The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02852

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
[Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement. .Special Insert
eJewisHi Floifidiaim
jume 56-Number 39 Three Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, September 30,1983
Frmd Shochtt
By MaiiaOCtnls
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huti fully-decorated Torah scrolls in second
kofot in Kikar Malchei Yisrael in Tel
|ii>, /ie/p mar* Simchat Torah. Jewish
communities throughout the world celebrate
the occasion on Friday, bringing the High
Holy Day season to an end.
Hmchat Torah
Wall Unites Us As A People
I DR. JEHUDA MELBER
Friday we celebrate
special holiday of
chat Torah. What is so
fcial about it? It is the
holiday which sur-
ges every limit of joy
(delight, a day of extra-
lary simcha for all men
Simchat Torah is
anding in its unique
are of dancing and
rding with the Torah
Is by one and all.
hat comes to mind at those
in moments is the famous
}g of Saadya Gaon (9th
Mry): "Our people is a people
b> virtue of the Torah."
fed. what makes us all one
If? What is the common
linalor of Ashkenazic and
Sephardic Jewry? What ties the
Jew of Morocco with the Jew of
Western Europe.
THE LANGUAGE of the two
segments is different, the
mentality is different, the life-
style is different. Yet we are all
one united people. By virtue of
what? By virtue of the Torah that
has its applicability to every Jew
all over the world, regardless of
his particular locality-
It is only this sameness that
makes us all one united people-
No wonder that the conclusion of
the annual cycle of the Torah-
reading in the synagogue cons-
titutes the most happy occasion
for abundant delight by every
member of the Jewish people.
It must, however, be added
that Simchat Torah is not only a
day of great joy in the plain sense
of the term. For it presents also a
great challenge, a clarion call
summoning every Jew to a
stronger attachment to the
Torah.
THE GREAT Chasidic Rabbi
of Kotzk (19th Century) said once
to his followers on Simchat
Torah: "You dance so enthusias-
tically with the Torah, indicating
your great happiness about the
Torah. But that is not enough:
the question has to be asked: Is
the Torah equally happy with
you? Is your demonstration of
delight only a one-way road, or is
it a two-way road? Is it a mutual
happiness for both parties?"
Indeed, this question has to be
asked in all its sharpness and
poignancy on Simchat Torah of
this year. Is the Torah really
happy with us and our situation?
Or is there enough reason for the
Torah to be unhappy about us?
Do we abide by the Torah-
teaching to give her gladness
over our conduct, or do we
deviate from so many of her com-
mandments to make her gloomy
over our negligence?
Continued on Page 2-A
Yeshiva Posts
$15,000 For
Shooting Info
By KEVIN FREEMAN
And BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A total of $15,000 in reward
money has been offered by
New York City and a major
Jewish organization for in-
formation leading to the
apprehension of the person
or persons responsible for a
series of sniper attacks on
Yeshiva University stu-
dents.
The announcement of the re-
ward followed the wounding of a
Yeshiva University High School
student who was riding in a car
on an expressway in the vicinity
of the school after having left the
Manhattan upper West Side
campus, and the killing of a
woman in another car that was
travelling ahead of the students'
car.
THE URGENCY related to
the incident was the annouce-
ment by Police Commissioner
Continued on Page 2-A
Walter Mondale
Former Veep
Mondale Urges Strategic
Agreement to Bar Soviets
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Former Vice President
Walter Mondale urged that
the United States forge an
"effective strategic agree-
ment with Israel to restrain
the Soviets and their prox-
ies" in Lebanon.
Addressing a meeting of the
Conference of Presidents of Ma-
jor American Jewish Organiza-
tions here, Mondale, a candidate
for the Democratic Presidential
nomination in 1984, blasted the
Reagan Administration's Middle
East stance and charged that the
administration has no policy in
Lebanon. He claimed the Admin-
Continued on Page 2-A
%r
If Ceasefire Fails
Reagan Plan for Middle East Goes Down Drain
tident Reagan
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration stressed
that the diplomatic efforts
to achieve a ceasefire in
Lebanon early this week
produced some success as a
consequence of U.S. special
envoy Robert McFarlane
who met in Damascus with
the Syrian Foreign Minis-
ter, Abdel Hahm Khad-
dam, and with Walid Jum-
blatt, leader of the Leba-
nese Druze who are fighting
the Lebanese army from
the Shouf mountains.
The Administration pressed the
diplomatic effort not only be-
cause it wanted Congress to
adopt the compromise agreement
allowing the U.S. Marines to stay
an additional 18 months in
Lebanon, but because, as Presi-
dent Reagan made clear, the
Administration believes that if
the effort in Lebanon fails, it will
take down with it any remaining
hope for the Reagan Middle East
peace initiative.
ANSWERING questions from
regional editors and broadcasters
at the White House. Reagan said
if the ceasefire effort failed, "the
peace plan for the whole Middle
East that we had proposed and
offered our help in bringing
about, based on Camp David and
the UN resolutions ... I think
also goes."
Reagan, in his talks with the
visiting journalists, stressed, as
did Secretary of State George
Shultz in testifying before Senate
and House committees, that
Syria is to blame for the lack of
progress in Lebanon. "They've
made it pretty apparent that they
Continued on Page 10-A




Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. September 30. 1963
$15.000 Reward
Yeshiva Posts Cash Offer for Shooting Information
Coatii J
1-A
Robert McGuire ina: -=x. ::*
shooting to three other pnor
shooting incidents \Jes: J^ne ::
which Y estiva Ur^versst? stnv
dents sere the ayf targeu
In the earher skootsngs. which
took place m aad round the
campus of the Yeshna Univer-
sity, shots were fired on Jane T at
the front building on the univer-
sity s mam campus: on June 9 at
the Jewish Memorial Hospital:
and on June 22 at a luncheonette
frequented by university stu-
dents Several students were
injured m the June 22 attack.
The recent shooting occurred oc
the Cross-Bronx Expressway
heading east toward the Bronx-
Whites tone Bridge to Queens
where the five students who were
in the car live. According to a po-
lice official, a lone gunman armed
with an automatic or semi
automatic rifle using high
velocity" bullets, trade the stu-
dents from the campus where
they had been participating in
try-outs for the high school
hockey team.
THE GUNMAN, police said.
followed the students and ther
pulled ahead of their car ano
stopped on the Castle Hill exit
ramp, an estimated 3'i miles
from the school's campus. He
waited for the car carrying the
students and fired three shots,
one of which hit the lead car.
Mondale
kflmg its occupant 3 T-year-old
i____Be Rivera of VYoodhaven.
Qmmm then fired at the stu-
dents car. hitting one of them.
1 "-year-old Donald Spuky of Far
Rockaway. Queens, m the knee
The third bullet hit a retaining
wall, ponce said.
Deputy Police Commissioner
of Public Information Alice
McGillwn confirmed the
sequence of events and said that
it was feasible that the car trailed
the students from the Manhattan
campus and then pulled onto the
ramp and fired the three shots.
They were not aware they were
being followed.' McGuire said.
The sniper's car has been de-
scribed as a dilapidated four-door
late 1960s or early 1970s Chrys-
ler, perhaps a Plymouth or
Dodge, possibly with New Jersey
license plates. The sniper has
been described as a man with
close-cropped hair, in his 20s. by
eyewitnesses. Commissioner
McGuire said.
McGUIRE TOLD a news
conference that ballistics tests
have determined that the bul-
lets used in the shooting were
fired from the same rifle used in
two earlier incidents. There were
no spent bullets from the June 7
shooting at the main building of
the university that could be used
to make a positive determination,
but police feel it was from the
same weapon.
Questioned on whether the at-
tacks were anti-Semitic. McGuire
said. We can speculate that the
shootings were anti-Semitic, that
they were done by people who
had problems with Yeshiva stu-
dents, by gangs in the area, or by
a disgruntkd employe."
The theory of a disgruntled
employe was central to the in-
vestigation initiated following
the first shooting at the campus.
But according to a source at the
Yeshiva University, the theory
that the incidents were related to
an employe fired three weeks
prior to the June 7 incident for
stealing refrigerators, has been
dropped after the individual was
given a polygraph test and in-
vestigated extensively.
THE SOURCE said the police
are working on the "premise"
that the attack is anti-Semitic,
but that the attack is not the
work of an organized group or
gang because no one has called to
claim responsibility for the at-
tacks, the source said. McGilbc-n
said. The police do not consider
this attack the act of a rational
person."
The police have taken, since
the first shooting incident, what
were described as "excellent" ef-
forts to halt any further occur-
rences. More than a dozen uni-
formed police officers have been
assigned to cover the four-block
campus while there are 30 detect-
Urges U.S. Strategic Accord With Israel
Continued from Page 1-A
istration harbored illusions' in
the region.
He listed these as the belief
that Saudi Arabia is a moderat-
ing force: that King Hussein of
Jordan will enter negotiations
with Israel: and that Israel's
withdrawal from Lebanon would
be followed by Syria's withdraw-
al from that country.
"WE HAVE troops in Leba-
non but no policy there." Mon-
dale declared, stating what he
believed American goals there
should be. The U.S. should not
accept Syrian domination of that
country, he said. It should not
tolerate wanton attacks on the
Marines. It should work for a
compromise between the various
factions to broaden the govern-
ment of President Amin Gemayel
and then forge an "effective stra-
tegic agreement with Israel to re-
Cornerstone Laid
Jewish Chapel Gets
Going at West Point
WEST POINT, N.Y. -
(JTA) The cornerstone
of the first Jewish chapel at
the United States Military
Academy was laid here at
ceremonies attended by
about 400 persons. A mes-
sage from President
Reagan hailed "the contri-
bution of citizens of the
Jewish faith who have
served with distinction in
every battle for freedom we
Americans have fought"
from pre-Revolutionary
times to the present.
The message was read by
Herbert Ames, president of the
West Point Jewish Chapel Fund
which raised $4.5 million of the M
million nwdwi to build the 'hyp**
which will be completed next
year. The funds were donated
X entirely by Jewish and non
i, Jewish individuals and organiza-
tions through the Chapel Fund
* which is a non-profit organiza-
tion.
WHEN COMPLETED, the
chapel will be a center for reli-
gious worship. Judaica studies
and holiday observances for the
Academy's Jewish cadets, ins-
tructors, post personnel and their
families. It will be open to
visitors as well and will serve to
familiarize non-Jewish cadets
with Jewish customs, traditions
and religious ritual.
Ames noted that until now,
"Jewish cadets who have at-
tended the Academy since its
first class was graduated in 1802
have been using the chemistry
lab, auditorium or non-
denominational chapel at the
post cemetery for worship ser-
vices. When the chapel is com-
pleted neat year it will serve the
religious and cultural needs of
some 250 Jewish cadets, faculty
and other military personnel sta-
tioned at the Academy and their
dependents."
Groundbreaking ceremonies
were held in December, 1962. The
Jewish chapel will stand on a
bluff overlooking the parade
grounds, midway between the
Protestant and Catholic chapels.
strain the Soviets and their
proxies."
Mondale charged that in the
past year the Reagan Adminis-
tration has pressured Israel alone
on the issue of Lebanon and
"took the heat off Syria." The
result, he said, is that Syrian
troops are still in Lebanon and
PLO Chief Yasir Arafat is back
there as well.
Mondale was the second Dem-
ocratic Presidential aspirant to
appear before the Presidents
Conference, and his remarks were
highly favorable to Israel. He
said he believed the U.S. should
move its Embassy from Tel Aviv
to Jerusalem because Jerusalem
is Israel's "undivided capital."
HE SAID he did not believe
Jewish settlements on the West
Bank are illegal, asserting that
the fate of the settlements will be
determined only when negotia-
tions are resumed within the
Camp David framework.
Mondale also expressed oppo-
sition to the sale of sophisticated
weapons by the U.S. to Arab
countries because the introduc-
tion of such weapons will only ac-
celerate the arms race in the Mid-
dle East. If the Arabs are sold
sophisticated weapons, the U.S.
has to provide Israel with arms to
defend itself against them, he
said. Mondale called for good re-
lations between the U.S. and the
Arab countries, "but not at the
expense of Israel." which he
called a strategic asset to the
U.S.
Asked if he supported a state-
ment by Sen. John Glenn ID.,
Ohio), a rival lor the Democratic
Presidential nomination, who
said in New York that the
U.S should sad it* evw-
handed policy in the Middle East
and tilt openly in Israel's favor,
Mondale replied, "I have never
had to redefine my attitude" He
stressed that as s Senator from
Minnesota and later as Vice
President in the Carter Adminis-
tration, he was always a staunch
supporter of Israel.
ives investigating full time in the
area.
The police protection around
Yeshiva University led one offici-
al to comment. "The major
reason it (the recent shooting) did
not happen on this campus is be-
cause of the uniformed presence
on this campus."
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY has
initiated its own security ar-
rangements by allocating
$250,000 to hire Wells Fargo se-
curity guards and increasing
campus security, which doubled
the number of security guards at
the university. But the university
is reluctant to provide specific
numbers on how many security
guards it employs.
There have been no reports of
parents pulling their children out
of Yeshiva University divisions
because of the rash of shootings.
"No parent has called and said he
is not sending his kid here be-
cause he will get shot," the uni-
versity source said. "No one has
done this."
There has also been an out-
pouring of support from the His-
panic community and the Jewish
community. The American Jew-
ish Committee said it has joined
with a variety of other racial, reli-
gious and ethnic leaders, to es-
tablish a fund for information
leading to the apprehension and
conviction of the perpetrators.
The AJC fund totals $5,000 at
latest reports.
MALCOLM HOENLEIN, ex
ecutive director of the Jewish
Community Relations Council of
New York, said that the linkage
of the shooting to the previous
incidents around Yeshiva
University "are of grave concern.
However, we do not believe this
is cause for panic and warn
against irresponsible action in re-
sponse to the news."
Nathan Nagler. chairman of
the Anti-Defamation League of
B nai B rith s New York regional
board, called the attack "a de-
spicable act of bigotry" and said
"there is no basis at present to
believe that this is more than the
act of one or a handful of sick in-
dividuals.
The university source told the
JTA that Yeshiva University
students have no more problems
around the campus with the
diverse upper West Side neigh-
borhood residents than "'any
other person wearing a yarmulka
walking around New York." The
source said there have been re-
ports of harassment and some
vandalism against university
property in the past, but
"nothing out of the ordinary."
Dr. Jehuda Heller
Torah Unites
Us As People
Continued from Page 1-A I
That is the great ch
which confronts us on t
day of Simchat Torah. In"!
the slogan must be called o
happy with the Torah. butletl
Torah also be happy with ym]
IT IS interesting to noted
the Torah ends with the Ha
letter / (in the word Yis
Conversely, when we roll I
Torah scroll back and startl
once the Biblical reading all a
again, the first Hebrew letterf
(in the word Bereishitl. Til
together these two letters I-i|
arrive at the wonderful i
tion of the Hebrew word I
which means Heart
This comes to teach oil
tremendous lesson: that
cardinal principle in Judais
to stimulate and develop J
heart to triple love: Love I
God. love thy Torah. Love|
people wholehearta
Nothing substantial can be|
complished in our realm wii
love of the heart, without!
plete devotion and dedkatia
the sublimest degree of san
cation.
On this day of Simchat Is]
Friday, we are duty-boundi
member our brethren in
Russia, who under the
verse conditions gather i
in the only s] nagogue of J
particularly on Simchat
amazingly large numbers ml
to demonstrate their loya"
the Torah and to the Jfl
people, to show the world I
the inner Jewish flame canr
be extinguished, because!
yisam yisrael chai theJJ
people is an everlansiingenur
Let us learn from theml
.mulate their devotion in our J
country, to practice our
with pride and dignity Let"
gather together at all hoir
worship on Simchat
intensify our allegiance W|
Torah and to our History
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Sponsoring the Guardian Plan Prearranged Funeral
Tradition. Itk what makes us J
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nHKHHES


Tew Book
Sees Soviet as a Minority at Home
I / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By ARNOLD AGES
\Part II of a Two-Part Senea
dward Luttwak does
agree with Andrew
kburn. Luttwak is the
ant defense analyst
one-time Israeli re-
nt who wrote what has
i called one of the major
[s in political science,
Coup d'Etat." He is
[ably the only political
ntist to have a word,
fwakian, coined after
kame. The term is syno-
Jous with brilliant
/sis.
working as a consultant
j United States Department
ifense (and a lecturer before
university and academic
lituencies), Luttwak has
pred a study of the Soviet
; which is diametrically op-
I to the conclusions reached
ckburn. Luttwak's book.
Grand Strategy of the
Union" (St. Martin's
l), is a frightening look at
| imperial designs of the
an colossus.
IS significant that 1-utt-
Jwho wrote a doctoral dis-
port on the Roman empire,
ders the Soviet Union today
|a modern incarnation of the
Dt empire. He sees uncanny
rities, particularly between
upansionist patterns which
nt Rome undertook and
nt Soviet practices. In fact,
Irak sees Soviet expan-
i as almost inevitable.
atever weaknesses may
rchaeologists
(n New Dig
l FA (JTA> An ar-
bgical team sponsored
by Haifa University and
Iniversity of Marburg in
^Jermany has unearthed the
of a Canaanite settle-
Dating from approximately
TO BCE at Tel Acco, near
orth of Haifa bay.
}>rding to Prof. Moshe
n. head of Haifa Univer-
Brchaeological department,
Irected the dig, the various
lessels found indicate the
Jjent predates earlier
tes by about 1,000 years.
led that "this early settle-
kas not fortified and was
^ly agricultural in nature."
I skeleton of a horse was
lin a layer of rubble dating
fcli' middle Canaanite pe-
|Dothan called that dis-
"one of the most remark-
|nds ever made in Israel."
I from the late Bronze Age
|lso uncovered at the site,
containing clay vessels
|ng very rare pieces
I in two tones. A jar in a
known as "chocolate and
is only the second piece of
hd to be found in Israel,
> said.
grave yielded scarabs,
It them combined with gold
[In another, day vessels
^nd similar to those of Sy-
Turkish origin. In other
?'the hill, relics were found
[from the Iron Age and late
pite period, including day
the archaeologists as-
I with the Shardan people,
F'ng mercenaries who
lua coastal area at about
kg the rare pieces found
p ivory cosmetic container
shape of a duck and a
| image of the ancient deity,
which are believed to date
13th century BCE.
have existed in the Soviet armed
forces (and Luttwak recognizes
that they did and do exist), they
are now under control. Luttwak
believes that in the last ten years
the Soviets have effected enor-
mous improvements both in their
military hardware and in their
battle planning.
According to Luttwak, the
Soviets not only have impressive
military equipment of immense
destructive power, they also have
armaments for which no
equivalent as yet exists in the
West.
THESE INCLUDE automatic
trench-diggers and ribbon-
bridges; the latter were put to ef-
fective work in the Egyptian
crossing of the Suez Canal in
1973 during the Yom Kippur
War. Luttwak says that while the
Russians were at one time behind
the Americans in helicopters, the
Soviets are now on a par with this
brand of weaponry.
On the issue of the ramifica-
tions of the various Arab-Israeli
wars, Luttwak does not share the
same conclusions as Cockburn
does. Luttwak denies that Soviet
equipment was found wanting in
the confrontation with Israeli
soldiers.
"They tdl us more about Is-
raeli skills than about the quality
of Soviet equipment." Western
armies, says Luttwak, would not
have found it so easy to develop
the projectiles and strategy
which destroyed so many
Russian tanks.
IN HIS analysis of Soviet
military production, Luttwak
suggests that the West not be
fooled by allegations about
Russian inefficiency. The Ameri-
cans might have a slight lead in
ordnance, says Luttwak, but that
is more than offset by the faster,
Soviet production cycles. |
Luttwak is concerned that the
experience of Soviet armies in
Hungary and Czechoslovakia not
be used as a paradigm of future
Soviet strategy. He agrees with
Cockburn that the Russians per-
formed very poorly in both
theaters and that had either the
Hungarians or the Czechs fought
back, the Soviets would have lost
many men.
The example of Afghanistan,
according to Luttwak,shows that
the Russians have improved
tremendously since their actions
in 1956 and 1968 in Hungary and
Czechoslovakia. In fact, the inva-
sion of Afghanistan demon-
strated a Soviet capacity for
boldness in planning and execu-
tion that were uncharacteristic of
traditional Russian partterns of
military thinking. This means
that Russian military men have
opted for a new kind of flexibility
in their grand strategies.
LUTTWAK'S MOST im-
portant insights derive from his
perception that the Soviet
Union's expansionist future is a
function of its volatile political
and ethnic make-up. Using the
example of ancient Rome,
Luttwak paints a scenario which
sees the Russians eventually
gobbling up those countries ad-
jacent to it in order to protect its
own vital life lines.
This problem is compounded
by the fact that within 20 years,
if demographic trends continue,
the Russians will be a minority in
their own country. The Asian
populations will have become the
dominant group in Soviet so-
ciety. This change in the ethnic
strands of Soviet society will
contribute to the disequilibrium
of the country.
It is interesting to note that
neither Cockburn or Luttwak
consider as decisive factors the
intelligence information on
Soviet weaponry supplied to the
United States by Israelis.
It is, of course, impossible to
test the validity of either the
Cockburn or the Luttwak thesis.
That would require testing para-
meters too horrific to conceive
namely, global war between the
United States and the Soviet
Union. Hopefully, the debate will
remain on the academic level.
Mrs. Sally Lewis (center), wife of U.S. Ambassador to Israel
Samuel Lewis, plays host to a gathering of B'nai B'rith
leaders at the Ambassador's residence in Herzliya to mark the
start of a new year of social service activities by the Jewish
fraternal organization. Mrs. Pnina Brod (left), president of
B'nai B'rith Israel, is seen with Gershon Lev, senior assistant
general manager of Bank Leumi le-Israel, which is providing
support for B'nai B'rith 's humanitarian projects among Israel's
underprivileged. ^
Neo-Nazi Teacher Finds Walls
Adorned With War Crimes Posters
BONN (JTA) A neo-Nazi teacher walked into
his classroom in Ladenburg last week to find the walls
adorned with posters chronicling Nazi war crimes and his
own rightwing activities within the neo-Nazi National
Democratic Party (NPD). The headmaster of the school in
the federal state of Baden-Wuerttemberg had approved
the exhibit and background music of anti-fascist songs.
THE TEACHER, Guenter Deckert, 43, is a long-time
leader of the NPD's young guard which has attacked the
party's leadership for being "too moderate." He has twice
tried, unsuccessfully, for the office of NPD national
chairman.
ISRAEL. $510.
2 WEEK VACATION -$510.
Blull
Plus A*
5 Nights in TEL AVIV 2 Nights In TIBERIAS 6 Nights In JERUSALEM
Includes: Hotel Acconx, t Days of Sightseeing, Twin Bedded Rooms.
Israel Style Kosher Buffet Breakfast, Translers i Porterage.
4 WEEK TOUR OF LEISURE S102Z
PMMAlf
WITH LATE DEPARTURES, LITTLE WALKING SLOWER PACE
3 WEEKS IN NETANYA* 1 WEEK IN JERUSALEM
Tour HUM Aceommodstton In First Class Hotel, Twin Bmdded Rooms, 2 Kosher Meals Erery Day,
$ Dmys of Sightseeing. Transfers A Porterage, Travelers Insurance: Medical, Financial 4 Personal

O'
FOR RESERVATIONS A INFORMATION ON THESE TOURS, OR OUR
OTHER ISRAELI TRIPS, CALL MIRIAM COLLECT AT
TRIANGLE TOURS- 931 -3031
18407 W. Dixie Highway North Miami Beach
tfS*
Today Is For Tomorrow
Leave your legacy burning brightly
Legal assistance regarding wills, trusts and
foundations available upon request.
YESHIVA
UNIVERSITY
1886-1966.
I
To see how you can help contact:
Friends Of Yeshiva University
Chaim H. Friend, Director, Southeastern Region
2301 Collins Avenue, Suite M-25, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
(305) 861-3365

There is only one Yeshiva'


....


Page4-A The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, September 30.1983
Let's All Pitch in To Save Our Statue of Liberty
The Statue of Liberty is uppermost in
our minds these days for two reasons. One
is the status of disrepair into which Our
Lady of Freedom has fallen over the years.
A South Floridian, Nicholas Morley. has
been named by President Reagan to lead a
campaign throughout our state to help
raise the funds necessary to restore the
Statue of Liberty to help preserve her as
the great symbol of our nation's freedom to
oppressed peoples everywhere and to
Americans as well, who live and enjoy the
benefits of freedom in their daily lives.
A second reason for our concern is that,
for nigh onto a century, the Statue has been
the welcoming site for many immigrants
throughout the world who came to our
nation's shores. From almost the earliest
days of American history, the Statue of
Liberty has cast its shadow across Ellis
Island in the Hudson River, where today a
museum celebrates their voyages here and
the magic moment of their entry into the
excitement of becoming an American.
It was the Statue they first saw, where,
on her foot, was emblazoned a poem in-
scribed in 1903, The New Colossus,"
calling to the tired and hungry, yearning to
be free, to come to her open arms.
That poem, composed in 1883, was the
work of the American Jewish poetess,
Emma Lazarus, to help raise funds for the
Bartholdi Pedestal Fund the building
fund for the Statue's then-new pedestal.
November, 1983 will be the centennial
anniversary of Emma Lazarus' com-
position.
In recalling this centennial event, we
must not forget the Lady herself. Through
her poem, Emma Lazarus helped raise
funds for the new pedestal. Today, we must
help raise funds to "Save Our Statue." Let
us all pitch in behind Nicholas Morley and
put Florida on the map of this SOS cam-
paign.
Reagan Must Speak Out
Anatoly Sharansky, the Soviet Jewish
Prisoner of Conscience who has become the
symbol of the struggle of Soviet Jewry,
marked the midpoint of his 13-year sen-
tence on Sept. 15. He continues to languish
inside the notorious Chistipol Prison,
subjected to inhuman conditions, deprived
of fundamental rights such as visitation
privileges and correspondence with family
members, all on the trumped-up charges of
treason against the Soviet Union.
The silence at this point from the Soviet
Union is expected. To let Sharansky out of
prison, or even out of the Soviet Union,
would mark a grave peril to their closed
society, exposing the harsh cruelties to
which it has subjected not only Sharansky,
but many other Jews during the past years.
President Reagan has stated repeatedly
that the Administration has raised the
issue of Soviet human rights when senior
Administration officials have conferred
with Soviet officials.
Publicly, the Administration appears to
be acting on empty words. Since it has
come to office, the Reagan
Administration's policy of quiet diplomacy
in the field of human rights has left many
Americans feeling that little has been
accomplished.
^Jewish Floridian
....__... UkinmiiHirMiiMi n~nnm
MMMM
The current level of Soviet Jewish
emigration is at an all-time low, and any
indication of an increase in emigration from
the Soviet Union, in light of the Korean
airline downing, appears limited. But the
Administration must continue to play a
significant role to help the Sharanskys, and
it could start with public revelations of its
specific efforts for Soviet Jewry.
Bond Sales Vigorous
With 30 synagogues participating, the
State of Israel Bonds Organization of
Greater Miami has announced sales of
nearly $2 million in Bonds and Certificates
during the Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur Appeals.
Gary R. Gerson, general campaign
chairman of the Israel Bonds Organization
here, has noted that the results were ex-
cellent, "and showed that the communitv
stands firmly behind the State of Israel and
its government." ^
The High Holy Day Appeals account for
a great portion of Israel Bond sales in
Greater Miami and throughout the United
States and Canada. This year the theme of
the campaign was "For Israel and the
Young."
In addition to the regular Israel Bonds
an additional $250 Israel Certificate was
issued this year. The Certificate is
redeemable in Israel after 30 months for
$300, and after 60 months for $350. It is
designed specifically to promote travel to
Israel among Jewish youth in the diaspora.
Anyone who did not have the op-
portunity to make an Israel Bond pledge
during the High Holy Days should do so
now. Israel needs our support more than
ever before.
y f*. 1m Lsna \
- 1
"~
" ^''^ >

- ----- _
i*
Robert Segal
The Recent March on Washington]
Sg. ffff, TMSOatSSlASS!SSA^m
Friday. September 30,1963
Volume 56
23 TISHRI 6744
Number 39
Have we witnessed
progress or just change?,
one may reasonably inquire
in sifting through the dif-
ferences of the March for
Jobs and Freedom in 1963
and the March for Jobs,
Peace, and Freedom in
1983.
Criticism there was in abund-
ance for the effort by the New
Coalition of Conscience to make
more of Martin Luther King's
historic dream of 20 years ago by
means of staging a commemora-
tive, new March on Washington.
On that electrifying march in
1963, the focus was sharp, the
goals vital but limited, and the
spirit of unity notable. Above all,
there was a modern Moses to
infuse the assembly with elo-
quence, magic, courage, love, and
irrefutable logic.
THIS TIME around, the
agenda was diffuse and multi-
farious. Not just the expansion of
equal opportunities for jobs and
dear access to places of public
accommodation were the goals,
as in 1963, but the promotion of
the causes of environmentalists
and gays, and advocacy of
women's rights and nuclear
freeze were rolled into one hujre
bundle. m
In 1963, the statesmanship and
genius of such giants as A. Philip
Randolph, Roy Wilkins, Whitney
Young, Bayard Rustin, and Dr.
King himself gassa1 the
march. This time, much of the
organizing burden fell on the cap
able shoulders of Correta King,
valiant and admired. But death
had cut the ranks of the other
greats.
And those Jews who bucked
the dissent of several large Jew-
ish agencies and joined in the
march could not have been com-
pletely unaware of the flirtations
with PLO leaders by two of the
current leaders, Dr. Joseph E.
Lowery of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference, and Rev.
Jesse L. Jackson, spark plug of
PUSH and a seemingly available
candidate for President.
THESE CONTRASTS having
been delineated, let us try to deal
with the question raised earlier:
has there been change since 1963
or real progress? And let us add
that, if we are able to record true
advancement, what is the outlook
for the still unrealized sectors of
Dr. King's dream?
Progress? The 1963 march
gave great impetus to civil rights
gains: 1964 saw passage of laws
barring discrimination in jobs
and in places of public accom-
modation; the Voting Rights Act
followed in 1965; Fair Housing
Legislation was placed on the
books in 1968. Reluctantly, some
sectors of industry and some
labor unions made concessions.
Many of the walls of segregation
fell in the field of education.
Progress: Dick Gregory put it
succinctly when he said in Wash
mgton: "Twenty years ago, we
came here and asked other folks
to take care of business; today,
we can take care of business on
our own."
But again, it was in the 1960s
that setbacks were registered.
The nation was torn by the tor-
ment in Vietnam. Assassinations
stained the white pages of our
history books: President Ken-
nedy in 1963; Bobby Kennedy M
1964; and Dr. King himself 11
1968. Riots and other forms
violence ripped through the King-1
spun fabric of non-violence.
IN MORE recent years, net I
factors fuel the fires of anger and
doubt and discontent. Millions
who champion the prime cause .
ending the arms race threatening
planetary destruction WI
branded as soft on Communisn
and insulted by a President wno |
refers sarcastically to "tn* ;
called peace movement' and K
cuses nuclear freeze proponents |
of indulging in theatrics.
Change without progress-
When we turn to employment
figures, we find some nine to ten
million Americans jobless even
when we count those in mil'tarj
service as employed. Finally.
slowly, the public, and even W
White House, begin to real*
that there is such a blight
hunger in America. Hunger
and
Hunger in numit"- *"_ _h
poverty. When the 1963 M^
on Washington took Ptacf',ji
Srcent of this nation's &**
nilies were under the povenj
line, while only 13 PpWfU
white families were. Today. **> I
Continued on Page 7-A
BMM


Friday, September 30,. 1983/ The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
Hist Eugene Massin Is Fascinated By Acrobats
By LEO MINDLIN
|The human figures fly
jugh the air with the
atest of ease. One does a
ndstand on the out-.
etched palms of another,
gers grasping, inter-
ling The two hang to-
cher, clinching in space in
Ife-threatening balance, a
gle instant of precarious
on.
here are other such
jig figures in flight.
ne are made of stainless
. Others are painted
(lv in the typical colors of
rnival atmosphere on
at one is told is a
terial called cupranickel.
I of them are acrobats. They
[the work of renowned Miami
^t Eugene Massin now on ex-
in the final few days of an
tst month-long showing at
Netsky Gallery in South
1EREAFTER, lovers of art,
| of the work of Massin in par-
r, will be able to see them
i routinely just for the joy of
Experience, or to buy them for
r private collections: the Net-
|Gallery has been designated
he artist as his exclusive rep
btativein Miami.
at strikes an observer of
tin's most recent sculptures
apparent fascination with
[>ats.
estion: Does he love the
atmosphere the tight-
[walkers, the trapeze artists?
seem to say something
lal to him.
|Io," he says flatly. The sur-
response, reducing typical
lie class expectation to
Ird notions, is the Massin
tmark. one of his endearing
Bcteristics and a specialty of
humorous style, something
pin-pricking pomposity. "No,
n't care much for it at all." he
iins.
)VT YOU don't have to go to
circus to be fascinated by
tats. Or to see acrobats all
the place, either. Every-
rj an acrobat. We're sur-
ded by acrobats all the time,
|le who are twisted and con-
by life in a carnival all of
|own."
ssin is a big man. His lion-
|head is a sculpture itself:
of granite on which are
I the honorable scars of daily
k- Astride it all grows a main
Iquisite salt-and-pepper hair.
" a fierce moustache which
military authority to his
puncements.
' adds to his feelings about
bats: "Don't most of us
through hoops pretty much
[the time anyway?"
ople who recall the work of
pin, the painter, wonder
1 his devotion to sculpture in
recent years. "I have al-
been a sculptor," he says
but the least bit of defensive-
in the tone of his explana-
|"And I have always tended
oncentrate on the human
b, even in my paintings."
^SSIN ADDS: "Someone
[wondered why it is that my
Ttt matter is almost ex-
yely people. Other artists
landscapes, mountain or
cenes, bowls of fruit." A
i of revelation sets his eyes
fe. It telegraphs a zinger:
people are what I know
and that is why I paint
I and sculpt them.
fs this fixation," he ex-
unfurling the zinger, the
ht into his self, "that makes
[ Jewish artist. Jews, though
might not quite see my
as Jewish in a thematic
are unique in their em-
p or. humanity on people.
' m this emphasis.'! .....
EUGENE MASSIN: his lion-like head a sculpture in itself.
LEO MINDLIN
'People are what I know best,
and that's why I paint them/
After a thoughtful moment, as
if to pound the point home: "You
know," says Massin by way of
more explanation, "I went to
cheder until I was 15." His
father, he declares, "was an Or-
thodox Jew, and he saw to that."
There follow gales of laughter
that come from somewhere deep
within him, and he reminisces:
"Both my parents immigrated to
the United States from Russia
near the turn of the century and
landed on Ellis Island."
WHAT MAKES them differ-
ent from most of the other Jews
who settled in ghettoes of Jewish
tenement life along the north-
eastern seaboard is that they
wound up in Galveston, Tex.,
where Massin was born.
"Don't be surprised," he
cautions. "Galveston became an
active Jewish community. What
the Jews who arrived there miss-
ed in numbers, they made up
right away by building two syna-
gogues, one Orthodox and one
Reform." More laughter. "Isn't
that typical of us?"
Massin speaks with fond me-
mory of Galveston's Reform
Rabbi, at that time one, Henry
Cohen. 'My father, the Orthodox
Jew, had great regard for Rabbi
Cohen. The whole community
had great regard for him. They
admired his scholarship and
sense of Jewish spirit, no matter
v. Inch synagogue thej happened
to belong &) "_....
One learns quickly to sense the
next zinger he is preparing to
serve up, this one serious, but
like the others an object lesson.
"It was Rabbi Cohen," he says,
"whose monumental efforts suc-
ceeded in releasing O. Henry, the
gifted American writer, from jail.
That's the kind of Jewish leader-
ship we had in Galveston."
WHEN DID art as a calling
first come to him?
"Almost from the beginning. I
can never remember when I
wasn't drawing. I used up a lot of
paper bags in my father's grocery
store in Galveston learning how
to draw."
And now, after the drawing on
paper grocery bags "almost
from the beginning," after the
painting which brought him an
international reputation, now it's
sculpture exclusively?
"Well, I have combined both
art forms into one and produced a
new kind of sculpture," he says.
Crowds at the Massin show in the
Netsky Gallery have seen the re-
sult: the painted cupranickel
acrobats: the stainless steel acro-
bats that gleam in the natural
finish of this material, unadorn-
ed.
THE SCULPTURES start out
as two-dimensional figures cut
from the two metals of Massin's
choice. Then, he "shapes" the
figures by "bending" them into
"life." As Massin elaborates on
the process, his own tall, power-
ful body bends to illustrate how
he establishes the sense of three-
dimensionality by a manipulation
of two-dimensional form in space.
"Sometimes," he says, "my
body aches after a day's work of
bending and shaping these fig-
ures." Another burst of laughter
animates his face as he continues
his aching illustration. "I seem to
be bending myself first as a pat-
tern for the figures themselves."
Finally, comes the painting of
the figures done in cupranickel
a gay, carnival panoply of color in
oranges, violets, purples and
blues to evoke a circus atmos-
phere.
WHAT ABOUT the stainless
steel figures, the unpainted acro-
bats?
"Through the same animation
process," he says, "the bending,
there is the warmth of life that I
bring to their cool metal surfaces.
And they do the same hand-
stands in mid-air. In their precar-
io'ii existence, we can recognize
recisely the same kind of pre-
cariousness of existence that all
of us experience in our own lives.
Because they are not painted, be-
cause they are so cool to the
touch and the eye, they offer a
different perception of the acro-
bats' world."
Odds are for another zinger
the explanations of the preceding
moments have been too serious,
almost academic. "The philos-
ophy that holds these acrobats
together," Massin says wryly,
"is reach out and touch some-
one." Yet another burst of laugh-
ter, this one with gravel to the
sound, humor deeply felt.
You mean the telephone com-
pany motto?
"Exactly. We're completing a
major piece right now on com-
mission for the new Southern Bell
Building in Jacksonville."
ENTITLED Person to
Person," the new sculpture, in
stainless steel, again features
acrobats as they perform some
miraculous feat in mid-air. The
20-foot-tall figure, weighing near-
ly half a ton, will hang in a two-
story atrium.
Question: In talking about this
commission, Massin refers to
"we," not "I." Who is "we"?
Enter Barry Massin, the ar-
tist's son. (There are two other
Massin children in Miami and
Atlanta.) Barry is tall, dark,
bearded, an artist in his own
right. Both share studio and
workshop quarters in a shaded
compound on secluded, tree-
arbored Little Avenue in Coconut
Grove's "Ye Little Wood." An
old stone house bears a large sign
made of wood, with the legend,
"Massin," prominently lettered
upon it.
WITHIN, are Eugene Mas-
sin's studio, a gallery where some
of his work may be seen on dis-
play, and various other rooms in
which visitors passing through
note the backs of occasional,
seemingly discarded canvases,
pieces of metal sculpture in dif-
ferent stages of development, and
personal memorabilia in the form
of dozens of framed photos of
famed personalities who are
Eugene Massin's friends, patrons
and frank fans.
From Metropolitan Opera
tenor Luciano Pavarotti to local
pillars of the South Florida com-
munity they gaze down from
their frames to inform the casual
visitor on just who were among
the 750-odd guests crowded in at
the Netsky Gallery show-opener
of Eugene Massin's newest, art at
the beginning of September.
Inside the compound, further
to the rear, is a second building
where Barry Massin's sovereign-
ty is situated: a huge workshop
for metals, acrylics and exotic
woods, the site where some of
Eugene Massin's "bending"
takes place under the watchful
eye of his sculptor-engineer son,
when a watchful eye is needed.
"I respect what Barry does,"
says the older Massin. Needless
to say, Barry feels the same way.
To emphasize the point, Eugene
Massin observes about the
Southern Bell commission in
Jacksonville: "We're partners on
that project."
WHAT DOES Barry do?
Eugene Massin defers to his
son, who stands at the side of his
wife of 21 years, Frandee, an
artist also. Her media: drawing,
photography.
Barry begins at the beginning:
"When I was a kid, my father
was a hippie. He'd come home
with paint on his pants. I almost
never remember him wearing
' Continued on Page 12-A
'Don't most of us jump through hoops
pretty much all of the time anyway?'


!
Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 30,1963
Noisy Dissenters
They Refuse Service in Lebanon
By CARL ALPERT
HAIFA Small but ar-
ticulate groups in Israel continue
to object to the campaign in
Lebanon and to continued
presence there of Israeli soldiers
Protest vigils have for months
been held outside the home of
Menachem Begin or at the
Knesset, and occasional public
demonstrations have been
organized.
Since Jews have a highly
developed conscience and moral
sense, and are frequently found
as leaders in liberal, leftist, and
extremist groups, it is not
surprising that we have the
extremists here as well. Indeed,
they are not new. and the
previous Labor governments had
their share of problems with
them.
ONE OF the first was 19-year-
old Amnon Zichroni who in 1954
refused to serve in the army,
since he objected to the "very
existence of the institution of
armies in Israel and the world as
a whole." He was sentenced to
prison by a military court for
insubordination, desertion and
refusal to carry arms.
Even more notorious was the
case of Uri Davis, not long there-
after. Davis, too. was a cons-
cientious objector, and he served
time in a military jail. He went on
to become a leading spokesman
for Arab rights, and frequently
tangled with the authorities when
his activities led him into
violations of law or security.
Defensive Sharon
Calls on U.S. to Save
Situation in Lebanon
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTAl
Former Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon
wants the United States to
call in the Marines to save
the situation in Lebanon.
He has also hurled barbs at
his successor, Defense
Minister Moshe Arens, in
an interview published in
the Jerusalem Post.
Sharon, a Minister-Without-
Portfolio, was quoted as saying
the U.S. Marines now deployed
around Beirut airport, should be
sent into the mountains to repel
the Syrian-backed Druze and
PLO attack on the strategic town
of Suk el-Gharb where the Leb-
anese army is under seige.
ACCORDING to Sharon. U.S.
forces presently in Lebanon and
off-shore are "definitely capable"
of repelling the anti-government
forces attempting to capture the
town regarded as the gateway to
Beirut. But he said, more marines
from the U.S. Sixth Fleet should
be landed in Lebanon and the
fleet's air power should be em
ployed if necessary. Naval
bombardment alone could not
turn back a determined enemy
attack, the general maintained
He said he was convinced that
if the U.S. acts forcefully, the Sy-
rians and their surrogates wouid
back off because neither
Damascus nor its Soviet backers
want a head-on confrontation
with the U.S.
Turning to Israel's role.
Sharon charged that Arens kept
the Cabinet "in the dark" about
"the total change of orientation"
in Israel's Lebanon policy. Ac-
cording to Sharon, this was a
shift away from the Christian
Phalangists which Israel has
armed and supported since 1976.
toward the Druze. The matter is
one of vital political, military and
moral significance but it has not
been debated either by the full
Cabinet or the ministerial defense
committee. Sharon said.
THE FORMER defense chief
said he had heard "rumors" of
the shift two months ago and
privately warned Premier
Menachem Begin at the time
"against any reliance on (Druze
leader Walid) Jumblatt."
He said he had also urged that
the Lebanese army be deployed
in key positions in the Shouf
mountains before the Israel Def-
ense Force withdrew to its new
line along the Awali River.
Otherwise, he said, the mountain
Druze would not allow the Leb-
anese army in. But his warnings
to the Cabinet were brushed
aside.
Sharon charged that Israel did
not make "serious efforts" to
have United Nations or multi-
national forces undertake a buffer
role before the IDE's redeploy-
ment. Had such an international
force taken up positions, the
Syrian surrogates would not have
dared to overrun them, he said.
.. .At Same Time He
Declares War on Press
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Former Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon has
gone to war against Is-
raeli journalists. He ac-
cused them of "carrying
out a systematic, long-time
character assassination"
aimed at him and of trying
"to close my mouth."
i
Sharon was responding to the
Jerusalem Journalist Associa-
tion s order to all of its members
not to cover any public events in
which Sharon, a Minister-
Without-Portfolio, participates.
The order was issued after
Sharon, addressing a crowd of his
supporters in downtown
Jerusalem, made offensive re-
marks against journalists.
ACCORDING to some reports,
the Minister asked, "You know
what the journalists are?" and
the crowd responded, "PLO," a
reply that apparently pleased
Sharon. He also unleashed a
sharp attack on the judicial com-
mission investigating the Sabra
and Shatila refugee camps mas-
sacres last year which found him
indirectly responsible for the
murders of Palestinian civilians
by Christian Phalangists.
The panel's recommendations
forced Sharon to resign his def-
ense portfolio. He claimed that it
furnished fuel to Israel's enemies
all over the world. Sharon
claimed the journalists banned
coverage of his public ap-
pearances because they realized
their attacks on him had "failed
to persuade the public."
By 1970, his pacifist program
included a call for sabotage of
Israel's railways and military
plants. He left the country to
take up an academic post in
London, where he served as an
active anti-Israeli agitator. In the
spring of 1979, interviewed on
radio, he stated that Israel had
no right to exist and that its
government was not "like"
Nazism but actual Nazism. He
foresaw, with evident pleasure, a
prospective defeat of Israel on
the battlefield.
MOST OF the present crop of
objectors to the Peace for Galilee
operation who refuse to do
military service in Lebanon are
undoubtedly sincere, but the
situation was aggravated by the
alacrity with which the political
opposition to the Likud
government seized upon the
refusals and exploited them to
whip up anti-government
feelings. Communications media,
unfriendly to the Likud govern-
ment in any event, gave ample
and encouraging publicity to
every manifestation of the anti-
war feelings. Something like 90
Israeli civilians, called up for
their military reserve duty, have
refused to serve in Lebanon and
have been sentenced to various
short terms in prison.
One of them, Shuki Kook.
writing to the press from jail,
expressed his disappointment
that there were not more. He
called upon all who felt as he did
to implement their views in their
personal lives so that he would
not get the feeling that his own
sacrifice was a waste of time.
Small groups which called
themselves "There's a Limit" or
the "Committee Against the War
in Lebanon," drawing members
from the Peace Now movement,
found frequent new publicity
gimmicks to express their
hostility to the Likud govern-
ment, but few indeed felt
strongly enough to do what
Shuku Kook did or Amnon
Zichroni in his day.
Since Israel is a democratic
state, they are free to demon-
strate, though any attempt to
keep them within normal bounds
of public order is at once met with
howls that they are being denied
freedom of speech. It was Mark
Gefen, an accepted spokesman of
left-wing Zionism, when com-
menting on the Uri Davis
situation, who said that those
who cry for freedom of speech
don't know what the word
freedom means.
THERE IS no such thing as
absolute freedom: there must
always be some restrictions when
the welfare of the whole is
concerned. The alternative. Gefen
implied, is anarchy.
Of late a contrary movement
has been formed, consisting of
patriotic youth who volunteer, in
the nation's interest, to serve in
Lebanon if necessary in place of
the objectors.
A recent issue of Yachad,
journal of the kibbutz movement,
quotes one Mike Jaffe, a 31-year-
old kibbutz member who had
been called up for his military
reserve duty. "Refusal to serve as
ordered undermines the army
which assures our survival," he
said.
"If I refuse to serve in
Lebanon, I abrogate my right to
fight for my views in a
democratic fashion because I
have excluded myself from
society."
THE OPPONENTS of the war
continue to object that though
they may be a small minority, the
majority has no right to impose
its will on them which leads to
a strange definition of demo-
cracy. There is no doubt that the
vast majority of the public in
Israel disavows the objectors,
looking upon them, at best, as
naive and misguided.
Jews Join Catholics
In Nuke Freeze Drive
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Rabbi Mordechai
Waxman, president of the
Synagogue Council of
America, declared here that
because of the Biblical
commandment to "choose
life,** Jews support the
move for an immediate,
mutual and verifiable freeze
of nuclear weapons.
The Torah concludes with a de-
claration to 'choose life that you
and your children may live."
Waxman said at a Capitol Hill
press conference. "It is not mere-
ly a bit of good advice. Jews un-
derstand it to be a command-
ment."
Waxman said that the SCA. as
representative of the Jewish reli-
gious community, supports the
freeze resolution in the Senate,
sponsored by Senators Mark
Hatfield (R.. Orel and Edward
Kennedy (D.. Mass.)
THE RABBI joined the Rev
James Armstrong, president of
the National Council of Chur-
ches; Bishop Thomas Gum
bleton. chairman of Pax Christi. a
Catholk- peace group: and repre-
sentatives of physicians, lawyers
and other professions at the press
conference just prior to the
Senate Foreign Relations Com-
mittee s consideration of the
freeze resolution. Earlier, some 20
Jewish religious and secular
leaders from across the country
lobbied Senators for the freeze.
Waxman seemed to be
referring to the Soviet downing of
the Korean airliner when he noted
that "the threat of universal
destruction which yesterday
seemed to be remote,
ever more real in the atn.
of international violence i
lessness which surrounds ml
noted that Jews recently l
on Yom Kippur for life bull
responsibility to choose lifeij
God's, it is ours, he said
Kennedy, at the press i
ence. rejected the view u*J
freeze resolution should I
laved "because of the bn
tack against the Koreani
That tragedy makes it
more urgent to do all wef
can to reach a realistic i
with the Soviet Union I
nuclear arms race.''
HE NOTED that ten i
after his late brother,
John Kennedy, "stood upt
Soviet Union over the "
missile crisis in 1962," Ik I
the 1963 nuclear test ban)
with the USSR.
Hatfield urged the
public to make their
favor of the freeze known I
representatives and
Waxman also stressed I
ricans have the right to i
public opinion and while<
ing that the Soviet pec '
have that righ;. he ad
can hope the word willsp
voices will be raised therel
Waxman. whose organa]
represents t h -> nagog
rabbinical organil
Reform. Conservative
Orthodox Judaism in
stressed that "ifweCMM
money, the imagination I
effort involved (in
nuclear weaponsl to
battle against hunger,
and suffering, then we
made the choice for U
than death."
Fixed Rate or Variable Rate
1/4 0/
S2.500.000
Subordinated Notes Due January 1. 1993
Ottered in Multiples of S1.000
With $5,000 Minimum Purchase
IDF
Notional Dank of Florid
.....
' (J05 I 576-4200
, I .1
'.".
.. .-. .'I
... TM(V 'H


Tho is Richard Murphy ?
Like Shultz, An Aura of Suspicion Precedes Him
ie Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
London Chronicle Syndicate
post of Assistant
cretary of State for Near
astern and South Asian
fairs is crucial as far as
policy towards Israel
kd the Arab world is con-
ned. The person who
that job is the State
apartment's highest-
ing Middle East spe-
He is the man who
the Secretary of State's
on Middle East policy.
m the years, he almost
trays has played a deci-
role in shaping Ameri-
policy toward the re-
Dn.
jring the first two decades
powing Israel's independence,
ost all of the career diplomats
served as Assistant Secre-
were "Arabists." That
at they had spent virtually
r entire careers working in the
ab world or on Arab affairs.
ey usually spoke Arabic, and
lir sympathies were clearly
\h the Arabs, as opposed to
ael. Their names instilled fear
hostility among Israeli offi-
Loy Henderson, Parker
William Rountree, Lucius
itIe. to name but four.
WITH Joseph Sisco's
ointment to that sensitive
:in the late 1960s at the start
he Nixon Administration, a
tradition developed to find
re "balanced" specialists to
that role. The "Arabists"
\e avoided as Israel and its po-
fcally active friends pressed
to find more '"friendly
ihus following Sisco, Alfred
nerton became Assistant Sec-
ry. He was another official
extensive experience in
Jing with Israel. He was fol-
by Harold Saunders, who
could not speak Arabic and
at one point in his career
serving on the National Se-
Sty Council, at the start of the
^gan Administration, was suc-
ded by Nicholas Veliotes, a
ner Ambassador to Jordan
Deputy Chief of Mission in
Bel who was also no hard-core
kbist.
Jut with the appointment of
r-old Richard Murphy to
Continental
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replace Veliotes (who is pegged
as Ambassador to Egypt), the
State Department once again has
reverted to the tradition of
having a real Arabist in charge of
the Near Eastern Affairs bureau.
And that has naturally aroused
some concern.
SECRETARY of State George
Shultz has insisted that this
latest Middle East personnel
shakeup at the State Department
will not affect U.S. policy toward
the region. In announcing the ap-
pointment on Aug. 4, the Secre-
tary made a point of noting that
Murphy could be expected to
visit Israel in the near future.
Shultz suggested, however, that
Murphy, the current Ambassa-
dor to Saudi Arabia, had never
been to Israel.
Because of Murphy's back-
ground he speaks Arabic Flu-
ently, was the first U.S. Ambas-
sador to Syria after the two coun-
tries resumed diplomatic ties in
1974 and has spent much of his
career in the Arab world Israe-
li officials and American Jewish
political activists quickly ex-
pressed some concern that he
might not be very sensitive to Is-
raeli positions.
But Shultz actively sought to
ease those concerns. He said he
had come to know and deeply
admire Murphy both before be-
coming Secretary of State and
since. In a clear reference to Is-
raeli officials and pro-Israel sup-
porters in the United States,
Shultz said: "People who don't
know him and get to know him
will see as I have the superb
qualities that he brings to his
work."
SENIOR White House politi-
cal aides, especially sensitive to
Israeli concerns as the U.S.
enters into a new presidential
election season, have actively
embarked on what they call a
"damage control" campaign to
ease Israeli concerns. For one
thing, they have raised the
example of Shultz himself as
becoming a pleasant surprise to
Israel, given his feared Bechtel
connection.
Israel, of course, was deeply
worried that Shultz's big busi-
ness experience with Bechtel
would negatively affect his atti-
tude toward Israel. But Shultz
has managed to overcome that
obstacle and to develop good,
strong ties with several Israeli
policymakers, especially with
Defense Minister Moshe Arens.
The White House and the State
Department are now telling Is-
raeli officials and American
Jewish leaders that Murphy, too,
will be a pleasant surprise. "Just
give thim a chance," one Admin-
istration official said.
In the process of trying to ease
these concerns, they have re-
called that Murphy, while in
Syria, played a very active,
behind-the-scenes role in improv-
ng the plight of Syrian Jewry.
The Administration is not alone
in spreading that story. Others
have confirmed it, including
Democrat Congressman Steven
Solarz of New York, who is
Jewish and one of Israel's
strongest supporters on the
House Foreign Affairs Commit-
tee.
HE RECALLED that Murphy
played a crucial role in winning
the exit permits for a dozen
Syrian Jewish girls to come to
the United States in the mid-
1970s to get married because no
eligible Jewish men were left in
Damascus.
Other U.S. officials said
Murphy also had invited Syrian
Jews to the U.S. Embassy in
Damascus, and had raised their
concerns directly with high-
ranking Syrian officials. In the
process, Solarz and these other
American Jewish leaders who got
to know him personally (there
were not very many others)
emerged with a high degree of
respect for him.
State Department officials
have only the highest regard for
Murphy. One official called him
"bright, able and balanced."
Another said: "He's going to
surprise a lot of people in Israel."
Murphy started his new as-
signment in early September
even before winning formal
Senate confirmation. No serious
opposition to his appointment
occurred on the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee, although
he was questioned seriously
about sensitive aspects in U.S.
policy. Before being confirmed,
Murphy headed the bureau as
Assistant Secretary-designate.
Who exactly is Richard
Murphy? He was born in Boston
on Jnly 29, 1929. He received a
BA from Harvard in 1951 and
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another degree from Cambridge
in England two years later. He
joined the State Department in
1955 after serving two years in
the U.S. Army.
HIS FIRST foreign assign-
ment as a diplomat was in Salis-
bury, Rhodesia. His experience
with the Arab world started to
develop after that. Between 1958-
60, he studied Arabic and region-
al Arab affairs intensively, first
at the Johns Hopkins University
School of Advanced Internation-
al Studies in Washington (the
same graduate school where Am-
bassador to Israel Samuel Lewis
received his MA) and later at the
U.S. Government's Arabic
language Training Institutte,
then in Beirut, Murphy, over the
years, has also learned French
well.
Between 1960-63, he served in
Aleppo, Syria, as an economic of-
ficer. From 1966-68, he was in
Amman, Jordan, as a political of-
ficer. In 1968, he was awarded the
State Department's superior
honor award. In 1979, he was
promoted to the rank of career
minister.
His diplomatic career really
started to take off in the early
1970*8, Saudi Arabia was actual-
ity his fourth ambassadorial as-
signment, having served as Am-
bassador for Mauritania from
1971-74; to Syria from 1974-78;
and to the Philippines from 1978-
81.
HIS SWITCH from the Philip-
pines to Saudi Arabia in 1981 was
unexpected. It followed the firing
of the then-U.S. Ambassador to
Saudi Arabia Robert Neumann,
an outspoken political appointee
who was hostile toward Israel.
The Reagan Administration, em-
barrassed by Neumann's remarks
about Israel and then-Secretary
of State Alexander Haig during
the height of the Saudi AW ACS
debate, urgently needed to find a
non-controversial, respected pro-
fessional for the Saudi slot: their
choice was Murphy.
In between his foreign assign-
ments, Murphy also played im-
portant roles in Washington on
Middle East issues. He was
country director for Arabian
Peninsula affairs between 1970-
71 and assistant executive direc-
tor for personnel in the Near
Eastern Affairs bureau from
1968-70. Thus, he is no stranger
to the ways of bureaucratic
Washington and its famous bare-
knuckles infighting. That experi-
ence should come in handy in the
months ahead as he takes on his
new assignment.
U.S. Middle East policy is di-
rected from the top meaning
Reagan, Shultz and special envoy
Robert McFarlane. But the gov-
ernmental bureaucracy, everyone
recognizes, is still very impor-
tant. Murphy, therefore, may not
be well-known in Israel right
now, but you better believe he
will be soon enough.
March
Continued from Page 4- A
families on the poverty lists
number 35 percent while the
figure for white families is just
about where it was 20 years ago.
Civil rights? Yes, huge gains.
But hunger, joblessness,
poverty, despair plague millions.
This is a sad record of disabilities
for the world's wealthiest nation,
preoccupied with trying to tell far
less prosperous countries how to
manage their affairs.
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 30,1983
Jewish Community Cen
Celebrates its Gol
1933
Ruth Shack
President
Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida
SINGLE ADULTS
The JCCs' have active, successful singles programs where un-
married Jews can gather to socialize and learn in an un-
pressured and Jewish atmosphere.
FOR TEENS
Teenagers come to the JCCs
for sports leagues and in-
struction, for club meetings,
for career and college
guidance, and a new wide
range of social and leader-
ship development programs.
FOR SPORTS AND RECREATION
'"*^-;::v-:V -*
4^ f^K_ ......w'. /
B LyaE*,. i ^w
/ ^^^m
***** ~n I, "V / *-A
When evt
m
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC offers a superbly equipped
sports and recreation facility, with basketball, lighted ten-
nis courts, two pools, two jogging tracks, exercise room and
racquetbaU courts. For body as well as mind, the JCC
presents a challenging environment
FOR CHILDREN
There's Something for Everyone
at the Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida
"Jewish Community Center" is a philosophy, a name, a place. For 60 years the JCCs
have provided the Greater Miami Jewish population with a wide variety of activities that
fill social, recreational, cultural and physical development needs. It is a "people place," a
center for Jews of all ages to get together, play together, learn together and work
together.
The JCCs are more than any one program...more than any one age or interest group.,
more than any one particular type of activity.
The Jewish Community Centers of South Florida is more than the sum of its parts. It is
unique in the scope of services offered and as a Jewish center of life.
Programs for children start with 18 month olds and progress
from nursery school to a wide variety of after-school clastss
and camps that keep children busy, happy and aware of
their Jewish identity.


Friday, September 30,1983 / Hie Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
inters of South Florida
olden Anniversary
1983
WRt
THE COMMUNITY
Hershel Rosen thai
Chairman
50th Anniversary
Dinner Committee
FOR FAMILIES
Vhen events reach across the Jewish community...when
'ew^rom throughout Dade County need to gather to hear,
Bf*. to act... the JCCs' are the places they can come to.
FOR ALL ADULTS
1
The JCCs present a panorama of education, social, cultural and
recreational activities. From Jewish education and Israeli dan-
ce, to classes in the arts, and lectures on current events, the
JCCs have a great deal to offer every adult.
There is a lot of pressure on the family these days, with many
single parent families, and families in which both parents
work. The JCCs help through their special after-school, no-
school holidays, and mini-camp programs. The JCCs are also
where family members can come to obtain a greater under-
standing of their situation. Family holiday celebrations are
also a part of the JCCs as Jewish holidays become more
meaningful through group celebration.
SENIOR ADULTS
r
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The JCC is a gathering place for senior adults that helps
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Michael-Ann Russell JCC
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Jewish Community Centers
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-e^ iw-rt iiicjewit.il rionuiuii rnuuy, ovpiemoer ov, atoo
Mesorati
Alternative for'Jewish Quarter
By ROCHELLE WOLK
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Among the numerous
synagogues and minyans in
the Jewish Quarter of the
Old City here, only the
small but vibrant Mesorati
(Conservative) congrega-
tion is non-Orthodox.
Organized by a few families
of American olim in the
autumn of 1979, the
congregation is a Con-
servative alternative for
Jewish Quarter residents.
"For us, the synagogue is our
community," said Prances
If Ceasefire Fails, Reagan
Plan to Go Down Drain
Continued from Page 1-A I
have a proprietorship over much
of Lebanon," the President said
' of Syria.
"They, and I think under the
influence of the Soviet forces that
are there in their own country,
are behind much of what is pre-
sently going on," he added.
Shultz said that there are
about 7,000 Soviet advisers in
Syria, but at the same time, he
asserted that Syrian President
Hafez Assad still is capable of
making his own decisions.
SHULTZ ALSO expressed
concern that the Syrians have
allowed the Palestinians to infil-
trate back into Lebanon in viola-
tion of the agreement by which
the Palestine Liberation
Organization was evacuated from
Beirut last year. But he was not
clear whether the Palestinians he
was talking about were members
ofthePLO.
State Department spokesman
John Jughes said that there are
"a variety of Palestinians" who
have infiltrated back into
Lebanon, some of whom are
"loyal" to PLO chief Yasir
Arafat and some "not so loyal"
to Arafat. He said some of them
are members of the PLO while
others are part of the Syrian-
sponsored Palestine Liberation
Army.
Reagan, however, said that it
was the PLO which has reinfil-
t rat I'd and "have moved into the
fighting." Hughes indicated that
the Palestinians seemed to be
taking turns with the Druze in
doing the fighting. He explained
that probably, as one group
comes under shellfire and with-
draws to regroup, the other takes
over the fighting.
Alpert. one of the founders.
Along with her husband, Ber-
nard, a former Midwest United
Synagogue of America president,
and their two teenagers, she came
on aliya in 1979 from Highland
Park, 111.
THAT YEAR the congrega
tion met in each other's homes for
Kabbalat Shabbat services every
Friday evening; once a month
communal Shabbat service
followed. A volunteer student
rabbi from Neve Schechter
taught monthly Talmud classes.
Since then there have been
classes in Jewish philosophy and
a public affairs forum.
Alpert said the Mesorati
movement cooperates with the
congregation and provided a
Torah and their first prayer
books. The Jewish Quarter
congregation is not only con-
veniently located for neighbor-
hood residents and visitors, but
is also informal, and "heimish."
Today the congregation has
grown to about a dozen families,
and services are held every Fri-
day evening at the Yigal Allon
Center in the Jewish Quarter.
The building is owned by the
Histadrut, which allows the
congregation to meet there rent-
free. Membership costs only $25
per family. Most members are
Conservative American olim, or
American-Israeli "mixed
marriages." Their children are
either very young or no longer
living at home.
"WE ARE never going to be
that big," Alpert said of the
congregation's size. "The nature
of the area we live in gives us that
problem." There is housing in the
Quarter for only 600 families; 75
percent are Orthodox and most
others are secular.
Despite the largely Orthodox
makeup ot the Jewish Quarter,
Alpert said that the congregation
has never been harassed by
neighbors. "Sometimes our
posters are torn off bulletin
boards, but that happens to
everyone," she said. When a re-
sident Hasidic rabbi needs extra
beds for his overflow of young
guests on Shabbats, he does not
hesitate to ask Alpert or other
congregation members to house
them.
At present, the congregation
meets regularly only on Friday
evenings and on holidays. "Only
four of our families are Shomer
Shabbat and the rest drive on
Saturdays," Alpert explained.
"We can't always catch them on
Saturdays. Everyone in the Jew-
ish Quarter goes to Kabbalat
Shabbat services, so it's a lot
easier to get a minyan then. Fri-
day night at home is an Israeli
tradition." Men and women are
counted in the minyan, and
women are called to the Torah for
aliyot.
ALPERT SAID that getting a
minyan of ten people is a "worry"
for the small congregation, even
on Friday nights. She said she
"thinks twice before going away"
for a weekend, and she en-
courages American visitors to
join the minyan. During the High
Holy Days, however, some 120
people attend services.
On special occasions such as
Bar or Bat Mitzvahs, the
congregation also meets on
Saturday mornings. For these
Saturdays and on the High Holy
Days, a rabbi and cantor are
engaged. Between Succot and
Shavuot, there is a student rabbi
on alternate Friday evenings, and
during summer months, visiting
Conservative rabbis from
America frequently lead Kab- (
balat Shabbat services.
Congregation members would
like to see more American fami-
lies celebrate Bar and Bat
Mitzvahs with them. "We're in
the heart of the Jewish Quarter,
overlooking the Kotel," (Western
Wall) Alpert said. She also sug-
gested that United Synagogue
Youth groups visit the Jewish
Quarter minyan, as an alterna-
tive to the "segregated Kotel." **
Bar and Bat Mitzvah kiddushes,
elegantly catered by members,
provide income for the congrega-
tion.
PRESIDENT OF the
Congregation is Walter Roth,
who came on aliya in 1978 with
his wife, Lois, and their children.
Like the Alpert family, the Roths
were active in the Conservative
movement in America.
The congregation reached a
milestone on July 23, 1983, with
the first Brit Milan of a
congregational family. The
friends, relatives and neighbors
of the baby's American olah
mother and Israeli father created
a fascinating mosaic of secular,
Orthodox and Conservative
Jews. To complete the picture,
officiants were a Hasidic mohel,
complete with fur hat, and Rabbi
Yosef Green, spiritual leader of
the Agron Street Conservative
Synagogue and a resident of the
Jewish Quarter.
ROTH ECHOED Alperts
description of harmonious rela-
tions with Orthodox neighbors.
"We've had no overt com-
plaints," he said. "Things have
happened (to Conservative
congregations) in other neighbor-
hoods. In this neighborhood, so
far Baruch HaShem things
are going pretty smoothly."
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Friday, September 30,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Defense Minister's Brother
Richard Arens in Scathing Attack on
Israel Before Group of Palestinians
M. Kennedy (D., Mass.) will receive an honorary
\at the annual dinner of the American Associates,
In University of the Negev. He meets with co-
, Bobbie Abrams and Aron Chilewich, to discuss
Oct. 5 event at the Pierre in New York.
mltz Blames Syria
>r War in Lebanon
[INGTON -
The Reagan
Ration fired off its
riticism to date of
lie in the current
crisis which
of State George
larged was block-
ts for a national
tion in that coun-
ipearing before the
eign Affairs Com-
it er before the Senate
stations Committee,
ha of failure to honor
sent to pull its troops
^anon. of permitting
estinian groups to
regions recently
Iby the Israeli army
Sy of responsibility for
iied presence of Israeli
ebanese soil.
the Secretary of State
using its influence in
obstruct national
jn and "indeed .
gated political op-
frithin Lebanon and
Bral factions engaged
actions against the
|overnment."
ippeared before the
i.il foreign policy
bupport a resolution
allow U.S. Marines to
Li'h.inon for another 18
is is a compromise be-
[Aclmmisiralion which
ret' hand in Lebanon
BH limit and many
Congress who have
at the President in-
J7;i War Powers Act
lid give Congress
order the Marines
turn in 60-90 days.
Btary defined the U.S.
janon as helping to
kirul of equilibrium"
encourage a ceasefire
political accom-
inil the ultimate with
Jl foreign forces from
warned that to pull
larines now would
{hose objectives.
; ANGRILY criticized
eign Minister Claude
or saying several days
ince, a participant in
itional force in the
dissociated itself
IS decision to allow
to call for air and
irt if they were en-
jy gunfire from anti-
forces.
ich Foreign Minister
I would consider a
Jboyant statement,"
He contended that
isffincil "to position
between what he
as the U.S.-Israeli
the Soviet-Syrian
forces. I don't think it was a
particularly helpful statement,
very frankly."
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) Richard Arens,
brother of Israeli Defense Minister Moshe
Arens, delivered a scathing attack on Israel
here at a meeting sponsored by pro-
Palestinian groups.
He likened Israel's settlement drive on
the West Bank to Nazi Germany's quest
for lebensraum and accused the Israelis of
subjecting Palestinian Arabs to curfews,
torture, confiscation and mass arrests. He
said Israel wants the Arabs out of the
territory.
ARENS, a professor of international law
at the University of Bridgeport (Conn.)
Law School, has long been at ideological
odds with his brother, the Israeli defense
chief, a Herut hard-liner who as a Knesset
member opposed the Camp David accords
and the Israel-Egypt peace treaty.
In the course of his address to about
1,000 people at a meeting sponsored by the
Arab Palestine Association and the
Canada-Palestine Solidarity Committee to
mark the first anniversary of the Sabra and
Shatila refugee camps massacre, Arens
criticized his brother for failing to in-
vestigate the murders of Palestinian
students last July by what he alleged were
Israeli death squads.
THIS WAS A REFERENCE to the
attack by masked gunmen on a group of
students at the Islamic College in Hebron
during which three students were killed and
33 were wounded. The attackers have still
not been identified.
Arens called the refugee massacres
perpetrated by the Phalangists "one of
the most horrible examples of genocide
humanity has had the misfortune to
witness."
Arens described himself as a penitent
and Jewish by heritage but not in faith. He
shared the platform with Abdullah
Abdullah, the unofficial representative of
the Palestine Liberation Organization in
Ottawa.
STILL GIVING AWAY CASH AND BEAUTIFUL GIFTS
WITH ALL CERTIFICATE ACCOUNTS.
DICK TEREBECKI IS BACK ON THE BEACH
Miami Savings is pleased and proud to announce that as of June 27th,
1983. Dick Terebecki is back on Miami Beach as a member of the Miami
Savings team.
Over the years, Dick Terebecki has made many friends by providing
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To receive Dick Terebecki's spe-
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5 W MANCH
1842 S.W81h Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Tel. (305) 642-3800


fagel2-A The Jewish Flondian Friday. September 30. 1963
^
Miami A rtist Gene Massin
i
Discovers
age5-A
anything but bine jeans and work*
Ma
My friends' fathers me air-
tine pilots, lawyers, doctors,
bankers. They all wore suits, ties.
white shirts. In their appearance,
they screamed respectability
Eugene Massin listens serious-
ly. For the moment, there are no
more angers. It is drffirnh to
know what he is thinking. He
makes it even harder to know
when he bursts into laughter an-
other time as Barry leaves his
father the hippie to recall about
himself: "I graduated in 1966
with a major in industrial ana
from the L nrversky of Miami
SAYS Eugene Massin. by way
of filling in earlier background on
his son: "When he was 14. Barry
was already into mar hi nee of all
kinds. We bought Barry his first
car. a pile of junk, which he
promptly put together and made
into a fine working automobile in
record time." I'We" means
Massin and his wife.
of 41 years whom Massin
at odd times calls Tante in gails
of laughter because, he explains.
Tante is a Jewish aunt, than
which there is no greater nur-
turer. "Helen, of course, nurtures
me. Beautifully." he explains. I
Barry resumes. I became an
industrial design teacher, and
Fran and I wound up at Miami
Springs Junior High a year
later."
If this was his first move in the
direction of testing the "respec-
table" lives his friends' fathers
led when he was a kid. Barry
doesn't say because it was an
experiment that ended before it
really began.
"For the first nine months of
school that year, the checks came
in. and we could eat." Frandee
recalls. "But then came the sum-
mer and vacation. And there was
no more money until the new fall
term."
ID HOOKED my students.
says Barry. He remembers
especially the time be brought a
'Volkswagen engine to school and
bed his class learn its various
parts by painting the engine in
exquisite if dearly identifying
colors. "But for me, it was an im-
portant step in the direction of
combining art and hjaajaal
objects."
Adds Barry: "In those lean
summer months, many of my
students took pity on us starving
Mass ins They would visit bear-
ing chickens, vegetables, bread,
fruit, great deserts." The young
couple didn't go hungry as a re-
sult, but the experience spelled
the end of Barry's classroom
career.
The aspiring industrial artist
subsequently became an assis-
tant to his father.
"His knowledge of materials is
prodigious, "says Eugene Massin
proudly of his son. "I don't think
there is a material or a "mm*I"m to
work it that he doesn't know
about."
**I AM a presenter," says
Barry of his role in the Massin
enterprise today. "I enhance my
dad's art work or any other
Beth Dm Otfic*
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicng Local and foreign
counties
1532 Washington Avenue
M.an. Beach. Florida 33139
Tel 534-1004 0 672-0004
BARRY MASSIN
There's no achievement
in being a starving artist9
artist's work that needs this spe-
cial service on commission. I am
a medium interpreter. What I
contribute doesn't call attention
to itself, but to the art work it-
self. "
As a sculptor himself, how
does this vision of his own self-
effacement sit with Barry
Massin?
He responds quickly and with
pride: "If someone buys a
Eugene Massin, they get as much
of roe. if I am involved in it, as of
my father." On a more modest
note, be adds: "I have no such
name by comparison with dad's.
But at this time in my life (he
turned 40 on Aug. 22), I don't
want to do work on consignment
either, and that's what so many
younger artists have to do at
first. The fact is, I want to get
paid up front for my specialized
contribution right now."
That helps in the name-build-
ing process. "Besides, there's no
real achievement in being the
starving artist," he declares.
Barry looks at Frandee. "We
learned that at Miami Springs
Junior High, for sure. Maybe.
we're working our way into the
art world by the back door."
SAYS Eugene Massin: "When
I first began working my new
sculptures, I had trouble keeping
them standing. It was Barry who
designed bases for them of spe-
cial materials. And it was Barry
who suggested that I sculpt pegs
into the feet which be made invis-
ible by sinking them into the
bases. It did the job beautifully."
It is also Barry who was in
charge of producing the first
model and who is designing the
special devices by which Eugene
Massin s latest sculpture will
hang in the atrium of the new
telephone building in Jackson-
ville.
The father explains: "He is
literally the engineer on that pro-
ject. The extraordinarily large
size of the piece meant that we
couldn't produce it in the work
Hovor Sense*too
shop here It's Barry who's been
running that end of the project at
a foundry in Hialeah."
That is how the Mass ins colla-
borate. And when Barry is not
involved in a commission from
his father, it is Barry who
"sculpts" the cases, bases, back-
drops, frames and a variety of
other such exhibition media that
artists need to show their work
and who come to him for this spe-
cial attention.
But the link between the two is
even more intimately tied to the
search for and expert use of new
materials than that.
EUGENE MASSIN is a Pro-
fessor of Art at the University of
Miami. Like so many of the fine
artists of the past. Massin sees a
profound link between practicing
art in painting or sculpture and
the need to train others in these
okffls.
In 1948. he studied with the
distinguished painter David
Alfaro Siqueiros in Mexico, at the
same time meeting the leading
Mexican muralists, Orozco and
Rivera. But a year later, turning
the tables from his status as stu-
dent, Massin became a visiting
instructor in painting at the
Escuela Universitaria de Bellas
Artes in San Miguel. And by
1950, be was teaching painting
and drawing at the University of
Wisconsin.
In between times. Massin s
work was exhibited at the Metro-
politan Museum of Art in New
York and a host of other
museums and galleries through
out the United States. And by
1953. he had joined the Art De-
partment as an instructor at the
University of Miami where, one
year later, the Lowe Gallery pre-
sented a showing of his work.
THERE FOLLOWED more
work and more exhibitions at the
same time that he was teaching
and moving up the art-academic
ladder: 1965 prize, Baltimore
Museum, national exhibition;
Whitney Annual of American
Art; 1966 Four Arts Exhibi-
tion; American Federation of
Arts Exhibit ion: 1968-59 Art
USA Invitational: 1960 more
painting in Europe and North
Africa: one-man show, RoKo
Gallery. New York City: 1961-63
one-man show, Nordness Gal-
lery, New York: traveling exhibi-
tion. West Coast Art Show; West
Coast Invitational at Sarasota.
Fla.: 1963 Ford Foundation
Honorarium for opera set design;
one-man show. James David Gal-
lery. Miami Beach: included in
the permanent collection of the
Brandeis Rose Museum Collec-
tion: more travel in Europe, per-
menent collection. Jacksonville
Art Museum: collection. New
Contemporary Wing, Ringling
Museum. Sarasota: 1964-65
one-man show. James David Gal-
lery; Humanities Grant. Univer-
sity of Miami: Ford Foundation
Artist in Residence. University of
West Virginia.
THE LIST is endless But the
University of Miami's Human-
ities Grant proved to be a special
turning point in his career. As
Massin s international reputation
grew, the U of M gave him a
modest $2,500 grant to do re-
search into new materials that an
artist can use materials, be
says, "that I believe attract and
enhance an artist's perceptual
awareness." Confesses Massin:
"I've since spent" here, he
censors the figures out of a sense
that discussions of large sums are
unflattering either to art or the
artist himself.
"Just write that it's a lot
that I've put a lot of my own
funds into this research. Actual-
ly, it was Siqueiros in Mexico
who got me started. It was
Siqueiros who first looked for
other than the classical media to
use in painting. Siqueiros, for ex-
ample, pioneered painting in lac-
quers."
He emphasizes the point,
adding: "It was the toxirity of
the lacquers that turned
Sequeiroe away from than -.
me. too. uttimatelv jj^
Siqueiros tried other raedaX
and that show I bega^"*
eearch for my own new mat-J?
That's how I first B^T-2
ics." And most recently 2
nickel, a copper-nkkei i^Z
to stainless steel.
EUGENE MASSIN S a*
tore today is a product of tZ
search for new materials h
voyage away from his earner pre-
occupation with painting -\
very Bale painting now." be fe.
dares evenly, meaning exekan*.
ly on canvas.
But it has also served as a
aesthetic link to his sons own a>
search into new materials, ad
into the media possibilities oflej.
ed by the new technolopes.
which led to their praam
collaboration.
Says Eugene Massin Peop*
call Barry from all over If be
weren't an artist, he could be i
consultant. They're constaart
asking him for information about
the latest materials And the
latest and best machines to work
them."
After the search for net
materials, what come* next on
his artistic pilgrimage' Dots
Eugene Massin know what comes
next?
If nothing else, one thing that
does come next is the nes
zinger: "I hope not. he says.
erupting into more gravel, more
laughter.
UNHAPPILY for Miami thai
isn't altogether accurate Afte
the zinger. next is the news thai
Massin is leaving Miami. He has
already arranged for a sabbatical
at the U of M that may well be
the beginning of his farewell to
teaching. "After all." he says. "I
have been teaching steadily sine*
1953. He and Tante Helen haw
just sold their house in South-
west Miami. They're loo king fort
loft in New York, and Massin
hopes to divide his time later be-1
tween the Big Apple and here.
"New York's a tough town." be
admits, "and I would like lo
prove to myself that I really an
the mayven I think I am
Adds Massin: "Besides, teach-
ing has changed since I started
out 30 years ago mainly because
young people have changed I
have seen the ambiance of
classroom go from post-Korea to
post-Vietnam, with the effect of
the civil rights struggle thrown i
for some added excitement.
"EVERY TIME there has bee)
a change, there has also been i
movement away from the time
when the art student, and stu-
JOIN
HON. MEIR ROSENNE-
Israel Ambassador to the U S
U.S. SENATOR ALFONSE DAMATO (R-N.Y)
M.K. ZEVULUN HAMMER -
Israel Minister of Education
THOMAS DINE-Executive Director. AIPAC
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dents
campus
in general, came to the
-to learn. I'm not mi.
7 really troe of them any-
Uore today. I'm not eure what
he says, "too much brooding
Lnong young people now, even
| hostility."
A brief moment of silence sug
rests that Masain can find no-
thing humorous or even human in
| this to say something amusing.
He returns to hia own plans.
I'm iot retiring, whenever that
happens anyway. I'm just going
to have more time from now on to
do my own things. I've enjoyed
the teaching, but I'm looking for-
Iward to time for myself. I have
I had great satisfaction from the
I exchange with young people in a
[classroom, but I'm getting selfish
las the years go by" he was
Ibom in 1920 and is 64. "I would
llike." he says, "to give to me
[now. After all, / would appreciate
lit"
In February-March, 1966, the
Joe and Emily Lowe Art Gallery
I at the University of Miami show-
ed Massin's work a second time
I in a one-man exhibit in the form
of a "Retrospective, 1966-1965."
I In a note on.his achievement in
the Massin Booklet published on
the occasion of the exhibit,
Dorothy Blau and Roddey
I Burdine wrote:
"EUGENE MASSIN is a re-
Imarkable and important person
I of our times. Fads and tastes and
I people change, but Gene Massin
I paints, consistently sound and
| with an understanding and re-
| liability of life that has no need
| for deep concern of commercial
pressures. Massin paints the
|most obvious of all subject mat
Iters: what is around him
[people, animals, groups, friends,
all the factors that make his life.
[He is a personal painter, emo-
Itiunal not only to himself but to
|the viewer."
When Temple Israel of Greater
IMiami offered Massin the com-
[mission to produce a memorial to
|l)r Joseph R. Narot, the Tem-
ple's late spiritual leader, Massin
called that he had attempted to
|paint a portrait of Dr. Narot sev-
eral years before his death.
Friday, September 30,1983 /The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
On the Bookshelf.
Why Have Jews Been Hated
So Deeply for So Long?
Why the Jews? The Reon for i details are given to persuade the
Anti-Semitism. By Dennis ] reader that Prager and Telushkin
Prager and Joseph Telushkin. have advanced a convincing and
New York: Simon and Schust- fundamental explanation of Jew-
er. 1983. 238 Pp. $14.95. hatred.
LEO MINDLIN
Eugene Massin:
'Remarkable,
important person*
"Joe was my old friend, and
after a while I just quit. Some-
how the vibes were all wrong.
Nothing went right," recalls
Massin. Personal, emotional, the
artist sensed the tension and tur-
moil in bis friend, and somehow
he just couldn't produce a por-
trait.
TODAY, Massin's memorial to
his old friend satisfies Massin as
a better representation of that
friend and his tragic passing. It
communicates, not only to the
artist, but as Blau and Burdine
wrote, to the viewer also.
Three figures "three be-
cause the number is kabbaliatic,"
explains Massin stretch
heavenward toward the light.
They say as much about the
subject of the memorial as about
the living, vibrant artist himself.
{American Theater
Israelis Eating Up Broadway Plays
NEW YORK (JTA) -
American visitors to Israel who
devotees of the American
theater may very well feel that
pey never left home. While Is
ael may not yet be competition
or Broadway or London's
Shaftesbury Avenue, an im-
pressive selection of American
nd international entertainers
iilarly augment Israel's per
nanent theatrical scene.
A report released here by the
^orth American Israel govern-
ment tourist office in conjunction
*ith the Israel Ministry of
tourism noted that American
ctor James Earl Jones is
urrently repeating his Broadway
ok in Athol Fugard'a Tony
Ward nominated play "Master
larold and the Boys," with
erformances in Tel Aviv,
Jerusalem, Haifa, Carmiel and
\rad.
. THE BROADWAY cast of the
tit play, "Agnes of God," also
^Ppeared this summer in Israel,
TJith Elizabeth Ashley, Geraldine
Page and Maryann Plunkett
Relighting Israeli audiences just
^s they did New Yorkers.
This fall the Neil Simon-
Marvin Hamlisch musical hit,
"They're Playing Our Song,"
comes to Israel with the cast
which undertook the show's re-
cent successful American tour.
The musical will play Oct. 1-3 at
the Jerusalem Theater and Oct.
4-15 at Tel Aviv's Frederic Mann
Auditorium.
Apart from visiting drama,
there is constant theater in Is-
rael. The country has four major
repertory theaters Habimah,
Cameri, Haifa and Beersheba
Theaters plus countless small
companies. The Habimah
(Hebrew for "the stage") com-
pany was founded in Moscow in
1912, performing plays in
Hebrew for the first time in 2,000
years, and now is baaed, as is the
Cameri company, in Tel Aviv.
PLAYS IN Israel are generally
performed in Hebrew, although
some are presented in English,
Arabic, French or German. How-
ever, all major Israeli theaters
have simultaneous translation
facilities for English.
All types of drama are per-
formed, from Aristophanes to
Shakespeare to Shaw to Sholom
Aleichem to Neil Simon, Noel
I Ambassador Went to Hebrew U.
GENEVA (JTA) Kassa Kebede, the new
Sthiopian Ambassador to the United Nations here, is a
raduate of the Hebrew University in Jerusalem and
Peaks fluent Hebrew. The 40-year-old envoy was tie
linister of Labor in Ethiopia from 1979 untd recently. He
* also fhairmsn of the labor commission of the
Sanitation of African Unity.
Coward and Edward Albee to
a multitude of Israeli play-
wrights.
Israeli talent is also exported.
In New York, Israeli ballerina
Galina Panova is currently starr-
ing in the Broadway hit musical,
"On Your Toes." "Soul of a
Jew," a play by Israeli dramatist,
Yehoahua Sobol, is currently a
major attraction at Britain's
prestigious Edinburgh Inter-
national Festival.
ELSEWHERE in Britain,
Topol, the Israeli star of the
movie musical "Fiddler on the
Roof," is recreating the role of
Tevye the milkman in a London
stage revival of the hit show.
The arts in Israel are of the
highest standard. The Israel
Philharmonic Orchestra, one of
the country's numerous or-
chestras, was founded in 1935 by
Arturo Toscanini, and is under
the directorship of Zubin Mehta.
Dance companies such as Bat
Dor and Batsheva appear regu-
larly in Israel and around the
world. (Bat Dor opened a two
week run recently at the Joyce
Theater in Manhattan in New
York City). Other major enter-
tainment events this season have
included two concerts in
Jerusalem's Birket Sultan open-
air theater one with Judy
Collins, and the second with
Simon and Garfunkel.
Simon and Garfunkel returned
to Israel for a second major
concert at the Ramat Gen
Stadium, the largest' arena in
metropolitan Tel Aviv, on Satur-
day night, Stpt. 24.
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Booh Editor
The question posed by these
two very able authors is one that
has often been asked by many
people in different times and in
various places. Why have the
Jews "been hated so deeply and
for so long?"
It is a question which has pro-
duced numerous answers, some
of which are glib and some
thoughtful. Prager and Telushkin
identify these common answers
"economic factors, the need
for scapegoats, ethnic hatred,
xenophobia, resentment of Jew-
ish affluence and professional
success, and religious bigotry."
But they quickly claim that these
are all insufficient and in-
adequate explanations for the
persistent and widespread hatred
of the Jews.
THE AUTHORS insist that
Jew-hatred is best understood as
a reaction to Judaism and the
problems it creates for non-Jews.
These problems include Jewish
monotheism and the consequent
rejection of other gods; the Jew-
ish code of behavior which sets
forth laws that take precedence;
Jewish nationhood which has
survived even though the Jewish
state ceased to exist in the year
70 and was not reborn until 1948.
Three additional reasons for
Jew-hatred on the basis of Juda-
ism are cited: the Jewish obliga-
tion to improve the world; the
chosenness of the Jews; and the
higher quality of life among
Jews.
Judaism, assert the authors,
arouses hatred of Jews because it
threatens and challenges the
values and tenets of other people.
They offer a systematic demon-
stration of the validity of their
thesis by incisively examining
anti-Semitism in the ancient
world, during the Enlightenment
and among Leftists, Nazis, anti-
Zionists, Christians and Mus-
lims.
THEY PROVIDE a rapid-fire
summary which effectively cap-
tures the highlights of a tragic
history, identifying a number of
notorious anti-Semites and re-
counting horrendous events. Be-
cause it is a hasty summary, the
recital omits many names and oc-
currences but more than enough
They are somewhat less per-
suasive in their prescription for
action based on their answer to
the question which they posed at
the outset of the book. Five re-
sponses are briefly considered:
assimilation, aliyah, proselytiz-
ing for converts to Judaism,
combatting anti-Semitism by all
appropriate means and working
for the universal adoption of
Jewish moral values.
The clear implication of these
relatively frail responses is that
this may well be a problem for
which there is no solution. Such
an implication runs counter to
the American myth which holds
that every problem has a solu-
tion. The history of the world
does not support this myth and
the authors' feeble solutions
suggest that this is but one of
many problems that cannot be
solved.
THERE ARE two interesting
footnotes which deserve atten-
tion. First, the term "anti-
Semitism" is properly identified
as inaccurate, since it does not
refer to all Semites. However,
instead of taking the bold step of
recommending elimination of the
term, the authors simply adjust
the spelling to "antisemitism."
This usage has some notable ad-
vocates, but it is far less powerful
than the forceful term used fre-
quently in the book, "Jew-
hatred."
The other question of style is
one which we should all adopt.
The authors point out that we
thoughtlessly use the word
"extermination" to describe what
the Nazis did to the Jews. This
word should be avoided because
its use implies acceptance of the
Nazi description of Jews as
vermin to be exterminated. A
better term is "annihilation."
All in all, this is a thoughtful
and easy-to-read piece of work. It
succeeds in presenting an accep-
table answer to the difficult ques-
tion of why Jew-hatred persists.
However, it fails in telling us
what to do once we have the cor-
rect answer. Nevertheless, the
book should be judged affir-
matively for its success rather
than for its failure. The sugges-
tions for action occupy only one
of fourteen chapters. The other
thirteen chapters vigorously
tackle a tough question and are
worthy of a wide readership.
Anti-Jewish Material
Appears in Egypt Again
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
Openly anti-Jewish mate-
rial continues to appear in
the publications of opposi-
tion elements in Egypt
despite that country's
formal peace treaty with
Israel, says a report issued
here by the Institute of
Jewish Affairs.
The report by Dr. Raphael Is-
raeli, director of the Hebrew
University's pre-academic
studies and an expert on Islam
and Chinese history, concludes
that no substantial changes oc-
curred in the popular Egyptian
conception of Jews, Israelis and
Zionism during the years im-
mediately after President Anwar
Sadat's peace mission.
DR. ISRAELI'S report is based
on his forthcoming book
analyzing the Arabs' stereotype
descriptions of Jews and the wide
ranging accusations levelled at
Israel.
Of particular concern, he
writes, are a number of publica-
tions, published at least until
1981, which were based on the
infamous "Protocols of the
Elders of Zion,"* and blood libel
themes.
He cites two popular books
"The War of Survival Between
the Koran and the Talmud" and
"The Jews, Objects of the Wrath
of God" which were in demand
by the Egyptian public during
the Cairo book fair of February,
1981.
In Dr. Israeli's view, the exist-
ence of anti-Semitic publications
places "a long dark tunnel at the
end of the light which the peace
treaty has kindled."


:"~ '>agW,r *^ffi&&yii$B9
hR>.
1983
/
Levine, Rosenwald
Tapped for AJCong.'s
Louise Wise Award
Jacqueline Levine and Nina
Rosenwald were the 1983 reci-
pients of the Louise Waterman
Wise Award of the American
Jewish Congress at a luncheon in
New York Sept. 14.
Levine. chairperson of the Na-
tional Governing Council of
AJ Congress, serves as the chair-
person of the National Jewish
Community Relations Advisory
Council (NJCRAC) the first
woman ever chosen for that posi-
tion.
Rosenwald has been active in
many campaigns in support of
civil liberties, international hu-
man rights and the security of
the State of Israel- Through her
family's foundation, the William
Rosenwald Family Fund, she has
contributed generously to MM
welfare:
Tagar Zionist Student Activist
Movement has announced that it
will be starting Mivtxa Hasba-
rah, or Operation Information, on
college campuses across the
country this month. The cam-
paign is designed to neutralize
the effects of anti-Israel propa-
ganda aimed at college students
by Arab and other sources.
Mivtza Hasbarah will dissemi-
nate information on college
campuses about subjects vital to
Israel's security. According to
Tagar leader Glenn Mones, a sec-
ond objective is to sensitize stu-
dents to the propaganda activi-
ties of groups whose actions are
either anti-Israel or counter-pro-
ductive to Israel's interests.
The American Jewish Commit-
tee has urged Secretary of State
George P. Shultz to allow Den-
nis Brutus, an African poet who
fought South African racism and
who has lived in the United
States for 12 years, to remain in
this country.
* Brutus, who is a tenured pro-
fessor at Northwestern Univer-
sity in Evanston, 111., faces de-
portation unless his U.S. residen-
cy is legalized. His supporters
claim that his life will be in
danger if he is forced to return to
Africa.
Brutus' problems arose out of a
situation involving his failure to
apply for immigrant status after
he left South Africa, and his lack
of a "proper" passport when
Rhodesia became Zimbabwe.
In a letter to Secretary
Shultz, Samuel Rabinove, legal
director of the American Jewish
Committee, pleaded that Prof.
Brutus be allowed to remain in
the United States either as a per-
manent resident alien or as a reci-
pient of political asylum.
JWB Executive Vice President
Arthur Rot man has appointed
Mitchell Jaffe and Robert
Fischer to the newly-created po-
sition of assistant executive di-
rector of JWB.
In making the announcement,
Rotman said that Jaffe would
* continue to serve aa director of
Community Services and that
Fischer would continue to func-
tion director of Fiscal Devet-
, and Management. In ad-
they wiB assist Rotman
and Solomon Greenfield. JWB
associate executive director, in
guiding the day-to-day opera-
tions of the agency.
JWB is the network of and
central aervie* agency for JCCa,
YM YWHAs and camps in the
U.S. aad Canada, serving more
than one million Jews.
Chaplain (Map) Marc Alan
Abrampwitz has become the first
full-time Jewish chaplain at the
U.S. Military Academy at West
Point. N.Y.. according to an an-
nouncement by the JWB Com-
mission on Jewish Chaplaincy.
Chaplain Abraroowiu. who
will serve at the newly-dedicated
$6.5 million West Point Jewish
Chapel, will minister to all the
Jewish cadets at the service
academy and to the Jewish mili-
tary personnel among the sup-
port staff and their dependents.
He will be assigned to the
academy's Chaplain's Office,
directed by Chaplain Richard
Camp.
Born in Brooklyn in 1945,
Chaplain Abramowitz has lived
most of his life in Valley Stream.
N.Y. Ordained by the Rabbi
Isaac Elchanan Theological Sem-
inary of Yeshiva University in
June, 1970, ha was ecclesiastical-
ly endorsed for service to military
personnel by the JWB Commis-
sion on Jewish Chaplaincy in
December. 1971.
The roster of top-echelon ORT
participants in the forthcoming
Chaplain Marc Abramowitz
27th Biennial National Conven-
tion of Women's American ORT
the first West Coast Conven-
tion of the organization ever to
be held Oct. 16-19 in Los Angeles,
has been announced by Sandra
Isenstein, convention chairman
and Ruth Taffel, co-chairman.
The list includes Joseph Har-
matz, director general, World
ORT Union; Israel Goralnik, di-
rector general, ORT Israel;
Joshua Flidel, director of ORT's
Latin American operations; and
Jules Bloch, director general,
ORT France.
The Convention will be attend-
ed by some 1,200 delegates, rep-
resenting some 145,000 members
of Women's American ORT in
1,250 chapters from coast-to-
coast.
A "living memorial" will be
constructed in honor of the late
Julius Bisno, who as the first full-
time professional of the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization and
later as associate director of the
Loa Angeles Jewish Federation
Council, touched the lives of
thousands of young people.
He died in June at 72 after a
long illness.
A group of friends and col-
leagues has sat up a committee to
establish the Julius Bisno Learn-
ing Cantor at the B'nai B'rith
Beber Camp in Muskwonago.
Wis. The center expected to
cost about $360,000 will be an
integral part of the camp's Perl-
man Leadership Village.
The World Union for Progres-
sive Judaism, the international
body of Reform Judaism, is
taking a public stand against the
Members of Hashachar, the youth move-
ment sponsored by Hadassah, meet in the
traditional booth for Suhhot on the mid-
town terrace of Hadassah House. Two doves
of peace are perched above the corn staves,
fruit and gourds which represent a plentiful
harvest This year Suhhot extends through
Friday. Sept 3d
apparent concessions being made
by the new Government coalition
of Yitzhak Shamir to the
Agudath Israel Party.
The Orthodox bloc is again de-
manding that, in return for its
participation in the new leader-
ship alignment of Israel, the
Government agree to an amend-
ment to the Law of the Return.
The amendment would declare
that individuals who have been
converted to Judaism by Reform
or Conservative rabbis not be
eligible for automatic Israeli cit-
izenship.
WUPJ President Gerard Dan-
iel, Executive Director Rabbi
Richard G. Hirsch, and North
American Director Rabbi Benja-
min A. Kamin have warned that
if Shamir invokes party discipline
for such a commitment then, in
effect, hundreds of thousands of
Jews in North America, South
America, Europe, South Africa,
Australia and elsewhere will be
disenfranchised.
Dr. Noah H. Rosenbloom. pro-
fessor of Hebraic Studies at
Yeshiva University's Stern Col-
lege for Women, has won the
Abraham Friedman Prize from
the His tad ruth Ivrith of America
for his new study of Naphtali
Hartwig Wessely's "Songs of
Splendor'' (Shire Tiferet). He re-
ceived the award at the orguia-
tion's annual banquet at the
Fifth Avenue Synagogue in New
York City.
Dr. Rosenbloom s work is the
first comprehensive analysis of
Wessely's work, the only major
epic in Hebrew literature. Songs
of Splendor'' represents the first
major modern literary work in
Hebrew and has remained the
only heroic epic in Hebrew. Dr.
Rosenbloom said.
Dr. Rosenbloom s book, writ-
ten in Hebrew, is titled The
Exodus Epic of the Enlighten-
ment and Exegesis. It has been
published by Rubin Mass Ltd in
Jerusalem.
Mutual Antagonisms
Jews, Poles Urged to Achieve Amity
WASHINGTON (JTAI -
Jews and Poles were urged to
"lay aside" their "mutual an-
tagonism" in a call for amity by
six prominent members of both
groups here.
A statement, noting that Jews
and Poles face similar concerns in
today's world, was signed by
Simon Wiesenthal, head of the
war crimes documentation center
in Vienna, Joseph Lichten of the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, and Michael Borwicz, an
author and historian.
The Polish signatories were
Prof. Jan Karski of Georgetown
University, Jerzy Lerski. profes-
sor emeritus at San Francisco
University, and Jan Nowak, di-
rector of the Polish-American
Congress. Wiesenthal and
Borwicz are Holocaust survivors.
The statement, released on the
44th anniversary of Nazi Ger-
many's invasion of Poland,
acknowledged that the "mutual
antagonism" arose from Jewish
bitterness over anti-Semitism in
Poland in this century. It noted,
however, the sacrifices by non-
Jewish Poles to rescue Jews
during World War II and other
reasons why Poles believe the
depth of anti-Semitism has been
exaggerated.
"Mutual recrimination serves
no useful purpose," the state-
ment said. "Men of good will are
trying to create a real dialogue
and mutual understanding. Let
us use this dialogue to find what
unites'' Jews and Poles. In that
connection, the statement
referred to the dangers shared by |
Poland and Israel.
"Poland's geographical posi-
tion makes it particularly vulner-
able to the current Soviet menace
and Israel is surrounded by a set
of hostile Arab countries.' the
statement said. It suggested that
"rapprochement"' between Jew
and Poles would be advanced if
Poles "at home and abroad"
forcefully supported Israel and if
all Jews would support the right
of "people of all nationalities and
religions" not just Soviet Jew
to emigrate from the Soviet
Union.
Wa an proud to honor Dr. OMh Peri,
a woman who embodies the history
of Jewish participation in medicine
A biatory that reflect* the atory
of the Jewish people, ita suffering,
tta .truggia for religious freedom, ita
P**OMtedirefOTkTxmledgeand.
at all times, ita reepect and
obedience to truth and moral law.
Voa Are Invited To Attend A Luncheon
in Tribute to
DR. G1SELLA PERL
THE ANGEL OF AUSCHWITZ"
Tuesday, November lit. 1983
TEMPLE EMANUEL
VTeshmgton 6 17th Street, Miami Beetb, Fl.
12.00 P.M. (NOON)
Doort Wilt Open at 11:50 A.M.
Retentions Accepted Only to The Cspedtj
of the Hell
118.00 PER PERSON For Reservations
TELEPHONE 531-8329


Friday, September 30,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 30,1963

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Mil


iletic Ouh to V
Miami's JCC To Mark 50 Years of Amazing Performance
In 1932, a group of 12
0VS realizing the urgent
ecessity for a YMHA in
liami, formed what was
Mi known as the Hebrew
athletic Club. Its existence
L9 immediately beset with
[ardships, foremost being
Le lack of a meeting place.
EVery week saw the organi-
ttion hold sessions in dif-
rent Talmud Torahs or
aagogues."
I That's how the Young Men's
lebrew Association (which later
Tcame the Jewish Community
Inters) began in Miami, as
fated in the 1936 program of the
MHA of Greater Miami's Fifth
nnua" Ball.
| ON SATURDAY evening, Oct.
| the Jewish Community Cen-
rs of South Florida will cele-
ste its 50th anniversary with a
nner dance at the Four Ambas-
Jors Hotel. There will be cock-
kils beginning at 7:30 p.m., fol-
Led by a sit-down dinner
lietary laws will be observed),
Wing to the Ted Martin Or-
(estra and an original musical
vue highlighting the JCCs' half
kntury of service.
I Dade Circuit Court Judge Mil-
kn Friedman, a performer in the
Wue. and member of the "Y's"
B36 Board of Directors, remem-
fers those early days well.
[ "We had a tough road to hoe,"
s says. "We had a young bunch
fellows most of whom had
jver been active in any organi-
st ion. All they were interested in
j sports."
| BUT FOR some members like
dge Friedman, who became
sident of the "Y" in 1938, and
Herschel Rosenthal
1937 president E. Albert Pallot.
sports were not enough. For them
and a small leadership group,
finding a permanent home with
the needed athletic faculties,
meeting rooms, library and audi-
torium was an immediate goal.
By 1939 the "Y" had its first
permanent home, a small
building at 1567 SW 5th Street in
Miami, a membership of 585, and
many of the facilities it needed.
Affiliation with the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, then
known as the Greater Miami
Federation of Jewish Welfare
Funds, insured the survival of
the Center and removed the club
mystique forever.
An item in Harry Schwartz's
"YMHA Notes" in The Jewish
Fktridian reported that two re-
quirements were to be met by the
young organization in return for
the $4,500 in funding from the
Judge Milton Friedman
Federation. The YMHA was to
discontinue soliciting funds for
its 1939 journal, and card playing
would not be permitted after Jan.
1 of the same year.
FROM THEN on, it was spir-
ited development and growth for
the "Y." A Miami Beach YMHA
opened in the late 1930's on the
site of the present Di Lido Hotel,
and servicemen flocked to Satur-
day evening dances at the Miami
Beach and Fifth Street Centers.
"Town Branch," as the Fifth
Street "Y" was known, was the
center of activity for Jewish boys
and girls living in Miami's Shen-
andoaharea.
One of those boys was 14-year-
old Herschel Rosenthal, now
president of Flagler Federal
Savings and Loan Association,
and chairman of the 50th anni-
versary dinner dance committee.
He remembers those days with
fondness.
"That's where Jewish youth
went for their social activities,"
he says. "The 'Y' was where you
met the girls. And it was really
the only place for girls to meet
Jewish boys. That's where the
dances were, and all of the AZA
and BBG clubs also met at the
Y\ "
THAT CUSTOM continued
after the war years when young
men returned from military duty
and went to work or to college.
"I really never left the 'Y',"
Rosenthal continues. "1 met my
wife at the wall, the famous wall
on 16th Ave." The wall ran
around the new Center, opened in
1947 at 450 SW 16th Ave., and
around an entire block. A popular
phrase was, "I'll meet you at the
wall," Rosenthal recalls.
He stayed active in the Jewish
Center, serving as president of
the Jewish Community Centers
in 1966 when its offices were at
the South Dade branch on SW
Eighth St. That branch was pop-
ular with teens whose clubs met
there and had active pre-school
and summer camp programs
until it was sold in 1972.
Ustoric Milestone
Brandeis University to
Celebrate 35th Anniversary
By JERRY ROSEN WAIKE
WALTHAM, Mass. -
VTA) When Brandeis
jniversity inaugurates
fvi'lyn Handker as its fifth
sident Oct. 9 at Boston's
storic Symphony Hall, it
fill also be celebrating
lot her university mile-
)ne its 35th anniver-
|"You know, most people are
nazed when you remind them
kat Brandeis is so very young,"
[id Dr. Abram Sachar, Bran-
ds' founding president who was
augurated at Symphony Hall
fctober 7, 1948. "It is as if they
nnot believe we have come so
r. so fast."
[THE UNIVERSITY is named
\r Louis Dembitz Brandeis. "the
ople's lawyer" and the first
w to sit on the U.S. Supreme
ourt. The nation's only Jewish-
unded, nonsectarian liberal arts
stitution of higher learning,
ndeis today is widely recog-
d by leading educators as one
the country's finest private
era! arts universities.
I Although it has no medical
pool, Brandeis students con-
stantly are accepted at medical
fhools at a rate that for exceeds
i national average. Although it
> no law school, Brandeis
udents have historically been
JJght after by the best law
Jhools in the nation.
[And although it is a small uni-
rrsay enrolling about 2,750
[idergraduates and 700 graduate
Jdents Brandeis combines
the breadth and range of
academic programs usually found
at much large universities with
the intimate educational atmos-
phere of an undergraduate col-
lege. The student-faculty ration
is approximately 10:1.
THE BRANDEIS success
story is one that, ironically, was
born of failure the dissolution
of a medical and veterinary col-
lege, Middlesex University in
Waltham. Massachusetts, that
previously occupied the Brandeis
site. Fortuitously, at the same
time insolvency loomed for Mid-
dlesex, a committee of public-
spirited Jews in New York City
was seeking a campus for their
plan to establish a Jewish-
founded university.
After hearing about the plight
of Middlesex, and following a
series of negotiations between the
two parties, the campus and the
charter passed to the committee
with no purchase investment.
Although the group had to as-
sume many .of Middlesex's out-
standing obligations, Jews in
America could be "a host at last"
to gifted young men and women
scholars. But the committee
there were eight founding
trustees had no money, no
constituency, and no educational
objectives except the conviction
that the school represented a gift
from the Jewish people to Ameri-
can higher education.
"IN THE PAST 35 years, the
precious gift has been sustained
by Jews and non-Jews alike,"
said Sachar, who served for 20
years as president and for many
years thereafter as chancellor.
In order to represent a lasting
bequest to America by the
"people of the book." Brandeis
felt it had to epitomize the best.
It had to strike boldly for the top
rank immediately, using as
Continued on Page 4-B
Philip Habib, President
Reagan's former special envoy
to the Middle East, will be the
keynote speaker at an
American Technion Society
Greater Miami Chapter an-
nual dinner dance scheduled
for Dec. 3 at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel. Habib also
served as a senior adviser t
the Secretary of Stuie,
Under-Secretary of State f\
Political Affairs, and as
Assistant Secretary of State
for Asian and Pacific Affairs.
Stanley Gilbert, president of
the Jewish Community Centers
from 1972 until 1975, remembers
that time as a period of planning
and growth.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC
was in the planning stages, and
temporary centers in north and
south Dade were serving the
Jewish community. The South
Beach Activities Center was de-
dicated in 1972.
"IT WAS A time of excite-
ment," Gilbert agrees." The sort
of excitement everyone of us who
is active in the Centers would like
to once again capture.
"That's just the spirit that is
behind the 50th"anniversary din-
ner dance," said Rosenthal. "The
same worthy job needs to be
done, and the dinner dance is
really a way of bringing people
back to the JCCs. With three
centers in Dade County, more in-
terested and committed people
are needed than ever before.
"But for the dinner dance,
we're looking for everyone who
was a member in the old 'Y's' and
the JCCs to get together for an
evening of fun and reminiscing
about the good times we had."
Assembly Prexy
Palestinian Calls for
State Under PLO
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The newly elected
President of the General
Assembly, Jorge lllueca,
the Vice President of Pana-
ma, called in his inaugural
speech for the establish-
ment of a Palestinian state
"under the leadership of the
PLO."
lllueca said, at the same time,
that until "the right of all states
in the area to live in peace within
secure and recognized borders is
guaranteed," there will be no
peace in the Middle East.
But the Panamanian diplomat,
elected at the opening session of
the 38th General Assembly,
stressed the rights of the Pales-
tinian people. He said they in-
clude the right "to independence
and the establishment of its own
free, independent and non-
aligned state on Palestinian
territory, under the leadership of
the PLO, the authentic political
representative" of the Pales-
tinian people. Until then, he said,
there will be no solution to the
Middle East conflict.
PRESIDENT REAGAN
addressed the General Assembly
Monday. He outlined U.S.
foreign policy, including its
Middle East positions. But the
President devoted much of his
speech to the downing of
Korean airliner by Soviet planes
Israel is scheduled to address
the Assembly on Oct. 3. Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir
originally was supposed to speak
for Israel. But because he is now
occupied with forming a new
government, Israel's Ambas-
sador to the UN Yehuda Blum
will deliver Israel's major foreign
policy address. President Hosni
Mubarak of Egypt will address
the Assembly a day later, On
Oct. 4.
There are 142 items for debate
on the agenda of this session of
the General Assembly. Middle
East and Palestinian issues are
expected to come up for debate at
the end of October.

Dulzin Pledges WZO Support for
West Bank Settlement Near Nablus
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
Jewish Agency and World
Zionist Organization Executives,
has pledged the WZO's support
for the establishment of an
educational institution for
diaspora youth at the settlement
of Brae ha, near Nablus.
Bracha, dubbed "upper
Nablus" by its detractors, is one
of the most controversial of the
new West Bank settlements. Its
critics claim it was set up by
Ariel Sharon with a view to its
becoming a major Jewish town
overlooking the large Arab town
of Nablus. It is situated on a high
peak just south of the city.
Some 30 famines are presently
living there, but a broad highway
leading up the hill to Bracha indi-
cates that its planners were
instructed to prepare a blueprint
for a major urban development.
Bracha hit the headlines earlier
this year when its official inau-
guration ceremony in the pre-
sence of Deputy Premier David
Levy was disrupted by a Peace
Now demonstration and had to
be held indoors instead of out-
doors as planned.
Dulzin, on a tour of the settle-
ment this week, said the Bracha
residents had proved themselves
eager and resourceful and that
the WZO would be happy to help
them as it would help any Jew
contributing to Zionist settle-
ment in Eretz Yisrael.
1 >Jewio Floradiajni
Miami, FloridaFriday, September 30.1983
111 1
Section 8
------------3


Page 2-B The Jewish Florkfaan Friday. September 30,1983
Area Holocaust Survivors Henrietta London to be Honored at
To Attend Local Gathering JNF-Temole Emanu-El Tribute Lunch*
A gathering of survivors of the
Nazi Holocaust living in South
Florida will take place Sunday
evening. Oct. 23 at the Konover
Hotel. Miami Beach.
This gathering, the first of its
kind to take place locally." stated
Goldie R. Goldstein, executive
vice president of the South-
eastern Florida Holocaust
Memorial Center, "was inspired
by the American gathering held
in Washington in AditI. at which
time 15.000 survivors stood to-
gether and proclaimed 'We are
here." It was a symbol of their
resistance to the murderous
tyranny of Nazism."
The local event is being co-
ordinated by the Southeastern
Holocaust Center, which is
located on the Florida Interna-
tional University Bay Vista
Campus in North Miami The
Center is currently accumulating
audio and video testimonies of
survivors, liberators, and
protectors to create a permanent
memorial to the Holocaust, which
is currently being used in public
and private schools.
"Survivors will gather to
express support of the goals of
the Center to create a living
memorial through education."
according to Goldstein, "and to
memorialize their loved ones lost
in the Holocaust. These
testimonies realize that hope by
educating people about the
meaning of the Holocaust and
how it scarred the conscience of
the world. Such an event must be
prevented from ever happening
again.
"The Center is dedicated to
ensuring that people everywhere
will hear the voices of the sur-
vivors, and that the lessons of the
Holocaust will be remembered
forever," she added.
Sponsors of the upcoming
gathering are Children of Holo-
caust Survivors, Czenstochov
and Vicinity Social Club of
Greater Miami, David Ben
Gurion Cultural Club, Holocaust
Survivors of South Florida, New
American Jewish Social CTub,
Radomer Relief Club of Greater
Miami, and the Yiddish Cultural
Circle of Point East.
Stephen Cypen to he Installed As
Beach Kiwanas Club President
Stephen H. Cypen will be
installed as president of the
Kiwanis Club of Miami Beach
Saturday at a 7:30 p.m. dinner at
the Fontainebleau Hotel.
Leonard (Doc) Baker, of the
Miami Beach Chamber of Com-
merce, is in charge of the event.
Cypen, past president of the
Civic League of Miami Beach, is
a member of the board of gov-
ernors and former vice president
of the Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce and a member of the
board of Temple Emanu-El. He is
treasurer of the Mount Sinai
Medical Center Foundation and a
member of the hospital's board of
trustees.
He is vice president of the
Miami Jewish Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens, a graduate of the
University of Miami School of
Law, the University of Florida,
and the Miami Beach Senior
High School, and is an attorney
for the Town of Surfside, the City
of Miami Beach Police and Fire
Pension Fund, and for the Miami
Beach General Employee Pension
Fund.
Taking the oath with Cypen
will be William E. Shockett, as
first vice president; Robert
Freedman, second vice president;
Gary Cole, treasurer; and Doc
Baker, secretary. Other members
of the board who will be sworn in
include Martin Engel, Ira Giller.
Zeke George, Paul Kalv, Neisen
Kasdin, Keith Kovens, Leon
Manne, Randy Marks, Neville
Rhone, and Robert Schulte. Tony1
Noboa is immediate past pre-
sident.
Both Baker and Stuart Jacobs
are past governors of Kiwanis
International, the highest office
in the state for the service club.
Former Dade Circuit Court
Judge Irving Cypen will install
his son as president, and Jacobs
will install other officers and di-
rectors.
The Kiwanis Club of Miami
Beach was founded in September,
1939. The major project of the
Club is a loan scholarship to
youth attending college. Fred
Stanton, past lieutenant gov-
ernor, is chairman of the Scholar-
ship Foundation of the Kiwanis
Club of Miami Beach.
Conductor, Opera Singer to
Headline Beth Am Concert
Miamian Marvis Martin,
recital and opera singer who
made her New York debut this
year with the Metropolitan Opera
in Ravel's "L 'Enfant et les
Sortileges," and Miami-born con-
ductor and pianist, Willie
Anthony Waters, who assumed
the music directorship of the
Greater Miami Opera in June,
will highlight "An Afternoon of
Music" at Temple Beth Am.
Doreen Marx, who is chairing
the concert series at the temple
assisted by Cultural Arts Com-
mittee members, Jean Berman,
Joyce Keusch, Elaine Cohen,
Barbara Lipcon, Roni Lefcort,
Suzanne Zientz, Nedra Oren and
Estelle Rothfield, said the event
will take place Sunday. Oct. 9 at
4 pm. in the Beth Am Sanctuary
with an artists' reception im-
mediately following at the South
Miami home of Gwen and Jerome
Berlin.
Martin, who while attending
the University of Miami School
of Musk sang in the Temple Beth
Am Choir under the direction of
Selma Baumgard, made her
Carnegie Hall debut in the Brah-
ma "Requiem" under the baton
of Margaret HiUia with the New
Marvis Martin
performed in Paris in 1960 with
the Radio Orchestre de Paris and
in Chicago at the 1961 Grant
Park Festival.
Also a graduate of the Univer-
sity of Miami, Waters made his
professional debut aa a conductor
in 1979 in the Utah Opera-Utah
Symphony's production of
"Carmen." From 1973 through
1975, he served as assistant con-
ductor and chorus master to the
Memphis Opera Theatre and
from 1975 through 1979, as
musical assistant to the general
director at the Saa Francisco
Dr. Irving Lehrman. chairman
of the Jewish National Fund
Foundation, and Abraham Grun-
hut. president of the JNF,
Greater Miami, have annouced
that Henrietta London, president
of the Temple Emanu-El Forty-
Niners club and a past president
of Hadassah in Miami Beach, will
be honored at a Jewish National
Fund-Temple Emanu-El Forty-
Niners Tribute Luncheon Sun-
day, Oct. 9. at noon, in the Fried-
land Ballroom of Temple Emanu-
El.
Guest speaker will be Dr.
Lehrman, who is also the spirit-
ual leader of Temple Emanu-El.
Serving as luncheon chairperson
is Mrs. Meyer Levinson.
London will be feted for "a life-
time of distinguished and dedi-
cated service to Israel and the
Jewish community," Dr. Lehr
man stated, "who has been in-
volved in multiple synagogue re-
sponsibilities and charitable ac-
tivities for so many years.
"Mrs. London," he continued,
"has distinguished herself as a
true Eshes Chayal and deserves
this tribute, which will link her
name eternally with the soil of Is-
rael."
Dr. Lehrman, recently-return-
ed from Israel where he visited
JNF projects and observed the
organization's daily activities
there, added, "Although we all
know that the JNF is a
miraculous organization, dealing
in miracles, the more one sees of
its accomplishments, the more
one stands in awe of its achieve-
ments."
The JNF is the fundraising
agency of the movement for af-
forestation, reclamation, and de-
velopment of the land in Israel,
Miami-Dade Community
College's District Board of
Trustees voted unanimously
this week to rename the New
World Center Campus in
honor of the late CoL Mitchell
Wolfson, above. Wolfson was
instrumental in acquiring the
original site of the North
Campus.
Attorney to Talk
A talk by an attorney on
"Advice on Your Estate" and
plans for the 1983-64 year will
highlight a meeting scheduled by
the Bay Harbor Chapter of
Hadassah for Monday, Oct. 10,
noon, at the First Nationwide
Bank, Kane Concourse
;**^***rrri*ii*i*girtfTrr n .
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
;Call me, Esther,
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &_
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
Henrietta London
including the construction of
roads and preparation of sites of
new settlements.
The Temple Emanu-El Forty-
Niners, a group for mature
adults, meets regularly for edu-
cational and cultural activities.
London, a Miami Beach resi-
dent since 1938, is a life member
of the Temple Emanu-El Sister-
hood and chairman of its Torah
Fund- She is a life member of
Women's League for Israel, the
Hebrew Academy. Douglas Gar-
dens Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Hadassah,
and the American Friends of He-
brew University.
She currently serves as vice
president of fundraising for the
Miami Beach Region of Hadas-
sah and received a "Woman of
Valor" award from the State of
Israel Bonds Organization.
She and her husband, Irving
have supported the American
Technion Society, the Hadassah
Medical Center in Israel, Wall of
Healing, Pillar of Hope, and
Mount Scopus Reborn.
London is also a member of the
Resident Hotel at the Jewish
Theological Seminary and a past
president of the Hanna Senesch
Chapter of Hadassah.
A musical program for the
luncheon has been planned by
composer, Shmuel Fershko.
Dr. Irving Lehrman
Serving on the luncheon ca|
mittee are Mr. and Mrs. JossJ
A below. Judge Frederick N.
Barad, Mr. and Mrs. Low
Baron, Dr. and Mrs. Ellis U
Barrist, Mrs. Benjamin BelolJ
Mr. and Mrs. Bob Bezark, N
and Mrs. Andre Bialolenki, Mr. I
and Mrs. Sidney Coopermu, 1
Judge and Mrs. Irving CypoJ
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Dix. Floranl
Feldman, Mr. and Mrs. Shmixjl
Fershko, Bess Fink, Mr. and I
Mrs. Irving Firtel, Mr. and Mrs I
Sol Goldstein, Mr and Mrs I
Carol Greenberg, Mr. and Mnl
Leo Hack, Mr. and Mrs. Jail
Harris, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Har-I
rison, and Mrs. Bernard D Katl
Ian.
Also, Dr. and Mrs. Shermul
Kaplan, Mrs. Otilia Keller
Mrs. Grace Kunis. Col. Nath
H. Kutcber, Mrs. Augusta
Lazarus, Meyer Levinson, Iraq
London, Mr. and Mrs. Mo
Luck, Philip Richland and
gusta Mentz. Mr. and Mnl
Samuel Pascoe, Miriam Preai
Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Ml
Schantz, Dr. and Mrs. Richd|
Schwarz, Judge and
Herbert S. Shapiro. Alice Su
man, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar:
Mr. and Mrs. Milton Smith.!
and Mrs. Alfred Stone. Mr.
Mrs. Edward H. Weiner. and St
and Mrs. Leonard Zilbert.
Federation Plans Worker TrainM
The South Dade Branch of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion has announced it will
sponsor a Worker Training
Session Thursday, Oct. 20, 6
p.m., at the Jewish Junior High
School of South Florida.
The session, being conducted
in cooperation with the United
Jewish Appeal's Operation Up-
grade, will be the first ever held
in South Dade. Fran Storper is
chairman of the event, with
Mikki Futernick as South Dade
chairman and Alvin Brown, vice
chairman for campaign.
"The success of the 1984
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund relies on the ef-
forts of a committed cadre of
trained volunteer workers,"
Storper said. "We strongly urge
all those previously involved in
the campaign to bring new
potential workers to this un-l
portanl session. Also, we hopeul
see familiar faces for what pr|
mises to be one of the most inter f
esting and exciting workinjj
training sessions ever asf
sembled."
The evening will emphasis
face-to-face solicitations, as wdl
as other solicitation tecriniq*i|
and tips. A deli dinner will J
served.
Play Scheduled
A preview showing of '*kr||
Up the Sky" by Moss Hartal
be presented by the South Da*I
Friends of Douglas GardeM
Miami Jewish Home |
Hospital for the Aged Thursday j
Oct. 27, 7:30 p.m. A desserti
party will follow. J
Advertising
Salesperson
Wanted
Full-time. Salary/Draw. Call Joan collect or
write:
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
P.O. BOX 012973
MIAMI, FLORIDA 33101
PHONE 305-373-4605
MMunnuii
..--..., r ,,,,,...., ,.....,..',-. ._.....


[Fromberg Accomplishments
Lead City Commission
Accomplishments of Commis-
sioner Malcolm H. Fromberg,
who has taken a strong lead for
Mayor of Miami Beach in the
city wide race to be decided Tues-
day. Nov. 1, have been called "a
tribute to the leadership and
integrity" of Fromberg by
Stanley Arkin and Donald
Lefton, two of his campaign co-
chairmen.
Fromberg has been credited
with the major role in such
projects aa beginning cons-
truction of the new Miami Beach
Marina, selecting the old City
Hall site for the new municipal
police station and justice center
and for restructuring the South
Shore Redevelopment Plan to
encourage responsible zoning
with proper new zoning and in-
novative incentives.
Appointed to the Ad Hoc Task
Force on Police, he implemented
his campaign promise to hire 25
additional police officers.
Fromberg has led the fight to
protect residential property from
commercial intrusion, and
successfully fought for creation
of the Purdy Avenue park.
Fromberg worked actively as a
member of the City of Miami
Beach Parking Committee one
of only two members of the com-
mission to secure necessary
parking facilities for primary
1 corridors and parking areas. He
insisted upon and secured strict
safety requirements and
regulations for ACLFs under the
Minimum Housing Code and
stopped the proliferation of
ACLFs by successfully in-
troducing an absolute limit on
the number of rooms which may
be made into ACLFs through
either conversion or new con-
struction.
He championed the improve-
ment of the Theater of Per-
forming Arts (TOPA) and special
performances for Miami Beach
residents. Under his leadership,
the commission unanimously
approved a complete rebuilding
of TOPA to give the city a world
class performing arts center.
Fromberg supported and en-
couraged all activities which
involved the participation of
young people.
In addition, he played a key
leadership role in the campaign to
secure an expanded Miami Beach
Convention Center which will
serve as a catalyst to rebuild the
city's weak tourism industry.
Campaign kickoff for Malcolm Fromberg for Mayor brings
together key supporters. From left are Donald and Marcy
Lefton, campaign cochairmen; Arlene and Mai Fromberg; and
Eileen and Dr. Paul Swaye. Not pictured are campaign cochair-
men Marilyn and Harry B. Smith.
At dedication ceremonies for expansion of Lehrman Day
School, a top-level conference takes place between, left to right.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of Temple EmanuEl; Congressman
Claude Pepper, an honorary member of the Miami Beach
congregation for more than 40 yean; Lawrence M. Schantx,
vice president of the congregation and chairman of the board of
education; and Malcolm H. Fromberg, secretary of Tempi*
EmanuEl and past president of the Temples prestigious
Family League.
Meeting at the office of Miami Beach civic leader Stanley Arkin
to announce Malcolm H. Fromberg s candidacy ApMBW
featured leaders of all segments of the community. From left
are Arthur Pearlman; Arkin; Fromberg; Ramon Fisch; and
Harry PUssner. Jill Arkin and Stanley Arkin are cochairmen of
theFromberg campaign. a^
Friday, September 30,1983 / The Jewish Floridiari Page 3-B
WE SUPPORT
SHOCKETT
MOST
EXPERIENCED
... by Far!
MOST
ENDORSED
... by Far!
Spell
Leadership
SHOCKETT
WILLIAM E. SHOCKETT
SHOCKETT ENDORSED BY
Steve Cy pen
Larry Aberman
Frank Alter
Oscar Baisman
Dr. Robert Bass
Michael Brumer
Manuel Carvajal
Michael Dribin
Martin Engela
Robert Frehllng
Barton Goldberg
Barry Guriand
Sam Kantor
Noel King
Ira Glller
Harriet Green
Joseph H.AItschul
David Balogh
Arthur Berkey
Murray Candlb
Sandy Dix
Richard Baenman
Goidle Finkelstein
Ruth Fuller
Lefty Greene
Dr. Jerry Hagen
AnaKasdln
Donald M. Klein
Keith Kovens
Leonard Abess
Stanley Arkin
Joan Baron
Phil Brooke
AINaaon
Luis Domlnguez
Junior Bite
David Fleeman
Martin Gelb
Robert Z. Greene
Joe Kantor
Ben R. Kate
Donald Koran
Harvey Kramer
Julian Kurlander
Morris Lapidus
Edward Levlnson
Leon Manns
Madelyn Merritt
Former Mayor
Kenneth Oks
Samuel Rabin
Gerald Rlchman
Mike Rotbart
Edward Shapiro
Murray Sheldon
Marion Silverman
Ronald Krongold
Carole Lansburgh
Dorothy F. Lear
AlanLorber
Wm. Q. Mechanic
Senator
Kenneth Myers
Maureen O'Brien
RuthReglna
Ben Rossnthal
Dan Roth
Hon. Martin Shapiro
Mollye Shockett
Former Mayor
Harold Rosen
Ronald Molko
Felice Schwartz
Harry B. Smith
Jhn my Silvers
FradStanton
Florence Hecht
Barry Sugerman
June Taylor
Mrs. Milton Weiss
Bill Tugsnberg
ram fteniaiwin
. Murry Koreteky
JsneGoodmen
^\ll^ e Wlf
Sidney Copperman
Richard Russ
Charles Glller
Bertha Bossuk
Esther Nachman
Martha Mlshcon
Jason Beritman
Dr. Ronald Shane
Neal Amdur
Gerald K. Schwartz
Egmont Sonderllng
Ron Wayne
Jerome Stem
Hyman Oliner
Dr. Stanley Sutnick
Bernard Toll
Jeffrey Waxman
Paul Wimblah
[ Lynn Wolf son
! BsysWsxIsr
Revs Blatt
Susan Blumln
Sylvia Meyers
Richard Selderman
Edith Jaffa
Joel Gray
JoeeRslJ
Lou Keen
Rebecca Chemoff
Marie Tlshmen
BevAberbach
Carol Green berg
Hap Levy
William Corbln
Solomon Uchter
BlenVenzer
Ted Alison
Hon. Irving Cypsn
Sem Adler
Norman Bremen
GaryGerson
Dr. Sherman Kaplan
GROUP 3 CITYWIDE VOTE NOV. 1
SHOCKETT




*

Page4B The Jewish FTorkfcaii Friday. September 30. 1983
Historic Milestone
Brandeis' 35th Year
Continued from Page IB
modela the Harvards, the Prince-
tons, the Stanfords and others of
the traditional elite. "That was a
conscious decision by the eight
founders," explained Sachar
"They wanted the best students,
the most distinguished faculty,
and the most adequate facilities.
They were not about to accept
anything less." Brandeis' first
entering class in 1948 the same
year Israel was founded con-
sisted of 107 intrepid young men
and women and 13 equally ad-
venturous faculty. Today the
nearly 3,500 undergraduate and
graduate students scholarly
legatees of the 1948 pioneers
freely choose an energetic intel-
lectual atmosphere, a distin-
guished and internationally
known faculty, and an institution
that has, from its inception,
maintained the highest academic
standards.
Brandeis' commitment to ex-
cellence was swiftly recognized
by Phi Beta Kappa, the national
honor society, which granted rec-
ognition to Brandeis just 13
years after the University was
founded the youngest institu-
tion so honored in over 100 years.
Recently, Brandeis was one of
only 12 universities in America
ranked among the top 10 in the
country in three or more of six
undergraduate disciplines sur-
veyed.
SIMILARLY, several of Bran-
deis' graduate departments have
been rated among' the nation's
best, and the most recent survey
of professional school deans
Fershko Named Musical Director of
Concert Honoring Sidor Belarsky
Composer Shmuel Fershko, Is-
raeli conductor, concert pianist,
and musical director at Temple
Emanu-El here, has been named
to direct a memorial concert
being planned as a tribute to the
memory of the Jewish folk singer,
Sidor Belarsky.
Irving Gordon, southern re-
gional director of the campaign of
the Israel Histadrut Councils of
South Florida, the organization
sponsoring the tribute, also an-
nounced that the formation of an
area committee to arrange the
event is currently underway.
Fershko recently returned from
Israel where he met with the di-
rectors of the Histadrut Hapoel
Cultural and Education depart-
ments, which will award gifts
from a Sidor Belarsky Perpetual
Scholarship Fund for Young
Artists in Israel to aspiring stu-
dents in the musical arts.
Belarsky, known internation-
ally as a cantor and folk singer,
recorded 21 record albums. His
music "warmed homes and con-
cert halls with a blend of robust-
ness and delicacy that are a
perfect expression of the tender
and heroic spirit that is represen-
Liquor Industry
Bonds Event Set
Members of the national and
local liquor, wine, and spirits
industry will gather at a recep-
tion in support of the State of
Israel Bonds Organization and to
honor Seymour L. Leikind, pre-
sident. General Wine and Spirits
Company Tuesday at the Bacardi
Building, Miami.
William A. Walker, president
of Bacardi Imports Inc. and
chairman of a national Israel
Bonds Tribute Dinner to be held
for Leikind at the Waldorf
Astoria Hotel in October, wil
host the event.
Co-host of the local reception is
Harvey R. Chaplin, president of
Southern Wine and Spirits Inc.
and national tribute cochairman.
Walker and Chaplin said that
many distributors, suppliers, and
members of the liquor, wine, and
spirits industry in South Florida
will be attending the reception.
Pioneer Lunch Set
An annual fall luncheon and
card party sponsored by the
Golda Meir Chapter of Pioneer
Women-Na'amat has been sched-
uled for Thursday, Oct. 6 at noon
in the auditorium of the Lincoln
Road Building.
According to Katherine
Lippman, president of the group,
all proceeds will benefit the child
rescue program of Pioneai
Women.
Shmuel Fershko
tative of the Jewish people," ac-
cording to Fershko.
"From folk song to cantorial,
in Yiddish and Hebrew, Sidor
Belarsky brought the discipline
of an opera singer and the soul of
a Hassid to each of his per-
formances," he added. "It is to
his memory that we dedicate this
living tribute."
ranked its Florence Heller Grad-
uate School for Advanced
Studies in Social Welfare fourth
in the country among schools of
social work.
The university's mutli-million
dollar Rosenstiel Basic Medical
Sciences Research Center, built
in 1973. enhanced Brandeis'
growing reputation in the physi-
cal sciences and attracted leading
researchers to probe areas in the
bio-medical field
The four schools in the under-
graduate college at Brandeis
Science, Social Science, Humani-
ties and Creative Arts offer
about 900 courses in 32 fields of
concentration and several spe-
cialized programs. Brandeis un-
dergraduates men and women
of diverse ethnic, religious and
racial backgrounds come from
virtually every state in the union
and over 40 foreign countries.
They are able to participate in re-
search normally offered only in
graduate programs at other
leading colleges and universities.
In addition, undergraduates
receive part of their training from
senior faculty members. From
the beginning, Brandeis felt that
its academic "stars" which
have included such giants as his-
torian Henry Steele Commager.
composer Leonard Bernstein,
psychologist Abraham Maslow,
and Judaic scholar Nahum Glat-
zer should enrich the under-
graduate experience.
AT A TIME when many col-
leges and universities have aban-
doned or cut back their commit-
ment to liberal arts in favor of
technical training, Brandeis has
actually strengthened its tradi-
tional commitment to the liberal
arts. "As our society becomes
more complicated and increas-
ingly technologically oriented,"
sakl one Brandeis administrator,
"the ability to learn how to learn
and apply knowledge both
hallmarks of a liberal arts
training will become even
more valuable in the future.
For the overwhelming majority
of the nearly 17,000 men and
women who are Brandeis alumni,
such a philosophy has equipped
them for leadership positions in
business, medicine, the law, the
arts, and nearly every other pro-
fessional endeavor.
The Latin Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home and figJ
/- *LM A twnrl ,,it'll ervmenrnn "Fiyonina in tUa CilA llr_..i. .^"
for the Aged will sponsor an "Evening in the Old Wctr"<(9
with proceeds going to the Home, Sunday, 6p.m., at the Fiffj
de los Matz. Shown above are co-chairpersons of the
Gladys and Ruben Matz and Anita Stone, and At
President Raquel Wax.
Ciment Out of Mayor's
Race; ADL in Strong Stani
Miami Beach Mayor Norman
Ciment, under increasing attack
for widely publicized statements
about setting up roadblocks to
keep Mariel refugees out of
Miami Beach, including a con-
demnation from the Florida Re-
gional Office of the Anti- Defama-
tion League of B'nai B'rith, an-
nounced that he will not seek re-
election on Nov. 1.
The backlash against Ciment
reached a height Monday when
the ADL declared that it "con-
demns" recent statements made
by the Mayor in which he called
for restrictions against Mariel
refugees to the U.S. who seek to
enter Miami Beach.
The ADL statement denounc-
ed Ciment's comments as having
"exacerbated ethnic divisiveness
in Dade County" and "served to
inject ethnic prejudice into the
political arena." It urged Ciment
to "cease actions which are de-
structive of intergroup harmony
in our community.''
In Ciment's letter of withdraw-
al, he said, "The public media has
chosen to distract the peoples
attention" from the issues,
"making it impossible for the
citizenry of our city to make an
educated decision."
were in response to U.S. _,,
Judge Marvin Shoob's ruW,
Atlanta calling for the rek*,]
the Cuban refugees still ioca
ated in federal detension on)
basis that their entry in^i
U.S. was illegal and that aim.
them had dangerous crim3|
mental health records.
On the basis that he H:
that most of the released u,
would head south for Dade Co^H"'
ty and Miami Beach, May^R>n
ment called for 24-hour rflv.
blocks to access points on L
Beach to keep the refugees out]
Although his letter, ac
to published reports, mdei^
mention of his controversialpl^H?fl
Ciment said he had not ioU
to downgrade any Mariel i_
or Hispanic immigrant. Hei
that his own parents were i
grants to this country. t|
"If for any reason I orfent^H a
anybody because of the nuskj^Bet
pretation of my remarks, >hfl \ I
were taken out of context ^Bu'
misquoted, it is my fen ent h^Hst
that those people under*
that at no time did I intendi
form of slur on any
group." fa |
All mayoral candidates b^B I
until a Friday evening, Septjff
deadline to make their candidr]
ies official.
Ciment's original statements
Conservative Leaders to Meet in St. Peters
Clergy and lay leaders of 17
Conservative congregations lo-
cated in the Central Conference
of the United Synagogue of
America's Southestern Region
will meet Sunday, Oct. 9 at Con-
gregation B'nai Israel in St. Pe-
tersburg. The group will discuss
ways of building leadership for
Local congregations and of
strengthening the Conservative
movement.
Principal speakers will ind
Rabbi Charles Simon, execu
director of the Federation of J
ish Men's Clubs: Harvey
Lavigne. vice president of
Federation and preside!)
deputy for the Florida Region^
its international orgar
and Miamian Al Solo, pn
of the Florida Region.
IF YOU HAVE TO
CHANGE PLANES IN EUROPE
ON TH E WAY TO ISRAEL,
CHANGE AIRLINES.
t Fly,^ AL-Only El Al has a daily (except Fridays) non-stop 747 flight from New York to
Israel. Or, fly the Direct Miami Connection to Israel.
Dine on EL AL-You'll enjoy gourmet kosher meals, including our famous bagels and lox
breakfast.
Relax with EL AL-EL AL is the Airline of Israel, so we can help with all your travel plans.
Call your travel agent or EL AL toll-free for more information or reservations:
1-800-223-6700.
The Airline of Israel


Friday, September 30,198a/ The Jewish Floridian Page 6-B
Fashions to Highlight Bonds Hadassah Luncheon
Jv^gp
A fashion show will be the
highlight of an annual Hadassah
Bond with Israel Pre-vue Lunch-
eon on Thursday, 11:30 a.m., at
Temple Emanu-El, Miami Beach.
The luncheon is traditionally held
in advance of a Hadassah Israel
Bonds event each November.
Sponsored by the State of Is-
rael Bonds Organization, the
gathering will host members of
the Miami Beach Region of Had-
assah. The event is open to
women who pledge a minimum of
$1,000 to the Israel Bonds cam-
paign, according to Betty Kes-
tenbaum, president of the Had-
assah Region.
The luncheon is being held so
that plans can be finalized for the
city-wide Hadassah Israel Bonds
Tribute Luncheon in honor of
Mollie Weinberg scheduled for
Nov. 3 at the Konover Hotel.
The fashion show has been
conceived by Debbie Wernick,
field representative for the Bonds
Organization and former presi-
Macy'8 Opening to Host Calvin Klein
\kine over some of the fashions which will appear in the
assah Bond with Israel Pre-vue Luncheon and Fashion
|k are from left, Louella Shapiro, Corrine Moskowitz,
orietor of Saavy Woman, which is supplying the fashions;
\y Levin, and Niety Gerson.
Designer Calvin Klein will
present a showing of his latest
collection Tuesday evening when
Macy's celebrates the opening of
their new store in North Miami's
Aventura Mall. Proceeds from
the evening will benefit the
Dean's Fund at the University of
Miami School of Medicine, used
to provide financial aid for gifted
students, to purchase medical
equipment, and to enhance
research facilities.
Among honored guests will be
University President Edward T.
Foote II, James W. McLamore,
chairman of the board of trustees.
and Dr. Bernard J. Fogel, vice
president for medical affairs and
dean of the School of Medicine.
Ciment to Speak
Miami Beach Mayor Norman
Ciment will be the guest speaker
at the regular monthly meeting of
the Miami Beach Zionist District
Monday, Oct. 17, 1 p.m., at the
American Savings and Loan As-
sociation Auditorium, Lincoln
and Alton Roads.
The mayor will discuss
problems confronting Miami
Beach.
dent of the Miami Beach Region
of Hadassah. It is entitled, "A
Hadassah Woman in Israel" and,
through fashion and prose, traces
a trip to Israel.
Local Hadassah women will
serve as models. Coordinator is
Toby Levin, and commentators
are Louella Shapiro and Henny
Nortman. Beauty consultant is
Mary Kay Cosmetics; flowers are
courtesy of Mollie Weinberg; hair
stylist is Annetta International;
and invitations are courtesy of El
Al Israel Airlines.
Fashions to be featured are
from the Saavy Woman, and
music will be courtesy of Ben Z.
Grenald and Irving Laibson.
Luncheon chairman is Anne Yar-
row, and hostesses are Dora Y.
Abrahams, Florence Barth, Ger-
trude Bayles, Sue Berkowitz,
Helen Cohen, Natalie Deitsch,
Yaffa Dermer, Barbara Eisen-
berg, Fremette Fox, Jean Harri-
son, and Augusta Hoffman.
Also serving as hostesses are
Laura LaTuchie, Toby Levin,
Henrietta London, Sadie Miller,
Esther Molasky, Gus Mentz-
Richland, Louella Shapiro, Lil-
lian Simonhoff, Mollie Weinberg,
Anne Yarrow, and Faye Yarrow.
r. Sol Landau to
tak Before Congress
)r Sol Landau, head of the
ni-based Mid-Life Services
jindation. has accepted an
|itation to speak in Washing-
as part of the Dialogues on
^erica's Future sponsored by
U.S. Congress' Joint Com-
Congressional Clearing-
seon the Future Oct. 19.
le announced that he will host
eption prior to the event for
ridians Oct. 18, 6 to 8 p.m., at
Florida House in Washing-
I. His message to Congress will
j on "How Our Society Can
I with the Future."
\adassah Opener Set
pa opening meeting of the
on of the Queen Esther
Bpter of Hadassah will feature
lk by Natalie Lyon, of Miami
assah, speaking on "The
er of a Member." The event
l been set for Monday, Oct. 10
I noon in the auditorium of
House, North Miami
pch
program of piano and song
also be featured, with Karen
of the Hallandale Cultural
|s Center.
pf J. Holtz has been
ed assistant vice presi-
R of commercial loans at
Vital Bank, according to
on Portnoy, executive vice
lident. In the position,
p* will be responsible for
ewing commercial loan ap-
Wions received through
w branch offices. A
iuate of George Wash-
ton University, Holtz is a
I president and director of
mi Bank, N.A., a Capital
affiliate i* Washington,.
Introducing
the only
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The freshest ideas are baking at Pillsbury-
t 1983 The Pillsbury Company
STORE COUPON NO EXPIRATION DATE
SAVE25C
25
on Pillsbury Frosting Supreme
(any flavor)
I
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cated Not valid it transferred or reproduced Any
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RETAILER We win reimburse you or your agent
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deemed By a consumer at the time ol purchase ol
the Brand specified and the lace value ol the cou-
pon is deducted from the retail selling price Pre
sentahon lor payment represents compliance with
these terms. The consumer must pay sales tax
Invoices proving purchase ol Brand specified must
Be shown upon request Coupons nol properly re-
deemed wif be void and held Mail to PiHsbury
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tion value too ol te Vox) where taxed or re-
stricted by law LIMIT ONE COUPON PER ITEM
PURCHASED Reproduction ol coupon prohib.led
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1
I
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J




Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 30, 1983 .
Histadrut to Honor Beach Announces Fall
Workmen's Circle Branch BBS Line-Up
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard,
spiritual leader of Temple Beth
Am, has announced that he will
lead a course for five Wednesday
evenings at 8 p.m. beginning Oct.
8. on "A Guide to Jewish Life
Cycle Events," as part of Tempto
Beth Am s fall schedule of its
Adult Education Institute.
His course will feature compa-
rative material from other
religions, and its main text will
be "Gates of Mitzvah," which is
Members of Workmen's Circle |
Branch 692-28 of Miami Beach
will be the honorees at an annual
Israel Histadrut Chai Luncheon
Sunday. Oct. 16 at noon, at the
Konover Hotel.
The announcement was made
by Irving Gordon, executive di-
rector of the Histadrut campaign.
Gordon stated that the officers
and members of the Branch are
being honored for "many years of
devotion and dedication to Israel
and the cause of Histadrut and
for the exemplary manner in
which thev have adhered to the
principals and ideals of the
Arbeter Ring, always being the
first to come to the aid of fellow
Jews in need."
Gordon also announced that
Shelomo Ben-Israel, correspond-
ent and political news comments
ter on WEVD-radk) in New York,
will be featured speaker.
Ben-Israel, former member of
the editorial staff of the Jewish
Daily Forward, where he served
as foreign news editor and United
Nations correspondent, was the
first recipient of the Jewish Her-
itage Award, presented by the
Jewish and Ethnic Studies Pro-
gram at Queens College. New
York, in recognition of service to
Shelomo Ben-Israel
journalism. Yiddish literature,
and culture.
Miami Beach Workmen's
Circle Branch 692-28 supports
the Greater Miami Combined
Jewish Appeal Campaign. Israel
Histadrut. Jewish Labor Com-
mittee. ORT, YIVO and I. L.
Peretz Yiddish schools through-
out the United States and Israel.
Cantor Moshe Friedler will
conclude the program with a con-
cert in honor of Israel and Israel
Histadrut on its 64th birthday.
Beach Groups, Leaders Endorse Bond
Issue Authorizing TOPA Rebuilding
The Civic League of Miami
Beach and the Palm, Hibiscus,
and Star Island Association have
joined the Miami Beach Chamber
of Commerce in giving endorse-
ment of the Miami Beach bond
issue authorizing the rebuilding
of the Theater of the Performing
Arts. The ballot question, auth-
orizing $22 million in general
obligation bonds, will appear as
Question No. 1 on the Nov. 1
ballot.
A citizens' political group
known as the Raise the Roof
Committee has been organized to
campaign for passage of the bond
issue. It is headed by Judy
Drucker, the Beach impresario
who has brought many or-
chestras, ballet companies, and
opera stars to TOPA.
Ruth Neinken, president of the
association of homeowners of the
three Mac Arthur Causeway
islands, announced the
unanimous vote taken at a
general meeting held at the Rod
and Reel Group following a
presentation by Drucker, who is
cultural series director of Temple
Beth Sholom and the JND
Foundation.
Billie Kern, president of the
Civic League of Miami Beach,
announced that the organization
she heads also had endorsed the
project by a unanimous vote at a
general meeting. Jan Pfeiffer.
Jewish lady to share 2-
bedroom, 2-bath apar-
tment in North Miami
Beach. Very reasonable
arrangement. Call 93S-1278.
Chamber president, said her
organization's board of governors
had gone on a record in favor of
the bonds, also by unanimous
vote.
Among the co-chairmen and
executive committee members on
the Raise the Roof Committee are
Robert Herman of the Opera
Guild of Greater Miami; John
Bitter and Letty Greene of the
Community Concert Association:
and Zev Bufman. who produces
the dramas and musicals which
appear at TOPA.
Others include Father James
Murphy, Rabbis Leon Kronish
and Irving Lehrman. Rev. Garth
Thompson, Seacoast Towers
Apartments owner Stephen
Muss, State Rep. Barry Kutun of
Miami Beach, Dan Paul, Ira
Giller, Billie Kern, Gary Gerson,
Ronald Molko. Stanley Arkin,
Sidney Cooperman, Marcy
Lefton, Joel Gray, I. Stanley
Levine and Nancy Kanter.
"This fund should produce
$500,000 a year or more so that
all of our senior citizens can enjoy
the internationally-renowned
artists who will come to our new
Theater," Drucker said. She said
leaders of virtually every senior
citizen group have pledged to join
the campaign for the bond issue.
Rep. Kutun noted that the cost
to the owner of a home assessed
at $100,000 with the usual
$25,000 homestead exemption
would be leas than $63 a year,
"thus assuring that those orches-
tras, ballet companies and artists
who refuse to return to Miami
Beach will come once again."

__
,
RARE OPPORTUNITY
TO REASONABLY RENT OR BUY
Location on Miami Beach
Ideal For Kosher Restaurant
and Catering Operation
Partially Equipped
Formerly Occupied by Popular
Kosher Restaurant
Call: Mr. Morris
538-1357
10 a.m.-4 p.m.


published by the Central Confer-
ence of American Rabbis and to
which Rabbi Baumgard is a
contributor. "Liveral Judaism in
the Home" by Rabbi Morrison
Bial will also be used.
"Great Romances in the
Bible,'" a course to be taught by
Rabbi Norman Lipson. will begin
Nov. 8, running for five Tuesday
evenings. He will discuss Samson
and Delilah, David and Math
Sheba. Esther and King
Ahasuerus, Ahab and Jezebel,
and the Song of Songs. The Bible
will be used as text.
Professor Robert Sandier will
lead a course on "The Wisdom of
the Sages Through the Ages.'
beginning Oct. 3 and running
Mondays at 7:30 p.m. He will use
material from the Bible, Talmud.
Midrash. and Apocrypha.
Associate rabbi of Beth Am.
James Simon, will present the
course. "An Introduction to
Judaism" Wednesday evenings
at 7 p.m. Required books are
"Loving What is Close," by
Rabbi Baumgard, "Choosing
Judaism" by Lydia Kukoff. and
"Liberal Judaism in the Home."
The course is open to prospective
converts to Judaism as part of
the required 12-week course in
Jewish concepts, rituals, and
history they must take.
Lenore Kipper will lead two
courses in Hebrew beginning Oct
5, beginners class at 7:30 p.m.
and intermediate Hebrew at 8:30
p.m.
Dade Youth Program
To be Highlighted
Lottie Morton, Miami philan-
thropist, and other volunteers in
the Listen to Children program
will meet at Morton's North Bay
Road home Oct. 11 at 2 p.m. for
an educational-informational
forum on the program.
The afternoon tea will provide
insight into the children's
program, sponsored by the
Mental Health Association, Dade
Partners, and the Dade County
School System, which works with
youth in the school system.
J
Miami Beach Mayor Norman Ciment, a vice president oli
Miami Beach Chapter and a member of the District St,
Committee of American Red Magen David for Israel, .
met with District Vice President and Miami Beach Pre*
Howard Kaufman and Director Bob Schwartz to coon..
plans for a drive to build a new national blood center in /j,
Local ARMDI chapters will assist the national organuatin
raising funds for the new center, to be built near TelAvivi
the auspices of Magen David Adorn, Israel's Red Cross i
'Cinderella Complex' to Highlight|
Talks at Erev Women's Wednesdi
The "Cinderella Complex."
woman's fear of independence,
will be the theme of this year's
Erev Women's Wednesday, an
annual community education
event sponsored by the Business
and Professional Women of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Women's Division, sched-
uled for Tuesday. Oct. 11.
The evening's program, which
will deal with fear of success and
self-defeating behavior, will begin
at 7:30 p.m. Susan Maker, dean
of students at Broward Commu-
nity College, will discuss wom-
en's conflicts today "wanting
to be out on their own and yet at
the same time wanting to be
taken care of."
Participants will also break
into small focus groups for
sessions on "de-brainwashing"
ways in which to develop new
attitudes.
Malu-r holds three master's
degrees, an MBA from Florida
International University and a
master's specialist in counselor
education and a master's in coun-
seling from the University of
Florida. Her undergraduate
degree, from the University of
Florida, is in psychology.
Dean of students at Broward
Community College for the last
two years. Maker feels the
greatest fear of success women
have is their new perception of
themselves. "Like Cinderella,
we're waiting to be taken care of.
saved." she stated.
Susan Matter
Erev Women s V\ednesdif|
be held at the Greater M
Jewish Federation building.
Technion Opener!
Singer and guitarist, Hj
Shara will highlight the op
meeting of the season d[
Miami Beach Chapter. Woi
Division, of the An
Technion Society Thursday,!
13.
The event, which inclu
luncheon, has been schedolaj
take place at the ShelborneJ
at noon, according to Jean'
president of the chapter.
IEWKH
IWlOfW.
$W The Jewish National Fund &
The Forty-Niners of
Temple Emanu-El
In Honor Of
Distinguished Guest Speaker
1
Mre. Irving (Henrietta) London Rabbi Irving Lehrmarj
Sunday, October 9,1963 12:00
The Friedland Ballroom
1701 Washington Avenue
For Reservations:
Temple Emanu-El Office
538-2603
j^hN.u-rjj
' b^L^b^b^b^L^HbV


Friday, September 30,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
vmberg Continues
Leadership Roles in
Major Organizations
Malcolm H. Fromberg, front-
Ininning candidate for mayor of
iMiami Beach, has not only con-
tinued his leadership activities in
.national and local organizations
Iduring his two years on the
iBeach city commission, but has
laccelerated his participation.
Harry B. Smith, past president
[of the Greater Miami Jewish
I Federation and a co-chairman of
iFromberg's mayoral campaign,
I noted that Fromberg has ad-
vanced to the position of Senior
I International Vice President of
I B'nai B'rith, the highest position
Iin the Jewish fraternal organiza-
tion ever attained by a Floridian.
Fromberg also has been elected
|to membership in the Young
I Presidents Cub of Mount Sinai
I Medical Center, named to the
Iboard of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, and been
lelected an officer and director of
Temple Enanu-El. Fromberg is
Ipast president of the Temple
lEmanu-El Family League and
ontinues as an officer of that
oup.
A member of the American
Zionist Federation, Fromberg
has been honored by the Anti-
efamation League of B'nai
frith for service to the commu-
nity, and has served as an ADL
Commissioner.
Listed in Who's Who in World
Jewry. Fromberg is senior
artner in the law firm of From-
erg. Fromberg, Roth, Gross,
"ohen. Shore and Berke, P.A.,
vith offices in Dade and Broward
ounties. He is licensed to prac-
tice law before the United States
Supreme Court.
Malcolm H. Fromberg
Past president of the Miam
Beach Lodge of B'nai B'rith
Fromberg also has served as|
president of District 5 of B'na
B'rith, embracing the entire}
South, Maryland and Washing
ton, D.C. He then was elected inj
ternational vice president, anc
served in that post for two years
before being elected senior inter
national vice president.
A graduate of Northwestern!
University with honors in busi
ness administration, majoring in
accounting, Fromberg earned his
Juris Doctor degree from the
highly-rated University of
Michigan School of Law. He has
served as international chairman
of the B'nai B'rith legacy devel-
opment and deferred giving pro
gram.
Community Leaders
Endorse Fromberg
for Beach Mayor
More than 700 of Miami
Beach's foremost business, civic
nd religious leaders this week
Announced their formal endorse-
ents of the campaign by Mal-
olm H. Fromberg for Mayor.
! Fromberg supporters include
^is ('"chairmen Marilyn and
iarry Smith, Jill and Stanley
Irkin and Marcy and Donald
eft on Smith is past president of
' Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation; Ark in is a member of the
Jniversity of Miami Board of
rrustees; Lefton is past presi-
dent of the American Friends of
lebrew University for Greater
liami.
Others who have endorsed
omberg. senior international
Ice president of B'nai B'rith, in
"de Harriet Green, national
c* president of Pioneer Women-
?a'amat; former Dade School
chairman Phylias Miller;
Ivton S. Goldberg, past presi-
>t of the Miami Beach Cham
of Commerce and the Civic
oe of Miami Beach; and Dr.
Mus Henchman, past president
*f the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
iebrew Academy.
More Fromberg supporters in-
fctode Ted Arison, Haim Weiner,
Golden, Leo Hack, Leon
Janne, past president of the
tomi Beach Chamber of Com-
nerce; Mary Rose and Dr. Sher-
Mn Kaplan; Neisen Kasdin;
jerald K. Schwartz, president of
JJ Jewish Community Center of
jiami Beach and vice president
f Temple Israel; and Gerald
Schwartz, past president of the
onist Council of South Florida.
Also joining the Fromberg
campaign team are Burton
Young, past president of the
Florida Bar; Congressmen Bill
Lehman and Larry Smith; former
Dade State Attorney Richard
Gerstem; Seymour Friend; Drs.
Joe and Joan Harris; and Russell
Galbut, president of the Miami
Beach Taxpayers Association.
Other Fromberg committee
leaders include Joseph Nevel,
president of the Hebrew Free
Loan Association of Greater
Miami; David Nevel, past presi-
dent of the Miami Beach Tax-
payers Association; former Dade
Circuit Judge Irving Cypen;
Martin Taplin; Sidney Cooper-
man, president of Temple
Emanu-El; Ana and Oscar Sklar;
Normari Giller, past president of
the Concerned Citizens; Norman
Frank;' Jerrold Goodman,
Founder of Bar-Han University,
Haifa University and the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem.
Fromberg also gained the nod
of Pearl and Ted Kipnis; Steve
and Debbie Schwartsberg; Carol
Greenberg, pas* president of
Temple Emann-EI; Marvin
Green; Sam Adler, former cam-
paign chairman for Federation;
Harold Segal, past president of
the Miami Beach Board of
Realtors; Don Aranow; George
Talianoff, Norman Broad;
Burnett Roth; Milton Gaynor,
past president of Temple Beth
Sholom; Shepard Broad, past
president of Temple Beth
Sholom; Sidney Poland; and
Robert Siegel, past chairman of
Israel Bonds for South Florida.
W.M.*tf.
EXPERIENCED
TRUSTED
RESPONSIBLE
ALEX DAOUD
KEEP THE VOICE
OF THE PEOPLE
Board Chairman, Past
President, American Federation
of Senior Citizens, Miami Beach
Chapter and Club 7
Former Vice Mayor, City of
Miami Beach
Wills and Bequests
Counsel, Miami Beach Region
of Hadassah
Led Enactment of Miami
Beach Equal Rights Amendment
Led Fight for People's Right
to Vote on all Major Issues
Legal Counsel to Dade
County Council of Senior Citizens
1980 Winner of the General
Chappie James Americanism
Award from Miami Beach
Jaycees
Past President Miami Beach
Striders
Active Member Masons,
Elks, Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce, American Zionist
Federation, Knights of Pythias
Native of Miami Beach;
Miami Beach High School
Former Attorney for Hispanic
Political Organization of America
Advisory Committee Member,
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged's Channeling Project
Long time Legal Counsel for
Tenants Association of Florida
Championed Increase in
Police Protection
Active Speaker for Pioneer
Women/Na'amat
Barry University Board of
Governors
Former Volunteer Attorney,
Legal Services of Dade County,
Miami Beach Branch
Associate Professor, Medical
Jurisprudence, St. George's
University School of Medicine
Founder of Miami Beach
Service Club which raised
Thousands of Dollars for Police
Chief Pete Corso Memorial Fund
and Tenants Association.
Founder Shep Davis Memorial
Scholarship at Haifa University in
Israel.
HeTowers AboveThe Field!
ALEX DAOUD
pd pel sd, Doud Cfi*>an f und Eviyn Deouil Rontrwi rrssfura'


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. September SO, 1983
' v1.1 .-------.'!VV-----!? -' ''-------------------------!
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Friday, September 30,1983/The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 30,1983
* v
Members of the local and national vending machine industry
gathered at a reception on behalf of the State of Israel Bonds
Organization to honor James T. McGuire, president and chief
executive officer of the Canteen Corporation, for ongoing
support of the Jewish state. The local meeting was hosted by
Van Myers, president and chief executive officer, Wometco
Enterprises. From left are Gary R Gerson, general campaign
chairman of the Greater Miami State of Israel Bonds
Organization, McGuire, Myers, and George Flesch, a former
member of the Israeli Knesset, who was guest speaker.
Community Corner
Prof. Julian Wrinkle, recently-returned from serving as
consultant to a U.S. Information Agency mission in the
Dominican Republic, has been named acting associate dean of
the Graduate School of International Studies at the University
of Miami. He also served as associate director for the Center for
Advanced International Studies.
Auditions for a 16-week internship in acting and technical
production sponsored by the National Foundation for
Advancement in the Arts in conjunction with the South Florida
Theatre Company's upcoming "Shakespeare Festival at Viz-
caya will be held Oct. 1 and 2 at Barry University Auditorium.
Applicants must be 18-25 years of age.
Lvnn Nachwalter, 16. a iunior at Palmetto Hurh School and a
Kendall area resident, has been chosen to be a Democratic
congressional page for U.S. Congressman Dante Fasceil in
Washington. Nachwalter is the daughter of Miami attorney,
Michael and Irene Nachwalter.
Private First Class Michael D. Silberhorn, son of Ted L. and
Marrianne B. Silberhorn of Miami, has arrived for duty at Fort
Benning, Ga. Silberhorn is a construction surveyor with the
U.S. Army Infantry Center.
The Haven Center, a non-profit residential rehabilitation
facility for the mentally handicapped, has scheduled its first
annual Golf Tournament for Oct. 26 at the Biltmore Course.
Proceeds will help fund two new residential homes currently
under construction.
Mrs. Frank Borman, Richard G. Capen, Jr., and Informed
Families of Dade County will host a Kick Off Luncheon for
"Epidemic: South Florida Fights Drugs," a media campaign
sponsored by the Junior League of Miami, Channel 4, the Miami
Herald, and Informed Families, Tuesday, Oct. 11,11:30 a.m., at
the Omni Hotel. Dr. Donald Ian Macdonald, president of the
Florida Pediatric Society, will keynote.
A Coconut Grove Jaycees and Jaycee Women fundraiser last
month raised $6,000 for the Diabetes Research Institute at the
University of Miami School of Medicine, according to Institute
Executive Director Myron BarezJn. Over 700 people attended
the event.
The Miami Children's Hospital Foundation Community
Council, the newly-named women's group supporting a $9.8
million fundraiaing effort for an expanded Children's Hospital,
met recently to discuss plans for their second year activities,
according to Linda Altaian, chairman.
SURROGATE MOTHERS-
Jewish couples uneble to hsve children willing to pay a
fee and expenses to single woman to carry their child.
Conception to be by artificial insemination. Contact
Alan S. Kessler, Esq., 2301 Collins Ave., M-8, Miami
Beach, FL 33139 (305) 538-4421. All inquiries confiden-
tial.
Oasis Motel
Low monthly rants, all utilities included, pool.
Walking distance to Orthodox Temple. Please
call manager at:
865-9875
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue Miami, Florida
- *."


tpsuofihe WeeklyTorafiPortioh
. and God divided the
(Gen. 1.3-4).
God said: 'Let there be light' .
i the darhness"
BERESHIT
[IT God created the world in six days. On the first
sted the light and called it "day"; the darkness He
jht". On the second day He created the expanse of the
On the third day the waters were assembled into
nd dry land was seen. This was called "earth". Next,
flourished. On the fourth day the luminaries were
jth- sky- On the fifth day, fish, reptiles, and fowl were
the sixth day, the beasts, animals, and man were
)n the seventh day, God rested from all His labors.
I he blessed the seventh day and sanctified it. Man was
me; afterward, God took a rib from Adam's side and
a wife for him; Adam called her Eve, meaning "the
jf all living things." At first Adam and Eve lived
the Garden of Eden; but they ate the fruit of the
tree of knowledge and were driven out of Paradise,
of man multiplied and progressed. However, their
evil and God decided to erase all men from the face of
\. Only Noah found favor in the eyes of God.
untmg of the Weekly Pertion of the Law It extracted and based
I Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
|S, published by ShangoM. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
I York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang Is president of the society dls-
i volume.)
MCE UNDER
l/IOUS NAME LAW
IS HEREBY
st the undersigned,
engage In bualneaa
flcUUoua name
; 631 71 Street Miami
Intends to register
I with the Clerk of the
urt of Dade County,
JDWCORP.
September 30;
)ctober7. 14.21.1983
[CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
3UNTY,FLORIDA
IATE DIVISION
. Number S3 7S4
|8TATE OF
HARKS
JOT1CEOF
INISTRATTON
(PERSONS HAVING
OR DEMANDS
THE ABOVE ES-
ALL OTHER
INTERESTED IN
sTE:
IE HEREBY NOTI-
st the administration
state of PAUL A.
deceased. File
7888, la pending In
nit Court for Dade
Florida, Probate Dlvi
Address of which la 78
eler Street, Miami,
he personal repre
of the estate la
RARES. whoae ad-
D2S Mar Street, Coral
srlda. The name and
the personal repre
attorney are set
Dm having claims or
ralnat the eatate are
WITHIN THREE
FROM THE DATE
FIRST PUBLICA
[THIS NOTICE, to file
clerk of the above
vrltten statement oi
l or demand they may
claim must be In
must Indicate the
he claim, the name
> of the creditor or
or attorney, and the
limed. If the claim la
the data when It
ne due shall be
I the claim la conUn
unliquidated, the
he uncertainty shall
If the claim se
security shall be da-
Hie claimant, shall
tlctent copies of the
i clerk to enable the
all one copy to each
epresentaUve
na Interested In the
[whom a copy of this
Administration has
are required.
!THREE MONTHS
DATE Of THE
NATION OF
ICE. to file any ob-
ey may have (hat
the validity of the
wUl, the quail
the personal rep-
or the venue or
lofthecourt i
IMS, DEMANDS,
CCTIONI NOT SO
BE FOREVER
the first publication
(lea of Admlrtstr*
nberSO, 1S6S
iRaraa
I Representative
I the Estate of
|ULA. RARES
Deceased
CY FOR PERSONAL
CNTATTVE
'(er. Eaq.
econd Avenue
Drlda S3130
>: 578-6300
September SO,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in bualneaa
under the fictitious name
Fedco Drugs Intends to regis-
ter said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Federal Discount
Centers Company
13320 September 30:
October 7,14. 21.1983
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 83 34031
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
JAMES MA REE.
PeUUoner-husband,
and
ANGELA F. MAREE.
Respondent-wife,
TO: ANGELA F. MAREE
208-D. Warren
WUllama Apt.
Columbus. Georgia
YOU ARE HEREBY re-
quired to file your answer to
the peUUon for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the
above Court and serve a copy
thereof upon the petitioner's
attorney. COHEN at COHEN,
622 S. W. 1st. Street. Miami.
Fla. 33130, on or before October
31. 1983, or else peUUon wUl be
confessed.
witness my hand and the
seal of this Court, at Miami.
Dade County. Fiord*, this 27
day of September. 1963.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By K. Self rted
Deputy Clerk
13322 September SO:
__________October 7,14.21,1961
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number S3 464J
Di vision 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FLORENCE C. GANSKY.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of FLORENCE C. GAN-
SKY. deceased, File Number
83-6862. Is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which la 73 Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 13110.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
nd the personal repreeenta
Uvo'a attorney are set forth
below.
All Interested persons are re
quired to file with this court,
WITH IN THREE MONTH S OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) ail
claims against the eatote and
(SI any objection try an inter
ested person to whom this no-
lies waa mailed that challenge
llMh, nl rh* will tha
the validity of the will, the
qualincatlons of the personal
representative, venue. Of |
cUonoftheooort
ALL CLAIM" AMD OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SX) FILED WILL
BE FOREVERBARRED
Publication of this NoUce baa
begun on September SO. 1BSS.
Personal RepreaentaUve:
Dr. EARL MARVIN URAM
14 Pond Road
Easton.Ct. 06612
Attorney for Personal
RepreaentaUve:
ARNOLD L. LIEBERMAN
370 Minorca Avenue, Suite 6
Coral Gables, Florida SUM
Telephone: (305)446-2992
1SS3S September SO;
October 7.198S
Friday, September 30,1983 /The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
f
Weiselberg Timoner
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
RACHEL TIMONER
Rachel Doane Timoner, daugh-
ter of Lisa and Eli Timoner, was
called to the Torah as Bat Mitz-
vah on Saturday, Sept. 24, at
Temple Judea, Coral Gables.
Rabbi Michael Eisenstat officiat-
ed.
Rachel is an honor student and
a member of the volleyball and
soccer teams at Ransom-Ever-
glades.
A reception was held at the
Four Ambassadors Hotel follow-
ing services.
SCOTT WEISELBERG
Scott Jason Weiselberg, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Alan Weiselberg,
will be called to the Torah as a
Bar Mitzvah Saturday, Oct. 1 at
9 a.m. at Beth David Congre-
gation. Rabbi David H. Auer-
bach and Cantor William W.
Lipson will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in
the Beth David religious school.
He attends Arvida Junior High
School as an eighth grader and
belongs to Howard Palmetto
Little League and Kingsbay
Tennis Club.
Mr. and Mrs. Weiselberg will
host the Kiddush following the
services in honor of the occasion
and a reception the same day at
Beth David.
JEREMY HAFT
Jeremy Haft, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Richard Haft, will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday at Temple Beth Sholom
of Greater Miami. Dr. Leon
Kronish. spiritual leader of the
congregation, will officiate.
Jeremy is a student of the
Confirmation Class of 5745.
Emanu-El After School
Program to Begin
The 1983-84 after school pro-
gram of Temple Emanu-El and
the Lehrman Day School has
been scheduled to begin Monday,
Oct. 10 both at the Belle Lehr-
man Youth Center and at the
Day School.
Sidney Cooperman, president
of the congregation, and
Lawrence M. Schantz, chairman
of the board of education for the
temple and the school, said that
registration is now in progress.
Transportation by the congre-
gation's own buses is available,
they said.
'Israel Diary' to
Host Yitzhak Navon
Yitzhak Navon, former presi-
dent of Israel, will be the first
guest of the television season of
WPBT-Channel 2's interview
program, Israeli Diary, which is
filmed on location in Israel.
Host and producer of the pro-
gram, Stanley Rosenblatt, a
Miami attorney, will discuss with
the former president the war in
Lebanon and the formation of the
Israel commission of inquiry
after the Palestinian refugees
massacres. Navon will also,talk
about Zionism and the election
process in Israel.
Israeli Diary is directed by
Kevan Cramer.
-; W **'*>
Florence Greenberg, president
of the Henrietta Scold Chapter of
Hadassah, has announced that a
chapter board meeting has been
scheduled for Oct. 3, 12:30 p.m.
at the Hadassah Building,
Lincoln Road.
She also said that the group's
monthly meeting has been set for
Oct. 10, 11:30 a.m., at the
Shelborne Hotel, when a speaker
and a film will be featured.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlelighting
Time: 6:49 p.m.
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Driva
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
Frl.. 6:30 pm, Slwbbel Beresheet
Set. Mi am, Shsbbat Servtoss. Ml pm. sSnehs.
Sun.. 1:30 sm snd 4:30 pm.
Monday thru Friday, 7:30 sm and 6:30 pm
TEMPLE BETH AM Or. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Or. Baumgard
S. Mlsml-667-6667 Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Aaaoclate Rabbi
Frl.. S:1 5 pm. RefeM laaasara-i
Mow to En|oy Lite Enn II You an
Set.. 11:11 sm. Rabbia topic: "Is There s Case
lor Craaaanhnr? fear Mktaaah. Jonathan Coaan.
abbi Jsmes Simon will aaalat in both sentoee
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvl Adler. Cantor
Shabbet Ee Santos
alSpm
SJmohst Torah
Shebbet Service
st 8:46 am.
Df. Irvine Lehrman
wtM preach at 10:10
m
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONQREQATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schllf
BETH DAVID CONQREQATION
Coral Way: 2625 S.W Vfl Arsnua //
South Oade 7S0O S.W.I 20th Street '<
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Corel Way Sanctuary
Frl.. 9 am. Consecration Oarclaaa tor chMoren
beginning Judaic etudleeJOddueh follows.
Frl., 6 pm, Shabbet En Services.
Set.. sm. Shabbet Mevarschlm.
Ssrvtoss oonducted by RsbM DevM H. Ausrbseh
end Cantor William W. Upeon.
B'nel Mitzvah, Scott Weiselberg and Noel Neu
Kldduah tollowa.
BETH KODESH
Modarn Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ava.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlln-Exacutlve Secretary


TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Qreater Miami
Unmi's Pioneer Worm Congraganon
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Haskell M. Bemat, Senior Rabbi
Donald P. Caahman, Assistant Rabbi
Jacob Q. Bornsteln, Cantor
Rachelle Nelson, Student Cantor
Philip Goldln, Exec. Dlr.
Frl., 1 pm. Downtown Only. SMnehat Torah
Celebration, m soadartty wHh Jews In opprsaaad
lends throughout tha world, Hakstot,
Procession of Teratta, Israeli Dancing, snd Torsh
Procession In Straet. Consecration of Religious
school students led by Confirmation Clasa
of MM
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Cables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Frl., :t5 pm. Worship Service. Slmhat Torsh.
Consecration. Weekly Torah portion Beraehtt,
Oenesls 1:1 -4*. H altar ah laalah 42:5-43 10
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
Danny Tadmore, Cantor
Saturday Servtcee
Sundays*
OaHykMnyan
4:44 am end 4:SO pm
am and 4: SO pm
7:44 am and S pm.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S NE 121 St. N. Miami, FL 33181
691-5506 Conservative
Only Temple in North Mleml
Cantor Moahe Frledler
Rabbi Emarrtus Joseph A. Gortlnkal
Dally services 8:15 a.m. 6 pm
Frl., Spm, Shabbet Em
sit., V !!, SfWrDOST MOffilfttJ
m
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1846 Jefferson Ava., MB., FL 33139
Tel. 68*4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nlesbn Benvamlnl
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chasa Ava. 8 41 st St. 838-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Convlsar
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75trt St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz .sfc
Cantor Murray Yavneb (l|
Memtng Servtcee6 em.
Setuiilsi Maiatas SarvtpsaSeas.
E waning Services 4:10 pm.
Saturday Evening Services 7:44 pm.
TEMPLE NER TAMID
Conservative
7902 Cariyle Ava.,
Miami Beach 88141
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz
Cantor Edward Klein
DeHyaaVwsnatSam.1
Sunday MlnysnstSJO am.
688-8345
m
1446)46 am
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971-Northeaat 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1662
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SH A ARE TERLLAH OF KENDALL
S.W. 154 Ava. and 75 St.
Rabbi Warren Kaaitl
Modem Orthodox
62-3343 362-0898
Frt,7ass.Sl>>semSsrvloss Set.fcSOam,
labbaStSsrwnsa ptMssMMMMsMMs
SaTaSssaV Osfs) morning asnyens M a TK MS ass.
Pia6taeeianlisrnianiorfaa________
Frl.. 6:16 pm.
Set, 10:44 am, Sabbath
Senie
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONQREQATION 847-7628
1061 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Or. Max A LIpecMtz. RsbbJ
Zv** Aronl, Cantor
I
Harvey L Brown, Exec. Director
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ava.
North Deda'a Raform Congregation
Ralph P. Klngsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Aaaoclate Rabbi
Irvtng Shulkas, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl, fcH ass* S pm
SeU 4cS0 smarts 4: ISpm
BETH YOSESEPH
CHAIM CONQREQATION
843 Meridian Ave.
TEMPLE ZK)N
6000 Miner Dr. 271-2311
Or. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi 4^,
sMtaMM Ader. Cantor /Bij
Misisefcrnassll4a.aiwara.raai^4C^
aaaeaskCseaervteesfttSes.

RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF QREATER MIAMI
83137
Phone 678-4000
Executive Vice PreeMent
Religious Information
Houeee of Worship
Phone:57*4000
Rabbinical Association Office
FTU6rtSm.Wesaaj
Tarsh wrtaae Se
.Oe
1 Ar-
sis 1:1 J
j SOUTHEAST REGION /,
| UNITED SYNAQOQUE
OF AMERICA
I sat a. i
V
-------ufiloN-oPAMEAiAAN--------
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Oftica Park, 3786
NW 82 Ave.. Suits 210. Miami, Fl.
33168,592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Littman. regional director


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 30,1983
,
Pub1icNotice\
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE No. (3-306T7
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAQLER FEDERAL
K SAVINGS
^AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
OF MIAMI,
a United States corporation.
Plaintiff.
vs.
FLORIDA PLANNING A
DEVELOPMENT CORP.. et
al..
Defendants.
TO:
ARTURO MARTINEZ and
VILMA VIHBAL da
MARTINEZ, his wife
Cra. 53 No. 78-158 Apt. SA
BarranquUla. Colombia
CARLOS A. DONADO and
ARACELY LLENAS de
DONADO. his wife
Calle 66 50-50 No. 940 A
BarranquUla, Colombia
LEONARDO DA VILA and
VILMA MENA de
DA VILA. Ma wife
Farmacla Lourdes La Cuba
AUantlda. Honduras
RAUL F. AVENDANO and
ELSY AVENDANO. his wife
Call* 94 No. 82-14
BarranquUla. Colombia
OLGA FERRER de
HERNANDEZ. and
married.
-HERNANDEZ. her
husband
Resldencla Ma. Alexandria
Apto S-D |
C-l, Ste. Rosa Lima
Caracas. Dto. Federal.
Venezuela
BERTA de GARCIA, and If
married,
-GARCIA, her husband
Carrera 63 No. 80-181
BarranquUla. Colombia
FRANCO MARTINEZ
APARICIO and
GISELLA de MARTINEZ
APARICIO
Calle 90 No. 66-L8 Apto.
XL B
BarranquUla, Colombia
ROLF BERNARD UFER
and
LAURA GIL de UFER, his
wife
Cuarta Ave. A LB-66, Zona
L4
Guatemala City, Guatemala
LEOVIGILDO BETAN
COURT and
MARIA BETANCOURT. his
Wife
20 Calle 8 Ave. 8.O. SSL
San Pedro Sula, Honduras
YOU ARE NOTIFIED
that an action to foreclose
a mortgage on the following
described property In Dade
County. Florida. PARCEL
A:
A portion of Tract "DD" of
'KENDALE LAKES NORTH
SECTION THREE". ac-
cording to the Plat thereof.
as recorded In Plat Book 94
at Page 79 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, and being described
as follows:
Beginning at the Northwest
comer of said Tract "DD";
thence N87 degrees 42'39"E
along the North line of said
Tract -DD" for 287.0 foot:
thence S2 degrees 17'81"E
for 212.0 fet; then S87
degrees 42'29'W for 229.87
feet to a point on the
Westerly line of said Tract
"DD"; thence N17 degrees
26'31'W along said Westerly
line of said Tract "DD" for
21861 feet to the Point of
Beginning. (Also known as:
All of KEN DAI. ROY ALE.
Condominium, according
to the Declaration thereof
as recorded In Official
Records Book 11812. Page
1100. of the Public Records
of Dade County, Florida),
and
PARCEL B:
A portion of Tract "DD" of
"KENDALE LAKES NORTH
SECTION THREE". ac-
cording to the Plat thereof.
"as recorded In Plat Book 94
at Page 79 of the Public
Records of Dade County,
Florida, and being described
as follows:
Commence at the Northwest
corner of said Tract "DD";
thence N87 degrees 42'29"E
along the North line of said
tract "DD" for 287.0 feet to
the Point of Beginning of
the following described tract
of land; thence continue
N87 degrees 42'29'E along
said North line of aald
Tract "DD" for 128.0 feet;
thence S2 degrees 17'81"E
for 180.0 feet; thence S87
degrees 42'29"W for 26.0
feet; thence 82 degrees
17'31'E for 198.86 feet to a
point on the South line of l
said Tract "DD". said point
also being on the arc of a
circular curve concave to
the Southwest and bears NB
degrees BB'32"E from the
center of said curve; thence j
Westerly along the arc of.
said curve and along the
Southerly line of said Tract
"DD" having a radius of
766.0 feet and a central
angle of 20 degrees 28'88"
for an arc distance of
272.96 feet to a point of
reverse curvature of a
curve concave to the
Northeast; thence along
the arc of said circular
curve to the right and
along the Southerly and
Westerly Une of said Tract
"DD" having a radius of
28.0 feet and a central
angle of 88 degrees 06'S6"
for an arc distance of 86.26 |
feet to a point of tangency.
said point being on the.
Westerly Une of said Tract I
"DD"; thence N17 degrees'
28'81"W along said Westerly
Une of said Tract "DD" for
128.66 feet; thence N87
degrees 42'29"E for 229.67
feet; thence N2 degrees
17'81"E for 212.0 feet to the
Point of Beginning.
All of the above described
property lying and being in
Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to
It on Keith. Mack, Lewis A
Allison. Plaintiffs attorneys,
whose address la 111 N.E.
1st Street. Miami, Florida
S3152, on or before October
28. 1988. and file the
original with the Clerk of
this Court either before
service on Plaintiff's at-
torneys or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and
seal of this Court on the
22nd day of September
1988.
RICHARD P. BRTNKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
13306 September 80;
October 7, 14. 21. 1983
'\
NOTICE Of ACTION t
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE |
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN I
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-31*85
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ALICE PARKES,
Petitioner Wife,
and
DANIEL PARKES.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: DANIEL PARKES
Residence and Mailing
Address Is Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on George T. Ramanl, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 711 Blacayne Bldg .
19 West Flagler Street, Miami, I
Florida 88180. and file the,
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before I
October 14. 1883; otherwise al
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 9th day of
September, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Wong
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
George T. Ramanl
19 West Flagler Street. No. 711
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (308)374-4840
12208 September 16.23. SO;
__________________0 IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA '
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 83 3314*
NOTICE OF PETITION
FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ALVARO PAVA. I
Petitioner-Husband.
and
MARITZA ARANOO DE
PAVA.
Respondent Wife
TO: MARITZA ARANGO DE
PAVA
Calle 100 No. 2806
Bogota, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage haa been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of the
written defenses. If any, to It
on: PEDRO F. MARTELL.
ESQUIRE, of MARTELL A
VILLALOBOS. P.A., 1401
Ponce de Leon Boulevard.
Suite 200. Coral Gables. Flor-
ida. 33134. and file the original
with the Clerk of the above
styled Court on or before the 28
day of October, 1988, otherwise
a Default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for in the Petition
This Notice shall be publish
ed once each week for four (4)
consecutive weeks in the JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami,
Dade County, Florida on this 20
day of September. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: K.Selfrted
Deputy Clerk
12292 September 23, SO;
October 7.14.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the un-
dersigned, desiring to
engage In business under
the fictitious names of
EQUITABLE PRECIOUS
GEMS, INTERNATIONAL
RARE COIN, and CESME
INTERNATIONAL at 7771
W. Oakland Park Blvd.. In
the City of Sunrise. Florida,
intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida,
this 6th day of September,
1988.
TOTAL MARKETING
AND SALES. INC.
By: YTLMAZ KOYUN-
CUOOLU
President
Attorney for Applicant:
Robert A. Brandt
Counselor At Law
Merrick Way Building
Suite 201
69 Merrick Way
Coral Gables, Florida 33184
12299 September SO;
October 7. 14, JJ, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF
THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. 83-3491)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
IDAIJS C. IZQUIERDO.
Petitioner Wife.
and
SAMUEL IZQUIERDO.
Respondent-Husband
TO: SAMUEL IZQUIERDO
638 W. 160th Street, 5-B
New York, N.Y. 10033
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage haa
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on GEORGE T. RAMANI,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 711 Blscayne Bldg.,
19 West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before i
October 28, 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
witness my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 26th day of
September. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
George T. Ramanl, Esq.
711 Blscayne Bldg.,
19 W. Flagler St
Miami, Florida33130
Telephone: (306) 374-4340
13316 September 30;
October 7, 14.21. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious names
Serge Ambrolse. d-b-a I. R. C.
Building Maintenance Co. ( not:
inc.) at 10901 N. Kendall Drive.I
Miami. Fla. 33176 Intends to1
register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Serge Ambrolse.
Sole Owner
13312 September 30;
October 7. 14,21. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious names
Vogue Originals, Inc., d-b-a
Kings Bay Accessories at 6101
N. W. 36 Ave., Miami. Fla
38142 intends to register said
names with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Country,
Florida.
Bennle Schwartz, President
13310 September 30;
October 7. 14.21, 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
File Number 83-4784
Division 64
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAUL KORNBLUM
Deceased
NOTICE OF
AD M INI STRATION
TO ALL PERSONS
HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE AND ALL
OTHER PERSONS IN-
TERESTED IN THE
ESTATE:_____
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the ad-
ministration of the estate of
PAUL KORNBLUM, de-
ceased. File Number 83-
6784, Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of i
which U 78 West Flagler \
Street. Miami. Florida. The
personal representative of
the estate Is MILDRED
KAY SCHELL AND
MARILYN ROSS, whose ad-
dress Is 216-30th St. Apt.
No.IB. Miami Beach. Fla
and 66-10 Thornton PL Rego
Pk. N.Y. The name and
address of the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persona having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WTTHTN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be m
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim la se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative
All persona Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required
WTTHTN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quall-
flcaUons of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first
publication of this Notice of
Administration September
30. 1683.
Marilyn Ross
and
Mildred Kay Schell
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
PAUL KORNBLUM
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSON-
AL REPRESENTATIVE
Richard I. Kroop
(Fla. Bar No. 128026)
Kwltney. Kroop A
Schetnberg, P.A.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 612
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (308) 638-7578
12298 September 30;
__________ October 7, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Su-
perior Cleanser Products at 821
S.W. 31 st Ave.. Miami Fla.
33138 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
Juan Rodrlgues
and Inea G. Rodrlgues
12280 September 23.30;
October 7,14,1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83-53(2
Division 92
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACQUELYN M. NUTTER.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS
HAVING CLAIMS OR
DEMANDS AGAINST THE
ABOVE ESTATE:
Within three months from
the time of the first
publication of this notice
you are required to file
with the clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division,
the address of which Is 78
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida a written and
verified statement of any
claim or demand you may
have against the estate of
JACQUELYN M. NUTTER,
deceased. ,
Each claim must be In'
writing and must Indicate
the basis for the claim, the.
name and address of the
creditor or his agent or
attorney, and the amount
claimed. If the claim Is not
yet due. the date when It
wUl become due shaU be.
stated. If the claim Is
contingent or unliquidated.
the nature of the un-
certainty shall be stated. If
the claim Is secured the
security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver
a copy of the claim to the
clerk who shall serve the
copy on the personal
representative
ALL CLAIMS AND
DEMANDS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Dated September SO, 1983.
NATHANIEL L.
BARONE, JR.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JACQUELYN M. NUTTER.
Deceased
Attorney:
NATHANIEL L. BARONE.
JR
6361 Sunset Drive
South Miami. Florida 33143
Telephone: 682-2004
13306 September 30;
October 7. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the un-
dersigned, desiring to
engage In business under
the fictitious name ERIC
SHOES at 319 N.W. 26 8t..
Miami, Florida Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court
of Dade County, Florida.
Catallna Shoe Corporation
By: Mlron Gutateln,
President
Del Valle and Netach. P.A.
Attorneys for Catallna Shoe
Corporation
88 Grand Canal Dr..
Miami. Fla. 38144
13808 September SO;
October 7. 14. 21. 1M3
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number S3-SS14
Division M
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCES K. BEHR.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of FRANCES K.
BEHR. deceased. File Num-
ber 88-6814. la pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of
which Is Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. FL 33130.
The name and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this
court. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (8)
any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom this
notice waa mailed that
challenges the validity of
the wUl. the qualifications
of the personal representa-
tive, venue, or Jurisdiction
of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice
haa begun on September 80,
1983.
Personal Representative:
ROBERT KESSLER
6181 Collins Ave. Apt. 610
Miami Beach, FL 33140
JOSEPH D. BEHR
1886 Spring Valley Drive
Springfield. PA 19084
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
IRVING CYPEN
Cypen, Cypen A Drlbln
P. O. Box 402099
Miami Beach. FL 88140
Telephone: (308) 832-3200
13304 September 80;
October 7. 1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUtlous name
SUNRISE CLEANERS at 16700
N.E. 19th Avenue, No. Miami
Beach. Florida. Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
ANTHONY B. GALAN
18817 September 80;
October 7, 14. 21, 1983
IN
IN THE CIRCUIT COgiT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FL0,ln.
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 13.71*
Division 03
RE:ESTATE OF
JENNIE ELIESON.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS BAvL
CLAIMS OR DEluS
AGAINST THE ABM,
ESTATE AND ALL 0q2
PERSONS INTKHKSTH v
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTt
FIED that the admlnlitnu-
of the estate of Jgjjn
ELIESON. deceased 3
Number 83-7898, Is pendlnt,
the Circuit Court for 32
County. Florida, prob,u
Division, the address of wta
1S78W. Flagler Street, mi
Florida 33130. The perso*
representative of the estate*
SCOTT ELIESON. who.
address Is P.O. Box in
Surf side, Florida 331M r,
name and address of tj
personal representati.,,
attorney are set forth below
AU persons having claim-
demands against the stsUu,
'quired. WITHIN Tiffin,
MONTHS FROM THE Om
OF THE FIRST PUBLRl
TION OF THIS NO-nci tofc
with the clerk of the 3
court a written statement j
any claim or demand they g
have. Each claim must bi
writing and must lndlcstt tk
basis for the claim, the mm
and address of the creditors
his agent or attorney, and Ik
amount claimed. If the claims
not yet due, the date what
will become due shall k
stated. If the claim U coots
gent or unliquidated, ta
nature of the uncertainty shsl
be stated. If the claim is
cured, the security shall be*
scribed. The claimant, shsl
deliver sufficient copies of Hi
claim to the clerk to enable tk
clerk to mall one copy to sat
personal representative
AU persons interested In Ik
estate to whom a copy of tha
NoUce of Administration hss
been mailed are reqiarH
WITHIN THREE MONTH
FROM THE DATE OF TO
FIRST PUBLICATION OT
THIS NOTICE, to file toy*
' Jectlons they may have ttt
challenges the validity of tk
decedent's will, the quit
flcstlons of the personal n
resentative. or the venue
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMAND!
AND OBJECTIONS NOT N
FILED WILL BE FORMAT!
BARRED.
Data of the first publieatM
Of this Notice cf
Administration: September.
1983.
SCOTT ELIESON
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JENNIE ELIESON
Deceuel
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MARTIN ROTH
Attorney at Law
14 N.E. 1st Avenue Suite 1111
Miami. Florida 33132
Telephone: (300)371-8682
18316 September*;
October 7.1IB
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT C0U8T
OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA.!*
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No (3 33111
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION.
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
PAULO GONCALVES.
Petitioner,
and
KATINA GONCALVES,
Respondent.
TO: KATINA GONCALVES
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT
FIED that an action "
DisBolutlon of Marrlsg* m
been filed against you and)*
are required to serve a copy"
your written defenses. If *
It on MELVIN J ASM*
ESQ., attorney for Hetiuon^
whose address U 1860 S. M
Street, Suite 208, M"*
Florida 33186, and B9J
original with the clerk 01 "
above styled court on or w1
October 28. 1983; otter**-
default wUl be entered s|sw-
you for the relief demsno"
the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand sna
seal of said court st jaw"
Florida on this 26th September. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKE
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florid*
By KATHLEEN SHAW
As Deputy Clert
(Circuit Court Seal 1
13313 September*
October 7 14. a.


Friday, September 30,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
MR
DAM COUNTY, FLOR IDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Flit Numbir 13701 N
Division II
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARIE MOMMERTZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
[estate of MARIE MOM-
MERTZ, deceased, File
Number 88-7688. la pending In
I the Circuit Court for Da.de
ICounty. Florida, Probate Divi-
sion the address of which la 78
West Flagler Street, Miami.
I Florida, 33130 The names and
[addresses of the personal
representative and the per-
|sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All Interested persona are re-
quired to file with this court,
MTU IN THREE MONTHS OF
HE FIRST PUBLICATION
DF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
rlalms against the estate and
21 any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
i mailed that challenges the
alldlty of the will, the quallfl
atlons of the personal repre-
ntatlve, venue, or jurtsdlc-
i of the court.
ALL CLATMS AND OB
SCTIONS NOT 80 FILED
riLL BE FOREVER
*RED.
Publication of this Notice has
egun on September 28,1883.
Personal Representative:
MICHAEL FRIEND
201 Seville Avenue
Coral Gables. Florida
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
SPRESENTATTVE:
braham A. Galbut
ilbut. Galbut Menln, P.A.,
I Washington Avenue
nl Beach, Florida. 881M
Hephone: 873-8100
Septembers*;
------------------------fO.stty
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.U-122M
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
I IN RK The Marriage of:
|WTLFRIED DALIEU,
Petitioner,
land
|JACQUELINE DALIEU,
Respondent.
[TO JACQUELINE DALIEU,
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
IED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
[your written defenses, If any, to
Jl on JACK J. TAFFER, ESQ..
sttomey for Petitioner, whose
ddress is 8801 N.E. 2nd
ivenue, Miami, Florida.
Phone: (80S) 876-8300. and file
he original with the clerk of
he above styled court on or
before October 10. 1883;
otherwise a default will be
ntered against you for the
ellef demanded In the com-
Dalnt or petition.
This notice shall be published
bnce each week for four con-
ecutlve weeks In THE JEW-
SH FLORIDIAN.
witness my hand and the
Jeal of aald court at Miami.
Tlorlda on this 18th day of
'eptember. 1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CP. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
f Circuit Court Seal)
sttomey for Petitioner:
Jack J.Taffer, Esq.
"801 N.E. Second Avenue
iflaml, Florida88187
Phone 578-6300
September 16.28,30;
October 7,1883
NOTICE OF INTENTION
TOAPPLY
FOR CHANGE OF NAME
Case No. 83 31489
WHOM IT MAY CON-
SRN:
Notice is given that the un-
dersigned Petitioner's. Louis
P*nry Stewart and Sarah
Stewart, whose residence ad
Fess Is In the City of Miami,
Pade County. Florida, have ap-
?"ed to the nth Judicial Clr-
Swt in and for Dade County
Pourt House, on September 8,
|M, for an order changing Pe-
Jtioner's minor child name
m Loula Henry McConlco to
uls Henry Stewart by which
me Petitioner's minor child
hail be known.
ta*ted at ***". Florida, this
E*4*I of September. 1888
PHILLIPS 8. DAVIS. Esq.
attorney for Petitioner
TO. Box 12M
Florida 83101
Jephone: 836-0860
September 33, 80;
October T, M, 1SSS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 31-74*0
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IDA MOLLER
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
state of IDA MOLLER.
leceaaed. File Number 88-7660.
la pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 78 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida SS1S0.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 28.1863.
Personal Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
888 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 88138
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT, Esq.
Galbut. Galbut and Menln.
P.A..
888 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 88188
Telephone: 672-8100
12283 September 28,80,18V
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. IHI1H
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
BERTHA GUERRA.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
ARNALDO RIVERA.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: ARNALDO RIVERA
727 24 St.
Union City. New Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to
It on Leopoldo A. Ochoa,
Attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is IBS South Miami
Avenue, Penthouse One,
Miami, Florida 88130. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before October 14, 1883:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be pubUahed
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 2nd day of
September, 1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: KATHLEEN SHAW
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Leopoldo A. Ochoa. Esq.
166 South Miami Avenue, PH1
Miami, Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
12248 September^. 16.
28. 30. 1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
given that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Pele-
grin Realty at 80S SW 87th Ave-
nue Portoflno IV, Miami,
Fla. 38174 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Elena A. Pelegrin
12341 September 8,16;
__________________ 23.80,1863
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names
KREUTER CONSULTANTS.
INC. dba FRIENDLY THRIFT
STORE, at 13SO0 West Dbde
Highway. N. Miami, FL. In-
tends to register aald names
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Michael A. KreuUr,
risstnant
12247 September 8. 16,
38,30,1888
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 8111 in
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
IRMAHAWLEY
Petitioner Wife
and
JOSEPH HAWLEY
Respondent-Husband
TO: Joseph Hawley
Route B, Box 240
Henderson, No. Carolina
27536
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. Esq.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 181 N.E. 82nd SL,
Miami, FL 38188 and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
October 7, 1888; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 6th day of
September, 1863.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN
181 NE 82nd St.
Miami. FL 88138
Telephone: 767-6800
12263 September 6.16.
23, 80,1888
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 6111135
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRI AGE OF
ILIODES JOSEPH.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
EDITH JOSEPH,
Respondent-Wife.
TO: EDITH JOSEPH,
Respondent
C-O: Pasteur Ellma
Henry
Boca Pa trio
Anse Rouge. Haiti. West
Indies
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN,
ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la
181 N.E. 82 Street. Miami. FL
33138. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 7,
1888: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
Thla notice shall be pubUahed
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on this 6 day of Sep-
tember, 1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY: Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Law Offices of Lloyd M.
Routman
Attn: Lloyd M. Routman,
Esquire
181 N.E. 82 Street
Miami, FL 33138
306-767-6800
Attorney for Petitioner
12262 Septembers, 16;
28. 80.1888
- NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
CRISSOLI at 16730 S.W. 88th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 83167
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
CLARIZA PA8ALOD08
Vice President
MONTSERRAT WATSON
Secretary-Treasurer
LESTER ROGERS. P-A.
Attorney for
VIVARI OF ITALY, INC.,
1464 N.W. 17th Avenue
Miami. Florida 88126
12278 September 16, SS, SO;
October 7,1863
' IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 83-12346
I NOTICE OF
SUIT ACTION
FOR
DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
GERTRUDE LASH
Petitioner-Wife
and
SEYMOUR LASH
Respondent-Husband
To: SEYMOUR LASH
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTC-
.FIED that an action For Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you, and you are
required to serve a copy of your
: written defenses. If any, to it,
on JACK P. DRUCKMAN. At-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 16211 North East
12th Avenue, North Miami
Beach, Florida 88162. and file
the original with the Clerk of
the above styled Court on or be-
fore October 21,1883. otherwise
la Judgment may be entered
: against you for relief demand-
ed In the Petition.
THIS NOTICE shall be pub-
1 llahed once each week for four
(4) consecutive weeks In the
Jewish Floridian, 120 North-
east Sixth Street, Miami. Flor-
ida.
WITNESS MY HAND AND
SEAL OF SAID COURT AT
MIAMI. FLORIDA on thla Sep-
tember 13.1883.
Richard P. Blinker
Clerk, Circuit Court
By: C P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
Jack P. Druckman
Attorney for Petitioner
lean N.E. 12th Avenue
North Miami Beach.
Florida 38182
Telephone: 848-8667
12270 September 18.23,80;
October 7.1663
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage hi business
under the fictitious name Bob's
Ices at 18707 S. nixie Highway.
Miami, Florida. Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Robert Wollnltx
Joan M. Peterson
Eric B. Turetaky, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
12286 September 28,80;
______________October 7,14.1883
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
I THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
I CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
I DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 83-30*14
. IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
PATRICIA GLOVER,
WIFE
and
ANTHONY GLOVER,
HUSBAND
TO: ANTHONY GLOVER
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
n action for dissolution of
narrlage haa been filed
gainst you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq.. 15480
NW 7th Avenue, Suite 209.
Miami, Florida ssiee. on or be-
fore October 7,1888 and file the
original with the Clerk of thla
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition
DATED: September 1.1888
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: D.C.Bryant
as Deputy Clerk
12246 Septembers, 16;
28.80.18SS
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Civil Action No: 83-33212
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DELROY LLOYD SMALL
and
DITHA MAUD SMALL
TO: Dttha Maud Small
38 Hallifax Avenue
Kingston 6, Jamaica
A Petition for Dissolution 01
your Marriage has been filed In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses on Alec Ross, attor-
ney for Petitioner, at 16400
N.E. 18 Ave Miami. Fla.
33162 and file the original with
the 'Jerk of the above court on
or before October 28, 1883;
otherwise a default will be en-
ured against you.
Date In Miami on September
20.1883.
RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk
Dade County. Florida
By K. Selfried
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12281 September 28. 80;
October 7, 14. 1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
SANDY'S ADMINISTRATIVE
SERVICES at 6806 N.W. Blue
Lagoon Dr.. Suite 186. Miami,
Fla. 83126, Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Sandra G. Lama.
Owner
12260 Septembers, 16,
28.80.1883
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 81 144S0
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CATALTNASHOE
CORPORATION.
Plaintiff.
vs.
BARONA EXPORT COR-
PORATION and ARCOIRIS
DE LAS AMERICAS COR-
PORATION.
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION:
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY
TO: BARONA EXPORT COR-
PORATION, a Florida Corp.
ARCOIRIS DE LAS AMERI-
CAS CORPORATION, a Flor-
ida Corp.
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for monies
owed has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any to It on DEL-VALLE A
NETSCH, PA. whose address
Is: 86 Grand Canal Drive. Third
Floor, Miami, Florida 88144 on
or before October 21, 1888, and
file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before
service on Plaintiff 'a attorney
or Immediately thereafter;
otherwise a Default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the Com-
plaint or Petition.
Dated on this September 14,
1683.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
aa Clerk of the Court
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
12277 September 23, SO;
October T. 14,1883
NOTICE OF ACTION
FOR ANNULMENT
No. 61-11468
DONNA A. KEELING, also
known as Donna A. TUlery.
Plaintiff, versus. GEORGE
HENRY TTLLERY in, Defen-
dant.
TO: THE ABOVE NAMED
DEFENDANT AND ALL
OTHERS WHOM IT MAY
CONCERN:
You are hereby notified that
suit was Instituted by the above
named Plaintiff against the
above-named Defendant on the
8th day of September, 1883, in
the above styled cause, Involv-
ing the purported marriage of
May 34. 1878 In the Bronx, New
York, to wit:
Relief sought as to such mar-
riage Is annulment by the
Plaintiff against the Defen-
dant.
You will, therefore, please
govern yourselves accordingly
PHILLIP S. DAVIS, Esq.
Attorney for the Plaintiff
P.O. Box 4264
Miami. Florida 63101
Telephone: 826-0800
September S3.80;
October 7, 1863
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
GREEN PLANT COMPANY
AT T14S Miami Lakee
Drive. R 18, Miami Lakes. Fla.
88014 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
1 Circuit Court of Dade County,
< Florida.
Gregory S. Green,
Owner
12266 September 16, 23, 80;
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN YNB CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 81-11061
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
llN RE: The Marriage of
'MERCEDES ESCOTO
CUBAS DE NEAL,
Petitioner
and
OSCAR ORE GO RIO
NEAL DELGADO.
Respondent.
TO: OSCAR GREOORIO
NEAL DELG ADO
c-o Gladys Georglna
Castro
Barrio San Martin
Colonla Sltraenp.
Case No. 48-B
Puerto Cortes,
Honduras, C.A.
' YOU ARE HREEBY NOTI-
iFTED that an action for
I Dissolution of Marriage haa
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
, your written defenses, If any, to
It on MELVTN J. ASHER.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 1860 S.W. 8th
Street, Suite 306, Miami,
Florida 83186, and file the
original with the clerk of the
[above styled court on or before
October 7. 1S8S; otherwise a
.default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
: the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on this let day of
September, 1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
,12242 Septembers, 16.
. 23, SO. 1888
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 83 31*57
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
JACK J. THOMAS
Petitioner
and
CHRISTINE H. THOMAS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CHRISTINE H. THOMAS
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
1 YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage haa been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses to it on I. JE-
ROME GRAFF. ESQ., attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad
dress Is 688 N.E. 167 St.,
N.M.B. Florida 33162. on or be-
fore October 14, 1888. and file
the original with the clerk of
thla court; otherwise a default
will be entered against you.
Dated September 7,1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By C.P. Copeland
Aa Deputy Clerk
12263 September 16. 23.30;
October 7,1688
NOTICE
ffrtntiirT isil
UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
ler the fictitious name
>Y'S ADMINISTRATIVE
:RVTCES at 6806 N.W. Blue
mi Dr., Suite 1SS, Miami.
83146. Intends to register
name with the Clerk of the
It Court of Dado County.
Sandra O. Lama,
Ownar
12360 September 3,16,
23, SO. 1663
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE .
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. S3-31SS4
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
TO MAS A. TRELLES.
Petitioner,
and
CATALTN A CAMPOS
ZAMORA.
Respondent.
TO: CATALTN A CAMPOS
ZAMORA
Conception No. 1161
Entre 28 y 24
Lawton
Habana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
, required to serve a copy of your
1 written defenses. If any, to It on
MELVTN J. ASHER, ESQ.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address la 1860 S.W. 8th Street,
Suite 206. Miami. Florida 88186.
land file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
ion or before October 7, 1888;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
I WITNESS my hand and the
eeal of said court at Miami.
Florida on thla 7 day of Sep-
tember. 1888.
1 RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dads County, Florida
By C. P. Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12364 Septembers, 16;
23,80,1868


Pajjel4-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 30, 1963
Public Notice
NOTICE Of ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVC SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. Ill
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
ARACELI SALAZAR
Petitioner
and
HUMBERT SALAZAR.
Respondent.
TO: Humberto Salasar
Calle 4SA.No.4M1.
Villa VTceneto.
Mate. Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
F1ED that an action foi
Diaeolutlon of Marriage hac
been filed against you and yov
are required to serve a copy ot
your written defenses. If any. to
It on Emlllo C. Pastor, attorney
for Petitioner, whose addresa U
ISO South Miami Avenue.
Penthouse I. Miami. Florida
and Ole the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 21 1M3;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded m the com
plaint or petition
This notice shall be publlahed
once each wash for four con-
sec utive weeki In THE
JEWISH FLORTDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of amid court at Miami.
Florida on this 16th day of
September. IMS.
RICHARD P. BRIN KER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. P. COPE LAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMTLIO C. PASTOR PA
Penthouse I
1SS South Miami Avenue
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
12282 September 23. 30
October 7.14. IMS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the underslgnec-
desiring to engage In buslnew
under the flcatloua name
VTVARI at 10720 S.W. 86th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33157
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Clrcul
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Antonleta B. de Benches
Clarlxa Paaalodoa
Montserrat Watson
LESTER ROGERS. P.A.
Attorney for
VTVARI OF ITALY. INC.
1404 N.W. 17th Avenue.
Miami. Florida S3128
11 Septembers. IS,
23. SO. IMS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 63 7144
Division 64
IN RE: ESTATE OF
RUBIN WOLLOWICK.
Deceased
NOTICE or
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of RUBIN WOLLOWICK
deceased. File Number SS-71S4.
la pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the sddrsss of
which is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. FL SS1M. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the person-
al representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persona are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OT
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(S) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will. the quallfl
cations of the pas sons! ispre
sen Utive. venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLA] MS AMD OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FTLED WILL
BE FORE VER BARBED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 28. IMS
Personal Representative:
GLADYS WOLLOWICK
ISIDORE WOLLOWICK
HERBERT WOLLOWICK
c-o MYERS. KENTN.
LE VTNSON. RUFFNEH.
FRANK RICHARDS,
Attn: KATHLEEN MARKET
14M BrtckeU A venue
Suite 700
Miami. Florida SSI SI
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Myers. Kstun. Levlnson, Ruff-
ner, Frank A Rlcharts
By: KATHLEEN MARKET
IsMBrtcksOA
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(WITH PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACT ION
NO. S3-24474 FC IS
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
Of MARRIAGE
TN RE The Marriage of
ANKE R STTMPSON.
Petitioner-Wife.
and
PHILIP G. STTMPSON.
Respondent-Husband
TO: PHILIP G STTMPSON
(Residence unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-I
FIED that an action for)
Dissolution of Marriage has
bean filed p "* you In
connection with the real
property described on thel
attached sheet >
Lot S. Stock 1. of PALMETTO
ROAD ESTATES, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded In
Plat Book SO. Page S3, of the
Public Record! of Dade
County. Florida, a-k-a- 7830
S.w. 137th Terrace. Miami.
Flo ride S3157
Unit 13822 T AMI AMI PARK j
CONDOMINR-M No. 1. ac-'
cording to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof, si
recorded in Official Record I
Book 11140. Page 80S. of the,
Public Records of Dade I
County. Florida, a-k-a 13S22
S.W. 142nd Avenue. Miami.'
Florida.
Parcel in E S of NE V Section'
IS, Township 47. Range 30. as
described In Official Record
Book 1443. Page 1310. of the
Public Record of Lee County.
Florida.
Bonne Farms. Section M. Plat
Book 3. Page 27. Pt. Lot B Fr.
NW Cor Lot Official Record
Book 1102. Page 1710. of the
Public Records of Lee County. 1
Florida.
Bonlta Farms. Section 34. Plat
Book 3. Page 27. Pt. Lot Fr.,
NW Cor. Lot 9. Official Record
Book 1466. Page 0419. of the '
Public Records of Lee County, l
Florida.
You are required to serve a
ropy of your written defenses. '
if any. to It on Alan Rosen thai.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 3000 Blscayne
Boulevard. No. 800. Miami.
Florida 33137. and Ole the'
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before .
October 31. IMS: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORTDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal ot said court at Miami.
Florida on this 30th day of
September. IMS.
RICHARD P. BRIN KER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
< Circuit Court Seal)
Alan Roaenthal
Suite 800
3000 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Attorney for Petitioner
12390 September 33. SO:
October?. 14. IMS
Miami, Florida SSI SI
i: (SM> sn-
Ssptsmber2S.S0,lMS
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORI DA, IN
AMD FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-32218
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION POR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ZORATDA FERRO.
Petitioner.
and
HUMBERT RODRIGUEZ
Respondent
TO: HUMBERTO
RODRIGUEZ
Reeldenee Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FOED thai an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been Hied against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on MELVIN J. ASHER.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner.
whose iMim is ISM S.W. 8th
Street. Suite SOS. Miami.
Florida MISS, and file thel
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
October 14, 1MB; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
eel ot said court at Miami,
Florida on this 18th Say of!
September. ISM
RICHARD P. BRIN KER
Ai Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLA RIND A BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
September 38, SO;
October 7, 14,1008
NOTICE OF ACT ION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
TNE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-11134
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: GUICELA CAR
BALLO.
Petitioner-Wife
and
DE NN IS C ARBALLO,
Respondent-Husband
TO: DENNIS CARBALLO
Calls 37 De Mayo
Detras de la Igieela
del Carmen. No. 3M
Managua, Nicaragua
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action tor
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defences, If any. to
It on Harvey D. Friedman,
attorney tor Petitioner, whose
address Is 430 Lincoln Road.
Suite S7S. Miami Beach.
Florida S313B. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
October 31. ISM; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeke In THE
JEWISH FLORTDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 30th day of
September. 1983
RICHARD P. BRIN KER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Law Offices of
Harvey D. Friedman
By: Harvey D. Friedman
Attorney for Petitioner pS,
430 Lincoln Road. Suite 379
Miami Beach. Florida S31S9
Telephone: < SOB i 531-0361
12265 September 23. 30:
______________October 7,14,1963
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-13283
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
Oi RE: THE MARRAIGE OF
JORGE E. MURRTETA.
Husband,
and
ANA MURRTETA.
Wife.
TO: ANA MURRTETA
Calle Plaza No. 0.
Apt. 1M
Residencies Flamboyan.
Mlrador Norte '
Santo Domingo.
- Re public a Domlnlcana
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
Albert L. Carrlcarte. P.A.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address U MB1 N.W. 7th Street.
Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above styled court on or before
October 30, IMS: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDLA N
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 31 day of Sep-
tember, IMS.
RICHARD P. BRISKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT) L.
CARRICARTE. P.A.
3491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida S3128
Telephone (800)049-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
13307 September 23, M;
October 7,14, 1903
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the un-
dersigned, desiring to
engage In buatneee under
the fictitious name The
ERIC GALLERIES at SIB
NW. 20 St.. Miami. Florida
Inlands to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida
raisllna shoe Corporation i
By: Mlron Outetetoi.
President
Dal Vails and Nstech. P.A.
Attorneys tor
CateJlne Show Corporation
M Grand Canal Dr..
Miami.'Fla. HIM
1SS07 September SO;
October T. 14. 81.
-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
POR
DADS COUNTY, PLORIOA
PROBATE DIVISION
File SSSsEEEf 0-7S2S
Division 63
IN RE ESTATE OP
KATHERTNE A MEYER.
DecsaMd
NOTICE
OT ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of KATHERTNE A
METER, deceased. File
Number 83-7030. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
is 3rd Floor. Dads County
Courthouse 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida ssiso
The names and addreasss of
the personal representative
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth
below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS Or
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OP THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom this
notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
psrsonal rapressntatlva.
venue, or Jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FTLED
WILL BE rOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 23. IMS.
Personal Representatives:
LAWRENCE ROBERT
BATSON
10410 8. W 139th Court
Miami. FL 33186
MARY JANE MORRIS
7330 S.W 39th Street
Miami FL 33155
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Ronald M. Friedman. Esq.
370 Minorca Ave. Suite 6
Coral Gables. FL SS134
Telephone: c 306 i 440-6800
12383 September 23. SO, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND POR DADS COUNTY
Civil Action Ms. 83-32464
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTA OLG A LUJAN.
Petitioner
and
ENRIQUE DE LA CRUZ
LOPEZ TORRES.
Respondent
TO: Enrique De la Cruz
Lopez Torres
Carre ra Segunda
No. 1900
Barrio Los Maltlres
Naipawlla. Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
Emlllo C. Pastor, attorney tor
Petitioner, whose address Is
Penthouse I. 1M South Miami
Avenue. Miami. Florida S31S0.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 31, 1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the re
Uef demanded in the complain
or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID I AN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 16 day of Sep-
tember, IBM.
RICHARD P. BRINKSR
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC P Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Emlllo C. Pastor. P.A.
Penthouse I.
IMS. Miami Ave.
Miami. Florida SSI SO
Telephone (800)872-0098
Attorney for Petitioner
September 23, SO;
October 7, 14. 1*84
eleventh cibcuit court
dade county, f lor i da
fc Cam No. 03-37410 (33)
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LUMENCIE C. GORDON.
Petitioner Wife.
WILLIE JOE GORDON,
Respondent-Husband.
To: WILLIE JOE GORDON,
Residence unknown,
hall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dis-
solution of Marrlags upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attor-
ney. OS N.W. 13th Avenue.
Miami, Florida. M1M, and 809
original with Court Clerk on or
before October 14. IMS, other
wise a default will be ante red
Septembers, IBM.
RICHARD BRINKER
By:B J Foy
Deputy Clerk
September 16; 1
38, SO, October 7, IMS I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 63-4471
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN STLBERSHER,
a-k-a
BENJAMIN A
STLBERSHER.
Deceased
notice or
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of BENJAMIN STLBER-
SHER. a-k-a BENJAMIN A
STLBERSHER, deceased, file
Number 88-0471, Is pending In
the Circuit Court tor Dads)
County, riortda. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which Is TS
West Flagler Street, Srd Floor
Room No 307. Miami. Florida
SSISO. The names and ad
drsssss of the psrsonal repre-
sentative and the personal rep-
i as salami's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS Or
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OT THIS NOTICE: (1) ail
claims against the e state and
(S) any objection by SB Inter-
ested person to whom this no-
tice was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris-
diction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FTLED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 23. IMS.
Personal Representative:
Howard W. SUbershsr
407 Essex Lane
Yardley. PA 19007
Personal Representative:
Netta H. Shlnbaum
400 Estrath Haven
Swarthmore. PA 19081
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Robert M Herman. Esq.
Blank. Rome. Com laky A Mc-
Cauley
4770 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida SSI37
Telephone: (808)073-0000
12270 September 33. SO. IBM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY.
Civil Action No. 03-32442
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OP MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
TE RE SIT A M. ROS.
Petitioner.
and
OSCAR L. ROS.
Respondent
TO OSCAR L ROS
107 -17.140 Road
JAMAICA. N.Y. 11434
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been files and commenced In
this Court and you are required
to serve s copy of your written
defenses, if any. to It. on CAR-
LOS M. MENDEZ. Esq.. Attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress la 2986 W. 4th Avenue.
HLALEAH Florida. 33012. and
file the original with the Clerk
of the styled Court on or before
October 14. IMS; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed tor In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week, tor four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORTDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami,
Florida, on this 10 day of Sep-
tember. IBM
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By. S. Venaal
Aa Deputy Clerk
13331 September 33,80.
October, 14,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
dssirtng to engage in business
under the fictitious nama EL
MUELLE DEL PESCADOR at
7991 8.W. M Street. Store 16,
Miami. Florida. HIM intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Luis Sanchei
133TB September M. 30;
October 7. 14. 1903
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTS SESWIC.
(NOPNOPERTY) *
INTHB CIRCUIT COURT he
THE ELEVENTH MlSuS
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA .J-
AND FOR DADE CoSh'ty
Civil ArtHm He. lM>iIV
ACTION FOR DISSOLuTL
OPMARRIAoi!
w-IS! MARlAQgor
and
PABLO RODRIGUEZ.
Respondent
TO: PABLO RODRIGUEZ
Cabanas. Ptnar del Rio
Fines A SentUta
Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY Nor,.
rTED that an action for Dee.
lutlon of Marriage has ben
filed against you and n^
ll,MllteMtT4 a copy of w
written defenses, if any, tooa
A. KOS8, Attorney ai U *
tomey tor Petitioner. whoH
addresa Is 101 N.W uth W
nue. Miami. Florida, and flu
Em original with the dark of
the above aty led court on or be
tors October 31. 1988. other-
wise a default win be entered
against you for the relief a*.
mended in the complaint or m-
tltJon.
Thls notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISHFLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 19 day of Sep.
tembsr. 1MB.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. Koaa. Attorney at Law, P.A.
101 N.W. 13th Avenue
Miami. Florida 3312*
Telephone: (300)326-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
(Publish) Mariano Sole Esq
12289 September 23.30;
October 7 14,1861
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICf
(NO PROPERTY)
-I IN THE CIRCUIT COURT0F
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. S3 336*4
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRI AGE OF
MYRNA LOPEZ
Wife,
and
PEDRO LOPEZ.
Husband.
TO: PEDRO LOPEZ
AlSArrleta
Bayamon. Puerto Rico
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlsa>
lutton of Marriage has been
Died against you and you art
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Albert L. Carrlcarte. PA., at-
torney for Petitioner, whoet
address Is 2491 N W 7th Street,
Miami. Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the
shove styled court on or before
October 28. IMS: otherwue a
default will be entered agalnit
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive wssks In THE JEW-
ISH rLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and On
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 19 day of Sep-
tember. IMS.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Kathleen Shaw
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L Carrlcarte P.A.
2491 N W 7th Street
Miami. Florida M13B
Telephone (300)049-7917
Attorney tor Petitioner
September 23. SO:
October 7,14,lW
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEBEBJ
GIVEN that the underalgnea.
dssirtng to engage in buelneai
under the fictitious namt
RUSTIC PELICAN riSH
MARKET at TM1 S,*-"
Str. Store IS. MBS* %*
Ida. S8100 intends to re|0Mr
aidname with thsjO**-*
Circuit Court of Dads Oouaty.
Florida
LulaSanche.
122Te September 38. w
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERBBT
GIVEN thai the
dssirtng to engage In 1
under the fictitious
J.M.J. Air
113B0 8W M Terrace,
ria. SS1M Intends to
said name wrth the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dads County.
Florida.
Marco Dime
Jorge L Hernandes
USBT September 16, 38. 30;
OetoharT, IMS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
given that the undersign**
dssirtng to engage to buatBSSJ
- fictitious I
tuner n "" ^j
Something Special from Shert
Intends to register said1060*
with On Cterk of tha aw-"
Court of Dade County, Florida
Classic Applied
Products Inc
Attorney Richard Kroop
430 Lincoln Rd.
Miami Beach. rU.lS


Studley Radio Talk Show to
Feature Israel Volunteers
Friday, September 30,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Isouth Florida volunteers who
nated a month of their time to
out the Israel Defense
^es in their Operation Peace
Galilee effort during the past
will participate Monday in a
program on WNWS-radio
iblic Notice
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the flctlUoua name J. B.
MARTIN INDUSTRIAL
HARDWARE, Flamingo
Shopping Plaza, Stores Ss and
M at East 10th Avenue and Bth
Street. Hlaleah. Florida 88010,
Intends to register said name
. with the Clerk o' the Circuit
I Court of Dade County. Florida.
Juan H. Fernandez
ijjig September 80;
October 7, 14.21, 1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
Igiven that the underlined.
desiring to engage In business
under the flctlUous name
.MEDIC INTERNATIONAL a
ICO.. not a corporation at 168
ISE 1st Street. Suite 601,
Miami. Florida Intends to reg
I uter said name with the Clerk
lot the Circuit Court of Dade
I County. Florida.
jorge hurtado
Ilawofficesof
i harvey d. friedman
I Attorney for
I MEDIC INTERNATIONAL
11332S September 80:
October 7. It. 21.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
I GIVEN that the undersigned.
I desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
MIAMI MOTORS at 3034 C NE
1181 St. N. Miami Beach, Fla.,
I intends to register said name
Iwith the cierk of the Circuit
j Court of Dade County, Florida.
PHIUP J. DEL GROSSO
113324 September 80;
October 7.14,81,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
I GIVEN that the undersigned.
I desiring to engage In business
| under the fictitious names
Vogue Originals. Inc.. d-b-a
Simon Embroidery at BUM N.
I W 36 Ave.. Miami. Fla. 88148
Intends to register said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Bennle Schwartz, President
13311 September*);
October 7, 14.21.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83 0S4
Division 08
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DOROTHY LEVY,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of DOROTHY LEVY.
deceased, File Number 83-
0054, is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of
which is Dade County
Courthouse. 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida
33130 The names and ad-
dresses of the personal re-
presentative and the per-
sonal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All Interested persona are
required to file with this
court. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE: (l) aU claims
against the estate and (3)
ny objection by an Inter
"ted person to whom this
notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of
will, the qualifications
personal represent*
the
of the
AND OB-
BO FILED
FOREVER
ve, venue, or Jurisdiction
of the court
ALL CLAIMS
JECTION8 NOT
WILL BE
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice
JJ* begun on September 30.
^?Personal Representative
Richard Levy
3708 Blue Heron Drive
.LI" KB1* Florida **
ATTORNEY FOR PER-
T?ilAL REPRESEN-
TATIVE;
J** A. Brett
0. Drawer oo.
* Myere, TL MM
*POno: 818-884-1141
f
October T. IBB
with host Barbara Studley from b
to 9 p.m.
Benjamin Dinkes, regional di-
rector of a newly-opened
Volunteers for Israel office at the
Jewish Community Center in
Fort Lauderdale, said the
volunteer program has sent thus
far over 1,000 Americans to
Israel. The men and women who
for 30 days packed food and
clothing, cleaned and repaired
equipment, or worked on con-
struction and land projects
necessary to the security of
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADB COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 88-77*8
Division 81
(N RE: ESTATE OF
TTLLIE ZAVTDOW
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of TTLLIE ZAVIDOW,
deceased. File Number 88-7790,
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 83130.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
*egun on September SO, 1083.
Personal Representative:
HERBERT ZAVIDOW
AND RUTH KATZ
210 Harvest Commons
Westport, Conn. 08880
ITS Dundee Road
Stamford. Conn 08908
\ttomey for Personal
lepreaentatl ve:
temuel I. Left
c-o Leff, Pesetsky
and Zack. PA,
1367 NE. 182nd Street
No. Miami Beach. Fla. 83182
Telephone: 945-7501
15328 September SO;
October 7.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DAOB COUNTY
CIVILACTION
No. 13-33847
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage Of
CARMEN ADDERLY
OLIVER
PeUuoner-Wlfe,
and
KEITH OLIVER
Respondent-Husband.
TO: Keith Oliver, Respondent
730 Trethewey Drive,
Apt. 60S
Toronto Ontario,
Canada MOM 8AS
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
fled that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been Wed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on Brent E- Routman, at-
torney tor Petitioner, whose
address U 181 N.E. S3 Street.
Miami, FL SSlSt). and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
October 38. 19SS; otherwise a
default win be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each weak for four con
secutlve weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 98th day of
September, IMS. ____
RICHARD P. BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByK 3EIFRJJED
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Law Offices of Routman and
Routman
181 N.E. 83 Street. Second
Floor
Miami. FL 88188
Telephone: (306) 767-0800
Attorney for PeUtloner
11944 September SO;
October 7, 14.21.1988
Israel, were responsible tor
giving 1,000 Israeli army
reservists a month off to return
to their families.
The need for the program be-
came apparent, according to
Dinkes, as the Lebanon war
dragged on and on, and its effects
on Israel's economy and military
morale began to take its toll. He
said the program allowed Israelis
to return to their professions,
bouying the country's economic
productivity, and also gave them
much-deserved time off.
According to Dinkes, he has
received over 150 requests from
people living in Dade and
Broward counties to participate
in the program since he took over
at the Fort Lauderdale office this
summer. He said 34 people have
been approved to leave for Israel
by Nov. 2, while another 36 will
leave in the beginning of 1984.
A new program for college
students who want to join toe
Volunteers for Israel effort has
also been inaugurated, Dinkes
said, and is under the direction of
Dick Goldstein, the Florida state
director for Hillel Jewish Student
Centers. Students who join the
program perform military field
work during the days, while
pursuing their college studies in
Israel universities at night.
The courses programs offered,
which begin Oct. 6, Feb. 1, and
June 4, are geared toward
providing "an intimate under-
standing of Israel and the Is-
raelis the students will be work-
ing with during their tour of
emergency service," Dinkes said.
The college program, spon-
sored in conjunction with the
College Consortium for Inter-
national Studies and the Rock-
land Community College of New
York, offers students courses in
Hebrew Ulpan, Introduction to
the Land and History of Israel,
Introduction to Jewish Thought,
Perspectives on Israeli Society,
and Jewish Culture, all allowing a
student to earn up to 15 college
credits.
The tuition, which includes air-
fare, room, board, and tours, is
minimal, according to Dinkes,
and three-month, 15-credit and
one-month, six-credit programs
are available.
When Dinkes and his wife,
Sylvia put in their month of ser-
vice this summer, they "worked
and lived, and ate and slept in
camps side by side with Israeli
soldiers." Dinkes feels the
program offers a "unique" and
"intimate" view of this vital
aspect of Is. aeli life and therefore
will offer the students, and all
other volunteers as well, a chance
to truly know what Israel is all
about.
LEVINSON
Jennie D, 89, a local resident for over 46
years, died Sept. 21. She was formerly of
Mount Vemon, N. Y. Survivors Include a
son. Marten Levlnson; daughter,
Bemlce L. Parker; seven grand-
children: and six great grandchildren.
She was a pioneer member of Beth
David Congregation and Its Sisterhood,
a life member of the Miami Chapter,
National Children's Cardiac Hospital
for SO years, and a sister of Emunah
Chapter of Eastern Star 176. She waa
also a member of Breath of Life
Chapter, Coral Cancer League, the
Children's Center, a life member of the
Hebrew Academy, and belonged to the
Dade County Association for Retarded
Citizens. Funeral services were held
Sept. 25 at Gordon Funeral Home.
Interment waa at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
SOLOMON
Bessls. an area resident for the past 88
years, passed away. She waa the mother
of George of Dallas and Harold of North
Miami; grandmother of ten; and great-
grandmother of seven. Funeral services
were held Sept. 27 at Riverside Chapel.
KAPI. Miguel. Miami Beach. Sept 35.
Rubin Zllbert
WAGNER, Nathan. Miami Beach. Sept
26. Rubin Zllbert.
HANS, Arnold, Miami, Sept. 36. Star of
David.
GLEICH, Tessle. Miami Bsach.
Riverside.
SOSTHEIM, Tilly. Coral Oables, Sept
36. Riverside.
ALPER. Beatrice. Miami Beach.
BAZYLBR. Zellg. Miami Beach. Sept
21. Rubin-Zllbert.
GLASSER, Eatelle. 88, Sept. 38.
SILECHNIK. Edith K., 88. Bay Harbor
Island. Sept 37. Riverside.
GOTTLIEB, David, Miami Beach. Sept
38. Rubin Zllbert
TIARSMITH, Benjamin, Miami Beach,
Sept. 36. Rubin-Zllbert
RE ISM AN, Bertha. Miami Beach. Sept.
37. Rubln-ZUbart
STEELE. Irvtn. 61. Miami. Sept 37.
Riverside.
BLUM. Sidney. Rubln-ZUbert.
Germain. Aaron R si. North Miami
Beach. Sept. 28. Levttt-Welnsteln.
MATHEWS. Helena R S3, Miami
Beach, Sept. 27. Riverside.
DECKINGER. Sydney, North Miami
Beach. Sept. 38. Riverside.
SCHWARTZ. Ada. Miami Beach. Sept
27.
ALTMAN
Jack, 68, a resident of Miami since I960,
died Sept. 38. He earned his bachelor's
degree and master's degree of
education at the University of Miami
and was employed by the Dade County
Public School System for 29 years, first
as a teacher at Kenwood Elementary
and then as a visiting teacher for the
south area. Mr. Altman waa a member
of Phi Delta Kappa and the Masons and
was acUve with B'nal B'rlth and the
Teachers Bowling League. He also was
acUve with various aquare dance clubs.
Including the Ssulty Daugs. Olympla
Stars, Florida Crackers, and the Lin-
vllle Mt. Mixers. Survivors Include a
wife, Hern ice. son. Gary; daughter-in-
law, Lima, daughters, Jodl Altman and
Robin Mann; and son-in-law, Peter.
Funeral services were held Sept. 37 at
Riverside Chapel.
GLUECKAUF
Dr. Lewis, a resident of Miami Beach
and a practicing physician since 1947,
coming from Chicago, died last
Saturday. He was on the staff of Mount
Slnal Medical Center. Miami Heart
Institute, and St. Francis Hospital. HsIs
survived by a wife, Josephine; children,
Dr. Robert and Alexandra Olueckauf
'and Linda Olueckauf Pawligjer; son-ln-
law, Michael Pawllger; mother-in-law,
Minnie Simon; and granddaughter,
RacheUe Olueckauf. Funeral services
were held Sept. 36 at Blasberg Chapel
HIRRON
Aneda, of Miami Beach, a local resident
for over 00 yean, coming from St
Louis, Mo., died last Friday. Shs Is
survived by brothers, Julius and Lao
Levitt; sisters. Bobby Grossman and
Dorothy Caplan; and many nieces and
nephews Graveside services were held
Sept 26 Riverside Chapel was In
charge of arrangements.
UMffl
Louie B.. TO. of Miami Beach, died Baa*.
33. He had made Ms home here for the
past 33 years coming from N.Y.C. Hs
was a member of Shalom Lodge of B rial
B'rlth, where he had served as
president He was the husband of
Madeleine; father of Agnes Freund of
Miami; brother of Margaret LlgeU of
Montreal; and grandfather of four.
Funeral services were held Sept. 36.
Gordon Funeral Home was in charge of
arrangements and Interment followed
at Star of David Memorial Park.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SCHWM BROWS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
18840 West Dixie Hwy.
Represented by S levin. F O.
New York: <2121 26.1-7600 Queens Blvd & Tblh Rtl Forest Hilis, N.Y.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL *>
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin. F.D. Leoneid Zllbert, Founder
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
Miami Baach
Coral Qablaa
South Mlami-Kandall
DADE
The Only
Guaranteed
538-6371
No. Miami Baach-Hallandala
BROWARD
456-4011
Pre-Arrangamants
with
No Money In Advance
Main Of flea: 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
11


Page 16-B The Jewish FloridUn / Ftkfay. SapUmber 30,1968
James Galway to Openl

:
" -------i-----
i
ir
I
*
1
'Great Artist' Season]
James Galway. flutist, will,'
both perform with and conduct ,
the Orchestra of Miami for the"
inaugural presentation of thei
16th subscription season of
Temple Beth Shalom's "Great
Artist Series."
He will perform Sunday, 8
p.m., at the Miami Beach Theatre
of the Performing Arts, and he
will feature Haydn's Symphony
94, Mozart's Flute Concerto 2,
and Vivaldi's "The Four
Seasons," concertos in flute and
strings.
A book of "James Galway "s
Music in Time" will be published
next year.
JWV Project Helping
The Needy Planned
Arrangements for an annual
Thanksgiving community project
aiding the needy, sponsored by
the Abe Horrowitz Post 682 and
its Ladies Auxiliary of the Jewish
War Veterans, has been initiated,
according to Phyllis Shaw,
Auxiliary president.
She asked that anyone in-
terested in donating food to help
needy families during the
Thanksgiving holiday bring
items to the North Miami Beach
Police Department.
Book Review Planned
The book, "In One Ear and
Out the Other" by Sam Levinson
will be reviewed by Faye Bruck-
er. president of the Eilat Chapter
of Pioneer Woman-Na'amat at a
meeting of the chapter Tuesday,
1 p.m., in the auditorium of
Financial Federal Savings and
Loan Association, Washington
Ave.
Soloist Regina Balin, accom-
panied by Helen Skolnick on
piano, will present a musical pro-
gram.
Ren
earsato Underway
The Delta Players has an-
nounced that rehearsals for its
upcoming production in Yiddish
of Gilbert and Sullivan's "HMS
Pinafore" are currently under-
way.
Director Seenie Hurwitz said
that openings still exist for
male vocals to participate in the
chorus.
Beginning in January, perfor-
mances have been scheduled for
Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach
counties.
Dancers to Open Bet
Breira Cultural Season
Momentum Dance Company, a'
young South Florida dance
troupe, will kick-off the Fine Aria.
Series season sponsored by the
Temple Bet Breira Cultural Arts
Committee, Sunday, Oct. 9, 7:30
p.m.. at the temple.
The seven-member troupe will
present a program which includes
works in modern dance, jazz,
contemporary ballet, and post-
modern dance styles.
Talk on Humor Set
A talk on Jewish humor by lee- '
turer, Dora Meisel of Miami
Beach, and a musical program
featuring Arnold Cymes singing
traditional Yiddish songs, will
highlight a Sunday, Oct. 9 meet-
ing planned by the Kinneret
Chapter of Pioneer Woman-
Na'amat.
According to President Rita
Adoff, the session will be held at
12:30 p.m. in the social hall of
Temple Ner Tamid.
Lazarus Event Set
A luncheon meeting has been:
planned by the Emma Lazarus
Chapter ot Hadassah to take
place Monday. Oct. 10, 11:30
a.m., at the Holiday Inn, 88 St.
and Collins Ave. Dora Frankel is
in charge of arrangements.
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