The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02846

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
THE
jme 56-Number 33
m
i*
Two Section*
Miami, FloridaFriday, August 19,1983'
ay mh o emu Price 50 Cents.
Syrians Dig In
Bekaa Valley Shows Signs of Permanent Lebanon Occupation
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The Syrians are reinforcing
their positions in the Bekaa valley in Lebanon and are
apparently preparing to remain there for a long time,
according to Brig. Gen. Yehuda Cohen, commander of the
Israel Defense Force Engineering Corps.
HE TOLD military correspondents that hundreds of
tank positions have been prepared in the valley and ex-
tensive minefields have been laid there, facing the IDF
positions.
Cohen disclosed that his men have begun to move
some of their equipment from the present Israeli front line
in Lebanon. He stressed, however, that this removal did
not endanger the IDF positions and that the efficiency
and safety of Israeli soldiers would not be affected even if
the government ordered the IDF to remain in its present
position, postponing its redeployment for any reason until
after the winter.
\President Mubarak
ov. Cuomo
ligns New
'Get' Law
By BEN GALLOB
KEW YORK (JTA) -
i second effort by New
rk State Assemblyman
?ldon Silver (D., Man.)
[obtain legislative relief
j Jewish women refused a
Igious divorce (G?f)by
^ir husbands and thereby
ined from marrying
lin succeeded when Gov.
krio Cuomo signed the
kasure into law last week.
Continued on Page 9-A
Egypt Opens Drive to Resume
Relations With Arab World
By JUDITH KOHN
CAIRO (JTA) -
Egypt has injected some
new vigor in recent days in
its drive to reestablish
relations with the Arab
world. The latest campaign,
which has been given
prominent coverage in the
news and editorial columns
of the government-control-
led press, has included a
visit by Osama El-Baz,
political advisor to Presi-
dent Hosni Mubarak, to
Amman Saturday, where
he delivered a letter from
Mubarak to Jordan's King
Hussein on recent develop-
ments in the region.
A similar letter was to be
delivered to President Amin
Gemayel of Lebanon, where El-
Baz was headed from Amman.
At the same time, an active
correspondence between
Mubarak and President Gaafar
Mimeiry of the Sudan has
reflected Egypt's interest in
renewing its traditional role as
the pivotal point of political
movement among the Arab
states.
EGYPT WAS stripped of that
function following the conclusion
of its peace treaty with Israel and
the breaking of relations by most
Arab countries.
".What is happening in the
Arab arena," Mubarak's most
recent message to Mimeiry on
developments in Lebanon, the
West Bank and the I ran-Iraq
war, is reported to say, "is not
the responsibility of any one
state or group of states, but
rather calls for a collective Arab
move arising from a common
ground that will help to settle the
crises confronting the Arab
nation today."
Mubarak reportedly called for
the drafting of a definitive Arab
program for Lebanon that will
"deny (Israel) any pretext for
postponing its withdrawal."
THE RECENT flurry of
diplomatic activity in Cairo has
also included an exchange of
visitors with Baghdad, among
them Iraqi Foreign Minister
Atriq Aziz, who met with
Mubarak here last month; an
Iraqi delegation of journalists
which followed; and Egypt's
Minister of Finance and Foreign
Trade, currently visiting Iraq.
Although no formal relations
exist between Egypt and Iraq,
Egypt has consistently stressed
that it maintains good relations
with Baghdad, as it does with
most of the Arab countries which
removed their embassies from
Cairo four years ago.
Egypt has also supported Iraq
in the Persian Gulf war, which
has undoubtedly made the Iraqis
more amenable to Egyptian
appeals for more tangible ties. A
branch of a main Iraqi bank is
expected to open in Cairo later
this month.
ADDING A more novel
feature to the Egyptian diplo-
matic drive and recent hints of
renewed contacts with Syria,
Egypt has consistently pointed
to Damascus as one of the new
Continued on Page 7-A
Meets Shamir
Chamoun Said To Eye
Campaign for Presidency
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Danny Chamoun, the
son of former pro-Western
Lebanese President Camille
Chamoun, met here with
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir. During their meet-
ing Chamoun expressed
support for the ratification
of the Israel-Lebanon
agreement, which Lebanon
has so far failed to do.
He also expressed the hope
that the Israeli withdrawal from
the Shouf mountain area would
be coordinated with the Lebanese
government, "so that the
dangerous vacuums which could
lead to new flare-ups would not
develop."
Chamoun, who was also sched-
uled to meet with Defense Minis-
ter Moshe Arens and other Israeli
leaders, was invited to come here
as tensions between Israel and
Lebanon are increasing.
HE TOLD reporters that he
had not come to Israel se~.-etly or
^tk fe^fc^

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Danny Chamoun
by accident. Chamoun said there
was no reason to be secretivp
Continued on Page 9-A
Arab Attack in Paris Recalled
Mitterrand Visibly Moved at Goldenberg Ceremonies
'resident Mitterrand
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
President Francois Mitter-
rand was one of the thou-
sands of people who came
to pay tribute to the vic-
tims of the terrorist attack
which a year ago killed six
people and wounded 22 in a
Jewish restaurant in the old
Jewish quarter.
It was remembrance day on the
Rue des Rosiers where shops
were closed and people came from
all over the country to com-
memorate the event and show
their solidarity with the Jewish
community.
The street was closed to traffic
early in the morning as loud-
speakers started to broadcast
traditional Hasidic tunes. A long
line of people passed through the
heavy police cordons and filed by
Jo Goldenberg's restaurant,
laying flowers on the spot where
most of the victims fell.
MITTERRAND, who was
accompanied by Ely see Palace
Chief of Staff Jean-Louis Bianco
a->d his main Jewish adviser,
Joseph Attali, seemed personally
moved as he read aloud the
names of the victims Jews,
Christians and Moslems on a
plaque outside Goldenberg's
restaurant where the bullet
marks are still visible.
On the day of the attack,
August 9, 1982, Mitterrand flew
Continued on Page 11-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, August 19,1983
Lavie 'On Target9
U.S. Delay Seen Coming To An End
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The development
of the Lavie, the light-
weight fighter plane Israel
wants to build in coopera-
tion with the United States,
is now right "on target"
following the nearly year-
long delay in U.S. approval
caused by Israel's invasion
of Lebanon in June, 1982.
This was stressed at a briefing
for Israeli reporters at the offices
of Grumman International Inc. in
Rosslynn, Va., by George Kin-
near, Grumman's vice president
in charge of its Washington
operations, and Marvin Klemow.
director of the Washington office
of Israel Aircraft Industries
(IAI). Grumman is developing
the wing and tail for the Lavie.
KINNEAR, a retired U.S.
Navy Admiral, said there has
been a lot of misinformation both
in the U.S. and Israel about the
Lavie, some of it due to deliberate
"disinformation." The Pentagon
is presently conducting the tech-
nical review of Grumman's por-
tion of the plane needed before a
license can be given by the U.S.
to begin manufacture of the first
prototype of the plane. The re-
view, which started June 10,
takes 60-90 days.
Perhaps more important is
that the White House and the
National Security Council are
studying whether to allow U.S.
foreign aid .funds to be used for
the research and development of
the Lavie. There is no question
about them being used for the
U.S. portion of the production of
the Lavie, since the military aid
is designed for the purchase of
military equipment in the U.S.
However, Klemow pointed out
that foreign aid funds were allow-
ed to be used for the development
of the Lavie engine and have been
used for the development of other
weapons designed by Israel
AS EXPLAINED by Kinnear,
Israel authorized development of
the Lavie in 1980 to meet the
qualitative and quantitative
threat its military experts predict
for the period 1990 to 2010. The
plane is being "tailor made" for
Israel to replace the Kfir and the
Skyhawk and in its later stages,
the F-4. It is not being designed
to replace the larger more sophis-
ticated F-15, Kinnear said.
There have been reports that
the Pentagon has been concerned
about the export of sophisticated
American technology abroad in
the Lavie design. But Kinnear
stressed that there is no tech-
nology that is not now available
on the world market. All the
material for the Lavie is also
available now commercially, he
noted.
The Lavie will, however, be
built at a lower cost, mainly be-
cause only five prototypes are be-
ing planned rather than the usual
12 or more and because less paper
work is involved. The Lavie is
estimated to be 16 to 30 percent
less expensive than U.S. planes.
An an example, it was shown
that 300 Lavie would cost about
S10.9 billion as compared to $13
billion for the F-16.
KINNEAR NOTED that Is-
rael is now receiving 75 F-16s
from the U.S. and has to make $1
Bank of Israel Devalues
Shekel By 7.5 Percent
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Bank of Israel, Isra-
el's central bank, has de-
valuated the Israeli Shekel
by 7.5 percent against the
dollar, in a new -indication
that Israel was continuing
to lose its battle against the
economy's galloping infla-
tion.
The Shekel was being sold by
the Central Bank to commercial
banks at 57.13 Shekels to the
dollar, as against 53.14 the pre-
vious day.
The announcement came as the
Ministerial Economic Committee
continued its closed door
meetings for a third day in an
effort to implement the Finance
Ministry's plan to cut Israel's
out-of-balance budget by
drastically trimming the funds all
government ministries may
spend this year.
THE COMMITTEE is trying
to formulate specific proposals
which were expected to be
adopted by the Cabinet. Last
Sunday, the Cabinet failed to act
on a proposal by Finance Minis-
ter Yoram Aridor that 56 billion
Shekels be cut from the govern-
ment budget including a hefty 20
billion Shekels cut in the defense
budget.
The devaluation was de-
nounced by Israel's powerful
union movement, the Histadrut,
and received only a lukewarm
welcome from manufacturers who
called it "too little and too late."
Some exporters said the
devaluation would help Israel's
urgent need to expand exports if
accompanied by other fiscal
measures, presumably meaning
deep government budget cuts,
and possibly reduce imports by
increasing their prices.
Yisrael Keissar, deputy
secretary general of the Hista-
drut, warned that devaluation
would not solve all of Israel's
economic problems and repeated
the Histadrut's opposition to any
changes in the present arrange-
ment which links wage hikes to
inflation increases. But Eli
Hurwitz, head of the Manufac-
turers Association, called the
devaluation "a move in the right
direction."
EXPERTS NOTED that the
7.5 percent devaluation was a
sharp jump from the customary
unofficial creeping devaluation of
the Shekel which, until about twr
months ago, averaged about fivi
percent a month. In recent weeks,
the Central Bank accelerated the
rate of devaluation and during
the past 10 days, the Shekel lost
10 percent of its purchasing
power.
The official explanation for. the
7.5 percent devaluation was that
the adjustment brought the
Shekel closer into line with its
"real value."
The Central Bank announced
that it would continue to take
steps to correct the exchange rate
against the powerful American
dollar and the basket of world
currencies, made up of Western
European currencies .and the
Japanese Yen.
BUT BANK of Israel officials
asserted that^the latest de-
valuation was due mainly- to
international and not to local
developments. They noted the
American dollar has been at-an
all-time high relative to several'
European currencies in recent
days.
Economic experts agreed that
devaluation alone cannot cure the
ailments of the Israeli economy
and that it could serve as another
stimulus to Israel's roaring
inflation
M-B-19-8S
million in changes in each of the
planes in order for it to meet Is-
raeli specifications. He explained
that the U.S. planes are designed
to be used throughout the world
and thus contains many features
which Israel's Air Force does not
need but is included with the
planes.
The development and the
initial production costs in the
U.S. are estimated to be $1.5 bil-
lion and are expected to provide
37,000 jobs in the United States.
By the time IAI lets out all its
contracts, some 100 companies
throughout the U.S. will have
worked on some part of the
Lavie. -
The first prototype is expected
to be flown in Israel in 1965.
Actual production is scheduled to
begin in 1990 with 12 planes,
eventually building 30 planes a
year. Klemow said this will pro-
vide 12,000 permanent jobs in Is-
rael. He said in the first years
more of the work will be done in
the U.S. but as production con-
tinues, the U.S. contribution will
lessen and the percentage of the
work in Israel will increase until
almost all of it is done there.
K IN NEAR NOTED that since
the planes will not be ready for
production until 1990, it will be at
least 15 years until Israel could
even consider trying to export
the Lavie so the plane cannot be
considered as competition for any
U.S. planes now on the market.
Northrop has been the major
U.S. company opposed to the
Lavie, arguing that it will com-
pete with its F-20.
The co-production of the Lavie
will provide many benefits to the
U.S., Kinnear said. He said that
the technology being developed
would be useful to the U.S. and
that the engineering teams
assembled by the various com-
panies would be kept together at
a time when production for the
U.S. military has slackened.
The co-production also
"enhances U.S.-Israeli relations"
as well as shows other countries
that the U.S. continues to sup-
port Israel's security, Kinnear
said.
Cuomo Signs N.Y. Law
To Limit Coroners'
Powers to Autopsy
ALBANY, N.Y. -
(JTA) An unprecedented
measure, which will sub-
stantially limit the power of
medical examiners
throughout New York
State to perform autopsies
over religious objections,
an issue of vital concern to
observant Jews, has been
signed into law by Gov.
Mario Cuomo.
The measure's principal
sponsor, Assemblyman Sheldon
Silver, (D., Man.) said, when the
bill was adopted earlier this year
by the Legislature, that it is the
first and only law of its kind in
the United States.
THE NEW law provides that,
if there is conscientious objection
by next of kin or "friend" of the
decedent, the medical examiner
may not perform an autopsy
unless there is "a compelling
public necessity," defined as a
situation in which an autopsy is
"essential to the conduct of a
criminal investigation of a
homicide" of which the dead
person may be a victim; or that
"discovery of the cause-of death
is necessary to meet an imme-
diate and substantial threat to
the public health; and that a
dissection or autopsy is essential
to ascertain the cause of death."
Silver said the new law also
provided that even a l_
autopsy cannot be tJfaL
without notice to pSl
objecting party to challens, i
propriety of the
dissection."
Silver said the law
that if a medical ex
contends an autopsy is wa
by a "compelling
necessity" other than L
gation of a possible homiail
prevention of disease, a c
order must be obtained
notice of next of kin or fa*._-,
if none is known to them, toi,
party as the court may direct"
SILVER SAID this re.
the prior process of thou
posing an autopsy having tog
to court to halt "clearly
jectionable autopsies" but I
new law also provides 7
mechanism for a court to raltd
extraordinary situations."
Asserting that "many m__
autopsies" are done in New Va
State, Silver said the new I
while recognizing certain ne
ties for valid post mor_
"more rationally defines tb
areas in which a ma
examiner is entitled" to
an autopsy.
Jewish religious law
severe limits for permit)
dissection of a body. Impn
dissection is considered a
ment of the body and
desecration of the good namq
the dead person.
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M-8-19-83


amir Expresses Deliaht
Liberia Renews Diplomatic Relations With Israel
By JTA Services
IUSALEM Liberia has
to renew its diplomatic
tns with Israel, it was an-
in Monrovia, the na-
capital. Foreign Minister
ik Shamir expressed
f 8 warm gratification at this
pment and expressed the
at many other African
would follow Liberia's
tie.
ia is the second state
ire last May to renew
ith Israel. Most African
tea severed diplomatic
as at the time of the Yom
War in 1973. Following
aeli-Egyptian peace treaty
Brael's withdrawal from
here has been a discernible
ent among many African
in the direction of
tig full relations with
sources are reluctant to
which African countries
Jed as "in line" to follow
footsteps of Zaire and
apparently for fear of
ting delicate contacts that
erway._________________
ih Group
is Israel____________
ICOUVER The Sixth
jly of the World Council of
es ended last week after
bg, among a number of
Ions on political issues,
lien continued the umbrella
Nation's hostility toward
I resolution, which placed
I blame on Israel for the
ni turmoil in the Middle
| asserted that Christian
nd remorse over the Nazi
jst have "often led to un-
s up port of the State of
(conference of the World
often under sharp
from other churches for
ly neglecting theology to
pate on political issues,
jtended by 900 delegates
hting 300 churches.
Mideast resolution urged
er awareness among
churches about the
and justice of the l'ales-
ause."
let Postpones
>mic Decisions
I'SALEM The Cabinet
|ts session Sunday without
Bng any of the budget cuts
pd by Finance Minister
I Aridor last week or those
nended by the Ministerial
piic Committee last
day after three days of
stions behind closed
rhe Cabinet was scheduled
finue its assessment of the
cuts at a special
; this week.
I major difficulty at the
i session was the
demand that the
budget be slashed by 20
Shekels. Defense Minister
Arens is fighting hard
the proposed cut and has
I Cabinet colleagues that
uld insist on a Cabinet
h, implying that the
libihty for the defense
leut should be borne by all
sters, not just by himself
was quoted by Hoaretz
lay as saying "The choice
en our standard of living
J'fe itself."
Synagogue
J"8 Denounced
SSBURG Am-
or Eliahu Lank in of Israel
WO the bomb attack
lemple Israel here on
Aug. 6 as a cowardly attack on a
place of Jewish worship and
directed at the Jews as a people.
He told the dose to 600 people
who gathered at the synagogue
last Friday night, "There are neo-
Nazis all over the world, perpe-
tuating the Nazi ideology of anti-
Semitism, but the Jews are no
longer defenseless. We stand
fearless, and the Jewish spirit
will never be broken."
Temple Israel was damaged by
an explosion just hours before
President Marais Viljoen and
other dignitaries, including the
city's Jewish Mayor, Allan Gadd,
and Lankin were scheduled to
attend ceremonies to mark the
50th anniversary of Reform
Judaism in South Africa.
Soviet Charge
Called False
WASHINGTON The State
Department has charged that
Soviet authorities have made a
false drug charge against an
imprisoned Soviet Jewish refu-
senik and has called this
"disturbingly reminiscent of the
Stalin era."
State Department spokesman
John Hughes read a strong state-
ment last Friday in defense of
Ley Elbert, a 35-year-old Kiev
civil engineer, who was convicted
in May of evasion of reserve mili-
tary service. Elbert has been re-
fused permission to emigrate to
Israel since 1976 because of his
military service during 1973-75
which, according to the Union of
Councils of Soviet Jews (UCSJ),
was spent mostly digging dit-
ches.
In early July, while being
transferred to a new prison camp,
Elbert was accused of having
sewn a bag of hashish into his
undershirt and was charged with
"possession of drugs for personal
use," which carries a three-year
sentence.
Arson in Conn.
Destroys Synagogue
WEST HARTFORD, Conn.
A fire, which Fire Department
investigators say was clearly the
work of arsonists, destroyed the
sanctuary and study hall of the
Young Israel Synagogue here
last week.
The fire, which was reported at
3:30 a.m. last Wednesday,
destroyed many religious articles
and prayer books as well as the
synagogue's main halls. The
Torah scrolls suffered only minor
damage. According to the Fire
Department, arsonists set fires in
five locations in the synagogue.
There are no leads yet as to who
the arsonists might be.
According to Rabbi Solomon
Krupka, the spiritual leader of
the congregation, there had been
no significant history of van-
dalism against the synagogue
building, which was built six
years ago.
Qemayel Presses
For Timetable
JERUSALEM Lebanese
President Amin Gemayel ia
reported, as Lebanese Druze
intensified their attacks on
fovernment forces, to be pressing
Israel to issue a public commit-
ment that Israel's imminent start
of redeployment of its troops in
Lebanon is part of a withdrawal
process linked to a specific target
date for total withdrawal and
specific schedules for interim
withdrawals.
Gemayel is understood to be
urging that course on Israel both
directly and through Robert
McFarlane, the new special
Mideast envoy of President
.".V.WV.V.Wi'iV,': i r ''<:'
Reagan, who was received by
Syrian President Hafez Assad
and rebuffed, as was his prece-
dessor, Philip Habib, on the
United States proposal that
Syria pull its estimated 40,000
troops out of Lebanon.
McFarlane met here last
Thursday night with Premier
Menachem Begin and Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir to
report the failure of his Damas-
cus mission
State Dep't. Calls
Proposal Impractical
WASHINGTON The State
Department has rejected as
"impractical" a proposal that the
United States admit some 10,000
Palestinian refugees.
The proposal was made by a
State Department "working"
group which has been studying
means of alleviating "the plight"
of the Palestinians, Department
spokesman John Hughes said
last Friday. He denied that
Secretary of State George Shultz
ever personally proposed that the
U.S. consider taking in a large
number of Palestinians.
Instead, Hughes said that
Shultz has stated publicly on
many occasions his "keen in-
terest in the overall plight of the
Palestinians.''
Colombia Blast
Damages Synagogue
BOGOTA The Beth-El
Synagogue, in the coastal Colom
bian city of BaranquUla, was
damaged by an explosive device
which detonated only hours after
Friday night services ended, the
World Jewish Congress reported.
According to the Confedera-
cion de Asociaciones Judias de
Colombia, the central representa-
tive body of Colombian Jewry
and the WJC affiliate here, the
explosion occurred early last
month shortly after Sabbath eve
services attended by some 150
persons. Despite property
damage, there were- no civilian
casualties.
.Reporting on the incident,
Edgardo Gorenberg, acting
undersecretary of the Latin
American branch of the WJC,
said the force of the explosion
had blown a hole in the roof of the
synagogue one meter in diameter.
UN Parley
Assails lerael
GENEVA Israel's policies
in the West Bank and South
Africa's policy of apartheid came
under severe criticism at the
United Nations World Confer-
ence to Combat Racism. The
conference voted 104-0 for
measures to combat apartheid,
ranging from economic sanctions
to a complete cutoff of all scien-
tific, cultural and sports con-
tacts.
The conference also approved a
final declaration that included a
paragraph condemning Israel for
what was termed intensified co-
operation with South Africa and
another paragraph describing
Israel's "racial discrimination
against inhabitants of the Arab
occupied territories."
The United States and Israel
boycotted the two-week confer-
ence attended by 124 nations be-
cause of the 1975 UN General
Assembly resolutions equating
Zionism with racism.
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Berman Sets Egypt's Record Straight for Shultz
When Julius Berman, chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of Major Ameri-
can Jewish Organizations, met with Secre-
tary of State George Shultz last week, Mr.
Berman openly expressed what may be for
the first time the American Jewish commu-
nity's fears about the "cold peace" that
exists between Israel and Egypt.
More specifically, Berman reminded Mr.
Shultz what the rest of the world prefers to
forget: that Israel has made substantial
sacrifices for peace in the Middle East. At
issue was the "peace" between Israel and
Egypt bought at the price of Prime
Minister Menachem Begins unilateral
promise to then-President Anwar Sadat to
return the Sinai Peninsula in toto
for the establishment of normal diplo-
matic relations between the two countries.
What Mr. Berman told the Secretary of
State was that, in return for the Sinai, with
its many valuable oil and airbase instal-
lations which Israel had established there,
Israel in fact merely received a "piece of
paper" from Egypt. An important piece of
paper, perhaps, in the sense that it prom-
ised normalization of relations.
But that promise has never been fulfilled.
Not by President Sadat. And not by his
successor, President Hosni Mubarak, after
the tragic Sadat assassination.
In fact, and we are not certain that Mr.
Berman reminded Secretary of State Shultz
about this, but it certainly should be point-
ed out, Egypt today stands in violation of
that piece of paper. Against all the stipula-
tions of the peace accord, Egypt brought
its ambassador to Israel back home follow-
ing Israel's invasion of Lebanon last year.
And now that the war is over, Egypt still
refuses to return its envoy. Mubarak's
condition? Only when Israel "does some-
thing' about a Palestinian state on the
West Bank and in Gaza.
As of last week, it became clear that
Egypt is playing footsie with Syria's Presi-
dent Assad once again that very Assad
who refuses to end his own "invasion" of
Lebanon. So that there is no telling
whether a genuine peace between Egypt
and Israel will ever emerge out of the Camp
David travesty.
Clearly, there is nothing much that
Secretary of State Shultz could have said to
Mr. Berman in reply. But at least Mr.
Berman's sentiments are on the record.
There is no need any longer for a purpose-
less limbo of opinion so far as Egypt is
concerned not for Israel and not for
Israel's friends abroad.
We Regret Split
The Union of American Hebrew Congre-
gations is one Jewish organization still
committed to the Aug. 27 commemoration
march of the 20th anniversary celebration
of Martin Luther King's historic "I have a
dream" speech. Perhaps there are other
Jews and Jewish organizations that feel the
same way despite the fear that the or-
ganized black American community in-
tends to use the event as a forum for the
expression of strong anti-Israel sentiments.
One thing is clear. The event has sent
some fissures through the American Jewish
community on this issue. We tend to sup-
port the statement of Donald Feldstein,
executive vice president of the American
Floridian
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Friday, August 19,1983
Volume 56
Jewish Committee, that the anniversary
celebration's agenda "consists of a hodge-
podge of controversial national and inter-
national issues quite unrelated to the
central civil rights goals that unite most
Americans of good will."
Worse: that "there is evidence .to
have the march endorse extreme positions
on many of them including, it is feared,
implied condemnation of Israel and support
for the PLO." Whatever civil rights im-
pulses American Jews may have to show
their union of feelings with their black
American neighbors, this alone is enough
to turn them around so far as the Aug. 27
march is concerned.
Compared to the fissures in Jewish en
munity sentiment on whether or not to
participate in the Washington march th
feelings between blacks and Jews rela'tb
to the march is an unhappy split. "
But leaders of the black community
appear so far not to want to offer specific
assurances to allay Jewish fears other thi ;
in the form of this superficial response'
"The march, and what it represents, is so
much greater than whatever individual dif.
ferences we may have."
We regret the split.
-WIU-HE
?wiqiNTHei^e?
OTA
to
Travel for Young and Beautiful
10ELUL5743
Number 33
ON THE way to Bangor,
Maine on a recent Sunday morn-
ing, I settled into my seat with a
copy of an in-flight magazine.
There was the usual array of
articles in it mainly they dealt
with exotic places to visit.
Maybe I never noticed it be-
fore, but there were several other
articles, prominently displayed,
also of the travel variety and yet
of a distinctly different order.
Each of them was committed to .
the man-on-the-move theme, and
even the woman-on-the-move.
IN EITHER case, the spirit of
this second variety of articles was
youth their beauty, upward
mobility and ultimate success:
just like in the movies and on TV.
The rest of us didn't matter. If
you weren't one of the Beautiful
People, there was nothing in the
magazine for you, not even in the
exotic places to visit articles in
which the accompanying photo-
graphs were absolutely devoid of
anybody over age 28 and looking
like they had just come out of Vic
Tanny's.
I. persisted in reading the
magazine anyway, determined to
learn what some of the Beautiful
People do at least to the extent
of what kind of pop literature is
dished up to the Beautiful People
to amuse them on their travels,
which is to say, while they're on
the move, upward or in any other
direction.
I must say, it doesn't seem to
be all that much fun for the BP's
as they make their way to suc-
cess. For instance, I read one
article entitled "How to Divorce
a Millionaire," which lists itself
as "a guide to playing for keeps
in big-league divorce court."
APPARENTLY, this article
offers a short cut to success and
money. An accompanying illus-
tration shows a poor millionaire
schnook being wrung out over a
bathtub by his now ex-wife and
lawyer as a presiding judge look-
ing on slugs him over the head
with a judicial gavel. Into the tub
pour his millions.
Another article, entitl
East, Young Man," echoJ
upward or forward or 1
onward mobility theme oil
magazine, with no apologic|
Horace Greeley either.
In this piece, there is sul
advice given to the lev*
computer-conscious tech
as to which American
focus upon for his comp
consciousness, East or
Piquantly, the artides
chortles: "Care to guess ag&
The object here is to
the reader with the usuar
about SUicon Valley in OJ"
microcomputer chip capita"
universe, where "entn?f''
engineers," the article aflegi
not as busy with their en|
ing as they are with j
$12,000 diamond neckW
their girlfriends" and where
first development of %
tract homes opened on. Uf P*l
land near Foothills Park 'm
ly along Route 101 outr
Palo Alto.
BUT THEN comesthe!
While the West was exp
its rate of computer tea
shipments at a healthy m
cent clip for the years
Continued on Page9A


Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish FloridianPage5-A
ie PLO-Sandinista Connection
Central Americans In Hiddle East As Early As 1970
The Palestine Liberation
|ganization is an active
of Communist revolu-
naries throughout Cen-
[\ America. The PLO has
Applied training and
ateriel for the Sandinista
solution in Nicaragua,
is still supplying mili
aid and advisors to the
kmmunist Sandinista
/ernment. For their part,
idinista revolutionaries
Ire fighting beside their
10 comrades in the
idle East as early as
70, are anti-Semitic and
dedicated to the de-
action of Israel.
tight now, the PLO is giving
Salvadoran Communists the
ae sort of help. Since the late
9s, the PLO has been working
Fidel Castro and his net-
He of Latin American revolu-
naries and has developed ties
evolutionary organizations in
lumber of Latin American
Intries.
["HOUGH THIS alliance has
eived little attention in the
ss, neither the PLO nor its
tin Communist allies trouble
deny it. On June 7, 1979, six
feks before the Sandinistas
Be to power, Sandinista press
t>kesman Jorge Mandi deliver -
a particularly strong tea-
konial to the alliance:
[There is a longstanding blood
|ty between us and the Pales-
ans. Many of the units
anging to the Sandinista
bvements were at Palestinian
folutionary bases in Jordan. In
early 1970s, Nicaraguan and
lestinian blood was spilled
ether in Amman and in other
ces during the Black Septem-
I battles .
'It is natural therefore, that in
war against Somoza, we re-
ved Palestinian aid for our
Solution in various forms."
landi also made it clear that
Sandinistas had participated
PLO terrorist acts such as
a eking.
/ AWOINTINA-
I MOMTON1SO*
Intelligence information has linked the PLO with terrorist and guerrilla organizations around the world.
THIS REPORT on the PLO
in Central America is from
the White House Digest, a
service of the White House
Office of Media Relations
and Planning.
CUBA HAS been the great or-
ganizing center and supply depot
for Communist revolution in
Central America. Fidel Castro in-
troduced the PLO into the region
and has vigorously promoted and
supported the PLO's activities
there.
Until the mid-1960s, Castro
supported Israel. But, in 1966,
Castro sponsored the First Con-
ference of the Organization of
Solidarity of the Peoples of Asia,
Africa and Latin America, bring-
ing together revolutionary lead-
ers from three continents in order
to get them to work together.
PLO Giving Salvadoran
Communists Same Help
FIDEL CASTRO
PLO representatives attended,
and Castro began efforts to make
the PLO a part of international
revolutionary activities, especial-
ly in Latin America. -
BY 1968, Cuban intelligence
and military personnel were as-
sisting the PLO in North Africa
and Iraq. By 1969, Cuban officers
were in joint training with PLO
officers in the USSR. In June
1969, Cubans from that training
class participated in a joint raid
with the PLO in the Sinai desert.
In 1972, Castro met with PLO
leaders in Algeria and the two
sides agreed to step up their joint
activities. The PLO undertook to
augment Cuban training of Latin
American terrorists with special-
ized training in Lebanon, South
Yemen, and Libya. In 1973,
Castro broke relations with Is-
rael. Cuba had become one of Is-
rael's most dedicated enemies. In
1974, the PLO opened its first
Latin American office in Havana.
Since being introduced to the
region by Castro, the PLO has
developed ties with revolutionary
groups in nearly half the coun-
tries in the region.
COOPERATION between the
Sandinistas and the PLO goes
back at least to 1969, seven or
eight years before most Ameri-
cans had heard of the Sandin-
istas. That year, some 50 Sandin-
ista guerrillas went to Tyre for
training under the PLO. Other
Sandinistas went to train in
terror at PLO camps in Algeria.
The Sandinista terrorists fit
right in with their PLO counter-
parts. It has been reported that
Pedro Arauz, a Sandinista who
had hijacked a Nicaraguan air-
liner in 1969, trained under the
PLO in 1970. Aa the quote from
Jorge Mandi makes clear, San-
dinista troops fought beside the
PLO against King Hussein of
Jordan in 1970.
Thomas Borge, Interior Minis-
ter of the Sandinista regime, has
confirmed that he and other
Sandinist-leaders were trained by
Al Fatah, the leading PLO group,
prior to 1970. Borge repeatedly
spent much of the early 1970's
working for Castro, and was fre-
quently in the Middle East,
where he used Libyan money and -
PLO assistance to obtain arms
for Central American guerilla
movements.
THE FIRST official confirma-
tion of the PLO-Sandinista al-
liance came" in February, 1978.
The two groups issued a joint
communique in Mexico City that
affirmed the "ties of solidarity '
existing between the two revolu-
tionary organizations. They were
united in their hatred of what
they called the "racist state of Is-
rael."
In a similar incident in March,
1978, the Sandinistas went so far
as to join the Democratic Front
for the Liberation of Palestine in
a joint "declaration of war"
against Israel.
As the Sandinistas became
more confident of victory, PLO
aid became more concrete. Early
in 1979, shortly before the final
Sandinista victory, the PLO sent
an arms shipment to the Sandin-
istas but it was intercepted by
the government of Morocco.
DURING THE final weeks of
the revolution, several large ship-
ments of anna arrived from the
Middle East. According to one
source, Thomas Borge arranged
for a shipment of guns to be sent
from North Korea on a ship own-
ed and operated by the PLO.
Within two weeks of the San-
dinista victory in July 1979, the
Sandinistas sent a mission to
Beirut to establish official con-
tacts with the PLO. The PLO
facilitated a S12 million loan to
the Sandinistas.
Today, Nicaragua is one of the
few countries in the world where
the PLO mission is- officially
designated as an Embassy and
the ranking PLO official is refer-
red to as "Ambassador" a tes-
timony to the importance the
Sandinistas attach to their PLO
connections. '
ON THE first anniversary of
the Sandinista Communist take-
George Habash
over in 1980, Yasir Arafat came
to Managua as an honored guest.
Thomas Borge proclaimed, "The
PLO cause is the cause of the
Sandinistas."
And Arafat replied, "The links
between us are not new; your
comrades did not come to our
country just to train, but to fight.
Your enemies are our
.enemies."
The PLO information bulletin,
Palestine, commented:
"There is no doubt there is a
common line between Nicaragua,
Iran, and Palestine. A common
front against a common
enemy .
"The Palestinian revolution
understands the international
dimensions of its struggle and its
international task of supporting,
within its capabilities, inter-
national liberation movements."
Current estimates suggest that
there are about 50 PLO personnel
in Nicaragua. Some are involved
in training Sandinista military in
the use of Eastern Bloc weapons,
some training pilots and flying
helicopters, maintaining aircraft
Continued on Page 6- A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, August 19,1983

Jpws Spam King Memorial
Fear Anti-Israel Attack Slated on Rally Agenda
By RIFKA ROSENWEIN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Two major Jewish organ-
izations are currently seek-
ing assurances from the
leaders of the 20th anni-
versary celebration of Mar-
tin Luther King's historic
"I have a dream" speech
that the event will not be
used as a forum for expres-
sion of anti-Israel senti-
ment.
A number of other Jewish
organizations that have trad-
itionally been at the forefront of
the civil rights movement have
decided not to endorse the Aug.
27 commemorative march in
Washington, D.C. because of
what they consider to be the anti-
Israel position of some of the
rally's sponsors. They also object
to parts of the rally's platform,
which they feel would lead to a
distortion of the purpose of the
event. The groups object as well
to the scheduling of the march for
Saturday.
A SPOKESMAN for the
Union of American Hebrew Con-
gregations (UAHCI told the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency that his
organization was assured by the
leadership of the march that
"anti-Israel rhetoric will not take
place" at the event. If any such
rhetoric is expressed, the spokes-
man continued, the leadership
promised to "disavow" it.
The spokesman explained that
the UAHC was now "negotiating
the (content of the) official posi-
tion papers" of the event. He
added, however, that barring
"overt anti-Semitic sentiment,"
the UAHC is endorsing the
march because "we feel the risks
involved are not worth pulling
out" from the event. He also
stressed that the UAHC "is not
encouraging" its members to
march "because of the conflict
with Shabbat." Rabbi Alexander
Schindler, president of the UAH-
C, is a co-convenor of the event.
The American Jewish Con-
gress is working with the UAHC
"to negotiate certain commit-
ments" from the march leader-
ship, an AJCongress spokesman
said, but its decision on whether
or not to endorse the march will
depend on the outcome of these
negotiations, the spokesman
added.
THE LEADERSHIP includes
co-chairpersons Corel ta Scott
King, widow of the slain civil
rights leader; Dr. Benjamin
Hooks, executive director of the
National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People; Dr.
Joseph Lowery, president of the
Southern Christian Leadership
Conference; Judy Goldsmith,
president of the National Orga-
nization for Women; and Rep.
Walter Fauntroy (D., District of
Columbia), the national director
of the event.
The march is being publicized
as a "New Coalition of Con-
science" that will boast a plat-
form of "jobs, peace and free-
dom."
The JTA contacted the offices
of Hooks in New York, Fauntroy
in Washington and Mrs. King in
Atlanta, but was told that they
were unavailable for immediate
comment. A spokesman for the
Martin Luther King Center for
Social Change in Atlanta, which
Mrs. King heads, read a state-
ment issued earlier by Mrs. King:
"I hope the Jewish community
and Jewish leaders will support
the march. The march, and what
it represents, is so much greater
than whatever individual dif-
ferences we may have."
THE JEWISH groups that
have decided not to endorse the
event noted several reasons for
their decision. Most cited a spe-
cific clause in "A Call to the Na-
tion" issued by the march orga-
nizers, which says:: "We oppose
the militarization of internal con-
flicts, often abetted and even en-
couraged by massive U.S. arms
exports, in areas of the world
such as the Middle East and Cen-
tral America, while their basic
human problems are neglected."
Nathan Perlmutter, national
director of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith, said, "In
view of Israel being a recipient of
some of these 'massive arms,' the
message is clear: we do not be-
long in this march."
He added that "by bringing in
a number of political issues" to
the rally's platform "not directly
related to civil rights," the event
was being "diluted" and "polit-
icized." Perlmuter said he saw
"absolutely no purpose (in join-
ing) in an event that has so
broadened its agenda, even
reaching so far as the Middle
East. They are working far
afield."
endorsing the march, cited nu-
clear disarmament and Central
America as issues which have
connection with the civil
objectives which we
no
rights
share.'
DONALD FELDSTEIN,
executive vice president of the
American Jewish Committee,
said that the 'call for a New
Coalition of Conscience' consists
of a hodgepodge of controversial
national and international issues
quite unrelated to the central
civil rights goals that unite most
Americans of good will."
He explained that "the
AJCommittee and most other
Jewish groups have no official
position on many of these issues;
but there is evidence of consider-
able pressure to have the march
endorse extreme positions on
many of them including, it is
feared, implied condemnation of
Israel and support for the PLO."
A spokesman for the American
Section of the World Zionist
Organization, which is also not
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THE JEWISH War Veterans,
who originally endorsed the
march, withdrew its sponsorship
in June because of the issues
"unrelated to civil rights" that it
felt "distort the original pur-
poses" of the event, according to
a spokesman.
The JWV and the other groups
also objected to certain sponsors
of the march who have been as-
sociated with anti-Semitic or
anti- Israel statements. Those
most often mentioned were Rev.
Jesse Jackson and former Sen-
ator James Abourezk, who is now
chairman of the American-Arab
Anti-Discrimination Committee.
"I do not wish to literally or
figuratively march side by side"
with those people, said Perl-
mutter.
"Too many of those in the line
march to the sound of a different
drummer that grates on the mes-
sage of the Reverend King's im-
mortal 'I have a dream' vision,"
said Bernice Tannenbaum, chair-
man of the WZO American Sec-
tion.
A SPOKESMAN for the WZO
cited a list of several other "Com-
munist and pro-PLO" sponsors
of the event to whom the Jewish
groups object. The groups were
identified as the People's School
for Marxist Studies, which has
hosted PLO officials in this coun-
try; Jewish Affairs, a publication
of the Communist Party; the
United States Peace Council;
Pax-Christ i; Women for Racial
and Economic Equality; and the
National Alliance against Racist
and Political Repression. The
WZO spokesman also noted that
Lowery and Fauntroy have orga-
nized pro-PLO conferences and
anti-Israel rallies.
Feldstein said this New Coali-
tion could "only undermine" the
Leadership Conference on Civil
Rights, "for decades the most ef-
fective coalition of Blacks, Jews,
labor and other supporters" of
the civil rights agenda.
Besides their opposition to the
current agenda and some of the
new leaders of the march, the
Jewish groups objected to the
scheduling of the event for the
Sabbath. Feldstein called it
"insensitively scheduled" and
Tannenbaum agreed that it was
"thoughtlessly" planned.
AT THE same time, however,
the Jewish leaders stressed their
continued commitment to the
original civil rights objectives,
and many are endorsing other
events scheduled for the week of
the rally in commemoration of
the original march.
A spokesman for the AJCom-
mittee said that his organization
was "recommending local events
be held to underscore our com-
mitment to complete the un-
finished civil rights agenda." The
JWV spokesperson said her
organization "still endorses the
agenda of Martin Luther King
and will continue to work" to-
wards his goals.
PLANNING
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The National Jewish Commu-
nity Relations Advisory Council
(NJCRACI, which is an umbrella
coordinating body, is "taking no
position in regard to the march,"
according to Charney Bromberg,
associate director. "Because
there was a division among the
members," which include UAHC,
the NJCRAC has "no power to
take a position," he said. He add-
ed that many of its members were
planning other forms of com-
memoration of the historic
march.
THE JEWISH Community
Council of Greater Washington is
planning a week-long,^]
programs, includingsporW*
television show abouttSiJI
rights movement. showing J
ADL film about Martin Lutl!
King encouraging rabbis to J
Sabbath sermons about u*
sues of civil rights, urging 1%.
to plant trees in the Dr 3
Luther King Jr. Memorial p2
in Israel, and sponsoruT*
discussion about the 1983
gressional legislative agenda
pertains to the area
rights. The events are
conjunction with the
offices of the ADL
AJCongress.
f rivjl
and tg|
The AJCommittee has issud
booklet entitled "The 53
Legacy of Martin Luther 1
Jr." by Rabbi Marc TanenbaM
national interreligious aflZ
director of the CommitUe,
part of its commemoration offlj
march.
PLO Influence Said To Be
Strong in Latin America
Continued from Page 5-A
and training Salvadoran gueril-
las to export Communist terror to
that country.
THERE IS also a strong al-
liance between the PLO and the
Salvadoran Communist gueril-
las. The Salvadoran Com-
munists, like the Sandinistas,
share the PLO's fierce opposition
to Israel.
One of the first clear signs of
sympathy between the two
groups emerged when one of the
major Salvadoran Communist
guerrilla groups, the Popular
Liberation Forces (FPL) kidnap-
ped and murdered the South
African Ambassador to El
Salvador. The FPL demanded, as
part of the ransom, that the
Salvadoran government break
relations with Israel and estab-
lish official relations with the
PLO.
Just a month later, the
People's Revolutionary Army
(ERP), another Salvadoran
communist guerrilla group,
bombed the Israeli embassy in
San Salvador to show "solidarity
with the Palestinian people," and
demanded that the government
recognize the PLO.
IN MAY, 1980. a delegation
from Revolutionary Coordination
of the Masses 1CRM), the unified
political front for all the im-
portant Salvadoran Communist
groups, met in Beirut with one of
Yasser Arafat's deputies, Abu
Jihad, and with George Habash,
head of the terrorist Popular
Front for the Liberation of Pales-
tine, and arrived at agreements
for training programs and arms
purchases. The first group of
Salvadoran trainees finished a
course" in PLO-style terrorism
at an Al Fatah camp in June
1980.
On July 23, 1980, represen
tatives of the Salvadoran United
Revolutionary Directorate
(DRU) which was then the unif-
ied military command for the
various Salvadoran Communist
groups, met with Arafat in
Managua. Arafat promised thai
arms and aircraft. Later in tal
year, Arafat did send some aral
to the DRU, and according 11
published reports, PLO fighunl
were sent to El Salvador in ScJ
tember.
The alliance picked up steamil
1981 In March, Shafik HandaU[
Salvadoran of Palestiniail
descent and 'aead of El Salvador 1
Communist Party, met will
Arafat and representatives 4\
Habash's Popular Front in Leb-I
anon. The meeting resulted in i|
joint communique that, amort
other points, included an agrai
ment to continue cooperation btl
tween the unified Salvador! I
guerrilla groups and Habut'il
group.
BY EARLY 1981, according!*!
Congressional testimony from I
Acting Assistant Secretary i
State for Inter-American Affan
John Bushnell, there had been "11
massive influx of arms I
Soviet and other ConvnunixJ
sources." Radical Arab state 1
and the Palestine Liberatiotl
Organization, and the terrors:!
Popular Front for the LiberatK
of Palestine have furntshedl
funds, arms, and training.
In January, 1982. Arafat saidI
publicly that PLO guerrillas wen I
serving in El Salvador. Audi
documents captured in Beirut I
during the summer of 1982 revea
that there were Salvadoru
guerrillas in PLO camps in UM
anon.
Though these fragments v
information have left a clear trail
even without them there woulc
be no doubt about the relation
ship between the Central Amen-
can Communists and FLO terror.
because both sides have loudly
proclaimed it. In 1981. Yasir
Arafat spoke in words too dear to |
be misunderstood or explaii
away: "We are a great revolution
that can never be intimidated
We have connections with all u*
revolutionary movements
throughout the world, in
Salvador, in Nicaragua m* '
reiterate Salvador and el
where in the world."
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S


Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Jewish Leaders Tell
Shultz They Fear
Cold Peace' With Egypt
Jy DAVID FRIEDMAN
ASHINGTON -
fA) A group of
lerican Jewish leaders
/e expressed concern to
(jretary of State George
dtz about the "cold
ice" that exists between
ael and Egypt.
alms Berman, chairman ot
Conference of Presidents of
for American Jewish
ations, said the Jewish
ers had stressed that they
i "very wary" that Egypt has
returned its Ambassador to
el even though Israel and
non had signed an agree-
it for the withdrawal of Israeli
as from Lebanon.
/hen Egypt withdrew its
mssador last September, it
he would not return until
^el agrees to withdraw from
non. But Egyptian spokes-
are now talking about a
kplete withdrawal as well as
[improvement of conditions on
(West Bank before an envoy is
; to Tel Aviv.
SRMAN SAID the Egyptian
jUion was not only "disap-
lting" but "not very
luctive toward the overall
effort." He said there is an
ctation" that Israel will be
I to take "risks for peace."
lut he said when it took a
ftjor risk" for peace by its
ddrawal from the Sinai all it
pved in return was a "piece of
er" that promised a new
tionship that has not yet been
eved.
rman and 10 other Jewish
lers, representing the
kidents Conference and the
tonal Republican Jewish
Jit ion. met for an hour-and-a-
with Shultz. They had been
ted by the White House
ch said President Reagan had
B(i Shultz to brief them on the
Lings with Lebanese Presi-
Amin Gemayel and Israeli
sign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
Defense Minister Moshe
5.
tHE JEWISH leaders
Brged from the State
ban mem apparently pleased
[the present state of Israeli-
\. relations. Noting that he
become chairman of the
sident's Conference on June 9,
I, Berman said, "I've never
I it better."
le said the present state of
M-ions were "much more
iamental" than the "honey-
>n" that it has been labeled
be the May 17 signing of the
kanese- Israeli agreement. He
first of all, two major
irritants between Israel and the
U.S. have been removed for the
present because of Jordan's
refusal to join the autonomy
negotiations, a fundamental part
of Reagan's Sept. 1 peace initia-
tive, and the issue of Israeli with-
drawal.
Secondly, Berman stressed
that Shultz himself is responsible
in the improvement in relations.
He asid that the Secretary
believes in "interpersonal rela-
tionships" and has been able to
relate to Israeli officials on an
individual basis. He said this is a
positive sign for the future of the
relations between the two
countries.
ISRAEL AND the U.S. are
now collaborating to get Syria to
withdraw its troops out of Leba-
non, Berman said. While not
overly optimistic, he said the
U.S. understands that it will not
get Syrian President Hafez
Assad to agree immediately to
withdraw.
Instead, the U.S. is hopeful that
in the "long run," Syria can be
"isolated" by having other Arab
countries and the West Euro-
peans join the U.S., Israeli and
Lebanese efforts for Syrian with-
drawal, Berman explained. He
added that in this connection, the
State Department believes that
Saudi Arabia has been and will
continue to be helpful.
This means that the naming of
Robert McFarlane to replace
Philip Habib as special Mideast
envoy is not part of a "fresh
Julius Berman
approach" to the problem,
Berman emphasized.
HE SAID: "It is not a
question of sending McFarlane to
Syria and he'll walk out of the
meeting with Assad saying
'okay' and with McFarlane
saying 'He (Assad) didn't give
into Habib and Shultz but he
gave into me.' Instead, Berman
said the Administration realizes
it cannot expect "immediate
results" but it was necessary "to
persevere" for the "long run."
The issue of Soviet Jewry was
also discussed, Berman said. He
said the meeting "reinforced" the
understanding of the Jewish
community that in every U.S.
meeting with the Soviets, in-
cluding the meetings Shultz is
expected to have with Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei
Gromyko in Madrid in Sep-
tember and at the United Nations
General Assembly in New York
this fall, the Soviet Jewry "issue
will be raised, including the
specific issue of Anatoly
Sharansky."
7.5 Percent Devaluation of Shekel
Only First Step Against Inflation
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The 7.5 percent devalua-
tion of the Shekel is only
the beginning of new meas-
ures to control Israel's
headlong inflation, eco-
nomic observers say, but
they add that Treasury of-
ficials themselves are di-
vided over what the addi-
tional measures should be.
The Treasury has announced
that it wants a total cut in the
budget of 55 billion Shekels, but
there is little certainty that the
Cabinet will approve so sharp a
cut.
THE MINISTERIAL Eco-
nomic Committee has approved
cuts in the budgets of the min-
istries of communications, trans-
port, tourism and housing,
leaving the Treasury well short of
its 55 billion Shekel cut goal.
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The budget cuts for the minis-
tries of defense, education, health
and welfare remain in dispute.
The Ministerial Economic Com-
mittee also recommended a tax
package which would bring in
some 15 to 20 billion Shekels, but
it must still find enough cuts to
reach the Treasury target.
The economic experts say the
two possible options were both
nettlesome. One would be limits
on private income and the other
more cuts in public services. The
experts say that the public prob-
ably would react to any limi-
tations on income by drawing on
savings, which would be counter-
productive to the goal of cutting
consumption.
APPARENTLY for the first
time since Finance Minister
Yoram Aridor announced a policy
of budget cuts, coupled with re-
sistance to wage increases, eco-
nomic experts and government
officials were in agreement that
devaluation of the Shekel would
help curb inflation only if it was
accompanied by drastic cuts in
government spending. This was
said to be necessary to curb the
injection of cash in the economy,
one of the factors in spurring the
nation's raging inflation.
in n^a
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Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
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re! 534 1004or67?0004
Egyptian Praises Syria's
Refusal to Withdraw
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Syria's refusal to withdraw its
forces from the Bekaa valley has been justified by
Egyptian Minister of State Boutros Ghali. He told Arab
journalists here, after his arrival in Paris, that Syria's
stand "is justified and natural" because Damascus "is
worried by Israel's intentions." He added that "one
should not forget that Israeli troops still occupy the
Golan."
GUAM'S DECLARATION,printed in several Arab-
language dailies, might indicate a change in Egyptian-
Syrian relations. Cairo and Damascus broke off
diplomatic relations in 1979 after the signing of the
Israeli-Egyptian peace treaty and the two countries' state
radios and televisions have been generally trading ac-
cusations and insults.
Damascus Radio, monitored in Paris, warmly
praised, for the first time, Egypt's stand and thanked
President Hosni Mubarak for his support. The radio
bitterly attacked the new American mediator, Robert
McFarlane, saying his trip to the Middle East "serves to
help the pro-American regimes and the Phalangist in-
terests" in Lebanon. Damascus Radio indicated that
McFarlane might not be welcomed once again in Syria
unless he "brings with him new ideas."
Egypt Opens Drive to Resume
Relations With Arab World
Similarly, the omission of
Syria by Egypt's Minister of
State for Foreign Affairs,
Boutros Ghali, among the Arab
countries with whom he noted
Egypt had no relations, prom-
pted the somewhat sensational
headline in the London-based
Arabic-language weekly Al-
Magalla, which conducted the
interview: "Are There Secret
Ties Between Egypt and Syria?"
The minister declined comment
when asked directly if such ties
existed.
Continued from Page 1 -A
capitals with which relations
have not been resumed.
In an interview with the
weekly Akhbar El Yom last
week, however. Foreign Minister
Kamal Hassan Ali hinted at
possible contacts between Egypt
and Syria to break the deadlock
in Lebanon, saying "Egypt
believes that dialogue with Arab
brothers is always useful and
needed."
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Vag* 8-A the Jewwhtforicfian/ Friday, August 19,1963
Yeshayahu Dan (second from right) is
honored with the Ma'asim Tovim Award of
the American Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee at its July Executive Committee
Meeting in New York. The meeting was
addressed by Jerold C Hoffberger (third
from left), recently efected chairman of the
Board of Governors of the Jewish Agency.
Dan was honored for his lifetime dedication
to Jewish service. Shown with Dan are (left
to right) Jack D. Weiler and Henry Taub,
honorary president and president of JDC
respectively; Hoffberger; Dan; and Ralph I.
Goldman, JDC executive vice president
New Effort on Tap
More Wallenberg Info Being Sought
A renewed American effort to
secure from the Soviet Union
information on the whereabouts
of Raoul Wallenberg, the
Swedish diplomat arrested by the
Russians after he saved approxi-
mately 100,000 Hungarian Jews
during World War II. has been
proposed to a Congressional sub-
committee.
In testimony before the House
Subcommittee on Human Rights
and International Organizations,
Mrs. Rachel Oestreicher Haspel,
president of the Raoul Wallen-
berg Committee of the United
States in affiliation with the
Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B'rith, urged that all branches of
the U.S. government, when com-
municating with the Soviets on
official matters, raise the issue of
Wallenberg and press for his
release from prison; Radio Free
Europe and Voice of America
broadcasts to the Soviet Union
be used to aid in establishing
Wallenberg's whereabouts; and
Soviet immigrants to the U.S. be
asked about any information
they may have concerning
Wallenberg.
Broken bones are the price
some asthma victims must pay
for controlling their illness with
high doses of steroids, re-
searchers at Denver's National
Jewish Hospital, the National
New Human
Rights Group
WASHINGTON The
formation of a new international
human rights organization was
announcedhaw, rtaeignad te~
provide unity and cohesion for
Western nations and European
countries to speak out against
human rights abuses in the
Soviet Un*
Asthma Center, report in the
current New England Journal of
Medicine.
Two studies by Allen D.
Adinoff, and Dr. J. Roger
Hollister indicate that chronic
steroid users are at much greater
risk of suffering from sponta-
neous rib and backbone fractures
than are severe asthmatics who
do not require high doses of
steroids.
"People who require steroids
for asthma and other diseases
often suffer spontaneous bone
fractures, but there was a ques-
tion whether the fractures were
the result of the steroids or the
disease. Our study confirms it's
the steroids," Dr. Adinoff said.
"A good deal of my childhood
was shaped by my father's com-
mitments to public service, to
civil rights, and to the Jewish
state of Israel For my father,
the existence of a Jewish home-
land in Israel was a matter of
principle and justice," Hubert H.
Humphrey III said at a luncheon
given in his honor at Bar'I Ian
University in Ramat Gan.
Humphrey, who is the son of
the late U.S. Vice President and
Sen. Hubert -Humphrey, serves
as the Attorney General of
Minnesota. He was in Israel on a
fact-finding mission and as a
guest of Bar-Ilan.
Shanghai, the haven for 25,000
Jews fleeincr Nazi Europe during
World War II, is expected to
designate several former synago-
gues as historic landmarks, it
was revealed this week by Rabbi
Arthur Schneier, president of the
Appeal of Conscience Founda-
tion, on his return from a study
mission to China.
Rabbi Schneier, senior rabbi of
Park East Synagogue in Manhat-
tan, reported that an interfaith
delegation of the Foundation
which he led in China, had met
with Shanghai's Deputy Mayor,
Li Zhao Ji, last month.
The Shanghai official
responded favorably to the dele-
gation's request that several of
the former synagogues be given
landmark status. Rabbi Schneier
said. The buildings are now being
used for industrial, commercial
' and educational purposes, he said
at a news conference in New
York.
A call on American Jewry to
support the observance of World
Food Day, Oct. 16 this year, was
made last week by the American
Jewish Joint Distribution Com-
mittee, the overseas relief arm of
the American Jewish community
The call was issued by Henry
Taub, president of the JDC, and
Ralph I. Goldman, executive vice
president, and noted that there
are now more than 300 American
sponsoring agencies of World
Food Day.
According to the JDC, almost
every American community
organizes some food-related
events during the pre-Thanks-
giving period. The JDC urged
Jewish communities to make
these observances an important
part of the local calendar.
The movement of Mesorati
(Conservative! Judaism in Israel
has sent a letter to Prime Minis-
ter Menachem Begin protesting
his intention to change the Law
of Return to exclude from
recognition non-Orthodox
conversions to Judaism, even
those made according to Halachic
requirements. The Mesorati
Movement is allied with the
United Synagogue of America,
the congregational arm of the
Conservative Movement in North
America.
The letter was sent in response
to a pledge made by Prime
Minister Begin recently to the
Adugath Yisrael Orthodox reli-
gious faction that he will "make
every effort" to revise Israels
Law of Return, which grants
automatic Israeli citizenship to
all Jews wishing to settle in
Israel.
The American Jewish Com-
mittee is urging a Senate sub-
committee to vote down a bill
that calls for the Government to
hold back Federal education
funds from public schools that do
not permit their teachers and
pupils to engage in "voluntary
religious activities."
ACJ maintains that any
organized religious activity held
in a public school would violate
the Constitutional principle of
separation of church and state
and that any religious activity
conducted in
school could
an elementary
never be truly
voluntary.
The human relations agency
contends also that "any child
who wishes to say a prayer in
school is perfectly free to do so"
and that no law is needed to
permit such prayer.
Henry Was
Just Plain
U.S. Citizen
fr2
Dc
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON
,(JTA) The State .
partment has stressed that
when former Secretary 0f
State Henry Kissinger met
a Palestine Liberation Or!
ganization official in Mor.
occo last November, he was
doing so as a "private tin.
zen" and was not conduct-
ing "back channel" talis
for the Reagan Administra
tion.
Department spokesman John I
Hughes, in a statement defend J
ing the former Secretary, also re-"
jected the claim in a published I
newspaper story that the meetm.
had caused "complications" it I
the U.S. effort to get King Hu I
sein of Jordan to join in the Mid I
die East peace negotiations.
"NEITHER THAT conversJ
tion nor any of Dr. Kisskgeri
private activities have been i
complicating factor in our diplo-
macy or have delayed the j
process." Hughes said.
He said Kissinger's efforts had I
been "mischaracterized'' in the
Washington Post story which *
vealed that Kissinger had met
with Ahmed Dajani, a memberof
the PLO executive committee I
and a top aide to PLO chief Yasir I
Arafat. Kissinger was in Morocco I
at the time for a meeting of the I
American-Moroccan Foundation.
a private foundation of which he [
is co-chairman of the Board of I
Trustees.
Kissinger, appearing on the j
NBC-TV "Today Show, said his
meeting with Dajani was not a
30-minute private tete-a-tete at
the Poet reported but in full view
of all those attending a party at
King Hassan of Morocco's Mor-
occan Academy. Dajani appar-
ently is a member of the'
Academy. Kissinger said he was
brought over to meet Dajani as 11
Palestinian and did not know be |
was an official of the PLO.
HE SAID their conversation I
consisted of Dajani telling bin
that the U.S. should change its
policy toward the PLO and he ex-
plaining why the U.S. should
maintain it.
It was Kissinger, who as Sec-
retary of State in 1975, made a
pledge to Israel that the U.S.
would not negotiate with the
PLO. That policy "remains un-
changed," Hughes said
raise The
The formation of The In-
terparliamentajry Group (IPG)
was announced* at a joint press
conference-by/tBe Union of Coun-
cils for Soviet. Jews (UQSJt and
its four irutiauXo-sponsore in the
United State**. Sens* Depms
DeConcini Utuiriz.) and Chiles
Graasley fit;,; firwa), and
Tom LantoeHllf Calif.) and,
Porter Grass!
speakingjrfth
Western wprl
people w
rights we-
"We will be
voice in the
the plight of
ave the human
.
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^3


Leo Mindlin
Two Novels by European Jews;
Travel for Young and Beautiful one is classic, other is cheap
Continued from Page 4 A
"the Northeast states were ex-
panding their shipments a little
faster, about 17 percent." Hence,
the article's subtitle, "Care to
guess again?"
The computer-conscious tech-
nocrat is therefore warned that
during the same period "... the
Northeast (Coast) shipped
$21.6 billion worth of high-tech-
nology items, $6 billion more
than spilled forth from the fac-
tories of the West. Thus, by 1982
the Northeast, almost completely
unnoticed, had raised its level of
shipments to S71.2 billion," as
compared with the West Coast
high-tech total shipments of a
mere $55.1 billion.
So where is the upwardly-
mobile young man to go in the
end? Silicon Valley or no Silicon
Valley (with its $12,000 diamond
necklaces for girlfriends), why to
the East Coast, of course, where
the real money is. Surprise!
IF THESE articles are in-
formative and "must" reading
for Beautiful People on the go,
just imagine the accompanying
advertising in the in-flight maga-
zine I was perusing so hungrily,
with its nubile female beauties
sunning themselves on the patios
of their posh hotel suites between
corporate meetings in one metro-
politan world center of economic
power and glittering opportuni-
ties for success, and planes to the
next metropolitan world center,
the suntan a mere lube stop, so to
speak.
And, of course, the "special"
items advertised for her potential
lovers, for example, the young
man advised to go East. Which
such mobile young man (un-
doubtedly also suntanned)
doesn't know, as another ad de-
clares, that "Success means
risk "? He is therefore advised
that "there's one risk you (the
young man) can't afford to take.
Protect your lifestyle." Well, who
wouldn't want to, what with all
that money and success just
around the next upwardly mobile
corner?
The item in question is an
EMGO bulletproof vest "for the
fast-moving executive." And
what fast-moving executive, a
brisker euphemism for the up-
ward or forward or onward-
moving Beautiful Person, isn't
mobile enough to need an
EMGO? Without a bulletproof
vest, he'd surely be admitting he
isn't fast enough, and hence not
entitled to be a Beautiful Person.
Then who'd want to shoot him at
all?
AND WHEN he gets to where
he is going, say to the nubile
female beauty in the first ad I
saw sunning herself on the patio
of her posh hotel suite, what does
he do? Why, if he is mobile
enough, something say like Clark
Kent, there's a CCS Communica-
tion Control waiting for him in
yet a third ad. As she opens a
greasy sunscreened eye in greet-
ing, the "Secret Connection
Briefcase" for the exec on the real
move, who must constantly fear
that he's being bugged, goes
right to work for him.
The CCS Communication Con-
trol for this whirling exec, attired
in his EMGO bulletproof vest, is
his "pocket-sized tape recorder
detector" of those who may be
"secretly recording your con-
versation." What is more, the
good old CCS is also a "miniature
stress analyzer (that) lets you
know when someone is lying,"
precisely the perfect thing, say,
for the "Go East, Young Man"
article itself, which may be a
plant to confuse the East Coast
microchip industry as Silicon
Valley forges ahead on some
super hush-hush project.
Or the mobile beauty sunning
herself on the patio between
meetings perhaps. The nubile
femme fatale of sex on the hoof,
but actually employed as an
industrial spy for Japanese tech-
nocrats. Her eye opens, she
speaks a word in greeting, and
his CCS instantly analyzes her
stress to reveal her status as cor-
porate spy or just plain lover be-
tween planes.
BY THE time I arrive in
Bangor, I am thoroughly ex-
hausted by all this youth on the
run. All this beauty. All this up-
ward mobility and success cloth-
ed in bullet proof vests and pro-
tected by miniaturized ant i-bug-
ging devices that double for lie-
detectors.
I take some comfort in the
notion that in spite of so much
youthful commotion, the Beau-
tiful People aren't really faster
than a speeding bullet, or they
wouldn't need those EMGO vests
in the first place. And that they
aren't so much on the move as on
the make.
For those of us, like me,
ignored by the in-flight mag-
azines, there seems to be a sense
of peace and tranquility in ex-
change, where there's no need for
the CCS Communication Control
either.
Legislative Relief
New York Helps Women to Divorce
Continued from Page 1 -A
Both the 1982 and the 1983
bills were approved by the
Assembly and State Senate but
Silver withdrew his 1982 bill out
of fear of a veto by the Governor,
though Silver was convinced the
bill was constitutional.
SILVER SAID the new law
provides a court-enforceable
mechanism under which a spouse
who starts a civil proceeding to
annul a marriage or get a divorce
must declare, in a sworn state-
ment, that he or she has taken, or
will take, prior to the entry of
final judgment for annulment or
divorce, all possible steps to
remove any barrier to the
defendant's remarriage following
the annulment or divorce.
The Commission on Legisla-
tion and Civic Action of Agudath
Israel of America, the Orthodox
agency, initiated the 1983 bill, as
an effort to ease the problem of
those Jews who could be barred
from marrying again after a
divorce.
For Orthodox Jews, this
becomes a reality if the husband
refused to grant a Get, thus
blocking his spouse from
remarrying. In some cases, the
wife refuses to accept a Get,
barring her spouse from
marrying again.
THE NEW law requires that
any marriage performed by a
clergyman should not be ter-
minated by a civil court if there is
any barrier to remarriage, speci-
fically, for an Orthodox couple, a
refusal by the husband to give a
Get or, more rarely, a refusal by
the wife to accept a Get.
If the clergyman who per-
formed the ceremony verifies
that, to the best of his
knowledge, the plaintiff has
failed to act to remove the
barriers to remarriage for his or
her spouse, the court will refuse
to grant an annulment or divorce.
The bill was written by Nathan
Lewin of Washington, a leading
Chamoun Said To Eye
Campaign for Presidency
Continued from Page 1 -A
about his visit because Israel and
Lebanon are not enemies. The re-
lationship between the two coun-
tries should lead to eventual
peace, he said.
Chamoun has spent five years
>n self-imposed exile following his
defeat in his bitter rivalry with
Phalangist leader Bashir Gem-
ayel during the years of struggle
between the Christian armed for-
ces and Chamoun's "Tiger"
militia. Gemayel was murdered
last September, a few days before
he was to assume the presidency.
The Phalangists then proceeded
to butcher the Tiger militia and
have since then dominated the
Lebanese forces.
Chamoun's visit to Israel was
seen as his bid to return to Leb-
anese politics. He acknowledged
that he would like to be Leb-
anon's President, following in the
footsteps of his father's three-
term presidency.
constitutional lawyer. In a reply
to a dissenting brief, Lewin
rejected the opposition of the
American Civil Liberties Union.
He declared the new law does not
violate the First Amendment.
BOTH THE American Jewish
Congress and the Union of
American Hebrew Congre-
gations, the association of
Reform congregations, urged the
Governor to veto the 1983 Silver
bill on grounds it was un-
constitutional.
In explaining his purpose of
preparing the law, Silver said
that, in its absence, either spouse
"may take unconscionable ad-
vantage of the other spouse by
refusing to accept or participate
in a Get." He added that since, in
Jewish law, both parties must
consent, "the opportunity for
engaging in extortion-like prac-
tices is obvious."
He asserted that his measure
"confronts a sensitive issue
without involving the state in
religious disputes and without
placing the imprimature of the
state on any religion or on
religion in general."
THE 1982 bill provided that, in
the case of such disputes, the
court hearing the divorce action
could order the parties to submit
the question to a fact-finding
panel, with authority to deter-
mine if a barrier existed and to
seek to remove the barrier by
mediation. Without a finding
submitted by the panel to the
divorce court that the barrier had
been removed, the court did not
nave to give the plaintiff a civil
divorce.
The Senate version of the 1983
law was sponsored by State
Senators Martin Connor (D.,
Man.), John Marchi (R.Staten
Island) and Norman Levy (R.,
Nassau).
Beware of PHy. By Stefan Zweig.
New York: Harmony Books,
1982. 353 Pp. $14.95.
The House of Women. By Chaim
Bermant. New York: St.
Martin's Press, 1983. 250 Pp.
$12.96._____________________
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Book Editor
Both these novels were written
by European Jews, and both in-
clude Jewish characters whose
Jewish identification is marginal.
Beyond that, there are few
resemblances. Zweig's book is a
On the
Bookshelf
beautifully written classic. Ber-
mant's book is a cheap, racy,
foul-mouthed pot-boiler.
Let me dispose of "The House
of Women" quickly. Presumably,
it is an English family romance
with the accent falling strictly on
the sexual aspects of romance.
The father of the family, a veter-
an of the British Army in World
War II, is an unsuccessful sales-
man in his father's metal busi-
ness; he has an older brother, a
younger sister, four daughters
and a wife who dies at the begin-
ning of the book.
HIS SECOND wife, former
governess to the four girls, gives
birth to a son and soon there-
after, leaves her husband. Her
first marriage also ended in
divorce. But the story centers not
so much on the father with his at-
tachments in and out of marriage
as it does on the four daughters
and their liaisons.
They seem to be constantly
falling in and out of beds and
other trysting places beds
which belong to them, their hus-
bands, their lovers and other
temporary boyfriends. The cast
of characters is long and confus-
ing. With the exception of the
narrator who is the second
daughter, none of the character
portrayals has any depth. They
rush past the reader in great
haste, stopping to use some four-
letter words and causing great
bewilderment as to who is sleep-
ing with whom.
The Jewishness of the family
"was a source of bother." How-
ever, one daughter does take up
the Jewish religion, and the son
finds his way to Israel where he
joins a kibbutz. There, the only
redeeming scene of the book
occurs, a kibbutz wedding which
is well and accurately described.
There is also a reasonably good
picture of a small mid-western
American university where the
narrator has a short stay as a
junior faculty member.
This book is a light piece of
froth which can be lightly put
aside.
BY CONTRAST, "Beware of
Pity" is an impressive achieve-
ment. Its author, Stefan Zweig,
was a brilliant figure in German
literature who died in 1942. A
gifted short story writer, he
wrote this one novel. It was orig-
inally published in 1939, and this
translation came out last year.
The story takes place in
Austria prior to World War I.
The protagonist is a young Aus-
trian army officer who becomes
involved with the crippled
daughter of a baron whose estate
is close to the military post where
the officer is stationed. The baron
is a closet Jew who is determined
to do whatever he can to insure
his daughter's health and hap-
piness. The officer, moved by
pity, becomes the object of the
daughter's affection. They both
confide in the daughter's Vien-
nese doctor who tries to help
them.
He is particularly sensitive to
the officer's feelings, having him-
self married a blind woman out of
pity for her plight. However, he is
unable to help the officer move
from pity to love and the girl, her
love unrequited, commits suicide.
Filled with remorse, the officer
plunges into World War I and,
careless of his life, emerges a dec-
orated hero. The story ends as
the officer realizes that "no guilt
is forgotten so long as the con-
science still knows of it."
The lesson of the story is that
loneliness requires sensitivity to
others in order to moderate the
sense of emptiness. Pity in-
creases vulnerability to pain even
though, ironically, it is the key to
mitigating the feeling of isola-
tion. Caring for others, pitying
them, is one expression of our
common humanity. Feeling for
others and identifying with them
eases the ache of loneliness. Pity
for others can lead to sympa-
thetic understanding of human
failings, both our own and those
of others. While this can produce
a benign tolerance, as Zweig
powerfully and eloquently teach-
es us, we must "beware of pity."
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Faculty Release Letter
'Distinction' Between Israel, Begin
WALTHAM, Mass. (JTAI
Thirty-six hmhiiIw of the
faculty and staff of the Brandeis
University, all identified as
having contributed to the current
annual f mp'g" of the Com-
bined Jewish Philanthropies
(CJP) of Boston, have released a
letter questioning key elements
of the policies of Premier Men*
chem Begin's government and
declaring that "we make a clear
distinction between the policies
of the Begin government and the
people of Israel."
The protest letter was sent to
Ruth Fein, president of the CJP,
and released to the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency. The letter
"As inaiiihws of the faculty
and staff of Brandeis University,
we have recently been solicited to
contribute to CJP in Boston, part
of whose funds go to support
welfare activities in Israel. This
solicitation comes at a time when
we are seriously concerned about
recent events and policies in the
State of Israel.
"THESE NECESSARILY
affect our feelings about con-
tinuing to give to CJP. While we
have not resolved all our doubts,
we are continuing our support
with a contribution. Therefore,
French Employed Nazis
For Anti-Soviet Info-Gathering
PARIS (JTA) The
French intelligence service
employed former Nazis
after World War II for
intelligence gathering acti-
vities in the Soviet Union
and its satellite countries
and to keep tabs on at-
tempts to resurrect Nazi
groups in other parts of the
world, Le Monde reports.
The paper stressed that these
Nazis, unlike Klaus Barbie who
was employed by the CIA after
the war, were not involved in war
crimes. Barbie, the wartime
Gestapo chief in Lyon, is
presently awaiting trial there for
"crimes against humanity."
According to recent revelations,
the CIA helped Barbie escape
from Europe at a time when
France was seeking his extradi-
tion from a U.S. detention camp
in Germany.
ACCORDING TO Le Monde,
the French secret services, like
their American and British
counterparts, selected Nazis with
intelligence experience in the
prisoner-of-war camps after 1945
to renew contacts with their
agents in East European coun-
tries. Those agents had informed
German intelligence of Soviet
moves during the war.
France believed that with Rus-
sian forces in occupation of all of
Eastern Europe, it was essential
to continue to receive information
from those sources and the only
way to do it was through ex-
Nazis, Le Monde reported.
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France employed the services
of agents from Section VI of the
Reichs Sicberhert Haupt Amt
(RSHA) which had been involved
in sabotage missions in regions
under Soviet influence, such as
Iran, Turkey, certain Arab coun-
tries and Eastern Europe. Also
hired were former Abwehr
agents, the German military
intelligence service, which was
active until February, 1944.
ACCORDING TO Le Monde
there was dissention between the
RSHA which employed agents
close to the Nazi movement,
many former members of the SA,
and the Abwehr which was less
sympathetic towards the Nazis.
Both groups were fiercely anti-
Communist. They had worked
with thousands of anti-Com-
munist agents planted in the
Eastern European countries
while under Nazi occupation.
le Monde said the French also
needed the help of these former
Nazi agents to prevent the reacti-
vation of Nazi movements
throughout the world. Former
RHSA members were not too co-
operative in that mission, the
paper said.
The cooperation lasted four
years, until the Berlin blockade in
1949. After that the efforts to
revive anti-Communist net-
works in Eastern Europe ended.
we feel compelled to com-
municate to the leadership of the
campaign views which we believe
should be taken into account for
the future."
The letter continued:
"We are committed to the
State of Israel, its security, and
the strong moral standing it has
long held as a nation.
"We believe that the Pales-
tinian people have been deprived
of elementary rights by the
nations of the world, not least by
the Arab countries in which most
of them have lived since 1948.
While Israel must protect its
citizens from attacks, its long-
range security requires a
resolution of the Palestinian
problem, as well as acceptance of
Israel by the Arab countries.
"The fact that the PLO (as
distinct from the Palestinians)
and the Arab nations have thus
far refused to negotiate does not
justify policies of the Begin
government which makes discus-
sions virtually impossible at a
time when there are such possi-
bilities.
"WE REJECT the concept of a
'Greater Israel' which would have
the effect of making a million
Arabs on the West Bank a hostile
and fast-growing minority within
Israel and would make of Israel a
permanent garrison state."
The letter noted that "a
stumbling block in the coming
years" concerns the West Bank
settlements. "Continuation of the
settlement policy or annexation
of that territory (whatever the
euphemism or legality) is detri-
mental to the possibility of
achieving peace with one hundred
million Arabs and to the long-
range security of the State of
Israel," the letter stated.
"We make a clear distinction
between the policies of the Begin
government and the people of
Israel. Unfortunately, that
distinction has not always been
made, and it is sometimes
suggested that to support the
people of Israel, one must un-
critically support the govern-
ment's policies. This we refused
to do or accept."
2 Israelis Killed, 1 Wounded
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two
Israeli soldiers were killed and
four were wounded when an Is-
rael Defence Force encampment
on the outskirts of Beirut was hit
by rockets. The rocket attack was
aimed at the Beirut International
Airport and the city's environs
by Druze in the hills east of the
city.
During the intermittent shell-
ing of Christian areas, some 30
Lebanese were killed or wounded.
A U.S. marine, First Lt. Ailneal
Morris, 26, of Sarasota, Fla., was
also wounded in the attack on the
airport. He was treated at the
marine base and returned to
duty. The airport, which closed
down because of the shelling, was
reopened, but closed again
minutes later when the shelling
was renewed.
Meanwhile, three Lebanese
Cabinet ministers a Christian,
Druze and Moslem who were
kidnapped by masked gunmen
while they were meeting with a
Druze leader in the Shouf moun-
tains were released. The three
ministers were reportedly held
overnight at the residence of
Walid Jumblatt, the Druze leader
and pro-Syrian opposition leader.
According to reports, Jumblatt
issued a list of demands as a
condition for their release, in-
cluding the removal of Christian
forces from the Druze areas and
the abrogation of the Lebanon-
Israel agreement. But the three
ministers were finally released
without any of the demands
being met.
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Anti-Israel Poster
Dismantled at UN
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) An anti-Israeli
poster exhibition here was
dismantled at the order of
Secretary General Javier
Perez de Cuellar following a
strong Israeli protest. The
exhibition of pro-Palestin-
ian posters was sponsored
by the Secretariat of the
UN International Confer-
ence on the Question of
Palestine, which is sched-
uled to take place in Gene-
va from Aug. 29 to Sept. 7.
De Cuellar announced his
decision to dismantle the display,
which was set in the public lobby
of the UN headquarters, after
Ambassador Yehuda Blum of
Israel protested that the posters
in the exhibition were not only
ant i-Israel but anti-Semitic as
well.
BLUM DREW the attention of
the Secretary General to one
poster in particular that depicted
a hammer smashing a Star of
David, fashioned out of chains,
on the background of the map of
the State of Israel.
Israeli sources said that Blum
conveyed his protest first in a
telephone conversation with de
Cuellar and later submitted the
protest in an official letter.
The exhibit consisted of about
40 posters in several languages,
published by the Palestine
Liberation Organization and
other Palestinian and pro-Pales-
tinian groups.
The exhibit was cleared by the
UN'8 Exhibits Committee. The
guidelines of the Committee
include, among other provisions,
the stipulation that "due regard
should be paid to the sensitivities
of UN member-states." Israeli
diplomats said that the poster
exhibition clearly did not meet
this particular condition.
A UN spokesman said that the
posters that were displayed are
part of the personal collection of
Daniel Walsh, a resident of
Washington.
In his letter of protest, which
was circulated here, Blum
charged that the exhibition was
"yet another manifestation of the
misuse of UN funds, machinery
and premises in the relentless
campaign of vilification waged by
the enemies of my country."
Blum also said that the actions
"gravely compromised the im-
partiality and integrity required
of this organ of our organiza-
tion."
Blum noted, however, his
"satisfaction" that the Secretary
General "issued the necessary
instructions for the immediate
removal of the exhibition" as
soon as he became "aware of this
outrage." But Blum added that
the exhibition should not have
taken place on the UN premises
in the first place.
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Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Arab Attack Recalled
Mitterrand Moved At Ceremony
Continued from Page 1-A
Mck to Paris from his summer
home in the south of France to
attend a special funeral service in
|the quarter's old synagogue.
Last week, as he recalled that
jtigic event, he told the newly
elected president of the Council of
Alaior French Jewish Organiza-
tions (CRIF), Theo Klein, that
his Administration will continue
ill it can to prevent future
prrorist attacks and to protect
fhe Jewish community.
KLEIN AND the new CRIF
dership had decided on a silent
ceremony. There were no
Speeches, but Chief Rabbi Rene
Birat and half a dozen other
eligious leaders recited Radish
ind extracts from the Psalms.
For several hours, people walked
last Goldenberg's restaurant in
|ilence- Some carried lit candles;
Bonn Bans
Critical Film
BONN A film critical of the
3onn government for not fully
noving the verdicts of the
Notorious Peoples Courts of the
4azi era from official records has
en banned from distribution by
West German Foreign Minis-
i, the Frankfurter Rundschau
orted. The film. Die Weise
tose ("The White Rose") which
ells the story of a wartime anti-
n'azi group, was to be distributed
Worldwide by the Goethe Insti-
iites which are largely supported
by government funds.
others laid wreaths on the dusty
sidewalk.
Some of the community's
traditional leaders privately
criticized Klein for having
compared, in press interviews,
the Rue dee Rosiers attack with
the recent murder of three Arab
students in Hebron. Klein, a 62-
year-old lawyer who holds both
French and Israeli nationalities
and lives half of the time in Jeru-
salem where he is a member of
the bar, said:
"As far as I am concerned,
shooting people sitting in
Goldenberg's restaurant or those
in an Islamic school in Hebron, is
the same." He told several daily
papers, including the leftwing
Liberation, "How can one
condemn the Rue des Rosiers
attack without condemning what
has happened in Hebron?"
KLEIN'S declarations,
welcomed by many, show how
deeply the community has
changed since last summer.
Then, France's Jews were already
deeply shaken by the previous
terrorist attack which killed four
people and wounded 20 when a
bomb exploded outside the
Liberal synagogue on Rue
Copemic. Local Jews felt hurt
and insulted by the daily press
comments accusing Israel of
using unnecessary force and
causing unnecessary civilian
victims.
The community still recalls the
tragic days of August, 1982, but
has overcome the trauma. Many
of those present at the ceremony
on the Rue des Rosiers said that
Klein's declarations show that
"we have overcome the hurdle
and that the community now
feels secure enough to speak its
mind when it deems it
necessary."
French police, meanwhile, say
their year-long investigations are
finally progressing. The police
sources say they have ballistic
proof that the Rue des Rosiers
killers used similar weapons to
those which members of the Abu
Nidal group used when they
attacked Vienna's main synago-
gue in August, 1971. The Vienna
terrorists have been arrested, and
the Austrian police are convinced
they belong to the Abu Nidal
gang.
THE FRENCH also believe
that the terrorist arrested last
April in Lisbon and charged with
the murder of PLO roving am-
bassador and negotiator Issam
Sartawi, was part of the Rue des
Hosiers hit gang. The suspect
was questioned by a French
investigating magistrate, and the
French Ministry of Justice is
preparing to ask Portugal for his
extradition.
French radio reports said that
an Armenian involved in the
recent Orly Airport explosion at
the Turkish air line counter had
also played an active role in the
Rue des Rosiers attack. The man,
for whom an arrest warrant has
been issued, reportedly harbored
the killers after the attack. He
might also have supplied them,
police suspect, with the grenade
used against the Goldenberg
restaurant.
SHOCKING SU^PRlse
Near Hebron
Jewish Settlers Claim 'Creditr
For Setting Arab Bus on Fire
JERUSALEM Jewish set-
tlers claimed credit for setting
fire to an Arab bus in the Al
Aroub refugee camp near the
Hebron-Jerusalem highway on
the West Bank, Voice of Israel
Radio reported.
The settlers, from Kiryat Arba,
a Gush Emunim stronghold
adjacent to Hebron and from
Gush Etzion, said they acted in
reprisal against alleged stone-
throwing from the refugee camp
at an Israeli bus enroute to Kir-
yat Arba. Two passengers, a
mother and daughter, received
minor scratches.
The bus fire, which local police
initially attributed to criminal
elements, coincided with the pub-
lication by Haaretz of leaked por-
tions of a report on Jewish
vigilantism against West Bank
Arabs by Deputy Attorney
General Yehudit Karp. Karp
headed a year-long investigation
of such incidents and the status
of low enforcement in the ter-
ritory.
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\t Lincoln Memorial Ceremony
Kirkpatrick Receives Hadassah's ffighest Honor
WASHINGTON -
Ambassador Jeane J. Kirk-
patrick, United States
Permanent Representative
to the United Nations,
received a rousing ovation
I from the 3,000 delegates
and guests attending the
plenary session of the 69th
national convention of
Hadassah here.
On a dais at the base of the
! Lincoln Memorial, in a session
devoted to Human Rights,
Ambassador Kirkpatrick was
presented with the Henrietta
Szold Award, Hadassah's
highest honor, for her "publicly
expressed indignation at the
unchallenged calumnies of
Israel's enemies and her fear-
[less denunciation of United
Nations voting procedures .
I (thisI has earned her esteem and
I gratitude of the American
[ people."
THE SPIRIT of Abraham
|Lincoln. who appeared to be
looking down on the assemblage,
[permeated the evening as each
|speaker sounded the themes of
freedom from oppression,
reconciliation, and justice for all
people.
Hernice S. Tannenbaum, past
president of Hadassah and chair
of the Henrietta Szold
\wards Committee said: "Over
the years, the Henrietta Szold
Vward has been given to a Presi-
dent of the United States and two
Presidents of Israel, to several
Prime Ministers and to a Queen
and a President's wife, and to
lany talented scientists.
Tonight we add another name to
the roster, that of a women whose
shining integrity lights up the
dim halls of the United Nations.
[Miami Mission to
Visit Project
Renewal Sister
City in Israel
A delegation from the Greater
IMiami Jewish Federation will
I view first hand the physical and
Isocial rehabilitation taking place
I in Or Akiva, the Miami Jewish
community's Project Renewal
community in Israel, when it
|visits this October.
The Miami group will be wel-
comed in Or Akiva by Sandi
ISimon, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Women's Division
Project Renewal chairwoman,
who made aliyah to Israel. The
stop will be just one of the high-
lights of Federation's eleventh
annual Community Mission, a
| ten-day trip Oct. 24 to Nov. 2.
"Mission participants will
have a special opportunity to see
for themselves how Federation's
role in Project Renewal is helping
the people of Or Akiva," said Joel
I Levy, who is co-chairing the mis-
[sion and Federation's Missions
Committee with his wife, Paula.
"We will see the new facilities
land services, made possible with
I Federation funds, that are im-
proving the quality of life in the
I Israeli community."
Some highlights on the itin-
erary include briefings with high-
Itevel Israeli government officials;
[stays on a kibbutz; and visits to
Ian active archaeological dig and
jnew settlements in the Judean
[desert.
"The response for this year's
mission has been excellent, and
we anticipate a record number of
Participants," said Paula Levy.
^However, there are still a limit-
pa number of openings for those
Flo wish to join us for an inside
Fk at Israeli contemporary so-
"On behalf of Hadassah, an
organization of women whose
commitment to life, liberty and
justice is grounded in our twin
heritages, I have the honor to
present the Henrietta Szold
Award to Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, a
woman of versatile achievements
and talents; distinguished
political scientist, author, lec-
turer, teacher, who has been
honored by the academic com-
munity for creative scholarship,
by the national government for
devoted service, and by
Members of the National Board of Hadassah
convened in Washington prior to the 69th
national convention, where 3,000 delegates
and guests met Aug. 14-17, and visited the
Lincoln Memorial where the opening
ceremonies took place: Lisl Schick of
Clearwater, Fla., is president of the Florida
Central Region.
Rabbi Greenberg to Conduct
Holiday Seminar for Rabbis
Rabbi Sidney Greenberg of
Temple Sinai of Dresher. Penn.,
will conduct a High Holy Days
seminar for members of the
Rabbinical Association of Great-
er Miami Wednesday at Beth
Torah Congregation, North
Miami Beach.
A lecturer and writer, Rabbi
Greenberg has edited the books,
A Treasury of Comfort; Adding
Life to Your Years; A Treasury
of the Art of Living; Contem-
porary Prayers and Readings for
the High Holidays, Sabbaths,
and other Occasions; Hidden
Hungers High Holiday Ser-
mons on the Art of Living;
Likrat Shabbat Worship,
Study, and Song for Sabbath and
Festival Service for the Home;
and The New Mahzor For
Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur.
Rabbi Greenberg received an
AB degree at Yeshiva University
in 1938 and was awarded the
Rabbi Sidney Greenberg
Ethics Prize and graduated Cum
Laude. He served on the editorial
staff of the college magazine.
He was ordained at the Jewish
Theological Seminary and was
awarded a DHL degree. He
worked as department editor of
"Conservative Judaism," a pub-
lication of the Rabbinical As-
sembly and currently serves on
the editorial board of "The
Reconstruct ionist" and "The
Jewish Digest." Rabbi Green-
berg is also a columnist for the
Philadelphia Inquirer.
In making the announcement,
Rabbi Max Lipschitz, president
of the Rabbinical Association,
stated, "This program is a most
meaningful way to develop a
mood of reflection and con-
templation appropriate for the
High Holy Day season. This is an
important part of the Rabbinical
Association's agenda, which is to
provide educational oppor-
tunities for its members, thereby
enhancing their abilities to offer
the highest form of spiritual
leadership to their congregations
and communities."
numerous public institutions for
wisdom and insightful action.
"As United States Ambas-
sador to the United Nations since
1981, she has publicly expressed
righteous indignation at the
unchallenged calumnies of
Israel's enemies. Her vigorous
responses and fearless denun-
ciation of United Nations voting
procedures have marked her as a
woman of vision and courage.
She has earned the esteem and
gratitude of the American people
and the respect of democracies
throughout the world."
PRESIDENT REAGAN sent
a message to Hadassah in which
he said: "I want to take this
opportunity to commend your
selection of Ambassador Kirk-
patrick for the Henrietta Szold
Award. She is one of the most
trusted and intellectually
courageous members of my
Administration. Her leadership
and impact on public affairs have
made her fully deserving of this
honor. .
"As the Women's Zionist
Organization of America,
Hadassah plays an instrumental
role in strengthening the bonds of
friendship between Israel and the
United States. Your dedicated
efforts on behalf of the Israeli
people serve as an inspiration to
everyone concerned with further-
ing humanitarian progress
around the globe Your
programs addressing those needs
reflect the finest elements of
America's voluntaristic spirit."
Convention chairman,
Charlotte Jacobson, called the
meeting to order with appeal "for
a more perfect union" where
differences would be resolved on
the basis of the common "shared
values of the Prophets and our
Continued on Page 4-B
Assembly Will
Sponsor Jewish
Inf a Course
Registration is currently un-
derway for a Jewish Information
Course sponsored by the South-
east Region of the Rabbinical
Assembly at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation building,
according to an announcement by
Rabbi David H. Auerbach,
Region president.
The fifteen-week course, sched-
uled to begin Sept. 13 and to be
taught on Tuesday evenings from
8 to 10 p.m., will cover Jewish life
cycle occasions, Jewish holidays,
and basic Jewish beliefs.
Rabbi Edwin Farber, spiritual
leader of Temple Samu-El and
chairman of the Information
Course, said the class is designed
for people of little or no Jewish
background.
AJC Conference on 'Countering
Arab Propaganda'Set for Aug. 28
"Countering and Coping with
Arab Propaganda," an American
Jewish Committee workshop for
the Southeast and Florida area
has been scheduled to take place
Aug. 28 at the Ramada Renais-
sance Hotel in Atlanta, Ga.
Highlighting the conference
will be a talk by Sheba Mit-
telman, AJCommittee's program
specialist in the Trends Analysis
Division of the Domestic Affairs
Department, on "Arab Influence
and Propaganda Today: Chal-
lenges and Cautions." Mittleman
is also the editor of "Petro
Impact" and a newsletter which
examines a growing Arab in-
volvement in American affairs.
Howard Kohr, AJCommittee's
assistant Washington rep-
resentative who maintains liaison
between the organization and the
White House agencies of the
federal government, the
Congress, foreign embassies, and
Washington representatives of
religious and civic agencies, will
also highlight the agenda with a
speech on "Arab Influence in
Government."
Also presenting a discussion
during the workshop will be
Chicago attorney, Robert S.
Jacobs, chairman of the Com-
mittee's board of trustees, on
"Moving Ahead in Our Com-
munities" during the Wrap Up
Plenary session.
Serving as Florida Area chair-
man to the conference is Barton
S. Udell. Lowell J. Friedman it
Southeast Area chairman.
Rockets Fired Into Galilee
TEL AVIV (JTA) Two Katyusha rockets were
fired from Lebanese territory towards western Galilee.
They caused slight damage but not casualties. It was the
first time in many months that shells have fallen in
western Galilee, from inside Lebanon.
Meanwhile, in the Beirut area heavy shelling was
reported in sharp .exchanges between Druze militia and
Christian Phalangists. Three residents of the Christian
quarters of east Beirut were reported killed and some 24
injured, according to radio reports from the Lebanese
capital.
dfewislhi Floridiaim
Miami, FloridaFriday, August 19,1983 Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, August 19,1983
------------------------------------------------ Mall Exhibit to
.Bony University Appoints Xew I e&inre 0RT prog^s
Director of Jewish Studies Program
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman has
been appointed director of the
master s program in Jewish
Studies at Barry University.
Currently assistant professor in
Barry's School of Arts and
Sciences, he comes from Wichita
State University. Kansas, where
he was a professor of Judaica.
Unterman will be working with
Nathan Skolnick. consultant to
the president of the university,
and Sister Jeanne OLaughlin.
OP. Skolnick, recently-retired
director of planning and budget-
ing for the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, will introduce him to
the South Florida Jewish com-
munity.
A scholar and author, Unter-
man has a doctorate solely in
Jewish Studies. Barry's master's
degree in Jewish Studies pro-
gram will be in its second year
this fall.
Unterman will teach two
courses, on Tuesday and Wed-
nesday evenings weekly during
the first semester. "I hope to
create a major center for Jewish
Studies in higher education at
Barry University." he stated.
He earned his doctorate in the
Judaic program at University of
California. Berkeley, and he has
lectured and taught at Dart-
mouth College. University of
Judaism in Los Angeles, and at
University of California.
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman
Unterman holds dual citizen-
ship in the U.S. and Israel. In his
high school senior year, he joined
a youth tour to Israel and later
spent his junior year in college at
the Hebrew University in Jeru-
salem. At the end of that year, he
became involved in Israel's Six
Day War.
Staying on in Israel for six
years. Unterman earned a
master's degree in biblical stu-
dies and also taught and lectured
at Hebrew University. He also
became involved in the war in Is-
rael in 1973. serving as a volun-
teer at Hadassah Hospital.
Unterman reads in seven lang-
uages and speaks Hebrew fluent-
ly. He said. "I'll speak to any
group, anywhere, on any subject
from the Bible to Israeli politics."
The Southeastern Florida
Region of Women's American.
ORT has been invited to parti
cipate in Career Awareness Week
sponsored by the A venture Mall
in North Miami Beach Wednes-
day through Friday. 10 a.m. to 9
p.m.
According to Region President
Dale Flam, an exhibit depicting
ORT's contributions to career
education, such as the ORT Tech-
nical Program at the Jewish High
School of South Florida, the
Bramson Technical Institute in
New York, and the newly-
planned Los Angeles ORT Tech-
nical Institute, has been planned.
Hilde Smissman is chairing the
exhibit.
Folk Dance Course Set
Israel folk dance and folklore
classes, directed by ASCW and
dance instructor, Yusi Yanich
and sponsored by North Miami,
Carol City, and Ida Fisher Adult
Centers, will run Mondays at
Surfside Community Center,
Tuesdays at Seacoast Towers
South, Wednesdays at Surfside
Community Center and A venture
NE Metro Library, Thursdays at
Lake Park Condominium and
Morton Towers, and Fridays at
McDonald Adult Center.
ORT Meeting Set
The next regular meeting of
Biscayne Chapter of Women's
American ORT is scheduled for
Thursday, Sept. 1 at noon at
American Savings and Loan
Association. Lincoln and Alton
Roads.
44 My great-
grandfather
invented
Gulden's'Mustard
Glaze
^ cut
'A cup Guldens
Spicy Brown Musla"!
** cup beer
I teaspoon horseradisn
Glazed Corned Beef
S pound corned bee'
brulel *
* carrots, ail irno 1 inch
Ves
I onion, qutrlerti
I bay leaf
I fiitc clove, crushed
Place meal in large sauce pot. cover with cold water Add
carrots, onion bav leal and garic: heat to boiling Reduce
heal, cover and simmer 3W Hours or until tender. Meanwhile
in small saucepan, combine honev mustard, beer and
horseradish. Simmer over low heat, about S mtnules. Mirnna
occasionally Place meat on rack in open routing pan. Spoon
some glaze over meat, and bake in 3S0T oven
lor 20 minutes, basting occasionally
until well glazed. Serves 10 to 12
CHARLIE GULDEN
It's his recipe
that makes
these recipes
so delicious!*9
Potato Salad
7 potatoes, peeled,
boiled and cut up
W cup chopped onion
Vj cup chopped celer>
v? chopped lomaio
cup imitation bacon bits
'l cup mayonnaise
V4 cup Guidens Spicy
Brown Mustard
2 tablespoons tarragon vinegar
2 tablespoons sugar
Combine potatoes onion, celery,
tomato and imitation bacon bits Blend
mavonnaise mustard vinegar and sugar
About a hall hour before serving, loss
potato salad wiih dressing Serves.*
n-rlirt Mtil Ctapl.tt Iif.itl-lt.isl Wttklj
Priatod La English / ~
WWfZ Ol r to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
may keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout"the world.
Enclosed please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
? lYwr $18.00 ? 2 Years $34.00
LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ONLY
Name:.
Address:,
City:
Apt. No.
.State:.
A..
(Plm (teat* AM Owcki Mk TMB JSWISH FLO* IOIAN")
P.OlMll.mi.MiaMl.ritrManil'
ttrai M
Management of the new Grand Bay Hotel in Coconut Grove,
which is scheduled to open this fall, has announced that Susan
R. Panoff, left, a community relations coordinator and writer
formerly associated with Central Agency for Jewish Education
and United Synagogue of America has been appointed hotel
director of public relations. Also named were Sheila Murray,
center, previously membership director for the Mutiny Hotel
as director of membership for the hotel's private club, Regine's
and Luis Mejorado, right, as chief concierge. He previously
served in that position at Chicago's Park Hyatt.
Temple Israel Plans 'Magical' Open House
An Open House Magical
Morning for prospective new
members will be held by Temple
Israel of Greater Miami Aug. 21
from 10 a.m. to noon at its down-
town facility and Sunday, Aug.
28 at the same time at its Kendall
building.
At both events. Rabbis
Haskell M. Bernat and Donald P.
('ashman. Philip S. Goldin.
executive director, and Joan
Bornstein. educational consul
tant, will be on hand. At Kendall,
Etta Gold, school supervisor, and
Judy Kuritz, nursery director,
will also be available.
Featured guest at both loca-
tions will be Trudi-Trixie. star of
Channel 17's twice daily, seven
day a week program, "The Funny
Paper People Show."
TEACHERS
Experienced in early childhood education for
Temple Samu-EI. West Kendall area. Certified
preferred. Half-day.
Call: Ruth Stern
at
382-3668
Israelite Center Temple
3175 S.W. 25 St. Miami
Conservative Family Temple
High Holy Day Tickets Available
Members: $20 Non-Members: $30
Family Membership $125.**
Cemetery Priviledges Available
Rabbi Solomon H. Waldenberg Cantor Hyman Lifshin
Al Landskroner, President
For further information call:
445-1529
HIGH HOLS DflE
1711 M.
Plantatl
ralty Drive
, riorida
J.



\8tiSg
iwn above is Dr. Cecelia Davis and Bob Schwartz, director
\A merican Red Magen David for Israel's Miami office.
Originator of Jewish
Red Cross Remembers
Helping Others
By LISA RUBENSTEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
| Ninety-one-year-old Dr. Cecelia
avis was something of a vision-
in her day. As a young Jew
i physician wanting to help her
ople, she decided that just as
ere was the Red Cross emer-
Incy service organization, so too
tould there be such services
ovided under Jewish auspices.
| Currently a resident of Miami
ach, Dr. Davis recalls how in
>18 she mobilized Zionists first
Chicago, where she lived, and
en in other American com-
munities to assist young Jewish
en who were going to Palestine
fight with the British during
Md War I.
The doctor and others like her-
felf received the young soldiers
kith a smile and provided warm
leals and lodging as they left for
pe Middle East. Dr. Davis par-
pularly remembers one man be-
muse he stood out for his scruf-
ness a young David Ben-
lurion, whom she personally ad-
ministered.
She insisted that the fledgling
fcrvice organization be symbol-
ized not by a Red Cross but a Red
Magen David, the Jewish Star of
David. Mogen David Adorn, Is-
rael's Red Cross service today,
carries that insignia.
Chapters began to spring up
throughout the eastern and mid-
western United States, and such
luminaries as Henrietta Szold,
the founder of Hadassah, gave
their support to Dr. Davis' ef-
forts.
When the war ended, the flurry
of activity subsided, but the
doctor is nonetheless remember-
ed for her revolutionary idea that
became official reality in 1930 in
Israel, when Magen David Adorn
was founded. She was honored in
Israel for her contributions in
1954.
Speaking of her work, Dr.
Davis says, "I was a young doc-
tor concerned for these young
men and their families. I wasn't
interested in any fame or having
my picture in the newspapers. I
just wanted to help."
American Red Magen David
for Israel, Magen David Adorns
American fundraising arm, was
founded in 1941.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
of Greater Miami
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Announces
Its
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
In The Theater of Performing Arts
DR. IRVING LEHRMAN WILL OFFICIATE
CANTOR ZVIADLER WILL CHANT
Assisted by the Temple Choir
under the direction of Shmuel Fershko
ADULT AUXILIARY SERVICE
in the Temple Sanctuary
OPEN TO THE COMMUNITY
RABBI MAXWELL BERQER WILL OFFICIATE
CANTOR STANLEY RICH WILL CHANT
LEHRMAN DAY SCHOOL
ALL DEPARTMENTS RELIGIOUS SCHOOL
Open Monday, August 29
Membership Inquiries Invited
Temple Office School Office
538-2503 866-2771
ire a l\qamal
Chapters Announce
New Officers
Sarah Matlin has been elected
president of Pioneer Women
Na'amat's Club No. 2 of Miami
Beach, with Ida Chinsky and
Esther Shedroff elected honorary
presidents. Named as vice presi-
dents were Neta Melman and
Minnie V reed man.
Other officers are Sally Green-
berg, treasurer; Norma Novitz,
financial secretary; Judes Mazur,
corresponding secretary; and
Esther Shedroff, recording secre-
tary.
New officers of the
organization's Eilat Chapter of
Miami Beach, headed by Presi-
dent Faye Brucker, are Ann
Cohen and Rose Rubin, vice
presidents; Helen Sassower,
treasurer; Eva Leipziger, finan-
cial secretary; Barbara Green-
berg, corresponding secretary;
and Goldie Rubinstein, recording
secretary.
Katharine Lippman was
elected to the presidency of the
Golda Meir Chapter, with Ruth
Price, Claire Balaban, and Vera
Gorfine serving as vice presi-
dents; Dorah Halpern, treasurer;
Frances Seligman, financial
secretary; Ruth Price, corres-
ponding secretary; and Mollie
Krichev, recording secretary.
* Miamians Karen Chadroff, center, and Laurie Berman
Naturman received master of social work degrees from the
Block Program of Yeshiva University's Wurzweiler School of
Social Work recently for agency work completed here and
course work completed in New York City. They are pictured
with Dr. Solomon Green, associate dean of the School. Chadroff
completed her agency work at Jewish Family and Children's
Service in Miami, and Naturman, at Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
Advertising
Salesperson
Wanted
Full-time. Salary/Draw. Call Joan collect or
write: *
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DAYT0NA BEACH KOSHER PACKAGE
Ann Salomon Kravitz of
Miami Beach has been ap-
pointed director of human re- \
sources at Temple Emanu-El
of Greater Miami. Her ap-
pointment to coordinate vol-
unteers, programs, and activi-'
ties of the congregation was
announced by Sidney Cooper-
man, president, and Samuel
N. Friedland, chairman of the
board.
Rabbi's Discussion Set
I Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat,
spiritual leader of Temple Judea,
i recently-returned from a trip to
j Israel with members of his
congregation, will conduct a
special Torah service and discus-
sion Friday evening, Aug. 19 at 8
p.m.
The service is open to pros-
pective temple members.
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Hotal Accommodations (doubla occupancy, tax
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Ocaanlront Room
Private Balcony
Breakfast and Dinnar
Glatt Kosher (k) Supervised
Mashgiah and Synagogue
Fraa Chaise Lounges
Entlra Tour conductad by Morse Traval Tours
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J^agfe 4- XJw'J^wistf i Jondian r^nday. Angus* im, isaa
AJC Appoints ExecutiveDirectorF
The American Jewish Con-
gress has named Miami Rabbi
Dennis Wald its Southeast
Region executive director. Rabbi
Wald comes to the organization
from B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion, where he has served as
director of South Dade Hillel. at
Florida International University
and Miami-Dade Community
College.
During his Hillel tenure Rabbi
Wald also served as an adjunct
professor at FIU's Department of
Political Science.
His responsibilities will include
further growth and development
of the American Jewish Congress
throughout Florida and sur-
rounding areas.
Rabbi Wald graduated from
Cleveland State University and
OR10*
Rabbi Dennis Wald
earned a masters degree and
rabbinic ordination from Hebrew
Union College in Cincinnati.
Pre-Holiday Oneg Shabbat Planned
A pre-holiday Oneg Shabbat
has been scheduled by Temple
Menorah for Friday evening,
Aug. 19 and will feature Israeli
singing and a question and
answer discussion on "What is
Cruise Planned
The Men's Club of Temple
Emanu-El is sponsoring a cruise
to Nassau, the Bahamas, Friday,
Nov. 4 through Monday, Nov. 7,
according to an announcement by
Col. Nathaniel Kutcher, newly-
elected Men's Club president.
Chairing the cruise committee
is Richard Prager.
Memorial Concert Set
A recorded memorial concert in
honor of the 50th anniversary of
the death of Cantor Yossele
Rosenblatt will be held at Young
Israel of Sunny Isles on Satur-
day, Sept. 3 at 10:30 p.m., ac-
cording to Charles Skupaky,
synagogue president. Rabbi
Rubin Dobin will officiate at the
service and will deliver an ad-
dress on the life of Cantor Rosen-
blatt.
Judaism to Me."
The event will be a welcome to
newly-arrived residents of the
Miami Beach, Surfside, Bal
Harbour, and Bay Harbor areas.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
spiritual leader, who will be
returning from a Prime Ministers
Conference in Israel that day, will
report on conditions in Israel.
Cantor Kusevitsky
Performs Here
At the invitation of Ham.
Wiener, whose daughter, Mirit is
being married this weekend to
Jose Braverman, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Abraham Braverman of
Lima, Peru, Cantor David
Kusevitsky will chant the service
Saturday morning at Beth Torah
Congregation, North Miami
Beach.
Serving as cantor at Temple
Emanu-El of Boro Park,
Brooklyn for the past 35 years,
Cantor Kusevitsky is celebrating
his fiftieth year in the cantorate.
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz, spirit-
ual leader of the congregation,
will deliver the sermon.
Kirkpatrick Receives
Henrietta Szold Award
Continued from Page IB
Founding Fathers based on a
belief in the inherent worth and
dignity of each individual."
Hadassah president, Frieda S.
Lewis, called for a broadening of
the definition of human rights to
encompass guarantees of econo-
mic and social opportunity as
well as political freedom: "We
believe reliable health services
are indispensable to every
society. A people crippled and
disabled by disease can neither
build nor defend a nation We
believe that education is a human
right. The illiterate, unskilled and
untrained are not free. Further-
more, a democratic society
requires educated citizens to
survive as a democracy."
FURTHERMORE, she said:
"We support America's role as
protectcr of human rights. This
policy enhances our stature as a
great nation, promotes
democracy, and raises the hopes
of oppressed people everywhere.
There can be no secure peace, no
guarantee of freedom for any
person or any nation in a world
half-slave and half-free. ."
Commenting on the Helsinki
meetings, which will soon be
drawing to an end in Madrid,
Mrs. Lewis said: "The persistent
campaign against Jews in the
Soviet Union, combined with the
refusal to permit thousands of
Jews to emigrate, is a direct
violation of the Universal
Declaration of Human Rights
and the Soviet constitution itself,
as well as of the Helsinki
Accords."
. She pledged that "Hadassah
efforts on behalf of Soviet Jewry
will continue until all the
Prisoners of Conscience are free
and until every Jew who wishes
to go to Israel is granted an exit
visa."
IN ACCEPTING the
Henrietta Szold Award, Ambas-
sador Kirkpatrick recalled that
Hadassah's founder, Henrietta
Szold, was a pacifist who believed
that Jews and Arabs could live
together but never lived to see
the hand of peace extended.
"Just as Miss Szold was a
practical idealist who believed
that social reforms come through
incremental stages," Ambas-
sador Kirkpatrick predicted,
"peace would come to Israel and
her Arab neighbors in a series of
incremental steps such as the
Camp David Agreements and the
recent understanding between
Israel and Lebanon."
Mrs. Kirkpatrick said that the
work of Henrietta Szold in health
care and refugee education and
absorption in many ways
presaged the kind of work that
the United Nations was meant to
do so different in execution
(from the politicizing of the aarv-
lice agencies at the United Na-
itions today.
She then referred to the cam-
paign at the United Nations to
"delegitimize Israel" and to the
"pernicious" efforts to work
against a peaceful settlement in
the Middle East. She said that
the "rejectionist Arab-Soviet
bloc seeks to portray Israel as the
obstacle to peace. When, in fact,
the real obstacles are the PLO,
Syria, and the Soviets, who work
to undermine all constructive
efforts to find a solution."

V'
nil
Mindy Miller, third from left, describes her
artwork which received one of four first prize
ribbons in the Temple Menorah Summer Day
School Art Contest, sponsored by the Nor-
mandy Isle Office of AmeriFirst Federal
Savings and Loan. Other first prize winners
are Randy Breitner, fifth from right, Jessica
Muhtar, fourth from right, and Manny
Tanich, third from right. Also shown ani
judges, Kenny Goldman, Lois Jordan,
president and manager of the Normandy I
Office; Bryna Berman, Temple Mm
education director; and Marsha Hauut
counselor. The artwork is on display thn
Aug. 23.
Memorial Garden to Honor Civic Leader
The City Council of North
Miami Beach has designated a
parcel of city land for a monu-
ment and memorial garden in
honor of local civic leader. Jack
Chaiken, whom the Council has
officially named "good will
ambassador."
To be called "Jack Chaiken
Memorial Garden," the property
will feature landscaping, benches,
and a memorial plaque com-
memorating the contributions to
North Miami Beach made by
Chaiken. He died earlier this
year.
The project was initiated and
developed by B'nai B'rith Har-
mony Lodge, where Chaiken had
served in several officer posi-
tions. In addition to belonging to
the Lodge, he had also been
active with Beth Torah Congre-
gation, Home Owners Associa-
tion, the City of Hope, New York
Club, and Senior Citizens of
North Miami Beach.
The memorial is expected
dedicated formally in Deca
and City Council memberj|
other dignitaries are pli
attend.
Eric Gutman. who isinc
stated that members ofi
ni/ations to which Cbi
belonged as well as other 4
Miami Beach residents. cu|
tribute to the project
UNIVERSITY OF MIAMI
JUDAIC STUDIES
Courses Offered for Fall Semester 1983
JUDAIC STUDIES 231, ROOTS OF ANTI-SEMITISM; 3 credits Prof Fagin. T.Th 1 40-2 3
Manifestations of Anti-semitism from the ancient times to the present
JUDAIC STUDIES 311. ETHICS IN JEWISH LIFE; 3 credits. Prof Emmergl.ck. T.Th.. 12:15-
Jewish ethics as a foundation for personal conduct and for social justice Examination of i
issues and their relationships to ancient and contemporary Jewish teachings.
ENGLISH 263. JEWISH LITERATURE; S credits. Prof Sandier. M.W.F.. 12:00-12:50 A chronologic
study of Jewish thought and creativity as expressed in a variety of literary forms from I
Biblical period to approximately 1800 Included are selections from The Bible. The Talmu
medieval writings in prose and poetry, and tales of the Hassidim
HEBREW 101. ELEMENTARY HEBREW; 3 credits. Prof. Abramowitz T.Th.. 12:15-1:30 Learmngi
read and write; fundamental grammatical principles; reading of easy prose for comprehensiOr|
and conversation; oral and written exercises.
HEBREW 201. INTERMEDIATE HEBREW (Reading Method); 3 credits. Prof Abramowitz TlJ
3:05-4:20 Rapid reading of various types of Hebrew for comprehension; practice m fxf1
composition, grammar drill, and conversation.
HISTORY 355. ANCIENT NEAR EAST; 3 credits. Prof. Patsavos. M.W.F.. 11:00-11 50 A survey!
the civilizations of ancient Egypt. Mesopotamia. Asia Minor Syria-Palestine, and Pe'S
emphasizing the contributions of the peoples of the ancient Near East to later civilizations
HISI 9:05 P.M. Ethnic composition of Russia and the Soviet Union. The formation of Russian ethn
groups, and Russian attitudes and official policies toward ethnic minorities
POLITICS AND PUBLIC AFFAIRS 593. INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS OF THE MIODLE EAST; I
credits, Prof. Schechterman, W.. 3:00-5:30 P.M. Regional and inter-regional analysis of P
foreign relations of Middle Eastern nations, domestic and geopolitical factors
^fiSLWlf'BWffSJS THE HEBREW BIBLE (Old Teal.rn.nt), 3 credits I
oweeney. i. in.. 12:15-1:30 The history and literature of ancient Israel and early Judaism
RELIGION 202, THE PROPHETS; 3 credits. Prof. Sweeney, T.Th 9 25-10 40 A study of the secondl
major division of the Hebrew Bible, which includes the Former and the Latter Prophets J
RELm3'S?^lt,cJaU^A.,8M ^ ,8LAM: 3 credi,s- P'f Shamir. T.Th.. 3:05-4:20. A survey of* |
SuijTduudatsm andUm "9 "^ "" '^^ ***"**" JeWS 8"d MStemS A ""*"*
WttSUS JEW,8H C0*MU"ITY '" THE UNITED STATES; 3 credits. Prof Wo*|
i n 1.4U-Z.55. An application of minority group analysis to the U.S. Jewish community.
Registration for fall semester 1983 begins Wednesday. August 24
Classes begin Monday, August 29
For Additional Information Please Contact
Dr. Helen N. Fagin. Director of Judaic Studies
* private, independent, international university
An equal opportumty/aff.rmal.ve action employer
284-4375


Community Corner
Association for Parents of American Israelis will hold their
next meeting Sunday at 1:30 p.m. at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation building. Guest speakers from Israel will present up-
to-date news of events there.
The Miami Choral Society, under the direction of Dr U.
Kjelson, conductor, will hold interviews for DrosDective
members Aug. 29 and 30 at University of Miami Choral Office 7
to 10 p.m.; interviews for returning members, Sept. 6 from 7 to
9:30 p.m.; and an organizational meeting and first rehearsal
Sept. 13 at the university^ Broby Hall at 7 p.m reftearsal.
State Representative Hal Spaet has been named the recipient
of Florida Representative of the Year Award by the Association
for Retarded Citizens. He will receive the honor at the
Association's annual conference in Fort Walton Beach Sept. 30.
Rabbi David H. Anerbach, spiritual leader of Beth David
Congregation, recently reelected to the Executive Council of the
Rabbinical Assembly, has been appointed to the board of South
Dade Federation and named regional liaison of the Joint
Placement Commission of the Rabbinical Assembly, Jewish
Theological Seminary, and United Synagogue of America.
Temple Zion will hold Membership Open House and Religious
School Registration Sunday, 10 a.m. to noon; Tuesday, 7 to 9
p.m.; and Wednesday, 6 to 8 p.m.
Auditions for the Miami Beach Community Theatre
production of "Bye Bye Birdie" will be held Monday, Aug. 29 in
room 110 of Miami Beach Senior High School at 7 p.m. Starring
in the play will be Peppy Fields in the role of Mae Petterson.
The first social of the "Bronxites" for City of Hope will be
held Sunday, Aug. 28 from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Sheraton Bal
Harbour Hotel's Kloridian Room.
The Men's Club of the Sephardic Jewish Center will hold a
meeting Sunday at 9 a.m. The synagogue will present the film
'Friday, the Rabbi Slept Late" Saturday, Sept. 3 at 8:30 p.m.
University of Miami has announced that the 1983-84 season at
Gusman Concert Hall will begin Sept. 9 featuring the United
States Army Band.
TWIN CITY GLASS CO
MAtJUrTHS MNrtOt S ITOSt PWMWI MB TOW
AftTMtff AMD MAMID MI*909S
Plat* ft Window Glass Replacements
122016lh St., M.S. Visit our Snow room 673-29A
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get your own fire rated, locked
rooms. 5 x 6, 5 x 8, 5 x 10 etc.
Call Art for further infor-
mation.
442-1949
VOLUNTEERS WANTED1
If the history of the Nazi Holocaust Is s concern of
yours, plsssa call us so thst you may become a Volun-
teer Interviewer for
THE SOUTHEASTERN FLORIDA
HOLOCAUST CENTER, INC.
Florida International University
Bay Vista Campus
N.E. 151 Street & Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Florida 33181
The Center collects orsl histories of Holocaust Sur-
vivors, their Liberators and Protectors, on audio and
video tapes. As a volunteer Interviewer you will attend
a compreheneive training course each Wednesday af-
ternoon for 12 weeks. This course includes lectures
and seminars on the history of the Holocaust and in-
terviewing skills. Our interviewing program is free,
open to the public, and conducted at Florida Inter-
national University, Bay Vista Campus at N.E. 151
Street and Biscayne Blvd.
To register, please call the Center office before Sep-
tember 9,1983, at 940-5690.

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Apple
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PANTRY PROt BLUE
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OR VIN ROSE __^,
No. Moun. $E39
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49
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AN A'-BAC- rt .A^Jf I INC~MA-.-,NGBAS*S
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Watermelon
GARDEN FRESH SWEET
Yellow Com ..............5
GARDEN FRESH TENDER
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US NO ALL PURPOSC U PCK
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3PK GIANT MR BIG
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2 UT. BTL. TAB, SPRITE.
SCHWEPPES GINGERALE OR
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AND $7 ORDER
$149
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Super Angle Toothbrush 1.49 100 CT BTL EXTRA STRENGTH Jyfenol Tablets 3.77^,
Planter's Snacks 89*
200 CT CORONET
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50-OZ JAR LUCKY LEAF
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Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
^
FU^)RSHIPPED PREMIUM FRE
Ifftioie
Count on usl
for the best fail
ISAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
Choice Meat
SALE!
WE SELL ONLY THE BEST. WHY
PAY MORE WHEN PAYING MORE
DOESNT MAKE IT BETTER.
Underblade
Pot Roast-|TQ
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK ^* I l>**^
BONELESS ^% I
Crossrib Pbt
IRoast $fl 79
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCKBONELESS .------------
Clnderblade Steak^l9?
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
CUT EXTRA THICK FOR BROILING
Shoulder Steak
USDA CHOICE 2J LBS AVG
Beef for tew
USDA CHOICE
BEEF CHUCK
BONELESS
LB
Top Round
Roast $
USDA CHOICE
BEEF ROUND
LB
HLLSHWE BEEF
Smoked Sausage.......... 2.39
SWIf I INTERNATIONAL ENTREES FRESH FROZEN CHICKEN
Cordon Bleu or Kiev....... 2.89
USDA CHOICE
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K$159
USOA CHOICE BEEF ROUNO
Top Round Steak............lB 2.79
USOA CHOICE BEEF ROUNO 1ST CUT
Top Round Steak............ .. 2.99
FAMILY PACK MEATS
FlA ORSHIPPEDPREM FRESMJIBS OVER
Fryer Combo..............lb 1.19
USOA CHOICE BFEF CHUCK 3 MEALS IN ONE CONTAINS ROASI
BEtFSTEWANOGROUND BEE'
Beef Chuck Combo ........ 1.69
'JSOACHOFT BEEF CHUCK 3 MEALS IN ONE CONTAINS ROAST
RFff SIEWAND GROUND BEEF
Beef $-|79
T
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J-w COW N* MflH HMD IWvw.
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Kraft American Cheese........1.69
Sargwito 8 oz pkg
Colby Longhom Cheese.......1.29
Blue Bonnet Margarine ..55
FRIENDSHIP MIDGET-REG OR NO SALT^
Farmer l^%/t
v-ficcse ^UriSr
&WffiMe1 T.......... 73
K%Sne%KBar:.........aim
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orraine Swiss Cheese........1.09
LB
% PANTRY PRIDE GRADE 'A'
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WITH COUPON AND $7 ORDER
Genet* Co*o>*a 1 2 ox (*g
American Slices...............99
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I 42-OI BOX HEAVY OOTV 0V
1.19
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AUGUST 18-AUGUST24. 1983
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MADE WITH WISH FRUIT "" ~ <2B,#"f"M.. .""""... J AUGUST Ib'AUOUST 24. 1983'" ~v~"~ur' OO0 _
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CLUDING TOBACCO PRODUCTS COUPON^


"YBge o-M ine jewisn nonman/ rriaay, August i, ioj
Shown above are the principal partners of
the two merging law firms, Britton, Cohen,
Kaufman, and Schantz, P.A. and Cassel and
Cassel, P.A. From left are John L. Britton,
James Cohen, Marwin S. Cassel, Edward A.
Kaufman, and Lawrence M. Schantz.
Two Miami Law Firms Plan Sept Merger
Two Miami law firms, Britton,
Cohen, Kaufman, and Schantz,
P.A., and Cassel and Cassel,
P.A., will merge Sept. 1 to
become one of the top eight in
size among approximately 500
law offices in South Florida.
The new association will be
named Britton, Cohen, Cassel,
Kaufman, and Schantz, P.A.,
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF FLORIDA, IN AND
FOR OADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 13 2*454
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
SALVATORE BUFFA
and
QrULlA MISTRETTA
BUFFA
TO: Glulla Mlatrett*
Buffa
Via Francesco Colla No. 5
Palermo, Italy
YOU ARE NOTTFrED that
an acUon tor Dissolution of
Marriage has bean tiled
against you and you are
required to serve a copy ot your
defenses on ALEC ROSS, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address U 16400 N.E. 19 Ave..
Miami. FL SS163. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above court on or before
September 16, 188S; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you.
WITNESS my hand and seal
at Miami. Florida on August 12.
lam
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ll 174 August IB. 36;
Septembers, 9,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORID*
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 0-4*47
Division 02
DIRE: ESTATE OF
ELEANOR LANDAU,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of ELEANOR LANDAU,
deceased. File Number 88-8667,
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the sikluss
of which la Dade County Court-
house, T8 West Flagler Street.
Miami, FL 88180. The name*
and addresses of the personal
representaUve and the per-
sonal rep re sen tatlve's attorney
are set forth below.
All Interested persons an
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the win, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
began on August 19,1961/
Pe rsonal Representative.
MICHAEL LANDAU
JEROME LANDAU
7883 S.W. 106 Circle
Miami. FL 88179
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
SPARBER, SHEVIN. ROSEN,
SHAPO' ..AND HEIL
BRONNOREP-A.
One Soothes** Third Avenue
Mlam^sTaigfBtl
Tele|iliiiR9aisji> 966-79*9
11176 August IB, 36,1988
(
with a combined staff of 124.
Britton, Cohen, Kaufman, and
Schantz has 104 staff members,
while Cassel and Cassel will bring
a 20-person office to the new law
firm.
"The merger will increase the
diversity and depth of our opera-
tion," said senior partner, John
L. Britton, "It enhances our
abilities as a full service firm.
"As Miami continues to be-
come a center of international
trade and commerce we feel that
our practice must grow and ex-
pand to meet the challenges of
the community," he added.
Marwin Cassel said that he is
proud to be merging with a law
firm that has 58 years of exper-
ience in the South Florida
market.
Dade County Vice Mayor
Harvey Ruvin has been asosciat-
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
MIAMI-INTERNATIONAL
INSURANCE at 909 BrlckeU
Plata, Suite 730. Miami, FL
33131, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
MIAMI-INTERNATIONAL
INSURANCE, INC.
By: CAYETANO ALFONSO,
President
Attorney for Applicant:
DEL-VALLE A NET8CH, P.A.
1960 S.W. 27 Avenue.
Miami. Florida 331
111*6 August 6,13.19,36.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADS COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO.S3 245MFC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOS
IN RE: The Marriage of:
DULCE RODRIGUEZ,
Wife,
and
JOSE RODRIGUEZ.
Husband.
TO: JOSE RODRIGUEZ
Rssldence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FntD that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on ALBERT L CARRI-
CARTE, P.A.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la
3491 N.W. 7th St. Miami
Florida 88136, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 3. 1988: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secuUve weeks In THE
JEWISH FLO RID LAN
WITNESS my hand and the
jeJ of amid court at Miami,
Florida on this 37th day of July.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
2481 N.W. 7th 8t.
Miami, Florida 89138
111*4 August 6.13.19,36,1988
ed with Cassel and Cassel, and
will become Of Counsel to the
new firm.
Both offices will relocate in
1984 and occupy one-and-a-half
floors of the new Southeast
Financial Center in downtown
Miami to accommodate the larger
staff. They will retain satellite of-
fices in North Miami, Fort
Lauderdale, and West Palm
Beach.
Representative clients of Brit-
ton, Cohen, Kaufman, and
Schantz, P.A. are Southeast
Bank, N.A.; Walter E. Heller and
Company Southeast; E.F. Hut-
ton and Co., Inc.; NCNB of Flor-
ida, Inc.; Eastman Kodak Co.;
PPG Industries; and Securities
Protection Investment Corpora-
tion.
Cassel and Cassel's rep-
resentative clients include
Central Bank and Trust Co.;
Quayside Associates, Ltd.;
International Savings and Loan
Association; and Peoples Down-
town National Bank of Miami.
The principal office of Britton,
Cohen, Kaufman, and Schantz,
P.A. is currently located in the
Southeast Bank Building, South
Biscayne Blvd. Cassel and Cassel
has maintained offices on North
Biscayne Blvd., Miami.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 68-28996
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
GREGORIO SANTANA.
Husband,
and
ANA GLORIA SANTANA.
Wlfs.
TO: ANA GLORIA
SANTANA
Rssldence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on ALBERT L CARRI-
CARTE. P.A., attorney for
PeUtloner. whose address is
2461 N.W. 7th Street. Miami
Florida 88138. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 16, 1988; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition. ^^
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
sscutlve weeks In THE
JEWISH FLO RID LAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this isth day of
August, 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clark, Circuit Court
Dado County, Florid*
ByN.A. HEWETT
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
Albert L. Carricarte, P.A.
3*91 N.W. 7th Street
Miami, Florida SUSS
Telephone; (806)649-7917
11189 August 19, SS;
September 3.9, ISM .
foms
Miami Beach Mayoral Race
Rabbi Dr. David Raab,
spiritual leader of Temple King
Solomon of Miami Beach, has
declared himself a candidate for
the office of mayor of Miami
Beach.
In making the announcement,
he stated, "I have lived in this
community for many years, and,
having traveled throughout the
world. I still think that this is the
finest place in which to live. I
love Miami Beach.
"Both my wife, Shoshana and
I are proud of our children, Linda
Joy and Michael, who were raised
here and attended Miami Beach
schools before graduating from
the University of Miami."
Rabbi Raab is an honors
graduate of Brooklyn College,
and he also attended University
of Miami Law School. Recently
he was awarded the degree of
Doctor of Divinity from his alma
matter, the Hebrew Union
College-Jewish Institute of Reli-
gion, presented in recognition of
"his scholarship, dedicated
service as a chaplain in the U.S.
Army, and for contributions to
the State of Israel."
Rabbi David Raab
Rabbi Raab was selected the
Knight of the Year by George
Gershwin Lodge of Knights &C
Pythias, and he serves as a
member of the Greater Miami
Rabbinical Association, Miami
Beach Democratic Club, Mahi
Shrine, and, for the past 10 years,
the Social Service Advisory
Board of Miami Beach.
Jefferson Bank Appoints Kramer
Harvey E. Kramer, vice
president of Thomson McKinnon
Securities, Inc., has been elected
chairman of the Advisory Board
of Jefferson National Bank for
Miami Beach. The investment
banker is a former Beach hotel
owner and operator who has been
a stock broker and investment
banker for the past 25 years.
Announcement of Kramer's
election was made by Arthur H.
Courshon, chairman of the board
of Jefferson Bancorp, Inc., the
bank holding company which
operates Jefferson.
Kramer is a former vice
president of Temple Beth Sholom
Brotherhood, past president of
the Bayshore Service Club, and a
member of the Masons.
Harvey E. Kramer
Concerned Seniors Held Appreciation Dinner
An annual Volunteer Appre-
ciation Dinner was held Tuesday
ORT Chairmen Named
Sandra Isenstein of Highland
Park, 111. has been named to chair
the forthcoming 27th Biennial
National Convention of Women's
American ORT scheduled to take
place Oct. 16 through 19 in Los
Angeles. Assisting her will be
Ruth Taffel of Brooklyn, N.Y.
who will serve as co-chairman.
JCC Events
Announced
Traditions, symbols, foods,
recipes, and crafts of the High
Holidays will be reviewed and the
liturgy explained at a High
Holiday Workshop Thursday,
Sept. 1 at 7:30 p.m. at South
Dade Jewish Community Center.
The JCC will also sponsor a
beginners conversational Yid-
dish-Jewish literature course for
senior adults beginning Sept. 18.
To be held at Federation Gar-
dens, the course, Joys of Yiddish,
will be led by Girt Boesak.
BusinessNote
The National Association of
Health Underwriters has an-
nounced that Rabbi Chaim M.
Kovacs of North Miami Beach, of
Unionmutual Life Insurance Co.,
has qualified for the 1983 Lead-
ing Producers Round Table's
Gold Award.
A professional association for
licensed disability income and
health ^ insurance agents,
NAHU's award recognizes
"excellence" in the sale of those
types of insurance.
Rabbi Kovacs, with Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
teaches at Temple Judea.
evening by the Concerned
Seniors of Dade, Inc., a coalition
of senior citizens groups. The
event was one of two major fund-
raisers held so the group can
further its efforts addressing the
problems of the elderly.
Entertainment for the dinner,
accordionist, Patricia Gayle, was
sponsored by Flagler Federal
Savings and Loan Association.
Season Opener Set
The first meeting of the season
of Haim Yassky Chapter of
Hadassah has been set for Aug:
31 at Byron Hall at 1 p.m.
Program will feature Debbie
Wee.nick narrating on "A Visit to
Israel."
Chamber to Host Rep.
State Representative Ron
Silver, from North Dade, will be
featured speaker at a luncheon
meeting of the Miami Beach
Chamber of Commerce Thursday
at noon. The event will take place
at the Beau Rivage Resort Hotel.
Card Party Planned
A card party and brunch has
been scheduled by the Kinneret
Chapter of Hadassah for Tues-
day, Aug. 30 at 11:30 a.m. at the
Conquistador Clubhouse.
Open House Set
Miami Beach City Conimis-
sioner Sy Eisenberg has ajr
nounced the opening of his re-
election campaign headquarters
in the Sheldon Insurance Build-
mg, Prairie Ave. An Open House
ror campaign workers and sup-
porters has been scheduled for
Tuesday at 2 p.m.


Vc Notice
I CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
COUNTY, FLORIDA
\rm DIVISION
*vlilon (01)
rATE OF
[KRUSHEN
sd
NOTICE
5MINI8TRATION
PERSONS HAVING
OR DEMANDS
THE ABOVE
AND ALL OTHER
INTERESTED IN
lATE:
HEREBY NOTI-
|t the administration
[estate of MORRIS
deceased, File
1-6400, la pending In
lit Court (or Da.de
Florida, Probate
I the addreaa of which
ounty Courthouse, 73
rler Street, 8rd Floor,
[Florida 331SO. The
| representative of the
MARY KRUSHEN,
Area* la 5801 Co Mm
Apt. 1121, Miami
orlda. The name and
of the personal
stive's attorney are
BlOW.
oni having claims or
I agalnet the estate are
WITHIN THREE
FROM THE DATE
FIRST PUBLICA-
' THIS NOTICE, to file
clerk of the above
' written statement of
i or demand they may
lach claim must be In
land must Indicate the
the claim, the name
ress of the creditor or
or attorney, and the
I claimed. If the claim la
due, the date when It
come due shall be
I If the claim la contln-
un liquidated, the
[of the uncertainty shall
d. If the claim la se-
[the security shall be de
The claimant, shall
1 sufficient copies of the
i the clerk to enable the
i mail one copy to each
>1 representative,
ersons Interested In the
[to whom a copy of this
< of Administration has
F mailed are required,
THREE MONTHS
THE DATE OF THE
PUBLICATION OF
NOTICE, to file any ob-
ns they may have that
nges the validity of the
life will, the quail
of the personal rep-
stive, or the venue or
Ictlon of the court.
CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
[OBJECTIONS NOT SO
WILL BE FOREVER
IED.
of the first publication
this Notice of
ration: Auguet 12,
i MARY KRUSHEN
eraonal Representative
of the Estate of
IORRIS KRUSHEN
Deceased
My for Personal
tsentatlve:
i J. Orundwerg. Hays and
Swerg
900 21 Southeast First
il, Florida 33131
hone: (80S) 871-4419
__. AU-rustl2. 19,198? _
JTICf OR ACTION
tSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
i ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
tCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
ID FOR DADE COUNTY
IviI Action No. 13 2*1 4
FAMILY DIVISION
MOM FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
I: The Marriage of
ILES M.KRAMER,
tltloner,
IOTH Y M. KRAMER,
spondent.
[ DOROTHY M. KRAMER
560 Foreat Avenue
Apt. No. 4
Dayton. Ohio 45405
3U ARE HEREBY NOTI
that an action for Dtsso-
of Marriage has been
against you and you are
Ired to serve a copy of your
en defenses, If any, to It on
-VIN J. ASHER, ESQ., at-
y for Petitioner, whose
as Is Suite 208, 1850 8.W.
Street, Miami. Florida
S. and file the original with
clerk of the above styled
on or before August 38,
I; otherwise a default will
[ entered against you for the
f demanded In the com-
fit or petition.
ESS my hand and the
of said court at Miami,
Ida on this 2fl day of July,
[RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
rcult Court Seal)
1*0 July 29;
Augusts. 12,19.1988
| I NTH! CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 63-42*7
Division (II)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAULA KAHN
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The admlnlatratlon of the
estate of PAULA KAHN,
deceased. File Number 88-8297,
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which is 78 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 88180.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal rep-
resentative'a attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with thie court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) ail
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
waa mailed that challenges the
validity of the Will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal rep-
resentative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJECT-
IONS NOT 80 FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 19,19U.
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
Suite 1201, 19 West Flagler
Street
Miami, Florida 88180
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY NORTON
Suite 1201.19 West Flagler
Street
Miami. Florida 88110
Telephone: (805)874-8118
11176 August 19.28,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. IJ 2*441
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE:
THE ADOPTION OF
A MINOR
TO: JOSE S. DIBLASI, SR.
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Adop-
tion has been filed and com-
menced In this Court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
it on M. CRISTINA DEL
VALLE. ESQ.. attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address Is 85
Grand Canal Drive, Third
Floor. Miami, Florida 88144.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 9,1988;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8 day of August.
1988.
. (Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D. C. Bryant
Aa Deputy Clerk
11162 Augusts. 12;
1. 26. 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE Cl RCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 83-29643
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
HAROLD SCHULER,
HUSBAND
and
OLGA VICTORIA
SCHULER.
WIFE
TO: OLOA VICTORIA
SCHULER
Residence Address:
2081 Orange Avenue
Costa Meaa,
California 92827
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq. 16490
N.W. 7th Avenue, Suite 206,
Miami. Florida 88169. on or
before September 16, 196S and
file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before
service on Petitioner's at-
torney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
Petition.
DATED: August9,1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: K. SEIFRIED
aa Deputy Clerk
11170 August 12,19, 26;
September 2,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. S3 2*731
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRI AGE OF:
LAZARA TERESA
GUILLERMES,
Petitioner,
and
MIGUEL GUILLERMES,
Respondent.
TO: MIGUEL GUILLERMES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
ADRIAN D. FERRADAZ. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 1880 N.W. 7th Street,
Suite 102, Miami, Dade County,
Florida, U.S.A., and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 2. 1868; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 29 day of July,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF
JUOO AND FERRADAZ
1830 N.W. 7th Street.
Suite 102
Miami. Florida 38125
Telephone: (805)541-2980
Attorney for Petitioner
11161 Augusts. 12;
______________ 19,28.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 63-448*
Division-64
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GERTRUDE SALTMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of GERTRUDE SALT-
MAN, deceased, File Number
83-8488. Is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is 78 West
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
33130. The name and addresses
of the personal representative
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are aet forth
below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom this
notice was mailed that challen-
ges the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris-
diction ot the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notlc- has
begun on August 12,1988
Personal Representative:
ZEV W. KOGAN
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 38189
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
RAPHAEL K. YUNES
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Telephone: (305)538-6216
11172 August 12,19,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name King .
Fish Market No. 1. at 2049 N W
27 Ave., intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Laurantino Oonaalet
11136 July 29
Augusts. 12.19,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
PRIME BURGER a-k-a
DANNY'S PLACE, at 200 So.
Miami Avenue, Store No. 10,
Miami, FL 88180, Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
NANTERCORP.,
a Fla. Corp.
By: InesScauso, Pros.
200 S. Miami Ave.. No. 10
Miami. FL 83180
11186 July 29;
Augusts, 12,19,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83-4461
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LAURENCE T. SAMPLE,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSON'S INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of LAURENCE T.
SAMPLE, deceased, File
Number 83-6081, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which Is 78
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 83180. Third Floor. The
personal representative of the
estate la JOYCE STONE SAM-
PLE, whose address is 1021 Al-
fonse Avenue, Coral Gables.
Florida 38146. The name and
address of the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set
. forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim la se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: August 12.1983.
JOYCE STONE SAMPLE
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
LAURENCE T. SAMPLE
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Joseph DlBartolomeo. Esq.
8400 Bird Road
Miami. Florida 33166
Telephone: (306)226-2276
11166 August 12,19,1988
---------NOTICE OF AC*T (6M-------
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 11-254 72
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CAROLINE WARE,
Petitioner Wife
and
WILLIE WARE,
Respondent-Husband
TO: WILLIE WARE
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on Alan Roaenthal, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
3060 Blscayne Boulevard, Suite
800, Miami, Florida 33137, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before August 26. 1988;
otherwise a default will be
< entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
1 once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 21st day of July,
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
I Alan Roaenthal
3060 Blscayne Blvd., Suite 800
l Miami. FL 88187
11124 July 29;
____________AuiiatB.12.19.16M
N THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 63-41M
Division 02
N RE: ESTATE OF
SAMUEL UTWIN,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
1 estate of SAMUEL LITWIN,
' deceased, File Number 88-4124.
i is pending In the Circuit Court
:for Dade County, Florida,
! Probate Division, the address
[of which Is 78 W. Flagler St..
- Miami, FL 88180. The names
and addresses of the personal
representatives and the per-
sonal representatives' attorney
are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
| WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
lOF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
waa mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
, begun on August 12,1988.
Personal Representative:
SHARON TELTSHER
198 Palm Avenue
Miami Beach, FL 88189
RUTH BLACKER
2780 Pine Island Drive
Phase 3. Bldg. 61 No. 807
Sunrise, FL 88822
I Attorney for Personal
' Representative:
Stephen A. Kress, Esq.
BARNET A KRESS. P.A.
I 19 W. Flagler St.. Suite 406
Miami, FLSS1S0
I Telephone: (306) 868-0088
I 11169 August 12.19.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 81-7104
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BARBARA KAMI N SKY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate Of BARBARA KAM1N-
SKY, deceased. File Number
81-7804. is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for DADE County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida,
33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below. All Interested
persons are required to file
with this court. WITHIN
THREE MONTHS OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) ail claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested per-
son to whom notice was mailed
that challenges the validity of
the will, the qualification of the
personal representative,
venue, or Jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 19,1988.
Personal Representative:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Fla. 83189
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT
GALBUT, GALBUT* MENIN.
P.A.,
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida. 83139
Telephone: 872-8100
HITS August 19, 28,1981
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name The
J.A. Cart Co.. at 780 University
Drive, Coral Gables, Fla88184,
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
H. Sussklnd Co.. Inc.
780 University Drive
Coral Gables. Fla. 88184
11127 July 29;
____________August6.12.19.19W
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number *3-*37i
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ESTHER ABRAMS, a-k-a
ESSIE ABRAMS.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of ESTHER ABRAMS, a-k
a ESSIE ABRAMS, deceased.
File Number 88-2802 (01), Is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 12000 Blscayne Boulevard,
Suite 208, North Miami, Fl.
33181. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom this no-
tice was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 12,1988.
Personal Representative:
RICHARD A. GOLDEN
KRAMER A GOLDEN, P.A.
Attorney for Personal
| Representative:
i Richard A. Golden. Esq.
Blscayne Centre, Suite 203
12000 Blscayne Boulevard
l North Miami, Fl. 88181
Telephone: (306)899-1800
11166 August 12.19.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names
HAVING BABIES AFTER 80
and HBA SO. at P.O. Box 2684.
South Miami, Florida 88148,
Intends to register said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
HAVING BABIES
AFTER 80. INC.
|lll46 August 6.12.19,26.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 61-24723
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
LAZARO GORDILLO,
Petitioner-Husband,
and
OLIVIA ELISA GORDILLO.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: OLIVIA ELISA
GORDILLO
Avenlda Prtmera
entre 4y B
San Jose,
Costa Rica. C.A.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlaso-
i lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
I required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
TED E. TSOUPRAKE. attor-
I ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
1 dress is 220 Miracle Mile
i Suite 222, Coral Gablea, Florida
33134. and file theorlglnal with
1 the clerk of the above styled
I court on or before September 9,
1988; otherwise a default win
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 4 day of August,
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByK.Selfrted
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
TED E. TSOUPRAKE
220 Miracle Mile-Suite 222
Coral Gables, Fla. 88184
Attorney for Petitioner
11164 August 12.19.26;
U September 2. IBM
NOTICE Undue!
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
i NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name TTTO
TRANSMISSIONS at 2074 N.W.
139th Street. Miami. Florida.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
SILVIO GONZALEZ
STANLEY E. GOODMAN
Attorney for
TITO TRANSMISSIONS
11141 July 29;
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Sablna's Ball Bonds at 1461
N.W. 14 Street. Miami. Fla.
33125. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Junior's Ball Bonds, Inc.
By: Sablna VanTuyn
FrederickC. Sake, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
11180 July 29;
August 5. 12,19,1983


*-
iiif3c'. fiin'ii nH
>-S"^
'j "____t
PublicNotice\
FICTITIOUS N AME LA*
WOTIC* IS HtRIBTI
anrr-
wh 9h Clerk ef toe
Ot^DrttOiMTj
mo
MOTICC UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HIRIBI
GIVKJI toei Oh
sewing service. *t irr
N.W
to
i to* Clark of the
QreuK Cwert of Dade County
ALXIDA
1UJB Anapa* IS. M.
September 2. t. 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
KM
DA DC COUNTY. FLORIDA
nOMTI DIVISION
'J-Jttt
1
TNRE ESTATE Or
edgard p Mnn
Dnmm
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMAND8
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the Administration
of the estate of EDGARD P
NUNEZ. deceased. Pile
Number 88-8899. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
Is Dade County Courthouse. 73
w Flagler St., Miami. PL
13130 The personal rep-
resentative of the estate Is
JOSEFA NUNEZ, whose ad
dress U 8687 S W 28th Street,
Miami. Florida 33156 The
name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons ha vine claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim la se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
dellv r sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mail one copy to each
personal representative.
All persona Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to We any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedents will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
PILED WILL BE FOREVER I
BARRED
Date of the first publication I
of this Notice of Admlnls- [
tratlon: August 19, 1983
JOSEFA NUNEZ I
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
EDGARD P. NUNEZ
Deceased
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
A. Koss
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, FL 33128
Telephone. (300)828-8844
11184 August 18.28.1S8S
NOTICE OF ACTKX
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(WO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COUR T OP
THE ELE VENTN JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA, IN .
AMO FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACT MM
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMAJtaiAOC
IN RE The Marriage of______
RUPERT GEORGE BAXTER.
HAZEL BAXTEP.
TO HAZEL BAXTER
2A
IS, M
YOC ARE HEREBY NOTI
of toe above styled coot ea or
before August 36. 1M3
detauR arm be
you tor the
secuUve weeks to THE
JEWISH FLORID LAN
WITNESS my head aad the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on Has 22ad day of
July. ISM
RICHARD P BRTNKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
By V BARKLEY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
Geoffrey w Pines Esq.
Suite 4. 2828 Bird Are..
Coconut Grove. FL 88188
"U8 Juty29;
Augusts. 12. 18.1883
NOTICE UNDER
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCCHJRTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-2*1 ts
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
OLVEIN FUNDORA,
Petitioner,
and
MIGDALIA SIGLER,
Respondent.
TO: MIGDALIA SIGLER
Mayor No. 12
Entre Central y
Fernanda
Reparto La Fernanda
San Miguel De Padron
Habana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
Melvln J. Asher, Esq., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1850 s.w. 8th Street. Suite 208.
Miami. Florida 33135. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore August 28. 1883; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of July
1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM.J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11139 July 28.
Augusts, y. 19.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW J
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name THE
SHERIDAN at 41st Street and
Sheridan Avenue. Miami
Beach. Florida, Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
H*M PROPERTIES,
A Florida General
Partnership
Attorneys for Applicant
Smith and Mandler, PA.
111150 August 8.13,18,28.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Dora-
sol Corp. at 6181 S. W. 4th
Street, Miami, Florida Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Peter Crur
ErsaCrui
"187 Ju|vao.
Augusts, 12, IB, 19BJ.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(no property;
in the circuit court of
the e le ventm judicial
a RCU IT OF F LOR IDA, IN
AMO FOR OAOC COUNTY
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
DIRE THE MARRIAGE OP
DIAZ.
BARBARA DIAZ.
WSto
TO BARBARA DIAZ
'
'
UNKNOWW
YOC ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Dteso-
ef Marriage has bees
you aad yen are.
tacopyofyour
. tf any. lotion
L. CARRI CARTE.
PA. attorney tor Petitioner.
whose 1 lUrsss 2481 N.W. Tth
Street,
aad file _
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 2.1883.
Unaietss a default will be en-
tered against you for the rettof
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published I
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks to THE JEW
E5H FLORID IAN
WIINESS my hand and toe
seal of said court at Miami..
Florida on tola 2 day of August
1888.
RICHARD P BRTNKER
Ai Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM.J. Hartnett
As Deputy Oerk
i Circuit Court Seal i
Albert L Carricarte. PA
2481 N W Tth Street
Miami. Florida S3128
Telephone: 849-7919
Attorney for Petitioner
11188 Augusts. 13;
IB, 26, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE Cl RCU IT COU RT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASENO.:SS-2M47
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
TAJUDEEN SALTU,
HUSBAND
and
JOHNNIE SAl.ll WIFE
TO: JOHNNIE SALIU
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
TOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Ei.. 15490
N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite 20B.
Miami. Florida 33169 on or be-
fore September 9, 1983 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
DATED: August2.1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
l Circuit Court Seal I
By: DC Bryant
as Deputy Clerk
"180 Augusts. 12;
atJUMI
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-271 *
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE:
DAPHNE ADASSA THOMP-
SON
tad
JOHN W. THOMPSON
TO: John W. Thompson
18 Pine Tree Close
Freeport. Grand Bahamas
Bahamas
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on Alec Ross, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
18400 N.E. 18 Ave., Miami.
Florida 33162 and file the
original with the clerk of the
shove styled court on or before
September 2. 1983, otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and tht
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 2nd day of
August, 1888.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By NA. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
'Circuit Court Seal)
11107 August 6,12, 19. 28, 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN tha
ito all aM to
under the fictitious name DN-
TERIOR3 BY ODESSA, at
Miami Decorating aad
N E 2nd Av
to Clark of to
Court of Dade County. Florida
ODESSA LTTHGOW
DrTKRlORSrNC
BT ODESSA W LTTHGOW
11187
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELE VENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANOFOR
DADS COUNTY, FLOP IDA
ciMto.n-uin
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
SAMUEL A. BURK
SB -- ssaTJ
i

TRESSTE P. BURK
NOTICE OP ACTION
TO: TRESSTE P. BURK
11321 Amarilio Drive
Westminister
California 82888
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses to It on I. J.
GRAFF. ESC), attorney tor.
Petitioner, whose aililiiM at
SSS N.E. 1*7 St.. State 1015.
N.M.B. Florida 88183, on or he-
fore August 28. 18*9. and file
the original with the clerk of
this court; otherwise a default
will be entered against you.
Dated July 28.1883
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By C P Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
11188 July 28:
Augusts. 12. 19. 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 8114388
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Adoption of Minor
TO: JEAN GERALDERICK
DAUTRUCHE
3838 103rd Street
Corona. New York 11888
YOU, are hereby notified that
the Petitioner. LOUIS FRANK-
LIN DROUIN, filed a Petition
for Adoption In the above-
styled cause for the adoption of
a minor child DCM. and you
are required to show cause why
the same should not be granted
by serving a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, if any upon Dan-
iel Gallup. Attorney for Peti-
tioner. 13145 Coronado Ter-
race. North Miami. Florida
33181. and by filing the original
thereof with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court, on or before this
2nd day of September. 1983.
otherwise a Decree may be en-
tered against you granting said
adoption.
WITNESS MY HAND and
Official Seal of said Court at
Miami. Dade County. Florida
this 1st day of August. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: D.C.Bryant
DEPUTYCLERK
11153 AuguatB. 13;
19. 28, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANOFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 83-13852
TN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
DEBORAH L. FOSTER,
Wife
and
DARRELL FOSTER.
Husband
TO: DARRELL FOSTER
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOnrTED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
gainst you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq 16490
N.W. Tth Avenue, Suite 208
Miami. Florida 33189, on or
b"*>re September 28. 1988 and
Hie the original with the Clerk
of Uus Court either before
service on Petitioner's at-
torney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
Petition.
DATED: August 18.1988.
RICHARD P BRTNKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: D.C. BRYANT
AsDeputyCIerk
,U8B August 19, 39;
September 2,9,1988
-..,v y, .< .-.-, .
'.'.VW
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Of
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AMO POP DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 61-1*1 7
ACTION POP DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
TN RE: The Marriage of
ERNESTO RAMIREZ
PTXAR RAMIREZ
TO:
PTLAR RAMIREZ
1*11 Pens) St Apt 3
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTt
THAT an acton to
of Marriage he.
been filed against you and r*
are required to serve copy <*
your written defenses if any
It ca ALBERT L CARRI-
CARTE PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
8481 N.W. Tth St Miami.
Florida, aad file the origin*!
with toe clerk of to*
styled court on or
August 38. 1*88; otherwise *
default will be entered agakat
you tor the relief demanded
the complaint or peDtior.
This notice shall be published
once each weak tor tour con-
secutive weeks In TRY
JEWISH FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and tht
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28th day of July.
1888.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County Fionas
By LOLA H. CURRIER
AsDeputyCIerk
i Circuit Court Seal I
Attorney for Petitioner
ALBERT L CARRICARTE.
PA
2481 N W Tth St
Miami Florida S3128
11134 JulyS.
Augusts. 12 19 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT COURT OF
FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 81-27047
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
TN RE: lite Marriage of
ALTNA GARCIA.
Wife,
and
RE IN ALDO GARCIA
Husband
TO: RelnaldoGarcia
Residence Addren
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage hai
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses if any. to
It on Albert L Carricarte PA.
attorney for Petitioner whose
address is 2491 M W Tth Street
Miami. Florida 33125 and fll
the original with the clerk of
the above stvled court on or
before September 2. 198J
otherwise a defaul. will b
entered against you for ui
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 2nd day of
August, 1988.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
Attorney for Petitioner
Albert L. Carricarte. PA
3491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33126
Telephone (SOS) 649-7917
11156 AuruatS.13.19.26 .W
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engsge In business
under the fictitious name
Quality Plus Window Cleaning
at 18888 W. Dixie Highway
North Miami Beach. Florid*.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Darryl Felnman
Owner
11143 July*
_______iMRifjMyg
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name LS* >
Manufacturers Representa-
tives at 1083 NE 304 La. -
Miami. FL 88179 Intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dad*
County, Florida.
NeULentln
11171 August 13.19.
September2.i
>VM "... cV,'.\. .VC-V
" I 'Iff RSsPPsYPI ">< l I IV W*V .
I


Feller, Beth David Pioneer, Passes
Friday, August 19,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 1 IB
,'s- Feller, a pioneer member
Beth David Congregation and
Went of Miami for the past 50
Cs. died Aug. 9. She was 80
sold.
(he wife of the late Johnnie
ja, founder of Johnnie and
, Mrs- Feller was a life
jiber of Torah Chapter of
Gassah and Woman's Ameri-
foRT.
, David, 96. Miami Beach. Aug. IT.
EL, Martha. Bal Harbour, Aug. 17.
verflde.
jIMK'l. Dr. Herman H Surf*lde,
. 18. Blaaberg.
t)ST. Benjamin. Miami Beach, Aug.
;. Rubln-Zllbert.
|rMAN. Beaile, Miami Beach, Aug.
L Rubln-ZUbert.
liKKR. Samuel. 96. North Miami
oh. Aug. 16. Levitt-Welnateln.
IEN. Benjamin. To. North Miami
ich, Aug. 16. Rlveralde.
tRKES. Sam. North Miami Beach,
j. 16. Rubln-Zllbert.
|S0OL, Benjamin, Miami Beach,
. 16. Rubln-Zllbert.
ILMAN. Dave M.. SS. North Miami
ch, Aug. 16. Rlveralde.
ch. Aug. S. Rlveralde. Star of
|vld
Hyman B 71, North Miami
ich Aug. 6. Levttt-Welnateln.
EFF, David, T4. Bay Harbor.
r. B. Riverside
PIRO. Robert. North Miami Beach.
. 7. Menorah.
terdde.
DER, Mayer, Miami Beach, Aug.
kubln-Zllbert.
C, Henrietta, North Miami Beach,
. 10. Rlveralde.
JEB. Eleanor, Coral Qablee,
. 10. Rubln-ZUbert. Mt. Nebo.

She was the mother of Ivan
Feller and Natalie Cohen, both of
Miami; sister of Jeanette; grand-
mother of Nancy, Arthur, Suzy,
Lori, Jeff, Mitchell, Bradley, and
Matthew; and great-grandmoth-
er of four.
Funeral services were held
Aug. 11 at Gordon Funeral
Home. Interment followed at Mt.
Nebo Mausoleum.
mm
Harry, 80, of North Miami Beach, paaa-
ed away Aug. 15. He waa a Florida real-
dent alnce 1982, formerly of S. Falla-
burgh, N.T. He waa the former owner of
Palm Reataurant and the Tiffany Hotel,
Miami Beach. He waa the father of
Rhoda Jullua of North Miami Beach,
Sandra Stonberg of Miami Beach, and,
Suaan Stallop of N.J.; brother of Anna
Schandler of Miami Beach and Pearl
Haber of North Miami Beach; grand-
father of eight; and great-grandfather
of one. He waa a member of Miami
Beach Lodge 1601 BPOE. Hibiscus
Lodge FJ.AM, Miami Ooiutiatory Bcot-
Uh Right, Mahl Shrine, and Temple
Adath Yeahurun. Funeral aervlcea were
held Aug. IT at Levitt-Welnateln.
SAMUELS
Emma B., 88, of Miami Beach, died last
Friday. She waa a resident here for the
paat 27 yean, coming from Memphis,
Tenn. She la survived by a niece, Muriel
Meyers of Miami Beach and nephew,
Ralph Samuels of Rhode Island.
Rlveralde Chapel waa In charge of local
arrangement*
BERINSTEIN, Benjamin B 80, Miami
Beach, Aug. 14.
DEUTSCH, Edna. Miami Beach, Aug.
14. Rubln-Zllbert. Star of David.
FOG EL, Molly Rose, 88, Hollywood,
Aug. 16. Gordon. Star of David.
HABER. Sophie, 83, Miami Beach.
Rubln-ZUbert.
ROGERS. Clara. Miami Beach. Aug. 14.
Rubln-ZUbert.

ZSsa
oX\\o<*e*
keed

p0l


KUFILD
Bertha, 88. a realdent of Miami for the
paat 28 years, passed away. She waa the
mother of Harold of Miami and Julius of
Brooklyn. N.Y.; grandmother of five;
great-grandmother of two; and sister of
Jack Roaenberg of Queen* N.T.
Funeral aervlcea were held Aug. 11 at
Rlveralde Memorial Chapel. Interment
followed at Star of David Memorial
Park.
ROOOVIN
Thdodore M.. 68. of North Miami Beach,
paaaed away. He came to Florida 16
years ago from Ohio. Survivors Include
a wife, Florence; daughters. Estelle
Brandama of Sunrise. Chariene EhrUch
of Detroit, and Judy Roaenberg of
Eastern, Pa.; brothers, Milton and
Jack; sisters, Nettle Feldman. Sylvia
Levoff, and Ruth Shapiro; and nine
grandchildren. Funeral aervlcea were
held Sunday. Rlveralde Chapel waa In
charge.
GROSSMAN
Betty, a realdent of Miami for the paat
26 years She waa the wife of Samuel;
cousin of Dr. and Mrs. William
Rogoway to Calif.. Dr. and Mrs Morris
Rogoway of Calif., Dr. and Mrs Alfred
Hexter of Calif., Mr. and Mrs Jack
Catlow of Calif., Mr. and Mra. Gerard
Groaaman of Miami, and Charlotte
Grossman of N.T. Rlveralde waa In
charge of funeral arrangements
KAROHER
Fannie, 98, a realdent here for SB years,
coming from Cleveland, paaaed away
Aug. 12. She la survived by daughter,
Beatrice R. Schaffer of Bay Harbor
island; two grandchildren; five great-
grandchildren; two great-great-
grandchildren; and sister. Betty
Goodfriend of North Miami Beach.
Funeral aervlcea were held Sunday at
Rlveralde Chapel.
KINO
Rose (Meyers) of Miami paaaed away
last Friday. She waa a realdent tor 84
years, coming from Albany. N.T. She
waa a member of PROPS and Kings
Bay Yacht Club and waa the widow of
the late Albert Meyers Survivors In-
clude sons. Michael and Mark Meyer*;
alx grandchildren: three great-
grandchildren; and brother, Harry
Aranove. Funeral aervlcea were held
Aug. 14 at Rlveralde Chapel.
SAMUELS
Harry P., 88. of North Miami Beach,
paaaed away Aug. 12. He waa a realdent
of the area for 23 years, coming from
Perm. Survivors Include a wife, Mollle;
daughter, Lola Schwartz of Perm .
atepdaughter, Eleanor Monoaaon of
Tex.; three grandchildren; three great
grandchildren; and brother. Adolph of
Ohio. Mr. Samuels waa the owner of
Samuel'a Shoe Store In McKeeaport,
Perm and waa past president of B'nal
B'rlth and Temple B'nal Iarael In Perm.
Rlveralde waa In charge of
arrangement*
For Ml*. Two crypts, PRIVATELY
OWNED, In newly-constructed
action of Star of David
Cametary In Tamarac. Substaln-
ilal discount. Write Box No. EM
c/o Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box
012973, Miami, Fla. 33101 or call
We Hope
You Never Need Us ]
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
& Monument, Inc.
76io Northeast 2nd Avenue
Phone 759-1669
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL'
CHAPEL #
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zllbert, Founder
Four Locations Serving
u. .. ^ The Jewish Community
Miami Beach
Coral Gables ,. *-..%.
South Miami-Kendall nlY No. Miami Beach-Hallandale
DADE Guaranteed BROWARD
538-6371 Pre-Arrangement a 456-4011
with
No Money In Advance
Main Office): 1701 Alton Road, Miami Beach, Fla. 33139
HERBST, Pearl, Aug. 13.
MAGENHEIM. Lena. Miami Beach.
Aug. 12. Rubln-Zllbert.
ROTH. Llbby, Miami Beach. Rubln-
ZUbert
BETESH. Jack, 83. Miami Beach.
MARCUS. Herman. 87. Aug. 10. Rubin
Zllbert.
CHAVIN. Abraham. Miami Beach. Aug.
11. Rubln-ZUbert. Star of David.
ZUCKERMAN, Sandra Selfter, 84.
Miami. Aug. ll. Rlveralde
SHAFER. MolUe, 87. Miami. Aug. 11.
Gordon.
BARNETT. Jerome. 86, North Miami
Beach. Aug. 14. Levttt-Welnateln.
GOLDSTEIN. Leo. 69. North Miami
Beach. Aug. 11. Levltt-Welnateln.
EPELBOIM, Slma. Miami Beach, Aug.
16 Rubln-ZUbert
SCHWARTZ
William H. He waa the national director
of development for Yeshlva Unlveratty
and the Albert Elnateln OoUege of Med-
icine for more than 16 yeara. Prior to
that he waa national executive director
of American Technlon for 14 yeara.
Funeral aervlcea were held Aug. 16 with
Rlveralde In charge of arrangement*.
WEI8KOPP, Joeephlne. Rlveralde
FRIEDMAN, Florence, 68. Miami
Beach, Aug. 14. Rlveralde.
GROSS. Benjamin, 86. Bal Harbour.
KUNIANSKY, Loul*. 88. Aug. 13.
Rlveralde.
GOTTLIEB, Eleanor. 66. Aug. 10.
Rubln-ZUbert.
BENNETT, Estelle Sltomer. 84. Aug. 7.
BAUM, Miriam. 84, Aug. 7. Blasberg.
SM
Secured Family Protection
Pre-Arranged Funeral Plan
gOKDON
TUXCERL HODVIS
Serving The Jewish Community Since 1938
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130
Phone: 858-5566
James B. Gordon, F.D.
Ike Gordon, F.D.
Harvey Gordon, F. D.
Allan Brestin, F.D.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd
18840 West Dixie Hwy.
Represenled by S levilt. f D.
New York: (2121 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76th Rd.. Forest Hills, NY.
.J
THE MENORAH
PRE-NEED PLAN
Satisfaction.
Thoughtfulness.
Value.
Your choices set at
today's prices and in the
Jewish tradition.
And now vou can receive a FREE Permanent ^^^S^^$
EMERGENCY WALLET CARD with your personal medi
cal information a gift to you from Menorah Chapels.
I
i WOULD LIKE TO RECEIVE MY FREE EMERGENCY
WALLET CARD. PLEASE SEND ME INFORMATION
ABOUT THE PRE-NEED PLAN.
Mail Coupon to: Menorah Chapels, 6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd.,
Ft. Lauderdale, Fl. 33313 Artn Pre-Need Plan Director
Nama
Address______________________________________________,
City_________________________________________________
Stale________________________________Zip_____________
j Telephone_____________________________________________ s
'""^&W"
In Dade, 945-3939. In Broward, 742-6000.
Cemetery and chapels in North Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale,
Margate, Deerfield Beach & West Palm Beach


Page 12-B The Jewish Ftoridian / Friday. August 19,1983

Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"When thou goest forth to battle and seest among the
capti es a woman of goodly form and wouldest take her to
thee to wife"
iDeut. 21.10-111.
KITETZE
KI TETZE "When thou goest forth to battle against thine
enemies, and the Lord thy God delivereth them into thy hands,
and thou earnest them away captive, and seest among the
captives a woman of goodly form, and thou wouldest take
her to thee to wife; then thou shah bring her home to thy house
And it shall be. If thou have no delight in her, then thou
shalt let her go whither she will. but thou shalt not sell her at all
for money" (Deuteronomy 21.10-14). "It a man have a stubborn
and rebellious son ... all the men of his city shall stone him with
stones, that he die" 'Deuteronomy 21.18-2). The body of a
hanged man "shall not remain all night upon the tree, but thou
shalt surely bury him the same day: for he that is hanged is a
reproach unto God: that thou defile not thy land"
(Deuteronomy 2123). "Thou shah not see thy brother's ox or
his sheep driven away, and hide thyself from them: thou shalt
surely bring them back unto they brother" (Deuteronomy 22.1).
"Thou shalt not take the dam with the young, thou shalt in any
wise let the dam go, but the young thou mayest take unto
thyself (Deuteronomy 22.6-7). "When thou buildest a new
house, then thou shah make a parapet for thy roof, that thou
bring not blood upon thy house, if any man fall from thence"
'Deuteronomy 22.8). "Thou shalt not plough with an ox and an
ass together. Thou shalt not wear a mingled stuff wood and linen
together" (Deuteronomy 22 10-11). The man who "lays wanton
charges" against his wife shall be chastised by the elders of the
city. "A bastard shall not enter into the assembly of the Lord"
'Deuteronomy 23.3). "If brethren dwell together, and one of
them die. and have no child, the wife of the dead shall not be
married abroad unto one not of his kin: her husband's brother
shall go in unto her. and take her to him to wife, and perform the
duty of a husband's brother unto her. And it shall be. that the
first-born that she beareth shall succeed in the name of his
brother that is dead" (Deuteronomy 25.5-6). "An Ammonite or a
Moabite shall not enter into the assembly of the Lord: .
because they met you not with bread and with water in the way.
when ye came forth out of Egypt: and because they hired
against thee Balaam the son of Beor from Pethor of Aram-na
haraim. to curse thee Thou shalt not seek their peace nor
their prosperity all thy days forever. Thou shalt not abhor an
Edomite. for he is thy brother; thou shalt not abhor an
Egyptian, because thou wast a stranger in his land. The children
of the third generation that are born unto them may enter into
the assembly of the Lord" (Deuteronomy 23.4-9). Finally, the
portion ends with a reminder of eternal enmity against a dread
foe: "Remember what Amalel did unto thee by the way as ye
came forth out of Egypt" (Deuteronomy 25.17).
(The recounting of the Weakly Portion of the Law It extracted and
baaed upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamir. $15, published by Shengotd. The volume is avail-
able at 75 Maiden Lane, New York. N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is
president of the society distributing the volume.)
The Jewish American Latin Singles (The J.A.L.S. Club 30-55)
Invitee you to a SUMMER DANCE with Let Wagman A Hit Send in
perton, Saturday, August 20,1983 9:00 p.m.. at Temple Moses,
1200 Normandy Drive, Miami Beach. Donation: S6.00 (includes
1 drink, munchlee. A door prizes). More Information:
866-1533/5634330.
mmmmmmmmmmmmmm
Mail Box Rental
YOUR ADDRESS CAN BE
Suite Number XXX
4100 Aurora Street
Coral Gables, Florida
Call For Information
442-4590
KBBS3HBBa
BqtMUzw^1
Kopel
JOSE KOPEL
Jose Abraham Kopel, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Enrique Kopel, was
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday morning, Aug. 6,
at Temple Menorah. Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz officiated.
The celebrant is a ninth grade
student living in Santo Domingo,
Dominican Republic. His favorite
activities are participating in
sports.
Mr. and Mrs. Kopel hosted a
luncheon following services and a
reception and dinner Saturday
evening.
Youth Dance to
Benefit Bonds
An end of summer Youth
Dance benefitting the Israel
Bonds campaign will be held
Saturday evening. Aug. 27 at 9
p.m. at Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, according to Gary R.
Gerson, general campaign chair-
man of the State of Israel Bonds
Organization. Also sponsoring
the event are B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization, United Synagogue
Youth, Young Judea. NIFTY,
and other area youth groups.
Gerson said that several
hundred young people from north
and south Dade are expected at
the temple, where they will
discuss their summers and listen
and dance to a live disc jockey
playing popular musk.
Gerson also explained that the
theme of this year's Israel Bonds
High Holy Day Campaign is
"For Israel and the Young."
"Once again, we shall have
youth group members through-
out the county taking part in the
synagogue campaign by collect-
ing the pledge cards in their
synagogues," he said. "This was
a most successful aspect of last
year's High Holy Day Appeal
and response from the congre-
gants was very favorable."
More than three million dollars
was raised in last year's Bond
Appeal, and it is hoped, Gerson
said, that with youth parti-
cipation once again, the figure
will be surpassed.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1546 JtffftflM Avmmm
TtL- 63M112
CORDIALL Y EXTENDS AN IN VITA TION ^ m
^mmmmm TO OUR FRIENDS & NEIGHBORS mmffS^m
TO WORSHIP WITH US FOR THE
! HIGH HOLY-DAY SERVICES
* SFPT 1 CCI la**Ufwt_a
SEPT. 3 SELICHOTH NIQKT
SEPT. 7 EREV ROSH-HASHANA
SEPT. 8-9 ROSH-HASHANA
SEPT. 16 EREV YOM KIPPUR
SEPT. 17 YOM KIPPUR
CNOICE SEATS AVAILABLE
SPECIAL OFFER TO NEW MEMBERS
OFFICE HAS. DAILY Ail. to 3 P.M.
$
Synagogue
Listing
Candlellng
Tlma:7:33|
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
tJOpm.aamch.
Sunday, *K am and B: JO pm
Mob. Mm Friday. 7:30 am and ft pat
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Satizman. Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchinskv. Cantor
Sat. a: as am and 515 pm.
OaB Sarvtoaa at fcSO an and M pat
Laia Friday Eaaning Sanrteee
w!HraaumaAug.2ft.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
ajar"*-'-.
Frt-ayHannjs.^
Ip.m
Dr.Lam>a>M
pnacaatifca
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
Bar-0**"-?*-!
Cantor. RabW Solomon ScrMd
TEMPLE BFTr AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
M, US pm. Aaaodata Rabbi Jama. L Simon
111 preach on -Jearieh BigotryTha
Scandalous Traatmant ol Jaw* ByChoIca
Sat., u 15 am Bar Mltnahot JaaonOraman
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami'* nw.ll nt'otm Conongal.o.
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573-$*
gWNKend.il Df 595.5055
Haskell M. Bernat. Senior Rabbi
Donald P. Cashman, Assistant f
Jacob G. Bornsteln, Cantor
Rachelle Nelson. Student Canto
Philip Goldin, Exec. Dlr.
Friday. I pm. Randall. Rabbi Hawaii taw
-Exploding tha Myths of tha DMaM RI
Liturgy: Studanl Cantor flachaiis Nasm
Ooamloan. Aaelatant Rabbi Donald Ca1
" Use." Lltunjy Cantor Janet
Bomatam.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Corn Way 2S25 S 3rd A.anua i
SouthD.de 7S00SW I20tnsiiaet 5
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH -3
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Dada Ch.pal
Fit., a pm. Shabbat Eia SaMcaa.
Onag Shabbat Follow.
Coral Way Sanctuary
S.t 9 am. Shabbat Sanrtcaa conductad by
Rabbi David H Auarbach and Cantor William
W. Llpaon. Klddu.n lot low >
BETH KODcSH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Saturday Samcaa -a 45 am and 0:30 pm.
Sunday Sanrtcaa a am andft 30 pm.
High Holy Day aaata ...il.tXa.
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd R|0
Coral Gables 667 S6S|
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Fri 8 pm. Rabbi Mich.., E.un.iataf i
conduct aoadal Torah tamca and I
Waakty Torah Portion- Km Tabs'
Deutaronomy 21:102511 Mattarah-la
______ 54:1-10.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534 9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Danny Tadmore, Cantor
Fit. 7:30 pm
Sat.. 9 30 am
TEMPLE 3ETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorlinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Fri., a pm, Shabbat Era
Sat. 8 am. Shabbat Morning
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz .
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Dam/Morning Sanrtcaa I am.
Saturday Morning Sanrtcaa I am.
Eaaaanaj Sanrtcaa pm
Sesavday tsanmg Sanrtcaa 7 45 pa
TEMPLE NERTAMID
Conservative
7902 Carlyle Ave..
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Mlnyan at t am. Sabbath Stnkml I
:45 am. Sunday Mlnyan at t-30 an.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jeflerson Ave.. M.B. Fl. 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Or. Jshuda Melber
Cantor Nlaalm Benyamlni
am and a JO pm.
Saturday mamma, aa. iteee a BJ aav
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOm
Chase Ave. a 41st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon "ronish, Rabbi Liberal
CcMor David Conviser
Fri. ft15 pm, Sabbath En) Sanrtcaa
Set, nm am. Sabbath Sanrtcaa
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Arom, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Frt..*:
Sat ,30
.San-Bam ffjjfj)
amends: IS am. ^r*- '
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENOALl |
S.W. 154 Ave. and 75 St
Rabbi Warren Kasztl
Modern Orthodox
382-3343 3624611
Fit. 7 am. Sabbath BM Sanrtcaa Sat. Ml [
SaLlaWia20MmMlaa>l
MaThtdsi|
Mr Ml
TEMPLE SINAI 18601 NE 22 An |
North Dede's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kangc>y, Rabbi 932-90U |
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator I
Sat.. 10
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CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
II Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwalg. Rabbi
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone, 576-4000
Rabbinical Ass^attorT Office
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8000 Millar Dr. 271 23111
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi
Benjamin Adter, Cantor
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UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park. 37 |
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