreer is chairman
of the board, and Mr. Beck and
Dr. Berger serve on the board.
Hillel Day School
Holds Exposition
The Samuel Sheck Hillel
Community Day School of North
Miami Beach will hold its third
annual Exposition of the Arts
and the Sciences Feb. 29 in the
school's Friedman-Uhlar
Auditorium.
Judging will take place in
several categories: the
elementary division 1st and
2nd grades; the junior division
3rd through 5th grades; and the
junior high department; 6th
through ninth grades.
Presentation of the awards wil.
be made by Rabbi Dr. Joshua
Tarsia, principal, together with
Dr. Jerome M. Levy, vi
principal: and Rabbi Jay
Neufald, Assistant Principal.
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25/8oz. 1.19
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Bates Emery Boards
Bath Set
16pak.34
.99
Q-Tips
Cotton Balls
65s .69
130's .99
Selsun Blue
Shampoo
Murine Eye Drops
Murine PIUS Eye Drops
.5 ok. 1.46
.5 0Z.1.43
Murine
Eye Drops
1.5 oz.
2.
39
Lubath
Bath Oil
8oz.3.99
i6 oz. 6.59
Gee Your Hair
Smells Terrific
Shampoo
1.
12 oz.
79
Jergens
Dry Skin Lotion
Extra
iiii.
Skin Lotion
60,1.29
60,1.29
Close Up
Toothpaste
8.2 oz.
1.
49
Lifeline
Toothbrush by Pepsodent
.89
Lady's Choice
Anti-Perspirant Solid
2oz.
l.
99
Old Spice
Anti-Perspirant Solid
2oz.
1.
49
Old Spice
Skin Conditioner
Musk Cologne
41/4 0Z.^.'
Vanish
Automatic Toilet Bowl Cleaner 12 oz.
l.
46
Endust
Furniture Polish
10 oz.
2.
29
Trident Sugarless Gum
Chiclets Gum I ^gg
Bubblicious
Bubble Gum
Gentle Touch
Soap BathSize 4Bar
I Dentyne chewing
' Trident Gum
Freshen-Up


Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B

tmirressman William Lehman (D-N. Dade, ^rom tyt: Regina GreenhiU; Sherry Cherna;
Infer) greets members of the Greater Miami Anna Mae Ross; Rep. Lehman; Carol
Vction of the National Council of Jewish Orunberg; Nan Rich; and Louise Stubins.
fomen at his office in the Nation's Capitol
For Sale or Exchange
Junior Prayer Book*
Volume One The United Synagogue of America, N.Y.C
The High Holiday Prayer Book
Rosh Haahanah and Yom Klppur By Ben Zion Baxer.
Sabbath and Festival Prayer Books
By SUverman
If Interested Call Charles PachVer
305*944-4862
Larry Smith Talks
At Holocaust Event
IlI.S. Congressman Larry
oith, representative from
prida's sixth congressional
Strict, and Mark E. Talisman,
ho spearheaded the effort to
ng "The Precious Legacy"
[lection of Judaica from
_echo9lovakia to this country,
pi be among the featured
akers at this weekend's
tlocaust Conference-Survivor
[ithering at the Seville Hotel.
Entitled "The Holocaust:
ality of the Past, Implications
the Future," the statewide
Jent. which will take place on
|nday and Monday, is being
pnsored by the Zachor
Btitute for Holocaust Studies
the Greater Miami Jewish
deration.
lighlights of the event will
llude: a private showing of
fhe Precious Legacy," now at
Bass Museum, which will be
by Talisman; photographer
^rmari Morrison's dramatic
Jjibit, "Auschwitz Revisited;"
exhibit of Nazi memorabilia;
1 exhibit from Israel on Jewish
listance against the Nazis; and
ptinuous showings of the
ademy Award winning film,
lenocide."
Chairman of Project Judaica
vice chairman of the U.S.
tlocaust Memorial Council,
lisman will present the
ynote address, "The Precious
gacy: A Gift of Life," at the
jference dinner on Sunday,
bnically, the collection of 350
facts, drawn from more than
3,000 objects, was the result of
Nazis's efforts to establish a
juseum to an extinct race."
lith, well known as one of the
ongest supporters of Israel in
fngress, represents a district
th one of the highest percent -
es of Holocaust survivors and
sir children.
The second day of the con-
ence will focus on teaching the
[ilocaust, with several work-
ops and panel discussions
ared to this end. Some of the
holars who will be leading
Ssions include: Menachem
psensaft, chairman of the
ternational Network of
kildren of Holocaust Survivors:
Dr. Jack Kugelmass, professor of
Yiddish at the Max Weinreich
Center for Advanced Jewish
Studies-YIVO; Dr. Eli Pfef-
ferkorn, professor at Tel Aviv
University and consultant to the
U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council; Dr. Helen Fagin,
director of the Judaic Studies
Program at the University of
Miami and Rositta Kenigsberg,
chairperson of the South Florida
chapter of Children of Holocaust
Survivors.
Serving as conference co-chairs
are Dr. Fagin and Robert
Maland. The conference's
honorary chairmen are Jack
Chester, Peter Goldring, Harry
A. (Hap) Levy, Rubin Offenbach,
David Schaecter and Jacob
Sheiniuk. Marc Pollick, executive
director of the Zachor Institute,
is the conference director.
The conference is being
sponsored in conjunction with:
Dade County Public Schools;
Southeast Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center; National
Conference of Christians and
Jews; Broward County Public
Schools; New American Jewish
Social Club; David Ben-Gurion
Culture Club; Central Agency for
Jewish Education, and the
Judaic Studies Program at the
University of Miami.
MARGARET MORSE TOURS
" MORE OF THE BEST -^FJ
SPECIAL LEISURE VACATION
ISRAEL with EILHT
a me B. Homer, a member
' the Florida Regional Board
the Anti-Defamation
}ague of B'nai B'rith, has
cepted the chairmanship of
i Florida Chapter of the
ciety of Fellows of the
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Experience the splendor of great food and
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We maintain the finest banquet facilities
including our unique chandeliered Ballroom
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'"""** I i
Pagel4-B The Jewiah Floridian / Friday, February 24,1984

Dr. Evelyn Mayerson, a University of Miami associate
professor and author whose latest novel is in contention for a
Pulitzer Prize, spoke before the recent meeting of the Founders
of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged. From
left to right: Mr. and Mrs. Emanuel Fass, Mr. and Mrs. Don
Mayerson, Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Boer.
~J)'
I
Aileen Ross
The International Brotherhood of Teamsters held its con-
vention on Miami Beach and honored Joseph W. Morgan,
international vice president, with the Israeli Eleanor Roosevelt
Humanities Award at a Testimonial Dinner in his honor in
cooperation with the state of Israel Bonds Organization. The
Teamsters Union is the largest corporate holder of Israel Bonds
in the United States. From left are Hon. Meir Rosenne. Israel's
Ambassador to the United States; Morgan; Mrs. Morgan;
Yehbshua Trigor, Consul General of Israel for the State of
Florida and Howard Klein, executive director of the Israel
Bonds Organization.
Aileen Ross Joins
Foundation Staff
Aileen Rita Ross, formerly of
California, has been appointed
Associate Director of the B*nai
B'rith Foundation in Florida as a
Fund Raiser. Ms. Ross has had
extensive experience in estate
and financial planning for in-
dividuals and has held respon-
sible positions as a volunteer,
coordinating the hospital guild in
Fairfield. Calif. She has produced
radio shows and has served as a
public relations director for a
newspaper in California.
She earned a graduate degree
in speech pathology from Long
Island University in New York,
and also did graduate work at the
University of Southern
California.
She will be working with B'nai
B'rith Lodges and other elements
of the Fund Raising Program to
help raise funds to support the
Youth Services of B*nai B'rith-
Hillel Foundations, and the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization, in its
national programs.
Jacob is Talk Subject
Dr. Jehudah Melber, spiritual
eader of Temple Beth Raphael,
will speak on Jacob Feb. 29 at
10:30 a.m. at the Miami Beach
Public Library in the second in a
series of talks on great biblical
figures conducted by the Central
\gency for Jewish education.
Coordinator of the series,
originated by Samuel Reiser, is
Dr. Diana Reisman with Rabbi
Norman s. Lipson serving as
adult education director.
Labor Zionist Meeting
Sendor Kaplan, campaign
associate of the Miami Jewish
Federation, will be guest speaker
at the meeting Feb. 27 at noon of
the Chaim Weizmann Farband
Labor Zionist Branch 343, to be
held at the American Savings
Bank at Lincoln and Alton
Roads. The club will also
celebrate the 65th wedding anni-
versary of Norman and Sophie
Kemper at the meeting.
MIRRORS
"QUALITY & PRICE"
TROPICAL GLASS
and Construction Co.
Dade 757-0651 BR. 462-3711 BOCA 368-1933
HAROLD ROSENSTEIN, Pres.
Lauderdale Lakes
Cypress Chase Condo
2 Bed 2 Baths Enclosed
Terrace Near Shopping and
Synagogue. Low Maintenance
Original. Tsl. 4*4-5284.
Companlon/Homsmakar
English speaking, live-in, for
elderly woman, N. Miami area,
References required.
Call 893-5178 9-12 a.m.
TEMPORARY
NURSING
SERVICES
Cantors Association ot Florida
Competent Cantors Available
for Passover Seders, High
Holidays, Yearly Positions and
Concerts Please Call (Dade)
949-9842
Home Nursing Licensed Personnel
Aides Companions Home Makers
Miami Ft. Laud.
891-5322 491-6003
Ferdie Re-elected as Citizens Group Head
Ainslee R. Ferdie was re-elected
Chairman of the Coral Gales
Citizens Advisory Committee at
its meeting last week. Mr. Ferdie
is a Coral Gables attorney and
resident who has been a commi-
ttee member since 1977. He is
also President of the Jewish War
Veterans USA National
Memorial, Inc. chartered by
Congress in Washington, D.C.;
and is Treasurer of Florida
Lawyers Prepaid Legal Services.
Inc. He is former Chairman of the
Dade County Urban Renewal
Agency and a Past President of
the Coral Gables Bar
Association.
Elected Vice Chairman was
Carl Prime, who also has served
since 1977. City Manager Donald
LeBrun continues as Secretary.
Other members of the Committee
are Lyman W. Higgs. Robert
Moorman, Marjorie Rosendorf,
Martin J. Rosen, S. Hosmer
Compton, Rabbi Michael
Eisenstat, James E. Perryman,
Lola B. Walker and William A.
Cooper.
Ainslee R. Ferdie
Mizrachi Fetes Abrahams
Samuel Abrahams will be
honored by the Greater New
York Council of Mizrachi at the
organization's 45th annual
banquet March 4 at the Waldorf-
Astoria Hotel in New York.
Abrahams, a lawypr who lives
in North Miami Beach pan oftl
year, has lectured widely in |
fields of law. Zionism, ^
Judaism in South Florida. He]
the author of a book entitl]
"Law in Familv Conflict."
We
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FOLLOWING ITEMS
UVING ROOMS DINING ROOMS
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OTHER VALUES UP TO 20% -50% OFF
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WE WILL GO TO YOUR HOME OR OFFICE
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1984
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All Rates Based On 48 Mo.
Closed End Commercial Lease.
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CALL BARRY MAEL
Fleet & Leasing Manager
DADE 754-7551 BROWARD 525-7511_


Synopsis ofthe Weekly Torah Portion
"And they came, both men and women, as many as were
\jlling-hearted, and brought all jewels of gold'
(Exodus 35.22).
VAYAKHEL
IaYAKHEL Moses gathered the people together and in-
truded them in the holiness of the Sabbath. He also instructed
ern in how to build the Tabernacle and its vessels. Bezalel and
tioliab headed the skilled craftsmen working on the Taber-
icle. The people gave liberally toward the sanctuary so
berally. in fact, that it was necessary to ask them to stop. Once
tain, the details of the Tabernacle and its vessels are given, at
\e end of this portion.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
en "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
imir, US. published by Shengoid. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
ne, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
puting the volume.). .
Shoshana AMIT Women
Shapiro, president of chairman of the National Board
Vomen Shoshana Chapter,
honored at her birthday
jn Sunday at noon at the
Irer Hotel. Shirley Schulder,
of Amit Women, will be guest
speaker. Evelyn Zuckerman is
chairperson, and Ida Sussman is
co-chairperson.
UPON COUPON COUPON COUPON
Jince 1969
gard Available
CARPET CLEANED
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Dining Room (or dining area)1
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ol Room
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THRIFT CAIPET ClIANINO CO.
Serving Dade & Broward
COUPON
Dr. Alan L. Horowitz
Chiropractic Physician
JLISTIC CARE
IUTRITION
SPORTS INJURY
ACUPUNCTURE
We Accept All Of Tvpe of Insurances
Medicare
|ridian Medical Center1680 Meridian Ave.Suite 320
Miami Beach, Florida 33139305-673-6757
Ifford J. Benezra, M.D.
Norman M. Palgon, M.D.
associates in Internal Medicine
Conveniently Located At
The Office Park at the California Club
BLDG.3* Suite 119
1021 IVES DAIRY ROAD
North Miami Beach, Florida 33179
(305) 653-9607
lLOMATESOFTHE
lERICAN BOARD OF
tERNAL MEDICINE
MEDICARES MOST
INSURANCE ACCEPTED
R. JOSEPH M. LYTTON
ANNOUNCES
THE RELOCATION OF THE
DENTAL OFFICE TO
AN S0UCI PLAZA
688-6554
2124 NE 123 ST.
N. MIAMI, FLA.
ELEVATOR TO 2ND FLOOR
Bar/Bat
Mitzvah
Friday, February 24,1984 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15:B
Vergara
Rosenthal
JESSICA LINDEN AUER
Jessica Lindenauer, daughter
of Laurie Wynn and Paul Lin-
den auer, will become a Bat
Mitzvah Feb. 24 at Temple Beth
Moshe.
Jessica is a seventh grader at
Highland Oaks Jr. High School,
where she is an honor student in
math and English.
Laurie and Jack Wynn will
sponsor the Oneg Shabbat
following services. A reception
will be held Saturday at the
Turnberry Isle Yacht Club.
ROBYN COHN
Robyn Cohn, daughter of Dr.
and Mrs. Martin Cohn, will
observe her Bat Mitzvah Feb. 25
at Temple Beth Sholom. She will
be twinned with Irina Zaturensky
of the Soviet Union.
Robyn is a student of the
Confirmation Class of 5746.
DORA LADIS
Dara Elizabeth Ladis,
daughter of Marilyn and Alan J.
Ladis, will be called to the Torah
as a Bat Mitzvah Feb. 24 at 8:15
p.m. at Temple Adath Yeshurun.
She will be twinned with Elena
SheibaoftheUSSR.
Dara is a student in the Hai
Class of Adath Yeshurun. She
attends John F. Kennedy Jr.
High School, where she is in the
seventh grade-
Mr. and Mrs. Ladis will host
the Oneg Shabbat following
services.
AARON EPSTEIN
Aaron N. Epstein, son of Mrs.
Gail Epstein, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on Feb.
25 at 8:30 a.m. at Temple Adath
Yeshurun.
Aaron is a student in the Dalet
Class of Temple Adath Yeshurun
Religious School. He is a seventh
grader at Norland Junior High
School.
Mrs. Epstein will host an Oneg
Shabbat following the service.
OREN ROSENTHAL
Oren Rosenthal, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Jack Rosenthal, was called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah
Feb. 18 at Beth David
Congregation.
Oren is in the seventh grade at
Brandeis Academy, where he is
treasurer of student council. He
is also president of Pre-USY at
Beth David.
Mr. and Mrs. Rosenthal hosted
a luncheon following services.
HECTOR VERGARA
Hector J. Vergara, son of
Hector and Amanda Vergara,
will be called to the Torah as a
Bar Mitzvah Feb. 25 at Shaare
Tef illah congregation of Kendall.
Hector is a student at Brandeis
Academy, where he is in the
seventh grade.
A reception will be held at
Calusa Country Club on Feb. 26.
Yiddish Winkle Meets
The Yiddish Culture Winkle
will hold its sixth cultural
meeting March 8 at 10:30 a.m. at
Temple Ner Tamid. Guest
spekaer will be Dora Mesiel, who
will review the writings of Eli
Shectman. Also at the meeting,
Ben Bonus will sing and be
accompanied by Shmuel Fershko.
PASSOVER HAQADAH
Non-Sexist, yet traditional In
Hebrew, English, and Tran-
sliteration. $4.00 or SASE for
brochure. Hagadah-Q, P.O.B.
3094, Oakland, Cal 94609.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting
Time: 6:01 p.m.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
Frl.. 8:15 pm, Bat Mitzvah: Dara Ladle
Sat., 8:so am. Shabbat Seretcee
Bar Mhzveh: Aaron Epetein
( pm. inch. Service Shala Seudot
Sun., 1:30 am and 8:30 pm.
Monday thru Friday, 7:30 am and t pm
()j
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler, Cantor
Late Ff! Eve service
Sal. Mom. Service
lam
Or. Irvine Letwmen will preach at 10:30
Confirmation Claaa
Participating
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schitf
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
Jamas L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
F n 8:15 pm, Rellgloua Sarvlcaa.
Rabbi Baumgard will tpaak on "II Thomaa
Jatfaraon Ware Allva Today."
Sat, 11:15 am, Torah Sarvlcaa
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way: 2625 S.W 3rd Avenue ,,,
South Dada '500 S.W. 120th Straat -^<*' )
RABBI DAVID H.AUERBACH -
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Oada Chaoal
>n S pm. Shabbat Era. Sarvlca
Onag Shabbat follow.
Coral Way Sanctuary
Sat., 9 am, Shabbat Sarvlca
Bal Mitzvah ol Mlkkl Lynn Elkln.
Klddlah lollowi
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Haskell M. Bernat, Senior Rabbi
Donald P. Cashman, Assistant Rabbi
Jacob G. Bornstein, Cantor
Rachelle Nelson, Student Cantor
Philip Goldin, Exec. Dir.
Frl.. 8 pm. Rabbi Caahman will apaak on
"Samarltani, Karaltaa, Ethiopian! "
Downtown: Rabbi Milton Rlchman will apaak
on "Tha Olhar Slda ol Jawlihnaaa."
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Frl., 8:15 pm, Worahlp Sarvlca
Sat., 11 am. Torah Shabbat
Bat Mitzvah of Amy Langar
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 658-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Friday Sarvlca.-5:30 pm
R.bbl Shapiro will dlacuaa
tha ongoing "PreeMentlal Campaign."
Saturday Sarvlca.:45 am and 9 pm
Sunday Sarvlcaa8 am and 6 pm
Dally Mlnyan Sarvlcaa7:45 am and t pm
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Israel Jacobs
Cantor Moehe Frledler
Rabbi Emeritus Jmeph A Qofftnkal
Dally services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Frl.. 8 pm, WoraNp Sarvlcaa
Bat Mitzvah of Jeeetea Undanaoar. (V
Torah Sabbath
Sat.. ( am, Shabbat Morning Sarvlcaa
m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nissim Benvamini
TEMPLE BETHSHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41 st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronlsh, RaDDl liberal
Harry Jolt, Auxiliary Rabbi
Paul D. capian, Assistant Rabbi
i FrL,8:15pm,Sabbath!
Bat Mitzvah of Robyn Cohn
Raafflrmanta: Cr.lg Zaron, Elian Harti
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd. me.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi ^ |
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Randall Konigburg, Aast. Rabbi
Frl., MO am. It JO pm, pm
Penury Secvfoo
Dairy Santoa* 7:30 am, 5:30 pm
BETH YOSESEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwalg, Rabbi
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phona 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schlff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone: 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Office
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Danny Tadmore, Cantor
Frl .730pm
sat. 9:10 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz j
Cantor Murray Yavneh
tei
Morning Services- -8 am ft. -.w
Friday Evening services8:1 $ tfm
Saturday Momlhg Sarvlca. am.
Evening Sarvlc.i 6:30 pm.
Saturday Evening Sarvlcaa7:48 pm.
TEMPLE NER TAMID
Conservative
7902 Carlyle Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugen* Labovitz
DalTyMlnyanatS
866-8345

am
Lata Frl. night Sarvlca at 8:15 pm
Sabbath Sarvlcaa at
8:45 am. Sunday Mlnyan at 8:30 am.
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ave. and 75 St.
Rabbi Warren Kasztl
Modern Orthodox
382-3343 382-0898
Frl., 5:45 pm, Sabbath Eve Sarvlcaa.
Onag Shabbat 8 pm.
| Sat. 9 30 am, Sabbath Sarvlcaa Mlnha 20
mlnutea before Sundown._________
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
rving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl., 8:15 pm. B'nal B'rlth Sabbath
Sat., 10:30 am, WoraNp Sarvlca.
Bar MItxv.h of Michael Faee.
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi --.
Benlamin Adler. Cantor ,'' SiS i
Mlnyan Sarvlcaa Mon. a Thure.. 7 am ff''
Fit, 8:15 pm. Adult Forum Sabbath
Dr Shapiro will officiate.
Queota Are Welcome
Sat., .m, Sabbath morning eervtcee
haw
V
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
282 S Unlvarelty Dr., Plantation, FL 33324
47-80B4. HeroM Wlehna, executive director
Franklin D. Kreutzer, regional prilldant
UNION OF AMERICAN .
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park, 3785
NW 82 Ave., Suite 210, Miami. Fl.
33166, 592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Littman. regional directc:


.....-I
"'tflLge ltVr? '"-TKrj^riM'rio??
"rVday, reoruaiy24, iw4
Public Notice^
NOTICE OF ACTION I
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE1
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. M-OS741
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CHRISTINE ANNE-MARIE
BAZENET MILLER,
PeOOoner-WUe.
and
WILLIAM EUGENE
MILLER
Respondent-Husband
TO: William Eugene Miller
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an aeon for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed aalnat you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to
It on Richard A Golden, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 12000 Blscayne
Blvd Suite 203. North Miami.,
FL 33181, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before March
23. 1804: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 16 day of Feb
ruary. 1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByK Shaw
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal t
KRAMER A GOLDEN. P.A.
12000 Blscayne Blvd..
Suite 203
North Miami. FL 33181
Richard A. Golden
Attorney for Petitioner
15713 February 24;
March 2. 9. 16. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL '
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 64-0S71 2
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of
JACQUES A MAJEUR.
Petitioner-Husband.
and
LINDA CENATUS MAJEUR.
Respondent Wile
TO: Linda Cenatus Ma)eur
Respondent
Rue VernetNo 2
Gonaives. Haiti
West Indies
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any to
it on Lloyd M. Routman. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 181 N.E. 82 Street.
Miami. FL 33138, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
March 23. 1984; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 15 day of Feb
ruary. 1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Routman A Routman
A Moneys at Law
Attn.: Lloyd M Routman. Esq.
181 N.E. 82 Street.
Second Floor
Miami. FL 33138
Telephone: 305-757-5800
Attorney for Petitioner
15710 February 24;
March 2, 9.18.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.!
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
AMPCO INSTALLATION
COMPANY and AMPCO-
TANSEY COMPANY at P.O
Box 4190. Hlaleah. FL 33014
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
AMPCO PRODUCTS, INC
By: Stanley L. Krleger.
President
H. ALLAN SHORE. Esquire
Attorney for
Ampco Products, Inc.
Fromberg. Fromberg. Gross.
Cohen. Shore A Berke. PA
420 South Dixie Highway. 3rd
Fir.
Coral Gables. FL 33146
Telephone: (3051 666-6622
15656 February 3. 10;
17.24. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 84-04432
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SIGIFREDO BERNAL.
Husband,
and
ESPERANZA BERNAL.
Wife.
TO: ESPERANZA BERNAL
8627127 th Street
Jamaica.
Long Island. NY.
YOU ARE HEREBY]
NOTIFIED that an action for1
Dissolution of Marriage has.
been filed against you and you!
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE. PA., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
2491 N.W. 7th Street, Miami,
Florida 33125. and file the
original with the clerk of thei
above styled court on or befon
March 09. 1984; otherwise
default will be entered agalns
you for the relief demanded li
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse
cutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and Uu
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 7 day of
February, 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY: K.SHAW
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L. Carricarte. Esq.
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33125
(305)649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
15689 February 10, 17,24;
March 2,1984,
NOTICEOF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Cat* No. 84-0301 S
IN RE THE MARRIAGE
OF MICHAEL PEREZ.
Petitioner-Husband
and
SUSAN B.PEREZ
Respondent-Wife
TO: SUSAN PEREZ.
Residence Address:
6641 E.Calle Alegrta.
Apt. BTuscon
Arizona 85715
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq. 15490
N.W. 7th Ave. Suite 205 Miami.
Florida 33169 on or before
March 2. 1984 and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter, other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition
DATED: January 26. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seali
BY: Kathleen Shaw
As Deputy Clerk
15650 February 3;
10.17.24,1984
NOTICEOF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CS NO. 63-2SM?
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
HERIBERTO TRIANA,
Petitioner Husband
and
NANCY TRLANA,
Respondent-Wife
TO: NANCY TRIANA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been died
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq. 15490
N.W. 7th Ave. Suite 205 Miami,
Florida 83169 on or before
March 2. 1984 and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
DATED: January30,1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: D.C.Bryant
as Deputy Clerk
15661 Februarys;
10.17.24.1984
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 84-455-FC-21
FAMILY DIVISION
FL BAR 34801*
In re the marriage of
EDNA M. CABALLERO
Petitioner
and
RAFAELCABALLERO
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: RAFAEL CABALLERO,
San Gregorio M242.
Los Domlnlcos.
Bayamon.
Puerto RicoOOS 19
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
1 against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses upon: I. J.
GRAFF. ESQ attorney for
| Petitioner, whose address Is
633 N.E 167 St.. North Miami
I Beach Florida 33162. on or
{ before March 16. 1984. and Die
the original with the clerk of
this court otherwise a default
will be entered against you.
Dated: February 10.1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
15700 February 17. 24;
I ___________March 2. 9. 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 84-048*4
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Florida Bar No. 253707
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MANUEL D. MARQUEZ
Petitioner-Husband,
and
MARIA C AN DE LAR D\
GARCLA
Respondent-Wife.
TO: MARIA CANDELARLA
GARCIA
Carretera de Zulueta
Entre Llnea y Egldo.
J Gladys
Placetas. Villa Clara.
Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy ol
your written defenses, if any. to
it on Leonardo P. Mendez.
attorney for Petitlner. whose
address is 1437 S.W. 1st Street.
. Miami. Florida 33135. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before March 16. 1984: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks ir. THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
. WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 9 day of Feb-
ruary'. 19M
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seali
1437 S.W 1st Street
Miami. Fl 33135
Telephone: (305i 649-54S6
Leonardo P. Mendez. Esq
Attorney for Petitioner
15698 February 17.24;
__________March 2, 9.1984
NOTICE UNDER ,
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names
Bunion Clinics of Dade County
Clinics de Juanetes de Dade
County at 1790 W. 49th Street
Suite 305, Hlaleah. Fla. 33012 -
1350 N.E. 163rd St., North
Miami Beach Intends to
register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Donald H. Llpp.
D.P.M., P.A.
15679 February 17, 24;
March 2, 9, 1984
I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-432
Division 83
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BEVERLY RAKOV
Deceased
NOTICE TO
CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE:
Within three months from the
time of the first publication of
this notice you are required to
file with the clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida, 33130, a
written and verified statement
of any claim or demand you
may have against the estate of
BEVERLY RAKOV. deceased
Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due, the date when it
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be
described The claimant shall
deliver a copy of the claim to
the clerk who shall serve the
copy on the personal represen-
tative.
ALL CLAIMS AND
DEMANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Dated February 24.1984
MARK J RAKOV
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
BEVERLY RAKOV
Deceased
PETERH. LEAVY.
Fla. Bar No. 137870
KING. WAYNER. LEAVY A
RABIN
6301 Sunset Drive.
Suite 201-203
So. Miami. Florida 33143
Telephone : ( 3051 666-6000
15720 February 24;
March 2. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
BROTHERS TOWING &
STORAGE at 9640 N.W. South
River Drive. Medley. Florida
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
BROTHERS AUTO AND
TRUCK RECYCLERS. INC.
SAMUEL MILLER
Attorney for owner
15715 February 24;
March 2. 9. 16.1984
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names
International Building Limited
Partnership; International
Building; and International
Office Building at 4556 Adams
Avenue. Miami Beach, Fl.
83140 intend to register said
names with the Clerk of the
Circuit of Dade County,
Florida.
David M. Dobln.
General Partner
Jack Bu rate In
Limited Partner
Robert Marlin.
Limited Partner
Frank Tolln,
Limited Partner
15728 February 24;
March 2.9,16.1984
NOTICEOF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case NO.: 84 04294
ATTORNEYS No. 25275
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OK
I.II.L1E MAE GLOVER.
WIFE
and
ANTHONY GLOVER.
HUSBAND
TO:ANTHONY GLOVER
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq. 15490
N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite 206
Miami, Florida 33169 on or
before March 9. 1984 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
DATED: February 6.1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: ARDEN WONG
aa Deputy Clerk
15684 February 10.17.24;
March 2.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
.. NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.1
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Southeast Food Service Equip-
ment at 9676 S.W. 148th Ave.,
Clr. W. Miami, Fla. 33196 in-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Basil Management A
Associates Inc.
By: Barry Resnlck, Pres.
15697 February 17. 24;
March 2, 9,1984
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF <
THE UTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
CASE NO. 64V 101*4
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
INRE: ESTATE OF
J AME S WALLACE.
Deceased.
TO: The Unknown Spouse,
Heirs. Devisees, or other party
claiming by, through or under
JAMES WALLACE, Deceased
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to re-establish the
lost Will of JAMES WALLACE,
deceased, has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve notice of your
written defenses, if any, to-wlt:
on Petitioner's attorney,
SAMUEL E. SMITH, whose
address Is 1320 S. Dixie High
way. Suite 850. Coral Gables.
Florida, on or before the 4 day
of April. 1984, and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
DATED this 22 day of
February. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
BY:CHARLOTTE W.
GIRARD
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
Published four consecutive
weeks in
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
15726 February 24;
March 2. 9. 16. MM
IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
Case No. 83-2060 CC65
NOTICE OF ACTION
SAC SUPPLY. INC..
Plaintiff.
vs.
CLARENCE D LEE.
Defendant.
TO:CLARENCE D LEE
832 Northwest
146 th Street
Miami. Florida
(LAST KNOWN
RESIDENCE i
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a complaint
for damages for dishonored
checks has been filed against
you and you are requlrted to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it on Ira S.
Sliver. Plaintiffs attorney,
whose address is: Suite 1326.
150 Southeast 2nd Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33131. on or
before March 29. 1984. and file
the original with the clerk of
this court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint.
DATED, on February 21.
1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: AnaL Maury
As Deputy Clerk
15722 February 24:
March 2. 9. 16. 1984
NTHE CIRCUIT eauJ
THE ELEVENTH,?U,T
DADE COUMTtB83
FAMILY D.VIS#
"M EMARRjV
RANDY LO^11
PetlUoner-HusbW
and
HARONMORim.
Respondent wife
NOTICE OF ACTlfiv I
TO. SHARONM fffiRy
2212 Irving St. 8E 'I
Washington DC 2002D
you are NorrHL
an action for 2j
marriage ha, 1 '""*'
against you and m\
required to serve a tJl'
GRAFF. ESQ.. ltt*L;
Petitioner, SUatfSl
633 N.E. 167 St N Mb t^J
33162. on or before yJl
1984. and file the mS2f
th clerk of thS*'
otherwise a d.e(lull J1
entered against you
DATED: February 2 ft .
RICKARDP.BRINKI.I
Clerk of the court
BY K SEIFRIED
As Deputy Clerk
15 Febnar.J
March 2 |. m1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
IRCUIT. IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 84 02877
NOTICE OF SUIT ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
HELENESIMS
Petitioner
and
JERRY J.SIMS
Respondent
TO: JERRY J.SIMS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you. and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It. on JACK P. DRUCKMAN,
Attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 16211 North East
12th Avenue. North Miami
Beach. Florida 33162. and Hie
the original with the Clerk of
the above styled Court on or
before March 2. 1984; other-
wise a Judgment may be en-
tered against you for relief
demanded In the Petition.
THIS NOTICE shall be
published once each week for
four (4) consecutive weeks In
the Jewish Floridlan. 120
Northeast Sixth Street, Miami,
Florida.
WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT AT
MIAMI, FLORIDA on this
January 26,1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
BY: ArdenWong
As Deputy Clerk
JACK P. DRUCKMAN
Attorney for Petitioner
16211 N.E. 12th Avenue
North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162
Telephone: 944-2819
15648 Februarys;
10, 17, 24, 1984
NOTICE UNDER I
FICTITIOUS NAME ui
NOTICE IS HEPU
GIVEN that the undenT
desiring to engage in to,
under the fictitious m
BAYSHORE GLASSWORrf
3584 N.W. 49 Street. MiamJ
33142 intends to reflst,,,
name with the Clerk i
Circuit Court ol Dade Cs
Florida.
BAYSHORE GLASS.
MIRROR. INC
President
15702 February];.
i_________________March m
INTHECIRCUITCOUlf
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDtl
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number mil"
Division 01
TO ALL PERSONS 1IAV3
CLAIMS OR DEMASl
AGAINST THE
ESTATE AND ALL 0t_
PERSONS ginterESTED:
THEgestate.
YOU ARE HERB
NOTIFIED that the ad
stration of the estate ol DIB
MESA, dec eased. File Nunl
83 62M. is pending in the (
cuit gcourl (or Dade Cou
Florida. Probate Division!
address of which is ;3'
Flagler Street. 3rd
Miami. Florida 33130
personal representative oil
estate is ROSARI0 MB
whose address is IMS i\
124th groad. Miami. Fla
The name and address of
personal represent
attorne> are set fcr thbek I
All persons having clainM
demands against the estattj
required. WITHIN Trull
MONTHS FROM THE DA1
OF THE FIRST PIT
TION OF THIS NOTICE.I
with the clerk of the i
court a written statemesj
any claim or demandthtysj
have Eac h I laim must!
writing and musl indicate]
basis for the claim, their
and address of the credM
his agent or attorney, wj
amount claimed Iflhecij
not yet due the date 1
will become due shall |
stated. If the claim is e
gent or unliquidated
nature of the uncertainty'
be stated. If the claim J
cured, the security shallJ
scribed. The claimant."
deliver sufficient copies*]
claim totheclerktoeiuMJ
clerk to mall one copy ir
personal representative.
All persons Interested"!
estate to whom a copy *]
Notice of Administrate]
been mailed are req*
WITHIN THREE MM
FROM THE DATE OF I
FIRST PUBLICATION
THIS NOTICE, to 111* l
jectlons they may *1
challenge, the validity
decedent's will. J
fiction, of the p.r>
resentauve. or the vn|
jurisdiction of the court
filed wax be row 1
BARRED. L
date of the r.t puWjejg
this Notice of Adminui"
February 24. l
ROSARIO MBS*
As Personal Repr**"*
of the Estate of
DIEGO MESA
ATTORNEY FOR PEH
REPRESENTATIVE.
LAW OFFICESI0F A
ARMANDO J.BgJgpl
DAVID I SCHL"
ESQ
.9601S.W. 27 th A venue
Miami. Florida 33145
Telephone: (306)#gJ
18719 |ur-sl


>ublic Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
I (NO PROPERTY)
In THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
Em eleventh judicial
PciRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
'civil Action NO. 84-OSill
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
K re THE MARRIAGE OF
[ RIGOBERTO FUENTES.
Husband.
[RAQUEL FUENTES.
Wife.
RAQUELFUENTES
CarreteradelSur,
Casa No. 4
Tegucigalpa,
Honduras
|you ARE HEREBY
0TIF1ED that an action for
fcssolution of Marriage has
n filed against you and you
I required to serve a copy of
_jr written defenses, if any, to
Ion Albert L. Carricarte. PA.,
Eorney for Petitioner, whose
dress is 2491 N.W. 7th Street.
Bami. Florida 33128, and file
original with the clerk of
above styled court on or
re March 16, 1984; other-
... a default will be entered
Blnst you for the relief de-
nded in the complaint or
lion.
us notice shall be published
each week for four con-
fcutlve weeks In THE
JwiSH FLORID IAN.
[VITNESS my hand and the
il of said court at Miami,
brida on this 13 day of Feb-
Ary. 1984.
| RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
DadeCounty, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
Ircult Court Seal)
pertL. Carricarte. P.A.
N.W. 7th Street
nl. Florida 33126
tone: 1306)649-7917
ey for Petitioner
February 17. 24;
March tj, 1884
I THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
. CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
^ADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. I4-0M02
FAMILY DIVISION
FLBAR3M0U
|rethe marriage of
LDA HALL
(etitloner-
lANI.EY HALL
Respondent NOTICE OF
riON
STAN1.F.Y HALL
Residence Unknown
roi ARE NOTIFIED that
action for dissolution of
Image has been filed
inst you and you are re-
Ired to serve a copy of your
fltt<-n defenses to it on 1
ROME GRAFF. ESQ.,
lorni-v for Petitioner, whose
is 633 N.E. 167 St..
|i It Florida 33162. on or be
March 9. 1984. and file the
Iginal with the clerk of this
ui' otherwise a default will
uttered against you.
llfil February 1,1964
IRlfHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By Arden Wong
As Deputy Clerk
February 10, 17.24;
March 2,1984
NOTICE UNDER
'ICTITIOUS NAME LAW
(IOTICE IS HEREBY
VEN that the undersigned,
tiring to engage in business
d /ENDI at Miami, Dade
linty, Florida intends to
lister said name with the
|rk of the Circuit Court of
de County, Florida.
Scandlnova, Inc.
A Fla. Corp.
By: JacobSafdeye,
OP resident
February 17, 24;
March 2. 9. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
[FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
/EN that the undersigned.
iring to engage In business
der the fictitious name LAW
'"ICE OF LAMCHICK,
I.UCKSMAN & JOHNSTON,
at 10661 North Kendall
Ive, Suite 217. Miami. FL
|78 Intends to register said
ne with the Clerk of the Clr-
Court of Dade County
prlda.
BRUCE LAMCHICK
President
SVEN G. GLUCKSMAN.
Sec-Tres.
IONALD A. JOHNSTON.
Vice President
As all officers
and directors of
^MCHICK. GLUCKSMAN
* JOHNSTON, P.A.
&UCE LAMCHICK
ney for Corporation
UN. Kendall Dr..
111*
phone: (906)696-6333
February 10.17.24;
March 2.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Cat* No. (4-03212
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
NILDA TSOUKALAS.
Petitioner-Wife
and
NAPOLEON TSOUKALAS
Respondent-Husband
TO: NAPOLEON TSOUKALAS
Residence Address:
58 Metropolitan Avenue,
Bronx. NY. 11101
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq. 15490
N.W. 7th Ave, Suite 206 Miami,
Florida 33169 on or before
March 2, 1984 and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the Petition.
DATED: January27,1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
I Circuit Court Seal I
BY: K. Shaw
as Deputy Clerk
15654 February 3.10;
________ .________17.24.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case NO. 84-0327*
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BERNARD GONZALES,
Petitioner-Husband
and
FALCON GONZALES,
Respondent-Wife
TO: FALCON GONZALES
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to it on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq. 15490
N.W. 7th Ave. Suite 206 Miami.
Florida 33169 on or before
March 2, 1984 and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court elgher before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
DATED: January 27. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: K Shaw
As Deputy Clerk
15656 February 3, 10;
17.24, 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Mail-
ing Methods at 9712 Hammocks
Blvd., Bldg 30 Unit 103, Miami,
Florida 33196 intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dated: January 31.1984
Edgar Sanabrla
Owner's Name
Attorney for Owner
Sanford S. Faunce
6601 SW 123 Street
Miami. Florida 33156
15675 February 17, 24;
March 2. 9, 1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Cat* NO. 64-03J?3
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BILL DALEY, HUSBAND
and
HELEN A. DALEY. WIFE
TO: HELEN A. DALEY
Residence Address:
Oak Forest Apartments- Apt.
4
Belton.S. Carolina.
Anderson County. 29627
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of
marriage hs been filed against
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any, to It on Bruce
N. Crown. Esq. 16490 N.W. 7th
Avenue. Suite 206 Miami.
Florida S3169 on or before
March 2. 1984 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the Petition.
DATED: January SO, 1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER Clerk
of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: Kathleen Shaw
as Deputy Clerk
18882 Februarys;
10.17,24,1984
INTHECIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 64-1149
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WILLIAM WOODS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST gthe ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the admini-
stration of the estate of
WILLIAM WOODS, deceased.
File Number 84-1149. is pending
In the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 73 W. Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate Is
EMANUEL J. SMITH, whose
address is 3100 South Mia
Avenue, gmlami. Florida. The
name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice Administration:
February 17. 1984.
EMANUEL J. SMITH
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
WILLIAM WOODS
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
SILVER* SILVER
Max R. Silver
Suite 1326-
.50S.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33131
Max R. Silve;-: Bar No. 073967
gtelephone: (305) 374-4888
15704 February 17.24. 1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name H & R
Master Finish at 1351 N. E. 211
Street, North Miami Beach,
Fla. 33179 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Herlberto Rodriguez,
Owner
15695 February 17.24;
March 2.9.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
SUNDEK BY AIR-FLOW at 320
N. W. 170th Street. North
Miami Beach, Fla. 38169 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
AIR-FLOW
ENTERPRISES, INC.
By: Gene A. Latham,
President
16677 February 17.24;
March 2.9,1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
PUBLTMED INTER-
AMERICA at 611 Catalonia
Ave.. Coral Gables. Fla. 33134
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
RAMON DIEGO.
Owner
15699 February 17.24;
March 2.9.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTION SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 84-03389
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
SUSANA SIERRA a-k-a
SUSANA FRANCO
Petitioner-Wife
and
DIEGO SIERRA
Respondent-Husband
TO: DIEGO SIERRA
Avenida Marino,
SurNo. 189.
Estado Aragua
Maracay, Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
it on Leonardo P. Mendez,
Esq., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1437 S.W. 1st
Street, Miami, Florida 33135,
Tel: (306) 649-5486, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
March 2, 1984; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded lr,
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 30th day of
January. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C. P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(CircuitCourt Seal)
Leonardo P. Mendez, Esq.
1487 S.W. 1st Street
Miami. FL 33135
Tel: (306)649-6486
15863 February 3.10,17, 24,1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO Property)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 84-05710
IN RE: The Marriage Of
FRANK DO RLE AN.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
BETTY ANN DORLEAN.
Respondent-Wife.
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
(Fla. Bar No. 868081)
TO: BETTY ANN DORLEAN
Last Residence
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
it on BRENT E. ROUTMAN,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 181 Northeast 82nd
Street. Miami. Florida 33138,
and file the original with the
Clerk of the above-styled court
on or before March 23, 1984;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDI AN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Dade County. Florida on this 15
day of February. 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROUTMAN & ROUTMAN
Attorneys at Law
Attorneys for Petitioner
Attention: Brent E. Routman,
Esquire
181 N.E. 82nd Street
Miami, Florida33138
Telephone: (305)757-5800
15712 February 24;
March 2, 9.16.1984
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cat* No. 84-05482
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION OF
MIAMI, a United States
Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CARLOS RAFAEL HEREDI A.
etal..
Defendants.
TO: CARLOS RAFAEL
, HEREDIA and FIORELLA
de HEREDIA. his wife.
Carrera 8a. No. l-B-9,
Qulnta Mamana
Collnas de Santa Rosa,
Barqulslmeto, Edo. Lara,
VENEZUELA
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED, that an action to
foreclose a mortgage on the
following described property In
DADE County. Florida:
Unit A of CUMBERTOWN
CONDOMINIUM No. 2-28.
according to the Declaration of
Condominium, filed July 29,
1980, In Official Records Book
10824. at Page 372. of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida; together with all
Improvements, appliances,
and fixtures has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
Keith. Mack, Lewis St Allison.
Plaintiff's attorneys, whose
address Is 111 N.E. 1st Street,
Miami, Florida S8182, on or
before March 16, 1984, and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Plaintiff's attorneys or
Immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be
entered against your for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on the 14 day of
February, 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
BY: Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
16706 February 17,24;
March 2,9 1984
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
f COURT
, DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: The Marriage of
' DINA ROSITA EVERSON
Petitioner
and
WILLIE RAYMOND
SVERSON.JR.
Respondent-
To: WILLIE RAYMOND
EVERSON. JR.
Residence unknown,
shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dis-
solution of Marriage upon
CEORGE NICHOLAS, at-
torney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue,
Miami, Florida, 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
lefore March 2,1984, otherwise
a default will be entered.
January 27,1984
RICHARD BRINKER
By: Arden Wong
Deputy Clerk
15658 February S. 10,
17.24.1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 44 3*5
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN MARKS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of BENJAMIN MARKS,
deceased. File Number 84-365.
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom this
notice was mailed that chal-
lenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this NoUce has
begun on February 17,1984.
. Personal Representative:
Minnie Mallnsky
Apt. 6A
801 Meridian Avenue,
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
JOSHUA S. GALITZER
633 N.E. 167 Street
No. Miami Beach. Fl. SSI62
Telephone: (305) 653 3538
16707 February 17, 24.1984
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
SS.
The undersigned under oath
says: It la the Intention of the
undersigned to engage In a
business enterprise under the
fictitious name of JIMMY'S
GULF SERVICE STATION
Located at 1726 79th Street
Causeway, in the City of North
Bay Village, Dade County.
Florida.
Those interested In said en-
terprise, and the extent of the
interest of each. Is as follows:
JAMES VINCENT
VARRONE
100 percent Interest
(sole owner)
15661 February S. 10.
17,24,1984
C
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Inter-
rlor Building Concepts at 3670
NW 78 St., Miami, Fla. 33147
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Interior Building
Concepts, Inc.
By: Sheldon Jaffee,
Pres.
15673 February 17, 24;
March 2, 9. 1984
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-764
Division 03
Florida Bar No. 044228
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MO/TON POSNER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
-state of MILTON POSNER,
deceased, File Number 84-764,
Is pending in the Circuit Court
|for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler
'Street, Miami. Florida. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
i the personal representative's
[ attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualif-
ications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris-
diction of the court
ALL (".AIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 24.1984.
Personal Representative:
SAMUEL I. LEFF and
FLAGSHIP NATIONAL
BANK OF MIAMI.
1387 N.E. 162nd Street
No. Miami Beach.
| Fla. 33162
| Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LEFF. PESET8KY It ZACK
1387 N.E. 162nd Street
No. Miami Beach.
Fla.33162
Telephone: 946-7601
15718 February 24;
March 2.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 84-04408
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JORGE GONZALEZ,
Petitioner,
and
ESTELA M. LIZARAZO
ALEMAN.
Respondent.
TO: ESTELA M.
LIZARAZO ALEMAN
Agulla 160
Entre Bemal y Trocadero
Centre Habana
Habana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
it on MELVIN J. ASHER ESQ..
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1860 S.W. 8th Street.
Suite 206. Miami, Florida 33135,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
m or before March 09. 1984;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 7 day of
February, 1984.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY: Kathleen Shaw
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18688 February 10.17,24;
------------------.____Marr.h 2. mu
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
QUALITY HOME TOOLS at
7012 S.W. 4th Street, Miami,
Dade County. Florida, Intends
I to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Lank ford Equipment
Company, Inc.
By: JamesB. Lankford,
President
LeoPlotkln.P.A.
Attorney for Lankford
Equipment Company, Inc.
15849 February S. 10,17. 24.1984 .


S**R
1.......LL .1.
a$e*TcVtF'
55wrRfT
frre"unft>yrM, T y Public Notice
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
. CI HXR1
.:...':
desiring 10 engage in business
under the I name J fc B
Appliance! at 2ul3 H
Annul Miami. Florida in-
tends to register said name
Air. the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Jear. V.ajcman.
50 percent owner
William E Geller.
50 percent owner
Gary P Cohen. P A
Attorney for Applicant
y;-7 February ll7-9*
VUrch2.1*M
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOU* NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business '
under the fictitious name Three
G Body Craft at 5201 N W 36th
Ave.. Miami. Fl* Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Varentln Castellanos
Owner
| MB February 10.17.34;
March 2.1N< -
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number S3-42S4
Di vision fl
TO ALL PERSONS HAVrNG
CLAMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS glnterESTED IN
THE gestate.
YOL ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the admini-
stration of the estate of DIEGO
MESA, deceased. File Number
83-6284 is pending in the Clr
cult gcourt for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. 3rd Floor
Miami. Florida 33130 The
personal representative of the
estate is ROSARIO MESA.
whose address is 10525 S.W.
124th groad. Miami. Florida
The name and address of the
personal representative's I
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
wtDi the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent-or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due, the date when 11
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contln
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is se
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
date of the first publication of
this Notice of Administration:
February 34.1964.
ROSARIO MESA
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
DIEGO MESA
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LAW OFFICES OF
ARMANDO J. BUCELO. JR
DAVID I. SCHLOSBERG,
ESQ.
M0 S.W. 77th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33145
Telephone: (806) 442-1942
16719 February 24
March 21,198".
F
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In buslnness
under the fictitious name Joyce
Lynn Interiors at 18200 N. w
27th Ave.. Miami, Fla Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Conunty, Florida.
Marie Joycelyne Lebreton.
Owner
15714 February 24
March 2, 9.16, 19*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-447
Division 01
IN RE ESTATE OF
JACOB A SCHWARTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMLMSTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HA%1NG
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THEESATE
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the admini
stratum of the estate of JACOB
A. SCHWARTZ, deceased. File
Number 84-447. Is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 73 West Flagler St. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate is
Rose SchwarU and Arlene
Ostrover, whose addresses are
2301 Collins Ave Miami
Beach FL and 188 Mountain-
wood Rd. Stamford. Conn. The
name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBUCA
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name >
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the .
amount claimed If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
win become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated If the claim Is se-
cured the security shall be de-
scribed The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO-
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED ,
Date of the first publication I
of this Notice of Admini-
stration: February 17, 1984
ROSE SCHWARTZ and
ARLENE OSTROVER
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JACOB A SCHWARTZ
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL '
REPRESENTATIVE:
KATHLEEN MARKEY |
Myers, Kenln, Levlnson.
Ruffner, Frank A- Richards
1428 Brlckell Ave -
Suite 700
Miami, Florida 33131
Telephone: (305) 371-9041
15709 February 17. 24.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name THE
CLOISTERS ASSOCIATES, a
Florida General Partnership at
No 700, 1866 79th Street Cause-
way, Miami, Florida 33141
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
MG CLOISTERS, INC.
BELESE
INVESTMENTS, INC.
LARIMAR CORPORATION
JOMEK CORPORATION
MOSTER CORPORATION
ROITSA CORPORATION
KOWO CORPORATION
DANIEL RETTER, ESQUIRE
Attorney for
THE CLOISTERS
ASSOCIATES
No. 2280 AmerlFlrst Bldg.
One Southeast Third Ave.
Miami. Florida 33181-1777
15717 February 24'
March 3. 9.16.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name THE
DENT MAN at 9680 N.W. South
River Drive, Medley. Florida
Intends to register amid name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
BROTHERS AUTO AND
TRUCK RECYCLERS. INC.
SAMUEL MILLER
Attorney for owner
15716 February 24
March 2, 9.16.1984 I
r
INTHECIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 84-SI3
Division 84
IN RE. ESTATE OF
ADOLFHALPERT
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
067064
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHEP.
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that he admini-
stration of the estate of ADOLF
HALFERT. deceased File
Number 84-513. is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
is 73 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate Is SALLY
HACKENBERG, whose ad-
dress Is 86 White Pine Lane.
Princeton. New Jersey 08640
The name and address of the
personal representative
attorney are set forth below
All persons having claims or.
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated. the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the e'erk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Admini-
stration: February 24. 1984.
SALLY HACKENBERG
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ADOLF HALPERT
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES:
MARVIN I. MOSS. P.A.
P. O. Box 546250
Surfslde. Florida 33154
Telephone: 866-6736
16711 February 24:
March 2.1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name NEW
YORK. NEW YORK,
RESTAURANT AND
LOUNGE at 7250 N.W. 11 St.,
Miami. Fl 33126 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
RAMADA RESTAURANTS
CORPORATION
By: JAY BORKOWSKY,
Pres.
HARVEY D. ROGERS
Attorney for RAMADA
RESTAURANTS
Corporation, a Florida Cor
Deration
15701 February 17, 24: March 2
9, IBM
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names B.J.
and J.C., INC. a Florida corpo
ration, doing Business as
WARREN J. WEISS.
ASSOCIATES, at 9822 N.E. 2nd
Avenue. Miami Shores. Florida
33138 Intends to register said
names with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
EDWIN A. WILLINGER,
Attorney for Corporation.
B.J. and J.C. INC. a Florida
corporation,
d-b-a WARREN J. WEISS
ASSOCIATES
209 Lincoln Drexel Building,
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
15690 February 10,17, 24;
March 2,1984
NOTICEOF ACTION
CONSTRUCTION SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 84-0317*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of:
VIVIAN A GONZALEZ
Petitioner-Wife
and
OSMIN GONZALEZ
Respondent-Husband
TO: Osmin Gonzalez
3870 Broadway
New York City
New York 10082
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
it on HYMAN P. GALBUT.
ESQUIRE. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
999 Washington Avenue, Miami
Beach. Fla. 33139. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
March 21. 1984: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 26th day of
January. 1984.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal i
Attorney for Petitioner:
Hyman P Galbut. Esq
GALBUT. GALBUT and
MEN IN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. FL 33139
15657 February 3. 10.17. 24.1984
NOTICEOF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case NO.: 84-0430*
ATTORNEYS N0.2S27S
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EDUARDOMEJIA.
Petitioner- HU SB AN D
and
SUSAN MEJLV
Respondent WIFE
TO: SUSAN MEJIA
Residence Address:
13371 Roberto Circle.
Garden Grove. California
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq. 15490
N.W. 7th Ave Suite 205 Miami.
Florida 33169 on or before
March 9. 1984 and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
DATED: February6.1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal*
BY: B. J.FOY
as Deputy Clerk
15683 February 10,17. 24;
---------.__________March 2.1984
NOTICEOF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 84-0413S
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BELETAKAY
CARROTHERS.
PeUtloner-WIFE
and
JOE B. CARROTHERS.
Respondent -HUSBAND
TO: JOE B. CARROTHERS,
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq., 15490
N.W. 7th Ave.. Suite 206.
Miami. Florida 33169 on or be-
fore March 9. 1984 and file the
original with the clerk of this I
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter, otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the Petition.
DATED: February 3. 1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Cleric of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: Clarinda Brown
as Deputy Clerk
15678 February 10. 17,24;
March 2.1984
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTION SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 84-03347
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
ROQUE ALBERTO BAKAT
Petitioner.
and
IBISBARAT
Respondent
TO: IBIS BARAT
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
it on MELVTN J. ASHER.
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 1850 S.W. 8th
Street Suite 906, Miami. I
Florida 33135. and file the
original with the clerk of the |
above styled court on or before l
March 2. 1984; otherwise aj
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In <
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 30th day of
January. 1984
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC P.COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
15664 February 3.10, 17. 24.1984

NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTION SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 64-03366
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of:
LIZZETTE MARIA VEGA
Petitioner,
and
CARLOS MANUEL SOTO
Respondent
TO Carlos Manuel Solo
97 Pitt Street Apt No. 1
New York. NY 10002
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
it on MELVIN J ASHER.
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner
whose address is 1880 S.W. 8th
Street. Miami. Florida 33135.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before March 2. 1984.
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petiuon.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 30th day ol
January. 1984
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
15659 February 3, 10.17, 24,1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Desk
Concepts at 3670 NW 76 St..
Miami. Fla. 33147 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Desk Concepts. Inc.
By: Sheldon Jaffe.
Pres.
15674 February 10.17,24;
March 2,1984
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Canaan Fruit Market at 1368 N
E. 163rd Street North Miami
Beach. Fla. 33162 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Julio Marlines, Owner
Richard I. Kroop. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
15682 February 10.17. 24;
March 2.1984
NOTICE OP ACTIOn r
CONSTRUCTION,;,0;}
'NTHEClRC^TcOURTOiJ
THEELE.ES'hjX^I
CIRCUIT OP PLORIDA*!
*"D FOR DADE COUNT? 11
CIVILACTION I
NO N-033SI
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTkhJ
OF MAHR,age 1
IN RE TheMarrue.o!
ARNOLD JEAN LOUIS
Husband
and
CLORENEJEANLOfjs
Wife
TO CloreneJeanLouu
186 Ruelle Abattoir*
Gonaives Haiti
YOU ARE HERFwl
NOTIFIED that an iS2|
Dissolution of MarrhctS
been filed against you ssiBBsi
are required to sen* (JJ
your written defense* tfam Jl
it on Albert L Carncan, p. I
attorney for Petmoner, wn.1
address U 2491 N w TUiShTI
Miami. Florida 33125. and 0,1
the original with the clerk the above styled court on .1
before March 2. 1964; o0fl
wise a default will be enui*!
against you for th ni$M
demanded in the complaint 1
petition
This notice shall be publm* I
once each ween for fourccsl
secutive weens in Tttl
JEWISH FLORIDIAN 1
WITNESS my hand and Ik I
seal of said court at Miaafl
Florida on this 30th day M
January. 1984
RICHARD!- BRLNKER I
As Clerk. Circuit Cowl
Dade County Florida
Byclar:m'..abrown I
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court seal i
Attorney for Petitioner:
Albert L Carncarte,Ea)
2491 N W 7th Street
Miami. Florida .'.3125
Telephone 309 849-TM1
16660 FeOruar. 10 17.24.lBH
INTHE CIRCUIT COURTOTI
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL^
CIRCUIT. IN ANDFOR j
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA I
GENERAL JURISDICTION I
DIVISION
CASE NO. W-0377?
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL I
SAVINGS AND Uial
ASSOCIATION OF MIAMI,.1
United States Corporation.
Plaintiff.
vs.
MARTIN P LSIAK.etll
Defendant-
TO: ||
MARTIN P s:.AK. residnal
unknown, if alive andifdolM
to all of the unknown -
devisees, grant.-. -
lienholders. creditors, tr
or otherwise lalmini
through, uncle: I sga
said MARTIN I I U
all other pa:: I I >
claiming to have any ngnt.utt|
, or Interest in and to
property under force
; herein
YOU ARE NOTIFIED Ml
i an action to foreclose a m*|
tgage on the followinjl
described property in DADEI
, County, Florida aj
Lot 76. in Block < >J
SNAPPER CREEii.
: TOWNHOL'SES SECT.0
TWO. according to the r*|
: thereof, recorded in Pl*|*
I 94. at Page M. of the P*
Records of Dade Co*
Florida
has been filed against |
and you are required toservMl
copy of your writun k*l
: If any, to it on Keith. W|
and Allison. Plain* I
.address if IH|
Vfo
;eT
I
.-.i

;CC
Lewis
attorneys, whose **"
N.E. 1st Street. Mmi.'
_____ ._ -- >...,.r*. MarcB *
on
1984. a
the Clerk
before service
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name R *
W FLORALS, INC.. DBA
DISTINCTIVE FLORALS
LTD. at 1885N.E. 149 St.. North
Miami. Fl. 33181 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
Richard Zee man
15693 Febraury 10.17.24:
March 2.1984
33132. on or before Marc"!
nd file the original m
of this Court eW
on PlamtUn
attorneys or immediate
thereafter; otherw!se,
default will be enteredlag*
you for the relief demandeor
the complaint tmm*M
WITNESS my hand and -
of this Court on the 27 da)
January. 1984 ___
RICHARD P BRINKS."
Clerk of the Court
By:K SEIFRIED
Deputy Clerk
16668 February 3.10,17. M.>"
NOTICE UND6R
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
NOTICE IS *2
GIVEN that the una>r
desiring to engage In_**
under the flcUUousns*f,
WIX at 828 Arthur Wg
Road. Miami Beach. M
33140 intends to regM"
name with Iht> Cg *
Circuit Court of Dade Cowy
F,or, By:RUTHFEUEK.
Post Office Box 4020OT
MUm. Beach, F.o^al
,5668 ^^2.1


Panel on Justice
A panel discussion on the
"Criminal Justice System and
You" will highlight a 12:46 p.m.
meeting of the Miami Beach
Lodge of B'nai B'rith Feb. 24 in
the civic auditorium of the 100
Lincoln Road Building.
Panelists will include Dade
Circuit Court Judge Marguerite
Esquiros, former Dade County
Judge Milton Starkman, former
Dade Assistant Public Defender
David Peckins, and Miami Beach
attorney Amy Steele Donner.
Gerald Schwartz, past
president of the Beach Lodge,
will moderate the panel.
im M. Lehman, Jr. of
jm Lehman Buick, Inc.
[recently elected 1984-85
lent of the South Florida
mobile Dealers Associa-
He is president of the
el-Ann Russell Jewish
%unity Center.
I Steele Donner, Miami
attorney, has an-
ed her candidacy for the
bounty Circuit Court. A
ite of the University of
I School of Law, Donner
forked as law clerk or
ite with Dade Circuit
Irving Cypen, Milton
an and Leonard
i. She is a founder of
Sinai Hospital and
as co-chairperson of the
Beach Commission on
itus of Women.
lish Winkle Meets
] Yiddish Culture Winkle
lold its sixth cultural
March Sat 10:30 a.m. at
Ner Tamid. Guest
will be Dora Mesiel. who
Mew the writings of Eli
Ian. Also at the meeting,
lonus will sing and be
lanied by Shmuel Fershko.

iS
!t


*J0b^
Nathan Konigsberg
New President for
Furniture Association
Nathan Konigsberg, president
of Kane's Masterbuilt, Miami,
one of the pioneers in the fur-
niture manufacturing business in
Florida, has been elected 1984
president of the Florida Asso-
ciation of Furniture Manufac-
turers (FAFM).
Konigsberg, along with the
other 1984 officers, will be in-
stalled Saturday, March 3 at the
FAFM's annual dinner at the
Miami Springs Villas.
Serving as vice president for
1984 will be Donald Blechman;
secretary, Leo Martin; and
treasurer, Camilo Lopez.
Three past presidents
Dennis Lentin, Harold Beck and
Max Friedman will also serve
on the board, along with newly
elected board members Stanley
Ferber, Ralph Federki, Jack
Block and Keith Baucom.
26640 Greenfield Rd.
Oak Park. Michigan 48237
Obituaries
COOPER
Esther. SO, Cooper City, passed av.ay
Feb. 14. A resident for the past 16 years,
coming from New York City. She was a
teacher with the Dade County School
system for seven years In special
education. Survived by husband. Alan:
son. Seth Adam: mother, Luba
Borensteln: four brothers and one
sister. Services held Feb. 16. Gordon.
NAKDIMEN
Rosa, passed away Feb. 14. A resident
for over 30 years, formerly of New
York. Survived by sister. Harriet
(Bernard) Tanenbaum. Services held,
Rubin-ZUbert.
PITTELL
Dorothy J.. 78, Hlllcrest, passed away
Feb. 17. A resident for 16 years, coming
from Buffalo. Survived by husband.
Bernard; son, Dr. Robert Plttell; three
grandchildren, and sister, Jeanette
Feldman of Woodmere, L. I. She was a
member of the Hlllcrest Hadassah.
Services held Feb 19, Riverside.
SUNNESS
Betty, 60. Delray Beach, passed away
Feb. 18. Originally from Scranton, Pa.,
she was a 34-year resident of Miami
before moving to Delray Beach. Sur-
vived by husband. Stewart; son. Bob
Sunness of Chicago; daughters, Linda
Cohen of Miami. Patricia Stanley of
PlantaUon: brothers, Irwln Isaacs of
Scranton, Pa.. Dr. Herman Isaacs of
Cincinnati, Ohio, and five grand-
children. Services held Feb. 20. Gordon.
Mt. Nebo.
ROSOW
F.lllott S, 66, passed away Feb. 18. He
was born In Hartford, but had resided In
Miami for the last 30 years. He was
president of Broodmoor Pharmacy for
20 years, and served on the advisory
board of the Peoples Bank of Miami
Shores and Peoples Liberty National
Bank of North Miami and was a
member of the Footllghters. Survived
by wife, Ruth (Carp); daughter. Paula
of Miami Beach; and two brothers.
Norman and Peter, of West Hartford.
Services held Feb. 20, Gordon.
nm
KOLLER, Laura, Bay Harbor Island",
Feb. 17. Riverside.
MOSS, Esther, 83, Miami, Feb. 17,
Gordon. Mt. Nebo.
SIEGEL, Hugo, Feb. 17, Riverside, Star
of David.
MERV1S, Jack. 77, Bay Harbor.
BARON. Louis, Miami Beach, Feb. IB,
Rubln-ZUbert.
COHEN, Helen. 87, North Miami Beach.
Levltt-Welnsteln.
COPLON, Betty, Surtalde, Rubln-
ZUbert.
DOBKINS, Sol, Miami Beach, Rubln-
ZUbert.
SHAMUS, Slgmund S., 79, Point East,
Feb. 19, Riverside, Star of David.
SHAPIRO, Lena,, 89. North Miami.
Feb. 19, Gordon.
STERNBERG. Helen R., North Miami
Beach, Feb. 19. Menorah.
WEISBERG. Bella. 68. North Miami
Beach, Feb. 19, Riverside.
AGIN. Louis, North Miami Beach,
Menorah.
GORALNICK. Esther. 61. Bay Harbor
Island. Feb. 19. Menorah.
LEWIS. Ray. Miami Beach. Feb 19,
Blasberg.
ARONOV, Benjamin, 93, Feb. 21.
Riverside, Mt. Nebo.
BELSKY. Morris, 73, Miami Beach,
Feb. 20, Riverside.
PEARLMAN, Mrs. Frieda E., West
Palm Beach, Feb. 21, Rubln-ZUbert.
VINIK, EdnaK.,Feb.20, Rlverlsde.
BOBAK, Maria, Miami. Feb. 22, Rubln-
ZUbert.
FEUERMAN, Sol, 90. North Miami
Beach, Feb. 22. Riverside.
GORDON, Meyer. Miami Beach. Rubin-
ZUbert.
LUBLIN, Edith, 76. North Miami
Beach, Feb. 22. Levltt-Welnsteln.
RAFF, Birdie Fay, 79, North Miami
Beach. Feb. 22. Levltt-Welnsteln.
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GOLDBERG
Loula. 82. Miami, paased away Feb. 20.
A resident for the part 27 years, coming
from Baltimore. Survived by daughters
Barbara Merkle and Gllda Fried, boih
of Miami; slaters. Ruth Goldberg anil
Sarah Dwartr, both of Baltimore; six
grandchildren and one grea'
grandchild Services held Feb.
Gordon.
TODD
Martha, Miami Beach, passed awav
Feb. IB. A resident for 31 years, for-
merly of New York. Survived by
husband. Robert S.; daughters, Vlolette
T. (Arthur) Kahn and Sonya R. (Simon
Pltler, three grandchildren and two
great-grandchildren. She was a
member of Temple Israel and a Hie
member of Temple Israel Sisterhood I
member of Hadassah and llfe-memb'"'
of Ocean Harber ORT. Services hel.i
Feb. 22, Riverside.
GORALNICK, Esther. 61. Bay Harbor
Island, Feb. 19. Menorah
LEWIS. Ray. Miami Beach. Feb. 1
Blasberg.
ARONOV, Benjamin. 3. Feb. 2
Riverside, Mt. Nebo
BELSKY, Morris, 73. Miami Beac-i
Feb. 20. Riverside.
PEARLMAN, Mrs. Frieda E.. West
Palm Beach. Feb 21. Rubin Zllbert.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
Max Raskin
February 12,1890 February 20,1984
Max Raskin, a 27 year resident of Miami Beach, passed away
February 20, 1984 at the age of 94. Mr. Raskin came to the United
Sates from Vilna, Poland in 1905. He made his home in St. Paul, Min-
nesota before retiring to Miami Beach. Surviving Mr. Raskin are: his
wife, Ida D., a sister, Sadie Meyers of Miami Beach, 3 sons; Kenneth
of North Miami, Aaron of Minneapolis, David of Portland, Oregon and
1 daughter, Marion Oakes of Minneapolis. Also, 17 grandchildren and
6 greatgrandchildren. Funeral arrangements are in Minneapolis.
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH 'THE ASSURED PLAN"
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Directors o* A-nenoa
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Funeral Direi
865-2353 m.am.
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bJ m
hy is this memorial park
different from all others?
Important answers to 4 Questions
Why is Lakeside considered the Lugest and moat beautiful
all-|ewish memorial park in South Florida'
Lakeside is set among,
surrounding a large lak
Lakeside is set among acres of green space trees and flowers
ike. all interlace with wide paved roads
lust minutes from anywhere in Dade or Broward
\
\
Why is Lakeside considered the most rea
memorial park in South Florida'
anably priced
Qa
Our pre-need plans allow vou substantial savings over ot lei
parks that ofter less than Lakeside And Lakeside has a perpetual
care fund in excess of a million dollars on deposit at a local bank
assuring there will never be a care or maintenance cha; .-
Lakeside plot ownei
What is the unique quality of the grave sites at Lakeside'
Each plot is fronted hy a sidewalk that allows m
accessibility and sanctitv mat the tvpicai memorial par
not pro.
How does Lakeside fill the needs oi all-Jewish families'
We have set aside areas lor upright memorial-; strict iv ."thodox
burials and inspiring mausoleums all meticulously mam.ained
To obtain tne complete story on Lakeside or to arrange an
esc one j tout without obligation, call todav
. Joes
lakeside.
A trdltioii since 19S5
lOKHNW 25th Street
DADE HOWARD
$92-0690 525-93)9
Frossdly offering memorials by Gotham
aster craftsmen In bronse


Page 20-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 24, 1984
*

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STUDIOS, EFFICIENCIES
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SALES OFFICE MODELS OPEN 7 DAYS A.M. 6 P JR.


February 1984
FREE

RALLY 8a
to Save Soviet Jews
Sunday, March 11
peacock Park
Supplement to the Jewish Floridian Section C, February 24,1984
,_-
^


?""'.'m- tn..X~-~~*
TUcrmar:
Federation, February, 1984
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
February 24,1984 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137 -
President
Norman H. Lipoff
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee
Eli Timoner
contents
CAMPAIGN 3
A message from the cja-ief Chairman
Former Israeli prime minister to speak at Mercantile Dinner
Special representative of Israeli government to assist 84 campaign
CAMPAIGN /PLANNING & BUDGET 4
upcoming High Rise events
Attorneys Campaign underway
Planning and Budget Subcommittee studies Jewish education
PROJECT RENEWAL 5
Dance troupe inspires pride in Israel community
Federation committee to visit Miami's sister city
6
7
8&9
Medication tips from Mount Sinai Medical center
WOMEN'S DIVISION
See the women's Division in action
women's Division calendar
SOVIET JEWRY/FREEDOM RALLY'84
A profile of a Refusenik filmmaker and his family
communitywide rally for Soviet Jewry on March 11
Soviets intensify anti-Semitic campaign
SOUTH DADE
Study for new JCC facility continues
Ciora Feidman, master clarinetist, to appear in concert
South Dade Midrasha lecture series
JCC sponsors mammoth auction
ISRAEL/AU YAH
New Israeli community for middle-age immigrants
Computerized care for pregnant diabetics
Planning continues for spectacular Israel 36 celebration
Aliyah conference slated for April
AGENCIES /LONG RANGE PLANNING
JASS services Jewish singles
Hiilei students attend UJA mission
Long range planning process enters phase two
North Dade Midrasha "Journey Through Culture
FOUNDATION
Charitable investments can yield lifetime income
CABLE TV
JFT soon available to entire Creater Miami community
"We Remember" perpetuates memory of the Holocaust
Programming schedule
CALENDAR
10
11
12
13
14
15


Federation, February, 1984
message from the chairman
/ >
\ward R. Scharlin
The 1984 Combined Jewish
peal-Israel Emergency Fund/
ject Renewal-Or Akiva
npaign is setting record levels of
ievement as a result of the
cern and commitment of our
iter Miami Jewish community.
it the beginning of the month, the
(ipaign stood at $14.5 million,
ch included $425,000 for Project
kewal-Or Akiva. This total
resents a 25 percent increase over
year's regular campaign and an
ercent increase for 1984 compared
the 1983 total of the regular and
p-gency campaigns.
er Sunday
["hanks to the efforts of more than
volunteers from our Jewish
lmunity, Super Sunday and
ier Week January 15 to 19
an extraordinary success!
ring the course of the five days,
26 million was raised to help aid
|ial services in Greater Miami,
ie\ and Jewish communities
ind the world. There are
i sands of people to thank for the
cess of the phonathons. However,
fould like to extend my special,
sonal thanks to Super Sunday
lirmen Fran Levey, Jerry Sch-
tz, Susan Sirotta and Barry
fchin and Super Week Chairman
arlotte Held. You all did a super
i Rise Division
Last month, we kicked off our
npaign in many of the high rise
ttdings in the community. The
?h Rise Division constitutes a
al part of our total campaign
brt, and I urge all high rise
dents to attend the functions
|eduled in their buildings. The
etings, breakfasts and receptions
' feature prominent speakers, and
iers may refer to the article on
four for a full list of upcoming
rise events.
eaetter Precious Legacy'
eption
he Bass Museum of Art on
nu Beach was the setting for a
esetter event on January 25,
ch featured a private showing of
ne Precious Legacy: Judaic
Insures from the Czechoslovak
kte Collections" and a reception
fted by Paula and Joel Friedland.
ie Divisions Gearing Up
Physicians, dentists, builders,
Ptors, merchants, attorneys, and
|iy other professionals in Greater
Miami have been taking part in the
campaign through our trade
divisions. A number of events
oriented towards your profession are
scheduled in the coming weeks. Be
an integral part of the campaign and
meet fellow professionals from your
field.
Join our Volunteers
Our many divisions and campaign
events rely on the hard work and
dedication of many local leaders who
volunteer their time. Your in-
volvement can make a difference! If
you are interested in being a part of
the 1984 CJA-IEF, please call
Federation at 576-4000.
The 1984 campaign is ahead of the
1983 campaign in dollars and in pace.
But despite the tremendous
momentum we've generated, we are
now at a critical juncture in the
campaign. Through our united ef-
forts, as individual Jews working
together as one, we can make this the
greatest campaign in the history of
Federation. Let's all pitch in and
'Lead the Way' for our fellow Jews.
Howard R. Scharlin
General Campaign Chairman
1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund-Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign.
Rabin to address
Mercantile
Division
Yitzhak Rabin
Yitzhak Rabin, former prime
minister of the State of Israel, will be
the guest speaker at the annual
dinner of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Mercantile Division on
Thursday evening, April 5 at the
Biscayne Bay Marriott. The dinner
is being held on behalf of the 1984
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund/ Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign. Tim R. Cohen,
executive vice president of
Modernage Furniture and Howard
Socol, president of Burdines, serve
as chairmen of the Mercantile
Division.
Rabin, a native Israeli, served in
the Israeli army for 27 years. By the
end of his military career, he had
achieved the supreme rank of Chief
of the General Staff (Lt. General)
and with it, served as the Com-
mander of the Israel Defense Forces
in the 1967 Six Day war.
Shortly after his military
retirement in January 1968, Rabin
was appointed Israel's Ambassador
to the United States. During his five
year tour of duty in Washington, he
established a reputation as an
unusually influential ambassador.
To The Jewish community
A very big thank you" to everyone who made last
months Super Sunday and Super week truly super
events. Thanks to the commitment of more than 3,000
volunteers and thousands of individuals who made
gifts to the 1984 combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, we raised a record $1.26 million!
Again our sincere thanks for helping to LEAD THE WAY
for our fellow Jews.
In the spring of 1973, he returned
to Jerusalem and became active in
the Labor Party ranks. In the
national election of December 1973,
he gained a Knesset seat
representing the Labor Alignment
and with the formation of the Golda
Meir Cabinet, he was appointed
Minister of Labor. He was
nominated by the Labor Party as its
choice for Premier following Mrs.
Meir's resignation in April 1974. He-
served as prime minister until June
1977. Rabin is presently a member of
the Knesset.
In addition to guest speaker
.Rabin, the evening will also be
highlighted by the presentation of
the coveted Harold B. Bosworth
Memorial Award.
Past recipients of the award in-
clude Eh Timoner, J. William Baros,
John N. Serbin, Jacob Rabinowitz,
Jay I. Kislak, Robert Macht, Max
Orovitz, Milton Weiss, William S.
Ruben, Thomas C. Wasmuth, Robert
Russell, Mendell M. Selig, Goldie R.
Goldstein, Ted Bodin, Ralph Levitz,
Melvin Jacobs, Leonard Luna and
David Kenny.
"This is the first time two people
from different groups within the
Mercantile Division have joined
forces to chair this event, Howard
from the Department and Retail
Store Group and myself, from the
Home Furnishings Group," said
Cohen.
"I am confident that with the
business climate improving and the
tremendous problems still facing
Israel, we will have the most suc-
cessful Mercantile Division Dinner
ever," added Socol.
Members of the Mercantile
Division are hosting the dinner.
There will be no couvert charge for
participants in this annual event.
For more information about the
Mei can tile Division dinner, please
call Marty Barasch at Federation,
576-4000, extension 274.
Pilot protect to be national model
Dr. Aryeh Nesher, special representative of the State of Israel, will
lead a pilot project for the Greater Miami Jewish Federation in which he
plans to restructure and reorganize the Aventura / Turnberry campaign
on behalf of the 1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund / Project Renewal-Or Akiva. The program is expected to result in
greater campaign yields and will serve as a model for other Miami and
American communities.
Nesher, a renowned lecturer who has served in many governmental
capacities for the State of Israel, was born in Rumania and immigrated to
Israel in 1948. He served in the armed forces of Israel and in "Sherut
La'am," Israel's Peace Corps-type program. By presenting first hand
information to campaign leaders on current happenings in Israel, Dr.
Nesher hopes to stimulate them so that they may in turn pass on this
knowledge and enthusiasm to their co-workers.
The major thrusts of the program will be education and the
development of active solicitation skills. Dr. Nesher will be forming three
sponsor clubs at Turnberry. They are a $100,000 club chaired by Frank
Beckerman, a $50,000 club led by Leonard Strelitz, and a $10,000 club
headed by Herb Canarick.
The Federation has also arranged for Nesher to work with the
California Club. Since the California Club is now conducting its first
campaign, he is working strictly with education in the development.
Nesher plans to create communities of unified groups of individuals who
were active in other Jewish groups.
LYDIA AND PETER GOLDRING, LEADERS OF THE GREATER
MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION'S FIRST TRADITIONAL
MISSION TO ISRAEL, July 2-13, announced that mission plans are
rapidly being finalized. Mission highlights will include visits to religious
settlements and Yeshivot, confidential briefings with top Israeli military
strategists, religious and political leaders and special Shabbat program-
ming. Registration is limited. For more information, please call
Federation's Mission Department at 576-4000.
*
mm


.....
^K^?*
Federation, February, 1984
Campaign/Planning & Budget
increased giving
at High Rises
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's High Rise Division
Campaign on behalf of the 1984
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Project Renewal -
Or Akiva is well underway with
buildings reporting increased levels
of giving among many of their
residents. Listed below are upcoming
events:
bay Harbor residents will have a
bagels and lox breakfast on Sunday.
February 26 at the Lancelot Hall
Recreation Room. Elaine Bloom,
director of the Government Affairs
Office of the Florida Association of
Jewish Federations, will be the guest
speaker. Jack Kasdan is the general
chairman. Gladys Israel is associate
chairperson and Ted Nelson is
honorary chairman.
Stratford House will have a
breakfast on Sunday. February 26 at
9:30 a.m. Edith Pisk and Aaron
Miroff serve as building co-
chairpersons.
Aventura-Coronado's annual
brunch will be held on Sunday,
February 26 at 10:00 a.m. Dora
Roth, representative from Israel's
Prime Minister's office, will be the
guest speaker. Gertrude and Simon
Bressler will be honored.
Del Prado residents wul have a
breakfast on Sunday, February 26 at
10:30 a.m. Steven J. Kravitz,
Federation Board member, will be
the guest speaker.
Bonavida-Aventura's annual
brunch will be held on Sunday,
February 26 at noon. Dora Roth will
be the guest speaker.
Eldorado-A venture's annual
breakfast will be held on Sunday,
March 4 at 10:30 a.m. Jerome
Gleekel. Middle East political
scientist, will be the guest speaker.
Bonavista-Aventura will have a
cocktail party at 5:00 p.m. Jerome
Gleekel will be the guest speaker.
Residents of Imperial House will
have a brunch on Sunday, March 11
at 11:00 a.m. at the Imperial House
Restaurant. Barbara Studley, local
radio talk show host, will be the
guest speaker. Sylvia Farber
Freedman and Milton Jacobson
serve as co-chairmen.
Residents of the Kenilworth will
have a buffet dinner on Sunday,
March 4 at 6:00 p.m.
Residents of Manhattan Towers
will have an event on Wednesday,
March 8 at 7:30 p.m. Julius Stern
serves as building chairman.
Jade Winds will have its annual
brunch on Sunday, March 11 at the
building clubhouse. Metro-Dade
Commissioner Barry Schreiber will
be the guest speaker. Bernard
Graber serves as building chairman
and Hermione Spahn is co-
chairwoman. Miriam and Ben Lew
will be honored.
Residents of 5701 Collins will
have a buffet dinner at the Doral
Beach Hotel on Sunday, March 11 at
5:30 p.m. Morton Silberman,
president of the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC)
and former Federation president, will
'be the guest speaker. Mr. and Mrs.
Jerome Brill serve as building
chairmen.
Arlen House residents will have
a breakfast on Sunday. March 11 at
10:00 ajn. Irving H. Cypers serves
as building chairman and Abraham
S. Mannes is co-chairman.
Ensenada-Aventura will have an
event on Sunday. March 11 at 5:00
p.m. Dora Roth will be the guest
speaker.
Villa Dorada- A venture will have
a coffee and cake meeting on Sun-
day. March 11 at 8:00 p.m. Dora
Roth will be the guest speaker.
Residents of Eden Isles will have
an event on Monday. March 12 at
7:30 p.m. Abe Franklin serves as
building chairman.
Biscaya-Aventura will have a
brunch on Sunday. March 18 at
noon. Dora Roth will be the guest
speaker.
Point East residents will have an
advance gifts cocktail party on
Sunday, March 18. Arthur Kepes
serves as building chairman.
Ocean Pavillion will have a
brunch on Sunday, March 18 at
10:30 a.m. Arthur Jurkowitz is
building chairman.
Residents of Winston Towers
will have a coffee and danish meeting
on Wednesday, March 21 at 8:00
p.m.
Residents of Point East will have
a rally on Thursday, March 22.
Flamenco-Aventura will have a
breakfast on Sunday, March 25 in
the recreation hall. Dora Roth will be
the guest speaker.
Residents of Key Biscayne will
have a dinner at the Sonesta Beach
Hotel on Saturday evening, March
25. Bess Myerson will be the guest
speaker. Sandra Shapiro, David
Jacobson, Jerry Rosen, Irving
Kreisberg and Ted Kreuter serve as
Key Biscayne Campaign co-
chairmen.
For more information about High
Rise events, please call Federation at
576-4000.
Attorneys develop
campaign
structure
Donald Bierman
The Attorneys Division of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
under the leadership of Donald
Bierman, overall division chairman,
has established a campaign structure
involving three levels. Area vice
chairmen of the division include
John Sumberg, Alvin Entin, Richard
Grossman and Robert Benin. These
vice chairmen are coordinating the
efforts of a cadre of "captains" which
includes Jeffrey Berkowitz, Paul
Berkowitz, Jeffrey Bernstein,
Stephen Lip ton. Bernard Wolf son,
David Stone, Robyn Greene, Alan S.
Subcommittee
Culture and
responsibility
formal and
Subcommittee examines
educational opportunities
Many individuals involved with
the Jewish community believe that a
strong Jewish background is the
best method of preventing our youth
from leaving the Jewish mainstream.
Because of the importance placed on
Jewish education by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, the
Planning and Budget Committee's
on Education.
Religion has the
of reviewing the
informal Jewish
educational opportunities for local
Jews of all ages provided by
Federation's beneficiary agencies.
The subcommittee reviews the
programs of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education (CAJE). CAJE
Teachers Fringe Benefit Program,
eight Jewish day schools supported
by Federation, High School in Israel
and the Judaic Studies Program at
the University of Miami.
"We believe that quality Jewish
education is one of the most effective
means of inculcating in our youth a
commitment to Judaism and Jewish
identity," said Kalman Mintz,
chairman of the subcommittee. "We
see Jewish education as taking place
in informal, as well as formal set-
tings and for interested adults, as
well as for youth. Federation's goal
is to make quality Jewish education
available to all concerned Jews in the
Greater Miami community."
Mintz said the subcommittee has
recently been reviewing the High
School in Israel program. "We feel
that it is a very positive program. It
provides a vehicle for long-range
Jewish commitment on the part of
young people who participate in it."
The subcommittee has been
examining the quality of the
curriculum and the achievement of
students at the Jewish High School
of South Florida and the Brandeis
Kalman Mintz
Academy, a junior high day school*
South Dade. The two communiti
based schools are the oni
Federation-sponsored schools
their kind in the country. He nt
that graduates of the high schodl
have been admitted to many h\
colleges, and that the Junior* Higkl
School has established an out-l
standing Judaic and secul|
program.
Mintz also pointed out that CAJ||
is recommending an acadei
evaluation process for affiliated i
schools which will help to ensn
excellence in Federation fund
schools.
"The Subcommittee gains anii
depth understanding of the vario
educational institutions.'' said San
Samole, vice chairman of the sub-l
committee. "We do not jusl
review budgets, but also try toassisil
the agencies in meeting problem!
and planning for the future. a|
particular concern of the Sub-I
committee is to ensure thai"
educators in our community
highly trained and properly con
pensated.
Residents of Admiral's Port held their annual champagne party on behal'A
of the 1984 CJA-IEF. Dora Roth, representative from Israel's primtl
minister's office, was the guest speaker. Shown above, from left, Ai\
mirals Port Executive Committee Member Eric Salm, Admiral's Po\
Campaign Chairman Nathan Katzen, Roth and Executive Committal
Members Milton Engelman and Ruby Zaretsky.
Ross, A. Budd Cutler, Michael
Weiss, Bill Turnoff, Eunice Baros,
and Shep King. In turn, they provide
campaign support to workers.
To date, the attorneys have met
many times to coordinate their ef-
forts and to be trained in solicitation
techniques. Each of these meetings
was well attended and the results
have been excellent, as evidenced by
a 25 percent increase in giving
among Dade County attorneys.
The Attorneys Division is now in
the process of organizing two major
campaign events. The first will be
hosted by Alvin Entin for North
Dade Attorneys. This is the second
year Entin has sponsored this event,
which was tremendously successfoj
last year in reaching attorneys *W|
would normally be unable to attend
"downtown" functions. This spec*
event is tentatively scheduled W
late March. j
The second event will be *j
Annual Attorney's Division CockUJij
Reception scheduled for late Ap|
Detailed information for these tw|
campaign events will be announce^
shortly.
For further information on ho*
you can lend your leadership to M
Attorney's Division campaign
please contact Donald BiermaD.7,
358-7477 or David Goodman at S'*|
4000.


Wfl^afl5H,P*BHU5HV,iy54
roject Renewal
Dancing lifts Ramat Eliayhu
By JOAN SILBERSTEIN
I RAMAT ELIAYHU This is a
rue story about a dance troupe in a
Kroject Renewal neighborhood in
Israel. It is about what has been
one to expand the mental horizons
If people living physically crowded
ves. And it is about much more that
leeds to be done. It is about a
Jooden floor, a mirror, and a practice
ailing that are not there.
I It is a summer night. A sharay
Lys a heat wave over the buildings,
he people. Though the sun has gone
(own, the temperature is still above
00 degrees. In Beit HaNasee
Resident's House), a community
enter with an impressive name, one
xpects to see decent rooms, modern
Iquipment. The expectations
lemains unmet. Against the debil-
lating humidity there is not even a
In.
I The 21 dancers in the Ramat
Kliayhu Dance troupe are practicing
a central meeting room which
Roubles as a movie hall and theatre.
But what you picture, in American
ierms, is not what is here. What you
must imagine are two ordinary-size
assrooms placed end to end, rooms
ftiuch used and a bit on the scruffy
lidc. At one end is a platform raised
bout four feet off the floor, trying to
Be a stage. Above it, on the back
rail, a cloth is hung, a big white
Iquare, to screen movies on. Along
Ihe other three walls, 100 or more
heap metal chairs have been pushed
It) the side and stacked to make room
fcr the dancers
I The dancers are 16 and 17-year
lids, sweating with the effort they
Ire making. They are black-skinned
Ind brown-skinned and white-
unned trying, all together as one,
ft) create beauty out of the shape of
ftSeir bodies in space. The two strips
|l cold fluorescent lighting overhead
low the boys and girls in the
larshest light possible, but their
Stalky shines through. They are the
Irst dance company in this neigh-
borhood in the 35-year history of
fcodern Israel.
Yedidia Amram, their Moroccan-
lorn. 24-year old director, choreo-
Irapher, teacher stands facing tiem.
there should be one mirrored will in
ftie room. There is not. For war.t of
fconey. (For want of a nail, the shoe
las lost, for want of the shoe, r.he
lorse was lost, for want of the hoise,
Pie kingdom was lost.) He gi\es
piem his two eyes for a mirror, it is
111 he has. From his face, they have
K> learn how it looks right. "It" -
fieaning every arch and stretch and
prn and lift and hold of every step in
pery dance. There is no practice bar
Pther, that railing that should run
f>e length of the non-existent mirror.
Pow do they learn to keep their
Nance then? They hold onto
fedidia's will. He transfers to them
T confidence to try but this is not
he way it should be. It is not only
9king these young people to do the
npossible, it is also dangerous.
The floor, too, is dangerous. What
Jancers need is wood beneath then-
feet but here there are
tote, standard Israeli floor
"lea. Ronit Reichental stands with
w partner at the head of the line
armed for a new exercise. On
nmand from Yedidia, the two
wve out into open space. She
thrusts her tall, thin body straight
up into the air. Her partner already
has his arms up to catch her. A
second command is added: Make a
full turn while in the air. Ronit tries.
Fails. Slips through the boys fingers.
Her feet hit the floor so hard the
thud kicks me in the stomach,
making me want to vomit. Ronit
rubs the bones in her feet, gets up
slowly obviously shaken, struggles
to piece her confidence back
together. 'Do it again,' Yedidia's
eyes tell her when she looks in their
mirror. 'We have no choice, we have
no money for the wooden floor. You
want to dance? This is the way it is,
this is the price you have to pay.' She
does the leap again, but she is
scared. It doesn't work.
During a break, I manage to speak
to her. She is incredibly beautiful,
the Yemenite thin, desert strength of
her mother mixing with the Polish
blood line of her father.
"The thing is" she says, "dancing
fills my life. I have friends who don't
have an interest like this and their
lives are so empty. They go to school
because they have to, they go home.
But all of us who dance, we have a
bigger life. We meet people. Our
whole neighborhood is proud of us.
"I remember, it was about six
years ago, before Project Renewal
came to Ramat Eliayhu, we had a lot
of trouble. There were boys, bad
ones, who would bang on the door to
the room where we practiced. That
was before this community center
was built, when we had only the
bomb shelter to dance in. They
would bother us and try to stop our
lessons.
"Instead of throwing them out, we
invited them in. "Come watch us,"
we told them 'Listen to the music'
So they did it and then they became
friends with us and started to help.
They decided to guard the doors and
keep out other wild ones. The
problem is that there are many fam-
ilies in this neighborhood with many
children. Not every child gets the
attention he needs. If everyone had a
group to belong to, the way we
belong to the dance company, then
no one would go to the street to act
crazy and steal and do even worse
things.
"I know that before I learned to
dance, I was a child. I had no self-
confidence. But the things we do in
our classes carry over to other
things. We have to learn to help each
other, to depend on each other. The
exercises we do are hard they
teach us to hear things we think we
can't. We are different because we
dance we are stronger, better. For
the life. The army. For everything."
Moshe, another member of the
troupe, draws my attention. His
name means Moses but he looks like
Huckleberry Finn. He is 17 and next
year will go to the army. He wears
cut-off jeans shorts and is otherwise
naked. His body is like a Rodin
sculpture.
"I want to be a trial lawyer," says
this boy who carries the name of a
man who, 2000 years ago, received
the tablets of law on Mt. Sinai. "But
I want to continue to dance always.
Why?
"A man who creates, when he
finishes, he is satisfied with what he
does. This is what I get out of dance:
satisfaction. All of us dance, we give
something to people. We love what
we can do with the human body and,
when we perform, this is what we can
give.
"The people, who give money to
help us must do it not because we
will make money from our ballet. It
has nothing to do with money. Art
takes the person and it gives him a
plus, it teaches a person how to be a
person with other people. When I
started to dance, I was fifteen. A
friend from school told me about
Project Renewal and a dance course
that was starting. I wanted to try it
because it was something new for
me. I noticed, as soon as I started to
dance, I matured. I thought
thoughts that would never have
come into my mind if I were not
hearing the music and moving to it.
Suddenly, I started to discover I had
imagination. I could create, I could
see the world larger, fuller than the
person who doesn't dance. Our
troupe lifts the whole neighborhood.
So many people want to help us.
They organize things for our per-
formances, they sew costumes. They
love us."
It is Yedidia who is the generator,
the human energy force powering
this troupe. How did he begin? And
where will it lead?
"Look," he says, "there are 13,000
people living in Ramat Eliayhu.
When I came out of the army, I
wanted to do something beautiful in
this neighborhood. That was late in
1977, almost 1978. I got 12 students
together and we went from door to
door. We went to ask the parents to
let their children study dance. What
did they know from dance? So we
showed them. Right there in the
street, we danced, while they leaned
out of the windows to watch. 'You
see?' we told them. 'It's beautiful. So
give us your child and in a few years,
he'll be here dancing with us.'
"Then, in 1980, Project Renewal
came to Ramat Eliayhu. Dancing
received a big push and now we have
a ballet school with 200 students, age
4 to 14, and two teachers. Those first
6 boys and 6 girls with whom we
started something happened to
them because of dancing. They all
got the highest marks in their
classes. They all went to the army
and not one was ordinary, they all
became officers.
"But what we are talking about
here is not for the first 12 kids or the
200 learning now. We are talking
about one year ahead or two. We are
building a whole generation and we
are teaching more than dance. We
are teaching them to shower, to be
clean, to eat healthy that a wall
must be beautiful and not scrawled
all over and ruined, that electrical
wiring must not be left exposed.
Then they go home and teach their
parents, their brothers and sisters.
"I am one man. How much can I
do? For dance, you need a rehearsal
hall, a room to perform in, with a
decent stage. You need a mirror and
a practice bar. You need a wooden
floor. You need more teachers. I am
not God. I am not a king. I did all I
can and I have taken my students to
a certain level. But now someone
must help.
"I don't say to the Americans that
they should give us money. But they
love us. We know that because they
brought us to America and they
showed us. In May, we were in New
Jersey for 11 days. Twenty-two
performances, that's what we gave in
that time. In front of children, in
Sunday schools, in hospitals, for old
people we danced for them all
and they all showed that they loved
us. Now we want them to use the
strength of that love, they have so
much more strength than we do.
They have the power to tell the
Jewish Agency to do something for
our dance troupe to give us our
hall and our mirror and our practice
bar and our wooden floor. With these
things, we will lift ourselves and we
will lift the whole neighborhood of
Ramat Eliayhu.
"Why? Why us? Because we are
building people. Good Israelis. We
are making good soldiers also, for the
army. Who does this? The parents?
Not yet. Maybe the children we are
working with will be such mothers
and fathers, to their children when
they marry and have them. But not
yet. If we were not here, who knows?
Maybe they would go on the bad
road, maybe they would be wild ones
and get into trouble. I am telling you
straight: we need more help."
We leave Beit HaNassee. It is
nearly 11 at night and the sharay has
not broken. The dancers walk home,
along the shoulder of the road. They
must wait two weeks until they can
rehearse again. Yedidia is going to
the army. There is no one to replace
him.
Federation
to visit Or Akiva
Plans are being readied for the
annual visit of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Project Renewal
Committee to Or Akiva, Greater
Miami's Project Renewal sister city
in Israel, to review its projected
1984-85 budget.
Stanley C. Myers, chairman of the
committee and founding president of
Federation, announced that the
group will visit Or Akiva between
March 1-9 to help evaluate the
Greater Miami Jewish community's
present and future relationship with
the town. He noted that the con-
tinued flow of dollars from Miami is
contingent on the progress made by
Or Akiva and the recommendations
made jointly by the Or Akiva Project
Renewal Steering Committee and the
Miami liaison-consultant working in
the Israeli community.
"I am committed to the practice of
an annual on-site visit to Or Akiva,"
Myers said. "I believe it is impera-
tive that a delegation visit Or Akiva
and review its progress on a line-by-
line budgetary basis. We must
satisfy ourselves that Federation's
future involvement is necessary for
Or Akiva's continued growth and
development. Along with several
other committee members and a
Federation staff member, we'll
consult with Or Akiva's citizens
council steering committee and
assist them with their planning
process."
.


L-


'?a
Federation, February, 1934
Agencies
Pill-taking pitfalls
Small children get their vitamins
disguised in the form of popular
cartoon characters the Flint-
stones. Bugs Bunny. Some even look
like Porky Pig. But by the time
you're grown up, you better know
what you've got in your medicine
cabinet, or you may be facing a
number of pitfalls.
Pitfall No. 1:
LACK OF UNDERSTANDING
Know what your medicine is for.
Many diseases are treated with more
than one medication, so you must
have a clear understanding of
whether or not your new prescription
is meant to replace an old one, or if it
is meant to be taken with your
current medicines.
Ask your doctor if it produces side
effects. Be sure to report anything
unusual that happens after you
begin taking the medicine. Some side
effects are temporary and will go
away with time. Others can be in-
dicators of serious problems and may
cause your doctor to tell you to stop
taking the medicine immediately.
Ask questions. Are you able to
drink alcohol while taking the
medicine? Are there any special
precautions that may be necessary
while you are using it? What are the
proper times of the day to take each
dose? How long should you continue
to take the medication?
Pitfall No. 2:
COMPLIANCE
Compliance is a fancy term for
taking your medicines exactly as
prescribed. One of the most common
reasons for poor compliance with
your doctors' directions is confusing
the instructions for one prescription
with those of another.
If you take two or more medicines,
be sure that the directions for each
have been clearly explained by both
doctor and pharmacist. Sometimes, a
doctor will write the words "as
directed" on your prescription.
Instead, ask the doctor to write
complete instructions on each
prescription and be sure that these
instructions are transferred to the
prescription label. If the instructions
are too long or complicated to fit on
the prescription label, ask to have
the complete instructions for each
prescription written on a separate
piece of paper for you.
Most drugs have to be taken at
specific times during the day. If you
don't follow the right schedule, you
can lose some of the medicines'
value. You may find it helpful to
keep a daily calendar with the times
that each medication should be
taken. This will serve as a simple
reminder to help you stay on the
schedule for each one of your
prescriptions.
Don't transfer your medications to
a pillbox or other unlabelled con-
tainer. Keeping your medications in
the original prescription container
will insure that each of them is
properly labelled with directions for
use and helps avoid confusion.
Pitfall No. 3:
PROPER STORAGE
Most medications can be safely
stored at room temperature.
However, heat, moisture and light
can cause some medicines to break
down more rapidly than usual. For
this reason, medicines should not be
stored in a bathroom where they are
more likely to be exposed to high
temperatures and humidity.
Some drugs must be stored in the
refrigerator and are effective for a
relatively short period of time. These
products should be labelled as
requiring refrigeration when you get
them from your pharmacist.
Pitfall No. 4:
USING OLD MEDICINE
Sometimes, people keep
medication on hand that is left over
from old prescriptions. This can lead
to errors and the possibility that you
will take an old medicine to treat a
new problem. By using old medicine,
you may be taking a product that
has become ineffective with age.
Some drugs can cause special
problems if they are too old. Ask the
pharmacist to label each prescripton
with an expiration date and be sure
that it is disposed of then.
The best approach is to buy only
enough medication to supply your
present needs. Buying larger
quantities may lower the price per
pill, but can leave you with lots of
left-over medicine.
Pitfall No. 5:
DRUG INTERACTION
If you are taking more than one
medication, you may experience a
drug interaction, where one of the
medications influences the effect of
the other. If you are taking more
than two medications the possiblity
of drug interaction increases.
Basically, a drug interaction causes
one of two things to happen.
You may experience an increase in
one of the drug's effects, leading to
drug reaction or side effect. On the
other hand, the effect of one of the
drugs involved in the interaction can
be decreased in the overall effect-
iveness in treating the increase in
drug dosage.
There are many technical ex-
planations for the whys and
wherefores of drug interaction. Your
pharmacist or doctor can provide
you with more information. But,
when you consider possible drug
interactions, be sure you don't forget
non-prescription drugs and alcoholic
beverages.
Pitfall No. 6:
USING SOMEONE ELSE'S
MEDICATION
Another common medication mis-
use is borrowing medicine from a
friend or relative to treat an ache,
pain or other symptom. This ap-
proach to the self diagnosis and
treatment of illness can be dangerous
for two reasons. First, you expose
yourself to unknown risks when you
decide to take medicine from
someone else's prescription bottle.
You may be allergic to the medicine
or be unable to tolerate it. You could
develop a side effect or adverse
reaction to the new medicine, or
suffer the consequences of a drug
interaction with another prescription
or non-prescription medicine, or you
may be taking medicine that has
been stored improperly or is close to
its expiraton date.
Secondly, by taking someone
else's medication, you may be
treating yourself improperly and
allowing your condition to worsen.
Avoiding traditional medical
treatment may allow your condition
to degrade to the point where more
severe measures are necessary. For
example, if you take somebody else's
left-over antibiotics to treat a "cold "
you will expose yourself to nausea
vomiting, upset stomach and .nl
the possible complications of J
tibiotic drugs. Since the coj
cold is caused by a virus and vZ]
are unaffected by antibiotic dnj
there is nothing to gain from 3
them. ^^|
Pitfall No. 7:
DRUG ABUSE
Drug abuse, taking medicine J
often or in larger doses J
prescribed, is one of the rj
common and dangerous ways!
misuse medicines. While marijuJ
heroin and cocaine account for nj
illegal drug abuse, more people ab3
prescription drugs than all jj]J
substances combined. FurthermJ
combinations of illicit drugs J
prescription drugs account for!
percent of the drug-related overdM
and deaths each year. While rr.J
people who abuse prescription dnij
do so intentionally, it is possible^
unknowingly fall victim to tj
medications by becoming dependM
on their effects. The medicatiol
with the greatest potential forabul
are amitriptyline (Elavil) J
antidepressant; diazepam iValmJ
a tranquilizer; methadone -m
pain reliever and heroin substitutfl
propoxyphene (Darvonl a J
reliever; secobarbital (Seconall -I
sleeping pill; codeine a coi
suppressant and pain relieviH
methaqualone (Quaalude) I
widely abused sleeping pfl
phenytoin (Dilantin) an anil
epileptic medicine; phenobarbital-2
a tranquilizer and anti-epilepJ
medicine.
All of these drugs are effect
when used and in the prescribe
dosages, although most expem
agree that there is little need m
methaqualone in light of the im
that so many other effective sleepaB
pills are available. Trouble usualfl
develops only when you begin to these medicines more often andi(
amounts that are larger ihsM
prescribed by your doctor. CorM
your doctor if you suspect thatjiB
are using your medication as
crutch to deal with the evendri
stresses of life.
Be sure to get the most from yafl
prescription and non-prescriptiofl
drugs while avoiding the comittfl
pitfalls. Although it's hard topictui|
a world without the drugs to whit|
we have become accustomed, tf
using them cautiously and correctly I
they can help heal and control tin
illnesses for which they were m
tended.
Reprinted from Images,
monthly magazine published !?
Mount Sinai Medical Center m
Greater Miami. Mount Sinai Medial
Center is a member of Federation'!
family of agencies and is J
beneficiary of the Combined Jewi|
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Federation Towers Accepting Applications
2fr5n. Towers' the Greater Miami Jewisti
32S& low cost apartment housing for trie
elderly on Miami Beach, is now accepting applications
SLiIkJ^J"8 ,l,st No apartments are presently
2PS5SHP be e,IQiD,e for an apartment, one must be
LKe^ola Send a self-addressed stamped
SSSftLS WEBS' JSPShJF. #e* Avenuj
Miami Beach, R. 33139
housing opportunity.
No phone calls. An


Federation, February, 1984
Women's Division
SIMPLY GRAND! It was the Lion of Judah Luncheon held at
the Grand Bay Hotel in Coconut Grove. Shown above, from left,
Lion of Judah Event Chairwomen Irma Braman and Paula
Friedland, Pacesetter Trustee Chairwoman Gloria Scharlin,
Pacesetter Trustee Co-Chairwoman Sue Helfman, Women's
Division Campaign Chairwoman Terry Drucker, and Women's
Division President Maxine E. Schwartz.
Arentura/Turnberry Trustees are welcomed at Lion of Judah lun-
cheon.
The first Business and Professional Women $500 minimum gift
reception and dinner was a tremendous success, reported Phyllis
Harte, Business and Professional Women Campaign chairwoman.
Shown above, from left. Business and Professional Women
Chairwoman Amy Dean, guest speaker Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Vice President Marilyn K. Smith, W.D. Campaign
Chairwoman Terry Drucker, W.D. President Maxine E. Schwar-
tz, and Event Coordinator Maryanne Witkin.
Hold the Date
February 29 BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL WOMEN $100 EVENT Omni Hotel 6:00 p.m.
March 8 Campaign Steering Committee
March 9 i NORTH DADE EVENT ATTURNBERRY Tennis, art and fashion shows
March 15 March 16 Executive Committee Women's Division Nominating Committee
March 22 Campaign Steering Committee
April 30-Mayl TALLAHASSEE MISSION
May 10 RETREAT AT TURNBERRY
Guardian Chairwoman Marvis Schaecter and Guardian Benefac-
tor Event Chairwoman Joan Morrison, display the K'Tubat
Enumin at the annual Guardian Benefactor Reception. The
K'Tubat is presented to women who make a $2500 five-year gift
to Project Renewal This reception was highlighted by the Presen-
tation of 14 karat gold Shomer lavaliers to new Guardians of the
Women's Division.
A 330 percent increase in giving was reported at the Miami Beach
Donor/Sponsor/Patron event held at the Saxony Hotel and the
Bass Museum of Art. Shown above, excited about the results of
the day, from left, Miami Beach Campaign Chairwomen Meryle
Loring and Adria Rasken, Miami Beach Board Chairwoman
Debby Schwartz, and Event Chairwoman Dava Lipsky.
"Passages to Influence and Success," the first Business and
Professional Women's Attorneys Forum, featured three local
female attorneys. Business and Professional Women Chair-
woman Amy Dean (second from left) is seen congratulating (from
left) Eleanor L. Schockett who specializes in Matrimonial and
family law; Robyn Green, a partner in Greene and Cooper; and
Barbara D. Schwartz, assistant U.S. attorney in the Major Nar-
cotics Division, Southern District of Florida, after their presen-
tations.
mmmu


8
Federation, February. 1884
Soviet Jewry / Freedom Rally '84
Masada in Leningrad
By MARTIN GILBERT
Reprinted with permission of
The Jerusalem Post
The Soviet Union's 10,000 Jewish
Refuseniks have no organization and no
spokesman. Under the Soviet system, no
independent organizations are possible
outside party control. Those Soviet Jews
who seek exit visas must do so alone:
each one, each family must make its own
decisions, risking professional livelihood
and long years of uncertainty.
Despite the dangers of Jewish ac
tivism, young Soviet Jews are con
stantly drawn into the growing search
for Jewishness: the desire to know about
Jewish history and culture, religion and
traditions.
One such young man is the 40-year-old
Leonid Kelbert. a filmmaker from
Leningrad, one of whose films, "The
Catastrophe Will Not Happen," won
three prizes in the Cuban Film Festival
in 1975.
Another of Kelbert's films, "The Ideas
of Academician T. Selikov." won the
gold medal at the Czech Film Festival in
1976. A third film. "Ice and Fire," which
he made in 1980 for the Italian Film
Festival. was shown on Italian
television, but under another director's
name. For on November 9, 1979, Kelbert
was refused permission to go to Israel.
He had become a "non-name."
At the time of his first application for
an exit visa, Kelbert was 35 years old. A
graduate of the State Institute of
Cinematography, he knew nothing about
Jewish culture, spiritual heritage or
traditions. Having been refused per-
mission to emigrate, he found himself
drawn to these Jewish values. "I
plunged into all of this greedily," he now
recalls, "because the lack of real spiritual
food was an important component of my
creative dissatisfaction."
It was Kelbert himself who decided to
turn from his official work to the new
world of Jewish culture. "Nobody
dismissed me. I was even asked to
remain at my job. I left it because I was
not satisfied with the creative level, the
conditions of censorship, and with the
lack of possibilities to express myself."
Kelbert began his new life by lecturing
on Jewish topics. He had six themes:
Heinrich Heine; the genesis of
Christianity; Jews and the Christian
world up to the 17th century; the in-
teraction of Hebrew and Arabic cultures
in philosophy and poetry in Spain; the
texts of the Uead Sea Scrolls; and the
history of the Jewish theatre in the
Soviet Union.
Kelbert gave his first lecture, on
Heine, on November 9, 1980, the an-
niversary of his first "refusal."
Arising out of these wide-ranging,
Jewish-related interests, Kelbert began
to stage short plays in the apartments of
triends. The presentation of these plays
arose, he later explained, because of "my
own strong wish and the desires of the
enthusiasts to act and to direct; an
interest in Jewish drama, which ap-
peared to be strikingly interesting and
real." This interest in his dramas,
Kelbert felt, reflects the mentality of the
young Jews around him, with their
search for "the ethical principle of the
world and of man."
The first of Kelbert's productions were
a series of humorous Purim plays. Later
he wrote and produced a play called
"The Lot," the story of the Jews trapped
on Masada by the Roman legions who
resorted to mass suicide rather than
become the objects of a Roman and
pagan triumph. The Masada play was
first performed on November 9,1981, the
second anniversary of his "refusal."
Early in 1982, Kelbert decided to
perform one of his plays in Riga. But
when a friend went to Riga to find an
apartment and alert an audience, he was
stopped in the street and told: "You may
return to Leningrad. Your friends will
not come to Riga. Riga is a hospitable
city, but not for all."
A few days later, on February 13,
19H2, Kelbert accompanied two French
visitors from his apartment to the
Metro. His wife, Maria, who remained at
The Kelberts (from left): Maria, Liza, Ruth and Leonid
home, was eight months pregnant. What
followed may seem to belong to the
world of theatre. But it happened, in
reality, on the streets of Leningrad.
Kelbert was accused of "pestering" a
passerby, then of "knocking out the
stranger's false teeth," finally of cursing
and "waving his hands" in the street.
Despite pointing out that, with a bottle
of lemonade in each hand, he could
hardly have knocked out the false teeth
without dropping one of the bottles, he
was sentenced to 15 days in prison.
Kelbert served his 15 days. Then he
returned to his private theatricals.
Shortly after his release, he gave his 20th
performance. All those entering the
apartment to see the play were stopped
at a police picket and forced to show
their documents, including the internal
passport in which, for Jews, their
"nationality" is inscribed as "Jew."
To those whose documents he
checked, the senior police officer made a
sign with his fingers the sign of
crossed bars as to signify, "all you
will be imprisoned." Yet, as Kelbert
himself stresses, "my theatre if it can
be called so is not only Jewish but,
first of all, a purely cultural undertaking.
It is not anti-Soviet, nor pro-Soviet, but
unofficial theatre; a natural continuation
of old traditions of folk theatres."
Kelbert believes that "wandering
theatres," such as his given free of
charge, with direct actor-audience
contact, and their special intimacy
"could in future be a kind of an alter-
native to the mass, or official, culture."
In this "theatre of the apartment," or,
as Kelbert calls it, "the theatre without
any stage," the response of the audience
became "a kind of self-identification."
"For most of our audience," Kelbert
notes, "it was the first meeting with
their history, with their culture and
unexpectedly, it appeared that the circle
of the problems was far wider than in-
dividualistic. 'To be or not to be?' They
are the same problems which were not
solved by our fathers and grandfathers,
and which we have to solve."
Describing his work in a letter to a
friend, Kelbert wrote about his Masada
play: "I built the whole performance
around this self-identification: total
darkness, black background and black
clothes for the actors, light from the
candle, which was put behind the actors,
silhouetted them and gave
mysteriousness and some special effect
that I can't describe.
"It is an effect of an intimacy and a
confidence together, and at the same
time it gives space for imagination. Add
the tragedy of the events, add the strain
of the choice: "What was the right
choice: to die as Jews or to exist as
slaves, preserving this way the people
and the possibility for future
generations ..."
"An impression was so strong,"
Kelbert added, "that sometimes there
were tears in the eyes of some of an
audience," and he went on to explain
how: "After every performance there are
some minutes of absolute silence and
only after the actors have changed their
costumes and come before the audience
is there always a lot of generous and
sincere applause. And after this there is
a discussion. This moment can
sometimes be the most exalting one."
Kelbert explained: "It could be an
elderly man standing and describing a
time when he was working in the Jewish
theatre of Mikhoels and how he is now
afraid to give his telephone number
because of his neighbors anti-Semites.
"Or the woman, crying, who described
how she survived Babi Yar and how her
whole life she tried not to think about it,
not to remember, and now she suddenly
has understood that it is necessary not
to forget and to remind it to others.
"Or a young boy or girl who asked to
be involved in the theatre.
"Or some people who suddenly
demanded performances on the whole
Jewish history they just demanded
and it makes an impression that they
hare the riffht to demand.
"And all, nearly all, have to stand and
to speak out perhaps the first time in
their life to speak out sincerely without
double thinking.
"In other words, I love this my
performance, actors and an audien-
ce .. ."
In summer 1982, Kelbert staged
another play, "Letters from the Fink
File," about the life of immigrants from
the Soviet Union in Israel, with Uvely,
and stormy discussions among former
Refuseniks. The play was based on the
work of a former Soviet Jew, Yakov
Tsigelman, now living in Jerusalem.
As performed by Kelbert in
Leningrad, the "theatre without any
stage" became a focal point of the
Jewish renaissance. It also became a
focal point of official pressure: Twelve
students were expelled from the
university just because they attended
one of Kelbert's plays. At another
performance, of a Purim play in 1983
some of the audience had to enter
through the window as police were
"blocking" the entrance to the apart-
ment.
On December 23, 1982, Kelbert wrote
to a friend in Britain: "In our situation
most of all we need international support
and assurance. The constant attention of
public opinion it is the only chance for
us to survive."
Kelbert lives in a single room with his I
wife. With them are his wife's daughters,
Liza, aged eight, and their one-year-old
daughter Ruth, born a few weeks after
Kelbert's release from his 15-day sen-
tence.
As a family, the Kelberts have the
right under Soviet law to leave this
single room part of a "communal"
apartment and to buy a cooperative
apartment with more rooms.
But to make such a purchase, Kelbert
and his wife need references from their
places of work. These references must be
"positive." Unfortunately, on February
23. 1982. Maria Kelbert received a
negative reference. They are, therefore,
unable to buy an apartment, even of two
rooms.
Maria Kelbert is a physician, working
in the Bureau of Forensic Medicine. In
iy"(>, after her application for a visa she
was expelled from the young Communist
League. This fact was made clear in her
apartment "reference." The reference
also stressed that whereas she had no
abilities lor social activities." she did
have "an interest in foreign languages.
She was also said to have a "friendly-
selective or indifferent attitude to her
colleagues." to display "poor initiative.
and to show "little interest" in her work
The Kelberts complained to the
Municipal Medical Office about this
negative reference. But the Medical
OH ice refused to follow up their com-
plaint. So it is that four people continue
to live in a single room, sharing an even
smaller bathroom with several other
families.
1 myself was in Leningrad in March
this year, on the day that Kelbert was
given an official warning against con-
tinuing with his Jewish cultural ac-
tivities. He had no chance of seeing
Israel, he was told, only U> JJJ
Birobidjan, the Jewish Autonomous
Region in eastern Siberia, beyond Lake
Baikal.
Kelbert continues to seek an exit visa
If the gates of aliyah are to open again
and to open soon, we may yet see tus
Masada performed here, or better still.
on Masada itself, in the presence ot iw
author.
Meanwhile, it would be an en-
couragment, both to Kelbert, and W au
the young Leningrad Jews who are
search of an exit visa, if one ot "
humorous Purim plays could be stage"
at next year's Fourth Internationa
Congress on Humor, to be held in re
Aviv. Such a performance would be a
link between Jewish aspirations in t
Soviet Union and the achievements an
humor, of the Jewish State itself


Federation, February, 1984
9
speak out for Soviet Jews
As the plight of Jews in the Soviet
Union becomes increasingly
desperate, the Greater Miami
community will gather in a show of
support for these brave men, women
and children who are being denied
their human rights to emigrate or to
live in the USSR as Jews free to
practice their religion and maintain
their cultural heritage.
The Soviet Jewry Rally, "Freedom
Rally '84," will be held Sunday,
March 11, beginning 2 P.M. in
Peacock Park, Coconut Grove. The
rally is sponsored by the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry,
a committee of the Greater Miami
| Jewish Federation's Community
Relations Committee.
Guest performer at the event will
I be Mary Travers, of Peter, Paul and
Mary fame, who is deeply committed
[to the cause of the Soviet Refuse-
niks, those Jews who have been
refused exit visas. Emphasizing the
Refuseniks' plea, "Save Our
Children," the rally also will feature
I Israeli dancing and other performers.
"On March 11, at this most im-
I portant gathering, we will be sending
a clear message to the government of
the Soviet Union that we will not
rest until we win freedom for every
Mary Travers
Soviet Jew," said Hinda Cantor,
chairman of the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry. "If we
fail to show our concern for our
fellow Jews and outrage at the
Soviet government's wanton
disregard of human rights, the situa-
tion will get even worse. Also, we
must do everything we can to make
our Administration deal with the
issue of Soviet Jewry whenever they
negotiate with the Soviet govern-
ment."
Perhaps the most well known
Prisoner of Conscience those
Refuseniks who have been im-
prisoned for their desire to leave the
Soviet Union is Anatoly
Shcharansky whose health continues
to deteriorate as a result of the 100-
day hunger strike he conducted last
year, compounded by horrendous
prison conditions. Despite frequent
chest pains and a weakened heart,
Soviet officials refuse to hospitalize
Shcharansky on the basis that his
condition "has not changed." His
wife, Avital, and numerous organ-
izations throughout the world
continue to wage a campaign for
Shcharansky's immediate hospital-
ization because of the imminent
danger to his life.
Countless other Jewish Prisoners
of Conscience currently are being
held in prisons, labor camps and
internal exile. Others have completed
their sentences but continue to be
refused permission to leave the
Soviet Union. In 1983, Soviet Jewish
emigration hit a low point of 1,315.
Annually the figure grows smaller:
51,000 in 1979, 21,000 in 1980, 9,400
in 1981, and 2,688 in 1982.
As featured guest at the rally,
Mary Travers first came to
prominence in the early 1960's as a
member of the trio that was instru-
mental for taking socially conscious
folk music into the mainstream of
pop music. Today, 20 years later, she
still is involved with pressing social
issues. She recently spent time in
Israel and the Soviet Union, where
she met personally with many
Refuseniks. A song she penned,
"Sweet Survivor," has become the
anthem of the Soviet Jewry
movement.
In addition to her 22 years with
Peter, Paul and Mary, Travers has
five albums to her credit, has written
and starred in a BBC series, and has
hosted a syndicated weekly radio
show. Reflecting her concern with
human issues, she lectures on the
college circuit on the subject
"Society and Its Effects on Music."
American Jewish organizations
involved with Soviet Jewry have
found that public pressure and media
exposure are the most effective
means of responding to oppressive
Soviet policies, a factor that has led
to Soviet Jewry rallies being held in
many communities. Hundreds of
thousands of persons have parti-
cipated in these actions to protest
the official Soviet persecution of
Jews, inhumane treatment of
Refuseniks and restrictive emigra-
tion policies.
The South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry urges all organizations,
congregations, youth groups,
schools and individual citizens to
join together on March 11 to allow
the collective voice of the community
to be heard. There is no admission
fee and everyone is welcome. For
more information, contact Judy
Gilbert at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, 576-4000.
,s Propaganda cartoon, published in a Soviet newspaper, equates Israel's military operations in Lebanon with the
I Nazis' extermination camps ______________________________________________
NEWSFLASH
The Soviets' intensified anti-
Semitic campaign gained
additional momentum with
seven prominent Soviet Jewish
Refuseniks fired from their jobs
last month, the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry has
learned.
"This random but systematic
action reinforces the official
anti-Semitic campaign so
clearly outlined in last month's
attack published in Pravda,"
stated Hinda Cantor, chairman
of the South Florida Con-
ference.
Aimed at intimidating the
Jewish community, this latest
incident casts Leningrad
Refuseniks Sasha Lein
(daughter of former Prisoner of
Conscience Evgeny Lein);
Grigory Vasserman; Elimelech
Rochlin; Leonid Raskin; Yakov
Gorodetsky; Lev Furman;
Michael Zinaver as pariahs
of the Soviet State. Leningrad
Hebrew teacher Iosef
Radomyslsky is under pressure
"to resign" from his job as a
computer programmer and
could face a similar fate.
"The obvious persecution of
these leading Refuseniks is not
in response to any particular
actions on their part," ex-
plained Cantor. "Already
relegated to the most menial of
jobs, these refuseniks are now
removed as contributing
members of Soviet society and
are labelled 'parasites.' "
These last few months have
demonstrated the deliberate
anti-Semitic campaign rein-
forced through the Soviet
media. In their desire to
"prove" their lack of
vulnerability to Western
opinion, the Soviet government
has chosen to further promote
its vicious attacks against
Soviet Jews.


10
Federation, February. 1984
JCC studies need
for new facility
The Feidman phenomenon
HBH| I
A JCC Focus Group
The South Dade Jewish Community Center is continuing its com-
munitywide project to assess the need for a new facility, as the center staft
and members of the community try to determine what they would like to
have in a new multi-faceted JCC. The process began in late October and
continued through the end of December. Focus Groups (parlor meetings),
which involve small informal discussion groups hosted in private homes
led by trained facilitators from the South Dade Jewish Community
Center, were the vehicle used by the center for reaching the community at
large.
"In order to assess what the community needs required that we go to
the community for answers," stated Naomi Olster, president of the South
Dade JCC. "We reached over 300 people, representing all parts of the
community including teens, senior adults, single parent families, couples
without children, single adults, and many other people in the com-
munity."
The JCC, as a result of these Focus Groups, has collected over 270
questionnaires filled out by participants, 60 percent of which were non-
members. After feeding all the information into a computer and cross-
tabulating it. some common information has been derived that will help in
the decision making process.
The next step, now in progress, is to break down into various com-
mittees in order to turn the information gathered in the Focus Group
process into recommendations for programs and facilities. Ed Rosen,
director of the South Dade JCC, said "Many of the people who are now
involved in the committee process are from the South Dade community.
We are delighted to find that many of the people who were involved in the
Focus Group process, who were never before affiliated with the Center, are
asking to be put on the various committees, which is Phase II of the whole
project."
According to current statistics, there are about 70,000 Jewish people
living south of Flagler Street, 50 percent of whom are under the age of 34.
It is a young growing Jewish community. Currently, the JCC is the one
Jewish community resource that reaches all Jews regardless of affiliation
and is open to non-Jews as well.
After the committee process is finished, a report and proposal will be
prepared to be sent to the Jewish Welfare Board in New York. The Board
will take the activity and program proposal prepared by the various lay
committees and determine a space budget: in other words, how many
square feet will be needed for certain areas and what facilities can be
eliminated or serve a dual function. It will also tell the South Dade JCC
Board of Directors how much the facilities will cost.
The information will be returned to the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation for final consideration.
The answer for approval and design should come by early May as to
whether or not South Dade will have a new Jewish Community Center.
According to Ruth Shack, president of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, the Focus Group process has helped to build a
gr*s root* constituency in South Dade," she added. "This is what the
JCC's had hoped for."
The Jewish Community Centers of South Florida are members of
Federation's family of agencies and a beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
South Dade Midrasha
to conclude '84 season
The South Dade Midrasha Lecture Series will conclude its 1984
season with two events in March.
Al Vorspan, vice president of Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, nationally renowned author and speaker of the American
Jewish scene will appear on Thursday, March 1, at Temple Beth Am, 5950
N. Kendall Drive at 8 p.m. His topic will be "Jews and *84 Election."
In conclusion, on Sunday, March 11, 1984, Rabbi Immanuel
Jakobovitz Chief Rabbi of the British Empire, will speak on "Jewish
Medical Ethics at Temple Israel, 137 N.E. 19th Street at 11 a.m.
Tickets will be available at the door and wfll be S3 for Midrasha
members and 4 for non-members.
Master clarinetist Giora Feidman and company
Giora Feidman has earned a world-
wide reputation as a wizard of the
clarinet. He is recognized as one of
the best clarinetists and bass
clarinetists in the world. Born and
educated in Argentina, he played
with the famous Thater Colon in
Buenos Aires. He came to Israel in
1957 at the invitation of the Israel
Philharmonic Orchestra, where he
served until recently.
Testimonials to Feidman's
uniqueness as a clarinet virtuoso,
stylist and performer have come
from such luminaries as Leonard
Bernstein and Zubin Mehta, the
latter having invited him to solo in a
work for clarinet and orchestra based
on Jewish folklore.
A fourth generation descendant of
the celebrated Klezmer family and
recognized as the leading authority
in Jewish Folk music, Feidman has
been devoting himself to interpreting
and performing music of the Jewish
soul and spirit, past and present. He
has been acknowledged as one of
Israel's leading cultural am-
bassadors, building bridges of
understanding through Jewish song
to the Jewish and general com-
munities.
Maestro Feidman has completed
highly successful concert tours in
Latin America, North America,
Japan, Australia, Thailand and
Europe. He has performed widely in
the United States, participating in
music fairs and appearing on
national television. A London
company made a feature film based
on his career and achievements of
Feidman, master of "Jewish Soul
Music," Klezmer. Feidman also
arranged and played music for the
film "The Seventh Match," starring
Mia Farrow, and was involved in
several other films.
On March 18, he made concert hall
history at Lincoln Center's Avery
Fisher Hall in New York, bringing a
new dimension to the clarinet's
repertoire, including classical along
with Jewish soul music, Klezmer. He
played to a standing-room-only
house, which greeted his program
enthusiastically, and enjoyed highly
successful reviews from the critics.
The legendary Feidman skill for
creating and improvising achieves a
new sound for concert audiences.
c GiraE.,FiJdman wU1 Prform for
tvouth Florida on Saturday, March
10th at 8 p.m. at Miami Dade
Community College, South Campus.
I he performance is sponsored by the
S2 Pj^e Jewish Community
Center. This gala cultural event is to
benefit the South Dade JCC and is
presented on behalf of the Cultural
Arts Committee. Tickets are 825.001
for Sponsors and $50.00 for Patrons.
For ticket reservation or further I
information contact Marsha Botkin
at 251-1394.
Dr. Seligman
At JCC
Dr. Fred Seligman, a native of I
Canada, and Associate Professor of
Psychiatry and Pediatrics at the |
University of Miami School ofj
Medicine, will speak at the Michael-
Ann Russell Jewish Community I
Center February 27, at 7:30 p.m. He
is director of Child and Adolescent
Psychiatry at the University of
Miami and chief of Child and
Adolescent Mental Health Services |
at Jackson Memorial Hospital.
This lecture on early childhood I
adolescent behavior, parenting, and
medicine is sponsored by the Jewish
Community Centers of South Florida
Michael-Ann JCC branch and is free I
and open to the public. For more^
information call 932-4200.
Eleventh Annual
Mammoth Auction
On Saturday, March 24th, at 7:30
p.m., the South Dade Jewish
Community Center will have their]
11th Annual Mammoth Auction.
This special event was set up by J
Lee and Laurel Shapiro after the I
death of their daughter and benefit!
the Linda Shapiro Richard Camp
Scholarship fund. The scholarship
fund allows children the opportunity
to attend summer camp at the JCC |
who normally could not.
There will be many fabulous items I
up for bid at the auction, including J
jewelry, art, appliances, and pinbail
machines. Some unusual highlight
will be scripts from excerpts of "1
Street Blues" autographed by Dar
J. Travanti and Michael Conrad
(Sgt. Philip Esterhaus), autographed
items from all potential presidential
candidates, and celebrity luncheons
and dinners with Barry Kutun and
Elaine Gordon, of the Florida House
of Representatives, Metro-Dade
Commissioner Ruth Shack, Metro-
Dade Mayor Steve Clark, and Mi*'
Schneider and Chuck Dowdle fro*
Channel 10.
Admission is $3.00 per per"*
Anyone interested in donating item
for the auction or needing wV
information can contact the Sou
Dade Jewish Community Center
251-1394. _^


Federation, February, 1984
11
iscael/Aliyah
idult community-
Israeli style
The State of Israel has always
iwelcomed the aliyah of the middle-
aged and elderly, whose work and
occupations had previously denied
them the opportunity of settling in
Israel and in many cases being near
| their children and grandchildren.
A thriving, English-speaking
I community is being established
specially designed for the middle-
aged and upwards (55 percent) to be
called the Neot Ashkelon Adult
Community. It will provide every
home service and comfort and,
[perhaps most important of all,
I company and companionship of like
[people.
Each building in the Neot
I Ashkelon Adult Community will
I feature top-quality design and
[numerous elevators. A beautiful
[entrance hall will serve as a fitting
[introduction to the solidly con-
structed building, and a superin-
tendent will be at the residents'
I service around the clock.
The "N.A.A.C." will feature some
|500 apartments in various sizes.
lOnce children have "left the nest,"
[it's better and far more convenient to
[run a compact apartment. That's
[why each apartment has a living
[room, a compact kitchen, a bath and
[separate toilet and a sleeping area.
Naturally, one may choose to furnish
[the apartment to meet personal
|taste. Alternatively, should one
Iprefer. a beautifully furnished
lapartment tastefully designed by
professional interior decorators can
be obtained.
A thriving community life with
none of those everyday bothers
lawaits at the "N.A.A.C." All the
Iconveniences are within easy reach:
k swimming pool, gymnasium and
[fitness rooms, a library, a cafeteria,
and a mini-market. A wide variety of
[cultural activities talks, lectures,
Jgroups of all kinds will keep you
fcusy during free time. As the saying
jgoes. "A happy, busy life leaves no
|time for illness and worry." A clinic
id nurse are always at your
iisposal; for an added feeling of
jsecurity a special buzzer is installed
lin every room, so help is never far
away. And in the event of any real
illness, a sick bay has been provided,
[with all the required medical at-
tention.
The 'N.A.A.C." will be part of a
jlarge complex of 1700 units including
la cottage district for young families,
[giving the opportunity of never
[being too far from the joyous sounds
[of children playing.
A word about Ashkelon, where the
|"N.A.A.C." is to be built. Ashkelon
[is a bubbling medium-sized (by
[Israeli standards) city with 65,000
[inhabitants. Its residents represent
[an interesting cross-section of young
[and old, new immigrants and veteran
[Israelis.
Modern Ashkelon, built after the
stablishment of the State, is a 45-
linute drive from Tel Aviv and
Jerusalem, and serves as a con-
venient starting post for trips to the
For further information regarding
this new and unique venture that
vas initiated to help you make a
Home in your Homeland, please
contact the Israel Aliyah Center,
1200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami, 573-
2556.
Remote control medical care
JERUSALEM Until recently,
diabetic women who became
pregnant faced serious complications
which put them and their babies at
high risk. A new therapeutic regimen
for pregnant diabetics at Bikur
Holim Hospital in Jerusalem is
providing a solution for this problem
and teaching women to actively
participate in their own care.
The women are hospitalized at the
beginning of their second trimester
for a 24-hour period, during which
their blood sugar level is monitored
continuously with a new com-
puterized instrument called a
biostator.
The biostator supplies the medical
team and the patient with in-
formation about the amounts and
schedules required for her insulin
injections. When she leaves the
hospital, she is equipped with a
battery-operated micro-
computerized miniature pump, pre-
programmed to deliver the necessary
amounts of insulin based on the
biostator profile. If there are any
sudden changes in the patient's
blood sugar level, the woman can
contact her physician by telephone
and have her regimen changed, or be
briefly re-hospitalized to obtain a
new, up-dated profile.
The program is the first of its kind
in Israel. Professor Yoram Diamant,
head of Bikur Holim's Gynecology
Department, explained the medical
problems involved: "Diabetic
women can normally be treated with
one, or more daily injections of in-
sulin. During pregnancy, however,
the tremendous hormonal changes
associated with gestation can cause
dramatic upheavals in their sugar
balance, even within a period of an
hour or two." If the patient does not
adapt her insulin therapy to the new
situation, the result can be
deleterious to the mother, who can
develop high blood pressure and
toxemia, and even more disastrous
for the fetus.
Children born of mothers whose
A diabetic woman in the early stages of pregnancy is fitted with a bat-
tery-operated micro-computerized pump.
sugar levels were not properly
stabilized are usually abnormally
large at birth, causing serious
problems at delivery. The newborn
babies can suffer severe respiratory
problems and can have develop-
mental difficulties which may carry
over into school age.
How were such patients treated
before the new treatment was
developed? "Until recently,"
Professor Diamant says, "the
stubborn cases had to be
hospitalized for almost the full term
of their pregnancy. This resulted in
severe emotional and physical stress
for the patients and their families,
not to mention enormous
hospitalization costs."
The new therapeutic unit has been
operating for the last six months.
The team consists of gynecologists,
internists and dieticians, who can be
in 24-hour telephone contact with the
patient. Dr. Yaffe, one of the
gynecologists on the team, is very
encouraged by the preliminary
results. "We have treated four
women in the unit to date," says
Yaffe, "and, except for one
miscarriage (which was not related
to the patient's diabetes), we have
delivered three healthy babies."
Professor Diamant would like to
develop the unit into a computerized
center, staffed around the clock by
medical personnel who can provide
advice and, if needed, a change in
programming for the patients on a
"remote control" basis. When asked
about this "remote control
medicine," Dr. Yaffe explained:
"Our patients are easily trained to
recognize new and potentially.
dangerous symptoms. We, in turn,
have learned to seek the patients'
advice before deciding on changes in
their treatment. The more in-
dependent they can become in
assessing their own needs, the easier
it is for us to help them."
The number of diabetic women
who will require this type of care is
relatively small. Therefore, the
center can realistically expect to
provide the most up-to-date
treatment for this problem for the
whole Jerusalem area. The cost of
developing and running such a unit
is high, but is immediately justified
in terms of the lowered
hospitalization costs and the in-
calculable drain on society of sup-
porting and treating children with
birth defects.
Be a part of Israel 36'
Planning is underway for "Israel
36," a communitywide Israel
Independence Day event celebrating
the 36th birthday of the State of
Israel that will be held on Sunday,
May 6.
Coordinated by the Jewish
Community Centers of South Florida
in cooperation with the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, the
Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami, the American Zionist
Federation and the Israeli Consulate,
this year's Independence Day
celebration promises to bring
together the entire Jewish com-
munity for its largest public event
ever.
"This year, for the first time, we're
eoing to hold one massive walkathon
Ld celebration in honor of Israel s
independence." said Philip T.
Warren, general chairman of the
event. "We urge everyone in the
community to join us for this very
Philip Warren
special joyous occasion."
The activities will kick off at 4
p.m. with a walkathon, to benefit the
1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, which will begin
at Temple Israel of Greater Miami on
19th Street, proceed across the
Venetian Causeway and end at the
Miami Beach Convention Center. At
5:15 p.m., the celebration, which will
include entertainment, Israeli food,
displays, arts and crafts, a market
place, culture tent and dancing, will
commence. The day will culminate
with a major evening event at the
convention center.
The executive committee over-
seeing Israel 36 arrangements in-
cludes: Fern Canter, Gary Holtz-
man, Neal J. Menachem, Barry
Schreiber, Gerald K. Schwartz,
Kenneth Schwartz and Dror Zadok.
For additional information about
Israel 36 and becoming a volunteer
for the event, please call Lorrie
Taylor at the Jewish Community
Centers, 576-1660.
Diverse sessions at Aliyah conference
The Aliyah Council of South
Florida has chosen the categories for
the workshops that will be offered at
the Second Annual Aliyah Con-
ference which will take place on
Sunday, April 8th from 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. at Temple Israel of Greater
Miami. A strictly kosher lunch will
be served.
The workship categories will be:
Israel Programs, Education, Initial
Absorption, Professional Oppor-
tunities, Retirement, Kibbutzim,
Settlements / Moshavim, Business
and Employment, and Returning
Israelis.
For further information please call
the Aliyah Council office at 576-
4000. Linda Minkes is overall
chairperson for the conference.


reuei ciliuii, rcyi ueii y, laon
g Range Planning
Jewish singles...
and all that j ass
JASS is an acronym for Jewish
Association Serving Singles, and it
has become a by-word among singles
in the South Florida area. It is a
coordinating council comprised of
representatives of many Greater
Miami Jewish singles groups as well
as representatives from the unaf-
filiated single Jewish Community. It
acts as both a resource organization
for singles groups and a liaison with
unaffiliated single Jews. It provides
leadership development, calen-
darizing. and coordination for
existing groups. The JASSLINE
(573-JASS) publicizes, through a 24-
hour telephone information line, a
weekly recording of events for
Jewish singles and currently receives
more than 600 calls per week. In
addition to serving these functions,
JASS also offers late Friday night
services and Oneg Shabbats,
leadership training, outreach to
singles including those who are new
to the community, and helps various
Jewish singles groups.
One of the goals of JASS is to
involve single Jewish individuals in
social, cultural, community and
religious programs and activities
with a Jewish orientation. The
strengthening of Jewish groups and
activities already in existence is also
another goal of JASS. Outreach
service to new single people in the
community and those who have
never been involved in groups is also
of primary concern to the
organization.
JASS is a countywide central
program of the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, and is
administered by the South Dade
Jewish Community Center. It is a
small cohesive committee with the
organization and commitment of
purpose to accomplish its tasks and
attain its goals through an advisory
process and when called upon,
through hands-on assistance.
JASS began with a special
allocation to the J.C.C. in 1982 to
develop an innovative approach to
servicing the growth of the Jewish
single population. The program
began in January 1982 with a series
of late Friday night Jewish religious
services beginning at 10:00 p.m. at
synagogues in the Greater Miami
area during the second and fourth
weeks of each month, followed by an
Oneg Shabbat where singles can
meet and socialize. The Friday night
services still in progress draw on the
average of over 225 singles each time
they are held.
Shortly after a JASS coordinating
committee was formed, its first
project was the creation and im-
plementation of the JASSLINE, a
24-hour telephone service offering a
recorded message updated every two
weeks, and listing activities, dates,
times and contact persons for ad-
ditional information, specifically for
single persons.
The committee formed a coor-
dinating council to assist existing
groups serving Jewish singles in the
community, which also provides
training to present and future lay
leadership through meetings of its
council.
To learn about events that are
happening for singles in the Greater
Miami Jewish Community, call the
JASSLINE, 573-JASS.
Memories of UJA
student mission
A nun, Jews with long side burns
and tall black hats, hippies, and
students boarded the El Al flight to
Jerusalem. Our United Jewish
Appeal National Winter Students
Mission departed from JFK in New
York. When the plane landed in
Israel, tears of excitement were held
back.
Our first morning found us in
Jerusalem on an archeological field
study. It was amazing to climb on
the rocks where everything hap-
pened thousands of years ago. That
afternoon we heard Mik Adi Amorai
speak at the Knesset. Our day ended
with a discussion on Arab-Israeli
relations with Dr. Allan Pollack.
On our second day we actually
visited sites that are supported by
UJA. First we spent time at an
absorption center in Mevaseret. It
was interesting to hear how im-
migrants lived and started new lives.
They showed us their classrooms,
apartments, etc. The most exciting
event was the visit to the youth
villages. The kids there were great.
We ate lunch with them, and
although verbal communication was
difficult, body language allowed us
to understand each other. The girls
were curious about Michael Jackson!
Our next stop was quite over-
whelming. A tour of the museum at
Yad Vashem, the memorial to the six
million of the Holocaust, was very
moving. A yizkor service was held
and we paid a tribute to the fallen
Israelis at Mt. Herzl Military
Cemetary. The flow of emotions was
more than could have been an-
ticipated. After our dinner, there was
a briefing by Secretary of the
government Dan Meridor.
Erev Shabbat was a very eventful
day. At four o'clock in the morning,
we managed to make it to Masada to
climb the snake path before it
became too hot in the day. It was
wondrous to realize how history
shaped the land and people. The view
from the top of Masada was
breathtaking. After descending the
mountaintop by cable car, we
proceeded to visit the Dead Sea
Scrolls. We met with a very in-
formative and interesting speaker,
Shlomo Drori, who explained that
the chemicals of magnesium, salt,
and phosphate from the sea will
become a valuable resource.
As part of our educational ex-
peditions, we participated in a
Project Renewal workshop; everyone
took an active position in a role
playing situation on the various
ways to allocate funds for Project
Renewal settlements. Afterwards we
toured Chatzor, a Project Renewal
area that was rural and not linked
with an American city. That evening
we slept at the Kibbutz Hogoshrim
guest house and listened to a
seminar on Jewish identity and
Israel compared to Diaspora
relations. On January 2, the mission
participants departed and spent the
day at the Good Fence, a military
unit in the Golan Heights, before
reuniting in Tel Aviv. We also spent
some time on a kibbutz with a family
and had dinner in the main dining
room. It was great to see how other
people live in a community at-
mosphere._______________'
Amy Davis, Kent State University
student, and Robyn Kerzner, from
the University of Miami, in
Jerusalem
The following day was spent in A
Negev at a medical project u.l
toured the facilities and heard man
different people speak about J,'
area.
Overall, it was a privilege to have
been a part of such a wonderful war
to learn and tour Israel. The friend^ I
and experiences will remain in mv
memory forever. '
Robyn Kerzner, a Hiliel member at
the University of Miami, wrote this
article. She is chairperson of tht
United Jewish Appeal campaign on
campus. The Hiliel Jewish Student
Centers are members of the
Federation family of agencies and a
benef'ciary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Long range planning process
completes first phase
Initiated last spring to assess the future human service needs of the I
local Jewish community and encourage strong Jewish identity, the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Long Range Planning/ Capital Needs
Process has concluded its first phase.
In the initial phase of the comprehensive planning process, sub-
committees reviewed the current state of Federation's social service
network and prepared reports that will comprise the data base for the
ongoing process.
The subcommittees and their respective chairmen are: Jewish I
Federation, Helene Berger; Jewish Group Work Services, Morris1
Futernick; Individual and Health Services, Melvin Kartzmer, and'
Community Life Services, Donald E. Lefton.
In preparing their reports, the subcommittees considered the I
following points: current services/programs; consideration of new
and/or expanded services/programs; external events, trends or
possibilities that will affect services in the future; develop criteria and
establish priorities; determine adequacy of physical facilities to meet
current and projected services / program needs; examine need for new
Jewish communal institutions in the context of their raising the level of
Jewish consciousness and strengthening the Miami Jewish community:
and projecting on an annual basis the dollar share of financial resources
available to the community.
The subcommittees are now presenting their reports to the Steering
committee of the long range planning capital needs process. Thef
steering Committee will review the reports" findings in conjunction with
representatives from Federation-beneficiary agencies and the Federation's1
South Dade Advisory Board.
"Now that we've completed the first phase of the long range plan-
ning capital needs process, the Steering Committee has the complex task
ot reviewing the subcommittees findings and developing an agenda for the
greater Miami Jewish community for the next five to ten vears." said,
Harry H bmith, the former Federation president who is chairing the Long
Kange Planning t Capital Needs Committee. "Thanks to the work of our j
subcommittees, we now have a better understanding of our current
programs and services, as well as the projected needs of our Jewish
community.
r~ mit-h ^IS that. other organizations are assisting in the planning
process, including the Jewish Welfare Board, the South Dade Jewish
-ommunity Center and independent consultants.
Midrasha Journey Through culture
ioLH? North Dade Midrasha Journey Through Culture will continue its
1984 Lecture Series with its final two events in February and March.
ioLhe/??umP.ro?"a^ f the Series wil1 be held on Sunday, February 26,
I?Vfi i. ^"S^Kation, 2225 N.E. 121st Street, North Miami,
at B:U0 p.m where a special event of interest to the entire community will
!irn?,Sn th\t CVening' Morton Siegel, noted speaker and
MM**. Wfflladdw the community on the topic: "Contemporary Moral
STSlSf Si *' ?' Siege1' di*tor of the Department of Education
SLiPXf Syffogue of America, has lectured widely on the issues whicV-'
affect Jews in today's modern society.
Rahh! tlSST^L?? North *** Midrasha will be presented by
teadL ESS"etKJrkoSrto' Chk5f *"* of the British Empire and
r& S2S P" Jakobvitz will appear in North Dade at John
SlJS^i: *f n?h00l> 1076 NE- 167th ^reet, on Sunday evening,
ft-obleml:- Pm "" topic wUI "Jewi8h Uw Face8M0derD
meTmteanWdm*4^faVailable the door d for Midrasha
mempers and J4.00 for non-members.
mm


Federation, February, 1984
13
ou can receive income for life
through your
investments
By JAMES SLOTO
There are various types of trusts
Ihich you can set up to benefit
T seif your family and the Jewish
[Immunity. The Internal Revenue
ervice has approved certain forms
gifts in trusts allowing you to
complish these purposes under the
Iresent tax laws. These trusts are
died Charitable Remainder Trusts.
You can establish a Charitable
.emainder Trust by contributing
,v amount of cash or property you
rish to the trust and can specify that
percentage of the value of the
ssets held in the trust be paid
nnually to you and / or a member of
our family for life. The annual
ayment may be specified as a
ercentage (not less than 5 percent)
the initial value of the trust
roperty, or as a percentage (not less
han 5 percent) of the trust property
alued annually. After the death of
he designated income beneficiaries,
he balance of the trust property is
aid to a charity such as the
oundation of Jewish Philanthropies
be used for its general charitable
urposes. Some of the tax ad-
antages of contributions to a
!haritable Remainder Trust are
iscussed below.
JY CONTRIBUTING PROPERTY
(OU CAN PRESERVE INCOME
VND RECEIVE TAX REDUC-
TIONS
If, for example, you have stock
'orth $100,000 paying dividends of
6000 annually you can create a
haritable Remainder Trust to hold
he stock for your lifetime and can
:ontinue to receive the $6000 an-
lually. In the year that you set up
he trust you will be entitled to a
haritable income tax deduction, the
imount of which will depend on the
ige or ages of the income bene-
iciaries of the trust and the amount
)ayable by the trust to the bene-
iciaries during their lifetimes. Your
after-tax income for the year that
you set up the trust is, therefore,
increased as a result of the tax
avings from the charitable
deduction and your cash flow
thereafter is preserved.
INCREASE YOUR INCOME BY
USING APPRECIATED
SECURITIES
Assets placed in a Charitable
Remainder Trust are generally
exempt from Federal Income
Taxation, although the annual in-
come derived from the trust may be
taxed. Consider an investment you
may have which has appreciated
substantially over the price you paid
for it but which produces little or no
[current income. If you sell this asset
I with a view toward reinvesting in
I something with a greater yield, your
I principal may be dissipated by as
[much as 20 percent due to capital
gains taxes. A Charitable Remainder
Trust will preserve all of the prin-
cipal.
Suppose, for example, you have
ame vacant land for which you paid
James Sloto
$20,000 that is now worth $200,000.
The following are consequences of
your sale of the land and reinvest-
ment of the proceeds.
Current Income $ -0-
Current Value 200,000
Tax Basis 20,000
Capital Gain Tax
(assuming 50 percent tax
bracket) 36,000
Principal for
Reinvestment 164,000
Annual Income
at 8 percent 13,120
Compare these results with the
following consequences of placing
the property in a Charitable
Remainder Trust followed by the
trust sale and reinvestment of the
proceeds.
Current Income $ -"
Current Value 200,000
Tax Basis 20,000
Capital Gain Tax -0-
Principal for
Reinvestment 200,000
Annual Income
at 8 percent 16,000
Your pre-tax annual income
would, therefore, be increased by
$2280, In addition, your net (after
tax) income in the year you set up
the trust would be further increased
by the charitable deduction available
in the year you transfer the property
to the trust equal to the value of the
remainder interest in the property
gifted to the Foundation.
THE IMPACT OF NEW IRS
VALUATION TABLES ON SPLIT
INTEREST GIFTS
The Internal Revenue Service has
recently revised the tobies which are
used in determining the amount of a
charitable contribution deduction
that may be claimed when assets are
contributed to a charitable
remainder trust. New tables increase
the rate of return that the assets held
in the trust are assumed to earn from
6 percent to 10 percent and eliminate
sex-based differences in mortality
rates. The effect of these new tobies
on various types of Charitable
Remainder Trust's are illustrated
below.
NEW REGULATIONS IN-
CREASE THE DEDUCTION FOR
CHARITABLE REMAINDER
ANNUITY TRUST
A Charitable Remainder Annuity
Trust is designed to pay a fixed sum
annually to the life income bene-
ficiary with the remainder passing to
charity. The annuity amount may be
stated as either a specific dollar
amount or as a stated percentage of
the value of the property initially
used to fund the trust.
FOR EXAMPLE:
Mr. Cohen, age 45, creates a
Charitable Remainder Annuity
Trust and funds the trust with cash
or property worth $250,000. The
trust is to pay Mr. Cohen $12,500 per
year until he dies. After Mr. Cohen's
death, the remaining assets in the
trust will be given to the Founda-
tion. The value of the charitable
deduction available to Mr. Cohen in
the year he funds the Charitable
Remainder Annuity Trust is the fair
market value of the property in trust
less the value of the annuity for Mr.
Cohen's life. Under the 6 percent
tables the value of Mr. Cohen's
annuity was $153,756.25 and Mr.
Cohen, therefore, would be entitled
to a charitable deduction of
$96,233.75 in the year he funds the
trust. Under the revised 10 percent
unisex tobies, however, the value of
Mr. Cohen's annuity would only be
$110,697.50 and the amount of Mr.
Cohen's charitable contribution
would increase to $139,302.50. Thus
the revised tables now in effect
would result in an increase of $43,000
in the amount of Mr. Cohen's charit-
able contribution.
CHARITABLE REMAINDER
UNITRUST
A Charitable Remainder Unitrust
is a trust which must pay to a non-
charitable beneficiary at least an-
nually a fixed percentage of the net
fair market value of its assets, which
must be valued annually to deter-
mine the beneficiary's income
amount. The remainder goes to
charity after the beneficiary's death.
FOR EXAMPLE:
Mr. Schwartz, age 45, creates a
Charitable Remainder Unitrust
under which he is to receive 6 percent
of the net fair market value of the
trust assets, valued annually each
year until he dies. After Mr.
Schwartz's death, the remaining
assets in the trust are to be given to
the Foundation. Mr. Schwartz funds
the trust with $250,000.
The first step in determining the
value of the remainder interest in the
trust to be given to charity is to
compute the "adjusted pay out rate"
by multiplying the 6 percent rate by
a payout factor provided under the
regulations. Assuming there will be
four payments per year, and that the
trust principal will be valued an-
nually at the first of each year, the
valuation factor for the remainder
interest of the Unitrust is .22578
giving a charitable deduction of
$56,444.05.
Although the increase in the
assumed rate of return from 6
percent to 10 percent does not affect
the valuation of the Charitable
Remainder Unitrust, the new
mortality assumption of the unisex
tables would result in an increased
charitable deduction if the unitrust is
based on the life of a female under
the age of 78, and a decreased charit-
able deduction if the unitrust is
based on the life of a male or the life
or a female age 78 or older. For
example, the Charitable Remainder
Unitrust described above for a male
age 45 would have resulted in a
haritable deduction of $63,857.50
under the old 6 percent table.
POOLED INCOME FUND
A Pooled Income Fund is a special
type of charitable remainder trust
which can best be thought of as a
charitable mutual fund. Donors join
the fund by making an irrevocable
contribution of an asset to the
Pooled Income Fund, while retaining
the life income interest for them-
selves or someone they designate.
The property transferred to the
Pooled Income Fund is co-mingled
and invested with other assets of the
fund. The donor's income is deter-
mined by the yearly rate of return
earned by the fund on its invest-
ments.
FOR EXAMPLE:
Assume a 65-year-old man makes
an irrevocable transfer of property
worth $10,000 to the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies Pooled
Income Fund, retaining the life
income interest for himself. In order
to determine the deduction obtained
for the charitable gift, it is necessary
to value the life income interest the
donor will receive. This calculation is
made by using the average rate of
return of the pooled income fund for
the past three years and applying a
factor determined by the IRS table.
Assuming the average rate of
return on the fund for the past three
years was 7.4 percent, the factor
used for determining the gift value
by a 65-year-old male under the 6
percent table was .45758. Applying
that factor the present value of the
remainder interest given to the
Foundation was $4576.
Under the new 10 percent unisex
table that factor would be .40539.
Under the above conditions, the
value of the $10,000 contribution to
charity is $4054 or about $522 less
than it was under the 6 percent tax
tables. This example illustrates the
increase in value of the life income
interest under the new tables.
CONCLUSION
Substantial benefits can be
derived through contributions to
Charitable Remainder Trusts.
Further, the increase in the assumed
rate of return from 6 percent to 10
percent, coupled with the new
mortality assumptions of the unisex
tables, will have a significant effect
on the valuation of many types of
split interest gifts donated to
charity. For further information on
how you can receive life income from
these and other charitable invest-
ments, please contact the Founda-
tion office at 576-4000.


14*
Federation, February, 1984
Peder
GREATER MIAMI
JEWISH FEDERATION
TELEVISION
This spring. Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Cable Television
(JFT) will be expanding to reach
nearly every cable television home in
Dade County. JFT's programming
airs every night from 5 to 7 p.m.
Viewers of Miami Cablevision.
Americable and Dynmic Cablevision
(Coral Gables) will soon be able to
watch JFT, which will mean a poten-
tial audience of 150.000 homes.
As part of this expansion. JFT will
be adding several new programs to
its schedule in March. We remember
will look at the Holocaust through
the eyes of survivors, their children,
and noted scholars (see accompany-
ing story).
New entries will highlight JFT's
weekly movie specials. Included are
Abraham's People, which examines
the history of the Jews in the Middle
East during the Diaspora until the
establishment of the State of Israel
and Avenue of the Just, a film which
introduces 10 valiant Christians who
risked their own lives to rescue Jev
during the Holocaust. JFT movie
specials air Wednesday 6 to 7 p.m.
and Saturday 5 to 6 p.m.
JFT will also continue its highly
acclaimed series of programs on The
Precious Legacy (Tuesday 5 p.m.
and Sunday 6:30 p.m.). The exhibit
of Judaic treasures from the
Czechoslovak state collection will be
at Miami Beach's Bass Museum
through March 18th.
The medical series Check Up.
produced in cooperation with Mount
Sinai Medical Center, will tackle
medical problems ranging from
breast cancer and heart disease to
nutrition. The program, which airs
Monday at 5:30 p.m.. Thursday at 5
p.m. and Saturday at 6 p.m.
examines a new topic every week.
Viewers are encouraged to contact
Mount Sinai directly for more in-
formation on upcoming topics (674-
26001.
Proving that the easiest way to
our hearts is through our stomachs.
Eenies Kitchen remains one of the
most popular series on JFT. (Recipe
No. 1. Monday at 5 p.m. and
Thursday at 6:30 p.m.. Recipe No. 2,
Wednesday at 5 p.m. and Sunday at
5:30 p.m.). Requests for Eenie
Frost's mouth-watering Kosher
recipes are pouring in to JFT. If you
want to prepare one of these treats in
your own home send a self-addressed
stamped envelope along with the
name of the recipe you want to:
Eenie's Kitchen, Jewish Federation
Television (JFT), 4200 Biscayne
Blvd., Miami, Fl. 33137.
And for more information on JFT
programming, please check the
community billboard channel on
your cable system, or call JFT at
576-4000, Ext. 340.
Check-up
An in-depth look at the
medical problems affecting our lives
Mon. 5:30 p.m.
Thurs. 5:00 p.m.
Sat. 6:00 p.m.
Produced in cooperation with
Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater miami
' *
'We Remember probes HolocayJ
Elie Wiesel
"Author, scholar, humanist, teacher, storyteller, survivor ."Th
are the words that Marc Pollick, executive director of the Zachor Institute
for Holocaust Studies and host of JFT's "We Remember.'' uses t&
describe Elie Wiesel. Wiesel is also a professor at Boston University,
chairman of the United States Holocaust Memorial Council.
Ellen Fine, professor of French and Holocaust Literature at the Cift
University of New York, has written, what many people say, is the
foremost book on Wiesel, "Legacy of Night: The Literary Universe of Elk
Wiesel." As a guest on "We Remember," she talks about Wieselspr*
Holocaust life, as well as his life during and after. Fine, not a survivu
herself, but extremely knowledgeable about Wiesel's life and literan
works, affirms, "to listen to a witness is to become one."
"We Remember." produced by the Zachor Institute for Holocaust
Studies and JFT, was created as a forum for prominent scholars on the
Holocaust, survivors, or for individuals who have something to say aboat
the Holocaust. Discussions about Wiesel, "The Precious Legacy,"
exhibition of Judaica currently at the Bass Museum, and other Holocaust
related matters are the focus of "We Remember."
"We want to bring before the community issues of memory
conscience that challenge, probe, create bonds and make us witness to
some of man's darkest hours so that our children's future can be
brighter.'' Pollick said.
Pollick, a PhD Candidate at Boston University studying with advisa
Elie Wiesel, would like to use "We Remember" as a teaching device. "By
interviewing special guests, like Fine, Ben Meed, president of the
American Gathering of Holocaust Survivors, and Mark Talisman, w_
played an instrumental role in bringing 'The Precious Legacy to the
United States, we can enhance public awareness in the lessons of the
Holocaust and educate about a subject whose actual history is little
known and is just now beginning to be uncovered."
Future topics to be addressed on "We Remember" will include the
role of the Judenrat the Jewish councils in the ghettos, the heroism ol
the righteous gentiles, the many various forms of spiritual resistance and
teaching the Holocaust to young students in public and parochial schools.
watch cmjf cable Television on:
Storer (North Dade)--Channel P-29
Storer (South Dade)--Channel 34
UltraCom-Channel 2
Miami Cablevision-Channel 11-Coming soon.
Dynamic-Coral Gables-Coming soon.
Americable-Coming soon.

* Programming Schedule
Greater Miami Jewish Federation cable Television inc.
MARCH 1984
5-5:30 p.m.
5:30-6 p.m.
6-6:30 p.m.
Monday
Eenies
Kitchen
Check up
Focus
Tuesday
The
Precious
Legacy
Subject to change
Wednesday
Eenies
Kitchen
Sunrise,
Sunset
6:30-7 p.m.
Still
Small
voice
Hayom
Thursday
Check up
vision
Israel
Movie
we
Remember
we
Remember
Still
Small
voice
Eenies
Kitchen
Friday
vision
Israel
Saturday
Movie
Focus
Sunrise,
Sunset
Encounter
Sunday
JCC:
A Special
Place
Eenies
Kitchen
Encounter
Check-up
vision
Israel
The
precious
Legacy


15
i
foluntarism
I conference
The Mental Health Association of Dade County is
ionsoring a two-day conference on The Power of
Inliintarism: Energizing Communities, Cor-
\2m and Individuals" on Thursday, March 15,
L4 at the Hrickell Point Holiday Inn, 495 Brickell
venue from 9 a.m. through 5 pjn.
I Co-sponsored by the Junior League of Miami,
Wia, the United Way and more than 25 other
Brticipating agencies throughout Dade County, the
[inference will feature more than 30 speakers
.presenting various community agencies and
usinesses, including Tanya Glazebrook, Executive
lice President of the United Way and Sister Jeanne
J Laughlin, President of Barry College.
I Topics will appeal to volunteers, agencies utilizing
olunteers and businesses as well. Among the topics
be discussed are: "Managing a Volunteer
.ogram"; "Advocacy"; 'Coalitions"; and
Volunteer Stress and Burnout."
An application has been made for continuing
ducation units for attendance at the conferences
J Cost tor the conference will be announced at a
Iter date. Parking is free. For more information, call
lynda Sloan at 379-2673.
WAY. FEBRUARY 26
Ige and Mrs. Robert Grover will be honored at the
h annual dinner of Beth Israel Synagogue of
kmi Beach, Friedland Ballroom, 1701 Washington
inue. The dinner will begin at 6:00 p.m. Call
fka Shapiro or Ahuva Epstein at 538-1251 for
> information.
WAY FEBRUARY 26
lurprise member of the Miami Dolphins and a
Jnlwr of the Miami Hurricanes will be featured at
urts celebrity breakfast held at 11 00 a.m. at the
thui'l Ann Kussell Jewish Community Center.
Ml N.E. 25th Avenue. Contact Marvin Glassman
|)2-420U fur more information.
4DAY FEBRUARY 26-MONDAY,
JRUARY27
survivors, teachers, and other interested
ticipants at Florida's first statewide Holocaust
aference and Survivor Gathering at the Seville
el, Miami Beach. Sponsored by the Zachor
Ititute for Holocaust Studies of the Greater
ami Jewish Federation, "Reality of the Past;
plications for the Future," will include speakers,
linars, and a private showing of the Precious
racy Exhibit. For more information call 576-4000.
ESDA Y FEBRUARY 28
pniel and th> Middle East" will be discussed in a
ture by Rabbi Irving Lehrman at 1:00 p.m. The
fgram is .sponsored by Forte Forum and will be
Id ul 1200 West Avenue. Call 672-3336 for in-
hnaiion.
(esDAY, FEBRUARY 28
- American Jewish Committee will sponsor a
Jcheon, "The Miami Herald: A Look To the
Iture." Richard Capen Jr., chairman and publisher
the Miami Herald will be the guest speaker. The
Icheon will be at the Holiday Inn, 495 Brickell
lenue, from noon to 1:30 p.m. Tickets are $13. Call
t>-4240 for reservations or information about series
Ascriptions.
5DNESDAY FEBRUARY 29
Bernard Schechterman will speak about
lurrent Arab-Israeli Problems" at 8:00 p.m. in
|m 101 of Temple Beth Am, 5950 North Kendall
|vc. I'honc 667-6667 for more information.
PURSDAY. MARCH 1
l South Dade Jewish Community Center will hold
restive dramatics seminar consisting of eight
pses from 4:30 to 6:00 p.m. at the Center, 12401
p. 102nd Street. Fees are $30 for members and
J for non members. Call Toby Rose by February
for information at 251-1394.
IURSDAY MARCH 1
I Vorspan, vice president of the Union of American
Mruw Congregations, will speak on "The Coming
[tional Elections and the Jewish Stake In It," at
p.m. in room 101 of Temple Beth Am, 5950
th Kendall Drive. For more information call 667-
IURSDAY MARCH 1
k North Miami Beach Auxiliary of the Miami
Nsh I lome and Hospital for the Aged will hold its
bnthly meeting and Dutch treat luncheon at
[nny's Restaurant, Miami Gardens Drive, at noon.
K meeting is open to all. Call Sophie Desky, at
K>1490 for information, or Cornelia Philipson at
11-8626, ext. 189.
SUNDAY MARCH4
The residents of Imperial House will sponsor a
fund raising brunch at the Imperial House
Restaurant, 5225 Collins Avenue on behalf of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign. The event will
begin at 10 45 a.m. For more information contact
Bernie Bendheim at 576-4000.
SUNDAY. MARCH 4
A Sadie Hawkins Dance will begin at 7:30 p.m. at
the Sheraton Riverhouse, 3900 N.W. 21st Street.
Sponsored by the South Dade Jewish Community
Centers, the event is $6.00. Call 251-1394 for more
information.
TUESDAY. MARCH 6
Dr. Margie Sweeney, assistant professor of religion
at the University of Miami, will speak at 1:00 p.m.
on "The Dead Sea Scrolls and the Maccabees." The
program is sponsored by Forte Forum, 1200 West
Avenue. Call 673-3336 for further information.
TUESDAY. MARCH 6
The Junior Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its monthly board
meeting at 10:00 a.m. at the First Nationwide
Savings and Loan on Kane Concourse in Bay
Harbor. Call Esther Schneiderman at 932-0518, or
Cornelia Philipson at 751-8626, ext. 189 for more
information.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 7
Join the New Parents Group in learning about the
adjustments of having a new child, stress
management, child care and division of respon-
sibility, at the South Dade Jewish Community
Center, 12401 S.W. i02nd Street at 8:00 p.m. Call
251-1394 with questions.
THURSDAY MARCH 8
Arthur Tcitelbaum will speak on "Origins of Anti-
Semitism Its Genesis and How it Developed" at
6 00 p.m. in room 101 of Temple Beth Am, 5950 N.
Kendall Drive. Call 667-6667 for information.
SATURDAY MARCH 10
The South Dade Jewish Community Center will
sponsor Giora Feidman, Klezmerist and in-
ternationally known clarinet player of Jewish soul
music. The event will begin at 8:00 p.m. at the
Miami Dade Community College South Auditorium.
I all 251-1394 for further information.
SUNDAY MARCH 11
Teens will participate in a rally at Peacock Park
beginning at 2 00 p.m. The event is co-sponsored by
South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry and the
South Dade Jewish Community Center. Please
respond to Toby Rose at 251-1394 by March 7.
SUNDAY MARCH 11
The residents of the Jade Winds Tower will be
holding a fundraising breakfast on behalf of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Project Henewal-Or Akiva Campaign. The event will
begin at 9:00 a.m. For further information call Lisa
lmberman at 576-4000.
MONDAY MARCH 12
Stones and Monologues from the Wonderful World
ol Sholom Aleichem" by Sarah Heller will be
sponsored by the Torah Chapter of Hadassah at
12:30 p.m. at Temple Zamora. 44 Zamora Avenue.
Coral Gables. Contact Ray Jacobson at 382-2038 for
more information.
TUESDAY MARCH 13
Forte Forum will sponsor Ms. Linda O'Bryon,
director of news and public affairs for WPBT-
channel 2 und co-anchor of the Nightly Business
Report, who will speak on "The Emergence of
Women on WaU Street." at 1:00 p.m., 1200 West
Avenue. Call 672-3336 for information.
TUESDAY. MARCH 13
A rap session for dads on problems dealing with
adolescent sons will be sponsored by the South Dade
Jewish Community Center at 12401 S.W. 102nd
Avenue from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. Dr. Steven Mack will
lead the session. Call Toby Rose by March 7 at 251-
1394 for reservations.
WEDNESDAY. MARCH 14
The American Jewish Committee will sponsor "The
Future of Brickell Avenue," presented by
Arquiteconica. Brickell architects and planners. The
luncheon will be held from noon to 1:30 p.m. at the
Hobday Inn, Brickell Point, 495 Brickell Avenue.
Tickets are $13 and may be obtained by calling 576-
4240.
THURSDAY. MARCH 15
Temple Beth Am will sponsor a speech by Professor
Bernard Schechterman entitled "Anti-Semitism in
Europe and the Middle East." at 8:00 p.m. in room
101 of the synagogue at 5950 North Kendall Drive.
Call 667-6667 for more information.
THURSDAY. MARCH 15
The North Miami Beach Auxiliary of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged will hold a
Dutch treat lunch and open board meeting at noon,
at Denny's on Miami Gardens Drive. For more
information call Sophie Desky, at 756-1490, or
Cornelia Philipson at 751-8626. Ext. 189.
SUNDAY. MARCH 18
"Moonlight and Cruise" dining and dancing will
begin at 7:00 p.m. The evening is $17.50 per person,
and the boat leaves from Haulover Dock, 10880
Collins Avenue. The event is sponsored by the
Men's Club of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged. For more information, please call
Cornelia Philipson 751-8626, ext. 189.
TUESDAY, MARCH 20
The Junior Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged will hold its monthly luncheon
meeting at the Singapore Hotel, 9601 Collins
Avenue, at noon. For more information please call
Esther Schneiderman, 932-0518, or Cornelia
PhiliDSon, 751-8626 ext. 189.
TUESDAY. MARCH 20
Merle Norman Instruction will highlight "Your
Individuality: Coordinating Wardrobes and Make-
up Skin Care for Teens." from 7:15 to 8:15 p.m. at
the South Dade Jewish Community Center, 12401
S W 102nd Avenue. The event is for Junior High
Members and is free. Call 251-1394 for information.
TUESDAY. MARCH 20
Lt. Colonel Daniel Russo, Air Force research
associate of the University of Miami, will discuss
"The U.S. Air Force Its Relations With The Latin
American Air Forces." Forte Forum will sponsor the
event at 1:00 p.m. at 1200 West Avenue. For in-
formation call 672-3336.
THURSDAY, MARCH 22
Professor Robert Levine will speak at Temple Beth
Am, room 101, 5950 North Kendall Drive at 8:00
p.m. His topic will be "Anti-Semitism in Latin
America." For further information call 667-6667.
SUNDAY. MARCH 25
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center will
present a "Tiki Fishing Trip" from 1:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Contact Iris Berger at 534-3206 for information and
reservations. The event is sponsored by the Family
Program.
TUESDAY. MARCH 27
Dr. Mark Rosenberg, director of the Latin American
and Caribbean Center and associate professor of
Political Science at Florida International University,
will speak on "U.S. Policy in Central America and
the Caribbean," Forte Forum will sponsor the event
at 1:00 p.m. at 1200 West Avenue. For information
call 672-3336.
TUESDAY. MARCH 27
A panel discussion on eating disorders affecting
teens, open to parents and teens, will be held by
David Saltman, Jewish Family and Children's
Service director, and Kathy Einstein, M.S.W. and
nutritionist. The discussion will be held at 7:15 p.m.
at the South Dade JCC, 12401 S.W. 102 Avenue.
Respond to Toby Rose at 251-1394 by February 28.
THURSDAY. MARCH 29
Single parents are invited to attend "The Empty
Chair." a lecture on how to handle many Jewish
holidays as a single parent. The 7:30 p.m. event will
be lead by Barbara Udell. M.S.W. and Rabbi Norm
Lipson at the South Dade Jewish Community
Center. 12401 S.W. 102nd Avenue.
THURSDAY, MARCH 29
"Anti-Semitism in the United States" will be the
topic discussed by Professor Abe Lavender at 8:00
p.m. in room 101 at Temple Beth Am. 5950 North
Kendall Drive. Call 667-6667 for information.
THURSDAY. MARCH 29
The North Miami Beach Auxiliary of the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged will host
their annual donor luncheon at noon in the Garden
room of the Turnberry Isle Country Club. Guest
speaker will be Fred D. Hirt, executive director
of the home. Call Sophie Desky at 756-1490 or
Cornelia Philipson at 751-8626, ext. 189, for in-
formation and reservations.
Luting (or Jewish Community Calendar
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for April events is March 6.1984
Organization.
Event______
Place.
Date.
.Time.
_( I a.m. Op.m.
Your name.
Title______
.Phone No..
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
afia.


16

Federation, February, 1984
Someone pays tlie pidce* J
until you pay your pledge!
Please send your check today
1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
576-4000
mmmm


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FILES


Federation, February, 1984


This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
February 24,1984 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137 -
President
Norman H. Lipoff
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Communications Committee
Eli Timoner
Contents
special representative of Israeli government to assist 84 campaign
CAMPAIGN/PLANNING & BUDGET 4
upcoming High Rise events
PROJECT RENEWAL _____^. 5
Dance troupe inspires pride in Israel community
Federation committee to visit Miami's sister city
AGENCIES
Medication tips from Mount Sinai Medical center
WOMEN'S DIVISION
See the Women's Division in action
women's Division calendar
SOVIET JEWRY/FREEDOM RALLY '84
A profile of a Ref usenik filmmaker and his family
Communitywide rally for Soviet Jewry on March 11
Soviets intensify anti-Semitic campaign
SOUTH DADE
Study for new JCC facility continues
Ciora Feidman, master clarinetist, to appear in concert
south Dade Midrasha lecture series
JCC sponsors mammoth auction
ISRAEL/AUYAH
New Israeli community for middle-age immigrants
Computerized care for pregnant diabetics
Planning continues for spectacular Israel 36 celebration
Aliyah conference slated for April
AGENCIES /LONG RANGE PLANNING
JASS services Jewish singles
Hiiiei students attend UJA mission
Long range planning process enters phase two
North Dade Midrasha 'Journey Through Culture"
FOUNDATION
Charitable investments can yield lifetime income
CABLE TV
jft soon available to entire Greater Miami community
"We Remember' perpetuates memory of the Holocaust
Programming schedule
CALENDAR
6
7
8&9
10
11
12
13
14
15


Federation, February, 19S*
message from the chairman
/>
VardR. Scharlin
|e 1984 Combined Jewish
eal-Israel Emergency Fund/
ct Renewal-Or Akiva
jaign is setting record levels of
.emerit as a result of the
Em and commitment of our
ter Miami Jewish community.
the beginning of the month, the
|>aign stood at $14.5 million,
included $425,000 for Project
val-Or Akiva. This total
sents a 25 percent increase over
gear's regular campaign and an
cent increase for 1984 compared
1983 total of the regular and
jency campaigns.
Sunday
|anks to the efforts of more than
volunteers from our Jewish
lunity, Super Sunday and
Week January 15 to 19 -
an extraordinary success!
ig the course of the five days,
million was raised to help aid
services in Greater Miami,
and Jewish communities
(id the world. There are
bands of people to thank for the
|ss of the phonathons. However,
lid like to extend my special,
kial thanks to Super Sunday
len Fran Levey, Jerry Sch-
Susan Sirotta and Barry
Jin and Super Week Chairman
lotte Held. You all did a super
| Rise Division
It month, we kicked off our
|aign in many of the high rise
igs in the community. The
Rise Division constitutes a
part of our total campaign
1 and I urge all high rise
hits to attend the functions
|uled in their buildings. The
igs, breakfasts and receptions
Biiture prominent speakers, and
rs may refer to the article on
four for a full list of upcoming
pse events.
etter 'Precious Legacy'
fction
Bass Museum of Art on
p Beach was the setting for a
etter event on January 25,
featured a private showing of
Precious Legacy: Judaic
ires from the Czechoslovak
[Collections" and a reception
I by Paula and Joel Friedland.
(Divisions Gearing Up
fsicians, dentists, builders,
rs, merchants, attorneys, and
[other professionals in Greater
Miami have been taking part in the
campaign through our trade
divisions. A number of events
oriented towards your profession are
scheduled in the coming weeks. Be
an integral part of the campaign and
meet fellow professionals from your
field.
Join our Volunteers
Our many divisions and campaign
events rely on the hard work and
dedication of many local leaders who
volunteer their time. Your in-
volvement can make a difference! If
you are interested in being a part of
the 1984 CJA-IEF, please call
Federation at 576-4000.
The 1984 campaign is ahead of the
1983 campaign in dollars and in pace.
But despite the tremendous
momentum we've generated, we are
now at a critical juncture in the
campaign. Through our united ef-
forts, as individual Jews working
together as one, we can make this the
greatest campaign in the history of
Federation. Let's all pitch in and
'Lead the Way' for our fellow Jews.
Howard R. Scharlin
General Campaign Chairman
1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund-Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign.
Rabin to address
Mercantile
Division
Yitzhak Rabin
Yitzhak Rabin, former prime
minister of the State of Israel, will be
the guest speaker at the annual
dinner of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Mercantile Division on
Thursday evening, April 5 at the
Biscayne Bay Marriott. The dinner
is being held on behalf of the 1984
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund/ Project Renewal-
Or Akiva Campaign. Tim R. Cohen,
executive vice president of
Modernage Furniture and Howard
Socol, president of Burdines, serve
as chairmen of the Mercantile
Division.
Rabin, a native Israeli, served in
the Israeli army for 27 years. By the
end of his military career, he had
achieved the supreme rank of Chief
of the General Staff (Lt. General)
and with it, served as the Com-
mander of the Israel Defense Forces
in the 1967 Six Day war.
Shortly after his military
retirement in January 1968, Rabin
was appointed Israel's Ambassador
to the United States. During his five
year tour of duty in Washington, he
established a reputation as an
unusually influential ambassador.
To The Jewish community
A very big "thank you" to everyone who made last
months Super Sunday and Super week truly super
events. Thanks to the commitment of more than 3,000
volunteers and thousands of individuals who made
gifts to the 1984 combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, we raised a record $1.26 million!
Again our sincere thanks for helping to LEAD THE WAY
for our fellow Jews.
In the spring of 1973, he returned
to Jerusalem and became active in
the Labor Party ranks. In the
national election of December 1973,
he gained a Knesset seat
representing the Labor Alignment
and with the formation of the Golda
Meir Cabinet, he was appointed
Minister of Labor. He was
nominated by the Labor Party as its
choice for Premier following Mrs.
Meir's resignation in April 1974. He-
served as prime minister until June
1977. Rabin is presently a member of
the Knesset.
In addition to guest speaker
Rabin, the evening will also be
highlighted by the presentation of
the coveted Harold B. Bosworth
Memorial Award.
Past recipients of the award in-
clude Eh Timoner, J. William Baros,
John N. Serb in, Jacob Rabinowitz,
Jay I. Kislak, Robert Macht, Max
Orovitz, Milton Weiss, William S.
Ruben, Thomas C. Wasmuth, Robert
Russell, Mendell M. Selig, Goldie R.
Goldstein, Ted Bodin, Ralph Levitz,
Melvin Jacobs, Leonard Luna and
David Kenny.
"This is the first time two people
from different groups within the
Mercantile Division have joined
forces to chair this event, Howard
from the Department and Retail
Store Group and myself, from the
Home Furnishings Group," said
Cohen.
"I am confident that with the
business climate improving and the
tremendous problems still facing
Israel, we will have the most suc-
cessful Mercantile Division Dinner
ever," added Socol.
Members of the Mercantile
Division are hosting the dinner.
There will be no couvert charge for
participants in this annual event.
For more information about the
Meicantile Division dinner, please
call Marty Barasch at Federation,
576-4000, extension 274.
Pilot project to be national model
Dr. Aryeh Nesher, special representative of the State of Israel, will
lead a pilot project for the Greater Miami Jewish Federation in which he
plans to restructure and reorganize the Aventura / Turnberry campaign
on behalf of the 1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
.Fund / Project Renewal-Or Akiva. The program is expected to result in
greater campaign yields and will serve as a model for other Miami and
American communities.
Nesher, a renowned lecturer who has served in many governmental
capacities for the State of Israel, was born in Rumania and immigrated to
Israel in 1948. He served in the armed forces of Israel and in 'LSherut
La'am," Israel's Peace Corps-type program. By presenting first hand
information to campaign leaders on current happenings in Israel, Dr.
Nesher hopes to stimulate them so that they may in turn pass on this
knowledge and enthusiasm to their co-workers.
The major thrusts of the program will be education and the
development of active solicitation skills. Dr. Nesher will be forming three
sponsor clubs at Turnberry. They are a $100,000 club chaired by Frank
Beckerman, a $50,000 club led by Leonard Strelitz, and a $10,000 club
headed by Herb Canarick.
The Federation has also arranged for Nesher to work with the
California Club. Since the California Club is now conducting its first
campaign, he is working strictly with education in the development.
Nesher plans to create communities of unified groups of individuals who
were active in other Jewish groups.
LYDIA AND PETER GOLDRING, LEADERS OF THE GREATER
MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION'S FIRST TRADITIONAL
MISSION TO ISRAEL, July 2-13, announced that mission plans are
rapidly being finalized Mission highlights will include visits to religious
settlements and Yeshivot, confidential briefings with top Israeli military
strategists, religious and political leaders and special Shabbat program-
ming. Registration is limited. For more information, please call
Federation's Mission Department at 576-4000.