The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02838

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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
>*-
A Miami Rabbi Differs WithHisReform
Colleagues on Jewish Descent... Page 5-A
THE
56-Numbr25 Three Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, June 24,1983
Pmt mmum
V
BMnaocnn Price 50 Cants
from Auschwitz
o Warsaw
John He i sey, Quiet Man, Speaks Again
By ARTHUR MAGIDA
finght Baltimore Jewish Times
iipnni fcv Special Arrangement
|John Hersey is a quiet
i. In his writings, in his
son. there is a thought-
, cultivated stillness:
tile, disciplined, perme-
inmforting. There is
bombast, no rhetorical
[florid nourishes. One de-
Its a man privy to his
-mall voice." to a
et within that balances
s frenetic world without.
lid what Hersey hears, ap-
Imth despite the horrors and
Tories he has witnessed and
*n ;bout. give him a reas-
bg hope, a confidence that, in
lend, man will emerge, maybe
^invincible, but at least intact.
tall that he has done and.
*ivably, will do to his
pen and to his planet.
' IS THIS quiet, understated
etulness that is most impres-
about Hersey. a tall man
Use measured deliberateness
b his bearing, his speaking,
iwriting. His optimistic con-
less belies calamities. "I sec
boenix rising out of every dis-
he told me recently.
ere is some kind of tenacity
kt human beings have that
I to keep us going."
plhere we are going is be-
his ken. But man's stum-
past the 20th-century
alyptic pillars of Hitler and
i Bomb and somehow surviv-
| to meet another day must be
tome to a man who wrote
M both as a novelist and a
nalist.
As a correspondent on both
Ms for Time and Life. Hersey
Arens Says
Redistribution
Being Studied
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA)
Defense Minister Moshe
Arens said that Israel
might order a
"redistribution of our
forces" in Lebanon but
ruled out a unilateral with-
drawal of Israeli troops
from that country.
ADDRESSING A conference
on the world economy organized
by the United Mizrachi Banks,
Arens said a decision to carry out
a "redisposition" of forces would
have to be accompanied by
assurances that the Lebanese
Continued on Page ll-A
Ambassador Arens
Kimche Brings Assurance
About Troops in Lebanon
John Hersey
saw the carnage of World War
Two. He visited concentration
camps in Europe soon after their
liberation by the Russians. He
saw the "prostrate, silent stones"
of the leveled Warsaw Ghetto. As
a New Yorker writer, he visited
Hiroshima. and interviewed
stunned residents of that ruined
and once beautiful city.
"EVERY WRITER." Hersey
said, "is crying out for a better
world." That Hersey can envision
a better world after seeing some
of the hells of this one confirms
his reservoirs of optimism,
though he chooses to put his
writing ahead of his personality.
This satisfaction with speaking
through one's written words
rather than being a public figure
is uncommon these days. "A
Continued on Page 6-A
Jews. Blacks
Not Close Anymore
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The director gen-
eral of the Israel Foreign
Ministry, David Kimche,
arrived here reportedly to
explain to Administration
officials Israel's intentions
to redeploy its forces in
Lebanon.
While the Israel Embassy
would only confirm that Kimche
would arrive here, it would not
provide details of the purpose of
the Kimche visit. It has been re-
ported that he will explain to of-
ficials Israel's intentions to set
up more defensible lines in Leb-
anon in order to cut down on the
rising casualties suffered by the
Israel forces in Lebanon.
THE UNITED States has
reportedly been pressing Israel to
stand firm in its position in Leb-
anon, arguing that should it pull
back the areas evacuated would
be filled by Syrian forces and
Palestinian terrorists. A pull
back would also lessen any in-
centive for the Syrians to with-
draw from Lebanon.
The Lebanese Parliament by
an overwhelming majority of 65-2
with four abstentions, ratified the
Lebanon-Israel agreement for
troop withdrawal from Lebanon
and other matters relating to
security and normalization be-
tween the two nations. But the
agreement continues to remain
contingent on a Syrian with-
drawal from Lebanon.
Nevertheless, the Lebanese
Continued on Page 13-A
Differences are Transitory, Says Urban League Prexy
SAVANNAH, Ga.- In a
major address here, the
president of the National
Urban League has called
current differences between
blacks and Jews "trans-
itory rather than sharp
and permanent divisions."
John E. Jacob told a national
conference on African American
and Jewish American relations
sponsored by Savannah State
College that "new alliances be-
tween blacks and Jews" were
needed to help America "live up
to its promises to minorities and
to the downtrodden." He added:
"Black-Jewish relations are
not as close as they once were.
lust as clearly, they are not as
bad as many assume. What fric-
tions exist between blacks and
Jews can be traced to common
misinterpretations. They are
transitory differences rather than
Continued on Paje 14-A

greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement... See Special Insert



K
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Page 2-A Trie Jewish Flondian / Friday, Jane 24,1983
Felled Bu Stroke
At Aae 67
Deputy Premier Ehrlich Succumbs
JTA Syndicate
JERUSALEM
Funeral services were held
Tuesday for Deputy Pre-
mier Simcha Ehrlich, one of
the founders of the Likud
coalition and a leader of the
Liberal Party wing, who
died Sunday night at Bikur
Cholim Hospital. Ehrlich,
67, was hospitalized June
14 after suffering a stroke.
He was buried at the
Mahlat Yitzhak Cemetery
inGivatChaim.
Premier Menachem Begin
eulogized Ehrlich. his close friend
and political associate, at a
special memorial session of the
Cabinet Monday morning. He
also paid condolences to Ehrlich's
family and to the Liberal Party.
THE PARTY'S chairman. Yit-
zhak Modai. Energy Minister in
the Begin coalition, said the
people and government of Israel
" lost one of the most outstanding
and talented leaders.'
Another prominent Liberal.
Leon Dulzin. called Ehrlich's
death "a hard blow for the
Zionist movement and the State
of Israel.'
Ehrlich led the Liberal Party
for the past 10 years. He reached
the peak of his political career
when he became Finance Minis-
ter in the first Likud government
elected in 1977. But his economic
reforms failed in the fiercely
inflationary climate. He was
forced to resign, and was suc-
ceeded by Yigael Hurwitz.
AFTER LIKUD'S second
election victory in 1981. Ehrlich
was elevated to the office of
Deputy Prime Minister and was
also named M mister of Agri-
culture, the offices he held at the
time of his death.
Born in Bychowa. Poland in
1915. Ehrlich immigrated to Is-
rael in 1938.
Swiss Shocked By
Move From Paris
Palestinians to Hold Confab in Geneva
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTAi -
The Swiss government and
officials at the United Na-
tions were shocked here to
learn that tne scheduled
conference on Palestinian
rights which was forced I
canrei a meeting in Parta
this Au trust reportedly due
to h rencn pressure will tane
piace here in August
Tne conference, which was met
with nero opposition when it
was announced that Paris had
been chosen as the venue for the
August 16-24 meeting. was
abandoned bv the committee
reponsible lor planning the
conclave The date and location
ol tne conlerence had been fixed
n- a Lenerai Assembly resolu-
tion aaonted last December
BUT THE news ot the con
lerence to tan" niace at the
UNESCO huildinp precipitated
Mime reservation from tne bwiss
'overnmen anri irom polict
authorities mat Geneva was no.
capable <>t t>riviaini; tne securu>
necessary tor the conterenci
Johannesburg Elects
Jewish Deputy Mayor
JOHANNESBURG (JTAi
Eddy Magid. a city coun-
cilman tor many years, was
recently elected Deputy Mayor of
Johannesburg Magid joined
Betar. the Revisionist youth
movement when he moved to
Johannesburg in 1946.
He became one of the first
South African Jews to join the
battle for the new-bom Jewish
state, serving in Israel's first
tank squadron, which he said
consisted of only 20 men and two
tanks, both now mounted as
monuments in Tel Avi\
He returned to South Africa in
1950 and started a political
career. When the area in which he
lived was incorporated into
Greater Johannesburg in 1969, he
was elected to the City Council.
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Some 1.000 delegates are
expected to participate. Swiss
officials have also expressed
concern that hotel* in the city
will be unable to accommodate all
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Franceses Pometa. head of the
UN division at the Swiss Foreign
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1'ariiament earlier this weeK
Swiss Foreign Minister Pierre
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security problems ana the tact
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finding accommodations m
August, the height of the tourist
season here. Auber said nowever
that according to international
law the U.\ was free to hold any
conlerence and at any time they
choose at the UN premises in
Geneva.
Minister of Police Guy Fon
tanet was furious at the news
that the meeting would take
place here, saying that he had no
idea where he would find suffi-
cient security and police force in
August to replace all those who
were on vacation.
The objection to the meeting in
Paris had focused on security
problems as the French govern-
ment had made it clear that it
was fearful that such a conclave
might touch off anti-Semitic inci-
dents as well as attract terrorists
to Paris from all over the Middle
East.
MEANWHILE, at the UN the
mood was also gloomy. Many UN
officials feared that their summer
vacations might be interrupted
by the conference. And this
opinion was also expressed by the
UN press corps that are furious
they will also be forced to cancel
their plans for the customary
August vacation.
The Minister- of Police is
scheduled to call a press confer-
ence to expand on their, security
concerns and the Jewish com-
munity is also expected to file
protests.
In New York, the Israeli
mission to the United Nations
called the scheduled conference
an exercise in PLO pro-
paganda' which will not achieve
solving any problems of the
Palestinian people.
Satmar Rebbe in Israel
Surrounded by 200 Hasidim
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Satmar Rebbe. Rabbi
Moishe Teitelbaum, arrived in
Israel on his first visit since be
coming heed of the Hasidic
movement. He came to be pro-
claimed officially as the Rebbe of
the Satmar Hasidim. both in Is-
rael and abroad. He arrived with
an entourage of 200.
Among the group of an estim-
ated 20.000 followers who waited
for him near the Mandelbaum
gate were some who made,
aal tnp to Jerusalem to*!'
the event. He had been s^.
to bless a large group ofb-J
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frenzied by his presenoTC
not get out of his black I
sedan
Surrounded by a wall of
he and his entourage were I
Shabbos Square in the
Shearim quarter where he <
ally assumed his title
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Friday, June 24,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Pag 3-A
\nti-Zionist Jews
lash in Moscow
Were Zionists Nazi Collaborators?
LONDON (JTA) -
i Jewish members of the
ntly established Anti-
bnist Committee of the
irish Public" clashed at
committee's June 6
ss conference in Moscow
it was alleged,
other things, that
s desirous of leaving
Soviet Union have al-
dyleft.
clash, according to the
|itute of Jewish Affairs, the
ch arm of the World Jewish
ess. was between Samuel
I Yuri Kolesnikov and the
ct was not emigration but
I Zionist collaboration with
the Nazis during World War II.
ZIVS WAS questioned at the
press conference about "The
Class Essence of Zionism,"
published in Kiev last year by the
hardline Soviet propagandist,
Lev Korneyev, which alleges
widespread collaboration be-
tween Zionists and Nazis. Zivs
responded that the Committee
"will struggle against improper
expositions in such booklets that
unfortunately do appear."
But Kolesnikov, himself the
author of novels on "Zionist-Nazi
collaboration" defended Kor-
neyev's work. He claimed that
during the war, the Zionists "not
only failed to protect their co-
religionists but betrayed them,
wholly in league with the gestapo
and SS." He claimed that Adolf
Bonn to Consult With Israel
Over Arms to Saudi Arabia
By DAVID KANTOR
DNN (JTA) The gov-
ern has said that it will con-
|ith Israel and the United
Ik beforv making a final deci-
on arms sales to Saudi
to ll ''nnfirmvd, at the same
that Chancellor Helmut
i mi! Foreign Minister Hans-
i.m M i n nschtT have discussed
isalts with Saudi officials.
was reported to have met
ly with the Saudi Defense
bier, Prince Sultan Abdul
Lseveral weeks ago and Gen-
rmet with the Saudi Ambas-
in norm. Both meetings
^related to the Saudi interest
| purchasing the German
rd II tank and other ad-
I weapons systems.
IER BOENISCH. a gov-
ern spokesman, said further
sions would be held. He in-
that a decision is not
likely until after Kohl visits Isra-
el and Saudi Arabia next Sep-
tember. He noted that the gov-
erning Christian Democratic
Union (CDU) favors arms sales
abroad but wants to keep them
limited.
There has been speculation
here that Israel might drop its
objections to a West German
arms deal with Saudi Arabia if
Israel also received German
weaponry. But Boenisch said he
knew nothing of any Israeli re-
quests to buy German arras. The
Bonn government apparently is
trying to work out an arrange-
ment whereby both Saudi Arabia
and Israel will benefit from coop-
eration with West Germany. The
dairy Die Welt reported that a
high ranking Bonn official went
t<> Jerusalem several days ago to
consult with the Israeli govern-
ment.
Eichmann was executed by the
Israelis to prevent the "sacred
secrets" of this collaboration
from becoming public.
Tony Lerman, senior research
officer of the IJA, noted that
Korneyev s booklet also claims
that Zionists and Jews are partly
responsible for violent anti-Semi-
tism in Europe from the Czarist
pogroms to the Nazi Holocaust;
the idea that all Jews are citizens
of a Jewish nation "automa-
tically puts Jews in the role of a
fifth column in any state;" and
that Zionist agents provoked the
Russian and Ukranian pogroms
before World War I "in order to
increase emigration from the
country."
ACCORDING TO Lerman,
Korneyev's latest work denies
that six million Jews perished in
the Holocaust, indicating that
Soviet propagandists are
adopting a line that has been
pushed up to now only by neo-
Nazis and extreme rightwing
groups.
Korneyev's booklet, "On the
Path of Aggression and Racism,"
100,000 copies of which have been
published by the Pravda
Publishing House in Moscow,
says the six million figure is a
two or three fold exaggeration by
the Zionists.
Kornevev deliberately mis-
quoted a speech by Chaim Weiz-
mann in 1937 in which the Zionist
leader warned that the lives of six
million Jews were in danger,
Lerman said. The writer chums
the figure given by Weizmann
"became the basis of the legend
of the 'total destruction' of the
Jews by the Nazis."
Korneyev also claims that
most countries in the world did
not shut their doors to Jewish
refugees before and during the
war. It was those countries in
which "Zionist" influence was
strongest that opposed Jewish
immigration, the Soviet propa-
gandist wrote.
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Ambassador Meir Rosenne (center), Israel's new envoy to
Washington, made his first public appearance last week in an
address to the Conference ofPresidentsof Major American Jew-
ish Organizations. Left is Julius Berman of New York, who was
reelected as chairman of the Presidents Conference for a second
one-year term. Right is Yehuda Hellman, who has served as
executive vice chairman of the Conference since its founding in
1959.
Kosher Chicken Prices Found
Double Non-Kosher Variety
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) The
New York City Department of
Consumer Affairs, reporting on
the findings of the first two
"Market Basket" food price
surveys since the department
agreed to include kosher chicken
in the list of items in those sur-
veys, found that kosher chicken
prices per pound were more than
double those of non-kosher
chicken, Councilman Noach
Dear, a Brooklyn Democrat, said.
Dear said the city department
had added kosher chicken to its
survey list at his request, a
request made in support of his
contention that "the kosher food
price problem is a problem that
needs year-around attention, not
just publicity around the holi-
days."
DEAR SAID the department
sends comparison shoppers to
150 retail groceries in all five bor-
oughs, checking prices of 140
items, a procedure that takes two
weeks. He said that for the first
survey including kosher chicken.
May 9 to May 20, 21 of the 150
stores carried kosher chicken.
The survey found that kosher
chicken sold, on an average of
$1.50 per pound, compared with
non-kosher chicken average
prices of 60 cents, a 90 cent per
pound differentia).
For the second survey, cover-
ing the same 150 stores during
the May 23-June 3 period, 24
stores were found to carry kosher
chicken and the average price per
pound was $1.44, compared to an
average for non-kosher chicken of
58 cents, a differential of 86
cents, Dear told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency.
Dear defended a previous re-
port that public pressure had
caused a drop of 37 cents per
pound in the price of kosher-for-
Passover prices before the holi-
day last March.
THAT REPORT had been
questioned by Marvin Schick, a
long-time Jewish community
activist, who said, in a letter to
the JTA that while it was true
that the consumer affairs depart-
ment "did indicate that the cost
of matzah and other Passover
products had gone down, the
period was from April 11 to April
15," after the holiday.
Schick wrote that "this was
after the Passover holiday and
therefore it is not surprising that
products which had been pre-
pared primarily for Passover use
were now being sold at a reduced
price. There was no decrease in
price before Passover and there
was, at best, a small decline
during the holiday."
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Page4-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. June 24.1963
Is There A Need To Understand Black Anti-Semitism?
In an address dealing with Black-Jewish
relations in the U.S., John E. Jacob,
president of the Urban League, explains
the current differences dividing both
groups in America today. Jacob concedes
that Jews and Blacks are not as close as
they once were.
On the other hand, he wants us to un-
derstand that the differences are "tran-
sitory" and far from "permanent." What it
boils down to, in Jacob's opinion, is that
"some Blacks suffer from the disease of
anti-Semitism and some Jews from the
disease of racism."
In our view, some of this is correct.
Nevertheless, like all over-simplifications,
Jacob's conclusion is profoundly
misleading and, what is worse, in a sense
deceptive.
If, in his view. Blacks are bitten by the
American anti-Semitic bug, he reminds us
that, after all, "there is a deep current of
anti-Semitism that runs strong (in
America) ..." For this, then, Blacks must
be excused, since they are allegedly no
different in this regard than other
Americans.
Furthermore, while the Jewish iden-
tification with the State of Israel is clear
and apparent and understandable, so too
must the more recent Black shift in
sympathy be understood from a time when
Blacks saw Israel "as a small, struggling
democracy in a sea of Arab hostility," to
the present day when "Palestinians (are)
seeking a homeland of their own."
Confused Idealism
Jacob told his audience at a national
conference on African American-Jewish
American relations that "I and most
Blacks do not share that viewpoint." But
Jacob also said that he supports the
Reagan initiative of of Sept. 1 and that
" Palestinians are a people whose natural
longings for self-determination must be
respected."
In the confusion of the Urban League
president's idealisms, he appeared
determined to knit the schism between
Jews and Blacks in his head. But not in his
heart.
Part of the problem, as we see it, may
have been his willingness to excuse Black
Americans for their anti-Semitism as
symptomatic of the American climate
today. And who knows to what heights
that anti-Semitism may have reached?
For, in the end, how can Black anti-
Semitism be "explained" by American
Jewry's identification with Israel about
which Blacks today, Jacob would have us
believe, feel differently than they did in the
past? If Jews are to "excuse" Blacks for
their anti-Semitism, should not Blacks be
expected to "forgive" Jews for their love of
Israel?
New Discovery Needed
Several Israeli scientists have developed
a bio-technological product which removes
the left-over oil in tankers so that it does
not pollute the sea.
Jewish Floridian
PO b.lin
rUD< M40CHCT
I.M.MISDI IV
Ami
Ink
n ii i
M'llia. IT. .I'.lT.iK
wiimiii.ro NiiianiiM.ikiNi
o iimii
More important, the resulting mixture
can be used as fuel for power plants. These
scientists call their product Emulsan
because it emulsifies or enables oil to mix
with water. This has a vast range of
potential applications ranging from im-
provement of the flow of oil in cold pipes to
the production of cosmetics.
Very nice. But would it not be even nicer
if these or other Israeli scientists finally
found a way of making petroleum products
from whatever available source garba
or grain alcohol or any of the other vaunS
sources of ersatz crude? ^
This is a dream all of us have had from
the days of the Yom Kippur War when tb
free world was turned upon its ear by the
Arab oilionaires. Not only would such a
discovery do much to solve Israel's
runaway inflation, but it would also solve
the free world's victimization by the
petroleum industry's potentates once and
for all.
Discomfort of Siding With Reagan
KiatCBimON *ATfcS In AMm Ht*J Amm <-m- --ll Iw VMra-.M-Ji IK
Tia,. Mt* Hp0fc-J- I---* tl.wal Arwi I.Mt FnAWv *r* mmmih lu Immi flip* i
m-j**.' +* -nr-
Friday, June 24,1983
Volume 56
13TAMUZ5743
Number 25
JEWS have traditionally
opposed quotas because quotas
were and in some cases still are
directed against them in
employment, education, social
organizations, immigration and,
ultimately, wider economic
opportunity.
When the other week President
Reagan fired three members of
the U.S. Commission on Civil
Rights, including one Jewish
member, Rabbi Murray Saltzman
of Baltimore, the Jewish com-
munity seemed largely to remain
consistent in its anti-quota posi-
tion by demonstrating an ap-
parent indifference to the firings.
THE PRESIDENT fired the
trio in order to replace them with
people more in sympathy with his
own anti-quota position. For
Jews, this has since posed some
major problems.
One is that, for the first time,
they are running contrary to the
sense of outraged civil libertarian
feeling nationally. In particular,
they find themselves at odds with
the Leadership Conference on
Civil Rights, of which Benjamin
L. Hooks is chairman.
Hooks is also executive direc-
tor of the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored
People, and Jews have been
prominent in their support of
that organization almost since its
beginning. The late Kiwie
Kaplan of Boston was, for exam-
ple, president of the NAACP for
a long time.
AND SO, civil libertarians
generally and blacks especially
appear to feel that for the first
time Jews are abandoning their
traditional attitudes. Otherwise,
why would Jews seem to agree
that, although they wish he
hadn't done it. President Reagan
perpetrated no real harm when he
fired the trio of Civil Rights
Commission members?
My own suspicion is that many
in the Jewish community are
themselves confused by all of this
and find it difficult to answer the
question, particularly because
Rabbi Saltzman has been
replaced by another Jewish
member, Morris Abram, whose
credentials are if anything far
more distinguished than Rabbi
Saltzman's ever were.
It is, in fact, also likely that
outraged civil lebertarians view
the apparent Jewish support of
President Reagan's action the
same way, that is to say, why
should Jews care? They may
have lost Saltzman, but now
thoy've got Ab.-i'" n tru1 Con
mission. No wonder thai
seem indifferent
Thi- answer to this secoo
question is that there is a hug
difference. I said at the beginnin
that Jews have traditional!
opposed quotas, and so they wert
consistent in their attitu*
toward quotas when they
ported Mr. Reagan's firings.
BUT THERE are two types'
quotas. One is the old variety.J
is exclusionary and based '
race, religion, or ethnic F
ground. Its object is to
targeted groups out.
The second kind of quo" '
affirmative action, and
purpose is to batter down
doors of the exclusionary pro<
so that victims of the process
guaranteed an in. To assure I
success of affirmative w
quotas, the system mandai
a percentage basis the numb*
persons representing a sp*
race or ethnic background ote
sex in. say. a specific jodv-
tunity or perhaps in a cia
at a college or a university
competition for entry is hige
These assurances and ^
tees are quotas too. AJJ*
their purpose it ,P"""L,
opposite of exclusionary jf*
andwould indeed appear w
eminently humane, tor
Jews they nevertheless carry
same stigma, except that
include rather than cl*
Continued on Page J-A


Friday, June 24,1988 / The Jewish Ptoridton Pag6-A
[iami Rabbi Dissents from Reform 'Flight of Derangement'
By RABBI
Ihaskell M. BERNAT
is well known, the
ish line has been
iferred by the mother for
tit 19 centuries this is
I matrilineal descent. I
ihasize the time period
[underscore that for the
19 centuries of Jewish
dating back to
fcraham. Jewish status
5conferred by the father.
yichus, Jewish
I status such as Cohen,
and Yisrael, is confer-
jpartilineally.
He assume that the change
crystallized during the
persecutions of the First
Second Centuries. Slavery
prape left Jewish women with
fring who. in a sense, had no
tunable fathers, but whose
swere non-Jews.
I WAS an act of compassion
; led to an innovation which
licted Jewish mothers to
ler Jewish status on these
|therless" children. Not only
i the change humane, but it
I also demographically sound.
u kept the size of the Jewish
ilation in tact and even
>ing despite Roman brutal-
ifact, Jews were, during that
K, the single largest minority
| the Roman Empire. What
n, however, as permitting
women also to confer de-
eve ntually became only
sh women and not Jewish
- Given the rigors of the time,
i understandable, for pater-
f may be questionable, where-
| maternity is always patent,
i change was to set up an in-
-ity that would haunt the
ish community in modern
?'hat had begun as an
klioration in the ancient world
ne a vexation in today's
With the crumbling of the
}tto walls, the Jew entered
bmity, and the open society
'God save us from rabbis
turned amateur lawyer7
RABBI HA SHELL M. BERN A T
The Central Conference of American Rabbis, in a flight
of intellectual derangement, has clouded the identity of
children of Jewish mothers. So claims Rabbi Haskell M.
Bernat in this article written for The Jewish Floridian.
Rabbi Bernat, spiritual leader of Temple Israel of Greater
Miami [Reform), explains why he dissents from the
CCAR's Doctrine of Patrilineal Descent and prays: 'May
God save us from rabbis when they function as amateur
lawyers.'
exploded upon him. Without the
social and religious constraints of
the past, we began to intermarry
at an unprecedented rate
often without conversion. The
children of unions of Jewish
fathers and unconverted non-
Jewish mothers were, of course,
Israel is to risk,
must we
Consultation Needed, Not Confrontation
By JOHN GLENN
JAs the Reagan Adminis-
ition moves forward with
:e initiatives in the Mid-
East, the state of U.S.-
eli relations takes on an
led degree of impor-
e. If we are to ask Is-
to take risks for peace,
isalem must be con-
*t that America's
sidship with Israel re-
Jns deep and that we
TO behind our commit-
ZB"its one hundred percent.
* the Keagan Administration
^ forward with peace initia-
" in the Middle East, the
l U.S.-Israeli relations
n an added degree of
ZBflance It we are to ask Is-
10 tak.- risks for peace, Jeru-
must be confident that
c s friendship with Israel
deep and that we stand
ur commitments one
percent.
toins
Rod
Hred
Fortunately, this Ad-
^ation. at the verv time we
K much of l9rael- has
" creating frictions
i ... -,.
U.S.-Israeli relations to an all-
time low.
In the past, the United States
and Israel have had disagree-
ments, and it is probable that in
the future such disagreements
will continue. But the Adminis-
tration's approach has highlight-
ed these differences publicly, and
in so doing has caused many to
lose sight of the more basic areas
of values and policies where we
are in profound agreement.
AMERICA HAS stood with
Israel since its birth and time
and time again, it has proven to
be a stable, reliable ally. In a
region where the seeds of dem-
ocracy have yet to flower, Israel
is a bulwark of democracy.
If Israel also has some faults
and all democracies do it
also has constitutional pro-
cedures to correct these prob-
lems, a free press to call attention
to them, and guaranteed rights
for citizens to make their views
heard. America must never forget
that we share with Israel an in-
dissoluble bond of democratic
and Judeo-Christian values
unique in its region of the world.
Beyond the moral bond. Israel
is aiso a counirv oi considerable
ed States. It is an ally on whom
we can count in the Eastern
Mediterranean, where we face
formidable problems of maintain-
ing a military balance with the
growing Soviet Navy which in
wartime could be supported by
Syria and Libya. In this regard,
the strength of the Israeli Air
Force and Navy is a factor that
the Soviet Union must take into
account should it contemplate
aggressive action in this region.
WE KNOW, and the Soviets
dare not forget, that Israel's
location and strength also make
it important for the defense of the
Middle Eastern region. Should
the Soviet Union precipitate a
crisis in this area, it would be of
considerable importance to have
such a strong ally who shares our
concern with preventing the re-
gion from falling under Soviet
domination.
Sure, from time to time we also
will have some differences with
Israel, as we oo with many other
allies. But the proper way to con-
duct relations with an important
ally is close consultation within
the relationship, not public con-
frontation.
By contrast, what the Reagan
tathmad n '^f v
not considered Jews.
THE CHILD could be con-
verted at birth and raised as a
Jew. Jewish law certainly allows
for it; it always did notably
with adopted children. Save only
that, at 13 years for a boy and
approximately 12 years for a girl,
the child would appear before a
Beth Din to confirm the parental
decision made in infancy.
Basically, the Reform rabbi-
nate adhered to this pattern, ex-
cept that Bar Mitzvah, or
Confirmation, was accepted as
the child's assent in lieu of ap-
pearing before a rabbinic court.
The Reform rabbinate reasoned
that these ceremonies were suf-
ficiently public to clearly express
the child's intent and eliminate
the potential trauma of appearing
before an august judiciary.
This pattern worked for 25
years. Two factors did lead to
dissatisfaction. The rate of mixed
marriage without conversion
climbed, which made the problem
numerically more acute. Further,
modern times brought the ethical
dawning that Jewish law was
really discriminatory to Jewish
men by casting their offspring
into the disability of not being
Jewish, no matter what the
father may have wanted, whereas
the children of Jewish mothers
were Jewish without any defect
in their status.
AT THE urging of Rabbi
Alexander Schindler, the Central
Conference of American Rabbis
created a committee on patri-
lineal descent to explore and,
presumably, to find a solution to
the problem. What the times call-
ed for was the restoration of the
Biblical right of Jewish fathers to
determine the Jewishness of their
children while at the same time
continuing the Talmudic practice
of the mother conferring Jewish
status.
It was a completely ethical and
logical response sharpened by the
movement toward equality of the
sexes in contemporary Judaism.
It sounds simple and, in truth, it
should have been so. It would
have taken courage on the part of
the Reform rabbinate to defy the
censures of Orthodox and
Conservative Judaism, but
ethical audacity has never been
part of the movement's limita-
tions. The potential benefit to the
Jewish population would ad
ditionally justify it.
Rather than following the
function mandated by the com-
mittee's own name Patrilineal
Descent its members focused
instead on the condition of chil-
dren of mixed marriages as such,
declaring:
"THERE ARE tens of thous-
ands of mixed marriages ... It
can no longer be assumed a
priori, therefore, that the child of
a Jewish mother will be Jewish
any more than the child of a non-
Jewish mother will not be.
"This leads us to the con-
clusion that the same require-
ments must be applied to es-
tablish the status of a child of a
mixed marriage, regardless of
whether the mother or the father
is Jewish."
Therefore:
"The Central Conference of
American Rabbis declares the
child of one Jewish parent is
under the presumption of Jewish
descent. This presumption of the
status of the Jewish offspring of
any mixed marriage is to be
established through appropriate
and timely public and formal acts
of identification with the Jewish
faith and people. The perfor-
mance of these mitzvot serves to
commit those who participate in
them, both parent and child, to
Jewish life."
WHILE THIS sounds well-
reasoned, it is really maddeningly
deceptive. The key word in the
resolution is "presumption."
Presumption is a condition based
on opinion or belief. It is de-
pendent on another set of facts
for its own veracity without any
independent truth of its own; and
as any first-year law student
knows, presumption is thorough-
ly arguable.
What relief does this resolution
bring, seeing that it creates a
Jewish status that is arguable?
Presumption means tentative,
probable. In other words, chil-
dren whose status prior to this
resolution was incontrovertibly
Jewish because of their Jewish
mothers are now relegated to be-
Continued on Page 9-A
JOHN GLENN is a United States Senator from
Ohio. Sen. Glenn is running among a field of
Democratic candidates for the 1984 presidential
elections. In response to recent allegations tnat
he is either anti-Israel or that he insists upon a
role for the Palestine Liberation Organization in
^''ddle East peace talks. Sen. Glenn has written
9 iew Mideast Paoer


fragiyfi-A Th& Jewish Fioridian/ Friday, June 24,1083
- -
i \ *.
Jb Warsaw
John Hersey, Quiet Man, Speaks Again
Continued from Page 1 -A
writer should appear in his books
and nowhere else," said Hersey,
who ventures infrequently into
the glare of the world. He is gen-
erally content to teach one
writing or journalism course a
semester at Yale, to serve occas-
sionally on commissions or com-
mittees working to improve pub-
lic and private education and to
write his books. He is critical of
those writers who are public
figures almost more than literary
figures: "One of the real hazards
of the writing life in America is
that the public does like to take
people up. With so many egos
loose in the writing world, that is
all too common."
Recently, Hersey broke this
aversion for publicity. While ac-
cepting the Maurice Stiller
Award for distinguished writing
at Baltimore Hebrew College on
May 1, he told a capacity
audience of the evolution of his
second novel, The Wall And he
granted an interview "a rare
exception for me."
HERSEY'S journalism in-
cludes Hiroshima (1946), a chil-
lingly objective rendering of the
results of the first atomic bomb
and The Algiers Motel Incident
(1968), which is an examination
of an event in the 1967 Detroit
race riot. His best fiction is that
which he calls "the novel of con-
temporary history," which allows
readers to live history through
characters caught up in contem-
porary events.
His first novel, A Bell for
Adano, tells of the American oc-
cupation of an Italian village
during World War Two. This won
the Pulitzer Prize in 1945. The
Warsaw Ghetto uprising in 1943
inspired his next work of fiction,
The Wall
While discovering the atroci-
ties of the Nazis as a war corre-
spondent, Hersey "knew that if I
was ever going to justify my
existence on this earth as a
writer, I would have to try, at
least, to pass on to American
readers some of the sorts of
things which my eyes had seep
and my ears had heard."
HE RETURNED to the
United States in February 1945.
Shortly after, a single bomb from
the Enola Gay incinerated Hiro-
shima and Hersey was assigned
by The New Yorker to write a
series of articles about the begin-
ning of the nuclear age. "But all
the time," while researching and
writing Hiroshima, "scars from
my visits to Eastern Europe
burned under my skin."
Hersey first planned to write a
book about Auschwitz. He
"mined the nightmarish memo-
ries'" of a survivor of that death
camp. "But, somehow, Warsaw
kept insisting. For one thing, the
life in the ghetto had, for
some time, seemed to maintain,
dreadful as it was, a kind of
mimicry of pre-ghetto urban life.
Families lived together, young
people had clubs and dramatic
societies, lovers shared their
pleasure and pain. As things
grew worse those signs of
civilized existence withered
away. But they did not altogeth-
er disappear, for at last there was
the defiantly civilized and most
amazing flash of humane light,
the ghetto uprising, surely one of
the most beautiful statements of
courage and faith in mankind in
all history."
Hersey soon discovered an
abundance of material about the
Holocaust and the ghetto revolt:
diaries, organization records,
letters, statistical data, medical
histories and songs. All of it was
in Yiddish and Polish and all un-
likely to be translated into Eng-
7 see a phoenix rising
out of every disaster.
There is some kind of
tenacity that human
beings have that seems to
keep us going.'
lish. Hersey found competent
translators for each language,
survivors, themselves, of the
Nazis. They translated directly
from the text into English on a
wire recorder. Each had lost
relatives in Warsaw and each
knew "already, as it were, too
much."
AFTER ONE YEAR of re-
search, almost two million words
of notes were transcribed. Listen-
ing to them, Hersey "felt as if I
were being drawn into a laby-
rinth, to meet some kind of Mino-
taur of history." Yet, he "groped
forward," realizing first, he had
to become a Jew in his imagina-
tion and, secondly, he must
muster the courage to identify
with the people of the ghetto.
An agnostic, he read the Five
Books of Moses, histories of Ju-
daism, Martin Buber, Sholom
Aleichem and "listened, listened,
listened to my two story-tellers."
He did "a lot of sitting and
staring," trying to make sense of
the material, to reduce the chaos,
to fabricate a narrative and a
structure.
Characters, episodes and,
finally an outline came out of his
"bewilderment." He began to
write, and what he wrote was
"very hard even for me to read
. it was confused and confus-
ing." In late 1948, after writing
almost 1,300 pages of longhand
and about eighty percent of the
first draft, Hersey "realized that
what I had written was in no way
worthy of the Jews of the War-
saw ghetto. I stopped. I knew I
was going to have to begin all
over again."
HE TRIED to restructure the
book until the "fatal falsity" of
the story being told by an "all-
knowing, all-seeing John Her-
sey," was apparent. The story of
the ghetto, he concluded, had to
be told by a Jew, by someone who
was there. "Imagination would
not serve; only memory would
serve ... I had to invent a me-
mory."
The fictional memory that
Hersey invented, that of Noach
Levinson, a scholar and an ar-
chivist, a man who recorded al-
most every phase of life in the
Warsaw Ghetto, was loosely
based on Emmanuel Ringelblum.
A published social historian, Rin-
gelblum realized that posterity
had to know about the life of the
Warsaw Jews. He formed a secret
group, the Shabbos Celebrants,
which preserved a record of the
ghetto.
When deportations from the
ghetto began, the group began
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collecting material about Treb-
linka. Just before the ghetto up-
rising in April 1943, the archives
were buried in two different
caches. One cache had been found
in September 1946 and some of
Ringelblum *s notes had been
published.
HERSEY WAS excited by the
little he had heard about Ringel-
blum and "decided to give the
story to Levinson to tell." In
early 1949, he started writing
again. This time, he wrote
"feverishly." It was no longer his
book; it was his fictive Jewish
Pole's, Noach Levinson, a master
interrogator and a superb
listener, Levinson tells of a Nobel
Prize winner who grandly shirks
leadership until the moment he
v.v.v
leaves Warsaw with a IWJ
passport, of an old S never accepts the fact thaTl
Porch comrades careXH
" fare ?J the ghetto, S\
ShloirMazur,raptlnthe;
ual life of h.s boob Si
touched by anyone bv Ik.
cutions. I
At the center of The H'J
Dolek Berson, Rachel a?]
Levinson. all fighters agaiwl
Germans and, the last uT.
vivors of them, also.
The Jews fight in the
and the sewers Yet, even'!
the brutality of the Gem
Rachel for whom the Toral
encapsulated in Thou shalt 1
Continued on Pag, iq.a
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Friday, June 24,1963 / The Jewiah Floridum Page 7-A
Jewish National Fund Leaders
JSSSl of Greater Miami and Hollywood Greet Charlotte Jacobson, National
hud
President and Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, National Executive Vice President
The Jewish National Fund Select Leadership Luncheon was held recently at the
Konover Hotel in Honor of Mrs. Charlotte Jacobson, National President JNF of
America, and Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, Executive Vice President JNF of America.
Dignitaries from all walks of life attended and paid tribute to these two
magnificent outstanding leaders. The star studded reception had an electrifying
effect and the vibrations will be felt for a long time to come. Dr. Samuel I. Cohen.
Executive Vice President JNF of America, exhalted the virtues of Charlotte
Jacobson, and presented an analysis of the Jewish National Fund of today and
tomorrow. Charlotte Jacobson in a most stirring address left the audience spell-
bound, recalling the early days of JNF through the eight decades, summarizing
the Zionist dream, today's role of Israel in the world power struggle, the place of
Israel in the Jewish world, and the place of the JNF in Israel. The audience
responded magnificently, and commitments were made to JNF in an un-
precedented manner.
Master of Ceremonies was Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz. Chairman JNF Executive
Board. The Honorable Mayor Stephen Clarke of Dade County, who just returned
from Israel spoke of the role of JNF in Israel and its importance. The Honorable
Mayor Norman Ciment presented the Keys to the City of Miami Beach to
Charlotte Jacobson, and to Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, and he spoke of the importance
of JNF in his life since his early years, and proudly announced that his son is go-
ing to Israel to study in the Yeshivah. Doreen Stuart, noted accordionist provided
dinner music. A musical program was presented by Israeli Opera Star Lois
Yav nielli and Cantor Saul H. Breeh.
T B ** j
K tr f^

Ann Ackerman, JNF Queen Esther, pins
an orchid on Mira Cohen, wife of Dr.
Samuel I. Cohen, Exec. Vice President
JNF of A merica.
Hon. Mayor Norman Ciment,
presents the Keys to the City of
Miami Beach to the beaming and
smiling, Charlotte Jacobson.
National Pres. JNF, and Dr. Samuel
I. Cohen, Exec. Vice Pres. JNF.
First Lady of JNF, Mrs. Abraham
Grunhut. pins an orchid on JNF Nation-
al President, Charlotte Jacobson.
Left to right: Hon. Norman Ciment, Mayor Miami
Beach, Zev W. Kogan, Pres. JNF Southern Region, Hon.
Stephen Clarke, Mayor Dade County, Guest of Honor
Charlotte Jacobson, President JNF of America, Dr.
Samuel 1. Cohen, Exec. Vice Pres. JNF of America, and
Abraham Grunhut, Pres. JNF Gr. Miami.
Seated left to right, Ernest Samuels, Vice-Pres. JNF Gr.
Miami, Guest of Honor, Charlotte Jacobson, National Pres.
JNF of America, Ann Ackerman, JNF Queen Esther for 1983-
84, Dr. Alon Ben Meir, National Director for Regional
Development, Chief of Police, Emmett Miller of Miami
Beach.
Standing left to right Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, Chairman,
JNF Exec. Board, Dr. Samuel I. Cohen, Exec{ Vice Pres. JNF
of America, Hon. Mayor Stephen Clarke, Dade County, and
Zev W. Kogan, Pres. JNF Southern Region.
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Chrmn.
JNF Foundation.
Left to right- Leon Schuster, JNF Man of
the Year, Ida Weasel Comptroller, JNF Gr.
Miami, Suzanne Lasky, Channel 7 luminary,
Miriam Press, Treasurer JNF Or. Miami
Prof. Andre Bialolenhi, Vice Pres.
JNF Gr. Miami, Philip Richland
Augusta Menu Richland, Chairper-
son Women for JNF.
Rabbi Samuel Z. Jaffa, Spiritual leader Temple Beth El
Hollywood, and dynamic JNF leader. Rabbi Morton Malav-
sky. Spiritual leader Temple Beth Shalom, Hollywood and
Chairman JNF Broward, Kathy Schwarz, Chairperson
Sisterhood JNF, Dr. Rachel Abramowitz, and Charlotte
Jacobson, Quest of Honor, and Pres. JNF of America.
Flanking the Uuest of Honor Charlotte Jacobson,
National Pres. JNF of America are from left to right:
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz, Chrmn. JNF Exec.
Board, Hon. Mayor Norman Ciment, Miami Beach,
Hon. Stephen Clarke, Mayor Dade County, Dr.
Samuel I. Cohen, Exec Vice Pres. JNF of America,
and Abraham Grunhut, Pres. JNF Gr. Miami.
Augusta Me*/z Richland Chairperson
Women for JNF is shown with Dr.
Samuel I. Cohen, Exec. Vice-Pres. JNF
America and Charlotte Jacobson, Pres.
JNF of America
Guest Artists, Cantor Saul
H. Breeh, Chrmn. JNF
Special Activities and
Israeli Opera Star, Lois
YavnielL
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i iuny i auw **, iwu
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, June 24,1983
sity.
Cummings has served on the
Boards of Canada-Israel Founda-
tion for Academic Exchanges.
Allied Jewish Community Serv-
ices. Canadian Jewish Congress.
Jewish Community Foundation.
Jewish Community Research
Institute.
Hospital.
University.
Director
Committee
sources Oil
partner in
and Sons,
director of
Jewish General
and Ben-Gurion
Bprnard Bell, prominent New England civic
leader and president of the Jewish National
Fund of Rhode Island, is planting trees in
the JNF's John F. Kennedy Peace Forest
near Jerusalem to mark the graduation of
John F. Kennedy, Jr., from Brown Univer-
sity. Bell, also a Brown alumnus, was host to
the son of the late President at the March
1980 dedication of the Rhode Island Pylon of
the JNF's John F. Kennedy Memorial in
Israel. Pictured here with John Kennedy, Jr.,
at the 1980 ceremony held in Newport's
historic Touro Synagogue are lie ft to right/
guest speaker Sen. Claiborne Pell (D., R.I.)
and banker John J. Loch, who endowed the
Pylon.
Begin to Address Progressive Judaism
Confab in Jerusalem June 28
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin heads the list of speakers
who will address the 22nd inter-
national conference of the World
Union tor Progressive Judaism in
Jerusalem June 28-July 5. it was
announced by Gerard Daniel.
WUPJ president.
More than 600 delegates rep-
resenting Reform and Liberal
synagogues in 25 countries in-
cluding Israel will participate in
the deliberations of the inter-
national body of Reform Juda-
ism.
The conference, according to
Daniel, 'will underscore Reform
Judaism's commitment to the
Jewish state and reinforce our
demand for the right to practice
Judaism in Israel as we interpret
it-----without interference by
the Orthodox establishment."
The Herman Goldman
Foundation of New York has
awarded Georgetown University
in Washington a grant of $65,000
for support of its Jewish chap-
laincy program.
"This generous gift from the
Goldman Foundation will allow
us to further expand the Jewish
chaplaincy program's campus
activities and will support the
significant contributions to
academic and campus life made
by our Jewish chaplain and direc-
tor of the program. Rabbi Harold
White, and his staff." Father
Timothy S. Healy. president of
Georgetown, said.
The Goldman Foundation gift
also addresses the goals of the
University's current SI 15 million
five-year capital campaign.
Launched in May of 1982, the
Georgetown University cam-
paign has raised $57 million of its
intended goal.
There is a new library in
Boston, and it is extending an
invitation to Bay Staters and
visitors to come and learn more
about Albert Einstein's theories,
and Einstein the man.
Solomon Quasha, director of
the Albert Einstein Library, a
private, non-profit, free institu-
tion, says. "It's a small library.
but it's unique, and 1 think it's
appropriate that in Boston we
have established a library-
dedicated to a giant oi a man who
has changed our concept of the
universe.''
Noting that Einstein received
an honorary degree from Har-
vard. Quasha says. "There is an
interesting paradox about Ein-
stein. His name is known by
nearly everyone, along with his
distinctive face, but it's amazing
how little the average person
knows about his theories and his
personal life."
Dr. David A. Scheinman has
become a founding member of the
Board of Governors of the Touro-
Technion biomedical program,
Dr. Bernard Lander, president of
Touro College, announced in New
York.
The biomedical program,
which leads to an MD degree
from Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology. Faculty of Medicine
in Haifa, is a cooperative venture
of Touro and Technion. A com-
bination of study in the United
States and Israel is a feature of
the program.
High school graduates can
earn a BS from Touro College and
an MD from Technion Faculty of
Medicine in six years plus a one-
year internship.
Ampal American Israel
Corporation (Amex AIS.A) has
commenced marketing a new unit
offering consisting of $10 million
of ten-year. Series TT. 11 percent
redeemable debentures and one
million shares of Ampal Class A
Stock.
The price of each unit will be
adjusted weekly and will be
$1,000, phis the market value of
100 shares of Class A Stock, as
determined by the last reported
sale price of the Class A Stock on
the American Stock Exchange
for the preceding week, less $1
per share.
Minimum purchase is five
units. The debenture portion of
the offering, due 1993, is non-
callable for four years.
Jack L. Cummings of Canada
has been reelected for a second
term as chairman of the Board of
Governors of Tel Aviv Univer-
of the Executive
of Aberford Re-
Co., he is also a
Maxwell Cummings
and has served as
Trizec Corporation
Ltd. and of Star (Great Britain)
Holdings Ltd.
Jacob Burns, a member of the
Board of Directors of Yeshiva
University's Benjamin N
Cardozo School of Law. present-
ed seven students with Jacob
Burns Medals at the school's
recent commencement.
Speaking at the commence-
ment. Burns told the graduating
law students that every lawyer
has a duty "to protect his profes-
sion and his own reputation as an
upright person."
Medal recipients included
Janice W. Neale. Marc Allen
Rigrodsky. Sandra Ellen
Wallach. Amy Margaret Attias.
Julie L. Miller. Adam Jeffrey
Krim, and Greg S Feldman.
Henry Taub. founder of Auto-
matic Data Processing Company,
has been awarded an Honorary
Doctorate of Science and Tech-
nology degree from the Technion
Israel Institute of Technology at
ceremonies on the Institutes
Haifa campus.
The Technion Board of Gover-
nors bestowed the degree upon
Taub in recognition of his con-
tinuing and active support for the
State of Israel and of his contri-
butions and activity on behalf of
the Technion through the Ameri-
can Technion Society "
A pioneer in the development
of the data services industry.
Taub founded ADP at the age of
21, just two years after his
graduation from New York
University in 1947.
Conservative, Orthodox and
Reform synagogue religious
schools and Jewish day schools
across the country are being in-
vited to participate in the fourth
Great National Jewish Read-In
for students sponsored by the
Jewish Braille I nstitute of Amer-
ica
Through the "Read-In," par-
ents, relatives, family friends and
neighbors act as sponsors" to
the children, pledging a certain
sum to the Jewish Braille In-
stitute for each book the students
read during a four-week period in
the fall term.
The program offers recognition
to all boys and girls for their
reading efforts on behalf of the
blind and visually impaired, said
Dr. Jane Evans. JBI president,
noting that certificates, patches.
T-shirts, sweatshirts and othet
gifts and prizes are awarded
Rabbi Melvm L. Libman has
been appointed executive vice
president of the American opera-
tion of Bar-Han University. it
was announced this week by Mrs
Jane Stern, president of the
American Board of Overseers.
Rabbi Libman. former assis-
tant executive vice chairman of
the United Jewish Appeal, will
direct all activities in the United
States. His responsibilities will
include fundraising programs
and supervision of the activities
of Bar Han's field offices in.
Chicago. Detroit. Los Angeles
and Miami, as well as it~ 1 S
headquarters in New York
"The appointment of I!
Libman opens a new era in the
development of major support for
Bar-llan in the United States
Mrs. Stern said.
Fiddler on the Cjlyde.
By the banks of the river Clyde in the bonny town of Glasgow,
there thnves a small but active Jewish community center. And here a
simple stage boasts shows put on by its proud members. Yihj might be
stirred by bagpipes wailing to the strains of Hava Nagila. Or even see the
hora danced by men in kilts.
While productions like these do the heart good, the Scots have
an encore that does the palate good, as well: A wee sip of fine scotch
whisky. Americans have also taken kindly to this tradition and made
J&.B Rare Scotch the one preferred above all others. For so delicate and
so refined is its taste that J&.B is the scotch that whispers. And that is
why we recommend it as the perfect libation sunrise, sunset or when-
ever the curtain calls.
M Pwo BUndKl ScoWi Wh*ky. i/ 1M2 Th PmMnfar. Corporakon. NY
J&B. It whispers.
I
, ^-


Friday, June 24,1963 / The Jewish Floridian Page9-A
Rabbi Dissents from Reform 'Flight of Derangement'
Continued from Page 5-A
ing "probably" Jewish but not
definitely.
The resolution has the po-
tential of creating the chaos that
Jewish women endured earlier in
history. Instead of lifting the
burden of discrimination upon
the Jewish man and his offspring,
the Central Conference of Ameri-
can Rabbis, in a flight of intel-
lectual derangement, clouded the
identity of children of Jewish
mothers. They did achieve equal-
ity of men and women an
equality of disability and
anguish.
THE RESOLUTION is also
a denial of a cardinal aspect of
Judaism that status is confer-
red by birth and not by activity.
Mitzvot. Jewish sacred activity.
determines the quality of one's
Jewish life, but not that one is
Jewish. Only birth confers this
status. Conversion also confers
Jewish status precisely because it
is a "birth." Traditional conver-
sion involving circumcision and
immersion is a birth ritual.
Emerging out of the waters is
the symbolic act of being reborn.
Even within Liberal Judaism
where these rituals are viewed as
optional, still a new name is given
to the convert. His own birth
parents' names are not mention-
ed, but he is rather called the
child of Abraham, signifying
clearly that the non-Jew has been
reborn as a new Jew.
Whether through natural birth
or through spiritual birth, it is
birth that confers Jewish status.
The Reform rabbinate has
diminished birth, or perhaps even
eliminated birth as the central
agency for conferring status.
SHOULD NOT the time have
come to simply and courageously
say that a child born of a Jewish
parent is Jewish? This the
Reform rabbinate did not do. It
exhibited neither courage nor
clarity.
Following the "logic" of the
Central Conference of American
Rabbis, should not the Jewish
status of a child born of two Jew-
ish parents also be presumptive
unless there are mitzvot to prove
it? The convention at which this
was voted was to have been an
historic conclave a watershed
of Jewish life. Historic indeed, it
plunged us back into the chaos of
ancient history, and the only
waters we see are terribly murky.
As for myself, I will continue
to regard the child of a Jewish
mother as fully Jewish no
presumptions or probabilities
about it. Until a body of rabbis
can come up with a clearer and
better way than has served the
Reform rabbinate for the past 25
years. I will continue to support
Jewish fathers and their non-
Jewish wives in raising their chil-
dren as Jews, leading to the
public affirmations of Bar Mitz-
vah and Confirmation as
dramatic signs of commitment to
their father's choice of their iden-
tity at birth.
May God save us from rabbis
when they function as amateur
lawyers.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, June 24,1983

John Hersey, Quiet Man, Speaks Again
Continued from Page 6-A
thy neighbor" insists that one
must love, even when one's
neighbor is a Nazi. It is this
loving Rachel who is given the
final words in The Wall, words
that Hersey intended for the
novel to live on with the reader
and move him into action. It is a
line predicated on hope for the fu-
ture. Rachel murmers, as Noach
Levinson bends over in the
Lomianka Forest to pluck a leaf
from a bush, "Nu, what is the
plan for tomorrow?"
WHAT IS THE plan for to-
morrow?" I asked Hersey 33
years after The Wall was first
published. Any "plan." he said,
must be founded on love, the love
that. Rachel Apt clung to. One
plan, he said, is to minimize ten-
sions between the United States
and Russia through discussions
and exchanges ot citizens
anything to understand what's
going on.'
Another "plan" was prompted
by W. H. Auden's contention
i hat the political duty of a poet is
to defend the language. With cor-
ruption ot the language comes
misunderstanding. With that
comes violence. That seems to
me. Hersey said, "to be a very
economical way to keep the lan-
guage alive so we can understand
<>ne another. Language is all we
have with which to express love.
We must keep it fresh."
Hersey s love and optimism
may have come from his spend-
ing his first 10 vears in China,
surrounded by appalling pover-
ty, floods, famine and seeing the
incredible cheerfulness and forti-
tude of the Chinese people in the
middle of all these disasters. It
may also have come trom my own
missionary parents who thought
that a better world was possible."
Hersey was born in June. 1914.
in Tientsin. China of American
missionary parents. A foreign
land grab alter the 1900 Boxer
rebellion had divided China into
miniature nations, each with its
own national architecture, lan-
guage, legal systems, plumbing,
business and social customs and
costumes.
WHEN HE was 11 years old. a
"brilliant schoolmate,'' Israel
Epstein was hit by a car. His left
leg was badly broken and he was
put in traction at home. Visiting
him. Hersey was overcome with
envy Kppy. as Hersey called
him. had become, it seemed,
part ot a beautiful machine. A
metal frame towered over him.
His leg, encased in plaster of
Paris, was elevated and attached
to marvelous ropes, pulleys,
weights."
Hersey went home with a
"burning wish" to be Eppy. The
envy was almost insurmountable
a few days later when a local
newspaper pronounced: "Israel
Epstein Writing History of the
World," in two volumes. Hersey
was determined to break his leg
and become a writer.
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'A Bell For Adano,
'Hiroshima,' The Wall
John Hersey writes about
survival and the rebellion
of hope.
He never broke his leg, but he
did become a writer. After gradu-
ating from Yale and doing gradu-
ate work in 18th-century English
literature at Cambridge, Hersey
was Sinclair Lewis' secretary for
one summer, then joined the staff
of Time.
HERSEY WAS enormously
movea by the revelations ot Nazi
genociOe as the war was ending.
Hut before he had a chance to
write about them at length. The
eiv Yorker commissioned him to
write about Hiroshima. His
article, which appeared in the
magazine in August 1946 and
was immediately published as a
book, was an event of the first
order. The New Yorker devoted
.II of its editorial space to Her-
sey s reportage.
A New York Times editorial
urged "every American" to read
the book. Albert Einstein ordered
1.000 copies; Bernard Baruch or-
dered 500. The Book-ofthe-
Month Club distributed free
copies to all its members. And
within two weeks of its publica-
tion, the article was read in four
hour-long segments on ABC
Radio.
Hersey s story of Hiroshima
was an intimate one: he wrote of
six people and how they survived
the noiseless flash": two
doctors, a German priest, a Japa-
nese Methodist minister, a
housewife, and an office girl.
Small moments of volition a
decision to stay indoors, to catch
one street car rather than the
next spared each. "And now."
Hersey wrote, "each knows that
in the act of survival he lived a
dozen times and saw more death
than he ever thought he would
see.
THE BOOK is a memorial to
the dead: it is a warning to the
living. It is also an examination
by a writer more interested in the
act of survival than in anything
else he saw at the scene of
100.000 deaths.
Hiroshima was so understated,
so objective that the London
Times Literary Supplement said
Hersey "spoke too quietly;" au-
thor Mary McCarthy compared
Hersey's account of nuclear
devastation to tales ot Mrs.
O'Leary's cow tipping over the
lantern that started the Chicago
fire everything is told coolly
and dispassionately.
Rut all was not dispassionate.
"I felt tremendous passion and
kept it under tight rein. Hersey
told me. "I take exception to
those criticisms based on the let-
ters 1 get every week from young
people who have not been ex-
posed to the nuclear idea in a
vivid way before. 1 think this
book reaches them in ways a
more polemic or passionate writer
could not do. The argument is in
the event rather than in the com-
ment or the anger about the
event.
Hersey was at home when he
heard President Truman's an-
nouncement on the radio about
using the atomic bomb on Hiro-
shima. It was clear we were in a
new world." he said, "that the
whole world had changed." What
Hersey later saw in Hiroshima
did not significantly differ from
the damage in Yokohama or
Tokvo. he said. "The difference
was that 400 planes every night,
night after night, had bombed
Tokyo and Yokohama. One in-
strument had done this other
thing. So the way in which there
was a new world was that we
would think in a new way about
violence. Alas. I don't think that
all humans are thinking in a new
way about violence not by a
long shot."
HERSEY HAS been called an
affirmative writer. He speaks of
man s ability to overcome. Per-
haps, in a sense, he has adapted
his parents' missionary calling to
literature, maybe he has put into
print their conviction that the
world can be bettered. But "mis-
sionary I am not in any sense,"
he said, "although I do have a
sense that life can be better. I am
a non-believer. Yet. I am dazzled
and thrilled over and over again
by the multiplicity of forms of life
and the remarkable things we are
privileged to see and feel every
day."
Hersey claimed "there is no re-
ligious center in my life." Maybe
so. Yet. anyone who has strug-
gled with the legacy ot Hitler,
with the havoc ot The Bomb,
with prejudice against blacks and
Jews and still be convinced of the
invincibility of the human spirit
is deeply religions, although
maybe not in the conventional
sense. At age 69, he is even more
convinced of the survival of the
race than when he wrote The
Wail and Hiroshima:
"I'm quite a bit older now and
life, therefore, seems much more
intense, much more valuable than
it did then. Every day was a lark.
Now, every day is an adventure,
but I have less of it to count. So I
feel more greatly the value of
life."
"SO, YES. I do, I do. I do
think we will survive. Human
beings do very cruel and very
foolish things. But little by little,
they seem to do other things that
are not so bad. There's a reservoir i?
of sense in humanity, something
under the surface of our follies
that will probably keep things in
balance. '
In 1974, Hersey wrote My Pe-
tition for More Space, a novel
about a miserablv crowded,
cramped overpopulated world. It
is a taut book with a bleak vision.
The motto of the government,
taken as cant by the people, is
Acceptance is Survival." The.
world of Mersey's books demands
non-acceptance if the world is to
survive. Hersey has been faulted
for his piety, tor his preaching.
He has rarely, it ever, been called
a rebel But his is a rebellion of
hope: without such calls to
reason, there can be no plans for
tomorrow
DAIA Dismayed Over
Fate of 'Disappeareds'
NEW YORK UTAI The
OA1A. the representative body
of Argentine Jewry, has ex
pressed "dismay" over the recen
assertion by the Argentine au
thorities that the thousands Of
persons who huve disappeared
in recent years should be pre
sumed dead, and called for clan
fixation, the World Jewish Con
gress reported.
The DAIA (Delegacion de
Asociaciones Israelitas Argen-
tinast, which represents the
largest Jewish community in
Latin America, stressed that it
shares the "anguish" of the rela-
tives of disappeared persons of
Jewish origin, its six-point state-
ment, released here by the WJC.
affirmed "the Jewish tradition of
respect for the sanctity of human
life" and its "categorical repudia-
tion of all expressions of
violence."
It noted that through the
years, the DAIA had received
"the insistent pleas of parents
and relatives of disappeared per-
sons ot Jewish origin" and it fully
shared the natural feelings of
any parent or relative in a similar
situation, regardless of creed."
It is indispensable that this
chapter in our history be fully
elucidated in order to obtain the
reconciliation of all the inhabit-
ants ot the land and achieve a
fruitful dialogue among them; tor
this we feel that, in order to be
legitimate, any act aimed at con-
inbuting to social harmony must
take place within the framework
if the National Constitution and
the concordant legislation." the
DAI A statement said,
i
It urged "the furtherance of
action to prevent the recurrence
of any state of violence in the
country, whatever its cause, and
voices its ardent wish for the
peaceful development of the Re-
public, predicated on the demo-
cratic and pluralistic coexistence
of all its inhabitants, protected
by appropriate laws precluding
all acts of injustice.
raise The
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? -i*>
Friday, June 24, 1983 / The Jewiah Floridian Page 11 A

tier Jewish Debate
War in Lebanon
andeis Prof Says Rancor Alarms Him
ARNOLD AGES
rNTO (JTA) -
ideis University
who specializes
lie thought, voiced
\re at the bitterness
ebate among Jews
las emerged with
Fehemence since the
lvasion of Lebanon
0.
Fox, director of the
ol of Near Eastern and
Studies at Brandeis
. indicated in an in
hat Brandeis has not
I the rancor which has
[the American univer-
Fox, in Toronto as
edec's "Scholar-in-
[" said spokesmen for
are strongly rep-
i the Brandeis campus
ifluenoe can be felt in
the discussion on the
. THE last campus
Ifor the United Jewish
lembers of the Peace
tion on the Brandeis
wanted to circulate
I through which the
fundraising effort
ociate itself with the
prnment. Fox indicated
I personally intervened
i his associates not to
i a disclaimer.
Indeis professor, who
i of his early academic
E)hio State University,
fthe Peace Now forces
Up primarily of Begin-
are unable to accept
hat the Labor govern-
longer in office.
J the Peace Now move-
nfluenced the thinking
Its on the Brandeis
fox replied: "The first
you have to under-
that Peace Now rep-
I 'positive' wing among
critical of Israeli
tere are other Jewish
who are far more
kYS that during a
bit to the campus of
[University by Noam
the linguist, who has
Le preface to a book by
pious French historian
"aurisson, a book
ie (actuality of the
I. Chomsky was con
well-informed Jewish
(Who heckled the anti-
fcdemic mercilessly. On
hand, noted Fox, Meir
id also spoken recently
i and had been cordially
listribution
ing Studied
sued from Page 1-A
the multinational force
ion would not allow
Liberation Orga-
forces to enter areas
by Israeli troops. Ac-
i Arens, the Syrians and
trying to test Israel's
to stand firm in face of
bs and hit-and-run at-
suld be made clear to
at this tactic will not
said. He said the Leb-
>vernment joined Israel in
ing the withdrawal of
Pnd PLO forces from Leb-
Lebanese Parliament
He overwhelmingly
the Israel-Lebanon
fcnt signed last May 17.
received by the Brandeis
students.
A frequent guest in Israel
where he has lectured in several
universities. Fox expresses some
anxiety about the polarization of
feeling in that country. He des-
cribed the explosiveness of the
situation in the following way:
"During my last trip to Israel I
was invited to a gathering of
distinguished Israeli academics.
The evening was an especially
congenial one and the talk very
elevated and non-controversial.
There was not a hint of discord
among the group.
"THEN AS we were about to
leave and were standing at the
door someone made an innocuous
remark of a political nature and
within seconds the atmosphere
became volatile. Everyone began
shouting.
"One of my colleagues said to
' another: 'When you say things
like that you are sticking a
dagger into the back of every
soldier in Zahal.' The bitterness
of the debate was all the more
shocking when compared to the
convivial discussion that had
occurred during the evening.
When we finally left I asked my
host who was driving me back to
the hotel why he had not parti-
cipated in the heated exchange at
the door.
"My host, who is a distin-
guished professor of humanities
at the Hebrew University said to
me that he has learned to keep his
mouth shut because every time
he has participated in discussion
he is cut short with the remark
that he has an American pass-
port.
"AT THIS point I asked my
colleague the following question:
'Assuming that every one of Be-
Dorothy and Sidney Shames flank Metro Mayor Stephen Clark
during an American Jewish Congress tour of Israel. Mayor
Clark was a member of a delegation of mayors from across the
U.S. attending a week-long conference in Jerusalem co-spon-
sored by the AJ Congress and the U.S. Conference of Mayors.
gin's aims had been realized as a
result of the invasion of Lebanon,
what would you say to that?'
"Whereupon my host, normal-
ly the most rational of people,
began to scream at me in a
manner not unlike the way his
colleagues had been shouting at
each other at the gathering. Such
is the nature of political discourse
in Israel today."
Alarmed by this unfortunate
development in Israel, Fox feels
that the situation in North
America has been affected by the
Israeli scene. He indicated that at
some American campuses anti-
Israel forces, composed largely of
Arab students working in concert
with other groups, have made the
university an unsafe place for
Jewish students. The anti-Semi-
tic quotient is inordinately high
on those campuses.
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Pagel2-A Tan
14.1
Administration Raps Soviet Committee
JWV Withdraws
From Sponsorship Of
King March Anniversary
WASHINGTON -
Stanley X. Zwaik. national
commander. Jewish Wax
Veterans of the U S A, has
announced the organiza-
tion's withdrawal of spon-
sorship of the August, 1983
ceremonies to com-
memorate the 20th anni-
versary of Martin Luther
King, Jr. s march on Wash-
ington.
One year ago. JWV received a
mailagram from Coretta Scott
King requesting the organiza-
tion's support for a coaiiuoo of
conscience" to "reaffirm Martin's
dream for jobs, peace and free-
dom" in a 1983 celebration. Since
JWV took part in the historic
1963 march and agreed on the
need to reassert Rev rungs
ideals, the organization agreed to
co-sponsor the commemoration
HOWEVER." National Com-
mander Z*aik aeciared. JWV's
name has recently appear ic as an
endorser of a Coalition of Con-
science declaration which deals
with issues unrelated to civil
rights and distorts the original
purposes of the
"In addition, he said among
the hat of fimiatii and en-
dorsers of this Sew Coalition arc
several names which have been
linked on other ocraiaons with
anti-Semitic activities. JWV does
not and will not participate with
people or mgaiiiiatinrm who are
anu-Senhtic-
Zwaik advised that JWV
woukl be unable to participate in
the march because it a scheduled
on a Sabbath. Saturday Aug. 27.
JWV told the Coalition of Con-
endorses the civil rights agenda
of Martin Luther King, Jr and
agrees that "his vision has yet to
become a reality "
JWV is withdrawing its en-
-iirsemer.: *&jC Z*jl aaaaeni
the program disfigures the causes
for which Rev King so valiantly
TEMPORARY
NURSING
SERVICES
Home Nursing Licensed Personnel
Aides Companions Home Makers
Miami
891-5322
Ft. Laud.
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By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration denounced
as "patently fake" the
assertion by the head of the
"Anti-Zionist Committee of
the Soviet Public that the
majority of Soviet Jews
who desire to emigrate from
the Soviet Union have al-
ready left.
"Many thousands of Jews.
scene estimates range into the
of thousands, are still
this fundamental right of
of movement on the
flimsiest pretext." State Depart-
ment deputy spokesman Alan
Romberg said It is parucularry
depeorabie tnat the Soviet regime
should now enhst some peopk* of
Jewish ancestry to participate in
:hetr ann-Semitic diatribe
THE SHARP I 5 reouke
followed the claim by Samuel
Zrvs a Jewish law professor at
Moscow ho beads the ano-
Zjoust group, wmcc was rect
formea by tne Soviet aninonues
:aat ail Russian Jews who
wasted to leave the USSR have
already done so and that Zionist
groups are jugghng figures to
show that large numbers of Jews
still wish to emigrate.
Zrvs whose chums were earned
in Tass, the official Soviet news
agency, toad a Moscow press
conierence that The absolute
inajiahy of Soviet Jews who
wanted to leave in order to
reunite wah their families abroad
have left by now. The Jews left in
Russia have no desire to leave
their country except those who
have fallen vrtun to Zionist
propaganda which has brain-
washed them." Zrvs. who serves
as First Deputy of the anti-
Zionist committee, was quoted as
saying by Tass.
According to Tass. the com-
mittee, established last ApriL
endorses Israel's right to exist
but is opposed to the polrif.s of
the Premier Menachem Begin s
government and supports the
creation of a Palest man state.
The committee is chaired by Gen.
David Dragunsky. one of the
highest ranking Jewish officers in
the Red Army. now reured.
THE STATE Department said
that "while this particular state-
ment was purported to reject
anti-Semitism, in fact the basic
-_---: :.-_* and xher
7irmttm propaganda is
tic. Romberg pointed out
specifically a statement by Dra-
gunsky who was quoted as
r> mg. The tane is now for us to
sase more concerted efforts to
counter international Zjomsm
ana to rebuff the anu-Sovnt
iisr.z-i-fr- I aaaatJ hi gafjfcwg
his thugs are very
to those of Hitler s atroo
he was quoted as savnag bv
Tass
Romberg said the IS.
ii particularly the
by Dragunsky "who
wah
100 a month arc permitted to
have Despite the claims of the
anti-Zionist i naamillae .
Western moaitors know
least 300.000 aiwitatksi
been sent to Soviet Jews to par-
nut them to take the first step in
leaving. These have not bean
acted upon."
The Soviet authorities, the
NCSJ charges, have mated this
mmmittw using people who are
ostensibly Jews, but who
never involved with fellow J<
and are retort ad by Soviet Jews
as their spokespeopla The
practice of using selected Jews to
express Soviet opinion on
of Jewish concern b not
The NCSJ said Dragunsky
and Zrvs have been trotted out
to deny that thn*J
' oj[Jew,T*
thatJcv,^
hi the
ny .
Soviet Ui
to leave."
The Student Strug*, J
Sovaa Jewry sad uWusL*$
CouBtfla for Soviet Jew, Sfl
New York that 4^
thousarAcf dc^umn^j;
of fanahea stiB iaanfah drS
by Kremhn pobry and CZ\
every reason to behave |W /*
many tens of thouaaaos am
Under any ca-cumsuace, u|
Soviets are cleariy vtakatksj
repealed affirmation of the UN
Declaration of Human Rw,
which obligates there to rSZ\
"^f "*? a=:P*- not
just those lucky enough to hv
ausnecbat* family me-=oers in Ij. (
rant as the Kremhn requires
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cower is an eaueme
of the truth and h
absolutely unacceptable.
Rosabei g said
The statements as reported by
Tass by the members of the anti-
aiso drew a
1 from Sovnt Jewish
The National Conference
Jewry NCSJ- said the
a the larger compo-
of a new propaganoa
campaign .n wnicc do\iet
anthorxns are trying to deaegx-
anize lsraet and Zaiemai ana
awake the desare for repatnauon
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m


Friday, June 24,1963 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Leo Mindlin
At the Anti-Defamation League Ameri-
canism Awards Dinner honoring Gary Y.
Holtzman, executive vice president of
Jordan Marsh Company at the Four Ambas-
sadors Hotel are (left to right) Jerome C.
Berlin, Florida chairman, Society of Fellows;
Holtzman; Larry Adams, dinner chairman,
executive vice president. Southern Division,
Florida Power and Light Co.; and Jonathan
Kislak, chairman, Florida Regional Board.
\0n the
\Bookshelf
Needed: Shot of Vigor for Dreary
I Ia-idi Democracy: The Middle of
the Journey. By Daniel Shim-
shoni. New YorkThe Free
Press, 1982. 543 pp., $34.95
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Book Editor
As a member of Miami Federa-
Ition's Project Renewal Com-
Imittee, I met the author of this
Ibook during the Committee's
I visits to Or Akiva, the Israel
development town with which
IMiami is twinned. He was then
llhe Israel government's coordi-
Inator for Project Renewal, one in
I i series of top-level jobs which he
I held since moving to Israel
|from the United States in 1948.
His closeness to the seat of
power was manifested in one of
lour meetings when a question
[arose that could only be answered
by one man. Shimshoni simply
[picked up the phone and placed a
Icall to that man the President
I'it Israel.
Armed with a Harvard PhD
| a ml a special vantage point high
Israel's power structure,
IShimshoni has given us a sober
land searching view of "Israeli
IDemocracy." His insights are
I penetrating and cogent. His
|analysis is perceptive and
discerning. His history is
abundant and erudite. His
research is thorough and exhaus-
tive.
NEVERTHELESS, the book
is ponderous and dull. The ex-
citing story of Israel's birth and
development is converted to a
lifeless and monotonous text
book. Shimshoni has drained the
drama from a spectacular
chronicle.
One disheartening characteris-
tic of the book is its absence of
characters. Very few people
appear, except in footnotes. Only
once, and then in a footnote, does
Shimshoni tell an anecdote. He
undoubtedly could have told
many more, thus giving life to an
inert book.
Miamians may forgive his
general failure to mention names
since he makes an exception
when discussing Tel Aviv
University. He speaks of the
"entrepreneurial force of Presi-
dent George Wise," paying what
is really insufficient tribute to
one of Miami's leading citizens.
What Shimshoni set out to do
was to illuminate the process by
which policy decisions are made
in Israel. He provides an
historical background and then
looks in depth at issues in
defense, the economy, social wel-
fare, science and the environ-
ment.
HIS PERSONAL participa-
tion in working on many of these
matters gives authority to his
analysis. But his restraint and
his omission of the actors block
off the lively debate and
discussion which are a vital part
of the difficult decision-making
process.
He is overly-guarded, for
example, in dealing with the
waste, duplication and overlap-
ping which arise from main-
taining at least three governing
authorities in Israel the
government, the Jewish Agency
and the Histadrut.
His reserve is particularly puz-
zling, since he was severely
handicapped in carrying out his
Project Renewal responsibilities
by the unnecessary complexities
of government and Jewish
Agency involvement. His frus-
tration could have been the basis
for a vivid picture, but we search
for it in vain.
Democracy in Israel is lusty,
filled with ferment and topped
with tension. You would never
know it from "Israeli Demo-
cracy." Among the blessings
which open the daily morning
prayers is one which praises the
Lord for restoring vigor to the
weary. What this book needs is a
shot of vigor for the dreary.
Reagan Concessions Demands Rapped
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA)
Son. Alan ('runston (1) Calif.)
arned here that efforts by the
Fagan Administration to pres-
sure or seek concessions from Is-
*'! on major policy issues could
uve fatal consequences for the
fwish State.
"Israel might not survive, but
*' (the U.S.) would." Cranston
told some 100 persons at a
I'uncheon meeting of the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress' national
Governing council, which met
ere for its three-day annual
'ting.
"' say that we should make it
unmistakably clear to all the
,rb nations that we will not
sure Israel in an effort to try
Persuade Israel to make con-
ssions which may be contrary
1 er interests and perhaps con-
trary to her survival," Cranston
said.
In attacking the "myth" of
what he called a balanced U.S.
polk-y in the Middle East, Cran-
ston said the U.S. should not let
Israel doubt its steadfastness
and that Amerka's national in-
terests are equated with Israel's
security. "We must make it plain
to the Arabs that we will never
sell Israel down the river as a
price for their friendship or for
their oil," he asserted.
The Senate deputy minority
leader said, "America's policy of
pouring arms indiscriminately to
Arabs and Israelis alike, poses
tremendous strain on Israel's
economy." He criticized Presi-
dent Reagan'8 assertion that Is-
rael need not be concerned by
U.S. arms shipments to the Arab
Discomfort of Siding
With President Reagan
Continued from Page 4-A
bases that are arbitrary and irre-
levant to capability.
IT WAS the celebrated AUen
Bakke case in California that
propelled Jews toward their
interest in what came to be
known as "reverse discrimina-
tion" quotas by which certain
minority groups are given handi-
cap advantages.
In the Bakke case, Allen Bakke
was denied a seat at the Univer-
sity of California Medical School
despite the fact that his record of
performance was far more im-
pressive than the significantly
lower records of students granted
entrance to the school who were
either black or hispanic or from
other racial and ethnic minorities.
Reckoned in terms of President
Reagan's firings, what must be
understood is that Rabbi Saltz-
man, et aL, were for affirmative
action quotas, and the President
is against them, as are many
American Jews who tend to
oppose affirmative action quotas,
as well.
IN THIS sense, civil liberta-
rians are absolutely correct in
being offended by those Jews
who appear to have abandoned
them and their cause. In the civil
libertarians' view, these Jews are
turning their backs on the tradi-
tional beliefs in which they have
held common cause for so long.
But these Jews are also correct in
their feeling that they remain
consistent in their anti-quota
attitudes.
All of which is more than a
semantic problem, especially if it
is not forgotten that, particularly
between Jews and blacks, things
have not been happy for a long
time. And it is not an unhap-
piness having to do with affir-
mative action either that started
the downward slide in feeling.
Black anti-Semitism in America
has far more ominous roots than
that.
Many Jews nationally, there-
fore, suddenly feel isolated in the
world of civil libertarian affairs
where they were once pioneers
and dominant. In matters of
discrimination, they only fear
exclusion, not competition in the
marketplace of excellence, and it
is precisely here where the great
divide begins.
Kimche Brings
Assurance
Continued from Page 1 A
Parliament vote caused Secretary
of State George Shultz to express
optimism over the situation Ll
Lebanon while he testified before
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee.
THE LEBANESE ratification
now clears the way for the Leb-
anese government to exchange
ratification documents with Is-
rael Lebanese Prime Minister
Safiq Wazzan said his govern-
ment will decide on an "ap-
propriate" date for this exchange
with Israel, meanwhile hoping
that Syrian opposition to the
accord will be dropped.
Meanwhile, Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger, in response
to questions after addressing the
National Press Club here, ex-
pressed a willingness for the
restoration of the memorandum
of understanding on strategic
cooperation between the U.S. and
Israel.
The accord was suspended
shortly after being signed in
October, 1981 because of U.S.
displeasure over Israel's annexa-
tion of the Golan Heights. "The
revival or restitution of that
memorandum could take place at
virtually any time depending on
the wishes of the Israeli govern-
ment," Weinberger said.
nations because they are in-
tended for use against the Soviet
Union. However, Cranston
pointed out that the number one
enemy of the Arab states is
Israel.
Cranston, who is seeking the
Democratic nomination for the
1984 Presidential election,
stressed during his 20 minute
speech that he had refused to join
those who condemned the Israeli
raid of Iraq's nuclear reactor in
June, 1981 because he viewed the
action as "defensive, not offen-
sive."
A leader in the Senate in oppo-
sition to the AWACS arms
package sale to Saudi Arabia last
year, Cranston said he is pre-
pared to lead the opposition in
any proposal to sell sophisticated
weaponry to Jordan.
I
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Page 14-A The Jewnfa Flcndijc Fnday. June 24, 1983

i
V.
Jews. Blacks
Not Close Anymore
Differences are Transitory'Jacob
CoatinoMl horn P* 1 A
sharp ana permanent divisions. '
THE CIVIL rights leader said
that some friction between the
two groups "boas down to the
sad fact that some blacks suffer
from the disease of anti-Semitism
and some Jews from the disease
of racism. But we cannot define
the relations between commu-
nities by the acts and thoughts of
their least representative
elements." he said, adding:
"The path of intergroup rela-
tions in an American marked by
racism and ethnic tensions has
never been easy. That two such
different minorities as blacks and
Jews should have retained so
extraordinary a degree of con-
tinuing cooperation says a lot
more about the permanence of
their alliance than the more
transient friction does."
Jacob cautioned against
underestimating "the strength of
racism that must bind blacks and
Jews together in common cause.
For despite the apparent accep-
tance of Jews in our society," he
said, "there is a deep current of
Thatcher's New Jewish Ministers
Attract Attention in London
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) Two
young Jewish ministers in Prime
Minister Margaret Thatcher's
new Cabinet are attracting the
most attention here since the
Conservative's landslide election
victory June9.
Nigel i iv, son. 51, is the first
Jewish-br -n Chancellor of the
Exchequt since Herbert Samuel
held that office in 1916 Samuel
went on o become the British
High ('<: missioner in Mandate
Palestine
Leon i'/rittan, 43, is the first
Jewish Home Secretary since
Benjamin Disraeli and the
youngest since Winston Chur-
chill. Both are sons of Jewish
immigrant from Eastern Europe
and typify the breed of successful
self-made men whom Thatcher
seems to tavor. Neither identifies
himself closely with the Jewish
community however. Both have
non-JewLsh wives but neither
denies his Jewish family back-
ground.
BRITTAN IS the son of a
Lithuanian-born doctor who
immigrated to England from
Germany in 1927. A Socialist in
his youth, he shifted to the
Conservative Party during the
1956 Sue/. Canal crisis because
the Laborites supported Egypt.
He was educate at Cambridge
and at Yale University in the
U.S. and practiced law, becoming
one of Britain's most successful
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libel lawyers.
He entered Parliament in 1974
and was named a junior minister
at the Home Office after That-
cher won her first election in
1979. Less than two years later.
Thatcher brought him into her
Cabinet as First Secretary to the
Treasury.
Brittan's older brother,
Samuel, is economics corres-
pondent of the Financial Times
and is considered England's most
influential economic writer.
Lawson also entered Parlia-
ment in 1974, was named a junior
Treasury Minister in 1979 and
later Energy Secretary. His
father was a tea merchant whose
family came from Latvia. Lawson
was educated at Westminster
Public School and at Oxford.
HE BEGAN his professional
life as a journalist on the Finan-
cial Times. Later he was city
editor of the Sunday Telegraph
and editor of The Spectator, a
weekly magazine.
Lawson first entered politics in
1963 as a speechwriter for the
Conservative Prime Minister, Sir
Alec Douglas Home. He earned a
reputation as one of the country's
most forceful and original eco-
nomic thinkers in the Thatcher
Administration. His elevation to
head the Treasury was long pre-
dicted but came as a surprise
nevertheless.
Lawson was married to the
former Vanessa Salmon from
1965-1980. They had four chil-
dren. He has had two more
children by his second wife.
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HIGH HOLY DAYS
Conservative Temple-Hialeah
Call N7-MW9 am -12 Noon.
*~
- a a a a
I
r Anyone with information
concerning the whereabouts
of the following person,
please call: The National
Council of Jewish Women
5764747. Sam Drucker, ap-
proximately 67 years old,
from Buchash, Poland,
arrived 1948/49 last known
address 542 Jefferson
Avenue Miami Beach,'
Florida ten years ago His
brother Yakob is trying to
I find hjrfl,
anti-Semitism that runs strong.
. The historic thread of anti-
Semitism and racism is always
just beneath the surface."
ON ISRAEL'S role as a factor
in black-Jewish relations, the
Urban League leader declared:
"I see Israel as a democratic
state deserving of America's
total support. The special nature
of that State, rising from a holo-
caust that was unprecedented in
the history of the world, demands
continued support for its exis-
tence and for its safety in a sea of
enemies.
"Let me further say that the
Palestinians are a people whose
natural longings for self-
determination must be respected,
but that they have been badly led
and have been mistaken in allow-
ing a terrorist band to monop-
olize their cause.
"We only have to see Mr.
Arafat's latest rejection of the
Reagan plan which I support
to be convinced that the PLO
is irrelevant to Palestinian
aspirations, destructive of at-
tempts to bring peace to the
region, and unspeakably self-
serving in its desire to hang on to
subsidies and the trappings of
power at the expense of securing
a homeland for Palestinians."
JACOB acknowledged that
"there is a significant part of the
black community that identifies
with the Palestinian cause, and
this is a source of continued fric-
tion between blacks and Jews."
He commented:
"I fully understand Jewish
sensitivity toward Israel. It is the
safe haven for a part of the Jew-
ish population almost destroyed
by the Nazis, and another part
oppressed in Arab lands. It is the
home of blood relatives of most
American Jews. Its safety is not
a matter to be taken lightly, nor
is sympathy with those perceived
as Israel's enemies to be easily
dismissed.
"But there is an unfortunate
tendency to misinterpret a
natural sympathy for the under-
dog as anti-Semitism. That
sympathy led blacks to almost
unanimous support for Israel
when it was seen as a small,
struggling democracy in a sea of
Arab hostility. Now some of that
sympathy has been transferred to
Palestinians seeking a homeland
of their own."
VMMVWIVWMM
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther,
and let me quote yo
rates. Also local moving <
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or)
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
*aVMM
(of Mi
H
rra
Beth DinOffico
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
count'ies
1532 Washington Avenue
Mia^i Beach. Florida 33139
re I 534 1004 or 672-OO04
w^B
^aaaaaWa^^LwJ *--_w PR ^J wf T
L ~'^il i 40*
avar ^
Sen. Lawton Chiles (D., Flo.) meet* with Assistant Secre-
tary of State Elliott Abrams to discuss the plight of Soviet
Jewry. The Senator presents a mailbag of letters from con-
cerned Floridians and a petition with hundreds of signatures to
Abrams, the Administration official responsible for human
rights issues. The petition and letters, many of them written by
children, were gathered earlier this year at a rally in Miami
organized by the South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry.
Chiles told Abrams that 'repression of Jews and other religious
minorities in the Soviet Union is on the rise.'
Tannenbaum Says Soviet
Committee is Moscow Tool
NEW YORK-(JTA)- Bernice Tannembaum. acting
chairman of the American Section of the World Zionist
Organization, said the Soviet Anti-Zionist Committee is a
"palpable and blatant Soviet propaganda tool. It has been
artificially concocted by the Kremlin to counteract and
cover up condemnation of the USSR's program of Jewish
spiritual and cultural repression and the almost complete
cessation of Soviet-Jewish emigration.
"This calumny together with Soviet government inter-
ference with the delivery of mail to potential Jewish emi-
grants" are orchestrated by Moscow.
The brunch
bunch.
^rro
}*<^*
-Marriott Hotels
'Hemndu
A BUBBLY WAY TO SPEND SUNDAY.
Marriott invites you to an all-you-can-eat brunch extrava-
ganza. Choose from Roast Beef, Coq Au V'in, Omeletes cook"
to order. Blintzes, Bacon, Sausage, Oysters on the half shell
baskets of cheeses and fruits, a table laden with salad*, eggs
benedict and delicious desserts such as strawberry cheesecake,
chocolate mousse and english trifle. Plus champagne and
well you'll have to stop in to see for yourself!
Come and try us this Sunday, 10:30 a.m. 2:30 p.m
^iriottHotei
1201 N W L|*un*Road Miami. Florid* J3126 a iOS)e*-S0OO


Friday, June 24,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page IS-A
Iflsrael Is To Risk.
So Must We
Consultation Needed, Not Confrontation
Continued from Page 5-A
| Administration has done is to
lack away from consultation:
promulgating its September 1
plan in close discussions with
heveral Arab countries, but de
I dining to consult with Israel be
I lore its publication: refusing to
Im the Prime Minister of Israel
L February, at a time when a
mrm welcome was being given
I to several Arab heads of state
Ivisiting the President: and in
I other ways treating Israel as the
"poor relation" who is allowed
kmto the kitchen but not the
|drawing room
MEANWHILE, the Adminis-
I tration has imposed a steady
I stream of sanctions against Is-
Irael: suspending the 1981 agree
[merit on strategic cooperation,
I halting F-16 deliveries and sales
Imow rectified) and encouraging
I press reports that it is planning
I io eliminate or reduce economic
I and military aid.
It has even sent, and then
I leaked to the press, messages to
I the Prime Minister of Israel
liarning darkly that, if Israel
Itoes not accede to U.S. views, the
Imtire relationship between the
|two countries mav be in doubt.
In effect the Administration
laas conducted its dioiomacv in a
I > mat treats Israel more as an
licnersarv tnan an allv This
KeaKcns Israeli confidence trial
line I nitc Sen. Glenn
liable ally over the long term, and
without such confidence there
can be little progress toward
peace in the Middle East
It also strengthens the hand of
those in the Arab world who have
the mistaken belief that the Unit
ed States will deliver Israeli con-
cessions to them on a silver plat
ter. when in truth only direct and
realistic negotiations can produce
real solutions We need to do all
we can to strengthen our rela-
Uonshm with Israel not en-
courage her eneniM
THE PRESIDENTS almost
complete silence for several
weeks on the disturbing develop-
ments in Syria, where large num-
bers of Soviet troops are operat-
ing new missiles linked to a So-
viet command system, and large
numbers of Syrian and FLO
troops have moved back into
Lebanon, concerns me.
This is dangerous escalation,
and the President's long silence
on the matter sent the wrong
signal to the Soviet Union. It
seems to be another example of
how, in failing to reaffirm our
bonds with Israel, we are hurting
not only Israel but ourselves.
The Administration has also
moved quietly away from Camp
David, making ever fewer refer-
ences to it. The Camp David
process remains our best hope.
Camp David worked because it
addressed those issues which
could be solved and put off the
issues that could prolong the
conflict.
THE ADMINISTRATION,
on the other hand, seems to seek
quick and easy answers and
this is bound to be disappointing.
Long-standing tears, hatreds and
suspicions will not disappear
overnight. No action or policv of
the United States no matter
how well conceived or intended
will automatically solve the
crisis
Onlv the Middle Eastern na-
tions themselves can do that. But
what America can and must do is
to serve tirelessly as a catalyst
for peace and to discourage out-
I siders who would meddle for their
own selfish gain.
Let's not kid ourselves. To
have peace in the Middle East the
Arabs must join the process. If
any Arab nation wants peace, let
it step forward. Egypt did and
Israel proved its good faith by
turning over the Sinai. I believe
that Israel is prepared to meet
other nations halfway. But no
one's interests will be served by
statements that imply we are
willing to discuss a divided Jeru-
salem, nor should the United
States agree to preconditions for
negotiations.
Lebanon War Investigation
Motion Defeated 56-50 by Knesset
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
An opposition motion to
investigate the govern-
ment's conduct of the war
in Lebanon has been reject-
ed by the Knesset in a 56-50
vote. The outcome was not
unexpected. But one Likud
MK, Yitzhak Berman,
voted with the opposition,
and his colleague, Dror
Seigerman abstained.
Premier Menachem Begin led
the debate, insisting that the war
had only one objective to pro-
tect the people of Galilee from
terrorist bombardment. He re-
jected allegations that his gov-
ernment wanted to establish a
'new order" in Lebanon. He con-
ceded that there had been some
difficulties observing however
that "all military campaigns run
into difficulties
BEGIN DISMISSED the idea
ot creating a commission to uv
ouire into tne government s de-
cision-making process during the
war on grounds that it would
"give ammunition to Israel's
enemies The demand for a com
mission came from the Labor
Alignment and Shinui. Labor
Party Chairman Shimon Peres
said there was no intention to in-
vestigate the causes of the war or
the performance of the army but
to find out if and why the Cabinet
often gave approval to war moves
by then Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon "aftet the fact." Sharon
was abroad during the debate.
Mordechai Virsubsky of the
Shinui faction said he had
documentary proof that the army
was ordered to fight the Syrians
in Lebanon long before there was
any decision by the government
to engage the Syrians. Begin
claimed that in Israel's previous
wars there were cases of military
actions approved retroactively.
Likud Mh Akiva Noff in-
troduced a motion to investigate
the behavior ot the opposition
parties during the war The
Alignment's Knesset faction rose
en oloc and left the cnamoe
"BY POPULAR DEMAND!"
EJtSHini; CONTINUES THE GREATEST
"OFF-LEASE" CAR SALE IN OUR 29 YEAR HISTORY!
THE "CREAM OF THE CROP" OF OUR CAREFULLY MAINTAINED. PRIVATE LEASE CARS HAVE
BEENSELECTED FOR THIS GIGANTIC SALE AT AMAZINGLY LOW-LOW PRICES.
1975 Cadillac tldorado Convertible Mwi wily 52.000 mUaal Look* 1 nd runt Ilk* w "artoet topi nd tin*. Trad* aooapf d. First Buyer With a $6666. 1980 Pont lac Qran Prix Crul control Pot. window* Door looks TMt OTteel. etorao. I Cloth bench Mat. Uk* now Must Sell! $5295. 1979 OMa Cutlass Supreme Brougham IMartor. CM** contra). Loadad vrMh entree. 4 new reetete. Buy Now! $5555. 1979 Cadillac Eldorado Wgm to. (MM at Wto) 1 avheeU. Ne **>yi tee*. WW finer 1 Till.....UK Like New! $9495.
197S Ford Fiesta Mr cond. apiad tile* AfcVFM ***. leek* run* Hk* naarl Want IM tout. Trad*.......a $2495. 19MCa*dMlaeSevme L* 81 Dodge Arle*
Station Wagon
K CAR* Economy plus Factory
atr. Full powor. Automatic. 20.000
1981 Dataun 280ZX
Ola*. T-Top. 5-Spead
mlla*.
KWl.
Take Me Home!
$5995.
Bargain Priced
$10,495.
,100 OTHER CARS TO
CHOOSE FROM AT
SACRIFICE PRICES!
ImRMEDims *FULL SIZE
CADILUCS^UHCOLiS
STATIOM
1879 Chev. Caprice
4-Dr. Pot. mm;aunt too. wtn-
Oow. t door took*. Uk* new
condition. Comptala 30-day
warranty.
$4295
Immaculate
IfMChw.Chovotto
4-Dr. Hatchback
I tmmmt* <
Price to Swill!
From $2795.
1980 Chew.
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1980 AMC Concord
DL4-Dr
a Cyl Automatic. Cool
aTMta. Foil aee**ri package
Buy Now! 3995.
1880 Ford Fairmont
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ACyLAtr
Low Low
Sale Price $3295.
1881 Cadillac Brougham
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$13,395.
EVERY CAR CARRIES PERSHING'S FAMOUS ALL INCLUSIVE WARRANTY'
* TRADES ACCEPTED BANK FINANCING ON THE PREMISES'
~7 AUTO LEASING
1545 ALTON RD.9 MIAMI BEACH 532-5421
OPEN 8 AM to 7:30 P.M MONDAY thru FRIDAY SATURDAY it SUNDAY TILL 5 P.M.
-1*;^


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. June 24. 1983
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ICalJNF Leaders Honored Interfaith Observance to
ationai President Jacobson Highlight Crime, Victims
jigh National Fund leaders
ater Miami and Hollywood
Charlotte Jacobson,
president of JNF of
wm) and Dr. Samuel I.
^executive vice president,
Ij reception last month on
dj Beach. Master of cere-
was Rabbi Mayer
vitz, JNF Executive
i chairman.
, County Mayor Steve
fc who had just returned
I Israel, spoke of JNF activi-
there, and Miami Beach
r Norman Ciment presented
^son and Cohen Keys to the
rof Miami Beach. A musical
m was presented by
jd Stuart, accordionist, Is-
jopera singer Lois Yavnielli,
ICantor Saul Breeh.
nong the JNF leaders at-
were Ann Ackerman,
rAbramowitz. Molly Adler,
kin Altshuler, Mr. and Mrs.
irt Anker, Mr. and Mrs. lou
fnson Judge Frederick Barad,
I and Mrs. Arthur Berkey,
\ndre Bialonlenki,
Bhain Hodow. Mrs. Breeh.
ami Mrs. George Brodie,
don Huxbaum. and Mr. and
i Maxwell Corn.
Florence Flederman.
[tha 1 ox. Mr. and Mrs. Irving
er. Mr. and Mrs. Aaron
khr,. Anna Gilinsky. Fay
Idberg. Gertrude Greenberg,
jTand Mrs. Morris Greenfield.
[ and Mrs. Abraham Grunhut,
lalpern. Dr. Siegfried
iburjjer, Mr. and Mrs.
lore Hammer, Mr. and Mrs.
(phen Igra. Rabbi Samuel Z.
Rose Kass. Rae Kaufman,
Becca Kaufman, Jennie
Itman. Zev W. Kogan, and
psKotick.
|lso. Sol Krival. Mr. and Mrs.
i Kronheim. Rae Kupferman,
1 Nathaniel Kutcher, Suzanne
iy. Augusta Lazarus, Rabbi
Ing I.ehrman, Rebecca Leon,
sa Levine, Betty Lippman,
Shown above are Metro
Mayor Steve Clark, center,
and Ernest Samuels and Ann
Ackerman, Jewish National
Fund supporters.
Mollye Lovinger, Rabbi Morton
Malavsky, Clara Mazer, Dr. Alon
Ben Meir. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur
Miller, Chief Emmett Miller, Mr.
and Mrs. Sam Pascoe, Mr. and
Mrs. Paul Perlis. Lillian Perlow,
Helen Pollock, Mr. and Mrs.
Albert Pomper, Miriam Press,
and Mr. and Mrs. Moe Reiffen.
Also. Mr. and Mrs. Irving
Reingold, Philip Richland,
Augusta Mentz Richland.
Maurice Robbin. Celia Rosen-
blatt. Frieda Sack, Ernest
Samuels, Mr. and Mrs. Abe
Savelle. Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Schiffman. Mr. and Mrs. Leo
Schimel, Mr. and Mrs. Igor
Schuitz, Leon Schuster. Kathy
Schwarz, Mr. and Mrs. Israel
Schwartz. Mr. and Mrs. Rubin
Shapiro, Thelma Sheckter, Doris
Skol, Gussie Tabach, Freida
Tobey, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Toll.
Mr. and Mrs. Alexander
VValdman, Mr. and Mrs. Abe
Wenger, Mr. and Mrs. Max
Wagman, Ida Wessel, Revy
Wilder, Mr. and Mrs. George
Wind. Mr. and Mrs. Irwin
Wladaver. and Anna Zuckerman.
"Civic Responsibility Sab-
bath," an interfaith observance
by churches and synagogues
throughout Dade County to in-
crease public awareness of crime
and its victims, will be held Jury
2 and 3, according to the Most
Reverent Edward A. McCarthy,
Archbishop of Miami
Prayer services will be con-
ducted in synagogues on Jury 2
and in churches July 3, reflecting
the Judea-Christian ethic of law,
justice, and communal tranquil-
ity, according to the Archbishop.
"We all share the same concern
for our families, friends and
neighbors. In order to make our
community a safer place to live,
each individual must assume
their civic responsibility," stated
Archbishop McCarthy, chairman
of Religious Heritage Committee
of Miami Citizens Against Crime,
an anti-crime group of more than
180 community leaders and 150
organizations throughout South
Florida.
Miami Citizens Against Crime,
chaired by Alvah H. Chapman,
Jr., was formed to initiate a pro-
gram to curb crime and improve
the quality of life in South
Florida. Among the goals of the
groups executive and eight
action committees are increased
police protection, increased re-
sources for the state's criminal
justice system, continued federal
involvement. greater public
awareness of the crime problems,
and more community involve-
ment in the fight against crime.
Serving with Archbishop
McCarthy on Religious Herit-
age Committee are Reverends
Dr. Richard J. Bailar, United
Church of Christ; Dr. Irvin
Elligan. Jr., Presbyterian Church
in the United States; Aaron D.
Hall. St., United Methodist
Church; Dr. W. Ivan Hoy, im-
mediate past president of Greater
Women's Division Officer to
{Participate in UJA Mission to Israel
Terry Drucker, campaign
vomen of Greater Miami
Irish Federation's Women's
hision. will participate in an
pied Jewish Appeal mission to
i June 25 through July 1 for
urmin and campaign directors
ki2fc major American cities.
ITo be led by Women's Division
ptional Chairman Harriet
nmtrman and National Direc-
Nan Goldberg, the partici-
p.Ti- will meet with mission
fwps of campaign and Project
newal lay and professional
idership, which will be led by
pA National Chairman Robert
I-oup and Project Renewal
itional Chairman Bernard
ftldman.
I I'm looking forward to an
(citing and challenging learning
rience in Israel," Drucker
d "I hope to come back to our
mi community with valuable
^rmation to help enhance the
nen's Division campaign."
[Drucker noted that she will be
iting Or Akiva, Greater Miami
eh Federation's Project
val community, where
("men's Division plans to fund
Btruction of a new communal
ility.
I The various mission groups
join together for a dinner
Terry Drucker
with Prime Minister Menachem
Begin and a dinner for president
of Israel, Chaim Herzog and will
also study various aspects of
UJA-supported projects.
"The purpose of a take-off
mission at this early date in our
campaign is to give our
chairmen an opportunity to see
first-hand where our money goes
in Israel," stressed Zimmerman.
"These leaders want to assess for
themselves what is needed and
compare that evaluation with
what is being raised."
dominations for Dade
"ity's Outstanding Citizens
"W, in its 34th year, are being
Bht by South Dade Council of
P B'rith Lodges, which
pnsors the annual award
Paring a man and a woman for
P* voluntary civic service to
Pcommunity.
kSal or8arizations are being
w to submit the name of a
ana-cr woman they believe
Miami Ministerial Association:
T. Luther Jones, president of
Metropolitan Fellowship of
Churches; Thomas J. Price, Jr.,
United Methodist Church; Jsmes
J. McCartney, Roman Catholic
Church; Dr. Patrick H. O'Neill,
Roman Cathobc Church; Arnold
Perry, Lutheran Church in
America; George S. Pyke, Chris-
tian Church (Disciples of Christ);
and Victor L. Rankin, United
Methodist Church.
Also, Rabbi Solomon Schiff,
executive vice president of
Rabbinical Association of Great-
er Miami; Right Reverend Calvin
O. Schofield. Jr., Bishop of the
Episcopal Diocese of Southeast
Florida; Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz,
president of Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami; and Rev-
erend J. W. Stepherson, presi-
dent of People United To Lead
the Struggle for Equality.
has "contributed to the better-
ment of our community through
volunteer service during the past
year," according to Ronald M.
Friedman, chairman of the
awards luncheon, which will be
held Oct. 27 at the Four Ambas-
sadors Hotel.
Deadline for submission of
names is June 30. Names should
be submitted to Friedman of
Coral Gables.
In Washington, President Reagan meets with Stanley Zwaik
(right), national commander, Jewish War Veterans of the
U.S.A., and Harris Stone, director, to discuss issues of concern
to American Jewish war veterans.
Jewislhi Floradiaini
Miami, FloridaFriday, Juna 24,1983
Section B
standing Citizen'Nominees Sought
Every floor in every store is brimming
with brisk savings. You'll find
outstanding values on everything you
need for your family and home.
Hurry in early for the best selection.
Sorry, no mail or phone orders
lordani
Jmarsh

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Use your Jordan Marsn charge card, American Express, Diners Club. We welcome trem all'
SHOP JM DAILY, 10 AM TO 9 PM: SUNDAY. 12 NOON TO 5:3C PM


Page2-B The Jewish FToridian / Friday, June 24, 1963
Miamian Publishes
Jewi8h EdUCatOrS Elected Book on Spanish Jews
Officers, Honored Teachers
Elections of a new slate of
officers for 1983-84 and recogni
tion of veteran teachers marked
closing dinner meeting events of
Jewish Council of Early Child-
hood Educators held at the
Hebrew Academy this past week.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff was instal-
ling officer.
Serving as president for the
coming year will be Shulamit
Gittelson, JCECE director at
Beth David Solomon Schechter
Day School. Area vice presidents
will be Nancy Eisenstadt. Temple
Judea (South Dade); Judy Balle-
tta. Temple Emanu-Ei (North
Dade-Miami Beach); Ellen
Heilig, Temple in the Pines
(South Broward): and Arlene
Lasko, Temple Kol Ami (North
Broward-Palm Beach-Boca
Raton). Treasurer will be Gilda
Ashbal, Hebrew Academy;
secretary, Barbara Rosenblatt,
Temple Menorah; and sunshine
chairperson, Gail Adler, Michael
Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center.
Outgoing president is Arlene
Green berg who served in that
capacity for the past two years.
Director of Early Childhood
Development Program at South
Dade Jewish Community Center,
she was given a gold charm in
recognition of leadership.
President Gittelson, a resident
of Miami for the past 30 years, is
a graduate of Hunter College and
Herzliah Hebrew Teachers Semi-
nary and holds Continuing Early
Childhood and Hebrew Teacher
licenses issued by Central Agen-
cv for Jewish Education's Board
of License. She is a certified
Montessori teacher and was
leader of 1982 and 1983 JCECE
Early Childhood Israel Study
Tour. She was also co-leader with
her husband of Israel Teenage
Tours and participated in a visit
to the Soviet Union to meet with
refuseniks.
Projects for 1983-84 outlined
by Gittelson in her acceptance
speech were formulation of a
Code of Practice for early child-
hood teachers, increased profes-
sionalization of ECE teachers,
development of ECE Resource
Center, and retainment of an
ECE consultant for the South
Florida area.
Outgoing officers honored for
25 years of service to early child-
hood education in the community
were Anita Koppele of Temple
Beth Sholom of Greater Miami
and Ossie Elfenbein of Beth
Torah Congregation. Recognized
for 20 years was Ruth Hirsch of
Temple Or Olom.
Gilda Ceppoe of Temple Beth
Am, and Ruth Glass man of
Temple Samu-El were honored
for 15 years of service, and
recognized for 10 years of JCECE
teaching were Sylvia Bott and
Audrey Dillaman of Beth Torah
Congregation, Charlotte Matalon
of Beth Shalom of Hollywood.
Joan Perlman of Temple Beth Is-
rael of Fort Lauderdale, Shirley
Schiff of Hebrew Academy, and
By ma Herman of Temple Judea.
Emanu-El Club Names President
Col. Nathaniel Kutcher ha
been elected president of the
Men's Club of Temple Emanu-El,
replacing Edward Weiner. Allen
Goldberg, a past president, was
elected chairman of the board of
the organization, which supports
activities both at the temple and
Lehrman Day School.
Elected as vice presidents were
Dr. John Berger, Dr. Jeffrey
Blumenthal, past president of
Temple Emanu-El Family
League; Louis Jacobson, and Dr.
Allan Land.
Other officers elected wert
Commissioner Bruce Singer,
membership secretary; Joseph
W. Malek, corresponding secre-
tary; Oscar Sklar, recording
secretary; and Richard Prager.
financial secretary.
Now in his sixth term as presi-
dent of Judea Lodge of B'nai
B'rith, Kutcher is a former state
vice president of B'nai B'rith and
is active in Jewish National
Fund, Shaare Zedek Medical
Center, and Hebrew University
CoL Nathaniel Kutcher
of Jerusalem. He also serves on
the board of directors of Temple
Emanu-El.
Lehrman Groundbreaking Set
Groundbreaking ceremonies
for a S2.500.000 expansion and
renovation program of Lehrman
Day School of Temple Emanu-El
will be held Sunday. 10:30 a.m.,
at the Miami Beach Hebrew day
school, according to temple
President Sidney Cooperman.
A new preschool facility, new
library, new science laboratory,
new computer center, new audi-
torium, and new Kvmnaaium
have been planned. Renova-
tions will also include
adding a third story to the exist-
ing structure, remodeling of the
existing two stories, enlarging an
outdoor recreational area and

FAYEQROSSBERQ
The Officers & Staff of
Riverside Memorial
Chapels of Florida note
with deep sorrow the
passing of the beloved
wife of Carl Grossberg,
President of "THE
RIVERSIDE OF NEW
YORK." May he & his
family find consolation in
her many good deed8^__|
adding sports equipment, adding
parking facilities, and adding
new central air conditioning and
reverse cycle heating.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, spiritual
leader of Temple Emanu-El, will
officiate at Sunday's ceremonies.
Lehnnari Day School Choir,
assisted by Cantor Zvi Adler and
musical director, Shmuel Fer-
shko, will also participate.
Lawrence Schantz. chairman of
the temple board of education,
Lorraine Greenberg, Sisterhood
president, and Ana Sklar, PTA
president, will also extend greet-
ings.
JWVBarbequeSet
An Annual Aid to Israel
Barbeque sponsored by West
Miami Post and Auxiliary 223,
Jewish War Veterans, is
scheduled for Saturday evening
at 7:30 p.m. at the home of Stan
and Carol Gold.
Proceeds will go to Chaim
Sheba Medical Center in Tel
Aviv. The Golds are chairing the
event, along with Post Com-
mander Marvin Herman and
Auxiliary President Thelma
Potlock.
Miami historian Seymour B.
Liehman is the author of a newly-
published work, "New World
Jewry 1493-1825: Requiem for
the Forgotten." Published by
Ktav Publishing House, the book
is an account of Jews who sought
escape from the Spanish and
Portuguese Inquisition.
Spanish edition rights have
been acquired by Altalena
Editores, of Madrid. This is Lien-
man s second book to appear in
Spanish. His volume, "The Jews
in New Spain," published by the
University of Miami Press,
appeared in Mexico under the
title, Los Judios en Mexico y
America Central
Liebman is honorary life presi-
dent of the Jewish Historical So-
ciety of South Florida.
Barry M. Podolsk v
Russell JCC Names
New Director
Barry M. Podolsky has been
named director of the Michael-
Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center in North Miami Beach.
An accountant, he was financial
officer with Anilam Electronics
Corporation before joining the
JCC staff.
Podolsky was also previously
senior auditor with Touche Ross
and Company.
He holds a bachelor of science
in accounting degree from
University of Illinois and a
master of business adminis-
tration degree with concentration
in accounting from University of
Washington in Seattle.
Podolsky belongs to Temple
Sinai of North Dade.
Small Hotel, Cantor,
Shofer Blowing, Salary
Room with Meals. Call
Aaron Greenstein.
673-3842

Chairpersons Mr. and Mrs. Joel Levy, left, and Mr nnw
Budd Cuttler. wa>
Art Show at Douglas Gardens Jewi
Home to Display Resident's Work]
South Dade Friends of
Douglas Gardens, in its first
major effort on behalf of Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged, will sponsor an Art
Exhibit in the Home's
Auditorium Sunday from 1 to 3
p.m. Art created by residents will
be displayed.
South Dade Friends, a newly-
established support group of
Miami Jewish Home, is chaired
by Paula and Joel Levy and
and Budd Cutler, and, with LI
members, informs about i
encourages support of the Hon
among southwest Dade Jewi.
residents.
The exhibit will feature wo
by participants in an Artist j
Residence' program at
Gardens.
Ida Ludwig is art instructor.
I Found a Great Invitation at
y%UUa#ri/ ^tne^^S^oum
Bar Mitzvahs Bat Mitzvahs
Wedding Invitations
Custom New Year Cards
Fine Stationers and Engravers
Desk Sets Gifts
Bal Harbour Shops
9700 Collins Avenue
Bal Harbour, Florida
(305)868-1111
ie
The delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
of pasta-shaped animals kids love!
Moms and kids go tor Zooroni two by two' Kids think Zooror
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vtamin-
ennched pasta simmered in tots of yummy tomato sauce ar.d
tangy cneese Moms love to pair up with it. too1
MECHAYEH FISH
6th STREET AND MERIDIAN AVENUE
(ACROSS FROM CARNIVAL FRUIT)
MIAMI BEACH
673-1664
.mm<.
FREE
DELIVERIES
PHONE
ORDERS
Featuring one of the widest
selections of fresh fish in town
Come by for coffee and danl sh
every Sunday
UNDlfl
ORTHO00I
SHOMERSHABBOS
)WNED*Mft**GED IBBMIt!r^^aiHH.^B ,"
Mon to Thurs 8:00 am to 6:30 pm
Friday 8 am to 4:30 pm Sunday 830 am to 4:30 P11'


.

Friday, June 24t 198a/ The Jewish Floridian
Page3-B
^aS&.SS&sS

t-point- six- million dollars in State of Israel Bonds were sold
,New Leadership "Night in Haifa" gala held last weeh at
t of Miami, where 500 young professional men and women
Item! to demonstrate support of Israel Bonds Organization
| the Jewish State. Guest speaker. Ambassador Joseph
tah, left, former Israel representative to the United
,4ns, u shown with Ronald and Glenda Krongold. Krongold
itional chairman of Israel Bonds New Leadership Division.
lian Named Young Lawyers Prexy
(Attorney Neil J. Berman of
ni, long-time participant in
Irida Bar Association activi
, was sworn in as president of
ng Lawyers Section of the
which represents 15,000
nbers, at an annual meeting
Disneyworld last weekend.
nan received a bachelor's
from Boston University,
lire he graduated magna cum
in 1971. He received a JD
from University of
ecticut in 1974, where he
> managing editor of Connec-
btLaw Review.
I Herman has served as an
nnct instructor of law at
ayne College, as a member of
erican Arbitration Asso-
on. as a memger of Florida
Board of Governors, and as
nan of the Bar's Legal Edu-
on Committee.
le is also a member of Beta
na Sigma and Phi Alpha
i fraternities.
iBerman practices law here,
NeilJ. Berman
where he specializes in general
civil trials as well as commercial,
bankruptcy, and real estate.
Topf Made Honorary Fellow of
Technion at Ceremonies in Israel
I Sam B. Topf of Miami Beach
m made an honorary fellow of
thnion-Israel Institute of
Khnology at ceremonies on the
Mitute's Haifa campus June
|Technion's board of governors
owed the honor "in recogni-
f of Topf's devoted activity in
American Technion Society
in appreciation of his un-
pvering and long-standing
Torts in achievements bettering
economy of Israel."
[Topf is currently a member of
tchnion's International Board
I Governors and serves on the
F*e Simonhoff, a native
ftomian, has formally an-
need his candidacy for the
*?oral race of the City of
[wni, which will be held in
fovember.
Children's Hospital South FUl Federation Leaders Took
Honored Donors Partin National CJF Teleconference
Contributors to Miami Chil-
dren's Hospital Foundation
campaign for hospital expansion
were honored at a Society of
Founders dinner recently, ac-
cording to David Walters,
Foundation president.------
Honored at the event were rep-
resentatives of the Hospital
Alumni Association, more than
200 doctors who have graduated
from the hospital's resident pro-
gram, as well as former Senator
and Mrs. Paul B. Steinberg, on
behalf of the estate of Betty P.
Forman.
Also honored as members of
Society of Founders were Mr. and
Mrs. Joseph F. Fogarty. Jr. and
Mr. and Mrs- Arthur L. Moses,
and H. Richard Possenti, Marvin
Haven, and Paul Skoric were
welcomed into the President's
Council.
FIU's Phi Delta
Kappa Officers Named
Gladys Fisher will be installed
as 1983-84 president of Phi Delta
Kappa honorary society of Flor-
ida International University at
its seventh annual installation of
officers and awards ceremony
Saturday at 7 p.m. in University
House, Tamiami campus.
Others to be installed are E.
Joseph Kaplan, vice president
and president-elect; Rosa
Harvey, vice president, member-
ship; Jo Palchinsky, secretary;
Muriel Barth, treasurer; Shelton
Elks, historian, Alicia Mendoza,
adviser; Judith Slater, founda-
tions representative; and Gerri
Long, research representative.
SamB. Topf
board of directors of American
Technion Society. He is also
chairman of the board and past
president of the Society's Greater
Miami Chapter.
Topf is founder and president
of Consultants for Israeli Indus-
try, a national organization
aimed at increasing: Israeli
business productivity. He also
serves as a Special Industrial
Consultant to Industrial Division
of the Jewish Agency and was
honored in 1980 by American-Is-
rael Chamber of Commerce as
'' I ndustrialist of the Year.''
Volunteers Honored
Mildred Grappel, Shirley
Gluckstein, Sylvia Neiman, Sally
Schlanger, Anne Kessler,
Hermione Spahn, Fritzie Singer,
Lee Greenburg, Sherry Wolin,
May Yastrow, Ida Lubow, and
Annie King, all of Dade County,
were among those honored last
week as South Florida Blood Ser-
vices "outstanding volunteers."
More than 50 leaders of five
South Florida Jewish com-
munities participated in a na-
tional teleconference coordinated
by Council of Jewish Federations
last week. Utilizing* a** system of
telephones and television trans-
missions, the teleconference
linked more than 300 Jewish
Federation leaders nationwide for
a strategy session on an Assem-
bly held by the Jewish Agency
last week in Israel.
Jewish Federation leaders from
Greater Miami, South Broward,
Fort Lauderdale, Palm Beach,
and South County gathered in
Miami to represent communities
in the region.
The teleconference originated
from New York City, where
Jewish Agency leaders were
present in a studio to direct the
topics of discussion. Thirteen
regional centers were linked with
the New York City studio via
satellitte, and participants could
view proceedings and exchange
comments and questions. The
regional centers included Miami,
Chicago, Cincinnati, Cleveland,
Dallas, Detroit, Hartford, Los
Angeles, Newark, Rochester, St.
Louis, Baltimore, Washington,
and New York.
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Past President Robert
Russell moderated the Miami
portion of the session with
Federation President Norman
Lipoff and Jim Baer, chairman of
Florida Association of Jewish
Federations. Topics of discussion
during the two-and-one half hour
meeting included a proposed
Jewish Agency budget and
reports and recommendations of
Jewish Agency Commissions on
aliyah, Jewish education, finance
and fiscal policy, goals and
objectives, governance, and
management.
Local Yeshiva University
Graduates Named
Yeshiva University students
from Florida participated in its
52nd Annual Commencement in
New York City earlier this
month, when Dr. Norman Lamm,
university president, awarded
1,500 degrees and diplomas.
University graduates from
Miami Beach are Abraham Wil-
liam ("names, Benjamin Jacob
Benet, Gila Shifra Gross, and
Ricki Sheryl Tokayer. Those
hailing from North Miami Beach
are Joel Ira Frand and Janet
Greenhut, and from South
Miami, Emily S. Rosenthal.
"STILL SMALL VOICE"
WSVN-Channel7
Sunday at 7:30 a.m.
Host Rabbi Brett Goldstein,
Spiritual Leader of
Temple Shir Ami.
Pw deMBooefy time ffcoriMwni, pow on the
e s,ii.i ni iiflr,! 11
r*loc one rounded teo-
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c *teaeiut>cnp'ii


r-age4-B The Jewish FToridian / Friday, June 24,1963
Temple Beth Sholom Plans
For Future Generations
The hundred or so chil-
dren aged three to 18 who'
recently participated in
groundbreaking ceremonies
at Temple Beth Sholom
were more than symbolic of
the new project they helped
celebrate. According to
Rabbi Leon Kronish, they
were the entire reason for it.
"We're moving onto our fifth
decade in Miami," Rabbi Kronish
said. "We've been a part of three
and even four generations of.
families. And we know it is
through the children that our
traditions will be kept alive."
Now. however, those traditions
will depend on the "star-wars
techniques" of today and
tomorrow, he said.
THE CONSTRUCTION and
restructuring plans call for the
addition of an 8,000 square-foot
educational wing at the north end
of the temple at 4144 Chase Ave.,
Miami Beach, he said, plus the
complete gutting and rebuilding
of another 7,000 square feet.
The project encompasses the
entire educational and fine arts
centers, including the ceramics
center (until now housed in a
trailer), the music and arts and
crafts centers, and the library,
which will now be a library of
learning resources, according to
Rabbi Kronish, "offering not
only books, but video resources,
including study programs on
cassette."
Judy Drucker. director of the
school of fine aits, says the facili-
ties promise to be among the
most modern in the country.
"Rabbi Kronish envisions state
of the art equipment through-
out," she said.
HELPING FINANCE the
project is a group called Foun-
ders of the Future, which Rabbi
Kronish says will provide addi-
tional resources beyond the
normal support of the congre-
gation. "Our goal is to have 100
families in Founders of the
Future," he explained, adding,
"they're more than halfway to
the goal."
He adds that "the founders
group is not inaptly named."
Declares the Rabbi: "We are af-
firming not only our faith in our
children, but in Miami Beach and
South Florida our corner of the
world. The children educated at
our new facilities may help bring
the region to its full maturity."
Members of Israel's Caesarea Golf group,
recently on tour throughout the U.S. East
Coast, visited a Miami golf course two weeks
ago. Shown above from left are Naghi Cha-
cham, Nissim Zanati, Motty Cohen, Aloa
Ben-David, Yaish Amor, Yibal Zalach, and
Jacob Avnaim. Ben-David, leader of the\
group, is Israel-born, and the others aJ
originally from Morrocco and Iraq. Eachisl
an active reservist in the Israel Defense}
Forces except for Amor, who is a securit\\
officer with the Border Police.
Local Vets Attended Department Confab
President Belle Swartz and
Commander Alex Greenwald of
Norman Bruce Brown Post and
Auxiliary 174, Jewish War
Veterans, and members of the
Post and Auxiliary recently
attended a June Department of
Florida Annual Convention.
Claire Greenwald, Dade County
Council president and member of
the Auxiliary, was awarded cita-
tions in honor of work done by
Dade County auxiliaries.
Past Department Presidents
Mae Schreiber and Swartz were
Iected to the Department's
Budget and Finance Committees,
and Schreiber was also appointed
Temple Students
Place High in
Math Contest
Beth David Congregation's
Solomon Schechter Day School
placed first in Dade County and
third in Florida in 1982-83
Elementary Contest of Florida
Mathematics League sponsored
by University of Florida at
Gainesville.
Michael Buckner, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Donald Buckner,
ranked ninth, and Aaron Tarjan,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Tarjan,
ranked eighteenth, statewide in a
fifth and sixth grade computa-
tion and problem solving test.
In regional results, the first
five places belonged to Beth
David students, including
Buckner, Tarjan, Stacy Lubell,
Oren Rosenthal, and Jeremy
Weinberger.
Summer Programs Set
For BBYO Leaders
Local B'nai B'rith Youth Or-
ganization leaders will par-
ticipate in a variety of Summer
Leadership Training programs
'.his year, including Kallah pro-
nram. to run June 29 through
i'uly 26 at B'nai B'rith Perlman
Tamp in Penn.; International
leadership Training Conference,
'uly 26 through Aug. 16 at the
tame location; and Chapter
readership Training Conference
>t B'nai B'rith Beber Camp in
Vis. July 6 through 8 and July
W0 through Aug. 2.
Also, Shirkada program, at
I'nai B'rith Beber Camp Aug. 3
' hrough 6 and Israel Summer In-
stitute, a six-week tour through
*.arael.
by newly elected Department
President Belle S. Horowitz as
Department Organizer.
Acorns Production Set
A comedy stage production of
Moss Hart and George S. Kauf-
man's "You Can't Take it With
You" will be presented by Acorns
Civic Theatre, sponsored by
Miami Beach Recreation Depart-
ment, July 1,2, and 3, 8, 9, and
10, 15, 16, and 17, and 22,23, and
24.
Showtime is 8 p.m. at Little
Stage Theatre, according to Ari
Kedem, Acorns artistic director.
$10,000 Scholarship
Bears MeiseVs Name
A S 10,000 scholarship in honor
of Ida Ruth Meisels, wife of
Cantor Saul Meisels, who serves
at Del Prado Minyan Synagogue
in North Miami Beach, was
established at Cantors
Assembly's National Convention
last month.
She was cited for "her devoted
efforts on behalf of music for
cantors and the American syna-
gogue and in recognition of her
numerous arrangements and
publications in the field of Jewish
music."
Proceeds of the scholarship will
be awarded to needy students
studying for the cantorate.
5^
BARRtCINI THE NAME IS WELL KNOWN IN THE
CONFECTIONARY WORLD ITS RESPECTED FOR
OUALITY AND GOODNESS AND NOW IT MEANS
FLAVOR ANO FRESHNESS IN ICE CREAM
BARWCINI A NEW. HIGHER-QUALITY ALL
NATURAL ICE CREAM WITH EXTRA RICHNESS
ANO GOODNESS WITH EXTRA FRUITS AND NUTS
Produced under the supervision of
Rabbi Menachem Qenack
Available at 7-Elevtn, Grand Union
Baiici and otktr fin* food g torts .
ab
We've Added Tuesday it Sunday
Matinees 2 pm $10.
MARCO POLO'S NEWEST FUN SHOW
THE %<
WONDERFUL p
WORLD J
A Musical 95
Birthday Tribute
Marco Polo 931-7663
Fri-Sat-Sun 8 pm S10
IRVINGl
tBERLINf
wMoacauM

A stirring tribute to Irving Berlin
BILL von MAURER
MtMVH News EMOfwHMMftt E del Of
It's called "The Wonderful World of Irving Berlin" and
it is ever bit of that and more.
This new musical revue that has just opened at the
Marco Polo Hotel is as crisp and refreshing an evening of
entertainment as you are apt to find this summer.
It would be handy to call this revue a tribute and a
nostalgic journey and it is some of that, too. But mostly
it is a good, solid show that stands firmly on its own feet.
It has happily shunned the cliched device of a narrator
who would ordinarily tell the story of composer Berlin's
progress through life sprinkled with anecdotes and with a
good amount of sentimentality stirred in.
None of that here. "The Wonderful World of Irving
Berlin" quicksteps right into Berlin's fabulous music and
before the evening is done, you have been taken on a
whirlwind tour of 95 Berlin songs, a number selected to
mark the composer's 95th birthday on May 11.
One of the remarkable achievements of this show is its
ingenious pacing. Although it delivers 95 songs, at no
time are any of them jammed together in panic.
This extremely difficult success has been wrought by
director Phil Sena, assisted by Tony Gyle and Micki
Marioall of whom are also in the cast. And speaking of
the cast, there are 13 members in all and it has been a
long time since that many local singers and dancers have
been assembled for South Florida audiences without a
clunker amongst them. These performers are talented
workers who know how to sing, how to act, how to deliver
a line. They have the land of talent you would expect to
find in a top-rate off-Broadway hit.
The show is the baby of producer Jerry Grant, who has
frequently demonstrated a knack for assembling fresh-
faced performers of collage age, casting them in *
nostalgic musical revue, ignoring seta and leaving nu>
audiences happy nevertheless. .,
Grant has outdone himself with "The Wonderful WorW
of Irving Berlin" with a good-looking cast that obviously
has had excellent experience, a handsome set and clue
costumes. .. ,
If you miss this show you will be depriving yourseli oi
this summer's biggest entertainment value. You'll have
wonderful time at "The Wonderful World of Irving
Berlin"and for just f 10.
Raprtnt: Miami Hn, Jun* 20. IMS
-3-----------------------'---------------------------------
A0V.


.,. .....
...... .... ....... -
__,..........-----
.... ifjtty",Jpe24-i988/.Th6l^ri>i^orMi> **&**
___-j-l.
|SAou;n aooue is Mount Sinai Medical
I Center's newly-opened Sophia and Nathan
\Gumenick Ambulatory Care Center. The
I(aw-story, 35,000-squarrfbot facility houses
li ambulatory surgery program and Breast
Center and outpatient services, including a
Gastroenterology Center, Obstetrics and
Gynecology offices, a Pain Center, and
Sidney and Miriam Olson Dialysis Unit
Commodore Sets New Itinerary
For M-S Boheme
With the addition of the new 23,000-ton, 900-paasenger m-s
Caribe I to its cruise fleet, Commodore Cruise Line will be
sailing more of the Caribbean than ever before two sun and
fun-filled itineraries aimed at pleasing the most discriminating
traveler.
While the Caribe I heads for the eastern Caribbean ports of St.
Thomas, San Juan and Puerto Plata, the m-s Boheme. Com-
modore's original "Happy Ship," will begin service to the
western Caribbean beginning October 1, the Boheme will
visit Port-au-Prince, Haiti; Port Antonio, Jamaica; George
Town, Grand Cayman and Cozumel, Mexico.
The Fort George Ruins, Pedro Castle and Bat Cave await
explorers on Grand Cayman while Tulum's Mayan ruins on
the famed Yucatan Peninsula and a day of beachcombing await
Boheme passengers in Cozumel.
Like the Caribe I, the Boheme will sail for the Caribbean every
Saturday from the Port of Miami.
Gaines-burgers and
announce a

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with real beef for a moist delicious taste
That's right! Gaines has lowered the prices, but not the quality on Gaines-burgers
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20
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ot im coupon ptus 7* tor Mnw.no il you memo il on tnt UN or tht
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. June 24,1963
A State of Israel 35th Anniversary Award was presented to Z.
Siegfried and Ethel Berens, center, at an annual Temple
Menorah Salute to Israel held on behalf of State of Israel Bonds
Organization. The Berens were honored for participation in the
Israel Bonds program and for activity in philanthropic and
service organizations. At left is Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
temple spiritual leader, and Isidore Wollowick, Salute to Israel
chairman, is at right.
Community Corner
Registration is currently underway for fail programs at Beth
Torah Congregation's Early Childhood Education Department.
including Mom's and Tots, pre-school nursery, nursery, pre-kin-
dergarten. and kindergarten classes, according to Miriam
Lorber. education director. Registration is also underway for
afternoon Hebrew School classes.
Airman Neil O. Lefkowitz. son of Carol and Leo M. Lefkowitz
of North Miami Beach, has completed Air Force basic training
at Lackland Air Force Base, Tex. He is a 1982 graduate of North
Miami Beach Senior High School.
Marilyn Volker, director of Institute on Sexism and Sexuality
at Miami-Dade Community College, New World Center campus,
will speak on sexuality and surrogate sexual programming at a
meeting of Prime Time Singles of South Dade Jewish Commu-
nity Center Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. at the Center.
Revy Wilder, author and publisher, will receive Humanitarian
Award of the Biscayne Democratic Club at its installation
luncheon June 26 at noon at the Konover Hotel.
Catherine Fahringer was reelected president of Florida
International University Foundation. Executive vice president
of Dade Savings, Fahringer is the only women Foundation
president to serve in Florida. She is a past chairman of the board
of Public Health Trust.
Ted Spak, Miami and Chicago businessman, received an
annual Mid-Life Services' Award at a membership reception at
the home of Myron and Maureen Stayman. Toby Ansin, vice
president and coordinator of Mid-Life Services Foundation,
presented the award. Dr. Sol Landau, president and executive
director, also attended.
Annette Katz of Miami, a writer for UTD Today, a publica-
tion of United Teachers of Dade, was adjudged the winner in the
magazine category of the 1983 Awards for Excellence in Medical
Journalism for a three-part series on health care costs. The
awards were presented by Florida Medical Association.
Paintings by artist, Reyna Youngeraan are currently on view
at Grove Isle Gallery, Coconut Grove, to run through July 5.
Lorraine Frost, president of Women's League for Israel
Florida Region, and other Florida officers and members,
Annette Kay, Charlotte Goldstein, Mickey Halpern, Gertrude
Jaffee, Muriel Lunden, Bertha Mindlirh, Faye Roaenatein, Mary
Sanft. and Regina Wermiel attended a 55th anniversary
celebration luncheon in New York City June 9.
Jeffrey S. Schmutder, son of Karolyn S. Roshaven of Miami,
has been promoted in the U.S. Army to the rank of private first
class. He is a 1982 graduate of Miami Killian Senior High
School.
Lt. Col. Ronald S. Frankel, son of Margot L. Frankel of Miami
Beach, has completed U.S. Army Command and General Staff
College Regular Course at Fort Leavenworth, Kan.
Gerald Schwartz, regional director of American Friends of Tel
Aviv University, will address members of Miami Beach Lodge
of B'nai B'rith Friday, June 24 at 12:45 p.m. in the civic
auditorium of Lincoln Road Apartment Building.
Dr. Leonard Haber, former mayor of Miami Beech and long-
time member of the city commission, returned last week from a
five-day meeting of United States Conference of Mayors, at
which he served as official representative of the City of Miami
Beach.
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue Miami, Florida
at*?
Baby Lotion 16 oz. O.
SO 99
Baby Bath 16 oz. <*.-
byMENNEN
speed
stick
DEODORANT
DvMINNIN
2.5 oz.
s1.79
Regular. Lime. Herbal and Sptce
afta
AFTER SHAVE
SKIN CONOmONER
by I
Sensible Core for Sensitive Skin
MOISTURE WEAR
Blush Kit Pressed Powder Liquid Make-up
$2." $2.75 $2.75
JW^MQTH
DATRIL
Analgesic
Capsules
24's
BAND-AID
Brand
Sheer Strips
All Wide
30's
1.'
COVER GIRL
Pro-Lining
S2.15
*-.....%
( XI.
Un*
Cream
Make-Up
$2.75
Coverstick
U $2.05
POND'S
Naturally
Dry
Deodorant
Body Powder
M49

8oz.
13oz
s1.
99
iROOM & CLEAN
Qreasless
Hair Control
4.5 oz.
6.5 oz.
||L
$2.i*
$2.69
VASELINE
JL
Hair
Tonic
$1a79
19
3.5 oz.
5.5 oz. ^.
10oz. dLw
SUAVE
Hair
Spray
Regular
sr
LPSIICK
Marathon
Mascara |
2."
Luminess
Lipstick
S2.25
POND'S
Cream
Cocoa
Butter
Tropical
Bath
5oz. 1.
7oz.
$1.
39
PONC&
COLDCREAM
Deep Cleanses
DRY SKIN CREAM
Extra Rich Formula
13.4 ox. $3."
SUAVE
Conditioner
Regular
Balsam Protein]
Extra Body
sin
28 oz.
Suave
SUAVE
SHAMPOO
Baby
Golden
Egg
Protein
Balaam
Strawberry
Dandruff
16 oz
$1
*


Friday, June 24,1863 / The Jwiah Floridian
Pa\g7-B
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
. How goodly
(Num. 24.2-5).
"And Balaam saw Israel. and said.
art thy tents, O Jacob, thy dwellings, O Israel?'
BALAK
BALAK Hearing of the Israelites victory over the Amorites,
Balak. king of Moab, became frightened. Jointly with the elders
0f Midian, he sent messengers to Balaam, the son of Beor,
urging him to curse Israel. Balaam was both a soothsayer and a
prophet, and it was believed that his curse would lead to the
defeat of the Israelites. But Balaam, hearkening to the voice of
God, twice refused to accompany Balak's messengers on the
hostile mission. Finally God said to Balaam: "Go with the men;
but only the word that I shall speak unto thee, that thou shalt
speak" (Numbers 22.36). En route to Balak, an angel warned
Balaam. When he arrived, he had Balak build seven altars and
make appropriate sacrificial offerings preliminary to Balaam's
cursing Israel. But when the time came, Balaam gave the Is-
raelites his blessing instead of his curse. This reversal was re-
peated three times.
Moabite and Midianite women seduced some of the Israelites
persuading them to worship the idol Baal of Peor. As a result, a
plague broke out in the Israelite camp. The plague ceased only
when Phinehaa, stabbed an Israelite man to death for consorting
with a Midianite woman.
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law Is extracted and
based upon "Tha Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by
P. Wollman-Tsamlr, $15, published by Shengold. The volume Is avail-
ible at 75 Maiden Lane. Now York, N.Y. 10038. Joseph Schlang is
president of tha society distributing the volume.)
Members of Temple Judea in Coral Gables celebrated an annual
Mute to Israel on behalf of State of Israel Bonds Organization
hd also honored temple "Chai Society" members, who have
ylonged to the temple for more than 18 years. Serving as
airpersons of the event were Ann and Victor Reiter. From left
p Rabbi and Mrs. Michael Eisenstat, Mr. and Mrs. Reiter,
nd temple President Russell Silverman.
i a \ 1* T"U
Ik H f \^T jfl
\randfather Hyman Galbut. left, and father, Abraham Galbut.
tiht, stand with grandson-son Eric, who graduated Rabbi Al-
ander S. Gross Hebrew Academy Kindergarten last week.
I three represent three generations of Academy graduates.
Former Jewish Frat Seeks Members
An alumni reunion committee
'University of Pennsylvania's
*eta Chapter, a chapter in Zeta
PJJ Tau fraternity, a Jewish
fcuil fraternity until 1954. when
'opened its membership to all
Ne college students, is current-
/ seeking to contact surviving
fapter members, most of whom
^Jewish.
he former Jewish fraternity is
planning its 75th anniversary re-
union, to take place Oct. 28
through 30 during the univer-
sity's Homecoming Weekend.
Among the 1,100 alumni of
Theta Chapter are William S.
Paley, chairman of the board of
Columbia Broadcasting System;
Richard Bloch, a founder of
H & R Block; and Arthur
England, former chief justice of
Florida Supreme Court.
BarI Bat Mitzvah
Orouitz
Richter
robin oRovrra
Robin Gail Orovitz, daughter
of Norma and Michael Orovitz,
was called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah last Saturday at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami The
granddaughter of Pearl and the
late Dave Achsen and the late
Ruth and Max Orovitz, Robin
helped conduct the Sabbath
morning service. Rabbis Haskell
Bernat and Jeffrey Salkin and
Cantor Jacob Bornstein offi-
ciated.
During the service, the
celebrant's two sisters, Judy and
Lisa, her uncle, Dr. Richard
Deutch, and her aunt, Bonnie
Hoffman were called to the bima
for honors. Robin wore a family
tallit, originally presented by her
maternal grandmother.
The celebrant is an eighth
grade student at Miami Country
Day School and Temple Israel
Religious School. At MCDS,
Robin plays on Junior Varsity
Girls Soccer Team.
Following the worship service,
Robin was honored at a reception
and luncheon at Westview
Country Club.
SAUL RICHTER
Saul Moshe Richter, son of
Rabbi and Mrs. Harold Richter of
Hollywood and grandson of Jack
and Katie Dernis of Miami
Beach, will be called to the Torah
as a Bar Mitzvah Saturday
morning at 8:45 a.m. at Temple
NerTamid, Miami Beach.
The celebrant attends the He-
brew Academy, where he is in
seventh grade and is active on
Flag Football Team. He is in-
terested in sports.
To celebrate the occasion, a
trip to Israel has been planned.
RACHEL MENDELSSOHN
Rachel Susan Mendelssohn,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Seymour Mendelssohn, will be
called to the Torah as Bat
Mitzvah Saturday at 9 a.m. at
Beth David Congregation.
The celebrant is a graduate of
Beth David Religious School's
Hey Class, and she attends
Arvida Junior High School in
seventh grade, where she is
active in Student Council and
National Junior Honor Society.
Mr. and Mrs. Mendelssohn will
host the Kiddush following servi-
ces in honor of the occasion and a
luncheon reception at the congre-
gation's Spector Hall.
Special guests will include
Rachel's brother, Michael,
grandmother, Frieda Mendel-
ssohn, aunt, Sylvia Klein, aunt
and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Bernard
Schnitzer, and uncle, Stanley
Marcus.
Plans for March of
Dimes Telethon Set
"Let Freedom Ring for Amer-
ica's Babies" is the theme of
March of Dimes' 26th anniver-
sary. A national telethon, sched-
uled to air locally over YVCIX-
Channel 6 July 3 and 4, will raise
funds for March of Dimes Defects
Foundation, which sponsors re-
search in the diagnosis, treat-
ment, and prevention of birth de-
fects.
March of Dimes Telethon's
National Chairman Hal Linden
will host the event, which will
originate in Hollywood, Calif,
with 15-minute local segments
live from Sheraton Bal Harbour
Hotel.
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting time: 7:55
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-. 435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saltzman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchinskv. Cantor
fa, Mf pm. Rebel Mm* wm afMata
tareM Kamamii apeak en -.very las' Uses
to a New aee*an*ne," *M am end :1 pm.
Pea>eerrtooea>aa0emone:15pm.
TEMPLE BETK AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate
Rabbi
Fri., ai s pm. Senate ear
a.ocui. Rabbi Morton Hot*
Herbert Saumgard apeak ore "WhetDoea
aRabMOor*
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Cor.i Way 2(25 S W 3rd *>mui 'KS
South Dad* '500 S w 120th Straal < B| |
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH '-?.'
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Dado Chapel
Frl.. S pm, Shabbat Eva Setvloee.
Coral Way Sancturay
Sat., 9 am. Shabbat Senrlcea conducted by
Rabbi David H. Auerbech and Cantor William
W. Llpaon. Bat Mitzvah ol
Rachel S. Mandalaaohn
BETH KODcSH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin Executive Secretary
Sal 6 45 am and 5 pm
Sun B am and 5 pr.i
C*ily Minyan Sarv 45 am and 5 pm
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler, Cantor
F rtdey knroeanej eervtce
S p.m.
Sabbath Homing Service
a.m.
Or. Lehrman will preach at 1030
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
24C0 Pinetree Drive, Miami B.acn
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schtff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Muni Pioneer RerormConoreeefion
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 5735900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 5fJ5-5055
Haskell M. Bernat, Senior Rabbi
Donald P. Caahman, Aesistant Rabbi
Jacob Q. Bornstein, Cantor
Rachalle Nelson, Student Cantor
Philip Goldln, Exec. Dlr.
Frl., pm, Downtown. Rabbi Haekell Bernat:
"The Rabbinate la Nearly 2000 Yeera OM."
Kendall. Rabbi Jertrey Salkin:
Shalom raMneeauleeeranee."
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frt., I pm, Summer Worehrp Service.
'orah portion: Balak Number* 22:2 25:9
Hartarah Mlcah S:8-9:S.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
EDWARD BARON, Cantor
Fri.. 7:30 pm
Sat.. 9:30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75thSt. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz .-j^n
Cantor Murray Yavneh (fw)j
Daily Morning Service* a am
Saturday Morning Service* a am
Evening Servtcea CM am
Saturday Evening Sarvtcn 7:45 pm
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami, Fl 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
RabN Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorfinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Frl.. ( pm. Sabbath Eva Servtcea
Bat Mitzvah, Cara Schottenatam.
Sat., am. Sabbath BorHoo*.
fc
i
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B. Fl. 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
Weekday iinlm jam and B.wpex.
Saturday mamma eervtoee BMaax
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOm
Chase Ave. ft 41st St. 536-7231
Dr. Leon "ronish, Rabbi Liberal
Color David Conviser
Frl., fciapm. Sabbath Eve Servtoea.
Sat. 10-.4S am. Sabbath Service*
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipechitz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Mommg.1
leraetA.1
.Fib.
Saturday Afternoon, Bar
htrurveh or Dorrtn
Frt..S:1Send(pm
Sal a30 amends 15

BETH YOSESEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwatg, Rabbi
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses ol Worship
Phone 576-4000
Rabbinica^ssociationOlfice;
866-8345
TEMPLE NERTAMID
Conservative
7902 Carlylo Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Dairy Minyan at am. Sabbath Service* at
a:45 am. Sunday Minyan at CSO am.
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971-Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFiLLAH OF KENDALL
15410 SW 75 Circle Lane
Miami, Fl. Modern Othodox
Rabbi Warren Kaszti 382-3343
IF*^R ******* set, aao am,
aeaeeaj latvjaaa. Bar Mkavah. Dee yieaeT*
aattkmmmenmmi.........Bam.
T. W, F. 7 am. Preschool Regtetiatton tor tea.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave "
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Klngc>y, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
rt, arts eaa. Sabbath e*e Werahap service
R*MTOt>teaMelB3
a^jetseepxTaabbaNtl
an^MUii'S" Con.erv.ilv.
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Man. B Thar*. 7 am
iSetveaea arts eat
ainlmtee.
Frl., 4:15 pm. Sabbath Eva Servtoea.
Or. Norman N. Shapiro:
"The End ol an Era.
at, a am. Sabbath Senrteee in Tenter Chaeei.
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
' **** "**T"- ."-niiMi._niiij-
MT-aM. Herald wtehna. aei^dan>eler
Fr^MnQKreuo,. y^ Bwt-c,0,
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Dor.l Executive Office P.rk, 3785
NW 82 Av... Suit. 210. Miami, Fl.
33166. 592 4792. Rabbi Lewi. C.
Liltm.n. regional director


Page 8 B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, June 24,1993
FIRST OF THE SEASON
EXTRA LARGE 15 COUNT CALIFORNIA
Cantaloupes
LB
8AO
.49
.89
.99
EACH
GARDEN FRESH CRISP O PICK
3 FOP.
A DELICIOUS TROPICAL FRUII J PIC"
Florida Mangoes.........2
Oj NO IjU PURPOSE
Red Bliss Potatoes........5
TOP OUALlTv f lORiOA u PC*
Seedless Limes..........10 1.00
'HIM MtA0~
Green Cabbage.............. .23
Yellow Onions................ .23
Zucchini Squash............ .33
Red Radishes ...........2 .39
Pitted Prunes.............. 1.29
Orange Juice.............. 1.99
Nectarine^
DAIRY- DELI
BAKERY
t*-\ SUNNY DELIGHT FLORIDA
w Otws
Punch
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Light Pf Lively Oscar Mayer
Yogurt
HALF
GAL
99
6$|49 $149
1
12-OZ
FLEISCHMAN S REG OR UNSALTED CORN Oil
.. u .89
PANTRY PPJOE REG OR LOW FAT
. OONT 1 .39
PANTRY PPJOE
Half and Hail 2^1.19 Cheddar
PANTRY PPJOE NATURAL SLICED SWISS OR
3148
SAROENTO ITALIAN
. pg 1.99
REDO WHIP AEROSOL
Cream To
LAND 0 LAKES RED OR UNSALTED
Whipped Butter
PANTRY PPJOE MONTEREY JACK OR MILO
CheoV
VIASCOEU
DM P
OSCAR MAYER
c1.19
Cream Topping
LAND 0 LAKES REG OR UNSALTED
Whipped Butter..\% 1.09
l.2.59
PANTRY PRiOE ASSORTED SLICED
PANTRY PPJOE
1.89
.^1.19
M<*1.39
JAR
, PKO
.99
LAND O FROST THM SLICED
Luncheon
GWALTNEV GREAT DOG
Chicken
Franks
2"XSS .
LB
'OL-MAR OVEN BROWNED
Turkey
Breast
SERVICE-DELI
IN-8TORE BAKERY
NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES!
ITALIAN
WINES
KITCHEN FRESH
."-51.19
. l. .79
$
half lb
J89
IN^TORE
BAKERY
JACK JILL FWE ST OUAUT v
not available m all stokes
JWRSM STYLE WITH OR WITHOUT SEEDS
Rye Bros*..../?& 49
CORN SRANOR
taabarry Muffins 671.19
OWUT WITH PANTRY PRJQ1 COFFEE
a .- Cinnamon Rolls .. 41.90
LEAN HRST CUT CORNED
I* 1.1V OVENFRESH
OTR
MOTHER GOOSE OLD FASHIONED
t.1.39
OORMANS CHEESE
No Salt Swiss ...."1.99
WHITE OR YELLOW
American Cheese ls 1.49
'1.39 CRISPY LARGE
- Kaiser
"SM.49
BONUS PAK
Meyers Eng
Muffins
2 $-100
PKGS
OF 8 8bV
Tropic Bread loaf
GRIFFIN LEMON PINEAPPLE OR
MEYERS MM LOAF OR WHEAT AND
White Bread.....
ADLERS JEWISH RYE BREAD OR
. PKO
SCT ^
VELVET CREME
Glazed Donuts... I
A | C ITALIAN OR
, .LOAF
.69
FROZEN
Alamaden
!99
'IP"*!*1 AMMO OR CAMRNIT
Carlo $>
Rossi Wines -J
HEALTH & BEAUTY
0 OFF LASEL USTERJNE
mm I,, ^|......m
nuuinwasn .
IKOFFLASEL4 < TUK
"^2^9
TL.
1.07
c^SS-ST*'0'***"'*00'
Lotlon Shampoo" ,
yo or asmm mmmmtmi
,M"*47
7mt
OU.-ON SUPER ORV OR IMY POWDER
I S TO
QUART CONT ASSTO FLAVORS
Breyers $159
Icetream M.
240Z BAG PANTRY PROE TfK
Dinner Fries #y
14-OZ BOX PET WT2 ASSTO OQt
Cream Pies.....skf
B^o Waffles 79*
BOX OF 12 JCLLOCMOC
Puckjfcig Pops
TOTJNOS 10O2 BOX
Parly
93t
T RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS


:
Friday, June 24,1988 /The Jewish Floridian Pg*g_
A sharp way to buy meats!
FLA. OR i keW*
PREMIUM FRESH ^V| II I^V*
Steak *^,Q kS8.0^
S?S52? ^ M3K3 ChirkPfl ^ BREASTS, 3 LEG QTRS.
BONELESS 4 L^| VJ llxJVd IW/ BACKS, 3 GIBLET PKS.
qp n ^^ FAMILY PACK
I ^A||^1||1#ul^ fr^k^^^StV1 FL* O" SMPPED PREMIUM FRESH 3 LBS t OVER
ICllUCllUlll DCCI FryerBmst -1.29
^_^^ ^^^^ FLA OR SHIPPED PREMRJM FRESH. 3-LB5 OVER
rCOAjsr Rndcf4" ^^^^^^^^^
JJJL m^^%9^^^| ^MBTK AL |^||^ft| CONTAINS BEEF ROAST STEW BEFF AND OROUNO BEEF
SPA.St12,CEL^ JI9A irr* nrrrj. e^i~fcd~fc combo.................... lm
BEEF LOIN <^yi A |^ I J^^pr %mr WHOLE IN ^Jr >Jaa^F ejjaf^ contains beef roast stew beef ano orouno beef
^nfeA CRYOVAC ChiK*
9K LB. JIL LB. Combo 1.99
FROZEN GRADE A SMOKED OCJ\T\JiJlJ
Turkey QiiniYtHcinH Mfhrnr^metaT 1 no
Drumsticks 49 OUTIIlyiariCI Whrting Fillets 1.09
_____ t SKINLESS ANO BONELESS FROZEN
$^m -rw-k c^ Fi,let
| ""**** 49 *%ai ICaSW* JL Ftounder Fl**1.39
USOA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK SHOULDER USDA CHOICE BEEF LOIN
Boneless ^^ftQ Shell ^
Crossnb Pjoy Sirloirw
Roast JL Steak
SAVE 74$
CAROLINA MORNING HALF GAL M4A
*Apple Juiced19
OPK/120Z CANS WET PEPS. PEPS UQHT, MOUNTAIN
DEW. PEPSI FREE OR ^ BQ
Pepsi Cola^59
NOT AVAILABLE IN MARATHON OR KEY WEST
Snack
6oi cemCeMra
Tomato Sauce 5/1.00
tt M Wahbont itatan o.
French Dressing 1.29
300cl PmyFKH
Napkins..........1.29
OpanPit'Cg 0 BBQ Sauce.......79
46 OZ BTL ORANGE OR LEMONUMF
Gatorade
25-OZ JAR MOTTS
9.9. fC*5
32-OZ BTL HEAVY DUTY LAUNDRY
Wisk
89"
$J69
^jrl^r^K 32-OZ JAR PANTRY PROE d^efW* CPK/12-OZ CANS
todfers gy Mayonnaise^ Goebei
8PK/I6-OZ RETURNABLE BTLS OR PEPPER.HIRES ROOT BEER
Cmuii I In Reg or diet
OCVCII VJIJ NO' AVAILABLE IN KEV WEST OR MARATHON
NABISCO 4-OZ CHIPSTERS. S-OZ CORN LUGGERS
6-OZ NACHOS OR 7-OZ CHEESE & CRUNCH
1 -LB BOX MUELLERS
Elbow Macaroni
6H-OZ CAN PANTRY PRIDE CHUNK
White Tuna
12-OZ CAN SPAM
Luncheon Meat
2 LTR BTL ASSORTED FLAVORS
White Rock Sodas
GIANT RtXL PANTRY PMOE-1 PLY WHTTC OR ASSORTEO
Paper Towels00"*8
5 LB BAG MAHATMA
Long Grain Rice
48-OZ JAR VLASIC KOSHER
Dill Pickles
24-OZ BTL
Del Monte Catsup
BPK/12-OZ PANS
89*
9*
*i19
2LTR 611 eTCOt Tab or $f 19
VrfOKC NOT AVAILABLE IN FT PIERCE A
18%-OZ UBBY NATURAL. CREAM STYLE OR ""HOtE
Com ^TO*
4 ROLL PANTRY PRIDE1 PLY WHITE OR ASSORTED
COLORS / Bath Tissue OSr
FINAL WEEK!
PRICES
EFFECTIVE
JUNE 23
JUNE 29.
1983
WE REDEEM
FEDERAL
FOOD
STAMPS
COMPLETE SETS VOLS.1-15
AVAILABLE IN OUR MQRS.OFFICE
cPtide


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, June 24,1983
'
Weddings
LEWISON-BLONSKY
Lorena M'liss Lewison. daughter of Robert J.
and Rita Lewison of Miami, was married to Adam
Robert Blonsky, son of Hope and Joseph Blonsky
of Miami, June 18. Rabbi Michael EisensUt offi-
ciated, and a reception and dinner was held at
Kings Bay Country Club.
Serving as bridesmaids were Amy Goldstein,
Ilene Greenbaum, Dina Wolfman. Jennifer
Gardiner, Teri Borenstein, and Nirah Shapo.
Kimberly Lewison and Tami Lewison were maids
of honor.
Serving as ushers at the wedding were Todd
Lewison, Steven Kaplan, Stephen Baker, and
Dennis Doughty. Daniel Blonsky was best man.
The bride is a recent graduate of Cornell Uni-
versity. She will attend University of Chicago
Business School in the fall. The groom just grad-
uated from Massachusetts Institute of Techno-
logy and plans to work at First National Bank of
Chicago.
The couple are honeymooning in Mexico City
and Acapulco, Mexico. They will reside in Chi-
cago.
Mrs. Gordon Heffner
STISSHEFFNER
Rebecca Faye Stisa, daughter of Sol B. and
Therese Stiss of Miami, and Adam Gordon Heff-
ner, son of Hy and Alice Stolman of Hollywood,
were married May 29 at Temple Zion.
Sarah Stiss, sister of the bride, was maid of
honor, and matron of honor was Jana Ernest.
Serving as bridesmaids were Abby Brown, the
groom's sister, Betsy Stiss, Stephanie Heffner,
and Lori Petrosantra.
The groom's brother, Andrew Heffner, was
best man, and Barry Brown, Steven Neckman,
Richard Peterman, Robert Horowitz, and Carey
Stiss, the bride's brother, served as ushers.
The bride's gown was made of Venise lace flow-
ers with a high illusion neck. It had a long-flowing
cathedral-length train, and the hem was trimmed
with schiffli embroidery lace.
Rebecca attended Santa Fe College and Uni-
versity of Florida and currently works as an as-
sistant manager at Casual Corner retail clothing
store. Gordon graduated from University of Flor-
ida and is currently a third-year law student at
University of Miami.
The couple spent their honeymoon in Switzer-
land and reside in Miami.
Engagement
KLEINBERGPERLMAN
Mr. and Mrs. Mike Kleinberg
of Miami Beach announced
the engagement on June 4 of
their daughter. Lori Jaye, to Dr.
Brae* Perlman of Miami Beach,
son of Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Perl-
man.
An October wedding is plan-
ned.
Mary Ann Bollard, licensed antique appraiser, seated,
examines a William IV silver basket dated 1832 belonging to
Pauline Rose, center, at Winston Towers office of AmeriFirst
Savings and Loan Association. Bollard spent several hours at
the bank, appraising and offering historical information on an-
tiques and collectibles. Also pictured are Ray Leightman, vice
president and manager of Winston Towers office, and Paula
Brown, antique collector.
Birth
Sharyn and Robert Marks-
Peltz of Miami announce the
birth of their son. Jeremy
Michael, on June 6. Maternal
grandparents are Dr. Asher
and Dorothy Marks, former-
ly of Miami and now of
Rabun Gap, Georgia.
Three-hundred persons participated in an annual installation
brunch of Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Young Adult
Division. In attendance are, from left,YAD Chairman David
Perkins, Federation Executive Vice President Myron J. Brodie,
board of directors member, David Schaecter, and YAD
Immediate Past Chairman Robert J. Merlin.
Alan H. Rauzin has been
named in-house legal counsel
for Capital Bank, according to
Abel Holtz, bank chairman
and president. Prior to joining
the Miami-based Capital
bank, Rauzin was engaged in
private law practice handling
real estate, corporate, comer-
cial, and immigration matters.
Printmd la English
4c/A*ftV/FnMyM*M*r/ss<*/
*9 Pr Oil to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world.
may
Enclosed
please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
D 1 Year $18.00 ? 2 Years $34.00
/ LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ONLY
Name:,
Address:,
.Apt. No.:.
City:.
State:.
(* Maka AN Ckacfts PayaMa M> "THS JBWISH F LOU IDI AN ")
P.O. Sea M-ftn, Miami, PlacMa M<
i|Killii pranMa t*trlattMi to paM m etfvaaca.
Jewish War Veteran Post Commander Morton Todd of Abe
Horrowitz Post 682. top photo, is shown placing an American
flag at the grave of Abe Horrowitz on Memorial Day. The
commander and Post officers visit Mount Sinai Cemetery each
Memorial Day to honor departed war veterans. Others who
participated were, bottom photo, from left, Nat Shane, officer;
Moe Feingold. past commander; Barney Massarsky, who
recited Kaddish; Frank Anshe, past commander; Commander
Todd; and Ben Barew, adjutant.
Rabbi Goldstein Hosts TV Program on Cults
Rabbi Brett Goldstein,
spiritual leader of Temple Shir
Ami. will host WCKT-Channel
7's Jewish religious program,
"Still Small Voice" Sunday at
7:30 a.m.
Joining him in a discussion on
Promotion Announced
Carlos Grosso has been promo-
ted from administrative assistant
to assistant cashier of Jefferson
National Bank, according to
Barton S. Goldberg, president of
the bank, a subsidiary of Jeffer-
son Bancom. Inc.
"Cults: Coercion or Conversion?"
will be Rabbi Harold Richter, di-
rector of chaplaincy of Jewish
Federation of South Broward,
and Helen Friedman, staff di-
rector of Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Task Force on Cults
and Missionaries.
MUST SELL
Walk to Young Israel. 4 Bed
2 Bath, Florida Room, New
Roof, Huge Kitchen, Cen-
tral Air, More. 652-9451


Recipes For Sabbath
Friday, June 24,1983/The Jewish Floridlan -PngH-B
'
J *** &
[Chocolate Squares, Smoked Herring Salad and
are three recipes from the Kraft Kitchens which
xade ahead for Sabbath feasting.
iKE AHEAD RECIPES FOR THE SABBATH
cial day for the Jewish family, the Sabbath takes place
ek throughout the year. For this observance The Kraft
has developed three recipes that can be made ahead,
tr a Sabbath buffet.
a tasty loaf of Challah. This version of the braided
id makes one large loaf, topped with a sprinkling of
lied Smoked Herring Salad features a unique and
combination of chopped cooked potatoes, smoked
celery. Miracle Whip salad dressing, onion and pimento.
[onto lettuce-covered plates, the salad makes a hearty
liment or light meal.
Bsert, Minty Chocolate Squares combine three favorite
chocolate, mint and cream cheese. The crust made
colate pieces, graham cracker crumbs, flaked coconut,
___Bnuts, and Parkay margarine serves as the base for a
I Philadelphia Brand cream cheese, powdered sugar and
Tnt extract. After chilling well, spread on a frosting of
[chocolate and margarine. Keep this treat in the
|tor until serving time.
MINTY CHOCOLATE SQUARES
Parkay margarine
[pkg. semi-sweet chocolate pieces
is graham cracker crumbs
iked coconut
chopped nuts
[pkgs. Philadelphia Brand cream cheese, softened
kitted powdered sugar
in peppermint extract
ops green food coloring (optional)
he '> cup margarine and 1-3 cup chocolate pieces in
m: stir over low heat until smooth. Add combined
coconut and nuts; mix well. Press onto bottom of
13 x 9-inch baking pan; chill. Combine cream cheese,
Attract and food coloring, mixing until well blended,
tover crust; chill. Melt remaining margarine and
ite pieces over low heat. Spread over cream cheese layer;
iCut into squares. Serve chilled.
SMOKED HERRING SALAD
topped cooked potatoes
loked herring, skinned, boned, chopped
celery slices
Miracle Whip salad dressing
spoons chopped onion
spoons lemon juice
spoons chopped pimento
>nsalt
Iof pepper
he
line potatoes, fish, celery, salad dressing, onion, juice,
> and seasonings; mix lightly. Chill. Add additional salad
before serving, if desired. Serve in lettuce-lined bowl.
i servings.
CHALLAH
f. active dry yeast
i warm water
ip Parkay margarine, melted
;s, beaten
)lespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
4-'/i to 5 cups flour
1 egg yolk, beaten
1 tablespoon water
Poppy seed
>lve yeast in water; add margarine, eggs, sugar and salt.
cups flour; beat until smooth. Stir in enough remaining
form a stiff dough. On floured surface, knead dough
kmooth and elastic. Place in greased bowl, turning to
op. Cover; let rise in warm place until double in volume,
[45 minutes. Punch down dough; divide into two pieces,
Jut 1-3 of dough and the other 2-3 of dough. Divide larger
*to three equal pieces; roll each piece to 16-inch rope.
three ropes on greased cookie sheet; braid. Press ends to
"vide remaining dough into three equal pieces. Roll each
12-inch rope; braid. Place on top of large braid; press
k^er at ends to seal. Cover; let rise until double in volume,
45 minutes. Brush loaf with combined egg yolk and
sprinkle with poppy seed. Bake at 375 degrees, 30 to 35
bs or until done. Remove from cookie sheet; cool on wire
Neal Sonnett, incoming presi-
dent of Dade County Bar
Association, will be honored
at its Annual Installation
Luncheon Wednesday at
noon. Special guests will be
Chief Judge Joe Eaton, Chief
Judge Gerald Wetherington,
and Dade County Mayor
Steve Clark. Officers and
directors of the Bar and
Young Lawyers Section will
be installed.
Dr. Benjamin Lewis has been
appointed executive vice
president of Miami Federal
Savings and Loan Asso-
ciation, according to Paul
Cejas, president and chairman
of the board. Dr. Lewis will
have senior responsibility for
administrative operations of
the Association.
Hoffman, Goldstein
To Leave Beth Am
Assistant Rabbi Morton Hoff-
man of Temple Beth Am will no
longer work at the Kendall area
congregation as of July 1, ac-
cording to Senior Rabbi Herbert
Baumgard. He has taken a pulpit
in East Lansing, Mich.
Assistant Rabbi Robert Gold-
stein will also be leaving the tem-
ple, effective July 21. He will take
a pulpit in Falmouth, Mass.
Rabbi James Simon has been
named new assistant rabbi of the
congregation. He will take the
pulpit starting July 15.
Yeshiva to Offer
Summer Art
Chaim Friend, director of
Florida Friends of Yeshiva Uni-
versity alumni organization in
Miami, has announced that a
special summer series of pro-
grams, "Connoisseurship in Art,
Antiques, and Collectibles" will
be held July 5 through 14 at
Yeshiva University's Midtown
Center in Manhattan.
The programs are sponsored
by the university's Center for
Continuing Education in co-
operation with New York Chap-
ter of American Society of Ap-
praisers.
Among the topics to be
analyzed are "Masterpieces of
Asian Art," "Inside Today's Art
Market," "Going, Going Gone,"
"American Folk Art," "The
World of Louis Comfort Tif-
fany," "Conserving and Restor-
ing Fine Antique Furnishings,"
and "Appraising Art of Black
Africa."
The one-day programs are de-
signed for appraisal studies
students, collectors, dealers, and
other admirers of arts and an-
tiques.
Green New Owner of Binder Baldwin
Thomas L. Green, former
senior vice president of sales
promotion for Jordan Marsh-
Florida, has purchased
Binder Baldwin Piano and
Organ Company, which was
founded by Williams Binder
in 1958 and has become a
large retailer of pianos and
organs in South Florida.
The company currently
has warehouse-showrooms in
North and South Dade and a
store in the Broward Mall. It
is the exclusive dealer of
Baldwin products in Dade,
Broward, and Monroe
counties. Other keyboard
products include Rogers
organs and Aeolian pianos.
Green's career with Jordan
Marsh covered more than 20
years and included many
merchandising, store ad-
ministrative, and sales
promotion positions. He was
general manager of Jordan
Marsh's Dadeland and Omni
stores prior to his service as
sales promotion director
from 1974 to 1983. He will
assume the presidency of
Binder Baldwin, while
Binder will continue with the
company in a consulting
capacity.
Green has been active in
community affairs and
currently serves as chairman
of March of Dimes-South
Florida Chapter, as vice
president of Temple Israel of
Greater Miami, and as
secretary of Community
Television Foundation-
Thomas Green
WPBT-Channel 2.
He is a director of Ameri-
can Cancer Society, Guard-
ianship Program for the
Elderly of Dade County,
Hispanic Heritage Festival,
and the Fashion School
Advisory Board of Miami-
Dade Community College.
Green graduated from
Dartmouth College and
received an MBA from Amos
Tuck School of Business
Administration. He resides
in Coral Gables with his wife,
Carol and son. Spencer.
Shack Elected to Third
Term as JCC President
Ruth Shack was reelected to a
third term as president of Jewish
Community Centers of South
Florida at the agency's annual
meeting last week.
Also elected as officers for
1983-84 were Marc Hauser,
Steven J. Kravitz, Joel I. Levy,
Neal J. Menachem, and Gerald
Schwartz, vice presidents:
Sydney Newmark, secretary; and
Steven L. Schwartzberg,
treasurer.
Elected to the board of direc-
tors were James W. Baros III,
Emanuel Berlatsky, Marcia
Bilzin, Joseph Blonsky, Barry N.
Burak, Fern Canter. Tim R.
Cohen, Linda Fieldstone, Harvey
Friedman, Hope K. Fuller,
Morris Futernick, Stanley R. Gil-
bert, Norman K. Goldberg. Freda
Greenbaum, Stanley G. Green-
stein, Marc Hauser, Gary Y.
Holtzman, and Ezra Katz.
Also, Steven J. Kravitz,
Robert G. Lay ton, Harry A
(Hap) Levy, Joel I. Levy, Peter
Luria, Allan B. Margolis, Neal J.
Ruth Shack

Menachem. Douglas J. Miller,
Sydney Newmark, Shirley
Raffel. Muriel Russell, Gerald K.
Schwartz, Steven L. Schwarz-
berg. Shack, Ronald W. Shane,
and Harry Weitzer.
Farina Announces Intention to
Run for County Court Seat
Attorney Frances Farina has
announced that she is seeking
election to the County Court seat
being vacated by Marshall Ader.
Judge Ader recently announced
his candidacy for a Circuit Court
judges hip.
Farina, a native of Syracuse,
N.Y., graduated from George
Washington University and at-
tended University of Florida
Masters of Business Administra-
tion program. She received her
law degree from Nova Universi-
ty, where she finished in the top
fifth of her class.
Farina is secretary of North
Dade Bar Association, co-hosts
North Dade Bar television pro-
gram, "Approach the Bar," ha*
served as special counsel to Flor-
ida Bar Grievance Committee,
and has acted as a mediator in
North Miami Beach County
Court's "Operation Case flow."
Frances Farina
Farina is president of Miami
Shores Chamber of Commerce
and belongs to Temple Adath
Yeshurun. She is a member of
Hadassah'a Aliyah Chapter and
B'nai B'rith Women, Shoshona
Chapter.


Pgel2B TheJemd*Flonduui/Priday. Job*24, W63
Public Notice
CONSTRUCTIVE f ERVICE
(MOnOflRTY)
i n the circuiteowrr of
TME ELEVENTM JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACT KM
ho ti-ivyf
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFAAARRIAOE
INRC JURRUGIOr |
PABLO ENRIQUE TOVAR
Petitioner
and
ELS A OONZAIXZ
DE TOVAR
TO: ELBA GONZALEZ
DE TOVAR
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
ID that an action tor
PIohiUutl at Marriage has
bean Bled against you and you
an required to ssrre a copy of
your written difnim. If any, to
It on Laurence J. Altman.
attorney tor Petitioner, whose
address la 1*M Blscayne Bird..
Suite Ml. Miami. Florida WB,
and flla tha original with tba
dark of the above styled court
on or batora July l. IMS;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you tor tha
relief damandad In tha com
plaint or petition
Thto notice shall ba puMlahad
onea aach waak tor tour con-
secutive Hki in THE
JEWISH FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and tha
of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 38 th day of May.
IMS.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
By M.J. HARTNETT
Aa Deputy Clark
(Circuit Court Seal)
Laurence J. Altman
National Law Firm of Gerald
Kalaer
1444 Blacayne Blvd.. Sutta 101
Miami. Florida JS113
Attorney for Petitioner
l*7e June a. IP. IT. 34. im
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS N AMI LAW
NOTICE IS HBREBT
GIVEN that tha undereigned.
desiring to engage In business
under tha flcUttoua name
PUEBLO RESTAURANT atl
B701 S.W. 8th Street, Miami. I
Dade County. Florida Intends
to register aald name with tha
Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Flortda.
ANTONIO SANCHEZ
June 14; I
Juh" \m\
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONST* UCTI VE SERVICE
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT OF
TNR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL'
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADR COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-21*31
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOSE MANUEL COLORADO
Petitioner
IN TNR CIRCUIT COURT
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
FRORATR DIVISION
File Namter n MM
IN RE! ESTATE OF
GILLETTE SCHUMPERT
WEBSTER,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
Tha administration of the ea-
tate of Gillette Schumpert
Webster, deceased, Flla Num-
ber 83-4480. Is pending In tha
Circuit Court tor Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which la Dade Coun-
ty Courthouse, 78 West Flagler
Street. Miami. FL 81180
The names and addressee of
the personal representative
and the personal represents
tlve'a attorney are set forth be-
low.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of tha will, the quallfl-
catlona of tha personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AN OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED will be
forever barred.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June IT, IMS.
Personal Representative:
Malcolm Lewis Kneale
1841 S.W. First Street
Miami. FL 81180
Phone: fSOB) 842-90O0
Attorney for Personal
Representative: Malcolm,
Lewis Kneale, Eaq.
1841 S.W. First Street
Miami FL 88180
Telephone: (800)043-9000
Florida Bar No.: 048070
(member since 1062)
1RU8 June 17. 24.1908
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
TNR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case Na. 81-1fisi
NOTICE OF PETITION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
DELIA RODRIGUEZ.
Petitioner Wife.
and
RIGOBERTO MANUEL
RODRIGUEZ.
Respondent Husband
TO: RIGOBERTO MANUEL
RODRIGUEZ
ApartadD 8340. Zone 0
Panama. Republic of
Panama
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
mad acalnat you and you are
required to serve a copy of the
written defenses. If any. to It
on: PEDRO F. MAR TELL,
ESQUIRE. OF MARTELL A
VILLALOBOS. P.A.. 1401
Ponce da Leon Boulevard.
Suite 200. Coral Gables.
Florida. S81S4. and file the
original with the Clark of the
above styled Court on or before
the lot day of Jury. 1888. other-
wise a Default will be entered
against you tor the relief
prayed for In the Petition.
This Notice shall be pub-
lished once each week tor four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLO RID IAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami.
Dade County. Florida on thU
day of June 1.1961. IMS.
RICHARD P BR INKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By; N. J. Hartmett
Deputy Clerk
19810 June8.10.17.24.1883,
MIRIAM DEL SOOORRO
FERNANDEZ
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUttoua name of I
BERKSHIRE SCHOOL at 18270
S.W. ISSth Street. In the City of
Homestead. Florida, Intends to
register the said name with the
Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dado County, Florida.
Dated at Homestead,
Florida, this list day of June,
1988.
LYONSDOWN SCHOOL. INC.
By: LouisR. Farrell.
President
Attorney for Applicant:
THOMAS J. WALSH, P.A.
M0 English Avenue
Homestead. FL 88000
19084 June *4
July 1.8, 10,18*1
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
FRORATR DIVISION
File Number 83 3773
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SOPHIE GOLDEN
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of SOPHIE GOLDEN,
deceased, File Number 83-3773
(01), Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
addreas of which la Dade
County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and ad
dresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTION8 NOT SO FILED I
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has I
begun on June 17.1983.
Personal Representative
MARK GOLDEN
9101 Eaat Bay Harbor Drive
Bay Harbor Islands. FL 881B4
Attorney for Personal Rep
resentative
THEODORE R. NELSON.
Esq.
1136 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands. Florida
88164
Telephone: (808)886-6710
18829 June 17, 24, 1983
TO: MIRIAM DEL SOOORRO
FERNANDEZ
P.O. Boat 0M
Oil City. LA 71427
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action lor
Dissolution of Marriage has
been flled against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to:
It on Leonardo P. Mendes,,
attorney for Pattttonar, whose
address Is 1437 S.W. 1st Street,
Miami. Florida SUM. and flla
the original with tha dark of
the above atylad court on or
before Jury 23, IMS; otherwise
a default will bo antorad
against you tor the relief
damandad la tha complaint or
pstttton. |
This notice shall be published
once each wash lor four eon-
sec uUve weeks In THE'
JEWISH FLO RID IAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17th day of
June. ISM.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A. D. WADE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LEONARDO P. MENDEZ,
ESQ.
1437 S.W. 1st St.
Miami. Florida 33136
Telephone: (306)849-6480
19863 June 34;
July 1,8.16. 1983
IN TNR CIRCUIT COURT
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
FRORATR DIVISION
File Nambei
DMtBOaEI
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAE BRODIE.
NOTICE
OT ADMINISTRATION
Tha administration at the
estate of MAE BRODIE.
deceased. FUe Number 83-8034,
Is pendmg In the Circuit Court
lor Dads County. Florida.
Probate Division, tha MMaW
of which la Dads County
Courthouse. 71 Wast Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida SUSS.
The nsmss end uliliasass of
the
and the
tative's attorney are set torth
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADR COUNTY. FLORIDA
FRORATR DIVISION
File Nwmber 83-J815
Divistontl
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FREDA M BLOCH.
Deceased
NOTICE
. OF ADMINISTRATION
' The administration of the
estate of FREDA M. BLOCH.
deceased. FUe Number 83-6036.
la pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida,
Probate Division, the addreas
of which la 3rd Floor, Dade
County Courthouse, 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. FL
83180. The names and ad
dresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
AU interested persons are
required to flle with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 24,1988.
Personal Representative
SAMUEL H. BLOCH
6701 Collins Ave.. No. 804
Miami Beach, FL 33140
Attorney for Personal Rep
resentative
NELSON AND FELDMAN
P.A.
U 86 Kane Concourse.
Bay Harbor Islands. FL MUM
Telephone: (800) 806-0716
1W*______June 18. July 1. IMS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
The undersigned, under oath,
says: It is the Intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the,
fictitious name of La Chalet,'
A.C.L.F. located at 78 West
16th Street. In the city of
Hlaleah. Dade County, Florida.
Luis M. Valdes. Jr.. M.D.
9830S.W. 87 Street,
Miami. Florida SS186
JuanaC. Soto
12196 S.W 10 Street. No. 6
Miami, Florida 33184
Silvia M. Arenas-Buergo
3840 N.W. 9 Street Apt. 106.
Miami. Florida 33126
19888 June 17.34;
July 1.8.1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAMR LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Kama's at 800 N.E. 30th Street.
Apt. 1817. Miami. Eta. intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
r. 8. Design Group
International Corp.
By: Jacob Safdeye.
President
June 24;
July 1,8.18. ISM t
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engsge in business
under the fictitious name
POTOYAS AT THE aSS
SEILLES at 1741 Collins Ave
Miami Beach. Fla. 38140 in-
!^Vrer"ter ,a n*m
with the Clerk of Circuit Court
of Dade County. Florida.
VICTORIA RIOS,
Owner
18818 June 10,17,34;
July M MS
AU interested
required to file _.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
or thu notice (i) an
claims against Use estate and
(S) any objection by an m
tereeted person to whom notice
was mailed mat challenges toe
validity of the will, the
qualifications of tha personal
representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 34. 1983
PersonalRaprsssiilaUiss:
ZEB ULON JULIAN B ROD IE
71S Hibiscus Dr..
Miami Beach. Fla 33130
JEROME BRODIE.
8104 Neuwood Road.
RoekvUls.MDMMB
EDWARD E. LEVTNSON
5481 No Bay Rd,
Miami Beach, FL 88140
Attorney tor Personal Rep-
resentative:
EDWIN M. GINSBURG, Esq.
Myers Kenln Levtnson Ruffner.
Frank and Richards
1428 BrlckeU Avenue, Suite 700 -
Miami. FLSS1S1
Telephone: (806)871-0041
10SM June 34, July 1,1963
IN TNB CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORIDA
FRORATR DIVISION
File Number 83 J148
DIVISION (M)
IN RE ESTATE OF
IRVING LUBELL
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of IRVING LUBELL.
deceased. FUe Number 88-6148.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
tor Dade County. Florida,
Probate Division, the addreas
of which la Apt. 310. 1078 N.E.
Miami Gardens Dr.. North
Miami Beach. Florida 38162.
The names and addressee) of
the personal representative
and the personal rep
resentaUve's attorney are set
forth below.
AU interested persons are
required to flle with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 24.1983
Personal Representative:
LYNN BARTON LUBELL
2948 E. Lincolnshire.
Toledo. Ohio
ROBERT M. LUBELL
2948 E. Uncolarure
Toledo. Ohio
Attorney for Personal Rep
resentative:
HAYS AND GRUNDWERG
(FL. BAR No. 032230)
By: MOSES J. GRUNDWERG
213 E 1st. Ave. Suite 900
Miami. FL 88181
Telephone: (308)871-4419
19863 June 24. July l, 1983
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO. 83-21 77*
IN RE: The Marriage of:
LUCIENNE NESBrTT.
Petitioner Wife.
and
ALEXANDER NESBITT.
Respondent-Husband.
To: ALEXANDER
NESBITT. Residence
unknown, ahall serve copy of
your Answer to the Petition for
DlasoluUon of Marriage upor
GEORGE NICHOLAS
Attorney, 612 N W. 12th
Avenue. Miami. Florida. 38188.
and flle original with Court
Clerk on or before Julv 22,1983.
otherwise a default' wUl be
entered.
June 20, 1983
RICHARD BRINKER
ByC.P.COPELAND
18MS June 34;
July l, 8.16.1863 .
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTR UCTI VE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
TNR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CME ACROSJ Mo. M SMM
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
BARBARA IRWIN. aka
BARBARA SAFFIR IRWIN
PeUUsswi Wlto
and
JOHN WIRWIN
Risansisstot ITS
TO: JOHNW.IRWIN
Number 404
Maiden. Masa 03143
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Diaeo-
MirTaMJS has been
you and you are
to sacra a copy of your
lfany.tolton
ROCALYN LANDI8BURG,
ESQ.. attorney tor Petitioner,
whose address Is:
NOTICE h| uV**
GIVEN tha, JfJJt
W. lio Court kZ^ U
^e^mrhecierkj^*
DoutaCCt ta
tea*. wner
**i."
Bred.. Sutta 804, Miami, fla.
inn. and flle the original with
tha clerk of the above styled
court on or before July 18, IMS;
otherwise a default will ba
entered against you tor the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for tour con-
secutive weeks to THE JEW
ISH FLORID IAN
witness my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 9 day of June.
IMS.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Rnsalyn LandUburg. Esq.
I860 Blacayne Blvd.
Suite 504
Miami. Fla. 33136
Telephone: 308-673-0008
Attorney tor Petitioner
June 17. 34;
__________Jury l.S. IMS
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SRRVICR
(NO PROPERTY)
IN YNR CIRCUIT COURT OF
TNR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADR COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-1 77to
PETITION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
IN RE:
HERBERT H SCOTT.
F t'tioner Husband
and
VTDA B. SCOTT.
Respondent Wife
TO: VTDA B. SCOTT,
Residence Unknown.
Last known addreas:
1346 N.E 127 th Street.
North Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written answer and defenses, if
any. to It on GEORGE J.
BOLTON. ESQ., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
2330 N.E. 171st St.. North
Miami Beach. Florida 33100
(306) 949-8341 and flle the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
July 1. 1983; otherwise a
default wUl be entered for the
relief prayed for In said
petition.
This notice ahall be pubUahed
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN, 130
N.E. 6th St. Miami, Florida.
WITNESS ray hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 27th day of May,
1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By DC. BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
George J. Bolton. Esq.
Attorney for Petitioner-
Husband
3830 N.E. 171st8t.
N. Miami Beach. Florida H100
Telephone (SOB) 949-8341
19807 June 3 10. 17. 34.1988
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CASE NO 81-2177J
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ARMANDO ALMEIDA.
Petitioner-Husband.
and
CLARA LUZ ALMEIDA.
Respondent Wife
To: CLARA LUZ ALMEIDA.
Residence unknown, shall
serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE'
NICHOLAS, Attorney. 813N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami, Florida.,
S31M, and flle original with
Court Clerk on or before July,
22. 19SS. otherwise a default
will be entered.
June 30, IMS.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: C.P COPE LAND
M6l June 34: '
July 1,8,18. IMS
i
NOTICE OFACTKJT I
CONSTRUCTIVE SElvU
(NOFROFi"1V'C,L
IMTHRCIRCUITCOwStJ
TNR ELEVENTH JUoJcuTl
CIRCUIT OF PUwSlnP
AND FOR DADI COvJrrr f
Civil Acne* NeiVfer, I
ACTION FOR DISS0LUTN.I
OFMAERIAOI
IN RE: The Marriage of
APPOLEON D. LUBD,
Petitioner Husband, '
DENI8E L. LUBTN,
Respondent-Wife,
TO: DENISE L LUBD*
RESPONDENT
Addreas and
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY I
FTED that an action tori
lutton of Marriage hai L
filed against you and jou"i
required to serve a copynM|
written defenses. 11 any Ion J
LLOYD M. ROUTsUN. itnl
ney for Petitioner, whoa ell
dress la 181 N.E. U Stmtl
Miami. FL. and file the ontwl
with the clerk of the tbonl
styled court on or before JiijJ
1803: otherwise a default *f|
be entered against you fortkl
relief demanded In the o|
plaint or petition
This notice shall be pubUaedl
once each week for four col
secutive weeks In THE JM-f
QH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and tail
seal of said court at Miami, I
Florida on this 28 day of Kir I
1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC P Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seali
LLOTD M. ROUTMAN
in N.E. 83 Street
Miami. FL 88138
Telephone: (SOB| T6T-5800
Attorney for Petitioner
| 1MM June 3,10,17.*. INI
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOf
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORID*. IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
N0.83-1S71S
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
UNA MAY HEPBURN
Petitioner
and
CARLKILROY HEPBURN
Respondent
TO: CARLKILROY
HEPBURN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action lor
Dissolution of Marriage lie)
been filed against you and yw
are required to serve s copy"
your written defenses, if any.
It on Laurence J Altman.
attorney for Petitioner, whoa
addreas Is 1444 Blscaym **
Suite 301. Miami, Florida 81
and file the original with
clerk of the above styled court
on or before: July 1. l
otherwise s default will
entered against you for W
relief demanded in tha con-
plaint or petition.
Thla notice shall be pubiuhri
once each week for four co
secutive weeks In th*
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and m
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 38th day of W
1988
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clsrk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M.J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Laurence J. Altman u
National Law Firm of GeraW
MM Blacayne Blvd. Suite *
Miami. Florida SS1S2
1*800 JuneS.lO.lT.N.lW
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
NOTICE 18 HEREBT
GIVEN that the understand
cleaning to engsge In buaw"
under the fictitious namj
PUEBLO CAFETERIA at "2
S.W. 18th Street. Miami. usw
County. Florida Wendf
register said name wltti "
Ctork of the Circuit Court
Dads County, Florida.
"antoniosanc*.^
Jiriyl.*.*1*'



Friday, June 24,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
iblic Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
U,M$TRUCTIVBSBBVICB
'"(NOPROPBRTV)
irH| CIRCUIT COURT OR
HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
SJAjIT OF FLORIDA, IN
ND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.lHlin
ICTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOR
pjc: The Marriage of:
IAIME GONZALEZ,
lid
IATRIZ ALICIA TOVAR
ONZAI.EZ
BEATRIZ ALICIA
TOVAR GONZALEZ
3615 Fenn 3 tree t
Irvine, California
| TOU ARK HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dlutlon of Marriage haa
i filed against you and you
I required to serve a copy of
ur written defenses. If any, to
ion LEOPOLDO A. OCHOA.
omey for Petitioner, whose
la Penthouse One, ISO
ith Miami Avenue. Miami,
orlda 33180. and file the
nal with the cleric of the
eve atyled court on or before
lily 13. 1983. otherwise a
|tfauK win be entered against
i for the relief demanded In
h complaint or petition.
[ Thli notice shall be published
bee each week for four con-
kcutlve weeks In THE
EWISH FLORTDIAN.
| WITNESS my hand and the
of said court at Miami,
Brlda on this 14th day of
A 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M.J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
cult Court Seal)
omey for Petitioner:
B0P0LDO A. OCHOA,
QUIRE
nthouse One
South Miami Avenue
nl, Florida 88180
itphone: (SOBI 374-1232
June 17,94;
July 1,8.1988
|lNTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
IDE COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 13 3514
DIVISION: M
IRE: ESTATE OF
(fNA BECKERMAN.
ceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
1 ALL PERSONS HAVING
LUMS OR DEMAND8
AINST SAID ESTATE AND
HER PERSONS IN-
VESTED IN SAID
IATE:
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
ED that the administration
the Estate of ANNA
KCKERMAN, deceased, late
|Dade County, Florida, haa
nenced in the capUoned
*edlng.
(OU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
ID AND REQUIRED to file
) clalma and demands which
may have against the
>>te and to file any challenge
|the validity of the Last Will
Testament offered for
*>te. If any, or any ob
on to the qualifications of
Personal Representative,
pue or Jurisdiction of the
put. with the Court. Dade
My Courthouse, 73 West
gler Street. Miami, Florida
1M, WITHIN THREE
PNTHS FROM THE DATE
THE FIRST
Plication or this
TICE OR YOUR RIGHT TO
' 80 WILL BE FOREVER
RRED.
CLAIMS. DEMANDS
OBJECTIONS NOT SO
tD WILL BE FOREVER
USD.
It Publication of this
'" on the 34th day of June,
HERBERT JAY COHEN.
Personal Representative
of the Estate of
I ANNA BECKERMAN
<, deceased
S. Dadeland Blvd.. No. BOO
Miami, Florida Ml68
"ORNEY FOR PERSONAL
RESENTATTVE:
, BERT JAY COHEN. P.A.
1 B. Dadaland Blvd.. Suite
.Florida BUM I
*one: (306)668-0401
June 34, July 1,1988
,. **T|c unorn
firl^^i00* *** LAW
[OTICE 18 HEREBY
f-N that the undersigned,
SMI engage In business
the fictitious name of
BOW CAFETERIA AND
,TAy ?ANT numbs* ISM
ibjb Avenue. In the aty of
M, Florida. Intends to
of the Circuit Court of
County, Florid..
to at HUteah. Florid*.
P*dayol May. IBM.
Pedro A. Coronal
Jun8,l0.iT.KiMS
NOTICE OF ACTION >
CONSTRUCTIVa SRRVICB
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OR
THB ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OR FLORI DA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civic Action No. 61-36447
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOR
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARCOS F. CADAVtt),
Huaband-Potltlonar
and
LUISA CAD AVID.
Wife-Respondent.
TO: LUISA CADAVID
Calle Francisco
Bono No. M
San Francisco
deMacorU
Republlca Dominicans
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage haa been
filed agalnat you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
P.A.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 1481 N.W. 7th
Street. Miami. Florida M12B,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above atyled court
on or before July IB, 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each weak for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 9 day of June,
B8S.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByM J.Hertnett
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L. Carrlcarte. P.A.
2481 N.W. 7th Street
Miami, Florida 33126
Telephone: (806)648-7917
18834 June 17. 24;
July 1.8. 1963
IN THR CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
OENERAL JURISDICTION
CASE NO. 83-18547
NOTICE OF ACTION
MANUEL VAZQUEZ,
Plaintiff,
-va-
JOSE GARCIA PARRA,
JOSEPH P. BOUKAL and
DOROTHY BOUKAL, his wife.
Defendants.
TO: JOSE GARCIA-
PARRA
Calle La Collna.
Quints Alicar
Oounaa de la Trinidad
Caracas, Venezuela
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Interpleader haa
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to
It on MANUEL VAZQUEZ.
ESQ., whoae address la SIB
S.W. 17th Avenue. Suite 817,
Miami, Florida 83135, on or
before July 8. IBM. and file the
original with the clerk of this
court, either before service on
Plaintiff or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint.
Dated on June 2, IMS.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By: D.C. BRYANT
Aa Deputy Clerk
198U June 10.17, M;
_____________________July 1, IMS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In buatneas
under the fictitious name
IMPULSE UNLIMITED at
8MB S.W. 111st Street, Miami,
Dade County, Florida, intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
IMPULSE UNLIMITED
By: William C.Stuart
Attorney* for Applicant; -
Caeaal and Oaaael. PJL
Suite toil
100 North Btscayne Blvd
Miami, FloridaM132
19818 June 10. IT. 34
______________________Jutar 1.1MB,
NOTICE UNDBR
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I NOTICE IS HEREBY
'GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Security Sedans at 6601 N.W. M
8L. Suite 400, Miami, Fla HIM
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida,.
Vanguard Security, Inc.
By: David H Shopay, Pre*.
and David H. Shopay.
Individually.
Barry S. Yarchln, Esq
Strooch, A Strooch at La van
Attorney for Applicant
11STM June B. 10.17. 24, IBM
__ "" OR ACTION |
CONSTRUCTIVE SIR VICE '
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
TNI ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OR FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADR COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 83 31374
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOR
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MANUEL O. AREVALO.
Husband-Petitioner
and
ROSA T. AREVALO.
Wife-Respondent
TO: ROSA T. AREVALO
Santo Atahualpa MB
Urbanldad El Trebol
Umi, Peru
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage haa
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on ALBERT L. CARRI-
CARTE. PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2491 N.W. 7th Street, Miami,
FL S3126. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July
23. 1M8: otherwise a default
will be entered agalnat you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 16th day of
June, 1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE
P.A.
2481 N.W. 7th Street
Miami, Florida88126
Telephone: (806)648-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
18648 July 24.;
JulyL8.16.lSM
NOTICE Of ACTION--------
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 83-31552
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOR
IN RE: The Marriage of
VASUDHASUTRAVE,
Petitioner-Wife,
and
& OOVINDA RAO SUTRA VE
Respondent-Husband.
TO: S. OOVINDA RAO
SUTRAVE
2-11 Fe the Nagar
HydrabadlS
(A.P.), INDIA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
GEORGE T. RAMANI. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 711 Blscayne Bldg.. 19
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before July
22, 1983; otherwise a default
will be entered agalnat you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on this 16 day of June.
IBM.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM. J.Hartnett
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T. RAMANI
TU Blscayne Bldg.
18 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida BUM
Telephone: (806)874-4340
1MM JuneM;
JUT LI. 18,
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT
ROR
DADR COUNTY, FLOW IDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83 188*
Division 81
IN RE: ESTATE OF
KITTY RICHMAN
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMIN I8TRA TION
TO ALL PERSONA HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
lot the estate of KITTY RICH-
MAN, deceased, File Number
83-1886. is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which la 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
88181. The peraonal
representative of the estate la
Ray Bortx, whose address la
200 South Hoover Bldg. 219
Room 1M, Tampa. Florida
33809. The name and address of
the personal representative's
attorney are aet forth below.
All persons having claims or
' demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to Hie
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or i in liquids ted. the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be atatod. If the claim la se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration haa
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of
Administration: JuneM. IBM.
, RAYBORTZ
Aa Peraonal Representative
of the Estate of
KITTY RICHMAN
Deceased
Attorney tor Peraonal Rep-
resentative:
KWITNEY KROOP AND
SCHEINBERG. P.A.
420 Lincoln Road Suite 612
Miami Beach, Florida 83138
Telephone: (806)988-7878
18864 June 24, July 1,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THR CIRCUIT COURT OF
THR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADR COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 61-1VI33
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOR
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MIGUEL BARRAGAN,
Husband
1 and
INES BARRAGAN.
Wife.
I TO: INES BARRAGAN,
Realdence addreaa
unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage haa
been filed against you and you
are to require to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on ALBERT L. CARRI-
CARTE. P.A.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose addreaa la
2491 N.W. 7th Street, Miami,
' Florida 33125, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
July 1. 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you tor the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 1st day of June,
IBM.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M.J. HARTNETT
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L. Carrlcarte, P.A.
Attorney for the Husband
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 88126
Telephone: (806)648-7917
18808 June 8,10. 17, 24, IBM
^ NOTICB UNDBR
FICTITIOUS NAMB LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
NTNOS' DAY CARE CENTER
at 4411-18 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida HIM Intend to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court ol
Dade County, Florida.
Raquel V. Marians
Miguel Mariana
June IT, M;
1
NOTICB UNDBR
FICTITIOUS NAMB LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GtVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Tri-
dent Stock Transfer Company
at 2838 NE 1M St.. Suite SB,
North Miami Beach. FL 83160
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
MarkPUnlck
18822 June 10.17, M;
July 1. IBM
IN THE Cl RCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 83 1V353
NOTICE OF PETITION
FOR DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
PEDRO LUIS DUARTB,
Petitioner-Husband,
and
CIRA ROSALINA MONS
MARTINEZ,
Respondent-Wife.
TO: CIRA ROSALINA MONS
MARTINEZ
Clodoveo Pedroso S-N
Las Martinaa, Plnar del
Rio. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of the
written defenses. If any, to It
on: PEDRO F. KARTELL,
ESQUIRE. Of MARTELL ft
VILLA LOBOS, P.A.. 1401
Ponce de Leon Boulevard,
Suite 200, Coral Gables,
Florida, M1S4. and Ble the
original with ther Clerk of the
above styled Court on or before
the 1st day of July. IBM. other-
wise a Default will be entered
agalnat you lor the relief
prayed for In the Petition.
This Notice shall be pub-
lished once each week for four
consecutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORTDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald Court at Miami.
Dade County. Florida on this
day of June HBU.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: N. J.Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
1W11_. _JtiMS, 10,1/rjM, IBM
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 63-3514
DIVISON: 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNA BECKERMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
ITO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS IN-
TERESTED IN SAID
ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the Eatate of ANNA
BECKERMAN, deceased, late
of Dade County, Florida, haa
commenced m the capUoned
proceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file
any claims and demands which
you may have against the
Estate and to file any challenge
to the validity of the Last Will
and Testament offered tor
probate, if any, or any ob-
jection to the qualifications of
the Personal Representative,
venue or Jurisdiction of the
Court, with the Court, Dade
County Courthouse. 78 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33180, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST
PUBLICATION OF THIS
NOTICE OR YOUR RIGHT TO
DO SO WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First Publication of this
Notice on the IT day of June.
IMS.
HERBERT JAY COHEN. P.A.
As Representative of the
Estate of
ANNA BECKERMAN
Dec eased
9400 S. Dadeland Blvd. No. BOO
Miami. Florida 33168
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
RE P RESE NT A TTV E!
HERBERT JAY COHEN, P.A.
8400 S. Dadeland Blvd. Suite
BOO
Miami, Florida BUM
Telephone: (806)666-0401
18828 June IT. M. IBM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVa SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TNR CIRCUIT COURT OR
THB ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND ROR DADR COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 63 I8VV1
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ROY O. PENGELLT.
Petitioner,
and
j FLORENCE P. PENOELLY
Respondent
TO: FLORENCE P.
PENGELLT
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
i Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
i your written defenses. If any. to
lit on BENNET D. FULTZ,
iESQ., attorney tor Petitioner,
whose address is 618 S.W. 12th
Avenue. Miami, Florida 88180.
land file the original with the
I clerk of the above styled court
on or before July 1st. IBM:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
| once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
I WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on tola 28Ui day of May.
IBM.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByV. BARKLBY
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
BENNETTD. FULTZ. ESQ.
619 S.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (806) 868-4783
: Attorney for Petitioner
18780 June 8, 10, IT. 24. 1883
NOTICE UNDER
RICTITIOUS NAMB LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
j GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
ROYCE at 816 Lincoln Road.
Miami Beach, Florida Intends
] to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
I BRUPER, INC.,
Ja Florida Corporation
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for Bruper, Inc.
19830 June IT, M;
____________________July 1, S. 1MB
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
I NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engsge In business
under the fictitious name
JOHN ROYCE at 318 Lincoln
Road, Miami Beach. Florida
Intends to register aald name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
BRUPER, INC.,
a Florida Corporation
'HARVEYD. FRIEDMAN
, Attorney for BRUPER .
1SS81 June 17.24;
'_________ July 1.8, 1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THR ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
IN AND FOR
DADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
ORNERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 83 -146V CA 24
NOTICE OF ACTION
ANCHELL REALTY. INC..
Plaintiff.
4
NOTICE UNDBR
RICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICB IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name TIRE
DISTRIBUTORS OF FLOR-
IDA at 7288 and T2M S.W. slat
Street. Miami. Florida U1U In
tends to register aald name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Coulrt of Dade County, Florida.
MARTI NO TIRE COMPANY
| Howard LKuker
8300 So. Dadeland Blvd
No 608
| Miami, FL881M
'Attorney for Martino Tire
I Company
18784 June S. 10. IT. M. IBM
WILLIAM BAKER and
ROWVENA BAKER.
his wife.
Defendants
TO: WILLIAM BAKER and
ROWVENABAKER,
his wife
30600 NW 30th Ct.
Miami. FT, MOM
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose Agree-
ment for Deed Lot 6, Block U.
LAKE LUCERNE SECTION
THREE, according to the Plat
thereof aa recorded In Plat
Book 72 at Page 71 of the Public
Records of Dads County,
Florida, has been filed sgalnst
you and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
faneea. if any. on: Marvin I.
Moaa. pa.. Plaintiffs attor-
ney, whose addreaa is P.O. Boat
646260, Surf side, FL 88164, on or
"fore July 23. IBM, and Hie the
original with the Oerk of this
Court, either before service on
PtalntifTa attorney or Immedi-
ately taereatter; otherwise a
Default will be entered sgalnst
you tor the relief demanded hi
the Complaint
I WITNESS my Hand and Baal
of this Court on June 16. IBM
Richard C Brlnker
As Clerk of
the Circuit Court
By: D. C. Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
umo JuneM;
July 1.8, 16. IBM


PajBf4-B Tbe Jewish Floridian PViday. June 24. 1983

Public Notice
Mn or action
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
IMOPtOfHTY)
iktmcicwtcowto.
the eleventh judicial
cir cuit of flow da. m
amo fob dado county
action fob dissolution
onwwmi
IN RE TTe Marries* af
JUR2 CLAUDE I'll
rahming
TO
LLOYD M
I FLORID IAM.
RICHARD PI
AtOHLOa
ni*irij.
ByCP
At Deputy Pert
I Circuit Cburt Saal )
LLOYDM ROCTMAM
1BMB Street,
i fcrl
NOTICE UNOE
nomouf mams i
NOTICE B HE
given oat o
tar Tie
.TLWKT7*
fli
ia.MrT.st.:
notice
toBaea M 1MB 5 W
CAL
SO UTH FLORIDA
DRIXaURDL
nrl
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COUBVI
OAOE COUNTY. FLOS IDA
F C CASC MO. O-141*7
IN RE Tr* MArrUureof
FRANCOSUR R FRANCOIS
PetKtour-Huebasd
sad
SYLVINA FRANCOIS
To: SYI.VTNA FRANCOIS
R*ne*c<* unknown, anall
erv* Cv^/ of yow Anvff to
3m PtCtJOB lor D BanlK In of
MurUft a poo GEORCE
VKHOUi A3rnr/ UXW
12Hl ATtcot. Miami Florida.
UUI. mod Hie kkjSRI *>
Court Ork oo or be toe* July
a IBM. otter*) toe a fifliiM
RICHARD BRISKER
Clerk. CtrcaNAnd
County Courta
By DC BRYANT
Deputy Clerk
Ml JuneM.
*-^r1.Mf.ntt
MnMMM SHVKI
(Mopoopcam
inthecibcuitcoubtof
the eleventh judicial
circuit op flob i da. ml
ano for dadc county
civil action
wo.st-iaa*
ACTION FOB DISSOL UTION
OFMAIIIWI
IN RE TII MtllMaaM
IONA CLARKE
RAP HEAL CLARKE
TO Rapnaal Clarke
Ml New Tort A warn
ApC No J-B
Brooklyn. Naw Tort
TOC ARE
I LED thai
Dweoiutton i
baas mad tap
ar* i if dnil to aerve a copy of
your written daSeaaae. tf aay. to
it on Kramer and Golden. P Jk..
addreea m Biecayn* Centre
toBto MB. lMMPaj iiMat.
Nora MtomL FL an*l and Ale
ae ocHil wsb tka dark of
Om ekon d|ki court as or
betorejulyl.il
detautt will be
. Thf aoacaakaJkaiiAtkikil
notice or action
CONST RUCTTVC SERVICE
(ofrri)
m the a bcuit courr or
THE ELEVENTH JUCMCIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ACTION I
IBM
lotion
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
ANABCCARRA]
TOO ARE

I FLORID IAN
RICHARD P
AsO*rt CM
hot ice op actiom
const ructivb service
imopmfutti
in the circuit coubt of
the e le venth juoicial
cimcuit or flobida. in
ano fob da ob county
ChHI ACNNINN tJ. n NJS
ACTION FOB DISSOLUTION
OF MAR RI ABE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE Or
ROBERTOD
ECHE\ ARR1A.
I omN to
I FLO RID IAN
THE
JULIA E
FAJUOA.
TO: JULIA E.
ECHEVARRIA
Call* IT MM
NJOTJ-
P-A..
3i*rr*acopyofyow
Brim. Many. to**n
L CARRICARTE.
may far PatJftonar.
n-HlNNWlB
RICHARD P BRINKS R
Ai Clark. Circuit Court
Dad* County. FtorMa
By CLARINDA BROWN
A Deputy Ctork
rOrcutt Court Seal)
Ml i iiniikwB.PJk.
.Fll
IN TH E CIBCUrT COUBT OF
THC ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
ci Bcurr. IN ANO FOB
DAOE COUNTY. FLO". IDA
CIVILACTIOM
NO.D-HB4
CENERAL BBBBBCrW
DIVISION
HOT ICE OF ACTION
PATRICK J FULLER and
JUDITH ANN FULLER.
MOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTBUCTIVE SEBVICB
(NOFBOPEBTY)
IH THE CIBCUrT COUBT OF
THC ELEVEMTM JUDICIAL
ClBCUrTOFFLOBlOA IH
AMD FOB PADS! COUNTY
MaBVUWlSFC
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OT
GLORIA]
(
IUCT1VB!
UCXM VTDAL
sn.
iJwjy*.:

oa totoS Bay of
RICHARD P
By D C Bryant
AtDepntyCarrk
i Circus Court Saal >
LLTB VTDAL E3Q
JTS Waat NCk Street.
Sum 111
a* M. 17 M:
July MHO *
MAURT
GROSS. l
TO: MAURT & GROSS and
SALLY A. GROSS. H Irrtkf.
unanown tpou***. betre.
other nut paraeaa
BawBBBJ by. through. niNi or
asaawt MACRY & GROSS aad
SALLT A GROSS and or tbatr
latpetOii eeaarla) V tk*y b*
TOC ARE NOTTrTED (sat
aa action to ratoras or caacal a
a Dad* County. Florida
That portton a* tk* FVrkta
Lot 1. Block I.
E8TATBS,
to
N kDaaU.FT.1
lS.MklV.M.1
HOTICE OT ACTION
(MOFBOFSBTY)
IH THE CIECU1T COUBT OF
THEELEVSMTMJUDtCUU.
CIBCUrriMAMOFOB
OAOS COUNTY. F LOB I DA
FAMILY DIVISION
CAM MO.: HUM
IN RE THE 1
QAKY1
SANDRA 1
TO SANDRA1
mi

IFLORIDIAN
JKW-
aaal of aaid court at Wu
Ftortda oa thla M day of Jva
RICHARD P BRISKER
A Clark CtrcuR Court
DaA* Oounry. Ftonda
By M J HartnNt
Aa Dtaatj dart
drcutt Court SaaJ i
Albert L Carrtcart* P A
BBS W TOiStraat
IK
htm
Attorney tori
it
Oj*

DATED Maya.:
RICHARD P.
C.crk of Clreaat Oaart
CtrcuBCbartBaal)
3y M J Haraatt
aaDaauty Clart
UYSt Jiaat t. la. IT. SL II
PMt Bookti at PaaaNlataa
Public Racorda of Dad*
County. FNalBv BBf bmt*
particularly
BBBBK
Bagto at Ok*
BBNfJ of Lai l
Lot 1
FICTITIOUS MAAtC LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN aat aa
ARC ALL-STATE ACCIDENT
RECONSTRUCTION CORP I
at BIT Lacota Read. SuB* UD.
I a* dart of a* Or
rt of Dada CkwMy. FMrl
CHARLES L HATES
IN TNfJ CMCUIT COU
THEELEVtNTHAII
CIRCUIT OF FLOBII
IS RE TWMarrtos*.
CATHY ADDERLET
Boal
.P-A.
RICHARD P
AaCSark.araa>
ByCLARINDAB
AaDepatyOi
(CXrcattCoartSaaJr
JOTHX OF ACTwlT
coNsraucTivE $tv,~
'MOIBOeTT^e,
NYlBlClBCUi'caaU
TNBf^XEVEBTH^Sf
pSkBMLTr?' 0'nB
.__r*WLT 01 v I Sum
tARTAJTELA
TO MARIA NX l_f
ROTJRICtYi
NSPNaStrar,
TOUARE MIT?!..
raa? aat an action fec^
ST -- Mamt Sto hi
eaZ !lT,^^*0:WaJ|w
YTNJ ASHEREH) u^T
NrPmriuan -*oa,ajZ_7
awKLFlnrlda i ^J
?* Tttm >J "^ "-"' elrrl<
aaaewa aryted eojt oo k>
PA.
AFFI DAVIT UNOCB
FICTITIOUS
HAAtE STATUTE
STATEOFFLOBIOA
COUNTY OF DAOE
a ansac* a a
uader a*
WilBBBN name of KOBO. WAT
NER. LEAVT m Rawrjl
LOCATED AT BMB mn
Drtre. Suae BTl-NB to aa etty
KING RABTN. p a
WATNER A LEAVT PA.
MS S W.fJBto Aawaa*
CONSTBUCTIVE IE VICE
(MOFBOFBBTY)
I H THE CIRCUIT COUBT OF
THE ELEVEMTM JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AMO FOB DAOE COUNTY
CIVILACTIOM
MO. U-ICHU
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
Of MAItlAfiE
IN RE Tk* Mamas* of
BRENDAH GREES
IERRT MICHAEL
TO JERRTMKHAEL
GREEN
c-o Barbara FTbm
TOC ARE KEREBT NOTT-
PNBkja.
Ml 1.MESS ay kmMsajto J
** ** cout u Ekai
fcrtto aa &N nn ar m NB.I
3CHARDP BRISKEn
A* CNrk. Cjt_i Com
D*** Caucty. rrto
ByS a Hrwa
A* Deputy ant
CtocaSOawt Saal t
a* -"wNikn.k;
-----------------------/uauB)
.Julyi.:
IS.M.1T.M.I
FlCTmOUSNAAASL
notice: IS HEl
GIVEN aat a
PA..

atai *f aa cm
Dad* Canary r
dayafJwM.Bwa
RICHARD P
AjCiarkota*Ca**t
By MJ HARTNETT
Deputy dart
MI JaaalT.M.
Jury 1.1 its*
AM. n.Sa.a'
FICTITIOUSNAAMILAW
NOTICE IS HEREBT
otvwji aat a
MIAMI BEACH OFFICE
CENTER at SfSSCOUaa A**..
CJart of ttot Clrcafl Court af
lac
E_>3tt!
iwan.M.
Jatyl I IBM
RKHARDP
By DC BRYANT
lEM.n.SA.1
IN THE circuit court
FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORID*
NOBATE DIVISION
Drnaaan
iSRI ESTATE OF
AcccsT rnrrM
ALTS ITT STURM in
AUGUST STC ?J<
Deceaaci
NOTTCX
OrAEM^.-3TRAT10!(
Tk* atkr-T i-iiui at N
*CaN af AUGUST mull*
a-a AUGUST 5TITUI H*
AUGUST TC=JI iKfuM
r>V=bir-aM ItNNBf
a a* Crtsit Cojt br lab
Coaaty Tzr.U ProMk
Dtvaaa. a* ixm* wtuct
"1 *st ~w.r 5tmt.
Mhuai rr-j fllN to
IBM c 5 lMTtl :l N
persona. .- a* paraoeA. r*;n*BiUtM'i
attorney at* mc Ttrtt btloa
AJ .-j~j: ;*ncrj in
raq^red a "_ "-', '."J aot.
WTtHTN TKRXE MOSTHSOr
TrBE FTR9T ?"-"BLICATIOII
or this xrxE iii a
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n
embers of Society of Older Students at Florida Atlantic Uni-
ity recently established a $500 scholarship for study in the
i of health administration, nursing, or social welfare, with
Vpkasis on gerontology. SOS President Jack Leroff, left, and
ector Sol Kolodny are shown presenting the contribution to
elaide R. Snyder, FAU vice president for university
ations and executive director of FA U Foundation.
NOTICE Or ACTION.
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT Or
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADB COUNTY
Civil Action No. IJ-l 118s
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOSE SOLIS.
Husband Petitioner
and
ZODLASOLIS.
Wife-Respondent.
TO ZOILASOU3
Hirrlo MaiMnor Uictno
Managua. Nicaragua
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Diiso-
lution of Marriage has been
died against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
PA., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 2401 N.W. 7th
Street, Miami, Florida SS128.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before July IS, IMS;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petlUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORTDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 14 day of June,
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L. Carrlcarte, P.A.
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 88128
Telephone: 13061 949-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
19843 June 17. 34;
July 1,8,1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number S3-SI42
Division 0J
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LOIS E. WADE
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of LOIS E. WADE,
deceased. File Number 88-8142,
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade. County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which U T8 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 13180
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are set forth
below.
All interested parsons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) ail
claims against the estate and
(1) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT 80 FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of Oils Notice has
"lun on June St, 1988
f rsonai Representative:
HYMAN P. OALBUT
99* Washington Avenue
, ml Beach, Florida 81110
Attorney far Personal Rep-
f*Mntatlve:
ABRAHAM A OALBUT. ESQ.
Oslbut. Qalbut and Heron.
g Washington Avanua
*ml Beach, Florida 18139
Wjphone: (108)878-8100
Ban June St. July 1.19S8
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
POR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 81 SIM
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REBECCA HOROWITZ.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of REBECCA
HOROWITZ, deceased. File
Number 88-6184. la pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
la 78 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida SSiso The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom this
notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal repreaentatlve,
venue, or jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June 24,1983.
Personal Representative:
HENRY M. WATTZKrN
740-71 st Street
Miami Beach. Florida 88141
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative :
HENRY M. WAITZKIN
740 7lst Street
Miami Beach, Florida 88141
Telephone: (SOSISsfi-OSfiS
19888 June 24, July 1.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
POR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 13 SO*?
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FERDINAND KATZ,
Deceased
NOTICE
OP ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of FERDINAND KATZ,
deceased. File Number 88-0008.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dada County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which is 78 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida SSISO.
The names and addresses of
the personal repreaentatlve
and the personal represen-
tative's attorney are aet forth
below.
All Interested parsons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE!: (1) ail
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
repreaentatlve, vanue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on June St. 1SSS.
Peraonal Representative:
IRMA RUTH KATZ
1880 Meridian Ave., Apt. 1101
Miami Beach. Florida SUSS
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative;
HENRY NORTON. Esq.
1201 Blscayne Building
1W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 88180
Telephone: (806)874-8118
19867 June 24, July 1,1088
Kane, Furniture
Owner, Killed
Irving Kane, owner of York
Furniture Corp. and Kent Show-
rooms Inc. and a survivor of the
Holocaust, was killed in an
apparent robbery last Saturday
afternoon in front of the factory
he founded over 20 years ago.
Mr. Kane and his older broth-
er, Nathan, came to the U.S. in
1947 after the rest of their family
perished in Nazi concentration
camps. He labored as an
upholsterer in New York, where
he met his wife, Hilda, before
moving to Miami in 1957.
Mr. Kane's Kent Showrooms,
managed by his wife and partner
of over 30 years, is a five-story
designer showroom in the Miami
Design District.
Survivors in addition to Mr.
Kane's wife include daughters,
Debbi and Marian Gold and his
son, Steven.
Funeral services were held
June 20 at Riverside Memorial
Chapel.
Green, 43-Year
Resident, Passes
Milton H. Green of Coral
Gables, an area resident for the
past 43 years, died June 19. A
founding member of Temple Beth
Am, he was 69 years old.
He is survived by sons, Ira H.
of Miami and Burton J. of Cocoa
Beach; daughter, Ellen G.
Slatkin of New York City; a
brother, Frank Gray of Miami; a
sister, Essie Cohen of Los
Angeles. Ca,; and two grand-
children.
Funeral services were held
June 22, with Gordon Funeral
Home in charge of arrangements.
KARP
Harry, 81, a resident of North Miami
Beach for the past 18 years, formerly of
Connecticut, died. He was founder,
president, and vice president of Con-
gregation Agudath Achlm of Star Lake
and a member of B'nal B'rtth. He was
the husband of Marian: father of
Charles of Ca., E. Charlotte Fogel of
Stamford, Conn and Soyna Lukes of
Pembroke Pines; grandfather of seven;
and brother of Samuel of Lake Worth,
Isidore of Delray Beach, Sidney of Lake
Worth, and Bessie Saltsman of Delray
Beach. Funeral services and Interment
were held June 20. Riverside Memorial
Chapel was In charge of arrangements.
GREENBERG, Jack. 78, Miami. June
20. Riverside. Star of David.
OSSIP. Rose, 87, Miami Beach. June 19,
Riverside.
SINGER. Jack. 78. Miami Beach. June
19. Riverside
TOKOWITZ, Sam, 08. June 16. Gordon.
FUCH8, Anna. St. June 18. Bias berg
BRAMSON. Rose. 78. Miami. June 18.
Riverside.
RIVKIN. Beatrice. 06, North Miami
Beach. June 30. Riverside.
KRIE3BERG, Bessie, 08. Miami Beach.
June 18.
KUPERSMTTH. Mildred. TS. North
Miami Beach. June 17.
WELCHBR. Benjamin. North Miami
Beach. June 17. Riverside.
BRINT. Arthur, North Miami Beach.
June 18.
FOOLER. Isabella Tropp Greaser,
Miami Beach, June IB. Riverside
SMOTRICH, Jack. 77, Miami Beach,
June 16.
TOKOWITZ. Sam. M. Miami. June 16.
Gordon. Mt. Nebo.
HITTER. Sally. 78, North Miami Beach,
June 31. Riverside.
PHILLIPS. Susan. 70. Miami Beach.
June 38. Riverside.
Friday, June 24,1983 / The Jewish noridian Page 15-B
Helen Jolt, Rabbi's Wife, Passes
Helen Jolt, wife of Auxiliary
Rabbi Harry Jolt of Temple Beth
Sholom of Greater Miami, died
June 14 at Cedars Medical
Center. She was 70 years old.
A Braille transcriber for the
blind in English and Hebrew,
Mrs. Jolt was a life member of
Hadassah, Shaare Zedek
Hospital of Jerusalem, Technion,
and the American Jewish
Congress.
She was born in Lincoln, Neb.
and graduated from University of
Nebraska with a bachelor of
science degree in education.
0KUM
Joseph, 76, of Miami Beach, pasaad
away June 18. He was a local resident of
South Florida since 1007. He came here
from Israel where he waa a pioneer In
the early 80s He was a native of
Poland. He waa a long standing member
of Temple Emanu-El. a board member
of the Miami Beach Apartment
AssoclaUon, the B'nal B'rtth. and the
Farband. Joseph was the beloved
husband of Suns and loving father of his
daughter. Hana and her husband.
Marty and Ms son. Darnel. He was a
most loving grandfather to Edward and
Lisa. Funeral services were held June
10 at Riverside with Interment at Mt
Sinai.
OSSIP
Rose. 87. a 10 year resident of Miami
Beach, formerly of New York. She waa
a member of Pioneer Women. ORT. and
Hadassah Beloved mother of Jerry of
New York, and Rita Alpert of
Lauderdale Lakes; adored grand-
mother of Lewis. Alpert. director of
Israel Hlatadrut Foundation of Miami.
Jo Ann Hoffman of Mass., and Mlndy
Glvon of Israel; sister of Minnie
Goldstein of Miami Beach and Cecil
Price of Miami Beach. Services and
Interment were held June 18 in New
York. Contributions may be made to the
Hlatadrut Scholarship Fund.
Arrangements by Riverside Chapel,
1030 Alton Rd., Miami Beach.
COHEN
IdeU If., a resident of Miami Beach for
the past 40 years, formerly from
Chicago, passed away June 30. She was
the wife of the late Leo Cohen; mother
of Jules and Jackie Cohen, Hermene
Cohen, and the late Jay Cohen; grand-
mother of Jill. Larry, Lauren, and
Carey; and sister of Moe Gutman. the
late Fred Gutman. and the late Jerry
Goodman. Funeral services were held
June 32 at Blaaberg Chapel.
A resident here for 15 years,
Mrs. Jolt was a member of
Temple Beth Sholom and an
honorary member of its Sister-
hood.
Survivors in addition to her
husband include two brothers,
Ben Finkelstein and Aaron
Fenton of Los Angeles; and two
sisters, Bees Levy of Los Angeles
and Marjorie Graetz of Lincoln,
Neb.
Funeral services were held
June 16 at Temple Beth Sholom.
Rubin-Zilbert Memorial Chapel
was in charge of arrangements-
BBMMAN
Isadora. 78, a resident of Miami for the
past 40 years, coming from UUca, N.Y.,
passed away June 18. He was the owner
of Florida Auto Parts for S3 years and
waa a member of Florida Racing Asso-
ciation. Ha la survived by a wife. Es-
telle; a eon, Sidney of Coral Gables; two
daughters, Judy Steinberg and Chert
GUles. both of Miami: two sisters,
Leona Case of Miami and Bern Sltrtn of
NYC; and five grandchildren. Funeral
services were held June 16 at Gordon
Funeral Home.
BAUMBL
Nathan, St. a resident of North Miami
Beach for the past 38 years, formerly of
Pennsylvania, paaaed away. He waa the
father of Joseph Baumel of New York,
Irwin Baumel of Mass.. and Florence
Flsch of Tamarac; grandfather of
even; great-grandfather of two; and
brother of Max Baumel. Jack Baumel.
Molly Talber, and Sara Keesler, all of
New York. Funeral services were held
June 17 at Riverside Memorial Chapel.
GOTTLIEB
Harry B SO. retired civic activist and
businessman and former resident of the
Kendall area of Miami since 1000, died
June 11 in Massachusetts.He had spent
his last two years In Boca Raton. He waa
founder and former president of Avon
Curtain Corp. and former chairman of
the board of Aldan Container Corp. In
Massachusetts He had been a chair-
man of United J e wish Appeal and Israel
Bonds campaigns, a founder of United
Way. an overseer of Jewish Theological
Seminary, a director of Weltsman Insti-
tute of Science, and a director of Ameri-
can Friends of Hebrew University. Sur-
vivors include a wife, Helen; three
daughters, Sylvia Jacobean of North
Miami Beach. Betty Helndel of Boca
Raton, and Bern ice Snow of Kendall;
two sons, Frederick and Benjamin of
Fall River, Mass.: three sisters; a
brother; 17 grandchildren; and two
great-grandchildren Funeral services
were held June 18.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SCHWARTZ BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
18840 West Dixie Hwy.
Rei>r<-srnied by S Icvilt. F O.
1921 Pembroke Rd.
New York: (2121 263-7600 Queen* Blvd & 76th Rd.. ffirest Hills, NY.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL #
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Three Generations of our
Family Serving You in
Dade
Miami Beach
1701 Alton Road
538-6371
Th# only
Guaranteed
Pre-Arrangaments
No Money In Advance
Broward
Haltandate
100 S. Dixie Hwy.
456-4011
I


Pagel6-B The Jewiah Floridian / Friday, June 24, 1983


\-
STARTING JUNE 27
DICK IS COMING
BACK TO THE BEACH
Miami Federal Savings is pleased and proud to announce
that as of June 27th, f?83, Dick Terebecki will be back
on Miami Beach as a member of the Miami Federal Savings team.
Over the years, Dick Terebecki has made many
friends by providing his customers with expert
professional advice that goes far beyond a
cold analysis of financial figures. He has
helped many people establish and
achieve new financial goals.
lb receive Dick Terebecki's special
kind of financial advice, come in or call
for an appointment at our Miami Beach
Branch. The number is 673-2500. He's
looking forward to seeing you soon.
So are we.

MIAMI FEDERAL
SAVINGS ft LOAN ASSOCIATION
MIAMI BEACH BRANCH
1265 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Tel. (305) 673-2500
FSUC
m
MAIN OFFICE
1 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33132
Tel. (305) 358-6620


June 1983
THE M AN Y FACES
OF ISRAEL
SappfaM* to th. M* Florid** Sactfoa C. Jan. 14.1968


BN2
^1

Contents
ANNUAL MEETING
PAGE 3
The 45th Annual Meeting of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
highlighted the 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
and the people who made the campaign a success.
PAGE 4
WOMEN'S DIVISION
Eighth Annual Women's Division Retreat
Women's Division Update
SOUTH DADE PAGE 5
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's South Dade Branch offered an
unprecedented variety of campaign and educational activities during
the 1983-84 year.
1983-84 South Dade Board Members announced.
New South Dade Branch assistant director.
Jewish Vocational Service expands its "Services To The Elderly" in
South Dade.
This material was prepared for
me Jewish Florfdlan supplement
June 24,1983 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
president
Norman H. Upoff
executive vice President
Myron J. MM
Chairman, communications committee
FOUNDATION Page 6
What constitutes a valid charitable contribution?
More than 30 women have signed letters of intent to make gifts to
Foundation.
WASHINGTON/HIGH SCHOOL
IN ISRAEL PAGE 8
A Middle East report from Congressman Lawrence Smith.
High School in Israel celebrates its tenth anniversary.
AGENCIES
PAGE 9
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital's Chernin Nursing Building is
slated for construction.
The Jewish Family and Children's Service is offering two summer
workshops.
Hillel Jewish Student Centers of Miami is organizing an alumni
organization.
MT. SINAI
MEDICAL CENTER
How to deal with high blood pressure.
THE MANY FACES
OF ISRAEL
PAGE 10
PAGE 11-13
Folklore is alive and well in Israel.
Yehuda Amichai: the poetic voice of Israel's middle generation.
New findings on Dead Sea Scrolls.
VOLUNTEER SERVICE
BUREAU/AGENCIES
PAGE 14
A volunteer's work is a "Labor of love" at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
The Jewish Vocational Service expands its Job Placement Program.
The Jewish High School of South Florida announces honor roll.
CALENDAR
PAGE 15


Federation, June, 1983
Pag
Meeting Lauds Record Campaign
achievements of the 1983
nbined Jewish Appeal-Israel
pergency Fund Campaign and
people who made them pos-
e were the centerpieces of the
Annual Meeting of the
ater Miami Jewish Federa-
[Aaron Podhurst, general cam-
zn chairman of the 1983 CJA-
announced that the cam-
jn will'close having raised a
of $22.6 million, the largest
3unt ever raised by the
eater Miami Jewish com-
bnity. He said the record-set-
results were brought about
the dedication and commit-
knt of the 1983 campaign
Lrkers and volunteers who
fched out to the community on
alf of human services for Jews
eand abroad.
['The sincerity and determina-
of our campaign workers
ch friends, colleagues and
zhbors, and evoke acts of com-
lunent and support," Podhurst
These volunteers in our
ofessional, high-rise and
en's divisions are the unsung
3fs of the campaign. They
ie our achievements possible.
ey are the irreplacable essence
lour 1983 success story."
iPodhurst explained that $20
Uion of the CJA-IEF total has
en allocated to the regular cam-
zn, which supports human
/ice programs in Greater
|iami, in Israel and in 32 other
: id us abroad. The additional
|.6 million has been earmarked
the Special Israel Emergency
bid, which will provide addi-
Inal aid to the people of Israel in
|time of economic hardship and
ancial strain on the social serv-
es provided to tens of thousands
IJews.
(Federation President Norman
Lipoff praised Podhurst and
1983 CJA-IEF leadership and
(esented the general campaign
ariman with a special award in
jcognition of his devotion and
pmplishments during the past
ar.
["Aaron has spearheaded and
spired our campaign leaders
\A the entire Jewish communtiy
Be There wherever and
|ienever Jews needed our sup-
Lipoff said. "His en-
|usiasm has been contagious.
devotion has been boundless.
i dynamic, gutsy brand of
blership has touched each of us
his sincerity has been
emplary."
|A highlight of the Annual
t'ting was the election of a new
slate of Federation officers, Board
of Directors members, trustees
and Advisory Council members.
The meeting delegates' vote in-
cluded the election of Lipoff to
serve a second term as Federation
president.
Other Federation officers
elected include Immediate Past
President Harry A. (Hap) Levy;
Vice Presidents Norman Braman,
Donald E. Lefton, Joel Levy,
Aaron Podhurst, Howard R.
Scharlin and Marilyn K. Smith;
Secretary Forrest Raff el; Asso-
ciate Secretary Helene Berger;
Treasurer Cal Kovens; and Asso-
ciate Secretary Steven J. Kravitz.
The 1983 Stanley C. Myers
Presidents Leadership Awards
were presented to Debby Grod-
nick and Jack H. Levine, who
were chosen as recipients as a
result of their demonstrated
devotion to the goals of Federa-
tion and its family of agencies.
The award has been named in
honor of Federation's founding
president and is given each year
to outstanding young leaders of
the Jewish community.
Lipoff also formally announced
the election of Dr. Max A. Lip-
schitz to the 1983-84 presidency
of the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami. Lipschitz serves
as spiritual leader of the Beth
Torah Congregation of North
Miami Beach.
In recognition of their achieve-
ments, Grodnick, Levine and
Lipschitz will attend the General
Assembly of the Council of Jew-
ish Federations, which will be
held this fall in Atlanta and is ex-
pected to be the most significant
gathering of Jewish communal
leaders to be held this year.
At the conclusion of the meet-
ing, Lipoff announced that
Howard Scharlin has agreed to
serve as 1984 general campaign
chairman of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Scharlin had been elected as a
vice president of the Federation
and has been an active member of
the Board of Directors.
"Howard has served in a num-
ber of Federation leadership
capacities and I am extremely
confident that the campaign will
break new records next year,"
Lipoff said.
At the conclusion of the An-
nual Meeting's business portion,
the delegates enjoyed refresh-
ments and campaign workers re-
ceived specially designed certifi-
cates presented in recognition of
their vital roles in the 1983 CJA-
IEF.
Federation President Norman H. Lipoff addresses the Annual Meeting
delegates.
Aaron Podhurst and Howard Scharlin share a moment at the 45th Annual
Meeting.
^^^H
M d ft :
** 1 > 9 i t- -' ^
> i
A ,JBv*
P m j 1 / jr
4M f'
w Xm H rl it- ,.
& ^^V s
' Jach H. Levin* and Debby Grodnick receive.,
their awards from Stanley C Myers, founding
president of Federation.


v.

June, 1983
-,

Women's Division Annual Retreai
r P ^ ^ |l
i.. di
1 J
1 4 1 ^ IZ "j
J !l L
7% newly elected 1963-84 executive officers of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Women's Division (from left): Mikki Futemick, parliamentar-
ian; Ellen Mandler, secretary; Dorothy Podhurst, vice president, leadership
development; Gail Harris, vice president, community education; Maxine
Schwartz, president; Terry Drucher, vice president, campaign; and Pat
Feldman, nominating committee chairwoman.
-^ ta_
\ m\ TVS ^Ht 9
\ m \t
, A 1
/ "I
Shown are, from left, Mikki Futemick, vice president of leadership
development; Rachelle Kaminsky, North Dade representative; Estel
Haber, Miami Beach representative; EUyn Elkins, South Dade represen-
tative; Anne Sheldon, 1983 Retreat chairwoman; Nancy Orovitz, South
Dade representative; Leta Behren, South Dade representative.
Serving with South Dade Chairwoman Robbie Herskowitz as 1983-84
Women's Division constituent board chairwomen are {from left): Marilyn
Kohn, Southwest Dade; Amy Dean, Business and Professional Women; Judi
Billig, North Dade; and Deb by Schwartz, Miami Beach.
Retreat guest speaker Martin Agronsky, prominent journalist and
television moderator.
Women's Division Update
UJA Women's Division
Conference
On June 1 and 2, key leadership of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Women's Division participated in the
United Jewish Appeal Florida Regional
Women's Division Conference in West
Palm Beach.
Primarily programmed for leadership
to learn UJA's strategy for the 1983-84
campaign, the two-day gathering in-
cluded workshops dealing with new gifts,
campaigns, business and professional
women, foundation and endowment,
management skills for committee chair-
women and fund raising methods.
Attending the conference were: Wom-
en's Division President Maxine E. Sch-
wartz, Campaign Vice President Terry
Drucker, Bunny Adler, Nancy Lipoff,
Parliamentarian Mikki Futemick, Secre-
tary Ellen Mandler, Helene Berger,
Business and Professional Women
Chairwoman Amy Dean, Business and
Professional Women Campaign Chair-
women Ellen Brazer and Phyllis Harte,
Business and Professional Community
Education Chairwoman Ray Ellen Yar-
kin, Southwest Dade Campaign Vice
Chairwoman Sandi Miot, Southwest
Dade Chairwoman Marilyn Kohn, Com-
munity Education Vice President Gail
Harris, Miami Beach Chairwoman
Debby Schwartz and Miami Beach Cam-
paign Vice Chairwoman Adria Rasken.
Several Women's Division members
from Federation led workshops and
chaired presentations at the event. Mikki
Futemick was speaker at workshops on
management skills and training; Nancy
Lipoff discussed "Fund Raising: Con-
cept and Reality" and philanthropic
foundations; Ellen Mandler chaired a
session entitled "Experiential: Getting
to Know You," and Amy Dean led a
workshop on Business and Professional
Women. Jeff Klein, .director of Federa-
tion's Planning and Budgeting Depart-
ment also conducted a session on new
gifts.
Guest speakers at the conference were
UJA National Women's Division Chair-
woman Harriet Zimmerman, Professor of
Middle Eastern Studies Dr. Haim
Snaked, Associate Professor of Socio-
logy Dr. Rela Geffen Monson and jour-
nalist Annette Dulzin.
WD Leaders Named to
National Posts
Three leaders of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation have been named
board members of national Jewish com-
munal organizations.
Bunny Adler and Nancy Lipoff have
become board members of the national
United Jewish Appeal Women's Divi-
sion, and Dorothy Podhurst, Women's
Division vice president of leadership de-
velopment, was appointed to the Nation-
al Women's Cabinet of the Council of
Jewish Federations.
Our congratulations to all of them!
WD Morocco-Israel Mission
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Women's Division will be sponsor-
ing an exciting mission to Morocco and
Israel. Join Division President Maxine
E. Schwartz, mission Chairwoman
Bunny Adler, Nominating Committee
Chairwoman Pat Feldman, Carolyn
Miller, Irma Braman, Dorita Felden-
kreis, Roberta and Joan Segal, Mona
Parker, Marvis Schaecter and others on
this unique journey.
The itinerary, dates and cost of the
mission have yet to be finalized. For
more information, please call the
Women'8 Division at 576-4000.
Studley Added to Women's
Wednesday Bill
Chairwomen for Women's Wednesday,
the Women's Division's annual commu-
nity education event slated for October
12 at the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel,
have announced that Barbara Studley,
whose popular talk show airs on WNWS-
AM, has been added as a guest speaker
for the day's program.
Award-winning actress and best-
selling author Polly Bergen, who
recently appeared in the television mini-
series "The Winds of War," will be the |
other featured speaker at Women's
Wednesday.
This year's chairwomen for Women's I
Wednesday are: Pat Feldman, Rachelle i
Kaminsky, Roberta Segal and Dolores ]
Wolf. Women's Wednesday was for-
merly the Women's Division's Federa-
tion Tuesdav event.
New Women's Division Director
Deborah Pollans has been named di-
rector of the Women's Division of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, an-
nounced Federation Executive Vice
President Myron J. Brodie. She replaced
Laurie Azoulai, who accepted a position
with American Friends of Tel Aviv Uni-
versity.
Pollans has held several positions at
Federation since she joined the staff in
September 1981, including campaign as
sociate. assistant director of Women s
Division, South Dade Branch campaign
director and Super Sunday coordinator
"The Greater Miami Jewish Federa
tion always tries to promote from
within," Brodie said. "I'm very pleased
that we were able to promote DebWJ
someone who has proven her capabilities
in several positions, to head u*
Women's Division.
Prior to joining the Federation staff.
Pollans was assistant director of uev
opment and Public Relations at Bascom
Palmer Eye Institute and held a pojjWJ
managing donor recruitment at mo
Sinai Medical Center. She receivednw
degree in Business Administration trom
the University of Miami.
"I look forward to the challenge
working with Women's Division, J.
lans commented. "With the outstanojng
and dynamic leadership we have, i
sure the coming year will be very
cessful."


7&
niinhi i. t 11. irft"*"" J^]
1 1 ivi ')- *------------------------'
A Record Year for South Dade Branch
Responding to the needs of South
hade's growing Jewish community, the
loreater Miami Jewish Federation's
ISouth Dade Branch offered an un-
precedented variety of campaign and
jucational activities during the 1983-84
ear.
Under the leadership of South Dade
branch Chairman Mikki Futernick and
IHarry Weitzer, South Dade Branch vice
Jiairman for the 1983 Combined Jewish
lAppeal -Israel Emergency Fund, a
{number of new programs were in-
jtroduced that succeeded in attracting
nreviously unaffiliated Jews and
Strengthening the sense of Jewish
{community spirit.
"The South Dade Branch of
{federation has made significant strides
its efforts to reach out to those Jews
tho are not familiar with Federation and
its importance in the community," said
(Norman H. Lipoff, president of
Federation. "During the past few years,
he South Dade Branch has fostered the
jwth of Jewish communal involvement
End commitment which has helped
{strengthen our entire Greater Miami
Jewish community."
Thanks to the support of thousands of
{area Jews, the 1983 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
{paign was a record success in South
{Dade. The campaign was highlighted by
{two highly successful cocktail recep-
tions: the first event was attended by
|325 people who made $500 minimum
11983-84 South
Dade Board
Announced
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
(President Norman H. Lipoff has an-
nounced the selection and confirmation
Lit 1983-84 board members for the South
ll)ade Branch of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation.
The board members who will serve for
Itwo years are: Minda Bernstein, Robert
Berrin, Bert Brown, Sidney Fagin, Joan
[Fisher, Morris Futernick, Sam Hoch-
Iberg, Kenneth Hoffman, Dr. Bart
[Ketover, Joel Levy, Neil Littauer, Ellen
Mandler, Judge Robert Newman,
Sydney Newmark, Elaine Ross, Bill
jSaulson, Norman Sholk, Sam Smargon,
|Barry White and Barry Yarchin.
The board members selected to serve
[for one year are: Rabbi David Auerbach,
[Paul Berkowitz, Paul Breitner, Shelly
Brodie, Gary Brooks, Kenneth Cohen,
Howard Frank, Susan Fuller, Bernard
Goodman, Micki Hochberg, Paul Kade,
Ron Kohn, Norman Lieberman, Bluma
|Marcus, Dr. Robert Marlin, Linda
(inkes, Stanley Newmark, Dorothy
[Oppenheim, Sandi Samole and Harry
|Weitzer.
'These individuals have proven that
they possess the dedication and commit-
ment to guide Federation's South Dade
Branch," Lipoff said. "I am confident
that their leadership will benefit South
Dade's growing Jewish community, as
|*ell as Jews everywhere."
Last month, Lipoff announced the
late of 1983-84 South Dade Branch
officers, led by Mikki Futernick who will
[serve a second term as chairman. Ser-
ving with her are: Alvin Brown, vice
chairman for campaign; Dror Zadok,
vjee chairman for community education;
Marc Hauser, vice chairman for commu
J4yservice and planning; and Debby
wrodnfck, vice chairman for leadership
[tody and development.
:.
gifts to the campaign and featured guest
speaker Michael Moriarty, the Emmy
Award winning actor; the second
reception, attended by 225 people
making a $250 minimum campaign gift,
featured Bruce Weitz, who portrays
Mick Belker on the television show "Hill
Street Blues." The South Dade Branch
also conducted a phonathon in April that
reached hundreds of unsolicited
prospects, and handled administrative
arrangements for a CJA-IEF walkathon
that was part of the Israel 35
Celebration.
"More persons than ever before
demonstrated their commitment to their
fellow Jews by being part of the 1983
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund," Futernick said. "In
addition, those that previously par-
ticipated in the campaign increased their
support compared to past years. We
believe that the success of the campaign
was based on communicating the urgent
human service needs that are faced by
Jews at home, in Israel and in com-
munities around the world."
The continued strength of the Jewish
community relies on the individuals who
will guide it in the coming years, and the
South Dade Branch's leadership
development programs help ensure a
secure future. In addition to the worker
training sessions offered to volunteers
who worked on the campaign, an in-
novative Organizational Skills Sym-
posium was held. Each of the four
sessions was led by a skilled presenter,
and participants included represen-
tatives from 24 social service agencies,
synagogues and other Jewish communal
organizations.
"If we're going to work together to
provide for the needs that must be
fulfilled, we have to share our expertise
and know-how," Futernick said. "Those
who participated in the symposiums had
the feeling that we're willing to share
what we can with other groups in the
community. We look forward to more
symposiums in the future."
Community education is an integral
part of Federation's activities, and the
South Dade Branch initiated several new
programs during the past year. A
Federation Forum, featuring Dr. Nor-
man Ornstein speaking on the
"Implications of the 1982 Congressional
Elections for U.S. Jewry and Israel,"
attracted a large audience and more
Forums are planned for next year.
Another excellent program, conducted
by the Jewish Family and Children's
Service, was entitled "Survival Skills for
the 80's."
"All in all, it was a terrific year,"
reflected Futernick. "We got a lot of new
people involved with Federation and
they learned what we're all about. We
increased their awareness of the many
services Federation offers and supports
and opportunities to volunteer. We're
really getting the Jewish community to
work together as a whole."
UJew S>. Dade Assistant Director
Jeremy Neimand
Jeremy Neimand has been named
assistant director of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's South Dade Branch,
announced Federation Executive Vice
President Myron J. Brodie. He replaced
Deborah Pollans, who has been named
director of Federation's Women's Divi-
sion.
In 1981, Neimand joined the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation as a campaign
associate and has worked primarily with
major trade and professional divisions
during the past two years.
"I'm excited to be joining the staff at
our South Dade Branch," Neimand said.
"South Dade has a rapidly expanding
Jewish community, and we're working to
ensure that all newcomers will be intro-
duced to Federation and have the oppor-
tunity to become involved."
Prior to coming to Miami, Neimand
was director of the Berkshire Federation
of Pittsfield, Massachusetts and the
Greater Portsmouth Federation in Vir-
ginia. He received his Masters Degree in
Social Work from Yeshiva University
Wurzweiler School of Social Work.
JVS Expands in South Dade
The Jewish Vocational Service is
happy to announce the expansion of our
"Services To The Elderly" in the South
Dade County area. Our newly-hired,
parttime Master's level Social Worker,
Phyllis Ferber, will be assessing the
needs of senior citizens living in the new
Federation Gardens complex, as well as
seniors living south of Coral Gables.
Once this assessment is complete, JVS
hopes to provide appropriate services for
the elderly which will improve their daily
living conditions and maintain them
more adequately in their own homes.
This is an extension of the JVS Home-
maker Referral Department, which is
located on Miami Beach and provides

. .
companions, homemakers, and certified
nurse's aides to our senior citizens at
reasonable prices.
Persons interested in learning more
about this program, or those aware of
people in need of supportive services, or
people who would like to work with the
elderly should contact Phyllis Ferber.
She will be located at the JVS South
Dade Office at 8353 SW 124 Street, Suite
102, and can be reached Monday through
Thursday at 235-9482.
JVS is a member of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's family of agencies
and a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
-


Page6
Federation, June, 1983
4
oftie Valid Charitable Contributions
By: Fredric A. Hoffman, Esq.
Lynn H. Gelman, Esq.
The taxation of individuals in this
country has always had a dual purpose.
The first, obviously, is the construction,
maintenance and support of the national
treasury. The second, is the imple-
mentation of social policy through
various tax incentives and disincentives.
One need only peruse our favorite form
(1040) to be assured that this is the case.
One particular social policy implements
the encouragement of certain altruistic
endeavors through the deducibility of
charitable contributions. By allowing a
charitable contribution deduction, the
government is granting an indirect
subsidy to support causes in which it
should not or could not be involved. The
government may decline participation
for a variety of reasons, among them its
inability to assist due to constitutional
prohibitions (as in the case of supporting
religious institutions), and the well-
founded belief that the private sector can
do a better job in some instances.
A charitable contribution deduction
from gross income has always been
available to those who itemize on their
federal income tax return. Recently.
Congress recognized the far reaching
extent of charitable contributions and al-
lowed a charitable contribution
deduction to those who take only the
standard deduction. Unless continued by
Congress, this provision, the so-called
'above the line" deduction, will ter-
minate after 1986.
The Internal Revenue Code and
Regulations devote considerable energies
to the rules for the deductibility of
charitable contributions. By contrast,
the definition of what constitutes a valid
charible transfer for deduction purposes
is not stated in either the Code or
Regulations. The Code only provides
that a charitable contribution is "a con-
tribution to or for the use of" certain
enumerated types of organizations. It
then goes on to describe the various
charitable organizations to which one
can donate and receive a deduction. The
Regulations refer back to the Code for
the definition of a valid charitable
(transfer. Some help is offered by the
Regulations since they negatively define
a contribution by describing what it is
not. Any transfer "bearing a relationship
to the taxpayer's trade or business and
made with a reasonable expectation of
financial return commensurate with the
amount of the transfer" may constitute a
deduction as a trade or business expense
but will not be an allowable charitable
contribution.
Court decisions have helped in shaping
the definition. Case law has held that
transfers stemming from "detached or
disinterested generosity" or "out of af-
Fredric A. Hoffman, Esq.
fection, respect, admiration, charity or
like impulses" will be deductible. There
can be no expectation of return nor can
there be a quid pro quo.
Quid pro quo is a Latin term meaning
"what for what". It is used in the law to
mean a bargained-for benefit and sounds
the death knell for a charitable deduction
if found to be an element of the transfer.
Structuring the transaction as a charita-
ble contribution is not determinative of
deductibility. As with any transaction,
the IRS looks to the substance, not the
form, of a charitable contribution and
has often litigated the issue of whether a
taxpayer has received some benefit in re-
turn for his contribution. Examples of
benefits which have defeated the
charitable contribution deduction are
favorable zoning variances obtained
after "donations" to local governments
and payments to schools deducted as
contributions when they were, in fact,
tuition payments.
No charitable contribution deduction
is allowed for the value of services per-
formed, for, or provided to, a charity.
The IRS has ruled that providing news-
paper advertising space, radio and tele-
vision broadcast time, and donating
one's blood all fall within the definition
of services and are thus non-deductible
contributions. However, a volunteerroai
deduct "unreimbursed expenditui
made incident to the rendition of servi.
to an organization, contributions
which are deductible". Such expend
tures include the cost of purchasing
uniform that has no general utilityjjutl
of-pocket transportation expenses,
meal and lodging expenses incur.,
while away from home in the course i
performing donated services.
To support a charitable contributio
deduction, the donation must not only 1
made with the requisite donative int
and in the manner discussed, it musta
be made to a qualified cha.
organization. Such an organization
have received or applied for a letter L.
the IRS granting its tax exempt stab
IRS Publication No. 78 lists tb
organizations which have receiv
exemption letters and describes
work. All listed organizations are qualil
fied to receive contributions for income!
estate and gift tax charitable deduction
purposes.
Deductions are never allowed forl
charitable contributions to individua
no matter how worthwhile, nor will
contribution to a charity that is ear|
marked for the benefit of a designati
individual support a deduction. Forl
most part, in order to qualify for
deduction, the charitable contributio
must be used within the United Statesorl
its possessions. However, one can validryl
claim a deduciton for donations toi|
domestic charitable organization wh
benefits foreign charitable recipients]
Again, there can be no earmarking ofl
funds for a particular foreign use at the!
time contribution is made, nor can the!
organization serve merely as a conduittol
funnel funds to the foreign entity
Thus, the transfer of money orl
property to a charitable organization!
does not automatically ensure its deduc-j
tibility for tax purposes. The gift mustl
be made with the requisite donative
intent and must be given to a quaufi
charitable organization.
Women's Committee Gets "Bullish4 \evm\
At its May meeting, Women's Letter
of Intent Committee Chairwoman,
Nancy Lipoff, announced that since the
formation of the Committee last June,
more than thirty women have signed
Letters of Intent to make gifts to the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Committee members also received
good news on the current economic
outlook by stock market maven, Charles
Ganz. Ganz, who also serves on the In-
vestment Committee of the Foundation,
projects a positive forecast ''*. ,
born during the post World V> ar II Bajyj
Boom begin to discover the M
Market."
Lipoff also announced that in responsel
to interest that has been expressed m
learning more about investments am
prudent financial planning, the commi
tee will sponsor a half-day estate plan-
ning seminar for Federation women.
Elbe Ganz and Bluma Marcus will w
chair this event, which will be held in wi
Fall of 1983.
''...as my father planted for me before I was born,
so do I plant for those who will come after me."
Talmud Ta'anit


Federation, June, 1983
PageT
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TO EVERYTHING THERE IS A SEASON-AND THIS IS IT
This is the time for hard logic. Simply put- here it is.
Since August 12, 1982 when the Dow Jones industrial average stood at 776.92 to the time of this
writing it has increased to 1214.98 I May 31, 1983.1
.Many people have been blessed with increased stock values with percentages as high as 163%.
Perhaps you didn't have one of the top performers, but again you may have some real appreciated
gains in the equities you hold.
No one really knows if we are at the "top of the gain" 61V' let's suppose there is a correction due. Why
not take the following suggestion seriously:
SET UP A PERSONALIZED PHILANTHROPIC FUND with the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies. This
fund will bear your name or the name of anyone else you wish to designate. You can establish the
Fund by contributing your appreciated stock or other property to the Foundation and by com-
pleting a simple form.
YOUR TAX ADVANTAGE
"An income tax deduction may be taken this year since contributions to your Fund are treated
as gifts to a public charity.
'The fair market value of your appreciated long-term securities is deductible up to 30% of your
contributing tax base.
'There is no tax on income within your Fund.
"No tax returns or reports need to be filed on your Fund.
' You may continue to contribute to the Fund enabling you to make larger contributions during
high income years and especially after a windfall.
'There is no cost to establish the Fund and no cost to operate it.
WHAT CAN THE FUND DO?
* Recommendations from you for disbursements of income and/or principal to recognized
charitable purposes are acceptable. IN 1982 GRANTS IN EXCESS Of $3,000,000 WERE DISTRIBUTED TO
CHARITIES RECOMMENDED BY FUND DONORS.
'All grants require approval by the Foundation which reserves the right to determine if the
recommended beneficiaries are consistent with the Foundation's charitable purposes.
All checks going out have the name of the Fund on them. Example: "The Harry and Arlene Stein
Philanthropic Fund."
REMEMBER: Capital gains are avoided on the transfer of appreciated stocks to set-up a Philanthropic
Fund.
Don't miss out on this opportunity to "bank" your gains.
For further information please call Joseph Imberman at the Foundation Office, 576-4000 for details
on how to effect the transfer of those appreciated securities, and of course, consult your own tax
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federatjort
4200 Biscayne Boutovsrd. Miami, R. 33137
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rage 8
Federation. June, 1983
Smith Reports on Capitol Hill Issues
Dade County resident* are already
familiar with the vocal support for Israel
provided by the region's prestigious con-
gressional delegation. The voters are
well-aware of the records of Senators
Lawton Chiles and Paula Hawkins, and
Representatives Dante Fascell. William
Lehman and Claude Pepper. A new voice
has been added to the delegation, that of
freshman Representative Lawrence
Smith. Smith recently sent the following
letter to David Fleeman, chairman of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Community Relations Committee, and
reported on Capitol Hill developments
involving Israel and the Middle East.
A great deal has developed in the Mid-
dle East and the Congress in respect to
our joint concerns for Israel. I am hope-
ful that you will find the following up-
date interesting and informative.
As a Jewish member of Congress, I
believe it is extremely important to keep
our community informed of develop-
ments in Washington and to motivate
them to participate in the political
process.
The Subcommittee marked up foreign
aid to Israel for Fiscal Years 1984 and
1985. It rejected an Administration re-
quest for a $200 million decrease in
grants and approval an overall increase
of $365 million. Members of the subcom-
mittee recommended a $300 million
increase in military assistance grants
and a $65 million increase in economic
assistance to help the stagnant Israeli
economy. These two significant increases
to foreign aid for Israel were unanimous-
ly passed by the subcommittee. As a
member of this subcommittee, I am
proud my colleagues realize that the U.S.
must maintain a firm strategic and moral
commitment to the State of Israel.
One of our main concerns is the
potential sale of sophisticated aircraft to
Jordan which would seriously jeopardize
Rep. Lawrence Smith
the security of Israel. I sponsored an
amendment to the foreign aid bill which
directly linked Jordanian arms sales to
Jordan's publicly recognizing Israel and
entering into peace negotiations. My col-
leagues agreed with me that Congress
must hold the Reagan Administration to
its word that it has no plans to sell ad-
vanced aircraft to Jordan. The adoption
of this amendment sends a clear message
to King Hussein that Congress is upset
over his decision to reject entering into
direct negotiations with Israel.
Many freshman members of Congress
were upset with President Reagan's deci-
sion to withhold the sale of 75 F-16 jets
to Israel. In response, I recently initiated
a letter to the President urging him to
release these planes. The letter sinned by
24 members of Congress told the Presi-
dent that "... The F-16 sale to Israel
has strong bipartisan support in
Congress since it would enable Israel to
maintain a strategic balance with its
more populous neighbors at a time when
the Soviet Union is heavily rearming its
allies in the region." Members who
signed the letter believed the Adminis-
tration should honor its outstanding
commitments. Since Israel has
agreed to withdraw from Lebanon ,
now working on a second letter whj
will urge the President to approve
sale of the F-16 jets immediately.
During the Committee's markup of u.
foreign aid bill, an amendment was inl
troduced which would have repealed i
Subcommittee's increase in foreign
for Israel. Several other members and L-
led the fight to defeat this amendment]
As I said during the debate, Is
just agreed to a U.S. supported aglvv
ment on the withdrawal of foreign troops]
from Lebanon. The U.S. should
rewarding, not punishing Israel forth.
courageous action." The amendment wa
easily defeated 5-18, and the increase ia
aid will be reported to the House.
A new section to the foreign aid bi|
was proposed which would have allowe
the Administration to decrease foreis
assistance across the board for i
countries. It introduced an amendme
to remove this section of the bill, and j
was unanimously adopted by a voic
vote. This amendment could save Israel
millions of dollars in foreign aid. Fo
instance, if the section remained ai
there was a 10 percent cut in all toot
aid funds, the Administration could hav
reduced aid to Israel by S255 million, i
you can see, the approval of this amendl
ment is very important in protecting for|
eign aid funds for Israel.
The adversaries of Israel are spendin
a great deal of time and money in at]
tempting to turn the American publij
against the Jewish State, and we
must do what we can to increase support
for Israel from the American Jewislj
community. Along with my work in Con
gress, I am speaking out on importa
issues concerning the American-JewisJ
community. I recently spoke before
AIPAC Training Conference in Rich
mond, Va., and encouraged participant
to increase their lobbying and politic
activities at this crucial time.
High School in Israel Dedicated Dorms
The 10th anniversary of the High
School in Israel program was celebrated
recently with the dedication of the first
dormitory facilities on the school's
campus in Hod Ha'Sharon. The event
was highlighted by the participation of
several prominent personalities, in-
cluding Israeli Defense Minister Moshe
Arens and U.S. Ambassador to Israel
Samuel Lewis.
The two new buildings bear the names
of leaders of the High School in Israel
program, and will be known as the Gloria
and Harvey Friedman Dormitory, and
the Ruth and Harry Wohl Dormitory.
Gloria Friedman is chairman of the High
School in Israel Adult Course, and
Harvey Friedman is a Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Board of Directors
member and Special Gifts chairman, as
well as a former president of the High
School in Israel.
"I'm quite sure that the dedication of
these facilities will signal the beginning
of further growth on the High School's
Mosenson Campus," Gloria Friedman
said. "This is a wonderful, worthwhile
program that offers unique and excellent
educational experiences."
The ceremony was attended by a
number of High School in Israel alumni,
including new otim (immigrants to
Israel) and Israeli university students.
Participants in the June session of the
Adult Course also took part in the
dedication.
) Gloria Friedman noted that the Adult
Course, which offers a series of 22-day
sessions in Israel, is becoming in-
creasingly popular, with the September
session already completely booked and
the October session rapidly filling. She
said other sessions are scheduled to
begin on November 23, April 30, 1984,
and May 28,1984.
Adult Course participants travel to
sites scheduled in chronological order of
Jewish history, beginning with trips and
discussions about Abraham at Tel Gezer,
the home of the Jewish faith's founding
father.
As the trip proceeds, subjects of study
include history, culture, philosophy and
archaeology. The program also includes
time to touch base with Israeli relatives.
The participants include persons fn
cities throughout the United States.
Friedman said program participant
must be in good general health becaus
the trip involves a great deal of walking]
She explained that this type of personal
contact enhances individuals' exj
iences in Israel.
Individuals who have already taken
part in the Adult Course are encouraged
to join advanced course sessions, which
expand upon the experiences of th*
initial course.
For more information about the Hij
School in Israel Adult Course, call'
program's main office at 576-3286.
For information about Jewish singles events occurring
throughout Dade County call:
THEJASSLINE
573-JASS
It's a seven-day-a-week service, sponsored by
the Jewish Association Serving Singles,
that provides a recorded listing of major events geared to
singles of all ages.
J ASS is a program of the Jewish Community Centers of South Florida
and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.


Federation, June, 1983
Page 9
H JIIIIA Plans Snrsing Facility
The Chernin Nursing Building will
soon become a reality on the Douglas
Gardens campus. This planned 192-bed
skilled nursing facility has been on the
drawing boards for over one year. The
result is a "state of the art" design that
-- represents an exciting breakthrough in
-^ long term care facility design.
The Chernin Nursing Building was
(so named to honor Harry S. Chernin.
Harry (honorary vice president and
member of the Home's Board of Direc-
3 tors), and his wife Lucille, are long time
active supporters of the Home. It was
the Chernins' recent generous contribu-
tion of one million dollars that enabled
MJHHA to commence its expansion
I plans creating desperately needed ad-
ditional nursing home beds.
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged has been working with the
Gruzen Partnership, a New York City
-j based architectural firm that specializes
in the design of long term care facilities .
One member of the team of architects
handling this project actually resided at
MJHHA for a two week period. A
videotape of his experience provided
invaluable research material. Exhaustive
interviews were conducted with members
of the Home's residents council as well.
Data from the architects, residents
and various professionals in the field of
aging was collected and thoroughly
analyzed prior to the project's design.
The result is an exciting five story
building that marks the convergence of
M the amenities of home with the needs of
An artist's rendition of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged's Chernin
Building.
the elderly in a long term care environ-
ment. Gone will be the sterile institu-
tional feeling prevalent in many such
facilities.
The overall design of the building
centers around developing a "communi-
ty concept." Each of the floors will
feature a town center which will allow for
neighborhood style congregating. The
corridors are designed as "streets" with
each "residence" having a "front porch"
adjacent to the corridor. Sconces
marking each portal will further enhance
JFCS Offers Workshops
The Jewish Family and Children's
rvice is offering two workshops this
'summer as part of their prevention
series.
Starting Tuesday, July 19-August 8,
1^198;}, from 7:30 to 9:00 p.m. "Stress:
Make It Work for You, Not Against
you" will be conducted by David Salt-
man, LCSW and executive director of
JFCS. Saltman has an extensive clinical
background in the area of stress reduc-
tion. This series of four evenings will be
open to single adults or couples who
want to discover the sources of stress in
their lives, learn new healthy habits, set
priorities, manage time effectively,
reduce job stress, practice relaxation
techniques and find less stressful ways
to interact, communicate or argue effec-
tively.
"Remarriage: Step with Style" will be
an exciting and stimulating educational
workshop where remarried couples with
children or visiting children, and couples
planning to remarry can hear about the
myth of the wicked step-mother and
learn the truth about the Brady bunch.
It will be an opportunity to meet other
step-parents, share tips about child-
aring, handle the everyday stresses of
remarriage and avoid common pitfalls.
The workshop leaders will be Bene
Marie Kass, LCSW, and Susan Rubin,
LCSW. Kass has more than 25 years of
experience in work with families, and is
the director of the Family and Children's
Service Department. Rubin is the direc-
tor of the Prevention Department and
has been a group facilitator for more
than 15 years. Registration for these
groups will be kept small deliberately in
order to assure personalized attention
and individual instruction.
The fees for these workshops are
nominal. Only $30 per individual or $45
per couple, for four, one and one-half-
hour sessions.
The groups will meet at the JFCS
Coral Gables Office located at 1790 S.W.
27th Avenue. Lighted, off-street parking
is available.
Pre-registration is requested.
Interested participants are encouraged
to call JFCS, 445-0555 to reserve their
place.
JFCS is a member of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's family of
agencies and a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
the feeling of "home."
Each of the five floors will boast a
lanai terrace. From these terraces resi-
dents will have panoramic view of the
formal gardens. Architectural landscap-
ing will create the aura of the gardens on
every terrace.
Responding to the information
gathered from current residents, the
need for privacy was the key factor in
room design. Each semi-private room is
large and airy with a center dividing wall
offering privacy for the two occupants.
These dividers are partially removable, if
the residents so wish. The rooms will also
feature a comfortable reading area which
will duplicate the concept of a living
room environment.
The Chernin Building will also house
Douglas Gardens Hospital. This is a 32-
bed facility serving the residents of the
Home.
The Home has undertaken this exten-
sive expansion program as a reaffirms -
tion of its commitment of South Flor-
ida's elderly population. Not only will
the number of actual nursing home beds
increase (to 500), all the acillary service
capacities will increase greatly. The
Chernin Building represents phase one of
these plans. Upon completion of the
Chernin Nursing Building (in early '85)
work will commence on the Stein Com-
mons Building.
The Jewish Family and Children's Service staff discusses stress training.
Hillel Alumni
After 40 years of serving the Jewish
college community of South Florida,
Hillel Jewish Student Centers of Greater
Miami plans to expand its services to
include an alumni organization.
Graduates of University of Miami,
Miami Dade Community College and
Florida International University Hillel
can contact the Hillel area office by call-
ing 661-8549 and register with Marilyn
Emas, Public Affairs Coordinator, or
they can write to Hillel Alumni Orga-
nization, 1100 Stanford Drive, Coral
Gables, Florida 33146.
People are needed to help organize
homecoming parties on the various
campuses throughout Dade County, as
well as helping to discover where Hillel
graduates have gone since college. An
alumni newsletter is being planned to
unite all graduates of South Florida
Hillel.
Join the Hillel Jewish Student Centers
of Greater Miami and help to organize its
first reunion. After forty years, isn't it
about time?


Page10
Federation, June. 1983
What to Do When Tour i\iimhcr Is Up

Q: What do yon do when your number is
up? A: Reach a new low!
It's part of most physical examina-
tions, as familiar as the tongue depressor
and the stethoscope ... the blood pres-
sure cuff. Talk of high blood pressure
often dominates the conversation of the
elderly. Concern over it is prevalent, as
evidenced by the proliferation of low-cost
blood pressure screening devices in
supermarkets and drugstores. Hospitals
are fond of offering these tests free of
charge during special events or open
houses because early detection is pro-
foundly important. But, despite the fact
that people line up to hear the numbers
that make them feel sad or glad, not all
of them understand what blood pressure
actually is, or what those numbers really
mean.
Simply stated, blood pressure is the
force of blood exerted against the walls
of the arteries which carry blood from the
heart to all parts of the body. Your heart
contains muscle tissue which rhyth-
mically squeezes and contracts, creating
the needed force to send the blood flow-
ing on its circuitous journey. Every time
the heart beats, the pressure increases;
when the heart relaxes between beats,
the pressure which occurs during the
heart's contraction is called systolic; the
"lower" pressure, when the heart is at
rest between contractions, is called
diastolic. Thus, your blood pressure
value might read 140 over 80, the first
number being a measurement of your
peak force (systolic) and the second
number a measurement of the minimum
pressure (diastolic).
Your blood pressure can vary from day
to day or minute to minute.
"Intermittent blood pressure elevation
may be induced by periods of stress,
indiscreet eating, and an inordinant
intake of salt or medications even the
use of a single drug such as a deconges-
tant," says Dr. Frank Hildner, director
of the Mount Sinai Medical Center
Cardiac Catheterization Lab. "This
usually doesn't require any treatment.
But, if you are aware of symptoms
coming from high blood pressure, you've
had it a long time and you have a
problem. It is crucial to seek treatment
immediately."
The symptoms can include bother-
some headaches, characteristically in the
back of the head and the upper part of
the neck, dizziness, shortness of breath,
excessive flushing of the face, fatigue
and insomnia. But, generally high blood
pressure is known as the silent disease
because recognizable symptoms are
often not present until blood pressure
has reached dangerously high levels.
High blood pressure is a major risk to
health and life. It can make your heart
pump harder and arteries become less
elastic. Eventually your heart may
enlarge, weaken and stop pumping ef-
fectively. It can speed up the process of
atherosclerosis, a type of hardening of
the arteries, which in turn contributes to
coronary heart attacks. It can cause
damage to the eyes, strokes, and kidney
disease.
The only sure way to know if your
blood pressure is all right is to have it
measured about once a year. There are an
estimated 35 million hypertensive adults
in the United States today, about one
out of every six persons. Blood pressure
levels increase with age, and systolic
hypertension is often found among the
elderly. When blood vessels become less
elastic, as a person ages, the systolic
pressure may increase while the diastolic
reading may remain relatively normal.
Some physicians choose to take multiple
blood pressure measurements because
the systolic blood pressure may fluctuate
widely in such patients. In any case,
since an initial high reading may reflect
only a transient increase, doctors may
want to repeat the procedure on a dif-
ferent day, or while you are sitting,
standing or lying down before or after
physical exertion, or even on different
arms.
-



.
Most people with abnormally
blood pressure are referred to uW,
"essential" hypertension. It's there 3
there's no apparent cause. The ten*
"secondary" hypertension is used wW
the elevated blood pressure can be m
tributed to a specific organic cause if
the cause can be eliminated, this tvoei
hypertension can sometimes be cured
People with hypertensive close relatival
are probably at higher risk of develop^
the disease than those who have no m
ents, grandparents, or siblings with a
tendency to high blood pressure. Women
especially those under 40, have slightly
lower blood pressure than men. Amoni
black people, hypertension is a major
disease. A National Health Survey
revealed that 21.1 per cent of urban
blacks have hypertension compared to
13.5 per cent of urban whites. The death
rate among young and middle-aged
blacks is three to twelve times greater
than among whites.
Sheila Spencer, a Mount Sinai secre-
tary in her early thirties, had a number of
factors working against her. Black, with
a history of high blood pressure and
diabetes on both sides of her family, she
was considerably overweight. Suffering[
with a cold, she consulted a physician
and during the routine examination bad
her blood pressure taken. She was told it
was on the borderline of becoming
hypertension. She then remembered get-
ting an occasional dizzy spell, having
headaches, even blacking out for a I
second or two not enough to be heed-]
ed, but in retrospect, warning signs. Atj
the time of her visit to the doctor, she
also had a bladder infection and had
taken a decongestant earlier in the day to
relieve her cold symptoms. Despite these
extenuating circumstances, the warning|
remained.
Sheila began to cut down on her salt I
intake, red meat and fatty foods. She I
became a Weight Watcher. In twoj
months time she lost 33 pounds. She had|
her blood pressure taken again. It had j
gone from 150 over 100 to 120 over 78.
Some cases such as Sheila's can be|
handled effectively without medicines j
through a change of diet to lower the
intake of calories and sodium. A reason!
able amount of sodium in the diet of the I
average person is two grams daily, whichl
is equivalent to the amount of sodium
found in one teaspoon of salt. But, most I
Americans eat two to four times that]
amount.
Some people who are on blood pressure
medication, begin to feel "terrific, so
they discontinue their medicine and only
resume taking it when they start to
experience adverse symptoms again.
However, the successful control of nign
blood pressure depends upon follow"f
the regimen the doctors present**-
When prescribing drugs, the pnys'^l
has a variety of medications to cnowe
from and it is rare that a rampage
blood pressure cannot be brought under
some measure of control. The therapy depends upon the seventy mm
hypertension. Antihypertensive
medicines generally fall tog "J
categories: those that relax blood vessel
directly; those that relax blood vessel
directly; those that block the nervesw
the blood vessels; and those that eiu*
nate fluids from the body. Thereb^
hundreds of variations of these
formulas.
While there are no conclusive answ
as to the exact cause of hypeitension. g
Hildner is precise about what cw
done for it.
"If it's high, we can bring it dowj
Then, it's up to the patient to cam
with the recommended therapy and,o
tinue to be observed by a physician.


Federation, June, 1983
Pagel!
Folklore in Modem Israel
Various strategies exist for getting to
Iknow a country. The most pleasant way
to learn about a foreign land is to expose
(yourself to the national folklore, which in
I Israel is as rich and varied as the
(national history and as much alive as the
Ispirit of the nation. The songs, dances
land stories all easily accessible
[reveal a great deal about the roots and
[aspirations of the people of Israel.
Jews have been dancing and singing
land telling tales since the days of the
Bible, and when the Jewish communities
developed in the Diaspora they also
I incorporated dancing ito their devotional
land recreational life. In countries as far
[dung as Kurdistan, where women
[gathered to dance in private homes, or
[Romania, where youths came together
[lor circle dancing in the public cour-
tyard s, folkdancing was an integral part
of people's lives. When these com-
munities returned to Israel they brought
[their dance patterns with them, adding
[to the local dances and crating the wide
[repertoire of dances of over 300 dances
[known today as "Israeli." In modern
[Israel, the Miriams and Judiths, Davids
land Sauls continue making music with
[the enthusiasm of their Biblical
[predecessors.
Almost every high school and all the
[popular youth movements have folk
[dance troupes. Community centers
[provide the framework for dance-loving
[adults, and many of the hotels have folk-
[dance evenings. Take a peak at the folk-
dancing at the King Solomon Sheraton
lin Jerusalem, for example, and you will
find the well-dressed manager kicking
[his feet along with the guests and
[jerusalemites who are addicted to the
Ihealthful habit.
Take Ami Shitrit, for example. He is a
Ihandsome, 17-year-old sabra who got
|hooked on folkdancing several years ago.
"I'd rather dance than play soccer," he
[said. "Even though I am a fourth
[generation Israeli. I enjoy and feel part
[of the dances of the Hassidim, the
[Yemenites, the Romanian circle dances
land the Arab line dances all of which
|we dance. This is part of my tradition."
Shitrit dances in the much-lauded
Idance group of the Israeli scouts, which
[appears from time to time at dance
[festivals but dances mostly for their own
[enjoyment. He also is a regular dancer on
[the stage of the International Culture
[Center for Youth (ICCY) in Jerusalem,
[where he and other young people present
[a sampler of Israeli dance. They
[demonstrate the lively hora, the virile
IdcMa, the spiritual dancing of the
[religious and the optimistic dances of
[Israeli pioneers. A second group, made
up of Israel-born youngsters of Yemenite
origin, present the dances and music
[their parents brought with them when
hey were flown to Israel on Operation
lagic Carpet. Their dancing is based on
[the small steps they used in the crowded
[conditions in Yemen. The evening at the
[ICCY also includes a performance by
virtuoso Arab drummers from East
Jerusalem, who make music on goat-
|skinned drums called tambours.
A real treat for folklore fans is an
I evening with the Jerusalem Dance
Troupe, with choreography by Israel's
[dean of the art, Jonathan Carmon. A
rge troupe of vibrant young men and
[women present a sophisticated program
of dance, punctuated by melodic vocal
Performances. In a dance called "Wild
'lowers" the beautifully costumed
teenagers represent the anemones,
daffodils, cyclamens and irises that
Nourish in the hills around Jerusalem. A
iramatic rendition in dance of the
Jysticism of the Kabbala, with the male
dancers dressed in the elaborate garb of
the Hassidim, leaves the audience
breathless. An interpretation of Israeli
writer Amos Oz's short story "The Tree
of Evil Counsel" begins with the young
dancers looking like a half-century old
photograph on the wall of a home in
Jerusalem. The caftaned Jews of Yemen
smuggle womenfolk under their gar-
ments in a series of "Encounters in
Yemen." The program ends how else
with the nature-inspired dances of the
farmers of Israel. The fields, with their
seven kinds of vegetation and water
sprinklers, become central symbols in
the dancing.
Although dance and song did grow up
around secular themes, religious ob-
servance has always been the most
important source of creative life for the
Jews. Dances trace back to observance of
the Sabbath and festivals, and songs are
often part of the liturgy. Synagogue
services abound in cantorial variations
and Sabbath tables are still the scene for
introducing new tunes. Outside the
synagogue in Eastern Europe an oral
tradition of music also arose the music
of the klezmerim, virtuoso in-
strumentalists who provide many hours
of entertainment on happy occasions.
The tradition is alive and well in Israel
today; if you are in Israel during the
Festival of Sukkot (Tabernacles) in the
fall, check with one of the Government
Tourist Offices to locate one of the large
yeshivot in which such entertainment is
part of the celebration.
In the last decade a new genre of
religious folk music has developed.
Usually called "rock hassidic," this
music combines lyrics of the Bible,
prayers and psalms to the sounds of
electric guitars, drums and banjos. Most
of the performers are young religious
immigrants from America and Western
Europe, who have become observant
Jews and now combine their manifold
musical talents with their love of the
Bible.
The veteran performing group of the
"rock hassidic" entertainers is the
Diaspora Yeshiva Band, a sextet that
takes its name from the study center
where all the members spend most of the
day with their spiritual books open.
These unusual performers include a
singing rabbi, a ritual slaughterer, a
ritual circumciser and three Bible
students. The Diaspora Yeshiva Band
plays soft rock and modern ballads with
a country-western flavor and often
perform to a foot-stomping, hand-
clapping crowd in the stone-walled
cavern on Mount Zion. Says the band's
leader Rabbi Avraham Rosenblum, an
accomplished guitarist who played with
members of Frank Zappa's band in New
York's Greenwich Village before im-
migrating to Israel in 1970: "Since the
yeshiva is next door to the tomb of King
David, we like to think we're picking up
King David's vibes. The band's musk is
a positive, vibrant expression of how a
Jew feels living in Israel, studying
Torah, and feeling the need to express
himself."
The group performs every Saturday
night in a post-Sabbath show called
melave Malke (literally "accompanying
the queen") at the Diaspora Yeshiva at
Mt. Zion. When they are touring abroad,
a group of charming French yeshiva
students called Maor Zion fills in for
them.
Other performing groups including
the humorous Megama, and an ac-
complished group of Ladino performers,
can be heard at the N.C.S.Y. Israel
Youth Center (10 Strauss Street) in
Jerusalem also on Saturday nights.
The tradition of modesty among
strictly Orthodox women prohibits them
from performing before a group of men,
so four times a year religious women
gather for an all-women's performance,
also at the Mount Zion Center. Many of
the women have serious musical
backgrounds and their talent in per-
formance and composition is impressive.
Check with the Mount Zion Center to see
if a performance is scheduled during your
visit. Ask for "Kol Isha" "a woman's
voice."
The Friday newspaper entertainment
section is a good source for checking out
other shows that are on that week. You
might enjoy a lively musical, Your
People are Mine, based on the Book of
Ruth or an evening of Yiddish stories in
English in a performance of the Best of
Shalom Aleichem. Israel's top
songwriter Naomi Shemer, (who wrote
Jerusalem of Gold) regularly performs
her own songs at concert halls.


Federation, Jut, 1963
*___
* **!
5AJ.'(. .oi)*-S!'4
on
War and Tradition
JERUSALEM If there is one poet
who can be said to be the voice of Israel's
middle generation, it is Yehuda Amichai.
Born in Wurzburg, Germany, Amichai
came to what was then Palestine in 1937;
he was 13 and the horror that was to en-
velop Germany and all of Europe was
growing to its crescendo.
When he was in his early thirties
Amichai established himself as one of the
leaders of a group of new poets who re-
jected their predecessors' formality and
with it, the automatic idealization of the
land and the Jewish people. Questioning
and introspection took their place: ques-
tions about history, about human rela-
tionships, about God, and most of all,
about identity as a person and as a
Jew.
Attachment To Jerusalem
Amichai was raised and educated in
Jerusalem and still lives in this city of
stone and light, with his wife and three
children. The poet, who taught Hebrew
literature at the Greenberg Institute here
for more than 20 years and before that in
municipal high schools, is a familiar
figure to Jerusalemites; they often see
Amichai, a man of medium height,
brown eyes and casual appearance, ex-
ploring the city he has written so much
about.
There is hardly a corner of the New or
Old City, or the surrounding hills and
valleys, that Amichai has not discovered
and considered in his poetry. And the
sense of continuity Amichai brings to his
poems is perhaps strongest when he
talks about Jerusalem:
Jerusalem is a place where all
remember that they have forgotten
something but they don't remember
what.
And for the sake of this remember-
ing I wear my father's face on mine.
As a sergeant-major in the Israel De-
fense Forces Amichai saw enough of war
for it to heavily mark his poems. Hover-
ing always is the memory of those who
did not survive, and the guilt of the sur-
vivor, as he writes in "Rain on a Battle-
field":
It rains on my friends' faces, On my
live friends' faces, Those who cover
their heads with a blanket. And it
rains on my dead friends' faces,
Those who are covered by nothing.
In one of his most famous poems,
which was set to music and became a
popular Hebrew song, Amichai seems to
wonder how the concepts of suffering
and divine intention can coexist:
God has pity on children in kinder-
gartens, He pities schoolchildren
less. But adults he pities not at all.
He abandons them. And sometimes
they have to crawl on all fours In the
roasting sand To reach the dressing
station, And they are streaming
with blood.
Bittersweet Love Poems
Amichai has also written extensively
about the puzzling and contradictory ties
between man and woman, which mix joy
and pain. The joy is here in the present,
but often is weighed down by memories
personal and historical and the
poet is always looking over his shoulder,
counting the days of happiness left. He
writes of one love:
In the middle of this century we
turned to each other, I saw your
body, throwing shade, waiting for
me, the leather straps for a long
journey already tightening across
my chest. I spoke in praise of your
Yehuda Amichai in his neighborhood, the Yemin Moshe artists quarter of Jerusalem.
mortal hips. You spoke in praise of
my passing face.
Amichai's love poems seem to say that
the world gets in the way, that time and
events and perhaps life's natural allergy
to happiness destroy strong ties; he
writes in "A Pity. We Were Such a Good
Invention":
They amputated your thighs off my
hips. As far as I'm concerned they
are all surgeons. All of them.
They dismantled us each from the
other. As far as I'm concerned They
are all engineers. All of them.
Amichai, who has traveled widely
reading his poems and lecturing (he has
been visiting poet at the University of
California at Berkeley), has published
seven books of poetry, as well as a novel,
plays and short stories.
Much of his poetry has been published
in English; the latest, a collection of his
love poems, was put out by Harper and
Row in 1982. He has worked with various
translators, including Harold Schimmel,
Assia Guttman, and the well-known
British poet, Ted Hughes. In 1982 he re-
ceived the prestigious Israel Prize for
Poetry.
His most recent poems reflect the
sometimes bitter conclusions of a crea-
tive and thoughtful writer approaching
his sixtieth year, but his dedication to
life, to his land, and to his people that
was always present in the earlier poems
has not been forgotten. When he was 40
he wrote:
All the generations that came before
contributed to me in small amounts,
so that I would be built here in Jeru-
salem all at once, like a house of
prayer or a charitable institution.
That commits one. My name is the
name of my contributors. That com-
mits one.
What has gone before are the genera-
tions of Jews his ancestors in history,
his grandparents and parents in Ger-
many, his fallen comrades. Amichai's
commitment to continue the chain
remains.
BEWARE!
DID YOU KNOW that many cults deliberately deceive the public about their
beliefs and goals?
DID YOU KNOW that there are millions of young men and women involved
in cults in the United States today, and that Jews fall prey to these groups in
disproportionately large numbers?
DID YOU KNOW that the Lynmar Hotel and the Lynmar South Hotel on
Collins Avenue have been purchased for the use of the Shalom Tabernacle, a
Hebrew-Christian group?
THERE IS HELP AVAILABLE
THE TASK FORCE ON CULTS
AND MISSIONARIES
SPEAKERS BUREAU
INFORMATION SERVICE
REFERRAL SERVICE
For further information, contact the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Task
Force on Cults and Missionaries, 576-4000.
Rabbi Brett Goldstein, Chairman
Helen Friedman, Director
1
.
v-K^srte
>'A stofrfiBl b**


:.-.-. .-. -; '"' '
..,...-..
IS
Keeping the Head Sea Scrolls Alive
JERUSALEM When a bored
Ishepherd boy, wandering with his flock
3ng the Dead Sea, aimlessly threw a
one into a cave in the summer of 1947,
struck an archaeological treasure of
triceless worth. Investigating a tinkle he
ard from the cave, he found he had hit
old clay jar which contained a rolled
[parchment.
That incident sparked the most
[momentous archaeological discovery of
[the 20th century. Further probes into the
{shoreline limestone caves, used as places
|of refuge in antiquity, turned up more
jars and parchment scrolls. Eventually,
biblical scholars had at their disposal the
(earliest biblical manuscripts ever found
I- 1,000 years older than they had previ-
|ously known.
Besides the books of the Bible, there
ere commentaries on the Old Testa-
ent, apocryphal stories based on the
Bible, and documents relating to the Es-
Isenes, an ascetic Jewish sect that lived in
lie Dead Sea area from the first century
|B.C. to the first century A JO. All of the
crolls were written in meticulously
cripted Hebrew.
Some Bible scholars had traced the
its of Christianity to the Essenes and
ven suggested that Jesus might have
Ibeen a member of the sect. So it was
[natural that the experts pored over the
|Dead Sea scrolls to find any hint of
Jesus' affiliation.
But understanding of the various im-
plications of the centuries-old manu
cripts was not the only challenge facing
he scholars. A way had to be found to
[prevent further deterioration of the
tlready fragmentary parchments.
After thirty years of study by Bible
iholars and archaeologists of the
ontents of the scrolls and seven years of
ntensified scientific research on their
[preservation, some new findings have
ecently come to light.
Was Jesus an Essene?
Prof. Yigael Yadin of the Hebrew Uni-
versity of Jerusalem, one of the first ar-
chaeologists to see the scrolls, has con-
:luded that Jesus had not been an Es-
|sene. The writings found in the scrolls
ive convinced him, he says, that "Jesus
did not live with the Essenes because he
Duld not agree with one iota of what
[they were teaching. For example, they
|thought purity was most important but
Jesus was in contact with lepers, prosti-
tutes, impure people. Secondly, in Jesus'
[Sermon on the Mount (Matthew 5:43,
|<41. Jesus says, 'Ye have heard that it
[hath been said, Thou shalt love thy
[neighbor, and hate Thine enemy. But I
lay unto you, love your enemies, bless
|them that curse you'..."
Yadin continues: "There can be no
ftibt that when Jesus told these people
love their enemy, he was preaching
gainst the Essenes and their teachings.
ie was anti-Essene."
The Essenes disappeared from history
kith the Roman conquest of Jerusalem
P 70 A.D. Left behind in eleven caves
*as their library which the Beduin
JJhepherd boy happened upon accidental-
ly-
Today, the most important documents
lre ensconced in a specially built vault
[room and shrine in the center of Jerusa-
lem. The Shrine of the Book," located
r the grounds of Israel's national
Ijnuseum, is one of Jerusalem's most dis-
junctive works of architecture.
[Dating Deterioration of Parchments
1*5 the Shrine's curator, Magen
PJJMU, a veteran archaeologist, the cus-
uaianship of the Western world's most
suable archaeological documents is a
Peavy responsibility. It is little wonder
m 1975 he ordered a full-scale aci-
Two pottery jugs in which the Dead
Sea Scrolls were found in Qumran.
entific study of the condition of the
parchments.
Says Broshi, "We wanted to know
exactly what happens in the course of
time to the parchment material, why the
parchments tend to deterioate, how best
they can be preserved, and not least
whether they had deteriorated since they
were found in 1947."
The project landed in the lap of a
South African-born biogeochemist, Ste-
phen Weiner. Now on the staff of Israel's
prestigious Weizmann Institute of Sci-
ence, Weiner was trained at the Califor-
nia Institute of Technology.
The puzzle that faced him and his
team of chemists and isotope experts
was unique. Never before had anyone
tried to quantify the deterioration of a
2,000-year-old parchment. At first they
tried spectrophotometry on tiny blank
pieces of the scrolls. They got nowhere.
Visually, it was obvious that the
darker areas of the scrolls had deterior-
ated. When they examined those areas
they found them to be gelatinous. By
comparison, the lighter areas of the
parchment were clean and healthy. Why
had some areas turned into gelatin while
others had not?
Weiner and his team turned to infrared
examinination. This showed them that in
the darker portions the collagen of the
parchment fibers had broken down. (Col-
lagen is a fibrous protein existing in all
living matter and parchment is made
from animal skin. When collagen comes
in contact with heat and water it turns
gelatinous.)
Clearly, the deterioration had taken
place because moisture had gotten to the
parchment scrolls But when? Rumors
had been circulating among politically
sensitive scholars that the deterioration
had taken place while the documents
were in Israeli hands. Broshi was con-
cerned. The outcome of the study could
be politically explosive.
Expert on Moon Rocka
Studies Scrolls
One member of Weiner's team, Prof.
Emanuel Gil-Av, was an authority on
the use of a process known as racemiza-
tion the conversion of an organism's
amino acids after its death. By studying
the conversion with gas chromato-
graphy, it is possible to determine the
time when the conversion from one type
of amino acid to another stopped. Gil-Av
used the process to study moon rocks
brought back U earth by the U.S.
astronauts.
After careful work on pieces of the
parchment, Gil-Av found an "extraordi-
narily high rate" of "right-handed"
amino acids. Since such a high percen-
tage takes hundreds of years to develop
from "left-handed" acids, he concluded
that the degradation of the parchment
could not have possibly taken place
during the relatively brief period in Isra-
el's custody.
Weiner's assessment: "The damage
may even have begun while the scrolls
were still being used by the Dead Sea
sect, some 2,000 years ago. We have
found no evidence whatsoever that dete-
rioration took place since they were
taken from the caves (in 1974)."
Broshi and the Shrine's directors could
now breathe easier. But they were taking
no chances. They established a monitor-
ing system to warn them if degradation
is resumed. Small samples of the parch-
ment have been placed in various sec-
tions of the vaults. Periodically, they are
sent to the Weizmann Institute for
analysis.
Authorities on the preservation of
documents have suggested placing the
scrolls in glass filled with helium as has
been done with the American Declara-
tion of Independence. But the scrolls are
too long for that. The complete book of
the Prophet Isaiah is 24 feet. Moreover,
the use of gas is designed to prevent bac-
teria from attacking the parchment. The
real danger to the scrolls is not bacteria
but degradation of the collagen.
The 750,000 visitors who annually tour
the Shrine of the Book never see all the
Dead Sea Scrolls. The Isaiah, for
example, is shown only in facsimile in the
Shrine's rotunda. Those that emerged
from the Dead Sea caves in poor condi-
tion will never see the light of day if
Broshi has anything do do with it.
A visitor to the Shrine of the Booh at the Israel Museum loohs at fragments of Isaiah from the Dead
Sea Scrolls.


Page 14
Federation, June, 1983
The Spirit of VolunUcrism
The spirit of volunteerism is alive and
well at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, as demonstrated by the
dedication of the Volunteer Service
Bureau's participants.
Ten years after its spontaneous birth
in the midst of the Yom Kippur War, the
bureau relies on a solid core of 70 hard-
working volunteers who provide the
various Federation departments with a
wide variety of backup services which
would otherwise cost approximately
$600,000 a year.
The volunteers began as a small group
who helped provide support services for
special events and projects. They con-
tinue to collect checks for the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign from persons unable to mail
them or bring them to the Federation
Building for processing. The volunteers
also spend long hours collating thous-
ands of pieces for multi-page bulk mail-
ings and untold numbers of other
materials brought to the bureau's office
for assembly.
Volunteer Service Bureau Director
Gert Schner explained that some of the
volunteers give several hours of their
time each day to the program, while
others offer their services several times a
week. Some of the workers are long-time
residents of Greater Miami, while others
are new residents who have yet to estab-
lish close friendships in the community.
Schner said the bureau provides the
opportunity to take part in a vital under-
taking, while enjoying an atmosphere of
camaraderie.
Federation Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodie commended the volun-
teers on the large role they play within
the Jewish community and for the devo-
tion they have displayed to take active
part in Federation projects.
"Our volunteers are an irreplaceable
resource that we treasure and
preciate," Brodie said. "Thev nlav &
role in the flow of materials ZlT
grams that benefit Jews at home S
abroad. A volunteer's work is a labJ ,
love, an effort that cannot be measuJj
in terms of dollars and cents We at S
Federation are extremely thankful
these dedicated workers are so invoB
and committed."
If you or someone else you know i,
interested in joining the Volunteer Serv
ice Bureau, please call Gert Schner t
576-4000, extension 251. at
The members of the GMJF Volunteer Service Bureau pose with Federation Executive Vice President M\
J. Brodie, who presented them with a special award. y
JVS Expands Job Service
Moved by difficult economic con-
ditions and the resulting high unem-
ployment level, the Jewish Vocational
Service has expanded its Job Placement
Program through funding supplied by
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Employment services were redesigned to
meet the needs of career-oriented white
collar workers in various professional
and managerial areas.
The JVS's initial effort included
development of a career bulletin mailed
monthly to more than 800 potential
employers, alerting them about pre-
screened, qualified individuals seeking
employment. As a direct result of these
career bulletins, a large number of suc-
cessful placements have been accom-
plished.
Joseph Schwartz (not his real name), a
middle-aged accountant initially con-
tacted the JVS at his wife's suggestion.
An appointment was arranged at the
Michael Ann Russell Jewish Community
Center, which serves as JVS's North
Dade outreach center. The interview was
held in a gymnasium on a rainy after-
noon during a power failure. Despite the
adversities, Schwartz was referred to an
employer who had previously listed with
the "job bank" his needs for a comp-
troller. Schwartz was hired and is
presently satisfactorily employed.
Ann Cohen (not her real name), a 30-
year-old divorcee who recently relocated
in Greater Miami, approached JVS for
assistance in her job search. Seeking to
make a new start, Cohen was willing to
follow all leads and devoted countless
hours to finding suitable employment.
Several interviews were arranged with a
variety of employers. Cohen is now
happily employed by a major hotel chain
where she utilizes her previously
acquired bookkeeping and administra-
tive skills. Job placement counselors
learned in subsequent conversations
with the employer that Cohen will be
promoted in the near future.
In response to the career bulletin, an
employee at a large corporation request-
ed a salesman with managerial potential.
The position offered excellent benefits
and upward mobility. JVS was able to
send a suitable applicant in his mid-
thirties with an MBA in marketing and
considerable sales experience. The ap-
plicant was hired and both employer and
employee have contacted the JVS since
then to express their gratitude.
Sam Kaplan (not his real name), an
experienced food salesman who was out
of work for 18 months, was referred to
JVS by another member of Federation's
family of agencies. After meeting with a
placement specialist, an interview was
arranged with an employer whose needs
were compatible with Kaplan's skills and
experience. As a result, Kaplan was hired
the same day and remains satisfactorily
employed.
For more information about the Job
Placement Program, call JVS at 576-
3220. The Jewish Vocational Service is a
member of Federation's family of local
social service agencies and a beneficiary
of the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
Honor Students Make the Grade
The Jewish High School of South
Florida, in its second year of existence,
proudly announces that 32 percent of its
student body have achieved honor roll
status. A student must earn a grade
point average of at least 3.0 in order to be
on the honor roll.
The High Honor Roll has been estab-
lished for those students who earn grade
point averages of 3.5 or better. Seven-
teen percent of the students in the school
earned High Honor Roll status at the
Jewish High School for the first semester
of the 1982-83 school year. They are as
follows: Jamie Del), Julia Epstein,
Viviana Fraiman, Ariela Halberstein,
Daniel Katz, Jacob Kiriaty, Hedy Kloda,
Gary Mars, Shana Morganstern,
Jonathan Passik, Gary Plotkin, Elena
Roth, David Rothenberg, Marty Scheck,
Jay Seinfeld, Yael Simon, Amy Solomon,
Evelyn Solomon, Joey Tessone and
Elizabeth Toth.
Those students who have achieved
Honor Roll status are as follows:
Marlene Bedzow, Jodi Dell,Marc Egort,
Howard Fellman, Roy Fleischer, Adam
Gordon, Shari Herzberg, Sandra
Huzeman, Larry Jaffe, Jennifer Levin,
Jonathan Lipson, Michael Maisel, Dina
Polanski, Sandra Richter, Stuart
Rosenthal, Julie Sazant, Steven Sch-
wartz, Nathalie Sebag, Amy Seinfeld
and David Wolf.
The Jewish High School, located on
the grounds of the Michael Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center in North
Miami Beach, is a community school
which educates ninth through twelfth
grade students from Dade and Broward
Counties.
The Jewish High School is a member
of Federation's family of agencies and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Cam
paign.
.". .
Students of the Beth Am Religious School undertook a special fund raising drive for the 1983 Combi**
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, which drew exceptional results.


fcaei .enul ,n.<&i> b
Federation, June, 1983
jam
^DAY,JULY5 .,.,..
n. sharing session discussion group for singles led by
jnselor Karen Kaye, M.S., will meet this evening at
ft 30 p m. at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com-
munity Center, 18900 N.E. 26 Ave. Members free, non-
embers $150. Call Karen Kaye at 932-4200 for more
uformation.
IURSDAY.JULY7
[personality Fitness," is the title of a two session
Lorkshop for singles led by Lee Straasman, M.S.W.
day at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC, 18900 N.E. 25
ve. Cost is $3 for members, $4 for non-members. Call
Karen Kaye at 932-4200 for more information. The
and session will be held on Thursday, July 14.
mJRDAY,JULY9
l dance for singles ages 20-40, featuring live music, will
j held tonight at 9 p.m. at the Sheraton Bal Harbour,
J701 Collins Ave. Sponsors are the Michael-Ann
Russell and Miami Beach JCCs. Admission is $3 and
ere will be a cash bar.
JESDAY, JULY 12
> South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry will hold
eir monthly meeting this evening at 7:30 at the
federation Budding, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard. For
ore information, please call the Soviet Jewry office at
176-4000, extension 291.
JNDAY, JULY 17
I bagel brunch and lecture on "Inner Relaxation, Outer
auty" will be held for adults this morning at 11 a.m.
the Michael-Ann Russell JCC. 18900 N.E. 25 Ave.
ost is $2.50 for members, $4 for non-members. Call
en Kaye at 932-4200 for more information.
JNDAY, JULY 17-WEDNESDAY, JULY 27
I large delegation of Federation Young Adult Division
members will join the 1983 United Jewish Appeal
ummer Singles Mission to Israel this week. This
aique program draws the participation of young
dults, ages 22-40, from Jewish communities
throughout the United States. For more information,
use call Milt Heller at 576-4000, extension 284.
tIDAY, JULY 29-THURSDAY, AUGUST 11
(Parents and their children are invited to take part in
Federation's Summer Family Mission to Israel. This
pission will provide an itinerary of interest to all ages,
plus elements of separate interest to parents and
oungsters. For more information about the Family
lission and all other missions to Israel, please call
oan Scheiner. Federation's missions director, at 576-
), extension 281.
JESDAY, AUGUST 2
I sharing session discussion group for singles wUl meet
onight at 7:30 p.m. at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC,
Calendar
18900 N.E. 25 Ave. Admission is free for members,
$1.50 for non-members. Call Karen Kaye at 932-4200 for
more information.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 9
The South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry will hold
their monthly meeting this evening at 7:30 at the
Federation Building, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard. For
more information, please call the Soviet Jewry office at
576-4000, extension 291.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 14
Michael-Ann Russell JCC singles will have an "Escape
to the Eden Roc" brunch and pool event today
beginning at 11 a.m. Cost is $15. Reservations must be
in by July 29. Call Karen Kaye at 932-4200 for more
information.
SUNDAY, AUGUST 14 WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17
The Hadassah national convention will be held this
week in Washington, D.C. For more information, please
call Dorothy Handshu at 576-4447.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 17
An evening for singles at Dania Jai Alai, with dinner
and reserved seating, will be held tonight at 7 p.m. The
event is being sponsored by the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center. Cost is $9.25 and checks
must be sent to Karen Kaye by August 3. Call 932-4200
for more information.
THURSDAY. AUGUST 18
"Discovery After Divorce" is the title of a two session
lecture and discussion for singles being led by Lee
Strassman, M.S.W., this evening at 7:30 p.m. at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC, 18900 N.E. 25 Ave.
Admission is $3 for members, $4 for non-members. Call
Karen Kaye at 932-4200 for more information. The
second session will be held on Thursday, August 25.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 24
An all day Professional Growth Institute of the Jewish
Council of Early Childhood Educators, in cooperation
with the Central Agency for Jewish Education, will be
held at Temple Beth Am. 5950 North Kendall Drive,
today from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The Institute will be
highlighted by 20 different workshops in the area of
Nursery-Kindergarten education for the teachers of the
synagogue and day schools' early childhood programs
in Dade and Broward counties. For more information,
please CAJE at 576-4030.
FRIDAY. AUGUST 26-SUNDAY, AUGUST 28
Attant. Summer Getaway AWmJ.l[*&!*
sports and southern hospitality in AtluU If***?
singles. The weekend is bemg P<"ored. "*
Biael-Ann Russell and Atlanta JCCs. Cost1IMifor
JCC members, $105 for non-members. Call Karen naye
at 932-4200 for reservations and more information.
WEDNESDAY, AUGUST SI
The Miami Region of Hadasaah will be holding a board
meeting today. For more information, please can
Dorothy Handshu at 576-4447.
THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER
Advanced Israeli dancing will be offered overySun-
day in July and August beginning at 8 pA attne
Michael-Ann RusseU JCC, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue. Cost
is $1.50 for members. $3 for non-members. Contact
Karen Kaye at 932-4200 for more information.
The Michael-Ann RusseU singles bowling league will
meet on Mondays at 9 p.m. through July and August at
the West Dixie Lanes. 15950 W. Dixie Highway. Cost is
$5.50 each week. Call Jaime Kaplan at 987-5757 after 6
p.m. for more information.
A separation and loss group will meet on Wednesdays
from 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. through August at the
Michael-Ann RusseU JCC. 18900 N.E. 25 Ave. Linda
Ray bin, ACSW, of the Lock Towns Community Mental
Health Center wUl lead the group. There is no charge.
CaU 932-4200 for more information.
"Psychology of Emotions" workshops focusing on
loving relationships for persons 60 and older wUl meet
every Friday at 10:30 a.m. through the end of August
at the Michael-Ann RusseU JCC, 18900 N.E. 25 Ave.
Larry Koziol, M.S.W.. will lead the g roups, which are
being sponsored by the JCC and the Douglas Gardens
Community Mental Health Center. CaU 932-4200 for
more information.
Dancercise for adults is being offered through July on
Tuesday and Thursday mornings from 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.
at Federation Gardens, 1901 S.W. 122 Ave. Cost for the
series is $19 for JCC members, $26 for non-members.
Babysitting is available. CaU 251-1394 for more in-
formation.
The Golden Age Friendship Club of the South Dade
Jewish Community Center wUl meet on Sundays,
through July, at 12:30 p.m. at Federation Gardens,
10901 S.W. 112 Ave.
Senior Adult Summer Camp of the South Dade Jewish
Community Center wiU have Wednesday outings and
meet at Federation Gardens, 10901 S.W. 112 Ave., July
12 through August 18. Cost is $60 and registration is
open to South Dade JCC members only. CaU Sherry
Horwich at 251-1394 for registration and information.
Civic Responsibility Sabbath
"Civic Responsibility Sabbath," an
linterfaith observance by churches and
[synagogues throughout Dade County to
[increase public consciousness about
Icrime and its victims, will be held on
IJuly 2-3, announced the Most Reverend
Edward A. McCarthy, archbishop of
I Miami.
Special prayer services will be con-
Iducted in synagogues on July 2 and in
[churches on July 3, reflecting the Judeo-
IChristian ethic of law, justice and
[communal tranquility. Worshipers will
[be reminded that the Bible teaches not
[only "Thou shalt not commit murder"
(Exodus 20:13), but also "Thou shalt not
stand idly by while the blood of my
|neighbor is being spilt." (Leviticus
[19:16).
"We all share the same concerns for
[our families, friends and neighbors. In
| order to make our community a safer
[place to live, each individual must as-
[sume their civic responsibility," said
[Archbishop McCarthy, chairman of the
Religious Heritage Committee of the
Miami Citizens Against Crime, an anti-
crime group comprised of more than 180
community leaders and 150 organiza-
tions throughout South Florida.
Miami Citizens Against Crime,
chaired by Alvah H. Chapman, Jr.,
[chairman and chief executive officer of
kmght-Ridder Newspaper, Inc., was
tanned to initiate a comprehensive pro-
gram to curb crime and improve the
quality of life in South Florida. Among
we goals of the group's executive com-
mittee and eight action committees are
mcre8ed police protection, increased re-
sources for the state's criminal justice
system, continued federal involvement,
greater public awareness of the crime
problem and more community involve-
ment in the fight against crime.
Serving with Archbishop McCarthy
on the Religious Heritage Committee of
the Miami Citizens Against Crime are:
Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz, president of the
Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami; Rabbi Solomon Schiff, executive
vice president of the Rabbinical Associa-
tion of Greater Miami; The Reverend Dr.
Richard J. Bailar, United Church of
Christ; The Reverend Dr. Irvin EUigan,
Jr., United Methodist Church; Dr. W.
Ivan Hoy, immediate past president of
the Greater Miami Ministerial Associa-
tion; The Reverand T. Luther Jones,
president of the Metropolitan Fellowship
of Churches; The Reverend Thomas J.
Price, Jr., United Methodist Church;
The Reverend James J. McCartney,
Roman Catholic Church; The Reverend
Dr. Patrick H. O'Neill, Roman Catholic
Church; The Reverend Arnold Perry,
Lutheran Church in America; The
Reverend George S. Pyke, Christian
Church (Disciples of Christ); The
Reverend Victor L. Rankin, United
Methodist Church; The Right Reverend
Calvin O. Schofield, Jr., Bishop of the
Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida;
and the Reverend J. W. Step her son,
president of the People United To Lead
The Struggle For Equality.
"There is an authoritative ten-point
anti-crime program that everyone is
familiar with and can adhere to," Lip-
schitz said. "The ten commandments,
the basis of Judeo-Chriatian law, are a
set of values that can help improve our
community."
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, executive director of the Community Chaplaincy Service, and Rabbi Dennis
Wold of the Hillel Jewish Student Centers, inspect a circumcision hit which will be sent to Jews in the
Soviet Union who need such material for Brit Milah ceremonies.


Page 16
.V? Hi
One nation has given
Palestinian refugees more
aid than Bahrain, Egypt,
Algeria,Syria,Oman,lraq,
and Yemen combined.
Of all the Arab nations who say they care about the
Palestinian refugees, few put their money where their mouths are.
From 1950 through 1979, for example, Egypt gave a total
of $5.5 million to UNRWA to aid Palestinian refugees. Syria gave
$2.7 million. Iraq gave $1.3 million. Oman and Bahrain gave less
than half a million between them. Algeria and Yemen gave nothing.
One Middle East nation has given nearly $10 million-more
than all of them combined. That nation is Israel.
In one year alone, 1976-77, Israel gave an additional
$42.2 million directly to the refugees themselves.
All but one of these Arab nations refuse Palestinians
citizenship. Most, like Saudi Arabia, import workers from as far
away as South Korea rather than hire more Palestinians to fill their
labor shortages.
Yet, there is one Moslem country where Palestinians
are at home. Where they are granted automatic citizenship.
Where Palestinians make up two-thirds of the population,
hold three-quarters of the govern-
ment posts, and run 70% of
the businesses.
This country is Jordan.
Culturally, linguistically,
religiously, demograpHlcally,
geographically, and historically,
Jordan is a Palestinian Arab
nation in every respect. More-
over, it occupies 77% of the
original Palestine Mandate.
Jordan is the homeland
for the 600,000 Palestinian
refugees kept homeless for
35 years by their Arab brothers.
Please write Jordan is Palestine Committee,
R O. Box 2003, New Hyde Park, NY 11040.
with your comments. Richard Jacoel, Chairman.
This advertisement was reprinted courtesy of the Community WttotiiTne
Committee of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. Yon may wish to
send this to your U.S. senators or congressional representatives


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