The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
newspaper   ( marcgt )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02858

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
dFewislbi Floif Miami
, 56 Number 45 Two Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, November 11,1983
QFndShoch.i
By Mall 80 Cams
Price 50 Cents
Obstacle to Peace
Administration Blows Hot and Cold About Israel
il
bbi Waxman
NEW YORK (JTA) -
America's continued "hot
and cold" policy toward Is-
rael and the dominant pro-
Arab voices in the State
Department were described
here as obstacles to achiev-
ing lasting peace in the
Middle East.
In remarks prepared for deliv-
ery to the Synagogue Council of
America's annual Covenant of
Peace Award dinner, Rabbi
Mordecai Waxman, Council pres-
ident, said, "We are disturbed by
the hot and cold policy which
successive American Admin-
istrations have followed in rela-
tion to Israel allies and friends
must be consistent in their
behavior."
THE CONSERVATIVE Jew-
ish leader asserted that "the back
and forth shifts, the approval and
disapproval, the friendly today
and not very friendly tomorrow
U.S. attitude must end. Amer-
ican Presidents must stop listen-
ing to pro Arabists in the State
Department and adopt a long-
range policy which will involve
Israel as an ally in the search for
a durable peace."
Waxman said that American
policy of recent years, whether
described as "even-handednesa
or re-evaluation, has served to
prevent stability in the Middle
East and has been harmful to any
peace process." He cited as a re-
Continued on Page 8-A
IUNY Mishandled Academic's Lies
eedom to Rap Zionism Closer U.S. Ties
Challenged Ineffectively Shultz (Ye8), Weinberger (No) Race
To Tell Which Way Policy Will Shift
ly KEVIN FREEMAN
W YORK (JTA) -
sraeli professor whose
last summer to col-
lies at the State Uni-
y of New York at
Brook triggered the
t controversy sur-
ing the teachings of a
sor who linked Zion-
) racism and Nazism
w charging that the
s administration
andled the affair and
fully wrapped itself
loak of academic free-
pademic freedom even by
fcfinition of the State of New
York carries with it the notion of
academic responsibility," Selwyn
Troen said in a lengthy interview
with the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency. "Stony Brook wrapped
itself ud in the banner of
academic freedom arguing that
anybody can say whatever they
please because they have a right
to do so."
"THEY HAVE not addressed
the issue of academic responsibil-
ity," which, Troen said, "deems
that students be offered an alter-
native viewpoint and afforded a
reasonable opportunity to
develop their own thoughts on
the subject." There "is no way"
the instructor of the course,
Ernest Dube, "fulfilled these ele-
Continued on Page 15-A
etter
[han Expected
Israel Satisfied With
First Round in Geneva
Leaders Adjourn.......................Page 8-A
By DAVID LANDAU
SRUSALEM (JTA)
flsrael feels the first
I of the Lebanese na-
I reconciliation talks in
eya ended fairly well
i its point of view.
May 17 Lebanon-Israel
ent is still intact despite
ous Syrian efforts to have
gated, government sources
after a Cabinet meeting
They added that Syria's
to replace Lebanese Prime
r Shafik Wazzan with a
malleable politician waa
waited.
Jot a bad balance sheet so
the Israeli sources said.
cautioned, though, that
nese politics are notoriously
f"t to predict especially
toe precarious security
on m various parts of the
"" The second round of the
Geneva talks, scheduled to
resume Nov. 14, could yet deal a
mortal blow to the May 17 agree-
ment.
THE FIRST round of the talks
ended with the conference
Continued on Page 8-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Lawrence Eagle-
burger, Undersecretary of
State for Political Affairs,
arrived in Israel last week
as the idyllic relationship
that has existed between
Israel and the U.S. since
last May is being shaken by
a dispute within the
Reagan Administration as
to whether the U.S. should
seek closer ties with Israel.
President Reagan, who has
always publicly maintained that
Israel is a strategic ally of the
U.S., appears to be leaning
toward the argument of Secre-
tary of State George Shultz that
there should be closer strategic
cooperation with Israel. Shultz is
reportedly supported by Robert
McFarlane, the President"s new
National Security Adviser who
has been described as a
strategist.
HOWEVER. Shultz is being
strongly opposed by Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger
who has the support of CIA
Director William Casey. The
experience of the last weeks has
shown that the Pentagon has
been able to succeed as a
stumbling block to forging closer
U S- Israeli ties.
According to sources here,
there were at least two meetings
of the National Security Council
Secretary of State Shultz
recently at which the issue was
hotly debated in an effort to
convince the President. Shultz
argued that closer coordination
with Israel is needed as the only
way to counter Syrian intran-
sigence in Lebanon. Weinberger
reiterated his view that this
would harm U.S. relations with
Arab states.
Shultz appears to be close to
the views of former Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger who, after
the Oct. 23 terrorist bomb attack
on U.S. Marine headquarters in
Beirut, said coordination between
Israel and the U.S. is needed to
change the "balance of power"
without which, he maintained,
Syria and the radical elements in
Lebanon will gain domination
over that country.
"IT IS AN amazing phenom-
enon that the Israeli army is
sitting 29 kilometers from where
Americans are being killed, and
there seems to be no coordination
between our policies at all,"
Kissinger said at the time.
Shultz's predecessor, former
Secretary of State Alexander
Haig, who had his own battles
with Weinberger over relations
with Israel, has also argued that
the most effective way to show
the Soviet Union and Syria that
"the U.S. means business" is in
concert with Israel, the nation
which, he said, is most feared by
Damascus.
This lack of coordination in
Lebanon is a policy initiated by
Weinberger and was evident from
the time the Marines first went
into that country and were or-
Continued on Page 15-A
A rgentine Jews Relieved
Inside
Stories
Bombing stirs new
security measures... 3 A
Joint Chiefs bigwig
says 'no'............8-A
Did Senate
kill Jordan plan?...11-A
U.S.-lsrael strategic
cooperation?.......13-A
Alfonsin's Election Sweep Brightens Their Future
BUENOS AIRES
(JTA) The victory of
Raul Alfonsin in this
country's presidential elec-
tions "has brought about a
note of relief and optim-
ism" to the Jewish com-
munity, according to Prof.
Manuel Tenenbaum, execu-
tive director of the Latin
American Branch of the
world Jewish Congress,
He also noted that in the after-
math of the elections, which was
a stunning defeat for the Peron-
ists, the recent anti-Semitic res-
urgence in the country "seems to
have quieted down for the time
being.'
ALFONSIN, a former Con-
gressman and co-founder of the
Argentine Permanent Assembly
for Human Rights, waa the
candidate of the Radical Civic
Union, a middle class party, j He
won 52 percent of the vote to 40
percent for Italo Luder, the
Peronist candidate. The Peron-
ists have dominated Argentina's
political scene since their party
was founded in 1945 by Juan
Peron.
Tenenbaum pointed out
Continued on Page 15-A


Pag2-A Tha Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 11,1983
JWB Scholarships Totalling $60,550 Awarded to 22
NEW YORK JWB scholar-
shipe totalling $60,650 have been
awarded to 22 students enrolled
in graduate schools of social
work, health and physical educa-
tion and Jewish communal ser-
vice.
The announcement was jointly
made by JWB President Esther
Leah Ritz, of Milwaukee, and
Leonard Rubin, of Tenafly, N.J.,
chairman, JWB Scholarship
Committee.
"All of the scholarship re-
cipients," Mrs. Ritz said, "are
future professional staff members
of JWB-affiliated Jewish Com-
munity Centers and YM-
YWHAs.
"The scholarships have been
contributed by individual
sponsors, JWB Board members,
foundations, and JCCs. They will
help these future JCC profes-
sionals get the graduate educa-
tion they need for their jobs."
JWB administers scholarships
in its capacity as the central ser-
vice agency for 275 JCCs, YM
and YWHAs and communal
camps serving more than one
million Jews.
"So that JCCs and YM-
YWHAs can be assured of an
adequate supply of qualified
professionals," pi.
"JWB Bod n^V
tns JCC. andSSi
and individuals havet.^
scholarships to f*
Its not easy to be a Riverside.
Being the best at what you do is
never easy.
There can be no let-up of effort.
No compromising of high standards.
And no cutting of necessary service.
For nearly 70 years, we've tried hard
to be the best. It began with Charles Rosenthal,
Riverside's founder.
It continues today in the hands of
Carl Grossberg, Alfred Golden, Leo Hack,
Andrew Fier and a new generation of Jewish
management.
It is the kind of leadership which,
working closely with Orthodox, Conservative
and Reform Rabbis, actually helped set the
standards for Jewish funeral service.
They understood that being a Jewish
funeral director had to be more than just a
business.
They knew it was a very special calling
that demanded a total commitment to Jewish
tradition.
.
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And the knowledge.and resources to
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That's why today, Riverside is the mod
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the world.
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice PwJ*
Leo Hack, Vice President, Religious AoW
Andrew Fier, Vice President
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The most respected name in Jewish tunei
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...-.'-..
Friday, November 11,1983 /The JewUh FUriidlah *&&k
hricide Attack in Ture
Israel Beefs Up Security Measures
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
[The Cabinet has begun
nsideration of further se-
ity measures in south
banon in the aftermath
Friday's suicide truck
ab attack on Israeli mil-
headquarters in tyre.
nposals to seal off south
Ibanon from the rest of
country by closing the
irali River bridges were
ferred to a later session
decision at the request
Premier Yitzhak Shamir.
According to Israeli army
fires. 28 Israeli soldiers and
der policemen and 32 Leba-
p. mostly detainees awaiting
rrogation but some of them
ployes at the Israeli installa-
I were killed. Of the 28 Israeli,
[were Druze. Twenty-nine Is-
Uis and 12 Lebanese were
pred. Among the Lebanese
re relatives of the detainees
in had been waiting outside of
>of the buildings hit. Five per-
ks were extricated from the
bble.
THE ATTACK was almost a
p..'.* of the suicide truck
nbing.s that hit U.S. and
feiKh military headquarters in
lirut on Oct. 23, killing 230
Jerican and 53 French service-
In and wounding scores more.
(sraeli military sources said
;death toll at Tyre would have
l-n much higher had not a
filer policeman guarding the
bpound tired at the speeding
pup truck, killing the driver
causing the explosives to
locate outside rather than in-
k the building. The amount of
plosives contained in the truck
plill undetermined.
[A group calling itself the "Is
nic Jihad" (Holy War) claimed
kponsibility for the attack in
ire. It is the same group that
pk credit for the attacks on the
ultinational force in Beirut last
pnth and on the U.S. Embassy
ere last April.
[ISRAELI ARAB affairs
Iperts identified the group as
|tremist Shiite Moslems, allied
Iranian Shiites. They have
en fighting alongside the
rians and elements of the Pal-
Jtine Liberation Organization
pinst the Lebanese army.
[Israel launched swift retalia-
pn for the attack which occurred
6 a.m., local time, Friday.
[aves of Israeli fighter-bombers
Bsted Syrian and terrorist
tnta at Behamdoun on the
eirut-Damascus main highway
d Mansouriya, to the south.
ese were described as terrorist
ses established after Israeli
fees evacuated the region two
>nihs ago to more secure lines
Mh of the Awali River.
[Heports from Beirut Friday
tanks and three Syrian
IDF Safely
Defuses Bomb
rIEL,AVIV- l"r safely defused a bomb they
found at the side of a road
] by IDF patrols north of
e- The army spokesman said
J2" dealt with before it ex-
Hoded.
Meanwhile, IDF engineers
pve completed a minute exam-
aon of all buildings in Leb-
n used by IsraeU soldiers. The
"""nation was begun after the
Potion of a budding in Tyre
L* tl y a yew ago, as a result of a
F8 leak, in which 76 Israeli
P were and border police were
artillery batteries were destroyed
in the bombing and strafing
attacks. An Israeli military
spokesman said all planes
returned safely to their bases.
SHAMIR WARNED that the
terrorist erred gravely if they
thought the attack would force
Israel's total withdrawal from
Lebanon. "We shall leave Leba-
non only once we are convinced
that our leaving will not unleash
waves of terror," he said. "We
are strong, and we shall not leave
Lebanon before we reach our
goals which are sovereignty for
the Lebanese and security for
Israel."
(A similar statement was made
in Geneva last week by David
Kimche, director general of the
Israeli Foreign Ministry. He told
reporters that if the Syrians
think Israel was too preoccupied
with its internal affairs and un-
willing to fight, they were badly
"misreading" the mood in Jeru-
salem.)
Shamir informed the Cabinet
that he had received a message
from President Reagan sent Fri-
day expressing the support of the
American people for Israel at this
grim hour. Reagan said he hoped
that America's "deep sense of
sympathy" with Israel in the
Tyre bombing would "ease the
loss that the people of Israel
feel."
THE PRESIDENT'S message
stated: "Today I participated in
a memorial service for the
casualties suffered by American
forces in Beirut. Our sense of loss
was made even greater by the
knowledge that your forces have
suffered today casualties in the
same kind of terrorist attack."
News of the Tyre bombing
reached the President at Camp
LeJeune, N.C., where he was at-
tending services for the Marine
dead.
U.S. Undersecretary of State
Lawrence Eagleburger, who was
in Jerusalem Friday after win-
ding up two days of talks with
Israeli officials, described the
attack as "murderous terrorism
of the worst kind" and said every
effort should be made to stamp
out such acts.
The Cabinet was briefed on the
Tyre attack by Chief of Staff
Gen. Moshe Levy, Air Force
Commander Gen. Amos Lapidot,
and chief of military intelligence,
Gen. Ehud Barak. The meeting
opened with the ministers rising
for a minute of silence for the
dead in Tyre. Shamir offered his
condolences to the bereaved fam-
ilies and wished the wounded a
speedy recovery.
DISCUSSION of Finance
Minister Yigal Cohen-Orgad's
austerity program to resolve Is-
rael's severe economic crisis,
originally the top agenda item at
Sunday's Cabinet meeting, was
postponed until Monday when
the Cabinet convened again in
special session.
The ministers were divided
over the wisdom of sealing off the
Awali River bridges to improve
the security of Israel-occupied
south Lebanon. Some senior min-
isters objected to fche idea tor feat
of negative political and security
implications.
Shamir, Defense Minister
Moshe Arens and Deputy Pre-
mier David Levy were said to
have argued that a closure would
not guarantee an end to
sabotage. Interior Minister Yosef
Burg and Science Minister Yuval
Neeman urged total segregation
of south Lebanon from the north.
Although Shamir postponed a
decision, the military is applying
stricter controls over the Awali
bridges. Traffic has been sharply
curtailed but the crossings
remain open for the time being.
ISRAEL IS also expected to
launch a campaign among the
Shiites in south Lebanon to warn
them against assisting terrorists
while reiterating Israel's interest
in maintaining a good relation-
ship with that community.
ine suicide attack caused ex-
tensive damage to the military
headquarters compound. One
building, housing general securi-
ty services, was completely
demolished. Another, housing
border policemen, was partially
destroyed as was a third where
Arab detainees were being held.
One of the buildings served as
a storage for explosives which
continued to detonate after the
initial blast, complicating rescue
operations. The dead and
wounded were pulled from the
rubble within 12 hours by a new
technique, developed after a gas
leak caused an explosion which
destroyed an Israel army head-
quarters building in Tyre a year
ago, with heavy loss of life.
SPECIAL equipment was
flown in from Tel Aviv to help in
the rescue work. This included
specially designed pneumatic
lifts capable of raising concrete
slabs of up to 20 tons, inflatable
rubber pillows to support the
slabs while the wounded were ex-
tricated, and long tubes to pump
oxygen into the rubble.
Lt. Col. Aharon Gonem, the
army spokesman for the Sidon
region, said the same equipment
was offered to the American
forces in Beirut after the bom-
bing of the Marine headquarters
on October 23. The Israeli offer of
technical and medical aid was
rejected by the U.S.
Eye-witnesses to Friday's at-
tack, which occurred shortly after
dawn, said an unidentified pick-
up truck was seen speeding
toward the headquarters com-
pound, zig-zagging between con-
crete blocks which had been
erected as a security measure.
A BORDER policeman, identi-
fied as Nakad Sarbach, opened
fire on the vehicle as it swerved
along the approach road. He said
later he believed he shot and
killed the drive before the vehicle
blew up just short of the head-
quarters buildings. Sarbach him-
self was hurled into the air by the
blast but was alert enough to re-
capture several Arab prisoners
who had seized the opportunity
to try to escape. Doctors said
Sarbach, who was treated for in-
juries, suffered nothing worse
than punctured eardrums.
The dead and wounded were all
identified by Saturday morning.
Israel army burial squads assist-
ed in identifying the Lebanese
victims whose bodies were turned
over to the International Red
Cross to be returned to next of
kin for internment.
A board of inquiry was imme-
diately set up by Chief of Staff
Levy to study the lessons of the
attack. An immediate measure
taken was the replacement of the
concrete blocks by phalanxes of
parked vehicles around the
perimeter of the military head-
quarters.

'There is no more tribute to JNF's important work than
emulation of it,' said American Murachi Women National
President Roselle Silberstein, and so AMW planted a tree in
front of the Jewish National Fund's national headquarters in
New York in honor of JNF's 80th anniversary. The event at-
tracted JNF's neighbors and a number 6f dignitaries, including
Israel Deputy Consul General Uri Bar-Ner (shown 'digging in'
with Mrs. Silberstein) and Herb Hick man. special assistant to
Mayor Koch, who praised the joint role of AMW and JNF in
beautifying Israel.
Soldiers Wounded by Explosive
Charges Detonated Near Vehicle
TEL AVIV (JTA) Three IsraeU soldiers were
slightly wounded when an explosive charges detonated
near their vehicle on a road in south Lebanon east of the
Zaharani River. Concern is mounting, meanwhile, over the
fate of the six Israeli soldiers held prisoner by the
Palestine Liberation Organization because of renewed
fighting between PLO dissidents and forces loyal to Yasir
Arafat.
DEFENSE MINISTER Moshe Arena reiterated that
Israel holds the PLO and its leaders directly responsible
for the safety of the Israeli POWs. Reports from Beirut
said fierce fighting broke out near Tripoli in northern
Lebanon between pro-and-anti-Arafat elements of the
PLO, the latter aided by Syria.
The Syrians were said to be pounding residential
areas of Lebanon's second largest city and nearby camps
with GRAD and other missiles.
Temple Solel and American Red Magen David for Israel
Benefit Showing
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Sun. Dm. 11 at 10:30 A.M.
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Tax Deductible Donation:
Adults $20.00 Children (under 13) $10
For Tickets See:
Sylvia GTreenberg Dr. Joel M. Wllentz
Temple Solel 0604)205 2100 E. Hallandale Bch. Blvd.
Bob Schwartz
ARMDI- 047-3263
Dr. Alvin Cohen
2500 E. Hallandale Bch. Blvd.
PRIPSTEIN'SCAMP
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featuring small size, warm family
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FLORIDA INTERVIEWS OVER HOLIDAYS
For more Information, please call:
(Broward & Palm Beach Counties)
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Page 4-A The Jawiafa Floridian /Friday, November 11,1988
BfrWWWWCK^m^lJWWWWWW
Thinking Due at Assembly in Atlanta Wednesday
The General Assembly of the Council of
Jewish Federations and Welfare Funds is
an annual site for some heavy thinking
about the agenda of the Jewish community
for the year ahead. This year's, set for next
Wednesday in Atlanta, is no different.
There will be a host of stellar
personalities at the GA, local and national.
And especially this year, even from abroad.
Among the latter will be Israel's President
Chaim Herzog and Leon Dulzin, chairman
of the Jewish Agency and World Zionist
Organization Executives.
Issues on the agenda range from
Lebanon to the impact of the American
economy on our nation's Jewish poor. It is
an agenda rich with vital consideration. In
between these two outposts of concern, for
example, there is the ever-persistent agony
involving Jews in the Soviet Union. And
whether or not it reaches the floor for
consideration at this General Assembly,
increasingly there is a heightened
American Jewish consciousness with
respect to the fate of Falas ha Jewry.
Lebanon Tops Agenda
But there is no doubt that Lebanon will
head the agenda. The war in Lebanon
brought increasing world isolation of Israel
and an increasing uneasiness for
American Jewry with respect to Israel's
role there.
But the growing U.S. presence in Leba-
non, heightened by the twin tragedies of
the brutal terrorist attacks on the Marine
compound in Beirut and the Israeli
command center in Tyre appears, for the
first time in a long time, to heighten the
possibility of stronger ties between the
U.S. and Israel for an approach to long-
term Middle Eastern probabilities.
Will this ease the American Jewish
strain with respect to its agonized appraisal
of their own ties to Israel and their own
right to dissent?
These issues apart, what about the
growing American Jewish communal
burden with respect to its financial needs
for health care of the aged, nutrition for
elderly and children, Medicaid, rent
subsidies for elderly, food stamps, single
parent families, and families with marginal
income?
What about the concern for new
approaches to dealing with traditional
Jewish family ties, which presently appear
to be weakening? What about allocations
and uses of Jewish communal resources,
modes of governance of the Jewish
community, our nation's university
campuses as the testing ground for the
Jewish future in America?
These and many other issues and
problems will undoubtedly surface at the
General Assembly in Atlanta. There may
not necessarily be any specific solutions to
emerge from the deliberations. But there
will surely be much food for thought for
future effective action.
Miami's Young Leaders
The Young Leadership Cabinet of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation was
founded on the premise that the United
Jewish Appeal was to be the major force
providing Israel with humanitarian
*Jewis*i Floridian
/ *
iiUKT-nuMiLiiiaLih aia
roia uam.". rw u ,i
9MINOUN aUZAIINESMOCHrr
anal
><
assistance. And so the Cabinet began to
train our community's future Jewish
leaders back in 1960.
Each year since then, Miami
Federation's young Leadership Cabinet has
served as the training ground for our
community's best and finest in the cause of
Federation's many programs.
They bore in mind the objectives recently
verbalized by Michael Reiner, national
director of the U J A National Leadership
Cabinet: "Our goal is to move toward new
and higher levels of involvement and in-
fluence, locally and nationally," he said.
"The young Leadership Cabinet is a role
model for Jews everywhere."
In this regard, the Young Leadership
Cabinet sent representatives of our
community to an annual retreat in Prin-
ceton, N.J., earlier this year, where they
joined their counterparts from throughout
the nation and contributed, among other
things, toward the National Cabinet's
pledge of more than $4 million to the 1984
campaign, an increase of more than 11
million over last year's pledges by the snv>
donors. *une
Furthermore, many of our contineent
will be part of a group of 50 young
Americans who join 75 of their Israeli
counterparts and 25 other young Jewish
leaders from nations around the world t
the first World Young Leadership
Assembly scheduled next month in Israel
from Dec. 11-14.
"This is a record-breaking achievement"
said Michael M. Adler, one of Miamis own
Young Leaders. To demonstrate the ef-
fectiveness of Miami's Young Leadership
Cabinet as the training ground originally
envisioned in 1960, Adler is a national
chairman of the U J A Young Leadership
Cabinet and chairman of the national
conference of the Cabinet scheduled for
Washington in March, 1984.
That our community's leaders of
tomorrow are already leaders today is
beyond question.
tfWKftKKi*^^
k WWRE
Tears of Agony at Camp LeJeune
">ccvmr. pi. n.ni
Friday. November 11.1983
Volume 56
5KISLEV5744
Number 46
THERE WFRF tears nf nony
last Friday at Camp Le Jeune in
North Carolina. Tiiey were Lear.-
for the young Marines killed in
the terrorist attack on their
compound in Beirut where they
had come to serve as peace-
makers.
The tears were understandable.
The hypocrisy was not. Said
Commodore J. R. McNamara, a
Navy chaplain: "I do not know
why young men die. You would
think it would break the heart of
God."
UNLIKE THE Commodore, I
am not authorized to speak for
God. But the first McNamara
statement of eulogy for the 230
slain Marines is another matter.
It was hypocritical pure and
simple.
I do know why young men die,
and so does the Commodore.
They die because old men send
them to die. In the games they
play, the old send the young to
die in the name of some political
principle that is quickly forgotten
even as the young are being
buried.
Certainly, this was true at
Camp LeJeune. There was Pres-
ident Reagan, shedding a tear
with the grieving families, at pre-
cisely the same moment that his
Administration stood and still
stands at the center of two
seemingly unrelated events, both
of which show what an absolute
sham Mr. Reagan's own com-
ments were, no less than Com-
modore McNamara's.
ONE IS the Reagan Adminis-
Leo
Mindlin
tralion's unconscionable in-
trusion into the Baby Jane Doe
case. The President's Surgeon
General. Theodore Koop, has
inspired the Justice Department
to file suit against the Medical
Center at the State University of
New York in Stony Brook.
Baby Jane Doe is hospitalized
at the Center. She was born Oct.
11 and is so seriously crippled
both mentally and physically
that physicians have advised her
parents airainst surgery that
would at beat keep her alive
through perhaps age 20.
But they would be 20
bedridden years in a vegetable
condition filled with pain,
paralysis and. of course, total
unawareness of the world in
which she would live. That is why
the best medical advice has been
to let her stay as she is so that
she can die, far more mercifully,
within the next year or two.
Dr. Koop, however, is a right-
to-lifer under any circumstances,
and sn all t K.. l>_....:.i__-T_ji-
now alter Baby Jane Does
medical records to determine if
her civil rights are being violated
by the decision of her parents and
the doctors not to operate.
IN THIS, u is easj lu see a
relationship hrtwwn the USB
shed at Camp LeJeune and the
Justice Department > action of a
wi-t-k ayo Wednesday When at
Camp LeJeune Mr. Reagan
talked about our country as "a
force for good in the world." he
would of course be able, in these
same terms, to justify his intru-
sion into the agonizing decision
of Baby Jane Doe's parents to let
their child die quickly and with a
minimum of suffering.
But comes now the second
event. When many of those
Marines whom the President
mourned might yet have been
saved, when they needed instant
and skillful medical attention,
why didn't they receive it?
There was Ramban Hospital in
Haifa, an institution that is
world-renowned for its treatment
of the war-wounded, a mere
20
minutes away from Beirut by
helicopter. There was BP
offering its aid and its skills to*
presumable ally -
AND THERE was this ally"
a quick decision forced byu
Pentagon, the State Department
and other of Mr. Reagan s men
saying no to the offer, spurning
in a craven pandering w
sensibilities many ofjnw*
same Arabs who slaughtered W
and so all the President's mVn are Continued On Page 1-A
___


Friday, November 11,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 6-A
Urging America to 'help me to have my husbdnd free,' Natalia
Sharansky break's down during her description of her husband's
plight in the Soviet Union. The Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith honored dissidents Anatoly Sharansky and Andrei
Sakharov with the Joseph Prize for Human Rights. At left are
ADL Chairman Burton Joseph and then-U.S. Vice President
Walter Mdndale.
B'nai B'rith Launches Celebration of UOth Anniversary
Today's Programs Still
Serve on Global Basis
Women's Role. Page 1-B
B'nai B'rith Interna-
Itional is celebrating its
140th year. The celebration
Ibegan Oct. 13. Ceremonies
[denoting the start of their
115th decade will be held
I throughout the year by
(members around the world.
| The Jewish service organiza-
tion, whose half a million mem-
bers in 18 countries comprise the
[largest democratically-organized
leroup of its kind, was founded in
|i843 by 12 emigres in New York
City. Their objective was to unite
Lews "in the work of promoting
[their highest interests and those
[of humanity."
EARLY IN its history, B'nai
[B'rith focused on bringing to-
[gether American Jews with
[disparate backgrounds. At the
[same time, members widened
I their attention to help widows
land orphans. In short order, they
I were also helping victims of
I natural disasters and launching
their first fight against anti-
Semitism in 1851, by persuad-
I iog the United States to withhold
[approval of a treaty with
[Switzerland until several Swiss
[cantons removed legal restric-
[tions against Jews.
Today, B'nai B'rith is still aid-
ling disaster victims and fighting
[religious and racial bias. Its Anti-
| Defamation League, founded 70
[years ago to thwart the growing
[menace of the Ku Klux Klan, is
[widely considered to be one of the
[foremost human rights advocates
[in the world. The ADL has offices
lin North and South America and
[Europe and works hand-in-hand
[with other B'nai B'rith human
[rights groups in Canada,
[Australia and New Zeland.
[ In the 1880s, as the first mas-
Isive wave of Jews from Europe
[reached the United States, B'nai
[B'rith set up manual and tech-
Inical schools and the first free
I employment bureau, all aimed at
[making these immigrants both
Iself-sufficient and comfortable in
[their new surroundings. A
hundred years later, B'nai B'rith
[volunteers continue to assist im-
| migrants mostly from the
[Soviet Union to become "at
[home" in America.
I AT ABOUT the same time,
|B nai B'rith's first overseas lodge
[was established appropriately,
jin Israel. Today, members reside
|m countries from Austria to
[Australia, from Japan to
Jamaica. Israel, of course, re-
mains special. Not only are there
more than 200 lodges in that
Middle Eastern country, each
engaged in social and educational
welfare projects, but there are
some 5,000 teenage members of
Noar Lenoar, Israel's BBYO
counterpart, and thousands of
students active in the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundations at
various college campuses. In ad-
dition, Jerusalem is the site of
B'nai B'rith's World Center,
which serves as a program re-
source agency for the org-
anization.
Just as Israel is special, so,
too, are Soviet Jews. For nearly
two decades, B'nai B'rith has
spearheaded efforts to prod the
USSR to permit Jews and others
who desire to emigrate to leave.
During that time, some 270,000
Jews did leave, most of them go-
ing to Israel.
Last March, in face of a vir-
tually complete emigration shut-
down, B'nai B'rith led a world-
wide rally to let those Jews re-
maining in the Soviet Union
know that they have not been
and will not be forgotten.
B'NAI B'RITH is also a world
leader in seeking positive resolu-
tion to other issues of Jewish
concern. Through its Interna-
tional Council, members are kept
informed on what is happening
around the world both in front of
and behind the scenes of formul-
ating public policy. An accredited
Non-Governmental Organization
by the United Nations, B'nai
B'rith maintains a close watch on
Continued on Pane 11-A
Service Organization
Credited With Many 'Firsts'
In American History
L^^-'
W m
S?f
jfll ^^k ^B 1 III
B'nai B'rith is the first
international service orga-
nization founded in North
America. Formed in 1843,
B'nai B'rith preceded the
Grange, the Salvation
Army, the Knights of
Columbus, Kiwanis, and
Rotary. Its half-million
members are enrolled in
over 3,000 men's lodges,
women's chapters, mixed
units and college and youth
groups in 48 countries
around the world.
B'nai B'rith is credited with
many "firsts" in American
history:
It organized the first disaster
relief campaign for victims of a
Baltimore flood in 1868, just 13
years before the founding of the
American Red Cross. One of the
founders of the American Red
Cross was a member of B'nai
B'rith; he became the ARC's first
vice president. B'nai B'rith
mobilized relief drives for victims
of the Chicago fire, the San Fran-
cisco and Guatemala earth-
quakes, and scores of other
catastrophes in America and
abroad;
It opened the first Jewish
community center and the first
Jewish library, both in 1852, in
New York City;
It sponsored the National
Jewish Hospital in Denver, a
pioneer institution for treatment
and research in tuberculosis and
chest diseases, and the Leo N.
Levi Hospital, Hot Springs,
Arkansas, devoted to the relief of
arthritis and kindred diseases.
Both are non-sectarian, non-fee
hospitals. B'nai B'rith was also
instrumental in the establish-
ment of the Jewish Hospital of
Philadelphia (now the Albert
Einstein Medical Center) in the

B'nai B'rith President David M. Blumberg chats with Israel
Prime Minister Go Ida Meir at the 1973 B'nai B'rith Board of
Governors meeting in Tel Aviv. The Jewish organization Held
its international convention in Israel in 1957 and 1974.
18608. When hospitals in Phila-
delphia refused to accept Jewish
soldiers wounded in the Civil
War;
* It maintained orphanages
and homes for the aged in more
than a dozen major cities. Today
it sponsors some several dozen
low-rent apartment projects in
the U.S., Canada, Great Britain,
Australia, New Zealand and
Israel;
It "adopted" 600 European
war orphans following World
War I;
It opened the first free
employment bureau and manual
and technical schools for new
immigrants to the U.S.;
It has provided aid and
encouragement to Jews in Israel
for a century. Since the establish-
ment of the Jewish state, B'nai
B'rith has bought hundreds of
millions of dollars in Israel
bonds. As an organization, it baa
provided unwavering support of
the Israeli government in
Continued on Page 14-A
13 Years Before American Red Cross,
{B'rt B'rith PrJsidmt Jack J.SmUtr and Egyptian MaitUnt *% T-n l Tr- > A'J
\p^^'^i^t^^:^ZZ'7^ B'rm Bnth Came to Flood Victims Aid
Jeih organization to meet with the late Egyptian Ikadtr.


Page6-A The Jew iah Flpridiaw / Friday; November 11,1963
Begin No-Show
Misses Services for Wife Aliza
By JTA Services
JERUSALEM Former
Premier Menachem Begin failed
to attend the memorial service on
Mt. Olives last Friday to mark
the first anniversary of the death
of his wife, Aliza. Begin's chil-
dren, Premier Yitzhak Shamir
and his wife, Shulamit, dozens of
friends as well as journalists did
show up, however, for the 15-
minute ceremony.
Begin was known to have been
exceptionally close to his late
wife, and therefore it was ex-
pected that he would be present
at the service. The fact that he
was not was interpreted as an
indication that he is in poor
health.
Begin retired to his residence
60 days ago and has not emerged
since, reportedly because of a
skin disease which prevents him
from shaving. He has seen only
family members and his close
associates, Yehiel Kadishai. and
Cabinet Secretary Dan Meridor.
Even Shamir has not seen Begin
since he assumed office.
U.S. Stands Behind
May 17 Agreement
WASHINGTON The
Reagan Administration has
rejected any proposal to
renegotiate the May 17 Lebanese-
Israeli agreement for the with-
drawal of Israeli forces from
Lebanon. "We think it is a good
agreement, carefully negotiated,"
State Department spokesman
John Hughes said. He noted it
was the basis which would lead to
the withdrawal of all foreign
forces from Lebanon.
At the same time, Hughes said
the U.S. believed "progress" was
made at the meeting of Lebanese
leaders in Geneva which ad-
journed after apparently getting
President Gemayel to agree to
seek a renegotiation of the
agreement.
Pressed to explain what he
meant by progress, Hughes said
that there was progress because
the various leaders who had
fought each other had met and
then had agreed to meet again.
The second round of the Leba-
nese national reconciliation talks
is scheduled to resume Nov. 14.
Israel Still Controls
Balance of Power
TEL AVIV Israel is in no
danger of attack by any of the
Arab confrontation states in the
near future because the balance
of military power in the region
continues very much in its favor
and the Arab world is deeply
divided, according to "The
Middle East Military Balance,
1983," the first year book
published by the Jaffee Center
for Strategic Studies of Tel Aviv
University.
The annual review noted that
the war in Lebanon demonstrates
vividly the dissarray in the Arab
world. No single Arab state could
expect to confront Israel success-
fully in the near future unless it
was able to achieve total surprise,
the review contended. A broad
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Arab coalition against Israel also
appears unlikely, the study said.
But it warned: "While a major
outbreak of fighting in the near
and middle term is not indicated
by recent developments, the
possibility of war cannot be
excluded. If a new war should
erupt, Jordan and Saudi Arabia
might be drawn in regardless of
their intentions. Any indication
of Egyptian support for other
Arab belligerents might force
Israel to reoccupy strategic areas
in eastern Sinai."
Ford, Carter Team
Up at Conference
ATLANTA Two former
Presidents, once bitter political
opponents, were in close agree-
ment here that the United States
should exercise caution in its
involvement in Lebanon and
should continue to press toward a
broad, comprehensive Middle
East peace despite the continuing
crisis in the region.
Gerald Ford, Republican, and
Jimmy Carter, the Democrat who
defeated him in the 1976 Presi-
dential elections, served as co-
chairmen of a four-day conference
on the Middle East at Emory
University. The conference,
sponsored by the Carter Center of
Emory University, drew govern-
ment officials, diplomats and
scholars from 10 nations, in-
cluding the Soviet Union and
Middle Eastern states.
Israel boycotted the event be-
cause the Palestine Liberation
Organization was represented in
the person of Harvard University
Prof. Walid Khalidi. But several
Israeli academics attended.
Awali Bridge Opens
After Terror Attack
TEL AVIV The bridges
across the Awali River, closed
since Friday, were reopened
Monday to pedestrians and some
vehicles. The relaxation of the
restrictions, imposed after
Friday's suicide truck bomb
attack on Israeli military head-
quarters in Tyre, apparently
ended a heated debate in govern-
ment circles over whether south
Lebanon should be sealed off
from the rest of the country as a
security precaution.
The consensus among political
and military leaders was that the
isolation of south Lebanon would
be counter-productive and politi-
cally dangerous. For one thing it
would allow critics to claim an
Israeli intention to partition
Lebanon and transform the
southern part of the country into
an Israeli province.
Moreover, Shiite Moslems who
constitute the majority in south
Lebanon, would have protested
fiercely if they were cut off from
family and fellowsShiites in the
rest of the country.
orsuasNMKeur
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WMSCKCMTIII 0wMr,i J
Cabinet Approves Sweeping
Economic Reform Program
Criminal Proceedings
Dropped in Hannover
BONN Criminal proceed-
ings have been dropped against
two officials of Moringen who
were held responsible for allowing
anti-Semitic material to appear in
the town's official history. The
prosecution in Hannover
determined that Walter Ohlmer,
the former town archivist, and
town manager Rudolph Boedcher
could not be charged with incite-
ment to racial discrimination or
public disorder.
Ohlmer, 64, was fired from
what is an honorary' post as
keeper of the town's records.
Boedcher retains his job. He was
not accused of writing anti-
Semitic material but of accepting
their inclusion in the official
records. One passage justified the
notorious Kristallnacht of 1938
as a legitimate response by
Germans to Jewish provocation
in the United States and else-
where.
Six Arab Prisoners
Crushed to Death
TEL AVIV Six Arab
prisoners held at the Ansar
detention camp in south Lebanon
were crushed to death in a tunnel
under the camp through which
they had hoped to escape.
The IDF spokesman said that
bulldozers had been at work in a
section of the camp being razed
after new accommodations had
been built on concrete or asphalt
bases to prevent escape tunnels
from being built.
The tractor suddenly sank into
the earth, breaking through the
surface into a tunnel already dug
in which six inmates had been
hiding. In a search of the area
after the incident two more
prisoners were found hiding
underground in another tunnel.
Arab Prisoner Shot
TEL AVIV ~ UTA) A
prisoner held at the Ansar pri-
soner ot war camp in southern
l.i'liamm was shot and wounded
when he tried to escape last
Tuesday night. The IDF spokes-
man said he attempted to run
away while detainees were being
transferred from the old camp to
a new area more suitable for oc-
cupation during the winter rainy
and cold season.
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By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Cabinet has ap-
proved a sweeping program
of economic reforms
proposed by Finance Min-
ister Yigal Cohen-Orgad
which include sharp tax
hikes for higher income
brackets and reductions in
government expenditures.
The goal of the program, ac-
cording to Cohen-Orgad, is to
slash the national budget by $2
billion and to brace the country
for a period of high unemploy-
ment and economic austerity.
Most of measures will remain
in force for 10-15. months but the
government has the option to ex-
tend them if the economic situa-
tion warrants. Several of them
will take effect immediately.
Others must be approved by the
Knesset Finance Committee.
ONE OF the most controver-
sial among the latter is doubling
the exit tax from $50 to $100 for
Israelis who wish to travel
abroad. That measure, originally
proposed by Cohen-Orgad's
predecessor. Yoram Aridor. was
blocked by the Finance Com-
mittee at the time.
Other changes announced after
a lengthy special session of the
Cabinet raise the income tax rate
from 60 to 66 percent for persons
who earn 250.000 Shekels a
month at the September Shekel
value. Cohen-Orgad had asked
for a 70 percent rate. The one
agreed to was a compromise.
Government officials said it
would affect only one percent of
the population.
Broader areas of the popula-
tion will feel the bite of a new tax
to be paid on child allowances to
families of up to three children
whose breadwinner is in the 50
percent tax bracket. A lax has
also been levied on the income of
pensioners who take early retire-
ment.
THF.RE WILL be a monthly
700 Shekel fee for hlDiliei
children attending ?^
cut in car allowance,rJt
servants. A health b^JJ
was also approved buufei
were not immediately annouS
Meanwhile, the price of h*
shares on the stock exchanged
lapsed despite the hundrK
rmlhons of Dollars poU JJ j
the Treasury to prop then, i
Business analysts are predjaj
an epidemic of bankruptcies^
mass unemployment.
In an effort to trim bud*.
Cohen-Orgad met with Wfl
Minister Aharon Uzzanandrtk
Education Minister fo^
Hammer. Uzzan apparnS
agreed to the Finance Mim*
plan to tax child allowances J
by the National Insurance In,
tute to families whose ra,
breadwinner is in the 50 pen,
tax bracket.
Both Hammer and Uzzan i
reportedly going along ft
spending cuts in their respect*
ministries. In the case of iat
Welfare Ministry, a savingoim
million Shekels is expected.
91 Jews
Leave Soviet
NEW YORK UTAi -
National Conference on Nua
Jewry reported last VVednesdrr
that 91 Jews left the Sovii
Union in October, the low*
monthly figure since Januay
This brings the total for the)
to 1,162, less than half that b
the first ten months of 1982.
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Jpw 'PointMan'
Rumsfeld Takes Over as Envoy
Friday, November 4,1963 / The Jewish Floridian Pag* 7-A
Geneva Conference Reaffirms
Lebanon's 'Sovereign' Statehood
I By DAVID FRIEDMAN
(WASHINGTON -
PA) President Reagan
is named Donald
amsfeld, a former Con-
ssman who was Secret-
of Defense in the Ford
dministration, as his spe-
ll representative in the
Eddie East. He succeeds
Dbert McFarlane, who
is recently named the
esident's National Secur-
r Adviser.
The 51 -year-old Rumsfeld, who
agan said would be his "point
hn" in the Mideast, said he
iuld start immediately in his
lw position, which he said was
L an indefinite period. But he
Li he would only take a leave of
Isence from his job as president
Id chief executive officer of
ID Searle and Co.
[RUMSFELD GAVE no in-
Ication of when he would make
i first trip to the Middle East.
[IAS Seeks Info
I SEW YORK (JTA) -
llAS. the Hebrew Immigrant
[id Society, is seeking to locate
Mi who lived in or around the
Iwns of Kudensk, Kaidanov
loidanovo), and Dukara, Byelo-
ssia (all in the vicinity of
linsk), during the period 1941-
44, it was announced here.
lid. persons are sought as pos-
ble witnesses in an ongoing De-
Bruncni of Justice war crimes
osecution. They may call or
rite Joseph Edelman at HIAS,
Park Avenue South, New
ork, 10003.
"I want to spend some time here
and get briefed up and visit with
people who have been involved
previously," he told reporters.
Rumsfeld, who has no expe-
rience in the Mideast, is a friend
of Secretary of State George
Shultz, who reportedly had urged
that he be named to the post.
Reagan said that Richard Fair-
banks, who was in Geneva for the
Lebanese reconciliation meeting,
will "continue his critical in-
volvement in these issues." But
there was no indication whether
Fairbanks will serve as Rum-
sfeld's deputy as he did under
McFarlane.
There have been reports that
Alfred Atherton, who has just
ended a term as Ambassador to
Egypt, may be named as a
deputy representative for the
Mideast, but Rumsfeld said that
he had not made any plans deal-
ing with personnel.
RUMSFELD refused to com-
ment on any specific issue in-
volved in his new post, but he re-
jected a suggestion that he is
taking a "no-win" job. Noting
that the Mideast is "an im-
port at nt part of the world to our
country," he said, "The fact that
the problems there are intracta-
ble and difficult and have per-
sisted over long periods doesn't
mean that the United States
should ignore them. Rather, I
think, that it is worth our best ef-
forts and that is what is in-
tended."
In announcing the appoint-
ment at the White House,
Reagan said of Rumsfeld that "I
can't think ol a better individual
in whom to trust the coordination
of our role in the Middle East
process and in the Lebanon nego-
tiations."
The President called his
September 1, 1982 peace initia-
tive "a realistic set of principles
which we consider the best
chance for a resolution of the
Arab-Israeli conflict. No one has
come up with a better proposal
since. I am confident that pro-
gress in Lebanon will add
momentum to the serious efforts
that are going on to establish this
broader peace."
REAGAN URGED the Leb-
anese leaders in Geneva to "put
the problems of the past aside.
They have it within their ability
to move toward a national con-
census. Progress in their talks
could lead to the withdrawal of all
foreign forces from Lebanon and
the establishment of a truly re-
presentative government."
The President rejected a sug-
gestion that the United States
should agree to the abandonment
of the May 17 Israeli-Lebanese
agreement because of serious op-
position. When he was asked
about "freezing it," as apparent-
ly the participants at Geneva
have agreed, Reagan quipped,
"In that climate?"
Rumsfeld, who will have the
personal rank of Ambassador,
was a Republican Congressman
from Illinois from 1962 to 1970.
He served the Nixon White
House first a director of the Of-
fice of Economic Opportunity
and then as a director of the
Economic Stabilization Program
from 1969 to 1972. In 1973-74, he
was United States Ambassador
to NATO and then served as
Secretary of Defense from 1975 to
1977 when he became president of
Searle.
By T AM A R LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) -
The conference aimed at
national reconciliation in
Lebanon has produced a
draft agreement which de-
fines Lebanon as "a sov-
ereign state" which "be-
longs to the Arab world"
and "is a founding and
active member of the Arab
League."
It was not immediately clear
whether all of the parties to the
Lebanese conflict were in agree-
ment on the text or whether it
implies renunciation of the with-
drawal and security agreement
signed by Lebanon and Israel
last May 17.
THE DRAFT text reads:
"Lebanon is a sovereign state,
independent and united in its
land, its people and its institu-
tions inside borders defined by
the Lebanese Constitution and
internationally recognized. It be-
longs to the Arab world, it is a
founding and active member of
the Arab League. It is bound bv
all those treaties and the State
will apply these principles in all
domains, without exception."
Sources close to President
Am in Gem ay el said the draft
agreement changes nothing with
respect to the accord with Israel
and suggested that it was com-
posed as an incentive to Druze
leader Walid Jumblatt not to
walk out of the conference.
But Nabith Herri, a leader of
the Shiite Moslem delegation, in-
sisted that the agreement with
Israel is now dead.
The conference press spokes-
man told reporters, "We have
been fighting for 15 years, please
give us some more time to set up
something to tell you."
The most important event was
President Gemayel's meeting
with the Syrian Foreign Minister
Abdel 1 lalim Khaddam, who is at
the conference as an observer.
Khaddam reportedly insisted
that Gemayel cancel the May 17
agreement with Israel. The U.S.
observer, special envoy Richard
Fairbanks, lunched with Jum-
blatt. According to rumors, there
will be a meeting between the
Americans and Syrians.
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Annual Tribute Banquet
-I
Honor**
Honoring
ABRAHAM BODOW
JNF Man of the Year
Sunday, December 18,1983 12:00 Noon
Konover Hotel, 6445 Collins Ave.
Rabbi Irving Lehman
Chrmn.JNFFdtn.
Z*v W. Kogan Em*tt Simutli
Prss. JNF Southern R*glon V.P. JNF Or. Miami
Abraham Qrunhut
Praa. JNF Or. Miami
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Chrmn. JNF Exac. Board
Outstanding Ent*rtalnm*nt
JNF Strengthens Israel
For Roaarvatlona:
Jswlsh National Fund
420 Lincoln Rd., Miami Baach
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Koahar Cukaln*
Strengthen the JNF


Pge8-A The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, November 11,1983
i i 11 i' i i i.
Mum On Retaliation Geneva Talks Recess;
Chiefs Bigwig Rules Out Israeli Tie Gemayel Visits Mitterrand!
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger and
Gen. John Vessey, Jr.,
chairman of the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, refused
Sunday to reveal whether
the United States would
retaliate for the terrorist
bombing of the Marine
headquarters in Beirut as
did the Israelis imme-
diately following the terror-
ist bombing of its head-
quarters in Tyre last
Friday.
But Vessey ruled out any joint
action with the Israelis. "The Is-
raelis are in Lebanon in a dif-
ferent position than we are,"
Vessey said on NBC-TV's "Meet
thePress" program. "The Israelis
are at war with the Syrians. We
came in as a peacekeeping force
to try and help reestablish Leb-
anon, to get both the Israelis and
the Syrians out."
Asked about retaliation,
Vessey replied, "We need to find
the perpetrators. We don't need
to side with the Israelis or the
Syrians." Vessey said he did not
know who was responsible for the
terrorist bombing of the Marine
barracks which took some 230
American lives. But while being
vague about retaliation, he
added, "I think we should attack
the terrorists."
WEINBERGER, appearing on
ABC-TVs "This Week With
David Brinkley," said he would
not discuss what action, if any,
the U.S. would take against those
responsible for the terrorist at-
tack. There have been some re-
ports that in moving in another
aircraft carrier into the waters off
of Lebanon, the U.S. may be
planning air attacks similar to
the ones staged by the Israelis on
Friday.
But Weinberger said the air-
craft carrier that is arriving off
the coast of Lebanon is ac-
companying a ship carrying the
Marine contingent that will re-
place the Marines now in Leb-
anon. He said that while the new
Marines are going in and the old
ones leaving, there is a certain
"overlap" in the number of ships
the U.S. has off Lebanon but that
is all there is to this.
In its initial reaction, the
Reagan Administration said Fri-
day that it was "revolted" by the
terrorist bombing in Tyre and
appeared to indicate that it did
not disapprove of Israel's im-
mediate retaliation. Officially,
State Department spokesman
John Hughes said he had "no
comment" when he was asked
about the Israeli bombing of Sy-
rian and Palestinian targets in
Lebanon. Unofficially, however,
the Department called Israel's
action "understandable wrath."
AFTER PREVIOUS Israeli
retaliatory strikes, the State De-
partment had either condemned
them or had deplored the use of
U.S. Hot and Cold Stance Called
Major Stumbling Block in Mideast
be dealt with," he said, "unless it
is overcome it will be difficult to
get back on the road to peace."
Habib said that the present Leb-
anese dilemma appears difficult
to resolve. However, he believed
that this can be accomplished
during the next few months.
He stressed that U.S. foreign
policy "must contain a peace plan
for the Middle East; U.S. inter-
ests require a peace process."
Habib added that "without a
plan for peace such rational Arab
states as Egypt and Jordan can-
not move towards the peace
table." The U.S. diplomat felt
that any American long-range
peace plan for the Middle East
should still be based on the Camp
David agreements and the pro-
posals set forth in September
1982 by Reagan.
The Synagogue Council of
America, which represents the
congregational and rabbinic
bodies of Conservative, Orthodox
and Reform Judaism presented
its Covenant of Peace Awards to
Habib, AFL-CIO president Lane
Kirk land, and philanthropist
Max Fisher.
Continued from Page 1 -A
cent example the U.S. refusal to
accept Israel's "humanitarian of-
fer" to provide hospital care for
those marines wounded in the
Beirut bombing Oct. 23.
He added that the need for a
binding and firm relationship
with Israel in no way implies that
"America should not seek to have
good relations with various Arab
nations, or that it be totally un-
critical of Israeli policy." Despite
these reservations, Waxman
stated that American Jews were
"grateful" for the assistance that
past administrations have
provided Israel over the years.
Philip Habib, President
Reagan's former special repre-
sentative for the Middle East,
said in a prepared statement that
the current U.S. proccupation in
attempting to resolve the day-to-
day crisis in Lebanon has created
the impression that the U.S.
"appears to have abandoned the
peace process in favor of
resolving a crisis."
"THE CURRENT crisis must
violence by all sides. But there
was none of this Friday as the at-
tack on the Israeli installation
came 13 days after a similar ter-
rorist attack killed more than 230
Americana
When Hughes was asked if Is-
raeli retaliation would result in an
escalation of violence in Lebanon,
he replied that any escalation
would have been caused by those
who bombed the Israeli head-
quarters.
Hughes said the United States
still plans its own retaliation
against the group that commit'
ted the terrorist act against the
Marine headquarters, but would
not say what form this would
take or when it will come. He said
the U.S. investigation was still
going on. When asked about Is-
rael's immediate response,
Hughes said the Israelis made
their own judgement on how to
respond and the U.S. will make
its own judgement on its
response.
HUGHES READ a statement
on the terrorist act against the
Israelis which said: "The United
States is revolted by the tragic
bombing by terrorists of the Is-
raeli army building in Tyre, Leb-
anon today, and we extend our
sympathy to the victims and
their families.
"Attempts to thwart the ob-
jective of returning peace and
stability to Lebanon through viol-
ence and terrorism will, in the
end, fail. Those who believe that
they can work their will through
terrorist actions are sadly
mistaken. Only negotiation can
pave the way for the withdrawal
of foreign forces and a return to a
peaceful and independent Leb-
anon. We rededicate ourselves
today to the objectives to which
we have adhered since we under-
took partnership in those nego-
tiations."
"Our hearts go out to the
people of Israel and Lebanon in
this tragic loss of precious human
lives. We stand ready to assist in
uny way that we can in this hour
of national travail."
Israel Satisfied With
First Round in Geneva
Continued from Page 1 A
mandating President Amin
Gemayel to launch a new
diplomatic effort to bring about
Israeli withdrawal. The President
is also to negotiate "on interna-
tional levels to assure the total
and absolute sovereignty of
Lebanon over its entire
territory."
Syrian efforts, through
Damascus' Lebanese client-
factions, to have the May 17
agreement abrogated failed
against the solid resistance of
Gemayel and some of the pro-
government factions. A sub-
sequent move to declare the
agreement "frozen" was
discarded in favor of the more
vague formula empowering
Gemayel to negotiate on
Lebanon'8 behalf and report back
to another round of the talks
scheduled for mid-November.
The Israeli sources said that
this mandate to Gemayel meant
that the President had emerged
from the conference with his
standing enhanced. The Syrian-
backed opposition factions had
hoped for a diametrically op-
posite outcome
GENEVA (JTA) -
The nine Lebanese factional
leaders who met here for
national reconciliation talks
have recessed their meeting
until Nov. 14. President
Amin Gemayel himself left
Geneva shortly after the
bomb attack on an Israeli
security base in south
Lebanon and was expected
to return to Beirut.
Instead, he went to Paris
where he met with President
Francois Mitterrand and
reportedly planned to go to
Washington to see President
Keagan before leaving for a Far
East tour Tuesday. Gemayel s
visit to Paris and Washington
was aimed at obtaining Western
help in getting a negotiated early
withdrawal of Israeli troops from
Lebanon.
Last Thursday, the Lebanese
factional leaders unanimously
adopted a resolution mandating
Gemayel to try to obtain
America's intervention in ending
the occupation of Lebanon by
foreign troops. The resolution
mentioned only Israel's occu-
pation, but spokesmen for four of
the factions supporting Gemayel
said the resolution indirectly, and
without mentioning Syria by
name, also calls for a Syrian
withdrawal.
THE CHRISTIAN Phalangist
spokesman, Alfred Maadi, said
the adoption of the resolution by
all the factions signified "a
victory for Lebanon as a united
nation.' Veteran rightwing
Maronite leader Pierre Gemayel,
the founder of the Phalangist
I'arty and lather of President
Gemayel, loid the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that the
resolution as udopted was "the
best we could do."
He pointed out that the
resolution was certainly better
than the demand by four op-
position leaders, including Druze
leader Wulid Jumblatt and Shiite
leader Nabith Herri, not to im-
time
was
plement the Lebanese-i, 1
May 17 withdrawal andt?l
agreement but to fretteSI
bang. This free* d^*|
relatively mild 9
me demand by veteran C
leader and former ft, ,
Camille Chamoun, that the?
17 accord be placed in deeo fiJ
for an indefinite period oftiffiT
But Jumblatt told repon-J
after the resolution was adoR-l
that it spells theendofthet!|
with Israel. "Lebanon can*
start off on a new basis," hem I
According to Jumblatt andotW
opposition leaders, the resoluad
and Gemayel's trip to Paris 3
Washington symbolize the d
Of the Gemayel "clan." _,
contended that the resolutbaj
the first step towards liberation of south Lebual
Berri is the leader of 1.2 milij
Shiites, most of whom live al
south Lebanon under Israeli
administration.
Palestinians
Stay Home
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The West Bank military govern
menl prevented two promineu
Palestinian leaders from meeuaj
with visiting British Minister if
State Kichard Luce as Israel
authorities took tough measurs
to squash demonstrators in tot
territory linked to Halfour Day
Bassam Shaka, the deposed
Mayor of Nablus and Hank
Abdul Shafi, a leader in the Can
Strip sympathetic to the Pafe
tine Liberation Organization.
were barred from a meeting Luc*
had here with two other I'alesl*
ian notables. Mayor Klias Frit]!1
Bethlehem and Anwar Nussena,
a lonner Defense Minister of Jor-
dun who heads the Last Jenv
suleni Electric Corp. Shaka s
reportedly slopped by border
police on the way to Jerusaku
and forced U> return to his home
in Nablus.
ADD IT ON!
A different
movie
every
night in
November.
MrffeN*.
The Movie Channel lets you choose
from over 60 great movies in
November. Paul Newman plays
a desperate lawyer in The Venfct. fc
Meryl Streep and Roy Scheider stir up ,
intrigue inSoflo/ (he Ntfu. And Richard-------------
Tune m for November', special feature, too. All on the only channel
mats always got a nwvieJOnUltr^omcabUchannri 17.
Add THE MOVIE CHANNEL to your
current ctbla ser>lce and sm how
much more your entertainment value will be
"cablew 861-1567
"Television never looked to good!"
1983

I .<'. i I aH -. BmHiBS^HflB HI


Friday, November 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Wkat's the best way to
vacation in Israel?
Have a friend get you
airfare, a hotel and a car
for only ^839^
Get a complimentary
Avis Rent A Car.
"You know who your friends are.
"El Al, the Airline of Israel.
"Right now we've got the best
vacation going to Israel.
"For one price
you can take our
'Sunsation' vacation
round-trip from the
U.S. to Ben Gurion
Airport in Israel.
"We're the only
airline that flies 747's
to Israel nonstop,
you know. And no
one else can claim all their food is kosher.
"You'll stay at a superior hotel in Tel Aviv or Jerusalem for six days and five nights.
"Or if you want, add $100 to the package price and stay at the deluxe King David
Hotel in Jerusalem, a city filled with history and beauty and charming people.
"Or you can stay at the deluxe Dan Hotel in Tel Aviv
my hometown and as friendly and modern a city as
you could want.
"There's also a complimentary Avis Rent A Car so you
can drive all over Israel for five days.
"Only a friend like El Al could do it all from as
little as $839.
"And who knows? I might be the one to fly you there.
"So call your travel agent or El Al
Stay 6 days/5 nights. at 1-800-223-6700."
For complete tour details, call or write Sunsation Six Tour Desk:
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unavailable, comparable accommodations will be substituted.
Package price based on New York-Tel Aviv round-trip only For prices from
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The Airline of Israel.


PagelO-A The Jewish Floridian/Friday, November 11, 1983
Cappu 'Pained'
Denies Rejecting Israel's Hospital Offer
Secretary Weinberger
would be equipped' by 'the U.S'
and under "our general direc-
tion." He stressed that it would
be "no threat to Israel."
Weinberger said the memoran-
dum of understanding for
strategic cooperation with Israel
was also designed to prevent
Soviet expansion in the Middle
East and expressed the hope it
would be soon revived.
He said the U.S. did not object

to Israel building its new plane,
the Lavie. but only to financing it
with U.S. military assistance. He
said military aid was designed by
law to enhance a country's mili-
tary capability, and Israel had
much more sophisticated planes
than the Lavie which would not
be ready until the 1990s. He said
there is no objection to the Lavie
being financed through U.S.
economic aid.
WEINBERGER stressed that
he considers Israel a "strong and
effective ally" with "the
strongest military capability in
the Middle East." But he said the
United States needs Arab
friends, too, and said the basic
United States effort in the Mid-
east is to try to help create condi-
tions to achieve peace. He said
such a peace will safeguard
Israel's security and relieve it of
the heavy military burden which
is presently draining its
economy.
The Defense Secretary said the
United States is determined to
keep its
noting
Marines in Lebanon,
the United States
presence there, particularly the
"visible evidence of military
strength that could be used"
helped bring .bout the L*.^
national reconciliation cjjfc
can t be driven out by act. i.,
ronsm," Weinberger dKi*
ger that his SKSLffl
to a strong United Su
defense, has opposed the 2
freeze movement and ha* Z2
Israel Votes With U.S. at UNations
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) Israel wasoneof.
handful of countries to join with the United States
opposing a General Assembly resolution "deeply
deploring" America's "armed intervention in Grenada
The vote was 108-9, with 27 abstentions. Those votiw
against the resolution included Antigua and Barbuda
Barbados, Dominica, El Salvador, Jamaica, Saint Lucia
and Saint Vincent, and the Grenadines.
AMBASSADOR Yehuda Blum of Israel, in response
to a question by the Jewish Telegraphic Agency on
Israel's vote, said: "As a result of Israel's own experience
we naturally understand and identify with all other states
who are confronted with the danger of subversion a__
destabilization. Certainly all states must be guaranteed
the freedom to elect their own government and determine
their own future without fear of external subversion."
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger has
denied to a group of
Orthodox Jews from 20
states that American Ma-
rines, wounded in the ter-
rorist bombing of their
Beirut headquarters, had
not been taken to hospitals
in Israel because he had
rejected an offer of help
from the Israelis.
The decision on medical treat-
ment was made by the command-
ers on the scene, Weinberger said
at a briefing at the Pentagon for
the National Council of Young
Israel. "If we had needed the
hospitals we would have used
them in a minute," he declared.
The 45 persons attending the
briefing, including members of
the National Council, its women's
auxiliary, and the commander of
the Jewish War Veterans and
the presidents of the Jewish Na-
tional Fund, Emunah Women
and the Religious Zionists of
America, had come to the
Pentagon perturbed about the
refusal of the Israelis' facilities.
BUT WEINBERGER raised
the issue himself, saying he had
suffered "personal pain" over
what he called "misinformation"
that had appeared over the Israe-
li offer of hospital facilities. He
particularly labeled as "scurri-
lous" stories that the Pentagon
refused the offer for fear of anta-
gonizing the Arabs.
The Defense Secretary said
that several hours after the ter-
rorist bombing in which 230
American military personnel
were killed, Israeli Defense Min-
ister Moshe Arens telephoned
him to offer Israel's condolences
and offered Israel's help, includ-
ing the use of Israeli hospitals.
He said he told Arens that this
was a decision for the commander
on the scene, and he would relay
it to him.
Weinberger said the U.S. com-
mand in Lebanon already knew of
the Israeli offer, through the U.S.
Embassy in Tel Aviv, but felt
there were adequate facilities on a
U.S. hospital ship offshore and at
a British hospital in Cyprus
where there had been a long-
standing arrangement for U.S.
forces. When the Cyprus hospital
was filled, the wounded were sent
to military hospitals in West
Germany.
WEINBERGER said the next
day he wrote Arens a letter of
thanks for the offer not knowing
whether it had been accepted or
not. But he stressed "the last
thing" he would tell a military
commander on the scene "is what
he should do or not do about
wounded."
At the same time, he assured
the group that "we have absolu-
tely no geographic or national re-
striction of any kind" about
where to take wounded soldiers.
"They can go anywhere." He said
to place either geographic or na-
tional restrictions is "not only
absurd but cruel."
Weinberger's statement was
slightly at variance with the ex-
planation given by U.S. official
spokesmen up to now. They said
it was U.S. military policy to
treat its wounded at American
military hospitals. This explana-
S^.'ELSlSStt D*te:65M353 BlD**458O200 Ex****Office.: 17801N.W.2ndAvenue Miami Rorida33K
publicans last week. '
ON ANOTHER issue that baa
recently caused concern in the
Jewish communky. Weinberger
defended the proposed joint U.S.-
Jordanian rapid defense forces asi
a "trip wire" to prevent Soviet
expansion into the Persian Gulf.
He seid the Jordanian forces
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Friday, November 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A ,
i i in 11...... ii i' H i' I '' *
Jordan Plan Dead? lanA Consider8 Flap 0ver
Senate Deletes $220 Million in Funding Marines as Case Closed
WASHINGTON -
TA) The Senate Ap-
propriations Committee
pay have killed a Reagan
Administration plan to arm
e units of the Jordanian
rmuflv as P*rt of tne U.S.
Enid deployment force in
|he Middle East when it
toted to delete from the
1984 military spending bill
1220 million previously au-
thorized for the project.
, The committee acted behind
llosed doors after objections were
aisi'ii by Sens. Alfonse D'Amato
(R-, N.Y.) and Daniel Inouye (D.,
Hawaii). According to Congres-
sional sources, the Administra-
tion will have no money to fund
the once top secret program
unless the appropriation can be
included in another bill or an
amendment when the military
spending bill reaches the Senate
or House floor. According to the
sources, this appears highly
unlikely.
THE UNEXPECTED rejec
lion of the Administration pro-
ject by the Republican-controlled
committee may have rendered
moot the question of whether
Israel would use it influence in
B'nai B'rith Celebrates
140th Anniversary Year
Continued from Page 5-A
Activities affecting Jews at the
JN as well as in other nations.
In recent years, as ethnic
Neighborhoods disappeared in
nany countries. B'nai B'rith has
attempted to keep its members
ptrongly aware of their Judaic
background through education
programs The organization
prepares, through its Adult Jew-
ish Kducation Commission, a va-
riety of publications and audio-
ideo tapes that range from how
to conduct Sabbath services at
home to interpretation of the
Bible; it also sponsors summer
Institutes at which noted author-
ities in religion, philosophy,
listory and politics discuss is-
Bues of Jewish interest in the
light of their expertise.
At the same time that ethnic
neighborhoods are disappearing,
the populations of many coun-
tries are growing older. As with
Soviet Jews, B'nai B'rith has
been making it clear that the el-
derly are not forgotten. In place
of the orphanages it had spon-
sored from the Civil War through
A'orld War I, B'nai B'rith over
Ithe last 15 years has been
[sponsoring low-rent, non-
|sectarian apartment projects.
IN THE United States alone,
Isome 5.000 senior citizens reside
lin these homes in 17 cities, with
Imore projects planned.
[Thousands of additional elderly
[reside in B'nai B'rith apart
Iments in Canada, Great Britain,
[Australia. New Zealand and Is-
[rael. The purpose of the program
[is to enable these people to parti-
cipate in their communities and
[to enjoy to the utmost the sunset
eSHSl- T^tSWtSESMtSWtiWfcl
of their lives.
And while B'nai B'rith helps
the elderly, it looks to youth to
maintain the organization's vigor
in the future. In 1923, the first
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
was founded at the University of
Illinois. Today, 60 years later,
there are B'nai B'rith Hillel of-
fices on more than 400 college
campuses in a dozen countries,
offering religious, educational,
cultural and social activities to
some 300.000 students.
B'nai B'rith offers similar acti-
vities to teenagers through its
youth organization, which was
established in 1924.
BOTH BBYO and B'nai B'rith
Hillel also offer leadership train-
ing, the purpose of which is to
prepare young people to become
leaders in B'nai B'rith and both
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Among the alumni of BBYO
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Congress to fight the plan. It has
become a source of friction be-
tween the Administration and
the Israeli government and re-
portedly figured in the talks held
in Jerusalem between Undersec-
retary of State for Political Af-
fairs Lawrence Eagleburger and
top Israeli officials.
Israel's position has always
been to object vehemently to
U.S. plans to sell arms to any
Arab country that is in a state of
belligerency with Israel. The Is-
raelis reportedly were briefed on
the Jordan plan in secret and
argued that while the mission of
the rapid deployment force was
to protect the Persian Gulf
states, U.S. equipped Jordanian
units would pose a direct threat
to Israel.
According to some reports, the
Israelis agreed, however, not to
go public on the issue. But many
in Congress first learned of the
Administration plan when Israel
Radio reported the secret funding
and details later appeared in the
American press. The authoriza-
tion to spend up to $220 million
to arm the Jordanian units was
contained in the 1984 Defense
Procurement Bill passed by Con-
gress earlier this year.
EAGLEBURGER arrived in
Israel amid reports that Israel
might agree to muffle its objec-
tions to the plan in return for
"compensation." This was taken
to mean substantially increaed
U.S. military and economic aid to
Israel. But Premier Yitzhak
Shamir vehemently denied to
Knesset members that any quid
pro quo had been a subject of ne-
gotiations with the U.S.
Some observers in Jerusalem
suggested that Israel would not
try to wage a fight against the
Administration plan in Congress
or in the area of American public
opinion because it was chastened
by its losing battle to defeat the
sale of AW ACS reconnaissance
planes to Saudi Arabia two years
ago. According to those observ-
ers, Israel now realizes the limi-
tations of the pro-Israel lobby in
Washington when pitted against
a determined Administration.
Defense Secretary Caspar
Weinberger has been a major
supporter of the Jordan project,
as he has been for selling sophi-
sticated U.S. military equipment
to Jordan. Secretary of State
George Shultz was said to believe
that Israel could be mollified.
HE REPORTEDLY argued at
a recent meeting of the National
Security Council that if closer
U.S.-Israeli cooperation can be
forged, the Israelis might drop
their objections to the Jordan
plan and might even be more
flexible toward negotiations over
the future of the West Bank.
Shultz's position that the U.S.
and Israel should cooperate more
closely was reported to have the
support of Reagan's new Nation-
al Security Adviser, Robert Mc-
Farlane. Weinberger, who prefers
to distance the U.S. from Israel
to retain the friendship of
moderate Arab states, is report-
edly backed by CIA director Wil-
liam Casey.
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By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The behind-the-scenes
quarrel between Israel and
the United States over
America's failure to avail
itself of Israeli offers of
medical aid to Marines
wounded in the bombing of
their barracks on Oct. 23
has now been resolved.
Top Israeli officials say they
are "fully satisfied" that the U.S.
decision was not taken "at the
political level" and was not mo-
tivated by political considera-
tions. A warm letter from Sec-
retary of State George Shultz to
Premier Yitzhak Shamir and
other U.S. reassurances delivered
through diplomatic channels
helped to ease Israeli resentment
and suspicions.
ISRAELI policymakers now
accept the explanation offered by
Keagan Administration officials
that the wounded U.S. Marines
were flown to U.S. army hos-
pitals in Italy and West Germany
rather than to the much closer
and equally qualified Israeli hos-
pitals because of a rigid obser-
vance by the Americans of their
standing procedures.
The I sraelis feel that it was un-
fortunate (for the woundedl that
the U.S. Army Medical Corps did
not react with more imagination
and flexibility, as the French
military did when it sent some of
their wounded from the Beirut
carnage to hospitals in Israel.
But Israeli policymakers no
longer feel that a political desire
to steer clear of Israel or to dis-
tance itself from Israel underlay
the American decision.
Shultz, in his letter to Shamir,
wrote:
"I want you to know the
American people and my col-
leagues appreciate the outpour-
ing of sympathy and offers of
assistance from the government
of Israel and from private Israelis
from all walks of life on learning
of the attack against the Marines
in Lebanon.
"I ESPECIALLY appreciated
your government's taking extra-
ordinary emergency steps to re-
ceive any wounded Marine^ and
offering all other possible assis-
tance in the face of this tragedy.
"This is a point I made when
appearing before Congress on
Monday (Oct. 24). Your spontan-
eous action genuinely reflects the
spirit of close cooperation and
friendship which binds our
countries together."
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Pwl2-A The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, November 11,1983
.-
Israel's President Herzog
To Visit U.S. Next Week
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
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i
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) President Chaim Herzog of
Israel will begin a 10-day visit to the United States Nov.
14 that will include a meeting with President Reagan, an
address to the United Nations General Assembly and
meetings with Jewish leaders and organizations, the
spokesman for the Israel Consulate here, Uri Savir, has
revealed.
Herzog, who will visit the U.S. for the first time as
Israel's President, will meet with Reagan at the White
House on Nov. 22. He will address the UN General
Assembly on Nov. 16. On the same day, the former Israeli
Ambassador to the UN will attend a reception in his honor
given by Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar.
On Nov. 17, Herzog will address the 52nd General
Assembly of the Council of Jewish Federations in
Atlanta. Ga. Earlier in the day, he will meet with the
Conference of Presidents of Major American Jewish
Organizations in New York.
Other highlights of Herzog's visit will include meetings
with New York City Mayor Edward Koch and New York
State Gov. Mario Cuomo, and he will address meetings of
the United Jewish Appeal, Israel Bonds and students and
faculty members of Yeshiva University.
Two Jewish Brothers
Win in Argentina
BUENOS AIRES (JTA) Two Jewish brothers
were elected to the Chamber of Deputies as a result of the
large majority of votes garnered by the Radical Civic
Union in Argentina's presidential elections.
According to the Latin American branch of the
World Jewish Congress, Marcelo Sturbin, 32, represents
the federal capital in the Chamber, and Benjamin Sturbin,
31, represents the providence of Santa Fe. The brothers
are former student leaders. Before the elections, Marcelo
Sturbin declared that he was proud of his Jewish origin.
THE WJC ALSO reported that two other Jews are
members of President Raul Alfonsin's economic advisory
team. Dr. Bernardo Grinspun and Dr. Mario Brodusohn
are expected to play a very important role in the
elaboration of the new government's economic policy.
Alfonsin. who was the presidential candidate of the
Radical Civic Union won 52 percent of the vote to 40
percent for Italo Luder, the Peronist candidate. The
Peronists, who suffered a stunning defeat, had dominated
Argentina's political life since their party was founded in
1945 by Juan Peron.
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lhamtr Due in U.S.
Eagleburger Visit a Success
By DAVID LANDAU
| JERUSALEM (JTA)
i Undersecretary of State
iwrence Eagleburger has
bncluded talks here with
Israeli officials on
jser political and stra-
tic coordination between
landtheU.S.,andap-
ently the talks went
M.
Israeli sources disclosed that a
fch level Israeli ministerial del-
Ltion will visit Washington in
He next couple of weeks." They
| not say who would comprise
t delegation, but it may include
tmier Yitzhak Shamir. Shamir
M a visiting group of Israel
nd leaders here last week that
d to confer with President
n in -IS not too distant
ure.
THE SOURCES characterized
talks with Eagleburger as
and thorough and focused
linly on Lebanon. Eagleburger,
is Undersecretary for Poli-
_ Affairs and the third rank-
(diplomat at the State Depart-
t, said the U.S. believes Syria
buually will agree to an
ngement that will preserve
lianon's sovereignty and in-
fcrity.
said the U.S. was doing
nthing in its power to make
Lebanese national reconcilia-
i talks a success.
Mending to Eagleburger, Sy-
18 attitude toward the Leban-
I ceuselire has changed of late
m outright rejection to a
wing recognition that the
It iiwii ii innl force in Beirut and
! Lebanese government intend
Mil ml linn und defend it.
le insisted, however, that this
lessment does not contradict
Islington's deep suspicion
|ii Syria <>r certain Syrian of-
als. knew in advance of the
nirist bomb attack on U.S.
irine headquarters in Beirut
'-' which look the lives of
American servicemen and
willed scores more.
^AULEBURGER said the
was still examining the
Icncc und hud very persuasive
I ihui Iranians were involved
n alladu on the U.S. ind
I'iK'li military headquart
I he would not suy whether he
liiiiins wire agents of t. at
niry or irregulars.
1'llnr U.S. sources here not -d
hi President Keagun's pled :e
I punish those responsible f< r
outrage was "a matter f
\o Mindlin
record'' and that if Eagleburger's
visit to Israel impressed the
uuiltv with [ear that the U.S. and
Israel were jointly planning
retribution, then so be it.
The sources asserted, however,
thai the U.S. will in no way seek
Isrueli help of involvement in any
punitive measures it might con-
template. "This is our business,"
the sources said.
EAGLEBURGER strongly af-
firmed American support for the
May 17 withdrawal and security
agreement between Israel and
Lebanon in his talks with Shamir
and top Foreign Ministry offi-
cials here. Israel had expressed
concern that Lebanon might
surrender to Syria pressure to re-
nounce the accord.
U.S. Says No to Denver Consulate
JERUSALEM (JTA, --
The U.S. government has re-
jected Israels application to open
a new Consulate-General in
Denver, Colo. The refusal is an
embarrassment because the
Cabinet approved the appoint-
ment of veteran diplomat Yaacov
Morris to be Consul General four
months ago and preparations
have been going on to establish
the Israel Mission.
The U.S. decision was justified
by the State Department on the
grounds that Denver is close to
sensitive military installations. If
Israel opens a Consulate there,
less desirable foreign missions
might seek to follow suit and the
American authorities do not wish
to encourage this development,
the State Department explained.
Friday, November 4,1963 / The Jcwtoh Floridian Page 13-A
Ignorance of Christian
Theology a Handicap
The Body. By Richard Ben Sapir.
Garden City. N.Y.: Doubleday
and Co.. 1963.347 Pp. $16.96.
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Book Editor
Most Jews know very little
about Christian theology. Al-
though many Christians are fam-
iliar with the Bible, few Jews
have ever read the New Testa-
ment. Sometimes, this is a handi-
cap, since our lack of knowledge
prevents us, for example from
examining the interpretation of
Paul's Epistle to the Romans
which supposedly contains a
powerful argument against anti-
Semitism.
The deficiency in our acquain-
tance with Christian belief can be
painlessly and partly remedied
by reading this third novel by
Richard Ben Sapir. It is a book
which is relatively easy to read,
despite its tangled mixture of
mystery, intrigue, suspense, sex
and romance.
MOST OF the action takes
place in Jerusalem where a
beautiful Israeli archaeologist
discovers a tomb which, she be-
lieves, contains the bones of
Jesus. Here, Ben Sapir takes on
responsibility for educating his
readers. What is the importance
of this discovery if it can be
authenticated?
Knowledge of Christian belief
is essential to understand the
significance of this find. If the
bones of Jesus actually exist,
then there could have been no re-
surrection on Easter Sunday and
no subsequent ascension to
heaven. This would challenge and
invalidate fundamental elements
in the Christian religion.
In the novel, the Israeli au-
thorities immediately recognize
the significance of the find. They
are convinced that they will be
criticized and condemned no
matter what happens. To lessen
the blow, they promptly notify
the Vatican and try to transfer
total responsibility for the dig
and its contents to the Roman
Catholic Church.
THROUGH A careful and ela-
borate process involving the
Pope himself, a priest is selected
to journey to Jerusalem with the
specific assignment of proving
that the bones could not be those
of Jesus. He is a young American
Jesuit who is given full authority
and practically unlimited access
to funds. He decides to keep the
Israeli archaeologist on the job
and yes, you guessed it. They
fall in love, and he moves into her
apartment, violating his priestly
vows.
The story unfolds with consid-
Agony at Camp LeJeune
Continued from Page 4-A
"nes in their sleep in the first
Ice.
Mis is not a matter for
ulation. Regardless of what
*tary 0f State Shultx has
said to "clarify" matters,
'act is the Pentagon
Pmen, who by now wish
V never opened their mouths,
p already admitted to making
.decision. Furthermore, it is
mated that somewhere near
Marines died as a result of that
"*, flying nine hours to
tTj8 ln Germany, which they
fled too late, long after their
P*" could sustain their
PJW without proper treat-
H President Reagan have a
** word for the families of
* Marines who had been
JJJ* to doubly senseless
^ter one at the hands of
hi Beinit, the other by
politics-playing members of the
Administration? What might the
President have said to these
grieving people if he had the guts
to confess to this special
brutality? Would he have a word
for the right to life of these
Marines?
HE MIGHT have said that an
expedient political decision led to
their "special" deaths. But then
that would have required a
special brand of honesty, in-
cluding the ctpacity to say that
this is true of all losses in war.
That all losses in war are caused
by old men who send young men
to die for causes they've never
even dreamed of.
In any case, that is why Presi-
dent Reagan was a rank
hypocrite, too, atCamp LeJeune.
He wept for the lives of the
Marines, while ignoring those
wounded who died needlessly
only because the Administration
erable and accurate detail about
the use of dating techniques to
determine the age of the bones.
Experts are called in for then-
opinions. All the findings keep
pointing to the correctness of the
archaeologist's first impression
that these are indeed the bones of
Jesus.
To complicate the tale, the
Russians are dragged in. They
send an Arab agent to Jerusalem
to find out what it is that so
On The
Bookshelf
deeply and at so high a level in-
volves the Vatican and the Israeli
government.
THIS AGENT succeeds in
persuading the priest to steal the
bones out of Israel. Together,
they cross into Syria where the
Arabs capture them, kill the
agent and burn the bones. The
priest is returned to Rome where
the Israelis deliver the bones, in-
sisting that the Arabs destroyed
fake copies.The Israeli messenger
then tells the priest that his lover
was killed when she tried to
follow him into Syria. She, in
turn, was told that the priest was
killed when he tried to escape into
Syria with the bones.
The priest and archaeologist
mourn for each other and live out
their lives not knowing that they
are both alive. The priest stays in
the Vatican under the protection
of the Pope, with no one really
knowing what his job is. After 47
years, he finally dies, firm in his
faith. The archaeologist continu-
ed her work with great success.
She eventually dies, still grieving
for her lover.
Determined to tie up every
loose end, Ben Sapir throws in
two pages at the end in which
there is a flashback to the days of
Jesus in Jerusalem. The true
identity of the body in the tomb
is revealed, and the mystery is
unravelled. But I have already
given away too much of the
book's surprise ending. The
solution to this part of the puzzle
should be left for your own
reading which should not be
spoiled by complete, advance
knowledge of the outcome.
The story flows smoothly and
holds the reader's interest.
Learning about Christianity is a
useful by-product but the educa-
tional emphasis is applied with a
light touch. It does not interfere
with the enjoyment of what is
basically an absorbing yarn.
killed them aa surely as the Arab
terrorists were responsible for
their slaughter in the first place.
He wept for the lives of the
Marines, while Commodore
McNamara bleated soulfully that
he does not know why young men
die.
THE PRESIDENT wept for
the lives of the Marines only two
days after he stuck this country's
nose into a matter that can not be
its concern the Baby Jane Doe
case.
And in the Baby Jane Doe
case, the President, on personal,
parochial religious grounds,
showed greater concern for the
life of one doomed infant than he
did for tbe lives of those Marines
who had to die because nobody
cared about tnet'r right to life.
Because all the President's men
would not let them be treated in
IsraeL


Pago i*.A r:?\to Jewish Mdriditn/.PHUfi ^6Vttt)etli-1983
B'nai B'rith Credited With Many 'Firsts'
Continued from Page 5-A
dealings with other nations,
especially in regard to the Pales-
tinian problem.
WHEN B"nai B'rith was
founded on October 13, 1843, in
New York City, there were about
20,000 Jews in America, most of
them new immigrants. Their
community life centered around
34 synagogues, whose Portu-
guese, Dutch, English, Polish,
Bohemian and Russian members
were often antagonistic toward
one another. It was this splin-
tering of the small Jewish com-
munity that motivated 12
German-speaking Jews, led by a
young mechanic named Henry
Jones, to meet in a cafe on New
York's Lower East Side and
create a movement that became a
rallying point for Jews of varied
origins, religious viewpoints, and
economic backgrounds.
The 12 founders contributed
$60 to start the first B'nai B'rith
service program, a widows and
orphans fund. This year B'nai
B'rith will spend more than $25
million on education, social
service, youth activities, career
and vocational counseling, and
dozens of other programs and
activities.
As spokesman in public affairs
for its large constituency, B'nai
B'rith fought its first campaign
against anti-Semitism long
before the term "anti-Semitism"
became part of the language. In
1851, eight years after the organ-
ization was founded, it persuaded
the United States Congress,
which had a treaty with Switzer-
land pending, to insist on the re-
moval of anti-Jewish restrictions
in several Swiss cantons.
IN THE 1870's when anti-
Jewish violence erupted in
Romania, President Grant ap-
pointed Benjamin Peixotto of
Cleveland, a former B'nai B'rith
president, as U.S. consul in
Bucharest. Peixotto helped to
alleviate the hardships suffered
by Jews in Romania and was
instrumental in having minority
rights safeguarded by treaty.
Many American consuls in those
days were unsalaried; therefore
B'nai B'rith funds supported
Peixotto and consulate in
Romania.
The records are filled with such
incidents, ranging from a million-
signature petition protesting the
pogroms of czarist Russia to
relief measures for the victims of
the Nazis. Since World War II,
many B'nai B'rith programs have
been focused on the economic and
social development of Israel; the
strengthening of Jewish com-
munities in the free world; the
quest for human rights in the
Soviet Union, East Europe and
Latin America; and a reaf-
firmution of Jewish culture and
traditions in America.
To coordinate its activities in
community relations and in
opposing anti-Semitism, B'nai
B'rith established its Anti-
Defamation League in 1913. (In
Canada, the ADL's counterpart
is called the League for Human
Rights.) ADL has become one of
the world's foremost advocates of
human rights, fighting for Jews
and non-Jews alike.
B'NAI BRITH'S record of
wartime service goes back to the
Civil War when it successfully
campaigned for the appointment
of the first Jewish army chaplain.
During World War II, B'nai
B'rith sold over $711 million in
War Bonds; supplied recreational
equipment and facilities to
hundreds of military bases,
hospitals and rest centers and
converted hotels in several cities
into free lodging centers for
troops on leave. Hospitality
House in Los Angeles handled
600 servicemen a day. Even
today, B'nai B'rith volunteers
donate thousands of hours an-
nually in helping military ser-
vicemen and veterans.
To encourage greater aware-
ness of their heritage among
Jewish college students, B'nai
B'rith sponsors its Hillel Foun-
dations on more than 400
campuses around the world. The
first was organized in 1923 at the
University of Illinois. B'nai
B'rith provides similar education,
religious, cultural and social
programs for teenagers, through
its Youth Organization formed in
1924. With an enrollment of some
35,000 youngsters, BBYO,
composed of Aleph Zadik Aleph
for boys and B'nai B'rith Girls, is
the largest Jewish youth
movement in the world.
B'nai B'rith's Career and
Counseling Services (BBCCS),
established in 1939, is staffed by
skilled guidance counselors and
psychologists. The agency
provides vocational and lifestyle
counseling and tests, working not
only with youngsters going to
college, but with adults seeking
second and even third careers,
and with middle-aged women
seeking to enter the job market
for the first time.
TO KEEP its membership
apprised of events affecting the
Jewish community around the
world, B'nai B'rith employs
experts in public affairs in
Washington, New York (to
monitor the United Nations),
Paris, Geneva and the Vatican.
Israel, of course, holds a special
place in the hearts of all Jews and
the Israel Commission, with
offices in Washington and Jeru-
salem, services its needs. In
addition, Soviet Jewry has been
of special concern for nearly 20
years. Last March, B'nai B'rith
led a world conference in Jeru-
salem and demonstrations in
more than 100 cities on behalf of
Soviet Jews.
Thousands of members par-
ticipate each year in the B'nai
B'rith Adult Jewish Education
Department's study programs,
inaugurated in 1948. AJE's
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e
Friday, November 4,1083 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
Ineffective Challenge
SUNY Mishandled Academic's Lies
Continued from Page 1-A
mentary precepts," Troen
pointed out.
Just prior to returning to Isra-
el last summer, Troen charged in
i letter to senior faculty members
and administration officials at
the university that Dube, a Black
South African-born professor,
had "employed his position for
the propagation of personal ideo-
logy and racial biases" in
teaching the course, "The Polit-
ics of Racism." Troen asked for a
formal accounting of the course's
teachings.
After the letter was sent, the
university's Faculty Senate con-
cluded that the bounds of
academic freedom had not been
crossed by Dube and that there
would be no investigation of his
teachings. It took nearly three
months for the university presi-
dent, John Marburger, under
pressure from New York State
officials. Jewish community
groups and the academic commu-
nity, to issue a formal statement
dissociating the university
from the course's teachings.
THERE HAS also been an
angry exchange of internal me-
morandums between the
Africana Studies Department
and the university's senior
faculty members, including a
particularly strong statement on
academic freedom and Troen s
charges issued by Amiri Baraka,
chairman of the Africana Depart-
ment, replete with attacks on
"Israeli imperialism'' and
"Zionist outrages against the
Palestinian people."
The llaraka memorandum, cir-
culated to the faculty and news
media, professed to provide
evidence to support the view of
Zionism Is a form of racism by
refering to the 1975 United
Nations General Assembly reso-
lution which
with racism.
equated Zionism
The memorandum, dated Aug.
31, said that the Africana Studies
Department views the Troen-
Dube controversy as an issue of
academic freedom "and given the
internationally known opinions of
the majority of nations in the
United Nations on Zionism, we
feel it would be merely an act of
ideological conformity with
Zionism and the policies of the
Israeli state not to make such
views and opinions known to
students."
THE BARAKA memorandum
elicited an angry response from a
group of 43 senior faculty
members of the Stony Brook uni-
versity. Their statement said:
"Although we probably hold
widely divergent views on
Zionism and the State of Israel,
we are unanimous in our con-
demnation of all philosophies of
hatred including those that
equate Zionism with racism and
Nazism. We believe that the sub-
stantive view presented in the
Aug. 31 memo to be an isolated
one, shared by few on this
campus."
The 43-year-old Troen, whose
wife also taught at Stony Brook,
was a visiting professor of
Human Development and Edu-
cational Policy in the university
for two years. Born in Boston, he
emigrated to Israel in 1975 and
currently is professor of modern
history in the Ben Gurion Uni-
versity in the Negev. He has also
taught in Princeton University
and other universities.
Troen, who objects to many of
the policies of the present Israeli
government, has followed the
Stony Brook controversy while in
Israel from news articles and
through contacts with his
leagues in Stony Brook.
col-
He
Alfonsin's Election Sweep
In Argentina Brightens Jews
Continued from Page 1-A
that the Jewish voters in the
elections behaved in the same
manner as the general electorate
and spoke up clearly in favor of
Alfonsin." He stressed that the
pro Alfonsin vote of the Jewish
electorate was motivated both by
general considerations, as well as
those concerns particularly felt
by the Jewish community.
"The Jewish voter, like the
average voter, wished to vote for
democratic institutional life and
'or an option of change,"
Tenenbaum said. "On the strictly
Jewish level, he believed that
lAlfonsin's) Radical Party of-
fered more guarantees, due to its
democratic make-up and its
rejection of xenophobic trends."
THE JEWISH vote, he
pointed out. was important only
m the district of the federal
capital, where it comprised about
nwe percent of the total. There
were no Jewish candidates for any
significant posts, and only a few
small parties directed their cam-
paign specifically to the Jewish
voter, among them the Social
n tea
Beth Din Olficn
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBOR H. STfRN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
SDunfies.
shmglon Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
rel 534-1004 Of 872-0004
Democrat and the Christian
Democrat parties.
Tenenbaum summed up
several expectations of the Jew-
ish community in the aftermath
of the elections: promulgation of
a penal law outlawing anti-
Semitism, non-inclusion in the
public school system of subjects
or matters which might irritate
Jewish sensitivity, elimination of
the invisible hurdles that block
Jewish access to certain public
posts, and a foreign policy of
balance with regard to the pro-
blems of the Middle East.
On the eve of the elections, the
DA I A, the central representative
body of Argentine Jewry, pu-
blished a statement in the general
press in which "it reaffirmed its
unwavering policy of total
neutrality with regard to the dif-
ferent political trends."
In a general assessment,
Tenenbaum said that the election
results displayed two funda-
mental traits: "It's undoubted
democratic nature and the desire
for change on the part of the
voters who broke not only with
the immediate past but also with
forty years of Argentine politics
dominated by Peronist
hegemony."
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Miami
charged, in his interview with the
JTA, that the school's adminis-
tration has sought to "con-
tain" the issue and had failed to
take the necessary steps at the
outset of the controversy which
could have prevented a protract-
ed debate.
THE UNIVERSITY'S
Faculty Senate, Troen insisted,
failed to investigate the charges
against Dube and did not even
interview the student who had
come to him to present him with
material that would later form
some of the basis of his letter last
summer. Troen said that before
he sent his letter, he discussed
the issue with colleagues at the
university and investigated the
background of the student to
determine his credibility.
According to the information
obtained by Troen through the
student, the syllabus of Dube's
summer course said, "Fifth
week: the three forms of racism
and how they have manifested
themselves. 1. Nazism in Ger-
many. 2. Apartheid in South
Africa. 3. Zionism in Israel."
Dube has promised to continue
with this syllabus.
Troen predicted that the issue
has not yet been settled, partially
because Dube has received strong
support from the Africana
Studies Department and because
the university has failed to take
strong measures to see to it that
such "sloganeering," as Troen
termed it in his letter last sum-
mer, does not persist in the uni-
versity's lecture halls.
TROEN EXPRESSED the
hope that the controversy will
not become a Black-Jewish issue,
insisting that the debate focused
on academic responsibility. He
said Dube should have provided a
broader range of reading materi-
als on Zionism instead of the one
essay he distributed to students
which accused Israelis of being
Nazis and concluded with a call
to support the Palestine Con-
gress, an umbrella group for more
than 50 North American pro-PLO
organizations.
According to a university offi-
cial, Dube is listed in the univer-
sity directory as an assistant
professor of Africana studies. He
received a scholarship to study
psychology at Cornell University
where he received his PhD in cog-
native psychology in 1976. He
became an associate professor in
the Africana Studies Department
at Stony Brook in 1977. He and
his family have become U.S.
citizens.
Meanwhile, the university offi-
cial said that the course, "The
politics of Racism," continues to
be an elective, offered jointly by
the Africana Studies Department
and the Political Science Depart-
ment.
The Natal Mercury
Close Horse Race
Over Ties With Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
dered not to have any contact
with Israeli troops.
But its most glaring example
came after the terrorist bombing
on Oct. 23 when the U.S. refused
Israeli offers to provide sophis-
ticated earthmoving equipment
to help dig out injured and dead
Marines from the rubble and to
treat the injured Marines in
Israeli hospitals.
THE OFFICIAL U.S. ex-
planation on the hospitals was
that it is U.S. military policy to
treat wounded military at U.S.
military hospitals, even though
some of the wounded were taken
to a British hospital on Cyprus.
There have already been attacks
on this in Congress and calls for
investigations, particularly since
many of the wounded had to wait
hours to be taken to military
hospitals in West Germany while
Israeli medical facilities were
close by.
Meanwhile, another issue has
come to the fore recently, that of
the joint rapid deployment force
the U.S. has been secretly
organizing with Jordan in order
to meet threats to the Arab
states on the Persian Gulf. The
issue became public when it was
revealed that $250,000 has been
appropriated this year to
organize the force which would
include two Jordanian battalions
equipped and transported by the
U.S.
Weinberger has been a major
supporter of the force, as he has
been for selling sophisticated
arms to Jordan. Now that the
issue has become public, it faces
rejection by Congress which
accepts the Israeli view that the
force could be used against
Israel.
SHULTZ REPORTEDLY ar-
gued in the National Security
Council that if closer strategic
cooperation was forged with
Israel, then the Israelis might
drop their objections to the rapid
deployment force with Jordan.
He also indicated that Israel
might be more flexible toward
West Bank negotiations.
Before the bomb blast in
Beirut, Eagleburger's mis-
sion was seen in part as an
effort to revive Reagan's peace
initiative of September 1. 1982
which has been moribund
because of Jordan's refusal to
enter into neogtiations.
Eagleburger's visit to Israel
may have provided clues as to
whether stronger ties between
the U.S. and Israel are actually
being forged. Another sign to
watch for is the negotiations in
Geneva among the various
factions in Lebanon aimed at
national reconciliation.
THE Syrians and their
are pressing the govern-
AS
allies
ment of President Amin Gemayel
to renounce Lebanon's May 17
agreement with Israel, the U.S.
up to now, has been urging
Gemayel to stand fast on the
agreement.
Weinberger, who, like the Joint
Chiefs of Staff, never wanted the
Marines to go to Lebanon in the
first place and would like to see
them pulled out as soon as
possible, is reportedly urging
greater concessions toward Syria.
This despite the Adminis-
tration's hard line toward
Damascus and the belief that the
Syrians may have been behind
the bomb attack on Marine
headquarters.

r
Jose Ferrer Presents A WHOLE NEW ACT
1983-84 Season: That's American Entertainment
Lois Nettleton and Mary Wick* in LIGHT UP THE SKY
By Moss Hart Directed by Jose Ferrer
___________October 28-November 20 (Previews October 25-27) -
A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM
Book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart
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________December 2-25 (Previews November 29. 30. December 1)
CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF
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ARSENIC AND OLD LACE by Joseph Kesselring
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II
Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 11,1983
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1
1 *'-M, P*., <-y.0l

Cong. Smith Speaker
At Federation Kickoff
m%?
i B'rith leaders meet with President
man in the White House Oval office to
kcuss veterans' problems. Sealed with
uman is B'nai B'rith President Henry
pnsky. Standing (from left) are A. B. Kap-
fn, director of the Postwar Service Com-
mittee; Sidney G. Kusworm, chairman of the
American Committee; Lt. Col. Elliott A.
Niles, chairman of the National Veterans
Advisory Committee; and Maurice Bisgyer,
national B 'nai B 'rith secretary.
romen Pitch In
They Help B'nai B'rith Mark
140th Anniversary Year of Service
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Young Business and
Professional Campaign, on behalf
of the 1984 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal-Israel Emergency Fund-
Project Renewal-Or Akiva, will
kick off on Sunday, Nov. 13 with
a $1,000 minimum gift cocktail
reception.
Federation's Young Adult
Division, the Miami members of
the United Jewish Appeal's
Young Men's and Young
Women'8 Leadership Cabinets,
and participants in the Chazak
and Chazaka Missions to Israel
will co-sponsor this campaign
event.
Guest speaker will be U.S.
Congressman Larry Smith, re-
presentative from Florida's sixth
congressional district, who will
share his personal observations
and concerns about the current
scene in Israel, Lebanon and the
Middle East.
Hosting the reception at their
home will be Gloria Scharlin,
Federation Women's Division
Pacesetter-Trustee chairwoman,
and Howard Scharlin, general
chairman of the 1984 CJ A-IEF.
"We sincerely hope that all the
committed young Jewish leaders
of our community will join us for
| Women worldwide
feserve the same quality of
; as men;
l Women are entitled to
r treatment under the
Women have the right
give birth to healthy
Ibies.
|These sentiments are more
an just slogans to the 120,000
fcmbers of B'nai B'rith Women,
I international Jewish women's
vice and advocacy organiza-
bn Through its public affairs
Id programming efforts, BBW
I striving to better the economic
of the world's women, to
range discriminatory laws, and
educate teenaged and disad-
pntaged mothers-to-be about
eventing birth defects.
[ TODAY'S B'nai B'rith Women
ps come a long way from the
omen's auxiliary founded in
n Francisco in 1897 to
promote sociability for B'nai
I'rith members and their fam-
es. An independent member of
he H'nai B'rith family since
B40, BBW directs its energies
|>wards service and advocacy
puses.
r'or example, because it is con-
erned that past UN-sponsored
pnferences on economic
pequities facing women were
ubverted from their purpose by
Wd World and Soviet-bloc del-
gates who used the conferences
attack Israel and the U.S.,
|BW is acting to prevent it from
curring at the 1985 End-Decade
onference on Women.
BBW invited leaders of 12
fajor Jewish women's organiza-
ns to its Washington head-
|uarters to meet with officials
om the White House, State De-
tment and Congress and dis-
uss the U.S. role in keeping the
|nference geared to its original
^"pose.
ON THE homefront, BBW is
packing the proposed Economic
Equity Act, which would give
'omen fairer treatment under the
aw- Under the proposed act,
ender will no longer be a factor
1 determining insurance rates
nd payments; wives will benefit
ore from their husbands' pen-
sion plans; and divorced women
will be better able to plan for
their retirement. BBW also sup-
ports pro-choice abortion legisla-
tion and the Equal Rights
Amendment.
Seeking to fight discrimination
on all fronts, BBW recently
joined with the And-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith in
sponsoring three pilot programs
aimed at reducing ethnic
prejudice among teens.
In the first, in Houston, Tex.,
high school juniors of various
backgrounds were encouraged to
explore the nature of prejudice.
The youths learned that even if
they themselves are not victims
of prejudice, when one person is
discriminated against, all are af-
fected.
The other pilot programs are
planned for this fall in Phoenix
and St. Louis.
IN BELIEVING women have
the right to give birth to healthy
babies. BBW has been working
with the National Foundation-
March of Dimes. BBW's Opera-
tion Stork program, now cel-
ebrating its 18th year, is
designed to reduce the incidence
of brith defects and infant
mortality. The program provides
pregnant women, particularly
teens and disadvantaged
mothers-to-be, with assistance to
ensure that mothers-to-be receive
early and regular pre-natal care.
Operation Stork includes
Ferre Faces Runoff With Suarez
Maurice Ferre will be facing a run-off^lectjon with
Xavier Suarez next Tuesday when City of Miami
voters wUl go to the polk. The count foUowmgthg
week's primary saw a close race. Mike Simonhoff
nnThed? distant third. Rosa (Jackie) Floyd Wei-
lington RoUe and Eduardo Lambert were not in the
running.
Miami voters overwhelmingly favored a munKipal
lottery, the non-binding referendum outnumbering
those opposing it by a 9-1 margin.
JL Plummer ran an overwhelming majority
covering some 72 percent of the vote for his 4th term
and Joe Carollo won re-election by a 53 percent of the
total vote, enough to avoid a runoff.
Cong. Larry Smith
this special evening," said Bob
Merlin, chairman of the event
and immediate past president of
the Young Adult Division.
"This year, the needs of world
Jewry that we must meet have
never been greater," added Rick
Turetsky, who chaired the
Chazak Mission. "It is up to us to
LEAD THE WAY in the com-
munity's efforts to help ; all
Jews," he said.
screening for Tay-Sachs, a Jew-
ish genetic disease, transporta-
tion to clinics, nursery recreation
for children accompnaying their
mothers to clinics, healthy-baby
fairs featuring a wide range of
available community services,
and free layettes to disad
vantaged mothers.
Contending that ignorance and
misinformation have contributed
to the growing teenage
pregnancy rate in the U.S., BBW
is developing a program on adol-
escent sexuality consisting of
peer sessions and meetings
between groups of young people
and their parents.
BBW'S CONCERN for chil-
dren and adolescents extends to
Israel, where the organization
supports the Children's Home, a
residential treatment center for
emotionally disturbed boys aged
nine to 14. The home, now mark-
ing its 40th anniversary, does not
use any behavior-modifying
drugs and the boys stay there
considerably longer than they
would at similar U.S. ins-
titutions.
Its success rate is very high.
Those few unable to make it on
their own once they leave the
Children's Home can turn to the
BBW of Canada Group House,
also in Jerusalem. There, they at-
tend school or go to work in the
mornings, and return to the ther-
apeutic atmosphere of the Group
House in the afternoon.
Muriel Russell
MikiGranoff
Dorothy Podhurst
Grove Isle Scene of
Women's Campaign Event
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Women's Division's
Annual Leadership Parlor Meet-
ing and Luncheon, on behalf of
the 1984 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal-Israel Emergency Fund-
Project Renewal-Or Akiva Cam-
paign, will be held on Tuesday,
Nov. 15, at Grove Isle, Coconut
Grove.
Attorney, Stanley Rosenblatt,
will be one of the guest speakers
at the event. Rosenblatt has
produced and hosted programs
for the Public Broadcasting Sys-
tem on topics dealing with Jew-
ish concerns and matters of law.
Most recently, his series, "Israeli
Diary," composed of interviews
with a diverse group of Israeli
leaders, was aired nationwide on
PBS.
Howard R. Scharlin, general
chairman of the 1984 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel Emergency
Fund-Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign, will present a cam-
paign update. Martin Z.
Margulies will lead participants
on a tour through the Grove Isle
sculpture garden after the
luncheon.
"The Leadership Parlor Meet-
ing is designed to bring together
the women who work in cam-
paign to discuss their feelings
and share ideas concerning issues
that affect the Jewish community
today," said Dorothy Podhurst,
Women's Division vice president
of leadership development.
Miki Granoff, Sue Graubert
and Muriel Russell serve as
chairwomen of the Leadership
Parlor Meeting. Women's Divi-
sion members and residents of
Grove Isle who will underwrite
the luncheon are Irene Baros,
Helene Berger, Phyllis Cotton,
Rosemary Furman, Bunny
Horowitz, Paula Levy, Nancv
Lipoff, Pat Papper, Marv
Schaecter, Eileen Silberman a i
Esther Smith.
Jfewislhi IFloridLiaia
Miami, Florida-Friday, Novambar 11,1983 SactlonB


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 11,1963
Jflaa the Puloit
If The Stamp Could Speak
By RABBI ALBERT TROY
Congregation
Sha'aray Tzedek
Sunrise, Fla.
The sages of our people, in
their wisdom, have taught that
there is no individual who is so
all-knowing that he cannot learn
from others. Furthermore, they
tell us that everyone has some-
thing to teach us. Ben Zoma, one
of our great teachers, said. "Who
is wise he who learns from
every man." A Hassidic rabbi
once remarked:
"Everything can teach us
something, and not merely
everything that God has created.
What man has made has also
something to teach us.
"What can we learn from a
train?", one Haaaid asked
dubiously.
"That because of one second,
you can miss everything."
"And from the telegraph?"
"That every word is counted
and charged for."
"And the telephone?"
"That what we say here is
heard there."
Commonplace things all of
them we see them so frequent-
ly, and yet what vital lessons and
messages they convey to us.
I WOULD like to add another
item to the three discussed here.
It, too, is a commonplace thing,
and is taken for granted. I refer
to the postage stamp. Who will
deny the tremendous cultural and
aesthetic values that inhere in
most stamps? One can talk at
great h length about the fascinat-
Rabbi Albert N. Troy
ing stories, the historical events,'
the exciting march of progress of
which the stamp could speak if it
were able to talk.
Do you know what else the
stamp can teach in order to make
our lives more fulfilled and vic-
torious? It would say, "I stick to
my job until it is done." Isn't
that true? The stamp has a job to
do, to bring an article to its des-
tination. However adverse the
circumstances, and regardless of
the conditions that accompanied
its mission, it persevered until it
successfully fulfilled its responsi-
bility. How many of us have yet
to master this quality indivi-
duals who accept responsibilities,
but, alas, who fail to "stick to the
job until it is done."
The stamps has yet another
message to impress upon us. If
the stamp could speak, it would
say, "I never give up when 1 am
licked. I only hold on tighter."
The pressures and the emergen-
cies that crop up from time to
time on the stamp's journey to its
destination, must be frustrating
and demoralizing. Snowstorms,
thunder and lightning intervene
to delay its progress.
ONLY A tenacity of purpose
and a firm determination not to
yield to defeat or failure, enable it
to triumph. How each of us needs
to learn this lesson! Perhaps the
greatest challenge that confronts
us in life is to be able to pick up
the broken pieces of our lives
after defeat and failure, and with
faith and courage, to make some-
thing worthy and beautiful and
productive of our lives. What an
achievement to be able to say, "I
never give up when I am licked, I
only hold on tighter."
And finally, the stamp would
say, "I represent my country."
The stamp portrays values which
are noble, just and true. It
conveys symbols of America at
its highest and its best. We, too
represent America. Let us be
noble and worthy representa-
tives. This is the season of the
year when we pause to pay
tribute to our country's veterans,
countless numbers of whom
heroically died for America. Let
each of us resolve to live for our
country by strengthening,
through our lives the ideals which
are so essential a part of the great
American dream.
Hadassah Associates
To Hear Lenore
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah Associates will hold
their meeting on Wednesday,
Nov. 16, noon, at the Region Of-
fice, Lincoln Mall, according to
Irving London, chairman.
Guest speaker will be Norma
B. Lenore, a member of the Na-
tional Board of Hadassah, the'
Women's Zionist Organization of
America. Mrs. Lenore is pre-
sently chairman of Hadassah As-
sociates of National Hadassah.
She is the immediate past pres-
ident of the Connecticut Region,
B'nai B'rith Forum
B'nai B'rith Lodge 1591 week-
ly Friday Forum will be held in
the Lincoln Road Social Hall on
Nov. 11, according to Gershon
Miller, president. Guest speaker
will be Joseph Ross, certified fi-
nance planner.
Norma B. Lenore
American
Israeli
Big Selection
For Chanukah
$
All
Talesim
on Special
W kava aofer oa
and prior was chairman of leader-
ship development and publicity.
She has served as membership
vice-president and recording
secretary for the Norwalk Jewish
Center, treasurer for Beth Israel
Synagogue; calendar chairman of
the National Council of Jewish
Women and a member of the Al-
locations committee for the UJA
Federation. She was honored by
Israel Bonds in the state of
Connecticut.
Concert Meeting
Charles Infeld, chairman of
Branch 679 Workmen's Circle of
South Florida, has announced a
concert meeting will be held on
Sunday, Nov. 20 at 1 p.m. at the
Aztec Hotel, Miami Beach.
Cantor Moshe Friedler will per-
form in a special program of
Jewish music. Cantor Friedler is
a graduate of the Conservatory of
Music in Buenos Aires and Man-
hattan School of Cantors.
1357 Washington Avb
Miami Beach
531-7722
Conservative Synagogue in Miami, Florida
aaaka full time cantor. Will be required to read
the Torah in addition to other cantorlal duties
plus teach Bar-Bat Mitzvah.
Send Resume to Box #CS, c/o Jewish
Floridian P.O. Box 012973, Miami, Fla. 33101.
Podhurst to Chair
CJA Opening Dinner
The Campaign Opening Dinner
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1984 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund-Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Campaign, will be held Wednes-
day, Dec. 7 at 6:30 p.m. at the
Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel.
Howard It. Scharlin, general
campaign chairman, appointed
Aaron Podhurst, last year's
chairman of the CJA-IEF, to
chair the dinner. Guest speaker
will be Florida Governor Bob
Graham.
Those who attended the Cam-
paign Opening Dinner make a
1.000 minimum gift to 1984
CJA-IEF. Podhurst said that
record attendance is anticipated
at the event, which will provide a
strong start to the Jewish com-
munity's effort to furnish social
services to Jews around the
world.
"All of us share the (*,..,
secure future for the peX,
rael and Jews everv.il1
Podhurst said. "At lb 7
paign Opening Dinner ..
LEAD THE %$ **
tergest campaign this co^
has ever mounted," he i
Also serving as coordiuio-
the dinner are Dinner pZ.
Chair Dorothy Podhurst S
Arrangements Chair 2
Lefton, and Dinner Attend,.
and Table Captain daffi
Lipoff. Serving as vice chair I
dinner attendance and -__
captains are Fern Blum M
Canarick, Mitzi Center br j!
Ellenby, Mark Friedland Ham!
Friedman, Al Golden, Miri*
Kohn, Steven J. Kraviu, Jgv
Lefcourt, Davida Levy, Q
Mildenberg, Marlene Olin, fl
Richman, Guillermo Smk,
and Joe Linger
Katz Art Benefits Home
May the stamp be a constant
reminder of these valuable
lessons, and may they have a
beneficent influence in our lives.
Beth David Series
Adult Education Forum Series
will be held at Beth David
Congregation, South Dade on
Monday, Nov. 14 at 8 p.m.
William Gralnick, executive
director of the American Jewish
Committee and Dr. Barry
Snowden, pastor of St. Timothy
Lutheran Church will speak
about "Lutherans and Jews: A
New Era?"
JWV Dinner Dance
West Miami Post and
Auxiliary No. 223, Jewish War
Veterans, will hold a dinner and
dance in honor of their Past Post
Commander and Past Auxiliary
Presidents, Saturday evening,
Nov. 19, at 7:30 p.m. at the
Kendale Lakes Country Club.
Dinner Chairmen are Ruth and
Norman Burman. Post Com-
mander is Marvin Herman and
Auxiliary President is Thelma
Potlock.
Alex Katz, renowned artist,
has accepted a commission from
the Greater Miami Women's
Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged.
Under the chairmanship of Bess
Stein, the group will sponsor a
limited edition lithograph
The special work, limited to
100 pieces, will be available ex-
clusively through the Miami
Jewish Home. The Auxiliary has
created a new gift giving categ-
ory, and the first 100 donors of
$1,000 will receive the print.
"This represents an exceptional
value as the market worth of a
limited edition work by Katz far
exceeds this with some of his
lithos selling for as much as
$2,000. All proceeds from the sale
will go the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged, a
multi-purpose geriatric center
serving over 20,000 So. Flc-
ridians an on annual basis," Mrs.
Stein stated.
"Alex Katz, an "artist's ar-
tist' is held in extremely
repute by collectors and curto
His works are part of the ^
manent collections of some of till
most prestigious museums it
eluding, the Museum of Modai
Art, the Metropolitan Museum
Art and the Whitney Museum
American Art, all in New Yon,
the Hirschhorn Museum
Sculpture Garden at the Nation!
Museum of American Art i
Washington. D.C., the Art Ins
tute of Chicago, and the Museu
of Fine Arts in Boston,"
added.
Musical Revue
Tropical Cancer League A1K
Cancer Research Center will hoi
its luncheon meeting on Friday
Nov. 18 at the Ocean Pavillm
Miami Beach. A musical rev*
written and choreographed I
Lillian Cuttler, will be preseci*
Guest artists will be Jan
Caretta and Joseph Baker.
Not since Noah's time has
something so tiny made it so big.
It's Tettey's tiny little tea leaves. They've been making it big in
Jewish homes for years. Tetley knows that just as tiny lamb
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same is true tor
tea leaves. That's why for rich, refreshing tea, Tetley bags
are packed with tiny little tea leaves. Because tiny is tastier!
K Certified Kosher
TETLEY. TEA "in., 1.1"-
M
H


South Dade JCC Holds Book Fair
Friday, PfeyenibeifY; 1*985 /%B\Jvitiskflpridjan..' J*9ge3-B
Dade Jewish Com-
mUS Center wiU hold their
m i Ipwish Book Fair on Nov.
rfiS. t the Center.
Ks. author of "Arab Reach:
Tht Secret War Against Israel,
2 Joel Gross, author of "This
Year in Jerusalem.
The four day event at the
Center will open with a book sale
beginning at 7 p.m. on Wednes-
day Levins will speak on the
Arab political and financial
influences throughout the world.
Levins, a prize-winning Phila-
delphia newspaper and magazine
reoorter. sparked a national
controversy with his 1979 cover
gtaries on Arab financial ac-
tivities in America when they
appeared in a local Philadelphia
magazine.
Joel Gross will be the guest
speaker at the Women's Day
luncheon on Thursday, Nov. 17
at 11:30 a.m. at Bet Breira
Synagogue. Gross' fictional nar-
ratives draw on the richness of
Jewish history and culture for
their backgrounds and settings.
The book sale, which will
continue in the Center's social
hall throughout the four days,
will have more than 1,000 new,
children's and adult titles, in-
Rabbi Randall J. Konigsburg
has been appointed Assistant
Rabbi of Beth Torah Congre-
gation, Rabbi Max A. Lip-
schitz is spiritual liader of the
congregation.
JEWISH
rwicxvu.
The 1983 Jewish Book Fair Steering Committee includes (front
row, left to right) Carol Cantor, Karen Eisner, Ruth Shere; (top
row) Fred Greenbaum, Karen Wainberg, Joan Murphy, Marsha
Botkin and Michelle Krinzman
*f/h Your Are Cordially Invited To Attend i
CHAIM WEIZMAN
FARBAND BRANCH
Sponsored By
The Jewish National Fund
Distinguished Gnest Speaker
eluding a selection of Judaica
books and some 2,000 soft and
hard cover books.
Family Day Festival will be
held Sunday, Nov. 20 from 1-5
p.m.
Carol Cantor, general co-chair-
person of the South Dade JCC
Jewish Book Fair, said the event
promises "something for
everyone. It will be a very ex-
citing program with interesting
speakers, entertainment for the
whole family and books for every
interest."
Karen Eisner, who shares
general co-chairperson duties
with Cantor, said the Jewish
Book Fair promises to be "the
biggest and best Jewish Book
Fair yet.
Jewish Book Fair is an annual
event of the South Dade JCC and
is supported by more than 20
Jewish organizations in south
Dade. The South Dade JCC is
one of three branches operated by
the Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida.
Farband Meets
Farband Labor Zionist Al-
liance will meet on Monday, Nov.
21 at noon at the Cuban Hebrew
Cultural Center, Miami Beach.
Guest speaker will be Farband
president Dr. Ezra Spicehendler.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chairman JNF Foundation
Sunday
December 4,1983
Konover Hotel
12:00 noon
Entertainment
Kosher Cuisine
Isadore Hammer
Pres. Chaim
Weizman Farband

For Reservations:
Jean Lew. Corresponding Sec,y 672-7396
Sonia Horowitz, Social Chairman 673-8807
Sheva Berland, Social Chairman 864-6292
Finally!
Rich, real cream cheese taste
with only half the fat!
And it's Kosher, too!
Rabbi Joseph P. Sternstein
uas elected national president
f the Histadruth Ivrith
(Hebrew Culture Movement of
America) at its convention in
Kiamesha Lake, N.Y, The
convention was the culmina-
tion of the annual 'Shavua
Ivri' (Hebrew Week) activities
conducted by the Hebrew Cul-
ture Movement. Rabbi Stern-
ttein is spiritual leader of
Temple Beth Sholom of
RoslynHeights, N.Y.
Experienced Fund Raiser
For National Human Relations
Agency. Familiar with Jewish
Community. Creative and
dynamic personality. State
travel Involved. Excellent
benefits. P.O. Box EFR do
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Page 4-$ The Jewish Flftridian / Friday, November. 11,1983
JNF Luncheon Set for December
Abraham Grunhut, President,
Jewish National Fund has an-
nounced that Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man, Spiritual Leader Temple
Emanu-El and Chairman JNF
Foundation will be the Guest
Speaker at the forthcoming
Chaim Weizman Branch Farband
Traditional Installation Lunch-
eon, to be held Sunday, Dec. 4 at
the Konover Hotel.
"The Chaim Weizman Branch
of Farband," said Rabbi Irving
Lehrman, "is the only organiza-
tion of World Zionist movement
which holds a traditional JNF
function, started by the late Moe
Levin, who was president of the
Chaim Weizman Branch of Far-
band for more than 20 years."
Lehrman praised Isadora Ham-
mer, president, on "the continua-
tion of this tradition, and his
Branch of Farband, who are
Lehrman Hammer
devotees of JNF ideology and
work."
Grunhut pointed out "that the
installation of officers is
presented in a special ceremony
and the total theme is centered on
the JNF achievements and ideo-
logy."
"This year, because of special
conditions in Israel, every JNF
function takes on a special
meaning of idealism, with its
needs, and the role it plays in
Israel's defense and security,"
Dr. Zev Kogan added.
The Luncheon Committee lncludei
Mr and Un. EU Altman. Reglna Balln.
Sheva Berland, Mr. and Un. Joaeph
Fisher, Viola Freed. Mr. and Mr*. ia-
dore Hammer. Harry Kadlah. Sarah
Kaufman, Mr. and Mr. Norman Kem-
per, Freda Lentan, Jean Lew, Mr. and
Mra. MorrU Maier, LUllan Perlow. Mr
and Mra. 8am Freed. Mr. and Mrs
Julius Rubinstein. Mr. and Mrs. Abra-
ham Simon, Mr. and Mrs. Boris Slno-
way. Mr. and Mrs. Sam Splvak.
Also, Mr. and Mrs. Abe Wenger, Rose
Kaas, Esther Welnsteln. Mr. and Mrs.
Milton Greenberg, Mr. and Mrs. Louis
Grlnberg, Mr. and Mrs. Morris Horo-
wlta, Sam Lelfer, Mr. and Mrs. Charles
Pechter. Mr. and Mrs. Max Rothman.
Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Berenhaut, Mr.
and Mrs. Murray Natanson. Mr. and
Mrs. Oscar Elsenberg. Robert Solowy,
Ann Samet, Rose KaU, Frelda
Mailman. Rose Lelter. Clara Goldstein,
and Gertrude Soloman.
**-

6,000 Jews, Non-Jews March
In Buenos Aires To Urge Government
Action On Anti-Semitic Incidents
Shown above are (left to right) Leroy Raffel, Louis .
Forrest Raffel at the California Country Club '$ campifa
nizational meeting on behalf of the 1984 Combined J
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund-Project Renewal-Or
Campaign.
Veterans Honored At Beach Se
The American Legion Post No. American
85 together with the City of
Miami Beach will honor its war
veterans on Friday, Nov. 11
beginning at 10:30 a.m. at the
Cenotaph, Washington Ave. and
11th St., Miami Beach.
Veterans organizations par-
ticipating include the National
Guard, Veterans of Foreign
Wars, Military Order of World
Wars, Jewish War Veterans, Dis-
Survivors of peari %
Veterans of World VVi
Veteran Boxers Associtioi|
Guest speaker will be I
Raymond E. Womack.
mander of the Seventh
Guard District, Chief Ea
ing Division. Isabelle Hel
Sadye Padden will sing |
tional Anthem. Mayor
Fromberg will make a i
ess.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An Argentine Jewish
student attending the Rab-
binical School of the Jewish
Theological Seminary of
America here, reported that
6,000 Argentinian Jews and
non-Jews marched in
Buenos Aires to urge gov-
ernment action on a grow-
ing spate of anti-Semitic in-
cidents and violations of
human rights.
Rolando Matalon, who is also a
student at the Rabbinical Latino
Americano in Buenos Aires, told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
that the march was sponsored by
the Jewish Movement for Human
Rights (JMHR), a national
organization. Matalon, who has
been studying at the Conserva-
tive seminary here for two years,
feMi* u.s.a / _
Leaders of the American Red Magen David for Israel present at
the dedication of a new ambulance for the State of Israel's Red
Cross service, Magen David Adorn at Fort Towers, Miami
Beach are (left to right) Howard G. Kaufman, Florida state
president; Mrs. Bessie Lepow of Miami Beach, in whose honor
Irving Bernstein dedicated the 1984 ambulance, and Dade
County Judge Steven D. Robinson, a Miami Beach native,
whom Mrs. Lepow has served as financial secretary for the past
16 years and for the Robinson family for 57 years until her re-
tirement this month.
Reagan Condemns USSR
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA> -
President Reagan has strongly
condemned the Soviet Union for
the 12-year sentence against
Jewish activist Iosif Begun,
calling it an "illegal and
inhumane act."
In a statement issued at the
White House, Reagan accused
the Soviet Union of "launching a
new campaign of repression
against human rights activists"
after it had made a commitment
to respect human rights "nearly a
month" ago at the Madrid con-
ference on compliance with the
human rights clauses of the Hel-
sinki accords, of which the Soviet
Union is a signatory.
Calling Begun a "courageous
Jewish believer," Reagan said
"Soviet persecution of religious
and political dissidents is not
new. In the case of Mr. Begun the
Soviet regime has refused for 13
veats>. to .honor bis request to- -.
emigrate to Israel."
Reagan said that "Soviet pol-
icy toward Jewish emigration
and dissident movements has
sunk to a new low of brutality
and repression. Anti-Semitism
has escalated dramatically as has
harassment of other human
rights defenders.''
He said that a Lithuanian
Catholic priest, Father Sigitas
Tamkevicius, "is facing a similar
fate" to Begun, and Oleg Rad-
zinsiy, a Soviet peace activist,
has been held for almost a year.
"We condemn these illegal and
inhumane acts," Reagan said."
We hold the Soviet Union ac-
countable for its violations of
numerous international agree-
ments and accords on human
rights to which it is a party. We
call upon the Soviets to reverse
their inhumane policies and to
prove to the world they will back
up their words with action, and
start living up to their agree-
ments, v.
said the demonstration was led
by Rabbi Marshall Meyer,
director of the Buenos Aires
Seminary.
MATALON stressed that the
JMHR was completely inde-
pendent of the DAIA, the central
representative body of Argentine
Jewry, and that the JMHR is
the first such movement within
the Argentine Jewish community
to "go public."
The JTA was told that there
was a feeling among JMHR
leaders, including Rabbi Meyer,
that the DAIA would have
preferred the protest march not
take place. This was conveyed to
Meyer both before and after the
march.
Among the events which have
disturbed Argentine Jews have
been an increase in the smearing
of swastikas on synagogues,
occasional kidnapping of Argen-
tine Jews for ransom and the
need for increased police
protection for synagogues during
the recent High Holy Days.
MATALON, a resident of
Buenos Aires, said he was close
to Rabbi Meyer and that the
Rabbi had called him to tell him
of plans for the protest march. He
said he had called Meyer to find
out what happened.
Matalon said Meyer reported
that not only was there no police
interference with the protest
march but that police provided
protection for the marchers.
Matalon said he did not know the
proportion of Jews to non-Jews
among the 6,000 demonstrators.
He said he had been told they
marched quietly through the
streets and that the events ended
with addresses by several
speakers, including Meyer.
Two distinguished leaders of Conservative Judaism, Dr. Robm
Gbrdis (left) and his son. Dr. David M. Gbrdis. will join in 11
duo-keynote address on Sunday at the biennial convention A
the United Synagogue of America at the Concord Hotel in
Kiamesha Lake, N.Y. More than 2,000 delegates of 8000\
servative congregations in the United States and Canada u \
attend the five-day convention. The convention marks thelOtk
anniversary of the United Synagogue of America, which im
founded in February, 1913 by Solomon Schechter
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Friday, November 11,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Wedding
MARGELWEINTRAUB
and Mrs. Sigmund Wointraub, Miami
JT_ announce the marriage of their son, Paul
Lard to Lana Margel, daughter of Mrs. Helen
jrgeland and the late Nathan Margel of
Montreal, Canada.
The wedding was held in Montreal, on Oct. 23.
Guests in attendance were from the United
States, Mexico, Belgium and Israel.
The couple is residing in Surfside.
The groom'8 parents are owners of the Nether-
lands Hotel, Miami Beach.
V
I
|fc4fck
1

Suburban League President Feme Toccin presents a check for
$108,500 to Diabetes Research Institute President Martin
Kleiman and Executive Director Myron Berezin (far right). The
contribution benefits the Diabetes Research Institute at the
University of Miami School of Medicine. Pictured on either side
of Toccin is her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Donald Jacobson of
Miami.
ir Adm. Neil Stevenson (left), new Chief
{Chaplains, U.S. Navy, and Commodore
in McNamara (second from right),
puty Chief of Chaplains, USN, visit JWB
imission on Jewish Chaplaincy to discuss
coverage by Jewish chaplains in the
. Navy, ship-sea duty, lay leader training
other matters. Rabbi Barry H. Greene
Icond from left). Executive Committee
chairman, JWB Chaplaincy Commission,
and Rabbi David Lapp (right), Commission
director, heard the naval officers say that
there is a need for up to ten more Jewish
chaplains in the U.S. Navy. Courtesy visits
are made to major religious denominations
whose ministers serve in the various
branches of the U.S. Armed Forces.
Book Review
lisU'rhuud of Congregation
i\ Shalom will hold a luncheon
Ui'iliu'.sday. Nov. 16, noon, at
I .i-,.!iI.iih;i Hotel. Miami
ih. Arlviw Ditchik will give a
Ik review on "This Year in
niNilciii.
Sholem Lodge
ih.il.il) Lodge 1024, Bnai
lull, will hold their meeting in
I Bucml hall of the Israelite
Mm Temple, on Sunday, Nov.
lai 10:30 a.m., according to
prris Feld. president. Guest
taker will be Dr. Eva Friedl.
ulessor Kmeritus of the
piversily Beach Zionists
Miami Heath Zionist District
I hold their monthly meeting
Nov. 21 at 1 p.m., at the
nerican Savings and Loan
Iditorium, Lincoln Road,
lami Beach. A representative of
Consul General of Israel in
lami will speak on "Israel
dale."
Shaare Zedek
[South Florida Womens Com-
mittee of Shaare Zedek Medical
"-nter will hold its Chanukah
ncheon meeting on Wednesday,
ov. 23, noon, at the Casablanca
PW. Miami Beach. Guest
aker will be Rebbetzin Helen
Plman, who will conduct a
"die lighting ceremony. *
Hebrew Forum
I Abraham J. Gittelson, asso-
Pto director of the Central
Agency for Jewish Education has
renounced the Hebrew Forum
IJMoadon Ivri) of Miami will
^egin ita lecture series on
8day, Nov. 15 at 1:30 p.m. at
I Miami Beach Public Library.
The Moadon Ivri will hold
ln,e_irew lecture on the first and
Ijlurd Tuesdays of each month
gnui Nov. through March. Rabbi
|w Jehudah Melber will conduct
I'he classes. Dr. Joseph Diamond
iwves as president.
South Dade
Midrasha
The South Dade Midrasha will
hold a forum series, under the
direction of Rabbi Norman S.
Lipson, on Wednesday, Nov. 16
at 8 p.m. at the South Dade
Jewish Community Center.
Guest speaker will be Hoag
Levins, author of "The Arab
Reach: The Secret War Against
Israel."
Kaduri Musical
Arie Kaduri will present the
musical "Ain't Misbehavin- at
Eden Roc's Cafe Pompeii on Dec.
25, continuing through Feb. 12.
Songs written by Fats Waller, in-
clude "This Joint is Jumpin',"
"Your Feels' too Big," "Ain't
Misbehavin," "Honeysuckle
Rose" and "Keeping out of Mis-
chief Now," will be featured.
Pictured are (left to right) Dr. Joseph Harris, president of the
Medical Staff of Mount Sinai Medical Center, former Senator
Robert W. McKnight dnd Alvin Goldberg, executive vice
president of the hospital. McKnight spoke to the medical staff
on health care costs dnd new legislation.
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander Ros-
ner have been appointed
chairmen for the Rabbi Alex-
ander S. Gross Hebrew Aca-
demy 's annual scholarship
dinner to be held Sunday, Dec.
11 at the Konover Renais-
sance Hotel
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Page6-B The Jewish Sloridian/ Friday, November 11,1983
Community Corner
Benjamin Paul Baum. Miami, has been inducted into Tau
Beta Pi, the National Engineering Honor Society. Inclusion in
the society is awarded for academic excellence and overall
excellent achievement.
Baum is presently serving as a vice president of the Miami
Beach Jaycees. He will complete his MSIE Degree in
December, and presently holds an MBA Degree from the
University of Miami, where he maintained a straight A average
in all of his graduate work.
Mike Sie/el, WGBS talk show host, will explore the life of
John F. Kennedy at 7 p.m: Nov. 14 through Nov. 18. Siegel will
interview Ralph Martin, author of "A Hero For Our Time,'' and
Evelyn Lincoln, Kennedy's personal secretary, on Mon., Nov.
14.
The historical Association of South Florida will sponsor the
eighth annual Harvest on Nov. 19, 10 am. to 7 p.m. and Nov.
20, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at the Tamiami Park. The Harvest
celebrates South Florida's heritage. Crafts and works of art will
be on sale.
The Florida Association for Women Lawyers, Dade County
Chapter, will host a luncheon on Nov. 20 at Reflections on the
Bay Restaurant at Miamirina. Guest speaker will be Dade
County Commissioner, Ruth Shack.
1__
Cr.aig Donoff, tax attorney, Richard G. Jackson, president
of Am eriFirst Florida Tnist Company, and Jeff Kassower,
financial analyst, Will participate in a seminar entitled "How to
Plan Your Estate in Florida," in the Wiegand Auditorium of St.
Francis Hospital on Nov. 17 from 2-4 p jn.
The Juvenile Diabetes Foundation is sponsoring a coin and
stamp show at Hollywood Fashion Center, 441 and Hollywood
Blvd., Hollywood, on Sunday, Nov. 13 between 12-5 p.m.
i
Flagler Federal Savings and Loan Assoc., West Chester
Branch will celebrate "Thank you Westchester Week,'' through
Nov. 11. Flagler Federal, University Lakes Branch, will have
free blood pressure screenings on Friday, Nov. 18 from 11 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
The seventh Annual Chanukah Run, sponsored by the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC Pacers and SPORT Clinic will take
place Sunday, Dec. 4 at 8 a.m., starting and finishing at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC, North Miami Beach. A pre-race clinic
will be held Nov. 30 at 7 p.m. at the JCC in preparation for the
race.
United Order True Sisters, Miami No. 43, a service group of
senior women, recently held their annual luncheon in the Miami
Children's Hospital auditorium. Gertrude Zion, president,
presented the hospital with a check for $50,000 to be dedicated
towards a Bone Marrow Transplant Unit in the hospital s new
facility due for dedication in 1986.
The new Blanche Swift Morris Tower will be dedicated in
the honor of Mrs. Blanche Swift Morris, by St. Francis Hospital
on Tuesday,Nov. 22. Participating will be Mrs. Polly de Hrsch
Meyer, Mr. and Mrs. Ira Giller, Mrs. Carrie Mastronardi,
Commissioner Ruth Shack, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Badami, and
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Bakst.
The South Dade Hebrew Academy will present an Art
Auction on Saturday, Nov. 26 at the Academy. The preview will
begin at 7:30 p.m. with the auction at 8:30p.m.
B'nai Zion Miami Beach Chapter No. 186, American Zionist
fraternal Organization, will have their card game parties on
Sunday Nov. 13 and Sunday, Nov. 27 at 1 p.m. in the Cadillac
Hotel, Miami Beach, according to Seymour Rubin, president.
The Association for Retarded Citizens. Dade County will
hold open house on Sunday. Nov. 13 from 2-4 p.m at the
recently opened Group Home in Homestead.
Miami contractor Robert L. Tvdsia was honored aa
outstanding alumnus of Tulane University for 1983 during their
Homecoming celebrations.
Phi Sigma Sigma will celebrate its 70th anniversary at a
" n ft?> No*, 20 at 11 ..m. at the SSSmtSU
gT- frfg* *?" be former national president, Jeaaiae
SS?rSW,TlL.MeiSb?I8 of """mil re Ruth Rosea*
BobbJ Osdp. Barbara Zohhnaa and Aaa Rafter. Diane Macer
executive secretary. y
Dade County Preeident Claire GreenwaJd and staff of
officers will make their official viait at the Jewish War Veterans
Four Freedoms Auxiliary No. 402 meeting on Nov. 17 Alex
Greenwald, post commander of Norman Bruce Brown Post No
174 will speak.
.. VSftH Aton** University Festival Chorus will present
Handel s Judas Maccabaeus" on Sunday, Nov. 20 at 230 p m
in the University Center Auditorium.
Emanu-El Classes
Start Tuesday
Temple Emanu-El Adult
Institute of Jewish Studies,
directed by Dr. Irving Lehrman
and Rabbi Maxwell Berger will
hold classes on Tuesday mor-
nings, 9:30 to noon. Regis-
trations are being accepted on
Tuesday, Nov. 15 at 10:30 a.m.
Nov. 15, also marks the begin-
ning of the 24th consecutive year
of the Torah Luncheon Club, led
by Dr. Lehrman, which meets on
alternate Tuesdays at 12:15 p.m.
in Sirkin Hall.
Four-week courses will be
offered in Shema Yisrael
Affirmation, The Book of Ruth,
Ecclesiastes, The Book of Esther
and Lamentations.
A Sabbath Bible class will be
held before Mincha services
under the leadership of Rabbi
Ralph Y. Carmi, the congre-
gation's rituals director. Rabbi
Berger is auxiliary rabbi
Temple Emanu-El's library has
branches in the main building,
Washington Ave. and at the
Lehrman Day School. The main
library is open Tuesday mornings
from 10 a.m. until 12 noon and
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 2
to 5 p.m. The Lehrman Day
School branch library is open
during school hours.
Bonds Award
c-;
^ >*?'

Pictured at the Miami Beach Region ofHadassah annual]
for Israel luncheon are (left to right) Betty fasten)
president; Louella Shapiro, Mollie WeinbergandAnneYn
Mr8. Weinberg was named a "Woman of Valor."
Hadassah Chapters Set Programs
Queen Esther Chapter, Miami
Region of Hadassah, will hold a
luncheon and card party on
Monday, Nov. 14 at 11:30 a.m. at
Arlen Restaurant.
Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will meet on Monday,
Nov. 14 at 11:30 a.m. at the
American Savings Bank, Alton
and Lincoln Road.
Renanah Chapter, Miami
Beach Region of Hadassah, will
hold their board meeting on
Monday, Nov. 14 at 10:30 a.m.
with their luncheon meeting
following at noon. Guestt
will be Jack Polinsky Jh
Speaker's Bureau of Mew
Harriet Cohen is president.
Henrietta Szold Chapt
Hadassah will hold a bn
meeting on Monday. Nov!l4j
11 a.m., according to Flon
Greenberg, president
Miami Region of Hadassah id
celebrate the 50th anniversary
Youth Aliyah with a party alt
Sheraton Bal Harbour i
January 15.
Dinner Pioneer Women Schedule Meetings
The State of Israel Bond Org-
anization's New Life Dinner will
be held on Thursday, Dec. 8 at 7
p.m. at the Konover Hotel,
Miami Beach. New Life Awards
will be presented to survivors of
the Holocaust.
Rachel Abramowitz of Miami
Beach will be a recipient of the
award, according to Gary R.
Gerson, general campaign
chairman.
Golda Meir Chapter of Pioneer
Women-Na amat will hold their
annual membership luncheon on
Thursday, Nov. 17, noon, in the
Lincoln Road Social Room,
according to Katherine Lippman,
president. Guest speaker will be
Leah Benson, former national
vice president. Benson is
currently membership vice pres-
ident of the South Florida
Council. Claire Balaban
is vice
president and membership char]
man.
The A viva Chapter will hoidj
their non meeting on Weil
nesday. Nov. 16 in tJ
uuditorium o! the McDoaM
Senior Citizens Center, Najfl
Miami Beach. Margot Amstaj
will give a report on the recta [
Biennial Convention
Baltimore. Amslel is prognsl
chairman und past president at|
the chapter.
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Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"And he dreamed, and behold a ladder set up on the earth,
the top of it reached to heaven; and behold the angels of
i ascending and descending on it"
(Genesis 28.12).
[ayetze
VAYETZE
t __On his way to Haran, Jacob lay down to rest at a
"where God appeared to him in a dream, promising to be
u tf him and to give the land to him and his seed after him.
r a the next morning, Jacob lifted the stone on which he had
i and set it up as a pillar. He called the place Beth-el,
JJ '. 'house of God", and vowed to serve God there when he
. Jacob worked twenty years as a shepherd for Laban
Wen vears for his first wife, Leah, seven years for his second
, Rachel and six years for the sheep. His wives gave him
lir maid servants Bilhah and Zilpah as wives. Jacob's four
Lives bore him 11 sons: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan,
nhtali Gad, Asher, Issachar. Zebulun, and Joseph; he also
ad one daughter named Dinah. At God's direction, Jacob
turned home to his father's house. On the way he met the
ngels of God.
(The recounting el Hit Weekly Portion of Hit Law It extracts* and bated
boon "The Graphic Hiftory ol ttie Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollmen
rumir, st 5. published by Shengold. The volume Is available at 75 Maiden
jne. New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Sctilang Is president of the society di
rlbuting the volume.)
mnukah Workshop For Teachers
1 seminar on "The Teaching of
Inukah" for teachers of the
Bgogue and day schools in
imi, will be held Sunday, Nov.
from 2-5 p.m. at the Central
Ency for Jewish Education.
Pie seminar is sponsored by
Hebrew Educators Alliance
CAJE. According to Ben-
hin Ben Ari, 1IEA president,
kanukah highlights a signif-
ni period in the history of the
fish people. It contains within
blues, mitzvot, concepts and
ideas that are vitally important
for our students."
Participating are Marsha
Kolman, art instructor at the
South Dade Hebrew Academy,
Shulamit Atkin, music instructor
at Toras Ernes Academy, Rabbi
Menachem Raab, director of the
Day School Department of
CAJE, Dr. Yehuda Shamir,
professor of Judaica at the Univ-
ersity of Miami and Florida In-
ternational University, and
Stephanie King, instructor at the
Jewish High School.
ZOA Region Elects Officers
The Southeast Region of the
jmist Organization of America
It in Boca Raton for election of
peers for the 1983-85 term, with
! I- lorida district participating,
lording to Dr. Michael
Inwand, regional director.
blficers elected at the meeting
pe Kabbi Samuel Silver, Delray
aih. regional president; Rabbi
ling I.liimum, Miami Beach,
kional vice president; Ben
pplan, Hollywood, regional
treasurer; Bernadt Oolie,
Lauderhill, regional recording
secretary; Dr. Alvin Colin, Fort
Lauderdale, regional corres-
ponding secretary; and Alan
Taffet, Jacksonville, chairman of
the board.
Area vice presidents were Mrs.
Rose Shapiro, Miami; Mrs. Anne
Rosenthal, Hallandale; Mr.
Irving Seid, Delray Beach; and
Dr. Joseph Honigan. Jackson-
ville.
Chug Aliyah Meets
fhe S)uth Florida Chug
lyah Ciroup will hold their
pling (in Sunday, Nov. 20 at 7
at the Jewish Federation.
fesl speakers will be Mrs. Dorit
avit, the new Israeli Consul for
State of Florida and Joe
Mck, executive director of
sociation of Americans and
nadiansin Israel.
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Mrs. Shavit, an Israeli,
graduated in Islamic studies
from Hebrew University and also
serves in the Intelligence Forces.
Her topic will be "The New
Challenge of the Shamir Govern-
ment."
Joe Wernick, founder of North
American Aliyah Movement, will
speak on Adjustment to Israeli
Life."
Rabbi Klein
Honored At
ADL Breakfast
Rabbi Dr. Carl Klein of
Hallandale Jewish Center will be
presented with the Torch of
Liberty Award by the Anti- Defa-
mation League of B'nai B'rith at
the annual ADL breakfast on
Sunday, Nov. 27 at 9:30 a.m. at
the Center, according to William
Seitles, chairman of the event.
Guest speaker will be Seymour
D. Reich, chairman of the ADL
national civil rights committee.
Rabbi Klein served as assist-
ant to the president of Bar Ilan
University in Ramat Gan, Israel,
and helped to organize the first
student body and faculty.
He is the author of "Hungarian
Jews Between the Two Worlds,"
among a number of others.
Rabbi Klein is the former pres-
ident of the South Broward
Council of Rabbis and is a mem-
ber of the National Rabbinic
Cabinet of the United Jewish Ap-
peal.
William Littman and Joseph
Perlstein are chairmen emeritus
of the event. Associate chairmen
include Maurice Berkowitz, Ben
Goldberg, Lillian Glasson, Roz
Michaels and Max Shapiro-
Arthur Rubin is treasurer.
Frombergs
Chair Dinner
Mayor and Mrs. Malcolm H.
Fromberg, past presidents of the
Temple Emanu-El Family
League, will serve as chairmen of
the Temple's Semi-Annual
Dinner, Dance and Family Night
Sunday, Nov. 20, at 6 p.m. in the
Friedland Ballroom of the con-
gregation.
Arlene and Malcolm Fromberg
are both active in the synagogue,
with the new mayor serving as
secretary of the congregation and
a member of its executive com-
mittee and board of directors.
Mrs. Fromberg is a vice president
of Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood
Music will be provided by Ted
Martin and his society orchestra.
Trudy Trixie, will provide
entertainment.
Salute to Israel
A salute to Israel on behalf of
the State of Israel Bonds Organ-
ization will be held Monday, Nov.
21, at 8 p.m. at Byron Hall, ac-
cording to Florence Gordon,
chairperson. A tribute will be
paid to "the brave men and
women of the Israel Defense
Forces who have given so much
to help seek freedom in the Mid-
dle East," she said. 'Byron Hall
has always been a staunch sup-
porter of the Israel Bonds pro-
gram and have pledged their help
to have another successful cam-
paign during the 1983-84
season," she added.
Guest speaker will be Jerome
Gleekel. Co-chairperson is Phyllis
Feigenblum.
Jewish Books
Group Meets
Central Agency for Jewish
Education under the direction of
Rabbi S. Lipson, will hold a
meeting of the Great Jewish
Books Discussion Group on
Thursday, Nov. 17 at 1 p.m. in
the auditorium of the Miami
Beach Public Library.
Rabbi Rami Shapiro will
review the book "9l/i Mystics."
Rabbi Shapiro is the spiritual
leader of Congregation Beth Or.
He graduated from the Uni-
versity of Massachusetts with a
BA in Asian religious studies,
and received his MA in Judaic
Studies from McMaster Uni-
versity in Hamilton, Ontario. He
was ordained from the Hebrew
Union College and also holds a
MA in Hebrew Literature.
Friday. November 11,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
--------------------------------_------------------1 ----------------------'--------
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting
Timei 5:15 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue (t's
Miami Beach WU,,
Dr. Irving Lehman, Rabbi
ZvlAdtor, Cantor
ta ....
Pal, Mom. sansoo
am
jfcMaiUawavip
rxaachaUO.JO
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN
1028 NE Miami Qardana Drive
North Miami Beach MM 438
Rabbi simcha Freedman
Center len Atoem Ceneervatlve
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kandall Dr. Baumgord
S. Mlaml-667 6667 Senior Rebbl
Jamas L. Simon, Asaoclata Rabbi
Fri-HSpm. Family Bannoaa.
UoKn C. JMOfe, fiM. NMomI Wtan
Lmwanwiiiai*
Sat.1
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Baach
832-0421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlll
LM0tMwMlb.au*
.11:11 it. fa
B'flal Mlttvah of
MrMvahofDavMU
wid Um Will MM
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION,
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Mleml
MUml'i Wonaar Rtlorm Congngtllon
137 N.E. 19th St, Mleml, 873-8000
9900 N. Kendall Dr., 505-5055
HaskalI M. Bemet, Sanlor Rabbi
Donald P. Cashman, Assistant Rabbi
Jacob G. Bornatetn, Cantor
Rachollo Neleon, Student Cantor
Philip QoMIn, Exec. Dtr.
Fit, pm, Kanddll. Stud** Cantor Mm
wW JUumm -las *** "*
nm: RabM 8anwH M dtecuM
'Of War and Boo*.."
m
Cei.l Way: 2SM S. W. Mm
SavNiDad*7M0S.W.ttM ...
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH v-
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Dad. Chap*
OrMeQ 3n4VDO0n Fottovw.
OgBJWafBMiawJMT
lei., em, StufctMlat enrtOBi ootvtucted by
P TEMPLE JUDEA
8800 Grenada Blvd. Reform
Coral Qablao 887-8087
Michael B. Beenstat, Rabbi
1 Frt.. pm. Famlry Worahlp Smm.
W#*vtry TotmwI Portion
Viymi
eaaaaMMweeee
Haftarah Hooa. 12:13-14.10
BETH KODESH
Modem Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ava.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 688-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlln-Executlva Secretary
Saturday Bervtoaa* am and : JO pm
Sunday Sarvtcaat am and ftJO MR
Dally Mtnyan Santem-rM am and f pm.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 834-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Danny Tadmore, Cantor
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2228 NE 121 St. N. Miami, FL 33181
891-5508 Coniarvatlva
Only Temple In North Miami '
Rabbi Israel Jacobs
Cantor Moehe Frledler ^
Rabbi Emeritus Joeeph A Gorflnkal
Dally services 8:18 a.m. S p.m.
Fri., t pm, Shabbal Eva Sarnoaa.
Frt. MHa, Robbl Jacob' armon: "That, mual
aaUasL"
Sat., t am. Shabbal Horning Sarvtcaa.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowttz
Cantor Murray Yavnah
Morning Sarvtcaa( am.
Saturday Momma faevtcaa am.
Evan log Sarvtcaa 0: JO pm.
Saturday Evening Sarrtoaa7:40 pm.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1648 Jefferson Ave., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 8364112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Mother
Cantor Nlsalm Benvamlnl
TEMPLE NERTAMID
Conservative 866 8345
7902 Carlylo Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141 ((
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz
Cantor Edward Kldn Dally Mlnyan at I an
" L.t. Frt. niohtaarvtcaaittMSpm.
Seiooetn Senrtoee st t4o em
Sunday MtnyiaJp am.
W)
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
ol North Miami Beech
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
681-1862
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. ft 41et St. 836-7231
Dr. Leon Kronleh, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Convlaer
Fri.. 0:1 o pm. Sabbath EveSaovoaa.
SM. 10* am. Sabbath Sarvtcaa.
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.VY. 184 Ave. and 76 St.
Rabbi Warren Kaaztl
Modern Orthodox
382-3343 382-0898
Fri,7rjm.SaolHr*EvaSarvtaM.SaUt:J0am.
Immm m*.m*umm2myetm
oasi m| iimvjmmm a in am.
avStfioalwialiii *
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1061 N. Miami Beech Blvd. ..:>,
Dr. Max A. LlpschlU, Rabbi (>))
Zvaa Aronl, Cantor '
Harvey L. Brown, Exec Director
Randall Komgeburg, Aaat. Rabbi
Frt7:J0am. MOpm.apm
IM,MlMlM|
Doer
7.J0
am.MOpm
[TEMPLE SINAI 16801 NE 22 Ava.
North Deda's Reform Ccftgregatton
Ralph P. Klngolay. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Aeeodete Rabbi
Irving Stiutkee, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramaay, Administrator
Fri., t:15pm. Family WorafctpSarvtoa.
Sat.. 10: JO am. Worahtp Sarvtce.
real Mmva si ft-ao Wetmiem
a sn wni i mat
BETH YOSESEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
643 MarWIan Ava.
Dow ReaenewelQ. Rebbl
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Blscayna Boulevard
Mian* Florida 33137
Phone 876-4000
TEMPLE ZION Conaarvatlva
6000 Millar Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi Amm
Sanjamln Atnar. Cantor 'ffi
MM aoraMM Mom. 4 TMara. r M)V&'/
0MmM.Ev.SirrlafcHpm
Saa6.maorvtom.0am
Frt.,a:1ipm
FamMy Shabbal.
Or. II11.....eVioiio mm ateoipM.
SMMMxvahotPaulST.aldan.
' SOUTHEAST REGION ,^=J->
UNITED SYNAGOGUE \W}j
OF AMERICA -"
ExeoutHe VTee President
Religious Information
CorvoojoOng Greater Mleml
Houo^ea of Worship
' Phono: 579-4000
R.bb+ntcal Aaeocratton Off loa
------UN^OF AMERICAN-------
HEBREW CONQREQATtONS '
Dorel Executive Office Perk. 37SS
NW 82 Ava., Suite 210, Mleml, Fl.
33166,592-4792. Rabbi Lewie C.
Littman, regional director
. I -;r HSKBi bSi'jliji:

P*8* 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 11,1963
Public Notice
IN THE COUNTY COURT
IN AND FOR
DAD! COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL DIVISION
CASE NO: 3 3433 CC 15
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE
SERVICE PROPERTY
CHARLES SANDEFUR,
Plaintiff.
va.
ENRIQUE LOPEZ and
NORMA STARR REAL ES-
TATE. INC..
Defendant.
TO: ENRIQUE LOPEZ
Address unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to require payment of
a fund held or debt owing to the
Plaintiff which waa given aa a
deposit on a real estate
contract has been filed against
you, and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, If any. to It on FERDIE
AND GOUZ. Plaintiffs Attor-
neys, whose address Is 717
Ponce de Leon Blvd.. Suite 215.
Coral Gables, Florida 33134. on
or before 30 day of November.
1863 and file the original with
the Clerk of the Court either
before service on Plaintiff's At-
torney or Immediately thereaf-
ter, otherwise a Default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the Com-
plaint.
Dated on 18 day of October,
19S3.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: ElllnoreKrupka
As Deputy Clerk
FERDIE AND GOUZ
Attorneys for the Plaintiff
717 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Suite 215
Coral Gables, Florida 33134
Telephone. (806)446-3667
By: AINSLEE R. FERDIE
13382 October 21.28;
-----------------Nnvtmlnff
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-34914
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
HELEN BAPTISTE
Petitioner-Wife
and
ARTHUR BAPTISTE
Respondent-Husband
TO: ARTHUR BAPTISTE
8S6 Ocean Avenue
Apt. 6C
Brooklyn. NY. 11236
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2760 N.E. 183rd Street, Miami.
Florida 33180. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 28.183: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 19 day ol
October. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
DadeCounty, Florida
By Clartnda Brown
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAY FRIEDMAN, ESQ.
2750 N.E. 163 Street
Miami. Florida 83180
Telephone: 949-8926
Attorney for Petitioner
18384 October 21.28:
Novtmber4.il, 1983
rN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 13-39301
NOTICE OF SUIT ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
EDITHE PIERRE,
Petitioner-Wife
and
LESLY GERARD PIERRE,
Respondent-Husband
To: LESLY GERARD
PIERRE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It.
on H. LAWRENCE ASHER
Attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 16311 North Bast
12th Avenue, North Miami
Beach. Florida 38162, sad file
the original with the Clerk of
the above styled Court on or be
fore December 9. 19M, other
wist A Judgment may bo
entered against you for relief
demanded In the Petition
THIS NOTICE shall be pub
llshad one* each week for four
(4) consecutive weeks In the)
Jewish Floridian. ISO North-
east Sixth Street, Miami, Flor-
ida.
WITNESS MT HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT AT
MIAMI, FLORIDA on this No-
vembers. 1988
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By: C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
H. LAWRENCE ASHER
Attorney for Petitioner
16211 North East 12th Avenue
North Miami Beach.
Fla. 83162
Telephone: 949-8667
14433 November 11,18.26;
__________________December 2.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 13 39035
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
INRE:
AMABELLE C. DELEON.
and
JOHN C.HYDE,
TO: John Hyde
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
BRUCE M. CEASE.
ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2720 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33135, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before December 16. 1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this November 4.
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K.SHAW
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Bruce M. Cease, Esquire
2720 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33136
Telephone: 642-5231
Attorney for Petitioner
14427 November 11,18. 26;
December 2.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-14*24
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOHN THEODORE SMITH,
Petitioner,
and
ELAINA CHE RISE
8WANN SMITH.
Respondent.
To: ElalnaCherlse
Swan Smith
Hospital Rd..
Grand Turk Island
Turks and Calcos Islands
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on LAWRENCE M. SHOOT,
ESQUIRE. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
8000 Blscayne Blvd.. Suite 815,
Miami. Fla. 38137. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 26,1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWI8H FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 19th day of
October, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By 8. VERZAAL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Lawrence M. Shoot, Esq.
3000 Blscayne Blvd., Suite 816
Miami, Florida 88187
Telephone: (806)678-6010
Attorney for Petitioner
1M** OctoberSS;
November 4,11,18,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13 19171
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
MARIA VIRGINIA RAMOS,
and'
JOSE RAMOS.
TO: Mr. Jose Ramos
Villa Unlversltaiia
C-12S-U
Humacao. Puerto Rico 0OM1
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Dlssol
utlon of Marriage has boon
filed against you and you art
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
EMTLIO C. PASTOR attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
Penthouse I. 166 South Miami
Avenue Miami, Florida, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before December 9. 1988;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse-
cutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 8 day of
November, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIOC. PASTOR, P.A.
PH I, 166 S. Miami Avenue
Miami. FL 33130
(306)372 0088
Attorney for Petitioner Wife
14436 November 11.18,26:
__________ December 2.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-37147
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CECIL BANNISTER.
Petitioner,
and
TERRY BANNISTER.
Respondent.
TO: Terry Bannister
8109 Malvern Circle
Fayettevllle.
North Carolina
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
LAWRENCE M. SHOOT.
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 3000 Blscayne
Blvd.. Suite 315. Miami, Flor-
ida 38137. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 2. 1983: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
The notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 27 day of
October, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Arden Wong
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAWRENCE M. SHOOT. ESQ.
3000 Blscayne Blvd..
No. 315
Miami, Florida 83137
Telephone: (306)578-6010
Attorney for Petitioner
14411 November 4, 11.
18. 26, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13 34323
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
rVETTE LOPEZ
Petitioner.
and
ANTHONY LOPEZ
Respondent.
TO: Anthony Lopez
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petlUon for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Robert M. Zleja, Esq.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
838 N.W. 183rd Street, Suite 208
Miami. FL 33169, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
December 2, 1983; otherwise a
default win be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNE8S my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 26th day of
October, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Robert M. Zleja, Esq
BM N.W. 183 Street. No. 206
Miami. FL 33169
Telephone: (805) 668-1982
Attorney for Petitioner
14403 November 4, n, i,2
1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
VAN WORLD at 7860 8.W. 89
Terrace. Miami. Florida 38158
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
JOSEPH RIVERA.
Owner
MARIA RIVERA.
Owner
LAWOFFICE8 0F
NICHOLAS. PARKER
ACARBONS
Attorney for JOSEPH AND
MARIA RIVERA
612 N.W. 12 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33136
324-5667
14487 November 11.18.26;
December 2.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13 31411
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DONNA A KEELING
a-k-a
DONNA A. TILLERY
Petitioner,
and
GEORGE HENRY
TILLERY ni
Respondent.
TO:GEORGE HENRY
TILLERY ITI
Present residence
unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on PHIL-
LIP 8. DAVIS. ESQ.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
P.O. BOX No. 4254. Miami.
Florida 33101. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 2. 1983: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 27 day of
October. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Phillips S. Davis. Esquire
P.O. Box No. 4264
Miami. Florida 33101
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (305)326-0850
14407 November 4.11
---------------------------------------18 BJ 1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13 311*9
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of
ST. ELOI JOSEPH.
Petitioner-Husband.
and
CLAIRE LA DECAYETTE
JOSEPH.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: CLAIRELA DECAYETTE
JOSEPH. Respondent
13621 Francis Lewis
Boulevard
1 -au re l ton Queens.
New York 11480
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN AT-
TORNEYS, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 181
N.E. 82 Street, Second Floor
Miami, FL 38188. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
December 2. 1968; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded Int
he complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
witness my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 81 dav of
October. 1988.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByN A Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ROUTMAN A ROUTMAN
ATTORNEYSATLAW
Brent E. Routman, Esquire
1*1 N.E. S3 Street, ^
Second Floor
Miami. FL 83188
Telephone: 806-757-6800
Attorney for Petitioner
* November 4.11.
18. 26.1964
IN TNB CIRCUIT COua..
CASENO.U.ilM
wPermo*4,
MAGGIE BERNADDt
RESPONDENT-WIPg
TO: Maggie Bernadln
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HlSuS?^
FIED that an action^
lutlon of Marriage has *
filed against you. and Ifi
required to serve S-7*
written defense,. uS***
on H. LAWRENCETshm1
Attorney for Petitioner S
address 1, iou North *
12th Avenue. North loZ
Beach Florida 33l2. Jft
Uie original with the Clerk*
the above styledCourton orb*
fore December 9, 1933. *,.
wise a Judgment mavT
entered against you far ,_M
demanded In the Petition
THIS NOTICE shall be p*
llahedonce each week (or, '
(4) consecutive weeks in U,
Jewish Floridian. 120 No*
east Sixth Street, Miami'. Flor
Ida
WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT AT
MIAMI. FIAORIDA ON THIS
November8.1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By: Clartnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
H. LAWRENCE ASHER
Attorney for Petitioner
16211 North East 12th Avenue
North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162
Telephone: 949-3557
14435 Novemberll.11,1,
December 2.1(8
IN THE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORID*
PROBATE DIVISION
Flit Number 137137
I RE: ESTATE OF
JEROME MOROSS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that the administration
of the estate of JEROME
MOROSS, deceased. File Num-
ber 83-7937. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is Dak
County Courthouse. 73 M
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The ancillary personal
representative of the estate la
Susanna Tarjan. whose ad-
dress Is 6951 S W 134 Street
Miami. Florida. 331M. The
name and address of the ancil-
lary personal representative'!
attorney are set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate ire
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. IftheclalmU
not yet due. the date when II
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated. the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim is
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested in the |
estate to whom a copy ol this
Notice of Administration hu
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION Of
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may **'
challenges the validity ol u*
decedent's will, the qu*"
flcatlons of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue >'
Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS N0JS0
FILED WILL BE FORBVtB
BARRED.
Date of the first l of this Notice of Admimio*
taon: November 4. IMS
SUSANNA TARJAN
As ancillary Personal
Representative
of the Estate of
JEROME MOROM^
ATTORNEY FOR
ANCILLARY
PERSONAL
RXPRJXSENTATIVK:
JAMES M. SCWFF, B*
Park Place n, Suits *
1801 Venera Avenue
Miami, rionda S>**M-
Telephone: (805)861-e" m
14417 November ""


. .
.
Friday, November 11,1983 / The Jewish Floridiap Page9-B
1 NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
C (NO PROPERTY)
IMTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY,FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
case no. mm
petition
for change of name
m re petition for
change of name
Sandra bernice oreen
TO'
SANDRA BERNICE
ANDREWS
TO: SANDRA GREEN
1511 Sheridan Avenue
Apt B7
Bronx. New York 10487
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition tor
Change of Name has been filed
bv NELSON ANDREWS tor
your daughter. SANDRA
BERNICE GREEN. You are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
HOWARD HILL BENNETT.
ESQ., 18 West Flagler Street.
Suite S20. Miami. Florida S31 SO,
and file the original with the
Clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 2. 1983:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
Petition.
THIS NOTICE shall be
published once each week for
four consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Flrolda on this lit day of
November, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Howard Hill Bennett. Esq.
19 West Flagler Street, Suite
520
Miami, Florida 33130
Ph: 379 1H85
14430 November 4,11.
18. 25. 1S8S
1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action no. si-iam
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FELIPE G. FRANCES.
Husband
and
AMOR FRANCES.
Wife
TO AMOR FRANCES
Avenldade Acosta210.
ApartamentoS
Vlbora, La Habana. Cuba
YOl ARE HEREBY NO-
FIED that an action for Dlssol-
utlon of Marriage ha been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to it on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
PA., attorney for Petitioner.
whose address la 2491 N.W. 7th
Street, Miami, Florida 33125.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 2,1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you tor the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week tor four conae-
culive weeks In THE JEWISH
FI.OIUDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 1st day of
November. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: ClarlndaBrown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
PA
2491 N.W. 7th St.
Miami. Fla. 33126
(3051849-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
1*419 November*. 11;
_ 18.26.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVil Action No. 13-3*011
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ARYF. CHAN AN
ROT8HTYN
Petitioner Husband
and
ANDREA ROSS
ROTSHTYN
Respondent Wife
TO: ANDREA ROSS
ROTSHTYN
C-o Laurie K earns
28 Mechanic Street
Webster. Mass. 01B70
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action tor
Dissolution of Marriage has
been OJed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on DAVID S. BERGER.
attorney tor Petitioner, whose
address la 989 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach. Florida
38189. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November
18. 1988; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 13th day of
October 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID S. BERGER
999 Washington Avenue
Miami. Florida 83189
Attorney for Petitioner
18871 October 21,28:
November*, 11.1088
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 81-3*1 OS
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELSA RIV AS.
Petitioner,
and
JOSE ANTONIO RIVAS.
Respondent.
TO: Jose Antonio Rlvaa
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action tor
Dissolution of Marriage haa
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on MEI.VIN J. ASHER,
ESQ., attorney tor Petitioner,
whose address U 1880 S.W. 8th
Street. Suite. 208. Miami.
Florida S31S5. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 28.1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 18th day of
October ,1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. SHAW
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
1S87B October 21,28;
November*. U. 1988
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PC CASE NO. M Wl
rNRE:TheMarralsof:
MARIANIE FORMELUS.
Petitioner-Wife
and
NICAISSE F. FORMELUS.
Respondent-Husband.
Xj NICAISSE f.
FORMELUS. Residence
unknown, shall serve copy of
your Answer to the Petition tor
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 812 N.W. 13th
Avenue, Miami, Florida. 88188,
JJM Ale original with Court
vmn on or before December 2,
i88; otherwise a default will
H entered.
October 28,1988.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: C. P. COPELAND. D.C.
14415 November 4,11,18,25
NOTICE OF ACT ION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. II 371U
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
PAULINE EDELMIRE.
Petitioner Wife.
and
TONY EDELMIRE,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: TONY EDELMIRE
SON. Edge water A ve.
Bridgeport P.O.
St. Catherine.
Jamaica W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
GEORGE T. RAMANI, attor-
ney tor Petitioner, whose ad-
dress Is 711 Blscayne Bldg.. 19
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 331 SO, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 28.1988; otherwise a
default wll be entered against
you tor the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH KI.OR IDI AN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of sal court at Miami,
Florida on this 20 day of
October. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. Self ried
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI
711 Blscayne Bldg.
19 West Flagler St.
Miami. Florida 33180
Telephone: (808)874-48*0
Attorney for Petitioner
1SS91 October 28;
November*. 11,18.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 83 3*057
NOTICE OF SUIT ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MERY MOUYAL
Petitioner-Wife
and
ALBERT MOUYAL
Resondent Husband
TO: AlbertMouyal
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action tor
Dissolution of Marriage haa
been filed against you, and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It, on H. LAWRENCE ASHER.
Attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 18211 North East
12th Avenue. North Miami
Beach. Florida. 88182. and file
the original with the Clerk of
the above styled Court on or
before December 9. 1988:
otherwise a Judgment may be
entered against you tor the
relief demanded In the
Petition.
THIS NOTICE shall be
published once each week tor
four (*) consecutive weeks In
the Jewish Flortdlan. 120 North
East Sixth Street, Miami.
Florida.
WITNESS MAY HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT AT
MIAMI, FLORIDA ON this
November*, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By: CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
H. LAWRENCE ASHER
Attorney for Petitioner
. 18211 North East 12th Avenue
North Miami Beach
Florida 38182
Telephone: 9*9-8867
14428 November 11,18, 26
December 2,1988
NOTICE OF ACT ION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 83-3*428
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA ELENA
FERNANDEZ.
Wife,
and
WILFREDO FERNANDEZ.
Husband.
TO: Wllfredo Femandes
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action tor
Dissolution of Marriage haa
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on Albert L. Carrtcarte. PA..
attorney tor Petitioner, whose
address is 2491 N.W. 7th St..
Miami, Florida 88126, and rile
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before November 18, 1988;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORTDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
I seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17th day of
October. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByARDENWONG
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
PA.
2*91 N.W. 7th Street
Miami, Florida 88126
(808) 6*9-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
13380 October 21,28;
Nnvambai;i,a,tB3
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 83 38883
IN RE: Thesjarrumeof:
ORLANDO TELLBS.
Petitioner Husband,
VS.
DINORA US. TELLBS.
Respondent-Wife.
TO DINORA L.8. TELLBS
Canada da 10 Octubre No. 1U1
Entre Carmen y Patronlo.
Apartment No. IS Vlbora
Habana. Cuba shall serve copy
of your Answer to the Petition
tor Dissolution of Marriage
upon GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney. 812 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida, 88188.
and file original with Court
Clerk on or before Decembers,
1988; otherwise a default will
be entered.
October 28,1988
RICHARD BRINKER
By: CLARINDA BROWN. D.C.
1*418 November*, 11,
It. SB. 1888
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 83-M15*
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ICLELIE EDUARD,
Petitioner-Wife
and
DOUGLAS EDUARD.
Respondent-Husband
To: DOUGLAS EDUARD.
Residence unknown, shall
serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney, 613.
N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami.
Florida. 88188, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
November 28,1988; otherwise a
default will be entered.
October 1*. 1988.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: KATHLEEN SHAW
18876 October 21,28;
November*. U. 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
; GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
TERESA LIVING FACILITY,
at 1086 W. 23rd Street. Hlaleah.
FL 83012, intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
MUda Teresa Gutlerres
4418 November*. 11.
18,26, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COU RT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO 83 3*415
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
OF MIAMI,
a United States Corporation.
Plaintiff.
vs.
FRANKLINGRAU; etai ,
Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: FRANKLIN GRAU
Ave. 9 de Octubre 1300,
Guayaquil, Ecuador
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that
an action to foreclosure a
mortgage on the following
described property In DADE
County. Florida:
Condominium Unit No. 10810-
6. Building 10810 N.W. 7th St. of
LAGUNA CLUB
CONDOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of
Condominium thereof,
recorded June 6,1976 In Official
Records Book 9009. at Page
1808, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, as
amended; together with all
Improvements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any, to it on Keith. Mack.
Lewis A Allison. Plaintiff's
attorneys, whose address is 111
N.E. 1st Street, Miami, Florida
38182, on or before November
18. 1983. and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or
Immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
complaint.
WITNES8 my hand and seal
of this Court on the Uth day of
October. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clerk
188T7 October 31. 28;
November*, 11.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83 use
I Division 83
,N RE: ESTATE OF
OPHELIA ARNETT
a-k-a LILLIAN ARNETT
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of OPHELIA
ARNETT a-k-a LILLIAN
ARNETT. deceased. File
Number 88-8869, Is pending In
the Circuit Court tor Dade
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 78 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 88180. The
personal representative of the
estate is ALFRED ROLAND,
whose address is 1401 N.W.
174th Street. North Miami,
Florida. The name and address
of the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FOIST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to Hie
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
U writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when it
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative,.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration haa
been mailed are required.
| WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of
Administration: November *.
1988.
Alfred Roland
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
OPHELIA ARNETT
a-k-a
LJLLIAN ARNETT
Deceased.
Attorney tor Personal
Representative:
Richard I. Kroop
(Fla. Bar No. 128026)
Kwltney. Kroop and
Schelnberg. P.A.
420 Lincoln Road, Suite 612
Miami Beach. Florida 38139
Telephone: (808)688-7676
14401 November 4.11. 1983
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
File Number 83-77**
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAMUEL KANE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of SAMUEL KANE,
deceased, File Number 88-7798,
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Dlvlalon, the address
of which is 78 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
I representative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
I begun on November 11.1988.
Personal Representative:
EVELYN FOGEL
I 106 So. Swarthmore Avenue,
Nentnor, New Jersey 08408
and
ROBIN FOGEL
2 Camlllla Court
Lawrence villa.
New Jersey 08848
Attorney tor Personal
Representative:
GEORGE GILBERT
One Lincoln Road Bldg.
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (306)688-4812
14431 November 11,18,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name El
Cafe Restaurant and Lounge at
4736 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 88138, Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
| Dade County, Florida.
1 Manuel Rodriguez
114433 November 11.18, 26;
December 2,1983
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
. FC CASE NO. 83 1*7*1
IN RE: The Marriage of
MYRACENE ZAVO,
Petitioner-Husband,
vs.
NADILA ZAVO,
Respondent-Wife.
TO NADILA ZAVO No. 00 Rue
Veraet Oonalve, Haiti shall
serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon OBOROB
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 813 N.W.
13th Avenue. Miami, Florida.
38188, and file original with
Court Clark on or before
November 18,1988; otherwise a
default will be entered.
October 18,1988.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: CLARINDA BROWN
18881 October 31. 38
November*, 11,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
MOLE STUDIOS at 199 Palm
Avenue. Miami Beach. FL
83139 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
IRA NEWMAN,
Sole Proprietor
MARC POSTELNEK. ESQ.
Attorney tor DU NEWMAN
407 Lincoln Rd..
Suite 10-B
Miami Beach. FL 33139
14413 November 4,11,
18.36. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HBRBBY
GD/EN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
JIMMB BUILDINGS at c-o
MARSHALL B. FISHER.
ESQ., Suite 800. 9856 S. Dixie
Hwy.. Florida 88188. Intends to
register amid name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
EUGENE T. NAPOLL
Trustee
Marshall Bennett Fisher. Esq.
Suite 800, 9866 S. Dixie Hwy.
Miami. Florida 88188
Attorney for
Eugene T. Napoll, Trustee
14429 November 11,18, 26'
December 3.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 81-3**7*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARITZA MARTINEZ.
Petitioner Wife,
and
JOSE B. HERNANDEZ,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: JOSE B. HERNANDEZ
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
Hied against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
LUIS VTDAL, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is 1780
West 49th Street. Suite 811. Hla-
leah. Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 38,1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you tor the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 19 day of
October, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByKSelfried
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LUIS VTDAL, ESQ.
1780 West 49th St.,
Suite 811
Hlaleah. Florida 83013
Telephone: (806) 668-0008
Attorney for Petitioner
18887 October 38;
November 4,11,18, IMS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HBRBBT
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Boll's
Ices at 18707 8. Dixie Highway,
Miami. Florida, intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Bob's Ices, Inc.
Eric B. Turetaky, Baq.
Attorney tor Applicant
18873 October U. M;
November 4, 11, ISM


:Fge,tO-B .The Jewish Floritiian. / Friday, November 41, 1983
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT I
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA I
PROBATE DIVISION
File Numt* 83-8841 '
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RUTH F AHNESTOCK
Deceased
NOTICE OP
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
Uto of Ruth Fahnestock.
deceased, FUe Number 88-8881.i
la pending In the Circuit Court
tor Dade County. Florida,
Probate Dtvlaton. the address
of which to 7S West Flagler
Street, Miami Florida. The
namea and addreaaaa of the
personal representative and i
the personal representative'*
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 4.1988.
Personal Representative
James Fahnestock
781 N.W. 179th Street
Miami. FL 33189
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Stephen A. Kress, Esq.
BARNETT* KRESS. P.A.
19 W. Flagler St.. Suite 406
Miami FL 33180
Telephone: (SOB) 808-0038
14409 November 4.11,1983
I N THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
File Number t*-ei H
Division 92
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JUAN ROLANDO
LAFUENTE.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of JUAN
ROLANDO LAFUENTE. de-
ceased. FUe Number 83-9121. to
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
to 78 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130 The per-
sonal representative of the es-
tate to JUAN ROLANDO LAF-
UENTE, JR., whose address to
13606 NE. S Court No. 330.
North Miami. FL 88161. The
name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83-6S32
Division M
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JAQUES J. WISCH. A-K-a
JACQUES WISCH, a-k-a
JACK WISCH,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of Jaques J. Wtoch. a-k-a
Jacques Wtoch. a-k-a Jack
Wtoch, deceased. File Number
83-8632. to pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which to 78 West'
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 The namea and ad-,
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal re-
presentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (l) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quali-
fications of the personal re-
presentative, venue. or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 4, 1988.
Personal Representative
Ruth Winston
3190 Holiday Springs
Boulevard. Apt. 807
Margate. Florida 33083
HENRY NORTON
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAI
REPRESENTATIVE
Suite 1301, 19 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: 374-8116
14410 November 4, 11, 1983
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case No.: 3 35035
IN RE The Marriage of
MICHAEL VAUTRIN,
Petitioner-Husband
vs.
KATHLEEN P. VAUTRIN.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: KATHLEEN P. VAUTRIN
898 Weeden Street
Pautucket,
Rhode Island 03860
hall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attor-
ney, 613 N. W. 13th Avenue,
Miami. Florida. 88186, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before November 38. 1988,
otherwise a default will be
entered.
October 36.1988
RICHARD BRINKER,
Clerk
By: D.C.Bryant
Deputy Clerk
Octobers*;
November 4,11,18,1*0
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim to
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim to contln
Igent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim to se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT 80
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication,
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: November 11.1988
Juan R. Lafuente
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JUAN ROLANDO
LAFUENTE
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
ALAN SCHNEIDER, P.A.
2720 West Flagler St..
Miami. FL 33135
Telephone: 306848-6988
llfBL__November 11 18. 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13 35**2
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
CELINE de RUFFIEU
HOUGHTON
and
JOHN PHILLIP HOUGHTON
TO: JOHN PHILLIP
HOUGHTON
ADDRESS AND
RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
LOUIS R. BELLER. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
430 Lincoln Road, Suite 388,
Miami Beach. Florida 88189.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
I on or before December 9,1988;
a otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and th
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this S day a
November. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByB. J. Foy
As Deputy Clerk
14438 November 11.18, 36;
December 2.198!
i
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-38113
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GLADYS PROTUESE,
Petitioner Wife,
and
PATRICK PORTUE8E
Respondent-Husband
TO:PATRICK PORTUESE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NORI
FIED that an action for Dtosol
utlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. ot it on
Kramer and Golden. P.A., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Btocayne Centre,
Suite 303. 13000 Btocayne
Boulevard, North Miami. Fl.
33181. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before December 3.
1963; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse-
cutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 38 day of
October. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY: Arden Wong
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Kramer and Golden. P.A.
Btocayne Centre. Suite 208
12000 Btocayne Boulevard
North Miami. Fl. SS18S
Attorney for Petitioner
14414 November 4.11;
18.36.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 83 34272 (21)
NOTICE BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: The Marriage of:
JANICE L. ALFARO.
Wife Petitioner,
and
CHRISTOPHER L. ALFARO
Husband- Respondent.
TO: Christopher L. Alfaro
I Residence I'nkown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on
ARTHUR A. COHEN, ESQ.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address to Tenth Floor, 21
Southeast First Avenue Miami.
Florida 33181 and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
December 9. 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 2nd day of
November, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Arthur A. Cohen. Esq.
Tenth Floor
21 Southeast First Avenue
Y Miami, Florida 83181
(Phone) 868-7100
14422 November 11. 18, 28;
_______________December2.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT Of FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Art Ion Ns. 83-171 S3
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ARMTNDA E. INFANTE.
Petitioner.
and
HECTOR VERONA.
Respondent.
TO: HECTOR VERONA
Carre ra If
No. 4889 entre 48 y 49
EstadoDeLara
Barqulsimeto.
Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address to 1850 S.W. 8th Street,
Suite 208. Miami, Florida SS1S6,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 28.
1988; otherwise a default will
be entered against you tor the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 20 day of
October. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByC.P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Coulrt Seal)
13390 October 28;
November 4,11.18.1983
;
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned |
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Paul
Youngs Restaurant at 6955
N.W. 77th Ave.. Miami. Fla
? to^re5later Mld "*
with the Clerk of the Circuit.
Court of Dade County, Florida
H.O.L.A..Inc.,d-b-a
Paul Young's Restaurant
By: MyrIan Young,
President
14404 November 4,11, ig, 28
'
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUI T COUR T OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action Ne. 83-334**
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE The Marriage of
WINDELL JOHNSON
Petitioner-Husband
and
BARBARA JOHNSON
Respondent-Wife
TO: Barbara Johnson
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to it on
ROBERT M ZIEJA. Esq.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 888 N.W. 183rd
Street. Suite 206. Miami.
Florida 38189. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
December 9. 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
lorida on this November 7
1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByB.J.FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Robert M.Zlela. Esq
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone (306)653-1951
14430 November 11. 18. 26;
December 2. 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
File Number 839531
Division (02)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HANNAH MONTES.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of HANNAH
MONTES. deceased, File
Number 88-8681. to pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which to 78
W. Flagler St.. Miami. Florida
83130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate to HENRY
NORTON, whose address to
Suite 1301. 19 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130
The name and address of the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
3F THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim to
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim to contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim to se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to fUe any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: November 11.1983
Henry Norton
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
HANNAH MONTES
Deceased
HENRY NORTON
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
1201 Btocayne Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: 374-3116
14424 November 11,18. 1983
NOTlCli
FICTITIOUS u
NOTICE u
GIVEN
desiring to enjnulr*
under th. *,,j
Hometown' 91
O"* Hundred f
14431 v***"
-Pjjll
NOTICE Ut
FICTITIOUS m
NOTICE is'
GIVEN that th,
desiring tosBsBs.nl
under the fcSSiiL
CABINET DIsTRlSl
J N* 166 St.SI
Beach. Fla mublL?!
register said nar* j!"
Clerk of the oSS
Dade County, Fiona.
Milton Ron
Owner
18374
r FLORIQii
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE to hereby given that
the undersigned, desiring to
engage In business under the
fictitious name of TER8A ART
ENTERPRISES, 14084 8W 47
Terrace. Miami. Florida
intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Countv
Florida. *'
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
4th day of November, 1988.
John L, Sachko
and
Terry A. Sachko.
Owners
14406 NovembeM, 11, ig, 36.
1 wo 3
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage in business
under fictitious name ABC Alr-
conditlonlng Repair A Sales at
1669 Michigan Ave Miami
Beach Fla. S81S9Untends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Alberto Varela
l78 October 21. 38;
November 4,11, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW I
NOTICE 18 Hrnrnv
Sno-T* ,."*ta >3S
""A** the fictitious name
Bonnie Ke.ling Ki.
gSLf* MT. Intend,
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court ot
Dade County, Florida.
BONNIE KESUNQ
_KEPES.P.A.
By: Bonnie Kssllng Kspss
ELEVENTHCIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO 13 38*4?
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA GORETTI BONGIOVI
DE ALMEIDA a-k-a MARIA
GORETTI BONGIOVI
Petitioner Wife
and
NEWTON VICENTE DE
ALMEIDA.
Respondent-H us band
TO: Newton Vicente
de Almeida
Herculano de Freltas,
No. 131. Apto. 146,
Cerquelra Cesar
Sao Paulo, Brazil,
shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 612 N.W. 12th
Avenue, Miami, Florida. 33138,
and file original with Court
Clerk on or before December 9,
1883; otherwise a default will
be entered.
November 4, 1988. j
RICHARD BRINKER
By: ARDEN WONG
1 *426 November 11,18. 38;
Decembers. 1983
NOtiCil
CONSTRUCTIVE SEh.
(NO PROPERTY;
INTHECIRCUITC
THE ELEVENTH JUBo
CIRCUITOPFLOI
ANDFORDAOEC
Civil Action No. |
ACTION FOR I
OF MARRUCE
INRE:TheMarnin0|
SANDRA SIH.
Petitioner Wife,
and
PRADIPSUR.
Respondent-Husband
TO PRAPIPSUR
8607 Caprlcon Wit
No. 71
San Diego, CAMU
YOU ARE HEREBY S
FIED that sn action lor I
lutlon of Marriage hu 1_
filed against you and rni
required to serve a copy of is
written defenses. If any, I
GEORGE T RAMAN!, i
ney for Petitioner, wn
dress Is 711 BlscayneB
West Flagler Strut.
Florida 33180. andBletl
nal with the clerk of I
styled court on
November 28. 1983
default will be entered i
you for the relief i
the complaint or pi
This notice shall be p
once each week for I
secutlve weeks in TM J
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my ham) udkl
seal of said court at I
Florida on this 30 dai f|
October, 1983
RICHARD P. BRmm
As Clerk. Circuit Coal
Dade County, Florin
By K Selfrled
As Deputy Clert
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE TRAMANI
Attorney for Petitioner
19WestFlaglerSt.No.711
Miami, Florida331 SO
l Telephone 13051374 4M0
13389 October*!
November!.11.11 *
Novembers
October 34;
^wDersd;
" 131*83 ]
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GTVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name Eppy
* Eppy at 6043 N.W. 187th
Street. Miami. Florida 83108,
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
JESSICAEDWARD8. INC.,
A Florida Corp.
By: Alan W. Epstein.
President
Sheila B. Epstein.
Secretary
14408 November!, 11, 18,26
1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE|
(N0PR0PERTYI
INTHE CIRCUIT COUITOI
_ THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAll
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA";
AND FOR DADE COUNT:f
Civil Action N0.I3-I"* I
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTWl
OFMARRIAOE |
[N RE THE MARRIAGEuT|
GLORIAE PINEDA.
Petitioner,
and
ALBERT" PINEDA.
Respondent.
TO ALBERTO PINEDA
Residence I'nknws
VOr ARE HEREBY NOTrl
FIED that an action forDla|
lutlon of Marriage hu *VM
filed against you and f*"*r
required to serve a cop) a"" ]
written defenses. If any, i
A. Koss, Attorney, at U^
A., attorney for Pl*
whose address Is 101 N *
Avenue, Miami, rlorlosffljl
and file the original jM
clerk of the above styled m
"on or Ire few December!
otherwise A*eWm
entered against y~
relief demanded In ",
plaint or petition. ^
ThlsnoUceshaUbepu6l"
once each week *J*3
secutlve weeks In THE "
ISH FLORIDIAN. m
WITNESS my hand u
seal of said court i **~.
Florida- on this V
October, 1988 _.
RICHARD P. BRINK"
As Clsrk. Circuited'
Dade County, TW*
By 8. Vsrswl
As Deputy CUrt
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARIANO SOLE. *<
101 N. W. 13th A*e.
Miami. IHoridaSn*
Telephone: tsWgg"
^.yfor^^


Anna Meyers 86, Communal
Worker, Public Official Passesd
. Brenner Meyers, active
KTjewUh community for
f years and who served on
Kade School Board for 18 of
Imost turbulent years died
day at her Miami Beach
. she was 86.
Irs. Meyers had been vice
Lent and treasurer of the In-
rational Association of Wo-
t Lawyers, organized and
ted as first president of the
tida Association of Women
Uers and was national vice
[fdent of the American Jewish
kgress.
|he was appointed to the
ool board by the governor in
fi and she was instrumental
[making one of the largest
tool systems in the United
fTes into an integrated
ucture.
buring her tenure on the
krd, she was instrumental in
ablishing a community col-
* the Baker Aviation Voca-
nal School and educational
evision.
.Hie Miami-Dade Community
Liege dedicated its medical
>ility to her, and the school
lard will name its new telecom-
jinications center for her when
[opens in the near future.
I As a result of her efforts, the
orida Legislature repealed a
w that prohibited a married wo-
rn from writing a binding
n tract.
Mrs. Meyers was bom in Lodz,
bland, and came to the United
ates as an infant.
I She attended grade school in
ewton, Connecticut and
hduated from Columbia Urn-
fcrsitv's state teacher's college,
EMOEM
Sedle. 80, Hollywood, paseed away Nov.
I. A reaMent here tor M years, MMM
from Mt Vemon. NT. WUe of the late
JoMph Barter; survived by her dau*1*-
ter Sylvia (Morton) KaUn of HoUy-
wood; .on, Adolph (Helen) Berger of
North Miami Beech; and daughter.
Bernlce MUler or Bel Hert>our; grand-
chUdren. Susan Hoffman, Dr. Jack
KaUn, OUvla KaUn. Dr. Mark Berger,
Bonnie Berger. Robert MUler. and
Coiinne MUler; sisters, Beeele Abramo-
wlU of North Miami Beach. Belle Ker-
noff of San Joee. Calif.; brother-in-law,
Fred SchwarU of Pembroke Pines. She
was a member of Temple Beth El of
Hollywood and JewUh FederaUon of
South Broward. Servlcee Nov. S River-
side Chapel, interment In Beth El Me-
morial Qardene. Contribution* may be
made to the JewUh FederaUon of South
Broward.
Fridy,NovmbeTll,19e8/TliJeiriAFlorid^ P*S*}}
Carol Guralnick Accident Victim
with Melvin Belli and F. I*e
Bailey.
She ia survived by Ronald
Guralnick; her pwaiaV. Iqg
and Carol Rutkm; her brother^
Dennis (Martha) luttkmjandher
grandmother, Leone K) Brian.
Services were held Nov. 10,
Riverside.
VIM
V Brenner, M, of Miami Beach,
*d away Nov. 8. She la survived by
iiers. Mrs. Gertrude Bergad. Mr*.
lurlel Bernstein, and Mrs. Dorothy
tester; and brothers. Robert. WUllam.
kid Herman Brenner. Services were
*\A Nov. 10 at Temple Emanu-El,
piaml Beach. Interment at Mt. Nebo.
Ilveralde Chapel waa In charge of ar-
ingements. Donations In memory may
J made to Temple Emanu-El or Sher-
han Kaplan and the Research Fund.
Ht Slnal Medical Center. Miami Beach.
r American Cancer Society.
KEIDORF. SolR., 88. Nov. 8, Rlveralde.
GREENBERG, Annie. Miami Beach,
Rubln-Zllbert.
EvrrCH. Cora, 84, Miami Beach. Nov.
\ Riverside.
^ONBLATT. Rubin, Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert.
0LLOCK, Sophie Lee. North Miami.
i Nov. 4, Levltt-Welnsteln.
L'REIJ.. Rose, Miami Beach. Rubln-
Zllbert
*ARD, Eileen. 87. Miami. Nov. 4.
, Cordon.
BENDER, Sylvia. 57. Miami. Nov. 4.
Gordon.
Anna Brenner Meyers
the Brooklyn Law School and the
New York State School for Social
Workers.
She did social work in New
York until she moved to Miami
with her husband in 1935 because
of his health.
She was admitted to the Flo-
rida Bar in 1936 and had prac-
ticed law in Miami until five
years ago.
Her many honors included the
School Bell award from the Dade
Classroom Teacher's Associa-
tion, outstanding citizen of Dade
County in 1957, and honorary
degrees from the University of
Miami Law School and from
Bethune-Cookman College for her
leadership on behalf of blacks.
She is survived by three
sisters, Gertrude Bergad, Muriel
Bernstein and Dorothy Foster;
and three brothers, Robert,
William and Herman Brenner.
Services were held Nov. 10 at
Temple Emanu-El. Riverside
Chapel handled arrangements.
WEISS
Helen S.. *>. passed away Nov. 1. A resi-
dent for the past 88 years, coming from
Bronx. NY. She waa a life member of
the Naomi Chapter of Hadaaaah.
member of the Dorothy Tobln Chapter
of the American Cancer Society, and
B'nal B'rlth Women Kendall Chapter.
Survived by her husband. Bernard,
sons. Norman of New York and Allen
and daughter-in-law. Laura of Pem-
broke Pines; mother. Sadie Shane,
Miami Beach; two brothers; three
grandchildren. Servlcea Nov. 3 Star of
David. Gordon.
FRANK. Julian. N. Miami Beach. Nov.
8. Levltt-Welnateln.
OOLD8CHER. Mae. Miami Beach,
Nov. 8. Riverside. -
ROTHMAN, Jennie. 80. N. Miami
Beach. Nov. 8. Levltt-Welnateln.
SHAPIRO. Meyer. Miami Beach. Nov.
7, Rubln-Zllbert.
WEXELMAN, George, 82.
GOLDMAN. Esther S-. 78. North Mtaml.
Nov. 8, Levltt-Welnateln. Star of Da
vld. .. .-____-^a
e^
^S*e.
SHIND
Hyman. Miami Beach, paaaed away
Nov. 4. Survived by wife. Esther. Serv-
ices held Nov. 6. Mt. Nebo.
OELMAN
Joseph. 72. Miami Beach, a resident for
S6 years. orlglnaUy from Plttaburg. Sur-
vived by wife. Jean; aona. Dr. Stanley
(Suxan) Gelman and Michael (Bather)
Gelman. and one grandchild. Servlcee
Nov. 7. Riverside.
BINDLEM
Sidney, 88, Miami, a resident for 29
years, coming from New York. Surviv-
ed by wife. Helene; eon. Howard of
Miami: daughter, Harriet OUmour of
New York; one grandchUd; slaters, Ann
Jenkln of New York; Roae Landman of
Pembroke Pines and Natalie Halt of
New York. Servlcee Nov. 8, Riverside.
SCHLAPIK
Dr. Daniel D.. 82, Bay Harbor Iale.
passed away Nov. 4. A resident since
IBM coming from Illinois. Survived by
wife Ethel; son. Miles; and two grand-
children Servlcea Nov. 8. Rlveralde.
eNO ,
Sylvia. 87. Miami, paaaed away Nov. 2.
A resident for the past 80 years coming
from Brooklyn. NY. Survived by her
husband, Robert; mother. Lena Shap-
iro; two sons. Jeffrey Bender and Dr.
Gerald Schlckman of Miami; two
daughters. Carole Schlckman and
Jackie Bender of Miami; brother. Sam
Shapiro of Philadelphia, and three
grandchildren Servlcea Nov. 4, Gordon.
BMILLIANT
Nathan. Miami Beach, paaaed away
Nov. 8. A resident since 1968. Survived
by nlecee and nephewa. Servlcee Nov. 4,
Riverside.
HARRISON
Harry. 87. Miami Beach, paaaed away
Nov. 7. He waa a resident for 18i years,
formerly of AUanta, Qa. 8"^"=.v
wife Jean; daughtera. Dorothy Shelby
and Jacqueline Paaol. brother. Marcus;
seven grandchUdren and seven great
grandchildren Servlcee Nov. 9. River-
side.
SCHAFFER
Henry. Miami Beach, paased away_Nov.
8. A resident for 17 years, formerly of
New York. Survived by wife. 8yWU.
son, Stephen, and four grandchUdren.
Services Nov. 8. Rlveralde.
SCHULBEMG
Shirley. 80, Miami Beach, paaaed away
Nov. 2. She had been a resident since
1947. coming from Chicago. ***V?
the co-founder, with her lato husband.
Nate, of the Flagler Surplus Store^ Sur-
vived by sons. Richard (Helen) Schul-
Lrg of Miami Beach; Alan (Beth)
3Crulberg of Miami; three WHM-
25 brother. Martin (Bernlce) Ep-
23 of Miami. Services were held Nov.
Overside. Mt. Nebo.
GOLDBERG. Minnie, Miami Beach.
JANCOTS. Joaeph O.. 77. N. Miami
Beach. Nov. 7. Rlveralde. 8tar of Da-
vtd
LILYANDER, Albert A.. Miami Beach.
Nov. 8. Rlveralde. ,.
COOPER8MITH. Jacob, 78, Miami,
Nov. 8. Levltt-Welnateln.
Carol King Guralnick, 34, an
attorney, died Nov. 7 at South
Miami Hospital of injuries suf-
fered in a traffic accident. She
waa a beauty queen at the Univ-
ersity of Miami and the school's
yearbook, Ibis, voted her the
yearbook princess. After her
graduation from law school, she
got her legal training as a clerk
WBISBARD. Miriam, 87, North Miami
Beach Nov. 8, Levltt-Welnateln.
aSTcS Catherine Kay. 41 North
Miami Beach. Nov. 8. Rlveralde.
CONrTBenJamln. North Miami Beach,
Nov. 10. Riverside.
I.
R08ENTHAL, David. 86, North Miami
Beach, Nov. 9. Levltt-Welnsteln.
ROSS. Joaeph Samuel. 79. Miami
Beach. Nov. 10.
STARK, Ann W.. 81, Miami. Nov. 10.
Gordon.
STEINER. Larry, 84, North Miami
Beach, Levltt-Welnsteln.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
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Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 11,1983
Our Film Folk
.<
\
By HERBERT G. LUFT
HOLLYWOOD Jane Fonda
and her husband, California State
Assemblyman Tom Hay den,
invited us to their ranch house in
Santa Monica to participate in
the dedication ceremony of the
Henry Fonda Memorial Forest, a
permanent tribute to the actor
who died a year ago. The forest
will be established within the
Jewish National Fund's Ameri-
can Independence Park in Israel,
dedicated on July 4, 1976 to com-
memorate the Bicentennial of the
United States and as a testi-
monial to the eternal friendship
between the United States and
the Jewish democracy in the
Middle East.
Though festive in nature, the
ceremonies at Jane Fonda's home
were austere and simple. The
customary array of stars was not
evident, though a number of
Hollywood's prominent per-
sonalities attended. Respecting
the solemn occasion and Jane's
social awareness, everyone
avoided flashy attire and
flamboyant behavior, from the
photographers who remained
subdued to the stars partici-
pating in the dedication.
JANE SAID that her father
was deeply rooted in the soil. Her
first recollection of him when she
was a little child seeing him
plowing the ground at his farm
and planting fruit trees. Like the
trees he grew, those in Israel will
provide life, shade, shelter and
comfort. It is no accident, Jane
observed, that her father made
his first screen appearance in
"The Farmer Takes a Wife."
(1935), thereby being linked with
the land from the beginning of his
career. "The Grapes of Wrath,"
in which he also starred, became
the epic of the depression period,
revealing the anguish of those
who struggle to maintain the
dwindling soil in a relentless fight
against man and nature.
Hay den spoke of the pioneers
of Israel who, working in the
kibbutzim, planted the trees and
made the desert fruitful. These
are the kind of people Henry
Fonda would have been proud to
Hebrew Ulpan
Classes

Hebrew Ulpan classes, under
the direction of Rabbi Norman S.
Lipson, Central Agency for Jew-
ish Education adult education di-
rector, will begin Nov. 16 and 17.
Classes will be held twice a week
at the Miami Beach JCC. Mon-
day and Wednesday mornings,
9:30 to 11:30 a.m., a beginners
class will meet Monday and
Thursday evenings from 7:30 to
9:30 p.m.: Michael-Ann Russell
JCC classes will be held Monday
and Wednesday mornings and
evenings; and the South Dade
JCC will meet Monday and
Wednesday evening s.
Israel Update
The Aventura Jewish Centei
and the ireater Miami Jewish
Federati' will sponsor its an-
nual community forum, Israel
Update, "on Wednesday, Nov. 16
at 7:30 p.m. at the Center, North
Miami Beach.
Guest speaker will be
Yehoshua Trigor, consul general
of Israel.
Lakes Division
Nan Rich, president of Lakes
Division, National Council of
Jewish Women, has announced a
board and membership meeting
will be held on Wednesday, Nov.
16 at 9:30 a.m. at Golden Glades
Masonic Lodge, North Miami
Beach. Guest speaker will be
Susan Holtzman.
know, though he never saw the
land of Israel.
At the ceremony which I at-
tended with my wife and a guest
from Paris, Anne Marie Bijaoui
Baron, who came to France from
Tunisia as a small child and now
represents "Radio Com-
munaute," the Jewish com-
munity radio station of Paris,
and currently writes a series on
Hollywood for the French daily,
Le Matin, we talked with a
number of personalities, such as
George Peppard and Leonard
Nimoy, both co-chairmen of the
Tribute Committee.
NIMOY IS known to me since
he appeared at the Civic Play-
house in Hollywood with Maurice
Schwartz in the long-running
Sholem Aleichem play, "Hard To
Be a Jew." Most recently, he
made a switch from "Star Trek"
to the TV epic, "Golda," in which
he portrayed Meyerson, husband
of Golda Meir. We also spoke
with Jack Lemmon, a staunch
supporter of the Jewish State and
a great admirer of the Jewish
people, ever since visiting the
Holy Land a year ago.
He went to Israel on a junket
with his wife, the actress Felicia
Farr, their three children,
together with Walter Matthau
and his family, during the earlier
days of the Lebanese war visiting
settlements and wounded
soldiers in the hospitals. Lemmon
was deeply impressed with the
indomitable spirit of the Israeli
army which faced hardship and
seemingly insurmountable diffi-
culties while destroying the
center of terrorist activities.
Jane Fonda, a woman of peace
during the Vietnam war, often
has spoken up in the recent past
in behalf of Soviet Jewry and
their right to join their families in
Israel. During a visit to Jeru-
salem, she was presented the
Humanitarian Award for ad-
vocating social justice. The
award was given at the Hebrew
University's Givat Ram campus
before students, teachers and
new arrivals from the Soviet
Union.
Meanwhile, 10,000 trees will be
planted on the hills surrounding
Jerusalem in the name of Henry
Fonda. As Jane pointed out, for
the past 2,000 years, foreign
conquerors cut down the trees
and destroyed the roots, while
the Jewish people of today
redeem the land physically and
symbolically.

Pictured at the opening of an art exhibit at Jefferson Nan
Bank, Miami Beach, are (left to right) Miami Beach Afo
Malcolm Fromberg, his wife, Arlene; Arthur H. Courii
chairman of the board of Jefferson Bancorp, and his wife i
AMTT Women Gatherings
The Geula Chapter of AM IT
Women, (formerly American
Mizrachi Women) will hold an
installation dinner on Tuesday,
Nov. 15 at 6 p.m. at Wachtel's
Tower Suite Restaurant, Miami
Beach, according to F lory nee
Breeh.
Fanny April, president of
Aviva Chapter has announced a
meeting on Monday, Nov 21*1
p.m. at Beth Kodesh "
tion.
Chai Chapter will hold i
Chanukah luncheon given H
Jeanne Finkelstein at her b on Wednesday, Nov. 16 at nocj
according to Regina Wan* ml
ident.
where shopping Is a pleasure 7days a week
ALL PUBLIX BAKERIES OPEN AT 8 AM
With dattcioua OW WorW flavoi
umpernick
Bread
~69
Fraahly baked, 8-Inch elza
Pumpkin Pie
$149
ach 1
Prices Effective
November 10th thru12th,1983
Baked freah for kMa of all agat \
I HI
Mr
Chip Cooki
99
dozen
ita iovara delight
Fudge Cake
$179
Buttar Strauaal
Coffee Cake
$159


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