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The Jewish Floridian ( September 9, 1983 )

UFJUD
' Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
amir Is Man of the Hour
^ut Begin StflTWoiTt Vacate Center Stage
JERUSALEM Israel's foreign Minister Yitzhak
kmir may be the Likud Party's new choice as Prime
bister to succeed Menachem Begin. But Begin, as of
Tuesday, was still delaying submitting his
^nation in writing to President Chaim Herzog a
nality without which the resignation does not become
rial.
Le of the reasons for the
Ly, it is explained here,
that Shamir appears to
[having increasing diffi-
^y in putting together a
/ government.
he ruling Likud Party of
ne Minister Begin is attempt-
court members of the op-
Ition Labor Party. Labor
lesman Yossi Bailin has al-
ly acknowledged that his
Ty wants to remain within the
ks of the Likud coalition.
THER PARTNERS, or po-
partners, include the Na-
Religious Party and
II. It was TAMI that origi-
threatened to bolt Likud, a
lure that was apparently the
\ straw in Begin's decision to
pi. As of early this week,
II still appeared to be
ding talks with Likud.
he Herut Party nomination of
Shamir came last Friday, when
he defeated by a 436-302 vote the
bid of Deputy Prime Minister
David Levy in the party's central
committee. In an acceptance
speech that did not end until 2
a.m., Friday, Shamir said that
his acceptance of the post was a
"temporary trust" which he
would willingly return to Begin
"whenever he wishes it."
Shamir made it clear from the
start that he intended to continue
the policies of Begin's govern-
ment. "This government has to
continue its work, its glorious
activity," Shamir said. Speaking
of Begin's achievements, he said
that the present Prime Minister's
six-year tenure "fortified Israel
. made peace with our neigh-
bor in the south (Egypt) eli-
minated a nuclear threat from the
east (Iraq) liquidated the in-
frastructure of the ememy of
Israel (the Palestine Liberation
Yitzhak Shamir
Organization) and strength-
ened Jewish settlement in the
land of Israel."
The 68-year-old Shamir was
born Yitzhak Yzertinsky in Ruzi-
noy, Poland. Fluent in English
and French, he was educated at a
Jewish school, and as a youth he
joined Betar, the Zionist move-
by
ment founded in Europe
Vladimir Ze'ev Jabotinsky.
SHAMIR EMIGRATED to
Palestine in 1935 at age 20, where
he adopted the Hebrew name
Shamir, which means "thistle" or
"flint." He was later head of the
Lehi organization, known as the
Stern Gang during the days of
the British mandate.
Twice arrested by the British,
he escaped twice, the second time
from a detention camp in British-
held Eritrea on the Red Sea in
East Africa, by hiding inside an
empty water tanker which took
him to the French colony of
Djibouti.
When Israel achieved indepen-
dence in 1948, he returned and
went into private business. In
1956, be was recruited by Mossad
as a secret agent., and for 10
years he operated out of Paris.
He is reported to have served
Mossad as deputy director gener-
al until 1965.
In 1970, Shamir joined Herut
and was elected to the Knesset
three years later. He became
Speaker of the Knesset after the
Begin Likud coalition victory in
1977.
HE WAS named to succeed
the late Moshe Dayan as Foreign
Minister in March, 1980. In that
capacity, he vigorously opposed
the Camp David accords, declar-
ing that Begin had not driven a
hard enough bargain with Egypt.
Shamir's immediate difficulty
in becoming Prime Minister
stems from the fact that Herut
holds only 24 votes in the Knes-
set. But its Likud bloc controls
46 votes. While coalition partners
have in principle since the Friday
election agreed to support
Shamir as nominee, individual
members are threatening to
defect.
Jumblatt Kayoes 'Reconciliation'
By EDWIN EYTAN
ARIS (JTA) Leb-
se Druze leader Walid
iblatt said that he will
attend the "reconcilia-
conference" convened
President Amin Gem-
to pave the way for a
Jceful takeover by the
te of the Shouf moun-
as after Israel's with-
kwal.
umblatt, speaking on the
nch radio from Damascus,
out any negotiations be-
en his forces and Gemayel
bm he accused of preparing "a
new Sabra and Shatila mas-
sacre."
Jumblatt charged Gemayel
with having used the army in
order to strengthen the influence
of the Christian Phalangists. He
said "Gemayel has turned the
national army (state-controlled)
into just another, better armed,
Christian militia."
OBSERVERS IN Paris believe
that Jumblatt's refusal to attend
the conference, which Gemayel
hoped to convene last weekend,
spells its doom as other Lebanese
opposition leaders, such as
former President Suleiman Fran-
jieh and former Premier Rashid
Karami, will probably follow suit.
The Shiite Amal leader, Nabih
Berri, known for his close con-
5744
HAPPY
NEW
YEAR
**
JEFFERSON
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OUS STRENGTH IS TOOT SECOTJTL
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3 Sunny Ul^Boutorart and 18170 CcOixfvmT,^ tacts with the Druze forces con-
trolled by Jumblatt, will probab-
ly also boycott the meeting.
Meanwhile, reports from the
Shouf area say the Lebanese
army victory in regaining control
in Beirut has served to stiffen
Druze determination to resist the
area'3 takeover after the Israel
Defense Force withdraws.
The French expect fighting to
intensify in the Shouf area, and
ordered one of their main units,
the aircraft carrier Foch to Leba-
non where it will be stationed off
Beirut, joining up with the U.S.
carrier Eisenhower and several
French cruisers.
PRESIDENT Francois Mit-
terrand also dispatched one of his
closest advisors, Francois
deGrossouvre, to Beirut to try to
mediate between Gemayel and
the opposition. Grossouvre at-
tended last weekend's tripartite
talks between Jumblatt,
Gemayel's representative and
U.S. special envoy Robert Mc-
Farlane.
Mitterrand told his govern-
ment that France wants ^ to
avoid "getting bogged down" in
a Lebanese civil war but will con-
tinue to fulfill its obligations
within the multinational force.
France has 2,200 men in the
force, which includes the U.S.,
Britain and Italy. An estimated
100 Lebanese soldiers were killed
and hundreds wounded in the
Marco BgMMj in the Beirut area.
Happy New Year
Alfred Golden, Exec. V.P.
Leo Hack, V.P.
William Saulson
Jack Weiss, F.D.
William Seitles
Bernard Eilen
Barney Selby
Carl Grossberg
Riverside Memorial Chapel
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Page 2-A* The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, September 9,1983

MinffH8|8MH
In the Jewish month of Tishri,
approximately 3800 years ago, an
event took place that had a profound
affect on the conscience of humanity.
It established the principle that
Man alone is responsible for preserving
the gift of freedom granted to him by
God at the Creation.
The experience of the patriarch
Abraham, the father of the Jewish
people, launched a new era of human
understanding. For Abraham's will-
ingness to sacrifice his most cherished
possession, his son Isaac, on behalf of
his faith and ideals,gave man a new
"bBMMMHBI
direction and purpose for life.
The Biblical story of Abraham's
triumph, therefore, is not merely an
account of the test of the strength of
one man's convictions and prepared-
ness to act on behalf of what he
believed. It is a test all humanity must
be ready to face. For freedom to live,
develop and worship as one chooses is a
gift not easily acquired, and once
obtained, of ten requires sacrifice to
maintain.
If humanity is unprepared to meet
its obligations to preserve freedom, it
may ultimately lose it
- -r no wiiiii
Rosh Hashana, the solemn Jewish
New Year, reaffirms the principle
established nearly 4000 years ago, that
Man s destiny to be free lies in his
own hands.
As the Shof ar is sounded on Rosh
Hasnana.it summons humanity to
unite in the cause of freedom and jus-
tice It bids mankind to heed the pleas
of all who suffer from oppression and
slavery. It rekindles the spirit of hope
and peace for humanity.
his souieVke8 ** d*y inwhich Man met
It's what makes us Jews.
Miami Beach: 1920 Alton Road (19th St.)
Normandy Iile: 1260 Normandy "
Miami: 1717 S.W. 87th Avenue (Dougl" n
North Miami Beach: 16480 N.E. 19th A
Dade County Phone No.: M'-l/V
Hollywood: 2280 Hollywood Bl.
Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarae)
8701 W. Commerical Blvd.
Broward County Phone No.: S-t*'
Wet Palm Beach: 4714 Okeechobe* "
688-8676 .
Five chapel* earving- the New Yor*
Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
rW Ch.p*. l/r.r.l l>.rlo
M-S-8-8S
Spooaorla* The GUARDIAN PLAN* tfiffi
Fraarraa**. Faaeral Fiora.'*'
M-B-8-M


MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
September 9, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02849

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla
Creation Date:
September 9, 1983

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02849

Related Items

Related Items:
Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper

Full Text
T J [Tume 56 Number 36 Six Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, September 9,1963
V 1
Price $3.00
-i-
' ' }&

May Peace Be On
Your People, Israel'
57U


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 9,1983
%
In the Jewish month of Tishri,
approximately 3800 years ago, an
event took place that had a profound
affect on the conscience of humanity.
It established the principle that
Man alone is responsible for preserving
the gift of freedom granted to him by
God at the Creation.
The experience of the patriarch
Abraham, the father of the Jewish
people,launched a new era of human
understanding. For Abraham's will-
ingness to sacrifice his most cherished
possession, his son Isaac, on behalf of
his faith and ideals, gave man a new
direction and purpose for life.
The Biblical story of Abraham's
triumph, therefore, is not merely an
account of the test of the strength of
one man's convictions and prepared-
ness to act on behalf of what he
believed. It is a test all humanity must
be ready to face. For freedom to live,
develop and worship as one chooses is a
gift not easily acquired, and once
obtained, often requires sacrifice to
maintain.
If humanity is unprepared to meet
its obligations to preserve freedom,it
may ulUmately lose it
Rosh Hashana, the solemn Jewish
New Year, reaffirms the principle
established nearly 4000 years ago, that
Man's destiny to be free lies in his
own hands.
As the Shofar is sounded on Rosh
Hashana,it summons humanity to
unite in the cause of freedom and jus-
tice. It bids mankind to heed the pleas
of all who suffer from oppression and
slavery. It rekindles the spirit of hope
and peace for humanity.
It evokes the day in which Man met
his soul.
It's what makes us Jews.
Miami Baaeh: 1920 Alton Road (****
Normandy hit: 1260 Normandy Vi*
Miami: 1717 S.W. $7th Avenue North Miami Beach: 1*480 N.E. A*
Dade County Phone No.: BMW
Hollywood: 2230 Hollywood "
Ft. Lauderdale (Tamaraci
6701 W. Commerical BIL
Breward County Phone No.. J"JJ.
Wat Palm Beach: 4714 Okeechobee V
883-8676 fc
Fiva ehapeli aarrinr the New Tor.
Metropolitan area.
RIVERSIDE
Spoaaoria. Tk. GUARDIAN PLAN* W
Prmrraacaa funeral Program. PaW
......
. . ,'
M-S9-M
M-t-t-M
*: '':?*&i:I **&':??ir aaaaaj


amir Is Man of the Hour
3ut Begin StflTWon't Vacate Center Stage
' Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
. JERUSALEM Israel's Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Imir may be the Likud Party's new choice as Prime
' ster to succeed Menachem Begin. But Begin, as of
Tuesday, was still delaying submitting his
^nation in writing to President Chaim Herzog a
aality without which the resignation does not become
Sal
ne of the reasons for the
Jay, it is explained here,
fhat Shamir appears to
[having increasing diffi-
ly in putting together a
i government.
ruling Likud Party of
ne Minister Begin is attempt-
Jto court members of the op-
Ition Labor Party. Labor
lesman Yossi FJailin has al-
ly acknowledged that his
Ty wants to remain within the
Is of the Likud coalition.
THER PARTNERS, or po-
lial partners, include the Na-
il Religious Party and
ill. It was TAMI that origi-
/ threatened to bolt Likud, a
lure that was apparently the
(straw in Begin's decision to
pi. As of early this week,
II still appeared to be
ding talks with Likud.
he Herut Party nomination of
Shamir came last Friday, when
he defeated by a 436-302 vote the
bid of Deputy Prime Minister
David Levy in the party's central
committee. In an acceptance
speech that did not end until 2
a.m., Friday, Shamir said that
his acceptance of the post was a
"temporary trust" which he
would willingly return to Begin
"whenever he wishes it."
Shamir made it clear from the
start that he intended to continue
the policies of Begin's govern-
ment. "This government has to
continue its work, its glorious
activity," Shamir said. Speaking
of Begin's achievements, he said
that the present Prime Minister's
six-year tenure "fortified Israel
. made peace with our neigh-
bor in the south (Egypt) eli-
minated a nuclear threat from the
east (Iraq) liquidated the in-
frastructure of the ememy of
Israel (the Palestine Liberation
Yitzhak Shamir
Organization) and strength-
ened Jewish settlement in the
land of Israel."
The 68-year-old Shamir was
born Yitzhak Yzertinsky in Ruzi-
noy, Poland. Fluent in English
and French, he was educated at a
Jewish school, and as a youth he
joined Betar, the Zionist move-
ment founded in Europe by
Vladimir Ze'ev Jabotinsky.
SHAMIR EMIGRATED to
Palestine in 1935 at age 20, where
he adopted the Hebrew name
Shamir, which means "thistle" or
"flint." He was later head of the
Lehi organization, known as the
Stern Gang during the days of
the British mandate.
Twice arrested by the British,
be escaped twice, the second time
from a detention camp in British-
held Eritrea on the Red Sea in
East Africa, by hiding inside an
empty water tanker which took
him to the French colony of
Djibouti.
When Israel achieved indepen-
dence in 1948, he returned and
went into private business. In
1955, be was recruited by Moesad
as a secret agent., and for 10
. years he operated out of Paris.
He is reported to have served
Mossad as deputy director gener-
al until 1965.
In 1970, Shamir joined Herut
and was elected to the Knesset
three years later. He became
Speaker of the Knesset after the
Begin Likud coalition victory in
1977.
HE WAS named to succeed
the late Moshe Dayan as Foreign
Minister in March, 1980. In that
capacity, he vigorously opposed
the Camp David accords, declar-
ing that Begin had not driven a
hard enough bargain with Egypt.
Shamir's immediate difficulty
in becoming Prime Minister
stems from the fact that Herut
holds only 24 votes in the Knes-
set. But its Likud bloc controls
46 votes. While coalition partners
have in principle since the Friday
election agreed to support
Shamir as nominee, individual
members are threatening to
defect.
Jumblatt Kayoes "Reconciliation9
By EDWIN EYTAN
>ARIS (JTA) Leb-
Itse Druze leader Walid
iblatt said that he will
attend the "reconcilia-
conference" convened
President Amin Gem-
to pave the way for a
Iceful takeover by the
|te of the Shouf moun-
is after Israel's with-
kwal.
|umblatt, speaking on the
nch radio from Damascus,
out any negotiations be-
en his forces and Gemayel
bm he accused of preparing "a
new Sabra and Shatila mas-
sacre."
Jumblatt charged Gemayel
with having used the army in
order to strengthen the influence
of the Christian Phalangists. He
said "Gemayel has turned the
national army (state-controlled)
into just another, better armed,
Christian militia."
OBSERVERS IN Paris believe
that Jumblatt's refusal to attend
the conference, which Gemayel
hoped to convene last weekend,
spells its doom as other Lebanese
opposition leaders, such as
former President Suleiman Fran-
jieh and former Premier Rashid
Karami, will probably follow suit.
The Shiite Amal leader, Nabih
Berri, known for his close con-
5744
HAPPY
NEW
YEAR
JEFFERSON
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tacts with the Druze forces con-
trolled by Jumblatt, will probab-
ly also boycott the meeting.
Meanwhile, reports from the
Shouf area say the Lebanese
army victory in regaining control
in Beirut has served to stiffen
Druze determination to resist the
area's takeover after the Israel
Defense Force withdraws.
The French expect fighting to
intensify in the Shouf area, and
ordered one of their main units,
the aircraft carrier Foch to Leba-
non where it will be stationed off
Beirut, joining up with the U.S.
carrier Eisenhower and several
French cruisers.
PRESIDENT Francois Mit-
terrand also dispatched one of his
closest advisors, Francois
deGrossouvre, to Beirut to try to
mediate between Gemayel and
the opposition. Grossouvre at-
tended last weekend's tripartite
talks between Jumblatt,
Gemayel's representative and
U.S. special envoy Robert Mc-
Farlane.
Mitterrand told his govern-
ment that France wants to
avoid "getting bogged down" in
a Lebanese civil war but will con-
tinue to fulfill its obligations
within the multinational force.
France has 2,200 men in the
force, which includes the U.S.,
Britain and Italy. An estimated
100 Lebanese soldiers were killed
and hundreds wounded in the
fierce fighting in the Beirut area.
Happy New Year
Alfred Golden, Exec. V.P. i Leo Hack, V.P. William Saulson Jack Weiss, F.D. William Seitles Bernard Eilen Barney Selby 11
Carl Grossberg
Riverside Memorial Chapel
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.-
| :


PagetA The Jewish Ploridian Friday,
9,1983
'Akedat Yitzhak' Is Central Theme ofTEghTIoly 1W
The first of the High Holy Days. Rosh
Hashanah, began on Wednesday evening.
Friday is the second day of this observance,
which launches the New Year 5744. On this
second day in the synagogue, a dramatic
highpoint is reached with the reading of
Genesis, ch. 22, dealing with the Akeda t
Yitzhak, the binding of Isaac.
The various aspects of this trial of faith
have been studied through the centuries.
Some have suggested that the meaning of
the story is God's rejection of human
sacrifice. Others have called Abraham and
Isaac giants of faith for their readiness to
accept God's fateful word.
And still another interpretation points to
a reborn Isaac who is a changed individual,
prepared to accept his future role as one of
the three Fathers of Israel.
Whatever the higher meaning of the
Akeda, the story itself dovetails with our
traditional recitation of a line on fast days,
and Yom Kippur. the second of the High
Holy Dsys. next Friday. Sept. 16. is
just such a day. "May He that answered
Abraham our Father on Mount Moriah
answer us and hearken to the voice of our
weeping today."
Perhaps we are not so much weeping
today as wondering about the future, and it
is strange that our future as Americans
seems especially bound up on this High
Holy Day occasion with our future as Jews.
For the first time in a long time, in fact
since our involvement in Vietnam, there are
American soldiers fighting and dying
this time in Lebanon.
It is a fighting and a dying that should
not have been. It would not have been were
our nation's leaders more clearly aware of
Israel's own war in Lebanon why it was
launched, what its aims were and how
Israel hoped to achieve them.
For these questions why, what and
how all dealt with, and to this very day
continue to deal with issues of equivalent
importance to every American, not just to
Jews, were the American people permitted
to be acquainted with them.
America Misinformed
The war, which began in Lebanon only
months before the advent of the Hebrew
Year 5743, was a war to root out Soviet
surrogates from the virtual occupation of
Israel's northern neighbor. It was a war to
put a halt to the bombings of Israel's
northern border villages by these oc-
cupants. It was a war once and for all to
end the arrogant terrorism of the Palestine
Liberation Organization. All these goals
were achieved. At first.
Unhappily, the American people never
were permitted to become acquainted with
these facts. Nightly, their television sets
bombarded them with half-truths,
distorted facts and twisted insinuations
about Israel's purposes. Daily, the
newspapers of the nation fed them with
fictional accounts of war stories until
Israel's best leaders and highest purposes
were frustrated and stymied, and some
even turned away from their commitments
in shock.
Perhaps the most stunning story of the
Outgoing Hebrew Year 5744 was the report
of the Commission of Inquiry into the
Sabra and Shatila massacres, which in
^Jewish Floridiari
0HKiiMmiiT-iiiiM>.iniMiia t nmm
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'
Israel placed excessively introspective
blame on top government officials and
Israel Defense Forces officers as the intent
of the inquiry was magnified to suggest
"guilt" for the war itself.
Justice Was Denied
In the end, the United States prevailed.
It sold out just about every Israeli gain in
the war with the double result that
Americans generally are just beginning to
feel. Not only will Israelis suffer this
betrayal of an ally in future years, but so
will Americans.
Indeed. Americans are already suffering
this betrayal with the presence of VS.
Marines in Beirut, two more of whom were
killed in combat earlier this week against
feuding Moslem. Druze and Christian
forces as they explode back into the areas
to continue their chrfl war that the Israelis
have just vacated on their redeployment
march to the Awali River.
And so, it is as we have said. There are
two futures for us on the High Holy Day
season one as Americans and a second as
Jews. In each role it is of highest
significance for us that we recall the Akeda
in the synagogue on Rosh Hashanah.
And that, on the fast day, we pray to
Him Who answered Abraham to "answer
us and hearken to the voice" of our own
prayers today. For an answer is desperately
needed by all Americans who still do not
understand what is happening in Lebanon.
And by us, for we continue to believe in
the justice of what Israel wrought in
Lebanon, and to weep that our own country
has denied that justice, and is being
punished for it at this very moment.
How People Look Foolish
uMCmrriOM urn iuw fi o. nr-moi t -....-moo t,m
^riistfm*
Number 36.
Friday, SepUmbei-9, 1983
Volume 56 *
THERE seems to be no limit to
the effort people make to delude
themselves. Take the case of
Lester Brown, a staff member of
the Subcommittee on Environ-
ment, Energy and Natural Re-
sources.
According to Rep. Jack Brooks
(D., Tex.), who is chairman of the
House Government Operations
Committee, what Brown did,
with chilling success, was to alter
transcripts of 1982 hearings of
his committee. The result was
that Republicans are now ac-
cusing Brown of having made
them look foolish.
THIS IS the typical self-
delusion I am talking about. For-
get Republicans specifically. The
truth is that politicians generally
don't have to be tricked into
looking foolish. They can do that
all by themselves.
Or take the case of poor, old
John Timpane, a professor of
English at Rutgers University,
who wrote an article in the Sun-
day paper last weekend about the
' .E?n's and P^sure of teaching
Putting himself into the posi-
tion of people and what their re-
actions might be these days upon
first meeting somebody as quaint
and archaic as a Shakespeare
professor. Timpane imagines an
' academic'' and an intellectual"
who "comes bunking out of the
library at 5 every day with a piece
of toilet paper stuck to his heal
(sic).
CONSIDER this misfortune: a
Rutgers professor of English vic-
timized by a spelling error. But
this bitter experience is merely
the result of his own self-delusion
that he considers his work unique
enou*h to. .wrifa about it,,in, ,
newspaper. Aa a consequence, he
let himself in for typical news-
paper nonsense: shipwreck on the
shoals of American illiteracy.
Or, seen from another point of
view, the arrogance of a news-
paper which perceives of itself as
sufficiently above the illiterate
crowd as to publish an essay by
an English professor at Rutgers
only to ink-stain its ambition
and pride with a spelling error in
the very first paragraph.
The variations on this theme of
the human capacity to look fool-
ish are endless. But in their
specific cases, the Republicans
and John Timpane each received
an assist from the outside. Not
so, however, with Joseph Kralt,
the columnist, who like polit-
icians generally, appear to be able
to look foolish all by themselves
IN TWO separate articles last I
week. Kraft offered up his view ot* |
the American role in Lebanon,
with carefully-footnoted com-
mentary about Israel and why
Israel is at tault for President
Reagan's new little Vietnam.
Overall, what disturbs Kraft is
.J^Jara^U.witjbdiawalof iU.for-.
Continued on Page 13-A


Friday, September 9, 1983/The Jewish Floridian P*e6-A
leTTig stories of 5743
Lebanon Dominated the News Reporting Ccmdemnutwn
, GEOFFREY W1GODER
Repercussions of the
rablsrael conflict have
in dominated develop-
lents in the Jewish world
w the Pa8t twelve
nths. Already in the
first days of the year,
I massacre in the Beirut
ps sent out shock
aves. Apart from the
tural revulsion at the
rn of events, Jews were
.rticularly sensitive to the
ndemnatory reaction of
_ir non-Jewish neighbors,
ad during the first days of
decision on the role of the
rael Government, Dias-
ra voices were added to
iose inside Israel demand-
,g a commission of in-
iry.
I The establishment of the
ahan Commission and its
easured report were widely wel-
bmed by Jews everywhere as a
fealthy expression of the preval-
hce of the Jewish tradition of
istice.
The Lebanese War caused
luch confusion among Diaspora
i'ws although there were indica-
ons that Israel's actions were
Jipported by the "silent major-
|y" of world Jewry. Moreover
massive media onslaught on
krael often caused a defensive
action among Jews who came
kllying around the Israel flag.
1 HOWEVER, there were those
[ho remained critical, especially
nong the intellectuals. Al-
jiough Jewish leaders have con-
antly tried to discourage any
ublic criticism by Jews in other
Lmtries of Israel's policies, open
hticism inside Israel of certain
tficial policies during the Leba-
pse War was taken as legitim-
ation for the public expression
critical views in the Diaspora.
h the course of the year, the
ritical voices became less strong,
Specially following the signing
the Israel-Lebanon peace
reaty.
Terrorist activity during the
pr continued to show that in
K eyes of the perpetrators of
prror no distinction was to be
irawn between Israelis and Jews
I other countries. The trial of the
huld-be assassins of the Israel
Xmbassador to London, Shlomo
Vrgov. revealed that their hit list
Event of the year: A column of Israeli tanks
advance into Lebanon during the Peace for
Galilee campaign, which started on June 6,
1962. The Israel-Lebanon accord was signed
on May 17, 1983.
covered English-Jewish person-
alities and institutions that had
no particular Zionist orientation.
Then a bomb set off at the en-
trance to the famous Rome syna-
gogue on the festival of Shemini
Atzeret killed a child and
wounded many other worship-
pers. The anger of the Jews of
Rome exploded against those
Italian leaders who only a few
weeks earlier had given a warm
welcome to Yasir Arafat.
THE BOMBING evoked ex-
pressions of sympathy and iden- i
tification with Italian Jewry on
the part of Italian parties and
movements, some of whom had
previously been keeping a dis-
tance from the community.
Among some of the Italian Jews,
especially in the younger genera-
tion, the Rome bomb led to an in-
tensification of their feeling of
Jewish identity.
Another synagogue attack oc-
curred in Brussels on Rosh
Hashanah when machinegun fire
was opened during service, and
several people were injured. Syn-
agogues and Jewish institutions
throughout Western Europe are
having to maintain tight secu-
rity, which is often a heavy
burden and expense. The saddest
consequence of this need for se-
curity has been the closing of one
of the world's most famous and
beautiful Jewish houses of wor-
ship the Portuguese Syna-
gogue (the Snoga) in Amster-
dam.
The city's small Sephardi com-
munity could not meet the costs
of the extensive protective
measures required to protect the
synagogue in the face of Arab
terrorist threats.
In Russia, the emigration of
Jews came to a virtual stop. Al-
though many tens of thousands
of Russian Jews are waiting to
leave, a mere trickle of 100-200 is
permitted to depart each month.
World protests are having little
effect especially as the U.S.
and the USSR remain in stand-
Continued on Page 11-A
Vance joins 'writers' guild'
His New Book Reveals A Score of Old Carter Rivalries
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON
(JTA) Now that Cyrus
Vance has weighed in with
his account of his tenure as
President Carter's Secre-
tary of State, "Hard
Choices,"' all three of the
chief architects of the
Carter Administration's
foreign policy Carter,
Vance, and Zbigniew
Brzezinski, who was Na-
tional Security Adviser
have published books.
The Vance book, as did Car-
\Tht Israel-Lebanon accord was signed on
Way 17 0f tht Outgoing Hebrew Year 6748 at
lMt Lebanon Beach Hotel in Haide, Lebanon.
ter's memoirs, "Keeping Faith,"
and Brzezinski's "Power and
Principles," confirms that there
were differences over foreign
policy within the Administration,
particularly due to the rivalry
between Vance and Brzezinski.
But the one area where there
seemed to be cooperation and
agreement was the Middle East.
Even before Carter took office,
he and Vance agreed that the
United States would have to play
an active role in seeking a Middle
East settlement. "Without ques-
tion, the bedrock of the Carter
Middle East policy would con-
tinue to be our commitment to
Israel's security," Vance wrote.
But he adds:
"WE AGREED, however, that
the critical importance of stable,
moderate, pro-Western regimes
in the Middle East and access to
Arab oil meant that a return to a
passive U.S. posture was not
realistic. The United States
would have to be a fair and active
mediator between the parties if
there was to be any chance of a
genuine peace. Playing this role
would necessarily require serious
attention on the part of the
mediator to both sides of the dis-
pute and a sincere effort to ad-
dress the Palestinian problem.
"Because of the intimate
American association with Israel
in previous Middle East peace ef-
forts, for Carter to adopt an
activist, balanced policy carried a
significant political risk. He
could be seen both at home and in
Israel as tilting toward the Arabs
and pressuring Israel to make
dangerous territorial conces-
sions ."
Vance goes on to say that "The
President and I were convinced
that no lasting solution in the
Middle East would be possible
until, consistent with Israel's
right to live in peace and secur-
ity, a just answer to the Palestin-
ian question could be found, one
almost certainly leading to a
Palestinian homeland and some
form of self-determination."
TO THAT END, Vance makes
clear the Administration sought
for a way to bring the Palestine
Liberation Organization into the
Mideast negotiations, only to be
frustrated, as has the Reagan
Administration, by the PLO's re-
fusal to do even the minimum re-
quired of it by the U.S.
The position that Vance out-
lined as the Carter Adminis-
tration prepared to take office
was essentially the same one it
followed for the entire four years.
The Carter Administration re-
mained wedded to seeking a com-
prehensive settlement, rather
than a step-by-step approach, a
position that the Reagan
Administration also believes in
Continued on Page 14-A
Shown is chief
Kimche, with Maj
looking
Israeli negotiator,
\ego
Av
Gen. Avraham
David
Tamir

' .. return to a passive US.
posture was not reoJfetw?
,-/: .....
. ......
. i .


Page*-A Tte Jewish rToridian/ Friday. September 9.1963
Andropov Said
To Be Talking
Hard Line
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON
Sen. Dennis De-
Concini (D., Ariz.) said that
Soviet leader Yuri Andro-
pov took a "very hard
nosed" position toward
human rights during a
meeting with nine U.S.
Senators on Aug. 18 in
Moscow.
DeConcini. who participated in
the meeting, told the Jewish Tel-
egraphic Agency in an interview
here: We presented a joint
statement prepared by aD nine of
us and within that statement
there was a discuss ion of human
rights. Fouir particular cases
were mentioned Andrei Sak-
harov. Anatoty Sharansky. Uri
Oriov and Raoul Wallenberg. We
also brought to (Andropov's) at-
tention the reduction in the
number of exit visas for Soviet
Jews."
CONTINUING. DeConcini
said: "In his response to our
statement. Andropov said some-
what facetiously that it was a
lucky day for him because we had
picked such bad examples Then
Andropov compared differences
between what human rights
means in the Soviet Union and
our country. He said that the
USSR should not try to make the
U.S. think like it does on human
rights, and that the U.S. in turn
should not try to make the Soviet
Union come to our standards. If
(Andropov told the Senators)
this continues, it will never lead
to batter relations between the
two countries."
DeConcini said that Andropov
went over each of the four cases
with the Senators. He told them
that Sakharov was "sick" and
that he had written an article in a
foreign magazine which called on
the U.S. to declare war en the
Soviet Union.
The Arizona Senator and the
Soviet leader referred to Sharan-
sky as a "spy" and affirmed that
"there will be no discussion of
him until his prison time is
finished." He also described Or-
iov as a spy, DeConcini said. As
to Wallenberg, Andropov insist-
ed, according to DeConcini, that
the former Swedish diplomat who
rescued thousands of Jews
during the Holocaust, is not in
the Soviet Union.
THE ISSUE of Jewish immi-
gration was also discussed in the
meeting and Andropov, the
Senator said, tried to show with
statistics from 1945 to 1983 that
the USSR's record on Jewish
emigration was positive. Andro-
pov claimed that 270,000 Jews
have left the Soviet Union since
1945. The Soviet leader contend-
ed that about 92 percent of the
applications for exit visas were
approved, DeConcini said.
The Senator reported that he
met with a number of refuseniks
in Moscow who expressed their
gratitude for the support they get
from American Congressmen.
The other members of the dele-
gation were: Senators Dale
Bumpers (D., Ark.) Claibome
Pell (D.. R.I.) Russell Long (D.,
La.). Patrick Leahy (D., Vt.l,
Howard Metzenbaum (D., Ohio),
Donald Riegle (D., Mich.), Paul
Sarbanes (D., Md.l. and James
Sasser(D.,Tenn.)
JTA Fmturti Syndicate
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President
S.F.W.C.
SaolM.Zabd
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IDF Withdrawn
Syria Makes MSveTo Return ToTacated Areas
[BEIRUT In the wake
Israel's completed with-
awal from the Shouf
fountains, Christian,
loslem and Druze militias
lean a crossfire of tanks
fcd artillery Sunday that
ned many lives.
I long-expected Israeli with-
iwal, postponed twice when
Reagan Administration
[pealed to Jerusalem to remain
I force until the Lebanese Army
uld gain better control of the
uation, began Saturday as
ristians and Moslems almost
nediatety tested one another
Ian exchange of artillery and
fcketfire.
ISRAELI ARMY spokesman
Col. Yehuda Weinraub
acterized the withdrawal as
1 step in the total redeploy-
from Lebanon.'/ The
liury command said that "On
night of the 3rd and 4th of
it ember, the Israel Defense
i commenced pulling out its
era from the Shouf and Aley
Duntains. The forces are mov-
; toward the redeployment line
\n% the Awali River."
verhead, Israeli jets circled in
btective cover of convoys of
diers who left the Shouf and
py mountains behind. Over
jt radio, spokesmen
ruard Wounded
At Ascor
[TEL AVIV (JTA) An Is-
Defense Force "guard at the
|Nur prison camp in south Leb-
})ii was mounded during a riot
iong the Arab prisoner-detain-
Four of the inmates were
untied by shots fired by the
ards to quell the disturbance.
p'he army spokesman said that
inmate was caught while
Jing to escape, and fellow in-
lea stoned the guards, hitting
V of them in the head. The
ards were ordered to fire
rning shots.
promptly attacked the with-
drawal as "without coordination
with the Lebanese army."
But IDF spokesman Weinraub
replied that Lebanese army
forces had been "informed of our
intentions and were given an
opportunity if they had so
desired to redeploy. I don't know
if they will seize this opportunity.
I certainly hope they shall, and I
really do hope Lebanon will be
able to control this area."
THE LEBANESE are ob-
jecting to Israel's plan to move
its forces to more defensible posi-
tions along the Awali River and
that they had been given insuf-
ficient time to reploy But the Is-
raelis are replying that "At this
stage in time we have no reason
to believe that if we gave them
any mere time, that anything
would change."
Saturday, Beirut radio also
charged that Israel had set fire to
their abandoned equipment and
bunkers as they pulled out of the
Aley mountain area. The Israeli
withdrawal was "contrary to
what was expected and to what
Israel had announced," Beirut
radio declared. It said that the
Lebanese government was trying
to reduce "tension and fighting in
the mountains."
A broadcast Sunday described
shells falling along the main road
from Aley to the east of Beirut.
Israeli armed forces
acknowledged the falling shells
and said they were coming from
Syrian forces in the Bekaa Valley
who were advancing on Beirut.
In Tel Aviv, Israel's Defense
Minister Moshe Arens warned
Syria on Monday not to take over
territory vacated by_ Israeli
"troops. "We made it clear we do
not want hostile forces entering
the area that we leave," he said.
"It should be clear to the Syrians
that this includes them."
BUT SYRIA has already an-
nounced that the Israeli with-
drawal to positions south of the
Shouf means "Lebanon becomes
partitioned."
Beirut radio declared that
"The Lebanese-Israeli agreement
is considered frozen, especially
since it has not been ratified."
Jewish National Fund
to
mttm
&<* Jjbbl Irving Lehrm.n
Chrmn. JNF Fdtn.
Abraham Qrunhut
* JNF Or. Miami
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board
Emaat Samuel*
Vice-Pros. JNF Qr. Miami
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln Rd.,
Miami Beach, FL. 33139
5384464
The report continued: "Prime
Minister Chefik Wazzan and
Foreign Minister Eke Salem told
Secretary General of the Arab
League Chadli Klibi in a
telephone call that this with-
drawal took place outside the
context of any agreement, par-
ticularly the Israeli-Lebanese
agreement."
The Israeli army command
insisted, however, that "advance
S
I notice of the pullback was given
i to representatives of the
Lebanese army, the Druze and
Christians in all sectors, with a
demand to maintain quiet in the
area."
In Washington, meanwhile,
asked if the Israeli pullout would
hurt his Administration's peace
efforts, President Reagan
replied: "No, Israel had already
delayed (the pullback) twice at
our request."
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUES AFFILIATED WITH
ul nitcd Synagogue of (-America
SOUTHEAST REGION-SOUTHERN COUNCIL
282 S. University Drive, Plantation, FL 33324
(305)947-6094
MARSHALL BALTUCH
Southam Council Vice President
MARLENE LUSSKIN
Regional Vice President
DR. ALAN MARCOVITZ
Treasurer
FRANKLIN D. KREUTZER HERBERT LELCHUCK
Regional President Secretary
WISH ALL A HAPPY AND HEALTHY NEW YEAH
AND INVITE YOU TO AFFILIATE WITH
AND TO WORSHIP IN ONE OF THE FOLLOWING
CONSERVATIVE SYNAGOGUES IN SOUTH FLORIDA
<
wari Hate rwh
HAROLD WISHNA
Executive Director
BRUCE KLASNER
Youth Director
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue, Miami
854-3911
7500 S.W. 120th Street, Miami
238-2801
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Mr. Philip H. Bergman, Pree.
Mr. Sheldon G. Mills, Exec. Dlr.
B'NAI TORAH CONGREGATION
1401 N.W. 4th Avenue, Boca Raton
392-8566
RABBI THEODORE FELDMAN
CANTOR DONALD ROBERTS
Mr. Sheldon Jontlff, Pres.
TEMPLE SHOLOM
132 S.E. 11th Avenue
Pompano Beach
942-6410
RABBI SAMUEL APRIL
CANTOR JACOB RENZER
Mr. Reuben B. Sperber, Pree.
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th Street, Miami Beach
866-0221
RABBI MAYER ABRAMOWITZ
CANTOR MURRAY YAVNEH
Mr. HaroM Rosenststn, Pree,
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
222S N.E. 121st Street, North Miami
891-5508
RABBI ISRAEL JACOBS
CANTOR MOSHE FRIEDLER
Mr. Elliot Elseman, Pree.
Mr. Irving Jaret, Exec. Dlr.
Rabbi Emeritus
Dr. Joseph A. God Inkel
TEMPLE ZION
800 Miller Drive, Miami
271-2311
RABBI DR. NORMAN N. SHAPIRO
CANTOR BENJAMIN ADLER
Mr. Gerald Goldfarb, Pres.
Mrs. Dorothy H. Grant,
Exec., Dlr./Adm.
TEMPLE OR OLOM
8755 S.W. 16th Street, Miami
221-9131
RABBI SAMUEL RUDY
Mr. Alan M Schulberg, Pies.
Daniel Ucker, Exec. Dlr.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
538-2503
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CANTOR ZVI ADLER
Mr. Sidney Cooperman, Pres.
Mr. QersM Tsub, Exec. Dlr.
TEMPLE BETH AHM
9730 Stirling Road, Hollywood
431-6100
RABBI BERNARD P. SHOTER
CANTOR ABRAHAM KOSTER
Dr. Avriel C. Cohen, Pree.
Mrs. Toby Berkowltz, Exec. Ok.
TEMPLE BETH ISRAEL
7100 W. Oakland Park Boulevard
Ft. Lauderdele
742-4040
RABBI PHILLIP A LABOWITZ
CANTOR MAURICE A. NEU
William Brooks, Pros.
Mr. Jules Shapiro, Pres. Emeritus
William Goldstein, Exsc. Dlr.
TEMPLE NEW TAMID
7902 Carryte Avenue, Miami Beach
866-6345 or 866-9833
DR. EUGENE LABOVITZ. Rabbi
CANTOR EDWARD KLEIN
Merry Nat ha neon, Pres.
TEMPLE BETH DAVID
4SS7 Hood Road
Pslm Beach Gardens
845-1134
RABBI WILLIAM MARDER
CANTOR EARL RACKOFF
Mr. Leonard Oilman. Pres.
BETH TORAH CONGREGATION
10S1 North Miami Beach Boutevsrd
North Mlitnl B#6cti
7-7821
RABBI MAX D. LIPSCHITZ
RANDALLKONIQSBURG
Assistant Rabbi
CANTOR ZVEEARONI
Ml*. L#SteH EflQsMa Pitt.
Mr. Hsrvey L Brown, Exeo. Dlr.
TEMPLE BETH AM OF MARGATE
7208 Roayal Palm Boulevsrd, Margati
9744650
RABBI PAUL PLOTKIN
RABBI EMERITUS
DR. SOLOMON GELD
CANTOR IRVING GROSSMAN
Mr. Alfred Cohen. Prealdent
Mr. Harry Hlrach, Executive Director
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 A vent ura Boulevard
North Miami Beach
935-0666
RABBI DAVID B. SALTZMAN
CANTOR LAWRENCE TUCHINSKY
Mr. Roy Sager, Pros.
Richard Auerbach, Pree.
NORTH BAY VILLAGE
JEWISH CENTER
7900 Htopsnots Ave.
North Bay Village 33141
861-4006
RABBI MARVIN ROSE
CANTOR JACOB TAMBOR
Mr. Irving Bunts, Pros.
TEMPLE SINAI
1201 Johnson Street, Hollywood
920-1577
RABBI RICHARD J. MARGOLIS
RABBI DAVID SHAPIRO
RABBI EMERITUS
Mrs. Marcy Kameron, Pree.
Rsyond Chart, Exec. Mr.
TEMPLE EMETH
5780 West Atlantic Avenue, Delrsy
owmai
RABBI BERNARD A SILVER
CANTOR NAFTALILINKOVSKY
Mr. Morris Anapolaky, Pros.
TEMPLE BETH TORAH
9101 15 N.W. 57th Street
TAMARAC 33321
721 7680
RABBI KURT F. STONE
CANTOR HENRY BELASCO
Mr. Sol Schuiman. Pree.

TEMPLE SAMUEL
BBSS aW. 152nd Avenue
Miami
RABBI EDWIN FARBER
Mr. Lawrence a Metecrt, Pros.
Dr. Joyce Qlasser, Exec Dlr.


rigto-ft
merfetHHirMWUui' riiv.l"
ffe Rejected Herut Pleas
How Begin Refused To Nominate His Successor
By GIL SEDAN
and HUGH OBGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Menachem
Begin rejected requests by
Herut Party leaders last
week that he personally
nominate his successor to
avoid a bitter contest
between Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir and
Deputy remier David
Levy.
Begin reportedly told his
Herut colleagues: We tire m a
democracy and not in a monarchy
in which the leadership a passed
on in succession. There are in-
stitutes which are established in
democratic elections, and they
will select the man they wish to
see leading them."
OHEL SHEM hall in Tel Aviv
was readied far the secret ballot
last thureday night by the 900
members of the Herut central
Hi The voting was
delayed for more than an hour
because the election chairman.
Elkanan Vinitzky, was late in
arriving, and when he got there
the rubber atpi required for
the balloting could not be found.
The voting was also delayed to
allow for the arrival of two
central committee members who
were finally brought to the hall
by ambulance accompanied by
A Herut spokesman said that
Begin would not attend the
voting because he was "weak and
tired." Until the actual voting
began, the headquarters of
Shamir and Levy remained open
in an effort to sway central com-
mittee members to vote for their
respective candidate.
THERE WAS no reliable
estimate as to who would win.
and both the Shamir and Levy
camps expressed optimism. At a
meeting Wednesday, the two
contenders reached an agreement
that whoever wins, the personnel
structure of the Cabinet would be
retained.
No matter who the winner in
the election, there were serious
fears in the Likud camp that he
might face difficulties in keeping
the old coalition intact. One
obstacle was the announcement
by five Likud Knesset members
that they would not join the new
coalition government unless it
pledged to form a government of
national unity with the Labor
Alignment.
The five were Yitzhak Berman,
Dror Seigerman and Menachem
Savidor of the Liberal Party
wing, and Yigael Hurwitz and
Mordechai Ben-Porat of Telem.
Should these five defect, the
new Likud government would
have only 59 seats in the 120-
member Knesset, two short of a
majority. The possible defection
of these five MKs was not being
taken lightly in view of the
defection last year by two other
Likud MKs. Amnon Lin and
Yitzhak Peretz. They joined the
Labor Alignment and thus made
Labor the largest party in the
Knesset.
IF THE outgoing Likud
administration could not agree on
a new list of at least 61 Knesset
members to form a new govern-
ment. President Hergoz might
very well give the Alignment a
chance to form the new govern-
ment. Even if the Likud managed
to keep its present component
factions intact, there may still be
a need to renegotiate a new
agreement within the coalition.
The Aguda indicated that it
wanted firm assurances that the
old coalition would remain now
that Begin is no longer at its
helm. The TAMI Party, whose
secretariat last week voted to
quit the government unless the
policies were geared
more closely to meet the needs of
low income groups, continued to
insist on those changes as the
price for remaining in the new
coalition
The Liberal Party demanded a
redistribution of Cabinet port-
folios, starting with the post of
Deputy Premier, which belonged
to the late Shncha Ehrnch.
Several Liberal Party members
rr^t*r to discuss switching allegiances.
Alignment sources said this was
not really a form of defection
from the Likud but merely the
result of "some Liberals having
second thoughts about where
they belong, in the wake of the
war in Lebanon and concessions
made by the Likud to the reli
gious parties."
HOPES FOR a government of
national unity have not been
ruled out by the National Reli-
gious Party and TAMI. The
NRP. despite its allegiance to the
coalition, set an overall goal of
bringing the Alignment into the
coalition after it is formed by the
Larod.
However, there was little
enthusiasm for a national unity
government in Alignment ranks.
Younger elements in Mapam. an
Alignment partner, threatened to
leave the Alignment if it agreed
to a national unity government.
The small Shinui movement also
ridiculed such an idea, saying it*
would be a national paralysis
government.
Meanwhile, bitterness
developed in the Shamir-Levy
campaign. Maani quot*)
Sharon, tbe forme/*
Minister who is
Wfchoot Portfolio,
would not serve in
j-d by Levy. He repo3
he would rather alh^hSS
the uhra-nationalBtTri
Party.
ALL THE SeveD
Cabinet ministers 5uJ:n
Shamir. Both he and Levvl
been close to Begin over .
years. The friendship bee-
Begin and ShanurgcesbS
the pre-State days. dJH
tune when Shamir was a htval
the Stern Group, and Bennl
the Lrgun. Although the two,
parted ways during those i
ground days, their views have,
Continued on following page
May the sound of the shofar awaken us to thejlight
of time and summon us to spend our days with pwpose
Wannest wishes to the QreatefcMiami Jewish community[for a year of
health, happiness and prosperity from the Officers and 'Board of Directors
of the greater cMiami Jewish Federation^
PresiOent
Norman H
Upoff
immediate Past President
Harry A (Hap) Levy
Vice Presidents
Norman Braman
Donald E Lefton
Joe* Levy
Aaron Podhurst
Howard R Scharlin
Marilyn K. Smith
Secretary
Forrest Raffel
Associate Secretary
HeieneBerger
Treasurer
Cal Kovens
Associate Treasurer
Steven J Kravrtz
Executive Vice President
Myron J Broflie
Micnae Adie'
Samuel i Adier
L Jules Arkin
Bernardo Batievsky
Tneodore Baumntter
Harold Beck
Jeffrey Berkowrtz
David Blumberg
Beniamm Botwimck
Fred Chekanow
Tim Cohen
Irving Cypen
Myra Farr
David B Fleemar
Howard Frank
Harvey Friedman
Malcolm Fromberg
Dr. Phillip Frost
Mikki Futerrwck
Gary Ger son
Stanley Gilbert
Alfred Golden
Peter Getting
Golae Goldstein
Sheldon Guren
Aiex Ha'oerstem
Kenneth Hoffman
Arthur Horowitz
Joseph Ka^ter
Meiv.n Kartzme'
Ezra Katz
Sheoard King
Jay I Kisiak
Jonathan K s a-
A>an Kiuger
S.dney Lefcour
Robert K Levenson
Frances B Levey
JacK H Levine
Rabb Max A Lipschitz
Elien Manaic
Stanley C Myers
Sdney Olson
David L Perkms
Nan Ricn
Barry Ross

Robert Russe.
Jeffrey Same*
David Scnaecter
Geraid K Scnwarz
MaxrneE Schwartz
Hon Ruth Snac<
Roberta Snevin
FreaK Shocnet
Edward Snohat
Morton Suberma"
Harry B Smith
Guillermo Sostchin
Eli Timoner
Robed Traung
Joseph Linger
Philip T Warren
Harry Weitzer
Dr George Wise
'Board of Directors of the South Dade Branch
of the Greater JMiami Jewish Federation^
Chairman
Mikki Futerrwck
Vice Charmen
Alvin Brown
Debby Grodmck
Marc Hauser
DrorZadok
Rabbi David Auerbach
Paul Berkowrtz
Minda Bernstein
Robert Bernn
PaulBreitner
Shelly Brooke
Gary Brooks
Bert Brown
Kenneth Cohen
Sidney Fagin
Joan Fisher
Howard Frank
Susan Fufler
Morns Futermck
Bernard Goodman
Dr Harry Graff
Robbie Herskowrtz
Micki Hochberg
SamHochberg
Kenneth Hoffman
PauiKade
Dr Bart Ketover
Marilyn Kohn
RonKohn
Frances B. Levey
Joel Levy
Norman Ueberman
NeilLittauer
Ellen Mandler
Bluma Marcus
Dr. Robert Martin
Unoa Minkes
Judge Robert Newman
Stanley Newmark
Sydney Newmark
Dorothy Oppenham
ElaneRoss
SandiSamole
BMSauison
Norman Shoik
SamSmargon
FranStorper
Harry Weitzer
Barry White
Barry Yarchin
Miriam Zadok


Sandistas Vow
Friday, September 9,1963 / The Jewish Floridkn ?age 9-A
They'll Return Synagogue To Nicaragua's Jewi
NEW YORK (JTA) -
iThe Anti-Defamation
I League of B'nai B'rith has
I said it welcomes the Nic-
laraguan government's as-
surance that the country's
lonly synagogue will be
[given back to its congre-
gation.
The pledge for the synagogue's
I return and other assurances
relating to Nicaraguan Jews were
I made by Antonio Jarquin, the
I Nicaraguan Ambassador to the
I United States, at a meeting with
I six ADL leaders in Washington.
I The diplomat acknowledged dur-
[ing the meeting that a mistake
I had been made when authorities
I seized the synagogue following
Ithe July. 1979. Sandinist revolu-
Ition.
IN RESPONSE to Jarquin's
[remarks, Kenneth Bialkin,
[ADL's national chairman, stated
[that the "record of the govern-
Iment of Nicaragua will be de-
Itermined by actions, not asser-
tions Nicaragua should do
I what is right, just and fair, acting
I on the basis of facts."
The meeting was held to
discuss charges made by ADL
last May that the Nicaraguan
J Jewish community had fled be
I cause of Sandinist anti-Semitism
and the confiscation of Jewish-
owned property, including the
synagogue. The ADL had first
raised the issues in a private
meeting with Nicaragua's For-
eign Minister, Miguel d'Escoto,
I in October, 1981.
According to Abraham Fox-
man. ADL's associate national
director and head of its Inter-
national Affairs Division, Jar-
quin's statements were the first
substantive responses to ADL's
I complaints. Foxman said that
' positive elements in the Ambas-
sador's remarks included the
following:
Begin Refused
To Nominate
Continued from preceding page
mained similar on foreign and
defense issues.
The real split between Begin
and Shamir occurred when
Shamir abstained on the vote to
approve the Camp David ac-
cords. But this did not hinder
Begin from appointing him
Foreign Minister in 1979, when
Moshe Dayan resigned from the
government.
Levy, 45, has always been a
Begin protege. He immigrated to
Israel from Morocco at the age of
20 and went through a difficult
period of life in the development
town of Beit Shean. He was once
jailed for 12 days after running
amok at the local employment of-
fice, demanding proper employ-
ment.
LEVY WAS at first considered
a drawing card for the Sephardic
voters, but over the years he has
gained respect from all segments
of the Israeli electorate as an up
and coming leader.
They Fly to Israel
NEW YORK (JTA) Ful-
tilling the pledge they made last
year at the conclusion of Yom
I Kippur services, 360 Israelis are
scheduled to leave the United
Mates and will bring in the New
ear in Jerusalem. The Israelis,
whose return has been coordinat-
ed through the Israel Aliya
Center, flew to Israel on Sept. 6
5 on a special El Al flight
chartered. by Abie Nathan.
HE DENOUNCED anti-
Semitism as "morally reprehen-
sible" and declared it is contrary
to Nicaraguan law; pledged to
clarify the status of Jews in exile
by informing ADL of any charges
pending against them and said
those who have no charges
against them would be welcomed
back to Nicaragua; and sug-
gested that those who have no
charges against them should
petition the Ministry of Justice
for the return of their confiscated
property, as has been success-
fully done by some other Nic-
araguans.
At the meeting, Bialkin urged
that the government of Nic-
aragua take specific steps to
insure the security of Jews wish-
ing to rejoin the few members of
the Jewish community who re-
mained in the country despite
intimidation.
Jarquin was also told that
some Nicaraguan Jews plan to
file complaints with the Inter-
American Commission for Hu-
man Rights charging that their
property was confiscated without
trial on the basis of false allega- The ADL group requested that
tions. Nicaragua allow the Inter-
American Court of Human
Rights, an international tribunal,
to be the final arbiter over any
human rights violations found by
the Commission. This procedure,
it was pointed out, is consistent
with the American Convention on
Human Rights to which Nic-
aragua is a signatory.
ay the New Year
be one of Health, Happiness
and Prosperity for you and
your family
Mr. and Mrs. Fred K. Shochet
and Family
$
roc n
TT
Night descends, prayers begin, the candles lit,
apples dipped in honey, rounded challah loaves,
the shofar sounds, the circle is completed.
May we all be inscribed in the Book of Life
for a healthy, happy, prosperous and peaceful new year.
bank leumi le-israel "iwrt pn
Regional Management
342 Madison Ave.
Suite 1104
New York. NY 10173
Tel: (212)850-9500
Telex: 177 390 bltrut
Miami Branch'
407 Lincoln Road Mall
Suite 7B
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Tel: (305)531-3378/9
Telex: 264112
24-32
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let tO)* 12111
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refHNC
With over 455 branches sad office* woMwidt


^ciu-a tnejfwan rionami/ f tumj, aeptantwr v, 1963
ana
reeting

NATIONAL BANK OF FLORIDA
OFFICERS
JOSEPH H KANTER
Chairman of the Board &
Chief Executive Officer
GEORGE M. APELIAN
President & Chief Operating Officer
DIRECTORS
SAMUEL T. COLE
Partner.
Gallagher-Cole Associates
NORMAN S. EDELCUP
Vice Chairman &
Chief Operating Officer
National Banking Corporation
of Florida
GWYNN M. ELIAS
Real Estate Developer
GEORGE M. GOOD
President. Bertram Yacht Co.
A Div. of Whittaker Corp.
CHARLES J. HANDY
President
Jay-Cee Mfg. Co.
HARRY S. KANTER
Vice Chairman. National Bank of Florida
JOSEPH H. KANTER
Cnairman. The Kanter Corporation
Chairman. National Bank of Florida
EDWARD A. KELLY
Senior Vice R-esident.
National Bank of Florida
FRED K. SHOCHET
Publisher. Jewish Flondian
Group Newspapers
FRANKLIN TOLIN
President.
Tolin Construction. Inc.
ROBERT E. WILDERMUTH
President.
The Kanter Corporation
BANK OF FLORIDA
IN SOUTH FLORIDA
OFFICERS
GEORGE M. APELIAN
Chairman of the Board
JOSEPH SHULMAN
President
DIRECTORS
SAMUEL T. COLE
Partner.
Gallagher-Cole Associates
NORMAN S. EDELCUP
Vice Chairman &
Chief Operating Officer
National Banking Corporation
of Florida
JOSEPH H. KANTER
Chairman. The Kanter Corporation
Chairman. National Bank of Florida
HARRY S. KANTER
Vice Chairman .'---'-.
National Bank of Florida
RICHARD E. RECKSON, ESQ.
Partner.
Blank. Rome. Comisky & McCauley
CHARLES H. ROSENBERG
Builder Developer
FRED K. SHOCHET
Publisher.
Jewish Floridian
Group Newspapers
WILLIE TAYLOR
President.
Ambassadors Fifty-Four. Inc.
GEORGE M. WILSON
Chairman. Hoisum Bakers
MONROE ZALKIN
Moss Manufacturing. Inc.
Notional Bonk of Florido
Bonk of Florido
in South Florido
and the Kanter Family
5000 Biscayne Boulevard
3550 Biscayne Boulevard
265 S.E. First Street
20099 Biscayne Boulevard
(305) 576-4200
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South Miami
(305) 665-1106
MEMBER FDIC

;.-*-


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Biff-
Lebanon Dominated Developments

Continued from Page 5-A
I off positions so that Russia is not
LsSptible. as previously, to
pressures from the West.
NOR HAS Yuri Andropov's
taking over from Leonid Brez-
hnev made any discernible differ-
twice on policy towards Jews.
lAnatolv Sharansky and other
| refuseniks" still languish in
I remote confinement. Would-be
emigrants to Israel continue to
(suffer various forms of harass-
ment. Jewish culture is sup-
pressed. Anti-Semitic literature
I is circulated.
A world Solidarity Conference
,*ith Soviet Jewry held in Jerusa-
lem in March brought 1,500 dele-
I gates from many parts of the
[world who heard the U.S. United
Nations representative, Jeanne
Kirkpatrick, bring a promise
from President Reagan that "we
I will not forget Soviet Jews."
I They have not forgotten, but
1 little progress has been achieved
| in assisting them.
There was more success with
Jews wishing to leave Rumania,
I whose emigration earlier in the
I year had been in effect stopped
lowing to the difficult conditions
I imposed including the repay-
Iment of the entire cost of their
I higher education. As a result, the
I U.S. revoked Rumania's "most-
favored nation" status. Within a
I few months Rumania relented
I and won back her MFN.
THE SHADOW of the Holo-
caust fell over the Jewish world
in many ways. Grim reminders of
the sufferings of French Jewry
Israel Will
were revived with the arrest in
Bolivia of Klaus Barbie and his
removal to France for trial. The
"butcher of Lyon" earned his
sobriquet for his torture, murder
and deportation of Jews,
resistance fighters and children
while he was Gestapo chief of
Lyon. The evidence is being col-
lected and charges prepared for a .
trial next year. Also in France
Maurice Papon, former French
Budget Minister, was charged
with "crimes against humanity"
in connection with the deporta-
tion of Jewish children in 1942.
And the death was revealed (it
had occurred in Spain in 1980) of
the most notorious of France's
wartime Jew-baiters, Louis Dar-
quier de Pellepoix, Vichy's
General Commissioner for Jewish
Affairs.
The 50th anniversary of Hit-
ler's accession to power was
widely marked throughout the
world as a warning that such an
event must never recur. And in
Warsaw, the 40th anniversary
commemoration of the Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising, organized by
the Polish Government, was,
attended by Jews from manyl
countries, including a large dele-,
gation from Israel. '
In" the arts, the Australian
author, Thomas Keneally's
"Schindler'8 Ark," an account of
how a German saved over a thou-
sand Jews, won the coveted
British Booker Prize, while Hol-
lywood produced one of its few
films to treat a Holocaust subject
in "Sophie's Choice." The 70th
anniversary of the birth ot Kaoul
Wallenberg was marked by gath-
erings and TV programs and
the lingering hope of some that
he might still be alive, languish-
ing in a Soviet prison.
AMONG THE year's other
events: Jewish groups were again
permitted to visit Falasha vil-
lages in Ethiopia; it was revealed
that under pressure from the Nic-
araguan authorities, all the tiny
Jewish community had left that
country a couple of years ago;
and the Jewish-bom Archbishop
Lustiger of Paris was created a
cardinal.
The 30th Zionist Congress was
held in Jerusalem; although
marred by political infighting, it
remained an impressive demon-
stration of the commitment of the
Cwish people to the State of
srael and of the positive role
ilayed by Israel in the life of the
iaspora.
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
BOUGHT AND SOLD
Invest in
Israel Securities

WE'RE SPECIALISTS IN
ISRAEL SECURITIES
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Withdraw
Totally,
Dulzin Says
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTAJ -
| Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
Jewish Agency and World Zion-
ist Organization Executives, said
here that "in the not too distant
future Israel will totally with-
draw from Lebanon, letting Syria
stay there." In Dulzin's opinion,
this would constitute a basis for a
long-range agreement between
Syria and Israel.
He told the Zionist Organiza-
tion of Canada that "there is no
future for Lebanon as a state."
He said that the war in Lebanon
"was a most difficult but also a
very important one for Israel and
that, with the exception of Syria
and Libya all Arab states are
willing to start a dialogue with
Israel"
The Zionist leader stressed
"the honeymoon" relationship
Israel enjoys today with the U.S.
following the Reagan Adminis-
tration's terrible disappointment
with the so-called moderate Arab
states whose words and promises
have proved unreliable would
continue.
Regarding the solution of the
Palestinian problem, Dulzin said
"there will never be another new
Arab state in the region." Peace
>n the region will be achieved only
through negotiations between
Israel and Jordan, not between
Israel and the Palestinians.
On other matters, Dulzin fore-
cast a government of national
unity in Israel whose primary
objective will be to deal with the
thorny issues of the standard of
living which has been hard hit by
rampant inflation, with the in-
tensification of immigration from
the diaspora and with Jewish
education around the world. It
was decided by the Zionist Orga-
nization of Canada that a number
of scholarships be awarded to
Canadians studying in Israel.

The Management and
Empbyees of
EL AL Israel Airlines
wish our passengers,
friends and Jewish People
everywhere,
Health, Prosperity d Peace
in 5744.
mJMJZ'ElXJ/AC7N^'EC7J/AC7M^rEC?
I


-..
Chevsson Predicts
Return toTformal TTeiTWitli Israel
France continues to respect its
former pledges to Israel and cor-
siders that the first step towards
a generalized negotiation musth
a dear Palestinian recognition;
Israel.
By EDWIN EYTAN
. PARIS (JTA) -
Foreign Minister Claude
Cheysson said in an inter-
view here that Franco-
, Israeli political relations
would revert "to normal'"
as soon as all Israeli troops
evacuate Lebanon. In an
interview with the French
Jewish weekly, Tribune
Juive, Cheysson said that
Franco-Israeli cultural,
technical and economic re-
lations "have remained un-
changed" but said that on
the political level serious
differences separate the two
countries.
The Minister clearly implied
that there will be no exchange of
ministerial visits as long as
Israeli troops remain in Lebanon,
though he said "the dialogue is
open" after he had met on several
occasions with Israeli Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir at the
United Nations in New York.
IN THE first major govern-
mental explanation of France's
policy in the Middle East since
the start of the "Peace for
Galilee" operation June, 1962
Cheysson said "there can be no
real negotiations (in the Middle
East) as long as the Israeli gov-
ernment and the Knesset fail to
accept the Palestinian people's
right to self (i< termination and
the need to evacuate the occupied
territories."
Cheysson said that France
fully backs the peace plan pro-
posed by President Reagan, "al-
though at one point we go further
than the American" plan. He
added: "If there is one subject in
the world in which we blindly
follow the American lead it is on
the evacuation of foreign troops
from Lebanon. But we harbor nc
illusions; the responsibility for
Shofar Link Ties N.Y. Jews
With 'KoteT Via Tel-Connection
NEW YORK (JTA) A "telecommunications"
link tied Jews here to a congregation 6,000 miles away at
the Western Wall in Jerusalem on the eve of the Jewish
New Year 5744. The two groups simultaneously blew the
Shofar and sent each other wishes for peace in the world,
it was reported by JWB.
AT MIDNIGHT SATURDAY, Sept. 3, when peni
tential prayer services were recited, Rabbi Joseph Sim-
ckes blew the Shofar at Hollis Hills Jewish Center in
Queens. Simultaneously, U.S. Navy Chaplain Arnold
Resnicoff, stationed with the Sixth Fleet, blew the Shofar
at the Western Wall. The time in Israel was 6 a.m., Sun-
day, Sept. 4.
Simckes and Resnicoff, who are first cousins, then
wished each other best wishes for peace throughout the
world, those wishes also representing their respective
congregations. Simckes made contact with Israel by
dialing a telephone number at the Wall. The entire
proceeding was amplified so that each congregation could
hear the other.
NEW YORK
ONE WAYALL WEEK
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the departure of the foreign
forces is obviously not Europe's
nor France's but," stressed the
minister, "that of the United
States."
The minister said that Uh;
conditions seem ripe for a nego-
tiated peace in the Middle East.
He said "there are now two poss-
ible venues (the Reagan proposal
and the conclusions of the Fet
summit* for negotiations."
Cheysson made it clear that
escsrs-
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Anatoly Shcharansky could have
told you about Soviet brutality
but he cant. He, too, like the South Korean airliner, was
in the wrong place at the wrong time.
The place the soviet union
the time today
and so he languishes in a Soviet prison, another victim of Soviet repugnant
disregard for human dignity, justice and morality.
Show your contempt and revulsion for Soviet barbarity by asking our
President to demand the release of the Prisoners of Conscience in the Soviet
union.
NOW!
send this ad today to President Ronald Reagan, The white House, Washington,
D.c. 20500.
South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry, 4200 Biscayne Blvd.,
Miami, FL 33137.
CEDARS MEDICAL CENTER
EXTENDS
NEW YEAR'S GREETINGS
TO THE READERS
OF THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
At this special time, Cedars' Board of Directors,
Medical Staff, Auxiliary, Volunteers and Employees wish
you and yours a Healthy Happy New Year.
CEDARS MEDICAL CENTER
1400 N.W. 12TH AVENUE
MIAMI FLORIDA
325-5511
&tatf*KMdMdM^ ttW>*w*Btofc'


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
No Help Is Needed To Peel Foolish
Continued from Page 4-A
a* to the Awali River. Kraft i
this as a move that is destructive
w the best interests of the United
States never mind that na-
jjons generally function in their
own best interest and not in an-
other's. Note, for example,
France and Great Britain, not to
mention the United States.
To support his thesis, Kraft
[ reasons this way: In every Israeli
M from the first in 1948
through the Yom Kippur War of
1972, American prestige grew in
the Middle East because it could
force a winning Israeli people to
accept the role of loser and give
back substantial if not all of the
territories it had conquered.
THIS WAS even true in the
[legendary 1967 Six-Day War in
which Israel ceded the strat-
egically and economically im-
portant Sinai Peninsula to Egypt
under the articles of the Camp
David accord of 1979 a dozen
I years later.
But in Lebanon, Israel's with
Idrawal to the Awali River, ac-
cording to Kraft, represents an
Israeli return of territory at
I precisely the time that the United
States found itself in a supplicat-
ling position of begging Israel not
I to move lest the endless struggle
I among Christians, Moslems and
Druze should erupt again and put
I the impotent Gemayel regime out
I of business.
This would pave the way for a
[Syrian return into Lebanon in
force, with Hafez Assad's
ultimate aim in mind to incor-
porate the Lebanese into his
[vision of a "Greater Syria." A
\Soviet-dominated Greater Syria,
I warns Kraft.
THE SOVIET issue and the
[poor Lebanese, themselves,
laside, why is this significant? Be-
cause, argues Kraft, the Israelis
leave the U.S. high and dry. If
they had refused to leave, then
President Reagan and all his
flunkies could accuse the Israelis
of being intransigent (that dread-
ful word again) and threaten
them with all sorts of reprisals to
which the flunky media would
shout amen.
Thereafter, the pressure on
Israel would mount as in the
past. For example, when Presi-
dent Nixon and sweet, old, love-
able Henry Kissinger threatened
the Israelis in October, 1972 that
if they didn't quit whipping the
Egyptians both north and south
of the Suez Canal, and if they
didn't call a halt to their symbolic
drive on Cairo, the U.S. would
leave them to the Russians.
Kraft's game-plan ends this
way: The Israelis would finally
put their tails between their legs
and quit Lebanon, precisely as
they quit beating up on Egypt in
1972, and the U.S. could once
again bow to the applause of the
Arab world.
IN EFFECT, Kraft's vision for
peace in the Middle East de-
mands an Israeli whipping boy
for Arab moderation and friend-
ship. Furthermore, in analyzing
the Israeli experience in Lebanon
as a "defeat," Kraft refuses,
along with the media generally,
to accept as true what the Israelis
have claimed all along: that they
want no Lebanese territory
that the invasion in the first place
was an operation to silence the
PLO rocket emplacements aimed
at settlements in the north of Is-
rael.
And so, the Israelis aren't real-
ly giving anything up. They
never intended to keep any of it
at all, as their withdrawal clearly
indicates. But Kraft's vision is
defective for yet another reason.
He argues that the United States
played no role whatever in the Is-
raeli war in Lebanon in the sense
that, unlike in other Israeli wars
when Washington had been fore-
warned, this time the operation
came as a complete surprise.
This argument must join
Kraft's other about the Israeli
decision to invade Lebanon aa
having been contrary to U.S. in-
terests. Why should the Israelis
have informed the Reaganites?
So that they, in turn, could fore-
warn the Syrians and the PLO?
Furthermore, Kraft's assertion
that the U.S. played no role in the
war is not only incorrect, it re-
writes what in fact occurred in
Lebanon.
EVEN THE media, whose de-
mented ravings knew no limit to
their distorted view of the Israeli
operation, reported the American
role in forcing Israel to permit
safe passage for a general PLO
exodus and for a Syrian with-
drawal of its forces back along
the highway to Damascus from
which, as a kick in Uncle Sam's
hindquarters in gratitude, the
Syrians diverted their withdraw-
al into the Bekaa Valley.
There, both the Syrians and
the PLO, whose hides the Ameri-
cans saved, remain ensconced to
this very day, and on the alert to
move back toward Beirut given
the first opportunity. In effect, it
was the United States that once
again either diminished or totally
subverted the goals achieved by
victorious Israeli forces in a war
they fought in the cause of their
survival.
That Reagan policy in Lebanon
thus turned Israel's victory into
another "no-win" situation
resulting in a mired American
presence and the danger of an all-
out war there hardly suggests, as
Kraft insists, the absence of a
i rob.
IF THE Arabs do not cheer the
Americans today, as Kraft de-
plores, it is because they have
learned that to jeer gets you more
in Washington.
It also suggests a meddlesome
American foreign diplomacy in
the Middle East that this time
has ensnared nobody but itself, a
fact that seems to elude Kraft. In
all of which, whom has he made
to look foolish? He might well ask
the Republicans out for the hide
these days of Lester Brown. Or
that professor of Shakespeare,
John Timpano.
Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Leo Mindlin
and Sons
IDF Medics Used Hypnosis
To Treat Battle Fatigue
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Defense Force medical
corps successfully used hypnosis
and suggestion to treat battle-
fatigued (shell-shocked) soldiers
at front area treatment centers
during the Lebanon war, return-
ing them fully recovered to their
battle units within a day or so,
| without any after effects.
The treatment was described
this week at the week-long inter-
national congress of the Israel
and European societies of
hypnosis in psychotherapy and
psychosomatic medicines meet-
ing at the Rambam hospital in
Haifa. The conference is being at-
tended by some 250 psycholog-
ists, psychiatrists, physicians
and dentists, including 150 dele-
I gates from abroad.
Drs. A. Levy and M.
Neumann, of the Tel Aviv
University medical school, said
that on the basis of earlier exper-
ience in the Yom Kippur War,
[doctors this time treated their
patients at a military installation
| set up close to the front line,
under full war conditions of uni-
forms and discipline.
One-ThinT oTTsrael
^oes Back to School
TEL AVIV (JTA) Just
I under 1,300,000 pupils about
lone-third of the entire population
ItK returned to school Sept. 1 at
I the end of the summer recess.
II here were far fewer than usual
I Problems associated with the
[opening of the school year.
Only a handful of schools failed
|w open on time as against
[dozens or even hundreds in pre-
L"0"8 years mainly because of
Miiiiiuiuii | (mmimg
The doctors said that the uni-
forms, military discipline, time-
tables and rifle fire made for a
realistic atmosphere and made it
possible to treat soldiers and re-
turn them to their units in little
more than 24 hours.
Hypnosis also made it possible
to uncover the soldier's uncon-
scious guilt feelings about sur-
viving while a comrade was kill-
ed, helping to instill in him the
feeling that he did rightly by at
least saving himself, the doctors
said.
TOJinpi 13p3Tl H31U
May the new year bring your way
New unexpected things each day
New joys, new dreams, new plans to make
New worthwhile things to undertake
And may it bring you peace of mind
Success the real and lasting kind
The gift of health, the joy of friends
And happiness that never ends
- Reubin and Donna Lou Askew
Paid for by Askew for President
A.


Pig* 14-A Tbm Jewish FVridian / Friday. September 9,1963
VanceJoins^Writers' Guild
His Book Reveals Old Rivalries
5-A
principle."The Cuter Adminis-
tration pushed the compre-
hensive approach after Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat went to
Jerusalem, when he realized an
agreement could not be reached
through a general settlement.
and even after the Camp David
agreements.
YET, Vance learned on his first
trip to the Mideast, that while
Egypt and Israel were not far
apart, "the real problem was dis-
unity among the Arabs. How-
ever, it does not seem that Vance
ever learned what an Israeli of-
ficial tried to point out to report-
ers in Washington earlier this
year, that there is no consensus
among the Arabs except enmity
toward Israel. On everything else
they disagree, and so peace can
only be made with each country
separately
Vance's book confirms that the
major issue which strained US-
Israel relations during the Carter
Administration was the estab-
lishment of Jewish settlements in
Judaea and Samaria. But Vance
does not reveal in his book any of
the deep anger over the issue that
Cyrus Vance
Brzezinski. in his memoirs, at-
tributes to him.
Vance, who maintains that
Hard Choices" is not a dip-
lomatic history or a memoir, does
not go into the criticism of
personalities that characterized
the Brzezinski book. He has kind
Israel Makes Effort,
Against Heavy Odds.
To Reduce Casualties
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Security sources stress that
the Israel Defense Force is
making every effort to re-
duce casualties among Is-
raeli troops in Lebanon.but
the present disposition of
Israeli forces makes it diffi-
cult. They occupy an area
of Lebanon with about one
million inhabitants.
The sources said the situation
would be made easier if the IDF's
disposition is changed under the
terms of the withdrawal of forces
agreement with Lebanon or after
negotiations with the U.S. and
Lebanon. But a decision must be
made within a few weeks, the
sources stressed.
THEY SAID there was no in-
tention to fight the Syrians in
order to get them to pull out of
Lebanon, but neither was there
any decision for a unilateral with-
drawal by Israel to the Awali
River line which defines the 28-
mile security zone north of the
Israeli border. To do so would
create a vacuum into which
hostile forces could move, the
sources said.
They charged that Palestine
Liberation Organization terror-
ists have breached the agreement
they reached with U.S. special
envoy Philip Habib last summer
for their withdrawal from west
Beirut.
According to the Israah'
sources, hundreds of PLO men
have returned to Beirut, and a
PLO brigade has moved from
Syria to the Beirut region. The
sources also said that Syrian
units withdrawn from Beirut
have returned to the Bekaa valley
from Syria.
words to say lor Premier Men-
achetn Begin and for former
Ambassador Simcha Dinitz who
was savaged by Brzezinski.
BUT THE Israeli who Vance
admired most and for he seems to
have a genuine affection was the
late Moshe Day an. with whom he
dealt as Israeli Foreign Minister.
The Israelis, including Begin, al-
ways liked Vance above all the
Americans with whom they dealt
with in the Carter Administra-
tion because they considered him
to be a gentleman.
It was this characteristic that
Brzezinski criticized in his me-
moirs. Yet one would wish that
Vance was less gentlemanly in
"Hard Choices." which was writ-
ten in the style of a State Depart-
ment press briefing. While there
is no need to go into bow U.S. of-
ficials really felt about foreign
leaders, as Brzezinski did. Vance
could have provided more details
about the events he covered.
He also left some things out.
such as Andrew Young's resig-
nation as U.S. Ambassador to
the United Nations after de-
ceiving the State Department
about his meeting with a PLO of-
ficial, and the 1980 U.S. vote for a
UN Security Council resolution
condemning Israel which Carter
subsequently reversed. Vance
was directly involved in both
controversies and it would have
been useful to have his views on
such important events.
The dryness of the Vance book
has brought it less attention than
the Brzezinski or Carter ac-
counts. Yet all these books
should be read, particularry by
those with a special interest in
the Middle East, because they
tell not only how an official views
the events in which he partic-
ipated, but how foreign policy is
made.
JTA Features Syndicate

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Sunday
September 11,1983
Conducted by
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10:30 a.m.
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11 a.m.
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Rabbi Max Shapiro
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Rabbi David Auerbach
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12:00 a.m.
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Rabbi Haskell Bernat
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Special Services 11:30 a.m.
at the Richter Mausoleum Site, Section K
For further information
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M v
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 16-A
cS
Palestine Confab Opens in Geneva
UN's de Cuellar Makes Surprising Appeal for Palestinian People
ByTAMARLEVY
GENEVA-(JTA)-The
jnited Nations-sponsored
Conference on Palestine
kpened here with an un-
expectedly strong speech
|v UN Secretary General
Javier Perez de Cuellar
dling for self-determina-
in for the Palestinian
ople but stopping just
t of calling for a Pales-
tinian state.
Another unexpected develop-
nent, one which caused fury
nong the Arabs at the confer-
.ice, was the attendance by 300
jiternational press correspon-
Hents at a press conference called
hy Israeli Ambassador Ovadia
."oifcr earlier in the day. His
enunciation of the gathering
thus the first news item of
iday.
IN HIS SPEECH, de Cuellar
the plight of the Palestinian
ople was highlighted by last
r's massacre in the Sabra and
itila refugee camps. He said
problem of the Palestinians
vas no closer to a solution than it
yas 36 years ago when the UN
|irst addressed the problem.
"The tragic events of Lebanon
fulminating in the massacre of
Inarmed men. women and
Children in Sabra and Shatila
ought to our attention the need
find urgently a solution to the
buestion of Palestine, de Cuellar
laid.
Solutions, he added, "must be
based on the exercise by the
Palestinian people of their
nalienable rights which have
been reaffirmed in a numer of
General Assembly resolutions."
He also stated that all Israeli
forces must be withdrawn from
the territory Israel captured in
the Six-Day War and said the
question of Jerusalem remained
crucial to settling the Palestinian
issue.
SOFFER, at his pres confer-
ence, said Israel is not attending
the gathering on Palestine. "This
conference will not be a dialogue,
because one single opinion will
dominate: that of the extremist
Arab States who are its
initiators," he said. "For 35
years, these states have opposed
any Jewish-Arab coexistence in
the Middle East, and have denied
the right of the Jewish people to
self-determination.
This conference is a mirror
image of their policy of in-
transigence and refusal, and will
therefore in no way serve the
cause of peace."
Sorter's view of the conference
was borne out when Chedli Klibi,
the secretary general of the Arab
League, denounced Israel as a
state founded on oppression and
aggression. He told the confer-
ence that "Zionism is a form of
racism hardly different in essence
from the racism which Jews
themselves have suffered."
External Affairs Minister
Narasimha Rao of India read a
message from India's Prime
Minister Indira Gandhi on behalf
of the Third World saying that
peace and security would remain
elusive as long as "the just and
legitimate rights of the
Palestinian people to the
establishment of an independent
national" state were unrecogniz-
ed."
ALSO DURING the opening
session a message from Palestine
Liberation Organization chief
Yasir Arafat was read. It de-
clared that the people of "Pales-
tine will go on fighting in spite of
the adversity and the problems it
will have to face along the road"
to victory over Israel and called
on the international community
not to be "paralyzed by the Zion-
ist arrogance." The international
press correspondents found this
statement harsh and provocative.
The conclusions of the confer-
ence are already known. They are
contained in the drafts of the
final resolution which is certain
to be adopted because there is no
opposition. These drafts call for
total war against Israel by "all
possible means, including armed
struggle;" reject Jerusalem, as
Israel's capital; call for a new
Middle East conference with the
full participation of the PLO; and
urge that the right of Palestin-
ians to an independent state be
recognized.
The conference has been sharp-
ly criticized by the Swiss press.
The consensus of the media was
that "the drastic security meas-
ures, the barbed wire which
encircles the United Nations
building transforming it into a
military garrison with trenches,
tanks and troops only reflect the
nature of the conference and the
risks of holding it."
SOME SWISS papers have
referred to the conference as "a
useless show" and "a political
non-event." One journalist wrote
that the conference was like "a
cow without milk."
The United States, Canada and
Israel are boycotting the confer-
ence. Most of the other Western
nations are keeping a low profile,
represented, if at all, by obser-
vers and low-level diplomats. The
Arabs have made clear their dis-
appointment with this, especially
as the heads of their delegations
are ministers and vice ministers.
The Swiss sent an unknown
young diplomat to represent the
country, and the Arabs are
taking this as a slap in the face.
The PLO is represented only
by supporters of Arafat. All other
factions presently at war with
each other in Lebanon have
expressed rancor at being left out
and the internal PLO war may
erupt in some form at the confer-
ence.
THE ONLY ones who will gain
from this 10-day meeting will be
the Arabs and Arafat's faction
along with the Soviet Union
which will exploit the gathering
in order to bolster its flagging
position in the Middle East by
appearing to be the only non-
Arab nation fully supporting the
Arab cause against Israel.
Thus, close to $6 million will
have been squandered by the
time the conference ends to re-
affirm what Soffer called a
"policy of intransigence and re-
fusal."
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Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 17-A

Fasting on Yom Kippur Why?
To Prove That the Spirit of Man Holds Dominion Over His Body
By DVORA WAYSMAN
WHY DO Jews fast on Yom Kippur? Many
sins arise through satisfying bodily appetites;
so fasting demonstrates that man can conquer
his physical cravings and that the spirit can
master the body. Abstaining from food is not
enough; it must be accompanied by deep
remorse at our failings and a resolve to strive
for a better way of life.
The Day of Atonement allows us to repent
for wrongs against God, but not against our
fellow man. The latter wrongs must have been
redressed before we can ask Divine forgiveness
and we are supposed to have made amends for
them before we begin our fast.
DURING THE Temple period, there was a
complicated ritual for this solemn day. The
High Priest was allowed to enter the Holy of
Holies only on Yom Kippur, and he had to
prepare himself for seven days beforehand.
During that time, he lived apart in a special
room of the Temple, and the elders read to him
the ordinances laid down in Lev. XVI. The
night prior to Yom Kippur, he would not sleep
but read from Job, Ezra, Chronicles and Daniel.
When he entered the Holy of Holies, he did
not wear the golden vestments which he usually
wore in his office of High Priest, but simple
garments of white linen emblems of humility
and purity. Today Jews also wear white on
Yom Kippur as if going to a feast con-
fident that those who return penitently will re-
ceive pardon.
On returning from the Holy of Holies, the
High Priest would offer the following prayer:
"May it please Thee, O Lord our God, that this
year may be a year of rain. Let there not be
wanting a ruler belonging to the House of
Judah. Let not Thy people Israel be in want, so
that one Israelite may not be forced to beg his
sustenance from another or from strangers; and
hearken not to the prayer of travellers since
they pray for rainless weather, which is a
calamity in the Holy Land." (Talmud)
PART OF the elaborate ritual in the Temple
was concerned with a scapegoat (the origin of
the word we use until today). The High Priest
placed his two hands on the goat to be sent
away, and having confessed the sins of the
people, symbolically transferred them to the
head of the animal, which was then sent into
the wilderness. Later, when the land was more
densely inhabited, the goat was cast down a
precipice as there was no effective place from
which it could not wander back.
The ceremonies of the Day of Atonement
were for all time. The Torah named "Aaron" as
the atoning priest, but whoever had been
consecrated after him to the High Priest's office
was eligible to continue the ritual.
But even after the destruction of the Temple,
and with it the cessation of the High Priest-
hood, Yom Kippur remained. In fact, with the
passing of animal sacrifice, it gained in spiritual
power. It also benefited from the fact that there
remained no intermediary between man and
God man must make his confession direct to
his Maker with no one to intercede for him.
There remained the fasting and humiliation;
the confession and contribution for sins; and
fervent prayers for forgiveness.
These were the reality of the Day of Atone-
ment for which the Temple rituals had been
dramatic symbols. When the sacrifices ceased
(and many believe that animal sacrifice was
just a concession to the prevailing custom at
that time of pagan human sacrifice) Israel was
left with repentance as the only way for
remission of sins.
THE RABBIS declare that the Day of
Atonement will never pass away as long as
Israel does not lose its soul. On Yom Kippur,
Jews confess in unison, summarizing all
possible religious failures using the pronouns
"we," "us," "our." All Israel stands in relation
to God as a single immortal individual.
Israel was the only nation that took upon it-
self as a matter of law to love God, to observe
His commandments, to love our neighbors as
ourselves, to protect widows and orphans, to
give charity to the poor. They form Israel's
statutory law, and as Jews we are bound to ac-
cept this morality as our commitment.
To be in Jerusalem as the Day of Atonement
draws to a close is awe-inspiring. Darkness
descends like black velvet spangled with stars,
and the pine trees sigh a prayer of their own.
Thousands are drawn to the Western Wall to
hear the dramatic sound of the shofar rend the
night. Hungry and weary, but spiritually
refreshed, they wish each other "Next year in
Jerusalem rebuilt," before returning to their
homes and families, still with the prayers and
hopes of the Day of Atonement inscribed in
their hearts.


Page 18-A The Jewish Floriefian Friday. S<^ticmber~9. 1&3
In This Special Section
This special section of The Jewish
Floridian Holiday Edition deals with
news reports throughout the previous
Hebrew Year 5743. Because these
reports were of special importance, they
are presented here as current events.
Together, they offer a vital picture of
world Jewish affairs since last Rosh
Hashanah. and it is for this reason that
many of the reports published here will
seem current in any case.
Berman Urges Reagan
To Reassess His 'Plan'
Despite Papal Decision
Ties to Vatican Must Not Weaken
NEW YORK The
American Jewish Commit-
tee has urged that dif-
ferences between the Jew-
ish and Catholic communi-
ties over the recent audi-
ence granted the PLO's
Yasir Arafat by Pope John
Paul II not be allowed to
'impede the advances in
understanding and mutual
esteem which have marked
the relations between our
comunities for the past
several decades."
That view was expressed by
Maynard I Wishner. president of
the American Jewish Committee,
in a letter to His Eminence
Johannes Cardinal Willebrands.
president of the Vatican Com-
mission on Religious Relations
with the Jews. In a letter ad-
dressed to Wishner. Cardinal
Willebrands recently sought to
explain the reasons why the Pope
agreed to receive Arafat Among
other explanations. Cardinal Wil-
lebrands said that the fact that
the Holv Father receives some
roe in audience is in no way a
agn of approval of all the ideas
and actions attributed to that
person
THE CARDINAL also wrote
that the Holy Father did not fail
to express u> Arafat the hope
that an equitable and lasting
solution of the Middle East con-
flict should be reached, a solu-
tion which, as he said during the
audience, should exclude re-
course to arms and violence of all
kinds, especially terrorism and
reprisals "
In his response. Wishner
stated that the .American Jewish
Committee did not question "the
honorable and pacific intentions
of the Pope
The Pope s hope. Wishner
continued, "for an equitable and
lasting solution of the Middle
East conflict as his stated posi-
tion that such a solution should
exclude recourse to arms and
violence of all kinds, especially
terrorism and reprisals.' are
shared by all persons of good will
seeking peace in that troubled re-
gion.
However. Wishner added. "We
do strongly disagree regarding
the impact of the audience with
Mr Arafat on popular opinion
and its widespread interpretation
as an act of legit imirat ion for the
organisation which he heads
an organ gat ion which has
claimed credit for the murder of
innocent civilians. including
Christians. Muslims, and Jews,
and which has never departed
from its stated aim of destroying
the sovereign State of Israel."
WISHNER TOOK the occa
sion of his letter to Cardinal Wil-
lebrands to repeat calls for recog-
nition of the State of Israel
both by the .Arabs and by tlv
Holy See.
"We fervently share the Pope's
hope." Wishner wrote, "that an
equitable and lasting solution of
the Middle East conflict will soon
be reached and his affirmation
that the recognition of Israel by
the Arabs is a basic condition for
the construction of that peace.
The logic of that important af-
firmation by the Pope does argue,
in our judgment, that the recog-
nition of Israel by the Holy See
would constitute a model of
moral courage and leadership
that would advance the cause of
peace and co-a*istence bet v. <*-u.
the Arab nations and Israel "
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA> -
Julius Berman. chairman of
the Conference of Presi-
dents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, has
railed on the Reagan
Administration to reassess
its Mideast policy in view
of "the collapse of the
Reagan peace plan."
Speaking at a press conference
here. Berman said that the recent
decision by King Hussein of Jor-
dan not to enter into negotiations
with Israel demands that the
United States end its reliance on
"moderate Arab states and aban-
don its efforts to create an Arab
consensus regarding a settlement
with Israel." Berman also said
that the U.S. should recognize
that peace in the Mideast can
only come when individual Arab
states display the courage to defy
PLO terrorism and join Israel at
the negotiating table.
BERMAN SAID that the
Presidents Conference has re-
quested a meeting with the Presi-
dent to discuss U.S. policy in the
Mideast, and that it is expecting
a reply from the White House in
the next few days
T am optimistic that a re-
evaluation of U.S. policy has
already begun." Berman
declared. "The positive action of
Secretary of State George Shultz
in permitting American com-
panies to supply Israel with as-
sistance needed to develop its
Lavie Fighter planes is a highly
encouraging development."
Berman addecU_ "We hope to
See an earrv decisfen bv*-the
Julius Berman
Administration to notify Con-
gress of its intention to fulfill in I
commit merit to sell 75 F-16 jet
fighters to Israel. This would be
the most effective answer to the
provocative action of the Sovkt!
Union in placing and manning
with its own troops the leth2
SAM-5 missiles in Syria
TURNING TO the situation in I
Lebanon. Berman expressed the
hope that an agreement between '
Israel and Lebanon may come
soon. He said, however, that the
U.S. holds the key for an early
solution because "it remains only
for the United States to signal to
Lebanon that it wants an agree-
ment soon. When the signal is
given. Lebanon will respond."
He added that the bombing of
the American Embassy in Beirut
must have demonstrated to the
Administration that Lebanon is
not yet strong enough to prevent
terrorists from returning to the
Israeli border. That is why Israel
insists on adequate safeguards
before it withdraws."
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happy and prosperous New Year
from the family of...
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Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 19-A
There Was Much to Cheer About in '83: A 14 Percent Rise in Olim
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM A
|total of 13'176 new ">mi8rant8
I arrived in Israel during 1982, a 14
Inercent increase over the
I previous year. But most were
Ifrom Western countries. The
I Soviet Union, the largest reser-
Ivoir of potential olim remained
I virtually dry, the Knesset was
I told as it opened its summer
I session Monday with a debate on
Lliyah.
I The immigration figures were
Iprovided by Aharon Uzan, the
I Minister of Absorption. The
paucity of aliyah from the USSR
was the subject of a separate
report by Rafael Kotlowitz, head
of the Jewish Agency's immi-
gration and absorption depart-
ment.
Knesset members spoke of an
aliyah "crisis" because, despite
the marginal increase from the
West, overall figures were low
relative to the Soviet immi-
gration boom of the middle and
late 1970s.
Kotlowitz reported that of the
114 Jews allowed to leave the So-
viet Union last month, only 11
came to Israel. He said that was
the lowest monthly figure since
the mid-1960s when the Soviet
first opened their gates a crack.
"In effect, a month after the
Jerusalem Conference on Soviet
Jewry, we are now facing the
total end of Soviet emigration,"
Kotlowitz said.
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
Jewish Agency and World
Zionist Organization Executives,
continued to blame HI AS for the
high neshira (drop-out) rate.
HI AS aids Soviet Jewish emigres
who opt to settle in countries
other than Israel even though
they leave Russia with Israeli
visas, ostensibly to reunite with
relatives in Israel. Dulzin said he
would propose "tough measures
against HI AS" when the Jewish
Agency Assembly convenes here
next month.
Uzan said his ministry was
sponsoring a "door-to-door"
aliyah encouragement campaign
in France. He also said one of the
chief deterrents to aliyah the
high cost of housing in Israel
was being ameliorated. He said
an immigrant could now buy an
apartment on the private market
with a mortgage loan covering up
to 95 percent of the price.
But opposition MKs sharply
criticized the government's im-
migration policies. Dov Zakin of
Mapam warned of possible
wholesale resignations from the
Knesset's immigration and
absorption committee to protest
the ineffectiveness of Uzan's
ministry.
Maythe
new year
be filled with
peace and
well being.
AMERICAN SAVINGS
And Loan Association of Florida
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>*


Page20-A The Jewkh Fkridian / Friday, September 9.1963
Noted Physician Snubbed Ghetto Uprising Memorial
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Maxek Edelman, the only
surviving leader of ZOB
(Zydowska Organizacja
Bojowa Jewish Fighting
Organization) and deputy
commander of the Warsaw
Ghetto uprising, has
refused to join the Hono-
rary Committee to com-
memorate the 40th Anni-
versary of the uprising in
April in Warsaw because
of its official Polish govern-
ment sponsorship.
The Jewish Labor Committee
and the Committee in Support of
Solidarity simultaneously re-
leased here a copy of an open let-
ter that Edelman sent to the
underground Solidarity news-
paper, Informacja Solidarnoici
Region Mazowsze (Solidarity
Information, Warsaw Region),
which was published Feb. 22. A
translation of that letter has just
been made available.
EDELMAN, a noted phy-
sician, member of the Lodz
Region Executive Commission of
Solidarity and a delegate to the
First National Congress of
Solidarity in Gdansk in Sep-
tember 1981. was briefly interned
by the Jaruzelski regime when
martial law was imposed in Po-
land on December 13. 1981.
Following is the translation of
the full text of Edelman's letter:
"I was invited to join the Hon-
orary Committee to Commem-
orate the 40th Anniversary of the
Warsaw Ghetto Uprising. I wish
to explain why I refused. Forty
years ago we did not fight merely
to survive we fought for life in
dignity and freedom.
"TO CELEBRATE our an-
niversary here, where enslave-
ment and humiliation is now the
lot of the whole society, where
words and gestures have become
nothing but lies, would betray
the spirit of our struggle, it
would mean participating m
something entirely to the coo.
trary, it would be a cynical ct o(
contempt.
"I shall not be a purty to this
nor will I accept the participation
of others, regardless of whet?
they come from, whatever their
credentials.
"The true memory of the vic-
tims and heroes, of the eternal
human striving for truth and
freedom, will be preserved in the
silence of graves and of hearts -
afar from manipulative cere-
monies."
5744
1983
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Before Sharon Ouster
Neutralize 'Pro-Jordan Elements9
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 21-A
Analysis of Yuri Andropov:
How He Differs from Brezhnev
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
_ The civil administration
on the West Bank has in-
structed the regional gov-
ernors to "neutralize" pro-
Jordanian elements among
the local Arab leadership
and force them into greater
dependency on Israel.
Guidelines to that affect were
issued recently by the acting
head of the civil administration,
Col. Yigal Karmon, according to
Haarotz which published them.
They apparently were prompted
by fears of rapprochement be-
tween King Hussein of Jordan
and Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation chief Yasir Arafat.
THE GUIDELINES have
raised angry protests in the
Knesset from both government
and opposition members. Likud
MK Dror Seigerman demanded
to know whether Defense Minis-
ter Ariel Sharon, who controls
the West Bank administration,
was acting on his own without
consulting Premier Menachem
Begin.
While the guidelines instruct
the civil administrators to con-
tinue the struggle against
"radical" pro-PLO mayors
nine of whom were summarily
ousted from office this year
they stress the need to bind anti-
PLO groups more tightly to Is-
rael. The pro-Jordan Palestinians
were described as "unwillingly
pro-PLO" since Jordan acceded
to the 1974 Arab League summit
decision in Rabat, Morocco, to
designate the PLO as the sole
legitimate representative of the
Palestinian people.
They were said to include
moderate political figures who
"will not make a move without
Jordan's consent" and therefore
must be neutralized and made
more dependent on the Israeli ad-
ministration. In that connection
it was noted that 12,000 Arabs
work for the civil administration,
400 in senior positions and 50 in
"very senior" positions. The
guidelines suggest "they should
l>e strengthened for political
ends, for political use in the
future."
THE METHODS proposed to
accomplish that end included
massive removal of those who
stand in the way of the system
and maximum support for posi-
tive elements. This should in-
clude pay raises, larger powers
and personal encouragement."
The regional governors were
also instructed to submit weekly
reports to the civil administra-
tion on how the "nationalist and
pro-Jordanians" were being
treated. They were ordered to in-
tensify supervision over Arab
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civil service workers who "for
years either showed no political
tendencies or who were indiffer-
end to or actively jeopardized the
administration efforts."
Singled out for increased sup-
port were the anti-.PLO Village
Leagues organized by the civil
administration and armed and
financed by Israel. The Leagues,
branded "Quislings" by other
West Bankers, were recently con-
solidated under Mustapha
Dudein, a leader in the Hebron
region. They have held a series of
"yes to peace" rallies, organized
by the civil administration.
BUT AT the last such rally,
the Israelis were shaken by a
challenge from Dudein that they
negotiate directly with the Vil-
lage Leaguers over the future of
the West Bank. Dudein has not
accepted the autonomy plan of-
fered by Begin and is on record in
favor of President Reagan's Mid-
dle East initiative which Israel
has rejected as even a basis for
negotiations.
The guidelines were distribut-
ed about two weeks ago. In the
Knesset. Seigerman of Likud has
questioned whether they were is-
sued at the civil administration's
initiative or by the government.
If the latter, he said, they meant
that Israel has decided to run the
affairs of Arabs on the West
Bank, leading to ultimate an-
nexation. If this plan is im-
plemented, he warned, it will
make the West Bank into "Is-
rael's Viet Nam."..
The Peace Now movement is-
sued a statement charging that
the civil governors were instruct-
ed to implement "corrupt colo-
nialist policies" for political ends.
The Labor Party young guard
called for immediate cancellation
of the guidelines. The policies
adopted by Sharon are "catastro-
phic and close off all options for a
political settlement," the Labor-
ites said.
MEANWHILE, two more for-
eign lecturers at West Bank uni-
versities were forced to leave the
country because they refused to
sign a document dissociating
themselves from the PLO, a pre-
requisite for work permits.
They are Mohammad Rashiq, a
Palestinian holding a Jordanian
passport who lectures in chemis-
try, and Fairuz Shehadeh, an
American citizen who is an Eng-
lish instructor. They were the
first non-resident faculty mem-
bers of Bir Zeit University near
Ramallah to be ordered out of the
country.
Their expulsion brought to 21
the number of non-resident facul-
ty members at three West Bank
universities to be ousted. Anoth-
er 31 have been ordered to cease
teaching immediately. All have
refused to sign the document on
grounds that its intent was polit-
ical and violated professional
ethics.
By
DR. LUKASZ HIRSZOWICZ
The approach to nationalities
policy in the Soviet Union out-
lined on two recent occasions by
Party General Secretary Yury
Andropov differs from that
followed by his predecessor,
Leonid Brezhnev, and may have
important implications for Soviet
Jews. In December, 1982,
Andropov spoke at the 60th
anniversary celebration of the
USSR, a traditional opportunity
for discussing the national ques-
tion, and at the Presidium of the
USSR Supreme Soviet on
January 12, 1983 he spoke in the
debate on the development of co-
operation between the nations of
the USSR. As a multinational
state, the problem of reconciling
a policy of integration with
recognition of national identities
in the USSR is a major one for
Soviet leaders.
Although a Jewish autono-
mous region, Biro-Bidzhan,
exists, it is inhabited by a tiny
minority ol the Soviet Jewish
population; the Jews are in fact a
dispersed nationality whose cul-
tural right3 are more severely
curtailed than those of other
dispersed nationalities, and any
changes in policy might well
affect them.
ANDROPOV SAID the Com-
munist goal is to merge the na-
tions of the USSR, and indication
of a stronger assimilationist
policy, and that "negative
phenomena" in national
relations, "national conceit and
arrogance," usually associated
with Great Russian nationalism,
must be attacked. On the special
role of the Russian nation he said
little, though this is a subject
which has been emphasized by
Brezhnev and other Soviet
leaders in the past.
In a possible hint at a stricter
censorship and a sterner treat-
ment of religion and adherence to
tradition, Andropov emphasized
Dr. Lukasz Hirszowicz is head
of the Soviet and East
European Department of
the Institute of Jewish Af-
fairs and editor of 'Soviet
Jewish Affairs.'
that elements of the cultural
heritage which conflict with
"Socialist morality and our Com-
munist ideals" must not be pre-
served. But he also said more
attention should be paid to the
susceptibilities of the national
minorities, indigenous nationali-
ties should be more fully rep-
resented in the working class of
their areas and the proper rep-
resentation of nationalities in
party and State bodies is "im-
portant" and calls for "a consis-
tent effort."
Andropov seems to offer
nothing to nations, like the Jews,
who live outside their national
entities. Brezhnev spoke of the
possibility of meeting their cul-
tural needs, but in practice, for
Jews at least, the suggestion was
never implemented. Andropov
merely emphasized the need "to
ensure the full equality of Soviet
people of all nationalities," which
nevertheless provides a foun-
dation for Jewish demands
against discrimination.
FROM ANDROPOVS
speeches and the deliberations of
the USSR Supreme Soviet Presi-
dium, nationalities policy and
state discipline appear as the
main planks in the new General
Secretary's program. Toning
down Russian nationalistm and
showing more sensitivity to
minority feelings may appear
equitable and liberal but the need
to combat negative elements in
the cultural heritage and to
tighten state discipline implies
the curtailment of rights and out-
right repression.
The attitude of the Androprov
leadership to the national needs
of the USSR's Jewish population
should, therefore, be watched
carefully.


Page22-A TheJ
Friday. September 9. 1963
Syria Army Stronger Now Than Before
Israel's Invasion of Lebanon Last Year
'4m YisraelChai'
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTAI -
The Syrian army is now
stronger than it was last
year before Israels in-
vasion of Lebanon and at
almost twice its strength
compared to what it was at
the outbreak of the Yom
Kippur War in which Syria
was a participant.
It now has more than
3.600 Soviet-made tanks,
compared with 2.000 at the
time of the Yom Kippur
War. and more than 600
Mig fighter planes, com-
pared with 300 in 1973.
Furthermore, the new defense
budget of Syria has been in-
creased this year to $2 4 billion
S4 percent of its national budget
The number of Soviet advisors in
Syria has been rising steadily,
jumping from 2.500 advisors last
vear to 4.500 at present.
THESE DETAILS were given
to the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency during a special inter-
view with Naphtab Lavie. Is-
raels Consul General in New
York.
The Syrians now have the po-
tential to engage in a new war
with Israel." he said. Common
sense says that they shoula not
get involved in a new war. since
thev lost all their wars with Israel
so far But it is hard to judge
their motives, mainh because
they act not only on behalf of
their interests or the Arab world,
bat they dearly serve other inter-
ests, those of the Soviet Union."
According to Lavie. who
served for many years m the Is-
rael Defense Ministry as an aide
to Defense Ministers, including
the late Mosbe Dayan. the
Syrians are trying to torpedo"
the accord reached between Israel
and Lebanon on the withdrawal
of Israeli troops from Lebanon,
through threats and psy-
chological warfare, as they did
before the Six-Day War"
SYRIA THE Israeli official
pointed out. has vanous in-
terests in Lebanon that are not
connected with the current
presence of Israeli forces there.'
He noted that Syria never recog-
nized Lebanon as a state and
does not have any diplomatic
representation in that country.
"The Syrians were occupying
Lebanon for the last seven years.
It is hard for them to accept the
fact that it's time for them to
leave Lebanon. Lavie said.
He said Israel is closely watch-
ing Syria Their threats are not
ECC Rejects Proposal
To Try Terrorists
PARIS 4JTAI Tbt
European Economic Community
rejected a proposal by France to
create a European court to try
terrorists and other international
criminals as an alternative to ex-
tradition
The plan was presented by
French Minister of Justice
Robert Badinter to the Justice
Ministers of France's nine EEC
partners meeting in Luxembourg
yesterday. Badinter intimated
that terrorist attacks against
Jews and Jewish instiutions in
France and other Wi
European countries in
years was one example lor tha
need for International coopera-
tion u> brn^g terrorists to justice.
But his fellow ministers ex-
pressed preference for re-enforced
extradition and other judicial
procedures contained in a 1977
draft convention agreed on by the
21-member Council of Europe in
Strasbourg. The convention has
yet to be ratified.
Joseph Nevel extends
Best Wishes
For The
New Year

Pershing
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. we have been living with
them for the last 35 years, but we
are >T*nC alert to meet any
eventuality." Lavie stated.
He said, in response to a ques-
tion, that Israel's image in the
United States, which was tar-
nished as a result of Israel's in-
vasion of Lebanon and further
damaged after the massacre of
Palestinian refugees in the Sabra
and Shatila camps near Beirut
last September by Christian
militiamen, is showing an im-
provement.
THE BASIS for the change in
the .American public opinion.
Lavie claimed, is threefold. First
are the conclusions by the Israeli
commi5>on to investigate the
massacre, which reestablished
Israel's credibility among the
.American people and the media.
Lavie noted, in this regard, that
while the commission investi-
gated the tragedy and recom-
mended action against top
government and Israel Defense
Force officials, the Lebanese
government has still to in-
vestigate and punish the murder-
ers
Second. Lavie continued, the
Arab rejection of the Reagan
peace initiative shows that all
the talk about Israel being an ob-
stacle to peace in the Mideast is
baseless. The Americans have
realized that they erred in their
attempt to achieve an .Arab con-
sensus regarding a solution to the
Arab-Israeli conflict''
.Anyone who knows the Arab
world "would have known that
the Arabs can achieve only one
kind of consensus destructive
and extreme. The experience
shows that an agreement be-
tween Israel and the Arabs can
be reached through separate
negotiations with each Arab
country', as Israel did with
Egypt." Lavie said
THE THIRD reason for Is
rael's improved image in the
U.S.. he noted is the agreement
reached between Israel and Leba-
non through the mediation of
Secretary of State George Shuttz.
"Even the Israeli opposition
parties are claiming that Israel
made too many concessions in
order to achieve the accord with
Lebanon." be said. "But it
proved to the world and to
American public opinion that Is
ael is ready to make sacrifices
for peace, as it did when it re-
uirned the Sinai desert to
Egypt."
Singer Ofra Haza, who won the second prize for Israel at the
Eurovision song contest, watched by an estimated 100 million
TV viewers. In recent years, two Israelis have won the contest
both, like Ofra, of Yemenite origin. The name of Ofra s song
was 'A m Yisrael Hai.'
V
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Friday, September 9, J983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 23-A
When Arafat Visited Pope Paul
Jewish Groups Reject Vatican Communications
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Two American Jewish
groups have strongly re-
jected communications
' from the Vatican respond-
ing to their appeals to Pope
John Paul II in September
not to receive Palestine
Liberation Organization
chief Yasir Arafat. Arafat
was granted a Papal audi-
ence on Sept. 14.
Julius Herman, chairman of
I the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Or-
ganizations, said he received with
"dismay and disappointment" a
letter dated October 7 from
Johannes Cardinal Willebrands,
president of the Secretariate for
Promoting Christian Unity in
I Rome.
THE LETTER, made public
I by Berman late last week along
with his reply, defended the audi-
lence as consistent with the
I Pope's efforts to promote peace
land understanding and said it
I could not in any way be con-
Istruid as an endorsement of Ara-
I fat and the PLO or as an expres-
sion of hostility toward Israel
|and the Jewish people.
A similar letter, dated Oct. 9,
Iwas sent to the Simon Wiesen-
Ithai ("enter-at Yeshiva Univer-
Isiiy of Ix>s Angeles by Msgr.
(Jorge Mejia, secretary to the
I Vatican Commission for Re-
ligious Relations with the Jews.
lit stated that the Pope strongly
opposes "all forms of anti-Semi-
Itism" but reiterated his wish "to
ter was a reply to a Sept. 13 cable
from Berman to the Pope on be-
half of the Presidents Conference,
stating that "We are profoundly
distressed at news reports that
you may grant an audience to
Yasir Arafat, chairman of the
PLO, the slaughterer of hundreds
of Israeli children, mothers and
old people, including survivors of
the infamous Nazi concentration
camps."
The cable warned, "If you
grant Arafat an interview the
world will interpret it in only one
way: that you regard his views as
worthy of discussion, his leader-
ship of the Palestinian Arabs
legitimate, his pretensions to
statemanship valid, his terrorist
acts forgiven..."
Willebrands stated in his re-
ply: "The Holy Father is pre-
pared to receive all men and
women who ask for it, intending
in this way to manifest his con-
cern for all people, to further the
aims of peace and to promote un-
derstanding among nations .
the fact that the Holy Father re-
ceives someone in audience is in
no way a sign of approval of all
the ideas and | actions attributed
to that person the considera-
tions that led to the granting of
the (Arafat's) audience, and also
its meaning cannot in any
way be interpreted as hostile to
Israel and the Jewish people
around the world. The attitude of
the Holy See toward the Jewish
people and its strong opposal to
all forms of anti-Semitism have in
no way been changed by this
audience."
BERMAN REPLIED that he
was 'gratified'" to receive the
shu^ hi.swKfc **"> frff^"^"1'^ jyg?jy^!>. ^ct'^e
I Palestinian peopletand hig par-
ticipation in their protracted siif-
fierings."
Mejia's letter was made public
[along with a response on Oct. 15,
by Rabbis Marvin Hier and
Abraham Cooper, dean and as-
sistance dean, respectively, of the
Wiesenthal Center. They charged
that "Arafat's visit to the Vati-
can helped convince extremists
that the Jews are legitimate tar-
gets for the PLO chairman's kind
of terrorism." The Wiesenthal
Center officials cited specifically
the terrorist attack on the main
synagogue in Rome on Oct. 9.
CARDINAL Willebrands let-
embrace the L'opt gave to. .this -.
murderer of children was taken
by the world to confer legitimacy
on him and exploited by Arafat
to that end. If the Pope wished to
'show his good will toward the
Palestinian people and his par-
ticipation in their protracted suf-
ferings," it was not necessary to
shake the hand of one who is re-
sponsible for the assassination of
so many Palestinians and the
suffering of so.many more," Ber-
man wrote.
According to Berman, "For
Jews around the world, there can
be no comfort" in Cardinal Wille-
brands' letter. "Rather, this
justification of the Pope's meet-
ing with the killer Arafat comes
as a profoundly depressing event,
one that puts into question all the
hopes for Christian-Jewish un-
derstanding that began so en-
couragingly with the works of
Pope John XXIII There has
been dialogue between Jews and
Catholics because there is a
mutual commitment to peace, to
understanding and to good rela-
tions between them. To place the
Pope's meeting with the world's
leading terrorist on the same
basis fills us with dismay and
disappointment.''
Berman added that the Pope's
audience with Arafat "has caused
a blow to the cause of world peace
and deep distress to Jews the
world over."
Mejia's letter to Hier and
Cooper stated: "In the exercise of
his high pastoral office, the Holy
Father is ready to receive all men
and women who ask for it, in-
tending in this way to manifest
his concern for all people, to
further the aims of peace and to
promote understanding among
nations."
THE RABBIS, in their reply
noted: "While the Pope has the
right to invite anyone he wishes
to the Vatican, for many Jews the
fact that Pope John Paul II has
never met with the duly elected
Prime Minister of the democratic
State of Israel giving, instead,
a private audience to the self-ap-
pointed head of the Palestinians;
a man who has brought fame to
international terrorism serves
as an endorsement of Yasir Ara-
fat at the expense of the Jewish
people and the State of Israel."
Mejia's letter was accompanied
by a copy of the communique is-
sued by the Vatican Press Office
on Sept. 15 summarizing the
Pope's remarks to Arafat the day
before.
The communique said the Pope
'expressed the hope that an
equitable and lasting solution of
the Middle East conflict should
exclude recourse to arms and
violence of all kinds, especially
terrorism and reprisals; it should
involve the recognition of the
rights of all peoples, particularly
those of the Palestinian people
for a homeland of its own and of
Israel for its own security." The
Mejia and Willebrands letters es-
sentially reiterated the points
made in the communique.
Norwegian Official Says He's
Not Home to Visit by Arafat
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Foreign Minister Svenn
Stray of Norway said here
that if Palestine Liberation
Organization chairman
Yasir Arafat were to visit
Norway he (Stray) would
not meet with him.
At a press conference winding
up his four-day visit to Israel,
Stray said he thought it unlikely
that Arafat would come to
Norway, though there was a real
possibility of his visiting Sweden.
THE PLO chief does have an
invitation from the opposition
Socialist Party to visit Oslo, but
if he accepts it, said Stray, "I
would not meet with him because
as far as 1 know the PLO has not
denounced its former terrorist
activities. I would consider
(meeting Arafat) if he would
admit that his former terrorist
activities were wrong and un-
dertake not to carry out such
activities any more."
Stray stopped short, however,
of endorsing Israel's refusal to
have any dealings with the PLO.
The considerations for Israel, as a
party directly involved in the
conflict, might be different, he
observed.
Stray termed his visit here
'successful" and "useful for both
;tides." Having been recently to
Egypt and Jordan, too, he felt
the prospects for the Mideast
peace process were perhaps
better now than they had been for
a long time in the past. But
obviously there were still wide
gaps, the Norwegian statesman
continued. He cited Jordan's
demand for a West Bank set-
tlement freeze as a precondition
for its joining negotiations as one
such obstacle.
REGARDING Lebanon, Stray
said he agreed with his Israeli
host, Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, that the United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL) was not capable of
preventing terroraw in south
Lebanon. Stray observed that
UNIFIL was not a fighting force
or even a police force. It had been
established to keep guard along
an agreed Rife dividing the
parties.
But as to UNIFIL's future
Israel wants it moved out of the
south Lebanon security zone
Stray said this was an issue for
negotiation and then for a
decision by the UN Security
Council. Norway has furnished a
battalion of men to UNIFIL
since the force's inception in
1978.
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Page24-A The Jewish Floridiap / Friday, September9,1963
Political Maneuvering
Mapam Leader Urges Break With Labor
responsibihty far what's haw*?
ing now in Israeli society
^Ppeo-
By YITZHAK BABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A leader of Mapam and a
former Knesset member
said she believes her party
should end its alignment
with the Labor Party but to
continue to cooperate with
it on various issues.
In a special interview with the
Jewish Telegrahpic Agency,
Chaika Groaman, who repre-
sented Mapam in the Knesset for
12 years, and who is now a secre-
tary of the party, said: "I believe
that many of the voters are not
pleased with the continued exis-
tence of the Alignment. I do not
think we can enter the next elec-
tions with the slogan used in
previous elections, 'Only not the
Likud.' The electorate wants a
more defined platform."
GROSSMAN POINTED out
that a serious gap has been de-
veloping between Labor and
Mapam the two parties that
comprise the Alignment since
the beginning of the war in Leba-
non. While Labor voted against a
motion of non-confidence in the
Likud government when the war
broke out, Mapam abstained, she
recalled. '
Furthermore, she noted, there
are bask differences between
Labor and Mapam on crucial is-
sues that might determine the
future of Israel. Mapam wanta an
immediate freeze of the Jewish
settlements on the West Bank,
calls for mutual and simul-
taneous recognition of Israel and
the Palestinians of each other,
and is willing to negotiate with
"any organization," including
the PLO, that recognizes Israel's
right to exist and repudiates ter-
rorism, Grosman said.
In addition, she stated.
Mapam contends that Jordan is a
rahliiiian state but believes
that after a peace agreement is
reached between Israel and
Jordan the Palestinians can de-
cide on issues regarding then-
self-determination and indepen-
dence
"Mapam's decisions, in con-
trast to those of Labor, are much
more open-ended and flexible.
They do not foreclose options,"
Grosman said.
SHE COMPLAINED that
Mapam was not treated as an
equal partner in the Alignment.
"Labor has a great deal of in-
ternal problems and when a deci-
sion has to be reached on major
issues, what determines Labor's
position is not the cooperation
with Mapam but the need to
maintain the unity of the party."
she said.
The outspoken Mapam leader,
who is a member of Kibbutz
Evron in northern Israel, said
that if Mapam does leave the
Alignment there is a good likeli-
hood that various elements in the
Labor Party that share the prin-
ciples and ideology of Mapam
would join that Socialist-Zionist
organization. While Grosman did
not mention any names, it was
apparent that she was referring
to such Labor doves as MK Yossi
Sarid and Shulamit Aloni of the
Civil Rights Movement.
Turning to the issue of the de-
cline of Socialist ideas in Israeli
society and the general shift to
the right on the part of growing
numbers of Israelis, Grosman
said the decline can be attributed
to the growing "alienation" be-
tween the general public and the
"socialist sector" which she said
is generally identified with
Mapam and the kibbutz move-
GROSMAN, relentless
fighter for workers' rights and a
leading advocate of progressive
causes, contended that the So-
cialist elements in Israel failed to
imbue the average worker with
the feeling of being part of a
movement end a partner "in
building the country." She added
that in her view, there should be
more emphasis on the education
of workers and efforts should be
made by organized labor to give
workers the feeling "that they are
part of the factory where they
work" by involving them in deci-
sion-making processes in com-
panies owned by Histadrut and
in films that are in the public
sector.
Grosman pointed out that des-
pite the decline in Socialist ideas,
the rule of the Likud government
and rightward trend among Is-
raelis, "the Socialist elements in
Israel still exist." She expressed
the belief that Socialist ideas will
in the future once again play a
major role in determining the
direction of Israeli society.
"There is a great potential for
Socialism in Israel," she claimed.
Grosman, in response to a
question, sharply criticized Pre-
mier Menachem Begin as being
responsible for the "chaos and
violence in Israeli society today."
She said that if Begin wanted to,
he could stop the spreading
hatred between the Sephardim
and Ashkenazim.
"HE FANNED the hatred and
incited the public in his speeches
before the elections, presenting
the Alignment as Ashkenazim, as
kibbutzniks, as members of an
elite group who plundered the
milk and honey of Israel from the
poor and deprived sectors of the
society." Pausing for a moment,
Groaman la presently in N->
York attending a conference Z
coinmemorate the 40th annive?
^ t t^LWw'rr Ghetto UP"-
ing, in which she participated
The conference is sponsored hv
YIVO Institute for Jewish f
search.
Canada Party Ousts
High School Teacher
By BEN KAYFETZ
TORONTO (JTA) -
The rightwing Social Credit
Party of Canada has ousted
James Keegstra, a high
school teacher and Mayor
of the village of Eckville.
Alberta, who taught his
classes that Jews are the
root of all evil in the world
and that the Holocaust
never occurred.
Martin Hattersley, national
leader of the Social Credit Party,
said he requested and received
Keegstra's resignation only 10
days after the teacher was elected
to the party's executive at its re-
cent convention and three days
after a federal judge upheld
Keegstra's dismissal from the
Alberta school system.
ACCORDING TO Hattersley,
a lawyer from Edmonton,
Alberta, the party delegates "did
not realize it was the same Jim
Keegstra" when they elected him
third vice president. Keegstra's
views are "not compatible" with
present day party politics.
Hattersley said.
He acknowledged, however,
that the theory of an interna-
tional Jewish conspiracy, pro-
pounded by Keegstra. was
popular with some Social Credit
factions in the 1930s when the
movement was transplanted to
Canada from Britain and "there
quite likely are other Social
Credit members today who hold
these views privately."
But Hattersley insisted that
the national party is "an open
party (which) cannot take stands
critical of any race of peoples."
He disavowed any party affilia-
tion with outside factions that
distribute Social Credit and anti-
Semitic literature.
KEEGSTRA, 48, taught social
studies for 14 years at the high
school in Eckville, a hamlet of
763 persons about 100 miles from
Edmonton, the provincial capital.
He became a figure of national
controversy last December after
some parents complained about
his anti-Semitic indoctrination.
There are no Jews in Eckville.
Keegstra was dismissed for
failure to follow the prescribed
curriculum after several warnings
from the school board. His appeal
for reinstatement was rejected by
a Court of Queens Bench Judge
after lengthy public hearings.
David King, the provincial
Minister of Education, told the
Alberta legislature last week that
he was considering steps to
revoke Keegstra s teaching
license. The Social Credit Party,
which was in power in Alberta for
more than 35 years, ending in
1971. presently has no seats in
the legislature.
1


Chase Federal Savings
and Loan Association
Commemorates
the New Year
with a-prayer for
Peace, Health and Love
Savings and Loan Association
lkmoim

.....in


Friday, September 9, 1983/The Jewiah Floridian Page25-A
in Loving memopy
Harriet S. Jackman
uW/t. aid oMfts. Sam Setfftn
uW Cfcftfa fiduwd qi/awwi. <3ta*y o\kxrf. Cao&p Sue
and ufody cDa'(d atari best wishes jpk
lA Wom "d cPtoJpGus oMew Qjew 9o ^ fitepfcen Jtactonan
oW CWH**. q^cucli JAicfceOe and Je fi^1^ Aisles 9b*
cA 9Jappu, and ^ffcape/ious lAW QJeat 9b c_A#
and (Jfe. Q/teenftcCd
u*d <0a*#* fi* gated u* 9JapW ad ^Ptopewus Jkui QJea* 9b ^
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and son cAdaw Scott
rtend Qest Wishes 9bft
cA 9&tt*} and


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Insurance
990 S.W. 1 St., Miami, Fl. 33130
Phone (Dade) 545-8311 (Broward) 763-6771
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Page 26-A The Jewish Fkridian/ Friday, September 9, 1983
i
AJComm., ADL Appeal
For Posthumous
Pardon for Frank
f connection with their apDlir,
for pardon, they submitted,
evidence not available atthet
of the trial in Fulton Sur*
Court. A major part of the
evidence is the testimony
Alonzo Mann, who at the tmLi
the murder was an office ho,I
the National Pencil ComniJ
managed by Leo Frank Ma3
testimony first brought to n&
attention by Nashville Ten!
sean reporters Jerrv Thoma
and Robert Sherborne, sh
conclusively that the crime 1
not have been committed i
described by prosecution
nesses at the trial.''
Israel in Lebanon. A photo taken from a
captured terrorist of an RPG boy. Hundreds
of children, from the age of 12, were trained
by the terrorists to fight Israel and at least
250 fell into Israeli hands in Lebanon.
Terrorism Against Jews 'More Lethal'
NEW YORK (JTA) The
American Jewish Committee, the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith and the Atlanta Jewish
Federation have submitted an
application to the Georgia State
Board of Pardons and Paroles
seeking a full and complete
posthumous pardon for Leo
Frank, exonerating him and
declaring him innocent of the
murder of Mary Phagan 70 years
ago.
The Frank case, involving one
of the most disputed trials in
American history, was brought
to light again last March when an
83-year-old Virginian, Alonzo
Mann, gave a sworn statement to
the Nashville Tennessean news-
paper declaring that Frank was
innocent.
According to the three groups,
"Leo Frank was an innocent man
convicted in a trial permeated
with perjury and prejudice, and
lynched by a mob inflamed with
anti-Semitism." The trial led to
the founding of the Anti-Defama-
tion League in 1913.
The three groups said that in
Describing the conviction v
lynching of Frank as one of i
worst episodes of anti-Semiti
in the history of the Un
States, the AJCommittee,..
and the Federation said
continues to be a blot
Georgia's criminal jusu
system. By issuing a full I
complete pardon, the Board]
Pardons and Paroles
repudiate the twin evils
prejudice and mob rule and i
an historic wrong."
NEW YORK (JTA) -
An intelligence evaluation
by the State Department
Office for Combatting
Terrorism shows that
terrorist attacks against
Jews and Israelis "have
been more lethal than other
terrorism'* and that "over
three-quarters of the at-
tacks were carried out by
Palestinians."
This report was provided to the
World Jewish Congress by Frank
Perez, the director of the OCT
and was released here by Rabbi
Arthur Schneier, chairman of the
WJC-American Section. The
report covers incidents during
the past two years. Perez had ori-
ginally presented the report at a
closed session of the WJC
European Branch meeting a week
ago, which was attended by the
leadership of 16 European Jewish
communities.
IN HIS report, Perez disclosed
the following:
OCT records from January,
1981 until September, 1982
contain 104 international
terrorist attacks against Israeli
and Jewish interests. This does
not include domestic attacks in
I srael or on the West Bank.
Attacks against Israeli and
Jewish interests have occurred in
26 countries during the last two
years, with over 20 percent of the
attacks in France and Italy.
Over three-quarters of the
attacks were carried out by Pale-
stinians, but terrorists from
Guatemala. Colombia, France.
West Germany, Italy, Greece,
and Japan carried out attacks
against Israelis and Jews world-
wide.
About half of the attacks were
targeted against Israeli citizens
or facilities, but Jews from 17
countries have been attacked by
Palestinian terrorists primarily
because they are Jews.
Attacks against Jews and
Israelis have been more lethal
than other terrorism. Almost 60
percent involved attacks on
people rather than property and
about 65 percent of the incidents
intended to cause casualties.
About 400 people have been
wounded and 25 killed in these
attacks. Almost half of all at-
tacks against Jews and Israelis
have occurred in Western
Europe.
SCHNEIER, who attended the
WJC European Branch meeting,
said on his return to the United
States that the climate within
which West European Jewish
communities find themselves
ranges from "uneasiness, to
insecurity, to fear." He added
that the situation required
vigilance of Jewish communities
throughout the world and this
therefore places particular re-
sponsibility on the largest Jewish
community American Jewry."
He noted however, that ultim-
ately, the security and well-being
of European Jews, and indeed all
minorities in Europe, must be the
responsibility of the respective
governments. "It is a matter of
self-interest: governments must
recognize that attacks upon Jews
ultimately will lead to destabili-
zation of democratic institu-
tions," Schneier concluded.
Happy New Year To All
>680 Coral W.iv
*
MAIN Of HCt *, s a a.. rrfA., ). .,-,.,, ft* V
MEMBER MOCRAi OE'USir i\s RANCC JM-OAATmin
Security Council Urges Special
Inquiry In West Bank 'Poisonings'
L'Shanah
Tovah
Happy New Year 5744
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The Security
Council has requested that
Secretary General Javier
Perez de Cuellar "conduct
independent inquiries con-
cerning the cause and
effects of the serious prob-
lem of the reported case of
poisoning (on the West
Bank) and urgently report
on the findings."
The request was included in a
statement issued by Ambassador
Jeane Kirkpatrick of the U.S.
The statement was the result
of informal consultations among
members of the Council after the
Arab states called for an argent
meeting of the Council to discuss
the "mass poisoning" of Pales-
tinian schoolgirls on the West
Bank.
The Arabs requested a meeting
in a letter to Kirkpatrick signed
by Iraqi Ambassador Riyadh Al-
Qaysi, who charged that the
"mass poisoning" affected more
than 1,000 schoolgirls and that
Israel was responsible for it.
Yehuda Blum, Israel's Ambas-
sador, said that the Arab charges
were "irresponsible and un-
founded." Blum also rejected the
Council's statement, claiming
that the reference in it to "pois-
oning" was "completely un-
founded."
IN WASHINGTON, mean-
while, State Department spokes-
man John Hughes said that "we
believe the Council's statement
was a constructive action which
should reinforce the international
effort already underway to deter-
mine the nature of these reported
poisoning cases."
Hughes noted that at Israel's
request, the U.S. has sent a team
from the Centers for Disease
Control in Atlanta and the Inter-
national Committee of the Red
Cross and the World Health Or-
ganization are also looking into
the problem which has been in-
vestigated already by Israeli
medical authorities.
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For information and rmli
Call Your Travel Agent or Air Fru*. atTlo.2S7.274Z
RFRANC


i -" :
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 27-A
llJj3roding
Support
Spurs Drive
ITASHINGTON -
_ The eroding sup-
j for Israel in the United
[tes is of great concern to
(porters of the Jewish
[te, Jews and non-Jews
(e. Many of them there-
believe that it is now
essary, more than ever
jre, to elect representa-
to Congress who be-
that it is in the best
ferest of the U.S. to en-
l the security of Israel.
Ilarvin Josephson, a New
: businessman with close ties
the entertainment field,
ves that the most effective
to achieve this goal is
lugh a political action
Imittee and so he formed the
Fional Political Action
hmittee. NatPAC, of which
fephson is treasurer, hopes to
able to contribute to as many
Bte and House races as the
rs it is now raising will allow.
A telephone interview from
|PAC's headquarters in New
City. Josephson noted that
ough PACs are more and
playing a major role in
essional elections he, like
Americans, knew little
I them until last spring.
was then he attended a
Jng with Sen. John Danforth
Mo.I, a supporter of Israel
voted against the sale of
fACs to Saudi Arabia last
r. He said he was shocked by
'wave of anti-Semitic
sh" which Danforth
jribed in the wake of the
[ACS vote.
put he also learned about how
business firms which sup
the AWACs safe all have
-s. Josephson noted that
doing business with Saudi
kbia include not only the oil
Hpanies but also hundreds of
er companies selling various
ducts to the Saudis.
hIS LED directly to the
ning of the PAC as a way of
vating the Jewish com-
nity. Josephson pointed out
the United Jewish Appeal
the various Jewish com-
al organizations cannot
Itribute to political campaigns,
^Symbol
. for
.Engravings
Symbol
... for
Color
^Separation!
^ r-
Irving
J Advertising-
***flg Industry since
"7 ancf now m-t^ tn
JM Modern Production
facilities throughout Florida
635-5308

While NavonWas Still Chief
Musician Naomi Shemer receives the Israel Prize from then
President Yitzhak Navon in a ceremony in the Jerusalem
Theater. Education Minister Zevulun Hammer stands behind
Yitzhak Navon and Teddy Kollek, Mayor of Jerusalem, looks
on.
neither can the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee. But
through NatPAC, individuals
can contribute up to $5,000 and
NatPAC in return can donate up
to $5,000 to each House and
Senate campaign.
For those who cannot make
large contributions there is an
annual credit of 50 percent for
political contributions on the
federal tax returns, up to $100 on
a single tax return and 8200 on a
joint return.
Josephson said he started by
going to persons who could
contribute the full 85,000, and
this provided the "seed money"
for NatPAC's first ads in Jewish
weeklies. The original supporters
of NatPAC included Jews and
non-Jews from the entertainment
world as well as persons
prominent in the Jewish com-
munity, among others.
THE NEXT step was a letter
signed by Woody Allen to
200,000 persons seeking con-
tributions. "Bv acting now we
can translate growing concerns
regarding Congressional
doubletalk' on the Middle East
into effective political action in
each of the 33 Senate races and
435 House contests to be decided
in 1982.'' the fetter said.
Josephson said the response
has been good with about
8400,000 quickly received. He
said that there were some who
said they would not give because
of opposition to the actions of the
government of Premier
Menachem Begin.
To them, Josephson said, be
wrote that they were being asked
to support American interests,
not the Begin government.
Josephson also noted that
Democrats did not desert the
U.S. when Ronald Reagan was
elected President or Republicans
when a Democrat is elected.
Israel will exist after Begin
leaves office, he added.
Because NatPAC started late
" In The year it will not have the
funds to contribute to all races,
Joseohson said. It will contribute
the full 85,000 to-each race rather
than making a lot of smaller
contributions with less impact.
A FIVE-member panel, now
expanded to six, will decide
which candidates will receive the
funds. The original members of
the committee, headed by
Josephson, also include Barry
Diller, chairman of Paramount
Pictures; Rita Hauser, a New
York attorney; Martin Peretz,
editor-in-chief of The New
Republic; and James Wolfen-
sohn, an investment banker and
financier. The sixth member
recently added is George Klein, a
New York businessman and
leading Jewish Republican.
NatPAC has already donated
to some 20 campaigns and ex-
pects to contribute to another 20
soon. The contributions are being
allocated on the basis of priorities
now. This means that Danforth,
like Sen. Daniel Moynihan (D.,
N.Y.I, who is another close
supporter of Israel, is not getting
contributions because they are
believed to be shoo-ins,
Josephson explained.
Among those receiving sup-
port are Sens. Jim Sasser (D.,
Continued on Page 29- A


Page 28-A The Jewish Floridiam / Friday. September 9, 1963
Needed:
Negotiating
Platform
With Jordan
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK- (JTAI-
Asserting that the Arab-Is-
rael conflict has been mar-
red by a series of failed
peace proposals, Mapam
Knesset member Elazar
Granot suggests that in-
stead of peace plans a
platform for negotiations"
should be developed for Is
rael, Jordan and represen
tatives of the Palestinia:
people.
Such a proposal. Granot said,
if backed unanimously by the
United States and Europe,
"based on principles of equality
and mutuality, could not be re-
jected out of hand by any of the
parties concerned." He added,
that a peace platform "would
steer the peace forces in the area
by providing them with a plan
they could fight for. without be-
ing accused of betraying the in-
terests of their people."
ADDRESSING some 200 peo-
ple attending the 1983 Human
Rights Luncheon at the Sheraton
Centre, sponsored by the Ameri-
can for Progressive Israel, the
Givat Haviva Educational
Foundation and the Kibbutz
Artzi Federation, Granot said
such a platform should be com-
posed of the following principles:
Mutual recognition of the right
to self-determination of all states
in the region; honoring the sover-
eignty of all states; the establish-
ment of peace between Israel and
its neighbors behind secure and
recognized borders; an obligation
to refrain from aggressive actions
during the negotiations period,
including a freeze on Israeli set-
tlement policy on the West Bank;
and the right of each participant
to present within the negotia-
tions, its own peace plan.
The Mapam MK said that ac-
ceptance of the platform would
Pioneer Women
Redouble Effort
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The Pioneer Women-
Na'amat, the women's La-
bor Zionist Organization,
said it would redouble its
efforts to protect women's
freedom of choice in repro-
duction in both the United
States and Israel.
Phyllis Frank, of Washington,
vice president of the 50,000
member organization, made that
statement in hailing the ruling by
the U.S. Supreme Court striking
down a series of local legislative
restrictions on access to abor-
tions. "The Supreme Court's de-
cision is a victory for all Ameri-
can women, for the cause of free-
dom and for the principle of
church-state separation," Frank
said. "We welcome the ruling as a
significant advance for the
American idea of freedom of
choice."
The Pioneer Women's sister
organization in Israel, Na'amat-
Pioneer Women, played a key
role in the defeat of recent pro
Eosals in the Knesset that would
ave further restricted the al-
ready limited right to abortion in
Israel, Frank said. Those propos-
als, branded a "public scandal"
by Masha Lubelsky, secretary-
general of the 750.000-member
Na'amat.
Chief Dublin on the Move
L i" f
w r*' 5f u "*
fv$ -3f %5
it "^y % *g !%*
( t m m (*
^t1 B^?r IB ^ Ja2K ^9
v
V 1 <'-
Iv i
A scene from the 30th Zionist Congress in Jerusalem Dec. 7-16.
Chairman of the Zionist Executive Arieh Dulzin leaves his seat
to explain his case to delegates from different factions i
heated exchange of opinions.
qualify a party as a legitimate
negotiator.
ALSO ADDRESSING the
luncheon was the former presi-
dent of the World Jewish Con-
gress, Philip Klutznick, who af-
firmed the right of diaspora Jew-
ry to be actively involved in
policy debate within Israel be-
cause of the deeply rooted links
between the two. He said that be-
cause of Israel's unique exper-
ience in relations to world Jewry
and the Mideast, the situation
"should demand debate."
"We cannot be one in our need
and separate in our ability to
speak and write the truth to one
another," Klutznick declared. He
said that when Israel shines in
the eyes of the international com-
munity, the diaspora "basks in
its sunlight," and when Israel's
international standing diminish-
es, the diaspora feels the effect.
Klutznick, who was Secretary
of Commerce during the Carter
Administration, addressed the
advantages of peace in relation to
the economy of Israel. He called
Israel one of the most productive
states in the world, a "miracle in
the use of high technology,"
which last year boasted a Gross
National Product more than $20
billion.
CONTINUING, he said Israel
cannot continue to spend one-
third of its GNP on its military
budget and not meet the needs of
its people and work force, which
he said suffers from a lack of suf-
ficient technological training.
Klutznick said that if a peace
agreement could be achieved,
then Israel could become "the
Japan of the Middle East." As it
stands right now, he noted, the
technological market to the na-
tions in Asia remain closed to Is-
rael, as do many of the markets
to the Third World nations and
African states.
Klutznick said that after the
establishment of the Jewish
state, and especially now as it has
proven itself to be a major mili-
tary strength in the Middle!
it is the next step of the dia
to increase Jewish educat
culture. He said Jewish co
continuity in the diaspora'
important as 1.000 F 16s."
"If Jewish life is assin
in the diaspora, it will
a loss of security for the Sti
Israel and the future of theS
>[ Israel that is more dan
I ban the failure of Washing
provide extra military
ware." he declared.
The Kibbutz Artzi Fed
was presented with the 19831
man Rights Award for its<
linued efforts on behalf of
in the Middle East.
Close Personal Banking.
It brings us closer to you. And separates us from the rest.
Ever since we opened our doors,
we've been providing our customers
with the kind of one-on-one service
you only get from genuinely
friendly people.
We do care about your needs
And the community's. No matter
how small or large your deposit, we
know your account represents your
personal security, your
personal reserve.
That's what Close Personal
Banking is all about Whether you're
talking about a checking or savings
account, a home improvement loan,
a personal or commercial loan
whatever.
Stop in. It could spoil you for any
other bank.
REPUBUC NATIONAL BANK.
THE HOME OF
CLOSE PERSONAL BANKING.
UJEUrCAR^a^BTORr^A^^^^
ii**&@&a^


Friday, September 9, 1983/The Jewish Floridian Page29-A
I Dutch Criminal Trials Tapering Off
| By HE NRIETTE BOAS
JSTERDAM (JTA) -
I BrUman, the Public Prosec-
believes chances are slim
I'many more Dutch war crim-
l will be tried and sentenced
olland in the years ahead.
gn, who is in charge of
ch for and prosecution of
who committed war
i in the Netherlands in col-
iion with the Nazi occup
fluring World War II, ex-
his views in a television
I discussion. The discussion
prompted by the acquittal of
: T.ilfns who was a "kapo"
te leader) at the Kauf-
Riederloh forced labor
i near Dachau.
Uens, the only non-Jew in his
section, was charged with crimes
against humanity and especially
cruel behavior toward his fellow
Jewish inmates. But he was ac-
quitted by a special tribunal
sitting in a Maastricht District
Court for lack of conclusive evi-
dence. Several of the prosecution
witnesses gave testimony in con-
flict with what they had given
during a preliminary hearing.
Brilman pointed out that with
the lapse of 40 years since the end
of the war, memories are no
longer fresh and there is an in-
creasing chance that evidence
presented by different eye-wit-
nesses will not correspond. He
noted further that many Dutch
war criminals succeeded in
fleeing Holland after the war and'
have been living abroad for many
Israel's Eroding
Support Spurs PAC
ntinued from Page 27-A
|) and Lowell Weicker (R.,
and Chic Hecht, a Jew,
I the Republican candidate
t-ada against Sen. Howard
pn, a Democrat. In the
races, contributions have
|to Reps. Tom Lantos (D.,
Sam Gejdenson (D.,
|l Dante Fascell (D., Fla),
Yates iD., 111.) and Jack
J(R.,N.Y.).
IPPORT WILL not
arily go to a Jewish
date over a non-Jew who
kit Israel for example.
\tth's opponent is Harriet
s, a Jew. In New Jersey,
VC contributed both to the
atic candidates for the
Prank Lautenberg, a
national chairman of
and his Republican op-
bt, Rep. Millicent Penwick.
renwick returned the money
pe she doesn't accept
fcutions from PACs,
ihson said.
Josephson said that by giving
$35 to $50 a "broad number of
people" can participate in
NatPAC. In fact, while the base
of the new organization is in the
Jewish community he would
eventually like to see the
majority of contributions come
from non-Jews.
In 1984, Josephson said he
hopes that NatPAC will have the
funds to compete in every Senate
and House race. As NatPAC
declares in a statement of policy
and Dumose, it was formed as "a
political action effort for
Americans of every political,
religious and ethnic background
who are fearful of the day when
our government might no longer
recognize this country's stake in
a viable Israel, who are outraged
by the aspersions cast on the
loyalty of American Jews in this
country, and who care enough
about these issues to act in a
realistic and effective manner."
ASSOCIATION
A Happy
New Year
To All Friends
Of The Opera
854-1643
lewish National Fund nJggg^
RMS
torn* Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
On the Occasion of the New Year 5744
*LANT TREES IN ISRAEL
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
| pl*nt as Many Trees aa You Wieh
<6 Per Tree)
18Treee-Chai
25 Treee-Cluster
36 Trees-Double Chai
60 Trees- Jubilee
75 Trees-Arbor
100 Trees-Garden
300 Trees- Orchard
1000 Trees-Grove*
Won Oaremony fat latest and a
1 "qu* in Us Forest is Included
a Holiday Greetings
O Birthday
n Anniversary
D Bar/Bat Mltzvah
D Wedding
n Graduation
Din Honor
O In Memory
LI Get Well
n Good Wishes
D New Baby
O New Year
D Special Occasion
[J In Gratitude
a_______
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln Rd., Snite 353
Miami Beech, FL 33139
Paeae 5364464
years and acquired citizenship in
their countries of residence. Most
countries do not extradite their
own nationals, he said.
Nevertheless, Brilman felt that
his office should continue its ef-
forts to bring war criminals to
justice, despite the acquittal of
such a person as Talens.
Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Flink
At Kosk Maskam,
ftiay theNewl/ear bring peace and
prosperitytotjouami'thoseyoulove

Fun 'n Games
in
Freeport/Lucaya
Only 35 minutes away on Grand Bahama
Island is El Casino, the most lavish pleasure
palace in the Western Hemisphere. Two Con-
tinental restaurants El Morocco and the
Oasis await your dining tastes. Tibor
Rudis' Crazy Gang, a colorful revue is
featured twice nightly except Monday.
Fly to Freeport/Lucaya. Tempt Lady Luck
at El Casino. Visit the fabulous Garden of the
Groves. Shop in the fascinating International
Bazaar. Have the time of your life on Grand
Bahama Island. .
For reservations, call your Travel Agent
or Eastern Airlines, Bahamasair.
Fr6jport/Lucy6). Grand Bafiama Island
.' .'.
.


r*age 30-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 9, If
To Be Entered as Evidence
Book Documents 80,000 Deported French Jews
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A book which documents
and lists the names of some
80,000 Jews who were de-
ported from France and
murdered by the Nazis will
be entered as evidence at
the upcoming trial of Klaus
Barbie, the "butcher of
Lyons" who is facing trial
in France on charges of
crimes against humanity
during World War II.
The book, which was published
here in its American edition, is "a
memorial to the Jews Deported
from France 1942-1944," by
Serge Klarsfeld. The book was
introduced by Klarsfeld and his
wife, Beate Klarsfeld, at a press
conference at the American Jew-
ish Committee's headquarters
here. The two Nazi hunters
helped bring Barbie to justice
and were instrumental in his re-
cent return from Bolivia to
France.
IN THE PRESS conference,
Klasfeld said that the 704-page
volume, first published in France
in 1979, serves as the only
"tombstone" to many Jewish
families who were wiped out alto-
gether in the deportations from
France.
In addition, he said, the book
was "a potent legal weapon" in
the struggle against Nazi war
criminals still at large. Klarsfeld
noted that the book was already
accepted, shortly after its pub-
lication in France, as evidence at
a trial in Cologne of three top
Nazis who were active in France
during the war.
The book, published here by
the Beate Klarsfeld Foundation
at the price of $35 a copy, con-
tains a detailed description of
each of the 78 convoys that car-
ried Jews from detainment camps
in France to Nazi death camps, in
most cases to Auschwitz.
IT GIVES the name of each
person in the convoy, together
with his or her birthdate, place of
birth and nationality. It also con-
tains many hitherto unpublished
photographs, evewitness ac-
counts of the Nazi horror and re-
productions of documents from
the period that point to the active
role played by the French, as well
as by the Germans, in the depor-
tations.
The book reveals that Jews
ranging in ages from newborn to
95, and coming from almost 60
countries, were victims of the de-
portations. Most of the deportees
were, however, from France and
Poland, but others were from
countries such as Turkey, Ireland
and Tahiti. They came to France
Flirts With Arabv
Greek Minister Wants Palestine State
By SHELDON KIRSHNER
TORONTO tJTA) -
Prime Minister Andreas
Papandreou of Greece has
called for the establishment
of a Palestinian state
alongside Israel with secure
frontiers. At a press con-
ference here last week, the
64-year-old Greek leader
said his 18 month-old
government intends to "de-
velop and enrich" its grow-
ing ties with the Arab
world.
Papandreou, who was in
Canada to promote Canadian in-
vestment in his country, com-
pared Greece's struggle for
national independence with that
of the Palestinians' quest for self-
determination. Greece, he em-
phasized, has a "soft spot" in its
heart for "any people" seeking
self-determination and a home-
land.
PAPANDREOU, who heads
the Panhellenic Socialist Move-
ment, has moved Greece closer to
the Arabs since he took over as
Prime Minister in the autumn of
1981.
Under Papandreou, Greece has
become the only member of the
European Economic Community
to extend diplomatic recognition
to the PLO. Yasir Arafat, chair-
man of the PLO, was the first
foreign dignitary to visit Athens
after Papandreou's election vic-
tory. It was then that Greece per-
mitted the PLO to open a mission
in Athens.
During the war in Lebanon, he
likened Israel's invasion to Nazi
genocide against Jews. In 1982,
welcoming Arafat to Greece after
his flight from Beirut, Papan-
dreou described him as "this
great fighter for freedom." Not
long after Israel invaded Leba-
non, Papandreou expressed op-
position to Israel's "aggressive
and expansionist policy." At
European Economic Community
meetings, Greece took the lead in
condemning Israel.
PAPANDREOU, who was a
rork University professor of
economics from 1969 to 1974, told
reporters at his press conference
held at the Hilton Harbour Caatle
Hotel, that he understood the
Palestinians' desire for sov-
ereignty because Greece itself has
had a "long and difficult" his-
tory.
Greece has always fought to
maintain its independence and
territorial integrity. Therefore, he
explained, it is sympathetic to
the Palestinians.
Papandreou, the son of a
former prime minister, said "we
have a soft spot in our heart for
any people struggling for self-de-
termination and a home-
land."
In a reference to the 1948 Arab-
Israeli war, Papandreou said the
Palestinians had been "kicked
out" of their homeland. This, he
noted, was a "major injustice"
which could be remedied if they
were granted a homeland.
HE SAID that Israel was en-
titled to "secure frontiers" and
that the Palestinians deserved a
homeland. (Earlier in the week,
he told a joint session of the
Senate and House of Commons
that the Palestinians are "fully
justified" in their demand for a
homeland.)
Papandreou, who received an
honorary doctor of laws degree
from New York University at the
tail end of his Canadian visit,
said he would grant Israel and
the PLO embassy status in
Greece once the Arab-Israeli con-
flict is resolved.
(Yannis Haralambopoulos,
Papandreou's Foreign Minister,
implied in a brief interview with
this reporter that Greece has not
asked the PLO to recognize Is-
rael. He implied that Greece
would urge that course on the
PLO if Israel extended recogni-
tion to the PLO.)
ASKED WHY his government
is pursuing a stronger pro-Arab
policy than previous Greek
regimes, Papandreou said he was
not concerned what his predeces-
sors had done or not done.
Greece, he said, was a European,
Balkan and Mediterranean
nation which, traditionally, has
had close ties with the Arab
world. It would be "short-
sighted" if Greece viewed itself
exclusively as a West European
country, he added.
Greece, he went on to say, in-
tended to develop and enrich its
unks with the Arabs. Greece im-
ports much of its oil from Arab
countries, and Greek construc-
tion firms have landed heftv con-
tracts in places like Iraq, Saudi
Arabia and Lebanon.
a l u 1981\ Greek exPts to the
Arab world totalled more than $1
billion. A press release issued b-
tne Greek embassy in Ottawl
points out that investors will find
many attractive and unique fea-
tures in Greece" along them
proximity to the Middle East and
excellent political and economic
thlVL co"nJries throughout
the Arab world.
~* ^Holiday S?a
son to
*4U
0, CJrUnJU
FARM STORES
seeking refuge from Nazi and
other persecution. They found,
instead, deportation and death.
Klarsfeld told the press con-
ference how he was able to obtain
the lists of the departees. "Each
time a convoy left France for the
killing centers in the East," he
disclosed, "a list of the names of
the victims was, by Nazi order,
prepared in quadruplicate. Two
copies of the list accompanied the
convoy and were eventually des-
troyed. A third copy was kept by
the Germans at the detainment
camp, and was also lost.
"THE FOURTH copy was
kept by the captive Jewish com-
munity council in Paris. When
the Germans fled the city in 1944,
they were in such haste that they
simply neglected to get back and
destroy those fourth copies." He
!"**** discovered th, |
0m."tided andcnuX
a crate in FrenchTJa
chive in Paris, few JJJ
where he lived.
In response to a c
Klarsfeld said that aJH
pose for his visit here waaj
relatives of the Jewish dulJ
who were deported by BiuSl
death camps. He said thatBJ
ordered the deportation iJl
least 41 children in the\
town of Izieu. He said he w,
the family members of these/
dren to take part in Barbie^
coming trial.
In response to another
tion, Klarsfeld said th*
whereabouts of Dr. Joseph ]
gele, the notorious war
who experimented and ,,
thousands of inmates in An
witz, are not known. HesaidJ
Mengele is probably in Pan,
but his exact whereabout* 1
known. He declined to
what is being done, if any
to locate him, saying only i
until Mengele is found notb
can be done regarding hisi
tradition to Germany.

-*


Mayor Maurice Ferre
And ""-^
Mrs. Ferre
13TOJ, f
GUT
YOMTOV
HAPPY
ROSH HASH ANA
Happy New Year
ffl
FLAGSHIP NATIONAL BANK
OF MIAMI
** Bank* he .
ntmbn FOC


.- -z> v ^-il
,f,;,r.n .1 ...,\
Friday, September 9, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 31-A
Teen Dance For Israel Bonds
Nearly 300 area youth gathered at a The dance was sponsored by the State of
jee on behalf of the Israel Bonds Program Israel Bonds Organization in cooperation
id pledged their help for the success of with USY, Young Judea, B'nai B'rith
ie Israel Bonds Annual High Holy Day Youth and NIFTY.
)peal in local temples and synagogues.
, LEADERS (from left) Gila Madam, ARVOT ^ *^ ^^ YOUNG JUDEA (from left) Steven Cohen, Alyssia
Regional President; David KubUiun, president YOUNG JUDEA (from left) Jackie Brown, Flavia Ader, Mike Eisenmann, David Zipes, Robin Cash-
Torah USY; Barbara Wagner, HANEGEV Zveibil, Staci Katz, Joelle Ader and Jason Krieger. man and Michelle Moskovitz.
\ional executive vice president; Marnie Posner,
HANEGEV vice president and Stephen Frank, ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ <
tpresident Beth David USY. JaiSij^^^^^*i^^^ *"- tAl J*^fct
' (from left) Barbara Saxon, Aviva Bernatt,
nantha Lewis, Julie Segor, Amy Minches, Valerie
Hums and Cheri Lazar.
1 DEBS BBG (from left) Jody Black, Jennifer Matin, ^EBS *BG d HURRICAINE ALA (from left)
1 Karey Breslauer, Micky Kossman and JilLesnik. ""? Bloom' ^fSLS^tSSS^ Hillary Alpenn,
Eddie Guerra and Stefanie Mailin.
.
'>.
_____ J MIAMI BEACH HIGH (from left) Melissa Eileen Vilk, EUyn Gershkoff, Tiffani Towbin, Sharry
JRRICAINE AZA (from left) Jerry Margolis, Delgado, Stacy Bushman and AlysePevar. Bedrin and David Hadani.
?sident; Eric Gould, vice president; and Eric
?.TH
'^^K
^B<.. ..30a R_ 1^^
M^X\J^t^i
' J If I ;-.

1 k
__ _^_^_ HIGH SCHOOL IN ISRAEL Summer '83 (from YOUNG JUDEA (from left) Eric Rutner, Avi
TORAH USY (from left) Adam Kosnitzky, left) Carolyn Scher, Hope Greenstein, Bonnie Bouman, Simone Greenstein, Seth PolUno, Kathy
fc*.y Gendler, Ira Kahn, David Nudelman, akd Waldman.
enny Gold
Goldberg and Artie Martin.
*YO (from left) Caren Laufer, Karen Plave, David DEBS BBG and AZA (from left) Todd Hochstadt, YOUNG JUDEA (from left) Steve Reichelson, Seth
fsen, Susanne Walzer and David Berezin. Jackie Gross, A ndy Stein, and Jenny Kluger. Prezant, Gary Harris and David Zipes.
~,


Page 32-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 9,1983
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happs Hew Sear

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WITH 26 STORES THROUGHOUT FLORIDA


14 New Year-
Begin's Resignation
A New Beginning
He 'Simply Cannot Bear the
The Significance of Rosh Hashanah Responsibility Any Longer'


By DVORA WAY8MAN
Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish
iNew Year, is different from its
[secular counterpart. It occurs on
] 1st of Tishri and it is more a day
I of reflection and repentance than
[one of celebration. It is preceded
|by the Hebrew month of Elul,
[when we prepare ourselves spirit-
ually for the forthcoming "days
|of awe." On the Saturday night
| before Rosh Hashanah we begin
[saying special penitential prayers
Icalled "Selihot." The first night
these are said at midnight, and
|after that, just before sunrise.
New Year's Day has a number
lot other names. It is known as
\Yom HaDin (Day of Judgment);
lyom HaZikaron (Day of Me-
Imorial) and Yom Teruah (Day of
|Shofar-sounding). Its mood is a
Ilittle ambiguous on the one
hand it's a festive day which we
[also call Yom Harat Olam (the
birthday of the world), but it's
lalso a solemn day of reconcilia-
Ition.
Why do so many Jews who
never enter a synagogue at any
I other time somehow manage to
Ijoin a congregation, if only for a
lfew hours on this day? Many
are even willing to pay a whole
year's membership for the
privilege. The observance of Rosh
Hashanah binds Jews to their
heritage and expresses their
[identity, no matter how far they
Imay have strayed from Jewish
(tradition.
JEWS BELIEVE in the ef-
[ficacy of prayer. When we com-
Imunicate our wishes to our
Creator, we are reminded to
I examine our desires, whether or
not they contain anything
unholy, unjust or ignoble. Our
prayers purify, refine and ennoble
our hearts. Perhaps that is why
we have been endowed with a
natural impulse to pray, even
though the ulterior motive may
be in the hope of fulfilling certain
wishes.
Every such fulfilment implies a
kind of miracle something that
we wouldn't expect in the normal
course of events. We pray for
those things which we believe to
be dependent on God's will.
There are those who think it
incompatible with the notion of
God that He should be moved by
our prayers to do something
which He otherwise would not
have done. Others believe that
the laws of nature are so fixed
and permanent that they never
change under any circumstances.
YET THE pious Jew thanks
God daily "for His miracles
which on our behalf He performs
every day, and for His wonders
and kindness shown at all times."
Each Rosh Hashanah in the
Musaf service, we repeat the
words: "Repentance, prayer and
good deeds remove the evil of the
divine decree." Whatever a man
has forfeited by evil deeds, he
may recover by prayer and
improved conduct.
This raises a perplexing ques-
tion: If our condition for a whole
year is determined in advance, on
the Holy Days of Rosh Hashanah
and Yom Kippur what is the good
of praying for help in times of
trouble? The answer is that it is
always in God's power to accede
to our petitions and fulfil our
wishes.
Abraham was, by Biblical
account, the first to utter a
prayer. It was a true prayer
not for himself, but for his fellow
man. From Abraham onwards,
prayer remained the Jew's chief
refuge in danger and the best
solace in trouble.
ALTHOUGH we believe in the
efficacy of prayer, we know that
God does not grant every peti-
tion, nor should we expect it.
Sometimes the denial is also for
our own good. The Mishnah
Olsons to Receive Shaare Zedek
{Hospital Award at Jerusalem Event
Miami Beach residents Sidney
I a.nd Miriam Olson will be honored
Lby the International Board of Di-
I rectors of Shaare Zedek Medical
Center at the hospital's annual
dinner, to be held in the Laromme
Hotel in Jerusalem Tuesday,
Sept. 27. The highlight of world-
wide Shaare Zedek activities, the
event is marked by the presenta-
tion of the award, which
recognizes leadership and com-
mitment to the Shaare Zedek
Medical Center in Jerusalem.
Activities this year coincide
with the dedication of Mordecai
Ardon's Ten Tapestries, which
will be permanently housed in the
Rotunda of the Jerusalem Medi-
cal Center.
Philanthropist and supporter
of the Medical Center, Olson is
vice president as well as chair-
man of the American Committee
for Shaare Zedek Hospital's
Greater Miami Chapter.
Honorees of the past years
have included former Israeli
Prune Minister Golds Meir,
Prime Minister Menachem
Sidney and Miriam OUon
Begin, author. Eli Wiesel, Nail
hunter, Beatte Klarsfeld, and
Maine Poher, speaker of the
French Assembly.
dTewislhi IFloridliaim
(Aboth ii:13) teaches: "Do not
make thy prayer a fixed claim or
demand which must be fulfilled,
but a supplication for mercy. .
On Rosh Hashanah we believe
that God examines the scrolls on
which are recorded our every
deed during the past year. It is
decided who will live, who will
die; who will be rich, who will be
poor; who will rise in the world
and who will be brought low; who
will live in peace and who will
survive in misery. But the decree
is not final.
We have ten days in which to
search our souls, repent of wrong
done and do good deeds to alter
the balance before the scrolls of
fate are rolled shut.
IN ISRAEL, the New Year is
celebrated much as Jews do
everywhere. We draw together as
families; attend synagogues; eat
apples dipped in honey for a
sweet New Year. Services are
arranged for our soldiers no
matter where they are serving,
and Shofars are distributed to
every Army base.
Rosh Hashanah has never-
theless special significance in
Israel. In addition to God's
protection promised to us at Mt.
Sinai if we accepted His laws, we
are living in our own land, given
to us as a birthright. We are all
one people, and when we wish
each other "Happy New Year"
the busdriver, the bank teller, the
lady in the grocery it is with
the knowledge of a shared
destiny. To the traditional
greeting of "May you be in-
scribed for a good year," the
Israeli adds: "May it be a year of
peace."
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Menachem Be-
gin announced that his de-
cision to resign is final be-
cause "I simply cannot
bear the responsibility any
longer." He thus rejected
intensive efforts by his
Likud coalition partners to
I persuade him to change his
' mind. But his colleagues
did convince him to post-
pone submitting a formal
. letter of resignation to
President Chaim Herzog
which would make his
resignation legally binding.
There was no indication as to
how long it would be before Begin
submits the letter, but it was as-
sumed he would do so as soon as
all the coalition partners agree on
his successor. Begin apparently
wants to avert a situation in
which the President would ask
the Labor Alignment to try and
form a new government. If all the
coalition partners agree before-
hand on the new candidate for
Premiership, the President would
have no choice but to ask that
person to form the new govern-
ment.
BEGIN'S FINAL decision
Aug. 30 ended two days of in-
tensive consultations and
speculation about the Premier's
intention to resign. The Premier
first announced his move at the
end of a routine Cabinet session,
catching the ministers and the
Menachem Begin
nation by surprise.
Until the last minute of the
consultations at the Premier's
office it was not clear whether
Begin would in the end give in to
the pressure to remain in office.
But as the three-hour consul-
tations ended, Begin said he was
determined to resign.
Begin said he was moved by
the statements and appeals of the
Cabinet ministers and other key
officials of the coalition parties to
get him to reverse his decision. "I
would like to stress that I do not
blame anybody for my resig-
Contlnued on Page 15-B
JORDAN MARSH
WISHES YOU A
HAPPY NEW YEAR
FILLED WITH PEACE
AND CONTENTMENT
We hope the coming months will be
filled with many shining moments.
Including the warmth ot new friendships
and the joy of old ties with those you
love and surmounting them all,
the happiness of dreams come true.
prdain
FLORIDA
MtiMiOt <0 t*oeil
Miami, FloridaFriday, September 9,1983
Sections
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Page2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 9,1983
Chaim Herzog
Israel's Sixth President; X Unifying Personality
By SIMON GRIVER
In becoming Israel's sixth
president. Chaim Herzog has
taken on his most challenging
role. His proven versatility
should stand him in good stead,
having in the past been a suc-
cessful soldier, diplomat, polit-
ician, lawyer, industrialist, jour-
nalist, writer and even something
of a sportsman.
Perhaps a more important
qualification for being president
than his professional accomplish-
ments is the fact that he spans
the four major chasms that
divide the Jewish people: relig-
ious and secular, Ashkenazi and
Oriental, Israel and the Diaspora,
and the political left and right.
HERZOG describes himself as
a traditional Jew. He is looked
upon as belonging to the non-
Orthodox establishment, but his
family background (he is the son
of the late Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi
Yitzhak Herzog) makes him
sympathetic of and acceptable to
the Orthodox community.
Herzog s wife. Aura Ambacbe, is
half-Sephardi, their oldest son,
Yoel. has married the daughter of
the Swiss Sephardi business
magnate, Nessim Gaon, and Her-
zog claims that so many uncles,
aunts, cousins, nephews and
nieces have "mixed" marriages
that he is not conscious of who is
Ashkenazi and who is not.
At the same time, having been
born and brought up in Ireland,
educated in Britain and served in
America as Ambassador to the
United Nations, Herzog points
out that he understands the
hopes and fears of the English-
speaking Diaspora and its
relationship to Israel. Finally, as
somebody whose political home is
towards the right and hawkish
inclined circles in the Labor
Party, his centrist views are
acceptable to most of the popula-
tion, albeit that the presidency is
a non-political role.
With the country's divisions in
mind. President Herzog's ac-
ceptance speech in May, as he re-
placed Yitzhak Navon, stressed
that internal wrangling was be-
coming a greater threat to the
country's security than the ex-
ternal enemy. But if Herzog is a
unifying influence in the nation,
his path to the presidency ex-
posed some of the uglier aspects
of division.
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AFTER IT was known that
the popular President Navon was
stepping down, it became a 'two-
horse race" for the post. Supreme
Court Justice Menachem Elon.
who was the government coali-
tion's man. contended with
Labor's candidate Herzog. In the
event some seven government
Knesset members betrayed
Prime Minister Menachem Begin
who had personally chosen Elon,
and in the secret ballot Herzog
won by 61 votes to 57. Just who
crossed party lines and why re-
mains unclear for nobody ad-
mitted responsibility. Despite
this, Begin struck up a good
working relationship with
Herzog.
There was nevertheless a dis-
tinct feeling in the country that
the more suitable candidate won.
Elon, the reserved scholar and
jurist, could not match the flam-
boyant Herzog for popular sup-
port.
Herzog was at pains to stress
that he was not born with a silver
Continued on Page 10-B
Israel's sixth President Chaim Herzog
(right) is sworn in at the -Knesset in Jeru-
salem on May 5, 1983. From left are former
President Yitzhak Navon
speaker Menahem Savidor.
and Knesset
From our family on the shores of Brooklyn,
to Jewish families everywhere...
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Best wishes for a Happy, Healthy and Prosperous
New Year from Manischewitz Kosher Wines.
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Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
5743: Israel in the Middle East
****%
Chief Lebanese negotiator Antoine Fattal is
shown signing the Israel-Lebanese
agreement for his country.
"hmxK
Best Wishes for a Year Blessed With
Peace, Health and Happiness
Congressman and Mrs. Lawrence J. Smith
Grant and Lauren
P-d to. b liny SmMh tar Coograaa Camoaajn. Joaaph Iimiln. Trent**
By YOEL COHEN
For Israel, her experience
the Jewish year in terms
f Middle Eastern politics
iay In- summed up by one name:
Lebanon. Before the Jewish year
began Israel's Operation Peace
for Galilee appeared to have
secured some of tis goals, with
the departure from Lebanon of
'PLO forces, and with the return
if some normality to a country
/"flirted by civil violence since
974.
Hut the initial victory proved
o be short term. Already before
the Jewish year began, President-
elect Bashir Jemayel died when a
missive bomb explosion wrecked
he headquarters of the Phalange
party. Bashir was known for his
orolsraeli feelings, and only his-
ory can speculate whether Mr.
pegin's vision of full diplomatic
relations developing as a result of
fthe war would have taken place
had he survived. Instead, his
brother, Amin, who has replaced
him, has proved less reliable as a
political ally to Israel.
As Kosh Hashanah was usher-
ing in the new year, the Phalange
[massacres at the Palestinian
camps of Sabra and Shatilla
loccured. In retrospect, as this
may have been the beginning of a
series of events which was to
result in the agreement between
Israel and Lebanon in May in-
volving the withdrawal of foreign
forces, including Israel, from
Lebanon.
ALTHOUGH it was the
rnalange forces which carried out
the actual massacres, it was Isra-
el that felt the full brunt of criti-
cism by foreign public and politi-
cal opinion.
Within Israel the massacres
confirmed to critics of the war
Inat the Government ought to
nave restricted the goals of the
military operation to the 45 kilo-
JWwr limit which Mr. Begin
mposed initially. Four-hundred-
J-nousand people demonstrated in
i *v,.v,for ^e establishment of
" Judicial commission of inquiry
examine Israels involvement
lYii w affair Then President
rh.ak, Navon has meanwhile
w2?? that ta would have re-
signed had Prime Minister Begin
|TOt tinted the commission.
lnVKy,lh<; end of 1982 a three-way
I kn i ad developed between
wX8' Beirut "3 Washing-
p about the nature of the future
Continued on Page 11-B
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Page4-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 9,1983
On the Eve of Shamir's Victory
How the Vote Went
ByHUGHORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A fight to decide on a
successor to Premier Men-
achem Begin broke out
within the top echelon
circles of his Herut Party
several hours after Begin
told party stalwarts and
other leading representa-
tives of the Likud coalition
that he will not reverse his
decision to resign.
Ministers stressed that the
discussion to name a successor
would also have to entail the how
and the where for deciding on a
candidate acceptable to all the
parties and factions comprising
the Likud coalition. Although
party officials said it appeared
certain that Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir would be the
party's candidate. Deputy Pre-
mier David Levy said that "all
options are open. When the de-
bate starts there will be more
than one candidate."
WHILE SHAMIR'S support
ers wanted the choice of the can-
didate to be discussed by small
inner forums of the party. Levy's
supporters for his candidacy felt
he had a better chance of success
in the larger party central com-
mittee. Levy had many grass
root supporters in the central
committee while Shamir, a veter-
an member of the "fighting fam-
ily," had more support among
the top party functionaries.
Supporters of Ariel Sharon,
former Defense Minister and now
Minister Without Portfolio, also
felt he had a chance if the vote in
the central committee was by
secret ballot. But they gave him
little chance if the discussion
took place in the smaller forums.
In any event, there was a gen-
eral feeling in the Herut hier-
archy that some decision on a
candidate must be made at most
within a day or two to avoid
growing rancor and disunity
among the coalition groupings,
thus paralyzing a unified decision
and thereby creating a basis for
the Labor Alignment being called
upon to form a new government.
ONCE A candidate is chosen,
the party would try to put to-
gether a list of at least 61 Knesset
members who support a new
Likud-led coalition headed by an
agreed upon candidate. Begin
could then take this list with him
when he handed his letter of
resignation to President Chaim
Herzog, with the suggestion that
the list be accepted as the new
coalition.
If the delay in naming a can-
didate for the Premiership and
getting together a Knesset list
extended too long even a few
days Begin might feel that he
must submit his formal resig-
nation without a proposed coali-
tion.
In that case, Herzog would
have no alternative but to call on
Shimon Peres, as the leader of the
Labor Alignment, the largest
party in the Knesset, to suggest
an alternative government within
21 days with the possibility of
extending this period for another
21 days.'
PERES, who kept a low profile
since Begin announced his inten-
tion to resign, broke his silence
and that of the Labor Party. He
told an Israel Television inter-
viewer he was doing so now be-
cause it was "evident beyond
doubt" that Begin was resigning.
Peres said the most urgent need
at the moment was "to end the
crisis. We are beset with major
problems in Lebanon and in
the economy and the most
urgent need is to establish a wide
coalition which can deal imme-
diately with those problems." He
said he was confident the Labor
Alignment could establish such a
wide coalition.
Peres said that no official con-
tacts had yet been made with
possible coalition parties, but un-
official talks indicated that some
of the smaller parties, at least,
would cooperate with Labor.
Asked how this jibed with
party reports that they would
continue with the Likud, Peres
replied: "That was yesterday.
What we are now dealing with is
today and tomorrow."
PERES SAID he had per-
sonal respect for Begin the man"
but not for his policies. "I agree
with him on one thing he de-
scribed the war in Lebanon as a
tragedy, and I agree with that."
Asked how he estimated his
"Likud rivals," Peres said:
"They are not my rivals at the
moment. They are their own
rivals."
Meanwhile, leaders of the var-
ious coalition parties said they
would await the results of the
debate within Herut on pro-
cedures to name a successor to
Begin and for a successor to then
be named. While expressing gen-
eral support for the present coali-
tion, even under a new head,
some coalition leaders agreed
that a new situation had been
created.
Agudat Israel spokesmen
noted that "the Likud without
Begin is not the same Likud,"
and some party leaders hinted
that if the struggle for the suc-
cession within Herut went on for
too long, they would consider an
approach by the Labor Align-
ment if Peres was called on by the
President to build a new govern-
ment.
EDITORIALS in the Israeli
press adopted a wait-and-see at-
titude for the first few days after
Begin announced his resignation,
postponing hard comment until
the Premier submitted his formal
resignation. But some editorials
began to edge toward harder
comments.
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The Jerusalem Poet stated
that it is to Begins credit that he
carried through his intention to
resign and did not waver in the
face of an "unprecedented orgy of
personal adoration by breast-
beating supplicants imploring
him to stay on." It added that
"Likud without Begin, even
without one who feels he can no
longer carry the burden of leader-
ship, will not be the same.
Among his putative successors
there is not one who begins to
measure up to Mr. Begin in
stature, let alone popularity."
The independent Haaretz said
Begin's resignation was a sad end
to the career of a man who had
finally achieved power after 29
years in opposition, made even
sadder by the infighting in his
party for his successor.
THE NATIONAL Religious
Party's daily. Hatzofeh, said that
a united coalition government i
would have weighty problems to
deal with, not the least of which
would be the economic and social
problems. If such a government
could not begin to cope with
these problems at once, early
elections would be preferable in
order to get the kind of govern-
ment that would be rPon*iv to
these needs.
The Hiatadrufs daily, n,^
stated that however urgent the
establishment of a new coalition*
was, it should not be formed "n
any price, at the demand of each
and every small coalition pan-
ner." Without Begin at the neb,
the editorial continued, "tw.1
magic has passed and the riJ
has run out." '
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y, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 6-B
Architect Kenneth Triester to Receive
JAJCommittee's Human Relations Award
Miami architect Kenneth
Triester will receive the 1983
Human Relations Award from
I the American Jewish Com-
mittee's Greater Miami Chapter
at a dinner at the Omni Hotel
Tuesday, Sept. 20, 7 p.m.
Keynoting the affair will be U.S.
[Congressman Dante Fascell who
[will address the topic, "The
IMadrid Treaty: Is there a Future
[for Human Rights in Eastern
| Europe?"
, Alfred H. Moses, former
I special advisor and counsel to
President Jimmy Carter, will
I present the award. He will review
I history and priorities of AJC's
I Institute of Human Relations.
The announcement was made
I by dinner Co-Chairmen David
I Fleeman and Audrey Finkelstein,
Iboth past presidents of AJC's
I Miami Chapter. Fleeman was
I also president of the Greater
I Miami Jewish Federation.
Triester is known locally for his
I Coconut Grove works, which
I include The Office in the Grove
land Yacht Harbor Condominium.
Both were featured in the 40th
I Anniversary Edition of Florida
IArchitecture. He is currently
Iworking on an expansion of
] May fair Shopping Center, which
Ihe designed. Such structures as
[Elizabeth Virrick Park, Rainbow
IPark Elementary School, and the
[Colonial Drive Elementary
[School bear his style.
Triester also served as ar-
chitect for "Chapel for Temple
(Israel of Greater Miami," which
received the 1968 Merit Award
{for Architectural Design from the
Juild for Religious Architecture
and was included in Stetson
Jniversity's Exhibit of Out-
standing Architecture in Florida,
1966.
Kenneth Triester
In addition, Triester has
sculpted bronze plaques depict-
ing Jewish modern history,
forming a limited-edition series of
six plaques commissioned by the
United Jewish Appeal and
originally presented to Elie
Wiesel.
He is the creator of "Judaic
Sculptures," a series of five busts
in four categories commissioned
by the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, which was presented
by the Federation to Teddy
Kollek, mayor of Jerusalem, in
honor of his 70th birthday. Also a
painter, Triester created "The
Pictorial Saga of Jewish
History," a series of ten paint-
ings depicting 4,000 years of Je-
wish history, commissioned by
Temple Israel of Greater Miami.
Alfred H. Moses is a partner in
the Washington law firm of
Covington and Burling. He
series as president of AJC's
National Executive Council and
is a member of it's Board of
Governors.
American Jewish Committee's
Miami Chapter president is
David Mesnekoff.
Cuomo Raps Faculty for not
Opposing Racist Professor
ByBENGALLOB
^ NEW YORK (JTA> -
Gov. Mario Cuomo has
issued a denunciation of the
faculty of the State Uni-
versity at Stony Brook for
failing to openly oppose the
teachings of a faculty
member linking Zionism
and racism.
The
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Cuomo also said, in a state-
ment, that the teaching of Prof.
Ernest Dube is "intellectually
dishonest and pernicious because
it is designed to serve as a justifi-
cation for genocide in the form of
a completion of the 'final solu-
tion' through annihilation of the
State of Israel."
A SPOKESPERSON told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
the Governor issued the state-
ment after members of the Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith met with the Governor's
staff in New York City, but
stressed that he had issued the
statement independently of that
meeting because "he feels very
strongly" about the develop-
ment.
Dube was exonerated on Aug.
17 by the executive committee of
the university Faculty Senate,
which ruled that the South
African-born professor had not
breached academic ethics or the
bounds of academic freedom in
his teaching of a course on "The
Politics of Race."
A university official said a re-
port will be made on September
12 to the full Faculty Senate and
action against Dube was still
possible. Dube is away on vaca-
tion.
DECLARING he was not
certain what the exoneration of
Dube by the faculty committee
Continued on Page 16-B
MECHAYEH FISH
6th STREET AND MERIDIAN AVENUE
(ACROSS FROM CARNIVAL FRUIT)

New Year Greetings
Hazel & Irving Cypen

"Sunsweet Prune Juke.
It's not just good for my body.
It just plain tastes good"
Everyone knows that Sunsweet Prune Juice has a variety ot
vitamins and minerals. So when people see me drinking it.
they usually figure that 1 drink it to stay healthy. Actually.
thdt'sonly half the reason. Italsohappenstotastedelicious.
And why not., it's a rich, 100 natural fruit juice, with
no sugar or preservatives added I enjoy Sunsweet Prune
Juice often After all. how often do you find something
that's good for you and that riikiruir r T
tastes good too? bUNbl/VLb I
To your health
MIAMI BEACH
673-1664
FREE
DELIVERIES
SHOMER SHABBOS
OWNED MANAGED

PHONE
ORDERS
UNOER
ORTHODOX
RABBINICAL
COUNCIL
SUPERVISION
Mon to Thurs 8:00 am to 6.30 pm
Friday 8 am to 430 pm Sunday 8.30 am to 4:30 pm
Here's a good deal
on Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Good on any size of Sunsweet Prune Juice.
Retailer: This coupon it redeimiblt lor 104 (plus 74 handling) whan
mailed to SuntwMt Prune Juice. R0. Box 1404, Clinton. IA 52734.
provided it has baan used for a purchase in accordance with this
offer. Any other usa constitutes fraud Invoices proving purchase
of sufficient stock to cover coupons presented for redemption must
be shown upon request. Void if use is prohibited, taxed or other-
wise restricted by law. Cash value 1/204. OFFER LIMITED TO ONE
COUPON PER PURCHASE. This offer expires October 31. 1M4.
SUNSWEET GROWERS. INC.
70>450 A007A7
CHT1FIED KOSHEt JaV^a*F OFF
L....... .nil i ,- -*. eaF.iayjaa-^W^1 TT *
10


Page 6-B 11m Jewiah Floridian / Friday. September 9,1983
Bienenfeld Heads 1983-84 Academy
Beth Am
Sets Debate
Officers; Installation Planned On Medical Care
Jerome Bienenfeld. president f
of the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross ,
Hebrew Academy, has an-
nounced that the school will in-
stall its 1983-84 slate of officers
and board members Sept. 18 at s
dinner held at Beth Torah Con-
gregation. North Miami Beach.
Bienenfeld. who has been*
active with the Hebrew Academy
for 25 years and also involved
with Central Agency for Jewish
Education, Shaare Zedek. and
Beth-El Congregation, will head
the slate which also includes
Moses J. Grundwerg. chairman
of the board.
Others to be installed are Sey-
mour Reinhard, assistant chair-
man of the board; I. H. Abrams.
chairman of the executive com-
mittee; George Kimel. assistant
chairman of the executive com-
mittee: Gerald Ness. senior vice
president: and Hyman Chabner.
treasurer.
Also. Gertrude Shapiro, assis-
tant treasurer: Dr. Irving Mosk-
owitz. financial secretary: Ronald
Molko, assistant financial secre-
tary; Seymour Brief, general sec-
retary; and Alexander Rosnar.
assistant general secretary.
JWVA Sets Agenda
A report by President Ruth
Geoghegan oa a recent visit to
Miami Childrens Hospital, where
150 handmade gifts wore distrib-
uted, will highlight the first
meeting of the fall seas on of Four
Freedoms Ladies Auxiliary 402.
Jewish War Veterans Sept. 22 at
noon. The event will take place at
the Sherry Frootcnac Hotel
The Auxiliary has also sched-
uled their monthly games party
for Sept. 27 aft the Miami Beach
Hebrew Home for th* Aged.
Jerome Bienenfeld
Executive committee mem-
bers being installed are Dr. Law-
rence Ciment. Joseph Rackman.
Mauricio Gluck. Abraham
Laeser. Dr. Walter Fingerer,
Isaac Ben-Ezra. Isaac Benmer-
gui. Jack Burstein. Isaac Silver-
berg. Howard Malu. Rabbi
Rubin Dobin. and Dr. Ira Gins-
berg.
"Are Americans Paying First
Rate Fees for Second Rate
Medical Care?" will be the topic
for debate at the next Temple
Beth Am Brotherhood Breakfast
Forum Sunday morning, Sept.
18. 9:30 a.m.. in the Temple
Youth Lounge.
Participants will be Henry
Rothblatt. attorney and author of
legal texts on medical mal-
practice, and Dr. Edward Annis.
former president of the American
Medical Association. Moderator
will be Prof. Robert Sandier of
the University of Miami.
Installation Planned
The first meeting of the 1983-
84 organizational year of the
Beba Idelson Chapter of Pioneer
Women-Na amat has been set for
Wednesday at noon, to take place
in the civic auditorium of First
Nationwide Savings and Loan
Association. Normandy Drive.
Miriam Gingold. national ad-
viser, will install new officers,
who will be heeded by President
Sarah Kaufman, and humorist,
Sarah Heller will provide enter-
tainment.
.....i. We 70td& tyu *

rSE ****** *"* K

Clean. Fresh & Good make a
ADVERTISING...
READ IT AND REAR
Advertising
IT WORKS FOR YOU
This Pubuc Service Message brought to you by this Publication
and die Advertising Federation of Greater Miami
A TRADITION OF QUALITY
BEST WISHES FOR
A YEAR OF
HEALTH & HAPPINESS
Isidore Pines
President
Dr. Tibor A. Stern
Rabbi


I
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Best wishes for the New Year and may
it be filled with good health, hapf------
and may your wishes be fulfilled.
IN OUR SERVICE DELI
Pantry Pride has available:
Whole Schmaltz Herring Whole Pickled Herring
Hening Filet in Cream Sauce Herring Filet in Wine Sauce
Chopped Hening Chopped Liver
Fresh Smoked Fish Rye Bread
Bagels Challah
: Smoked Fish Party Trays
Bagel & Lox Party Trays

CE DEPARTMENT
IN OUR PR<
We will cany a full selection of fresh Root Parsley,
Dill and Parsnips,
IN OUR GROCERY
a
'ARTMENT
QUART JAR
Manisdiewitz Borscht
10-OZ. PKG. GOODMAN'S SQUARE
Unsatted Matzohs
24-OZ. ROKEACH OLD VIENNA
GefflteFish
99
89
$969

2
MAY YOU BE INSCRIBED FOR A GOOD YEAR
cptide



Page8-B The Jewish Floridi*n/ Friday, September 9,1983
Fresh! Choice! Low Priced to
Save You Money. Check it out Compare!
3LBS.0RM0RE
Fresh
Ground Beef
WHOLE
USDA CHOICE
Beef Brisket
UNTO-*., SOLD
IN CRYOVAC LB.
USDA CHOICE PONT CUT BONELESS BEEF BRISKET... LB. $1.79
USOA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
Pot Roast JL
BONELESS UNDERBLADE STEAK...LB. $1 .#
$149
1
LB
aOMMWMfBII
im frozen GRADE wmos or
USOA CHOCE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
3 MEALS.. OX
CONTAINS ROAST GROUND BEEF TEV BEEF
Combo
USOA CHOCE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
J MEALS M ONE
CONTAMS ROAST OROUND BEEF STEW BEEF
Combo.
FRESH FROZEN
.49
.49
1.89
1.89
1.39
USOA CHOCE BEEF CHUCK BLADE
Roast or
Steak
SHENANOOAH OR RAEFORO BUFFET
Smoked Turkey Ham....... 1.39
SHENANOOAH FRESH FROZEN
Pure Ground
Turkey............
Our
We've got the product and]
to save you money. When yc
you're going to save
iSAVESA)
2 LITER BOTTLE SPRITE, TAB,
WET COKE OR
:%rt-
roll T9
FRESH l-ROZEN PEE LED t OEVEINED
2 TO 3 LB FAMILY PACKAGE
(REG. OR CAFFEINE FREE)
wrm coupon
BELOW
BeefUver
FORFLAVORMG
NEW ZEALAND- (IMPORTED NOT USOA GRAOEO
FRESH FROZEN SHOULDER
Spring Lamb
Blade Chops.........
USOA CHOCE
lb .89
LB 1.29
lb 1.79
2.79
C
Cola
1-LB. VACUUM BAG COFFEE ASST'D. G RINDS
Maxwell
House
LOUIS RCm FRESh
Turkey Breast Slices
.e
3.29
DAIRY-DELI
BAKERY
Breakstone
Cottage Cheese
16-OZ **
99*
CREAMY
LOW FAT OR
CAUFORMA
STYLE
16-OZ CONTAINER
Break;
Sour
Cream
1-LB PKG INOUARTERS
LandO
Lakes
PANTRV PFtlQE
All Meat or Beef
SWEET N LOW ASSORTED FLAVORS
3 AS 1.19
8-OZ
JUGS
FRUIT FLAVORED ORMKS
Little Hug6
KRAFT MLD COLB- OR MEDIUM CHEDDAR
Natural Cheddar 1.39
PANTRY PROE
Half and Half. 2 conts 1.19
KRAFT COLORED SMGLES OVOUALL' WRAPPED
PKG I .69
Margarine esPb*#
TROPIC AN A lOO". PURE HALF GALLON
Chilled Ag-PWV
Orange $-|79
Juice JL r
1-LB PKG
WINE OR CREAM STy.
VKa
FRIENDSHIP 8 OZ PKG *"$
Cream Q^^
Cheese i7e#
lolms rch slceo
Chicken Breast
s LOU RCh slcec
Turkey Breast ..S3
SHOFAR MiOGE* BCH.OGNA OR
2.09
1.39
1.39
Salami.........".11.89
SHVEB SPRiN-iS PREPARED BEET O" CREM STVLE
" S OZ
PKGS
2^ 1.29
PANTRY PRIDE
Raisin
Bread
89
COCONUT OR C-NNAMON P*G OF 0
Paean Twirls 2 .99
APP..E LfeMON 0 PINEAPPLE
Golden Ptes ...."& 1.29
MEE S APPLE CINN OR SOURDOUGH 6 M
.....2f*?I .99
*
Muffins
AOiER S PKG OF
Jewish Rye.
AXEOS PKG C* ASSTC DiNNEO RQUS --
79
, Pk3 i/
VEivf c"EME
Donuts
ba* j serve cinnamon
Meyer's Bread
.69
.89
RESSLER-S
Turkey
QUARTER LB aflL
HANSEL I ORETEL PICKLE t PMENTO OR
OftveLoaf.......^1.29
THORN tfRi VALLEY OLD WORLD FLAVOR
Uverwurst......* 1.79
HEBREW NATIONAL BOLOGNA OR
Salami..........^2.09
NEW CHEESE
No-Seft Swiss "l. 1.99
DOMESTIC CREAM>
Provolone $"179
SERVICE-DELI
IN-STORE BAKERY
BNOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
USOA CHOCE 1 2 LB RARE
Roast $*Y79
DELI
$2'
S-STOILE
BAKERY
MOT AVAILABLE M ALL STORES
SANDWICH MAKER
4 for JB8
Cainarnon RoBs 6 .99
GREAT FOR BREAKFAST
WHTTE LATER
STORE BAKED
1-69
White
HALF LB
r
OLD
FASHIONED
16-OZ
LOAF
59
PANTR\ PRipfc Atl BEEF
Frankfurters
$109
FROZEN
1
OSCAR MAYER UVEFCHEESE OR 3UCE0
Cotto Salami "p, .
HEALTHS
BEAUTY AIDS
REGULAR OR UNSCENTED I SOZ CONT
Lady Speed Stick 1.77
24-OZ BTL MOUTHWASH
UrtamiaH.........2.99
Eg "JL MX TUBE ASSORTED PRE*RCEO
PreH Shampoos .99
JOCT BOX
BUY TWOOET ONE FREE B40Z TUBE FREE
CRISP N TASTY 10 1 OZ BOX ASSOR'S-
Jeno's QQ(
Pizzas W
SARA LEE 10*. OZ PKG
Pound $-149
Cake 1
SEAL TEST
511.88
PANTRY PROS CUT OR FRENCH
PANTRY PROE CRMUE CUT
2&. -78
32.59
. ... BAG
FREEZER OUEEN ASSORTED
Family Suppe
GORTONS POTATO ORBP
..1.38
MINUTE MAC CONCENTRATE __
Juice ..2c6aS1.08
BANQUET _
Fried Chicken .l2A*


Friday, September 9,1983 /The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B

9
Delcious, Fresh and Crisp. And
nly what you want from 01
displays. You pack
dear reusable plastic bag
$119
?neyaews
FLAME ^^
iweet Tokan
TOP QUALITY WESTERN EXTRA LARGE 5 SIZE
JUICY AND FLAVORFUL MOUNTAIN
A GARDEN FRESH
WITH COUPON
BELOW
TOre IN VITAMIN A Carrots 2^.59
GARDEN FRESH TENDER U PICK *^a#a.
Eggplants .39
ADO ZEST TO SALADS FRESH FLORIDA ,#}
Avocados .59
USNO 1ALL PURPOSE U PICK f^a^
Yellow Onions .23
GARDEN FRESH CRISP (2 IN CELLO BAG) ^^
Celery Hearts .49
GARDEN FRESH ZUCCHINI U-PICK ,_ j-.
Green Squash .33
i -i
p*m&9*
SWEET NORTHWEST FREESTONE U PICK
Blue Rums
LB
CRISP AND CRUNCHY

ha^ei**^. b
49*
CRISP GBItN
LB
IfED FLAVORS
5/1.00
s'sQuik 2.59
E LEMONADE GRAPE
1.99
-. i *j -l,i-l er^Bm^P^fc
Tissue .79
__ 1 OR NAT .. -
Juice 1.29
CMERR' SIRAWBERRy ORANGE LEMONADE GRAPE
Sk1 M"ES 10 OTS
| OH ASSORTED FACIAL
[ LEAF RG OR NAT
I PASTA ROMANO
2/1.00
ItvJJv^ 6 5 0Z CHEESE CURLS 7 S-OZ CORN CHIPS
SAVE! SAVE! SAVE!
15-OZ CAN SPINACH 16-OZ CAN GREEN BEANS FRENCH OR
CUT 1 7-OZ CAN CORN OR PEAS REGULAR OR NO SALT
Del Monte
Vegetables 2/
8-PK OF 16-OZ RETURN BOTTLES
DR PEPPER SUNKIST
HIRES ROOT BEER OR
Seven-Up
(NOT AVAILABLE IN KEY WEST & MARATHON
CORONET ASSORTED OR PASTEL
8 ROLL PACK ___
Bath Tissue
CORONET JUMBO 125-CT PKG M M M
Paper Towels OEJ
89*
SJ59
THONl
$]79
GoebeTsBeer
$159
6 PACK OF
12-OZ CANS

Mr F*a 3 roll pg
Paper Towels........1.49
Hot Do*
Bathroom Cleaner .... 1.59
12S M (Bonus S-/el
Dow Saran Wrap......1.89
33 oz can Country Time
Lemonade..........1.99
16 3/ bo Sonsnme reg c* unstftea
Krispy Crackers........79
1 2 w bo Sunsntne
Hi Ho Crackers.........99
16 Ol corn cntps cheese curls or nacho crtee&p
on Ton Snacks........99
Glacier Springs Water .59
' 0/ can Bumblu Bw w\ o^l o w.ir.-i
Solid Tuna..........1.19
28 oi can Pope tomatoes vtr< paste crushed
tomatoes or imported
Plum Tomatoes ......89
3-p* 6 4 ohg assorted
Ssips Fruit Drinks.......79
3-pfc 8 46 or ooaes drmMs
Hawaiian Punch........79
46 oi OH orange o* lemon-am*
Ga torade.............99
1 >D DO" Mueller s reg mn vermtceHi or alDowt
Spaghetti ............59
8 w bo- GqWen GVi
Yellow Rice Dinner. .2/1.00
7Vo* oo Golden Ctam r*nne*
Macaroni & Cheese
16 or can Oven Baked
&MPe
B
3/1.00
ea Beans.......69
.69
?4o/ | Pantiy Pnde
Chunky Applesauce
32 qz m Hem;
Keg-O-Ketchup ......1.29
16 0/ >ar Hem;
Sweet Cucumber Slices ..79
l 4 of. cans al variehe*
Alpo Dog Food......21.79
3 or bo a| flavofs
Royal Gelatins......4/1.00
12 oz can rtguw or Scent H
Lysol Spray.........2.19
8 K> bag Giamou. Kitty
Premium Cat Litter 1.49
is-oj can Choi Boy *i On apaghaal I ma
ay boat a i on. ot
isagna .............79
400CT
ROLL
.77
^CT1#49
PKO
PRICES & COUPONS
GOOD SEPT. 8
SEPT. 14.1983
Save at a nearby Pantry Pride
32 OZ
BTL
1-OAL
JUG
.59
.75
Juice
"1.89
isaasia?" o
Tova
ON
SAL!
NOW
How to TH Whtn
Your KkJ Naad Htrip
e
What You Eat
Affacta Your Brain
e
Braak That Bad
Habit in 21 Daya
S t>. M*, iSWIM*"
a. ft-, Vm> Car*"
N Or 4SW 1/'*>A-
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'**< Si Ur.... *. litn, V,
AK...K -I ,- |.,M
*"'.. *-'. lyl- tarVi't.*.
"*.*..... Um.i
isagna ........
| VALUABLE COUPONNJPJ
COUPON VALUE 60*___
2LTR BTL TAB. SPRITE DIET ,
COKE. CAFFEINE FREE COKE OR m '
lCocaCoiaCC|<:i
I PLU-913 |^|
IUM1I ONE BIL WITH AN ACOTONAn^HOel^fiMORE
EXCl TOBACCOPHOOUCTS OOOOSEPT 8SEPT 14 Itg
BBJ VALUABLE COUPON BJJ
CCX1PON VALUE 86*'
1 LB VAC BAG ASSORTED GRINDS
MAXWELL HOUSE
M MAXWELL HOUSE
Coffee
ONE COUPON PER PERSON
10-OUNCE JAR
Maxwell House Instant Coffee I
COUPON GOOD SEPTJ-SEPT^J^M^ J K ^^COPROgrjiyooogT^EPjM yw
PLU-914
LIMIT ONE BAG WITH AN ADDITIONAL 7 OKOEH OX MORE
'C
.


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 9,1963
Israel's Sixth President; A Unifying
Personality Unlikely To Be A Figurehead
Continued from Page 2-B
spoon in his mouth and has had I
to fight hard to get on in life. It is J
true that Herzog has been I
diligent and hard-working, but he [
was not hampered by the ad-
vantaged circumstances of his
birth. His story does not reflect
that of Deputy Prime Minister
David Levy, the Moroccan boy
who grew up in a Beit Sheen
transit camp and raised children
in the poverty of a distressed
development town.
BORN IN Belfast, Northern
Ireland in 1919 as Vivian Herzog,
the new President's family soon
after moved to Dublin when his
father became Chief Rabbi of Ire-
land. Aged 17, he joined his
grandparents in Jerusalem to
study at the Hebron Yesbiva, a
year before his father became
Chief Rabbi of Palestine.
Herzog soon returned to
Britain, receiving a Law degree
at Cambridge University and
graduating from the Royal Mili-
tary Academy at Sandhurst. He
served in British Intelligence
during the Second World War,
helped capture Heinrich Himmler
and represented the British at the
first conference on displaced per-
sons at Belsen.
Herzog's heart was in Eretz
Y israel. to which he returned in
1947. He fought in the War of In-
dependence, and with the official
formation of the Israeli army he
headed its intelligence branch. In
the 1950s, he served as military
attache in Washington for four
years.
HE WAS the first military
commander of the West Bank in
1967, and UN Ambassador in
New York from 1975 to 1978,
when the infamous "Zionism
equals racism" resolution was
passed. In one of his great mo-
mments. he strode to the UN
rostrum and tore the resolution
to shreds in the name of Israel,
the Jewish people and the Zionist
movement.
For many years as a lawyer he
had close contacts with Sir Isaac
Wolfson's GUR-Rassco corpora-
tion. Herzog picked up board
memberships all over the place
with Israel Discount Bank, ORT
ISRAEL
SUPER TOUR
14 DAYS
from MIAMI
for only $1497.00
$3 latl tu
liiHIl
TOUR INCLUDES
Air transportation from Miami or.
a scheduled carrier
' AD transfers
' Extensive sightseeing as per
Itineracy,
brack breakfast & dinner dally
Accommodations first class &
deluxe hotels, Moshav and Kib-
butz guest houses
And above all fully escorted.
Am Unforgettable Holiday
la Am Uaforgettable Country
ISRAEL
The Modern Country That la
-4000 Yean Old
CHOICE OF DEPARTURE DATES
from MIAMI
OctsbOT t4 mm mmammmm *. ltes
Itamwn 9 ratara Ja 22. 19*4
March 12 ratam Marc* 25. 144M
Ma* 14 ratara Ma* 27. 19S4
Octafcar IS ratara October 2*. 1984
TRANS OLYMPIA TOURS
SHALOM TOURS
ISMS VOUMGCSKU
MOUYWOOO. PLCJHTM
Chaim Herzog
and Keter Publishing being sev-
eral of many such posts. He has
published a number of books
about Israel's wars and frequent-
ly contributes to Israeli news-
papers, radio and television. As
president he has had to give up
all his businesses and journalistic
interests, as well as his Knesset
seat, which he took up in 1981.
However, despite his "blue
blooded" British education, the
fact he is a Knight of the British
Empire and could put Sir before
his name, despite the eminent
rabbinical family from whom he
is descended and his marital con-
nections (Abba I", ban is his
brother-in-law), Herzog is no
aloof aristocrat but a staunch
social democrat and man of the
people.
He is popular with the Israeli
man in the street and on the eve
of his election as president, Israel
Television interviewed Israelis in
both Labor and Likud strong-
holds. All expressed satisfaction
with him and many Likud sup-
porters said they were happy he
had defeated Eton, although
having regrets that so many
members had cheated on the
prime minister.
MANY ISRAELIS admire the
fighter in Herzog. Indeed he is a
former boxing champion of
Maccabi Ireland and today still
takes a keen interest in sports,
indulging in sailing and watching
soccer. "Politics is a bit like box-
ing," he says. "You have to take
the knocks, stay on your feet and
persevere." Herzog feels,
however, that he has been too
naive and honest to get to the top
on the greasy pole of party
politics.
He is also a family man with
four children: Yoel, 33; Michael.
30; Yitzhak, 22; and Ronit, 19.
His wife, Aura, he emphasizes, is
no mere appendage but a woman
who has achieved much in her
own right, being the longtime
head of the Council for a Beau-
tiful Israel, the founder of the
Education Ministry's Public
Council for Arts and Culture, and
the creator of the country's an-
nual Bible Quiz.
The Herzogs admire the open,
deeply involved, much traveling
FIVE NIGHT CRUISE
S/S BRITANIS from MIAMI
MEXICO
Nov. 6 Nov. 11
AH Inclusive
Cabin. $339
lower
929 beds
CABINS ARE LIMITED
For Reservation & Intormaton
G3*OLYMPUTOUftS
'800 S YoifKjOde HoSywood FL
and hosting style of the Navons,
which transferred the Presidency
from a largely ceremonial post to
a leadership position of status
and influence. In perpetuating
the presidential style of his pre-
decessor, Chaim Herzog will no
doubt also set his own novel tone.
IN THEORY, the presidency
is merely titular, a ceremonial
role lacking authority or power.
In practice, however, it is an in-
fluential and inspirational
symbol for the country as a
whole. It may transpire that
Chaim Herzog is one of the few
personalities capable of promot-
ing and advancing the new style
given to the Presidency by his
predecessor the transforma-
tion of the post into one to which
the people look for non-partisan
advice and moral guidance on the
major issues of our times.
BE A RISING STAR WITH THE
B'N Al BRITH YOUTH ORGANIZATION
What do WILUAM SHATNER. KAREN PLAVE, JERRY MARQOUi
LEONARD NIMOY. and USA 8ILVERBERQ have In commot**
They all Joined the B'nal B'rtth Youth Organization
an International Organization of Jewish Youth
All 14-17 year olds Interested In making new friends can join tr*
ranks of these Infamous BBYOers by attending
THE 1983 MEMBERSHIP BLITZ, SEPTEMBER 27
The University of Miami Hillel
1100 Stanford Drive 7 p.m. -9 p.m.
Call the BBYO office, 253-7400 for more Information.
May You and Your Families Enjoy a
New Year with Peace, Health and Happiness.
Camp Mountain Lake
Hendersonviile, North Carolina
P.O. Box 4450
Miami Beach, Fla. 33141
ALVIN AND NANETTE SAVAGE
To All Our Friends:
A Healthy. Happy and
Prosperous New Year
SAFETY SEALED
FOR YOUR PROTECTION
ACME SMOKED FISH
OF FLORIDA INC.
6704 N.W. 20th AVE.
FORT LAUDERDALE, FL. 33309
BROWARD 974-8100 DADE 947-812
PALM BEACH 737-4481
44-487*
ARO 925-8220

AND FAMILY


Friday, September 9,1988 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
5743:Tsrael in the Middle East
Continued from Page 3-B
Ipolitical order in Lebanon and its
elations with Israel. From the
utset of the Operation Peace for
Jalilee the Begin Government
oked towards a full normaliza-
of relations with Lebanon,
.jng her the second Arab state
i formally recognize the Jewish
te. But the Lebanese Govern-
ed faced with pressures
om conflicting Maronite Chris-
ian and Muslim groups
Ranted little more than a with-
awal of foreign forces.
UNITED STATES supported
he Lebanese side through much
,' the negotiations between Isra-
i and Lebanon in 1983. It failed
calculate that Syria would
fefuse to withdraw her troops
Lebanon even after Israel
to withdraw its troops.
knd Israel for its part said it
Irould not withdraw its' forces
jitil the Syrians withdrew their
prces. Only a withdrawal of all
preign forces from Lebanon
(wild create the right conditions
the reconstruction of Leba-
on, argued the Israeli Govern
ent.
The Lebanese situation had re-
ussions for Israel elsewhere
the region. After Israel
lunched its operation in Leba-
Egypt recalled home 'for
ansultations' its Ambassador to
srael Saad Mortada, and a sue-
or is only likely to be ap-
ved once Israel withdraws.
The Lebanese situation turned
Attention away from the adminia-
territories of Judea and
Samaria. The number of settle-
ments have increased, and by the
end of the year the total Jewish
population is expected to increase
to 60,000 from the present 35,000.
Israel experts expect the total to
reach 100,000 Jewish residents
by 1987.
IT WAS, in order to "freeze''
the settlements program that Mr.
Reagan's newly appointed Secre-
tary of State, George Shultz,
drew up the so-called Reagan
Plan which, for the first time,
called for a Palestinian homeland.
But after the PLO refused to give
King Hussein power to represent
them at any negotiations the
Plan had no chance of success.
Since the Reagan Administration
did not consult Israel before an-
nouncing the Plan the Israel
Government immediately
rejected it.
Overall, leaving aside the
economic and political costs
of deploying an army abroad, Is-
rael's position in the Middle East
looked strong in official eyes. The
opposition attacked the wisdom
and consequences of the Leba-
nese war. Its protagonists noted
that neither Egypt nor Jordan
seemed to have any intention, or
were in any position, to attack
Israel The only threat was from
Fashion Show Set
A fashion show by July's of
Coral Gables and the Baby Boom
will highlight the first monthly
meeting of the season of the Ali-
yah Chapter of Hadassah, which
has been scheduled for Tuesday
at 7:45 p.m. at Congregation Bet
Breira.
Syria. The PLO threat from Leb-
anon seemed to have been
reduced. The Iran-Iraqi war con-
tinued to divide the Arab world.
Oil was no longer a viable politi-
cal weapon given the disarray in
pricing policies among oil pro-
ducing states. The Soviet
Union s influence in the immedi-
ate region remained small with
the exception of Syria.
If by the end of the Jewish year
as the army's extensive deploy-
ment in Lebanon was increasing-
ly questioned, ways were being
sought with US and Lebanese co-
operation to an IDF redeploy-
ment along lines less vulnerable
but able to secure Israel's vital
security needs. Israel's ability to
consider this option is a sign of
her new potential for influencing
events in the Middle East and
within this framework to look
after her own security interests.
THANK YOU
L'Shana Tova Tikatevu
As we begin a New
Year, we wish to
thank our community
for its support of
our Thrift Shops
during the past
year.
Your generous
5713 N.W. 27 Ava., Miami
600 N.E. 79 St., Miami
Free pickup
751-3988 (Dado)
981-8245 (Broward)
donations of resalable
merchandise and your
continued patronage
of our stores, have
enabled us to provide
quality health care
and needed social ser-
vices to thousands of
indigent elderly persons.
DOUGLAS GARDENS
THRIFT SHOPS
A division of the
Miami Jewish Home
& Hospital for
the Aged.
3148 Hallandale Bch. Blvd.
Hallendale
Irving Cypen
Chairman of the Board
Harold Sec*
President
Aaron Kravitz
Chm. Thrift Shop Comm.
FredD.HIrt
Executive Director
Good Merchandise at a
Good Price.
Now at three locations.
YOU ARE INVITED TO
>z;MSnn*JGS SPECTACULAR
a
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z*1
Community Corner
Pagel2-B The Jewiah Floridian/ Friday, September 9,1983 BadaS8ah CeremoHyW
Honor Israeli WaTDead
A candle lighting service in
honor of the soldiers who died
during Israel's operation "Peace
for Galilee" and a report on the
Hadassah national convention
held recently in Washington will
highlight the first regular meet-
ing of the year of Hadassah's Ein
Karem Star Lakes Chapter. The
event is set for Tuesday at 11:30
a.m. in the Star Lakes
Auditorium.
The convention report will be
given by Belle Scall, membership
vice president, who served as a
chapter delegate to the con-
vention, according to Blanche
Avrich and Dena Greenfield,
chapter presidents.
Chairmen of the candle light-
ing ceremony are Edna Weidman
and Erna Schulmeister.
Miami attorney Gary P. Simon has been appointed co-
chairman of the Landlord-Tenant Committee of the Keai
Property, Probate, and Trust Law Section of the Florida Bar
Association. The Section has a membership of 5,500 lawyers.
Linebacker for the Miami Dolphins, Larry Gordon, who died
recently from heart disease, will be honored by the American
Heart Association of Greater Miami by the establishment of a
special "Larry Gordon Memorial Heart Research Fund. The
fund, set up in cooperation with the Dolphins and WIOD Radio,
will support heart research.
Miamian Annette Eiaenberg was named to the queen's Court
of Recruiting at the Mary Kay Cosmetics 20th anniversary
Emerald Seminar held last month at the Dallas Convention
Center. Eisenberg is an independent sales director with Mary
Kay.
Susan Kleinberg of North Miami Beach has been appointed to
the committee for the National Football League Players
Association-March of Dimes Celebrity Golf Classic to be held
Columbus Day, Monday, Oct. 10 at the Doral Country Club.
Temple Israel of Greater Miami in cooperation with WTMI
93.1 FM radio will broadcast traditional Yom Kippur Kol Nidre
services Friday, Sept. 16 at 8 p.m. Spiritual leader, Rabbi
Haskell Bernat stated that he will discuss the importance of the
State of Israel Bonds campaign on the air.
Marilyn K. Smith, a leader of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, and Harry B. Smith, partner in the law firm of
Smith and Mandlcr. were recently elected fellows, of Brandeis
University by its board of trustees. Fellows are elected to five-
year terms.
Epilepsy Foundation of South Florida will conduct a meeting
Tuesday, Sept. 20 at North Miami General Hospital in the
Conference Center, Meeting Room Three, from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Barbara Gillman Gallery will present the first in a series on
"Discover Florida Artists" with "Florida Finds: Gainesville,"
starting at an opening reception Friday, Sept. 23 from 7 to 10
p.m. and Saturday, Sept. 24 from 1 to 4 p.m.
In honor of support and participation of employers in
providing employment for the mentally retarded, the
Association for Advancement of the Mentally Handicapped will
honor employers representing 15 businesses at an Annual
General Meeting Sept. 14, 7:30 p.m., in the auditorium of North
Miami Beach Senior High School.
Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Myron Brodie
and Family
Business Note
Morris N. Broad, president and
chief executive officer of Ameri-
can Savings and Loan Associa-
tion of Florida, has announced
the appointment of Nicholas
Cross as senior vice president of
asset development.
Cross has held various posi-
tions with Lloyds Bank Group
throughout the world, and most
recently served in its New York
office as senior vice president and
manager.
Happy New Year
Alan Heilpern
of Reliable Drugs
Assistant office administrator
Jewish cemetery, light
bookkeeping and typing ability,
six days. Reply P.O. Box
012941, Miami 33101.
TEMPORARY/
NURSING
SERVICES
Home Nursing Licensed Personnel |
Aides Companions Home Makers
Miami
891-5322
Ft. Laud.
491-6003
Heaven forbid you should
ever need
re medicine than this.
Ill
But, if you should, isn't it good to know
there's a hospital where your tradition is our tradition?
Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami
has received international acclaim for its
scientific studies of the curative properties of
chicken soup. We're the ones who have proven
what your mothers and grandmothers have
insisted all along: There's a lot of healing
power in that steaming bowl!
But, we all know there are times when
illness or injury demands services which only
a hospital can provide. For more than thirty
years, Mount Sinai Medical Center has been
the hospital to which the community looks for
state-of-the-art health care.
At Mount Sinai, we know that caring is as
important as curing We care not only for your
physical well-being but your spiritual comfort
as wellno matter what your race, creed or
color We understand and honor tradition.
That* why, for example, we provide
candelabra* for Shabbat, a kosher kitchen for
those who choose, and religious service*
for every holiday on our closed-circuit TV
system.
At Mount Sinai, we not only understand
your personal culture, we gladly become
a part of it. And we also understand what
is needed to provide the highest quality in
health care. Our modern facilities, our
sophisticated technology, and our expert,
dedicated health care team combine to
create an environment in which medicine is
practiced at the forefront of science.
Mount Sinai Medical Center
4300 Alton Road Miami Beach, Florida



TTrrnfillfill Y>


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
[rea'Tashlich Services Were to
highlight Plight of Soviet Jewry
kUy Miami area synagogues
L to have utilized Taahlich
vices on Sept. 8, the first day
Josh Hashanah, to dramatize
plight of Soviet Jewry.
^jnsored by the Rabbinical
Ejciation of Greater Miami to-
C with the South Florida
Eference on Soviet Jewry, a
Uittee of the Community Re-
tns Committee of the Greater
i Jewish Federation, the
,am was to, through the
_ilich Service, combine an-
|t ritual with current appli-
takan the first steps to
on.
lashlich is when Jews symbol-
ly cast their sins into the
[.r and pledge they wiU not re-
' them. In the service, congre-
ts were to cast away sins of
tsion and indifference they
have had in the past year in
ird to Jews in the Soviet
on and were to also rededicate
nselves to the Soviet Jewry
e.
ccording to Hinda Cantor,
rman of the South Florida
Cerence, the group has docu-
Jted cases of thousands of
sum Jewish families who
been refused the right to
^rate. In addition, there are
dreds of thousands more who
have
' have.
In 1979, more than 61.000 Jews
were able to leave the Soviet
Union. New restrictions on emi-
gration requirements, however,
brought the number of Jews
leaving to 2,699 in 1982, and
through July of 1983, only 806
have been allowed to leave.
Rabbi Max Lipschitz, presi-
dent of the Rabbinical Associa-
tion, noted, "Rosh Hashanah is a
time when we are judged by God
as to our action and behavior.
Our fate is determined based on
that behavior.
"Since one of the most critical
problems facing world Jewry is
the condition of Jews in the
Soviet Union, it is appropriate as
we begin a new year, to recommit
ourselves to help save our broth-
ers and sisters from spiritual
genocide."
Sisterhood Meeting Set
The first regular meetng of the
season of the Sisterhood of Ohev
Shalom Congregation has been
scheduled to take place Tuesday,
Sept. 27 at noon. Installation of
officers will take place.
The NOrth Dad* Vaad Ha-Kashruth wishes the entire community a healthy, happy and peaceful New Veer. At the New Year is about to begin allow us to remind you that the following establishments and only these establishments are under our supervision.
MENDELSON* SONS KOSHER MEAT MARKET 1354 N.E 163rd Street NEW DEAL KOSHER MEAT A POULTRY MARKET 1362 N.E. 163rd Street SURF KOSHER MEAT A POULTRY 7432 Collins Avenue -NORMANDY KOSHER MEAT MARKET 1112 Normandy Drive ROYAL GLADES CONVALESCENT HOME 16650 W.Dixie Highway EXECUTIVE CATERERS OF BETH TORAH CONGREGATION 1051 North Miami Beach Boulevard TAKE OUT GOURMET 1730 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive KOSHER MAGIC TAKE OUT FOOD 1830 Miami Gardens Drive SHEPUDAYAHUVA 1330 N.E. 163 Street KOSHER TREATS INC. 1678 N.E. 164th Street *
Rabbi Max Lipschitz, President Rabbi Beth Torah Congregation SUNSHINE BAKERY 772 N.W. 183rd. Street Rabbi Simcha Freedman, Vice President and Secretary' Rabbi Temple Adath Yeshurun.
CANTORS ASSEMBLY
FLORIDA SOUTH EAST REGION
WAatva ?Towa/i
May the Almighty
seal you in the Book of Life
for a happy and healthy New Year
Hazzanim:
Shabtai Ackerman
Ian Alpern
Morris Amsel
Jacob Barkin
Philip Blackman
Mario Botoshansky
Nathan Bryn
Irving Grossman
Saul Kirschenbaum
Morris Levinson
Murray J. Lind
William W. Lipson
Philip Marantz
Yaacob Renzer
Abraham Seif
Jacob E. Tambor
Mayor Steve Clark
Edward Klein, chairman
Saul H. Breeh, vice-chairman
Maurice Neu, secretary
Eleazar Bernstein, treasurer
Saul Meisels, past national president
David Leon, past national president
Happy New Yew To All of Yon
From AU of Us
HILCRAFT
INCORPORATED
Creators of Award Winning
Steel-Die Engraved Stationery
Business/Industry/Banks
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THANK ADVEFTISING
YOUKNOW!
advertising
rr XI7/"*DVC cad Vf"T T TW* Pubfc Service Message brought to you by this Publication
II WUKIVO ri*K T\J\ and the Advertising Federation of Greater Miami.


Page 14-B 1 he Jewish f londian / Knday, September y, iy3
Let My People Knew
By ANNETTE LABOWTZ
Let My People Know herewith presents
material of a religious, historical, and
general educational nature. Author is1
Annette Labovitz. whose credentials for
writing in this field are enviable. Her
recently published volume under the im-
primatur of the CAJE. 'Secrets of the Past.
Bridges to the Future,' is a Jewish history
resource book exploring the past through
the mythology and traditions of the Jewish
people, and chronologically arranged ac-
cording to theme.
Mrs. Labovitz served as a presenter at1
the Coalition for Alternative to Jewish
Education Conference at Oberlin College |
and Trinity University. She is a member of
the Junior-Senior High School faculty of
the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew
Academy, specializing in Judaic studies,
the Bible, and Jewish history.
Let My People Know
TISHRAY
5744
Tishray is the seventh month on the Jewish calendar (the first being Nissan,
the month of Pesach), but it is the beginning of the New Year. Tishray com-
memorates Creation, the birthday of the world, while Nissan commemorates
freedom, the Exodus from Egypt. The symbol of Tishray is the scale of justice,
suggesting that mankind is judged according to its virtuous deads.
It is called Yerach Ha-ay-tanim, the month of strength. Our Rabbis explained
that the source of Tishray s strength is threefold: 1) Our patriarchs, Abraham,
Isaac, and Jacob, were born in Tishray and the prayers of our childless matriarchs
(Sarah, Rachel, and Hannah) to conceive were answered; 2) Tishray is the month
of repentance and forgiveness; 3) Tishray has more Jewish identity symbols
(commandments) than the remaining eleven months. The following are the.
symbols of Tishray.
ROSH HASH ANA THE NEW YEAR, THE DAY OF REMEMBERANCE
SHOFAR among the many reasons for the sounding of the shofar are:
celebrating the Creation of the world by reaffirming that the Almighty is our,
King; announcing the beginning of the ten days of repentance; reminiscing that'
our forefathers accepted the Torah at Sinai amidst the sounds of the shofar;
reminding us that the end of the Jewish diaspora, the ingathering of the exiles,'
will be heralded by the sound of the shofar. The sounds of the shofar are a com-
bination of the cry of the broken hearted repenetant and the plea for compassion.
EATING SWEET FOODS (CHALLAH AND APPLE DIPPED IN HONEY) -
symbolic of our hopes that the coming New Year will be blessed with sweetness.
Many customs are experiential, thereby elevating the physical being to a spiritual
plane.
LSHANA TOVAH TEKATAYVU VTAYCHATAYMU extending wishes to
our family and friends to be remembered and inscribed for a blessed New Year.
TASHLICH on the afternoon of the first day (or the second day if the first day
falls on the Sabbath), it is a custom to walk to the water's edge and perform the
physical act of contritely removing our wrongdoings. We recite three verses from
the prophet Micha (7:18, 19, 20), beseeching the Almighty's compassion as He
forgives our evil ways and washes us anew with cleansing waters.
YOM KIPPUR THE DAY OF ATONEMENT, THE DAY OF JUDGMENT
SEUDAH MAFSEKET the meal before Yom Kippur, the fast of atonement.
According to our Rabbis, partaking of a festive meal preceding the beginning of
Yom Kippur is as important as fasting on Yom Kippur. In Jewish life,
celebrations are associated with festive meals: we celebrate that we have the
strength to fast and pray for forgiveness the following day.
PHYSICAL DISCOMFORT Yom Kippur is a day of introspection and self-
evaluation, therefore we refrain from any form of social communication and
physical pleasure. Through abstention from physical gratification, we humble
ourselves before the Almighty and subdue our desires to His Service.
WHITE CLOTHING customarily worn on Yom Kippur, reminiscent of
contrition, forgiveness, and purity. White is also symbolic that we are equal before
the Almighty on this awesome Day of Judgment. The Kohen Gadol, the High
Priest, officiated at the sacrificial offerings of atonement in the Holy Temple
attired in white garments.
SUCCOS THE HOLIDAY OF REJOICING, TABERNACLES, THE HAR-
VEST FESTIVAL
SUCCAH symbolic of the seven clouds of glory which encompassed the Jewish
people during their forty year sojourn in the desert after the Exodus from Egypt.
Since many commandments are experiential, we eat in the succah during this
harvest festival to remember how our ancestors fared. By leaving the security of
our homes, we are cognizant of nature. Then we can reaffirm our faith that "to the
Almighty belongs the world and its Creation.'' (Psalms 24:1) It is a custom to
invite the seven faithful shepherds of Israel (Abraham, Isaac, Jacob Joseph
Moses. Aaron, David) into our succah, one each night for the duration of the
holiday.
ETROG AND LULAV (CITRON, PALM BRANCH, WILLOW MYRTLE) -
are four species, taken from nature, each representing a different type of Jew The
"fl t^S ,raFanC^ 8nd ^SJte; JrePreLsenting the Jew whose being is a combination
of Torah study and good deeds. The palm branch has taste but no fragrance
representing the Jew who does not study Torah but devotes himself to doinK Kood
^aS,'.,H t 7 r frarancJe no **! representing the Jew who does
not study Torah nor does good deeds. The myrtle has fragrance but no taste
representing the Jew who does not study Torah but devotes himself to doing good
deeds The four species are significantly bound together when the blessings are
recited to teach us that we are one people.
HOSHANA RABAH, SHMINI ATZERET, SIMCHAT TORAH THE FES
Tl VAL OF GATHERING, THE LAST DAYS OF THE HOLIDAY SEASON
COMPLETION OF THE TORAH READING CYCLE these last three days of
the holiday season are a special gift to the Jewish people. The Almighty declared:
"You, my people, have been in my presence for twenty one days. Your departure is
so difficult for Me to bear. I will give you another holiday, that you might tarry a
bit longer." There is no more fitting way to end the holiday seasons than by
rejoicing with song and dance at the completion of the Torah reading cycle.
Resolve For The New Year 5744
"WE WILL NO LONGER PERMIT THE CULTS TO TAKE OUR CHII,
DREN."
The following is a true experience which occured to me about six weeks ago on,
Moshav Modiin in Israel. I share it with you in the hope that this story wffl
provide some clues that we might be able to carry out the above resolution. Asa
community, many people are putting much effort into curative medicine: trying^
remove our children from the cults once they have been brainwashed. My proposal
is in the nature of preventive medicine. It is self-explanatory. The subject of the
story has given me permission to write about her.
We were just completing the Shabbos meal in the dining hall of Moshav
Modiin. A few of the young people who live on the Moshav know that I tell stories,
so they asked me to share a story with them. Since this was the Friday night after
Tisha B'Av, the national day of Jewish mourning, I chose as my theme an ex-
perience from behind the iron curtain. I wanted to impress upon these youngmej'
and women the tenacity of the Jewish people to survive.
When I finished, a young lady named Wendy Seidler confronted me. She
wanted to know why I was so concerned with Jews behind the iron curtain who
have so little hope for freedom. She demanded to know why I don't spend all i _
effort helping American Jews find their roots. 'At least,' she said, 'you have a
chance to help American Jews.'
Not being put off by Wendy's attitude, I asked her to tell me her story. Shi
was anxious to share her story with me This is what she related.
'I was born and raised in Los Angeles. I am twenty one years old. I grew up is
a family that did not identify very strongly with Judaism. Sometimes we attended I
temple on Friday night, sometimes my mother lit the Sabbath candles. I attended
afternoon religious school for seven years and I was Bat Mitzva, but I realize now
that the minimal Jewish education I received did not prepare me for the questions
I would have as I grew up.
'There are three children in our family. My sister married a Japanese man and
my brother became very religious. He is presently studying in a Yeshiva m
Jerusalem. The people around me simply did not have the answers to my
questions, so I became involved in 'Jews for Jesus.' I was searching for religious
truth.
'My parents did everything in their power to convince me to leave the cult
Finally, they promised me a trip to Israel. Since I did not find the answers to my
questions in the cult, I accepted their offer.
'I spent six uneventful weeks wandering around Israel, always searching for |
someone who could help me understand the truth.
'The night before I was supposed to return to the United States, I decided to I
say 'goodbye' to the Kotel, the Western Wall of the ancient Holy Temple. It was
ten p.m. My plane was scheduled to leave at eight a.m. the next morning. I still
had no answers and no direction. As I walked away from the Kotel, a Rabbi from
one of the women's Yeshivot approached me. He asked me why I looked so
confused. When I told him my dilemma, he offered to answer my questions on the
condition that I would remain in Israel. He offered me a year's Jewish education in
his school. Neve Yerushalayim. I had to let him know my decision the next/
morning.
' 1 struggled with that decision all night. The next morning, I packed my bags
and took a taxi to Neve Yerushalayim. I studied Torah, prophets, Jewish law and
Jewish history in that school the entire year. I began to live a Jewish lifestyle: the
Sabbath, the holidays, the dietary laws all began to make sense in my new I
surroundings. I found the answers to my questions. Now I am living in Ofra, a
new absorption center among the West Bank settlements. I am learning the j
Hebrew language in an ulpan and I hope to make permanent aliya.
My parents promised to finance my education. As soon as I am fluent enough in
Hebrew, I will enroll in the computer science department of Tel Aviv University. 11
know I will always live a Jewish lifestyle. One day I hope to marry. I'm certain j
now that I will be able to provide satisfying answers for my children's questions.
Teach Us To PrayA Rosh Hashana Story
It was Rosh Hashana in Sanz. The disciples of Rebbe Chaim Halberstam
(Divray Chaim), the Sanzer Rebbe, surrounded him, beseeching him to teach them
the secret of prayer.
The disciples pleaded: "No one knows how to pray as deeply as you, and only
you can help us understand the holiness of prayer."
The Rebbe answ ?red:" What do you know about prayer that makes you think
I m an expert? Let me tell you a story about Maxele from Vienna.
'One hundred years ago, Vienna was the center of Jewish assimilation. A Jew
named Maxele lived in Vienna with his father and neither the rather nor the son
knew anything about Judaism. When Maxele's father realized that he was ap-
proaching death, he called his son to him and said: 'Maxele, swear to me that you
will never forget that you are a Jew.'
"Maxele turned to his dying father and said: "If I am a Jew, please tell me
what I am supposed to do.
"Maxele'sfather answered: I would give my whole life for someone to teach
me what it means to be a Jew and what I am supposed to do, but I don't know. I
only know that on Rosh Hashana a Jew goes to the synagogue.' "
The Rebbe paused, interrupting his narrative with a deep breath before he
continued. r
"Maxele's father passed away, and on Rosh Hashana of that year, Maxele
searched out a little synagogue, timidly entered, and sat down in an unobtrusive
corner at the rear. No one in the synagogue paid attention to Maxele, but there
Juda!smmCane en as the an*els "Wvered, anticipating Maxele's return to
iw. ThC i?eaven,y "** sang joyfully, but then there was a sudden silence
Uedthe'Rebbe ***** Maxele"9 ***' This was Maxele's prayer." a*
nH ".i.iin HeavenJ""Itime8 I forg* that I am a Jew, that You are There.
Wi M6 'S.0ne Gf Believe me-l lov* You with all my heart, so please don t
torget me, Maxele from Vienna.' "
As the Rebbe finished the story, his disciples noticed that he was crying.
Hke SaSfiSSSSS^ my Ufe'" ***the Sanzer Rebbei ',th,,t could pray
*r,im____,_
bwB wjsrfi* tf4%3c3ft3


Simply Cannot Bear the
Responsibility Any Longer'
. : Friday, September 9, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Continued from Page 1-B
lion." Begin said.
He then disclosed for the first
j the reason for his decision:
simply cannot bear the
ponsibility any longer. If I
ved that there would be a
lice to continue, I would have
isidered it differently. It was
ja sudden decision. I am ask-
[you to allow me to present my
|er of resignation to the Presi-
|t today" He then asked those
bent to continue to. serve as a
Ed coalition after his resig-
non.
luT BEGIN'S desperate plea
k rejected. Yaacov Meridor,
lister for Economic Coordina-
t, a long time friend of Begin,
|, "I turn down your request,
. Prime Minister." Begin re-
nded, "Okay, I will do it then
fjout your consent." He then
jan to write his letter, mumbl-
I toward Meridor, "Yaacov, it
I not help you."
is the letter was sent to an ad-
Lit room to be typed. Justice
lister Moshe Nissim was the
, to suggest that Begin post-
j formally resigning. "This is
ph too serious a decision," he
"Give us time out for sev-
I months."
Lguda Knesset member Men-
em Porush suggested that
iiaps the upcoming High Holy
\s would give Begin a chance
ethink his decision. But for-
Defense Minister Ariel
Iron, Tehiya MK Geula
\m. and Haim Druckman of
M.a/.hI (Religious Zionist)
li\ said the time was ripe for
f elections.
finally, Finance Minister
lam Aridor proposed a for-
la that was accepted. He re-
minded Begin that even if he re-
signs he would still have to head
the caretaker government until
an alternative government is
formed. Therefore, Aridor sug-
gested. Begin should remain in
office until a new coalition is
formed which would allow "a
smooth and comfortable transi-
tion." Begin accepted this sug-
gestion, but he stressed that this
could not be a prolonged process.
A SUGGESTION to im-
mediately sign a draft agreement
by all the coalition partners to
continue under the new Premier
the Herut movement would
designate was dropped when
Cohen and Aguda MK A v rah am
Shapiro objected. It was decided
therefore, that all Herut minis-
ters would meet this evening to
name their candidate for the Pre-
miership.
Should the Herut Party fail to
agree on a candidate and should
the coalition partners decline to
accept that person if a candidate
is named, the likelihood is that
there would have to be new elec-
tions. "No government, whether
headed by Begin, another Likud
person, or the Alignment, can
continue to govern without new
elections," Cohen said.
Shortly after the session with
the coalition representatives
ended, Begin left his office. He
made no statement to reporters
and entered his car and went
home. When he arrived, a crowd
of supporters cheered him. But
again. Begin made no remarks
and disappeared inside the house.
Police kept demonstrators in
support and in opposition to Be-
gin separated and at a safe dis-
tance from the Premier's resi-
dence.
Hillel Opens for 1983-84 Year
With Record Enrollment
[he Samuel Scheck Hillel
nmunity Day School of North
ami Beach opened its doors for
school year 1983-84 with a
ord enrollment of over 725
dents, according to an an-
uncement by Marshall
Ituch, executive director.
the school is under the
cuon of Rabbi Dr. Joshua
bis, principal, and its staff of
fer 60 teachers. Ten specialists
ve been engaged in the areas of
bic. art, reading lab, math lab,
anish, physical education,
nputer science, and ESL (En-
Bh as a second language). A
1-tune guidance counselor,
center director and con-
ting psychologist are also on
r. Jerome M. Levy is the
ol's vice principal, and
frothy K. Gruen is director of
p Early Childhood Program,
pich consists of a nursery
Dgram as well as four kinder-
Irten classes. Rabbi Jay
fufeld is the assistant principal
Judaic Studies.
[Rabbi Tarais stated, "It is
interesting to note in an era of
declining school enrollment,
especially at a middle school
level, that our enrollment con-
tinues to grow. Perhaps it is due
to the superior quality of edu-
cation which is a blend of expert
faculty and a caring administra-
tion. Nothing can replace the
dedication and expertise of a fully
certified faculty whose
credentials have been approved
and accepted by the Southern
Association of Colleges and
Schools."
The Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School is a
member of the National Commis-
sion on Torah Education and
Southern Association of
Independent Schools, according
to Michael Scheck, president. It
is also a beneficiary agency of the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the Jewish
Federations of South Broward
and Greater Fort Lauderdale.
The first PTA meeting of the
school year has been scheduled
for Monday, according to
Rochelle Baltuch, PTA president.
Happy New Yw
Joe Brewer
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Pagel6-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, September 9, 1963

Beth Moshe Names New Rabbi mnwMSmm*
Rabbi Israel Jacobs baa been
named the new spiritual leader of,
Temple Beth Moshe in North
Miami, according to an an-'
nouncement by Irving Jaret,
temple executive director.
Rabbi Jacobs baa for the past'
20 years occupied the pulpit of
the Baysbore Jewish Center, a
Conservative congregation in
Suffolk County, N.Y.
He attended Yeshiva Univer-
sity as an undergraduate in rab-
binical studies and received a
masters degree in Hebrew Let-
ters and was ordained as rabbi at
the Jewish Theological Seminary
in 1954. Rabbi Jacobs also holds
a doctorate from the Seminary.
The rabbi will be officiating at
Temple Beth Moshe for the Yom
Kippur Holy Days. He will
Cuomo
Raps
Continued from Page 5-B
meant. Cuomo said that if the re-
port of that committee "is
posited in such a way as to make
it possible to construe its mean-
ing as an endorsement of the
doctrine" equating Zionism with
racism "or the soundness of its
reasoning, then I reject that
report."
Cuomo then declared he was
"disappointed" that more faculty
members at Stony Brook "did
not publicly disagree with the
content of the state-
ment" exonerating Dube. The
Governor said academic freedom
"should not release anyone from
the responsibility to express ap-
propriate moral repugnance." He
added that academic freedom
"certainly does not restrict their
freedom to do so, nor does it
demand silence in the face of
twisted logic that does damage."
The faculty investigation
followed a charge by Sefwyn
Troen, a visiting professor from
the Ben Gurion University in the
Negev, who sent a letter to uni-
versity officials asserting that
Dube "employed his position for
the propagation of personal ideo-
logy and racist biases."
In his letter asking for a
formal investigation of Dr.
Dube's teaching on race, Troen
said he was acting on a complaint
from a student and submitted
Dube's course materials as evi-
dence. Troen has since returned
to Israel.
Ted Anaon, chairman of the
board of Carnival Cruise
Lines and the Hamilton Cor-
poration, hat been selected by
the Florida Friends of Albert
Einstein College of Medicine
to receive the college's 1983
Distinguished Achievement
Award at the organization's
annual dinner dance gala
Nov. 6 at the Konover Hotel "

Rabbi Israel Jacobs
preach on Kol Nidre. Sept. 16 on
"No Small Sacrifice," and on
Saturday morning. Sept. 17 at
Yom Kippur services will speak
on "The Successful Failure."
Membership Blitz
The B'nai B'rith Youth Orga-
nization of Greater Miami will
hold a Membership Blitz, entitled
"Catch A Rising Star With
BBYO," for teens interested in
joining AZA and BBG chapters
on Sept. 27, 7 p.m., at the Uni-
versity of Miami Hillel. Every
Jewish teen aged 14 through 17
years old is eligible to join. The
Blitz will feature introduction to
BBYO and opportunity to meet
various chapter leaders for regis-
tration. A surprise celebrity will
emcee the program.
The "Catch A Rising Star"
theme for the membership drive
commerates outstanding alumni
of the organization. An interna-
tional organization of 24,000
members, BBYO alumni have in-
cluded Carl Bernstein, Philip
Klutznik, Congresswoman Bobbi
Feidler, and Leonard Nimoy.
Telephone Repair
Easy to Arrange
If you have a telephone which you lease from Southern rJ
that isn't working properly, there's a convenient wv nt -..t"!
it repaired. ^li
"Simply take the telephone to your nearest Southern
Service Center and in most cases, well replace your phone l
another one if the damages aren't caused by misuse I
Southern Bell spokesman, John Thomas. "Or, you may'chmlll
to have a replacement phone sent to you through a rioi^?*'
service for an extra charge.
Only telephones that are furnished by Southern Bell mi \A
returned for replacement, says Thomas. Telephones purdu^l
from Southern Bell and still convered by the original warrant I
or an optional maintenance agreement should be brought to' I
Service Center for repair at no charge. Sets not covered bv i I
warranty will be repaired at a Service Center for a chirl
Southern Bell does not repair phones purchased from oths
vendors. '
"To return a modular phone, all you have to do is uncliptla.'
cord where it connects to the wall and return the cord withtk
phone, says Thomas. "For wall models, lift up on the basemji
pull the phone towards you. If you have a desk-type phone thatl
isn't a plug-in model, call repair service for instructions ond|
connecting your phone."
nn rora rcrcft
tkey dkall heat tkeir
Awordd into plow^kare^ and tkeir &p$ar<$
into pruninc/kook^; nation dkall not lift up
Aword against nation, neither &kall tkey
learn war any more."
%aiak 2, IV
Publix
Through the new year, may your family
share the blessings of peace, joy and love.
A Happy Rosh Hashanah
to your whole family from
the people at Publix.


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
Women Found to Have Achieved Career
'Breakthrough' in Jewish Journalism
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
One area in American Jew-
ish communal service in
which women appear to
| have achieved a major
[career breakthrough in re-
cent years is Jewish jour-
nalism, according to the
j findings of an informal sur-
vey by the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency of Jewish
news publications in the
I United States and Canada.
An examination of the editorial
[staffing of 62 of the publications,
[representing all but a few of those
Imi'dia. showed that nine of the
publications had women in the
categories of editor-publisher, co-
publisher, and publisher-execu-
tive editor. No fewer than 38
early 60 percent of the publi-
cations listed women as editors
nd managing editors.
IN ADDITION, 16 women
kerve as associate and assistant
ditors and six hold various sub-
Jitor positions. The list of
women staff members includes 13
ditorial assistant. More than a
tiii/cn women were listed as edi-
orial contributors. The findings
khowed that only six of the publi-
cations listed no women in any
ditorial capacity.
The survey was based on an
Jxamination of editorial mast
eads, the membership list of the
Jlmerican Jewish Press Associa-
tion iAJFAl, and listings in the
Jurrtni American Jewish Year
ok.
r The current membership list
\i the AJPA lists 51 full mem-
ers and 13 associate members
ong news publications, for a
btal of 64 Jewish news publica-
jons. The 1983 American Jewish
tear Book lists 71 such publica-
ions in the United States and
Ive in Canada for a total of 76.
ly either yardstick, the publica-
lons studied by the JTA repre-
knt an overwhelming majority of
|ich news publications.
I THE PRESENCE of women in
fey editorial positions appeared
1 be totally unrelated to such
ctors as geographical location,
raership by either Federations
r private individuals, or size and
ICObtloo or publications.
Women serve as editor and
publisher, or as editors and
managing editors, on both pri-
vately-owned and Federation-
sponsored news publications, on
weeklies with substantial
numbers of pages and wide circu-
lation, down to letter-head size
private and Federation-
sponsored publications ranging
in size from four to 12 to 16
pages, published and circulated
within a limited geographical
area.
Women have been emerging in
recent years in growing numbers
as presidents of Federations,
major power centers in Jewish
organizational life, and of Jewish
congregations. But this is con-
siderably less true of appoint-
ments of women to key executive
positions. Women remain a rarity
in decision-making high echelon
presidential and executive posts
of major national organizations
which are not women's organiza-
tions.
AN EXAMINATION of the
1983 Directory of the Council of
Jewish Federations indicated
that 32 of the presidents of the
225 Federations, Welfare Funds
and Community Councils listed
in the Directory about 15
percent are women.
Since these are volunteer elec-
tive posts, the number of women
in Federation executive director-
ships, or their equivalent, was
considered more meaningful. A
total of 28 women, again slightly
more than 10 percent, were found
to be holding posts as paid exec-
utives. Sixteen are listed as exec-
utive directors, seven are listed
as executive secretaries, two as
secretary-treasurers and three in
the categories of administrator,
administrative secretary and
treasurer.
Women also hold executive po-
sitions in affiliates of the national
organizations and in local units of
such organizations but precise
data on their numbers and duties
were beyond the scope of the
survey.
BUT COMPARISON of the
percentages clearly demonstrate
that the deepest penetration by
women in formerly all-male pre-
serves in American Jewish orga-
nizational professional areas has
been made in Jewish journalism.
Two publishers, one considered
the dean of Jewish publishers,
and one of the relatively young
men coming into the field as pub-
lishers, commented on the survey
at the request of the
JTA.
Philip Slomovitz, veteran
editor and publisher of the
Jewish News of Detroit, and
Jerome Lippman, publisher and
editor-in-chief of the Long Island
Jewish World, expressed gratifi-
cation at the survey findings.
SLOMOVITZ, a vice president
of the Board of the JTA, com-
mented that the Jewish News
may have been one of the
pioneers in opening its doors to
women for key editorial posi-
tions. He declared that "one of
our earliest city editors was a wo-
man whose skills I would match
with the best," establishing a
tradition maintained to the pre-
sent.
Lippman, president of the
AJPA, commenting that the six
publications without any women
editorial representation were "six
too many," said that the high
proportion of women in key
Jewish journalistic positions
meant that opportunities in Jew-
ish journalism are wide open for
the competent journalist, male or
female.
He said the findings indicated
that any Jew, man or woman,
who wants to work in the Jewish
community can rise to the high-
est positions of responsibility in
Jewish journalism and thus make
valuable contributions to the
community on a professional
level.
Bufman to Present
Neil Simon Hit Here
Neil Simon's current Broad-
way comedy hit, "Brighton
Beach Memoirs," which was
honored with the Drama Critics'
Circle Award as Best Play of
1983, will launch 1983-84
theatrical seasons at Fort
Lauderdale's Parker Playhouse
and Miami Beach Theatre of the
Performing Arts, according to
producer Zev Bufman.
Kicking off the play's first
national tour with a gala
premiere Nov. 29 at the Parker
Playhouse, the show. will run
three weeks there and then move
to Miami for a three-week enga-
gement starting Dec. 20.
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF GREATER MIAMI
137 Northeast 19 Street 9990 North Kendall Drive
573-5900 595-5055
The Synagogue with a Tradition for Excellence
wishes our people everywhere
A Healthy and Happy New Year
Haskell M. Bemat, Senior Rabbi
Donald P. Caahman, Assistant Rabbi
Jacob Q. Boriisteln, Cantor-Educator
Rachelle Nelson, Student Cantor
Philip S. Qoldln, Executive Director
Burton S. Kahn, President ^^^
Jerry Libbin, director of the Miami Beach Jewish Community
Center, accepts a gift of canned goods for needy elderly at the
Miami Beach JCC Senior Center from Robert Merlin, im-
mediate past chairman of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Young Adult Division. The food was donated last
week as an act of 'tzedakah' prior to the start of the Jewish
New Year by 60 men and women who participated in Young
Adult Division's Singles Mission to Israel in July.
D'aann fituk
inictf
s-socitftion
A
The Dade County members of the Association, comprised
of Orthodox, Conservative, Reform and Reconstruc-
tionist rabbis extend warm wishes for a Sbanah Tovah to
the entire community.
The Association encourages Jewish education and
philanthropy and fosters civic betterment and interfaith
communications.
May the New Year, 5744, usher in an era of peace for
Israel and all mankind'. -.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Rabbi David H. Auerbach Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz
Rabbi Maxwell Berger
Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat
J Rabbi Allen Bezner
f Rabbi Akiva Brilliant
1 Rabbi Jonah E. Caplan
Rabbi Paul D. Caplan
[Rabbi Mitchell Chefitz
I Rabbi Julian I. Cook
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat
Rabbi Edwin Far ber
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
Rabbi Jacob S. Green
Rabbi Harry Jolt
Rabbi Warren Kasztl
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley
Rabbi Maurice Klein
I Rabbi Randall J.
Konigsburg
I Rabbi Leon Kronish
Rabbi Norman S. Lipson
Rabbi Meir Matzliah
Melamed
I Rabbi Jehuda Melber
Rabbi Sadi Nahmias
Rabbi David Raab
Rabbi Menachem Raab
Rabbi Marvin Rose
Rabbi Samuel Rudy
Rabbi David B. Saltzman
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Rabbi Norman N. Shapiro
Rabbi Rami Shapiro
Rabbi Shmaryahu T. Swirsky
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
Rabbi Solomon H.
Waldenberg
Rabbi Elliot J. Winograd
Rabbi Nathan H. Zwitman
Rabbinical Association
of Greater Miami
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137
Telephone 576-4000
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz
President
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President


Page 18-B The Jewish Ftoridnn / Friday. September 9,1963
Ezra Katz Named to Lead
Zachor Holocaust Institute
Ezra Katz. a member of i
Greater Miami Jewish Federa /
tion's board of directors, has been
appointed to serve as president of
Federation's Zachor Institute for
Holocaust Studies, which is now
beginning its second year of re-
searching on the Holocaust and
educating the public about its
consequences.
"It is very appropriate that
Ezra, the child of a Holocaust
survivor, will be guiding the
Zachor Institute during this
crucial phase of its develop-
ment." said Federation President
Norman H. Lipoff. who made the
appointment. "Ezra has a deep
understanding of the lessons of
the Holocaust and how they must
be communicated, as well as the
leadership ability needed to guide
this most important endeavor."
Katz. has served as chairman
of Federation's Young Leader-
ship Cabinet, as vice chairman of
the Chazak Leadership Program,
and as co-chairman of the Yachad
Young Adults Mission.
"I'm honored to have been
chosen to chart the direction the
Zachor Institute will take during
the coming year." Katz said.
"While the Institute's initial year
was a tremendous success, we
intend to expand its activities
and make it an influential entity
in the entire Miami community."
Officers serving with Katz are
Dr. George Wise, honorary chair-
man; Harry A. Levy, founding
president; Donald Lefton. Stan-
ley Rosenblatt. David Schaecter,
and Marilyn Smith, vice presi-
dents: Helene Berger. secretary;
Jack Chester, treasurer: and Dr.
Helen Fagin. special advisor to
the board of directors.
The Institute has also created
Bylaws. Education-Program
Ezra Katz
ming. Development-Long Range
planning, and Communications-
Community Relations commit-
tees to carry out its various ac-
tivities.
Established to perpetuate the
memory of the six million Jews
who perished at the hands of the
Nazis, the Institute collects,
develops, and disseminates curri-
culum materials on the Holocaust
for educational purposes. It also
gathers materials to maintain a
library, archives, multi-media
resource center, audio-visual pre-
sentations, oral histories, art,
textbooks. memorabilia, and
other materials for the formation
of a Holocaust museum.
The Institute also sponsors
seminars and lectures on the Hol-
ocaust for the general public and
educators, and last April spon-
sored South Florida's first Holo-
caust Education Week, a public
awareness program.
On the Bookshelf
Refugee Artists Who Came
Here Contributed Greatly
The Muses Flee Hkler: Cultural
Transfer and Adaptation
1930-1945. Edited by JarreU
C. Jack man and Car la M.
Borden. Washington. D.C.:
Smithsonian Institute Press.
1983. 348 Pp. $8.95 paper,
$17.50 cloth.
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Book Editor
In 1980. on the 100th anni-
versary of Albert Einstein's
birth, the Smithsonian Insti-
tution held two meetings in honor
of that occasion. The meetings
lasted a total of five days, and 29
scholarly papers were delivered.
The subject was the experience of
refugees who fled from the Nazis.
Not all refugees were considered.
The meetings focused on the
artists, scholars, scientists and
intellectuals who managed to
escape.
The questions discussed in-
cluded the following: "What did
this diaspora of savants mean to
the receiving countries? How
were the fruits of their intellects
affected by being planted in new
soil? How did they succeed or fail
in establishing new niches for
themselves in new geographical
and human environments? How
would the world later profit from
the rescue and nurturing of such
talent?"
DEALING WITH these ques-
tions was certainly an appro-
priate way to pay tribute to
Albert Einstein, perhaps the
most famous refugee of all. He
was 54 years old when Hitler
came to pwer and, fortunately,
was in the United States on a
visit at that time. He never
returned to Germany. He con-
sidered invitations to settle in
England, France, Belgium,
Spain, Israel and the United
States before deciding to go to
the Institute for Advanced
Study at Princeton. His scientific
achievements both before and
after he became a refugee have
changed the world.
Not all refugees were so for-
tunate as Einstein: the papers
presented at his birth centennial
meetings review their ex-
periences. Nineteen of the 29
papers have been collected for
this volume. One of the co-
editors, Carla M. Borden, works
at the Smithsonian and arranged
the program. The other co-editor,
JarreU C. Jackman, has
published on the experiences of
German refugees in California: he
gave a paper on that subject at
the meetings and it appears in
the book.
The presentations are arranged
into three groups: Background
Continued on Page 32- A
From the Puloit
Caught by the Horns
In the Thicket
By RABBI
MICHAEL B. EISENSTAT
Temple Jodea
One of the great Torah por-
tions is read on Rosh Hashanah.
the Akedah narrative, the portion
that deals with the binding of
Isaac. We learn that Abraham is
tested by the Almighty in a
strange way. Commanded to
sacrifice his son, Abraham pre-
pares to fulfill the mandate, but
at the last second, with his hand
poised in mid-air to deliver up his
son, God countermands Abra-
ham. Abraham lifts up his eyes
and sees a ram caught in the
thicket by its horns. He sacrifices
the ram instead of his son.
Throughout the year, we Jews
often feel that we. like the ram,
are caught by the horns in a
thicket. There was the ram,
powerless in the drama that was
taking place. We, too, often feel
powerless as we stand amidst the
dramatic events that are being
played out on the world's stage.
WE WHO are chov'vai Tzion,
lovers of Zion, who pour out
energy and substance in support
of Israel, often feel the sense of
fear and frustration that the ram
must have felt when it realized
that it was caught up in some-
thing from which it could not ex-
tricate itself. We yearn for peace.
We have fought to achieve peace,
and we have sat at the treaty
table to negotiate peace. Like the
ram, we have twisted and turned,
exerting herculean efforts.
Yet every time some of the ten-
drils in the thicket give way.
there are others that catch our
horns. We succeed in making
some breakthrough toward peace
with one party only to fund that
others are finding new reasons to
turn their backs on us. For years,
the major nations of Europe gave
us political succor while we faced
implacable enemies in the Middle
East.
Today, even as Israel tears at
the thicket and makes some
progress towards peace with
Egypt and Lebanon, other
nations denounce Israel and her
partners in peace. We feel frus-
tration but dare not give up our
struggle, for like the ram, we
have been placed where we are by
the Hand that guides history,
and it is not for us to give up the
role ordained for us. Only God
can tell us to cease struggling,
and there are no indications that
that is His will.
THERE ARE thickets other
than the thicket of international
politics and intrigue in which we
find ourselves caught by the
horns. Our country has been
struggling through terrible
economic times. We Jews find
Jewish Houaakaapar-Live-in, non-smoker, non-drinker
with references. Care for older gentleman close to
163 Street Shopping Center. Must drive with current
license. Light housekeeping: Light cooking, (Kosher)
room, board & salary. Call Nan, 685-8451.
EVERYONE REALIZES that depression, the inability to move
toward new friends and relationships, new careers, a happier more
rewarding Ufa are caused by mental barriers we somehow can't over-
come.
We are so often drained by the wear and tear of life and feel
helpless, Immobilized, consumed by rage, unable to utilize the
energy and creative ability we each possess.
Yet these barriers are not insurmountable. You will be amazed at
what individual or group psychotherapy can do to unlock your men.
tal powers and lead you to a happier life. Call us
GROUP 6688662 S. Miami.
PATHFINDERS GROUP 666-6662 S.Miami.
Rabbi Eisenstat
ourselves caught by the horns as
we. along with our President and
Congress, look for solutions.
There are solutions that have
been proposed to cure the
economic illness of our nation and
from a fiscal standpoint may ap-
pear sound. But from the stand-
point of Jewish concern for the
poor, the orphan, the widow, the
downtrodden, the solutions arj-
pear worse than the problems
the cure worse than the disease.
We understand the need for so-
cial programs. We recognize that
they cost money. And we also
recognize that we. as occupants
of seats on the bus of middle class
America, are going to have to pay
the fare, caught by the horns in
the thicket aeain. Do we turn in
the direction of self-interest? Or
do we heed the admonition of the
Prophet who said, "What mean
ye that ye crush my people and
grind the face of the poor, said
the Lord?"
There are no easy answers to
complicated questons. It is i
frustrating thing to be caught by
the horns in thickets of confu-
sion. Such has often been our lot
in the past. If that is what is in
store for us in the future, then we
can only thank God for the
blessing of life and the blessing of
a new year in which we can con-
tinue to struggle to find answers
and emerge stronger and wiser
for having struggled.
Local Leaders Named To Aid
Statue of Liberty Restoration
Nicholas H. Morley. appointed
by President Reagan to the
Statue of Liberty-Ellis Island
Centennial Commission, has an-
nounced the creation of a South
Florida Steering Committee to
raise funds from this area for the
restoration of the landmarks. The
committee will work with Statue
of Liberty-Ellis Island Founda-
tion. Inc.
Serving on the South Florida
committee are Ralph Renick,
Armando Gutierrez. David R.
Ross, and Richard Zimmerman.
Commissioner Barry Schreiber is
acting as Of Counsel for the
newly-formed steering commit-
tee.
"This area of the country will
assume a leadership role in this
effort to restore America's land-
marks by joining together South
Florida's diverse ethnic groups
into one bold force to raise funds
for the restoration drive," Morley
said. "Other communities around
the country may wish to mold
their efforts along the lines being
formed now here."
Morley co-chairs the National |
Commission's Fundraising Com-
mittee. Denver Frederick, direc-l
tor of fundraising for the Nation-
al Centennial Commission, said
South Florida was the first com-
munity to kick off a concerted
drive to raise money for the res-1
toration of the Statue of Liberty
and Ellis Island.
Kestenbaum to Speak j
Betty Kestenbaum, president
of the Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah, will address the first
meeting of the season of toe
organization's Henrietta Szold
Chapter Sept. 12 at the Hadassah
office, Lincoln Road.
The meeting begins at 1 p.m..
according to Florence Greenberg,
chapter president.
Cohen JWVs to Meet |
A regular meeting has
scheduled by the Harry H. Cohen I
Post and Auxiliary 723, Jewish
War Veterans for Sept. 18 at
a.m. at the Surfside Civic Centa
of South Florida
'M*mm Am MtmAm
The Officers and Board of Directors of the
Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida
join in wishing you a
Happy and Healthy New Year
5744 "
Honorable Rath Shack
President


Intelligence Man Who Gathered
Information On Barbie After WWII for
U.S. Shocked by Ryan Report
Friday, September 9.1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
LOS ANGELES -
/jTA) A former member
of the U .S. Army's Counter
Intelligence Corps who was
(responsible for gathering
land preparing information
on Nazi war criminals in
Europe immediately after
World War II said here
that he was "shocked" by a
Justice Department report
which said CIC officials in
Europe had been unaware
of the activities of Klaus
Barbie when the U.S. hired
him for intelligence activi-
I ties.
Michael Thomas, a Jewish
I French resistance fighter who
was employed by the CIC from
11944-1947, said his responsibi-
lities included setting up in-
formation nets" and finding and
[apprehending for trial alleged
Iwar criminals. He said that while
in Munich, working in the CIC
[office in 1945, he had established
Ian "extensive" file on Gestapo
[officials with profiles and activity
[reports, including detailed in-
formation on the activities and
locations of those individuals.
One of those Gestapo officials
[who he maintained a file on was
[Barbie, the notorious "butcher of
[Lyon," Thomas told a press
[conference at the Simon Wiesen-
|thal Holocaust Center.
"The Barbie report was a short
lone, but stated that he was
[wanted by the French as a war
Icriminal and for crimes against
irwmanity," Thomas said. "Most
[of the information in those
profiles, which I personally
prepared, had been obtained
during interrogation of captured
| (lest apo officials."
BECAUSE OF these existing
piles in Munich, Thomas said, he
was shocked by the Justice
Department report issued Aug.
116 in Washington which said the
decision to employ Barbie "was a
defensible one (which) depends
upon the fact that the persons
who made those decisions cannot
k charged with knowledge that
Barbie committed, or likely com-
mitted, or was wanted for war
crimes or crimes against
humanity."
The Justice Department study
as conducted by Allan Ryan
Pji a special assistant in the
[nminal division of the Depart-
ment and the former head of the
Wfcce of Special Investigation,
responsible for investigating and
prosecuting Nazi war criminals
Jvng in the United States.
His 218-page report and its
re than 600 pages in sup
orting documents admitted for
[he first time that U.S. intelli-
n,CQremployed Barbie from 1*7
1951 and then helped him flee
from Germany to South America
"nere he lived until last February
HJ. he was returned from
Bolivia to France. He currently
F^aits trial for "crimes against
pumanity."
lmTE WIESENTHAL Center.
[ eanwhile. called the Justice
fodwtsah Opener Set
unThe rwt Hadassah national
CMention in Washington and
niroaUction of new chapter offi-
g* will highlight the first gener-
C? tln8 of the season of Had-
L ^^Menorah Chapter, which
df .,J!led to teke P1** Mon-
received the support of California
Democratic Representatives Mel
Levine and Howard Herman.
The Center released at the
press conference a packet of
documents, some of them marked
confidential, supporting Thomas'
statements that he was employed
by the CIC and his particular res-
ponsibilities. He emigrated to the
United States after his service
with the CIC and lives in New
York State. His family died at
the Auschwitz concentration
camp.
mm
New Year Greetings
Mr. & Mrs. Stanley C. Myers
New Year Greetings
Kenneth M. Myers
Thomas
Department report "morally
unacceptable" and asserted that
after discussions with Thomas,
found it containing "inaccuracies
and omissions." The Center said
it takes "strong exception" to a
statement by Ryan in the con-
clusion of the report which said,
"I cannot conclude that those
who made the decision to employ
and rely on Klaus Barbie ought
now to be villified for the deci-
sion."
The Center, in a prepared
statement, said: "The history of
the Gestapo was and forever will
be associated with genocide. To
employ an individual whose very
organization was dedicated to the
mass murder of Jews cannot be
defended under any pretext."
Furthermore, the Center
described as "morally disgrace-
ful" Ryan's assertion that
"whatever his crimes, he (Barbie)
has never been in the same
category as Adolph Eichmann
. and other SS leaders."
THE CENTER has called on
Congress to establish a bi-
partisan, independent inquiry
into the "entire issue of all U.S.
utilization of Nazi war criminals
after World War II." The request
for a congressional inquiry has
Healthy
and Happy
New Year
from
Miami Heart
Institute
Miami Heart Institute extends best wishes to our Jewish friends
for the year to come. May the New Year bring peace, prosperity,
health and happiness for eveyone.
ohw
We wish the Jewish Community
a very Happy New Year.
B
PAN AMERICAN BANK, N.A.
250 S.E. 1st Street, Miami, Florida 33131 Telephone 577-5600
Member FDIC
,
f Vtf VVT t i ...... vv "/v r S*SSS''>-' -'-' '-


Page20-B The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, September 9,1983
Orthodox Jews, Polish
Government in Accord on
Preservation of Cemeteries
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A leadership delegation of
Orthodox Jews returned
from Warsaw last week
with a signed agreement
from the Polish govern-
ment granting Orthodox
communities outside of
Poland control in the
preservation of Jewish
cemeteries in Poland.
The agreement includes the es-
tablishment of a joint committee
which will have the responsibility
of restoring some of the 434
cemeteries which still exist in
what was the largest Jewish
community in pre-war Europe.
The report of the agreement
was disclosed by Dr. Isaac Lewin
and Rabbi Chaskel Besser. who
headed the American delegation
to the Warsaw talks. Other
members of the delegation in-
cluded Rabbi Chaim Dovid
Halberstam of the U.S.. Rabbi
Yehuda Meir Abramowitz of
Israel, chairman of the Agudath
Israel World Organization. I.M.
Zimmerman of England, and
Sholom Dovid Horowitz of
Belgium. The Polish government
was represented by several
ministers and representatives of
the Prime Minister.
ACCORDING TO Besser. the
delegation was accorded a royal
welcome almost from the moment
they arrived at Warsaw's Inter-
national Airport, where they were
greeted by a high level Polish
delegation. The Orthodox leaders
had traveled to Poland at the
request of leading Torah autho-
rities from around the world.
In their report. Lew in and
Besser noted that there were over
800 cemeteries in Poland before
the war. Currently, only 434 re-
main, of which only 22 can be
classified as in decent condition.
The Polish government itself
concedes that 68 are "half
damaged" and a further 73 are
over 60 percent ruined.
There are 136 burial grounds in
which only a few tombstones re-
main, and 129 of which there are
no signs of graves or lou bstones,
but the areas and bounda "ies are
still known by local inhabitants.
All have no fences, with the
result that they are increasingly
vandalized and often used as
recreational grounds.
THE WORST condition in-
volves some 250 burial grounds
in the smaller towns and villages
of which not only is there no trace
of graves but it is difficult, to
establish the proximity of their
former existence, the report add-
ed.
The permanent commission
that was established as a result of
the agreement will include the
Polish Ministries of Religion.
Finance, Home and Culture. The
Polish Jewish community will be
represented by their president,
Moshe Finkelstein, and Orthodox
communities outside Poland will
be represented by delegates from
Israel, tht United States.
England. Belgium and Swit-
zerland.
The next plenary' session is to
be convened in November, at
which time a comprehensive plan
will be available for imple-
mentation, according to Lewin
and Besser.
DURING THEIR visit, the
delegation also visited the former
concentration camp in Ausch-
witz. Two members of the dele-
gation were former inmates of the
camp. In the report. Besser noted
that there are still a number of
synagogues in Warsaw. Cracow.
Lodz and Wroclaw, but that they
can only muster a quorum on the
Sabbath. Those attending are
mostly elderly and there is little
sign of youth. No Jewish
marriages take place.
In their discussions with
Polish government officials, the
Orthodox leaders raised the issue
of the preservation of synagogues
in Poland, including such historic
sites as the huge Beth
Hamedrash of the Gerer Rebbe.
Also under discussion was a plan
to provide kosher food in several
locations throughout Poland for
visitors.
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fhe Diplomatic Year 5743
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 21-B
Year of the

War in Lebanon
By WALTER EYTAN
The year 5743 will be re-
membered as the year of Israel's
war in Lebanon. It opened with its
nadir last Rosh Hashanah the
day of the Phalange massacre in
the Sabra and Shatilla camps. As
the year ends, the war is not yet
over. Israel suffered severe
casualties: over 500 soldiers kill-
ed, almost six times as many
wounded.
The war was at first, as far as
the public knew, no more than
"Operation Peace for Galilee."
Officially, this is still its name.
Its purpose was to chase the PLO
terrorists 40 kilometers (25 miles)
beyond Israel's northern border,
out of range of the weapons with
which the peace of Galilee's peo-
ple had systematically been shat-
tered. This object was achieved in
a week.
Only then did it become clear
that Israel was pursuing more
far-reaching goals: the PLO's
expulsion from Lebanon, with its
headquarters in Beirut shut down
and its militia infrastructure de-
stroyed, and then full peace
with a Lebanon freed at last from
the internecine strife which had
racked and wrecked it since 1976.
THE SCHEME was imagina-
tive the Government's oppo-
nents said imaginary. Could it
have succeeded? It had been
hatched with Bashir Gemayel,
hut he was assassinated before he
could take office as President of
Lebanon. The consequent
Phalange massacre in the camps,
for which some Israeli officers
and even Ministers were held to
Ijear indirect responsibility.
feudal Lebanon's domestic
cupation forcbr.ther Syria's oc-
lossea at Israel's *Htf/red hea^
ground and in the air. butR !*
soon re-equipped and re-armed by
"big brother" Soviet Union.
In default of full peace, Israel
was able, with American support,
to negotiate with Lebanon an
agreement for security guaran-
tees there after the withdrawal of
Israeli forces. Lebanon claimed
that, so far from establishing
formal peace, this agreement was
little more than a glorified armis-
tice.
Israel, for its part, maintained
that the agreement was an his-
torical advance on the armistice
of 1949, which indeed it super-
seded. International law, we are
told, recognizes only a state of
war and a state of peace
nothing in between. Since the
agreement explicitly ended the
state of war, there must now be
peace.
LEGALISTIC argument has
its place, but the fact remains
that Israel is not yet out of the
Lebanese wood. This 'land of
cedars' is still under occupation
by Syria's armed forces,
estimated at a little short of
50,000 men. Israel has made the
pull-out of these forces a condi-
tion of its own withdrawal. So far
there are few signs that the
Syrians are ready to oblige. For
Israel to withdraw if Syria does
not would mean not only loss of
face this could be borne but
the creation of a vacuum which
Lebanon's own army is not
strong enough to fill.
As things stand, it is taken for
granted that Syrian troops would
pour into the vacuum, coming
dangerously closer to Israel's
Galilee border. Thus Israel finds
itself in a dilemma from which it
will not be easy to extricate itself.
We have learned once again the
preponderant role played by the
super-powers. Without the
U.S.A. there would have been no
Lebanon-Israel agreement, no
multinational force to keep order
in Beirut. Were it not for the
USSR's all-out backing of Syria,
there might be no great problem.
It was America's participation in
the world force which moved
France, Italy and Britain to
despatch contingents of their
own.
As long as neither the U.S.A.
nor the USSR gives in, the con-
frontation will continue. It is
some comfort, perhaps, that
precisely because of super-power
involvement the situation (as in
Europe. Central America or the
Far East) will not be allowed to
get wholly out of hand. It would
represent far too grave a menace
'<> world peace.
___,~ *,D. been hoped, by all ac-
counts, thai. r>i /-> j i
, ; PLO s defeat in
Lebanon would ; ,
Israel
freer hand in Judea ano v.
a
(Jordan's former "West Banff ,
President Ronald Reagan's
assurance that the U.S.A. did not
favor the establishment of an
independent Palestinian state in
that area was something of a
feather in Israel's cap.
On the other hand, his demand
for a freeze on new Jewish settle-
ments there and in Gaza came as
a blow, though it represented
nothing new in American policy.
There are Palestinian notables of
the caliber of an Elias Freij,
mayor of Bethlehem, who hold
Continued on Page 23-A

Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Max R. Silver
Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Lester Rogers
Read these statements and you'll
understand why Israel is so
important to the Jews.
1945HHHBMHHHMHH1
"The Jews are lower than animals."
General George S. Patton referring to
the survivors of the Holocaust
19451
19461
"The Americans are so enthusiastic about
opening Palestine to the refugees because
they do not want to have many of them in
New York."
British Foreign Minister Bevin
"We appear to be treating the Jews as the
Nazis treated them, except that we do not
exterminate them."
Report to President Truman
19481
"We will punish the Jews in a way the race
dislikes by striking at their pockets."
Sir Evelyn Barker, British Commander in
Palestine on the eve of Israel's Independence
Drawn from hitherto secret documents placed in the custody of
the author by David K. Niles, a close aide to both Roosevelt
and Truman, and scores of interviews here and in Europe and
Israel, this book is about the 400,000 survivors of the
Holocaust and their dreams. It is about organizations like
B-Rlcha that rescued the homeless of Eastern and Central
Europe through an underground network headquartered in
Palestine; it is about a phantom army created to spirit
thousands of Jews past a British Navy determined to block
immigration to the promised land. It reveals fully the role
of Niles in President Truman's support of Israel. And it
shows the indifference of those who stood by while
"Displaced Persons" from Hitler's death camps were
held under guard against their will.
Redemption of the Unwanted re-creates the heroic
story of those who survived the Holocaust with a rare
combination of sensitivity, historical accuracy, and a
master historian's gift for fine writing.
r 11k-----:-
oernptKZMn
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5
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People who know books know B. Dalton.
BOOKSELLER
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BOCA RATON
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r
L/Shana Tova Tikatevu
TT3S1
',

May the coming year be one of
peace for Israel and for the
entire world, a year of
continued support for the
Sf^aqle for freedom for all
those wn&cijffer oppression
and loss of their irurnan rights.
*W
BEN Z. GRENALD & FAMILY
RDSH H29-HN71H 5744
>


Page 22-B TheJewivb FlorkHan Friday. September 9,1988

Wedding


FADENKRUMHOLZ
Estelle Sir Faden. daughter of Ann and the late
Abraham Sir of Miami Beach, was married on
Aug. 28 to Dennis Jonathan rL-umholz, son of
Kir. and Mrs. Sidney Krumholz of New York City
and Crompond, N.Y. The ceremony was per-
formed by Rabbi Joel Goor of the Metropolitan
Synagogue of New York City at Mayfair Parma.
West Orange, N.J.
The bride is a graduate of the University of
Florida at Gainesville and of Yeshiva Univer-
sity's Wurzweiler School of Social Work. She is
employed as a psychotherapist on the staff of St.
Clair's Hospital. Denville. N.J. and also serves as
employee assistance counselor to Warner-

She

Lambert Corporation of Morris Plains. N J.
is also engaged in private practice.
The bride's father was the owner and manger of
En-Joie Apartments and a member of the Miami
Beach Board of Realtors.
A graduate of Oberiin College and Boston
College Law School, the groom is a practicing
attorney specializing in environmental law with
Riker. Danzig. Scherer. and Hyland of
Morristown and Newark. N.J.
His father is a certified public accountant with
his own public practice in Manhattan, and his
mother was employed by the French Cultural
Embassy there.
Community Corner
"Design Discoveries '83," an annual auction featuring art.
collectibles, furniture and accessories, has been set for Sunday,
Oct. 2 at the Coconut Grove Playhouse. Proceeds from the 1 to 6
p.m. auction session will benefit educational projects of the
Interior Design Guild of South Florida and the National Home
Fashions League, the sponsoring organizations.
Dr. Seymour Alterman will address "What is Diabetes?" at
Mount Sinai Medical Center's next Diabetes Club meeting
Thursday, Sept. 22 at 7 p.m. in the hospital's Cherain
Auditorium. The hospital also announced that Dr. David Sch-
mitt will address "Common Respiratory Illnesses" Thursday at
2 p.m. in Wolfson Auditorium.
J.M. Lipton
Insurance Agency
101 East Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33132
Phone:371-5631
Best Wishes For A Happy New Year
To Our Clients & Friends
Green Leaves of Miami Inc.
P.O. Box 69-4224. Miami625-9403
A Happy New Year To All
Haircut ting Station
Bat's 1979
10675 SW 88 Street274-1845
Wishes A Happy New Year To The
Entire Jewish Community
Henri and {tilth's
Alterations
Men and Women
Wishes A Happy New Year To The
Entire Jewish Community
932-71 Street 885-1882

Here Comes The Sun
2188 NE 123rd St.. Miami895-6793
Happy New Year To Our Customers and Friends
Heres Gift Center
607 Lincoln Rd. Mall, Miami Pch 673-1706,
Extends New Yean' Greetings To All

Hermans Do-It-All Auto
Upholstery
6785 Bird Road, Miami-665-0948
A Happy New Year To AU
Happy New Year From
Holbert Electric Co.
1434 Alton Road, Miami Beach672-6611
Get Your New Year Linens From
Home Fashion Products
14652 Biscayne Blvd., N. Miami-940-3377 j
S. & S. Air Conditioning
7320 NW 58th. St.. Miami-592-3412
We Wish Everyone A New Year
Hughes industrial
Burner Service
1980 NE 148 Terr., Miami 944-2274
Happy New Year
Independent Transmissions Service 5846 SW 68 St.. Miami667-4208 Happy New Year to all our Customers and Friends *s\/ei
International Bonded Warehouse 601 SW8th St., Miami856-1208 Happy New Year to all our Friends and Customers

-
International Safe Deposit Corp. 310 Arthur Godfrey Rd.. M.B. 674-7233 Extend New Year's Greetings To All Our Customers and Friends North Miami General Hospital 1701 NE 127 St.-891-3550 Happy New Year
J & J Air Service Inc. 1282 NW 119 St.685-0541 Happy New Year To AU Happy New Year Mary Morgan
Jeannetts Dresses 423 Arthur Godfrey Rd. Miami Beach, Fl.531-7562 Wishes You A Happy New Year
Jtmmie's Machine Shop 2621 NE 1st Court, Miami576-0947 Wishes All A Joyous A Happy New Year T Happy New Year Joan C. Teglas
Joseph Cust^i Tailor 220 Miracle tOmfH* a06"Conu Gblea443-8893 Happy New Year
Josh Upholstery 653 Washington Ave. -672-0806 Best Wishes To Our Customers Abram's Fabrics Inc. 2311 Ponce de Leon 1825 Biscayne Blvd Coral Gables Miami 445-6166 379-8997 Happy New Year
Kaleidoscope 3112 Commodore Plaza Coconut Grove446-5010 A Happy New Year To AU China Maid Restaurant 9280 Bird Rd., Mi ami-226-0331 Happy New Year
Kendall Garden Center 10200 SW 107 Ave.. Miami. FU.-274-0947 Happy New Year To Everyone Dr. & Mrs. Solomon Lanster & Family Wish all our friends & relatives a Happy New Year
King Arthur Chair Co. 5501 NW 36 Ave 635-3086 Happy New Yew To AU Florida Smoked Fish 1111 NW 159 Dr., Miami625-5112 Happy New Year
LA. Ornamental Iron 12901 NW 32nd Ct., Opa-Locka-685-0419 Happy New Year Miami Jack Service Inc. 1011 E. Hialeah Drive, Hialeah-634-2226 Happy New Year
Lasch Realty 9165 Park Drive, Miami Shores757-4509 Wishes AU A Very Happy New Year Amber Oil Corp. 1861 Bay Rd., Miami, Beach538-4611 Happy and Healthy New Year


Year of the War in Lebanon
Friday, September 9,1988 / The Jewish Floridian Page 23-B
Continued from Pago 21-A
that the Arabs must negotiate
and come to terms with the
Israeli 'occupier' but all of
them insist on 'self-determina-
tion.' In political code, this
means independence and a Pales-
tinian state, with or without
association with Jordan-
All efforts to bring King
Hussein of Jordan to a negotia-
tion table have failed. He himself,
like Barkis, might have been
willing-PLO extremists, however,
put a stop to Arafat's toying with
him, and in disgust the king gave
up. Bound even now by the Arab
League's fiat of 1974, Hussein
cannot claim to speak for the
Palestinians. This privilege is
reserved still for the PLO, de-
termined anew to save what it
can in political terms from the
ashes of its collapse in Lebanon.
A survey of 5743 would not be
complete without reference to
Egypt. President Hosni Mubarak
recalled his ambassador from Is-
rael after Sabra and Shatilla, but
the peace treaty between the two
countries has held. However
critical it may be of Israel, Egypt
will not again risk a war for the
Palestinians. It promises to send
back its ambassador when imple-
mentation of Israel's agreement
with Lebanon begins in earnest.
In the situation which had been
created, this could happen, in
spite of contrary declarations,
even while some Syrian troops
remain in Lebanon. Israel cannot
for ever live with a Syrian veto on
its freedom of action.
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Mid-Town Plumbers Inc.
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Happy New Year
Rose and Irving Newman
NEWMAN
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K & K Trailer Supplies
23215 South US Hwy. 1 South Miami-245-1212
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KNM Press
11513 S. Dixie Hwy., Miami233-5414
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Metro Gas
1234 NW 79 St, Miami693-3921
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Miami Beach
Auto Tag Agency
756 Washington Ave., M.B.531-5000
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Miami Beach
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923 West 39 St., Miami Beach531-4161
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Kaberaf Modes
315 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach531-5112
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Kane's Masterbuilt
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5851 NE 35th Avenue, Miami633-0542
Happy New Year Greetings To All
Larry Kline Wholesale Meats
3766 NW 80th St, Miami
Dade-835-2222 Broward-921-8010
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Miami Beach Police
Athletic League
999 11 St., Miami Beach531-5636
Exec. Dir.-A.J. Daoud Pres.-Arnie Notkin
Happy New Year
Miami Equipment
& Repair Co. Inc.
1927 NW 36 Street, Miami-635-2313
Happy New Year
Miami Graphics and
Silk Screen
1450 N. Miami Ave., Miami371-4499
Happy New Year to the entire Jewish Community
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Lawrence & Family of
LAWRENCE PLUMBING SUPPLY CO.
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
I Lear School
/ 11211 Biscayne Blvd., Miami893-5351
| Happy New Year
Dr. Philip Leon & Family
18545 NE 18 Avenue
No. Miami Beach, Fla. 33162
Wish Entire Jewish Community
A Joyous, Prosperous New Year
Libby's Hair Styling
1656 NE 123rd St., North Miami891-2848
Happy New Year
Lincoln-Marti Schools
904 SW 23 Ave., Miami643-4888
Wishes the entire Jewish Community
a Happy New Year
Loomis Paperback
Exchange
5794 Bird Rd., South Miami661-2043
Happy New Year To All

Lory's Fashion Shop Inc.
2650 NE 189 St., Miami-931-2010
I Happy New Year
Miami Review
100 N.E. 7th St., Miami, Fla.377-3721
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M. Kotler Real Estate
9585 Harding Ave., Surf side866-2423
Happy New Year To All
Krayit Jewelers
800 East Hallandale Beach Blvd.
Hallanaale-949-9943
Happy New Year
Miami Rug Co.
Happy New Year To All
Miami Tobacco
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3939 NW 7 St., Miami649-5611
Happy New Year
Michel's Kartway
6001 NW 74 Ave, Miami Beach
592-5899 592-5909
Happy New Year
MGM Meats and Deli
18401 NE 19th Ave., N.M.B.9314201
Happy New Year to all our Customers A Friends
Larry Marks & Co.
541 NW 27 St., Miami -576-6587
I Happy New Year
Marriott Hotel &
Racket Club
1201 NW42 Ave., Miami649-5000
Happy New Year
Martha's Flower Shpp
3921 Alton Rd.Near 41 St., M.B.538-5523
Happy New Year
Laura McCarthy Inc.
8601 Biscayne Blvd., Miami Shores751-1641
Happy New Year
Merrill Stevens
Yacht Brokerage
2640 S. Bay shore Dr., Miami324-5211
__________Happy New year


Page24-B The JewiahFToridian/Friday, September 9,1983
Delegation of U.S. Congressmen on Visit to Middle
East Reviewed the Status of Israeli POWs
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON The
head of a delegation of
seven Congressmen who
returned to Washington
after a tour of the Middle
East said there are 11 Is-
raeli prisoners of war in
Lebanon, according to a
briefing the group received
from the International Red
Cross in Damascus.
Rep. William Lehman (D.,
Fla.) also reported that Israel
claims that there are four, not
three. Israeli POWs held by Syria
but that the Red Cross said its
representatives had seen only
three war prisoners when it last
visited on July 15. Those POWs.
the IRC reported, had no serious
health problems and were getting
packages from Israel.
LEHMAN SAID two other
prisoners are being held by the
fanatical" Popular Front for the
Liberation of Palestine, headed
by George 11 abash. He said the
two war prisoners had been
checked by the IRC. and one was
found to be mentally ill and
should be sent back to Israel.
The group also learned that six
Israeli soldiers are being held in
Tripoli by the El Fatah, the larg-
est group in the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization. Lehman
said the group was told that the
six soldiers were visited recently
by IRC representatives and
found to be "in good shape."
The six representatives met
with Svrian officials in Damascus
but did not see President
Hafez Assad who. they were told.
was "in the mountains."
LEHMAN SAID the Irc
informed the group that the
Syrians had not replied to an
Israeli offer to exchange 300
Syrians for the three to four
Israeli prisoners held by Syria.
But, he said, the group had been
told that "the Syrians are going
to let the IRC exhume Israeli war
dead and ship them back to
Israel, after the bodies are
medically identified as Israelis."
Pioneer Womell/Na, Amat
Council of
South Florida
AND ITS
ATID
AVIVA
BEBA IDELSON
CHAI
CLUBI
CLUB II
CORAL GABLES
DIMONABET
EILAT
GOLD A ME IR
CHAPTERS
HIRISETIKVAH
ILANA
KADIMAH
KINNERET
MASADA
MIRAMAR
OR
SABRA
SHALOM
SHARON
Extend Heartiest New Year Greetings
To The South Florida Jewish Community
*
Hadassah
Extends To The Entire Jewish Community
Best Wishes for a Happy New Year to ail
THE MIAMI REGION
Mrs. Harold Eisaenberg, President
THE MIAMI BEACH REGION
Mrs. Joseph Kestenbaum, President
National Council
OF Jewish Women
GREATER MIAMI SECTION
Extends Best Wishes for
A Happy and Healthy New Year
i\\ temple ^
OH
A CARING CONSERVATIVE CONGREGATION
Wishes Our PeopleEverywhere
A Healthy, Happy A Peaceful New Year
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi Gerald Goldfarb. Pre.
Benjamin Adler. Cantor Dorothy H. Grant, Exec. Dir
Temple Zamora
Coral Gables' Only Conservative Synagogue
44 Zamora Coral Gables
Rabbi-Dr. Aklva Brilliant
CantorLoMts HerslMian
PresidentHarvey Brant
New Year Greetings To The Entire Community
/Mini
BethTorah
Congregation
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
North Miami Beach, Fla
Dr. Max A Lipecbitz, Rabbi
Randall Konigsburg, Asst. Rabbi
Lester Engel, President
Harvey L. Brown, Executive Dir.
L'Shana Tova Tikatevu
From the Officers, Directors and Membership
The Israelite Center
Temple
3175 SW 25 Street
The Rabbi, Cantor, Officers and Members
Extend Their Greetings
To All Their Members and Friends
For A Happy New Year
Al Landskroner, President
Membership Inquiries Invited
Temple Adath Yeshurun
1025 NE Miami Gardes* Drive 947-1435
Rabbi Simeha Freedasss Cantor Iaa Alpern
<*-".....HmttmS, Mom. N K.i.
aMaSaai PmMm. Man O*****
MW. CU+ Pr.di.,1. AM. Eli.
Caaba f ss Bass, Al Dh
EiOTUrt Dncur. flmii & PaUack
Btaastaaal Dhaaha. Haaaea 1. rww
Early Cyi*.... ftrM,, J Br.
Happy New Year

May the New Year be a bountiful one and bring
a full measure of happineea to our members and
the entire Jewish community
TEMPLE NER TAMID
SISTERHOOD
Mrs CaHton (MildredJ Blake, President
Happy New Year To All
THE BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Miami's Historic Congregation
Extends Best Wishes For
A Happy. Healthy and Peacelul New Year
To Its Members and To The Entire Jewish Community
L'Shana Tova
Miami Chapter
American
Jewish Committee
David Meanehoff, President
William A. Gralnick
Southeast Regional Director
Steven H. Naturman. Area Director
Temple Sinai of North Dade
18801 N.E. 22nd Avs.. No. Miami Bch.-982-9010
Ralph Kinealey. Rabbi-Irving Shulkea. Cantor
Julian Cook, Assoc Rabbi-Norman Klein, Prea.
A Happy New Year To
The Entire Jewish Community
RAM AT SHALOM uiba Jim
11301 West Broward Boulevard
Plantation, Fla. 33325
(305)472-3600
A Happy New Year To AH
Temple Emanu-El
of Greater Miami
sMaa? Coopersaa
Presides
A Joyous New Year to All
TheSisterhood-The Mien's CUbThe P.T. A
The PlayersThe Forty-NinersThe Family League
And All Affiliated Youth Groups
The Greater Miami
Jewish Cemetery Assoc.
Owners of
Mt. Sinai Memorial
Park Cemetery
1125 NW 137 Street, Mismi, Fla
& Jewish Section of
Woodlawn Park Cemetery
3260 SW 8 Street. Miami, Fla.
Hy man Chabner
President
Fredric Rosen thai
1st V.P.
aWsaiUss. iV* tssajapi
t% SAe Wees\%effe\\Mms\\ Ve***mmtes'/ft
A Rabbi will be available
lor private service a
each Sunday lor the month of
El ad preceding the
High Holy Holidays
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy of Greater Miami
Extends a Happy and Healthy New Year
To the South Florida Jewish Community
Jerome Bienenfeld, President
I.H. Abrams, Chairman Exec. Committee
Holiday Greetings From
TEMPLE BETH AM
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard. D.H.L.. D.D
Rabbi James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Barry Goldstein. President
David Stuart, Executive Director
Joan Schwartzman. Associate Director


Lehman said "the Syrians
realize the negotiating value even
unfortunately of dead Israeli
soldiers." That procedure, he
said, was expected to take place
within 30 days, depending on
how the Syrian doctors respond.
IRC doctors in Geneva are
waiting to fly to Damascus as
soon as the gravesites are
opened," he said.
But Lehman also reported that
"some progress" was being
made in the form of negotiating
an exchange of war prisoners.
He said that while the Congress-
men were in Beirut, they met
with Lebanese President Amin
Gemayel and chatted with U.S.
marines in the multinational
force. Adding this was before
Rep. William Lehman
"the tragedy" last Monday when
two marines were killed during
the intermittent exchanges of fire
in the Beirut area.
LEHMAN SAID Lebanese
officials think the Israelis may
"dig in" after IDF forces with-
draw to the Awali River and that
the Syrians will not negotiate
"until the Israelis are completely
out" of Lebanon.
The group met with Premier
Menachem Begin, before his
resignation announcement, and
felt that "Begin looked quite ill,
but his frame of mind was
positive and he was very in-
formative. His parting words
were basically that the United
States was a dedicated ally of
Israel and that Israel is a
!
!
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish ftoridian Page 25-B
L'Shana Tova
Tikosevu
Best Wishes for a Healthy
and Happy New Year
from the Officers and Members
Department of Florida Ladies Auxiliary
Jewish War Veterans of the U.S. A.
Department President Belle S. Horowitz & Staff
Temple Samu-El
936S8W 152d Ave., Miami
"A Conservative Synagogue
Serving South Dade"
Ed win Frt>er, Rabbi
Lawrence R. Metach, President
Pamela Dernia, Siaterhood President
Kenneth I-evine, Man's Clab President
Debra Dana, Couples' Club President
Happy New Year
To the Entire Jewish Community
May the travails of last year's nourish wisdom for
this year's dreams and aspirations
Temple Judea
Of Coral MM
A Reform Congregation
|5500 Granada Blvd. Phone 667-5657
MICHAEL B. EISENSTAT, RABBI
Executive Director Cantorial Solo
ESTELLE P. MICHELSON LAUREL N. SWERDIN
President Education Director
RUSSELL SILVERMAN RAYBERMAN
American Mizrachi
Women
Best Wishes for Blessings of Good Health
nd Good Fortune for This Year and Ever After.
| With and added prayer for Peace in Israel and
the Entire World.
Florida Council
, dedicated ally of the United
States" and that this relationship
must be continued, '.Lehman
. said.
1 Defense Minister Moshe Arens
told the visiting Congressmen
that he was concerned about
projected cuts in Israel's defense
budget which he said would
hamper research and develop-
ment, specifically in electronic
warfare.
LEHMAN ALSO said that
the Congressmen found "lots of
facts, most of them very com-
plicated. But at least the PLO is
not a factor in Lebanon at this
time. Thank goodness, Begin at
least accomplished that."
All of the Congressmen are
members of the subcommittee on
foreign operations of the House
Appropriations Committee,
which is responsible for most of
the United States foreign aid
program, both military and
economic. Lehman said the
purpose of the mission was "to
see where our dollars are going."
The other six delegations
members were representatives
Clarence Long (D., Md.|,
chairman; Charles Wilson (D.,
Tex.); Lawrence Coughlin (R.,
Pa.); John Porter (R., HI.);
Marty Russo (D., 111.); and
Richard Lehman (D., Cal.).
JTA Report
New Years
Greetings From
Temple Solel
A Liberal Reform Congregation
with a creative religious school pro-
gram, Hebrew school, high school,
pre-teen and teen activities, and
nursery school.
Rabbi Robert P. Frazin
Cantor Michael Kyrr
Friday Service 8:15 PM
Saturday Service 10:30 AM
\f\/ 5100 Sheridan Street
YiaaY Hollywood. Fla. 33021
/\/\ 989-0205
Our warmest greetings to all our Friends
May the New Year bring peace
throughout the world
American Friends of
The Hebrew University
Otto Stieber
Chairman, State of Florida
Stanley Rosenberg
Director. S.E. Region
Donald E. Lefton
President, Gr. Miami Chapter
Florence D. Feldman
Director, Women's Division
Yiddish Culture
Winkle
Happy New Year
Menashs Feldstein, President
Sarah Kaufman, Vice President
Sheva Borland, Financial Secretary
Ell Altman, Recording Secretary
A Happy New Year To All
Temple Beth Moshe
2225 NE 121 St.. N. Miami. Fla. 33181
Israel Jacobs
bbi
UUotEise
'Mident
Moshe Freidler
Cantor
HALLANDALE JEWISH CENTER
Beth Tefilah
416 NE 8th Avenue, Hallandale 33009
Rabbi, Dr. Cart Klein Cantor, Jacob Danziger
President, Myer A. Pritsker
IIS1 D M C 3
NillEW EDUCATOIS ALLIANCE
411 N.E. 164th Stre*. No. Miami B.ach, Florida 33162
Benjamin Ben-Ari, President Gladys Diamond, 1st Vice-Pres.
Zahava SukenHc, Past Pres. Shula Ban-David, 2nd Vice-Pres.
Rabbi Shimon Azutay, Hon. Pres. Michael Aahbal, Secretary
Joseph A. Uorfinkel. Ph.D
Rabbi Emeritus
Irving L. Jsret
Executive Director
Wish
Of
Franklin D. Kreutzer
President, Southeast Region
United Synagogue of America
and Family
t Judy, Frank, Renee & Jay
all members of the Southeast Region
the United Synagogue of America
(Conservative)
A Happy and Healthy New Year
Stein Paint Co.
Wholesale & Retail
Our 43rd Year
545-8700
545 West Flagler St.
Happy and Healthy New Year
Tova & Shlomo Lichtman
Wish All a Happy New Year

Wong's Shanghai Restaurant
12420 Biacayne Blvd., No. Miami-891 4313
Health and Happiness to All
Olympia Motel
15701 Collins Ave., Miami Beach 947-6541
Happy New Year
The Frame Factory
1405 West 49 Street, Hialeah-558-0412
Happy New Year
Fu-Manchu Restaurant
325 71 St., Miami Beach866-4303
Happy and Healthy New Year to All
umn
The Ambulatory Centre
8700 Kendall Drive, Miami595-9511
Wishes all its Customers and Friends
A Happy New Year
Central Medical Lab
1801 Coral Way, Miami 856-4363
Happy New Year
Nobewood Furniture
4975 East 10 Avenue, Hialeah-685-5246
Happy New Year
New Year Greetings
Mr. & Mrs. Zev Kogan
and Family
Happy New; Year
Suzanne & Bertram Schild


Page26-B The Jewish Horkiian Friday. September 9, 1983

.
President's Firing of Civil Rights Commission
Members Put Jews in Midst of Impassioned Debate'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President
Reagan's firing of three
members of the United
States Commission on Civil
Rights and naming three
others to replace them has
put four Jewish organiza-
tions, all of them with long
established records in the
civil rights movement, in
the midst of an impas-
sionate national debate.
The controversy has taken on
an additional dimension for the
Jewish groups since one of the
nominees is Morris Abram.
former president of the American
Jewish Committee and of Bran-
deis University, and a New York
lawyer who fought for civil rights
in his native Georgia in the
1960's.
REAGAN HAS argued that be
has a right to replace three com-
mission members. Mary Frances
Berry. Rabbi Murray Saltzman
and Blandina Cardenas Ramirez
as he had two other members of
the commission. He has charged
that the opposition is due to the
rejection by his three nominees of
quotas as a remedy for discri-
mination against Blacks, women
and other minority groups.
Civil rights groups, however,
have charged that Reagan is
seeking to undermine the inde-
pendence of the commission
which has frequently criticized
his policies on civil rights.
All the Jewish groups oppose
quotas. But they differ in the
present controversy. The Anti-
Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith has taken the strongest
position in favor of the Reagan
action, supporting all three
Reagan nominees Abram;
John BunzeL a former president
of San Jose State University:
and Robert Destro. an assistant
professor of law at Catholic
University in Washington as
well as the President's right to
make the changes on the com-
mission.
THE ADL also supports
Reagan's nomination of Linda
Chavez, assistant to the
president of the American
Federation of Teachers, as the
commission's staff director, a
position now open. She was given
a recess appointment by Reagan.
The American Jewish Com-
mittee and the American Jewish
Congress have chiefly argued in
favor of Abram, urging that the
nominations be considered on
their merits. The position of the
three groups has put them in
opposition to the Leadership
Conference on Civil Rights, to
which they belong, which has
called for the Senat* to reject the
three nominations.
The Union of American
Hebrew Congregations (UAHC)
is the only Jewish organization
also to support the rejection of all
the nominees. Saltzman. one of
the ousted commissioners, is a
Reform rabbi in Baltimore.
THE ADL has taken an
aggresive position on the issue
from the beginning. Nathan
Perlmutter, the ADL's national
director, spoke out frequently on
the issue and charged that
"behind the assaults on the
President's nominations, racial
quotas and mandatory busing are
being presented as a litmus test,
a latter-day loyalty oath to
determine one's fealty to civil
rights."
Testifying before the Senate
Judiciary Committee hearing on
the nominations in July. Kenneth
Bialkin, ADL's national chair-
man, noted that "all three
nominees have devoted much of
their professional and personal
efforts to securing basic rights
and liberties for various
disadvantaged minorities in this
country."
But he said the critics have
"narrowly focused on one highly
controversial issue, character-
izing the nominees' opposition to
race-prefereritial quotas as
wholesale abandonment of affir-
mative action and civil rights."
Bialkin stressed that both the
ADL and the nominees' opposi-
tion to quotas have in no way
"diminished" their "support and
struggle for equal opportunity for
all individuals."
IN TESTIFYING before the
same Senate committee. Howard
Friedman, the AJCommittee's
president, also noted that opposi-
tion to Abram centered on his
disapproval of quotas. "Is it not
perfectly clear that his views on
that subject are firmly rooted in
his bedrock commitment to
individual and civil rights?"
Friedman asked.
Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Howard Klein
New Year Greetings
Karen Alexander
Happy New Year
Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Schwartz
While noting that he agrees
with the Leadership Conference
that the commission must retain
its independence. Friedman
stressed that "all three can-
didates have publicly stated their
determination to be independent
and that they have made no com-
mitments to the President in any
specific issues." He said since the
President has acted, the can-
didates should be judged on their
qualifications.
Howard Squadron, president
of the AJCongress, in a letter to
the committee, endorsed Abram
as 'eminently qualified." But he
noted that the President's
"wholesale firing of members of
the Commission indicates an
insensitivity to the feelings of
minority communities, which
have already experienced deep
disappointment at the failure of
this Administration to assign a
higher priority to the enforce-
ment of civil rights."
IN EXPRESSING the
UAHC's opposition to the
nominations. Albert Vorspan. the
Reform group's vice president,
stressed its respect for Abram
and his efforts in the civil rights
struggle.
"It is not the independence and
integrity of the nominees which is
at issue: rather it is the inde-
pendence and integrity of the
commission that is at stake."
Vorspan said. "We firmly believe
that the President's actions will
retard the progress of civil rights
in America." He said if the nom-
inees are confirmed, "the impar-
tiality and the independence of
the U.S. Commission on Civil
Rights will be seriously iinpaj,.
ed ."
This seemed to be the position
of the Democrats on the com
mittee even though the nominees
are all Democrats. Sen. Josenh
Biden (D., Del), the committee1,
ranking Democrat, said that il-
though the nominees had "im-
peccable" credentials he would
vote against them because "at
stake is the independence of the
commission.''
Sen. Howard Metzenbaum ID., i
Ohio) also said he had "no
doubt" about the nominees'
qualifications but that "regar
dless of the merits of the net
appointees, the issue before us
relates directly to the inde-
pendence to the commission."
SQUADRON suggested this
could be assured by passing
legislation "which would
establish in law fixed and stag-
gered terms for all members of
the commission and which would
preclude their dismissal except
for neglect of duty or malfeasance
in office." There is some expedi-
tion that this would be done while
at the same time the Senate
would approve the Reagan ap-
pointees.
But the House, before taking
its summer recess, approved
legislation that would renew the
commission's charter, which
expires September 30. but
stipulated that a- commissioner.
could only be fired for neglect of
duty" or "malfeasance If the
Senate were to approve this
before it confirmed the Reagan |
Continued on Page 27-A
L'SHANAH TOVAH
from
crer syEISENBERG&FAMILY
Join with ns as we mew
again our prayers during tht
figh Ho* ft* to a lasting
thnMifhont tht work)
W ill mankind
"tK -


Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"Give ear, ye heavens, and I will speak; And let the earth hear
the words of my mouth"
(Deut. 32.1).
HAAZINU
HAAZINU Moses' song beginning "Give ear, ye heavens,
and I will speak" contains the principal elements in the unique
relationship between God and his people Israel. Moses opens
with a call to heaven and earth to witness his declaration. From
the beginning of time, Moses asserts, the Lord had chosen Israel
for a special place among the nations of the world. He had first
singled out Israel in the desert, whence he lovingly led them into
the land of Canaan. But Israel, Moses prophesies, would
abandon their God for foreign idols. Then Gold would send a
cruel nation to enslave and torment the children of Israel.
Eventually, however, God would have compassion on His
beloved people and wreak vengeance on Israel's tormentors. All
the nations would then behold how the Lord had avenged the
blood of His servants and had made expiation for the land of His
people. At God's command, Moses prepares to ascend mount
Nebo, in the land of Moab. From there at a distance he is to
glimpse the Promised Land and die; as Aaron had died at mount
Hor. "Because ye trespassed against Me in the midst of the
children of Israel at the waters of Meribathkadesh, in the
wilderness of Zin; because ye sanctified Me not in the midst of
the children of Israel" (Deuteronomy 32.51).
,The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. The volume Is avail-
able at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is
president of the society distributing the volume.)
Chase Federal Offers Information Hotline
IA hotline number offering
(formation on the various
nancial accounts and services
pw available to consumers due
deregulation has been set up
Chase Federal Savings and
an Association. Its new Hot-
Center, located at the As-
Iciation's Dadeland head-
arii-rs. offers information^-"
kAs. NOVVs. CDs. av -*l*
currently on the market.
The Center also answers
questions concerning special
investments, such as KEOGH
plans for professionals an''
businesses, according *- tnc,a
Mennitura, ~aX*T dlrectorjjjj
,,,^i, Callers are confused
about investment options, and
we primarily clarify the choices.
ivum raits rav*
&^*s with the passing y
cars
our minds and wisdom mature
and our outlook on life becomes
more mellow, we pause to offer
thanks for all the blessings
of the past and to wish to
all of our friends
all of the blessings that a
bountiful and merciful God
can bestow
reace of heart ana mina
and gooa fortune tnruout
the coming gear.
iordon Funeral Home
CMAPMfl SOtDON.
Me roJon
i*n>my Toulon
&Ca**ey Woufon
Bar/Bat
Mitzvah
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 27-B
Greenwald
DARREN GREENWALD
Darren Scott Greenwald will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday at Temple Emanu-
El. Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual
leader of the congregation, will
officiate.
The celebrant is a student at
Lehrman Day School, where he
has been named to the Honor
Roll. He also received the Camper
Award at Miami Country Day
School and enjoys playing guitar.
At the ceremony, Mischa
Smeliansky of the USSR, who
has been named Darren's "twin,"
will also become Bar Mitzvah.
Special guetftd will include
grandfather, Arnold Teichler;
great-grandmother, Fanny
Lieberman; great aunt and uncle,
Mr. and Mrs. Max Yo-e
Kansas City- *_ Marcel
Xpi-i-i-. oi Puerto Rico; cousins,
the Mueller family of New York;
cousins, the Leopold family from
New Jersey; aunt and uncle, Mr.
and Mrs. George Stark of
Houston; and Mr. and Mrs.
Schenkel of New York.
A reception will be held in the
Friedland Ballroom at Temple
Emanu-El.
AIMER HOFFMAN
Aimee Hoffman, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Hoffman,
will be called to the Torah as
Bat Mitzvah on Saturday at
Temple Beth Sholom of Greater
Miami. Dr. Leon Kronish will of-
ficiate.
Aimee is a student of the Con-
firmation Class of 5745.
Business Note
Members of the national and
local vending machine industry
will gather at a reception in sup-
port of the State of Israel Bonds
Organization and to honor James
T. McGuire, president and chief
executive officer of the Canteen
Corporation Monday. Sept. 19 at
the Standard Club, Miami.
Van E. Meyers, president and
chief executive officer of Worn-
etco Enterprises, Inc. and a na-
tional Israel Bonds co-chairman
for the event, said many industry
members will be attendance to
pay tribute to McGuire.
Firings Put Jews
In Midst of
National Debate
Continued from Page 26-A
nominations it would mean that
Reagan would not be able to
remove the three commissioners
he wants replaced.
The controversy could have
provided a real opportunity for
discussing the issues of quotas
and mandated busing and
whether they can accomplish the
goals of a more equal society, or if
not, what should be done. But so
far more heat than light has been
shed, and with the Presidential
election little more than a year
away reasoned discussion cannot
be expected. For the Jewish com-
munity this could mean further
exacerbation of the tense situa-
tion that alrealdy exists between
it and some parts of the Black
community.
Synagogue
Listing
Candlellghtlng
I Time: 7:12 p.m.
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN '
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Slmchs Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Ftl., 7:1 Bom, Sabbath EvaSarrtcaa.
Sat.. :30 am. Sabbath Sarvlcaa.
Sat.. KM om. Minolta
Sunday. 30 im and :30 pm
Monday thru Friday, 7:J0 am and 6:30 pm
OI
TEMPLE BETr AM Or. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
Fri., i:15 pm, Rabbi Jiirm Simon to preach
on "Atoning Forth. Sin. of Saxl.m"
Sal., |M am, Torah Sarvtc, Sal Mrtnah of
Mk Cook. 11:1S am. Torah Samoa.
BETH DAVID COwontQATION
Coral wrS.W.3rdAirafaja /,*
inB.d. 7S00SW t20th Streat J(
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACHY.
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Coral Way
IM^Srllaiii.taiiaMailaiitiSailiiartth
ftaWM DM4 H. Auaraao* and Cantor WSRam
W. Upaon. Torah
Friiraafca^awMrtllwIriliiajWiiidi
ft,tpw,alaaaHSanSllilllll.
6sCTsa\r
BETH KODtSH
Modem Traditional
1101 S.W.I 2 A...
Rabbi Man Shapiro 858 6334
Canter Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-executive Secretary
Sunday Santo
-dam and a* pm
TEMPLE EMANU EL .-=.
1701 Washington Avenue f($t>\\
Miami Beach Vv ? '/
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi ^'
Zvl Adler, Cantor
\.\
Sabbat Shuvah
8enrlee at 9 am
\ In Temple Sanctuary
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
24C0 Pinetree Orive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Raboi Solomon Schif I
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Greater Miami
met Pion.tr Ht'orm Congrtgatron
37 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
fc990 N, Kendall Dr.. 595 5055
rtaskeil M. Bernat, Senior Rabbi
Donald P. Cashman, Assistant Rabbi
Jacob G. Bomsteln, Cantor
Rachelle Nelson, Student Cantor
Philip Goldln, Exec. Dlr.
Frl. S pm. Downtown, Rabol Haakall Bomat
will conduct.
Kandall. AaalatantBan** Donald Caahman:
"Or> flapantanea."
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Elsenstat. Rabbi
Fit. M am, aaMMa Santeaa. anakaa* Shumtv
Waaary Torah portionOlWIIIWIIJ tfcl-tl
Haltarah Moaoa i*J-10; attoah 7:t a-,
JoounnT.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Ad. Tel. 534-9776
OR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Danny Tadmore, Cantor
*>1.. 7:30 pm
Sat.l30.rn
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer AbrarnowSt //
Cantor Murray Yavneh \ (
n Mamma Samcaa-S aaa.S
ryat.mlngS.rTtoa.-V
.-
e

aybrentagl
-7:44 pm.
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2228 NE 121 St. N.Miami, Fl 33181
891 5508 Conservative
Only Temple In North Miami
Cantor Moshe FrisdTer
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Qorf ink.i
Daily services 8:15 a m 5 pm.
TEMPLE NERTAMID
FfUSpm,
Sat,tam,a*
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jellerson Ave.. M.B. f 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Or. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nisslm Benyamlhl
Wna.....ram earn lnOMaaa.
llllUll ailillaal......taWaa,
7902 Carlytm Ave.,
Ml.ml Beach 33141
Rsbbl Eugene Labovttr
IC.ntorEXa^K^^
\
athS.
imkdSi
ataaoat
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651 1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
!
TEMPLE BETH SHOLO,
Chase Ave. 41 st St. 538 7231
Dr. Leon ronlsh, Rabbi Liberal
C; -tor Oavld Conviser
Frt. an am, WaaalFaal Caglm tana
*)' Exanun VaurOarnSaW Fmt"
lm-nMmm,9Mltm*%mmMeeme,
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1081 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Or. Max A UpacMtz, Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
, Final *aah Haahanah attnoha
BETH YOSESEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Rozencwalg, Rabbi
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Blacayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schlf I
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone_576-4000
Rabbinical Association Otllce
SHAARETEFILLAH OF KENDALL
S.W.I 54 Ave. and 75 St.
RabW Warren Kasxtl
Moo#fn Orthodox
392-3343 382-0999
TEMPLE SINAI 19901 NE 22 Ave.
North Oade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Klngc>y. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkea, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
_ Friday.fcllpm. VA*Npa.
LTarahpanaanH
maaftjaaiais-ir.
t**tO;
TEMPLE 2IION
8000 Miller Or
Coneervative
271-2311
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi,
a^n^rninAdasr. Cantor TJ
i SNaV*3
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
an a i
soTasat.
FfoaaaaOXnwt^.raa^aaalaa
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park, 3785
NW 82 Ave.. Suite 210. Miami. Fl.
33166. 592-4792. Rabbi Lewi* C.
Llttmar., regional director
^^aWaaaas-awa-aaajsaj


Page28-B The Jewish Floridkn / Friday, September 9,1983
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CAM No 81-11227 C A-II
9.D.A. CORP .
Plaintiff
THEODORE WILLIAMS
ETALS..
Defendant
NOTICE BT
PUBLICATION
TO:
A Unr*!2 k i
Anthony D I
(104 3 W MkMn<
North!
I
nn
a-k-a Andrea C Masses*
8104S W 2aTaf*reet
North L*i*5rdajf Flnrissi
TOU A !iiTT AB-
thony D kwB and Jbb-
Belli, hat wife, a-k-e ABatae C
that eoenpiasnt to
mortgage on the toDowtag de-
scribed property
Lot Forthy-Frre 48 and
Lot Forty-Stz i46 Block Four
4 HENRT FORD SUBDIVI-
SION NUMBER TWO accord-
laf to the Plat thereof, re-
corded IB Pa-. Book Nine 8 at
Pace One Huudied Nineteen
i lit of the Puboc Record* of
Dade County Florida
baa beer, flied agaur-s*. you and
you are required to aerre a
copy of your answer or
paaadlrg thereto apsa EXatot L
MOer ** Arthur Godfrey
Road Suite SB. Wuu Beach.
Florida SJ140 and file the orat.
daI answer or pesadSng with the
Clark of thla Coulrt oo or before
the 23 day of September. 1983
If you fail to do or. .'udgrner.t
by default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded
hi the amended complaint
Dated August 22 1981
RICHARD P BRINKER
Qerk of the Above
aty led Coulrt
by: D. C. Bryant
Deputy Clerk
August 26:
September2. 9. 16 IMS
12206
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case Ne 81-1)652
?4 RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DEBORAH L FOSTER.
Wife
And
DARRELL FOSTER.
Huaband
TO: DARRELL FOSTER
Residence Addreaa:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN !
TOU ARE NOTIFIED that I
an action lor dissolution of
marriage haa been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq.. 16488
N.W. 7th A varan. Suite 205
Miami. Florida mss. on or
before September 23. 18*3 and
Ble the original with the Clerk
of thla Court either before
service on Petitioner's at-
torney or immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you lor
the relief rtsmsadsl ka fa*
DATED: August la. imb
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Clrcutt Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: D.C BRYANT
i
turn
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTTV1SBRV1CB J
(NOPRORRRTY)
IN THR CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN '
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
ClvH AcfNM N4L s9-2**M
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
NESTOR R AT ALA.
PeUOoorr
ad
OLTMPIA AT ALA
TO OLTMPIAATALA
* Mission Street
SanFranctoro
rarrmriua _____
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dtaao-
of Marriage ha* been
yon and you are
lo serve a copy of your
a. If any to It on
LAWRENCE M SHOOT eaq
eaarary aw Peatjoner whoae
addreaa N Saw)Bwxavjrae Bred..
Sub* No HA aQaaal Flortda
SSiT" and fOe the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court ob or beam September
2A IMS. otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be pubUahed
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Fjonda on this 23 day of Au-
gust 1883
RICHARDP BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
Byrat Shaw
A t^r- clerk
, Circuit Court Seal
Lawrence M Snoot. Eaq
3000 Blscsyne Blvd. No 335
Miami. Florida S313T
Telephone: (SOU 87S-6010
Attorney for Petitioner
uirr August*.
September 2. >. 16. IMS
NOTICE OF ACT KM
(NOPROPERTY)
l N T H E CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AMD FOR
DADE COUNTY, F LOR I DA
FAMILY DIVISION
Caws ttaVl swwawsf FC11
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF i
MARCO J. MORALES A

JEANETTE T. MORALES
TO: JEANETTET MORALE I
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.S3-112M
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE The Marriage of:
BERTHA GUERRA
Peauoner-Wtfe.
and ____
ARNALDO RIVERA,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: ARNALDO RIVERA
T27 24 St-
Urdon City, New Jersey
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses If any. to
It on Leopotdo A Ochoe
Attorney for Petitioner, whoae
addreaa la 156 South Miami
Avenue. Penthouse One,
Miami. Ftortda SUM. and Ble
the original with the clerk of.
the above styled court on or
before October 14. IMS;
otherwise a default will be'
entered against you tor the
relief demanded to the com-
plsirit or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each weak tor four con-
secutive weeks tat THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
MINUS my hand and the
of said court at "'
awl day of
N
JTIOM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIECUITCOURTOF
THE ELE VE NTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. SJ-11 Ml
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLU
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE The Marriage of
OUaAHAWLET
Petitioner Wife
and
JOSEPH HA WLET
Respondent -Husband
TO: Joseph Hawiey
Route B. Box 240
Henderson. No Carolina
Saw .
TOC ARE HEREBT NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
DtasotutSon of your Marriage
baa been filed and commenced
m thla court and you art
required to serve a copy of your
written deft ran i. If any, to ft on
LLOTD M ROUTMAN Eaq .
attorney tor Petitioner, whoae
address la 111 N.E 82nd St.
Miami FL SATS and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
October T. ltd: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8th day of
September. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
Ai Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit i.i s^_j
LLOYD M ROUTMvnx
181NE S3nd St.
Miami. FL 33138
Telephone 757-6800
12253 September 9. 16.
23. 30. 1M3
marrlags haa been file
against you and you an re
qusred to aerve a copy of you
wrtttaa detonass, Many, to Ho
NOTICE I
FICTITIOUS I
NOTICE IS
GIVEN that the
arto Realty at SSs SWI
IT.
FTs 88174
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-31385
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ILIODES JOSEPH.
Petitioner Husband
and
EDITH JOSEPH.
Respond.-nt-Wlfe
TO: EDITH JOSEPH
Respondent
C-O: Pasteur Ellma
Henry
Boca Pa trio
Anas Rouge. Haiti. West
Indies
TOU ARE HEREBT NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlaaol-
utlon of Marriage haa been
filed against you and you an
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
LLOTD M. ROUTMAN,
ESQUIRE. attorney for
Petitioner, whoae addreaa Is
181 N.E. 83 Street. Miami. FL
33138. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before October 7.
IMS: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or pennon.
This notice shall be published
bt four con-
THE JEW-
ISH FLORID LAN
By hand and the I
of said court at
6 day of
FICTITIOUS
NOTICE IS
GIVEN Oast the
to
LAW
HEREBT
MUTER CONSULTANTS,
IMC. dba FRJJENDLT 'THRIFT
I. at
r. N Miami. FL, ton
PRIVATE FOUNDATION
_ ANNUAL REPORT
tof the art
rTheADanH
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Nwtoewasr 83-7178
tNvtaasawt
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA DAMANT
Deceaaad
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED Di,
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
VTJED that the administration
of the estate of ANNA
DAMANT. deceased. File
Number 83-7170. Is pending In
the Circuit Court tor Dade
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the addreaa of which'la 78
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130 The personal
representative of the estate Is
URSULA METZGER-WEL-
LISCH. whoae addreaa la 11875
SW 73rd Are Miami. Florida
33156 The name and addreaa of
the personal repreaentatlve'a
attorney are set forth below
Paul R Stanton. Welllsch
and Metsger. PA 181 Almerta
Ave Suite 200-E. Coral Gab-
les FL 33134
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WTTHIN" THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and addreaa of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due. the daft when It
""* hecome due shall be
stated. It .~- .,.,_ u oontm.
gent or unllqulcU^- th^
nature of the uncertainty shan
be stated If the claim is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration haa
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decadent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL ra.Aiwrn DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WTLL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Admlnlstrs-
tlon: September* 1983
URSULA
METZGE R WE LLISCH
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ANNA DAMANT
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
RE PRE SENTATI VE:
PAUL R. STANTON
WELLISCHAND
METZGER. P.A.
161 Almerta Ave.,
Suite 200-E
Coral Gables. Fla. SUM
Telephone: (808)448-78*4
12J4S September 8.16. 1883
NOTICR OF ACTION
(NOPROPERTY)
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AMD FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASENO.:8J-lwU
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
PATRICIA GLOVER,
.If-.
ANTHONT GLOVER.
HUSBAND
TO: ANTHONT GLOVER
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
marriage haa bees filed
NOTICE OF CLAIM OF
LIEN AND PROPOSED
SALE OF VEHICLE
TO: DAVID RODRIGUEZ
Manrtquesn
Havana. Cuba
TO: Clerk of Circuit Court
71 Watt Flagler Street
Miami. Dade County. FL
Pursuant to Flortda Statutes
Section 713.580. the Llanor.
Cubanahtne Frame and Body
Shop, Inc.. 178) Northeast 29th
Street. Miami. Florida 88187.
will enforce Its lien on the
following vehicle for labor and
materials plus reasonable
storage charges In the amount
Of Seven TliWssaiHl Seven
Hundred Sixty (I7.7S0.OO)
Dollars, plus Interest by public
sale at 12:00 Noon on October
17. 1SSS. at 170 Northeast 29th
Street. Miami. Florida. Any
person claiming an Interest in
said vehicle, Including the last
known owner may redeem the
vehicle from the Lien by
paying the above amount to the
Llenor or may recover
possession by posting a bond In
accordance with Florida
Statutes 568 917
Interested persons may
request a hearing prior to the
sale by filing a Demand with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court In
Dade County, claiming an
Interest In said vehicle. Any
proceeds of the sale remaining
after satisfaction of the Lien
plus storage charges, coat of
publication and other chargea
win be deposited with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court pursuant to
Florida Statute Section
713 585(11 ill A description of
the vehicle Is as follows:
l96 Jeep. Identification
Number: MD 123532
A copy of the aforementioned
Notice of Claim of Lien and
Proposed Sale of Vehicle haa
been sent to the above named
addressees by certified
registered mall this 30th day of
August. 1983.
IsM^mjE"-*".
Suite 206 "trway
Coral Gables. FL3S146
By: VIVIAN MORAN. ESQ.
Attorney for the Llenor
Cuban shine Frame
and Body Shop. Inc.
12246 September 9. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name
SOUTH FLORIDA AUTOMOT-
IVE DISTRIBUTORS at BAY
FS. 5887 S W 21st Street. W
Hollywood. Florida 33023 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
STANLEY E GOODMAN
Attorney for JET AUTO
PARTS WHAREHOUSE DIS-
TRIBUTORS. INC.
12200 August 26:
September 2, 8 16 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUOous name
VTVARI at 15720 SW 80th
Avenue. Miami. Flortda 881B7.
intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Flortda.
Antofueta B. de ananass*
Clartxa PassJodos
Monteerrat Watson
LESTER ROGERS. P JL
Attorney for
VTVARI OF ITALY. INC.
1484 N W 17th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 31120
Saptember8.lt.
. 28.89.1981
NOTICSONDRR
FICTITKJUS NAME LAW
^SI?0* tt HRRJtBT
GIVEN (feat Qm ujMfera,--.,,
dsalrmg to
i Mr.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE St7|Ca
(NOPROPERTY, C*
IN THE CIRCUIT C0URT0*
TRBll^lNTHjOWr,.!
CIRCUIT OF FLORItR
AND FOR DADE COUNT,
CIVIL ACTION Y
NO. 63-11011
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTioi,
OF MARRIAGE*
m RE :Trw Marriage of
MERCEDES ESC0T0
CUBASDENEAL
Penooner
and
OSCAR OREGORI0
NEALDELGADO,
Respondent
TO: OSCAR GREGORI0
NEALDELGADO
^Gladys owita.
Barrio San MarUn
Oolorua Sltraenp
CaaaNo. 48-B
Puerto Cortes,
Honduras. C.A
TOU ARE HREEBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage haj
been filed against you and aw
are required to serve i copy of
your written defenses. If any -
It on MELVIN J ASHER
ESQ.. attorney for Petition*
whose address Is 1S50 S W gtn
Street, Suite 206. Miami
Florida 33138. and file U
original with the clerk of o
above styled court on or before
October 7. 1983: otherwise i
default will be entered again*
you for the relief demanded a
the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and lot
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 1st day o(
September, 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal I
12242 September!. II,
23 1C ISM
-he Clark of the
C^^Coart of Dad. County.
**roaen Foode, Inc..
DATED
RICHARDP
Clark of
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBT
OIVEN that the
to
A
SEWING SERVICE, at UTS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In buslnta
^jr the fictitious name EJ
9Ul*.4lTO SUPPLY at (Li
EE2* 52 ""lead, to r*p>
ter saw] name -m,. ._4 nrlo(
the Clrojit Court of DadVl, "
ty. Florida *
Rlcarco Estrada
12230 J->tember:.l;l
23 1M|
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREB
GIVEN that the undersigns! j
desiring to engage :r buslnes I
under the flcUuous r.ame L I
lmo. Inc at 211* N E lSal
Street. N Miami FLinterxksl
register said name with Ml
Clerk of the Circuit Court a|
Dade County. Florida
Morris YcUcson
Lulu Ycikson
GuUlermoSostchln Esq
Attorney for Lullmo. Inc
1401W Flagler St
Suite 201
Miami. FL S313S ,
12233 September!.!;!
lt.a.1811
NOTICR OF ACT ION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICI
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT0'.
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL'
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDAI"
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
ClvMAttoaN4X8)-llW
FAMILY DIVISIONI
ACTION FOR 0ISSOLUTI0I
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
TOMAS A. TRELLES.
CATAUM A CAMPOS
SANDRA.
TO: CATALINA CAMPOS
ZAMORA
N0.U81
iMjrM
Habana Cuba ^.s
TOU ARE HEREBT NOBJ
FTXD that aa bwbwSRR""
tuttoa of Marriage hat
you and y*'
,aeopyo _______,,___tfaay.**;
L.YW J. AStatR.
w-tolafSW^8J
sB.matM#ainortd8l
t*Ml lias oflSBW^r"*,,
A*CaBffcClriJ
sto^P.CastoM-*
*


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 29 B
Mc Notice
NOTICE UNDER >
FICTITIOUS NAWE LAW .
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
deilrtng to engage I" business
under the fictitious name of
MEDICAL CONDO EN-
TERPRISES, a Florida
General Partnerahlp at No. 700
. K8-7eth St. Cauaeway, In the'
CJty of Miami, Florida. Intend*
(o register the aald name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dide County. Florida
Dated at Miami, Florida. thU
joth day of July. 1868
P0L1EX TRADING N.V.
M-G DEVELOPERS. INC.
BELESE
INVESTMENTS. INC.
DANIEL RETTER. ESQ.
Attorney for Applicant
OneS.E Third Ave. No.2280
Miami. Florida 83131-1777
12223 September 2, 0;
________16.23,18
IN fMECIRCUIT COURT
FOR
,DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83-7110
Division 04
QN RE: ESTATE OF
MILDRED SMALL.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
state of MILDRED SMALL,
ceased. File Number 83-7110,
pending In the Circuit Court
h>r Dade County, Florida.
robate Division, the address
t which Is Dade County Court-
ouae. 73 West Flagler Street,
lanii FL 33130. The names
nd addresses of the personal
presentatlve and the per-
al representative's attorney
* set forth below.
All Interested persons are
quired to file with this court,
IN THREE MONTHS OF
E FIRST PUBLICATION
iF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
ilalms against the estate and
2) any objection by an In-
rested person to whom notice
as mailed that challenges the
alldlty of the will, the quail
cations of the personal rep-
lentatlve. venue, or Jurls-
ctlon of the court.
L CLAIMS AND OB-
CTIONS NOT SO FILED
ILL BE FOREVER
RRED.
Publication of this Notice has
gun on September 2.1888.
Personal Representative:
JACK SMALL
MB Ocean Drive
Miami Beach, FL 831SB
ttomey for Personal
epresentatlve:
rber, Shevln, Rosen. Shapo
dHellbronner, P.A.
ie Southeast Third Ave..
ml, FL 33131
lephone: (3081368-7880
September 2.8.1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
given that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name TER-
IESA LIVING FACILITY at
|1M5 W 23 Street. Hlaleah -
33012 Intends to register
Jsald name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
|Florlda.
MIRTA TERESA
r GUTIERREZ
L September]. 8:
_______________16,88.188S
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
EIVe.N that the undersigned.
Effing, to engage In business
MM the fictitious name of 302
*et at number SOS N.W.
wi Avenue. In the City of
lam I, Florida, Intends to rag-
pier the said name with the
gn of the Circuit Court of
MMe County, Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
hdayof July. 1883.
j Anthony M. Recuast. Owner
AuguatSS;
Septembers. 8. IS. 1888
|^'""JiOUIMAMBLAw
Mr*0*. I8 HEREBY
NEN that the undersigned.
7JVn buatnaa.
r thsaeUttoui name TUR
***FT INTERIOR at
-^M7. Opa-Locka Air-
Opa-Locta. FTa. SSOMIn-
S D*d" Oom/hf, Florida.
AJtOKUORTUKOwmr
Augusts*:
$*** the u2r2SI
r to angage In buataaea
** fictitious name
tat iX^** * *
tit Hlaleah, ria. tsoii>
nth tht ?* 9*
S.6.
1, Si. IBM
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No. 81-13181
8.D.A. CORP.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
EUGENE J. FDO.EY,
ETALS.,
Defendant,
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
TO:
i Anthony D. I arm*111
8104 3.W.20th8treet
North Lauderdale, Florida
...Iannelll, his wife
a-k-a AndreaC. imIM
8104 S.W. 20th Street
North Lauderdale, Florida
YOU, Anthony D. Iannelll
and ....Iannelll, his wife a-k-a
' Andrea C. Iannelll are hereby
notified that a complaint to
foreclose a mortgage on the
following described property:
The West Sixty and Forty-
Seven Hundredths (60.47) feet
>l the South one-half Tract Eight (8), Revised Plat
of WEST LITTLE RIVER, ac-
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded In Plat Book Thirty
Four (34), Page Nineteen (18),
of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida. Also known as
1883 N.W. 81 Street. Miami,
Florida.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your answer or plead-
ing thereto upon Elliot L. Mil-
ler, 828 Arthur Godfrey Road,
Suite 308, Miami Beach. Flor-
ida 33140 and file the original
ana we r or pleading with the
Clerk of this Court on or before
the 23 day of September, 1888.
If you fall to do so, Judgment
by default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In
the amended complaint.
Dated: August22.1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the above
styled Court
by: D.C.Bryant
Deputy Clerk
12208 August 28;
September 2, 8, 18, 1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
Banyan Bay Cafe; Banyan Bay
Convenience Store at 708 N.E.
84th Street. Miami. FL 88188 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
BASIL MANAGEMENT AND
ASSOCIATES. INC.
BY: Barry Resnick.
President
12228 Septembers, 8;
16,38,1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
BROTHERS CHEMICAL
CORP at number 8500 NW 78
Ave Bay 8, In the City of
Hlaleah Garden, Florida, In-
tends to register the said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami Dade.
Florida, this 32 day of August.
1888
Eduardo Esqulvel
12226 September 2,8.
16.23,1888
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-2*777
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LILLIAN LUQUIS.
Petitioner,
and
GILBERTO RODRIGUEZ.
Respondent.
TO: GILBERTO RODRIGUEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
MELVEN J. ASHER. ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is I860 g.W. 8th Street,
Suite SO*, Miami, Florida 83188,
and Hie the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 38.
1883: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
1 plaint or petition
WTTNE 88 my hand and the
seal of MM court at Miami.
Florida on this 38 day of Au-
gust, 18S. ___________
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A* Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clartnda Brown
As Deputy Clark
(Circuit Court Seal)
111 AuguatSS:
September S.*.1*,1*M
I NOTICE OF ACTION
' CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERT Y)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
I THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
I CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
i NO. ii Mast
I ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
| OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
GILD A VILLA VICENCIO.
Petitioner.
and
LUIS E. VILLAVICENCIO.
Respondent.
TO: LUISE. VILLA-
VICENCIO
Callejon Magallanes
No. 118
Guayaquil, Ecuador
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on M. CTRISTTNA DEL-
VALLE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 88
Grand Canal Drive, Third
Floor, Miami, Florida 88144,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 80,
1883; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my band and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 38th day of
August, 1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12221 September 2.8.
16. 23,1883
I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. iJ 224
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAGLER FEDERAL
SAVINGS A LOAN ASSOCIA-
TION OF MIAMI, a United
States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ERNESTO PULIDO
TAMAYO.etal.,
Defendants.
TO: ERNESTOPULTDO
TAMAYOand
MILAGROS PULIDO,
his wife
Ave. Leonardo
Da Vine I No. 8
Bello Monte
EdlfFaure
Caracas. Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a mort-
gate on the following described
property In Dade County. Flor-
ida:
Lot 32, Block 8, of THIRD
ADDITION TO CALUSA CLUB
ESTATES, according to the
Plat thereof, as recorded In
Ptat Book 103. at Page 78. of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses.
If any. to It on KEITH, MACK,
LEWIS A ALLISON, Plaintiff's
Attorneys whose address Is 111
N.E. First Street, Miami, Flor-
ida 33132. on or before Septem-
ber 23, 1883, and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorneya or Immediately
thereafter: otherwise, a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on the 18 day of
August. 1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: Arden Wong
Deputy Clark
11184 Augusts*,;
September 2, 8,16,1*88
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IB HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name IN-
LAND INDUSTRIAL PROP-
ERTIES at 2111. 2121 2181
N.W. 138th Street, Opa Locks.
Florida 88064 Intends to regis-
ter said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida
Monte Frledkln and
Carol Joyce Friedman,
d-b-a Inland Industrial
Properties, a partnerahlp
Nelson A Feldman, P.A.
Attorneys for Applicant
12204 August 36;
September 3. 8,16.1888
tH
NOYica unDbr
FlCTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name HAL-
LANDALE REALTY ASSOCI-
ATES at T77 BrlckeU Avenue.
Suite TO*. Miami, Florida 88181
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of th. Circuit
<>xirt of Dade County, Florida.
8AMTEJCHMAN
BOLTEICHMAN
SIDNEY SCHWARTZ
BERNARD ELEFANT
DAVTD STEINBERG
VICTOR SABO
RUDOLPH WBINSTE IN
UELCHIORHAUER
ERNEST BRICK
FRED SCHWARTZ
SIDNEY TEICHMAN
BENJAMIN SABO
JOSHUA D. MAN ASTER, ES-
QUIRE
Attorney
111*1 Augusts*;
September 3.8,16. IBS*
IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: (3-1*471
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
. (NO PROPERTY)
INRE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
VILMA BADELT,
Petitioner,
vs.
JOSEPH BADELT.
Respondent.
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: Joseph Badelt
208 Sem Avenue
Toronto, Ontario
Canada M6R1K2
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED, that a Petition for Dis-
solution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on R. A.
del Pino, Esq., Attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is 1401
West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida. Suite 201 and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above styled Court on or before
September 28. 1888; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This Notice shall be pub-
lished one each week for four
(4) consecutive weeks in the
: JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami,
gust. 1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: Clartnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
R. A. del Pino
1401 West Flagler St.
Miami, Florida 38188
Telephone: (806)648-4411
Attorney for Petitioner
11188 August28;
______Septembers. 8,16.188*
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE ClRCUIT COURT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
> FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 83-2**54
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
INRE:
SALVATORE BUFFA
and
GIULIA MISTRETTA
BUFFA
TO: Glulla Mlstretta
Buffa
Via Francesco Co 11a No. 6
Palermo. Italy
YOU ARE NOTTFrED that
an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
defenses on AI.EC ROSS, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 16400 N.E. 18 Are.,
Miami, FL 88163, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above court on or before
September 16, 1888; otherwise
default will bo entered
against you.
WITNESS my hand and seal
at Miami. Florida on August IS,
186*.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARTNDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11174 August IS, SS;
September 2,8.1*83
'
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
TNI ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DAD! COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO.tHMM
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOl
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
UREOORIO SANTANA.
Husband,
and
ANA GLORIA SANTANA.
Wife.
TO: ANA GLORIA
SANTANA
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
it on ALBERT L. CARRI-
CARTE, P.A., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2481 N.W. 7th Street. Miami,
Florida 88136, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 16. 1883; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you tor the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
ice each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 18th day of
August, 1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N.A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
, Attorney for Petitioner:
Albert L. Cari-lcarte. P.A.
2481 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 88136
Telephone: (806)648-7817
11188 August 18.36;
September 3.8,1888
pen
i one
.sec
_i_
IN THB CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
No. II 1*6*1,
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
FRITZ ETTENNE,
Petitioner husband.
and I
MONA ETTENNE,
Respondent-wife,
TO: MONA ETTENNE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY re-
quired to file your answer to
the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the
above Court and serve a copy
thereof upon the petitioner's
attorneys, COHEN A COHEN.
622 S. W. 1st Street, Miami.
Fla. 88180. on or before Sep-
tember SO, 1888, or else petition
will be confessed.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court, at Miami.
Dade County, Florida, this 23
day of August, 1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By Clartnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
12208 August 26;
September 2. 8,18, 1883
UfVBNTN CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. (3-2*4*4
INRE: The Marriage of:
STL VINA DOBDSZEW8KI,
Petitioner Wife.
and
THOMAS DOBISZEWSKI,
To:
THOMAS DOBBZEWSKI.
Residence unknown.
shall serve copy of your
swer to the Petition for D
lutlon of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attor-
ney. 613 N.W. ISth Avenue.
Miami. Florida. SUSS, and file
original with Court Clark on or
38, 1*88.
otherwise a default will be so-
tared.
August 18.1*88
RICHARD BRINKER
ByC.P.Copsland
111*6 August**;
.It.
IN THECIRCUIT COURT OF -
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 83 45
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
C.KNARO A. DIAZ.
Petitioner,
vs.
GLADYS GATTCA DIAZ,
Respondent.
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
, TO: GladysGaUcaDlas
I CalleCaopoUcan
483 Villa Alemana.
Chile V Region
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED, that a Petition for Dis-
solution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this Court and you are required
' to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on Rogello
, A. del Pino, Esq., Attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
STONE, SOSTCHIN A OON-
ZALES, 1401 West Flagler
Street. Suite 301. Miami, Flor-
ida, and file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled
Court on or before September
36, 1883; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief prayed for In the
complaint or petition.
This Notice shall be pub-
lished one each week for four
(4) consecutive weeks in the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami,
Florida, on this 18 day of Au-
gust. 1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: K.Shaw
A* Deputy Clark
(Circuit Court Seal)
STONE. SOSTCHIN A
GONZALEZ, P.A.
R. A. del Pino. Esq.
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33186
Attorney for Petitioner
1U8S AuguatSS;
S*pt*borl,*,l*.iSSs
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name CEN-
TRO SEVILLANO RESTAU-
RANT at 4848 N.W. 7th Street.
Miami, Florida 33126 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Cafeterias Dlversas
Incorporated
Nathaniel L. Barone, Jr.
Attorney for Applicant
6361 Sunset Drive
So. Miami, Florida 33148
11188 August 26;
September 2.8,16,1888
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
I THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 63-2*057 FC 27
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
RICARDO SOTO. HU8BAND
and
I ASUNCION GON-
ZALEZ CAPELLAN DE
SOTO
RESIDENCE ADDRESS:
ALF-DIAZ
SANCHIZ64-ATICO
ALICANTE,
ESP ANA (SPAIN)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown. ESQ.. 18480
N.W. 7th Avenue, Suite 206,
Miami, Florida 88168. or on be-
fore September 37,1888 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or lm-
medlatelyr thereafter; other-
wise a Default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the Petition.
DATED: August 17,1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By:K. Selfried
as Deputy Clerk
11187 August 36;
Septembers, 8,16,1868
AFFIDAVIT UNDBR
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORID A
COUNTY OF DADE
The undersigned, under oath,
says; R la th* lntsptton of Ok*
<0
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
JOMI HOMES at number 1187
W. 40 Place. In the City of Hla-
leah, Florida, Intends to regis-
ter th* said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
17th day of August, IMS.
Joml Investments. Inc.
By: Joel Banes, President
Antonio Torrent, Jr.
Attorney for Applicant
Stone, Snatrtitn a Qon*ales,
PA.
1401 W.riaglor SL.Ste 201
Miami, Florida SUM
AuguatSS;
September 2, 6,1*. 1*83
fictitious name Of DIAL PAGE
located at S8 West Flagler
Street In the city of Coral Gab-
les, Dade County. Florida
Those Inters**sd In said *n-
Itarprlse. and the extend of th*
of each, to sa follows:
10* percent
JoyA-r
Attorney: Marun Starr
not South Dtxle Highway
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that Ok*
to angata k* I
the fictitious
at 18*06-
. Opa
' to
with the
Clerk of 0k* Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Montorrlortlto.il ha
lA
[I Attorney
P.A.
Septembers.*;
16.SS, IMS
AugustM;
s.t.u.ms
m keg


Page 30-B The Jewish FToridian Friday. September 9. 1963
Public Notice^
NOTICE Off ACT KM
CONSTRUCTIVE SEVICE '
|HOOffTYI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 0^ '
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
Civil ActHa No. 63-1AM6
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE Th Marriage of
RON MESHTLAM
Petitioner
and
TANA MESHULAM
Respondent
TO Tana Meahtsam
Residence Unknown
TOL' ARE HEREBT NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage baa been
filed niWl you and ye*, are
required to aerre a copy of your
written defense* tf any to it OB
Marva Gay attorney tor Pea-
?oner whose address la '.27W
So. DUO* Highway Miami
Florida MOT and HI* the orlgJ-
nai with the dark of the above
styled court on or batore Sep-
tember N. lass mhaiaiaa a
default will be entered again*
yoo tor the relief demanded to
the complaint or petition
Ttoa notice shall be pnhrlahed
sstuBn weeks
DH FLORID IAN
WITNESS my
aaal of sai
Florida on Una:
RICHARD P BRINKER
A* Clerk Qreatt Court
Dad* Canty.
By DC
Ad Deouty Clerk
lOreuM Court Seel)
Marva Gay
NATIONAL LAW FIRM OF
GERALD KAISER. PC
12236 So Dixie Hlgbwsy
Miami. Florida M1M
Attorney tor Petitioner
'3.8:
notice of action
constructive service
(no property)
inthecircuitcourtof;
the eleventh judicial1
circuit of florida, in .
and for dadecounty '
civil actkni
HO. 83-3*47*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE. The Marriage of
MANUEL ALFARO.
Huaband
and
ROSA ALFARO.
Wife
TO: ROSA ALFARO
Villa FaUma
Call* 20 No 1772
Barrto Comibol.
La Pax. Bolivia
TOU ARE HEREBT NOTI-
FIED that an action tor
Dtoaohitton of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on ALBERT L CARRI-
CARTE. P.A.. attorney tor
Petitioner, whoae addraaa la
2481 N.W. 7th Street, Miami.
Florida 33128. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above atyled court on or before
October 7, 1983. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you tor the relief demanded In
the com plain t or petition.
Thla notice shall be published
once each week tor tour con-
secutive weeks to THE JEW
1SH FLORID IAN
WTTNESS my hand and the
aaal of said court at Miami,
Florida on thla fMh day of
August, law.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
AS Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner,
Albert L Carrl carte. PA
2481 N.W 7th Street
Miami. Florida teat*
Septembers, a,
it, a. im
AFFIDAVITUNDR
FICTITIOUS
NAMESTATUTE
STATS OF FLORIDA
COUNTTOFDADE
as:
The undersigned, under oath,
says: It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage la a
bus In ess enterprise under the
fictitious name of ALL FLOR-
IDA COMMUNICATIONS CO.
located at MM Wast Flagler
Street In the city of Coral Gab
lea. Dade County. Florida
Those Interested Is said en-
terprise, and the extend of the
Interest of each, la as foUows:
Interest 100 percent
Joy A Miller
MM West F lagler Street
Coral Gables. Florida Ml to
Attorney: Martin Starr
FTOB South Dixie Highway
Miami. Fla. M1M-MM
122M September 3. f;
16, M. IMS
IN THE CIRCUIT COUNT
POT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
BUM
1
IN RE ESTATE OF
MAX LEPOW
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of MAX LEPOW
deceased File Number S3-TOSS
is pending in the Circuit Court
tor Dade County Florida.
Probate Drruaon. the address
of which is 73 West Flagler
Street Miami. Florida 33130
The -iT.H and aiMrissaa of
the personal i 686 tsentativt
and the personal represent-
stive s attorney are set forth
below
All interested persons are
required to file wttt this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE fl all
claims against lbs stats and
'1 any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
T**>*^r*tywif of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Pttbtlcatlan of this Notice has
begun or. September 2 IMS.
Personal Ripe as an tative
NEIL IRWIN LEPOW
210 SheO Potot Road
avf
MOA (
?
Attorney for Pe
ABRAHAM A GALBLT. ESQ.
CALBUT. GALBLT AND
MENTN. PA
SM Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida. SUM
73-3100
September 3.3. IMS i
NOTICE OF ACTION
CO NSTR U CTIV E SI R VIC E ,
(NOPROPERTYI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADS COUNTY
Civil Action No. tJ-Mn
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JO ANN RODRIGUEZ.
Petitioner
and
GEORGE RODRIGUEZ.
Respondent. _____
TO: GEORGE RODRIGUEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action tor
Dissolution of Marriage baa
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to
It on MELvTN J. ASHER,
ESQ.. attorney tor Petitioner
whoae address Is i860 S.W. 8th
Street. Suite 3M. Miami.
Florida. 53116. and file the ori-
ginal with the clerk of the
above styled court on before
September 30 1RM: otherwise
a default will be entered
against you tor the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on thla 30th day of
August. IMS
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
by Clarlnda Brown
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Saal)
Septembers. 3:
IS. 23, IMS
^*"
ELE VE NTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FCCASENOS2-N1M
IN RE The Marriage of:
MARTHURIN J. NOEL.
Petitioner Husband,
and
MARY SLASH NOEL
Respondent-Wife.
TO: MARY SLASH NOEL.
Residence unknown,
shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition tor Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attor-
ney. 313 N.W. 1Mb Avenue.
Miami. Florida. SUM. and fits
original with Court Clerk on or
before September so, IMS,
otherwise a default will be en-
tered.
Augustto. 1983
RICHARD BRINKER
ByN A Hewett
Deputy Clerk
12216 Septembers.!; i
13. M. IMS
NOTICE UNDER I
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business i
under the fictitious name LAV-
IANK DISTRIBUTORS at 3771
NW 41 Ave Miami. Fla. 33134
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
FRANK LABRADOR. Owner
HOT August M;
Septembers, 3. 13, IMS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADC COUNTY. FLORI
PRORATE DIVISION
FOT Nosaber RMOT
WlNllM
IN RE ESTATE OF
MIRIAM WE IN BERG
III MIRIAM W HJRSH
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-'
tate of MIRIAM WEINBERG
a-k-a MIRIAM W HTRSH de-
ceased FUe Number 83-MlO. Is
pendmg to the Circuit Court for
DADE County. Florida Pro-
bate Division the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami Florida 33130 The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative
attorney are set forth below
AD interested persona are re-
quired to file with thla court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FTRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE (1) all
claims against the estate and
i2> any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the pet suuai repre-
sentative venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
an ft ,4 rue AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of thla Notice baa
begun on September 3. IMS.
Personal RspisestitotlM:
HYMAN P GALBLT
MS Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida M1M
Attorney for Personal
Representative ABRAHAM A
GALBLT. ESQ.
GALBLT. GALBUT A MENTN.
P.A..
SM Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida. 331M
Telephone: 872-S100
13310 September 1.3. IMS
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN YHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 33-M347
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SAMUEL NTEVES.
Petitioner
and
CARMEN GARCIA RIVERA
Respondent
TO: Mrs Carmen
Garcia Rivera
Canuno Luciano Vazquez
BuaonSSSRSD.
Rute No. 3
CupeyAIto.
RloPledras P R
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to it on
EMTLIOC. PASTOR, ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address la 1M South Miami |
Avenue. Penthouse I. Miami.
Florida 38130. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of lbs above
atyled court on or before Sep-
tember M. IBM: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you tor the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
Thla notice shall be published
once each week tor tour con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISHFLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on thla M day of Au-
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
Ths undersigned, under oath,
says It Is the Intention of the
undersigned to engage to a
business enterprise under the
fictitious name of BEEPERS
OF DADE located at 3638 Flag
ler Street to the city of Coral
Gables Dade County Florida
Those Interested in said, en-
terprise, and the extent of the
interest of each, ts as follows
Interest 100 percent
Joy A Miller
MS8 West Flagler Street
Coral Gables Florida 33135
Attorney Martin Starr
703 South Dixie Highway
Miami Fla 33158-2823
12228 Septembers. 8:
13. 33. IMS
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMHJOC PASTOR. PJL
100 South Mhunl Avenue
13234
Septembers.*. 18.33. 1*83
NOTICE UNDER I
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY I
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage m tin atoll
under the fictitious name of
PARKWAY CONDO ENTER-
PRISES a Florida General
Partnership at number 700 -
13M IOT m. Causeway, to the <
Ctty of Miami. Florida, Intends
to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, thla
34 day of August IMS
TERRANOVA
DEVELOPME NT. INC
M-G DEVELOPERS. INC.
BELESE
INVESTMENTS. INC.
DANIEL RETTER, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
One 8.E. Third Ave No 2260
Miami. Florida MlSl-i777
12223 September 2.8.
18. M. IMS
r-
NQTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN YHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil AcMaa Ho. S3-2874*
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE The Marriage of
JOSE FIN A R PEREZ.
Wife
and
GUTLLERMO JULIAN
PEREZ.
Huaband
TO: Gulllermo Julian Peres
Unit 34-F
7US S.W llflth Place
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you ara
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Manual Zalac attorney tor Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 180
S.E. 2nd Ave.. Suite 830.
Miami. Fla. 33131. and file the
original with ths clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 30. 1383: otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week tor four con-
secutive wssks In THE JEW-
ISH FLOR ID IAN
WTTNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this M day of Au-
gust. 1883
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D C.Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Manuel Zalac
150 S E 2nd Ave Suite 810
Miami. Fla. 3S1S1
Attorney for Petitioner
12218 September 2. 8:
16. a. IMS
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 33 MOT
IN RE The Marriage of
GUERLANDE CLAUDE
PIERRE.
Petitioner-Wife
and
MERCIDIEN PIERRE.
Respondent Husband
To: MERCIDIEN PIERRE,
Residence unknown, shall
serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition tor Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 813 N.W.
13th Avenue. Mhunl. Florida.
S31S6. and die original with
Court Clerk on or batore
September SO, IMS: otherwise
a default will be entered
DATED: August SB. IMS.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: N.A. HEWETT
.mberS.6.
M. S3, IMS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that me undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Something Special from Sharl
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
Classic Applied
Products Inc.
Attorney Richard Kroop
420 Lincoln Rd
Miami Beach, F,a 33,3.
M4 September 14.
73,30, 1*33
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
r.r^.T?CE I8 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage to business
"frto School of Real Estate
at MS S.w 87 Avenue Porto
^Pjy "EOT Florid. S8174.
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dads County. Florida
,. la*A-Prtaajta
1BM September X 3.
16.JS.1M3
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
F He Nasabar 831884
Divine* 63
IN RE ESTATE OF
MARIANNE KORN
WECHSLER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OF DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that ths sdmlnlatratlon
of the estate of MARIANNE
KORN WECHSLER, deceased.
File Number 83-6886 U pending
In the Circuit Court tor Dade
County. Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which la 73
West Flsgler Street. Miami.
Florida S31S0 The personal
representative of the estate la
BORIS VTASMENSKY. whose
address is SM North Shore
Drive, Miami Beach. Ftorlda-
The name and address of the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
Ursula Metzger. WeUlsch
and Metzger PA. 183 Almerta
Ave., Suite 300-E Coral Gables.
Florida 33134
All parsons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the dark of the above
court a written statement of
any etaxm or demand they may
have. Each claim must be to
writing and must SjaOTOT the
basis tor the claim, the name
and addraaa of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, aad the
amount claimed If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unnmadated. the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated If the claim la se-
cured the security shall be de-
scribed- The claimant. shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration baa
bean mailed ara required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FTRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jectiona they may have that
challenges the validity of ths
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: Septembers. IMS,
Boris Vlaamenaky
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MARIANNE KORN
WECHSLER
Decsassd
ATTORNET FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Ursula Metzger
weilisch and Mctsger P.A.
161 Almerta Ave .Suite 200-E
Coral Gables. Florida SUM
IBS* September 3.3. II
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN YHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Actlea He. 83-785
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE:
THE ADOPTION OF:
Minor Children
TO: TULIO MORENO
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition tor Adop-
tion baa been filed aad com
menced to this Court aad you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on M. CRISTTNA DEL-
valle. attorney for PatSttea-
T. whose MOTSM Is M Grand
Canal Drive, Third Flow.
Mhunl. Florida 33144. aad file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September M. 1883: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded la the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week tor four con-
secutive weeks to THE JEW-
ISH FLO RIDIAN
WITNESS my hand aad ths
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 23 day of Au-
gust. IMS
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K. Shaw
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12307 AugustM:
September 3,9.16. IMS
" THE CIRCUIT COURT"
DADE COUNTY, FLOtiru
*OEATE Divisor
~ .5* "**'"'cm
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HYMAN BENEZRA
Deceased
NOTICE
TO ALL PERSONS HAV
CLAIMS OP. Dziuiit
AGAINST THE ABoi
ESTATE AND ALL QTFJ
PERSONS TNTEPESTlrv
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY
FIED that the
of the estate of
BENEZRA deceased.
Number 83-6H2 CP (n,'-|
pendmg in the Circuit Count
Dade County. Florida,
Division, the address of 1
is Dade County Com
Third Floor. 73 West
Street. Miami Florida
Ths personal repreaentatmT
be estate la Atealee R rn1
whose address h Suite 21s 7
Ponce de Leor. Blvd
Gables. Florida 33114
name aad address of
personal reprsaentatin,
attorney are set forth btlov
AH persona having clalmis
demands against the aataiti
required. WTTHIN THB,
MONTHS FROM THE DAB
OF THE FIRST PUBLIC
TTON OF THIS NOTICE log
with the clerk of tbt
court a written iiatemett 1
any claim or demand they at
have. Each claim miat bt |
wruing aad must lndlcaii 1
basis tor the claim, tbt 1
sad aitdrtsa of the creditors
Ms agent or attorney, aaal
amount claimed If the elala j
oot yet due. the date wha|
will become due shall
stated If the claim u
gent or unliquidated
nature of the uncertainty 1
be stated If the claim a 1
cured, the security shall be I
scribed. The eaMMSnt,
deliver sufficient copies of I
claim to the clerk to enable I
clerk to mall one copy to 1
personal representative
AH persona Interested 631
estate to whom a copy of I
Notice of Administration I
bean mslled are
WTTHTN THREE
FROM THE DATE OF
FIRST PUBLICATION
THIS NOTICE, to flit any I
fSSOTSM they may ban
challenges the validity of I
decedent's will, the
ficattooa of the personal 1
resents tree, or the venue 1
Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEI
AND OBJECTIONS NOT I
FILED WILL BE FORIV
BARRED.
Data of the first
of thla Notice of
tratton: Friday SepUmbtrt
1333,
AlnslecR Ferdle
Aa Personal Representatin |
of the Estate of
HYMAN BENEZRA.
Attorney tor Personal
Representative:
FERDTE AND GOUZ
Suite 215
TIT Ponce de Leon
Coral Gables. FL 33134
Telephone: (3M) 448-3887
September 2.1,1
CONSTRUCTIVE SEVlCll
(NOFROFESTV) I
IN THE CIRCUIT COUETEfl
THB ELEVENTH jUDiCWj
CIRCUIT OF "LOBIOAjr
AMOFORDADiC0Uirn|
CM AeNaa Ns. SJ-lW
FAMILY DIVISW*
ACTION FOR DISSOtUTK
OFMARRIA0*
IN RE: The Marriage of
REYNA ZALDIVAR
OSCAR ROBERTO I
TO: OSCAR ROBERTO
RAMIREZ
Barrio Concepc Ion
Case No 430
Frenteala
DroguerlaNac tonal
Tegucigalpa
TOU ARE HEREBT
FIED that an action for 1
baJOT of Marriage hts
filed against you and rj'
lesajzred to ssrvs s copy wr
written defense. .If any.**"
MELVIN J. ASHER aSMj"
ton,*, lor Petitioner.
address Is I860 S.W
Suite SM. Mlaau. FlortdU
and file the original fjSJl
ctork of the above *>''"!
on or before IwSMSSMfJ
IMS: otbsrwto. a **.
bs entered against you **
relief demanded to tto
plaint or petition .,
WTTNESS my hard *
seal of said court at y-
FlorMa on this S3 day *>
"IbCHARDP BRINK*
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dads County Florid"
By Clarlnda Brown
A.D.putyart .


Hofmayer, Real Estate Investor, Dies
Obituaries
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 31-B
Lerome Carl Hofmayer, a
mer lawyer who became a real
-lite investor, and a resident of
his community since 1945, died
Jonday at his Miami home. He
las 67 years old.
|Born in Albany, Ga. and
Hucated at Ohio State Uni-
fcrsity and Harvard Law School,
|r Hofmayer served with the
[S. Army Air Corps during
fork) War II in the China-
Jurma India Theatre. He was
leased from active duty as a
Lionel.
Ill, was a member of the
florida Bar Association since
(46 and practiced law with the
ran of Friedman, Shapiro, and
ofmayer in the Seybold Build-
Mr. Hofmayer became pre-
sident of the Miami Automobile
Dealers Association before be-
coming a full-time real estate
investor.
He was a member of the
Orange Bowl Committee since
1950, and also a member of the
Standard Club, Westview
Country Club, Dade Bar As-
sociation, and several veterans
groups.
Mr. Hofmayer is survived by a
wife, Gloria; children, Toni
Muerlot of San Diego, Calif, and
Arthur I. Hofmayer of San
Francisco, Calif.; sister, Helen
Hess; and brothers, Edward
Hofmayer and Stephen Hof-
mayer.
I Jewish Agencies Question
Clubs' Constitutionality
I NEW YORK Twona-
nal Jewish agencies have
^allenged the constitu-
aality of a Federal dis-
|ict court ruling permit-
ng a religious club to meet
|id pray on public school
emises during regular
thool hours.
Iln a joint amicus curiae (friend-
Ithe-court) brief, the Anti-
efamation League of B'nai
frith and the American Jewish
Ingress have called upon the
piled States Court of Appeals
\ the Third Circuit, Phila-
|lphia. to reverse the decision.
rHE CASE arose when a
pup of high school students in
p W'illiamsport Area School
Strict of Pennsylvania sought
mission to form a club
>tros| whose members would
Id scripture, pray and discuss
pgious themes. The club would
et during a special period in
official school day set aside
clubs "which promote the
ellectual, physical and social
Velopment of students."
udents who do not participate
fclub activity must go to their
tieroom or the library.
jVhen permission was denied
I the Area's Superintendent of
tools and the School Board be-
Jse it would be a violation of
constitutionally mandated
aration of church and state,
I students sued. Their suit was
held by the district court in
Won, Pa.
In seeking reversal, ADL and
Congress argued that the stu-
Pts religious club "presents
kisely the dangers which the
1st Amendment seeks to avoid
1 which prior (Supreme Court)
puna prohibit."
WONG THESE dangers, the
{ef declared, are:
Potential divisiveness along
gious lines;
The appearance of a govern-
ntal imprimatur on religious
Irtices in general, or certain
Kions in particular;
Substantial risk of prosely-
"on in public schools with the
'~~Bn.ce of official sanction;
Inevitable entanglement be-
* government and religion.
he brief cited the precedent of
iblic Notice
22, V*1 underetgned.
S3myah'^S^ttou' "*m
^RVICES t 6S06 N.W. Blue
mm 8| tan"e to register
|norZ0ourtorD",,County-
^taO.UiM,
|uo *ZL
September 9,18,
n. so, ltu
McCoilum v. Board of Education
(194fl| in which the Supreme
Court held that public school
classrooms may not be turned
over to religious groups for relig-
ious purposes during the school
day.
In McCoilum the Court stated
that "the public school must keep
scrupulously free from entangle-
ment in a strife of sects," since
the public school is "designed to
serve as perhaps the most power-
ful agency for promoting co-
hesion among a heterogenous
democratic people."
THE BRIEF went on to state
that permitting the Petros club
to meet under the sponsorship of
school authorities at a time when
attendance is mandated by state
law during the school day
when student club meetings are
regularly scheduled would
mean that "public schools serve
as vehicles for propagating relig-
ious values and beliefs."
The two agencies also pointed
out that the district court erred in
upholding the constitutionality
of the Petros club's religious
activities by declaring that they
did not violate the establishment
clause. To the contrary, accord-
ing to the brief, for the school
authorities to approve the relig-
ious club and allow it to meet
during the school day would
imply "official recognition" of
religious activities and constitute
the very advancement of religion
forbidden by the establishment
clause.
The brief argued further that
the Supreme Court has repeated-
ly "cited the impressionability of
primary and secondary school
pupils" as a reason for the strict
enforcement of the separation
principle.
FURTHER dangers lurk in the
involvement of a faculty adviser
for the religious club, the brief
stressed. It pointed out that such
an adviser would have great dif-
ficulty remaining religiously
neutral, making certain that club
participation is purely voluntary,
that activities are non-denomina-
tional and that there is no
proselytizing.
KRAMER
Joseph David. 61, a long-time resident
of Miami, formerly of Pittsburgh. Pa..
died Sept 5. He waa the huaband of
Joyce; father of Charlea Michael
Kramer of Alexandria. Va.. and EUen
Kramer Ellleon of Houaton, Tex.; and
brother of Belle Cohen of Pittsburgh.
Pa Perle Krongold and George
Kramer of Miami Beach, and the late
la* and Raymond Kramer. Funeral
eervlcea were held Sept. at Riverelde
Chapel.
FREUNDLICM
Annie. 61, of Hlaleeh, paaaed away Sept.
6. She had made her home here for the
past M yeara, coming from Jackson-
vllle. She waa a member of Temple TU-
ereth Jacob and waa the wife of Mar-
cue; mother of David of Homestead.
Frederick of Miami, and Stephanie SU-
verman of Miami; alater of Blla Boat-
wrudit of JackeonvUle, Dolorea Sodden
of Undenhurat. N.T.. and Beatrice
Steckel of N.J ; and grandmother of alx.
Funeral eervlcea were held Sept T at
Gordon Funeral Home.
OOLDBERO
Maurice of Miami Beach, paaaed away
September 4. Beloved huaband of
Bertha Lobel Goldberg; brother of Sara
Lowenthal of New York. Jack Goldberg
of New York, deceased brother*,
Nathan, Loula, Hyman, and Harold and
deceased alater, Lillian Reaaler. He waa
the uncle of nine, great-uncle of two, and
great-great-uncle of two. He la alao
urvlved by brothere-ln-law, Lewie
(Ruth) Lobel of Tamarac and Herman
(Reglna) Lobel of New York. We will
mlaa you Uncle from slater-ln-Iaw,
Bather Lobel Nadler; niece, Barbara
(Howard) Goran; nephews. Larry
(Shelly) Nadler and Sandy Nadler;
great-nieces Shaynle Goren and Olla
Nadler. He was a member of Beth Israel
Congregation and Knights of Pythias
Miami Beach Lodge No. 170. Services
were held September 4. OcntiibuUons
may be made to Beth Israel Congre-
gaUon or Rabbi A. S. Gross Hebrew
Academy. Arrangements by Riverside
MAIER, Alice Feldhelm, 77, Miami
Beach. Sept. 1. Riverside
ROSENBAUM, Florence B.
BOB. Paul, Miami Beach. Sept. 6.
Rubln-Zllbert. Mt. Nebo.
BOWER. Loula. Miami, Sept. 4.
BROWN. Hortenae. Miami Beach, Sept
S. Rubln-Zllbert
COOPER. Jack B Miami Beach.
Blaaberg. Mt. Nebo.
LEICHTNER, Arthur, 7. North Miami,
Sept. 4. Riverside. Mt. Nebo.
ZELLMAN. Sol. 90, North Miami
Beach. Aug. SI. Levltt-Welnateln.
RAABIN. Herman D., Bal Harbour.
Riverside
NABER8. Benny. 81, Sept. 6. Riverside.
SKOLNICK, Hyman B North Miami
Beach, Sept. 6. Rubln-Zllbert
GOLDWAS8ER, Nathan. Miami Beach
Rubln-Zllbert.
JENETT. Adeline. Miami Beach. Sept.
4. Rubln-Zllbert.
KE8DEN, Julius, Sept. 2. Riverside
LORBERBAUM. Seymour Jacob.
LOUIS. William (BUI), 71. Miami
Beach. Sept. 4. Gordon. Mt. Nebo.

REDLICH
Ernest, 81. a resident of Miami for the
peat 44 years, coming from Vienna,
Austria, died last Friday. He Is survived
by a wife, Hedwlg; eon, Jerry of Miami;
daughter and eon-in-law. Sylvia and
Victor Bott of Miami; sister-In-law,
Hedy Redllch of Bayslde, N.Y.; and two
grandchildren. Funeral services were
held Sept. 4 at Gordon Funeral Home.
COWAN
Bemarr C, a local resident for many
years, coming from Cleveland, Ohio. He
la survived by a wife, Maria Elena;
eons, Robert and Gregory; and parents,
Max and Sally Cowan. Funeral services
were held Sept. 4 at Riverside Chapel.
Interment followed at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
LUCK
Manuel Robert. 60 of Miami Beach, a
resident of the local community since
1M6, formerly of Akron. Ohio, died Sept.
S. He waa the huaband of Carolyn;
father of Josef Luck. George Luck, and
Judith Jordan; grandfather of three;
and brother of Milton, Leonard, and
Donald Luck, and Beulah Puakln. Mr.
Luck waa the founder and owner for 80
years of Lucky Truck Sales of Miami.
Funeral eervlcea were held Sept. 4 at
Riverside Chapel.
SILVERMAN
Helen A., a resident of North Miami
Beach for the peat 14 yeara, coming
from Jersey City, N.J., died Aug. 81. She
la survived by her children, Herbert and
Helene SUverman and Dr. Warren and
Diane SUverman and her four grand-
children. Funeral services were held
Sept. 1 at Blaaberg Chapel.
MOOT
MaJ Daniel, 88, a Florida resident sines
IBM and native of New York aty.
Previous to World War n, he operated
under contract with the U.S. War
Department the concessions at Camp
Dlx In N.J. During the war, he enlisted
in the U.S. Army Air Force aa a private
and retired a major. Following the war,
he engaged In the Import business In
NYC. and upon retirement became
'involved In land development
throughout Florida. He was a member
of Temple Ner Tamld, the Jewish War
Veterans, and Order of the Masons He
was alao a founder of Technlon. Sur-
vivors Include a wife, Eleanor; brother,
Joseph; and nieces and nephews.
Funeral services were held Sept. 1 at
Riverside.
OREENSTEIN
1 Jacob (Jake) S.. 86 a resident of this
community since IBM, died Sept. 1. He
waa formerly of Nashville, Term.
Survivors Include a eon. Bernle;
grandchildren, Barry Dale, Arlene
Appelbaum, Dennis Greenateln. Ronald
Oreenetem. and Stanley Qreensteln;
and seven great-grandchildren. Funeral
eervlcea were held Sept. 2 at Riverside
Chapel. Interment followed at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
LEVANTINE
Anna. 79. resident of Miami for the paat
80 years. Life member of B'nai FJ'rlth.
Dear mother of Lou Leonard of N.
Miami and Toby Fiiedland of Miami
Beach. Adored grandmother of 6; great-
grandmother of 4; and sister of Murray
Isaacs of North Miami Beach. Elliott
Isaacs of New York, and Delia Brown of
Lauderdale Lakes. Services were held
September 6 at Riverside Chapel, with
Interment at Lakeside Memorial Park.
ContiibuUons may be made to the
Miami Jewish Home for the Aged, 101
NE 82 St., Miami. Riverside.
MERKER, Maurice, 88, Aug. 21. Rubin
ZUbert.
EISENBERG. Norton. 68, Aug. 31.
Gordon.
OREENBERG. Reuben. 88, Aug. 21
FRIEDMAN, Jennie. 83. Aug. 33.
Riverside.
KORSON. Larry. 84. Aug. 34. Riverside.
WEISS. Leonard. 70. Aug. 34. Riverside
DRUCKER, Sondra, 40, Aug. 28. Rubln-
Zllbert.
COHEN, Esther, 94, Aug. 36. Rubin
ZUbert.
MILLHEISER, Beta. 88, Miami. Sept.3.
Gordon.
MILLER. Al. Miami Beach. Rubin
ZUbert.
ROTHENBERO. Oerl. Sept. 3.
APPELBAUM. Aaron. Rubin ZUbert
KLEIN, Anna. 91, Miami. Sept. 1.
Gordon. Star of David.
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Page 32-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 9,1983
On the
Bookshelf
Continued from Page 18-A
and Migration; The Muses
in America; Cultural Adaptation
in World Wide Perspective.
AMONG THE four papers in
the first section, two stand out.
One deals with the sad story of
United States policy towards
refugees and the other with a
specific instance of how that
policy was circumvented by an
Emergency Rescue Committee.
American immigration res-
trictions sharply limited the
number of refugees who were
admitted.
There was one loophole which
made it possible to grant
emergency visitors visas to
"persons of exceptional merit
those of superior intellectu.
attainment." Using thi
provision, the Emergency Rescut
Committee managed to get "on<
thousand carefully screenec
artists, musicians, writer-
scholars, politicians, lab<
leaders and their families to lea< i
France either legally or illegally.
The second section, The Muses
in America, has eight papers and.
in many ways, is the most in-
teresting part of the book. It
opens with a discussion of the
refugees in California, most but
not all of whom, had some asso-
ciation with the movie industry.
Some had great difficulty in
adapting to what they considered
as "lowbrow," compared to their
"high culture." Arnold Schoen-
berg. the composer, was a prime
example; he refused to write
music for films, and he died a
bitter man. Others made their
mark in Hollywood, becoming
rich and famous.
SOCIAL SCIENTISTS,
writers, musicians, architects,
physicists, chemists and
mathematicians are each the
subject of an article in this
second section. It is breathtaking
to recognize the great names and
the great contributions in each of
these fields. Oar arts and our
sciences have 'bean profoundly
influenced by the work of
refugees. We can only reflect
ruefully on what might have been
had we been more hospitable.
There are seven papers in the
last section dealing with what
happened to refugees in other
parts of the world. Two deal with
Canada: two with Latin America
and one each tells about Switzer-
land, Great Britain and
Shanghai.
One of the two articles on
Canada is written by Irving
Abella and Harold Troper. It is a
condensation of their book,
"None is Too Many," and it
retells the unhappy story of
Canada's miserable record in
fading to admit refugees prior to
1948. The authors conclude: "At
a time when the consciences of all
the Western democracies were
tried and found wanting, Canada
was no exception. We differed
only in that we behaved worse
than most."
THE SWISS and the British
were a little better but not
much. Shanghai, oddly enough,
was the only place where, for a
time at least, free immigration
was permitted. Some 17,000
refugees came, and during three
of the seven or eight years that
refugees were in China, the com-
munity flourished. There were
Yiddish plays and a newspaper,
the Shanghai Jewish Chronicle.
All of this disappeared with
Japanese occupation, and the
refugees themselves disappeared
from Shanghai when the war
ended. One of the SKnyhi
Jewish refugees was Michael
Blumenthal, former Secretary of
the Treasury.
The articles on Latin America
indicate that few artists and
intellectuals remained there for
any length of time.
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JONAH IN THE FISH
v a
22 U ,1

2
,3 s?
<
1
1 1
3 8* "E
High Holy Bays
Immense Power on Jewish Life Draws on More Than Ceremony
By CHAIM RAPHAEL
London Chronicle Syndicate
HOW IS IT that we are always moved so
powerfully by the annual arrival of the Yamim
Noraim, the ten Days of Awe that start with Rosh
Hashanah and culminate in Yom Kippur? It is not
enough, for once, to look to the Bible for the hold
that these days have on us; for though the dates on
which they are to be celebrated are set out in the
Bible, the immense power they have had on Jewish
life draws on far more than the ceremonies described
there.
It is true, of course, that the prayers and imagery
and legends of these days can all be linked to Bible
texts in one way or another; but this verbal sanction
m magical in its power only because our niscory since
Bible days has constantly opened up the living
significance of the texts we cite.
THIS SAME IDEA was applied by the great
scholar Solomon Schechter to the power of the
Sabbath in Jewish life. His way of expressing it
sounds very startling at first. "Jews do not keep the
Sabbath so much because it is in the Bible," he
wrote, "but because of the emphasis the biblical
injunctions received in the history of Jewish life,
thought and experience." Apply this to the Days of
Awe and it is even more startling, but also more
illuminating.
I will try to express this by looking first at the
biblical presentation of Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur, and then at some of the ways in which Jews
have lived out these two great Holy Days and the
ideas behind them. It is not a process that has
stopped in our own day. The new experience of our
people continues to demand new expression, not
least in the words of poets who wrestle at midnight,
as Jacob did, with the mysteries of existence.
As set out in the Bible, Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur offer little that matches the detail of the
Holy Days we know. The Rosh Hashanah that has
come down to us is a rich composite. It is not just
the calendar New Year (which it was not originally),
but also the day of Creation, and because of this the
day on which God's creatures stand on the brink. It
is the day on which Abraham's faith his
willingness to sacrifice his only son, Isaac was
tested by God; and all this (and other episodes of
history) is evoked for us in the blast of the shofar.
BUT IN THE Bible we hear little of this. The
Israelites are simply told through Moses (Lev.
23:24-5) that on the first day of the seventh month
(not exactly the New Year) they are to have a no-
work day (shabbaton), a holy convocation fmikra
kodesh) which is to include zichron terua "a
memorial trumpet blowing."
It is not until we come to the Mishna, the code of
law and custom produced in the second century,
hundreds of years after Leviticus, that we see the
background to our current Rosh Hashanah. The
Mishna tractate of that name still talks of four
different days known as "New Year" for this or that
purpose; but the third on the first day of the
seventh month is when God's creatures "pass
before Him like legions of soldiers" (or "flocks of
sheep").
IN THE TALMUD, which evolved over the next
two or three hundred years, this idea of personal
inspection by God is specifically linked to the
creation of the universe on this day.
It is in the Talmud, too, that we are told that when
Continued on Page 2-C
JONAH ASLEEP AT THE BOTTOM OF THE BOAT


Page 2-C The Jewish Ftoridian
Friday. Septmber 9.1983
Power of Holy Days
il-C
a*l>* open
the imxtyt of
God site b
books axe opened, on* for the i
'who are mscrmed vor
wicked '3d face
between most of as
pjfl Y:~ Kipp>' &_:
the themes that were being ted
Rosh Hashanah.
The idea of a book of record on human behavior
was common in the ancient Sear East and un-
doubtedly famibar to Hebrews. The Psalmist asks
i Psalm 69:28) that bis enemies be b'xsed out of the
tefer kayyun (book of the thing)
Long before tlus. Moses had pleaded wh God to
forgive Israel for the Golden Calf offense and had
said lExod. 32:331: -If not, blot me out of the book
You have written Gods reply had been pungent:
'Whoever sins against me. I wfll blot out-
A BOOK OF RECORD was dearly in the air. The
opening chapter of Job presents a version of the
actual scene of judgment, with God anxious to
inscribe Job as a perfect and upright man'" 'cfearty
. candidate for the first book), while Satan
mischievously raises doubts, pointing out that Job
had lived too securely, without his faith being
tested.
This concept is obviously richer than the simple
ideaas projected, for ex ample, by Rabbi Akrva in
Ethics of the Fathers that God's record-book is an
arithmetical balancing of good and bad deeds In
Job. faith is crucial: and this concept, linked to the
akeda (the binding of Isaac), assumed great im-
portance in Rosh Hashanah as it developed in
Jewish history.
From the beginning, the meaning of the akeda ha.
troubled everyone. Had this horrible human sacrifice
ever really been intended? Did faith mean that one
had to be prepared to go to the brink, as the martyrs
did?
ONE THING was very clear. If Rosh Hashanah
was a day of judgment, one had to find room in this
for the triumph of faith demonstrated, however
mysteriously, by Father Abraham. Here was a way
of understanding the two words of iiistruction.
zichron tema (memory and trumpet blast) that the
Bible had given. God would remember (to our credit)
the faith that our ancestor had shown; and the
shofar born of the ram that had substituted for
Isaac would symbolize the whole story.
These became two of tne three themes that the
rabbis assigned to the day as it developed:
malehiwot (God as King), zkhronot (the day of
memory), and shofarot (the day of the shofar). The
prayers assigned to Rosh Hashanah, and the pi war
(poetic hymns) written on these themes, combined to
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awatea mood of nnlrmited response to history and
myth, far deeper in its influence then the idea of
Rosh Hashanah sunply as a day of judgment.
With Yam Kippur. too. its" cetera-srion is far
different m character from what is set out m the
Bible text- Despite thia, the great fast of
iv-four hours by every Jew on the tenth of the
". and the linking of this to Rosh Hashanah to
n unbroken penitential period lasting for ten
days the Days of Awe have become the anchor
of Jewish faith and existence
THE BIBLE. Yom ka-Uppunm (as it is called)
was a dav on which the High Priest was to carry out
the most awesome rituals of personal purification
and sacrifices as part of an atonement 'kippuriml for
the people of Israel: to deanse you that you may be
dean from all your sins before the Lord.'- Nothing
was said specifically of a fast. The people were
simply told that on this day you shall afflict your
souls and do no work at alL"
The interpretation of this into a most rigorous fast
was put in writing much later: and with it came a
dramatic transmutation of the atmosphere of the
Temple scene into a day of continuous prayer and
moral self-examination.
Central was the concept for Yom Kippur that on
thia day the judgment launched at Rosh Hashanah
now reached its climax. The verdict on each in-
dividual that had been written down tentatively was
now to be scaled." And in this fateful mood, the
worshippers guided by commentators and poets
_ tried to understand one aspect of the Temple
story, the azazel (scapegoatl. that was as mysterious
as the akeda had been on Rosh Hashanah.
A HIGH POINT in the avoda (Temple service) on
Yom Kippur. as described in Lev. 16. had been the
drawing of lots between two goats, "one for the Lord
and one for AzazeL" The goat for the Lord" was to
be sacrificed as a sin-offering. The other "shall be
presented live before the Lord, to make atonement
on him. and then to send him into the wilderness for
Azazel.''
No one. it must be said, has any clear idea what
the Bible means by "Azazel." Scholars have argued
on whether it can be interpreted ety mo logically as
meaning a rocky place, or a precipice, or a demon
rivalling God. But this is a side issue to the central
question, which is how the ancient Hebrews treated
expiation through sacrifice, and how successive
generations of Jews have explored this to form ideas
on how sin and atonement are to be considered in
Jewish life.
Even in Bible times, there were endless warnings
that sacrifices went only part of the way towards
expiation. They were certainly regarded as essential
rituals to secure purification, and reflected the
holiness enshrined in the priests.
The at/odd ritual was always spoken of with
reverence in the synagogue services, and has
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remained a particularly dramatic element n the Yom
Kippur service, when cUwrenrianta of priests reenact
the final priestly Mussing. Yet the prayers, the
recitation of Bible paaaages, and the piyyutim that
fill the services constantly, emphasize that sincere
repentance alone brings forgiveness of sin.
NOWHERE IS THIS apparently paradoxical
division between formal rituals and personal
responsibility made clearer than in the tractate of
the Mishna dealing with the fast and called simnlv
VomartheDay). '
As the Mishna is a code of instruction, almost the
entire tractate is devoted to explaining how the High
Priest has to be prepared for the inexpressibly
sacred moment when he will enter the Holy of
Holies. Minute details are given of his clothing, ha
handling of the sacrifices, and the Azazel
ceremonies. But at the very end, there are a few
almost laconic sentences on what it is really ill
about:
"If a man said I will sin and repent, and sin again
and repent.' he will be given no chance to repent. If
he said 1 will sin and the Day of Atonement wJl
effect atonement.' then the Day of Atonement ef-
fects no atonement. For transgressions that are
between man and God, the Day of Atonement effect!
atonement: but for transgressions that are between
a man and his fellow, the Day of Atonement effecu
atonement only if it has appeased his fellow I through
reparation)."
It is in this spirit that s formula emerged in
Jewish life which alone might rescue those of us -
all of us who have reason to fear our fate in these
Days of Awe: "Prayer, repentance and charity will
avert the dread decree-" This phrase became the
climax of the most moving prayer of this penitential
period: unetanneh tokef.
ONE BEGINS TO understand the power of Rosh
Hashanah and Yom Kippur by comparing their
celebration with that of the pilgrim festivals.
Passover, the most rivetting of these festivals, is
basically a time of joy. It is a feast of freedom.
evoking a sense of national fulfilment.
By contrast, the Days of Awe are intensely
personal. At many moments in this period, every
individual is conironted with the deepest problems
of conduct and character. One asks what one is
making of one's life. One contemplates the awful
uncertainties that lie ahead: "who will live, who will
die."
The climax on this is reached on Yom Kippur.
when one forces oneself to face the "sins' one has
committed both positively and negatively by
turning aside from duty. The central element in this
is to accept that where one has fallen short, it is
one's own responsibility. Even though human frailty
is part of life, it never assumes the force of original
sin."
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Friday, September 9, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian
Page3-C
BY THE SAME TOKEN, one has to find one's
own path to expiation. Faith alone, or the mediation
0f a godhead, will not help. Ideas that emerge in
these forms have always to be tested by conduct.
Only within these parameters do Jews explore the
strange areas of life that are hinted at in concepts
like akeda and azazel, and the acceptance jointly
with one's fellow-worshippers of an unbearable
weight of sin, an endless mea culpa.
The mood that is generated at moments in the
rituals goes far beyond anything that can be
analyzed in factual terms. How is it that the
unetanneh tokef prayer has such a hold on us when
we recite it on Rosh Hashanah?
Certainly, it leads us to confront the fate fulness of
this day, with our life in balance; but if the opening
is awesome, we are moved equally by the tenderness
of the language as the prayer proceeds: "As a
shepherd seeks out his flock, leading each sheep
under his staff, so dost Thou lead and number and
care for every living soul. ."
There is the same tenderness in many of the Bible
verses drawn on to illustrate God's love for Israel:
"Ephraim is my dear son, a child of delight. As often
as I speak against him, I do lovingly remember him;
therefore My heart yearns towards him. I will surely
have mercy on him, saith the Lord."
THE POWER OF each prayer in the Days of Awe
is often intensified by its provenance in the history
of the Jews. It is said of the unetanneh tokef prayer,
for example, that it was composed by a tenth-
century rabbi, Ammon of Mainz, in the most
terrifying circumstances.
The Bishop of Mainz had been putting enormous
pressure on him to convert to Christianity. At one
weak moment, Ammon had pleaded for three days to
consider it; but he then returned and asked for his
tongue to be cut out for such blasphemy. Instead,
his whole body was mutilated; and as he was carried,
dying, into synagogue on Rosh Hashanah, he recited
the prayer he had composed in his agony
unetanneh tokef. Later, it was said, he appeared in a
dream to a rabbi of the great Kalonymus family, and
taught him the words, which then became part of the
ritual.
This was in the Eleventh Century, during the
massacres of the First Crusade, when a prayer of
this kind was doubly charged with meaning. A
historical gloss is given in the same spirit to the
intense feeling of the Kol Nidrei prayer on the eve of
Yom Kippur. Our plea in this prayer to be released
from vows that cannot be fulfilled goes back, some
have said, to the forced converts of Spain, the
Marranos.
THE PRAYERS on these Holy Days are like
some great symphony, the themes constantly
reappearing in different mood, but with total in-
tegration. The intensity of the quiet Kol Nidrei
opening of Yom Kippur is echoed, twenty-four hours
later, by a strange stillness in the air for the service
called Ne'ila, "the closing of the gates."
In the interim, there has been prayer and poetry in
abundance; and among the Bible readings our spirit
has been refreshed in a very special way, before dusk
falls at Ne'ila, with a reading of the Book of Jonah. I
have sometimes felt that when this great sea-story
dies away, some rabbi with a powerful voice should
offer us not his own sermon, but the remarkable
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sermon on Jonah and the whale given by Father
Mapple, the whalemen's padre, in "Moby Dick":
"Shipmates! This book, containing only four
chapters four yarns is one of the smallest
strands in the mighty cable of the Scriptures. Yet
what depths of the soul does Jonahs dep sea-line
sound! What a pregnant lesson to us is this prophet!
We feel the floods surging over us; we sound with
him to the kelpy bottom of the waters. But what is
the lesson that the book of Jonah teaches? ... As
sinful men, it is a lesson to us all, because it is a
story of the sin, hard-heaitedness, suddenly
awakened fears, the swift punishment, repentance,
prayers, and finally the deliverance and joy of Jonah
There is another moment in the Yom Kippur
service where the mood can come to us reinforced
from outside. In the al chet. a passionate and
unending beating of breasts, a recital of sin that
tears us apart with its longing for faith, I have often
thought of John Donne turning to his own God in
the same desperation:
Batter my heart three -personed God; for you
As yet but knock, breathe, shine and seek to
mend;
That I may rise and stand, o'erthrow me and bend
Your force to break, blow, burn and make me new
IT WOULD be wrong to think of the Yamim
Noram solely in these terms. There is at the same
tune a more easy-going side a happy social side
which offers a parallel to the happiness of Pesach.
Being a Jew is often like this, with solemnity
yielding to the human warmth of kinship.
Even in the endless versifying the piyyut
that we recite on these days, a happy sense of ar-
tistic fulfilment close to wit surges through the
rhymes, the puns and the brilliantly adapted phrases
from Bible and Talmud that emerge in a rich tzim-
mus of delight. It is virtually impossible to convey
this in translation; but even in English versions one
can admire the hugely intellectual skill and the
imaginative power that was poured into this form of
literature from earliest times.
Some of this piyyut goes back to the mystical
poets of the Holy Land in the third and fourth
centuries, much of whose work was rediscovered
within the past few years by the great scholar
Gershom Scholem, who died a few months ago. One
can now read these hechalot hymns, often
anonymous, in the splendid "Penguin Book of
Hebrew Verse," published in 1981.
THE EARLIEST paytan we know by name is
Yose ben Yose (fourth-fifth centuries), who com-
posed an immensely long poem built around the
avoda service of Yom Kippur, full of literary and
musical skill. Many of the verses of one of his early
successors, Eleazar B. Kallir (Six Century) were
absorbed into the machzor (the prayer-book) for the
Holy Days, starting with melech azur, a rapturous
salute to God as King. A few pages later in the
machzor, we encounter a lovely poem "Trem-
bling, I pour forth my plea" by R. Yekuthiel of
Speier (Eleventh Century).
As time went on, the verses were less likely to be
absorbed into the machzor, though they obviously
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drew on the feeling that the earlier poets had
stimulated. One very famour poem on the akeda
"When the gates of mercy open" by Judah
Samuel Abbas, who died in Aleppo in 1167, is, in
fact, included in the Sephardi ritual. On the other
hand, the touching poem on Yom Kippur by the
almost contemporary Judah Halevi "Lord, my
longing is before You" was not picked up in this
way.
HEBREW VERSE, as anthologized in the
"Penguin Book," and also in another splendid
anthology, "Voices Within the Ark," has continued
to our own day to express many of the themes of the
Yamin Noraim. One finds a moving poem by Aliza
Shenkar (born in Israel 1943) on the akeda, begin-
ning: "The loudspeaker screamed-Take your only
one-the one you love." On Ne'ila, she begins: "I will
be exacting before the dosing-of the silent gates-My
watch stopped how-many years have passed
since then..."
A Hebrew poem on the akeda by Amir Gilboa
(bom 1917, Ukraine) is startling in its power: ". .
It is I who am being slaughtered, my son; already
my blood is on the leaves." Yehuda Amichai (born
1924, Germany) is equally moving, though in a dif-
ferent vein, in a poem on Yom Kippur."On Yom
Kippur in 1967," the poem begins, "I put on my
dark holiday suit and went to the Old City in Jerusa-
lem."
He stands outside an Arab shop, "buttons and
zippers and spools of thread in all colors like a
Holy Ark with its doors open." He imagines trying
to tell the Arab that his father had a shop like this in
Germany. He wants to explain why he, Amichai, has
rome to Israel; his father's shop "is in ashes there,
and he is buried there.
By this time he has finished telling the story "in
his heart," it is time for Ne'ila. He walks home "with
all the worshippers." He has not spoken to the Arab.
THE EVENTS of our time seem to have stirred
Jewish poets to write on these themes in all lan-
guages. Among many of these poems in English in
"Voices Within the Ark," there is a short poem on
repentance by Eric Chaet (born Chicago, 1945):
"/ throw off all the ceremony
to get to the kernel of the wheat,
the germ, to get to the
repentance itself;
pardon me, I am not trying
to get organized,
I am trying to operate
from the fire that is the bush."
Francis Landy (born London, 1947) has a long
imaginative "Lament for Azazel." Emanuel Lit-
vinoff (born London, 1915), in a bitter poem on T. S.
Eliot's anti-Semitism, includes a memorable line
which could apply on Yam Kippur to mmay al urn: "It
is hard to kneel-when knees are stiff.''
But there is also the other side of the Days of Awe.
If fasting was all-important on Yom Kippur, it was
taken almost as a mitzva that one had to fare
sumptuously before and afterwards. Eating and
drinking well on the eve of the fast was enjoined in
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Pag*4-C The Jewiah Ffaridian t Friday. September9.1963
the Talmud (Berachot 8bi. and was thought to be a
way of honoring the festive day.
THESE IS A STORY in the Midrash on Lamen-
tations that a rabbi arriving in Nisibis i Mesopo-
tamia) on the eve of the fast was farced by the head
of the synagogue to join him at the table, even
though he bad already eaten "the last meal" The
boat served eighty courses, and the rabbi, it is said.
sjsjsjasjaj in the end to do justice to each dish, on the
principle of Tapp*tit vient en mangtan:
It was wefl understood that the serious part over
joy could be uncon fined This was certaady true in
Temple times, when the populace was not engaged in
daylong prayers, but were only fearful spectators
during the morning of the rituals of the High Priest
on their behalf.
Dr. Leo Jung has painted a graphic picture of the
scene in his introduction to the Yoma tractate of the
Soncino Talmud The people waited with bated
breath for the Hh Priest s emergence after offering
ncense in the Holy of Hobes A faithless High Priest
might carry out the rituals wrongly and be struck
down After his safe emergence, the afternoon os
Yom Kippur became a bobday
THERE IS A FAMOL'S passage oc this x the
.Mishna 'Taan4:8:
There were no happier days for Israel than the
15th of Av
of the vintage' and the Day of Atonement, for on
them the daughters of Jerusalem used to go forth in
white raiments: and these were borrowed, that none
should be abashed which had them not. The
daughters of Jerusalem went forth to dance in the
vineyards, and what did they say: Young man. lift
up your eyes and see what you would choose for
vourself. set not your eyes on beauty, but set your
eyes on family.'
There is also the purely social aspect of the Yamim
\ormm As at Pesach. it has always been a time
when famOv and friends come together to enjoy the
holiday.
In every" autobiography and collection of letters.
there is always talk of the imminent approach of
Rash Hashanah One delightful story of getting
home for Yomtoi appears in the wonderful book of
menjoiis written by that indomiable housewife.
Gtuckei of Hamein (1646-17241. Travel was not easy
in the seventeenth century, but nothing ever go"
Giuckel down.
Her husband Chaim was still alive when the whole
family went to Cleves (apparently around 1680).
some weeks before the Yamim Soraim, for the
marriage of their daughter Zipporah to the son of the
very rich Eba family. It was the grandest of wed-
dings, with the Prince (due to become Frederich I of
Prussia) and many other courtiers present "In
truth, my '<'g***r was really beautiful and had no
equal"
RETURNING VIA AMSTERDAM, where they
stayed for fourteen days, "my husband doing a little
business." they were first delayed by a storm at sea
and then by news of pirates, which made them go by
ku>d with immense delays. They had to spend Rosfa
Hashanah and Yom Kippur in different places,
staving with an assortment of cousins and m-laws.
and in the end got home only by Sukkoth.
In sad contrast, there is the diary published
after the war as Scroll of -Agony" which the
schoolmaster Chaim Kaplan began to keep *
Warsaw Ghetto, writing in Hebrew, when war broke
out on September 1.1939
Rosh Hashanah was on Sept- 14.1n his entry
written at 5 am. that morning we read:
It is difficult to write, but I consider it an
obligation and am determined to fulfill it with my
ktst ounce of energy. I will writ* a scroll of agony, in
order to remember the past in the future. For despite
all the dangers. I still have hopes of coming out of
this alive-
Yesterday was a day of horror and destruction.
Between 5 and 1 o'clock on the eve of Rosh
Hashanah there was an air raid on the North
Quarter, which is predominantly Jewish The
enemy mercilessly poured his wrath on the Jewish
quarter with incendiary bombs ..."
On the second day. the entry begins:
Everything bears the stamp of war. Instead of
Jews wearing taleisim and carrying prayer books
rushing to the synagogue, one sees stretcher bearers
carrying the dead and wounded .... Inwardly,
everyone is preparing himself for death ..."
A YEAR LATER. Rosh Hashanah was on Oct. 3.
The entry for the eve before begins:
"There is darkness in our synagogues, silence and
desolation within, and sorrow looking on from
without Everything u forbidden. Secret
minyanim by the hundreds throughout Warsaw
organize services They pick some inside rooms
where windows look out onto the courtyard, and
pour out their supplications before the God of Israel
in whispers. .
Kaplan was 60 at the time He and his wife are
believed to have been put to death in the Treblinka
camp in December. 1942. or January, 1943.
For those of us descended from Eastern Europe,
all echoes of that area are profoundly moving.
Memories of the Yamim \oraim are liable to be a
mixture of good feeling and perplexity, often in the
same person.
The letters of Chaim Weizmann. recently
published in 23 volumes, are strongly evocative of
this mixed sentiment, especially in his young days,
when he was building his career as a chemist in
Manchester, but also fighting night and day to rally
the Jews all over Europe for Zionism. Typical of
many of bis Rosh Hashanah letters is one from
Home! to his pal Leo Motzkin in Berlin on Sep-
tember 11. 1899. five days after the hoUday:
.... Lectures on Zionism have begun in every
town The Yamim Noraim give us an opportunity
of carrying out propaganda among the broad masses
of the people They are amazingly responsive: as
soon as they leave the synagogue they would at once
like to do something- ..."
HE IS IN A very different mood when be wtam
from Manchester to his wife-to-be Vera in Geneva nn
Octobers. 1906: "
"Today is the eve of Yom Kippur. At home, tha
day is usually both solemn and sad. I long to b&ar
Kol Nidrei in my own surroundings- I. too. feel
traditionally sad today, even depressed. It isn't
pleasant to realize that tomorrow morning I j^alj
have to be at my post at the laboratory as if it ere
any other day. and teach chemistry to my govm
There is a very different a much more bitter -
mixture of elements from the same background in
the life of Isaac Deutscher. the biographer of
Trotsky, as revealed in his book. "The Non-Jewish
Jew.'' As a child he had been a talmudk prodigy.
studying with the Gerer Rebbe. and acclaimed as a
rabbi at thirteen. He was soon to surrender wholly to
Marx, and look back with spite to his Jewish origins.
YET SOMETHING LINGERED. We hea.- in the
introduction to the book, by his widow Tamara. that
he often talked of how. at the age of 14. he had defied
everything in his origins by eating a ham sandwich
on Yom Kippur in a Jewish cemetery", to wjr. a bet
from a non- Jewish Marxist friend. But he also spoke
of his remorse. He didn't mind offending God. he
said, but he had betrayed his parents.
To get the true flavor of the Yamim \. ram in
Eastern Europe one turns from Deutscher to
Shmarya Levin, who was born in Swislowitz in '. "
became a Zionist leader in America, and left, among
his writings, a warm book of memoirs called Child-
hood in Exile.'
He was very proud as a child that Swislowitz was
on two rivers the Beresina and the Swisla which
flowed into it. It meant that for the tashlich
ceremony on Rosh Hashanah. when Jews cast their
sins in a ritual gesture into running water, one had a
choice:
"If you liked, you could patronize the Beresina:
and if you liked, you went to the Swisla. flung your
transgressions into it. and had them carried down to
the far-off Dnieper, thence to the Black Sea. to be
lost at last in the oceans which encircle the globe
There is a graphic description in the book of how
the Yishuvniks Jewish backwoodsmen who led
solitary lives all year in alien surroundings came
to town for Rosh Hashanah:
"We did our best to make them all feel at home.
gave up to them our nicest rooms, and in the syna-
gogue assigned them to the places of honor by the
eastern wall. We children, too. received the
youngsters from the backwoods with all friendliness.
Some of them were wild creatures, terrified by the
vast crowds, and unable to utter a word. My
father would take some of them on his knee, caress
ihem. and tell them not to be frightened.
Kosh Hashanah would have been wonderful, he
Continued on Page 8-C
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Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 6-C
The Search for Jewish Roots
The search for roots among the current generation
of American Jews grows out of the urge to sanctify
the memory of the victims of the Holocaust. As our
younger people struggle desperately to hold on to
the past, there is an appropriateness in the recent
announcement by the American Jewish Congress
that it has introduced a new tour this year, on the.
S. L. Shneiderman is a Yiddish writer and
literary critic who lives in New York. Born
and educated in Poland he has visited East-
ern Europe many times since World War II.
He is theauthorof The Warsaw Heresy,' The
River Remembers' and 'Between Fear and
Hope,' studies in post-war Eastern Europe.
25th anniversary of its much-heralded travel
program, entitled "Jewish Roots Eastern Euro-
pe."
Such a journey can provide deep personal meaning
to the American Jew by integrating past and present
as it includes visits to reconstituted Jewish commu-
nities located in cities like Prague, Vienna, Buda-
pest, Belgrade, Bucharest, Cracow, Warsaw and
Amsterdam.
VISITS TO the pitifully small Jewish communi-
ties brings these isolated and often beleaguered sur-
vivors closer to the Jewish mainstream. It also
serves to remind both government authorities and
the general population that the Jewish people,
whether in Budapest or Buffalo, N.Y., are one. The
presence of American Jews in the concentration
camps of Terezin and Auschwitz provides them with
a rare opportunity to bear personal witness to the
tragic Jewish experience in the 20th century. No Jew
can help but be changed in the process.
Even in corners of Eastern Europe where the
Jewish communities today are virtually extinct, the
| sensitive traveller is nevertheless amazed to discover
that there are still fascinating remnants of a Jewish
life that has lasted for more than a thousand years.
In cities in Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary,
Rumania and Yugoslavia, where the tiny Jewish
communities are living out their last chapter, streets
still bear names that evoke a significant Jewish past.
The monumental historic synagogues remind the
visitor of the former splendor. In Jewish cemeteries
one finds beautifully ornamented gravestones with
[ Hebrew inscriptions dating back to the Middle
? Ages. And, of course, there are the museums that
display priceless religious artifacts, sacred books
I and historical documents saved from annihilation.
Hut perhaps the most astonishing discovery for
the American Jewish traveller is the very fact that
active Jewish communities struggling to preserve
the glorious past of their ancestors still exist. The
future of these communities is dim, since there are
I virtually no succeeding generations.
A visit by American Jews brings encouragement
to these lonely, elderly people, uniting them with the
greatest Jewish community in the free world.
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Reliable Auto Leasing
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9700 Collins Ave-866-1172
Happy New Year
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1150 NW 14 ST.324-0803
Holiday Greetings To All
R.H. Popkins Insurance
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Happy New Year
Grows Out Of
Urge To
Sanctify Victims
By S. L. SHNEIDERMAN
THE SURVIVORS of the Holocaust in Eastern
Europe have erected monuments, honoring heroic
Jesish resistance against the Nazis. Despite hard-
ships imposed by Communist regimes, they have es-
tablished valuable documentation and research
centers for the study of the Holocaust, except for the
Soviet Union where such centers are non-existent.
Outside of Israel, Poland is the main center for
Holocaust research. The Jewish Historical Institute
in Warsaw is the repository of the Oneg Shabat ar-
chives, created in the Warsaw Ghetto by the Mar-
tyred historian, Dr. Emmanuel Ringelblum.
The permanent exhibit of the Jewish Historical
Institute the building where the ghetto-archives
were created displays the rusty milk cans and
metal boxes in which the record of life and death of
Polish Jewry was buried and unearthed after the lib-
eration from underneath the ruins of the Warsaw
Ghetto. The museum also has a permanent art-
exhibit of works by noted painters who perished in
the Warsaw Ghetto.
OF THE three-and-a-half million Jews who lived
in Poland at the outbreak of World War II, all that
remain are some 5,000 to 6,000 elderly Jews who
struggle to maintain a semblance of Jewish commu-
nity life. Additionally, there are about 1,000 to 1,500
assimilated Jews with Polish names, mostly profes-
sionals. However, a number of retired professionals
of Jewish descent recently joined 17 small congrega-
tions scattered throughout the country. And of par-
ticular significance is the large number of young
Poles of mixed marriages who are examining their
Jewish roots, studying Hebrew and Yiddish and
considering emigration to Israel.
The Jewish Cultural and Social Union, with 17
clubs around Poland, and the Union of Religious
Congregations, with a similar number of small
prayer-houses, provide closer ties, prompted by the
growing national awakening of their members. The
Cultural and Social Union is publishing the Folks-
Shtime, the only Yiddish weekly in the Soviet Bloc
countries that is also circulated in the Soviet Union.
The weekly, with its Polish supplement, is edited by
Abraham Kwaterko and is widely read by liberal
Polish intellectuals.
A strange experience for the foreign traveller is a
visit to the Yiddish State Theater in Warsaw where
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2400 N. Miami Ave.,Miami573-8337
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one can see colorful performances of classic Yiddish
plays. Most people in the audience are Poles who
follow the simultaneous translation of the dialogue
with earphones. The characters on the stage, often
played by Polish artists tutored in Yiddish at the
theater studio, are the only Jews with beards and
traditional garb so prevalent before the war
that can be seen today in Poland.
IN THE HEART of the once Jewish Quarter in
Warsaw stands the imposing monument to the Six
Million by the noted sculptor, Nathan Rappaport. It
is located on a square bordering the street named
after the martyred commander of the Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising, Mordechai Anielewicz,. It is a long
avenue leading to the Gensia Cenetery established at
the end of the 18th Century.
The cemetery, which was miraculously saved from
destruction, is the Pantheon of Polish Jewry where
the foremost leaders, religious and secular, are
buried. Among them is the father of modern Yid-
dish literature, I. L. Peretz; S. Anski, theauthorof
"The Dybbuk;" Chaim Zelig Slonimsky, editor of
the first Hebrew daily, Hatzefirah; Dr. Ludwik
Zammenhof, the creator of Esperanto, and many
other prominent personalities in Jewish and Polish
life.
There is also the grave of Adam Czemiakow, the
tragic president of the Judenrat, who committed
suicide after refusing to sign the Nazi order for mass
deportation. Nearby is the collective grave of the
ghetto fighters, as well as the recently erected
monument to Janusz Korczak, the writer and educa-
tor who perished in Treblinka with the children of his
ghetto orphanage.
IN CRACOW, where a Jewish community existed
for almost a millenium, some of the historic syna-
gogues have been converted into monuments of the
Jewish past. The old Jewish cemetery was complete-
ly destroyed, except for the gravestone of Rabbi
Moses Isserles, known as Remuh, and considered
the greatest Cracow goon, or wise man, of the 16th
Century. On the anniversary of Remuh's death,
which falls on Lag B'Omer, thousands of pious Jews
used to come to Cracow from every part of the coun-
try to pray at the grave of the great sage.
The celebration of the millenium of the Czech Jew-
ish community, set for the summer of 1968, was
twice postponed by the Communist regime. First,
because of the Six-Day War, when Czechoslovakia
followed the Soviet Union in breaking diplomatic re-
lations with Israel. Shortly afterward came the
Soviet invasion of Prague and the liquidation of the
liberal Dubcelc government.
The planned celebrations marking the Jewish mil-
lenium were postponed indefinitely. Of the prelimi-
nary preparations, all that remained was the fascin-
ating exhibit in the State Jewish Museum in Prague
entitled: One Thousand Years of Jewish Life in
Bohemia.
THE MUSEUM is located in the area that was
once the medieval ghetto of Prague. This beautifully
preserved section of the Czech capital is dominated
by the tower of the ancient Jewish Town Hall with
its clock with Hebrew letters, of which the French
poet Guillaume Apollinaire once wrote:
Please turn to next page.
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448-2290
Coconut Grove
448-0942
Happy New Year
Patient's Center
3121 Coral Way. Miami-445-2662
Wish Entire Jewish Community
A Joyous A Prosperous New Year
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
To All Our Customers and Friends
163rd Street Mobil
1300 NE 163rd St., North Miami Beach, Fla 33162
949-1996
Opticare Center, Inc.
1825 N.E. 164th St., N.M.B.944-5122
Best Wishes to the entire Jewish Community
Oscar's Restaurant
5713 Sunset Drive, Miami667-5158
Happy New Year
The Palette
125 NE 26 St., Miami573-0980
Happy New Year
Paperback Outlet
1661-A Meridian Ave., Miami Beach538-8158
Best Wishes to the Entire Jewish Community
Pastry Lane Bakery
1688 NE 164 St, North Miami Beach
Phone: 944-5934
Happy New Year To All


Page 6-C The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 9.1983
Search for Jewish Roots: Need to Sanctify
The hands of the clock in the Jewish quarter move
backward.
And you, too, begin to move backward through
life.
Nearby is the Old-New Gothic Synagogue, the
oldest functioning synagogue in Europe, h^tm
1270. The creator of the legendary Golem, Rabbi
Judah Ben Bezalel Loew of Prague, known as the
Maharal. was associated with this synagogue.
The whole ancient quarter has been converted into
a Jewish museum, unique in the world. The narrow
streets still bearing the names of Jewish sages show
no physical evidence of destruction. One has the
feeling that Czech Jewry with its long and fruitful
history is embalmed in these streets.
THE EXHIBITS give a fascinating picture of the
splendor and wealth of the Jewish community in the
capital of the Bohemian kings. They also tell drama-
tically of the bitter struggles for survival waged by
the Jews of Bohemia and Moravia.
A large section of the museum, housed in a huge
Romanesque structure that was once a morgue, is
devoted to the tragedy of the Nazi occupation of
Czechoslovakia. On display here are documents from
the ghetto of Theresienstadt. used by the Nazis as
an assembly place for Czechoslovak Jews later
deported to Auschwitz. There are naive crayon
drawings done by children in Theresienstadt depict-
ing butterflies with sad human faces, symbols of
their desire to fly away from the hell of the ghetto.
Of the 400.000 Jews who lived in Czechoslovakia
when its dismemberment began in Munich in 1938.
fewer than 10.000 now remain. Prague, which had a
Jewish population of 60.000 when the Nazis came,
harbors barely 2.000 Jews today.
THE MOST impressive feature of Prague's Jew-
ish Museum is the memorial to Czech Jewry's mar-
tyred thousands that has been created in the Pinkas
M nagoue. a magnificent stone structure dating
from 1625. Inscribed on the walls are the names of
77.297 Jews men. women and children, known to
have been murdered by the Nazis.
There is not a Jewish family in Czechoslovakia
that does not have at least one relative in that vast
scroll of the dead. Two of the names inscribed on the
walls of the Pinkas Synagogue are those of the
sisters of the great Czech-Jewish writer Franz
Kafka. The Kafka sisters, Otla and Vali. perished in
Auschwitz. Their illustrious brother, who died in
1924. is buried in the family plot in the New Prague
Cemetery, with Hebrew inscriptions on his grave-
stone.
The second largest Jewish community in pre-war
Europe was Hungary's. Out of a Jewish population
of 860.000, more than 225,000 lived in Budapest,
where Adolf Eichmann established his headquarters
for the Final Solution of the Jewish Problem in Eu
rope. More than 600,000 Hungarian Jews perished in
Auschwitz. After the liberation many survivors
settled in Israel, the United States and Canada. To-
day the 80.000 Jews in Hungary comprise the second
laigest Jewish community in Eastern Europe, next
to the Soviet Union.
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New Owi.erPhil Sharlet
1426 Ponce De Leon Blvd.. Coral Gables-448-3441
Happy New Year
Gaffin Store Equipment
2500 N. Miami Ave., Miami
Extend Happy Holiday Wishes
Gelfand Roofing
2401 NW 77 Terr.. Miami-759-0922
Happy New Year
Gino's Italian Restaurant
1906 Collins Ave., Miami Beach532-6426
Happy New Year
Gold Tour
1602 Washington Ave., Miami Beach531-4606
Happy New Year To All
Good Times Travel Center
9421 Harding Ave., Miami Beach868-1606-10
"Keep the Good Times Going"
Happy Ji/ew Year
UNDER THE liberal Communist regime of Janoe
Kadar. Hungary became the moat vibrant Jewish
center in the Soviet Bloc. Budapest has a Rabbinical
Seminary that provides spiritual leaders for all the
communist countries, including the Soviet Union.
There are about 30 active synagogues in Budapest
and 105 in the provinces. The Grand Temple m
Budapest, with seating for 3.500 people, the
largest synagogue in the world. On High Holidays it
overflows with worshippers.
The Central Board of Jewish Communities pub-
lishes a weekly magazine, maintains a modern hos-
pital, a kosher restaurant, a matzo bakery, and ad-
ministers the Jewish Museum, where one can find
archaeological artifacts dating back to the Roman
era. In the museum are displayed Jewish tomb-
stones from the 10th and 12th centuries and por-
traits of outstanding Jewish personalities of modern
times.
THERE IS ALSO a large permanent exhibit
devoted to the Holocaust. The Museum is located in
the house in which Thedore Herzl was born. Under
glass, there are hand-written letters from this
founder of political Zionism.
Jews of Yugoslavia date back to antiquity. The re-
cently discovered ruins of a 3rd Century synagogue
in Split (Spalatol and a cemetery of the same period
testify to the existence of Jewish community life in
Yugoslavia more than 15 centuries ago.
At the outbreak of World War Two, about 90.000
Jews lived in Yugoslavia. Only 16,000 survived the
Holocaust. Among them were 4,000 former anti-Nazi
fighters in the ranks of Tito's partisans. Many
earned high military distinction and were some of
Tito's closest companions-
More than half of the surviving Jews settled in Is-
rael. Now the Jewish minority of about 6.000 is the
smallest ethnic group in Yugoslavia.
THE COUNTRY has a number of prominent Jew-
ish personalities in all fields of intellectual endeavor,
among them noted writers, artists and members of
the Academy of Sciences, particularly in the field of
medical research.
A significant factor in Yugoslavian demographics
is the large percentage of young Jews. They main-
tain lively contact with Israel through tourism, par-
ticularly in the summer, when many Israelis of
Yugoslav descent return for a visit.
Belgrade houses an impressive Jewish Museum,
located in the building of the Central Board of Jew-
ish Congregations. The exhibits trace the history of
Yugoslavia's Jews, including the Holocaust, with
special emphasis on the role of Jews in the partisan
movement. The Belgrade Jewish cemetery has a
huge monument for the Six Million.
OUTSTANDING AMONG the numerous Jewish
monuments in Yugoslavia is the old fortress-like
synagogue in Sarajevo, which was saved from de-
struction under the Nazis. The most enduring
document of ancient Jewish life in Yugoslavia is the
richly illuminated Sarajevo Haggadah, dating back
to the 14th century.
At the outbreak of World War Two, the Jewish
population in Rumania totaled about 800,000. Al-
most half survived the Holocaust significantly
more than in other Nazi-occupied countries be-
cause Rumania only fell under Nazi domination in
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Happy New Year To All Our
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Frank B. Hall and
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2600 Douglas Road, Miami448-2211
New Year Greetings To All
Hallet Pontiac Inc.
13401 So. Dixie Hwy., Mi ami-238-4040
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Harold's Garage
5781 Commerce Lane, Miami661-6931
Holiday Greetings
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Prosthetics & Orthotics
1150 NW 14 St. Miami-324-0913
_________A Happy New Year To All
Holocaust Victims
1944. Almost 90 percent of the survivors left for I
reel and other countries of the Free World. N0
there are about 40,000 Jews in Rumania halt i
them in the Capital, Bucharest. 0I
'lb* spiritual leader of Rumanian Jewry, Rabbi
Moses Rosen, is a member of Parliament and alto
president of the Federation of Jewish Comrnunitieg
in Rumania. There are 68 organized communitiej
with 130 synagogues. A number of community,'
have Talmud Torahs. In 22 communities, Hebrew is
taught. The Federation publishes a bi-monthly jour.
nal in three languages, Yiddish, Hebrew and Ru.
mania n.
THE STATE Publishing House, Criterion, issues
four or five Yiddish books annually by Yiddish
writers living in Rumania.
Rumania is the cradle of the Modern Yiddish The-
ater. A century ago, Abraham Goldfaden founded a
theatrical troupe in the town of Yassi. Their perfor-
mances of his plays throughout Poland, Russia and
the United States gave impetus to the development
of Yiddish art theater in these countries.
Rumania is the only Communist country that did
not break diplomatic relations with Israel after the
Six-Day War. The leaders of the Jewish community
maintain close contact with Israel. Israelis frequent-
ly visit Rumania. The beautiful resorts by the Black
Sea and in the mountains are popular vacation spots
for Jewish visitors from all over the world.
EN ROUTE FROM Eastern Europe,
sophisticated Jewish tourists find Holland to be a
country of particular attraction. In its colorful
capital. Amsterdam. Baruch Spinoza wrote his re-
bellious philosophical treatises and Rembrandt
painted portraits of rabbis and Jewish patricians.
Many visitors are not aware that Polish Jews who
settled in Holland in the 16th and 17th centuries
spoke Yiddish and even the Sephardic Jews used it
in every-day business dealings. That prompted an
enterprising publisher, in 1686, to start the first Yid-
dish newspaper in the world, called Kuranten (Cour-
ier!. An elaborate program of festivities in 1986 is
being prepared to mark the 300th anniversary of this
event.
A set of Kuranten is preserved in the famous Bib-
liotheca Rosenthaliana, at the University of Amster-
dam. The founder of this invaluable collection of
Judaica was a Polish Jew, Lesser Rosenthal. from
the shtetl of Nasielsk, who settled in Amsterdam at
the beginning of the 19th century.
AFTER SUCCEEDING in business, he began to
collect Hebrew and Yiddish incunabula books
prmt.-d before 1500 and Hebrew Judaica books
Eventually, his library consisted of 6,000 books and
32 important Hebrew manuscripts. His son. George
Rosdenthal. a banker, established the Rosenthaliana
Library.
Out of a pre-war population of 140.000 Dutch
Jews, only 35,000 survived the Holocaust. After the
liberation, the Jewish community established an In-
stitute for the Research of the Holocaust.
Even during a short journey to these European
countries in the East and West, the visitor can expe-
rience the lasting vibrations of a thousand-year-old
Jewish culture that flourished in these lands and has
profoundly influenced Jewish life in the New World
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THE QUESTION is often asked: "Can Israel
reach a point where she can go it alone become
independent of financial support from the U.S.A.?"
The answer is and must be "definitely yes."
Israel has no choice but to work towards getting out
of the perilous situation where the U.S. can apply
pressures against her thus forcing the Govern-
ment of Israel to make decisions often considered
not to be in her best interest.
The better part of good judgment requires us to
question whether the United States will continue to
provide loans and grants to Israel of $2.5 billion per
year indefinitely. Domestic pressures at home are in
conflict with Israel's request for long-term funding.
SO, despite the fact that I believe American
economic and military aid to Israel is a bargain
particularly when one compares what it costs the
United States in men and money to protect Western
Europe an intensive campaign should be un-
dertaken now to make Israel financially independent
of the U.S.
U.S. Ambassador to Israel, Sam Lewis, recently
cautioned that "Israel today is far too dependent on
the U.S. for Israel's own good and also for the good
of the U.S." He proposed that Israel try to work its
way out of "the onus of the balance of payments gap
which makes Israel too dependent on the U.S. ap-
propriations process for either side to be com-
fortable."
AFTER STUDYING the growth of the Israeli
economy in some detail, interviewing its leaders of
commerce and industry and talking with its leading
governmental economic officials, I believe that
Israel can celebrate its "Economic Independence
Day" on December 30, 1990. To make this possible,
a new kind of cooperation between the two countries
will be necessary: doing it with the Israelis rather
than for them.
What is needed, then, is a matching effort, with
input by both countries. The key to this cooperation
lies, as I see it, in the private sector. American
corporations must be encouraged to establish
manufacturing plants in Israel, investing their
capital (together with Israeli entrepreneurs) and
pooling their know-how. The aim would be to in-
crease the number of U.S. companies with
manufacturing branches in Israel from 150 to more
than 200 by 1990.
The increased production for export of such an
increase would be sufficient to realize the Israeli
governments plan to more than double its annual
exports from $5 billion in 1982 to $11.3 billion by the
and of 1991. If Israel can meet or exceed that export
figure, it will have eliminated its balance-of-
payment deficit, provided only that imports are kept
under some kind of tighter control and government
spending can be reduced.
Happy New Year
Federal Discount Center
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Federal Discount
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1120 West 49th St.. Hialeah-556-5270
New Year's Greeting
Flower Wagon
14055 S.W. 142nd Ave., Miami233-6166
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Food Spot Stores
7901 S.W. 67th Ave., Miami-666-0642
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Four Star Poultry
2180 NW13 Ave., Miami325-1183
Happy New Year
Can Israel Ever
Hope To
Go It Alone?
By ELMER WINTER
Chairman, Committee For Economic Growth
of Israel
TO REACH the goal of $ 11.3 billion in exports per
year, $1 billion of additional capital must be invested
in Israel each year. Some of this capital will no doubt
come from Israeli companies and from American
firms operating in Israel. The balance must come
from new enterprises that will open in Israel.
I believe that the battle is already half won, for
Israel is a modern economic miracle and is in-
creasingly being recognized as such in American
business circles. Israel has reason to take pride in its
large cadre of skilled business executives, scientists
and engineers who work and live in the country.
With the kind of expansion foreseen here, many
Israelis now working in high tech companies in the
U.S. may be expected to return to Israel to take
advantage of the new opportunities for industrial
development created by the increase in investment.
TO BECOME economically independent in 1990,
there must be a reduction in the involvement of the
Israel government in the management of productive
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-C
enterprises. It would also be well for the Jewish
Agency and the Israel government itself to sell off
some of the companies they own and operate to
private entrepreneurs.
One economic area of huge potential in Israel is
research and development. With a capitalization of
$60 million ($30 million from the U.S. and $30
million from Israel), the Bi-national Industrial
Research and Development Foundation, known as
BIRD-F, has been established to fund joint U.S.-
Israeli R&D in Israel.
Among the American companies that have
received grants to work with Israeli firms in R&D
projects are Lockheed, Veeco Instruments, General
Mills, General Telephone and Electronics and many
others. Their experiences have been uniformly good,
in part because of the high quality of Israel's
scientists and engineers.
To attract the additional 50 American cor-
porations, a much stronger and more effective
marketing effort must be launched. The many
advantages Israel offers must be brought to the
attention of more U.S. corporations.
HERE IS where the U.S. Government comes in.
In my judgment, more American companies will be
attracted to set up shop in Israel if the conditions are
"i? i'j T create tho8e conditions, negotiations
should be started at an early date between
Jerusalem and Washington aimed at these forms of
intergovernmental cooperation:
.Reinstatement of the Memorandum of
Understanding between the U.S. and Israel, dated
September 1981, that provided for $100 million in
military credits to Israel, permission for third
countries to buy Israeli-manufactured arms with
American credits, and provision for the US. armed
forces to spend $200 million in Israel.
" .Creation of a Center for the Development of
Alternate Sources of Energy one way for the U.S.
Continued from Page 10-C
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Myra, Aaron & Harvey Farr
Farr Tour Travel
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Jack Thomas Inc. Realtor
311 NE 13 Terr.. Miami358-5511
Happy New Year
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18827 Biscayne Blvd.
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Happy New Year
Gordon Roofing &
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1450 NW 21 St.. Miami-325-8287
Happy New Year
Green-Brook Corp
1085 East 14th St. Hialeah888-8300
Extends To the Entire Jewish Community
A Happy New Year
Haddon Hall Hotel
1500 Collins Ave.. Miami Beach531-1251
Happy New Year
NEW YEAR
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28 SE 1 St. Miami-358-1004
Health Care
Communications
11550 SW 82 Terr., Miami274-0999
Happy New Year
Hi-Grade Food Co.
240 NE 71 St.
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Ideal Tours Inc.
7455 Collins Ave., Suite 207-868-1162
Happy New Year


Page8-C The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 9,1983
,
JONAH FLEEING FROM JAFFA
JONAH BEFORE NINEVEH
High Holy Days
Their Immense Power on Jewish Life
Continued from Page 4-C
says, "if they had not told us about the Dav of
Judgement." He lay awake for hours as a child,
imploring God to have mercy on his parents. On the
eve of Yom Kippur his mother told him, after the
great last meal, that he must seek out playmates
with whom he had quarrelled and forgive or beg
forgiveness. This was not too easy; but Yom Kippur
took on its real atmosphere the moment one entered
synagogue:
"The floor of the synagogue was thickly strewn
with hay. On all the window sills, as well as on
special tables, were ranged the huge white wax
candles the soul-lights which were to bum for
twenty-four hours in memory of the dead. The
windows were kept closed, for fear a candle might be
blown out; and it was accounted a good omen when
the candles burned evenly right down to the socket,
without spilling their wax over the sides. There was
soon created that special atmosphere which
belonged to Yom Kippur. The room became hot, and
the mingled odors of the wax candles and hay
liecame thicker and thicker. ..."
THERE IS A MARVELOUS story of Sholom
Aleichem called "A Yom Kippur Scandal" set in this
kind of background, but drawing on it in a way that
expresses all the drollery of "Fiddler on the Roof."
The story tells of a stranger arriving in Kasrilevke
Tevye's home-town on the eve of Yom Kippur,
and handing out cash on a generous scale to ensure
that he would have an honored place in synagogue
over the fast. All through the evening, all that night,
and all the next day, the stranger stands and prays
with the utmost devotion.
When the service has ended and all are about to
disperse, there is a sudden shriek of agony from the
man: a cache of 1,800 rubles which he deposited in
the synagogue for safe keeping before Kol Nidrei has
disappeared. "Lock the door," says the rabbi.
"Everyone must be searched."
It would be unfair to say who was searched and
who wasn't, and why. I mustn't give the game away.
For those who want to find out, the story appears in
an excellent collection. "The Best of Sholom
Aleichem."
IF ONE IS in the drollery department, with
echoes of "Fiddler," one thinks of the tale, told in
many forms, of the tailor who sets out on the eve of
Yom Kippur to settle his account with God:
"Here, Master of the Universe, is the list I have
kept scrupulously of all my offences against You in
the last year, and here, Master of the Universe, is the
list I've been keeping of all the afflictions and
distresses and losses vou've put us throush this
year. If a proper book-keeping were made, I'm afraid
I've been more sinned against than sinning.
"But this is Yom Kippur Eve, when we're sup-
posed to forgive one another. So I forgive You
everything, and You too will forgive us all our sins
against You."
In Jewish life, one learns to smile without abating
for a moment the seriousness that the heritage
brings with it, powerfully present in the historic
experiences that have continously unfolded around
the Days of Awe. How one responds to this history
is one's own affair; the seed is there, and one waits to
see what happens.
Carol Rumens expressed this thought in a
luminous poem "The Hebrew Class," that appeared
recently:
. "We are blank pages hungry for the pen. We
are ploughed fields, soft and ripe for planting. Oh
smiling child, oh dangerously gifted ones, take care
that you learn to ask why, for the room you are in is
also history."

s&eife&'J&iEifcs* ; i-


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-C
JONAH UNDER THE GOURD
JONAH


Page 10-C The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 9,1983
Can Israel Ever Hope to Go It Alone ^Without Help from Abroad?
Continued bom Pag* 7-C
to take advantage of Israeli know-how in solar and
other forms of alternative kinds of energy.
Expansion of the BIRD-F program by in-
creasing the capital from $60 million to $ 100 million.
_ The purchase of Israeli-manufactured arms by
the U.S.
Increasing the percentage of military supplies
transferred to Israel on the basis of grants rather
than interest bearing loans.
Purchase of medical equipment in Israel by the
U.S.
Development of a Tri-National Consortium to
encourage and promote trade among the U.S.,
Egypt and Israel.
Development of a free-trade agreement between
Israel and the U.S.
Del Amo Plumbing Inc.
Wishes Ail Their Friends And Customers
A Happy New Year
7323 NW 8th St.-264-9712
Diabetes Research Institute
Martin Kleiman President
Myron BerezinExecutive Director
7525 N.W. 74th Ave., Miami888-3437
Happy New Year
Robert Davis Paint
& Body Shop
5818 S.W. 68th St., South Miami, Fla. 661-9695
____________Happy New Year To All___________
Decor Inc.
9487 Harding Ave., Surfaide-866-0905
Happy New Year
Del Mar Upholstery
CUSTOMMADE
8164 NW 103rd. St., Hialeah Garden*
821-0989
Happy New Year
Delta Gas
2850 S.W. 71 Ave., Miami, Fla. 266-2881
Happy New Year
Dependable Plumbing
Service Inc.
915 NE 79th St., Miami-866-8513
Happy New Year
Di Franco Beauty Salon
411 41st Street-531-5253
Happy New Year To AW
I RECOMMEND the development of an extensive
"Science City" in Haifa, Israel, along the lines of the
Research Triangle Park in North Carolina. Haifa, a
major Israeli port with a deep harbor, modern port
equipment, oil refineries and two of the finest
universities in Israel the Technion (an
engineering school) and Haifa University has all
of the necessary ingredients to produce a similar
science center.
As I see it, "Science City" in Haifa would be the
place where Israeli industry turned for expertise and
guidance in microelectronics, robotics, fiber optics,
biotechnology, solar energy and laser technology.
M.\ny other areas of cooperation between private
U.S. and Israeli companies suggest themselves. To
deal with the explosion that has taken place in the
computer industry, Israeli companies offer superb
Dr. Louie's
Upholstery Shop
3419 NW 36 St., Miami-634-4067
Happy New Year
Dolphin Plumbing
Service Inc.
18715 SW104 Ave., 233-5643
Happy New Year To All
Doral Beauty Salon
4833 Collins Ave.-531-1689
Wishes all its customers and friends
a Happy New Year
Dorissa Children's Wear
2850 NW5th Ave., Miami, Fla. 33127573-3600
Happy New Year To All
Dutch Packing Co., Inc.
4115 NW 28 St. Miami-871-3640
Happy New Year
Compliments of
Eagle Industries, Inc.
Hialeah, Fl.
Manufacturera of Augurs, Vinyl and Products For Usa
Happy New Year
Easy Method
Driving School
675 NE 123rd St., No. Miami, Fla. 33161
Happy New Year
El Cid Restaurant
& Lounge
Le Jeune and Flagler St.541-3514
Happy New Year To All
Engler
Engineering Corp.
1099 E. 47 St., Hialeah688-8581
Happy New Year To Everyone
Executive Caterers
1061 North Miami Beach Blvd.,
North Miami Beach945-2221
Happy New Year
Expressway Lanes
3601 NW 167 St., No. Miami-624-2624
Happy New Year To All
Fashion Jewelers
110815th Street673-3289
Happy New Year To All
Ruth Fenton Appropos
341 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables445-6472
Happy New Year
technological skills in software capability. There ia a
vast market for Israeli-manufactured home com-
puters. Israeli companies have the know-how to
become world leaders in word processing and
robotics, as they have already proven in the area of
computer aided design.
ONE WAY Israeli companies can help themselves
is to come to the American securities market for
financial backing. Approximately 12 Israeli com-
panies are already listed on American stock ex-
changes and over-the-counter. Plans are moving
forward to launch a U.S. based mutual fund that
would hold Israeli stocks sold in the Tel Aviv as well
as the New York and American Stock Exchanges.
The call of financial independence is realizable
provided there is an active joint participation by
American and Israeli businessmen supported by the
governments of both countries. We would do well to
Continued on Page 13-C
-->_
Fine Distributing Co.
3485 NW 65 St., Miami691-0231
Happy New Year
Floridian Furniture
4795 SW 8th St., Miami, FU.-448-2639
Happy New Year
The Forge Restaurant
432 Arthur Godfrey Rd., Miami Beach
538-8533
Extends To The Entire Jewish Community
A Very Happy New Year
Franks Jewelers
7271 Red Road, Miami661-7627
Wishes All A Joyous & Happy New Year
Front Page
8922 SW 97 Ave., Miami274-4642
A Happy New Year
To The Entire Jewish Community
Fujiya Inc.
12777 SW 280 St. Homestead-257-5535
Happy New Year
Fulton Pest Control
1981 NE 153 St., North Miami Beach945-6525
Happy New Year To All
Furniture Artist
& Upholstery
783 NE 125 St., Miami895-6951
Happy New Year
-W
Florence M. Futch, Realtor
925 Arthur Godfrey Road, Miami Beach
538-1843
New Year Greetings
Florida Lace &
Braid Co., Inc. ^
565-575 NW 24 St., Miami-573-8020
Happy New Year from All of Us to All of You
Golden Razor Barber Salon
9700 Collins Ave., Miami Beach865-2779
Wishes a Happy New Year to all
Golden Touch
Beauty Salon
6981 Collins Avenue865-6428
Extends A Happy New Year To All
Ben Grabers Ladies Wear
1325 NE 163rd St., N. Miami Beach-945-4171
Happy New Year
lainauSAl


V -
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-C
It Was Reported
torch
A Top Story of The Outgoing Hebrew Year 5743
| By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
I"A) The replacement
iriel Sharon as Defense
lister by Israel's Am-
ssador to the United
lies, Moshe Arens, may
lessen the problems be-
|een the U.S. and Israel,
it is expected to im-
)ve the atmosphere in
|ich they are addressed.
least that appears to be
prevailing attitude in
ishington.
Personalities do play a part in
ergovernmental relations as
by do in domestic politics, and
fis no secret that Sharon was
most unpopular Israeli offi-
ll in Washington. Even critics
Premier Menachem Begin
ewed him as a moderate when
Impared to his Defense Minis-
]r.
It is perhaps a coincidence, but
te two Defense Ministers
baron of Israel and Defense
cretary Caspar Weinberger
;med to be the official in each
jmiry that had done the most
lexacerbate relations between
U.S. and Israel during the
\l two years of the Reagan Ad-
listration.
LRENS, did get along with
feinberger. as he has with most
kmbers of the Reagan Adminis-
ii ii hi since coming to Washing-
i a year ago.
[in what may have been sym-
\\\> of the new atmosphere,
ens met with Weinberger at
Pentagon Feb. 13 just hours
er the Israeli Cabinet an-
jnced his appointment as De-
kse Minister. And when the Is-
ili envoy's name was men-
Ined during a television inter-
pw with Secretary of State
urge Shultz, Shultz volun-
L'red that Arens was an "out-
indingman."
[Yet the 57-year-old-plain-
keaking aeronautical engineer is
pnsidered as much a "hardliner"
i anyone in the Begin govern-
ent. After all, Arens was
egin's first choice for Defense
linister when Ezer Weizman re-
two years ago but turned
pwn the offer because he op-
sed the peace treaty with
YPt-
BUT SINCE leaving the
merful post of chairman of the
Lnesset Foreign Affairs and De-
ense Committee to come to
Washington in February, 1962,
Irens has been an effective
spokesman for the Israeli view
:>t only to the Reagan Adminis-
tration, but to the American pub
lie, particularly in his numerous
elevision appearances.
In recent months he has made
Israel's arguments for the two is-
sues that now divide Jerusalem
nd Washington, Lebanon and
Israel's rejection of President
leagan's Sept. 1 peace initiative.
r Differences over these two is-
Isues, especially Lebanon, have
brought US-Israeli relations to
I a new low in recent weeks. The
Administration has argued that
there must be a withdrawal of all
foreign forces from Lebanon as
I soon as possible in order to allow
the new Lebanese government to
obtain sovereignty over all its
I territory.
IN THE television Interview,
[Shultz denied that U.S. policy
was aimed at a "speedy with-
| drawai-of tsraeH forces-,^-stress-
ing that it sought the "speedy
withdrawal of all forces in a man-
ner that's consistent with the
security needs of Israel."
But he told the House Foreign
Affairs Committee he believes
that once an agreement is worked
out for Israel's departure, the
Syrians will agree to leave, and
the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization forces will follow the
Syrians.
But Israel denies there is any
urgency and stresses that it
wants to be assured that once its
army leaves it will not have to re-
turn again because Palestinian
terrorists are back shelling
northern Israel. If the PLO were
to return to south Lebanon that
"would be the end of Lebanon,
and that would be the end of any
hope for stability in the area,"
Arens warned recently.
Shultz told the House Com-
mittee that the U.S. considers the
Israeli security concerns "quite
legitimate" and "worth the care
and effort" being given them.
But President Reagan has been
urging a speedy Israeli with-
drawal in his meetings with Jew-
ish leaders and with various
newspeople from around the
country. At one such meeting,
Reagan called Israel an "occup-
pying power" and accused it of
"unneccessarily delaying" its
withdrawal from Lebanon.
ON THE negotiating issues it-
self, the Administration opposes
Israel's demands for permanent
security outposts in southern
Lebanon. Shultz call it "hardly
consistent with the idea of
sovereignty for Lebanon." The
Administration has also opposed
Israel's efforts to work out some
sort of normalization of relations
with Lebanon, which many ob-
servers see as an effort to appease
Saudi Arabia.
But the Administration's ur-
gency on Lebanon is above all an
effort to save the Reagan peace
initiative. Persons with such
diverse views on the Middle East
as former Secretary of State
Henry Kissinger and Chancellor
Bruno Kreisky of Austria have
urged that the issues not be made
conditional on each other. The
Administration has denied there
is any link. "The fundamental
priority has to be the basic peace
process," Shultz said last week.
But for the Reagan initiative to
succeed, King Hussein of Jordan
must enter the autonomy talks.
The Administration has made it
clear that it believes that Jordan
will not do so until the Israelis
agree to leave Lebanon.
JULIUS BERMAN, chairman
of the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Or-
ganizations, reported after a re-
cent Oval Office Meeting between
Reagan and a small group of
Jewish leaders that the President
indicated that Hussein would en-
ter the negotiations as soon as an
agreement for an Israeli with-
drawal is achieved.
But longtime observers of
Hussein note that the king has
always found some excuse for not
being able to negotiate. Lebanon
aside, Hussein does not seem to
be getting the approval of the
PLO that he claims he needs to
enter the talks.
Yet there is fear among Israel's
friends that the Administration,
wittingly or not, is setting up an
excuse for Hussein not to join the
talks, an excuse on which the
blame will fall on Israel.
"The pattern for peacemaking
in the Middle East has been set
. direct face-to-face talks with-
out any preconditions," Arens
recently said on television. "And
that is the pattern that King
Hussein must follow. He might
find it difficult; he may not be
enthusiastic; he may feel no in-
centive to do it, but that's what it
takes to arrive at peace in the
Middle East."
RATHER THAN accept that
pattern, many in Washington
would rather blame Israel. Ber-
man has reported that Jewish
leaders in recent meetings with
Reagan and Shultz have stressed
that Israel is being made to ap-
pear intransigent when it is the
Arab states that refuse to nego-
tiate with Israel. Even though
the Begin government rejected
the Reagan peace initiative, it
was welcomed by many in Israel
and in the American Jewish com-
munity because it urged the
Arabs to negotiate with Israel
and especially because it sought
Jordan to the negotiating table.
As Leon Dulzin, chairman of
the World Zionist Organization
and Jewish Agency Executives,
recently pointed out here, there is
greater commitment by the Ad-
ministration to the Reagan
initiative than there was to the
Rogers plan by the Nixon Ad-
ministration because it bears the
name of the President not the
Secretary of State.
When Will Next Inflation Round Hit Us?
By ARNO HERZBERG
Inflation has died down,
but nobody knows when
the next round will come.
The breathing spell we are
enjoying right now might
be reason enough to survey
the devastating results
inflation had on the life of
our congregations and
other Jewish organizations.
Higher and higher mainte-
nance costs have strained many a
budget and have played havoc
with the best planned finances.
There was a time when member-
ship dues covered 70 and more
percent of the total expenses.
These times are gone. The
Eercentage of dues to the total
udget has declined rapidly and
decisively during the past years.
A congregation is lucky if, in
spite of the increases of dues,
membership fees cover 40 percent
of the budget. The balance has to
be raised by other means. As
last resort, new mortgages and
debts seem to provide a way out.
But one can only burden future
generations if a stable member-
ship is a certainty. Although
nobody can foresee the future,
there are developments pointing
to a shrinking membership base
in the decade ahead.
FOREMOST of all, there are
the demographic changes among
Jews in America that will have a
bearing on the future. The
number of older people will in-
crease, the number of young
people will decrease. There are
and will be more single women of
child-bearing age that have
chosen their own way of life. As
far as the older people are con-
cerned, their move to the Sun-
belt, the effect of inflation on
their giving power have to be
reckoned with.
In the metropolitan areas,
neighborhoods have changed.
Congregations had to move after
their members. They had to sell
buildings and temples. They had
to nay the price peaceful, law-
abiding citizens have to pay for
crime and neglect. This change of
neighborhoods continues
unabated. It will go on in years to
come.
Some of these congregations
have tried to retain their
membership by merging with
another-congregation. But it is a
risky venture. Mergers create
problems of their own. There are
personality clashes, rivalries, and
different customs to contend
with. There are the "old timers"
versus the "newcomers. A
merger of facilities can prove to
be easier than a merger of minds.
In any case, there is always a loss
of members. It is unavoidable.
WHILE INFLATION,
demographic facts and changing
neighborhoods provide ample
reason for adjustments and plan-
ning, due consideration has to be
given to a change in attitude and
an ever increasing polarization
among American Jews. There is
hardening of minds, the absence
of any willingness to compromise
that is pervading Jewish life
today as it is prevailing in our
society in general. It is
unavoidable that such arr at-
titude will increase each and
every problem we are faced with.
It hardly could be different.
How will this absence of a
spirit of compromise affect the
religious character of our congre-
gations? How will it contradict a
necessary trend to merge and
how will it affect the will to
survive as Jews? For reasons of
economy, there will be pressure
to combine facilities and merge
activities. There will be reluct-
ance and apprehension to go this
route. There will be outright
resistance if compromise cannot
be achieved.
If the trend to merge and to
combine is here, will it mean that
the small congregation as such is
doomed? Will it mean that it will
not be possible to preserve a more
personal and fraternal way of
life?
THE ANSWER will depend on
the financial structure of every
congregation, the way they
handled their finances in the
past. Some have amassed
marketable real estate that can
be sold and the proceeds used to
lower debts or to bridge the
future. As a whole, if congre-
gations do not consider in their
plans the problems inherent in
the situation, they will be in
trouble. If they do not know how
to handle their finances and the
concerns of their members in a
prudent manner, they will join
the list of defunct congregations.
Naturally, the pressures do not
only come from the financial side.
Especially, congregations of the
conservative persuasion have
been caught up in the struggle to
have women participate a...'
services in a manner completely
at odds with thf rmq^ ^
-


12-C Ti* imc Fj
TrXMj
? :n&
.
But Hebrew Lessons
In Cairo?
Egyptian Uses Radio To Turn Israeli Enemy Into A Friend
VJ-TVk
3j JVItTTH EOH*
CAIRO IfEesJ -
by r*djo
ilaraeLa
toex-
Lets spes-x
The prograr: a
va_ig -jrjuOcatgi froe las?
leaeWaVawti amd radio
i iilt, as Cairo, and
Pi aa anttcavers are
V%y^*:*- rsaies^s of H*r-
-,rv azjr-*%*- at Cairo
University Eic sr.arr. and
El-Aznar
.'- iu&jxxj-. \xx>. ter.ru? afur
.ae rp[ that issju issinsiy brought
0-j. Ay/. Nf v- power
~Kol Kahar as tat atsuoa
taJed was es cab he had by the
zr/>erasDent wah me expr 1 aaa
aj vroadeasung aosuie adeems
tave to the caxzens of a state
hirii it Tfugki tir if i T y
'IS THE past. says Ahmed
EI-Hunaly. the station s mana-
josr. "we always tried to base the
tone of oar program on an aaati
stnent of the Israeli citizens
has mentality, hja thoughts, bis
posots of view and havopsuoos
in the light of the state of war be-
tween oa. aa a soldier, not as a
person.
Speaking in proficient though
oat entirely flawless Hebrew. El-
Hhnaly recalled the early days of
Kol Kahir. which he has directed
lor wefl over 20 years. "Prom the
very beginning, when we started
to broadcast a special Hebrew
program for the Israeli people, we
had objectives that were one
hundred percent psychological,
dictated by the state of war that
prevailed then."
But El-Himaly maintains that
even before the peace between
Egypt and Israel, the belligerent
tone of Kol Kahir did not dis-
courage Israelis from listening.
The stations ratings reached a
record high during the Yom
Kippur War. when, he claims, one
and a quarter million listeners
kept their ears peeled to the radio
for the regular announcements by
Kol Kahir naming Israelis taken
prisoner in the fighting. Today,
El-Himaly speculates, the station
enjoys no less than 60,000 regular
listeners in Israel.
HIS ASSESSMENT may be
scoffed at by some Israelis, but it
derives from a conviction that
steps taken by the station back in
1973 to moderate the tone of its
programs would inevitably in-
crease the number of its listeners
and expand its influence over
public opinion.
"Since the outbreak of the
October (Yom Kippur)War," says
El-Himaly, "we have adopted
very clear line. Following in-
structions from above we
deckled that we moat present the
facts in their entirety, in order to
influence public opinion through-
out the world, Israel included.
Accordingly, our reports became
one hundred percent accurate and
we started to speak in a very dif-
ferent tone; beginning in 1973, a
dramatic and substantive change
took place, not only in the testa
of our news broadcasts and com-
mentary, but in the musical pro-
grams that were added to them.
"We continued this way until
the late President Sadat decided
in November. 1977 to visit Jeru-
salem. From the moment that the
ANWAR SADAT ARRIVES AT BEN GURION AIRPORT
lace President Sadat arrived at
Ben Gurion Airport, we received
instructions to Jawajp our line
180 degrees instead of war.
peace: inwad of hatred, friend-
ship."
TODAY A staff of some 90
Egyptians work at the station,
chrning out daily five-hour pro-
grams that include news in
English. French and Russian, as
well as in Hebrew, commentary, a
woman s hour, a program for
youth, history lessons on Egyp-
tian civilization and regular
lectures by El-Himaly on some
aspect of Jewish life in the Arab
world in the pre-Islamic and
Islamic periods
"I prepare special material on
the ties that have existed be-
tween Jews and Arabs in Medina,
Mecca and elsewhere." El-
Himaly explains, "to show how
there has always been a near-
complete bond between the two
sides the Jews and the Arabs
. We enjoyed a genuine peace.
So here we have a lesson from the
past that we should learn now, as
we bear in mind the future."
El-Himaly s unbounded opti-
mism about the past and future
of Jewish-Arab ties may seem
almost anachronistic at a time
when relations have soured be-
tween Egypt and the Jewish
State and when the rest of the
Egyptian media is regularly
attacking Israel in a manner
reminiscent of the Nasser period.
BUT HE sees no incongruity
in sounding his orations on the
need to cultivate Israel-Egypt
friendship amid the freest in
relations imposed by his govern-
ment and preserved with a per-
sistent chill from his colleagues in
the press.
"I never quote from the Egyp-
tian press.'- he says emphati-
cally." We have a completely dif-
ferent line Those who write
for the press hare are aililiaaajiis.
the Egyptian masses intatlec
tuals and the less eaaWaaaWa1 abac
- as well as general Arab pubbe
opinion And you could asy their
style is extremely biting, anti-I-
rael. This is clear.''
In contrast, aays EUihnary,
Kol Kahir avoids
SADAT IN JERUSALEM.
individual Israeli officials for
entienm or censuring Israel as a
state, all the while mamf ;ing
"our full right to analyze ob-
jectively and comprehensively.
the positions taken by Israeli
leaders."
CAN A MAN who for nearly
20 years wielded the tongue of hk
enemy aa a psychological weapon
of _war, feel entirely comfortable
using it sea public relations tool
for a nominally friendly state,
with the declared aim of promo-
ting friendship and under-
standing?
"Pubbc relations. First of all, is
my job," says El-Himaly. "And
public relations always expresses
tbe existing reality. In the peat
the reahty was different; it rested
thecoatinoauonofthesuteof
w. Today we have another
?"** baaed oa peace This
***" II I dxnWe. Is, the
past I attacked. Today I take an
entirely different line."
The turnabout was completed
last spring when the Radio and
Television Association of Egypt
and the Israel Broadcasting
Authority concluded a protocol of
cooperation, just before the
eruption of the war in Lebanon
The lessons in Hebrew, says El-
Himaly, are provided by Israel
within the framework of the pro-
tocol, and the Director-General of
Israel Radio has provided musi-
cal recordings as sreU "another
sign," he says "of the new co-
operation between us."
But implementation of the pro-
tocol, for all practical purposes.
has been frozen, together with
the normalization of Egyptian-
Israel relations in other areas
Still. El-Himaly, who has visited
Israel s number of times, says he
continues to receive ******
musical i etui dings from tbt
Israeli Fran assy in Cairo.

|M A^atfrdMseSia


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-C
the caution expressed by Ambassador Sam
l when he said, "Israel today is far too
ndent on the U.S. for Israel's own good and also
the good of the U.S." Let us proceed to work
rds financial independence for Israel so that
ftior Israeli governmental decisions are not based
whether or not the U.S. will continue its economic
jstance.
Continued from Page 10-C
Lnners study new settlement srea in
Lsalem corridor 20 miles southeast of
Lei's capital city.
Armando's
Italian Restaurant
1201 Coral Way, Miami854-4717
Happy New Year
V
Tony and Medora
Dance Studio
18200 Biscayne Blvd., Miami931-1822
Wishing the entire Jewish Community
a Happy New Year

Happy New Year
Conger Life Insurance
5050 Biscayne Blvd., Miami745-3291 .
Ides Hotel & Apartments
1220 Ocean Drive, Miami Beach531-6701
Happy New Year
Tiger Tiger Tea House
Authentic Chinese Gourmet Dining
Mandarin and Szechuan Food
Open Daily
5716 S. Dixie Hwy.665-5660
--------Happy New Year -------------
The Tivoli Restaurant
3439 Sunny Isle Blvd.-945-7080
Happy New Year To All
Touche Ross & Co.
Tax Consultants
.100 Chopin Plaza, 7th Floor
377-4000
We wish A Happy New Year To All
Travel Trade Link inc.
100 Biscayne Blvd. North
Miami, Fla. 33132-379-8451
Happy New Year
Trojan Transport
6495 N.W. 36th Street
va. Gardens, Fla. 33168871-4460
Happy New Year
Tropical Audubon
Society
5630 Sunset Drive-666-6111
Wishes AU Their Friends A Customers
A Happy Now Year
BcraieMorri*
ss
Discount-Grocery
& Dairy
1421 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach534-6779
A Happy New Year To All Our
Customers and Friends.
Barnett's
Office Supplies
DIVISION OF SCHREIBER INDUSTRIES
228 NE 59th Street-757-8513
Sol Schreiber, President
An Chairman Of The Board
FREDCHEKANOW
Extends to the Entire Jewish
Community New Year Greetings
Twery's Imports
160 NE 40 Street, Miami576-0564
Happy New Year
The Unicorn
Natural Food Restaurant
16454 N E 6 Ave. 944-5595
Open 7 Days For Dinner
We now have a gift & clothing store next door.
_________Happy New Year_____________
Uptown Delicatessan
7438 Collins Ave., Miami Beach866-7077
Wishes All A Very Happy New Year
Vann Academy
400 NW 112 Avenue223-3241
Se Habla Espanol
Happy New Year
Wavelength Haircutters
12161 S. Dixie Hwy., Miami253-3822
Happy New Year
Bob White's Bowling
PRO SHOP & BILLARD SUPPLIES
1227 NE 2nd Ave., Miami374-0642
New Year Greetings
Annette Willis
Insurance Agency
17381 NW 27 Ave.. Miami, FU.-625-8131
Happy New Year To All
Window Mart
12330 N.W. 7th Ave.687-0808
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Pagel4-C The Jewish Floridian Friday. September 9. 1983
Always the Heavy
Reaganites Continue to Give Saudi Arabia Kid-Glove Treatment
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON
While Israel is constantly
made to appear to be in-
transigent. Saudi Arabia con-
tinues to get the kid glove treat-
ment from the Reagan adminis-
tration. To be fair, of course, the
administration is only following
the practice of its predecessors in
speaking softly when a: comes to
the Saudis.
At the same time. President
Reagan has been using every
opportunity to declare that there
is an urgency in getting the for-
eign troops out of Lebanon, not
only Israeli, but Syrian and
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion forces: and the President
continues to stress his commit-
ment to his Sept. 1 Middle East
peace initiative. The Saudis were
counted on to be helpful in both
of these.
Yet there is a growing sus-
picion that Lebanon's and the
Reagan administration's opposi-
tion to a peace treaty with Israel
is due more to the objection of
Saudi Arabia than anything else.
Many here believe King Hussein
of Jordan, whose participation in
the autonomy talks is the key to
the Reagan initiative, would be
on his way to the negotiating
table if it were not for fear of
Saudi opposition and thus a cut
off in much needed Saudi aid to
the Hashemite kingdom as the
Saudis did to Egypt when the
late President Anwar Sadat went
to Jerusalem.
BUT THE Administration
continues to maintain that the
Saudis are the moderate" hope
of its Mideast policy Secretary of
State George Shultz was
especially strong in expressing
this view during his recent public
appearances. Take this colloquy,
for example, on ABC-TV's "This
Week with David Brinkley."
Columnist George WiD asked:
"Mr. Secretary, this Adminis-
tration came into power with a lot
of hopes that the Saudis would
play a moderating and construc-
tive role, and to that end a lot of
sophisticated weaponry was sold
to them. Is it not the case that
one reason Hussein won't enter
(the negotiations) is the Saudis
won't give him the go-ahead, and
he's afraid they'll do to him what
they did to Sadat, which is cut off
their substantial support to him.
which would be more damaging
to him, even than it was to
Egypt?"
Shultz replied: "No, I don't
think so. I think that the Saudis
have been playing a constructive
role in the region, not only with
respect to King Hussein, but also
with respect to Lebanon It
doesn't mean they have done
everything that at least we think
they might do, but they've done a
lot and will continue to do a lot.
and I think they're a very con-
structive
process."
partner in this whole
When Will asked if the Saudis
want Hussein to enter the nego-
tiations. Shultz replied, "Under
the right conditions, I think they
do."
SHULTZ ALSO defended the
Saudis in testifying before con-
gressional committees. At one
point his answer was most re-
vealing. Replying to Sen. Larry
Pressler |R.. S.D.). Shultz denied
the cut in the price of oil will
effect the ability of the Saudis to
help Lebanon. Saudi assets are
"so large" they can fulfill any
commitment, he said.
But what the Saudis are wait-
ing for. according to Shultz, is for
the foreign forces to leave Leb-
anon. "People who are thinking
about putting money in there are
waiting to see what happens," be
noted.
In other words, while the U.S.
is already pouring millions into
Lebanon the Saudis see no
urgency to help their fellow
Arabs, even though they sup-
ported the PLO. the terrorist
group responsible for Lebanon's
present tragic state. The Saudis
first want to see whether the out-
come is one which they approve,
which means one not favorable to
Israel.
In fact, what are the Saudis
doing now? They have reportedly
refused to accept any imporu
from Lebanon because some of
them may have originated in Jj.
reel. Thus they are adding to the
already heavy financial problems
of Lebanon.
IT IS ABOUT time that the
administration realizes that the
Saudis are not going to play the
moderate role which the U.S. his
set for the desert kingdom Every
expert on Saudi Arabia, includ-
ing those favorable to it. his
maintained that the Saudis prefer
to sit on the sidelines rather thin
take the lead in changing arsb
policy.
At the same time, the Saudis
have demonstrated intransigence
against any other Arab country
moving that policy away from
rejection of Israel. The A rib
League communique adopted it
Fez last fall is nothing more thin
the Fahd plan, proposed by the
present long when he was only
crown prince. It stipulates that
Israel accept Arab demands,
many of them completely
unacceptable, in return for which
there is a vague suggestion of
Arab acceptance of Israel's exis-
tence. It is no way near Israel's
rightful demand that peace must
result from negotiations without
preconditions, a position which.
after all. is the heart of the Rea-
gan initiative.
JTA Feature Syndicate
St. Francis
Hospital
868-5000
250 West 63rd Street
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Happy New Year
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Best Wishes To All For A
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Happy New Year
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Happy New Year
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PLACE PIGALLE
SHOW PLACE OF THE SOUTH
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5384)055
Happy New Year
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Happy New Year
Sofas & Chairs Unlimited
80 NE 27 St., Miami-573-0760
Holiday Greeting
From
Wometco Enterprises, Inc
Happy New Year
Baron's
Men's Shop
Southeastern Public
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P.O. Box 41000 R _Jt~
(Normandy Branch) Miami, 33141-866-7771^13
Happy New Year
Ocean Pavilion Apt & Hotel |
5601 Collins Ave., Miami Beach-865-6511
Happy New Year
Gulf stream Press
3800 NW 59 St., Miami-633-8271
A Happy New Year To All


1
mid Coconut Palms
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-C
Rosh Hashanah Is Celebrated In Trujillo's Gift To Jews
By GEORGE BERNARD
SOSUA, Dominican Re-
public Amid sloping
coconut-bearing palm trees
and sandy beaches, Rosh
Hashanah is once again be-
ing celebrated in this north
coast area in the province of
Puerto Plata. The holiday
here, however, commemo-
rates a dual Exodus.
Of the 100,000 Jews, primarily
from Germany and Austria who
were offered settlement here by
Dominican President Rafael Tru-
jillo in 1938, only about 600
squeezed through Europe's tan-
gled red tape and closing doors as
Hitler's Final Solution foreclosed
on asylum and Jewish life.
JUDITH KD3EL is one of the
fortunate "600." When she
arrived here in 1940, she chose
kitchen work over latrine duty.
Today she rents apartments. In
1947, many of the original Jewish
settlers departed for the U.S.,
Canada and Israel. Judith, how-
ever, elected to remain in this re-
gion of the country which Chris-
topher Columbus explored on his
first trip to the New World.
"Someone comes in and cooks
food for Passover," she told this
visitor shortly before the holiday
was to begin. She noted that
Rabbi Harvey Newman would
preside over the Passover ser-
vices at the Synagogue of Sosua.
"You know," she said, "the Seder
is going to be at the Oasis," a
popular tourist spot specializing
in seafood and assorted Domini-
can dishes. "And, yes, we're
going to have unleavened bread,"
Judith added.
"But what has happened to our
original clolony of Jewish fami-
lies?" she moaned. "Jewish life is
not the same as it was when we
first came here. You know, there
are only 36 Jewish families left
from the 1940 group."
"THERE'S considerably
more." claimed a local merchant,
pointing to the movement of the
European Jewish settlers and
their families to nearby and sur-
rounding areas of the country.
Judith's neighbors, Pablo
Cohen and Horst Wagner, also of
the original 600, were away in
Miami Beach but were expected
back for Passover. "They, too,
return to Sosua, no matter how
many times they leave the
country," Judith said. She added
that the Dominican Republic is a
land of vast natural resources,
religious freedom and oppor-
tunity. "There's no prejudice
here, none at all," she said.
"Everyone is Dominican, no
matter your skin color or reli-
gion."
GEORGE BERNARD is
a noted American
journalist and author
of 'Inside the National
Enquirer Confes-
sions of an Undercover
Agent,' and 'Moment
of the Predator,' a
modern-day suspense
novel forecasting the
violent death of Yasir
Arafat by the PLO.
Carol Rubenstein, of New
York, who was visiting Judith,
revealed that there were five Bar
Mitzvahs in Sosua last year. She
expressed the hope that no one
would write about Sosua which is
already in the early stages of a
tourist boom. "Soon my uncle,
my aunt and all my relatives will
be flocking here," she cried. "It
won't be the same."
JUDITH NOTED that the
grandchildren of the original
settlers are of mixed Dominican-
Jewish blood through intermar-
riage. The children of the 600
refugees were sent abroad for
higher education and most
remained in Israel, the U.S.,
Canada and Europe. In fact,
Judith's two daughters continue
to live in California.
Today, the legacy of these
European Jews can be found in
the dairy farms they inaugurated
here, which they still operate,
producing much of the milk, meat
and cheese consumed by this
West Indies nation of 5'/ million.
Wolfgang Oberfeld, tour
operator for Turinter and the
luxurious Bahia Beach Hotel in
Samana, tells sightseers that the
Jews have made major contribu-
tions to the growth of this nation.
"Because of the Jews who settled
in Sosua, special trade arrange-
ments exist with the U.S., Cana-
da and Israel." Oberfeld, who
once lived in Tel Aviv, noted that
Sosua cheese is characteristically
"white, extremely delicious made
under strict kosher conditions."
He added that Sosua also exports
a variety of smoked meats to the
U.S. and Puerto Rico.
OBERFELD REVEALED
that in the entire Dominican Re-
public, there are 2,500 Jews.
Also, the first inter-racial
marriage between a Jewish des-
cendant of a 1940 arrival and a
Dominican occured in 1970.
Primarily through word of
mouth and a few newspaper
articles, Jews from many coun-
tries are arriving in record
numbers in search of heritage and
culture. Many are remaining in
Sosua.
At La Union, the nation's
largest airport, in Puerto Plata,
which is serviced regularly by
Capital Airways. Air Florida and
Dominicana Airlines, the Star of
David, carved in miniature out of
translucent yellow-brownish am-
ber, is sold for five pesos.
And over at nearby Sosuamar,
a sprawling, perfectly landscaped
resort of breathtaking spacious
villas and apartments, culinary
delicacies, well-tended tennis
courts along a generous-size
swimming pool overlooking
Sosua Beach, the names of
Weinberg, Bloom and Wolfson
are commonplace among guests.
SOSUAMAR'S resident
manager, Chris Broadbent, noted
that Sosua is steeped in Jewish
tradition, culture and curiosity:
"Even before their bags are fully
unpacked, and before going for a
swim, many of our Jewish guests
take off to explore various ethnic
locations like the synagogue.
I've never seen anything like it."
Occasionally, when time
permits, Broadbent will take
guests on a guided tour of the
Jewish homes surrounding
Sosuamar, including Judith
Kibel's. "If I'm too busy," he
explained, "I'll at least provide
them with a map of the area.
They'll find their way, no doubt."
Five minutes away down the
road from Sosuamar, Judith is
telling friends she's becoming
annoyed answering tourists'
questions about Sosua. Secretly,
however, she enjoys every
moment of it. She also cherishes
two possessions which she has
framed: a personal letter from Is-
rael Premier Menachem Begin
thanking her for wishing him a
happy birthday; the other, from
the Israeli government praising
her support of Israel during the
controversial strike on a French-
built Iraqi nuclear reactor two
years ago.
No Softening
Shamir Still Talking About Israeli Outpost
By DAVID LANDAU
And GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Officials here denied that
Israel has softened its posi-
tion on retaining military
surveillance outposts in
south Lebanon after its
army withdraws from that
country. The officials
termed inaccurate reports
that Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir had said
Israel might waive that
demand.
Shamir, who was in Wash-
ington in the early Spring for
talks with Secretary of State
George Shultz, was reported
earlier as having told the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee that Israel
would have to make concessions
to achieve the withdrawal of
Syrian forces from Lebanon.
DESPITE THE denials,
observers here detect a softening
in the Israeli stand and believe it
was given concrete expression
during Shamir's meeting with
Shultz.
Shamir was reported to have
told the Knesset committee that
Israel would agree to joint
patrols by the IDF and the Leba-
nese army to make sure that
terrorists do not infiltrate south
Lebanon.
There was no confirmation of a
radio report that Shamir spoke of
joint Israeli, Lebanese and
American patrols to ensure
security and observers discount
the possibility of American in-
volvement. But they believe
Israel will eventually be prepared
to forego the manned surveillance
outposts if acceptable alterna-
tives are offered.
But involvement occurred
some ten days ago with the death
of two Marines in Beirut, when
both Moslem and Druze milita
began shelling positions occupied
by U.S. contingents in the Multi-
national Force sent to Lebanon to
oversee the Lebanese Army's
takeover of peacekeeping activi-
ties in the area as Israel withdrew
toward the south of the country
and the Awali River.
Serbin Fashions Inc.
3480 NW 41 St., Miami635-0607
Happy New Year
|Saf eco Air Conditioning
3 NW 23 Ave., Miami-541-1923 or 635-1288
Happy New Year
Radiators Agency
2011 S.W. 8th St.. Miami-643-3243
Happy New Year
Flo & Ben Kram
Print-Rite Co.
748 NE 79th St., Mlaml-691-5452
Happy New Year
Mandarin Garden
Restaurant
3268 Grand Avenue
Coconut Grove446-9996
Happy New Year
Noblewood Furniture
4975 East 10 Avenue. Hialeah685-5246
Happy New Year
George's Super Sub Shop
4580 SW 8th St., Miami443-1713
Happy New Year
Elsie Undergarment
Company
8295 West 20 Ave., Hialeah822-6981
Happy New Year To All
Ocean Electric
1526 Alton Road, Miami Beach-672-7233
Happy New Year
Hearne Electric
14801 NE 20 Ave., No. Miami Beach944-7799
Happy New Year
Acme Industrial Sheet
Metal Inc.
555 West 18 St., Hialeah 885-4943
Happy New Year
London Shop Inc.
159 E. Flagler St., Miami-374-6135
Happy New Year To All
^1


PtgelfrC Th>JwnahFtorhKm/Friday,9eptaaab B'nai B'rith Council of South Florida Lodge
Best Wishes for the New Year
The 36 lodges their membership of approximately 7,000 men which constitute the B'nai B'rith
Council of South Florida Lodges extends greetings to the entire Jewish community for a healthy,
happy and prosperous New Year. As B'nai B'rith marks another year of unbroken service to the
community its volunteer army of one half million men, women and youths invites you to join them
in their continuing programs helping those in need, regardless of race, religion or national origin.
B'NAI B'RITH COUNCIL OF
SOUTH FLORIDA LODGES
Preeideat:
HERMAN GELLER
1351 Miami Gardens Drive. Apt 1424E. North Miami Beech, FL 33179
944-7008
President Elect:
MILTON SAMUELS
3750 N.E. 170th St.. Apt. 306E. North Miami Beach. FL 33179
944-7008
Vice Presidents:
STEVEN FISCHMAN
3323 Atlant St.. Hollywood, FL 33021
(O) 531-1151. (H) 983-4149
NATHAN GUZOVSKY
7921 East Drive. #11. North Bay Village. FL 33141
(Ol 634-0304. (H) 756-7396
WILLIAM ROMER
P.O. Box 630428 OJUS Branch. Miami. FL 33163
(O) 949-8833. (H) 932-5680
GEORGE SPITZER
19001 N.E. 14th Ave.. Bldg. 51104. North Miami Beach. FL 33179
947-2789
Treasurer:
PHILIP FRIEDMAN
1075 N.E. 159th St., North Miami Beach, FL 33162
947-6056
Secretary:
MAX MICKELSON
15240 N.E. 12th Ave.. North Miami Beach, FL 33162
947-4025
TRUSTEES
Harry Cohen, Friendship
Abe FeMman. Levi Eshkol
Carl Friedman, Sunny Isles
Julias Gerber, Maimonides
Jack Gould. Ben Yehuda
Mike Maged, Haven
Leo Pam, Col. Marcus
Mannie Pearl, Haym Salomon
Henry Sterling, Harmony
Sig Topfer, Eastern Shores
PAST PRESIDENTS
Marvin Beckerman
Bert Brown
Maurice Finegold
Louis A. Frank
Judge Milton Friedman
Kenneth Friedman
Malcolm H. Fromberg
Joseph Gorinstein
Barry T. Garland
Arthur Horwitz
Louis Hymson
Jack Krischbaam
George N. Kotin
Howard M. Neu
Sam Nieberg
E. Albert Pallot
Samuel Pascoe
Jack Rosenberg
Sid Schwarzbach
Norman M. Sevin
Sam I. Silver
FredSnyder
Leon Steinman
deceasd!
Past President.
KENNETH FRIEDMAN
BEN YEHUDA No- 2962. North Miami Beach
Dr. Harry Weisberger. 19380 Collins Ave.. Apt. 618,
North Miami Beach. FL 33160. Tel. 935-1495
COL. MARCUS No. 2884. North Miami Beach
Oscar Nadel. 2801 N.E. 183rd St.. Apt. 605YV. North
Miami Beach. FL 33160. Tel. 931-8632
DREYFUS No. 2775. North Miami Beach
Michael Furhman. 1461 N.E. 169th St.. North Miami
Beach. FL 33162. Tel. 944-3139
FREEDOM No. 2421. Miami Beach
Terence Speyer, 1605 Kane Concourse, Bay Harbor
Islands FL 33154. Tel. 865-5911
GOLD COAST No. 2608. Miami Beach
Sidney Goodman, 5750 Collins Ave., Apt. 10-H, Miami
Beach. FL 33140. Tel. 864-0671
HATIKVAH No. 2362. Miami Beach
William Galanter. 1500 Bay Road. Apt. 437. Miami
Beach. FL 33139. Tel. 532-6533
HAYM SALOMON No. 2885. North Miami Beach
Herbert Backman. 231 174th St., North Miami Beach
FL 33160. Tel. 931-5210
HOTEL EXECUTIVE No. 2690. Miami Beach
Bernard Eilen, 11 Island Avenue (1008). Miami Beach
FL 33139. Tel. 534-0254
ISRAEL No. 2676. North Miami Beach
Max Cooper, 1501 N.E. Miami gardens Dr., North
Miami Beach. FL33179. Tel. 9471597
BRANDEIS No.2705. North Miami Beach
Al Koratsky, 2949 Point East Drive. North Miami
Beach, FL 33160. Tel. 931-7670
DEDICATION No.. 2743. North Miami Beach
Bernard Graber. 1770 N.E. 191st St., Apt. 415, North
Miami Beach. FL 33179, Tel. 949-0394
Here's Why You Should
Belong To B'nai B'rith
to id*ttHy wit* thm JwHh community
?to ao m/mm*9m*mm ead sj totmm of bigotry
0 to work tor yomi community
to *ea> Ma Statm of teraef
9tobuUdutmiormm1J*wry
:to pfOMott good crtimvsAJp
to M#ip bvikt chMftcttf to oat youth
0 to MP a*aJ ias mpM kmmam cMai
LIST OF PRESIDENTS 1983-84
EASTERN SHORES No. 2954. North Miami Beach
Max Golden. 3750 N.E. 170th St.. Apt. E201. North
Miami Beach. FL 33160. Tel. 949-2972
FRIENDSHIP No. 2795. North Miami Beach
Bernard Siegei lei. 940-1393.1301 Miami Gardens Dr.
No 1425W.NMB 33179
Abe Schuchman Tel. 940-7381. 1301 Miami Gardens
Dr. No. 1604W. NMB 33179
HARMONY No. 2463. North Miami Beach
Sam Frank. 17501 N.E. 9th Avenue. North Miami
Beach. FL 33162. Tel. 651-6818
HAVEN LODGE No. 2903. North Miami Beach
Mike Maged. 18051 Biscayne Blvd.. Apt. 1503. North
Miami Beach. FL 33160. Tel. 931-8820
ARON SCHAFFER HESED No- 3010, Miami Beach
Abe Cohen. 4101 Pine Tree Dr., Apt. 401. Miami Beach
FL 33140. Tel. 531-4433
ISAIAH No. 2955. Miami Beach
Rabbi Marvin Rose. 7525 E. Treasure Drive. North Bav
Village. FL33141. Tel. 861-4005 (H) 865-4109
JUDEA No.2855. Miami Beach
Nathaniel Kutcher. 7135 Collins Ave., Apt. 911 Miami
Beach. FL 33141. Tel. 868-1666
L CHAIM No. 3013. North Miami
Marvin Warhaftig. 1330 N.W. 199th St. Miami FL
33169. Tel. 653-2257
ME AMI No. 2393. North Miami Beach
Irving Green, 400 N.E. 143rd St.. North Miami FL
33161, Tel. 891-7617
MIAMI BEACH No. 1591. Miami Beach
Gershon Miller, 420 Lincoln Rd.. Suite 506, Miami
Beach, FL 33139. Tel. (0) 538-6415-6 |H> 534-4036
MIAMI LATIN UNIT No. 5164. Miami Beach
' Te^^OSo2720 SW' 33fd AVe- MiMli' FL 33313'
SCOPUS No. 2718. Miami
Jerry Kristal. 2821 N.E. 163rd St.. No. 5X North
Miami Beach. FL33160, Tel. (O) 3M729 SIN Al WEIZM AN No. 2709. North Miami Beach
Frank Glickman. 1540 N.E. 191st St., Apt. 102. Sorta
Miami Beach. FL 33179. Tel. 940-8797
SUNNY ISLES No. 2806. North Miami Beach
Carl Friedman. 500 Bayview Drive. Apt. 2019. Nortal
Miami Beach, FL 33160, Tel. 947-5763
WOODSIDE No. 3060. North Miami Beach
Harry Cohen. 16950 W. Dixie Highway. North Miami I
Beach, FL 33160. Tel. 947-0114
LAKE CARMEL No 3074. North Miami Beach
Harvey Berman. 445 N.E. 195th St.. North Miami|
Beach. FL33179. Tel. 651-0210
LEVI ESHKOL No. 2786. North Miami Beach
Abe Feldman. 1351 N.E. 191 st St.. North Miami |
Beach. FL 33179. Tel. 947-7857
MAIMONIDES No. 2812. North Miami Beach
Solomon Epstein, 270 N.E. 191st St.. Apt. 104, North]
Miami Beach. FL 33179, Tel. 652-0163
MEL FEIGELES No. 2043. North Miami Beach
Sidney Gelb. 7513 Mutiny Ave., North Bav Village. FL
33141, Tel. 865-2231
MIAMI LAKES No. 3009. Miami Lakes
Edward Graff. 929 West 80th Place. Hialeah. FL 33014.]
Tel. 823-5658
NORTH SHORE No. 1744. Miami Beach
Al Kaplan. 7135 Collins Ave.. Apt. 16, Miami Bead
FL 33141. Tel. 864-3151
SANS SOUCI No. 3065. North Miami
Harold Brown. 2150 Sans Souci Blvd.. Apt 150".J
North Miami, FL 33181. Tel. 891-9596
SIMCHA AVENTURA No. 2911. North Miami Bead
Jack Bellock. 3675 N. Country Club Dr.. Apt 2108.
North Miami Beach. FL 33180. Tel. 932-5525
SPORTS No. 2834. Miami
David Lew in. 2625 Collins Ave No 1903, Miami Beach.
FL 33140. Tel. 672-4813
tosfootse
to serve (he
serWce tor our saajsj people
fofcat roforana in ftoeprtaJt
Serving is Believing
Believing is Belonging
To: B'nai B'rtth Regional Office
WehardBernstein. Regional Director
IZ?2 ?"5 ****** ** *
Norm Miami Beech, Florida 33160
47-3744 / 947.3745
I am interested in Joining B'nai Brith. Please ha*
Nam*________________________________
Addra
Cltv "
someone contact me.
-ZIP-


Retiring Prime Minister
Menachem Begin
5743 Was Painful
And Difficult Year
For World Jewry
By MENACHEM BEGIN
Retiring Prime Minister
Of Israel
The year 5743 was a difficult
and painful one. With all our
hearts, we pay homage to the
precious sons of our people who
gave their lives to assure the
security of the northern part of
our country. We pray for the
recovery of those wounded in this
fight against a cruel enemy.
As we look at the events of the
past and anticipate the days and
months ahead, theer is cause for
-^^some comfort and satisfaction.
DURING THIS year, we
signed an agreement with Leba-
jl^non terminating the state of war.
Lebanon is the second of our
immediate neighbors to sign such
an agreement with us. Much
remains to be done to give effect
t<> the letter and spirit of that
agreement. But the foundation
has been laid.
We respect the integrity and
sovereignty of Lebanon and will
wave its soil when, as it is under-
stood under the terms of the
I agreement, all foreign forces will
^withdraw. Meanwhile, we have
begun preparations for the
redeployment of our forces for the
(sake of the security of our men.
jOur northern neighbor will have
to see to it that Lebanon is never
"gain used as a springboard for
(attack against our population.
. ''"'venting the return of the
l| LO is essential not only for us.
lit is vital to the future stability
[of Lebanon, which has at last
loeen partially freed from the
(domination of that barbaric force.
.GRADUALLY the Western
IWorld realizes that the PLO,
(operating from Beirut, was the
(center of international terrorism,
(undermining stability around the
globe. On the basis of our exper-
ience we urge the free democratic
(world to confront this menace
|until it is overcome.
As we enter the New Year,
(there are positive indications that
(we may expect some develop-
ments in our foreign relations.
lotions that had severed their
[i inow considering the restoration
li normal diplomatic relations.
And we are especially pleased
L "at some of those who moved
their embassies out of Jerusalem
are returning. We hope it will not
be long before all of them do so.
The day will surely come when all
nations with whom we have
normal diplomatic relations will
recognize that Jerusalem is the
capital of our country and that
their embassies should be here.
WE DERIVE satisfaction
from the growing acceptance of
our people's right to live in Judea
and Samaria. Our presence there
is not an obstacle to peace but, on
the contrary, an encouragement
to peaceful coexistence. We have
always maintained that there is
adequate room for Jews and
Arabs to live together in mutual
respect, in dignity and in peace.
Let us now apply ourselves to
the tasks of strengthening our
people residing in the Land. We
must strive for greater unity of
purpose within the diversity of
opinion in our democratic society.
Let us combine all our forces into
one strong nation veterans
and newcomers, Sephardim and
Ashkenazim, city dwellers and
the farming community, religious
and non-observant. We are all
part of this great ancient and
renewed House of Israel.
There are still large numbers us
our brethren who yearn to join ut,
but are prevented from doing so
by the hostile policies of their
governments in the Soviet Union,
Iran, Ethiopia and Syria. Again
we urge the leaders of those
nations to let our people go. They
are not hostages, they are not
refugees; they do seek to exercise
their elementary human right to
repatriation.
AND OUR brethren in the free
world should know that the
greatest contribution they can
make to the Israel they love is to
come here and share in its
development and its upbuilding.
Strengthened in numbers, in
spirit and in resolve, we shall
ensure that our beloved Eretz
Israel will endure, will flourish
and will shine for all generations
to come.
As we enter the New Year
5744, my heartfelt greetings to
out to the entire Jewish people
from our Eternal Capital, Jeru-
salem.
Shana Tova.
Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kipper Greetings
New Year Messages
From World Leaders
What the Holy Days Mean to Jews
President Ronald Reagan
THE WHITE HOUSE
Washington
It is a pleasure for Nancy and
me to extend greetings to Jews in
this country and the world over
as you join in celebration of the
High Holy Days.
We know that Rosh Hashanah.
the New Year, is a time for intro-
spection, reflection, and renewal.
It is also a time when members of
the Jewish Faith reexamine the
year past and look to the one
ahead in a spirit of prayer and
hopefulness.
TEN DAYS later, Yom Kip-
pur, the Day of Atonement, is a
solemn period of fasting and
penitence which culminates the
High Holy Days.
For all of you this is an especi-
ally thoughtful season, and we
join fellow Americans in sharing
your hopes and aspirations for
peace and human understanding
and for an end to hatred and
violence.
As the shofar calls Jews to
their places of worship during
this period, our thoughts and
warm good wishes will be with
you. May the year 5744 bring
health, prosperity, and peace to
you and your families.
RONALD REAGAN
A New Year Message From
The President of Israel,
Mr. Chaim Herzog
By CHAIM HERZOG
President of Israel
It is a privilege for me to
address world Jewry as President
of the State of Israel on the occa-
sion of Rosh Hashanah, 5744.
In the course of the past year,
Israel has signed a second formal
agreement with an Arab country
namely, Lebanon. However,
many problems continue to beset
Israel political, military, eco-
nomic and social. We look for-
ward to the coming year in the
hope that, as in the past, so in the
future, the common efforts of our
people in the State of Israel,
coupled with the efforts of the
Jewish people, will enable us to
overcome many of these
problems.
NOW AS NEVER before, it is
incumbent upon the Jewish
people to close ranks and stand
together. The ominous rise of
anti-Semitism in different parts of
the world, coupled with an in-
crease in acts of violence and
terror against Jewish persons
and institutions, must sound an
alarm in many Jewish communi-
ties.
The greatest danger facing our
people, however, is not from our
enemies, but from within our
ranks. The Jewish people is being
President of Israel
Chaim Herzog
decimated by assimilation, which
in many communities reaches
catastrophic dimensions. There
are only two effective measures
to overcome this danger. The
first is by strengthening and
enlarging the Jewish educational
system in every community. The
second is by increased involve-
ment on the part of Jewish youth
throughout the world in life in
Israel, by studying here, visiting
and spending vacations all of
which we hope will culminate in
Aliya.
I send special greetings to the
members of our Jewish family
who live under oppression and
suffer from discrimination, who
languish in prison and in exile,
and who crave to join us in free-
dom. They are always in our
thoughts.
I SEND my greetings on
behalf of the people of Israel to
the Jewish communities of the
world from the eternal city of
Jerusalem, confident in the
knowledge that by common ef-
fort, the Jewish people through-
out the world, will continue to
prosper, that your communities
will be successful in all their
fields of activity and that Jewish
communal and personal involve-
ment with Israel will continue to
grow and develop.
m


Page2-D The Jewish Flondian Friday, September 9.1963
In Miami
Rabbinical Association Pledges Continued
Activity in Cause of Jewish Community
By RABBI
MAXA-LIPSCHITZ
Aad RABBI
SOLOMON SOU FF
Execatrve Vi
of Greater!
It is oar prrvileg*. on behalf of
the Rabba
d AasocaataoB of
Greater Mian::, to extend
warmest withes u> oc fcuow
Jews for the year ;" Mar :he
new rear brag Israei
mankind closer v> peace by
His children ""^ z
fellowship to 0V0 Ha Wl wxx a
perfect heart
Aa spokeameo for the rabbi-
nate, the fifth largest Jewish
community in the United States.
we are particularly sensitive to
the deep spiritual scars that need
to b*> healed on the body
organism of our society to make
our hope*, our aspirations and
our prayers for the New Year
more than poetic expressions.
ABOVE ALL, the Rabbinical
Association attempts to fulfill its
sacred task by serving aa the reli-
gious information and co-
ordination center of the Jewish
community. In the closest rela-
tionship with the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, and the
leadership of the total com-
munity, the Association analyzes
and guides the total development
and growth of its people.
Our rabbinic organization is
comprised of colleagues of all
interpretations of American
Judaism and meets on a monthly
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
basis for a discussion of current
problems. Rabbis represent the
Association in many community
bodies, agencies and institutions,
spanning the spectrum from
Jewish education. Israel, youth,
chaplaincy, through community
relations. Thus, the rabbis have
their continuous input into the
shaping of our community
programs and, in turn, are kept
informed of the lay points of view
on all issues.
The Rabbinical Association
Rabbi Max Lipschitz
also sponsors educational pro-
grams through the com-
munication media. Among those
programs are the "Still Small
Voice" on Channel 7; the "Jewish
Worship Hour" on Channel 10;
"Interfaith Forum" on Channel
2: and special educational
material that appears regularly in
The Jewish Flondian. From time
to time special programs are
prepared and presented by the
Association on other television
and radio stations.
THE COMMUNITY Cha-
plaincy Service, sponsored bv
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation in association with
the Rabbinical Associatjoc of
Greater Miami. provides
visitation and spiritual counsel-
ing to unaffHiaied Jews _-
hospitals, nursing homes, homes
for retarded, correctional and
ot her institutions.
This representative rabbinate
works with all major Jewish
organizations and for important
causes. At the same time, it is in
dose contact with the school
authorities from elementary to
university.
The Rabbinical Association
works closely in the area of inter-
faith activities and many projects
in cooperation with the Catholic
Archdiocese of Miami and with
the Metropolitan Fellowship of
Churches, the Ministerial Asso-
ciation, luc National Conference
of Christians and Jews, the
Interfaith Commission. the
Miami Citizens Against Crime
and other appropriate
organizations.
We are working closely with
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation on the development of
Cable Television which would be
a new source of education for our
community.
We hope that in the New Year
we will be able to further extend
and deepen our activities for an
even more committed and more
dynamic Jewish life in our South
Florida community.

MR. and MRS. JACK ABBOTT
and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MIMI ABEL
and Family
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
L'Shonah Tovah
To Our F riends and Dear Ones
From
MRS. JACK M. BASH and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. BERNARDO BATIEVSKY
and FAMILY
Wish Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
JUDGE and MRS. HARVEY BAXTER
and Sons
MITCHELL and KENNETH
Wish The Entire Community
A Happy and Healthy New Year
New Year Greetings To All Our Friends
BERNARD and DOROTHY BERGER
Sincere Wishes for a Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. DONALD BERKOWITZ
and FAMILY
MR. AL BERKOWITZ
and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. ABE BERKOWITZ
and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. HAROLD BERKOWITZ
and FAMILY
DR. and MRS. LEO BRAVERMAN
and FAMILY
MR. WALTER MACKAUF and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. FRED BERNARD
Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. ED BLACKMAN
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy and Healthy New Year
JUDY and IRA BLITT
DIANE, STUART, JERILYN
AND PHILIP BOTWINIK
CYNTHIA, MICHAEL and WILLIAM
ANDREW KORENVAES
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. WILUAM BOROS
LARRY and PHYLUS NEWMAN
ANDREW and FRANCES BOROS
BRUCE and UNDA BOROS
Grandchildren AARON and JARYD
A Happy New Year To All
MR. and MRS. RUBIN BOTT
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. JACK H. BRENNER
Daughter MICHELLE
Sons JEFFREY and GREGORY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
JOANNE and BERT BROWN
and FAMILY
Wish Their Friends A Happy New Year
PUBUC DEFENDER
BENNETT H. BRUMMER
and ARUM BRUMMER
Extend To The Entire Community
A Very Happy New Year


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridiaa Page 3-D
Rosh Hashanah Message From Reaffirming Our Link With Israel
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation A Hih Holy Day Message
B, NORMAN LIPOFP
' President
And MYRON J. BUDDIE
Executive Vice Preddent
Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
As we enter the new year, 5744,
|we reflect on the accomplish-
Iments of the past twelve months
land the tasks that we will face m
I the coming days. These are
Ichallenging times for the Jewish
Ipeople, but during the pest year
I we demonstrated our reaoWe and
Icommitment by strengthening
lour unity. The future, however,
land the prospect of attaining the
collective vision we share with
IIsrael's brave people and Jews
I worldwide depends on our
I personal determination to assist
lour brothers and sisters.
Each of us will assume a vital
[role in the mission that confronts
las. The Talmud tells us: "The
Iman who learns but does not
I teach is like a myrtle in the desert
|- no one profits from it." We
I must communicate to all Jews a
I very basic tenet of our religion
I that constitutes the basis of the
IGreater Miami Jewish Federa-
Ilion's philosophy: every indivi-
[ dual has a responsibility to help
I fellow Jews live in security and
| dignity.
MILLIONS of Jews in the
I Soviet Union, Ethiopia, Syria,
the Arab countries and other
I nations are denied the basic right
I to emigrate. They are faced with
I the daily threat of physical harm,
Norman Lipoff
living with the fear that the
practice of their religious beliefs
and heritage will make them the
targets of violence.
The people of Israel remain
steadfastly committed to a
strong and secure Jewish home-
land that will embrace and ab-
sorb all Jews who cannot live
DR. and MRS. LEONARD CANTOR
and FAMILY
Wish Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. WILLIAM CARMEL and CHILDREN
ALLAN (BARBARA) CARMEL
MICHELLE and MARC
MRS. BARBARA KRAKOW, DAVID and BETH
DR. and MRS. JERALD (ANDREA) CARMEL
BRETT, JENNIFER and AMANDA
MR. and MRS. ROBERT (LINDA) SOSSIN
RHONDA, ANDREW and DEAN N A
Wishing A Happy, Healthy and Prosperous
New Year To All their Relatives and Friends
HAROLD CEASE and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
A Happy and Healthy New Year To All
From
ULUAN and NORMAN CHASIN
Larry, Stephanie,
Rebecca and Amanda Chasin
Ellen and Jeff Barkalow
LEWIS and BARBARA COHEN
Dianne and Lauri
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. MAURICE COHEN
and FAMILY
New Year Greetings
To All Our Friends
DR. and MRS. MAXWELL DAUER
MR. and MRS. ROGER A. DAUER
DR. and MRS. EDWARD A. DAUER
Wish All Their Friends
A Happy New Year
Myron J. Brodie
freely in their native lands or
desire to live in the Jewish State.
In its quest for security and
peace, Israel has been subjected
to international condemnation by
critics who ignore those still bent
on Israel's destruction.
Israel, central to Jewish life in
our age, must cut expenditures to
human service programs in order
to meet its urgent security needs
and maintain financial solvency.
It is up to us, the American
Jewish community, to ensure the
health of Israel's human service
network and provide assistance
to the communities in Israel that
desperately need physical and
social rehabilitation.
IN OUR OWN community,
social service programs used by
the indigent and elderly must
contend with shrinking federal
grants and growing lists of
clients. Also, for the first time
since the Great Depression, there
are significant numbers of the
new Jewish poor in America who
cannot afford decent housing,
medical care or an adequate meal.
It takes everyone's individual
efforts, working together as one,
to maintain and raise the
standards of our worldwide
Jewish community. If we fail in
our duty to our fellow Jews, no
one else will safeguard the
vitality of our people. Let us
commit ourselves to do our share
to assist our people in a manner
that is most responsive to the
high mural traditions of our
Jewish '
Or : ue Oliicers,
Board < Oil cctors and staff of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, we wish you, your
family and loved ones a year of
health, happiness and prosperity.
May we all be inscribed in the
Book of Life, and may 5744 be a
year of peace, unity and fulfill-
ment for the Jewish people.
WTO/
won f
ByGARYR.GERSON
General Chairman
Greater Miami
Israel Bonds Organization
The end of one year and the
beginning of another is an ob-
vious sign of continuity. But in
the thousands of years of the
Jewish calendar, it is no more
than a single page in the encyclo-
pedic history of our people.
Nevertheless, we weigh each
passing year in the scales of
Jewish destiny and assay the
promises and prospects of each
coming year with deep concern
for preserving our heritage.
THE KALEIDOSCOPE of this
year's events once again affirms
the centrality of Israel and its
continuing but painful sacrifices
for peace. It has also been a year
in which we have vainly hoped for
a lifting of the barriers to the
emigration of Soviet Jews.
The final burden of maintain-
ing peace in the Galilee has
placed added stress on Israel's
economy. The rate of inflation
remains high. For its security,
Israel is embarking on a multi-
billion dollar project to produce
its own advanced fighter
planethe Lavie. This places an
unsually heavy strain on the
budget, which is already heavily
burdened, and which means more
sacrifice on the part of the people.
The coming of the New Year
commands us to renew and
reaffirm our link with Israel. But
after 35 years of statehood we
need no special prodding to
understand that our partnership
with the people of Israel is a long-
term and in many ways unbreak-
able relationship.
Gary R. Gerson
The consciousness of this
relationship is at its highest point
during the High Holy Days when
prayers and resolution are
supplemented by such concrete
efforts as the Israel Bond
program.
THE PURCHASE of Israel
Bonds has in itself become a holi-
day tradition because of the
central role they play in
providing the economic founda-
tions for Israel's growth and
security.
The New Year heightens our
awareness of our responsibility.
It should also fill us with pride in
the opportunity to serve and to
share. May this be a Shana Tova
and a year of peace for all of
Israel.
MR. and MRS. JOEL DAUM
and FAMILY
DRS. A. D. and ROSE RUCHOCKI
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. MAX DEAKTER
and FAMILY
Wish To All A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. GABRIEL DEUTSCH
CHILDREN and GRANDCHILDREN
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
DIENER WEINE and CHILDREN
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. J. BERNARD DRUCKER
Extends New Year's Greetings
To The Jewish Community
ABE and LEAH EISENMAN
and Sons DAVID and MORRIE
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. GERALD ENERFELD
and FAMILY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
i

-


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NEW YORK (JTA) -
The report titled "Klaus
Barbie and the United
States Government" by
Allan Ryan. Jr.. outgoing
director of the Justice
Departments Office of
Special Investigations
(OSII. is in certain aspects
Yet. a ctoae study of the 21&'
page report raises some disturb-
ing questions in that it coo-
sptcuoush- fails to address rtseh
to the issue, even after nearly 40
years of denial and cover-up. that
Nazi war criminals and collabo-
rators had found refuge and in
numerous, provable instances,
employment by government
agencies in this country.
The reports historic value
comes from the fact that it is the
first official arrmrwmn by the
VS. govetuaueut that a had used
and protected from prosecution
by an aSy m this case. France
a wanted, notorious war
criminal Klaus Barbie, execu-
tioner of French Jews and resist-
World War II
THE REPORTS documen-
tation consists of nearly 600
declassified Army. Central
Agency (CIA) and
Department intelligence
is covering the period
1947-1961 when the US. Army s
Counter Intelligence Corps (CIO
as Em-ope knowingly used and
Report
On Barbie:
How
Complete
Is It?
By CHARLES ALLEN. JR-
protected Barbie. That the
.American government released
sock a body of evidence which
is powerfully re paste with self
damning self-damaging revela-
tions ultimately redounds to
the credit of both Ryan and the
Justice Department.
When Ryan said at a jammed
press confaence that justice
delayed is justice denied" is a
bask democratic uiinciple. he
was invoking the bast in
Amerkan demuciacy and ir
himIf as a thorough-going law
enforcement professional.
Of concern, therefore, are the
broader, general premises which
undergird the report rather than
the more than a few factual and
historic errors contained in it
Despite the crushing evidence
that the report offers, showing
the shameful duphaty of the CIC
in both using Barbie and protect-
ing htm from French justice.
Ryan concludes that it was
perfectly defensible in 1947 to
KLAUS BARBIE: in P
DR. and MRS. LESTER EPSTEIN
andFAlMLY
Wish Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. JACK J. FALK
Wish A Happy New Year
To All Their Relatives and Fnenas
DR. and MRS. JEFFREY FBNGOLD
ERIC and GLEN
Wish Their Friends and Relatives
A Haopy and Healthy New Year
ATTORNEYS
MKHAEL K. FELOMAN
and THEOOORE R. NELSON
Extend New Year Greetings
To The Entire Jewish Community
MRS. AJNSLEE FERD4E
I. aVQt^B0arvLn waOO O'JOO'^jBn
Wish All A Very Happy New Year
LAURA and RICHARO KRBGER FINK
Wish Thear Friends and Relatives
A Very Happy New Y
MRS J. MAURICE F1NXEL
MAROA. ELUOTT and SETH
Year Greetings To AM Our Friends
WtatoThsir
A Happy and
DR. and MRS. MORRY FOX
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS.
SAMUEL FRIEDL AND
and FAMILY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
MR. and MRS. MORRIS FUTERAN
and FAMILY
Wish TheirFnends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. LOUIS GADON
and Children
BENJAMIN. REBECCA SARA and BRUCE
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
MRS. PAUL GAIER
and FAMILY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Ye
MR. ABRAHAM GALBUT
CAPT. and MRS. HYMAN GALBUT
and CHILDREN
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Prosperous New Y
MR. and MRS.
ROBERT GARBER
FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 6-D*
ek out, recruit and use Barbie.
Ryan blames the then Cold War
for such usage.
BARBIE WAS sought out and
recruited because it was believed
that he could provide U.S. intel-
ligence agencies with information
about Soviet activity in Europe
in the struggle against Soviet
Communism. But from a
practical view, Barbie provided
no intelligence of worth about
Soviet activity. His role in
Prance was to hunt down, torture
and exterminate the resistance
movement and Jews. These were
the only "Communists" about
which Barbie was knowledgeable.
The Ryan report glides over
this point of the qualitative level
of the purported "value" which
the CIC found in a Barbie. The
"defectors" from the Soviet zone
of occupied Germany and else-
where in Eastern Europe who
were also sought out and recruit-
ed like Barbie were actually
large numbers of fascist
collaborators: Iron Guardists
from Rumania, Thunder-Cross
vigilantes from Latvia,
Ukrainian pogromists of the
proscribed Organization of
Ukrainian Nationalists (OUN)
barred from the benefits of the
International Refugees
Organization (IRO) immediately
after World War II, and from
other similar organizations who
fled Westward.
Ryan, in his report, asks if the
American intelligence officers
who hired Barbie in 1947 really
knew who he was. His name was
"not generally known" at that
time and did not become
"known" until later, the report
insists. Therefore, by inference,
these officers can be excused on
the grounds of ignorance.
The report itself shows that
lists compiled as early as the
summer of 1945 counted Barbie
among the wanted war criminals.
THERE WAS CROWCASS
(Central Registry of War
Criminals and Security
Suspects), an American listing of
wanted Nazis, the United
Nations War Crimes Commis-
sion, and other lists. More im-
portantly, the individual listings
of the Grand Alliance (Holland,
Belgium and the Soviet Union)
also identified Barbie as a war
criminal.
An analysis of the report's text
shows that some 46 percent of its
data base was given to the
Justice Department by the
French. The single most inclusive
documentation on Barbie in Lyon
where he was Gestapo chief,
originated with the French
resistance. Yet, the Ryan report
does not contain a single
reference to this source which is
enormously rich and precise in its
detail.
Moreover, to compound this
basic omission, the report totally
fails to put the role of Barbie, the
Gestapo and Lyon within the
German occupation of France
and the treasonous Vichy gov-
ernment with which the U.S.
maintained diplomatic contact
and gave sympathetic support
during the larger part of Barbie's
murderous activities in Lyon.
IT IS important to recall that
Lyon was under the Vichy gov-
ernment which continued to
administer southern France after
the Nazis occupied the north
until early 1942 when the Nazis
installed their own military-
political apparatus in the south
as well. Barbie was sent into
Lyon, which was the acknow-
ledged capital of the resistance
movement, in 1942, and for the
next two years he was respon-
SANOOR and HELEN GENET
and Childran
North Miami Beach, FL
Have A Peaceful and Joyous Year
MR. and MRS. GARY R. GERSON
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MS. ROSALIND GETTIS and
MR.LESWBNSTEIN
Wish All Their Relatives And Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MRS. BERNARD (MIRIAM) GINGOLD
Wishes All Her Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. NATHAN GLOVER
and FAMILY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy and Prosperous New Year
MR. and MRS. BARTON S. GOLDBERG
Best Wishes
For
A Happy and Healthy New Year
MICHAEL and NANCI GOLDSTEIN
and FAMILY
New Year's GreetIngs
sible for the execution of some
4,000 people and the deportation
of 7,000 more, most of whom
never returned from the death
camps in Eastern Europe.
It is small wonder, therefore,
that the intelligence analysis of
Barbie's role and the now-
admitted post-war American
utilization of Barbie fails to
consider a crucial pattern in the
fabric of history: were Barbie's
post-war activities a continuation
by other means to exterminate
the remnants of the French
resistance movement?
Another, explosively vital
documentation in the Ryan
report is the relationship between
the CIC and one Padre (actually
Monsignor) Krunoslav
Dragonovich who is described in
the report as the "operator" of a
"sort of underground railroad,
dubbed (by the CIC) a 'rat line'
that ran from Austria to Italy
where it relied on a Croatian
priest (Dragonovich) attach-
ed to a seminary in Rome where
Croation youths studied for the
priesthood."
ADDITIONALLY, the report
notes that "Dragonovich used
this base to operate an escape
service for Croatian nationalists
fleeing from the Yugoslav
authorities."
Moreover, the CIC itself, the
report says, "was under no illu-
sions" about the priest: "''Drag-
onovich is known and recorded as
a fascist, was criminal, etc' (the
CIC stated in a top secret mes-
sage) and his contacts with South
American diplomats of a similar
(fascist) class are not approved
by U.S. State Departments offi-
cials ..."
Yet, the Ryan report continu-
es, the "CIC saw advantage,
however, in cloaking its 'visitors'
with Displaced Persons status
and in dealing with someone who
had ties to the Catholic Church:
(We) may be able to state, if
forced,' (the CIC observed in
1950) that the turning over of a
DP (Displaced Person) to a Wel-
fare Organization (of the Vatican)
falls in line with our democratic
way of thinking and that we are
not engaged in illegal disposition
of war criminals, defectoes and
the like'."
IT 18 FURTHER proven in
the documents accompanying the
Ryan report that Dragonovich
charged anywhere from f 1,000 to
$1,400 for each "defectee" trans-
ported over the "rat line" he op-
erated that clearly was the escape
line for major war criminals, in-
cluding Ante Pavelic and Andrija
Artucovic of the Uatachi colla-
borationist "government" during
the Nazi occupation of Yugosla-
via 1941-44.
Artucovic has enjoyed refuge
in the U.S. since 1948. He lives in
affluence in Seal Beach, Califor-
nia. Recently, an Immigration
and Naturalization Service (INS)
judge barred his deportation
from the U.S. Both the late
Pavelic and Artucovic are
charged with participation in the
slaughter of more than 700,000
Serbians and Croats along with
some 78,000 Jews.
But even with this totally
damning evidence of Vatican
complicity in providing "benevo-
lent protection" over its illegal
escape routes for, among others,
wanted Nazi war criminals,
Ryan's report fails to pursue this
matter. In fact, Dragonovich was
Barbie's sponsor and secured his
Bolivian visa for him
WHEN THIS writer first re-
vealed (last February in a three-
part series in the Dairy News
Bulletin) the details of the so-
torn to next
MR. and MRS. HOWARD W. GORDON
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
HARRIET and MILT GREEN
and Children
BUNNY and DENNIS
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JOHN GUTERMAN
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. HERMAN HALPERN
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
HARRY and JEAN HARRISON
and FAMILY
Best Wishes for
A Happy Rosh Hashanah
MR. and MRS. LOUIS HYMSON
SHERYL, STUART and SU AN
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JERRY ISAN
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. GEORGE JACOBSON
and FAMILY
Wish Their Retetivea and Friends
A Vary Happy and Proaperoui New Year
*


Page6-D The Jewish Fteridian Friday. September 9. 1983
ailed La Vista report a 1947
I" State Department
into the Vatican's
escape routes opera-
tive immediately after the war
Ryan's office did not know of its
existence and asked me far a
--opy. I referred him to the State
Department. That agency could
not find'" copies of the La Vista
report, according to the Justice
Department. I then sent the full
text to the 061 for its use in the
Barbie investigation
However, there is not a word
about the La Vista report offi-
cially titled Illegal Emigration
Movements In and Through
I tab'." authored by Vincent La
Vises, an international lawyer
then (1947) military attache to
the American Embassy in Rome
and a skilled intelligence-diplo-
matic State Department officer
in the Ryan report.
My own disclosures coupled
with the documents in Ryan's
report establish conclusively that
the "rat line" over which more
than a few wanted Nazi war crim-
inals escaped justice besides
Barbie was in fact the very
monastery routes operated ille-
gally by some 22 different na-
tional denes in addition to
Dragooovich that, as the La
Vista report found in 1947. "en-
joyed the protection of the
Vatican Why is such a vital
aspect of the Barbie matter
missing4
FINALLY, another asserted
premise of the Ryan report is the
innocence of the CIA. Ryan takes
particular pains to exonerate that
agency of any role in the utiliza-
tion of Barbie. "It is my conclu-
sion." Ryan wrote, "that at no
time from the end of World War
II to the present time has the
Central Intelligence .Agency had
any relationship with Klaus Bar-
bie. ~ iThe CIA was not opera-
tional until 1945.)
Yet. such an assertion fails to
examine adequately the sub
a*ajaaJel evidence unearthed by
Bear* and Serge Klarsfeld in
Paris that both French and West
German intelligence sources are
on record about such involve-
ment: that the Interior Minister
of Bolivia told ABC-TVs corre-
spondent. John Martin, that
there was CIA contact with Bar-
bie during 1974-75: that substan-
tial sources which I have reported
alleged that Barbie was involved
with the 1967 search for and kill-
ing of Che Guevara in Bolivia, an
operation that had been widely
associated with CIA involve-
ment .
Instead. Ryan asserts in his re-
port that the CIA allowed ban to
examine its files on Barbie. No
doubts that Ryan and his associ-
ates did examine carefully what
the CIA gave them. The question
is. did the CIA provide all the
data that it had on Rarba> or just
aaaaaaJ files? This aspect of the
report is as disquieting as the
other factual and historical omis-
sions and evasions.
A CONNECTION between the
CIA and Barbie is dearly estab-
lished in CIC "top secret" reports
in the documents provided by
Ryan in his report. One George
Neagoy. a CIC agent, had sole
responsibility and overall su-
pervknon and conduct" over the
rat line" that freed Barbie. Nea-
goy went directly from the CIC to
the CIA not too long after ac-
companying Barbie to Italy.
On July 4. the BBC aired a tel-
evision documentary naming
Neagoy as "a CIA agent" who
had figured in the Barbie case.
Ryan specifically denies a rela-
tionship, a denial which does not
stand up under a careful study of
the original declassified docu-
ments accompanying Ryan's own
report.

These documents show to what
purposes American intelligence
agencies used Barbie. Necessari-
ly, it had to include the CIA
which picked up Barbie from the
CIC in 1948. The CIA had ab-
sorbed the activities of the CIC
as a "ccntact agent" for nearly
three decades.
THERE ARE frequent refer
ences in CIC and State Depart-
ment documents accompanying
the Ryan report referring to
BANDERA "Ukrainian
groups" and "Rumanian German
ethnics" throughout the 1947-51
period when Barbie was used.
"BANDERA refers to Stefan
Banders, a Ukrainian nationalist
terrorist and anti-Semite. "Ukra-
inian groups" means, among
others, the OL'N (Organization of
Ukrainian Nationalists), a pro-
scribed fascist jjroup that sup-
plied much of the collaborators
who helped implement the Nazis
"final solution."
Rumanian German ethnic"
means the leadership of the hi
Guard and the Green 8m*)3
figured in recent war cnnaZ
trials in the U.S. by the JoT
Department. Archbishop vJl
ian Trifa. self-admitted nro,
inal who was ordered depot-
last December, who heads (J
Romanian Orthodox EpisconJ
in the VS.. was a aa*r3
Iron Guard and the Green SaW I
BARBIE CLEARLY *Um\
of an elaborate organization i
these remnant fascist etemenuu
be used in the Cold War ip*
the Soviet Union and Easts)
Europe. By 1947 the CIC n\
feeding such dements as i nail
diary operation into the so-aa||
Gehlen Organization Its can
was the former Nazi intelligent
director of Eastern Front w I
tions. Gen. Reinhard Gehlen.
By 1948. the Gehlen Org..i|
was known, was financed. ocel
ated and controlled by the C1A.I
Thus, by that date Barbie migkl
well have been part of that iml
ligence strategy. But nowhertil
the Ryan report is there a sug I
gestion of this vital CIA com*
tion. Instead, the report sum
that the CIC and by unplkata.
other agencies were concerad
almost exclusively with Be
hie a "knowledge of post-wtr*
tivities of ex-SS officers.'' Tk
report neglects to determine wht
activities, but the document! i
themselves show what he *al
doing in large part. Andithtdul
include the CIA in the view of tk
complex history' and relationship
between U.S. intelligence |
agencies and Barbie
BRUCE A. JUUEN.M.D.
ARTHUR J. SCHATZ, M.D.
Ne* Year Greetings To All
MRS. DESJDERIO KELLERMANN
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. HERMAN KORENVAES
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Fnencte
A Very Happy New Year
THE KRAMERS
Harvey and Ann
Gofdon. Sally. Joshua and David
Wish All Thetr Friends
A Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. GEORGE KRONENGOLD
Wish All Their Fnends
A Very Happy New Y
MR. and MRS. KENNETH G. KRONOWTTZ
DEBBIE. STEVE and TRACY
Wish All Thar Relatives and Fnends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. SIDNEY LEFCOURT
and FAMILY
Wish Their Fnends a Happy New Year
LEFF. PESETSKY and ZACX
1367NEln2ndStrawt
North Maaa* Beach -945-7501
Happy New Year
..
MR. and MRS. BENJAMIN LEIGH
and FAMILY
Wish All The*- Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. J.M. LELCHUK
Wish Their Relatives and Fnends
A Very happy New Year
JUDGE and MRS. SHELDON N. LELCHUK
Wish Their Relatives and Fnends
A Happy New Year
PETER M. LOPEZ
A Happy New Year To All
MR. and MRS. EDWARD V. LUSTIG
and FAMILY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Y<
OR. and MRS. IRWIN H. MAKOVSKY
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Y
New Year Greetings
From
MR. and MRS. JOSEPH W. MALEK
ADAM and ROBYN
MR and MRS. HARRY MARKOWTTZ
od FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
------


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-D
JB the 500th Birthday
)f Martin Luther
His Spiritual Voyage Recalled: From Philo-to-Anti Semitism
NEW YORK MARTIN LUTHER'S relations
lith the Jews are reexamined and reinterpreted in a
cial edition of Face to Face, a quarterly of the
nti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith, issued to
rk the 500th anniversary of Luther's birth.
two articles written by Christians and two by
vs, the publication analyzes Luther's con
versial philosemitic and anti-Semitic writings and
effect they have had on Christian attitudes
A'ard Jews through the centuries, with particular
nphasis on the influence his preaching had upon
! Nazi plan to exterminate the Jewish people.
| ACCORDING TO the editorial preface, Martin
tther and the Jews, the questions and issues raised
i the publication are part of a dialogue among the
btheran Council in the U.S.A., the Graymoor
pumenical Institute and the ADL which has taken
ace at annual conferences over the last several
ars at the Institute in Garrison, N.Y.
he introduction points out that the purpose of
issue as well as the ongoing dialogue is to
jrther conversations between Lutherans and Jews
l spirit of religious pluralism and understanding
at has become the hallmark of our post-Holocaust
J'l'hf lour articles are by:
la Dr. 11<>nion Rupp of England, a retired Cam-
Tuitji' I niversity professor, whose topic is, "In the
pntt'xi of His Life and Times";
Arne Siirala, professor of Systematic
hcokigy at Waterloo Lutheran Seminary, Ontario,
Iinuda. who presents "A Theological Analysis" of
IiiIiit'> work;
Dr. Robert M. Seltzer, associate professor of
History at Hunter College, City University of New
York, who gives "A Jewish View" of the founder of
Lutheranism; and
Dr. Mark U. Edwards, Jr., professor of History
at Purdue University, Indiana, who asks, "Is There
a Holocaust Connection?"
IN THE lead article, Dr. Rupp explains Luther's
lapse into anti-Semitism after making sympathetic
overtures to the Jewish people as a reaction to "the
Jewish refusal" to accept Christ and to the "internal
stresses of Protestant doctrine."
He concludes that, "As we follow Luther through
the years, we find a signal instance of how we
become like what we hate, a withering of com-
passion, a proneness to contemptuous abuse the
very things he thought were the marks of judgment
on the Jews."
Dr. Siirala's article delves into Luther's impact on
the Christian-Jewish encounter, describing him as
one who loved the Jews of the Bible but not the later
Jews, who Luther believed, "crucified the Christ."
Although Dr. Siirala claims that Luther "did not
hate the Jews," he admits that "Luther became a
fatal link between modern racial and medieval magic
anti-Semitism."
Dr. Seltzer, presenting a Jewish point of view,
said that "it is inadequate merely to say that Luther
was an anti-Semite and leave it at that" because, to
Luther, Jews were a low priority as compared to
"papists, Turks and not a few fellow Protestants."
HOWEVER, Dr. Seltzer added that Luther
"allowed himself to become yet another channel for
passing on a demonological image of the Jew in
Western civilization" and pointed out that it is this
"theological notion that has resurfaced in so
many other religious and secular guises in later
times with such murderous consequences."
Dr. Edwards, tracing the connection between the
Nazi Holocaust and Luther's writings, said that
"Nazi propagandists and other modem advocates of
racial anti-Semitism misuse Luther when they in-
voke his name to bless their unholy cause" because
"his arguments tend more to undermine than to
support the racial policy of National Socialism."
Dr. Edwards went on to emphasize that, in
Luther's opinion, a Jew who converted to
Christianity became "a fellow brother in Christ"
while for the Hitlerites "belief was irrelevant."
NEVERTHELESS, Dr. Edwards pointed out
that the Nazis did employ "Luther's epithets for the
Jews and his harsh recommendations for their
treatment" in their anti-Semitic propaganda, even
though it was a selective use, "divorced from their
context."
The issue of Face to Face also includes "The
Observations and Guidelines for Conversations
between Lutherans and Jews" which were developed
by the Lutheran Council in the U.S.A. for use by the
congregations of the American Lutheran Church.
In addition, there is a review of the book,
"Luther's Last Battles: Politics and Polemics," by
Mark U. Edwards Jr. The reviewer is Rabbi Leon
Klenicki, associate director of ADL's Interfaith
Affairs Department.
MR. and MRS. SAMUEL MATTER
and MRS. ARTHUR SELEVAN
and the Family of
The Late ARTHUR SELEVAN
of Naveles Industrial Sales
Wish the Community
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
MR. and MRS. MARTIN MAYER
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. JULES MINKES
DAN and BONNIE
ROB.KEN, SUZYandPAM
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
cJCcWDU
TED NELSON
AND FAMILY
Bay Harbor Islands
Florida
MR. and MRS. OSCAR NEUMANN
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. SOL NUSSBAUM
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Prosperous
New Year
MR. and MRS. FRED OBER
and HEIDI LEE
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Proaperous New Year
MR. and MRS. MICHAEL OLIN
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends and Relatives
A Happy New Year
MRS. JACK PALLOT
MR. and MRS. RICHARD J. HORWICH
Francine and Ronald
Mitchell Sherry and Jenine
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Healthy and Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. SAMUEL PASCOE
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. HOWARD N. PELZNER
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. EARL PERTNOY
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
LEO AND VERA PLOTKIN
and Daughter AMY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Prosperous New Year
MRS. DAVID POST
and FAMILY
New Year Greetings
MRS.SAMRAUCH
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year


PngeS-D The Jewish Floridian Friday.
9.1983
His Appearance Was Eccentric
But Schapira Was Among the Most Distinguished Delegates at Basle
By LAURIE EDELMAN
"His silver hair hung
shaggily over his .high
forehead, his lean, harsh.
ascetic face was aflame
with an inner light, his
large eyes agleam with s
consuming power." poet
Lei> Jaffe vrote, describing
Prof. Hermann Schapira.
the founder of Che Jewish
National Fund, at the First
Zionist Congress in 1897.
Despite his somewhat eccentric
appearance. Schapira was among
the moat distinguished delegate*
at the Baste con venuoc When be
spoke, which was seldom, his
words carried almost aa much
i those of Theodor H erci
At one particularly divisive
point in the proceedings.
Schapira arose to defaver an
impassioned pass for unity: "Let
each man raise his hand and
repeat after me. 'If I forget thee.
0 Jerusalem, may my right hand
forget its canning-' The other
delegates iiimmliaulj i nmplinl
reciting the ancient oath in what
was later described as "one of the
most solemn moments of the
Congress "
SCHAPIRA S first Zionist
Congress was also his last; he
(bed at the age of 58, one year
later, just over 84 years ago. But
in that brief appearance, be hud
the foundation for one of the
most important entities within
the Zionist movement: the JNF.
Jewish National Fund (Keren
Kayeroet LeYisraelt
First formulated m 1884 at the
Ksttowiu Conference of the
Hovevei Zion. a precursor to
Herd's Zionist movement.
Scbapra's proposal called for a
massive fund-raising effort to
secure land for the Jewish people.
"Let us suppose." he argued,
"that our forefathers had placet
any sum of money, howevet
small, in trust for the benefit of
future generations We should
now be able to acquire eminent
tracts of land. And what our
ancestors failed to do. that is
incumbent upon us to do for
ourselves and for those who wii:
come after us."
Putting his idea into practice.
Schapira went to a local tinsmith,
according to his biographers, and
ordered the famous JNF "blue
box." Each day thereafter.
Schapira deposited a German
pfennig into the box. which was
to become a major symbol of the
JNF.
THE JNF was not officially
established until the fifth Zionist
Congi ibs in 1901. Schapira s
vision, however, was what guided
the organization in its central
aims: that land purchased in
Palestine was to be the property
of the entire Jewish people: that
land, once purchased, could not
be sold, and that the land would
be acquired through funds raised
throughout the entire Jewish
world, under the auspices of a
world Zionist organization.
Like many other Zionist
luminaries. Schapira was a
person of wide intellectual
abilities. Born to a religious
DR. and MRS. PAUL RICHMAN
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. LESTER ROGERS
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
BOB, GLORIA, REMEE SHAM,
and TODD ALAN ROSEN
of W42 SW 78th Ptaca
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Happy and Healthy New Year
DR. and MRS. MORTON ROSENBLUTH
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. BRUCE ROSENKRANZ
and FAMILY
and the ENTIRE STAFF
Wish You All A Happy, Healthy New Yea
SOL and ELENORE ROSENKRANZ
And Family
Wish All Their Friends and Family
A Happy New Year
Happy New Year
To All Our Relatives and Friends
THE ROSS FAMILY
BARRY, ELAINE, SHERI and MARC
MR. and MRS. NORMAN SANDMAN
and FAMILY
A Very Happy New Year
To All Our Friends
family in the lift1""""1 town of
Erswilkan. he became known as
an Out a prodigy in Judaic
studies. By the age of eight.
Schaps-a was said to be the equal
of any Talmud scholar in hia
town, and by his mid-teens, he
had become a rabbi and rooak
jtshivo.
At the age of 22. Schapira
turned to more seralar activities.
Mathematics was his passion,
though he lacked the money to
study full-time. Over the course
of nearly two decades. Schapira
worked as a clerk, bookkeeper.
watchmaker and military sup-
plier until he ">d money for
university studies.
COMPLETING his doctorate
at the age of 40, be was appointed
several years later to the position
of professor of higher
mathematics at Heidelberg
University in Germany.
As one of the few Jews on the
faculty. Schapira found himself
in an isolated position all the
more so. because he was un-
willing to assimilate Schapira
never abandoned traditional
Judaism. According to Zionist
leader and historian Nahum
Sokolow. "he remained in ap-
pearance, in manners and in
mentality as typical and pic-
turesque a member of his people
as any old rabbi."
Yet Schapira was also very
much a product of the
Enlightenment. "He was an
excellent Hebrew scholar, and
well-versed not only in ancient
Jewish history and literature, but
also in modern Hebrew
literature." Sokolow continued.
"His heart and soul were in the
Lovers of Zion movement and in
the Hebrew revival
In addition to his Jffp
proposal. Schapira was one of the
first to envision a Hebrew
university in Palestine Such i
university, he wrote, would bring
forth "Torah, wisdom tad
morality for the entire bouse of
Israel" and he volunteered his
services ss a mathemates
professor whenever the
university should be established.
SCHAPIRA was also one of
the first to foresee a Zionist role
for American Jewry. "We do not
wish to settle Eretz Israel im-
mediately with all the Jews that
are now scattered throughout the
world." he wrote. "I, personally.
am not worried about those
masses who in the dark days of
despair fled to the free land of
America and who prefer this land
to the land of our forefathers.
(Yet) how fortunate would it be
that the foundation stone for our
national homeland should be laid
not by those who are oppressed
and forced to flee, but rather by
those who have the freedom of
choice...
Like many other early Zionist
leaders. Hermann Schapira did
not live to see the State of Israel.
He died while on a speaking tour
in Cologne in 1898. In 1953. his
remains were brought to Mount
Herzl in Jerusalem, a lovely.
tranquil place surrounded by the
JNF Jerusalem Forest-
It seems a fitting resting place
for a visionary whose ideas were
only to be brought a life years
after his death yet are now an
indivisible part of the Israeli
landscape.
MR. and MRS. LAWRENCE M. SCHANTZ
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. HOWARD SCHARLIN
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy and Prosperous New Year
MR. and MRS. LEONARD E. SCHWALB
and FAMILY
Wish All their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
Happy New Year
MICHAEL SHANE
MICHAEL H. WOLF, ATTORNEY
WOLF and SHANE P.A.
Fiaglar Street Suite 816
MR. and MRS. ISAAC SILBERBERG
and FAMILY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
LESLIE SIMMONDS
Wishes All His Friends
A Very Happy Holiday
MR. and MRS. CHARLES SIMON
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. MILTON SIRKIN
Wishes All His Friends
A Very Happy New Y


[;W YORK Local
I boards that support
0U8 educational
Tams in parochial
U are violating the
htutional doctrine of
fch-state separation,
{the American Jewish
ress on behalf of a
i of 30 educational, re-
hs and civil liberties
z at ions.
yers for the AJCongreM
[that two programs spon-
by the School Board of
j Rapids, Mich, are "imper-
fcle" because they were used
ichial schools to advance
1 religious interests.
bngress has filed an amid
[brief on behalf of itself, the
efamation League of B'nai
land the National Coalition
ublic Education 'and Re-
I Liberty, which represents
izations across the country,
[the U.S. Court of Appeals
Jold a federal district court
[prohibiting the programs.
CASE is considered to
pationwide significance be-
similar programs are
1 in a number of states.
brief, filed in the U.S.
[of Appeals for the Sixth
I, AJCongress noted that
I result of the programs,
as "shared time" and
bunity education," the
timent "has become
; less than a full partner in
operation of religious
brief was submitted by
9 Z. Dershowitz, counsel
Congress and the National
Ion for Public Education
Uigious Liberty, and Justin
| and Jeffrey P. Sinensky of
piiDefamation League. It
epared by Marc D. Stern of
Congress legal staff.
AJConaress Reports
How Local School Boards
Violate Church-State Doctrine
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-D
i--------------------------------------------------------- '
Under "shared time," non-reli-
gious courses are offered to paro-
chial school children during
school hours on school premises
as part of the general curriculum.
IN THE Grand Rapids pro-
gram, the courses included such
subjects as art, music, physical
education, remedial and enrich-
ment mathematics, remedial and
enrichment reading, language
arts, home economics and
science. Except for physical
education, these courses would
not otherwise be available in non-
public schools.
"Community education" offer-
ings are also taught on the
premises of private schools, but
are scheduled outside regular
school hours. Some may be used
at the high school level for credit
towards graduation. But most
are considered "enrichment"
courses and include typing, busi-
ness machines, computer pro-
gramming, photography, retail-
ing, communications, bookkeep-
ing, astronomy and some that are
distinctly recreational.
Under the policy of the Grand
Rapids School Board, all the pro-
grams were conducted entirely
within the religious schools, by
teachers hired, paid by and under
the control of public officials. The
school district paid the religious
schools nominal rent for the use
of their premises.
A SUIT was brought in the
U.S. District Court for the West
REBEL SOLLOWAY
and
BENES and ALAN GLACKMAN
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
THE ALBERT SOLO FAMILY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
REPRESENTATIVE
HAL and LISA SPAET
and FAMILY
Wish Everyone
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. BENJAMIN SPECTOR
and FAMILY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JACOB STEFIN
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. IRVIN STEINBERG
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
MR. and MRS. JOSEPH SORES
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
SANDY and BETTY SUSMAN
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
em District of Michigan by a
group known as Americans
United for Separation of Church
and State and a number of indi-
vidual taxpayers. The suit
charged that while "shared time"
and "community education" pro-
grams were authorized by Michi-
gan statute, the Grand Rapids
School Board had crossed the
1 'institutional line by permitting
programs to be used to ad-
vance the religious interests of
the parochial schools involved.
The federal District Court up-
held the plaintiffs and prohibited
continuance of the programs. The
court's findings included the fact
that the public school offerings
were frequently listed in the
parochial school catalogue as if
they were part of the religious
school curriculum.
The court also noted that while
"shared time" and "community
education" courses were sup-
posed to be open ot non-parochial
students as well, the private
schools which participated gave
preference in admission on the
basis of religion, and that as a re-
sult the programs were segre-
gated on the basis of religion. In
addition, the court found that
teachers employed in the public
school program were usually also
employed in the religious schools.
THE GRAND Rapids School
Board has appealed the district
court's decision to the federal
Court of Appeals for the Sixth
Circuit. In its brief, AJCongress
has asked the appeals court to
uphold the lower court's de-
termination, citing past Supreme
Court decisions that prohibited
governmental assistance to reli-
gion on religious premises in or-
der to prevent a fusion of church
and state.
In the brief, AJCongress says
that in the Grand Rapids case the
"blending" of secular and sec-
tarian education which the Grand
Rapids School Board has accom-
plished through its "shared
time" and "community educa-
tion" programs has gone so far
that it has created a "partner-
ship" between the public and re-
ligious schools "which compels a
determination that such pro-
grams are unconstitutional."
The religious and publicly-
sponsored programs are so inter-
mingled that special ongoing
supervision is required in order to
insure religious neutrality in the
School Board offerings, the
AJCongress brief declared.
"TEACHERS who are in the
employ of the religious schools
for most of the day and who are
expected to advance the religious
teachings, practices and beliefs of
their schools, are suddenly re-
quired to be scrupulously neutral
in matters of religion," it points
out. "Public school officials have
recognized the potential for
abuse, and have found it neces-
sary on several occasions to warn
teachers that, in teaching shared
time and community education
classes, they must remain neutral
on matters of religion."
The brief adds: "But even if
teachers comply with the con-
flicting duties imposed by public
and private employers, it is en-
tirely unreasonable to expect
school children to be able to com-
prehend that a teacher who in one
classroom urges religious views
upon them may not do so in
another, seemingly identical
classroom."
MR. and MRS. EDWARD SWERDUN
and FAMILY
Wish Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
DR. and MRS. RODNEY L. TEICHNER
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Friends
A Very Happy New Year
L'SHONATOVA
Happy New Year Greetings
and Peace For All
JUDGE and MRS. DAVID L. TR ASK
MR. and MRS. DAVID PHILLIPS
and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. PAUL LEFKOW
and FAMILY
SETH DANIEL LEFKOW
and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. NORMAN SMITH
and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. BARRY ROBBIN
and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. ARTHUR TURKISH
and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. JEFFREY BRODY
and FAMILY
MR. and MRS. JEROME UFFNER
and FAMILY
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy and Prosperous New Year



Page 10-D The
Friday. September 9. 19K>
Afraid of Reunion
IDF Colonel Revisits His Old Synagogue
there
to larnd BegaDy.
boat with 170 other
Has family followed the
By GIL SEDAN
BHAMLXHJN. Lcb. -
iJTA. The Israeli Colo
nd mounted the steps
slowly examining the
building as if he was afraid
of the reunion. Never in his
wildest dreams did he be-
lieve that someday he
would return to the syna-
gogue in which he cele-
brated his Bar Mkxvah
as an officer of a victorious
army.
was mostly Christian
When Sutton met neatly in
h capacity as advisor to the
Mayor of Bhamdoun. the Mayor.
Dr' Loos Ghussun recalled that
although the Jews were always a
mmonty. they were always the
driving force behind the town.
Although neither efforts, nor
money w*r* spared building the
synagogue, there was no perman-
ent Jewish community as such in
the town The 4.000 Jews who
resided :here during the summers
did not own any real estate. They
would rent their summer lodg-
ings from local owners. The syna-
gogue m tact served only the
Suttonhad no contact with his
Lebanese past until the Lebanon
War. Only when he returned to
Bhamdoun did he learn that the
DR. and MRS. HUGH UNGER
JEFFREY, ADRIANNE and RICHARD
Wisfi All Their Fnends
A Very Happy New Y(
JOEL and SYLVIA VOGEL
and FAMILY
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
WALTERS, COSTANZA. MILLER
and RUSSELL
Suite 500, 330 North Biscayne Blvd.
Miami 379-2661
Happy New Year To All
DR. and MRS. EDWARD WIENER
and ADAM
Wish All Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
JUDGE and MRS. ARTHUR WINTON
and FAMILY
New Year Greetings To All Our Friends
DR. and MRS. JACK WOLFE
KEITH, NANCY
STEPHEN and SHARON
Wish Their Relatives and Friends
A Very Happy and Prosperous New Year
MR. and MRS. IRVING MARK WOLFF
LAW FIRM HOLLAND and KNIGHT
1200 Bricked Avenue
New Year Greetings To All Our Friends
THIS WAS the case until the
early "70s. when the Palestinian
pieseme increased and the Jews
preferred to spend their summers
a the neibj Druzetown of Aha.
closer to Beirut
The vast majority of the Jew-
ish summer residents were, of
course, among the wealthy in
Beirut's Jewish community,
which until 1947 numbered about
10.000. In that year the Jews of
the Syrian town of Halab suf-
fered a pogrom, and most of them
fled to Beirut, more than
doubling the size of the commu-
nity. They engaged m business,
specializing in stocks, gold and
diamonds.
A large part of Rafi s family,
the Djamous; family, on his
mother's side, emigrated from
Halab to Lebanon in the 1930s
The Djamouss. who were gold-
smiths and diamond dealers.
settled in Beirut.
WHEN HE reached Bar Mitz-
van age. Halab was in the midst
of bloody events as the Syrians
fought to get rid of the French
Mandate. The Bar Mitzvah was
celebrated at the local synagogue
hastily, with no ceremony: and
on the same day. Rafi was sent
by bus to Beirut. His relatives in-
sisted that the Bar Mitzvah be
celebrated properly and it was. in
the Bhamdoun synagogue on the
next Saturday, attended by the
Chief Rabbi of Lebanon.
In March. 1948. when the Syr-
ians were about to draft Rafi into
synagogue was inactive
since 1975. With the growing
of the Palestinians and
Syrians, the few remaining Jews
of Beirut piefened to stay home
during the summer A number of
famili immigrated to Israel re-
cently.
It has been 37 years since the
Bar Mitzvah of Raphael (Rafi)
Sutton. 34 years since he last vis-
ited the building. As he admired
every stone, every curve of the
house of worship which once
served a thriving Lebanese
Jewish community, he was con-
vinced that it had acquired
beauty with age.
BHAMDOUN a Phoenician
name is a summer resort of the
Beirut-Da highway, dose
to the point where the Israel De-
fense Force and the Syrian army
face each other. The town was
captured last Jury in the Israeli
drive toward Beirut.
During the peak of the summer
season Bhamdoun is overflowing
with people There are about
100.000. most of them wealthy
Lebanese from Beirut, only 20
miles to the west. When Sutton
first visited the synagogue as an
advisor to the IDF civil adminis-
tration in the area, the town was
humming with vacationers.
When he revisited the place
with this writer, earlier this
month, the town looked deserted
Only some 4.000 local residents
remain as winter approaches.
These include three Jewish
families, who usually spend most
of their time in Beirut.
AS HE ENTQeo tat
froaitheoiddeyVpan
to those who bad e
the building of the
1945.
Three beautiful ,
were still hangup downwl
vestflxate ceilmg But UJ
tared the sanctuary fejTf
noticed that the '. 2 crysuj,
deliers which were one* th
ware no more. The Hob .^ J
wide open, with no scrolls ml
For a moment Sutton fcsj-f
the synagogue bad been vuj
aed by Syrians or terrorauJ
had occupted the town be!,,,!
Israeli army ousted them. '
He did notice however
the furniture was in perfect!
cation, the mikve 'ritual
was good order prayer
were intact in theu- racfaJ
soldier even found the 1L
ting seats by names Lais]
discovered that thr Hob Ah(
opened by oomimuutr
save the scrolls The .,
desk was stil in good shape.;
ton even found a iew
strips.
"I CAN STATE ca
ry'said Sutton. that chenj
no malicious vandalism
the synagogue, despite i
the contrary Local Mo
families kept a close watcbi
the building in recer.: yearsi
a Fatah unit was ;-_a:nedi
of the flats opposite the
gogue.
It was in a nearby bn
that young Raft would
summers with his uncle Oal
the neighbors thee was At
Al-Yaffi. Lebanon s Premier.J
would make a p-;.--. of jj
the synagogue on even
occasion. That cordial
pbere characterized res
with the local population
STANLEY ZAKAMN, D.D.S.
PAUL BUSKER, D.D.S.
JAMES STDG, D.D.S.
Extend New Year Greetings
To All Their Friends
MR and MRS. MORTON B. ZEMEL
JOE, PNINA, FRED
AUSA, BRUCE AND AVTVA
Wish Their ReJatrves and Friends
A Very Happy and Prosperous
andFAANLY
Wisfi Their Relatrves and Friends
A Very Happy New Year
The staff
of the
Jewish Floridi
extends a
happy, healthy
and prosperous
New Year to all.
5744 -1983
L'shana Tom
aeaaaa
iniflnVB
rv.- ''^"^i*1"-'*^'! '"'Ay: :-i'v.;i
:>->:*<- ffJ^ffJH


.
'"
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-D
Racism and The KlanThe Current Scene
By IRWIN SUALL
Suall is director of the Fact Finding
urtment of the Anti-Defamation League
\'nai B 'rith. He presented this article as a
Itch at the Savannah State College
Lfennce on Blach-Jewish Relations.

r rY YEARS AGO, a Jew named Leo
was arrested, convicted and subsequently
ed in Georgia for a crime we now know he never
feted. The mob that lynched him was crazed
tnti-Jewish hate. And 70 years ago, the Anti-
tation League of B'nai B'rith was bom. The
tho lynched Leo Frank went on to organize the
i Ku Klux Klan and ADL was formed, in part.
WESTCHESTER
[ENERAL HOSPITAL
2500 SW 75th Ave.
264-5252
MIAMI
Happy New Year To All Our Friends
And Customers
Dade Tire Co.
^501 North Miami Ave, Miami373-8445
Happy New Year
Raleigh Bicycles
Of Kendall Mall
8941 SW 107 Ave.-Phone: 279-4111
Happy New Year To All
lay Harbor Fine Foods
|77 95th St, Bay Harbor Islands865-0331
Happy New Year
Tropex Batteries
2100 NW 17 Ave., Mi ami -325-0535
Happy New Year
Youngblood
Roofing Co.
1085 NW 36 St.-635-2501
Happy New Year To All
Sikes Tile Dist.
4010 NW 24 St.. Miami-871-3950
Happy New Year
Warren Henry Volvo
19275 NW 2nd Ave., Maimi-652-6511
Happy New Year
Kaufman Press
Morris and Dave
|445 North Miami Ave.. Miami374-3687 !
Happy New Year To All
to combat the Klan. Its major assignment, however,
was the broader one of working to end the
defamation of the Jewish people.
In the words of its founding charter, ADL was
225? ^ 8ecure J1181'** and fair treatment to aU
citizens alike and to put an end forever to unjust and
unfair discrimination against the ridicule of any sect
or body of citizens." ADL's initial major assignment
was to check the widespread anti-Semitism that was
endemic in those years in American popular culture;
in newspapers, magazines, songs, vaudeville per-
formances, plays, school textbooks and silent
movies.
Black people, of course, were subject to the same,
n not worse, treatment in our organs of popular
culture, and it lasted longer.
Foot Clinics of Dade County
Wishes AU Our Patients and Friends a
Happy, Healthy and Prosperous New Year.
1688 Meridian Ave., M.B.
531-8874
34E.5St.,Hialeah
887-1403
Free Transportation in Dads and Broward
Director- Dr. Jerome F. Jacobs, P.A. Podiatrist
(305)699-1406
Happy New Year
Gilbert W. Leung, M.D.
Internal Medicine
By Appointment
1073 N.E. 125th Street
North Miami, Florida 33161
Elgin & Waltham
Factory Outlet
7640 NW 36th Ave.. Miami693-6130
Happy New Year
Perfect Service Inc.
1133 Kane Concourse, Bay Harbour Island
864-9804 866-4723
Happy New Year
White-Star Realty Co.
1720 79th St. Causeway, Miami Beach868-7966
Morris J. White & David I. White
Happy New Year
Well-Bilt Kitchens Inc.
5561 NW36 Ave., Miami635-8621
Happy New Year
J. Vericat
Personalized Custom Tailoring
1025 Kane Concourse, Bay Harbor Island
Phone: 866-3827
Happy New Year _____
Union Optical
53 NE 2nd St., Miami, FL379-9682
Happy New Yer
Smith Terminal
.Warehouse
3535 NW 112 St., Miami685-0325
ALTHOUGH COMBATTING the Klan was not
the major initial assignment of ADL, it was cer-
tainly one of its tasks, and we have been monitoring
the Klan ever since. Actually, it was not too long
after our organization was founded that it became
necessary to intensify our Klan-watching activities,
for the simple reason that the KKK grew to enor-
mous proportions.
Few people realize how powerful the Klan was in
the 1920s. At its peak in 1925, the KKK's mem-
bership according to the most reliable estimates
was between four million and five million. In that
same year, 40,000 robed Klansmen paraded down
Washington 8 Pennsylvania Avenue in a giant show
of strength.
In the previous year, 1924, the KKK came close to
Please turn to next page.
National Brands
P.O. Box 680310
Miami685-3551
Happy New Year
S.A.C. Construction
9501 South Dixie Highway
Happy New Year
UPJOHN HEALTHCARE SERVICES -
1440 79th Causeway
North Bay Village
Fl. 33141
(305)861-9000
Medicare
Home Care
Private Duty
Staffing Services

7o Care is Human
Sfa
Flair Of Miami
209 W. 21st Street-Hialeah-885-3988
Happy New Year
Florida Fill Inc.
16380 SW 137 Ave., Miami 255-5555
Happy New Year
Team Mobile Service
3647 NW 36 St., Miami -635-2970
Happy New Year
Tropical Paper Box Co.
7000 NW 25th Street, Miami592-5520
Happy New Year
Canton of Westchester
Restaurant
2501 SW 87 Ave., Miami552-5292 552-9264
Happy New Year
Westchester Cleaners
8687 Coral Way, Miami264-7733
Happy New Year To All


Pae*12-D TawJewaMFWa-aiian/ Friday, September 9,1963
Racism and The KUmThe Current Scene
control of the Democratic
And the Klan those years i
to the soathern states. For
OliobditeprBHlwM
by bo
(fed
la
THE NEXT SIGNIFICANT raw m Db
strength a thai country took place m the 19OTs.
when the hooded order revived to combat the
growhw strei^th o tae ova rightt inovanent-KKK
awaliiiihej prokrd in 1967. with total strength of
ease 56.000 located ahaoat euaaery in the southern
an Incidentally, the state with the
id naanber of iiiim1 ax that tone i
, with a total membershnj of some 16,000-
Permx me now briefly to prroaut an ovgy-,
the dinw^wnoas of today's Ku Kha Khn. A* rfe!|
it aa the Kb Kan Klan. bat m rmhty thsT
several coanpatrng Klan groups. The tkree
otgannauons are the United Klans rA kastQ
headquartered in Tuscaloosa, Ak_. nd^
imperial wizard Robert Saeaton. the
Empire. Knights of the saw Kha Kh=. _
tered in Denham Sprmgs. La., and Wd by
Waasairm, and the Knights of the Ka Kka
liieihawnlissd in Tiisniiliia. Ala. whkt
ongmeOy farmed by David Duke, who a.
rand waard by Don Black. How*
doing time in fsdsrai pnscc. ud thn'l
battle rsgaig aa the orgaiaratioB far
AMONG THE SMALLO. local
Lilyan Coriez
670C ME 77th. Ct, Miami
Pnonee: 5*24000 or 54111
WalKk>-wre?ert*i--"Wartex"
Imperial Scruooal Gtendura"
Ve are TIM Wall Covering
Leader in The South
S and S Discount
7306 Coilins Ave., M.B. 861-0694
Happy New Year To All Our
SALON BLANCO
970 Arthur Godfrey Rd., Miami Bch. 532-6017
We Wish AU Our Friends and Customers
A Very Happy New Yt
THE SALVATION
ARMY
13*8 8W let. I
Happy New Year
Spec's Music Inc.
WISHES THE ENTIRE JEWISH
COMMUNITY A VERY HAPPY NEW YEAR
Sea View Awnings
3750NW46St,Miami-633-650
A Happy New YewToAU
Service First Insurance
3421 NW 7th. Aesx, Miaini-636-7607
Happy New Year
From The Levison Family
Southern Wine &
Spirits, Inc.
1600 NW 163 St., Miami625-4171
A Joyous New Year To All
The Garden Restaurant
17 Weetward Dr.. Miami Springs8*5-5391
Freeh Seafood-VeajeUbiae A Salads
Home Baked Paatriea Open Lunch k Dinar |
If on. thru Sat.
Happy New Year To AU
Spector & Sons
575 SW 22 Aveaoe, Miasai-642-3151
Happy New Year
Strictly Tennis Inc.
1401 Seneet Drive. Miaaei -6663067
13720 Keadall Drive387-1200
Happy New Year To AU
Seybold Building
36 NE 1st St, Mlll 374-7922
Happy New Year
Silver Plumbing & Sewer
Service Inc.
1071 NE 79 St-672-1741
Happy New Year
Small Fry Camp Galaxy
2W6No.SUURd.7,HaDywood-949780
Happy New Year
Sofinna
511 Liaeola fUL, Miaami Bear- 511-6547
' Happy New Year
TheZShop
Repair work juat for you
13110 S DfarJs Highly 2535480
Happy New Year To Oar Friend* A Customer*
The Plumbing Shop
986| 418t Miami Beach-532-4407
Happy New Year
Supertype Inc.
SE 9th. Avenue, Hialeeh -896*241
Happy New Year
Vision Travel
2191 Pence ee
Coral Gables
Happy New Year
BhrrL,
WINZ News Radio
Extend* Happy New Year Greetings
To Their Many Listener*
Zelick's Tobacco
326 Liaeola RL, Miami Bch.-538-1544
Happy New Year
Surf side Decor Inc.
9497 Harding Ae., Miami Bch.-8660905
Happy New Yt
Saras Kosher Pizza Shop
2214 NE 123 St, North Miami-991-3312
Happy New Year To AU
Snzana's
UnisexandfuU
from haircuts to
269 SE 15th. IL,
Happy New Year To AU
Salon
Central Cab
To A*
rear-
Prestige Motor
Car Imports
15551 W. Dixie Hwy.N.M.B.-944-1800
Happy New Year
Lee's Prescription
Pharmacy
2525 S.W. 3 Are.. Mianu-854-3625
Happy New Year
Miller & Solomon
GENERAL CNTRACTORS
BOB MILLER JOE SOLOMONj
460 S. Dixie Hwy. Coral Gablea, Fla. 3314
Pbosar 661-3403
Happy New Year
Brooks American
Sprinkler
2430 NW 79th St691-1182Miami, Fla 33*
Happy New Year To AU
T.A. Adams
Insurance Agent
753 NE 167th St., North Miami Beach
New Year Greeting* ToAU
Bressers Cross
Index Directors
853 NE 79th St, Miami-758-6786
Happy New Year
Farovi Shipping Corp*
1500 Port Blvd., Miami 33132-3734765
Happy New Year
Fox's Sherron Inn
6030 Sooth Dixie Highway. Miami -666-S#,
Happy New Year ToAU
Simons & Rose Ins.
Agency
2801 5252? *asataa*2i?SftT
*smwsm*m*mwMWMWMWMWMwmwmu^


Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Florid ian PageK
irrouDS. one of the larger ones is the Georgia
New Order, Knights of the KKK, led by
Brd R Fields, who also happens to be national
uv of the National States Rights, another
abased hate organization.
present generation of Klan organizations
its current revival about ten years ago, under
"rtimulus of a young, articulate former Nazi
a David Duke. Duke solicited and obtained
and television appearances throughout the
ntry and, thanks in large measure to talk show
i who had failed to do any background research,
was able successfully to deliver a spurious line
but how the "new Klan" avoided violence and
Dtry.
lided by mail responses from listeners around the
try, Duke began to put together his new
_*ts' of the Ku Klux Klan. An additional con-
uenci' of these media appearances by Duke was
burgeoning of new recruitment by other Klan
organizations, some of them dormant for several
years.
THE ANTI-DEFAMATION League's surveys of
Klan membership over the past ten years have
shown a steady but unspectacular growth, halted
recently by what may or may not be a temporary
decline in strength. At the present time, we estimate
the combined membership of the various Klans
operating in the United States at about 8,000 to
10,000.
This represents a gain of about 100 percent since
1973, but a slight decline since 1961, when our
survey indicated a membership of between 9,700 and
11.000. Only time will tell whether the present drop
in Klan strength will continue or if it is only a
temporary hiatus. The one option which is most
unlikely is stabilization at its present strength, since
the Klan is fueled by fervor sod excitement,
emotions easily exhausted without a constant in-
fusion of success.
[The Officers and Staff of
BARNETT BANK
Wish All Of Our
Friends
Happy
New
Year
arnett
anK
Member FDtC
Barnett Bank of South Florida, N. A.
Charade Restaurant
2900 Ponce de Leon Blvd.-448-6077
and
Kaleidoscope Restaurant
3112 Commodore Plaza-446-5010
Happy New Year
Dr. Stephen W. Chase, D.C. & Family
681 N.W. 119th Street
No. Miami. Fla. 33168
Wish Entire Jewish Communtiy
A Joyous, Prosperous New Year
Cheeky Weeks
1704 N.E. Miami Gardens Dr.
No. Miami Beach, FL 33179
Wish Entire Jewish Communtiy
A Joyous, Prosperous New Year
Dade Pipe & Plumbing
975 NE163 St., No. Miami Beach949-0801
Happy New Year
D'avila
Happy New Year
To All
676 NW 28 ST
East Coast
Fisheries Restaurant & Market
360 West Flagler St.-358-3052
Happy New Year r
~T"
T775
^r
Nightly at 7:45. Tues., Thurs., Sat. at 12:30 pm
Still Just 50* Grandstand. Only $1.00 Clubhouse
Sept. 5 to Oct. 29,1983
July 2 to Sept. 4,1984
The Burak
Chiropractic Clinic
Wishes All His Family and Friends
And Patients
A Very Happy New Year
Dr. Barry N. Burak, Director
Belcher Oil Co.
Phone: 551-5200
Happy New Year
Philip H. Bergman C.P.A.
8001 NW 36 St., Sutie 100, Miami591-3631
Happy New Year
GEORGE H. BERNSTEIN C.L.U.
7550 SW 57 Ave.Miami
662-4131
Happy New Year
CandS
Precision Repairs Inc.
19060 N.E. 26th Ct.-931-6884
Happy New Year
Central Hardware Co.
545 Arthur Godfrey Rd., Miami Beach531-0836
Happy New Year
Cancellations Unlimited
9484 Harding Ave.Loehman's Plaza
864-8112
Happy New Year
Klan ideology is today very much the same aa it
has been in the past. Simply put, it is the racist
doctrine of "white supremacy," a concept that
serves as justification for bigotry and violence
against blacks, Jews, Hispanics. Asians and other
minorities. One of the greatest sources of frustration
for those of us who monitor and combat the Klan is
the experience, over and over again, of radio and
television interviewers who invite Klan spokesmen
on their programs and then permit them to get away
with the false line that they don't hate blacks, but
only love whites. Actually, even the most cursory
examination of Klan literature provides in-
controvertible proof that the Klan has only one
product to sell: racial and religious hate. Here are a
few examples:
FROM THE Fiery Cross, organ of the United
Klans of America: "There will never be peace in this
land as long as Whites are forced to live among the
colored savages of Africa and Asia that are among
Please turn to next page.
Donta
Oak**
P.O. BOX 96
301 E. DANIA BEACH BLVD
DANIA FL 33004
(305)927-2841
Open thru April 1984
Happy New Year to All
A Happy New Year from
Dial-Rent-A-Nurse
1490 W. 49th Place, Miami, Fl 33012558-1931
Cye's Lounge & Restaurant
444 Brickell Ave., Miami
Happy New Year
Fiesta Travel
1445 W. Flagler St., Miami 642-6500
Happy New Year
ENFIELDS
4000 NW 30th Ave., Miami-633-1551
Extends to the Entire Jewish Community
A Happy New Year
Ennes Garment Co. Inc.
590 NW 27 St. Miami
576-4996 576-5997
Happy New Year
Family Drugs
18100 NE. 19th Ave., N.M.B.945-1131
Happy New Year
,.-) C.
> mm v -- w
U-
. .
_l -* I w


*
' rage 14-U The Jewish Fioridian
ly, Septembers, 1983.
Racism and the Klan
us. The one and only solution has always bean and
shall always be America for the White man."
Or this, from the taped telephone message of the
Invisible Empire in Pensacola, Fla.: "Listen
Whitey, the Jews have taken over America and you
are too damned ignorant to out your tax money to the niggers and you are too
damned brainwashed to know it."
These are but a small sample of the kind of bigotry
that pours forth steadily from the propaganda hate
mills of the Ku Kmx Klan.
How potent, how dangerous is the Klan today?
Certainly the Klan of 1963 cannot be meaningfully
compared to Klans past other than in its am-
bitions. The Ku Klux Klan is not presently a
national threat nor is it likely to be. Its 10,000 or
so members and its 100.000 sympathizers constitute
no more than a tiny fraction of the American
C U Associates Inc.
Electricians
7282 NW25th Street592-6900
Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy New Year
Mario Chuy Hair Salon
715 NE 167th St.. North Miami Beach
651-4061
Happy New Year
Book Horizons
1110S. Dixie HWY.,C.C665-6161
Wish To All Friends and
Customers A Happy New Year
Books by the Park
2713 S.W. 37th Ave.. Miami-442-0468
Happy New Year to ail our
Customers and Friends
Brandt's Billiard &
Bowling Supply Inc.
651 NW 124 Street
No. Miami 688-2661
Happy New Ye
Broadmoor Hotel
7450 Ocean Terrace
Miami Beach866-1631
Happy New Year
I. Brown Sales
4380 East 11 tti. Ave.,Hialeah-685 7622
wishes All Their customers And Friends
A Happy New Year
Budget Hardware &
Appliance Corp.
849 NE 12S St., No. Miami, Fla. 33161
Happy New Year
Business Information
Systems Inc.
1330 Coral Way, Suite 205-Miami
Dade858-5505 Broward785-9508
Happy New Year
Compliments of
CALIFORNIA CLUB REALTY, INC.
1564 Ives Dairy Road
North Miami Beach(305) 652-0300
Happy New Year
Captain John Callen
Castaway Dock Master
16375 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach947-4081
Happy New Year
Gil Capa's Bistro
920 71st Street, Miami Beach-868-7870
Ooen Tuesday-Saturday- 6-10
Happy New Year
population of 240 million. Even if to the Klans
strength is added that of all of the other organized
hate groups in America, they nil] constitute but a
tiny proportion of our population.
NEVERTHELESS, the very existence of this
hate movement is an indication that all is not well in
the Republic. While they don't have the capacity to
acquire significant political influence or power not
a single elected official in the United States today
openly identifies with the Ku Klux Klan they do
have the ability to divide communities, foment racial
conflict and maim or kill people. Let us not forget
that members of the Ku Klux Klan and various other
hate groups have shot and killed Americans in
recent years.
Five members of the Communist Workers Party
were murdered several years ago in Greensboro,
N.C.; four black women were shot in Chattanooga,
Tenn.; two young black men were killed as they were
jogging in Salt Lake City, Utah; two black
Horizon Trailers
Hialeah895 W. 19th Street-887-8796
Miramar-3540 S. State Road 7 (US441>961-9567
Pompano670 S. Dixie Hwy.-943-5410
Wishes Everyone A Happy New Year
Brickell Emporium
HOOBrickell Plaza
Miami377-3354
We Wish All Customers A Friends
A Happy New Year
Carl's Camera Shop
7401 Collins Ave.-866-3733
Wishes To Extend New Year Greeting
To His Friends A Customers
Carpet Mart
12645 South Dixie Hwy., Miami232-2430
Happy New Year
Happy New Year from
Casa Novella
32 Giralda Ave., Coral Gables
448-8925
Casey Room
Air Conditioning
11540 S.W. 120th St., Miami232-0951
H-jtpyNew Year
Castle Harbor Sailboat
Dinnar Kay Marina, Miami858-3212
Happy New Year
Celan Fashion Outlet
603 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 534-3811
A Happy New Year To all
Certified Poultry &
Egg Company
763 West 18 Street, Hialeah 3794)675
____ Happy New Year
Christian Community
Service Agency
1090 NE 79 St., Miami-758-3071
________Happy New Year To All
Christy's Restaurant
3101 Ponce De Leon Blvd\, Corel Gables
46M40O
A Happy New Year To All
Clipper Travel
6653 S. Dixie Highw.y-667-7667
Our Staff Wishes The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy New Year
111 I ? ?
ministers were beaten severely as they emerged*
a restaurant in Muscle Schoals, Ala;" 13 met
the United Klans of America in Talledega
Commercial Sewing
Machine
2035 N.W. 1st Place, Miami573-5314
Happy New Year to all our
Customers and Friends
Continental Engraving
9300 S. Dixie Highway, Miami, Fla -666-67I
A Happy New Year To All
Continental Tailoring
1220 NE 163rd. Street, N.M.B.-940-11291
Happy New Year
The Cookie Express
13887 N. Kendall Drive, Miami, Fla385-12
Happy New Year To All
Copy's Uniforms Boutiqi
13855 N. Kendall Dr., Miami-385-5581
Happy New Year
Country Club Clothes
1447 S. Dixie Hwy., Miami, Fla-2386065 j
Happy New Year To All
Creative Doors &
Window Corp.
7371 SW 8th. St., Miami-264-6057
Happy New Year
Crest Hotel & Apartment
1670 James Ave^ MJ3.-531-0321
Happy New Year
Crown Laudry and Clean*
2025 N.E. 163rd Street. North Miami Beach|
947-1812
A Happy New Year To All
Our Friends and Customers
Cy's Dry Cleaners and
Inc.
510 West 20 Street
Hialeah 887-9441
Happy New Year
Cypress Gardens
Flower Shop
10691 Sunset Drive (72nd Street)
Phone: 596-2993
________Happy New Year
Dadeland Pool Corp.
14094 S.W. 84th St., Miami385-5181
Happy New Year
-
Order Your Holiday flowers from
Daisie's Florist
& Gifts
1695 NE 123rd St-895-4448
Happy New Year
""ff


f.HMf ,ft-w

.-gazed in shootings and other violence against
'"nt victims, and two Klan leaders are presently
time in prison for conspiring to bomb a
h house of whwhip. The Temple, in Nashville,
| And these are but some of the recent proven
of Klan violence. So the danger to life and limb
il one and requires constant vigilance. Yet,
said that, I repeat that the Klan and the
hate groups operating on the domestic scene
have no overall capacity for gaining political
lr in the United States, either regionally or
Inally- This is good news and we should welcome
k it should never become a reason for growing
Jlacent.
[at raises the issue of how most effectively to
at the Klan and other hate organizations. The
I can be neutralized if we tend to the roots from
|i its support frrows, and it can be made to
bitive opportunity for promoting democracy by
ring in a planned program of education for
acial understanding. Such a program can
lit the study of Klan history in the schools; the
lliver Drugs Pharmacy
93 Miracle Mile, Coral Gables444-9891
A Joyous & Happy New Year To All
Open House
1753 N.E. 2nd Ave, Miami371-8691
rPPy ^ew Year to U our Customers & Friends
Ophelia Art to Wear
5794 Sunset Dr., Miami665-3986
Happy New Year
Outrigger Ship's Store
And Boatique
13301 Biscayne Blvd., Miami944-0704
Happy New Year
Palm Island Of Miami
100 NE 39 St., Miami, Florida
The Reinhard Family Wishes
AHA Happy New Year
|Tom Palmer's Roof-Rite
15 NE 17 Terr., Miami-324-5125
Happy New Year
Pampered Lady
Women Apparel
7589 Dadeland Mall, Miami661-7517
Happy New Year
Pappagallo Restaurant
Gourmet Dining
11500 Biscayne Blvd.895-3730
Happy Holiday To All
Party Time
The complete party rental center
3601 NW 81 St.
Dade: 696-6521-Broward: 523-1382
A Happy New Year To All ____
Pawliger
Building Industries
4834 SW 75 Avenue, Miami-264-6986
Holiday Greetings
[People Management Inc.
8725 W. Dixie Hwy.. No. Miami Ben., Fla. 33180
932-6540
wish The Entire Jewish Community
A Joyous New Year________ _
Perfection Paint &
Body Shop
2A2-1100
7017 SW 8th St., So. Miami, Fla. 33144
New Year Greetings ToAU
Planet Ocean
| n The Rickenbacker Causeway -361-9455
Happy New Year To All
Friday, September 9,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-D

display of appropriate literature in the libraries; the
adoption of anti-Klan resolutions by legislative
bodies; sermons in the churches; editorials in the
press and on radio and television, and the promotion
of inter-group education by community
organizations, political parties and business and
labor groups.
NO LESS important is the rigorous enforcement
of the law against members of the Klan or other hate
groups when they flout the law. The record of local
and state law enforcement agencies in recent years
has been a good deal better than it was back in the
1960's, not to mention the 1920s. Nevertheless,
there is a need for citizen vigilance and pressure on
some police and sheriff's departments, if and when
they show a lack of enthusiasm for enforcing the law
against the Klan.
At the same time, it must be said that the recent
record of violent confrontations against Klan
marchers and demonstrators by left-wing extremists
who have decided to take the law into their own
hands is counterproductive. If anything, these
Printers In The Grove Inc.
2829 Bird Ave., Coral Gables, Fla. 33133
442-2679
Wish The Entire Jewish Community
A Happy New Year
Professional Oxygen
18901 NE 5th Ave, Miami652-2792
Happy New Year
Prude's Wig Studio
1732 79th St., Causeway, Miami Beach 33141
Happy New Year
Public Safety Devices Inc.
322 N.E. 80th Terrace. Miami, Fla 33138
754-1928
Happy New Year
Purcell Travel
305 Alcazar Avenue, Coral Gables448-7453
Happy New Year
Purity Condiments
1800 NW 70 Ave., Miami592-3600
Happy New Year
Queen Interiors
of South Florida
12961 SW 85 Ave., Miami-232-0174
Happy New Year
R.E.A. Air Conditioning
8860 SW 82 St., Miami226-2952
Happy New Year To All
Rand Accounting Co.
3800 W. Flagler St., Miami445-7948
Happy New Year
Redland Supply Co.
141 W. Mowry St., Homestead247-2471
Happy New Year
Renee de Paris Inc.
French Jewelery Inc.
6608 Collins Ave., Miami Beach865-7631
Happy New Year
Revelation Shoes
"The Most Comfortable Shoes In The World"
20505 S. Dixie Hwy.-233-0875
Happy New Year
Riviera Photo
1564 S. Dixie Hwy, Coral Gables661-7524
Happy New Year
groups which have in recent months assaulted Klan
members with bricks, bottles and rocks on the
streets of Washington, DC, Houston, Austin and
other cities have succeeded only in creating public
sympathy for the Klansmen.
Not only are the victims of these violent con-
frontations usually policemen rather than Klan-
smen, but no useful purpose has been served by
them. On the contrary, they have created the im-
pression that Klansmen are the victims rather than
the perpetrators of violence. And they have made it
seem that the opponents of the Klan are a lawless
mob. The guardians and the proponents of rational
order are always the losers in such confrontations, as
we have seen all too often in other countries where
the forces of moderation and civility are rendered
impotent in the clash of violent extremes. Perhaps
the best lesson we can learn from the history of the
Ku Kux Klan is this: We must cease toleration of
organized violence of any kind, for armed fanaticism
is just as dangerous and deadly as armed
criminality.
Riviera Tile And
Terrazzo, Inc.
8747 SW 134 St., Miami-235-7441
Happy New Year To All
Road Side Market
& Florist
9851 SW 112 St. Killian Pkwy595-3053
New Year Greetings To All
ROYAL EMBASSY
CONDOMINIUM APARTMENTS
5750 Collins Avenue866-3849
Wishes A Happy Holiday Season To All
Save Way Industries Inc.
4920 NW 165 St., No. Miami Boh., Fla.
621-6211
Wishes All A Joyous New Year
Sheet Metal Assoc.
2463 NW 76 St.Sam Oitchlck, Pres.836-6011
Happy New Year
South Miami
Travel Service
5864 Sunset Drive, South Miami661-2550
TOLL FREE: (800) 327-9851
Happy New Year To All
Steak & Ale Restaurant
9090 SW 97 Ave., Miami, Fla. 279-8111
Happy New Year To All
Stembridge Fine Furniture
545 NE 125 St. Miami893-0800
A Happy New Year To All
Studio of Lighting
Studio of Lighting Retailers- Wholesalers
Manufacturers-Exporters
708 NE 1 Ave373-2171
Happy New Year To All
Suni Dade Florist
10537 S. Dixie Hwy., Miami, Fla 33156
Happy New Year To All
Svinga Brothers Corp
Scrap Metals
3511 NW North River Dr.635-4455
A Happy New Year To All
Sznapy's Inc.
Sporting Goods
2086 NW 21 Street, Miami326-7151
A Happy New Year
Thelma's Hats
927 Lincoln Road #217
Miami Beach534-4896
Happy New Year to all our Customers and Friends
i


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155x13 41.39 142
165x13 46.45 1 55
175x14 53.18208
185x14 57.35215
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P165/80R13 35.62 '67
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155SR-2 39.50 1 19
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