The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02856

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
.
U.S. Marine Alan Soifert, Kitted in Beirut, Was a Proud Jew
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Marine Sgt. Allan Soifert,
Uled Oct. 14 by sniper fire
8s he drove his jeep
through a Shiite Moslem
dominated sector of south
Beirut, was described as a
"very proud Jew."
"He didn't hide his Judaism,
and everyone knew he was Jew-
ish," said Soifert's stepfather,
Chaim Romer, in a telephone
interview with the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency. Romer said his
stepson was an active member of
the Jewish community in his
hometown of Nashua, NH, where
Soifert was buried Oct. 18.
The 25 year-old marine is
believed to be the first Jewish
American soldier killed in Leb-
anon as part of the U.S. con-
tingent in the multinational
force. Romer stressed that Soifert
viewed his participation in the
MNF as a purely military ende-
avor. Soifert served as a bomb
disposal expert.
AT FUNERAL services at the
Temple Beth Abraham in
Nashua, Soifert was eulogized
"as a marine who was even wil-
ling to sacrifice his own life for
peace so that others could live."
Rabbi Shlomo Hochberg of the
Montifiore Synagogue in Lowell,
Mass. who delivered one of the
eulogies, said:
"Allan is not only a national
hero but a personal hero. The
telephone calls of sympathy have
come not only from the Pres-
ident, the Governor and the
marine commander, but from
childhood friends and teachers
who remember Allan."
Soifert was born in Toronto,
Canada, and became a natural-
ized U.S. citizen. He dropped out
of high school in 1977 to join the
marines. He served a six-month
tour of duty in Lebanon last year.
He visited Nashua last July and
said he had volunteered for a
second tour of duty in Lebanon.
sjfewislhi Flor Idiaim
Volume 56Number 43
Three Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, October 28,1983
G frl Shochtt
By Mail 80 Cants
Price 50 Cents
Germany Wants War
Criminal in Damascus
|BEATE AND SERGE KLARSFELD
Tempest in
British Teapot
Should Prince Ask
Jews for Funds?
By CHAIM BERMANT
London Chronicle Syndicate
Should Jews as a com-
minity contribute to the
Vestminster Abbey resto-
lation fund? Britain's
I'rince I'hilip, in a letter to
ie Chief Rabbi, suggested
hat it might, and quoted
[he precedent of a group of
Jewish merchants who, in
1245, sent money to Henry
II towards the rebuilding
of the Abbey.
His Royal Highness is prob-
ably not a medieval scholar and
may not have been expected to
know this, but his staff should
have advised him that the 1245
precedent was not a particularly
happy one, for the money was not
donated, but extorted.
The Royal Exchequer was, in
fact, running a virtual protection
racket and obtained 2,500
Pounds from one Jewish family,
3,000 Pounds from another, and a
large but unstated sum from
Aaron of York, whose father had
been martyred in the massacre of
Continued on Page 3-A
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Beate Klarsfeld, who along
with her husband Serge,
were responsible for track-
ing down the wartime head
of Gestapo in Lyon, Klaus
Barbie, said this week that
West Germany is currently
preparing to make a formal
request to Syria for the
extradition of an alleged
Nazi war criminal now
living in Damascus.
Klarsfeld, the world famous
Nazi-hunter, said in an interview
that West Germany will seek the
extradition of Alois Brunner, who
is alleged to have directed
gestapo operations in the Nice
region. Serge Klarsfeld went to
Damascus in June, 1982 to make
a formal protest with the Syrian
government for harboring
Brunner. He was ultimately
expelled from Syria.
ACCORDING to the Klar
sfelds. Brunner was responsible
for the deportation of Jews from
Austria, Salonika and France in
1943-1944. They claim that
Brunner was personally responsi-
ble with having rounded up 300
children from Jewish centers in
the Paris area on July 20, 1944
and deporting them to Auschwitz
where they were exterminated.
Mrs. Klarsfeld said that
Brunner decided to seek haven in
Syria because "he knows the feel-
ing of Syria towards the Jews,
and towards Israel" and also
knows the way the Syrian gov-
ernment has treated its Jewish
Continued on Page 8-A
SUNY Prexu
He Condemns Racist
Lesson OK'd by Faculty
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The President of the State
University of New York at
Stony Brook, John Mar-
bupger, has termed as
"morally abhorrent" the
teachings of a professor
that equated Zionism with
racism, and has firmly dis-
sociated the school's ad-
ministration from the views
expressed in the course.
"The Stony Brook administra-
tion absolutely divorces itself
from any view that links Zionism
with racism or Nazism," Marbur-
ger said in a statement issued a
day after he met with 35 repre-
sentatives of Jewish organiza-
tions. "Furthermore, I personally
find such linkages morally abhor-
rent."
MARBURGER also announc-
ed the formation of a committee
to "review courses of racial,
ethnic, and religious sensitivity
to insure the proper balance in
presentation between academic
freedom and academic responsi-
bility." The committee will be
chaired by Nobel Laureate C. N.
Yang, according to a university
spokesman.
Phil Bourn
sensitivity, understanding
The controversy at the univer-
sity which erupted three months
ago focused on the views of South
African-born Prof. Ernest Dube
in a summer course on "The
Politics of Racism." A faculty in-
vestigation was launched into his
teachings after Selwyn Troen, a
visiting professor from the Ben
Gurion University in the Negev,
sent a letter to the University as-
serting that Dube "employed his
position for the propagation of
Continued on Page 11-A
Schmidt Gets Into the Act
Kohl Tries to Score Leopard Points With Saudis
Chancellor Helmut Kohl
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The
opposition Social Demo-
cratic Party (SPD) is up in
arms over Chancellor Hel-
mut Kohl's reported deci-
sion to sell modern weapon-
ry to Saudi Arabia. The
plan has also been attacked
by Israel. But Kohl, who
visited Riyadh a week ago,
appears to have defused
most of the controversy by
eliminating West Ger-
many's most advanced and
sophisticated tank, the
Leopard II, from the sales
list.
Horst Ehmke, vice chairman of
the SPD's Bundestag faction,
charged that Kohl has made a
grave mistake "with unbelievable
recklessness." He said this was
the first time the Federal Repub-
lic has made a military commit-
ment outside the NATO alliance.
FORMER Chancellor Helmut
Schmitdt of the SPD warned in
an article in Di* Zeit that West
Germany should refrain from
shipping arms to the Middle
East. Schmidt, when in office,
was a strong advocate of weep-
Co.UawedonPag.8-A
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement.. .Special Insert


... __.._.. ...,, rJ.- -.
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5
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Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 28,1983
Reagan Understands
Says Israel Had to Defend Border
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Reagan
has displayed again under-
standing, if not support, for
Israel's invasion of Leb-
anon last year.
"With the border of Israel, the
northern border, being
violated ... by terrorist groups,
innocent people there being
killed, they had a responsibility
to try and defend that border."
he said in his nationally televised
press conference from the East
Room of the White House.
The President's remarks were
made as he stressed that "great
progress' had been made in
Lebanon toward achieving sta-
bility there. Noting that the Is-
raeli army has withdrawn to the
Awali River and that Israel has
signed an agreement with Leb-
anon to withdraw completely
from that country, Reagan
added, "We are doing everything
we can to persuade Syria to quit
being a roadblock in this
process."
REAGAN STRESSED that
his September 1, 1982 peace ini-
tiative hinged on successfully re-
solving the situation in Lebanon,
and reiterated his determination
to maintain the U.S. marine force
in Lebanon and to continue the
diplomatic efforts there.
"As long as there is a possi-
bility of making the overall peace
plan work we're going to stay
there," he said.
Reagan stressed that Lebanon
was the "first phase" of his
Mideast plan and the U.S. still
intends by "working with the
more moderate Arab states to
bring about the kind of peace
with Israel that Anwar Sadat
helped bring about. Our process
is following the lead that was es-
tablished in the Camp David
talks and the two United Nations
(Security Council) Resolutions,
242 and 338."
But Reagan made clear he be-
lieves that the Syrians have been
"dragging their feet" and "aided
and abetted by about 7,000
Soviet advisers and technicians
and some pretty sophisticated
Soviet weaponry, I think that
they are contributing to the dis-
order and the trouble" in
Lebanon.
HE SUGGESTED that one
reason for Syria's behavior was
that "they believe much of
Jordan and much of Lebanon
truly should belong to them" as
part of a "Greater Syria."
Reagan stressed that the U.S.
would continue its diplomatic ef-
forts in Lebanon but warned
Syria not to prevent the effort
toward national reconciliation in
Lebanon. "I don't think there is
any way we should stand by and
just let Syria destroy what so
many people want, which is peace
and order there in that troubled
country." he said.
When it was suggested that
the Syrian roadblocks might be
an effort to wear down his
determination so that he will
eventually pull out the marines,
before Lebanon is unified,
Reagan declared. "If they are
doing it with the idea of wearing
me down, they are going to be
disappointed."
No Confidence Motion
Shamir Defeats Opposition Vote
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Premier Yitzhak Shamir's coali-
tion easily defeated an opposition
non-confidence motion in the
Knesset last week. The motion,
backed by the Labor Alignment,
Shinui and the Hadash (Com-
munist) Party, was knocked
down by a 61-54 vote after an
abrasive debate over the govern-
ment's economic policies.
The debate gave the newly-
installed Finance Minister. Yigal
Cohen-Orgad, an opportunity to
outline the measures he intends
to take to extricate the country
from its current economic crisis.
He predicted that the crisis
would end "withing the very near
future" and accused the opposi-
tion of exaggerating its depth,
thereby damaging public con-
fidence.
Opposition spokesmen focused
on two issues the aborted plan
of former Finance Minister
Yoram Aridor to link Israel's
Tough U.S. Stand
Gratifies Israeli Officials
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israeli officials are grati-
fied by the tougher U.S.
line toward Syria and what
they see as a more realistic
assessment by Washington
of Syria's destructive role
in Lebanon.
President Reagan's sharp
warning, at his press conference
last week, that the U.S. would
not allow Syria "aided and
abetted by 7,000 Soviet advisers
and technicians" to destroy the
chances for stability in Lebanon,
dispelled the perception held here
in recent weeks that the U.S. was
tilting toward Syria in the Leba-
nese situation.
U.S. special envoy Richard
Fuirbanks also took a firm line
toward the Syrians when he met
with Premier Yitzhak Shamir
VI
r-a
Beth Dm Office
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local and foreign
counties.
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Tel 534-1004 o 6770004
here. Fairbanks, who was ac-
companied by U.S. Ambassador
Samuel Lewis, assured Shamir
that Washington remained com-
mitted to a strong central
government in Lebanon and the
eventual withdrawal of all foreign
forces from that country. He was
confident that the national
reconciliation talks would start
next week.
THEY WERE to have begun,
but disagreement among the
various parties over a site for the
talks forced postponement.
Reports from Beirut later said
that all of the parties have agreed
to meet in Geneva.
Fairbanks is, at the moment,
the senior U.S. diplomat in the
region. He had served as deputy
to special envoy Robert
McFarlane who became Presi-
dent Reagan's national security
adviser last week. He stressed to
Shamir that the U.S. continues to
support fully the Israel-Lebanon
withdrawal and security
agreement signed last May 17
but still not ratified by Lebanon.
His assurance in that respect
was welcomed here. Israelis had
been worried that U.S. policy in
Lebanon was veering toward the
idea that concessions to Syria by
the government of President
Amin Gemayel would yield
cooperation from Damascus in
the reconciliation process. One
concession presumably would
have been the abrogation of the
May 17 accord with Israel.
But Reagan's tough remarks
indicated to officials here that the
U.S. now shares Israel's skep-
ticism about Syrian aims in
lyebanon.
M-'-2S-
currency exclusively to the U.S.
Dollar and the government's ap-
parent agreement to bail out
commercial banks by shoring up
the price of bank shares when the
Tel Aviv stock exchange resumed
trading Oct. 23.
LABOR MK Gad Yaacobi
charged that Shamir, contrary to
his disclaimers, knew of and
endorsed the Aridor plan inas-
much as the Finance Minister
disclosed, before he resigned
under fire last Thursday, that the
plan was in the making withing
the Likud coalition for the past
six months.
Shamir has acknowledged that
it had been "an idea for discus-
sion" but claimed he never took it
seriously as government policy
until an aide to Aridor leaked it
to the press. The leak triggered a
massive run on Dollars and pre-
cipitated Aridor's departure.
The government's reported
agreement to support bank
shares was denounced by Shunui
MK Amnon Rubinstein as
"moral anarchy" designed, he
said, to protect the banks, not the
small investors.
Cohen-Orgad, speaking for the
government, listed five economic
measures he intends to imple-
ment: budget cuts; restrained
public consumption; a freeze on
living standards; broader based
taxation; and protection for the
weaker sectors of society.
HE SAID he would strive to
reduce Israel's $5 billion foreign
trade deficit by half. He an-
nounced that he has invited
Histadrut Secretary General
Yeruham Meshel to meet with
government representatives and
the private business sector to
discuss cooperative measures.
The talks are intended to create
"social and economic calm" he
said.
Cohen-Orgad said the private
employers have already accepted
his invitation and he had "reason
to believe" the trade union leader
would also accept. He expressed
confidence that the public would
trust his economic policies which,
he said, were founded on deci-
sions already adopted by the
Shamir government.
Shamir, in his inaugural speech
to the Knesset Oct. 10, warned
that the country has been living
too long beyond its means and
said he would institute an auster-
ity regime until economic health
is restored.
M-io.aii.ua
Noted Opera director Sarah Caldwell confers with Mayor
Shlomo Lahat of Tel Aviv on plans for next springs inaugural
season of the newly-organized Israel Opera Company, begin-
ning with four touring productions of one-act operas. There an
plans being formulated to build a new opera house in Tel Aviv.
The company is supported in the United States by the
American Israel Opera Foundation.
Kirkpatrick Scores UN's
'Obsessive' Anti -Semitism
BALTIMORE (JTA) -
Ambassador Jeane Kirkpatrick
defended the United Nations as
an important forum for the re-
solution of conflicts despite a
decade-long "obsessive" anti-
Semitic campaign in the UN that
has "nothing to do with the
particular policies of the different
Israeli governments."
She said that during the past
10 years. Israel has been
isolated, despised, himilialed
and victimized" in what he
termed "ritual denunciation."
But Mrs. Kirkpatrick asserted
that Israel's situation in the UN
is now improving.
The envoy made her remarks
during an address to GOO
delegates at the biennial conven-
ion of Pioneer Women-Na'amat
which presented her with its
Golda Meir Human Relations
Award for "her staunch defetw
of Israel in the UN" and ha
"vigorous advocacy'" of the emi-
gration rights of Soviet Jews.
In another session. Stephen
Solender. executive vice pres-
ident of the Associated Jewish
Charities and Welfare Fund of
Baltimore, described the effects
of federal budget cuts in social
services. "'The Jewish commun-
ity must adapt to a new reality
because the program of Reagu
cutbacks shows no sign of abat-
ing." he said. Solender cited a 35
p.-rivnt increase in the caseload
of his agency in the first fiw
months of this year which, he
said, includes many Jewish
middle class unemployed.
Help Wanted
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fbmpest in Teapot
Should Prince Ask Jews for Funds?
Friday, October 28,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Continued from Page 1-A
Lrk in 1190. And what is worse,
, exactions did not prevent
xpulsion of the entire Jewish
nunityin 1290.
I IN THE circumstances, I feel
t the Prince used less than hia
al tact in writing his letter at
Nor was it phrased with the
icacy one might have ex-
d. "I quite understand," he
*, "that individual Jewish
rities normally restrict their
ations to their own commu-
|t would, I think, be under-
aidable if they did, and some
but others don't, and the
: Rabbi can be forgiven for
slightly tart tone of his reply:
^principle," he wrote, "neither
rish individuals nor Jewish
ritable organizations normal-
strict their donations to their
community, realizing the
l we owe to the country, its
teas and national institu-
Ihere are large, prosperous
i well-established communities
iloslems, Hindus and Sikhs in
i country. Did they receive a
ilar appeal from the Prince? I
ct not, though he would
i had strong grounds for ap-
g at least the first-men-
d, not because there happen
| be a great many extremely
pithy Arabs in this country,
because the Moslem com-
city received the magnificent
lent's Park site for their
on mosque as a gift from the
taxpayer. I know of no
community, and certainly
Jewish institution, which
*n so favored.
COULD, perhaps, be
argued that Jews as art organized
community have been around for
so much longer than the Mos-
lems, Hindus or Sikhs, that they
are so well integrated, and are
regarded as part of the fabric of
old England and, as such, could
be reasonably expected to help
maintain the fabric of one of old
England's most venerable insti-
tutions. That, indeed, is the most
charitable construction which can
be put on the Prince's letter.
It could further be suggested
that, since England is almost a
pagan country, and since the Ab-
bey has been virtually deconsec-
rated by the relentless march of
tourist hordes, one can dismiss
the embarrassment which can
arise when the adherents of one
faith are invited to contribute to
the upkeep of the institutions of
another; but do do so would, in a
sense, abet the drift towards
paganism.
One of the reasons why it is so
difficult for Jews to stay Jewish
in England is that Englishmen
are ceasing, or have ceased, to be
Christian.
THERE IS really only one
reason why any non-Christian
should wish to help the
restoration appeal, and that is
the pleasure one gets from the
sight of the Abbey. I have been
there many times and, in spite of
the crush of tourists and the
babble of voices, I have been
moved by the very scale of the
place, the grandeur of its monu-
ments (especially in the Henry
VII chapel), its associations, its
ghosts, its treasures, including a
pair of magnificent bronze
candelabra by Benno Elkan near
the choir screen in the-Old Bap-
tistry. No matter how often one
goes, or how long one stays, one
always comes upon something
one hasn't notice before.
New Device Unveiled
|o Protect Tanks in Battle
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Israeli Armaments
elopment Authority (ADA) has unveiled a new device
rotect tanks against hollow-charge missiles which
i serious casualties among Israeli tank crews in the
Kippur War. According to Zeev Bonnen, director
ral of the ADA, it was tested with great success
ig the war in Lebanon.
HOLLOW-CHARGE MISSILES are shells or
els in which the explosive power is concentrated in a
cone that can puncture a small hole in a tank's armor
pr^Pe' deadly spray of shrapnel into the interior of the
The defensive device is a series of box-like struc-
which absorb the penetrating effects before the
le strikes the tank's armor plate.
-cording to Bonnen they add about one ton to the
w tons weight of the average tank. A lighter version
lng produced for armored personnel carriers. Bonnen
the government has given permission to sell the new
eabroad.
ng
ISRAEL $510.
P1uAlr
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APRIL 9,1984
Si!!m~n},*n0H* INFORMATION ON THEM TOURS,
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The Abbey began as a work of
Christian homage, but one does
not have to be Christian, or even
religious, to admire it as a work
of art. The same is true of a great
many ecclesiastical buildings. I
visit churches much in the spirit
that I visit art galleries, and once
when I was a veshiva student
I made a grand tour of English
cathedrals, from Durham right
down to Truro.
I, however, derive particular
pleasure from the small country
churches which ennoble the
English landscape, their mellow
stones, their ancient timbers,
their stained-glass, their car-
vings, their brasses. I have
visited many hundred in my time
and have in more than one in-
stance contributed a small sum to
their upkeep. England would not
be England without them. And
London would not be London
without Westminster Abbey.
And yet I feel that we, as a com-
munity, should not have been
formally invited to contribute to
its upkeep. The appeal itself, and
the terms in which it was
couched, are in poor taste and
evoke faint echoes of the exac-
tions of the medieval exchequer.
Maggie: "Ah. the Leader ol the Labour Party. I presume1
Two Pilots Crash, Die
In Takeoff from Tel Aviv Field
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
young pilots were killed when
their light civilian plane crashed
shortly after takeoff north of Tel
Aviv last Wednesday.
The ITIM news agency
reported that the two 19-year-old
men, attending an army pilot
training course, rented a two-
seater plane privately from a
flying club at Herzlia airfield and
were said by eye-witnesses to be
performing low-level aerobatics
when their aircraft plunged to the
ground near Kibbutz Yakum
some five miles north of the
airstrip.
Club officials said the craft had
been checked out and found
airworthy before the flight. The
Transport Ministry has set up an
inquiry commission into the
incident.
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____


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 28,1983
Gentile Neighbors Are More Deft in Mysteries of Money
For a long time, the word was out. War
or no war in Lebanon, Israelis were buying
new cars faster than one would have
thought possible only several years ago.
They were snapping up color television sets
as if there were no tomorrow. Their appetite
for stereos and cameras seemed insatiable.
Ditto for refrigerators, washing machines
and a host of other domestic goodies.
What's wrong with that? Nothing, if you
can afford them. But too many Israeli
creditors said that Israelis cannot afford
them. When Finance Minister Yoram
Aridor, since resigned, moved to link the
Shekel with the American Dollar, the
bubble finally burst.
We are told now there is an agonizing
reappraisal of Israel's economy taking
place. The favorite phrase this week to
describe the Israeli experience is that the
whole nation is "biting the bullet" as a
consequence of an across-the-board 25
percent devaluation of the Shekel. Nor can
this reappraisal be laid entirely at the feet
of Aridor. Even the new Prime Minister,
Yitzhak Shamir, in his inaugural address
warned that the nation was living beyond
its means.
Does all of this suggest an instant
bettering of a years-long triple digit in-
flationary spiral? Does it say that things
will improve, say, tomorrow? Hardly likely.
Even Uncle Sam, sobered more than ever
by the tragic terrorist deaths of 191 U.S.
servicemen in Beirut Sunday, increasingly
recognizes what Israel's move into
Lebanon was all about in the first place.
And sobered Uncle Sam, anxious to have a
stable Israel as its ally in the region, not an
economically crisis-ridden ally, only the
other day offered help to the beleaguered
country to climb out of the morass.
No details are available as yet. But one
sobering thought that strikes us is that
Jews, charged by anti-Semites for millenia
with a mysterious gift for handling money,
find their Gentile neighbors far more deft in
this enterprise than they ever were as they,
themselves, struggle to survive.
Redeeming Commitments
It is imperative that members of the
Jewish community, who have indicated
their commitment to stand by Israel,
redeem that commitment by immediate
cash payments for their outstanding Israel
Bond commitments. This is the opinion of
Gary R. Gerson, general campaign
chairman of the Greater Miami Israel
Bonds Organization.
Any examination of the crurrent
economic situation in Israel confirms the
central role which Israel Bonds have played
during the last 33 years in reinforcing the
economy and enabling it to withstand the
shocks and impact of wars, inflation and a
constantly changing world.
Under the most difficult circumstances,
the people of Israel put Bond dollars to
work with the resourcefulness and vision
that have made it possible for the Jewish
State to become one of the fastest growing
of the developing countries in the world.
Still, the recent change in Israel's
government and the currency crisis have
made it essential for more dollars to be sent
to Israel. Dollars are critical now to prevent
a shortage in Israeli banks. One of the ways
dollars can be raised is by immediate
payment of Israel Bond pledges.
Floridian
irLANT-IMHE M UIM '
racoK-MOCHcr lsdmihdun
SOUNNCIHOCHET
All Bets Are Off
Suggestions have been made that the
Soviet Union, in the aftermath of the
shooting down of the South Korean
passenger airliner, would ease its
harassment and persecution of Soviet
Jews. As has now been demonstrated, this
will not be the case. Last week, Iosif
Begun, the Soviet Jewish activist and
unofficial teacher of Hebrew, was given the
maximum sentence by a court in Vladimir.
Begun, a 51-year-old engineer who has
long sought to emigrate to Israel, was
sentenced to seven years imprisonment to
be followed by five years in internal exile.
He was charged with "anti-Soviet" ac-
tivities. He could have received a lighter
sentence but by drawing the maximum,
Soviet intentions have been brought into
sharp focus.
Begun had become a special case as he
symbolized the struggle of Soviet Jewry,
along with such notable activists as Ida
Nudel and Anatoly Sharansky. His par-
ticular case has included three arrests,
beginning in 1977, his internal exile in the
remote city of Magadan, and also having
lost his job at the Moscow Central Institute
many years ago.
The Soviets, by harassing Begun for an
many years, were in the position to use faL
as a demonstration of their new con-
ciliatory position in the aftermath of the
Korean airline massacre. Many govern-
ments were therefore keeping a close watrh
on how the Soviets would handle the Beei
trial. And now, the hardline view of the"
Soviet government has been confirmed
There will be no easing of human rights and
no increase in the emigration of Soviet
Jews.
The United States said the Begun trial
marked the cutting edge of a "new wave of
repression" in the USSR and an "increase
in officially sanctioned anti-Semitism." The
Israeli government appealed for Begun's
release and said instructions have been
issued for diplomatic efforts toward this
end.
Overall, the Begun three-day trial and
the imposition of the maximum sentence
leave an emptiness that the fight for the
freedom of Soviet Jewry still has a long
way to go. But it also serves to instruct
American Jews to continue in their efforts
by protesting, demonstrating and actively
pressuring local representatives in an effort I
to have Begun and his many other
comrades released from the tyranny of the
Soviet Union.

Vatican Radio: Matter of Importance?
TICK. UIU (loe >*! OM mr-IHH. In VMff-tMOO. Tn.M
Friday. October 28,1963
Volume 56
21 HESHVAN 5744
Number 43
REPORTING on the protest
against the deployment of new
U.S. missiles in Europe, a front
page story over the weekend
quotes Vatican Radio as declar-
ing that the dramatically reduced
number of protesters who partic-
ipated compared to the projected
figures proves "doubts and reser-
vations that cannot be under-
estimated."
Vatican Radio is also quoted as
observing that the much smaller
than expected protest shows that
people are hardly unanimous in
their opinions about how to "ex-
press and share" their yearnings
for peace.
MY OWN reaction to the Vat-
ican Radio report is: Who cares?
Not about the deployment of nu-
clear missiles, of course, which is
an issue of monumental concern,
but about the Vatican's view on
this or, in fact, anything else.
One must, naturally, under-
stand that the newspaper quot-
ing Vatican Radio is published,
as it were, on the banks of the
Tiber and in the shadow of St.
Peter's, since Havana North is
essentially that. Still, there are
other people reading the paper,
and it is no small concern that
they are being fed bigoted pap as
if it were objective truth.
Is this too strong a reaction to
;^*K*:*:;W:&::::%W
I
5
%
Leo
MilMllill
what is presumably a minor
matter? In the allegedly
"ecumenical world" of the 1980's,
is there really a need for so
abrasive and even hostile a view?
THE FACT is that the
"ecumenical world" is a monu-
mental fiction. It is mostly a fab-
rication of Jewish organizations
whose leaders like to think that
their programs in the cause of
interreligious understanding are
in fact having some salutary ef-
fect on the Christian religious
community. But every once in a
while an event occurs that is so
breathtaking in its official anti-
Semitism that the "spirit of
ecumenusm" dies yet one more
time in an infinite series of deaths
programmed as executions from
the beginnings of the history of
the Church.
Consider the Rome Je
community's memorial the(
week to the murder by ten
gunfire and grenades of or
fant congregant and the *
ing of 40 others on the steps!
their main synagogue on C ,
1982.
There they were, takui? |
breath of air during HjW'
season services outside thai*
ly synagogue in the Ghetto^
its beautiful marble Arkdof
by King Victor Emanu
high, high ceiling with
skylight suggesting, as it'
an entranceway to Heaven.
history of anguish at the htf*
the Nazi occupiers in Vvorra
II, who would have burnea
synagogue to a cinder exce|M
the courage of decent *-
government officials wno .
night declared it a naUoMi'
toric site and padlock
doors. Then came death I
ago on its steps and neanw
THIS WAS the attack]
precipitated angry Je
ings against the Vatican w
typical failure to resi current Jewish agony *>"
Catholic spokesmen wig
of their negative P^bW'
dilemma after their insen*
Continued on Page12*


Friday, October 28,1963 / The Jewish Floridian Page 6-A
The Mvth Exploded
Is Israel's Army Apolitical?
Lebanon War Tells the Story
GEN. RAPHAEL EITAN: he shaped policy.
By YITZHAK RABI
The myth that the Israeli
army is apolitical and does
not get involved in the
shaping of national policy
was shattered as a result of
the war in Lebanon and its
aftermath. Furthermore,
the involvement of the
military establishment in
Israeli politics is likely to
increase in the next few
years and exacerbate the
already existing tension be-
tween the civil and the
military branches of
government.
This is the assessment of Dr.
Yoram Peri of Tel Aviv
University, who is author of the
newly published book, "Between
Battles and Ballots" (Cambridge
University Press, New York), on
Gen. Moshe Dayan
the role of the Israeli military in
politics since the establishment
of the Jewish State in 1948.
We Have Cheated Soviets
Promise Needed Not to Permit Drop-Out
By S.J. GOLDSMITH
London Chronicle Syndicate
My acquaintance with
Russian Jews goes back to
he day I was born. When I
ras in the Soviet Union not
ong ago, I felt in some
?ays at home, and let no
onyhearts come and tell
ne that I have become a
bllow-traveller. Some of
Dy Russian friends on the
[Kremlin side" cannot for-
give me for deserting the
evolution. All my protest-
ations that I was a babe in
ns at the time, and that
ny parents did not consult
pe about going back to
pair native Lithuania, are
|f no avail.
It was. therefore, natural for
M to be a founder member of the
pociation of Baltic Jews way
wk in 1945 and subsequently of
" National Council for Soviet
pwry in 1975. The Baltic Jews
still going strong. Their
Urpose is to send material aid to
Dviet Jews and they have sent
over the years one hundred and
ten thousand parcels. This effort
continues successfully. But the
National Council for Soviet Jew-
ry has come to a dead end, and I
felt it was time to surface and
take stock.
THERE ARE a number of
incontestable facts in the situa-
tion of Soviet Jews, and therefore
also in the campaign on their
behalf. Let me start from the
positive ones.
The National Council in
Britain is part of a world-wide
Jewish movement. The campaign
is a campaign of the Jewish
people in the free world. It is a
true partnership between Israel
and diaspora Jews.
It is not an anti-Soviet cam-
paign and is not involved in in-
ternational politics. There are
other platforms for both anti-
Soviet and pro-Soviet activities,
and they are open to Jews, too.
This is a fully justified cam-
paign. We all live in a small world
and interfere with each other all
the time. The Russians are the
last people to complain about
interference in their internal af-
fairs, and they know it.
The campaign on behalf of
Soviet Jews has brought into the
movement numerous diaspora
Jews who used to be on the side-
lines, as it were, though devoted
to Israel.
THE CAMPAIGN has created
a fellowship which is a precious
asset. It has reawakened Ahavat
Israel, which means care for, and
solidarity with, fellow-Jews
wherever they are. This attitude
of mind has nothing to do with
chauvinism. Yitzhak Leibush
Peretz, a humanist and a great
spokesman for the inarticulate
poor, once remarked: "I worry
about Jews a little more because
they are more exposed and
vulnerable." This was said before
the Holocaust. Peretz died in
1915.
Now, the negative facts.
The campaign on behalf of
Soviet Jews has obviously
reached a dead end. There is no
Jewish emigration from the
USSR to speak of, and our im-
pact upon the attitude of the
Soviet authorities to Jewish cul-
ture and the absurd trials of indi-
vidual Jewish martyrs seems to
be nil. But most of the cam-
paigners, in this country and
worldwide, seem to be unware of
the situation. They do so much
campaigning that they have no
time to look at what is going on
around them.
WE MUST admit, firstly to
ourselves and secondly urbi et
Continued on Page 13-A
ACCORDING to the 39-year-
old Peri, who was an adviser to
Premier Yitzhak Rabin and who
spent his military service in the
Israel Defense Force as a military
correspondent, the myth that
there is a civilian control over the
military is only partly true. "In
reality, a new model of civil-
military partnership has emerged
in Israel," Peri said in an in-
terview with the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency.
He contended that, contrary to
general belief, the military in
Israel has considerable influence
in the political life of the nation:
it brings its influence to bear on
foreign policy and serves as a
mobility channel to the highest
governmental posts. This was
clearly the case with such
military figures as Generals
Moshe Dayan, Ezer Weizman
and Yitzhak Rabin who later
became key government
ministers. Peri pointed out.
"Furthermore," said Peri, who
is currently on a lecture tour in
the U.S., "the civil control over
the military is rather weak." He
noted, for example, that both the
Knesset and the Knesset Foreign
Affairs and Security Committee
were not involved with the peace
negotiations with Egypt or with
the war in Lebanon.
BUT PERI said that despite
the centrality of senior military
personnel in Israeli politics, a
military coup in the Jewish State
"is unlikely, although in the
future the involvement of the
military in the political process
will increase."
Continued on Page 14-A
[ostilitv and Suspicion
American Jews, Poles Fire Up Growing
Spirit of Friendship Among Them
By BEN GALLOB
suspicion
[Hostility and
peen Jews and "Poles,
led in Poland and
^Planted to the United
ates, has been succeeded
I*,!! .?rc!win8 spirit of
C P between the two
pmunities in this coun-
C acc,ord3ng to an Ameri-
Jewish Committee
|The
ert.
expert is George Szabad, a
P* vce president of the Com-
P7 ,and co-chairman of the
^American-Jewish-
ncan Task Force. Speaking
'symposium on "Poles and
> the New World," held at
Columbia University, he
delineated the history of "this
unique relationship," which he
said was at present "breaking
through massive walls of
hostility and suspicion erected on
Polish soil" and which was
"counteracting a half-century of
animosity transplanted from one
side of the Atlantic to the other."
The symposium was the
prelude to a four-day conference
on "Poles and Jews: Myth and
Reality in the Historical Con-
text." The conference was
sponsored by Columbia Uni-
versity's Institute on East
Central Europe in collaboration
with its Center for Israel and
Jewish Studies. Scholars from
universities in the United States,
Canada, Poland, Austria, Britain
and Israel, as well as leaders of
the American Polish and Jewish
communities attended the all-day
sessions.
SZABAD SAID the Task
Force had its origin in a meeting
in September, 1979 at St. Mary's
College, a Polish Catholic school
in Orchard Lake, Mich., when
representatives of the AJCom-
mittee met to discuss for the first
time mutual concerns with rep-
resentatives of Polish American
national, cultural, academic and
religious organizations. Szabad
said their common agenda in-
cluded "combatting defamation,
generating a balanced view of the
history of Polish-Christian and
Jewish relations, and demonstra-
Continued on Page 14-A
GIFT OF SHARING
Unable to celebrate his bar mitzvah openly, Evgeny Kremen, a
refusenik since age four, dons a tallis presented to him by a
foreign visitor at his Moscow home on behalf of ail free world
young men and women who have linked their 13th birthdays
with him, in a photo obtained by the South Florida Conference
on Soviet Jewry and Student Struggle for Soviet Jewry. Names
of Bar and Bat Mitzvah 'twins' in the USSR, with details on
how to share this Jewish milestone, are available from the SSSJ
at 210 West 91st Street, New York, 10024.


-. \ ..'. --..- ......
PagfrA the Jewish Floridian/ Friday, October 28.1983
Many Ideas in Progress*
McFarlane Labeled Old Friend of A Strong Israel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Robert McFar-
lane's appointment to re-
place William Clark as As-
sistant to President Reagan
for National Security Af-
fairs came as the Adminis-
tration was beginning a
high level review of the
United States' policy in the
Middle East.
After Reagan announced the
appointment at the White House,
McFarlane, who has been special
Middle East envoy since July 22,
told reporters he believes in con-
tinuity in U.S. Mideast policy.
But he noted that he saw his job
"not to be an advocate, but to be
a coordinator."
AT THE same time, he gave
some clues as to where that pol-
icy is going when he was asked
whether the Administration was
concerned about the Palestinian
people. He replied that that con-
cern was reflected in Reagan's
September 1, 1982 Mideast peace
initiative. "The history of the
Palestinian community like that
of the Lebanese is a very sad his-
tory," McFarlane said.
He said there were a "number
of ideas in progress" for improv-
ing the conditions of the Pales-
tinians in Lebanon and on the
West Bank. While not going into
details, he said the Palestinians
are in a state of "flux," and the
U.S. "has opportunities it has
not had until now." Repeating
that Palestinian history was
"sad," he declared: "it's time to
stop reading about it and try to
make a little of it."
At the same time, McFarlane.
who has been Deputy Assistant
for National Security Affairs
under Clark, stressed that he be-
lieves in "strong" U.S. Israeli
relationship. "I have always felt
that way, and I shall remain to
think that way." He also noted
that the U.S. was "concerned"
about Israel's economic difficult-
ies and would welcome exchange
with Israel about means of
helping to alleviate it.
McFARLANE also stressed
that a "strong relationship is
vital to the security of American
interests in the Middle East."
But he maintained that reports
that during his negotiations in
Lebanon saying he tilted to one
side or the other were completely
untrue. There has been "no tilt to
anybody," he said.
McFarlane revealed the U.S.
method of trying to bring Syria
into support of the present efforts
to reach a national reconciliation
among the various religious
groups in Lebanon and the even-
tual withdrawal of all foreign
forces from that country. He said
the U.S. sought to "intensify and
make more frequent our talks"
with the Syrians. "We're looking
for common ground that can lead
to Syria's interests being accom-
modated without prejudicing the
well-being of Lebanon," he said.
Both Reagan and McFarlane
made clear the Administration's
determination to keep the U.S.
marines in Lebanon despite the
casualties they have suffered.
Reagan said the marines are
there because it is "vitally impor-
tant for the security of the United
States and the Western world
that we do everything we can to
further the peace process in the
Middle East."
WHILE SAYING the "loss of
life is unacceptable," McFarlane
said that since the U.S. forces
entered Lebanon there have been
"some" who have by "threaten-
ing, killing" hope to "cause us to
pull out. Their expectations are
wrong." He did not identify who
the "some" are.
He expressed high hopes that
the meeting that starts Thursday
in Lebanon will bring progress
toward national reconciliation
because he said the various
groups realize that they must
compromise since the "alterna-
tives to reconciliation are worse."
Reagan left open who will suc-
ceed McFarlane as special Mid-
east negotiator. He said it will be
one of his "hardest tasks" since
McFarlane did such an "excel-
lent" job. McFarlane seemed to
indicate support for his deputy in
the Middle East, Richard Fair-
banks, who is still in Beirut. He
noted that Fairbanks has con-
ducted as many meetings as has
he himself, but he said the deci-
sion was up to the President.
A MAJOR question raised by
the McFarlane appointment is
whether it will lead to a renewal
of the public squabbles over the
Middle East, as well as other
issues, between Secretary of
State George Shultz and Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger, or
whether McFarlane will be able
to control this in his job as "coor-
dinator" of policy. Shultz report-
edly had supported McFarlane's
appointment, as did Clark, while
it had been opposed by Weinber-
ger and Central Intelligence Di-
rector William Casey.
McFarlane admitted that
Clark was "as close as any man"
to the President. The 45-year-old
McFarlane, a retired marine lieu-
tenant colonel, is basically a staff
man who received his first expe-
rience in negotiations when he
replaced Philip Habib in Lebanon
three months ago.
He served in the National Se-
curity Council in the Nixon and
Ford Administrations and was a
staff member of the Senate
Armed Services Committee
during the Carter Administra-
tion.
IN THE Reagan Administra-
tion he was first the State De-
partment counselor under Alex-
ander Haig, but when Clark left
his post as deputy assistant Sec-
retary of State to go to the
White House as National Secu-
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....
i
rity Adviser, he took McFarlane
with him as his deputy. There,
with Clark unfamiliar with mili-
tary and foreign affairs. McFar-
' ^eVaicredlted'wi'ththedaw
day administration of affaV
Both Reagan and McP.
stressed that he would
access to the President
whether this will lead to 5m
tinuation of the U.S Israel01
operation that has exists .V
the May 17 Israel!^
agreement or whether confro
tion will once again be in the |
front, remains to be seen
'Theu Were Slick'
Simon and Garfunkle
Concert Draws 90,000
By CINDY KAYE
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Simon and Garfunkle gave two
sell-out benefit concerts in Ramat
Gan. The duo performed for a
combined crowd of 90,000 fans
old and young who packed the
stadium in order to hear favorites
such as "Sounds of Silence,"
"The Boxer," "Homeward
Bound," "Bridge Over Troubled
Waters," and a couple of new
unrecorded songs "Cars are
Cars" and The Late Great
Johnny Ace."
At times the concert became a
sing-along, as the fans joined the
duo. At the performance, Paul
Simon was so overwhelmed, he
noted to the crowd, a bit teary-
eyed,'' I want to say so much, but
I can't. I'm just so happy to be
here." The audience receptively
brought the singers back for four
jncores.
And yet after the
people had very mixed n_
Many complained that the i
had made little effort to
performing in Israel a sp
event. They did not iiu
anything typically Jewish
Israeli in their repertoire, nor j
they make mention of
theme.
One spectator seemed i
up the event by ren_,
"They were slick they r
formed on a schedule, sangi
songs we expected to heardu
a two-hour span, and did _,
duty just as they did in Nil
York two years ago. We paid?
hear them sing and that's wh
they did."
The proceeds of both cono_
are going to children's chirij
through the Variety Club
Israel.
Get the
ANACIN
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When you join the University's Pooled Life Income Fund
you invest in Brandeis' life and your own.
The Washington Hebrew Congregation
in
Washington, D.C.
is seeking a highly qualified
DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION
The Washington Hebrew Congregation is one of the j
nation's largest and most dynamic Reform Temples me
Congregation is seeking an individual who desires wi
make a significant contribution to Jewish Education t>!
directing a multi-location and multi-dimensioruu
program. The starting date may be flexible, but no uk
than July 1.1984.
The director will assume the following broad respon-|
sibilities:
1. Direct Religious School of 1,200 students (Grades K to 10 pl"nU> I
aery school)
2. Plan, Implement and evaluate education policies, programa'
curriculum.
3. Recruit, motivate and direct a professional staff of SO
4. Develop and manage school budgets.
Qualifications for the position Include degrees In Judaic studies a" I
education, as well as teaching and significant supervisor eD"
in a Religious or Day School.
Send letter of application and complete resume by Decemoer;. 1963."
David C. Forman. Chairman of the Search Committee
Washington Hebrew Congregation -
3935 Macomb Street. N.W.. Washington. D.C 200ic


Friday, October 28,1963 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Henrietta London Honored At
The Jewish National Fund -
Temple Emanu-El Forty Niners Banquet
Mrs. Henrietta London, President of Temple Emanu-El Forty Niners was
honored recently at the JEWISH NATIONAL FUND TEMPLE
EMANU-EL FORTY NINERS BANQUET held in the Friedland Ball
room of Temple Emanu-El. Rabbi Irving Lehrman, the distinguished
Spiritual Leader of Temple Emanu-El and Chairman of JNF Foundation
was guest speaker. He brought out the present day needs of the JNF and
the role it plays in Israel's present and future. Rabbi Lehrman linked the
JNF as the "Yiddishe Mamme" responsible for the establishment of the
State of Israel. Rabbi Lehrman praised Henrietta London, the "Eshes
Chayal" of the Forty Niners and Temple Emanu-El for her many out-
standing deeds, activities and achievements, and presented her with a
beautiful plaque: "In Recognition and Appreciation for Dedicated
Leadership and Service to the Temple, Community, Judaism, the Jewish
National Fund, and Israel, the State and its People".
Mrs. Meyer Levinson was Banquet Chairman, and Mrs. Irving Firtel was
Vice-Chairman. Hon. Zev W. Kogan, Pres. JNF Southern Region brought
greetings. Augusta Mentz Richland, Chrmn. Women for JNF delivered
the invocation, Irving London, husband of the honoree made the Hamot-
zei. Cantor Zvi Adler of Temple Emanu-El presented a beautiful musical
program accompanied by Maestro Shmuel Fershko, Musical Director.
Banquet music was by Doreen Stuart, Accordionist.
The Banquet Committee was Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Abelow, Judge
Frederick N. Barad, Mr. & Mrs. Louis Baron, Dr. & Mrs. Ellis M. Barrist,
Mrs. Benjamin Beloff, Mr. & Mrs. Bob Bezark, Prof. & Mrs. Andre
Bialolenki, Mr. & Mrs. Sidney Cooperman, Judge & Mrs. Irving Cypen,
Mr. & Mrs. Gary Diz, Florence Feldman, Mr. & Mrs. Shmuel Fershko,
Bess Fink, Mr. & Mrs. Irving Firtel, Mr. & Mrs. Sol Goldstein, Mr. &
Mrs. Carol Greenberg, Mr. & Mrs. Leo Hack, Mr. & Mrs. Jack Harris,
Mr. & Mrs. Harry Harrison, Mrs. Bernard D. Kaplan, Dr. & Mrs. Sher-
man R. Kaplan, Otilia Keller man, Grace Kurds, Col. Nathaniel H. Kut-
cher, Augusta L. Lazarus, Mr. & Mrs. Meyer Levinson, Irving London,
Mr. & Mrs. Morris Luck, Philip Richland and Augusta Mentz, Mr. &
Mrs. Samuel Pascoe, Miriam Press, Mr. & Mrs. Lawrence M. Schantz,
Dr. & Mrs. Richard Schwarz, Judge & Mrs. Herbert S. Shapiro, Alice
Sheffman, Mr. & Mrs. Oscar Sklar, Mr. & Mrs. Milton Smith, Mr. & Mrs.
Alfred Stone, Mr. & Mrs. Edward H. Weiner, Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Zilbert.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Spiritual Leader of Temple Emanu-El and
Chairman JNF Foundation presents the Plaque of Achievement to
Honoree Henrietta London, Looking on are Mrs. Meyer Levinson,
Banquet Chairman, and Hon. Zev. W. Kogan, President JNF Southern
Region.
From left to right: Hon. Zev W. Kogan, President JNF Southern
Region, Ruth Firtel, Banquet Co-Chairman, Mrs. Meyer Levinson,
Banquet Chairman, Henrietta London, Honoree, Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man, Spiritual Leader Temple Emanu-El, and Chairman JNF Foun-
dation.

Henrietta London, the Honoree, and her husband Irving, are shown surrounded by their beautiful family who came from various parts of the country
to do honor to their beloved mother and grandmother.
- ._** >*. .*... .* ti.-^fc. -^^-^ *
From left to right- Hon. Zev W. Kogan, Pres. JNF Southern ReaionRelle
Lehrman, Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Spiritual Leader Temple Emanu-El and
Chairman JNF Foundation, Henrietta London, Honoree, and Irving London.
From left to right: Mrs. Meyer Levinson, Banquet Chairman, Meyer
Levinson, Augusta Mentz Richland, Chairperson Women for JNF,
and Philip Richland.
Augusta Menu Richland, Chairperson Women for JNF delivers the
^vocation, while looking on from left to right- Henrietta London, the
Honoree, Irving London, and Mrs. Meyer Levinson, Banquet Chair-
Ktoan.
Seated left to right- Mrs. Andre Bialolenki, Maestro Shmuel Fershko,
Mrs. Zvi Adler, Standing left to right- Prof. Andre Bialolenki, Vice-
Pres. JNF Or. Miami, Abraham Bodow, Cantor Zvi Adler.


wmmmmmmm
Page AC --The Jewiah Floridian / Friday,October28,1983
Rightists Charge
Jews Colonizing' French Government
Germany Wants War
Criminal in Damascus
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
French Jews were accused
of "colonizing" the coun-
try, controlling the govern-
ment's policies and of dual
loyalty by representatives
of six extreme rightwing
organizations at a meeting
here this week attended by
close to 8,000 people. The
gathering was dubbed
"Friendship Day" by the
organizers and was an ef-
fort by the extremist
groups to try to unify their
forces and strengthen their
impact in the political
arena.
Several of the speakers at the
meeting said that two of the
government's Jewish Cabinet
members, Transportation
Minister Charles Fitterman, a
Communist, and Justice Minister
Robert Badinter, a Socialist,
"represent the two traditional
poles of Jewish influence:
Marxism and capitalism."
ARNOLD DE LASSUS, rep-
resenting an association of
Catholic school parents, said,
"Badinter is the son-in-law of the
king of French advertising and
one of the country's richest men.
Marcel Blaustein-Blanchet, while
Fitterman headed the (Com-
munist) party school for cadres.
This is the first time that the two
exponents of Jewish colonialism
sit in the same government. It is
as if Rothschild and (Karl) Marx
had been ministers together in
their days."
The extreme right has been
deeply split since the end of the
war and until last month had
failed to play an active role in
French politics both on the
national and local level.
Last month, the center-right
opposition parties for the first
time concluded a formal alliance
with the extreme right to contest
the municipal elections in the city
of Dreux. Their joint platform
was based on their opposition to
the presence in France of
immigrant guest workers whose
percentage is especially high in
industrial Dreux hard hit by
U nemploy me n t.
ALTHOUGH MANY liberals
opposed the deal, the opposition
won a sweeping victory. Simone
Veil, a prominent Gaullist leader
and often mentioned as a possible
presidential candidate in 1988,
Kohl Wants
To Sell Tanks
Continued from Page 1 A
ons sales to Saudi Arabia but
failed to get his party to agree.
Aides to Kohl insist that the
Chancellor made no blanket com-
mit muni to sell the Saudis every
type of weapon save the Leopard
11. They said he offered a limited
iuhiiIht of defensive items such
as the "Gepard" urmored
vehicle with anti aircraft capabil-
ities and a modern anti-aircraft
surv .illance system.
But some experts here say the
Chancellor is engaged in a com-
plicated maneuver to open the
door to large scale West German
arms sales to Saudi Arabia with
an option to include the Leopard
II ai a later date.
KOHL HIMSELF angrily as-
sailed Israeli critics of his plan
Iasl week, especially the remarks
by the Israeli Ambassador here.
Kohl said the critics know per-
fectly well that the arms sales
ix.se" no danger to Israel inas-
much as Bonn has assurances
that they would be used solely for
said she could not approve this
sort of political alliances and
stressed that she herself would
have abstained had she had to
chose between the government
coalition and an opposition linked
to the extreme right.
Some Liberals within the
Gaullist and Republican parties,
led, respectively, by Paris Mayor
Jacques Chirac and former
President Valery Giscard
D'Estaing, privately continue to
echo Veil's warnings.
Most commentators, none-
theless, believe that the center-
right parties campaign com
mitties plan to continue,
whenever useful, their alliance
with the extreme right. Many
campaign workers say the ex-
treme right helps to mobilize
votes on certain popular issues
and yet "is not important enough
to influence party lines."
Extreme rightwing spokesmen
also generally deny, at least in
public, any anti-Semitic policy or
intentions and claim that their
views are "badly misinterpreted
and misrepresented by the
media."
AT LAST SUNDAY'S meet-
ing, many of the speakers were
not only openly anti-Semitic but
also opposed to the Protestant
minority and, to what some of the
speakers said was "the growing
influence of the Masonic lodges."
Two non-Jewish ministers were
singled out for attack:
Agriculture Minister Michel Ro-
card, a Protestant, and Defense
Minister Charles Hernu, a
Mason.
The most violent attacks were
directed, however, at the Jews
and alleged Jewish influence on
government decisions. One of the
speakers, militant Catholic writer
Romain Marie, accused Jews "of
putting the interests of Judaism
far above the interests of
France."
He added: "The Jews claim
that we are anti-Semitic. We
should retort that we are anti-
Communist and that Com-
munism is mainly Jewish. Jews
till arc a majority within the
Communist International, an
international of murder."
Continued from Page 1-A
population in the past.
The Klarsfeld were in the
United States to receive the
Women's American ORT Human
Rights Award at the organiza-
tion's 27th biennial convention in
Los Angeles at the Westin
Bonaventure Hotel. Serge was
called back to Paris for personal
reasons, and Beate was in New
York attending to responsibilities
at the office here of the Beate
Klarsfeld Foundation.
IN A SPEECH delivered by
Beate on behalf of her husband at
the ORT awards dinner, Serg
promised that he "will do every-
thing in my power to make sure
that Brunner pays for his
crimes not just out of
revenge, but because impunity
for a Nazi war criminal like
Brunner is intolerable for a Jew,
for all Jews."
Serge Klarsfeld's father, Arno,
was taken by the Nazis and
deported to Auschwitz where he
was killed. While conducting
research at the YIVO Institute
several months ago on the Barbie
case. Serge discovered a docu-
ment written, in pencil which
bore the name "Arno Klanff
Serge Klarsfeld said: "He hid
been transferred from NiceT
Lyons Fort Montluc Prisonand
had probably tried to contaa
someone with a message forT,
It took 40 years for the messan
to reach me ,"
Business Brisk
222 -K,JTAI -1-*
publishers who participated u
this year's International Book
Fair at Frankfurt reported that
they did well from a busine
point of view and enjoyed
somewhat eased political at-
mosphere which permitted better
contact with publishers from
other countries, some of which
have no diplomatic or cultural
ties with Israel.
The Frankfurt Book Fair is the
largest in the world. It attracted
6,000 publishers from 77 coun-
tries this year and was reported
to have been a major commercial
success.
Decorated for HaHowoon
Cup Cakes............................6
Prices Effective
October 27th thru 29th. 1983
for
$J59
Mini Donuts
it


Friday, October 26, 1963 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A ... .'
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the work with a fabulous selection
of Deli treats from Publix.
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PagelO-A The Jewish Floridim/ Friday, October 28,1983
Credentials Okayed
Iran Tries to Bump Israel from GA
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Israel's creden-
tials to the 38th General
Assembly were approved
last week despite an at-
tempt by Iran, backed by
42 other Third World and
Arab states and the Soviet
Union to suspend Israel
from this year's session of
the world organization.
At the opening of the General
Assembly's meeting, the Iranian
Ambassador to the UN, Said
Court Declines
To Review
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Supreme Court has declined
to review a decision by the Attor-
ney General not to prosecute
Gen. (res.) Matityahu Peled for
appearing together with leaders
of the Palestine Liberation Orga-
nization at a press conference
during the war in Lebanon in
1982.
The high court ordered Yedi-
dya Be'eri, an attorney who filed
the complaint against Peled, to
pay 40,000 Shekels in court costs.
Justice Yitzhak Kahan. president
of the Supreme Court, said the
Attorney Generals decision not
to bring charges against Peled
was made in good faith.
Kajaje-Khorassani, introduced an
amendment to the report of the
Credentials Committee which
recommended the approval of the
credentials of some 120 delega-
tions, including Israel's.
Charging that Israel ignored
UN resolutions and occupied
Arab territories, the Iranian
amendment read: "The General
Assembly approves the first
report of the Credentials Com-
mittee, except the credentials of
Israel."
NORWAY, acting on behalf of
the Scandinavian states,
proposed that no action be taken
on the Iranian amendment.
Although the legality and
validity of the Norwegian motion
was challenged by Iran and other
nations, it was approved by a
vote of 79-43 with 9 abstentions.
Egypt supported the Norwegian
motion. The Lebanese delegation
did not participate in the voting.
This was the second conse-
cutive year that Iran attempted
to block approval of Israel's
credentials in the General
Assembly through an amend-
ment to its Credentials Com-
mittee's report. The Iranians
were thwarted last year by a no-
action motion introduced by
Finland.
Before the Assembly session
opened, the 42 countries backing
the Iranian amendment cir-
culated a letter to all delegations
explaining their opposition to the
approval of Israel's credentials.
The letter cited Israeli actions in
the occupied Arab territories and
its refusal to implement UN
resolutions.
ISRAEL'S AMBASSADOR
to the UN, Yehuda Blum, cir-
culated a letter of reply
denouncing the letter of the 42
countries as a "crude ... at-
tempt" to abuse the credentials
procedure for extraneous con-
siderations and a manifestation
of the "obsessive hatred" of
certain states for Israel.
Only the day before, the Reag-
an Administration warned the
General Assembly that any
attempt to deny Israel its right to
participate as a member of the
UN "would have grave conse-
quences for our own continued
participation and support" of the
General Assembly.
Blum, addressing the General
Assembly after the vote
sustaining the Credentials Com-
mittee's recommendations, said
the assault on the UN by the
"forces of bigotry and interna-
tional gangsterism" has been
thrown back again. He said the
attack on Israel, led by Libya and
Iran, was unfounded and the
remarks of their delegates were
"well worn cliches," frivolous and
ironic.
Blum said that if the criteria
Israel's enemies sought to apply
to Israel were applied to all
member states, most of the
General Assembly's seats would
be empty. He added that the
move to suspend Israel also
violated the obligation of member
states to use the UN to resolve
their disputes.
French Leaders Demanj
Release of Iosif Begun
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Leaders of
the American and French Jewish
communities have called here for
the release of Soviet Jewish
activist Iosif Begun who was
sentenced by a Soviet court this
week to seven years' imprison-
ment and five years internal
exile.
The appeal was made at a joint
press conference held by Julius
Berman, chairman of the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
and the leadership of the Repre-
sentative Council of Major
French Jewish Organizations
(CRIF).
Observing that Begun's
"crime" in the eyes of the Soviet
authorities was his demand to be
allowed to emigrate to Israel and
the fact that he taught the He-
brew language, Berman said: "It
is only fitting that the various
Jewish communities should co-
operate on an issue as essential as
the situation of Soviet Jewry and
the fate of the Jewish activists."
rsesea*- rne
He stressed that th....
beh^ofrkgun-C^
do w.th East-West 3
t*nsK>ns. It is based SSf
justice and humanitark^
erations." ""
Berman met with CRIF,
dent Then Klein to conE'
possibilities of increased bbI
tion and coordination 3
the two representative Jewd
ganizations. He told thej?
Telegraphic Agency later 3
hopes to establish 11
working relationship with cl
He cited as an euronll
need to consult wUifftf
Jewry and be briefed on
needs and views before Ama
Jewish leaders meet with
minent French
visiting the U.S.
Berman, who is enroutet
reel, also met yesterday, uJ
capacity of president of]
Union of Orthodox Jewish I
gregations of America, with!
resentatives of the French f
sistory, the Unions French a
terpart.
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,. 'i
n
i <\
\ r.
v<
Friday, October 28,1883 / The Jewish Floridian
\v. -'- f.l
Pagell-A
Condemns Lesson Taught by Racist
| Continued from Page l-A
tsonal ideology and racial
es." Trot-n has since returned
jlsrael
The Conference of Jewish Or-
LLations of Nassau County
La Island), an umbrella group
nposcd of virtually the entire
raized Jewish community in
[area, which helped in arrang-
[ the meeting between the
irish leaders and Marburger,
J in a statement that it was
tiffed" with Marburger's
tndid and statesmanlike
I to the community con-
frT ADDED that with Mar-
(rger's statement, the univer-
administration "has corn-
ed itself to a series of
asures that we are hopeful will
address and prevent simila situa-
tions."
Rabbi Arthur Seltzer, the Long
Island regional director of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, said the ADL was grati-
fied that the university has
"fortbrightly dissociated itself
from Professor Dube's repugnant
equation and has committed it-
self to internal procedures to
prevent any future injection of
racist and anti-Semitic teachings
at Stony Brook."
Phil Baum, associate executive
director of the American Jewish
Congress, commended Marbur-
ger for responding "with sensiti-
vity and understanding" to the
Jewish community concern over
Dube's course.
MARBURGER said the re-
view of the courses taught at the
university would be aimed at
achieving what he called a
"higher degree of understanding
of behavior likely to be offensive
to one or another of our consti-
tuencies." He called for more
"positive and closer ties" with
members of the Jewish commu-
nity, according to the ADL.
The university official also re-
jected claims that a pattern of
anti-Semitic behavior has devel-
oped on the Stony Brook campus
as a result of the Dube case, the
publication of a controversial
poem in a student magazine and
cuts in funding for the campus
Hillel organization. "They are
anomalies, not the norm for our
campus," he said in the state-
ment.
At annual award dinner of the Appeal of Conscience Foun-
dation in New York Oct. 4, Baron Guy de Rothschild (right)
receives the Foundation's 1983 award a crystal star 'for
distinguished humanitarian service'from former Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger. At left is Rabbi Arthur Schneier,
Foundation president. The audience of 500 heard Rabbi
Schneier propose a world conference of religious leaders'to
confront the festering, ever-deepening religious conflicts that
imperil world peace.' _____
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian /Friday, October 28, 1983
--------7-------:-----:--------7-7----------------------1-----------------
Our Readers Write
Resumption' is Halachic Term
Vatican Radio: Is It
A Matter of Concern?
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
In an article sometime ago.
Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat's
historical treatment of patri-
lineal-matrilineal descent in es-
tablishing Jewish status is sound
and sympathetic to the problem
as it exists. However, Rabbi
Bernat fails to mention that
though "presumption" is a pro-
blematic concept in law, it is a
well-established halachic term.
Centuries of rabbis, in lawyer-like
fashion, used this term (in
Hebrew, hazaqah). and it had
three applications. Each applica-
tion has some bearing on the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis' resolution on Jewish
identity and patrilineal descent.
Soviet Hero
In Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Col.
Wolf Vilenski, holder of the Hero
of the Soviet Union Medal the
Soviet's highest award and
other high Soviet honors, has
arrived in Israel with his wife.
They had been trying to obtain
exit visas from the Soviet Union
for the past 10 years.
They received their papers last
week and took the train from
Vilna, where they had been living
since Vilenski had served as a
senior officer in the Lithuanian
division in World War II, to
Vienna.
The couple were met in Vienna
by their daughter, Dr. Lila
Singer, who had flown from her
home in Israel to meet them, and
by Maj. Arye Vilenski, their son,
who, as an officer in the IDF is
continuing his father's military
career.
Col. Vilenski was among the
144 Jews who received the Hero
of the Soviet Union Medal during
the war, and the second of four
Jews in the Lithuanian division
so awarded to come to Israel.
Sgt. Kalman Shorr arrived in
Israel in 1979.
One application is legal pre-
sumption of the continued exist-
ence of a once-ascertained state of
affaire until the contrary be
proved. In our case, the once-
ascertained state of affaire is
Jewishness through the birth of a
child to at least one Jewish
parent.
IF WE accept this application
of hazaqah, the CCAR resolution
may be criticized as too severe
because it assumes that, lacking
the establishment of status
"through appropriate and timely
public formal acts of identifica-
tion with the Jewish faith," the
contrary. namely the non-
Jewishness of the child, is
proven.
Another application of pre-
sumption is the legal presump-
tion of the existence of a fixed
and accepted custom or of the
psychological nature of man. If
we accept this application, the
CCAR resolution may be criti-
cized as too lenient. The customs
and psychological nature of
living in an open society, unique
in Jewish history, in which group
loyalty and commitment must
always be acts of choice not taken
for granted, challenge any
predictions about the future of
our people.
This phenomenon, and not the
CCAR resolution, essentially
clouds the identity of children
bom of Jewish mothers. Children
of two Jewish parents may be
more immune to these
Challenges, but it could be con-
tended that they must be con-
fronted with the demand to es-
tablish their bona fides.
RABBI BERNAT hesitates to
push the CCAR that far. He
correctly states that, custom-
arily, "Jewish sacred activity
determines the quality of one s
Jewish life, but not that one is
Jewish." Yet, as our Orthodox
brethren are wont to point out, it
is the quality that will secure the
future. And, according to Rabbi
Bernat, was it not that concern
for quality that innovatively per-
mitted Jewish mothers to confer
Jewish status on "fatherless"
children?
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The third application of pre-
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a fact to be inferred from parti-
cular surrounding circumstances.
As Rabbi Bernat has argued, the
CCAR resolution does permit a
rabbi to infer that, lacking "ap-
propriate and timely public
fromal acts of identification with
the Jewish faith," a child of a
Jewish mother is not a Jew de
facto.
He certainly continues to draw
that inference in the case of a
child of a Jewish father and non-
Jewish mother. In this respect,
the CCAR seeks, with little
prospect of complete success, to
move away from supporting the
anomaly of de jure Jews, who are
de facto non-Jews. Even the ap-
peal to "quality" has limits, as
the Jews for Jesus movement so
painfully reminds us.
THIS ANOMALY will proba-
bly persist because we are an
anomalous people, not suscepti-
ble to neat, workable categoriza-
tions. Nevertheless, the evalua-
tion of any halachic activity re-
quires an understanding of what
motivated it. The Reform rab-
binate was motivated to permit
the child of a Jewish father, no
less than one of a Jewish mother,
"to seek refuge under the wings
of the God of Israel," to claim the
Jewish birthright.
If, because of what I have pre-
viously stated, the CCAR ex-
hibited "neither courage nor
clarity" as Rabbi Bernat claims,
its motivation gives him the per-
mission to courageously and
clearly say "that a child born of a
Jewish parent is Jewish."
Instead, he falls back on the
morally unsupportable practices
of the past 25 years plus.
RABBI SCOTT B. SAULSON
Pretoria, Sooth Africa
Continued from Page 4-A
became newspaper grist through-
out the Western world.
They wiggled out of it by say-
ing sweet nothings about terror-
ism long after the fact after
the murder, after the woundings.
For the moment at least, Rome's
alienated Jews seemed assuaged
that the Vatican had responded
with essential indifference if not
silence to the senseless slaughter
of two-year-old Stefano Tache
and the assault upon 40 others.
But not for long.
On their sad memorial oc-
casion, the Jewish community in-
vited Papal Vicar Cardinal Ugo
Poletti to attend. Poletti refused,
citing "pastoral duties" as an
excuse. Furthermore, he sent no
papal representative in his stead
or even a message of con-
dolence.
IN FACT, this last affront to
the Jews of Rome, indeed to Jews
everywhere, followed within mere
days a speech by Cardinal Etche-
garay of Marseilles before the
Oct. 4 Bishops Synod in Rome.
Said Cardinal Etchegaray on that
occasion:
"So long as Judaism remains
foreign to our salvation, history
will be subjected to anti-Semitic
reflexes We. too. have a mis-
sion of penitence because of our
centuries-old attitude toward the
Jewish people. We must learn to
ask forgiveness of the Lord and
of our brothers."
Imagine the bloody chutzpah
on the virtual eve of the year
2000, when princes of the Church
should long since have learned
that, for those who want to travel
them, there are many paths to
God.
DID NOT John XXIII say this
only two decades ago? And do
not the princes remain deaf today
to such passionate simplicity as
Mindlin
John's, still talking u.,
Etchegaray talked, of Judu,
"foreign to our salvation"?'
should Judaism not remain'
eign'? Who is the father h,
and who is the pipsqueak son?]
These bloody fools are still!
anyway; still encouraging
hatred of Jews after two n
of their poisonous, crazed U
as a religion marked bytheti
of the Jewish God. the Jei
Word, Jewish thoughts and I
ings which they now pre*
to interpret for Jews as to inq
and meaning.
Still talking about ,
Semitic reflexes." as if they)
not responsible for these reflei
and cannot stop them were iu
their advantage to do so; still
voking the mumbo-jumbo of|
mission of penitence" in _
equivalent to their missions!
conversion by Inquisition,1
and flame; still talking ab,
"forgiveness of the Lord." tril
Cardinal Poletti spurns one
Jewish agony on the pretot|
"pastoral duties."
Who cares what Vatican I
says? Until Vatican Radio i
something, anything, as fact I
shows the least scintilla oil
humility and truth it preach
principle in all its pulpits,
"Vatican Rag" as Tom
once dubbed it should be oft
consequence to a thinkingsoull

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Although Jews have a tradition of maintaining their cultuial heritage,
they also have the reputation of becoming an integral part of the community^
live in. And Scotland is no exception.
Glasgow prides itself on having the only Jewish pipe-band in
the world. And one of the city's largest kilt-makers is Jewish.
Scotland's most famous product is fine Scotch whisky. And
America's favorite scotch is J&.B. NX'e carefully select the finest scotches |
and blend them for smthness and subtlety. The result is why we sav
that JckB whispers.
No matter where your friends or guests come from, serve them
j&BnddMmfed.h M PnxXSMnOM Scotoi Wk, C >M' I t P*nglon Co-p NV


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>


Three-year-old patient at Hadassah-Hebrew
'Jniversity Medical Center functions nor-
naliy after deformed arms and hands are
Straightened and repositioned through soft
kplinting, massage and exercise, and plastic
surgery. Child was treated in Hand Surgery
Unit of Plastic Surgery Department at the
Hadassah University Hospital on Mount
Scopus in Jerusalem.
foviets Were Cheated
We Helped Jews Default on Promise
Continued from Page 5-A
ii, that we have misbehaved in
i recent past. For a number of
s, we have cheated the Soviet
overnment by helping Soviet
tws to default on their signed
dertakings once they reached
enna. We helped a large
bmber of Soviet Jews, in the
few years well over three-
|iarters of all the emigrants from
t Soviet Union, to defy a basic
nciple of Soviet governance,
ely that there is no emigra-
bn from the USSR.
All this happened while the
pviet authorities had recognized
long last that the bulk of
bviet Jews refuse to assimilate
kd merge into the surrounding
filiations, Lenin or no Lenin.
xty-six years after the Revolu-
bn, Soviet Jews are still there,
Imanding their constitutional
khts to study Hebrew. So the
pssians made an exception to
I emigration rule in the case of
ael. But we have shown in-
atitude. not to mention bad
tenners, by helping Soviet Jews
|go elsewhere.
IThe argument of "free choice"
Jail very well. The strugg'e for
Iman rights includes 'free
oice." But the free world has
|i *->n (his struggle yet. Thus,
[argue "free choice" in the pre-
fit circumstances in in fan ,ile.
i do not have free choice a Her
|u have signed a check. 'ou
ljf honor it, or you ire
glared bankrupt.
EVERY JEW who leaves tie
|viet Union signs a declarati >n
I the effect that he renounces h 8
fyiet citizenship in exchange f< r
Tiission to go to Israel. Eve i
Baptists, who are obviousl;
I Jews, had their exit visa*
fen to them on condition that
0 go to Israel. Afterwards
g can do what they like. And
W did not drop out. They went
~ to Israel.
|Thus, we have presented the
iet Propaganda machine with
foost powerful argument it
' had. We have enabled it to
Mize successfully a group of
who decry the whole busi-
ness of emigratior and attack
Zionism; they ha' e an unan-
swerable argument: look where
they are going. They only
pretend to want to go to Israel.
At the same time, we have
weakened our campaign for the
rights of Soviet Jews to enjoy the
same cultural faculties as do
other minorities, and for indi-
vidual martyrs among the Soviet
Jews. The "Kremlin Jews" are
riding high, not to mention the
anti-Semites. Ruth Okuneva
could not have had her famous
confrontation with A.A.
Sazonov, the ideologue of the
Politburo, in 1983. This is for
sure.
THE COMPARISON between
the Soviet Union and Nazi
Germany in regard to the treat-
ment of Jews, which some of the
constituent members of the Na-
tional Council are making in
print, is not only absurd and
stupid but also very harmful to
our campaign. Of course, there is
plenty of anti-Semitism in the
Soviet Union (more in the
Ukraine and Byelo-Russia than
in other parts) but no more than
in some of the Western countries.
How can we fight it vhui viir
colleagues make such com-
parisons. In exposing Soviet anti-
Semitism we have plenty of allies
among the Russians themselves,
but we are taking the weapon of
ridicule out of their hands by
making such comparisons.
What has happened to the
tenacity and courage of both Is-
raelis and diaspora Jews that we
are permitting a few bedraggled
neo-Bundists concentrated in
HI AS to behave the way they
do and undermine the struggle
for Soviet Jews? Once upon a
time, Russian Zionists defied
Herzl when, in a weak moment,
he was inclined to agree to a
"stopover for the night" in
Uganda. They wept when they
had to defy Herzl, but defy him
they did. He soon recanted. Now-
adays we seem to be unable to tell
a few neo-Bundists to get out of
the way.
THE FUTURE?
>viet Missiles Arrive in Syria
TEL AVIV (JTA) Defense Minister Moshe
Kens confirmed that the first consignment of Soviet-
He SS-21 ground-to-ground missiles have arrived in
jna, but said they did not radically change the balance
military power in the region.
HOWEVER, Arens stressed that Israel would have to
fntinue to increase its defense budget because of the
pave rearmament of the Arab states. Priority in the
Ptonal budget must be given to defense, he said.
The SS-21S have' a range of about 75 miles, which is
J* than that of the SCAD missiles already used by the
Us. But they are more accurate, military sources here
1 and can reach targets in much of Israel.
Friday, October 28,1963 /The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
On the Bookshelf
'Next Year in Jerusalem'
Represents Deep Yearning
The movement for Soviet Jews
must come clean and admit that
it had been guilty of a great col-
lective mistake by permitting the
drop-out phenomenon, and
apologize to the Soviet Union for
it. There is no harm, and it is no
sign of weakness, to offer a col-
lective apology. Only recently,
the United States apologized to
France for its behavior in the
Barbie case. And France ac-
cepted the apology.
I make no comparison between
the two cases. I merely say that
an international public apology is
neither unique nor odd. I am not
sure the Russians will accept it
publicly. But we shall start
afresh with clean hands. We shall
then be able to fight for justice
for Soviet Jews much more con-
vincingly.
I know, some Soviet Jews do
not wish to live in Israel. They
can leave Lod Airport without
even going to Tel Aviv for one
night. At Lod they can have free
choice, provided HI AS pays their
tickets. But they must first go
where they had undertaken to go
before they were allowed to leave
the Soviet Union. We are not
campaigning to alter the Soviet
system.
THERE IS reason to believe
that the Russians would relent to
the extent of renewing emigra-
tion to Israel, and permit a
neutral airline until El Al can
fly to Moscow to take
emigrants to Lod. Swiss Air,
KLM, S.A.S. come to mind in
this connection. If not, we can
then vigorously campaign for
such a common sense solution.
The Russians would have no
convincing answer. Such a solu-
tion might be acceptable to the
Russians at this juncture. If we
don't act now, we may well miss
the boat.
Those among the Soviet Jews
who do not want to go to Lod,
could always Tell the Ovir that
they want to go to New York and
become waiters in seedy Bronx
Kosher restaurants. (I speak of
cases I have seen with my own
eyes). There are no Ulpan, no re-
training and no apartment to be
had for free in America, but this
is their business. Nobody will
force a single Russian Jew to stay
in Zion against his wish. Israel is
a free country, and there is
genuine free choice in Israel.
This kind of solution to the
impass, into which we have
landed, requires vision, courage
and political acumen. Do we, as a
people, have it?
For the movement to go on as
before will sow the seeds of its
disintegration. More ominous: it
may well delay the redemption of
the Jewish tribe in the Soviet
Union for another half-century.
The False Messiah. By Leonard
Wolf. Boston: Houghton
Mifflin Company, 1982.
278 Pp. 13.96.______________
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian
_____Book Review Editor
Both Yom Kippur and Pass-
over are brought to a close with
the prayer, "Next Year in Jeru-
salem." For most diaspora Jews,
this hardly represents their
deepest yearning. They find more
congenial an interpretation which
holds that the words, "Next Year
in Jerusalem," are not to be
taken literally. Rather, the prayer
represents a fervent hope that the
Messiah will appear within the
next year.
Certainly, the plea for the
coming of the Messiah is an age-
old theme among Jews. Many
sorrows and tragedies were
bravely borne in the expectation
that all would be well when Mes-
siah came. If indeed "Next Year
in Jerusalem" really means "May
the Messiah come this year,"
then this semi-annual supplica-
tion gives voice to a longing
which was keenly felt each day.
SEVENTEENTH Century
Europe provided fertile soil for
ardent faith in the coming of the
Messiah. Receptivity was rife
when Shabbatai Zevi was born in
1626. His excellence as a student
quickly marked him as a prodigy.
Convinced that he had glory
and power within him, Shabbatai
resisted the marriage which his
parents arranged. He reluctantly
succumbed but was unable to
consummate the marriage
because, as he explained to his
unhappy bride, he was a holy
man for whom marriage was in-
appropriate.
Undaunted, his parents ar-
ranged a second marriage, but
the same thing happened. This
time, Shabbatai was reinforced in
his determination to pass this
test of his holiness by a vision he
had in which Abraham, Isaac and
Jacob urged him to take up his
task as the "savior of Israel."
SHABBATAI became a rabbi
and acquired followers. He also
acquired a third wife who in-
sisted that she was destined to
be the bride of the Messiah.
Miracles were attributed to him,
one having been observed by
Rabbi Nathan Ashkenazai. Both
Nathan and Sarah, Shabbatai's
third wife, urged that he declare
himself the Messiah. Overcoming
some slight wavering, Shabbatai
asserted that he was indeed King
of the Jews and that Nathan was
his prophet.
Disciples followed Shabbatai
as Nathan proclaimed his mis-
sion. Nathan promised that
Shabbatai would take the crown
from the Turkish emperor and
lead all Jews to Jerusalem. The
emperor imprisoned Shabbatai
and offered the choice of death or
conversion to Islam. He chose to
live, became a Muslim, and
finished his days as the door-
keeper of a brothel.
Wolf calls his book "a histori-
cal novel." He uses the freedom
of fiction to tell what is essential-
ly a true storv a story made
possible by the longing for the
Messiah. During the Middle
Ages of the Seventeenth Century
when Shabbatai Zevi and his
movement flourished, there was
widespread interest in creative
rebirth.
MESSIANIC FERMENT
reached a peak in the middle of
the Seventeenth Century with
Shabbatai Zevi and his prophet,
Nathan of Gaza. But they were
preceded by others, from the be-
ginning of the Sixteenth Century,
who claimed leadership over all
Jews. And they were followed by
still others, most notably Jacob
Frank, who emerged in the
middle of the Eighteenth Century
as the leader of a Shabbatain sect
and became another false
Messiah.
Unlike Shabbatai Zevi,
however, he converted to Chris-
tianity rather than to Islam.
Their conversions shook their fol-
lowers to the core.
Nevertheless, the movement
which Shabbatai Zevi initiated
swept through Europe, attract-
ing followers among the masses.
The craving for a Messiah has
persisted, perhaps the response
of the Jews to the leadership of
Theodor Herzl had its origins in
the longing for the Messiah and
in the early success of Shabbatai
Zevi. There were modern echoes
of this yearning recently in the
chant of some Israelis, "Begin
King of Israel."
The longing persists as we ache
for Utopia and as we say the
prayer, "Next Year in Jerusa-
lem."
LEONARD WOLF: studies fab* messiahs.


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 28,1983
Jews, Poles of America Seek Ties
Continued from Page 5-A
ting concern for global human
rights.
Szabad stressed that both
Poles and Jews have been the
targets of hostile caricatures and
that, currently, the Polish people
are subjected to the same kind of
violation of their human rights as
Jews were in the Soviet Union.
He asserted that most people
were unaware of the period
known as the "golden age" of
freedom for Jews in Poland, or of
the fact that as many Polish
Christians as Polish Jews
three million had been annihi-
lated by the Nazis or that
"many" Polish Christians had
risked their lives to save Jews
during the Nazi occupation.
Iran Wrestlers
Recalled
By HASKELL COHEN
NEW YORK (JTA) The
world wrestling team rep-
resenting Iran was recalled from
an international competition
taking place in the Soviet Union
because the scheduling slated an
Israeli competitor against an
Iranian. The official Iranian news
agency IRNA said the Iranian
Physical Training Organization,
sponsoring the wrestling team in
the Kiev competition, was
recalled because Soviet officials
did not provide the Iranian
delegation with details of the
match in advance.
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He reported that, after the
first national dialogue, Polish-
Jewish relations started to
develop at the local level in
Chicago, Philadelphia and
Detroit and some other cities.
SZABAD SAID that in New
York, the Kosciuszko Foundation
"offered a course on modern
Polish history featuring the
Jewish experience in Poland, for
which research was conducted at
the YIVO Institute for Jewish
Research."
In December, 1981, he
reported, the "fledgling alliance"
faced a crucial test. This was the
time when martial law was
declared in Poland, when
Solidarity was banned, and Jews
and "Zionists" were being used
as scapegoats, charged with
masterminding the "mass
uprising" against Poland's
Communist rulers.
The AJCommittee expert said
the response of the Task Force
was "an unprecedented out-
pouring of activity demon-
strating mutual support and
collaboration between the two
groups." He said there were
many such expressions of mutual
concern.
One response was the organ-
ization by the AJCommittee
chapter in Chicago, at the request
of Polish American leaders, of a
Multi-ethnic Coalition for Polish
Relief and Human Rights. Made
op of more than 40 rep-
resentatives of different ethnic,
racial and religious organiza-
tions, the coalition called for an
end to martial law in Poland,
increased United States
receptivity to Polish refugees and
emergency United States food
aid to Poland.
POLISH AMERICAN lenders
joined Jewish American leaders
at City Hall in Chicago in a
ceremony to light the Hanukah
me nor ah. not only to celebrate
the Jewish struggle for religious
liberty, but also to condemn the
Polish government's continued
imposition of martial law and its
use of anti-Semitic tactics,
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Szabad recounted.
In the office in Philadelphia of
Archbishop John Cardinal Krol,
the highest ranking American of
Polish descent, the Cardinal,
Polish American leaders and
Rabbi Marc Tanenbaum, director
of the AJCommittee's inter-
religious affairs department, held
a joint press conference at which
support was pledged to the
Polish people and condemnation
made against acts of anti-Semitic
scape-goating attributed to the
Communist regime.
In the months that followed,
when the initial crisis atmosphere
evoked by the Polish government
crackdown eased somewhat, a
series of Polish-Jewish initiatives
took place in a number of cities,
Szabad reported, adding that "in
some cases, there had been no
prior contact" between Poles and
Jews "and considerable soul-
searching went on before the
process of beginning a dialogue
could take place."
He said that, as an example,
the Archdiocese of Milwaukee
Ecumenical and Interfaich Com-
mission invited Jewish leaders to
join in a special prayer service in
which one reading compared the
plight of the Poles to that of the
Iraelites in ancient Egypt.
IN HARRISBURG, Pa., Ron-
ald Skubecz, the president of the
local Polish Cultural Association,
wrote a letter to the editor of a
Harrisburg newspaper, attacking
anti-Semitism in Poland. In New
York, Attorney General Robert
Abrams, at the invitation of the
AJCommittee, addressed a rally
in front of the United Nations,
sponsored by the Polish
American Congress.
Szabad also reported that an
"historic event" took place in
Detroit on September 1, 1982
when Polish Americans, Jewish
Americans and Ukrainian
Americans "joined together to
commemorate the 43rd anni-
versary of the Nazi invasion of
Poland."
Szabad also reported on the
release from a Polish prison of
Wladyslaw Bartoszewski, a
Catholic who had been honored
twice by Israel for his work in
saving Jews in Poland during the
Nazi occupation and who had
been prominently identified with
human rights causes in Poland
and around the world.
Szabad said that, as an
AJCommittee leader, he had
written a letter to The New York
Times calling for Bartoszewski's
release. Szabad added that he
had recently recieved a letter
from Bartoszewski, from West
Berlin, thanking him and the
Committee for the part they had
in helping him get his freedom.
JTA Feature Syndicate
Is Israel's Army Apolitical
Lebanon War Tells Story
Continued from Page 5-A
He explained that a military
coup of the kind that occurs in
Africa and Latin American
countries requires two conditions
that do not exist in Israel: the
alienation and segregation of the
army from social institutions.
"In Israel the army is a people's
army, and there is no separation
between the military and the
people," he said.
According to Peri, the military
involvement in Israeli politics
was sharply demonstrated in the
Lebanese war. He said that many
actions were undertaken by the
army without prior consent of the
government. "As a matter of
fact," he said, Gen. Raphael
Eitan, who was at the time Chief
of Staff, "shaped Israeli policy in
Lebanon even before the war
broke out. Premier (Menachem)
Begin only gave his stamp of
approval to Eitan's policies."
PERI NOTED that Eitan was
"the most political Chief of Staff
of the IDF, ever." Eitan, Peri
charged, "was the first Chief of
Staff to refer to the territories
(the West Bank and the Gaza
Strip) from an ideological point of
view and not to their function
from the point of view of Israel's
security. By doing so he dragged
the IDF into the stormy public
debate in Israel on the future of
the territories."
A turning point in the involve-
ment of the IDF in politics came
after the 1967 Six-Day War, Peri
said. "The reason was because
the IDF, for the first time, was
charged with political adminis-
Oen. Ezer Weizman
traiion in the territories,
pointed out. "In addition,
fact that the national consei
on the defense issue was
was also a constibuting
for the growing involvement
the military in politics."
Peri predicted that t
government now headed
Premier Yitzhak Shamir
have to face ever growing
volvement of the army. "Wi
the departure of Begin from
political arena, the rule of
founding fathers of Israel
come to an end. (Davidl
Gurion, Golda Meir and Bei
imposed, by their charis
personalities, limitations on tl
military and kept the delici
balance between the two h:
dm of government -
military and the civilian -
tact."
JTA Feature Syndkatt
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Jose Ferrer Presents A WHOLE NEW ACT
1983-84 Season: That's American Entertainment
Lois Net tie ton and Mary Wicks in LIGHT UP THE SKY
By Moss Hart Directed by Jose Ferrer
_________October 28-November 20 (Previews October 25-27)_________
A FUNNY THING HAPPENED ON THE WAY TO THE FORUM
Book by Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart
Music and Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
December 2-25 (Previews November 29, 30. December 1)
CAT ON A HOT TIN ROOF
By Tennessee Williams Directed by Jose Ferrer
Featuring Lois Chiles (from the smash TV hit Dallas) and
Terence Know (From TV's St Elsewhere)
________________January 6-29 (Previews January 3-6)____________
ARSENIC AND OLD LACE by Joseph Kesselring
____________February 10-March 4 (Previews February 7-9)
LIFE WITH FATHER By Howard Lindsay A Russet Crouse
______________March 16-April 8 (Previews March 13-15)__________
A SOLDIER'S PLAY By Charles Fuller
Performed by New York City's Negro Ensemble Company
April 27-May 20 (Previews April 24-26)
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Playhouse Dining/Theatre packages Contact Group
Sales at 4422662 For ticket information call the Boa
Office at 442-4000. Credit cards welcome.
________________________mmm___________ MOO Mean Maatmwy to CaBSt 0_


Friday, October 28,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
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rage
it>- a i he Jewish V^San^nday."October 28, 1983
VANTAGE
THE TASTE OF SUCCESS


dfe wislfo Floridliajni
Israel Blames Syria for Beirut Blast Miami, jjSSj^SS! 0*0* 28,19*
Section B
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israeli officials asserted
[ondav that the Syrians
S responsible for Sun-
tav's massacre in Beirut in
ch at least 214 U.S.
irines and sailors were
and 75 were wound-
|ln addition, at least 27
Lich paratroopers were
Lied, 13 wounded and 53
paring-
|The figures of the dead,
unded and missing kept
jnging upwards during the day
xording to different assess-
tots of the tragedy by
e, American and French
ithorities. The number of
ericans killed was the highest
[a single attack since the Viet-
jWar.
| ACCORDING TO Deputy
emier David Levy, the
In Bonn
(Hundreds Mass
Outside Of
rael's Embassy
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) Hundred of
[Iti-nuclear demonstrators
outside the heavily
ded Israeli Embassy here
nday shouting anti-Israel
ans. They were part of a
uman chain' that filled the
ts around the embassies of
I alleged nuclear powers. These
jluded the U.S. and the Soviet
pon, China. South Africa,
ain, France. India and Israel.
of those countries, except
pth Africa and Israel, have
ra nuclear devices and ac-
"ledge their possession. Is-
Jhas denied that it has nuclear
kpons but is widely believed to
W them or to have the capa-
|ty to manufacture them.
NO ATTEMPT was made to
|er the Israel Embassy
pxis in the Bad Godesberg
dential neighborhood or to do
damage. Cordons of police
"ded the building. Later,
l groups of demonstrators
ithed into Bonn's Hofgarten
Ipg Havenu Shalom
Mm in Hebrew.
fte demonstrations in Bonn
N held in the framework of a
P've nationwide protest
*Mt the planned deployment
PA cruise and Pershing 2
L ,ui in West Germany at the
I


I J.~~ :-,
magnitude of the attack pointed
to Syria's role in the tragedy. He
said a small, hitherto unknown
organization could not have
carried out such an attack on the
U.S. and French military head-
quarters unless it was aided by a
large country. Levy was referring
to a group calling itself the Free
Islamic Revolutionary Move-
ment which claimed responsibi-
lity for the suicide mission at-
tacks.
Meanwhile, Defense Minister
Moshe Arens told the Knesset
Defense and Foreign Affairs
Committee that the marines
stationed in Lebanon as part of
the multinational peacekeeping
force are not there at the behest
of Israel. "We did not invite
them,'' he said. "The Americans
entered Lebanon after the
massacres in Sabra and Shatila
(refugee camps), at the invitation
of Lebanon." Therefore, Arens
suggested, Israel cannot be
identified with the U.S. in this
context.
Arens was reacting to com-
ments by Labor Alignment MK
Yitzhak Rabin who said there
were too many statements issued
in Israel "which could be in-
terpreted as an Israeli invitation
to the U.S. to stay in Lebanon."
THE FORMER Premier said
that the Lebanon crisis might
end up in an American as well as
Israeli failure. Both countries,
Rabin said, have been living with
illusions that the war in Lebanon
last year succeeded in destroying
the Palestine Liberation
Organization and terrorism in
that war-torn country. Today
there is more terror in Beirut
than there had been prior to
the war, he asserted.
Arens also told the Knesset
committee that the redeployment
of the Israel Defense Force from
the Shouf mountains to the Awali
River in the south of Lebanon
was not the end of the redeploy-
ment process. The Awali River
line is not sacred, he said. If
Israel finds another, better line to
redeploy its forces further south
it would do so.
Administration Says Refusal
Of Israel's Help Was 'Normal'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The Reagan
Administration maintained Monday that the U.S.
rejected an Israeli offer of its hospital facilities for the
marines wounded in Sunday's terrorist bomb attack in
Beirut because the military was following its "normal"
procedure for evacuating the wounded.
White House spokesman Larry Speakes said the
wounded were "initially treated" at battalion field
hospitals and aboard U.S. Navy ships off the Lebanese
Continued on Page 13-B
Beach Residents to Vote Tuesday
Trigor Takes Over as Israel's
Consul General in Miami
Yehoshua Trigor has been
appointed Consul General of the
Israel Consulate in Miami. He
succeeds Joel Arnon, who will be
assigned to another post in the
Foreign Ministry after serving
for five years as Consul General
in Atlanta and Miami.
Trigor was educated at the Tel
Aviv School for Law and
Economics and is a graduate of
the National Service College in
Jerusalem.
After two years with the State
Comptrollers Office, he was
transferred to the Ministry of
Foreign Affairs, and Trigor's
first post was at the Embassy of
Israel in Australia.
TRIGOR HAS also served as
Charge d'Affaires at the Embas-
sies of Israel in Seoul, South
Korea, and in Malta. He was
Deputy Chief of Mission and
Charge d'Affaires of the
Embassy of Israel in The Hague,
Netherlands, and was in charge
of the Israeli Consular Mission in
India.
During his tenure there, Trigor
participated as a member of the
Israel delegation in the 33rd
meeting of the UN Economic and
Social Council for Asia and the
Pacific held in New Delhi. He also
headed a special technical
assistance Embassy to the
Republic of the Maldives. From
1959-1965, he served as Vice
Consul in Atlanta and later as
Consul in Los Angeles.
A Minister Counselor of the
Israeli Foreign Service, Trigor
has at the same time combined
his diplomatic duties with public
speaking engagements before
civic groups, universities, the
United Jewish Appeal and Israel
Yehoshua Trigor
Bonds. He is the recipient of a
UJA national Man-on-the-Go
Award and has traveled widely as
a special UJA emissary to Peru,
Trinidad, Barbados, Haiti and
Jamaica.
TRIGOR SERVED four
months in 1977 as special
emissary to Australia and New
Zealand. While on home tour in
Israel, he was Deputy Director of
the Official Guests Division of
the Israel Foreign Ministry. He
previously served as a senior
refer ant to the Asia-Pacific
Bureau of the Foreign Ministry
and in 1977-1979 as director of
the Israel Youth Information
Program in the U.S.A.
While serving as Consul
General for the Southeastern
United States in Atlanta, he was
awarded a medal for Meritorious
Diplomatic Service by the Israel
Foreign Ministry.
for New Mayor, Gty Commissioner Gifts pom> j^ (^j^
Miami Beach residents go to the polls on Tuesday, Nov. 1, to
choose a new mayor and members of the Beach City Commission in
seven groups.
With incumbent Mayor Norman Ciment out of the race,
Beachites have the following candidates to choose from: Maria Kay-
Eden, Malcolm Fromberg, Raphael Herman and Murray Meyerson.
In City Commission races, Group I candidates include Maron
Freifelder, Terrence Rosenberg, Robert Schlichter and Bruce Singer;
Group H-Sy Eisenberg, Pablo Tachmes and Simon Wilder;
Group Ill-Albert Guidotti. Robert Napp, Eli Schler and William
Shockett;
Group IV-Alex Daoud and Mildred Falk;
Group V-Ben Grenald and Melvin Mendelson;
Group VIBarbara Capitman, RocheUe Malek, Daniel Retter,
Rolin Rodriguez and Sidney Weisburd.
As 'Opening Night' Arrives
end of this year. Earner, the
American school in Bonn was
closed because of an anonymous
bomb threat. The school is at-
tended by the children of most
Israeli diplomats here.
When some 600 or so guests
arrive at Cedars Medical Center's
fourth annual benefit, "Opening
Night," on Saturday, at the Pav-
ilion Hotel, they will hear that
over $250,000 has been raised to
date for the purchase of a new
linear accelerator for the hospi-
tal's Radiation Oncology Depart-
ment, a vitally important com-
ponent of the Cancer Treatment
Center at Cedars.
"We've received $210,000 in
contributions and almost $40,000
from the sale of advertising space
in our Souvenir Journal," said
Barbara Weintraub, general
Marathon Runner
Rabbi Makes Race in 3 Hrs., 24 Mins.
P'KingsUy
For the third consecutive year.
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsiey of Tem-
ple Sinai of North Dade has run
the 26.2 mile New York Mara-
thon. In Sunday's race, the Rabbi
did the course in 3 hours, 24
minutes.
North Dade's Reform congre-
gation Rabbi is a familiar figure
as he runs past congregants
homes in his running shorts and
T-shirt a far cry from the tra-
ditional suit, skull cap, and
prayer shawl. When asked why
he ran the Marathon again,
Rabbi Kingsiey explained:
"First, it's marvelous to set a de-
manding goal and to achieve it,
and that's what marathon run-
ning is all about.
"SECOND, the New York
Marathon in particular is such an
exciting happening running
through each of the five boroughs
and being cheered on by people of
all walks of life and from all
manner of ethnic backgrounds
who don't know you but shout
their encouragement as you pass.
In addition, one always seeks to
better the previous time."
Rabbi Kingsley's time in prior
marathons was 3 hours, 19
minutes; and 3 hours, 26
minutes His goal this year was
to stay around 3 hours, 29
minutes so that he can qualify for
the Boston Marathon. He better-
ed it by 5 minutes.
The Rabbi trains for tho mara-
thon by running 40 miles a week.
While he runs, he often says the
morning prayers. The lonely run-
ning hours are occupied with
thinking about future sermons.
According to Rabbi Kingsiey,
"The best part about running is
coming home, whether it's to the
finish line or to one's house at the
end of a training run. Then it's
lots of liquids to drink, a cool
shower, and on to being a Rabbi
again."
chairman of this year's event,
and a 12-year veteran fund-raiser
for the American Cancer Society.
Weintraub explained that "At
our first Benefit Team meeting, I
stressed the importance of
making this a team effort. These
figures prove that everyone
working together can produce
great results. The outpouring
from the community has been
tremendous."
Mrs. Weintraub is chairing the
Cedars "Opening Night" with
her husband, Michael, who is vice
chairman of Pan American
Banks.
Co-chairmen of Opening Night
are Dr. Mariano Garcia and his
wife, Connie, Mr. and Mrs.
Walter Jacobs, and Dr. Daniel
Seckinger and his wife, Pat.
Dr. and Mrs. Garcia are re-
sponsible for the decorations and
entertainment for "Opening
Night." Commented Dr. Garcia,
"We hope to make it as signifi-
cant socially aa it is medically to
the hospital. Cedars' benefits
have always been trend-setters,
and this party will be no different
it will be the party of the
year."
Entertainment for the evening
will feature singer, Sylvia Ben-
nett, and the June Becker
Dancers. Bennett has just re-
turned from a week-long appear-
ance at Dangerfield's in New
York City and was recently
named the best female vocalist in
Continued on Page 12-B


rncp ik-a
:r&'
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. October 28,1983
From The Pulpit

In Chayeh Sarah
By RABBI
ISRAEL I. HALPERN
Hebrew Congregation
of Lauderhill
In Chayeh Sarah, the Sidrah of
the Torah for this week deals
with the death of Sarah,
Abraham's wife, and th<
marriage of their son, Yitzchak.
our second patriarch, to his wife,
Rivkah.
Undoubtedly one of the most
powerful forces which helped oar
people mightily in maintaining
our identity as a people through-
out history to this day has been
the importance we have always
stressed on family. We find this
ideal taught in the beautiful life
of our first patriarch, Abraham,
and his wife, Sarah. They shared
J. Jeffrey Campbell, chairman
and chief executive officer of
Burger King, will be presented
with the 1983 Americanism
Award at the Anti-Defama-
tion League's dinner-dance,
Dec. 17, at the Omni Interna-
tional Hotel, according to
Jonathan I. Kislah, chairman.
M. Anthony Burns and James
W. McLamor* will serve a*
dinner co-chairmen.
Holiday Apartment
NeUnya Israel
Fully furnished self catering
holiday apartments on sea-front,
available all year round. '
Tel: (201) 654-3871 -Evening..
their joys, and also their sorrows,
and worked at their mutual
problems with a sense of deep
harmony and profound respect
for each other.
WHEN SARAH was taken
away from him by death, we are
informed that her husband asked
the owners of the Cave of Mach-
pelah, the children of Heth, to sell
him the Cave, which later became
the Cave of the Patriarchs, so
that he might lay to rest there his
beloved wife.
The Cave's owners then
replied: "Hear us, my lord: you
are a prince of God in our midst.
In the choicest of our burial
places, bury your dead." Since
the implication was that this was
to be a gift, Abraham politely
refused. The memory of his
beloved wife was too precious for
him to accept charity.
He then agreed to pay four
hundred shekels of silver, which
was a very large sum in those
days, considering that the wages
of a working man for a year were
fixed at six or eight shekels then.
Not only in life, but in death as
well, did Abraham honor the
memory of Sarah, who helped
make his family life, and that of
her child, so sweet and satisfying.
THE IMPORTANCE of fam
ily found expression also in the
life of Yitzchak, son of Abraham
and Sarah. When Rebecca, his
future bride, was brought to him
in marriage, we are told of
Yitzchak: "And Isaac brought her
into the tent of Sarah, his
mother. He married Rebecca, she
became his wife, and he loved
her."
Our sages explain that as long
as Sarah lived, her bouse was
always open to all who were in
need. And Rebecca, wife of Isaac,
continued the tradition. We are
also told that Sarah, our first
matriarch, introduced the
lighting of the Sabbath candles
each Friday afternoon, prior to
the Shabbat. When Isaac saw
how Rebecca, his wife, followed in
the footsteps of his mother, be
was comforted and overjoyed in
the continuity of tradition.
SS Wise Luncheon
The Stephen S. Wise Chapter
of Hadaasah will hold a luncheon
meeting on Nov. 7 at the Ocean
Pavilion Mezzanine, 11:30 a.m.,
Fanny Willing, president an-
nounced.
Whatagreat
summer:!
WHERE? AT CAMP JUDAEA!!
Video Presentation Meet the Director
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MS1SWfc^c"."GrM Sund'*mt'
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A Major Exhibition
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Meet the Artist
Sunday. October 30, 530-7 30 pm
OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 27
CIRCLE GALLERY
... -. .. .. ..

Local Agencies Win National Awards
From Council of Federations
in developing programs to mj
changing needs in the je3
community; through the |
change of successful experienoMl
to assure the most effective cT
Tm-v 8ervic?; *3
establishing guidelines for fS\
raising and operation; 3
through joint national plj
and action on common puroo3
dealing with local, regSf
national and international needJ
The Communications Depart-
ment of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and the High
School in Israel, one of Federa-
tion's local beneficiary agencies,
have won awards from the
Council of Jewish Federations,
which will be presented at the
Council's General Assembly in
Atlanta, Ga. next month.
Robert L. Adler, chairman of
the CJF Public Relations Award
Committee, announced that
among large city Federations, the
GMJF received awards for:
Federation, a monthly news-
magazine supplement of The
Jewish Floridian; television
advertising for the 1983 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign; and
its worker training kits for
campaign volunteers. Federation
has received more than 60 public
relations awards from the Council
in past years.
"We're thrilled that the
Council has honored us with
these awards," said Eli Timoner,
chairman of Federation's Com-
munications Committee. "We
believe that the fine work of the
Communications Department
increases Federation's visibility
in the community and enhances
the success of its campaign.
High School in Israel is the
recipient of the William J.
Shroder Award, presented in
recognition of outstadning
contributions to Jewish com-
munal service by community
service organizations.
Established in 1973, the goal of
the High School in Israel is to
acquaint American students with
the birthplace of Western culture
and civilization Israel. The
school is located near Tel Aviv
and students spend ap-
proximately 20 of the 48 class
days visiting sites of historic or
cultural significance.
"The High School in Israel has
always tried, above aU, to en-
courage strengthened Jewish
identity among teenagers," said
Donald Bierman, president of the
school. Receiving the presti-
gious Shroder Award
acknowledges that our efforts
have been successful."
Established in 1932. the
Council serves as a national
instrument to strengthen the
work and the impact of Jewish
Federations through leadership
Center Plans Three Affairs
Miami Beach Jewish Commu-
nity Center will hold a flea
market, annual auction and book
fair during the month of
November. Flea market will be
held Nov. 6, 9 a.m. to 3 pm., on
the Center grounds.
The JCC will hold its annual
auction Nov. 19 at a private
home. Auction merchandise wffll
include portraits, dinners for two f
weekend vacations, stereos 2j
color televisions.
New Judaica books will.
available at the annual JC
Jewish Book Fair Nov. 20,
a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Center.
GETTING THE CHILDREN
TO EAT A DELICIOUS
HOT MEAL IS EASY AS
ABC's & 123s
from
Chef Boy-ar-dee
ABC's &123s
from Chef
Boy-ar-dee"
are tasty
pasta alphabet
letters and
numbers covered
with a rich tomato sauce. The
children will absolutely love it as
a delicious hot lunch and as a
tasty dinner side-dish. And so
will the adults! Either way you
serve it, getting the children to
eat is as easy as Aleph Bez!
Erikc-
Ballenna
lb be a gn** baB**8
toke* concwrtrrtifl"
ondprsc*^**1
?omuer.*,,7,
wjy | drink So****
peopk^l
note**
fc.
but not


Friday, October 28,1983 / The Jewish FToridian Page 3-B
LEADERSHIP NOW!!!
The FROM BERG platform
v/FIGHT CRIME
Add 50 Police Officers to Street Patrol
Enforce Minimum Housing Code -
Block by Block, House by House
Expedite New Police Station
"V '*
-.-

-. !

v/REBUILD OUR ECONOMY
Establish Economic Development
Authority to Stimulate New Investment
Expand Convention Center- Build
NewT.O.P.A. with Senior Citizen Benefits
Lead Drive to Carry Out Voter Mandate
on Casino Gambling
punch #6
H Pol Adv.
MIAMI BEACH m NEEDS

J!
,r
A MAYOR YOU CAN TRUST
*:** y?^&7Sft&M$e:i&x'-*.Tij"..


mmm
Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 28,1983
Reiner Speaks at Retreat
Michael Reiner, National Di-
rector of the United Jewish
Appeal'3 Young Leadership
Cabinet, is the guest speaker
slated for the Weekend Retreat,
the sixth annual "get-away"
sponsored by the Young Adult
Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, to begin Fri-
day evening through Sunday at
the Hilton Inn-Singer Island.
Rivera Beach.
Reflecting the theme of the re-
treat, "The Challenge of Jewish
Identity as a Modern Dilem-
ma n. Reiner will explore the
confrontation that Jewish people
pace in relationship to the
historical and contemporary
influences shaping Jewish
identity today.
Technion Seminar
A seminar on Estate and
Financial Planning, sponsored by
the Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Technion Society will
be held Sunday, Nov. 6 at 10
a.m.. Temple Moses, Normandy
Isle. Leon Greenspan, Attorney,
will deliver a presentation. The
seminar will include discussion
on ways to save money on taxes,
provide orderly distribution of
assets and offer long-range finan-
cial objectives for beneficiaries.
Beth David Events
Adult Education Forum series
will be held at Beth David Con-
gregation, South Dade Chapel,
Oct. 31, 8 p.m. Guest speaker will
be Ernesto Fischer.
Sisterhood Book Review and
Luncheon will be held Nov. 2, 10
a.m. South Dade Chapel. Profes-
sor Rita Deutsch will review
"Breadgivers" and speak on
"The Jewish Woman Revealing
Herself Through Literature."
Michael Reiner
Reiner served as the Director
of the Institute for Emissaries
(Schlichim) of the World Zionist
Organization from 1979 to 1983.
He is presently on loan to the
UJA from his position as As-
jociate Director of the Institute
for Leadership Development of
the Jewish Agency in Jerusalem.
According to Chairwoman
Terry Weiss, 75 people are ex-
pected to attend this three day
event. Program highlights, in ad-
dition to Reiner's address, will
include Shabbat services and
dinner, Israeli singing and
dancing, a river boat cruise and
sports activities.
Serving on the Retreat Com-
mittee are Michael Blasberg,
Zena Inden, Phyllis Klau, Shirley
Lerner, Helene Robinson, Paula
and Eric Rosenberg, Arlene
Snyder, David L. Perkins, com-
mittee member and chairman of
Federation s Young Adult Divi-
sion and David Goldweitz. com-
mittee member and Campaign
Chairman of the Young Adult
Division.
Chief Rabbi of France Rene Samuel Sirat
meets with Yeshiva University President Dr.
Norman Lamm and other University ad-
mainistrators, faculty members, and
students during a visit at the University s
Main Center in New York. His tour was
sponsored by the University's Maybaum
Brothers Foundation. Left to right are Dr.
Herbert C. Dobrinsky, vice president for
University Affairs; Rabbi M. Mitchell
Serels, associate director of the Jacob E
Safra Institute for Sephardic Studies of the
University, and director of the Joseph and
Rachel Ades Sephardic Community
Outreach Program; Dr. Israel Miller, senior
vice president of the University; Rabbi
Sirat; Dr. Lamm; and Dr. Solomon Goon,
director of the Jacob E. Safra Institute for
Sephardic Studies.
Chamber of Commerce, Dade Commission
Endorse Bond Issue for New TOPA
The Greater Miami Chamber of
Commerce and the Dade County
Commission this week joined an
impressive list of organizations
and civic leaders endorsing a vote
for passage of the City of Miami
Beach bond issue that will
authorize the complete rebuilding
of theTheater of the Performing
Arts (TOPA).
Judy Drucker, chairman of the
Raise the Roof Committee, told
more than 2,000 persons attend-
Einstein College Honors Ted Arison
ing a TOPA free performance
Monday night that the two
groups have joined the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce,
Civic League of Miami Beach and
numerous senior citizens and
homeowners organizations in
endorsing the TOPA project.
Unanimously supported by the
Beach City Commission and by
almost all candidates in next
Tuesday *s election on Miami
Beach, the TOPA bond issue will
provide new elevators, a new
sound system, new air-condition-
ing raising the roof bv 21 feet.
state of the art acoustics, a Dew
backstage area and a handsome
new lobby to the existing site,
Drucker said.
Monday's free performance
was sponsored by the Greater
Miami Opera Association to
promote passage* of the bond is-
sue. Serving as co-chairmen with
Drucker are Gary Gerson,
Stephen Muss, Rabbis Leon
Kronish and Irving Lehrman,
Dan Paul, Ted Arison and scores
of other leaders, including State
Reps. Barry Kutun and Mike
Friedman.
The Albert Einstein College of
Medicine Distinguished Achieve-
ment Award dinner dance will
honor Ted Arison, Chairman of
Carnival Cruise Lines, Nov. 6 at
the Konover Hotel, Miami Beach.
SidneyL. Olson, founder of Olson
Electronics, will host the event.
Committee members include
Alvin Goldberg, Dr. Robert
Grenitz. Rabbi Leon Kronish, Dr.
Arkadi M. Rylin, Beatrice Sadin.
Dr. Nathan Segel, Louis Stein
and Sonja S. Zuckerman.
Co-chairmen for the event are
Dr. Charles Weiss, Dr. Phillip
Frost, and Norman Braman.
Expected to attend the dinner
dance are Micky Arison, David
Balogh, Alvah H. Chapman, Jr.,
Sidney Cooperman, Commis-
sioner and Mrs. Sy Eisenberg,
Mr. and Mrs. Maklouf M.
Free Speech
Top on TV
WPBT Ch. 2 public affairs
program, "Viewpoint," examines
freedom of expression in the reli-
gious community on Saturday at
7:30 p.m.
Host Del Frank and his guests
will discuss Freedom of speech in
the religious community.
Slated are Rabbi Carl Klein,
Hallandale Jewish Center; Rev.
Luther T. Jones, chaplain,
Jackson Memorial Hospital; and
Fr. James Fetscher, pastor, St.
Louis Catholic Church.
"Viewpoint" is co-produced by
Ed Fleming, Carolyn Edwards
and Rodney Ward. Herbert
Ammons is director.
College Night Workshop
The Jewish Vocational Service
and the South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center will present a col-
lege workshop at the Center,
Nov. 15, 7:30 p.m. The program
is for high school students and
parents involved in the college
selection process, and will pro-
vide information on financial aid,
and career planning.
Elkaim. Dr. and Mrs. Alan I.
Jacobs, Rabbi and Mrs. Leon
Kronish. Dr. and Mrs. Irving
Lehrman, John R. Levitz.
William D. Parkhurst, Dr. and
Mrs. Larry Robbins, Dr. and
Mrs. Philip Samet. Dr. and Mrs.
Nathan Segal. Earl D. Waldin,
Jr. and Dr. And Mrs. David
Wollowick.
"These additions to the dinner
dance committee are significant
to the evening's success," said
Olson. "Their interest in
AECOM and their active support
of the College's advancement,
along with their personal appre-
ciation and affection for Ted
Arison will enhance the com-
mittee's determination for a
prosperous dinner dance gala."
Shalom Series Presents Aiky
Ted Arison
The Alvin Ailey American
Dance Theater, celebrating its
25th anniversary this year, will
bring three world premieres to
the Miami Beach Theater of the
Performing Arts from November
9-13. The performances are
sponsored by Temple Beth
Sholom of Greater Miami as part
of the Temple's 1983-84 dance
series.
Also featured in November will
be the Ballet Nuevo Mundo de
Caracas, scheduled for one
performance on Nov. 25 at the
Dade County Auditorium.
Alvin Ailey's American Dance
Theater was the first black
company to be formed in this
country. It immediately garnered
worldwide acclaim for its in-
novative choreography cham
pioned by the dynamic Mr. Ailey
and others, as well as for its
ensemble of enormously talented
dancers.
FOR SALE
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And more.
By appointment only. Call Gerri Cohen
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Enjoy all the fantastic facil-
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how to have fabulous Eden Roc
luxury living on a yearly basis
from $1500 to $2000 monthly


Friday, October 28,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Pae 5-B
Most Experienced...By Far!
Served as member of City
of Miami Beach Charter
Review Board
Member, Young Presidents
Club of Mount Sinai
Medical Center
Served as Chairman,
Grievance Committee
"A" of Florida Bar
Past President,
Greater Miami Alumni
Club.AEPI
Division Chairman, United
Way of Dade County
'Graduate, U. of Miami and
U-M School of Law, B.B.A
(Accounting) and Juris
Doctor Degrees
Cubmaster, Treasure Island
Elementary School
Active member, Temple
Beth Sholom
PUNCH #30
Most Endorsed ...By Far?
SHOCKETT MAKES
THINGS HAPPEN
WE PROUDLY ENDORSE SHOCKETT
AND URGE YOU TO PUNCH NO. 30
Miami Beach
FRATERNAL ORDER OF POLICE
Dade County
COUNCIL OF SENIOR CITIZENS
MIAMI BEACH BAR ASSOCIATION
MIAMI BEACH BOARD OF REALTORS
MIAMI BEACH EMPLOYEES
BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION
FIREFIGHTERS OF MIAMI BEACH
MIAMI BEACH
APARTMENT ASSOCIATION
BOARD OF DIRECTORS, COUNCIL OF
CONDOMINIUMS OF DADE COUNTY, INC.
Spell
LEADERSHIP
Shockett
PUNCH ^30
Elect William E.
SHOCKETT
Past President, Miami
Beach Chamber of
Commerce
Former President, Miami
Beach Bar Association
Past President 2,000-
member Miami Ski Club
Active in Greater
Miami Jewish
Federation CJA-IEF
Campaign
Active member, B'nai B'rith
Elected "Civic Leader
of the Year," 1977 by Civic
League of Miami Beach
Served as Special Assistant
Dade County
Public Defender
Elected Trustee, U. of Miami
Law School Alumni Assn.
Heads Miami Beach Law
Firm of Shockett and Meyers
Vice President, Kiwanis Club
of Miami Beach
Group 3 Citywlde
Vote Nov. 1
M. Pol. Adv.


Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 28, 1983
Students Will
Frieda C. Kufeld Elected Be Welcomed
Amit National President At i*"*
NEW YORK Mrs.
Frieda C. Kufeld, a former
principal in the New York
Public school system, was
unanimously elected na-
tional president of the
newly-renamed AMIT Wo-
men (formerly American
Mizrachi Women) by
delegates to the organiza-
tion's national convention
at the Sheraton Centre here
Oct. 10.
Kufeld, a resident of Great
Neck, N.Y., is immediate past
chairwoman of the AMIT Na-
tional Board. She is a lifelong
Zionist who represented the
organization as a delegate to the
first post-World War II Zionist
Congress in Basle, Switzerland in
1946.
Kufeld. who holds a Master's
degree in English literature from
New York University, began her
professional career at the
teaching level and served as
principal in two New York City
public schools prior to her
retirement.
"I AM especially proud to
head an organization which has
been designated by the Israeli
government as its only official
Re she t (Network) for religious
secondary technological
education," Kufeld said, "and I
will apply both my knowledge of
the Israeli and Zionist com-
munities and my experience in
the field of education in a con-
tinuing effort to serve Israel
optimally in this role."
^^H
^^atti *mj

i
Frieda C. Kufeld
Kufeld was installed as na-
tional president on Oct. 11. She
succeeds Roselle Silberstein.
Kufeld will be succeeded as
chairwoman of the National
Board by Shirley K. Schulder of
Brooklyn, N.Y., also elected on
the same day.
AMIT Women is this coun-
try's major women's religious
Zionist organization, with
members in 425 chapters
throughout the United States
maintaining 13 educational and
social welfare projects in Israel.
Its new name was adopted at the
just-concluded national con-
vention here.
Aronson Heads JNF
Tribute Luncheon
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, chair-
man of the Jewish National Fund
Foundation, and Abraham
Grunhut, president JNF of
Greater Miami, have announced
the annual tribute banquet of the
JNF-Morton Towers to be held
Nov. 27 in the Konover Hotel,
noon. Rabbi Lehrman will pay
tribute to Lou and Etta Aronson,
chairpersons, for years of service,
leadership and efforts on behalf
of the JNF. Rabbi Lehrman will
honor Albert and Anne Anker for
their support of JNF.
Mr. Grunhut reminisced about
the early days of Morton Towers,
where Gus Mentz Richland and
the late Manny Mentz initially
introduced the JNF annual
tribute luncheon, and also ack-
nowledged Marcus and Alice
Fuchs in their continuing efforts
for this event-
Chairman of the banquet is
Lou Aronson, Co-chairman is
Cantor Saul H. Breeh, and Ticket
Chairman is Etta Aronson. The
banquet committee includes
Albert and Anne Anker, Marcus
and Alice Fuchs, Harry Hanover,
Ann Lowenstein, Golda Moss,
Philip Richland, and Augusta
Mentz Richland, Celia Rosen-
blatt, Joseph Schoemann, Ben
Sweetow, Freida Tobey, Meyer
Treinkman, Anna Zuckerman.
Agam's Exhibit At Circle Gallery
The new Circle Gallery, under
the direction of J. Burton Lange,
will feature Yaacov Agam, artist,
in an exhibition in the Miami
Knight Center. Hyatt Regency
Hotel. Oct. 30. A reception for
Agam is scheduled from 5:30 to
7:30 p.m. The exhibition continu-
es through Nov. 27. The show is
titled "From the 2nd to 3rd into
the 4th Dimension."
He was born in Israel in 1928,
son of a rabbi, and moved to
Paris in 1951. In 1955, he partici-
pated in the group show, "Le
Mouvement," at Galerie Denise
yyyy>MWy^^**i
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-6554
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. o
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
Yaacov Agam
Rene in Paris. That exhibition
brought kinetic art to the atten-
tion of art communities through-
out the world.
One of Agam's monumental
sculptures, "Beyond the
Visible," is in the Palm Court of
the Hyatt Regency Hotel. The
sculpture was a focal point in the
Agam exhibition at the Guggen
heim Museum in New York.
Aleph Class students of Adath
Yeshurun Religious School will
be consecrated and recognized for
scholastic honors during Friday
night services, 7:30 p.m. Twenty-
nine students will be welcomed
into the Adath Yeshurun family
and presented with a Certificate
of Consecration and a Siddur
prayer book.
As attendants of Mrs. Dena
Axelrod's Aleph Class, the
following students will be conse-
crated: David Baum, Laura
Berger, Benjamin Bierstein,
David Coba, Jessica Coba,
Gregory Cohen, Stephen Hersh-
man, I,ana Israel, Joshua Green-
berg, Melissa Kaiser, Nelson
Klahr, Seth Kohn, Samantha
Krulewitz.
Also Stacy Lieberman,
Michael Liebman, Kennith Lowy,
Michael Promoff, Jean Rifkin,
Barry Rosen, Daniel Rosenfield,
Jeff Rothenberg, Kari Saifman,
Donny Shane, Steven Shapiro,
Stuart Skopit, Jeffrey Talpins,
Jennifer Wertman, Heather
, Yeckes and Beni Zonis.
Students taught by Gladys
Diamond, Myra Brill and Edith
Zaprir who will be recognized
"for achievement of a high level
of scholarship on the Yediat
Yisroel exam" include: Noel
Brand, Leonard Cohen, Paul
Damski, Mitchell Fine, Cori
Flam, Jeffrey Goldenberg,
Miriam Graff, Lawrence Karples,
Suzanne Lechner, Matthew
Levine, Marni Lichstrahl, Jason
Lieberman, Jack Lynn, Bonni
Mailer, Frederic M ell in, Peter
Mendelsohn, Lisa Paniry, Aron
Pollack, Aaron Reed, Edward
Riechelson, Edward Rifkin,
Gregory Rosen, Bradley Rothen-
berg, Rebecca Saidenstat, Joel
Silver, Alan Tempkins and
William Wigutow.
Services will be led by Rabbi
Simcha Freedman and Cantor
Ian Alpern, as well as the
students of the Adath Yeshurun
Religious School who are parti-
cipating in the Dor L'Dor
Incentive Program to Israel.
Selma and David Jacobson
Jacobson to
Observe 50th
Anniversary
Selma and David Jacobson
were remarried after 50 years by
a rabbi in a ceremony at the
Whiffenpoof, Coral Gables.
Among guests attending were
son, Irwin (Linda), and grand-
daughter, Jodi Frank, from
Texas: grandsons, Mitchell
Frank from Alabama, and Mark
Lefcourt from Gainesville, Fla.,
daughters, Anita Frank, Debra
Jacobson and Beverly Lefcourt,
from Miami; and several other
family members along with
Selma's mother.
Selma and Dave have been
active pioneers in the community
since 1946, and charter members
of Temple Judea, formerly the
Coral Gables Jewish Center.
Hebrew Academy's 36th Journal
to Help Meet School's
'Staggering' Financial Need
Mrs. Barry Bogin has been ap-
pointed chairperson of the 36th
annual Journal of the Rabbi Al-
exander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy, according to Jerome
Bienenfeld, Academy president.
Mrs. Bogin, a graduate of the
Academy herself, and her hus-
band, also an alumnus, now have
their two daughters attending
the school.
Mrs. Bogin said that "I have
full understanding of the finan-
cial structure of the school, and it
is clear that this year's Journal
must be the biggest and most
profitable one thus far to fulfill
the Academy's large financial
needs."
Honorees of this year's annual
dinner will be Miami Beach
Mayor Norman Ciment and Mrs.
Ciment. The Journal, dedicated
to the Ciments, will be presented
at the annual dinner of the
Academy on Dec. 11 at the Kon-
over Hotel.
Assisting Mrs. Bogin are Mrs.
Martha Schechet, Mauricio
Gluck, Jerome Bienenfeld, Mi-
chael Reinhard, Kenneth Slat-
koff, Sam Leff, Jack Burstein,
Mrs. Grace Stem, Mr. and Mrs.
Seymour Reinhard, Mrs. Cheryl
Kadar, Mrs. Ahuva Retter, Mrs.
Sandra Edelboim, Dr. Wally Fin-
gerer, Isaac Ben-Ezra, Mrs. Rita
Restler, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Ros-
Mrs. Barry Bogin
ner, and Joseph Rackman.
This year's Journal will feature
the beginning of a special Alumni
Section. Alumni chairman
Barry Bogin. will head the com
mittee. including Dr. and Mrs
Lawrence Ciment, Howard Bien
enfeld. Dr. Randy Makovsky, Dr
Robert Galbut. Dr. David Gal
but, Rabbi Elias Hochner, and
Isaac Ben-Ezra.
Hillel Names Rabbi Neufeld
Rabbi Jay Neufeld will serve as
Assistant Principal, Judaic
Department of the Samuel
Scheck Hillel Community Day
School, according to Michael
Scheck, president.
Rabbi Neufeld has served as a
teacher at the Hillel School since
Sept. 1979, and had previously
taught at the San Diego Hebrew
Day School. He had also served
as synagogue administrator of
Congregation Schara Tzedeck in
Vancouver, Canada.
Rabbi Neufeld has many years
of experience in youth work,
serving as the yough director of
program services at Temple Beth
Shalom in Hollywood.
"The school is fortunate to
have someone as dedicated as
Rabbi Neufeld on our profes-
sional staff. His presence will aciu
Rabbi Jay Neufeld
a new dimension to the many
activities at Hillel.'' stated Rabbi
Joshua Tars is, principal.
Daoud Gains More Support
Fresh support for Miami Beach
City Commissioner Alex Daoud
in his campaign for reelection in
Tuesday's city wide voting is
reported this week from the
Democratic Club of Miami
Beach, Dade County Council of
Senior Citizens, Beach Fraternal
Order of Police, Beach Fire-
fighters, Employees Benevolent
Association of Miami Beach, and
Voters and Taxpayers League of
Miami Beach.
Campaign chairmen Joseph
Nevel and Gerald Schwartz said,
"Daoud also picked up support
from Russell Galbut, Harry B.
Smith, Harriet Green, Gerald K.
Schwartz, Congressman Dante
Fascell, State Representatives
Barry Kutun and Mike Fried-
man, and Stanley Arkin."
Daoud, who is legal counsel on
wills and bequests to the Miami
Beach Region of Hadassah and
Speakers Bureau member for
Pioneer Women-Na amat, is an
active member of the Amencan
Zionist Federation and a board
member of Barry University-
Former State Sen. Richard
Pettigrew. Larry Schantz, David
Nevel, Phil Brooks. Barton GoM
berg and Ira Giller have also
joined the Daoud team, according
to Nevel and Schantz. He led *
effort for Miami Beach to pa
the state's first ERA ordinance.
Beth David Adult Classes
Beth David Congregation is
accepting registration for its fall
semester of Adult Education,
Oct. 31, at the South Dade facil-
K 6:15 pm- Classes will be
held from 7 to 9 p.m. and will be
taught by Rabbi David H.
Auerbach, Cantor William W
Lipson, Mrs. Yona Sarel. and
Miss Arleen Snyder.
will
Speakers for the series w
include Ernesto Fischer, i
Yehuda Shamir. WiU*J
Gralnick. Dr. Bern"
Schechterman, Art""
Teitelbaum, Dorothy Serottai
Dr. Allen Rutchik.
Medicine, Religion Seminar
A one-day seminar on "Inter-
faith Between Medicine and
Religion" will be held Tuesday,
Nov. 8, at Mount Sinai Medical
Center on Miami Beach.
Speakers will include Dr.
Bryan Weiss, chairman of Mount
Sinai's Department of
Psychiatry, and Dr. ^gj
Emmerglick. of the University"
Miami Law School.
Dr. Emmerglick wg*fi|
ethical issues surrounding "^
and dying. Rabbi ^gJ*J
director of the L"V,irtl*
Chaplaincy Service, will cha*
program.


Friday, October 28,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Miami Beach
54th Year, 82nd Issue
Thursday, October 13, 1983
15 CENTS
our opinion
Support the passage
of TOPA bonds
Miami Beach voters will face three questions on the
Tuesday, Nov. 1 ballot in addition to deciding among can-
didates for mayor and six city commission seats.
Question No. 1 is of paramount importance, and promises
to provide more benefits for our citizens than any bond
issue in recent history.
The Sun-Reporter urges a vote for approving the issuance
of $22 million in bonds for structural and acoustical ad-
ditions, renovations and improvements to the Theater of
the Performing Arts.
Coupled with the expansion of the adjacent Miami Beach
Convention Center, the city is given the opportunity to
build a new TOPA at less than half the cost of construc-
ting a new facility on city-owned property and at an even
smaller fraction of beginning a new theater on a different
site.
Leaders of a broadly-based committee seeking passage of
the bond issue, which has been endorsed by the Beach
Chamber of Commerce, Beach Civic League and various
homeowners and senior citizens organizations, emphasize
that numerous world-renowned artists have been un-
willing to perform at our theater. They declined because
the facility was less than adequate for their needs, and
because seriously deficient sound and lighting systems
were provided. The prestigious Dade County Council of
Arts and Sciences supports the issue, which will provide
much-needed elevators for the elderly and handicapped.
Leonard Bernstein, Zubin Mehta and other artists want to
come back to Miami Beach. They should be given that op-
portunity. Half-way measures in rehabilitating TOPA have
been tried in the past, and with the basic structure more
than 30 years old, a total rebuilding effort is required. New
air conditioning, a new roof and new sound systems are
absolutely essential.
By approving the bond issue, Beach voters will insure the
success of a new program to supply senior citizens with
both free tickets and half-price tickets to numerous per-
formances at the theater. These tickets will be made
possible through a surcharge of a dollar on all tickets sold
at TOPA beginning Oct. 1, 1984. The Community Benefit
Committee for the Performing Arts, established by the
city commission to administer a fund which should ap-
proximate $500,000 a year, assures that all money derived
from the surcharge will benefit senior citizens residing in
Miami Beach.
And the world class new TOPA, which is being designed
by the same firm which worked on the modernization of
Carnegie Hall and helped to make the Lincoln Center in
New York and the Mann Auditorium in Tel Aviv among
the finest in the world, will be a key factor in the cultural
renaissance of Miami Beach and indeed, all South Florida.
The cost to a Beach property is nominal. We encourage a
resounding vote of confidence in the future of our com-
munity by voting for the bonds. It's an investment in our
future that will pay handsome dividends.
YOTEFOR "ST
Tuesday, Nov. 1st Punch #63
PQ Miami touch Son Reporter Thure. Oct. 13,1M3
Aptf.**!
IrtZtVBUFMANI


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 28,1983
Community Corner
The University of Miami's Graduate School of International
Studies. Coral Gables, will feature a lecture by Dr. Bernard
Reich on "U.S.' Policy in the Middle East," Nov. 3 at the
Graduate School, 11 a.m.
According to Ford Pollard, president of the North Miami
Westside Property' Owners Association, the Keystone Point
Homeowners Association will jointly sponsor the annual City
Wide Flea Market, Nov. 6, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Griffing Park
North Miami.
The University of Miami Symphony Orchestra, directed by
David Becker, wUl give its second concert of the current season,
8 p.m., Nov. 1, in (1 us man Concert Hall.
The Greater Miami Chapter of the Community Associations
Institute will present a seminar at Community Associations
Day. Oct. 29, beginning at 8-30 a.m. at the Sheraton Americas
Hotel, NW 103 St. and Palmetto Expressway, according to
Chapter President Edward Bramson-SethWeismann,Atlanta
attorney, will lead the seminar.
South Dade Jewish Community Center will have a bicycle trip
and picnic for single adults on Nov. 6, beginning at 10:30 a.m.
The several mile trip will follow the bike path from Dade Cycle,
Coconut Grove to Matheson Hammock Park.
Fred Rose and Dr. Jeffrey Schilit are serving on the executive
committee for the President's Committee on Mental Retardation
for the National Open Forum to be held at Florida Atlantic
University in May.
AmeriFirst Federal in conjunction with the American Heart
Association's nutrition program will hold a seminar, "Cooking
for a Healthy Heart." on Oct. 25 beginning at 4:30 p.m. at Alton
Road office and Oct. 27. also beginning at 4:30 p.m. at Nor-
mandy Isle office.
Fromberg Eyes Mayor's Post
Miami Beach City Commis-
sioner Malcolm H. Fromberg,
this week won more endorse-
ments in his campaign to be
elected mayor in Tuesday's city-
wide, non-partisan voting.
Fromberg claims endorse-
ments from the Beach Fraternal
Order of Police, Miami Beach
Firefighters, Dade County
Council of Senior Citizens, Board
of Directors of the Council of
Condominiums of Dade County,
Ted Arison, Sam Adler and
Happy Levy.
Other Fromberg supporters
include his campaign co-
chairmen, Marilyn and Harry
Smith, Jill and Stan Arkin, and
Marcy and Donald Lefton. Also
endorsing Fromberg are the
Miami Beach Apartment Asso-
ciation, the Miami Beach Bar As-
sociation, the Miami Beach
Board of Realtors, Congressmen
Taft Speaks
to Emanu-El
Temple Emanu-El Sisterhood
and PTA will hold a joint
meeting, 10:30 a.m., Nov. 2 at
Sirkin Hall, Miami Beach. Guest
speaker will be Adon Taft,
religion editor of the Miami
Herald. Mary Rose Kaplan, a
past president of Sisterhood will
serve as chairman of the day.
Others participating in the
program include Ruth Kaplan,
Mimi Weiner, Lorraine Cooper-
man and Kathy Schwarz.
William Lehman and Larry
Smith, former Dade State At-
torney Richard Gerstein, former
Beach Police Chief Rocky
Pomerance, and State Rep. Mike
Friedman.
Still more boosters for the
senior international vice pres-
ident of B'nai B'rith are Sidney
Cooperman, Arthur Courshon,
Barton Goldberg, Norman and
Ira Giller, Gerald K. Schwartz
and Gerald Schwartz, Harriet
Green, Larry Schantz, Marty
Taplin and Joseph and David
Nevel.
Holiday Bazaar
Holiday Bazaar sponsored by
the Temple Samu-El Sisterhood
will be held Sunday. Oct. 30, from
9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the Social Hall
of the Synagogue. The event will
feature gift items, including
Pierre Cardin handbags and Lee
Martin lithographs.
Galil Shows Films
The Galil Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will hold a
luncheon meeting on Nov. 7,
noon, in the Sky Lake Syna-
gogue, North Miami Beach. Two
films will be shown.
Forte Book Review
Forte Forum will open its 17th
season. Nov. 1, 1 p.m. in the
North Building auditorium,
Forte Towers, Miami Beach.
Sophie Primak will present a
book review on "The Life and
Times of Isaac Bashevis Singer."
J
WANTED
The Jewish Floridian is seeking a well-
qualified person with experience in literary
criticism to serve as a regular book-reviewer.
Background should include a wide range of
skilled reading with special emphasis on
Jewish subject matter and professional com-
petence in writing. Academic credentials are
desirable but not necessary. There will be a
minimum fee for each review, plus reviewer's
copy.
Write c/o The Jewish Floridian,
PJO. Box 012973,
. Miami, Fia. .33101
T,
he men and women whose names
are herein inscribed have left a legacy of love
to the Jewish Community. We honor the
memory of those whose lives serve as an
inspiration for future generations. Their gifts
reach across time-creating a link between
yesterday's dreams, today's hopes, and the
promise of tomorrow. May their benevolence
be an unfailing light for all who follow.
Peter Amazon
Martha Arnstein
Herman Auerbach
Celia Barer
Sarah Barkin
Henry Baron
Jacob Bernstein
Noel Bring
Fay Buckner
^Villiam Chersky
Louis G. Gohen
Lee De La Viez
Irving Epstan
Nathan Epstein
Jacob Estreicher
Morrie Flower
Jeannie Jean Frankel
Morris Freeman
Florence Friedlandcr
Rose Friedman
Lucille Goldsmith
Sylvester Goldsmith
Esther Goodman
David Gordon
Rose Gould
George Green
Esther Grccnstein
John Heifer
William Hertz
Rosa Horowitz
Frances Kallos
Adele Kamlot
Amelia Kaplan
Mildred Kaye
Philip Kraus
Joseph Krefetz
Irving Lannin
Samuel Lazarus
Dorothy Lebovitz
William Levenson
Louis Levy
Samuel Lincenbcrg
Charles Lippon
RoscLocwy
Benjamin Miller
Martin Minkoff
Elsa Oppcnheimer
Evelyn PlatotT
Annie Popicl
Rose Rich
Rae Rosenthal
Libby Rost
Gertrude Rothenberg
Harry Rothenberg
Jacob A. Sachs
Eve Schacht
Edward Schlussel
Alexander Schneiderman
Edward Schuchman
Perry Schwarcz
Hannah Schwartz
Jerome Schwartz
Betty Siegel
Philip Siegel
Morris Silver
Hyman Stern
Betty Weinstcin
Lena Wolf
Friends and family of these men and women arc cordially
invited by the Board of Directors of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and its Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies to a special service dedicating a new
memorial panel in honor of these individuals on
Tuesday, November 8th
4:45 P.M.
at trie Federation Building
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Pka*c call the Foundation office at 576-4000 to let us know that you wifl attend
this dedication ceremony.



Friday, October 28, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9;B
Beach Leaders
Unite Behind
Alex Daoud
Miami Beach City Commis-
sioner Alex Daoud has gained
widespread community support
in his campaign for reelection,
subject to the Nov. 1 election,
with scores of the Beach's best
known civic, business and
religious leaders rallying to
Daoud's support.
Daoud. who was elected to two
terms by overwhelming margins,
was honored at a recent
testimonial luncheon on the
occasion of his 40th birthday.
Honorary chairman of the event
was Congressman Dante Fascell.
Fascell was aided by seven
tochairmen of the Daoud salute.
Cochairmen for Daoud are
Joseph Nevel, past president of
the Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce and long-time
president of the Hebrew Free
Loan Society of Greater Miami;
Jean Fein berg, past president of
the Miami Beach region of
Hadassah; Harriet Green, former
national vice president of the
American Zionist Federation and
president of the South Florida
Council of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat.
Other cochairmen include: Hy-
man Galbut. a Beach attorney,
former city commissioner and
reserve captain in the U.S. Navy;
Dr. Elias Hershmann, immediate
past president of the Rabbi
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew.
Academy; Max Serchuk, |
president of the Dade County
Council of Senior Citizens; Mo
Schiffman, president of the
Miami Beach Retirees and past
president of the Tenants Asso-
ciation of Florida; and Dade
County Commissioner Barry
Schreiber, president of the
American Zionist Federation of
South Florida.
Daoud is counsel for the Beach
Region of Hadassah for wills and
bequests on a pro bono basis, a
member of the American Zionist
Federation and a frequent
speaker before numerous pro-
Israel groups.
Master of ceremonies for the
communitywide tribute to Daoud
was his campaign coordinator,
Gerald Schwartz, past president
of the Miami Beach Lodge of
B'nai B'rith and former national
chairman of B'nai B'rith for
Israel Bonds. Schwartz is
national vice president of the
American Zionist Federation.
Among the community leaders
endorsing Daoud for relection
who took part in the tribute
luncheon were Barton S. Gold-
berg, vice president of Temple
Emanu-El; former Judge Jason
Berkman, longtime Miami Beach
justice of the peace; Stephen
Cypen, president-elect of the
Miami Beach Kiwania Club; and
Harold Rosen, former Mayor of
Miami Beach and past president
of the Beach Jaycees.
Other Daoud boosters on hand
included Phil Brooks, member of
the Miami Beach Zoning Board;
Norman Giller, former chairman
of the Florida State Board of
Architecture; Ben Giller, former
president of the Seacoast Towers
East Men's Club; and Ira Giller,
president-elect of the Beach
Chamber of Commerce and past
president of the Beach Kiwanis
Club.
Daoud also won the nod from
Russell Galbut, president of the
Miami Beach Taxpayers Asso-
ciation; Pauline Mildner, officer
of the Beach Retirees; Phoebe
Morse, past president of the
Humane Society of Greater
Miami; Ruth Regina Glasser;
Bill Tugenberg, leader of the
Southgate Men's Club; Irene
Portnow, past president of
Pioneer Women Club One and
vice president of the American
Federation of Senior Citizens.
Daoud has served as president
of the American Federation of
Senior Citizens, and ia now chair-
man of the board of the Federa-
tion and Senior Citizen Club
Seven, which merged recently.
He also has been awarded the
General Chappie James Ameri-
canism Award by the Beach
Jaycees, ia a member of the
Board of Governors of Barry
University; and ia a member of
the Masons, Shrine, Knights of
Pythias, Elks and numerous
other organizations.
Others who took part in the
testimonial for Daoud, who was
the only city commissioner to
carry every precinct in the 1981
election and the only incumbent
to receive more than 50 percent of
the vote, included the Honorable
Richard Pettigrew, former
Speaker of the House of the
Florida Legislature; community
leader Murray Candib, former co-
chairman of the Lehrman Day
School Scholarship Ball; Dr.
Morton Lang. Beach physician:
Manny Carvajal, president of the
Latin American Chamber of
Commerce; civic activists Larry
Taylor, Allen Goldberg and Lou
Jacobson.
More Daoud supporters in-
clude Harry Plissner, Marilyn
and Max Kaminski, Dr. Jerry
and Barbara Hagen, Neisen O.
Kasdin, Planning Board member
and past vice president of the
Jaycees: Zionist leader Joseph
Morley; Abe Resnick; Planning
Board member Aaron Euster;
Irving Garber, former Morton
Towers club president; and Plan-
ning Board member Harry
Mildner; Clara Fischer and
David Nevel.

ix Miami Beach Fraternal Order off
POLICE
|X FIREFIGHTERS Of Miami Beach
.x M.B. DEMOCRATIC Club
EMPLOYEES Benevolent Assn. of
Miami Beach
ix BADE COUNTY COUNCIL OF SENIOR
CITIZENS
ix VOTERS and TAXPAYERS League of
Bade County
ix Homestead Tax Exemption League
ix Voters, Inc.
ix Tiempo Nuevo Newspaper
KEEP THE VOICE OF THE PEOPLE

^Pporurt ofAUx Daoud for reduction at Miami Beach city
"^missioner include, from left, Dr. Elias Herschmann, past
* of the Htbrtw Academy; former San. Richard
Jjyrw; Daoud; and his mother, Evelyn Daoud Rosen-
DAOUD


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 28,1983
Max Mickelson
BB Elects
Mickelson
President
Al Golden, past president of
the Advisory Board and Anti-
Defamation Commissioner of
International Bnai B'rith, in
stalled Max Mickelson as pres-
ident of the Board at Hillel House
at the University of Miami. Fred
Snyder. past Hillel Commis-
sioner, was master of ceremonies.
Al Landskroner was installed as
president elect.
"'One of the accomplishments
of the Board was to install a new-
roof over the Hillel House, which
was supported by the B'nai
B'rith Lodges and members such
as Ella and Sam Kirschbaum who
gave a large donation for this
purpose." Golden added.
Officers and trustees include
Vice Presidents. Rabbi Shaia
Blati. Moe Fenster. Arthur
Bassman, Harry Yablin.
Treasurer. Helen Kurland:
Chaplain Rabbi Mark Kram:
Trustees. Max Fox. Abe Tobias.
Sidney Vogel. Joseph Sussman.
Carole Romer. Andy Tibor, Eli
Lesser, Alma Hofstadter. Louis
Walter. Judge Kronhart. Marie
Ugent and Fred Snyder.
I1 lUQl \i -
-'^Hk^ _** w (J
1
.,.,.,/. ^KT-
Wi BE
Pictured receiving a plaque
from the South Florida State
Hospital to the Opti-Mrs.
Club of Miami Beach for the
support of the children of the
hospital are (left to right) Mrs.
Dorothy Camel, Mrs. Beverly
Hornreich, president, Robert
A. Burton, Hospital Ad-
ministrator, and Mrs. Sydney
Olkin.
MoUie Weinberg will be
named as Israel Bonds
Woman of Valor at the annual
Hadassah Bonds with Israel
luncheon to be held Nov. 8 at
the Konover Hotel, Miami
Beach.
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1
Friday. October 28,1963 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
RE-ELECT
COMMISSIONERSv
EISENBERG
MIAMI BEACH CITY COMMISSION
___ GROUP 2
MIAMI BEACH HAS A $80,000,000 BUDGET
AND MORE THAN 1600 EMPLOYEES-
IT IS SERIOUS BUSINESS!
That's why EXPERIENCE is the Issue
I.MIAMI BEACH RESIDENT
30 Years
|.R00NEY PACE, INC. MEMBERS N.Y.S.E.
Senior Advisor for Corporate Finance
CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
Washington D.C.
Former Vice President
REAL ESTATE BROKER
INSURANCE AGENT
18 Years
VETERANS OF FOREIGN WARS
| .FLORIDA LEAGUE OF CITIES
Board of Directors
Municipal Finance &
Taxation Committee
> 'NATIONAL LEAGUE OF CITIES
Policy Steering Committee
|.DADE LEAGUE OF CITIES
Treasurer
'FLORIDA STATE
DEMOCRATIC PARTY
Former Finance Chairman
BARRY UNIVERSITY
Board of Governors
BAR ILAN UNIVERSITY
Board of Directors
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY
Co-Chair Florida Friends
EMBRYRIDDLE AERONATUCAL COLLEGE
Graduate Advisory Council
HEBREW ACADEMY
Board of Directors
ASSOCIATION FOR WELFARE OF
SOLDIERS IN ISRAEL
National Board Member, Florida Chairman
ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL
Advisory Committee
GREATER MIAMI JEWISH FEDERATION
Active Supporting Participant
MIAMI BEACH CHAMBER OF COMMERCE
Member
DADE COUNTY POLICE
BENEVOLENT ASSOCIATION
Member
PUNCH #22
ENDORSEMENTS
VOTERS INC.
MIAMI BEACH FRATERNAL
ORDER OF POLICE
'FIREFIGHTERS OF MIAMI BEACH
HOMESTEAD TAX EXEMPTION LEAGUE
'VOTERS AND TAXPAYERS LEAGUE
OF DADE COUNTY
REAL ESTATE ACTION COUNCIL
OF DADE, INC.
TIEMPO NUEVONEWSPAPER
The Board of Directors of
THE COUNCIL OF CONDOMINIUMS
OF DADE COUNTY, INC.
If you want to "Let Experience Work For You"
a
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"HAVE FAITH IN MIAMI BEACH"
PUNCH#22 Free Rides To The Polls 538-6268 -9 PUNCH #22
RE-ELECT
COMMISSIONERSy
EISENBERG
MIAMI BEACH CITY COMMISSION
GROUP 2


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. October 28,1983
Newman Chairman
of Bonds Dinner
Mrs. Fleur Jacobs, Donald S. Rosenberg,
Mr. Walter Jacobs, and Mr. and Mrs. Mi-
chael Weintraub at a Cedars Medical Center
Benefit Team meeting where it was announc-
ed that over $250,000 has been raised to date
for the Cancer Center. Mrs. Jacobs is
chairman of Underwriting and Contribu-
tions, Rosenberg is chairman of the Board of
Directors at Cedars, and Mr. and Mrs. Wein-
traub are general chairmen of the benefit
which will be held on Saturday at the
Pavilion Hotel
Generous Gifts Pour Into Cedars
As 'Opening Night' Arrives
Joel Newman has been named
Dinner Chairman of the annual
Cuban Hebrew State of Israel
Bonds Dinner, scheduled for
Nov. 5th, 7:90 p.m. at the
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel.
Juan Matalon is president of the
Cuban Hebrew Israel Bonds
Campaign.
Newman is a member of the
Cuban Hebrew Congregation and
Temple Beth Shalom in Holly-
wood. He has been honored by
the Israel Bonds Organization on
several occasions for his work in
promoting the economic develop-
ment of the Jewish State and is a
member of the Bonds' Ambas-
sador's Society of Trustees.
In addition. Newman has sup-
ported the Combined Jewish Ap-
peal, Hadassah, Deed Club for
Variety Children's Hospital and
has sponsored a scholarship at
Temple Beth Shalom.
The Cuban Hebrew Israel
Bonds Dinner will honor Leon
and Pola Yarmus who are
scheduled to receive the State of
Israel Gates of Jerusalem
Medallion, recognizing their out-
standing participation in
Joel Newman
numerous Jewish philanth
and service organizations.
Special guest will be K
sador Yosef Tekoah. ..
raeli Ambassador to the Un
Nations.
Continued from Page IB
South Florida by Miami
Magazine. A strong believer in
using her talents to help charit-
able causes, she is donating her
performance.
After reviewing the most
recent tally of funds raised, Mrs.
Fleur Jacobs, who is head of un-
derwriting and contributions for
the benefit, said that "It looks
like the community is really in
tune with our needs. We're look-
ing forward to being the leading
medical center of the community.
Our friends have participated
with much generosity."
Contributors so far to the
benefit include Mr. and Mrs.
Isadore H. Abrams, Mr. and
Mrs. Harry Achter, Mr. and Mrs.
David Balogh, Cedars Medical
Staff, Ellerbe Architects and En-
gineers, Inc., Emergency Medical
Group, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph A.
Garfield, Dr. and Mrs. Robert S.
Mayor's Interfaith Prayer Breakfa
Heller. Mr. and Mrs. Julius Kass,
Mrs. Berake Kaye
Also Mr. and Mrs. Sidney
Langer, Lomas & Nettleton Fi-
nancial Corporation, Pan Ameri-
can Banks, Frank J. Rooney,
Inc., Donald S. Rosenberg, Mr.
and Mrs. Morris Rosenberg,
Earle V. Rifas, Dr. Daniel Sec-
kinger, and Associates; Turner,
Fascell. Russo & Stanley; Varian
Associates, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Weintraub, and Mr. and Mrs.
Michael Weintraub.
Subcommittee chairmen are
Mrs. Martha Hamilton, guest list
and mailing; Drs. Steven Tarkan
and Michael Troner, ticket sales;
Mrs. Donna Freshwater,
Souvenir Journal sales; Mrs.
Merle Arostegui, reservations
and seating.
Other members of the Benefit
Team are Mrs. Anna Carrion,
Mrs. Bibi Conde, Mrs. Sis si Felt-
man, Mrs. Dianne Halpryn, Mrs.
Julie Gonzalez, Mrs. Kathleen
Gordon, Dr. and Mrs. Robert S.
Heller, Mrs. Carol Hollander,
Elly Howard, Mrs. Sally Jacobs,
Mrs. Corinne Marks, Kirk Mun-
roe. Ma. Joan Navarre, Mrs.
Rebecca Nordqvist, Mrs. Ann
Norman, Mrs. Betty Poliakoff.
Mrs. Susanna Ramos, Mrs. Josie
Romano, Mrs. Blanche Rosen-
blatt, Mrs. Judy Schild, and Mrs.
Sally Weintraub.
The first Mayor's Interfaith
Prayer Breakfast of North Miami
is scheduled for Nov. 18, at the
Sheraton Hal Harbour Hotel,
Miami Beach, 8 a.m., according
to CO. Woody, chairman. Guest
speaker will be Marshall
McDonald, chairman of the
Board for Florida Power and
Light
Over 70 voluteers from local
churches, synagogues and busi-
nesses have contributed in plan-
ning this event.
According to Marco B.
fredo, Jr., Mayor of No
Miami, "Our intent for an L
faith Prayer Breakfast is to b
churches, synagogues, fai
and business people of our t
community together to join i
city-wide prayer emphasis,
people pray, God answers."
Kosher meals and rides will
available by notifying the No
Miami Chamber of Commerce I
Shockett Claims Endorsements
William E. Shockett is claim-
ing Miami Beach organizational
and individual endorsements in
his campaign for election to the
Beach City Commission in the
open seat in Group 3, elected
citywide.
Backing Shockett, according
to his campaign chairman, Steve
Cypen, are the Miami Beach Bar
Association, Miami Beach
Apartment Association, Miami
Beach Board of Realtors, Board
of Directors of the Council of
Condominiums of Dade County,
and the Democratic Club of
Miami Beach.
The former Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce president
is said to have gained support
from the Dade County Council of
Senior Citizens, Voters and
Taxpayers League of Miami
Beach, Miami Beach Fraternal
Order of Police, Beach Fire-
fighters and from the Beach
Employees Benevolent Asso-
ciation.
Individual endorsements are
claimed from Harry B. Smith,
Ted Arison, former Judge Irving
Cypen, County Commissioner
Harvey Ruvin, former State Sen.
Ken Myers, former Mayors Ken
Oka and Harold Rosen and from
campaign treasurer Ira Oilier.
Others include Harriet Green,
Gerald K. Schwartz, Neal
Amdur, Felice Schwartz, Carol
Greenberg, Lynn Wolfson, Cece
Weiss, Sam Adler, Keith Kovens,
Leon Manne, Barton Goldberg,
Ronald Molko, and Bev Aber-
bach.
CAN YOU GET
18% INTEREST
I
SL
ON A 2 YEAR LOAN?
A private company will pay 18% interest to private in-1
dividuals on loans of $25,000 and $50,000 with security]
value of $50,000 and $100,000 on Prime Real Estate.
Call 442-4582
from 9-4 P.M. for all Information
SOUTH DADE MIDRASHA
LECTURE SERIES
Sponsored by Temples Bet Breira, Beth Am, Beth Or, Israel, Judea, Samu-EI, and by
the South Dade Hebrew Academy, Jewish Community Center of South Dade, and the
Central Agency For Jewish Education, member agencies of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation.
SCHEDULE OF EVENTS
Sunday, November 6th, 7:00 P.M. South Dade Hebrew Academy
11801 S.W. 74th Avenue
FILM ANI YRUSHALMI (I WAS BORN IN JERUSALEM)
MUSICAL HEBREW TRAVELOGUE OF JERUSALEM
Wednesday, November 16th, 8:00 P.M. Jewish Community Center of So. Dade
12401 SW 102nd Avenue
HOAG LEVINS
Author "THE ARAB REACH: THE SECRET WAR AGAINST ISRAEL"
Sunday, December 11th, 10:45 A.M.
Temple Samu-EI
9353 S.W. 152nd Avenue
RABBI MOSHESHUR
A FAMILY ORIENTED CONCERT OF JEWISH MUSIC FOR YOUNG AND OLD'
Monday, January 9th, 8:00 P.M. Temple Bet Breira
9400 S.W. 87th Avenue
DENNIS PRAGER
"WHERE HAVE ALL THE YOUNG JEWS GONE?"
Sunday, February 5th, 8:00 P.M.
Temple Judea
5500 Granada Blvd.
* ^ ~*- .~. RABBI MARVIN TOKAYER
Author "THE FUGU PLAN" (Japeneae Scheme to Save the Jewa During World War!
Temple Beth Am
5850 N. Kendall Drlvt
Thursday, March let, 8:00 P.M.
ALVORSPAN
JEWS AND '84 ELECTION
Sunday, March 11th, 11:00 A.M. Temple Israel
RABBI IMMANUEL JACOBOVITZ 137 n.E. 19th Strati
Chief Rabbi of th British Empire
"JEWISH MEDICAL ETHICS"
Swiff/Mots: $25.00 for 2 (members);$30.00 for 2 (non-members)
Individual Lectura Ticket*: $3.00 (members); $4.00(non-members)
CUP A SAVE V-----------------------------------------


pops* of the Weekly Torah Portion
I A afterlthis Abraham buried Sarah his wife in the cave of
\pofMachpelah. before Mamre"
(Genesis 23.19).
HAYE SARAH
w CARAH Sarah died at the age of 127 in Hebron, and
i, "ad in the Cave of Machpelah, which Abraham pur-
JuTa family graveyard. Anxious for Isaac to marry one of
i Unfold rather than an idolatrous Canaanite woman,
I tTm sent his trusted servant Eliezer to his former home in
Lnotamia where his brother Nahor lived. Approaching the
rTliezer prayed for the success of his mission. He deter-
ii on a procedure: He would ask each girl he met, "Give me
, nitcher and let me drink"; the girl who would reply,
k and I will give thy camels drink also" should be Isaac's
^ed bride /Genesis 24.14). Rebekah, daughter of Bethuel,
! nn of Abraham's brother Nahor, came to the well to draw
tV and responded with the correct formula to Eliezer's
Eat Thanking God for His kindness, the old family retainer
tinted himself to Rebekah's family, explained his mission,
Mcaived permission for Rebekah to accompany him back to
aan as Isaac's prospective wife. Isaac loved Rebekah, and
Tronsoled in her after his mother's death. Abraham took
ther *'ife' Keturah, and she bore him sons whom he
Mit-hed to the east. At the age of 175 Abraham died and was
Jjed next to Sarah in the Cave of Machpelah.
The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law it extracted and based
LiT'Tne Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Emir, Vi. published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
pe. New York. NY. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president ot the society dis-
itmgthe volume.)
Ad ministration Says Refusal
Of faraers Help Was 'Normal*
Continued from Page IB
and then taken to U.S. naval hospital facilities in
Ls or to the army hospital in West Germany.
(THAT'S THE STANDARD procedure, the way the
try operates in that part of the world," Speakes said.
Ire is no other reason." According to Speakes, 75
Ided marines and sailors had been evacuated from
non at the time. The death toll stood at 200 as of
| Eastern Daylight Time on Tuesday.
Recording to reports from Beirut, most of the
ded were taken by helicopter to the Iwo Jima, an
fcibious assault ship, the battleship New Jersey and
IE1 Paso, an amphibious cargo ship. A marine
lesman was quoted as saying that an additional 21
[were flown by the British for treatment at a Royal
pice base in Cyprus.
The reports also said that some dead and wounded
taken to a dozen different hospitals in Beirut, in-
big the Shiite-run Al Zahra Hospital, which has burn
Iment facilities.
.^oo
RETIRED RABBIS
icellent opportunity to Serve as volunteer
baplains in Hospitals of North Dade and
Foward.
For further information call
Rabbi Harold Rich ter or Raquel King
) 921-8810 DADE 94&0964
EMPORARY
NURSING
SERVICES
Home Nursing Licensed Personnel
Aides Companions Home Makers
Miami
891-5322
Ft. Laud.
491-6003

, Bar "Mitzvah
KENNETH ENGELS
Kenneth Engela, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Martin Engels, will be
called to the Torah aa a Bar Mitr-
vah, Oct. 29, at Temple Beth
Sholom of Greater Miami. Dr.
Leon Kroniah will officiate.
Kenneth is a student of the
Confirmation Class of 5746.
BRADLEY BRAUTMAN
Bradley Edward Brautman,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Robert
Brautman, was called to the
Torah as Bar Mitzvah, Oct. 22nd,
at Temple Adath Yeshurun.
The Celebrant is a student in
the Adath Yeshurun Hai Class
and is vice president of Junior
Congregation.
He attends Highland Oaks
Junior High where he is in the
eighth grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Braut-
man hosted the Kiddush follow-
ing the services in honor of the
occasion.
Bradley shared this day in his
life with Mikhail Suleimanov of
Kokand, Uzbek, USSR, who does
not have the freedom to study the
traditions of his people and be-
come a bar mitzvah.
Youth Aliyah
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah will have a paid-up
membership function to celebrate
the 50th anniversary of Youth
Aliyah, Oct. 31, at the Miami
Beach Theatre for the Performing
Arts. Fifty students in the Toras
Ernes Academy Children's
Chorus under the direction of
Mrs. Shulamit Atkin will provide
the entertainment. According to
Mrs. Joseph Kestenbaum, pres-
ident, Mrs. Judith Epstein, past
national president, will receive
the Myrtle Wreath Award.
JCC Flea Market
The Miami Beach Jewish Com-
munity Center will hold a flea
market on Nov. 6 on the Center
grounds starting at. 9 a.m._______
Public Notice
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name MR.
CABINET DISTRIBUTOR at
800 NE IBB St.. North Miami
Beach. Fla. 33163 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Milton Rosen,
Owner
13374 October 21,38;
November 4,11.1983
Friday, October 28,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 13 37143
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OP MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
SANDRA SUR,
Petitioner Wife.
and
PRADIP SUR.
Krspondcnt Husband
TO: PRADIP SUR
8607 Capri eon Way.
No. 71
San Diego, CA 92138
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you an
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to it on
GEOROE T. RAMANI, attor-
ney for PeUUoner. whose ad-
dress la 711 Blacayne Bldg., 19
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 38.1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
Thla notice shall be pub I Is hed
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 30 day of
October, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRTNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. Selfried
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI
Attorney for PeUUoner
19West Flagler St.. No. 711
Miami. Florida 88110
Telephone: (806)874-4840
' 13380' October 28:
November 4.11.18.1983
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting
Time: 6:23 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Or. Irving Lehrman, Rabtol
Zvl Adler, Cantor
Kabbaiat Shebbat Servic*
%m
Sat. Mom. Sorvtoo
aa
Or. kvtng Lehrman will preach st 10:30
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Baach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
'realism
Set.. S30 am. Stiabbat Sarvtoas 8:30 pen, Mtncha
Sun., 8:10 sm and 4: JO am.
Monday thru Friday, 7:80 sm snd 6:30 pm
Bsr Mltzvsh of Scott Friedman
(Mini)
TEMPLE BETH AM Or. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami-667-6667 Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Frt..8:1Spm. Fsmlly!
John E Jscob, Free, ot National Urban
League will bs guest speaker.
Sat., 11:16 sm, Torsh Services.
B'nsl Mltzvsh: John Mots,
Paige Brodkln 8 Jannllsr Cohen.
BETH DAVID CONQREQATION
Corel Way: 2828 8.W. 3rd Avenue ',
South Dads 7800 S.W. 120th Street <
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Dads Chapel
Fit, 8 em. Fsmay Sorvioss.
Ones Shebbat Follows.
Coral Wiy Sanctuary
Sat., 8 sm, Shsbbst Semes* conducted by
Rabbi David H. Auerbech snd Cantor William
W. Upson. Bat Mttzvsh ol Jsnet Sandra
Krsdl. Kiddush follows.
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ava.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 856-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Saturday Servtces-8:4 am and 8:30 pm
Sunday Sendees8 sm snd 4:30 pm
Dally Mmysn Sendees7.-48 sm snd 4 pm.
))
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St. N. Miami. FL 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple In North Miami,,
Rabbi Israel Jacobs '<{
Cantor Moehe Frledtcr _.
sTssfJM Erne* Hub Joeeprt A. Gotnnkel
Dally services 6:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
it, 8 pm, Shebbat Eve Sarvleea.
Frl Nits Sermon: "When Qod ToM s Fib."
Sal., ( am. Shabbal Mormno Servtcee
Bar Mltnah ol Seth Si.illey.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
164S Jeff arson Ava., M.B., FL 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nlsslm Benveminl
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave.*41stSt. 536-7231
Dr. Leon Kronlsh, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Convlsar
Frt.8:1am,Saetwlhl:ve8erytcea.
Sat, tell ass. Ssaasssi SarHsss.
eHuMwyl
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONQREQATION 947 7528
1061 N. Miami Beach Blvd. A
Dr. Max A. Upechltz, Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Randall Konlgsburg, Aaet. Rabbi
Frl, 7:80sm.4:80pm.Spm
Bat Mttzrsh ol Lisa Rash
Sal., 8:80 am 4 4: JO pm
Bat Mltnah ol Crslg 8. Shutmsn
Oaky Servtees TM sm, 8:30 pm
))
BETH YOSESEPH
CHAIM CONQREQATION
Ortnooox
843 Meridian Ava.
Dow Roz#ocw4il*g, Ribol
RABBINICAL ASSOa ATION
OF QREATER MIAMI
4200 Blacayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houeee ot Worship
Phone: 57*4000
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONQREQATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schlff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Mimi s Pioneer Reform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
HaBkell M. Bernat, Senior Rabbi
Donald P. Cashman, Assistant Rabbi
Jacob Q. Bornsteln, Cantor
Rachelle Nelson, Student Cantor
Philip Qoldln, Exec. Dlr.
Frl.. 8 pm. Kendall Rabbi Bemat will discuss
"Do not Forsake ua when we are old."
Downtown: Rabbi Caehmsn will discuss
"Judaism 8 Capital Punishment."
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Qranada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eleenstat. Rabbi
Fn 8:15 pm. Worship Service.
Weekly Torsh Portion
Hsys Sarah. Genesis 23:1-28:18
Hartsrsh I Kings 1:1-81
Bar Mltzvsh ol Adam Oelber.
TEMPLE KINQ SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Danny Tadmore, Cantor
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz i'Sti
Cantor Murray Yavneh (>, V )J
Morning Servtees8 sm.
Saturday Morning Senriose8 sm.
Evening Borvtoss A80 pm.
Saturday Evening Services 7:45 pm.
TEMPLE NERTAMID
Conservative
7902 Carlyla Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz
Cantor Edward Klein
OaUyMbiyanatSa
Sunday taasBBB st 8:30 sm
866-6345
m
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971-Northeaet 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
661-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TERLLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ave. end 75 St.
Rabbi Warren Kasttl
Modern Orthodox
362-3343 382 0898
Frt,7swOsbBS8ti8sMiJii Sot. 830 sm,
Senlese. eat Basils 20 Bssiyiii lialus I
sskiyans M 8 Th. 8MB as*.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dede's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Klngaley, Rabbi 832 9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramaay, Administrator
Fn^*14em.FemtlyWorehp Santa
Sat.. 10:10 am, Worship Samoa
Bat MKjveh el Alyee Swart.
TEMPLE DON Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi,,
Benjamin Adter. Cantor (\

dm. Cantor ,'llV,
toaa Men. 8 Thurs. 7 am v-TT '.
BreBlrvtoaa 8:18 s
Or.Na
Frl, 8.14 pm
anShapa-awH
SOUTHEAST REGION /,-.
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
Msa
-.'..
'-----------UNlUd OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Dor al Executive Office Park, 3785
NW 82 Ava., Suit* 210, Miami, Fl.
33166, S02-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Ltttrojtn. regional director



*
'*

Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 28.1983
Michael Adler Reports
Record Sum Pledged

The United Jewish Appeal's
Young Leadership Cabinet an-
nounced a program to forge ties
between young leadership of the
American Jewish community and
young professional leaders in Is-
rael at its annual retreat recently
held in Princeton, New Jersey.
During the Retreat, members
of the Young Leadership Cabinet
pledged more than $4 million to
the 1984 campaign, an increase of
more than $1 million over last
year's pledges by the same
donors. This figure includes $1.6
million in new pledges to Project
Renewal.
"This is a record-breaking
campaign achievement," said
Michael M. Adler, a national
chairman of the cabinet and
chairman of their upcoming na-
tional conference. "It's impera-
tive that the cabinet set the
example in terms of their com-
mitment, as well as continuing to
play an active role involving all
Jewish issues," he said.
Stephen Greenberg, newly
installed national chairman of
Young Leadership, appointed
Daniel R. Rubin as chairman of
Israel Diaspora Relations to
organize the first World Young
Leadership Assembly in Israel.
Fifty young Americans will join
75 Israeli counterparts and 25
other young Jewish leaders from
nations around the world at the
Assembly to be held from
December 11-14.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Young Leadership
Cabinet was represented at the
retreat by Adler, Saby Behar,
Jeff Berkowitz, Richard
Berkowitz, Louis Berlin, Brian
Bilzin, Tim Cohen, Kenneth
Hoffman, Ezra Katz, Michael
Katz, Jon Kislak, Alan Kluger,
Ron Kohn, Jack H. Levine,
Robert J. Merlin, David L.
Perkins, Ed Shohat, Miami
chairman of the Cabinet, John
Sumberg, Eric Turetsky, Allan
Yarkin and Richard Zinn.
Temple Israel
Series
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami Sisterhood will hold their
meeting Nov. 1, 11 a.m. in the
Wolfson Auditorium, and will
feature "Cultural Happenings."
book review series. Rabbi Haskell
M. Bernat will review two books,
"Ancient Evenings." by Norman
Mailer and "The World is Made
of Glass." by Morris L. West.
"We will be discussing the
'Erotic Obsession in American
Fiction"." said Rabbi Bernat.
"One book is about ancient
Egypt and the other is a fictional
account of the life of psychoana-
lyst C.J. Jung.
JoAnne Bander and Nettie
Werner are chairpersons.
RECOGNIZE SINGER
LEADERSHIP
Rabbi Irving Lehrman congratulates Commissioner Singer for helping to bnng
about new projects and public improvements, using state and federal funds
instead of city tax dollars.
U.S. Congressman Claude Pepper is encouraged by the reduction in violent
crimes against the elderly in Miami Beach.
Former Florida Assistant Attorney General
Former Miami Beach Chief Assistant
City Attorney
Named One of the Outstanding
toung Men in America

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}AJE Annual Day School
itute Set for Monday
260 teachers will parti-
J Z Annual Day School
"in Service Institute
*^n be held on Monday.
JuttheHillel Community
fcchool North Miami Beach.
Lfcynote speaker of the day
TvasU Kerensky. Professor
ununity Education at the
U Atlantic University. Dr.
uky will be speaking on
Changing Role of the
n in the Coming Decade.
ter his general presentation,
I participating teachers will
\up into various workshops
hiding on the levels of inter-
I [he elementary, junior high
|h school categories. Head-
these workshops will be: Dr.
Insky elementary General
fies; Rabbi Mordechai
laidraan, elementary Judaic
lies; Dr. Solomon Lichter,
ler principal of Miami Beach
^School and Nautilus Junior
[ School for junior and senior
"General Studies and Dr.
lachem Raab. Director of Day
Department at Central
Agency for Jewish Education for
junior and senior high Judaic
Studies.
Credit towards professional
growth in both General and
Judaic areas is offered to all
teachers attending. The Institute
is being sponsored by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education
and the Council of Principals and
Administrators. "The annual
program presents an opportunity
of in-study and professional
growth for all teachers in the day
school movement. An added
highlight of the Institute will be
the displays of books and educa-
tional equipment and supplies
and individual workshops con-
ducted by the various schools for
their respective faculties," Dr.
Menachem Raab, Day School
Department Director, co-
ordinator of the Institute, said:
Dr. Kerensky, the keynote
speaker, was named this year to
the Eminent Scholars Chair in
Community Education at Florida
Atlantic University where he
has been on the staff since 1966.
Pioneer Chapters Vary Programs
! e Brucker. president of
t Chapter of Pioneer Women-
nat, announced that a
program will be held
in the auditorium of
ncial Federal Savings and
Assoc., Miami Beach,
lining at 1 p.m. The musical
lion will be conducted by
Levitan. Special honors
|be presented to Veda Gruber,
i Greenberg, Bertha Katz,
Greenfield, Esther
aryn, Riva Kroll, Libby
lik, Ruth Schultz, Benjamin
pnik. Dr. Emilek Sc handle
iFrieda Levitan.
he Masada Chapter will hold
r meeting at 12:30 p.m. Nov.
I the auditorium of American
gs and Loan Assoc., Wash-
ington Ave., Miami Beach, ac-
cording to Bertha Liebmann,
president. Guest speaker will be
Ruth Finer.
According to Lilian Hoffman,
president of liana Chapter, the
annual paid-up Membership
luncheon meeting will be held
Nov. 1, noon, in the Social Room
of Winston Tower 300, Sunny
Isles. Patricia Gayle is in charge
of entertainment.
Rabbi Littman Featured
Temple Sinai of North Dade is
featuring Rabbi Lewis Littman
who will present "A Musical Tale
of Two Cultures" on Sunday,
Oct. 30, at Wiener Social Hall, 3
p.m.
B'nai ffrifli to
Honor Bill Gun ter
B'nai B'rith International will
honor Florida State Treasurer
and Insurance Commissioner Bill
Gunter with its American Tradi-
tions Award for his many years
of community service and leader-
ship. The award will be presented
Nov. 5 at a dinner at the
Sheraton Bal Harbor Hotel in
Miami Beach.
Chairmen of the dinner are
attorney Marvin S. Rosen,
Michael M. Adler and Stephen L.
Riemer. Malcolm H. Fromberg,
senior international vice
president of B'nai B'rith and
candidate for mayor of Miami
Beach, will present the award and
be the main speaker.
Proceeds from the dinner will
support youth service programs
of B'nai B'rith, including 13
campuses in Florida.
Gunter has been active in civic
affairs since 1966 when he was
elected to the Florida Senate. A
reform leader, he was vice
chairman of the Ways and Means
Committee, chairman of an
appropriations subcommittee
and co-chairman of the
Legislative Auditing Committee.
During his tenure, Florida was
one of the few states to show a
budget surplus even though the
state continued to expand its
service.
Gunter returned to Florida in
1976 to serve as state treasurer
and insurance commissioner. In
1978 he was overwhelmingly re-
elected to a four-year term and in
1982 he was unopposed for still
another term.
Beth Am Workshop
Temple Beth Am will hold
workshops on bereavement, Nov.
2, 7:30 p.m. to 10 p.m. in the
Sanctuary. Lecturers will be Edie
Stark, RN, BS, Grief and Ber-
eavement Counselor: Doris Bass,
Florida International University
and Barbara Lopatin, RN,
Patient Care Coordinator of
Broward County.
Friday, October 28, 1983 / The Jewish Ftoridian Page 16-B
Religious Faiths Issue Resolution
The religious leaders of the
community issued a resolution
calling for prayers to be recited
during Sabbath services on Oct.
29 and Oct. 30 for the victims of
the bombing in Lebanon. The
resolution was issued by the
Archdiocese of Miami, the
Metropolitan Fellowship of
Churches and the Rabbinical As-
sociation of Greater Miami.
The resolution stated:
"We, the clergy of the
community, deplore the
recent acts of terrorism in
Lebanon which resulted in
the death of over 200 Amer-
ican servicemen and the
wounding of many others'.
Our hearts go out to the
grieving families of these
victims during this painful
period. We call for prayers to
be recited in all houses of
worship during Sabbath ser-
vices on Saturday and Sun-
day, Oct. 29 and Oct. 30. We
ask for prayers to be recited
for the souls of the victims
and for a speedy recovery to
the wounded. We pray that
their families will be com-
forted by Divine strength.
We pray that all people of
good will will call for im-
mediate steps that will bring
an end to all acts of terrorism
and to a beginning of an era
when respect for justice and
human values will prevail.
Only in this way will
security and peace be es-
tablished at long last in that
troubled area and to the
entire world."
The statement was issued by:
Archbishop Edward A.
McCarthy, Archdiocese of
Miami; Reverend T. Luther
Jones, President and Reverend
Jim Plinton, Executive
Secretary, Metropolitan Fellow-
ship of Churches; Rabbi Max. A.
Lipschitz, President, and Rabbi
Solomon Schiff, Executive Vice
President, Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami.
New Tax Laws
New tax laws will be taught in
a program "How to Lower Taxes
By Arrangements Within the
Family," on Thursday, Nov. 3, 8
p.m., at the South Dade Jewish
Community Center. Dr. Elliott
Manning, director of the Gradu-
ate Program on Taxation at the
University of Miami Law School,
will be guest speaker.
Slide Show Slated
Hadar Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will hold a
meeting Thursday noon, Nov. 3,
at the First Nationwide Savings
and Loan Association Auditori-
rum, Bal Harbour. Dr. Archibald
and Shulameth Cohen will show
slides of their recent visit to
Israel.
Academy Book Review
Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy will hold their monthly
meeting in the Junior-Senior
High School Library, Oct. 26, 1
p.m. Mrs. Lena Mirvis will re-
view "An Orphan in History," by
Paul Cowan. Mrs. Hermia Rein-
hard is president.
Rabbi Katz at Forum
Gershon Miller, president of
B'nai B'rith Lodge 1591, an-
nounces the weekly forum will be
held Oct. 28, 12:30 p.m. at the
Lincoln Road Social Hall. Guest
speaker will be Rabbi Joseph
Katz who will speak about the
Middle East and his recent trip to
Israel.
Menorah Classes
A 30-week Adult Lecture
Series for men and women learn-
ing to speak Hebrew is held
Wednesday evenings at Temple
Menorah, under the direction of
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, spir-
itual leader.
**
do
"
BEN Z. GRENALD
PUNCH 41
W*
K&*
aW
\V** VOTERS INC.
REAL ESTATE ACTION COUNCIL OF DADE
MIAMI BEACH FRATERNAL ORDER OF POLICE
CITIZENS ADVOCATING RIGHTS FOR ELDERLY (C.A.R.E.)
Board of Directors
COUNCIL OF CONDOMINIUMS OF DADE COUNTY INC.
TIEMPO NUEVO NEWSPAPER
MIAMI BEACH NEWS
HISPANIC POLITICAL ORGANIZATION OF MIAMI BEACH
DADE COUNTY COUNCIL OF SENIOR CITIZENS
FOR
BETTER
GOVERNMENT
FREE RIDES TO POLL
Call
538-6144
538-6145
538-6178
538-6179
^ ELECT
GRENALD
caycSSrSon PUNCH 41
GROUP5 "^? xZ*


Page 16-B The Jewiah Floridian / Friday, October 28,1983
<


*
Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF F LOR I DA, IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
Civil Action No. H-MM
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
INRE The marriage of:
MARIE CONSTANCE
MAURER.
Petitioner,
and
DAVID PAUL MAURER.
Respondent
TO: DAVTDPAUUMAURER
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage haa been
fllad iplnit you and you arc
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses if any. to It on
MARTIN ROTH, attorney tor
Petitioner, whoa* address la 14
N. E. 1st Avenue. Miami. Flor-
ida 33182. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 4. 1M*. otherwise
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week tor tour con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 30th day of Sep-
tember. 1983.
RICHARD P BRISKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Martin Roth
Attorney at Law
14 N.E 1st Avenue
Suite 1111
Miami, Florida 33133
Attorney for Petitioner
13334 October T. 14:
21.28. 1B83
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 81 34434
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROY ORTIZ
Petitioner-Husband
and
MARIA ORTIZ
Respondent Wife
TO: MARIA ORTIZ
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that,
an action tor dissolution of
marriage haa been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq.. 1S4B0
N.W. 7th Ave Suite 206.
Miami. Florida 33168 on or be-
fore November 4, 1988 and file
the original with the clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter' other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the Petition.
DATED: Octobers. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: S. Verzaal
as Deputy Clerk
13343 October 7.14.
21.28,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 83-34420
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
IRVING M. SHAPIRO
Petitioner-Husband
and
BELLE SHAPIRO
Respondent-Wife
TO: BELLE SHAPIRO
Residence Address:
BELLE SHAPIRO
1639 Emmons Avenue
Brooklyn. New York
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action tor dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq., 16490,
N.W. 7th Ave Suite 306,
Miami. Florida 33169 on or be-
fore November 11,1983 and file
the original with the clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the Petition.
DATED: Septembers*. 19S8
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: Kathleen Shaw
aa Deputy Clerk
13329 October 7,14;
21,38,1*68
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
ClVil Action NO. 13-34477
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE : THE MARRIAGE OF
NANCY DELGADO.
Wife,
and
CARLOS DELGADO.
Husband.
TO: CARLOS DELGADO
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTT
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage haa been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
Albert L. Carrtcarte. P.A.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 34*1 N.W 7th Street,
Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 4, 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week tor tour con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 39 day of Sep-
tember. 1963
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
Albert L. Carrtcarte. P.A.
2491 NW 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Telephone: (3061649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
13330 October 7,14;
21.38,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-35797
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VIVIAN C.BARRO-
THOMPSON
Petitioner
and
DONALDO THOMPSON,
Respondent.
TO: DONALDO THOMPSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
M. CRISTINA DEL-VALLE. .
attorney tor Petitioner, whose
address is DEL-VALLE A
NET8CH. P.A. 86 Grand Canal
Drive. Miami. Florida 33144
(Third Floor), and file the orig-
inal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 14,1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 11 day of
October. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
13365 October 14. 21. 28.
November 4. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION No 83-34*49
FAMILY CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MAGARRE ANDRE
AUGUSTS ACHTLLE.
Petitioner
and
JEAN FRITZ ACHILLE
Respondent.
TO: Jean Frtte Achllle
Delmaa 64 No. 444
Port Au Prince. Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition tor
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
to this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
David E. Stone, Esq., attorney
tor Petitioner, whose address U
1401 West Flagler Street Suite
301. Miami. Florida 33136. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before November 4, 1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you tor the
relief prayed tor in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for tour con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 30th day of
September. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByB.J. FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Stone. Sostchin and Gonzalez.
P.A.
David E. Stone. Esq.
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
13342 October 7.14.
21,28.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 83 34*04
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
ATHENA KAY STUNNECK
Petitioner
and
JOHN C. STUNNECK
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: JOHN C.
STUNNECK,
3610 Archmere Av
Cleveland, Oh. 44109
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re
quired to serve a copy ef youi
written defenses upon: I.
JEROME GRAFF, ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 633 N.E. 167 St.,
N.M.B. Florida 33163. on or be-
fore November 4. 1983. and file
the original with the clerk of
this court otherwise a default
will be entered against you.
Dated: September80.1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
ByN A Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
13336 October 7. M.
21.28,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 11351 50
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MYRLAM BELTRAN,
Petitioner
and
JUAN RAMON BELTRAN
Respondent
TO: Juan Ramon Belt ran
Co Sylvia Beltran
7 79 Gave Street.
Urb Lourdes, Saint Just
Trujlllo *Jto. Puerto Rico
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
fled that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on MILTON C. GOODMAN,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 19 West
Flagler Street Suite 520.
Miami. Florida 33130, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before 14 November. 1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 5th day of
October, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Arden Wong
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Milton C. Goodman, Esq.
19 West Flagler Street,
Suite 630
Miami, Florida 33130
13300 October 14. 21,38;
November 4,1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the underatgned.
desiring to engage to business
under the fictitious name
CALLE OCHO TAXI in Miami.
Florida, and Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
METROLTMCINC.
A Florida corporation
By: SlgmundZilber.
President
13349 October7.14.
31.38.1983
~~. NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
PAUL YOUNG'S COFFEE
SHOP at 6966 N.W. 77 Ave..
Miami, Fla. Intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
H.O.L.A.. INC.
BY: MYRIAN YOUNG.
President
13346 October 7.14;
21,28. 1963
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage to business
under the fictitious name Bob's
Ices at 18707 S. Dixie Highway.
Miami. Florida, intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Bob's Ices, Inc.
Eric B. Turetsky. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
13372 October21,28;
November 4, 11.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
JP.A.L. INVESTORS TRUST, a
.Florida General Partnership at
'6000 Collins Avenue. Apart
jment 3003, Miami Beach.
'Florida 33140. intend to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
ISIDORE J. WOLLOWICK
PATRICIA WOLLOWICK
Edward E. Levlnaon, Esq.
Myers, Kenln, Levtnson,
Ruffner, Frank and Richards
Attorneys for PAL
INVESTORS
TRU8T. A Florida General
Partnership
13327 October7,14, 21.38, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13 34570
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CARLOS J DELGADO. ,
Petitioner,
and
ZOILA ESPERON PADRON.
Respondent.
TO: ZOILA ESPERON
PADRON
Avenlda37.No. 10811
Entre 108 y 110
Reparto Homo
Marianao. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ at-
torney tor Petitioner, whose
address Is 1800 S.W 8th Street,
Suite 208, Miami, Florida 33135.
and die the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 4,1983:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 30 day of Sep
tember, 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC P Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13332 October 7. 14
21.38, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 83 344*8
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
LILEITH DEANS
Petitioner-Wife
and
HORACE DEANS
Respondent-Husband
TO: HORACE DEANS
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq 16490
N.W. 7th Ave., Suite 206.
Miami. Florida 33169 on or be-
fore November 4. 1963 and file
the original with the clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
DATED: October3,1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(CircuitCourt Seal)
BY: Clarlnda Brown
as Deputy Clerk
1M44 October 7.14,
31.38,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONST RUCTIV E SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83 35*53
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FRANCY HELENA
CAMPUZANO de SEGURA.
Petitioner Wife.
and
JORGE ENRIQUE
SEGURA.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: JORGE ENRIQUE
SEGURA
6 St. Leonards Rd.
Brighton-Sussex. England
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has been
Bled against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to it on
ALAN S KESSLER. attorney
tor Petitioner, whose address Is
The Roney Plasm. Suite M-8.
3301 Collins Ave.. Miami
Beach. Fla. SS138, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before.
November 14.1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse-
cutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 11 day of
October. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
AlanS rfessler, Esq.
2301 Collins Ave Suite M-8
Malmi Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (306)538-4431
13364 October 14.21.28;
November4.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 33 3*93*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOHN THEODORE SMITH.
Petitioner,
and
El-A IN A CHE RISK
SWANN SMITH.
Respondent.
To: ElalnaCherlse
Swan Smith
Hospital Rd ,
Grand Turk Island
Turks and Calcos Islands
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on LAWRENCE M SHOOT.
ESQUIRE. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
3000 Blscayne Blvd.. Suite 315.
Miami. Fla 33137. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 28,1983. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEW ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 19th day of
October. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By S VERZAAL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Lawrence M. Shoot, Esq.
3000 Blscayne Blvd Suite 315
Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone: (306)573-6010
Attorney for Petitioner
13388 October 38;
November 4. 11.18. 1983
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 83 3*159
IN RE The Marriage of:
ICLELIE EDUARD.
Petitioner-Wife
and
DOUGLAS EDUARD.
Respondent-Husband
To: DOUGLAS EDUARD.
Residence unknown, shall
serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition tor Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney, 12.
N.W. 13th Avenue. Miami.
Florida. 3S136, and file original
with Court Clerk on or before
November 28,1983; otherwise s
default will be entered.
October 14, ltSS.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: KATHLEEN SHAW
13376 October 21. 38,
November 4,11,1983
NOTICE OF ACTIO* i
^s&Sff
Civil Action No. S
ACTION FOR DlSsXj
F MARRIAGE
INRETheMarri.",
PATRICIA ALLEN*
Petitioner,
and
EDWARD D ALLEN
Respondent
TO: Edward D Allen
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY 1
FIED that an ^
Dlssolutlon of Mam, I
been filed against you LI
are required to serve coo,,
your written defense.. 131
It on Kathleen PhlUlB.
torney tor Petitioner \
address Is 711 b'ikm
Building, 19 West Flan
Street, Miami. Fionas um
the original with the cleit.
the above styled court on i
before November it m
otherwise a default wU: |
entered against you fe, |
relief demanded in th
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be pubtt..
once each week for lour ca
secutlve weeka in
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand andt
seal of said court at Idas
Florida on this Tth da<
October, i98s
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, ClrcultCourt
Dad'County Florida
By STEVEN B0BES
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
Kathleen Phillips
711 Blscavne Bldg.
19 W. Flagler St
Miami. Florida33130
Telephone 303-374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
13362 October 14.21.1
November 4,1
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT |
OF THE 11TH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, INANDFOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDll
Civil Action No. 63-34674
INRE: The Marriageo(
NIAZALIBAIG
and
LINDA PEARL BAIG
TO: Linda Pearl Balg
Residence Unknown
A Petition for Dlssolutkr, i
your Marriage haa beenfllrtl'
this court and you are requtretf
to serve a copy of your *iS
defenses on Alec Ron, I
tornev for Petitioner, at 1
N.E. 19 Ave Miami. Fla I
file the original with thee
of the above court on or btk
November 4. 1983; otntnnaf
default will be entered anl
you.
WITNESS my hand anda
at Miami. Florida on OctcoerJ
1983
RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByCP .COPELAND
As DeputyClerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
13340 October: I4|
21.2*. II
NOTICE OF ACTION ,
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE!
(NO PROPERTY! I
.NTHEC.RCUITCOUTOn
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIUJ
CIRCUIT OF FLORID*.J"I
AND FOR DADE COUNT'I
Civil Action NO 83 "W
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTl"
OF MARRIAGE
INRF. The Marrlageo!
JAIME RAMIREZ.
Petitioner.
and
ALICIA MEJIA.
Respondent
TO Alicia Me)la ^..,
ManianaNol'aN0<
Barrio San Fernando
Perelra. Colombia
VOU ARE HEREBY
FIED that an *"
Dissolution of Ma/nap I
been flted MSinrt jrou-JJ
are required to *]
your written defense*. '|
ff on MELVIN -I f^
ESQ. attorney for P
whose address lj
th Street l ,
Miami, Florida.U i
rteortgto.lw.th'M*M
the above stylsd cow. m
before November! J
otherwise a defau" I
entered against m M
relief demanded
plaint or petition. ^|
WITNESS my h*J5J
-j eg said jftfa
Florida on th" *
October, 1983 -&!
ByA. Deputy Cle* I
Circuit Court*^rlta


Friday, October 28, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
iblic Notice
INTHECIRCU.TCOURT
HoiDE COUNTY, FLORIDA
*?ROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83-7801
Division 04
'v HF ESTATE OF
Anthony truscello.
B
ANTONIO TRUSCELLO
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
ALL PERSONS HAVING
.AIMS OR DEMANDS
RANST the ABOVE ES-
^ AND ALL OTHER
1RSONS INTERESTED IN
,E ESTATE:
Y0L ARE HEREBY NOTI-
iD that the administration
the estate of ANTHONY
USCELLO. SR.. a-k-a AN-
010 TRUSCELLO, de-
ied File Number 83-7801, li
nijlng in the Circuit Court for
ide County. Florida, Probate
viuon, the address of which
Srd Floor, Dade County
Ihouie, 73 West Flagler
,_jt, Miami. Florida 33130
e co-personal represent*-
M of the estate are Salvatore
Truscello Jt Edward J. Trus-
ilo whose addresses are 9*46
W Mth Avenue. Miami. Flor-
k 9158 8.W. 97th Terrmce.
ml, Florida SS176. respec-
ly The name and address
the personal representa-
attorney are set forth
low.
All persons having claims or
inlands against the estate are
d, WITHIN THREE
I0NTHS FROM THE DATE
THE FIRST PUBLICA-
I0N OF THIS NOTICE, to file
the clerk of the above
a written statement of
claim or demand they may
ive Each claim must be In
iting and must Indicate the
.ii for the claim, the name
address of the creditor or
agent or attorney, and the
lount claimed. If the claim la
t yet due, the date when It
become due shall be
ted. If the claim Is con tin -
;l or unliquidated, the
iture of the uncertainty shall
itated. If the claim la se-
. the security shall be de-
bed The claimant, shall
liver sufficient copies of the
im to the clerk to enable the
rk to mall one copy to each
inonal representative.
|AII persons Interested in the
ite to whom a copy of this
nee of Administration has
mailed are required.
IN THREE MONTHS
0M THE DATE OF THE
ST PUBLICATION OF
0 NOTICE, to file any ob
Uons they may have that
lllengei the validity of the
(dent's will, the quail-
itlons of the personal rep-
ratatlve, or the venue or
diction of the court.
LL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
[D OBJECTIONS NOT SO
-ED WILL BE FOREVER
RRED.
l^.0J^enr,tPub"c*Uo'n
luus Notice of Admliuatra-
i. October 28,1088
SHvatoreA Truscello
As Co-Personal
Representative
of the Estate of
Anthony Truscello, Sr.
a-k-a
Antonio Truscello
Deceased
Edward Truscello
* Co-Personal
Representative
,,. ofthe Estate of
Anthony Truscello Sr
a-k-a
Antonio Truscello
J-yforCc-Peraon.ereMed
pfesentatlves:
f* f romberg, Esq.
p*lrrjmbW Roth,
** Cohen. Shore Berke.
fc^* Highway.
tables. Fla.ssi 48
PPhone. 30M66-6822
October 28;
November 4,1088
pcrmou $ NAME LAW
Wtttl ,i8 "KREBY
kr ,1. *nga*e business
IS 22?CKNTER S
Ni intend **". Mtaml.
* of Dade County,
?vtYLLYr?OLOMON
D FRIEDMAN.
-yfor
f-Y SOLOMON
KNfeltflttl.
U^h. Florida asja*
<:toberl4,2l,28;
Novernber4,l988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-34018
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ARYECHANAN
ROTSHTYN
Petitioner-Husband
and
ANDREA ROSS
ROTSHTYN
Respondent-Wife
TO: ANDREA ROSS
ROTSHTYN
c-o Laurie Kearns
28 Mechanic Street
Webster, Maaa. 01S70
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on DAVTD S. BERGER.
attorney for Petitioner, whoae
address Is 089 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach, Florida
33130, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November
18. 1088: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of amid court at Miami,
Florida on this 12th day of
October 1088.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVIDS. BEROER
000 Washington Avenue
Miami, Florida 88189
Attorney for Petitioner
18871 October 31.28:
____________November 4,11,1 a
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 83-8IM
DIVISION: 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY M. NORTH,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST SAID ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN SAID
ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the Estate of DOROTHY M.
NORTH, deceased, late of
Dade County, Florida, has
commenced in the capUoned
proceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file
any claims and demands which
you may have against the
Estate and to file any challenge
to the validity of the Last Will
and Testament offered for
probate. If any, or any
objection to the qualifications
of the Personal Rep-
resentative, venue or
jurisdiction of the Court, with
the Court, Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR YOUR
RIGHT TO DO SO WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First Publication of this
Notice on the 21st day of
October. 1983.
DONALD K. NORTH
12 Florence Street
Cambridge. MA 021S9
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
DOROTHY M. NORTH.
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PE RSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HERBERT JAY COHEN. P. A.
9400 8. Dade land Blvd.
Suite 800
Miami, Florida 88168
Telephone: (SOB) 888-0401
13878 October 21. 28,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name 44TH
ST. RECREATION AND
LAUNDROMAT at 4408 N.W.
2nd Avenue, Miami, Florida
intends to register said name
with the Clark of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
WASH A GAME INC.
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for
WASH A GAME INC.
420 Lincoln Road
SutlsSTO
Miami Beach. FL 33180
18888 October 14, 21. 28;
November 4, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-34105
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELSA RIVAS,
PetlUoner,
and
JOSE ANTONIO RIVAS.
Respondent.
TO: Jose Antonio Rlvas
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
it on MELVTN J. ASHER,
ESQ., attorney for PetlUoner,
whose address Is 1880 S.W. 8th
Street. Suite. 208. Miami.
Florida SS1S8. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 28,1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
witness my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 18th day of
October .1968.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. SHAW
Aa Deputy Clark
(Circuit Court Seal)
1SS7B October 21. 28;
November 4.11.1988
NOTICE Or* ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-14828
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
KEDA BRANTLEY,
Petitioner-Wife,
and
WILBUR JUNIOR
BRANTLEY.
Reapondent -Husband.
TO: Wilbur Junior BranUey
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on Kramer and Golden, P.A.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Blscayne Centre,
Suite 203. 12000 Blscayne
Boulevard. North Miami. FL
33181. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 4,
1983; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 3rd day of
October, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By S. VERZAAL
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Kramer and Golden. P.A.
Blscayne Centre, Suite 203
12000 Blscayne Boulevard
North Miami, FL 33181
Attorney for Petitioner
13341 October 7,14.
21.28.1083
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANOFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 13-357*3
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
KAREN L. ALPERN
Petitioner Wife
and
LEONARD ALPERN
Respondent-Husband
TO: LEONARD ALPERN
Residence Address:
RE8IDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq., 1B400
N.W. Tth A vs., Suite 208.
MUml. Florida 33189 on or be-
fore November 14.1988 and file
the original with the clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
DATED: October 11.1988
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: S Veriaal
aa Deputy Clark
18888 October 14,21.28;
November 4.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 83.14428
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA ELENA
FERNANDEZ,
Wife,
and
WTLFREDO FERNANDEZ.
Husband.
TO: Wllfredo Fernandez
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on Albert L. Canicarte, P.A.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address la 2491 N.W. 7th St.,
Miami. Florida 38128. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before November 18, 1988;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four
consecutive weeks in THE
JEWI8H FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17th day of
October. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By ARDEN WONO
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L, CARRICARTE.
P.A.
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 88128
(800)849-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
13380 October 21,28;
____________November 4. U. 1883
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY
GENERAL
JURISDICTION DIVISION
CASE NO. 83 34415
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
OF MIAMI,
a United States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
FRANKLIN GRAU; et al..
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: FRANKLIN GRAU
Ave. OdeOctubre 1200,
Guayaquil, Ecuador
YOU ARE NOTIFIED, that
an action to foreclosure a
mortgage on the following
described property In DADE
County, Florida:
Condominium Unit No. 10810-
B. Building 10810 N.W. 7th St. of
LACUNA CLUB
CONDOMINIUM, according to
the Declaration of
Condominium thereof,
recorded June B. 197B In Official
Records Book 9009. at Page
1808, of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida, as
amended: together with all
Improvements, appliances and
fixtures located thereon
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
If any. to It on Keith, Mack,
Lewis A Allison, Plaintiff's
attorneys, whoae address la 111
N.E. 1st Street. Miami. Florida
33132, on or before November
18. 1988, and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on
Plaintiff's attorneys or
Immediately thereafter;
otherwise, a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the
complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on the 14th day of
October. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: CLARINDA BROWN
Deputy Clark
18877 October 21,28;
November 4.11, 1083
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 8334712
IN RE: The Marriage of
MYRACENE ZAVO.
PetlUoner Husband,
vs.
NADILAZAVO,
Reapondent Wife
TO N ADILA ZAVO No. BO Rue
Vernet Gonalve, Haiti shall
serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney, 812 N.W.
12th Avenue, Miami, Florida,
88188, and file original with
Court Clerk on or before
November 18,1988; otherwise a
default will be entered.
October 18,1888.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: CLARINDA BROWN
18881 October 21,28
November 4, 11,1088
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 83-35740
| IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOAN BRODIE
Petitioner-Wife
and
WILBER BRODIE
Respondent-Husband
TO: WILBER BRODIE
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are requir-
ed to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses. If any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq., 18490
N.W. 7th Ave., Suite 206.
Miami, Florida 83180 on or be-
fore November 18,1983 and file
the original with the clerk of
this |Court either before ser-
vice on Petitioner'! attorney or
Iimmediately thereafter; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
DATED: October 11, 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: N. A.Hewett
as Deputy Clerk
18889 October 14.21.28;
,_______________November 4.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASENO.:IJ35178
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN EDWARD MARTIN
Petitioner-Husband
and
ANNA MARTIN
Respondent Wife
TO: ANNA MARTIN
Residence Address
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq., 1B490
N.W. Tth Ave.. Suite 206.
MUml, Florida 83189 on or be-
fore November 14.1988 and file
the original with the clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the Petition.
DATED: Octobers, 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: ARDEN WONG
As Deputy Clerk
18862 October 14, 21,28;
November 4.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 81-35182
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MISTRAL TELLY RAN D
Petitioner Husband
and
ISABEL TELLYRAND
Respondent-Wife
TO: ISABEL TELLYRAND
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq.. 184*0
N.W. Tth Ave, .Suite 806.
Miami. Florida 88180 on or be-
fore November 14,1988 and file
the original with the clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the Petition.
DATED: October8.1988
Richard P. Brlnker
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: Clarinda Brown
as Deputy Clerk
13888 October 14. M. St;
November 4.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name The
Well South Florida Alternative
Growth Center, at 4210
Braganza Avenue, Coconut
Grove, Florida 881 S3, Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dsde County, Florida.
Lakshml Production
Company
J. David Uebman. Esq.
Attorney for Lakshml
Production Company
18888 October UJH. 28;
November*. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 82-8847
Division 01
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
} IN RE:ESTATE OF
I ISIDORE HERSKOWITZ,
' a-k-a
ISADORE HERSKOWITZ,
Deceased.
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST SAID ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS
INTERESTED IN SAID
ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the Estate of ISIDORE
HERSKOWITZ. a-k-a
ISADORE HERSKOWITZ.
deceased, late of Dade County,
Florida, has commenced in the
captloned proceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file
any claims and demands which
you may have against the
Estate and to file any challenge
to the validity of the Last Will
and Testament offered for
probate. If any, or any
objection to the qualifications
of the Personal Rep-
resentative, venue or
jurisdiction of the Court, with
the Court, Dade County
Courthouse, Miami, Florida,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR YOUR
RIGHT TO DO SO WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
First publication of this
Notice on the 28th day of
October. 1888.
BERNARD HERSKOWITZ
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ISIDORE HERSKOWITZ,
a-k-a
ISADORE HERSKOWITZ
Deceased
7601 S.W. H4th Street
Miami. Florida SS1B6
JEROME HERSKOWITZ
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ISIDORE HERSKOWITZ
a-k-a
ISADORE HERSKOWITZ,
Deceased.
480 Campana Avenue
Coral Gables. Florida SS1B6
Attorneys for Personal
Representative:
SAMUEL 8. SMITH
1111 Lincoln Road Mall
Miami Beach. FL 88189
Telephone: (SOB) 878-1100
13388 October 28;
November 4.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-18979
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARITZA MARTINEZ.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
JOSE B. HERNANDEZ.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: JOSE B. HERNANDEZ
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
LUIS VTDAL, attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 1780
West 49th Street. Suite 811. Hla-
leah. Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 28,1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 19 day of
October. 1088.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByKSelfrled
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LUIS VTDAL. ESQ.
1780 West 49th St..
Suite SI 1
Hlaleah. Florida S8012
Telephone: isosi 668-0006
Attorney for Petitioner
13887 October28;
November 4,11,18,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
PEPOO at 2700 N.E. 209th
Street North Miami Beach,
Florida 88180 Intend to register
jald name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Gopm an Pepper
Associates. Inc.
1S88T October?, 14;
21,28,1983


^^^^
mm
Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 28.1983
PublicNotice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
KM
DAOE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PKOBATI DIVISION
File Number 83 6044
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CARIDAD GALATAS
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AOAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of
CARIDAD GALATAS.
deceased. FUe Number 83-8064.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Uth Judicial Dlvision. Dade
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130 The
personal representative of the
estate Is ANA MARIA
GALATAS. whose address U
MSB S.W. lom Court. Miami.
Dade County, Florida. The
name and address of the
personal representative s
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having- claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Admlnlatra-
tlon: October 21. 1988
ANA MARIA GALATAS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
CARIDAD GALATAS
Deceased.
Attorney for Personal
Representative
Juan F. Gonxales. Esqulr*
1481 N.W. North River Drive
Miami, Florida 83130
Telephone: (3061 324-0909
1837B October 21.28. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
ECONOMEAT A FISH In
Miami, Florida and Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
PEROLI CORP.,
a Florida corporation
By: Julio Oilva
President
13328 October 7. 14, 21.28,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
LOTUS FLORAL DESIGNERS
at 9481 SW. 83 St.. Miami. Fla.
83166, Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
JOSEFINA GRANDE
Owner
13338 October 14,21. 28;
November 4.1383
A.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under fictitious name ABC Alr-
condltlonlng Repair A Sales at
1669 Michigan Ave Miami
Beach Fla. 331 SOUntende to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Alberto Varela
13373 October21, 28:
November*. 11. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TNE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-34465
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The marriage of
ALVARO SALCEDO,
Petitioner-Husband,
and
DENISE ADRIAN A ROMANO
de SALCEDO.
Respondent-Wife.
TO DENISE ADRIANA
ROMANO de SALCEDO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you snd you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
ALAN S. KESSLER, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
The Roney Plaza. Suite M-8,
2301 Collins Ave., Miami
Beach. Fla. 33139, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 4, 1983, otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 33 day of Sep-
tember. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALAN S. KESSLER. ESQ.
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
13831 October 7.14:
21.28.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number u tsso
Division S3
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HARRY MOSE8 ADLER,
Deceased
ANCILLARY
AD MINI 8TRATION
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE: Within three months
from the time of the first publl-i
cation of this notice you are re-
quired to file with the clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which Is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130. a written and
verified statement of any claim
or demand you may have
gainst the Ancillary estate of
HARRY MOSES ADLER. de-
ceased.
Each claim must be
lni writing and must Indicate the
basis tor the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver a copy of the claim to
the clerk who shall furnish the
copy to the personal represen-
tative.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
NOT SO FILED WILL BE
FOREVER BARRED.
Dated October 33.1983
DANIEL NEAL HELLER
As Ancillary Psrsonal
Representative
of the Estate of
HARRY MOSES ADLER
Deceased
LOUIS F. 8NETMAN
Attorney for Ancillary
Personal Representative
HELLER A KAPLAN. Esqs.
1306 Israel Discount
BankBldg.
14 N.E. First Avenue
Miami. Florida 33132
Telephone: (306) 888-6644
13892 October 28;
November 4.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
ROBERT'S ONE OF A
KIND at 9700 Collins Avenue.
Bal Harbour, Florida 33164
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
DAM. Inc..
a Florida corporation
Broad and Cassel
Barry D Schrelber. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
13336 October 7.14;
a. 88, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE Cl RCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. S3-Mt3l
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOS
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
REGINAC. GUZMAN
Petitioner
and
RAFAEL GUZMAN
Respondent
TO: RAFAEL GUZMAN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
Fl ED that an action for Dlssol
utlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you arc
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
A. KOSS, ATTORNEY AT
LAW P. A., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
101 N.W. Uth Avenue. Miami.
Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 4, 1983, otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on Una 8 day of
October. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY: Kathleen Shaw
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS, ATTORNEY
AT LAW. P. A.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Telephone: (306)826-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
MARIANO SOLE. ESQ.
13346 October?, 14;
21.26.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-371 S3
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OPMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ARMINDA E. INFANTE.
Petitioner,
and
HECTOR VERONA.
Respondent.
TO: HECTOR VERONA
Carre ra 16
No. 4889 entre 48 y 49
EstadoDeLara
Barqulslmeto.
Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1880 S.W. 8th Street,
Suite 208, Miami. Florida 33136.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 28,
1983; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 20 day of
October. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC.P. Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Coulrt Seal)
13390 October 28;
November 4.11.18. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOFROFERTY)
INTHS CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-3I7BS
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LUIS SANCHEZ,
Petitioner
and
J. GUADALUPE SANCHEZ.
Respondent.
TO: J. Guadalupe Sanchez
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on DEL-VALLE AND
NETSCH. PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 86
Grand Canal Drive. Suite 302,
Miami. Florida 33144. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before November 21, 1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 8th day of
October. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByB.J.FOY
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
13369 October 14.21.28:
November 4.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTHJUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIOA
Csie No. 83-f84-FC-2f
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
JOHN O. IDOWU
Petitioner
and
E. MARY IDOWU
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: E.Mary Idowu
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses to It on John
O. Idowu. Petitioner, whose
address Is 833 N.E. 167 St..
Suite 1018, N. Miami Beach. FL
33162. on or before November 4.
1983 and file the original with
the clerk of this court;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you.
Dated October 3.1983.
Clerk of the Court
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Clerk
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
13339 October 7.14.
21.28,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-21533
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE
MIRTA TORRES
Petitioner,
and
ALBERTOTORRES
Respondent.
TO: ALBERTOTORRES
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on DEL-VALLE AND
NETSCH. PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 88
Grand Canal Drive, Suite 302.
Miami, Florida S3144. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before November 21, 1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6th day of
October, 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByB.J.FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court 8eal)
13388 October 14, 21.28;
November 4.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 63-14*6] FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ANNETTE P. HINES,
Wife
and
CURTIS HINES.
Husband
TO: CURTIS HINES
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlssol
utlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on ARTHUR H. LIPSON.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address U 1930 Tyler Street
Hollywood, Fla. 33030, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before November 4. 1983-
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and th.
eal of said court at Miami1
Florida on this 4 day of
October. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY:C.P Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
18347 October 7,14;
21.28,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Fashion Factory at 6831 8.W.
137th Avenue, Miami. Florida
33183, Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Juan J. Benltez
Juan L. Benltez
13387 October 14.21,28;
fl.Ytmhr .* i
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOFROFERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
Cl RCUIT OF F LOR IDA, IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-34*14
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
HELEN BAPTISTS
Petltloner-Wlfe
and
ARTHUR BAPTISTE
Respondent Husband
TO: ARTHUR BAPTISTE
836 Ocean Avenue
Apt CO
Brooklyn. N.Y. 11226
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2750 N.E. 193rd Street. Miami.
Florida 33180. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
November 28.1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 19 day of
October. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clartnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAY FRIEDMAN. ESQ
2790 N.E 163 Street
Miami. Florida 33180
Telephone: 949-8823
Attorney for Petitioner
13384 October 21, 28;
November4.ll.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
SUNRISE CLEANERS at 16700
N.E. 19th Avenue. No. Miami
Beach. Florida, Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Sunrise Cleaners, Inc.
13317 OctoborT. 14.
31, 28, 1663
nthbcountycoT;
DADE COUNTY,jr"0|,(,
CIVIL MVffi-W|
NOTICE OFicTlOi8
constructVv?
,_ SERVICE PROfSSr,
CHARLES SANDErSf*
Plaintiff. UR-
vs.
ENRIQUE LOPE?
NORMA mJSwL 1
TATE. DJC. K
Defendant.
TO: ENRIQUE L0PEZ
___Address unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED.
an action to require JZ1
a fund held or debt cSrE.
Plaintiff which mtigSi
deposit on a real
contract has been Wed ,_
you. and you are reqZ
serve a copy of your nS
tenses. If any, to It on rcm
AND GOUZ. Plaintiff"
neys. whose addrti, a
Ponce de Leon Blvd., Suit!
Coral Gables, Florida Sa
or before 30 diy of Norm,
1983 and file the ortpuj
the Clerk of the Court t
before service on Plalntsri
torney or Immediately fa
ter. otherwise a DetauItT^
entered against you fee
relief demanded In tht I
plaint.
Dated on 18 day of Orel
1983
RICHARD P BRINKI
As Clerk of the Cwrl
By: KlllnoreKrupu
As Deputy CWrt
FERDIEANDGOUZ
Attorneys for the Plalmffl
717 Ponce de Leon Blvd
Suite 218
Coral Gables. Florida am
Telephone: (306)446-3697
By: AINSI.KF. R FERDB
13382 OctobtrS
November 111
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-35230
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
RAULE. YTURRIA
PeUtloner
and
AMELIA JOSEFINA
LEDEZMA-YTURRIA.
Respondent
TO: Amelia JosefIna
Ledeima-Yturrla
Avenlda Boyaca 99-42
Valencia 2001,
Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on DEL-VALLE AND
NETSCH. PA., attorney for |
Petitioner, whose address Is 86
Grand Canal Dr., Suite 302.
Miami. FL 33144. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
14 November. 1983; otherwise a
default win be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6th day of
October. 1883
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Arden Wong
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Del-Valle and Netach. P.A.
88 Grand Canal Drive No. 302
Miami. Florida 33144
Telephone: (306)264-6283
Attorney for PeUtloner
13364 October 14. 21. 28;
November 4,1963
INTHECIRCUITCOUI
FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLO*IL
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number /(
Division M
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HUGO KUGELMAN,
Deceased.
NOTICE
OF ADM1NISTRATI0J
The administration i
estate of HUGO KUGELH
deceased. File Numbers-
Is pending In the CtrcullQ
for Dade County. Fa
Probate Division, the tiki
of which Is 73 W. Flagler*
Miami. Florida 0134
names and addrestti 4
personal representttht
the personal represents
attorney are set forth best
All Interested pern*
required to file with ihki
WITHIN THREE MOXTB
THE FIRST PUBLIC!!
OF THIS NOTICE (II
claims against the eit*
(2) any objection lj
Interested person to
notice was mallei
challenges the validity I
will, the quallflcatlou I
personal represent*
venue, or Jurisdiction i
court.
ALL CLAIMS
OBJECTIONS NOT301
WILL BE
BARRED
Publication of this M
begun on October 28.lUl
Personal Represent!!*
HENRY N0RTW
1301 Blscayne BuUoMR
19 West Flagler Sit*
Miami. Florldi 8
Attorney for Pertom!
Representative:
Henry Norton
Suite 1201. UW.Flslkf*
Miami. FloridaSJ1
Telephone: (3061 ****
1WB4 0C<*
IS8IM __saas^
NOTICE UN
FICTITIOUS NA*U
NOTICE 19
GIVEN that u
desiring to *#**}
under the flctltW".
Bonnie Kesllni
Attorney at La*.
3860 Blscayne
Mlunl. Florid* SB*
KEPES.P-V
By: Bonnie KsilWJ
NovemboM
; ON0--
FICTITIOUS NAMJ
NOTICE
'GIVEN that tht '
desiring to aojajJR,
under the MgST
ARTURO RJ
4646 NW 7th 90*
Dade County, r-lo"",
6861 Sunset D^ f
South MWml.FK"^
13360


ean Lansburgh, Hotel Owner Passes Sol Roth, 26-Year
lean K. Lansburgh, 63 widow
_,, hotelman Morris Lansburgh.
led Oct. 18 Mrs. Lansburgh, 63,
ill her late husband, who died in
jtf77 owned and operated several
HMiami Beach hotels, including
%L Eden Roc. San Souci and
,aUville. She had been a bene-
tor of several organizations.
.|udinK the Miami Children's
Hospital, National Children's
Cardiac Hospital, Mount Sinai
Medical Center and Temple
Israel.
Survivors include two sons,
Leonard and Mickie; a daughter,
Ellen, a sister. Ruth Fuller, and
seven grandchildren. Services
were held Oct. 20 at Riverside
Chapel.
Resident
tegina Tepper, 45-Year Resident
Services for Regina Tepper
rere held Oct. 24. She had been a
lident of Miami Beach for 45
s. Survived by son, Dr. War-
Tepper; daughter, Gladys
^man; four grandchildren, and
TLBBAUM. Edith. 80. North Miami
Betch Levitt Welnstsln.
MERNBAUM. Sidney I.. M. MUml
t,MBch.Oct 20.Wver.lde.
pRANK. Esther L., Oct 18.
Public Notice
STATE OF FLORIDA
DEPARTMENT OF STATC
I certify that 204TH TE RRACE
ASSOCIATES. LTD.. Limited
Partnership formed under
Chapter 120. Florida Statutes.
laving Its principal place of
business In North Miami
Btach. Florida was cancelled
for failure to file Its 1983 Annual
Report Pursuant to the
provisions of SecUon 630-81,
Florida Statutes, I hereby give
I NOTICE In this newspaper.
which Is published In Dade
County, Florida, that said
limited partnership has filed
all reports and paid all fees
required under law.
Given under my hand and the
Great Seal of the State of
Florida, at Tallahassee, the
Capital, this the 14th day of
October, 1983.
George Firestone
Secretary of State
ISM October 28.1888
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
COURT
DADECOUNTY,FLORIDA
FCClttNo.:CMMM
IN RE The Marriage of
MICHAEL VAUTR0J.
Petitioner Husband
it.
| KATHLEEN P. VAUTRTN,
Respondent Wife
I TO: KATHLEEN P. VAUTRm
J8J Weeden Street
Pautucket.
Rhode Island 03M0
I shall serve copy of your An-
I mr to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLA8. Attor-
ney. lz N. W. 13th Avenue,
I Miami, Florida, 38188. and fUe
original with Court Clark on or
I before November 28. 1888.
otherwise a default will be
I entered
| October 25,1988
RICHARD BRINKER,
Clerk
By: D.C.Bryant
Deputy Clerk
October ,
JjovembsM, U. 18,1888
NOTICR OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA. IN
AND FOB OADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 83-371M
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
'"RE: The Marriage of
PAULINE EDELMIRE.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
TONYEDELMIRE.
Respondent-Husband.
| TO TONY EDELMIRE
30 N EdgewaterAve.
Bridgeport P.O.
SI. Catherine.
Jamaica W.I.
I siV^ ARE HEREBY NOTI-
I f, .7 ,hal an action for Dlsso-
UiUon of Marriage has been
I i against you and you are
j2t0 8erve a cpy of yur
nSSi.tf'en8es' ""y- to "on
UvTV RAMANI, attor-
wy for Petitioner, whose ad-
* Ft7". Bl8C'yne B'dg- ,9
ItW. lttKler strt. Miami,
? r"n\33130andrlletheorlgl-
S1"Uhtne clerk of the above
invied court on or before
I E5SbM 28'198S i otherwise a
fcault wll be entered against
I m for the relief demanded In
"lecomplalnt or petition
I nils notice shall be published
l*^H?ach Week ,or four con-
lBHr^^eek8 ta THE JEW"
1SHFLORIDUN.
WITNESS my hand and the
Inert.. "" Court Miami,
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. Selfried
Jifw,.A" DePuty Clerk
R2?T RAMANI
l,,'BlyneBldg.
|2uMt Pl'r St.
I ^["'V'or Petitioner
L M October 28;
November*. 11.18,1983
brothers, Irving, Moe; sisters,
Betty, Ethel and Phoebie. She
was a member of B'nai B'rith and
Hadassah. Riverside Chapel in
charge of arrangements, inter-
ment at Mt. Nebo.
KRISOFF. Bluma, 88. Miami Beach,
Oct. 31. Rubln-ZUbert.
WHITE, June August, Oct. 81, Gordon.
ML Nebo.
WHITE. Kevin. 9, Miami. Oct SI,
Gordon, ML Nebo.
CONN, Robert A.. 81. Miami. Oct 18,
Lsvltt Welnsteln, Mt. Nebo
HELFER. Alice M Oct 2S, Rubin
ZUbert.
CASSORLA. Herman. Oct. 28. Oordon.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83-SSS1
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LOUIS STAHL,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es
tate of LOUIS STAHL.
deceased File Number 88-
8851, is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Flo-
rida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 78 West
Flagler Street, Miami Florida
13130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repres-
entative and the personal re-
presentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(1) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom this no-
tice was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris-
diction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 88,1888.
Personal Representative:
ETHEL STAHL
1801 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach, FL 81178
MARILYN EASTZER
8815 148th Street
Flushing, NY 11364
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRE8E NT ATI VE:
Michael A. Dribin, Eaq.
Cypen. Cypen and Dribin
P.O. Box 402O9W
Miami Beach. FL 88140
Telephone: (SOB) 632-3200
18888 October SB;
November 4,198S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
File Number 83 7784
Division 81
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAULINE BLOOM
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of PAULINE BLOOM,
deceased. FUe Number 88-7789,
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
Of which Is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Fla. 38180. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an
interested person to whom
notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative,
venue, or Jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS AND
OBJECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 28,1988.
Personal Representative:
MAE S. ALPERIN
18888 N.E. 14th Avenue
No. Miami Beach, Fla.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SAMUEL I. LEFF,
c-o Leff, Pesetaky and Zack.
P.A..
1887 N.E. 182nd Street
No. Miami Beach. Fla., 88182
Telephone: 945-7801
October 28;
November 4.1988
Sol Roth, a Miami Beach civic
leader, died Oct. 22. He was a
member of the Citizens Advisory
Board for improvements of
Miami Beach and treasurer of the
city's Civic League, and had been
a local resident for 26 years.
Mr. Roth was the founder and
president of the King Solomon
Temple, vice president of the Bis
cayne Democratic Club, chair-
man of the Social Service of
Miami Beach and a member of
the Safety Committee of Miami
Beach. He was also affiliated
with the Hebrew Home for the
Aged.
Survivors include his wife, Ida;
daughters, Sharon Pearl, Shirley
Koteen. Marilyn Slotkin and
Jean Zuckerman; a brother, Jo-
seph Roberts, 11 grandchildren
and 13 great-grandchildren.
Services were held Oct. 25 at
Rubin-Zilbert Funeral Home.
WISE
Alma (Frltii), 77, passed away Oct IT.
A Miami resident for over 56 years, she
Is survived by a son, D. Richard
(Lorna) Wise; daughter. Nancl
(Morton) Miller, and 8 grandchildren,
and 3 great-grandchildren. Services
were held Oct. 20. Riverside.
WECHSBERG
Dr. Henry, 64. of Miami, paased away
Oct. 18. He practiced dentistry In Miami
for 82 years. Survived by his son, Orln in
New York, daughter, Wendee of
Nashville, Term., brother, Rabbi
Bernard Wechaberg of Calif, and one
grandchild. Services were held Oct. 20.
Riverside Chapel.
SISSELMAN
Elsa, a resident of 26 years, passed
away Oct. 18. Services were held Oct.
18, Riverside.
DAVIS
Harry L., a resident for 47 years, passed
away Oct. 22. Survived by wife,
Annette; brother, Irving; sister. HatUe
Zurlln He was a member of the
American Institute of Certified Public
Accountants. Services were held Oct
24. Riverside.
WEISRERO
Charlotte, 88, Miami Beach, paased
away Oct SS. A resident here for S3
years, formerly of Carbondale, Pa.
Survived by the late Benjamin; son,
Jullon (Cynthia); and 4 grandchildren
Services were held Oct. St. Riverside.
SOULS
Harold H. Miami, resident for SO year*,
originally from Youngstown, Ohio,
paased away Oct. SO. Survived by Wife,
Madeline; daughter, Babette (Sidney)
Tucker; and four grandchildren.
Services were held Oct. SS. Riverside.
KATES
Philip, 70, of Miami, died on Oct U.
Survived by wife, Esther (Terry);
daughters Tana (Arnold) Merkow and
Susan (Leonard) Gets; granddaughter,
Zaharah Rachel Markoe; brother. Ben-
jamin Kates and sister, Sophie Peakoff.
Contributions may be sent to South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry.
4200 Blscayne Blvd.. Miami. Services
were held Oct. 21 at Riverside Chapel.
KRAVEC
Chaya, 83. Miami Beach, a resident ior
21 years, originally from Lithuania, she
resided In Cuba for 86 years. Survived
by her children. Joee. Rafael, Jacobo,
Ellsa from Cuba, Eugenia, Lucia and
Pure; 16 grandchildren, and 12 great-
grandchildren. She was not only a
mother, but matriarch and guiding light
for the entire family. Funeral services
were held Oct. 26 at Riverside Chapel,
with Interment at Mt. Sinai Cemetery.
Friday, October 28, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
Philip Kates of Miami Passes
Services for Phil Kates, 70, an
active member in several Jewish
organizations, were held on
Friday, October 21 at Riverside
Memorial Chapel. Kates and his
wife, Terry, came to Miami in
1974 from Long Island, New
York.
He was one of the founders of
the A venture Jewish Center, a
member of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Super Sun-
day Executive Committee, a
steering committee member of
the South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry, chairman of the
Jewish Children with Learning
Disabilities Committee of the
Central Agency for Jewish
Education and the founder and
first president of the Long Island
Committee on Soviet Jewry.
Survivors include his wife, Es-
ther (Terry); daughters, Tana
Phil Kates
Markoe and Susan Getz; one
grandchild; brother, Benjamin
Kates and sister, Sophie Peakoff.
Ruth Rudine, Museum Official
Ruth L. Rudine, public rela-
tions director for the Museum of
Science, died Oct. 22. Mrs.
Rudine, the widow of the late
Philip Rudine, had lived on
Miami Beach for more than 30
years.
PECHTER
Tlllle, an area resident for the past 40
years. Wife of the late Harry Pechter,
one of the founders and owners of the
Pechter Bakery of Brooklyn and
Harrison. N.J. Beloved mother of
Morton of New York, Karl of Delray
Beach, Anna Charles of N. Palm Beach
and Addy Adler of Plantation; adored
grandmother of 9; great-grandmother
of 5. She was a member of Congregation
Talmud Torah of Brooklyn, HIAS
Society. Pioneer Women. Hadassah,
ORT and B'nai B'rith. Services were
held Oct. 28 In New York. Memorial
donations may be made to the charity of
your choice. Riverside In charge of
arrangements.
Survivors include her
daughter, Edith Lee Rudine; and
sister, Charlotte Goldstein.
Services were held under the
direction of Blasberg Funeral
Home.
Chaya Kravec,
83, Passes
Services were held for Chaya
Kravec, 83, Oct. 26, at Riverside
Chapels. She was a resident for
21 years, and is survived by chil-
dren, Jose, Rafael, Jacobo, Elisa
from Cuba, and Eugenia, Lucia
and Pura; 16 grandchildren and
12 great-grandchildren.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SIMM BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
18840 West Dixie Hwy.
Reprccnled by S Lrviir. f D
1921 Pembroke Rd
New York: (2i2i 26.1-7x) Queens Blvd & 76th Rd.. Forest Hilis, n.y
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL & Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Leonard Zilbert, Founder
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
Miami Beach '
The Only
Coral Qablaa
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
538-6371
No. Miami Beach-Hallandale
Guaranteed BROWARD
456-4011
Pre-Arrangements
with
No Money In Advance
Main OHIce: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139


Page 20-B The Jewish FlarfcHui / Friday, October 28,1983
are the
Choices
^1

Group VI
? Capitman
? Malek
^Better ^
? Rodriguez
? Wfeisburd
Wife. Margie Former Assistant Federal Public Defender
Three Children, Lea age 16, Avi age 11, and Yael age 6.
Retter is Better!
Better is Best!
Free Ride to Vote
538-8368 532-5254
^
Pd Pol Adv Dan Reller Campaign Fund Or Matthew M Zucherman Treas


pacesetter Dinner Nov. 10/Campaign Opening Dinner Dec. 7
October 1983

WAD THe W^

1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund/
Project Renewal-Or Akiva
Supplement to the Jewish Floridian, Section C, October 28.1983


^mmmmmmmmmmi
mm
mmmtm
Page 2
Federation, October, 1963

Contents

This material was prepared for
The Jewish Florldian Supplement
October 28,1983 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 53137
president
Norman h. Upoff
Executive vice President
Myron J. Brodle
Chairman, communications committee
EHTimoner
CAMPAIGN/ISRAEL CONSULATE PAGE 3
The 1984 CJ A-I EF/Project Renewal-Or Akiva seeks to meet the human
service needs of world Jewry.
New staff at Israel Consulate.
Campaign Opening Dinner set for December 7.
PROJECT RENEWAL/ISRAEL
PROGRAMS/CAMPAIGN PAGE 4
Campaign '84 highlights goals in Or Akiva.
Gilad Shafran named new Shaliach in Israel Progams Office.
Herb Canarick to head Aventura Campaign.
WOMEN'S DIVISION PAGE 5
"Women's Wednesday" record success.
Chazaka mission set for November 2nd.
Stanley Rosenblatt to speak at Leadership Parlor meeting.
Lion of Judah luncheon at new Grand Bay Hotel
Calendar
P & B/ LONG RANGE PLANNING/ CAPITAL NEEDS/
SOVIET JEWRY PAGE 6
Marilyn Smith and Jon Kislak to chair P & B Committee.
Committee plans for community's future.
Conference efforts intensify for Soviet Jewry.
AGENCIES PAGE 7
GMJF Information Referral Service, a valuable resource for agency
assistance.
Join volunteer program at Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged.
Jewish Family & Children's Service offers prevention workshop series.
Transportation now available to the Jewish Vocational Service
Nutritional Project.
CAMPAIGN LEADERSHIP

PAGES 8 & 9
SOUTH DADE PAGE 10
First South Dade Mission to the Nation's Capital
Events in South Dade.
Campaign expands in South Dade.
JCC Book Fair features best-selling authors.
ZACHOR/CAMPAIGN PAGE 11
Zachor Institute sponsors trip to death camps of the Holocaust.
GMJF names new Campaign Director.
CABLE TV/UJA/CAMPAIGN PAGE 12
Cable Update
Nation's young Jewish leadership to meet in D.C.
Vanguard Division kicks off '84 Campaign.
Super Sunday set for January 15th.
MISSIONS/AGENCIES PAGE 13
A day in the life of the Community Mission.
Jewish Junior High to be accredited.
New JCC singles travel club.
AGENCIES PAGE 14
Happy 50th JCC!!!
New Staff for Hillel
Maternity fashion show at Mount Sinai Medical Center.
CALENDAR PAGE 15
FOUNDATION PAGE 16
Year end stock market tax planning.
Tribute to Foundation donors fchfduled for November 8th.



Federation, October, 1983
Page 3
is up to you...
LEAD THE WAY
|l.984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund/Project Renewal-Or Akiva
hroughout last year's campaign, the
ggter Miami Jewish community demon-
ted its unity and resolve during difficult
nes that threatened to divide the Jewish
Ed. The 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-
ed Emergency Fund raised a record $22.6
ilion, a resounding affirmation of the vision
[share of a secure future for the people of Is-
i and Jews everywhere.
)ur common vision is the impetus that in-
.es us to increase our campaigns and build
onger Jewish communities that will serve
! needs of all our brothers and sisters. And
needs that we must meet this year have
\g been greater in Israel, in Greater
ni and in Jewish communities spanning the
|be. This year, we are calling for the Greater
ni Jewish community to LEAD THE
\Y when our fellow Jews require our
fcistance.
It is up to each of us, as individuals working
ether, to communicate the urgency of the
an service needs that confront us. It is up
lyou to LEAD THE WAY to help Russian
Vs find a new life of freedom where they can
dice their religious and cultural heritage.
|ien needy Jews in our own community can-
t afford decent food or housing, LEAD THE
\Y so they can lead dignified lives.
J'he Jewish Agency, which provides social
vice programs to the Israeli people, has been
I to cut its 1983-84 budget by $25 million.
substantial reduction will force the
itponement of establishing key settlements
he Galilee and Negev, loss of enrollment in
Howard R. Scharlin
Youth Aliyah, rollbacks in social and educa-
tional programs and reduced aid to the aged.
The Agency's capacity goes far beyond the
budget's constraints; if the American Jewish
community could raise an additional $146
million, thousands of other Israelis could
receive the help they need.
Israel has an alarming number of
economically depressed communities that are in
serious need of social and physical
rehabilitation. Project Renewal, the United
Jewish Appeal program that twins American
Jewish communities and Israeli communities,
is improving the quality of life in these towns.
Or Akiva, Greater Miami's sister community,
has had many new services and facilities in-
troduced since Federation began participating
in the program two years ago. But in order to
continue the progress, we must accelerate the
flow of funds to Project Renewal it needs $80
million in new pledges from the American
Jewish community to carry out planned im-
provements.
Faced with another year of reduced federal
funding for local services, American Jewish
communities will need an estimated $25 million
more than last year to support Jewish
education, the indigent, elderly, college youth
and community relations.
Because we share the. hope for a secure
Jewish future, we're asking two things this
year: give as much as you possibly can to the
1984 CJA-IEF to support human services in
Israel, Greater Miami and thousands of other
Jewish communities, AND make a one-time
additional gift equal to at least 10 percent of
your 1984 pledge to Project Renewal-Or Akiva
to ensure the continued rehabilitation of our
sister community.
Your meaningful gift your personal
commitment to LEAD THE WAY will help
us realize our vision of a vital Jewish future in
which we can achieve our dreams.
HOWARD R. SCHARLIN
General Campaign Chairman
Xcw staff heads Israel Consulate office
The Israeli government has appointed new
kff to head its consulate office in Miami, due
|the conclusion of the tours of duty for Consul
neral Joel Arnon, Vice Consul Oded Ben-Hur
Consul for Economic Affairs Moshe
tanel. The new representatives for the State
|lsrael are: Consul General Yehoshua Trigor,
i Consul Dorit Shavit and Consul for Trade
Investment to the Southeastern United
^tes Avi Harpaz. Arnon, Ben-Hur and
anel have returned to Israel to receive new
pignments.
graduate of the Tel Aviv School for Law
Economics and the National Service
pge, Consul General Trigor has a long and
Itinguished diplomatic career in which he has
Vd on nearly every continent. He served at
I Israeli Embassy in Australia, was charge
[affaires at the Israeli Embassies in Seoul,
uth Korea and Malta, was head of the Israeli
nsular Mission in India, and spent three
g.M deputy chief of mission and charge
llfaires of the Embassy of Israel in the
me, Netherlands. From 1959 to 1965, he was
r consul in Atlanta and consul in Los
Igeles. He has also served as deputy-director
|the Official Guests Division of the Israeli
P'gn Ministry, senior referent in the Asia-
pfc Bureau of the Foreign Ministry and
P*or of the Israel Youth Information
ppam in the United States.
ter completing her studies at the Hebrew
pversity. Vice Consul Shavit joined Israel's
ryy of Foreign Affairs in 1974 and was as-
ped to the Ministry's Center for Political
pch. In 1977, she was appointed head of
I foreign Ministry's Bureau in charge of the
Jtemite Kingdom of Jordan; in that cape-
rs sne was responsible for much of the re-
P giving the possibility of Jordan
HLS neStiations with Israel. Her last
1 oejore coming to Miami, was the chief
,Z w. formation Department of Israel's
en Ministry.
lwu-and Inve*tment Consul Harpaz re-
p hM undergraduate degree from Tel Aviv
^1111972 and, soon thereafter, ea-
Yehoshua Trigor
Avi Harpaz
tablished a private accounting firm. Until
recently, Harpaz served as vice president of
Sunfrost, Israel's largest frozen food company.
Sunfrost is jointly owned by American and Is-
Dorit Shavit
raeli stockholders and has annual revenues
exceeding $30 million. Earlier this year, he ac-
cepted a request by Israel's Minister of Finance
to assume his new post.
Campaign Opening Dinner
The Campaign Opening Dinner of the
1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund / Project Renewal-Or
Akiva Campaign will be held on Wednes-
day, December 7 at the Fontainebleau-
Hilton Hotel on Miami Beach, announced
dinner Chairman Aaron Podhurst, a
Federation board member and chairman
of its Community Relations Committee.
The gala event, which was attended by
1,600 persons last year, is the kickoff of
the Greater Miami Jewish community's
effort to provide maximum support for
human service programs serving Jews in
Greater Miami, Israel and other com-
munities around the world.
"We're depending on the members of
the Greater Miami Jewish community to
make a record showing at the Opening
Dinner, so we can begin the 1964 cam-
paign with a massive demonstration of
our commitment to our fellow Jews," said
Howard R. Scharlin, general campaign
chairman. "The Opening Dinner will
LEAD THE WAY to the most successful
campaign this community has ever
mounted."
Dorothy Podhurst is chairperson of the
dinner program, Marcy Lefton is chair-
person of dinner arrangements, and
Nancy Lipoff is chairperson of dinner
attendance and table captains.
For more information and reservations,
call Federation at 576-4000.


iiiiiih i
Page 4
Federation, October, 1983
^hafran to
Miami: 'I am
here to help.9
Gilad Shafran
Gilad Shafran is the "shaliach," literally, one
who is sent (from the Hebrew "li-shloah") and
new director of Miami's Israel Programs Office.
Shafran, often referred to as "Gilley" by the
many young people in and out of the offices,
was born in 1942 and grew up on the first
American kibbutz called "Ein-Hashofet"
meaning "judge." He graduated high school
from Mosad Hare Efraem and studied social
work at the University of the Kibbutz.
"I fought in the Sinai War in 1967, remember
climbing the Golan Heights in the Yom Kippur
War, established cattle ranches throughout
many kibbutzim, even went on missions to
Africa as an agricultural expert. I have been
through much in my country and feel honored
to be here today to help communicate
everything there is to know about Israel,"
reflects Gilley.
The shaliach, as a member of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation staff, provides
professional consultation and assistance to
individuals, groups and organizations con-
cerning Israel-oriented programs and activities.
He might be found lecturing on Yom
Hazikaron, Israels "Memorial Day," a
Chanukah celebration or the Holocaust.
Coordinators at universities use Shafran as a
tremendous resource; once a week all the
"shalichim" of other organizations discuss the
problems of Israel, its programs and other
matters.
Whatever the specific tasks undertaken by
all the shaliach, or shilichim, the common
element is the presence of an Israeli, who, by
virtue of personality, education, work and life
experiences, projects an up-to-date and vibrant
picture of Israeli society and helps to
strengthen connections between the com-
munities outside of Israel and the Holy
Land. American Jews' deeply felt concern for
all aspects of the Jewish State's survival has
brought an increased desire for knowledge
about Israel.
Many Americans have visited Israel on
group tours, missions, study groups, and as
individuals. They have sent their children to
study in its universities, to work in kibbutzim
and development towns, to spend two weeks, a
summer, a year and a lifetime. This significant
movement as people, this increased desire for
knowledge, this continuing concern and
support for Israel brings us Shafran.
The Israel Programs office, established 13
years ago, serves as a central community
resource for information on a wide variety of
subjects on Israel. The primary population
group served by this office is Jewish College
youth, as students are among the most likely
individuals to visit Israel and need guidance
and assistance in doing so.
"My wide and varied travels have opened my
eyes to the tremendous advantages of Israel
and the programs it has to offer the American
people. If you would like to live on a kibbutz,
study at a learning institution in Israel, visit
with a family or volunteer your help, that is
what the 'shaliach' is for. I am the 'sender of
information,' says Shafran. "I am here to
help."
For more information about programs or
infonnatior on Israel, contact the Israel
Programs office at 576-4000.
Campaign '84 highlights
goals in Or Akiva
In Campaign '84, Project Renewal is
being restored to its rightful role as a key
motivational force in a two-line campaign.
This year, the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund must include a
determined effort to accelerate the flow of
funds into Israel for activating a large
number of approved social and physical
rehabilitation programs in Or Akiva.
The latest move to strengthen the ties
between the two cities are Rivka Bitton
and Rami Assayag, students from Or
Akiva, who were invited to be part of the
community and given the opportunity to
be counselors-in-training along with other
local teenagers of their age. Both Rivka
and Rami lived with local families.
Increasingly, it's this one-to-one
relationship that the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will encourage in the
future to strengthen the Jewish com-
munity's relationship with its twin city.
Many people believe that if Project
Renewal is to be successful, it will be with
those communities that were able to
develop personal relationships with their
twin communities.
This is not to say that physical im-
provements being made in the twin
communities are not important. In fact,
Miami's initial involvement, was to
remedy a major problem in Or Akiva:
filling in the trenches that were both an
eyesore and actual danger to the people.
Other physical projects that Greater
Miami's Jews can be proud of when
visiting Or Akiva are the modern and
enlarged dental clinic, newly dedicated
day care center, and community center.
Plans for a music center, tennis courts and
educational programs are in the works.
The Women's Division of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation has launched a
project to construct day care centers in Or
Akiva, appropriately named Operation
Day Care. The dedicated women feel that
by starting from the beginning with the
poor, disadvantaged children, we can help
them break the vicious cycle that has
afflicted people for generations. Through
expansion and renovation of three
existing day care centers, the youngsters,
ages six months to pre-kindergarten, will
have: a place to play and exercise in a
creative and stimulating background; a
chance to eat hot meals and develop
healthy nutritional habits; and teachers
with early childhood training, who will be
able to create a safe and loving en-
vironment. These facilities will enable the
mothers of Or Akiva to bring extra income
A playground in Or Akiva built with
Federation funds.
into their homes, thereby raising the
standard of living. Through Operation
Day Care, the disadvantaged children of
Or Akiva will be able to make their first
tentative explorations of life outside their
homes, confident they are being given the
start in life that will turn around the
crippling effects of early childhood
deprivation.
The planning process of Project
Renewal required the residents to or-
ganize, form a local citizens council, and
take an active role in identifying
problems, devising programs to resolve
them, and setting priorities for im-
plementation. The citizens council of Or
Akiva, along with the assistance of ad-
visors provided by the Jewish Agency, the
municipality, the Israeli government, the
academic community and leadership from
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, had
formed steering committees and
developed comprehensive plans for
physical economic and social
rehabilitation. A priority list of upcoming
projects for implementation includes:
housing improvement and enlargement
where possible; new construction when
necessary; communal facilities
establishing and staffing schools, nur-
series, day care facilities, synagogues,
community centers and parks; human
services vocational training and em-
ployment, -personal and family coun-
seling; and facilities' for physical and
mental health care, tutoring, home
management services and meals on wheels
for the aged. It is a program that will not
only provide the means to accomplish
these goals, but a program that will also
develop a generation of Israelis able to
implement them independently.
The people in Israel have built their
hopes on us. We are committed to help
alleviate problems in Israel's distressed
neighborhoods. It will truly be in keeping
with Jewish values to help one another
help ourselves.
Canarick to chair
Avenlura campaign
Herb Canarick, chairman
for the 1984 Aventura Turn-
berry Combined Jewish Ap-
peal-Israel Emergency
Fund/Project Renewal-Or
Akiva Campaign, has an-
nounced Frank Beckerman
as chairman of the Turn-
berry Campaign.
Jack Bellock and Harry
Rosen have also been named
as honorary chairmen of the
Executive Committee.
Herb Canarick
Thanks to the responsiveness of many
Aventura-Turnberry members who demon-
strated their commitment to their fellow Jews,
the 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund was a record success. Last
year, over $1 million was raised. This year,
Canarick plans to raise more by broadening the
base of leadership, training committed workers
on a one-to-one basis and starting the campaign
early. As a result, the goal of leadership if
raise $2 million.
"In 1984, the reason for giving is much now
than a function of facts and figures. This up
coming campaign is a test not just for our
ability to raise urgently needed dollars, it is J
teat of our vision, our tenacity, our duty.
Canarick said.
The upcoming events will lead the way to*
1983-84 goal of $2 million. The following *J
have been scheduled: November 16 w
December 14 at 8 p.m., Israel Update s
Aventura Jewish Center; January (exact
to be announced) exclusive Turnberry even
February 8 Leadership event at Turn*"'
Country Club-Garden Room, and March *.
18 and 25 Fund Raising Breakfasts (pw-
to be announced).
For further information, contact Susani N
at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation at
4000.


Federation, October, 1983
PageS
Savitch, Studley highlight
Women's Wednesday
More than 950 women recently gathered at
I the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel for the Greater
I Miami Jewish Federation Women's Division
annual community education event, "Women's
I Wednesday." This event featured guest
Isoeakers Jessica Savitch, NBC News reporter,
land Barbara Studley, Miami radio talk show
I host.
Women's Wednesday reflected the theme
("Images of the Media." Jessica Savitch spoke
lof the myths that our society places on women
today, particularly those in the television field.
lOn a personal level, Savitch noted, "There has
Ibeen an insidious social phenomenon lurking
laround. that women's voices are not author-
lative, that an audience would not watch a
Iwoman anchor woman at 11:00 in the evening.
|The image of the modern day homemaker or
[volunteer, victimized by commercials, that
[portray a woman fantasizing about a little man
lumping out of her washing machine. It is our
[responsibility to dispell these and any other
Imyths about women."
Gail Harris, vice president of community
ducation for the Women's Division, remarked
^>n Barbara Studley's grave concern for Israel
nd the political situation in the Middle East.
"Studley placed great importance on the
lenormous Soviet buildup in Syria with the
n-five anti-aircraft missiles and the an-
ouncement of additional deliveries of the Sam-
Itwenty-one. She feels, they could, in fact,
otally neutralize the effectiveness of the Israeli
or force. Studley believes that Israel's strength
and survival is imperative to the survival of the
world," Harris continued. "These are just
ome of the thoughts she tried to reflect when
presenting herself to the media."
Another highlight of Women's Wednesday
ras the premiere of "Life Behind the Lifeline,"
self-produced documentary which com-
prehensively examines the Greater Miami Jew-
N.B.C. Reporter Jessica Savitch
Schwartz prepare for an interview
ish Federation, its family of agencies and the
services and programs it provides.
Maxine Schwartz, president of Women's
Division, interviewed Jessica Savitch after the
event. The interview covered personal and
career objectives and touched on Savitch s
reaction to the Jewish community's allegations
and criticism of the media's performance in
June of 1982 the Lebanese incursion. This
interview will be aired on the Federation's new
television station called Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Cable Television, Inc.

W.D. Clia^aka Program
"Chazaka," meaning strong, is the title of
he Women's Division program designed to
Jncourage young women to take a more active
ole in the life-sustaining work of the Greater
iliami Jewish Federation.
This year's program will be chaired by Gail
Jaffe Newman, an independent business
oman and her co-chairman Phyllis Harte, an
|ttorney.
The Chazaka program's concept of shared
ommitment and responsibilities produces both
I challenging opportunity for participants and
| significant basis of growth for future Federa-
Pn campaigns," said Newman.
"This is a wonderful opportunity for us to
ducate women for the campaign and develop
Mure leadership," Harte added.
The essence of the Chazaka concept is a set of
pint commitments by Federation and the 15
"ogram participants designed to strengthen
leadership of the Greater Miami Jewish
ommunity.
Federation has agreed to provide the follow-
"I to Chazaka participants:
1 An intensive educational process to
fgnificantly raise the level of Jewish consci-
usness of the participants.
A learning experience wherein participants
^ome conversant with Jewish needs locally,
nationally and overseas.
Exclusive and intensive training in
campaign solicitation skills.
A fully subsidized 10-day study mission in
Israel.
A professional staff person from the
Women's Division to coordinate program ac-
tivities and provide maximum utilization of
Federation resources.
Privileged attendance at all appropriate
Federation functions.
In exchange for these Federation commit-
ments, each Chazaka participant agrees to:
Attend six orientation and training
sessions between September 13 and October 30.
Participate in a special 10-day study
mission in Israel from November 2 through
November 13.
Solicit fifteen prospects of their choice on a
face-to-face basis within ten weeks of their
return from the mission.
Attend all follow-up report meetings after
returning from Israel.
Make a minimum commitment to the 1984
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund of $1,000.
For additional information concerning future
Chazaka Programs, please call the Federation
Women's Division at 576-4000.
HOLD THE DATE!
October 31 Miami Beach Board
Meeting.
November 2-13 Chazaka Mission.
November 3 Campaign Steering
November 10 Executive Committee
Meeting.
November 14 Business and Profes-
sional Leadership Parlor Meeting.
November 15 Leadership Parlor
Meeting.
November 29 South Dade Board
Meeting and South West Dade Board
Meeting.
and Women's Division President,MaxineE.
being taped by G.M.J.F. Cable TV.
Women's Wednesday Chairwoman Pat Feld-
man was very pleased with the enormous at-
tendance at the annual event. "On behalf of the
other chairwomen for this event, Rachelle
Kaminsky, Roberta Segal and Dolores Wolf, I
want to thank each and everyone for support-
ing our annual event. Without your participa-
tion and belief in Women's Wednesday, there
could never have been such a record success,"
beamed Feldman.
Leadership
Parlor Meeting
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Women's Division will host its annual Leader-
ship Parlor Meeting on Tuesday, November
15th, announced Dorothy Podhurst, Women's
Division vice-president of Leadership Develop-
ment. The event, which is for Women's
Division Board and Committee members from
all areas throughout Greater Miami, will take
place at Grove Isle in Coconut Grove.
Prominent Miami attorney, Stanley Rosen-
blatt, will be the guest speaker at the function.
Rosenblatt has produced and hosted programs
for the Public Broadcasting System on topics
dealing with Jewish concerns and matters of
law. Most recently, his series "Israeli Diary,"
composed of interviews with a diverse group of
Israeli leaders, was aired nationwide on PBS.
Event Chairwomen Muriel Russell, Sue
Graubert and Miki Granoff, noted that the
event is designed to bring together the women
who work in campaign to discuss their feelings
and share ideas concerning issues that affect
the Jewish community today.
Information about the Leadership Parlor
Meeting may be obtained by calling the Feder-
ation's Women's Division at 576-4000.
Lion of tJutluh
January 17 is the date and the new Grand
Bay Hotel in Coconut Grove is the place that
have been set for the Lion of Judah luncheon to
honor new women Pacesetters and Trustees,
announced Chairwoman Gloria Scharlin.
The Lion of Judah Luncheon is held annually
for Women's Division Trustees, those women
who make a minimum gift of $5,000 to the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund. The Trustee trademark is the distinctive
Lion of Judah gold pin, which has been adopted
by several Federations around the nation.
Working hard in preparation for the big day
are event Chairwomen Irma Braman and Paula
Friedland. w
For further information about this exciting
event, call the Federation Women's Division
office at 576-4000.



, Page 6
~ Federation, October, 1983
Smith and Kislak
to chair P&B
Committee
Marilyn Smith
Jonathan Kislak
Greater Miami Jewish Federation President
Norman H. Lipoff has announced the appoint-
ment of Federation Vice President Marilyn K.
Smith as chairman of Federation's Planning
and Budget Committee. Lipoff also announced
the appointment of Jonathan Kislak, a member
of Federation's Board of Directors, as vice
chairman of the Committee.
The Planning and Budget Committee, along
with its subcommittees, develops and conducts
Federation's planning and budget activities. It
is responsible for identifying the Jewish com-
munity's needs, formulates programs and serv-
ices, determines the appropriate sources of
financing and identifies the appropriate
delivery systems to provide needed programs
and services. It reviews the allocation requests
of all of Federation's agencies and then makes
recommendations to Federation's Board of Di-
rectors as to the appropriate allocations from
the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund.
Smith has been one of the leaders of the
Greater Miami Jewish community for the past
25 years, having served as president of the
Women's Division, vice chairman of the CJA-
IEF, and a member of Federation's Board and
Executive Committee. She is also a member of
the Board and Executive Committee of United
Jewish Appeal's Women's Division and Na-
tional Campaign Policy Board, as well as the
Board of the Council of Jewish Federations.
"We have some very big challenges for our
committee this year," Smith said. "We're at
Long Range Planning/
Capital HTeeds Committee I
Charged with the responsibility of as-
sessing the future human service needs of
the Greater Miami Jewish community and
encouraging strong Jewish identity, the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Long
Flange Planning / Capital Needs Commit-
tee is now engaged in the process of
developing a strategy to set priorities and
objectives.
Since the committee's formation last
spring, its subcommittees have been
meeting to review the current state of
Federation's social service network, and
Federation agencies have been providing
data pertaining to the services they
provide.
"Now that we have initiated this excit-
ing process of comprehensively planning
for the future of our Jewish community,
we must examine where our community
stands today, where we would like it to be
in three to five years and make specific re-
commendations, based on available data,
to realize our projections," said Harry B.
Smith, the former Federation president
who is chairing the committee.
Smith noted that Federation's family of
local agencies has been cooperating with
the committee to help determine the ser-
vices that will be needed in the years to
come. He pointed out that the Jewish
Group Work Service Subcommittee has
met with the Jewish Welfare Board to
discuss the special situation in South
Dade, a rapidly expanding Jewish com-
munity, and the area's future needs.
"The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
is setting an example by taking concrete
steps to develop a long-range community
plan," Smith said. "During a time of
increased need for human services and
strained capacity for providing them thU
is a most crucial undertaking. Other Jew
ish communities are watching our
progress and considering similar studies"
The chairmen of the subcommittees are'
Helene Berger, Jewish Federation; Morris
Futernick, Jewish Group Work Services
Melvin Kartzmer, Individual and Health
Services: and Donald E. Lefton, Com-
munity Life Services.
Federation has a precedent of a plan-
ning process that analyzed and filled a
specific need in the community. Formed a
decade ago. Federation's special Commis-
sion on the Elderly examined the needs of
Greater Miami's senior citizen population
An outgrowth of the study was the
creation of 224 subsidized housing units
by Jewish Federation Housing, Inc. and a
series of senior programs by several of
Federation's local agencies.
The committee is working in conjunc-
tion with a Financial Resource Develop-
ment Committee, under the chairmanship
of Sheldon Guren, which will determine
funding sources for recommended pro-
grams and facilities Such sources would
include all levels of government, the
Greater Miami Jewish community,
private and public foundations and user
fees.
"The Long Range Planning Capital
Needs Committee is just one demon-
stration of the vitality of our Greater
Miami Jewish community," said Federa-
tion President Norman H. Lipoff. "By
planning for the future, we are ensuring
the perpetuation and well-being of our
people, our identity and our ideals."
the point in time where Greater Miami's Jewish
community has to determine where we're at and
where we're going."
Smith noted that although her past Federa-
tion activity was primarily campaign oriented,
she has always "been involved with planning
and budget to protect my investment... I felt
it was important that the money we raised was
well spent."
Smith and Kislak have been meeting with the
directors of Federation's local beneficiary
agencies in order to coordinate the provision o!
services that will best serve the Greater Mil
Jewish community. Kislak will also be cha
an Ad Hoc Committee that will examine I
budgeting process that Federation has us
The purpose of the Ad Hoc Committee i
ensure "that the dollars painstakingly rai
by the Campaign are spent in the mosU
way," Smith said.
Smith also pointed out that Federation'!
Long Range Planning-Capital Needs ComraiJ
tee is in the process of determining what til
priorities and objectives of the Greater Mil
Jewish community will be for future years.
South Florida Conference intensifies
efforts on behalf of Soviet Jewry
"In these frightening times of heightened
Soviet anti-Semitism, our efforts on behalf of
Soviet Jewry are more vital than ever before.
We need the total community's support and
commitment to our cause because the situa-
tion has never been more critical."
This is the assessment of Hinda Cantor,
chairman of the South Florida Conference on
Soviet Jewry (SFCSJ), a committee of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Commu-
nity Relations Committee (CRC). Cantor spoke
as Soviet Jewish emigration hit the lowest level
since the beginning of the movement, with only
936 Jews allowed to leave the Soviet Union
thus far in 1983. By way of comparison, in 1979,
51,000 Jews left the USSR; in 1980, 21,000 left;
in 1981, 9400; in 1982, 2600 left. If this year
continues at the present rate, less than 1500
Jews will emigrate in 1983.
Numbers alone do not tell the whole story.
Since Yuri Andropov was named General Sec-
retary of the Communist Party last October,
the clamps have tightened on the Refusenik
community. Iosef Begun, Simon Shnirman,
Yuri Tarnopolsky, Lev Elbert ... all leaders,
all activists, all arrested, silenced, and many
more are in grave danger or arrest and im-
prisonment.
Many people are aware of the dire situations
of Prisoners of Conscience Anatoly Scharari-
sky, Victor Brailovsky and Alexander Parit-
sky. The names of renowned Refuseniks Ida
Nudel and Vladimir Slepak are familiar ones.
One can read about their trials and tribulations
and sympathize with their separated families.
There are thousands of other Refuseniks and
their families like those just named.
Anti-Semitism has taken on alarming pro-
portions in recent months in the Soviet Union.
Soviet propaganda aimed at dehumanizing the
Jewish populace and tying them in with an "in-
ternational Zionist Conspiracy" has pervaded
virtually every type of media in the USSR.
Children's magazines and books, used as
materials in the classroom, rewrite history
concerning the Mideast situation and the
portrayal of Jews. A favorite game among
school children is called the "Concentration
Camp Game." The rules are simple: Jewish
children are given a number by which they are
referred to instead of by name.
Television broadcasts announcing the
"Jewish Problem" are illuminated by flashed
pictures of prominent Soviet and western
Jewish figures. Newspaper articles link leading
activists in the Refusenik community with anti-
Soviet activity perpetrated from the west
Violent accusations against Refuseniks appear
regularly in the press. The Soviet anti-Semitic
campaign has most recently been encapsulated
under the guise of the newly formed "AnM
Zionist Committee." On June 6, 1983, t
official group held a press conference A
Moscow in which members pronounced thil
following: the reunification of separawl
families has been essentially completed; tw
vast majority of Jews who wish to leave tin!
USSR have already received permission Ml
emigrate, and anti-Semitism as an ideology r
a policy does not exist in the Soviet Union.
The South Florida Conference on Sov*|
Jewry believes that the warning signals nal
already been sounded in the Soviet Union m
cording to Cantor, "At this moment in Je*|
history we are witnessing a cultural 8enoC"r
an intellectual genocide and a human genoo|
Soviet Jews are deliberately and systematic*!
ly being stripped of their culture and tea |
identity. They are coldly treated as outcal
that neither allows them to live as a people w|
to be free to emigrate."
The South Florida Conference on Sov*
Jewry will increase its activist efforts tlirou^ I
out the year. If you are interested in becnl
active in the committee, call the Officeat^l
4000. Community participation is e^l
sought. J


Federation, October, 1983
Page 7
Need help? Try GM JF
Information/Referral Service
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
llnformation and Referral Service provides a
(centralized resource for people in our com-
Lunity who are in need of help. Through this
Iresource people can avoid making many tele-
I hone calls when they are seeking assistance,
which can be frustrating and discouraging. By
calling Federation's telephone number, people
lean get information regarding those local agen-
Icies which can best meet their needs, the kinds
|of services those agencies provide, and their
^legibility requirements.
The Information and Referral Service
Ireceives over 200 inquiries a month on behalf of
[people who are having problems for which they
[require referral to community agencies. There
Lre also about 100 requests a month for in-
Iformation of various kinds. About 75 percent of
Ithe clients served by the program are over the
t of 60. Because of the unique nature of this
Community, there are many inquiries from
family members living outside of Dade County
regarding parents or other relatives who live in
|our community and are in need of assistance.
This program is staffed by a professional
Isocial worker, Martha Cohen, who obtained her
[Bachelor of Arts Degree from Brooklyn College
land her Master of Social Work Degree from
Itt'ayne State University. She has had over
Itwenty years of experience working for various
(Federation agencies.
Working with Cohen is a corps of dedicated
land concerned volunteers who perform a
[variety of duties, depending on their particular
[interests. They are trained to deal with requests
JFCS prevention
workshop series
The Jewish Family and Children's Ser-
vice is offering six workshops this fall as
part of its prevention series, which will fo-
cus on significant areas important to Jew-
ish individuals and families.
The workshops will include:
ll) "Assertiveness for Women" How1
not to say yes when you really mean no. v
(2) "Parenting Your Hearing Impaired
Child" (Infancy-4) An opportunity to
discuss this important subject and find
some answers.
(3) "Divorce and our Children and
Grandchildren" A workshop for adults
whose grown children have experienced
divorce.
14) "Parent Effectiveness Training
IP.E.T.)" Learn how to communicate
with your children.
(5) "Stress: Make it work for you, not
against you" Develop your own stress
profile, learn time management,
relaxation, and improved communication
skills.
(6) "Remarriage: Step with Style"
An educational workshop for parents,
step-parents, and couples with children
who are considering remarriage.
Clinical staff and consultants of the
Jewish Family and Children's Service,
who have years of experience and training,
will be leading these workshops. Most
workshop groups will be kept small, to
insure personal attention and adequate
time. The programs employ written
materials, films, exercises and examples
rom real life situations as teaching tools.
Preregistration is requested. The times
and places for these workshops vary, and
the fees are nominal. For more in-
formation, interested participants are
encouraged to call Susan Rubin, LCSW,
at the JF&CS, 445-0555.
JF&CS is a member of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's family of
agencies and a beneficiary of the Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
fund.
Sophie Lipsitt and Roberta Graham (from left), two volunteers for the GMJF
Information/Referral Service.
for help, by assisting clients in determining
what their needs are and referring them to ap-
propriate agencies. At a later date, they follow
up by contacting clients of the program to as-
certain whether or not they received the help
they needed. Volunteers also assist with some
of the clerical duties involved in the program.
Federation is currently seeking to recruit ad-
ditional volunteers to assist in the Information
and Referral Service. Volunteers must be
willing to work at least three hours a week, one
day a week, on a regular basis. Those who serve
in this program can expect to have the satisfac-
tion of knowing that they are contributing their
time and energy in a very vital service.
Interested volunteers should call Martha
Cohen, Information and Referral Specialist, at
576-4000, Ext. 351.
'What have I got to offer?'
It is the question most often asked of any Di-
rector of Volunteers. "I have no talents or spe-
cial skills. What could I possibly do that would
make a difference?" Ask that of any of the 376
residents of the Miami Jewish Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged and the answer will be, "All
the difference in the world."
Two hundred and twenty widely disparate
men and women make up the volunteer pro-
gram at the Miami Jewish Home. They range in
age from 15 to 91 and in background from
retirees to the 15 students who report thrice
weekly from Archbishop Curley High School.
Although the functions volunteers perform
vary from friendly visitor and shopper to
clerical assistant, the motivation is the same
a desire to help those in need. Theirs is a unique
gift of love and compassion, sensitive to local
needs and lifestyles, and respectful of the
dignity of the individual.
In return, volunteers gain a special sense of
satisfaction from their work. Ann Berner, the
Home's Director of Volunteer Services, ex-
pressed it this way, "Douglas Gardens is a
great place to do volunteer work. There is
something for everyone. We go to great lengths
to ensure that all our volunteers are happy and
fulfilled working in their chosen areas."
Ms. Berner made this observation during a
speech given at a seminar on volunteerism
hosted by the Stein Gerontological Institute at
Douglas Gardens conjointly with the "Net-
work," a program funded by the U.S. Depart-
ment of Health and Human Services and the
Administration on Aging.
The focus of the seminar, which attracted Di-
rectors of Volunteers and Activities Directors
statewide, was the tremendous impact the vol-
unteer has on the nursing home environment.
Featured speakers included Ruth Shack,
Metro-Dade County Commissioner and
Virginia Essex, Trainer for the "Network."
The seminar also highlighted the surprising
fact that, contrary to public opinion, the volun-
teer workforce is not decreasing. A 1981 Gallup
poll reflects that, compared to 1974 figures, the
volunteer workforce has increased from 24 to 31
percent. The same poll showed that the main
motivation for people to volunteer their ser-
vices remained the desire to help others.
Fred D. Hirt, Executive Director of the
Miami Jewish Home, feels strongly that the
Home's volunteers have a tremendous impact
on the life of Douglas Gardens residents:
"Contributions made by our volunteers cannot
be overrated. There is no measure for the
amount of love and devotion generously given
and the warm friendships shared. They add the
special sense of caring and of family for which
Douglas Gardens is noted."
Anyone wishing further information on the
volunteer program at the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged should contact Ann
Berner at 751-8626.
Transportation to JVS meal site
The Jewish Vocational Service Nutritional
Project is pleased to announce that tran-
sportation is now available to the meal site
located at the Biscayne Elementary School,
800-77th Street, Miami Beach.
The JVS Nutritional Project is a Kosher hot
meals program providing approximately 1,800
meals daily at eight congregate sites and to the
ho me bound elderly.
The program is open to those aged 60 and
above who are in economic or social need.
Following is the transportation schedule for
the meal site at Biscayne Elementary School:
Sherry Frontenac Hotel 3:00 p.m.
6565 Collins Avenue
Super X Drugs
69th St. & Collins Avenue
Corner of Byron Ave. & 72nd St.
(Across the street from North
3:00 p.m.
3:05 p.m.
Shore Recreation Center)
North Shore Community Center 3:05 p.m.
73rd St., East of Collins Avenue
North Shore Library 3:10 p.m.
75th St. & Collins Avenue
Harding Avenue 3:15 p.m.
83rd Street
81st Street
79th Street
77th Street
For further information call the main office of
the Jewish Vocational Service Nutritional
Project at 673-5106.
The Jewish Vocational Service is a member
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
family of agencies and a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund.


Page 8
Federation, October, 1983
1984 CJA-IEF < a m pa i

Norman H. Lipoff
President
Howard Socol
Co-Chairman.
Mercantile Division
Myron J. Brodie
Executive Vice President
Howard R Scharlin
General Chairman
Susan Sirotta
Co-chairman, Super Sunday
Terry Druckc
Chairman,
Women's Division
Barry S. Yarchin
Co-Chairman,
Super Sunday
Dr. Jay EUenby
Co-Chairman.
Physicians and
Osteopaths Division
' t Kw
w
1^ r )

# K
Charlotte Held
Chairman, Super Week
IHHH
Michael M.Adler
Chairman.
Pacesetter Division
Dr. Philip Frost
Co-Chairman,
Physicians and
Osteopaths Division
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Chairman,
Cash Committee
Bernardo Batievsky
Co-Chairman,
Latin American Division
1SS ,
Dr. Harry Graff
Co-Chairman,
Physicians and
Osteopaths Division
Alan J. Kluger
Co-Chairman,
Cash Committee
Alex Halberstein
Co-Chairman,
Latin American Division
Dr. Alan Graubert
Co-Chairman,
Physicians and
Osteopaths Division
.


1 &->'-'*- |
&A&
Harvey 'riedmi
Chairman, ipecial
Joel Levy
Co-Chairman, Missions
Paula Levy
Co-Chairman, Mission
LeroyRaffal
Co-Chairman, New Areas
Maxine E. Schwartz
President.
Women's Division
Ed Shohat
Chairman. UJA
Young Leadership Cabinet
Elaine Silverstein
Chairman, ACE Division
George Simon
Chairman,
Westview Country Club
Richard Berkowitz
Co-Chairman,
Westview Country Chib
Guillermo Sostchin
Chairman,
Cuban Hebrew Diviai
Alfred Golden
Joseph Kanter
Ezra Katz
m.i
Cal Kovens
Steven J. Kravitz
Jeffrey Lefcourt


Federation, October, 1983
Page 9
Steering Committee
B Hock
Jeffrey Berkowitz
Co-Chairman,
Pacesetter Division
Donald Bierman,
Chairman,
Attorneys Division
Alvin Lloyd Brown
Chairman, South Dade
Dr. Barry Burak
Chairman,
Chiropractors Division
Herb Canarick
Chairman, A venture
Tim Cohen
Co-Chairman, Chazak
Co-Chairman,
Mercantile Division
y Friedman Mikki Futernick
i, ipecial Gifts Chairman, Worker Training
*vy
Missions
Dr. Robert Marlin
Chairman.
Dentists Division
David Goldweitz
Chairman,
Young Adults Division
Stanley C Meyers
Chairman,
Project Renewal
1\
Gail Jaffe Newman
Chairman, Chazaka
Phyllis Harte
Co-Chairman, Chazaka
David L. Perkins Aaron Podhurst
President, Chairman,
Young Adults Division Campaign Opening Dinner
Fran Levey
Co-Chairman,
Super Sunday
Gerald K Schwartz
Co-Chairman,
Super Sunday
Norman Rachlin
Chairman,
Accountants Division
Forrest Raffel
Co-Chairman, New Areas
Sostchin
man,
e* Division
Robert Traurig
Chairman,
Vanguard Division
Eric Turetsky
Chairman, Chazak
Saby Behar
Co-Chairman, Chazak
Samuel I. Adlc
L. Jules Arkin
Rabbi Hukell Bernat
urt
Donald E. Lefton
Leonard Luria
Ellen Mandler
Kenneth J. Schwartz
Marilyn K. Smith
Philip T. Warren
'Committee in formation
(Frank Beckerman, Turnberry campaign chairman, was in Israel
at press time and could not be photographed).


Page 10
Federation. October, 1983
Meet the decision makers
First Souih DadeD.C. Mission
The decisions made daily by elected officials
in the nation's capital have a critical effect on
the Jewish people, whether they are in the
United States, Israel or other countries around
the world. With this in mind, the South Dade
Branch of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion has planned a Washington Mission which
will give participants the opportunity to under
stand how and why these decisions are made, as
well as the chance to meet some of the decision
makers.
The mission, scheduled for Wednesday and
Thursday, January 18 and 19, 1984, has three
basic goals: an educational element in which
participants hear from policy makers,
academics and legislators; the interaction
between leaders of the Jewish community and
members of Congress and administration of-
ficials; and the leadership development of
participants who return home with new in-
sights and understanding of the challenges and
issues facing Israel and the Jewish community.
The mission is being chaired by Leonard and
Joan Hayet and Ira and Estelle Segal.
"We believe that those who understand
policy issues concerning Israel and world Jewry
play a more active and sophisticated role as
WOWS SOUTH
U.S.S.R. Update
As part of its series of educational
workshops and lectures, the Public Affairs
Committee of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation South Dade Branch and the
South Dade Jewish Community Center
will present an "Update on Jewish
Problems in the Soviet Union," on
Wednesday, November 9 at 7:45 p.m. at
the Jewish Junior High School of South
Florida, 12401 S.W. 102nd Avenue. (On
the grounds of the South Dade JCC-
Federation campus.)
Featured speaker at the "Update" will
be Dr. Gary Frank, adjunct professor of
international studies at the University of
Miami.
Admission is free, and no solicitations
will be conducted. For reservations and
additional information, please call the
Federation South Dade Branch office at
251-9334.
Wanted!
The residents of Federation Gardens,
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
110 unit South Dade apartment building
for the low-income elderly, would welcome
donations of Jewish books, plants,
planters, a piano, a television, a kiln and
accessories, a pool table and other items to
help fill their leisure hours.
Donations are tax deductible. For
further information, please contact Joel
Waldman or Bernie Sharkey at 279-1708.
tIVS "Service*
to the Elderly"
The Jewish Vocational Service is
pleased to announce the expansion of the
"Services To The Elderly" program.
Seniors living from Coral Gables to West
Kendall and south will now be served by
the Homemaker Referral Program.
Persons interested in learning more
about this program, or those aware of
people in need of supportive services, or
people who would like to work with the
elderly should contact Phyllis Ferber,
MSW, Monday through Thursday, at the
Jewish Vocational Service South Dade
Office, at 8353 SW 124th Street, Suite
102. telephone 235-9482. On Miami Beach
or North Miami, contact Project Director
Sylvia Goldsmith, daily, 8:30 a.m.
through 5 p.m. at 920 Alton Road, Miami
Beach, telephone 672-2184.
The Jewish Vocational Service is a
member of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's family of agencies and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergeacy Fund.
Mikki Futernick
Jewish community leaders," said Mikki Futer-
nick, chairman of Federation's South Dade
Branch. "Due to the nature of this mission, we
can only accept a limited number of parti-
cipants, and reservations are being filled quick-
ly. Anyone interested in an inside glimpse of
the workings of our government, as well as a
visit to one of the world's most beautiful
cosmopolitan cities, is strongly urged to join us
on this exciting mission."
The planned itinerary for the trip includes: a
briefing by the American Israel Public Affairs'"
Committee, the major American lobbying
group for Israel; a private visit to the Israeli
Embassy; briefings at the Defense and State
Departments; VIP tour of the White House;
meetings with administrative officials and Con-
gressmen from Florida; and a tour of cultural
and governmental facilities.
In past years, this mission was usually res-
tricted to participants who made a specified
minimum gift to the Combined Jewish Appea)- .
Israel Emergency Fund. However, because of
the desire to get new people involved in the
South Dade Jewish community, there will not
be any minimum required gift. All participants
will have the opportunity to make a gift to the
1984 CJA-IEF during the mission.
For additional information about the
mission, please contact Jerry Neimand at the
South Dade office, 251-9334.
S. Dade Expands CJA-IEF
Keeping pace with the growing Jewish com-
munity in its area, the South Dade Branch of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation has
planned a variety of programs to involve a
record number of persons in the 1984 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Project
Renewal-Or Akiva campaign.
Under the leadership of South Dade Branch
Chairman Mikki Futernick and Vice Chairman
for Campaign Alvin Lloyd Brown, this year's
campaign effort will actively reach out to
previously unaffiliated Jews in the community.
One new aspect to the campaign is a project
to attract 100 percent participation from the
congregations of five area synagogues. Under
the chairmanship of Bert Brown, the syna-
gogue committee's work on behalf of the
campaign will also help solidify the unity of the
South Dade Jewish community.
A second new component of the South Dade
campaign will be the initiation of a neighbor-
hood campaign that will go into four new
neighborhoods in order to reach persons who .
are unfamiliar with Federation.
Two other firsts for South Dade this year are
its first worker training session, which was held
last week, and a mission to Washington, D.C.
scheduled for January 18-19, 1984. Plans are
also underway for a major campaign cocktail
reception, similar to two successful events held
last year. This year's reception, which is ex-
pected to attract 1,000 people, will feature a
prominent personality. The $250 minimum
event is being chaired by Mr. and Mrs. Richard .-,
Kohn and Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Kohn.M
Additionally, the South Dade campaign will
zero in on professional groups, including
lawyers, doctors, stock brockers and dentists.
For more information about these and other
programs to be presented throughout the 1983-
84 campaign season, please call the South Dade
Branch office at 251-9334.
Jewish Book Fair
Opens November 16
Hoag Levins, author of Arab Reach: The
Secret War Against Israel, and Joel Gross,
bestselling author of This Year in Jerusalem,
will be the featured speakers at the South Dade
Jewish Community Center's third annual Jew-
ish Book Fair, November 16-18 and 20.
The four day event at the Center, 12401 S.W.
102 Avenue, Miami, will open a book sale
beginning at 7:00 p.m., Wednesday, November
16 and running through Sunday, November 20.
The Center will be closed Saturday, November
19. More than 500 Judaica, children's and adult
books and some 2,000 used soft and hard cover
books will be on sale.
. Book sale hours will be 9:00 a.m.-ll:00 a.m.
and 2:30 p.m.-4:30 p.m. Thursday, November
17, 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m. Friday, November 18
and 10:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. Sunday, November
20.
Levins will deliver an address on Arab
political and financial influence, Wednesday,
November 17 at 8:00 p.m. Admission is $3.00
for adults.
Joel Gross, who wrote the 1979 best seller
The Books of Rachel, will be the guest speaker
at the Women's Day luncheon Thursday,
November 17, at 11:30 a.m. at Congregation
Bet Breira, 9400 S.W. 87 Avenue, Miami.
Admission is $15.00. An autograph session will
follow.
The Jewish Book Fair will end Sunday,
November 20 with a Family Day Festival of
special entertainment and ethnic foods, from
1:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. The Beth Americans
children's choir, magician and illusionist
Garrance Lightenheart, the Scott Evans Show
with dancer Yasmina and a story hour of
children's and Jewish folk tales told by the
Tattle Tales will delight adults and children.
There also will be pony rides.
Jewish Book Fair is an annual event of the
South Dade JCC, and is supported by more
than 20 Jewish organizations in South Dade.
The South Dade JCC is one of three branches
operated by the Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida. The Jewish Community Centersr
of South Florida are members of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation family of agencies
and beneficiaries of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.


Federation, October, 1983
Pageil
lurney of Conscience
HPPWP!i
Lib

ug^J
**-
..-TUrv
*
>^ *v' I?*-** HHP^ ft* |k^
^4 i ...r.r 1 'i'-f ? T. K^l
|^ o/d #as chambers and crematoriums, grass grows lush over pits filled with human ashes
tnau. The greenery can ft erase the memory of cold, hunger, death.
vhoiV children walk path of
dom through \azi death camps
The Zachor Institute for Holocaust
Studies is planning another Journey of
Conscience to Europe next summer. For
information about being part of this
memorable experience, please call the
Institute at 576-4000.
By Nonna Orovitz
nnted with permission of The Miami News
imer, a group of the children of
(ilocaust survivors returned to the
j-e their parents were imprisoned and
ily members were killed in Eastern
Jhe 22 people from Miami and
(retraced the steps of their families
Roland, Czechoslovakia and West
and then visited Israel.
jays been pagan wisdom to say that
burs everything, that the past
as though it's never been. It's
fen Jewish wisdom to remember,"
I.mil Fackenheim told the group,
American Journey of Conscience, in
lorld is ever to be made better, it will
jter by people who have the strength
phwitz and leave it there and take
of those experiences and somehow
I make a difference, ..." said Marc
itive director of the Greater Miami
Aeration's Zachor Institute for
Itudies, who joined the group as a
lale for much of the group, while
bitter pride that there is a second
>re than 40 years after Hitler's
Ion. is more basic. The children
}ir 20s and 30s sought the ghosts
they never knew, ties to a
[genealogy, closure to a period
1 in bizzare bedtime stories.
vas little," said Helene Frum, vice-
)i the International Network of
Jewish Holocaust Survivors, "I
used to ask my mother who I looked like
because I really didn't look like anybody ... I
just wanted to feel like I belonged. And mom
thought about it and said, "You know Helene, I
can't remember what my parents looked like.
You know a lot of times when you want to
remember something or somebody, you take
out a picture and look at it. As soon as you see
the picture, all of a sudden you remember. But I
don't have a picture and I can't remember."
And they came to say kaddish, the Hebrew
prayer for the dead. Lee Rosenberg wore the
name and the ring of a grandmother she never
knew. "With one gas chamber on one side and
another gas chamber-crematorium on another
side and looking out at the railroad tracks and
wondering which way my grandmother and her
children went, I really touched her. And I stood
there and said kaddish. It closed it up for me."
Bertha Lautman, the lone survivor, led the
group to Block No. 27 where she found the
bunk on which she slept with five other women
from August 1942 to November 1944. It is a
shelf six feet wide by just over six feet long
made of 12 wood strips wedged between white-
washed brick walls. Three and one-half hand-
lengths in height separate the shelf from the
one above.
"I kept putting my 9 year old daughter in
that bed, which was my mother's age when she
was in the concentration camps," said Chavi
Hertz of Miami Beach, the child of a survivor.
"That was the connection for me."
"I can't get any feeling out," Hertz had said
earlier, after leaving Auschwitz. "There's just
an ache inside. It hurts but I can't hurt like
they did."
But after the afternoon at Birkenau,
imagining her daughter sprawled on her
mother's long-ago pallet, she had different
feelings. "It was exactly what I expected to see
and when I saw it, it shattered me," said the
Miami Beach woman. "And I was really
waiting for this to happen, to feel that kind of
pain because I know that my parents suffered
so much."
The sign at the Lei ten berg Cemetery (near
Dachau on the outskirts of Munich) reads in
five languages: "Final resting place of more
than 7,400 mainly unknown concentration
camp prisoners." There, in the last hour at the
last Nazi camp in Europe, one woman was
joined in saying kaddish, a prayer for the dead.
Among the 22 members of the Journey of
Conscience, none of whom even knew her
grandfather's name, there was unity in her loss.
"When somebody dies, you know they're
dead," said Rosenberg. "You go to the
cemetery to see them or talk to them. You know
they're there. But my grandparents, there was
no place to go to see or to knew. I tried to
retrace a lot of steps my mother and father and
grandmother and grandfather had taken. It
made them closer. It made them real. I felt their
spirit all around me. When you spend a lifetime
thinking how life would be different if
something didn't happen, it's almost like an
obsession. This last week, I embraced it. I
almost touched it."
When Lee Rosenberg hobbled up the hilltop
to the cemetery in the dusk and rain and looked
at the little stone markers etched only with
numbers, at least one concentration camp
prisoner was finally known, and mourned. "My
grandfather, we made a connection," she said.
"You know, everything that goes around comes
around and makes a full circle."
rman, new GMIF campaign director
lh of the Combined Jewish Appeal-
|ency Fund has created a need for a
anal in the campaign department,
i the appointment of Kenneth
le Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
rmpaign director.
who graduated from Rutgers
New Jersey, has served during
I years as campaign director of the
^ration of Fort Lauderdale. His
risibilities included serving as
I Finance and Development and
>f the accounting department and
on department in concurrence with
n director. Through a myriad of
levelopment programs, missions
community organizations, he
evel of giving to an all time high.
cted the campaign fund from $1.8
f.000 gifts to $4 million and 28,000
jo was responsible for installing a
kful data processing system and
sold the system to other
previous experience included
impaign with the United Jewish
Kenneth Bierman
Appeal in small communities in the Midwest
and in larger communities in New Jersey.
Successful hard work led to his own fund
raising consulting firm which focused on
synagogues, related community programs and
Camp Renaz. After years of consulting on his
own, the understanding was clear Bierman
missed the excitement and fulfillment of Jewish
communal service. This personal decision led
him back to the Federation in Fort Lauderdale
and Miami.
"The scope of what I can accomplish here is
different. Everything is on a much larger
scale," reflected Bierman. "I feel very confident
of this new relationship because of my ex-
tensive background and experience in South
Florida."
In listing his goals and objectives for the
CJA-IEF Campaign, Bierman said he plans to
forge ahead in all areas of campaign and hopes
to initiate a strong new gifts effort by
"bringing new gifts in at a qualitative level
rather than quantitative level."
Ken is married to Cathy, vice president of the
Hebrew Day School in Fort Lauderdale, and is
the father of two children. His son, Lee, and
daughter, Laura, attend the Hebrew Day
School.
"I have received great support both
professionally from the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and from the community's
leadership. Although I've only been hero a
short time, everything I've experienced up until
this point makes me believe it will be a good
relationship between Ken Bierman and
Miami."


Page 12
Federation. October. 1983
It's another off-night of boring television
fare, and you're punching the buttons on your
cable television channel box to find a more
interesting diversion. You randomly select a
channel and find a show entitled 'Eenie's
Kitchen," which shows you how to prepare
matzoh balls and kreplach.
It's not your typical television show, but in
the near future the Greater Miami community
will have a wide range of Jewish-oriented shows
to view when Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Cable Television, Inc. begins broadcasting.
Formally established as a corporation last
month, Jewish Federation Cable Television will
initially provide two hours of programming
daily, from 5 to 7 p.m. on five local cable
television companies: Ultracom, Dynamic,
Miami Cable vision. Americable and Storer. The
corporation has concluded an agreement with
the Dade County School Board to use its
microwave transmitter, which will allow all
cable companies to simultaneously broadcast
the programming.
"We're very pleased with the cooperation we
have received from the school board, and we're
making considerable progress in our efforts to
finalize contracts with the cable companies,"
said Arthur Horowitz, president of Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Cable Television. "If
all proceeds according to schedule, we will
begin broadcasting before the year's end."
During the past two months, Director of
Broadcasting Marc Rosenweig has been
meeting with representatives from Federation's
local family of agencies, in order to receive
input concerning planned programming dealing
with Jewish culture and education, current
events and human services.
In its premiere year, the cable enterprise will
have limited original local programming due to
budgetary constraints. However, locally
produced programming will most likely include
educational shows from the Central Agency for
Jewish Educational and the Zachor Institute
for Holocaust Studies, a medical-health
ITJA Young Leadership
Conference in D.C.
The nation's young Jewish leadership will
converge on Washington, D.C. next March 11-
13 for "I.inking Destinies," the United Jewish
Appeal's Fourth National Young Leadership
Conference. One of the year's most influential
gatherings to determine a comprehensive
agenda for the American Jewish community,
the conference will bring together 2,000 active
and committed young Jews from throughout
the nation who want to address the critical
issues affecting American Jewish life.
The conference, a gathering that will have
substantial political significance due to its
Washington setting, will include briefings by
leading members of Congress, the
Administration and the State Department. The
gathering will also include discussions with
Israeli government representatives and noted
experts on U.S.-Israel relations and two-and-
half days of plenaries, panels, workshops and
study sessions more opportunities than in
any previous conference for intense and open
discussion of important problems.
"What we, the young Jewish leadership in
the country, discuss and decide in Washington
could help determine the future course of our
Jewish community and our relationship with
Israel," said Michael M. Adler, national chair-
man of the conference, Pacesetter chairman of
the 1984 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund / Project Renewal-Or Akiva
campaign and a member of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Board of Directors. "It
promises to be a very exciting conference, and I
pa
urge all of Miami's young leadership to be
of it."
Some of the fundamental issues confers
participants will be addressing include ho*!
participate knowledeably in the demoo*
process; how to express active support!
the people of Israel; and how to communicn
Jewish pride and commitment to the
generation.
"Reference is often made to a so-caj
"Jewish lobby,'' commented Alan Yarkj
Florida chairman for the conference. "Such
lobby does exist, and it is up to us to send
strong message to our legislators concerna
support of Israel and the Jewish communityi
this election year."
"Miami has traditionally sent a very lari_
delegation to the conference," added Rkhail
Berkowitz, Miami chairman for the confereno
"We certainly hope that this year's group i
larger than ever, and we will let the conferent
know that Miami's young leadership coi
stitutes much of the future's national Jewi
leadership."
Based on early registration and the respoi
to past conferences, a sell-out is anticipated
this year's conference, which will be held at tal
Washington Hilton Hotel from Sundt
through Tuesday, March 11-13.
For additional information about conferencJ
registration, air transportation and hotel ac
commodations. please contact Milt Heller
576-4000.
program from Mount Sinai Medical Center and
religious programs from the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami.
Federation Cable also has an agreement to
purchase programs from the Jewish Federation
of Chicago, which has developed one of the
nation's leading Jewish cable systems. It als<
plans to broadcast "Vision Israel," a magazine
style program produced by United Jewish
Appeal, as well as videos and films from other
Jewish sources.
Production will be handled at 9eva
television studios around the Greater Mil
area, including facilities owned and operated
the cable companies, the school board
Barry University. A orv end equipment i
be rented for "remote" production.
For additional Information about Greaifl
Miami Jewish Federation Cable Televisio
please contact Marc Rosenweig at 576-401
ext. 340.
Vanguard Division
launches CJA-IEF
U.S. Senator Rudy Boschwitz addresses Vanguard Division meeting.
Demonstrating their commitment to their
fellow Jews, members of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Vanguard Division last
month launched the 1984 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund / Project
Renewal-Or Akiva Campaign at a meeting that
gave the campaign one of its moat successful
starts. The event, attended by 66 persons who
made a minimum gift of $25,000 to the cam-
paign, featured guest speaker U.S. Senator
Rudy Boschwitz (R.-Minn.).
The gathering was held at the home of Irma
and Norman Braman, who respectively serve as
a chairwoman of Federation's Women's Divi-
sion Pacesetter-Trustee event and Federation
vice president. Robert Traurig is Vanguard
Division chairman.
On Super Sunday
Lead The Way
Super Sunday, the largest outreacj
program to the Greater Miami Jew*
community on behalf of the 1984 Con
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer8f^
Fund Campaign, has been scheduled I
January 15, 1984, at Temple Israel i
Greater Miami, 137 NE 19th Street.
"Super Sunday offers every Jew I
Dade County the opportunity to mate
commitment to their fellow Jews, satf
Howard R. Scharlin. general campaign
chairman of the 1984 CJA-IEF. "It n"
one day every year when we must renffr-
our efforts to provide social services
Jews who need our help in Greater Mu
in Israel and in communities througl
the world."
Last year, more than 3-000oJ.u(S
Sunday volunteers helped raise W*B
for the 1983 CJA-IEF Campaign i
chairmen of the 1984 event, Fran LeJ
Gerald K. Schwartz, Susan Sirotu
Barry S. Yarchin, expect that even gn 1
community participation will surpa
previous Super Sunday accomplishment
ft*
So mark the day on your
calerd*'
ou mar* cne uny u j" gg
January 15, 1984. Help us ^3
to the most successful Super Sunday <*


Federation. October, 1983
Page 13
day in the life of a GMJP mission
m0re than sixty people will be
the streets of Mea Shearun, one of the
famous areas in Jerusalem, preparing for
iHthi Israel as part of the 1983 Greater
L-Jewish Federation Community Mission
PLel At this very moment many par-
Ks will ** mside the Myn HosPita1' a
Kilitation center for crippled children or at
Usorption center for Falasha Jews, seeing
fnroblems Jews from Ethiopia are ex-
LnrinK After they finish with Kabbalat
Et (celebration at the Wall), they will
(dinner with Cantor Braun, Cantor of the
k1 Defense office, and his family. The end of
Uav brings the missionaires to The Plaza, a
Istar hotel from which the next exciting
fcrience will begin.
, Community Mission to Israel is
sentative of the Greater Miami Jewish
munity at large a microcosm of people
i all professions, ages and backgrounds. Its
| is to experience the land, history and the
L on a very personal basis so participants
letter understand the relationship between
mean Jews and Israel. Another objective is
[understanding of The Greater Miami
Ish Federation's relationship with Israel
[the tremendous needs that are fulfilled
Jugh their partnership.
fissions planned through the Greater Miami
ish Federation provide participants with an
rary and program that they couldn't ex-
ace on any other type of tour. The types of
lie one meets in Israel, the unusual places
the firsthand educational experience are all
fcrtant parts of the unique way the com-
lity mission is handled.
I submission to Italy took place four days
t to the trip to Israel, which included stops
JVenice, Florence and Rome. On a sub-
lion, the participant has the opportunity to
knowledge of a nation's history and a
jnt perspective as well. Not only do
fionaires experience the ruins, but also find
nhat it's like to be a Jew in Italy today.
i the Federation's Community sub-mission
pical day in Italy might be something like
this: In Venice, a first look at the Jewish
Ghetto, said to be the oldest in existence, where
for centuries the Venetian Jews lived, studied,
worshipped and maintained their traditions. A
tour of the five synagogues in the Jewish
quarter: the Spanish, the Levantine, the
Italian, the Canton, the Ashkenazi and the
adjacent Museum of Jewish Art. An inspection
of the stone murals sculpted by the Arbit
Blatas, an unforgettable tribute to the Jews of
Venice who perished in the Holocaust.
Joel and Paula Levy, chairmen of the
Missions Committee and Community Mission,
agree that every mission is designed
specifically for the group of people they are
taking. The itineraries are not laid out until
they know exactly who is going, their interests
and what they've previously experienced.
Briefings take place every morning, where an
expert is on hand to educate the participant
about the upcoming day's event. When touring
the Promised Land, going to Masada is a
naturally important side trip. On the Com-
munity Mission, a morning briefing will be led
by a foremost expert on Masada talking about
its place in history and its importance to the
State of Israel and the Jewish people.
Jewish Junior High
awaits accreditation
the fall of 1982, when it opened its doors to
first incoming class, the Jewish Junior
School of South Florida became the
o's first independent, community-based
sh junior high that was not affiliated with
er day school or synagogue.
Jay, only one short year later, the Jewish
^or High is about to establish another land-
It in its brief history. It will soon receive ac-
itation from the Southern Association of
s and Schools, and t will be one of the
few schools to be accre iited after only one
of operation.
st month, a six-member team from the
hern Association spent two days at the
ity, interviewing students, teachers,
ts and officers of the tchool, reviewing
lum, and analyzing 1 self-study the
conducted. In a repot issued by the
it recommended that tie school be sc-
at a regional meeting of the Associa-
jthat will convene in Decem wr.
visiting committee was impressed with
quality of instruction, the academic
Bram and the faculty at the Jewish Junior
of South Florida," an excerpt of the
|t states. "The faculty members are well
" ied, the headmaster is providing excellent
Bership and direction, and the school has
support from the parents and commu
*ipient of $136,892 this year from the
ter Miami Jewish Federation's Combined
J APPeal-Israel Emergency Fund, the
m* Junior Hih School of South Florida
V a .vied blend of modern studies the
*B ^nces, humanities and language
H a backdrop of traditional and lasting
'w'c va'ues. The school was conceived fovr
r,V ago by an ad hoc committee of tho
fHS Agency for Jewish Education, which
0 that an independent junior high school
a complement the Jewish High school that
^"g planned for North bade. CAJE is
K?"m the establishment of a second
^igh school in the South Dade area.
Barry Ross
"The school has achieved this accomplish-
ment toward accreditation because it has done
everything in a first class fashion," said Barry
Ross, president of the school. "We have first
class facilities and personnel, and the school is
organized to exceed academic requirements."
Ross also noted that the school opened up a
new addition this fall, which houses a
cafetorium (a combination cafeteria-auditori-
um), three classrooms and a computer room
with ten computers.
Commenting on the impending accreditation,
Headmaster Samuel Lasko said: "I'm certainly
thrilled. It's one of the few schools in the
country that will receive accreditation after one
year. It shows a tremendous amount of growth
for our school. It's a credit to our faculty, of-
ficers and Board of Directors, who have given
their time and effort to make this possible."
For additional information concerning the
Jewish Junior High School of South Florida,
please call 255-1335.
Home hospitality encounters are an everyday
occurrence while travelling with the community
mission. Two nights ago, a couple who both are
practicing attorneys were able to visit with an
Israeli attorney right in their own living room.
Coffee and dan ish might be served, maybe even
a little cognac. But most important is the
American couple's perception of what it is like
to be an attorney in Israel, ot sharing their
feelings about practicing the same profession.
Finding out that philosophies are the same, but
that the laws are completely different.
Experiencing that Israeli counterpart face-to-
face.
This Sunday, missionaires will tour Ramon
Air Force Base in the Arava, a military in-
stallation that is not open to the public.
Through the Federation, United Jewish Appeal
and other related agences, participants will be
able to see actual maneuvers taking place right
before their very eyes. A tank that had been
occupied in battle will be observed, sat in and
truly experienced firsthand. An airforce expert
will talk about the significance of the base, and
soldiers sitting in the tanks will speak of their
practical knowledge of the machinery.
Plans for Spring and Summer missions are as
follows: 1) mission designed for Orthodox
Jews, 2) missions for those who have been on
missions in the past, 3) Leadership Develop-
ment Mission, 4) Family Mission, 5) Com-
munity Mission and 6) Singles Mission.
For further information, contact Joan
Scheiner at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation at 576-4000.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Family Mission will be held from July 30
to August 10, 1984. For reservations and
information, please call the phone number
listed above.
Kew JCC singles
travel elnb
The Miami Beach Jewish Community
Center, located at 4221 Pine Tree Drive on
Miami Beach, has recently established a new
Singles Travel Club.
"The purpose of the Singles Travel Club is to
make travel for singles both affordable and ex-
citing," said Jerry Libbin, center director
of the Miami Beach Jewish Community Center.
"Our travel club will make trips available to all
participating organizations of JASS." (Jewish
Association Serving Singles.)
The club held its first planning meeting on
October 20th at which time a representative of
Club Med showed a film and described a
number of package deals that could be available
for the new club.
Mr. Libbin also indicated that in addition to
co-ordinating trips for the members of JASS in
South Florida, the Singles Travel Club will be
planning several trips which may be co-
ordinated nation-wide. One such trip presently
under consideration is the Mardi Gras in New
Orleans on March 5th.
Anyone interested in learning more about the
J.C.C. Singles Travel Club is invited to call Mr.
Libbin at the J.C.C. at 534-3208. The Jewish
Community Centers of South Florida are
members of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Family of agencies and beneficiaries of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund.


Page 14
Federation, October, 1983
JCCs celebrate golden anniversary
More than 300 members present and past of
the branches of the Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida and the old YMHA filled the
Crystal Room of the Four Ambassadors Hotel
earlier this month for a celebration of the 50th
anniversary of the JCCs and a nostalgic
evening reliving old times.
One of those members was Dorothy Kaplan.
As the wife of the late Leon Kaplan, president
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation from
1967 until 1969, past president of the "Y" on
S.W. Fifth Street and a founder of the Flagler-
Granada branch, Mrs. Kaplan, who was an
active participant in many Jewish organiza-
tions herself, witnessed much of the relatively
young history of the organization.
Asked how she and her husband became
involved in the Jewish Community Centers, she
replied, simply, "we were just brought up in
that environment."
That environment included involvement in
the synagogue and later the Jewish Community
Center in Pasaic, New Jersey. "He was very
devoted," Mrs. Kaplan said of her husband's
more than 35 years to work on behalf of the
YMHA and later the JCCs. "The JCC was
something he brought with him from when he
was a boy."
Leon Kaplan's efforts were recognized in a
1972 testimonial dinner during which he
received the Frank L. Weil medal "for distin-
guished contribution to the Jewish Community
Center field."
That contribution, Mrs. Kaplan said, "just
gave him the feeling that he was doing a good
deed, that he was helping people."
Leon Kaplan's "idea of a Jewish Community
Center YMHA," she added, "was that it
would encompass an entire family and have
programs for every age group."
Another person involved in the first 50 years
Stanley Gilbert and Muriel Russell,
(standing) former JCC presidents, and
Metro-Dade Commissioner Ruth Shack,
current JCC president, at anniversary
dinner.
of the JCCs was A. Budd Cutler, who served as
president of the Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida for three years in the 1960's.
His term, he said, "was one of the most
valuable experiences of my lifetime. I came to
the JCC as a young adult, when it (the old
Miami Beach branch) was occupying .
premises at One Lincoln Road. I got invol r
some young adult groups and got intermS-
athletics," he continued. *"'
That involvement grew with the JCC.
new Miami Beach Center on Bay Road on
and the Miami Beach and Miami YMH
became part of the Jewish Community cJl
movement.
The involvement of Muriel Russell
president of the Jewish Community Cent*
South Florida in the late 1970's, grew outi
personal tragedy.
Spurred by the desire to memorialize
daughter and grandson who died in an airpb
crash, Muriel and Robert Russell (then prt
dent of the Greater Miami Jewish Federatk
worked toward the construction of the 0
named after their daughter, Michael-Ann.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC in No
Miami Beach was "something we felt she wo
have liked to have had when she was groi
up and would have liked to have for her i
Mrs. Russell said.
She characterized her four year tenure
president as "a very rewarding experien.
because of the people I met and the growth I
the Centers." Today that commitment to I
JCCs remains strong. "I believe firmly ini
community center movement," she said.
For current Jewish Community Centers i
South Florida President Ruth Shack, her i
in the office (now in its third year) has tr
been one of service to the community. "I i
as a commitment to my Jewish heritage and I
the Jewish community," she said.
The Jewish Community Centers of South|
Florida are members of the Greater Mia
Jewish Federation family of agencies
beneficiaries of the Combined Jewish Appetl-J
Israel Emergency Fund.
Fashions for
HiUJi1 1^,mceS Mew Staff the expecting
Lyn Light Geller, (from left) Laurie
Naturman and Hope Hut tig.
Hillel Jewish Student Centers are expanding.
Staff appointments have been announced by
Jeffrey Samek, president of B'nai B'rith Hillel
Foundations of Greater Miami. Lyn Light
Geller was named unit director and Laurie
Berman Naturman was appointed director of
student activities for the South Dade Hillel
Unit. Hope Marcus Huttig joined the staff of
the area office as public affairs coordinator.
Lyn Light Geller replaces Rabbi Dennis
Wald, who left Hillel after five years to become
the regional director for American Jewish Con-
gress. Lyn has a Bachelor of Arts Degree in
Hebraic Studies from Rutgers University.
Included in her course work was a year of study
at the Hebrew University in Jerusalem. She
holds a Masters Degree in social work from the
University of Maryland.
Mrs. Light Geller came to the Miami area
with five years previous experience working
with college students. She was most recently
the acting director of Hillel at Harvard Univer-
sity and worked for three years with students
at the State University of New York at Albany.
She and her husband, Nathan, celebrated their
wedding in August. Nate is the assistant di-
rector of the Leadership Development Depart-
ment of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Laurie Naturman, the newly appointed
director of student activities in South Dade, is a
recent graduate of Yeshiva University's
Wurzweiler School of Social Work. Her under-
graduate degree from Florida International
University is in social work. She is returning to
Hillel, where she worked in a similar capacity
for two years before accepting an internship as-
signment in the Leadership Development
Department of Federation last year: Mrs.
Naturman was recently married to Steven
whom she met while working as a volunteer for
Federation's "Super Sunday" in January, 1982.
Steve is Assistant Area Director of the Amer-
ican Jewish Committee.
Public Affairs Coordinator Hope Huttig
will be responsible for public relations, inter-
organizational activities and internal fund rais-
ing for the statewide organization,
Mrs. Huttig attended Boston University
and graduated from Briarcliff College with a
Bachelor of Arts in History. She served as as-
sistant director of Volunteer Services at
Jackson Medical Center and has worked as a
social worker at several United Way agencies.
She and her husband, Fred, have two children
who attend Beth Am Day School.
The full time appointments of Mrs. Light
Geller and Mrs. Naturman represent an expan-
sion of H illel's staff and a broadening of Hillel's
presence in South Dade. A wide spectrum of
programs will be offered at Florida Inter-
national University and Miami Dade Com-
munity College. Inter-campus activities will be
scheduled on a regular basis. In addition to
program planning, both women will be involved
in counseling and related activities for Jewish
students.
In meeting the religious needs of the
students, Mrs. Light Geller will be Hillel's
representative to the Campus Ministry. In this
capacity she will work with ministers and
priests of other denominations to institute reli-
gious activities and related services for their
respective congregations. Mrs. Light Geller will
aid in developing the newly created Ministry at
Miami Dade's South campus.
The Hillel Jewish Student Centers are
members of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's family of agencies and beneficiaries of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund.
Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater
Miami set the fashion in obstetrical care wMl
their second annual maternity fashion show for ^
today's mother-in-waiting.
The pregnant models, all hospital employees,
were outfitted in maternity daywear. evening
wear and sport wear, courtesy of a local
maternity shop. Infant wear and accessories
were also modeled and displayed throughout
the show.
Though the fashion show was the major
event, the high point of the day came when the
door prizes were given away. Some of the major
prizes included a baby car seat, a crib, I
stroller, two rocking chairs, and several florai
arrangements. A long stemmed rose and a gi
bag filled with baby product samples *
presented to a 11 o f t he 150 pregnant guests. i
Mount Sinai Medical Center is a member j
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation MMlg*
agencies and a beneficiary of the Coml
Jewish Appei-Israel Emergency Fund.


Federation, October, 1983
Page 15
DAY, NOVEMBER 1
Primak will discuss "The Life and Times of
"Rashevis Singer" at the Forte Forum lecture
2v at 1 P-m. in the Forte Towers
EJtom 1200 West Ave., Miami Beach. For
PjgSuhn, please call Elsie Rubin at 673-
LsDAY, NOVEMBER 1
[Remarried Families Workshop" for parents,
Larents and couples with children, who are
lS*in marriage, will begin at 7:30 p.m. at the
, Dade Jewish Community Center, 12401 SW
I Ave. The cost for four sessions (consecutive
days) for Center members is $35 per couple, $20
Kjdual; non-members fees will be $55 per couple,
[individual. For more information, please call
ihaBotkin at 251-1394.
)AY, NOVEMBER 1
i Dade Jewish Community Center senior adults
rform in an original production of "The
Was Loneliness," at 1 p.m. at the Center,
ifsW 102nd Ave. There is a $1 donation. For
i information, please call Sherry Horwich, senior
tsupervisor, at 251-1394.
DNESDA Y. NOVEMBER 2
i yourself through sculpture in an eight week
i uught by artist Sid Smith. Oh meet at the
l-Ann Russell JCC for eight consecutive
___ays, beginning today, from 1 to 3 p.m. or 7
nj.m. The cost is $30 for members, $40 for non-
tbers. For more information, please call Melody
i it 932-4200.
MY, NOVEMBER 3
Elliott Manning, director of the graduate
in taxation at the University of Miami
of Law, will speak about splitting income
r family members for tax purposes, at 8 p.m. at
juth Dade JCC, 12401 SW 102nd Ave For
> information, please call 251-1394.
DAY, NOVEMBER 4
lies Rita Perlman and Marcia Reisman will
jduct a tram tour of Fairchild Tropical Gardens
nembers and guests of the South Dade Jewish
hmunity Center from 9:30 a.m. until 12:30 p.m.
1 cost, which includes lunch, is $8 for members,
| for non-members, and $5 for children over nine
old. For more information and reservations,
c call Marsha Botkin at 251-1394.
LIRDAY, NOVEMBER 5
! B'nai B'rith Foundation of the United States
I honor Bill Gunter this evening at a dinner at the
Valon Bal Harbour, Miami Beach. For more
nation, please call 864-2025.
DAY, NOVEMBER 6
t bargains are available at the Miami Beach
ih Community Center's Flea Market from 9
. until 3 p in., on the Center Grounds, 4221 Pine
t Dr. For more information, please call 534-3206.
DAY, NOVEMBER 6
Young Adult Division of the Greater Miami
i Federation will sponsor a Shalom Brunch to
one new members at 11 a.m. For more in-
lion, please call Nate Geller at Federation, 576-
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
VhtM Print or Type)
The deadline for December eventa ia November 8,1963
Organization
Event

Place
Date___ Your name Tinrm { ) m. < \ p.m.
Title Phnru* No -------
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
;reater MUmi Jewish Federation
<200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33187
Calendar
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6
Arthur Kurzweil, author of "From Generation to
Generation," will be the guest lecturer at Temple
Beth Sholom's Sunday Omnibus Series at 10:30 a.m.
His topic will be "The Old Country, Jewish
Genealogy." For more information, please call 538-
7231.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7
A special orientation on gerontology, in preparation
for the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Young
Adult Division Chanukah visit to local nursing
homes, will be held at 7 p.m. in the Federation
building. For more information, please call Nate
Geller at the Federation, 576-4000.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8
Murray Meyerson will discuss "Would Gambling
Encourage Tourism on Miami Beach?" at the Forte
Forum lecture series at 1 p.m. in the Forte Towers
Auditorium, 1200 West Ave., Miami Beach. For
more information, please call Elsie Rubin at 673-
1979.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 8
The Women's Committee of the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies will sponsor a seminar en-
titled "A Woman and Her Money," at 9:15 a.m. in
the Regency Room of Harbour House North. A fee of
$7.50 includes complete breakfast and parking. For
more information, please call Penny Merlin at
Federation, 576-4000.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation South Dade
Branch Public Affairs Committee and the South
Dade Jewish Community Center will present an
"Update on Jewish Problems in the Soviet Union,"
at 7:45 p.m. at the Jewish Junior High School, 12401
SW 102nd Ave. Dr. Gary Frank, adjunct professor
of International Studies, University of Miami, will
be the guest speaker. For more information, please
call 251-9334.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10
Learn the secrets of throwing great parties from
expert Michael Britt Henley at noon at the Michael-
Ann Russell JCC, 18900 NE 25th Ave. The cost,
which includes a gourmet lunch, is $10 for members,
$15 for non-members. For more information, please
call Melody Leeds at 932-4200.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Pacesetter
Dinner, the annual gala event open to contributors
of a minimum of $10,000 to the 1984 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign,
will be held this evening at the Fontainebleau-
Hilton. Cocktails begin at 6 p.m., dinner at 7 p.m.
For more information, contact Michael Fischer at
Federation, 576-4000, ext. 228.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13
A Young Business and Professional Cocktail
Reception, sponsored by the Young Adult Division
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, will be held
at 7 p.m. Congressman Larry Smith will be the guest
speaker. A $1,000 minimum gift to the 1984 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund is
required. For more information, please call Milt
Heller at Federation, 576-4000.
NOVEMBER 13-16
The Jewish Junior High School of South Florida will
be sponsoring a book fair this week at the school
campus, 12401 SW 102nd Ave. All proceeds will go
to the P.T.A. For more information, please call the
school office at 255-1355.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15
Rabbi Elliot Skiddell will discuss 'Recon-
struct ion ism: A Controversial Approach to
Judaism" at the Forte Forum lecture series at 1 p.m.
in the Forte Towers Auditorium, 1200 West Ave.,
Miami Beach. For more information, please call
Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 15
The Jewish Vocational Service and the South Dade
Jewish Community Center are co-sponsoring an
Annual College Night for high school students and
their parents this evening at 7:30 at the South Dade
JCC, 12401 SW 102nd Ave. Selected topics include:
college selection and application, choosing a career,
current financial aid and Jewish campus Ufa For
more information, call Beth K. Wald, career
development counselor, at the JVS, 576-3220.
NOVEMBER 16-18 aad 20
The South Dade Jewish Community Center will
sponsor its third annual Jewish Book Fair this week
at the Center, 12401 SW 102nd Ave. More than 600
new Judaica, children's and adult books and 2,000
used hard and soft cover books will be on sale
throughout the four days. Hoag Levins, author of
"Arab Reach: The Secret War Against Israel," will
be the opening speaker on Nov. 16 at 8 p.m.
Admission is $3. A Family Day Festival is planned
for Sunday, Nov. 20. A Women's Day Luncheon,
featuring Joel Gross, author of "This Year in
Jerusalem" will be held on Thursday, Nov. 17. For
more information please call the South Dade JCC at
251-1394.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17
Martin IMargulies, Grove Isle developer and art
collector, will conduct a tour of the Grove Isle
Sculpture Garden at 9:30 a.m. for adults from the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC. The cost, which includes
lunch and transportation, is $15 for members, $17
for non-members. For more information, please call
Stephanie Engelberg at 935-2440.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 17
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Young
Adult Division Social Action Committee and the
Young Jerusalem Group for Retarded Jewish Adults
will spend the evening singing Israeli songs and
dancing at the South Dade JCC, 12401 SW 102nd
Avenue. The fun starts at 7 p.m. For more in-
formation, please call Nate Geller at Federation, 576-
4000.
.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 19
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center will
hold its second annual auction this evening. Mer-
chandise includes portraits, dinners for two,
weekend vacations, stereos, color televisions and
more. For more information please call 534-3206.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22
Mendell Selig will discuss "Israel: What Next?" at
the Forte Forum lecture series at 1 p.m. in the Forte
Towers Auditorium, 1200 West Ave., Miami Beach.
For more information, please call Elsie Rubin at 673-
1979.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 27
The Batsheva Dance Company of Israel will give a
benefit performance on behalf of the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Center Scholarship
Fund at 7:30 p.m. at the Bailey Concert Hall of
Broward Community College. Tickets are $25,
$17.50 and $12.50 and are available from the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC. For more information,
please call Marsha Engelman at 932-4200.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 28
The Lorber Chapter of the National Asthma Center
will man a gift wrap station at the Cutler Ridge
Mall, 20505 South Dixie Highway, from today
through Christmas eve. Chapter members will be
wrapping gifts for a small fee, with all proceeds
going to support the National Jewish Hospital and
Research Center-National Asthma Center. For more
information, please call Sondra Hennart at 444-4098.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20
Hirsch Goodman, defense correspondent and
analyst of "The Jerusalem Post," will be the guest
lecturer at Temple Beth Sholom's Sunday Omnibus
Series at 10:30 a.m. His topic will be "The Strategic
Balance in the Mideast: An Analysis of the Present
and Peep at the Future." For more information,
please call 538-7231.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 20
New Judaica books will be available at the second
annual Miami Beach Jewish Community Center
Jewish Book Fair today, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. at
the Center, 4221 Pine Tree Dr. Refreshments will be
available. For more information, please call 534-
3206.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 22
The Accountants Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will hold a cocktail reception at 6
p.m. at the Four Ambassadors Hotel Dora Roth,
nationally known speaker and Holocaust survivor,
will be the guest speaker. Area stockbrokers will also
be invited to this event. For more information,
please call Joe Imberman at Federation, 576-4000.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 29
Dade County Commissioner Ruth Shack will discuss
"The Future of Dade County" at the Forte Forum
lecture series at 1 p.m. in the Forte Towers
Auditorium, 1200 West Ave., Miami Beach. For
more information, please call Elsie Rubin at 673-
1979.
Every Sunday
Ira Weisburd will be teaching traditional and
contemporary Israeli dancing every Sunday this
month, beginning at 8:00 p.m. at the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Center, 18900 NE 26th
Ave. The coat is $1.60 for members, $8 for non-
members. For more information, please call 932-
4200.


_ ......J
Page 16
Federation, October, 1983
..i
Tear end stock market tax planning
By Steven Meuing
Those of you who have invested in the stock
market since August of 1982 have probably
realized significant gains. The gains realized
can be further enhanced by decreasing the
amount of tax you will have to pay from the
sales of your stocks. With two months left in
1983, there is a considerable amount of income
tax planning that can be accomplished with
respect to your stock market transactions.
Long-term capital gains receive the most
favorable tax treatment since they are subject
to a maximum tax of 20 percent. It is important
to note that stock must be held for more than
one year in order to qualify as long-term. For
example, a stock bought on June 30, 1982 and
sold on June 30, 1983 would not qualify as long-
term. Furthermore, the trade date, (which is the
date the stock is actually bought or sold) and
not the settlement date, is used to determine
whether the one year holding period has been
met.
The tax planning that you may consider will
depend on whether you have already realized
gains and losses, and whether you still own
stock that has appreciated or depreciated in
value since you bought it.
1) CHARITABLE CONTRIBUTIONS. As
long as you have a long-term capital gain, you
can save tax dollars by donating your ap-
preciated stock to a qualified charity such as
the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies. By
doing this, you receive a tax deduction equal to
the fair market value of the stock on the day it
is contributed. Furthermore, you avoid paying
the capital gains tax of as much as 20 percent
you would otherwise have to pay if you sell
your stock.
As an example, assume you bought stock for
$4,000 on June 30,1982, and that the stock now
is worth $10,000. If you were to sell the stock,
you would realize a $6,000 long-term capital
gain. Assuming that you are in the 50 percent
tax bracket, your tax on the gain would be 20
percent x $6,000, or $1,200. If you were
planning to make a $10,000 cash charitable
contribution, you would save $5,000 in income
tax, but would have paid $1,200 in tax upon the
sale of the stock unnecessarily. If the stock had
been contributed directly to charity, you would
still get the $5,000 tax savings without paying
the tax on the gain.
2) NETTING GAINS AGAINST LOSSES.
Whenever you have capital gains and losses,
the losses are netted against the gains in a
certain way. With proper planning, this can
give you the opportunity to save income tax.
When you have realized both capital gains
and losses, the long-term losses must first be
offset against the long-term gains, while the
short-term losses are offset against the short-
term gains. This computation will yield: a) the
net long-term capital gain or loss and b) the net
short-term capital gain or loss.
(A) SHORT-TERM GAINS AND LONG-
TERM LOSSES. If you have a short-term gain
and a long-term loss, the long-term loss is
deducted against the short-term gain.
Assuming you are in the maximum tax bracket,
this will result in a 50 percent tax savings from
the long-term loss since the short-term gains
are taxed at a 50 percent rate. There are cir-
cumstances where you can maximize the
amount of long-term losses deducted against
short-term gains. For example, assume as of
November 1, you have the following:
Stock Sales through 11-1-83:
Short-term capital gains $50,000
Stock Held in your portfolio on 11-1-83:
Unrealized long-term capital gains 40,000
Unrealized long-term capital losses (40,000)
Net Appreciation in existing
portfolio
-0-
Without considering the fluctuations in
the stock market you should ask yourself how
you can best utilize the long-term capital losses
to save yourself taxes. In essence, you have
three alternatives:
1) sell the stock producing a loss in 1983
and recognize the long-term gain in 1964
2) sell the stock producing a gain and
recognize the long-term loss in 1984
3) sell both stocks
Steven Messing
These alternatives will produce the following
results:
Alternatives
Long-term Capital Gain $
Long-Term Capital Loss (40,000)
Net Long-term
Capital Gain (Loss) (40.000)
Short-term Capital Gain 50,000
2 3
$40,000 $40,000
(40.000)
40.000
50.000
50.000
In alternative 1, the long-term capital loss
will be offset against the $50,000 short-term
capital gain, thereby resulting in receiving a 50
percent tax savings from the long-term capital
loss deduction. In alternative 3, when the long-
term gains and losses are recognized in 1983,
^
I
the long-term capital loss only pro*
savings of 20 percent, since it ^a
amount of the long-term capital m
would be taxed at a 20 percent rate '
30 percent of the $40,000 lone4aJ3
$12,000 could be saved in th&3
selling the loss stock in 1983 and seS
gain stock in 1984 as in Alternative 1
(B) SHORT-TERM CAPITAI
AND LONG-TERM CAPITAL GAr
tax consequences relating to deduct
term losses against long-term gains |
favorable. This is a circumstance
should try to avoid, if possible. In thiss.
net short-term losses will be deducted]
the net gains. While this will reduce you
the savings generated from the <
losses will only be at a 20 percent
these losses reduce the long-term cai
which are otherwise taxed at a 20 per
If you had unrealized short-t_
gains from stock that you had not yetj
would be smart to recognize the gain
same year that you recognize the sh
losses. If you recognized the short-te..
in 1983 when you had long-term gains i
recognized the short-term gains in 19
would save taxes from the short-terra I
20 percent in 1983 and pay taxes on th
term gains at a 50 percent rate. Howe
short-term gains and losses were recog
the same year, the short-term losses wo
taxes at a 50 percent rate.
It is difficult enough trying
money in the stock market. However,;
make additional profits more eas|
reviewing the tax planning aspects
available for the remainder of the year.
OUNDATION OF
OewtsrfpH I LANrHRppiesI
of the greater Miami Jewish' federation
Foundation pays tribute
In its short ten year history, the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies has
received approximately $3 million in bequests from caring individuals who
have left a legacy of love to the Jewish community. These resources enable the
Foundation to fund creative programs that respond to the changing needs of
our community, as well as to meet emergencies.
In order to express appreciation for the important gifts received over the
last ten years, and to honor and perpetuate the memory of these donors, the
Board of Trustees of the Foundation has commissioned the construction of a
handsome memorial display panel on which the name of these deceased
legators, which are listed below, will be inscribed.
The Foundation invites all friends and relatives of the following people to a
special memorial service to be held to honor their memory on November 8th,
4:45 p.m. at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Building, 4200 Biscayne
Boulevard. For further information, please call the Foundation office at 576-
4000.
Joseph Krefetz
Peter Amazon
Jacob Bernstein
William Hertz
Samuel Lincenberg
Hannah Schwartz
Hyman Stern
Celia Barer
Morrie Flower
Rosa Horowitz
Amelia Kaplan
Benjamin Miller
Evelyn Platoff
Morris Silver
Lucille H. Goldsmith
Libby Rest
Jerome Schwartz
Philip Kraus
Irving Lannin
Charles Lippon
Martin Minkoff
Philip Siegel
Jacob A. Sachs
Edward Schuchman
Betty Weinstein
Martha Arnstein
William Chersky
William Levenson
Henry Baron
Nathan Epstein
Jeannie Jean Prankel
Florence Friedlander
Esther Goodman
George Green
Adele Kamlot
Louis Levy
Annie Popiel
Edward Schluasel
Karl Schneider
Paul Baron
Rose Rich
Betty Siegel
Herman Auerbach
Fay Buckner
Jacob Estreicher
Morris Freeman
Rose Friedman
David Gordon
Rose Gould
John Heifer
Mildred Kaye
Samuel Lazarus
Dorothy LeboviU
Eve Schacht
LeeDeLaViez
Perry Schwarcz
Louis G.Cohen
Gertrude Rothenberg
Harry Rothenberg
Sylvester Goldsmith
Esther Greenstein
EUa Oppenheimer
Rae Roaenthal
Lena Wolf
Sarah Barkin
Noel Bring
Irving Esptan
France* Kallos
Rose Loewy
Alexander SchneKUroa"


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