The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02834

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
THE
ma 56 Numbr 21 Thras Sections
m
Miami, FloridaFriday, May 27,1983
FratfMWWf
i.m..>wc^i Price 50 Cents
Whether Israel Withdraws Or Not
Experts Say Some Aspects of Pact With Lebanon Are Legally Binding
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israeli circles
are pondering whether all of the provisions
in the agreement just signed with Lebanon
are contingent on the withdrawal of foreign
forces from that country. Some Israeli legal
experts insist they are not.
The agreement will be ratified by the Is-
raeli and Lebanese governments once there
is a formal exchange of the "instruments of
ratification." But Israel has made it clear,
in secret accords with Lebanon and the
U.S. and in the public statements of its of-
ficials, that Israel is not required to pull its
forces out of Lebanon until Syria agrees to
a simultaneous withdrawal of its own forces
and those of the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization.
SO FAR Damascus has fiercely rejected the Is-
rael-Lebanon accord and has given no indication
that it will pull its army out of Lebanon.
In the interim, however, it remains unclear
whether the parties intend to mark time or to pro-
Continued on Page 3-A
IS. Professor's
jiti-Begin Organization
It Gets Going on 'BigLie'Fund-Raiser
p London Chronicle Syndicate
I WASHINGTON A
oup of prominent Ameri-
i Jewish critics of the Is-
eli Government has pub-
:ly apologized to Israel's
rmer Foreign Minister
bba Eban for using his
ae in a mass fund-rais-
mailing without his
lission.
|Thp Committee of Concerned
nerican Jews ICCAJ), a new
[anization led by Stanford
Uvtrsity Prof. Seymour Martin
net, issued a statement ex-
PtUOg -iniere regret" that
fan 9 name had been used in
) mailing
us trig's
Abba Eban
The original letter, sent out to
Jews around the United States,
noted that one major purpose of
the new organization was to help
those groups in Israel who op-
pose Prime Minister Menachem
Begin's West Bank policies.
"AND THAT is why it is
critical that we in America, who
have experience in non-partisan
citizens' organizations, provide
the benefit of our experience as
well as grants of financial sup-
port to those in Israel working
for change through community,
charitable, and public interest or-
ganizations," the letter said.
The mailing also included a
supposed "memorandum" from
Eban to the CCAJ written on
Continued on Page 11-A
U.S. Looking
For Arabs To
Muscle Syria
mbivalent Jew
What Now for Defeated Bruno Kreisky?
flv London Chronicle
IKWA The
palist Party's loss of its
Dlute majority in the
Krian general election
the government career
II
>#'
of a man whose place in his-
tory is already assured
whether from a positive or
negative point of view.
Dr. Bruno Kreisky. 72,
was not only Austria's first
Jewish Chancellor, but was
also the longest-serving
head of State in the longest-
serving head of State in the
country's history, ruling
uninterruptedly from 1970.
There can be no doubt that he
put Austria, a little-known coun-
try internationally, firmly on the
political map.
KREISKY IS a man of many
contradictions. There can be no
doubt about his political or intel-
lectual brilliance, but he is also a
man plagued with personal com-
plexes, almost all connected with
the inescapable fact of his Jew-
ishness. at least in the eyes of his
non-Jewish fellow Austrians.
Continued on Page 8-A
Washington Delighted 2-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration is looking
to the Arab countries to
persuade Syria to pull its
troops out of Lebanon in
the wake of the Israeli-Leb-
anese agreement for Israeli
troops withdrawal.
Special envoy Philip Habib.
who was told by the Syrians that
he would not be welcomed in
Damascus, was in Saudi Arabia
apparently to begin this effort,
after a brief stop-over in Cairo
where he held talks with Presi-
dent Hosni Mubarak.
President Reagan indicated
that the U.S. was taking this
course at his news conference last
week whin he was asked what
reasons he had to be "optimistic"
that the Syrians would withdraw.
"The Syrians have repeatedly
said that when other forces leave,
when the Israelis leave and so
forth, they, too. will leave Leba
non," Reagan replied.
"NOW I grant you they're
saying some different things
today." the President continued.
"But I also know that a number
of their Arab allies are urging
them to stick with their word and
to leave when all forces are
prepared to leave. And I can't
believe that the Syrians want to
Philip Habib
find themselves alone, separated
from their Arab allies.'
In an apparent reply to
Reagan, the official Syrian news
agency, SANA, said, "It has
been decided not to receive Habib
in Syria because we have nothing
to discuss with him and because
he is one of the most hostile
American diplomats toward the
Arabs and their cause."
Damascus Radio replied
directly to Reagan declaring that
Continued on Page 7-A
JNF Officials Will Visit Miami Next Week
rtorreJocooson
National President of the
Jewish National Fund of
America, Charlotte Jacob-
son, will be visiting Miami
and Miami Beach next
Tuesday. She will arrive
here for a series of recep-
tions attended by local civic
and political leaders.
With her, from JNF's national
headquarters offices in New
York, will be Dr. Samuel I.
Cohen, executive vice president.
Among local leaders on hand to
greet the JNF's top national offi-
cers will be Dr. Irving Lehrman,
chairman of the Jewish National
Fund Foundation; Abraham
Grunhut, president of the JNF of
Greater Miami; Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz, chairman of the
JNF Executive Board; and Zev
W. Kogan, president of the JNF
Southern Region.
MRS. JACOBSON is the first
woman president of National
JNF. She continues to serve in
her capacity as chairman of the
American Section of the World
Zionist Organization and has
long been regarded as one of the
most distinguished leaders of
American Zionism.
First elected to the Executive
of the Jewish Agency in 1968 at
the 27th World Zionist Congress,
Mrs. Jacobson was previously
national president of Hadassan
from 1964-68. She is a member of
the Board of Governors of the re-
Continued on Page 7-A

.

'teaterMiami Jewish Federation Supplement... See Special Insert


V SAB?...mibHomfcKj; <*#*&
Page "2-A The JewishiFloridian/ Friday, May 27k J.9^3
--------- "V '. '** i '* .* v
Background Report
U.S. Pleased Israel, Lebanon Signed

:T
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration, obviously
pleased that Israel and
Lebanon have signed their
agreement for the with-
drawal of Israeli troops
from Lebanon, continues to
express confidence that
Syria will agree to leave
too.
"We believe that this (signing)
is a major achievement that
proves that peace negotiations
can work in the Middle East,"
Nicholas Veliotes, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near East
and South Asian Affairs, de-
clared in briefing reporters on the
agreement.
President Reagan has hailed
the signing as "a positive step
toward peace in the Middle
East." Speaking to Congres-
sional leaders at a budget meet-
ing, Reagan also called on Syria
and the Palestine Liberation
Organization to "agree to with-
draw as well" so that all foreign
forces would be out of Lebanon
and that country can regain its
sovereignty and a control of its
territory.
THE PRESIDENT thanked
Premier Menachem Begin of Is-
rael and Lebanese President
Amin Gemayel for the courage
and statesmanship they showed
in the negotiations for troop
withdrawals, and he particularly
thanked Secretary of State
George Shultz for his efforts that
led to the agreement.
Veliotes said the agreement
worked out by Shultz during his
two week mission to th" Middle
East is "the first essential step in
achieving the withdrawal of all
foreign forces from Lebanon." He
said the agreement becomes of-
ficially effective when Lebanon
and Israel exchange the docu-
ments of ratification
But he stressed that it is
"understood" that Israel will not
begin withdrawing its troops
until there is an agreement for
the withdrawal of Syrian troops
and PLO forces. When this is
done, the Israeli withdrawal
would take 8-12 weeks to com-
plete, he said.
THE U.S. expects Syria to
abide by its "longstanding"
public and private assurances
that when the Lebanese govern-
ment tells it that the Syrian
army's presence is "no longer
necessary" it will withdraw,
Veliotes said. He noted that Is-
raeli troops in Lebanon are only
25 miles from Damascus.
"We assume that the with-
drawal of those troops is some
form of reassurance to Syria's
security concerns," he said. He
added that the U.S. cannot see
how the security arrangements
worked out for south Lebanon
between Israel and Lebanon
where, he repeatedly stressed, the
Lebanese army will be in com-
plete control, could be seen as a
threat to Syria.
Veliotes rejected any linkage of
the Golan Heights issue to
Syrian withdrawal. He pointed
out that while Reagan did not
mention the Golan in his Sept. 1
peace initiative for the Middle
East, the U.S. stressed on the
very next day that it considers
the Golan Heights part of the
territories occupied by Israel, as
EEC Welcomes Accord;
Mum on Syria's Rejection
BONN (JTA) The
European Economic Community
has welcomed the accord reached
between Israel and Lebanon and
signed by the two countries.
West Germany's Foreign Minis-
ter Hans-Dietrich Genscher made
that point at a press conference
here following a two-day informal
meeting of the foriegn ministers
of the 10 EEC-member states.
But Genscher, who currently
holds the rotating chairmanship
of the EEC Council of Ministers,
gave no indication of the
European reaction to Syria's
rejection of the agreement, which
could render it inoperative. There
was an understanding here that
the European Community will
try to exert influence on
Damascus to pull Syrian forces
out of Lebanon. German sources
could not say how the Syrians
would be addressed or on what
level.
Unless Syria withdraws from
Lebanon, the Israelis will not pull
out their troops, and the status
quo in Lebanon will remain. The
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
learned that the EEC Foreign
Ministers did not consider lifting
the partial sanctions imposed on
Israel after its invasion of Leba-
non in June, 1982. Sources here
have said such a move
Austrian Quits
Candidacy
I VIENNA (JTA) Fried-
K rich Peter, a leader of the Freed
L om Party, junior partner in Aua-
4 trie's new Socialist-led coalition
2 government, stepped down Tues-
day as a candidate for the office
of Third President of Parliament
because of widespread protests
over his Nazi past. Peter was a
former officer of the First SS
Infantry Brigade which was
notorious for mass murders
during World War II
possible only after the actual
withdrawal of Israeli forces takes
place.
Prior to the ministers' meeting,
sources said it was "premature"
to speak of lifting the sanctions
and there was not even a remote
chance to reach the needed
consensus to do so at this time.
Israeli Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir is due in Brussels some
time next month for talks with
Belgian and EEC officials.
Israel's demand that the sanc-
tions be lifted is expected to be
high on the agenda.
defined by UN Security Council
Resolution 242.
VELIOTES SAID he did not
believe the Soviet Union could
veto Syria's withdrawal from
Lebanon. He said he believed the
government of Syria will make its
own decisions. "We hope they
make the right decisions so
everyone will get out," he said.
He said that history shows "the
longer they stay" the more there
is a chance of conflict.
Meanwhile, U.S. special
Ambassador for the Middle East
Philip Habib has returned to
Beirut to begin the U.S. efforts to
gain Syria's withdrawal, Veliotes
said. No mention was made of
Shultz returning to the Middle
East. President Gemayel, in an
interview published in The New
York Times, urged Shultz to
return as soon as possible. But
Shultz reportedly believes the
main effort should now be made
by the Arab countries to get
Syria to withdraw.
Veliotes replied with a firm
"No" when he was asked if the
U.S. had to pay a price to gain
Israel's agreement to withdraw
from Lebanon. "It wasn't a ques-
tion of buying the Israelis out of
Lebanon," he said.
VELIOTES, who accompanied
Shultz on his recent mission to
the Mideast, said it was clear in
the talks that "the Israelis did
wish to leave Lebanon," but it
was a question of finding the
"proper circumstances" under
which their security could be
safeguarded. "The Israelis clear-
ly demonstrated in the negotia-
tions that they have no desire to
create a Northern Bank in Leb-
anon," he stressed.
Veliotes said the agreement
serves Israel's "legitimate self-
interest" and seeks to ensure that
a situation will not be recreated
in which "terrorist acts" against
Israel will once again occur. The
agreement also prohibits both
Israel and Lebanon from using
each others territory to launch
attacks against a third country.
Veliotes noted that Reagan, in
April, linked removal of the
embargo on the sale of 75 F-16 jet
fighter-bombers to Israel with
Israel's withdrawal from Leb-
anon. He agreed there was a
"change in the atmosphere" now.
But he said Reagan is "in the
process of considering" what ac-
tion to take now. This seemed to
be an indication that an an-
nouncement on the F-16s may be
made soon.
Doctors at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical Cma
declare 20-month-old Tomer Levy cured of Thalassemia aftt>\
bone-marrow transplantation from his father, Amram. Tomer I
the first such successful recipient of a bone-marrow rransplawl
from father-to-son. Two other operations, between siblinal
were done at University of Washington Medical School, &9
tie.
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Friday, May 27,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page3-A
Whether Israel Withdraws Or Not
Experts Say Some Aspects of Pact with Lebanon Are Legally Binding
Continued from Page 1-A
ceed with implementation of those parts of the
accord not directly related to the withdrawal
process.
According to the legal experts here, an obvious
example is Article I of the agreement in which Israel
and Lebanon "confirm that the state of war has
been terminated and no longer exists."The experts
say it would be illogical and spurious to argue that if
there is no withdrawal of all foreign forces from
Lebanon the "state of war" would be resumed be-
tween the two countries.
^ A SIMILAR question concerns the provision for a
"Joint Liaison Committee" of Israel and Lebanon to
begin working as soon as the instruments of ratifica-
tion are exchanged. While many of the committee's
functions are security related and therefore contin-
gent on the withdrawal of forces, others the main-
tenance of an Israel liaison office in Beirut, for
example and the "development of mutual relations
between Israel and Lebanon"are not.
There are of course many provisions in the agree-
ment that are meaningful only in the context of
withdrawal, such as security arrangements and the
limitation of forces in south Lebanon. But prima
fade, the Israel-Lebanon agreement signed this
week is a valid international document regardless of
what happens in terms of the withdrawal, Israeli
sources say.

\Roth Parties Fought Hard
After Five Months of Negotiation, A Pact Gets Off the Ground
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel
nd Lebanon signed their agree-
ent on troop withdrawals and
urity and got a pledge of
(firm" support from the United
|tates, a co-signator.
There were two signing cere-
onies, the first, at 9 a.m. local
: at Khalde, a Lebanese town
tat south of Beirut, and three
Durs later, at Kiryat Shemona,
Israeli town on the Lebanese
prder where, as in Khalde, many
! the negotiating sessions lead-
5 to the agreement were held.
[David Kimche, director general
the Israeli Foreign Ministry
ho headed the Israeli negotiat-
team, signed for Israel.
ptoine Fatale, chief of the
pbanese delegation signed for
i Beirut government. U.S. spe-
Ambassador Morris Draper
his signature on behalf of
! United States. All three made
(clear that this was not a formal
ce treaty between Israel and
anon but nevertheless a
kjor step on the road towards
Ice
)RAPER NOTED that both
ties had fought hard during
five months of negotiations
I their national aspirations and
Buirements. "But in the
cess of meshing these aims,
^h countries found they had
ny goal- and aims in common,
tluding an enduring and
fcndly relationship between
|m." he said.
)raper added that it was fit-
that ihe U.S. was present to
Dees the signing-. "The U.S.
warm and reliable friend of
|h countries. It is not only a
ness to this accord but will
Jain a firm supporter of the
erstandings which have been
pied," the American diplomat
|ared
he signings followed the en-
Bements of the agreements by
Iebanese and Israeli par-
ents. The Lebanese Par-
pent unanimously approved
accord. The Knesset regis-
J its approval by a vote 57-6
145 abstentions,
[our copies of the agreement
signed in English and
Glenn Wants
pLO in Talks
JENEVA (JTA> Sen.
Glenn (D., Ohio), who an-
nced that he will seek his
' nomination for the Presi-
in 1984, believes the Pales-
Liberation Organization
tld join in the Middle East
Fe negotiations, according to
[interview with the former
pnaut published in the Swiss
f. Const mire.
H permanent solution to the
rt will be possible without
[participation of the PLO."
was quoted as saying. He
[that while the U.S. should be
onaible for Israel's security,
Duld not support the creation
f settlements by Israel in
[occupied territories, Con-
reported.
French, the official versions, and
in Hebrew and Arabic. Three of
the signed copies are for Jeru-
salem, Beirut and Washington
and the fourth for the United Na-
tions archives in New York.
KIMCHE SAID at the sign-
ings, "The signatures are just the
beginning of a new chapter in our
histories. Many obstacles still
stand in our paths, and there are
many who would wish to render
the agreements meaningless .
But you cannot go against the
will of the people" of Lebanon
and Israel.
He stressed that Israel's final
withdrawal from Lebanon is con-
tingent on the departure of all
Syrian and Palestine Liberation
Organization forces from that
country and the return by Syria
of all Israeli prisoners of war.
The understanding of the con-
ditional nature of Israel's pledge
to withdraw was affirmed in side-
letters from the U.S. to Israel and
Lebanon which are part of the
agreement. Fatale, speaking in
French, noted that "The agree-
ment is not perfect, but then per-
fection belongs to God only."
MUCH OF the agreement and
its annexes deal with security ar-
rangements in south Lebanon
where Israel and Lebanon will es-
tablish a Joint Liaison Commit-
tee with U.S. participation. The
Lebanese army to be stationed in
the south Lebanon security zone
will be limited to two brigades
with their normal equipment.
Anti-aircraft or ground-to-sea
missiles are excluded, as is radar
capable of scanning Israeli terri-
tory. The security provisions
provide tor direct radio and tele-
phone communications between
the Israeli and Lebanese military
commanders and fact o face
consultations.
According to the annex of the
agreement, "within 8 to 12
weeks of the entry into force of
the present agreement, all Israeli
forces will have been withdrawn
from Lebanon. This is consistent
with the objective of Lebanon
that all external forces withdraw
from Lebanon.
"THE LEBANESE armed
forces and the Israel defense
forces will maintain continuous
liaison during the withdrawal and
will exchange all necessary in-
formation through the Security
Arrangements Committee. The
Israel defense forces and the
Lebanese armed forces will co-
operate during the withdrawal in
order to facilitate the reassertion
of the authority of the govern-
ment of Lebanon as the Israeli
armed forces withdraw."
The annex also states: "Three
months after completion of the
withdrawal of all Israeli forces
from Lebanon, the Security Ar-
rangements Committee will con-
duct a full-scale review of the
adequacy of the security arrange-
ments delineated in this annex in
order to improve them."
The signings represented a
major achievement for diplomacy
in which the U.S. played an over-
riding and probably decisive role.
The final accord was reached
after two weeks of strenuous
shuttling between Jerusalem and
Beirut by U.S. Secretary of State
George Shultz.
BUT AS Shultz himself
stressed, Israel and Lebanon had
by then reached agreements in
principle on most points during
the months of negotiations in
which Draper and U.S. special
envoy to the Middle East Philip
Habib participated.
Both Kimche and Fatale had
fulsome praise for Draper and
Habib. But despite the satisfac-
tion expressed by all parties with
the achievement consummated,
the fate of the agreement clearly
depends on whether Syria will
agree to withdraw its forces from
Lebanon.
Damascus exerted severe pres-
sure on the government of Leba-
nese President Amin Gemayel to
reject the accord with Israel on
grounds that Israel gained
politically and militarily from it.
Fatale, in his remarks, stressed
that Lebanon remained faithful
to its commitments to the Arab
world, but it required an end to
warfare if it is to rebuild a coun-
try shattered by seven years of
civil strife. He referred pointedly
to the fact that Syria itself
reached an accord with Israel in
the form of the 1974 disengage-
ment on the Golan Heights.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, May 27, 1983
S
[WMnMMnMMKimi
WMJUuuuuuuwuuiwsWWiMuii
Harvard Students' Gripes Deserve To Be Investigated
The name of John J. McCloy is
synonymous with the earliest years of post-
Hitler Germany's efforts to work its way
back into the family of nations, when
McCloy served as American Military
Governor of occupied Germany from 1949-
52.
Previously, McCloy was a respected
diplomat, serving as Assistant Secretary of
War during World War II. Many Germans
today fondly recall the efforts McCloy
made in their behalf honestly and diligently
to help them put their country back on
track after the devastating impact upon
them of the Hitler period, which left
Germany in physical and emotional
shambles.
At the same time, Jewish students at
Harvard University are now charging
McCloy with having been instrumental in
leading the campaign in the Roosevelt
Administration against the Allied decision
not to bomb the Auschwitz death camp, an
act these students claim could have saved
hundreds of thousands of Jewish lives.
Furthermore, others are now charging that
McCloy, while serving as High Com-
missioner of Germany, pardoned a number
of Nazi war criminals.
Among those making these charges is
Alan Dershowitz, the Harvard Law School
professor, who says that McCloy, later as a
private citizen, lobbied the Nixon
Administration against sending U.S.
defensive weaponry to Israel during the
1973 Yom Kippur War.
The upshot is that the angry Harvard
students are now demanding that Harvard
University remove the name of John J.
McCloy from a new German American
scholarship program to be financed by a $2
million initial grant by the Volkswagen
Foundation of Hanover, West Garmany.
Why is the sponsor of the scholarship
important? Well because Volkswagen
should know that Asian American students
at Harvard are joining their Jewish friends
in the latest anti-McCloy movement.
According to the Asian Americans, McCloy
ran, and still defends, the U.S. program to
intern some 120,000 Japanese Americans
during World War 11, a stain on our history
we are not likely to remove.
In the face of all of this campus furor,
Harvard administrators say that Mr.
McCloy is not responsible for any of "the
evils" as charged by these student
organizations. But in our view, while they
have the right to defend McCloy, they
ought to meet their obligation as an in-
stitution of higher learning to clear the
facts. And to so do before the first 10
German students who will come to study
American methods of public management
and policy analysis arrive on Harvard's
campus.
Punishing Anti-Semitism
Brad Barry, a Long Island, N.Y. man
convicted of vandalizing the property of
Jewish neighbors, was sentenced last week
to 5-15 years and ordered to pay $16,000 to
cover the damages. Barry was found guilty
in March on charges of arson and criminal
mischief against his neighbors, Yaacov and
Hanna Elkon.
Jewish Floridian
But an organization in Washington,
founded last year to take legal action in
support of victims of anti-Semitism, has
now filed a $6 million suit in a federal court in
Brooklyn against Barry, as well as Robert
Lesser and Brian Kolen, for punitive
damages.
What emerges from the suit is that the
trio did more than "just" vandalize Jewish
property. They went on a three-year
"rampage of assault, terror and (italics
ours) vandalism for the simple reason that
the F.Ikons are Jewish."
For example: They defaced the Elkon
home with swastikas and anti-Semitic
slogans; they set fires on the property;
they shot out windows; they spray-painted
ugly statements about Mrs. Elkon along a
public street; they placed a voodoo doll in
the front yard of the Elkon home with a
Star of David on the doll's chest and a
hypodermic syringe piercing the doll's eye.
Irvin Shapell is president of the Jewish
Advocacy Center in Washington that filed
the suit, which enlarges the verdict of
mischief from Barry to two others. Fur-
thermore, Shapell s organization also
enlarges the verdict of Judge Marie
Santagata from "mere" vandalism to shed
light on the true depth of the trio's anti-
Semitism.
Shapell and the Jewish Advocacy Center
deserve the support in their suit of the
entire American Jewish community. It is
high time that anti-Semities are dealt with
in the courtroom with the serious punitive
action they deserve.
7"
I
1
1
Hitler avid the Weakness of History
<*-
Friday. May 27,1983
Volume 56
15 SIVAN 5743
Number!!
WHAT STILL haunts me is
the monumental error in scholar-
shipand judgment of H.R.
Trevor-Roper. One word from
him, and the so-called Hitler
diaries would have been more
carefully scrutinized and found to
be phony well before they seized
the world's imagination. And
perhaps even before Der Stern
decided to publish its first in-
stallment of them.
Trevor-Roper's failure says
something about the study of
history as an academic discipline
to which he has dedicated his life.
There is no need to reexamine his
credentials as an historian and
especially as a scholar of the
Hitler period. He was one of the
first and has been one of the most
assiduous, as well as one of the
most acclaimed. His credentials
are impeccable. That is why Der
Stem might have waited for
Trevor-Roper's authentication,
bed be expressed the least
reservation about the diaries,
despite the positive diagnosis of
then* own people, who had a clear
ax to grind.
THEN WHAT happened?
Without talking to him about it,
one can merely speculate. But the
errors of haste and omission of
which be was guilty are certainly
non-characteristic of him and his
profession.
My own feeling is that Trevor-
Roper may have been anxious for
something more than the typical
historian's impulse toward drab
denial. After ah, the life and
of Adolf Hitler have bean
studied relentlessly since Hitler's
death in a Berlin bunker. They
have been chopped up as at an
autopsy, laid out, probed and
analyzed. And always with
pretty much the same result.
Can it be that Trevor-Roper
was anxious for some new and
different conclusions? I think so.
FOR EXAMPLE, were
Trevor-Roper's initial judgment
vindicated and the diaries found
to be real, a picture of Hitler
would have emerged that is far
different from the one we have
come to accept all these years.
Now we would be forced to be-
lieve that Hitler respected Cham
berlain aa a wiley adversary.
That the octogenarian, Rudolf
Hess, who still languishes in
Spandau, flew to England aa part
of a genuine Hitler attempt to
come to terms with the British
and to enlist them as allies in a
war against the Soviet Union.
That Hitler really knew next to
nothing about the vast scope of
the final solution" to the "Jew-
ish problem" and that he would
just as soon have let every single
one of the Jews escape Germany
"on luxury liners, for all I care,''
liners he was supposed to have
written in his diaries he would
have been glad to provide them.
This is no mere reaccentingof
history. It is a major rewrite. It
shows Hitler, however devilish,
nevertheless to have been a lot
more reasonable than we are led
to believe he was. and with a lot
more in common with Britain.
France and the United States
than can be found among the
stumbling blocks of contention
that divided them, the nasty
genocide business notwithstand-
ing, which even the Allies turned
their backs upon.
WHAT A FIND to be called
upon to authenticate! It may we"
have been beyond Trevor-Roper'
willpower to say no to them in tne
same way that an alcoholic or a
compulsive eater can not say no
to the only offerings that bring
sweetness to their lives.
For the historian, the known
fact of history perforce takes on
the drabness of an "nch,"f
pest. But it is the purpose ct
work to uncover this staaw.g
sue of whrt was without totj
harm to its integrity andItnsn m
keep it, like an object in
museum, sale from the assault*
upon it of the present.
In this. Trevor Roper f0*
However much one may *";
tbst. Ma trained scholar '"
his duty not to f *;
blandishments of **%\
haggling over the vahie <*
lea Paf I*-*



,,-... PridaytMay27,im/'l^^iabFloridiM Pg5-A
Roman baths and Florida alligators
meet in antiquity in Israel
Largest, Most Magnificent Excavation Ever


By RALPH VAN KIPPEN
"It is the largest,
possibly the most magnifi-
cent network of Roman
baths found anywhere in
the world." So saying,
Mickey Geago leads us off
to inspect the excavations
of the baths at Hammat
Gader.
"Follow me, and we'll go and
see the alligators.*' And off we
troop, following behind a young
man with a New York accent
called Guy Ben Moahe.
Alligators?
Hammat Gader is quite
remarkable: it nestles on the
shore of the River Yarmuk in a
deep valley, not far from the
legendary Sea of Galilee. It has
natural hot mineral springs,
whose water gurgles to the
surface at an amazing 125
degrees fahrenheit. And it was
here that the Romans built a
vast, elaborate network of bath
houses.
MICKEY GEAGO, our guide,
came to Israel 15 years ago from
the tiny fishing village of Mouse-
hole on England's Cornwall
coast. Few traces of a Cornish
accent remain; he is an Israeli
now and is one of the excavators
of the Roman bath complex. The
baths of Hammat Gader have
been known for millenia. The
First Century BCE Greek
traveler, Estrabo, wrote about
them; so did geographer, El
Mukadas, in the 10th Century
and the 13th Century Jewish
traveller Ashtori Haparchi.
The landscape around
Hammat Gader has changed just
a little since these ancient
travelers' visits. The vegetation
was always lush, but now the
lushness is intensified with grove
after grove of banana trees. The
drive to Hammat Gader is
fascinating. The road turns away
from the Sea of Galilee and
follows the course of the Yarmuk
' River, which flows deep in a
canyon to the south. As the road
twists and turns, neck-wrenching
vistas open up, one of which is of
the girdered bridge across the
canyon carrying the now defunct
Hejaz railway lines which once
took trains from Haifa to Bagh-
I dad.
The entrance to the actual park
of Hammat Gader has a Wild
West look, with log fences and
turnpike-style toll booths, but
At Hammat Gader in northern Israel, the excavations of
Roman baths now vie for attention with alligators, brought to
Israel in 1980 from Florida swamps. The alligators thrive in the
lush climate of this oasis.
that anachronism is quickly
surpassed by the overwhelming
sight of the excavations of the
baths.
THE BATHS built at
Hammat Gader were, according
to the Fourth Century Greek
historian, Eunapeus, "the second
largest in the Roman Empire."
They were in constant use during
the 2nd and 3rd Centuries, were
extensively restored in the 7th
Century and fell into disuse in the
9th Century, after which cen-
turies of earth, debris and neglect
took over, only to be removed in a
series of excavations starting in
1979.
Like Roman baths all over the
world, the Hammat Gader bath
complex incorporated different
pools for different purposes. The
Prigidarium the cold water
Continued on Page 14-A
He couldn't stand 'white lies'
of political arena
Yadin Links Bible, History
By ARNOLD AGES
TORONTO Yigael
Yadin, one-time Knesset
member, Deputy Prime
Minister and leading Israeli
archaeologist, told an inter-
viewer in the Biblical Ar-
chaeology Review recently
that while archaeology has
much to say about the Bib-
lical record, it cannot "give
a positive answer as to
whether a historical state-
ment in the Bible is true or
not."
The celebrated Israeli discov-
erer of the Bar Kochba letters
told Hershel Shanks, editor of the
Biblical Archaeological Review,
there is only one Biblical in-
cident, the capture of Ai during
the conquest of Canaan by
Joshua, which seems to be con-
tradicted by the evidence of ar-
chaeological excavations. Even in
this case, Yadin suggested that
the archaeological "evidence" is
subject to considerable conjec-
ture.
AS TO the historicity of the
Hebrew Bible, Yadin said that a
distinction had to be made be-
tween the poetic parts of Scrip-
ture, such as the first verses of
Genesis, and the historical sec-
tions, such as those found in the
Book of Kings.
"The early Genesis stories are
more in the nature of mythology.
They crystallized perhaps a
certain knowledge. I think basic-
ally the stages of creation are
perhaps correct as they are de-
scribed in Genesis, stages that
were telescoped in the tradition,
in the faith, into short periods
rather than much longer."
Yadin told Shanks that asser-
tions which claim archaeology
disproves the Bible are absolute-
YigaelAUon
ly untrue. On the contrary, ac-
cording to Yadin. archaeology
has confirmed the historical truth
about "the great events" re-
counted in Scripture "for
example, the conquest of Canaan
by the children of Israel cannot
be thrown away and be explained
by all sorts of sociological
theories, as is sometimes at-
tempted. First, archaeology
proves that there was a conquest
at the period, and second, the
Continued on Page 14-A
1 still believe Bitve records
'art
and has
<>flhe excavated Roman baths at the entire Rbman Empire
\*>nern Israetsite of Hammat Gader The Hnsirely uncovered during Jmr year, .,<
n*iork of bM%s is-fhe second largest in the excavations which began m MM.
main events o
^n,
^tors'


I

Page 6-A The Jewish Floricuan / Friday, Mmy 27,1963
Anti-Semitism
Sweeping Canada
Keegstra Case Sparks Deep Concern
By MICHAEL SOLOMON
MONTREAL (JTA)
Alan Rose, executive
vice president of the Cana-
dian Jewish Congress, said
that "without exaggera-
tion, there is a great sweep
of anti-Semitism across
Canada.'-
Specifically, he told the 1.500
delegates attending the CJC's
20th fiennial plenary, he
wanted "to express my profound
concern that Alberta Premier
1'eter Lougheed did not take the
proper attitude on the question of
the Mayor of Eckville. who de-
clared that the Holocaust did not
exist."
Rose was alluding to the case
of James Keegstra. a high school
teacher and Mayor of the village
of Eckville. Alberta, who taught
his classes that Jews are the root
of all evil in the world and that
the Holocaust never occurred.
KEEGSTRA, a member of the
rightwing Social Credit Party of
Canada, was ousted from the
party only 10 days after he had
been elected to its executive at its
recent convention and three days
after a federal judge upheld
Keegstra's dismissal from the
Alberta school system.
Rose suggested that the Cana-
dian criminal code be amended to
deprive hate-mongers of freedom
of speech.
On another issue. Rose re-
ported that he had visited
Ethiopia last year and stated
that the problem is how to save
the Jews of that country. He as-
serted that the government of Is-
rael -s the only one saving
Ethiopian Jews and that no one
should point a finger and accuse
it of doing too little for those
Jews. There has been criticism to
this effect by Ethiopian Jews
who managed to escape and those
who are campaigning on behalf of
Ethiopian Jews here, in the
United States and in Israel.
RABBI Joseph Hadani.
spiritual leader of the Ethiopian
Jewish community in Israel, de-
livered an impassioned appeal for
action to save Ethiopian Jews
who. he said, are threatened with
extinction, particularly in
Ethiopia's Gondar province.
The CJC has reportedly en-
rolled a large number of Canadian
political leaders in its effort for
Ethiopian Jews, including Prime
Minister Pierre Elliott Trudeau
In a discussion of Canada-Is-
rael relations, Harold Buchwald.
a lawyer from Winnipeg who is
the president of the Canada-Is-
rael Committee, said the
Canadian government's policy
toward Israel had been affected
by a number of events last year,
particularly Israel's invasion of
Lebanon. But he added that
"Canada's commitment to Is-
rael's right to exist as a sovereign
and secure country is as strong as
a rock and will remain so for the
foreseeable future."
AT THE same time. Buchwald
said, it is the Canadian govern-
ment's policy to support the
Camp David agreement and the
right of the Palestinians to a
homeland on the West Bank and
the Gaza Strip, which, he said,
does not exclude the creation of a
Palestinian state if the parties
concerned agree to one.
Buchwald declared that if the
Canadian government strongly
disagrees with the West Bank
settlement policy of the govern-
ment of Premier Menachem
Begin, it is also a fact that there
will be no Canadian government
recognition of the PLO until the
PLO recognizes Israel's right to
exist and ceases its terrorist
activities. He said the mood of
the Canadian government is one
of "full support for Israel despite
a growing sympathy for the
Palestinians, in each political
party, particularly after the mas-
sacres last year in the refugee
camps of Sabra and Shatila."
Buchwald added that "the
majority of Canadians are
against official recognition of the
PLO. while there is almost unani-
mous support for a secure and
sovereign Israel among all Cana-
dians."
YESHAYAHU ANUG. Is
reel's Ambassador to Canada.
said he realized that, despite the
"wholesale support'' for Israel
throughout Canada. some
Canadian Jews are combining a
faith for Israel with a "certain
discomfort." He pointed out that
"nobody asks you to be responsi-
ble for the policies of Israel."
adding that Israel must be strong
"because without this strength,
there is not much that can be
done" for Israel, "by sympathies
only."
Anug said that, with good will
on both sides, the present volume
of trade between Canada and Is-
rael can be quadrupled and that
this was also true for scientific
cooperation between the two
countries.
A similar approach was
presented by Jim Peterson, a
Liberal MP from Willowdale. On-
tario, who expressed his hope for
a continuous expansion of
Canada-Israel relations. He
SECURE THE MEMORY OF
YOUR SPECIAL OCCASION
FOREVER
Bar-Bat MiLzvahfi
Wedding*
^ Anniversaries
Graduation*
Birthday*
TefttimonJals
Will*
| Confirmation*
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VIDEO
MEMO
new* eeoi or "Thi- I
Your Life" aecpaaki
Kcported b profe*-
wlonaJ TV nc crew
locludlafl numi TV
personality mieoiewcr'
I i.e la cotor A ihrillinn
dual MNind
-/\
stated that Canada takes im-
mense pride in Israel's achieve-
ments, noting: "What other
country would take the moral re-
sponsibility for the aftermath of
the Sabra and Shatila mas-
sacres?"
AT ANOTHER session of the
CJC plenary, the unity of the
Jewish people and the joint ef-
forts of Israel and diaspora Jewry
to rekindle the Jewish spirit were
stressed by Edgar Bronfman,
president of the World Jewish
Congress, and Yosef Burg. Is-
rael's Interior Minister.
Burg observed that the Jewish
people are the "remnants of peo-
ple" who survived from one
tragedy to another. He em-
phasized the need for unity be-
tween Israel and the diaspora if
Judaism is to survive.
Bronfman described Israel as
the "center of our concern." He
added, however. "The free ex-
pression of the youth of our com-
munity will ensure the future of
the Jewish people as a whole. Not
to speak out frankly and sin-
cerely our views if we disagree
sometimes with the official policy
of Israel will endanger our rela-
tions with our governments and
even our relations with our chil-
dren."
BRONFMAN SPOKE at
length of the plight of Jews in the
Soviet Union, Syria and
Ethiopia. He also referred to his
visits last month to Argentina.
Brazil, Venezuela and Costa Rica
and announced he will visit South
Africa next month. He said that
in his travels he found that "des-
pite existing difficulties. I came
away with the feeling that we are
one people and I ask the Jewish
organizations to stop fighting the
battles of the past."
Comedian Robert Klein (left! joins the recent Young Leadership
Mission of the United Jewish Appeal to learn how a major net]
community center, Beit Yehoshua, built by Bank LeumilA
Israel in Tel Aviv, is serving the youth of Tel Aviv's
deprived Hatikvah Quarter.
J social^
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THE FAMILY JACOBS' KOSHER
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M**k ra# '-r* Nona


Friday, May 27,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
JNF Off! Mais Will
Visit Miami Tuesday
Continued from Page 1-A
constituted Jewish Agency for
Israel As chairman of the Jewish
Agency Commission on Higher
Education, she supervises its al-
locations for th- seven institu-
tions of higher learning in Israel
that it supports.
In 1970. Mrs. Jacobson was co-
chairman of a committee that re-
sulted in the founding of the new
I American Zionist Federation.
I She also served on the Committee
for the Reorganization of the
Jewish Airencv. A world-traveler,
she has visited Morocco, Iran,
Poland. Czechoslovakia,
Rumania. Hungary, France,
South Africa and Australia to
study immigration problems.
More recently, she has led
group surveys of medical and
social services in trips to Egypt,
| Jordan. Syria, and China.
DR. COHEN served as execu-
tive of the American Zionist Fed
leration before joining the Jewish
(National Fund in January, 1977.
|rle was director of organization
lof the American Jewish Congress
Iprior to that. An authority in the
I field of adult Jewish education.
Dr. Samuel Cohen
Dr. Cohen has written many
articles and studies in national
magazines and scholarly publica-
tions.
He was ordained in 1956 at
Mesivta Rabbi Chaim Berlin
Rabbinical Academy.
\Beain Visit On Tap
U.S. Looking for Arabs
To Pressure Syria
Continued from Page 1-A
lyria rejects the Israeli-Lebanese
ment which it charged was
dictated on Lebanon by the
'nited States and Israel and this
ejection will continue until the
cord is dropped." The govern-
nt-controlled radio station
Reagan spoke of Syria "as
ugh he possesses the right of
ision-making in Syria or can
ate its will on it." But it
ressed that "neither Reagan's
tement nor Israel's threat can
Iter Syria's decision."
US. OFFICIALS have
inted out that while the Israeli-
banese agreement stands on
own, Israel will not begin its
hdrawal from Lebanon until
re is also an agreement for the
!Prture of Syrian troops and
L0 terrorists.
State Department spokesman
*n Hughes, noting that "diaJo-
is the best way to advance
cause of peace," said that the
nan refusal to see Habib
a that "the dialogue cannot
forward for the moment if
y is talking."
Meanwhile, the Senate, by a
0 vote, adopted a resolution
mending the Israeli-Lebanese
roent and urging "Syria and
Palestine Liberation Organ-
itn to respect the sovereignty
territorial integrity of
non by agreeing to prompt
Mrawal of their forces from
*Mon." A spokesman for the
P* Foreign Relations Com-
*. whose leadership drafted
"Solution, noted it was rare
>" members of the Senate to
m favor of any resolution.
PN. CHARLES PERCY (R.,
,'.m introducing the resolution
J Senate Floor, noted that
"a Premier Menachem Begin
repeatedly stressed that
' had no intention of oc-
PjH Lebanon. The
eement proves that those
doubted Israel's intentions
e "Wag and confirms for all
security remains Israel's
"y concern," Percy said.
52? ,that ma9 ot Arab
have supported Leba-
S18nmg the agreement,
nations, including Iraq,
"J. Jordan, Tunisia, Egypt
Mners. also recognize the
Sen. Charles Percy
need for Syrian and Palestine
Liberation Organization forces to
withdraw," Percy said. "Syrians
and Palestinians will not succeed
in advancing their own legitimate
interests if they do not respect
the sovereignty and territorial
integrity of Lebanon."
At his press conference, Reag-
an confirmed that the Adminis-
tration is considering lifting the
embargo to supply Israel with
the promised 75 F-16 jet fighters.
Reagan said in April that the
planes would not be sent to Israel
as long as it is in Lebanon.
"THIS IS A matter now that
must go to consultation between
the State Deparment,
they handje that, and the
Congress, and that consultation
is about to begin," Reagan said
of the F-16 decision. Earlier in the
day, Nicholas Veliotes, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near
Eastern and South Asian Affairs,
said that the decision is being
considered by the President.
i Many observers believe that no
official announcement would be
made, which would be in the form
of a letter to Congress notifying
it of the proposed sale, as long as
the present effort is going on to
get Syria to agree to leave Leba-
non. This is also true of the
expected announcement of a visit
by Begin to Washington soon.
REPORT OF NOMINATING COMMITTEE GREATER MIAMf JEWISH FEDERATION
m accordance with the Bylaws el the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, Mm Nominating Committee It pleased to
present the following lists ot nominations and appointments of Officers, Directors, Trwstees and Advisory Council
members at fho Annual Meeting of the Ooneral Assembly. Tuesday, June 7 et I p.m. et the Oreeter Miami Jewish
Federation, 4100 aiscayne Boulevard, Miami.
Additional nominations for eny of the foregoing mey be presented to the Secretary of Federation by petition of eny
twtnty-flvt members in good standing no less then five days prior to the Annual Meeting of the Oenerel Assembly.
Nominations shall not bo made from tho floor et the General Assembly or membership meeting
President
Immediate Past President
Vice Presidents
Secretary
Associate Secretary
Treasurer
Associate Treasurer
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
1983-84
OFFICERS
ELECTED BOARD MEMBERS
Michael Adler
Samuel I. Adler
Bernardo Batievsky
Jeffrey Berkowitz
Tim Cohen
Myra Fan-
Harvey Friedman
Gary Gerson
Stanley Gilbert
Alfred Golden
Peter Goldring
Goldie Goldstein
Kenneth Hoffman
Arthur Horowitz
Ezra Katz
Melvin Kartzmer
Jonathan Kislak
Alan Kluger
Fran Levey
Jack H. Levine
Ellen Mandler
Norman H. Lipoff
Harry A. Levy
Norman Braman
Donald E. I -e ft on
Joel Levy
Aaron Podhurst
Howard R. Scharlin
Marilyn K. Smith
Forrest Raffel
Helene Berger
Cal Kovens
Steven J. Kravitz
Sidney Olson
David Schaecter
Gerald K. Schwartz
Guillermo Sostchin
Philip T. Warren
Harry Weitzer
APPOINTED TO BOARD BY THE PRESIDENT
Theodore Baumritter Malcolm From berg Shepard King Fred K. Shoe he t
David Blumberg Dr. Phillip Frost Nan Rich Edward Shohat
Benjamin Botwinick Alex Halberstein Barry Ross Robert Traurig
Howard Frank Joseph H. Kanter
PAST PRESIDENTS
L. Jules Arkin
PAST PRESIDENTS APPOINTED TO BOARD BY PRESIDENT
David B. Fleeman
Sidney Lefcourt
Stanley C. Myers
Robert Russell
AS REQUIRED IN BY-LAWS
Morton Silberman
Harry B. Smith
Chairman. Administrative Committee
Chairman. Building Operations Committee
Chairman, By-Laws and Governance Committee
Chairman. Campaign Steering Committee
Chairman, Cash Committee
Chairman. Communications Committee
Chairman. Community Relations Committee
Chairman. Federation/Agency Relationships Committee
Chairman, Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
Chairman. leadership Development
Chairman. Long Range Campaign Planning
Chairman. Multiple Appeals Committee
Chairman. Nominating Committee
Chairman. Planning and Budget Committee
College Student Representative
President, Rabbinical Association
Chairman. South Dade Branch. GMJF
President. Women's Division
Chairman. Young Adults Division
President, B'nai B'rith Youth Organization
President. Central Agency For Jewish Education
President, Hillel Jewish Student Center
Piesident. Jewish Community Centers of South Florida
President. Jewish Family and Children's Service
President. Jewish Vocational Service
President. Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
President. Mount Sinai Medical Center
Leonard L. Abess
Shepard Broad
Samuel N. Friedland
Howard Kane
Aaron M. Kanner
Rabbi Leon Kronish
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitc
Edmund N. Anain
Stanley H Arkin
J. William Baroe. Jr.
Rabbi Herbert M. Baumgard
Jack Bollock
Bernardo Benee
Adolph Berger
Emanuel Berlataky
Peter Bermont
Rabbi Haekell Bernat
Jerry Blank
I. Jerry Bloom
Morris Broad
Marvin M. Cooper
Joel B. Dennis
DevidEgoii
Gerald S. Engel
Ben Essen
Harold Essif
TRUSTEES
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Ralph Levitz
Irving Norry
Joseph M. Rose
Mrs. Muriel Russell
ADVISORY COUNCIL
Mendell M. Selig
Lillian Simonhoff
William D. Singer
Fay Stein
Esther and Carl Weinkle
(NOMINEES AT
Donald r'eldman
George Feldenkreie
Judge Milton Friedmex
Morris Futernick
Solomon Garaxi
MertonGettia
Burton Goldberg
William Goldrich
Jerrold F. Goodman
Elliot Gordon
Rose Gordon
Carol Greenberg
Robert Gruber
MarcHauaer
Charlotte Held
Morton Hill
Bunny HorowiU
Jerry B. Isaa
Stuart K. Jacobs
GertKarUmer
LARGE)
Frances KaUman
Rafael Kravec
Jeffrey Lefcourt
Marcy Lofton
Jerry M. Lelchuk
David* Levy
Beatrice and
Richard D. Levy
Nancy Lipoff
Bernard Mandler
Allan B. Margolis
Clifford Marks
Aaron Modow
Hank Meyer
Martha Myers
Dorothy Opprihirn
Michael Oritt
Albert E. Oeeip
Norton Pattot
Samuel Paecoe
S. Martin Sadkin
JoelSandberg
Marvia Schaecter
Kenneth J. Schwartz
SemSeitlin
SoIC. Shave
AbeSoloako
Louis Stein
Arnold Stern
Rabbi Tibor8Urn
Jerry Suaaman
Harold Thurman
HeryneTreiater
G wen and
Morton Weinberger
Robert Wolf
Sanf ord Zahler
SolZallee
Carl R. Zwerasr
ADVISORY COUNCIL
(ORGANIZATIONAL DELEGATES)
Altyah Council of South Florida
American Friends of Hebrew Unl ve rat ty
American Friends of Hebrew University. Women's Division
American Jewish Committee
American Jewish Congress
American Jewish Congress, Women's Division
American MsasweJJ Women's Organisation
American Physiclana Fellowship, be.
American society for Technlon, Greater Miami Chapter
American Society for Technlon, Women's Division
An tl De tarnation League
Beth David Congregation
Beth El Congregation
Beth Israel Congregation
Beth Jacob Oongregation
Beth Kodeah Congregation
Beth To rah Oongregation
B'nai B'rith Council
B'nai B'rith Women, Miami Beach Council
Chosen Children
Fart)and Labor Zionist Organisation of America
Friends of Lubavttch
Greater Miami Hebrew Free Loan Association
Hadaasah Miami Chapter
Hadaasah Miami Beach Chapter
Hebrew Academy
Hebrew Educators Alliance
Hillel Community Day School
Homestead Jewish Community Center
Hlstadrut Council of South Florida
Israelite Center Temple
Jacob C. Cohen Community Synagogue
Jewish Family and Children's Service
Jewish Family and Children's Service. Women's Dl vision
Jewish National Fund
Jewish War Veterans
Laadow Teehrra Center
Latin American Jewish Community ot Greater Miami
Mount Sknal Medical Center Women's Division
National Council of Jewlah Women
Ohev Shalom Congregation
Pioneer Women
Shaare Zedek Hospital In Jerusalem American Committee |
Sky I*ke Synagogue
south Dade Hebrew Academy
Temple Adath Yeshurun
Temple Beth Am
Temple Beth Moehe
Temple Beth Sholom
Temple Ememt-El
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
Temple Judea
Temple Menorah
Temple Ner Tamld
Temple Sinai of North Dade
Temple Zlon
Torah Academy of South Florida
United Synagogue of America
Women's American ORT
Women's League of Conservative Judaism
Workmen's Circle, District I
Ylvo IneUtute for Jewlah Research
Young Israel of Great er Miami
Zionist Organisation of America, Brandels District
Zionist Organisation of America, Miami Beac h


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 27,1983
Austria's
Ambivalent Jew
What Now for Defeated Bruno Kreisky?
Reagan Administration Still
Hopes to Block Increased Aid
Continued from Page 1-A
The son of a relatively wealthy
family, he joined the Socialist
Party at an early age. At that
time, the party already had well
over 100,000 Jewish supporters
but, contemporaries claim, with a
touch of malice, even then he was
far closer to his non-Jewish col-
leagues.
Kreisky's attitude towards Is-
rael can be described as univer-
sally negative, but this tells only
half the story. He is, of course,
anti-Zionist, possibly because he
thinks that the very existence of
Israel has destroyed any pos-
sibility of Jewish assimilation
and given a new lease of life to
charges of double loyalty.
IT WOULD be blatantly un-
true to claim that he wanted the
removal of Israel from the map.
The impression gathered from
examining his 25-year political
career is that his anti-Israel feel-
ing can be attributed to two
facts: that the Israeli leadership
took it for granted, at first, that
as a Jew he would automatically
be sympathetic and, later on,
that Israel would not heed his ad-
vice.
Not all this advice was bad.
His idea of an Israeli-Palestinian
federation has as many positive
elements, perhaps more than
In Russia
President Ronald Reagan's Mid-
dle East plan.
The problem was that the
Chancellor's advice to Israel was
always accompanied by personal
insults, which detracted from the
good sense it contained.
On the other hand, his attitude
to the Palestine Liberation
Organization has always been
unswervingly favorable.
HOW FAR this can be put
down to the constant flattery the
PLO leaders lavished on him is
hard to say, but their sycophancy
certainly came as a big contrast
to Israel's scathing remarks.
Even though Kreisky had ap-
peared seriously disappointed of
late at the inconsistency of PLO
policies. Arab leaders were
always able to dispel his doubts.
His relationship with Austria's
Jews is, at best, ambivalent.
Having opted out of the Jewish
community, he feels that he is no
longer a Jew, but merely of Jew-
ish decent.
He had many Jewish admirers,
but his anti-Israel attitude and
his tendency to play down neo-
Nazi activities and anti-Semitic
incidents in Austria led to the
Socialists' losing their majority
in the Jewish Community Coun-
cil.
Alleged 'Draft-Evader' Slated
To Stand Trial in June
A YORK iJTAi Mik-
h.i Itosenshtein. "he 21 -vear-old
son I Moscow refusenik Grigory
H senshtein. ia likely to be tried
in .lunt' lor "draft evasion.'" ac-
C( .. in National Confer-
in Soviet :' wry.
llikhail. a recent paramedical
graduate, applied for permission
to 'migrate to Israel in 1978,
ahe* his father's application for
the family was rejected four years
earlier because of alleged access
to 'state secrets." Promised an
exit permit in June, 1979, Mik-
hail never received one.
There is speculation that the
charge of draft evasion is being
used to place Mikhail and other
refuseniks in a "Catch 22" situa-
tion: many. including Mikhail,
seek exemption from military
service because it is used as a
mi ans to further delay permis-
sion to leave on the basis of state
security.
The Rosenshteins are one of a
growing number of Jewish
lamilies trying to raise their chil-
dren in a traditional, religious
manner. Grigory teaches them
history and customs, while his
wife. Natalia, instructs them in
Hebrew. They have held semi-
nars on Jewish religion and cul-
ture in their home, and celebrate
the Jewish holidays. The
youngest son, Efraim, became
Bar Mitzvan in a private cere-
mony in September, 1982.
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THE ATTITUDE of non-Jew-
ish Austrian8 towards their
Chancellor was equally am-
bivalent. They see him as a Jew
no more, no less.
However, Austrian anti-
Semitism is unprincipled. It is
summed up in the saying of Karl
Lueger, Vienna's anti-Semitic
Mayor at the turn of the century:
"It is I who decide who is a Jew."
This explains why anti-Semites
will not hesitate to buy in Jewish-
owned shops, if the price and
quality are right or vote for a
Jewish Chancellor.
It is too early to say whether
Kreisky has retired from active
politics. He intends to keep his
post as chairman of the Socialist
Party at least until the party's
next convention in August.
In the meantime, he is busy
giving instructions to his desig-
nated successor. Vice Chancellor
Fred Sinowatz. The likely out-
come of the present negotiations
in the wake of the elections is a
coalition Government made up of
the Socialists and the Rightist
Freedom Party, some of whose
supporters are former Nazis.
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration appears not
to be concerned about the
increase in its recom-
mended military and eco-
nomic assistance to Israel
voted by Senate and House
committees. But there were
indications that the
Administration hopes that
the increases can be
blocked before final
Congressional approval is
taken.
This reaction emerged after the
House Foreign Affairs Com-
mittee voted 18-5 to increase the
economic assistance to Israel for
the 1984 fiscal year from the S750
million recommended by the
Administration to $850 million,
all of it a grant.
THE COMMITTEE also
provided that the $1.7 billion in
military assistance for Israel be
split evenly between loans and
grants, at $850 million each. The
Administration had recom-
mended that only $550 million of
the military assistance be a
grant.
The Senate Foreign AftU
Committee voted the ^ 2
between grants and loans in Z\
military assistance last week 2
it approved $910 million in Z
nomic assistance to Israel
which $850 million would L
grant.
As occurred at the Senate
hearings, a State Department
representative present at tta
House committee meeting sup-
ported the Administration^'
proposals but did not oppose tat I
increase.
HOWEVER, at the State I
Department, deputy spokesman
Alan Romberg said, "We h
continued to support our pro.
posal. pointing out that vJ
believe it is sufficient to meet Ij.
reel's security requirements." He
said that "increases for Israelis
the confines of budget ceilings
run the risk of crowding om I
assistance to other countries of i
strategic importance to the Unit- (
ed Stated."
Romberg added that the House I
committee's action is "only on
step" in the Congressional
process. "The budget com-
mittees, appropriations com-
mittees and authorization com-
mittees have yet to complett
action," he noted
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Friday, May 27,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
'.
te Still Struts Like A Paratrooper
Gur Vies with Peres for Leadership of Opposition Labor Party
JOSEPH FINKLESTONE
]nion Chronicle Syndicate
Tall. powerfully-built,
rly in bearing, delibe-
in voicing his opinions,
,ve Maj. Gen. Mordecai
Etta) Gur still physically
nbolizes the roles which
I undertook in the Israeli
Xs that of paratroop
,eral and Chief of Staff.
It was Motta Gur who led the
Jitroopers in the conquest of
| Old City of Jerusalem during
11967 Six-Day War.
[ WAS to Motta Gur that the
nment and Israeli forces
J to find a solid, tough and
srprising Chief of Staff to help
ii through the disillusion-
its and traumas of the 1973
i Kippur War.
nd it was he who planned the
brated rescue operation at
bbbein 1976.
Jen. Gur is now a leading
kber of the Opposition Labor
Some of his critics con-
Gen. Mordecai Gur
sider him abrasive, and he has
not suprisingly clashed with
Menachem Begin, both while the
latter was Opposition leader and
after he became Prime Minister.
Gen. Gur is unhappy about
certain aspects of last summer's
war in Lebanon, as well as what
he regards as anti-democratic
developments within Israeli
society.
DURING HIS recent visit to
Britain, he deliberately avoided
confining himself to criticism,
emphasizing instead the overall
unity of feeling about Israel's
security needs which permeates
nearly all the country's political
parties.
He stressed that the Israeli
Labor Party does not favor the
dismantlement of Jewish settle-
ments on the West Bank nor the
withdrawal of Israeli forces from
Lebanon without first ensuring
that Palestinian terrorists will
never again endanger the lives of
citizens living in Galilee, in
northern Israel.
Gen. Gur has matured as a
politician, and likes to adopt the
tone of a national leader.
IN ISRAEL, he differs con-
siderably with Begin on the aims
of the war in Lebanon. He be-
lieves there is a feeling of despair
among sizeable sections of the
Israeli pubUc about the outcome
of the conflict a belief that the
price paid in casualties was too
high, and that the expectations
held before the war had not been
fulfilled.
The mistake, Gen. Gur
maintains, was the advance
beyond the 25 miles from the Is-
raeli border, a move against
which he and other leading mem-
bers of the Labor Party had
warned Begin a few days after
war broke out in Lebanon.
Gen. Gur does not see any
distinct advantage in unilateral
withdrawal from Lebanon by the
Israeli forces, particularly from
the Shouf Mountain area, east of
the Lebanese capital, Beirut.
This would merely provoke an
advance by the PLO and the
Syrians, he believes.
LIKE FORMER President
Itzhak Navon, Gen. Gur feels
that the strains between Sephar-
dim and Ashkenazim in Israel
will gradually disappear, and he
sees hope in the increasing
number of Sephardim occupying
important State positions.
He is far more concerned about
anti-democratic developments.
He totally rejects the claim that
Sephardi Jews are the instigators
of this trend.
On the contrary, he says, it is
for the most part the Ashkena-
zim, such as the ultra-nationalist
Gush Emunim (Block of the
Faithful), who are voicing extre-
mist views.
Gen. Gur has said that he is
worried by the opposition to open
discussion or differences of
opinion. He and two other former
Chiefs of Staff have been
denounced as "traitors" after
voicing criticism on certain
issues.
AS FAR as the Labor Party is
concerned, Gen. Gur has made no
secret of his belief that, should
Navon decide to return to the
political arena, there would be a
strong movement to encourage
the former President to assume
the party leadership.
However, should Navon choose
not to enter the political fray, and
should Shimon Peres, the current
party leader, and Itzhak Rabin
decide to stage one more fight for
the post, Gen. Gur has made it
quite clear that "they will not be
alone in the contest.'

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v. iOTV
i ne JewBn Flondian / Friday, May 27, 1983
*>
Pgf/i of Burials
Jewish Law Doesn't Require Them
By BEN GALLOB
A Conservative rabbi,
noting that unveiling rites
at tombstones often evoke
as much pain as burials,
has asserted flatly that
unveiling ceremonies are
not required by Jewish reli-
gious law, despite a wide-
spread impression that
"such a service is ordained
by Jewish law and tradi-
tion."
Editor of Polish-Yiddish Paper
Stimulated by Visitors from Abroad
By MILTON JACOBY
WARSAW (JTA) -
The new editor of the Yid-
dish weekly, Folks-Sztyme.
is Abraham Kvaterko, a
native of Warsaw, and af-
filiated with the paper since
its beginnings in 1947.
During that period he had
reported on Jewish life in
Poland. He replaced
Shmuel Tennenblatt, the
editor and driving force of
the Folks-Sztyme for many
years, until his untimely
death last September.
When the paper first was pub-
lished it consisted of eight pages
and came out four times a week.
For the past several years, it has
been a weekly, comprising nine
pages in Yiddish and three in
Polish.
Kvaterko, in an interview with
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency,
said his paper has a good re-
lationship with the government,
which subsidizes the journal to
the extent of 5 million Zlotys
($58,825) annually.
He also noted that the govern-
ment dispenses another 8 million
Zlotys for the Yiddish Kultur
Farband (with 15 clubs in various
towns and cities); and that the
Jewish Historical Institute is
also a recipient of government
funds.
During his interview, Kvaterko
focussed on the 40th anniversary
observance of the Warsaw
Ghetto uprising, noting that he
believed strongly in the coming
together of Jews from all parts of
the world to commemorate the
event. In an apparent criticism of
those who counselled Jews not to
participate, because the ob-
servance was government-spon-
sored, he said:
"IF SOMEONE wants to
make politics, that is his
privilege, but I don't believe in it.
I feel, very simply, that on a
Yahrzeit one goes to the cemetery
to mourn one's dead. I feel very
pleased that much of the Jewish
world was represented here in
Warsaw for the celebration."
Kvaterko revealed that there
had been telephoned warnings
some weeks prior to the ob-
servance that there might be an
attack on visitors. The Jewish
community asked the govern-
ment for extra protection and the
request received an immediate
positive response.
Emphasizing again that "We
feel very heartened that there
was such a turnout of Jews," he
pointed out that "all we need now
is a rabbi for our beautiful syna-
gogue. We have a shochet who
comes in from Budapest to take
care of kashrut, but if we had a
permanent rabbi, we would feel
really blessed."
KVATERKO SAID he looks
forward to the future with renew-
ed vigor and confidence after the
stimulus of the Jews who came
here from all parts of the diaspora
for a week-long visit.


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T
That assertion was made by
Rabbi Harry Epstein of Atlanta,
Ga. His statement was published
by Rabbi Arthur Oleisky in the
bulletin of Oleisky's congre-
gation, Anshei Israel in Tucson.
Arizona.
Epstein declared that, very
often, members of a family in
which a death has occurred will
ask him whether there must be a
formal unveiling ceremony of the
tombstone. He added that "to
my knowledge, there are many
families who would prefer not to
have such an unveiling service,
but they are under the impression
that such a service is ordained by
Jewish law and tradition."
HE ADDED that such
families, not wanting to violate
what they believed to be an
ordained rite, "will forego their
own reluctance and force them-
selves to schedule a public cere-
mony."
"An unveiling service is not
mentioned in any book of Jewish
codes," Epstein added. "It is a
custom that has arisen in Ameri-
can Jewish life," and, he asser-
ted, the practice should not go
unchallenged.
He declared that it was
meaningful "for a family to visit
the grave of the departed at the
time of the Yahrzeit, the anniver-
sary day of the death, and recite a
memorial prayer. But it is not
necessary for anyone else to be
there, not even a rabbi."
Epstein described as a "time-
honored custom" the practice of
setting up a tombstone at the
grave "as an act of reverence and
respect for the deceased, so that
they will not be forgotten and
their final resting plape will not
be desecrated."
HE ASSERTED that the
proper time for setting up a
tombstone is any time after 30
days of burial "but the 'unveiling
service' has no basis at all in our
ritual law. No family need feel
religiously compelled to hold a
formal unveiling service. Setting
up an appropriate tombstone and
a private visit to the grave site is
sufficient."
Epstein commented that "in
too many cases, people have been
making the tombstone setting
almost like a second funeral.
Such an occasion re-opens the
wound and causes needless
anguish. It would be a good thing
to return to the simple, private
family grave visitation."
Oleisky noted that if a family,
after having been informed that
Jewish custom does not require
the unveiling, nevertheless
insists on an "unveiling service,"
any rabbi will "gladly" serve the
wishes of that family.
IN REPRINTING Epstein's
statement, Oleisky reported that,
on a recent occasion, a member of
his family asked, "Rabbi, was it
necessary for us to hold this un-
veiling and stir up so many
feelings?" Oleisky declared that
"Often, I will observe the mem-
bers of a family so tense and so
upset that one has the feeling
that a second funeral is taking
place."
Declaring that he agreed fully
with Epstein, Oleisky reported
that he had prepared a pamphlet
that families might wish to use at
a private unveiling service,
available at the synagogue office.
Reporting that about a third of
the families in his congregation
hold unveiling services, Oleisky
declared that those families
should know they have "the
option" of either a private or
public service on such an oc-
casion.
JTA Feature Syndicate
45 Percent Increase Reported
In Immigration to Israel
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Jewish Agency reported that
1,175 immigrants arrived in Isra-
el last month, a 45.2 percent
increase over April, 1982 when
only 809 arrived. Immigration
figures for the first four months
of this year totalled 4,538, a 21.4
percent increase over the same
period last year.
Rafael Kotlowitz, head of the
Agency's immigration and ab-
sorption department, stressed
the "significant increase" from
Western countries. The arrivals
in April included 873 from the
West compared to 584 )ast year.
Immigrants from Latin Ameri-
ca numbered 309, the largest
single group from the West. The
U.S. provided 209 new immi-
grants compared to 75 a year
earlier and 108 were from Prance
which had provided only 56 im-
migrants a year ago.
But Kotlowitz noted that since
the beginning of the year, only
107 of the 421 Jews permitted to
leave the Soviet Union came to
Israel. Last month there were
only nine from the USSR, an all
time monthly low.
By contrast, Latin Am J
becoming the largest sour?
new immigrants. There I
1,082 arrivals in the fW
months of this year compart
641 in the same period last ve
rise of 69 percent.
Meanwhile, a controversy I
emerged in the Jewish AeJ
Executive over the claim bvl
of its members. Eli Artzi
Asher Ohaion. that a vast
potential exists in Asia.
Artzi, who is Director Gen
of the Absorption Ministry
Ohaion, who holds the same'
in the Ministry of Labor!
Welfare, contend that abouj
million people in Pakistani
ghanistan and India obsJ
Jewish customs, and theirT
sorption into Israel could be|
of the greatest projects since
State was founded.
The two officials made
proposal in a letter to Leon I
zin, chairman of the Jej
Agency and World Zionist I
nization Executives. But Ag
officials are skeptical.
stated flatly that these peoph
not Jews.
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Friday, May 27,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
I Professor's
Mi-Beain Organization
It Gets Going on 'Big Lie' Fund-Raiser
ICntinuedfromPagel-A
et stationery which out-
J ^ former Foreign Minis-
L longstanding position in
* n 0f dissent in the Ameri-
ijewish community as far aa
di governmental positions
icemed.
^ said that he had never
i the organization any per-
Btm to use his name in the
m He said he had strongly
ed to the action in a tele-
conversation with Alan
Kin, a well-known Washington
J consultant who is active
(organization.
Id a separate letter to Lipset,
in charged that the organiza-
isbehavior was with "no pre-
vt in my experience. I have
.er sought and do not desire
.contact with the CCAJ, and
L outrageous for you and your
jies to construct this
inary association."
JAN SAID the committee
F'fabricated notepaper with a
head: Abba Eban, The
jet, Jerusalem,' so as to give
impression that communica-
i under that letterhead
ute from me. I have no such
ler and have never seen it
He said the memorandum was
from Eban to the
"No such memorandum
|mt been drafted by me. I
r heard of the Committee of
*med American Jews until
Intention was drawn to this
ation," he said.
e Labor Member of Knesset,
I critic of the Israeli Gov-
said the memorandum
I of "words that I have
|fched in the Jerusalem Post
in communication with
organizations and pre-
I them falsely as communi-
itoyour organization."
b, Eban said, the mailing
sited funds from addresses
[manner that gives the im-
that I endorse and
Wesuch donations. I do not
I or advocate any such ac-
H A STATEMENT issued by
I CCAJ's Washington office,
^organization said: "We sin-
. regret any implication
J 1. CCAJ intends to play a
|o Israeli politics whatsoever,
- Mr. Abba Eban or any
non-American Jew has
played or will play any organiza-
tional role in CCAJ whatsoever."
IT SAID the "records" of the
individuals involved in the com-
mittee have provided it with
"public credibility," and not "the
positions of Mr. Eban or other
Israeli individuals or organiza-
tions with whom members of
CCAJ share certain values."
CCAJ's initial mailing, the
statement went on to say, "in-
cluded two statements by Abba
Eban, republished in a 'memo-
randum' format." Those two
statements came from Eban's
article last year in the Jerusalem
Post and in a separate communi-
cation he gave to American
friends of the Peace Now organi-
zation last year.
According to Eban, Baron
later had explained to him that
repackaging those separate
statements in the new form of a
memorandum to the CCAJ was
"common practice" in the United
States when used in mass mail-
ings.
But Eban, deeply upset by the
entire incident, did not accept
that explanation. The entire
matter had become politically ex-
plosive in Israel after Israeli
newspapers charged that Eban
was encouraging American Jews
to interfere both politically and
financially in domestic Israeli
politics.
LIPSET, in a separate reply to
Eban, blamed the Washington
office of the CCAJ for "manufac-
turing" the memorandum with-
out Eban's permission. Baron,
for his part, simply said there had
been a big misunderstanding.
Other Jews involved in the for-
mation of the committee include
David Cohen, the former presi-
dent of Common Cause, the
liberal citizens' action lobby;
Jocelyn Wurzburg, a member of
the Social Action Commission of
Reform Judaism; and Jonathon
J. Cohen, founder and president
of the New Israel Fund.
Baron, in his statement, said
that CCAJ is a non-profit, non-
political organization and "is
prohibited by U.S. law from po-
litical activities in either the
United States or in Israel."
"Because many CCAJ leaders
have expertise in organizing non-
partisan, citizen movements, it is
CCAJ's intention to make this
expertise available, at no cost, to
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non-partisan citizen movements
in Israel which share the basic
values of CCAJ," his statement
said, in an apparent reference to
Peace Now and other similar
groups in Israel which oppose the
Israeli Government's West Bank
policies.
BARON NOTED that the "use
of American expertise is no inno-
vation in Israel where both the
Labor and Likud parties have re-
tained political consultants, such
as David Garth and David
Sawyer."
In addition, he said, the
CCAJ's "major activities will be
focused on educating American
Jews as to the diversity of opin-
ions expressed concerning op-
tions available in solving the
problems facing Israel, America
and the Jewish community."
The CCAJ fund-raising letter
pointed out that contributions
are tax-deductible. "Send the en-
closed 'Message to Abba Eban'
back to me in Washington," Lip-
set said in the letter. "I will see
that your message, with those of
thousands of other concerned
Americans, is delivered personal-
ly to Abba Eban. He and other
Israelis of conscience will be
greatly encouraged by your sup-
port."
Lipset added: "Together, we
who love Israel can make a differ-
ence. We can do our part to avert
the potential of calamity. We
must do no less."
LIPSET, in the mass mailing,
said he was "deeply concerned
about some efforts in the
organized American Jewish com-
munity to silence discussion of
critical issues affecting Israel and
to question the motives of those
who dissent." He said the CCAJ
"has been created to foster a new
environment of open, healthy
discussion, in the American Jew-
ish community and to provide
critical assistance to Israelis
working for peace, and for the
kind of society (the late U.S.
Supreme Court Justice Louis)
Brandeis envisioned."
Lipset, who chairs the Execu-
tive Committee of the B'nai
B'rith Hillel Commission and the
Faculty Advisory Committee of
the United Jewish Appeal, said
that "debate and dissent are
Jewish traditions." He added
that "all too often these days we
find that our convictions about
Israel and American democracy
are not reflected enough in the
comments of some 'spokesmen'
for the American Jewish com-
munity. And certainly not by
those who have allied themselves
with leaders of the 'Moral
Majority.' That is a critical
reason for the creation of the
Committee of Concerned Ameri-
can Jews."
Mounties
Investigate
TORONTO There
are currently 100 investigations
being conducted by the Royal
Canadian Mounted Police into
possible extradition of Nazi war
criminals living in Canada,
Solicitor-General Robert Kaplan
disclosed here.
The Cabinet Minister, address-
ing a B'nai B'rith covenant
breakfast, said the issue of
former Nazis living in Canada is
still a priority for the govern-
ment. But until new avenues are
established to deal with
suspected war criminals, the
federal government will concen-
trate its efforts on extradition, he
said. It is, however, open to new
arguments on how to deal with
the matter, but for the time being
it is not convinced that there are
any, Kaplan added.
Tuition Tax Credits
Unconstitutional -AJCong.
NEW YORK A policy
of granting tuition tax
credits to parents of private
school students would be
unconstitutional and even-
tually would turn religious
schools into "variants" of
public schools, undermin-
ing their ability to teach
sectarian doctrines as they
seet fit, an American Jew-
ish Congress official has
warned.
Testifying befo*-e the Senate's
Committee on Finance, Nathan
Z. Dershowitz, director of the
Commission on Law and Social
Action of AJCongress, said the
Administration's proposed tui-
tion tax credit bill, if passed,
"would be the first national legis-
lation which fundamentally over-
rides and seeks to manipulate the
conduct of sectarian schools." He
termed the bill "blatantly uncon-
stitutional under existing deci-
sions of the Supreme Court."
UNDER THE proposed legis-
lation. Congress would deny tui-
tion tax credits to parents who
send their children to institutions
that practice racial discrimina-
tion. Under the same principle of
law, Dershowitz noted, Congress
could deny tax benefits in the
case of private schools that dis-
criminate on the basis of sex,
physical handicap or even reli-
gion.
Dershowitz explained that the
power of the federal government
"to inject itself into sectarian
' schools in a very dangerous
power." He pointed out that
Jewish and other religious
schools have flourished "because
of the strong belief on the part of
parents and religious leaders that
they have an absolute right to
teach their children in manners
consistent with their religion."
He said such a policy is cur-
rently "legitimate, acceptable
and commendable" becaust-
neither parents nor religious
schools receive federal money and
"therefore are constitutionally
entitled to run the schools in tn<'
manner they wish." except for
factors relating to safety and
health.
IF CONGRESS were to use
the power to give or take away
tuition tax credits in order to get
religious schools to conform to
government views of educational
standards and policies, Mr. Der-
showitz asserted, "we would
expect that in future years, sec-
tarian schools would not be sec-
tarian in the way that we know
them today, but eventually
would turn into variants of public
schools, denigrating their ability
to *" ch the religious message in
tht inner in which they wish to
undertake."
He said that even if fear of a
political backlash restrained
Congress from interference in re-
ligious school affairs under a
tuition tax credit system,
litigation by private individuals
or groups might force the gov-
ernment to involve itself in the
regulation of such institutions.
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r
PagajlfcA. Th3^rhF!drtdaSi/Friday, Mhy 27,1983 .
Subtle Changes in
Arabs'Psuche
Military Misadventures Taming Them
\&sft$Aoo9L
By ARNOLD AGES
TORONTO (JTA) -
Raphael Patai, the first
man to receive a PhD from
the Hebrew University
(1935) and the author of
more than a dozen books,
including the much ac-
claimed "The Arab Mind"
(1973), says that there have
been some subtle changes
occurring in the psyche of
the Arab world as a conse-
quence of the frequent mili-
tary encounters with Israel.
Patai, an anthropologist who
has studied Mid-eastern culture,
suggests that a new form of
sobriety, entirely uncharacterist-
ic of the Arab mind, is now part
of the world of discourse among
Arab intellectuals.
THE ISRAELI-trained schol-
ar, who now resides in the United
States, makes this observation in
a new paper-back edition of his
much heralded work on the Arab
mind. In the preface to the book
published by Scribners, Patai
says that for the first time demo-
cratic sentiments are being ex-
pressed by Arab writers.
He quotes the former Kuwaiti
Minister of Finance, Abdul Rah-
man Al-Atiqi, as being one of the
latter. Al-Atiqi has publicly
deplored the "constant oppres-
sion" under which Arabs live,
contrasting this deplorable state
with the democratic freedom of
Israel where people have the
right "to criticize their own
leader."
Patai indicates that AI-Atiqi's
statement, made just recently, is
unprecedented and that it bodes
well because heretofore Arab ex-
planations of Israeli successes
have all been based on presump-
tions of superior Israeli resources
and technology. The infusion of
democratic ideals can only help
moderate the tensions in the
Mideast, Patai indicates.
IN HIS survey of events which
have convulsed the Arab world
since the first edition of his book
appeared in 1973, Patai notes
that the euphoria which the
Arabs experienced in the wake of
their partial victory during the
Yom Kippur War, has all but dis-
sipated. Dreams of conquest, the
restoration of Arab dignity, Arab
unity all these have given way
to a more sober rendering of
reality.
His reading of the Arab press
leads Patai to conclude that Arab
intellectuals are becoming far
more sober in their criticisms of
traditional Arab rigidities in lan-
guage, thought and action. The
tendency towards mubalagha,
hyperbolic speech and exagger-
ated rhetoric, while still part of
Arab cultural patterns, is
becoming more muted in recent
times.
One factor which militates
against further progress on this
front is the economic power
which the Arabs have obtained
through petrodollars. The trans-
ference of vast sums of money to
the oil-rich states have fuelled il-
lusions about a return to the kind
of hegemony which the Arab-
Muslim civilization enjoyed
during the pre-medieval period.
"WHAT IT has done to Arab
pride cannot be underestimated,"
says Patai. "Yet at the same
time, the financial power which
the Arabs havelacquired.is fright-
ening, because the responsible
attitude, which alone can make
such power beneficial, could not
be acquired as rapidly as the
wealth itself."
On the plus side of the ledger,
Patai notes that the Arab world,
so long resentful of the techno-
logical advances of the West, has
finally come to an accommoda-
tion with it. This has been ef-
fected in part through the simple
purchase of Western technology
and know-how, and it remains for
the Arab world to integrate these
advances within "the context of
Arab culture."
Patai is also impressed by the
progress which has been made by
women in Arab society. While tM
concept of women's liberation, in
the Western sense of the word, is
unknown in Arab lands, there has
been a rapid improvement in
recent years in women's rights.
Patai makes this statement
after years of monitoring both
the popular and scholarly publi-
cations emanating from Arab
countries. Arab women them-
selves are becoming more
vociferous in denouncing injus-
tices against their sex and in de-
manding more equitable treat-
ment from a male dominated cul-
ture.
IN ONE area, Patai finds little
or no change in the Arab psyche
"conflict proneness." Since
the 1970's, Patai observes that
*Ffl
TOllC
P6.RK
,,*ATER
f SHORTAGE
SERKHJd
D*0U6HT
Le*-fc
\- s S J i^.
Arab countries have been in-
volved in 11 different armed con-
flicts which have drawn the
bloody participation of Jordan,
Syria, Libya, South Yemen,
Oman, Iraq, Morocco, Algeria,
Egypt, Lebanon, Chad and, non-
Arab Iran.
Patai traces the origin of these
conflicts to the obsessive pursuit
among the Arabs of the elusive
"unity," the mystical oneness
to which the Arabs aspire but
TheDly|
which is inevitably beyond I
reach.
The famous anthropolc6W
lieves that the Arabs will be]
to cope successfully with <
ordeal of modernity only *.
they rid themselves of theil
session and hatred of .
and can overcome their _
proneness. "and can devotet
best talents not to fighting w
mills, but to constructing the I
Arab man."
They Aim to Enhance Understands
NEW YORK (JTA) A
group of prominent Americans
and Israelis, led by former Presi-
dential assistant Stuart Eizen-
stat and former Knesset member
S. Zalman Abramov, met recent-
ly in Jerusalem to plan programs
aimed at enhancing understand-
ing between the American Jet
community and Israel. Itwa
first joint meeting of the la
and American advisory I
the recently formed InstituM
American Jewish-Israeli
tions, an arm of the
Jewish Committee.
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the Bookshelf
A Bag of Less
Consequential Books
Friday, May 37,1,883/ The tfwh JTaridian P*g 13-A
V*V
7 >
.MORTON I. TEICHER
ah Fbridian Book Editor
j more books of Jewish in-
J are published each year
ian possibly be reviewed in
[limited space. Accordingly,
\ time to time, as today, we
give brief mention to a
j of volumes.
Zionists and British
_ The Communal Politics
|Anglo-Jewry, 1895-1920. By
A. Cohen. Princeton,
Princeton University
W, 1982.349 Pp., $32.50.
Li is a tedious and circum-
al account of the struggle
en Zionists and anti-Zion-
lin England from the time
iHerzl first visited London in
1 until Great Britain became
ndatory power in Palestine
0. It was a period that in-
I two significant events for
n: the 1903 British offer of
lin East Africa for a Jewish
ent and the Balfour Dec-
tonof 1917.
. occurrences are de-
d, but they are given less
lion than the in-fighting
British Jews. These
gles are chronicled in great
, proving the old adage of
|Jews having three syna-
i to perpetrate their dis-
lents and to have one
they would not deign to
i great achievement of the
lir Declaration and Chaim
ban's important role is sub-
fcted by the author to con-
Tor communal power among
PJI minor figures. Their
seem like academic
i "here the fighting is so
Ibecause the stakes are so
Jre of Moses: The Emer-
: of Rabbinic Interpreta-
n Modern Literary
By Susan A. Handle-
Albany: Albany State
Jwsity of New York Press,
276Pp., $12.95 (Paper-
justs in literary criticism
1 this book of interest. It
i that their art might be
a if they followed the tra-
|f interpretation as prac-
' our Rabbinic ancestors.
In analogy is drawn be-
m Rabbinic search for
1 m Biblical texts and the
tion method of osv-
fiysis.
literary theory has a
number of scholars
who ignore ordinary people as
they converse and write for each
other in an impenetrable jargon.
With the publication of this in-
comprehensible book, Susan A.
Handleman has joined that select
circle.
Judaism: Development and Life.
By Leo Trepp. Belmont, Calif.:
Wadsworth Publishing Com-
pany, 1982. 365 Pp., $11.95
(Paperback).
This is the third edition of a
general text on Judaism, origi-
nally published in 1974. Since it
has been reprinted three times,
some readers obviously find it
useful. Its comprehensiveness is
both appealing and a major
drawback. Too much is covered
too quickly. However, the author
has succeeded in achieving what
he set out to do to provide an
introduction to Judaism for Jews
and Christians who have little
previous knowledge about the
subject. The book dashes once-
over lightly Jewish history,
Jewish customs, Jewish religion
the Torah, the Talmud, the Holo-
caust, the Sabbath, etc., etc.
The Destined Hour: The Hostage
Crisis and One Family's Or-
deal. By Barbara and Barry
Rosen, with George Feifer.
Garden City, N.Y.: Doubleday
and Co., 1982. 328 Pp., $17.95.
During the last two months of
1979, all of 1980 and the first
month of 1981, our minds turned
constantly to the American hos-
tages in our Teheran embassy.
Those trying months are vividly
recalled by this account, written
from the viewpoint of a hostage
and a wife who waited for his re-
turn. Reference is made to their
intermarriage and to the special
problems of Barbara with her
Jewish mother-in-law. The book
describes their experiences, their
stresses and their strains. It is a
useful, human record of an event
that we have forgotten too
quickly.
Day by Day in Jewish History: A
Chronology and Calendar of
Historic Events. By Abraham
P. Blorh. New York: Ktav
Publishing House, 1983. 336
Pp., $12.50.
This reference, arranged by
Jewish months, gives a day-by-
day, year-by-year listing of
events in Jewish history from
Biblical times to the present. It
was a monumental task to com-
pile the list and the author is to
be congratulated for his accom-
plishment.
\LReaders Write
V Resolution Deserves
To Be Approved
*TheJewish Fbridian:
d to my resolution of-
n.he Jew>sh War
"epartment of Florida,
F urgent that we recog
a Pubhcize the fact that
"Wute less than three
'in'86
[AVIV ,JTA) The
^ of Israel's new Lavie
e should be flying by
"ling to Defense Min-
P Arena. He told Labor
^ers that $100 million
W been invested in the
hB'Planning work, and
ld-T?nmintb*vet<>b<5
l^Wopment work before
B takes to the air.
percent of our nation's popula-
tion. Still, over one million Jew-
ish men and women have served
in the Armed Forces of the
United States in times of war.
from the struggle for Indepen-
dence beginning in 1776 to Viet-
nam less than a decade ago.
My resolution advocates col-
lecting one million pennies in
their honor. The pennies will be
donated to the Jewish War
Veterans National Shrine in
Washington, D.C. The resolution
will be voted upon at the JWV
Department of Florida conven-
tion June 3-5 at the Hyatt Hotel
in Palm Beach.
MORTON TODD
Cqsamandor
Abe HorrowHi Post
Jewish War Veterans
Pretoria News
Leo Mindlin
Hitler and Weakness of History
Continued from Page 4-A
"newly-discovered" artifact of
history, the truth is that, like the
rest of the world, he did give in.
The glamor of a genuine set of
Hitler diaries, their pricelessness
and the trumping of previous his-
tory all appear to have overcome
him as dreamed-of possibilities.
TREVOR-ROPER gave in to
the high-powered public relations
pressures of the chroniclers of
currencythe pseudo-sophisti-
cates of the journalistic trade
who record the present moment
as they see it and who intimidate
us into believing in its reality and
the excitement with which they
invest it. In this, Trevor-Roper
appears to have momentarily lost
his academic discipline and judg-
ment by mistaking the journal-
istic process for history itself,
which can never be nearly as ex-
citing as the phony thing.
In pronouncing the forged Hit-
ler diaries as real because Der
Stern presented it as real, Trevor-
Roper trivialized his own profes-
sion and encouraged a momen-
tary global rush toward yet
another saga in the malevolent
annals of revisionism in history,
this time, journalistic revision-
ism.
Why the global rush to accept
the Hitler diaries, though from
the outset, they reeked with the
stink of forgery? Perhaps they
represented an alternative to fly-
ing saucers or the return to the
Gentiles of Jesus as Christosa
relief from the boredom of self-
destruction through war and the
never-ending threat of more war.
WHATEVER THE reason,
people were readyand they are
still ready for something new
and exciting, say, Hitler found
still alive and plotting in Para-
guay.
Almost immediately, other
historians quickly warned
Trevor-Roper that he had spoken
too soon, that he was likely
wrong about the diaries, that he
should reconsider and "say it
ain't so."
To his credit, Trevor-Roper did
just that, apologizing more for
his affront to the historical
process than for his spurious con
elusions. But by then, it was too
late. The Hitler devil, despite the
picture of him in the diaries to the
contrary, was let out, and it is
among us again stronger than
ever since his demise.
Levin Accuses State Dep't. of Failing
To Report PLO Violation of Agreement
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Sen. Carl Levin
(D., Mich.) has accused the
State Department of failing
to make public that it knew
some 300-600 Palestine
Liberation Organization
"fighters" had remained in
west Beirut last September
following the agreement for
the evacuation of all PLO
terrorists.
"I believe the way the State
Department has conducted itself
in this matter is further evidence
of a tilt by the Administration
away from Israel," Levin said in
entering into the Congressional
Record a series of letters between
him and Lawrence Eagleburger,
Deputy Undersecretary of State
for Political Affairs.
LEVIN SAID that after he
and other Senators were told
about the PLO terrorists,
Eagleburger promised to make
the information public. He said
he was entering the letters, which
date from Sept. 24 to March 22,
to "set the historical record
straight with regard to what the
State Department knew about
the PLO presence in west Beirut
when Israel moved in, and how it
distorted public perception at the
time and since then by its refusal
to make the information known."
Israeli troops moved into west
Beirut Sept. IB following the as-
sassination of Lebanese Presi-
dent-elect Bashir Gemayel.
In a letter to Eagleburger Sept.
24, Levin noted that on Sept. 1
Eagleburger assured Senators at
a briefing that "if the State De-
partment had not that day
already stated that the PLO kept
300-600 armed personnel in
Beirut" in violation of the agree-
ment worked out by special
envoy Philip Habib, "the State
Department would do so
promptly."
LEVIN WROTE another letter
on Jan. 11 again asking that the
information be made public. He
received a reply Feb. 4 from
Powell Moore, Assistant Secre-
tary of State for Congressional
Relations, which talked about
PLO "combatants" having "re-
infiltrated into Lebanon."
After another letter to
Eagleburger Mar. 1, Levin re-
ceived a reply from Eagleburger
Mar. 22 in which the State De-
partment official said "last Sept.
17, I informed you and your col-
leagues that according to U.S. in-
telligence estimates, 300-600
armed PLO fighters remained in
Beirut in violation of the agree-
ment negotiated by Ambassador
Habib."
Eagleburger said that he told
the Senators that the State De-
partment spokesman would make
the information public if the
press asked about it but the
question was never raised. "The
Department was remiss in not
taking direct steps to make our
assessment public immediately
following my testimony," Eagle-
burger admitted. But he added
that because of the "fast break-
ing developments in Beirut," this
issue "was soon eclipsed by other
developments."
Levin said he finds "rather dis-
turbing" Eagleburger's explana-
tion that the reporters did not
ask about the issue "when the
media hadn't even known about
it."
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ucniauriuiHiuui rriuay,iviay ^, issoo
Bible Substantiates Roman Baths...
Ancient Jewish History,
Archaeologist Declares
Continued from Page 5-A
tradition is so strongly embedded
in the Bible. I don't believe that
it was invented."
*I STILL believe the Bible
records the main, the salient
events in the history of my an-
cestors. If someone attacks the
Bible, saying that it is not histo-
ry (I'm not talking about the
early parts of Genesis but the
historical books), that it is non-
sense and fiction, then I say that
archaeology has increased my
belief that basically the historical
parts of the Bible are ture. No
doubt of that."
Yadin said in bis interview
with the Biblical Archaeological
Review that the more digging he
has been involved in, the more he
has come to the conclusion that
Biblical history is correct. "It is
true that if you understand the
Bible literally there axe apparent
contradictions. But if you look at
the more general sweep, it is ac-
curate. I think archaeology has
actually given me, subjectively, a
greater respect for the Bible."
While differentiating the mate-
rials involved, Yadin also pointed
out that many of the ancient
Refusenik's
Trial Held
NEW YORK (JTA) The
National Conference on Soviet
Jewry has reported that Lev
Elbert, a 35-year-old refusenik
activist from Kiev, was scheduled
to be tried for "draft evasion" on
Wednesday.
Elbert refused to comply with
en unusual draft summons or-
e-ring him to begin reserve duty
on Apr. 6. Su< h duty is generally
served only b high-ranking offi-
cers. Elbert. .vho completed his
term as a priv .le in the- army nine
years ago. ap "area" at the draft
office to reqt st that he not be
sent to a secret unit. His request
was denied and the summons
issued.
Elbert v. denied an answer
by militar* uthorities to his
question o u .'ning the reasons
for the sun n n.-. unusual at his
age. The denial was given under
the pretext of state security.
Refusal to comply carries a
penalty of one year in prison.
Elbert. hi wife, Inna, and their
son, Karmi. have been waiting
since August. 1976, for permis-
sion to emigrate to Israel.
texts at one time thought to have
been unreliable historically, have
turned out to be remarkable ac-
curate historical chronicles.
Yadin cited Josephus, the Jewish
historian, in this regard.
ONE OP the problems current-
ly perplexing the famed Israeli
archaeologist is the tendency
found among certain of his col-
leagues to avoid using the term,
"Biblical archaeology." Yadin
told Shanks that there is a trend
in his discipline to substitute
"Syro- Palestinian" as the
preferred term.
Yadin feels that this is intellec-
tually suspect because it implies
that it would be possible to study
his discipline without full
mastery of the Hebrew Bible. It
would be like studying Egyptian
archaeology without being an
Egyptologist. Yadin indicated to
Shanks that the use of the term
"Syro-Palestinian" has political
resonances that are obvious and
can be used to open doors for
exacavations in Jordan and
Syria.
With regard to bis future ar-
chaeological endeavours, Yadin
told interviewer Shanks that he
wants to pursue the search for
written evidence of civilizational
activities during the Biblical
period other than the Bible.
Yadin explains the paucity of
available archives on the grounds
that the air of Palestine, unlike
that of Egypt, was humid;
papyrus records did not retain
their life for very long.
NEVERTHELESS, Yadin
hopes that excavations at Hazor
will eventually produce evidence
of this extra-Biblical literary ac-
tivity. "If we find letters in
Egypt from the king of Hazor,
there must have been an archive
of that king in Hazor. Those peo-
ple must have kept copies of their
letters ... I want to go back to
Hazor. I know where the archive
is."
In the interview, editor Shanks
queried Yadin on the difference
between his former life as an
active politician and his current
scholarly preoccupations. Yadin
replied that scholars can never
lie. In politics, however, white
lies are permitted.
"But I found that very diffi-
cult. I couldn't play the game, by
the rules of the game of the polit-
ician. That was I think my
greatest weakness. I suddenly
found myself in a jungle. If you
can't play by the rules of the
jungle, then you are prey for
other animals."
rt
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... And Florida Alligators inAntiquU
Continued from Page 5-A
pool; the Tepidarium the
lukewarm water pool; and the
Caldarium the hot water pool;
were all constructed so as best to
utilize the hot water of the
natural springs.
The genius of Roman engin-
eering is evident everywhere.
Extensive use was made of lead
pipes for water supply and
drainage; there were intricate
heating and cooling systems, and
a whole array of sophisticated
accessories were used by the
Roman designers in their attempt
to create optimum bathing condi-
tions.
THE HALL of Pillars, is
possibly the most magnificent of
all. This was the "Tepidarium,"
which held the most comfortable
water temperature of all pools.
Two rows of pillars once sup-
ported an enormous roof that
reached 14 meters above the
floor. It is awesome to realize
that the roof rose another 18 feet
above the reconstructed arch.
The Hall of Pillars has been
identified as the site of the
famous orgies, without which no
self-respecting Roman bath
would be complete.
The discovery of the Lepers'
Pool caused considerable excite-
ment among the archaeological
community, since the pool
matches exactly the description
recorded by the 6th Century
traveler, Antonius Plakentia,
who visited the site in 570: "Next
to the hot pool is a large bath
that, after being filled, all of the
doors are closed and the lepers
are brought in through the en-
trance with candles and incense,
and in this bath they sit all night.
When they fall asleep the ones to
be healed see visions ."
This small pool is the only one
with doors on all four sides, and
among the assortment of ar-
chaeological remains found here
were ceramic holders. The
existence of a Lepers' Pool im-
plies that there must have been
separate accommodation for
these unfortunates.
THE NEW Oval Pool and the
larger Caldarium Oval Pool were
intended for hot water bathing.
Both have been particularly well
preserved. This structure
originally had a 30-foot ceiling,
and was undoubtedly one of the
most luxurious and grandiose
buildings of its time. Plans are
under way to pump water
through plastic pipes (instead of
Minister Says
He Has Support
JERUSALEM (JTA) Fi-
nance Minister Yoram Aridor,
under heavy fire recently for de-
teriorating economic conditions,
has declared that he has the full
support of the government and
the Prime Minister and an-
nounced measures to restore
public confidence in his policies.
Appearing on a television in-
terview, Aridor said he has no in-
tention of quitting and claimed
that compared to Finance Minis-
ters who preceded him, he was in
fact popular. He blamed Israel's
economic difficulties on the cur-
rent world recess but rejected
suggestions that the Shekel
should he devalued at a more
rapid pace to help exports be-
cause that would only lead to
higher inflation. Israel bad had
triple digit inflation since the be-
ginning of the year.
Aridor's confidence-building
measures include a promise not
to renew the compulsory "loan"
to finance the war in Lebanon
which is deducted from workers'
paychecks and abolition of the
two percent tax on over-sub
scribed stock issues.
the original lead pipes to avoid
poisoning) into the Oval Pool, to
enable the modern bather to
enjoy the identical pleasures
experienced by Roman bathers.
But Hammat Gader is much
more than archaeology. It is a
tourist park with acres of lush
gardens, picnic grounds, natural
swimming pools fed by warm
mineral water, waterfalls and a
restaurant serving delicious
meals at low prices. More than
one thousand visitors a day visit
the site, and, of course, they also
come to see the alligators.
A sideline at Hammat Gader is
its Alligator Park. A few .
ago, more than 100 alii
were flown from Florida tolsr
and they are here in enclosu
pools and lakes where thev
separated by age group, andItfc
progress and growth examm,
by scientists Guy Ben Mosfcl
former New Yorker, is in chT
of Hammat Gader's ilMgZ
He shows us a baby/just
weeks old, that resides at pre*
in a turquoise plastic bucket
stroke it, it wriggles, we place!
back in water. His name? Wl
else but Rishon Lezion (The FL
in Zion), a fitting name for I
first alligator born in Israel.
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O r\ \ *-. f-i rr%g\ Ki
K8CI ,TSyV >4WH*>*5T. sin; *-U igB-
I Friday, May 27,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 16-A

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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 27, 1983
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NHt V WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS


Debby Grodnick
Jack H. Levine
jtodnick, Levine Named to
leceive 1983 Myers Awards
Debby Grodnkk and Jack H.
/vine have been named to re-
ave 1983 Stanley C. Myers
.sidents Leadership Awards
jounced Norman H. Lipoff.
esident of Greater Miami Jew-
k Federation.
The awards will be formally
wented to Grodnick and
,ine during Federation's 45th
imual Meeting on Tuesday eve-
bg. June 7, at the Federation
wilding.
[Established in 1957, the
ards are presented each year
Federation in recognition of
ung adults who have shown
dication to Federation, its
npaign. and its constituent
ncies. The awards were named
fhonor of Federation's founding
sident, Stanley C. Myers, who
witly serves as chairman of
roject Renewal Committee.
I Grodnick is a member of
derations Women's Division,
I she organized the Division's
uthwest Dade Board, which
) chaired for two years and
ved as 1983 Nominating Com-
ittee chairwoman.
| She also serves as vice chair-
lof Federation's South Dade
nch, is a member of Planning
I Budgeting Committee, and a
member of Jewish Junior
gh School of South Florida,
ntral Agency for Jewish

Education, and the Jewish Voca-
tional Service.
Levine has served as a member
of UJA Young Leadership
Development and Camp Judea
Committee, and was chairman of
1982 UJA National Singles
"Hatikvah" Mission to Israel.
He has held a number of posi-
tions within Federation, includ-
ing Young Adult Division chair-
man, board of directors member,
member of Planning and Budget
Committee and its Group Serv-
ices Subcommittee, Leadership
Development Committee mem-
ber, chairman of 1983 Young
Business and Professional Cam-
paign Cocktail Reception, and
vice chairman of Chazak Pro-
gram.
He also has served as a mem-
ber of Hadassah Florida Zionist
Youth Commission, B'nai B'rith
Koach Lodge, and Joshua
Society National Action Com-
mittee-Political Action Commit-
tee.
"We are extremely proud of
Debby and Jack, who have
served the Jewish community
with great dedication and devo-
tion," Lipoff said. "The qualities
and skills they exemplify assure
us of a vital and knowledgeable
Jewish leadership in years to
come."
\ *'*,
t*m above receiving a plaque commemorating a resolution of
>"! for Ethiopian Jewry, on behalf of his father, is Ben-
>'" Begin, center, son of Israel Prime Minister Menachem
pt Also shown are Ted Cohen of Social Action Committee
WempleAdath Yeshurun, left; and Rabbi Simcha Freedman,
ritual leader of Adath Yeshurun.
Plaque Meant for Begin Two
Years Ago Presented to His Son
plaque commemorating a
'lution of concern for Falasha
"y, sponsored by Rabbinical
[<*iation of Greater Miami
jcp-sponsored by American
Ration for Ethiopian Jewry,
g"^ly to be presented to Is-
F Prime Minister Menachem
Bin in Washington two years
F*as recently presented to his
Benjamin Begin, when he
r" North Miami Beach.
fewy Parness, Lilly Stone.
'Rabbi Simcha Freedman,
^f] 'fader of Temple Adath
Yeshurun. first thought of the
resolution two years ago when
Prime Minister Begin was
scheduled to visit, and Mrs.
Stone's son, Florida Senator
Richard Stone, was set to make
the presentation to the Prime
Minister in Washington.
Begin's trip was cancelled, and
the plaque remained in Senator
Stone's office. Benjamin Begin
received the plaque on behalf of
his father from Rabbi Freedman
and spoke of the bonds linking
Jews around the world.
dfewislhi Floridliaim
Kreutzer Hosts United Synagogue
Council of Presidents Confab on Beach
Southeast Region of United
Synagogue of America and its
president, Franklin D. Kreutzer
of Miami will host an annual
Council of Regional Presidents
Conference of United Synagogue
of America over Memorial Day
weekend. Every year, the Council
meets in a different region of the
U.S. to study and analyze the
current status of the Conserva-
tive movement of Judaism.
Harold Wishna, executive direc-
tor of Southeast Region, is local
conference coordinator.
Presidents will meet at the
Eden Roc Hotel for conferences,
seminars, and symposiums for a
five-day weekend. Beginning
with a bus tour of Dade County
and a dinner at the home of Judy
and Frank Kreutzer. the con-
ference will feature an opening
address by Alan Ades of Boston,
chairman of Council of Regional
Presidents. He will speak on
"Where are we? Where should we
be? How do we get there?"
Council Steering Committee,
Rabbi, Priest, Chaplin
To Discuss Marriage
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff,
spiritual leader of Temple Bet
Breira, Reverend Luther Jones,
chaplin at Jackson Memorial
Hospital, and Father Andrew
Anderson, priest at St. Louis
Parish, will be featured guests on
WPBT-Channel 2's public affairs
program. Viewpoint.
With host, Del Frank, they will
examine moral issues involving
marriage. Extra-marital sex,
divorce, and co-habitation will be
among the topics explored.
The show will air Thursday,
May 26 at 10:30 p.m., to be
repeated Saturday, May 28 at 3
p.m.
Franklin D. Kreutzer
consisting of M. Milo Mandel of
Los Angeles, Carol Sher of
Quebec. Canada. Kreutzer, and
Ades. will participate in discus-
sions on synagogue standards,
financing the movement, con-
veying the message of the move-
ment, and individual congre-
gants.
Marshall Wolke of Chicago,
central president of United Syna-
gogue, and Rabbi Benjamin Z.
Kreitman of New York, executive
vice president, will later parti-
cipate in a dialogue with the
regional presidents on the future
of the Conservative movement. A
presentation will also be featured
by Fritz Mint/, of Los Angeles,
chairman of Community on
Standards, on responsibilities of
the individual synagogues.
Rabbi Jerome Epstein of New
York, director of Department of
Regional Activities, will conduct
a session with Ades on program-
ming for regional structure, and
Harry Silverman of New York,
assistant director of regional
activities, will coordinate reli-
gious services.
Abraham J. Gittelson of
Miami, will later conduct study
sessions regarding "The Jewish
Family" and will analyze and
provide guidelines for synagogue
responsibility and planning.
Other participants and discus-
sion leaders will be Judy Sufrin ol
Pittsburgh; Mark Samuels of
Hollywood. Calif.; Alan Tichnor
of Newton, Mass.; Dr. Saul
Shapiro of White Plains. N.Y.;
and Max Goldberg of
Washington.
Plans for an upcoming Bien-
nial Convention, which will be
held Nov. 13-17, at the Concord
Hotel in N.Y., will be discussed,
and Kreutzer. convention co-
chairman, will also discuss
programming.
General Uzi Narkiss, com-
mander of Central Military
Region of Israel's defense
forces during the 1967 Six
Day War who was in charge of
troops who liberated Jeru-
salem June 7, will be guest of
honor and principal speaker at
a community-wide rally cele-
brating Yom Yerushalayim
(Jerusalem Day) Sunday at 2
p.m. at Temple Emanu-EL
*Cr*
Every floor in every store is brimming
with brisk savings. You'll find
outstanding values on everything you
need for your family and home.
Hurry in early for the best selection.
Sorry, no mail or phone orders
prdarv
-Tnarsn
I a jfiO* *u*D vOli
J|| Florida-Friday, May 27,1983
Section B
Use vour Jordan Marsh charge card, American Express, Dme'S Club We welcome them atll
SHOP JM DAILY. 10 AM TO 9 PM: SUNDAY. 12 NOON TO 5:30 PM


Page 2-B^ Ths^ewlsfe-floridiany Friday, May 27, 1983
..... ... -
T".
Congratulating Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged's "Volunteers of the Year," Mr. and Mrs. Theodore
Goldstein, right, are Judge Irving Cypen, chairman of the
board of directors, and Ann Berner, director of volunteers.
Recognition Lunch Honored Jewish
Home's Volunteers of the Year*
Mr. and Mra. Theodore
Goldstein have been selected by
the board of directors and ad-
ministrators of Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
as "Volunteers of the Year."
They were presented a plaque by
Marc Lichtman. associate
director of the Home, at an
Annual Volunteer Recognition
Luncheon.
The Goldsteins have volun-
teered every Monday and
Wednesday for the past two-and-
one-half years. Goldstein works
in the gift shop, and Mrs.
Goldstein, throughout the Home
as a "friendly visitor."
Irving Beck. "Volunteer of the
Year" for 1981. was also recog-
nized for contributing the
greatest amount of hours this
year. 1,194.
Goldstein is past president of
Civic League of Miami Beach and
North Dade Kiwanis and has
served on the board of directors
of Variety Children's Hospital.
Mrs. Goldstein has served as a
volunteer "friendly visitor" at
Scranton Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged in Penn-
sylvania previously.
"The Miami Jewish Home is
extremely fortunate to have such
a uniquely dedicated group of
volunteers," stated Fred D. Hirt,
executive director. "The compas-
sion and warmth they share with
our residents is irreplaceable"
Ann Berner, director of volun-
teers, said, "Our Home is con-
sidered a quality facility due in
large part to one of our most
valuable resources the volun-
teers who care about and love our
residents."
legion to Host
Observance
City of Miami Beach will com-
memorate Memorial Day with
ceremonies at the Cenotaph on
Washington Avenue, adjacent to
Old City Hall. Monday, starting
at 10:30 a.m. Beach officials will
attend.
Miami Beach American Legion
Post 85 is coordinating the event
with other civic and veteran
organizations, including Disabled
American Veterans, Jewish War
Veterans, Veterans of Foreign
Wars, Miami Beach Civic
League, and Miami Beach Elks
Lodge.
Chairman of the day is Legion
Commander Major Sidney
Pasternak, who has run the ser-
vices for the past 11 years. Post
85 has coordinated the Memorial
Day observance for the past 40
years.
Miami Beach Mayor Norman
Cirnent will address the gather-
ing, and Col. Robert Baxter,
commander of Slat Tactical
Training Wing of Homestead Air
Force Base, will also participate.
v\|
lib Serve 2nd tfei
Beverly Hornreich will be
installed as president of Opti-
Mrs. Club of Miami Beach for a
second term at a gala dinner
dance at the Konover Hotel
Saturday evening, June 18 at
7:30 p.m. Her husband, Arthur
Hornreich, will install her.
Beatrice Hirsch, past presi-
dent, will be chairperson for the
evening, and Molly Peal is
working with her on decorations.
The evening's theme is "Second
Time Around."
Other officers elected are
Bobby Miller, vice president;
Betty Gottlieb, treasurer; Edith
Katz, recording secretary;
Norma Kur, corresponding secre-
tary; and Edith Leibowitz and
Dorothy Miller, social secre-
taries.
Board of directors members are
Sydelle Blatt, Claire Brotman,
Dorothy Carmel, Charlotte
Chester, Ute Di Blasio, Evette
Fiur, Norma Henig. Beatrice
Hirsch, Helene Jackson, Carol
Levenson, Jeff Olkin, Lillian
Olkin. Geri Peters. Irene Pilzer.
v* -sv
te
-~
Beverly Hornreich
Anne Pines, Helen Segal, L
Steiner, Mitzie Webster
Muriel Weston.
Weston, who is a past.
dent, will be installing officer.
Beth Sholom to Honor Cantor of 25 Ye;
Temple Beth Sholom is plan-
ning a Special Gala Evening of
Music Thursday in honor of its
Latin American Bonds Dinner Set
The Latin American Jewish
community of Miami, comprised
of residents from Central and
South America, will hold an an-
nual dinner dance on behalf of
State of Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion Saturday, June 11, at the
Konover Hotel.
According to Gary R. Gerson,
general campaign chairman of
Greater Miami Bonds Organiza-
tion, "The Latin American Jew-
ish community has traditionally
been staunch supporters of Israel
and the Israel Bonds program.
For man years, they have pur-
chased Israel Bonds in their
native country and now we have
CTUDI0
a very successful Latin American
campaign in South Florida."
Special guest at the dinner
dance will be Victor Harel, First
Secretary of Embassy of Israel in
Washington, D.C. Harel served
in that position at the Israel
Embassy in Mexico City and
formerly worked in Legal Divi-
sion of Ministry of Foreign
Affairs in Jerusalem. He is a
graduate of Hebrew University
School of Law and an Alternate
Permanent Observer of Israel in
Organization of American States.
Cantor David Conviser
cantor, David Conviser. who nas
served the temple for 25 years. In
tribute to his service as temple
cantor and as director of Cantor's
Association of Florida, his fellow
cantors, under his direction, will
perform songs befitting the
occasion.
Temple Beth Sholom Junior
Choir will also be featured, and a
UM Hillel Director To Address Temple
&a&w
Continental
Cuisine
FREojosa
wMcofflM
yoaMcklo
h(l nnowntd
STUON}
NCSTAUMAMT
torauniQu*
dtmngaapartanoa
Matdi rourtaM* to vow
mood m SSS o 5 todMtdual
rooms. THaTant
Win* Oallar. Sluoto. Plaoa
PigaiM. Swiss CTiaW
Fine Entertainment
at ttw Piano
Also vtoMn playing
lor your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M. 1
(privata Lunohaona arranoad)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO" 1
As part of an ongoing 40th
Anniversary Celebration at Tem-
ple Beth Sholom, Rabbi Mark
Kram, director of University of
Miami Hillel Foundation, will
address the congregation Friday
evening, May 27 at 8:15 p.m. He
will speak on "College Students:
Challenges and Opportunities."
Rabbi Kram has been a direc-
tor of B'nai B'rith Hillel Founda-
tion at the university since 1960.
He also served University of
South Florida in Tampa's
Foundation for two years. He
received ordination in 1978 from
.Union College Jewish Institute of
Religions in Cincinnati.
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
"2340SW32AVE.
445-5371
cloaad Monday*
I | | IIIMM
\
^^JbBtfasaVJI
Ths delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
of pasta-shaped animals kids love! .
Moms and kids go for Zoorom two by two! Kids think Zooroni
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vitamin-
enriched pasta simmered in tots of yummy tomato sauce and
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it. tool
special reception will follow the
program.
Prior to his arrival at the
temple. Cantor Conviser served
at Berkshire School of Musk in
Tangle wood for five seasons,
participating in choral con-
ducting along with Robert Shaw
and Hugh Ross. Conviser also
served as music director at Bran-
deis Camp in California.
He is a graduate of Julliard
School of Musk and earned his
master's degree at Hebrew Union
College School of Sacred Music,
where he also worked Off
member.
Cantor Conviser has sung*
such personalities as
Hershman, Kwartin, KaU
Rosenblatt, Peerce, and'
He has also appeared in i
as a member of Robert
Choral
Conviser has also
under such conductor)
Toscannini, Reiner, Ber
and Koussevitsky With hist
Eve, he developed Temple
Sholom Junior Choir.
The bruncl
bunch.
rvC;
-Marriott Ho****
,J!!Tl.ir,"3at.L'5rry^
-^Yemmlii
A BUBBLY WAY TO SPEND SUNDA
Marriott invites you to an all-you-can-eat bruruh
ganza. Choose from Roast Beef. Coq Au Vin. Omeie
to order. Blintzes. Bacon, Sausage. Oysters on the nai
IOII invites you iu an au-yww-v-..------- .l.lail
i. Choose from Roast Beef. Coq Au Vin. Ornelet
to order. Blintzes, Bacon, Sausage. Oysters on the n
baskets of cheeses and fruits, a table laden with saw *arj
benedict and delicious desserts such as strawberry i
chocolate mousse and english trifle. Plus champagn
..well you'll have to stop in to see for yourselr
Come and try us this Sunday, 10:30 a.m. 2:30pm
ls\^ribttHoti
1201 N W l)tun Roid Mismi. Florids JJ126
. (30511*'-*



Friday, May 27,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
s of Orthodoxy Opens on Beach
.
National Jewish Commission
on Law and Public Affairs has
opened a branch on Miami Beach,
according to Margaret Retter, its
president. COLPA, a non-profit,
voluntary association of attor-
neys and social scientists, is
organized to fight discrimination
against observant Jews and to
represent the position of religious
jews in matters of public con-
cern.
Individuals and major Ortho-
fo, Jewish organizations have
been represented and counselled
by COLPA in such areas as Sab-
bath observance discrimination
and the proper wording of pro-
posed laws affecting the ob-
servant community.
The organization protects the
rights of Sabbath observers in
public and private employment,
in the area of Sunday blue laws,
in helping ensure kosher foods in
hospitals and prisons, in the
scheduling of government,
school, or other official tests on
Saturdays and Jewish holidays
and in helping protect the right
to bna milah in hospitals and to
Jewish cemetery practices, foster
care and adoption, and Jewish
divorces.
COLPA offers legal assistance
to individuals and institutions
involved in litigation if the out-
come of the case is of importance
to the religious community.
Organization members and
officers also testify before state
and local legislative committees
and the U.S. Congress. In co-
operation with other national
Orthodox organizations, COLPA
drafts and submits to legislative
bodies proposals intended to pro-
tect the interests of observant
Jewry and also opposes legis-
lative proposals that are seen as
against those interests.
Formerly an assistant federal
public defender, Retter stated,
"The goals of our organization
are to advocate the rights of
those persons who are discrim-
inated against due to their strict
religious practices and who may
not have the funds with which to
defend themselves.
"Additionally," she continued,
"our goal is not to take an offen-
der to court at the drop of a hat,
but rather, to educate the of-
fender of the laws that protect
the religious practitioner with the
hope that mediation and compro-
mise can satisfy all parties.
"In most instances," she
added, "there is a terrible
ignorance of the protections of
law both as to the Sabbath
observer and the employer, and
COLPA serves to breach that
gap. However, COLPA will not
hesitate to file suit if they find
that bad faith was shown or the
employer simply refuses to
Margaret Retter
recognize his obligation under the
law."
Retter's husband, Daniel,
previously represented COLPA
in an action against the State of
Florida for discharging an Ortho-
dox woman from her position at
Daniel Retter
Health and Rehabilitative Ser-
vices due to Sabbath observance,
and a monetary award was given.
Joining Mrs. Retter are attor-
neys, Alan Sakowitz and Betty
Makovsky, both Miami Beach
COLPA officers.
\bur Holiday Bonus
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And, more importantly in the long run, your
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. May 27,1983
Emanu-ElElects Cooperman its President

VAV.V
Bay Harbor Islands civic and
religious leader Sidney Cooper-
man has been elected president of
Temple Emanu-E! of Greater
Miami, succeeding Carol Green-
berg, who served for the past five
years as head of the Miami Beach
congregation.
Samuel N. Fried land of Holly-
wood was reelected chairman of
the board, and Greenberg was
elected associate chairman. Vice
chairmen of the board are Federal
Judge Herbert S. Shapiro, former
Circuit Court Judge Irving
Cypen, and Harry A. (Hap)
Levy, president of South Florida
Hotel and Motel Association.
Dr Irving Lehrman, temple
spiritual leader, swore in the new
officers. '
Cooperman is chairman of the
board of Park East Synagogue of
New York City, national co-
chairman of State of Israel Bonds
Organization, a founder and
member of Founders Board of
Mount Sinai Medical Center, and
a director of Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged.
He also is a founder of Tel Aviv
Development Fund, a director
and member of the executive
committee of Israel's Ben-Gurion
University, and a director of
Jerusalem Mental Health Center.
He is Southeastern chairman of
Boys Town of Jerusalem, a
director of Beth Israel Hospital
of New York City, former presi-
dent of Prime Minister Club and
former chairman of Israel Bonds
in New York City.
Twenty-one vice president* were
elected. Including Samuel Adler. Irving
Cowan, Dr. Maxwell Dauer. Ronald L.
Fine. B Morton GuUln. Barton S. Gold-
berg. George Goldbloom. Tlbor Hollo,
Abel Holtz. Dr Sherman R. Kaplan. Hal
Kaye. Murry KoreUky. Joseph Kosow,
Cal Kovena. Ronald Molko Stephen
Muss. Arthur Pearlman. Sidney Poland.
Lawrence M. Schantz, Milton Slrkln.
and Leonard ZUbert.
Named aa honorary vice presidents
were Ted Arlaor Norman Braman.
Herber* Buchwald, Samui J. Halperln.
Harry Mlllman. A J. Molasky, Emll
Morton. Victor Posner. Harry Rott.
Franklin Kreutzer, southeast-
ern president of United
Synagogue of America,
pictured above, and Harold
Wishna, regional director,
paid tribute to Rabbi Irving
Lehrman, spiritual leader of
Temple Emanu-El for the past
40 years, and Carol Green-
berg. president for the past
five, during Sabbath morning
services last week at Tempi
Emanu-El.
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Herbert Sadkln. Jack SUverman, LouU
Stein, and Dr. George S. Wise.
Secretaries elected were Miami
Beach Vice Mayor Malcolm H. From-
berg and Goldle Goldstein, with Jules P.
Cnannlng, and Dr. Jack J. Falk named
associate secretaries. Treasurer la Jack
Taylor, with Mrs. Mel Beloff. Leonard
Frledland. Donald Koren. and Herbert
C. Zemel associate treasurers. Dr. John
Berger and Mrs. Ruth Kaplan are finan-
cial secretaries, with Jack Flneberg,
Allen Goldberg, and Dr. Arnold Oper
associate financial secretaries.
Recording Secretary la Albert E. Osslp,
with Daniel Neal Heller. Alan Kaplus,
and John Shapiro associate recording
secretaries.
Members of the board of directors are
Joseph Abelow. Edmund Abramson.
Leonard Abramson, William I. Bard.
Louis Baron. Dr. Ellis M. Barrlst.
Herman Berk, Andre Blalolenkl, Dr.
Jeffrey Blumenthal. Murray Candlb,
Marwln S. Cassel, Joel Channlng, Harry
Chemln, Jack Cooper. Stephen Cypen.
Gary Dlx. Irving Flrtel. Robert R.
Frank, Irving Frankel, George Fried-
land. Walter Oettlnger. Ben GUler,
Phillip Goldfeln. Sol Goldstein, Judge A.
S. Gordon, Norman Goraon, Mrs. Carol
Greenberg. and Philip Greenberg.
And also. Leo Hack. Elliott Harris.
Jack Harris, Harry Harrison, Dr.
Milton Jacobson. H. Jerome Joseph,
Mrs. Sherman Kaplan, Walter Kaplan.
Irving Karp. Mrs. Jacob Katsman,
Manual Kaufman. Perry Kaye. Zev W.
Kogan. Col. N. H. Kutcher, Dr. Allan S.
Land. William Landa, Dr. Eric Lang,
Morris Lapldus, Eugene Lebowltz,
David Levlnaon. Richard Levy, Irving
London. Mrs. Irving London. Luis
Lowensteln, Morris Luck, Dr. Louis G.
Lytton. Joseph Malelc. Alvln I. Malnlk.
Allan B. MargoUs, Dave B. May. Hank
Meyer. Dr. Donald Mlchnoff. Gershon
S. Miller, Leonard Miller. Edward Mol
stein, Mrs. Alexander Muss. Dr. David
A. Nathan, Bernard Nemeroff, Edward
T. Newman, and Aaron Orkln.
Other members are Samuel Paacoe.
Henry Penchanaky. Henri Perlman,
Earl Pertnoy, Mrs. Al Podvln. David W.
Poplck. Richard Prager. Ell Qualn.
Charles G. Reskln, Murray M. Resnlck.
Maurice RevlU. Charles Rosenblatt.
Burnett Roth. Seymour Rubin. Norman
Schlndler. Frank Schneider, Mrs.
Richard Schwarz, Harold J. Segal.
Elliott Segall. David Shapiro. Sol C.
Shaye, Joseph Shulman, Comm. Bruce
Singer. Oscar Sklar. Sidney Stein,
Milton Smith, Louis Spector, former
Senator Paul Steinberg, Alfred Stone.
Michael Talnes. George Tallanoff.
Jerome H Uffner, Mrs. Jerome Uffner.
Ron Wayne. Edward H. Welner.
Leonard Welnsteln, Judge Eugene
Weiss, Jay Weiss. Dr. Bruce Welssman.
Morris J. White, A. B. Wiener, and
Theodore A. Zalles.
Members of the board of trustees are
Dr. Seymour Alterman. Joseph Alt-
schul. Bob Bezark. Col. Milton R. Blum.
Louis Brandt. Harry Busch. Dr. Sol
Center, Jon Channlng, Benjamin Cypen.
Roger Dauer, Israel Elpem. Judge
Milton Feller. Edward Gadlnsky. David
Golhman. Ben Grenald, Melvln Gross-
man, Joseph Handleman. Dr. Joseph
Han-Is. Louis Jacobson. Meyer Levin-
son, Dr. Meyer B. Marks. Hlllel Meyers,
David B. Saltman, executive
director of Miami Jewish
Family and Children's Servi-
ces, was one of 50 participants
from the U.S. and Canada who
attended the first Manage-
ment Institute for profes-
sional leadership of Jewish
Family Agencies. The Insti-
tute was part of Jewish Servi-
ces Association Conference
held in Boston in April
College Students
Experienced. avallaMa for high
holiday aarvtcaa. Baal shacharit
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Also Included are Larry Paskow. Al
Podvln. Harold Rosen. Dr. Mitchell
Rublnow. Sanford Rywell, Dr. Mor
timer Schaffer, Dr. Richard Schwars
Robert A. Skldell. Donald Softer. Dr
Michael Sossln. Sam Stein. Dr
Theodore Struhl, Roberto Susl
Lawrence Taylor. Carl J. Turner. Dr
Harold M. Unger, and Charles Walsey.
25 Confirmed
At Temple Sinai
Under the supervision of Rabbi
Ralph Kingsley, spiritual leader,
25 confirmands of Temple Sinai
of North Dade led Confirmation
Services last week. The students
wrote the evening service.
Those confirmed were Dorene
Alberts, David Berger, Michelle
Burch, Jon Donshik, liana Druc-
ker, Lara Edelman, Lisa Feld-
man, Mitchell Feldman, Laura
Fine, Benjamin First, Barbara
Israel, and Jonathan Kaleky.
Also, Matthew Klein, Vivian
Levy, Randi Perry, Julie Pod-
hurst, Amy Rachleff, Jessica
Roskin, Allan Sanford, Beth Sch-
wartz, Sharon Slotnick, Cathe-
rine Solomon, Gale Tickner, and
Andrew Wagner.
Former State Sen. and Mrs. Paul B. Steinberg, co-chairmen of
Temple Emanu-El's annual election dinner dance and meeting,
congratulate incoming President and Mrs. Sidney Cooperman.
New Director to Lead Judaic Studies
Barry University's master's
degree program in Jewish
Studies will begin its second year
in September under the leader-
ship of newly appointed director,
Dr. Jeremiah Unterman.
Unterman earned a doctorate
in the Judaic program at Univer-
sity of California, and he holds a
master's degree from Hebrew
University of Jerusalem, where
he also taught and lectured. He
also has lectured and taught at
Dartmouth College, University of
Judaism in Los Angeles, and
University of California.
"The program at Barry Uni-
versity sounds both exciting and
worthy," Unterman stated. "I
shall enjoy playing a part in it."
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Friday, May 27,1983 / f he Jewish Floridiaa
-------------------------- ''
Page 6>B
Over 600 guests attended a recent American Mizrachi Women
Luncheon at the Konover Hotel to hear guest speaker, Ainslee
R. Ferdie, past national commander of the Jewish War Veter-
ans of America, shown above, discuss Middle East affairs. Fer-
die is currently president of JWV Memorial Shrine in Washing-
ton. Ida Sussman, also pictured, and Nora Aranoff chaired the
event.
At an Annual Installation of Officers of Temple Ner Tamid,
three members of High Holiday and Sabbath Ushering
Committee were cited for many years of service. From left are
Rabbi Dr. Eugene Lebovitz, spiritual leader; Leo Schultz, head
usher for Auxiliary Service, Morris Charlip, head Gabbai, and
Herbert Steinberger, who has served as an usher for over 20
years, who were those honored; and Herman Esgar, mem-
bership chairman.
Gelb Named President of American
Technion Society's Miami Chapter
Martin Gelb has been elected
president of American Technion
Society's Greater Miami Chap-
*r. He will succeed Gerald
Engel.
"Martin Gelb is a man of
proven leadership ability," Engel
stated at a recent meeting of the
Chapter board. "He is the kind of
individual who is astute, capable,
and dynamic and will serve the
Technion-Israel Institute of
Technology admirably as presi-
dent of its Greater Miami
Chapter."
Gelb has served on the board of
trustees of Mount Sinai Medical
Center since 1978 and acted as
i chairman of the hospital's Young
Presidents Club. He has served
*? United Jewish Appeal captain
"'Greater Miami Jewish
federation, and since 1980, has
been a director on the board of
r
t XT 3
Beth Din Officn
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
rel 534-1004 or 672 0004
Martin Gelb
Temple Beth Sholom.
In assuming the presidency,
Gelb stated, "ATS has an extre-
mely important role to play in the
support of Technion-Israel Insti-
tute of Technology. Since 1924,
the Technion has trained more
than three-quarters of Israels
scientists and engineers.
"As such," he added, "the
university has been essential to
Israel's progress and stability as
a nation."
Gelb is senior vice president for
investments with Drexel,
Burnham, Lambert, Inc. and he
is a member of Jefferson National
Bank's advisory board.
Hillel Names New -
Board, Officers &ih Am to Confirm 97, Graduate 12
.*,
Hillel Jewish Student Centers
of Greater Miami has announced
its board of directors members
and officers for 1983-84. Jeffrey
Samek is president; Bernard
Dane Stein, first vice president;
Louis Berlin, vice president for
North Dade; Dr. Jerome Catz,
vice president for University of
Miami; Dianne Stahl, vice presi-
dent for South Dade; Barry Yar-
chin, treasurer; and William
Saulson, secretary.
Reelected to the board were
Louis Berlin, Norman Einspuch,
Lou Kleinman, Robert Levine,
Lois Mondres, Joan Peppard,
Paul Rosen, Fern Samek, Jeffrey
Samek, William Saulson, Brenda
Shapiro, Dianne Stahl, Bernard
Dane Stein, Peter Tell, Judianne
Traum, Barry Weinberger, and
Barry Yarchin.
Newly elected board members
are Jon Ceder, Judge Richard
Feder, Kenneth Feldman, Stan-
ley Gilbert, Joy Kurzer, Alan
Rosenthal, and Dr. Ira Sheskin.
Representing B'nai B'rith is Elise
Factor, Max Mickelson, Fred
Snyder, and Andrew Tibor. Rab-
binic advisors are Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, Orthodox; Rabbi Edwin
Farber, Conservative; and Rabbi
Barry Tabachnikoff, Reform.
Faculty representatives from
University of Miami are Dr.
Helen Fagin and Dr. Jerome
Catz, and from South Dade, Da-
vid Lavin and Barbara Lann.
Board of directors members
will be installed at an annual din-
ner on June 14.
Bank to Offer Seminar,
Blood Pressure Check
"Social Security Rights and
Responsibilities" will be the topic
of a seminar offered by North
Shore office of AmeriFirst
Federal Savings and Loan Asso-
ciation Tuesday at 4:15 p.m.,
according to Sally Peisner,
assistant vice president and
manager.
Allen Kent, Miami Beach
branch manager of Social Securi-
ty Administration, will be
featured speaker.
Free blood pressure readings
will be offered at the Normandy
Isle office beginning June 1
during regular office hours,
Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Customers and visitors
may check their pressure at the
"Blood Pressure Teller" as often
as they wish, according to Lois
Jordan, vice president and
manager of the office.
"Confirmation Weekend Expe-
rience" will begin at Temple Beth
Am Friday evening, May 27 at
8:15 p.m. when a creative Sab-
bath Eve service is conducted by
the contirmands. "The Windows
of Our Hearts" will be its theme.
Confirmation will continue
Sunday morning at 9:45 a.m.
with a service and musical narra-
tion on "The Living Sanctuary."
Rabbinical staff and teachers will
participate in the program, which
includes a chorus, dancers, and
narration.
Twelve Beth Am Judaic High School
students will graduate along with 97
Confirmation Class students. The
twelve are Michelle Baren. Laura Bat
Ue, Barbara Esslnger, Andrew Hellln-
ger. Karen Beth Josefsberg. Stad Lip-
ton, BUse Llpoff. Alan Nathans, Linda
Sablotsky, Mark Salzberg, Gregory
Evan Stewart, and Karen Kom.
Conflrmands will be John Ablsch. Al-
lison Ayares. Gregg Baasett, Debra Lee
BerkowlU, Alexis Berman, Robin
Bloom, Marjorlp Bellinger, Jeffrey
Bonilla. Alison Buchblnder, Deborah
Cohen. Victoria Lee Cohen, Jordana
Colan, Laurie Cooper, Andrew Cuba,
Stacey Deutach, Alys Doln. Lisa Beth
Drucker, Elizabeth Eckstein. Mitchell
Feller. Edmund John Ferdinand in,
Amy Freedman, Sherrl Fried, and Jol
Garfln.
Also, Evan-Varl Gavrin. Bradley G.
Goldberg, Andrew Golden, Robert Gol-
denberg, Eric Gould, Jamie Greenwald,
April Harris, Jeffrey C. Hellinger, Alli-
son Herah, Lorl HerakowlU, Marc
Hochberg, Philip Jacobson, David Jo-
setsberg. Lora KaUnaky. Fred Karlln-
ky, Klrbee Katx, Karl LaUman, Debra
Sue Kline, Richard Lanttnberg. Eliza-
beth Lapldus, Steven Letter, and Todd
S. Leshaw.
Also, Scott Levin. David LI peon, Jef-
frey Llppman. Elisabeth Magnea.
Stacey Marani, Adam Margolla,
Charles Marlln. Lauren Matell. Mi-
chelle Merer, Angela Mlot. Howard Mlt-
Uer, Jill Morrow, Robert Moser, Amy
Notarius, Jodl I.ynne Okun, Patricia
Palastrant, Rachelle Peri, Ben Powell.
Michelle Pozen, Andrew Relaman,
Abby Rossln. Gregory M. Roth. Dene
Beth Rubin, Amy Rublnson, Michael
Salem, and Janet Salzman.
Also. David Savltz. Lisa Schwartz,
Larry Alan Shane, Matthew I. Shapo,
Susan Sherman. Heidi L. Shore, Lauren
Slegendorf, Audra Slmovltch, Douglas
Skoke. Lauren Paige Smith, Lee Sobel.
Fernando Martin Socol. Firth Spiegel.
Adam Stuart, Debra Merle Tower, Ml
cheUe Welnberg, Michelle Welner,
Richard Welsberg, Amy Weltzer. Ilene
Wexler. Robbln Winston. Jack Wolfe,
Beth Wolfsohn, Howard Young, Bar-
bara Zalesky. and Jonathan Zwlbel.
Rabbi SaUcin to Assume Penn. Pulpit
Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin, who has
served as assistant rabbi at Tem-
ple Israel of Greater Miami for
the past two years, will leave
Miami when his tenure closes
with a final Shabbat on July 2.
He will deliver his farewell ser-
mons to Temple Israel on June 24
in Kendall and July 1 Downtown.
Rabbi Salkin will assume a
pulpit of his own at Temple
Judea of Bucks County in Doy-
lestown, Penn. in the Greater
Philadelphia area in July.
Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin
JWV Post Initiates Million Penny Drive
Abe Horrowitz Post 682 of
Jewish War Veterans, and its
Commander Morton Todd, have
initiated a drive to collect one
million pennies in honor of the
more than one million Jews who
served in the U.S. armed forces
since the War of Independence.
The pennies will be donated to
Jewish War Veterans Memorial
Shrine in Washington.
The Post has asked all Depart-
ment of Florida members to join
their campaign aimed at publiciz-
ing the contribution made by
Jews in the country's war efforts.
Commander Todd hopes to com-
plete the program by December.
Cmdr. and Mrs. Morton Todd
Summer is Special
at Stevensville.
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian f. Friday, May 27.1983
f
r
immunity Corner
Beth David Congregation will hold an Annual Meeting
I uesday at 8 p.m. at South Dade Chapel
Cardiac Rehabilitation, a medically prescribed, supervised,
joint program of Mount Sinai Medical Center and Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Center, is held three times a week at
the JCC. The Center's Diabetes Club meets every third Thurs
day of the month.
Captain Karen E. Bauman. daughter of Paul and Rose
Bauman of Miami, has graduated from U.S. Air Force flight
nurse course at Brooks Air Force Base. Tex.
Airman First Class Richard C. Zimmelman. son of Mary E.
Zimmelman of North Miami Beach, has been named "Outstand-
ing Airman" of the quarter for U.S. Air Force Clinic at RAF
Fairford. England.
U.S. Senator Paula Hawkins of Florida has been selected to
receive an award for Excellence in Legislative Achievement from
Child Find. Inc. for her work on the problem of missing children.
Child Find helps reunite missing children with their families.
A Father's Day Picnic has been scheduled by Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Center's Senior Adult Department,
to take place Thursday. June 9 at Greynold's Park.
A showing of the works of California artist, Richard Mann will
begin Saturday, June 4 at 8 p.m. at Congregation Bet Breira
The art show will follow the unveiling of Mann's eight-by-eight-
foot Star of David, which was commissioned for the synagogue.
Amy Susan Lit t. daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Richard E. Litt of
Miami, received a Bachelor of Arts degree in management this
month at Simmons College's 78th Commencement Exercises in
Boston. She is a graduate of Miami Palmetto Senior High
School.
Dr. Lawrence Robbins, chief of plastic surgery at Mount Sinai
Medical Center, has been elected secretary of Florida Society of
Plastic and Reconstructive Surgeons. American College of Sur-
geons has granted a three-year approval to the hospital's Cancer
Program.
Hillel School Sets Kinder gar den
Graduation Ceremonies for June 8
Samuel Scheck Hillel Commu-
nity Day School. North Miami
Beach, will .hold Kindergarten
Graduation 'Exercises Wednes-
day Evening, June 8 at 7 p.m. in
the schools Friedman-Uhlar Au-
ditorium.
Dorothy Gruen. early child-
hood director of 13 years, has an-
nounced that 89 children have
completed kindergarten and will
receive diplomas. In addition to
the graduating children, Gruen
oversees 190 children in nursery.
PK-3. and PK-4, which, together
with kindergarten, make up the
Early Childhood Department of
the school.
A musical cantata. "Learning
from A to Z." with Hebrew and
English speaking and singing
parts, will be presented by the
graduating class.
Michael Scheck. president, will
preside over the evening's festiv-
ities, and Rabbi Dr. Joshua Tar-
sis, principal, will give greetings.
Also participating in the cere-
monies will be Dr. Jerome M.
Levy, assistant principal, and
Marshall Baltuch, executive di-
rector. Diplomas will be pre-
sented by Dr. Stanley Spatz, ed-
ucational vice president. Diploma
caligraphy was written by Isaac
Berezdivin.
Kindergarten teachers are For
tunee Cohen. Ruth Jacoby,
Miriam Levy, and Rosalind Sin-
ger. Aides include Mina Donen-
feld, Fanny Lefkowitz, Ettie
Shaked. and Lola Stolberg.
Gail Spatz is serving as chair-
person for the graduation, and
servinc on her committee are
Gilda Azout, Joyce Botton,
Bonnie Edelstein, Marcia Hoff-
man, Clarita Kassin, Dahlia Op
penheimer, and Paulette Wagen-
berg.
Th jraduataa ar Botom Adar. Mi-
chael AlUchuler, Marc Anldjar. Joal
Aahkenazl. Sara Avarbook. Jeaalca
Aout. Jeffrey Backman. Alexander
Bakalari. Alesa Baltuch. Daniel Bar*
ket Slmy Benchlmol, AUa Banyatov.
Judith Beniadon. Naomi Bocklan.
Defers Chareon, Oahrlt Dar. Omer Dror.
Ikey Dweck. Amy EdeUteln. Elana
Ehrilch. Sharon Englander. Michelle
Eakenaxl Jenny Fefer. Audrey Feld-
min. Jaaon Fine. David Flngerer, War-
ren Frankl. Eric Friedman, and Shlera
Gilbert
Also. Lynne Glaaa. Paid Godfrey
Damlan Grama. LUa Oraeabarfer. Jp- .
eph Gruen. Elyaha Hammerman. Dan
lei Hoffman. Jennifer Hyde. Jennifer
Jacob*. Oahrat Kalzler. Joshua Karen.
Eynat Karp. Ezra Kaaaln. Male* Kler-
son. Monica Klein. Yonatan Kodary.
Daniel Kohn. Henry Lederman. Karen
Llchter. Philip Llpechltz. David Mach.
Michael Maleh. Neely Marcus Jesalca
Mazor. Shayne Meneaei. Michael Mor
rl. Harvey Moaaak. Salomon Mur-
clano. and Eric Nun berg
Alto. Roaa Oathelmer. Avl Opper
helmer, Jonathan Paiitzky, Clara Pel-
aach. Daniel Perez. Tamar Plotkln.
Davida Rantz. Courtney Recht. Mi-
chelle Reltkopf. Jeffrey Rerun. Tammy
Roffe. Anthony Rosenneld. Michael
Rothenberg. Bryan Rudnlck. Ella
Ryaboy. Daniel Saban Eltan Sasaon.
Marc Setton. Allony SUberman. Mark
Spatz. Nina Sprung. Jonathan Sosno-
wlcx. Ron Stelger. Avl Stein. Raquel
Tamlr. Howard Tuchlnaky, Rachel
Uriel. Tammy Waaanberg. Cindy
Worthaltar. and Andrew YachnowlU
Ampal Announces
1983 Increases
Ampal-American Israel
Corporation reported a net in-
come of $4,551,000 for the three
months ending March 31, up 11
percent from $4,087,000 for the
same period in 1982. Fully-
diluted earnings per share of
Class A stock were $.20 for the
first quarter of 1983.
Although earnings increased,
this figure was unchanged from
the same period of the preceding
year due to issuance of an addi-
tional Class A stock. Revenues
for the first quarter of 1983
amounted to $32,949,000, up
from $21,282,000 for the same
period last year, an increase of 55
percent.
'Diary'to Host Aloni
Shulamit Aloni, a liberal mem-
ber of the Israel Knesset, will be
featured guest on WPBT-Chan-
nel 2's television interview pro-
gram. Israeli Diary Thursday at
10 p.m.
Host and producer, Stanley
Rosenblatt will interview her on
location in Israel, and she will
talk on the status of women in
Israel, her views on the Palestin-
ian problems, and her opinion of
democracy in Israel.
Israeli Diary is directed by
He van Cramer.
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Friday, May 27,1983 V The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
k*^
own above with the proud graduate, from left, are Sylvia
farp, one of Lillian's daughters, Audrey Komrad, daughter,
iDr. Eugene Konrad, son-in-law.
family Congratulates Or ads
Son and Grandmother
| A lot of families can boast a
uating son this month, but
\m many a graduating grand-
rther?
[We know one Miami family
especially proud they
kveboth. \.
IDr Eugene and Mrs. Audrey
jomrad of Kendall have been
jtwing since son, Mark, a 1979
na cum laude, molecular
logy graduate of Yale Univer-
y, received his MO with honors
Duke University School of
dicine this month.
I And as if such an achievement
weren't enough for one
lily, grandmother Lillian
ptz, a 75-year-old resident of
imi Beach since 1973, went
1 graduated from Miami-Dade
mmunity College, also with
Mrs. She received an Associ-
p of Arts degree this month and
) graduated a member of the
ional honor society, Phi Theta
a. as well.
hat's reason to be proud.
wpite the graduates' large
I difference, they share a lot in
non. Both write original
>try. and both have been rec-
ced for that talent. Both also
pit. as their achievements so
point out, according to
Komrad, a "strong drive to
a drive that was so
fcinant in the spirit of that
^generation of Americans, a
p that has obviously been
pitted to Mark, a third-
ation American."
llian Katz was raised in the
1 of lower Manhattan and
K dreamed of becoming a
% a dream that was the
'evidence of a life-long devo-
^to the arts. At age 17, she
her ambition, but the
"Bg career was short-lived as
on took a back seat to wifely
and motherhood.
v* forgetting the excite-
oi her teenage stage life,
o returned later to little the-
. Productions as a choreo-
fr and also formed her own
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Lillian Katz proudly displays
her scarf on graduation day, a
symbol that she graduated
with honors from Miami-Dade
Community College.
Mark Komrad, who received
his medical degree with
honors from Duke University
Medical School, will continue
his education at Johns Hop-
kins University in Baltimore.
small company staging original
plays and reviews.
Transplanted to Miami Beach,
she continued her endeavors, also
writing poetry and short stories.
With her two daughters grown
and herself widowed, Lillian, at
age 72, entered Miami-Dade.
She continues her dancing and
her work in theatre, and accord-
ing to Mrs. Komrad, is also
currently involved forming a new
drama group for senior citizens
who. like herself, 'although born
in poverty and strife, nurtured an
enthusiasm to survive and the
ethical conviction that life has
more to offer than mere
existence.
Discussing the success of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat Council of South Florida's annual
Membership Salute and Awards Day
Luncheon held recently are, from left,
Miriam Gingold, national advisor; Miami
Beach Vice Mayor Malcolm H. Fromberg,
senior international vice president of B'nai
B 'rith and participant in a panel discussion
on Jerusalem Day; Shirley Partner, Council
recording secretary; Esther Weinstein,
financial secretary; Israel Vice Consul Oded
Ben-hur, panelist; and Lillian Davis, social
secretary. Other panelists were Harriet
Green, national vice oresident of Pioneer
Women, and Gerald Schwartz, national
vice president of American Zionist Federa-
tion, who moderated Felice Schwartz, vice
president of Council, was chairman of the
day.
Temple Beth Sholom Confirmands Named
Confirmation services at Tem-
ple Beth Sholom were conducted
recently by Rabbi Leon
Kronish, spiritual leader. Con-
firmation Class of 5743 includes
Mark Jonathan Alschuler, Alan
I. Amdur, Karen Gail Befeler.
Holly Brent, Steven Mark
Chyzyk, Jennifer Sharon Donner,
Rebecca Jill Fleischer. Jed
Levine, Marc Roy Levinson, Seth
Benjamin Liss, Rachel Meli
Mindes, Victoria Eve Nixon,
Kenny Michael Raymond. Jason
Joseph Rosenberg, Cathi
Deborah Shaw. Richard Jason
Shugar, Jay Martin Sobel,
Hillary Eden Weiss, and Jodie
Wynne.
Frankel, Melissa Sari Friedland.
Dara Michelle Goldstein, Eva
Lynn Goldstein, and Bruce
William Gross.
Also, Henry Stuart Haft,
Steven L. Holts, Franklin
Howard Kauffman, Robert
Michael Klein, Stephen Barrett
Maxwell House; Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox 'n bagels 'n cream cheese is al-
most as much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mezuzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomical innovation is Maxwell
House Coffee.
The full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House
has been delighting lovers of good
food for half a century. And why not ?
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food without great coffee!
So, nomatterwhat your preference
instant or goundwhen you pour
Maxwell House you pour flavor. At
its most satisfyingconsistently cup
after cup after cup.
K Certified Kwher
i.tmt'M FooJi
Corporjnum
VA living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century^


c=-----
Pae 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. May 27,1983
i> >: '.i:n'i'i-' .............i.i r
cPride
24 OZ JAR YELLOW
French's TAC
Mustaid /if
PANTRY PROS
AluminumFoN ....2&ls1.09
18-OZ BOX KELLOGG S
Com Flakes...........1.10
MAM9CHEWITZ
Seltzer Water.....2 "Kg .79
DEL MONTI
Catsup.............24 .99
BUSH'S BEST
Baked Beans.....2 1.00
HEAVY DUTY
Wlsk Detergent.....M& 1.60
PANTRY PRIOE BEG OB MM
Unr.lim.HmiH "7 AO
RnranniMowi......bag .*
IRTOIBJOMt FRENCH On
Kalian Dressing..... ^1.29
& .80
BEVERAGE SALE"
REO. ORUOHT
Coots or
SudwetserJ
PAKOF12-OZ CANS fj
2UTERBTL SOOA
^Sf 99*
18 OZ RET BTLS PEPSI UGHT OUT PEPS MOUNTAIN DEW
PEPSI FREE OR
Pepsi Cola..........pcM.59
NOT AVAILABLE M KEY WEST OR MARATHON
REO OR DIE r 2 LITER BOTTLE
AftWRootBoor 1.10
sssjaBve^SjBassnp ^sa9^ SjaBl
PANTRY PRO I .Y WHITE OR ASSORTED COLORS
Paper Towels.....ffil.00
LUCKY LEAF ft0 OR NATURAL
Apptejuwe......... an l.ow
RED BAO WHOLE BEAN
80*Cfc>ckCoffee ... .mo 1.99
4&.QZ BBBCNNUT STNAJNCD
Baby Food ........3 for T1
ORANGE OR LEMON 4OZ AA
BTL tWW
.42 2*47
nsutr
BoBF%afs.......... bo> iff
I4-QI
K
CAN
You wont
beef
o
Chicken!
There's no chicken like chicken fresh from our
Pantry. We buy only the best to give our customers
only he best..AND YOU'LL LOVE OUR BEEF.
Wings or
Rib Roast $^89
USOA CHOICE BEEF
SEMI BONELESS
Rib*
Steak $
USDA CHOICE
SMALL END
Tenderloin1
USDA CHOICE BEEF LOIN
(WHOLE IN CRY-O-VAC UNTRIMMED)
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH 3 LBS i OVER CONTAINS
BREAST THIGHS 4 DRUMSTICKS
Fryer Combo...............
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH 3 LBS t OVER
Fryer Thighs...............m .89
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH 3 LBS t OVER
Fryer Wings................lb .69
USOA CHOICE BEEF CHUCK-3 MEALS IN ONE CONTAINS
ROAST STEW BEEF AND GROUND BEEF
Chuck Combo.............B1.99
breoCookiesl.89
PANTRY PRIDE 20 LB BAG CHARCOAL
PANTHY PWOE 300CT PKG PAPER ,f| #*aST%
Napkins 1.29
Briquets 3.59^
32 OZ GENERIC CHARCOAL ^^^"fc.
Lighter Fluid .99
OPEN PIT REGORIJCKORY 18-OZ BTL PVA^b
BBQ Sauce .79
P^r^tes 1.19
FROZEN FOODS I
OUR PANTRY 18 YOUR PANTRY
s
PANTRY Pf
PROE 8-OZ CAN REG OR
SEAL TEST ABBOHTED
iSioo Bifflr* me
s M. Bleach OSf
..1.99
ORE -IOA GOLDEN CRWKLE CUT
MOCT JHXO
2 LB
BAO
BOX
.OF1J
1.
1.80
m
a1
llOO-CT
|VALUABLE COUPONI
25OFF
13-OZ BAO VACUUM
ASSORTED OWNOS
Msstsr Bend Coffes
p^as p*** #*-*. oca dcos/tw
WE
PANTHY
2B-LB
. BAO
4 MM
REO '2 0Z CAN
Hawaiian Punch
GORTON CRUNCMY
^ss-jraaa cma-us ^
.79
REIBUNQ OR CABERNET
.1.29
AOBATO. LAMBRUBCO OR BIANCO
BTL
TBOhM
BTL
QUANTITY RKSHTS RESERVED NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS
v^ COUPON PER PERSON
1 qq II COUPON OOCO MAY 28-^UNE'^ 9M JB^|
1.79 ?B^^"iST!
3.69 11 ms^M^i I I
House Coflse
2.oo ai as SB as si ss
LTR
1.00 I


Friday, May 27,1983 / tfha Jewiah Floridian Page *B
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Lots of
Chicken
3 BREASTS &
3LEGQTRS
W/ BACKS
3 GIBLET PKGS
cPride
LIMIT 2 PKGS., PLEASE
Whole
Fiyers EQC
FLA OR SHIPPED bJP ^^W
PREMIUM FRESH Bj^P' Bj^ LB
vjd IL vJiOUnQ i
99*
Quaiters^Uv
USDA CHOICE "MILK FED"
Veal
LB.
99
*
s
4%
PANTRY PRIDE
WITH VEGETABI
PROTEIN ADDED
BONELESS AND SKINLESS FRESM
Chicken Breast Cutlet...... .. 2.89
NEW ZEALAND FROZEN WHOLE OR SIRLOIN HALF
Leg O Lamb................LB2.19
KNE'P OR KINGS PfllOf
Corned Beef Brisket....... 1.99
USDA CHOICE BONELESS
Beef Rib Steak............ 4.99
'FROZEN SEAFOOD DEPTJ
Arrowtooth ^m
Flounder Fillet lb*!**
^LA OR SHIPPED
PREMIUM FRESH LB
Sea Best
Grouper Fillet
.LB
I SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
./_/.

SWEET AND TENDER (Q-PICK).
Florida (
Ll
Yellow Cor
"49*
33*
99

CRISP. CRUNCHV
Garden 9
Fresh 3
Cucumbers
GAROEN FRESH
FIRM
IN
PKG
Zucchini
Squash.....u
SWKTANOJUBYLO bosku-ox
Ripe
Salad
Tomatoes
FLAVORFUL AND REFRESHING
Sunklst Lemons
TOPS M VITAMIN A GARDEN FRESH
Florida Carrots
NUTRITIOUS AND DELICIOUS U PICK
.PKG i79
NORTHWEST EXTRA FANCV 10 IN VtXAR BAG
US NO 1 ALL PURPOSE UCK
Yeaow Onions
. CROP AND OAUNCHV U-MCK
. 9 FOR
...l. .25
. BAG .39
. l. .39
b(. 1.99
KRAFT 100X PURE HALF GALLON GLASS JAR
FRESHLY CUT ASSORTED COLORS
. m1.99
winch 1.79
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
SERVICE DELI
PWCES AND COUPONS
GOOD MAY 26>JUNe 1, 1983
WE REDEEM FEOERAL FOOD STAMP
waaaw aiascm
MOMiaiiMiMta omm-wn.....
li| 1C1 ll mtm hi
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CMM Mail MM* MM *
w.t! i iV a. ; J2Si
i>MSm*CMM "!.*".....
KM MB MM (IMA. .JHHBf_
NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES.
HANSEL & GRETEL
Potato
COLE SLAW OR
$139 Salad', 59
Bologna 1 "ftf
EXTRA LEAN COAMIO I
.31.39
^,2.09
LB
mmmm NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
LARGE CROPV
Kaiser Ro9s... 9 for
picnc : HOT OOQ ROLLS OR
Hamburger Rofts 31.99
. ooz 1.7W
OVEN FRESH
ton m SALT CHEESE
Urn**!
MRSJ*S8LRS
I UTKey SOUTHERN STYLE PCS IN BOX
Breast .halflb 1.49 FrtedChlcken 3.49
QUANnrYRWHTS RESERVEO NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHCAL ERRORS
EACH
100% PURE
TRQPtCANA CHILLED
Orange $199
Juice.... 12gal mmL
PANTRY PROE CHILLED
Orange Juice......."2. 1.19
DEAN S 1102 CONT
French Onion Dip...... .89
PANTRY PROE
Sour Cream........,9cSp 099
KRAFT SQUEEZE 18 OZ CONT
Parity Margarine..... .85
UGHT N' LIVELY LOW FAT OR
SEALTEST -^,
Cotiage\g/i7QC
Cheese :2& m ^
POLLY O WHOLE MILK OR PART SKIM
Ricotta Cheeae.....8? 1.79
PANTRY PRIOE SWISS STYLE ASSORTE0 FLAVORS
Yogurts..........3^11.09
color iHrrc
Singles via? $149
WOMOUAU.Y WRAPPED
BOR0EN FROSTED
Chocolate Shake 2 '8% .89
PANTRr PRIDE ALL BEEF
Bologna.............p.! 1.59
GWALTNE GREAT DOG
Chicken Franks..... .99
LOUIS RICH SLICED
Turkey Breast.......g 1.39
SUNNYI.AND JUMBO
Franks. Jl
SILVER FLOSS 2 LB BAG CfvaC
Sauerkraut JJ
CLAUSSEN S WHOLE OR HALF OR DtL SLICES
Pickles..............,ar1.49
HEBREW NATIONAL KNOCKWLMST OR
Frankfurters........'\% 2.19
MAMA S WINE OR CREAM STYLE
18-02
.............CONT
TKBSflF____
PANTRY PROE PICNIC PAK OF 12
Hamburger or cet
HotDoglloOs OD
m
or it
GRFFEN LEMON OR
PKO 1
PANTRY PROE SUIT TOT
m
ADLERS lOZ PUMPERNCKLE BREAD OR
0fT\.79
MEVERSBRAN
art 1
VELVET CREME CRULLERS OR
0TB


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. May 27, 1983


Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
W hen thou lightest the lamps, the seven lamps shall give
light in front of the candlestick"
(Num. 8.2).
BEHAALOTEKHA
BEHAALOTEKHA And the Lord spoke unto Moses,
saying: Speak unto Aaron, and say unto him: When thou
lightest the lamps, the seven lamps shall give light in front of
the candlestick. And this was the work of the candlestick,
beaten work of gold, unto the base thereof, and unto the flowers
thereof, it was beaten work: according unto the pattern which
the Lord had shown Moses, so he made the candlestick"
(Numbers 8.1-41. After the Levites had been purified, they who
were between their twenty-fifth (Numbers 8.241 and their fiftieth
years, came to the tent of meeting to take the place of the first-
born in the holy service. In the second year after the Israelites
had departed from Egypt, they observed the Passover festival
on the 14th day of the first month, Nissan. Those who having
touched a corpse were deemed impure, were required to wait a
month to observe the festival. On the 20th day of the second
month, the cloud rose from the tabernacle, and the children of
Israel journeyed from mount Sinai, each tribe grouped around
its standard, three days' distance behind the Ark. At this time,
the Israelites began burdening Moses with their complaints. To
ease the burden, 70 elders, on whom Moses" spirit rested, were
delegated to serve under him.
(The recounting el lit* Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History ol the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir. Sis. published by Shengold The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New Yo/k. N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.)
HillelDay School Plans Graduation
Members of the ninth grade
class of Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School, North
Miami Beach, will hold Gradua-
tion Exercises Thursday evening,
June 9 at 7:30 p.m. in the
school's Priedman-Uhlar Audito-
rium. Fifteen students will be
graduated, according to Rabbi
Dr. Joshua Tarsis, principal.
President Michael Scheck will
preside over the ceremonies and
will be assisted by Tarsis, Dr. Je-
rome M. Levy, assistant princi-
pal, and Marshall Haltuch, exec-
utive director.
Dr. Stanley Spatz, education
vice president, will present
diplomas to Keith Howard
Brooks, Tamara Joy Dennis,
Henry Gevurtz, Jeffrey Lang
Goldstein. Rivka Aliza Gold-
stein, Sylvia Gurinsky, Neil
Lang, and Tracey Eve Layne.
Also, Billy Liebesny, Ita Ruth
Mourino, Danya Rothenberg,
Rina Beth Spitzer, Karen Stern,
Adam Shawn linger, and Fred
David Zemel.
Judea Bonds Brunch to Honor Chai 's
Temple Judea in Coral Gables,
in conjunction with State of Isra-
el Bonds Organization, will hold
an Annual Salute to Israel
Brunch in honor of the 35th anni-
versary of Israel and the temple's
Chai Society, comprised of mem-
bers for more than 18 years.
The event is slated for Sunday,
June 5 at 10:30 a.m. to take place
in Temple Judea Social Hall, and
will feature entertainer and rac-
onteur, Joey Russell. Special
Scrolls of Honor, highlighting Is-
rael's 35th anniversary, will be
presented to Chai members.
Rabbi Michael B. Eisenstat.
temple spiritual leader, noted
that temple members have "al-
ways been staunch supporters of
the Israel Bonds program, and
we realize the importance of con-
tinuing our dedication to Israel's
economic development especially
at this crucial time in Mideastern
political affairs."
Ann and Victor Reiter are
chairpersons of the brunch.
Beth Moshe
to Host JWV
Irvin Steinberg, national com-
mander of Jewish War Veterans
of America, will address JWV
Sabbath at Temple Beth Moshe
in North Miami Friday evening,
May 27.
Local JWV members will at-
tend the 8 p.m. service and will
host the Oneg Shabbat following.
COMPUTERS at CAMP
_ professionally designed and conducted course available
I for children of all ages enrolled al our eight
camps
CAMP WOHELO for girls
CAMP COMET for boys
Silh Ymar / Qumliir Cmmpiitg My A Mimmi Fmmily
HiM* fft Tkr Blur Ridgr fountain*
12811 Old Rout* 18. Wayneeboro, Pa. 17258
Contact: Owner Director, Morgan I. Levy, C.C.D.
K*H) ^ia, M ^.j.------,rotfmm.;.
If I SPORTS Vn Rf ARTS SCfE.VCE COHHTtRS
\mWT\ Large Florida Area Enrollment 70 Miles From Washington
2 Great New Shows Opening Soon!
A
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First Came Dallas
. Now Comes
AMESHDGENEH
Soap Opera
tie MIki M*fiiti) Marco Polo
Openo May 27
Wed thru Sun. -2pm- $7.50
Sal. & Son. 1pm $8.50
931-7663
FlRVINGV
[BERLIN!
A Musical 95 th
Birthday Tribute
Fri-Sat-Sun 8 pm $10
Marco Polo 931-7763
Opens June 18931-7663
Bat/Bar
Mitzvah
Ditcheck
Levine
JORDAN DITCHEK
Jordan Jay Ditchek, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Norman Ditchek, will
be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah Saturday at Beth Israel
Congregation, Miami Beach,
where his father is president of
the board of trustees.
Jordan, grandson of Mr. and
Mrs. Moe Ditchek and Helen
Resnick. is an honor roll student
at Rabbi Alexander S. Gross He-
brew Academy, where he has
served as president of Student
Council.
The celebrant haa received
awards from Duke University's
Talent Search Program based on
excellent college board scores for
the past two years. A fisherman,
Jordan earned a "Best in Show"
at Dade County Youth Fair for a
fish anatomy exhibit.
Mr. and Mrs. Ditchek will hold
a party in Jordan's honor Sunday
night at Friedland Ballroom.
SUZANNE LECHNER
Suzanne Caryn Lechner,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Benja-
min Lechner. will be called to the
Torah of Temple Adath Yes-
hurun Saturday.
The celebrant will share the
occasion with a Soviet "twin,"
Clara Kajan of Leningrad, who is
not permitted by Soviet authori-
ties to practice her religion open-
ly. Clara's family has applied for
immigration to Israel and are
now considered refuseniks.
Suzy is a student at Greynolds
Park Elementary School and
attends Gifted Center at Sabal
Palm Elementary. She is also a
member of Adath Yeshurun's
Junior Choir.
Guest will be attending from
Maryland, Pennsylvania, New
York, Connecticut, California,
and Georgia.
GABRIEL LEVINE
Gabriel Levine, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Albert Chrem. will be called
to the Torah as Bar Mitzvah
Saturday morning at Temple
Menorah. Rabbi Mayer Abra-
raowitz will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in
Temple Menorah's Heh Class,
and he attends Highland Oaks
Junior High School, where he is
in the seventh grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Chrem will host
the Kiddush following services in
honor of the occasion and a
reception at Temple Zion Satur-
day evening.
Condo For Sal*
Century Village Boca Raton
Fanshaw. 2 Br., IVi Bath, 3rd
Floor Condo Completely Fur-
nished. $48,900.
Call Collect 313881-2868
Roommate
College graduate wants person
with apartment to share or
roommate to share apartment.
Call LIBBY 404-325-8783.
(Can Call Collect)
National Hebrew
Israeli Gift Center Inc.
ReligiousBar Mitzvah sets
CrystalGifts
1507 Washington Avenue
(3051532 2210
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting time: 7:45
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947- < 435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Friday Sabbath Eve Service.
Sal Mltrvah ol Surenne Lechner
Saturday. Sabbath Servlcee.
Bar Mltrvah ol Stuart Shemfeld
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami, FI.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saltzman. Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchinskv. Cantor
Frl.. 1:15pm, Rabbi Salt/man: Amerlce
Ideel end Reellty ." Sat.. 8.46 am, Torah Portion
B Healotcha Dally Sarvlcaa al o 45am and
_____ evening aervtcee al MS am.
TEMPLE BETf AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman. Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein. Associate
Rabbi
Fri.. 8 15. "Confirmation Weekend Experience)"
to begin Craatlva Sarvlca Conducted by Con-
flrmanda, "Tha Wlndoara ol Our Heart*."
Sat., 11:15 am, Torah Service B'not Mltnah.
Nancy Levitt and Jennifer Rich. Sun. 9 45 am.
Confirmation Service with muaical narration,
_______"The lining Sanctuary."
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue /(
Miami Reach U
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler, Cantor
P
Friday Evening Service
6 p.m.
Sabbath Morning Service
a.m.
Or. Lehrmen will preech el 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
24C0 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way: 2625 S W 3rd Avenue ;"",,,
South Dade 7500 Sw i:oth street fit''
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACHx-JT .
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Dade Chapel
Frl. I pm, Shabbat Eve Servlcee.
OavM Schaecter will report on April Holocaust
Survivor* Gathering In Washington.
Sat.. 10 am, Junior Congregation Service*.
Corel Way Sanctuary
Sal., 9 am. Shabbat Service* with Rabbi
David H. Auerbech and Cantor William W.
Llpaon. Bat Mltrvah ol Pamela MlnluM and
Arm* Llboeeah ol USSR in sboentl*.
BETH KODtSH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W 12Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Sat 8 45 am and 5 pm
Sun 8 am and S prr.
Cjily Minyan Seiv 7 45 am and 5 pm
TEMPLE SETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami. FI 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabhi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorlinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Frl., 8 pm, Jewish Wer Veteran* Service
0u* jt speaker. Irvin Steinberg. /.
Sat., Bar Mltnah ol Jeffrey Alt man (( ujx
'/
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Ol Greater Miami
Miami's Plonatr Reform Congregelron
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskell M. Bernat
Asst. Rabbi: Jeff rev K. Salkm
Cantor: Jacob G. Bornstein
Frl., ( pm. Downtown, Rabbi Marl.il Barnat
"Clarity and Dleclarlty, The Stale of the
Reform Rabbinate, Part 1, Statue ol Our
Children Kendall. Student Centor Rechelle
Nelson: "Joy* ol Jewteh Muilc "
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frl.. 8:15 pm. Worship Service Behealotokhe,
Numbere 8:1 12:18 Hanarah-Zecharlah2:14-
4:7 10 pm. Single* Services
Set., 9:30 am. Sabbath Service. Ber Mltnah,
J*.on War.hoftky 11 30 am. Bat Mltnah.
Nicola Haia.

TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
EDWARD BARON. Cantor
Frl. 7 30 pm
Sat.. 9:30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz v,( ,%
Cantor Murray Yavneh ($}'
Dally Morning Servlcee em. N'
Seturdey Morning Servlcee am.
Evening Service* 1:30 pm '
Saturday Evening Servlcee 7:45 pm
866-8345
TEMPLE NERTAMID
Conservative
7902 Carlyle Ave..
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovltz
Cantor Edward Klein
Dally Minyan al am. Sabbath Servlcee at
8:45 em. Sunday Minyan at 8:30 am.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B. FI. 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi br. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
Weekday aervlcee am and 8:30 pm
Seturdey momtng eervlcee 8:30 em
TEMPLE BETH SHOLGV.
Chase Ave. 6 41 si St. 538-7231
Dr Leon"romsh. Rabbi Liberal
Cr it or David Con vise r
Fri, MS pen. Rabb! Mark Krem. director ol
088HBtai Foundation: -College Studenta:
ChlMl.ia.iaml Oppofl unit lea." Sal., 1 a*s am.
Bar MtUveh. Richard eUeuetofn.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 847 7526
1061N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Seturdey Morning, Bar Mltnah
ol Brian Knitchtk.
Frl. MS and 3 pm
Set 8 30 am and 5 15 pm
SSi
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971-Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEFiLLAH OF KENDALL
15410 SW 75 Circle Lane
Miami. FI. Modem Othodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztt 382-3343
FH, 1 pm. Sabbath fve Serves**. Sat, 930,
Dally Morning Mlnyane MTh8*5am
T.WF.ram
TEMPLE SINAI 18601 NE 23 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. KingOy. Rabbi 933-9010
Julian I. Coo*.. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Fri, ktS pm. Worship Service. Rabbi Kfagemy:
-Hurray tar tat Mahapal Am To* Ueeamnp,
Mr.WiiginT-Set,leaOem, eTnw 9SU*h,
BETH YOSESEPH
CHAIN CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozencwalg. Rabbi
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone 576-4000
Rabbimca^ssocialioi^ffice
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
mean Ssnrts.s Man. Thure. 7 am
Built Eve Servlcee 8:18pm
Sabbath aWveeee 9 em
Queete Are Welcome
<(f)l
Fit, MS pm. Sabbath Eve Servlcee Dr. Merman
N.Sriepew-Hepper*ige-Set,*30em,S*bbeth
Servlcee. Ber Mrmel
wotx, i awn, Mtnysn
Devtd.
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 183rd St.. N. Miami Beach. FI. 33133
947 8094 Harold Wlahna. e>ecullve director,
Franklin 0. Kreutier. regional preeidenl
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park, 3785
NW 82 Ave.. Suite 210. Miami, FI.
33166.592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Llttman. regional director
'






iht are Eve Ruthfield, past president of United Order
\ters, Miami 43; Jules Hinkes, president and chief
officer of Miami Children's Hosoital: and Celia
UOTS president. The organization presented
vith a $50,000 check, half of their $100,000
vards the establishment of a Bone Marrow Transplant
\he hospital The Unit is scheduled for completion in
?venstein, left, chairman of the board of First City
fade County, has been named general chairman of
of Dimes Telethon, set to be broadcast live July 3
Los Angeles and Miami Beach's Sheraton Bal
^otel. Ron Levitt, right, president of Ronald Levitt
a Coral Gables public relations firm, will chair the
tions committee. The telethon, the organization's
telecast on WCIXTV Channel 6.
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard,
senior rabbi of Temple Beth
Am. will be installed as first
vice president of Synagogue
Council of America at a meet-
ing in New York June 21. The
rabbi has been second vice
president for two years and
will rotate into the presidency
in 1985. Baumgard is imme-
diate past chairperson of
Community Relations Board
of Dade County and was
recently named to Steering
Committee of Miami Action
Committee.
CIRCUITCOURT
FOR
kUNTY,FLORIDA
BATE DIVISION
|umber 83 432
Pi vision 02
TATE OF
itOSE REICHMAN
Td
NOTICE
INISTRATION
kimstr.it i.,ii of the
MINERVA ROSE
deceased. File
^328. is pending In
Court for Dade
Florida. Probate
address of which
Flagler Street.
*da 33130. The
Jaddresses of the
Ipresentatlve and
representative's
bet forth below.
ted persons are
lie with this court.
*EE MONTHS OF
PUBLICATION
NOTICE: (It all
put the estate and
ection by an In
i to whom this
mailed that
be validity of the
Jlflcatlons of the
Representative,
liisdlctlon of the
UMS AND OB-
|3_NOT SO FILED
FOREVER
\ of this Notice has
,27, 1983.
epresentatlve:
TRANCESCOLE
knots Road
I Fla. 32922
personal
aLITZER
|Street
. Fla U1U
5)3-S5SB
kylT. Jun*8,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR OAOE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
No. 83-18524
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JUANCELIS,
Petitioner.
and
MARIA JESUS MELGAR.
Respondent.
TO: MARIA JESUS MELGAR
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
RAFAEL E. PADIERNE. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1*37 S.W First
Street. Miami Florida 33135.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before June 24. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for 'our con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this day of May 28,
Issstt
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. J.Hartnet
As Deputy Clerk
RAFAEL E. PARDIERNE.
ESQUIRE
1127 S.W. First Street
Miami. Florida 33138
13081649-5486
Attorney for Petitioner
18783 June3.10,l78yi983
Friday, May 27,1983/The JewishFlorkh'an Page 1 IB
Qeth Moshe Reeled* President
Jackie Mason
Bonds Gala to
Feature Mason
Entertainer Jackie Mason will
be featured entertainer at a gala
"Night in Haifa" to be held by
New Leadership Division of State
of Israel Bonds Organization
Saturday evening, June 11 at 8
p.m. at Port of Miami.
"An evening of fun, dinner and
dancing is promised," according
to M. Ronald Krongokl, National
New Leadership chairman. Larry
Gotlieb, regional chairman,
noted, "The evening will take
place at Carnival Cruise Lines
pier, which has been graciously
lent to the Israel Bonds Or-
ganization."
Jackie Mason, a comedian, is a
film producer and actor, and has
appeared in many motion pic-
tures. He has been a featured
performer in night clubs, includ-
ing Caesars Palace, the Riviera,
and the Sands in Las Vegas.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name
HOWE ROOFING COMPANY
at 1900 79th St.. Causeway. N.
Bay Village. Florida 33141,
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
HOWE CONSTRUCTION
CO.. INC.
By James How.
President
LOUIS R. BELLER,
ESQUIRE
Attorney for
HOWE CONSTRUCTION CO.,
INC.
420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 238,
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306)831-0660
18787 May 27;
June 3.10,17.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO 11-16312
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
GONZALO GUEVARA
and
GILM A CUERVO GUEVARA
TO: GILMA CUERVO
GUEVARA
Calle 17S9B11
Bogota Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acdon for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
It on M. CRISTTNA DEL-
VALLE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la
I960 S.W. ST Ave Miami,
Florida S3148, and die the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June M, 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 23rd day of
May, 1963.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By V. BARK LEY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18781 May 27;
June*. 10. IT, 1983
Elliot Eiseman was unanim-
ously reelcted to a fourth term as
president of Temple Beth Moshe
uyNorth Miami Beach at its An
nual Election of Officers and
Board Members event.
Others appointed were Saby
Behar, vice president; Seymour
Smoller. vice president: Henrietta
Sostchin, vice president; Melvyn
Trute, vice president; Anita
Kanter, treasurer; Arnold Miller,
financial secretary; Eileen Rand,
recording secretary; and Joseph
Schwartz, corresponding secre-
tary.
Board of directors elected were
Michael BIynn, Bonnie Brooks.
Lawrence Fein, Bryna Goldberg.
Ricki Igra, Melvin Lask:n.
Harriet Margolin. Sandra
Shapiro, Abe Shepnick. Clara
Smoller, and Gurdon Wolfson.
Named to the temple's board if
governors were Abraham Baum-
garten, Danny Gordon, Samuel
J. Jaffe, Vivian Lelchuk, Flo-
rence Linden, Elaine Richman,
Dr. George Segal, and David
Stone.
Temple Celebrates 40th Anniversary
Paintings, sculptures, and cer-
amics by students of Temple
Beth Sholom School of Fine Arts
and Beth Sholom Religious
School are currently on display at
the temple's Art Gallery, and, ac-
cording to Judy Drucker, School
of Fine Arts director, will be
shown through June 5.
"Such an exhibit couldn't be
more appropriate," said Rabbi
Leon Kronish, spiritual leader.
"We're about to launch an ambi-
tious new program of restructur-
ing for the future of Temple Beth
Sholom, and nothing can speak
more eloquently for our future
than the creativity of our chil-
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 63 IIMO
Family Division
IN RE: The Marriage of
LINDA GAY DAVIS
PeUoner
and
PAUL IRA DAVIS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: PAUL IRA DAVIS
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
ROBERT M. ZIEJA, ESQ.,
Attorney for Petitioner, 633
N.W. 167 St.. N.M.B.. FL. 33162
on or before June 24. 1983. and
Hie the original with the clerk
of this court: otherv ise a de-
fault will be entered against
you.
Dated: May 24,1988
RICHARD P BRINKER,
Clerk
By. M J.Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
18782 May 27:
June 3, 10. 17.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. (3 18523
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
PERL A S. STRUSBERG a-k-a
PERLA S. STRUSBERG
FRATTALE.
PetlUoner.
and
JOSE FRATTALE
ANDREIME,
Respondent.
TO: JOSE FRATTALE
ANDREIME,
Pie de la Popa
Calle 29-D No. 21B44
Cartagena, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on RAFAEL E. PADIERNE.
attorney for PeUUoner, whose
address Is UST S. W. First
Street, Miami. Florida 33138,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before June 24, 1988;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 28th day of May.
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M.J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAF ABLE. PADIERNE.
ESQUIRE
1437 S.W. First Street
Miami, Florida 33138
Telephone: (306)649-8486
Attorney for PeUUoner
18T84 May 27;
Junes, 10.17.1983
dren."
According to Rabbi Kronish,
the art display is one of a series of
events planned as part of the
temple's 40th anniversary cele-
bration. Gary Gerson, general
chairman of the 40th anniversary
celebration, coordinated the
"Preview of the Future" with
James S. Knopke, chairman of
the board, and Harold Vinick,
president.
To kick off the reconstructing
program, and to open the exhibit,
Task Force Chairman Neal Am-
dur and his wife, I sabelle hosted
a cocktail party and reception in
honor of the "Founders of the
Future" last weekend. Featured
speaker was Eugene Massin, pro-
fessor of fine arts at University of
Miami.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the flcUUous name
CANPER CONSTRUCTOR at
7931 S.W. 14th Terrace Miami
Florida 83160 Intends to regis-
ter said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida.
Candldo Peres
1*778 May IT;
June 8.10,17, IBM
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO -S3 11498
NOTICE OF ACTION
INEZ T. DORMER.
PlalnUff,
vs.
FRED R. CARSTENSEN and
HAZEL W. CARSTENSEN. his
wife, RAY H. CORBETT and
GLORIA R. CORBETT. his
wife. JAMES D. PICKEN and
LILIAN C. PICKEN. his wife,
et. al., ROSE JOYCE D. SUB
BOT. as personal representa-
tive of the estate of EDWIN
SUBBOT, deceased, and ROSE
JOYCE D. SUBBOT. Indivi-
dually
Defendants
TO: FRED R. CARSTENSEN
and HAZEL W. CARSTEN-
SEN. his wife RAY H. COR-
BETT and GLORIA R. COR-
BETT. his wife JAMES D. PIC-
KEN and LILLIAN C. PIC-
KEN, his wife residences un-
known
and all parties claiming Inter-
ests by, through, under or
against them and all parties
having or claiming to have any
right, title or interest In the
property described herein.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED of the
Institution of this action against
you seeking adverse possession
and to quiet and confirm UUe of
PlalnUff and for declaratory
Judgment as to certain deeds
all regarding the following de-
scribed property In Dade
County, Florida:
Lot SO and the Northwest-
erly 40 feet of Lot 10. of CRYS-
TAL HEIGHTS, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded in
PUt Book 22. at Page 40, of the
Public Records of Dade
County. Florida
has been Bled against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
If any, to It on Stephen A.
Kress, Esq.. BARNETT *
KRESS, PA. PlalnUff s attor-
neys, whose address Is: 19 W.
Flagler Street. Suite 406,
Miami, FL 38130, on or before
July 1. 1988. and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorneys or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
Complaint.
DATED on May 24,1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By.K.Selfrled
Deputy Clerk
1""*6 May 27;
June 1.10.17.1983


I'age 12-B The Jewish Kloridian / Friday, May 27, 1983
Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OR FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. S3 1*5*7
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marralgeof
OLQA I. GONZALEZ.
PeUUoner wife,
and
OTTO GONZALEZ, a-k-a
RENE GONZALEZ.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: OTTO GONZALEZ, a-k-a
RENE GONZALEZ
CalIeS4A
Sur No 82-84
Bogota. Colombia.
South America
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ALAN S. KESSLER. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is The Roney Plaza.
Suite M-s. 2301 Collins Avenue,
Miami Beach, Fla. 331S9, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before June 10, 1963: otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
petllton.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORrDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this day of May 10,
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
by M. J. HARTNET
As Deputy Clerk
ALAN S. KESSLER. ESQ.
The Roney Plaza, Suite M-8
2301 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (306) 638-4431
18746 May 13.20,27;
June 3, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
HUMBERTO ESPINOSA
INVESTIGATIONS at 1876
s.W. 67th Avenue, Miami.
Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
SHE AND HE LEATHER
OUTLET, INC.
MICHAEL S. CEASE
Attorney for Applicant
2720 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33136
18753May 20. 27: June 3, 10,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. S3-1439*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
LEONES VICTOR LUBIN.
Petltlone r Husband.
and
PATRICIA LUBIN,
Respondent Wife
TO: PATRICIA LUBIN.
Respondent
Address and Residence
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are '
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
LLOYD M. ROITMAN. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address la 181 N.E. 82 Street.
Miami. Florida 33138, and We
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before June 10, 1883; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published >-|
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8th day of May,
1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A* Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
, By N. A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN,
ESQUIRE
181 N.E. 82 Street
Miami. FL 88188
(806)767-6800
Attorney for Petitioner
18739 May 18. 20.27;
June 8,1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTR UCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF ,
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 13-17421
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION ,
OF MARRIAGE '
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARLA O'BRIEN.
Petitioner Wife
and
JOSEPH PATRICK O'BRIEN
Respondent-Husband
TO: MR. JOSEPH PATRICK
O'BRIEN
Respondent-Husband
c-o General Delivery
Avon, Colorado 81820
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on RICHARD J. MENIN.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 999 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida
33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before June 17,
1983; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this lflth day of May,
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Clerk)
Attorney for Petitioner:
GALBUT. GALBUT AND
MENIN
By: Richard J. Menln
999 Washington Avenue
Miami, Florida 33139
18762 May 20. 27;
June 3, 10, 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83-327]
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
WALTER J. COHRSSEN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of WALTER J. COHRS-
SEN. deceased. FUe Number
83-3273, is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
.quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTH8 0F
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom this no-
tice was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualification of the personal
representative, venue, or juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 20,1988.
Personal Representative:
(8) DR. GERALDINE
COHRSSEN
9726 Broadview Terrace
Bay Harbor Islands,
Florida 33164
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NELSON A FELDMAN. P.A.
By: (s) Theodore R. Nelson
1136 Kane Concourse
6th Floor
Bay Harbor Islands,
Florida 33164
Telephone: 866-6716
18764 May20.27,1988
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case No.: 63-147*9
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIA CELIA J A YSON
Petitioner Wife
vs.
JOSEPH JA YSON m
Respondent-Husband
TO: JOSEPH JAYSON, in
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
shall serve copy of your An-'
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attor-
ney. 612 N. W. 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida. 38188. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before June 10. 1988. otherwise
a default will be entered
May 11.1888.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: M. J.Hartnett
1T47 May 18.20.27;
June 8,1888
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
Probate No. 83-3557
Dlviilon: SI
IN RE: ESTATE Or
LILLIAN 8. FAHEY.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST SATO ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS INTER-
ESTED IN SATD ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the Estate of LILLIAN 8.
FAHEY. deceased, late of
Dade County. Florida, baa
commenced In the capHoned
proceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file
any claims and demands which
you may have against the Es-
tate and to file any challenge to
the validity of the Last Will and
Testament offered for probate.
If any, or any objection to the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue or Juris
diction of the Court, with the
Court. Dade County Court-
house. 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 83180, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
YOUR RIGHT TO DO SO WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First Publication of this No-
tice on the 20 day of May ,1983.
MARY E. REILI.Y
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
LILLIAN S. FAHEY
Deceased
946 N.W. 32nd Avenue
Miami, Florida 33126
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Herbert Jay Cohen. P.A.
9400 S.Dadeland Blvd.
Suite 800
Miami. Florida 38166
Telephone: (306)666-0401
18749 May 20, 27, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 83-121*0
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FRANCISCO R. BIELMAN.
HUSBAND
and
MIRIAM BIELMAN.
WIFE
TO: MIRIAM BIELMAN
Residence Address:
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq., 16490
N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite 206.
Miami, Florida 33169 on or be-
fore June 10. 1983 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition.
DATED: May6.1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: D. C. Bryant
as Deputy Clerk
18731 May 13. 30.27;
June 8.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 63-1*828
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
AMY HUCKS. WIFE
and
WILLIAM LEE HUCKS,
HUSBAND
TO: WILLIAM LEE HUCKS
Residence Address:
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage haa been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq., 16480
N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite 308,
Miami, Florida 38169 on or be-
fore June 10, 1888 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition.
DATED: May 6,1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: V Berkley
as Deputy Clerk
May 13.30,27;
_____________________June 6,1888.
rOFf
IAL
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
THE ELEVENTH JUDICI
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION 82
File Ne. 83-38*1
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HARRY ARKIN
Deceased
NOTICE or
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HA VINO
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of HARRY AR-
KIN, deceased, late of Dade
County, Florida. FUe Number
83-3891 is pending In the Circuit
Court In and for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is 3rd Floor.
Dade County Courthouse. 78
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of this estate If
STANLEY KADUSHIN. whose
address Is 30880 N.E. 30th
Place. North Miami Beach,
Florida 33179. The name and
address of the attorney for the
personal representative are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
DATED at Miami. Florida on
this 6th day of May, 1868.
STANLEY KADUSHIN
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
HARRY ARKIN
DECEASED.
First publication of this notice
of administration on the 20 day
of May. 1983.
JOSEPH W. MALEK
Attorney for Estate
of Harry Arkln. Deceased.
Suite 501.
360 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla. 33189
18759 May 20, 37, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
GOLDEN FINGER
JEWELRY II at 8474 SW 8
Street. Miami, FL Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ROBERTGREEN.
President of
G A C JEWELRY. INC.
BRUCE LAM CHICK ESQ.
Attorney for corporation
10861 N. Kendall Dr., Suite 217
Miami. FL 83178
18766 May 20. 27;
June 8,10, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious names
MIAMI BEACH NETWORK
nd BEAUTIFICATION
TRUST at P.O. BOX 19T8 B26
West 49th Street. Miami Beach.
Florida 33140 Intends to regis-
ter said names with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County.Florida.
MIAMI BEACH NETWORK
and
BEAUTIFICATION TRUST
By: RobertKunst
STANELY M. PRED
Attorney for MIAMI BEACH
NETWORK and BEAUTIFI-
CATION TRUST
18766 May 30, 27;
June 8.10.1888
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT >
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Ntjmker 83-4187
Division S4
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GUTLLERMOA FLO RES
Deceased
NOTICE'OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of GUILLERMO A
FLORBS. deceased. FUe Num-
ber 88-4107. Is pending In the
Circuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which la 78 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33180. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with thla. court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom this'
notice was maUed that chal
lenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 27,1983.
Personal Representative:
Be rta Floras
10871 SW 86 Street
Miami, Florida 33166
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative :
LEO PLOTKIN. P.A.
8603 South Dixie Highway.
Suite 308
Miami. Florida38143
Telephone: (806)661-6068
18709 May27;
June 8, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-150*0
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GRACIELA GUZMAN.
Wlfe-PetlUoner.
and
RAUL GUZMAN,
Husband-Respondent.
TO: RAULGUZMAN
Calle 74 No. 38164
Barranqullla,
Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written dedenses, if any, to It
on ALBERT L CARRICARTE,
P.A., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2491 N.W. 7th
Street, Miami. Florida 33125.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before June 3, 1983:
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of April,
1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L. Carrlcarte. P.A.
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami, Florida 33136
Telephone: (306)649-7917
Attorney for PeUUoner
18684 May 8.13. 30.37, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name
NORTHSHORE APTS. at 988-
074 Biarritz Drive. Miami
Beach. Fla. 33141. Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
ROBERT SHERMAN
Attorney for Applicant:
ABRAHAM GALBUT
800 Washington Ave.
Miami Beach. Fla. 8MS8
18687 May 6.18. 30.37.1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name EL
MUNDO DE LOS
COLCHONE8 at 701 NW 27
Ave. Miami, FL 88136 intends
to register said name with the
Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
NELSON RODRIGUEZ
4311 SW 5 st
18780 May 30, 37;
JuneS, 10. 1983
NOTICE OF ACT in*.
CONSTRUCTlVsfR0vN|Cf
(NO PROPERTY,
IN THE CIRCUlfwURTOr.
THE ELEVENTH JUDmfl
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA .J-'
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTI0N
NO. 83-147*6 I
RB: The Marriage",
LAZARO JALANDONI
PeUUoner
and
ARLITA MANAiv I
JALANDONI, "ANA*I
Respondent
TO:ARLITAMANAAY
JALANDONI
Uptown Arcade Bids
LlbertadExt. ^
Bacalod City,
PhUlpplnes
YOU ARE HEREBY Basel
HED that an action '
Dissolution of Marriage in
been filed against you and yon
are required to serve a copy3
your written defense., if any tj
It on DEL-VALLE Hfl
NETSCH, PA, attorney fej
Petitioner, whose addrei, J
1950 S.W. 27 Avenue. Second!
Floor. Miami, Florida 331411
and file the original with thel
clerk of the above styled courts
on or before June 17, iwj I
otherwise a default will t*\
entered against you for thel
reUef demanded in the com-1
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published]
once each week for four con-l
secutlve weeks in THTl
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand andthtl
seal of said court at Miami, I
Florida on this 13th day of Miv I
1983. "f
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18T57 May 30. 17,
June 3,10.1MI
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBTl
GIVEN that the undersigned. I
deslrint to engage In buslneal
under the flcUUous namel
AUTO BEAUTY CENTERS it I
10622 S.W 184th Terrace In-1
tends to register said name!
with the Clerk of the Circuit I
Court of Dade County. Florida [
VANTAGE CONSTRUCTION.I
INC
MICHAEL A VANDETTY
Attorney for the Corporation
18733 May 13,20, V: I
June 3,1901
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBTl
GIVEN that the undersigned I
desiring to engage In buslneal
under the flctlUoua namel
BONFIRE RESTAURANT lt|
12000 Blscayne Blvd.. SuiteJ03.I
North Miami. FL 33181. Intenck f
to register said name with Uiel
Clerk of the Circuit Court of|
Dade County. Florida.
FLIEGERC0RP
By: RICHARD A GOIDEN
RICHARD A GOLDEN ESQ
Attorney for Flleger Corp
12000 Blscayne Blvd., SuiteM j
North Miami. FL 33181
18760 M,J,"'2il
JuneS, 10,1W I
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORID*
COUNTY OF DADE
M:
The undersigned, under oHJ.1
says; It Is the intention ofBM
undersigned to engage IJ
business enterprise under (Ml
fictitious name of KING, W|
NER. LEAVY RAB1RI
located at 8301 Sunset Driver
Suite 201-203 in thecltyofSoWl
Miami, Dade County. Flortdi
Those interested in nld l
terprlse, and the extentofWI
interest of each. Is SJfoUowl
Interest
Marshall King. rW
KINGaRABIN.PA
6301 Sunset Drive,
Suite 201-208
South Miami. FlorldaJll
Peter PLesvy.v.K
WAYNEReLEAVY.P*
9146 S W. 87th Avenue
Miami. Florida Ml*.
18720 M.ye.18,",^
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAM* W I
NOTICE IS HEMBI
GIVEN that the "*, I
desiring to engsge ""fj
under the ncUUojs1 name
GISELLE'S B0UTWIM
located at 18169 NE;
Blvd- 2 X DM. o2|
Miami Beach, ^^J
Florida, intends to regU"' I
said name with theClert^-
arcultCourtofDsdtWmi
100PRNT ,
BENHOLTZ.Pr*"?^
18169 MABSJCT
North Miami*'
18714


Friday, May 27,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B

iblic Notice
. NOTICE OF ACTION
INSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
W ,No PROPERTY)
-THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
.MEELEVENTH JUDICIAL
loHCOITOF FLORIDA, IN
WD FOR DADE COUNTY
11 CIVIL ACTION
NO.H-lMtS
MM FOR DISSOLUTION
r OFMARRIAOE
(IRE: The Marriage Of:
* AMANDA VASQUEZ,
WIN,
1 ROBERTO VASQUEZ,
J Husband
|j0 ROBERTO VASQUEZ.
Csrrers 18, No. 38-80 Sur
Bofrota, Columbia
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
LfHD that action for
Involution of Marriage has
n filed against you and you
I required to serve a copy of
jr written defense*. If any. to
la LEON Q. NICHOLS, at-
icy for Petitioner, whose
t li 7488 8.W. 8th Street.
___Florida 83144. and file
i original with the clerk of
i above ityled court on or
fere June 10,1983: otherwise
default will be entered
you for the relief
I In the complaint or
[ TTus notice shall be published
I each week for four con-
Kutlve weeks In THE
riSH FLORIDIAN.
| WITNESS my hand and the
I of said court at Miami,
i on this 9th day of May
RICHARD P. BFUNKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByMJ HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
cult Court Seal I
lomey for Petitioner:
I.0NG NICHOLS
SW 8th Street
ami. Florida 331*4
lephone: 13051262-3016
May 18,20. 27;
June 8, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
INOPROPERTY)
[THECIRCUIT COURT OF
ME ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
| CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
0ECOUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No: Ultm
RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EILA BALLARD,
[Wife
CLOMON BALLARD,
I Husband
I SOLOMON BALLARD
] Residence Address:
Residence l.'nknown
?OU ARE NOTIFIED that
I action for dissolution of
Frlg' has been filed
t you and you are re-
I to serve a copy of your
n defenses, if any. to It on
N. Crown, Esq., 16490
Tth Avenue. Suite 205,
Florida 33189 on or
June 17, 1963 and file the
I with the Clerk of this
t either before service on
FJjuner s attorney or lmme-
Wy thereafter; otherwise a
"wit will be entered against
J lor the relief demanded In
| Petition
WM: May 11, 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
[ Clerk of Circuit Court
By: V. Barkley
As Deputy Clerk
May 20,27:
June 3.10,1883
THECIRCUIT COURT OF
FELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
fBE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. IJ-l7ISI
THE MARRIAGE OF
NAFITZPATRICK,
I^UUoner,
lALBAN.
fMpondent.
.war alban
SIS*11 Unknown
I WTICE OF ACTION
*( ARE HEREBY NOTI-
"lat a Petition for Dlsso-
" of Marriage has been
\*Um you, and that you
"Wired to serve a copy of
o sponae or Pleading to
I *>ntlon upon the Petl-
r attorney, Ronald 8.
T^nan, ^tq., at 8900 8.W.
'*". Suite 208. Miami,
J 31176. and file the
J Response or Pleading
dtrvC' of the Clerk "
Court, on or before the
Pr June, 1983 If you
I* a Default Judg-
^ he taken against you
"/Wef demanded In the
l- t Miami. Dade
TJ ^orlda Uua day of
P^ARD P. BRINKER.
d. aerk
BV CUrlnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
May JO. 27;
June i, 10, IMS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 81-3187
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ETTA GOODMAN.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of ETTA GOODMAN,
deceased. File Number 88-3387.
la pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which is Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. FL 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 20,1983.
Personal Representative:
ABRAHAM GOODMAN
SOUTHEAST BANK. N.A.
By: ARNE R. THEMMEN
100 South Blscayne Blvd.
Miami, FL 33131
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative :
SPARBER. SHEVIN, ROSEN,
3HAPO AND HEILBRON-
NER. P.A.
One Southeast Third Avenue
Malml.FI.33131
Telephone: (306)368-7990
18764 May 20, 27, 1983
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY.FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 31-1*50
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
FRANCES FROMMER,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of FRANCES FROM-
MER. deceased. FUe Number
83-3960. Is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which Is 73 W.
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal rep-
resentative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 20,1983
Personal Representative
MARGARET FROMMER
1600 Bay Road, Apt. 1186
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
HENRYNORTON
HENRY NORTON LAW
OFFICES
Suite 1201.19 W. Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (306)374-3116
18767 May 20. 27, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned desiring
to engage In business under the
fictitious names "UltraMln"
and "UltraMlnd" Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
ARMANDO CLERCH
18781 May 20, 27;
June 3.10,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name SUN-
SPOT SOARING CENTER at
10811 SW 60 Ter., Miami. Fla.
S3173 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
THORPE AVIATION. INC.
By BRIAN THORPE, Prea.
FREDERICK C. SAKE. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
18771 May 27;
June 3, 10, 17,1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 81 41*3
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EDITH STONE,
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSON8 HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED DM
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of EDITH STONE,
deceased, File Number 83-4163,
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 West Flagler
Street, 3rd Floor, Miami. FL
33130. The personal rep-
resentative of the estate la
SHIRLEY GOLDSTEIN,
whose address Is 1760 N.E. 191
Street. Apartment 810. North
Miami Beach. FL 83179. The
name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persona having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due. the date when It
win become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: May 20.1983.
SHIRLEY GOLDSTEIN
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
EDITH STONE
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
LEE. J. OSIASON. Esquire
Fromberg. Fromberg, Roth
Gross. Cohen. Shore A Berke,
P.A.
420 South Dixie Highway.
Third Fir.
Coral Gables, FL 33146
Telephone: 13061 M-822
18765 May 20, 27, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO 81-1717
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VICKIE JOYCE
WILLIAMS,
Wife
and
RICHARD WAYNE
WILLIAMS,
Husband
TO: RICHARD WAYNE
WILLIAMS
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
dissolution of marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on Bruce N. Crown. Esq
16480 N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite
306, Miami, Florida 38189 on or
before June 17, 1983 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
DATED May 17. 19*3
RICHARD P BRINKER
CLERK OF CmCUTT COURT
Dade County, Florida
By: D.C.BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal!
mat May 20. 27;
June 3,10.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOFROFERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO IJ IM55
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
DM RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GLORIA ALFONSO HER-
NANDEZ,
Wife Petitioner,
and
ROBERTO HERNANDEZ,
Husband-Respondent.
TO: ROBERTO HERNANDEZ
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on ALBERT L CARRI
CARTE. P.A.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2491 N.W. 7th Street. Miami,
Florida 33126. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June 10. 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
witness my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 4th day of May
1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M.J. HARTNETT
As Deputy aerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
P.A.
2491 N.W. 7th. Street
Miami. Florida 33126
Telephone: (306)648-7917
18723 May 13, 20,27
June 3.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name HAL-
LANDALE REALTY ASSOCI-
ATES at 777 Brlckell Avenue,
Suite 708. Miami. Florida 83131
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Joshua D. Manaster.
Trustee
18774 May 27;
June 3.10.17.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
DINETTE CONCEPTS at 1280
N.E. 163 Street, in the City of
North Miami Beach. Florida.
Intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
26th day of April. 1983.
DINING CONCEPTS. INC.
By: HAROLDMONUSE,
President
Attorney for Applicant:
RICHARD A. GOLDEN
Kramer and Golden. P.A.
Blscayne Centre, Suite 203
12000 Blscayne Blvd.
North Miami, FL 33181
Telephone: (306)898-1800
18685 May 6,13. 20.27, 1983
ELEVENTH
CIRCUITCOURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case No: 13 151*4
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
GERARD FILS-ATME.
Petitioner-Husband
and
MUREIL FILS-AIME,
Respondent-Wife
TO: MUREIL FILS-AIME,
c-o LUCTNE CIVIX.
Bureau Contributions,
Crolx Des Mission,
Port-au-Prince. Haiti,
shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, attor-
ney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida, 33138, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before June 3. 1983, otherwise a
default will be entered.
April 29,1983.
RICHARD BRINKER
BY: V. Barkley
18716 May 8.13. 20. 27.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
MIAMI SPRINGS SHOE RE-
PAIR at 348 Westward Drive.
Miami Springs, Fl Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
HENRY M PEIRCE
I STANLEY E. OOODMAN
Attorney lor PEIRCE
18721 Mayf.ll, JO. 17.18M
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOFROFERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 81-11*43
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOSE M. SANDOVAL.
AND
MARIA ELENA SANDOVAL
TO: Maria ElenaSandoval
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
it on MILTON C. GOODMAN,
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 1* West
Flagler Street. No. 820. Miami.
Florida 83130, and file the
original with the clerk of the
I above styled court on or before
June IT, 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secuUve weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 13th day of May
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKE R
As aerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N.A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
MILTON C. GOODMAN. ESQ.
19 West Flagler Street No. 520
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (805)379-1886
18768 May 20, 27:
June3.10.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOFROFERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.91-15188
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
MARY B. SHABEER,
Petitioner,
and
GHULAM SHABEER.
Respondent
TO: GHULAM SHABEER
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
it on MARTIN ROTH, attorney
for Pettltloner, whose address
is 14 N.E. 1st Avenue, Miami,
Florida 33132, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June 3rd, 1983: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you fbr the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
Tills notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida or. this 29th day of April
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: V. BARKLEY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18717 May 6.18. 20, 27.1881
ELEVENTH
CIRCUITCOURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
FC Case No. 61-1SM7
DM RE: The Marriage of:
PETTT IFOCOEUR.
Petitioner-Husband
and
JEAN ETHEL rFOCOEUR.
Respondent-Wife
TO: JEAN ETHEL
IFOCOEUR.
Residence unknown,
shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attor-
ney, 812 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida, 33138. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before June 3.1983, otherwise a
default will be entered.
April 29. 1983
RICHARD BRINKER
By: V. Barkley
18719 May 8.18. 20. 27,1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
'GIVEN that the undersigned.
' desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
| FLORIDA SERVTTEC BUSI-
NESS EQUIPMENTS at 5M
SW 8th Street Miami. Fla
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
Raul Rodrtgues A
Rolando Rodriguet
18722 MayS. 13, JO,
27,1888
I NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 33-1*3fO
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
Ti RE: The Marriage of
MERELDA POITTER,
Petitioner-Wife.
ind
ELEAZAR POITTER,
Respondent-Husband
TO: ELEAZAR POTTIER
Augusta Street
Nassau, Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any to
It on LLOYD M. ROUTMAN.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 181 N.E. 82 Street.
Miami. FL 33138. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June 10. 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you fbr the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDLAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 9th day of May
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M.J HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN
181 N.E 82 Street
Miami. FL33138
Telephone: (3061757-5800
18741 May 13,20. 27;
June 3.1983
'
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIOA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO : 11 10317
DM RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EDGARD JEAN-PIERRE,
HUSBAND
and
BETTY JEAN-PIERRE,
WIFE
TO: BETTY JEAN-PIERRE
Residence Addreas:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq., 16480
N.W 7th Avenue. Suite 208.
Miami, Florida 33189 on or be-
fore June 10. 1983 and file the
original with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the Petition
DATE: May 6, 1883
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: D C. Bryant
as Deputy Clerk
18734 May 13. 20.27;
June 3.1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
ARBITRAGE LEASDMG AS-
SOCIATES at 1401 Brlckell
Avenue. Miami, Florida 33131
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
HUNTER W WOLCOTT
ROSEANN D. WOLCOTT
CYPEN, CYPEN A DRTBIN
Attorneys for Hunter W. Wol-
cott and Roseann D. Wolcott
i 826 Arthur Godfrey Road
Post Office Box 402009
Miami Beach, Florida 83140
18728 May 18, 20.27;
______________ Junes, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
.NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the) fictitious name
GLENVIEW VILLA at 9616
S.W. 170 Street. Perrlne,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
LIVING CENTERS. INC.,
d-b-a OLE NVIEW VILLA
By: LEON G. NICHOLS.
Attorney
LEON G. NICHOLS
Attorney for LTVTNO CEN-
TERS, INC.
7488 SWeth Street
Miami. Fl 33144
18783 May IS, 20. 27;
Junes, l*s)j


^ iug t/wwiHn r lonaian / r naay, May 27,1983
\
NOTICt OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVI SERVICE
PROPERTY
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF I
THE ELE VENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
OADR COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO: 82-12900
JOSEPH SOROTA
Plaintiff.
.
BURRON INVESTMENTS.
N.W..
Lai.
Defendants
TO: WILLIAM W. LTNN
a single man
Residence Unknown
JOHN DEREK SCOTT Of
the Isle of Man
Residence Unknown
and any unknown party who
la or may be Interested tn the
subject matter of this action
whoa* namaa and residences.
after diligent search and
inquiry, are unknwon to Plain-
tiff and which said unknown
parties may claim aa heirs, de-
vises, grantees, assignees,
lienora. creditors, trustees, or
other claimants by. through.
under or against the said De-
fendant BURRON INVEST-
MENTS. INC.
You are notified that an
action to foreclose a mortgage
on the following property in
Dade County. Florida, to-wit
Exhibit "A"
Lota l, 2. and S tn Block 10.
TOWNSITE OF HARDINO.
according to the plat thereof,
recorded In Plat Book 94 at
page 4 of the public records of
Dade County, Florida
All of the Mortgagor's right.
title and Interest In and to the
following leasehold estates:
(1) Lease dated January 1,
1900. recorded In Deed Book
9346. page BBS, public records of
Dad* County, Florida, between
DOROTHY HYLAND. Lessor
and THE COLLINS OCEAN
CORPORATION. Lease*.
covering Lot 6. Block 10,
TOWNSITE OF HARDING.
Plat Book 34. page 4. public
records of Dade County.
Florida
12) Lease dated May IS. 1*40
and amendment thereto, dated
January 1. 1946, recorded In
Dead Book 3641. page 184 and
Dead Book 2641 page 213. public
records of Dade County.
Florida, covering Iota 0 and 13.
Block 10. TOWNSITE OF
HARDING, according to the
plat thereof, recorded in Plat
Book 34. page 4. public records
of Dad* County. Fla
(*> Lease dated May 3a. I960.
between STLGO CORPORA-
TION. Lessor, and KAYAR.
INC.. Lessee covering the
Eaateriy 40 feet of Lot 11. Block
10. TOWNSITE OF HARDING.
Flat Book M. page 4. public
records of Dad* County,
Florida, less a certain struc-
ture located In the Northwest
corner of said parcel.
(4) Lease dated the 5th day of
October. 19B1, between
SAMUEL A. RIVKIND. et a).
Lessor and PAN AMERICAN
INVESTMENT COMPANY, a
Florida corporation. Lessee.
recorded in Deed Book 3013.
pake 904. of the public records
of Dade County, Florida.
covering lot 4, Block 10.
TOWNSITE OF HARDING.
Plat Book 94. page 4, according
to the public records of Dade
Coutny. Florida.
TOGETHER with the Improve-
ments thereon and together
with all of the furniture, fix-
tures, equipment, transferable
licenses presently on said
property or hereafter placed on
said property being known aa
BLUE WATERS HOTEL. SEA
SHELL APARTMENTS and
DU BARRY HOTEL aa set
fourth In the inventory at-
tached hereto and made a part
of. TOGETHER with all the
tenements, hereditaments and
appurtenances with every
privilege, right, title. Interest
and estate, reversion, re-
mainder and easement belong-
ing or in anyuise appertaining.
TOGETHER with all struc-
tures and improvements now
and hereafter on said land and
the fixtures attached thereto.
and all rente, issues, proceeds
and profits accruing and to
accrue from said premises, all
of which are Included within
the foregoing description and
the habendum hereof. Also all
gaa, steam electric water and
other heating and power
systems and fixture* which
now are or may hereafter
pertain to or be used wtih. In or
on said premise* even though
they be detached or
detachable.
has been Wed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any to It on SAMUEL S.
SOROTA. ESQUIRE. Plain
tlff'a Attorney, whose address
la: 10800 Northeast ISth
Avenue, suite 337. North Miami
Beach. Florida 88183. on or
before June !4. 1088. and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
upon Plaintiff's Attorney or
Immediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on this ISth
day of May. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKS R
aa Clerk of the Court
By B. J. Foy
Deputy Clark
18770 May 37:
Jun* 8.10.17.1988
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADC COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
N0.8J-14J8J
ACTION rOR DISSOLUTION
Or MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE Or:
LUIS A. FLORE8.
and
ZENAIDA F LORES.
TO: MRS. ZENAIDA FLORES -
1900 Lamone St (Apt 3041
Washington. DC. 20010
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has bean
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It
on. attorney for Petitioner
whoa* address la A. KOS8, '
ATTORNEY AT LAW. P.A..
101 N.W. 13th Avenue, Miami.
Florida 88138. and file the
original with the clerk of the '
above styled court on or before
June 10. 1983 otherwise a da-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded to
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each weak for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this day of May 0.
1888.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByM. J.Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
MARIANO SOLE. ESQ.
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW. PA
101 N.W. 13th Avenue
Miami. Florida 99138
Tel.: (908)830-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
18730 May 18,20.27;
JuneS. !"
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTR UCTI VE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHC CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DAD! COUNTY
Civil Action
Na. 83-2940 FC (91)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE Or
RENE BORUNET.
Petitioner Husband.
and
ENEIDA SANCHEZ
VELEZ de BORUNET.
Respondent Wife
TO: ENEIDA SANCHEZ
VELEZ de BORUNET
Bloc.ueE-2
Urbanization Los
Maeatros
Humacao,
Puerto Rico 00081
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
TED E TSOUPRAKE. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whoa* ad-
dress is 220 Miracle Mile-Suite
222. Coral Gables, Fla. 93194.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before June 9, 1989;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you tor the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of April.
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By D. C. Bryant
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal >
TED E. TSOUPRAKE
220 Miracle Mile-Suite 222
Coral Gables. Fla. 88184
Telephone: (300>44S-1SB7
Attorney for Petitioner
18712 May 8.18. 30.27. 1988 I
NOTICK UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name LA
MODA FURNITURE at 701
NW 27 Ave. Miami. PL 38125
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Nelson Rodriguet
4811 SW 8 St.
18752 May 20. 27;
June 9.10. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DAD! COUNTY
Civil Actton NO. 03-150*4
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ERNESTO PEREZ.
PstlUoner-Huaband.
and
MERCEDES AOUTLLAR. ,
Respondent-Wife
TO: MERCEDES AGUILLAR
29A 29B CsJJe 74
Marlanao, Buena Vista
Havana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT1 I
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address la 430 Lincoln Road-
Suit* 870. Miami Beach,
Florida 99190. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before June
9.1988; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 38 day of April.
1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
430 Lincoln Rd.-Suite 870
Miami Beach. Florida88199
Attorney for Petitioner
18711 MayO. 19. 20. 27.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Pile Number 83 12*5
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE Or
lewis rox.
Deceased
notice or
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
State Of LEWIS FOX. de-
ceased. File Number 89-8388. is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
to TS West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 88181. The
name* and addresses of to*
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
Or THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom notice
waa mailed that challenge* the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FTLED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on May 37.1988.
Personal Representative:
MAX FOX
c-9 Carole Kerun Ganguzxa
1428 Brlcxell Avenue. Suite 700
Miami. Florida 39191
Attorney for Personal
Representative
CAROLE KENIN GANGUZZA
Myers, Kenln, Levlnson.
Ruffner. Frank A Richards
1428 Brlckell Avenue. Suite 700
Miami. Florida 99191
Telephone: (905)971-9041
18778 May 27;
June 3.1989
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
CREME de la CREME at
481 s w 98th St.. Miami, r la.
33150. Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Gloria Jeanne De Witt
Owner
Russell W. Galbut. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
18777 May 27;
June 9.10.17.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
H.R.C. JANITORIAL SER-
VICES at 1346 Meridian Ave..
Apt. B. Miami Beach. Fla.. in-
tends to register amid name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Horado Resales
Owner
18778 May37:
Jun* 3.10.17. 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTR UCTI VE SE RVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 11-1 SO SO
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE Or:
NELLT BELLO,
Wife-Petitioner
and
LUIS ENRIQUE BELLO.
Husband-Respondent.
TO: LUIS ENRIQUE BELLO
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has)
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any, to
It on ALBERT L. CARRI-
CARTE, P.A.. attorney for
Petitioner, whoa* address la
2491 N.W. 7th. Street. Miami.
Florida 98138. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June 9. 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 28th day of
April. 1989.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: M.J. HARTNETT
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
ALBERT L CARRICARTE.
P. A.
2491 N.W. 7th. Street
Miami, Florida 99128
Telephone: (808)0*9-7917
18888 May 8.18.20.27.1983
r
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FROEATE DIVISION
File Number 81-4240
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE Or
MAX GOLDBERG.
Deceased
notice or
ADMIN1TRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of MAX GOLDBERG, de-
ceased, File Number 88-4240. la
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
la 78 Wast Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. The
namaa and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) ail
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
waa mailed that challenge* the
validity of the will, the quallfl-
catlons of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice haa
begun on May 27.1989.
Personal Representative:
RUTH GOLDBERG
4101 Pi net ree Drive
Miami Beach. Fla. 33140
Attorney for Personal
Representative'
HARRY ZUKERNICK
420 Lincoln Road.
Suite 441
Miami Beach. Florida 93139
Telephone: (305)672-0099
18779 May 27;
June 9.1989
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
No. 83-18307
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE EY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
MARIE DESIR.
Petitioner-wife,
and
CHARLES DESIR.
Respondent-husband,
YOU. CHARLES DESIR.
residence unknown, are re-
quired to file your answer to
the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the
above Court and serve a copy
thereof upon the petitioner's
attorney, Martin Cohen, Esq..
622 S. W. 1st. Street. Miami.
Fla., 38180, on or before June
27. 1983. or else petition will be
confessed.
Witness my hand and the seal
of this Court, at Miami. Dade
County. Florida, this 28rd day
of May, 1988.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk Circuit Court
ByK.Selfrted
Deputy Clerk
18780 May 27;
Junes. 10,17.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO S3-1*100
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
GRACIELA DIAZ da
ROMERO.
Petltloner-WIfe.
and
HUGO ENRIQUE ROMERO.
Respondent Husband
TO: HUGO ENRIQUE
ROMERO
Traversa) 10,
No. 13880 Interior 80.
Bogota. Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
bean filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defense*, if any. to
It on LEOPOLDO A. OCHOA.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Penthouse One, IBS
S. Miami Avenue. Miami.
Florida 98130. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
Jun* 10, 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 5th day of May
1903.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clark. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M.J. HARTNETT
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LEOPOLDO A OCHOA. ESQ.
Penthouse On*
108 S. Miami Avenue
Miami. Florida 99190
Telephone: (300)794-1233
18727 May 13.20. 27:
June 3.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 831*341
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
PHTLISTER O. YEARWOOD.
Petitioner Husband.
and
DOROTHY A. DARLING
YEARWOOD.
Respondent Wife
TO: DOROTHY A. DARLING
YEARWOOD.
Respondent
Highburry Park.
P.O. Box N9209
Nassau, Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress to 181 N.E. 83 Street. Sec-
ond Floor. Miami. FL 33138.
and fit* the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before June 10. 1083;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 9th day of May.
1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM. J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Lloyd M. Routman. Esq.
181 N.E. 82 Street
Second Floor
Miami. FL 33198
Attorney for Petitioner
18742 May 19,20. 27;
June 9.1989
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
HUGS N KISSES at 10056
Sunsst Drive. Miami. Florida
39173. Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Systems Dimensions, Inc.,
a Florida Corporation
By: JORGE CALVO.
President
Systems Dimensions, Inc
8878 S.W 83 Street
Miami. Florida 93143
MARSHALL BENNETT
FISHER. ESQ.
Attorney for Applicant
18778 May27:
June 8,10.17. 1989
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the underiwl
*jSj[to engsg. K5g*
S HAmcUTTERY. it I7u
"^Highway. Mlanu.rU
Intend* to register said nam.
with the Clerk of the cSS
Court of Dade County. Ftoild.
JOHN TRACY SKWIERC
Owner
David R. Welasman. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
92008. DadelandBlvd
Suite 008
Miami. Fla. 89156
It7* My,r;
__________ June 3.10, lta
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the g2g
desiring to engage In buslnM,
under the flctlUoua nam,
TREVI BUILDING .1 |S
Harding Avenue. Surfiid,
Florida, intend to register sun
name with the Clerk of th.
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
ELIE 8YNODINQ8
TOILETTE SYNODBJ0S
Applicants
Attorney for Applicant:
BRUCE LAMCHICK
10051 N. Kendall Dr.. Suite 117
Miami. FL98179
18796 May 13,20.77;
Ju.ne6.i9jj
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE C0UN7Y
CIVILACTI0N
No. S3-15471
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALPHONCINE G WILLIAMS.
PetlUoner-wife.
and
HAROLD WILLIAMS,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: HAROLD WILLIAMS
East Street
Southern DIM
Nassau Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY N0TI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage hai
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy ol
your written defenses. If any, to
It on GEORGE T RAMANI.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address to 711 Blscayne Bids.
19 West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the abort
styled court on or before June
10. 1988: otherwise a default
will be entered against you lor
the relief demanded In tlw
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and IK
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 4th day of May,
1989.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
GEORGE T RAMANI
19 West Flagler Street. No. 711
Miami. Florida 33110
Telephone: (3061374-4340
Attorney for Petitioner
18724 MaylJ.;
JuneS.
INTHECIRCUITCOUBTOf
THE ELEVENTH JUOIOAI
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORID*
CSS* NO 83 <2IS
NOTICE OF AC7I0N-
NO PROPERTY
IN RE The Marriage of
ALICE L MASHACK
Petitioner Wife
REGINALD MASHACK
&sffii.1Km
g,.. plaintiff. .W*g
whose address Is
r^do Terr. North Miam^
33181 onorbe^re'W
1983; and file th* **!
the clerk of this court .IIW
fore service on P'^'^r
y or Immediate^ fgg
otherwise s default *w ,
tered against you forw
demanded in the compi*"1
petition fc.rt and f>*
WITNESS my h"d'
seal of this court on w
19MR,CHARDPhBBy
aartoftMOF*
byD-CBryont
Ai DeputyCW *.
18743 NU/UB,I,1*


##ri&:$ay 27, ihs /The Jewish Floridian
i
Pagel5-B

Six adult members of Temple Shir Ami are
shown preparing for their upcoming B'nai
Mitvah, when they will be called to the Torah
June 3. Guiding the celebrants is temple
spiritual leader. Rabbi Brett Goldstein, bach
center. The six are, from left, Rhoda Mayer,
Barbara Feuer, Bonnie Jerostow, Jane
Weiner, Alan Gold, andOfeha SiegeL
Talmudic U. Adult Education Set Auditions Underway
An adult education program
has been initiated by Tabnudic
University of Florida at its main
campus, Miami Beach. Rabbi
Yochanan Zweig, president and
Rosh HaYeshiva, said enrollment
for the new semester is currently
underway.
Saturday afternoon Sabbath
study sessions are held at differ-
ent private homes in the 41st
Street area, with Rabbi Zwoig
and Rabbi Moshe Goldberg alter-
nating as lecturers.
Rabbi Zweig also provides a
discussion on the 13 principles of
Moses Maimonides on the main
campus, Mondays at 5 p.m. He
gives discourse and analysis on
the Torah portion of the week
Thursdays at 9 p.m.
Memorial Services To Host Bryn, Braidman
Delta Players of North Miami
Beach will be producing a gala
adaptation of Gilbert and Sulli-
van's HMS Pinafore (Der Shirtz)
in Yiddish for the coming season.
A non-profit organization, the
Players volunteer their services
to benefit charities supporting
Israel.
Openings are available for new
talent. Seenie Hurwitz is in
charge.
Thirtieth Annual Memorial
Day Services will be held by
West Miami Post 224 and Ladies
Auxiliary. Jewish War Veterans,
Sunday morning at 9:30 a.m. at
Edmund P. Cooper Park in West
Miami. Post Commander Marvin
Herman and Auxiliary President
Thelma Pollock will attend.
Rabbi Nathan Bryn of Temple
Beth Tov will chant memorial
prayers, flag-raising ceremonies
will be conducted by Boy Scout
Troop 509, and a flag flown over
Washington will be presented to
West Miami Vice Mayor Ken
Braidman.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. n-IMSS
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE KARRI AGE OF
RAMIROL RODRIGUEZ.
HuibandPetlUoner.
and
MARIA T. NUNEZ RODRI-
GUEZ,
Wife-Respondent.
TO. MARIA T. NUNEZ
RODRIGUEZ
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Jaarrlafe has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to Ron
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
PA., attorney for Petitioner,
whoe address Is 2401 N.W. Tth
Street. Miami. Florida 88126.
n er* of the above styled court
on or before June 10. IMS;
otherwise a default wUl be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
ecutive weeks in THE JEW-
OH FLORIDIAN.
witness my hand and the.
seal of said court at Miami,
nortda on this day of May a.
BBtV
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Ai Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM. J.Hartnett
.. As Deputy Clerk
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
J*i N.w. Tth Street
*J*mi.FtorldaliJ6
A"y tor Petitioner
W7sg May u, so, ST:
June I, IBM
Greetings will also be given by
Dade County Council officers, in-
cluding Department of Florida
President Carol Gold. Sidney
Potlock, past Department com-
mander, and Natalie Rosenberg,
past Auxiliary president, are
Americanism co-chairmen.
JWVService Set
Dade County Council and
Ladies Auxiliary of Jewish War
Veterans of America will hold
joint Memorial Day Services
Sunday at Mount Nebo Cemetery
at 10:45 a.m.
Howard Melnick, Council com-
mander, will attend.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. 83-17618
IN RE: The Marriage of
MEENA HIRANANDANI.
Petitioner Wife,
and
SHAM HIRANANDANI,
Respondent-Husband.
TO SHAM HIRANANDANI
OUNUN Saharl XI
No : S10E-S
Jakarta, Indonesia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed age'"* you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defensss. U any. to It on
GEORGE T. RAMANL at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 711 BUcejme Bids..,
i West Flagler Street Miami.
Florida asiJO, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
June *4. IMS otherwlss a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
witness my hand and the
eeal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this lth day of May
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida -
ByC.P.Oopeiand
At Deputy Clerk
GEORGE T. RAMANI
Til Blacayne Bldg.
loWsstFlaflerStret
Miami. Florida tnso
Attorney for Petitioner
irrrs Maysr;
Junei.l0.l7,iM

1 4 t 6 6
&&
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
RAPHAEL
Israel. 90, of Miami since 1S8. died. He
Is survived by daughters. Beverly Gold
and Helena Homlk: three grandchil-
dren. Gall Sanforo, Jr.. Bruce Hornlk.
and Melissa Gold; and two sisters. He
was a member of Miami Beach K of P.
Funeral services were held May 34
SCHAPIRO
Oscar B S3, of Miami Beach, passed
away May 18. Noted Philanthropist, Mr
Schaplro was active in Kneseth Israel
Congregation, Hebrew Academy, Israel
Bonds. JFN, Messina High School, and
academies of higher learning In Israel.
Services were held at Kneseth Israel
CongregaUon on May 30; arranged by
Riverside Chapel.
KISELGOFF, Frances, 84, North
Miami Beach, May 30.
FELDMAN, Max. Miami Beach. May
SO. Rubln-ZUbart.
FREIBERG, Ada. T3, Miami Beach,
May SO. Riverside.
PASTERNACK. Jacob, 78, Bal Har-
bour. May SO. Riverside.
SIEGEL, Eda. 74. Miami Beach. May
30. Riverside.
GOTTLIEB, Dr. Benjamin, Miami
Beach, May SO. Riverside.
SWIMAN. Milton M., North Miami, May
22 Blasberg.
BLOCH. Freda M., Miami Beach. May
SO.
FODOR, Frances H. North Miami
Beach, May SS Riverside
JULY. Mildred L.. CO, Coral Gables.
May 11 Riverside.
SCHOEM. Alex. tt. Worth Miami. May
M Menoreh.
STMBERO. Max. Miami Beaoh. May 3*.
Rubin ZUbert Star of David.
JARMULOFF,. Abraham. Miami
Beach, May S3. Rubin ZUbert.
LEVINE. Rose, Hlaleah. May S3
Rubln-ZUbert.
JOSEPH. Fretda. Miami Beach. May
S8. Rubln-ZUbert.
HEPPS. Frank. May 38. Riverside.
ORN8TEIN, Arthur. Rubln-ZUbert.
WEIS, Johanna. Miami Beach. May 23.
Riverside. Star of David.
SCHLEIN. Frances R May 32. Rubln-
ZUbert.
BERK, Milton, 78, North Miami Beach,
May 38.
BLUMENTHAL, Cy H., 68, North
Miami, May 36. Riverside. Star of Da-
vid.
HORWITZ, William J., North Bay VU-
lage, May 25 Rubln-ZUbert.
ROSENBLUM, June, Miami Beach,
May 28. Riverside.
UBERTHSON, David, 82, North Miami
Beach, May 18.
TOBIAS, Miriam, Miami Beach, May
17. Star of DavM.
SCHARF, Frances Moric Menorah.
SIMBERKOFF. Evle, Miami Beach,
May 30. Riverside.
FRAWLEY
WUma Dvora, 47, a native of Miami,
passed away May 16. She was a Traffic
Safety Director for Dade County Court
for over 26 years. Mrs. Frawley was a
member of Dade County Citizens Safety
Council, Woman and Child Committee;
Governor's Highway Council; member
at-large of Florida Federation of Safety
Organization; and honorary member of
American Society of Safety Engineers
and OES, Lakeside Chapter, Survivors
include a husband. William: eon.
Samuel Hlrsch of HaUandale; an aunt
and uncle. Mr. and Mrs. I.M. Dock of
Miami; and cousin, BUI Solen. Service*
were held May 19 at Gordon Funeral
Home. Interment followed at Mount
Nebo Cemetery.
MALKIN
| David, 88, of Miami, died May 18 at
Fountain head Nursing Home. He was
born In Boston and wokred for Westvlew
Country Club for SO years. He waa a
, member of Temple Beth El Northport
and Independent Order of B'nai B'rtth
of New York. Survivors Include a broth-
ler. Joseph Malkln of Warm Mineral
Springs. Fla and two nieces, Shirley
Cowell of Port Malabar, Fla. and Esther
Danslnger of Margate. Services were
held May SO.
DRANOW
Sylvia, as. of Miami, passed away May
19 after a long Ulness. She was an artirt,
member of Dadeland Garden Club.
and the Opera OuUd She was the wife of
Jack: mother of Jeffrey Elliot of Santa
tos-j^^aiidaorewrftasja^sha-
iE?" P^*. *- Oraaow^tairel c-.
MsitJsatioad, Mass end Rise. Ann
Ormnow of Miami; .later of Bernard
***** mat, Edna. Fred, and LUllan
Laaarui, all of Miami: and (he grand
mother of three. Funeral sen lies were
held May 30 at Gordon Funeral Home

STONE
Bertha. 89, a former civic leader and
businesswoman in Havana. Cuba and a
resident of Miami Beach since 1969, died
May 19. She founded Nuestra Senora del
PUar Hospital in Havana and with her
late husband. Max, founded Jewish
Cuban Center, which helped settle Ger-
man Jews after the Holocaust. She was
the mother Of Fantta Presmsn and Dr.
Mario Stone; grandmother of five: and
great-grandmother of six. Funeral
services were held May 23 at Riverside
Chapel.
HART
Ida. of Miami Beach, passed away May
23. She had made her home here for the
past 80 years, coming from N.Y. She
was a member of ORT. Survivors In-
clude sons, Jack of North Miami and
Herbert of Fort Lauderdale; daughter.
W'.lma Baron of Valley Stream. N.Y.;
sister. Frances Smith of Brooklyn,
N Y.i six grandchildren, and three
great-grandchildren. Funeral services
were held May 26 at Gordon Funeral
Home.
-r
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SlIMm BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
18840 West Dixie H wy
Represented by S levttt, f 0.
New York: (2121 26J-76O0 Queens Blvd & 76th Rd. forest Hills.N.Y.
Broward County
925-33%
1921 Pembroke Rd.
RUBINZILBERt
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL $
Murray Rubin, F.O.
Three Generations of our
Family Serving You in
Dade Th.or.iy Broward
Miami Pawn Guaranteed Hallandato
1701 Alton Road Prg-Arem.nt. ** H*y.
538-6371 No Money In Advance 456*401 f


<*>. Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, May 27, 1983

I
Pncei Effective in Dade
Broward. Palm Beach. Martin
SI Lucia and Indian Rive,
Counties ONLY!
Add value to your
D Kl. Memorial Day picnic
Pu?hx with extra savings from Publix
Breakfast Club, Hoi Dog or
Hamburger
Buns
Family Pa*. Cookout Favorita
3-lb. or Mora Package
Beef
Ground
Chuck
$179
Make your family s Memorial Day
picnic a feast they II rememb.
a long, long time Everything you
need is ready and waiting tor
you now at Publix
Assorted Flavors
Ht-C Fruit Drinks ....tZ 65*
Orange or Lsmon Lime,
Gatorade..........#'\ibotue !
Read's,
Throe Bsan Sated.
Garden Sated. Homastyte or Gorman
Potato Salad............t 69*
Van Camp's
Pork and Beans....... c.' 73*
Del Monte Catsup.... bott 59'
Squeeze Bottle
French's Mustard.... 1%'. 79*
Ttegulaf or Diet. Assorted Flavors
Publix Sodas............mm 69*
Unsweetened, Assorted Flavors
(Makes 2-quarts)
Kool-Aid.................. anv 73*
Breakfast Club. White
Sandwich Bread...... k>a' 55*
5-oz. Cheez Baas, 6.5-oz. Cheez
Curia, 7.5-oz. Corn Chaps or 7-oz.
Pretzel Twists
Planters Snacks....... 99'
Lindsay, Large Ripe
Pitted Olives...
6-oz.
can
Cairo Beauties, Whole
Sweet Pickles..........V 99*
7-oz. Natural or 6.5-oz. Barbeque
Wise Potato Chips... b,g 89*
Hieshire Farm, "Great for GriMng"
Cheddarwurst.......... $279
rkashire Farm, Meat or Beef.
"Cookout Favorite
Sausage or
Kielbasa.....
Dak-Fresh, Macaroni.
Cola Slaw or
Potato Salad...
lb.
lb.
$019
79*
(Umit 2 with other purchases
of $7. or more excluding
a* tobacco products)
Dee-Fresh. Whole
Barbequed
Chickens................. $149
DeM-Frssh. Southern Style
Fried
Chicken
Reynold's Wrap, 12-inch Wide
Aluminum Foil......22 *i.n $1
Sparky
Charcoal
Briquettes................Sf $2"
Scott. Family Pack
Paper Napkins........ pug. 73*
12-oz. Cans, Diet Coke. Tab. Sprite
Sugar Free Sprite, Fresca. Meiio YeHo,
Mr. Pies, Sugar Free Mr. PiBB or
Coca-Cola
!159
Prices and Coupons Effective Thursday, May 26th thru Wednesday, June 1, 1983. Quantity Rights Reserved



'
May 1983
Looking to the Future
In an effort to enhance
he assessment and
esponse to meeting human
ervice needs within the
(ewish community, the
Jreater Miami Jewish
federation has established
Long Range Planning/
papital Needs Committee.
Harry B. Smith, a former
president of the Federation,
i been named to chair the
ommittee. The panel will
ite Federation's broad
statements into con-
rete objectives, setting
cific priorities. In order
accomplish this, four
ubcommittees will be creat-
to develop strategies
[hich will be synthesized
Ito a strategic plan for Fed-
ration.
The chairmen of the sub-
[inimittees will be Helene
wger, Jewish Education;
Jon-is Futernick, Jewish
Jroup Work Services;
felvin Kartzmer, In-
idual and Health Ser-
ces; and Donald E. Lef-
Community Life Ser-
ces.
"We recognize that the
Itimacy, relevance and
asibility of any long range
*n will be based as much
1 the process of developing
plan as the final con-
t," Smith said. "It is
ucial, therefore, that the
fdership of Federation, its
encies and the entire Jew-
community be included
" dialogue about current
ivities and future plans."
Underlying the develop-
"tt of an effective long
1 plan is the formulation
[5 strategy that will assist
ration in examining the
it status of the Greater
The Federation, its
agencies and the en-
tire Jewish communi-
ty must be included
in a dialogue about
current activities and
future plans.
-Harry B. Smith
Miami Jewish community.
Such a strategy would pro-
ject the community's needs
during the next three to five
years, making specific re-
commendations based on as
much information as pos-
sible to realize these pro-
jections.
"The task confronting the
Federation is to examine
what is, what may occur in
the future and what ought
to be," said Federation Pres-
ident Norman H. Lipoff.
"There are no simple solu-
tions or formulas for such a
complex problem. Never-
theless, it is imperative that
the community engage in
this process and develop a
comprehensive plan to meet
the needs of Greater Miami's
Jewish community into the
80's."
Both Smith and Lipoff
noted that Federation has
undertaken such planning
processes in the past to
analyze specific needs of
sections of the Jewish com-
munity. The most success-
ful example of such planning
and implementation was the
Federation's special Commis-
sion on the Elderly, which
was formed a decade ago
and examined the needs of
Greater Miami's senior cit-
izen population. The results
of that analysis included
development of a package of
services for the elderly, which
included the creation of 224
subsidized housing units
through Jewish Federation
Housing, Inc., and a series
of effective programs pro-
vided by eight members of
Federation's agency family.
The new long range plan-
ning/capital needs process
already has been set into
motion through the dis-
tribution of information col-
lection forms, which have
have been designed to ob-
tain as much data as pos-
sible about the various pro-
grams offered by local social
service agencies. The form
seeks information about the
cost effectiveness and fu-
ture projections of these pro-
grams, as well as the pop-
ulation segment served.
Information collected from
this survey will serve as the
initial basis of the Long
Range Planning / Capital
Needs Committee's discus-
sion.
Continued On Page 15
See Page 4
Supplement to Um Jewish Flaridjw, Section C, May 27,1963


Page 2
Federation, May. 1983
LONG RANGE
PLANNING
PAGE1
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation has established a Long Range
Planning/Capital Needs Committee to help assess and respond to
human service needs.
ANNUAL MEETING
PAGE 3

. -
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridlan supplement
May 27,1983 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
President
Norman H. Upoff
Executive Vice President
Myron J. Brodle
Chairman, communications committee
BlTlmoner
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 45th Annual Meeting will
feature the installation of new officers and board members and the
honoring of campaign leadership.
PLANNING &
BUDGETING/CAMPAIGN PAGE 4
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Planning and Budgeting
Committee recommends the distribution of CJA-IEF funds to ensure
that communal needs are met.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Attorney's Division will host
its third annual cocktail party on behalf of the CJA-IEF on May 31.
MISSIONS/AGENCIES/
CABLE TV
PAGE 5
Enjoy an exciting summer experience by joining one of Federation's
two summer missions.
The Jewish Family and Children's Service will expand its group coun-
seling program in the fall
A report on the Fortieth Anniversary Celebration of the Hillel Jewish
Student Centers of Greater Miami.
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation is taking steps to produce cable
television programming for the Dade County Jewish community.
CAMPAIGN EVENTS PAGE 6
ZACHOR INSTITUTE FOR
HOLOCAUST STUDIES PAGE 7
A delegation from Greater Miami will go on a "Journey of Conscience"
to the concentration camps of the Holocaust and to Israel this sum-
mer.
Dr. Helen Fag-in. director of the University of Miami's Judaic Studies
Department, was recently honored for her leadership in perpetuating
the memory of the Holocaust.
ISRAEL 35
CELEBRATIONS
WOMEN'S DIVISION
PAGE 8 & 9
PAGE 10
Executive officers and officers for the five constituent boards of the
Women's Division were recently elected for 1983-84.
Terry Drucker, the newly elected Women's Division campaign chair-
woman, lives up to the ideals she admires.
The guest speaker and chairwomen for Women's Wednesday have
been announced.
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
Organization.
Event______
Place.
Date_
.Time.
[)ajn.()pjn.
Your name_____________
Title___________Phone No.
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
SOUTH DADE
PAGE 11
A slate of 1983-84 officers of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
South Dade Branch has been selected and confirmed.
The South Dade Hebrew Academy will celebrate its "Bar Mitzvah"
birthday on June 12.
FEDERATION HOUSING PAGE 12
Federation Gardens, the Greater Miami Jewish community's second
subsidized housing project for the elderly, has been formally
dedicated.
An 84-year-old resident at Federation Towers is a hero of the Jewish
people.
FOUNDATION
When there is a will...there is a way.
CALENDAR
PAGE 14
PAGE 15


Federation, May, 1983
Page3
Federation Leadership to be Eleeted

I Norman H.Lipoff
{President
Vice President
Umn Podhurst
tice President
MardR. Scharlin
'President
"tRaffel
trttary
The direction and leadership of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation will be
determined at Federation's 45th Annual
Meeting on Tuesday evening, June 7 at
the Federation Building, 4200 Biscayne
Boulevard.
A full slate of Officers, Trustees and
Board of Directors Members will be
voted upon by the meeting delegates.
Leading the list is Norman H. Lipof f who
has been nominated to serve a second
term as Federation president.
Other nominees for officers' positions
are: immediate past president, Harry A.
(Hap) Levy; vice presidents, Norman
Braman, Donald E. Lefton, Joel Levy,
Aaron Podhurst, Howard R. Scharlin
and Marilyn K. Smith; secretary,
Forrest Raff el; associate secretary,
Helene Berger; treasurer, Cal Kovens;
and associate treasurer, Steven J.
Kravitz.
A complete list of nominees for
trusteeship and Board of Directors posi-
tions appears below.
The slate of nominees was chosen by a
Nominating Committee, chaired by
L. Jules Arkin, a former Federation
president. Appointees listed below have
been named to the Board of Directors as
stated in the Federation By-laws.
The meeting also will honor the leader-
ship of the 1983 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
paign, which was led by General
Campaign Chairman Aaron Podhurst.
The campaign leadership will be thanked
and recognized for the efforts that
resulted in a record-setting accomplish-
ment for the 1983 CJA-IEF.
Two outstanding young leaders will
receive the 1983 Stanley C. Myers Presi-
dents Leadership Award, in recognition
of outstanding service to the Federation
and the general Jewish community. The
awards have been named in honor of
Federation's founding president, who
currently serves as chairman of the
Federation's Project Renewal Commit-
tee.
Dr. Max Lipschitz, spiritual leader of
North Miami Beach's Beth Torah
Congregation, also will be recognized as
the incoming president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami.
Reservations are required, for at-
tendance at the 45th Annual Meeting of
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
For more information about this crucial
gathering of Jewish communal leaders,
call 576-4000, extension 261.
Michael Adler
Samuel I. Adler
Bernardo Batievsky
Jeffrey Berkowitz
Tim Cohen
MyraFarr
Harvey Friedman
Gary Gerson
Stanley Gilbert
Alfred Golden
Elected Board Members
. Peter Goldring
Goldie Goldstein
Kenneth Hoffman
Arthur Horowitz
EzraKatz
Melvin Kartzmer
Jonathan Kislak
Alan Kluger
Fran Levey
Jack H. Levine
Ellen Mandler
Sidney Olson
David Schaecter
Gerald K. Schwartz
Guillermo Sostchin
Philip T. Warren
Harry Weitzer
Dr. George Wise
Appointed to Board by the President
Theodore Baumritter
David Blumberg
Benjamin Botwinick
Howard Frank
Malcolm Fromberg
Dr. Phillip Frost
Alex Halberstein
Joseph Kanter
Shepard King
Nan Rich
Past Presidents
L. Jules Arkin
Barry Ross
Fred Shochet
Edward Shohat
Robert Traurig
Past Presidents Appointed to Board by President
David B. Fleeman
Sidney Lefcourt
Leonard L. Abess
Shepard Broad
Samuel N. Friedland
Howard Kane
Aaron M. Kanner
Rabbi Leon Kronish
Stanley C. Myers
Robert Russell
Trustees
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Ralph Lev it z
Irving Norry
Joseph M. Rose
Mrs. Muriel Russell
As Required In Bylaws
Morton Silberman
Harry B. Smith
Mendell M. Selig
Lillian Simonhoff
William D. Singer
Fay Stein
Esther and Carl Weinkle
Chairman. Administrative Committee
Chairman. Building Operation* Committee
Chairman, Bylaw* and Governance Com-
mittee
Chairman. Campaign Steering Committee
Chairman. Caah Committee
Chairman, Communication* Committee
Chairman. Community Relation* Committee
Chairman, Federation-Agency Relationships
Committee
Chairman, Foundation of Jewish Phllan-
throplea
Chairman, Laaderahlp Development
Chairman, Long Range Campaign Planning
Chairman. Multiple Appeal* Committee
Chairman, Nominating Commute*
Chairman. Planning and Budget Committee
College Student Representative
President, Rabbinical Aasodatlon
Chairman, South Dade Area Office. GMJF
Prealdent, Women'* Division
Chairman. Young Adulta Division
Preldent, B'nal B'rlth Youth Organisation
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Immediate
Past President
Norman Braman
Vice President
Donald E. Lefton
Vice President
Marilyn Smith
Vice President
Preildent. Central Agency For Jewish
Education
President. HUlel Jewish Student Center
President. Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida
President. Jewish Family and Children's
Service
Prealdent, Jewish Vocational Service
President. Miami Jewish Home and Hospital
for the Aged
Prealdent, Mount Sinai Medical Center
Cal Kovens
Treasurer
Steven J. Kravitz
Associate Treasurer
Myron J. Brodie
Executive Vice President
Helene Berger
Associate Secretary


Page 4
Federation, May, 1983
P&B Panel
Serving the Jewish community
through its family of agencies, the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
carefully determines the allocation of
funds to its agencies to help ensure that
the urgent communal needs are met. The
distribution of funds collected by the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign is studied
by Federation's Planning and Budget
Committee, and the Federation Board of
Directors makes the final decision on al-
locations.
The Committee, chaired by Federation
Vice Presidents Samuel I. Adler and
Goldie Goldstein, receives requests for
social service funding from local and
national agencies. Prior to review by the
full Committee and submission for
approval to the Federation Board of
Directors, the allocation requests are
discussed by specialized subcommittees,
which meet with representatives from
the agencies.
"The members of the Committee are
very dedicated, hard-working people who
have taken on a great responsibility,"
Goldstein said. "It's often a frustrating
process, deciding who gets what and
when. It's a process of defining the needs
of the Jewish community and devising a
strategy to answer them."
Goldstein further noted that this year,
for this first time, the chairman of each
subcommittee made a presentation to
the entire committee regarding the
proposed budgets and representatives of
concerned agencies were in attendance at
such meetings.
"Just about every proposal that gets
presented to the Planning and
Budgeting Committee is worthwhile, but
there isn't enough money to fund every
project," Adler said. "However, the
agencies are very cooperative and un-
derstand that we must establish
priorities and maintain balance' in
funding Jewish community needs."
The Subcommittee on Group Services
reviews the budget requests of B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization, the Hillel
Attorney"*
Division Dinner
Set For Nay 31
The Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Attorneys Division will hold its
third annual cocktail party on behalf of
the 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, on Tuesday, May 31
at 5:30 p.m. at the Four Ambassadors
Hotel, 801 South Bayshore Drive.
Guest speaker at the function will be
former Florida Governor Reubin O.
Askew. A public servant who has served
in every level of government during his
25 years of public service, Askew
previously served as chairman of two
federal commissions and a member of
President Jimmy Carter's Cabinet.
Askew has also been honored for his
humanitarian work, having received
awards from B'nai B'rith, the National
Conference of Christians and Jews,
Brandeis University and the National
Council of Jewish Women.
"To date, this has been a record year
for the Attorneys Division campaign,"
said Edward Shohat, chairman of the
Division. "We're very pleased that
Governor Askew will be addressing us,
and we truly hope that our fellow profes-
sionals will join us for this special oc-
casion when we will demonstrate our
commitment to Jews worldwide."
For additional information and
reservations, please call Jerry Neimand
at 576-4000.
Samuel I. Adler
Student Centers, the Hillel Foundation
and the Israel Programs Office. The sub-
committee is chaired by Jack H. Levine
and Sandi Samole serves as co-chairman.
The Subcommittee on Individual and
Health Services reviews the allocation
requests of the Community Chaplaincy
Service, the GMJF Information and
Referral Service, the Jewish Family and
Children's Service, the Jewish Vocation-
al Service, the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, the National
Council of Jewish Women's Rescue and
Migration Service, and Mount Sinai
Medical Center. Jon Kislak is chairman
of the subcommittee.
The Subcommittee on Education,
Culture and Religion handles the budget
requests of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, the Jewish High
School of South Florida, the Jewish
Junior High School of South Florida, the
High School in Israel, and Greater
Miami's Jewish day schools. Kalman
Mintz chairs this subcommittee.
The Subcommittee on Non-Local
Services, chaired by Alfred Golden,
reviews the allocation requests from the
national agencies that Federation funds.
The Subcommittee on Community
Goldie Goldstein
Centers, chaired by Gwen Weinberger
and co-chaired by Stanley Gilbert,
reviews the .budget and allocation
request of the Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida.
The full Planning and Budgeting
Committee is composed of: Rachel
Abramowitz, Irene Baros, Saby Behar,
Adolph T. Berger, Emanuel Berlatsky,
Rabbi Haskell Bernat, G. Alan Brooks,
Jesse Casselhoff, Jerome Catz. Dr. Sol
Center, William Dorsky, Elliot Fassy,
Stanley Gilbert, Alfred Golden. David
Goldweitz. Debby Grodnick, William
Grodnick, Marc Hauser, Samuel Harte,
Kenneth Hoffman, Gail Jaffe, Melvin
Kartzmer. Jon Kislak, Jeffrey Lefcourt,
Frances B. Levey, Jack H. Levine, Gary
Lipson. Steven Messing, Linda Minkes,
Kalman Mintz, Jeffrey Newman,
Michael Novak, Ann Monique O'Hayon,
David Perkins, Nancy Persily, Aaron
Podhurst, Forrest Raffel, Shirley Raffel.
Dr. Robert Rasken, Anita Robbins,
David Rosen baum. Sandi Samole,
Steven Schwarzberg, Norman Sholk,
Sandra Simon, Marilyn K. Smith, Dr.
Henry Storper, Jerry Sussman, Gwen
Weinberger, Barry Weinberger and
Barry White.
NIGHTMARES
OF THE PAST
Forty years ago. one man dreamed of annihilating the Jewish people. His insane
hatrea combined with new technologies to create the greatest nightmare of
inhumanity in recorded history. Six million Jews were murdered by Nazi executioners
and became Adolf Hitler's greatest claim to infamy.
The world learned a lesson that the Jewish people discovered centuries ago. Evil
will triumph when good men do nothing to stop It.
As Jews, we adhere to a tradition of combatting oppression and tyranny wherever it
exists by caring for one another and by taking action that preserves the quality of
life in Jewish communities worldwide.
In this Shavuoth season, support human service programs for thousands of Jews at
home and abroad by making your maximum possible gift to the 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
In our unity and in our commitment, we can put to rest fears about the recurrence of
the nightmares of the past.

Aaron Podhurst
1963 General Campaign Chairman
*.,.^SflS5'
?jmuets>ija:


Federation, May. 1983
Page6
Summer Excitement in Israel
Enjoy an exciting summer experience
by taking part in one of two upcoming
Missions to Israel, sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
A large delegation of Federation
Young Adult Division members is ex-
pected to join the 1983 United Jewish
Appeal Summer Singles Mission to
Israel from July 17-27. This unique
program draws the participation of
young adults, ages 22-40, from Jewish
communities throughout the United
States.
Additionally, parents and their chil-
dren are invited to take part in Federa-
tion's July 29-August 11 Summer
Family Mission to Israel. This event will
provide an itinerary of interest to all
ages, plus elements of separate interest
| to parents and youngsters.
In 1982, 75 Young Adult Division
I members experienced the Summer
Singles Mission. Thus far, 35 persons
have registered for the 1983 program,
with a limited amount of openings
| remaining for registration.
Ellen Rose, a prominent young attor-
ney who has taken part in previous
missions to Israel, has been named as
[Miami-area chairperson of the upcoming
|Summer Singles Mission.
For first-time YAD mission partici-
Ipants, the Federation has developed a
subsidy plan for round-trip New York-
Miami airfare and offers a unique payout
package for all participants, designed to
|make this program most attractive.
The Family Mission program offers
|travel, study and enjoyment of Israel
land Jewish history. Eighty persons
[already have registered to participate.
Chairpersons of the Family Mission to
The 1982 Summer Singles Mission participants enjoyed a grand sendofffrom Miami International Airport
Israel are Merle and Howard Frank.
Howard is chairman of Federation's Ac-
countants Division and Merle is a
prominent Women's Division member.
Participants in the recent Yachad
Mission to Israel returned to Miami with
high praise for their experiences and
urged other members of the Jewish com-
munity to take part in future missions.
The April 10-20 trip was enjoyed by 40
young adults from Miami, under the
leadership of Florida Regional Chairper-
sons Ezra Katz and Judy Adler.
Katz explained that "yachad," the
Hebrew word for togetherness, described
the spirit of the 10-day program.
"The magic of Israel is as effective on
those who have been there before as it is
on first-time visitors," he said. "The
mission was a real tum-on, and was an
unusual opportunity for Miamians to
meet other Miamians and other Jews
JF& Counseling Program
The Jewish Family and Children's
ervice will expand its group counseling
brogram in the fall and will offer special
Importunities for single parents and their
hildren, step-parents, remarried fami-
lies, adolescents and children ages 9 to
|1. These groups will focus, with the
[ssistance of JFCS professional staff,
ppon the individual, child and parent
sues which involve the family, as well
I school and outside social issues.
The agency's emphasis on groups as
fl approach to counseling is related to
he fact that they provide an opportunity
J support and ideas from people in
pmilar situations. It is quite a relief to
id out that your family and its prob-
es are not that much different from
Jthers. Group discussion helps partici-
wts to understand that they are not
olated and alone with their feelings, ex-
erience and stress. The group also pro-
ves a chance to test out new ideas as
well as recently developed social and
communication skills. Becoming
comfortable with closer human inter-
action is so much easier in a group situa-
tion.
Jewish Family and Children's Service
is the only family service agency in Flor-
ida to have a special department for
group counseling. It employs several
clinical staff experts in group services to
work them them. Groups of various
types are offered throughout the year at
the agency's five offices in Dade County.
JFCS will organize fall counseling and
support groups during the months of
June, July and August to begin in
mid-September. For more information,
please call 445-0555.
JFCS is a member of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's family of
agencies and a beneficiary of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
Ilillcl Bash Is a Big Hit
More than five hundred people at-
aded Hillel Jewish Student Centers of
pater Miami Fortieth Anniversary
Nebration. The evening of en-
Ftainment featured Theodore Bikel,
Nge, film and concert star. Also per-
king were Nitzanim, the Israeli
Nee troupe from the University of
Pjnii and Debbie Friedman, noted
ish folksinger.
L following the two and one-half hours
entertainment, over one hundred
rjle joined Bikel for a cocktail
PPtion at the University of Miami
Pel House, according to Bernard S.
fndlar, chairman of the anniversary
""vance.
Dr. Donald Michaelson, the first Hillel
Director in Miami, attended the cocktail
party, and reminisced about the early
years of Hillel in Miami. Also in for the
evening was the first area director, Rabbi
Stanley Ringler, and his wife.
The first major fund raising event for
Hillel Jewish Student Centers, "An
Evening with Theodore Bikel," exceeded
all expectations for success, reported
Mandler.
The Hillel Jewish Student Centers are
members of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's family of agencies and
beneficiaries of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
paign.
who share the same commitments.
Katz said the joy of Israel's 35th anni-
versary enhanced the spirit of the
Yachad Mission, making it a memorable
and significant occasion. The same
positive aspects of the Yachad Mission
should add a sense of importance and
pleasure to the two summer missions, he
said.
For more information about the UJA
Summer Singles Mission, call Milton
Heller, director of Federation's Leader-
ship Development Department, at 576-
4000, extension 284.
Individuals interested in the Family
Mission to Israel are urged to call Joan
Scheiner, Federation's missions director,
at 576-4000, extension 281.
Federation Eyes
Cable TV Future
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
in cooperation with the Rabbinical Asso-
ciation of Greater Miami, has taken its
first step toward establishment of the
Dade County Jewish community's own
cable television programming, an-
nounced Federation President Norman
H.Lipoff.
Lipoff explained that the Federation
has retained the services of cable
television consultant Rabbi Allen
Secher, who was instrumental in the
organization of cable television for the
Jewish Federation of Chicago, which has
developed a prototypical Jewish
cablecast system. Secher currently is
meeting with community leaders and
local experts in Greater Miami's cable
television field to evaluate programming
resources in the community and to
organize a programming package.
Lipoff also noted that Jesse H.
Riebman, president of Ultracom Cable
Television of Dade County which ser-
vices Miami Beach and South Dade, has
been extremely helpful in the coor-
dination of the cable television project.
The Federation Communications
Committee, chaired by Eli Timoner,
recently approved the formation of a
Cable Television Subcommittee, which
will be comprised of prominent local
residents who will review plans for the
new cablecast project. Rabbi Haskell
Bernat will serve as the Rabbinical
Association's liaison to the sub-
committee.
In noting the diversity of the local
Jewish community .Lipoff emphasized
that Federation's cable project will
provide programming for senior citizens,
for youngsters, for families, and for
others interested in Jewish culture,
current events and human services.
'


P**e6
Federation. May, 1983
Campaign Highlights
1 M i V j %
j r
**>
Wk
Pacesetter Ball Arrangements Chairman Marcy Lefton, right, shares a
moment at the gala with Leonard and Carolyn Miller.
Federation leaders Philip T. Warren, Howard R. Scharlin, Arthur Horowiti\
and Harry A. (Hap) Levy enjoy the Pacesetter Ball
Senator Henry M. Jackson, guest speaker at the Cuban-Hebrew Israel In-
dependence Dinner meets Cuban-Hebrew Division Chairman Guillermo Sost-
chin and his wife, Keta.
Cuban-Hebrew Israel Independence Dinner Chairman Henry Percal and i
wife, Susan, pose with Senator Henry M. Jackson.
Eli Timoner, left, receives the 1983 Harold B. Bosworth Memorial Award from
Mercantile Division Chairman Leonard Luria.

Senator Christopher Dodd address the recent Mercantile Division

Dinner


Federation, May, 1983
Page 7

'Journey9 Takes Step Back in Time
A delegation from the Greater Miami
I community will join together with the
Second Generation from Cleveland, Ohio, on
a Journey of Conscience this summer, a trip
throughout Eastern Europe to the concen-
tration camps of the Holocaust and to Israel.
Guest scholar on the Journey will be Marc
Pollick, executive director of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Zachor Institute
I for Holocaust Studies.
Although most of the participants on the
i trip are the children of Holocaust survivors,
the Journey is open to all. The group will
I leave on June 19 and will return on July 6.
IThe itinerary will include: Poland Ausch-
witz-Birkenau, Warsaw and Cracow;
Czechoslovakia Terezin, Prague and
Lidice; Germany Bergen-Belsen, Dachau,
{Munich and Hanover; and Israel
|jerusalem, Tel Aviv and Haifa.
"No one can take this trip and return the
Isame person," Pollick said. "It opens the
Idoor to a deeper and more meaningful
[confrontation with the Holocaust than can
[ever be achieved through books, films or
[speakers."
The Journey of Conscience will bring
[participants to the locales of the tragic Holo-
caust period, as well as to Israel, land of
[Jewish rebirth and promise. The group will
|be limited to only 30 members, so early
{ristration is recommended.
For more information, please call the
IZachor Institute at 576-4000.

'Holocaust Is Not Just a Jewish Matter9
&
[1 t if
r" \
I Helen Fagin
l"We survivors have nothing to feel guilty
wit, we have no reason to apologize," de-
"wl Dr. Helen Fagin, director of the Uni-
|[*ity of Miami's Judaic Studies Program.
^e have 2,000 years of Jewish history and
ure to rebuild our lives on."
I'd the wake of her personal experiences
1 the Holocaust, Helen Fagin has de-
her professional life to educating
[-7*3 about Judaism and the lessons of the
Wocauat. At last month's Greater Miami
piual Community Holocaust Memorial
w Observance on Yom Hashoa, Dr. Fagin
** presented with a plaque in honor of her
itributions to the community. It reads:
For her leadership and inspiration in
tying alive in South Florida the memory of
'martyred six million Jews who died in
j horror during the Holocaust at the
uJ*8 of the Nazis and their anti-Semitic
prta throughout Europe during World
l/or almost single-handedly forcing the
^unity to confront the Holocaust and its
mining as a unique Jewish experience that
has enormous consequences for all humanity,
fulfilling Santayana's concept that "Those
who cannot remember the past are con-
demned to repeat it.'
"For her invaluable influence as an edu-
cator on countless numbers of students
throughout the general community.
"For her love and devotion to the Jewish
people."
Dr. Fagin has helped perpetuate the
memory of the Holocaust through her educa-
tional endeavors, as well as her roles as ad-
visor to the United States Holocaust
Memorial Council and board member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Zachor
Institute for Holocaust Studies. However,
despite all that has been done to educate the
public about the Holocaust, she readily as-
serted, "Our community has to be educated
much more; we have a very important task
ahead of us."
Born in Radomsko, Poland, Dr. Fagin
spent the Holocaust years in the Warsaw
Ghetto and on the Aryan side of Warsaw
before being liberated by Russian forces. She
came to the United States in 1946 and con-
tinued her higher education, which had been
interrupted by the war, at a junior college
and the University of Miami. She graduated
magna cum laude from the university and
began to teach English at the school after
she received her Masters Degree in 1968. In
1977, Dr. Fagin received a PhD in literature.
As an English professor at the University of
Miami, she introduced a course on literature
of the Holocaust in 1972.
Thanks to the initiative of a group of pro-
fessors at the school, including Dr. Fagin,
and a five-year grant provided by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, the
University of Miami launched its Judaic
Studies Program in 1976. In 1978, Dr. Fagin
assumed the directorship of the program,
and today the department offers more than
40 courses dealing with Jewish subjects.
In addition to its annual seminars and
conferences on the Holocaust, the Judaic
Studies Department has established a
Handleman Holocaust Collection of books
and documents dealing with Holocaust.
"This is a very important resource for the
community," Dr. Fagin said. "It's a very
solid acquisition."
Dr. Fagin was also one of the instrumental
forces in the community responsible for the
formation of the Zachor Institute for Holo-
caust Studies. She praised the Holocaust
Education Week that the Institute spon-
sored in April, and called this year's Yom
Hashoa observance "the moat meaningful
ever."
Dr. Fagin attended the American Gather-
ing of Holocaust Survivors in Washington,
D.C. last month and was a speaker at the
event's closing ceremonies. The historic
gathering attracted more than 20,000
participants, and Dr. Fagin believes it sig-
naled a new understanding of the Holocaust.
"The significance of the American Gather-
ing was' that it brought into focus the impor-
tance of the Holocaust as a subject to be ad-
dressed," Dr. Fagin explained. "The high
point of the Gathering was the transfer by
the American government of the key to Na-
tional Holocaust Memorial Museum to
become part of the American Monuments on
the Washington Mall. This act gives validity
to the concept that the Holocaust is not just
a Jewish matter. It indicates that everyone
must learn from history."


Page8
v *>.-
Federation. May, 1983
, ,i,i,i n ,i.f ifiniinn

More than 12.00
35th Anniversary a I

A
\

More than 12,000 persons enjoyed a communit
sary during festivities held at the Michael-Ann P
Miami Beach and the South Dade Jewish Commui
The celebration was coordinated by the Jewisl
cooperation with the Greater Miami Jewish Feder
The event began with walkathons in each lo<
$50,000 for the Federation's 1983 Combined. La
paign. 4Q0
The programs later climaxed with festivals thi
food and prominent personalities.


Federation, May, 1983
PmgeS
BO Honor Israelis
it Ivocal Celebration
amunitywide celebration of Israel's 36th Anniver-
- Ann Russell Jewish Community Center in North
lommunity Center.
Jewish Community Centers of South Florida, in
1 Federation.
ach location, which raised a total of more than
jah Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
jfi^^Kst
/els that featured performances, games, exhibits,
)CC WISMS 10 THtt i
Itt FflUOWWG SPOWC
FOR IW CHMOSIIT
... '


Page 10
Federation, May, 1983
Women's Division El
1983-84 Officers
Chairwoman
Practices What
She Preaches
Terry Drucker
Terry Drucker, the newly elected cam-
paign chairwoman of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Women's Division, says
three active ingredients are needed to be a
committed Jew: "giving, learning and being
involved." Judging from her many past roles
in Federation and other philanthropic
community projects, Drucker has surely
lived up to the ideals she holds in esteem.
Drucker initially joined Women's Division
in 1978, after friends introduced her to its
activities by taking her to Federation
Tuesday. Eventually, she became further
involved by attending North Dade area
board meetings and found that her interest
in Federation was increasing.
"I was very impressed by the Women's
Division leadership," Drucker noted. "I
became more and more attuned to what
Women's Division does for Jewish causes. In
addition, I wanted my children to know how
involved we were with Jewish deeds."
A native of Chicago, Drucker moved to
Miami 12 years ago, and Federation was the
first Jewish communal organization in which
she became active. Her three children attend
the Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day
School, where she serves as president, and
she is a member of the National Council of
Jewish Women, American Friends of Tel
Aviv University and the American Cancer
Society.
Recognizing the importance of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund and the vital human services it helps
provide, Drucker played an integral part in
the campaign in North Dade in subsequent
years by becoming Patron chairwoman in
1979-80 and area campaign chairwoman in
1981 and 1982. In addition, she became
involved in educating CMBfJgn volunteers
by chairing Speaker's Training Day during
the 1981 campaign.
"I want to he known as a Jewish woman
I who is involved and cares for her fellow
! Jews,'' Drucker said. "What I do is an in-
vestment for the future."
Looking forward to next year's Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund,
Drucker asserted that I e has the goal of
having every Jewish woman in the area
participate in the campaign.
"I would love to be able to get con-
tributions from women in the true sense of
tzedakah," she explained. "I want all of
them to feel they are making a contribution
to the Jewish future."
Executive officers and officers for the five
constituent boards of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Women's Division were
recently elected for 1983-84. These women
will lead the overall activities of the entire
Division, as well as the boards that carry out
other various programs.
Current President Maxine E. Schwartz
has been reelected to serve a second one-year
term and serving with her are: Terry
Drucker, vice president, campaign: Dorothy
Podhurst, vice president, leadership
development: Gail Harris, vice president,
community education; Ellen Mandler,
secretary; Pat Feldman, nominating com-
mittee Chairwoman, and Mikki Futernick,
Parliamentarian.
The North Dade Board will be headed by
Chairwoman Judi Billig. Other officers on
the board include: Renata Bloom, vice
chairwoman, campaign; Helen Berne, co-
chairwoman, campaign; Evelyn Mitchel,
vice chairwoman, leadership development;
Marlene Olin, vice chairwoman, community
education; Elaine Richman, secretary; and
Sue Fields, nominating committee chair-
woman.
The South Dade Board will again be led by
current Chairwoman Robbie Herskowitz in
1983-84. Serving with her are: Linda Hoff-
man and Elaine Ross, vice chairwomen,
campaign; Mikki Hochberg, vice chair-
woman, community education; Arleen
Rosen thai, vice chairwoman, leadership
development; Gail Jaffe, secretary, and
Annette Arensen, nominating committee
chairwoman.
The Southwest Dade Board includes
Marilyn Kohn, who will again serve as chair-
woman; Sandi Miot, vice chairwoman,
campaign; Joan Fisher, vice chairwoman,
leadership development; Stella Haas, vice
chairwoman, community education; Robbie
Housman, secretary, and Fran Storper,
nominating committee chairwoman.
The Miami Beach Board will be led by
Chairwoman Debbie Schwartz. Serving with
her are: Meryle Loring and Adria Rasken,
vice chairwomen, campaign; Helene Ber-
kowitz, vice chairwoman, leadership de-
velopment; Janice Miller, vice chairwoman,
community education; Estelle Haber,
secretary and Mikki Granoff, nominating
committee chairwoman.
The Business and Professional Women
Board will again be headed by Chairwoman
Amy Dean, who will serve with: Ellen Brazer
and Phyllis Harte, vice chairwomen, cam-
paign ; Susan Klein berg and Shula Gittelson,
vice chairwomen, community education;
Nancy Bloom and Barbara Schwartz, vice
chairwomen, leadership development;
Evelyn Perlman, secretary, and Sheila
Weiss, nominating committee chairwoman.
The Women's Division recently held a Southwest Dade Special Event on behalf of the 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Seen at the event are: (from left) Southwest Dade Chairwoman
Marilyn Kohn; Women's Division Nominating Committee Chairwoman Pat Feldman, who co-chaired
the function; Mimi Foreman; Betty Samuels; Evelyn Horowitz; Southwest Dade Campaign Vice Chair-
woman Sandi Miot, hostess of the event; Elaine Jacobs; Southwest Dade Leadership Development
Vice Chairwoman Joan Fisher, ccxhair of the event; Pat Levy; Heidi Friedland, and Southwest Dade
Community Education Vice Chairwoman Stella Haas.
Women's Wednesday to
Feature Polly Bergen
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Women's Division President Maxine E. Sch-
wartz and Community Education Vice Presi-
dent Gail Harris have announced the guest
speaker and appointment of chairwomen for
WOMEN'S WEDNESDAY, the Women's
Division annual community education event
scheduled for October 12 at the Fon-
tainebleau-Hilton Hotel, Miami Beach
WOMEN'S WEDNESDAY was formerly
the Women's Division's Federation Tuesday
event.
Award-winning actress and best-selling
author Polly Bergen, who recently appeared
in the television mini-series "The Winds Of
War," will be featured speaker at the day-.
long event. After starring in many films for
Paramount Pictures, Bergen received an
Emmy Award for her leading role in "The
Helen Morgan Story" on NBC's Playhouse
90. She subsequently became a panel
member on "To Tell The Truth," a co-host.
for "Not For Women Only" and starred in
the "Polly Bergen Show. Bergen is also
known for her books on fashion and beauty
knowledge, as well as the cosmetics company
she founded, and her work on behalf of
humanitarian causes.
This year's chairwoman for WOMEN'S
WEDNESDAY are: Pat Feldman, Rachelle
Kaminski, Roberta Segal and Dolores Wolf.
iwaSR>m



Federation, May, 1983
Page 11

ew South Dade Officers
|te of 1983-84 officers of the
Miami Jewish Federation's
[)ade Branch has been selected
led, announced Federation
[it Norman H. Lipoff.
I Futernick has been named to
second term as chairman of
^h Dade Branch. Lipoff noted
i position places Futernick on
Ion's Board of Directors and
jre Committee.
ISouth Dade Branch officers
I serve during 1983-84 include
Vice Chairman Alvin
Community Education Vice
Dror Zadok, Community
id Planning Vice Chairman
juser, and Leadership Study
/elopment Vice Chairman
Debby Grodnick.
Lipoff said the growth of Jewish
communal involvement and commit-
ment in South Dade during the past
years stems, to a large extent, from
Futernick's leadership.
"Mikki, who has proved her
dedication throughout many years of
devoted service to the Jewish com-
munity, has done an outstanding job
as South Dade Branch chairman,"
Lipoff said. "I am confident that her
second year as chairman will exceed
her previous accomplishments. The
leaders chosen to serve with her share
her dedication to the ideals of the
Federation, which will be of benefit to
Jews at home and abroad."
Mikki Futernick


I
i;
Dror Zadok
Marc Hauser
Debby Grodnick
Special Bar Mita&vah Brunch
Dade Hebrew Academy, a
>nal day school in southwest
ty, is celebrating its "Bar
[thday in the grand ballroom
jc Hotel, Sunday, June 12,
never had this type of re-
the entire community be-
in Kriss, vice president of
\. "I think that our reputa-
:ellent school as well as a
is is finally spreading
ra neighborhood. More and
are learning about the
igs we are doing here and
ring their approval and sup-
iting with us."
lore than 30 community
lg officers of the Greater
Federation, rabbis, Dade
ssioners and businessmen
attend the brunch, and to
i with 10 other guests.
llways believed that once
about our school they
ithusiastic about it as we
ss. "The SDHA fills a very
community. Being unaf-
ly synagogue or any one
lism, we are able to meet
Jewish children. We even
full Hebrew day school
le city of children with
Uties.,r
fof honor at the Sunday
\ Rabbi Ralph G. Glixman,
ide Hebrew Academy's
biritual leader. Marilyn K.
[president of the Greater
Federation will be the
>ie Huppert, chairpersons
of the Bar Mitzvah brunch explain why
Rabbi Glixman was chosen to be guest of
honor.
"The rabbi founded the Hebrew
Academy as a natural outgrowth of his
love for children. He has a very special
gift for teaching young people. They
follow him like pied piper. For example,
since he initiated Vatikim services this,
year dozens of students voluntarily go to
school 45 minutes early to fulfill the
mitzvah of saying morning prayers
before eating. The rabbi then sees to it
that the children eat breakfast, very
often buying the cereal and milk and
juice himself on his way to school. He is
giving our children the rightful guest of
honor."
Rabbi Glixman is also the rabbi of
B'nai Israel Youth Congregation of
Greater Miami.
Marlene Mitchell, principal of the
South Dade Hebrew Academy compares
the development of the school over
thirteen years to the development of a
child.
"Building a school is somewhat like
raising a very bright, very lovable but,
often exasperating youngster. We have
certainly had our share of joy and of
trouble over the years but on the whole
we are very happy with our accomplish-
ments. Our students constantly win all
sorts of awards and contests. They do
very well on their standardized tests.
Our alumni have been getting into very
prestigious universities and we even
have some now in graduate schools and
medical schools. Rabbi Glixman's dream
has come a long way in 13 years. We
have a lot to celebrate at our party."
The Bar Mitzvah brunch promises to
be a spectacular party. The public is in-
vited and encouraged to attend. All the
parents of the Academy's students are
working together planning the decora-
tions, the menu, the ad journal and the
entertainment. The children themselves
will perform at the brunch. Jack Gold-
stritch, president of the Academy,
strongly believes that the success of the
brunch as well as the success of the
school itself depends entirely on the co-
operative effort of every partent in the.
school.
"Only when the community sees that
we believe in our school and its purpose
100 percent, will any one outside the
school begin to care about it. This year
we have the total commitment from
within and the community is responding
to us. This is as it should be."
"Our school is like a family," he says.
"All the children and most of the parents
know one another and socialize together.
Celebrating our 'Bar Mitzvah' without
the children being there was unthink-
able. By having a daytime affair even the
youngest nursery student can come. We
were also able to keep the cost down this
way so that all our families could afford
to attend. We are all bringing the grand-
parents and all the aunts and uncles to
the party. This family atmosphere is
more suiting to us than a formal dinner.
We want everyone to be able to celebrate
with us."
Call the South Dade Hebrew Academy
at 253-2300 for information.
The South Dade Hebrew Academy is a
member of Federation's family of agen-
cies, .and. a benefic.ary of the.Combined
Jewish Appeal-Is 1 Emergency Fund.


Page 12
Federation, May. 1963
Federation Gardens Dedicated
Federation Gardens, the Greater
Miami Jewish community's second sub-
sidized housing project for the elderly,
has been formally dedicated in a cere-
mony that included participation by
leaders of the Jewish community and the
residents of the facility's 110 units.
Norman H. Lipoff. president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, told
the residents that Federation Gardens is
hoped to be the first of many human
service facilities to locate at the College
Park Trust, a 28-acre tract owned by
Federation which is centrally located
within the South Dade Jewish com-
munity.
"You are our pioneers," Lipoff said to
the residents. "We hope that many of
our local agencies will open offices and
program centers here to serve the Jews
of South Dade, and that they will be your
neighbors in years to come."
Samuel I. Adler. president of Jewish
Federation Housing, Inc., cut the ribbon
signalling the official dedication of the
housing complex. The Gardens is the
second subsidized housing facility spon-
sored and supported by Jewish Federa-
tion Housing, a subsidiary of the
Federation. Its sister facuity is Federa-
tion Towers, a 114-unit housing complex
for the elderly on Miami Beach.
Dedication Ceremony Chairman
09
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Samuel I. Adler, Martin Fine, Norman H. Lipoff, Myron J. Brodie and a rep
resentative of the Federation Gardens residents preside over the new facility's dedication ceremony.
Martin Fine noted that the successful
completion of the new complex is the re-
sult of a working partnership between
the Jewish community leadership, the
builders and architects and local govern-
ment officials who provided their utmost
cooperation.
Federation Gardens' elderly tenants
first occupied the complex on November
15, at which time a number of the mem-
bers of Federation's family of agencies
formed a Professional Committee on
Services to coordinate efforts and set
priorities for future programs. In addi-
Local Hero
Harry Bashover reminisces while leafing through his album of Jewish Brigade memories.
If acts of heroism live as long as they
are remembered, then Harry Bashover,
an 84-year-old resident of Federation
Towers, remains a hero of the Jewish
people.
Seated in his comfortable apartment in
the Miami Beach housing complex for
the elderly, Harry thinks back and
remembers the days when he and his
comrades marched in the Jewish
Brigade, the first Jewish military force in
the 20th Century and an important
precursor to the State of Israel.
He walks over to his bureau and
removes from a drawer his album of
photographs and souvenirs from his
years overseas during World War I.
There are photographs on the bureau of
his more recent past, of his wife who
recently passed away and of his younger
days.
But Harry is a proud man who stands
erect and walks tall. World War I may be
long over, yet there is a new battle to be
fought the battle against leukemia
for which he receives treatment through
Mount Sinai Medical Center's Project
Sinai.
The year was 1917 when Harry first
joined the Jewish Brigade, which had
been formed by Zionist leader and
thinker Vladimir Zeev Jabotinsky to
unite Jews with the Allies and against
the Turks in the hopes of creating a
Palestine partition and a Jewish State.
"I was 16 or 17 at the time, but no one
gave their right ages when they ap-
plied," Harry says. "There were a lot of
kids who wanted to be a part of the
action. I lived in Newark at the time and
you couldn't enlist as an American, but
my family had come to the United States
from Russia in 1910, so I was still a
Russian citizen."
Initial military training began in
Canada, where the Jewish recruits wore
uniforms of the Canadian Army. Soon
thereafter, the recruits were shipped to
England where they donned British
Army uniforms and became members of
the Royal Fusiliers. Harry served in the
39th Division, Company A, under the
command of General AUenby.
"I couldn't truthfully say that we were
at the war front," Harry says. "We were
used primarily as an army of occupation.
That's how we were trained."
Harry is asked whether he ever met
tion to Federation, these agencies u I
elude the Jewish Family and Chidren'<
Service, the Jewish Community CenterjE
of South Florida, Mount Sinai MedicaMF
Center, the Jewish Vocational ServiceBi
the Miami Jewish Home and HospitaB
for the Aged, the CommunitjH^
Chaplaincy Service of Greater MiamiMx
the Central Agency for Jewish Educa
tion and the Federation South Da
Branch.
For more information about Jewiskl
Federation Housing, call Nathan SkolfV
nick at 531-2388.
Jabotinsky during his tour in
Brigade.
"Yes, I did see Jabotinsky." he say^
"He was a short guy who took the tin
to come speak to us in England."
Harry opens the photo album wh
unfolds a series of anecdotes
military duty in some of the most exotj
parts of the world. In North Africa,i
France, in Gibraltar, in Egypt and |
Palestine.
"I remember one Passover.' he sajj
pointing to a photo, "in which theygaif
us matzahs and wine and something th
looked like chicken. It turned out
that it was rabbit, but it sure tasted I
chicken."
He pulls out an inscribed piece
metal and held it up as one ofl
proudest trophies.
"This was made for me by a Tu
when we were guarding a prisoner of I
camp," he says. "I held onto this and|
still have it."
As the memories rush into his mm
Harry nostalgically points to photosi
himself in his brown winter uniform ad
his summer uniform with shorts and p]
helmut. More old army stories
recalled.
"I served with guys from all over.
says. "I remember one time these W
Jews from Solonika got in a fight and |
stepped right into the middle betwe
them. I managed to stop the fight alter I
while."
Some of the entries in the albumJ
dude love poems Harry wrote to his r
decades ago, with tides sucn
"Romance" and "111 Love You Always]
"I remember during one trip
stopped at Malta between Gibraltar.
North Africa. We were told we jus J
to see this and I saw the most beam
sunset I've ever witnessed.
One section of the album conta
photographs from the Veterans Mu*
m Tel Chai, Israel, where the hero**0
the Jewish Brigade is describe*
permanent display. Harry explau"
these pictures were sent w
!.*,*. wK visitftd the Jewish btaw
relatives who visited the i
But one of Harrys
favorffl
:1
Continued On P*


Federation, May, 1983

Page 13
'
By leaving a legacy or an endowment with the
[Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies of the Greater
[Miami Jewish Federation, you can do more to make
[the world a better place than you may have thought
|possible.
Because your gift will be growing every day. And
working every day. To help Jews in need right now.
id to help perpetuate those Jewish ideals and
values you cherish for years to come.
It will help ease the unbearable loneliness of an
elderly Jewish woman with no surviving family
br friends.
It can help see a Jewish youth through a crisis
at challenges his faith and heritage.
It can help bring families together. It can help
ep families together.
It can help Israel.
It can help in ways you specify. And it can even
elp improve your own personal tax circumstance.
There are a number of ways you can create your
i legacy of love to life as these people have.
Give a gift that unites our heritage and our
opes.
For more information contact the
[0UNJDAT1ON OP
^ISrr^pHlLANTHRpPlg
'greater Miami Jewish 'Tetleralwn
'Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137
bne 576-4000
raiLAJVTBKOPIC FUNDS
Eva At Lester Abrahamer
Isadore Abrams
Roslyn As Sam Abrainson
Harry A. Achter
Adler Philanthropic Fund
Adlei Associates
Bernyce fit Samuel Adler
Neal O. Amdur
Sandra As L. Jules Arkin
Barbara At Henry Arman
Constance As Evans E. Baros
Irene AsJ. William Baros.Jr
Bernardo Batievsky
Ida As Alberto Behar
Florence At John Bellock
Ronna As Allan J Bennett
Felix Blank Family
Isaac Blank Family
Bessie At Benjamin Botwimck
Irin.i At Norman Braman
Morns Broad
Shepard Broad Family
Herbert Buchwald
Gertrude Si Jack Cooper
Hazel 6t Hon. Irving Cypen
Rose As Julius Darsky
Reva As Dr Maxwell Dauer Family
Eleanor As Mort Deckelbaum Family
Estella As David Egozi Family
Diana As Luis Egozi
Errol Eisinger Family
Dora As Dr. George Feldenkreis
Marjone As Dr. Jerome Fleeman
Anne As Irving Frankel
Harold Friedman
Lucille As Belvin Friedson
Barbara Friedson
David Marc Friedson
Patricia As Dr Phillip Frost
Gables Waterway Towers (Sam I Adler)
Ganz Family
Milton Gaynor
Leo Gelvan
Virginia As Milton Goldman
Charles Goldstein
Berime As Richard Goldstein
Shirley As Matthew Gorson
Estelle As EmilJ Gould
Ella Gelvan Greenberg
Elsa As Melvin Greenberg
Greenberg.Traurig. Askew, Hoffman.
Lipoff. Quentel. As Wolff
Ceil Greenspon
Barbara As Fred Havenick
David Hecht
Charlotte As Charles Held
Diane As Daniel Neal Heller
Polly Lux deHirsch Meyer
Larry Hoffman Family
Robert Howard
Lola As Donald Jacobson
Joseph Kanter
Gertrude At Melvin Kartzmer
Ezra Katz
Eleanor As Herbert D Katz
Herman M. Katz
Drs Nilza As Robert Karl
Jayl Kislak
The Khtenick Family
Roc he lie As Paul Koemg
Estelle As Stewart L Kohn
Sidney Lefcourt Family
Leonard Levenstein
Jack Levine
Rhoda As Morris Levitt
Ralph Leviiz
Edward Levy
Blossom As Edward Liebowitz
Nancy As Norman H. Lipoff
Bernard Loring
Ellen As Bernard Mandler
Bluma At Morton Marcus
Lea As Harold Marks
Charles Merwitzer
Zenia Meyer
Susan As Norman Neirenberg
Louis Neiweg
Irving Norry
Miriam As Sidney Olson
Patricia Papper
Irvin Pollak Community Fund
Ins As Sidney Poland
Forrest B. Raffel Family
Leroy Raffel Family
Nat Ratner
Phyllis As Sam Rosen
Thelma As Maurice A Rothman
Muriel As SJ Rudolph Aaron Israel
Muriel Russell Maxjaffe
Robert Russell D Jamison
Lee Ruwitch L.Jamison
Marian G. Scheer Frances Kallos
Neil Schiff Adele Kanlog
Maxine As Kenneth J. Schwartz Harry Katz
Mendell Sehg Max Kaufman
Pauline As George Schaeffer Janet Kellner
Suzanne As Fred K Shochet Benjamin Kershaw
Irvin Seigel Family M. Ketchel
Edna & Dr Harry Shpiner David Klebanoff
Marilyn As George Simon Max Klein
Marilyn As Harry B Smith Jean Klemman
Susan As Samuel Smith Philip Kraus
Simeon D Spear Leah Krede
Drs. Wu. Lipman and Spear Joseph Krefetz
Betty As Clifford Suchman Irvine Lamm
Roberto Susi Samuel Lemlich
Albert JTarrson Samuel Leyton
Lisa As EliTimoner A. Lichtenstein
Jacqueline As Robert Traurig Aaron Lieberfarb
Esther. Carl As Julian Weinkle Albert Lipson
Joan As Morton D. Werner Sol Mansman
Cecile Weiss J. Levinson
Haim Wiener Louis Levy
Marilyn As Frederic Wise Elizabeth Lie ht
Florence As Dr. George S. Wise Charles Lipcon
Bess As Max A. Witz Charles Lippow
Josephine Wolf Rose Lowey
Fay As Harold Zinn Esther Mandelbaum
Sonja As Harry Zuckerman M Michaelson
Mila As Carl Zwerner Benjamin Miller
Numerous Anonymous Donors M. Minkoff
Henry Norton
Elsa Oppenheimer
umDmmwumDrvmxwmQummn) Ed Pasternak
Gertrude Albert Ida Pekarsky
Arthur Alexander E PlatofT
Peter Amazon George Rapaport
Dan Anthony Annie Popiel
Martha Arnstein Mildred Rapaport
Fannie Atlas Charles Reiss
A. Averbach Rose Rich
Sarah Baukin Jul Rifkin
Leopoldine Berger Carlyn Rose
Jacob Bernstein Ann Rae Roaenthal
Leo Bernstein Libby Rost
Jessie Block Rose Rotter
Frida Blum Harry Rubin
L. Bornstein J.A.Sachs
Lily K. Boyer Emmanuel Sapin
Samuel Brewster Genia Sapin
Noel Bring Arthur L. Scheffler
Benjamin Brown I. Schlesinger
Sam Bruss Edward Schlussel
Fay Buckner Stanley Sen luster
William Chersky Karl Schneider
Anna Cohn Alexander Schneiderman
Sophia Doris Davis Gertrude Schwartz
Murray Drexler Hannah Schwartz
David Duchin Jerome Schwartz
Joseph Dworetz Harold Shatz
Irvin Epstain Betty Siegel
Nathan Epstein Philip Siegel
Jacob Estreicher S Silberstein
Stella Ettinger Morns Silver
S. Fein berg Eva Smith
Benjamin Felsher W. Sporn
Sara Finch Hy man Stem
Rosalie Finder Emma Tar low
Pauline Flemm Viola Taach
Morne Flower Charles Teitelbaum
Anna Frankel Alexander Ungar
J Frankel Eve Urdang
Morris Freeman Ann Meyers We in stem
Elvira Lampel Frteber Betty Weinstein
Mayshie Fnedberg Louis Weinstein
Fk>rece Friedlander Una Weiss
Marcella and Abraham Friedman Benjamin Wilson
Jacob Friedman Hortenae Wilson
Rose Friedman O. Wiser
Henry Gasner Lena Wolf
Joaeph Goldberg Abraham Wolfson
Jacob Golden berg David Woloshm
Lucille Goldsmith D.Woodard
Sylvester Goldsmith Yampolsky Fund
Esther Goodman Max Zuckerman
Harry Gotkin
George Green DssWs^swJaTB AMD TOIT 1
Esther Greenstein Eva Abrahamer
Felix E. Haas Harry Aibinder
Kathi Haber Samuel Aker
Harry Hartenstein Harry Grossman
William Hertz Harry Kurzman
J. H.iih Murray Stefert
Samuel Hollander Lillian Schuatak
Morris Honnigbaum Harry Slay
Rose Horwitt Cecelia Stutz
Ida Hutxler Numerous Anonymous Donors




i afcc
t ederation. May. iyd
D
UeWISH^pH ILANrHRpP1S
of tfie (jrealer Miami Jewish Tederation
Where There Is a Will...
MAKE SURE THAT WHAT YOU WANT
TO HAPPEN WILL HAPPEN
Unless you do it, the State will auto-
matically step in and make your WILL for
you. It will follow its own rules, no matter
what you might have preferred. For example,
under Florida law:
If you are survived by your wife and chil-
dren the first $20,000 of your estate, plus
one-half the balance, will pass to your wife,
and the remainder to your children no
matter what you might have wished.
Problems may arise when the State distri-
butes your estate involving the arbitrary
division of assets in excess of the first
$20,000 of your estate into halves even
when it is detrimental to everyone concerned
If you are survived by your children only
the entire estate will be handed on in equal
shares to your children, no matter what you
might have preferred.
If you are survived only by your wife all
the property goes automatically to her.
AND
If jou are a woman th*wame provisions
apply to your spouse and children.
It just doesn't make sense to take that
kind of a risk. Especially when there are so
many advantages to making a WILL.
FIRST OF ALL YOU CAN BE VERY
SPECIFIC
You can leave specific bequests to rela-
tives, friends and employees.
You can make such bequests in specific
dollar amounts, portions of the estate or
specific assets.
You can make charitable bequests which
you neglected to provide for during your life-
time. The State will not provide for the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
You can leave heirlooms or other items of
sentimental value to loved ones and friends.
And it's so easy to do here are some
examples of such specific bequests.
"I give twenty percent of my estate to my
brother, David Green."
"I give my gold Hamilton pocket watch to
my son, Mark Green."
"I give five thousand dollars ($5,000.00) to
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation (or
the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies)."
AND THERE ARE MANY OTHER
BENEFITS
You can name the person who will handle
the estate by naming a Personal Repre-
sentative you can be sure that the person
who will handle your property and deal with
your family is going to follow your wishes.
Why leave the matter up to a judge?
You can make sure that the Personal Rep-
resentative will have the power to do what
you want him to do your Will can grant the
Personal Representative the broad or special
powers to act in the best interests of your
beneficiaries. Without a Will, the court has
to supervise every important decision caus-
...There Is a Way
ing delay and often additional and costly ex-
penses.
You can provide for minor children or in-
dividuals with special needs by means of a
trust, you not only provide income for those
who need it most, but you also may be able
to reduce income taxes or provide creditor
protection for your family.
You can designate guardians for minor
children in case of untimely death, a WILL
can be of great value for small children.
Although such designations are not firmly
binding in Court, they are given great weight
in the case of a court deciding who should
care for orphans.
You can minimize estate and other death
taxes a WILL can be of great value in
reducing the taxes that are taken by govern-
ment. This is of special importance in regard
to large estates.
AND REMEMBER YOU CAN CHANGE
YOUR MIND!
A WILL is a revocable document and you
can, and should, change it periodically to fit
your changing needs and intentions
Changes in the tax laws also make it impor-
tant to review your WILL periodically. AND I
EVEN THOUGH A WILL DOES NOT
HAVE TO FOLLOW A PARTICULAR
FORMAT, IT SHOULD FULFILL SOME
LEGAL REQUIREMENTS SO IT IS AI
GOOD IDEA TO CONSULT A LAWYER
MEMORIALIZATION
A donor or the donor's family will receive a I
dignified acknowledgement of a gift or
bequest to the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies, and the name of the donor will be j
enshrined for perpetual memorialization.
MAKE SURE THAT WHAT YOU WANT I
TO HAPPEN, WILL HAPPEN WITH AI
WILL
If you would like further information, I
please write or call Joseph C. Imberman,
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida
33137. Phone (305) 576-4000. Then call your |
attorney.
Message from
the Chairmen
Melvin Kartzmer
Development Committee
MAKE A WILL AND
HELP CONTINUE OUR
PRECIOUS JEWISH HERITAGE
Through wars, depressions, genocide and
every other kind of calamity, the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation has stood ready to
help our fellow Jews in their time of need.
The responsibilities of the Federation are
greater now than ever before, and will in-
crease in the future.
As always, we depend on the deep
Jay I. Kislak
Foundation
generosity of our community, and that has
never failed us.
The tradition of our people, that of helping
those who need help is embedded W1
our hearts. For that reason, now is the tune
to make sure that this powerful tradition
the precious heritage will be preserved. w
sure that your WU1 incorporates a geno
bequest for the Greater Miami Jew |
Federation.
Now is the time to take care of it **|
you are thinking about it.
''...as my father planted for me before I was born,
so do I plant for those who will come after me."
Talmud Ta'anit
"*^J4*^ tit,,


Federation, May, 1983
Page 15
[WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1
I: Kaye, adult and singles services coordinator of
l.teMichael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center,
I II lead a group discussion about finding the perfect
I ite this evening at 7:30 at the MAR JCC, 18900 NE
E Avenue, North Miami Beach. The cost is $1.50 for
Lumbers $3 for non-members. For more information,
I Jse call Karen Kaye at 932-4200.
llHURSDAY,JUNE2
l-Letting Go of the Fear of Change, a workshop given
L MSW Lee Strassman, will be held this, evening at
BO at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC. For more in-
llomation, please call Karen Kaye at 932-4200.
JAY,JUNE2
I Hidden Job Market a career forum for persons
[looking for a job, considering a career change or
inting to improve their present job situation, will be
inducted by specialists from the Jewish Vocational
jgvice this evening at 7:30 at the South Dade Jewish
immunity Center, 12401 SW 102nd Avenue. There is
i charge. For more information, please call Marsha
, at 251-1394.
aTURDAY, JUNE 4
iioy an evening of classical music performed by the
isure Time Quartet, a group of business and
ofessional people who are also professional musicians,
iis evening at 8:00 at the home of Morris and Mikki
nick. For more information, please call Marsha
kin at the South Dade JCC, 251-1394.
UNDAY, JUNE 5
i Board of Directors of the Jewish High School of
uth Florida will host a Scholarship Cocktail party
ievening from 5:30 to 7:30 at the Sans Souci Hotel,
Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. For more in-
ation, please call the school at 935-5620.
UNDAY, JUNE 5
Young Adults Division of the Greater Miami
rah Federation continues its film series this evening
^8:00 with the showing of "Hester Street" at Temple
i Am, 5950 SW 88th Street. Admission is $4.00 and
hments are included. For more information,
Bcall 576-4000, extension 287.
UNDAY. JUNE 5
Israeli folk and contemporary dancing class will
this evening at 8:00 and will be held every
ly at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community
|mter, 18900 NE 25th Avenue, North Miami Beach.
icost is $1.50 for members, $3.00 for non-members.
br more information, please call Karen Kaye at 932-
ONDAY, JUNE 6
k Jewish Community Center bowling league begins
is evening at 9:00 at West Dixie Lanes, 15950 West
Highway. North Miami. For more information,
e call Jaime Kaplan at 987-5757 after 6:00 p.m.
tESDAY.JUNE7
H5th Annual Meeting of the Greater Miami Jewish
[deration will be held this evening at 8:00 at the
deration building. 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-
el Emergency Fund campaign workers will also be
ored at this event. For more information, please call
MOO, extension 261.
pJESDAY, JUNE 8
pi men do eat quiche. Find out why and enjoy fine
piental dining this evening at 8:00 at Toeblers
ftaurant, 1605 Federal Highway, Dania. with a
l"P from the Michael-Ann Russell JCC. For reser-
[ions and information, please call Elaine Dermer at
?9403.
PME8DAY, JUNE 8
> Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School will
P its kindergarten graduation tonight at 7:00 at
pi's Friedman-Uhlar Auditorium. 89 students will
(ticipate in the ceremony. There is no charge for this
ft Please call the school office at 931-2381 for
nations.
, SDAY, JUNE 9
I Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day School will
'its 9th grade graduation tonight at 7:30 at Hulel's
man-Uhlar Auditorium. For more information,
ecall the school office at 931-2831.
i, SDAY, JUNE 9
fiber's Day picnic, sponsored by the senior adult
*ment of the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
unity Center, will be held today from 11:30 to
!u Greynolds Park. Bring your own lunch and the
*ill supply drinks and dessert. A sing-along and
ff sharing will follow the meal. The cost is $100 for
Pbers. *2.00 for non-members.
I |>ay, june 12 ...
Beth David Solomon Schechter Day School wUl
L*J sixth grade graduation today at 4:45 at the
fwy Sanctuary.
.^Y,JUNE 12 M _
lth Dade Hebrew Academy will hold a Bar
ft celebration brunch this morning at 11:30 at
Bn Roc Hotel, Miami Beach. Rabbi Ralph B.
. ">, founder and headmaster of the Academy, will
hred The donation is $12.00 per person and the
, invited to attend. Dietary laws wdl be ob-
, Jor more information, please call the Academy
NNO,
Calendar
TUESDAY, JUNE 14
Learn about your aura, including mate selection
through aura interpretation, this evening at 7:30 at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC. Howard Adelman, lecturer,
consultant and reader, will lead the discussion. The cost
is $1.50 for members, $3.00 for non-members. For more
information, please call the JCC at 932-4200.
TUESDAY, JUNE 14
The Beth David Solomon Schechter Day School will
hold its kindergarten graduation and luncheon this
morning at 11:00 at South Dade. For more information,
please call the school at 238-2601.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE IS
Graduation exercises for the first graduation class of
the Jewish High School of South Florida will be held
this evening at 7:30 at the Beth To rah Congregation in
North Miami Beach. Gene Greenzweig, executive
director of the Central Agency for Jewish Education,
will be the guest speaker.
THURSDAY, JUNE 16
Chug Aliyah will hold a farewell to those making
Aliyah this summer tonight at 7:00 at the Federation
building, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard. For more in-
formation, please call Bemice or Ralph Geratenfeld at
653-2470.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22
A two week senior adult summer camp at Lake Como in
the Pocono Mountains from June 22 through July 26 is
being arranged by the Michael-Ann Russell JCC. Full
day and evening activities plus three Kosher meals
daily are planned. The cost is $695 per person, which
includes airfare. Limited openings are still available.
For more information, please call Staffanie Engelberg
at 935-2440.
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29
Dine around enjoy the company of other senior
adults and dinner at the Prince Hamlet restaurant
today. The bus leaves the Michael-Ann Russell JCC at
5:00 p.m. The cost is $15.00 per person and includes
transportation, dinner, tax and tip. For more in-
formation and reservations, please call Steffanie
Engelberg at 935-2440.
SUNDAY, JUNE 19
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC is sponsoring the Jewish
soap opera "Do We Have Tzooros, We Sure Do," today
at noon at the Marco Polo Hotel, Miami Beach. The
cost for this event is $13, which includes the show and
lunch. Checks must be received by June 3rd and car
pools are available. For more information, please call
Karen Kaye at 932-4200.
Let's Get Physical
In keeping with its plan to offer the finest
physical fitness, health and recreational
facilities in South Florida, the Michael-Ann
Russell Jewish Community Center, 18900
N.E. 25 Avenue, North Miami Beach, has
opened its new Nautilus Fitness Center and
exercise room.
The Julius and Blanche Werbner Nautilus
Fitness Center and Abe Feinbloom Exercise
Room were made possible through the
special gifts of these members as a
demonstration of their interest in the future
of the JCC.
The 11-station Nautilus exercise machines
offer a unique, proven system of high in-
tensity, strength-building exercise. Exer-
cisers can get a complete workout in as few
as three half-hour sessions a week. Results
are rapid and satisfying. The exercise room
features Universal exercise apparatus, wall
mounted chin-up bar and parallel dip bars.
A full-time, trained professional staff will
be available to develop individual exercise
programs and supervise members.
Membership in the Nautilus Fitness
Center is $95 in addition to annual single or
family membership in the JCC. Persons
interested in joining can call Jerry Luschak,
health and physical education director, at
Planning Continued From Page 1
A Financial Resource Planning Com-
mittee, under the chairmanship of
Sheldon Guren, will function in concert
with the Long Range Planning / Capital
Needs panel to determine funding
sources for the newly proposed pro-
grams. The sources to be considered for
support include government at all levels,
the Greater Miami Jewish community,
the general non-sectarian community,
private and public foundations, and user
fees.
If 51*0 Continued From Page 12
possessions is of more recent vintage and
hangs in a prominent place in bis
Federation Towers apartment. It is a
framed certificate presented to him by
his neighbors at a recent celebration held
in his honor. The inscription reads:
"Harry Bashover. In appreciation for
years of heroism and courage as a soldier
in the Jewish Brigade which was the first
step in achieving independence for the
State of Israel after 2000 years of
dispersion."
932-4200.
Commenting on the new physical fitness
facility, Michael-Ann Russell JCC President
William Lehman, Jr. said, "It will add a
modern, efficient, supervised Nautilus
Center and exercise room to the indoor and
outdoor running tracks, indoor and outdoor
swimming pools, four championship
racquetball courts, nine lighted tennis
courts, gymnasium and playing fields.
Nowhere else in South Florida is there a
facility that offers the variety and quality of
the JCC."
Julius Werbner, who exercises at the JCC
five days a week, said he wanted to assure
that the Michael-Ann Russell JCC had the
finest exercise facility in the area.
Abe Feinbloom, in announcing his gift,
urged that the Michael-Ann Russell JCC
continues to strive to be the best health and
fitness center in South Florida.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC is one of
three Centers nnerated bv the Jewish
Community Centers of South Florida.
The JCCs are members of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's family of
agencies and beneficiaries of the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
"In solidifying our commitment to
social services to this community, we
must look into the future to determine
the growth and evolution of needs."
Lipoff said. "Our new committees will
allow us to plot a course toward complete
service of our entire Jewish community
for years to come. One of the major bene-
fits of this process is its ongoing nature,
which will continue to project future
needs, thus allowing us to properly pre-
pare a maximal response."
As the reminiscences end. Harry
leaves his apartment to attend a current
events class given regularly at
Federation Towers. He greets each of his
neighbors in the hallways and elevator as
he rides down to the second floor This is
his home and these are his friend'
Despite his health problems, his pride
and courage remain. He is facing
leukemia without complaining That
dash of heroism still survives.
'



-, WM Hi


Two million
Palestinians already
have a homeland
in Palestine.
There is a nation in the Middle East which occupies
almost 77% of the original Palestine Mandate. A nation
which automatically confers full citizenship on Palestinians,
regardless of where they now live.
This nation is Jordan.
Three-fourths of Jordan's government appointments,
including nine Cabinet posts, are held by Palestinians. Half
of Jordan's Prime Ministers since 1950 have been Palestin-
ian. A majority of Jordan's army is Palestinian. Palestinians
have invigorated Jordan's economy and control 70% of its
businesses. The New York Times has called Jordan's capital
"the greatest Palestinian city in the world."
More than two-thirds of Jordan's people nearly
2 million citizens-are Palestinian. And with a popula- j0<
tion density of less than 61 per
square mile, it has ample room
for all of those who choose to
live among their own people
in their own homeland.
We believe the Pales-
tinians deserve a homeland.
We also believe the lfe^41flR80 PHKtlHB.
best Palestinian homeland
is the one they already have.
Please write Jordan is Palestine
Committee, RO. Box 2003, New Hyde
Park, NY 11040, with your comments.
Richard Jacoel, Chairman.
This advertisement was reprinted courtesy of the Community Relations
Committee of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. You may wish to
send this to your U.S. senators or congressional representatives.


Full Text

mmm *"** "
*Mr* ?% ***.
Two million
Palestinians already
have a homeland
in Palestine.
There is a nation in the Middle East which occupies
almost 77% of the original Palestine Mandate. A nation
which automatically confers full citizenship on Palestinians,
regardless of where they now live.
This nation is Jordan.
Three-fourths of Jordan's government appointments,
including nine Cabinet posts, are held by Palestinians. Half
of Jordan's Prime Ministers since 1950 have been Palestin-
ian. A majority of Jordan's army is Palestinian. Palestinians
have invigorated Jordan's economy and control 70% of its
businesses. The New York Times has called Jordan's capital
"the greatest Palestinian city in the world."
More than two-thirds of Jordan's people nearly A
2 million citizens-are Palestinian. And with a popula-
tion density of less than 61 per
square mile, it has ample room
for all of those who choose to
live among their own people
in their own homeland.
We believe the Pales-
tinians deserve a homeland.
We also believe the iJ^ffi^3M9lll PfltftfctfnP
best Palestinian homeland
is the one they already have.
Please write Jordan is Palestine
Committee, RO. Box 2003, New Hyde,
Park, NY 11040, with your comments.:
Richard Jacoel, Chairman.


This advertisement was reprinted courtesy of the Community Relations
Committee of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. You may wish to
send this to your U .S. senators or congressional representatives.
J


Friday, May 27,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
Whether Israel Withdraws Or Not
Experts Say Some Aspects of Pact with Lebanon Are Legally Binding

Continued from Page 1-A
ceed with implementation of
tccord not directly related
those parts of the
to the withdrawal
ocess.
According to the legal experts here, an obvious
example is Article I of the agreement in which Israel
and Lebanon "confirm that the state of war has
been terminated and no longer exists."The exoerts
. it would be illogical and spurious to artrue t
there is no withdrawal of all foreign forces from
Lebanon the "state of war" would be resumed be-
tween the two countries.
A SIMILAR question concerns the provision for a
"Joint Liaison Committee" of Israel and Lebanon to
begin working as soon as the instruments of ratifica-
tion are exchanged. While many of the committee's
functions are security related and therefore contin-
gent on the withdrawal of forces, others the main-
tenance of an Israel liaison office in Beirut, for
example and the "development of mutual relations
between Israel and Lebanon"are not.
There are of course many provisions in the agree-
ment that are meaningful only in the context of
withdrawal, such as security arrangements and the
limitation of forces in south Lebanon. But orima
facia, the Israel-Lebanon agreement signed this
week is a valid international document regardless of
what happens in terms of the withdrawal, Israeli
sources say.
been terminated and no longer exists, l he experts
say it would be illogical and spurious to argue that if
1 Roth Parties Fought Hard
After Five Months of Negotiation, A Pact Gets Off the Ground
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA1 Israel
__ Lebanon signed their agree-
ent on troop withdrawals and
urity and got a pledge of
a" support from the United
(iutes, a co-signator.
were two signing cere-
onies, the first, at 9 a.m. local
> at Khalde, a Lebanese town
south of Beirut, and three
ours later, at Kiryat Shemona,
i Israeli town on the Lebanese
order where, as in Khalde, many
[the negotiating sessions lead-
l to the agreement were held.
David Kimche, director general
the Israeli Foreign Ministry
> headed the Israeli negotiat-
team, signed for Israel.
ntoine Fatale, chief of the
fbanese delegation signed for
Beirut government. U.S. spe-
jnbassador Morris Draper
his signature on behalf of
! United States. All three made
r that this was not a formal
ice treaty between Israel and
banon but nevertheless a
ujor step on the road towards
Mce.
| DRAPER NOTED that both
ties had fought hard during
five months of negotiations
' their national aspirations and
quirements. "But in the
cess of meshing these aims,
countries found they had
ny goal- and aim* in common.
eluding an enduring and
endly relationship between
em. he said.
[Draper added that it was fit-
pg that the U.S. was present to
loess the signing*. "The U.S.
|a warm and reliable friend of
countries. It is not only a
|tness to this accord but will
a firm supporter of the
erstanciin^s which have been
died.' the American diplomat
Wared.
he signings followed the en-
ements of the agreements by
Lebanese and Israeli par-
The Lebanese Par-
ent unanimously approved
accord. The Knesset regis-
a its approval by a vote 57-6
|th 45 abstentions.
* copies of the agreement
signed in English and
Glenn Wants
PLO in Talks
3ENEVA (JTA) Sen.
[ Glenn (D., Ohio), who an-
that he will seek his
1 s nomination for the Presi-
' m 1984, believes the Pales-
Liberation Organization
' join in the Middle East
negotiations, according to
mterview with the former
^naut published in the Swiss
> 'Permanent solution to the
will be possible without
Participation of the PLO."
was quoted as saying. He
that whUe the U.S. should be
nsible fr Israel's security,
m nt support the creation
settlements by Israel in
occupied territories, Con-
F reported.
French, the official versions, and
in Hebrew and Arabic. Three of
the signed copies are for Jeru-
salem, Beirut and Washington
and the fourth for the United Na-
tions archives in New York.
KIMCHE SAID at the sign-
ings, "The signatures are just the
beginning of a new chapter in our
histories. Many obstacles still
stand in our paths, and there are
many who would wish to render
the agreements meaningless .. .
But you cannot go against the
will of the people" of Lebanon
and Israel.
He stressed that Israel's final
withdrawal from Lebanon is con-1
tingent on the departure of all
Syrian and Palestine Liberation
Organization forces from that
country and the return by Syria
of all Israeli prisoners of war.
The understanding of the con-
ditional nature of Israel's pledge
to withdraw was affirmed in side-
letters from the U.S. to Israel and
Lebanon which are part of the
agreement. Fatale. speaking in
French, noted that "The agree-
ment is not perfect, but then per-
fection belongs to God only."
MUCH OF the agreement and
its annexes deal with security ar-
rangements in south Lebanon
where Israel and Lebanon will es-
tablish a Joint Liaison Commit-
tee with U.S. participation. The
Lebanese army to be stationed in
the south Lebanon security zone
will be limited to two brigades
with their normal equipment.
Anti-aircraft or ground-to-sea
nu---iles are excluded, as is radar
capable of scanning Israeli terri-
tory. The security provisions
provide lor direct radio and tele-
phone communications between
the Israeli and Lebanese military
commanders and faci o face
consultations.
According to the annex of the
agreement, "within 8 to 12
weeks of the entry into force of
the present agreement, all Israeli
forces will have been withdrawn
from Lebanon. This is consistent
with the objective of Lebanon
that all external forces withdraw
from Lebanon.
"THE LEBANESE armed
forces and the Israel defense
forces will maintain continuous
liaison during the withdrawal and
will exchange all necessary in-
formation through the Security
Arrangements Committee. The
Israel defense forces and the
Lebanese armed forces will co-
operate during the withdrawal in
order to facilitate the reassertion
of the authority of the govern-
ment of Lebanon as the Israeli
armed forces withdraw."
The annex also states: "Three
months after completion of the
withdrawal of all Israeli forces
from Lebanon, the Security Ar-
rangements Committee will con-
duct a full-scale review of the
adequacy of the security arrange-
ments delineated in this annex in
order to improve them.
The signings represented a
major achievement for diplomacy
in which the U.S. played an over-
riding and probably decisive role-
The final accord was reached
after two weeks of strenuous
shuttling between Jerusalem and
Beirut by U.S. Secretary of State
George Shultz.
BUT AS Shultz himself
stressed, Israel and Lebanon bad
by then reached agreements in
principle on most points during
the months of negotiations in
which Draper and U.S. special
envoy to the Middle East Philip
Habib participated.
Both Kimche and Fatale had
fulsome praise for Draper and
Habib. But despite the satisfac-
tion expressed by all parties with
the achievement consummated,
the fate of the agreement clearly
depends on whether Syria will
agree to withdraw its forces from
Lebanon.
Damascus exerted severe pres-
sure on the government of Leba-
nese President Amin Gemayel to
reject the accord with Israel on
grounds that Israel gained
politically and militarily from it.
Fatale, in his remarks, stressed
that Lebanon remained faithful
to its commitments to the Arab
world, but it required an end to
warfare if it is to rebuild a coun-
try shattered by seven years of
civil strife. He referred pointedly
to the fact that Syria itself
reached an accord with Israel in
the form of the 1974 disengage-
ment on the Golan Heights.
ISRAEL ^$510.
2 WEEK VACATION -$510.
(*Mak
JMuaAk
15 Nights In TEL AVIV 2 Nights In TIBERIAS 6 Nlghte In JERUSALEM
ktdudM:Ho*IAax>m,iDft of Sgntoaafcig, Twfn Bedded Rooms.
BJBfJ Stf* Koaner Buff* Breakfast Transfers I Porterage.
4 WEEK TOUR OF LEISURE s1022.
WITH LATE DEPARTURES, LITTLE WALKING & SLOWER PACE
3 WEEKS IN NETANVA* 1 WEEK IN JERUSALEM
Tour Jnctodse? Accommodation In First Class rMat Twin BaddatfRoorna, 2 Koeiiar Mask Evwy Day,
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FOR RESERVATIONS A INFORMATION ON THESE TOURS, OR OUR
OTHER ISRAELI TRIPS, CALL MIRIAM COLLECT AT
TRIANGLE TOURS-931-3031
18407 W. Dixie Highway North Miami Beach
TO**'*
We're 82 years old,
and we never looked younger!
We've come a long way
since we used to send
the horse and buggy
down lo the Kadroad
Station to pick up our
quests and boasted about
electricity in every room.
From the country place
that became the summer
refuge of those who
spent the other 50 weeks
of the year in crowded
city apartments, we've
grown into one of the
most pampering resor -
cf the land.
Yet deep down we re
main the same. A friendly,
welcoming stopping off
place where you can get
away from the tensions
and problems of day to
day living and discover
a new world of pleasure.
As we start our 9th
decade, and with a 5th
generation of hosts
warming in the wings,
we say to you just as
We've been saying these
last 82 years:
Come up to the Nevele.
And enjoy yourself
mm
Nevele Motel
BJIenviUe. New York 12428
Hotel (!MDW7WKKI
r'wture* IX Hole Golf Course 10 Outdoor All Weather
Tennis Courts (Day & Night) Magnificent Outdoor
Menu I 'iii'l Health Club Indoor Pool Indoor Tennis
Kar<|ueiball Riding Private Lake Entertainment

. V b tub


/
/
I
^


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9WK4TW
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Page 2 A The Jewish Floridian Friday, May 27,. J.9^3
Background Report
wf\ '^ iHHI V-
v .
U.S. Pleased Israel, Lebanon Signed
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
(JTA) The Reagan
Administration, obviously
pleased that Israel and
Lebanon have signed their
agreement for the with-
drawal of Israeli troops
from Lebanon, continues to
express confidence that
Syria will agree to leave
too.
"We believe that this (signing)
is a major achievement that
proves that peace negotiations
can work in the Middle East,"
Nicholas Veliotes, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near East
and South Asian Affairs, de-
clared in briefing reporters on the
agreement.
President Reagan has hailed
the signing as "a positive step
toward peace in the Middle
East." Speaking to Congres-
sional leaders at a budget meet-
ing, Reagan also called on Syria
and the Palestine Liberation
Organization to "agree to with-
draw as well" so that all foreign
forces would be out of Lebanon
and that country can regain its
sovereignty and a control of its
territory.
THE PRESIDENT thanked
Premier Menachem Begin of Is-
rael and Lebanese President
Amin Gemayel for the courage
and statesmanship they showed
in the negotiations for troop
withdrawals, and he particularly
thanked Secretary of State
George Shultz for his efforts that
led to the agreement.
Veliotes said the agreement
worked out by Shultz during his
two week mission to th Middle
East is "the first essential step in
achieving the withdrawal of all
foreign forces from Lebanon." He
said the agreement becomes of-
ficially effective when Lebanon
and Israel exchange the docu-
ments of ratification.
But he stressed that it is
"understood" that Israel will not
begin withdrawing its troops
until there is an agreement for
the withdrawal of Syrian troops
and PLO forces. When this is
done, the Israeli withdrawal
would take 8-12 weeks to com-
plete, he said.
THE U.S. expects Syria to
abide by its "longstanding"
public and private assurances
that when the Lebanese govern-
ment tells it that the Syrian
army's presence is "no longer
necessary" it will withdraw,
Veliotes said. He noted that Is-
raeli troops in Lebanon are only
25 miles from Damascus.
"We assume that the with-
drawal of those troops is some
form of reassurance to Syria's
security concerns," he said. He
added that the U.S. cannot see
how the security arrangements
worked out for south Lebanon
between Israel and Lebanon
where, he repeatedly stressed, the
Lebanese army will be in com-
plete control, could be seen as a
threat to Syria.
Veliotes rejected any linkage of
the Golan Heights issue to
Syrian withdrawal. He pointed
out that while Reagan did not
mention the Golan in his Sept. 1
peace initiative for the Middle
East, the U.S. stressed on the
very next day that it considers
the Golan Heights part of the
territories occupied by Israel, as
EEC Welcomes Accord;
Mum on Syria's Rejection
BONN (JTA) The
European Economic Community
has welcomed the accord reached
between Israel and Lebanon and
signed by the two countries.
West Germany's Foreign Minis-
ter Hans-Dietrich Genscher made
that point at a press conference
here following a two-day informal
meeting of the foriegn ministers
of the 10 EEC-member states.
But Genscher, who currently
holds the rotating chairmanship
of the EEC Council of Ministers,
gave no indication of the
European reaction to Syria's
rejection of the agreement, which
could render it inoperative. There
was an understanding here that
the European Community will
try to exert influence on
Damascus to pull Syrian forces
out of Lebanon. German sources
could not say how the Syrians
would be addressed or on what
level.
Unless Syria withdraws from
Lebanon, the Israelis will not pull
out their troops, and the status
quo in Lebanon will remain. The
Jewish Telegraphic Agency
learned that the EEC Foreign
Ministers did not con airier lifting
the partial sanctions imposed on
Israel after its invasion of Leba-
non in June, 1982. Sources hero
have said such a move
Austrian Quits
Candidacy
possible only after the actual
withdrawal of Israeli forces takes
place.
Prior to the ministers' meeting,
sources said it was "premature"
to speak of lifting the sanctions
and there was not even a remote
chance to reach the needed
consensus to do so at this time.
Israeli Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir is due in Brussels some
time next month for talks with
Belgian and EEC officials.
Israel's demand that the sanc-
tions be lifted is expected to be
high on the agenda.
defined by UN Security Council
Resolution 242.
VELIOTES SAID he did not
believe the Soviet Union could
veto Syria's withdrawal from
Lebanon. He said he believed the
government of Syria will make its
own decisions. "We hope they
make the right decisions so
everyone will get out," he said.
He said that history shows "the
longer they stay" the more there
is a chance of conflict.
Meanwhile, U.S. special
Ambassador for the Middle East
Philip Habib has returned to
Beirut to begin the U.S. efforts to
gain Syria's withdrawal, Veliotes
said. No mention was made of
Shultz returning to the Middle
East. President Gemayel, in an
interview published in The New
York Times, urged Shultz to
return as soon as possible. But
Shultz reportedly believes the
main effort should now be made
by the Arab countries to get
Syria to withdraw.
Veliotes replied with a firm
"No" when he was asked if the
U.S. had to pay a price to gain
Israel's agreement to withdraw
from Lebanon. "It wasn't a ques-
tion of buying the Israelis out of
Lebanon," he said.
VELIOTES, who accompanied
Shultz on his recent mission to
the Mideast, said it was clear in
the talks that "the Israelis did
wish to leave Lebanon," but it
was a question of finding the
"proper circumstances" under
which their security could be
safeguarded. "The Israelis clear-
ly demonstrated in the negotia-
tions that they have no desire to
create a Northern Bank in Leb-
anon." he stressed.
Veliotes said the agreement
serves Israel's "legitimate self-
interest" and seeks to ensure that
a situation will not be recreated
in which "terrorist acts" against
Israel will once again occur. The
agreement also prohibits both
Israel and Lebanon from using
each other's territory to launch
attacks against a third country.
Veliotes noted that Reagan, in
April, linked removal of the
embargo on the sale of 75 F-16 jet
fighter-bombers to Israel with
Israel's withdrawal from Leb-
anon. He agreed there wss a
"change in the atmosphere" now.
But he said Reagan is "in the
process of considering" what ac-
tion to take now. This seemed to
be an indication that an an-
nouncement on the F-16s may be
made soon.
Doctors at the Hadassah-Hebrew University Medical CniA
declare 20-month-old Tomer Levy cured of Thalassemia aftA
bone-marrow transplantation from his father, Amram. Tomir' I
the first such successful recipient of a bone-marrow transput
from father-to-son. Two other operations, between siblinnl
were done at University of Washington Medical School, 39
tie. '
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