The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02848

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
m
56 Number 35
Two Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, September 2,1983
*
x'jlli!
Fr~ISh*c*.<

y m.i so ci Price 50 Cents
egin Quits Prime Minister's Post
\ecial
rvwes
March for Dr. King
iows Jewish Divisions
[HELEN SILVER
ISHINGTON -
Separate Sabbath
on Friday night,
|e of the mammoth
here commemorat-
20th anniversary of
53 March on Wash-
at which Dr. Martin
King presented his
"I have a dream"
symbolized differ-
fith the Jewish com-
over support of last
y's march.
Decial Sabbath service
Id at Temple Sinai,
by the Union of
Hebrew Congregations
which unhesitatingly
and took part in the
despite initial wide-
fopposition from other
Irganizations. About 600
|pers attended that
OTHER service was
by the New Jewish
an anti-establishment
rhich was held at Ameri-
versity and attended by
marchers.
Jtrast to the 1963 march,
any Jews marched under
banners, the only visibly
Organization represented
ne marchers was the New
Igenda, whose several
[marchers were joined by
of the UAHC, the
agency for American
fynagogues.
eds of other Jews joined
lated 250,000 marchers,
did so as individuals.
Jewish Agenda mar-
ried a red Star of David,
[greeting, Shalom," and
banner proclaiming in
Iters, "Justice, Justice
ku pursue."
than 60 speakers were
address the mammoth
Sg
Rabbi Schindler
assembly, each limited to five
minutes. There were no Jewish
spokesmen among them.
CORETTA SCOTT KING, wi-
dow of the assassinated black
civil rights leader, told the wor-
shippers at the Temple Sinai
service that "Jews have sup-
ported black Americans in their
quest for equality because it is
morally right. It is for this same
reason that responsible black
Americans will continue to
vigorously oppose anti-Semitism
in America."
Kabbi Alexander Schindler,
UAHC president, who gave the
benediction at the close of the
march Saturday, told the Temple
Sinai service: "I am proud that
the movement of Reform
Judaism will take its place
among the hundreds of
Continued on Page 13-A
But He Postpones 'Indefinitely'
Presenting His Decision to Herzog
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel's Prime Minister
Menachem Begin made it
official when he resigned
his office as Premier on
Tuesday. His original an-
nouncement of his decision
to resign came at a Cabinet
meeting Sunday. Almost
immediately, under heavy
pressure, he declared his
willingness to postpone
temporarily a final decision
on the resignation. Now, it
is been made, and irrevoca-
bly.
However, there's a hitch. As of
late Tuesday, Mr. Begin post-
poned "indefinitely" tendering
his resignation to President
Chaim Herzog. This is a
procedure that is more than a
formality. For the Prime
Minister's resignation to become
truly official no ifs, and's or
but's the Premier must make
his intentions clear in writing and
submit it to the President. Since
he has declined to do so, his
supporters now see hope that he
may yet change his mind.
Earlier, stunned delegations of
Likud activists came to Begin's
office, together with representa-
tives of Begin's Likud-led coali-
tion, and begged Begin to stay in
office to assure continued Jewish
settlement of the West Bank.
They also told the Premier that
the majority of the people wanted
him to stay in office.
SOME OF the delegations
blamed the Cabinet ministers for
placing obstacles in Begin's way
and with having made life for him
as Premier "unbearable." Begin
indicated he was not convinced
by these remonstrations, but
agreed to postpone his answer.
Avraham Shapiro, chairman of
the coalition, who attended the
meeting with Begin, emerged to
tell reporters that Begin had
made no comments on the ap-
peals but simply had listened.
Shapiro said no mention had been
made of a possible successor be-
cause the assumption of those
Continued on Page 3-A
PRIME MINISTER BEGIN
IDF Redeployment Goes
Ahead Despite Shakeup
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Premier Menachem Begin's
announcement of his resig-
nation will have no effect on
the redeployment of the Is-
rael Defense Force from the
Shouf mountain to its new
line along the Awali River,
the Defense Ministry said
here.
The redeployment, delayed for
a few days at the urging of the
American and Lebanese govern-
ments, will be carried out in ac-
cordance with the defense needs
of Israel, ministry sources said.
The pullback was to have started
Sunday and completed by the eve
of Rosh Hashanah on Sept. 7.
URI LUBRANI. the Israel
government's coordinator of
political affairs in Lebanon, was
scheduled to meet with Defense
Minister Moshe Arens to report
on the secret talks he held over
the weekend in Paris with Druze
Continued on Page 14-A
Bonn's Chancellor Cancels
Kohl's Trip to Israel This Week Goes By the Boards
cellar Kohl
BONN The visit of West German Chancellor Helmut
Kohl to Israel set for Wednesday was cancelled because of
Premier Menachem Begin's announced resignation, a
West German government spokesman said.
Earlier, the Israel Embassy in Bonn said nothing had
been changed by the Begin announcement in regard to the
visit by Kohl to Israel, bis first as Chancellor, and that no
new instructions had been received from Jerusalem about
the visit.
BUT THE WEST GERMAN government spokesman
reiterated that the decision to cancel was now a fact. The
decision, he said, had been left to the last minute because
Israel had not informed his country about any changes in
the Prime Minister's office.
Chancellor Kohl had received a detailed briefing on the
dramatic developments in Israel, and it was considered
that his visit to Israel would take place as scheduled on
the basis that Begin will remain Premier for at least a few
weeks. Why there was the decision to cancel at the last
moment, the West German government spokesman did
not explain.



A -X *.0*M P.|l
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 2,1963
He Stunned His Cabinet
Likud Leaders Appeared Dumbfounded by Begin's Decision
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
In a move that shocked
the Cabinet and stunned
the nation, Premier
Menachem Begin announc-
ed Sunday that he intended
to resign. He made the
announcement at the end of
a relatively brief Cabinet
session. Likud leaders and
spokesmen appeared
dumbfounded by this un-
expected development.
Begin surprised the ministers
at the end of the Cabinet session
when he asked to make a "perso-
nal statement." He declared: "I
came to the Cabinet session this
morning to tell you about my
intention to resign. This an-
nouncement has nothing to do
with today's session or with other
sessions that took place recently.
The reason for my resignation is
personal." The other sessions he
was referring to were those deal-
ing with the government's new
economic austerity budget.
THE MINISTERS were
visibly moved. Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir reportedly was
trembling when he told Begin:
"We have followed you through
thick and thin. Everything you
had asked for, we did and wr
shall do." Other ministers spoke
about Begin's special place in the
State of Israel and among the
Jewish people. The ministers
enumerated the achievements of
the present government, and
added:'' There is more to do."
The ministers told Begin that
he was the only person who could
rule the country at this time. But
Begin reportedly made no com-
mitments. "I will consider your
stand, but I do not promise any-
thing," he reportedly told the
ministers. According to one
report, Begin told the ministers
after the Cabinet session: "I do
not feel I function the way a
person who holds a job as respon-
sible as mine should function."
Begin did not indicate when he
would submit his resignation to
the President which by law is
mandatory to make the resigna-
tion legally binding. The Premier
agreed to meet with the leaders of
all the parties that comprise the
Likud coalition Monday morning
before making any further an-
nouncements.
BEGIN'S associates said that
his decision was not sudden, but
was formed gradually within the
past few months. The first
substantial indication that
"something was going on" was
Begin's surprise decision to
cancel a visit to Washington to
meet with Reagan in July for
"personal reasons." It was also
recalled that Begin had declared
a long time ago that he would re-
sign at the age of 70. His 70th
birthday took place several weeks
ago.
Since the death of his wife,
Aliza, last November, Begin has
been in a state of depression and
has gradually tapered off involv-
ing himself in day-to-day activi-
ties. He has spoken out less
frequently in public, and when he
has done so, he has appeared
tired and withdrawn.
The Premier is also known to
be depressed over the stalemate
in Lebanon and the continuing
toll of dead and wounded Israeli
soldiers there. He has also been
buffeted by the mounting econo-
mic crisis and the growing
animosity between the Sephardic
and Ashkenazic communities. In
addition, he is known to be dis-
heartened by the Reagan
Administration's persistent
criticism of his government';
West Bank settlement policy.
WITH PRESIDENT CARTER: triumphant achievement.
Only Saturday, President
Reagan, in his regular Saturday
address to the American people,
reaffirmed that Israel's West
Bank settlement policy posed
"an obstacle to peace" in the
Middle East. In his address,
delivered from his ranch house
near Santa Barbara, Calif.,
Reagan declared that "the future
of these settlements can only be
dealt with through direct nego-
tiations between the parties to
the conflict. The sooner these
negotiations begin, the greater
the chance for a solution."
REAGAN ALSO made it clear
that he feels his Mideast peace
initiative, which he offered last
year and which has been viewed
in diplomatic circles here and
abroad as having failed, "is
definitely alive and available to
those parties willing to sit down
together and talk peace."
That initiative, rejected by
Israel, called for negotiations
involving Israel and Jordan and
leading to the eventual establish-
ment of an autonomous Pales
tinisn entity in the West Bank in
association with Jordan. The
initiative, which also criticized
the West Bank settlements, was
considered moribund since
Jordan refused to participate last
April.
Shortly after the Cabinet
meeting Sunday, Cabinet Secre-
tary Dan Meridor issued a state-
ment which said: "At the
Cabinet meeting today, after
discussion of several issues, the
Premier informed the Cabinet of
his intention to resign from
office. After the announcement of
the Premier, all the ministers
asked the Prime Minister to
retract his announcement, and
stay in office."
LEGALLY, the resignation of
the Premier once it is submitt-
ed officially to the President is
at the same time the resignation
of the entire government. From
that moment on, the government
is considered a care-taker govern-
ment. Although such a govern-
ment is by nature transitory, it is
politically stronger in that it can-
not be toppled by a vote of no
M-9-2-88
confidence, nor can any minister
resign. A care-taker government
remains in power until it is re-
placed by another government.
A new government can be
formed by one of two ways: the
President can ask any Knesset
member, including Begin, to try
and form a new coalition; or the
Knesset can pass a law calling for
new elections. Traditionally, the
President has asked a
representative of the largest
party in the Knesset to form the
coalition.
Presently it is the Labor
Alignment which, since the last
elections, has been enlarged by
two defectors from the Likud.
But given the general disarray of
the Alignment and its lack of a
clear program on vital issues, it is
not clear that the Alignment
could actually form an alterna-
tive coalition.
This makes the option of new
elections a greater possibility. It
is assumed that if Begin decides
on new elections he could rally
sufficient support in the Knesset
to pass a law calling for new and
early elections. Begin's an-
nouncement of his intention to
resign did not make it clear
whether he would remain politi-
cally active after he leaves office.
SOURCES CLOSE to Begin
said Sunday that he would not go
back on his decision. Begin left
the Premier's office shortly after
the Cabinet session and drove off
to his residence. He made no
statement and would answer no
questions.
The assumption that Begin's
decision was final was buttressed
by Science Minister Yuval
Neeman of Tehiya. He told
reporters that Begin's move was
motivated by "an unexpected
personal reason," and therefore
he would not reconsider his move.
All efforts to persuade him to
remain in office would be useless,
Neeman said. He did not explain
what the "unexpected personal
reason" was.
However, Education Minister
Zevulum Hammer expressed the
Continued on Page 14-A
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European Radio, TV Highlight Begin's Resignation
cellor Helmut Kohl who was to go
to Israel this week for a long ex-
pected and often postponed offi-
cial visit.
In Paris, the tripartite talks on
Israel's redeployment from the
Shouf Mountains broke up
rapidly after the announcement
of Begin's decision. American
diplomats said the talks between
envoy Robert McFarlane, Druze
leader Walid Jumblatt and Presi-
dent Amin Gemayel's National
Security Adviser Waddi Haddad
were to end Sunday in any case.
Jumblatt told McFarlane that
his forces would not give up their
arms and allow Lebanese army
units in the Shouf area after the
Israeli forces leave, nor would the
Druze withdraw from their posi-
tions.
Shortly after the announce-
ment from Jerusalem that Begin
resigned, the various delegations'
cars drove up to the building
where the tripartite talks were
being held and the various repre-
sentatives drove away. McFar-
lane left for London for talks with
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
jest European radio and
elevision stations high-
lighted Sunday Premier
lenachem Begin's inten-
tion to resign often inter-
jpting news programs and
yen feature films. The
/est European govern-
ments followed diplomatic
actice and refrained from
:i> official comments, but
He press commentators
aid Begin's departure
light spell a "fresh start"
Or the Mideast and help
jive the Lebanese crisis.
1 West European Prime Minis-
^rs and Presidents were inform-
I of Begin's decision often while
key were far from their offices,
m ai ioning, on week-end rests or
ipaigning.
| THE ONE West European
ader who would be most ai-
ded is West Germany's Chan-
\n Miami
Rabbis Express Regret, Surprise
At Announcement by Begin
In Miami, the Greater Miami Rabbinical Association
jesday reacted to the resignation of Israel's Prime
[inister Menachem Begin by declaring:
"The Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami
[presses its profound surprise at the announcement by
[rime Minister Menachem Begin that he intends to resign
le office of Prime Minister.
'Mr. Begin's years of dedicated leadership of the
ftate of Israel is immeasurable. As one of the chief ar-
litects of the Camp David Accord, he played a leading
le in breaking through the wall of belligerency that
xisted for three decades between its Arab neighbors and
srael. The peace treaty with Egypt that resulted will be
)ked at, in future time, as the dramatic forerunner of full
ice with justice between Israel and all of her neighbors.
"We extend our prayers for the well-being of Mr.
Jegin in his personal life, as well as prayers for his succ-
essor and the people of Israel.
"We pray that the New Year will usher in an era in
yhich war and aggression will be at an end in the Middle
Cast and that peace and security will prevail for all time."
The statement was issued in the name of the Rab-
binical Association by its president, Rabbi Max A.
Upschitz, of Beth Tor ah Congregation, and its executive
rice president, Rabbi Solomon Schiff, director of
Chaplaincy of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Begin Postpones
Indefinitely' Writing
To President Herzog
Continued from Page 1 A
ailing the appeals was that
egin should remain. An Aguda
Knesset member, Menachem
Porush, was more optimistic, de-
laring that Begin had "opened a
ate of hope."
SHLOMO LORINCZ, another
^guda Knesset deputy, said the
[rouble was that no one knew
phy Begin had decided to resign,
-orincz said he had told the Pre-
fer that "rather than that we
poke for hours," Begin "should
Mve told us what he thought."
fle said he also told Begin that an
pplanation would have made it
sier to persuade him to with-
aw his planned resignation.
But, Lorincz reported, "Begin
aughed when I said that and
fould not disclose his reasons for
pigmng." The Premier told the
t-abinet he intended to resign for
[ perso nal reasons.''
Despite Begin's indication, he
did not at first go immediately to
President Chaim Herzog to offi-
cially submit his resignation, but
political analysts here were
nevertheless reported to be con-
vinced that he would do so.
Uri Porat, Begin's press ad-
viser, said after a meeting that
Begin had been deeply impressed
by the arguments for his staying
and had simply asked for more
time to think it over. Ehud
Olmert, a Likud deputy, said
after the meeting that he thought
Begin intended to proceed with
his resignation but that the insis-
tence of his supporters that he
remain Premier had created a
heavy dilemma for him.
The dilemma was resolved
shortly thereafter whatever
the dilemma was. The Prime
Minister is now an "ex."
British officials and possibly with
Prime Minister Margaret That-
cher.
McFarlane was in Paris as part
of a European tour for talks with
officials of Italy, France and
Britain, which have supplied
troops, along with the United
States, to the 4,800 member
multinational peacekeeping force
in Lebanon. He visited Italy last
week.
AMERICAN diplomats here
and in Washington refused to
comment immediately on Begin's
resignation, saying they needed
time to study the development.
But the Druze delegation here
said they hoped his departure
"would speed up the search for a
solution to the Lebanese crisis."
Begin did not have close per-
sonal relations with most of the
West European leaders, many of
whom had never met with him
and others who privately, like
France's President Francois Mit-
terrand, or publicly like Austria's
former Chancellor Bruno Kreisky
or West Germany's Helmut Sch-
midt, regretted his policies and
blamed part of Israel's interna-
tional isolation on Begin's per-
sonality.
Paradoxically, Western diplo-
mats attending the United
Nations-sponsored conference on
Palestine which opened Monday
in Geneva, said that some Pales-
tinian and hardline Arab diplo-
mats "regret Begin's resigna-
tion." He was their favorite
whipping boy, and his departure
will force them to change tactics
during the forthcoming
meeting.
White House Calls Begin
Decision an 'Internal Matter'
WASHINGTON (JTA) The White House
spokesman said Sunday that Premier Begin's announced
intention to resign was considered "an internal matter" of
Israel's government which appeared to be unrelated to
President Reagan's reiteration Saturday of the
Administration's oft-stated view that Jewish settlements
on the West Bank are an obstacle to peace.
LARRY SPEAKES said the Begin announcement
"is an internal matter with the Israeli government," that
the Reagan Administration saw no link with the
President's reiteration of his view that the settlements
hindered peace and that the White House would have no
other comment.
Speakes said the Reagan Administration was not
given any advance knowledge on the Premier's statement
to the Cabinet and that the White House learned about it
through a telephone call from Ambassador Meir Rosenne
of Israel. The statement by Speakes was issued in Santa
Barbara where Reagan is vacationing.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 2,1983

Marine Deaths, Begin Resignation Spell Tragic Irony
The tragedy of the deaths of two U .S.
Marines in Beirut may at least be an object
lesson to Washington that its arrogant
assessment of the Middle East condition
has been wrong all a long. And it is ironic
that the man whom the Reagan
Administration used without mercy as its
punching bag to blame Israel for
everything possible that is awry in that
area of the world, Prime Minister
Menachem Begin, resigned from his high
office only days after the two young
Marines were killed in their duty.
For one thing, while the White House
played the resignation with a coolness that
was almost supercilious, the fact is that
deep shock waves hit it with cold concern.
Never mind that the President, his State
Department and a bevy of Cabinet officials
repeatedly demanded the withdrawal of
Israeli forces from Lebanon while barely
mentioning the need for Syrian forces to
withdraw first as stipulated in the Israel-
Lebanon agreement. Never mind that the
U.S. military establishment has been
putting all of its eggs into the Egyptian
basket in its recent joint maneuvers there
while ignoring Israel as a military partner.
The fact is that when the Begin
resignation hit the fan, the U.S. was quick
to react and in a strange center. For it
was the military establishment in
Washington that called the President
somewhere around 2 a.m., Saturday night
in California to tell him the news. Urgency?
Yes, of course.
Way of All Flesh
What happened, suddenly, to the old
image of Prime Minister Begin as a pariah?
We suspect a good deal of that went the
way of all flesh when the two U.S. Marines
died, and at once it became clear that the
tempestuous Arab Middle East is not quite
as simple as the Administration and the
State Department had been leading the
American people to believe it is.
Or that, if only old Menachem Begin
would quit, things would be different. Or
even, if only Israel weren't around at all,
we'd have a rosy life with Araby.
Nonsense, and although nobody in the
Administration is saying it, now they know
better. At least, they know it well enough
to be begging the Israelis not to quit their
forward positions and withdraw back to the
Awali River so soon. They know it well
enough finally to see the Syrians for what
they are, a nation bent on annexing
Lebanon at the urging of the Soviet Union.
Although they won't say so.
They know it well enough to come just
short of speaking with rancor about the
Syrians and President Assad's plans for a
"Greater Syria."
But they are not saying that either. For
now, there are only the tears over the
deaths of the two Marines. But the object
lesson is beginning to take hold.
Too Soon to Speculate
Prime Minister Begin said he'd do it
resign on his 70th birthday. And although
it is a few weeks after that date of his
septuagenarian'8 status, it has come
withal.
Floridian
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'Ofct oi mi mum. rhn* uioi
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' I IIIII II
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Friday, September 2,1983 24 ELUL 5743
Volume 66 Number 36
It is much too soon to speculate upon his
own motivations. The foolhardiness of this
is demonstrated by the wide range of
"explanations." They range from ill-health
to nefarious plans Begin has promulgated
to whip his opposition into shape so that he
can come back with a major election victory
in hand and reign, truly, as "King of
Israel."
The better part of discretion is instead to
recognize the heroic stuff of which Mr.
Begin was made from the time he entered
office in 1976 until now. If we can take issue
with him at all, it was the speed with which
he returned the Sinai to Egypt without so
much as a single quid pro quo. In fact, with
little more than a promissory note on a
piece of paper that Egypt signed in which it
vowed to "make friends." Since the Camn
David Accord, this never did, in fact, tab
place. With increasing arrogance and in-
transigence, Egypt has actually broken a
prime condition of the accord by with-
drawing its envoy from Tel Aviv at the
outset of the war in Lebanon.
This apart, we see Mr. Begin as one of
the most courageous leaders Israel has ever
had. He has endured much criticism both
abroad and at home some of it perhaps
on target, but most of it launched by
ideological opponents who could not best
him.
We are saddened by his decision.
No "Trickle Down'
BEGIN AND SADAT: what will history say?
Poor Mob Agency for Assistance
By BEN GALLOB
Not only have recent
improvements in the
American economy not
"trickled down" to those at
the bottom served by the
Jewish community's key
agency for New York City's
Jewish poor and homeless,
but the agency has been
"deluged" with appeals
from individuals and fami-
lies "who simply cannot
make ends meet," an offi-
cial of the agency said.
Menahem Shayovich, presi-
dent of the Metropolitan New
York Coordinating Council on
Jewish Poverty, made that
comment in reporting on a grant
of $200,000 from the Federal
Emergency Management Agency
(FEMA) to operate emergency
shelters and food facilities for the
city's homeless, most of whom
are expected to be Jews, in-
cluding kosher facilities for Jews.
SHAYOVICH said the Co-
ordinating Council was working
on such a program in cooperation
with the Federation Employment
and Guidance Service. Joseph
Sonnenreich, Council Board
chairman, said the $200,000 must
be spent by Mar. 31. He said
there are few conditions attached
to use of the federal funds, other
than that their use must be
restricted to providing emergen-
cy food and shelter.
Rabbi David Cohen, co-
ordinating council executive
director, stressed repeatedly the
difficulty of defining what a
homeless person is. But, he
added, the Council is getting
hundreds of ''what we call, for
lack of a better name, transient
homeless."
Cohen said these have included
Jews coming to Brooklyn's Boro
Park section from Israel seeking
a possible marriage "for their
rapidly againg adult children";
Jews who live in boarding houses
or room occupancies "whose
public entitlements last only two
or three weeks;" and immigrants
coming without funds or friends
because they still believe New
York streets "are paved with
gold."
ADDING THAT the process
of determining just who the
homeless in New York City are
has been started, as the basis for
implementing the goals of the
FEMA grant, Cohen said there
are three Jewish programs
providing housing for the home-
less, mostly the elderly, which
began in the late spring in this
year one sponsored by the Co-
ordinating Council, one by
Project Dorot and one by Respite
House.
Dorot is a volunteer college
student group, organized on
Manhattan's Upper West Side,
aided by the Jewish Association
for College Youth (JACY), an
affiliate of the Federation of
Jewish Philanthropies.
The three projects were started
in the late spring of this year and
the number of persons needing
shelter was expected to be relati-
vely small during the warm
summer months. But both the
Dorot Project and Respite
House, each with a 14-bed capa-
city, have been housing an
average of 10 persons per night.
COHEN SAID the Co
ordinating Council project,
consisting of three rented apart-
ments in Brooklyn's Crown
Heights section and a room in
Brighton Beach, started in early
July, "currently offers 11 beds, of
which we have been filling an
average of six to nine beds
night." He said the agency had
the capacity to develop more bed
space and would do so "in the
near future."
Cohen reported that initial
results, as case records are buut
up for the coming winter months.
"are confirming expectations.
He said "we are finding homeless
Jews, many of whom are between
20 and 50, most of whom are
unemployed and some of whom
exhibit signs of mental
disability."
He said that during the height
of the "homeless season,
the
recent winter months, there were
in New York City some 60M
gious institutions providing
shelter for homeless persons ana
that five of them were
synagogues, using volunt!*r!
and each housing five to eigm
people each night. He reporteo
most of the religious institution*
Continued on Page 13"A


Startling Impact Unlikely
Reagan Middle East Team in Midst
Of Shakeup-To Keep Things the Same
ayJSeptember 2, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
By London Chronicle Syndicate
A major reshuffle of the
I Reagan Administration's
Middle East team is cur-
rently underway, but don't
[expect it to have any start-
ling impact on the final
product. U.S. policy toward
IIsrael and the Arab States
[is likely to stay pretty
[much exactly where it has
[been in recent years
(carefully balanced in order
Jnot overly to antagonize
fit her side in the continuing
I conflict.
That is not to belittle the
[importance of personalities in the
shaping of foreign policy. George
IShultz's replacement of Alexan-
der Haig as Secretary of State
did make an impact, although it
| was not nearly as negative for
[Israel as many had feared, given
[Shultz's dreaded Bechtel con-
Inection.
THE SAME can be said with
the removal of Nicholas VeUotes
as Assitant Secretary for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs.
Veliotes is succeeded by Richard
Murphy, the current U.S.
Ambassador to Saudi Arabia and
a career "Arabist" in the State
Department. Veliotes, although a
former Ambassador to Jordan,
was no real Arabist. Unlike
Murphy, VeUotes does not speak
I Arabic.
Furthermore, Veliotes had
served as the Charge d'Affaires
at the U.S. Embassy in Israel
under the late Ambassador
Kenneth Keating during the
early 1970's. How many self-
respecting Arabists would have
their career so permanently
tainted?
Murphy, a former Ambassador
to Syria, has spent much
(although not all) of his profes-
sional career in the Arab world.
He does not have the sensitivity
to Israeli concerns nor very
many personal relationships with
Israeli officials and American
Jewish leaders of a Veliotes.
BUT THE Murphy-for-
Veliotes change will not be all
that significant in the end.
Murphy, a respected professional
diplomat, can be expected to
follow in the tradition of the
Assistant Secretary, as
established in recent years, going
back to Joseph Sisco, Alfred
Atherton and Harold Saunders.
In short, Murphy, like Veliotes,
will be very even-handed.
The same can be said for the
Robert McFarlane appointment
to replace Philip Habib aa the
special envoy to the Middle East.
McFarlane, like Habib, will have
Ambassador Stone
considerable leeway in trying to
achieve a breakthrough in the in-
creasingly messy situation in
Lebanon.
But McFarlane, who still
retains the title of Deputy Na-
tional Security Adviser, will be
working under guidelines ap-
proved by Washington. He will
report to President Reagan
through Secretary Shultz even as
National Security Adviser
William Clark is becoming more
and more assertive in getting
involved in "the loop" on this
sensitive matter.
McFARLANE. a retired
Marine colonel who served under
Henry Kissinger on the National
Security Council and later under
Haig in the State Department, is
not a career foreign service officer
as was Habib. The ousted
envoy had come to recognize his
lost effectiveness after trying for
two years to bring some sort of
stability to Lebanon.
The Syrians blamed him for
the Israeli-Lebanese troop with-
drawal agreement of May 17.
Although of Lebanese ancestry,
Habib was accused by the
Damascus regime of being too
pro-Israel. Thus, he was refused
permission to visit Syria, and his
days in office were numbered.
McFarlane will do more of
what Habib and his deputy,
Morris Draper, had started
but most insiders are not holding
their breath waiting for a drama-
tic breakthrough. The Syrians
are seen in Washington as very
happy, almost like little kittens,
purring in content, licking their
whiskers after drinking some
milk.
Dr. Kissinger
Philip Habib
They have the virtually
unlimited support of the Soviet
Union in their adventuresome
policy. The pressure on them to
leave Lebanon is not very strong.
McFarlane will try to move them,
but his effort is already being
billed as "mission impossible." It
was thankless task for Habib;
that will probably be the case for
McFarlane as well.
BUT CLEARLY the most
frustrated foreign policy official
on the Reagan team right now is
none other than Shultz himself.
After one year on the job, he has
seen his influence and stature
slowly disappear to the point
where NBC News diplomatic
correspondent Marvin Kalb and
New York Times columnist
James Reston raised the poss'
bility on the same day that he
would not serve in a second
Reagan Administration and
might not even finish this first
term if things should continue to
deteriorate for him.
"He has always known when to
come into this capital and after a
short but critical period of service
has known when to go away,"
wrote Reston on Aug. 3. "He was
at the Department of Labor and
Treasury for only about two
years and is not likely to stay at
State much longer than that."
Time Magazine, in an article
entitled "Disappearing Act at
Foggy Bottom," boldly suggest-
ed that Shultz was no longer in
charge of policy in several critical
areas of the world. With
Reagan'8 blessing, Clark and the
White House have usurped
authority bit by bit.
THUS, the President went
outside the State Department
diplomatic corps to name former
Florida Sen. Richard Stone as
special envoy to Central America,
removing that issue from earlier
State Department dominance.
Later, that removal was solidi-
fied when Henry Kissinger was
tapped as chairman of a Special
Presidential Commission to take
a look at the bigger picture down
the road when it comes to Central
America. Isn't the State Depart-
ment supposed to do that?
New York Times diplomatic
correspondent Leslie Gelb
reported on Aug. 1 that Shultz
had also been overruled on the
selection of McFarlane to replace
Habib. Shultz's candidate, Gelb
said, was the former Defense
Secretary in the Ford Adminis-
tration, Donald Rumsfeld, but
the White House opted for
McFarlane instead.
Kalb reported on Aug. 3 that
Shultz did make a major fuss
over a White House suggestion
that Stone leave the Central
American assignment to replace
Veliotes as the State Depart-
ment's top Middle East official.
Simply put, that would have
devastated the morale among
career foreign service officers at
the Near Eastern and South
Asian Affairs Bureau. For one
thing, Stone is Jewish and well-
known as very pro-Israel, going
back to his days as chairman of
the Senate Foreign Relations
Subcommittee on the Middle
East. He was defeated in his 1982
bid for reelection.
THE ARABS probably would
have exploded in anger, sensing a
Capitol Hill Friends
They Press Spain to Establish
Relations With Israel
fop. Lantos
By London Chronicle Syndicate
Israel's best friends in
the American Jewish com-
munity and on Capitol Hill
have always played an
active role in trying to pro-
mote Israel's global diplo-
matic interests. Nowhere is
this more apparent today
than in the determined Is-
raeli effort to establish dip-
lomatic relations with the
new Socialist Government
of Spain. .
Spain is the only country in
Western Europe which has
steadfastly refused to recognize
Israel. Even Greece and Turkey
have formal diplomatic ties with
Israel, although at a low level.
Spain's Western neighbor, Por-
tugal, has full relations with Is-
rael.
THERE HAVE been some
unofficial contacts be-
tween the Israeli La-
bor allignment (which is the
opposition) with the ruling Span-
ish Socialist Party, and the Labor
leader, Shimon Peres, visited
Spain earlier this year. However,
Secretary of State Shultz
' blatant Administration tilt
towards Israel in the months
leading up to next year's U.S.
presidential election. According
to Kalb, Shultz joined forces with
the State Department bureau-
cracy and forced the White
House brass to accept careerist
Murphy for the critical post
instead. It showed that Shultz
can still win these bureaucratic
battles when he puts his foot
down.
But he still faces many
problems down the road.
The Middle East shakeup in
Washington is designed in part
to give the appearance of
momentum even if none is there.
White House aides are especially
sensitive to the upcoming Sept. 1
anniversary of Reagan's ill-fated
Middle East peace initiative.
The White House is bracing for
all sorts of news media stories
focusing on the anniversary.
Perhaps some new faces
Murphy and McFarlane might
deflect criticism.
FOR THE record, the
Administration continues to
maintain that the initiative is
still alive. "While we have
recently been deeply engaged
with the Lebanon problem, our
most fundamental goal in the
Middle East continues to be
peace between Israel and its Arab
neighbors and a just solution to
the Palestinian dilemma,"
Deputy Assistant Secretary for
Near Eastern and South Asian
Affairs Robert Pelletreau told the
House Foreign Affairs Sub-
Committee on Europe and the
Middle East on Aug. 3.
"The basis of our policy in this
regard remains President
Reagan's initiative of September
1, 1982, which is firmly rooted in
Security Council Resolution 242
and the Camp David framework.
I want to make clear that the
U.S. is determined to pursue this
initiative as circumstances
permit."
But the Administration's track
record in assessing the Middle
East has not been very good.
Spain, clearly concerned about
her relations with the Arab
world, has refused to bite the
bullet.
The Israeli Government is
clearly anxious to put the heat on
Spain to break away from her
traditional rejection of Israel.
Thus, it was no coincidence that
Spain's new Prime Minister,
Felipe Gonzalez, was subjected to
a fusillade of complaints about
this sensitive matter when he
came to Washington earlier this
month.
Continued on Page 10-A
Rep. Smith


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 2, 1983
Patrilineal
Descent?
Rabbinical Leader Declares 'No
Reform Judaism's recognition
that the Jewishness of both the
father and the mother can be ac-
cepted in the case of a mixed
marriage has been challenged by
the president of the Rabbinical
Assembly, Rabbi Arnold M.
Goodman of Atlanta, the inter-
national organization of Conser-
vative rabbis.
"The Rabbinical Assembly
does not agree that a child born
of a Jewish father is presumed
Jewish nor do we view this issue
in terms of whether Jewish status
is conferred matrilineally or pa-
trilineally." Rabbi Goodman de-
clares. "The issue is to be seen in
the context of Judaism's percep-
tion of the consequences of a
mixed marriage: a marriage be-
tween a Jew and a gentile where
there is no conversion."
Rabbi Goodman, spiritual
leader of Congregation Ahavath
Ac him of Atlanta, in commenting
on the statement on patrilineal
descent adopted by the Central
Conference of American Rabbis
at its annual convention in Los
Angeles this year, asserted: "The
survival of the Jewish people
and of the Jewish religion is
not to be achieved by extending
Jewishness on a wholesale basis
but in defining it in terms of its
uniqueness as a 'holy nation and
a kingdom of priests'. "
"White politicians and voters
still seem mesmerized by two
myths: the Machine's invincibil-
ity and the 'natural' political
languor of black citizens. It
squares with both of these
stereotypes to 'explain' Harold
Washington's victory in the
primary as a fluke resulting from
the division of the normal vote
between two white contenders.
But nothing could be farther
from the truth."
This is a major conclusion of a
comprehensive study of Chi-
cago's mayoral election, commis-
sioned by the American Jewish
Committee and prepared by Paul
Kleppner, Presidential Research
Professor of History and Political
Science at Northern Illinois Uni-
versity.
Some 150 presidents and key
executives of major American
corporations will participate in
the fourth Jerusalem Economic
Conference t be held in May, 1984
under the sponsorship of the Is-
raeli Ministries of Finance,
Economics, and Trade and In-
dustry.
More than 300 business leaders
from all parts of the world are ex-
pected to attend.
Former Secretary of State
Henry A. Kissinger and Prof.
Lawrence Klein of the University
of Pennsylvania, Nobel laureate
in economics, will be among the
guest speakers during the five-
day meeting in Israel's capital.
Other speakers will include
economic experts from Japan and
the European Economic Commu-
In an NBCEternal Light High Holiday special, "The Two
Chaims,' author Chaim Potok (seated left) and sculptor Chaim
Gross (right) discussed the spirit of Judaism in art and in life on
NBC-TV last Sunday.
H. Paul Rosenberg is the
newly-appointed chairman of
the Fall President's Mission of
the United Jewish Appeal.
The Mission will visit Israel
Oct. 2-7.
nity. Israel's President Chaim
Herzog will open the conference
at a reception in the President's
House in Jerusalem.
H. Paul Rosenberg of Kansas
City, Mo., a United Jewish Ap-
peal national vice chairman since
1979, and chairman of its Over-
seas Programs Department since
1981, has been appointed chair-
man of the Fall President's Mis-
sion, UJA National Chairman
Robert E. Loup announces. The
mission will visit Israel Oct. 2-7
and be hosted by Israel's Presi-
dent Chaim Herzog.
Rosenberg is a member of the
Board of the American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee,
UJA constituent agency, and of
the Executive Committee of the
American Associates of Ben Gur-
ion University. He also has
served as chairman of the West
Central Campaign Cabinet.
Israel Bond cash receipts for
1983 have passed the $300 million
mark, it was reported at the Isra-
el 35th Anniversary Internation-
al Israel Bond Conference in
Israel that concluded in Tel Aviv
last Wednesday. The results rep-
resent an increase in sales results
as of the same period last year.
Previously, years which fol-
lowed Israel's wars, as in 1968
and 1974, showed a drop in Bond
results. "This cycle has not been
repeated as world Jewry demon-
strates its determination to con-
tinue to strengthen Israel's
economy," said Conference
Chairman Rabbi Leon Kronish,
of Temple Beth Sholom. Miami
Beach.
The National Conference on
Soviet Jewry has designated
Sept. 15 as National Sharansky
Day in recognition of the half-
completed sentence served by
Soviet Jewish Prisoner of Consci-
ence Anatoly Sharansky since his
arrest in March, 1977. Activities
around the country will include
special programs in support of
Sharansky held by state and local
officials.
NCSJ Chairman Morris B.
Abram said that Soviet law pro-
vides for review and early release
of prisoners. Soviet leader Yuri
Andropov duly noted this fact in
a letter he wrote last January to
French Communist Party head
Georges Marchais in response to
Marchais' appeal on behalf of
Sharansky.
Abram has called upon Soviet
authorities to "honor your legal
procedures by releasing Sharan-
sky and allowing him to join his
wife in Israel."
Tormenting Rectal Pain And Itch
Of Hemorrhoidal Tissues
Promptly Relieved
In many cases Preparation 11
Hives prompt, temporary re-
lief from burning pnifl .'ind itch
nnd Actually helps shrink
swelling of hemorrhoid.il tis-
sues uiused by inflammation.
Tests by doctors on hun-
dreds of patients showed this
to be true in many cases
Preparation H lubricates to
protect the inflamed area-
won't sting or smart.
Preparation H ointment or
suppositories.
"Personal attack" and "politi-
cal editorial" broadcasting regu-
lations "are vital tools for ensur-
ing that the public remains in-
formed on controversial issues
and should not be repealed," ac-
Gordon Roofing 3
and Sheet Metal
Works, Inc.
1450 N.W.21.1 Street
Phone: 325-8287
Have your roof repaired now;
you will save on a new roof later
"Satisfactory Work by
Experienced Men"
cording to the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith.
The League is objecting to the
Federal Communications Com-
mission's proposal to lift the two
rules under which air time is
granted for opposing viewpoints.
In a letter to the FCC, Justin
J. Finger, director of ADL's Civil
Rights Division, said the public
access rules guarantee diversity
of opinion and the free and open
discussion of ideas protected by
the First Amendment.
Finger challenged the FCC's
point that rebuttal to a personal
attack which focuses on vindicat-
ing the individual's reputation
does not necessarily clarify a
public issue.
Israel-bound tourists have a
new opportunity to combine their
vacation in the Holy Land with a
stopover in Europe as a result of
the opening of direct air service
between Spain and Israel.
El AI, Israel's national airline,
is operating weekly flights from
Tel Aviv to Madrid (and vice
versa). Iberia, the Spanish na-
tional air carrier, is operating
weekly flights from Tel Aviv to
both Madrid and Barcelona.
Increasing numbers of Ameri-
can travelers elect to combine
their trip to Israel with a stop in
another Mediterranean, or a Eu-
ropean destination usually on
the way home. Until now,
Athens, Rome, Paris and London
have been favorites a
opening of the direct flight. W
Israel to Spain offafSJj
choice to American vacationerT
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy in
Mass.), who will receive an Ho '
orary Doctorate from Ben-Guri^
University of the Negev will h,
special guest speaker at tktl
seventh annual dinner of
American Associates on Oct7
Ambassador Yaakov Avnon vio
president of the University' will
be honored at the event.
The evening will be hosted by
the American Associates, Ben-
Gurion University of the Nev
of which Robert H. Arnow (
New York is national preskfcnt
Bobbie Abrams and Aron Chil*
wich are chairman for the dinntt
in the Grand Ballroom of the
Pierre Hotel in New York City.
Noting that many Jews wot L
not able to participate in the.l
march in Washington last Satar.'
day the Jewish Sabbath -
honoring Dr. Martin Luther
King, Jr., B'nai B'rith Intern*
tional is urging its members to
take part in other events in that |
local communities paying tribute
to the late civil rights leader.
Gerald Kraft, B'nai B'rith I
president, said that the Jewish
organization supports the goals
of Dr. King and of the 20th anni
versary of the historic march
"B'nai B'rith was there in spirit,'
he declared.
Army Keeps Secret Details Of
Redeployment to Awali River
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
army is keeping completely
secret all details of the date of its
redeployment from the Shouf
mountain area of Lebanon to its
new line along the Awali River.
Gen. Moshe Levy, the Chief of
Staff, said last week that the
move would begin "within a
matter of days" and be com-
pleted in one operation, within a
short period.
The Israel Detense Force has
denied an earlier report from
Beirut that the withdrawal would
begin Sunday and be completed
by the eve of Rosh Hashanah.
THE IDF declined any!
comment on a report that the
IDF had agreed to a 72-hour{
postponement to allow the I
Lebanese army more time to I
arrange to take over from the I
withdrawing Israelis to avoid 11
clash between warring Druze i
Christian Phalangists in the I
mountain area where Druze |
villages are situated close to i
alongside Christian villages.
The redeployment is not far
off. However, IDF soldiers in the.
area are no longer living under
conditions of any comfort but are
back on a "frontline wartime |
condition".
Whelher you're on Orymptc hopeful or just a toe-dipper, you'll
love our new indoor swimming pool. We've also got a great
outdoor pool.
Enjoy dining excellence at TJ. Peppercorn's. Indulge yourself
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You won't believe the tremendous variety in our Sunday Brunch
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The seventh annual Sea of Galilee Marathon
will take place around this beautiful site in
northern Israel on Dec. 21. Some 1,000
runners from throughout Israel and the
world are expected to participate.
1,000 Runners
They Eye Sea of Galilee Marathon
r~*
Jewish National Fund ^^
runo
r
Redeems, Reclaims, Rebuilds the Land of Israel
On the Occasion of the New Year 5744
PLANT TREES IN ISRAEL
FOR ALL OCCASIONS
Plant as Many Trees as You Wish
($5 Per Tree)
TIBERIAS, Israel A thousand
inners from Israel and around the world
re expected to participate this
iDecember in the 17th International Sea
)f Galilee Marathon. The race is open to
|all amateur athletes in possession of
ledical certification of their fitness to
compete in a marathon.
The marathon follows a route around
Ithe shores of this legendary lake starting
[from Kibbutz En Gev on the lake's
[eastern shore. En Gev's main industry is
(fishing and was founded in 1937 by
immigrants from Europe, one of whom,
Teddy Kollek, is now Mayor of
Jerusalem.
Five-hundred athletes from around the
world participated in the 1982 marathon,
the winner of which was Rafi Saltzman of
Israel. Sally Strauss of the United States
won the women's competition.
Details of entering the marathon, as
well as travel arrangements, may be
obtained from International Travel
Planners, 14 East 28 Street, New York
10016.
18Trees-
25Trees-
36Trees-
50Trees-
75Trees-
lOOTrees-
300Trees-
1000 Trees-
-Chai
-Cluster
-Double Chad
-Jubilee
-Arbor
-Garden
-Orchard
-Grove*
* Dedication Ceremony in Israel and a
Special Plaque in the Forest is Included
Q Holiday Greetings
D Birthday
G Anniversary
D Bar/Bat Hltzvah
D Wedding
D Graduation
? In Honor
a In Memory
D Get Well
D Good Wishes
D New Baby
D New Year
D Special Occasion
G In Gratitude
D___________
Hollings Raps Reagan 'Errors'
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 353
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone 538-6464
IM
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Sen. Fritz Hollings (D.,
>.C.) told the Conference of
'residents of Major Ameri-
tan Jewish Organizations
mat the Reagan Adminis-
tration had made "funda-
lental errors" which have
[' dissipated the advantage
jained by the signing of an
Egyptian-Israeli peace
^reaty."
In the first of a series of Presi-
dents Conference forums with
presidential candidates, Hollings
charged that United States
^policy in "refusing" to activate
"the United States-Israel agree-
ment on strategic cooperation, its
resistance to establishing nec-
essary liaison between United
States and Israeli forces in Leb-
lanon, and withholding delivery of
I lone promised F-16 fighter planes
[had sent "the wrong signals" to
|the Arab world and the Soviet
I Union.
"I HAVE warned for many
^years against the danger of
[giving even the merest impres-
[sion of wavering in our commit
Irnent to Israel's security, and
I n&ve said repeatedly that if Israel
[were allowed to appear weak in
Ithe eyes of the world, grave
I Murphy, Begin Meet
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Richard Murphy, the U.S. Assist-
ant Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
met with Premier Menachem
Begin and Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir here last Wed-
nesday. Following the meeting,
Murphy said the three talked
mainly about the situation in the
Mideast and the possible role of
Saudi Arabia in a settlement of
the crisis in Lebanon. Murphy's
recent nomination by President
Regan as Assistant Secretary is
awaiting Congressional approval.
consequences would ensue,"
Hollings said.
The Senator, in answer to a
question following his talk, said
he had supported for the past five
years the moving of the United
States Embassy in Tel Aviv to
Jerusalem. "Our country should
treat Israel not as a client state
but as a sovereign nation,"
Hollings declared.
He said he was "disturbed" by
the formation of an "Anti-Zionist
Committee" in the Soviet Union
and said he had written repeated-
ly to Soviet leaders including
the late President Leonid Brezh-
nev, his successor Yuri Andropov
and Constantin Zotov, whom he
described as director of immi-
gration in Moscow supporting
Jewish refuseniks and Prisoners
of Conscience and protesting
their "harassment and punish-
ment" by the Kremlin.
IN RESPONSE to a question
on public funds for parochial
schools, Hollings said it was
"bad public policy" for govern-
ment to do anything but leave
the private schools alone and give
public funds for public schools.
Anything else, he said, was
"excessive entanglement" and
harmful both to the cause of
religion and to the cause of public
education.
Beth Din Office
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
counties.
1532 Washington Avenue
M*ami Beach. Florida 33139
Tel 534-1004 or 672-0004
Hyr of Yontiffi
The night before each holiday the Jews in the Scottish town
of Ayr regularly gather together in their town's tiny shul. So tiny is
their house of worship that it really isn't a house at all. It's part of a
hotel known for. Kosher food!
Now if such arrangements make the Jews of Ayr unique,
certainly another of their traditions is more universally observed: the
toasting of special occasions with fine scotch whisky. In America the
favorite is J&B Rare Scotch. Blessed with a flavor that's smooth and
subtle, J&B is the scotch that whispers. So if this Erev Yont iff finds
you at home or even visiting in some quaint hotel, you'll find that
J&B is the holiday spirit to be raised without reservation!
86 Prod Bfendrt Scoter. Wtaky. 01982 Trw Paottnoton Corp NV
]&B. It whispers.


i lit- jewisn r lonaian/ t naay. September 2,1S3
As Holy Days
Approach
ADL Urges 'Security Consciousness'
Arthur Teitelbaum, director of
the ADL's Southern Area, de-
clared: "As we approach the
High Holiday period and the
beginning of the year for day
school and religious school
programs, iv is appropriate
and prudent for you to careful-
ly review security arrangements
and procedures at your insti-
tution."
AND IN a note to Jewish
agencies and organizations, the
ADL warned: "There is no total,
full-proof security. What we seek
is to obtain the best security pos-
sible in keeping with the amount
of funds available for a security
program and that it does not
seriously interfere in the daily
operations of an organisation."
Teitelbaum declared that "On
a case -by-case basis, the theft of
valuables, particularly from
synagogues, the anti-Semitic
destruction of property, or per-
sonal assaults, may result from
different motivations."
But he noted that "they relate
to similar issues of building and
personal protection." He advised
that "you contact your local
police agency or a private secur-
ity company for an on-site survey
of your security needs.
THE ADL executive listed
these procedures should an act of
vandalism or harrassment occur:
Immediately notify the
police no matter how minor the
incident:
Notify the rabbi, organiza-
tion president and-or your top
leadership:
If there is physical damage,
defacing, spray-painting, take
photographs of the damage.
As soon as the police have
had a chance to view the damage
and photographs have been
taken, clean up or repair the
damage:
It usually is unnecessary
and inappropriate to call the
media in such incidents. If it is
significant, they will pick it up
from police reports. However,
anti-Semitic incidents contain
many variables which will de-
termine the advisability of con-
tacting the news media;
Evaluate what happened
and determine if a negative can
be turned into a positive. Se-
riously discuss ways that you can
utilize the incident to help
educate against such things in
the future:
If an individual is ap-
prehended, consider prosecution.
It is helpful to get the word out
that vandals will be subject to
prosecution to the full extent of
the law. Note that the Florida
Legislature has enacted the Flor-
Klarsfelds Say France Employed
Former Nazis in Post-War Years
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
Nazi-hunters Serge and
Heati' Klarsfeld have ac-
cused French intelligence
organizations of having
employed notorious former
Gestapo and Nazi officials
in the post-war years.
In an interview with Le
Monde, the Klarsfelds said that
America "was not the only
country to have used former
Nazis" and said that several
French intelligence outfits, in-
cluding one investigating
wartime Nazi crimes, had em-
ployed former Nazi officials. The
Klarsfelds called on France to
follow America's example and
appoint an investigating com-
mission to throw all possible light
on these practices.
USING SECRET documents
obtained from the files of the
D.S.T.. a major French intelli-
gence service which was
responsible for investigating
wartime Nazi crimes, the Klars-
felds named a former high-
ranking Gestapo officer, Ernst
Missel wit/, as one of the war
criminals employed by the
French.
Misselwitz served during the
war in the Paris Gestapo head-
quarters and in 1952 was found
guilty of having tortured French
resistance fighters during in-
terrogation. The court said he
probably drove to suicide a
prominent resistance leader.
Pierre Brossolette.
The documents published by
the Klarsfelds show that the
French secret service spirited
Misselwitz out of the country at
the time of his trial and hid him
in Germany to ensure his
protection.
MISSELWITZ and the other
former Nazis were mainly em-
ployed in investigating wartime
Nazi crimes and preparing court
cases against wartime French
collaborators.
The Klarsfelds' revelations
were front-paged by Le Monde
which also called on the govern-
ment to open postwar intelligence
files. The paper said "France can
and should do what America has
done with Allan Ryan's investi-
gation."
It is not known whether
Misselwitz or any of the other
unnamed former Nazis employed
by the French are still alive.
Election Director Told To Quit'
TEL AVIV (JTA) Adi Halpera, the Likud Party's
municipal election director, who has been preparing
Mayor Shlomo Lahats campaign for the local council
elections later this year, handed in his resignation
Monday after a reportedly stormy meeting with Lahat.
THE MAYOR called him to his office to complain
about Halpern's remarks in the weekend edition of a local
Tel Aviv newspaper in which he praised South Africa's
system of apartheid and said he thought this system
should also be applied in Israel against the Arabs.
Lahat told Halpern he was strongly opposed to these
sentiments and demanded his resignation, which was
handed over on the spot.
ida House of Worship Protection
Act. based on ADL's model
legislation, which makes the van-
dalization or desecration of a
house of worship a third-degree
felony.
IN LINE with the ADL
recommendation that it is impor-
tant to "think security," an ADL
security checklist explains that
"Each person is a 'deputy' in the
effort to maintain security. It is
important that each adminis-
trator meet with his or her staff
... to increase their awareness of
the need for security conscious-
ness ."
The checklist notes that "Lay
people can also contribute to en-
hariced security Encourage your
institution's members and con-
stituents to be watchful when
walking or driving by your build-
ing. In those areas of acute need,
civilian patrols may be organized
for purposes of observation."
Other recommendations in-
clude establishing a procedure for
screening uninvited visitors and
for inspecting unmarked or unex-
pected packages: establishing a
regular working relationship with
a law enforcement contact, whose
responsibility includes investiga-
tions of vandalism, desecrations,
or threats: fostering teamwork
among staff as a key factor for
their own protection, as well as
protection for the building or
agency: making certain that
facilities have strong lighting and
gates around doors and windows
to deter criminal activity.
"BURGLAR AND fire alarms
are of obvious benefit." says the
checklist, but they vary greatly
in cost and sophistication ... In
considering the installation of
such devices, make sure you have
someone present who can offer
expert guidance as to your
needs."
As a preventive action
measure, the ADL recommends
that premises be inspected foi
security needs now, before tht
advent of the Holy Days.
Die Vade'lanO
Liberia to Reopen
Embassay in Jerusalem
culture, economics and miliunl
aid. Israeli experts will leave (kI
Liberia after the High HolyDnJ
to provide aid in the areas it
farming, tropical medicine, roul
building, shipping and airline I
Derations. Also mentioned
the possibility of Israeli militaJ
aid to Liberia and intelligent
information on Libya."
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Liberia will reopen its
Embassy here, in the same
building it left 10 years ago
when it severed its diplo-
matic ties with Israel, For-
eign Minister Ernest East-
man of Liberia has told Is-
rael TV.
At the same time, Israel and
Liberia will exchange Ambassa-
dors. The Liberians announced
that their Ambassador will be
Samuel Pearson, who was for-
merly Liberia's envoy to Kenya.
Uganda and Tanzania. Premier
Menachem Begin announced at
the same time that the Cabinet
would be asked to approve the
appointment of Gavriel Gavrieli
as Ambassador to Monrovia.
BOTH announcements were
made at a ceremony here where
Begin and President Samuel Doe
of Liberia signed an agreement of
cooperation in the fields of agri-
Both Doe and Begin appeard!
pleased by the outcome of thel
four-day state visit by the Blactl
African leader. "This is a goal
day for both Liberia and Israel. I
Begin said at the agreemeil
signing ceremony. "We signedil
good agreement, which will opal
a new year in the relations be-1
tween our two countries of under |
standing, friendship and cooper
ation."
Den- promised thai ai the upI
coming convention of pre-l
western African countries in ml
l\ory Coast, he would raise thtl
matter of other coumritil
resuming diplomat ic relations |
with Israel.
Ritual Director
CONSERVATIVE
Presently employed. Desires change. Excellent
Baal Koreh. Available after the Holiday. Write:
Box RDC c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, FL 33101.
New Year
from
Delta
Air Lines*
Delta Air Lines extends best wishes to our Jewish friends for
the holiday season and for the year to come. May the new year
bring peace, health, happiness and prosperity for everyone.


Friday, September 2,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Death of Two Marines ^ Make8 p^ Li8t
Won't Deter U.S. Diplomatic Approch Of New Economic Measures
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
||JTA) State Department
spokesman Alan Romberg
gaid that despite the killing
of two U.S. Marines and
the wounding of eight
Others in the Beirut area,
American diplomatic ef-
forts will "continue to be
itense."
A statement he read at a press
onference said: "Two U.S.
larines were killed and eight
rounded when a U.S. Marine
Dsition was shelled in the Beirut
luburbs this morning (Sunday)
li 3:49 a.m. Washington time.
'THE ATTACK on the
narines followed a day and night
pf sporadic fighting between
forces of the Lebanese army and
Lebanese Shiite militia groups in
kouth Beirut. There has also been
Ering from Druze militia posi-
tions.
"We are shocked and grieved
By the deaths of the Marines in
Israel Learns
Bitter Lesson
Of Negative
Treatment
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
One of the lessons Israel
Ihould learn from the
worldwide negative treat-
ment Israel received from
Ihe media over its cam-
)aign in Lebanon is the
lecd to coordinate the
fvcrseas information pro-
gram of the government,
iimcha Dinitz, former
ambassador to the United
States, said.
Speaking at the 19th annual
[America-Israel dialogue here,
iponsorad by the American Jew-
ish Congress, which this year
focused on the problem of Israeli
Information treatment overseas.
Ibinilz suggested appointment of
In deputy minister in the Foreign
Ministry to be responsible for
|such coordination.
HE SAID absence of co-
ordination among the various
{government agencies dealing
Iwith overseas information was
lone of the key reasons for Israel's
[' information failure" in
I Lebanon. He suggested that a
deputy minister was the best
[approach to the problem, rather
Ithan "complicating" Israel's
political system "with yet
I another minister."
The dialogue began with a
| screening of a film which
criticized NBC coverage of the
I war in Lebanon. The screening
was followed by a defense of NBC
by Paul Miller, the NBC Israel
Bureau chief.
Dinitz suggested that
reporters in west Beirut had been
hostile to Israel, at least in part,
to justify the fact that they had
not covered the "rape of Leba-
non" during the prior seven
years.
Joshua Muravchik, of the
Center for Strategic Studies in
Washington, also criticized
American media coverage of the
war. However, he declared, this
was less a matter of biased
reporting than a reflection of the
psychological atmosphere in the
United States which, he said,
views negatively any use of force
and maintains that negotiations
should be used to solve all
problems.
Lebanon. They died serving the
United States in its efforts to
help the Lebanese central
government restore order to the
greater Beirut area.
"We condemn those who are
responsible for the continuing
violence which has claimed many
victims, including our own
marines. Our forces are there at
the request of the government of
Lebanon and helping to provide
security for the Lebanese people.
Once more, we call upon all ar-
med elements to end this sense-
less violence and unite behind the
Lebanese government to restore
national harmony."
THE QUESTION of how this
incident is covered under the War
Powers Resolution is "under
intensive study at the present
moment," Romberg said. "We
are looking at the situation and
the War Powers Resolution, and
we will take whatever action is
called for with respect to the
resolution."
Concerning the killing of the
Marines, Romberg said that
"other elements of the multi-
national force also came under
fire." However, whether the
Americans "were specifically
being targeted and by whom is
not known."
Romberg said "no changes are
being contemplated one way or
the other" in the make-up of
American contingents to the
' MFN as a result of the killings.
He also stated that Robert
McFarlane, President Reagan's
special Mideast envoy, returned
Monday to Beirut and "he is
continuing actively his efforts, as
is Ambassador (Richard) Fair-
banks to pursue the mission the
President sent them on."
MCFARLANE had been in
Rome, Paris and London discus-
sing the multinational peace-
keeping force and ways to
achieve a permanent ceasefire in
Lebanon.
Romberg would not comment
on Premier Menachem Begin's
announcement that he resigned
except to say that the statement
made by White House spokes-
man Larry Speakes covered the
State Department's views.
Speakes said that Begin's
resignation was an internal affair
of Israel's government. He also
stated that the "close ties with
Israel" will continue whether or
not Begin resigned.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The government, after nearly two
weeks of debate on budget cuts,
finally made public a list of new
economic measures to balance the
national budget, but most of
them are still subject to approval
by either the Knesset Finance
Committee or the full Knesset.
Two of the major decisions are
to cut back on government
financing of political parties and
to reverse an earlier decision to
designate the 25 municipal elec-
tions a national vacation day.
Officials said the two decisions
should be worth three to four
billion Shekels equivalent to
half the cuts this year in the
Defense Ministry budget.
A NUMBER of other ten-
tatively approved steps await
Knesset action. One is abolition
of allowances for births, unless
the government can find another
source of funds for this grant.
Another is abolition of exemption
from municipal taxes for Israelis
in the armed forces.
Child allowances for the first
two children in a family of up to
three children will be taxable,
except for low-income families.
The fees for water will be updated
at the same rate as those for
electricity.
Income earned abroad will be
taxable at the same rate as local
income. Income taxes on
irregular earnings, such as
writers' fees and payments to
artists, will be raised from 40
percent to 45 percent.
BUT THE Cabinet rejected a
proposal by the Ministerial
Finance Committee, where the
initial proposals for budget
changes are hammered out, to
impose the value added tax
(VAT) on fruits and vegetables.
The Treasury still wrestled
with efforts to trim another 20 to
25 billion Shekels from the forth-
coming budget. The main
stumbling block continued to be
the education budget. The
Ministers of Finance and
Education failed to reach agree-
ment on the budget for
education, and they will meet for
another try.
Education Minister Zevulun
Hammer said that if no agree-
ment is reached with Finance
Minister Yoram Aridor, the issue
will be brought to the next Cabi-
net meeting.
STILL GIVING AWAY CASH AND BEAUTIFUL GIFTS
WITH ALL CERTIFICATE ACCOUNTS.
DICK TEREBECKI IS BACK ON THE BEACH
Miami Savings is pleased and proud to announce that as of June 27th,
1983, Dick Terebecki is back on Miami Beach as a member of the Miami
Savings team.
Over the years, Dick Terebecki has made many friends by providing
his customers with expert professional advice that
goes far beyond a cold analysis of financial
figures. He has helped many people estab-
lish and achieve new financial goals.
To receive Dick Terebecki's spe-
cial kind of financial advice, come in
or call for an appointment at our
Miami Beach Branch. The number is
673-2500. He's looking forward to
seeing you soon. So are we.
AND LOAN ASSOCIATION
MIAMI MACH BRANCH
1265 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 3313
Tel. (305) 673-2500
MAlNOfNCE
1NI 2nd Avenue
Miami. Florida 33132
Tel. (305) 358-6620
SW. BRANCH
1842 S.W 8th Street
Miami. Florida 33135
Tel. (305) 642-3800


i age iv>-/\ i iie j ewisn e lonaian / f naay, September 2, IV
President Reagan meets with a delegation of
board members of the Jewish publication
Society of America and presents them with a
new translation of the Hebrew Bible. Left to
right are the President, Chain Potok, Dr.
Norman Oler and Judge Charles Weiner.
Miami Leader
Russell Named to Top UJA Post
NEW YORK Robert
Russell of Miami, has been
named chairman of the
United Jewish Appeal En-
dowment Program by Her-
schel W. Blumberg, UJA
national president.
In making the appointment,
Blumberg described the new
chairman as "a forceful leader
with a superb grasp of XJJA's
goals and policies. Russell brings
deep experience and dynamic
energy to his new role, and I
know his expertise will
strengthen UJA's philanthropic
outreach."
RUSSELL, a national vice
chairman of the UJA and mem-
ber of its Board of Trustees, was
the initial national chairman of
Project Renewal. In that posi-
tion, he was. instrumental in
shaping and implementing the
neighborhood and human reha-
bilitation program in Israel,
Blumberg declared.
As chairman of the UJA En-
dowment Program, also known
as the Covenant for Continuity,
he will help to expand the nation-
Robert Russell
al leadership cadre that has been
active in promoting the program
throughout the United States. At
the same time, he will create a
"strong and vital endowment
program that enables partici-
pants to carry on, beyond their
lifetimes, the humanitarian tasks
51 Families from U.S. Decide
To Make Aliya After Summer's Stay
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Some 51 families of the 240
families who came to Israel from
the U.S. this summer as part of
Project 1000 have decided to
make aliya, it was announced
here by the Jewish Agency's
immigration and absorption
department.
Project 1000 was designed for
families who expressed interest in
making aliya and came to Israel
to explore the scene. Most of
those who decided to immigrate
said they would settle here within
the coming year. Some said they
would do so within three months.
According to a questionnaire
distributed among the
prospective immigrants, some 70
percent said that the program
"got them considerably closer to
aliya." Most said that one of the
main factors in deciding to
immigrate was pressure by their
children.
Eleven of 15 families who spent
their pre-aliya visit near
Jerusalem have already opened
local bank accounts. Four
families
tments.
have purchased apar-
they have undertaken as Jews,"
according to Blumberg.
Under Russell's leadership, the
Convenant for Continuity Pro-
gram "will underscore the satis-
faction to be gained from estab-
lishing a personal link with Isra-
el's future through UJA's sup-
port of resettlement, absorption,
youth service and educational
programs."
In addition to his new respon-
sibilities, Russell will retain his
present position as president of
the Israel Education Fund, a
UJA program that underwrites
capital construction of educa-
tional institutions in Israel.
RUSSELL ALSO serves on
the Board of Governors of the
Jewish Agency, and has been
designated by Jerold Hoffberger,
chairman of the Board of Gov-
ernors ef the Jewish Agency, to
be responsible for the Jewish
Agency International Project
Renewal Committee. Currently
chairman of the Jewish Agency
Committee on Immigrant
Housing, Russell is a member of
the Board of Directors of the
UJA constituent agencies, the
United Israel Appeal and the
American Jewish Joint Distribu-
tion Committee.
In Miami, Russell has held
every top post in the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, in-
cluding president, general chair-
man, and member of the Execu-
tive Committee.
IRVING
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Gen. Eitan Builds Image
As 'Greater Israel' Leader
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Former Chief of Staff (Res.)
Gen. Rafael Eitan, continuing his apparent efforts to
build up a political basis for a future political career as a
"Greater Israel" leader, delivered a hard-hitting address
to a young audience in Haifa last Tuesday.
To the applause of his young audience, Eitan said: "We
captured Galilee in the fighting in 1949, and completed
the job in 1967. We captured areas and expelled Arabs.
"THEY STARTED the wars, and must know that"
when they start a war they lose and get nothing back.
When they know, they will think twice about starting a
war. Who has ever heard of the loser getting anything
back? When you lose, you pay the price. That's the
custom in any normal country."
The former Chief of Staff appealed to government
leaders and officials to set an example by volunteering a
10 percent reduction in their salaries. *, .
Spain Presses to Establish
Diplomatic Relations With Israel
Continued from Page 5-A
publicly supported establishing
ties with Israel, but has refused
to follow through since coming to
power.
FIFTEEN MEMBERS of the
House of Representatives For-
eign Affairs Committee, led by
Democrats Edward Feighan ol
Ohio and Larry Smith of Florida,
presented Gonzalez with a letter
urging Spain to reconsider its po-
sition.
"... Your country maintains
diplomatic relations with all
States, regardless of any policy
differences that may exist. Spain
makes an exception to this prin-
ciple, however, in its relations
with Israel," the letter said.
It continued: "Should Spain
join the European Economic
Community, it will be the only
member State that does not have
diplomatic relations with Israel.
We feel that the establishment of
diplomatic relations with Israel
would be a decision of historical
magnitude for Spain.
"In light of the strategic value
of the region and its importance
to the United States and NATO
interests, we feel that a closer re-
lationship between Spain and Is-
rael would foster greater coopera-
tion and coordination that would
work to the advantage of Spain,
Israel, the United States and all
the Western allies .
"Spain's influence and ties
with the Arab world, coupled
with similar ties to Israel, would
grant Spain a strengthened posi-
tion of influence in this region."
PERHAPS EVEN more im-
portant, ten members of the His-
panic Caucus in Congress signed
a similar letter. Democrat Robert
Garcia of New York, chairman of
the caucus, personally Rave it to
Gonzalez when he visited Capitol
Hill.
After hoping thai Spain would
"seriously consider having
formal diplomatic relations with
Israel, the caucus letter said that
the country's "unique cultural
heritage and geographical loca-
tion put it in a position to act as a
conduit between the Arab world
and Israel."
The letter concluded: "Any
lessening of tension between
these nations would be in the in-
terests not only of the nations in-
volved and the United States,
but of all nations dedicated to
seeking a lasting peace in the
Midle East..."
House Democrat Tom Lantos
of California and Republican Sen.
Charles Percy of Illinois, chair-
man of the Senate Foreign Rela-
tions Committee, also pressed
Gonzalez to recognize Israel. He
clearly got the message, but
made no promises, saying
merely: "We're working on it."
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Friday, September 2,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue Miami, Florida
fsident of the State of Israel, Yitzhak Navon,
lonorary Doctorate from Tel Aviv University
If. Haim Ben-Shahar.
ttions Urged to Boycott
Itine Conference in Geneva
fGTON -
nations which
le "rule of law"
iding principles
Nations were
B'nai B'rith
to shun the
&nce on Pales-
led in Ueneva,
id of controver-
ist Monday.
chairman of the
International
that appeal when
I report he said in-
Jeneva conference
as "a staged at-
c red it Israel and
fright to exist."
SSSED that, at a
| Israel is demon-
[strong desire for
act with Lebanon
. troop withdrawal
\J0 and the other
Republic
lor Ties
5IL SEDAN
LLEM (JTA)
Itral African Re-
jrobably be the
(African country
iiplomatic rela-
tsrael, it was re-
Brael Radio. Ac-
he report, Israel
Itral African Re-
an agreement
ties several
lobutu Sese Seko of
Mted instrumental
the republic to
land Liberia in their
of diplomatic rela-
fcrael. Zaire renewed
lay, and Liberia did
II LE. President
I of Liberia met with
lister Moshe Arens
discussed possible
iry aid to Liberia-
reporters after their
Lrens said Liberia is
erned" about Libyan
imar Qaddafi "and
jbversion throughout
Iberia had already
le! to supply intelli-
Libyan activity in
Mci that no details have
out on this issue of
I but that Israel would
tart by providing mili-
ce and training to
^d might provide arms
Arab states are "intransigent
and hostile," the conference
should not get serious attention
from the west.
The report, prepared by Dr.
Harris Schoenberg, director of
the International Council's
Geneva office, charged that the
conference's preparatory com-
mittee already had taken steps to
exclude pro-Israel groups and
viewpoints and that the com-
mittee had formed a "mini-
working group" which has
censured and rejected more than
half of the background papers
submitted so far to the con-
ference.
The report indicated that on
June 14, the preparatory com-
mittee adopted a proposal,
demanded by the PLO, requiring
that all non-governmental
>rganizations (NGOs) wishing to
attend the Geneva conference
submit material documenting
their sympathies.
SCHOENBERG said this
decision "excluded any sentiment
favorable to Israel." He said the
proposal, approved by Made-
gascar, the Laos Peoples Demo-
cratic Republic, Syria and the
United Arab Emirates, had been
opposed by the Egyptian rep-
resentative, who argued for open
participation.
Schoenberg said 12 papers
approved for the conference, after
screening of all papers offered for
the event, were "rife with anti-
Israel themes," portraying Israel
as a "dark and evil nation." One
paper revives the "Zionism is
racism" slander and another
claims that the 1948 recom-
mendation by the UN General
Assembly, partitioning Palestine
into a Jewish and an Arab state,
was illegal.
Meanwhile, it was reported
from Geneva that envoys of the
10-nation European Economic
Community failed to reach a
common position on the Geneva
conference but diplomatic
sources said only Greece would
participate.
THE ENVOYS met for several
hours in the West German
Mission in Geneva, and sources
said most of them favored
sending on only observers.
Some, including West Ger-
many, said they favored boy-
cotting the conference. Greece
announced some time ago it
would participate. The other nine
ECC nations agreed to postpone
a public announcement of their
generally unfavorable attitude
for a few days.
Switzerland, the unwilling host
to the 10-day conference, said it
sent an observer but would not
participate. Some ECC diplomats
called the $6 million conference a
waste of money.
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-rage-iZrnc------nrjwuo rxrmian/ r nuay; aeptamwy &, igoo
Arens Meet With Freij
Ends Three-Year Boycott
By GIL SEDAN
BETHLEHEM (JTAJ
Defense Minister Moshe
Arens made a first visit to
Mayor Elias Freij of Beth-
lehem and his councillors
and ended what in effect
has been a three-year boy-
cott by Israeli leaders of
Arab mayors in the oc-
cupied territories.
Arens was greeted on the steps
of the large modern municipal
building by Freij, in the second
meeting in two days between the
two men. They first met in Arens'
office in Tel Aviv, but that meet-
ing was described by Freij as a
"getting to know you" event
whereas the meeting here was de-
scribed as "a working visit."
THE MEETING between
Arens and the Mayor and his
councillors here lasted nearly an
hour. The topics discussed were
mainly local matters such as
grants for rebuilding the local
marketing, simplified processing
of permits to cross bridges to
Jordan and reunification of fam-
ilies and release of prisoners held
by Israel for security reasons.
Arens promised that most of the
demands would be favorably
reviewed.
But both Freij and Arens said
the meeting was the start of a
dialogue which would include
political issues. Arens told re-
porters after the meeting that,
"of course," he could not promise
"that on those issues I will not
have differences with the
Mayor." He also commented that
the meeting was proof "that
Arabs and Jews should live
peacefully in this part of the
country."
OBSERVERS SAID the visit
to Bethlehem could indicate a
change in the attitude of Israeli
authorities toward West Bank
leaders. During the time Ariel
Sharon was Defense Minister,
there were few Israeli contacts
with the urban leadership, with
emphasis placed on the rural
leadership, particularly in
support of the pro-Israel Village
Leagues.
Tami Decides
To Exit
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
secretariat of the Tami Party
decided at a four-hour meeting
here to recommend to its central
committee that the party leave
the Cabinet and the government
coalition.
Tami leader Aharon Uzan, who
is also Labor and Social Affairs
Minister, said there was only a
"very small chance" that the
Central Committee would over-
turn the secretariat's decision.
He expressed anger over what he
termed the Finance Ministry's
insensitivity toward the poor,
who are the main supporters of
Tami which represents Israelis of
North African origin.
"If the Cabinet were to
reconsider the economic
measures it has taken, Tami
might reconsider its departure,"
Uzan said. He was referring to a
series of new taxes on consumer
goods and the levying of a
monthly education tax for school
children.
Uzan noted that theoretically
the government could continue to
rule without Tami's three Knes-
set votes, as it would still have a
majority of the 120 member
Kirliament. But among those 61
Ks there are at least two or
three known to waver in their
support for the Likud coalition,
he added.
The new trend at the Defense
Ministry is to revive dialogue
with the urban leadership, which
was flowering when the late
Moshe Dayan was Defense
Minister.
The observers said one initial
result would be an extension of
Israeli dialogue with pro-Jordan
elements, such as Hikmat al
Masri of Nablus. a former speak-
er of the Jordanian Parliament,
who was also received by Arens.
THE WEAKNESS of the new
Defense Ministry's policy is that
the pro-Jordan Palestinian Arab
elements will not move politically
without Hussein's approval.
They rejected the Camp David
accords, accepted by Israel, and
accepted President Reagan's
peace initiative, rejected by
Israel
In addition to meeting separa-
tely with Masri and Freij, Arens
also met with Suleiman al Astal,
the Mayor of Khan Yunis in the
Gaza Strip. These meetings were
described as the first in a series of
contacts with representatives of
Seven police officers guard the Soviet UN 2?***?!?* Sta*J
Mission in New York against a Torah scroll ffiJZL-Sli T^T^
t a 11 at l **v prayer service at the Mission, thh vJ
and a copyofAnatoly Sharanskys prison Seated to Sharansky, Dr. Joseph bZ\
letters. The latter are placed at its gates after the other Prisoners of Conscience 1
Russian officials refused to accept them. """*"' *
the territories, contacts frozen
since the war in Lebanon.
But most observers felt that no
immediate political fruits were
likely to grow out of the meet-
ings, a point made by Freij who
said, after the meetii
"presently, there are no
tions for a political momentiuil
What better way
to begin the
New Year
Carmel
Imported from Israel
Since 1882
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Crm.1 Win. Co.. Inc. 271 Madi.on Avwu. New York. NY. 10016 (212) 532-4016
FW a tree Carmel w.nes brochure send a slamped self-addressed envelope I
******* ^*sa**;*> > ,.; ... <, >: v^ic^* 9


Friday, September 2,1983 / Tbe Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Very Different Novels
[Deal With Contemporary
Middle East Setting
Poor Deluge Agency for Assistance
eLMtk>f Days By Moris Farhi.
Hew York: Crown Publishers,
1983.538Pp. $16.95.
e. By Laurie Devine. New
York: Simon and Schuster,
[983.477 Pp. $16.95.
C MORTON I. TEICHER
fewish Floridian Book Editor
Mthough both these novels
with the contemporary
ildle East, they are quite dif-
jit from each other. "Nile" is
omantic love story that tells
But star-crossed lovers,
ussef. a Jew, and Mona, a
(slim- It is an updated replay
'Abie's Irish Rose," with the
being Egypt and Israel,
er than the sidewalks of New
Hi.
[The Last of Days," by
Itrast, is a thriller a real
ller-diller. It is a barn-burner
a page-turner, one of those
pu can't put it down" books,
nance is subordinated to
liting, fast-moving events.
f Nile" begins in 1945 and ends
1978. Mona, the heroine,
ves from a poor village in
per Egypt to Alexandria
Bre she becomes a servant in
home of wealthy Jews. The
bst son in the family, Youseff,
In- Egyptian equivalent of the
[American Boy. They fall in
e. but their marriage is firmly
osed by Mona's widowed
ther and by Youseff's parents.
|y Youseff's Uncle Baruch, a
or, and Youseff's Egyptian
id. Hamid, are willing to help
rill'. LOVERS elope to Cairo
cannot find anyone to offl-
ine at the wedding of a Muslim
a Jew. Nevertheless, they
Isummate the "marriage," and
)na gives birth to a son, Ali.
vever, by that time, the 1956
intervenes. Jews, including
useff and his family, flee for
lir lives to Israel. He does not
pw that Mona is pregnant and
per meets his son.
|n Israel, although Youseff
ans for Mona, he marries and
three daughters. He con-
ntly thinks of Mona, and his
Jrriage ends in divorce. Mona
urns to her village despon-
tly and raises her son who
ntually goes to Alexandria
ere, assisted by Baruch, he
Idies to become a doctor. He
^rries and has a daughter, but
life is shattered when he
rns from his vengeful grand-
kther the secret of his parent
f- He joins a band of Palesti-
frns and is killed in a 1978
arist raid on Israel.
rh,e peace treaty between
ypt and Israel makes it possi-
. for Youseff to return to
pxandria where he arranges to
*t Mona, who brings their
mddaughter to the reunion
Pile Mona forgives Youseff, she
decides that they need to go their
separate ways.
THE ESSENTIAL plot of this
story has been retold many
times. This version holds the
reader's interest because of the
setting which the author depicts
with color and authenticity.
The action and there is
much action in "The Last of
Days" is compressed into the six
months between October, 1973
and April, 1974.
An Arab mystic who fancies
himself as the savior of Islam
organizes his disciples into a
terrorist gang which manufac-
On The
Bookshelf
tures an atom bomb. He
schemes to drop the bomb
on Mecca, casting the
blame on the Israelis, antici-
pating that this will unleash a
reign of revenge which will bring
about a second Holocaust and
install him as the new Prophet of
Islam. He is opposed by Israel's
secret service, acting in concert
with the CIA and a Jordanian
secret service officer.
The story is filled with tense
plots and counter-plots, distrust
and mistrust, intrigue and
double-crossing. The scene
swiftly moves from place to place
in the Middle East with the
climax being stirringly reached in
Ethiopia.
THERE IS a striking descrip-
tion of the pilgrimage to Mecca.
Since the holy city of Islam is off-
limits to non-Muslims, the details
provided by Farhi give his
readers a fascinating picture of a
great event which cannot be seen
by Jews. Christians and others
who do not share the Muslim
faith.
The large number of characters
and organizations is somewhat
confusing, but the author has
thoughtfully provided lists of
both the "cast" and the organi-
zations at the beginning of the
book.
This is a gripping tale which
will clutch your attention.
The gulf which separate Arabs
and Jews is effectively portrayed
in these two books. The somber
picture is relieved with hope by
the relationship between Mona
and Youseff in "Nile" and
between the Israeli and Jorda-
nian secret service agents in "The
Last of Days." While the books
are worth reading simply because
they tell captivating stories, their
message that individuals can
reach out across chasms of diffe-
rence gives some basis for op-
timism about the future and
makes the books eminently
worthwhile.
ribute at JNF Forest
JERUSALEM (JTA) An
Nrfaith group led by
Pencans now living in Israel
fd tribute to Martin Luther
pg and to his life's work as a
l rights leader on Aug. 28, the
|h anniversary of King's
ftoric "I have a dream" speech
Tvashington. D.C.
["he Committee for the Dr.
rtw Luther King Memorial
est in Israel announced that
tribute took place at a Galilee
Iside near Nazareth. The in-
ttaith group recalled that King
3 expressed a desire to vialt
ael, and voiced his admiration
ts democracy and progress.
The 10,000-tree King Memorial
Forest, established by the Jewish
National Fund of America, is now
in its seventh year of planting.
When the forest was first es-
tablished, every Black and
Jewish member of Congress
agreed to serve as an honorary
sponsor, and Congressional
sponsorship has continued over
the years.
The present Congressional co-
chairmen of the honorary
sponsors are Rep. Julian Dixon
(D., Calif.), chairman of the
Congressional Black Caucus, and
Rep. Sidney Yates (D., III.), for
the Jewish lawmakers.
Continued from Page 4-A
stopped offering their programs
in the spring "but intend on
opening up again in the winter
months."
THE RAW details of the treat-
ment of the Jewish homeless were
related in a separate report,
prepared by Cohen and Andrew
Frank, the Coordinating Council
operations director, in which
reference was made to a recent
report by the Federation's Task
Force on the Homeless which
mentioned results of two studies
sponsored by the New York State
Office of Mental Health and the
Human Resource Administration
(HRA), declaring that 2 percent
and 2.4 percent, respectively, of
the city's homeless were Jewish.
"Based on overall estimates of
a city-wide homeless population
of between 12,000 and 36,000 this
accounts for approximately 240
to 850 Jewish families," accord-
ing to the Cohen-Frank report.
They also reported that field
studies on the Jewish homeless
"claim that many of their
clients" have never used
municipally-operated facilities for
the homeless "due to the horren-
dous reputation and fear that
these facilities engender."
SOME SPECIFIC information
about privately-operated shelters
in Manhattan cited in the Cohen-
Frank report included an
estimate that 33 percent of the
users of the Goddard-Riverside
Church outreach program were
Jews. The Oliveri Center for
Homeless Women estimated 10
percent of its popualtion was
Jewish.
The Midtown Outreach Pro-
gram-Manhattan Bowery Corp.
claimed that from November,
1981, to July, 1982, from 139 to
159 persons, or around 40 percent
of users over 60 were Jews, and
that 56 persons or 80 percent over
70 were Jews.
A Federation report said the
Jewish Board of Family and
Children's Services (JBFCS)
serves an average of six homeless
persons a week or 300 a year. The
Jewish Association for Services
for the Aged (JASA) reported a
caseload of between 65 and 85
annually.
SHAYOVICH SAID. "Crisis
intervention and case manage-
ment services" will be provided
to beneficiaries of the FEMA-
financed project by 20 locally-
based neighborhood Jewish
Community Councils affiliated
with the Coordinating Council
and "long-term case planning
and follow-up will be responsibi-
lity of the FEGS Homeless
Project."
Crisis intervention was defined
as dealing with the immediate
problem, getting the homeless
person housed and fed, doing an
initial intake and assessment of
the person's problems and needs,
and starting, where appropriate,
the process of application for
public entitlements.
Case management was
described as coordinating the
provision of a package of services
to a needy person receiving such
services from a variety of sources
"and maintaining contact and
ensuring adequate follow-up on
whatever plan of service is agreed
upon" for the needy Jews.
COHEN SAID most of the 20
Jewish Community Councils,
located throughout the city's five
boroughs operate store-front,
walk-in multi-service centers. He
said all of them have helped
homeless persons at one time or
another. He said some councils
provide crisis intervention
services and daily checks on
persons located in shelters near
their offices.
The Federation recently
allocated $110,000 to implement
its Federation Homeless Project,
handled by FEGS, Altro Health
and Rehabilitation Services and
the JBFCS.
Cohen said this was an out-
reach and case-management
program which does not directly
operate shelters for homeless
Jews but the Coordinating
Council project, co-sponsored by
FEGS "now provides them with
direct access to shelter and they
in turn provide their services to
our clients."
IN A JOINT statement on the
FEMA grant, Alfred Miller,
FEGS executive director, and
Cohen said the effort was "the
result of collaborative under-
takings by the organized Jewish
community to deal with this most
urgent prob lem.''
They added that the FEGS
Homeless Project is funded by
the Federation and is co-
sponsored by JBFCS and Altro.
The Metropolitan Council's
affiliations include "direct
relationships" with the com-
munity councils, JASA, the YM-
YWHA and Jewish community
centers in all five boroughs.
"By providing not only shelter
and food, but appropriate follow-
up services located in neigh-
borhoods where the homeless feel
most comfortable, we hope to
develop a network of emergency-
response capability coupled with
a full array of professional social
services," Miller and Cohen said.
JTA Feature Syndicate
Special Services
March for Dr. King
Shows Jewish Divisions
Continued from Page 1-A
thousands of Americans of every
race, religion and walk of life who
will be marching together for
justice, peace and freedom."
He declared: "Our presence
will be consonant with the
highest moral and ethical values
of the Jewish tradition. It will be
in keeping with our devotion to
the security and dignity of Israel
and its people" and "it will
demonstrate our commitment to
the goals of Martin Luther King,
Jr. and his dream of reconcilia-
tion, of healing, and of struggling
together until the last battle is
won."
Dr. Benjamin Hooks, exec-
utive director of the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People, told the
worshippers that "we appreciate
the support of Jews who were in
the very forefront of the battle"
for civil rights for blacks.
REFERRING TO recent dif-
ferences between Jews and
blacks. Hooks said, "We must
submerge our differences and
remember the things that join us
together and strengthen us, not
the things that keep us apart."
Representatives of the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress, B'nai
B'rith and the Greater Washing-
ton Jewish Council, which had
also endorsed the march, some
after march organizers agreed to
eliminate from the march agenda
references Jewish groups con-
sidered to be anti-Israel, parti-
ciated in the service.
Martin Luther King III spoke
at the New Jewish Agenda
service. He was joined by Susan-
nah Heschel, daughter of the late
theologian, Rabbi Abraham
Joshua Heschel, in blessing the
bbath candles.
MOE ROSENSTEIN, the New
Jewish Agenda coordinator for
the march, said that the joint
participation by Dr. King's son
and Ms. Heschel in the service
"will be our way of beginning the
process of reconciliation" be-
tween Jews and blacks. He added
that "the alliance between blacks
and Jews in the past has been a
powerful force for promoting
justice and now is the time to
work through our differences so
we can join together to realize Dr.
King's dream."
After initial hesitation, the
American Jewish Committee also
endorsed the march. Like other
Jewish groups, the Committee
sent suggestions to chapters to
hold events at the local level to
commemorate the 1963 march.
Howard Friedman, Committee
president, sent a telegram to
Mrs. King, pledging the Commit-
tee's aupport and "renewed
determination" to help achieve
the goals of Dr. King.
9m
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Reserve Now for Winter Season


He Stunned His Cabinet
Likud Leaders Were Dumbfounded
Uoatfaraed from Page 2-A
hope that Begin would recon-
sider. He said the National
Religious Party, of which
Hammer is one of the leaders,
would continue its partnership
with Likud even if Begin resigns.
But he did not rule out a future
partnership with the Alignment.
Deputy Foreign Minister
Yehuda Ben Meir, also of the
NRP, said: "Whatever happens,
our party will remain loyal to the
partnership with Likud, because
this is the mandate which it
received from its electors."
LABOR PARTY leaders meet-
ing in Tel Aviv said they would
watch the situation closely and
try to weigh the political options
ahead. Because of the number of
question marks surrounding
Begin's next steps, Labor Party
leaders said thay would refrain
from making any further im-
mediate public statements, until
further ((insulations which were
to begin between party leader
Shimon Peres, Yitzhak Rabin,
Haim Barlev and Victor Shemtov
of Mapam, an Alignment par-
tner.
The most likely group for any
immediate partnership with the
Alignment would be the three-
member Tami Knesset faction. It
was Tami's threat last week to
leave the government because of
its discontent with the Finance
Ministry's latest economic cut-
back package that hung heavily
over the Cabinet. In fact, Tami
leader Aharon Uzan. who is also
Labor and Social Affairs
Minister, said he did not attend
Sunday's Cabinet session
because he anticipated Begin's
resignation, and he did not want
to be blamed for it.
The crisis with Tami might
very well have sparked Begin's
decision. It is possible
although there is no clear evi-
dence that Begin saw no way
out of that crisis. Rather than
have a three-member Knesset
faction cause his government's
fall by reducing its present majo-
rity to 61 members in the 120-
member parliament, Begin might
have decided to create a situation
whereby Tami could be out-
maneuvered.
EVEN IF Tami resigns from
he government and becomes an
Alignment partner in a new coali-
tion, and even assuming that
Shinui. with its two Knesset
members, would join an Align-
ment-led government, such a
government would have only 55
Knesset seats. The Communist
Party (Hadash) could promise to
be a silent partner of the Align-
ment, thus giving an Alignment-
led government 59 Knesset seats
but still two seats short of the
necessary minimum of 61 votes in
the parliament.
Thus, the political reality
seemed to be that if Begin re-
signed, this would probably lead
to new elections, with a Begin-led
caretaker government ruling
until those elections were held. If
no majority is found in the Knes-
set for early elections, such a
caretaker would rule until the
next scheduled elections, at the
end of 1985.
The report on Begin's action
instantly prompted pro-and-anti-
demonstrations. A gathering in
support of the Premier, urging
him not to resign, developed
Sunday outside Begin's residence
in Jerusalem's Talbiye quarter.
Peace Now demonstrators as-
sembled, urging Begin to stick to
his planned resignation. Police
created a separation zone bet-
ween the two groups of
demonstrators to avoid clashes
between them.
ACCORDING TO one report,
a movement of "Citizens for
Begin" was quickly formed,
which organized free transporta-
tion to Jerusalem to demonstrate
solidarity with the Premier.
Political observers speculated
that if Begin does quit political
life, the internal struggle within
Begin's Herut party could inten-
sify. The possible heirs are
Foreign Minister Shamir, Deputy
Premier David Levy, Defense
Minister Moshe Arens and
Finance Minister Yoram Aridor.
The observers said one public
figure former Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon should not be
ruled out of consideration.
Asked about that possibility in
a radio interview, Sharon said,
"The Herut movement always
had free competition and elec-
tions." If Begin sticks to his re-
signation, Sharon said, he hoped
Begin would "lead Likud in the
election campaign." He said
Likud would win a major victory
if an election took place.
'Don't bottwr lacing up ttw othar glove, one's enough!
'he Natal!%,
IDF Redeployment Goes
Ahead Despite Shakeup
Continued from Page 1-A
leader Walid Jumblatt and repre-
sentatives of the Lebanese gov-
ernment. President Reagan's
special Mideast envoy, Robert
McFarlane, was in Paris at the
same time where he also met with
Jumblatt and Lebanese govern-
ment representatives.
Israeli government officials do
not appear to share McFarlane's
optimism that the Lebanese
army is capable of taking control
of the Shouf mountain area when
the IDF withdraws. The area has
been the scene in recent weeks of
battles between the Druze and
Christian Phalangists.
The pessimism of Israeli offici-
als was underlined by the second
day of heavy shelling between
Phalangists and Shiite Moslem
members of the Amal mova
in the Beirut area. Two w
Marines were killed and ei
others wounded as well as m
14 Lebanese civilians, duruwj
shelling in the Beirut airport,
and the surrounding slum
to the south of the capital.
AN ITALIAN soldier withi
multinational force was
wounded. It was not immedu,
clear if the marines were
victims of stray shelling or if tl
were intended targets.
The American contingent i
the multinational force retu
the fire after the shelling I
and wounded the eight mai
using Cobra helicopter gunb
for the first time and pou.
mortar and artillery fire at \
Shiite source of fire against I
American forces.
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.


Palestinian Declares
Peace by Direct Negotiations Only
Friday, September 2,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
ATLANTA (JTA) -
leading West Bank
glestinian declared here
at the only way to peace
the Middle East "is by
Let negotiations between
Vael and the Palestin-
L" Mustafa Dodin of
tbron, head of the Arab
ullage Leagues on the
test Bank, addressing the
Ith annual convention of
|e Jewish War Veterans,
ated:
|We are Palestinians living
per occupation; we call for a
nination of that occupation,
the only means to achieve
r end is through direct
filiations." Dodin, who
ned that the Village Leagues
esent 70 percent of the West
Bank's Palestinian population
and are "the only ones leading
the masses," said, "We accept
the Reagan initiative as the
beginning of efforts to find a just
and durable peace."
DODIN ASKED the JWV
delegates to join with his organ-
ization in "condemning terror
from any group for any reason."
He noted that members of the
Village Leagues had been con-
stantly harassed by the PLO and
the Jordanian government
because of their call for peaceful
coexistence with Israel and be-
cause they were an indigenuous,
local movement.
With Dodin at the JWV
convention was Riad Khateev,
now head of the Ramallah
Village League, whose father, the
former Ramallah chief, and 23-
year-old brother were assa-
ssinated. Dodin stated the PLO
Saudis. Iran Attack
Appointment of Jew
As Director of BBC
LONDON (JTA) -
kudi Arabia and Iran have
karply attacked the ap-
^intment of Stuart Young,
rmer chairman of the
blicy planning group of
Je World Jewish Congress
search institute, to head
British Broadcasting
jpagjr, it was reported
We by the WJ Congress.
tiyadh Radio critically
orted the decision of Prime
lister Margaret Thatcher ap-
nting "a Jewish businessman
a supporter of the Israeli
(any as chairman of the Board
Governors of the BBC."
Iheran Radio noted the ap-
ntment of the "49-year-old
>nist" was part of the BBC's
Dstile attitude toward the
Imic Republic of Iran."
I'oung headed the policy plan-
^g group of the Institute of
vish Affairs, the London-based
ICongress research arm, when
I was tapped by Mrs. Thatcher
STUDIO
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for the sensitive BBC post. He
resigned from the Institute in the
wake of his appointment.
The Iranian media coupled its
attack on Young with a general
tirade against the "satanic and
anti-Islamic character" of the
BBC which along with other "lie-
spinning propaganda media" are
controlled by "international
Zionism." It charged that "the
new chairman of the Board of
Governors of the lie-spreading
BBC" had stated "he was a
staunch supporter of Israel, and
in so saying he expressed his
open and clear backing for the
Zionist criminals ruling the Quds
(Jerusalem)."
Teheran Radio added: "In
light of these remarks, which
indicate the depth of dependence
of the BBC on international Zion-
ism, we do not expect from them
anything except hostility, rancor
and prejudice toward the revolu-
tion and the Islamic Republic."
claimed responsibility for that
murder.
Dodin criticized the U.S.
Department of State for attempt-
ing to have King Hussein come to
the peace table with PLO chief
Yasir Arafat's approval. Having
been a political advisor to
Hussein for five years, Dodin
observed "You will wait 100
years before King Hussein will
come forward with Arafat," for
Arafat would get all the credit
and Hussein would lose his king-
dom.
DODIN ALSO charged that
the U.S. State Department has
met with terrorists of the Middle
East, but has refused to meet
with his group. He believes,
however, that the United States
is the "only third country which
can contribute to peace."
Urging that the time is ripe for
fruitful negotiations, he en-
visoned an ultimate solution to
involve a return to pre-1967
borders. Since the Egyptians do
not want Gaza, he said, Gaza
should be part of a West Bank-
East Bank state.
Dodin further stated, "Jeru-
salem should not be divided
again; Arabs and Jews should
contribute to an administrative
council for the city."
When asked by JWV delegates
if he rejected the idea of a West
Bank confederation with Israel
and Jordan, Dodin said he did
not reject this idea and at one
time had discussed positively
with Hussein the idea of "can-
tons."
DECLARING "we don't want
an army," Dodin also observed
that demilitarization of the West
Bank would be a good idea. He
urged JWV delegates, "I beg you
to support our mutual struggle
for peaceful coexistence. We
believe in the brotherhood of
man, of Arab and of Jews. God
meant for us to live in peace."
Stanley Zwaik, national com-
mander of the JWV, said his
organization did not agree with
all of Dodin's statements, but
expressed the JWV's gratitude
that the Village League leader
had made the long journey from
Hebron to bring his message of
peace to Americans.
Israel Military Industries
Disclose Latest Products
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Israel military industries,
now marking the 50th anniversary of their establishment
in the pre-State days, have disclosed two of their latest
products, both the result of local Israel research and deve-
lopment.
One is a 60 -mm gun mounted on a swivel which can be
attached to a standard armored personnel carrier or other
vehicle. The gun has a high muzzle velocity which its
producers say enables it to put out of commission the
heavy Soviet-made T-72 tanks now in use by the Syrians.
The other product is a multi-barrel Katyusha-like
rocket launcher which can fire either 18 or 36 rockets
simultaneously or in close sequence. The 160-mm rockets
have a range of 30 kilometers. The multi-barrel launchers
are at present intended only for export.
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Boeld
Likud Made Strenuous
Effort to Reverse
Tami Move to Quit
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Likud leaders, led by Premier
Menachem Begin, made
strenuous efforts last week to
persuade Tami Party officials to
change a decision made by the
party's secretariat to quit the
coalition, but without success.
Tami leaders, led by Labor and
Social Affairs Minister Aharon
Uzan, met with Begin and argued
strongly against government
plans for a 10 percent increase in
the sales tax on consumer goods,
asserting that many of the items
which will be affected by the in-
crease are not in the luxury cate-
gory and that the tax would hurt
tow-income families. The propos-
ed increases are part of a series of
major changes in government
income and outlays aimed at
bringing Israel's runaway infla-
tion under control.
BEGIN did not reply to the
complaints by the three-member
Knesset faction but asked Uzan
to postpone action to permit
further talks in the hope some
arrangement could be made by
which Tami would remain in the
Likud-led coalition. Uzan said he
did not believe any Treasury ac-
tion could change Tami's pullout
decision unless the proposed ad-
ditional sales tax on luxury items
was cancelled.
Tami leaders also are unhappy
about some of the budget cuts
Aridor has proposed, one involv-
ing plans to charge an estimated
330-Shekel education fee monthly
for school children.
The cancellation of increased
sales taxes was indirectly reject-
ed by Finance Minister Yoram
Aridor who emerged from a self-
imposed silence during the swirl
of controversy created by bis
proposals to cut the next govern-
ment budget by 66 billion
Shekels.
DEFENDING his economic
policy, Aridor criticized at a press
conference efforts of "pressure
groups" for changes in his
budget proposals. He also criti-
cized those who proposed budget
cuts and then, when such cuts
were introduced, continued to
criticize the government.
Uzan denied that Tami has
started talks with the Labor
Alignment opposition to form a
new government if the Likud-led
coalition falls, declaring that
Tami did not intend to bring
down the government only to
create an alternative govern-
ment. However, during a TV
interview, Uzan said the days of
the current coalition were
"numbered." Tami's central
committee meets soon to approve
the Tami secretariat's recom-
mendation to quit Begin's coali-
tion.
Youths Off
To Israel
For Work
BONN (JTA) Some 70
unemployed youths from Bremen
in north Germany will come to
Israel in the near future in the
framework of a special program
called "Preparation for Jobs."
They will stay in moshavim for
three months.
The program was initiated by
the local authorities and an as-
sociation for promoting un-
derstanding called "Shalom-
Salam" The 400 thousand Mark
project is financed by the Nurem-
berg-based federal labor office.
Henning Scherf of the Social
Democratic Party, who is respon-
sible for youth in the city govern-
ment of Bremen, said that the
project also includes a six-month
study and training period before
and after the stay in Israel.
This will include theory and
practice in such professions, as
agriculture, gardening, main-
tenance of vehicles and house-
keeping.
RAMADA
INN
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2 NIGHTS/3 DAYS
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a Beautiful Sandy Beach
a Pool Bar.
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Advance Reservations Required.
rt Present Coupon Upon Check-In.
Not valid:
Labor Day or Thanksgiving.
Expire*: 12/15/83
G u If side: $7.50 extra par person par day
12000 Gulf Blvd.
Treasure Island
St. Petersburg, Fla.
PH (813) 380-7051


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, September 2,1983
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Rosh Hashanah to be Launched At
Synagogues Wednesday Eve
Selichot Services Slated for Midnight Saturday
Selichot, penitential prayer services, will launch the High Holy Day season in
[synagogues throughout South Florida this Saturday, Sept. 3, at midnight. Selichot
'services, during which is offered a plea for repentance, set the tone for Rosh
\ Hashanah and Yom Kippur and the launching of the Hebrew New Year 5744.
As the sun sets Wednesday evening, Sept. 7, Jews throughout the world will
gather to observe the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashanah, one of the most sacred and
ancient days in their history.
The commandments for the observance of the holiday are described in the
Biblical Book of Leviticus, compiled 3,000 years ago.
Rosh Hashanah will continue with services Thursday and Friday, Sept. 8 and 9.
Finnish Millionaire Behind
Anti-Zionist Advertisements
Appearing in Europe Papers
Jews the Most Supportive of
U.S. Blacks, Historian Claims
By HELEN SILVER
IWASHINGTON -
TA) Jews have been
most supportive group
the struggle of blacks in
lerica to improve their
according to Dr. Hasha
iner, a historian of black-
fewish relations, who spoke
a luncheon sponsored by
le American Jewish Con-
ess.
I Diner, an academic director at
e American University in
Washington, is the author of a
cent book on black-Jewish
itions, "In the Almost
omised Land American
jws and Blacks," which she
discussed at the luncheon here.
Her talk was held in conjunction
with the 20th anniversary of the
historic March on Washington
where Martin Luther King
delivered his "I have a dream"
speech.
DINER ESTIMATED that
about 8,000 to 9,000 Jews parti-
cipated in that march. "The
whole spectrum of Jewish organ-
izations was represented," she
said. Jews were also involved in
the organization of the march,
speeches and other facets.
"It was an event of importance
to Jews as well as blacks," she
said. "It was significant to them
not only as Americans, but it also
had a very specific Jewish focus
for them Jews represented
the only large group in the 1963
r
-4V
. -

\
tik.
ie Minister Menachem Begin congratulates the first
Falasha university graduate in Israel, Rahamim Elazar, 27,
vho completed his work this week in Middle Eastern Studies at
Tel Aviv University. Right is Murray Greenfield, Israeli
epresentative of the American Association of Ethiopian Jews,
vhich helped support Elazar during his studies. This year the
\ssociation has granted stipends and scholarships to 70 young
ralashim men and women in Israeli institutions of higher
education.
Iiane Issenberg, president of the Miami Region of Hadassah, is
hown outside the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, where
topening ceremonies of the organization's 69th national con-
jfention took place. Three-thousand delegates and guests at-
tended the Aug. 14 through 17 meeting.
march that had no black consti-
tuency," such as various church
groups or political organizations.
Diner traced American Jewish
involvement in support of civil
rights for blacks for over half a
century. The 1963 March on
Washington "was the culmi-
nation of 60 years of massive
involvement in civil rights .
and Jews were far out of propor-
tion to their numbers," she said.
LOOKING BACK to the early
1900's, she read excerpts from
the Yiddish and American Jewish
press which compared race riots,
such as the brutal one in St.
Ixiuis, Mo., in 1916 in which
blacks were burned in their
homes, to the Russian pogroms
in Kishinev.
Eastern European Jews were
able to identify very closely with
the plight of the blacks. Diner
said. Race rioters were compared
to the "Black Hundred," the
feared crack troops of the
Russian Czar, which organized
and led many pogroms. The site
of a race riot was described by
Jews as an auto da fe, the bur-
ning of heretics under the
Spanish Inquisition. The Jewish
newspaper also struck out
vehemently against lynchings in
the South, Diner said.
She also recalled the early
organizers in the Jewish trade
unions of the garment industry
who helped the few blacks in their
ranks to organize. When a black
was present at a union meeting, it
was forbidden to conduct
business in Yiddish, Diner noted.
It had to be held in English and
then translated for the new im-
migrants. In 1935, the Interna-
tional Ladies Garment Workers
Union, played a critical role in
organizing black workers in
Harlem, she added.
JEWS WERE also among
those who signed the original call
in 1909 and joined with WEB.
DuBois to create the National
Association for the Advancement
of Colored People, Diner recalled,
and were also very active in
helping A. Philip Randolph
organize Pullman car porters.
Allen Dean, executive director
of Montgomery County (Md.)
Human Relations Commission,
told the AJCongress luncheon,
"We blacks would not be where
we are today without the support
and help of the Jews."
There were no estimates of how
many Jews participated in last
Saturday's march. Some who
wanted to attend did not do so
because of the Sabbath. The
American Jewish Congress and
the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations (UAHC) endorsed
the march. The New Jewish
Agenda (NJA) indicated that it
expected many bus loads of
marchers.
By JULIAN ROBINSON
London Chronicle Syndicate
An investigation con-
ducted by the London
Board of Deputies has re-
vealed that Eric Ertman, a
Finnish multi-millionaire, is
the man behind an anti-
Zionist advertisement
which has appeared recent-
ly in newspapers in West-
ern Europe.
The advertisement, published
in Britain in the "Sunday Tele-
graph," announced a series of
competitions. One offer is a
$2,500 prize every three months
for an article on an anti-Israel
and an anti-American subject.
The advertisement was placed
by an organization called the
Baltic Sea Foundation, which
claims to be a "charitable non-
profit making organization, sup-
ported by private and corporate
donors, established in 1967 in
Copenhagen, Denmark."
ERTMAN, who lives for most
of the year in Santa Barbara,
Calif., was traced to the Palace
Hotel, Helsinki, from where he is
coordinating the organization of
the competition.
He told the Jewish Chronicle:
"I am chairman of the Baltic Sea
Foundation, which has organized
the competition." But he refused
to answer questions about the
Foundation's background.
Charities do not have to
register in Denmark, and a search
by the British Board of Deputies
has been unable to find anyone
with any knowledge of the Baltic
Sea Foundation.
Neither the Foundation, nor
Ertman, is listed in the Helsinki
telephone directory, and no one,
including the Commercial Coun-
sellor at the Finnish Embassy
in London, has heard of Ertman.
ERTMAN, married to the
daughter of Sosthenes Behn, the
late founder of ITT Corporation,
is thought to have made his for-
tune as jewelry and art dealer,
and has most of his business
interests in America and Canada.
The Baltic Sea Foundation's
advertisement has appeared in a
number of leading newspapers in
West Germany. However, its ap-
pearance in "Information," a
small. Left-wing, anti-Zionist
publication, had led the Board of
Deputies to believe that the
advertisement was actually
being put out by an extremist or-
ganization with Arab connec-
tions.
The advertisement, which cost
$6,000 to place in the Sunday
Telegraph, was earlier turned
down by the International Herald
Tribune.
Philip Foisie, executive editor
of the Herald Tribune, which is
published in Paris, said that his
newspaper had refused to publish
the advertisement because the
sponsors were unknown, and
because the "purpose does not
seem to be genuine.
Five separate essay competi-
tions were advertised, with
specific subject headings, most of
which allege Zionist plots and
cover-ups.
Joseph Zoldan Elected
JWV National Commander
ATLANTA Joseph Zoldan
of Canton. Oh. has been unani-
mously elected national com-
mander of the Jewish War
Veterans of the U.S.A. at the
close of the organization's 88th
annual convention here.
In his acceptance of the leader-
ship of JWV, National Com-
mander Zoldan declared. "I
forsee a year of growth and unity
for our great veterans organiza-
tion. We will soon move to a new
building to house appropriately
the growing archives and
museum of the JWV U.S.A.
National. Memorial, as well as
headquarters for our organization
and for our Ladies Auxiliary."
A VETERAN of the Korean
War, Zoldan served with the U.S.
Army and joined JWV upon his
discharge from active duty. For
more than 25 years, Zoldan has
served JWV on both the national
and local levels. The positions he
has held for the JWV include
National Program chairman,
National Foreign Affairs chair-
man, National Finance Board
chairman. Department of Ohio
Commander, and Canton, Ohio
Post 73 Commander. He has
served as a member of the Board
of Directors, JWV U.S.A.
National Memorial, for the past
eight years.
Joseph Zaldan
A graduate of Ohio State Uni-
versity, where he was president
of his fraternity. Phi Epsilon Pi,
Zoldan is president of Zoldan
Iron and Metals Company and
numerous other enterprises.
He is married to the former
Rebecca Weisman of Columbus,
Oh. and they have three children.
Janis, Michael and Scott.
^Jewish Floridian
Miami, FloridaFriday, September 2,1983
Section B


..ragej>~ ipe Jewish Ftondian""fridayi'Septimber 2, li*t*3
FromJLhiLBilpiL
Will Judaism Survive
Despite Our Freedom?
Mizrachi Installs New Council Presidium
By DR. MAX LIPSCHITZ
President. Rabbinical
Association Greater Miami
An article in Time Magazine
called "The Crisis in Jewish
Identity" stated: "If you are
Jewish, chances are your grand-
children won't be." That was the
headline of an advertisement
appearing in New York news-
papers recently. The New York
Board of Jewish Education ran
the ad for the third fall in a row,
seeking to boost enrollment in
Religious School
The article goes on to tell us
that the advertising campaign
reflected the mounting concern
about the vitality of American
Jewry. Throughout our history,
Jews have survived by weather-
ing crisis, persecution, prejudice,
and genocide. The question posed
by Rabbi Max Arzt, former vice
chancellor of the Jewish Theolo-
gical Seminary, is "Will we
survive despite our freedom?"
IRONICALLY, the success of
friendly assimilation with our
fellow citizens poses a threat to
Judaism. Rabbi Marc Tannen-
baum, national director of Inter-
religious Affairs for the American
Jewish Committee, warns that
the acceptance of American
society of the Jewish community
has loosened group ties and
eroded many Jews' knowledge of
their past. The Fading of anti-
Semitism has made our people
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz
more relaxed and, therefore, less
coerced to fight for survival.
Rabbi Henry Siegman, exec-
utive director of the American
Jewish Congress, and Rabbi
Tannenbaum cite as evidence: '
Fewer than half of Jewish
households in the MS. belong to
a synagogue;
Close to 40 percent of all Jews
marry non-Jews, compared with
6 percent of those who got
married 20 years ago;
Since 1961. Religious School
enrollment has plummeted by
one-third from 600,000 to
400,000, largely a consequence of
the Jewish birthrate nose-
Einstein Achievement Award
Dinner Dance Set for Nov. 6
The date has been set and
committee formed for the 1963
Florida Friends of Albert Ein-
stein College of Medicine's
Distinguished Acheiv
Award Dinner Dance----------
to Dinner Dance Chairman _
Albert Einstein Colleges board
of overseen member Sidney. L.
Olson, the gala affair will be held
Sunday, Nov. 6 at the Konover
Hotel.
Dinner Dance co-chairmen are
Albert Einstein College alumni
Dr Charles Weiss, chief of ortho-
pedics and rehabilitation at
Mount Sinai Medical Center, Dr.
Phillip Frost, chief of der-
matology at Mount Sinai and
chairman of the board of Key
Pharmaceuticals, Inc., and
Norman Braman of Braman
Motors.
Alumni and community
leaders also having committed
their support to serve as
members of the dinner dance
committee are honorary chair-
men, Alvah H. Chapman, Jr.,
Mayor Steve Clark, Secretary of
State George Firestone, Senator
Paula Hawkins, Congressman
Fascell Picnic to
Feature Magic Act
A magic show featuring Fanc>
Fahy and the Mini Magicia /s wil
be presented at Congr daman
Dante Fascell's 33rd Annual La-
bor Day Picnic this year, to be
held Monday from 10 a.m. to S
p.m. at Larry and Penny Thomp-
son Park, located next to Metro
Zoo, according to Dede Simonoff,
1983 picnic chairperson.
The first magic show is sched-
uled for 11 a.m., with an after-
noon performance at 1 pro.
Hadassah to Gather
A holiday program has been
scheduled by the Forte Towers
Chapter of Hadassah to take
place Monday, Sept. 12 at 12:30
p.m. at the West Avenue Audito-
rium, according to an announce-
ment by Geraldine Ramme and
Pauline Lessem, presidium.
William Lehman, Congressman
Claude Pepper, and Israel Consul
Yehoshua Trigor.
Stniac vies dsUrmea on Um
ntttee are Uwrwn AuaOn. Mr.
Mrs. Theodora Btumrttl*, 1.
ss, Jr.. Dr. lam Ban, am
Dertowtu. Richard 1. BlechoH. Dr.
Hennaa Bloom, Dr. Larry Clans*.
Hymar, I. Cohan. Sidney Oii|iM|......
trvlns; Cypen. Jiattus Daraky.
i De Jut. Dorothy DreJOer. Com
a> sssaaaeaE, as* Marc M.
David Plesman. Mrs. Jack
flower. CommliilMir Malcolm
"combers;. Salomon Oaraai. Gary
Genoa, Dr. Latter QoieVarg. E. Pater
CMdrbur. Mr. and Mrs. JarroJd Good
man. Loo Hack. H. Bruce Haator. Ed-
ward HanaoUck. Dr. and Mrs. Allan I.
Jacob. Mr. and Mrs. H. Jerome Joseph,
Dr. Martin Kalian. Harold Konover, Tod
Konover. Cal Kovana. Donald Lefton.
and Rabbi Irvine Lohrman.
Alao. Beatrice Levlne. Harry A.
(Hap) Levy, Raul Maavldal, Benjamin
Nelaner. Arthur Pearbnan. 8ldney
Poland, Leonard J. Rapaport,
Lawrence Robbing. Dr. Philip Samet.
Commissioner Barry Schrelber. Dr.
Joseph Singer. Faux Stark, Otto
SUeber. Dr. Steven K. Tarkan, Earl D.
Waldin. Jr.. Halm Wiener. Andrew
Welnsteln, Teens Welas. Milton
Wlnoirad. Isadora Wollowlck. and Dr.
Matthew Zuckerman.
diving below the national average
and the increasing Jewish divorce
rate;
So-called Messianic Jews
have made inroads in recent
years, convincing about 10.000
Jews to join in their Evangelical
belief of Christianity.
DESPITE THESE statistics
and the article in Look Magazine
many years ago about the
"vanishing Jew,'* notwith-
standing my deep concern, I am
not that pessimistic. I see a
revitaiization of interest by many
Jews who are turning the tide. I
agree with those who believe
"that there is a new religiosity in
the air, born out of the
"disillusionment with the
American dream.'
Young adults are enrolling in
Jewish study courses, virtually
unheard of 15 years ago and now
offered by more than 300 United
States colleges. Young married
couples are returning to services
and interest in the synagogue, as
witnessed by the success of
young married couples groups
organized in the past year.
The Day School Movement is
growing. There are 90,000 young-
sters who attend Day Schools
throughout the country.
"Kosher" is becoming more and
more popular. Young people are
demanding more traditional
services in both Conservative and
Reform synagogues. Orthodox
Judaism is attracting more
adherents and growing.
AS WE pause to reflect on the
coming Holy Days, let us bear in
mind the New York advertise-
ment, "If you are Jewish,
chances are your grandchildren
won't be." We must ask our-
selves the question, "What are
we doing to make certain that our
grandchildern will be Jewish?"
Are we setting an tu of
commitment to the synagogue,
the Jewish community, and the
State of Israel for our children to
emulate? Or, can our children
counter by asking us: "Why are
you suddenly concerned about
Jewish grandchildren, when you
don't live as a Jew, when- you
reject any kind of positive and
authentic Jewish lifestyle?"
Let us remember that the crisis
in "Jewish identity" does not
begin with our children, but
rather with us.
Let this year, indeed, be "The
year of return," a year in which
there will be a renaissance of
involvement and commitment on
your part to the synagogue and
its multi-faceted program, as well
as a renewed commitment to the
State of Israel. The survival of
the Jew depends upon the sur-
vival of Judaism and the State of
Israel.

For the holidays, serve Golds
with meat, fish and fowl
Gold's adds zesty extra-flavor
to ketchup, mustard and
mayonnaise
Ail without adding calories
FREE RECIPE BOOK
Send stamped sell-
addressed envelope to
Gold's 895 McDonald Ave
Bklyn.. NY 1121B
Sandra Rothenberg, Jeanne
Finklestein, and Bea Young have
been installed as the presidium of
the Florida Council of American
Mizrachi Women for the 1983-84
year. Betty Kigleman, national
co-chairman and Broward Mini
Council liaison officer, served as
installing officer.
A graduate of Brooklyn
College Teachers II Institute and
Yeshiva University's Stem
College for Women, Rothenberg
served as the first president of
AMW'i Galil Chapter in North
Miami Beach and is also.
president of Vered Chapter '
Finklestein is a past ^
Council president and a n&2
pient of an Israel Bond m]
work on behalf of Israel Shi
also served as Israel Bond rk
man at Temple Beth Tov.
Young. Mizrachi honon
"atIona1,. v,ce President
Florida liaison officer, is ,.
with Yeshiva University
other civic and charitable,
izations.
Weiner, Former Men's Club Prexy, Honored
Edward H. Weiner, former
president of the Men's Club of
Temple Emanu-EI for the past
five years, was presented a
special award for "distinguished
and dedicated leadership" by Dr.
Irving Lehrman, spiritual leader
of the congregation, Sunday at a
meeting of the Club.
Weiner, a retired author and
public relations executive who
coTumnis^ *** II
Walter Wincneu. a^fi
by Miami Beach City Com?!
sioner Malcolm H. yFH
past president of the tSI
Emanu-EI Family League. "^
Weiner was succeeded asm*!
dent of the Men's Club this 21
by Col. Nathaniel Kutcher
With G. Washington's* Seasoning
and Broth they'll never say
'Feh' to your flan ken!
For a more flavorful flanken mi
m G Washington's Rich Brown
Seasoning and Broth when you
add the water and vegetables to
the meat G Washington s Sea-
soning and Broth is more than a
flavor enhancer. It's a complete
seasoning The special blend ol
herbs and spices flavors your
flanken in more ways than one
And it does wonders for your
stock, too1 With G Washing-
ton's they'll never say feh -
they'll say more''
6. WASHINGTON'S
RICH SHOWN FLANKEN
4
2
Ittaesrts
a
Mas
1 saris* earner
tt
2<
Ugntly brown Rank steak in shortening, dram. Add lemanng ingredients
stir Cover and cook for 2 hours over low he*, or until flan* is tender
Strawi stock, set aside as soup Sfcce the meat Serves 6 to 8
Not since the birth or Israel h*
something o tiny made H ao big.
*
It's Tetteys tiny little tea leaves. They've bean making it big m
Jewish homes for years. Tettey knows thai just as bny larr*
chops and tiny peas are the most flavorful, the same is true for
tea leaves. That's why tor rich, refreshing tea, Tetley bags
are packed with bny kttfe tea leaves Because tmy is lasher'
TETLEY
For Biq lea
Sattstacnon
K Certified Kosher
TETIJE Y. TEA n n i. < ',.


Gush Emunim Settlers Incensed over
Article by Former Security Head
Friday. September 2,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Pge3-B
Temple to Feature Handmade Shofars
By HUGH ORGEL
And GIL SEDAN
TEL AVIV (JTA) Gush
Emunim settlers on the West
Bank are seething over an article
written by the former head of the
Shin Bet, Israel's internal secur-
ity service, claiming that the set-
tlements are a "psychological
hothouse for the growth of Jew-
ish terror,"' and that the settlers
sometimes take the law into their
own hands because they feel they
have Jhe Likud government's
suppow
Avraham Ahituv, writing in
Davar stated that there is "heavy
suspicion" that settlers have
been responsible for attacks on
Arab mayors and on Arab stu-
dents at the Islamic College in
Hebron last month. Four masked
pinmen opened fire on a group of
students at the college, killing
three and wounding 33.
According to Ahituv. the
nature of the Likud government's
West Bank settlement policy
provides the settlers with a polit-
ical rationale and cover to
commit acts of terror, although
i hf government itself may not be
aware of what is going on or that
it might inadvertently be foster-
ing a terrorist mentality.
He said that the failure of the
security services to apprehend
those responsible for the
assassination attempts against
the West Bank Arab mayors
three years ago was not due to
political pressures hampering
investigations but to the opera-
tional methods of the "Jewish
terrorists" and to the unwilling-
ness on the part of the settlers to
cooperate with security services
investigators. Ahituv pointed put
that there has been no progress in
identifying the gunmen ip the
college attack nor those re-
sponsible for the assassination
attempts on the mayors.
A spokesman for the Gush
Emunim said Ahituv s remarks
were "a danger to the nation's
security" and should be officially
investigated. Elyakim Ha'etzni,
leader of the Kiryat Arba settle-
ment, charged that the fact that
Ahituv s article was published by
Davar, a Labor Party-affiliated
newspaper, proves that the for-
mer Shin Bet head is a
"Mapainik" (Laborite). Ha'etzni
also complained that the Shin
Bet had failed to identify and
apprehend members of Peace
Now "who had perpetrated the
pogrom at Efrat." This was a
reference to the daubings of anti-
Gush Emunim slogans on the
Schreiber to Keynote
B'nai Zion Luncheon
Commissioner Barry D.
Schreiber, regional president of
the American Zionist Federation,
will be keynote speaker at the
Second Annual Bnai Zion South
Florida Region and Chapter In-
stallation Luncheon and Dance
scheduled for Sunday, Sept. 25 at
11 a.m. at the Eden Roc Hotel.
President Seymour Rubin and
Installation Chairman Carl
Fisher made the announcement.
Friends of Lubavitch
Plan Shabbos Shuva
An Annual Shabbos Shuva
Melave Malka honoring the Sarei
Haelef and marking the tenth an-
niversary of the Yeshiva Gedolah
of Greater Miami has been sched-
uled by the Florida Friends of
Lubavitch, according to an an-
nouncement by Asher Zwebner,
chairman.
The dinner has been set for
Saturday, Sept. 10 at the Crown
Hotel starting at 9:30 p.m.
walls of houses in the West Bank
settlement of Efrat during a
recent Peace Now rally against
settlement in Arab areas.
The Jerusalem Post has quoted
unnamed senior intelligence and
security officials as confirming
Ahituv's statements.
Temple Zion has announced
that shofars it will use during the
High Holy Day season have been
borrowed from the private, hand-
made Israeli collection of attor-
ney and Mrs. Franklin D. Kreut-
zer.
Following Yom Kippur serv-
ices, Sept. 17, the shofars will be
exhibited at the temple. Kreutzer
is a past president of Temple Zion
and current president of the
Southeast Region of United Syn-
agogue of America.
If Sam Breakstone hadn't been so
meshuggah about his sour cream
in 1882, they wouldn't
taste so good today.
100 years ago, Sam Breakstone had a reputation for being a demanding man.
A very demanding man. .
Good wasn't good enough for Sam. His sour cream and cottage cheese had to
be as fresh, as natural, and as delicious as they could possibly be.
And because Sam was so demanding then, his sour cream and cottage cheese
tastes so delicious now.
Right now, you can demand 10* off both Breakstone s sour cream and cottage
cheese by redeeming these coupons.
CERTIFIED KOSHER
S9bOE2 DQEhT
Mr. Grocer: Kraft, Inc. will reim-
burse you for the face value of this
coupon plus 7 handling allowance
provided you redeemed it on your
retail sales of the named product(s)
and that upon request you agree to
furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemp-
tions. Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE 10 ON ANY SIZE ,
BREAKSTONE'S COTTAGE CHEESE
)/ied
COUPON
1(K
,i
or where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value 1/20*. Customer must
pay applicable sales tax. For
redemption, mail to Kraft, Inc.
Dairy Group, P.O. Box 1799, Clin-
ton, Iowa 52734.
Ml*
1M300 230165
10ETE2 00EHT
Mr. Grocer: Kraft. Inc. will reim-
burse you for the face value of this
coupon plus 7 handling allowance
provided you redeemed it on your
retail sales of the named product(s)
and that upon request you agree to
furnish proof of purchase of suffi-
cient product to cover all redemp-
tions. Coupon is void in Wisconsin
SAVE 10* ON ANY SIZE
BREAKSTONE'S SOUR CREAM.
O Kraft, Inc. 1983
ine&
COUPON
1 or where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law, and may not be
assigned or transferred by you.
Cash value 1/20C. Customer must
pay applicable sales tax. For
redemption, mail to Kraft, Inc.
Dairy Group. P.O. Box 1799, Clin-
ton, Iowa 52734.
0lwUM<
1M300 23130b


Page4-B Trie Jewish Ftoridian Friday. September 2,1983
New Israel Ambassador to *** TeUs Story of T U-S-
London Presents Letters
Of Accreditation to Queen
Consular Offices in Jerusalem
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
Yehuda Avner. the new Is-
raeli Ambassador to Brit-
ain, has presented his fet-
ters of accreditation to the
Queen, together with the
fetter formally recalling
Shlomo Argov. disabled by
a terrorist attack in London
last year. Avner. 53, is the
first British-born Israeli to
serve as Ambassador in his
native country.
He told journalists that be had
a 10-minute private conversation
with the Queen who. he said,
clearly displayed understanding
of the Middle East region in
general and of the major issues of
the day."
ANTICIPATING his
diplomatic activity here, he said.
"This is Britain and I expect to
get a fair hearing.' From his
initial soundings he said he
sensed that the British Foreign
Office was frustated by develop-
ments in the Arab world and
"curious to look again at the
Middle East in terms of its
realities.'
London is now ready to enter
a dialogue with the government
of Israel.'' he declared. In par-
ticular, he said he would give
"high priority" to persuading
Britain to drop its ban on arms
sales to Israel imposed by the
European Economic Community
(EEC) after the invasion of Leb-
anon last summer.
Avner s initial contacts with
the British government, he
disclosed, included a talk with
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher on the Tfay after his
arrival last week It took place in
the royal tent at a garden party
in Buckingham Palace.
An observant Jew. Avner
confirmed that after consulting
with his wife and children he had
initially declined the London
Ambassadorship when his name
JCC Agenda Set
An After School program for
children enterinc kindergarten
through sixth grade, running
Mondays through Fridays, has
just begun at the Miami Beach
Jewish Community Center. Pro-
grams for the pre-schooler, the
Mommy and Me program, and
two-year-old playground and
adult classes will also be offered
starting Sept. 1)
The JCC also announced that a
workshop on "The Hidden Job
Market" will be presented by the
Jewish Vocational Service at the
Center Thursday, Oct. 6 at 7:30
p.m.
Party to Benefit HMO
A Splash Party and Buffet
Dinner with proceeds benefitting
the Hadassah Medical Organiza-
tion has been scheduled by Had-
assah's Aliyah Chapter for Sat-
urday at 8 p.m. at the Kendale
Lakes Country Club.
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-65!
and let me quote yo
rates. Also local moving &|
long distance moving;
anywhere in the U.S. oi
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)
was tirst mentcned in connection
with it eight months ago.
"Everything I cherish is in Jeru-
salem." he said. But when the
offer was confirmed, he accepted
it "out of a sense of mission
AVNER WAS born in Man-
chester S3 years ago. the
youngest of seven children. He
told the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency that he first became-
caught up in Zionism when he
nrLH g camp of the B nai
Akivi religious youth movement
in 1942. which proved to be "a
turning point in my life. "
Five years later, in the final
year of the British Mandate, he
went to Jerusalem and served
with the Haganah when the city
was besieged by the Arab Legion-
He was introduced to his wife.
Mimi. by her late sister. Esther
Cailingold. another immigrant
from Britain who died heroically
while defending the Jewish
quarter of the Old City.
AVNER ONLY subsequent
prolonged period back in Britain
was between 1950 and 1954 when
he served as secretary of the Bnai
Akiva movement and also at-
tended the London Col'ege of
Journalism. His later visits
occurred more recently when he
accompanied both Premier
Yitzhak Rabin and Premier
Menachem Begin, to whose staff
he was attached as a speech
writer and adviser
Speaking humbly of the
morning's ceremony at the
palace. Avner said that during it
he was less aware of his personal
position, as a former British
citizen, than the fact that he was
Ambassador of the State of Israel
and the 4.000-year-old city of
Jerusalem.
BY
ROCHELLE SAIDEL-WOLK
JERUSALEM JTA) -
The fact that the United States
does not recognize East Jeru-
salem as part of Israel was
sharp! v dramatized for this
reporter in an incident involving
the notarization of a personal
document here.
Based in Jerusalem with
tourist status, the reporter was
advised that her document could
be notarized at the American
Consulate in the city.
She then discovered that there
are two U.S. consular offices
here, one on Agron Street in
West Jerusalem, which houses
Abramowitz Was to
Address PTA Seminar
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz.
spiritual leader of Temple Meno-
rah, was to speak on "Celebrat-
ing the High Ilory Days in the
Home" at a holiday seminar
sponsored by the temple's Parent
Teacher's Association Thursday.
Sept. 1 at 8 p.m.
"Experiencing the holidays
with the immediate and extended
family is an important element
for developing a strong Jewish
identity." the rabbi commented.
Parents were also to partici-
pate in cooking and singing
workshops and to receive a bro-
chure of pertinent holiday
prayers and information.
Rabbi Abramowitz was also to
install Lucy Zamir as PTA presi-
dent for 1983-84.
Veterans to Convene
A meeting at the Surfside
Community Center has been
scheduled by the Harry H. Cohen
Post and Auxiliary of the Jewish
War Veterans for Sept. 18 at 10
a.m.
only executive and commercial
offices, and the other on Nablus
Road in East Jerusalem, which
carries out routine services for
American individuals.
(The Agron Street office is not
affrnl to assist American
individuals, moat of them Jews,
who are shunted to the Nablus
Road office in the heart of an
exclusively Arab neighborhood. I
The document requiring
notarization had spaces for
State of and "City of." The
clerk at the Nablus Road Con-
sular office whited out the words
"State of." Then she stamped
twice on the document the words
"City of Jerusalem, Consulate
General of the United States of
America." It was subsequently
signed by the Vice Consul.
Lawrence Mire.
Asked why no state was filled
in as is the usual case on
notarized documents, the clerk
said: "For the Consulate, Jeru-
salem is just Jerusalem. We do
not write anything but 'City of
Jerusalem." Not the State of
Israel and not Jordan. No state."
She refused to elaborate further
and did not give her name.
In an opinion p*s fc fc
Jerusalem Post, a Palestinu*
Jerusalemite, Daoud k3
wrote: "Even Israel suuncW
supporters in the West haven
recognized the annexation J
Jerusalem by Israeli and sin
consider East Jerusalem
cupied territory."
If Kuttab was referring to tfe
United States, he could htv,
stated as evidence: 11 refusals
the American Consulate &>
acknowledge that the city rf
Jerusalem is in the State of
Israel. 2) the continued preaetu
of two American consulates u
Jerusalem, one in the west ud
one in the east. 3i the fact th
the American Embassy is located
in Tel Aviv.
(The United States refusal to
recognize Jerusalem as Israeli
capital is in stark contrast to ii
attitude toward East Berlin is
the capital of the German Demo-
cratic Republic. The U.S.
Embassy in East Germany is in
East Berlin, which the U.S. does
not recognize as that country!
capital.)
Advertising
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Full-time. Salary/Draw. Call Joan collect or
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MIAMI, FLORIDA 33101
PHONE 305-373-4605


leaders Write
Survivor Commends
Rabbi Freedman
Friday, September 2,183 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Israel to Withhold Part of Yearly
Contribution to U.N. in Response
To UJf. 's Anti-Israel Activities
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
As a survivor of Auschwitz,
Buchenwald and Theresiestadt, I
appreciate and commend Rabbi
Simcha Freedman for his recent
thoughts regarding the remain-
ing Holocaust survivors.
Yes, time is running out, and
each year fewer of us remain
alive. We have strived to teach
others that we can never forget,
and we have stressed to others
that they must never forget. We
have held memorial services, and
we have even organized national,
as well as worldwide gatherings
of Holocaust survivors. Films
have been made, and books have
been written, and all of this is not
enough to keep the memory alive.
We who were there are the ones
who can teach others by relating
our own experiences. One cannot
simply rely on the information
found in history books or films to
gain a significant understanding
of what took place during the
Holocaust. No one who was not
there himself can even begin to
imagine the events that occurred.
We, the survivors, have tried
to stay together, having a com-
mon bond in our past experi-
ences. This bond can be pre-
served by establishing a living
memorial, including literature,
photographs, films and our own
testimonies. This memorial
would be available to the public,
as well as to educational and reli-
gious programs, so that everyone
can continue to learn about the
atrocities of the Holocaust even
after we are no longer able to tell
them ourselves.
1 feel that I can speak for my
fellow survivors, that we would
like to see this accomplished
while we are still able to contrib-
ute and be part of it. From then
on it will be up to our children,
and their children after them, to
carry on the memory of the Holo-
caust not because they owe it
to us, but because once they un-
derstand what they are part of,
they will want to keep the memo-
ry alive.
I only hope that if a memorial
will be established in the Greater
Miami area, some of us survivors
will be around for the dedication.
RUBIN OFFENBACH
Miami
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
During a recent four-month
stay in Cyprus, I established
contact with Cypriot Jews and
also obtained information from
Jews and non-Jews alike con-
cerning the British camps used in
19461949 to stem the tide of
"''legal" immigration to Pales-
tine. I 'm gathering more material
on each of these subjects.
Berdichevsky (later Berdy),
bhapiro, Luria, Kingsfeld,
Argazi, Ossodry is an incomplete
roster of Cyprus' Jewish com-
munity. Are there people living in
the United States or Canada who
Know that their families at some
tune in the past lived in Cyprus?
There were thousands of Jews
detained in the camps who dis-
persed in 1949 to Israel and other
?*!! of the wor,d- In addition to
the detainees, others were in the
camps: journalists, observer-
teams, volunteers. Relatives and
"lends may still have photo-
graphs, letters and other docu-
ments sent to them from the
camps.
Any of the above who want to
"eip piece together these stories
may cantact me at 6 Alma Rock
n<*-, Stamford, Ct. 06906.
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
In a recent Jewish Floridian
article by Dr. David Geffen, "The
Three Faces of Purim," the
author appears to have made
some mistakes. He writes that
"the Persian Jews were leader-
less." This is not so.
In Chapter 4, verse 16 of the
Book of Esther, it states that
Esther was willing to risk her life
to save her people. "I will visit
the King even though it is not ac-
cording to the law, and if I perish,
I perish."
In Chapter 10, verse 3, it states
that King Ahasueros auth-
orized Queen Esther and Morde-
chai, the Jew, to rescind
the evil plan of Haman, and at
the same time the Jews were al-
lowed to defend themselves.
H. SHEINFIELD
Miami Beach
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) The government
of Israel has decided to
,withhold a certain amount
of its yearly contributions
to the United Nations in
response to the "anti-Israel
activities" by various UN
agencies, Ambassador
Yehuda Blum of Israel an-
nounced at a press confer-
ence here.
He said the amount Israel will
withhold will be about one-
quarter of one percent of the total
amount the UN devotes to anti-
Israel activities. Israel's annual
contributions to the UN budget
is about $1.5 million, or about
0.23 percent, Blum said. The
amount the UN spends on anti-
Israel activities annually is not
fixed.
THE ISRAELI envoy said
that "we expect right-minded
states" to join Israel in its
decision. The United States has
since 1980 been withholding some
25 percent from the budget of
pro PLO agencies at the UN.
According to observers, Is-
rael's decision was triggered by
the UN Conference on Palestine
which began Monday in Geneva,
and the flood of propaganda
material, in the guise of "scholar-
ly studies," that have been
published by the committee
preparing the conference.
At a press conference here
earlier this week, Lucille Mair of
Jamaica, the secretary general of
the conference, said that more
than 70 countries and some 100
non-governmental organizations
have agreed to attend the confer-
ence. Israel, the United States,
and most West European
countries are not participating.
DISCUSSING SOME of the
UN's anti-Israel activities, Blum
said that the Committee on the
Inalienable Rights of the Pales-
tinian People and the Palestinian
unit within the UN Secretariat,
two bodies that enjoy generous
UN funding, are nothing but the
"extensions of the PLO" and
have engaged in a "concerted
campaign of villification" against
Israel.
The culmination of "this anti-
Israeli campaign" at the UN,
Blum charged, is the conference
in Geneva. He pointed out that
the budget of this 10-day confer-
ence is $6 million, an amount that
"could feed millions of starving
children."
Blum could not provide the
amount Irael will finally
withhold. But Israeli diplomats
explained that the amount will
have to be calculated in relation
to the total amount the UN
appropriates for anti-Israeli and
pro-Palestinian activities. One
Israeli diplomat said: "We are
talking here about tens of
thousands of dollars that Israel is
going to withhold."
Blum said, in response to a
question, that Israel has not
withheld funds until now, since it
became aUN member in 1949.
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Dept. Won't Comment if
MNF to Replace IDF
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON IJTA1 -
The State Department declined
to comment on whether the
United Nations multi-national
force (MNF) will be sent into the
Shouf mountains of Lebanon
once the Israeli forces redeploy to
the Awali River.
Deputy spokesman Alan
Romberg also was asked whether
Israel has postponed its rede-
ployment for a few days at the
request of the United States and
Lebanon and whether the Leba-
nese government had asked the
United States and some other
countries to.rhbve the MNF into
the Shouf maintains once Israel
moves out.
ROMBERG REPLIED. I
can't confirm any of that and
wouldn't get into questions of
discussions of that sort.
Obviously, the issue of the MNF
and what it might or might not
do in the wake of the Israeli pull-
back is something that people are
thinking about."
He said that, "in the absence of
various sorts of information,
including specifically what the
political situation will be. in the
area from which Israeli forces will
be pulling back, it really is
premature to make decisions or
even consider hard recom-
mendations."
Romberg confirmed that
Ambassador Robert McFarlane
is in Rome, conferring with
Italian officials, but provided no
details on their conversations. He
stated, however. "We and the
Italians share a number of
common interests and concerns
about what is going on in the
region and specifically in
Lebanon. They are a contributing
member of the MNF and cer-
tainly that will be a natural topic
for discussion."
Jean Feinberg
AMERICA'S PLUMPEST PITTED PRUNES
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December 3"
1964
Feinberg Named
To Chair Jefferson
Advisory Board
North Dade and Miami Beach
civic leader. Jean Feinberg has
been elected chairman of the ad-
visory board of Jefferson Nation-
al Bank at Sunny Isles, succeed-
ing Hiram Goldstein. Election of
Feinberg was announced by Nor-
man ftl. Giller. president of Jef-
ferson at Sunny Isles, and vice
chairman of the board of Jeffer-
son Bancorp. Inc.
Feinberg is former president of
the Miami Beach Chapter of Had-
assah. first president of the
Miami Beach Region of Hadas-
sah. and immediate past chair-
man of the organizations Florida
Zionist Youth Commission.
In addition, she has served as
vice president of American Zion-
ist Federation of South Florida,
as chairman of the Dade County
Women's Plea for Soviet Jewry,
and has received the Woman of
Valor Award from State of Israel
Bonds Organization and was also
presented .the Israel Scroll of
Honor by the late Eleanor Roose-
velt.
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Community Corner
Jeff N. Pollack, son of retired Maj. Joel and Linda PolUck of
Miami, has completed a U.S. Air Force ROTC field trainii*
encampment at Charleston Air Force Base. S.C. PoUackiTi
1981 graduate of Miami-Palmetto Senior High School.
"More than Dance." a photographic exhibit of the work of
Peggo Cromer. is currently on display at First National Bank of
South Miami. To run through Oct. 1. the exhibit features photos
of dancers. Mikhail Baryshnikov, Fernando Bnjones. and
Cynthia Gregory.
University of Miami's Faculty Artist Series will present a
chamber music recital by David E. Becker, violinist: Eugene
Richer, cellist: Thomas Moore, violinist; Florence Aquiluu.
pianist: Maria Mutschler. violinist; and Lucas Drew, bassist
Sept. 17 at 8 p.m. The concert planned for Sept. 18 has been
cancelled.
State Representatives Mike Abrams and Art Simon have
been named "Outstanding Freshman Legislators" by the
United Teachers of Dade. At an annual Legislative Breakfast,
the teachers named the pair for their efforts on behalf of quality
education.
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N. Y. Supreme Court Judge First
To Use New Law Upholding Right to
Waiver Autopsg for Religious Reasons
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A New York State Supreme
Court Justice accepted a
contention that a new
state law curbing the
power of medical examiners
to perform autopsies over
religious objections, which
is not yet in effect, never-
theless represents public
policy by virtue of passage.
On that basis, he barred an
autopsy on an Orthodox
Jewish woman, a Jewish
legal aid society official re-
ported.
Judge Irving Green, sitting in
State Supreme Court in Goshen,
N.Y., issued the order barring an
autopsy on a 66-year old patient
in the State Psychiatric Hospital
in Middletown, N.Y.
DENNIS RAPPS, executive
director of the National Jewish
Commission on Law and Public
Affairs (COLPA), said the
woman, a long-time resident of
the facility, was found dead in her
room at the hospital with no out-
ward indication as to the cause of
death.
Rapps said that Roy Lippin-
cott, the coroner in Orange Coun-
ty, in which Goshen and Middle-
town are located, informed the
family of the dead woman that,
because there was no readily ap-
parent cause of death, he was re-
quired to perform an autopsy.
Rapps said that present state
law generally provides for the
performance of autopsies when
that is "necessary" to determine
the cause of an "unexplained
death."
BUT THE new law, signed by
Governor Mario Cuomo on Aug.
10, provides that if there is con-
scientious public objection by
next of kin or "friend" of the
dead person, the coroner may not
perform an autopsy unless there
is "a compelling public neces-
sity."
The new law defines that as a
situation in which an autopsy is
essential "to the conduct of a
criminal investigation of a homi-
cide" of which the dead person
may be a victim; or that
discovery of the cause of death
"is necessary to meet an immedi-
ate and substantial threat to the
public health; and that a dissec-
tion or autopsy is essential to as-
certain the cause of death."
However, the new law, which
puts the burden of proof of the
need for an autopsy on the
coroner, does not become effec-
tive until Sept. 7.
RAPPS SAID that, barring
prompt action on the dead
woman's behalf, the situation as
of the day of her death was that
the coroner would proceed with
the autopsy. The names of the
woman and family were withheld
for reasons of privacy.
The family sought to obtain
possession of the body for the re-
quired burial within 24 hours
after death but the coroner
refused to release the body.
On the day of the woman's
death, the family called David
Jacobson of the United Jewish
Community-Adath Israel, a
major Jewish burial society on
the Lower East Side of Manhat-
tan, which had been scheduled to
perform the funeral, and told him
of the dilemma. Davidson imme-
diately contacted COLPA.
Rapps said he tried, by a tele-
phone call to the coroner, to per-
suade him the autopsy was un-
necessary and would be a need-
less desecration of Jewish reli-
gious law. Rapps said that, when
that effort faded, he and Assem-
blyman Sheldon Silver (D.,
Man.), one of the sponsors of the
new autopsy law, began prepara-
tion of papers to start a lawsuit in
the State Supreme Court to
enjoin the projected autopsy.
Silver and Rapps, accompanied
by Rabbi Edgar Ghick of Brook-
lyn, an Orthodox expert witness
who has testified in hundreds of
autopsy hearings, hastened to
the State Supreme Court in
Goshen.
THEY FILED a lawsuit. In
response, Judge Green signed an
order placing the matter on that
day's court calendar and, after
being advised of the Halachic ur-
gency of prompt burial, ordered a
hearing, Rapps said.
At the hearing, the district at-
torney, Jim Brown, said there
was no suspicion of foul play or
any other illegality connected
with the woman's death and that
he, therefore, would not insist on
an autopsy. Lippincott insisted,
however, he was bound by law to
perform the autopsy because that
was "necessary" to determine the
cause of an "unexplained death."
Rapps argued that in cases of
death caused by automobile acci-
dents, courts have prohibited au-
topsies as not being "necessary""
under the meaning of present
state law since it could be
justifiably assumed that the acci-
dent caused the death
SILVER pointed out that the
new law amends the "necessary"
and "unexplained" provisions of
the existing law and requires a
showing by the coroner of a
"compelling public necessity" for
an autopsy to be performed over
religious objections.
Silver also argued that the new
law should be applied in the case
before Judge Green., though it
was not yet in force, as a "decla-
ration of the public policy" of the
state because it had been ap-
proved by the Legislature and
signed by the Governor.
Rapps said Green accepted
that proposal and ruled no autop-
sy should be performed and that
the coroner release to the family
the body of the woman. The
body was taken to Manhattan
and the funeral rites and burial
took place immediately, Rapps
said.
Hungary Returns Jewish
Cemetery After 13 Years
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Rabbi Sender Deutsch, a
leader of the Satmar Hasi-
dic movement, returning
from a visit to Hungary, re-
ported that the Hungarian
government agreed to re-
turn to Jewish control a
Jewish cemetery it confis-
cated 13 years ago.
Deutsch said the agreement
followed intermittent negotia-
tions during the 13 years and
that it marked the first time any
East European government has
returned to a Jewish community
a cemetery it had seized to be
used for other purposes. Deutsch
said the government had planned
to use the burial site for a
housing project.
THE SATMAR leader said he
had brought with him documents
signed by the Hungarian govern-
ment returning the cemetery to
the Jewish Community Council
in Budapest. The cemetery is
located in Ujhely, which is about
100 miles from Budapest. He said
the transfer took place On August
16, and that the only stipulation
required of the Jewish commu-
nity was to maintain the ceme-
tery and build a fence around it.
He said he had participated in
the negotiations, along with Imra
Haber, president, and Lajos
Bakos, vice president of the
Community Council. During the
13 years, the cemetery has been
maintained by the Hungarian
Jewish community with the help
of the Satmar movement in
America, he said.
A number of leading Hasidic
rabbis are buried in the Ujhely
cemetery, including the Yismach
Moshe. Rabbi Moishe Teitel-
baum, the grandfather of the late
Satmar Rebbe, Joel Teitelbaum,
and the great grandfather of the
present Satmar leader, Rabbi
Moishe Teitelbaum.
DECLARING that the Ujhely
cemetery is now in the possession
of the Hungarian Jewish commu-
nity, Deutsch added that owner-
ship is shared between that com-
munity and the Satmar commu-
nity in Brooklyn.
Kenanah Meeting Set
A general meeting at 11:30
a.m. and board meeting preced-
ing at 10:30 a.m. has been sched-
uled by the Renanah Chapter of
Hadassah for Monday, Sept. 12.
Yaffa Dermer, chapter Israel
Bond and tourism chairman, will
speak on life in Israel, and Presi-
dent Harriet Cohen, recently re-
turned from the Hadassah na-
tional convention in Washington,
will present a report.
The event is set to take place at
the Pulitzer Hotel.
TEMPLE BENARROCH
160 St. N.E. 19th Place
949-3557
Friday, Saturday Services, Sep-
tember 7,8, Roah Haahanah Sep-
tember 16,17, Yom Klppur.
Do You Have...
Do you have friends or relatives from the South Florida
area who are now living in Israel?
The Aliyah Council of South Florida is preparing a
directory of "olim" from South Florida so that they can
be in touch with each other in Israel and so that we in
the diaspora can keep in touch with them.
You can send the Information to the Aliyah Council of
South Florida,3950 Biscayne Blvd. Miami, FL 33137.
y, September 2,1968 /The Jewish Floridian Page7-B
Temple Beth Am Appoints New
Associate Rabbi, James Simon
Rabbi James L. Simon has
been appointed the new associate
rabbi at Temple Beth Am, ac-
cording to Senior Rabbi Hebert
Baumgard, who is also the
temple's founding rabbi.
Rabbi Simon, who was a
practicing attorney, is a recent
graduate of the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of
Religion in Cincinnati. The 33-
year-old rabbi is also a graduate
of Hastings College of Law at the
University of California.
Rabbi Simon holds a bachelor
of arts degree in political science
from the University of California,
Santa Barbara and a masters
degree in Hebrew Letters from
Hebrew Union College. He has
served as a student rabbi in
Ames, Iowa and Mcgehee, Ark.
and has also worked as rabbinic
intern at Temple Isaiah in Los
Angeles. He also served as
Installation Planned
Installation of officers of the
Eilat Chapter of Pioneer Women
Na'amat will be held Tuesday at
1 p.m. at Financial Federal
Savings Bank, Washington Ave.,
with Leah Benson, membership
vice president of the organiza-
tion's South Florida Council,
conducting.
Faye Brucker, president of the
Chapter, will preside, and Ann
Cohen, cultural chairman, will
present a talk on the Dead Sea
Scrolls.
Rabbi James L. Simon
special assistant to the dean of
Hebrew Union College there.
Co-author of a bio-ethics curri-
culum for high school students,
Rabbi Simon recently led a work-
shop on the subject for an annual
meeting of the Commission for
Alternatives in Jewish Edu-
cation. He also served for many
years on the staff of a camp for
Keform Judaism in California.
The new Beth Am rabbi will
assist Rabbi Baumgard in
various rabbinic duties. He
succeeds Rabbi Robert Gold-
stein, who has taken a pulpit in
Falmouth, Mass.
Israelite Center Temple
3175S.W.25St. Miami
Conservative Family Temple
High Holy Day Tickets Available
Sellchot Service
Saturday, Sept. 3, Midnlte
Social Hour 10 p.m.
All Invited
Members: $20 Non-Members: $30
Family Membership $125.**
Cemetery Priviledges Available
Rabbi Solomon H. Waldenberg Cantor Hyman Lifshin
Al Landskroner, President
For further Information call: 445-1529
Young Couples Free Membership First Year_____
PREFAB SUCCAHS------
special for Florida climate-easily assembled
ESROG & LULAV sets
straight from Israel-tops in price and quality
available at
TORAH TREASURES
The Department Store of Judalca
also.Super Special Seasonal Sale
(until 9/19) Hertz Pentateuch-Soncino Press le."
shut taleisim M."
.20% off shofrot, kittels and most machzorim.
Come to the "lower east side" of Miami!
Torah Treasures, 1201 Washington Ave. M.B., FL
673-6095 ____________
Sellchot Services at Adath Yeshurun
1025 N.E. Miami Gardens Drive
Saturday night, Midnight
September 3rd, 1983
\Rabbi Simcha Freedman Cantor Ian Alpern
Magnificent Choir
Film and Discussion at I(k00 P.M.
"A Response to the Media's Distortion
of Israel's Peace in Galilee Effort"
Public is invited.


Page8-B The Jewish Floridkn/Friday. September 2,1983
National Foods/Beverages
Sweet dishes served at Rosh Hashanah symbolize the hopes for
a happy year ahead. These recipes from the Kraft Kitchens
(from bottom to top) Carrot Pudding, Nutty Carrot Cake, and
Honey Cheese Pie, make holiday fare special
USHER IN A SWEET NEW YEAR WITH
SPECIAL ROSH HASHANAH RECIPES
Start the new year off right with a special Rosh Hashanah meal.
A trio of recipes from the Kraft Kitchens provides a selection of dishes
for ushering in a happy new year.
Carrot Pudding offers a unique baked pudding served as a side
dish. Bake the pudding in custard cups for individual portions and
serve along with other favorite vegetables.
For dessert. Nutty Carrot Cake, with a hint of cinnamon and a
cream cheese frosting is bound to be a hit with carrot cake enthusiasts.
Honey Cheese Pie makes another luscious ending to any meal.
Eggs, honey and Philadelphia Brand cream cheese are the key
ingredients for this rich pie in a crispy crust.
Try any or all of these recipes for a Rosh Hashanah feast.
CARROT PUDDING
11 cup Parkay margarine l',t cups flour
11 cup packed brown sugar
l-*n cups grated carrot
1 egg
2 tbsps lemon juice
1 tsp salt
1 tsp baking powder
': tsp baking soda
Beat margarine and sugar until light and fluffy. Blend in carrot,
egg and juice. Add combined dry ingredients: mix well. Spoon 'a cup
mixture into six 6-oz. custard cups. Bake at 375 degiees. 25 minutes.
Let stand 6 minutes; invert onto serving plate. Serve warm.
6 servings
Variation: Pour mixture into well greased 4'/i-cup ring mold
Bake at 375 degrees. 25 minutes.
Note: Carrots may be grated in blender. Cut carrots into 2-inch
pieces Place in blender container: cover with cold water. Cover;
process until grated. Drain well.
HONEY CHEESE PIE
Pastry for 1 crust 9-inch pie 2 tsp vanilla
l'i cups milk '/tsp salt
3 eggs, beaten 1 g.oz. pkg. Philadelphia
'' hone>' Brand cream cheese, softened
On lightly floured surface, roll pastry to 12-inch circle. Place in 9-
inch pie plate. Turn under edge; flute. Gradually add combined milk,
eggs, honey, vanilla and salt to cream cheese, mixing at medium speed
on electric mixer until well blended. Pour into pastry shell. Bake at 350
degrees. 35 to 45 minutes until knife inserted near center comes out
clean. Cool
8 to 10 servings
NUTTY CARROT CAKE
!.rcPupstSarmargarine iTSr*^
Zcups'shreSedcarrot XXgSF*
1 ^vanilla 5222L-.
2'/, cups flour JJ P SSEteSf.
2 taps baking powder Cream Cheese Frosting
Beat margarine and sugar until light and fluffy Blend in carrot,
eggs and vanilla. Add combined dry ingredients alternately with milk
mixing well after each addition. Stir in nuts. Pour into greased 13x9-'
inch baking pan. Bake at 360 degrees, 45 to 50 minutes or until
wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool; frost with Cream
Cheese Frosting. Garnish with additional chopped nuts.
Cream Cheese Frosting
1 3-oz. pkg. Philadelphia Brand cream cheese, softened
16 cup Parkay margarine
1 tbsp milk
'/> tsp vanilla
3'/ to 4 cups sifted powdered sugar
Combine cream cheese, margarine, milk and vanilla, mixing until
well blended. Gradually add sugar, beating until light and fluffy.
ofes
>i'- aU
,1%'WHJPK^JM
JARLSBERG
VEGETABLE BAKE
1 medium eggplant, sliced
1cup oil
3 medium zucchini, sliced
I cup sliced mushrooms
1cup green pepper strips
II cup sliced green onion
1 medium dove garlic.
minced
1 cup halved cherry
tomatoes
1 tsp. salt
one-eighth tsp. pepper
2 cups shredded Jaiisberg
cheese
Saute eggplant in oil in skillet,
browning lightly on both sides:
set aside. Saute zucchini,
mushrooms, green pepper, green
onion and garlic several minutes.
Add tomatoes, salt and pepper.
Alternate layers of vegetables
and cheese in shallow l-'.t quart
buttered baking dish. End with
cheese. Bake at 350 degrees for 30
minutes.
Makes 6 servings.
?*.*. "
iM mdsUa
-"'.1 odacai .ondi i
New Year Greetings from
J&B!
CLASSIC WHISPER
2 oz. J&B Scotch.
or to taste
Lemon peel
Over ice cubes in an Old Fash-
ioned glass, pour J&B. Stir well.
Twist lemon peel over glass, then
drop in.
FROSTED WHISPER
1'4 oz. J&B Scotch
' 1 oz. white creme de menthe
Mint sprig
Pack a cocktail glass to top
with finely crushed ice. Combine
J&B and liqueur, then pour
slowly over ice in prepared glass.
Pop mint sprig on. Serve with
short straws.
PERFECT WHISPER
1'1 oz. J&B Scotch
'.4 oz. dry vermouth
14 oz. sweet vermouth
Lemon peel
In a pitcher, stir J&B and
vermouths well. Strain into cock-
tail glass, or over fresh ice in an
Old Fashioned glass. Twist peel
and add to glass.
QUIET ROB ROY
l'/.oz. J&B Scotch
one-third oz. sweet vermouth
Dash bitters, optional
Maraschino cherry
In a pitcher, stir J&B. ver-
mouth and bitters well. Strain
into cocktail glass; add cherry.
GENTLE SOUR
2 oz. J&B Scotch
1 oz. lemon juice
1 tsp. sugar
Maraschino cherry
'.1 slice orange
Shake J&B, juice and sugar
briskly with ice. Strain into a
Sour glass. Decorate glass with
cherry and orange.
HUSHED HIGHBALL
2 oz. J&B Scotch
Lemon wedge
Chilled ginger ale, soda or water
Pour J&B over ice in an 8 oz.
Highball glass. Stir. Squeeze in
lemon juice; drop peel in glass.
Stir. Add mixer, to your taste;
rtir quickly.
J&B CARESS
2 oz. J&B Scotch
1 oz. lemon juice
1 tsp. superfine sugar, or to taste
Club soda, chilled
Shake J&B, lemon juice and
sugar briskly with ice to dissolve
sugar. Pour over ice cubes in a
tell glass. Add soda to fill, or to
taste. Garnish with lemon wheel,
if desired.
A delicious new recipe prepared especially for you from Maxim.
SOLE GOUJONNETTES
6 servings
4 to 6 large sole fillets
v4 cup milk
Celery salt
White pepper
Paprika
' to 1 cup flour
2 large eggs
2 tbsps dry white wine
1 to 1 '/i cups fresh white breadcrumbs, lightly toasted
03 for frying
Chopped parsley (garnish)
Horseradish Aioli Sauce -
Cut fillets into lengthwise strips 4 to 6 inches long by 1' < to 1H
inches wide. Place in medium baking dish and cover with milk. Alln
to stand 30 minutes. Drain and sprinkle lightly with seasonings D*
into flour, shaking off excess. Beat eggs and wine together. Dip filled
into egg mixture and then into breadcrumbs, patting crumbs find*
onto each piece. Place on large platter on cookie sheet so that pieces do
not touch. Chill at least M hour. Place M inch ofl in skillet 1 preferably
electric) and heat to 375 degrees. Fry fillets until medium brown.
about 1 minute per side. Drain on absorbent paper. Garmsh with
parsley and serve with Horseradish Aioli Sauce. (Whole sole filleu
may be prepared in the same manner.)
Horseradish Aioli Saucr
Makes 1 cup
Aioli, a garlic-flavored sauce resembling mayonnaise, is fromtb
Provence region of France. Excellent with cold poached fish.
2 egg yolks
1 tbsp white wine vinegar
1 tsp sugar
Vt tsp salt
'/4 tsp white pepper
2-3 cup peanut oil
1-3 cup olive oil
3 tbsp prepared white grated horseradish, or to taste
3 garlic cloves, minced, or to taste
In food processor or mixer bowl place yolks, vinegar, sugar, silt |
and pepper. Mix lightly. Combine oils and add drop by drop to yolk
mixture. As sauce thickens, oil can be added in a very thin trickle.
(Avoid adding too much oil at one time, or eggs and oil will not blend j
Add horseradish and garlic to taste. Chill before serving lean be
prepared one week ahead.I
MUSHROOM-SHELL SKILLET
2 small onions, finely chopped
4 tbsps oil
1 package (10 oz.) frozen spinach, thawed and drained
12 cup diced fresh mushrooms
2 cans (15 oz. eachl Chef Boy-ar-dee Macaroni Shells in Tomato
Sauce
14 cup Parmesan cheese
Saute onions in oil for 3 minutes. Add spinach and mushrooms. ,
stir: cook an additional 2 minutes. Pour on Macaroni Shells: simmer
for 5 minutes. Sprinkle with cheese. Serves 4.
APPLE NUT COFFEE CAKE
'4 cup Breakstone's butter
'4 cup sugar
3 eggs
1 tsp vanilla
2' 2 c ips flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
l'i tsp baking soda
1 cup (8 ozs.) Breakstone's Sour Cream
'4 cup packed brown sugar
2 tbsps flour
1 tsp cinnamon
2 tbsps Breakstones Butter
2 medium apples, peeled, chopped
'/cups chopped nuts
Cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs, one at 1
time, muting well after each addition. Blend in vanilla. Add combinec1
dry ingredients alternately with sour cream, mixing well after each
addition.
Combine sugar, flour and cinnamon; cut in butter until mixtuff
resembles coarse crumbs. Add apples and nuts; toss lightly Pour hi
of batter into greased and floured 13 x 9-inch baking pan; top **
apple mixture and remaining batter. Bake at 350 degrees, 45 minute*
POACHED SALMON WITH MOCK HOLLANDAISE
1 quart water
1 medium onion, sliced
1-3 cup parsley sprigs
1 slice lemon
1 bay leaf
V4 tap salt
3 peppercorns
''/'pounds salmon steak
2 tbsps parve Fleischmanns Margarine
% cup mayonnaise
3 tbsps lemon juke
Combine water, onion, parsley, lemon, bay leaf, salt and pa>
percorns in a large skillet. Bring to a boil. Add fish. Reduce heat;
cover and simmer about 10 minutes or until fish flakes easily Remove
to serving platter.
White fish is cooking melt margarine in a small saucepan. Stir'"
mayonnaise and lemon juice. Heat, but do not boil. Serve over fish.
>wu aa*jMf '>* **' ,r/,,*K>
M


*.-
, September 2,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Wer Holiday Suggestions


i
i traditional to eat freshly baked ehallah with honey on Bosh
ihanah for a sweet start to the New Year. This year, serve
iA with Fig and Homy Spread for a delicious change of
FIG AND HONEY SPREAD FOR CH ALLAH
From the land of milk, honey and figs comes a simple recipe that
l win a place in the tradition of holidays (and even the usual weekly
ibbath) for sliced ehallah or toasted bagels. It It Fig and Honey
pread, a modern Israeli recipe. Like a jam, but more flavorful with its
veet red wine, chopped oranges and cinnamon to flavor the chewy
Iried figs, this spread will also find its way as a cake or torte filling in
any a fine home baker's "secret" recipe, one can be sure.
The fig-honey spread is simple to prepare. Those who own a food
cessor will want to use it for chopping both the oranges and the
tied figs. Both fruits can also be ground in a traditional food chopper.
his spread will keep weeks in the refrigerator but will probably be
ped long before in well appreciated snacks by family members. Good
t know that it is nutritious, with the dried figs supplying many
ftamins, such as Vitamin B and minerals plus a good amount of fiber,
> often lacking in modern diets. Dried figs also are a good source of
icium and the oranges, of course, offer Vitamin C.
2 cups finely chopped dried figs
2 naval oranges, finely chopped or ground
1 cup sweet red wine
1 cup honey
2 i-mammon sticks
Combine all ingredients in a saucepan. Simmer, stirring oc-
casionally until mixture is thick and jam-like. Cool and store in
efrigerator until needed. Spread on sliced ehallah, toasted bagels,
lakes about 1 quart, depending on size of oranges.
HOME STYLE CHICKEN
IN MUSTARD SAUCE
5 packets G. Washing-
ton's (R) Golden
Seasoning and Broth
'A cup flour
1 chicken, cut in pieces
V* cup parve margarine
1 cup water
1 tbsp. chopped scallions
1 tao. tarragon
3 tbsp. Gulden's (R>
Spicy Brown Mustard
1 cup parve non-dairy
creamer
5>B$2f 3 Packets of seasoning
i broth with flour; com
cken piecM. Brown chicken
P*ces in butter until golden. Dis-
5aining 2 packets of
nmg and broth in 1 cup
. m Add to ,kiBw ""on* wi
MJUong and tarragon. Cover;
Muim cooking over low heat
until sauce begins to thicken and
chicken is fork tender. Mix
mustard with non-dairy creamer.
Pour over simmered chicken;
stir gently; cover. Allow to sim-
mer 10 more minutes. Serves 4.
Sunsweet Prunes wants to help
you bring in the New Year with a
delicious Spiced Dark Prune
Cake. This hearty cake is moist
and spicy and will delight family
and friends.
SPICED DARK
PRUNE CAKE
1V> cups Sunsweet
Pitted Prunes
1 cup water
1 tap. whole allspice
Vt tap. whole cloves
1 stick cinnamon
2V* cups sifted
all-purpose flour
I Vi tsps. baking powder
V* tap. salt
two-thirds cup shortening
II 4 cups
granulated sugar
3 large eggs, beaten
Vt cup liquid from prunes
1 tbsp. grated orange peel
Orange Syrup
Combine prunes, water and
spices in small saucepan; heat to
boiling. Cover and simmer 16
minutes. Cool. Drain and remove
spices, reserving liquid. Chop
prunes; set aside. Resift flour
with baking powder and salt.
Cream shortening and sugar to-
gether well. Beat in eggs. Add
flour mixture alternately with '/
cup liquid drained from prunes.
(If necessary, add water to make
Vt cup.) Stir in orange peel and
prunes. Turn into greased and
floured 9-inch tube pan (6-eup
capacity). Bake below oven
center at 926 degrees for about 1
hour and 60 minutes, until cake
testa done. Let stand 10 minutes.
Turn cake out onto serving plate;
prick with slender skewer. Slowly
spoon Orange Syrup over cake,
allowing syrup to absorb before
adding more. Cool thoroughly
before cutting. Makes one 9-inch
cake.
Orange Syrup: Combine one-
third cup each orange juice and
granulated sugar, stirring until
sugar dissolves.
Ricotta Stuffed Mushrooms
will make a delightful sidedish to
any fish entree for your holiday
festivities prepared for you by
Sorrento.
RICOTTA STUFFED
MUSHROOMS
8 to 12 large mushrooms
1 slice bread
1 tbs. milk
2 cloves garlic, minced
1 tbs. chopped parsley
2 eggs, lightly beaten
Vt cup Sorento Whole
Milk Ricotta
salt and pepper to taste
olive oil
grated parmesan or
romano cheese
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Re-
move stems from mushrooms and
chop fine. Soak bread in milk and
squeeze dry. Mix bread, chopped
stems, eggs, garlic, parsley, salt
and pepper with ricotta. Fill
mushroom caps with the mixture.
Place in buttered baking dish.
Drizzle olive oil over tops and
sprinkle with grated cheese.
Bake, uncovered, about 20 min.
HEARTY POTATO SUPPER SALAD
1 package (9 oz.) Birds Eye French green beans with sliced
mushrooms
2 cups diced cooked new potatoes, with skins (*)
2 hard-cooked eggs, diced
4 ounces cheddar cheese, diced
Vt cup mayonnaise
2 tsps prepared mustard
W tap salt
f) Or use 1 can (16 oz. (small whole potatoes, drained and diced.
Prepare vegetable as directed on package; drain. Combine
vegetable, potatoes, eggs and cheese in bowl. Combine mayonnaise,
mustard and salt; add to vegetable-potato mixture and mix lightly.
Chill about 2 hours. Makes 3 servings.
Supper Go-Witha: Salad Garnishes (radishes, cherry tomatoes,
dill pickles), Strawberries.
Tetley Tea wants to be sure that the tea you brew is as delicious
and refreshing as possible and advises the following:
HOW TO MAKE REALLY GOOD HOT TEA
Experts agree that the following Four Golden Rules insure a
delicious and refreshing cup often:
1. Use your teapot.
2. Bring fresh, cold tap water to a full boil.
3. Use one teaspoonful or one teabag per cup.
4. Brew by the clock 3 to 6 minutes.
Helpful hints for more Tea pleasure
Preheat your teapot by rinsing it out with hot water. This keeps
the tea hot during brewing.
Always use freshly drawn water. Water that has been standing
and reheated gives tea a flat taste.
Don't judge the strength of the tea by color. Some teas brew
light, some dark. Brew by the clock.
If you like weak tea. add a little hot water to your tea after the full
brewing period.
Stir tea before pouring to make sure it's uniformly strong.
Serve tea with milk (not cream) to let the true flavor of the tea
come through
Or with lemon to point up its flavor.
Add some fun to your coffee! A
delicious treat from Maxwell
House, Yuban and Sanka.
MIX YOU R OWN COFFEE
Hot freshly brewed or prepared
Maxwell House, Yuban or Sanka
brand, 97 percent caffein-free cof-
fee Select-a-"flavor-mate|s)"
Pour hot coffee into cups. Add
one of the suggested flavor-mates
to taste. Stir and serve with
cream or milk and sugar, if
desired.
Suggested "flavor-mates"
Baker's semi-sweet
chocolate flavored chips
Log Cabin syrup or honey
Tang instant breakfast drink
almond, rum or vanilla
extract
butterscotch or chocolate
sundae sauce
brown sugar or cinnamon sugar
ground cinnamon or nutmeg
or stick cinnamon
grated orange or lemon rind
thin orange or lemon slices
apple juice
chopped crystallized ginger
crushed peppermint candy
marshrnallows
red cinnamon candies
malted milk powder
mint jelly
Mifflintown, Pa. Chicken is
a traditional meal for the Jewish
holidays. Empire Kosher Foods,
the world's largest most trusted
name in poultry, would like to
suggest a delicious way to serve
chicken for your holiday meal.
We've enclosed our recipe for
"Empire's Chicken Superb."
Empire's Chicken Superb
1 box Empire cut-up
frying chicken
2V4 tbeps. margarine
1 cup sliced mushrooms
1 tomato, pasted, seeded,
chopped
2-3 cup dry kosher white
wine
Vt cop chicken broth
1 tbep. kosher cognac
'/i tap. paprika
1 Up. salt
1 dove garlic, minced
1 tbsp. minced parsley
In fry pan, place margarine
and melt over medium beat. Add
chicken and cook, turning, about
10 minutes or until brown on all
sides. Add mushrooms and
tomato; cook 5 minutes. Stir in
wine, broth, cognac, salt and pa-
prika; cook about 16 minutes or
until fork can be inserted in
chicken with ease. Remove
chicken to warm platter. Skim
any fat from pan and discard. To
remaining contents in fry pan,
add garlic and parsley and cook,
stirring occasionally, about 6
minutes to reduce liquid; poor on,
chicken. Makes 4 servings.
. *


We Labor Long
To Bring You Low Prices.
AD of our people work hard to save you money.
Come on in and stock up during our big Labor Day Sale
Prices effective Sept 1 thru Sept 7, 1983.
cPride
2UT BTl SCHWEPPES GINGER
" TA8 DIET COKE OR
se
rREGULAR CR C AFFCNE PREEI
ASSORTED FLAVORS 180Z NO RET BOTTLES
1J_PAKI2-OZ BTLS (REGULAR OR LIGHT,
YS
15-OZ SPINACH 16-OZ FRENCH OR CUT
GREEN BEANS 17-OZ CORN OR PEAS
Del Monte2/Qf*<:
Vegetable Cftf^
(REGULAR OR NO SALT)
1 -LB CAN (UMIT ONE. PLEASE)
I Chock FuB O' Nuts
$J79
Lay's Ruffles
Potato Chips
8 0Z
BAG
99*
FROZEN
RICH'S
Coffc
39*
16-OZ CTN
BUTONI 13 OZ MANICOTTI W.SAUCE I0VOZ BAK
EOZITl 10OZ FETTUCINIAUrReDOOR 14-OZ
Lasagne.............M .09
JENO S COMBINATION
Pizza Rods..........%Sg .99
JENO 5 10 I OZ COMBINATION
.CHEESE
Crisp N' Tasty Pizzas .. .99
outcwe
aon i loizoii....... pkg1.iv
PANTRY PRIDE CHICKEN BEEF TURKEY OR
macaroni 1 CHEESE
Pot Pies
3 1.00
[en
LOOK FOR OUR 8 PAGE INSERT
IN YOUR MAIL THIS WEEK FOR SAVINGS
ON NATIONAL BRANDS!
fe
I SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVEI
PRODUCE
6INPKG FIRM RIPE
Salad Size
MOUNTAIN GROWN
Bartlett
JUMBO 4 SIZE
Western
Honeydews
M
l a
a,
J-PICK)
hOMPSON .u PIC"
CRiSP ANC C"ONC" j :
Green Poppers.......
< J GARDEN FRESH CSP-2 IN CELLO PKG
Celery Hearts........
U S NO 'AlL PURPOSE IU PC*
Yellow Onions.......
^ "N ~ TOPS IN VITAM* A
. Garden Fresh Carrots
*w i
EACm
GARDEN FRESM IU-PICK.
i>^

:%y
DElCOUS RAW OR COOKED CRiSP 'U PCK.
2lB
<20Z
SAG
ASSORTED Flavors lO-Cal
Watden Salad Dressings cAi 1.19
NEW JERSEY GROWN (U-PICK)
Sweet
Peaches
LB.
GROCERIES
INOIL OR WATER 6 VOZ. CAN
Chunk light
Staridst Tuna
UMIT 2. PLEASE
COUNTRT TIM
Lemon
BUMeiEBEE SOUOlNOn-ORIVATEP
White Tuna..
LUCKY LEAF REG OR NATURAL
."can 1.99
White Tuna ...can 1.19
."1.29
DON JUAN S-. OZ STUFFED THROWN
ManzanMa Olives .69
LINGulNESoSGMeTT' "* m'
Pasta Romano 2 S1.00
CHEESE TORTILLA
99
ROtal all flavors
Gelatins....4 eo.ii1.00
PLANTERSSOZ CAN CHEESE BALLS
6SOZ CHEESE CURLS > S OZ CORN
ch*>s or ? o:
Pretzel Twists ... .89
YANKEE DOODLE ASSORTED FLAVORS
3<5Z PKG
Noodles .....6 for 1.00
ARM t HAMMER 65 O: BOHLAUNORr
.......1.29
BETT.CROCKERSUPERMOIST IS 5 OZ
BO >ELL0W DEVILS FOOO GERMAN
CHOC BUTTER YELLOW CARROT OR CHOC C-*
Cake Mix.........79
BETTY CROCKER READY TOSPREAO
ASSOHTEO FLAVORS
16 so: 4
CAN la
VSll^JSP2 N*CMO CHEESE TORTILLA
CHIPS CORN CHIPS OR
Curls
HIGH PROTEIN ASSORTEO
BuKoni Pasta 2
ORANGE OR LEMON LIME
Gatorada.....
B.M OVEN BAKED
MOUNTAIN DEW
PEPSI FREE.
WET PEPSI,
PEPSI UGHT OR
.1.00
oz
p STL
PANTRY PRiot 32CZ BTL PMK LEMON
UME OR GREEN DlSi.
Dinner
PANTRv prkx TALL
Kitchen Bags
pantry pwoe roz
GENERAL MILLS 14 0." BOY
Of Nf RAl MILLS
Wheahes
120:4
1 ii
B0> I.
.89
30 CI 4 /JO
PKG 1 .*?
'SOZ
1 CAN
Cold Cups .... pkcc. 1.29
PANTRY PRJOE 200 FT ROLL
Aluminum Foil
BETTY CROCKER i b 02 BOX AU
GRATW SCALLOPED HASH BROWN
SOUR CREAM WCHIVES. JULIENNE OS
HICKORY SMOKED CHEESE
32 OZ HEINZ
KeaO
Ketchup
BEECHNUT 4', OZ JARS ASSORTED
STRAMEO
Baby Foods.. 5 for 1.00
3.39 Juices'
PACK
FOR
"81*
REGULAR OR UGHT
6PAK
12-02. CANS
6PAK
12-OZCANS
UMIT 2. PLEASE


Friday, September 2,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
F* a,,
4
h
" \\
Stores'
>rDay
iff-i
w

toe corf*
T
ITT ~V IB J Ih '"?*'(
&*.^*Pbw.,x...;,:?'. ?t
SALE
PPED PREMIUM FRESH
OF
icken
3 BREAST & 3 LEG QTRS. W/BACK (UMIT 2 PKGS ) I D
3GIBLETPKGS
;hly ground
?und Beef
^NDOVER
! BEEF CHUCK
LB.
i POINT CUT
USDA CHOICE WHOLE
Boneless
Beef
Brisket
NEW ZEALAND FRESH FROZEN
SPRING LAMB NOT USDA GRADED
I # zj
NIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
L"ESH FROZEN WHOLE SPRING
W5ED-IMP0RTED
Chops
LOUIS RICH FRESH TURKEY
Drumsticks
LB
fBESH FROZEN ALL BEEF
Ich
32 OZ PKG
[f ROZEN CHICKEN KIEV OR
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS 3 MEALS IN ONE
ROAST GROUND BEEF AND STEW BEEF
itional
Beef
12-OZ PKG
or Wings
$^B #^JTfc BONELESS AND SKINLESS FRESH
199 Chicken Breast
* Cutlet
$599
$289
$189
LB
Beef Chuck
Combo
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS 3 MEALS IN ONE
CONTAINS ROAST GROUND BEEF STEW BEEF
Beef Shoulder
Combo lb
1
FRESH FROZEN
Mero Steaks
| SERVICE DEU
EN BROWNED
ey
49
HALF LB
69*
$289
_S IN ONE
$|89
.S IN ONE
$]89
$]29
PANTRY PRIDE PKG OF 8
Hot Dog or
Hamburger Roils
3/$l
SERVICE DELI
NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
Wsket
OR
Uver...
Mt Salad
$139
1
OTR LB
."% .99
HALF
.89
RlET;tS
. PKO llV
Chickens.........u.1.69
IN STORE BAKERY
NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
GREAT FOR PICWCS HOT DOO OR
Hamburger Rods..........8 for .79
CRISPY. LONO
French Breed...........
JEWISH STYLE WITH OR WITHOUT SEEDS
Rye Breed..............
WHITE on
Chocolate Cupcakes......2 for .79
OVEN FRESH
Apple Pie.................."S11.49
A REAL TREAT
Lemon Cream Me.........."2.49
ie-oz m
LOAF lO
lOAF .89
i
cPtide
DAIRY-DELI
Pantry Pride
Orange Juice
HALF GAL CHILLED df^OjkdP'^kd^
99*
LIGHT N LIVELY 24-OZ CONT
Cottage
Cheese
LIGHT N LIVELY ----------------
ASSORTED $^19
Yogurts 3s 07 cups JL
KRAFT COLORED AMERICAN
Cheese Singles..... 1.69
SILVER SPRINGS PREPARED BEET CREAM
Horesredish......2conts 1.29
SHEDO S COUNTRY CROCK
Margarine Spread ...1.89
FLEISCHMANN CORN OIL REG ORUNSALTED
Margarine Qtrs.......JS2 .85
PANTRY PRIDE
Sour Cream.........pt .89
DEANS
French Onion Dip ...'".;. .89
UTILE HUG FLAVORED
Fruit Drinks.......8^1 .99
Oscar Mayer
Beef Bologna
$-149
12-OZ PKG fl^L
KAHN S ALL BEEF JUMBO OR REG
Frankfurters........p1.79
BETTV ANN OLD FASHIONEO WITH EGG
Potato Salad........'< .59
VLASIC WHOLE OR HALF
Deli DM Pickles....."1.19
WINE OR CREAM STYLE
Vita Herring "#2.00
PACKAGED BAKERY
DANISH PKG OF 6
Cream Puffs.......2-1.00
MEYER'S BONUS PAK 8 IN PKG
English Muffins .... 2 ran 1.00
PANTRY PPJOE
RyeBread..........'fiB .59
VELVET CREME
Glazed Domrts.......31.29
AOLER'SS PAK KAISER ROLLS OR ISO* LOAF
Pumpernickel Bread ... .79
MEYER'S
Dinner Rods......2%S1.|


Page 12-B The Jewish Fkmdian / Friday, September 2,1983
Reporter Compares University of Miami Embarks
President Reagan,
9
Then and Now
Test Tube Baby'Fertilization
. By ROBERTSEGAL.
Serving as President is a*
learning process. In his
1961 inaugural speech, Mr.
Reagan said: "Government
is not the solution to our
problem; government is the
problem." Two years later,
in bis State of the Union
message, with a bow to
Bernard Baruch for saying
America has never forgot-
ten the nobler things that
light her path, our Presi-
dent threw away the whip
with which he previously
flogged government.
What says be now? "We are
realist*, we solve our problems
instead of ignoring them; we are
also idealists (Unemployment) at
a task for all of us ... We who
are in government must take the
lead ki restoring the economy."
If Mr. Reagan has learned from
Barney Baruch, he can learn also
from Dublin-bom Edmund
Burke: "Expense, and great
expense, may be an essential part
of true economy."
The true economy most of us
have in mind is enhancing the
quality of American lives. This is
applicable especially to those 30
million in our nation living below
the poverty level. Many of them
and millions more near the bor-
derline of poverty are suffering
from severe slashes in domestic
ptogiams.
SENATOR Paul Laxalt (R.,
Nev.(, closer to Mr. Reagan than
perhaps any other man in Wash-
ington, has given graphic expres-
sion to this calamity: "Non-
military spending has been cut
awfully close to the bone."
YET, now that the President is
seeking a S30 billion increase in
military spending for our 1984
budget, the hard truth is that
such expenditure will show an
actual increase of 14 percent
while all other spending is due for
a cut of 3 percent.
Does this square with Edmund
Burke's idea of economy? With
12 million Americans looking for
work and an additional 1.8 mil-
lion no longer considered
unemployed because they have
despaired of finding jobs, we still
find the government ax raised to
slice more from social programs
needed to keep both America and
Americans sound.
A year ago, you didn't need the
genius of David Stockman to tell
you that cuts had been made in
between 80 and 100 essential
domestic areas. School lunches,
mental health, immunization
against childhood disease, aid to
dependent children, student
loans, legal aid for the poor, food
stamps, education, environment
protection, health, job training.
The list runs long, tragically
long. Yet the season of slash is
here again. And unless the light-
ning of reason strikes in Wash-
ington, the quality of life for the
poorly nourished, jobless, and
poorly-domiciled will be dimin-
ished further.
IT SEEMS forgotten that for
half a century the 'lominant.
elements of both political parties
had been carrying, our nation
forward to a more just and
humane society within the frame-
work of enlightened capitalism.
Then the war drums of the New
Right began an ever louder beat.
Terry Dolan, most successful of
New Right money raisers, put it
bluntly: "If we had our way, the)
federal budget would be 99 per-/
cent for defense and 1 percent for
delivering the mail."
In high supply side circles,
George Gilder is credited with the
dour observation that the poor
need the spur of their poverty to
improve their condition and to
move into the American middle
class. (Let them stay the course
and tomorrow their hunger will
be appeased.)
Is there a special lesson in
these somber reflections for
American Jews? Can it be that,
some fail to cognize the dangers
for minority people inherent in
neglect of the government's
social responsibility?
EACH YEAS, lay and profes-
sional Jewish community
relations leaders meet to forge a
program guide for those who
want a strong Jewish community
and a sound American common-
wealth. As to social and economic
justice, now endangered by tax
cuts, the overwhelming opinion
of the National Jewish Commu-
nity Relations Advisory Council,
shapers of the program guide,
has been expressed thus:
"American Jewry has a
primary moral stake in the
achievement of social and
economic justice in American
society .. Jewish security,
along with democratic hfe in
general, is to a substantial extent
dependent on an American
society not driven by social and
economic discontent" fThen,
after noting shrinkage of federal
government support for key
programs, the statement warns):
"At this time of economic dislo-
cation whose first victims are the
traditional group targets of dis-
crimination, government is re-
treating from an active role ... in
implementing civil rights."
AmeriFirst Offers
Free Service, Gift
Free blood pressure readings
are currently being offered at the
NE 183 Street and Winston Tow-
ers offices of AmeriFirst Federal
Savings and Loan Association
during regular office hours, Mon-
day, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Tuesday
through Friday, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
according to Harriet Robkin, vice
president and manager of the NE
183 office, and Ray Leightman,
vice president and manager of
Winston Towers.
AmeriFirst has also announced
that its North Shore office is of-
fering a free jar gripper to
visitors and customers through
Sept. 16 during regular office
hours, Monday through Friday, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Commodore Announces
Oktoberfest Cruises
For the ninth consecutive year,
Commodore Cruise Lines is
offering Oktoberfest afloat
and with the addition of the new
23,000-ton, 900-passenger MS
Caribe I to Commodore's fleet,
there is twice the number of
opportunities to celebrate.
In honor of the traditional
festival which began when a
Bavarian prince married a polish
princess, Commodore has
scheduled this year's Oktoberfest
theme cruises for Sept. 24 and
Oct. 1,8,15,22, and 29.
The Bobeme sails to the
western Caribbean ports of Port-
au-Prince, Haiti; Port Antonio,
Jamaica; and George Town,
Grand Cayman, and Cozumel,
Mexico; and the Caribe I cruises
to the island destinations of
St.Thomas, Virgin Islands; San
Juan, Puerto Rico; and Puerto
Plata, Dominican Republic.
"Test tube babies" havel
been very much in the news
for the past five years when
the first successful implant
was carried out in England.
The first U.S. "test tube
baby." was born in Decem-
ber, 1981. Now the Univer-
sity of Miami is about to
embark on an in vitro fer-
tilization program. It will
be the first such center in
the State of Florida.
The process involves removal
of a mature oocyte (egg) from the
patient's ovarian follicle, trans-
ferring it to the laboratory where
it will be incubated and fertilized
by sperm from the patient's hus-
band. If the fertilization process
is successful, the fertilized oocyte
will have divided to a two- to
four-cell development stage after
approximately 48 hours, and will
then be transferred to the pa-
tient's uterus to implant and de-
velop into a fetus.
DR. T. T. HUNG, who was a
member of the in vitro fertiliza-
tion embryo transfer team at the
University of Southern California
for almost four yean, ante to the
University of Miami as co-
ordinator for the new program
hut December. His medical
specialties are obstetrics and
gynecology, endocrinology and
infertility, and be also holds a
PhD in biochemistry. Other
University faculty members who
will be immediately involved in
the program include Drs. Oscar
Davidson, William Lemaire,
Arthur Shapiro and Marwan
Shaykh.
Researchers and physicians in
the Department of Obstetrics and
Gynecology are quick to point
out that there is only a 10 percent
to 20 percent success rate per
cycle with the procedure, based
on efforts worldwide, at this time.
They do not want to build false
hopes in couples who may have
tried unsuccessfully to have chil-
dren over a period of years. The
in vitro fertilization program will
be carried out at the University
of Miami Hospital and Clinics
and at Highland Park General
Hospital which is adjacent to the
medical school campus.
Admission to the program will
be limited to women with irrepar-
able tubal damage, women whose
husbands have very low sperm
counts, or couples who have tried
unsuccessfully to have children
over a period of years. The
patient must be seen by the
physician on an almost daily
basis for a period of a month,
with no guarantee of success. Be-
cause the program will be able to
handle only 20 to 30 patients per
year, admission will be limited to
those couples who apparently
have no other chance to have
children.
Prospective patients who are
interested in the program should
inquire in writing to: In Vitro
Fertilization Program, De-
partment of Obstetrics and
Gynecology (D-5). University of
Miami School of Medicine, P.O.
Box 016960, Miami 33101.
mIi.i!ri!Lprob?bl>' bout J
month before the center *&
U> take on its first patient* ^{f
have been reluctant to diJ,|
will be far greater than we*
poss.b!ymeet/'saidaUniv5|
.spokesman. But it isanexcit
I w^T8and We ^l* to Perfect!
the techniques involved and kl
' prove the success rate Jl
stantiaUy."
French Woman Remembei
Barbie Raid on 41 Child
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) In
the small village of Izieu,
people still remember the
day, close to 40 years ago,
when German police and SS
men rounded up 41 Jewish
children who had been there
in hiding.
One of the village inhabitants,
Jeanne Couomb, used to live
right next door to the war-time
home lor Jewish children. She
still lives only a few hundred
yards away from the white villa
which Klaus Barbie ordered
raided on April 6,1944.
"IT MUST have been 8:30 in
the morning when I saw several
cars drive up," she recalled.
"Some of the men wore civilian
clothes, others wore German
uniforms. Some surrounded the
house, others barged in. The
children were having breakfast
but were kicked out before they
had a chance to finish their meal.
The small ones, maybe three or
four, did not know what was
happening and boarded the
waiting truck without com-
plaining. The older children
shouted out for help or burst into
tears."
Klaus Barbie, who according to
documentary evidence ordered
the raid and the arrest of the
children, who were all deported to
Auschwitz, is now in a French jail
waiting for his trial on charges of
"crimes against humanity." The
office of the investigating mag-
istrate dealing with the case says
none of the arrested children
survived their Auschwitz ordeal.
The woman who organized the
Izieu home, Esther Slatin, is still
alive. She was away at the time of
the Nazi raid but today, aged 80,
she intends to testify at the trial
of the man known as "the but-
cher of Lyons."
IWE VILLA which housed tl_
children's borne was boughtbjl
non-Jewish couple shortly
the war. Mr. and Mrs. Get.
Thibaudier did not know at I
time the sinister story of _
building and its flowery garden."]
After moving into the
and learning its sinister
they opposed a plaque
the April raid. Mrs. Slatin i
to come every year on Ren
brance Day. Now, too old
undertake the journey, she!
a bouquet of flowers.
la spate of tbe tragic eventii
which Barbie played a cast
role during his two yam
Lyons, 1942-44, as Gestapo <
his case is rapidly turning intoij
French fratieidal war marked I
charges and countercharges
cowardice, collaboration or jo
plain indifference.
SIMONE VEIL, a fo
President of the Europ
Parliament and herself an Ad
witz death camp sur
warned against this develop!
ment. "We should not try our-l
selves or even Barbie the mul
The trial should concentrate
the systemtic analysis of al
ideology which made such thinpI
possible."
Holiday Program Setl
Rabbi Mitchell Chefett wij
conduct a program on '' Preparini I
for and Experiencing the Jewisk I
High Holy Days" Monday, Sept I
12 at 8 p.m. at the South Dai
Jewish Community Center.
Singing and chanting will hi
highlighted.
Season Opener Set
The opening meeting of the
season of the Morton Towers
Chapter of Hadassah has been
scheduled for Monday, Sept. 12
at 11:30 a.m. at the American
Savings Bank, Lincoln and Alton
Roads. Gus Richland will present
a skit.
Th Jasiizjgfa FI'Diriidliionn
^^^^^eriantwppw m nap i^ajni ^a*ei
lUrUs'i Msit Csaplste lifliih-Iewiia Vttkit
Printmd In English (
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Triter Raps Supreme Court for Backing
_^ _^ at tne opening mee
ligious School Parents' Tax Deduction '&S&S5&
ip.m.. according to
Judge to Address Hadassah
Judge Rhea Pincus Grossman
will be the featured guest speaker
at the opening meeting of
the year of Ko'ach Chapter of
13 at 8
Jackie
I Hechter, president.
The event will take place at the
Bayside branch of the American
Savings and Loan Association,
Lincoln and Alton Roads.
I By ROBERT E.SEGAL
ent developments point up
scinating difference between
National Aeronautics And
Administration and our
t\e Court.
(ASA. with great patience
unanimity of opinion, sue-
in nudging a wobbling
illite away from its wayward
se and back on the desired
t. The Supreme Court, with
voluted reasoning and with a
rom unanimous decision (5 to
[succeeded in nudging the
ch-state separation guaran-
|into a wobbling course en-
ding those who wouldn't be
sorry to see a vital part of the
It Amendment sent spinning
1 limbo.
June 29, the highest court
ired that a state tax deduc-
for education expenses is
btitutional despite the met
sectarian schools pick up
It of the benefits. The decision
Ippointed those residents of
nesota who oppose a state
| granting a tax deduction of
i $700 per child for the cost of
nentary and secondary school
ation, whether public or pri-
f riting for the majority of the
Veme Court, Associate Jus-
| William H. Rehnquist said in
n that the Minnesota law is
inasmuch as it balances off
savings on private school
(ion with savings the parents
public school children may
i on such items as notebooks,
tils, and gym shoes. As Asso-
Justice Thurgood Marshall
liied out in his dissent, Min-
oia taxpayers-who send their
rigsters to public schools may
deduct tuition expensp s
puse they incur none.
Die decision in the Minnesota
follows by just one month
Senate Finance Committee
Lo-7 vote approving President
|gans proposed legislation
would permit parents of sui-
ts in private (including
pchial) elementary and secon-
schools to deduct a portion
the tuition costs from their
feral income taxes.
It isn't going to hurt the
lie schools," the President
It is Reagan himself who
Izoomed in on the heap of
penis facing the nation's im-
nt network of primary and
adary education. Can he pos-v
be unaware of the fact that
Peep cuts his administration
nade in federal aid to our
ols (25 percent and promis-
| lo go higher) are inflicting a
lot top teaching talent at a
YLAKE GARDENS CONDO
Bedroom Convertible, 1 Bath,
meable 7%% MTG. Walk
mpies Across From Shop-
Centers.
661-0701 457 6418
PARTYNET
ng soon to this area. A
Mortal on-line service for
enjoyment. Contact PAR-
i Box A 180 E. Pearson,
go Ml. 60611.
Steal Desperate
view rancher 3
ms, 2 baths dream
ien. Owner wants of-
B. De Cote assoc.
V291 Keyes Co.
tors, 1023 Line. Rd.
03.
time of greatest need?
Can he be oblivious to the fact
that the estimated S4.6 billion in
tax revenue loss accompanying
his proposal aiding parents of
private schools is certain to
punch new holes in the budgets of
many urban schools? Does he fail
to see that while private schools
are free to escape the burden of
accommodating handicapped
children, the public schools must
constantly face up to that expen-
sive responsibility?
18 it possible that the Presi-
dent didn't think twice before he
blamed "federal control" of the
schools particularly as to the
(court) order for desegregation
for what he calls losing sight of
the main purpose of education?
When he made his plea for
tuition tax cuts for all private
schools a year ago, Reagan said:
"I would like to think that we are
offering help to the inner-city
child who faces a world of drugs
and crime, the child with special
needs and to families who still
believe the Lord's Prayer will do
them less harm in the schoolroom
than good." This inaccurate ref-
erence to "special needs" com-
bined with the irrelevant plug for
Christian piety in classrooms
drawing children of non-Christian
faiths is cause for true astonish-
ment.
Even Senator Pat Moynihan
(I).. N.Y.), a proponent of the
tuition tax credit plan, has been
impelled to remind the President
Jewish Radio Program
To Begin Here Sunday
A Jewish radio program, "The
Voice of Jewish Activism," will
begin broadcasting on WBSS 98
AM radio every Sunday from 9 to
10 a.m. beginning this weekend,
according to radio host, Victor
Vancier.
'The Voice of Jewish
Activism" has become noted in
New York for its positions that
are sometimes considered un-
popular, such as the view that
American Jews have no future
here and that what happened in
Nazi Germany can happen in the
U.S., according to the host.
The New York program has
also organized demonstrations
for Soviet Jewry, opposed Peace
Now demonstrations, and held
weekly classes and meetings to
revive Jewish awareness among
young Jews. i
and other Administration offici-
als that they are malting "over-
blown" claims of how the tax
credits would solve the nation's
educational ills.
The educational welfare of
some 41,000,000 public school
children is affected by the atten-
tion or lack of attention we offer
those schools. And at a time
when we face heavy competition
from the Soviet Union and other
nations in the race for technologi-
cal supremacy, it is painful to
note that the San Jose, Calif.,
Unified Public School District, in
the center of that state's high-
technology, industrial complex,
has just let the nation know it is
involvent.
Sinai Meeting Set
Elsye Wexler, president of the
Sinai Chapter 1616 of B'nai
B'rith Women, has announced
that the group will meet
Tuesday, Sept. 20 at noon at the
American Savings and Loan As-
sociation, Lincoln and Alton
Roads.
Mayor Ciment
to Speak
An opening luncheon meeting
of the Mount Scopus Chapter of
Hadassah has been scheduled for
Monday, Sept. 12 at noon at the
Costa Brava Restaurant. Miami
Beach Mayor Norman Ciment
will be the guest speaker. He will
also install officers for the coming
year.
EVERYONE REALIZES that depression, the Inability to move
toward new friends and relationships, new careers, a happier, more
rewarding life are caused by mental barriers we somehow can't over-
come.
We are so often drained by the wear and tear of life and feel
helpless, Immobilized, consumed by rage, unable to utilize the
energy and creative ability we each possess.
Yet these barriers are not Insurmountable. You will be amazed at
what individual or group psychotherapy can do to unlock your men-
tal powers and lead you to a happier life. Call us.
GROUP666-6662 S.Miami.
PATHFINDERS QROUP 666-6662 S. Miami.
Listen to
The Voice off Jewish Activism
Every Sunday Morning at 9:00 10:00 a.m.
WBSS 98 AM on your Radio Dial
The Most Controversial and Thought Provoking
Jewish Program in the Country.
Oasis Motel
Low monthly rents, all utilities included, pool.
Walking distance to Orthodox Temple. Please
call manager at:
865-9875
MECHAYEH FISH
6th STREET AND MERIDIAN AVENUE
(ACROSS FROM CARNIVAL FRUIT)
MIAMI BEACH
673-1664
FREE
DELIVERIES
SHOMER SHABBOS
OWNED MANAGED
Open Sun. Sept. 4 and Mon. Labor Day Sept. 5
Closing at 4 pm Wed. Sept. 7
Erev Rosh Hashanah.
. Closed Sept. 8,9,10 For
Rosh Hashanah and Shabbat Shuvah
Open Sunday Sept. 11.
Mon to Thurs 8:00 am to 6:30 pm
PHONE
ORDERS
UNDER
ORTHODOX
RABBINICAL
COUNCIL
SUPERVISION
Long Distance
Increases
Floridians will make more
than 543 million long
distance calls in 1983, an
overall increase in toll calling
of six percent compared to
last year.
"Intrastate long distance
calls will increase the most,"
said Southern Bell spoke-
sman, John Thomas, "going
up nine percent over 1982's
volume, to 312.6 million
calls."
Interstate calls originating
in Florida will also increase
but not nearly as much as
intrastate calling. About 231
million intrastate calls will
originate in Florida in 1983,
about three percent more
than 1982's total.
Thomas reminds callers to
take advantage of the
evening and night discount
periods as well as the special
weekend rate for long
distance calling.
Friday 8 am to 4:30 pm Sunday 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
rierlla's Mail Csapltls I.f III
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Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
" Ye are standing this day all of you before the Lord your
God: your heads, your tribes, your elders, and your officers"
(Deut. 29.9).
NITZAVIM
NITZAVIM "Ye are standing this day all of you before the
Lord your God that thou shouldest enter into the covenant
of the Lord thy God and into His oath which the Lord thy
God maketh with thee this day: that He may establish thee this
day unto Himself for a people, and that He may be unto thee a
God. as He spoke unto thee, and as He swore unto thy fathers,
to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob. Neither with you only do I
make this covenant and this oath, but with him that standeth
here with us this day before the Lord our God, and also with him
that is not here with us this day The secret things belong
unto the Lord our God: but the things that are revealed belong
unto us and to our children for ever, that we may do all the
words of this law" iDeuteronomy 29.9-28). "I call heaven and
earth to witness against you this day, that I have set before thee
life and death, the blessing and the curse: therefore choose life,
that thou mayest live, thou and thy seed" (Deuteronomy 30.19).
..."And Moses wrote this law, and delivered it unto the priests
. and unto all the elders of Israel'
(Deut. 31.9).
VAYELEKH
VAYELEKH "And Moses went and spoke these words unto
all Israel. And he said unto them: 'I am a hundred and twenty
years old this day. I can no more go out and come in, and the
Lord hath said unto me:'Thou shalt not go over this Jordan. .'
And Moses called unto Joshua and said unto him in the sight of
all Israel: 'Be strong and of good courage, for thou shalt go with
this people into the land which the Loru hath sworn unto their
fathers to give them: and thou shalt cause them to inherit it
. .' And Moses wrote this law. and delivered it unto the
priests the sons of Levi. that bore the ark of the covenant of the
Lord, and unto all the elders of Israel. Now therefore write
ye this song for you, and teach thou it the children of Israel; put
it in their mouths, that this song may be a witness for Me
against the children of Israel" (Deuteronomy 31.1-19).
^The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and
based upon "Tha Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," sditsd by
P. Wollman Tsamir, $15, published by Shengold. Tha volume is avail-
able at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is
president of tha society distributing tha volume.)
ADL to Present Catalogue
Of Books, Jewish Education
Material at Moscow Fair
NEW YORK (JTA) A
special 54-page catalogue listing
more than 1,000 book titles,
records and educational materials
of Jewish content and interest
will be distributed by the
Association of Jewish Book
Publishers at the Fourth Moscow
International Book Fair in the
Soviet Union Sept. 6-12, it was
reported here.
The catalogue, prepared by the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, also contains a wealth of
supplementary material in
Russian translation.
Included are an article on the
range and diversity of Jewish
book publishing in the United
States, short descriptions of all
the Jewish holidays, Jewish
prayers, traditional Jewish
recipes, including one for haman-
Lashen, Jewish melodies and
Srics, a listing of Jewish
lympic prize winners of all
countries from 1896 to 1976, and
a multi-color foldout of the
alphabet in Hebrew and Russian.
According to Abraham
Foxman. ADL's associate
national director and head of its
international affairs division,
10,000 copies of the catalogue
have been printed to accommo-
date the expected demand. He
said a similar catalogue
distributed at the Fair two years
ago "was snapped up by Soviet
Jews who mobbed the exhibit."
Foxman said that ADL
regards the display of Jewish
books at the Moscow Fair every
two years as one of the most
significant contributions made
by the American Jewish commu-
nity to the maintenance of Jewish
life and culture in the USSR.
"Soviet Jews demonstrated
their feelings in 1981," he
declared, "by the overwhelming
enthusiasm of their response,
with many of them travelling ten
to 12 hours and standing in long
lines just to attend the Fair and '
touch their Jewish roots."
Deborah Meeting Set
Frances Hirechkop and Bea
Rosenfeld, members of the
Greater Miami Chapter of Debo-
rah, will present entertainment at
the group's next scheduled meet-
ing, for Sept. 6. The event will
take place at the American
Savings Bank, Lincoln Road at 1
p.m.
Transportation to Meal Site Announced
Jewish Vocational Service Nu-
tritional Project announces the
availability of transportation to
its Senior Citizen Meal Site at the
Biscay ne Elementary School,
800-77th St., Miami Beach. The
service will begin Monday, Sept.
12.
The project provides nutri-
tious, hot Kosher meals daily,
Monday through Friday, to per-
sons 60 and older.
Transportation will be avail-
able from the following locations:
Sherry Frontenac Hotel, 6565
Collins Ave., 3 p.m.; Super X
Drugs, 69th St. and Collins Ave.,
3 p.m.; corner of Byron Ave. and
72nd St., across the street from
North Shore Recreation Center,
3:05 p.m.; North Shore Commu-
nity Center, 73rd St., east of Col-
lins Ave., 3:05 p.m.; North Shore
Library, 75th St. and Collins
Ave., 3:10 p.m.; and Harding
Ave., 83rd St., 81st St., 79th St.,
and 77th St., 3:15 p.m.
ADAM BROWN
Adam L. Brown, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Harvey L. Brown, will
be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah Saturday morning at
Beth Torah Congregation, with
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. spiritual
leader, conducting the services.
Adam will be inducted into his
responsibilities as a member of
the adult Jewish community, and
he will conduct a portion of the
Sabbath morning service. A kid-
dush cup will Be presented to him
on behalf of the Mollie Kahaner
Sisterhood of Beth Torah, and a
Bible on behalf of its Men's Club-
Adam is an eighth grade honor
student at the Samuel Scheck
Hillel Community Day School.
His favorite hobby is computers.
Among the guests attending
will be maternal grandparents,
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Adelman of
Philadelphia and paternal grand-
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin
Brown of Philadelphia.
Mr. and Mrs. Brown will host
the kiddush following services.
LAURIE ROSENBLOOM
Laurie Rosenbloom, daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. Fred Rosen-
bloom, will be called to the Torah
as a Bat Mitzvah on Saturday at
Temple Beth Sholom of Greater
Miami. Dr. Leon Kronish. spirit-
ual leader, will officiate.
Laurie is a student of the Con-
firmation Class of 5745.
MfTZVANMT
NATIONAL BRANDS
Pierre Cordin
PobnBeoch
I Other*
Regular*
Huskies
Sliins-AII Sins
DORWIN'S
1572 WASHINGTON AVE.
S3? 4061
Synagogue
Listing
Candlellng
Time: 7:261
TEMPLE A0ATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947- ,435
Rabbi Simch* Freedman
Cintor Ian Alpern Conservative
Frt, Mi pa, !** &* Jwaam
fuaaa.!
Sat, 10 pm. SoHchot Pro***
Sermon at eMMtM. Rabbi st
**
tmmm "Facing aw New Veer."
an i iim* hum. w m em Ttej
8 am and 7:15 pm Frt. 8 am and 7:15 pm.
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saluman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchinskv. Cant"'
Frt-. Shabbat Era Sanrtoa Sat, fc*S am, and
US pm. Noah Haahanah Sontoee- Wad,
Thura, Frt. Thura, 8.15pm, Roah Haahanah
TEMPLE BETr' AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Or. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
James L Simon, Associate Rabbi
Frt, 7:30, Rabbi Simon-Tha Fifth Com-
mendmont AppSaa to Faraate Too."
Sac. n.Uam, Waal HKtaaH. JeWrey Bhanaal,
Ha* aaaat Sat. taaakaM. S-Uohet Samoa.
Rabbi Baumgard to conduct. Social hour M
precede at 10 pm. Wad, a-30 B pm.
Ere* Roeh Heeheneh, Thura.. S-.30 am. 1 30
Ml am Naah Heehaw*.
Rabbi Baumgard and Rabbi Simon
_______ tooawdaet aawlcaa
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
ITOIWaahlngton^
Miam, Beach *
lry^Lahrm,n,p-bb(
Zvt AdMK. Cantor
a* "-*Tflatjoi
at, 11 am aaaohoi slM'T*'
wad. Ml am Roah Maaw2?r
atTCeAendSeJr!!!-?1
have, and Fit, ioeso n BaZeC
*TOA.a-0Dlltn^fjMa4i
HEBREW ACADEMY
ETHEL CONGREGATION
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Scnrtl
TEMPLE ISRAEL
01 Greater Miami
Miami'l Pionamt Kt'otm Congregatioa
[137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, RU.
DonakJP.C^anrnan.Assisw,,!
Jacob Q. Bornsteln, Cantor ,
Rachelle Nelson, Student Co*I
PNIIp Qoldln, Exec. Dlr.
Fn,pm.Kanda,nab6IBamal.a,
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way 2625 S W 3rd Arenaae i,
South Oada 7500SW 120th SVeet I' jK1'
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH '>
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Oada Chap*
Frt, 8 pm. Youth Raunton Shabbat
Coral Way Sanctuary
Sat, 9 am. Shebbet Servtcee Bar Mltweh.
Adam Block and Laonld Amman aj USSR.
Sat, Midnight. SoHchot Service. (Seminar and
recaption to precede at 10 pm) Wad, 7 pm. Era*
Roeh Haahanah. Thura.. 8:15 am and 7 pm. Roeh
Haahanah. Frt, CIS am. Roeh Haahanah.
mown. Rabbi Ceehmen: -Th,TaH
lom.-S*t,10pm.Saawlmml
onr, Wed.Spm En* to *,J
Thura, 10 am. Roah Heehann
Roeh Haahanah Santeaa at Deb) Col.
Auditorium. Rabbi Bamat u Conaa I
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Re
Coral Gables 6674
Michael B. Eisenstat, Rabbi
Fit, fc15 pm. Sabbath Ere Sankm
Sat, 11 pm. SoHchot Sanrtcaa. precede at 10:30 pm)
Wad, S em Era* Roah Haahanah. Thm, BJ
Roah Haahanah. Frt, 10 am, Roah r
BETH KODcSH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Saturday Semcee-Sto am and 8:30 pm
aMm*
Sanrtcaa-8 am and 8:30 pm
Wadaaaday. Mi pm. Enw Roah Haahanah.
Thoredey, 8 am, Roah Haahanah
Friday.Sam. Roah Haahanah.
Rabbi Shapiro wta dwjeuee, -Whara ara Thy
d-Thra*ighSBnWeOro*i,'
TEMPLE BETH MOoHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorfinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Fit, S pm. Shabbat Eva Servtcee
Sat, Sam. Shabbat Morning Santeaa fl'
Sat, aadnteht. laiohol Setvtooo.
(Social hour to precede at 10:30 p.m.)
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Danny Tadmore, Cantor
Frt, 7 30 pm
Sat .9 Mam
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach331411
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat, Mtdntght. SalIchot Samcai
Wad, 7 JO pm. Era* Roah Haahanah
Thura, em 7:30 pm. Roah Heehaw*
Frt, am. Roah Haahanah.
TEMPLE NERTAMID
Conservative
7902 Carlyle Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
let, 10:30 pm, SoHchot Wad, 7 pm. Era*
Haahanah. Thura. and Frt, 8 am. Hoah K
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B. I ;3139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Malber
Cantor Nlaaim Benyamlnl
Weekday eenteoo S am end Ml em.
Saturday morning aorvtooa Mi am
TEMPLE BETH 5HOLO,.;
Chase Ave. A 41st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon "ronish, Rabbi Liberal
Fn, M pm, O. Kranteh: -MA Amhwsary of
t^taarchonWaahteotoii What Hapaanad to
taDnaamT-.SaUIOMam.aatMltnah.Laumi
Roaonbteom. Wad, kit A Ml am Era* Roah
Haahanah Thura. ? 15 am 3 15 pm, Roah
HoahaiiaKFnvaiaia.RoohHaohonoh.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Sat. Morning, Bar Mhnah o< Adam I. Brawn.
San,10:pm,Sa*lehotSwYlc Wad, hNncha.
f|am Era* Roah Haahanah Maori*, MS am.
Thura Frt, Shacharit, 8 am Torah Raadlng.
*1 am Shoter. 10 am ahraal. MM am
IVHoavThiai.iaiS,. Maadt.ftaiam
Fn,lonha-llaa*.7Bm
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971-Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDAU|
S.W. 154 Ave. and 75 St.
Rabbi Warren Kasztl
Modern Orthodox
382-3343 M24
FH, 7 pm. Sabbath Eva Sanrtcaa S*-**.L
Sabbath Sanrtcaa. Sat. ahnha 20 Mmutai*"I
Pa|iiiuiiaiMii*n)iina*m'**l
ra-School RaoUtiaiion kx lal I
Prf>-Sctx>o
Ragtatrafon h
BETH YOSESEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwalg, Rabbi
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscay ne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schlff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone. _.576-4000
Rabbinical Association Office
TEMPLE SINAI 1B801 NE22H.|
North Dado's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingc>y, Rabbi 932-901)|
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administratv I
Frt, MM MMH. a-**^-
andSaoaaaaborBtrtMaya SaU '**
WorahteSorvtea-Sat, iaWmaM. aa*Mn|
(yvacadadbyaSoclalallOaal
Wad, 8pm, Era* Roah Haaha-A
Thara, artftSS am. Roah h^atoa*
Frt, MESS am "aah n^ahaadi
TEMPLE ZION Constrvati*
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benjamin Adler, Cantor
Ptl_eiSamSabbaE*aa*iPi*
Set, Ml am Bar MjfMJHB (I
Sa,aSayile>I.S9SQhn(FraeaddBr*-
Thiaa S. 10. 11 am Roah Haar
Tma^ 7 em Teelaleh. 7jaiSarda
FW-S.10,11
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
ata a UWvaraR* Or, FlamaOan. ***
*7tO** HarabJWtohna. a.acuma"*
FrankHn D. Xraotaar. raelonal praaMa*
UNiONOFATMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Of flea Prk, 37
NW82 Ave., Suits 210. Miami.II
33166, 592-4792. Rabbi LswifC
Llttmsn. regional dlraclo'



Jewisr
JWV National Ladies Auxffiary JCC 50th Year Gala Set
sident Elected at Convention
nCe Goldberg of Hazlet,
) elected president of the
Inal Ladies Auxiliary,
I War Veterans of America
Lth annual convention last
i Goldberg has been an
member of the Bayshore
for almost 25 years,
& as its founding presi-
, was later elected Mon-
LOcean County president
fso held various chairs and
5 in the Department of New
Elected Department
! t in 1974, she has con-
fto serve as leadership and
izing chairman until this
dberg was appointed sery-
Ji's service chairman in
bnd she received an award
Today's Prominent Miamians
Spent Their Youth There
Florence Goldberg
trom the National USO and was
invited to attend their conven-
tion. She has served as a national
guard, membership chairman,
conductress, hospital and adopt -
a-hospital chairman, chaplain,
community relations chairman,
action and Jewish affairs chair-
man, junior vice president, lead-
ership chairman, senior vice pres-
ident, and organizing chairman.
She was also honor roll and
awards chairman and served on
many committees at national
conventions.
Diverse personalities sharing a
common thread in the past, many
currently prominent Miamians
spent their youth at the YMH A.
People like attorneys, Marshall
Harris, Murray Dubin, and
Robert Traurig; judges, Sidney
Aronovitz, Seymour Gelber,
Milton Friedman, Irving Cypen,
and Moe Tend rich; bankers,
Herschel Rosenthal and E.
Albert Pallet.
Representative Kenneth
Myers; realtors, Clifford Such-
man and Leonard Rosen; physi-
cians, Alan Cohen, Philip Samet,
and Arthur Gilbert; business-
men, Leonard Luria, Norton
Pallot, and Joe Novel.
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard of
Temple Beth Am; Morton Silber-
man, past president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion; and Fred Shochet, editor
and publisher of the Jewish
Floridian.
All spent their youth at the
Young Men's Hebrew Asso-
ciation (YMHA), which later
became the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida.
This year the JCC is
celebrating its 50th anniversary
with a reunion and dinner dance
Saturday evening, Oct. 8 at the
Herschel Rosenthal
Four Ambassadors Hotel to com-
memorate the years of service to
the community and to remember
the good times these members
and hundreds of others had at the
"Y" and JCC.
Herschel Rosenthal, 50th anni-
versary chairman, past president
of the YMHA and president of
Flagler Federal Savings and
Loan Association, said, "We are
looking for the people who grew
up in Miami and for whom the Y'
and the JCC were important
influences in their lives, to get to-
gether, renew old times, and cele-
brate the 50th year of this great
organization."
Channel 2 to Host
Tabachnikoff, Schiff
Interviews with Rabbi Barry
Tabachnikoff, immediate past
president of the Rabbinical Asso-
ciation of Greater Miami, and
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, executive
vice president, will highlight a
half-hour documentary on the
Jewish New Year, "Thoughts on
a New Year" Tuesday, 10 p.m.,
on WPBT-Channel2.
Host Richard Peritz will ex-
plore meaning and tradition of
the High Holy Day season, and
location scenes in Israel and a
segment on how young and old
South Florida Jews interpret the
meaning of the holidays will also
be featured.
H. Ramsey has been
\d executive vice presi-
of American Savings
%age Corporation and its
lidiary, American
iern Mortgage Corpora-
according to an an-
cement hy Morris N.
president and chief
ttive officer. Ramsey
American Savings in
is senior vice president,
jpment.
ish Radio Program
tegin Here Sunday
[Jewish radio program, "The
of Jewish Activism," will
broadcasting on WBSS 98
padio every Sunday from 9 to
Tm beginning this weekend,
rding to radio host, Victor
fcier.
ihe Voice of Jewish
|vism" has become noted in
York for its positions that
[sometimes considered un-
plar, such as the view that
fan Jews have no future
and that what happened in
| Germany can happen in the
. according to the host,
he New York program has
I organized demonstrations
Soviet Jewry, opposed Peace
^demonstrations, and held
kly classes and meetings to
pe Jewish awareness among
pg Jews.
1/ Manager Named
Hvid Schneider, general
Mger of El Al Israel Airlines,
I announced the appointment
|fraim Lanir as cargo manager
'lorth America.
^nir brings solid experience,
with innovative ideas to
new position," Schneider
nented. "We are confident
proven talents will allow
1 to maintain and expand
its position as a leading
to carrier."
New Year's
Resolutions:
? I promise never to over-cook one
of Falls' tender chickens.
DI promise never to be caught without
chicken soup after the first frost.
? I promise never to drown our
chicken in so much sauce that you
can't taste the chicken.
DI promise never to nosh while
carving a chicken so my family has to
fight for the white meat that's left.
DI promise never to have a holiday
dinner without Falls poultry as the star
of the meal.
Wishing you a
happy, healthy
New Year
from everyone at
Falls Poultry.
The finest in quality kosher poultry since 1935.
.'.%, *"


rz&rtVTs TEtfJewish KlohcGan Triday, SeptemBer 2,1983

NOTICE OF ACT ION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELE VE NTH JU Dl CIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLO RI DA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Acne* Ne. 63-24M6
ACTION PON DISSOLUTION
OFMARIIAOI
INRE TtwMirrt^ol
RONME8HULAM
Petitioner
and
tana asjDua
in the circuit court
for
0ade county. florida
proiate division
Fim nmmmt sMM
DU'MrrW
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAXLEPOW
in thc circuit count
for
dads county, florida
prorate division
fh Niim ms
HhrNURM
INRE ESTATE OF
MTR LAM WE IN BERG
S-k-S MIRIAM W. HTRSH
T" TiniMIiiiiiii
Mian OMehnri
YOU ARC HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that An Action lor Disso-
lution of Maniac* ** baa
fllad agatnat you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
wTtttoa datoaaaa. if any, to tt oa
Marva Gay, attorney tor PeU-
ttooar. whoa* ajjaaaj is 133M
So. Dlato Highway Miami.
Florida SSlta, and fDa the origi-
nal with the dark of tha above
at/lad court oa or batora Rsp-
tambar 99, iau. nTaaratoa a
default win t>* entered against
you tor tha raltof itooiaadail to
tha com plain t or r^rin
Thla nottoa shall ba published
aacuttr* wnai hi THE JEW
IBH FLORrPIAN.
WTTNES8 my hand and tha
aaal of amid court at Miami.
Florida on thla 39th day of Au-
gust 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clark, Circuit Court
Dada County, Florida
By D.C. Bryant
Ad Derxity Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal I
Marvi Gay
NATIONAL LAW FIRM OF
GERALD KAISER. P.C.
122X1 So. Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida tolM
Attorney for Petitioner
12211 September 2. 9;
__________________ia.to.lNM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOFROFRRTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADI COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-304 74
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MANUEL ALFARO,
Huaband
and
ROSA ALFARO,
Wife
TO: ROSA ALFARO
Villa FaUma
Calle 20. No. 1772
Barrio Comlbol.
La Pas. Bolivia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED thru an action for
Dlaaolutlon of Marriage baa
been filed agalnat you and you
are required to aerve a copy of
your written defanaaa, if any. to
it on ALBERT L. CARRI
CARTE, P.A.. attorney for
Petitioner, whoee addreaa la
2401 N.W. 7th Street. Miami,
Florida S8126. and file the
original with the Clark of the
above ityled court on or before
October 7, IMS: otherwise a
default will be entered agalnat
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
Thla notice ahall be pubUahad
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
aaal of said court at Miami,
Florida on thla 80th day of
Auguat.lSSS.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
AS Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Albert L. Carrlcarta, P.A.
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami, Florida 18126
12282 September 2,9.
_____________ii, a, ism
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious names Mr.
Special; Pan Americana; In-
teramericana at 1496 N. W.
28rd Street. Miami. Florida
38142 Intends to register said
namee with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
Pan American
Frozen Foods, Inc.,
a Florida corporation
Laxaro Munarrls,
Prealdent
Leonard J. Kalian, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
12288 September 2.9;
______________________16, 28.1988
-------NOTiei under
FICTITIOUS NAMR LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
dealrtng to engage in business
under the fictitious name ES-
TRADA AUTO SUPPLY at (L)
910 West Slat Street. Hlaleah.
Florida 33012 Intend* to regis-
ter said name with the Clark of
the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Rlcardo Estrada
12280 September 2,9;
16, 22.19SS
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of tha ea-
tat* af MAX LEPOW.
deceased. Flic Number 83-7086,
la pending In the Circuit Court
tor Dada County.
Probate Drrteton, the
of which I* 78 Woat Flaglar
Florida, 88180
the personal
atlves attorney are act torth
AD
required to file with thla court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OP THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims agalnat the estate and
12) any objection by an tn
ta rested paraon to whom notice
was malted that challenge* tha
validity of tha will, the
qualifications of Oka SR*a***aJ
r*pr**ntatlve, venue, or
Jurtsdaetion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT BO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of Una None* baa
begun on September 2, 1993.
Peraonal RepreeentaUv*:
NEIL IRWIN LXPOW
210 Shell Point Road.
MaJUand. Florida 82761
Attorney for Peraonal
Representative
ABRAHAM A OALBUT. ESQ.
OALBUT. OALBUT AND
MENTM. P.A..
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida, ISise
Telephone: 672-8100
12284 September 2,9,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Lul-
lmo, Inc. at 2118 N.E. 128rd
Street, N. Miami. FL intend* to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Morris Yclkaon
Lulu Yclkaon
GulUermo Sostchin. Eaq.
Attorney for LuUmo, Inc.
1401 W Flagler St
Suite 201
Miami. FL 88180
122*8 Septembers, 9;
___________________16,28.1968
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO FROFERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-3067*
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
INRE: The Marriage of
JO ANN RODRIGUEZ,
PeUUonar
and
GEORGE RODRIGUEZ,
Respondent.
TO: GEORGE RODRIGUEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage baa
been filed agalnat you and you
are required to aerve a copy of
your written defense*, If any. to
It on MELVIN J. ASHER.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whoee addreaa la i860 8.W. Sth
Street, Suite 206, Miami,
Florida. S81M, and file the ori-
ginal with the clerk of tha
above styled court on before
September 80, 1988; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
eeal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 80th day of
Auguat.lSSS
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clark, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
by Clarlnda Brown
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12286 September 2,9;
__________________IB. as, IBM
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 83-30160
INRE: The Marriage of:
MARTHURIN J. NOEL.
PeUUoner-Husbend,
and
MARY BLASH NOEL,
Respondent Wife
TO: MARY BLASH NOEL.
Residence unknown.
ahaU serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Dlaao-
lutlon of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attor-
ney, 612 N.W. 13th Avenue,
Miami, Florida. 88186, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before September 80, 1988,
otherwise a default will be en-
tered.
August 26,1988.
RICHARD BRINKER
By N. A. Hewett
Deputy Clerk
12216 September 2,9;
16,23.1988
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of MIRIAM WEDfBERO
a-k-a MIRIAM W. HTRSH. de
ceased. File Number 83-600, la
pending In the Circuit Court for
DADE County. Florida, Pro-
bate Division, tha addreaa of
which to T Weat Fkagtor Street.
Florida. 88180 The
drisaas of the
lejaieenlatln and
ipreeentaUVs
attosuey are eat torth below.
AD Int* rested persons are re
la alert to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FTRET PUBLICATION
OP THIS NOTICE (1) all
claims agalnat the estate and
121 any objection by an inter-
ested paraon to whom notice
waa mailed that challenges tha
validity of the win. the quattfl-
eaOana of the peraonal repre-
aantatrve. venue, or Jurtodle
tton of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this NoUc* baa
begun on September S, 1981.
Personal Representative
HYMAN P. OALBUT
to Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 88139
Attorney for Peraonal
Representative ABRAHAM A
OALBUT. ESQ.
GALBUT, GALBUT A MENTN.
P.A..
9M Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida. S31S9
Telephone: 673-8100
13216 8eptemberl,9.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Fil*NUmb*r8J4*44
Division 93
INRE: ESTATE OF
MARIANNE KORN
WECHSLER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OF DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of MARIANNE
KORN WECHSLER. deceased.
File Number 8S-8866. Is pending
tn the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the addreaa of which is 78
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 83180. The personal
representative of the estate is
BORIS VlASMENSKY. whose
addreaa la 884 North Shore
Drive, Miami Beach. Florida
The name and address of the
peraonal representatives at-
torney are aet forth below.
Ursula Metxger, WeUlach
and Metxger, P.A., 161 Almcria
Ave.. Suite 200-E Coral Gables.
Florida 88184.
All persona having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and addreaa of tha creditor or
Ma agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when it
will become due shaJl be
stated. If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated If the claim to se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each
personal representative
All persona interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
NoUce of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
Jectlone they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quail
flcaUona of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT 80
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: Septembers. 1868.
Boris Viasmenaky
Aa Personal Representative-
of the Estate of
MARIANNE KORN
WECHSLER
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
RE PRESENTATTVE:
Ursula Metxger
WeUlsch and Metxger P.A.
161 Almerla Ave.. Suite 200-E
Coral Gable*, Florida 88184
12239 September 2,9,1988
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OP FLORIDA
COUNTY OP DADE
The undersigned, under oath,
says; It la the intention of (
" to
fictitious name of BEEPERS
OF DADE located at 8688 Flag-
lar Street In tha city of Coral
Gables. Dada County, Florida.
Tho** Interested la said, en-
terprise, and the extent of the
tntereet of each. Is ss toilows
tlOOl
Joy A. Millar
8688 Weat FlagterSti
Coral Oabtoa. Florida
Attorney: Martin Starr
706 South Dixie Highway
September 3. 9;
16.3
NOTICS OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE E LE VE NTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil AcHOS) Na. 8J-16744
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
INRE The Marriage of
JOSEPTMA R PEREZ.
WU*
and
OUILLERMO JULIAN
PEREZ
Husband
TO: GulUermo Julian Peres
Unlt24-F
71S3 S.W.I 15th Place
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to aerve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to tton
Manuel Zalac. attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 180
8.E. 2nd Ave.. Suit* 610,
Miami. Fla. 38131. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 30. 1983; otherwise
a default will be entered
agalnat you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or pe-
tition.
Thla notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secuUve weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 26 day of Au-
gust. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Manuel Zalac
160 S E 2nd Ave. Suite 610
Miami. Fla. 83131
Attorney for Petitioner
12219 Septembers. 9:
16.23.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 63-30047
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
SAMUEL NIEVE8,
PeUUonar.
and
CARMEN GARCIA RIVERA
Respondent.
TO: Mrs.Carmen
Garcia Rivera
Camino Luciano Vasques
Buxon8S2RSD,
RutaNo. 6
Cupey Alto.
Rio Pledras, P R
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an actton for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed agalnat you and you are
required to aerve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
EMILIO C PASTOR, ESQ.. at-
torney for PeUUonar. whose
address is 166 South Miami
Avenue. Penthouse I. Miami,
Florida 83130, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Sep-
tember 30, 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
Thla notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on thla 24 day of Au-
gust, 988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EMILIO C. PASTOR. P.A.
Penthouse I
166 South Miami Avenue
Miami, Florida 88180
Attorney for PeUUonar
September 2.9.19. 38, 1983
13314
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT i*.
DAMCOUNTY.&T
PettUoner-Wlfe
and
MERCTDIEN PIErr,
RPondnt-Husb*nd'
To: MERCTDIEN pnrRB,
Raaldsnc. unknown***;
^r^copyof voutam^I
Ote PeUtton for Waa^J
%*"*>" MOW.
NICHOLAS, Attorney, mi,,'
IE* Avenue vtlaml IW
at* and file M|S1
Court Clerk on J* j
September 30, 1981: ottervhl
a default will be enter*!-.
DATED: August a, 8JBJ
RICHARD BRINKER
By: N.A. HEWETr
'PNtnbam
AFFIDAVIT UNDO
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE.
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
aa:
Tha undersigned, under o
aava; It U the intention o
undaralgnad to angagt ,
business enterprise undar fc
factitious name of ALL not
IDA COMMUNICATIONlm
located at MSB Wast riart.
Street In the city of Coma*
tee, Dade County. Florida [
Those Interested u aUd I
terprtas, and the extend of Oa I
Interest of each, ia as follovi:
Interest 100 percent
Joy A. Miller
3688 West Flagler Strait
Coral Gablee. Florida SUB
Attorney: Martin Starr
9708 South Dixie Highway
Miami. Fla. 83158-2923
13336 September!*!
____________________16.33.lRll
IN THE CIRCUIT COUtT
FOR
DADR COUNTY FLORID! |
PROBATE DIVISION
Fil* No. 93-4141 (CPU)
INRE: ESTATE OF
HYMAN BE NE ZRA.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVMSl
CLAIMS OR DEMANDll
AGAINST THE ABOVll
ESTATE AND ALL OTHdI
PERSONS INTERESTED
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTtl
FIED that the admlnHtnUal
of the estate of HTOAll
BENEZRA. deceased. Fhl
Number 83-6142 iCP Ml, k|
pending in the Circuit Court at I
Dade County. Florida. Probik|
Division, the addreaa of i "
Is Dade County Courthoual
Third Floor. 73 Wet Flips I
Street. Miami, Florid* JBtl
The personal representative!!
the estate is Alnalee R Ferial
whoa* addreaa Is Suite 215. n: I
Ponce de Leon Blvd.. Owl I
Gables, Florida 33134 Tkl
name and address of tol
personal repreeent*tlv'l|
attorney are set forth below
All persons having clalmivl
demands agalnat the estate in I
required. WITHIN THRU I
MONTHS FROM THE DATl]
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. tofD*
with the clerk of the abon
court a written statement a
any claim or demand theymij I
have. Each claim muit be k
writing and must Indicate lb
basis for the claim, the nan*
and addreaa of the creditor or
hie agent or attorney, and B
amount claimed If the claim J
not yet due. the date what I
will become due ihall "
stated. If the claim la conta
gent or unliquidated. BJ
nature of the uncertainty *a
be stated. If the claim U J
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, ib
deliver aufflclent copleeofW
claim to the clerk to enable
clerk to mail one copy to eao
peraonal representative
All persons interested M B4
estate to whom a copy of 99J
NoUc* of Admlnlatratlon w
been mailed are reqtttj*
WITHIN THREE M0NTW
FROM THE DATE OF THI
FIRST PUBLICATION 0T
THIS NOTICE, to file any
lections they may have aw
challenges the validity of *
decadent's will, the ***
flcadons of the personal rep
resentattve, or the venue <
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT
FILED WILL BE FOBIVW
Br5teBof the first pubUcaW
of this NoUc* of Admlnl*
tration: Friday. September*.
1988.
Alnalee R. Ferdle
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
HYMAN BENEZRA,
Deceased
Attorney for Personal
Representative
FERDIE ANDGOLZ
Suit* 216 _d
717 Pone* os Leon **
Coral Gables, FL 88184
Telephone: (80B)446-3M7
imi SentemberJ.*,"8*
12334
Septemt
BJBJ


iblicNotice
'|N THE CIRCUIT COURT
DE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Fli* Nymbnr u-ian
Division (M)
JrE: ESTATE OF
[lIieBelleCaln
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
ALL PERSONS HA VINO
AIMS OR DEMANDS
rjAINST THE ABOVE ES-
kTE AND ALL OTHER
IRSONS INTERESTED IN
JESTATE:
rOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
JD that the administration
the estate of MaeBelle Cain,
leeaied. File Number 883892,
Lending In the Circuit Court
\ Dsde County, Florida, Pro-
le Division, the address of
[irh Is 78 West Flagle r Street,
ml, Florida. The personal
esentatlve of the estate la
[LSON ROSENFELD,
Use address Is 8000 Blscayne
, Miami, Florida. The
j and address of the per-
1 representative's attorney
I et forth be low.
I persons having claims or
i against the estate are
ed, WITHIN THREE
pNTHS FROM THE DATE
THE FIRST PUBLICA-
DN OF THIS NOTICE, to Ola
the clerk of the above
a written statement of
t claim or demand they may
it Each claim must be In
Itlng and must Indicate the
(is for the claim, the name
I address of the creditor or
| agent or attorney, and the
nt claimed. If the claim la
yet due, the date when It
become due shall be
ed. If the claim la contln-
or unliquidated, the
ure of the uncertainty shall
I stated. If the claim la sa-
ted, the security shall be de
Ibed The claimant, snail
liver sufficient copies of the
llm to the clerk to enable the
rk to mall one copy to each
rial rep re sentatlve.
I persons Interested In the
te to whom a copy of this
ice of Administration has
mailed are required,
-UN THREE MONTHS
|0M THE DATE OF THE
UST PUBLICATION OF
IS NOTICE, to file any ob
lions they may have that
Ulenges the validity of the
^edent's will, the quail-
sllona of the personal rep-
entatlve. or the venue or
ladlctlon of the court.
I-l. CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
|D OBJECTIONS NOT SO
SD WILL BE FOREVER
IRRED
Date of the first publication
I this Notice of Admlnlatra-
August28.1B83.
| NELSON ROSENFELD
Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MaeBelle Cain
Deceased
3RNEY FOR PERSONAL
pRESENTATTVE:
8EPH W. MALEK
'Lincoln RoadSuite 001
nl Beach, Florida SS1S9
lephone: 308-538-4481
I*6 August 28;
September 2.1983
"NTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 63-480*
Division 02
pNRE: ESTATE OF
BESSIE H. SHERMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of BESSIE H. SHERMAN,
deceased, File Number 83-6809,
l pending in the Circuit Court
Jor DADE County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address
which Is 78 West Flagler
^Jreet, Miami, Florida. 38180.
fhe names and addresses of
the personal representative
land the personal represents
Jive a attorney are aet forth be-
llow.
All Interested persona are re-
HKS ,0 "le with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
[THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
112) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenge, the
validity of the will, the quallfl-
enuuve, venue, or jurledlc-
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
IE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
egun on August M, 1988.
fT!^*1 RP'>t*thre:
h AE H. SCHNEIDERMAN
Apt 12A. 101 Collins Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida. 88180
Attorney for Personal
JPfesentaUej:
ll?^*11 *- QALBUT. ESQ.
Wjr?ATOALBUr*MN-
^WashingtonAvenue
JfWJBeach. Florida, 33139
j,~!J>hone 872-1100
August 36;
Septembers. MM
Friday, September 2,1963 / The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name A
SEWING SERVICE, at 117B
N.W. 29th. Street, Miami.
Florida, Intends to register
aid name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
ALEIDA TORREN8
1U*> August IB, 28;
___________September 2.8.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADR COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 83-2**04
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
NESTOR R. AY ALA.
Petitioner,
and
OLYMPIA A Y ALA,
Respondent.
TO: OLYMPIA AY ALA
5866 Mission Street,
San Francisco,
California
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
LAWRENCE M. SHOOT, esq ,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 8000 Blscayne Blvd..
Suite No. US. Miami, Florida
S3137, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before September
24, 1988; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This not I ce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 23 day of Au-
gust, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K Shaw
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Lawrence M. Shoot, Eaq.
3000 Blscayne Blvd. -No. SIB
Miami. Florida 88137
Telephone: (806)878-0010
Attorney for Petitioner
11197 August 28;
September 2, 9.18,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 83 29779
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
REYNA ZALDTVAR.
Petitioner,
and
OSCAR ROBERTO RAMIREZ.
Respondent.
TO: OSCAR ROBERTO
RAMIREZ
Barrio Concepclon
CaaaNo. 420
Frente a la
Drogueria Naclonal
Tegucigalpa,
Honduras
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
addreea Is 1800 S.W. 8th Street.
Suite 208. Miami. Florida 88186,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 23,
1988; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of Au-
gust. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
12210 AuguatM;
September 2.9.16.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
SOUTH FLORIDA AUTOMOT-
IVE DISTRIBUTORS at BAY
FB, BS87 S.W. list Street. W.
Hollywood, Florida 88028 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
STANLEY E. GOODMAN
Attorney for JET AUTO
PARTS WHAREHOUSE DIS-
TRIBUTORS. INC.
12200 AugustSJ;
September 2,9.16. ISM
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. S3-1*2*4
NOTICE OF ACTION
FLAOLER FEDERAL
BAVTNOS A LOAN ASSOCIA-
TION OF MIAMI, a United
States Corporation,
Plaintiff,
vs.
ERNESTO PULIDO
TAMAYO.etaL,
Defendants.
TO: ERNESTO PUUDO
TAMAYOand
MTLAQROS PULIDO,
his wife
Ave. Leonardo
Da Vine I No. 6
Ms Monte
Edlf Faure
Caracas. Venesuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a mart-
gate on the following described
property In Dade County, Flor-
ida:
Lot IS. Block of THIRD
ADDITION TO CALUSA CLUB
ESTATES, according to the
Plat thereof, ss recorded In
Plat Book 108, at Page 78, of the
Public Records of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
U any, to It on KEITH, MACK,
LEWIS A ALLISON. Plaintiff's
Attorneys whose address la 111
N.E. First Street, Miami. Flor-
ida 38132, on or before Septem-
ber SI, 1988, and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorneys or Immedtetoly
thereafter; otherwise, a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of this Court on the 18 day of
- August, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: ArdenWong
Deputy Clerk
11194 August 26;
Septembers. 9,18.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 68-2*777
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LILLIAN LUQUIS.
Petitioner,
and
GTLBERTO RODRIGUEZ,
Respondent.
TO: OILBERTO RODRIGUEZ
Realdence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
addreaa is I860 S.W. 8th Street,
Suite 208. Miami, Florida 33136.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 28,
1983: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 28 day of Au-
gust. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12211 August 26;
September 2.9.18,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
Ne. 83-2*6*4
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE SY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
FRITZ ETTENNE,
Petitioner-husband,
and
MONA ETTENNE.
Respondent-wife,
TO: MONA ETTENNE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY re-
quired to file your answer to
the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the
above Court and serve a copy
thereof upon the petitioner's
attorneys, COHEN A COHEN.
623 8. W. 1st Street. Miami,
Fla. 33130, on or before Sep-
tember 80.1988. or else petition
will be confessed
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court, at Miami,
Dade County, Florida, this 28
day of August. 1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
By Clarlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
12200 August 38;
September 2, 9,16,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name IN-
TERIORS BY ODESSA, at
i Miami Decorating and Design
Center. 8841 N.E. 2nd Avenue.
Suite 404. Miami, Florida 88187,
Intends to register such name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
ODESSA UTHGOW
I INTERIORS INC.
BY: ODESSA W. UTHGOW
President
11167 August 13. IB, SS;
L____________September 2, 1983
V> HoTlcl OF ACTION-------
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO.S3-2US4
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE:
SALVATORE BUFFA
and
OnjLIA MISTRETTA
BUFFA
TO: Olulla Mlstrette
Buffa
Via Francesco Colla No. 6
Palermo. Italy
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
| an action for Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
defenses on ALEC ROSS, at-
torney for Petitioner, whoa*
address U 18400 N.E. IS Ave..
Miami. FL 88183, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above court on or before
September 16. 1988; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you.
WITNESS my hand and seal
at Miami, Florida on August IS,
1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
il "4 August 19.36;
Septembers. 9,1988
-*-
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICR
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
civil Action no. n-trrn
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE:
THE ADOPTION OF:
Minor Children
TO: TUL.IO MOREN O
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Adop-
tion has been filed and com-
menced In this Court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to
It on M. CRISTTNA DEL-
VALLE. attorney for Petition-
er, whose addreaa la 86 Grand
Canal Drive. Third Floor.
Miami, Florida 38144. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 28. 1988; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 22 day of Au-
gust. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. Shaw
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12207 August 26;
September 2, 9,16.1888.
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CsisNo.83-116 52
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DEBORAH L. FOSTER.
Wife
and
DARRELL FOSTER,
Husband
TO: DARRELL FOSTER
Residence Addreaa:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage haa been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to it on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq., 15490
N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite 300.
Miami, Florida 38169. on or
before September 38, 1988 and
file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before
service on Petitioner's at-
torney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
Petition.
DATED: August 16.1983
I RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: D.C. BRYANT
Aa Deputy Clerk
11186 August 19. 36;
September 3,9.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT OF
I THR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CsmN0.:bJ2S*47FC1I
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARCO J. MORALES.
Husband
and
JEANETTE T. MORALES,
Wife
TO: JEANETTE T. MORALES
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
, written defenses. If any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq., 16490
I N.W. Tth Avenue. Suite 308.
I Miami. Florida 881 SB, on or be-
fore September 23, 1888 and file
ithe original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or lm-
Imediately thereafter; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
I DATED: August IT. 1988
RICHARD P. BRINKER
I Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
ByK.Selfrted
aa Deputy Clark
,11188 August 26;
September S, S. 18.1SS8
NOTICE UNDER
I FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
dealrlng to engage In business
under the fictitious name CEN-
TRO SEVrLLANO RESTAU-
RANT at 4848 N.W. Tth Street,
Miami. Florida SS1S8 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
', Dade County, Florida.
, Cafeterias Dlverses
Incorporated
! Nathaniel L. Barone, Jr.
Attorney for Applicant
6861 Sunset Drive
So. Miami, Florida 88148
11189 August 26;
September 2, 9.16.1988
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 83-2*404
IN RE: The Marriage of:
SYLVTNA DOBISZEWSKI,
PeUtloner-Wlfe.
and
THOMAS DOBISZEWSKI,
Respondent-Husband.
To: THOMAS DOBISZEWSKI,
Residence unknown,
shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attor-
ney. 613 N.W. 13th Avenue.
Miami, Florida. 38186, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before September 28, 1983.
otherwise a default will be en-
tered.
August 18,1983.
RICHARD BRINKER
By:C. P. Cope land
11196 August 26;
September 2, 9,16,1988
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 63-1 3277 CA-11
S.D.A.OORP..
Plaintiff,
va.
THEODORE WILLIAMS.
ETAL8..
Defendant.
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
TO:
A. Iannelll.a-k-a
Anthony D. Iannelll
8104 S.W. 20th Street
North Lauderdale. Florida
Iannelll, his wife.
ska Andrea C. Iannelll
8104 S.W. 20th Street
North Lauderdale. Florida
YOU A. Iannelll. a-k-a An-
thony D. Iannelll and ....Ian-
nelll, his wife, a-k-a Andrea C.
Iannelll are hereby notified
that complaint to foreclose a
mortgage on the following de-
scribed property:
Lot Forthy-Flve (46) and
Lot Forty-Six (48) Block Four
(4). HENRY FORD SUBDIVI-
SION NUMBER TWO, accord-
ing to the Plat thereof, re-
corded in Plat Book Nine 19). at
Page One Hundred Nineteen
(119) of the Public Records of
Dade County, Florida
haa been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your answer or
pleading thereto upon Elliot L- -
Miller, 938 Arthur Godfrey
Road, Suite 806. Miami Beach.
Florida 33140 and file the origi-
nal answer or pleading with the
Clerk of this Coulrt on or before
the 38 day of September, 1B88.
If you fall to do so, Judgment
by default wUl be taken against
you for the relief demanded
In the amended complaint.
Dated: August33,1MB).
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the above
styled Coulrt
by: D.C.Bryant
Deputy Clerk
12306 AuguatM:
September 3.9.16.1988






Pagel8-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, September 2, 1983


Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
worn
DADE COUNTY, FLO* I DA
PROBATE DIVISION
rmiwnrtiini
IN RE: ESTATE OF
DAMASA BERTA
FERNANDEZ
Deceased
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED tint the administration
at the estate ot DAMASA
BERTA FERNANDEZ, de-
ceased File Number 83-4946. la
pending In the Circuit Court for
DADE County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division the addraaa of
which la 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida. The personal
representative of the estate Is
Jl'LIANA AIDA FERNAN-
DEZ, whose address Is 133B
S W IS Court. Miami. Florida
The name and address of the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below
All persons r. Ins; claims or
demands against the estate are
required WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA
TTON OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's win the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion : August 19. 1983.
JULIANA AIDA FER-
NANDEZ
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
DAMASA BERTA FER-
NANDEZ
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
WARREN JACOBS. ESQ.
3301 N.E. Second Avenue
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33137
Telephone: (3081 B78-83O0
11188 AugustM:
September 2. 1983
NOTICE UN OCR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of 302
Market at number 303 N.W.
22nd Avenue. In the City of
Miami. Florida, Intends to reg-
ister the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
30th dayof July. 1983
Anthony M Recuset, Owner
'2212 August 38:
Septembers, 9.18. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name TUR
AIRCRAFT INTERIOR at
Building 147. Opa Locka Air-
port, Opa Locka. Fla. 83054 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
ARGELIOR TUR. Owner
11199 August 38:
September 2, 9,18, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name LSA
Manufacturers Representa-
tives at 1083 NE 304 La. -
Miami. FL 33179 Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County, Florida.
Nell Lentin
11171 August 12.19.38:
Septembers. 1966
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
IN AND FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CsteNe.n-UUl
S.D.A. CORP..
Plaintiff.
vs.
EUGENE J. FINLEY.
ETAL8..
Defendant.
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
TO:
Anthony D. IanneUl
8104 8 W. 30th Street
North Lauderdala. Florida
Iannelll. his wife
a-k-a Andrea C. IanneUl
8104 S.W. 20th Street
North Lauderdale. Florida
YOU. Anthony D. IanneUl
and ...IanneUl. his wife a-k-a
Andrea C. Iannelll are hereby
notified that a complaint to
foreclose a mortgage on the
following dear nbed property:
The West Sixty and Forty-
teven Hundredths (80 471 feet
>f the South one-naif 14) of
Tract Eight (81. Revised Plat
of WEST LITTLE RIVER, ac
cording to the Plat thereof, as
recorded In Plat Book Thirty
Four 1341. Page Nineteen (19).
of the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida Also known as
1893 N.W 81 Street, Miami.
Florida
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your answer or plead-
ing thereto upon Elliot L. Mil-
ler. 925 Arthur Godfrey Road.
Suite 308. Miami Beach. Flor
lda 33140 and file the original
answer or pleading with the
Clerk of this Court on or before
the 23 day of September. 1983
If you fall to do so. Judgment
by default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In
the amended complaint.
Dated August22. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the above
styled Court
by: DC Bryant
Deputy Clerk
12208 August 28:
September 2. 9.16. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
Banyan Bay Cafe: Banyan Bay
Convenience Store at 708 NE.
64th Street. Miami. FL 33138 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
BASIL MANAGEMENT AND
ASSOCIATES. INC.
BY: Barry Resnlck.
President
12229 September 2,9;
16.23,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
BROTHERS CHEMICAL
CORP at number 9000 NW 79
Ave Bay 9, In the City of
Hlaleah Garden. Florida. In-
tends to register the said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami Dade.
Florida, this 22 day of August.
1989
Edurd"Esqulvel
12223
September 2, 9,
16.23. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NOPROPRRTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 83-26041
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
HAROLD SCHULER,
HUSBAND
and
OLGA VICTORIA
SCHULER,
WIFE
TO: OLGA VICTORIA
SCHULER
Residence Address:
3031 Orange Avenue
Costa Mesa.
California 92627
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq. 15490
N.W. 7th Avenue, Suite 308.
Miami. Florida 33169, on or
before September 16, 1983 and
Ale the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before
service on Petitioner's at-
torney or Immediately
thereafter: otherwise a default
wUl be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
PeUUon.
DATED: August9.1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: K SEIFRIED
as Deputy Clerk
11170 August 13.19. 38;:
NOT ICE OF ACT ION
CONST* UCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACT KM
NO 61-34285
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
GILDA VILLAVICENCIO.
Petitioner,
and
LUIS E. VILLAVICENCIO.
Respondent.
TO: LUIS E. VILLA-
VICENCIO
Calle)on Magallanes
No 119
Guayaquil. Ecuador
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on M CRISTTNA DEL-
VALLE. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is 85
Grand Canal Drive. Third
Floor. Miami. Florida 83144.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 30.
1983: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 25th day of
August. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12221 September2. 9.
16. 23.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION01
PRORATE NO. 63-4905
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEO ROKEACH.
Deceased.
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST SAID ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS INTER-
ESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the Estate of LEO ROKE-
ACH. deceased, late of Dade
County, Florida, has com-
menced In the capUoned pro-
ceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file
any claims and demands which
you may have against the Es-
tate and to file any challenge to
the validity of the Last WUl and
Testament offered for probate.
If any, or any objection to the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue or juris
diction of the Court, with the
Court, Dade County Court-
house. Miami. Florida. WITH-
IN THREE MONTHS FROM
THE DATE OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS NO-
TICE OR YOUR RIGHT TO
DO SO WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First publication of this No-
Uce on the 36 day of August.
1983.
MARJORIE SCHATZ
ROKEACH.
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
LEO ROKEACH
Deceased
8161 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
SMITH A HANDLER, PA.
By SAMUELS. SMITH
1111 Lincoln Road MaU
Miami Beach. Florida 83139
Telephone No. (SOB) 673-1100
12201 August28:,
Septembers. 1983
NOTICE UNDEN
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name HAL-
LANDALE REALTY ASSOCI-
ATES at 777 Brickell Avenue,
Suite 708, Miami, Florida 83181
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
SAMTEICHMAN
SOLTEICHMAN
SIDNEY SCHWARTZ
BERNARD ELEFANT
DAVID STEINBERG
VICTOR SABO
RUDOLPH WEINSTEIN
MELCHIORHAUER
ERNEST BRICK
FRED SCHWARTZ
SIDNEY TEICHMAN
BENJAMIN SABO
JOSHUA D. MANASTER, ES-
QUIRE
Attorney
NOTICE UNOCR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name IN-
LAND INDUSTRIAL PROP-
ERTIES at 2111. 2121 2131
N.W. 139th Street. Opa Locka.
Florida 83064 Intends to regis-
ter said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
Monte Frledkln and
Carol Joyce Friedman,
d-b-a Inland Industrial
Properties, a partnership
Nelson A Feldman. PA.
Attorneys for Applicant
12204 August 38:
September 2. 9. 16. 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 83-1*071
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
VII.MA BADELT.
Petitioner.
vs.
JOSEPH BADELT,
Respondent.
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: Joseph Badelt
209 Sem Avenue
Toronto. Ontario
Canada M6R1K2
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED, that a Petition for Dis-
solution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on R. A.
del Pino. Esq.. Attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 1401
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida. Suite 201 and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above styled Court on or before
September 23. 1983; otherwise
s default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition
This Notice shall be pub-
lished one each week for four
(4) consecutive weeks in the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami,
gust. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
R. A. del Pino
1401 West Flagler St.
Miami. Florida 88188
Telephone: (308) 649-4411
Attorney for Petitioner
11198 August 28:
_________September 2. 9. 16.1888
NOTICE OF ACT MM
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPRRTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA, IN
AND FOE DADE COU NT Y
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 63-29M6
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OP MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
GREGORIO S ANT AN A.
Husband,
and
ANA GLORIA SANTANA,
Wlfa.
TO: ANA GLORIA
SANTANA
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on ALBERT L CARRI-
CARTE. P.A.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2491 N W. 7th Street. Miami.
Florida 33128. and file Om
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 16. 1988: otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
peUtlon
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 15th day of
August. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N.A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
1 Circuit Court Seal 1
Attorney for Petitioner:
Albert L Carrlcarte. PA.
2491 N.W 7th Street
Miami, Florida33138
Telephone: (306)8*9-7917
11183 August 19, 38;
September 2. 9, 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
PRORATE NO. 83-4311
DIVISION: 93
IN RE: ESTATE OP
FRANCES M STEINBERG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST SAID ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS INTER-
ESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the Estate of FRANCES M.
STEINBERG, deceased. late of
Dade County. Florida, has
commenced In the capUoned
proceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file
any claims and demands which
you may have against the Es-
tate and to file any challenge to
the validity ot the Last WUl and
Testament offered for probate,
if any. or any objection to the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue or Juris-
diction of the Court, with the
Court. Dade County Court-
house. 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
YOUR RIGHT TO DO SO WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First Publication of this No-
tice on the 36 day of August.
IPoB.
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
FRANCES M. STEINBERG
Deceased
ADELEMANN
868 NE 18th St.. No. 19C
Miami, Florida 33132
MARVIN I. STEINBERG
906SklboLane
Mamaronek. New York 10648
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESE NTATTVE:
Herbert Jay Cohen. P.A.
94008. Dade land Blvd.,
Suite 300
Miami, Florida 38168
Telephone: (306)686-0401
M&... August 36;
September 2; 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 81-19454
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPRRTY)
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
GENAROA DIAZ
Petitioner,
vs.
GLADYS GATICA DIAZ.
Respondent.
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: GladysGatlca Diaz
Calle CaopoUcan
488 Villa Alemana,
Chile V Region
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED, that a Petition for Dis-
solution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this Court and you *0 required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on Rogello
A. del Pino. Esq., Attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
STONE. SOSTCHIN A GON-
ZALES. 1401 West Flagler
Street. Suite 201. Miami. Flor-
ida, and file the original with
the Clerk of the above styled
Court on or before September
26. 1983; otherwise a default
win be entered against you for
the relief prayed for In the
complaint or petition.
This Notice shall be pub-
lished one each week for four
(4) consecutive weeks In the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami.
Florida, on this 19 day of Au-
gust. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: K.Shaw
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STONE. SOSTCHIN A
GONZALEZ. P.A.
R. A. del Pino. Esq. 1
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 38185
Attorney for Petitioner
U193 August 26:
Septembers. 9.16.1983
-th^,;^
c-cV,tVfVlS'
ANDFORfMrjgJ'jM
ACTION FOR oSS?? I
IN RE Th MA"'2e
in RE The msrrlat,-
lazarogorBujS*
Petitioner Husbtrrt'
and
OLTVU EUSA Gordb
Respondent -Wtt*0"
TO: OLIVIA ELISa
GORDILLO
Avenlda Primer.
entre 4 y |
San Jose.
Costa Rica c*.
YOU ARE HEREBY ,
FIED that an action (or r,
lutlon of Marriage kJL
fUed against you and -,,
required to serve a copy ,,
written defenses. If any fc2
TED E TSOIPRAKE 2
nay for Petitioner, who*)
dress U 220 Miracle 1
Suite 222. Coral Gables. i
33134. and file theorlrusJi
the clerk of the above!
court on or before Septem
1988; otherwise a defnit,
be entered against yog fa
relief demanded in the 1
plaint or petition
This notice shall ber,__.
once each week for fouri
secutlve weeks tn THE J
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand 1
seal of said court at .
Florida on this i dayof/
1983
RICHARD P BRINKnl
As Clerk. Circuit Cotm f
Dade County. Florldi
ByK Selfrted
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal 1
TFDE TSOIPRAKE
220Miracle Mile-Suitem
Coral Gables Fla 33114
Attorney for Petitioner
11164 August 12, 111
______________September!, 1
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
The undersigned, under oath,
ays; It la the Intention of the'
undersigned to engage In a
business enterprise under the
fictitious name of DIAL PAGE
located at 3838 West Flagler
Street In the city of Cora] Gab-
les, Dade County. Florida.
Those interested In said en-
terprise, and the extend of the
interest of each. Is as follows:
Interest 100 percent
Joy A. Millar
SS88 West Flagler Street
Coral Gables. Florida 33138
Attorney: Martin Starr
9703 South Dixie Highway
Miami. Fla. 38186-2812
13227 Septembers. 9;
._____ 18, 38.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COUITOJ
THE ELEVENTH JUDICI*
CIRCUITIN ANDFOI
OAOE COUNTY, FLOHIUl
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO 83-28057 FC I
IN RE: THE MARRIAGEO
RICARDO SOTO. HUS
and
ASUNCION GOI
ZALEZ CAPELLAN
SOTO
RESIDENCE ADDRESS:
ALF-DIAZ
SANCHIZ64ATICO
ALICANTE.
ESPANA (SPAIN)
YOU ARE NOTIFIED I
an action for Dlssoludnl
Marriage has been
against you and you art)
quired to serve a copy ofJ
written defenses. If any, ton
Bruce N. Crown, ESQ., f
N.W. 7th Avenue. SUM I
Miami, Florida 33169. or an
fore September 27. 1M3 ano
the original with the 1
this Court either before 1
on Petitioner's attorney c
medlatelyr thereafter;
wise a Default will be enu
against you for the relli
manded in the Petition.
DATED: August 17.1M3.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Stall
By: K. Selfrted
as Deputy Clerk
11187
September.. 11.1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
NOTICE IS HEBIW
GIVEN that the underage*
desiring to engage In a"""*
under the fictitious mm*
JOMI HOMES at number 1
W. 40 Place. In the City of
leah. Florida. Intends to rep*
tar the said name wlf
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Dated at Miami. Florid*."
17thdayofAugut. 1N>
Joml Investment*. W
By: JoelBenes.Pre.kW
Antonio Torrent, Jr
Attorney for Applicant
Stone. Sostchln a Gors*
140l'w.FlaglarSt..Sts
Miami. Florida 33185
Tetephone. 649-4411
September 2, M.
NOTICE UN0E8
FICTITIOUS NAME L**
NOTICE IS HEMB"
GIVEN that the underage
desiring to engate In buttn*
under the flctltlou. n*W
Frledkln Enterprises at It**
14078 N.W. 19th Avenue, op.
Locka. Florida 83064 Intend*"
register said name with w
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida^
Monte Frledkln, d-b-
Frledkln Enterprises
Nelson A Feldman. P.A.
Attorney for Applicant
September^"


in: Israel Characterized
'riday, September 2, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 19-1
V MOitary Moral Strength ^jewis> Former Glass, Bay Village Publisher, Passes
** Q*'*1 _, --,_ David Glass, editor and i__*i__ c_j:_. __j _:-*_
JRONTO (JTA) Leon
zin, chairman of the Jewish
,_..ey' and World" Zionist Or-
.ni/iiiion Executives, said that
fael as a nation and as a people
J characterized by its dual
Ilitary and moral strength. He
Knled out to some 1,400 dele-
Ites and guests attending the
Inai B'rith International con-
ntion here that, while "follow-
the Yom Kippur War the
.aelis protested a failure in
purity, this time (following the
_ in Lebanon) they were pro-
fiting on a moral issue.
|"As we have witnessed, the
^sionate intensity of the
esent protest was far greater
i that in regard to their own
curity."
This proves, Dulzin continued,
lhat the prophetic heritage and
Jios of Israel and its people is
Eve and well. It proves the
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
MEDICAL CONDO EN-
TERPRISES, a Florida
General Partnership at No. 700
- 1686 79th St. Causeway, In the
City of Miami, Florida, Intends
to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
30th day of July, 1983
POLIEX TRADING N.V.
MG DEVELOPERS. INC.
OCa 1 jPi ij K
INVESTMENTS. INC.
DANIEL RETTER, ESQ.
Attorney for Applicant
One S.E. Third Ave. No.2280
Miami, Florida 331 SI -1777
12223 Septembers,;
____________________16. 23, IBM
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 33-7110
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MILDRED SMALL.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of MILDRED SMALL,
deceased. File Number 33-7110,
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade Coisity. Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which Is Dade County Court
house, 73 West Flagter Street.
Miami. FL 33130 The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the) per-
sonal representatives attorney
are set forth below
All Interested persons are
required to flle with this court.
WITH IN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an in- _
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the win, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, venue, or Juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 2,1983
Personal Representative:
JACK SMALL
6 Ocean Drive
Miami Beach, FL 33139
Attorney for Personal
RepresentaUve:
3parber, Shevln. Rosen, Shapo
andHellbronner, P. A.
One Southeast Third Ave.,
Miami, FL 33131
Telephone: (300) 35ST990
12MQ Septembers, 9,1933
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
r.I.ICB IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
tSU* F5 ncutto nn TUB,
f** UVUiQ FACDJTT at
" W. S3 Street, Hlaleah -
fV* **" intends to register
OrcuU Court of Dade County.
MIRTA TERESA
**" September 2,1;
___________________lt.ts.19SI
MOTIC1 UNDER
"CTITtOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
oetlrlng to engage In business
""w the Hctltlous name
opium Boutique at SS0 East
41*t St.. Hlaleah, FTa. 33013 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clark of the Circuit
Qwrt of Dad* County. Florida.
MarlaP.Lop.,
Attorney
"*" September 3, t,
13, 23, 1933
vitality and the deep sense of
justice in the Jewish State. It
proves the fervent regard in
Israel for human life and dignity.
In these matters, all of Israel is
united, as demonstrated by the
government's decision to estab-
lish its commission of inquiry" to
investigate the massacre' of
Palestinian civilians in two
camps in west Beirut by Chris-
tian Phalangists.
DULZIN, in his address, took
strong issue with a statement
made by Edgar Bronfman, presi-
dent of the World Jewish Con-
gress, at an earlier session of the
convention. Bronfman, in referr-
ing to the need to resolve the
Palestinian problem in a way
"that clearly provides for Israel's
security along with the legitimate
rights of the Palestinian people,"
said that President Reagan's
Middle East peace proposals
"sought to unlock and enhance
the Camp David peace process."
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Pelegrln School of Real Estate
at 953 SW. 87 Avenue Porto
Flno IV Miami, Florida 83174,
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Elena A. Pelegrln
12233 September 2. 9,
IS, 23.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUtlous name LAV
LANK DISTRIBUTORS at J77
NW 41 Ave.. Miami, Fla. 33133
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
FRANK LABRADOR. Owner
U198 Augusts*};
________September 1. > U. 19S8
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IE HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the HcUUoue name of
PARKWAY CONDO ENTER-
PRISES, a Florida General
Partnership at number 700 -
lEsS-TMIi EL Causeway, la the
City of Miami, Florida, Intends
to register the said name with
the aerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
2 day of August, 18*9
TERRANOVA
DEVELOPMENT. INC
M-g DEVELOPERS. INC.
BELESE
IN VE8TMENTS. INC.
DANIEL RETTER, ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
One S.E Third Ave No. 2260
Miami. Florida SSiSi-l777
12232 Septembers,*.
______________________M,S3,198
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CMI Action No. 81-1*183
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MILDRED JIMINEZ,
Wife-Petitioner,
and
MARIO JIMINEZ.
Husband-Respondent
TO: MARIO JIMINEZ
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution Of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on John
Muldowney, Attorney at Law,
attorney for Petitioner, whoa*
address U 2212 Blscayne Boule-
vard, lint Floor, Miami,
Florida, 33137, and Hie the orig-
inal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Sep-
tember SO, 1SSS; otherwise a
default wul be entered against
you tor the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice snail be published
one* each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this SS day of Au-
gust, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRTNKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByN.A.Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
12218 September 2. 9;
18.28,1*33
Cedars Chairman
Harry L. Lewis of Miami
Beach, former chairman of the
board of Cedars Medical Center
of Miami and resident of this
community for 33 years, passed
away. He was 80 years old.
Mr. Lewis was a philanthropist
and tax attorney and real estate
developer.
He is survived by a wife,
Hazel; daughters, Patricia and
Linda; granddaughters Jill and
Wendy; one great-grandson;
brothers, Avner and Saul; and
sister, Frances.
Funeral services were held
Aug. 29 at Riverside Chapel.
BOOKBINDER
Stanley N.. a Miami Beach resident for
many years, died Aug. X. He was the
senior vice president of the Mercantile
National Bank and Barnett National
Bank and was a member of the Knights
of Pythias, past president of the
Bayahore Exchange Club. Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce, Miami Beach
League for Progress, and American
Banker's Association Survivors Include
a wife, Verdi and brother, Arthur.
Blaaberg Chapel was In charge of
arrangements.
WOLFE
Gilbert, 84. a life time resident of
Miami, who worked for Eastern Air-
lines for 23 years, passed away. He was
a member of the Norm! Lodge 388 r|
AM and North Miami Elks Lodge 1838.
Survivors Include a wife, Mary and
brother, Slgmund of Miami. Funeral
services were held Aug. 39 with Inter-
ment following at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
STREET
Sade B long-time resident of Miami
Beach, formerly of Philadelphia, died
Aug. 34. She Is survived by a son,
Harlan; grandchildren, Robert Street
and Trudy Gold: and two great-grand-
children, all of North Miami Beach Fu-
neral services were held Aug. S8 at
Riverside Memorial Chapel.
HARELIK
Tillle. SO, a former resident of Miami for
SB years, passed away Aug. 34 In Dallas.
Tex. She Is survived by sons, Stuart and
Brian of Dallas; a daughter. Sally
Goldman of Miami, a brother. Albert
Wltus of Miami; a slater. Bertha Pevan
of Detroit: and eight grandchildren Fu-
neral services war* held Aug. St.
Gordon Funeral Home was m charge of
arrangements.
MTNTZ. Dorothy. Aug. 26
KATES, nanjamte. f*. North Miami
Beach. Aug. 28. Levltt-Welnsteln.
BACHARACH. Frieda (Eisner). .
Miami Beach. Aug. 28
SEIDEN, David. 78, Miami. Aug. SS,
Gordon.
WErNBERO. Joseph. SI. Miami. Aug.
28. Gordon.
SCHENK. Bertha, ST. Miami Beach.
Riverside.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
/f 10 Nrdheasl 2rc! Avenue
Phone 759-1669
David Glass, editor and
oublisher of the North Bay
Village Community Newspaper
for 10 years and owner of the
Harbour Island Health Spa and
Harbour Island Jewelry Store,
died Sunday at the age of 51
Mr. Glass, who also served as
executive director of the Lincoln
Road Mall Association during
the late 1960s, was past chan-
cellor of the George Gershwin
Lodge of the Knights of Pythias.
Survivors include a son,
Matthew; daughters, Deborah
Norwood and Sharon Glass;
mother, Sadie; and sister,
Fanchon Bell.
Funeral services were held
Aug. 30 at Rubin-Zilbert
Memorial Chapel.
SAMBERO
Nsthan, of Miami. Beloved father of
Anne (Rlno) Cugllano of New York and
Michael (Ruth) Sam berg of Miami;
cherished grandfather of Tom and Allen
Cugllanl and Mark (Marcee) and Ealee
Samberg; loving great-grandfather of
Joshua Aron Samberg. He was a
member of the Greater Miami
Benevolent Society and the Cap Makers
Union of America. Services were held.
Rubin Zllbert was In charge.
I When a loss occurs
I away from home.
m w mi BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
18840 West Dixie Hwy.
Represented by S tcvilt, F.O
1921 Pembroke Rd
New York: (212l 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76lh Rd.. Forest Hills. NY.
SM
Secured Family Protection
Pre-Arranged Funeral Plan
gORDON
TUCNEML HOME
Serving The Jewish Community Since 1938
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130
Phone: 858-5566
James B. Gordon, F.D.
Ike Gordon, F.D.
Harvey Gordon, F.D.
Allan Brestin, F.D.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL 3$
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zllbert, Founder
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
Miami Beach
Coral Gables
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
538-6371
The Only
Guaranteed
Pre-Arrangement*
with
No. Miami Beach-Hallandale
BROWARD
456-4011


No Money In Advance
Main Office: 1701 Alton ftoad, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139


Page 20-B The Jewiah Floridian Friday. September 2,1983
Torah Hadassah to
Install New Officers
Ann Goldstein, newly-elected
president of the Torah Chapter of
Hadassah. will be installed along
with other 1983-84 officers when
the chapter holds its installation
meeting Monday. Sept. 12. 12:30
p.m. at Temple Zamora. Coral
Gables. Dorothy Spector. a past
president of the chapter, will be
installing officer.
Rose Lauretz. past president
who is chairing the meeting, said
that other officers to be installed
are Olga Issenberg, administra-
tive vice president; Miriam
Saffer and Dora Hill, education
vice presidents; Lauretz. fun-
draising vice president; Lee
Stiglitz. membership vice presi-
dent and Ray Jacobson,
program vice president.
Also. Sadie Fritz, treasurer;
Helen Barson. membership dues
secretary: Jeanne Fishman.
financial secretary; Dorothy
Levine, corresponding secretary:
Ann Young, recording secretary;
and Lauretz. parliamentarian.
During the event. Miriam
Saffer will Dresent a review of the
book. When Bad Things Happen
to Good People.
VDL Official Leads
Program on Media
A program and film on media
distortions and reactions to the
events of last summer in Lebanon
will be presented by Temple
Adath Yeshurun in cooperation
with the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith's Commu-
nity Task Force of Southern
Florida Saturday at 10 p.m. at
the temple.
Jerome Homer, who serves on
ADl.'s regional board and is a
member of its national commit-
tees on education and community
service, will be the featured
speaker. Homer has college
training in international studies
to the PhD candidate level and
has performed special assign-
ments for the U.S. Information
Agency in Hong Kong. He is also
a member of the executive com-
mittee of Broward County Re-
publican Party.
Following the program, Rabbi
Simcha Freedman. spiritual
leader of Adath Yeshurun,
Cantor Ian Alpern, and the tem-
ple choir will conduct midnight
Selichot Penitential services.
'Carrier Alert' to
Aid Homebound,
Handicapped
The United Way of Dade
County is asking eligible senior
citizens and handicapped or
homebound residents in Dade
County to register for a new, free
service. Carrier Alert, a joint ef-
fort of the National Association
of Letter Carriers, the U.S. Pos-
tal Service, and United Way.
The program assures that a re-
sponsible agency will be alerted
to check on an individual's well-
being when a two or more days
accumulation of mail occurs,
signifying the possibility of acci-
dent or illness.
Postal Service customers who
are 60 years of age or older, or
who are handicapped or home-
bound, are eligible for the Carrier
Alert program.
Upon registration, participants
are issued a Carrier Alert decal to
be placed inside their mailbox,
and the decal serves as a notice to
the letter carrier.
Through locally developed pro-
cedures, the accumulation of mail
will be reported to United Way
Information and Referral Service
for follow-up.
NATIONAL BRANDS EVERY DAY PRICES *
PHARMACY j
. ___________ 531-5583
1605 WASHINGTON AVE
Aquamarine
Shampoo/Condi tioner
TwinPack\
I 1 69
F 15z.Aa
Revlon
Dry Skin Relief
Moisture Lotion
14.8 oz
2.
89
Milk Plus 6
Moisture Lotion ^ j %^g*
Cream
4oz.3.60
2.75 oz. 3.60
Colorsilk
Haircolor by Revlon
2.
79
Mitchum *
Anti-Perspirant Roll-on
2.5 oz at 1.5 Price ?! 2.5 oz
2.
19
Di-Gel
Antacid Tablets
'i 30,1.891
Corrected
Laxative Tablets
5
w.2.161
90's4.'
.79i
Requtol
Stool Softener
90'.
5.
99
Cushion Grip
Denture Adhesive
ttoz.1.83
loz.2.56
Aftate
Athlete's Foot
Aerosol Liquid
Jock Itch Aerosol
4 oz. z.oy
3.5 oz z./y
Mitchum
Anti-Perspirant Solid
2.66 oz. at 2 oz Price
H
2.66 oz
2.
80
Mitchum Anti-Perspirant 0 -ft
Aerosol 4 oz. Lt OU
1 -2.80
Cream
2 oz.
Halls
Mentho-Lyptus
Cough Tablets
HMlfi
>*.*:
30's
.86
Ivory
Soap Personal Size
4 Bar
.89
Murine
Eye Drops
Murine Plus
Eye Drops
5oz. J..OO
5oz. J..OO
Palmolive
Dishwashing Liquid
22 oz.
l.
29
Ajax
Cleanser
21 oz.
.63
Dial
Anti-Perspirant Roll-on
1.5 oz. X
29
Soft Scrub
Liquid Cleanser
26 oz.
1.
66
Tilex
Mildew Remover
16 oz
1.
79
Liquid Plumr
Drain Opener
32 oz.
1.
33
ClorOX Liquid Bleach 16o/..tH>
ClorOX II Powder Bleach 24 oz. 1. lv
Twice as Fresh
Air Freshener
.96
Neutrogena
% m
Ma
W,
'
Rainbath Gel 32 oz. 16.00
Shampoo Tube 5.5 oz O,\j\j
Tri Pack Soap 10.5 oz 2.99
Acne Soap Twin Pak 7 oz. Z.Oi)
Impulse
Body Spray
;
2.5 oz.
2.
39
PepSOdent Toothbrush /' kQ
Soft-Mediuin-Hard *
If;
H.
Disney Toothbrush For Children
by Pepsodent
.69


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