The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02844

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
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8tNumber 31
Two Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, August 5,1963
mammm
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fcA*X* CCCTioai
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Murder
[en, in Kafyyas, Fired Kalashnikovs
GIL SEDAN
HON (JTA) -
:e was too calm to
i any onlooker that
the scene only a
irs earlier of a
)us attack against
Ludents.
|lamic College in Hebron,
story building, stood
with only a handful of
patrolling the area.
there were hardly any
of the assault two
[cups of coffee left by
during the lunch-time
sion which was inter-
[by sudden violence. At
ranee hall, remains of
windows, chairs
I, and total quiet.
IE OLIVE trees grove of
/itsitv, one could spot a
of blood, with the
rf blood leading all the way
square in front of the
bty. This is apparently
ft all started.
pd midday two persons
more entered the
from a road behind the
we. The men, whose faces
jvered with the traditional
tafiyyas, stormed in with
Soviet-made Kalashnikov
machineguns, pouring fire all
over the place. Two students, in
their thirties, were killed imme-
diately, and this was probably
the source of the large blood spot
in the yard.
The attackers ran about 50
yards toward the main square of
the campus, continually
shooting. As they entered the
main gate of the building, they
threw in a hand grenade, which
apparently killed the third
person, and woulded 30.
According to the latest bulletins
all are in good condition in
Hebron and Beit Jalla hospitals.
THE ENTIRE attack did not
last according to eye witnesses
more than seven minutes. The
army rushed to the scene within
minutes, and began a large-scale
manhunt. Major reinforcements
were rushed to Hebron, partly by
helicopters. A curfew was im-
posed on the city and the nearby
town of Halhoul to prevent Arab
demonstrations.
Indeed, such demonstrations
did take place in the city of
Nablus in Samaria. One Arab girl
was reported killed, and another
wounded apparently in clashes
with Israeli security forces.
Several soldiers were reported
wounded by rock attacks.
Road blocks were placed
throughout the main roads of the
West Bank, with the security
forces checking both Arab and
Jewish vehicles.
THE SECURITY forces ven-
tured no guesses as to the iden-
tity of the assailants. The fact
that the attack came two-and-a-
half weeks after the murder of
yeshiva student Aharon Gross in
Hebron, and that it was directed
against a Moslem religious in-
stitution did not immediately
indicate that the attackers were
Jewish, according to senior of-
ficers.
The investigation was
reportedly taking all possible
directions beginning with the
possibility of Jewish vigilantes,
through Arab provocation, all the
way to the possibility that this
was an internal Arab struggle.
The attack was condemned by
various Israeli personalities, led
by Premier Menachem Begin. It
came three days after the curfew
was lifted in downtown Hebron,
and life was returning to normal
following two weeks of tension
after the Gross murder. One voice
that was not heard until later was
that of the Jewish settlers of
Hebron.
Coordinate IDF'S
Redeployment
With Lebanese
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Moshe
Arena outlined a two-
pronged approach to the re-
deployment of Israeli forces
in south Lebanon. He said
that Israel wants to coordi-
nate the redeployment with
the Lebanese government
and that, in turn, the Leba-
nese would have to coordi-
nate with the multinational
force the control of the ter-
ritory to be evacuated by
the Israel Defense Force.
Arens, who returned home
from Washington where he and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
met with President Reagan and
other top Administration and
Congressional leaders, said the
redeployment of Israeli forces
does not depend on the Syrians.
He said Israel wants U.S. and in-
ternational pressure on Syria to
Continued on Page 9-A
Shamir Describes His and
Arens Visit to U.S.ASuccess
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Foreign Minister Yitz-
hak Shamir told the Cabi-
net that the visit to Wash-
ington by himself and De-
fense Minister Moshe
Arens was a "success
story."
Briefing the Cabinet at its
weekly meeting, Shamir de-
scribed the talks in Washington
with President Reagan, Secretary
of State Shultz and other top Ad-
ministration and Congressional
leaders as "most positive and
friendly." Basically, Shamir ex-
Continued on Page 2-A
Foreign Minister Shamir
U.S. Avoids Pressure
On Redeployment
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration has ap-
parently decided not to
press Israel to postpone its
planned troop redeploy-
ment but instead is urging
that it be seen as the first
phase of the withdrawal of
all Israeli troops from Leb-
anon.
This was indicated after Israeli
Continued on Page 6-A *
ll-Scale Investigation
Israel in Giant Manhunt for Masked Gunmen
AVIV (JTA) -
of Staff Gen. Moshe
said that a full-scale
tigation had been
led into the killing of
Arab students and
founding in 33 at the
College of Hebron
lasked gunmen. He
press conference here
that there was as yet no
clear indication of who
carried out the attack.
He said, "We are operating on
two planes: first to prevent devel-
opments of disorder and attacks
in the wake of the incident and
second to investigate every direc-
tion to reveal who committed
these murders."
Gen. Ori Orr, regional com-
mander of Israeli forces, said
in a radio interview that the
authorities have no description of
the gunmen, whose faces were
covered with the traditional Arab
kafiyyas. "We don't know whom
we are looking for," he said,
adding that the investigation
into the incident will extend to
both Arabs and Jews.
THE THREE who were killed
were identified by Israeli authori-
ties as Saad Edin Hassan Sabri,
Saad Nazal and Samih Fathi
Daoud, all 30 years old. Sabri and
Nazal were identified as West
Bank school teachers who were
taking summer courses at the Is-
lamic College. Most of the injured
were in their teens or 20's.
PREMIER Menachem Begin
was quoted by Israel Radio as
saying that the attack was a
Continued on Page 6-A
Secretary of State Shultz


Pge2-A' The Jewiah Floridian Friday. August 5,1983
Three Arabs Killed.
30 Injured
Masked Gunmen Precipitate Riot

JERUSALEM (JTA)
Three Arab students
were killed and 30 injured
in Hebron, the largest
Arab city on the West
Hunk, by masked gunmen
who jumped out of a sta-
i ion wagon and opened fire
with automatic weapons on
a crowd of the students in
what was described as the
worst act of violence in the
west bank in several years.
The incident was followed
by riots, according to re-
ports from Hebron.
Eyewitnesses said that four
men drove up to a spot across
from the Islamic College in Heb-
ron in midday and began
shooting. The gunmen then
jumped back in the vehicle and
raced away, leaving a heap of
tangled bodies on the ground. Is-
raeli security sources said the
four attackers fired Kalashnikov
rifles and also threw a hand
grenade at the students who were
taking a noon break in classes.
SEVERAL HUNDRED Israe-
li troops immediately sealed
Hebron off with roadblocks and
Student Murdered in Hebron;
Was a Member Of Prominent
Yeshiva U. Family
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The death of Aharon Gross,
the 19-year-old student
murdered on July 7 near
the Hebron marketplace,
has cast a pall over the
Yeshiva University com-
munity. The slain teenager
was a member of a family
that has been associated
with the university for
more than 50 years.
Gross's father and both his
grandfathers attended university
schools and affiliates. His
paternal grandfather, the late
Reuben Gross, graduated from
the university's high school for
boys in 1931. He later became one
of the most prominent communal
U.S. Visit
Continued from Page 1-A
plained, the Reagan Administra-
tion now fully supports the Israel
army's redeployment in south
Lebanon.
THE FOREIGN Minister
made the same point upon his re-
turn to Israel. In a statement to
reporters at Ben Gurion Airport
and in a series of interviews,
Shamir said that he and Arens
had set the Reagan Administra-
tion's mind at rest concerning Is-
raeli intentions in Lebanon.
The Reagan Administration
ended three days of talks with
Shamir and Arens having accept-
ed the Israeli decision to redeploy
its troops in Lebanon as "in-
evitable" and agreeing to Israel's
contention that it would be the
first phase of its withdrawal from
Lebanon.
leaders on Staten Island and in
national religious organizations.
Two uncles and an aunt of the
murdered youth also attended
the university.
"WE REMEMBER the Gross
family in their mourning," Dr.
Norman Lamm, president of the
university, said. "They only
wanted to live in peace and to ful-
fill their love for Torah and for
Zion. We share in their grief at
the senseless killing of this young
man who had so much to give to
the world."
Aharon's father. Alex Gross,
graduated in 1964 from Yeshiva
College, the men's undergrad-
uate, liberal arts and sciences
division of the university. He
then earned his law degree from
New York University. He moved
with his family to Israel about
eight years ago.
At the same time, Aharon's
grandfather. Rabbi Yehuda
Gins burg, also moved to Israel.
Ginsburg was ordained in 1948 at
Rabbi Isaac Elchanon Theo-
logical Seminary, an affiliate of
Yeshiva University. One of
Aharon's uncles, Donn Gross, at-
tended Yeshiva College before
moving to Israel.
> Another of the slain youth's
uncles, Avery Gross, also grad-
uated from Yeshiva College" He
served as president of his senior
class there. He later earned a law
degree from New York Univer-
sity, and he is now an attorney on
Staten Island. Aharon's aunt,
Dr. Benita Gross, is a recent
graduate of the Albert Einstein
College of Medicine. A cousin
Miriam Gross Lowenthal, Is now
enrolled at the university's Stern
College for Women.
Elaborate Security Measures Taken
*
For Palestine Conference
GENEVA (JTA) Count-
less international gatherings
have taken place here including
meetings by Israelis and Arabs,
but none have had the kind of
elaborate security measures as
those being taken in preparation
for the conference on Palestine
scheduled for the end of this
month.
Three miles of barbed wire will
surround the Palais des Nations
where the conclave will take
place. The wing of the building
where the delegates will be
assembled will be sealed off and
everyone will be subject to a body
search. Each delegation will be
allowed only two bodyguards and
for every delegate there- will be
two policemen. Two tanks will be
posted at the gate of the Palais
des Nations'.
Employees will be requiredlo
wear special badges and wUl have
to pass through the kind of
electronic scanning devices of the
kind used in airports. The airport
will also be under heavy guard.
Miles of barbed wire are already
in place around the airport in
preparation for the conference.
M-8-B-83
imposed a curfew on the city,
scene of repeated clashes between
Jewish settlers and Arab resi-
dents. Reporters trying to enter
Hebron were turned back at
Kiryat Arba, a Jewish settlement
on the outskirts of Hebron. Is-
raeli army helicopters patrolled
the area. Regional commander
Ori Orr came to Hebron to take
charge of the search lor the
killers. Military vehicles
dispatched to Hebron clogged the
road from Jerusalem.
The wounded students, includ-
ing a number of girls, were taken
to a local hospital. Distressed
families rushed to the hospital for
information on the identity of the
wounded and their condition,
military authorities said.
Tension has been at a high
level for months in Hebron,
which is sacred to Jews and Mos-
lems. On July 7, a yeshiva stu-
dent, Aharon Gross, 19, was
stabbed to death in the Hebron
vegetable market, touching off a
rampage by Jewish settlers
against Arab residents.
ISRAELI SECURITY sources
declared they were investigating
two theories, one that the attack
was carried out by Jewish set
tiers in the spiraling violence and
counter-violence, and the other
that the attackers were Palestin-
ian terrorists. Students at the Is-
lamic College are bitterly divided
between rival factions of the Pal-
estine Liberation Organization
and the Moslem Brotherhood.
One of the main reasons for the
rise in Jewish-Arab tensions has
been the influx of thousands of
ultra-nationalist Jewish settlers,
led by Rabbi Moshe Levinger.
The settlers have built a modern
township in Kiryat Arba. They
have also moved a few families
into Hebron's old Jewish quarter,
living under Israeli guard. Heb-
ron had a substantial Jewish
presence until 1929 when Arab
rioters murdered 67 of the Jews.
OFFICIALS said the hit-and
run attack was the worst single
incident on the West Bank since
May, 1980 when six Jews were
ambushed and shot-dead as they
were returning to their homes
from a synagogue in Hebron.
Moshe Nissim. Israel's Justice
Minister, told the Knesset that
Israel deplored the killings and
had ordered a major investiga-
tion to find the perpetrators.
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ADL De nounces UN
Conference on' Alliance'
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A leading official of the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith has denounced
a United Nations-sponsor-
ed conference on "the
Racist- Fascist Alliance be-
tween South Africa and Is-
rael'" as another of the
UN's "periodic exercises in
hypocrisy and disinforma-
tion directed at Israel."
Abraham Foxman, the ADL's
associate director, noted, in his
denunciation, that the conclave
in Vienna was supported by the
UN Committee on Apartheid,
using UN facilities, documenta-
tion and financing, even though
"technically it was a conference
of Non-Governmental Organ-
izations accredited to the- UN."
HE ADDED that "two well
known Soviet front groups," the
World Peace Council and the
Afro-Asian Solidarity Organiza-
tion, took leading roles in the
July 11-13 conference.
Asserting that "the agenda
and the outcome" of the conclave
"were a foregone conclusion,"
Foxman declared that "Israel
was pilloried for diplomatic, trade
and military ties with South
Africa" and that, in its final
declaration, the conferea
declared its purpose was
"analyze relations between Isrt
and South Africa and cod
necessary actions to ensure I
the authorities in Israel
forthwith in such collaboration."
Foxman added that
delegates did not specify wWI
actions the conference had iij
mind except to make "a va
reference" to UN machinery for]
dealing with such issues.
"To appreciate the magnitude I
of h |M-ri>y involved, one should]
examine Israeli-South Africa)
trade, which amounts to a mini|
scule 4 percent of South Africa!
external trade," Foxman said.l
"Sizeably involved in the remain!
ing 99.6 percent of South AfrioJI
trade are none other than the]
Soviet bloc, Arab states and]
Black African nations."
Russian Sentenced
NEW YORK (JTAI Dr. )
Yuri Tarnopolsky of Kharko*,
was sentenced last Thursday tol
three years' imprisonment forl
"anti-Soviet slander," the Stu-i
dent Struggle for Soviet Jewrjl
(SSS.II reported here The 46-1
year-old chemist was arrested in I
March. He staged a to-day
hunger strike last fall for an exit]
visa to Israel.
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Soviets Warn Israel
Against War on Syria
TEL AVIV (JTA) A group of Israelis who
the Soviet Union for 10 days said upon their return
that Soviet senior officials warned them that Israel
Id "have to reckon" with the USSR if it goes to war
ist Syria or attacks Soviet missiles.
A spokesman for the six-member delegation said that
Makov, a senior official involved in formulating
let policy on the Middle East, "gave us a clear
sage: If Israel should attack Syria or move against the
Soviet missiles stationed in Syria, it will have to
Ion with the Soviet Union."
1 THE GROUP, which was invited to the USSR by the
lift Peace Council, consisted of Shulamit Aloni and
jn Arel, Labor Alignment MKs; Gen. (ret.) Mat-
ihu Peled of the Israel-Palestine Committee; Benny
ibash of Peace Now; Uzzi Bur stein of the Communist
ty; and Muma Ukas of the Kfar Yasif village council.
They maintained, before their departure, that the
liet Union has a major role to play in the Mideast.
said she thought it was essential to continue a
3gue and to hold channels ot communication open
a country which holds fellow Jews hostage and
egards human rights.
ate Law to Benefit College
Bound Jewish Students
By BEN GALLOB
ZW YORK (JTA) A
i Gov. Mario Cuomo signed
I law, permitting disclosure of
contents of some college
wee achievement tests every
years, rather than the
ent three years, will benefit
York State college bound
tsh high school seniors,
Jicularly of yeshiva high
mis. a Jewish civil rights
ncy official reported.
fclosure of the contents of an
lination means that
linat ion cannot be re-used.
\he College Entrance
linations Board (CEEB),
ch prepares and administers
ege and professional school
ince-related examinations,
contended that the three-
disclosure requirement,
luled to become effective
year, would make it inv-
isible for the CEEB to con-
ue to offer so-called low
iime achievement examina-
is in the state, including its
brew Achievement Test, said
nnis Rapps, executive director
the National Jewish Com-
Mn on Law and Public
airs (COLPA).
1ST MARCH, the CEEB
achievement tests in New
rk state on grounds it could
I prepare enough examinations
comply with the three-year
closure requirement.
Rapps said the CEEB's
bition was that the cost of
bparing new tests every three
ars for low volume tests would
|ve resulted in prohibitively
gh fees to students seeking to
ie those tests. N
lapps said high school seniors
iplying to colleges and univer-
ses with high admission
andards generally try to take
pEB achievement tests in areas
which they are proficient, in
Idition to the standard aptitude
laminations. The nine low-
flume achievement test the
EBB said in March it would
^continue included Hebrew, an
in which many Jewish high
tool seniors, particularly those
yeshiva high schools, are
hi/ proficient. Other achieve-
nt uts, the CEEB said it
hud drop were European
ktory, French, German, Latin,
jN"ature, mathematics level I,
lysics and Spanish.
|RAPPS REPORTED that, in
function with the Yeshiva
feh School Principals Council,
1 affiliate of the Board of Jewish
Education of New York, COLPA
had worked in support of the
measure Cuomo has signed.
The Principal's Council lauded
the "invaluable aid" provided by
State Sen. Kenneth Lavalle (R.,
Suffolk), chairman of the Senate
Higher Education Committee,
and Assemblyman Mark Segal
(D., Man.), chairman of the
Assembly Higher Education
Committee, in helping to get
passage of the measure.
Rapps said the five tests which
the CEEB had planned to
continue, as against the nine it
had planned to drop, were:
English Composition, mathe-
matics, Level I, biology, chemis-
try, and American History and
Social Studies.
THE NUMBER of students
taking the "high volume"
achievement tests for the 1981-82
school year in New York state
ranged from 27,858 in English
Composition to 5,224 in Ameri-
can History and Social Studies.
In Contrast, the number of
high school students who took
the low volume tests ranged from
3,541 in Spanish to 185 in Latin.
The number of students who took
the Hebrew Achievement test
was 214.
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;oi%,MMP.'Au|uf. nj^.^
en to Alice in Wonderland StvffAnymay?
No wonder Prime Minister Begin tele-
phoned President Reagan and begged off
on his July 27 meeting with the President
in Washington. The upshot of the meeting
of his surrogates. Foreign Minister Shamir
and Defense Minister Arens, with \
Mr. Reagan proves this beyond a shadow of
a doubt.
It would be hard to say precisely what
went on among the trio, or even in the
Israelis' meeting with Secretary of Defense
Shultz. But the President's comments
during his nationally-televised press
conference on the night of his meeting with
them certainly gives us a clue.
To put it bluntly, everything Mr. Reagan
said was predictable, and that is most
likely why Prime Minister Begin begged
off. Why listen to this Alice in Wonderland
stuff anyway?
Simply stated, what the President said
was this: Given that Israel will not be
dissuaded from redeploying its forces in
Lebanon, the United States hopes this is
not a first step toward an ultimate partition
of Lebanon between Israel and Syria. It is
to be hoped that the redeployment is, in
fact, a first step toward Israel's withdrawal
from the country entirely.
Forgotten Facts
No real mention, of course, of the May 17
agreement between Israel and Lebanon,
which both parties signed and which
stipulates that Israel will withdraw totally
from Lebanon when Syria does the same.
No real mention, of course, that Syria
continues to refuse to withdraw because it
does not recognize the agreement or why
Syria refuses to recognize the agreement.
No real mention, of course, that Syria's
intransigence (a word reserved by the
President and the State Department and
the media for Israel exclusively) is so in-
tractible that it refused to allow
Presidential Envoy to the Middle East
Philip Habib to come to Damascus for more
talks with President Assad on Syria's
ultimate intentions in Lebanon. And that
this is precisely why Habib had to quit the
shuttle and make way for someone else.
Why Waste Time?
On the contrary, both from Secretary
Shultz and from the President on television
came more of the same stuff: When would
Israel withdraw? Would Israel give the
United States a date for this withdrawal?
Would Israel assure the United States that
it didn't intend to settle in permanently in
southern Lebanon?
The implication of all this nonsense
places the burden squarely on the Israelis.
Nor was there anybody in Washington to
say, "Look here, fellas, read the Israel-
Lebanon agreement. It tells the whole
story. Everything else you have been
saying during the Shamir-Arens meetings
is pure propaganda, and it blames the
wrong party."
Mr. Begin was right to say that he just
couldn't make it. Why waste the time?
Dissent Needed
There is a new organization in the
American Jewish community that
represents a viewpoint somewhat different
Jewish Florxdian
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from the mainstream, and it is called the
New Jewish Agenda.
The New Jewish Agenda, for instance,
calls for negotiations between Israel and
the Palestine Liberation Organization. This
is a position that is anathema to the State
of Israel and to mainstream American
Jewry on the basis that the PLO is a
terrorist gang whose charter calls for the
destruction of Israel.
Furthermore, the New Jewish Agenda
calls for the establishment of an in-
dependent Palestinian state on the West
Bank. This is a position that is also
anathema to the State of Israel and to
mainstream American Jewry, but there are
substantial elements in each of these
communities that agree with this New
Jewish Agenda declaration.
Whether they agree or not is, however,
hardly the issue. If both Israeli and
American Jews are truly democratic, then
they must foster the spirit of dissent and
debate, not squelch it. The New Jewish
Agenda is obviously, as its name implies
new. It is attempting to build a platform
for this dissenting opinion, where it mavr*
debated. ym
Nevertheless, when the New Jewish
Agenda applied for membership in the
Jewish Community Council of Greater
Washington in June, the Council turned
the application down on the basis that its
ideals are not consistent with the best
interests of Israel's well-being. In other
words, because you do not agree with the
majority, then you may not speak.
But the New Jewish Agenda already hag
a membership of 2,500 in 34 chapters. This
is a significant number of Jews with a
significant difference of opinion, ad-
mittedly, from mainstream American
Jewry. Its existence should therefore be
acknowledged.
'Ghandi' Stirs Personal Memories
Friday, August 5,1983
Volume 56
26 AB 5743
Number 31
By JOSEPH I. SARGON
The movie, "Gandhi," brings
back personal memories and
places into dramatic focus the life
story of India's great spiritual
and political leader, Mahatma
(Great Soul) Gandhi, whom I had
the opportunity to meet and in-
terview when I lived in India. It
was a real pleasure to talk to this
great man never to be forgot-
ten.
The "Jewish Tribune," the
organ of Indian Jewry, edited by
my brothers and myself for a
number of years, carried first-
hand reports and statements on
Gandhi's views pertaining to the
Jews, including the then "Pales-
tine Question" and Hitler's ruth-
less drive against the Jews which
caused grave concern and to
which at times he made reference
through the medium of corre-
spondence and in his well-known
' *"' '"** .v. v.*.'..',
Joseph I. Sargon, born in Bom-
bay. India, where he lived for
many years, was managing
editor of the Jewish Tribune.
He also represented the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency in India
and the World Jewish Con-
gress. He now Hues in Brook-
line, Mass.
publication "Harijan."
SOME OP these events, which
may not be familiar, are recalled
because they tend to give an in-
sight into Gandhi's attitude
towards the Jews, about which so
little has been written.
Gandhi, who embraced
poverty, not only changed the
history of India but also initiated
a new kind of revolutionary
movement which made a tremen-
dous impact on the minds of mil-
lions and succeeded in its aim of
'-- : .-.-. v.
driving the British out of India
and the establishment of an inde-
pendent India.
Gandhi could not have suc-
ceeded in all that he achieved but
for a "weapon" peculiarly hi*
own which he called Satyagraha-
Translated it means "Soul
Force.'' He explained Satyagraha
as the vindication of truth, not on
the infliction of suffering on one s
opponent but on one's self- The
opponent must be "weaned from
error by patience and sym-
pathy." This was an unprece-
dented philosophy, unique in |U
conception and successful in iw
aim of wresting from Wgj]
Britain the independence of Indis
after 200 years of authoritative
rule by "passive resistance ana
non-cooperation.
I RECALL the events that
marked the drive to attain In-
Continued on Page 13- A
.......< -.,


Erfd*y. A0*HBt:5.IW3 TtoJL&m nat&Baa. Page 5-A
rapyfor
uncer victims
Unfreezing People Who Are Frozen With Fear
By BARBARA PASH
Vright Baltimore Jewish Times
]fprint by Special Arrangement '
Lbout a year after her
Iband died of cancer,
st Friedberg decided
, she wanted to share
it they had learned in
r fight with the disease.
result is a program she
ked last fall called
junct Therapy for Can-
'atients.
Friedberg makes no
is that the program will
>ng the lives of cancer
pnts. But it will, she con-
s, "unfreeze people who are
1 with fear. The goal is for
atient to feel he is acting on
rather than being acted
SLIM, petite woman who
[ a master's degree in social
from the University of
,-land, Mrs. Friedberg works
consultant to local nursing
es. She is offering the
ram from her northwest area
e in individual and limited
[group sessions, the length of
; in the program to be deter-
ed by the cancer patent.
fter sending flyers to area
Bicians and being listed in a
I'tory of local holistic health
kices, she already has some
nts and hopes to attract more,
kese things build slowly," she
I, "mainly by word of mouth."
\he Adjunct Therapy program
iased on experience with the
ponton program that she and
late husband, Julius, had.
Simonton program is named
br Dr. Carl Simonton, an
lologist who found in the
Irse of his medical practice
|t. for unknown reasons, some
cer patients did remarkably
,er than others.
("HE BEGAN studying this
bnomenon, and found that the
1st important factor was the
klity of cancer patients' lives,"
\s. Friedberg said, offering a
nplified explanation of the
eory that Dr. Simonton
tailed in his 1978 book, Getting
ell Again, subtitled "A Step-
J-Step Self-Help Guide to
ercoming Cancer for Patients
i their Families."
)r. Simonton and his wife,
ephanie Matthews-Simonton, a
How You Handle Stress May Well
Decide Your 'Cancer Quotient'
ONE FAMOUS, frequently-cited re-
search study was conducted on 1,337
Johns Hopkins Medical School students
who were graduated between 1948 and
1964.
Dr. Aina Nucho of the University of
Maryland School of Social Work and
Community Planning, reports that the
findings showed that "people who got
cancer had a certain personality config-
uration. How they handled stress and
worries was a risk factor." New research
on the mind-body link has produced in-
triguing results in the past few years,
aided by new biochemical techniques and
an expanding knowledge of immunology
and neu roc hem is try, according to Jene
Brody, a New York Times medical
writer.
Dr. Margaret Linn just finished a
Continued on Page 13-A
psychologist, established a
cancer center in Dallas, Tex.,
called the Cancer Counseling and
Research Center, to put their
studies into practice. (The
Simontons have since divorced.
Dr. Simonton now lives in
California where he has opened
another cancer center; Mrs.
Simonton runs the Dallas center.)
For the last year and a half of
his life, before he died in 1979,
leaving his wife of 21 years and
three children, Julius Friedberg
participated in the Simonton
program, starting with a stay at
the Dallas cancer center. Mrs
i Friedberg, who attended the
center with her husband, remem-
bered, "There was a limit of 12
cancer patients and their spouses
per week-long session. We had
cottages for sleeping in, and we
all met in a lodge for dining and
therapy sessions. We came back
from the center enthusiastic,
feeling there really was some-
thing to it."
MR. FRIEDBERG continued
the Simonton program at home
by listening to taped messages of
techniques that encouraged him
to maintain a strong social
network instead of withdrawing,
to express his emotions rather.
than bottling them up, and to set
goals for the future rather than
. giving up.
"Three weeks before Julius
died," Mrs. Friedberg continued,
"he was skiing. He never missed
a social engagement. He never
missed a day of work except
when he was in the hospital."
Subsequently, Mrs. Friedberg
took training in the Simonton
program, a two-day course held
in Washington, D.C. for health
care professionals and conducted
by Dr. Simonton himself. "It
invoved going over the stress
reduction techniques and ex-
periencing them," she outlined
the workshops.
"STRESS REDUCTION" or
"stress management," as it's
variously termed, is based on an
ancient idea, the subject of much
folklore, that the mind and body
work together. In recent years,
this mind-body link, which
hypothesizes that stress and
other emotions can influence the
onset and course of a disease,
even to the extent of chemical
changes in the body, has become
a hot topic. Hot enough for it to
make the cover of a recent Time
magazine. If has engendered a
slew of research studies and a
new name, peychoneuroim-
munology, for this field of re-
search.
Several different stress reduc-
tion-management programs are
available. Transcendental Medi-
tation, for example, is one that's
been around for a while. The
Time article cites several others,
sponsored by hospitals, insti-
tutes and large corporations. One
out of five of the Fortune 500
companies, Time reports, now
has some type of stress manage-
ment program for their em-
ployees, which may include on-
premises exercise facilities,
meditation and biofeedback
classes.
At present, there are no guide-
lines for evaluating the various
stress management programs. If
a program works for you, Time
indicates, fine. However, the
article cautions, no single pro-
Continued on Page 12-A
\Soviets step up
hate campaign
'New Low in Vileness and Hypocrisy'
EW YORK The
ti-Defamation League of
lai B'rith is charging
it the Soviet Union has
^pped up its anti-Semitic
)paganda campaign,
lescending to a new low of
leness and hypocrisy in
| process."
[The League, which constantly
onitors the Soviet press, says
t an article in a recent edition
Leningradaka Pravda by a
"tain B. Kravstov sounds the
mote for the intensified effort.
[ACCORDING to Abraham H.
Foxman, ADL's associate
national director, the article,
headlined "Caution: Zionism:
Kulturtraeger With a Skeleton
Key," combines the anti-Semitic
fabrications of the Czarist secret
police who forged "The Protocols
of the Elders of Zion" with the
Nazi terminology of Dr. Goeb-
bels. Kulturtraeger, according to
Foxman, "is a Soviet term used
sarcastically to describe Nazis as
bearers of culture."
Foxman said that the Hitlerian
big lies contained in the article
are used to denigrate its three
principal targets the unity of
the Jewish people, the State of
Israel and Soviet Jews who seek
to emigrate, learn Hebrew and
experience Jewish culture.
The article ostensibly an
exposure of two British tourists
who visited Soviet refuseniks
attacks Zionism as "racist .
the enemy of socialism" and says
that it employs Jewish religion
and culture to "form a Fifth
Column of Zionism" and "infil-
trate" racist and nationalist ideas
into socialist countries, the ADL
official said.
FOXMAN WENT on to say
that the author puts a modern
twist on the ancient anti-Semitic
canard of Jews plotting to rule
Continued on Page 15-A

Abraham Foxman


jha nrtn

Page6-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, August 5,1983
Reaganites Avoid Pressure
On IsraelBut Hope
For Phased Withdrawal
Continued from Page 1-A
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
and Defense Minister Moshe
Arens met for some five hours at
the State Department with
Secretary of State George Shultz
and Robert McFarlane, President
Reagan's new special en the Middle East.
"There was no pressure on
Israeli deployment,' Arens *.'
quoted as saying after tht
meeting. "The Americans did not
ask the Israelis to delay."
This position was also made
clear by Reagan when he was
asked about the redeployment at
his nationally televised press
conference. "I am very hopeful
that if this partial withdrawal
takes place that it will be
recognized and admitted to be by
the Israelis as one phase of their
agreement to withdraw," the
President said.
He later noted that he
discussed the issue with Shamir
and Arens at the White House.
The deployment issue was also at
the center of talks the two Israeli
ministers had at the State
Department with Shultz and
others. Arens also conducted
separate meetings with Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger at
the Pentagon.
REAGAN SAID that if Israeli
redeployment is part of a
"phased withdrawal it will cer-
tainly give us a better chance for
breaking the roadblock that has
been established by Syria and
persuading them to keep their
original promise that when others
withdrew, they would withdraw.''
But Reagan warned that there
is a "fear" that if the Israeli move
is "simply a withdrawal to
another line and then a digging-in
and fortyfying along that line,
that this would be what it looks
like Syria is doing, and that is
simply trying to partition Leba-
non, reduce Lebanon and grab off
some territory for themselves."
However, Reagan quickly
added that since Israel has
signed an agreement with Leba-
non for the withdrawal of all
Israeli forces, "I don't think
Israel has that in mind." When
th% two Israeli ministers arrived
here, Shamir stressed that the
redeployment is in the "context"
of the May 17 Israeli-Lebanese
agreement.
Full-Scale Investigation
Of Hebron Murders
Continued from Page I-A
"despicable act." Deputy For-
eign Minister Yehuda Ben Meir
declared: "I have no words to ex-
press my condemnation of this
outrage and atrocity which was
perpetrated by evil people in
Hebron." He pledged that the
government "will do everything
in its power to find the evil people
responsible for this despicable act
and bring them to justice."
Orr said that he saw no imme-
diate connection between the
attack on the students and the
stabbing death two weeks ago of
Aharon Gross, a 19-year-old
yeshiva student. Gross was killed
in the Hebron market place.
In New York, the Herat Zion-
ists of America, issued the fol-
lowing statement in response to
the attack on the Arab
students:
"THE AMERICAN public
must understand that, while the
government of Israel will uphold
law and order in Zion, no institu-
tion can prevent such an action
from being taken by individuals
shocked and enraged by the
world's callous indifference to the
brutal murder of yeshiva student
Aharon Gross.
("The horrifying murder of
young Gross, an unassuming and
upright student of Bible, has left
shock waves throughout the
world Jewish community. One
such manifestation of the inten-
sity of this feeling was yester-
day's incident in Hebron. We call
for an end to the tragic cycle of
violence and for the peaceful rec-
ognition by all parties concerned
of the inalienable Jewish right to
settle the width and breadth of
liberated Judaea and Samaria.")
I-evy told the press conference
that Jewish settlers in the
West Bank should continue to
carry weapons for self-protection.
But he stressed that proper
measures would be taken against
any settlers misusing their weap-
ons, an apparent reference to
vigilante groups.
MEANWHILE, the Israel
army moved thousands of rein-
forcements into the West Bank to
maintain order after stone-
throwing crowds staged demon-
strations following the attack on
the Islamic College. Hebron and
neighboring villages, as well as
the Nablus casbah, and the near-
by Balata refugee camp were
kept under curfew.
Palestinian activists called a
two-day strike, but it received
only spotty support. In East Je-
rusalem all shops were closed,
and police patrolled the narrow
streets and alleys. At Bir Zeit
University, a center of Palestin-
ian nationalism, several hundred
students attempted a protest
march along the Jerusalem-Ra
mallah highway, according to
reports by security forces.
Several students were wounded
in the demonstration by security
forces firing rubber bullets.
Scores of students were held for
questioning.
Israeli newspaper editorials
were unanimous in calling for a
thorough investigation into the
attack. Many previous attacks on
Arabs, including the 1980 car
bombing of three West Bank
mayors, have not been solved.
These bombings took place after
six Jews were ambushed and shot
dead as they were returning to
their homes from a synagogue in
Hebron. Their killers have not
been found and neither has the
killer of Gross.
Tormenting Rectal Pain And Itch
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Friday, August 5,1983. The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
structwp. Christian
Trouble
Conversion of Jews Activity Threatens Good Relations
By BEN GALLOB
A New York Protestant
Church official, speaking at
le first interfaith confer-
ence in New York City on
lestructive cults recently,
repressed concern over the
proliferation of aberrant
'Christian" groupsrecruit-
lg Jews, according to the
[ewish Community Council
)i New York (JCRC).
"It troubles me when I see
lewly-formed so-called Christian
roups making Jewish young
iple the target of their prose
,-tizing efforts," said Dr. Robert
polk, executive director of the
'rotestant Council of Churches
^f the City of New York. "Such
induct does not take into con-
sideration the history of Jewish-
Christian relations down through
he years."
Spanish Weekly
Says Relations
Imminent
Madrid's weekly news
Magazine, Tiempo reports that
I secret meeting in New York be-
veen Spanish Prime Minister
felipe Gonzalez and World Jew-
h Congress President Edgar M.
fronfman had hastened the pro-
ess toward diplomatic recog-
lition of Israel and said that re-
itions between the two countries
lay be established in August. It
Jso reported that approval of a
ending agreement for air links
etween Madrid and Tel Aviv
iras a direct result of the meeting.
According to the Federation of
fewish Communities of Spain,
he WJC affiliate, the most
scent issue of Tiempo says that
jonzalez met with Bronfman on
June 23 at the Waldorf Astoria in
Jew York. Bronfman was accom-
inied by Howard Squadron,
past chairman of the Presidents
Conference, at the meeting.
"The need to correct the
>resent anomalous situation and
establish diplomatic relations
between Spain and Israel was
stressed at that meeting," the
lagazine stated. It added, "As a
iirect consequence, the Council
:>f Ministers approved on June 29
an agreement between Iberia and
|E1 Al for air links between
I Madrid and Tel Aviv, which had
[been pending for several weeks."
The magazine disclosed that
[former Prime Minister Leopoldo
[Calvo Sotelo had previously de-
cided to recognize Israel, but the
Sabra and Shatila massacres had
set the matter back. The present
head of government, the
magazine notes, is looking for a
I favorable occasion, such as an Is-
raeli withdrawal from Lebanon,
to settle the issue, possibly this
summer.
Prison Inmates
Wounded In Blast
TEL AVIV-(JTA)- Ten in-
mates of the Beersheeba prison
lwere wounded, two of them ser-
iously, when a hand-made gren-
ade exploded in a corridor of the
prison's crimminal wing. Secur-
ity prisoners are held in another
wing and were not affected by the
blast. Prison authorities attribu-
ted the incident to a settling of
old scores in the overcrowded jail.
' THE CONFERENCE, spon-
sored by the Interfaith Coalition
of Concern about Cults (ICCC),
brought together, at the New
York City meeting, Protestant,
Catholic, Greek Orthodox and
Jewish clergy, counselors and
mental health professionals.
ICCC was formed at the sugges-
tion of the JCRC's Task Force on
Missionaries and Cults to
monitor the growth of cults, for-
mulate responses, and serve as a
resource for shared information
on cults.
Dr. Seymour Lachman, ICCC
and Task Force chairman, told
the conclave that the members of
the ICCC had "pledged them-
selves to the strengthening of
family and social structures
whose disintegration often con-
tibutes to the proliferation of de-
structive cults." The ICCC
issued a statement urging law of-
ficials to do all in their power to
ensure that children in cults get
the full protection of law for their
health, education and welfare.
Clergymen who have counseled
former cult members said that
they are susceptible to returning
to the cults and need support,
respect and encouragement from
family and friends to aid their
successful return to society.
SPONSORING the conference
were the Greek Orthodox Arch-
diocese of North and South
America; Queens Federation of
Churches; Council of Churches of
the City of New York; Roman
Catholic Archdiocese of New
York; the Jewish Board of
Family and Children's Service
(JBFCS); and the JCRC, includ-
ing the New York Board of
Rabbis.
In another development, the
Task Force alerted nursing
homes and psychiatric facilities
in the New York area that mem-
bers of the Alamo Christian
Foundation, described as a cult,
have been making approaches to
residents of such facilities.
Ann Johnson, project director
of the Coney Island Community
Support Systems Project of the
JBFCS, told the Task Force that
she had found literature from the
Alamo group in a Coney Island
adult home for deinstitutional-
ized psychiatric patients.
A man who identified himself
as a member of the group was
discovered approaching residents
during visiting hours. Confronted
by Johnson and asked why he
was in the facility, he claimed he
wanted to provide "sympathy
and companionship" to residents
of area nursing homes and he
named several he had already
visited.
DR. LACHMAN said the Task
Force had cautioned personnel in
such facilities "to look out for un-
usual visitors. It has been re-
ported that cults send members
into these facilities to take ad-
vantage of the resident's emo-
tional vulnerability and need for'
companionship, and convince
him to sign over his social
security insurance or his will."
He added that former members
have sued the Alamo group on
charges they had been brain-
washed and exploited.
Leaders of the various faith
groups initially joined, at the
suggestion of the JCRC Task
Force, in issuing a statement of
concern over the mass marriage
ceremony in Madision Square
Garden held by Rev. Sung
Myung Moon's Unification
Church in the summer of 1982.
They agreed that an ongoing ef-
fort to combat the cults was
needed and formed the ICCC.
Dr. Philip Abramowitz of the
Task Force said the primary goal
of the ICCC is to provide infor-
mation and to train ministers,
priests and rabbis on how to best
advise a congregant on cult-
related problems.
Malcolm Hoenlein, JCRC ex-
ecutive director and an initiator
of the Task Force, said that "by
linking leadership and commu-
nity institutions with sources of
expertise about cults, ICCC will
develop informed professionals
who will then be able to educate
their communities." He added
"the idea is catching ICCC is
already serving as a model for
similar interfaith coalitons across
the country."
JTA Feature Service
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Member FDIC



Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, August 5,1983
Anti-Semitic
Vandal Prosecuted
He Scrawled Symbols on Synagogues
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) A 23-year-old man
was convicted of drawing
anti-Semitic symbols on a
Silver Spring synagogue in
what the Je'/ish Advocacy
Center in Washington call-
ed one of the few successful
prosecutions in the United
States for acts of anti-
Semitic vandalism.
A jury deliberated for less
than two hours in Montgomery
County Circuit Court before
returning a guilty verdict against
Michael David Remer on charges
of destruction of property. Irving
Shapell, president of the Jewish
Advocacy Center, also said that
the verdict would serve notice
that the Jewish community
would "fight back" against such
attacks.
ANDREW SONNER, the
Maryland State's Attorney, said
it was the first prosecution and
conviction he could remember for
such a crime in the county circuit
court system.
Rabbi Martin Halpern,
spiritual leader of the vandalized
Shaare Tefua synagogue, said the
incident and the conviction had
heightened the awareness of all
residents of the community, non-
Jewish and Jewish, that "if
desecration happens to a syna-
gogue today, it could happen to a
church tomorrow and to a
mosque the next day."
Judge Rosalyn Bell, who pre-
Gush Emunim Patron Sets Up
His Own Knesset Faction
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Rabbi Haim Druckman, the ultra
rightwing patron of the Gush
Emunim, formally removed him-
self from the National Religious
Party and set up his own Knesset
faction called "Matzad" which
expects to draw its support from
the Orthodox settlers and yeshi-
vas on the West Bank. His
defection, which he announced
some time ago, leaves the NRP
with only five Knesset members
deeply divided among them-
selves.
Matzad is an acronym for
Mahane Zionut Datit which
denotes a rightist religious move-
ment. Druckman's associates in
the new party are Rabbi Moshe
Zvi Nenah and Yosske Shapiro,
the latter a former member of the
Jewish Agency Executive.
Neriah is the head of the Bnei
Akiva yeshivas.
The NRP. meanwhile, riven
by factional disputes, is strug-
gling to remain a cohesive poli-
tical party. Lengthy discussions
between Interior Minister Yosef
Burg, who heads its Lamifne fac-
tion, and Education Minister
Zevulun Hammer, leader of the
Young Guard, narrowly averted a
split over the upcoming party
elections. The two ministers
agreed that 55 percent of the
NRP leadership would be elected
by internal ballot and the
remaining 45 percent coopted
from among yeehiva and univer-
sity personalities not previously
involved in party affairs.
The Hammer faction considers
it essential to being in new faces
if the NRP is to survive the next
Knesset elections. The party
suffered a devastating defeat in
the 1981 elections when it was
reduced from 10 to six Knesset
mandates. Polls show that if
elections were held now, it would
suffer further losses.
Political pundits say the
NRP's problems is its lack of a
definitive image within Premier
Menachem Begins Likud-led
coalition. Likud is more strongly
nationalist than the NRP and the
Aguda Israel is more absolutist
in its orthodoxy, they point out.
A Minority within the Young
Guard, led by Deputy Foreign
Minister Yehuda Ben-Meir.
favors a split with the Burg
group on grounds that the
feuding with Lamifne is endless.
Waiting in the wings to return as
"savior" of the faltering NRP is
Yitzhak Raphael who was ousted
from the party some years ago
and has since reconstituted his
Likud Utemura faction.
HIGH HIE BBS
1711 n.
Plantatl
rslty Drive
, riorida
sided at the trial, set bond of
$50,000 for Remer and scheduled
sentencing for Aug. 11.
One of Renter's companions on
the night of the incident last
November 1 testified he watched
Remer, who now lives in Ellicott
City, Md., spray-paint "a big
swastika," a cross, a skull and
cross bones and the words "Ku
Klux Klan" on the back of the
synagogue.
REMER, testifying in his own
defense, denied any painting on
the synagogue, declaring "I was
drunk" and that he laughed at
his companions whom he said he
watched painting the symbols
and slogans on the synagogue.
Reiner's companions also have
been charged, and their cases are
pending.
Outside the courtroom, Remer
told reporters he was not anti-
Semitic. He also said that, while
he was not a Jew, he had grown
up in a home where his stepfather
and stepbrothers were Jewish
Prosecutor Rick Jordan said
Remer faced a sentence of up to
three years in prison and fines of
up to $2,500 on the property de-
struction verdict. Remer was also
convicted of six other criminal
charges stemming from similar
acts of vandalism the same night.
ROBERT JACQUES, Remer's
defense attorney, told jurors that
the desecration of the synagogue
was "so offensive and so heinous
that you don't have to be Jewish
to be outraged by them," but he
insisted Remer had not drawn the
smea rings.
The vandalism attracted wide
attention because synagogue of-
ficials decided to leave the daub-
ings untouched for several days
to give the community "a chance
to express community outrage."
Marshall Levin, the synagogue
executive director, said many
residents helped clean up the
wall, and tips from residents led
to the arrests of Remer and five
companions.
And wtMn you v* ftnWwd
, com* and Ms) th ottm two wtih the dtohni b*j
JNF Names Houston Man
NEW YORK Gilbert
Gertner, a Houston, Tex. real
estate leader, has been named
new chairman of the Jewish
National Fund's National Major
Gifts and Bequests Committee.
Gertner has served for the past
two years as president of JNF of
Greater Houston.
In announcing the appoint-
ment, Charlotte Jacobson, presi-
dent of the JNF, said that "The
National Major Gifts and Be-
quests Committee is the back-
bone of the JNF. I am delighted
that Gertner will be expanding
his already active role in the vital
work of the JNF in the United
States and in Israel."
GERTNER BECAME in-
volved in the Jewish National
Fund as a result of "my strong
belief in the remarkable con-
tributions of the JNF to the
building up of the Land of Israel.
"As chairman of the Major
Gifts and Bequests Committee, I
am committed to locating new
support for the programs of the
JNF which are critical now more
than ever for the future of Israel.
I also want those who are already
JNF supporters to become more
involved."
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Other languages taught French, Italian & German. Enroll now
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Haddad Lays Down Rules
On What He'll 'Accept'
Friday, August 5,1983. The Jewish Floridian Page9-A
By HUGH ORGEL
| TEL AVIV (JTA) -
auth Lebanon militia
bmmander Maj. Saad
faddad has said he would
cept only the position of
>mmander of Lebanese
rces in south Lebanon
would refuse the posts
deputy or chief intelli-
nce officer, such as are
>rted to have been pro-
ved during the negotia-
kns on the withdrawal of
reign forces from Leba-
in.
Speaking to reporters in Mar-
youn, his home town in south-
Lebanon, Haddad said that
er seven years of close co-
eration with Israel "I know
it Israel does not desert its
ends."
IE SAID that U.S. Secretary
I State George Shultz should
have talked to him, "as in
rut he only hears from Presi-
dent (Amin) Gemayel the Syrian
line." Haddad met reporters dur-
ing a ceremony of the swearing in
of new recruits to his forces.
Asked by an American corres-
pondent if he did not fear that Is-
rael might abandon him under
American pressure, Haddad re-
plied: "First of all, Haddad is not
for sale. After working together
with Israel for seven years I
know that the Israelis are not a
people who can sell their friends.
"It is not a question of Major
Haddad himself. It is a question
of our people." He said the people
of south Lebanon knew him and
respected him.
"That is all rubbish. It is not a
personal question. I'm not look-
ing for my own position. Any
change in the position of Major
Haddad is a change against the
population. I will never betray
my country," he said. Haddad
said the idea of American
marines protecting the area was
"absurd. The marines themselves
need protection."
Redeployment
Continued from Page 1 A
idraw from Lebanon, based
vhat he termed the "illegality
Syria's presence" in Lebanon.
JHE DEFENSE Minister ta-
sted that he was satisfied with
talks he and Shamir held in
shington. He said Israel and
U.S. share identical object-
in Lebanon and are very
in their assessment of the
ui ion in Lebanon.
Irens made a similar point at
[meeting with the Conference
Presidents of Major American
psh Organizations in New
last Friday. He said the
jan Administration and Isra-
ad strengthened their "corn-
resolve and common
ktegy" during his and
ir's talks in Washington.
said the talks were friendly
lultations "between friends
we compared notes,
sed mutual objectives and
ked out tactics that we could
ertake together to help bring
and stability to the Middle
ne focus of discussion during
[U.S.-Israel talks, Arens said,
the newly-established Syria-
. Dited National Salvation
tit in Lebanon created by
Pid Jumblatt, leader of the
anese Druze community
ch has been at war with the
ristian Phalangists, and
bier President Suleiman Fran-
f. a Maronite Christian. Arens
that this Front, which has
ounced its intention to bring
? n the government of Preai-
lt Amin Gemayel, assassin
1 President-elect Bashir
nayel, and bombed the U.S.
kbassy in Beirut.
The Israeli Defense Minister
that Washington and Jeru-
were working together to
ck the Front's efforts, which
I said were part of a joint
fian-PLO attempt to delegit
the Lebanese govern-
nt.)
HIS assessment of
r's talks in Washington,
ns denied that Administra-
officials had ought to dis-
de Israel from manufacturing
[La vie fighter Jet- On the con
Ty, Arens said, the U.S. is al
fly involved in the design and
I production of major compon-
of the Lavie and is therefore
nificant partner" in its pro-
on.
it Israel wanted, Arens
was American financial al-
Itions for the plane's con-
ation to be spent within Isra-
~elt. According to reports in
asalem, Defense Secretory
P" Weinberger told Arens
Shamir when he met with
' m Washington that Israel's
production of the Lavie would
hurt the American aircraft indus-
try.
Miriam Zatinsky (seated right), executive
director of the Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida, and Gail Weisberg (seated
center), the JCC's director of older adult
services, are among 26 Jewish Community
Center women professionals from across
North America who participated in JWB's
first Women's Management Institute. JWB,
which is supported by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, conducted the Training
Institute for women in management posi-
tions in JWB-affiliated Jewish Community
Centers. Standing (left) is Harreen Bertisch,
program director, JCC of the Palm Beaches;
and Frances Witt (right), assistant execu-
tive director, JCC of the Palm Beaches.
Standing (center) is Howard Wasserman
who, together with Josie Mowlem (seated
left), were JWB staff coordinators for the In-
stitute.
I
Study medicine in Israel,
A challenge and
an opportunity.
Touro College and Technion- Israel Institute of Technology
announce a new program leading to an M.D. degree
A new door is open to an M.D. degree from
one of the world's great teaching artti research
* centers. Starting in September 1983. the
Touro-Technion Program will offer qualified
college graduates a unique American-Israel
'educational experience.
The programs 18-month American phase
provides advanced science and Hebrew
language studies at Touro College's beautiful
15-acre campus in the New York City suburb
of Huntington. Upon successful completion of
these courses, students will receive a second
baccalaureate degree and may continue their
studies in Israel
Israel phases of the program comprise 6
months of initial bridging courses, 2 years of
* Applications will ba accepted through
August 15 for classes bag Inning at Touro
October 3,1M3.
advanced clinical study at Technion's Faculty
of Medicine in Haifa, a thesis and a year of in-
ternship in Israel. An M.D. degree will be award-
ed by Technion to students who successfully
complete its program requirements.
Our goal is the development of skilled and
compassionate physicians who also will be
well-prepared to meet internship, residency
and licensing requirements in the United
States.
* For applications and information call or
write:
Center for Biomedical Education
Touro College
30 West 44th Street
New York, N.Y. 10036
(212)575-0190
,...-.-.'-. .-


Page TO-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, August 5,1983
- .. : -
.
Morton L. Mandel (third from left), wel-
comes three members of JWB 's Commission
on Maximizing the Jewish Educational
Effectiveness of Jewish Community Centers
to a July session in New York. Left to right
are Barton E. Ferst, Philadelphia; Esther
Leah Ritz, Milwaukee, who is JWB
president; and Lois Fox, of Nashville. Man-
del chairs the 54-member panel of Jewish
leaders from all across the U.S. and Canada
who are engaged in the 18-month study. Ar-
thur Rot man, JWB executive vice president,
is project director.
Ban Backed on IRS Powers
Tax on Social Security Benefits?
Proposed legislation that
would bar the Internal Revenue
Service from treating tax-exempt
bond earnings as regular income
when determining whether a reti-
ree's Social Security benefits
should be taxed has received the
backing of the American Jewish
Congress.
Bills introduced in the House
and Senate would amend a re-
cently enacted Social Security
provision under which single re-
tirees with total yearly incomes
of $25,000 or more and married
couples with joint incomes of
$32,000 or higher are taxed on
one-half of their Social Security
benefits. Formerly, all Social Se-
curity benefits were tax free.
As the law now stands, tax
exempt bond earnings are in-
cluded in IRS calculations to de-
termine whether a retiree is above
the taxable threshold.
Congressman Dante B. Pascell
(D., Fla.) has joined in sponsor-
ing a resolution in the U.S. House
of Representatives which ex-
presses the Congress' deep con-
cern for the plight of the Falasha
Jews in Ethiopia.
The South Florida Representa-
tive, who presided over the com-
mittee which authorized funds for
the resettlement of Ethiopian
Jews, urged President Reagan to
use any diplomatic means avail-
able to facilitate their migration
to Israel. The resolution was
signed by 95 members of
Congress and would "demon-
strate the American people's in-
terest in the welfare of the Fal-
ashas and seek ways to ensure
their free emigration,'' Fascell
said.
Ivan J. Novick, immediate
past president of the Zionist Or-
ganization of America, has been
elected to serve as vice chairman
of the National Conference on So-
viet Jewry.
Novick served as chairman of
the workshop on "Jewish Iden-
tity in the Soviet Union Jew-
ish Heritage" at the third World
Conference on Soviet Jewry held
in Jerusalem this spring. In his
introductory remarks in Jerusa-
lem, Novick stated that Soviet
Jewry "is a Zionist challenge .
a Jewish challenge ... a chal-
lenge to all who cherish human
dignity .... It is one that we will
answer together, and with one
voice."
Rabbi Marc H. Tanenbaum,
national interreligious affairs di-
rector of the American Jewish
Committee, has told an interna-
tional gathering of Protestant
and Orthodox leaders that the
world's Christians and Jews
must join in a "massive, con-
certed effort" to restore regard
for the value of human life and to
counter the "growing callousness
to human suffering that despoils
every continent on the globe."
As part of this effort, said
Rabbi Tanenbaum. the two reli-
gions must work together to help
stem violence and inflammatory
propaganda, halt the arms race,
strengthen the economies of poor
nations, and promote under-
standing and mutual respect
among different ethnic and reli-
gious groups.
Rabbi Tanenbaum spoke be-
fore the Sixth Assembly of the
World Council of Churches,
meeting in Vancouver, Canada
from July 24 through Aug. 10.
Dr. Max M. Kampelman, who
recently played a major role in
working out a new agreement on
human rights with the Soviet
Union, began to develop his skills
as a persuader when he was a
student at Yeahiva University's
High School for Boys in the
1930's.
Kampelman, chief American
negotiator at the Madrid Review
Review Conference on East-West
Security, Cooperation, and
Human Rights, was a member of
the debating team at the high
school.
He graduated from the high
school, now The Marsha Stern
Talmudical Academy Yeshiva
University High School for Boys,
in 1937. He also served on the
newspaper staff during his years
as a student. The Madrid agree-
ment with the Soviet Union, the
first such pact for the Reagan
Administration, deals with issues
such as the rights of workers to
organize, human rights, religious
rights, family reunification, the
rights of journalists, and
measures against terrorism.
New Jewish Agenda (NJA), a
multi-issue Jewish organization
with 34 chapters nationwide, has
announced its continued commit-
ment to mobilize its membership
for the 20th anniversary March
on Washington set for Aug. 27.
Lee Levin, co-chair of NJA's Na-
tional Steering Committee, said
"Jews and Jewish organizations
played a prominent role in the
historic 1963 March. We strongly
feel that every effort be made to
join with those calling for jobs,
peace and freedom. The nation is
undergoing an economic
recession, and it is crucial that
the Jewish community join in the
fight against Reagan's economic
policies."
The Union of American He-
brew Congregation is another
national Jewish organization en-
dorsing the March.
Menachem Aharon, a student
at Tel Aviv University, received
hearty congratulations from
Edwin Shapiro, president of
HI AS, and his son, Saul, at the
HIAS Scholarship Awards cere-
mony held in Jerusalem recently.
Menachem was one of nine
young Israelis presented with a
scholarship check for $500 by
HIAS to help further their
1 studies. These stipends are give?
annually to needy Israeli stu-
dents who have demonstrated
academic achievement and com-
munity involvement.
The needs of victims of violent
crime must take priority over the
rights of criminals, according to a
scholarly paper issued by the
Ameriican Jewish Committee's
Jewish Communal Affairs De-
partment.
In a foreword, Yehuda Rosen-
man, director of the department,
stresses that "the Jewish
tradition has been one of social
responsibility, involvement and
action; Judaism is not merely a
museum piece to be studied and
admired. The tradition's impact
is maximized when Jews act upon
their Jewishness, applying their
value system to specific contem-,
porary needs and issues."
Dr. David Novak's "Violence
in Our Society: Some Jewish In-
sights" argues that crimes
result when "our possessions
mean more to us than even our
lives, and certainly the lives of
others," when "our quest for in-
dividual, familial or political se-
curity takes priority over the
needs of others." and when we
feel terror at the absence of God
in our lives.
Suspect In
Nuns' Murder
Confesses
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
suspect held in connection with
the murder of two nuns in
Jerusalem several months ago
has admitted killing them. Police
identified the suspect as Ala-
wishes Jiro Roberts, a 29-year-old
American Indian. He told the
judge in a Jerusalem court that
his spirit, not his body, commit-
ted the crime. The court extended
his detention. The two nuns,
mother and daughter, were found
murdered in the Ein Kerem
convent.
IRVING
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It might not be worth much to you.
but to us it's worth millions It's worth
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Everything you donate to the
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/-


ie Bookshelf
fere Are Two Books for Children;
But Fairy Tales Excite All Ages
and Other Jewish
Selected and lie
"Howard Schwartz-
Harper and Row,
}. $14.95.
[Kids Catalog. By
M. Burstein.
Jewish Publica-
w, 1983. 224 Pp.
MOBON I. TEICHER
I hWridian Book Editor
two books for
[are they? We cus-
ik of fairy tales as
en's literature, but
ay makes us wonder
t( or any other collec-
tales is really ap-
| children.
i remember Grimm's
i, for example. They
grim filled with
lemons and ogres.
fchwartz's collection is
jpulated by witches,
Drcerers, giants and
as well as kings,
inces and princesses.
_ic is practiced, and
ath frequently occurs.
igh these are Jewish
I they hardly seem ap-
for children.
WING TO Schwartz,
Cteristics make these 36
rish. First, a number of
[Jewish simply because
i from a Jewish source.
iy have specific Jew-
It often a rabbi
i in God enables him to
the struggle between
evil. Sometimes, the
Schwartz's book are
Jewish variations of the themes
in popular fairy tales about
Cinderella or Rapunzel.
The stories are "fairy tales"
because they take place in en-
chanted lands, and many charac-
ters have supernatural powers.
There is always a happy ending
"they lived happily ever
after." Good always wins out
over evil, and morality is always
rewarded. Frequently, the stories
are allegories with a good deal of
symbolism. They are parables
which teach a lesson.
This is particularly true of
Jewish fairy tales, some of which
are found in the Talmud and the
Midrash. Those which come from
the Hasidic masters, especially
Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav,
were used to pass on his teach-
ings to his disciples. Four of his
stories are included in this collec-
tion.
THERE IS a Jewish tradition
which holds that one should not
study Kabbala until reaching the
age of 40 and being married.
Reading these fairy tales enables
us to understand the basis for
that tradition and indicates why
fairy tales are not necessarily for
children.
By contrast, the "Jewish Kids
Catalog" is explicitly designed
for children. It is an effort to
provide for youngsters the
equivalent of the First, Second
and Third Jewish Catalogs which
have been very popular.
The book contains a good deal
of Jewish history, folklore and
customs. It has a guide to the
holidays, spelling out their mean-
ing and identifying the special
observances that accompany
each holiday. Also included are
recipes for holiday foods, instruc-
tions for making holiday crafts
and suggestions for holiday
parties.
VIGNETTES from Jewish
history, information about the
Yiddish and Hebrew languages
and explanations about Jewish
holy books are also to be found in
this catalog.
There are Bible stories, folk
tales and legends, supplemented
by an excellent list of Jewish
books for further reading. Music,
song and dances are not over-
looked. There are instructions as
to how to dance the hora and to
make instruments for playing
Bible music. The catalog has a
travel guide to places of Jewish
interest in the United States and
to places of special interest to
youngsters in Israel. The book
concludes with a "mini-encyclo-
pedia."
There are many other facts and
activities in the catalog. It is
much too rich to read through
but rather is a good reference to
use on appropriate occasions. The
index adds to its utility.
GENERALLY, the author has
succeeded in using fairly simple
language. From time to time, she
slips up, however, and it becomes
clear that the "Jewish kids" for
whom she is writing really need
to be teen-agers to use and ap-
preciate the catalog. For younger
children, the assistance of an
adult will be needed and this is
fine, because the book aims at
family involvement.
What we have in these two
books is one not especially suited
for children and a second one fit
for mature youngsters.
)RK (JTA) An
. agitator in Sweden
ntenced to 10 months
or disseminating hate
The conviction of
jlderer, a key adherent
titute for Historical Re-
l), a U.S.-based outfit
disprove the Nazi
, was aided by in-
provided by the Anti-
Mi League of B'nai
Swedish government
>r, Torsten Jonsaon, in a
the ADL's European
ctor, Shimon Samuels,
[the ADL for the in-
i. "It was of great value
made it easier for me
ilize the background of
[" Jonsson wrote.
er, who resides in the
suburb of Taby,
anti-Semitic news-
jititled "Jewish Informa-
r' Bible Researcher" and
[News" which are distri-
ughout Europe,
ling to the information
to the prosecutor,
was the source of mail-
leaders of the European
community which con-
pieces of fat and locks of
rith an enclosed letter
recipients if they could
is to Saudis
JN (JTA) The West
government is currently
ling the question of possi-
18 sales to Saudi Arabia,
Mnic Minister Otto Count
isdorff told a radio inter-
identify the contents as Hungar-
ian Jews gassed in Auschwitz.
Felderer is also known to have
called Jewish groups using the
pseudonym "David Cohen" to
seek out information to sup-
posedly, counter revisionist
claims.
Among the key witnesses who
testified against Felderer was
Mel Mermelstein, a Long Beach,
Calif, businessman and Holo-
caust survivor who is suing the
IHR for failing to make good on a
$50,000 reward promised to any-
one who could prove the Holo-
caust took place.
The investigation into the
Felderer case was launched large-
ly due to the effort of Vincent
Frank Steiner, president of the
Anne Frank Foundation of Swit-
zerland.
Open all year
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- Friday, August 5,1983. The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Our Readers Write: We Should
Help Restore Statue of Liberty
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Ralph Renick of Ch. 4, WTVJ,
has stated on the Six O'Clock
News that Miamians are starting
a collection to defray the cost of
restoring the Statue of Liberty.
He also reported that the
Cuban community of Miami is
preparing to start a fund of its
own for the same purpose.
I believe that the Jewish com-
munity should not be left out of
this laudable undertaking. It
should start a fund under the
auspices of some worthy organ-
ization. The Jewish community, I
am sure, will gladly contribute to
this worthy cause.
CHARLES SLATER
Hallandale
Bomb Goes Off
TEL AVIV (JTA) A car
bomb went off last Wednesday in
West Beirut as an Israeli patrol
was passing by. Israeli officials
did not give any details of
casualties. But according to re-
ports from Beirut two Israeli sol-
diers were killed and several
others injured. The bomb, which
was in a Mercedes, was reported-
, ly detonated by remote control.
ti-Semitic
itator Jailed
ititute for Historical Research Disciple
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Pagel2-A The Jewish Fioridim Friday, August 5, 1963
Cancer Patients
Unfreezes Victims Who Are Frozen With Fear
iP*CeS-A
gram is right for everyone. "One
person may need psychotherapy
to get at the roots of bis Type A
behavior (accepted by the Amer-
ican Heart Association as s risk
factor for heart disease) while
another needs nothing more than
regular exercise and vacations."
THE SIMONTON program,
and Mrs. Friedberg's Adjunct
Therapy, involve ten techniques
for cancer patients to master, and
various exercises to accomplish
this. The program, Mrs. Fried-
berg emphasized, is not a sub-
'Stitute for medical treatment.
She believes, though, that "more
is needed than the regular
patient-physician relationship,
which can be positive caring
and loving but may not be
enough to deal with what the
patient needs emotionally."
Among the techniques, Mrs.
Fried berg explained, "is visual-
ization and mental imagery,
where they patient pictures his
illness cancer cells his
treatment and his natural im-
mune system. He envisions his
cancer cells being destroyed. The
purpose is to create a positive
expectancy and to change the
patient's belief about the nature
of cancer, so that he moves from
helplessness to hopefulness, to
feeling that his treatment and
innate resources can destroy the
An exercise for this technique
is to ask the cancer patient to
draw a picture of what he thinks
is going on in his body, said Mrs.
Friedberg, pulling out several
pictures drawn by different
patients. In some pictures, the
cancer was depicted like a heavy,
black cloud overwhelming the
body; in others, the body was
fighting back the cancer cells.
"Just by looking at a picture,"
- she pointed out, "a therapist can
tell which the cancer patient
expects to win."
ANOTHER TECHNIQUE is
goal-setting, she continued, "to
re-invest in life. The patient is
asked to write a list, discussing
his general purpose in living, his
short and long term goals in life,
work and play."
A third technique is stress
identification, "identifying the
stress in your life other than
having cancer. This gives the
patient a feeling of control over
the other things, and lets him
explore the significant, stressful
events that occured before the
onset of cancer." An exercise for
this technique is to ask the
patient to list five stresses that
happened sue to 18 months before
the onset of cancer, and to list
five on-going stresses.
Along with the techniques, the
Simonton program includes daily
"play" activities, "something
you enjoy doing, to relax,
whether it's playing cards or a
game or taking a bath," Mrs.
Friedberg said, and a physical
exercise plan.
"If the patient is too ill to get
out of bed," she added, "he must
visualize the exercise. The goal is
three hours of exercise per week,
and it could be anything
swimming, running, walking,
' whatever. The point is to do it
regularly."
SPOUSES OF cancer patients
are urged to participate in the
program. In fact, when the Fried-
bergs went to the Dallas cancer
center, attendance by spouses
was required. "The spouse of a
y cancer patient is under a great
deal of pressure," Mrs. Friedberg
said. "There is uncertainty about
the future. There may be shat-
tered plans for careers or to have
children, not to mention the
personality changes cancer
patients may undergo. Spouses
need emotional support for them-
selves, and the techniques are
helpful in that respect."
One of Mrs. Friedberg's clients
is 35-year-old John Runner, a
home builder who won't, he re-
marks, "be building any more."
Mr. Runner lives in another,
nearby state. After he was diag-
nosed last winter as having can-
cer, he began looking for someone
who offered the Simonton pro-
gram.
"Several people had recom-
mended I read Simonton's book,"
Mr. Runner said. "I was im-
pressed with it. I felt their ap-
proach was quite valid, and I was
aware there were pitfalls in trying
to start the program on ones
own."
A local doctor recommended
Mrs. Friedberg's Adjunct
Therapy. Although Mr. Runner
and his wife were in the program
only briefly "until I got too
weak to travel," he commented
both felt the sessions were "a
good introduction to Simonton,
and we continue the program at
home with the tapes.
MR. RUNNER praises the
program, saying it gave him in-
sights into "what patterns of my
life were not causes of cancer
but participatory factors in
helping the cancer arise.
"It's helped me regain a sense
of control and direction in my
treatment and getting well," hie
continued. "I feel positive about
my future regardless of the out-
come."
There are no dramatic remis-
sions for the type of cancer Mr.
Runner has.'' I was kind of wildly
hoping for remission," he ad-
mitted. "Every cancer patient
does. But I understand now that
it's not in store for me. My
phrase for what the program has
given me is 'help in acceptance,'
and the excellent qualities that
come with that."
His wife, he believes, has also
benefited from the program. She
has found it helpful "in keeping
herself together, for all the tre-
mendous pressures and responsi-
bilities that have fallen on her
shoulders."
Mrs. Friedberg is not the only
person who offers the Simonton
program in the area. She knows
of two others, one a psychologist,
who offer it in Baltimore. There is
also a psychologist in Annapolis
who offers it, as well as four or
five people in Washington, D.C.
"I COULD say I offer a pro-
gram of emotional support for
cancer patients, to enable them to
have a productive and meaning-
ful life while they are going
through a devastating disease,"
Mrs. Friedberg said. "But I'm
not going to deny that this pro-
gram is controversial."
In a recent article in The New
York Times on the new mind-
body link research, medical
writer Jane Brody stated, "The
new studies strongly indicate
that virtually every ill that can
befall the body from the com-
mon cold to cancer and heart dis-
ease can be influenced,
positively or negatively, by a
person's mental state (The
studies strongly suggest that
psychotherapy and behavioral
techniques should be an integral
part of preventive and therap-
eutic medicine."
Moreover, Brody added, re-
searchers are finding that stress
is not intrinsically harmful.
Rather, the question is how a
person responds to it: "Failure to
cope well with stress can impair a
parsons ability to fight of illness,
whereas adequate coping with a
high-stress life may be) actually
protective."
BRODY SINGLED out the
Simonton program for special
mention. Calling it "highly con-
troversial," Brody wrote that
Simonton "has been criticized for
weiring cancer patients think
they caused their disease" due to
their personality types.
The Time article also discussed
the Simonton program, specific-
ally the visualization technique
through which cancer patients
picture their disease being des-
troyed. "Bizarre as it seems,"
Time quoted Boston University
psychiatrist Sanford Cohen as
saying, "the technique has
helped significant numbers of
terminally ill patients survive
beyond all expectations. How
they do it, we do not know."
Dr. Aina Nucho, an associate
professor at the University of
Maryland School of Social Work
and Community Planning, whose
degree is in social research, fully
approves of stress reduction pro-
grams, including Simonton s. Dr.
Nucho argues that the criticism
noted by Brody is a misreading of
Simonton.
"THE SIMONTONS are con-
troversial," she acknowledged,
"because they are in the forefront
of those advocating we should
take care of the mind as well as
the body. Their program is evolu-
tionary, not revolutionary."
According to Dr. Nucho, all
stress reduction programs, no
matter how they may seem dif-
ferent, share four components; an
appropriate diet, appropriate
physical exercise, meditation or
mental relaxation, and counsel-
ing to deal with social stresses
and family concerns.
Not all medical doctors oppose
stress reduction programs. 'It's
patchy," observed Dr. Nucho.
"You can't make a blanket state-
ment. Some are for them; some
against."
Although the Simontons ad-
minister their program in con-
junction with conventional medi-
cal treatment, they seem to have
raised a red flag for doctors.
Dr. Nucho observed, "The Si-
nontons say that if you do the
stress management, you might
recover and they imply that if
you do all these things, maybe
you won't need conventional
medical treatment. They don't
come out and say it, but the im-
plication is there."
DR. NUCHO is familiar with
Mrs. Friedberg's Adjunct
Therapy program, which she
judges "on sound ground because
Mrs. Friedberg encourages medi-
cal treatment for cancer
patients."
Dr. Nucho is in the process of
launching a five year-long study
entitled "Lifestyles and Cancer
Outcomes." The project will at-
tempt to determine if certain
stress reduction methods have an
impact on levels of depression
and on survival rates after cancer
diagnosis. She is currently
seeking cancer patient volunteers
who have received stress reduc-
tion training along with tat
medical treatment. She j.^ ,
measuring any kind of cW*
changes in the body. *
"We are postulating thai pression levels are bound to i
down," Dr. Nucho said. Inga*.
J, cancer patients respond wtf
to stress reduction proerunt i
"They feel relief. With any S
of illness, it's difficult to uk b
help. It's hard to admit you m
counseling.
"Be careful how you put tak"
she cautioned a reporter "it|,
hard to generalize but there
some evidence that people fc
get cancer are people who ukt
pain upon themselves. They can't
swing back grin and bearI
sort of thing and it's hard fo
them to say, 'I don't have to ufa
everyone's guilt on my head.' So
it's even harder for them to let
of the pain."
IN STRESS reduction pn>
grams, she observed, "there isi
factor of the cancer patient's m,
learning.' Programs like the Sim-
ontons' in essence tell people,
'You did the best you could with
your life. You were expected to be
the strong one, and you were. But
now let's see if there is another
way, a different way, you can live
out the rest of your life.'
"That's the 'unlearning fac-
tor," Dr. Nucho has concluded
"Mrs. Friedberg has a job cut out
for her."
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Tell
Whether Cancer Will Hit You
Continued from Page 5-A
five year study of heavy smokers at the
Veterans Administration in Miami. Pre-
liminary results showed that people who
developed lung cancer underwent the
same number of emotional life events (for
I instance, marriage, divorce, job loss) as
those who didn't get lung cancer. But the
I cancer patients perceived these events as
! more stressful than the non-patients, and
held themselves to be more responsible
for the bad things that happened.
Dr. Steven Locke, director of the
psychoimmunology research project at
Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, studied
healthy undergraduate students. Those
who felt high levels of psychological
symptoms in response to stress had one-
third the level of "natural killer .cell ac-
tivity" as students who coped adequate-
ly with stress. "Natural killer cells,"
Brody explained, are a type of white
blood cell that can instantly recognize
foreign cells without having been previ-
ously exposed to them.
%Time magazine's recent cover story on
'Satyagraha'
stress also provided examples of the new
research:
Dr. Redford Williams of Duke Uni-
versity, Durham, N.C., tested male un-
dergraduate students for behavior pat-
terns. Asked to solve a math problem,
Type A students produced 40 times more
cortisol and four times more epinephrine
than Type B students. Although their
performance levels were the same, Type
A students had three times more blood
flowing to their muscles than Type B
students.
Epidemiologist David Jenkin
studied Roxbury and South Boston, two
Boston neighborhoods, black and white
respectively, where a bitter feud over
school busing has been going on. Jen-
kins, who is now on the faculty of the
University of Texas Medical Branch in
Galveston, found mortality rates in the
two neighborhoods were elevated for hy-
pertension-related illnesses such as
stroke, as well as for other illnesses. The
rate of cancer among men in Roxbury
was 37 percent higher than the state
average.
And The Great Gandhi
Movie Brings Back Personal Memories
Continued from Page 4-A
lia's independence, saw the brut-
perpetrated against de-
enseless people, was in the midst
jr riots that raged at that time,
and witnessed the incredible
lanner in which the powerful
achinery of the mighty British
[administration "on whose
[empire the sun never set"
completely paralyzed by non-
Iviolent means by a man whom
[Winston Chuchill described as "a
seditious fakir" (religious mendi-
jcant). I recall seeing Gandhi
striding half-naked up the steps
of the Viceroy's palace to nego-
tiate with the representative of
[the King Emperor. He "twisted
| the tail of the British lion" by
passive resistance, civil disobed-
ience and non-cooperation.
Very little has been written or
[said about Gandhi in his relation
I to the Jews among whom he had
many friends and for whom he
[professed concern and under-
| standing. He considered himself
[a good friend of the Jews, and at
[times he was approached by them
for advice and guidance concern-
ing their problems. As a matter
of fact, one of his physicians was
an eminent Jew, and one of the
books he took with him the many
times he was in prison was "A
Book of Jewish Thoughts" by the
late Chief Rabbi Dr. J. H. Hertz.
Incidentally, in Gandhi's victori-
ous struggle for Indian rights in
South Africa, one of his many
Jewish friends was Herman Kal-
lenbaqh who was "second in
charge of the Satyagraha move-
ment."
When prohibition was first in-
troduced in Bombay in 1939, the
question arose regarding wine to
be used for Kiddush by Jews. The
Jewish community, always well-
treated, raised the issue and
pointed out that important reli-
gious and sacred requirements
were served in the use of wine.
Gandhi did not wish to interfere
with Jewish religious susceptibil-
ities, so he got in touch with
Jewish friends in South Africa
and asked for an authoritative
opinion from the then Chief
Rabbi in South Africa, the late
Dr. J. L. Landau. The Chief
Rabbi sent his report and Gandhi
expressed his satisfaction.
THE JEWS in India then
numbered no more than 30,000 in
a vast population of nearly 400
million. For over many centuries
Jews were always well-treated,
enjoyed religious freedom, and
did not suffer anti-Semitism in
any form or manner. They occu-
pied many important offices and
made an invaluable contribution,
out of all proportion to their
numbers, to the welfare and
progress of India. Records show
Shoppers Storm Appliance Stores
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) Is-
raeli shoppers stormed electrical
appliance stores and automobile
show rooms in anticipation of a
imminent sharp rise in import
duties. The Ministerial Economic
Committee, is expected to an-
nounce a series of measures to cut
down imports and curb run-away
inflation.
In addition to raising duties on
imports, the government is ex-
pected to reintroduce compulsory
deposits by importers, which is
an indirect tax and to increase
the sales tax on imported items.
Customers jammed shopping
centers to make their purchases
before the expected deadline.
Shekem, one of the largest de-
partment store chains, reported
increases of 17-22 percent in the
sale of electrical appliances dur-
ing the past week. Automobile
salesmen reported a surge in de-
mand with customers ready to
Eay cash for cars if they are de-
vered immediately.
The measures planned by the
Treasury to curb imports by
higher levies and taxes are a sub-
stitute for a higher rate of
devaluation of the Shekel which
the Finance Ministry considers
ineffective and inflationary.
Rand Daily Mail
'Righteous Gentile' Award
Goes to New Jersey Woman
that they came to India after the
destruction of the Second Tern-
pie.
Of special interest is the fact
that there was a special consti-
tuency for Jews in the Cochin
Legislature where Jewish tax-
payers elected their own candi-
dates. In particular, the Jews of
Malabar, from the fifth to the fif-
teenth century, enjoyed the
benefits of a virtually indepen-
dent principality ruled over by a
member of their own race.
During Hitler's persecution,
more than 600 German Jews were
given asylum in India. They
found employment as technicians
in the textile mills and oil indus-
try. Among the refugees there
were many doctors. True to the
spirit of Indian hospitality, at a
meeting of the medical and dental
professions after a lengthy dis-
cussion, it was resolved "to
extend to the duly qualified
doctors heartfelt sympathy in
their misfortune as a result of po-
litical persecution" and an oppor-
tunity to practice in the country.
It was pointed out that this was
in the traditional hospitality of
India which went back many cen-
turies when a haven of refuge was
afforded to the victims of persec-
ution.
IN THE Indian National Con-
gress, politicians took interest in
the events in Palestine. Moslem
organizations occasionally
passed resolutions of sympathy
for the Arabs there. And as every
"good Indian" completely hated
England and her imperialism,
they, therefore, were obliged to
side with the Arabs. Gandhi, and
even Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru,
were no exception.
The disorders in Palestine were
widely reported in the Indian
press, and Zionism and the Bal-
four Declaration were blamed for
the trouble in the country by the
Moslems. Although engrossed in
the internal policy of India and
the fight he led for her indepen-
dence, the "Palestine Question"
and Hitler's persecution of the
Jews received Gandhi's special
attention and were frequently
referred to by him in his well-
known journal" Harijan."
JTA Feature Syndicate
By RIFK A ROSENWEIN
NEW YORK (JTA) Elis-
abeth Bornstein, a resident of
North Plainfleld, N.J. was
honored for helping Jews escape
Nazi persecution in Berlin at the
risk of her own life.
Naphtalie Lavie, Israeli Consul
General here, presented Mrs.
Bornstein with a certificate and
medal upon her being named a
"Righteous Gentile" by Yad
Vashem, the Holocaust memorial
in Jerusalem.
"The very fact that we are
marking this event shows the
tragedy," said Lavie at the cere-
mony held at the Israeli Consul-
ate. "One person is being honored
for being righteous," a fact that
emphasizes how few there were
like her, he said.
Mrs. Bornstein kept Use Low-
enberg and her husband hidden
for one and a half years in her
"very small apartment," accord-
ing to Mrs. Lowenberg, who
nominated Mrs. Bornstein for the
award. "She had very little food,
but she shared it with me and my
husband," Mrs. Lowenberg said.
Mrs. Lowenberg was at one
point caught and sent to Au-
schwitz, but was able to escape
from the train and return to Mrs.
Bornstein, who took her back,
Mrs. Lowenberg said. Mrs. Born-
stein continued to shelter them
even after her own husband was
arrested and shot in the leg for
harboring Jews, Mrs. Lowenberg
added.
Mrs. Lowenberg, now a resi-
dent of New York City, said Mrs.
Bornstein had also helped other
Jews, giving them food and
shelter whenever she could. "I
would do it again," Mrs. Bom-
stein said at the end of the cere-
mony.
The designation "Righteous
Gentile" was set up by the Israeli
government to recognize the
deeds of individuals and commu-
nities during World War II, ac-
cording to Lavie. "Unfortunate-
ly, no communities have been
found," he addad.
The purpose of the award is
"not to express our gratitude" to
people like Mrs. Bornstein, "but
to remind the world of what hap-
pened and what can be," Lavie
said.
Gov. Thomas Kean of Jew Jer-
sey sent Mrs. Bornstein a tele-
gram lffwflfag her heroism and
congratulating her on receiving
the award.
Along with the ceremony, a
tree will be planted in honor of
, Mrs. Bornstein on the Mountain
of Remembrance in Jerusalem.
"There should not be an alley
(of trees) for the righteous gen-
tiles, but forests," said Mena-
chem Rosensaft, chairman of the
International Network of Chil-
dren of Holocaust Survivors and
present at the ceremony. "If
there were forests, there would
not be six million dead.
32-Year-Old College Professor
Takes Second Place in Marathon
By HASKELL COHEN
NEW YORK (JTA) Stu
M ittleman of New York City took
second place in the recently con-
cluded six-day "ultra-marathon."
The endurance run took place on
the quarter-mile track at Down-
ing Stadium on Randalls Island.
The first-place winner was Sieg-
fried Bauer, of New Zealand who
logged slightly more than 511
miles in 144 hours. None of the
runners broke the record of 623
miles, which was established in
Great Britain in 1888.
Mittleman, a 32-year-old col-
lege professor, set an American
record by covering more than 488
miles, including close to 100 miles
in the final 24 hours of the run.
He became the first American to
run more than 460 miles in this
event. His total record of 488
miles and 1,331 yards broke the
old mark of 460 miles established
six weeks ago in Pennsauken,
N.J. by Don Choi of San Fran-
cisco.
Mittleman is the holder of the
American record for the 100-mile
run. In describing his feelings
concerning the marathon, he
said: "After the second day I was
prepared to drop out of the race. I
was very much discouraged.
However, the crowd gave me
added encouragement, so I con-
tinued."
The event was sponsored by
the Road Runners Club, whose
president is Fred Lebow. Lebow
turned his back on a lucrative
textile design business to devote
all his time to road-running. The
six-day run, which ended last
Sunday, was the first one held in
New York since 1903. There is no
cash award, for winners, just a
trophy or two.
Ben Yehuda
Graves
Desecrated
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The graves of three leading mem-
bers of the Ben Yehuda family
were desecrated on the Mt. of
Olives in Jerusalem.
The desecrated graves were of
Eliezer Ben Yehuda, the reviver
of modern Hebrew, bis wife,
Hemda, and his son, Itamar Ben
Avi. Slogans condemning the re-
newal of archaeological digs ware
.smeared on the tombstones



Soviets Step Up
Hate Campaign
____
New Low of Vileness and Hypocrisy
Continued from Pag* 5-A
the world by writing that
Zionists, the standard Soviet
euphemism for Jews, are ex-
tending "tentacles" to the "fiv-
continents" and the "islands on
the oceans of the entire earth" to
spread extreme religious
fanaticism, chauvinism and con-
cepts of racial intolerance.
The article masquerades under'
a veneer of praising the contri-
butions of Jews to Soviet life to
attack Jews as "the assault-
strike detachment" of imperial-
ism. The term, "assault-strike,"
which means stormtroopers,
Foxman pointed out, "is right
out of the Nazi lexicon." He
added that other anti-Semitic
concepts unsparingly used by the
article's author are: "Philistines,
money-grubbers, consumers who
try to enrich themselves by any
means, fascistic Zionists, Kultur-
tragers and Hitlerites."
Foxman said that the Pravda
article is "most vile in its attacks
upon Israel, Prime Minister
Begin and the Israel Defense
Forces."
CITING JUST one example
Mr. Kravstov's style, Foxman
quoted ihe following sentence:
"It is the not yet cooled blood of
Beirut, where Israeli soldiers,
who have graduated from the
school of Zionist 'cultural' indoc-
trination, cold-bloodedly hacked
with their bayonets at the
stomachs of pregnant women,
and stabbed knives into children
and old men and women."
The Soviet author also invent-
ed fabricated quotes from Begin
and mistranslated what he
purports to be a line from an Is-
raeli kindergarten song, ac-
cording to the ADL associate na-
tional director.
Begin is fraudulently quoted,
Foxman said, as importuning Is-
raeli soldiers not to be "tender-
hearted when you kill your
enemy. You must not sympathize
with him until we destroy the so-
called Arab culture on the ruins
of which we shall build our own
civilization."
IN SIMILAR vein, the Soviet
author who, Foxman said, "is
either ignorant of Hebrew himself
or is well aware of his reader-
ship's unfamiliarity with the
language," translates the line
from the kindergarten song A
tu-tu, tu-tu, khaavarim yamtuv
(Have a good holiday) as
"May the Arabs die."
In passing, said Foxman, the
author does not hesitate to attack
the United States for "genocide"
of its Indian population.
In contrast to the insulting
denigration of Jewish would-be
emigrants, the Zionist philo-
sophy and the State and "ruling
circles" of Israel, the Soviet
writer, according to Foxman, "is
effusive and fulsome in praise of
the Soviet Union."
Foxman went on to say that
Kravstov mouths "blatant So-
viet propaganda" to present an
"Orwellian" picture of the Soviet
Union that no knowledgeable
Sovietologist will recognize be-
cause it does not square with
reality. According to the Soviet
author, Foxman said, the
U.S.S.R. is:
"The leading place in the
world ... in the field of culture";
A place where Soviet Jews
"are completely equal citizens";
A land of cultural unity
"devoid of setting off of nations
or individual persons to one
another on the basis of nationali-
ty":
A state where anyone can
learn Hebrew, although he does
not mention, Foxman said, that
it must be at the university level;
A country where anti-Semi-
tism is outlawed.
FOXMAN SAID, too, that the
article uses the Orwellian pattern
of "doublethink and double
meaning," praising the heroism
of Soviet Jews while attacking
the Jewish people, their religion
and their historic association
with the Jewish homeland.
Mr. Foxman calls upon the
Soviet leadership "to end its anti-
Semitic propaganda campaign
Die Burger
not only because it is stirring up
religious hostility within its own
country but also because in terms
of public opinion it reflects ad-
versely upon them since these
blatant lies and canards could
never be published without their
permission."
Attack A 'Criminal Act'
U.S. Calls Islamic College
WASHINGTON-(JTA)- The United States has cal-
led the attack on the Islamic College in Hebron, in which
three persons were killed and at least 30 injured, a "crim-
inal act" and urged Israel to arrest those responsible.
"The United States deplores this criminal act and con-
demns terrorism from any corner," State Department
spokesman John Hughes said. "We extend our sympathy
to the victims and their families. We fervently hope those
guilty will be apprehended by the responsible authorities.
We urge all in the area to be calm and refrain from further
ucts of violence."
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tagustS, 1983. The Jewish Floridian Page 15- A


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You've got what It takes.



Office Onene<
olunteers for Israel' Helps
ivert Manpower Shortage
I By LISA RUBENSTEIN
twish Floridian Staff Writer
lolunteers for Israel does just
V Since the beginning of its
Nations last December, the or-
lization has recruited and sent
1,000 Americans to help out
Israel, volunteers vitally
Bed to help offset an emergen-
manpower shortage that
atened to cripple not only the
Btry's war effort in Lebanon,
its economy's ability to
btion properly due to the
py reservists called to serve.
|or every one month a volun-
works, one Israeli reservist
ns to home and job. And
bouys morale as well as pro-
tivity.
lolunteers for Israel pack food
I clothing, clean equipment,
lir machines, and work on
Btruction and land projects
ssary to the security of the
Btry. Nothing glamourous as-
idly, but vitally important all
I same to the continuity of Is-
i life.
laving recently opened an of-
I in Fort Lauderdale at the
tish Community Center, Vol-
eers for Israel is stepping up
in s to reach American Jews in
Southeast. Ben Dinkes, a res-
It of Coconut Creek, who him-
I experienced a month in Israel
h his wife, Sylvia as a volun-
\, has been appointed the new
e's regional director.
Dr him, encouraging people to
linteer for Israel is easy, for he
overflows with enthusiasm over
his own experience there in Jury.
The Dinkes' had helped out at
a military camp called Machneh
Julis near Jerusalem. They
started their stay sorting pur-
chase orders and bills, keeping a
maintenance record for army
vehicles, and later moved on to
other tasks. He was assigned to
tank maintenance taking
apart shock absorbers and
cleaning and reassembling them,
and she, to the optic department,
cleaning and resetting lenses
used in periscopes and range
finders.
Throughout their stay, the
Dinkes' lived and slept and ate
and drank alongside Israeli sol-
diers. They spent Shabbats, cele-
brating the holiday in both the
Sephardic and Ashkenazic tradi-
tions, at camp or with friends
made on nearby moshavs.
They also participated in a tour
of Jerusalem with other Volun-
teers for Israel from other camps,
had briefings with army officers
and a Jewish Agency representa-
tive, and participated in a cere-
mony at the Western Wall.
All the while, more and more
contingents of volunteers ar-
rived, bringing Jews, and some
non-Jews, from Canada, the U.S.,
and France to help out in Israel.
During the closing days of his
month in Israel, all Dinkes could
think was it all had passed too
quickly.
First Phase Construction
Jomplete On Hebrew Home
212-Bed Addition
Construction is now complete
11 he first phase of a 212- bed ad -
lion to North Miami Beach He
ew Home for the Aged. Resi-
Bts will be moving in by mid-
list.
The new four-story, congre-
e-living facility, which cost
than $2.5 million, will ini-
ply house 76 residents. The fa-
ty is adjacent to the Samuel
Conine Kraver Pavilion,
kith houses 50.
Sidney Siegel, executive vice
esident of the Home, said the
building contains a separate
rsing facility, a 4,000-square-
Bt dining room, and a 24-hour
ergency-call-system which will
dw residents to summon help
t>m their apartments.
[In addition, a new Anna and
orris New mark Residence will
Jve a kitchen, laundry, infir-
/, and outside mezzanine.
The infirmary in the new facili-
ty has been named for Secretary
of State and Mrs. George Fire-
stone in recognition of their char-
itable work. The Firestones were
honored last year at the Home's
25th Annual Charity dinner as
"Man and Woman of the Year."
"With the occupancy of this,
new building, we offer two
separate living concepts," Siegel
stated. "Those who are able to
live independently will be able to
conduct their own personal lives,
with meals, housekeeping and
emergency medical services
available, if necessary. We also
offer continued-care for those
who cannot care for themselves,
and that includes meals, house-
keeping, health care, and more."
The models, one bedroom and
two studio apartments, are open
for viewing.
Howard Scharlin, general chairman of
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 1984
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign, visits theEin Kerem Youth
Village and talks with Israeli high school
students.
Federation Campaign Chairman Toured
Jewish Agency Program Sites in Israel
Howard Scharlin, general
chairman of Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation's 1984 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign, was among
leaders from large U.S. Jewish
communities who recently toured
Israel for briefings and on-site
visits to Jewish Agency pro-
grams in action.
"This invaluable mission has
helped to clarify some of the
goals of our 1984 campaign effort
in Miami," he said. "It is very
important to explain to people
that a gift to the Jewish state is
their own responsibility and not
something they should be pres-
sured into."
Scharlin was among campaign
chairmen and executives from 33
communities that raised S3
million or more in the 1983
campaign who were invited by
UJA National Chairman Robert
E. Loup of Denver, Colo, to
participate in the four days of
meetings with high-level Jewish
Agency officials and members of
Israeli government and industry.
A full-day seminar was
devoted to Project Renewal
needs, and mission participants
visited Project Renewal neigh-
borhoods linked with their home
communities. They also took part
in workshops on fundraising for
the Israeli-Diaspora partnership
program, as the centerpiece of the
1984 campaign.
Scharlin explained that Project
Renewal will be stressed this year
in the Greater Miami campaign.
"A person can see the specific
application of money in our
twinned community of Or
Akiva," he said. "Donors can
identify with the efforts of the
community and see what a
difference their gifts can make."
The representatives were
joined by Women's Division
chairmen and Project Renewal
leaders from communities
throughout the U.S. for the first
major leadership mission of the
UJA 1984 campaign.
The leaders met with Israeli
President Chaim Herzog and
Defense Minister Moshe Arens
for private briefings and also
heard Arye Dulzin, chairman of
the Jewish Agency Executive,
and Gideon Witkon, the
Agency's director general of Pro-
ject Renewal.
Treasury Stresses New Taxes Needed to
Pay Expected Rise in Doctors'Salaries
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Treasury said that
new taxes were unavoidable
to pay for the expected in-
crease in the salaries of
government-employed
physicians who ended their
four-month-old strike after
the government agreed
binding arbitration.
to
-if 1
%
^ ^^
'f^SSxii l I. ^T
bSmk, t Mi 1
1
w fll > ~:
'- \
* .*>?- ;,___g ^ ',- ). -996S SI
Although the panel of arbi-
trators is yet to be selected,
Treasury sources and others were
speaking of a 60 percent raise for
the doctors, far in excess of the
prevailing 22 percent average na-
tional wage hike ceiling agreed to
some time ago by the govern-
ment and Histadrut. The
Treasury sources estimated that
this will cost the country some 12
billion Shekels (about $260 mil-
lion), which is three times the
amount allowed for in the na-
tional budget. The problem now
is how to raise the additional
money.
ONE SUGGESTION floated
was a tax on every visit to a
doctor or stay at a hospital on top
of the monthly health insurance
premiums paid to the various
sick funds. Naftali Ben Moshe, a
member of the executive of
Histadrut which operates Kupat
Holim, the largest sick fund,
objected strongly.
Moshe Mandelbaum, Governor
of the Bank of Israel, also op-
poses a levy on medical care. He
said it would add to the tax
burden carried by citizens which
is alreadv too high. Labor Party
MK Gad Yacobi, chairman of the
Knesset Finance Committee, said
that the budget shortfall could be
more than covered if the govern-
ment slowed down its settlement
drive on the West Bank, institu-
ted daylight saving time in the
summer months and allowed El
Al, the national airline, to resume
Sabbath flights. The coalition
and especially its religious
constituents objected vehe-
mently to such measures.
Finance Minister Yoram
Aridor reportedly is determined
to find outside sources to pay for
the wage hikes. Aridor had
threatened to resign if the
government agreed to binding
arbitration which he considered a
surrender to the strikers.
HE HAS been silent on that
since the Cabinet's decision last
Sunday and is said to be waiting
to see what the arbitration panel
will decide. The Treasury is
deeply concerned that if the
Continued on Page 6-B
dTewislhi Floiridllajai
^ompleted first phase of a 212-bed addition
North Miami Beach Hebrew Home for the
Iged
Miami, FloridaFriday, August 5,1983
Section B


*rt r\ OO J
ftge2-b The Jewish Floridian Friday, August 5. 1983
From the Pulpit
'The Tree
Jewish Home Receives $400,000
Grant From National Foundation
preaching the Foundation
acquire the remaining $2 07?!
by January 15, 1984 to '
the Krer-ge award."
By RABBI
LOUIS L. SACKS
In a perceptive parable, the
Midrash relates how once a bird
nestled on a branch. As the bird
glided gracefully through the
heavens, the branch was filled
with chagrin and envy, for it
looked upon itself as being im-
prisoned on the tree and it longed
for the freedom and mobility of
the bird.
Pleadingly, the branch turned
heavenward and prayed to God
that he in his mercy would
liberate it from the tree so that it
could enjoy the unbridled
freedom personified by the
winging bird.
- The midrashic parable con-
tinues that God barkened unto
the prayer of the branch by
sending a mighty gale, wrenching
the branch from the trunk of the
tree, lifting it heavenward. As the
branch soared upward a lilting
song of freedom reverberated
through its being. It was blissful
in the awareness that now it had
the birdlike quality of flitting
through the elements.
After a few hours, however, the
gale subsided, hurling the branch
into a gutter and setting into
motion the slow but inevitable
process of decay. Shorn now of its
source of nourishment, the
branch began to dry up and rot
until what was formerly a beauti-
ful twig, pulsating with life-
energy, was reduced to a heap of
debris and rubbish.
The branch realized the
foolishness of its original longing.
In the moment of agony, it
understood fully that the rootage
to the trunk was not a straight-
jacket stifling and repressing,
but rather the very artery Of its
life, puring into the branch the
sap of sustenance, invigorating it
to grow and luxuriate in all of
God s glory.
In a penitential and confes-
sional mood, it now turned to
God, asking for forgiveness.
Every family represents a
branch of our To rah heritage's
majestic and glorious tree, with
the individual Jew being a leaf on
the branch. Too often in our
estrangement from Jewish life
and our alienation from Jewish
values, we, as the branch,
foolishly look upon our Torah
heritage and synagogue affi-
liation as being a straight-jacket,
stifling us and repressing us. Too
often we echo the poignant words
of Heine, that "Judaism is not a
religion but a catastrophe."
Some Jews seek to be liberated
from their spiritual rootage in the
quest for a birdlike type of
freedom. At last, through bitter
experience, many learn that the
trunk which was looked upon
with contempt, was indeed the
source of one's life. To be an
alienated Jew shorn from faith in
God, Torah, and the mission of
the peoplehood of Israel, is in-
deed a tragic experience not only
for the Jewish people but for the
individual.
Only by grafting your life into
the Eitz Chaim. the tree of reli-
gious commitment, will you
derive from its trunk the nourish-
ment for your mind and soul.
Instead of being a cipher, let us
write a luminous chapter adding
to the glory of a 4000-year
priceless Torah tradition spun by
patriachs, prophets, saints and
scholars.
Miami Jewish Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged has been
awarded a (400,000 grant from
the Kresge Foundation for con-
struction of a new 200-bed
nursing facility to serve the el-
derly. Chosen from among 1,316
qualified proposals submitted, it
is one of 133 charitable organiza-
tions funded nationwide.
The $400,000 represents a
"challenge" grant, according to
Fred D. Hirt, Home executive di-
rector, intended to help the Home
garner local support from private
citizens, corporations and foun-
dations in order to complete the
Chernin Building, which is
scheduled to open in 1964.
"An acknowledgment of out-
standing service delivery and
sound fiscal management, the
grant challenges the Florida
community to share that recogni-
tion by pledging local dollars,"
Hirt stated. "The Miami Jewish
Home, which raised the neces-
sary start-up funds prior to ap-
The new five-story ,
nursing facility, named in
of Harry Chernin. was planned!
response to the over 1,000 fr^A
derly who have applied for A
mission to the Home. It -?!
sents phase one of a muluwC
renovation and expansion 3
gram planned for the Home,*!
acre Douglas Gardens campuj
The Kresge Foundation, L
Troy, Michigan was created tJ
the personal gifts of Sebastaosl
Kresge. a
Membership Pknk &f|
j
A free membership picnic al
Kendale Lakes Park has baj
planned by Hatikvah Chaptall
Hadassah to take place Sundnl
at 3:30 p.m. Games will bef|
tured. J
MECHAYEH FISH
6th STREET AND MERIDIAN AVENUE
(ACROSS FROM CARNIVAL FRUIT)
MIAMI BEACH
673-1664
Mark Baranek of Miami
Beach has been appointed
principal of the Religious
School of Temple Emanu-El,
according to Sidney Cooper-
man, temple president, and
Samuel N. Friedland chair-
man of the board. Baranek,
who previously taught at in-
stitutions in Jerusalem,
Toronto, and Boston, WM
also serve as assistant director
of education at the temple.
FREE
DELIVERIES
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Friday 8 am to 4:30 pm Sunday 8:30 am to 4:30 pm
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A vaUable at 7-Eleven, Grand Union m
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Let us teach your children ages 5-13
Judaica and Hebrew through Drama,
Singing, Arts & Crafts, Field Trips
And Other Special Activities. Classes Are
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TUESDAY AFTERNOONS 3:15-5:15
SATURDAY MORNINGS 9:30-12:00
enroll now
Tel: 866-2771
Dr. Amir Baron, Director of Education
Mr. Mark Baranek, Principal, Religious School
The Religious School
Under the Supervision of Dr. Irving Lehrman
For Early Childhood Program Contact Phillip. Feldman, Principal 538-2603.866-2771
waecicnai


Jewial
Pg3-B
rFor Open Beach Seat
William E. (Billy) Sbockett,
ast president of the Miami
ieach Chamber of Commerce and
ember of the Miami Beach
Ige of B'nai B'rith, is the.
ant-running candidate for the
."ity of Miami Beach commission
at being vacated by Malcolm
[. Fromberg.
Shockett, also past president
f the Miami Beach Bar Associa-
on, has served as a leader in
ipaigns for the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and is an
Lctive member of Temple Beth
gholom. Former president of the
liami Ski Club, Shockett is vice
Bident of the Kiwanis Club of
liami Beach.
Stephen Cypen, Beach civic
eader and president-elect of
(iwanis, is campaign chairman
Shockett. Cypen is a former
nember of the board of governors
the Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce. Campaign treasurer
Dr Shockett is Ira Giller, presi-
t-elect of the Chamber and
rice chairman of the Beach
3ning Board.
Those endorsing Shockett in-
clude former mayors Kenneth
Oka and Harold Rosen, former
Judges Irving Cypen and Jason
Berkman and former B'nai B'rith
South Florida Council president
Barry Gurland. Past Beach
Lodge B'nai B'rith president
Gerald Schwartz is campaign
coordinator for Shockett.
Shockett also has drawn sop-
port from Harriet Green, national
vice president of Pioneer Women
Na'amat; past Chamber presi-
dent Leon Man lie; condominium
association leaders George
Nieves and Norman Frank; Col.
Nathan Kutcher, president, B'nai
B'rith Lodge on Miami Beach;
Keith Kovens, vice president of
the Beach Chamber; and Joseph
Altschul, president of the Forte
Towers Mens Club.
Shockett is a member of the
Young Presidents Club of Mount
Sinai Medical Center and an
Honorary Life Trustee of the
Beach Chamber. He has won the
support of Beth Jacob congre-
gation president Dan Roth, and
Phil Brooks.
Shockett also earned the
endorsements of Ronald Molko,
Gerald K. Schwartz, president of
the Jewish Community Center of
Miami Beach and vice president
of Temple Israel; former Hadas-
sah president Felice P. Schwartz;
Barton S. Goldberg, past presi-
dent of the Civic League of
Miami Beach; and past Temple
Menorah president Joel Gray.
Other Shockett backers include
Martin Gelb, president of the
American Techn io n Society;
prominent attorney Jerry Stern,
and Haim Wiener, president of
the American Friends of Tel Aviv
University.
Shockett also won the nod of
Neisen and Ana Kasdin, Dr.
Ronald Shane, Dr. Michael
Russin, Patti Weinstein, Beverly
Aberbach, Brian and Susan
Giller and Ben Giller. od. poi j.
Alex Daoud Gains Community
Support For Reelection Bid
William Shockett
Other Shockett boosters in-
clude Bill Tugenberg, past Miami
Beach Bar Association president
Donald Klein; Leon Firtel; ar-
chitect Jimmy Silvers, and Sam
Kantor.
Miami Beach City Commis-
sioner Alex Daoud has gained
widespread community support
in his campaign for reelection,
subject to the Nov. 1 election,
| with scores of the Beach's best
' mown civic, business and relig-
ous leaders rallying to Daoud's
support.
Daoud, who was elected to
two terms by overwhelming
BILL LEHMAN SPEAKS OUT
FOR MALCOLM FROMBERG

aw*
*
yjv
ifi
<*.#
av^StS*
jO* ,t*
r"

o*
"*%**
*>*..o--'
MIAMI BEACH'S OUTSTANDING CANDIDATE
FOR MAYOR ALSO ENDORSED BY
WE SUPPORT FROMBERG
Harry B. and
Marilyn Smith
Stanley and
Jill Arfcln
Richard Gersteln
Joseph A. Novel
Phyllis Miller
Dr. Sherman Kaplan
> George J. Talianoff
Jack J. Spitzer
Dr. Ellas Herschman
Sidney Cooperman
i Donald and
Marcy Lef ton
Al Golden
Bert Brown
Joel Gray
Ted Arison
Qarald Schwartz
Judy Drucker
Sam Adler
Russell W. Galbut
Milton Gaynor
Irving Cypen
VOTE TUESDAY, NOV. 1st
DO. Pd. adv.
Malcolm H. Fromberg
margins, was honored at a recent
testimonial luncheon on the
occasion of his 40th birthday.
Honorary chairman of the event
was Congressman Dante Fascell.
Alex Daoud
Fascell was aided by seven
cochairmen of the Daoud salute.
Cochairmen for Daoud are
Joseph Nevel, past president of
the Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce and long-time presi-
dent of the Hebrew Free Loan
Society of Greater Miami; Jean
Fein berg, past president of the
Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah; Harriet Green, former
national vice president of the
American Zionist Federation and
president of the South Florida
Council of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat.
Other cochairmen include:
Hyman Galbut, a Beach at-
torney! farmer city commissioner
and reserve captain in the U.S.
Navy; Dr. Elias Herschman, im-
mediate past president of the
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy; Max Serchuk,
president of the Dade County
Council of Senior Citizens; Mo
Schiffman, president of the
Miami Beach Retirees and past
president of the Tenants
Association of Florida; and Dade
County Commissioner Barry
Schreiber, president of the
American Zionist Federation of
South Florida.
Daoud is counsel for the Beach
Region of Hadassah for wills and
bequests on a pro bono basis, a
member of the American Zionist
Federation and a frequent
speaker before numerous pro-
Israel groups.
Master of ceremonies for the
community wide tribute to Daoud
was bis campaign coordinator,
Gerald Schwartz, past president
of the Miami Beach Lodge of
B'nai B'rith and former national
chairman of B'nai B'rith for
Israel Bonds. Schwartz is
national vice president of the
American Zionist Federation.
Among the community leaders
endorsing Daoud for reelection
who took part in the tribute
luncheon were Barton S.
Goldberg, vice president of
Temple Em an u- El; former Judge
Jason Berkman, longtime Miami
Beach justice of the peace; Steve
Cypen and Harold Rosen.
pd.pol.aoV


rage *-d "i uts Jewian ruihuuuiT r i luuy,"August /7 1 too
Rosen thai Expects 'Thousands' to
Participate in JCC 50th Year Gala
"It has been a half-century
since the Young Men's and
Young Women's Hebrew Associ-
ations were formed in Miami,"
stated Herschel Rosenthal. "And
sponsors of an upcoming Golden
Anniversary celebration hope
that thousands of present and
former members join in the ob-
servance of that event."
Rosenthal, who serves as
chairman of the 50th anniversary
gala scheduled for Oct. 8 at the
Four Ambassadors Hotel, said
organizations and groups, cur-
rently under the Jewish Commu-
nity Center umbrella, "have
boasted a membership over the
decades that include many of the
citizens who have made Miami
the great community it is today."
"We've had members who
have held and do hold local, state,
and federal office," Rosenthal
said. "We've had members who
have worked in their own families
and in their own communities to
make this a better area in which
to live and raise children.
"This 50th anniversary cele-
bration is a chance for all of us to
remember the times of grief and
Herschel Rosenthal
the times of greatness, the times
of poverty and the times of pro-
sperity, the times that have gone
into making our community one
of the most outstading in the
nation."
Miriam Zatinsky serves as ex-
ecutive director of the Jewish
Community Centers of South
Florida.
Community Corner
Membership Open Houses for prospective members of Temple
Zion will he held every Sunday morning and Monday and
Tuesday evenings through Sept. 4. Registration for religious
school will be held, and High Holy Day tickets will be available.
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin, spiritual leader of Congregation Kol
Yisroel Chaverim, has announced that the congregation and its
public service arm, the Jewish Community Information Council,
has issued a new publication, "The Rosh Hashanah Home
Reader," edited and produced by Rabbi Dobin.
U.S. Congressman Dante Faacell was roasted by fellow
Democrats of the Democratic Club of South Dade last week at
the Calusa Country Club.
Dede Simonoff, chairperson of the 33rd Annual Dante Fascell
Labor Day Picnic has announced that the Picnic Committee has
chosen Larry and Penny Thompson Park as the site for this
year's event.
Robert I. Spak of Bay Harbor Isle. Zvi Krugliak, and Robert
J. Merlin, both of Miami, have been selected for inclusion in the
1983 edition of Outstanding Young Men of America.
Baal Korah needed at Adath
Yeshurun. Conservative
congregation in North Miami
Beach.
Call
947-1435
Couple needed to manage/operate new 36
unit motel efficiency apartments. Compen-
sation based on monthly revenue incentives.
Free apartment and utilities with automobile
allowance. Send resume to Harvey Budd, P.O.
Box 1513, Gainesville, Florida 32602.
FOR SALE
LANDS of the PRESIDENT
3 b'drm 2 bath convertible S.E. exposure
Corner apt. on Golf Course in W.P.B.
Near Palm Beach, Shopping, Airport, I-95 and
Close to many cultural activities
(305)689-2115
Prices and Coupons Effective^9,
Thursday, August 4th thru vl<*
Wednesday, August 10, 1983.X/
Quantity Rights Reserved^^fe^V
Kik,
Pickup
Pubiix your picnic
from the Deli
at Pubiix
*
and make the lazy days of i
summer delicious!
M
Dee-Freeh
Hawaiian Salad....... *. '1
De*-Fresh. Whote
Barbequed
Chickens................. $ls
Dak-Fresh. Pork
Barbequed
Spareribs................. *. $33
Texas Style, Bonektea, Barbequed
Chicken.
Beef or Pork............ ,. *2"
CMcken, Beef or Pork
Barbequed
Sandwiches...........2 ik 'l49
DetTreari
Italian Submarine
Sandwich.................* 'I"

Claussen s Whole
Pickles
2 79
where ^opphg is a pleasure 7doys o week
Pubiix


Miami Rabbi Consulted Chief Rabbis,
Premier Begin While Visiting Israel
Friday, August 5,1983. The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Rabbi Tibor H. Stern of
Miami, delegated by the Union of
Orthodox Rabbis of the U.S. and
Canada in his new capacity aa
national vice president to meet
| with the new Chief Rabbis of Is-
: rael, has returned from Israel,
having established official rela-
tions between the two rabbinical
bodies.
Rabbi Stern had conferences
[with newly-elected Chief Rabbi
Abraham Shapiro, Chief Rabbi of
Haifa Rabbi Shaar Yishuv
Cohen, and Dr. Joseph Burg,
I minister of the interior.
Religious matters discussed
I included the establishment of a
(joint Rabbinic Commission to
Ideal with religious family prob-
lems, the certification of Hit tin.
[conversions, and the technologi-
cal issues of Kashruth, according
to the rabbi.
Rabbi Stern also lectured at
yeshivos, presented a paper for
100 prospective judges at the
Institute of Dayanim at Harry
Fishell Institute of Jerusalem,
and gave interviews to daily pa-
pers.
While in Israel, the rabbi and
his wife also participated in the
Bar Mitzvah of their grandson,
David Lyons, son of Rabbi and
Mrs. Simcha Lyons of St. Louis.
U.S. Senator John Danforth of
Missouri, who attended the cele-
bration at the King David Hotel
in Jerusalem, and the Bar Mit-
zvah party were received the fol-
lowing day by Israeli Prime Min-
ister Menachem Begin for a pri-
vate audience.
HRS Increases Immunization Efforts
In an effort to prevent out-
breaks of serious diseases in
Florida schools, where 138 cases
of measles were reported in the
first six months of 1983 and 218
in 1982, the Department of
Health and Rehabilitative
Services is stepping up efforts to
enforce the state law requiring
that all children entering school
for the first time be immunized.
Britain Voices
Lebanon Concern
LONDON (JTA) Con-
cern that the partial Israel with-
drawal in Lebanon will cause
Lebanon's de facto partition has
been voiced by the British
government. A statement issued
by the Foreign Office says that if
the Israeli decision to make a
partial withdrawal is intended as
a first stage in a complete with-
drawal it would be welcomed by
Britain. But if it amounted to a
de facto partition of Lebanon,
[ben it would undermine the
stability of the region and should
In' avoided at all costs.
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
New students must have proof
of immunization and physical
examination by a doctor in the
past 12 months, according to
Henry Janowski, director of the
Immunization Program here. The
immunizations required are for
polio, measles, mumps, rubella,
diphtheria, tetanus, and pertus-
sis.
iOTIAtS
C ATI I INC TO
TNI IAR
MITZVAN NT
NATIONAL BRANDS
Pierre Cordin
Pohn Beach
& Others
Regulars
Huskies
Slims-AII Sizes
Principals who addressed some 600 delegates
at a recent B'nai B'rith District Five con-
vention, shown above, from left, are Arnold
Ellison, newly-retired executive vice
president of the District; Philip Kerschnerof
Baltimore, immediate past president of
District Five, Malcolm H. Fromberg, Miami
Beach city commissioner and senior in-
ternational vice president of B'nai B'rith;
Dr. Daniel Thursz, executive vice president
of B'nai B'rith International; and Louis
Hymson, of North Miami Beach, newly-
installed president of the District.
Does your cracker goto pieces
when it meets cream cheese?
It's easy to imagine spreading
delicious cream cheese on something
besides a bagel.
But it's a lot harder to do.
Croissants crumble. Chips chip.
And it's terrible to see what hard
cream cheese can do to an
innocent piece of toast. Just terrible.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese
is whipped.
So it's smooth and creamy, and
very easy to spread.
Even on something as delicate as
a potato chip.
Temp Tee whipped cream cheese.
It's bigger than the bagel.
The Spreadable Cream Cheese
E99222 DDEhT
SAVE KX ON TEMP TEE
WHIPPED CREAM CHEESE
IOC
Mr. Grocer Kraft, Inc. will reimburse
you for the face value of this coupon
phi* 7C handling allowance provided
you redeemed It on your retail sales
of the named product! s) and that
upon request you agree to furnish
proof of purchase of sufficient prod-
uct so cover all redemptions. Coupon
O Kraft. Inc. 1983
is void where taxed, prohibited, or
restricted by law and may not be
assigned or transferred by you. Cash
value 1/20C. Customer must pay
applicable tax For redemption, mail
to Kraft, Inc. Dairy Group, P.O. Box
1799. Clinton. Iowa 52734.
11300 222flfi3



Pe6^ The Jewish FToridian Friday, Augu* tf, 1968

.-
-
British Jews Honor Baron Rothschild,
1st Jew Admitted to House of Commons
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON {JTA) -
On July 26, 1858, Baron
Lionel Nathan de Roth-
schild become the first pro-
fessing Jew in Britain to be
admitted to the House of
Commons. Exactly 125
years later, on July 26, the
event was marked by a
festive luncheon attended
by his great great-grand-
son, Jacob de Rothschild.
and two more of his
descendants.
At the luncheon held by the
Board of Deputies of British
Jews. Leon Brittan, the Jewish-
bom Home Secretary in the
present government, expressed
what he called "our great debt to
the Rothschild family" and to the
English people's spirit of com-
promise and tolerance.
AMONG THE many other
guests, who included Jewish and
no n-Jewish members of both
Houses of Parliament was 98-
year-old Lord Emmanuel Shin-
well who in 1922 became the first
Jew to represent the Labor Party
in the House of Commons.
Ian Mikardo. another promin-
ent Jewish Labor MP. said that
had it not been for Baron de
Rothschild's fight to enter Par-
liament, Britain might not have
admitted to its shores the waves
of immigrants fleeing from Czar
ist oppression towards the end of
the last century. "Instead of be-
ing a member of the House of
Commons I might have had an
unmarked grave in the Warsaw
Ghetto," Mikardo said.
Britain's Roman Catholics
were represented at the luncheon
by the Duke of Norfolk and the
Earl of Perth, the two senior
Catholic peers in the country.
IN HIS ADDRESS. Sir Im
manuel Jakobovits, Chief Rabbi
of the Commonwealth, pointed to
Controversial Bill Curbing
Archaeological Digs
Passes at Midnight Session
By HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Knesset has rejected
a Tami Party private mem-
ber's bill for elections for a
new Knesset next October,
instead of the scheduled
1984 date. The rejection
stemmed from a tie vote on
the proposal and under
Knesset rules, such a vote
means a proposal does not
pass.
Tami had wanted the proposal
to be discussed immediately,
without waiting the required 48
hours between submission of a
proposal and debate on it. Failure
of passage meant that the
proposal must wait 48 hours and
by that time, the Knesset will
have left on its summer vacation.
Meanwhile, a rift between
Menachem Savidor of the Liberal
Party faction of the coalition,
who is the Knesset speaker, and
Deputy Speaker Meir Cohen
Avidov of Herat, which led to the
Deputy Speaker's resignation,
was patched up.
The event which brought about
the rift, which split coalition
ranks, was the sudden and unex-
pected introduction and passage,
at midnight, of a controversial
bill aimed at curbing the right of
archaeologists to dig in areas
where there might be Jewish
graves.
THAT VOTE took place after
the Knesset was on the verge of
ending its session following eight
hours of debate on various bills.
Most MKs had left the Knesset
building in the belief that the
agenda had been completed.
At that point, Cohen-Avidov,
who was chairing the session,
announced that Menachem
Porush of Aguda Israel would
introduce his private member's
bill, "The Law to Protect Grave-
sites." Herat Whip Ronnie Milo
rounded up party members still
in the Knesset building and the
Porush draft proposal was ac-
cepted and sent to committee.
But Savidor declared that
Cohen-Avidov, as his deputy,
had known "full well" that the
Porush bill had been placed on
a different agenda, not that of
that particular night, and that
the deputy speaker had no right
to change the agenda by moving
the Porush bill up a day early.
The deputy speaker is a co-
sponsor of the Porush measure.
Savidor then said that if his
deputy's reason for changing the
agenda was that he did not know
the Porush measure was on a
later agenda, "he is not telling
the truth." Cohen-Avidov, de-
claring he had been grossly in-
sulted by Savidor, immediately
announced his resignation as
deputy speaker.
AT A RECONCILIATION
meeting arranged by Avraham
Shapira of Aguda Israel, Savidor
said he had not known, when he
made his charge against his
deputy, that the deputy had
come late to a Knesset presidium
meeting at which a decision had
been made to delay a vote on the
Porush bill and presumably did
not know about the decision.
Savidor apologized for calling
his deputy a liar and Cohen-
Avidov withdrew his resolution.
But Savidor insisted he had not
withdrawn his charge that
presenting the Porush measure
as his deputy had done was an
"unfair and unparliamentary
ambush."
The issue may be referred to
the Supreme Court for a ruling,
though experts on parliamentary
rules said the Supreme Court was
virtually certain to decline to
involve itself in Knesset
procedure and would tell the
Knesset to put its own house in
order.
Agreement Signed
HAIFA (JTA) A tripar-
tite agreement for research coop-
eration has been signed between
the Technion Israel Institute
of Technology, and the Technical
University ot Aachen and the
Nuclear Research Institute of
Juelich, both in Germany. This
agreement expands an earlier two
part agreement for the exchange
of scientists between the Tech-
nion and the University of Aa-
schen signed a year ago. The
three institutions seex to increase
their cooperation in research and
academic areas in the fields of
science and technology.
the parallel plight of England's
Jews and Catholics as they
fought for civil and political
emancipation in the last century.
Sir David Salomons, the first
Jewish Lord Mayor of London,
had been responsible for erasing
from a London monument an in-
scription blaming Catholics for
the great fire of London in 1666.
Speaking on behalf of his
family, Jacob de Rothschild
noted that it took his ancestor 12
years to win his fight to sit in the
House of Commons after winning
his first parliamentary election,
but that once he had done so he
never made a speech there.
IN ALL, the parliamentary
battle for Jewish emancipation
had taken 28 years. The first bill
to admit Jews to the House of
Commons had been presented in
1830, a year after the Catholics
were enfranchised.
But it foundered, like other
subsequent moves, over the
thorny questions of whether or
not Jews could refuse to swear an
oath of allegiance "on the true
oath of a Christian.''
Benjamin Disraeli, a supporter
of Jewish emancipation, did not
face this hurdle because he had
been converted to Christianity
while a child. But professing
Jews recoiled from doing so.
Although the opponents of
Jewish enfranchisement included
a hard core of reactionary bigots,
there were also high-minded
Christians like Lord Shaftesbury
who wanted to uphold the Chris-
tian oath of allegiance on purely
religious grounds.
THE MATTER was finally re-
solved in 1858 by a compromise
whereby each House of Parlia-
ment could determine the form of
oath to be administered for its
members.
Even so, Jews were still for
some time debarred from the
House of Lords: de Rothschild
was excluded at the insistence of
Queen Victoria. He was also
barred from the exclusive jockey
club of race horse owners, and al-
though he won the Derby he did
so under an assumed name.
The commemoration was a
purely domestic British affair.
Hence the absence of any repre-
sentative from the Israel Embas-
sy. Otherwise it would have been
difficult to ignore the fact that it
was to another illustrious
member of the Rothschild tribe
- Lord (Walter) Rothschild -
that the Balfour Declaration
pledging British support for a
Jewish national home in Pales-
tine was addressed. Of this, how-
ever, there was no mention at the
luncheon.
The youngest person ever to graduate from University of
Miami, 14-year-old Stephen Baccus, son of James and Florenct
Baccus of Miami, completed his bachelor's degree in computer
science there Aug. 4. Stephen, who finished his high school
education at Miami's Carol City High and began taking his fir-
st college courses at age 11, enrolled as a full-time student at
New York University in 1961 at 12. He transferred to Univer-
sity of Miami in 1982. In September, Stephen will enter the
university's School of Law, the youngest student ever to meet
its admission requirements. He will be 17 when he completes
his law degree.
New Taxes Necessary
Continued from Page 1-B
doctors receive a substantial
increase. other government-
employed professionals will
demand equal raises. The
engineers union has already an-
nounced that it will do just that.
Meanwhile hospitals all over
the country are trying to return
to normal as quickly as possible
as a backlog of patients streamed
through their doors. Hospital
administrators say the process
will take 2-3 days. The hospitals
have been functioning with less
than a third of their medical
staffs since the strike began over
four months ago.
Many of them shut down
completely because of the doc-
tors' hunger strike which made it
impossible for them to perform
their duties.
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... ..-. *i* i -1* y **-** >
Unknown Women's Group Raised
Millions for Homes in Israel
By RIFKA ROSENWEIN
NEW YORK- (JTA)-
women's group that has
anaged to raise millions
dollars for its institu-
pns in Israel while main-
lining a low profile, has
cided to go public.
"In some ways we have been a
ell-kept secret in the Jewish
nunity," said Sally Schar-
Jan. president of the Women's
:ial Service for Israel (WSS),
an interview with the Jewish
elegraphic Agency.
J The 35-year-old organization,
|hich serves the elderly and in-
rmed in Israel, maintains 20
libsidized apartment complexes
\i the elderly in Tel Aviv and
erusalem, two senior citizen
jmes in Tel Aviv, and a hospital
^r the chronically ill, the Lich-
istadter Hospital for Chronic
diseases in Tel Aviv.
WSS is the only (organization)
Rising arm of Sheruth Nashim
ciali in Israel, which was
(winded by Paula Barth in the
kid 1930's. Mrs. Barth, a Ger-
man immigrant whose husband
as the first president of Bank
eumi, began by organizing soup
|itchens, "meals on wheels," and
libsidized housing for the waves
immigrants arriving in Pales-
Ine before World War II, accord-
kg to Edith Jellin, vice president
:WSS.
Mrs. Barth began the tradition
working without much fanfare.
'he "never wanted publicity so
tiat relatives in the United
ates didn't have to see that
tieir relatives (in Israel) needed
ad," Mrs. Jellin said. Mrs.
larth emphasized care with
fegnity. Even today, residents at
Tie homes in Israel are encour-
ged to bring their own furniture
id belongings in order to per-
snalize their rooms, Mrs. Schar-
lan explained.
WSS is the only (organization)
^ere that supports very impor-
ant and high caliber support for
flderly people in Israel, (and)
.uses only on that," Mrs.
Ekharman said. The institutions
maintains stress "individual
Leeds and personal attention,"
Ihe added. "They are each small,
pot institutional. When you visit
:>ne) you have the feeling that it
Started small and stayed small."
THE ORGANIZATION cur-
i'luly has around 250 members,
though it used to have more than
30, according to Mrs. Scharman.
It now receives "the bulk of its
funds" from legacies plus annual
fund-raising dinners, she said.
"The ladies are getting older,"
Irs. Scharman explained. Many
l>f the members are survivors of
the Holocaust and almost all cur-
rently live in New York.
This, plus the group's "insul-
arity" and the fact that the mem-
ers "stayed within themselves,"
lean that the organization is
ising members and not gaining
any, said Dena Mendez. Mrs.
lendez is one of the leaders of
the Young Associates organiza-
tion, which was founded three
fears ago to help attract younger
and newer members to WSS.
THE YOUNGER group, which
rails itself Gila, after one of
SS's senior citizen homes in Is-
ael, has provided a lot of the
npeius behind the nationwide
campaign that WSS launched for
i first time recently.
"The organization is run very
individually, which is its strength
and its weakness," said Mrs.
"lendez. She noted that the
American organization has had
anly two presidents in its history
| the founder, Rosi Michael, and
rs. Scharman. "When these
figures leave, there's a gap,"
Mrs. Mendez said.
The parent group is anxious to
promote and work with the
younger organization, Mrs.
Scharman said. She said mem-
bers were concerned about who
would carry on their work.
Mrs. Mendez, like some of the
other members of her group, first
found out about WSS when her
grandmother moved into one of
its homes in Israel and she saw
its work "first-hand," she said.
She thinks the attraction of Gila
to people like herself, in their 20's
or UO's, is that it gives them the
chance to help and establish a
link with older people in Israel.
ANOTHER APPEAL for
some members of the younger
group, which includes men, is
that they can "work for a small
organization, without the bu-.
reaucracy," Mrs. Mendez added.
The money raised goes directly to
Israel to be administered by the
Israeli group. The American
branch maintains a small office at
240 W. 98th St. in New York, but
there are "next to no expenses
here," Mrs. Mendez explained.
Both Mrs. Scharman and Mrs.
Mendez, the older and the
younger leaders, emphasized the
sense of "friendship" among the
members of the organization and
the "personal touch" stressed at
the institution it supports.
Israel's Psychoanalytic
Society Celebrates 50th
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Israel Psychoanaly-
tic Society recently cele-
brated its 50th anniversary,
and the European Psycho-
analytic Federation marked
the occasion by holding its
fifth conference in Jerusa-
lem and publishing a
"festive" issue of the "Is-
rael Journal of Psychiatry
and the Related Sciences"
devoted to a "historic over-
view of the psychoanalytic
movement in Palestine and
Israel."
Prof. Don Hertz, the president
of the Society and the director of
the Psychiatry Clinic at the Had-
assah-Hebrew University
Medical Center, said that Israel's
psychoanalysts believe that this
is a nationwide milestone.
"IN FACT," he said, "an in-
terest in psychoanalysts pre-
ceded the founding of the Society
by several decades. Max Eitin-
gen, a great friend of Freud, came
to Palestine in 1910 and thought
of settling there, but eventually
he decided to return to Germany.
However, he never lost his inter-
est in Zionism and finally made
his home in Jerusalem in 1933."
In 1920, in a letter to his close
associate, Ernest Jones, Sig-
mund Freud wrote that he had
heard from Chaim Weizmann
that immigrants from Eastern
Europe arrived in Palestine with
few clothes and personal belong-
ings, but with copies of "Das
Kapital" and "The Interpreta-
tion of Dreams" under their
arms.
Weizmann invited Dr. David
Eder to serve as a member of the
British Zionist Commission that
came to Palestine in 1918. Eder
was the first secretary of the
British Psychoanalytical Society
founded in 1913. He was a pas-
sionate devotee of Zionism, So-
cialism and psychoanalysis.
MANY EDUCATORS in Pal-
estine in the early days supported
the theory of psychoanalysis.
Hertz said that it still provides a
frame of reference for the educa-
tional system of many kibbutzim.
Hadassah was always close to
the development of psychoanal-
ysis in Israel. Henrietta Szold,
founder of Hadassah, approached
Eitingen for help in dealing with
the problem encountered with
children in youth ajiyah, and he
Friday, August 5, 1983. The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Goldberg: Nothing U.S.
Jews Could Do Would
Have Deterred Hitler
willingly provided it. Eder was
considered for the post of
director-general of the Hasassah
Medical Organization but
decided not to take it. Hadassah
psychiatrists have always been
prominent among the Psycho-
analytical Society, such a Profes-
sors Julius Zellermayep, Eleazar
Edelstein and Jacob Avni.
Most people who have read
"Moses and Monotheism'' be-
lieve that Freud was anti-Jewish
to the point of seeming to be anti-
Semitic. Hertz says that this is
not a correct interpretation of
Freud's attitudes. "Because of
his traditional Jewish* back-
ground, he was preoccupied with,
but ambivalent about, the land of
his forefathers. But on December
10, 1917, he wrote a letter in
which he said: 'The only cheerful
news is the capture of Jerusalem
by the English and the experi-
ment they propose about a home
for the Jews.'
AN EVEN more remarkable
comment was made by Freud in a
fore ward to a memorial volume
on Eder: "We were both Jews
and knew of each other that we
carried in us that miraculous
thing in common which inac-
cessible to any analyst so far
makes the Jew."
Freud and Eitingen hoped to
set up a Chair of Psychoanalysis
at the Hebrew University of Je-
rusalem, and Freud accepted an
invitation to become a member of
the university's first Board of
Governors. These attempts
failed, because the university felt
that it wanted to have a Chair of
Psychology before introducing
one of Psychoanalysis.
Eventually, in 1977, when the
International Psychoanalytical
Association held its 30th Con-
gress in Jerusalem, the Freud
Chair of Psychoanalysis was es-
tablished.
AFTER THE State was
founded in 1948, psychoanalysis
went from strength to strength.
Erick (lumber, one of Eitingen's
students,became president of the
society, and he was succeeded by
H. Winnik. American psycho-
analysists rendered great assis-
tance, and many of them became
Corresponding Members of the
Society. Today many doctors
specializing in psychiatry in Isra-
el have had some psychoanalytic
training.
By JAMES RICE
CHICAGO (JTA) Arthur
Goldberg, chairman of the
American Jewish Commission on
the Holocaust, recently revealed
his personal experiences and
emotions during the Hitler era to
a standing-room only audience at
Chicago's Kent College of Law.
Born in the U.S. of parents
who came to this city in 1894, the
former Supreme Court Justice
and Ambassador to the United
Nations said that were it not for
that event, he tbo "would have
been in Auschwitz or in one of the
other 1,000 death camps." For
that reason, he said, he feels as if
he had the concentration camp
numbers tattooed on his arm
"almost physically."
GOLDBERG dealt directly
with the sensitive issues of what
the American Jewish community
knew 40 years ago about the
Holocaust, and what they could
have done. The "verdict is
beyond challenge that nothing
the American Jews could do
would have deterred Hitler," he
said.
The Allied governments cer-
tainly had some power of deter-
rence which was not used, Gold-
berg said. But even that might
not have stopped the murder
machine, as evidenced by Adolf
Eichman's use of railroad faci-
lities to send Jews to death
camps, when the German army
was in a desperate retreat to the
Brandenberg Gate in Berlin.
Goldberg revealed that in 1943
he was stationed in London as a
member of the U.S. Office of
Strategic Services, when he was
approached by Shmuel Ziegel-
man, a member of the Polish
government-in-exile. Ziegelman
showed him photographs and
affidavits- from Auschwitz,
smuggled out of Poland by a
brave non-Jewish Pole, disguised
as an Esthonian policeman.
Ziegelman begged Goldberg to
convince the Allies to bomb the
rail-line to Auschwitz.
AFTER WILLIAM Donovan,
head of the OSS, had seen the
evidence, he told Goldberg that
American planes could not be
"diverted" although planes
were bombing a German war
plant only five miles away. The
day after Goldberg gave Ziegel-
man news of the refusal, Ziegel-
man committed suicide.
Goldberg said European Jews
had not realized the danger until
too late because they were "be-
numbed." And so were American
Jews who might have done more,
he added. In his view, only the
American Orthodox Jews were
sufficiently vigorous in their pro-
tests, which were ineffective to
the general public because they
conducted their meetings in
Yiddish.
The American Jewish com-
munity, which then did not have
the political influence it has
Britain Voices
Lebanon Concern
LONDON (JTA) Con-
cern that the partial Israel with-
drawal in Lebanon will cause
Lebanon's de facto partition has
been voiced by the British
government. A statement issued
by the Foreign Office says that if
the Israeli decision to make a
partial withdrawal is intended as
a first stage in a complete with-
drawal it would be welcomed by
Britain. But if it amounted to a
de facto partition of Lebanon,
then it would undermine the
stability of the region and should
be avoided at all costs.
today, was intensely loyal to
President Roosevelt, who
"couldn't stand up to the
pressure, including from labor
and the isolationist public," who
were all against relaxing immi-
gration restrictions, Goldberg
said.
FOR GOLDBERG, the
"lesson is broader than the Holo-
caust": unbridled violation of
human rights should never be
countenanced and so-called
"quiet diplomacy is singularly
ineffective."
He cited his own experience as
a U.S. delegate at the Belgrade
Conference on the Helsinki Trea-
ty. There he had approached the
Soviet delegates and "offered a
deal": if the dissidents would be
released, the voices against the
USSR in the U.S. would be lifted.
But the Russians kept up the
harrassment, in fact sending to
forced labor or psychiatric insti-
tutions all the Soviet members of
the Helsinki Watch Committee.
After the meeting, Goldberg
was asked by this reporter to
comment on the rescue efforts of
the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee during
the Holocaust. He replied that he
was aware of their work, but JDC
was able to function only from
1933-39.
IT WAS pointed out to him
that JDC did, in fact, work
throughout the entire Hitler
period, as for example, JDC's
financing of Raoul Wallenberg's
rescue of 100,000 Hungarian
Jews. Goldberg replied that he
knew JDC had provided the
necessary funds, but only 2,000
flot 100,000 had been saved by
Wallenberg.
This statement was surprising,
since ibis generally accepted that
over 100,000 Jews were rescued
by Wallenberg. In fact, Prof.
Yehuda Bauer of Hebrew Univer-
sity, a leading authority on the
Holocaust, has stated in his book
"American Jewry and the Holo-
caust The American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
1939-1945," that through its
Swiss representative, Saly
Mayer, JDC provided the bulk of
the funds which enabled 119,000
Hungarian Jews to survive.
Bauer states: "The conclusion
is that JDC financed most of the
rescue activities in Budapest
the direct feeding, the upkeep of
the children's homes, the pro-
tection papers, and unknowingly,
even the (Zionist) youth
movement's underground activi-
ties." Bauer also points out that
the JDC was instrumental in
saving hundreds of thousands of
European Jews, with the all too
limited funds made available by
American Jewish communities.
EMANUEL RINOELBLUM,
the martyred historian of the
Warsaw Ghetto who was a JDC
representative, wrote in his
famous dairy, discovered after
the war and now in the archives
of YIVO and Yad Vashem:
"Through the active and
generous aid of the American
Joint Distribution Committee, a
network of institutions for com-
munal welfare was spread
throughout Warsaw and in the
country The ORT, too carried
on considerable work. Tens of
thousands of adults and children
were able to survive for a longer
period because of the help of
these institutions and of the
ramified network of house com-
mittees which cooperated with
them. These organizations
conducted their self-sacrificing
work up to the last minute, as
long as even the slightest spark
of life still burned in the Jewish
group."


rage S-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, Auguat 6,1963
cPtide
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Friday, August 6, 1983. The Jewish Floridiso Psge 9 B
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PRCES EFFECTIVE
AUG. 4-AUG. 10. 1983
2J PKG LEISUREWAY WHITE
per Plates


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday. August 6,1963
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
RabbisLaunch Mobilization'
To Swell Temple Membership
In a community-wide effort to
increase memberships in area
synagogues, the Rabbinical As-
sociation of Greater Miami has
proclaimed the month of Elul (the
last month of the Jewish calendar
year) as "Synagogue Mo-
bilization Month," beginning
Wednesday and ending with the
ushering in of Rosh Hashanah on
Sept. 7.
The announcement was made
by the Association's president,
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz, spirit-
ual leader of Beth Torah Congre-
gation, and its executive vice
president, Rabbi Solomon Schiff,
director of chaplaincy at Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
"Synagogues have always
been the traditional center of
continuity in Jewish life in every
community," Rabbi Lipschitz
stated. "It is the house of assem-
bly and learning as well as the
house of prayer.
"During 'Synagogue Mobiliza-
tion Month,' we urge all people
who are not currently affiliated
with a synagogue to participate
actively in the richness and
beauty that synagogues offer,"
he added.
The Rabbinical Association of-
fers information on Orthodox,
Conservative, Reform, and Re-
constructionist synagogues
throughout the community.
Miami Beach 'Confrerie de la Chaine des Rotisseurs' monthly
dinner meeting was held recently at Nine Island Avenue.
Shown above at the event, from left, are Dr. Leonard Sakrais,
who is 'Baili' of the Miami Beach Chapter; Robert Dickinson,
an officer of the organization; and Lucy Martineau.
B'nai B'rith District to Hold 'Soul Of
Judaism' Institute in N. Carolina
Rabbi Howard Addison, spirit-
ual leader of Congregation
Shaare Tikvah in Chicago, and
Rabbi Moshe Shur, director of
Hillel Foundation at Queens Col-
lege, New York, will comprise the
faculty for an Institute of Juda-
ism to be sponsored by B'nai
B'rith District Five at Wildacres,
Little Switzerland, N.C., Aug. 18
through 21.
District Five covers B'nai
B'rith lodges in Florida, Georgia,
South Carolina, North Carolina.
Virginia, Maryland, and District
of Columbia.
The theme of the Institute will
be "The Soul of Judaism,"
planned to explore the- role of
prayer, ritual, music, and mystic-
ism in Jewish life.
Lecture topics by Rabbi Addi
son. who is a graduate of Jewish
Theological Seminary, will be
"What is Prayer?;" "Ritual and
Myth;" and "Toward a Revitali-
zation of Jewish Worship."
Rabbi Addison served as an
assistant to the late Dr. Abraham
Joshua Heschel at the Theologi-
cal Seminary and has also worked
as a philosophy instructor at
Fordham University, Kent State,
and Detroit College of Jewish
Studies. He is a lecturer, an es-
sayist on Jewish thought and
contemporary Jewish life and
published in various journals,
and a columnist for Chicago Jew-
ish Sentinel
Rabbi Shur, a singer of Has id
ic and popular Hebrew, Yiddish,
and English folk music and a
composer, will lecture on "The
Baal Shem Tov: A Search for the
Soul;" "Jewish Mysticism and
Jewish Mystics;" and "Jewish
Soul Music, in Lecture and Con-
cert."
Rabbi Shur has entertained
throughout the Americas, Israel,
Austria, and New Zealand with a
mixed style of Hasidic folk music
interspersed with storytelling.
Dr. A. J. Kravtin is chairman
of the Institute.
Plight of Ethiopian Jewry
Improving, Activist Claims
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK -(JTA)-
The plight of Ethiopian
Jewry appears to have
demonstrated some im-
provement in recent
months as an "unprece-
dented number" of Fal-
ashas have succeeded in il-
legally leaving Ethiopia to
go to Israel, according to an
activist familiar with Ethi-
opian Jewry.
But at the same time, while
there has been an improvement
as a result of the efforts of the Is-
raeli government, the severe
drought in North Africa, said to
be the worst in over a decade, has
created new hardships. The
drought has triggered a famine
which the activist said is result-
ing in the deaths of some 50-100
children each day in the northern
Ethiopian province of Tigray, a
heavily populated Falasha
region.
THE ACTIVIST, Barbara
Ribakove, president of the North
American Conference on Ethiopi-
an Jewry (NACOEJ), provided
this assessment to the more than
300 persons who gathered here at
the Lincoln Square Synagogue.
Ribakove, who last visited
Ethiopia in 1981, was one of
several speakers addressing the
issue of Ethiopian Jewry.
When asked specifically for the
number of Falashas who have
successfully made it to Israel,
Ribakove declined, saying that
the figures were provided in con-
fidence. But her claims were sup-
ported by Rep. Bill Green (D.,
N.Y.) who also said there ap-
peared to have been some success
by the Israelis to make it easier
for certain groups to leave
Ethiopia.
The tone of the meeting,
despite the information of the
drought and its hardships, was
markedly different than past
rallies for Ethiopian Jews. The
Israeli government has been
sharply criticized by many
groups working with Falashas for
fading to take appropriate action
to secure the release of the
Falashas.
BUT AS GREEN noted, the
efforts by Israel and the United
States are hindered because the
Reagan Administration has little
ability to influence the actions of
the Ethiopian government. Since
the overthrow of Emperor Haile
Selassie in 1974, the Falashas,
who reside in the northwest of
Ethiopia, have been geographi-
cally located in the center of a
civil war.
The Falashas number about
20,000 today and have reportedly
been subjected to cruel and harsh
treatment, such as torture and
slavery, by the present Commu-
nist government. In 1972, Isra-
el's two chief rabbis recognized
the Falashas as Jews. But today,
relatively little is known about
how the Falashas reach Israel.
For practical and political
reasons, it is not a widely publi-
cized subject.
NEVERTHELESS, the Ethio-
pian government has just
recently opened its doors to
visitors to view first-hand the
status of the Falashas. Dr. Jay
Luger, a member of the steering
committee of the JACOEJ pre-
sented a brief slide presentation
of his trip to three Falasha vil-
lages last May. He, along with 11
others, made a 12-day visit to
Ethiopia.
Luger's slides presented a view
of the hardships and primitive
lifestyle of the Falashas. One
slide, showing the Falashas in
prayer in the synagogue in the
village of Wolleca, outside the
city of Gondar in the province of
Gondar, indicated the Western
influence on the Falashas in the
past years.
The huts in the town of Wol-
leca are constructed of wood and
mud. But the Western influence
was demonstrated, according to
Luger, by the Western-style
prayer-shawls which the Fala-
shas wore in the synagogue and
by the mezuzah on the entrance
to some homes.
In Ambober, the village refer-
red to as the "showcase village,"
the slides depicted some of the
structures remaining from the
combined ORT-American Jewish
Joint Distribution Committee
relief program which began in
1976. In 1981, the governor of the
Gondar province. Maj. Malaku,
revoked the permission for the
operation of the program.
IN THE THIRD village
visited, Abbas Antonias, the,
small synagogue used by the Fal- f
ashas did not have a Torah.
Luger said the visit was spon-
sored by the NACOEJ and
was primarily a fact finding mis-
sion.
Rep. Ted Weiss (D.. NY.), who
also addressed the meeting, said
that the Subcommittee on Africa,
of which he is a member, has
urged the Reagan Administra- ,
tion to help provide aid to'
Ethiopia. He said members of the
subcommittee will be going to
several Africa nations in August
and will, during the course of a
stopover in Ethiopia, underscore
the concern for the fate and
future of the Falashas.
Knesset in Uproar Following
ControversialBill's 'Sudden'
And 'Unexpected9Passage
By HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The Knesset was in an
uproar following the sud-
den and unexpected intro-
duction and passage of a
controversial archaeology
bill at midnight. There was
a demand by some Knesset
members that the midnight
vote be declared illegal and
null and void.
The introduction and passage
of the bill, which is intended to
curb the right of archaeologists
to excavate because of the
possible presence of ancient
Jewish graves, took place after
the Knesset was about to end its
session after eight hours of
debate on several bills. Most
MKs had left the building,
believing that the agenda had
been completed.
SUDDENLY, Deputy Speaker
Meir Cohen-Avidov of Herut,
who was chairing the session, an-
nounced that Menachem Porush
of Agudat Israel would introduce
his private member's bill, "The
Law to Protect Gravesites."
While Porush said he would
forego a long speech to explain
his proposal, Herut Whip Ronnie
Milo rounded up party members
still in the building and the draft
proposal was accepted and sent
to committee for debate.
But Liberal Party members of
the government coalition, who
oppose the bill, said its
presentation at the time it was
introduced was a "trap." But
Cohen-Avidov persisted that the
bill was among "other private
members bills" which are always
on the agenda.
HOWEVER, Menachem
Savidor, the Liberal faction
Speaker, said that Cohen-
Avidov, aa his deputy, knew full
well that Porush *s bill had been
placed on the following day's
agenda, not the previous night,
and that he had no right to
change the agenda by moving the
bill up a day ahead.
Savidor added that if Cohen-
Avidov's reason for changing the
agenda was that he did not know
it was on the next day's agenda,
"he is not telling the truth."
Cohen-Avidov immediately
announced his resignation as De-
puty Speaker, claiming he had
been grossly insulted by Savidor.
Parliamentary and legal ex-
perts are divided on the Deputv
Speaker's right to change the
agenda and the Speaker's right to
declare a previous vote null and
void. Many experts feel the issue
should be referred to the Supreme
Court for a constitutional ruling.
SOME OBSERVERS feel thatfj
the midnight vote might have
averted a coalition crisis with the
Aguda Israel by satisfying the
Aguda than an attempt had been
made to have the controversial
bill accepted.
But the vote has created a new
coalition crisis with other fac-
tions, including Tami and
Tehiya, which claim that the
sudden vote was a cheap trick
which brought no credit to the
Knesset.
The Archaeological Council,
which met to discuss Porush's
bill, said its passage would be a
black day for Israel. Prof. Yigael
Yadin, Israel's leading archaeol-
ogist, whose father's grave mUf*4*\
desecrated recently, apparently
by ultra-religious elements, called
the midnight vote a trick to
ensure the passage of a bill which
would hamstring archaeology.
He said that if this trick works,
"something must be wrong in the
State of Israel." ,
Rabbi Named Bnei
Akiva Executive .
Rabbi Chaim B. Seiger, former
senior rabbi of Baron Hirsch
Synagogue in Memphis, Tenn.,
has been appointed executive
vice president of American
Friends of Yeshivot Bnei Akiva
in Israel. The announcement was
made by Marvin Bienenfeld,
philanthropist who serves as
president of the organization.
Rabbi Seiger will be responsi-
ble for administering policy.
acting as a liaison between Dias
pora and Israel support of the or-
ganization, and maintaining
relations between the yeshivot
and the Israeli and American
governments.
Business Note
Leon Thaler, assistant treasur-
er of Wometco Enterprises, inc.
has been elected president or
South Florida Cash Management
Association for a term oi one
year.
' 'i


< sponsion Highlights
ing Auto'8 30th Year
I. Nevel, president and
\f the board of Per-
Leasing, Inc., has an-
ezpansion program
jpointment of depart
is to inaugurate the
/ersary of the founding
inty's "oldest inde-
r leasing and rental
celebrating the begin-
lr 30th year of service to
iridians," said Nevel,
inding our operations
yard and Palm Beach
and into the Orlando-
/orld area.
lide the expansion," he
1, "I am announcing the
ent of a number of our
fwn automotive experts
j-time employees to the
)f directors of Pershing
company department
Silver was named
/treasurer in charge of
tstration; Ho well Kase,
esident, general manager.
Leasing Division; Merle
(is, executive vice president;
rt Schentrup, general
zer, Car Rental Division;
|n Beck, manager. Fleet and
Car Sales; and Stuart
er, comptroller.
^ named as part of the
nsion program were David
pi. corporate counsel;
ard Drecksler, vice presi-
| business development;
lard (Red) Wheeler, maint-
Ice and service director; and
Iry Serrano, manager,
Irance Division. Appointed as
|ch managers were Sergio
erandi, Wellington Curtis,
lard Rodriguez, and Hector
firshing maintains company
^quarters and exeucitve
es on Alton Road, Miami
Eh. Branch offices in the
International Airport
i, in North Miami Beach, and
(various hotels on Miami
ch, in Miam.', and throughout
f ( County enable the company
provide round-the-clock
[ice seven days a week.
Is professionals in the car
ling and rental business,"
\e\ stated, "we have dedicated
lves to providing care-free
spoliation to our customers.
ther we provide a Cadillac
Dusine or a sub-compact car,
(efficient and friendly service,
"hallmark of Pershing, goes
; with it.
ir award-winning Service
tment keeps our cars in top
inical condition, and our
psive 'get-ready' department
our cars clean and fresh at
ies. Although our rates are
I competitive, we try to give
iving public much more for
honey than our competition
" he added.
side-light of Pershing
ptions is its Used Car
rtment, an adjunct to the
utive Offices on Miami
Most of these are "off-
I" cars, and, according to
1 Wheeler, service director,
buse we have serviced these
from the very moment they
^delivered to us new, we have
nplete "life-history' of each
-!sell.
pus, we can select the
of the crop' and con-
ply offer them for private
with an unconditional
from Australia
's friendship male /
ale in America. Keen
per writer, 18 years.
Wf (with photo) to:
>n m Lawrence
a. Mt. Waverley 3149
latralia.
Joseph Nevel
Friday, August 5,1983. The Jewish Floridian Page 1 IB
Mamians to Receive President Reagan Appoints Braman
YeshivaU. Degrees To U.S. Holocaust Memorial Council
guaranty," he added.
"During this 30th anniversary
year," Nevel commented, "we
would like to invite anyone who
has the need to lease, rent, or buy
a car to take advantage of the
tremendous discounts we are
offering.
"Many thousands of South
Floridians," he continued, "have
become our customers and our
friends over these past 30 years.
Lawyers, judges, doctors, house-
wives, students as a matter of
fact we are now serving the
children and grandchildren of our
original customers and we're
doing business with a substantial
number of those 'original'
customers.
"Whatever success we have
achieved has been the result of
the loyalty of those thousands
whom we've served faithfully. To
them, we are eternally grateful,
and we look forward to serving
them for another 30 years."
Local Delegates
to Hadassah
Confab Named
Hilda Berger, president of
Inter-American Chapter of
Hadassah, has announced
chapter members who have been
chosen as delegates to the organ-
ization's 69th National Conven-
tion, which will meet in Washing-
ton Aug. 14 through 17.
Those accompanying President
Berger will be Golda Weiss and
Margot Backer, vice presidents,
fundraising; Malka Majerowicz,
vice president, membership; Tola
Bloch, donor chairman; Eva
Tennen, American affairs chair-
man; Ida Raij, Ad Journal chair-
man; Julia Weiss, recording
secretary; Ana Grosfield,
publicity chairman; and Pauline
Kuper.
Theatre Trip Set
A one-day trip to the Burt
Reynolds Dinner Theatre in
Jupiter for lunch and show,
"George M." has been arranged
by Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood
to take place Wednesday, Presi-
dent Betty Greenberg has an-
nounced.
The bus will leave Sklar Audi-
torium at 10:30 a.m. and return
at 6 p.m., according to chairmen
of the event, Shirley Freeman
and Goldie Cohen.
Gordon Roofing
and Sheet Metal
i Works, Inc.
I 1450 N.W. 21t Street
Phone: 3264287
Have your roof repaired now;
you will save on a new roof later
"Satisfactory Work by
Experienced Men"
Miamians Laurie S. Berman
and Karen Leslie Chadroff will be
among 42 students from nine
states as well as Canada, Israel,
and England to receive Master of
Social Work degrees from Yesh-
iva University's Wurzweiler
School of Social Work during
Commencement exercises for the
School's Block Education Pro-
gram Aug. 5.
Berman s field instruction
placement is the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, while Chad-
roff will be placed at Miami's
Jewish Family and Children's
Service.
Commencement speaker will be
Bertram Beck, general director of
the voluntary agency, Commu-
nity Service Society of New York
and former executive director of
Henry Street Settlement Urban
Life Center.
In the Block Education Pro-
gram, students complete degree
requirements during three inten-
sive summers of study in New
York City, while spending the
balance of the two-year program
in full-time human service jobs.
JWV Confab to
Host Pentagon
Chairman
General John W. Vessey, Jr.,
chairman of the Joint Chiefs of
Staff, the Pentagon, will be key-
note speaker at the 88th Annual
Convention of the Jewish War
Veterans of the U.S., when it
meets Aug. 14 through 21 at At-
lanta, Ga.'s Downtown Marriott
Hotel. Vessey, Jr. will speak on
current American policies on na-
tional defense.
Others scheduled to address
the 1,500 delegates expected are
Elliott Abrams, Assistant Secre-
tary of State for Human Rights
and Humanitarian Affairs;
Israel's newly-appointed Ambas-
sador to the U.S., Meir Rosenne;
Mustafa Dodin, head of the Heb-
ron Arab Village League; and
Harry Walters, administrator of
veterans affairs.
The JWV Ladies Auxiliary will
be holding their 56th Annual Na-
tional Convention simultaneous-
ly
Candidacies Announced
Dade County Judge Steven D.
Robinson has announced his can-
didacy to become Circuit Court
Judge in the September, 1984
elections. He is seeking the open
seat that will be created by the
retirement of Judge Milton
Friedman at that time.
Seeking to fill the Dade County
Judge position being vacated by
Robinson is former Florida As-
sistant Attorney General Arthur
L. Rotbenberg, who also an-
nounced his candidacy this week.
Norman Braman, vice presi-
dent of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, has been chosen by
President Reagan to serve on the
United States Holocaust
Memorial Council.
He and other presidential ap-
pointees will lead an annual com-
memoration of the Holocaust as
well as oversee the construction
of a Holocaust Memorial
Museum in Washington.
Braman has served the Miami
Jewish community as a campaign
chairman of Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund, as a Federation board of
directors member, and as a mem-
ber of the board of directors of
Zachor Institute for Holocaust
Studies.
Nationally, he has served as
special consultant to the chair-
man of the President's Commis-
sion of the Holocaust and on the
board of directors of the United
Israel Appeal and Tel Aviv Uni-
versity.
"I feel very honored to have
been appointed to a council of
Hadassah Confab
to Host
Fashion Show
A fashion show premiere
presented by graduates of the
Hadassah Seligsberg-Brandeis
Comprehensive High School in
Jerusalem's Fashion Design
Department on "Landscapes of
Israel" and a report on a
"talking" computer, donated by
IBM to Hadassah Community
College in Jerusalem, will be
highlights of the organization's
upcoming 69th National Conven-
tion in Washington.
Three-thousand delegates and
guests are expected at the event,
to run Aug. 14 through 17 at the
Washington Hilton Hotel. Also
scheduled are ceremonies
honoring those whose contri-
butions to the Hadassah Medical
Organization have helped bring
modern medicine to the Middle
East.
wmm
Norman Braman
such importance," Braman said.
"Perpetuating the memory of the
six million Jews who perished in
the Holocaust is of great
significance."
Missing Phones
Cost Money
About 159,000 telephone
sets were missing in Florida
in 1982. Southern Bell wants
to find them. The tele-
phones are worth more than
$6 million.
"Most of these phones dis-
appear when people move
and forget to return them.
The phones become illegal
extensions when they are
taken from one place to
| another without notifying
Southern Bell," says
Spokesman John Thomas.
Since mid-1981, Southern
Bell has been billng custom-
ers if they don't return their
phones when disconnecting
their service. This charge
ranges from 835 to $55 per
basic set. But even with this
charge, telephones are still
not being turned in.
ISRAEL BASIC TOUR 4,670
P/F ML. OCC. 7
September 2S.19S3 FROM MIAMI 14 day
CiaaariMMlM
TOUfl INCLUDES:
(
I
at* wOe*
A CMvtrt
1 nirfrt hi Muhifi nrrr
OFF. (308> 661-4948 BETTY FAST TRAVEL SERVICE 8764 CoWns Ava
rUriis*! Meat CsapUtt Isfliik-ltvith Wttklt
Printed In EaglUh t
wW Pwdflaf to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
may keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world.
Enclosed please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
? 1 Year $18.00 D 2 Years $34.00
LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ONLY
Name:.
Address:,
City:____
.Apt. No.
State..
V
( Plan* Ma*. All Chacta PayaMa ta'TMf JEWISH FLORIDIAN'
p.o. %m tl-am, Miami, PktrMa awi
Misismaa aw m wmaml$tm a pa** wtemm.


Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, August 5,1983
-O
r'\
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACT KM
NO. 83-37144
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
DAPHNE ADA3SA THOMP
SON
and
JOHN W. THOMPSON
TO: John W Thompson
18 Pine Tree Close
Freeport, Grand Bahamas
Bahama*
YOU ARC HEREBY NOT!
FTED that an action tor
DUaolutkn of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on Alec Rosa, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
16400 N.E 19 Ave Miami.
Florida sae, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before,
Septembers. 1983; otherwise a
default win be entered against1
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 2nd day of
August, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N.A HEWBTT ,
As Deputy Clerk
'Circuit Court Seal)
11107 August 6. 13.19.36. IPs*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number (3-404*
Division 02
IN RE ESTATE OF
EDWARD O I
GREENBERGER
Deceased.
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION I
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING.
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of EDWARD O.
GREENBERGER. deceased,
File Number 83-6066, Is pending
In the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
la 78 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 88130. The
personal representative of the
estate Is MACEY R KEYES,
whose address if 11710 8.W.
67th Court, Miami. Florida
33156. The name and address of
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above'
court a written statement of.
any claim or demand they may'
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when it'
will become due shall be'
stated. If the claim la contln-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim la se-
cured, the security shall beds-'
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the,
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion Augusts, 1968
MACEYH KEYES
A* Personal Representative
of the Estate of
EDWARDQ. GREEN
BERGER
Deceased.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MURPHY. BUSCHBOM A
MURPHY
1880 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
Coral Gables. FL SUM
Telephone: (806)448-3661
1U48 Augusts. 13.1868
NOTICE
SERVICES TO PERSONS
UNABLE TO FAY
THEREFOR
SOUTH SHORE HOSPITAL
AND MEDICAL CENTER
MIAMI BEACH,
FLORIDA
The Bureau of Community
Medical Facilities, Depart-
ment of Health and
Rehabilitative Services. State
of Florida, has established the
sum of 110.766.80 as the level of
uncompensated services to be'
made available by South Shore
Hospital and Medical Center In
the period of June 1. 1983 to
May 31.1983.
This determination has been
made pursuant to the
requirements of the
regulations of the Public
Health Service. U.S. Depart-1
ment of Health, Education, and:
Welfare. (42 CFR, 83.111) and;
the applicable provisions of
Florida Medical Faculties
Construction Plan.
"Uncompensated services"
means services available In the
facility which are made
available to persons unable to
pay therefor without charge or
at a charge which Is less than
the reasonable cost of such
services. The level of such
services is measured by the
difference between the amount
paid by such persons for the
services and the reasonable
cost thereof.
The level set out above meets
the presumptive compliance
guidelines of the federal
regulations and la 10 percent of
all federal assistance provided
the faculty under the Hospital
and Medical Facilities Con-
struction Act.
South Shore Hospital and
Medical Center has the right to
determine how, when, and to
whom hospital services will be
provided.
There are no guidelines
which positively Identify a
person or family as eligible to
receive full or partial un-
compensated services. Each
case must be evaluated on Its
own merits.
11148 Augusts. 1988
IN THB CIRCUIT COURO* .
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADB COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 13 14361
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Adoption of Minor
TO: JEAN GERALD ERICK
DAUTRUCHE
8888 103rd Street
Corona. New York 11368
YOU. are hereby notified that
the Petitioner. LOUIS FRANK-
LIN DROUIN. filed a Petition
for Adoption In the above-
styled cause for the adoption of
a minor child DCM, and you
are required to show cause why
the same should not be granted
by serving a copy of your writ-
ten defenses, If any upon Dan-
iel Gallup, Attorney for Peti-
tioner. 13146 Coronado Ter-
race. North Miami. Florida
33181. and by filing the original
thereof with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court, on or before this
2nd day of September, 1988.
otherwise a Decree may be en-'
tered against you granting said
adoption. ,
WITNESS MY HAND and
Official Seal of said Court at
Miami, Dade County, Florida
this 1st day of August. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By: D.C.Bryant
DEPUTYCLERK
11168 Augusts. 13;
19.38,1868;
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THB CIRCUIT COURT OF
THR 8LBVBNTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Csjajs Ho. 63-24477
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF I
BEVERLEY RITCHIE, WIFE '
and
LINCOLN G. RITCHIE. HUS
BAND
TO: LINCOLN G. RITCHIE
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that'
an action for dissolution of!
marriage has been filed,
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq., 16490
N.W. 7th Ave Suite 206.
Miami. Florida 88169. on or
before August 12. 1988 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or
Immediately thereafter;!
otherwise a default win be I
entered against you tor thai
relief demanded in the
Petition I
DATED: July 12.1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: V. BARKLEY
as Deputy Clerk
11101 July 16.22.29;
August 6,1968
--------Notice- UNbfft--------'
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names
HAVING BABIES AFTER 80
and HBA 80. at P.O. Box 2684.
South Miami, Florida 88148.
Intends to register said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
HAVING BABIES
AFTER 80, INC.
1U46
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY'
GIVEN that the undersigned, i
desiring to engage In business'
under the fictitious name The
J.A. Cart Co., at 730 University
Drive, Coral Gables. Fla 33134.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
H. Sussklnd A Co., Inc.
730 University Drive
Coral Gables, Fla. 83134
11137 July 29;
Augusts, 13,19.1983.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 63-34762
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOCELYN LOUIS8ANT.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
CAROLINE LOUISSAINT.
Respondent Wife
TO: Caroline Loulssalnt.
Respondent
Cap Rouge
St. Louis Du Nord, Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been Hied against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses If any, to
It on LLOYD M. ROUTMAN,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 181 N.E. 83 Street.
Second Floor. Miami. FL88138,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 19. 1988;
otherwise a defeault will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 14th day of July
1668.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC.P.COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Law Offices of Lloyd M.
Routman
181 N.E. 82 Street. Second
Floor
Miami, FL 33138
Lloyd M. Routman
11108 July 22,29;
Augusts. 12.1983.
NOTICE OF ACT
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-2*731
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOB
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
LAZARA TERESA
GUTLLERMES.
Petitioner,
and
MIGUEL GUrLLERMES,
Respondent.
TO: MIGUELGUILLERMES
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso
luUon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
ADRIAN D. FERRADAZ. at-
torney tor Petitioner, whose
address Is 1880 N.W. 7th Street,
Suite 102, Miami. Dade County.
Florida, U.S.A., and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 2. 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you tor the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week tor four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 29 day of July.
1968. J
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF
JUGO AND FERRADAZ
1830 N.W. 7th Street.
Suite 103
Miami. Florida 88126
Telephone: (80S) 841-2960
Attorney for Petitioner
11161 Augusts, 12;
19.36.1963
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THB CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADB COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 63-26447
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
TAJUDEEN 8ALIU.
HUSBAND
and
JOHNNIE SALIU. WIFE
TO: JOHNNIE SALIU
Residence Address
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action tor dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
Bruce N. Crown. Es.. 16480
N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite 306,
Miami, Florida 38169 on or be-
fore September 9, 1988 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or lm-'
mediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
DATED: August3.1988
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: D.C.Bryant
as Deputy Clerk
11160 Augusts. 13;
19, 26, 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83-4048
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LOUISE STOCKTNaER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of Louise Stockmger, de-
ceased, File Number 88-6066-
01, Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 78 W. Flagler
Street. Miami. FL 33130 The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIR8T PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 6,1988.
Personal Representative:
Eleanor Duymovlc
6911 WUmett Road
Bethesda. MD 20817
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
MERVYN L. AMES. ESQ.
GEORGE A McQUADE
700 NE 126 Street
P. O. Box 610686
N*orth Miami, FL 83161
Telephone: 896-2028
11184 August 6. 12,1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 83-2497*
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
PRENTIS STANLEY
Petitioner
and
ESSIE STANLEY
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ESSIE STANLEY
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses to It on
MARVIN OREBER, ESQ.,
ATTORNEY FOR Petitioner,
whose address Is 683 N.E. 167
St. North Miami Beach.
Florida 33162. Suite No. 1016, on
or before August 18. 1988. and
file the original with the clerk
of this court; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you.
Dated: July 14, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By N.A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
"109 July 32.29;
-_______________Augusts, 12.1968.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBYl
GIVEN that the undersigned.)
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name BIRD
PARADISE at 7931 S.W. 13
Terrace, Miami, Florida 88144.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
He man Edward
Zaldlvar.Jr.
11161 August 8.12, It. 26. 1968
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name THE
SHERIDAN at 41st Street and
Sheridan Avenue, Miami
Beach, Florida, Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
HAM PROPERTIES,
A Florida General
Partnership
Attorneys tor Applicant
Smith and Mandler. P.A.
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.-
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names As-
sociated Plumbing Wholesale,
Inc. d-b-a A.P.8. Wholesale.
Associated Plumbing Stores,
Plomerla Cubana at 4401 N.W.
7th St.. Miami. Florida, Intends
to register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Associated Plumbing
Wholesale. Inc.
11118 July 22. 26;
August 8.12. IfJJB
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 63-27064
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOB
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
HERBERT E. DIAZ,
Husband,
and
BARBARA DIAZ.
Wife
TO: BARBARA DIAZ
RESIDENCE ADDRESS
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
P.A., attorney tor Petitioner,
whose address Is 2491 N.W. 7th
Street. Miami. Florida 88126.
and fUe the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 2,1988.
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 2 day of August,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByM. J.Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L. Carricarte. P.A.
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami, Florida 33125
Telephone: 649-7919
Attorney for Petitioner
11168 August 6,12;
19,26.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
- THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITCOURTOF
FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 63-27667
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ALINA GARCIA,
Wife,
and
REIN ALDO GARCIA.
Husband
TO: RelnaldoGarcia
Realdence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on Albert L. Carricarte. P.A.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 2491 N.W. 7th Street.
Miami. Florida 33126. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before September 2. 1988;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
reUef demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 2nd day of
August. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy CierkT
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Albert L. Carricarte, P.A.
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami, Florida 83136
Telephone (1KB) 649791T
1US6 August 6.13.19. 36,19881
'MTHBClRCUm
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLos, i
PROBATE DlviMc**'
m Number r*
_m Olvltionu
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JACOB HASSEN
Deceased
NOTICE
AGAINST "JUs-a
ESTATE AND ALL OtStJI
PERSONS IhTERWnSSI
THE ESTATE: ^^D B|
YOU ARE HEREBY NfnJ
FIED that the USSLSS
of the estate of sum
HASSEN. deceased 51
Number 83-4928, 1. p^l
the Circuit Court tot rial
County. Florida, Pr(JI
Division, the addres. of Jsl
is 73 West Flagler Sj
Miami, FL 33130 The pertMi
representative of the estates
CYNTHIA AUERBACH ital
address Is 34 Plermonl DitTI
Melville. NY 1174T TN ,
snd address of the pens*!
representative s attornev i
set forth below
All persons having claim..
demands against the eitaUnl
required, WITHIN THRnl
MONTHS FROM THE DATtl
OF THE FIRST PUBLIC*!
TTON OF THIS NOTICE to 3
with the clerk of the abcnl
court a written statement A
any claim or demand they mi. I
have. Each claim must belli
writing and must Indicate M
basis tor the claim, the mm|
and address of the creditor |
Ms agent or attorney, and tfcl
amount claimed. If the clalrr.i|
not yet due. the date when
will become due shall e|
stated If the claim l conta-l
gent or unliquidated, 0>|
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim li |
cured, the security shall be del
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of BE
claim to the clerk to enable the I
clerk to mall one copy to earl I
personal representative.
All persons Interested In thrl
estate to whom a copy of Un)
Notice of Administration hsl
been mailed are required I
WITHIN THREE MONTH I
FROM THE DATE Of Tffl[
FIRST PUBLICATION ON
THIS NOTICE, to file any*I
jectlons they may have that I
challenges the validity of 0*1
decedent's will, the quail I
flcations of the personal r* I
resentatlve, or the venue or I
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.|
AND OBJECTIONS NOT
FILED WILL BE FOREV
BARRED.
Date of the first publication I
of this Notice : I
Administration: Augusts. 1JS
CYNTHIA AUERBACH
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JACOB HASSEN
Deceased I
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
H. Lawrence Asher. Esq.
16211 Northeast 12th Avenue
North Miami Beach. Fl.33162
Telephone: (305i 849SM;
(Dade)
Telephone: (305i 5251171
(Broward)
11147 August 5,12.1 Ml
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORID*
PROBATE DIVISION
Flit Number 83-4174
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
IRENE SUSSMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
tate of IRENE SUSSMAN. *
ceased. File Number 8S-41K "
pending In the Circuit Courtl for
DADE County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address ot
which Is 73 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130. W
names and addresses of W
personal representative ano
the personal representative i
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re
qulred to file with tls court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS0F
THE FIRST PUBLICATK*
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) "J
claims against the estate am:
(2) any objection by an "Wr-
ested person to whom UiU<">
tlce was mailed that challengM
the validity of the will. W
qualifications of the P*"""*
representative, venue, or juw
diction of the court. r,
ALL CLAIMS AND 0BJB&
TIONS NOT SO FILED WIU-
BE FOREVER BARRED.
PubUcauon of this Notice h
begun on August B, 1083.
Personal R****"^
IRVING H. SUSSMAN
6841 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 38187
Attorney tor Personal
Representative: .._
WILLIAM C. SUSSMAN, FJV
100 N. Blscayne Blvd..
No. 1810
Miami. FL 88182
Telephone: 874-0888
U189 August B.l**"


iblic Notice
notice of action
(no property)
| the circuit court of
he eleventh judicial
, circuitin andfor
Lade county, Florida
family division
CsseNo.31-1451*
RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ROME SIMON, HUSBAND
IrNICE SIMON, WIFE
|7bERNICE SIMON
Realdence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
|0U ARE NOTIFIED that
"action for dissolution of
irrlage has been filed
Ln.ii you and you are
|ulrert to serve a copy of
r written defenses, If any, to
Bruce N. Crown, Esq.,
I N.W. 7th Ave.. Suite 206,
til, Florida 38140, on or
(ore August IS, 1988 and file
i original with the Clerk of
I Court either before service
Petitioner's attorney or
{mediately thereafter;
erwlse a default will be
ered against you for the
lief demanded In the
Jntlon.
|TED: July 12, 1983.
I RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: DC. BRYANT
as Deputy Clerk
July IB, S3.39:
August 6,1988
NOTICE UNDER
I FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
CN that the undersigned,
lairing to engage in business
fcder the fictitious name West
ile Professional Center at
680 West Dixie Highway. N.
Unml Beach. FL. 88180 in
nds to register said name
|th the Clerk of the Circuit
urt of Dade County, Florida.
Albert Sine
July 15. 33.39
Augusts, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORIDA
CIVIL FAMILY
DEPARTMENT
CASE NO. 81 24213
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ENID NOVBLO,
Petltloner-Wlfe,
and
ALEJANDRO NOVEL,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: ALEJANDRO NOVELO
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an Action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It to Bruce Lamchlck. LAM-
CHICK. OLUCKSMAN. A
JOHNSTON. Petitioner's
Attorneys, whose addreaa Is:
10861 North Kendall Drive.
Suite 317, Miami. Florida 88178.
on or before August 13, 1983,
and file the original with the
Clerk of this Court either
before service on Petitioner's
Attorneys or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on July 11,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: M.J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
11099 July 18,33. 39;
Augusts. 1983
RIVATE FOUNDATION
REPORT
Annual report of the
Ivate foundation. The Selma
nechter Foundation, Inc.,
Ijulred to be filed under
ction 8066, Internal Revenue
de. Is available for public
fepectlon at Its principal of
le. 2000 So. Dixie Hwy Suite
Miami. Fla. 88188, for
i'<'tion on business days
itween 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. by
ky citizen upon request within
i days after the date of this
fcbllcatlon.
J. Jerry Schechter
Principal Manager
ligust 6,1983 11183
In the circuit court of
the eleventh judicial
circuit in and for
[da de county, florida
Case No. 13 2*1 3
FAMILY DIVISION
n re the marriage of
AJMUELA. BURK
I Petitioner
ESSIE F. BURK
| Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
): TRESSIE F. BURK
13321 Amarlllo Drive
Westminister.
California 92683
I YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
action for dissolution of
parrlage has been filed
gainst you and you are re-
ulred to serve a copy of your
frltten defenses to It on I. J.
IRAFF, ESQ. attorney for,
fetltloner, whose address Is
N.E. 167 St., Suite 101B.
1MB. Florida 33162, on or be
or.- August 28, 1988, and file
he original with the clerk of
his court; otherwise a default
nil be entered against you.
Dated July 36,1988
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By C. P. Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
July 39;
August S, 13,19,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 81-2*17*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ERNESTO RAMIREZ.
Husband,
and
PILAR RAMIREZ.
Wife,
t TO: PILAR RAMIREZ
1013 Perm St., Apt. 2
Reading.
Pennsylvania 19801
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED THAT an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
it on ALBERT L. CARRI-
CARTE P.A., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2491 N.W. 7th St.. Miami,
Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
August 36, 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 36th day of July,
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By LOLA H. CURRIER
A&Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
P.A.
2491 N.W. 7th St.
Miami. Florida 33126
11184 July 39;
Augusts. 12.19,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
pVsMI that the undersigned,
leslrlng to engage in business
Under the fictitious name of
LATT TO MEAT YOU at 1B60
*-E. 168th Street. In the City of
North Miami Beach, Florida,
ntends to register the said
"Mns with the Clerk of the
*cult Court of Dade County,
lorlda.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
at day of July. 1981.
LETS EAT, INC.
Jttorney for Applicant:
WanSakowlu:
Dsdeland Towers North, Suite
a South Dadeland Boulevard
fnl, Florida SUM
July IB, 33, 20;
August 6,1983
>*...>.,, (.*>. w .
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: S3 25110
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CEASAR ADOLFO
PANCORVO.
HUSBAND
and
MARY M PANCORVO.
WIFE
TO: MARY M. PANCORVO
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
"written defenses, if any, to it on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq., 18490
N.W. 7th Avenue, Suite SOB.
Miami. Florida ttlM on or be-
fore August 19.1983 and We the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition.
DATED: July 18. ISM
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: C. P. Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
11118 July 33, 29;
August 6,13, 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
! INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.SS-3MS4
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE:
ZAMBRANO NEGRON. ENA
and
NEGRON. EDGAR
TO: EDGAR NEGRON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on M. CRISTTNA DEI,-
VALLE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
I960 3.W. 37 AVENUE. MIAMI.
FLORIDA 33148, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August 19. 19M: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 16th day of July,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DEL VALLE NETSCH
1960 S.W. 37 Avenue
Miami. Florida 8S14B
Attorney for Petitioner
11110 July 23.39;
August B. 13,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name King
Fish Market No. 1, at 3049 NW
37 Ave., Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Lauren Uno Oonsalss
11188 July 29
Augusts. 13,19. 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY CIVIL
DIVISION
CASE NO. 11-24*22
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELTER FRANCISCO S ALA DO,
Petitioner-Husband
and
ANTONIA OILDA SAL ADO,
Respondent-Wife
TO: ANTONIA QrLDA
SALADO
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an Action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It to
Bruce Lamchlck. LAMCHICK.
OLUCKSMAN A JOHNSTON,
Petitioner's Attorneys, 10661
No. Kendall Drive, Suite 217.
Miami. Florida 33176, on or be-
fore August 19, ISM, and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's Attorneys or
Immediately thereafter, other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on the 18th
day of July. IMS.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: V.Barkley
Deputy Clerk
11104 July 33. 29;
Augusts. 13.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
MI AMI-INTERNATIONAL
INSURANCE at 909 Brlckell
Plaza, Suite 720. Miami, FL
33181, intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
MIAMI-INTERNATIONAL
INSURANCE, INC.
By: CAYETANO ALFONSO.
President
Attorney for Applicant:
DEL-VALLE A NETSCH. P.A.
I960 S.W 27 Avenue,
Miami, Florida88148
11146 August B, 12.19. 26.19M
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO: 83 24703
NOTICE OF ACTION
In Re:
Petition of Beverly Ann
Rivera for Change of Name
TO: VICTOR MANUEL
RIVERA
37-33 College Point
Blvd.
Flushing,
New York 118M
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
petition for change of name of
Beverly Ann Rivera to Beverly
Ann Betancor has been filed
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written da fens sa.
if any, to it on Robert P. Bar-
nett, BARNETT A KRESS,
P.A.. Attorneys for Petitioner,
whose addreaa la: IS West
Flatter Street. Suite 406.
Miami. FL 33180, on or before
August 19. ISM; and file the
.original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorneys or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
' wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
DATED on July IS, 1983.
Richard P Brinksr
As Clerk of the Court
BY:M.J.Hartnett
As Deputy Cterk
11103 July 33,39;
Augusts, IS,ISM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.S3-MSMFC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
DULCE RODRIGUEZ,
Wife,
and
JOSE RODRIGUEZ.
Husband.
TO: JOSE RODRIGUEZ
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
it on ALBERT L. CARRI-
CARTE. P.A.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
2491 N.W. 7th St., Miami.
Florida 33126, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 2. IMS; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 37th day of July,
19M.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
P.A.
3491 N.W. 7th St.
Miami, Florida 88128
11144 August B, 12, 19, 38.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name MI-
CHAEL LEWIS WHOLESALE
MEAT at 8768 N.W. 80th Street.
Miami. Dade County, Florida
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
MICHAEL LEWIS
17022 N.E. 6th Avenue
Miami, Florida S8162
HOW July 16,22. 29;
August 6, 1988
1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Dora-
sol Corp. at 6161 S. W. 4th
Street, Miami, Florida Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Peter Crua
ErsaCrux
U137 July 39;
Augusts. 13.19, 1983
1 -!' ..
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case No. 12-21*15
IN RE The Marriage of
VERONIQUE FORBES.
Petitioner Wife,
and
ELMORE FORBE8.
Respondent-Husband.
To: ELMORE FORBES
Residence unknown.
I shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attor-
ney, 613 N.W. 13th Avenue.
Miami. Florida. 38186. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before August 13. 1SSS, other-
wise a default will be entered.
July 7, 1968
RICHARD .BRINKER
Clerk
By: Lola H. Currier
Deputy Clerk
11093 July IB. 22,29;
Augusts, 19M
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 81 25253
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
AI. I) DAK RING,
Petitioner-Husband
and
SHERYLLYNN DARRING.
Respondent-Wife
TO: SHERYLLYNN
TO: SHERYLLYNN
DARRING
216 Luther Circle
Jefferson vllle,
Ind. 47170
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you. You are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to the action
on petitioner's attorney whose
name and address Is:
H LAWRENCE ASHER,
ESQ., 16211 Northeast 13th
Ave.. North Miami Beach. FL.
88163
on or before the 19 day of Au-
gust, 1983 and file the original
with the Clerk of this Court,
either before service on peti-
tioner's attorney or immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
judgment will be entered to the
relief demanded in the petition.
This notice shall be published
once each weak for four con-
secutive weeks In the Jewish
Florldlan.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of said court at Miami. Florida,
on this IS day of July. ISM
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By:C. P. Oopetand
Deputy Cterk
111114 July 33,39;
I Augusts. 13.1961
NOTICE UNDER
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN .
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
ClVil ACttOn NO. 81-241 *s
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOE DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
OLVEIN FUNDORA.
Petitioner,
and
MIGD ALIA SIGLER.
Respondent.
TO: MIGD ALIA SIGLER
Mayor No. 12
Entre Central y
Fernanda
Reparto La Fernanda
San Miguel De Padron
Habana, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
Melvln J. Asher, Esq., attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
i860 S.W. 8th Street. Suite 306.
Miami, Florida 88186, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore August 36. 1988; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 38 day of July,
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11189 July 29;
Augusts. 13.19,1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
i NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engsge in business
under the fictitious name
Sablna's Ball Bonds at 1481
N.W. 14 Street. Miami. Fla.
33128. intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
, Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Junior's Ball Bonds. Inc.
' By: Sabtna VanTuyn
' Frederick C. Sake, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
11180 July 29;
August B. 12.19,1968
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-25922
I ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION .
OFMARRIAOE
I IN RE: The Marriage of
RUPERT GEORGE BAXTER.
Petitioner,
and
HAZEL BAXTER,
Respondent.
TO: HAZELBAXTER
2A Langaton Road
Kingston 3, Jamaica
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
lit on GEOFFREY W. PINES.
Esq.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 3839 Bird
Avenue, Miami, FL 881M, and
file the original with the clerk
, of the above styled court on or
before August M, 1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each weak for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 22nd day of
July, ISM.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: V.BARKLEY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Geoffrey W. Pines. Esq.
Suite 4. MM Bird Ave..
Coconut Grove, FL 881M
11138 July 29;
Augusts, 13, 19,1968
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 81 57*1
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEE GROSSMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE: YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of
LEE GROSSMAN, deceased.
File Number 83-5761, Is pending
in the Circuit Court tor Dade
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 78
West Flsgler Street, Miami.
' The personal representatives
of the estate are Frank Becker-
man 3130 Grand Concourse,
Bronx, N.Y., and Maurice
Gottlieb 480 Second Ave.. New
York. The name and address of
the personal representatives'
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
I WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THI8 NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent'a will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: July M. ISM.
Prank Beckerman
Maurice Gottlieb
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
LEE GROSSMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES:
Richard I. Kroop
(Fla. Bar No. 138036)
Kwttney, Kroop A
Schelnberg, P A
420 Lincoln Road.
Suite 5 U
Miami Beach. Florida 83189
Telephone: (SM) 686-7878
11188 July 39;
Augusts. ISM
I
*
.
-......


,
--x.
-
Public Notice}
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR \
DADS COUNTY, F LOR IDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FlltNumbtrH-MM
Division 62
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LOUIS GOODMAN
Deceased
NOTICE
Or ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of th estate of LOUIS
GOODMAN, deceased. File
Number 83-68M, la pending In
the Circuit Court for Dad.
County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
la 78 West Flakier Street.
Miami. Florida. The personal
representative of the estate la
Rose Goodman, whose address
la 100 Lincoln Road. Apt. 1143,
Miami Beach. Florida. The
name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persona having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of:
any claim or demand they may'
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim U contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated If the claim Is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to nail one copy to each
persona representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
bssn mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or ;
Jurisdiction of t:>* court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the Brat publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: July SB. lMa.
ROSE GOODMAN
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
LOUIS GOODMAN
Deceased.
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
Richard I Kroop
(Fla. Bar No. 138028)
Kwltney, Kroop Schelnberg.
PJL
430 Lincoln Road, Suite 613
Miami Beach. Florida S3138
Telephone. (SOS) BSS-7576
11134 July3S.AufUStB.ua
NOTICS OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVC SERVICE
(NOPUOPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELE VEMTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AMD FOR DADS COUNTY
Civil ActhM He. 81-241M
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE he Marriage of
CHARI SM KRAMER.
PeUtii IkW,
and
DOROTI YM.KRAMER.
Respo: tent.
TO: DOI.OTHY M. KRAMER
800 Forest Avenue
Apt. No. 4
Dayton. Ohio 48408
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Suite 308. 1880 S.W.
8th Street. Miami. Florida
MISS, and me the original with
the dark of the above styled
court on or before August M,
18SS; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded b) the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court ar Miami.
Florida on Una M day of July.
IN THE ClRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FWoNfrniMT
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LILY ROSE NORTON
Deceased
notice or
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES
T ATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of LILY ROSE
NORTON, deceased, File
Number 83-8097, is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which Is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 83180. The personal
representative of the estate Is
JOY N. MC GARRY, whose ad-
dress Is coo Silver and Silver
160 S. E. 2nd Avenue, 8-1338,
Miami. FL 88181. The name
and address of the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when it
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quail
ncauons of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the Brat publication '
of this Notice of Admirdatxa
uon: July 28. 1983.
Joy N. Mc Garry
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
LILY ROSE NORTON
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
MAX R. SILVER. ESQ.
SILVER A SILVER
150 S.E. 2nd Avenue,
Suite 1836
Miami. Florida MUl
Telephone: 374-4888
tJJJf July 28;
August 6. IMS
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
DAM COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 81-17854
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARIE L. WILLIAMS
Petitioner-Wife
and
BOBBY M. WILLIAMS
Respondent-Husband
To: BOBBY M. WILLIAMS,
Residence unknown,
shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attor-
ney, 813 N.W. 13th Avenue.
Miami, Florida, 3313a, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before August IB. IMS. other-
wise a default will be entered.
July 18. IBM.
RICHARD BRINKER
Circuit and County Courts
By: DC. Bryant
Deputy Clark
11106 July 33.38:
August 6,13, IBM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE I
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THR CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADR COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-15432
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE The Marriage Of
EMMANUEL GHEU8NEAUD
Petitioner-Husband.
and
MARIE ROSE LAURE
GHEUSNEAUD.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: Marie Roes Laure
Oheusneaud. Respondent
8M Montgomery Street,
Apt. 6A
Brooklyn,
New York 11336
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
Brent E. Routman, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
181 N.E. 82 Street, Second
Floor, Miami. FL HIM. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before August 36. 1B8S:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this IB day of July,
1B83.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By V. Berkley
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Law Offices of
Lloyd M. Routman
At tii Brent E. Routman. Esq.
181 N.E. 82Street
Miami. FL 8S1S8
Telephone: (806) 787-6800
Attorney for Petitioner
11119 July 23, 28:
August 6.13. IBM
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By LolaH. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
11140 July 38;
Augusts, 12. 18. 1888
NOTICR UNDRR
FICTITIOUS NAMR LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
- GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
PRIME BURGER a-k-a
DANNY'S PLACE, at 300 So.
Miami Avenue. Store No. 10.
Miami. PL SSlao, Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of)
Dade County. Florida.
NANTERCORP.
a Fla. Corp.
By: IneaSeauso, Free.
200 S. Miami Ave., No. 10
Miami, FL38130
11136 July28;
August 6, 12, IB, 1888
NOTICR OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTOR SRRVICE
(NOFROFRRTY)
INYHR CIRCUIYCOURTOF
TMR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADR COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-2*343
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE : The Marriage of
MERCEDES GOMEZ
DE ROBALES.
Petitioner-Wife
and
FRANCISCO GUILLERMO
ROSALE8.
Reapondent-Husband.
TO: FRANCISCO
GUILLERMO ROSALES
De Armando Outdo
3 cuadras al lago
y dosalsur
Barrio San Luis
Managua, Nicaragua
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Diaao-
lution of Marriage has been
Olad against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
ATTORNEY EDWARD
BEROHOLM. JR., attorney for
Petittoner. whose address la
1341 S.W. First Street. Miami,
. Florida 33186, and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
tyled court on or before Au-
gust IB. IBM: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this IB day of July
IBM. *
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByC P. Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
EDWARD BEROHOLM. JR.
Attorney for Petitioner-Wife
1841 S.W. First Street
Miami. Florida SUM
Telephone: (808)641-7840
11130 July 22. 38;
August 6.13. IBM
NOTICR UNDRR
FICTITIOUS NAMR LAW
The undersigned, under oath.
says; It la the Intention of the
undersigned to engage In a
business enterprise under the
fictitious name of FLAGLER
PONCE PLAZA located at 1821
N.E. 188th Street In the city of
North Miami Beach, Dade
County. Florida.
Those Interested Is said en-
terprise, and the extent of the
Interest of each Use follows:
Interest
HAROLD H KASSIN
1801 N.E. 188th Street
North Miami Beach. Florida
11116 July 22. 28;
Augusts. 13, IBM

T-
(
IN THR CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROSATE DIVISION
F*l# NvrHbtr S3-S99V
Division 82
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ID ELL M COHEN
Deceased
NOTICE or
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of I dell M. Cohen,
deceased, File Number H-BMB.
Is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which la 78 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida. The personal
representative of the estate Is
Jules Cohen, whose address Is
3311 NE 301 St., No. Miami
Beach. FL. The name and ad-
dress of the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE. to flle
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
clarm to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FTRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to flle any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quail
?cations at the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL C3.AIMB. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date Of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion : Jury M. IBM.
JULESCOHEN
Aa Personal Repreasntative
of the Estate of
IdeU M.Cohen
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSON AL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Terrence S. Schwarts. Esq.
Cohan. Reed. Ivans A Schwarti
18400 NW Snd Avenue.
Suite 300
Miami. Florida MlSS-eOTB
Telephone: (SOB) 840-8600
11132 July 29;
__________________August 6. IBM
noticr o# Act toN
CONSTRUCTIVE SRRVICR
(NO FROFRRTY)
IN THR CIRCUIT COURT OF
TNR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADR COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.B3-2MV3
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CAROLINE WARE.
Petitioner-Wife
and
WILLIE WARE.
Respondent-Husband
TO: WILLIE WARE
(Residence Unknown)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
it on Alan Rosenthal, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address la
8080 BUcayne Boulevard. Suite
800, Miami, Florida M137. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before August SB. 1888;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 31st day of July,
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC.P OOPELAND
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
Alan Rosenthal
3080 Blscayne Blvd., Suite 800
Miami, FLM187
U1M Juryt>.
-------------Au1urtS|t.,| lgti
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SRRVICR
(NOFROFRRTY)
IN TNR CIRCUIT COURT OF
THR ELE VENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADR COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-24784
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE The Marriage of:
GRACIELA DIAZ de
ROMERO
Petitioner. Wife,
and
HUGO ENRIQUE ROMERO
Respondent-Husband
TO: HUGO ENRIQUE
ROMERO
Traversal 16. No. issso
Interior 60
Bogota, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
fled that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on LEOPOLDO A. OCHOA,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is Penthouse One, 1M
South Miami Avenue. Miami,
Florida 33130. and flle the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
August IB. IBM; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 13th day of July
1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
LEOPOLDO A. OCHOA. Esq.
Penthouse One
186 South Miami Avenue
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (806)874-1382
11106 July 23. 28;
August 6.13. IBM
NOTICE UNOIt
yy** that m. ,5
seBHSR to BsBMBstfi
** aXoY
Uberty Building mu,m
* d-b-a Libert, -
??*atot Service,
8W. mm Pl4c
Florida M1T6. S
gljllll said BABM-a? '
Clerk of the 6*Z fii
Dade County, FlcrX^'
Alberto Henumde,
Owner
** as.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NesttLM
NOTICE is HtB* I
OTVEN that the un&
desiring to engage In b3aZI
under the flcdtlou.nam.TJ'l
Jewelry at H N.E. lit ShLI
Miami. Fla. SS131. w**!
register said name wttrfaM
Clerk of the Circuit Courts!
Dade County. Florida.
R R Refinery. Inc.,
a Florida corporation
"" Julya.|
_____________August 8, ;t
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAB
NOTICE IS HEREBll
GIVEN that the undernpt|
desiring to engage In busreal
under the fictitious run,I
Quality Plus Window ClesnnJ
at 16SM W. Dixie HlghtJ|
North Miami Beach. Florka.1
intends to register said runtl
with the Clerk of the Clrcisl
Court of Dade County, Flortia |
Darryl Felnman
Owner
11142 Julyftl
Augusts, 12,11.1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOFROFRRTY)
IN THR CIRCUIT COURT OF
THR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADR COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13 25545
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
FABIAN LIRA
Petitioner
and
ADELAIDA LIRA
Respondent
TO: ADELAIDA URA
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2760 N. E. 193rd Street, Miami,
Florida 33180, and flle the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Au-
gust M. IBM: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on this 30 day of July,
IBM.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM. J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAY FRIEDMAN. ESQ.
Miami. Florida
Telephone: 948-8828
Attorney for Petitioner
11132 July 22.28:
August 8, 13.1883
NOTICR UNDRR
- FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name TITO
TRANSMISSIONS at 3074 N.W.
138th Street, Miami. Florida,
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
SILVIO GONZALEZ
STANLEY E. GOODMAN
Attorney for
TITO TRANSMISSIONS
11141 JuJygg.
August 6. 12. IB. 1883
NOTICR UNDRR
FICTITIOUS NAMR LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
L.M.G. REALTY at 1061 W 38
St.. Hlaleah. Fla. 88013, intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
FRANCISCO GARCIA
U108 July 16. 23, 28:
August 6, IBM
IN THE CIRCUIT C0Ut1
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FL0R.lu|
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 828547
Divisions]
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELIZABETH A. McMAHaJ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS RAVI
CLAIMS OR DEMAND
AGAINST THE ABOVE
TATE AND ALL
PERSONS INTERE!
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
FIED that the admU
of the estate of EU2__
A McMAHON. deceased, ..
Number 83-8M7 (02 Ms pendaJ
in the Circuit Court for Datf
County, Florida, Probate 1
slon. the address of which I
Dade County Courthousi,
West Flagler Street. M
Florida 88180. The par
representative of the estate a I
PAUL McMAHON. whoa all
dress Is 836 Medina Averui [
Coral Gables. Florida SJUtl
The name and address of ds|
personal representstlvs'i i:[
tomey are set forth below
All persons having clalmi
demands against the eststti
required, WITHIN THRU
MONTHS FROM THE DAT!
OF THE FIRST PUHJClj
TION OF THIS NOTICE, lo
with the clerk of the stoe
court a written sUtemsnt i
any claim or demand they msj
have. Each claim must bt 8
writing and must IndlcaU
basis for the claim, the ma*
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and Bt
amount claimed If the claims
not yet due, the date what I!
will become due shall
stated. If the claim Is co
gent or unliquidated,
nature of the uncertainty mil
be stated If the claim U *
cured, the security shall bed*
scribed. The claimant. RR
deliver sufficient copies of
claim to the clerk to enable
clerk to mall one copy to esca
personal representative.
All persons Interested In W
estate to whom a copy of 1M
Notice of Administration W
been mailed are required
WITHIN THREE M0NTW
FROM THE DATE OF THS
FIRST PUBLICATION Of
THIS NOTICE, to file any *
Jections they may nav* *"
challenges the validity of w
decedent's will, ui* Jf*
flcations of the personal rep
resentatlve. or the venus
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS HOT"
FILED WILL BE FOREVW
BARRED.
Date of the flrst pubUotfM
of this Notice of AdmlnHtr*
Don: July M, IBM
PaulMcMahon
As Personal Repreaentatirt
of the Estate of
ELIZABETH A. McMAHON
Dscsetsd
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
PAUL R. STANTON
c-o Welltsch and Metsgsr, P.*.
Suite 300-E
161 AlmertaAve
Coral Gables, Fla. Ml*
Tstophons: (BOB) 446-7864
Augui>
'---
. ...w~. ..>-


Burstein, Histadrut Director, Fosses
Manuel Burstein. a director of
he South Florida Histadrut
nuncil and resident of Miami for
Le past 37 years, died July 29.
fe was 79 years old.
Formerly of Brooklyn, N.Y.,
|r. Burstein served as a member
the Chain) Weitzman Branch
[ Farband.
| Survivors include a son and
tughter-in-Iaw, Oscar and
leanor Burstein of Miami; a sis-
r, Rebecca Bromberg of Brook-
eight grandchildren, and
jht great-grandchildren.
I Funeral services were held
fcvY. Henry. Golden Beach, July ,
Huhln Zllbert
tiTER. Eva. Miami Beach. Rubin
albert.
IMO. Sylvia. North Miami Beach.
kuly 31. Gordon.
&RTZ, Sara. 87, Miami Beach, Aug. 2.
Mverstde.
(VINE. Edgar N.. 70. North Miami
Beach. Aug. 1. Star of David
side.
PublicNotice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. IJ-JM41
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE:
THE ADOPTION OF
A MINOR
TO: JOSE S. DIBLA8I, SR.
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Adop-
tion has been filed and com-
menced In this Court and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on M. CRISTTNA DEL-
VALLE. ESQ.. attorney for Pe-
titioner, whose address is 85
Grand Canal Drive. Third
Floor. Miami, Florida 88144.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 9.1983:
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
This noUce shall be published
onre each week for four con-
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FU)RIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 3 day of August,
ipr:!
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
11162 Augusts. 12;
19, 26. 1983
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
I 7610 Norlheast 2id AvenuP
Phone 759-1669
Sunday at Gordon Funeral
Home. Interment followed at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery.
ERTAO
Rebecca, BO years old, passed away
July 28. Survived by her loving chUdren,
her son, Leo Ertag; and her daughters.
Rose Peck, ray Goldman and Viola
Holts. She la also mourned by her seven
grandchildren, Maxlne Schwartz. Mer
Htt Peck. EUen Friedman, Andrea
Graver, Richard Ertag. Nancy Green-
berg, and Philip Diamond and by her 12
great-grandchildren. Services were
held July 81 at Riverside Chapel with In-
terment following In Lakeside Memori-
al. Riverside Chapel In charge of ar-
rangements.
KAHN
Evelyn, 81, of Miami, passed away July
80. Came to Florida In 1947 from Brook-
lyn. She waa the beloved wife of the
later Charles Kahn, and la survived by
her devoted daughter, Jeannette, and
son-in-law, Joseph Tanenbaum of
Miami. Dear sister of Max H. KJelman
of Miami Beach; loving grandmother of
David and Harold; cherished great-
grandmother of Stephen Cralg. Services
were held July 81 at Riverside Chapel,
followed by Interment In Mt. Nebo Cem-
etery. Contributions In her memory
may be made to Greater Miami Jewish
Federation or Hospice, Inc. Arrange-
ments by Riverside.
LEBOW
Rose, 88, of Miami Beach, passed away
July 28. Survived by son, Irving (Doc)
Lebow: daughter. Blanche Flnsllver;
brother, Jim Cohen; sisters. Anita Lei
berman and Mary Sallter; seven grand-
children, and nine great-grandchildren.
Mrs. Lebow wss a member of Temple
Emanu-El of Fort Lauderdale and past
president of B'nal B'rlth Chapter and
Council. She was also a member of Had-
assah, ORT. and very acUve In Jewish
life. Services were held July 31 with In-
terment In Beth El Memorial Gardens.
In lieu of flowers, donaUons to Temple
Emanu-El Scholarship Fund. Arrange-
ments by Riverside.
Obituaries
ELLER
Jennie, 83, a resident of South Florida
for the past 27 years, passed away July
80. She waa a life member of Hsdasssh,
a supporter of Douglas Gardens Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged,
and active In Jewish communal life In
Havana, Cuba for over 20 years. In New
York, Hollywood, and Miami Beach.
She Is survived by a son, Jacob BeUer
and wife. Maxlne of Brooklyn; a daugh-
ter. Natalie Lyons and husband, Arthur
of Coral Gables; a sister, Cells Falls of
Jacksonville: five grandchildren, and
six great-grandchildren Funeral serv-
ices were held Aug. 1 at Gordon Funeral
Home.
LEBOVICI
Rae. 90. of Coral Gables, a resident of
Florida for SO years, and formerly of
New Jersey, died July 80. Survivors In-
clude a daughter, Winifred Brown of
Coral Gables; son, Herbert Lebovtc! of
N.J.; four grandchildren, and three
great-grandchildren Riverside Chapel
was In charge of arrangements
WERNICK
Irving, 84, a resident of Miami Beach
for 19 years, formerly of New York,
passed away July 28. He la survived by
daughters. Judith Wernlck and Arlen*
Glllen; sister. Lillian Leltman; and two
grandchildren Mr. Wernlck was In the
motion picture business until his
retirement In 196B. He was a film
distributor, film exhibitor, and owner of
many theatres, and was also Involved In
other aspects of the film Industry. After
moving to this community In 1986, he
founded Motion Picture Pioneers of
Miami and served aa Its first president
and an acUve member of the execuUve
board until his death He was also an
adviser on many committees promoting
film business In Miami. Funeral ser-
vices were held July 28 at Levltt-
Welnsteln.
Marie, 84, July
Mitchell. 90. July
28
26
UCHTBLAU.
Gordon.
ROSENFELD,
Riverside.
KAZER, Ben, 71. July 27. Riverside
KEATING, Pearl, 86. July 27. Rubin
Zllbert
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL #
& Monument Co.
Murray Rubin, F.D. Leonard Zllbert, Founder
Miami Beach
Coral Qablas
South Miami-Kendall
DADE
538-6371
Four Locations Serving
The Jewish Community
The Only
Guaranteed
Pr*> Arrangements
with
No. Miami Beach-Hallandale
BROWARD
456-4011
No Money In Advance
Friday, August 5,1983. The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Cassel, Savings andLoan Founder, Dies
Phyllis Hyman Cassel .of
Miami Beach, founder and former
director of the International
Savings and Loan Association,
died July 30. She was 54 years
old.
A resident of this community
for 33 years, Mrs. Cassel was
legal administrator for Cassel
and Cassel P.A. and also the
owner of a boutique. She was the
daughter-in-law of Mana-Zucca.
Survivors include a husband,
Marwin; sons, William S., Brad-
ley W., James S., and Thomas
I).; four grandchildren; and
mother, Lena Hyman.
Funeral services were held July
31 at Riverside Chapel.
ALTSCHULER, Ray.
SCHWARTZ. Hat tie, 71. Miami Beach,
Auf. 1. Riverside.
BERKELHAaCMER. Harry C Miami
Beach, July 1 Riverside.
KATE. Randy. Aug. 4.
FEINERMAN. Hyman. July SI.
KAUFMAN. Joseph. 89. Miami. Aug. I.
Gordon.
SM
Secured Family Protection
Pre-Arranged Funeral Plan
QORDON
TWsfCML HOJVie
Serving The Jewish Community Since 1938
710 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33130
Phone: 858-5566
James B. Gordon, F.D.
Ike Gordon, F.D.
Harvey Gordon, F.D.
Allan Brestin, F.D.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
18840 West Dixie Hwy.
Reprrscnii'd by S Levitt, F D
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76ih Rd.. Fores! Hills NY.
THE MENORAH
PRE-NEED PLAN
Satisfaction.
Thoughtfulness.
Value.
Your choices set at
today's prices and in t he I
Jewish tradition.
And now vou can receive a FKEE Permanent ^^^^SS^
EMERGENCY WALLET CARD with your personal medi
cal information a gift to you from Menorah Chapels
=S5&-.......
sass IvJsnr____
astfTtC
"mm. ""^^unZi^*"*1**"
",.::;::;":.........2S55ll,fc*
*'v,n *"*.....: "........
I
I WOULD LI KE TO RECEIVE MY FREE EMERGENCY
WALLET CARD. PLEASE SEND ME INFORMATION
ABOUT THE PRE-NEED PLAN.
Mail Coupon to: Menorah Chapels. 6800 W. Oakland Park Blvd..
Ft. Lauderdale. Fl. 33313 Attn: Pre-Need Plan Director
Namw
Address__________________________________________________________
City________________________________________________________________
State____________________________________
-Zip-
Telephone .
rMeno&hjupi
vienomn \m\
CljapelSOO
In Dade, 945-3939. in Broward, 742-6000.
Cemetery and chapels in North Miami Beach, Fort Lauderdale.
Margate, Deerfield Beach & West Palm Beach
JF


Page I&-6 The Jewish Floridin">riday; August 5,1963
Tr
"
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"Thou shalt set the bleating upon mount Gerizim, and the
curse upon mount E bed"
fDeut. 11.291
REEH
RE'EH "Behold, I set before you this day a blessing and a
curse: the blessing, if ye shall hearken unto the commandments
of the Lord your God, which I command you this day; and the
curse, if ye shall not hearken" (Deuteronomy 11.26). When the
Israelites enter Canaan, six tribes are to stand upon Mount
Gerizim and bless all those who will keep God's commandments,
and six tribes are to stand on Mount Ebal and curse all those
who will disobey God's commandments. Sacrifices are to be
offered only in the place that God shall choose. He who wishes to
offer s meat sacrifice which he may eat, and lives too far from
the proper place of offering may slaughter the offering in his own
house, but it will not be considered a sacrifice. He must be
careful not to consume any of the blood. Those who incite others
to idolatrous acts are to be exterminated. The portion goes on to
state the rules defining purity and impurity in regard to
animals, fish and fowl the bask ritual dietary laws. The
portion also contains the rules regarding tithes, money
moratoria: a prohibition on interest, and regulations regarding
the Hebrew slave, the first-born of animals, and the three
pilgrim festivals.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted snd
based upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamlr, $15, published by ShengoM. The volume Is avail
able at 75 Maiden Lane, New York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang Is
president of the society distributing the volume.)
American Red Magen David for Israel, the American fun-
draising arm of Magen David Adorn, Israel's Red Cross
organization, recently honored its Isaiah Chapter of Jade
Winds in North Miami Beach for the group's "outstanding
service to Israel and Magen David Adorn." Shown above, from
left, are ARMDI National Director David Sidman, Nat
Pullman, vice president of Isaiah Chapter; Harry Rothman,
president; and Murray Kaye, district president. The chapter
helps to raise funds for and donate ambulances to Israel's
emergency medical services.
Benjamin Adler has joined the
professional staff of Temple
Zion to serve as its cantor, ac-
cording to an announcement
by Gerald Goldfarb, temple
president. Cantor Adler re-
ceived a masters degree in
music-voice from Florida
State University. He will be
officially welcomed by the
congregation Saturday, Sept.
3 at a special program.
JCC Fail Program Set
The Fall Program at Miami
Beach Jewish Community
Center, beginning Sunday, Sept.
11, will feature two-year-old
"Playgroup," Mommy and Me,
Workshop with Mr. Sam, gar-
dening, soccer, t-ball, drawing
and painting, and tennis and golf.
Adult classes will include
Hebrew, bridge, tennis,
calligraphy, lecture series, and
jazz-aerobics.
GalilMeeting Set
Fall meetings of the Galil
Chapter of American Mizrachi
Women will begin Monday, Aug.
29 at noon at Young Israel Syna-
gogue, North Miami Beach. A
new movie on Russia will high-
light the event, and Presidents
Ida Arluk and Ruth Goluboff will
preside.
The Lehrman Day School
of
Temple Emanu-El
:s<
fc.S
An Exceptional Prograi
for the
Exceptional Child!
The Early Childhood Department o> Temple Emanu-El
is pleased to announce a limited number of openings
in our new and expanded Individualized-Personalized
program for September of 1983.
MODERN CLASSROOMS
CONTEMPORARY
CURRICULUM AND
MATERIALS
INTRODUCTORY
COURSE IN COMPUTERS
FINE ARTS
JUDAICA
HEBREW
LANGUAGE
FIELD TRIPS
Supervised by
DR IRVING If HRMAN
TWO LOCATIONS:
727 77 STRUT and 1701 WASHINGTON AVI.
Maun: S:00 AM i. 3 30 f M iMiM awnajanmiN meaWW fctsj
Interviews conducted by Phillppa Feldman
538-2503 or 866-2771
For afternoon Religious School Information call Mark Boronek. Assistant
Director of Education. 538 2503 or 866-2771.
IRVING IfHRMAN. DHl
Mi
LAWRENCE M fcCHNIi
CKoHman fcxwd ol tdtMM
DM AMIR BARON
II.... to. d FdvtOfcOn
MARK BARANEK
At Dire. ii of f dV onvn
ROWtNA KOVIER
Pi i i k tpol
EARIYCHIIDHOODDEPI
PHIUPPA FELDMAN
MMfcsj
DD
Synagogue
Listing
CandMIng
Time: 7:44
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gartens Drhf*
North Miami Beach M7-. 435
Rabbi Slmchu Freedman
Center Ian Alpern Conservative
asses* eae ear**
jopm.atmcna
9mtmememmMmm
mm.mnfMi.TMtmm4kmi
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saluman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchinskv. Cantor
Sat-.a:*Samanda:ipm.
Oil SirvHn at S3P SBJ SrtS am
Late Friday giatdmj BjWSBM .
TEMPLE BETr' AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667-6667 Senior Rabbi
James L. Simon, Associate Rabbi
director of Hto tnotttuto tor Jrjmtoh Stttdtoo
1tOmtm Agency B JSMBS j III I jjj
cooOwct end
that You May Lhm."
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami's Ptonaar SarOrm Congrrajiroa
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N Kendall Dr.. 595 5055
Heskeil M. Bemet, Senior Rabbi
Donald P. Caarsnan, Assistant Rail,
Jacob Q. Bomsteln, Cantor
RacheUe Nelson. Student Cantor
Philip Goldln, Exec. Dlr
Friday. pm, KandiM.
RabM HaakaM Bamat ana AuMtai
nman: Joint tana...
Carder Jacob Bomttatrc Ukaj I
boo Somofi
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way: 2S2S S.W. 3rd Avanuo /'*
South Oada. 7S00 S.W 120th st.aai \t
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH WE
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
f
South Dada Chapal
Frt, | paw, Shabbal Eire Sardaaa.
Oneo Shabbat Fodowa.
Sal.. am. Shabbal Samoa* conducted by
Rabbi DavM H. Auarbaeh and Cantor William
W. Upaon Kldduah follow!.
BETH KODcSH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W 12 Ave
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858 6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Sat SaSamandSpm
Son.. S a* and S or..
Caily Mmyan Sarv.. 7 45 am and 5 pm
TEMPLE 0ETH MOoHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami, Fl 33181
891-5506 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorfinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Frt., a pm. Shabbat Ea
Sol., v ftin, Snooooi MOfiwtoj
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave M.B. Fl. 33139
Tel. 536-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Nlsslm Benyamlnl
Saturday momma, i
vtaa
TEMPLE BETH 5HOLO..J
Chase Ave. A 41st St. 536-7231
Dr. Leon ronish. Rabbi Liberal
Csitor David Conviser
Frt.. Hip., Sabbath Em I
St,Kt4Siw,seaiSinUn
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Or. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Saturday Momw
Mi i m el Un>
tiX
if
Fn.VIS.ndapm '\ ,
Sat.a30amandV15pm
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1TO1 WesNngton Avenue
Miami Beach
Or-Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler, Cantor
Friday Emn.no s^,
pm
ta*ae.laornm,Sarvl0,
Or. Lahmum -tSpmaehat |M|
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
S8sr*i**iii-*f
Cantor. Raboi Solomon Schin
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform I
Corel Gables 667-56571
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frt.. S pm. Smumm Worahlp SarncM.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
Denny Tadmore, Cantor
Frt.. 7:30 pm
Sal..*: 30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowilz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
(
Peay Hondng Sarrteaa I am.
Sabjceay aHiidraj Sendcea 9 am.
eiiialaSartoaa:30pm.
Saturday Emnma Sarvteai MS pn

TEMPLE NERTAMID
Conservative
7902 Carlyle Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz
Cantor Edward Klein
Dairy Mmyan alt am. SabbatnSarncaiii
:48 am. Sunday Mnyan n S 30
SHAARAY TEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENOALL
S.W. 154 Ave. and 75 SI
Rabbi Warren Kasztl
Modern Orthodox
362-3343 382-08*
Frl, 7 pm, Sabbath Ea Same*. .S.t.r30i
Sabbalh Sarrtoaa. Sat Mnrta 30 MmumijW
SurekmavDaaymormrio mtnyan. M.maa
TEMPLE SINAI 18601 NE 22
North Dede's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. KingOy. Rabbi 9329O10
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shuikes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Terl
Frt. 7:10 pm, Family WorarXp Sardos.
at, leJsie. wenm> "****
HalpiMt, Uaa and Dartd Saraai
niidaininmt n "
S4:11-:S
BETHYOSESEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
643 Merkflan Ave.
Dow Rozencwaig, Rabbi
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schlff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greeter Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone .576-4000
>Rabbjmcai^As>a^^
TEMPLE ZION Conservati*
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
.. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benjamin Adler, Cantor
aiYWra-Ta*"
'*1,f .esv
Summaraa
**-&*
',>X^=

SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
MyaXtea^r^oldWlahna, aiaeullm_*ffel"
FrankMn p. Kieetnr. rafamal praardai-i
a f
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park, 37
NW 82 Ave., Suite 210, Miami, Fl-
33186,592-4792. Rabbi Lewli C
Liftman, regional director


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