The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02829

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Jewish Floridian of South Broward
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Jewish Floridian of North Broward
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Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
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Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
'dfewislfo Floridiaim
e 56_Number 16 Four Sections
Miami, Florida-Friday April 22,1983
Frit Shochml
By Mail W Cell
Price 50 Cents
o Settlements Freeze, Begin Vows
.
WH^HnHMH
** '
'ens Fears
(yria Strike
rainst IDF
| By DAVID LANDAU
RUSAI.EM (JTA)
)efense Minister Moshe
is contending that
! is "cause for concern"
Syria might attack Is-
forces in Lebanon. He
this doos not mean
war is imminent but
Israel has to be on
rd on that front.
irens said Israel does not
It hostilitie- with Syria but
ned that Damascus has
ivs been hostile toward
el that its policy could, with
lification. be called "wild"
ecially as thf Syrians may be
oldened by the installation of
SAM") anti-aircraft
files nn their soil.
!NS MADE his remarks
(vision interview, his first
taking office as Defense
iter six weeks ago. The
Israeli Ambassador to
lington castigated President
bin for delaying the sale of 75
[jet fighter-bombers to Israel
I lirael pulls its forces out of
I m afraid chore is no pre-
kni m such a statement in
Inns between Israel and the
fed States during 35 years,"
declared. "It never hap-
that an American Presi-
I has said that the supply of
to which the United States
Bated itself is conditioned on
itiotu on policy. Today in
Bnon. tomorrow on another
Arena said.
I THAT connection he urged
Hit stress i n the develop-
|t of Israel's domestic arms
ptrv to reduce its dependence
lAmeriiun weaponry. Arens
denounced Reagan's recent
I Continued on Page 21-A
4-^-fc
*"
4^


A
ISRAELCELEBRATICN
SUNDAY APRIL24 1983
T
And No
Unconditional
Lebanon
Withdrawal
JERUSALEM In a
nationally-televised ad-
dress to Israelis Sunday on
the occasion of their 35th
anniversary as a state,
Prime Minister Menachem
Begin flatly refused to call
a halt to new Jewish settle-
ment of Judea and Sam-
aria, as well as Gaza.
Begin told his countrymen that
Israel has the "inalienable right"
to settle these territories won in
the 1967 Six-Day War.
The Begin address was in re-
sponse to a statement by Egypt
that it would not resume its talks
with Israel on Palestinian auto-
nomy until settlement of these
areas ceased and Israel withdrew
its troops from Lebanon.
BEGIN SAID that "The nego-
tiations for implementing the au-
tonomy for the Arab residents in
Samaria. Judea and the Gaza
district should be renewed."
He said. "The resumption of
negotiations does not have to
and can not be conditional on
the freezing of Jewish settlement
in Judea. Samaria and the Gaza
district. This settlement is legal,
and derives from our inalienable
right to the Land of Israel."
As Israelis took to celebrating
their anniversary day. the gov-
ernment began the conversion of
a military outpost to a civilian
settlement on Mount Bracha,
overlooking Nablus. To under-
score the fact that this resettle-
ment move was especially pro-
vocative, the Peace Now move-
ment demonstrated in the Mount
Bracha area, protesting the es-
tablishment of the new town,
which will be known as Upper
Nablus.
Fifteen civilian families will be
Continued on Page 2-A
Miami Celebrates
Weekend of Festivities Mark Israel's Anniversary
iJetro-Dade Mayor Ste-
J P- Clark has declared
y.Apr. 24, as "Israel
..- Yom Ha'Atzmaut
.ration Day In Dade
"Ky. to coincide with
l' ue?ts beinK "eld at
I Michael-Ann Russell
KL ^ munity Center
FJh Miami Beach and
^"th Dade Jewish
nunity Center to cele-
brate Israel's 35th anniver- nation.'
sary.
"The State of Israel has forged
a special friendship and strong
alliance with the United States
government and its citizens,'
reads the official proclamation
issued by the Metro-Dade Board
of Commissioners. "I urge the
people of the County of Dade to
participate in the walkathons and
festivals which celebrate the 35th
anniversary of Israel's founding
as a sovereign democratic
ISRAEL 35, coordinated by
the Jewish Community Centers
of South Florida in cooperation
with the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, will include joint
walkathons to benefit the
1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund, which
supports social services world-
wide. There will also be a variety
of activities and displays cele-
brating the land, culture and peo-
ple of Israel.
"We will be just one of thou-
sands of communities celebrating
this joyous occasion," said
Metro-Dade Commissioner Ruth
Shack, president of the JCCs.
"We are pleased to be sponsoring
Israel 35, and we invite
everyone in the community to
join in the festivities."
The five-kilometer North Dade
walkathon will begin in back of
Jordan Marsh, 1475 NE 163rd
St., North Miami Beach, and will
end at the Michael-Ann Russell
JCC, 18900 NE 25th Ave. The 10-
kilometer South Dade walkathon
will begin at 1 p.m., at Ron Eh-
mann Park, 10655 SW 97th Ave.,
and will end at the South Dade
JCC, 12401 SW 102nd Ave.
NORTH DADE festival will be
held from 12:15 to 5 p.m., and
will feature an Israeli Center with
films and displays, an Israeli-
style market with art and gift
items, food booths and contests.
Entertainment will include the
Continued on Page 2-A


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22, 1983
Shofar Blast Ends Gathering
'Our Story Must Not Be Forgotten'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The American
Gathering of Jewish Holo-
caust Survivors ended
three days of emotional re-
unions and rememberings
with the sound of the shofar
and the admonition to the
some 15,000 survivors and
their children who were
here that they must insure
that "our story is not for-
gotten."
"We came here as individuals
but we must leave together as de-
termined as never before that our
experiences will become volumes
in history, not mere footnotes,"
declared Roman Kent, chairman
of the national executive of the
Gathering.
BENJAMIN MEED, presi-
dent of the Gathering, stressed
again the major theme of the sur-
vivors' meeting: "Each of us has
a story to tell and it is important
that we tell it soon because our
numbers are steadily dwindling.
We must ensure that, our own
children and the Jewish com-
munity as a whole with the whole
nation should carry on our re-
membrance."
Dr. Helen Fagin, professor of
Judaic Studies at the University
of Miami, in urging her fellow
survivors to continue telling
about what happened to them
during the Nazi period, declared.
"Please go out and tell the truth,
for they do not believe us."
Bui Meed also noted that
"perhaps the most urgent reason
for our Gathering" was the
private individuals reunions be-
tween relatives and friends, many
"t whom had not seen each other
tor some 40 years, or had believed
each other dead.
THE SURVIVAL Village at
the Washington convention cen
seemed u> be one lon# search
A Torch of Remembrance was kindled at Jerusalem's Yad
Vashem Memorial and sent to the United States to commemo-
rate the opening ceremony of the Holocaust Survivors Confer-
ence in Washington. Deputy Knesset Minister Dov Shilansky
transfers the torch to El Al pilot Gideon Shapiro who deUvered
it to Conference representatives.
as people wandered through the
huge halls with signs-seeking lost
relatives or fellow concentration
camp inmates, or people from
their former towns and cities.
Many used the computer system
set up for this purpose.
The survivors held memorial
candles during the closing out-
door ceremony in the shadow of
the Washington Monument. The
wind carried cherry blossom
petals over the participants who
were assembled near the site of
the future Holocaust Memorial
Museum to be built by the
United States Holocaust Council.
Miles Lerman. chairman of the
Council's national campaign
cabinet, stressed that while the
government donated two empty-
buildings for the museum, it
must be renovated and operated
entirely by private donations. He
estimated that S75 million to
SKK) million would be needed.
THE SPEECH that drew the
Army Reservists Sign Petition
TEL AVIV (JTA) "Thousands of army reser-
vists" have signed a petition expressing their refusal to
accept campaign ribbons for the war in Lebanon, an ad
hoc group called Le'ot (No to Campaign Ribbons) claim-
ed. The organization said that none of the signatories is
presently on active duty.
But a reserve sergeant who refused to accept his ribbon
at an army presentation ceremony last week was sen-
tenced to 10 days' imprisonment and reduced to the ranks
by a military court martial. The Le'ot group has asked the
Attorney General to rule on whether it was a soldier's
right or duty to accept a campaign ribbon. If it is a right,
refusal is not a punishable offense, they say.
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H-M1
loudest applause from the sur-
vivors was made by Mayor
Edward Koch of New
^ork Cit> He denounced the of-
ficials of the American and
Canadian governments who had
refused to admit Jews to their
countries after Hitler came to
power. "The murderers are not
only those who did the killing but
also those who stood by and did
nothing," Koch declared.
"The world knew and the world
did nothing." he said. "What we
remember, the world will remem-
ber whether it wants to or not,
because remembering is a per-
sonal obligation and an interna-
tional obligation.''
Koch also delivered a blistering
attack on the FLU. declaring that
the organization'.-. "greatest
dream is to linish what Hitler
started." He also criticized Presi-
dent Keagun tor blaming
radicals' within the FLO lor
scuttling Jordan's King Hussein
Irom entering the peace talks
with Israel. By singling out the
"radicals" in the FLO, Keagun
implied that the majority of the
FLO is non-radical. Koch said.
The fact is. the Mayor added,
that the FLO as a whole "wants
to destroy Israel, the Jewish peo-
ple and our entire memory.
REP. Tom Lantos (D Cal.)
also urged the survivors to re-
member those who tried to save
Jews, particularly Kaoul Wallen-
berg, the Swedish diplomat who
saved thousands of Jews from
the Nazis, including Lantos. and
was arrested by the Soviet Union
in 1945. He is believed by many
to still be alive in a Soviet labor
camp.
Calling the Gathering a "re-
affirmation of life," Sen. John
Danforth (K.. Mo.I said the Holo-
caust Memorial Museum will be
of "vital significance to all
Americans."
The Gathering was ended by
Ernest Michel, who was chair-
man of the World Gathering of
Holocaust Survivors in Jeru-
salem in 1981, and who organized
the first Gathering. He said the
two events realize "a dream" that
he and some other young inmates
of Auschwitz had on Passover in
1943. This was the same time as
the Warsaw Ghetto uprising was
occurring, the 40th anniversary
of which the three-day Gathering
here also marked.
Michel said the dream was
that, if they survived, they would
meet again "in freedom." He said
that none of them believed, at
that time, that any of them would
survive.
But Michel noted 6,000 sur-
vivors from 23 countries met in
Jerusalem and 15,000 from
throughout the United States
and Canada were here. "This
dream has now come," be
declared.
Weekend of Festivities Will Ma
Israel's 35th Anniversary
Continued from Page 1-A
Hashachar Latin Review, the
Chosen Children Israeli Folk
Singers, the Nitzanim Dance
Group, Whistles the Clown, the
Puppet People, and strolling
musicians.
Activities at the South Dade
festival, from 4 to 7 p.m., will fea-
ture exhibits, art displays, Israeli
and American foods, and game
booths. Entertainment will be
provided by the Beth Americans,
the Nitzanim Dancers, singer-
dancer Rachel Wolpoff, dance
leader Yossie Yanitch, accordion-
ist Ari Kaduri, the Beth Am
Troubadours, Jewish Junior
High School of South Florida
performers, the Temple Israel
Dance Group, the Beth David
School Troupe, and the Bet
Breira Choir. The event will end
with an evening kumzitz (Israeli
bonfire), featuring singing and
dancing among the participants.
"Israel's 35th anniversary is
an occasion Jews will celebrate
worldwide," said Norman H.
Lipoff. president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. "Our
local celebrations will demon-
Mayor Clark
strate our joy and solklarityi
the people of Israel."
GARY HOLTZMANisNa
Dade Israel 35 chairman, i.
Rabbi Julian Cook serving
walkathon chairman. DrorZi
is South Dade chairman,
Terri Tharp is chairing thei
athon.
Begin Vows There'll Be No
Settlements Freeze or Withdraws
Continued from Page 1-A
moving into house trailers in Up-
per Nablus as the first in a series
of developments designed to
turned the town into one of the
largest Jewish communities on
the West Bank.
IN HIS address. Prime Minis
ter Begin also took note of the
wai in Lebanon. He said. "We
must insure the fruit ot victory in
the justified defensive war"
against the Palestine Liberation
Organization.
In his reference to Egypt, the
Prime Minister declared that the
worsening in relations between
the two countries was "thi
no fault of ours.'' Returning]
the Egyptian precondition fori
resumption of the Palestinmi
tonomy talks. Begin spumedg
Egyptian demands of a
ments freeze and withdm]
from Lebanon as antssemalv
lation of the original LampDiij
accords that presumably bn
peace tn the two signatorj I
lions in I fl
It is Israel position that a]
il signed : '" sccnrd
Palestinian juinnomy limiudl
local matters, with Israel reuf
inn |m> i -" polio
fensi
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Conservative Rabbis
Defeat Woman's Ordination Plea
Friday,xpmiA,-wtegttgjgljjPMakarii Pa&J&flB
DALLAS, Tex. The
| male Rabbinical Assem-
,v the organization of
BOO Conservative Rabbis
,resenting 1.5 million
regants holding their
u' annual convention
e, has narrowly defeated
motion to admit a woman
plkant, Rabbi Beverly
lagidson of St. Louis, Mo.
constitution of the Rab-
at Assembly requires a vote
i percent to admit new mem-
The vote on Rabbi Magid-
i application fell short of the
^percent requirement by only
rvotes. with 210 rabbis voting
vor of her admission and 75
5 against.
LTHOUGH women have
en accepted as members of the
[form and Reconstructionist
binical bodies for the past ten
, Rabbi Magidson's applica-
i was the first to come before
Conservative rabbinical or-
nization for a vote. Rabbi
_ dson was ordained as a
Iform Rabbi at the Hebrew
l College-Jewish Institute of
Ugion.
She first submitted her ap-
|cation to the organization of
nservative rabbis two years
i due to her desire to associate
df with the more traditional
vement.
It was the first time in the
more than 80-year history of the
organization that a roll call vote
was taken. Rabbi Arnold Good-
man, spiritual leader of Congre-
gation Ahavath Achim in At-
lanta, Ga.. president of the Rab-
binical Assembly, stated, "It is a
tribute to the members that they
were willing to take a public posi-
tion on this most sensitive
issue."
RABBI GOODMAN noted,
"It is obvious that an over-
whelming majority of the mem-
bers support the admission of a
woman into'the Assembly, and I
feel that this vote reflects the
feelings of our total member-
ship."
He expressed the hope that
this issue will continue to be de-
bated within the Conservative
Movement and called upon the
Jewish Theological Seminary,
"as the training institution of the
movement, to reassess its current
policy in light of today's vote and
to ordain women as rabbis in the
Conservative Movement."
Rabbi David Novak of Far
Rockaway, N.Y., opened the dis-
cussion on the motion with his
remarks against admission, with
Rabbi Fishel Pearlmutter of
Toledo, Oh. speaking in favor.
Over 50 rabbis spoke during the
ensuing four-hour, often emo-
tional debate, including Rabbi
David Aronson of Los Angeles,
at 90 years of age the oldest
Jordan Urged to 'Free Self,'
Start Negotiation With Israel
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK- (JTA) -
reel's Finance Minister
oram Aridor has called on
brdan"" to free itself" from
chains of the extremists
Jihe Arab world and start
Kotiations with Israel
pihoutany preconditions..
risen is no chance for peace
^rd uoon the consent of the
0." Aridor told an Israel Bond
nmr last night al the Pierre
lrti-1 here "So let us go back to
i('amp David accords and ask
to join the negotiations
*' the framework of Camp
pid," the Israeli Minister said.
ding that in order to achieve
ice Hussein should show the
.' of thi late Etyptian
Went Anwar Sadat.
HDOR CHARGED that Is-
jMistence on direct nego-
ns and its desire to have full
with its neighbors are not
aerstood" by the United
1 and other countries. "We
| Peace and normalization of
<*s with Lebanon and we
thai time is not ripe for
between the two countries.
We want peace with Jordan and
we are told stop the settle-
ments.' Aridor said.
He recalled President Reagan's
statement in 1981 that the settle-
ments are not illegal. "Why
should we be requested to stop
something that is legal?" Aridor
asked Turning to the audience,
he said: "Would you agree that
any part in the U.S. be closed for
the Jews? Why should Jews be
barred from settling any place in
Eretz Yisrael?"
Aridor said that in spite of the
friendship between Israel and the
U.S. and all the thanks Israel
owes America. Israelis them-
selves will continue to decide on
matters concerning their
security. He added that the help
given to Israel by the U.S.
"should never be used to pressure
us or used as a weapon against
us."
THE DINNER was attended
by members of the Mediter-
ranean Dead Sea Canal Founders
and the Prime Minister's Club.
At the end of the evening it was
announced that $3.8 million in
new 1983 Israel Bonds com-
. mitments and cash payment on
previous commitments were
made during the evening.

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member present, speaking mov-
ingly in favor of the need to
admit women into the Assembly.
RABBI Wolfe Kelman, execu-
tive vice president of the
Assembly, summarized the views
expressed during the discussion
by stating that those favoring
Rabbi Magidson's admission
supported an "equalization of the
role of men and women in Ju-
daism, so that women can
participate fully in the religious
life of the Jewish people."
Those opposing the issue be-
lieve that "such a step is a
revolution in traditional practice,
which ought not to be done light-
ly." Rabbi Kelman further noted
that some members feel that the
Rabbinical Assembly should not
admit women into membership,
since the Jewish Theological
Seminary, will not ordain them.
Jihad' Terrorists Bomb
U.S. Embassy in Beirut
BEIRUT A U.S. Navy spokesman said Monday that 25 people
were killed and 36 wounded when a bomb-laden car exploded outside
the U.S. Embassy. A doctor later said that 28 people, including six
U.S. Marines, were killed in the fiery blast. The Navy spokesman
confirmed the deaths of the six Marines.
EARLIER, French Ambassador Paul MacHniry told reporters
that 40 to 60 persons had been killed, and in the confusion of con-
flicting reports, the White House declared that "at least" 21 were
killed and up to 60 injured.
Among early explanations for the blast was one reporting that
the blast was caused when a Moslem suicide terrorist drove the bomb-
laden car past the Embassy. The blast collapsed the entire front of the
central wing of the seaside Embassy facility and blew a large hole
through the ground floor visa section in the northern wing.
Observers on the scene said that the building's center section
from the ground to the roof collapsed "like a layer cake." Other
witnesses reported that the explosion occurred when a car bomb in a
vehicle parked in the circular driveway outside went off in the
predominantly Moslem Ein Mreisseh neighborhood.
IN THE building at the time of the blast was U.S. Ambassador
Robert Dillon. Special U.S. envoys Philip Habib and Morris Draper
were in the presidential palace five miles away.
A Moslem group called Jihad claimed responsibility in a call to
the French news agency, Agence France-Presse.
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SPECIAL TV PREVIEW/APRIL 24th
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For 35 years the men
and women of the Israel
Defense Forces have stood
alone against the Jewish
nation's enemies.
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^ff-^A,- THrJWHsh FloHdiah/ Friday, ApttTia, 19&
Despite Alienation, Israel at 35 A Great Achievement
Israel celebrates its 35th anniversary in
an atmosphere of greater world alienation
than ever before. At a time when, one
would think, the success of a young nation
should be something for mankind to gloat
about, this is hardly the case.
A large part of the world, specifically in
the Middle East, is not only not committed
to Israel's success. On the contrary, it
pledges itself to Israel's destruction.
But even among the celebrant's so-
called friends, the sense of cordiality and
best-wishes is hardly what it used to be. It
is difficult, for example, to note the change
in attitude among the nations of Europe,
where Jews lived uninterruptedly for
almost two millenia, and where the
religiously-inspired tyranny against them
was brought to fever pitch in the Hitlerian
Holocaust.
Since that outrageous event, the
Europeans have shown a solicitousness and
spirit of contrition rare in the pages of their
history. But no longer.
Nor, indeed, is this reevaluation of at-
titude toward Israel confined to that
continent. Our own country, which was
first to recognize the State of Israel back in
1948, today castigates it at every turn. If
one is to judge by the Reagan
Administration's Secretary of Defense,
Caspar Weinberger, the real enemy in the
Middle East today is Israel.
Fortunately, not every American thinks
this way. Nor does every European. As Mr.
Reagan finds himself more and more these
days in the position of his late friend, John
Wayne, circling the wagons to fight off the
charge against his Administration and its
policies on virtually every front, it must
surely begin to strike him that not all of his
woes are the fault of others. Some of them,
he must come to see, are of his own making.
If the President has not yet come to that
self-revelation, fortunately the Congress of
the United States in the past few weeks has
shown itself to be a continuing good friend
of Israel, restoring the cuts in aid to Israel
that the Administration asked for in its
new budget proposals and even increasing
it, while holding back on a favorite Reagan
proposal the sale of F-16 jet-fighters to
Jordan until King Hussein shows a
ready willingness to join the Israelis in
peace talks unconditionally.
Another Terrorist Act
As Israelis and Jews throughout the
world are stirred by the meaning of this
35th anniversary of independence
celebration, we in America are grieved by
the dastardly attack by Palestinian
terrorists Monday on the American
Embassy in Beirut.
This comes at a particularly dangerous
time, when the Reagan Administration has
placed a further halt on the sale of 75 F-16's
io Israel until the Israelis agree to an
unconditional withdrawal of its forces from
Lebanon. This is a pre-condition that Prime
Minister Begin absolutely rejected in his
Independence Day address televised to the ,
nation on Sunday.
Inevitably, there will be those who will
say that the fate of the shockingly large
number of dead and injured in the terrorist
Jewish Florxdiam
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attack may be laid at the feet of "in-
transigent" Israel. But the Israelis know
by brutal experience what America and the
Europeans have yet to learn: There is no
dealing with the terrorists; there are no
concessions that can be made in the name
of consummating a mutually agreed-upon
deal; nothing will satisfy the Palestinian
terrorists but the absolute destruction of
Israel. The lengths to which they will go to
prove the point included the bombing
Monday of the American Embassy in
Beirut.
As Americans, we are incensed by the
deed. As Jews and as friends of Israel, we
suggest that it is about time that terms like
"intransigent" as applied to Israel be set
aside by those who purport to be Israel's
friends and that a growing awareness seize
them that concessions must be a two-way
street.
As Israel marks its 35th anniversary,
despite world events, it has great cause to
be proud of its most remarkable
achievements in so short a space of time. So
do we have great cause to be proud. And so
too, ought Israel's once most sympathetic
allies.
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New Declaration of Independence
Kriday. April 22. 1983
Volume 5fi
9IYAR5743
Number 16
DEFENSE MINISTER
Moshe Arens' statement last
week that new Israeli policy will
be to attempt a break-away from
dependence on American
weapons availability is long over-
due. The question is whether the
Israeli defense establishment will
go along.
Another consideration, per-
haps greater than the first, is
economics. A major problem for
the Israelis in the manufacture of
their own jets engines, for exam-
ple, has not been so much
technological, but the high cost
of developing and producing jets
of comparable quality that they
were able to get from the U.S.
more cheaply.
THE ARENS statement sug-
gests that, as U.S. policy in the
Middle East becomes more and
more anti-Israel, the political cost
of hanging onto Israel's depen-
dency must increasingly be
added to the economic cost of
opting for independence. This
should have been apparent as late
as a few years ago when the U.S.
humiliated Israel by blocking the
sale of Israeli-made jet-fighters to
Ecudaor because the jet engines
were of U.S. parts manufacture.
Clearly, there were other
reasons for the U.S. veto, compe-
tition not the least of them, but if
Israel indeed wants to become a
world-class arms merchant, then
obviously it can no longer rely on
an American say-so.
Arens, of course, had Lebanon
in mind and the Reagan
Administration's decision to link
the delivery of F-16e to Israel to
an essentially unconditional
withdrawal of all Israeli troops
from that country. Given an Is-
raeli arms independence, such
American arrogance would no
longer have to be suffered.
BUT THERE are more reasons
than these that give added
support to the value of the Arena
declaration. They lie in a
growingly clear American foreign
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policy determination to* bring
peace to the Middle East at the
expense of the amputation of Is-
rael back into its post-1948
borders.
This policy was first enun-
ciated in the early Nixon years by
then-Secretary William P.
Rogers. It gained enormous
strength a decade later with the
absurd Menachem Begin decision
to return the Sinai to Egypt in an
essentially unilateral and un-
conditional Begin bid for peace
with Egypt. If the Carter
Administration set up the struc-
ture for this amputation process.
the Reaganites have since gone at
it with flailing scalpels
What the State Department
seems to believe is that peace be/
tween Israel and the Arabs will '
sui generis mean |x>ace in the
Middle East. This is one more of
those Washington lunacies that
defy logical examination
A MERE glance at the civil
war in Lebanon; the war between
Iraq and Iran: the rising strength
of the Moslem Brotherhood
throughout the Middle East.
whose goal is jihad not only
against Israel, but all of
Christendom; the battle among
religious sects in Syria any
single one of these for starters
would place the American per-
ception of Middle Eastern
Realpolitik in serious question. ,
Still, it is on the basis of this
perception that our foreign policy
is pursued, and the most imme-
diate result of it has been
Continued on Page 21 A


Friday, April 22, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian PagefrA
\ln half an average life-span,
llsrael has built a modern democratic state.
Fleeting Episode in Experience of Other Nations
- Israel's 35 years of state-
Itood are rooted in 35 cen-
L ies of Jewish life in the
I of Israel. In 35 short
,-rs, less than half an
Cage life-span and in the
jves of many nations no
aore than a fleeting
Episode, Israel has built a
Cdern. democratic state,
Usorbed hundreds of thou-
mds of newcomers and
-sloped its economy, all
E while being compelled
lodefend its very existence.
On May 14, 1948, five months
Lathe United Nations General
Et*mblj vote paving the way to
Iwhood. Israel regained its
fiidt-pencieni-*- to become a
Ifcomclaml tor the Jewish People.
Eout800.000 people lived in the
leountrv "' Jewa and
\\:um Vraba and Druse. In
SBlwCLBR4TIC
* - 1
2S
SUNDAY APRIL24 1983
11983. Israel's total population is
J4.010.0OO. of which more than
FfiOO.OOO comprise the country*s
|Araband Dru/.e communities.
ISRAEL IS a pluralistic,
Ifgalilarian society in which
people of different religious,
ethnic origins and social tradi-
tions co-exist, and every citizen is
||iial before the law.
Slice 1948. Israel has
[wkomed more than 1.7 million
IJews, coming from more than 100
countries. Many were survivors
yl the Holocaust in Europe or
IJws forced to flee from Arab
Mods Others are immigrants
wo want to participate in the
nbuilding of the Jewish state.
|M.y. more than half of the
lbmlryS ^P"181'011 is Jewish-
Israel is basically an urban
I*.*/ Almost 90 percent of all
mat live in more than 112
|nn centers and three major
THENHaganah (Jewish Defense Forces) soldiers training in
secret somewhere in Palestine in the early 1940's.
NOWParachutists of the IDF (Israel Defense Forces) in
training in the 1980's for their first jump.
cities Jerusalem, the capital
(pop. 410,000); Tel Aviv-Jaffa
(pop. 336,000): and Haifa (pop.
230,000). Nearly half of Israels
total population lives in the
coastal plain bordering the
Mediterranean, from Nahariya in
the north to Ashkelon in the
south.
In 1948, fewer than 10 Israeli
towns had populations of over
10,000; today there are at least
65. Some are new development
towns built since the early 1950s,
each based on a comprehensive
plan for housing, employment,
distribution of services and the
siting of new industry.
RETURN TO the land has
been one of the central efforts of
modern Israel. Some 10 percent
of all Israelis today live in 125
rural centres, 230 kibbutzim and
360 moshavim. The kibbutz
the best kown of Israel's co-
operative agricultural villages
is a democratically-run com-
munity in which all property is
collectively owned and work is
organized on a shared basis.
About 2.8 percent of Israel's
population are kibbutz members.
Some 3.7 percent of Israelis live
on a moshav a cooperative
village in which each member
family owns and operates its own
farm, but marketing and services
are organized on a communal
basis.
Education is allocated a major
portion of Israel's national
budget. In 1948-49, 135,000
youngsters attended school in Is-
rael; currently over 1.25 million
Israeli youth are enrolled in the
country's education system. In
Israel, education is free and
compulsory for all children aged
5-16, and free for those who
continue through high school.
Today, 88 percent of all three-
year olds and 97 percent of all
four-year olds in Israel attend
preschool programs, the
highest rate in the world.
OVER 116,000 students are
enrolled in Israel's seven ac-
credited universities and other
institutions of higher learning.
Today, Israel boasts more than
2900 educational institutions and
over 76,000 teachers.
In 1948, Israel's 66 hospitals
provided 4620 beds; in 1983,
27,500 beds are available in 48
hospitals throughout the
country. Israel's doctor to
population ratio of 1:415 is one of
the highest in the world. Over 90
percent of Israel's population
receives comprehensive medical
care through one of the com-
pany's voluntary health in-
surance programs.
From a semi-agricultural
economy 35 years ago, Israel has
rapidly developed into a modern
industrial state, whose gross na-
Continued on Page 19-A
from Jerusalem come greetings: an end to 20 centuries
|of homelessness, defenselessness and holocaust.
Begin Sees Israel as the Triumph of Life Over Death
w
Minister Begm
By MENACHEM BEGIN
Prime Minister of Israel
From Jerusalem, our eternal
and indivisible capital, I send my
heartfeld greetings to the Jewish
communities throughout the
diaspora on the occasion of the
35th anniversary of Israel's inde-
pendence.
Yom Ha'atzmaut The Inde-
pendence Day of the Jewish State
is unique in the annals of man-
kind because it celebrates an un-
precedented historical truth,
namely, the return of an ancient,
exiled, scattered, persecuted and
ultimately almost devastated
people back to the land of its
birth after close to 20 centuries of
homelessness, defenselessness
and holocaust. This victory of life
over death, justice over might,
right over wrong, the few- over
the many, elevates Yom
Ha'atzmaut into a universal Jew-
ish festival for all generations to
come.
-
IN THE year of freedom which
this independence day heralds,
we will together pay homage to
all those who, in the blackness of
the night, kindled the torch
which illuminated our path to na-
tional liberty and who have de-
fended that liberty ever since.
We recall the martyrs and the
heroes, the partisans and the sol-
diers, who raised the flag of Jew-
ish revolt against the Nazi exter-
minators, fighting them, often
hopelessly, inside the death
camps and the ghettos. We com-
memorate this year the 40th an-
niversary of the Warsaw Ghetto
uprising.
We shall remember, the fight-
are for the liberation of our land
from foreign rulers, the members
of Haganah, Irgun and Lehi We
shall pay tribute to all our sons
and daughters who continued the
heroic fight to sustain our inde-
pendence against, aggression, and
we shall salute the Israeli De-
fense Forces, the army of the
people of Israel, devoted and
brave, dedicated to but one single
purpose the protection of our
country and people and the ad-
vancement of peace with
security.
BETWEEN the last day of in-
dependence and today, the Israel
Defense Forces were once again
compelled to enter battle against
a ruthless enemy of our nation
indeed of the Jewish people
who had built themselves an
armed state within a state in
Lebanon and who had turned
Beirut into a center of interna-
tional terrorism. For seven bitter
years, the citizens of Galilee had
suffered horribly from the incur-
sions, the atrocities and the
shellings of the ever-growing ter-
rorist aggression on our northern
border, equipped with some of
the best weapons the Soviets and
its satellites could provide and fi-
nanced by the petro-dollars of
Arab states.
The population of Galilee
every town, townlet, kibbutz and
moshav had become hostage
to the murderous and indiscrimi- '
nate attacks of the so-called PLO.
Their strength had reached a
point that Nahariya and Kiryat
Shmonah faced the threat of
physical destruction.
And so, Operation Peace for
Galilee was launched. Israel did
not "invade" Lebanon, for we do
not covet an inch of Lebanese
territory. The Israel Defense
Forces entered Lebanon for the
single objective to destroy those
armed bands who, with the aid of
Syrian occupation forces, had
virtually ruled large areas of Leb-
anon and oppressed its people, -
. THE AGGRESSORS were
ejected from Beirut, and that
capital city was restored to its
owners. The blessings of a new
Continued on Page 18-A


'age i
The Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22, 1983



Schindler Leads U.S. Delegation to Warsaw Memorial
NEW YORK (JTA)
Rabbi Alexander
Schindler, president of the
Union of American Hebrew
Congregations, led a dele-
gation of 24 Reform Jewish
leaders to Poland to attend
ceremonies marking the
40th anniversary of the
Warsaw Ghetto uprising
this week.
"Our presence cannot be con-
strued as support for the present
government there or as endorse-
ment of the suppression of
human rights in Poland,"
Schindler said.
"Rather, our purpose is to
dedicate the restored synagogue
in Warsaw, to visit the Jewish
cemeteries we helped repair, to
honor the memory of the heroes
of the ghetto in the place where
they died, and then to go on to
Treblinka and Auschwitz to say
Kaddish and to renew the vow
that those who lie in unnamed
graves will never be forgotten."
SCHINDLER recalled the cul-
tural exchange agreement, signed
in 1981, between the UAHC and
the government, church and aca-
demic institutions in Poland,
under which sacred objects,
books and manuscripts, his-
torical texts, paintings and other
items that were thought des-
troyed in the Holocaust are being
made available in the United
States for exhibition, reproduc-
tion and scholarly study.
A special aspect of this pro-
gram. Schindler said, was the
raising of funds from Reform
synagogues in the U.S. and
Canada to help repair crumbling
Jewish cemeteries in Poland.
Thus far. he said, about $25,000
has been raised and seven ceme-
teries in Warsaw, Lublin,
Bialystok, Lodz and Cracow have
had restoration work begun.
In Warsaw the UAHC delega-
tion is meeting with Joseph Car-
dinal Glemp, Primate of Poland,
and will be received at a reception
in the American Embassy there,
Schindler said. He pointed out
that participation of the UAHC
in the ceremonies in Poland had
been decided after "full consulta-
tion" with the U.S. State Depart-
ment, which he said "urged us to
go "
SCHINDLER will also take
part in the rededication and re-
opening of the Nejeck synagogue
in Warsaw. In behalf of Reform
Jews in the U.S. and Canada, he
will present to the congregation
eight silver Torah ornaments
from the collection of Mount
Neboh Congregation in Man-
hattan.
More than 1,000 Jewish rep-
resentatives from Western coun-
tries including several hun-
dred from Israel are expected
at the ceremonies. A highlight of
Weicker Assails Reagan Policy;
Says It Places Israel in 'Jeopardy'
NEW YORK (JTA) A
Republican Senator assailed the-
Reagan Administration for
"acting in such a way as to put
Israel in Jeopardy." Lowell
Weicker of Connecticut told some
1.300 persons at the 71st anni-
versary banquet of the interna-
tional Young Israel movement
here that Israel is America's
"only stable ally" in the Middle
East, and "we must never act in
such a way that would jeopardize
her future."
The event, attended by Israel's
Ashkenazic Chief Rabbi Shlomo
Goren who delivered the benedic-
tion. May or Edward Koch of New
Popular Will
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Knesset vote for Chaim Her-
zog as Israel's next President
reflected the popular will, accord-
ing to an opinion poll published
last week in the Jerusalem Poet.
Interviewing more than 1,000 re-
spondents. Dr. Naomi Shemer of
Modi'in Ezrachi found 56 percent
supporting Herzog with only 17.3
percent favoring the coalition
candidate, Supreme Court Jus-
tice Menachem Elon.
York, and Lt. Gov. Alfred Del
Hello, honored a number of local
community, civic and religious
leaders. Weicker. the main
speaker, called on the Reagan
Administration to Telease the 75
F-16 jet fighter planes ordered by
Israel which have been embar-
goed since last June.
HE URGED Congress at the
same time to "draw the line" at
AWACS and disapprove any
further arms sales to Jordan or
Saudi Arabia until they agree to
participate in the Camp David
peace process.
Weicker also urged the U.S.
and Israel to make every effort to
achieve the withdrawal of all for-
eign forces from Lebanon Is-
raeli, Syrian, Palestinian and the
multinational force of American,
French and Italian troops so
that Lebanon can become once
more a viable nation. He said a
stable Lebanon would stabilize
not only Israel's northern border
but the entire region.
Weicker, who chairs the Senate
Energy Policy Committee,
warned that the temporary
respite in the OPEC price hike
should not induce a sense of com-
placency.
uuOoId
You have the power to Will the future by
leaving a legacy to Hadassah today!
Your Will can continue Hadassahs achievements
in Israel for a better tomorrow.
ssah
MAH TO HADASSAH. WILLS BEOUESTS DEPT
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Mmm Mod m mformahv* brochura Thay Shi B* RuntmOtaO m Prm
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Add'tss
the visit will be the official cere-
monies in Warsaw's Grand Opera
House at which President
Vladislav Jablonsky will repre-
sent the Polish government.
Schindler will address the
gathering. Other scheduled
speakers are Julius Herman.
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations; Rabbi
Isaac Lewin, a leader of Agudath
Israel of America; and Henry
Taub, president of the American
Jewish Joint Distribution Com-
mittee.
WORLD COUNCIL of Syna-
gogues, international branch of
the Conservative movement, will
be represented at the ceremonies
through its vice president, Leon
Jolson, as will the World Federa-
tion of Jewish Fighters. Par-
tisans' and Camp Inmates,
headed by Stefan Grayek of Is-
rael, its president.
The World Jewish Congress
will be represented at the cere-
monies by Greville Janner. M.P..
of London, president of the Board
of Deputies of British Jews and
vice president of the WJC; Dr.
Gerhart Riegner of Geneva,
secretary general of the WJC;
and Kalman Sultanik of New
York, vice president of the
W.IC.
Yad Vashem, the Israel gov-
ernment-sponsored Holocaust
museum and documentation cen-
ter in Jerusalem, will be rep-
resented at the ceremonies by
Zevulum Hammer, Israel's
Minister of Education.
Two U.S. Jewish groups have
publicly opposed Jewish partici-
pation in the ceremonies. They
are the Jewish Labor Committee
and the Workmen's Circle. A sur-
viving leader of the Warsaw
Ghetto uprising, Marek Edelman
of Lodz, rejected an invitation to
serve on the Polish-government
sponsored anniversary commit-
tee. He declared:
"TO CELEBRATE our anni-
versary here, where enslavement
and humiliation is now the lot of
a whole society, where words and
gestures have become nothing
memory of the victim! *2
truth and freedom. vvOI Z
preserved in the silence of ,*
and of hearts. BWes
Commenting on this
ment, Schindler said: I
nize and appreciate Dr.
man's feelings. There
state.
recoB-
Edel-
- is no right
a T"g.were- Each of us mus
decide as the heart dictates. "
In Jf^L ?rayek ^ re-
sponded to Edelman s contention
by noting that he had argued
with the former Warsaw Ghetto
leader about it. Grayek charged
that Edelman was a Socialist
Bund leader in Poland and had
always been anti-Zionist and had
failed to speak out against ami-
Semitic tendencies in his country
Grayek noted that the Israeli and
Jewish delegations from the
West will be drawing attention to
the fate and heroism of the anti-
Nazi fighters in Warsaw and in
other ghettos.
4 WEEK LEISURE TIME TOUR
HlTtHrA
INCL AIR FARE < NY
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4 WEEKS-2 MEALS DAILY-12 TOUR DAYsJ
, Lkiuk Timtlwri 310 Mtdiiwi NYC 10017
t sun n? i
I ??3 ?*?<
Heaven forbid you should
ever need
more medicine than this.
But, if you should, isn't it good to know
there's a hospital where your tradition is our tradition?
____________-____SUUILL______________

Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami
has received international acclaim for its
scientific studies of the curative properties of
chicken soup. We're the ones who have proven
what your mothers and grandmothers have
insisted all along: There's a lot of healing
power in that steaming bowl!
But, we all know there are times when
illness or injury demands services which only
a hospital can provide For more than thirty
years, Mount Sinai Medical Center has been
the hospital to which the community looks for
state-of-the-art health care
At Mount Sinai, we know that caring is as
important as curing. We care not only for your
physical well-being but your spiritual comfort
as well, no matter what your race, creed or
color. We understand and honor tradition
That's why, for example, we provide
candelabras for Shahbat, a kosher kitchen for
those who choose, and religious services
for every holiday hi our closed-circuit TV
system.
At Mount Sinai, we not only understand
your personal culture, we gladly become
a part of it. And we also understand what
is needed to provide the highest quality in
health care. Our modern facilities, our
sophisticated technology, and our expert,
dedicated health care team combine to
create an environment in which medicine is
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Mount Sinai Medical Center
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MWMMMM>A.V.V.',V.-.v.v.' v v <-rr*tr%ri*m4*<+ t>
HMNMMfl


Friday, April 22, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Reagan Confirms He'll Continue
Goods Flow Squeeze Angers Israelis To ***** His Sept 1 initiative
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
L Israel has delivered a
vigorous protest" to Leb-
|lDOn against the Beirut
overnment s orders
Striding the transit of
od between the two
| countries. Israeli officials
,jd the protest was made
I Netanya where the dele-
gates of Israel, Lebanon
and the U.S. convened for
another round of talks
aimed at reaching political
and security agreements.
The Lebanese delegation of-
fered no immediate response but
aid it would refer the protest to
the authorities in Beirut. Israeli
sources quoted Lebanese nego-
tiators as saying that the issue of
trade would be resolved once an
agreement is signed for the with-
drawal of Israeli forces from
Lebanon.
LEBANESE merchants have
reported that the Lebanese army
has set up road blocks in the
Beirut area to impound goods
originating in Israel. A Lebanese
newspaper reported that some
traders have been arrested for
buying Israeli goods. President
Amin Gemayel recently issued an
edict ordering the confiscation of
goods purchased illegally, but it
is not clear whether this was
directed specifically at Israeli
goods.
Some Lebanese sources have
accused Israel of dumping its
products on the Lebanese
market, to the detriment of the
local enomomy. Israel insists
that trade is part of the normal-
ization of relations it demands
from Lebanon. It is unclear how
much reference to trade is
contained in the agreement that
has been evolving between the
two countries for the past four
months.
Lebanon is known to be extre-
mely reluctant to spell out the
terms of normalization in the
Catholic, Protestant, Jewish
Germans To Visit U.S. Centers
NEW YORK A group
of West German Catholic,
Protestant, and Jewish
leaders active in German
Christian-Jewish rap-
prochement will visit major
centers of Jewish religious
and cultural life in New
Vork City from Apr. 18-22
and in Boston from Apr. 24-
ft. it was announced here
by Robert S. Jacobs, chair-
man of the interreligious
allairs commission of the
American Jewish Commit-
tee.
The West C-'rman delegation.
hich includes major personali-
ties in Christian theological and
Jcademic circles, are seeking to
dnelop a firsthand experience
ith the vitality of Jewish
spiritual and intellectual life in
"United States by visiting the
major Jewish M'minaries. re-
nal schools, as well as key
Wof Jewish population.
THIS TOUR program is an
"'growth ot a cooperative pro-
Pam m Jewish-Christian rela
iMs between the Institute of
*archn the History and Re
, Iudaism of the Univer-
>'of Duisberg and the Intern-
es Affairs Department of the
^encan Jewish Committee.
I* Institute is codirected by
tSlam scholar' Dr Heinz
Sfn MdL the Catholic
.Dr. Michael Brocke. The
Christian Cooperation; Albrecht
Lohrbacher, dean. Teachers*
Training; Prof. Dr. Rolf Ren-
dtorf, professor. Old Testament
Studies, University of Heidel-
berg; Ulrich Schwemer, pastor,
director of KLAK; Helmut
Starck, presiding, Working
Group. Jews and Christians,
Khi'mland. Martin Stohr, direc-
tor. Evangelische Akademie
Xrnoldshain, Societies for Jewish
Christian Cooperation.
agreement because of the nega-
tive effect this would have on its
trade and diplomatic relations
with the Arab world. Never-
theless, Israeli sources say they
are satisfied with the sense of
determination that marks the
approach of all parties to the
negotiations.
THE TALKS are now said to
be in their final stage. The three
parties are meeting four times a
week instead of twice weekly as
had been the case. They spend
two days in Netanya, and two
days in Khalde. near Beirut. The
U.S. has been represented at the
talks by Morris Draper, a State
Department official with the rank
of special Ambassador. President
Reagan's representative, special
Ambassador Philip Habib. who
just returned to the region from
Washington, has now joined the
talks.
The delegates from the three
countries are attempting to
finalize a draft based on all
matters agreed upon to date and
to draw up an inventory of issues
still outstanding. Chief among
the latter, according to Israeli
sources, is the future role of
Israel's ally in Lebanon, Maj.
Saad lladdad. and the future
presence of the United Nations
Interim Force in Lebanon
(UNIFIL) in the south Lebanon
security zone.
The sources said Lebanon has
accepted Haddad's continued
presence in the zone in some
capacity. But it still refuses
Israel's demand that Haddad be
appointed commander of a "terri-
torial brigade" comprised of his
2,000-man Christian militia and
Lebanese army regulars to main-
tain security in south Lebanon
after Israeli forces withdraw.
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Reagan
has reaffirmed his intention
to move ahead with his
Sept. 1 Middle East peace
initiative despite the deci-
sion by King Hussein of
Jordan to drop his efforts
to negotiate with Israel on
behalf of the Palestinians.
Denouncing what he termed
"radical elements" for putting a
snag in his initiative, Reagan
said, "We will not let the forces of
violence and terror exercise a
veto over the peace process."
Reagan made his remarks during
a White House welcoming cere-
mony for the Sultan of Oman,
Qaboos Bin.
ASKED specifically if the
Jordanian decision brings his
peace initiative to an abrupt halt,
Reagan replied, "It is not dead."
He called on "the Palestinian
leadership" to make "a bold and
courageous move" to break the
Middle East impasse.
His comments were the first
since telling reporters that
Hussein's decision "would im-
TAPES
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pede" the U.S. efforts to bring
about a Mideast peace settle-
ment. Reagan asserted however,
that there "may be bumps along
the way," but the U.S. "will not
be deterred from our long-term
objectives."
Earlier, a White House spokes-
man said Reagan had telephoned
President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt to review the Middle East
situation. The spokesman would
not provide details of the conver-
sation with the Egyptian leader.
It was the fourth call Reagan has
made to an Arab leader since last
Sunday. He has also spoken with
Hussein, King Hassan of Moroc-
co and King Fahd of Saudi
Arabia.
MEANWHILE, the spokes-
man for the Israel Cabinet, Dan
Meridor, has urged the Reagan
Administration to return to the
Camp David process "and ask
King Hussein to come along
without the extremists," an
apparent reference to the PLO.
Speaking on the NBC-TV
"Today" program, Meridor said
"the worst thing to do is to ask
the PLO to participate."
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22, 1983

Shultz Says
He Wants Rabat Mandate Revoked
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Secretary of State
George Shultz indicated
that he would like to see the
Arab League revoke the
1974 Rabat conference
mandate in which it gave
the Palestine Liberation
Organization the sole power
to represent the Palestinian
people.
'1 wonder if it is not going to
become apparent to people that
when you seem to give such
power to a radical group you have
made a mistake,'' Shultz said at a
press conference. The Secretary
did not explicitly call for the
Arab League to revoke its man-
date, but noted that such power
when given should be "exercised
constructively." He said that
.there is a saying in the U.S. that
applied to this: "Use it or lose
it."
SHULTZ STRESSED that the
U.S. is "determined to stick
with" President Reagan's
September 1 peace initiative. He
said it offers "a "historic oppor-
tunity for peace." He added that
the U.S. was "disappointed"
when King Hussein of Jordan an-
nounced he would not join nego-
tiations especially since it ap-
peared he was ready to announce
his decision to join the talks. But
Reaganites Warn Congress Not
To Scare Hussein from Talks
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The Reagan Ad-
ministration has warned
Congress not to take any
actions that might discour-
age King Hussein of Jordan
from joining in Middle East
peace talks.
"It is important to the U.S.,
including the Congress, to en-
courage the King in his efforts to
move the area towards peace,"
State Department spokesman
John Hughes said. "Above all,
we must avoid giving the impres-
sion that we do not understand
i he real risk he is running or that
me might not support him in
facing these risks. Such a posture
i- common sense as well as good
policy "
HUGHES' REMARKS were
made in commenting on the ac-
tion by the House Foreign Af-
fair- Committee's subcommittee
on Kurope and the Middle East.
While approving the Administra-
tion's request for Silo million for
Jordan, the subcommittee stipu-
lated that Jordan could not buy
advanced weapons from the U.S.
unless President Reagan certified
that it was ready to enter nego-
tiations with Israel and to recog-
nize Israels right to exist.
Hughes said no weapons re-
quest had been received from
Jordan. However, while Jordan
has been known to be seeking to
buy U.S. planes and missiles
since January. 1982, it has held
up an official request because of
Congressional opposition.
"Jordan does accept Israel's
right to exist." Hughes main-
tained. "It is obvious that Jordan
has been doing everything it can
.i; move the peace process for-
ward, he said. He noted that
Columnists Told
They Erred
NEW YORK (JTAI -
Americans for a Safe Israel
(SAFEl said that syndicated
columnists Rowland Evans and
Robert Novak erred when they
reported on Apr. 8 that Israeli
government officials had
promoted the sale of land on the
West Hank to American Jews
during a SAFE conference in
New York on Mar. 13.
The organization. which
contends that Israel must perm-
anently retain the West Bank if it
i- to ba secure, said the confer-
ence was a forum in response to
President Reagan's Sept 1 peace
initiative which Israel rejects
that none of the speakers could
Ik- considered an Israel govern
ment official and that non-
promoted land sales
Hussein accepted President
Reagan's "peace proposals" as
enunciated in the President's
Sept. 1 Middle East peace initia-
tive.
A SPOKESMAN for Rep. Lee
Hamilton (D, Ind I, chairman of
the subcommittee, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
while Hamilton was not "sur-
prised" by the State Departent's
statement, he did not wish com-
ment at this time.
Meanwhile, Hughes main-
tained that Reagan's peace ini-.
tiative is still alive despite Jor-
dan's announcement that it will
not enter talks. He said that since
then. Reagan has talked with
Kings Fahd of Saudi Arabia and
Hassan of Morocco. President
Hosni Mubarak of Egypt and the
Sultan of Oman. Qaboos Bin. in
addition to King Hussein.
But. Hughes said, the U.S.
feels the lime for talking is over.
"We feel there has been enough
talks." and the issue "has been
discussed sufficiently." he said.
He added. "What is needed are
decisions from the Arabs which
clearly support the entry of King
Hussein with representative Pal-
estinians" into negotiations.
Hughes stressed that only
through "direct negotiations
with Israel will the Palestinian
people receive their legitimate
rights."
HUGHES CONTINUED to
maintain that Shultz has not de-
cided on a trip to the Middle
East. He reiterated the Secre-
tary's remarks that he would go
there at an "appropriate time."
But there was some indication
that the appropriate time
could come durinig or after
Shultz s trip to Europe later this
month.
Meanwhile. Hughes also said
the State Department remains
committed to the President's
budget proposals" despite an
increase in aid to Israel by the
House Middle East subcommit-
tee.
The subcommittee increased
economic aid to Israel for fiscal
19K4 from the S785 million rec-
ommended by the Administra-
tion to $850 million, all a grant.
The rant portion of the $1.7 bil-
lion in military aid to Israel was
increased to $850 million from the
$550 million the Administration
requested.
When Nicolas Veliotes, Assis-
tant Secretary of State for Near
East and South Asian Affairs,
appeared before the subcommit-
tee earlier this year, the Adminis-
tration was castigated by mem-
bera for reducing the grant
amount from that approved by
Congress last year, even though
tin Administration maintained
the amount it was proposing lor a
N i- more than it had pro-
183.
he stressed that the U.S. agrees
with Hussein that he had to
reject the new protKs*al which
was made by the PLO.
However, Shultz said that
for Hussein to join, he needs the
support of his "brothers in the
Arab world" in order to make any
agreement reached "meaning-
ful." He said that Hussein would
need Palestinian representatives
on any negotiating team.
But Shultz made it clear that
these Palestinians would not be
members of the PLO. He noted
that the Palestinians on the West
Bank have "not had a happy
life." But he said the way to
improve their lot is not through
violence but through nego-
tiations for peace. Shultz stressed
that there is no "alternative" to
negotiations.
HE SAID "almost by pun-
ctuation" a PLO moderate was
murdered in Portugal. He was
referring to the assassination of
Dr. Issam Sartawi who was
gunned down last Sunday in the
lobby of the hotel where the
Socialist International was
holding its congress, to which he
was a delegate. The Secretary of
State said that "the message"
from this is that the end result of
a Palestinian murdered by
another Palestinian "does
nothing for the Palestinians."
On other matters, Shultz said
he had no plans to go to the
Middle East himself. When asked ,
whether increased pressure was
needed on Israel, the Secretary
replied with a terse "No." He
said that the "key to peace is that
itself; that is the incentive that
has to drive people."
The undercutting ha* begun .. .'
TheNalaiMwcu
Red Cross Mum on 'Poisonings'
GENEVA (JTA) The
International Committee of the
Red Cross has declined to con-
firm or deny that its rep-
resentative who investigated a
mystery ailment on the West
Bank a week ago shares the Is-
raeli view that the symptoms
which sent hundreds of teenage!
Arab girls to hospitals were al
manifestation of mass hysteria.I
Dr. Franz Altherr, who con-l
ducted the investigation onl
behalf of the Red Cross, hasl
refused to make any comment to!
the press
at
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Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
His Painting Won't Hang From Any Nail
Artist Fashions Work From Sunlight Using Reflectors
By MS. KAPLAN
, The paintings of P. K.
Hoenich cannot be hung
C a nail. Their vivid
colors contain no pigment.
Although Hoenich never
Lches the canvas, the
ethereal images he renders
llfcpce before the viewers
Le P. K. Hoenich paints
IIV pictures using sun-
Ibeams the way other artists
squeeze acrylics from a
I tube.
Hoenich. who teaches experi-
mental art at the Technion-Israel
Institute of Technology, fashions
his paintings from sunlight in a
two-step process using reflectors
and color filters. Rays from the
am are twisted and curved by re-
flectors of various sizes and
ttitures Hoenich has experi-
mented with chromed copper,
aluminum foil, laminated metal,
even the crystal of his wristwatch
to draw his fantastic images.
Then, he tints his pictures with
filters made from cellophane or
colored gels.
AS THE sun moves across the
sky, the entire composition
comes to life. Filaments of color
coalesce into spectral geometries;
arcs and ovals undulate through
prismatic spectra Woven from
light and hue, sunpaintings are
an everchanging tapestry which
dazzle the eye and provoke the
imagination.
A sunpainting can be projected
onto any surface depending on
the size of the reflectors, says
Hoenich. Although Hoenich's
junpaintings have covered the
interiors of museums in Jeru-
salem, Brussels, and Paris, he en-
visions that one day his swirling,
kaleidoscopic pictures will
decorate the exteriors of build-
ings and monuments.
Rows of giant reflectors could
be built to catch the sun as it
moves across the sky making it
possible to drape town squares,
avenues, even the tops of moun-
tains, in color of shimmering
iridescence.
"If the reflectors and filters
permanently mounted,"
ys Hoenich, "you would get a
Mi-month program from
solstice to solstice for the pro
Wion." Since the artist can cal-
"te the exact position of the
n for every hour of every day,
could orchestrate all parts of
J images movements and
changes.
,JW>AVS ARTISTS are
Toting various tech-
*gical mediums into their
C, "Eluding electronics,
Witty, and mechanics.
t y Hoenich, "should
g?> harmony with the
Phdosophy, science and tech-
JJv of its time." Sunpainting
"* ">e sciences of astronomy
JNF Leaders
Meet in Eilat
JafiX-OTAI Over 200
HWka 1the Jewi8n National
l^dav?Tr,CaSpentthefir8t
ktann, a week he"> Eilat
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il4atinnC'en1Cebased lnd
C5 m kibbuUim in the
^wS w ^ undw
and the physics of optics the
laws of reflection and refraction
to create its otherwordly
images.
To achieve the brilliant hues
possible with sunpainting, the
artist must also be familiar with
the subtractive properties of
color. "Technical universities
should include the technology of
art in their research and study,"
comments Hoenich, who teaches
courses in conjunction with
Technion's Faculty of Architec-
ture and Town Planning. "Team-
work between artists, engineers,
and scientists should be en-
couraged."
The inspiration for sunpainting
came more than 20 years ago
when Hoenich sat down at his
desk to compose a proposal for a
research project. "The form lay
before me, white and untouched,"
relates Hoenich, "and through
the open terrace door streamed a
bundle of sunrays. There and
then," he says, came the idea of
using sunlight for pictures with
predetermined changes.
HE THEN took his revelation
one step farther: to use sunlight
for a series of pictures where
neither the picture nor the
changes were predetermined. An
apparatus could be equipped with
movable reflectors and color
filters that would use sunlight
but with the addition of a second
source of energy, such as wind or
the movement of a hand.
"If three or more reflectors
move independently of each
other," explains Hoenich, "They
will never form the same com-
bination twice. Their unified pro-
jection will change constantly
and never repeat itself." These
machines Hoenich dubbed "robot
painters."
Visitors to museums and gal-
leries all over the world have de-
lighted in creating sunpaintings
with Hoenich's robot painters.
Participants interacting with the
machines mixed colors and forms
with the joy and ease of finger-
painting. They reported that the
psychological effect of sunpaint-
ing was a new sense of creative
play.
PAINTING THE LIGHT FANTASTIC Technion Prof. P. K.
Hoenich demonstrates his technique for sunpainting using
hand-held reflectors and color gels.
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Page 10-A The JewishJ^Jowdlan /-Friday,'Ai>ril 23,1983

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Friday, April 22, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Mount Sinai Founders Dinner Dance
The annual Dinner Dance of the Founders of Mount Sinai
Medical Center was once again an outstanding success as
135 new members pledged their support as members of the
elite dono: group, made up of people who contribute $50,000
or more each to Mount Sinai's Foundation.
The Diplomat Hotel's Grand Ballroom was graced with
the presence of more than 700 elite members and their guests
who enjoyed a wining and dining extravaganza.
This vear s celebration was chaired by the Founders Vice
President Samuel Adler, and his lovely wife. Bunny. In
Keeping wit h the giving spirit of the evening, she was one of
the new Founders honored during the evening. Co-chairing
the event were Sidney and Miriam Olson, who will soon be
honored at the opening of the hospital's Dialysis Unit named
m their honor; Fran and Mel Harris, and Isabelle and
Sydney Levinson.
Their successful efforts began in the weeks and months
before the Dinner Dance, when the Olsons and the Harris'
opened up their homes to pre-dance social functions; Richard
Wolfson. I'resident of Westview Country Club, along with
Dr. Richard Deutch and Young President Jeffrey Gidney,
hosted selected guests at the exclusive Westview; and yet
another led by Roz and Cal Kovens, Mount Sinai's Board
President, at 101 Bal Harbour. New Founders were also wel-
comed at the March Founders Dinner meeting in the
Founders Dining Room at Mount Sinai.
They all led up to the finale at the Diplomat, where guests
were surrounded by flora of the season. Roger of the Bouquet
Shoppe chose blue irises, red tulips, pink heather, garberas
daisies and purple liatyrice for the floral centerpieces which
encircled the glistening ficas trees. Fountains surrounded by
gardens encompassed the periphery of the enormous room
made cozy by the decor. And the crowning glory four
white doves in elegant cages symbolized the magic and
innocence ol a spring's rebirth.
Guests dined on a delightful gourmet meal of crown roast
of veal with Chanterelle sauce after feasting on a bountiful
assortment of hot and cold hors d'ouvres ranging from crab
pate to eecargot en croute and jumbo shrimp. The backdrop
of music was provided by Ted Martin's orchestra.
Founder- President Gary R. Gerson opened the ceremony
with a salute to all the new Founders as well as the longtime
Founders v ho, through their exceptional efforts and dedica-
tion, enrolled the largest number of new members ever in one
year.
Mora t: n 800 people, donors of 850,000 or more, are the
resource at the spirit that makes possible new technology,
teaching, numerous programs, research and sophisticated
patient care, stated Gerson.
He then recognized Mount Sinai's distinguished leaders:
Chairman of the Board, Arthur Pearlman; President, Mount
Sinai Medical Center, Cal Kovens, President, Mount Sinai
Medical Center Foundation, Edward Shapiro; Executive
Vice President. Alvin Goldberg; Treasurer. Foundation.
Samuel Farber; Executive Director, Foundation, Ted
Safian; and Associate Director, Foundation, Arnold Pfeffer.
After extending his appreciation to participants including
Mrs. H. Jerome (Thelma) Joseph and Mrs. Philip (Carole)
Samet for the menu. Mrs. Mac (Anne) Gache and new
rounder Mrs. Gary (Niety) Gerson for the decorations, it
was time to introduce all new Founders to the audience.
The guest list was a true Who's Who from Miami,
Chicago, New York, Boston, Canada, and Latin America
which only proves that a genuine and worthy cause will
bring out the finest of people from around the world.
Mr& Mrs. Samuel Adler
Arthur Pearlman, Edward Shapiro, Samuel Adler, Gary Gerson, Cal Kovens
Mrs. Irvin Kovens, Mrs. Edward Shapiro, Mrs. Cal Kovens, Mrs. Harold Fein
Mr. & Mrs. Burton Kahn, Mr. & Mrs. Nathan Gumenick
Daniel Mones, Mel Harris, Ted Fine, Fred Havenick, Neat Amdur

Mrs. Polly de Hirsch Meyer, Mr. Gene Segel

.

. \\ i \.VV*.1 I


Pagel2-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. April 22. 1983
Jjr ^^H B 1 *
my
<^L > ijv >. jft j ^^dS f J
Illtlllll
MUNCM.CfMTE*OF
QRUTMMMMi
The Founders
28th Annual
Dinner Dance
Mount Sinai
Medical Center
Diplomat Hotel
Mr. A Mrs. Saul Glottmann, Mr. A Mrs. Jack Hodin, Mr. A
Mrs. Jerrold Goodman
Mrs. Nathan Gumenick, Mrs. Robert Z. Greene Edward Shapiro, Mrs. Ruth Gevirtz
Mr. A Mrs. Edward Brass, representing HANID]
Dr. A Mrs. Ralph Cobb, Mr. A Mrs.
Sidney Stein
Dr. A Mrs. Noel Zusmer, Dr. A Mrs.
Jerome Jacobs
Arthur Pearlman, Sue Berkowitz Mr. A Mrs. BernardH. Fuller
Mr. A Mrs. Albert Rosenberg, Mr. A
Mrs. Murry Koretzky
Mrs. Harold Warren, Mr. A Mrs.
William Eglin
Mr. A Mrs. Morris B. Morris Dr. A Mrs. Nathan Segel
Philip Greenberg, Dr. A Mrs. Mr. A Mrs. J. Gerald Lewis
Roger Javier
Mr. A Mrs. Harry J. Klein, Mr. Ted Mr. A Mrs. David Shapiro. Gary Gerson | ^
Safian


Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
Mr. A Mrs. Stuart Eber
Mr. A Mrs. Murray Candib
Mr. A Mrs. Edmund A bramson
Mr. A Mrs. Alfred SaUberg
Mr. A Mrs. Stephen Avrach
m-^^L^'^rf *<*" r* m.
^ A I < m
^^J[ i m 1
Mr. & Mrs. Leon Simkins
Mr. A Mrs. Samuel Farber, Mrs. Beatrice Block
Mr. A Mrs. Morry Koven
Mr* Mrs. Leon Cohen
Mr. George Simon, Mr. A Mrs. Theodore
K. Pincus
Mr. & Mrs. Myron Behrman
Dr. A Mrs. Federico
Justiniani
Uvin Oc _
Jeffrey Barash
hlT>9.otdberg. Mr. A
Mrs. Ruth Orleans, Mr. A Mrs. Lester
Abrahamer, Mrs. Olivia Hand
Mr. A Mrs. William Freeman, Mrs.
Reba Cole
Mr. A Mrs. Jack L. Daner
Spun-.red


Hage 14-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22, 1983
Miami's Jewish Leaders Greet Israel's Anniversary
Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity leaders, hailing the 35th
anniversary of the founding of
the State of Israel, issued state-
ments of greeting this week to
mark the anniversary occasion.
Norman H. Lipoff. president
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, noted in a message
that "'The people of Israel have
demonstrated during these past
35 years that the longing for a
Jewish homeland was not an idle
aspiration, hut a rightful quest,
one lor which they were prepared
to 81 niggle and sacrifice.
We have stood at Israel's side
during these three and a half
odes, us the new country kept
moving ahead, steadily progress-
ing while living through crisis.
AC have shared with the people
of Israel a pride born of achieve-
ment s. and we have also shared
grief and sorrow with them.
Ml along, we have gained
stature and an extra measure of
dignity, as Jews and as human
>eing8, through our identification
a n h the people of Israel. Our
support stands as dramatic testi-
mony to the American Jewish
community's sense of responsi-
bility."
\dded Lipoff: But the
courage and strength of the peo-
ple of Israel have drastically re-
vised our image. Today, we are
victors, not victims. We are the
beneficiaries of the persistence
and determination that made the
deserts of Israel bloom. We are a
more unified Jewish people, with
Israel as our central religions and
ethnic focus
Said Myron J. Brodie. exec-
utive vice president of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation:
"Jews throughout the ages have
shared their sorrows and their
joys with one another, creating
an extended family that stretches
throughout the world. This year,
world Jewry celebrates the fulfill-
ment of ancient prophecies and
aspirations We honor the
pioneering spirit of a handful of
visionaries and ideologies. We re-
join* on the thirty fifth anniver-
sary of the modern State of Is-
rael.
"For centuries. Jews prayed
Norman Lipoff
Mvron ./. Brodie
Ruth Shack
Aaron Pod hurst
that they should l>e returned to
Jerusalem, to the Jewish home-
land of our forefathers. Those
prayers have been answered. In
the aftermath of the Holocaust, a
refuge arose for Jews evading
persecution. For today Jews
inhabit the Promised Land, from
the Galilee to the Negev.
"Spiritually, we each carry a
piece of Israel with us. along with
the timeless values of brother-
hood and love that unite us as
one people."
Ruth Shack, president of the
Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida and a member of
the Dade County Commission,
declared that "The Jewish Com-
munity Centers is proud to be co-
ordinating Israel 35 .
"This is a very joyous time for
our community and Jews world-
wide, and we invite everyone to
join in the festivities and walka-
thons being held in North and
South Dade.
"Just as these Israel 35 cele-
brations will be uniting Greater
Miami Jewry in a day of celebra-
tion, the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida have
always strived to strengthen and
unite our community .
"As we celebrate Israel's 35th
anniversary, let us reflect on how
fortunate we are to be together on
this memorable occasion."
Aaron Pod hurst. 1983 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund general cam-
paign chairman, declared:
"Thirty-five years ago. a
Naturalized Canadian May
Appeal Extradition Ruling
TORONTO (JTA) Attor-
neys for Albert Helmut Rauca, a
naturalized Canadian charged
with the wartime murders of
thousands of Jews in Lithuania,
said they may appeal a ruling by
the Ontario Supreme Court or-
dering his extradition to West
Germany to stand trial.
The unanimous decision up-
held u lower court ruling holding
Ituuca. 74. extradited to face trial
on five indictments charging he
murdered 11,864 Lithuanian
Jews in a Nazi camp in Kaunas.
Rauca came to Canada legally in
1950. became a citizen in 1956
and was arrested last June after
witnesses .identified him as a
former Nazi enforcer in Lithu-
ania.
The Ontario Supreme Court
agreed that Rauca s constitu-
tional rights, under Canada's new
Charter of Rights, would be vio-
lated by extradition but held that
the prosecution had succeeded in
demonstrating that such a viola-
tion was justifiable in a demo-
cratic society on such charges.
Mauric A Ferre
Mayor
City of Miami
Salutes the
State of Israel
on its
35th Anniversary 1983
unique partnership was forged,
one that has led to the develop-
ment and growth of the modern
State of Israel. This relationship
also has created the most suc-
cessful human service provision
mechanism in world history, one
ISRAEL CELEBRATIOS
35
SUNDAY AFHIL24 1983
that has drawn together con-
cerned individuals from all
corners of the earth.
"The people of Israel and the
Jews of the diaspora share bonds
of heritage, history and tradition,
and during the past three and a
half decades have undertaken a
cooperative effort to support
social services for tens of
thousands of needy individuals in
Israel.
In Greater Miami, concerned
individuals provide their support
for the elderly, the young, the
needy, the lonely and the isolated
in Israel by taking part in the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund cam-
paign .
"The people of Israel have
given us 36 years of pride and
courage in founding and preserv-
ing a strong and unified country.
We. in turn, will continue to do
our share through the CJA-IEF.
They are counting on us and we
must vow to BE THERE in sup-
port of their human service
needs."
e Stanley C. Myers, chairman
of Greater Miami's Project Re-
newal program and founding
president of the Federation,
noted that "This year the resi-
dents of one particular Israeli
town will celebrate Israel's 35th
anniversary as a time in which
their community has achieved re-
newal and improvement. This ac-
complishment has been made
possible, in great measure, by the
generosity and concern of the
Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity.
"Two years ago. the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation joined
Stanley ('. Myers
Project Renewal, a cooperative!
program sponsored by the L'nltedl
Jewish Appeal and "the Jewish I
Agency to improve the quality oil
life in impoverished communities!
throughout Israel At the time.l
the Federation twinned' Greater!
Miami with Or Akiva, a com-
munity in need oi renewal. |o-|
cated one kilometer east of)
Caeserea. midway between Haifa!
and Tel Aviv.
"Prior to 1982. Or Akivas t
residents lived in a depressed en-
vironment, marked by a lack of
public facilities and services. The
community was pocked by aban-
doned drainage ditches and I
lacked landscaping.
"Most of the trenches and eye-
sores that once dotted Or Akiva
have been replaced by well-
groomed, attractive landscap-
ing." Myers said. Our relation-
ship has made this transforma-
tion possible. But there is much
we have yet to accomplish.''
Plans are being considered for
a music center, tennis courts, and
a new educational program for
school-age youngster- Myers
said. "The continued participa-
tion and involvement of the
Greater Miami community can
turn these plans into reality."
THE ESTATE
OF ISRAEL
IS
THE STATE
OF ISRAEL
V^G)ngratulateTrTem
on"
,1!
JEFFERSON
NATIONAL BANKS
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290 Sunny Isles Boulevard and 18170 Collins Avenue 949-2121
SubiWIarlesotJeBertonBancorp.Inc Member* FDIC


. ,. ..:... ,...-. rr un*
Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
ST
V

tstalgic moment in November, 1969, shows Golda Meir, Is-
fs Prime Minister, visiting children at the 4th Elementary
ol in Milwaukee, Wise, where she studied as a youngster in
lU.SA.
From Golda's Book:
Jewish Bond With Land
Is Irrefutable
iGoMa Meir, who served as Israel's fifth Prime Minister I1968
fill, was born in Russia in 1898 and came to the United States in
BOS living in Milu auhee. She settled in Palestine in 1921 and became
iHituimil figure in the Histadrut /Labor Movement), the Jewish
Iprtn and the Government of Israel after 1948.
VSkt na first \mbassador to the USSR. Labor Minister and For-
\Minister coming Premier. She died in Xovember, 1978.
[fti* extract is inl.cn from the book. Golda Meir Speaks Out.'
hhHshfii in II- a in 1970, it is an abridged version of Golda's
I m n ing an honorary decree of Humane Letters from
1 Mi I nion ( allege Biblical and Archaeological School ofJeru-
firm
By GOLDA MEIR
|Eath line of us. as he studies
thistor) of our people, ponders
wi lime in lime on what the
*ish people might have been
I Jews acted differently than
h did at a particular time or
Often we are simply unable
}explain in a rational way how
rjreat miracle uccured which
eus what we are today.
Ifcare an ancient people, and
speak 'if thousands of years as
|ihe> were bul days or weeks.
a few weeks ago, we cele-
. Ithe 1.900th anniversary of
destruction of the Second
li!AikCELEBRftTlCS
3
P*- Nineteen hundred years,
'still Jewry survives, scat-
Win all corners of the earth! I
'not referring to Jews who
"unable to fulfill their destiny
survive physically in the
" Pogroms or persecutions. I
AUl s whose heroism
l2J wm to remain Jewish in
ivntual national sense.
tjTCN WE lament the
\T2"*8 *hich exists within
*ish people, and we speak
' lV!! L W8y aDOUt OU" *
jj. 8hrtcomings. Yet we
VnZ s remarkable capacity
E^mng a united people des
Wst.",any differences which
r*81 among us.
^f indeed, if I may be per-
Mni '7 *> the most non-
F* nrnvf P^P'es. at least we
E^^nformist in our rela-
^BdUCh other Each of U9
^"W to express himself
with great individual emphasis
and firmness, yet despite it all.
our unity as a people remains
strong after the lapse of so many
centuries and in the direst cir-
cumstances
l.asi night, or rather early this
morning. I sat at my desk and
read tens of letters signed by tens
of Soviet Jews. Some were
written by groups and some by
individuals. All of them ex-
pressed one idea with such force
that as I read their words, my
Zionism and my sense of Ix'long-
ing to this land seemed almost
less strong than theirs. And who
are they? Middle-aged men in
their fifties or elderly men in their
sixties and seventies?
I READ a letter signed by ten
Jews, young people born in 1936.
1937, 1940. 1950, expressing their
passionate desire to live their
lives as Jews in Israel a letter
made public in Russia, regardless
of its personal, economic and po-
litical consequences.
In the face of this phenomenon,
each of us must ask the question:
Whence this miracle? The Rus-
sian Jews are living in a spiritual
desert, and what a desert it is!
Yet they express their will to be
with us. to live in Israel. Thev de-
clare that their dwelling place is
alien to them, that they belong to
their own land, to the land of Is-
rael. They do not make this pro-
nouncement secretly or in the un-
derground but address it to the
Soviet government and to the
world. There is no assurance that
they will ever arrive here. Yet let-
ter after letter ends on the same
note: "I am prepared for any-
thing, but I have one desire, and
that is to live and die in Israel.'
I am always a little afraid that
precisely here, where it is so
wholesome and easy to be a Jew,
where one can view oneself and
his own generation as a natural
link to the Jewish past without
any need to argue or to prove the
Continued on Page 20-A
PUT CAPITAL
BEHIND YOU
Salutes the State of
ISRAEL
on Its 35th Anniversary
Capital Bank
THROUGHOUT OAOE AND BROWARO COUNTIES
MemOeiFOIC
sasswxxMaaassBKjaaaassao^
Shown are David
Ben Gurion, Late
First Prime Minister
of the State of Israel,
with Mr. Arthur Stein,
President of
Stein Paint Company
of Miami,
when Mr. Stein
Presented an award
commemorating Is-
rael's 25th
anniversary in 1973.
In honor of the 35th
anniversary of the
State of Israel, Mr.
Stein is again
commemorating this
important occasion.
May the people of
Israel achieve their
spiritual and
democratic destiny
AM
YISRAEL
CHAI


Page 16-A The Jewish Florkiian / Friday, April 22,1983
How American Jews
Saw Reestablishment
Of State in 1948
By DR. DAVID GEFFEN
Thursday, Apr. 8, fell almost a
month before the new State of Is-
rael came into being, yet on that
day 35 years ago the Synagogue
Council of America called for a
"day of intercession on behalf of
our brothers in Palestine and of
protest against our Govern-
ment's attempt to nullify the
United Nations' decision on
Palestine."
Thousands of Jews all over the
United States went to their syna-
gogues late in the afternoon to
participate in a service and to ex-
press their disenchantment with
the apparent flip-flop policy of
Secretary of State Marshall and
President Harry Truman himself.
That day in April set the stage
for the feverish weeks which fol-
lowed, ultimately leading to the
proclamation of Statehood.
AS THE days passed, many
questions were raised both inside
the Jewish communities and out-
side of them. Would the state be
recognized by the U.S. Govern-
ment? What would Russia do?
SBiE. Ct.EcOaTios
US
SvSOav Afa:L:J ijsj
Would the Arab countries des-
troy Israel before it really came
into being? It was even asked
whether another holocaust might
not be in the making.
In Cincinnati, Ohio, on May
10, a community rally was held to
raise funds for the State-to-be.
The guest speaker was Reuven
Dafni of the Haganah, Israel's
pre-State defense force. He chal-
lenged those attending with these
stirring words: "We are locked in
one gigantic struggle for the sur-
vival of Judaism," he stressed.
"If Palestine is crushed, there is
no future for Judaism anywhere.
Whatever happens, it will affect
every Jew and Jewess no matter
where they are in the world."
Then he concluded, "Defeat
will mean hopelessness for the
displaced persons of Europe. Vic-
tory will mean liberation and
honor." A sum of $887,000 was
pledged that night for the emer-
gency.
AS A YOUNG boy, I recall the
tension in our household in
Atlanta. Ge. during the week
before May 14. My parents' in-
volvement in the Zionist cause
and my grandfather's lifelong
dedication to the founding of a
Jewish state had left its impres-
sion on me, as well. To make
matter even more critical, I knew
of our distant cousin, who had
survived the war, and went on
foot from Lithuania to the Italian
coast. Prom there, he was
smuggled in as one of the
"illegal" immigrants. He was a
soldier in Jerusalem, fighting to
defend that city. How poignantly
I recall those days when I too,
wanted to fight for our people
and our land, like the Maccabees
of old.
On Friday, the 14th of May, I
came home from school and after
playing around a bit, started to
get ready for Shabbat. I turned
on the radio to get some baseball
news, und the program was inter-
rupted to refer to some fighting
in the "Holy Land." Why my
parents came home from work,
the birth of our new state was
uppermost in their minds. My
father and I left for shul, and as
we made our way up Washington
Street, the part now covered by
the Atlanta Stadium, someone
came out of his house shouting,
"Mazel Tov, there is a State of
Israel. May she live for ever and
ever.
After all the centuries, the
hope had become a reality. Presi-
dent Truman had recognized Is-
rael only ten minutes after David
Ben-Gurion read the Declaration
of Independence. With these 18
words, the U.S.A. became the
first to acknowledge the birth of
the new Jewish State: "The
United States recognizes the
provisional government as the de
facto authority of the new State
of Israel."
WHAT PRESSURES Presi-
dent Truman had to overcome to
grant this recognition! With
America leading the way. the
Russians followed suit within the
hour, and then Guatemala be-
came the third nation to recog-
nize Israel.
At the service that Shabbat
evening, there was a real festive-
ness in the air, as constant
reference was made to the won-
derful event. The following
morning my grandfather, Rabbi
Tobias Geffen, dedicated his
sermon to this milestone event.
Over three decades earlier, he had
first assisted in the Zionist cause,
and in 1935 in a Yiddish radio
broadcast in Atlanta, he had
called for the establishment of a
State for the Jews in the face of
the Nazi threat.
"In this hour of celebration,
when the heart of the Jew is over-
flowing with anxiety and happi-
ness," he said on May 15, 1948,
"it is the obligation of all Jews
from every group and every
strata to aid in this historic
moment, this greatest triumph in
the chronicles of our people. We
must not be silent," he chal-
lenged his listeners, "until the
absolute safety of the Jewish
State is assured from within and
without. Furthermore, we here
are obligated to marshall all our
strength, and we must be pre-
pared to give of ourselves and of
our possessions for this lofty
goal: the establishment of the
Jewish State for the entire Jew-
ish people"
ALL ACROSS the United
States, similar calls were made.
Celebrations were held both on
Shabbat itself in the synagogues
and on Sunday, May 16, when
jubilation ran rampant. From
Delaware to New Orleans, from
Cleveland to Dallas, from Louis-
ville to San Frascisco. Jews and
Christians poured into the streets
to celebrate. In St. Louis, Mo.,
200 cars formed a motor caravan
which moved from the Jefferson
Memorial in Forest Park to the
YWHA at Union and Enright.
The cars were decked out with
Israeli flags and with banners
proclaiming, "Long live the Jew-
ish State" and "Jewish State
Day." When the parade finally
reached the YMHA, the cere-
monies were held on the roof, and
the building was engulfed with
thousands of happy people. That
night. Sen. Owen Brewster ad-
dressed a mass meeting to mark
statehood.
One of the great Zionist leaders
of the U.S.A., the late Ezra
Shapiro of Cleveland, who was
ultimately to become the world-
wide chairman of the Keren
Hayesod, delivered a moving ad-
dress to mark the occasion.
"What has made Israel possi-
ble?" he asked. "It is possible be-
cause we have always retained
our power to dream and because
we have faith in ourselves.
Always when the world turned
Continued on Page 18-A
An 'Aliya Bet' (Illegal Immigrant) ship
defies British restrictions and reaches the
shores of Palestine in pre-State days. The
refugees would merge and disperse with (km
local population waiting on the beach so astol
escape British searches.
TO THE PEOPLE OF ISRAEL AND JEWS
THROUGHOUT THE WORLD: WE HONOR THE
ACHIEVEMENTS OF OUR HOMELAND AND WISH
FOR PEACE FOR ALL PEOPLES OF ALL NATIONS.
SHALOM
vnan
&fJw0nt/u

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Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 17-A
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Page 18* A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22,1983
Begin Greets Israel's Anniversary
Reminds Nations of Purposes Behind Camp David
from]
Continued from Page 5-A
life of peace, serenity and
security have been given to the
people of Galilee, and as at the
outset so now, the one policy goal
of the Government of Israel is to
live in good peaceful relations
with our northern neighbor, Leb-
anon, whose sovereignty and
intergrity we respect, and to
ensure and guarantee that never
again will the blood of the Gali-
leans be shed.
To the Roll of Honor of the
wars of Israel in which the best of
our sons sacrificed their lives so
that Israel might live in security
'SBAUCElEBBi'iCs
UK
SUNDAY APRIL 2-4 1983
we add the names of those who
fell in Opperation Peace for Gali-
lee. The memory of them all shall
live on forever.
Despite the strains in the rela-
tions between Israel and Egypt,
the treaty of peace between our
two countries has withstood the
tost. We look forward to
strengthening those relations
us befits the spirit and letter of
the treaty, through a progressive
interchange of trade, culture and
tourism between our two ancient
l>eoples.
We live in a region in which
convulsion and turmoil persist,
eruping in inter-Arab confronta-
tion and even in attritional war-
tare, as between Iraq and Iran. It
is in this context that Israel
presses ahead in its quest for
peace with its neighbors, mindful
always that without security no
peace can ever prove lasting. This
ifl the essence of the Camp David
accords. Had that not been its
undamental point of reference,
Israel would not have signed
them.
LET THE world note this
truth, and let it register that it
was in the context of this truth
that we signed the peace with
Egypt. The sacrifices we made
for the sake of that peace were
great indeed, but we made them
because, by the provisions of
Camp David, and by the stipula-
tions of the peace treaty, Israel
satisfied itself that its security
remained intact.
Now we move ahead speedily
to consummate the other part of
the Camp David accords, namely
the negotiations on the full
autonomy for the Palestinian
Arab inhabitants in Judea,
Samaria and the Gaza district.
We want those negotiations
renewed. There are proposals, po-
sitions and plans, but there exists
only one single document of an
international character that is
building, and that is the Camp
David agreement, signed by Is-
rael and Egypt and witnessed by
the United States.
Just as we remained true, to
the date and the dot, to the one
part of Camp David the peace
treaty with Egypt so shall we
remain true to the other at the
heart of which lies the autonomy
program. Its negotiation and
realization are the key to further
advancement of the process of
peace to which Israel is firmly
committed.
ISRAEL HAS remained faith-
ful to its Declaration of Indepen-
dence. We have built up the land
and made it green. We have
gained national vigor with each
passing year. We have renewed
our heritage in our ancient home-
land. And we have brought home
millions of our scattered sisters
and brothers.
This, above all, the great in-
gathering, the Aliyah. remains
the ultimate mission of our gen-
eration. Let all those in the free
world who perceive the greatness
of this challenge come and join us
in the further up-building of our
beautiful country and of our free
and democratic society.
There are still vast members of
our brethren who wish to join us,
but are barred from doing so be-
cause of the hostile policies of
their regimes, notably Syria,
Ethiopia, Iran and the Soviet
Union. There, in the Soviet
Union, the largest of all. the
Jewish communities which lives
in a state of distress, after some
years of emigration, the doors of
the USSR have again been
slammed shut. As elsewhere,
with unbelievable courage, the
prisoners of Zion, the refuseniks
and the activities for Aliyah keep
alive this heroic Jewish move-
ment to return to the historic
homeland, Eretz Israel.
THEIR VOICE is heard, and
the response of the free world was
given dramatic and loud expres-
sion at the Jerusalem world con-
ference on Soviet Jewry. That
conference declared, "Let my
people go." We, Israel, the whole
Jewish people and men and wom-
en of good will everywhere, rede-
dicate ourselves to the holy en-
deavor to bring home al
fellow Jews who so wish
Soviet Union and from
country where the torment
sists. We shall succeed
ally of the free and de*
world, enter our 36th
freedom with the
resolve to pursue
peace while remainim
vigilant in protecting our nat,
alnghta and our vital %g
Eretz Israel. By standing toi
er in the performance of the
mentous tasks of our i
lions, the justice of our c
shall surely win the day.
Hag sameach
year |
unflinch
our
.ilhngraph bv Moshr I'ercg
"Tr* State qfqsi8el...wfll be based on/reedorti, Justice and peace
as envisaged by the prophets of qsiSel "*< nmimmtdkimu****m4mM*H.a*
"'unr iraj bv ojitn t6 mta'ti pm.nrrnn rrrntr ^y nnmtno ww..Srw ma"
How U.S. Jews Remember
of Establishment of Israel
vrwr> ^~k Ti .rnnxsyn rfrzn
on.Its thirty f\fthIndependence Bank Hapoalim
Day
Continued from Page 16 A
nmimt us. wp believed in our-
selves."
THEN HE continued with
these words, "There is a great
task ahead. A whole economy
must be built. All of us have con-
hdencc that the new State will be
tiuilt on terms of justice, equality
and freedom for all in the name of
the prophets of Israel. We all
hope and pray that the State will
be the great bastion of democracy
of the Middle East. Thus we now
enter a new era for our people."
The proclamation of the State
of Israel 35 years ago brought
new hope to the American Jewish
community and to Jewish com-
munities the world over. As we
mark this 35th anniversary, we
c,nn recall the words of the great
American Jewish leader. Rabbi
Abba llillel Silver (1893-1963),
delivered five years before Israeli
Statehood. "Are we merely to ask
for the right of asylum in our his-
toric home, the right which any
people may claim in any part of
the world ... Is this Jewish
statesmanship? Is this Jewish
vision, courage, faith?
Or are we to declare when the
proper time comes that we stand
by those who have given their
tears and their blood and their
sweat to build for them and for
us. and the future generations, at
long last, after the weary cen-
turies, a home, a National Home,
a Jewish Commonwealth, where
the spirit of our entire people can
finally be at rest, as well as the j
people itself?" '
Silver, who played an impor-
tant role in presenting the Zionist
case at the United Nations, lived
to see the foundation of Israel
and to witness its formative
years.
gton.
Head Office: 50 Rothschild Blvd. Tel Aviv. Israel.
t^rwai O^rri. Rockefeller Center. New York*'Plaza Branch, \r York Ojieen*. \c> York* Hunlin
New York* Bosion. Massachusetts' Ian Angeles, California' Chicago, Illinois' Philadelphia.
PMintvHmia** Miami, Florida London. Wen End, England*London. City, England Manchester.
England Zurich. Switzerland Luxembourg Paris, r ran. r Georgetown, Crand Ca\ man Toronto.
Canada Montreal. Canada Buenos Wes. Argentina Sao Paulo. Brazil Caracas. Venezuela \lontr\ uleo.
Iruguas Puma del Este. I ruguas Panama Cits. Panama Mexico Cits. Mexico
RiQMatMmattmtM I SA. I Rockeleller Plaza. Suite 1025. New York. Ne York. 'member H> 11
meuaseret aon educational center
THE CAUSE: Children are growing up without family guidance. These are children who mostly come from
underprivileged backgrounds, broken homes, orphans, "children of the street". In general, the young who must take
care of themselves, and those that cant. They include the lost, helpless and cast outs. These children are a part of the
future generation of ISRAEL.
THE REASON: Israel is the Holy Land. Israel is the land G-d claims as HIS. Each generation must earn its right to
use what belonged to HaShem. The cast-out children must be cared for and guided to be useful citizens and leaders of
Israel. We must assure the future generation of Israel.
A part of the Mevaseret Zion Educational Center is an institution which physically & actively seeks and assists
children like those described above, provide them religious guidance, give them secular training to enter society,
house them, shelter them, feed them, care for them, educate them to be a credit to themself, to Israel and to G-d.
Mevaseret Zion needs help.
Make your tax deductible contribution to:
American Friends of Mevaseret Zion
P.O. Box 015102
Miami. FL. 33101
CALL: DAVID SWARTZ-358-4665 to find out how-you can be a partner in helping shape ISRAELS future.


BfiBsBB
Friday, April 22,1983/ Tfc> Jeyiah Floridian PngB-19-A
Israel's Consul General
In Miami Greets
Anniversary Occasion
4
I.
V
Memorial for fallen soldiers of the Negev Palmach Brigade near Beersheba.
Israel's Achievements at Age 35
Continued from Page 5-A
J product has increased more
tenfold. Today Israel is
Bst self-sufficient in food
and its production for
ort is shifting to technology-
I industries. Finance, trans-
tion. communications,
hsmiction and other facilities
ily developed to serve the
|inlr\ s growing economy.
$28 million in 1949,
Is net export of goods has
bed to some $4.8 billion in
Today more than 90 per-
'SCiE.CELEBRATlOS
35
Sk,ND4V AF3IL24 1983
cent of all export goods are in-
dustrial products, including
sraeli Soldiers Killed, Wounded
In Terrorist Attack on Road
ByHUGHORGEL
(ELAVIV -IJTAI Anls-
soldier was killed, three
i were wounded, and three
wore treated for shock in
incidents in Lebanon,
(dad soldier was killed as a
W l a road accident arising
(of a terrorist attack. He was
[immediately identified.
The army spokesman said that
two soldiers were wounded when
an explosive charge was deton-
ated at the side of the road along
which their convoy was passing
near Kasr Chamoun south of Bei-
rut. Another vehicle in the
convoy tried to find a safer point
from which to counter-attack an
ambush but overturned, killing
one of its occupants and injuring
another.
Introducing
nightly dinner
specials at the
Ooral Hotel
Each evening a sumptuous
dinner specialty is being
offered in the
El Cat
: i r: i r i
RESTAURANT
from 530 pm. to 930 pm.
Price includes:
a delicious entree, soup
sa'ad, potato or vegetable,
rolls & butter, dessert and
coffeejgajorSanka.
Complimentary
rT\ VMM Parking
worn
"tel On-the-Ocean
48th & Collins/Miami Beach
polished diamonds, processed
foods, textiles, chemicals and
plastics. Recently, over 25
percent of Israel's industrial
output has been high-technology
electronic equipment, much of
which has developed as a result of
close collaboration between Is-
rael's scientific research centers
and local manufacturers. About
half of Israel's exports go to
European countries and about 20
percent to the United States.
ISRAEL'S agricultural econo-
my has traditionally been based
on citrus. However, virtually
every kind of farm produce has
been introduced since the
founding of the State. Intensive
cultivation in fields and hot-
houses as well as revolutionary
developments in irrigation and
harvesting have made Israel a
world leader in agricultural
production. Since 1948, the area
of land under cultivation has
increased from 408,000 acres to
1,075,000. while Israel's farm
output has grown from $130
million to more than $600 million
in the 1980s.
The tourist industry earned
over $900 million in 1982, a year
in which more than a million
visitors came to Israel, attracted
by the country's geographical
diversity, archaelogical and reli-
gious sites, and almost unlimited
sunshine. About 60 percent of the
annual influx of tourists comes
from Europe and some-30 percent
from the United States.
In 1982. about 23,000 tourists
came from Lebanon and Egypt,
in addition to the 100.000 from
Arab countries who have visited
Israel annually via the Jordan
bridges since they were opened in
1968.
ISRAELIS READ quite
extensively; 3700 books are
published annually, as are more
than 700 newspapers and maga-
zines. Concert halls are found
throughout the country and the
per capita subscription to per-
formances by the Israel Philhar-
monic Orchestra is the highest in
the world. Dance, drama and all
kinds of visual arts are created
and widely appreciated. Some 90
museums record more than 10
million visitors each year, while
25 official outdoor sites and 180
national parks and nature
reserves welcome .about 6.5
million annually.
After years of conflict in the
Middle East the State of Israel
and the Arab Republic of Egypt
concluded a Treaty of Peace in
1979. Israel hopes that the
general development of peaceful
and mutually fruitful relations
with its other Arab neighbors will
move forward. The current nego-
tiations between Israel and
Lebanon will hopefully take the
process towards peace one step
further.
By JOEL ARNON
Consul General
State of Israel
U.S. Southeast Region
On the occasion of Israel's 35th
year of independence, we at the
Consulate General of Israel in
Miami wish to extend our greet-
ings and appreciation to the
readers of this anniversary sup-
plement.
The consulate, opened just a
year ago to serve as Israel's offi-
cial representative in Florida, is
an indication of the importance
the government of Israel attaches
to bilateral relations and the mu-
tuality of interests we share with
the State of Florida.
Florida and Israel share similar
climates and grow many of the
same agricultural products, most
notably citrus fruits.
We both face the same prob-
lems of limited natural water
supply and the high cost of
energy.
Israel and Florida are engaged
in a continuous search for solu-
tions to the challenges before us,
be it drip-irrigation, water desali-
nization plants or solar energy
projects.
Both Florida and Israel are
dependent on the continued
growth of tourism in our respec-
tive states. I would like to add
that those of you who do visit Is-
rael, the land of the Bible, will re-
Consul General Arnon
turn having enjoyed an experi-
ence of a lifetime .
We would like to express again
the sincere desire and prayer of
all the people in Israel for the
achievement of a comprehensive
peace in the Middle East, a peace
obtainable given good will by all.
On behalf of the government of
Israel we extend to you its
sincere welcome and shalom.
Kiamesha Lake, New York 12751
Telephone: (914) 794-6900
Direct N.Y.C. Phone: (212) 924-6162
Hotel
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Or See Your Travel Age* Una Charge 4 Vrsa Honored


AJComm. Statement
Takes Israeli Settlement Policy to Strong Task
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The American Jewish Com-
mittee, in a major policy
statement, is taking issue
with Israel's West Bank
settlement policy as un-
helpful to the peace process
with Jordan in accordance
with the Camp David ac-
cords. At the same time, it
calls on King Hussein of
Jordan "to seize the oppor-
tunity offered him"' in line
with the accords "to join
uneqivocally and without
preconditions in peace ne-
gotiations with Israel."
If he does so. the policy state-
ment said, the AJCommittee
"would be prepared actively to
urge the government of Israel to
be flexible in such negotiations
and to make significant compro-
mises for the sake of peace, as it
did in response to the pvace ini-
tiative of President (Anwar)
Sadat of Kgypt."
BUT IF Hussein "and moder-
ate Palestinians once again reject
the opportunity for full participa-
tion offered them by President
Reagan (in his Sept. 1 initiative),
or if their acceptance is hedged
by crippling preconditions, then
it should be made clear to the
American public that the absence
of peace is due not to Israel's set-
tlement policies or alleged "in-
transigence,' but rather to the
fundamental refusal of the Arab
world to accept the permanent
reality and legitimacy of the
State of Israel."
The AJCommittee statement,
titled "Position Statement on the
Middle East," was issued by
AJC's president Maynard Wish-
ner. The statement had been un-
animously adopted after exten-
sive discussion by the AJC's
Board of Governors at its
meeting Mar. 21. Wishner noted
that the policy statement had
been issued before President
Reagan's comment on Mar. 31
that he was suspending the sale
of promised F-16 jet fighters to
Israel until Israel completed its
withdrawal from Lebanon.
The policy statement empha-
sized that the U.S. "should re-
frain from applying unilateral
pressure on Israel and should not
slow down or stop the shipment
of military equipment to Israel,
our most important strategic ally
in the Middle East."
THE STATEMENT also
pointed out that Israel could not
From Golda Meir's Book:
Bond With Land is Irrefutable
Continued from Page 15-A
point, there lurks a potential
danger for the continued strength
of our uniqueness. I am some-
times fearful that Jewish con-
sciousness in Israel might be-
come too natural, too unreflec-
tive, and that our sabras might
lose the sense of wonder at the
miracle of Jewish survival.
SHOULD THIS happen.
S04E. CUt3 35
5NQAY A"!L:i '9iJ
something very basic would be
missing from the souls of our
young people. But then they dis-
cover a unity binding them to-
gether beyond the difference of
language and circumstances, that
the strangers (from the Diaspora)
are really close relatives, mem-
bers of one people. In this way
the young Israelis will learn the
great reality of our being one
people, wherever we may be,
united despite all the differences
that superficially separate us.
Differences in modes of re
ligiou expression, I believe, will
become less and less important in
the future, for beyond them, the
decisive factor of the unity of Is-
rael everywhere will prevail.
Our bond with this land is not
only spiritual. Go out and look:
Israel is made up of a stone here,
a tree there, a road, a hill.
Archaeologists here dwell on the
natural and blessed link between
the Jewish spirit and the concrete
facts of our history, our rooted-
ness in the soil of this holy land.
We are not the people of the spirit
in the sense that we hover be-
tween heaven and earth. We have
earth, and we have sky. Where
there is soil there is also spirit.
This spirit cannot be shaken be-
cause it is deeply rooted in its
soil.
IT IS POSSIBLE that our fate
still has many difficulties and
dangers in store for us. However,
just as from my childhood on I
have believed firmly in Jewish in-
dependence, so I believe in per-
fect faith that we will live in a
Jewish state which will be just,
creative and dedicated to the
Jewish spirit.
It will be rich in the enduring
qualities of our age-old and ever-
new tradition, and it will be a
Jewish state at peace with our
neighbors. Many Jews will-come
here, as many already have come,
not because they have no other
choice, but precisely because they
are free to choose the Jewish
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be expected to withdraw from
Lebanon until effective arrange-
ments for its security against ter-
rorist attack from Lebanon had
been negotiated and Syrian and
PLO forces had also agreed to
withdraw.
The statement noted that the
Camp David accords led to the
signing of a peace treaty between
Israel and Egypt. These accords
also called on Israel. Egypt and
Jordan and the Arab inhabitants
in the West Bank and Gaza to
proceed with negotiations on the
future status of these areas. "The
refusal of Jordan and the Pales-
tinian representatives to partici-
pate in such negotiations has
been the major impediment to
achieving the broader peace fore-
seen at Camp David."
Continuing, the statement
said:
"The American Jewish Com-
mittee calls upon Jordan and the
Palestinian inhabitants of the
Wool Bank and Gaza to join in
direct negotiations, as called for
in the Camp David accords. The
American Jewish Committee is
confident that an expression of
willingness on the part of Jordan
to commence negotiations
with or without participation by
the Palestinian inhabitants of the
West Bank would be met by
Israeli flexibility and willingness
to make the necessary compro-
mises to achieve peace, consist-
ent with its security needs.
"JORDAN, too. would be ex-
pected to make compromises.
Therefore, no party should set
preconditions to the negotiations
envisaged at Camp David, for
they serve only to delay their
commencement.
"The American Jewish Com-
mittee believes that UN Security
Council Resolution 242 embraced
.in the Camp David accords, as
applied to the West Bank and
Gaza, ought to lead to territorial
compromise through negotia-
tions and to full peace between
Israel and her neighbors. As ne-
gotiations commence, we can
expect the parties to place
maximal positions on the table
including their respective claims
to sovereignty. These positions
will have to be compromised in
the course of such negotiations.
"Therefore, we view acts by Is-
rael which could limit the flexibil-
ity necessary to enable the
parties to reach agreement on the
future status of the areas as
being unhelpful to the peace pro-
cess.
"MOREOVER, the American
Jewish Committee shares i
concerns of many Iarael* 'h
the continuing and indefinite!!
raeh administration of the w.
Bank and Gaza, with kovL
hon Arabs who are not citizen,
Israel, could in the course of,
undermine the democratic
humane principles of the State
Israel. ""*
"The American Jewish Con
mittee believes that in the a
sence of negotiations concernii
the West Bank and Gaza, it mal
well be that Israels current sJ
tlement policy, if continued, mal
make withdrawal at a later datf
no longer a viable option for an|
Israeli government. There is
urgent need, therefore, for Jord_
to enter into negotiations wit]
Israel now."
Mass Campaign Aiming
To Attract Settlers
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel will launch a new
mass campaign to attract
more settlers to the West
Bank and Gaza Strip next
week, aimed to "establish
facts'" in those territories,
according to Ben-Zion
Rubin, Deputy Minister of
Labor and Welfare who an-
nounced the program at a
press conference here.
Rubin said the new settlement
drive "is the proper response to
the refusal of King Hussein to
join the peace talks." He ex-
plained that this was so, even
though the campaign was plan-
ned many months ago. because it
was announced two days after
Jordan declared it would not
negotiate with Israel on behalf of
the Palestinians.
"We shall establish facts in
Judaea and Samaria whether you
I Hussein) join or not join. Eretz
Israel is all ours." Rubin pro-
claimed.
Ho saiii the effort to attracl
more settlers will begin officiallj
next week, right after Israel'?
Independence Day and woult
last a month Tours will
organized to the building site
anil settlers will receive loans oil
easy term-, from the Housing]
Ministry, as well .is grantsj
Rubin said.
He said 68 settlements on thJ
West Hank and Gaza Strip are
participating in the campaign!
According to Rubin, -1.000 apart-I
ments are now ready for oc-|
cupancy. There are presently!
about IIO.OOO Jewish settlers ml
the territories and the intention isl
to adil 15,000 more by the end of I
next summer, a 50 percent in-[
crease.
TEL AVIV (JTA) All
least five cases of Acquired lm-1
mune Deficiency Syndrome!
(AIDS), a usually fatal deseasel
common among male homosexuf
als and intraveneous drug users.l
have been diagnosed in Israel, al
meeting of doctors was told last|
week.
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Friday, April 22,1983/The Jewish Floridian Pae21-A
Qnthe Bookshelf
Behind Canada's Immigration Policy
Leo Mindlin
k. h Too Many: Canada and
feleL of Europe 1933-1948
Irv Irving Abella and Harold
Ir^ner Toronto: Lester and
ESo Dinys, 1982. 336 p.,
1119.95._______________________
JJTmorton i.teicher
|/a Floridian Book Editor
1 Thisis a sad and bitter book. It
the woeful story of how
uida utterly failed to respond
the dire needs of Jewish
l^jees for a safe haven. What
,kes the story particularly
1 is the change which took
in 1948 when Canada
r uvJ its doors wide and became
[tod of immigrants. By then, of
, it was too late for the
I of Nazi persecution.
1 can personally testify to the
Afferent attitude which
vailed in 1948, since that was
_j year I moved to Canada to
(a the faculty of the University
(Toronto. I can still remember
[ cordial reception which I
lived at the border from the
ation official who greeted
"Welcome to Canada," he said.
I hope you will like our country.
Irving Abella
Harold Troper
Holtzman Urges U.S. Examine
Nation's Business Ties to Nazis
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
IJTAi Congress has
en urged by former Rep.
tlizabeth Holtzman to
plhorize the establishment
pf a special commission
Vith subpoena powers "to
examine what our govern-
bm did with Hitler's
lenchmen here."
Holtzman. who is presently
Dfcrict Attorney of Brooklyn,
preferring to the Nazi war
mnmals hired by U.S. govern-
rent agencies after World War
V and helped by them to escape
Met. The former member of
Nigress from New York
vend greetings and the
Kmng address at the plenary
(ssion of the American Gather-
8 of Holocaust Survivors here,
inung the 40th anniversary of
'Warsaw Ghetto uprising.
I,E. GATHERING was
fended last week by more than
WO Jewish Holocaust sur-
[* and "Mir children. Many
V 'hem were guests- at a
iinfiss,onal breakfast at the
J*m- where they met with
IT^han a dozen Senators and
|fcp*sentat,ves from their home
2 and dBtr'cts. The plenary
J, was followed by a series
Iff* discussions. One of the
SoT^"1^^. to which
?*? dav*as devoted, was
kiS nd ,ts """y nmiI'-
Holtzman, who called for "a
relentless war against anti-Semi-
tism" because "we must insist on
the right of Jewish survival,"
said that Klaus Barbie, the
"butcher of Lyons," now await-
ing trial in a French prison, is not
the only Nazi murderer helped by
the U.S. government hired more
than 20 Nazi war criminals after
World War II with full knowl-
edge of the charges against them.
Holtzman, who as a member of
Congress spearheaded the drive
to root out former Nazis living in
the U.S. who obtained American
citizenship by lying about their
past activities, stressed that
those Nazis still at large in the
U.S. must be brought to justice.
SHE SAID the U.S. must call
on Canada and on the Latin
American countries to act
similarly with respect to Nazi war
criminals within their borders.
European countries also must be
made to exert greater efforts in
that direction, she said.
Other speakers at the plenary
session expressed appreciation to
the U.S. for having provided a
haven and opportunities for
Holocaust survivors. They
praised the heroism not only of
the defenders of the Warsaw
Ghetto but of Jews who resisted
the Nazis in many other parts of
Europe.
Some of the panel discussion
topics were on the "Integration
of the Children of Survivors into
Society," "Creative Responses to
the Holocaust," and "Anti-
Semitism in America."
Th#Sr*-
In five years, you can become a
citizen." The attitude prior to
1948, as somberly set forth by
Abella and Troper, was comple-
tely opposite to that which I
experienced.
WHAT MAKES the story so
oppressive is the fact that, since
1948, Canada has been deserved-
ly known as a country which
welcomes immigrants. Indeed,
because of the many new immi-
grants, Toronto is now one of the
most cosmopolitan cities in
North America. But, before 1948,
Toronto was a dull town, and
Canadian immigration policy was
heartless and restrictive.
The authors of the book are
Ontario historians who spent four
years meticulously searching
through archives and manuscript
collections in Canada, the United
States, Europe and Israel. They
also interviewed 32 individuals
who were important sources of
information, some of them
having been significant actors in
the melancholy drama.
The value of their thorough-
going research is made clear as
the authors pile up the evidence
for their insistence that, prior to
1948, Canada had one of the
worst records in the world when
it came to admitting refugee
Jews. They recognize that no
country, including our own
United States, has much to be
proud of as a source of sanctuary
for Jewish refugees.
BUT THEY prove beyond any
doubt that Canada, with its vast
spaces, was especially cruel and
heartless in denying admission to
people who were eventually
slaughtered by the Nazis and
who might have been spared.
Before the 1948 change in
policy. Canada admitted a bare
5,000 Jewish refugees. Bolivia
and Chile each admitted about
three times as many; China and
Brazil more than five times as
many. Argentina ten times as
many, Britain 14 times as many,
and the United States 40 times as
many.
How can one account for this
dismal Canadian performance
prior to 1948 in the face of
Canada's current and correct
reputation as a caring, kind
country?
The authors clearly and ad-
mirably set out the answers to
this conundrum, recognizing full
well that there is no simple,
single explanation. Anti-
Semitism was certainly a major
element. Hatred of Jews in Que-
bec combined with the strength
of the provincial governments
limited Prime Minister
Mackenzie King's freedom of
action. The weakness of the
Canadian Jewish community and
dissensions within it resulted in
an inability to influence govern-
ment policy.
THERE WAS no great
popular outcry against the
government's callous stance.
Difficulties in the pre-World War
II Canadian economy limited
employment opportunities and
militated against immigration.
The government's perception,
undoubtedly accurate, that it
would lose rather than gain votes
by admitting Jewish refugees
was another factor.
Perhaps the most important
factor, a basic attitudinal one, in
accounting for the harsh and
indifferent Canadian policy is
reflected in the incident which
gives the book its title: "... an
anonymous senior Canadian offi-
cial ... in the midst of a ram-
bling, off-the-record discussion
with journalists in early 1945,
was asked how many Jews would
be allowed into Canada after the
war. His response, though
spontaneous, seemed to reflect
the prevailing view of a substan-
tial number of his fellow citizens:
'None he said 'is too many.* "
Israel Sounds New
Independence Declaration
Continued from Page 4-A
Washington's excommunication
of Israel from all of its plans, not
alone for the situation of an
American base in the Middle
East as a jumping off point to
defend the Persian Gulf states
from Soviet incursion.
The result of this excom-
munication has also been to
isolate Israel from participation
of just about any sort in support
of a regional defense plan under
any circumstances.
THE PATENT absurdity of
this latest Shultz-Weinberger-
Reagan option is that it is based
upon the most intransigent of all
Arab policies, which is that Israel
does not exist. The absurdity
becomes all the more apparent
reckoned in these incontrover-
tible terms: that Israel is the
most tested, most potent and
most sophisticated military
power in the Middle East.
What one has yet to see com-
mented upon is the ultimate
American aim to slenderize this
Israeli military potency in lock-
step with theamputation process
itself as still another sop to the
endlessly-stated Arab "fear" of
Israeli "expansionism." The
Reagan Administration's
currently-recommended reduc-
tion in aid to Israel supports the
growing speculation that Ameri-
can foreign policy, in addition to
amputating Israel, will hence-
forward be to sterilize it no
matter what Mr. Reagan may say
to the contrary before emotional
participants at gatherings of
Holocaust survivors.
How any of this maneuver-
ing can hope to achieve peace in
the Middle East, when the Arabs
are being led to believe that
Washington is helping them
achieve their ultimate goal so far
as Israel is concerned, makes
sense only in the world of jabber-
woe ky.
IN ITS genesis, no one ever
conceived of Israel as a military
power. From the beginning in
1948, not even the Israelis them-
selves dreamed of their new
country as anything but an
ultimately agrarian civilization,
with but exotic forays into
elementary industrialization. It
was a biblical-pastoral society
they saw in their future.
But it is in the crucible of Arab
hostility that all of this changed
to make of Israel not just a
military power, but a high-
technology nation inspired by its
great university research centers.
Out of Zion shall come forth
Torah so says the ancient
prayer. And so it has, but with
the footnoted explanation that
Torah these days takes many
forms, including the linguistics of
scientific genius.
Should that really have been a
surprise, when Jewish scientific
genius fired the civilization of
many European nations for such
a long time until European
shortsightedness and decadence
inspired by political and religious
fairytales gathered them together
for some fun at the Holocaust
they gave?
WHAT AMERICA'S changed
attitude toward Israel has
wrought is an Israeli response to
the change. The Arens
declaration of independence last
week is one such response. It
comes at a most appropriate
moment the 35th anniversary
celebration of Israel's indepen-
dence as a modern nation.
But I said in a column here last
week that the Shultz-Weinberger -
Reagan change is a two-way
street. If Israel must suffer it, so
too must the United States.
Indeed, for the United States, the
cost of this new policy bent on
the diminution of Israel may well
be far higher than for the Israelis
themselves who, after all, inherit
a kind of independence of action
from this bill of divorcement they
never had before provided they
are strong enough to seize the
opportunity as Arens proposes.
And to say to the American
dream, "No, thank you."
What is this high American
cost? For a final look, next time
Arens Fears
Syria Attack
Continued from Page 1-A
promise to King Hussem that the
U.S. would prevail upon Israel to
freeze its settlement activities on
the West Bank if Jordan joined
the peace process.
Arens confirmed that Israel's
insistence on a commanding role
for its ally, Maj. Saad Haddad in
Lebanon remains the principal
obstacle to an agreement with
Lebanon over the withdrawal of
Israeli forces from that country.
He said Israel will not waver
from its demand that Haddad be
placed in command of a "terri-
torial brigade" composed of his
own 2,000 man Christian militia
and Lebanese army regulars to
control security in south Lebanon
after Israeli forces are pulled out.
The Lebanese government,
backed by the U.S., has refused
to assign Haddad such a role
although Beirut reportedly is
now willing to give him some
degree of authority in the region.
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tie Jewish Floridian Friday. April 22. 1983
'!*'t '''J 1"V
15,000 Came to Show Selves and Tell Memories
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
They could be your average
group of tourists to the nation's
capital with their cameras, rain-
coats, and I.D. badges except
that those badges said "Ameri-
can Gathering of Jewish Holo-
caust Survivors." and the home-
towns listed were Lodz, Kovno.
Warsaw, and other European
towns. The I.D. cards also bore
the names of Bergen-Belson,
Buchenwald. Maidanek. Ausch-
witz, Birkenau and other Nazi
death camps.
The 15.000 survivors and their
relatives who assembled to at-
tend this conference here repre-
sented "an unparalled number of
participants not only of survivors
but in the history of the Ameri-
can Jewish community." accord-
ing to a Gathering official.
TO HELP house the delegates,
over 400 people in the area of-
fered their homes, including non-
Jews, many of whom sent
flowers. Hundreds of volunteers,
both Jewish and Christian, or-
ganized by the United Jewish
Appeal Federation of Greater
Washington, helped with mam-
tasks. During the closing
day. Washington churches of all
faiths rang their bells as a token
of their solidarity.
One of the primary tasks of the
Gathering at Washington's huge
new downtown convention center
was the process of matching sur-
vivors to long-lost friends and
relatives. A computer containing
names of 35.000 Holocaust sur-
vivors was set up to facilitate this
task. The first two people to be
reunited were Ellie Oking from
Philadelphia with his relative
Sidney Bachner of California.
Soon there were additional re-
unions; most, however, did not
located the loved ones they
sought, lost so long ago.
Throughout the three days, the
crowd attended plenary sessions
and workshops, visited the
numerous booths of the major
American Jewish organizations
and other institutions such as
Yad Vashem, and just enjoyed
mingling with one another.
ONE SECTION of the huge
center which attrated many
visitors was the exhibit, "The
Artist as Witness: Art by Sur-
vivors." In many different media
the artists. Holocaust survivors,
had chronicled their heart-searing
memories of the doomed ghettos
and the indignities, punishments
and death in the camps of Hit-
ler's "Final Solution."
Many of the conferees also
examined the scale model of the
future United States Holocaust
Memorial Museum to be estab-
lished in two old U.S. govern-
ment buildings near the Wash-
ington Monument on the mall.
The transfer of these buildings
which resemble concentration
camp barracks took place when
Vice President George Bush
presented the keys to the famed
writer. Elie Weisel. chairman of
the U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council.
Another feature of the Gather-
ing was the continuous showing
of several films about the Holo-
caust and taking of videotape
I testimonies for the Yale Univer-
sity Documentary and Research
Center.
THE SECOND day of the
gathering was devoted to dis-
cussing the role of children of
survivors, the second generation.
These young people attended in
large numbers and many brought
their children to include the third
generation. The Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency asked some dele-
gates how they felt about attend-
ing the conference and the inclu-
sion of the second generation.
Esther and Abe Feigenbaum of
Chattanooga, Tenn., who both
lived in the Kovno Ghetto, ex-
pressed a positive opinion about
the value of the huge reunion of
survivors. Mr. Feigenbaum said,
"My feeling is that the second
generations, children of Holo-
caust survivors, must assume the
responsibilities of making sure it
is not forgotten for future
generations, for posterity."
Helen Milich of Flushing,
N.Y., who was sent from Lodz,
Poland, to several internment
camps, was liberated when she
was 19 years old and came to the
U.S. in 1949. She felt somewhat
sadly that the Gathering "was
almost like reliving those days
. there are no words." Al-
though she is proud of the life she
made for herself in the U.S. and
her fine family, she said, "There
Kreisky Won't Dismiss Ex-Nazi
Chief of Austrian Army
VIENNA (JTA) -
Chancellor Bruno Kreisky
has refused to dismiss Gen.
Ernest Bernadiner. com-
mander-in-chief of the
Austrian army who was re-
cently exposed as having
been a leader of an outlaw-
ed Nazi military group
which helped pave the way
for the Anschluss before
World War II.
Bernadiner, 63, admitted
loining the Nationalsogialistische
Soldatenring iNational Socialist
Soldiers Ring) in 1937. the year
before Hitler annexed Austria,
after the conservative news
.veekly Wochenpresse found his
name on an old membership list.
The name was misspelled, which
apparently accounts for the fact
that Bernadiner's affiliation was
unknown to the public until now.
although it was known to the
Irvin W. Katz m.eap.a.
College Admission
Counseling.
School Selection and
Placement.
Aptitude Testing.
Career Guidance.
Test Preparation:
S.A.T/L.S.A.T.
M.CA.T./G.R.E.
S.S.A.T./G.M.A.T
G.E.D.'T.O.E.F.L.
P. SAT.
895-1775
12550 Bisruvne Hlvd.
2742711
HlOOS.W'.HlNt Drive
Ilv appointment
Austrian authorities after the
war.
The Soldatenring consisted of
Nazi-minded army officers and
cadets who spread Nazi pro-
paganda in the Austrian army.
Bernadiner held the rank of
Grupenfuehrer. He claims now
that it was only an honorary title.
Of 2.128 officers in the Austrian
army at the time, only 219 be-
longed to this group which was
branded illegal by the pre-war
Austrian government.
Article 12 of the Austrian
State Treaty after World War II
bars former members of the
Soldatenring from serving in the
army. Bernadiner said he re-
ceived an exculpation certificate
in 1950 from the city of Salzburg
and that the amnesty extended
for former Nazis in 1957 nullified
Article 12.
This is legally correct but
morally questionable according
to Wochenblatt which noted that
Bernadiner was responsible for
drilling and indoctrinating re-
cruits to the Nazi group and
observed that a man with such a
past cannot set a good example
for democracy.
Kreisky said at a press confer-
ence last Friday that he had not
been aware of Bernadiner s mem-
Urship in the Soldatenring when
he was named commander of the
army two years ago, but "I admit
I it wouldn't have bothered me if I
had known it." He noted that the
general was only 18 when he join-
ed the group and that he had
been pardoned by law after the
I war.
Bernadiner admitted to the
Wochenpress that he had found
Nazi ideas attractive when he
was 18. "But in 1942, at the
latest. I realized the whole back-
ground of the Nazi story, and I
had a different view about it." he
said.
Kreisky "s position on the
matter recalled his defense of
Friednch Peter, a leading Aus-
trian politician and former mem-
er of a notorious SS brigade
is still so much heartache, so
much turmoil inside you because
you know that your life would
have been entirely different."
ONE OF the two-generation
families attending, that of Esther
Elbaum of Whitestone, N.Y.,
herself a survivor and widow of a
survivor,, also used the Gathering
for a family reunion. Her three
children and daughter-in-law
came from both east and west
coasts.
Her son, Stanley Elbaum of
Woodland Hills. Ca said, "The
children of survivors have to
carry on and continuously pro-
mote the fact that the Holocaust
will never die. The only way that
it will live on is by the children of
the Holocaust survivors being in-
volved in this type of event .
Next year the children of Holo-
caust survivors are staging a
conference themselves."
Like most conferences, the
Gathering was a mixture of
formal speeches and informal dis-
cussions, asking questions and
pondering the right future poli-
cies but it will be many a day
before Washington, a city which
hosts hundreds of conventions
each year, sees a conference as
unique, emotional, and appre-
ciated as the American Gathering
of Jewish Holocaust Survivors.
It could be truly described as "a
happening.'"
Demand Eitan
Be Reprimands
For Remark
JERUSALEM ,JTAl
About 18 opposition memi,;
he Knesset demanded 5*D
fense Minister Moshe Ar! r
pnmahd outgoing Chief of Stal
Gen Rafael Eitan for remark
likening West Bank Arab,
drugged roaches." Areni
indicated he will not.
Eitan. due to retire later th
month, was quoted as telling d
Knesset's Foreign Affairs an
^security Committee last we
that for every stone-throwing
cident by Arab youths on th
West Bank. 10 new settlement
should be built, and "When
have settled the land all th
Arabs will be able to do about i
is to scurry around like drug
roaches in a bottle."
In a telegram to Arens, til
MKs charged that The Chief c
Staff caused considerabj
damage to the image of the Isr
Defense Force when he compai-
Arabs to drugged cockroaches!
These comments constitute I
shocking and severe phenomenoi
which cannot be ignored bi
whoever has concern for th
image of society in Israel and th
image of the IDF "
TO THE BANK YOU MAY BE A 'SMALL' BUSINESSMAN
BUT TO YOUR MOTHER ... AND PENCOA ... YOU'RE A
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AND YOU NEED A TAX DEDUCTIBLE PLAN INDIVIDUALLY TAILORED
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MAYBE MORE.
CALL PENCOA TODAY. WE WORK FOR YOU.
CALL OR WRITE (JI5) 592-2M9
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PEncod
PENSION CORPORATION
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A familiar sight
at Kutsher's.
miJI* FLORIDA *
ZEW697
BROWARD mmm
So many Floridians come to Kutsher's because we know
just what you want in a vacationand offer it with the
warmth and personal caring that you value. And everything
to keep you busy and happy is right on the premises! Only
a few steps to the golf course, tennis, boating and fishing,
any sport you like including shuffleboard on four new
beautifully designed courts! Of course there are also
interesting seminars, theme parties, barbecues, countless
delights that make the days seem far too short. All explain-
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of scenery, but a change of pace)
ON THE PREMISES: 18-Hoto. 7,157 Yard Gorf Court* 12 Outdoor
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Much more CAREFUL ATTENTION GIVEN TO SPECIAL DIETS.
Week After Week of Great Summer Entertainment
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Plus Many Other Stars To 8e Announce
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Monticello. New York 12701 (914) 794-8000
CALL TOLL FREE: (800) 431-1273
Major Credit Cards Honored


Friday, April 22, 1983 /The Jewish Floridian Page 23-A
GOME TO
ISRAEL NOW
AND WE'LL GIVE
TO THE
N *
THE WOO
FOR ONLY *S29'
It's all yours. A wonderful vacation in ancient, mystical
Jerusalem or the sparkling Mediterranean city of Tel Aviv.
With hotel, car and round trip airfare included. It's El Al's
"Sunsation "83" tour package. And it's unbelievable for
only $829.
tou'll board an El Al jumbo Jet at JFK Airport in New
York and fly non-stop to Ben Gurion Airport. You may
choose to stay in the exciting 20th Century city of Tel
Aviv in a luxurious hottl overlooking the sea. Or you may
want to go on to Jerusalemwhere first class accommo-
dations will make you feel like King Solomon. An Avis
Rent A Car will be yours for 5 full days so you can
leisurely drive to the places you've only read about in the
3
Bible. Kbu'll love exploringfrom the Jordan \fclley to the
breathtaking heights of Masada.
One thing more. As a special bonus. El Al will give
everyone on our special "Sunsation '83" 6 Day/5 Night
tour a 20% discount voucher Tbu'll be able to use it on
your next roundtrip El Al flight from the USA to Israel
anytime through May 31st. 1984.
So call your Travel Agent or ring El Al and ask for the
sun. the moon and the stars. This April and May. you can
get them.
EC7J/AC7N.
The Airline of Israel.
Price U per person based on double occupancy effective April 5th to May 28th. 198J. One Avis
car per double toom. gas. mileage and Insurance charges not Included Call El Al for prices for
deluxe accommodations, children's fares and complete tour details
tf
Laromme jorusauwr. hota*. Jerusalem hfton
t
TL AVIV ruiTon


Page 24- A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, April 22. 1983
An Evening in Paris
to honor
the major donors of
CEDARS
MEDICAL CENTER
March 24,1983 Mr M" w-sloan McCrea
Mrs. Audrey R Finkelstein d Congressman & Mrs. Dante Fascell
Donald S. Rosenberg
Charles Fotsch, Mrs. Kathleen Dr. d Mrs. Richard M. Rubinson
Gordon, d Donald b. Rosenberg
Mr. d Mrs. Irvin Korach
Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Hayet
Charles Fotsch (center) and Mr. d
Mrs. Ben No vac k
Dr. d Mrs. Kenneth Keusch
<
Mr. d Mrs. John G. Weil I
-SpontorM
/
L / i
Dr. d Mrs. Victor D. Dembrow
Mr. d Mrs. Harold Fein
Dr. Robert E. Jacobson
Mr. d Mrs. Carlos J. Arboleya
Mrs. Barbara Weintraub. Donald
S. Rosenberg d Mrs. Carol Russo

Dr. d Mrs. Robert F. Feltman
Dr. d Mrs. Cesar A. Conde
Dr. d Mrs. Jack D. Norman
Jacques Turner, Consul of France.
and Dr. d Mrs. Mariano Garcia


ground Report
(Well Do What's Right
lespite Bombing'Reagan
B, DAVID FRIEDMAN
[WASHINGTON -
,[fA, President Reagan
dared Monday that des-
the "vicious terrorist
nbing" of the United
Z Embassy in Beirut,
US. will continue to
sue "our goals of peace
; region.
I He President made his re-
i at the start of an awards
jony for Peace Corps volun-
s in the White House garden.
j. five-and-a-half hours after
[bombing took place at 6:05
IESTI. Although Reagan
"the cowardly act" cost a
juber of American lives,
jlher he nor the State Depart -
t was able to give casualty
es by mid-afternoon. Unoffi-
orts from Beirut listed the
j of dead as between 28
. 32. including six U.S.
rines and two soldiers, and 100
Lured.
[state department
wty spokesman Alan Rom-
I said that U.S. Ambassador
Robert Dillon was able to tele-
phone Washington within an
hour of the explosion after dig-
ging out of the rubble in his
office. The Embassy usually has
30 to 35 people working there at
one time, including the marines,
Romberg said.
Special envoys Philip Habib
and Morris Draper were in
another part of Beirut at the time
of the explosion. Draper's wife,
Roberta, was reportedly slightly
injured.
Although first reports said the
bombing was caused by a booby-
trapped car, Romberg said that it
was not certain what kind of
bomb had been used or where it
had been placed. He said the
United States did not know at
this time who was responsible,
noting that three groups have al-
ready claimed that they did it.
REAGAN, in his remarks, said
Lebanese President Amin
Gemayel had telephoned him to
express his "profound regret and
sorrow" at the bombing and to
offer the condolences of the Leba-
nese people to the families of
Americans who died as a result of
Continued on Page 15-B
Unseasonable Weather
Dampens Celebration
Of Independence Day
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Unseasonably cold and
ny weather put a damper
celebrations of Israel's
h Independence Day
onday. The blustery ele-
cts may also have help-
avert clashes between
ce Now demonstrators
West Bank settlers at
monies dedicating a
settlement. Beracha.
erlooking Nab his, the
gest Arab city on the
estBank.
The thousands of persons who
iked through mud to celebrate
(dedication or oppose it, got a
""rough drenching. The cere-
"onies had to be held indoors.
fcjwty Premier David Levy, the
jv Cabinet member to attend.
not address the celebrants
departed In helicopter after a
nefstay.
BERACHA,

military (Nahall outpost, was
officially proclaimed a civilian
settlement and a handful of
families moved in. But the oppo-
sition Labor Party and others
saw the government-sponsored
event as a deliberate provoca-
tion to the 100,000 Palestinian
residents of Nablus and had
urged the government to cancel
it.
Premier Menachem Begin
ignored their pleas and. in his
Independence Day speech,
declared Israel's "inalienable
right to the Land of Israel" and
stressed that his government's
massive settlement drive would
continue.
Thousands of Peace Now
advocates and others opposed to
Begin's policy were bussed to the
Beracha site where they faced
thousands more settlers, mostly
religious Jews wearing yar-
mulkas. The two sides shouted
slogans at each other and waved
placards. But violence predicted
Federation's Second Housing Project
For the Elderly to Be Dedicated May 1
Federation Gardens, the
Miami Jewish community's
second subsidized housing pro-
ject for the elderly, will be for-
mally dedicated Sunday. May 1
at 10 a.m., Samuel I. Adler.
president of Jewish Federation
Housing. Inc.. announced.
The ceremony will highlight
the completion of the facility,
located at 10905 S.W. 112 Ave.,
and the coordination of a service
package to meet Federation Gar-
dens residents' needs.
Jewish Federation Housing,
Inc., which sponsors and sup-
ports the facility, is a subsidiary
of Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion. Federation Gardens was
subsidized through a federal
Department of Housing and
Urban Development Title 202-8
loan.
Norman H. Lipoff, president of
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, serves as chairman of
Federation Housing Board of
Directors, and Martin Fine is
chairing the dedication cere-
mony.
Federation Gardens' 110 units
were first occupied by elderly
tenants on Nov. 15. at which time
a number of members of Federa-
tion agencies formed a Profes-
sional Committee on Services,
chaired by Michael Meyer, to co-
ordinate efforts and set priorities
for future programs.
These agencies include Jewish
Family and Children's Services,
Jewish Community Centers of
Samuel I. Adler
South Florida. Mount Sinai
Medical Center. Jewish
Vocational Service, Miami Jew-
ish Home and Hospital for the
Aged. Community Chaplaincy
Service of Greater Miami,
Central Agency for Jewish
Education, and Federation South
Dade Branch.
Adler stated that the new
facility is Federation Housing
second subsidized housing pro-
ject for the elderly, with 114-unit
Federation Towers at 757 West
Ave., Miami Beach, having been
opened in 1979.
"Even with these two com-
plexes, there remains an im
mediate need for at least an addi-
tional 500 subsidized units tor th*-
elderly," Adler said, noting that
the waiting list for both Federa-
tion facilities continues to grow.
"A decade ago, Federation
created a special Commission on
the Elderly to examine the needs
of our senior citizen populat'on "
Lipoff stated. "One of the com-
mission's findings was the need
for subsidized housing, a nee which Federation Housing and
its two housing facilities have
sought to address effectively."
Federation Gardens, Greater Miami Jewish
second subsidized housing project for the elderly.
Federation's

*\
Rabbi Haskell Bernat Marilyn Glaser
Stanley M. Rosenblatt
Barbara Studley
Hadassah Conference to Host
Bernat, Rosenblatt, Studley
formerly a Continued on Page 14-B
Betty Kestenbaum. president
of Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah, has announced that
the Region will hold its Annual
Conference at the Eden Roc
Hotel April 24, 25. an 26. Hadas-
sah National Representative
Marilyn Glaser of Baltimore, Md.
will attend.
Past Region President Jean
Feinberg and Betty Miller are in
charge of arrangements.
Rabbi Haskell M. Bernat.
spiritual leader of Temple Israel
of Greater Miami, will address
the conference Sunday evening,
and attorney Stanley M. Rosen-
blatt, producer and host of
WPBT-Channel 2'a Israeli Diary,
Is also scheduled to speak
A Henrietta Szold Award will
be presented to Barbara Studley.
WNWS-radio talk-show host, at
a Conference Plenary Session
Sunday evening at 8 p.m. She
will be cited in "appreciation for
activating the voice of conscience
in our community."
Abraham Gittelson, director <>f
Central Agency for Jewish
Education, is scheduled to ad-
dress a Conference Education
Session set for Tuesday morr.'ng
it 1030 a.m. He will I>> joined bv
Rabbi Norman Lipson.
Hadassah associates will be
tributed Monday evening at a
banquet. Music will be provded
by Bert Sheldon Trio
\Kibbutz That Needed Rebuilding
Ramat Rachel Has See Many EmergenciesStill Goes On. .And On
By JANET MOSHE
* picturesque fields of Kib-
f "amat Rachel appear to be
'anger of encroaching urban-
" with their orchards
PI MM the only thing
I Jerusalem's growth.
J the hardy mem-
J the kibbutz will succeed in
^g their rural lifestyle -
. Perseverance is Indeed
'egendary in Israel's
H926
-on 90 dunams of rock
m ; f*buti Ramat Rachel
"eights of Rachel) overlooks
he K' r?d t0 Bethlehem
ZiF* P* of Jacobs
Jfgk Rachel. In the early
i, seen,J hardly possible
7, ?ut nn agricultural
m>. if, seventy members
*> arable soil or any water
fJJfunded by Beduin
Was Just beginning when, in

1929, Arab rioters burned the
kibbutz to the ground.
REBUILDING THE homes
and dining room was top priority,
and in addition to communal
buildings, a cow shed and chicken
coops, the settlers also started a
bakery and a laundry to serve
nearby Jerusalem. "By the mid-
40's we had grown to almost 300
people," says Moshe Katz. a 50-
year veteran of kibbutz life.
Today the keeper of Ramat
Rachel's extensive archives. 70-
year old Katz vividly remembers
the War of Independence.
"In May of 1948, we were
under seige, and heavy Arab
attacks destroyed many of our
buildings once again." recalls
Katz. "The Haganah opened the
road to Jerusalem, and children
and those women who could be
spared were evacuated under
heavy fire."
On Saturday, May 22, sixty
defenders of Ramat Rachel were
attacked by 500 Arab troops.
"The Gush Etzion settlements
had fallen only days before in the
south, and the road to Jerusalem
was almost open to enemy forces
only Ramat Rachel stood in
their path," explains Katz. "In a
massive attack, the Egyptians .
were joined by Jordanian soldiers
from the east and Iraqi troops",
from the west as they advanced
on Ramat Rachel."
AMMUNITION, food and
water, already in dangerously low
supply, were depleted in a 13-
hour battle, and 14 of the kibbutz
defenders were killed. Almost all
the survivors were badly injured.
The entire settlement was rubble
after the arduous battle, but the
site changed hands six times as
Israeli forces time and time again
wo lost and rewon this im-
portant stronghold, despite high
casualties.
As the War of Independence
raged on throughout the country,
the once flourishing kibbutz lay
in ruins. "The ruins of the colony
are the most terrible I have seen
in all Palestine," reported I.F.
Stone in the Jerusalem Post
shortly after the battle. He
continued. "The stink of death
lies over its ruined cow barn, its
wrecked homes, and the famous
laundry and bakery that served
Jerusalem. Here in this ruined
kibbutz. Jerusalem was saved.
For if Ramat Rachel had not
held, the Egyptians might have
entered the city from the south
Continued on Page 15-B
JFewislhi Floridiajm
Miami, FloridaFriday, April 22,1983 Section B


P>g 2-B Tha Jewish Ftoridian / Fridty, April 22,1*388
J5VF to Honor Leaders at
AnnualBikurim Celebration
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, chair-
man of JNF Foundation, and
Abraham Grunhut, JNF Greater
Miami president, have an-
nounced that JNF Annual Bik-
urim Banquet will be held May 15
at noon at the Konover Hotel.
The banquet will be held in cele-
bration of Sha vuot.
"The festival of Shavuot com-
memorates the Jewish people's
pilgrimage to Jerusalem with
their first fruit offerings," Rabbi
Lehrman, who will be guest
speaker at the Bikurim celebra-
tion, stated. "The JNF, continu-
ing Jewish tradition, will honor
its leadership for their offerings
throughout the year "
He added, "This year, JNF re-
sponsibilities in Israel have in-
creased tenfold. We have helped
clear rocky terrain and sand into
land, transforming a wasteland
into a homeland."
"Israel's future and security
depend on creating the basis for
agricultural communities in Gali-
lee in the north and in the Negev
Desert in the south," Lehrman
added.
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
chairman of JNF executive
board, who recently returned
from Israel, stated, "Support of
the JNF means new life, new
farms, life-giving forests, and
green where there once was
parched, lifeless brown. The JNF
asks every Jew to become a
guarantor of our people's fate
the JNF is an obligation to the
next generation of Israel so it can
thrive proud and unafraid in its
own land."
"Your support of the JNF be-
comes a covenant with the future
and a guarantee of Israel's secu-
rity. he concluded.
A musical program for the cel-
ebration has been planned by
Ma.-M.ro ShmueJ Fershko.
JNF 1 riders to be honored in-
clude Anne Ackerman, Marion
Altshuler, Mr. and Mrs. Albert
Anker, Mr. and Mrs. Lou Aron-
son, Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Ber-
key, Mr. and Mrs. Lester Bigel-
man, Abraham Bodow, Beulah
Brodie, Mr. and Mrs. Leo Buda,
Maxwell Corn, Laura Dubbin,
Florence Flederman, Bertha Fox,
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Furst, Ir-
ving Garber, Mr. and Mrs. Aaron
Gershon, Anna Gilinsky, Mollie
Gillman, Fay Goldberg, Mr. and
Mrs. Abraham Goldman, and
Rabbi Jacob Green.
Also, Gertrude Greenberg,
Abrar.um Grossman, Dora Hal-
pern. Dr. Siegfried Hamburger,
Isador Hammer, Lee Hartman,
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Hollander,
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Horowitz,
Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Igra, Rose
Kass, Otilia Kellermann, Jennie
Kleeman, Louis Kotick, Shirley
Kotin, Rae Kupferman, Maurice
Kusnitz, Col. Nathaniel Kutcher,
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Kwartner. and
Rabbi David Lehrfield.
Also, Rose Leiter, Rebecca
Leon, Theresa Levine, Mollye
Lovinger, Rabbi Jehuda Melber,
Arthur Miller. Mr. and Mrs. Da-
vid Moskowitz, Elsie Nusbaum,
Paul Perlis, Helen Pollock, David
Pomerantz, Birdie Pomper,
Miriam Press. Mr. and Mrs. Moe
lteiffen, Mr. and Mrs. Philip
Richland. Maurice Robbin.
Ernest Samuels, Mr. and Mrs.
Abraham Savelle. and Oscar
Schapiro.
Also, Mr. and Mrs. Rubin
Shapiro, Mr. and Mrs. Sam
Schiffman. Leo Schimel. Igor
Schu.lt/, Leon Schuster. Mr. and
Mrs. Israel Schwartz, Sam Toll,
Mr. and Mrs. Max Wagman, Mr.
and Mrs. Alexander Waldman,
Mr. and Mrs. Morris Waldor, Mr.
and Mrs. Sol Wenger, Ida Wea-
sel, and Anna K. Zuckerman.
Mizrachi Auction Set
An Annual Auction has bee.
scheduled by Chai Chapter of
American Mizrachi Women for
Sunday, May 1 at Temple Or
Olom, to start with an Early Bird
Sale at 5 p.m. and auction to
follow at 7 p.m. Proceeds will
benefit Mizrachi educational pro-
jects and Beth Hayeled Child-
haven in Jerusalem.
Chairpersons of the event are
Ann SkHsky, Sadie Kane, Molly
Beckerman. Isabel Alexander,
Pearl Wallen. Jeanne Finkelstein,
and Bess Sokol. Chai Chapter
president
Barry University
Graduate Program in Jewish Studies
Summer 1983
Session I May 10 -June 17
Registration: Wed., May 4 6:00-9:00 P.M.
Mon. &Wed. 6:00-9:30 P.M.
"Introduction to the Bible Ancient Israel"
Rabbi David Lehrfield
Tues. &Th. 6:00-9:30 P.M.
"Modern Jewish Nationalism"
Dr. Yehuda Shamir
Session II June 20 -July 29
Registration: Wed., June 15
1:00-4:00 P.M. 6:00-9:00 P.M. .
Mon. & Wed. 6:00-9:30 P.M.
"Modern Hebrew Literature"
Rabbi Rami Shapiro
Tues. & Th. 6:00-9:30 P.M.
"Selected Portions of the Bible"
____ Dr. A. Atkins____________________
Summer School students registered in Jewish Studies
are entitled to a 30% discount.
ADMISSIONS OFFICE: 11300 N.E. 2nd Ave.
758-3392 Miami Shores, FL 33161
NAME______________-----------------------------------------------
ADDRESS_________________-------------
CITY________
_ZIP.
.PHONE.
Gene Greentweig
Women's Division
to Host
CAJE Director
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Women's Division will spon-
sor a Southwest Dade Special
Event on behalf of 1983 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign
Wednesday, May 4 at 7 p.m.
Gene Greenzweig, executive-
director of Central Agency for
Jewish Education, will be guest
speaker. No minimum gift is re-
quired to attend the event, but a
solicitation for CJA-IEF will fol-
low the talk.
The Special Event is being co-
chaired by Pat Feldman and Joan
Fischer and hosted by Sandi
Miot.
Bonds to Host Israel Embassy Official
Victor Harel is slated to be
guest speaker at an Adath
Yeshurun Israel Bonds Luncheon
scheduled for Sunday, May 1 at
11:30 a.m. at Adath Yeshurun in
North Miami Beach. According
to Luncheon Chairpersons Morris
and Rose Katz, Harel is a
"distinguished Israeli diplomat
who is a dynamic speaker and a
renowned Middle East expert."
Harel is first secretary at the
Israel Embassy in Washington.
He has also served as first secre-
tary at the Israel Embassy in
Mexico City and in the Ministry
for Foreign Affairs in Jerusalem.
Farband Sets Meeting
Victor Harel
On *Yom Haatzmaut'
Leah Benson, vice president of
Pioneer Women Na'amat Coun-
cil, will speak on "Yom Haatz-
maut" at a meeting of Chaim
Weizman Farband Labor Zionist
Alliance Branch 343 scheduled to
take place Monday at 12:30 p.m.
at American Savings Bank, Lin-
coln and Alton Roads.
Shev-a Berland and Sarah
Kaufman, vice presidents, will
read Israel's Declaration of Inde-
pendence in Yiddish and English,
and Esther Weinstein and Regina
Railen will sing and recite, ac-
companied by pianist, Helen
Skolnick.
A native of Uruguay. Hare!
has also served the Israel gove^
rnent as an observer of IsrJTo
States^ T" f **A
Hebrew University School J
Law and is a member of the Israel |
The Israel Bonds Luncheon I
will celebrate the 35th AnS.
versary of the Jewish State as !
well as the 20th anniversary of
the ordination of Rabbi Simcha'
Freedman. Adath Yeshuransi
spiritual leader.
General chairman of Israel
Bonds campaign at Adath
Yeshurun is Dr. Joseph Singer
&K3KK3KX
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5 year and 15 month old.
Weekend eves, and some
weekdays. Transportation
needed. South Miami. 661-4272
Stein.
WANTED
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Youth Advisor
Person to conduct junior congregation
Call:
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
in N. Miami
891-5508
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I
F^fttay, Aprils, 1*83/ ThetJ*#fchlTbrkiutf Page 3-B
'Genocide Premiere Drew Sell-Opt Crowd
teens
A SELLOUT crowd of
and city officials
"out April 12 to pay
ute to Simon Wiesen-
world-renowned Nazi
Dter, and to see the
uthern premiere of the
demy Award winning
olocaust documentary,
* which Simon
J'iesenthal Center in Los
les sponsored.
TV movie was the product of
liesenthal's years of documen-
tor, of Hitlers atrocities.
SELECTED AS Best
iDocumentary of 1982, "Genoci-
L tells the story of millions of
hen. women, and children who
Lre victims of the Nazi's "Final
[solution." Orson Welles and
iFJuabeth Taylor, narrators.
Ichronicle anti-Semitism from
Biblical times in t he film.
Wiesenthal brought the
Idocumentarv to Miami Beach at
the request of Miami Beach
Mayor Norman Ciment, who had
met with him last summer in
Austria and asked that Miami
Beach be considered for the
Southern U.S. premiere.
Wiesenthal, who is one of four
finalists for the Nobel Peace
Prize, made an appeal to Presi-
dent Reagan on the day of the
premiere for the nation's assis-
tance in bringing to justice two
men he said are responsible for
killing thousands of Jews during
WWII, Walter ftauff of Chile and
Walter Kutschman, also known
as Pedro Olmo. of Brazil.
"GENOCIDE" WAS written
by Martin Gilbert, Holocaust
scholar from Oxford University,
and Rabbi Marvin Heir of the
Simon Wiesenthal Center, who
was a co-producer. The screen-
play was written, produced, and
directed by Arnold Schwartz-
man.
All proceeds of the Miami
Beach premiere will go to the
Simon Wiesenthal Center.
Rabbis to Attend Bonds Middle
East Awareness Seminar
State of Israel Bonds Or-
Ipnization will host a Middle
I East Awareness Seminar of its
[Southeast Region Rabbinical
[Cabinet at the Konover Hotel
[Wednesday at 10 a.m., according
[to Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
[special events chairman of
[Greater Miami Israel Bonds
[Organization.
Rabbi Abramowitz noted that
fRabbi Barry Tabachnikoff.
al leader of Congregation
: Breira of South Dade, will be
[serving as chairman of the day
land that special keynote speaker
Iril lie Morton Silberman. presi-
dent of AIPAC, America-Israel
Public Affairs Committee.
Silberman is also former presi-
dent of Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
Rabbi Tabachnikoff said that
Silberman's address is entitled
"Israel's Policies as They Relate
to American Politics and the
American Jewish Community."
He added that several work-
shop sessions will also be held. A
guest faculty member from Uni-
versity of Miami's School of Poli-
tics and Public Affairs will serve
as moderator.
DO YOU REMEMBER THE
FLORIDA HEAT AND COME ON UP!
JHE WORLD FAMOUS CONCORD RESORT HOTEL
OFFERS YOU A SPECIAL SUMMER
COME ON
UPPACKAGE
$434
WEEKLY
(Minimum 2 weeks stay)
Per person, dbl occ .
Standard Room Does not
include air tare, round-trip
transfers, gratuities and
7% Sales Tax
Superior Room$504
Executive Room$546.
Tower Room$616
ALL INCLUSIVE PACKAGE
1,083.OO. 2 week stay
Doi Occ Per Person,
standard Room, air fare not
nciuded
includes
-'5 Days and 14 Nights
-Round trip transport
Ai'port to Hotel
-Conco'd representative
*'" meet you and handle
your luggage and transfers
-fatuities for waiter and
- .maiQS during your stay
; Local and State Taxes
; 3 Full Meals daily
- special Diets Available
= ICockta.l Parties
-welcomedrink upon
_ arrival
n r,n'e,'ain,rient every night
uS*?.h0|e golf, tennis
'"door & out). HealthClub.
'"floor and Outdoor Pool
E?J^'vations or any further information, please don't hesitate
Nwm i direc'To" Free 800-431-3850. or contact Helen and
yT Levin in Florida at 305-485-8861 (They will also assist
L. making your plane reservations) or Call Your Travel Agent
'NLYATTHEJ
CONCORD*
Kiamesha Lake. NY 12751 \^S
EARLY BIRO SPECIAL
A $50 REFUND per person
tor reservations made by
June 15th for a minimum
two week stay in Superior,
Executive or Tower rooms
ONLY (Also applies to all
inclusive package for
Superior, Executive 4.
Tower rooms)
M'ami Beach Mayor Norman Ciment proclaimed "Simon
Wiesenthal Day' in the City of Miami Beach in honor of the
Southern U.S. premiere of Wiesenthal's film, "Genocide.
Jefferson National Banks hosted the recent premiere of the
Academy A ward-winning documentary motion picture,
"Genocide" at Lincoln Theatre, Miami Beach. The banks also
contributed $2,500 to Simon Wiesenthal'Center^ which coor-
dinates tracking neo-Nazi activity in this country. Shown at a
reception honoring Holocaust survivor, Wiesenthal at the
Miami Beach home of Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Molko are Barton
S. Goldberg, president of Jefferson National Bank, Wiesenthal,
and Sandra Goldberg.
Elizabeth Chait to Share Her Bat Mitzvah
Elizabeth Ann Chait. daughter
of Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Chait
of Miami Beach, will be called to
the Torah as Bat Mitzvah Satur-
day, April 30 at 10:30 a.m. at
Temple Beth Sholom. Rabbi
Leon Kronish will officiate.
During the ceremony. Sima
Khagrevd Rabaev. a refusnik
from the Soviet Union, will also
become Bat Mitzvah. Comment-
ing on the 'twinning'' Bat Mitz-
vah. Rebecca stated. It is my
priviledge and honor to be called
to the Torah on the occasion not
only for myself, but for my twin'
as well. Sima has been denied the
freedom to live her life in the
Jewish tradition."
Elizabeth is a seventh grade
student at Ransom-Everglades
Middle School. She attended
Lehrman Day School through
sixth grade.
Mr. and Mrs. Chait will host
the Kiddush following services.
$4 Million in Bonds Sold at Emanu-El Event
Four million dollars in State of
Israel bonds were sold at an an-
nual Temple Emanu-El State of
Israel Bonds Dinner held Sunday
evening at the tempje, according
to Gary R. Gerson, general cam-
paign chairman of Israel Bonds
campaign, Greater Miami.
Gerson said that the $4 million
figure is the highest amount
Temple Emanu-El has ever sold
at one function.
Attorney to Speak
On Legality of
Cult Practices
Religious cults and the law will
be examined on April 28 at a
forum N sponsored by Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Task
Force on Cults and Missionaries.
Keynote speaker at the session,
which will take place at 8:30 p.m.
at the Federation building, will
be Herbert Rosedale, attorney
who has litigated cult-related
cases.
To be entitled "Cults: Beyond .
the Law?," the program will
review various constitutional
issues involved in cult-relnted
freedom of speech and religion
cases, particularly involving
charges of brainwashing and
coercive persuasion.
The discussion will coincide
with a bill currently under
consideration in Florida House of
Representatives which would
provide a person impacted by
coercive persuasion with a 30-day
period of a neutral site, with the
possibility of an extension of up
to 45 days.
Task Force on Cults and Mis-
sionaries is operated through
a special grant provided by
Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies of Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and is chaired by
Rabbi Brett Goldstein, spiritual
leader of Temple Shir Ami.
Weekend of Yiddish
Culture Planned
A Second Annual Institute for
Yiddish Culture will be held Fri-
day. May 13 through Sunday,
May 15 by Workmen's Circle at
Palm Beach Hilton-on-the Ocean.
Guest lecturers and artists will
include Professor S. Portnoy,
chairman of History Department.
Florida Atlantic University; Pro-
fessor I. Goldberg, lecturer on
Yiddish literature, author, and
editor: and Khayele Ash and
Arieh Furman. Yiddish artists.
Seminars have been scheduled
on Yiddish art. theatre, litera-
ture, and histors
Aventura Council
Elected Officers
Joint Council of Aventura held
elections recently, and Philip R.
Friess was appointed to a fifth
term as the group's president.
Others elected were V Herbert
Marks, executive vice president;
Rubin Steiner. vice president;
Joseph Fried, treasurer; Joe Bly,
secretary; George Berlin and
I.ewis Morton, directors; and
Norma Fiur, assistant secretary.
MECHAYEH FISH
6th STREET AND MERIDIAN AVENUE
(ACROSS FROM CARNIVAL FRUIT)
673-1664
FREE
DELIVERIES
Featuring one of
the most extensive
selections of fresh
fish in town
PHONE
ORDERS
Shomer Shabbos
Owner & Manager
HOURS
Monday to Thursday 8:00 A.M. to 5 30 P.M.
Friday 8 AM to 4 P M Sunday 8:30 A M to 4:30 P.M.
Under Orthodox Rabbinical Council Supervision


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. April 22, 1983
f3 Publix now
I SE EXTRA CONVENIENCE FOR
Ronzoni. Ungumo
Ebow Macaroni, nagular or Thin
Spaghetti................'2^63
Jiffy
Corn Muffin Mix... 3 :. 69*
Duncan Hlnes, Asaortad Flavors
Cake Mixes............*T77
Vlgo
Breadcrumbs.....3
YOUR SHOPPING PLEASURE.
OL
Quantity Rights Reserved.
Regular or Light 12-oz. Cans!
Stroh's
r%* Beer
The, Place for Frbzen FoodslP-^E';^
Hanover. Romano Baan Mscfsy or
Summer
Vegetables.............ST 90*
Green Giant
21-ot-i
Limit 2 with other purchases of S7 c
more excluding all tobacco products)
For Stor** without Baharlaa:
Danish Bakary Boxed
Cinnamon
Raisin Buns.......
Danish Bakary Boxed
Family Pack
Cake Donuts"*:
Special Recipe. 100%
Wholewheat
Bread..................
t9119
TetMy'a
Tea Bags...............tfla
Mh
Sunflower Oil..........U^1
12-ct.
bo
9f*9
5-OJ
cm
$179
*l
Caesar Dressing....
Seven Seas
Buttermilk Recipe
Lasagna..................2ZZ*2 $g
,V 1*oz. Cans, Tab, Sprtta. Sugar Fraa Sprtta, FMwa,
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Thin Potatoes.........*T9119 Coca-Cola or
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CoffeeRings 9^T*119 ,^.FWun.Bon1H,p^F1H,Dwpwl, Kosher DM PfckJes..2*
Bridgtord PapsiUght, Sugar Free Pepsi.F rs Mrjurrta* Dew or Optnptit0^ltmo,tckort Smoked Flaw
Bread Dough..........^r'100 Pepst-Cola...p^Bgi ^ *159 Barbecue Sauce.....
^S3
bora. 69C
''89*
bSS.1"
(Plus Tax and DaposN)
Pubax
Swanaon's
Eggs and Sausage As^xud Flavor. sW Apricot Preserves
Entree _*ST79 Dairi-Fresh Ice NHk X 119 ^
Swansons. Hungry Man SglSuSpB gs,__________ ** CWI With BSSVM ....
Salisbury steak Seaftest Ice Cream ...*
Entree..................... mJHI*1 Saaltast, Assortad Flavors
- 69
'ST 79*
Vegetable Oil
Spray.................
Sunshine
Vanilla Wafers..
Pubax.DisttMd.SaltFraa-M-walFraB
Drinking Water.......oWw,59
Syfo
Seltzer Water......tfi&M.
Bordeni
Cracker Jacks........X 69*
KaAogg's
Fruit Loops Cereal. 1S*1*
Kaaogg.
Fruit Loops Cereal
Carnation, VanMa, Chocolate, or Coftae
Instant Breakfast... t *1M
lEW
TloSancho
Taco Seasoning
Catentano
Cheese Pizza.........STM"
Mrs. Smiths
Boston Cream Pie.. '? *1W
Green Giant, Cauliflower and Cheese or
Broccoli
and Cheese............'? 99*
Sara Lee. Butter Strr isei or
Pccdn
Coffee Cake...........,UT',1a9
Morton 9'v-oz Mini Donuts or 11-oz.
Jelly Donuts........... D,, 89*
r-et Hitz (2-pack)
Pie Shells...
Ten Plus Bars.........X $199 J^.__. _...3
1.51-01
as*.
1.
Chunk Light In Oil or Water
,*&*HStar Kist
Tuna *
k^Star-Kis
TloSancho
Enchilada Dinner.
Tio Sancho
Taco Dinner..........
TloSancho
^Taco Shells
.8p^"*149
."';" 1"
'' 79*
From Concentrate
Publix
Orange
Juke I
IO-oi.
P*>9<
69
(Limit 2 with other purchases of $7. or
more excluding all tobacco products)
The, Place for Health & Beauty Rids
Golden Delight
Watties,.............
p\7 69<
6 4-oz. Gel or 7-oz. Regular
Colgate
Toothpaste.........
Extra Control or Unscentr
Mink Difference
Hair Spray......
7-OI.
can
m%*> ^-
m&
ni^mu
5-J29
$1 *
l|"S Ocean Spra,
The, Place/or Dairy foods
Friendship
Sour Cream ....... 89*
Breakstone
Cream Cheese 89f
Breakstone
Ricotta Cheese
CUD
$-)29
All Grinds
ft
^Folger's
\fl Coffee
(Limit 1 with other purchases of $7. or
more excluding all tobacco products)
[3.
i Put*' -^.1,
Breakstone. Large Curd Caktomia Style
Smooth and Creamy or Low Fa'.
Grapefruit Juice.....4 129 Cottage Cht e..... 99<
Welch's Assorted Flavors.
White Grape Juice *1"
Dairi-Fresh
Beef Flavored
Henny Penny
Dog Food
70-oz. Bottle
Fresh Start
Detergent..
Ann and Hammer, 227-oz. pkg.
Laundry Detergent.. .*3>
Molts. With Pulp
Prune Juice.
Stokery's, Bartlatt
Pear Halves.
bottle w M
Yogurts................3 cw 89*
16-or
can
63c
1"
Kraft
Velveeta Cheese
PBatoury ^
Cinnamon Rolls...... 69*
20 Mule Team Borax X*!85
Penny Saver
Cleanser..............3^709*
With Sprayer, 1B-o* BottJs
Mildews Gone
$13
' 1.
* 89*
Hunt's
Manwich Sauce
IS.S-OZ.
Regular Style 0133. 0 137 or 0143
Legg's Pantyhose m %
Sudsy Ammonia.....bora. 53* i2Bz. boom, uqutd
f+*******,*a***,2+cl,*,. Wisk Detergent......,*747
CUng Free_s^^^>artc.,1M ForawDMNs
Joy Detergent........US. *1*
32-oz.Bottta
2o^ Hi AJax for Dishes.......X sfai
Soft Pry
Heavy Duty
Ctvirmm. Asaortad Colors ? JK fMgnAr **ot $479
RathroomTissue... "
Baa-fMt.TaBV'-.,
riarbag..
*1M
Sptc ? .*d 3 -an
39 Cleaner............
54-w.
P0
|27fi
Stokery's
FruH Cocktail.......... ^ 63
stokiy, ReddiWip >mM#_
Skced Beets.........3 2T M. Topping......... -$119
Stokery's (Non-Butterfat Dressing'
Bavarian King Smoothee... 2
Sauerkraut...........3'.*119 M^oi-.s-ted or un^ed
Stok.ly'., Whole Kernel or Cream Style Margarine
Golden Corn.........3 SS 91M Quarters m
Stokely's Peas ....3VJS1" S^eparkay
Stokery's. Cut or French Style aTIrnarin*, Jots.'85*
Groan Beans........3 91 ^s**106...............""
87c Diet Margarine a*.k*.b'
^9* Wieconem Cheese Bar
Hun,, lilfflS* Muenster Clieese^. ^
Tomato PastePfSl'c1- 73 ^^,^57
Hunt's, Whole u^ jfo. ^1
Peeled Tomatoes... ''
Campbel's
Pork and Beans 4 c^. 91. akh-.
Stokery's, Dark or Light Red Soft Spread $13
Kidney Beans......BS?*1M Che^e................... 1
Assorted Flavors, Aegular or Diet Hartdmar
Pix Sodas..............6 c 99 Cheese N' Nut
Shasta, Assorted Flavors Quarters ................. pl"
Diet Soft Drinks...... 12Z 89* sonenw, whole m
Prego, Plair. Mushroom d: with Moat MOKZSfSSI
Spaghetti Sauce.....** 79 ct-eese
AOC Process Cheese Food 12 American Singles.. '^1*
$1w
IS-or Jrt3
rM* *


Friday. April 22. 1983 The Jewish Floridian Pajre 5-B
open 7 days
Prices and Coupons Effective Thursday, April 21st thru
Wednesday, April 27, 1983
a week
where shopping is a pleasure 7 days a week
Funk & Wagnalls
Encyclopedia
Publix Special
Choices
USD*. .
Jrl'MeM heavy western grain fed
Young n Tender Government
inspected Shipped Dressed and
Df.iwn Fresh Not Frozen Premium Grade
Whole
Fryers
vM;
USD* Chote*. Beet Round
Bottom Round
Roast....................
USD* Owe*. BmIChuck
Blade Steak............. 1"
USD* Cholc*. BmI Chuck
UnderWade Roast
USD* Choke*, Bmi Chuck. Bon*m.
UnderWade Steak
USD* Choice. Bmi Round
Eye Round Steaks.
U.VD.A Cholc*, BmI Round
Eye Round Roast
FtMyP*. BarMou* Favorite,
5- o> Mot* Package
Beef Ground
Chuck.....................
MM
2
Swift's Premium, Frozen
Tru-Tender
BeefUver............2 p&*179
Lykee. Saced
Cooked Ham..........ST*!*
TinriMM. Pride Frozen
Sausage and
Biscuits...................9ptr*1"
Julian Frtarteh'a
Smoked Tongue... $2M
Juean Frierich's
Cooked Tongue..... *&
In Wine or Cream
Ma Mavin
Herring Fillets.........32^3
Extra MU, MM, Hot or Special Recipe. Pork
Jimmy Dean
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tanuhk April 2lhn>U(!h
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Smokee Links.......
Lykaa Sugar Craah
Beef Franks..........
Gwaltney, Turkey
Great Dogs............
Roman Brand
Fresh Italian
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Bologna of
American Kosher
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pkfl.
1"
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pko-
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225
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Ball Park Bratwurst
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The, Proce for Frozen Seafoods
Fresh Frozen
Breaded Turbot....... 12
Fresh Frozen
Sole Fillets...............b *2
F-esh Frozen
Dressed Smelts...... a s139
* .. -0*0* Bioolrd P*lm Bejcn MjHm SI lUCM
'"" ** '*' Counlia* ONIY'
j^S.D.A. Insoected. Fresh Whole, Skinless
Boneless
Chicken Breasts....... *279
UnN Tasty Smoked Pork Loins
Center Cut Loin
Sat........................ 92"
l** c" Pork Chops..................*.-r-Sr- S3.19)
"it or Bmi r-*^*6
Kahn's ^,
Jumbo Franka.^TX 198
gjl Smrthfkjld. "No Sugar Added" "Lower San"
Pork Sausage......... fe 1M
* Weh.,m Quarter.) Smoked or
ven-Roasted
Turkey Breast........ 3M
Braunschweiger.....?, 1*
S*l. Sliced
c,*PPedHam.........SM"
^'MeW,Hdor
Gnoa Salami..........S 219
ffllaokkjM or
Jabrsw National
salami......................' *129
For tr\sgood times
Swift s Beat Garlic or
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Max Bauer s. Deft
Corned Beef Round
Oscar Mayer
Honey Loaf............. >
Norweetem
Deli Chicken Breast '309
Deft-Fresh. Macaroni Salad, Cole Slaw or
Potato Salad.......... 79
VateReal
Deli-Baked Ham
(Pistachio Nut* Added)
Trieste Mortadella
99% Sodium Fraa, Natural
Lorraine Cheese
Creamy Smooth, Ptein or with Caraway
Sweet Munchee..... $2M
Mama's. Smoked
SaWe Plates........... $5W
Dak-Baked
Apple Pie................ST-M"
DeH-Saked
Dutch Apple Pie 2.'$1M
Dee-Freeh. Plain or with Caraway Saede
Rye Bread.......... 9
P*9
$219
5t1
Jones Dairy Farm, Frozan
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Dinner Sausages.
Swift's, Frozen. Assorted V
Brown N' Serve
Sausage.............
Mrs WeJnberg'e. Frozan
Chopped Liver....... Sp 125
Bonnie Maid. Frozan. Breaded
Veal Parmesan....... *V
Tyson s, CMck'n Quick, Frozan
Chick'N Hoagies .
Tina's, Frozan, Green Ch*, Red Hot.
Hi and Chases or
Beef and Bean
Bunitoe................... 55 45
BrBBant. Frozen
Cooked Shrimp......T9'MM
MetJews, Frozen
Clam Oreganato..... 'pat*!**
,2-,-$289
Cooked Lobter.....,4pk,r$648
I B^iiiM, Frozen
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I'age 6-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. April 22. 1983
Community Corner
A regular meeting has been scheduled by Lincoln B'nai B'rith
U omen for Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at Lincoln Road Clubroom.
Miami Dade Community College, as part of its Lunchtime
Lively Arts Series, vill present "Poetry Introductions" with
Hannah Kahn WednesJiy. w
Hope n Cope Club, a cancer support group sponsored by
Parkway General Hospital Auxiliary, will meet Thursday, April
28 to discuss "Outliving Your Prognosis A Testimonial" in
the hospital auditorium. North Miami Beach.
Association for Jewish Special Education Chai Tikva will
hold a membership meeting Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at Greater
Miami Jewish Federation building.
Two years of construction and renovation have been com-
pleted on Miami Heart Institute, and a tree-topping ceremony
, celebrated the occasion Monday. Among those attending were
Institute President Osmer S. Deming, Dr. Richard A. Elias and
Joe Ann Batchdler, vice presidents, and John P. Lauri, ad-
ministrator.
Novelist Evelyn Mayeraon will discuss "Researching the
Novel" at a monthly meeting of Writer's Workshop Tuesday
from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at Coconut Grove Public Library. Mayer-
son's latest novel is entitled No Enemy But Time.
"Networking" will be the theme of a meeting of 11 women's
business and professional groups at the Pavilion Hotel Satur-
day, April 30. The joint venture is coordinated by Florida Asso-
ciation for Women Lawyers, Dade County Chapter.
Aventura Jewish Center Sisterhood will meet Wednesday at
12:30 p.m. Sohpie Weiman will review the book, The Life of
Irving Berlin.
Burton A. Landy is to have been sworn in as honorary consul
general of Korea for South Florida Thursday, April 21. Landy is
a founding partner in the Miami law firm of Paul, Landy, Beiley.
Harper, and Metsch PA. and he serves as chairman of Florida-
Korea Economic Comrrui.ee
Stein Gerontological Institute at Douglas Gardens Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged will conduct a seminar
on "The Balance Sheet for Patient Care" April 27, 28. and 29 in
Kuby Auditorium.
A Latch Key Self-Reliance Course" for children who are
home alone after school will be offered May 9 through 25
Monday and Wednesday evenings from 7 to 8 p.m. at South
Uade Jewish Community Center. "Our Parents. Our Selves"
will be offered at on Thursdays. April 21 through June 9 from
<:30 to 9 p.m. at Miami Beach JCC for adults with aging
parents. B 6
CONVE
Dr. Emit Fackenheim, Jewish
philosopher and Holocaust
scholar, addressed 2,500
participants during a Holo-
caust Memorial Day-Yom
Hashoah program, held at
Miami Beach Theatre of the
Performing A rts.
17 Home Residents to
Be Bar/Bat Mitzvah
Seventeen residents of Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged will participate in a
Bar-Bat Mitzvah ceremony Mon-
day at 1:30 p.m. in Ruby Audi to
rium.
Rabbi Solomon Schiff, repre-
senting Community Chaplaincy
Service of Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, has conducted
weekly preparatory classes for
the Bar-Bat Mitzvah candidates
since January and will preside
over the event. Over 200 family
members, residents, and guests
are expected to attend.
Hadar Sets Luncheon
An Annual "Mother in Israel"
Luncheon has been set by Hadar
Chapter of American Mizrachi
Women for Thursday. May 5 at
noon, to take place at First Na-
tionwide Savings and Loan
Association Auditorium. Bal
Harbour.
Helen Zaelis is sponsoring the
day. A musical program is
planned.
Jewish High School Sets First Dinner Financial Program
Kichard Levy, president of
Jewish High School of South
Florida, has announced that the
school's first annual dinner will
be bald May 1 at Friedland Ball-
room of Temple Emanu-El,
Miami Beach. Jewish High
School of South Florida is spon-
sored by Women's American
ORT and American ORT Federa-
tion.
\lfred Golden and Harry
I Flap) I^evy, who are chairing the
dinner committee, stated. "The
dinner promises to be a highlight
of the social season as well as
bringing together parents,
friends, and faculty."
Um serving on the committee
are Roberta Kuttler. Ellie Katz.
\ i > president of the school, and
Charlotte Brodie.
o R.C
Jewish High School was estab-
lished through a grant by Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and
Jewish Federations of South
Broward and Greater Fort Lau-
derdale
Sorority Benefit Set
University of Miami's Alpha
Epsilon Phi Sorority will hold an
annual Alumnae Luncheon Sat-
urday. April 30 at University of
Miami Faculty Club at 12:30
p.m Proceeds will benefit Alpha
Eta chapter and their philan-
thropy. Chaim Sheba Medical
Center in Israel.
Joyce Bauman-Soeder of Ken-
dall serves as advisor to the
group.
EMBASSY NORTH O
KOSHER STEAK HOUSE ......
1417 Washington Ava Miami Baach
EARLY BIRO DINNER *6" s E. NMmM Beh.
BVM.7MQ )) atvd. Hallandale. Fla.
Sun Thun 12 t.MFn 3PM f/J 1 (y) QLATT MEAT DEPT. W .J;.^/^.,
W LUNCH-DEL. -TAKE OUT %) WHERE DINING Witt BE
FOOD CATERING VOUR PLEASURE
ROYAL HUNGARIAN SfflRESTAUR;
Now under Supervision is proud to
announce that we are now located in the
Beautiful Sasson Hotel, 2001 Collins Ave.
Friday Dinner prepaid or
PAID by 5 PM Fn
WEISS FAMILY *
538-5401
Arnold M. Oanz, president and
founder of Arnold M. Ganz Asso-
ciates. Inc., is scheduled to be
guest speaker at a regularly
monthly breakfast program of
the Brotherhood of Temple Beth
Sholom Sunday at 10:30 a.m.,
according to Aaron Farr, pro-
gram chairman, and Perry If.
Fabian, president.
Ganz will speak on "Financial
Trends of the Future." He is also
a trustee of Federation of Jewish
Philanthropies Foundation.
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-i rim a, *
Hebrew Educators Alliance to
Honor Sukenik, Outgoing President
i.i____ c.l___It- ___.__:____. wll
Zehava Sukenik. outgoing
president of Hebrew Educators
Alliance of Greater Miami, will be
honored at a dinner of tribute
sponsored by the organization
Sunday evening. May 1, Lag
B'Omer, at the Casablanca Hotel,
according to Shimon Azulay,
dinner chairman.
An instructor at Hebrew
Academy of Greater Miami for
the past 25 years, Sukenik has
served as HEA president for 10
years. She stated that the or-
ganization was founded 25 years
ago to "raise the level of Jewish
education in the community and
to enhance the status of the Jew-
ish educator."
Hebrew Educators Alliance is
affiliated with National Federa-
tion of Hebrew Teachers nad en-
compasses synagogue and day
school teachers in the area.
The wife of Rabbi Julius
Sukenik, she is a native of
Chicago, where she attended Col-
lege of Jewish Studies. Before
moving to Miami in the 19.%s
she attended New York Univer
Yeahi^d taught at K,atbush
Sukenik has served as a mem.
ber of the Board of License of
?P Agency for jewish
Education for over 10 years and
helped draft a Code of Practice
for area day school teachers. She
worked as a member of Bnei
Akiva youth movement and was
one of the founders of that
organization's summer camp in
Los Angeles. She has also
studied in Israel.
"Holding the dinner on Lag
B'Omer is entirely fitting as this
day in Jewish tradition is the
Scholars and Teachers Holiday "
Rabbi Azulay noted. Benjamin
Ben-Ari, teacher at Hebrew
Academy, will succeed Sukenik
as HEA president.
ORT to Salute Honor Roll Members
Southeastern Florida Region of
Women's American ORT will
hold a culminating Honor Roll
Luncheon and Installation at the
Sheraton Bal Harbour Hotel
Sunday at 11:30 a.m. Over 600
members of the Region who have
achieved Honor Roll status will
be cited, with the highest
achiever in each chapter receiving
special recognition.
Leslie Riesenberg, Honor Roll
vice president and luncheon
chairperson, stated that the
event will celebrate a "record-
breaking year of fundraising,"
and that theme of the day will be
"Now Showing-ORT Salutes
Broadway." A review entitled
"Explosion" will be presented by
Jerry Marshall Enterprises.
Centerpieces, designed by
Kichard Riesenberg. are black
styrofoam decorated with mirrors
and beads for electric lights
which depict the New York City-
skyline and its theatre marquees.
Immediate past president of
the Region. Jean Rose, will in-
stall regional officers and presi-
dents of ORT's 30 local chapters.
To be installed as Region of
ficers are Dale Flam, president:
Sonnie Waters, executive com-
mittee chairman: Riesenberg.
Mildred Feld, Pauline Sher. Ceel
Segall, Syd Sablosky. Hilde
Leslie Riesenberg
Smissman. and Mimi Weiner,
vice presidents: Syd Pollard,
financial secretary; Bea Shultz,
treasurer; Ruth Levine, record
ing secretary; and Jean Rose,
parliamentarian.
Vets Set Agenda
A regular meeting chaired by
Phyllis Shaw, president, habeen
planned b) Abe HorrowiU
Ludiua Auxiliary B82, Jewish
War Veterans, for Sunday at 9:30
a.m.
The auxiliary and imisi will
utti'inl an Annual Donor Dinner.
Shov.. and Danceal ihoDeauvilk
Hotel Saturday, at 7 p-m
Assistant Administrator
For commercial Business office. Part time, 25
hours weekly. Give experience and
references. Write: P.O. Box 012941, Miami,
Florida 33101.
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Friday, April 22, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
And Aaron shall cast lots upon the two goats; one lot for the
lord, and the other lot for Atazel"
{Lev. 16.81.
AHARK MOT
AHARE MOT After the death of Aaron's two sons, God said
Moses: Speak unto Aaron thy brother, that he come not at
m (jmes into the holy place within the veil, before the ark-cover
*hich is upon the ark; that he die not, for I appear in the cloud
upon the ark-cover" iLeviticus 16.2). Only on the Day of Atone
ment, "the tenth day of the seventh month" may Aaron enter
the Holy of Holies, entirely alone, to "make atonement for the
holy place, because of the uncleannesses of the children of
Israel." Aaron was to bring a bullock as a sin-offering and a ram
u a burnt offering. He was to accept from the children of Israel
two he-goats fr a sin-offering and a ram for a burnt-offering.
One of the gnats was to be chosen by lot as a sin-offering to God;
ihe other was to be dispatched to the desert, (to Azazel) a
scapegoat carrying the sins of the children of Israel. The portion
enumerates the laws prohibiting the consuming of blood. It
concludes with regulations pertaining to sexual morality.
>, shall do no unrighteousness in judgment, in meteyard, in
Might, or in measure. Just balances, just weights shall ye
have'
(Lev. 19.35-36).
KEDOSHIM
KEDOSHIM "Ye shall be holy; for I the Lord your God am
holy. Ye shall fear every man his mother, and his father, and ye
shall keep My sabbaths Turn ye not unto the idols And
when ye reap the harvest of your land, thou shall not wholly
reap the corner of thy field neither shalt thou gather the
fallen fruit ol thy vineyard; thou shalt leave them for the poor
and the stranger ... Ye shall not steal; neither, shall ye deal
lalsely, not lie one to another. And ye shall not .swear by My
name falsely Thou shall not oppress thy neighbor, nor rob
him; the wages of a hired servant shall not abide with thee all
night until morning. Thou shalt not curse the deal, nor put a
stumbling-block before the blind ... Ye shall do no unright-
eousness in judgment Thou shalt not go up and down as a
talebearer neither shalt thou stand idly by the blood of thy
neighbor Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself" (Leviticus
192-18). "Ye shall be holy unto Me; for I the lxrd am holy, and
nau set you apart from the peoples, that ye should be Mine"
lUviticus 20.26).
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion ot the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History o the Jewish Heritage." edited by P. Wollman-
Tsimir SIS, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Line, New fork. NY 10038. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tnbutingthe volume.)
Bank Names North Bay Village Manager
Toni Western has been ap-
pointed North Bay Village
hranch manager tor Chase Feder-
al Saving;, .md Loan Association,
according to Charles L. Cle-
ments. Jr.. the thrift institution's
president
He-ton, who has been em-
ployed at Chase Federal for the
past 12 years, was previously a
les counselor at the Associa-
tions Hallnndale branch. She re-
M
t ira
Beth Dm OfliCR
01 Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
1532Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
fel 534 1004 or 672-0004
Bar/Bat
Mitzvah
RACHEL MENDELSSOHN
Rachel Susan Mendelssohn,
daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Seymour Mendelssohn, will be
called to the Torah as Bat
Mitzvah Saturday at 9 a.m. at
Beth David Congregation.
The celebrant is a student in
the Beth David Hey class and
attends Arvida Junior High
School where she is in the
seventh grade. She is active in
Student Council.
Mr. and Mrs. Mendelssohn will
host the Kiddush following the
servide in honor of the occasion
and a luncheon reception in Beth
David Congregation's Spector
Hall.
Special guests will include
Rachel's grandparents, aunts,
uncles, and cousins. Also to
attend are her brother. Michael
and friends.
DAVID BERGMAN
David M. Bergman, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Philip Bergman, will be
called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah Saturday at 9 a.m. at
Beth David Congregation. Rabbi
David Auerbach and Cantor
William Lipson will officiate.
The celebrant is a student in
the Zion class at Beth David and
a graduate of Beth David Solo-
mon Schechter Day School. He
currently attends Palmetto
Junior High School in seventh
grade and is also active in Beth
David Concert Choir and
Kadima. David takes piano
lessons and plays drums for
Palmetto Junior High School
Band.
Mr. and Mrs. Bergman will
host the Kiddush following the
service in honor of the occasion
and a reception Saturday evening
;it Beth David.
David's parents are active
members of the congregation,
where Mr. Bergman serves as
executive vice president, and
Mrs. Bergman is treasurer of the
sisterhood.
National Hebrew
Israeli Gift Center Inc.
ReligiousBar Mitzvah sets
Crystal'Gifts
1507 Washington Avenue
(305) 532 2210
Toni Weston
places Anthony J. Belotto, who
will become branch manager of
the bank's new Meadow lands
Shopping Center facility in Deer-
field Beach.
Chase Federal's North Bay
Village branch, located on North
Bay Causeway, is one of 21 re-
gional locations serving Dade,
Broward, Palm Beach, and
Martin counties.
HEAR
Rabbi Meir Kahane
Wed. April 27
Sandy Pay ton Show
WIOD6.10
10 a.m. -1 p.m.

Thurs. April 28,8 pm
Sky Lake Synagogue
1860 N.E. 183 Street
North Miami Beach

Thurs. May 5,10 p.m.
Israel Diary
Channel 2
FOR INFORMATION CALL: 532-0300
American &
Israeli
LARGE SELECTION OF
TALAISIM IN WOOL or RAYON
SEDURIM SKULL CAPS
Everything for all year around
Specializing in Bar Mitzvah Sets
I
We Have A Sofer
On Premises i
1357 WASHINGTON AVE.,
MIAMI BEACH
Phone: 531-7722
JUDAIC HISTORY
of America Medallions.
One of only 200 (est.)
complete sets in pure
silver. 120 one-oz. coins in
official books w. 120
descr. folders. 1975
acquisition cost $2340.
Make offer. 226 Scot-
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Fl. 32892.
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nd let me quote you
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Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting time: 6:28
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Frl.. Service Candlee6:30pan. Bat Mltmh.
Siaeay Wax.
Sal., Bar Mltmh. Scott Zucker.
Mktyone
Sun.. am and 5 pm
Men. thru Frl.. 7:30 am and 5 pm
Sat, 830 am and S pm
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
297? Avenlura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935 666 Conservative
David B. Saiizman. Rabbi
t awrence Tuchinskv Cantor
Frl, 8.15 pm. Rabbi Setbman: -laraaTa 36th Anrv>
wjntary. 28th Day ol Omar." Set 8:46 em
and 5 15 pm. Dally Sardeaa at 8 30 am
and&ISpm.
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Holfmnn, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate
Rabbi
Frl.. :15 pm. Rabbi Baumgard: "It Marrlege
Viable In Today'a Society?' Sat.. 9 15 am. Bat
Mltneh. Klmberty Qlaaar.
11:1 S am. B'nal Mltnah. Jonathan Aach a
Deborah Herman.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way: 262S S W 3rd Aenue
South Dade: 7500 S.W 120lh Street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Cede Chepel
Frl., I pm. Family Service
Sat.. 10 am. Junior Congregation Service.
Coral Way Sanctuary
Sat., 9 am. Shabbat Service conducted by
Rabbi Auerbach and Cantor Upton
Bar Mltnah. David Bergman.
BETH KODtSH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858 6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Sat 8 45 am and 5 pm
Su.l 8 em and 5 pr..
L.ill v Mmyen Sefv 7 45 am and 5 pn
TEMPLE BETH MOoHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rab'M Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gortinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Frl.. 8 pm, Servlcea. ij
Sat., S am, Senrlcea. Bar Mltnah, I
Scott Brady. Twilight. Bar Mltnah.1 '<
Cralg Qorme.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B. Fl. 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOeli
Chase Ave. & 41st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon "ronish. Rabbi Liberal
Cr ->tor David Conviser
Frl. 8 pm. m honor olTempteeaoth veer and
lereel Independence Dey. Coneul General
Joel Amen will epeea on "Thirty-Five Yeert
Latter." Set. 10:48 em. Sabbath Service
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zv*M Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Fn .5 15and8pm
Set. 8 Mem end 5 15 pm
((
I
BETH YOSESEPH
CHAIM CONGREGATION
Orthodox
843 Meridian Ave.
Dow Rozancwaig, Rabbi
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schltf
Executive Vic* President
Religious Inlormation
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone_. 576-4000
Rabb^mc^A^soc^aUwj^Mic^
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler, Cantor
Friday Evening Service
6 p.m.
Sabbath Morning Service
9 a.m.
Or. Lehrman will preech at 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
24C0 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
Miami s Pioneer Rmform Congregation
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami, 573 5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskell M. Bernat
Asst. Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Salkin
Cantor:Jacob G. Bornstein
Frl.. 8 pm. Downtown only, Rabbi Bemel:
"The Leeaona ol 3500 Yearn."
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frl., 8 15 pm, Worehlp Service. Chal Society
Dinner 6 15 pm. Adult B'nal Mltnah. Shabbat-
Ahare-Kedeehlm. Levltlcue 18 I 20 27
HaHarah-Amoa 97 15 Sat.. 11:15 am. Sabbath
Service. Bel Mltnah. Jami Paaekoft.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
EDWAPP BARON. Cantor
Frl. 7:30 pm
Set .9:30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sal. 9 am
TEMPLE NERTAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave..
Miami Beach 33141
RaLu. Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward ".lein
Frl.. 8:30 pm: Sat. 8:45 am
Dally morning tervlcea at 8 am
Sunday morning aervtcee at 8 30 an
Evening tervicee at 6 pm
SHAARAYTEFILLAH
of North Miami Beach
971 Northeast 172nd St.
North Miami Beach
651-1562
Yaakov Sprung, Rabbi
SHAARE TEF'LLAH OF KENDALL
15410 SW 75 Circle Lane
Miami. Fl. Modern Othodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 382-3343
Rebbi Speak a on Torah portion Saturday.
Fn.. 5 15 pm. Sabbeth Servicee
Sal 30 em and 5 30 pm Mlncha
Oelty Morning MMyane M 4 Th 8 45 am
T.W.F, 7em
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade'a Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kmgc>y, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Ufc15 pm, Worehlp S.
.waeh Giving end "veV
wettmtmwmnmtwwm minnf
Sa,ru^em,BerMtaveADaTenOenei.nd
1*7 15.
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Mlnyen Senrlcea Men. a Thure. 7 am
Sabbath Eve. Servtcee 8 15 pm
Sabbath Service, i
Queela Are Welcome
FA.* 18 pm.
of** Pew,*
e*e*>L
TO
R mosfejefjrtejer. mrooQn Ca>wwVmatk>n.
.

SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110NE183rdSt.N. Miami Beach, Ft 33182
947 80*4 Harold Wlahna. e.ecutWe director.
Franklin D. Kreutier. regional prealdenl
u7iiON OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Parti, 3785
NW 82 Ave., Suite 210, Miami, Fl.
33186. 592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Llttman, regional director


PageS-B "Hie Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22, 1983
Renee Brandes' musical portrait ofGolda Meir, "She's the Best
Man in My Cabinet," was presented recently at a Women's
American ORT, Southeastern Florida Region luncheon at the
Eden Roc Hotel. Pictured are Linda Washburn, soprano, who
plays Meir, and Pat Matthews, baritone, as David Ben Gurion.
Book and music were written by Brandes, who presents per-
formances at area temples and events.
Sunday Shopping At Publix
to Start This Weekend
Publix Super Markets an-
nounced last week that it will end
a 52-year tradition this Sunday
when its stores open for Sunday
shopping.
The employee-owned.
Lakeland-based food chain in-
dicated that loss of market share
to rivals was behind the move.
Publix s 245 stores, all of which
are located in Florida, will
maintain Sunday business hours
of 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
Commenting on the decision,
George W. Jenkins, company
founder, who established the
always-closed-on-Sunday policy,
slated, "Our company has
always tried to meet the wants
and needs of customers. This
decision, to open our stores on
Sundays is responding to that
commitment. Supermarket
customers, for any number of
reasons, have found it desirable
to have their food store open
seven days a week."
Mark Hollis, a Publix spokes-
man, said, "We believe that a
seven-day-a-week operation puts
us back in the dominant position
in the Florida market. Some
figures had indicated that our
share of the market was de-
creasing or that we were not
increasing our share."
Hollis said the company's
board of directors decided in
February to open its other food
chain. Food World, on Sundays
as an experiment. When that
deemed successful, it was decided
April 4 to break the Publix tradi-
tion.
He added that the chain's
30,000 workforce would remain
virtually unchanged.
ARMDI Confab to
Host Arnon, Dobin
A Spring Conference at Fort
Lauderdale Jewish Community
Center has been scheduled by
American Red Magen David for
Israel. Southeast District, to take
place Sunday, May 1 from 9:15
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Jerry Kamine
serves as conference chairman.
The conference will be attended
by ARMDI members from 24
South Florida chapters from
West Palm Beach to Miami
Beach. Topics to be discussed are
"Magen David Adorn: Its Mis-
sion. Service, and Future," "An
Appraisal of Israel at 35." "Israel
and Magen David Adorn: A View
from the Hill," and "The ABC's
of ARMDI."
Guest speakers will include
Israel Consul General Joel
Arnon, Rabbi Rubin Dobin, in-
ternational chairman of "Opera-
tion Recognition" for Magen Da-
vid Adorn, a congressman, and a
member of ARMDI's national
staff. -
Bob Schwartz serves as dis-
trict director.

Cedars Opens Headache
' ;. .:'
Treatment* Center
Cedars Medical Center has
established a hospital-based
Headache Treatment Center, Dr.
Allan Herskowitz, chief of
neurology, who is directing the
program, has announced. The
Center is designed to deal with
diagnosing, treating, and
managing various head and facial
pain.
"Our primary concern in
evaluating a headache," Dr.
Herskowitz stated, "is to rule out
an organic cause such as a tumor,
blood clot, or infection and to
pinpoint the cause. Then we seek
relief, whether the problem is
physical or psychological."
, Rosenblatt's Israeli Diary
To Host Kahane, Rabin
Stanley M Rosenblatt, host
and producer of WPBT-Channel
2's Israeli Diary, will interview
Rabbi Meir Kahane, contro-
versial founder of the Jewish
Defense League. Thursday
evening. May 5 at 10 p.m. Yit-
zhak Rabin, former Israeli prime
minister, will be featured May 12.
Each half-hour talk is filmed on
location in Israel.
Having attended both Univer-
sity of Florida in Gainesville and
University of Miami majoring in
political science, Rosenblatt went
on to graduate from University of
Miami School of Law. He is
currently an attorney with
Rosenblatt, Greene, Arnowitz,
and Roth in Miami.
An author of three books on
law, Rosenblatt has also ap-
peared discussing various legal
subjects on David Frost, Dick
Cavett, David Susskind, NBC
Monitor, and ABC's Good
Morning America programs.
He hosted his own television
program on law previously,
Within the Laic, and among
those he interviewed were former
Attorney General Ramsey Clark,
former director of the CIA,
William Colby. Watergate chief
counsel for the U.S. Senate. Sam
Dash, former Florida Supreme
Court Justice Arthur England,
former U.S. Senator George
McGovern. and former congres-
sman and ambassador to the
Unted Nations. Andrew Young.
Rosenblatt is chairman of
Miami Beach Mayor's Task
Force on Crime, serves as vice
president and director of Zachor
Institute for Holocaust Studies,
and formerly was a member of
Federal Judicial Nominating
Committee.
A special version of Israeli
Diary was airyd.nationally by the
Stanley M. Rosenblatt
PBS network in September!
Among Rosenblatt's guests have
been Shimon Peres, chairman!
and leader of Israel's Labor!
Party, former Defense .Minister!
Arid Sharon President Chaiml
Herzog. formerly Israel's!
ambassador to the United Statesj
and chief of military intelligence.
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy KoUek.l
Defense Minister Moshe Arensl
and Anwar Nuwibeh, formerly!
minister of defense of Jordan
Birth
Pioneer Miamiana Max
and Fdith Silver have an-
nounced the birth of a
grandson. Dana Shawn
Silver to their son and
daughter-in-law, Drs. David
and Francis Silver of Tampa.
The infant was horn April 14
at Women's Hospital in
Tampa, -lack and Rachel
Sandier of Miami are Dana
Shawns maternal grand-
parents
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runa Ilka a now car!
Slashed to
3995.
1975 Bulck Riviera
Oat ownor ear. se.ooo man.
SpHt Iron! mil Crulaa control.
Power wmoowa. Ooor lock*. THt
whe* Otharailraal
First Buyer With
1395.!
1979 Corvette
Only 33,000 Mil*.!
T-Top. etoroo-tepo. Powor
wtnaow*. Boc ooor lock*.
Crulaa control. TKI whoa).
Pr i lai, owned amco now.
Way Below The
Market at *9999.
1979 Ford Granada
Only 33,000 Miles!
Automatic ahML 6-Cylindar. Air
cond. Full powor. Aai/FM radio A
oaraged car amoe now by on*
ownor. Unbellevabla Condition!
A Bargain Price
For This Car!
s3695.
1979 Chevrolet Malibu
Cyl. 2 Or. Automatic. Air cond.
Full powor. AM/FM radio
Baeutrful clolh inl.rlor Rally
whoola.
Bargain Value!
3895.
100 OTHER CARS TO
CHOOSE FROM AT
SACRIFICE PRICES!
COMPACTS SUBCOMPICTS
liTElUIEDIATES FULL SIZE
CIDiLUCS-LIMOLMS
STATION WAGONS
CONVERTIBLES
1980 Ford Fairmont
r- 2-0r. Club Sedan
Arctic White. Economy 4 Cyl Air
cond. Full powor. Runa. lUro now!
Low Low Sale
Price s3695.
1980Cttev.
Citation Custom
frCyl. 4-0*. Automatic liana Air
oond. Full powor. Special Irt-lona
paint, immaculate!
Sacrifice s3995.
I960 Bulck Regal Limited
2 Dr. Sport Coup*. Economical
V*. Baautrrul 2 tone SpMt Iron!
Beet. Power wiooowe ooor
tocka TNI wheat. Btereo.
Great Buy
5995.
Immaculate
1980 Chev. Chevette
4-Dr. Hatchback
' Automatic Irana Air cond Tlntad
glut Radio Llka natlra
Priced to Sell!
*3195.
1979 Cadillac
Coupe da Villa
Valour interior Cabrlotetjo*
Low rallee. In parted ihowroom
condition'
Sacrifice! s7295.
1978 Chevrolet
Caprice Clasalc
40. aadan. Prl.atatj U
radlaia Yeu won't baHant u"
groat oondltlonl
Won't Last Long1
s3895.
EVERY CAR CARRIES PERSHING'S FAMOUS ALL-INCLUSIVE WARRANTY!
TRADES ACCEPTED BANK FINANCING ON THE PREMISES!
-7-*/Ay//AV
AUTO LEASING
1545 ALTON RD., MIAMI BEACH 532-5421
vmzjwsw*
is


-Homage to Janusz Korczak,". a bronze sculpture by Herzl
EmanueL
Sculpture Dedicated to UMDepicts
Trains Carrying Jews in Holocaust
"Homage to Janusz Korczak,"
I bronze sculpture commemorat-
lathe Holocaust by artist, Herzl
Emanuel. has been presented to
University of Miami by Dr. and
Mrs. Phillip Frost, art collectors
who live on Miami Beach.
Dedication ceremonies were
held Sunday in the breezeway of
Otto G. Richter Library, where
the 10-foot relief has been in-
filled. A reception followed in
Lowe Art Museum where current
exhibitions include works from
Frost's collection of American
Abstract Artists.
The sculpture donated to the
university depicts the trains that
carried millions of men, women,
and children to the death camps
of Nazi Germany. It also honors
Janusz Korczak, a Polish
physician, writer, and educator,
who, although having opportuni-
ties to escape the camps, chose
instead to remain with hundreds
of children in his care at Treb-
linka. Korczak was not Jewish.
Herzl Emanuel was born in
Scranton. Pa., but has- lived in
Rome, Italy, since 1962. After
studying in Paris for four years,
in 1W6 he returned to New York
City where he worked as a
sculptor on a Federal Art Project.
He was one of the founding
members of American Abstract
Artists. He has had many exhibi-
tions of his work here and abroad
and is represented in permanent
collections at Metropolitan Mu-
seum of New York, Israel Muse-
um in Jerusalem, and the Rose
Museum of Brandeis University.
Emanuel is currently in South
Florida for an exhibition of his
"ork at Bass Museum of Art on
Miami Beach through May 22.
That exhibition was also made
possible through the patronage of
the Frosts.
Arnon to Speak on
Israel's 35 Years
Consul General Joel Arnon will
speak on "Thirty-Five Years
Later" as part of an ongoing 40th
anniversary celebration of Tem-
ple Beth Sholom and in com-
memoration of Israel Indepen-
dence Day at Temple Beth
Sholom of Greater Miami,
Friday, April 22 at services at
8:15 p.m.
The consul general has served
Florida and Puerto Rico since his
appointment in 1982. Previously,
he was a member of Israel's mis-
sion to the UN. in New York. He
also served as deputy director
general with the ministry in
Jerusalem.
Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Talk on Nutrition Set
Nutritionist Daniel Tuyn, a
representative of Nutrition
Medical Centers in Hallandale,
will address a regular meeting of
Galil Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women Monday, May 2
at noon at Young Israel Synago-
gue, North Miami Beach.
Feature Comedy Movie
The Mad Adventures of
Rabbi Jacobs
Saturday, April 23 7:30 P.M.
Temple Zamora: 44 Zamora Ave., Coral Gables
448-7132
Adults $2.50 Children under 12 $1
Ogunquit, Main*
Box 418, Pine Ledge Motel,
reasonable Special rates two
weeks, month, season
apartments, suites. Bus rates.
Pool, quiet, lovely.
TfcMMM
a*!****
***
jH

OPEN ALL YEAR
RESERVE NOW FOR
SUMMER
REASONABLE RATES
New Indoor/Outdoor pools
Free Golf.Private Lake-
Elevator Service
Ciy .SuPervised Day
CampiTeenProflram.
N-Y.C. DIRECT WIRE
212244-3610
ftjgr.credit cards honored.
"Oner, General Manager
More People In
More Plaees Bank
WithUsThan
AnJIffik
tarnett
JanX
Mimtw FDIC
Barnett Bank of South Florida, N.A
Quality, Affordable
Dental Care!
Open Wide at
The Mall at 163rd Street
COMPARE and SAVE
Cleaning.......................$15
X-rays, examination & check-up 29
Silver amalgam (one surface).............. 14
While composite (one surface) 16
Regular denture (roll upper or tower) 249
Deluxe denture (lull upper or tower) 299
Patuei denture (acryhc)......................239
Partial denture (cast)..........................299
Full crown or cap (non-precious) 249
Single root canal................................. 99
(each additional root) ..................... 50
Orthodontics (braces) ...................... 1299
j^iSOpen Wide Special
Receive a regularly priced $29.00
thorough examination, x-rays
and check-up
Omni
FREE
Ventix*
The Mall ai 163rd Sl_
947-BS5S
o* np*m Mir 31. 1963
David R- Katz
D.D.S.. PA.
i mtmom oi
Omni)
Now Open Wide!
The Mall at 163rd Street
8:00am-9:30pm Monday-Saturday
12:00noon-5:00pm Sunday
*entix
Business Systems
<5>
305-947-6555
Also at: Boston, Dartmouth. Hyannis and Medford, Mass Ithaca, Utica and Glens Falls, New York
Soon At: Jacksonville and Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Chicago Virginia New York Rhode Island


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, April 22, 1983
cPtide
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD
APRIL 21-APRIL 27. 1983
WE REDEEM FEDERAL FOOD STAMPS
USDA CHOICE BEEF LOIN
Top
Loin
Strips
(SAVE 20 WHOLE OR
HALF IN
CRY-O-VAC
COMPARE
tLESS S.SKINLE!
CH< -
TMfbl
COMPARE
U S CHOICE
MICK
'HiCEb
COMPARE
^ COMPARE
... .
___________ '
Breast $^8 9 Cube $^8 9
Cutlets + Steak 4W
FAMILY PAK SECTION FROZEN
SAVE WHEN YOU BUY SEAFOOD
3 LBS. OR MORE
.....
ARROWTOOTH
'SON 12-OZ PKG
2
USDA CHOICE BEEF CHOICE BONELESS
Under-
Chkken$^99 blade $039
2
Fryer Breast .. 1.29 S Flounder $"139
r-i Fillet........lb J.
Pruor ThiriH QQ 10 S'NGlE'on fisherman ( I
Fryer High .99 i__J p|a|tor....... 3/79 [J
.........M M
.
Fryer Combo .. 1.19
s
PEPSI LIGHT,
MT. DEW, DIET PEPSI
PEPSI FREE, PEPSI
DELTA
BATH TISSUE
6 ROLL PKG
(SAVE 40C)
moii s-w!M Pulp
Prune Jui
U88v S-CHK*6N VI6NNA
,"^1.29
5 OZ
I C*N
.39
LIB6TS
Corned Beef
SONSMINt W1
Wafers......
BAG M 30 GAl
Trash Bags .
BAGM TAll- l GAl
Kitchen Bags
CAN 1 .39
BO
.99

bo 1.59
30
30 CT
BO
1.69
30
COMPARE fJ.l.TJll |g *"
piggpMI prices
PLANTERS I I
Cheese Balls .35 .99 Li^J
LS Bowl Cleaner 1.19 H
NEW 11KI I t) I
Dog Food.....'.2.19 LEJ
NA8ISCO-GREAT FOB SNACKS I----------1
Triscutts.....".Si 1.51 U*}
PANTO' PfllOl CUT |-. .
Or. Beans .. I"#51.00 OH
PANTRV PPJOt 100 CI BOX ______
Tea Bags........1.39 [*>]
COMPARE EBSBHJ ?StiT
Wl "ci
PAN'Rv PRICK IN Oil OR WATER SOIIO
While Tuna...^N .99
PANTRY PMiW ah vKrf 1A8U
Vegetable OH ^1.69
COMPARE gJJJJ
Check
THE SI
PRICES
PANTBl PHlDS PRINTt O OR PASTE I
. PKG >OV
Napkins
PANIRv PRI0E
1.49
PAN'R' PRIDE
Bleach...... '2*& .79
PftNTHY PHl0t GRffcN
Dish Detergent "fil .99
130J
?
Qo]
?
?
PANTR. PRK* ugmi or BMKOTJST M
......Scans l.VW
PANTRv PPJOE-' OZ .-.- .A
CoM Cupa...'0^ 1.49
PANTRY PWOf l/EQET ABIE OR
Tomato Juice .79
B^oy Diapers 6.99
KITTY WHITE BONUS PKG _
Cat Utter....,?e- .99
lil Al.il M
Spring Water "%> 59
JOJ
0
@
D
oil
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO Ml' ..iantiTii NO' HE'.! ONSlBll I I PI .hachi' Al ERRORS



YOUR CHOICE
FLORIDA
(SAVE 60)
i *:
Oim,- _
Grapefruit
LB.
BAG
Friday, April 22, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11 -B
cPtIde
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD
APRIL 21-APRIL 27, 1983
WE REDEEM FEDERAL FOOD STAMPS
LUCKY LEAF
64-OZ. BTL.
APPLE
JUICE
REGULAR OR NATURAL
REGULAR OR HICKORY
18-OZ. BOTTLE _____
open prr
BBQ SAUCE
FIRM RIPE
6 IN PACKAGE
SALAD SIZE
TOMATOES
CRISP AND CRUNCHY
3 LB BAG
RED DELICIOUS
APPLES
COMPARE
Cheez-lts
Muffin Mix..4lo.1i 1.00
Pretzels.....22& .89
WINES
Avia Wines 1.99
N. ML Wines
Carlo Rossi..
LiJ ffij Sour Cream.
I------1 HMFTSQueea r~i
Lil Parkay........SS> .89 Li2J
L^J Cream Cheese .89
COMPARE
PANTRY PRlO IOOS PURE GLASS JAR
Cni^K SAVE
these
PW ES
FlAVORFUl N '

FK(,
Lt tTAM
Gouda Cheese 2.99
5.39
03
Swiss'Cheese -. .99 HID
Herring...... .2.19 li2J
Cheese Singles 1.69 Li5J
30
Sunkist Lemons
>ONK ST NAVEL CALiFORNtA U P*C* I----------1
Oranges.....4.,, .89 Llj
Yellow Squash .29 LUD
.AHi.l Nl ... MJf >RNiA I----------1
Carrots........US .29 L]
>WE( t MING NORTHWEST LU 00 ' SAVE 10c
PANTR* PRIDE IOOS PURE GLASS JAR I-------I
Orange Juice.."':;. 1.99 l2J
I1 NORTHWEST EX >ANO '0 IN y/EARSAG- 10 I----------1
.79 M Delicious Apples .1.69 LJ
NO A, i PURPOSE
Anjou
Pears
White Potatoes .99 HD
ERESHlv Cu' ASVj'- (-----I
Floral Bouquet -1 69 [22\
FREEZE EM S EAT (v i i. o.- ACH I I
Otter Pops -; .99 LiJ
ADD ZEST "w _~AlADS (SAVE 59CI
California .PfA^
2/79
CORNED BEEF
ROUND
compare lasm ?$
""i"^ PMC
JW.I. ,, M pko
* Shells.... "pS .59
. P0E CHOPPED
SpocoB ....ass,i.oo
" Cor Dinners 2.49
l"RSBA,,o. ASSORIED
9*......."eG .59
Kl,cSJSr?"Svlr' SUPRtl*
aak. v-l-'WJ
Ph...... '^1.79
aii bc
GENERICS
'% .69
Bteach
2^' C ,.jMBO
Paper
rowels
Kitchen Bags .....: .79
Bat" Tissue... "'k',. .77
Tun* ..... .69
Frankfurters
I 1 MISSON CORN _, I ml
LJ3 Tortillas .... 2S LlPJ
KAHNS I ,n|
[g Braunschwekjer 1.39 L!J
_____. PANTRY PRK* ASSORTEO LUNCHEON f"onl
Qo) SNcsd Meats ".1.69 li9J
PANTRY PRIOe 12 O* P*G I Tftl
r-. Beef Franks 1.19 L^J
I *>1 HEBREW NATIONAL MIOGS T BOLOGNA ______
^Mk^et Salami 2.59 I I
0 health & beauty
AOLERS ASSORTEO
Dinner Rolls .79
A A C ITALIAN OK
French Bread.? .59
VELVET CHIME
Glazed Domrts *& .69
AIXt H S JEWISH ONION
Rye Bread ... 35? .89
Dl]
April in Paris
I mi fMNCHCHlfSi tOVfHS
favorite "WE Of VIA**'
COLGAT(-2St OFF LABEL REG TO? OR
MNTERFNESHOO fl, _
Toothpaste......"1.Z7
(Mil IW TRAVtl BTl MOOIHWASM|W
Scope.......... 3-67
Toothbrushes .. 2 1.00
Solid Deodorant 1.97
Body lotion..... 1-27
IN OUR SERVICE DELI
NOT AT AL1 STORES*
SOF' RlPENEL
DeHce De France 1.
OtP tV\4lD f I AVORMJi
Smoked Rambol 1.
i,mi am- HWTM RMI K
Gourmandise .. .l" ,
SMOO'H
Fropain Des Mages "51.
PRICK ) ?HANXJ
Cremeux........U!S1.
"I
PASTRAMI
ROUND
I 2 -LB
(SAVE 49e|
TURKEY BREAST B.LMAR ^ ^
OVEN BROWNED ^k 12 IB
(SAVE 29e|
compare |j@3 ,.::,;
NOT AVAILABLE IN ALL STOREs
HANSEL > GRETEL I----------1
..HrB1.39 Ijoj
THORN APPEE VALLEY OLO FASHIONED I I
Uverwurst......B1.79 lij
Bakery & Hot Foods
NOT AVAILABLE M ALL STOWS
LOADED WITH ONIONS I I
Onion RoMs .... .1.19 lioj
PLAIN BRAN OR BLUEBERRv I 1
Muffins........VSrI.10 W
CRISPY f "'"1
Italian Bread..... .69 LiJ
4th ANNUAL =
Miami Intml.
Culinary Show
Miami B.ch
Convention Canlw
Gi two f 3 SO lick.15 lor th pric* of on* at
lha gala Good only Friday. April 22 only with
Pantry Pnda SS.OO caari raglatar taps.
, TH( HM-.HT loUMIl '- NnTRF'.rnN-MI('rlWT,P(XiHA..HECAl RHOP'


Pag* 12-B The Jewish Ftoridian / Friday, April 22,1983
/
Mevaseret Zion
Education Center!
A group of American teachers
from all parts of the country,
together, in 1969 moved to
Mevaseret'Jerusalem. Israel, an
underprivileged community.
They became the American
founders of Mevaseret Zion
Education Center, a high school
for boys that eventually came to
also include on its premises a
high school for girls and a teach-
ing college as well.
A Miami-based group. Ameri-
can Friends of Mevaseret Zion,
sponsors fundraising efforts to
support the educational center,
which serves Iraqi, Kurdistani.
and North African students as
well as boys and girls from Jeru-
n ailn hi
The teachers pnae
themselves in teaching and hous-
ing children from broken homes,
orphans of the street, and under-
privileged children, providing
them a home and a trade.
Chairman of the board of
American Friends is David E.
Swartz; president, Rabbi Meir
Febnan; vice president, Norman
Bloom; secretary, Moe Grund-
werg; and treasurer, Abraham
Cohen.
A committee currently in
formation includes Sam Cohen,
Harry Ronick, Pater Goldring,
Louis Young, Dr. Arthur
Shapiro, Matthew Zuckerman,
William Gordon, Yehezkiel
Greenboim, Philip Bah, King
Rich, and Samuel Zabin.
Furnished One Bedroom
Apt* and Efficiencies
Walk to Temple, Shopping,
Buses, and Beach. In the 70*8.
Call For App 806-2814.
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No I3-IM34
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
LUIS E. QUINONES
Petitioner
ml
CANDY QUINONES
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CANDY QUINONES
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for Dissolution of
Marriage haa been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defense, If any, on
ROBERT M ZIEJA. ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, 633 N E
1*7 St., N.M.B., Fl 33162 on or
before May 20.1983, and file the
original with the clerk of this
court; otherwise a default will
be entered against you.
Dated: AprU IB. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
by K Self rled
As Deputy Clerk
l*MfcApnl 22. 28 May 6. 13, 1983
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT
COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
IN RE: The Marriage of:
HUGUES ST. CULUS,
PetlUoner-Husband
and
VIOLETTE ST. CULUS.
Respondent-Wife
To: VIOLETTE ST. CULUS
Residence unknown,
shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the PeUtlon for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attor-
ney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida, 33138, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before May 20, 1983, otherwise
a default will be entered.
April 19, 1983.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: M J Hartnett
18860 April 22.29;
May 8.13.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Ad-
Deiign at 870 N.W. 190 8t.,
Miami, Fla. 33189 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Rhonda Falchl, Owner
018848 April 22. 29; May 6, IS.
1983
I
&?;M
PHARMACY
'605 Waihmglon Avenue Juit Sou*h of lincoln Rood
NATIONAL BRANDS EVERYDAY PRICES 531 5583
M
Jergens
Extra Dry Lotion
Jergens
Aloe & Lanolin Lotion
15 oz.
2.
29
18 os.
2.
49
Shower to Shower
Body Powder Regular [ *fc*f 8 oz. 1.59
S/ 13 oz. 2.33
Shower to Shower fcj|
Body Powder Morning Fresh fogSA 8 oz. 1.59
^!i3oz.2.33
Stayfree ,
Maxi Pads Regular!
Super
30*3.59
30 s 3.59
Stayfree
Maxi Pad
12's
1.
56
O.B.
Tampons
30's
2.
66
Faultless
Goodhealth Water Bottle
Combination Syringe
Folding Syringe
Johnson & Johnson
Cotton Balls
Band-Aid
Brand Flexible Fabric
20's
1.
36
Band-Aid
Brand Tricot Mesh
30's
1.
79
Pepsodent
Toothpaste
8.3 oz.
1.
19
Aim
Toothpaste
8.2 oz.
1.
59
Signal
Mouthwash
32 oz.
2.
39
Wella Balsam
Shampoo
16 oz.
2#39
Wella
Kolestral Hair Dressing 4V* oz.
I.79
Pond's Cold Cream
Pond's
Essential Cleansing Lotion&
Make-up Remover
2oz.2.(
v/t oz. 3.091
6 oz. o. obi
Q-Tlps
Cotton Balls
130s
.99
Datril500
Capsule
50's
2.
09
Datril 500
Tablets
50s 1.83
ioos 2.99
Waldorf
Bathroom Tissue
4 Roll
1.
09
Soft & Pretty
Bathroom Tissue
4 Roll
la"
Sure
Anti-Perspirant Solid
2oz.
2.
2ft
Sure
Anti-Perspirant Roll-on
1.25 oz A
73
Sure O 89
Anti-Perspirant Aerosol 6oz.
2.
Scope
Mouthwash
40 oz.
Tampax
Tampons
4
3.
09
29


fivents Celebrated
Yom Hashoah
., ..-,vi-./; '.w--.v:.-'.{ '-.' "-
Friday, April 22, 1983 7 The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B


" 'T'--""'.-"" ':'
JK.'l^^al prajEgteB^^^^fl 1 1
1
1^ KB **.
81 IP'
. Eftr/ic/i and Dawid Kenigsberg participated inan inter-
Ztinnal candlelighting ceremony which memorialized the
W^uo\oclust !s part of a Yom Hashoah-Holocaust
iCrJ Pax program sponsored by Zachor Institute for
Wocaust Studies of Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Dramatic readings were among highlights of Yom
Wgshoah-Holocaust Memorial Day program, held at Miami
Mi Theater of the Performing Arts, Shown above, from left,
|rr ilrtwwttc reading performers, Jacob Solomon, Miriam
Vi/wrr and ')ebraOltchick.
i rfcsp/ov of ghetto and concentration camp currency, provided
Kfireater \lnmii Jewish Federation board of directors mem-
V<" Sidney Olson, and a lecture entitled "Forty Years After: A
prospective" presented ftv 'University of Miami Sociology
Wtofessor Abi Lavender, were offered as part of Holocaust
mlmition 11 eeh Shown above are. from left. Olson, Federa-
bniPresident Norman H. Lipoff, and Lavender.


Wrf \
S
Shir Ami Members to Perform Musical
Temple Shir Ami of West Ken-
dall will present "Sounds of the
Sixties" at South Miami Elks
Club Saturday. April 30 at 8 p.m.
The show will be an original
musical and pictorial tribute
created by temple members for
this fundraising event.
Toni Puhn, Rob Hardwicke.
and Leslie Mondshein will per-
form the songs, with Harriet For-
Public Notice
-. !
facje/ Abnimowitz, professor of Judaic Studies at University
IMMmmi. led a discussion at Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Com}
["unify Center as part of Holocaust Memorial Week, a program
[7 har Institute for Holocaust Studies of Greater Miami
{'wish Federation. Abramowitz is shown posing with sculp-
| WM created by Holocaust survivor, Jacob Sheiniuk, which
represented at the forum.
|l
31 YEARS ON 163rd STREET
FAMILY DENTISTRY |
Full Upper Denture...$50 & Up
DENTURES...............................FROM $50
H PARTIALS...... ...........FROM $75 |
LEANING.. .....FROM $20 I
EXTRACTIONS...... ...............FROM $15
| FILLINGS, CROWN, BRIDGES
i Jail For Appt. 1661 NE 163rd St.
| 9*0-6OOO North Miami Beach
| D*S.L RHODES, H. CHAMBERS, T.L CHEEPING
FLA. LICENSED
Minimum Fee May Vary Because of Complexity
In Any Given Case -^
'.'.. -This C\',','o:'"'-' mJ
SHOW Safe
4th Annual Miami
International
j CULINARY
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I MIAMI BEACH
! CONVENTION
fCWTFR
CENTER
Commissioner Alex Daoud
Daoud To
Seek Reelection
Miami Beach City Commis-
sioner Alex Daoud has an-
nounced that he will seek reelec-
tion to a third term. An attorney,
Daoud has also served as Miami
Beach vice mayor.
President of Miami Beach
chapter of American Federation
of Senior Citizens, Daoud has
often lectured before Hadassah.
Pioneer Women Na'amat. B'nai
B'rith. and synagogue and
church groups. He serves on the
hoard of governors of Barry Uni-
versity.
A native of Miami Beach.
Daoud is a member of Knights of
Columbus, American Zionist
Federation, and the Masons. He
also serves a? associate professor
of medical jurisprudence at St.
.(ieorge University School of
Medicine.
JND to Present
Paris Orchestra,
Isaac Stern
Orchestra de Paris will appear
in Miami under the auspices of
Judy Drucker's JND Concert
Foundation Prestige Series Arpil
j:i at 8 p.m. at Dade County Au-
ditorium Daniel Barenboim will
direct
The Foundation will also spon-
sor a performance by violinist
Isaac Stern on May 2 at 8 p.m. at
War Memorial Auditorium in
Fort l.auderdale. His appearance
will close the Prestige Series.
FRI. APR. 22 NOON-10P*
SAT. APR. 23 NOON-10PM
I SUN. APR. 24 NOON-7PM
* See & Enjoy Exciting Exhibits!
I Taste Exotic Foods &
I Beverages!
| Shop at Low Show Prices)
I Taste Fine Restaurant
Specialties!
I BRING THIS AD FOR 50* OFF
| REGULAR ADULT ADMISSION
I
!
I
I
Only One Discount Coupon
Emission
Get TWO $3.50 Tickets
for The Price of One,
Good All Day Fri., Apr. 22
with a $5 Receipt from
GRAND UNION. PANTRY
PRIDE or WINN DIXIE!
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Division No. 83-1 W It
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
BESSIE D CALBUT. Trustee.
Plaintiff,
-vs-
BLANCHE CHEPOTE-RUIZ.
Defendant.
TO: BLANCHE CHEPOTE-
RUIZ
Malecon Armendorlz 271
Edlflclo Brlsas
Marinas DPTO 2 A
Lima 18
PERU.
SOUTH AMERICA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an Action to Fore-
close a Mortgage on the follow-
ing described property In Dade
County. Florida:
Condominium Unit Num-
ber 302 of JEFFERSON OAR-
DENS CONDOMINIUM. INC.,
a Condominium according to
the Declaration of Condomi-
nium thereof, filed for record
December 27. 1979 In Official
Records Book 10611 at Page 160
and subsequent amendment
thereto, of the Public Records
of Dade County. Florida to-
gether with proportionate undi-
vided shares In the common
elements appurtenant thereto,
as established In said Declare
tion of Condominium,
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any. to It on ABRAHAM A.
UALBUT. ESQUIRE, Attorney
for the Plaintiff, whose address
i 999 Washington Avenue.
Miami Beach, Florida. 33139.
on or before May 20, 1983, and
file the original with the Clerk
of this Court either before serv-
ice on Plaintiff's attorney or
immediately thereafter, other-
wise, a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the Complaint.
WITNESS MY HAND and
Seal of this Court on this April
20.1983.
RICHARD P BR1NKER
As Clerk of the Court
By: M J Harlnett
Deputy Clerk
Abraham A. Ualbut, Esq.
Attorney for Plaintiff
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone 13051672-3100
18651 April 22. 29:
May 6.13. 1983
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 33 520
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ROBERTA KATZ,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The admlnlstraUon of the es-
tate of ROBERTA KATZ, de-
ceased. File Number 83-520
(01), Is pending in the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 73 Weat Flag
ler Street, Miami. Florida.
33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentatlve and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any obJecUon by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualm
rations of the personal repre-
sentaUve, venue, or Jurtsdlc-
Uonof the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 22, 1983 In the
Jewish Floridian.
Personal RepresenUiUve:
Mr. J. Seymour Kati
420 Fayette Street
Perth Am boy.
New Jersey 08861
Attorney for Personal
RepresentaUve
Sanford A Freedman, Esq.
12700 Riscayne Boulevard
410
North Miami, FL33J
rester. Helen Goldstein Peter
Manheimer. Steve and Brenda
Meyerson, Michael Puhn. Doug
and Susan Rader. Robert and
Suey Vengoechea. and Jack
Yesner filling out the cast. I- rank
Forrester developed a slide show
that will also be featured.
" INTHWCIUCUTTCOORTOF
. THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 13-5*44 FC
NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
KATHY REASONS,
PeUUoner. Wife
and
FLOYD S. REASONS.
Respondent. Husband
YOU FLOYD S. REASONS,
residence unknown. ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED TO
FILE your written response to
this acUon for dlssoluUon of
marriage, with the Clerk of the
above Court, and serve a copy
upon Petitioner's Attorneys.
SAUL T. VON ZAMFT and
SAMUEL E SMITH. 1320 S.
Dixie Highway. Suite 850. Coral
Gables. Florida 33146, on or
before the 2th day of April.
1983, else the Petlton for
DlssoluUon of Marriage will be
taken as confessed
DATED: March 23.1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
By: C.L. ALEXANDER
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
18574 April 1.8.16,
15.22. 1983
--------INTHE CIRCUTTTOURT
FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NUMBER 83 47
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SADIE FRIEDFELD.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT1
FIED that the admlnlstraUon
of the estate of SADIE FRIED-
FELD. deceased. File Number
83-87. Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Dade County. Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which is 73 West Flag-
ler Street, Miami. Florida The
personal representative of the
estate is Hilda Prager whose
address is 4101 Pine Tree
Drive. Miami. Florida and
Corlnne Moskovlts whose ad-
dress Is 3054 North Bay Road.
North Miami, Florida The
name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
suited. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be suited. If the claim Is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed art) required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OP
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quali-
fications of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the flrat publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion April 22.1988
Hilda Prager
and
Corlnne Moskovlts
As Personal RepresentaUve
of the Estate of
Sadie Frledfeld
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Daniel Retter, Esquire
AmertFlrst Building.
Suite 2250
1 Third Avenue
hi, Florida 1
1'ione i MB1 jv; wa


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. April 22, 1983

Rabbi Leff to Make Aliyah; Navon Warns of 'Divisions'
Will Lead Israel Moshav Sees Dangerous Religious-Secular Schisi
Rabbi Zev Left, who for the
past nine years has served as
spiritual leader of Young Israel of
Greater Miami in North Miami
Beach, has been named Rov of
Moshav Matityahu, an Israel co-
operative settlement organized
one-and-a-half years ago in
Shomron, Israel.
Rabbi Leff will make aliyah in
July together with his wife,
Rivkah, daughter of Mr. and
Mrs. Murray Minkoff of Fort
Lauderdale, and their four
daughters and four sons.
Born in New York in 1947, the
rabbi was raised in Miami and at-
tended Hebrew Academy of
Greater Miami and Mesivta High
School. His parents, Mr. and
Mrs. Paul Leff. have been resi-
dents of North Miami Beach for
28 years.
Rabbi Leff is a Musmach
graduate of Telshe Yeshiva in
Cleveland, Oh. and was a member
of Kollel Post-Graduate Division
of Telshe for six years. While
living in Cleveland, he also
taught at Hebrew Academy of
New Home Satellite
To Open in June
Construction on the first phase
of a new satellite facility of He-
brew Home and Hospital for the
Aged in North Miami Beach is
nearing completion. Developers
said they expect occupancy of the
first phase, for 76 residents, by
early June. Reservations are
currently being accepted.
The new four-story building,
which will eventually house 212
residents, is located adjacent to
Samuel and Corrine Kraver
Pavilion
The residence, to be named
after Anna and Morris New-
mark, will offer two types of resi-
dency, according to Sidney
Siegel, executive vice president of
the facility.
Temple Bet Breira
Sets Agenda
Rabbi Lewis C. Littman. re-
gional director of Southeast
Council and South Florida Feder-
ation of Union of American He-
brew Congregations and former
rabbi at Bet Breira congregation,
will present a guest sermon at
Bet Breira Friday, April 22 at
8:15 p.m.
An Intermarriage Forum will
be held in the Temple Social Hall
Wednesday, April 27 at 8 p.m. A
panel discussion to focus on
concerns and questions of inter-
marriage and how the synagogue
can be of assistance will be fea-
tured.
The temple will hold a Shabbat
service for teens Friday, April 29.
Christie Drama Closes
Players State Season
Players State Theatre's 1982-
83 season closes with Agatha
Christie's courtroom drama,
"Witness for the Prosecution," to
run through May 8. For four con-
secutive seasons. Players State
has produced Agatha Christie
works, including "Ten Little
Indians," "Go Back for Murder,"
and "Black Coffee."
"Witness for the Prosecution"
is the story of a young man,
Leonard Vole, played by Daren
Kelly, accused of murdering an
elderly woman who had be-
friended him.
Rabbi Cantor
Excellent speaker, beautiful
voice, seeks position for High
Holydays or Yearly. Conduct
complete service. Apply Box
NORC, Jewish Floridian, P.O.
Box 12973, Miami, Fla 33101
Rabbi Zev Leff
Cleveland. Mesivta High School,
Yavne Teachers Seminary, and
Machon Teachers Institute.
Under the rabbi's leadership.
Young Israel of Greater Miami
congregation doubled its size and
dedicated a new building. Rabbi
Leff served as a vice president of
Orthodox Rabbinical Council of
Florida, helped found and de-
velop Toras Ernes Academy Day
School, and served on the
presidium of Mesivta High
School.
He is Florida representative of
Kosher Supervision Service and
director of the Miami branch of
Jewish Learning Exchange of
OhrSomayach International.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
President Yitzhak
Navon has warned that the
divisions between religious
and secular elements is the
most dangerous internal
threat to Israeli society to-
day. The two groups are
growing further apart, he
said.
Navon. who will retire when his
five-year term ends next month,
expressed his views in radio and
television interviews on the
occasion of Independence Day.
He said he wondered why
education had to be segregated
from kindergarten on between
religious and non-religious Jews.
Such subjects as mathematics or
geography need not be taught
separately. "There is no such
thing as religious mathematics,"
he said.
NAVON SAID the ethnic gap
between Sephardic and
Ashkenazic Jews is narrowing
perceptibly thanks, among other
thiqgs, to intermarriage between
fe .v gr0UP"- He P
that the gap wUl disappear,
relatively short time. ThT
dent urged
tolerance.
greater politi
Premier Menachem Begin
called for mutual respect
among friends and rivals'- in hi
Independence Day message lij
he devoted much of his address ]
ruling out a freeze on settlemJ
on the West Bank as urired
President Reagan.
He claimed the settlema,
were not only legal but a vit]
element of Israel's security.
Bad Weather Dampens Anniversary Day Celebration
Continued from Page IB
in some quarters did not occur.
Peace Now circles said that
they had achieved some suc-
cess because the dedication of
Beracha. touted as a Stale event
and the centerpiece of this year's
Independence Day celebrations,
was. held under "semi-secret''
conditions. It was not clear
whether this was dictated by the
presence of large numbers of pro-
testors or by the heavy rainfall
and high winds.
LATER, Jewish settlers
reportedly drove through Arab
towns with Israeli flags flying
from their cars and large color
portraits of Begin on their rear
windows. But the territory as a
whole remained quiet in contrast
to the recent weeks of almost
daily clashes between stone-
throwing Arab youths and Israeli
security forces and settlers.
Independence Day festivities
began in Israel Sunday night,
before the weather turned foul.
Tens of thousands of young
people thronged the main streets
of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv, Haifa
and other towns. dancing.
singing and watching troupes i
performers on temporary stag
erected on sidewalks.
But the downpour Mondl
forced tens of thousands of I|
raelis to cancel their picnics :
outings to the countryside
seashore. Nevertheless, mi
braved the elements to vi
army, navy and air force ba_
which were opened to the publj
for the occasion. An estimate
50,000 persons visited the nav
facility at Ashdod and thousand
of Jerusalemites toured the N'evj
Yaacov artillery base
We want to'give you three words of
wisdom: Old is Smart. We've seen it
all in our lifetimes marriages and
children, wars and depression. The best of times, and the worst.
When it came to pre-arranging our funerals, we wanted to be sure of ourselves.
Each of us wanted to know exactly where the money was going and what it
was paying for. We wanted to know that everything would be covered, and
that there would be no extra "incidental" costs. That meant funeral, grave,
clergy, newspapers everything. And we wanted to be able to get all our
money back if we ever needed it.
So, we looked at Riverside's Guardian. We all shopped around, and we found
that the first such guarantee in Florida every time, no matter what is at
Levitt-Weinstein. Period.
Every day, more and more of us are discovering the Levitt-Weinstein
Guaranteed Security Plan?* And, do you know what? Once we sign up, we feel
more secure and at ease. We feel very smart. How do you feel?
Florida's first total pre-need package is the
Levitt-Weinstein Guaranteed Security Plan.'
Gel smart. Get your Guarantee. Call us for an Appointment Today!
SM
Hollywood
1921 Pembroke Rd.
305/921-7200
West Palm Beach
5411 Okeechobee Blvd.
305/689-8700
Serving Jewish families since 1900
Memorial Chapels
Florida's Most Trusted, Respected Family Funeral Homes.
North Miami Beach
18840 West Dlnie Highway
305/949-6315
Pompano Beach
7500 N. Stale Road Seven
305/427-6500
W.

.-s .r. _
JK
--


Friday, April 22, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Pa^f 1 ?>-B
} ayajiiSy.'- ti\*i
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue Miami, Florida
j^

-

m*r
\beseiged Kibbutz Ramat Rachel during Israel's 1948 War
lependence. Ramat Rachel was attacked in 1929, 1948 and
'. Now rebuilt and flourishing, the kibbutz is well known for
wist facilities.
Kibbutz That Still Goes On...
Continued from Page IB
d nude junction with the Arab
force battering it from
it tnd north."
|Wih the war won, forty
__j came back to the site.
'i&. a strong push from the
Wish Agency, land was
irhawd and the site and farm
ivdoped. Still opposite a
Jrdanian outpust, Ramat
ichel had its share of diffi-
llies, but it was not until June
11967 that enemy shelling once
ntook its toll '
|"JORDANIAN shells and
mbs rained on our settlement
\two days." reports Katz. "A
t hit by a Jordanian shell
moved the kibbutz dining
i Those too young or too old
Ifight spent over 50 hours in the
piers, and despite the sound
W of the Jordanians, the ls-
forces and the kibbutz
suffered heavy losses. Alto-
gether, 30 Israeli soldiers and 11
kibbutzruks were killed in the
Six-Day War.
Once again the survivors of
Ramat Rachel began to pull
themselves together to rebuild
their lives and homes. The settle-
ment's fourth dining room was
constructed. Israeli kibbutz
groups settled in Ramat Rachel,
and it has become home for
young pioneers from all over the
country. Youngsters finishing
their army service have married
and stayed on the kibbutz.
Today, more than 100 mem-
bers and 135 children live at
Ramat Rachel. It is still growing
but needs more people. Just as
Jerusalem apartments are edging
closer and closer to the kibbutz.
so the building activities of
Ramat Rachel are increasing all
the time.
We'll Do What's RightReagan
|CoMinued from Page 1-B
bombing. Reagan said
navel added his "firm deter-
Uon that we |>ersevere in the
1 for peace in that region," a
mnation Keagan said he
pnded.
This criminal attack on a
malic establishment will not
w us from our goals of peace
V*"0." Reagan said. "W
Jwwhat we know to be right.
ssadors Habib and Draper,
' > presently in Beirut, will
">ue to prt.b.s the negotia-
tor earliest possible total
*awal of all external forces,
r *1 remain committed to
"*very by the Lebanese
J"M of full sovereignty
.** all of its territory.
^People of Lebanon must be
,, ?"jee to resume their ef-
!lead a normal life, free of
wit-hout the presence of
,th0"*Kl foreign forces on
teal Estate Program Launched
their soil. And to this noble end I
rededicate the efforts of the
United States."
YITZHAK SHAMIR. Israels
Foreign Minister, said on ABC-
TV. that he was shocked by the
bombing, declaring, "It's horri-
ble, it's horrible." He added that
the attack "explains to a certain
extent our caution, our worries
about security problems in Leba-
non." He spoke via satellite from
Tel Aviv.
Asked whether he felt the
bombing would affect the out-
come ot the talks between Israel
and Lebanon on withdrawal of
Israeli troops from Lebanon, a
goal about which he said "I think
we are close," Shamir said he did
not think the Embassy attack
would complicate the talks. On
the contrary, he said, "we have to
work more closely in more efforts
to reach an agreement."
Li P, m*ke more dollars
Cf for. Florida real estate
Jefferson National
lT%& a Program to
tM*J^,1M million in wrap-
Nb,^rtgageloansforapart-
Kd,"gS'indu9trial parks,
Ejtllcent- and office
g* throughout the state.
"thur H n
Kboarri Lurshon. chairman
t "ft? i S bank which
Kndy Mmi "each,
~e, .........
lesign
agent for the wrap-around
mortgage program by American
Wrap Mortgage Company.
Courshon said, "Loans offered
under this program start at
$500,000 and could go into eight
figure amounts, depending upon
the project. Discussions with
potential borrowers indicate that
there is a sizeable market for this
type of financing for those who
want to free-up equity that has
accrued in the rapidly appre-
ml iininin *"* "*
'-d as
Simula
Florida
TYLENOL
Maximum Strength
Sinus
Medication
Tablets
24s
2.
49
LUBRIDERM
LOTION
1 For Dry Skin Care
Lubriderm
lotion
Scented
& Unseen ted
SO 69
8 OZ. Mm-
a 69
16 oz.
$4.
BRm.TZER
For Acid
Indigestion
& Headache
LUBATH
Bath Oil
CORN
HUSKERS
Lotion
Heavy Duty
Hand Treatment
59
J 7oz.$1.
MISS
BRECK -
AEROSOL
HAIR SPRAY
9oz.
$1.
69
uce
Stick
Deodorant
2Voz
$4 09
4.25 oz.
49
-2Jtt
M.
!Z!L
LISTERINE
Breath Freshener
Regular
Mint
.5oz.
^ l\0X
IVORY
Soap
4
Personal
Size
Bars
r / Aprlc
+H
M^
Apricot
Replenishing
Lotion
^3oz. O-
Cream
2oz.
$389
SHY
Feminine
Syringe
s4.
95
LUBRIDERM
CREAM
Lobriderm Cream
Scented
4oz.
S3_49
99'
ANTI-PERSPIRANT/DEOOORANT
2oz.
$2.19
SAFEGUARD
Deodorant Soap
Beige
BRECK*
SHAMPOO IN HAIRCOLOR
HKKK
7oz.
(Jteauhfuf Wail
BRECK'
n SHAMPOO
15oz.
Normal
and
Dry
S1aB0
BOUNCE
Fabric Softener
For the Dryer
sfe
40'S
Regular & ~0 2q
Unscented *Z.
COMET
Cleanser
21 oz.
nil 69
GOIOIN
Listerex
Scrub
LISTEREX
SCRUB
Medicated
Lotion
Regular
y8oz.
$2.6
MISS
BRECK
Pump
Hair Spray
8oz.
S2.39


i'age 16-B The Jewish Kloridian Friday. April 22, 1983
<\
Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-16947
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ROLANDO RUBI.
Petitioner Husband
and
MARIA EUGENIA RUBI.
Respondent Wife
TO: MARIA EUGENIA RUBI
Resldenclal Don Boeco
No E311
Managua, Nicaragua
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action tor
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed agalnat you and you ,
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to '
It on ALBERT L. CARRI-
CARTE, PA., attorney for
Petitioner, whose adresa Is 2491
N.W. 7th Street. Miami.
Florida 33138. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 2. 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse-
cutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28th day of
March. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: N.A HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
lCircuit Court Seal)
ATTORNEY FOR
PETITIONER:
ALBERT L CARRICARTE.
PA.
2491 N.W. 7th. Street
Miami. Florida 3312fi
Telephone (800)648-7917
18684 April 1,8:
IB. 22. 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 83-10447
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
MARINA COREA LOPEZ,
Petitioner-Wire,
vs.
OSCAR A. LOPEZ. *
Respondent-Husband
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAOE
TO:
Oscar A Ixipez
Recomendado Nee tall Corea
Slguatepeque. Barrio Arrlba.
Honduras
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution (1 your Marriage
has r>eer filed and corr.rr enced
In thil (our- :i-i! you a'e
required to serve h t oi your
*t liter :: ^ |, ;c it on
I del PINO, attorney for
Ml -st --.
VII
it raved
the i rrpiair ; cr petition
rhu Not : snail be
published oner sacr ween for
four I "<>nse, _:. e weeks in
the .'E ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS t\ nar.d and the
seal ol said Court at Mlam.
F\or.f.a on this 24th d >f
Man h iH3
RICHARD P BRINKS .
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
By M.J. HARTNET
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal i
ATTORNEY FOR
PETITIONER.
R A del PINO E9Q
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 381S6
Telephone: (3061649-4411
18878 April 1.8.
18. 22. 1983 ,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 63-12638
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JORGE MEZA.
Husband- Petitioner
and
MAOOLA MEZA.
Wife Respondent
TO: MAGOLAMEZA
171 8th. Ave. Apt. 3
Paterson. Jew Jersey
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
PA., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 2491 N.W. 7th
St.. Miami. Florida 33128. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before May 6. 1983. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8 day of April.
1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC. P Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
Albert L Carrtcarte. P.A.
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33128
Telephone: (308) 649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
18608 ApiilS, 18. 22.29.1983
NOT UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS .HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name DAST
LEASING COMPANY at 999
Washington Ave. Miami
Beach. Fla. 33139 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
JEFFREY LACKOWTTZ
Owner
UALBUT. UALBUT* MENIN
Attorneys
18673 April 1,8,16.
______________ 23, 1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
CATALINA SHOES at 319 N.W.
26 St Miami, Fl 33137 Intends 'o
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
INTERESTED PARTY:
CATALINA SHOE
CORPORATION
By: MIRONGUTSTEIN.
President
DEL-VALLE A NETSCH. P.A.
Attorneys for Catallna Shoes
18876 April 1. 8.18,
23.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
HOLYBA ENTERPRISES,
CO at 1811 N.W. 19Terr. No. 4.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
REINOLOLrVA
1811 N.W. i9Tarr No. 4
Miami. Florida
18603 ___April 8. IB. 22. 29. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
NO PROPERTY!
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
C:VIL ACTION
NO 83-11341
ACT.ON FOB OlSSOl. T'0N
3F varr:age
' i '- PHI MAI H.' \.., p
\f H*
tltltll A u
<:
UJ EEN
i Husbard
TO ALFREDCRFEN
:2h Rose Mont
Toronto Canada
M6E 1B2
YOL ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on GEORGE T RAMANI.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 711 Blscayne Bldg .
19 West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
May 30. 1983: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 14th day of
April. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: N.A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seall
GEORGE T. RAMANI
711 Blscayne Bldg.
12 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
18636 April 22. 39:
May 6,13. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83 1*18
FAMILY DIVISION (FC 24)
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
KATHLEEN ANN GORE
Petitioner Wife
and
WALTER EVERETT GORE
Respondent-Husband
TO: Walter Everett Gore
812 King Richard Drive
Virginia Beach. V. 23482
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
KRAMER A GOLDEN, PA,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Blscayne Centre
Building. Suite 203, 12000
Blscayne Boulevard. North
Miami. Florida 33181, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before May 20. 1983: otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 18th day of
April. 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By D.C.BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ATTORNEY FOR PETI-
TIONER:
SANFORD H KRAMER
KRAMER A GOLDEN, P.A.
Blscayne Centre Building
Suite 203
12000 Blscayne Boulevard
North Miami, FL 33181
18646 April 22. 29;
__________________May 6,13.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(WITH PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-1772 (36)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ELEANOR ANDRE'
NEWMAN.
Petitioner,
and
GEORGE F. NEWMAN.
ESPERO.
INC.. and ALMOND. INC..
Respondents.
TO GEORGE F NEWMAN
c-o Cricket Club
1800 N.E. 114th Street
Miami. Florida
YOL" ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and vou
are required to serve a ropy of
vour written defenses :(any. to
t m STANLEY M
EM M \KK attorney lor f-eti
'inner nose address li 9400
i nth adeland Boulevard
i* Miami, Florida i
i original with the
er*
>n or Before April J9. :983
n lse a default will Be
red against vou for the
eue( demanded in the com-
.unt or petition
T"his nonce snail be published
I each week for (our con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 29th day of
March. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for PeUtioner:
STANLEY M NEWWARK
9400 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 300
Miami. Florida 33186
Telephone: (308)688-9776
18688 April 1.8. 18.33. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
GLOBAL ENTERPRISES at
10698 N.W. South River Drive,
Medley. Florida 33178 Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
SOUTHEAST BONDED
WAREHOUSE, INC.
BY: TONY NAPOLI,
President
GARYP COHEN ESQ.
Attorney for Applicant
18811 ; 7J 39-
Ml ( 1VFI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIOA
PROBATE DIVISION
Fit* Number 63-78*4
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SARAH M. GREENSPOON.
Deceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of SARAH M.
GREENSPOON, deceased.
Pile Number 88-3896, is pending
In the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130 The personal
representative of the estate) Is
MAURICE R. GREENSPOON,
whose address Is Suite 1836,160
S.E. Second Avenue. Miami.
Florida 33131. The name and
address of the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is se-
cured, the security shall be de-
scribed. The claimant, shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this "
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the quail
flcatlona of the personal rep-
resentative, or the venue or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Adminis-
tration: April 18. 1983
Maurice R Greenspoon
As Personal Representative
Of the Estate of
SARAH M GREENSPOON
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
SILVER* SILVER
By IRA SILVER
IMS E Second Ave Suite 1328
Miami Florida 33131
i prone i 3061 874-4881
18613 -I' .5 22 '.983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
INO PROPERTY'
N THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIOA. IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
No. S2-UI94-FC 4
ACTION EOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of.
GRACIELA ALAMILLA
ALARCON
and
RODOLFO ALARCON
TO Mr. RODOLFO ALARCON
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
RAFAEL SILVA. Esq., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 1018 Capri St, Coral
Gables, Florida, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
May 13. 1983: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week tor four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8th day of April
1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByB.J Foy
As Deputy Clerk
Attorney tor Petitioner
Rafael Sllva
1018 Capri Street.
Coral Gables. Florida 33184
1M' April IB 32 39
Mi > 1988
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROVATE DIVISION
File Number 63-2466
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX CWANGER
Doceased
NOTICE
OF ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of MAX CWANGER,
deceased, File Number 83-2988,
Is pending In the Circuit Court
tor Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which is 78 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida S8180.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to file with this court
WTTHUJ THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom this
notice was mailed that chal-
lenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT 80 FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April 18,1988.
Personal Representative:
FRIEDA CWANGER
16701 N.E. 18th Ave.
(Apt. UJ)
No. Miami Beach.
Florida 88162
Attorney tor Personal Rep-
resentative :
JOSHUA S. GALTTZER
638 N. E 167th Street (Suite 619)
No Miami Beach, Florida
SSI 63
Teleohone: (806) 668-8886
_____ April 18, 23, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
No 83 1304*
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
IBRAHIM LOPEZ.
Husband-Petitioner,
and
ELS A MONTE RO LOPEZ,
Wife-Respondent.
TO: ELBA MONTERO LOPEZ
Calle 306 No. 1606
Santa Fe
Marianao.Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
P.A. attorney tor Petitioner,
whose address Is 2491 N W 7th
St.. Miami. Florida 33126. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before May 20, 1983: otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
"ea. ol said court at Miami
lorlda on this 13 day of Apr..
M
ICHARDP BRINKER
U i"!erk Clr< ill <"ourt
dv N A Hi well
As Deputy Clern
ILBERT L. CARRICARTE
i" A
2491 VW 7th Street
Miami. Florida33128
306 649-7917
Attorney for PeUtioner
18627 April IB. 22.29:
May 6,1983
NOTICE OF ACTli
CONSTRUCTIVE^'
(NO PROPERTY? 'i
!N THE CIRCUIT coVln>J
THE ELEVENTH JU0,a.1
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOi 3
ANDFORDADE0C"05*.^
Civil Action No. M.,,^
FAMILY
CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE^FOR BBfflrj,
OF MARR|AGE '"
TORE: The Marr,.*"
POORANDATH^
RAMKISSOON
PeUtioner,
and
BIANCA I. RAMKI8800N
Respondent.
TO:Blancal Ramklssxr,
_ "S""" Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY I
FIED that a petition for L
lution of your Marriage
been filed and commenced 1
this court and you are rtqu
to serve a copy of your
defenses, If any, to It on b
E. Stone; Stone. Sostchln
Gonzales. P A 1401 w Fk
ler Street. Ste. 201 ]
Florida 33138. attorney I,
titloner. whose address I
stated above i. and fllethi
lnal with the clerk of the luu
styled court on or before Mi
13. 1983; otherwise a defatf
will be entered against you |
the relief prayed for In
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be publl
once each ween for four .
secutlve weeks In THE JEI
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand i
seal of said court at _
Florida on this 7 day of /
1683.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Fionas
By DC Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
David E Stone
Stone. Sostchln*
Gonxalet. P.A
1401 W. Flagler Street,
Ste. 301
Miami, Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18618 April 18,22 1
Msye.l*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 63 11602
HEN QEIBINCUCR
Petitioner-Plaintiff
and
AUGUSTO MONSALVE and
LOLAMONSALVE
Respondent-Defendants
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: AUGUSTO MONSALVE
and
LOLA MONSALVE
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for specific per-
formance of a Contract and
Damages has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. on
ROBERT M. ZIEJA, ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner. 633
N.E.. 167 St.. N.M.B.. FL 33162
on or before May 6, 1983. and
file the original with the clerk
of this court; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you.
Dated April 4.1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk
Hy: C P COPE LAND
As Depulv Clerk
-*< A- '< IB 22 29 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE |
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOfl
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL!
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 83-12859
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION |
OF MARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CE MANES RAPHAEL,
Petitioner-Husband,
and
CLARETHA RAPHAEL
Respondent Wife
TO: CLARETHA RAPHAEL
Respondent
Address and Resldenct|
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-I
FIED that an action for!
Dissolution ol Marriage nail
been filed against you andyoul
are required to serve a copy oil
your written defense. If any. iol
It on LLOYD M ROl'TMAN P
attorney (or Petitioner whow|
IS IS 1*1 N E -ir.d Street [
Sao nd Flooi Miami Florida!
33138 and fill i nsinsi"*"!
p soovi
i i
pfsull
I
once earn ween (or I
.( ilive week! n THE JEW
ORII IN .
WITNESS n '. nand and ttw |
seai .1 SBld ourt a' M<>1
Florida on Uua '.iui W 0,|
April. ID83.
RICHARD P BRINKER
*s Clerk Orrult Court
; adeCountv Florida
By N A HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal'
Attorney for Petitioner
LLOYD M ROITMAN. ESQ_
181 N.E 82nd Street. Second |
Floor
Miami. FL33138
Telephone: 1306, 757-8800
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA"
NOTICE IS HEREB1
GIVEN that the undersigns
desiring to engage In busine-
under the fictitious nam.
DIASAIX8WdRSIatMN.M
1st Avenue, in U CW
Miami. Florida. Inten*
register the said iiamewimw
Clerk of the Circuit Court oil
Dade County. Florida r
Dated at Miami *8l
Florida, this 2nd W
December 1982 |
RICHARD "WAEBE.IM
Owner
MURRAY B WEIL. Jr. OJ,
Law Offices of Murray B
Attorney for Applicant ,
l*D4 'prM.y.*>


Friday. April 22. 1983 The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B

\j0c Notice
K Eleventh judicial
HrinTOF FLORIDA. IN
'S?0 FOR OADE COUNTY
*ND CIVIL ACTION
NO 13 i'
UoN FOR DISSOLUTION
J" OF MARRIAGE
Lll THE MARRIAGE OF:
I PtUUonerHu.band
lTAH0DELINSCOTT.
I^pondent-Wlfe
ImliruHodellnScott
L EmllloGlroEntee
[^tlnimo Orients.
IToL ARE HEREBY NOTI-
Irio that cUon htor
Involution of Marriage ha.
ILjaYflled against you and you
In required to serve a copy of
l-urwrltwndefenses.lfany.to
IfaSTEVENJL'GO. attorney
Inr Petitioner, whoae addreaau
loDNW. 7th Street, Suite 103.
I Kuml.Dade County. Florida.
I US A and file the original
I ,tui the clerk of the above
I (vied court on or before May
|10 1881; otherwiae a default
J ui tie entered agalnat you for
l Be relief demanded In the
1 mmplaUit or petition
I ThU notice shall be published
I once each week for four con-
I cuUve weeki In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
I WITNESS my hand and tha
I Ml of tald court at Miami.
I Florida on this 14th day of
I April 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
AiClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: DC BRYANT
Ai Deputy Clerk
JiClrcult Court Seal i
Jl'GOANDFERRADAZ
I Steven Jugo
I iHON W 7th Street. Suite 103
HUml Florida 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
11H3S April 33, 38;
May 6, IS, 1888
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FCCASE NO 63134*1
I IN RE The Marriage of
ICIORAISK RIVERA
PetUoner-Witi
an-.
INTONIO RIVER
Respondent Huan TO it RIVERA.
nee unxnuwr. shall
copv ol voul Answer to
I
> IRQE
Florida.

- Maj


KER
Bv V B !).(
ipriias n
6 IS, 1883
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
WTME CIRCUIT OF
TMEELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
N0 FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO IJ-M2M
CTI0N FOR DISSOLUTION
-. F MARRIAGE
u.p^ .KMAKK>AGEOF
"AR1AZL1.MAGALLKGO
Petitioner. Wife
and
CARLOS MARIO CARVAJAL.
KespondentHusband
TO CARLOS MARIO
CARVAJAL
"lronl33,No.34,A.S.36
'Envigadoi
Medellin, Colombia
riED SS HEREB* NOTI-
"> hat an acUon for
2*tai of Marriage ha.
itZ. 'nlefenaea. If any, to
m J2*S22 P MEN-
LWr :? "'torney for PeU-
S* hoe address I. 1487
StSftJB fl,e *
wile? C'erk "*"
1U ,y''^""rt on or before
SUJS' .otherwUe
Th^X* ""or petition
Hal0"rfrtmyhM<1'nOJe
K?m8 ,hu "^ of
rl^rti. Circuit Court
feSES?"
^^"fcNDEZ.EBQ.
*W"'-lB.M.>i.Hja
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR DADE COUNTY.
FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Flit) Number S3 J*83
Division
IN RE ESTATE OF
LOUIS AUGUST
ERBACHER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of LOUIS AUGUST
ERBACHER, deceased. File
Number 88-8088, is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County, Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is
Dade County Courthouse 78
West Fiagler Street. Miami.
Florida 88180. The names and
addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are
required to tile with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom this
notice waa mailed that chal-
lenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on April IB. 1883
Personal Representative:
Monslgnor John Glorle
Saint Theresa Catholic
Church
1370 Anastasla Avenue
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
James A. Lanler, II
2811 Ponce de Leon Boulevard
Coral Oablea, Florida 88184
Telephone (80S) 444-71111
18018 April IB. 33. 1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
WEST HIALEAH AUTO
REPAIRS at 3330 West 10th
Avenue. In the City of Hialeah,
Florida, intends to register the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
Dated at Hialeah. Florida
this 7th dav of April ibk:i
OCTAVIOTOLEIM.
ENRIQUE MII.IA-.
H1J.7,. April 18.22 28.
May 6, 1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAV.
NO! 18 HEREBY
QIVER that tne undersi
desiring to engage In business
under tne fictitious name
P8 ROOFING at 10870
N R 13r> Street in the City o'
Hialeah Florida, intend.-- to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florid;.
Dated at Hialeah. Florida
this 3rd dav of April. 1883
FERNANDO MENDP.7
Owner
18621 April IB, 22.28.
May 8.1883
AFFIDAVITUNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME
STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA)
COUNTY OF DADE)
as.
The undersigned, under oath,
says: It is the intention of the
undersigned to engage in a
business enterprise under the
fictitious name of LUCKY
LOBSTER located at 12888
S.W. 113 Street. Bldg. D. Bay 3,
Miami. Florida, 33183 In the
city of Miami, Dade County,
Florida.
Those interested in said en-
terprise, and the extent of the
Interest of each, la aa follows
Interest
Keith McFarlane. B0 percent
4480 NW 185 31
Miami. Fla .33066
Ruben Gomez, B0 percent
8860 Johnson St..
Pembroke Pines. Fla.. 88084
18882 April 1.8;
15.33. IMS
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY!
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. 83137]]
ACTION KIIH DISSOLUTION
OP MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
VINCENT P. MEDINA
Petitioner-Husband
and
BARBARA ANN MEDINA
Respondent-Wife
TO: BARBARA ANN MEDINA
Address and Residence
unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
LOUIS R BELLER. Esq.. at
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 430 Lincoln Road,
Suite 238. Miami Beach.
Florida 33138. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
May 20. 1883; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 18 day of April,
1883
RICHARD P. UK IN KK R
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByM. J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
18643 April 22, 28:
May 6, 13. 1883
NOTICE OF
FORFEITURE
PROCEEDING
TO:FRANKR.
DeJOSEPH.JR.
3B2B N.W. 38th Avenue
FortLauderdale.
Florida
On 6 April 1883, The Police De-
partment of the City of Miami
Beach, seized on Miami Beach,
Dade County. Florida a 1881
Chevrolet Monte Carlo auto-
mobile. VIN 1Z37JAR436806.
1884 Florida tag W 66407. em-
ployed as an instrumentality In
the commission of a felony, to-
wn Possession of a Controlled
Substance 1 cocaine 1. F.S
883 136 and in violation of See
lion 881.701 thru 932 704 of the
Florida Contraband Forfeiture
Art A Petition for a Rule to
Show cause why this vehicle
should not he torfellod is antlci
oated to be filed on or about i
June 1988 m tne Circuit Court
in and lor Dade County Ftol
1 ia luT Judicial Circuit Civil
1 n\ ision
LUCla Allen Dougl
Cltj Miome
CITY Gr MIAMI BEACH
1700 Convention Canter 1 >n\
Miami Beach. Florida 88181
Telephone 1 .(061 673 791 W-2-
By DANIELGALLUP
Assistant City Atlorne\
Office of the City Attorney
City of Miami Beach
Florida
1863!, April 22, 29. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name CUE
Building Maintenance at 18366
N. E 36th Court. North Miami
Beach. Fla. 33180 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
DAE Building
Maintenance. Inc.
By Edward Elsenberg,
President
18818 April IB. 22. 28;
May*. 1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name ERIC
SHOES at 819 N.W. 88 St.
Miami. Florida intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
INTE RE STED P ART Y:
ERIC HOES FOB MEN
CORPORATION
By: MIRONOUT8TEIN.
President
DEI.-VAI.IJ; A NETSCH. P-A.
Attorneys for ERIC SHOES
18876 April 1.8, 18.
72.ites
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Shop-
cen I Investments at 1401 Brie
kell Avenue, Suite 608. Miami.
Florida SS1S1 Intends to regis-
ter said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
Shopcen I
Investments, Inc.
Backbone Corporation N.V.
18880 April 32, 38;
May 6,18.1883
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 81-423 S FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
IELEEN CYNTHIA FOROU
ZANDEH.
Petitioner,
and
FARAJULLAH FOROU-
ZANDEH.
Respondent.
TO: FARAJULI.AH FOROU
ZANDEH
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed agalnat you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on MICHAEL G. BASS, at-
torney for Petitioner, whoae
address is Suite 308. 8000 S.W.
107th Avenue, Miami. Florida
33176. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 38.
1883: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 38th day of
March, 1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
MICHAELG. BASS, ESQ..
Suite 206. 8800 S.W. 107th Ave.
Miami. Florida 38176
Telephone: (3061 686-8300
18887 April 1.8, 15. 22. 1883
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO 93 10570
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION OF
MARRIAGF
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MAYRA HERNANDEZ
Petitioner-Wit.
an,
MIGUEL HERNANDEZ
Kesponrient-Hushand
TO Midi EL HERNANDEZ
11796 N w. 27th Avenue
Miami FL 8816"
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT1
FIED tnai an acilor for
Dissolution of Marriage has
Been tiled ..^uinst you and you
are require.1 to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
it on IRIS I. BENSON at
tornev for Petitioner, whoae
address Is 7367 West Fiagler
Street. Miami Florida 33144,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before April 28, 1883;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 34th day of
March. 1883
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C.MOORE
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
IRIS I. .BENSON
Attorney at Law
7857 West Fiagler Street
Miami. Florida88144
Phone: (806)361-4643
Attorney for Petitioner-Wife
18680 April 1.8,
16.33,1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
TIFFANY INTERNATIONAL
at number 1488 NW 107 Ave..
Store No. 834. In the City of
Miami. Florida. Intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Flortda.
Dated at Miami. Florida.
this 23rd day of March. 1888,
CARMEN M. I./.*'AS.
Owltti
W887 April 8. IB, 27. 2 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Was-
eerlauf Data Corporation D-B
A Vertical Management Sys-
tems at 7210 Red Road Sutte 808
A South Miami. Florida 88148
Intend to register said names
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Bernard J. Wasaeriauf -
President
Thomas N Wasaeriauf
VIce-President
Monlna A. Wasaeriauf -
Secretary
Attorney for
Robert O. Benin
7900 West Fiagler St.
Miami. Fla 3814*
1860? \pr! 0. is. V2. 20 : 0RS
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITCOURTOF
FLORIDA. IN AND
FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-11 U4
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JUAN BENITEZ PEREZ.
Petitioner. Husband,
and
FASTUMA BENITEZ
PEREZ,
Respondent-Wife
TO
Mrs. Fastuma Benltez Azds
621 South Thornburg. Apt. F.
San Maria, California
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any, to
It on EMII.IO C. PASTOR.
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 202 28 West
Fiagler Street, Miami. Florida
88180. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 6.1888;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID LAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 31st day of
March. 1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M.J. HARTNETT
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
KMII.If) C PASTOR, ESQ.
202-28 West Fiagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
18689 AprilS. 16. 22,28, 1883
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
INANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO 13 02291
AMENDE!
NOTICE OF ACTION
(PROPERTY)
HELEN HAl.l'KU and JOHN
E. MANDAH1.I .
I'laintn.
MARVIN M fJRBEN TRI S
ihi. and iiuuu J SHER
ma:
: lefendam.
in Ham J Sherman
2664 Vi Blrchwood
Chli af
Illinois 8084
V01 ARE NOTIFIED thai
an action to lore, lose ,1 mort
k*k<- on the following propert)
in Dude County. Florida
Lot 1. in Block 7. ol ALTOS
DEL MAR No. ti. according to
the Plat thereol, recorded In
Klal Hook K, at page 106, of the
i*ublic Records ol Dade Coun-
ty. Florida, together with the
Imporvements thereon and the
appurtenances thereto, and all
of the furniture, furnishings,
fixtures and equipment therein
contain*- 1
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses.
If any, to it on HENRY M
WAITZKIN. plaintiffs' attor
ney. whose address is 740 71st
Street. Miami Beach. Florida.
33141. on or before May 13.1883.
and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on plaintiffs' attorney
or immediately thereafter:
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on April 6,
1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
By D.C.Bryant
As Deputy Clerk
18607 April 8. IB. 23.38,1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
BAL HARBOR IN-
VESTMENTS at number 1120
88th Street. In the City of
Miami. Florida, Intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida. Dated at
Miami, Florida, this 81 day of
March. 1883.
RUTH BRANDT
Owner
ROBERT A. BRANDT
Attorney for Applicant
88 Merrick Way Suite 301
Coral Gables. FL 83131
April 8. IB,
I
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY,
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-11147
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIE COLDROS.
Petitioner-Wife
and
BORROSE COLDROS
Respondent-Husband
TO: BORROSE COLDROS,
Respondent
Address and
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before April 28. 1888; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on thle 38th day of
March. 1888
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, ClrculthCourt
Dade County, Florida
By K. Selfried
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Lloyd M. Routman, Esq.
181 N.E. 82nd Street.-
Second Floor
Miami, FL 33138
Telephone: S08-7B7-6800
Attorney for Petitioner
18680 April 1, 8;
16.22.1883
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. 63-13657
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THEMARRIAGEOF
JASMIN CRUZ.
and
JESUS MANUEL CRUZ.
TO: JESUS MANUELCRUZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT1
KIK!) that an action for Dis-
solution Of MarriaKe has been
filed agalnat ^i and you are
required u> sen < .t cop) ''I vour
written defenses If any toll
\ Km,.-.. Mtoi ney M 1 aw P \
attorni
address 1- 101 W 12th
avenue Miami. Florida 881
,uid (be Ihe original itn the
clerk ol the above it); d *uur*
on or before Maj 20 iWSothei
wise a default will be entereil
again! you for the relief ie
mandi'd In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall bo published
once each week for lour con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this day of April 18,
1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M.J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
MARIANO SOLE. ESQ
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW. PA
101 N.W 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
(306)326-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
18644 April 22. 38;
May 6. IS. 1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
DERWOODB at 1170 N.W. 11th
Street. Miami. Florida 38186.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
' Court of Dade County. Florida.
MIN NAN FOOD SERVICES.
INC.
' Attorneys for Corporation:
I LAW OFFICES OF HARVEY
I D. FRIEDMAN
I 430 Lincoln Road. Suite 878
Miami Beach. Florida 88188
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name BIS-
CATNE BUILDING, at 18 West
Fiagler Street, Miami. Florida
88U0. Intends to register such
name with the Clark of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
BUCAYNE
RUTLDDfO.INC
BT: DArfrsS M. FIORTNI
Prssttlstt
- !)*


Page 18-B The Jewish Floricjian Friday. April 22, 1983
' i --------- -^ ___,;_______l2j---------"^ -r___ -' -\ -,

Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCU IT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. n-nisi
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
F1DONIE NOEL AD LEY.
Petitioner-Wife.
and
HAROLD ADLEY.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: HAROLD ADLEY.
Respondent
c-o: Pasteur
Maslon Pierre
Post Office Box SSS1
Carew Street '
Nassau, Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
LLOYD M ROUTMAN, attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress Is 181 N.E. 82nd Street
Miami. Florida 33138. and Hie
the original with the clerk of ,
the above styled court on or be- !
fore April 29. 1083: otherwise a
default will be entered agalst j
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 29th day of
March. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByK.Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Lloyd M. Routman. Esq.
181 N.E. 82nd Street
Second Floor
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone 306-767-6800
18889 April 1.8:
____________ 15.28. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO.: 83-11279
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
Novelette Fay Hanse
Petitioner Wife
and
Carol R, Hanse
Respondent-Husband
TO Carol R. Hanse
Residence Address:
210 (lumber Boulevard,
Apt No 613
Toronto. Canada
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
Bruce N Crown. Esq.. 15490
N.W. 7th Ave.. Suite 206.
Miami. Florida 33169. on or be-
fore May 6. 1983 and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition.
DATED: March30. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal l
BY: V Berkley
as Deputy Clerk
18304 April 8. 15. 22. 29. 1983
NOTICE OF
FORFEITURE
PROCEEDING
TO: JUAN SEBASTIAN .
CASTIIXO
2316 Bay Drive Apt 2
or
7133 Rue Granville
Miami Beach. Florida
On 6 April 1983. the Police De-
partment of the City of Miami
Beach, seized on Miami Beach,
Dade County, Florida a 1981
Pontlac Grand Prix automo-1
bile. VIN 2AJ37A9BP6099. 1983
Florida tag HI v 596. employed |
aa an Instrumentality In the
commission of a felony, to-wit
Poasealon of a Controlled Sub-
stance (cocaine). F.S. 893.130.
and In vlolatlor of flection 983- j
701 thru 932-704 of the Florida '
Contraband Forfeiture Act. A
Petition for a. Rule to Show
Cause why this vehicle should
not be forfeited la anticipated
to be filed on or about 2 June
1983. In the Circuit Court In and
for Dade County, Florida, 11th
Judicial Circuit Civil Division
Lucia Allen Dougherty
City Attorney
CITY OF MIAMI BEACH
1700 Convention Center Drive
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 'S06I6737919-29
By: DaNIELGALLUP
Assistant Mtv Attorney
Office .if the Clt- '" ~ey
'......man
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-1II4S
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARIE NOELEDA ANDUZE,
Petitioner Wife.
and
JEAN-CLAUDE ANDUZE.
Respondent Husband
TO: JEAN-CLAUDE
ANDUZE. Respondent
Address and
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED THAT AN ACTION FOR
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on LLOYD M. ROUTMAN,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 181 N.E. 82nd Street,
Second Floor. Miami, Florida
33138. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before April 29.
1983: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 29 day of March.
1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByK.Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Lloyd M. Routman, Esq.
181 N.E. 82nd Street.
Second Floor
Miami. FL 33138
Telephone: 305-757-5800
Attorney for Petitioner
18581 April 1.8.
16.22. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Zec-
hor Institute for Holocaust
Studies at 4200 Blscayne Boule-
vard. Miami. Florida 33131 in-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Harry A. "Hap" Levy.
President
18637 April 23.29;
May 6, 13.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name C A C
LEASING at 6818 Sunset Drive.
Miami, Florida 88184 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
LARRY S. MARKS
STEVEN SILVERMAN. P.A.
Attorney for Applicant
18917 April 15.22.29;
May 6. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(WITH PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-3772 (30)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ELEANOR ANDRE'
NEWMAN.
Petitioner,
and
GEORGE F NEWMAN.
ESPERO. INC. and
ALMOND. INC..
Respondents
TO: GEORGE F NEWMAN
c-o Cricket Club
1800 N E. 114th Street
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if
any. to It on STANLEY M
NEWMARK. attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 9400
South Dadeland Boulevard,
Suite 300. Miami. Florida 33156.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before April 29, 1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.'
Florida on this 29th day of
March. 1983 ,
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: DC BRYANT
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
STANLEY M NEWMARK
9400 South Dadeland Boulevard
Suite 300
Miami. Florida 33156
Telephone: (305)668-9775
April 1,8, 13.22. 1883
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 83-8828
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
PATRICIO RUFIN.
Petitioner-Husband
va.
MARIA PATRICIA DUVAL
RUFIN.
Respondent-Wife
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO:
Maria Patricia Duval Rufln
5868 Campo de Mayo,
Santiago. Chile
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this Court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
R.A del PINO, Esq., Attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1401 West Flagler Street. Suite
201. Miami, Florida 33130, and
file the original with the Clerk
of the above styled Court on or
before May 20. 1983; otherwise
a default wUI be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or '
petition
This Notice shall be
published once each week for
four 14) consecutive weeks In
THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami.
Florida, on this 13th day of
April. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: B.J.FOY
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
R.A del PINO
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Telephone: (305)649-4411
Attorney for Petitioner
18632 April22. 29;
May 6.13, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-11744
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ROBERT GILBERT.
Petitioner Husband
and
SUZANNE GILBERT.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: SUZANNE GILBERT
21 Rouen
Ste Thereae
Terrebonne
Quebec, Canada
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage haa
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, ltany, to
It on GEORGE T. RAMANI.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 711 Blscayne Bldg..
19 West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
May 6, 1983: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Flprlda on this 1st day of April.
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M.J HARTNETT
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner:
GEORGE T. RAMANI
711 Blscayne Bldg.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida S3130
18601 Aprils. 13. 22. 2. 198.1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
SHEILA'S RESTAURANT!
f-k-a CHUCKWAGON
RESTAURANT at 7384 S.W..
117th Avenue. In the City off
Miami, Florida, Intends to reg-
ister the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dated at Dade County,
Florida, this Uth day of April
1988.
FLORIDA EATS. INC..
A Florida Corporation
By: SHEILA EPSTEIN.
President
MALAND AND TURETSKY
P.A.
By ERIC B. TURETSKY
Attorney for Applicant
18620 April 15. 22. 29:
May 6, 1K83
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 83-11030
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
ORLANDO J. PADRON.
Petitioner. Husband
and
CARMEN MARIA PADRON.
Respondent-Wife
TO: CARMEN MARIA
PADRON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
DAVID I. SCHLOSBERG.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address la S2B N.W. 27th
Avenue, Suite 100. Miami.
Florida 38128 and .file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
April 29, 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
leal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on this 29th day of
March. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M.J HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
' Circuit Court Seal)
Attorney for Petitioner
DAVID I SCHLOSBERG
326 N W 27th Avenue. Suite 100
Miami. Florida 88130
Telephone '3081 648-4616
18896 Aprils, 15,23. 39,1968
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name TTMI
at 4S6S S.W. Tlst Avenue;
Miami. Florida SS155 Intends to
register aald name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
TAURUS International
Manufacturing. Inc.
4563 S.W. 71st. Ave.
Miami. Florida 33165
Law Offices
BLASS A FRANKEL. P.A.
Attorney for Applicant
1S.E 3rd Ave..
Suite 2250
Miami. Florida 33131
18581 April. 1.8;
15. 22. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
WEST HIALEAH MUFFLERS
at 2230 West 10th Avenue. In
the City of Hlaleah. Florida.
Intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Dated at Hlaleah. Florida,
this 7th day of April. 1983.
OCTAVIO TOLEDO
ENRIQUE MILIAN
018742 April 16. 22. 29;
May 6.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CASE NO. 63-12384
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ELSA MARTINEZ,
Petitioner,
and
ROBERT MARTINEZ
Respondent.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: ROBERT MARTINEZ.
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage haa been
filed against you, and that you
are required to serve a copy of
your response or pleading to
the Petition upon the Petition-
er's attorney. JANIS L. FEL-
DER, ESQ.. HUNTER,
CALVO. WICHMANN ft
SWARD. PA.. 1930 Tyler
Street. HoUywood, FL 88030,
and file the original response or
pleading in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court, on or
before the 13 day of May, 1988.
If you fail to do so a default
Judgment will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition
DATED at Hollywood. Brow
ard County, Florida, this 12 day
of April. 1983
Richard P. Brlnker
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: D.C.Bryant
'8624 April 16.22, 39;
May 6. 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
< NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OR
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FO R DA DE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
Ne.sJ-ljaef
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMAHRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAOE OF
CARLOS A. TAURA.
Husband,
and
MINTA TAURA,
Wife.
TO: MINTA TAURA
3800 18th Street. N.W.
Apt. No. 1011
Washington. D.C. 30010
YOU ARE HEREBY
notified that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage haa
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any, to
It on ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE, P.A.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address la
3491 N.W. Tth Street. Miami.
Florida 33128, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
Mav 20. 1988: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this day of April 18.
1988.
RICHARD BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
Aa Deputy Clerk
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
P.A.
2491 N.W 7th Street
Miami, Florida 88130
Telephone: (808)849-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
18628 April 15.22, 29;
May 6.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITCOURTOF
FLORIDA, IN AND FOR
DADECOUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 83-13177
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
PABLO HER I .AN SOTO.
Petitioner-Husband
and
LEONTINA DEL CARMEN
ESPINA GONZALEZ SOTO.
Respondent-Wife
TO: l.ei>ntin.i Del Carmen
Espina Gonzalez Soto,
Lo Beltran 2141 Las
Condes
Santiago. Chile
YOI ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
it on DAVID S BERGER.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 999 Washington
Avenue. Miami Beach, Florida
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before May 20.1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 14th day of
April. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By: C P COPELAND
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVIDS. BERGER
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (806)672-8100
18834 April 23. 29:
MayS. 13,1963
NOTICE OF
FRFElTUOr
TO: STEPHEN I "
HABERMAN
12*07 8 W mth
Terrace
Miami, Florida
On 31 March 1983. th. p
Department of the %,
Miami Beach, se^Jft,
Beach, Dade County vEA
1881 Toyota Ceiica aulom^'
VW JURA4422B892?0 *
Florida tag RrE~?
Ployed as an instrumenuu,,!';1
UlecommUsionofaMoT?
CJPoMe88lono' Control
Substance (cocaine) pta
893.13 jnd in violation of Ll
Uon 932.701 thru 632 MefS
Florida Contraband Forfl^l
Act. A Petition for a Sulf
Show Cause why u...v,cuf
should not be forfeited *
patedtobeflledonoraCJ
and 'r Dade County Ftorl
|da.l,thJud,cUlC,rcUy,,y
Lucia Allen Dougherty
City Attorney
CITY OF MIAMI BEACH
1700 Convention Center Drive
Miami Beach. Florida33139
Telephone: (3051 6737818-29
By: DANIEL GALLUP
Assistant Cltv Attorney
Office of the City Attorney
City of Miami Beach '
Florida
18840 _______ April 22.28.188! I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in buslnea
under the fictitious names m
Compra y Venta; 21 The
Penny-savers, (3) The Money I
Savers, at 16604 NE Third
Avenue, North Miami Beach.
Fla 33162 Intends to register
said names with the Clerk 0!
the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Welcome Publishing Co., Die
By: Alfred Kaplan,
President
18613 April 10.22.29:
May 6.1881
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage hi business
under the flcutious name of
Gab.es Medical Center at 1918-
B S.W. 97 Avenue. Miami, Flor-
ida, In the City of Miami, Flor-
ida. Florida. Intends to register
the aald name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty, Florida.
DATED at Miami. Florida.
this 8th day of April. 1981.
Lee's Medical
Center, Inc .
David E. Stone
Attorney for Applicant
Stone, Soatchln A
Gonialez, P.A.
1401 W Flagler Street.
Ste. l
Miami. Florida 38180
18623 April 16, 23, 39; '
May 6.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
No 13-13311
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARR!.\<;E
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
JOSE CABRERA
Petitioner
and
MARIA ISABEL
ARtULLAO V'ABRERA.
Respondent
TO MARIA ISABEL
ARRILLAGA CABRERA
Residence I nknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defense? if any. to
It on Mil.TON (" GOODMAN,
attorney for Petitioner, whole
address Is IS West Flagler
Street. No 820, Miami. Fl
331. and file the cnginal with
the Clerk of the above styled
court onorbefi.ie May 20.1983.
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week fur four con-
secUtlve weeks In THE
JEWISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this Mth day of
April. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
ByM. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
MILTON C. GOODMAN. ESQ.
19 West Flagler. Street. No 820
Miami. Florida 33130
Phone. 379-1883
Attorney for Petitioner
18633 April 37,:
May.l3,lW>
NOTICI UNDER
FICTITIOUS N*ME LAW
NOTICE IS HMUtBT
GIVEN that the ndr,*"z
desiring to sngsge In basin*
under the fictitious namj
CXOL MEDICAL CErTTBRj'
1918-B 8.W. 67 Avenue MW'
Florida, in the City of m*
Florida, intends to ">*>'
Sd name with the aerk of W
Sreult Court of Dade Oountj.
Florida. _._,,,.
DATED at Miami. Fa*1*
this 8th day of April. 1
Lee's Medical
Center. Inc.
David E Stone
Attorney for Applicant
Stone. Sostchln *
Gonsales. P.A.
1401 W. Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33136 w
18622 ^.y.V



?pan, Industrial Firm Founder, Dies
Arnold Selevan of
k Miami Beach, 66. preat-
Ed founder of Naveles I n-
5Sales, Inc., passed away
a 12 at Parkway General
Ld He had been a resident
*bj for more than 50 years.
founded Naveles Inc. in
i. Selevan had long been
.with Jewish War Veterans,
. iS Florida Department
u^der, national adjutant,
P^Tpresident of a national
Ltion held in Miami. He
L^ted as chairman of a Com-
^ Conference of all
^iis organizations in
(, Selevan received many
L and a Presidential Cita-
, for service in the U.S. Air
(during World War II and
in active duty until
Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THEELEVENTM JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 11-1 ISM
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
Hi RE THE MARRIAGE OF
JOSETIBERIO ARCILA
PUUonr-Hu$band
and
JOANN ARCILA
Retpoodent Wife
TO JOANN ARCILA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
DtuoluUon of Marriage hai
bten tiled against you and you
in required to serve a copy of
jour written defenses. If any, to
II on HARVEY D FRIED-
HAN, attorney for PetlUoner.
whose address Is 420 Lincoln
Road. Suite 379. Miami Beach,
Horlda. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
ityled court on or before May
k 1983. otherwise a default
Iwlll be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
| complaint of petition.
This notice shall be published
I nice each week for four conse-
cutive weeks In THE JEWISH
[ FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
I Mai of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 13th day of April
1K3
RICHARD P. BRINKER
AiClerk. Circuit Court
DtdeCounty, Florida
By:B J FOY
As Deputy Clerk
'ClrcultCourt Seal)
UW OFFICES OF HARVEY
I D-FRIEDMAN
00Lincoln Road Suite S7B
jfiami Beach. Florida 33138
Wephone:(SOB)831-0301
Attorney for Petitioner
April 22, 29;
May 8,13, IBM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
'"THECIRCUITCOURTOF
"HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. (3-1302]
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
j OF MARRIAGE
IBRE. THE MARRIAGE OF
RAYNELLE PRATT
PetlUoner
and
JOHN LELAND PRATT
Respondent
WHN LELAND PRATT
v R"ldence unknown
JSV ARE HEREBY
g?D "tat an action for
"jWutlon of Marriage ha.
, n"d against you and you
required to serve a copy of
["rtttendefenaea.lf.nV to
I ton MILTON C GOODMAN.
a**;y ,0r Petitioner, whoee
C" *! Flagler
Iff*- ,Su,te M0 Miami.
| JJ* M130. and file the
2*"l with the clerk of the
Na U'yMrou or before
^^i'^^rwlseade-
wiu be entered against
"^""Plaint or petition.
SSSSSSBBS
IB ""i '3 day of April
^"pP BRINKER
D,CJ"'<-Circuit Court
u County. Florida
ByN AHewett
"ILT0N,n7,PU,yC1*rlt
8, Flagler Street. Suite
fc,!i0rtd.33180
C*^'Petitioner
April IB, 23.39;
Maye.ltas
1945. He was founding president
of Eighth Air Force Historical
Society and president of its
Florida chapter.
He was a vice president of Beth
Torah Congregation and a life
member of Hadassah Associates
and in 1982 served as chairman of
South Florida Division of the
Soldier's Welfare Fund in Safad,
Israel.
Mr. Selevan was also active in
Boy Scouts of America, having
served as scout master for Troop
Six in Miami and as a member of
Order of the Arrow, an honor
fraternity in scouting. He was a
member of the board of directors
of YMHA here, a member of Ful-
ford PTA, president of Federal
Credit Union KOP 195, member
of 100 Club of Dade County, and
director of International Material
Management Society.
Mr. Selevan is survived by a
wife, Bessie; children, Linda
Matter of Miami, Mona
Meretsky of Fort Lauderdale.
Gary Schaffel of Los Angeles.
Joan Mack of Miami, and Martin
Schaffel of Tampa; three grand-
children; brothers, Theodore of
Miami Beach, Bernard of Jack-
sonville, Dr. Sol of San Diego,
Ca., and Ira of Cincinnati, Oh.;
and sister, Sylvia Ben of Miami.
Funeral services were held
April 14 at Riverside Memorial
Chapel. Interment followed at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
PRIVATE FOUNDATION
ANNUAL REPORT
The annual report of the
private foundation of The Louis
Schwartzman Scholarship
Fund, required to be filed
under section 5060 of the
Internal Revenue Code, Is
available for public Inspection
at Its office 3122 Pine Tree Dr..
Miami Beach. Fla. 33140 on
business days from 10:00 A.M.
to 4:00 P.M. by any citizen,
upon request, within 180 days
after this publlcaUon.
JACOB KATZMAN
Chairman of the Trustee
18647 April 22, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
INTHE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 13 1 35
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
ALPHONSE FINCE,
PETITIONER
AND
OCTAVIA FINCE.
RESPONDENT.
TO: OCTAV1A FINCE
(RESIDENCE
UNKNOWN)
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and the Peti-
tion seeks an award that
certain property owned by you
and PeUtloner, ALPHONSE
FINCE. as tenants by the en-
tirety, located at M1B-1T N. W
6th Avenue. Miami. Florida,
and more particularly de-
scribed as:
Lot 17. Block 9. BUENA
VISTA GARDENS, according
to the Plat thereof, as recorded
In Plat Book 5. at Page 45. of
the Public Records of Dade
County. Florida, a-k-a 5415 17
N. W 6th Avenue. Miami, Flor-
ida.
to the Petitioner as a special
equity and-or equitable distri-
bution and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any. on to HOWARD
HIl.I. BENNETT. ESQUIRE,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 19 West Flagler
Street. No. 520. Miami. Florida
33130. and file the original with
the clerk Of the above styled
Court on or before May 20. 19X3.
otherwise ,i Default will be en
tared against you for the relief
pniV'd for in the Petition
This notice shall be published
once every Weak for four con-
secutive week, i" the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN. 120 N.E 6 Street
Miami, FL. 33132
WITNESS my hand and seal
of said Court at Miami. Dade
County. Florida on this 18 day
of April. 1983
RICHARD!' BRINKER
as Clerk of
the Circuit Court.
Dade County. Florida
ByM. J Hartnett
IlF.IMTY CLERK
(Circuit Court Seal I
Attorney for Petitioner
HOWARD HILL
BENNETT, ESy
19 West Flagler St No 520
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone 379-1885
18645 April 22. 29;
May 6, 13,1963
Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian PgilB
Katzen, S. Miami Merchant, Passes
Selevan
KATZ
Adele S.. 60. A 49-year resident of
Miami, .he was a member of Beth Tov
Synagogue, Ufe member of Hadassah
and president of Chalm WeUman chap-
ter for five years. A veteran of the U.S.
Navy, she graduated from Miami
Senior High School and University of
Miami. Mother of Allen Katz of Los
Angeles and Rebecca Kats of Miami
Daughter of Bertha Sootln of Miami.
and sister of Harvey Sootln of Miami
Funeral service, were held April 18 at
Gordon Funeral Home, with Interment
at Mt. Slnal Cemetery. Donation. In me-
mory may be made to Hadassah.
CONVISER
David J., 97, an area resident for the
past 32 years, passed away. He was a
mason. He was the father of Victor of
Delray Beach and France. Schiffman of
Delray Beach; grandfather of five;
great-grandfather of four; and brother
of Abraham of Miami Beach, Nemo of
Hollywood, and Isidore of Washington,
DC and Israel. Cryptslde services were
held April 19. Arrangements by River-
side Memorial Chapel.
RUBIN
Nathan of Miami Beach, a resident here
for the past 50 years, passed away. He
was the husband of the late Lee Rubin:
father of Renee Wohlman of New York;
brother of Pauline Adler of North Miami
Beach and Rose Uordon of Miami: and
an uncle. Funeral services were held
April 18 at Rubln-Zllbert Memorial
Chapel Interment followed at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery
RIEGEL
Abner. 84. of Miami Beach, passed
away April 14. He was an area resident
for 19 years, formerly of New York. He
Is survived by a wife. Sohple; brother,
William; sister, Stella Fortgang; and
two nephews. Funeral services were
held April 17 at Riverside Memorial
Chapel.
FISCHMAN
Joseph, 53. of Miami Beach died April
14 He had made his home In Miami for
the past 21 years, coming from Bogota.
Columbia. He was a member of Beth
Raphael Synagogue. He Is survived by
two daughters, Malca Flschman of San
Francisco and Shlomlt Flschman of Tel
Aviv, Israel: three brothers. Israel of
Los Angeles, Fabio of Bogota. Colum-
bia, and Efralm of Miami. Graveside
services were held April 15. All ar-
rangements were by Gordon Funeral
Home.
BERMANN
Belle. 68. a resident of Miami for the
past 50year., coming from Jersey City.
N.J-. passed away April 11. She was a
member of Beth Kodeih Synagogue, a
former member of Beth David Syna-
gogue and pa.t president of Its sister-
hood, and past executive director of
Florida Fashion Council. She wa. the
wife of Joseph; mother of Toby Rosen-
thai of Hmokeville. Md. and the late
Bobbe Bermann; sister of David Gold-
man of Fort Lee, N. J. and Rae Goldberg
of Miami: and grandmother of five.
Funeral service, were held April 13 at
Gordon Funeral Home.
BERNHEIMER
Kermlt. 70. a Miami resident for 20
year., coming from N.Y.C., died April
10. He was a member of Temple Beth
Am He Is survived by a wife, Rhoda;
two sons, Martin of Carlisle. Pa. and
Lowell; two daughters, Marcla Gllck of
Philadelphia and Joan Bernhelmer of
Miami; a brother, Gerald of Deerfleld
Beach: and nine grandchildren Serv-
ice, were held April 12 at Gordon Fu-
neral Home.
GOLDSTEIN
Nathan. 86. a resident of Miami since
1964. coming from New Rochelle, N.Y..
passed away April 9. He Is survived by a
son. Burton G ; a sister, Beatrice
Robblns of NY., five grandchildren:
and eight great-grandchildren. He
served In France In WWII and was a
member of Mt. Masada Masonic Lodge
In New Rochelle and a volunteer at
Douglas Gardens Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged
WISE
Arapad, 79. a resident and downtown
merchant of Miami for over 50 years,
passed away April 11. He was the owner
of the Wise Hatter. He I. survived by a
wife. Alma; children. D Richard Wise
and Nancy Miller; brother.. Aladorand
Albert Wle: a lter, Lottie Harmon;
lx grandchildren; and two great-
grandchildren. Funeral services were
held April IS at Riverside.
GELB
Abe Katzen, 70, who founded
and operated Red Sunset five and
ten store in South Miami for 30
years, died April 12. He had
made his home here for the past
35 years.
Mr. Katzen was a charter
member of Temple Beth Am, and
he served as first president of
Promenade Homeowners Associ-
ation. He also was a member of
Club 60, acting as its treasurer.
DENBERG
Isidore, of Miami Beach. Beloved hus-
band of Annie Shapiro Denberg; de-
voted father of Max (Hedda I Denberg of
New York. Bernard (Agli Denberg of
Lo. Angeles. Calif., and Brtna (Dr.
Robert) Colby of New York: dear
brother of Rose Abramowltz of New
York, Sally Berman of Miami Beach.
Betty Greene of New York, Harry
(Reva) Denberg of New York, and
Mark (Selma) Denberg of Miami
Beach. Cherished grandfather of seven,
and great-grandfather of three, also
adored uncle. He was a member of
Temple Menorah of Miami Beach,
founder and pioneer member of the
Hoard of the Southeast Region of Shaare
Zedek Medical Center In Jerusalem. He
will be dearly missed by all who knew
him His charitable deeds were legion.
Family suggests donations to the
American Committee Shaare Zedek
Hospital Jerusalem. 606 Lincoln Road,
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139. Special serv-
ices were held April 30 at Rubln-Zllbert
Memorial Chapel, with Interment at
King Solomon Memorial Park. CUfton,
N J.
SELEVAN
Arthur A of North Miami Beach,
passed away April 12. He established
Naveles Trading Co. In 1935. Art's Land-
scaping Services In 1945. Naveles Job-
bing Co. In 1950, and Incorporated
Naveles Industrial Sales In 1977. He
served as president. Survived by wife,
Bessie; children, Linda (SamuelI Mat-
ter of Miami. Mona (Dr. Warren) Mer-
etsky of Fort Lauderdale, Gary (Diane I
Schaffel of Los Angeles, Joan Mack of
Miami, and Martin Schaffel of Tampa,
grandchildren, Beth and Jason Matter
and Jenflfer Mack; four brothers, Theo-
dore (Llbby) of Miami, Bernard (Alice I
of Jacksonville, Dr. Sol (Rae) of San
Diego, Ira (Muriel) of Cincinnati; and
one sister, Sylvia (Arthur) Ben of
Miami. The family requests that tree,
be planted in the Arthur Selevan Jewish
War Veterans Memorial Grove In Israel
by contacting the Jewish NaUonal Fund
office. 420 Lincoln Road, Miami Beach.
Chapel services were held April 14. In-
terment foUowed at Mt. Nebo Ceme-
tery.
MERKOW
Llda. A 13 year resident of Hollywood,
she was a member of Temple Slnal of
Hollywood, Congregation Levl Yltz-
chok-Lubavttch of Hollywood. Hadas-
sah. ORT, Pioneer Women. B'nal B'nth,
and life member of Brandels and the
Jewish Federation of South Broward.
Beloved mother of Dr. William of Hart-
land, WIs. and Dr. Leonard of Pitts
burgh. Pa. Adored grandmother of
eight; cherished great-grandmother of
six Sister of Jack Parks of WIs Edwin
Parks of WIs.. Hyman Parks of Ariz.,
and Rose Knell of Hollywood. Funeral
services were held April 17 at Riverside
Chapel, with interment at Lakeside Me-
morial Park. Contributions may be
made to the charity of your choice.
KAUFMAN. Esther, Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert.
CUTLER, Morris. North Miami Beach.
April 17. Rubln-Zllbert.
FRIEDENREICH. Beth, April 17.
Riverside
PRESSMAN, Louis. Miami, April 17.
SHAYNE, Lowell Jay.
BERMAN, Abe, Miami. April 18. River-
side.
SARF, Jacov, Miami Beach. April 17.
Riverside.
He is survived by a wife, Mir-
iam; son, Jerry of Miami; daugh-
ter, Joan Stein of Miami; broth-
ers, Simon of Hollywood and Hy-
man of Harrisberg, Pa.; sisters.
Rose Schuman of Baltimore, Md.
and Sally Finkelstein of Harris-
berg; and four grandchildren.
Services were held April 14 at
Temple Beth Am, with interment
following at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
Gordon 'Funeral Home was in
, charge of arrangements.
Katz, 49-Year
Resident, Passes
Adele S. Kate of Miami, 60, a
member of Beth Tov Synagogue,
passed away April 15. Originally
from Brooklyn, she had made
Miami her home for the past 49
years.
Mrs. Katz was a graduate of
Miami Senior High School and
University of Miami. She was a
veteran of the U.S. Navy, a life
member of Hadassah, and presi-
dent of Chaim Weizman chapter
for five years.
She is survived by a son. Allen
Katz of Los Angeles; daughter.
Rebecca Katz of Miami: mother.
Bertha Sootin of Miami; and a
brother. Harvey Sootin of Miami.
Services were held at Gordon
Funeral Home. April 18.
Orvieto, of North
Miami Beach, Dies
Umberto Orvieto of North
Miami Beach died April 13. He
was 88 years old.
He is survived by a son,
Umberto of North Miami Beach;
daughters, Daisy Levi of Miami
Beach and Nyves Murphy of
Miami; eight grandchildren, 12
great-grandchildren, and two
great-great-grandchildren.
Funeral services were held
April 15.
(HERVONY. Marsna. Miami Beach,
April 15. Rubln-Zllbert.
COHEN. Benjamin. 80. Miami Beach.
April 17. Riverside.
COHEN, Rose L Miami Beach, April
IS. Rubln-Zllbert Mt. Nebo.
BAUMGARTEN, Carol. 38. North
Miami Beach, April 14.
ROSENTHAL. Dr. Hattle R., 88, Hal-
landale. April 14. Riverside.
DENBURG, Isidore. Miami Beach,
April 20. Rubln-Zllbert.
ROSKIN, Edith, 85, Miami Riverside
We Hope
You Never Need Us '
But IfYou Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
7610 Northeast 2nd Avenue
759-1669
When a loss occurs
away from home.
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
18840 West Dixie Hwy.
Represented by S levill, f D
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76lh Rcl Forest Hills, NY.
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd


Page 20-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22, 1963
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April 1983
CELEBRATE
ISRAELS
35th BIRTHDAY
Supplement to the .Jewish Floridlai


Page 2
Federation, April 1983
Contents
ANNUAL DINNER/
PRESIDENT'S MESSAGE PAGE 3
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 45th Annual Meeting will
feature the installation of new officers and board members and the
honoring of campaign leadership.
A message from Federation President Norman H. Lipoff.
WOMEN'S DIVISION
PAGE 4
Women's Division Phonathon Chairwoman Charlotte Held hopes to
reach all Miami Jews.
"Stress and How to Cope with It" is the theme of this year's Women's
Division Retreat at the Fontainebleau-Hilton Hotel.
ISRAEL SPECIAL FUND PAGE 5
Your support of the Special Israel Emergency Fund helps provide vital
human service programs to Israel's needy.
MOUNT SINAI
MEDICAL CENTER
PAGE 6
Mount Sinai's new Ambulatory Surgical Facility allows over 200
surgical procedures without a hospital stay.
CAMPAIGN
PAGE 7
Your support of the 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund helps the absorption of Ethiopian youngsters into Israeli
society.
ISRAEL 35
PAGES 8 & 9
On Sunday, April 24, thousands of Greater Miami Jews will celebrate
the 35th anniversary of Israel in joint walkathons and festivals in
North and South Dade.
AGENCIES/
SOVIET JEWRY
PAGE 10
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops Seek donations of used furniture and
appliances.
The South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry will present Yakov
Smirnoff, the country's only Russian born stand-up comic.
Jewish Vocational Services announces new $500 citizenship
scholarships.
PROJECT RENEWAL
PAGE 11
A Miami delegation that recently returned from Or Akiva, the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Project Renewal community, reported an
improved quality of life for the town's residents.
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Fiorldlan Supplement
April 22,1983 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
president
Norman H. Lipoff
Executive vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Public Relations committee
EliTimoner
JCCs/CULT TASK FORCE PAGE 12
Summer of fun awaits Jewish Community Center campers.
Two April 28 programs will focus on the controversial topic of cults
and the law.
FOUNDATION
PAGE 13
Restricted funds and endowment opportunities beneficial in estate
planning.
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies makes investment in Israel
bonds.
CALENDAR
PAGE 15


. .-... v. ::.. :: -
. ..--.. v-.


Federation, April, 1983
Page 3
|#$agc from
ic President
By NORMAN H.LIPOFF
recent months, we have continu-
demonstrated the unity of the
L people through the actions and
dvitjerof the Greater Miami Jewish
nunity U has been a period in which
.have maintained our commitments to
everywhere, while declaring our de-
oination to BE THERE when we are
ded.
Recordsetting Campaign Pace
e began the 1983 Combined Jewish
(tal-Israel Emergency Fund season
i an urgent plea for support in a time
# Jews faced their greatest challen-
[ We asked the Greater Miami Jewish
nunity to take part in the most
.bitious campaign in the history of our
deration. The response we received
riv displayed the dedication of local
/rv to our people's traditions of
cem for social justice.
is far, the campaign has raised
than $19 million for the social
jce needs of Jews at home and
.ad, with S2.5 million of that amount
jcated to the one-time Special Israel
xergency Fund. This represents a sub-
antial increase above the same persons'
dgesinl982.
[ We are on the verge of topping last
jrs CJA-IEF accomplishment and es-
blishing the 1983 campaign as the
jst successful ever. But we must do all
! possibly can to maintain the current
ampaign pace. We must continue to
sch out to individuals who have yet to
lake commitments to the CJA-IEF. In
Ids way, we can accomplish our goal of
eting the human service needs of Jews
greater Miami, in Israel and through-
itt the world.
Honoring Those
Who Made It Possible
The credit for our campaign success
ftory must go to the leadership of the
CJA-IEF. General Campaign
hairman Aaron Podhurst has directed
i extremely innovative, energetic and
ctive effort which has expressed the
legree of crisis facing Jews everywhere
i our need to respond effectively. The
npaign leadership has mobilized Jews
hout our community to take the
icessarv action to buoy the results of
kCJA-IEF.
These out standing individuals will be
honored at the Federation's Annual
Meeting, which will be held on Tuesday
lining. June 7 at the Carillon Hotel,
ftrticipants in this special event also
Jill elect the 1983-84 leadership of our
Federation.
1 urge you to join us for this important
|evening, as we recognize our 1983 ac-
l>niplishments and build the founda-
tions to next year's achievements. For
pre information, call 576-4000, exten-
1*0281.
A Community wide Commemorative
Thousands of South Florida residents
p part in Holocaust Education Week,
|r~ outstanding community-based pro-
[*'sponsored by the Zachor Institute
p Holocaust Studies. The seven-day
Warn began with Yom Hashoah -
IS. w^st Memorial Day at the Miami
I?Cl Theatre of the Performing Arts, at
JJg Dr. Emil Fackenheim, renowned
Id.i' Professor and Holocaust scholar,
levered the keynote address.
I Dm Week was accented by numerous
Ey" and displays that were
iw throughout Dade County.
served to commemorate the
< of the Holocaust, as well as
Unit and educate the gene1 co-
Inum! 0ffer our appreciation to the
rous agencies, organizations and
Meeting to Honor
CJA-IEF Leaders
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's 45 Annual
Meeting, to be held on Tuesday, June 7 at the Federation
Building, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard, will be a dual function
this year, featuring the election of officers and board mem-
bers, and the honoring of the 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign leadership.
The evening will be highlighted by the
presentation of the slate of officers and
board members, prepared by the
Federation Nominating Committee, for
approval by the Annual Meeting
Delegates. Current Federation President
Norman H. Lipoff has been nominated to
serve for a second year.
Aaron Podhurst, general campaign
chairman of the 1983 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, will be
recognized and honored for spearheading
the most successful campaign in Federa-
tion's history. An activist in Jewish
community affairs, Podhurst previously
served as vice chairman of the CJA-IEF,
Pacesetter chairman and Federation
board member. Podhurst is also former
president of Temple Sinai of North Dade.
Special tribute will also be paid to the
many 1983 CJA-IEF campaigners who
drew new commitments of support from
the Greater Miami Jewish community.
Special certificates will be awarded to the
campaign workers for their dedication in
securing pledges to the CJA-IEF.
"Aaron Podhurst spent countless
hours coordinating and leading this
year's record campaign, and his constant
dedication was instrumental in the
success of this year's effort," said Lipoff,
who is chairing the Annual Meeting.
"The campaign workers help bring us
closer to our goal of providing quality
Norman Lipoff
governmental bodies that helped to
make this program a success.
Israel 35 BE THERE
Thirty five years ago, an ambitious
and brave experiment was initiated.
Jewish pioneers fulfilled an age-old
dream, founding a modern Jewish State.
Today, that state, Israel, is the heart and
soul of our people.
In recognition of Israel's 35th anniver-
sary, an occasion to be celebrated by
Jews worldwide, the Greater Miami
Jewish community will hold two special
events that will capture the joy of this
human services to Jews in Greater
Miami, Israel and in communities
around the world."
The evening will be marked by the
presentation of the Stanley C. Myers
Presidents Leadership Award to two
recipients who will be recognized for ex-
ceptional service and dedication to the
ideals of the Federation and the CJA-
IEF Campaign. The award was named
after Federation's founding president,
Stanley C. Myers, whose ongoing in-
volvement and dedication to the Greater
Miami Jewish community continues to
set an example to young leaders.
The president of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami will be
recognized at the meeting and will serve
on the Federation Board of Directors by
virtue of his position. The new Rab-
binical Association president, as well as
the two recipients of the Leadership
Awards, will be sent by Federation to the
General Assembly of the Council of Jew-
ish Federations in Atlanta this Fall, in
order to gain an appreciation of the full
spectrum of Jewish communal services
in North America.
All Greater Miami Jewish Federation
members are invited to this important
gathering, which will shape the future of
the Jewish community.
For further information and reserva-
tions, please call 576-4000, extension 261.
Aaron Podhurst
historic time. The Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, with the
support of the Federation, will present
Israel 35 programs on Sunday, April 24
at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC in North
Miami Beach and the South Dade JCC.
Both of these celebrations will express
the Jewish community's commitment to
Israel with walkathons on behalf of the
1983-CJA-IEF Campaign, and the joy-
ous aspect with special celebrations.
Be a part of this very important Israel
35 event. For more information, call 576-
1660.


Page*
Federation, April, IwKJ
WD Leader Hopes to Reach
All Miami Jews
Charlotte Held, Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division phona-
thon chairwoman, is a great believer in
the "ripple effect." However, it's not the
ripples In water or the economy she's
concerned with. Held firmly believes that
the ripple effect can help increase the
numbers of involved and committed
Jews in the Greater Miami community.
"My main philosphy is: I'm a people
person," explained Held, who has been
an active Women's Division member for
11 years. "One-to-one contact is the key
to get people involved with what we're
doing. People will only come to activities
Women's
Division
Retreat Set
for May 26
Stress, that common mental malady
that is known to all, will be the topic ad-
dressed at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Women's Division Eighth
Annual Retreat, to be held on Thursday,
May 26 at the Fontainebleau-Hilton Ho-
tel, Miami Beach.
Retreat Chairwoman Anne Sheldon
announced that the special guest
speakers at the daylong event will be
psychologist Gail Silverman and Martin
Agronsky, the veteran journalist and
television commentator.
The day will commence with registra-
tion at 9:30 a.m., followed by Gail Sil-
verman who will discuss ways an indivi-
dual can cope with stress. After lunch, a
workshop led by former Women's Divi-
sion President Nancy Lipoff, Women's
Division Campaign Chairwoman Ellen
Mandler and Federation Vice President
Marilyn K. Smith will probe how Miami
is a community in stress.
The day will continue with an after-
noon board meeting led by Women's Di-
vision President Maxine E. Schwartz at
which the bylaws will be approved. A 5
p.m. cocktail reception will precede
dinner and the installation of the new
Women's Division officers.
The national dimensions of stress will
be discussed by Martin Agronsky, who
currently is the moderator of "Agron-
sky and Company," a highly rated public
affairs television show distributed na-
tionally by the Washington Post-News-
week syndicate. Agronsky has been a
Washington and foreign correspondent
for each of the major television networks
and was the recipient of an Emmy
Award and the George Foster Peabody
Award.
Women's Division Leadership Devel-
opment Vice President is Mikki Futer-
nick, and representatives for the retreat
are: Business and Professional Women,
Phyllis Harte, and Anne Monique
O'Hayon; Miami Beach, Estelle Haber,
Roz Ness, and Micki Teicher; North
Dade. Charlotte Held, Rachelle Kamin-
ski, and Evelyn Mitchell; South Dade,
Leta Behren, Ellyn Elkins, Linda Hoff-
man, Pat Lieberman, Nancy Orovitz,
and Elaine Ross; and Southwest Dade,
Judy Adler. Ellen Steiner and Susan
Zinn.
This event is only open to Women's
Division board and committee members.
For reservations and information, please
call the Women's Division at 576-4000
Charlotte Held
if you yourself say, 'Please come with
me.' It's like a ripple effect."
Held, a native of Atlanta, Georgia, has
served in a variety of posts in the Wom-
en's Division over the years: North Dade
area chairman, vice president-leadership
development, parliamentarian and
secretary. Although she's the mother of
two sons and a daughter, she said she
was always able to find the time to in-
volve herself in Federation activities.
''I've been very fortunate, and I.
SL -XS of 8haring with^yfe
Jews, she commented. y eu
In addition to her role as a mother,
a Women s Division leader, Held
also found the time to enter the fiel
plantscaping. She pointed out that
commitment as a Jew helped pro
to start her business with
Dolores Wolf they began their vent.
so they could pay their personal pled!
to Federation's Combined Jew]
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
"Being involved with Federationhej
give you a great sense of self worth," $
said. "It's also a marvelous education
tool and can serve as a role model for t
children."
In addition to her business and Fed
ation involvement, Held serves on
boards of the Michael-Ann Rt
Jewish Community Center and t
Jewish High School of South Florid
where her son is a student, and is a
unteer guide at Vizcaya Gardens.
"I juggle my time a lot." sheackno*.
edged. "But if we are truly concern^
with the future of Jewry, we owe it I
ourselves to get involved. Now, mo2
than ever, I think it's important for us j
be strong in numbers. There are mod
than 250,000 Jews in Greater Miami, a
I hope we can reach them all. Maybe tL,
way we can help more Jews everywhere.!
Prominent Women's Division leaders take part in a North Dade special event held at the Michael-Ann
RussellJewish Community Center. Shown above, from left, are President Maxine E. Schwartz, Dorothy
Dobin, Special Events Chairwoman Debbie Edelman, Campaign Chairwoman Ellen Mandler, Lenore
Elias, Ann Singer, North Dade Special Event Chairwoman Dorothy Podhurst and Ann Fingerman.
> -"
^&&Z' *
* -
^
'~1
IF A
[*".

Business and Professional Women of the Grea ter Miami Jewish Federation's Women s Division recen y
held a minimum gift event at the Mutiny Hotel on behalf of the 1983 CJA-IEF Campaign. Seen bovef'
from left, Phyllis Harte, guest speaker Shalmi Barmore of the Yad Vashem lnstitue in Jerusaie
Business and Professional Women Chairwoman Amy Dean and event Chairwoman Vida Berkowitz


Federation. April, 1983
Page*
Now More Than EverThe Case for 1983
You can make a difference in the lives of Jews in
Israel. The handicapped, the infirm, the elderly, the
young, they all count on support provided through the
Special Israel Emergency Fund, a one-time effort to
help Jews in need at this time of financial crisis in
Israel.
By supporting the Special Israel Emergency Fund,
in addition to your Regular Campaign gift, you are
aiding a full range of humanitarian services that might
otherwise face severe cutbacks or terminations.
These are just two descriptions of services affected
by your Special Israel Emergency Fund gift. There are
thousands of other persons in Israel who also are coun-
ting on you.

Hal f way to Somewhere
A Hi has hppi
Adi lives with three roommates in an
ittractive apartment on a tree-lined
, in one of Jerusalem's older neigh-
_jods. He is 24 and works in a book
dery. The four occupants do all their
|sbopping, cooking and cleaning.
Nothing particularly unusual or
lemarkable. Except that Adi, Eli,
nuel and Yitzhak are all retarded
lidults.
A few years ago, the future would have
Ibeen very dim for these young men. If
their parents were willing, they might
[have lived a "sheltered" life at home .
I a inactive and spirited kind of existence
[intil such time as the parents became
oo old to care for them or died, when
hey would have been institutionalized
|- probably for the rest of their lives.
They are fortunate to be part of the
Iprogram of "Agudat Shekel" (Shikun
jKehillati l'Mefagrim Institute for the
]Retarded), which aims to integrate the
I mildly retarded into society by making
I them as independent as possible. The
Iprogram is partly funded through the
I special Israel Emergency Fund.
This live-in-the-community system is a
I recent development in Israel, and there
Lareonly seven or eight apartments such
ftt Adi s in the entire country, although
I quite a few more are in the planning
tages.
To the first-time visitor, Adi's flat is a
delightful surprise. The pictures in the
living room are in bright colors vivid
posters, a Van Gogh print of a wheat-
field. The divan and easy chairs are
modern and inviting. There is a stereo
and a TV set, and large bowl of fruit sits
on the coffee table. The color scheme is
autumnal brown-beige-orange.
You can see the sparkling kitchen,
with its large refrigerator, laminated
cupboards and the modern oven. The
bedrooms have built-in closets, and the
kind of divan beds that make the rooms
more like attractive studies. They are
immaculately clean and tidy.
The four roommates were all born in
Israel, two of Moroccan parents. Eli also
works, in a Jerusalem chocolate factory.
He does not earn a large salary, but both
he and Adi take special pride in being
wage-earners, and contribute one-third of
their wages to a special fund for the
apartment. They are not wasteful with
the remainder, often buying bank shares
or stocks as a hedge against inflation,
just like the rest of the population.
Both wage-earners were brought up at
home and went through the regular
school system, but in Special Education
classes. At 18, they went to the Rehabi-
litation Center run by the Jerusalem
Municipality to learn vocational skills.
Adi has been at the book bindery for
two years and is so conscientious that he
leaves home soon after 6 every morning,
to make sure he won't be late for work at
7:30 although the trip only takes 20
minutes.
Shmuel and Yitzhak are still being
trained, but also hope to find jobs in the
near future, either in sheltered work-
shops or in the open market.
Although there are only four residents,
the apartment has a staff of three half-
time Agudat Shekel employees: Yehudit
Beiner, the director; Karen, the house-
mother; and David, a counselor.
There is no institution-like atmosphere
it is relaxed and friendly, with the
boys and staff all on a first-name basis.
The staff supervises the shopping,
cooking and cleaning; advises the
residents on handling their money; and
helps with any problems they might
have with family or friends.
Hobbies and other interests are
strongly encouraged. Adi has expressed
a wish to learn English and is making
good progress. Shmuel wants to learn
Tanach, and David, who is a religious
studies student at the Hebrew Univer-
sity, sits and learns with him.
The four decide what clothes they
want to buy, which friends they want to
invite and when, and how to spend the
Continued on Page 15
From Denial to Fulf i 1 llment
It was the eighth time Gila waited ex-
pectantly in a hospital bed after giving
bWh. The results of the other deliveries
*we seven healthy children. But this
* as Gila waited to hold her infant,
medical team was discussing how to
bfeak the news.
The doctors and nurses were strug-
jjtogwith some painful questions: How
J you tell a mother that she has just
JWght a genetically defective child into
JJe world? How do you deal with the
^ock, the despair, the cry of "Why me?
why did this happen to me?"
Shulamit Shalvit, a social worker from
i?e Jerusalem Developmental Child and
JJH, Center, was on hand to cope with
j"!f the first agonizing reactions: "Gila
*"e* immediately that something was
wrng. But the father wanted to wait a
Continued on Page 14


itKJtt.
* i i B -,
Mt. Sinai Facility
Comfort for Less Cost
Offers
When you're three and a half years
old, there's something well, special
. about your room. It's a lot more than
a place to sleep and play; it's an entire
world, a universe, where the voices
you've given to your toys speak to you in
lonely moments and the pictures on your
walls come to life when you whisper a
magic word. Even when your books and
puzzles and Smurfs and crayons are
scattered about the floor like so many
autumn leaves, there's a private order to
your room to your life and it makes
you feelgood.
When you're three and a half years
old, you don't like to be away from this
room overnight. Uh-uh. No way. Especi-
ally when you're sick.
Craig Teriaca, who just happened to
be three and a half years old when he
needed surgery, and just happened to
like his room very much, thank you, was
a lucky little guy. Sure, his ear infections
had been bad for a long time; he even has
some temporary loss of hearing. But
when he needed surgery involving some
pretty big words ("myrongotomy,"
"adenoidectomy") he only had to leave
his room for less than a day.
The youngster's pre-operative tests at
Mount Sinai were conducted early in the
morning. Dr. Alan Foster then removed
Craig's adenoids, opened his ear drums,
and inserted small plastic tubes for
draining fluids. After a short recovery
period. Craig rested in a Mount Sinai
hospital room for a few hours until it
was time to go to another room, for a
good night's rest. His room. Back home.
It's called "outpatient." or "ambula-
tory." surgery a relatively new
method of health care delivery that's
great for kids like Craig Teriaca, but also
for teenagers, adults, and the elderly; in
short: for the American health care
consumer. While Mount Sinai physicians
have been performing outpatient surgery
on a limited basis over the past few
years, most procedures still require one
night in the hospital or. as in Craig's
case, a few hours. Now, a major new
facility at Mount Sinai allows over 200
surgical procedures, ranging from hernia
repairs on infants to sophisticated
cataract surgery with intraocular lens
implants, to be performed with no hospi-
tal stay at all. The results: Lower costs.
Less disruption of normal life routines.
Greater emotional comfort.
"The Ambulatory Surgical Facility in
the Sophia and Nathan S. Gumenick
Ambulatory Care Center allows for many
Mount Sinai patients to have surgery in
a fully-equipped medical setting and
return home the same day." says Samuel
Tischler. assistant director. This is the
only free-standing, hospital-based ambu-
latory surgical facility in South Florida.
Not only do patients get all the advan-
tages of this type of surgery, but they
are cared for in a center which has the
immediate back-up support of Mount
Sinai."
The center bears the names of Sophia
and Nathan S. Gumenick to honor their
long-standing commitment, not only to
this particular project, but to all forms of
philanthropy. Both are founders of
Mountt Sinai, where Mr. Gumenick is a
life trustee and Mrs. Gumenick is mem-
ber of the Godmothers club.
The new two-story building adjoins
the hospital's Blum Pavilion at the
southwest corner of the hospital com-
plex. On its second floor are facilities for
Mount Sinai's expanded Dialysis Pavil-
ion; the Pain Center: a major new Gas-
troenterology Center; and Obstetrical
and Gynecological department offices.
-2*
i
2
!3i
One of the most unique features of the Mount Sinai Ambulatory Center is the comfort of same-dax
surgery.

The Center for Breast Diseases is housed
on the first floor.
The major portion of the first floor,
however 18.000 square feet is
devoted exclusively to outpatient
surgery. The center's six operating
rooms are fully equipped for all surgical
sub-specialties including fluroscopic X-
ray equipment for pacemaker implants
and complete endoscopic instumentation
for gynecological, orthopaedic and
urologic procedures.
Two operating rooms are equipped
with ceiling mounted Zeiss OPMI 6-S
microscopes for microsurgery; four are
equipped for educational video transmis-
sion to a second-floor conference room.
In essence, here is a self-contained sur-
gical unit "outside" of a traditional hos-
pital setting, with equipment and
surgical capabilities exceeding the
highest standards set by the Joint Com-
mission on Accreditation of Hospitals for
free-standing and hospital-integrated fa-
cilities.
It's made to order for people like Ann
Meyers, who dreads going to the hospi-
tal. Because of her chronic pulmonary
problems, her hospital stays are associ-
ated with pain and fear. That is why,
when she developed cataracts, her
chosen alternative was learning to live
with them. It meant frequent stumbles,
using a magfifying glass to read, relin-
quishing her driver's license and putting
up with a number of other discomforts.
No amount of arguments by friends and
family could convince her that the opera-
tion was "nothing.'' But, after viewing
the facilities at the Gumenick Center,
Mrs. Meyers, at last, consented to the
operation.
"As long as I don't have to stay over-
night, I.feel comfortable with it. I know
the constant postponement appears
ridiculous to others, but it is much easier
to say its foolish than overcome th^
actual fear."
Ophthalmic surgery such as somi
cataract procedures, tumor excisions and
eyelid repairs are common outpatient
procedures. Others are plastic surgerw
(noses, eyelids and facelifts; genera]
surgery i.e., breast biopsy, lesion
removal, vein stripping, removal of some
tumors'); gynecological surgery includj
ing D & C. laparoscopy. tubal ligationj
vaginal biopsy and gynecological laserj
surgery; oral surgery and restorative
dental procedures: some types ofl
urological surgery; orthopaedic proce-l
dures including arthroMopy; andl
podiatric surgery such as hammer toel
correction and bunion removal.
To understand how ambulatory sur-i
gery at the Gumenick Center works,!
picture yourself as a patient who needs!
an elective non-emergency operation!
Once your surgeon has determined thai
the operation can in fact be performed on
an outpatient basis, his office calls the!
Gumenick Center and schedules two
visits for you: the first, for pre admission
tests and paperwork: the second. ior|
actual surgery.
Before your pre-admission visit, aj
Patient Representative calls you at home
or at work to verify personal and insur-
ance information; when you do visit tne
center for the first time, all of your
laboratory and X-ray tests are com-
pleted, and all necessary legal and finan-
cial forms are prepared for your signa
ture.
On the day of surgery, you and a
family member or friend are greeted D>a
patient representative who escorts y
to a pre-operative waiting area, j
change into a hospital gown in comply
privacy and are prepared for surgerj
your operation proceeds, your fnena u.
relative waits nearby in a <-'omtor^"
lounge area You know you are not aim
Continued on Page I4


i- i r
Youth Ally ah Effort Eases
Ethiopian Jewish Absorption
"It's good to be among Jews," Abraham
declared. "We want to be good soldiers, good
citizens, and sports champions. Israel will be
proud of us."
Abraham is one of 35 Ethiopian Jewish
youngsters who spent last summer in "camp" at
Talpiot Hadera Youth Aliyah Village. Like the
others in the group, he'd arrived in Israel two
years before, and spoke fluent Hebrew.
Recalling his arrival, he said, "It was
like a dream. We clapped our hands and
we sang. The older ones kissed the soil of
Lretz Israel. Israeli authorities were
waiting for us, they invited us to eat and
provided us with accommodations."
What were the first real difficulties?
"The language," Yossef replies. "I
understood nothing around me. At
school it was very difficult, but the
Israeli kids helped us a lot."
David, when asked how he liked life in
Israel, answered, "I enjoy it here. I
study in the Youth Aliyah school during
the year. Here, in Talpiot Village, we mix
with Israeli kids and that's very impor-
tant to me. We want to be like Israeli
youth, exactly like them."
Daniel spoke enviously of several of
llie older boys who were leaving Talpiot
Hadera; they'd been accepted in the
Veinin Orde Village in the Galilee, where
they will study electronics.
David started to talk about his family
who were living in the south of Israel.
He'd come to Talpiot Hadera from the
Netiv HaMaale Youth Village, located
near his family's home. In Ethiopia,
David had attended a non-Jewish school,
and siudied Knglish. Did all the parents
send their children to school?
"No, most of the young ones in our
place were shepherds."
"Was there any Jewish life at home?"
"Oh, yes," replied Daniel, "we kept
Shabbat. We did not work, did not light
any fire, and we lit candles on Friday
evening and made Kiddush. On Shabbat
morning we went to pray in our syna-
gogue."
Like most young, healthy children, the
boys at Talpiot Hadera are active in
sports, especially basketball. The
varibus Youth Aliyah Village teams play
against each other, tournament-style.
"My team," says Yossef proudly, "is
the football youth champion of Israel."
"We played against the Maccabi Hadera
team," adds Solomon, "and we won
twice. We got two medals!"
The boys are proud of their sports
prowess, and they are confident that
Ethiopians will be Israel's future cham-
pions.
W hen asked for suggestions on how to
make integration easier for future
Ethiopian Olim, the boys all agreed,
"Let them meet other Ethiopians like us
who have already integrated. Then, tell
the parents that if they want to settle in
Beer Sheva or Netivot (in the South) be-
cause they can find work there, let them
send their children to the Youth Aliyah
Villages. It's better not to be left alone
with your own group. It's better to mix
with Israeli kids, they help us with our
homework, and make friends with us."
Who would be willing to be a
"madrich" (group leader) for new immi-
grants? Their hands shot up. "We'll do
it. Well do it," they shouted.
Despite the hardships involved, and
some setbacks, Israel has developed an
effective program for integrating their
newest immigrants. Youth Aliyah, which
has been caring for immigrant Jewish
youth since 1933, when it was
established to bring the endangered
Jewish children of Germany to Palestine,
is a major factor in helping the Ethiopian
youngsters adjust to their new en-
vironment. Close to 400 children and
adolescents are in attendance at 21
Youth Aliyah schools, where they are
receiving language instruction, educa-
tion, and vocational training. The
younger children (6-12) attend the local
religious state schools. Youth between
the ages of 12-18 are taken to Youth
Aliyah's religious schools after a period
of adjustment at an integration center,
the first stop for all newcomers. Six
integration centers were operating last
Spring, serving over 900 olim.
While the majority of young people in
Youth Aliyah today are born in Israel,
and come from disadvantaged families.
Youth Aliyah still regards its task in
absorbing and educating new immigrant
children as a major objective. The
Ethiopian children who arrive in Israel
are often undernourished, illiterate and
terribly frightened. Youth Aliyah helps
them regain a sense of security and of
self-esteem, bridging the gap between
them and other children.
As Israel's social problems changed
over the years, Youth Aliyah adapted its
programs to meet the new challenges. Its
basic strategy has, nonetheless,
remained consistent: caring for children
mainly in residential institutions, youth
villages, and kibbutzim. In 1982, close to
18,000 young people, mostly in the 12-18
age group, were cared for in 34 youth
villages and boarding schools, 109
yeshivas (the largest group in Youth
Aliyah), over 200 kibbutzim, a number of
moshavim, and 20 full-day centers.
Students unable to cope with the usual
educational framework are cared for in 6
residential educational institutions
operated and financed by Youth Aliyah.
Youth Aliyah's activities and facilities
are funded from various sources. Over 90
percent of its $52 million budget for
fiscal year 1982-83 came from the United
Jewish Appeal-United Israel Appeal in
the U.S., and similar campaigns world-
wide. The UJA-UIA is supported by the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund. Special Youth Aliyah
committees raised about $5 million
toward the total.
The Jewish Agency contributes
between 60 percent-100 percent of the
actual cost of maintenance of youngsters
in Youth Aliyah, according to the type of
institution, and whether or not it is
owned by the Agency. In those facilities
where Youth Aliyah students make up at
least 40 percent of the population, the
Agency also contributes to the costs for
renovations and repairs, in addition to
food and clothing expenses, celebrations
(Bar Mitzvahs, etc.) and a variety of
miscellaneous expenditures.
This year Youth Aliyah is celebrating
its Golden Jubilee, marking 50 years of
service to the Jewish people. Through
the programs and facilities of Youth
Aliyah, supported by the Jewish Agency
and others, over 200,000 Jewish
youngsters from all over the world have
found new lives and hope for a better
future, in Israel.
As young Abraham, lately of
Ethiopia, now a resident of Israel, put it,
"It is good to be among Jews. We want
to live here and die here. Jerusalem has
always been in our hearts. We have
prayed for her, we have prayed so
much!"




Federation, April, 1983
Celebrate Israel's 3
A
ISRAEL CELEBRATION
SUNDAY APRIL24 1983
Be a part of the excitement and
Miami Jewish Community's special
held Sunday, April 24 at the Michael
in North Miami Beach, and the South!
The emphases of the dual progn
Community Centers of South Florid
Jewish Federation, will be the joy of
as a sovereign state, and an expressi<
continued development and growth.
Walkathons, performances, celebril
and camaraderie will highlight the ev<
r'cSK'Kr-I

-
'
Planning a big party at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC in honor of Israel's 35th birthday are
standing, Alan Zuckerman, Harvey Brown, Helene Cohen, Rabbi Julian I. Cook, Barbara
Ramsey, and Norman Pollack, seated, Fred Hirsch, Phil Kates, Gary Y. Holtzman, Sol
Bernstein, Fern Canter, and Irving Jaret.
Israel 35 Walkathons in both north and south I
Israel by raising funds for the 1983 Combin
Campaign
Yorili Dadc
Support human service programs for Jewa in Israel by taking part in the first North Dade walkathon
in "upport of the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign. The route will begin at
the 163rd Street Mall, behind Jordan Marsh, and proceed for five kilometers to the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center. Participants who raise S50 or more for the walkathone will receive special
Israel 35 tee shirts, commemorating the anniversary celebration.
A festival will begin at the Michael-Ann Russell JCC. 18900 NE 25th Avenue, directly following the
walkathon. This event will feature an Israeli Expo Center with films and displays; a "Shuk" (Israeli
market) with art and gift items for sale; food booths; and prizes.
Entertainment will include special performances for adults and children. Adults will enjoy the
renowned Haschachar Latin Review, the Chosen Children Israeli Folk Singers and the Nitxanim Dance
Group. Youngsters will be entertained by Whistles the Clown of Circus Playhouse, the Puppet People
performances and demonstrations, carnival booths sponsored by North Dade youth groups, a magician,
and strolling musicians.
Schedule of Events
940 A.M. Registration for Walkathon Begins
At 163rd Street Mall
Behind Jordan Marsh
10:00 A.M.
12:15 P.M.
Walkathon Begins
Opening Ceremony for Festival
Michael Ann Russell JCC
18900 NE 25th Ave.
North Miami Beach
IKK) P.M. Festival Activities Begin


Federation, April, 1983
Page 9
Birthday with Us
ism of "Israel 35/' the Greater
ion of Israel's anniversary, to be
issell Jewish Community Center
ish Community Center.
is coordinated by the Jewish
ration with the Greater Miami
Israel's three and a half decades
itment to the Jewish State's
riMwrances, displays, games, songs
'elhoth locations.
ISRAELCELEBRATION
SUNDAY.AFRIL24.1983
| Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Members of the South Dade Israel 35 Steering Committee review blueprints of the event
Shown, from left, are Sydney Newmark, Miriam Zadok, General Chairman Dror Zadok,
Sidney Fagin, William Saulson, Dalit MeUerand Stephanie Hauser.
South Dade
0. __ .. .-. -^v Iarae] by taking part in the second annual South Dade Walkathon in
Show your identification mi""^XSIbSImWW Fund Campaign. The 10-kilometer course
3BaSS&SSSS^^%sgssc
jm^^*-*^_~~&riZ^Z!&^ D^r.. ******
Schedule of Events
1.00PM Refristration for Walkathon Begins
X.UV Mr .x. ~ Ehmann Park
2:00 P.M.
2:15 P.M.
4:00 P.M.
Opening Ceremony for Walkathon
Walkathon Begins
Opening Ceremony for Festival
South Dade JCC
12401 SW 102nd Ave.
4-15 P.M. Festival Activities Begin
7:00 P.M. Kumzitz with Entertainment


It's Easy to Feel
Like a Million
Without Spendinl
a Dime
"It's easy to feel like a million without
spending a dime.'' That's the new ad-
vertising slogan for the Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops, and it's more than just a
cute jingle.
Philanthropy can be practiced in many
ways. Donations of new and used fur-
niture and appliances are as valuable as
cash gifts. Revenues generated by the
three Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops
(two in Dade and one in Broward) buy
medicine and medical supplies for in-
digent residents of Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens. Sixty-five percent of the
Home's 376 residents are in this
category.
The economic resession has left its
mark on thrift shop sales. "We can't sell
what we don't have," said Aaron
Kravits, chairman of the Thrift Shop
Committee for the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged. "The culprit
is the housing recession, fewer people are
moving or redecorating and giving away
furniture, the mainstay of the thrift shop
business."
To counteract this downward trend, an
aggressive merchandise acquisition plan
has been launched by the Home in behalf
of its thrift shops. Furniture, clothing,
housewares and building materials
manufacturers have all been targeted for
solicitation. Hotels and restaurants are
, another group from whom donations will
besought.
But the mainstay of Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops is still the individual
consumer. Studies estimate that 75
percent of the Jewish households that
L.
.M&
as*
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops are located at 5713 NW 27th A ve.. Miami; 500 NE 79th St..
Miami; and 3149 Hallandale Boulevard Hallandale.
donate merchandise do not give their
household goods to Douglas Gardens
Thrift Shops. A dramatic increase is
expected as a result of the acquisition
campaign.
The thrift shops' staff provides door to
door pick-up of all merchandise and sorts
out all items for placement in the shops'
various departments. The goods are sold
department store style, with separate
sections reserved for men's clothing,
women's clothing, books, fabrics,
household items, furniture and other
merchandise.
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops picki
donations from Homestead to Pa
Beach. Dade County residents who wii
to donate merchandise or seek moil
information about the thrift shops
call 751-3988.
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospitij
for the Aged is a member of the Grea
Miami Jewish Federation's family
agencies and a beneficiary of the Co
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emerges
Fund Campaign.
Songs and Laughter Endure
A "one of a kind" experience awaits
the Greater Miami community on
hunuuy, May io. Yakov Smirnoff, this
country's only Russian-born stand-up
luiiietiiaii will be appearing at Tempie
Beth Am, 5950 N. Kendall Drive, in a
program sponsored by the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry.
As the one and only Soviet emigre
comedian, Smirnoff presents a routine
unique among the ranks of rising young
comics. The 31-year-old Jewish im-
migrant divides his acts between tales of
his youth back in Russia, his experiences
adjusting to a vastly different American
vernacular and lifestyle, and ob-
servations on the differences between the
two most prominent cultures on the
planet. His act is family-style en-
tertainment and youngsters are en-
couraged to attend this very special per-
formance beginning at 7:30 pjn.
Sharing the bill for this special tribute
to Soviet Jewry will be musical artists
Rita and Ira Shore. The Shores, who
currently reside in Miami, have en-
tertained in South Florida, New York
and Colorado, and their professional
training includes Julliard School of
Music as well as the University of
Miami. Rita's credits also boast the title
"world's first woman cantor." The
Shores will include in their program for
the evening selections of traditional,
Jewish, and popular music, as well as
highlight songs of the Refuseniks.
For information on tickets for this
unique evening of entertainment and
tribute, call the South Florida Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry office at 576-
4000. The South Florida Conference is a
subcommittee of Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Community Relations
Committee.
Yakov Smirnoff
J VS Announces Citizenship Scholarship
The Jewish Vocational Service is
pleased to announce the establishment oi
a new citizenship scholarship for the
school year 1983-84/This scholarship has
Keen established through the generosity
of Mr. and Mrs. Lou Cohen, in memory
of the late Benjamin S. Pius.
Ben, who was a graduate of Southwest
High School, was a sophomore at Emory
University when he was tragically killed
in an automobile accident. To com-
memorate the accomplishments, ideals
and attributes that this young man
possessed, the Cohens are making this
annual scholarship of $500 (each) to be
awarded to one male-female student.
The .Benjamin s. Pius scholarship is
non-sectarian and is open to all high
school seniors who have demonstrated
qualities of outstanding citizenship
within their school and community.
A specific application including a 500
word essay entitled "Good Citizenship
Us, must be completed by each ap-
plicant. A personal interview with the
JVS counselor will be required for
scholarship finalists.
For more information, please contact
Beth K. Wald. counselor coordinator w|
Community Services at the Jew
Vocational Service. The telephone
number is 576-3220.
Jewish Vocational Service is a member
of the Greater Miami Jew*
Federation's family of agencies ana
beneficiary of the Combined Jew
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund ^
Daign.


Iteration, April 1983
Miami Delegation View* Vast Improvements
->*
v
>,.
*.*
isisi*
0, yUJyfl residents perform for the visiting delegation of Greater Miami
Jewish Federation leaders.
The new OrAkiva dental clinic, provided through Greater Miami participation
in Project Renewal
Or Aki va: A Renewed Community
Thanks to the generosity of the
Greater Miami Jewish community and
its sense of identification with the people
of Israel, the residents of one particular
Israeli town are enjoying improved con-
ditions and have greater pride about
their community.
A recent visit by a delegation from the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation to Or
Akiva, its Project Renewal community,
revealed that Federation's involvement
in the town is helping the quality of life
for its residents.
Stanley C. Myers, chairman of Feder-
ations Project Renewal Committee,
reported that general conditions in Or
Akiva have improved significantly since
Federation joined Project Renewal two
years ago.
Most ot the trenches and eyesores
that once dotted Or Akiva have been
replaced by well-groomed, attractive
landscaping.'' Myers said. "Our rela-
tionship has made this transformation
possible. But there is much we have yet
to accomplish."
In its first two years, Project Renewal
has produced a number of new services
and facilities that have cemented the re-
lationship between the two sister com-
munities. During the past year, the Or
Akiva Dental Clinic was completed,
which will provide residents with medical
care that was previously unavailable. A
new daycare center has given mothers
the opportunity to take active part in
their offspring's education through par-
ticipation in a parent-child educational
program. A new community center has
brought Or Akiva's residents together
with a series of programs and services.
When the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration joined Project Renewal, a cooper-
ative program sponsored by United
Jewish Appeal and the Jewish Agency, it
agreed to commit up to $1 million a year
tor five years. Federation was "twinned"
with Or Akiva. a depressed community
located one kilometer east of Caeserea,
midway between Haifa and Tel Aviv.
Federation's role in Project Renewal is
supported by thousands of Greater
Miami Jews who make gifts to a special
Project Renewal fund, in addition to
matching funds supplied by the Jewish
Agency. Myers said plans are now being
considered for a music center and a new
educational program for school-age
youngsters, projects that can become a
reality if the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity continues its involvement.
Many local residents have visited Or
Akiva during the past year and have
reported about the sense of gratitude and
appreciation expressed by the citizens of
Or Akiva. Participants on recent Federa-
tion missions to Israel enjoyed special
performances by the children of Or
Akiva and returned to the United States
with a special sense of pride in the ac-
complishments they saw at their twin
city.
"They were thrilled to see us," said
Amy Dean, who chaired the Women's
Division Chazaka Mission earlier thi
year. "You didn't have to say a word of
English when you said Miami' they
loved you."
**"
"T
Or Aki
va s residential area
Project Renewal Chairman Stanley C. Myers, left, meets with community
leaders of Or Akiva and former Israeli Defense Minister Ezer Weizman, at
head of table on left.
Latch Key Program Provides After School Care
A "Latch Key" program to assist
working parents by providing supervised
after-school activities for their children is
Deing offered on Wednesdays from 1:45
Pm to 6 p.m. at the Miami Beach
Jewish Community- Center, 4221 Pine
Tree Drive.
Activities include sports, arts and
crafts, movies, gymnastics, cooking and
special outmes.
-
Taxis will be available as needed at
several nearby public and private
elementary schools. Parents can pick up
their children at the JCC at the con-
clusion of the day's activities. The cost of
transportation is being underwritten
through private contributions.
Participants in the program must be
members of the Miami Beach JCC. They
are charged only $5 per day to cover
expenses for instructors and supplies. If
children arrive after 4 p.m., the cost is $4
per day.
The program was implemented as a
pilot project. Plans are to make it a daily-
program next year.
For more information or Registration
of your child, call Iris Berger at 534-3206.


v*m&
Federation, April 1988
Summer of Fun Awaits Campers
ividua
A summer of fun awaits campers from
pre-schooi age through junior high at the
day camps of the Michael-Ann Russell,
Miami Beach and South Dade Jewish
Community Centers.
Special activities like sports in-
struction, Israeli shlichim, resident art-
ist, Israel Week and Maccabiah Games
are being offered in addition to regular
programs of sports, arts and crafts,
music, dance, field trips and Jewish
culture.
There are also special interest camps
in coed sports, gymnastics and tennis at
the Michael-Ann Russell JCC. Computer
camps and Counselor in Training (C.I.T.)
programs for teens entering 10th grade
are available at each center.
Parents may register children for
other four week session, June 2n i.
15 or July 18-August 12, !?*
sessions. Camp hours are 9 a.m to4 n
Times vary for some pre-school a
programs. Early drop off and late
programs are available for wort
parents. Fees vary for indivu
programs and JCCs. For more
formation about summer day cam ami
registration, call the Michael A
Russell JCC, 932-4200; Miami Beam
JCC, 534-3206; or South Dade JCC Mfl
1394. 01"
Teen Travel programs to the north I
eastern United States and Canada!
throughout the southeastern United!
States, Florida, and to the Bahama hi
lands are again available for teenagers inl
the seventh through 11th grades.
The Majestic U.S. of A. and Neigh-1
boring Canada trip June 22-July n
features stops in Atlanta. New York
City, Boston, Montreal, Quebec City,
Ontario, Toronto, Niagara Falls, the
Berkshire Mountains and Washington
D.C. Cost is $975.
The Great Outdoors and Island Cruise!
July 24-August 12 goes to Gainesville,
Fontana Village, the Great Smokey
Mountains, EPCOT at Disney World,
Orlando, Sarasota, Sanibel Island and
the Bahama Islands. Cost is $1,075.
A non-refundable deposit must ac-
company registration for either tour. Call
Gail Weisberg at the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, 576-1660, for
registration information.
Attorney to Speak on Cults and the Law
Two special April 28 programs will
center on the controversial topic of re-
ligious cults and the law. These events
will feature presentations by Herbert
Rosedale, Esq., a prominent attorney
with experience in litigating cult cases,
and are sponsored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Task Force on Cults
and Missionaries.
Rosedale is a partner in the corporate
department of Parker, Chapin, Flattau
and Klimpl. He graduated from Colum-
bia University in 1956 and was admitted
to the New York State Bar in 1957. He is
a member of the Advisory Committee for
the Center on Destructive Cults, as well
as being counsel to the Interfaith Coali-
tion on Missionaries and Cults.
Among his many cases has been sig-
nificant litigation in the States of New
York and Massachusetts involving
various cults. He also has successfully
represented communities in their actions
to deter establishment of cult centers.
The first program will begin at 6:30
p.m. at the Federation Building and is
being offered to the legal community.
The topic to be discussed will be "Cults
... A Legal Perspective," a review of the
constitutional issues involved in cult-re-
lated freedom of speech and religion
cases. Attendance at this event is by
invitation only and cocktails will precede
the program. This meeting is being
offered free of charge and there will be no
solicitation of funds.
The general public is invited to attend
the second session at 8:30 pjn. at the
Federation Building, which will review
the topic "Cults: Beyond the Law?" This
event also will be free of charge and
without solicitation.
Rosedale will deal with the complex
constitutional issues surrounding
charges of brainwashing and coercive
persuasion. This topic is particularly
timely in light of a bill under considera-
tion by the Florida House of Representa-
tives, which would provide a person im-
pacted by coercive persuasion with a 30-
day period at a neutral site, with the pos-
sibility of an extension of up to 45 days.
The Task Force on Cults and Mis-
sionaries is operating through a special
grant provided by the Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, and is chaired
by Rabbi Brett Goldstein. For more
information about these programs, call
Helen Friedman, the Task Force direc-
tor, at 576-4000, extension 356.
Federation Gardens to be Dedicated
Federation Gardens, the Greater
Miami Jewish community's second
subsidized housing project for the
elderly, will be formally dedicated on
Sunday, May 1 at 10 a.m., announced
Samuel I. Adler, president of Jewish
Federation Housing, Inc.
The ceremony will highlight the com-
pletion of the facility, located at 10905
SW 112th Ave., and the coordination of a
service package to meet the needs of the
Federation Gardens residents.
Jewish Federation Housing, Inc.,
which sponsors and supports the facility,
is a subsidiary of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. Federation Gardens
was subsidized by a federal Department
of Housing and Urban Development
Title 202-8 loan.
Norman H. Lipoff, president of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation, also
serves as chairman of the Federation
Housing Board of Directors. Martin Fine
is chairing the Federation Housing dedi-
cation ceremony.
Federation Gardens' 110 units were
first occupied by elderly tenants on
November 15, at which time a number of
the members of Federation's family of
agencies formed a Professional Commit-
tee on Services to coordinate efforts and
set priorities for future programs. These
agencies include the Jewish Family and
Children's Service, the Jewish Commu-
nity Centers of South Florida, Mount
Sinai Medical Center, the Jewish Voca-
tional Service, the Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged, the Commu-
nity Chaplaincy Service of Greater
Miami, the Central Agency for Jewish
Education and the Federation South
Dade Branch.
Adler explained that the new facility is
Federation Housing's second subsidized
housing project for the elderly, with the
114-unit Federation Towers, 757 West
Avenue, Miami Beach, which opened in
1979.
"Even with these two complexes,
there remains an immediate need for at
least an additional 500 subsidized units
for the elderly," Adler said, noting that
the waiting list for both Federation
facilities continues to grow.
"Ten years ago, Federation created
a special Commission on the Elderly to
examine the needs of our senior citizen
population," Lipoff said. "One of *
commission's findings was the ne*~/
subsidized housing, a need which Feder-
ation Housing and its two housing
facilities have sought to address effec-
tively."
For more information about Federa-
tion Housing, call Nathan Skolnick at
531-2388.


Federation, April, 1983
Pa*#l3
*
oftfie greater Miami Jewish federation
Restricted Funds and
Endowments Opportunities
The elderly enjoy a Friday afternoon gathering at the Jewish Vocational Service's Kosher
Kitchen program.
In his will, philanthropist Harry
Aibinder left the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies a substantial bequest
specifically earmarked for the benefit of
the Jewish Vocational Service (JVS) of
Miami. Today, because of good fiscal
management by the Foundation's in-
vestment committee, the assets of the
fund are worth more than the original
gift and important charitable programs
have been carried out. The Jewish,Voca-
tional Service is assured that when it
begins a new program such as the
Kosher Kitchen, or needs a new piece of
equipment to be used in its sheltered
workshop, the foundation will be able to
provide the needed dollars from the
Aibinder fund.
This month's column is designed to re-
mind our readers that this concept can
have wide application and can work for
many donors in their estate planning. A
donor may provide long term benefits to
a variety of specific agencies (or "fields
of interest") by setting aside funds in the
form of a bequest. The amount set aside
is not taxable to the estate and will
create a perpetual fund in the name of
the donor which will help to provide
human services to individuals in the
Miami area, nationally or overseas. Why
is this concept important to both
foundation and the individual?
1- By creating a "field of interest"
fund for care of the aged, youth services,
health and hospitals, or assistance to the
mentally handicapped, the donor is pro-
viding the Federation a critically impor-
tant pool of resources which are ear-
marked for a specific service area. These
funds endow the Federation's ability to
continuously provide for the expanding
needs of our people and prepare for the
future.
2. A recent capital needs survey of all
the Jewish agencies in Dade County're-
vealed some 26 million dollars of projects
needed to meet the diverse opportunities
>n our population. This fact emphasizes
the uniqueness of our community, which
deludes a rapidly expanding younger
Jewish population in South Dade as well
as an aging population on Miami Beach.
The Federation would like to be able to
^rve each group but cannot do so solely
through the annual campaign. While the
campaign does provide limited dollars
or the annual operating budgets of the
agencies, the foundation's endowment
program provides the equity from which
the community will be able to continu-
ously build its resources and programs in
the future. M
3. A donor interested in this type of
endowment could provide for the Federa-
tion's foundation not only by bequest in
a will but currently through the creation
of a charitable remainder trust. Such an
arrangement would involve a transfer to
the Federation during the donor's life-
time of assets, income of which wo uld
continuously flow to the donor, a family
member or other beneficiary until his-her
demise, at which time the principal of the
original gift would create a field of in-
terest fund as described above.
For example, a $100,000 gift made today
in this manner, using appreciated
securities might generate for the donor a
current charitable deduction of as much
as $40,000 and could yield a fixed
percentage or predetermined amount of
income to the designated beneficiary. A
field of interest fund of this type might
also be created by use of a life insurance
policy purchased today with the
Foundation as beneficiary.
4. Could the Foundation invade the
corpus created by such a gift? Not unless
the donor had specifically provided so in
the instrument creating the fund.
5. Who would manage the investment
of such funds? The Investment Commit-
tee of the Foundation, a group of ex-
tremely knowledgeable men and women
who voluntarily serve the community,
make decisions to maximize the yield
and safety of the Foundation's assets.
6. Who would make decisions as to
distributions from the fund: The Board
of Trustees of the Foundation, a group of
individuals chosen for their knowledge of
the needs of the community, would make
decisions based upon recommendations
of the Planning and Budget Committee
of the Federation and in consultation
with the donor, if appropriate.
7. How do donors receive recognition
for the creation of these funds? All
checks sent to agencies indicate the
name of the fund from which grants are
made. In addition, the donors' name
would be listed prominently in letters of
transmittal and all Foundation publica-
tions, scrolls, etc.
If you would like further information
on how to save taxes while leaving a
legacy to the Jewish community please
call the Foundation Office, 576-4000.
Foundation Invests in Israel
Due to recent changes in the interest
rate payable on State of Israel Bonds to
Foundations and Public Endowment
Funds, the Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies has purchased $500,000 in
Variable Rate Issue (V.R.I.) bonds.
The V.R.I, bond series pays a mini-
mum of 7.5 percent interest plus one-half
of the difference between 7.5 percent and
the average prime rate as determined by
three of the country's leading banking
institutions. Adjusted every six months,
on October 1st and April 1st, the rate is
guaranteed never to drop below 7.5 per-
cent. For example, if the prime rate on
April 1, 1983 were determined at 10.5
percent the interest payable on the bond
from April 1, 1983 to October 1, 1983
would be 9 percent. Although the bond
matures in 12 years from the date of
issue, it can be redeemed at par after
three years.
"This is an important step for the
Foundation." commented Shepard
Broad, member of the Foundation's In-
vestment Committee.
"Up until recently this attractive yield
was available only to employee benefit
plans, union and other private retirement
plans. As an investment this bond is now
competitive with other traditional
purchases, and enables the Foundation
to support vital public works projects in
Israel." Broad added.
Shepard Broad
"The Foundation is pleased to be able
to aid in the development of the State of
Israel by having these bonds in its in-
vestment portfolio." Arnold Ganz.
Investment Committee chairman
agreed.


Page 14
Federation, April, 1983
Mt. Sinai
Continued from Page 6
A more intimate feeling is further estab-
lished by the specialized staff who are
trained in handling all aspects of
surgery, from preparation, to operating
room duties, to post-operative care. In
most hospitals these are separate func-
tions, each performed by different mem-
bers of the hospital staff. Should any
unusual situation arise, emergency
capabilities are on hand in the facility, or
if need be, you can be immediately trans-
ported to the main hospital via a con-.
nee ting passage.
After surgery, and a short time in a
post-operative recovery area, you are
moved to an ambulatory recovery room,
a comfortable place, where you can relax
in reclining lounge chair and be joined by
the person who accompanied vou. When
you are ready to be dishcharged, both of
you are given careful instruction for your
post-operative care. Twenty-four hours
later, a patient representative and a
nurse representative call you at home to
see how you are getting along.
What have you saved, and what have
you gained, by skipping the traditional
hospital stay? For one thing, you have
probably saved money. In an era when
the public, the government, insurance
companies and the health care industry
all decry the rising cost of medical care,
outpatient surgery has emerged as an
excellent way to provide the highest
quality medical service at the lowest
possible cost. By eliminating hospital
stays, which include charges for the
room, food, personnel and maintenance
expenses, the cost of a surgical procedure
can be reduced by as much as 50 per
cent. In South Florida alone, this
translates to millions of dollars in
savings each year to the health-consumer
community; on a individual patient
basis, the savings can run from $300 to
over $1,000. depending upon the type of
surgery performed.
All major insurance providers, includ-
ing Medicare, cover outpatient surgery if
the same surgery is covered on an inpa-
tient basis. In fact, a recent law
regarding Medicare reimbursement has
eliminated all deductibles and co-
payments which you would normally pay
the surgeons when he performs your
surgery on an outpatient basis, when he
accepts the allowable reimbursement.
Another advantage is the convenience.
Having an operation as an outpatient
saves a considerable amount of time and
minimizes disruptions to business or
personal life. The pre-admission visit
requires just two hours at the most, and
the complete preparation, procedure and
recovery usually takes around five hours.
Best of all, the traditional two or three
nights in a hospital are eliminated, while
safe, skilled medical care is still assured.
Finally, the actual design of the Gum-
enick Center has been planned for
therapeutic value.
"Everything has been selected to
make the patient feel relaxed," says Ad-
ministrative Assistant Fran Crawford.
Such patient benefits make it easy to
see why outpatient surgery has already
proven successful in communities
throughout the nation, and why is has
been fully endorsed by the American
Hospital Association. Advantages tn
physicians, which ultimately result Z
better patient care, are also considerable I
With the opening of the center, Mount
Sinai is taking a giant step into tat
future of health care. Industry expert!
see ambulatory surgery as growing h
popularity as insurers offer greater in
centives for same day*surgery, as tech
nological advances lengthen the list of
ambulatory procedures; and as patients
perceive the safety and comfort of the
concept.
Of course, ambulatory surgery is not
for everyone. Each patient's medical his-
tory and current condition determines
whether or not a hospital stay is re-
quired. The final decision must be made
by a surgeon.
But, for the Craig Teriacas and the
Ann Meyers and many more people in
between their 70 year age span, ambula-
tory care is a positive new alternative in
health care.
Mount Sinai Medical Center is a
member of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's family of agencies and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
paign.
The Sophia and Nathan Gumenick Ambulatory Care Center
Jn-
Vi 11 It 14TII 4 Continued from Page 5
'.
ht
lys 'ore putting a name on what
obi was
Gil nd her husband, the name of
he rob m Downe s Syndrome
aid it mian much at first. Within a few
days, the> were denying that this label
ould possibly mean their child would be
mentally and physically retarded per-
manently.
"*>enying is normal" says Shalvit.
Th- parents are suffering terribly at a
time like this. It is no time to make deci-
sion A decision made about the child
during those first days is not pure. 1
knovv parents who placed their children
in institutions immediately, and they
have lived to regret it."
The center does all it can to encourage
parents to keep their handicapped chil-
dren at home. It offers parental counsel-
ing, extensive therapies for the children,
and kindergartens designed to meet the
special needs with a variety of different
handicaps. Most importantly, it offers
moral support and factual information to
guide parents.
Anne Bilowet, one of the center's
kindergarten teachers, is encouraging:
"Advancement that can be made with
these children today is incredible. We've
learned, for example, what a Downe's
Syndrome child can achieve when we
work with him or her from birth."
With a loving glance towards the two
and three-ye^^J^ulera, ^ ^:q

eludes quietly and proudly: "With these
children, we're setting the foundation.
I'm sharing in the most important time
of their lives."
Mothers like Gila have to be taught
exactly how important these beginning
years are. Gila, after those first days of
pain and denial, found healing and af-
firmation in that learning process.
"We taught her that her new-born
would move at a different tempo," says
Shavit. "That there are rules for how the
child should be fed and held, special
techniques for muscle development.
Above all, that there are rewards very
different from the satisfactions with a so-
called normal child but very special."
The center, a pioneering facility
launched in 1967 by the American Jew-
ish Joint Distribution Committee with
funds from UJA-community campaigns,
now reached out into the town around
Jerusalem.
Development towns like Beit
She mesh, where damaged children were
traditionally just kept with their
families, with no stimulation and no
chance for advancement. Some, whose
retardation might have been minimal,
ended up severely retarded.
For 94 special children in Beit
She mesh today, since UJA-Project Re-
newal fudns brought the Jerusalem cen-
ter's services into the town, the picture is
brightly changed. They are no longer
hidden, burdens. Every advance, every
small new motor skin learned, is a source ',

i
of joy and triumph in their households.
According to Director Asher Ornoy,
the center's approach is outside of Is-
rael," he states, "are only diagnostic.
The fact that we diagnose and treat
means that we're really fulfilling the
main goal of medicine.
Counseling pregnant women against
irrational fear of birth abnormalities is
a key function at the center. "My main
role is to calm down anxiety and reduce
the number of unnecessary pregnancy
terminations," says Ornoy.
The philosophy is clear: life is
precious, should be wanted guarded
cherished helped to grow.
Demand for the centers services is be-
ginning to outstrip its capacity, but
plans for expansion have been sus-
pended. Funded from the Ministry ol
Health, which has had responsibility tor
the Jerusalem facility and 12 similar pro-
grams in Israel since 1978, has been cut
back in the wake of Operation Peace for
Galilee. Future growth now hinges on
the success of the United Jewish Appeal
Israel Special Fund.
For Gila, three years after the birth of
her Downe's Syndrome baby, thehun
and anxiety are past: the promised re
wards mount with each sign of slow, new
progress in her special eighth child, in*
anxiety has now shifted to the centers
devoted staff, who wait and wonder"
they will be able to offer that W*JpW
all the other mothers and affu^.rj"
dren who will need their unique and w
ingcare. \^'[ :^^ o^ziuaKW "


Federation, April, 1983
Page 15
i^AY; Adults Division of the Greater Miami Jew-
fe5ilw 11 be sponsoring a Shalom brunch for
tetSs morning at 11:00. For more informa-
l AdJltl Division of the Greater Miami Jew-
IJ",1 continues its film series this evening
RKSrilSol "Frisco Kid" at the South Dade
1 SSSS which includes refresh^. **
iiftSnation. call Laurie Berman at 676-4000.
l_.Y jliaY 1
Lrl,iChapter of American Mizrachi Women wiU be
t%2%auction this evening at 7:30 at Temple
K>66 SW 16th Street- An Early bird sale wdl
'at 300. For more information, call Mrs.
^in at 595-6524.
IwMtcbAttar Area Chapter of Women's American
will be having a charter signing brunch this
1fat 10 30 at Temple Beth Tov. 6438 SW 8th
For more information, call Charlotte Wild at
[Southwest Chapter of Women's American ORT is
Ivue a Mothers Day luncheon today at 11:30 at Re-
gions on the Bay, 301 NE Miamarina Parkway. The
nation is $15 and includes lunch and a fashion show
Mi-5th Avenue. For more information and
nations, please call Vicki Einhorn at 385-5422.
t Sisterhood of Temple Ner Tamid will hold its donor
icheon at noon today at the Carillon Hotel, Miami
A
DAY,MAY1
| Hebrew Educators Alliance dinner will be held this
mingat the Casablanca Hotel. Zahava Sukenick will
honored. For more information, call Gladys
lond at 947-8306.
DNDAY, MAY 2 THURSDAY, MAY 5
_ Women's Division of Greater Miami Jewish
deration will be sponsoring a week long phonathon
i at various times and locations throughout the city
week. For more information, call the Women's
Hvision at 576-4000.
EDNESDAY, MAY 4
t Women's Division of the Greater Miami Jewish
.(deration is sponsoring a Southwest Dade Special
Event on behalf of the 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-
ing Emergency Fund this evening at 7:00. Gene
Ireenzweig. executive director of the Central Agency
|>r Jewish Education, will be the guest speaker. For
Tore information, call the Women's Division at 576-
FEDNESDAY. MAY 4
rat National Council of Jewish Women will hold their
Biallation of officers and volunteer recognition day
Imcheon at noon today at the Eden Roc Hotel, 4225
jollins Avenue Nan Rich will be installed as president.
for more information, call the Council office at 576-
m
Hl'RSDAY, MAY 5
(Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith will be
Mdinu a dinner dance this evening at the Four
Ambassadors Motel. For more information, call 373-
pESDAY. MAY 10
South Dade Chapter of Brandeis University
Fwnen's Committee will have their annual spring
wibership meeting and luncheon today at the Kings
y Yacht and Country Club. For more information,
11 Donna Singer at 233-4952.
JJESDAY.MAY10
e American Jewish Committee "Sage" Award lunch-
. [ will be held today at the Holiday Inn on Brickell
Niue. Howard Gary will be the guest speaker. For
*W information, call 576-4240.
Ndnesday. MAY 11
I "he Hidden Job Market" will be discussed by experts
PM" Jewish Vocation Service this evening at 7:30
I* Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center.
I'ormore information, call the JCC office at 932-4200.
Calendar
ORT
Tem-
IjEDNESDAY.MAYll
BJ" Gables Chapter of Women's American
E ijng a meeting this morning at 11:80 at aw
IKJudea, 5500 Granada Boulevard, Coral Gables. The
EPa" be Performing. For more information, caU
uteue Berman at 856-3638.
THURSDAY, MAY 12
I nan tour of the studios of surrealist Leslie Klein and
JT artist Leatrice Linden will be led by art historian
Ewn?* this morning at 9:00. The cost is $5 for
EZ ade JCC members, 67.50 for guests. For more
pormauon, call 251-1394.
NrSDAY.MAY12
EZ!9i* co"ed e*reiae will be led by instructor
W?n ?lpert tnfa evening from 7:30-8:30 at the
I "find a JewUh Community Center. 12401 SW
IjJM Avemw. The coat ia $4 for members. 16 for
u For more information, call 261-1304.
THURSDAY. MAY 12
The Jewish Junior High School will hold a scholarship
fundraising dinner this evening at 6:00 at the Beth
David Congregation, 7500 SW 120th Street. For more
information, call Sandi Samole at 667-0820.
THURSDAY, MAY 12
The Greater Miami Women's Division of American
Friends of Hebrew University will hold a "Daughters of
Mount Scopus" luncheon today at noon at the Fon-
tainebleau-Hilton. For more information, call Florence
Feldman at 868-7600.
THURSDAY, MAY 12
The Women's Division of the American Technion
Society will hold a luncheon at the David Williams res-
taurant in Coral Gables at noon today.
THURSDAY. MAY 12
"Are We Not All God's People," an open community
forum series sponsored by the Kendale Lakes Chapter
of Women's American ORT and the Sisterhood of
Congregation Bet Breira, will be held this evening at
8:00 at Bet Breira Synagogue, 9400 SW 87th Avenue.
Lawrence N. Schuval, a representative from People for
the American Way, will be the guest speaker, followed
by a Norman Lear film entitled "The Radical Right."
The evening will conclude with a citizens panel featur-
ing rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff, president of the Rab-
binical Association of Greater Miami, and Commis-
sioner Ruth Shack. The forum is open to the public at
no charge. For more information, call Hennie Golden-
sohn at 382-1760.
SUNDAY. MAY 15
"Songs and Laughter Endure," a tribute to Soviet
Jewry, featuring Soviet emigre comedian Yakov
Smirnoff and musical artists Rita and Ira Shore, will be
held this evening at 7:30 at Temple Beth Am. 5950
North Kendall Drive. The event is sponsored by the
South Florida Conference on Soveit Jewry a committee
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Community
Relations Committee. Ticket prices range from $5 to
$100. For more information, call 576-4000.
SUNDAY. MAY 15
The semi-annual dinner dance and election of officers of
Temple Emanu-El will be held this evening at 6:00 in
the ballroom. 1701 Washington Avenue. Parents and
children are encouraged to attend. For more informa-
tion, call the Temple at 538-2503.
SUNDAY. MAY 15
Dr. Irving Greenberg will present a lecture entitled
"Jewish Power and National Sovereignty Confront
Jewish Ethics" as part of the mini-college of Temple Is-
rael of Greater Miami and co-sponsored by the Zachor
Institute for Holocaust Studies. The seminar begins at
10:00 this morning at Temple Israel. 137 NE 19th
Street. There will be a $3.00 general admission charge.
For more information, call the Zachor Institute at 576-
4000.
SUNDAY. MAY 15
The Southwest Chapter of Women's American ORT
will be sponsoring a car wash-a-thon at the Kendall
Gulf gas station at 98th Avenue and North Kendall
Drive from 10:00 until 2:00 this afternoon. Refresh-
ments will be served.
MONDAY. MAY 16
The Jewish Family and Children's Service will hold its
installation meeting this evening at 8:00. For more
information, call 445-0555.
TUESDAY. MAY 17
The South Dade Chapter of Women s American ORT
will be holding their annual installation of officers this
morning at 11:30 at the Kendall Acres Clubhouse.
103rd avenue and North Kendall Drive. For more in-
formation, call the ORT office at 666-2901.
SUNDAY. MAY 22
The Temple Beth Am concert series will present an
"Afternoon of Music with Peter Zazofsky and Michelle
Levin" today at 4:00 at the Temple, 5950 North
Kendall Drive. For more information, call Doreen Marx
at 667-6667.
The Jewish Association Serving Singles (JASS) will
hold a conference today at the Sonesta Beach Hotel.
Key Biscayne. This all day leadership symposium for
Jewish singles begins at 10:30 this morning. The
Drogram will include brunch, workshops, and a cocktail
reception. A cover charge of 612.50 is required. For
more information, call Ellen Elkins at 251-1394.
SUNDAY. MAY 22 WEDNESDAY MAY 26
The Women's American ORT District VI fifth biennial
convention will be held this week at the Hyatt Regency
Hotel. Miami. The Dade South region is the region
hostess for the event. The convention will feature panel
discussions, installation of officers, a fashion show, and
much more. For more information, please call the ORT
office at 6*8i01< -
TUESDAY, MAY 24
"Keeping Your Weight Under Control," a program
covering weight control, fad dieting, healthy ways to
lose weight, the importance of exercise and the im-
plications of eating unhealthy foods will be given this
evening at the South Dade Jewish Community Center.
The cost is $1 for guest and members are admitted at no
charge. For more information, call 251-1394.
THURSDAY. MAY 26
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Women's Divi-
sion will sponsor its 8th Annual Retreat today at the
FonUinebleau-Hflton. The theme of this year's retreat
is "Can't Cope Here's Hope, Dealing with Stress,"
featuring Dr. Gail Silverman speaking about survival
tips for a stress-less self. This day long event is open to
all Board and Committee members of the Women's
Division and lunch and dinner will be served. The
dinner will include installation of officers and Martin
Agronsky, noted journalist and television com-
mentator, will be the guest speaker. For more in-
formation, call the Women's Division at 576-4000.
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
Organization.
Event______
Place.
Date_
Your
Tide.
.Time.
| a.m. () p.m.
name
. Phone No..
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Halfway To Somewhere
Continued from Page 5
petty cash left for them every day. In
fact, their lives are not very dissimilar to
normal men in their peer group, and their
standard of living is much higher than
many.
None of the staff stays overnight at
the flat, so the residents feel independent
and unsupervised. They red atly asked
for and were granted T\ esdays as
staff-free days also. They can entertain
friends, go to restaurants or movies, or
do whatever they want.
At times when no staff member is in
attendance, an upstairs neighbor is paid
to be available if they need any help or
advice. The neighbors are all supportive
and kind to the four young men, whose
retardation is classed as mild and all of
whom are functioning well in their new
community setting.
Yehudit and Karen have taught them
all kinds of recipes, and they can cook
eggplant parmesan, baked fish, thick
vegetable soup and a variety of casse-
roles'
Jerusalem already has two other
similar apartments operating one for
six retarded young women in Kiryat
Yovel and another for four men in the
prestigious neighborhood of Rehavia.
Soon Agudat Shekel plans to open one
for six children (who will have a live-in
house-mother).
In this way, Israel's mildly retarded
are being brought out of the shadows
into the sunlight, where they are learning
to make valuable contributions to
society while they enhance their own self-
image and self-worth.
Instead of facing a life with no future,
they are already half-way to somewhere
... on the road with ho dead-end.


Federation. April, 1983
.*. >
Yasir Arafat
and King Hussein
both say that Jordan
is Palestine.
In the late 1940s, King Abdullah, Husseins grandfather,
wanted to call his country the "Kingdom of Palestine"
In 1970, Husseins brother, Prince Hassan, said, "Palestine
is Jordan and Jordan is Palestine."
The same year, Yasir Arafat told correspondent Oriana
Fallaci, "What you call Jordan is actually Palestine."
In 1981, Hussein as well declared, "The truth is that Jordan
is Palestine and Palestine is Jordan."
Even The New York Times agreed when, on August 3,1975,
it called Jordan's capital "the greatest Palestinian city in the world."
Abdullah, Hassan, Arafat, Hussein, and The New York
Times were only confirming what any World Atlas and World Alma-
nac will tell you:
Jordan occupies almost 77% of the original Palestine
Mandate. More than two-thirds of Jordan's citizens are Pales-
tinians. Half of Jordan's Prime Ministers since 1950 have
been Palestinian. Three-fourths of
Jordan's government employees
are Palestinians. Palestinians con-
trol 70% of Jordan's businesses.
It s no wonder that in
1977 Hussein said, "The two
people are actually one. That
is a fact."
And if it's a fact that
the Jordanians and the Pales-
tinians are one people, it's a fact
that they deserve one homeland
Jordan.
Please write Jordan is Palestine Committee
RO. Box 2003. New Hyde Park. XV11040. with
your comments. Richard Jacoel. Chairman.
This advertisement was reprinted courtesy of the Community Relations
Committee of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. You may wish to
send this to your U.S. senators or congressional representatives


Israel's Economy:
Look to the Future
a special report apnl, 1983
BvMOSHENETANEL
hmf / Consul for Economic Affairs,
Miami
, For the past three and a half decades
LIsraeli economy has been charac-
Erfmainly by continuous expansion
Ebighrateof Kwth of its
[soduction capacity.
I 1,,he same time, the pattern of this
L1(wnomic development has been
like.!, throughout this entire period,
K^ady diversification and an in-
Ciing degree of industrial
I sophisticnum.
Today. Israel produces and exports
Inotonh WCh exotic and traditional
Kansas diamonds, oranges, ladies'
Inrifflwear and flowers; but also and
pen more so a wide range of high
I Kfhnolotfv products such as computers,
I bans, nuclear medical imaging systems,
I (omputerized irrigation systems.
executive jet aircraft, computerized
paphic equipment, and a broad spec-
I tram of electronic equipment.
. But while t hese achievements in
expanding the industrial capability of
I the country are certainly remarkable, yet
I the growth of exports was even more
I impressive from a mere $90 million in
1950to more t ban $5.5 billion worth of
agricultural and industrial goods ex-
ported in 1981. Total exports of goods
I andKTt ices (including tourism and
I banking' readied t he record figure of SI 1
[billionin "!. thus making Israel the
I eighth nation on the list of the top-
uporting countries in the world, per
capita. Exports from Israel were
shipped, last year, to more than seventy
countries around the world. Imports in
I9A1 reached $15.5 billion.
The intensity of its international
trade is indeed one of the outstanding
futures of the Israel economy. The
innual trade {exports and imports
combined) was $26.5 billion in 1981. (As
comparative figure, Florida, which is
lour times the size of Israel, had trade of
I M.6billion I And our annual trade ir
ids and services comes to 120 percent
of our gross national product one of
the highest ratios in the world. (For the
itntire U.S.. the comparable figure is 20
[percent!
The magnitude of this trade and the
"nportant role it plays in the economic
Wivity of the country, with a
Population of just over four million
can also Ik- illustrated by the fact that we
"nport about 10 percent of our total
purees, and export nearly 30 percent
Iku w: "s aPProPr'Bte to mention here
mi this performance in exports should
*v wed in t he context of the deep
""Wongripping Israel's principal
oporl markets The fact that Israel's
PMts dipped slightly last year is
gww m this critical period of
"Passed world economy. Man
r,.x,.,.,,, especially as uneat-
en ki i at a relatively
and t he gross national produ
i 5 percent
Jw"{ l" I "I
-that lie
m the future are even mon
plans 1
industry nvisagi : 2
thai by 1990. exports of
'.Is would more than double
~. "each M is l.dlion. If this am-
j-1"^ goal can be achieved. Israel could
* balanced trading account within
*> years.
Despite the fact that Israel is poor in
natural resources except for a few
minerals and that all of our raw
materials are imported; the central goal
of improving the balance of payments
can be achieved in the not-too-distant
future by pursuing our policy of:
1. Maximum growth of the industrial
output, through encouragement of
capital investments.
2. Structural changes of industry,
t hrough intensive development of
science-based industries for export.
However, this high pace of projected
growth will not just happen by itself.
Approximately $1 billion of investment
per annum originating from local and
foreign investors is needed in the
industrial sector alone.
Israel has a traditional policy of
welcoming foreign investments, and
indeed one of the first laws enacted after
the establishment of the State in 1948
was the "Law for Encouragement of
Capital Investments," which offers
investors (in industrial projects for
export! a wide variety of incentives
including grants and loans, tax con-
cessions and other financial incentives.
The thousands of foreign private in-
vestors, and the hundreds of industrial
companies from the US. (including
thirty Fortune 500 corporations) and
other parts of the world who have
already invested in profitable and
prosperous industrial projects in Israel.
Their success is the best assurance for us
that in the future they will be joined by
many more individuals and firms in-
vesting m Israel.
Already, the main accent is on in-
vestments in high-technology branches
of industry which implies focusing
on the creation of original new products
based on local research and develop-
ment. In 1981, the exports of innovative
science-based products (the result of
original Israeli R&D) reached $1.2
billion, which Is about one-third of
industrial exports. By 1990, it is
projected t hat this export will more than
triple, and will constitute about half of
industrial exports.
To achieve this growth in high-
technology exports, the present annual
$80 million outlay on R&D will have to
be increased to more than $250 million
FLORIDA
ISRAEL
published by America-Israel Chamber of Commerce Southeast Region
Continued on Page 3
Official Israel Business
Mission to Visit Florida
The importance of the Florida-Israel
business connection will be underscored
next month, when an official Israel
Business Mission to the United States,
visits here. Miami is one of only six cities
included in the two-week coast-to-coast
itinerary.
Leading the high-level 20-person dele-
gation is Israel Minister of Industry and
Trade Gideon Patt. Participants are
chief executives of major Israeli firms,
and represent a crossisection of that
nation's business and industry. (
Members of the M ission include:
Asher Halpersin. Managing Director of j
the Association of Banks in Israel and
President of the Israel-America Chamber
of Commerce, which is co-ordinating the
trip; and the CEOs of Israel Aircraft
Industries. Koor Industries. Israel
Chemicals. National Brewery and
Motorola Israel.
The Florida segment will include a
visit t.i Kpcot. a tour of the Miami Free
Zone, luncheon hosted by the State of
Florida and reception sponsored "> ru-
America Israel Chamber of Commerce-
S. : heat t Region.
The mainpurpost ol the Mission!* to
make known toth. Americanbusiness
community the widt '
for-doing prol isim i
1 ir '
The Florida-Israel Connection
By WAYNE MIXSON
Lieutenant Governor and
Secretary of Commerce
State of Florida
Florida's growth as an international
center for commerce and trade continues
to accelerate, and every indication points
to almost unlimited potential in world
markets during the decade of the '80s.
One market which is emerging as an
important one to Florida is Israel.
Factors in the growing I h nda-lsrael
business connection include increased
awareness by Israeli businessmen of the
potential of Florida as both a market and
a major center ot commerce and in-
dustry: the similarities between Israel
and Florida lifestyles, the activity ol 11
America-Israel Chamber ol Commerce
and the establishment last ear ol the
Israel Consulate and the Israel
Investment ami Export Authority in
Miami.
These t ies are continuously being
strengthened. Bilateral trade is growing
rapidly. The number ol imp iries from
both Israeli and U.S. businessmen is
increasing daily. The first official Israeli
t rade and business mission is coming to
Florida n May A Florida 1 |
business mission is scheduled next year
The roster of Israeli companies in
Florida is increasing wu note thai.
dozen firms opening Floi ida offices in
the last year. Israel participated recently
in the Tech-Ex Exhibition in Orlando, a
world's fair of high technology. The
Ministry of Tourism has announced
plans to open an office in Miami
Israel's modern infrastructure, high
number of industry executives and
professionals, and a marked preference
for doing business in America provide a
base for profitable joint enterprises.
I am committed to Florida's economic
development growth, and an important
factor within that growth plan is ex-
panding Florida's trade in e ery wsy
possible.
Florida and Israel have muchtO offer
each other and we are working U>
strengthen our important relationship, I
expect these bonds to continue to grow
and develop for the benefit of all.
Israel to Join
Community of Nations
at Florida's Disney World
A major pavilion representing Israel
at Epcot Center (Disney W >rW) in
Orlando. Florida, should be open to the
public within eighteen months .
Epcot, a vast new showplacc for the
nations of todny and the tec I mlogy o
the future, opened its first ise to rave
. lews lost fall
ThePfa* toftheSU ftheStats
,flsra. .< i. neo! mntriestn
thecircta at ions k t*
World Showcase Lagoon Mexico
United Kingdom. Franc*. M irocc
Japan China. Ital' Gel lany i
C
i snu I s pavilion will hi
a) ion's past, pre^- ni ana
past will depict th liblical hi*'
religious aspects ol Israel Mode
will ] the Israeli w. of lire
society. i nil. i. industi ....
with emphasis on Israel's pii n
.'in: md yoi ;. rm \ n
Futun Israel will focus w irae
i industries, scientific achievement!
and research and development, for u
t 'ornorrow.
By JOEL ARNON
Israel Consul-General
The ties that bind the State of Israel
and the State of Florida are particularly
close. Florida's sizeable Jewish
population is certainly one contributing
factor. But Israel and Florida have a
great deal in common in many ways.
Most notably, we share similar climates
and lifestyles, rapidly expanding
economies and industry. Agriculture,
irrigation and citrus-growing are im-
portant sectors for both; as are alter-
native energy, electronics, aeronautics,
medical equipment and, increasingly,
other high-technology areas.
Perhaps no bond is more meaningful
and important to Israel than the
business one. Florida has great at-
traction for the Israeli entepreneur, as
does Israel for his Florida counterpart.
We have been witnessing significant
growth in the number of Israeli
businessmen visiting Florida, and in the
number of Israeli companies opening
Florida offices.
Florida sent its first major business
mission to Israel just over a year ago,
and in a matter of weeks we will be
hosting the first official business
delegation from Israel. A high-level
Florida State trade mission to Israel is
being planned for the fall.
Both Florida's Governor, Bob
Graham, and Lt. Governor-Secretary of
Commerce Wayne Mixson, have taken a
personal interest in the promotion of
economic relations between our two
areas. And the Florida Department of
Commerce, as well as various county and
city agencies have been extremely
cooperative in furthering bilateral
commercial relations.
Evidence of expanding Florida-Israel
trade, investment, joint ventures of
many kinds, is all around us. I per-
sonally am most encouraged by the
quantity and quality of the business
activity and progress that I have ob-
served in just the year that our Cc
sulate has been open in Miami
With the continuing efforts of the
America-Israel Chamber of Commerce-
Southeast Region, our own economic
offic s -.-. and the ever-increasing
uwareni I s of the Florida and Israel
busirw 3 comnwra: ies of mutually
profitablebushi ss portunities 1 ha i
>ubt that sine sod together
Florida and Israel ar- embarking i
if unparalleled economic growth,
and prosperitj
... haveemergeda Switfrland
,., r/,.\ kvycei tersofftnancimdindustryandm
r partner in multinational commerce of all kinds. Rafael
Renreni'ti. Managing Director Go emm. nl ot tsrat Im -tment Authonn
(The Journal of Commerce. Fe6r,<. x 24, 19B&
Supplement to The Jewish Floridian
Section D. April 22. 1983


Page 2-D The Jewish Floridian / Friday. April 22,1983
America-Israel Chamber of Commerce
Strengthening VS.-
Israel Economic Ties
By SAM B. TOPF
Chairman, Board of Directors
American-Israel Chamber of
< 'ommerce-Southeast Region
Today. Israel is indeed the promised
land for business. With its dynamic
industrial and commercial development.
Israel offers a wide variety of attractive
possibilities for the American
businessman. Opportunities for
profitable two-way trade exist in
numerous areas; and for those U.S. firms
wishing to expand their facilities abroad.
Israel offers unbeatable advantages, and
incentives for investment, especially for
science-based export-oriented industries.
The basic purpose of the America-
Israel Chamber of Commerce is to let the
American business community know
that "Israel means business." and to
assist in all possible ways the establish-
ment and promotion of commercial ties
between the two nations, including
encouragement of two-way trade, in-
vestment, joint venture, licensing and
research and development agreements;
exchange of technical and professional
know how; dissemination of information
on economic developments and business
opportunities, and fostering close
contact between the business com-
munities of the United States and Israel.
America I'mel Chamber of
Comiuerce-Sout'.east Region is one of a
growing number ot similar non-profit
membership organizations across the
United States dedicated to forging
stronger and mutually beneficial
business links between America and
Israel. Our Chamber is also affiliated
with the Israel America Chamber of
Commerce and Industry (Tel Aviv); and
works in close cooperation with
Government u< Israel and U.S. gover-
nment economic offices.
The importance of the Chamber has
never been greater. With increased
supp< rt and inv ulvement of business and
community leant ra, the America-Israel
Chamber of Co.. lerce-Southeast
Region will thb year and in the yeais
ahead increase its efforts and ac
complishmcntf on behalf of U.S.-Israel
economic relations.
Business Conference
Scheduled
High technology and science-based
industries; re! estate development;
tourism; and the marketing of Israel's
exports; will be the focal areas of the
Prime M inister'9 Business Conference,
scheduled to take place in March. 1984.
The primary p>- -oose of the Conference is
to display Israel s greet economic
potential to firms and investo. t -verseas
and to help for;" isiness relati' Ba
between them i di-aeli conceras.
a special report
April, 1983
published by the
America-Israel Chamber
of Commerce/Southeast
3950 Biscavne Blvd.
Miami. FL 33137
(305) 573-0668
Editor
Lorraine Donin
Executive Director
Chamber's Program
Extensive, Varied
By PHILIPT. WARREN
Devt lopment Chairman
America-Israel Chamber oj
Commerce-Southeast Region
To accomplish its purpose of fur-
thering business relations between the
Unite States and Israel, the program of
the America-Israel Chamber of Com-
merce is extensh e and varied.
Dissemination ot information is a key
area. Information about current
economic developments, business news,
new Droducts and innovations from
Israel: about Israel Trade Weeks and
industry promotions; about business
opportunity's in the U.S. for Israeli firms
and in Israel for U.S. firms: about
legislation, customs regulations, taxes,
investment incentives and assistance
programs; is circulated widely via the
Chamber's monthly newsletter and other
publications.
Trade missions to and from Israel
provide in-depth familiarization; and
customized contacts and arrangements
are made for individuals wishing to
assess first-hand, business opportunities
in Israel.
Assistance is given to Israeli
manufacturers in marketing their goods
in the U.S., and to U.S. manufacturers
wishing to market their products in
Israel. Technical and professional ex-
pert ise is provided to Israeli companies
via the Consultants for Israeli Industries
Program, a nationwide roster of
volunteer American businessmen and
professionals.
A wide range of relevant issues are
discussed at monthly luncheon meetings
featuring distinguished American and
Israeli government and business leaders,
as well as at our Annual Dinner. Other
programs range from full-scale seminars
on business opportunities with Israel to
specific industry workshops.
The Chamber maintains an extensive
U.S.-Israel business library, and has
itself published several guides, in-
cluding: 'Directory of Israeli Goods and
Services Available in Florida" (both
wholesale and retail editions); "How to
Promote Made-in-Israel Products'*:
"Resources: U.S.-Israel Business
Services-Publications-1 nformation''; and
"How to Organize an Israel Trade Fair."
Special Chamber activities have
included participation in Florida trade
shows, exhibitions and promotions;
Israeli winetastings; made-in-Israel
product displays: the first Miami Israel
Film Festival and the upcoming
Israelarts '83 exhibit and sale of Israeli
fine art. graphics and handcrafts. The
Chamber's annual B.I.G. (Buy Israel
Goods) Week is a multi-faceted program
to publicize the wide variety of quality
Israeli exports available .n our area.
Look.. ahead f >r 198344, the
Chamber's plans include an official
Florida Trade Delegation to Israel, a full-
scale seminar on business opportunities
with Israel, and inten:..ti;ationof our
business development activities, in-
cluding the format kin of industry
committees. These committees will
pinpoint specific areas which appear to
specially attraUhie potential for
i... illy beneficial Florida-Israel
cooperation.
An important link in the Florida-Israel
connection was forged last year when the
Israeli Consulate and Government of
Israel Southeast Region Investment and
Export Authority opened Miami offices,
the first Israel government office in
Florida. Recently announced was the
decision to open an Israel Tourist Office
in Miami within the next few months.
Members Are
the Chamber
By HARRY A. (Hap) LEVY
Membership Chairman
America-Israel Chamber of
Commerce-Southeast Region
In the simplest terms, the America-
Israel Chamber of Commerce is no more
and no less than the sum total of
its members. Chamber membership is
comprised of business and professional
people from widely diversified fields
each of whom contributes from his or her
own particular fund of knowledge and
experience to the activities of 1 In
Chamber. In addition, almost all of the
Chamber's operating revenues are
derh ed from membership dues.
Members range from manufacturers
and importers to attorneys and
management consultants to community
leaders. Some have, or anticipate having,
business interests in Israel. Others
simply wish to offer their support and
expertise to the Chamber and its goals.
All share a commitment to further,,
U.S.-Israel business bonds, and" to*
promoting Israel's economic viability
The America-Israel Chamber offersa
permanent framework and encountw
opportunity for American businessm*.
interesting in establishing and ,2?l\
mg contacts with their Israeli counter
parts. At monthly luncheons and other
business u:ul so. .1 acth ities, Chamber
members meet other prominent Florida
business n. a.- well as visiting brad
business iders and outstanding
American and Israeli guest speakeri
On a regular basis, members receive
timely and interesting L'.s Israel
business news via our informative
monthly newsletter, which is ac-
companied by a bonus subscription to
"Israel Business'' report.
Specifically, the Chamber can furnish
members with guidelines for trade and
other business opportunities, andean
assist in establishing contacts with
appropriate companies
A less t ngible benefit of Chamber
membership is the personal fulfillment of
playing a direct role in enhancing I S .
Israel economic development and the
industrial development of Israel; and in
helping Israel to achieve economic self-
sufficiency through not Dial channels of
increased business and trade
Chamber membership has been in-
creasing at a steady pair Mill we have
recently embarked on a stepped-up
membership campaign, the goal o! which
is to double our current membership of
ab. it 200 to 400 during '>:( We believe
that this goal is attainable as the
Chamber's purpose and work become
more widely known, and that the
America-Israel Chamber of Commerce
will continue to grow and flourish as will
the Florida-Israel business connection.
Buying or selling
State of Israel
Securities or Bonds?
That's Our Business!
We're specialists in Israel securities and we make a market
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If there's something you'd like to know about trading in
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Name_______
Address_____
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in furthering U.S.-Israel economic ties
dMRICMSR&a OMMKROf COMMON
3950 Biscavne Boulevard-Miami, Florida 33137
(305)573-0668
MEMBERSHIP APPLICATION
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Corporate Member
Individual Member
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INVESTMENT
TStECHNOLOGY'RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT'JQINT VENTURE
Israel Offers Unique
Investment Benefits
Attracts Varied
Foreign Investment
Foreign investors of all types find a
uniquelv receptive climate in Israel,
foreign business investments have
grown steadily in recent years, to a 1981
high of SO'iS million.
Foreign investments in Israel take a
number of forms, ranging from the
purchase of shares in Israeli high-
iwhnologv companies traded on
overseas exchanges (mainly New York)
to real estate projects, including in-
dustrial parks, hotels and other
specialized facilities. In recent years.
however, investment in science-based
industry has accounted for a growing
share of t hi' total inflow of private
capital.
Currently, several hundred overseas
companies, including thirty which
appear on Fortune Magazine's list of the
500 largest I S. industrial corporations,
operate manufacturing and exporting
subsidiaries throughout the country.
Apart from industry, foreign investors
phy .1 major role in other economic
sectors \ significant proportion of the
total investment in Israel's tourism
branch has come from abroad, much of
Its ,kK am red industrial research and
development is conducted in partnership
with foreign firms, and foreign investors
iccounl for a growing share of trading on
the Tel Vvh stock exchange.
Export-Oriented
Industries Favored
Investors in export-oriented industries
benefit from an outstanding combination
of features which characterize Israels
economy, including: skilled labor at
relatively low wages, advanced R&D
capabilities, convenient geographical
location and transportation facilities for
ready access to the markets of the world,
a Free Trade Area agreement with the
European Common Market and duty
preferences in trade with the United
States. Canada. Switzerland, Austria.
Sweden. Norway. Finland, Japan,
Australia and New Zealand.
A modern infrastructure in a western-
oriented society and the absence of
exchange controls are other factors
which have attracted growing numbers
of overseas investors, especially in recent
years.
A comprehensive Government-
sponsored incentives package of grants,
loans ta,\ concessions and depreciation
allowances translates into significantly
strengthened financial leverage, low
costs and risks, and increased profits.
Most of these benefits also apply to
investments in sectors other than
manufacturing, such as property
development (including industrial
buildings and housing for rental),
tourism (hotels and recreational
projects), film production, investment
companies, and many other activities.
Israel's Economy from Page 1
per annum by the end of the decade.
Rased on t lie existing incentives for
R&I). hall of this sum will be financed
fmmgovernment resources.
However, since innovation is the child
of brain po or, t he key to the
development of Israeli K&D-based in-
dustrial exports is the country's most
highly prized resource its skilled labor
force.and a national tradition of
academic and vocational education.
\ reservoir of about 50.000engineers
and scient ists and about 3,000 graduates
of the academic institutions who join
this reservoir each year, give Israel the
relative advantage and the qualitative
idne it needs for competing in high-
technology sectors with the advanced
industrialized nations of the world.
Consequently, the goal of increasing
exports and closing the gap in the
balance of payments will be met only by
a well-devclo|R'd R&D industry.
requiring a minimum of imported raw
materials and utilizing the highly skilled
manpower of the country. In this
respect, cupital investment from abroad
- particularly the U.S. will be an
important ingredient in stimulating the
Israeli economy.
It is our firm belief that the past
t rends of growth will continue at a no-
less spectacular pace, and that the
impressive achievements of the past,
accomplished in a relatively short period
of time, more than justify these ex-
pectations.
nday, April
----------- ''..... iTT
U.S.-Israel R&D
Partnerships Pay
Dividends
Many of Israel's stunning achieve-
ments in the high-technology sector can
be credited to American Israeli efforts of
some kind. One extremely successful
"joint-venture" approach has been the
formation of U.S. limited partnerships
which finance, jointly with the Chief
Scientist's Office of the Israel Govern-
ment, industrial research and develop-
ment programs in Israel.
Organized by New York's Amira
Corporation, the attraction for the
American investor besides the per-
sonal satisfaction of having a direct
stake in Israel's economic development
is a conservative tax-sheltered invest-
ment with high economic potential in Is-
raeli high-technology R&D projects.
Amira's initial offering, only two years
ago. was for development of a high-
power industrial laser. The next project
involved development of a portable
artificial kidney and other products
utilizing reverse osmosis to purify
liquids: followed by peripheral equip-
ment for small computers and a mid-in-
lrared laser surgical coagulator. All of
these have already progressed substan-
tially, and the development phase of
some completed or near completion.
For 19*<2, Amira has undertaken to
fund four projects: a line of medical
diagnostic kits which are guaranteed
sterile in their final packages as a result
of gamma ray radiation: a unique trans-
mission for buses utilizing a fly wheel
which will cut fuel consumption by 50
percent in city traffic, reduce pollution
significantly and practically eliminate
brake wear: a special form of vitamin D3
which will prevent and cure osteopolosis
(loss of calcium in human bones), the
scourge of the elderly: and a vital
bioengineering project to develop human
interferons. monoclonal antibodies and
other items.
Israel Hi-Tech
Exhibited
Israeli advances in industrial R&D
were showcased last month in Florida, at
Tech-Ex '83 ("annual world's fair for
technology exchange"), which was held
in Orlando High-ranking Israeli
goverment officials, including the Chief
Scientist and Economic Minister to the
U.S.. and representatives of Israel's
prestigious research institutes, were on
hand to discuss the broad range of R&D
opportunities in Israel, and to bring the
message to even more American com-
panies that Israel offers unusual oppor-
tunities for profitable joint ventures .
------------1r"'------r1r-rV--------rt J---------
Investing in
Israeli Securities
Investing in Israeli companies
through either the Israel or U.S. stock
exchanges is gaining in favor with
American investors. Many of these
investors, particularly those trading in
Israeli shares, enact their transactions
through Leumi Securities Corporation in
New York.
The only brokerage house dealing
exclusively in Israeli securities. I^eumi
Securities has up-to-the-minute in-
formation available relating to the Tel
Aviv Stock Exchange and Israeli
companies, including daily quotations
received by telex from Tel Aviv.
A member of the National Association
of Security Dealers. Leumi Securitiei is a
subsidiary of Rank Leumi le-Israel, the
oldest and largest bank in Israel and the
leading trader on the Tel Aviv Stock
Exchange.
The Tel Aviv Stock Exchange is the
only organized stock market in Israel.
Recent years have seen a rapid growth in
the daily volume of trading, from some
$100,000 in 1969 to as much as $15
million in 1981. In addition, there has
been a dramatic increase in the number
of securities traded.
Besides firms listed on the Tel Av iv
stock exchange. Leumi also handles all
Israeli and Israel-related stocks trading
in the U.S. market, of which there are
now fifteen.
Leumi cites as among the most
significant developments for the in-
vestor, the growth of high-technology
industries in such fields as computers,
medical instruments, defense products,
textiles and printing: and notes that
"the outstanding success of these
companies in international markets
speaks well for Israel's economic outlook
and suggests worthwhile opportunities
for the investor in Israel's future."
Reynolds Construction, which is 45
percent owned by giant Sole! Boneh of
Haifa, has won a multi-million-dollar bid
to build a 1,600-room hotel-office-shops-
parking-conference center complex in
Miami Beach .
The widelv circulated "Israel
Economist's"October 1982 issue
featured a four-page cover story entitled:
'Miami Israel's New Horizon." .
Doing business in-or with-lsrael?
We can make It more profitable for you.
If you're doing business in Israel, you should be doing business
with us. Because we can contribute to making your operation
more efficient cost effective and productive-whether your needs
are for trade banking products, project financing or other corpo-
rate banking services.
Call today to learn more about how we can work together-in
Israel, in the US. and around the world.
Bank Hapoalim
407 Lincoln Rood Miami Beach, FL 33139 (305) 532-4476
HEAD OFFICE 50 ROTHSCHltD BtVD. TEl AVIV, ISRAEL
NtW0R IOSANGIIES CHICAGO RHIIAOEIPMIA BOSTON MIAMI LONDON MANCHESTER ZURICH iuHMBOURG PARIS
GRAN0 CAYMAN TORONTO MONTREAL SUE". 'RES SAO PAULO CARACAS MONTEVIDEO PUNIA Dl SSTf PANAMA CITY MEXICO CITY
B
M


Page 4-D The Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22, 1983
$49
38
per month
AND THE 17 VOL. UPDATED
ENCYCLOPEDIA JUDAICA
IS YOURS
AND FOR ONLY ONE MORE PAYMENT OF $4938
THE JUNIOR JUDAICA IS ALSO YOURS
FOR MORE INFORMATION
CALL TOLL FREE TODAY Name _
800-631-2564
(In N.J. call collect (201) 569-8700)
or Complete this coupon
Address
City
State
Zip
Mail to 14 W. Forest Ave.
Englewood, NJ 07631
Tel. Res.
Bus.


Friday, April 22.1983 / The Jewish Floridian
Page5-D
,ducive RCJD Climate
Itavectment Incentives,
Attract Hi-Tech Firms
fiquei
Hundreds..I high-technology multina-
1 firm- attracted by Israel s
.advantages and investment in-
.:.. have located in Israel for the
Le of manufacturing for export
.d-or earning industrial research and
Wvelopmenl projects. The roster to-
Clesdozens of America s largest in-
Trials par. i.ipating in technological
Kis in Israel, either with the frame-
arf; of their own subsidiaries opera-
tor in joint venture.
imong these are: Motorola. Chromal-
L American. Control Data. Intel.
EjeralTelephone & Electronics. IBM,
oter.Esmark. National Semi-Con-
jrtorand Miles Laboratories.
(Lures include grants and loans of up
l75percent of the investment in fixed
^.government cost-sharing in tu-
torial R&D and labor training, tax
Cessions, a> oidance of double-taxa-
jor, agreement with 15 major countries.
Ey-free access to the European Com-
mon Market and the U.S.. and preferred
Hiss toother prime markets. In addi-
tion Israel imposes no limits on foreign
.ncrship and allows the free repatria-
ion of invested principal and profits.
But for most of these high-tech firms,
bstarattraction is Israel's extremely
Miduiiveenvironment for industrial re-
kunh and development. Israel's excep-
jhII) well-trained labor force boasts
of the world's highest proportions of
liUin indusl r> All of the universities
jovideser\ ices to industry, and all have
|heirwn industrial authorities to com-
mcialize the results of their HAD.
In addition in cash grants from the
.Ministry of Industry and Trade, U.S.
peniesconducting R&D in Israel are
bible for substantial support from the
IUS -Israel Binational Industrial Re-
arch & Development Foundation, bet-
fkmmnasthe BIRD F. Established
lithendowments from the Israeli and
hnnrunn governments, the Foundation
inn ides gram financing for R&D
Meets conducted jointly by U.S. and
iVjiIicompanies tor the mutual benefit
[bath countries.
J.S. Investors Establish
IS New Israeli Firms
During 1982. American investors
ablished eighteen new companies in
|srael. a number of them with mutual
nerican-Israeli ownership. In addition.
Bring the past year, ten companies
khkh were established previously by
Americans in Israel, were expanded.
Israeli officials concede that the war in
-roanon and the economic depression in
America had a negative effect on
Nerican investments in Israel.
f*wr, while the Lebanese
P'uation might have caused some
Wmtial investors to shun Israel; it
ns that Israel's success in destroying
rusticated Soviet missiles and the
ptanding performance of Israeli-made
s.greatly enhanced Israel's
Winological reputation; and Israel is
* more than ever before, in-
"nationally recognized as a center of
awfic advancement and producer of
Phisticated. high quality technology.
rael Investment Clubs
_ Thousands of Americans have realized
^satisfaction of making a direct in-
P"nent m Israel through Israel
CS?- Clu,,s-There are now more
," Mtive investment clubs
7ktm North America, and three
hh !5r.Ma'lubs have ben formed
W ,lasl monlh- c,"b members
r*'!r funds to buy shares in Israeli
Pajnik*8 ften as litt,e BS $25 or $50
l ln and hold meetings to decide
*"'"vestment strategy.
k'n?,v,'U|ls SetVe several purposes
; he I srael economy. heightening
I 1 srael and bringing together
fc'fm,, ?llh a l'mmon interest in
Ei'',,fl^ael. Clubs in major
llX"lan-'l'nu'rs have regional
Pkttur i tooruinate such activities
kere b V vteitfat economists and
G,iinndividllal or rouP interested in
B'iSan 'Srael investment club can
*r ca uanc,e,?Lnd "sistance from the
"""Israel Chamber of Commerce.
AMIRA CORPORATION
HIGH-TECHNOLOGY INVESTMENTS IN ISRAEL
Seven ongoing limited partnerships in the following areas:
Lasers. medical instrumentation, microcomputers,
pharmaceuticals, bio-engineering and bio-chemical testing
Research and development projects conducted by major
Israeli companies and research institutes: Teva
Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., Laser Industries Ltd.,
Interpharm Laboratories Ltd., Ramot Purstech Ltd., Tek-
Iyn Ltd., The Nuclear Research Center Negev, Tel-Aviv
University, Weizmann Institute and Beilinson Medical
Center.
For more information, please contact I Mr. Israel Rosen
or Mr. TsviKatsir (212) 867-6757
Florida Offices for
More Israeli Firms
While then- are no reliable statistics
available, it is estimated that the
number of Florida importers and
wholesalers handling Israeli wares has
more than doubled during each of the
previous two years, and that there are
well over two hundred at present.
But it is known that less than five
years ago there were virtually no Israeli
companies based in Florida. Today
Israel's three largest banks, national
airline, national maritime carrier, largest
tour operator and at least twenty other
Israeli firms are located here. Of the
estimated total twenty six at present,
more than half that number were
established within the last year alone.
At least a dozen other Israeli com-
panies are now eyeing Florida for their
U.S. or regional offices, and even more
accelerated growth is anticipated.
More and more Israeli companies are
concluding that to do business with the
U.S., it is advantageous to establish
permanent offices or representation here.
Depending on the product or service
involved, the firm's office may be a sales
office and warehouse, assembly, service
and-or repair operation.

COME GROW IN ISRAEL.
WHERE HIGH TECHNOLOGY
BLOOMS.
Israel's out to encourage busi-
ness. High technology business. It
thrives in our business climate, a
climate favorable for increased prof-
itability We offer vou one of the most
skilled labor forces in the world. A wide
knowledge of the Hnglish language More
MIT graduates per capita than any country
OUlside the U.S. Highly trained technical
and scientific people
Pick some of the world's
best brains.
It's no secret that sheer brain power
brings a lot of investors to Israel You'll feel
right at home and in good company with the
technological capabilities found in Israel Our
technicians rank high in their scientific
achievement and our industry reflects this
expertise. We have made significant strides in
the fields of military electronics, avionics, med-
ical electronics, agrotechnologv, advanced com-
munications systems, metallurgy and
solar energy This has served to
attract U.S. companies, companies
like vours. Your Israel location will
mean immediate access to the interna-
tionally recogni/cd Wci/mann Institute.
Jerusalem's Hebrew University the lechmon in
Haifa, and the Ben Gurion University of the
Negev. among others Allot them institutions
experienced in satisfying sophisticated industrial
high technology needs. All of them institutions
vvhich work in close contact with the industry And
vou can hire vour team of professionals at lower
w age levels than in Western Europe. We even offer
training grants to help vou tailor vour pxil of workers
We'll help get you started.
Ib help vou get vour business going, we otter a set
of major financial incentives designed to lower costs
and nsk-anci increase profits. Grants and loans that
can mount up to 75% of your initial capital investment. A
tax break that can compete with even the tax free" coun-
tries, w passed a unique law designed to protect vour
investment trom taxation on profits resulting from inflation. It
vou want to start with research and development we have
two sources of financing, offering vou 50% of the cost ot your
R&D project There are no limitattons on the flow ot capital
I*
/
into Israel, or taking capital or divi-
dends out in U.S. dollars You
can enjoy all this by establishing a
joint venture or fully owned sub-
sidiary. The choice is yours
We give you duty-free
access to half
a billion people.
What you make in Israel gets into the
Common Market duty-free And 2700
product categories get into the U.S. duty-
free. Plus you benefit from reduced tariffs in
9 other affluent markets including la pan
Nor should vou overlook the potential of the
Israeli domestic market.
You'll be nght in the middle of the
world markets, at the crossroads of three
continents. Israel offers a modern infrastruc-
ture, international airports and seaports
equipped to handle containers, highlv devel-
oped land transportation systems, and an up-
to-date communications network
When we sav we're out to encourage
business, we mean it. We've designed bene-
fits to encourage vou in even,' possible way.
Find out what else Israel can do for your
business. Call our nearest office or send the
coupon We'll do everything we can
And that's a promise.
Moshe Netanel
Govt. of Israel Investment & Export Authority
330 Biscayne Blvd.. Miami. Fia 33132
Tel.: (305) 368-8140
( Please send me more information about
investing in Israel.
I | Please call me.
N^m." .------.-----------------------------------------..-------------------------------___
mir-------------------------
Addr".s -----------------.---------
Citv---------------------------------
Phoni-
, Stji,-
ftp
........ISRAEL........!
THE PROMISED LAND FOR BUSINESS.


Page6-D The Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22,1983
TRADE
IMPORT EXPORT
Unprecedented Expansion of
Israeli Exports Forecast
Israel's world exports, which had been
growing at the rate of about 30 percent
annually, declined in dollar terms in 1982
for the first time in many years, accord-
ing to preliminary figures
Primarily responsible for the decrease
was the severely depressed world
economy. Another consideration was the
drop in value of European currencies
(vis-a-vis the American dollar), which
meant a decrease in the profit margin on
Israeli exports to Europe. A serious
recession in the international market for
diamonds a significant sector of Israeli
export was also a negative factor.
Despite already hard economic times
worldwide, Israel's total exports of in-
dustrial goods scored a record $6 billion
in 1981 a respectable 5.5 percent gain
over the previous year. If the figures
were adjusted to exclude diamonds, the
growth rate would jump to an impressive
15 percent.
More important than the figures per se
is their relation to Israel's balance of
trade. In 1949, Israel's gross exports of
goods covered only 11 percent of im-
ports. By 1976, Israel was able to finance
50 percent of its import expenditures
through export; and in 1981, that figure
rose to 75 percent. So, although Israel's
1981 trade deficit ood at about $2 bil-
lion unquestionably a substantial
figure the gap is in reality being nar-
rowed.
A notable feature of Israel's 1981 ex-
port performance was the fact that every
export sector contributed to the increase.
Much of the growth in industrial exports
over the past decade has been due to
original R&D. which has yielded
numerous sophisticated high-technology
products, especially in such fields as
medical equipment, alternate energy
systems, chemicals and agricultural
equipment.
1 n fact, of the $6 billion of industrial
products that Israel exported to the
world in 1981. it is estimated that SI bil-
lion was based on original Israeli know-
how. It is believed that in 1982, about a
third of all Israeli exports resulted
directly from its own research and de-
velopment.
According to a 1980 Ministry of In-
dustry and Trade projection, Israel's
viable exports will increase two-and-a-
half-fold by the end of this decade. Al-
though that ambitious forecast may
have to be revised somewhat due to the
recent world economic depression, the
outlook for dramatic growth remains
largely optimistic.
Israel's export policies, together with
the proven capabilities of its manufac-
turers and exporters, provide a solid
basis for such growth. Diversification of
its industry, increased production
capacity, advances in high technology,
growing marketing sophistication, and
favorable tariff agreements with the
European Common Market. U.S. and
other countries, are other "pluses" that
should ensure that Israel's world exports
expand at an unprecedented rate.
The Israel Trade Center.
Your link with Israels
dynamic world of business.
The Government of Israel Trade Center (ITC), direc-
ted by the Israel trade commissioner to the united
states, is the first step if you are seeking or contem-
plating commercial ties with Israel. Located in New Yor
City, the ITC provides an entree to the entire spectrum
of Israel's exports.
Representatives in ITC regional offices, located in
Miami, Los Angeles, Chicago, Boston, Philadelphia and
Houston can, with their knowledge of your specific
regional concerns, provide you with personal, in-
dividualized service.
Whether you are an importer, distributor, manufac-
turer, retailer or wholesaler, ITC offers free assistance
and the timely information you need to do business
with Israel easily and profitably.
ITC marketing specialists place you in direct contact
with Israels manufacturers and suppliers; provide up-
to-date information on pricing, packageing, styling
and sizing of Israeli goods.
ITC can provice data enabling you to decide which
Israeli products are the most marketable through your
outlets for increased volume and profit.
itc is here to help you get started, though our
philosophy is "let businessmen do business" once the
initial contacts have been made.
For more information contact Moshe Netanel,
Government of Israel investment & Export Authority,
330 Biscayne Boulevard, Suite 510, Miami, Fla 33132
Tel. (305) 358-8140, or Beth Belkin, Israel Trade center!
350 Fifth Avenue, New York, n.y. 10118, Tel. (212) 560-
0661.
Israel Aircraft Industries' popular Westwind executive jet enjoys a substantL.
segment of world business jet market. I.A.I, 's Miami facility offers extensm
services, and maintains aircraft for several airline companies.
Exports Vital
to Israel's
Economic
Development
For Israel, as any nation, to be truly
independent, it must attain economic as
well as political independence. In the
historically brief span of thirty-five years
despite extraordinary obstacles and
pressures I srael has achieved a
remarkable level of industrialization, and
has made much.progress toward
realizing economic self-sufficiency.
Hut true economic independence for
Israel will be assured only by reaching a
balance of payments. Today. Israel's
foreign currency spending substantially
exceeds its foreign currency income, and
Israel is working hard to reduce the gap
between the money it spends and the
money it earns.
More than most nations. Israel is
highly dependent on foreign trade for
economic development. With a
population of less than four million, its
domestic market is too small to permit
manufacturing plants to achieve the
economies of scale required lor efficient,
modern industries
As a result. Israel has always looked
far beyond its borders to the world at
large. Today, a series of mutual trade
agreements link it to the most in-
dustrialized nations, exports constitute
about half of the Gross National
Product, and Israel is ranked among the
eight leading exporting states on a per
capita basis.
On the import side, Israel has also
been confronted by unique conditions.
To a great extent, Israel's imports are
inflexible. With few exceptions, it has no
significant deposits of minerals or other
natural resources, and virtually all of its
raw materials and energy requirements
must be brought in from abroad.
(Energy, defense and raw materials for
industry comprise 93 percent of Israel's
exports.) The resulting heavy financial
burden has been another major impetus
for the development of an export-
oriented economy.
In simplest terms, since Israel has no
choice but to buy certain commodities
outside, the question becomes not how to
spend less, but how to earn more in order
to finance international payments.
The answer is exports.
The steady expansion of Israeli ex-
ports toward eventual elimination of the
country's balance of payments deficit, is
a primary goal of Israeli national policy.
To that end. all efforts are being made to
encourage the development of industry-
and the growth of exports industrial
exports in particular. Only in this way
ran Israel afford to buy all of the items
necessary for survival, and ensure its
economic viability and independence.
14Value Added'
Key to Exports
Since Israel has virtually no natural |
resources, it becomes necessary to
concentrate on industries in which a
minimum of raw materials are required,!
or in which these materials represent a
relat ively small portion of the finished
product." Thus, the key to Israel's
exports is "value added" that is. the|
difference between the actual cost of
producing the product and the price for |
which it is sold.
Tourism is one industry thai has a
very high "added value" for Israel. The|
same is true for agriculture. But there
are only so many tourists, and the
tourism industry is a variable one. Too, |
there is just so much water and
cultivable land. So Israel had to look for]
another way. and found it in the fon
of the only natural resource it has
people, or more precisely, "brainpower."
Hy ul-iliaing iln most unique and
foremost asset. Israel discovered that ill
could develop products for industry witsj
the greatest added value. Israeli know-
bow und expertise has resulted in a
significantly growing volume of exports|
in (he science-based and high-technolog
area, such as medical equipment, air-
craft, agrkullural control systems and
computers.
Israeli Kibbutz:]
Melons to
Microcomputers
There was a lime when the Israeli
kibbutz, was essentially a farming
community, a cooperative settlement in
the rural sector whose economy was
based almost exclusively on agriculture
Hut there is not enough land and water
to substantially increase agricultural
capabilities, so over the past twenty-five
years, the kibbutz, has been undergoinga
process of diversification through in_
dustrialization Today, the income of the
approximately three hundred kibbutzim
is derived about equally from industry
and agriculture.
The kibbutz industrial structure is
characterized by a small work force per
plant, a high capital: labor ratio, a hign
per-worker productivity, and a very
rapid growth in export.
Some 360 industrial enterprises in
kibbutzim, ranging from guest nouses w
sophisticated electronics plants, empio)
a total work force of 17.500. of whom; W
percent are kibbutz members. [MOW
now accounts for over 50 percent Of m
total kibbutz output, and 7 percent oi
Israel's total industrial output, making
kibbutz industry an important.tapes
of industrial Israel. Available figures
indicate that total exports for WW*""
somewhere around the $200-m.ll.on
mark. ,
Kibbutz industry occupies b donenan
position in several important branches
dustry in Israel, among them plast"* '
metals, furniture, plywood and canning
In addition. Kibbutz Industries
Association includes thirty kbbul?
guest houses and camping sites. nar
Thousands of tourists from abroad a
Israelis come to enjoy their vacation*,
tour the countryside and see the kid
hiii / mi in action.
...-.


Friday, April22,1983/The JewishFloridian P*geY-t)
lEhcint's "all-organ, high quality Computerized Tomograph" ICAT scanner)
lAfls uon a substantial share of U.S. and world market. Firm recently opened
[Tampa. Florida sales-service office.
US-Israel Important
Trading Partners
The United States and Israel have
|bcen trading partners since the letter's
Inception in 1949 Trade between the two
Icounlries is steadily expanding in terms
both of volume and diversity of
| products.
In 1949. a year after the State was
Ifounded. Israel's purchases from the
llJ.S.totalled $75 million, and U.S. im-
|portsfrom Israel, only $5 million. From
l lopsided beginning, Israel has been
adily working to decrease the gap in
ance of trade. In 1949, for exam-
ple, Israel's exports to the U.S. repre-
I some 6.5 percent of its imports.
|By 1981. Israel was able to finance 75
t of its U.S. imports through its
[exports to the U.S.
In dollar terms, the gap has also been
[narrowing from $730 million in 1979
lloSfiOO million in 1980 to $400 million in
11981. This reduction was achieved by
^substantially increasing Israeli exports
llotheU.S. at a rate exceeding the
Ipowth of American commercial exports
|lo Israel.
In 1981. Israel sold $1.2 bUliion worth
|olgoods to the U.S. and purchased $1.6
billion worth in return. This meant that
[Israel bought $4 million or 33 percent
I- more from the U.S. than the U.S.
I bought from Israel. The U.S., Israel's
[major supplier, provided Israel with 19
[percent of its total commercial imports
[deluding"security items'*).
On the other hand, the U.S. share of
[Israeli world markets has increased to 25
[prcent. and with a nearly 30 percent
PnjH in dollar value of Israeli imports
f 1981 alone the U.S., as a single
Fntry. now represents Israel's most
Pyttant market. Yet Israel provides
fwy 04 percent of all imported goods
pcning the U.S., so that even if Israel
PNbU its exports to the U.S.. it would
[Wdly make an impression on the
*onornjc giant. But .04 percent to the
[ represents 22 percent of Israel's
\T'"Port*: so a doubling of exports to
Im.k', Would have substantial impact
'""I* Israeli economy.
The role of the United States, already
li u S argesl sinle trading partner.
L fc?iSUmV-ven Kreater importance in
\Z ilUre'for Israel is focussing in on
,n?sT'Can market- Th foremost rea-
Ike IB?* Potential of the U.S. mar-
|SDthh^ha8by been tapped.
Ei ^is the strength ofthe
ICtrLErUkSPe,traditinallyl8rae,"S
J>th their complimentary sophis-
|nutuaihT10m,le8' opportunities for
KSk ^nef,cia, two-way trade be-
lines nh y f areas Some of the indus-
N2n"S'ngledout especially
Uutinif 3re: Capital "moment, trans-
Kmh aerosPace. telecommnications,
l^aUonV!energy sources' W con"
VaUiLq.U,pent- biotechnology.
1VMt*Zitronics- defense electronics,
iWa tnH tec.hnology and consumer
ana services.
UeS. Is Israel's
Largest Supplier;
Israel U.S.*t 2nd Largest
Market In Middle East
From $75 million in 1949 to $1.6 billion
in 1981. Israel's purchases from the
United States have grown
dramatically over the past three
decade*. In 1981. in fact, the U.S.
provided Israel with 19 percent of
Israel's commercial imports (excluding
security items), making the U.S. Israel's
single largest supplier. At the same time.
Israel was the second largest importer of
American goods in the Middle East.
Main imports are machinery and
electronic equipment, agricultural
products (primarily grains and soya
beans), transport and aviation equip
mem. industrial chemicals, base metals
and electronic medical and optical
equipment.
Because U.S. exports to Israel totalled
SI .6 billion in 1981. while Israel exported
$1.2 billion worth of goods to the U.S.,
the U.S. enjoyed a $400 million trade
surplus.
U.S. ISRAEL
TRADE
Israeli Exports to U.S.
Increasing in
Variety & Volume
While many American importers still
think of Israel as a prime exporter of
citrus (and indeed it is), it is also a sig-
nificant exporter of the most sophisti-
cated goods in the world. Israel exported
$188 million worth of citrus in 1982. but
it exported more than seven times that
much in metal goods and electronic
items.
Polished diamonds continue to ac-
count for a substantial share of Israel's
sales to the United States. The other
main sectors are light industries, trans-
portation equipment (especially air-
craft), electric and electronic equipment,
minerals and fertilizers, and machinery.
Over the past few years, the biggest
increases have been registered in base
metals and fertilizers, followed by light
industries and metal products,
machinery, and electric and electronic
equipment.
Among the science-based products
that showed the greatest growth were
avionics, lasers, solar energy devices,
computer software, and medical equip-
ment.
The leading areas of industrial growth
encompass such industries as electric
and electronic products, transportation,
machinery, metal products, and
chemicals.
I n consumer products, gold jewelry
was Israel's premier export in 1981.
Other burgeoning consumer sectors
include printing materials, food products
and furniture.
The export trend is a percentage de-
cline in consumer products, stability in
agricultural products, and an increase in
the share of industrial goods.
It is significant to note that of the
$1.25 billion in exports to the U.S. in
1981, less than 10 percent was consumer-
type products with which we are
familiar, such as bathing suits, oranges
and jewelry. Some 90 percent of these
exports was in machinery, diamonds, so-
phisticated equipment and chemicals. In
fact, export of industrial products
specifically high-technology products
rose by more than 40 percent over the
previous year. An increasing percentage
of industrial exports to the U.S., (as to
world markets in general) are products
directly resulting from original Israeli
research and development, estimated as
high as 35 percent for 1982.
ISRAEL'. EXPORTS TO U.S. TOP SI BILLION
U.S. NOW ISRAEL'S BIGGEST CUSTOMER
Since the establishment of the State,
Israel's exports to the U.S. have risen
substantially from $5 million in 1949
to a record $1.2 billion in 1981. The
annual growth rate of Israeli exports to
the U S. over the last few years has been
close to 23 percent, and today the United
States is Israels biggest customer.
This represents a considerable
achievement for Israel, a country which
lacks natural resources, is geographically
distant from the U.S., and has had to
compete with many larger nations which
are both traditional trading partners
with, and wellestablished in, the U.S.
market. In addition, Israeli exporters
have had to overcome the special
challenges of the American market,
which is characterized by both highly
efficient mass production and advanced
scientific output.
While final figures are not yet in for
1982, preliminary statistics indicate that
although the percentage of trade be-
tween the two countries remained the
same: Israel's exports to the U.S. fell in
dollar terms for the first year in a long
time. Projections show a 7.3 percent
overall drop in exports, with diamonds
accounting for a major portion of the
decline. (If. in fact, diamonds were
excluded, the figures would show a 4.3
percent increase in Israeli exports to the
U.S.)
But the upward growth trend in
Israel-U.S. exports is expected to
resume in 1983, with an upturn in the
U.S. and world economies; and
economists predict record volume in the
years ahead.
ISRAEL.
The natural resource for high technology.
Brainpower, in Israel it's our number one resource. Our track record makes us
the most logical address for your high technology needs, whether your a
manufacturer, importer, or simply looking for top-flight R & D, Israel is ready
with a highly skilled and affordable labor force, a developed export market and
government assistance when you need it.
Israel exports high quality merchandise in thousands of product categories
ranging from food to medical equipment, from furniture to corporate jets. And
duty-free status in the U.S. and common market means you can buy or market
Israel goods at prices competitive with those of domestic products.
For further information about specific Israeli products, contact Moshe
Netanel Government of Israel investment & Export Authority, 330 Biscayne
Boulevard., Suite 510, Miami, Fla. 33132, Tel. (305) 358-8140.



fltfiMittl)
AGRICULTURAL & IRRIGATION
EQUIPMENT
11 is human resourcefulness rather
than nutural resources that has trans-
formed Israel's arid land into profitable
fields. A shortage of manpower, poor soil
and most importantly, a lack of water
and energy, meant that traditional
forming techniques were unsuitable for
Israel. So Israel was compelled to devise
11- own
I low successful Israel has been, is
c\ idenced by the fact that not only does
Israel IikI.in grow enough food for its
own needs; but also exports a billion
dollars worth each year. In addition,
agricultural and irrigation equipment
and knowhow have become major export
sectors in their own right: and Israel is
internationally recognized as a leader in
advanced agricultural technology.
Sectors of the industry in which Israel
i-- most active include, irrigation
equipment and systems, agricultural
machinery. livestock equipment,
hothouses and agricultural construction
and transportation, seeds and plants,
fertilizers, pesticides, veterinary
ugmchcmical products, fodder and feeds.
packing equipment and material, farm
equipment and supplies, overseas
agricultural projects, export of
ugricull ural knowhow. computerized
s\ slims nnd research
Agricultural Equipment
In the field of agricultural machinery,
as in irrigation. Israel's development has
Ix-en impelled by necessity; since, apart
from the lack of water, the very heavy
soil has been another obstacle to
farming. Typically, it breaks into large,
stone-hard clods when ploughed, so
heavy-duty machinery had to be devised
in order to fluctuate and cultivate the
top layers and make them fit for sowing.
Other machinery was developed for
speedier and more efficient transport.
planting, harvesting, grading and
packing, while mechanized feeding
systems for poultry and livestock were
introduced to release manpower for other
essential jobs
Today. Israeli agricultural machinery
exports include rolling and row crop
cultivators; triflane incorporating
equipment; loaders and hydraulic
products; tractor-mounted sprayers for
pesticide application: automatic
milking and flushing systems and other
dairy equipment: ploughs, subsoilers
am' harrows; milk and water tankers;
wagons, forage wagons, mulch
spreaders; bale elevators and related
components: machinery for harvesting
and pruning: a variety of machines for
sifting, sorting, cleaning and separating,
grading and packing.
I
AGRITECH *83
Progress through Agriculture
Oct. >6,1963 Tel Aviv, Israel
Hailed by the professional world as a major international agricultural
event. Agritech has, for eighteen years, been the focal point for
developments in sophisticated agronomy.
More than 120,000 visitors from seventy countries are expected at
Agritech 83 (October 3-6. 1983: Tel Aviv), where over 500 exhibits
Irom fifty countries will be displayed.
Agritech '83 will feature agriculture's most modern technology and
world-renowned developments by top Israeli experts. Everything from
the most advanced achievements to. knowhow for high-yeild pro-
duction to the special technology for progress, will be on display,
demonstrating their practical application on location.
Exhibits cover all branches of agriculture: farm machinery, irrigation
equipment and systems, livestock and poultry equipment, agrochemi-
cals and veterinary products, horticulture and seeds, agro-industry and
know-how. computerized systems and research, agricultural con-
struction and transportation.
In addition, professional tours, seminars and symposiums will be
offered on a wide range of topics, among them: The Third International
Conference on Irrigation (Planning and Operation of Irrigation
Systems; Chemigation) and Seminar on Plant Protection.

'
WSffc
Motorola Israel's computerized irrigation control system. Israel's prestigioui
reputation for having made the desert bloom brings many buyers to Israel in
search of their irrigation needs.
Israel World Leader in
Irrigation Technology
Because of its special conditions, Is-
rael has emerged as a world leader in de-
veloping modern technology for water
supply and distribution. Since Israel's
water resources are so limited, they must
be managed for maximum efficiency
especially in light of enormous fuel prices
for pumping and distribution.
As a result of its breakthroughs. Israel
has not only been able to increase its
total irrigated area substantially and
COSt-efflciently: but has become a major
exporter of irrigation equipment and
systems.
One revolutionary innovation has been
the method of drip irrigation which
brings water directly to plant root ty
terns through carefully placed flexible
tubes and specially designed trickle fit-
tings.
Another Israeli innovation involves
computer-controlled irrigation systems
in which everything is automatic: a
method which can be used for both
sprinkler and drip irrigation networks.
There are numerous other irrigation
control and regulating devices, including
systems in which shut-off is automatic
when a pre-set volume of water has
flowed through a meter; and modular
solid-state electronic controls which may-
be connected to water meters with
electrical output to achieve a simple
remote reading.
In sprinkler technology, Israel has de|
velopcd an efficient and economical sys-
tem for groves, orchards, \ ineyardsudl
other growing areas j method which
|>ermits the use of a separate sprinklpr
for each tree and thereby eliminate!
water waste inherent in conventional
overall irrigation.
There are also low-volume sprinklers
with built-in pressure regulators, self-
regulating sprinklers lor uniform
co\ erage along a permanent irrigation
network ujpderdifficult topographical
conditions, nuRksprinklera and mam
other types
In other areas of irri^r il ion technology]
I srael offers a complete line ol advanced
components and accessories* These in-
clude filters, someot them electrically
operated and self-cleaning, .ill typesol
meters and flow controls, pipes and fit-
tings, valves, fertilize! tanks and pumpuj
lensiomctcrs. irrigation programming
clucks and others. Pipes and fittings are
available in aluminum, plastic and steel
Chemigation. the supply of chemicals
through irrigation systems to improve
yields, is also viewed as a crucial
development for the future.
Israel Innovator in
Farming Systems
In the sphere of cultivation
techniques, a new agricultural system
developed in Israel has eliminated the
need for conventional soil or water
supplies. Known as "aeroponics." the
technique involves growing plants in
Wiled troughs where their exposed roots
are nourished by a nutrient-enriched
mist from a computer-controlled spray
system. Apart from using less water,
fertilizer and energy, the method yields
harvests which are almost 200 percent
higher than those produced by soil
farming.
"Tuboponics," is another made-in-
Israel revolutionary farming method
which provides for efficient use of water,
an escape from the constraints of poor
soil conditions, and dramatically in-
creased crop yields. Sometimes known as
"vertical agriculture," it uses a sub-
strate compound in eight-foot-high
aluminum tubes with perforated sides.
Plants are inserted in the holes, and
water and liquid fertilizers are control-
dripped from above.
As for greenhouse heating, methods
have recently been developed to exploit
solar energy rather than electricity. In
one case, daytime, sun-heated liquids are
pumped at night into rows of water-filled
canals in which various agricultural
plants are floating, and warm the roots
direct l\
***&&

i.
The Show for Planting New Ideas.
Israel has been cultivating novel agricultural concepts for the past 35 years. Little wonder
that today it is a leader in innovative farm and irrigation technology.
Rich green pastures, abundant crops and sophisticated irrigation methods are the reality of
Israel's former desert fantasy. Only a nation continually giving birth to new ideas is capable of
propagating new agricultural techniques applicable to your field of interest.
Come to Isrfael on October 3-6, 1983 for one of the world's major agricultural events. See a
comprehensive display of exhibits dealing with all phases of farming and irrigation. Participate in
a variety of field tours. And attend the 3rd International Conference on Irrigation.
Agritech '83. October 3-6,1983. Tel Aviv.
For more information about the show contact Moshe Netanel, Government of Israel Invest-
ment & Export Authority, 330 Biscayne Boulevard, Suite 510, Miami, Fla. Tel. (305) 358-8140.

." A


"Biggest Deal'* for
Irrigation Exports
Israel's Netafim. world leader in drip
irrigation systems, has opened its south-
eastern of f ice in Altamonte Springs, near
Orlando, Florida. The pioneer in de-
veloping drip irrigation in Israel and
abroad. Netafim offers a wide variety of
drippers, pressure regulators, filters,
drip irrigation systems and accessories.
The equipment is suitable for usage on
different types of soil, water and various
crops. Also being offered is the advanced
pressure compensated dripper, which is
touted as 'the dripper of the 90's."
In 1965. Netafim pioneered the drip ir-
rigation method in the Negev, and a
4700-square-mile area that had been vir-
tually barren for centuries soon became
the scene of intense agricultural activity.
With drip irrigation, every drop of water
goes immediately to the soil around the
plant roots, reaching the roots directly in
precisely controlled amounts. Today,
Netafim has three plants (all on kib-
butzim) in Israel and a worldwide
marketing network. In addition to the
Florida base, they have a main U.S.
office in New York and a west coast
office in California.
Just recently, Netafim concluded a
deal for what will be the largest export
order ever for Israeli drip irrigation
equipment The agreement, with Aqua-
Nova, Inc., of the U.S. (a subsidiary of
Southwide. a leading producer and dis-
tributor of high-quality cotton seed) calls
for the supply of more than $5.5 million
worth of drip irrigation fittings and
drippers to be used on a major project.
Aqua Nova is now preparing to install a
modern irrigation system for the
cultivation of 10.000 acres of cotton in
Arizona with the help of Israeli
agronomists and technologists.
Netafim experts are already assisting
U.S. growers in large cotton and tomato
fields in Arizona and California, and
other companies have expressed serious
interest. On the basis of this activity, the
company estimates that sales will double
this year, from $25 million to $50 million.
Computerized Irrigation
Introduced to Florida
Haim Goldman left his kibbutz near
Khu last summer for southwestern
Florida. Mission: to demonstrate to
Florida farmers how his country uses its
meager water supply to produce high-
quality crops.
Irrigation expert Goldman, who
signed a one-year contract with Hendry
Irrigation of LaBelle, is introducing to
Florida the new technology he helped
develop, a farming method described as
"as revolutionary as laser beams and
space shuttles."
Working together under the auspices
of Motorola Israel, Israeli scientists and
farmers have perfected computer-
controlled farming, a sophisticated drip
method irrigation system that not only
controls the output of water and
nutrients, but warns of problems that
could shut down outlets where trouble
occurs.
Computerized irrigation is new to
Florida, and it is anticipated that based
on the LaBelle success, it will spread
quickly to other areas of Florida and the
U.S. While the initial expense involved is
considerable, computerized irrigation is
seen by experts as "the answer to water-
shortage problems" and extremely
effective and cost-efficient in the long
run.
Israeli agricultural and irrigation
specialists are working on several varied
projects throughout both Florida and
Puerto Rico.
Pharmaceutical Firm
Stresses R&D
Like other sectors of Israeli industry,
Israel's pharmaceutical industry can
trace much of its growth and prospects
for export growth to research and
development. Taro-Vit Chemical
Industries of Haifa, one of Israel's four
largest pharmaceutical firms, has em-
barked on an agressive expansion
program, which includes expanded
production facilities, increased
capitalization and an intensive
marketing program. But because Taro
believes that its future lies mainly in
R&D, they have recently strengthened
their R&D efforts, which they feel will
provide a continuing stream of new and
improved pharmaceutical products.
Taro-Vit and its subsidiaries
manufacture and market quality
pharmaceutical products and other fine
chemicals sold in Israel and abroad. It
currently has an excellent domestic
market position in over-the-counter
analgesics and vitamins, and a strong
position in psychotherapeutic drugs,
gastrointestinal agents and nasal
I'econgestants.
WHIZ PRODUCTS* INC
distributor of
LEGO IRRIGATION
7780 N.W. 55th ST.
MIAMI, FL 33166
(305) 594-0834
TARO-VIT
CHEMICAL INDUSTRIES LIMITED
Quality Pharmaceuticals & Fine Pharmaceutical Chemicals
In Pursuit of Quality Today
R G D Targeted for Tomorrow
P.O. Box 103471 HAIFA BAY, ISRAEL / 26110. TEL 723287-8-9
USA: Taro Development Corp. / P.O. Box 360/ Mamaronech. NY 10543
Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floriduui Page 9-D
Chemicals, Minerals, Plastics
Organic Chemicals
Israel's organic chemical industry
developed as a result of the expansion of
oil refining activity in Haifa and Ash-
dod. In addition to the basic crude
refining units, these facilities include
cracking, reforming and desulphurizing
installations which supply feedstocks for
the petrochemical industry.
Petrochemical production includes
polyethylene, polystyrene, carbon-black,
elhylene. poly-vinyl-chloride, methanol.
ammonia and other products.
The pesticides branch developed in
close cooperation with Israel's highly
developed agriculture. Most of the
products synthesized in this field are the
results of original research and
development conducted in Israel. Crop
protection pesticides include in-
secticides, herbicides, fungicides and
acaricides, and more than 70 percent of
the output is exported.
Pharmaceuticals, fine chemicals,
synthetic fibers, soaps, detergents,
paints, cosmetics, glues and enamels and
a broad range of other products are also
manufactured by Israel's sophisticated
chemicals industry. In addition, a
growing share of exports is accounted for
by various chemicals for the food, textile
and metal industries.
Minerals from Israel
The main source of Israel's mineral
wealth is the Dead Sea from which the
major products extracted are potash,
bromine and magnesia. For some time,
Israel has bem the world's largest ex-
porter of bromine and its derivatives,
which are used for agricultural, in-
dustrial and flame retard ant purposes.
Another major Dead Sea product is high
purity grade magnesium oxide for
refractory and specialty uses.
The Negev Desert phosphate deposits
represent Israel's second major mineral
resource. These are used to produce
superphosphates, nitrophosphates,
phosphoric acid, complex fertilizers and
mineral feed additives and other
products.
Rubber Products
Currently, most of Israel's rubber
exports consist of tires, mainly
specialized items like all-steel radials and
a wide range of tires for off-the-road
vehicles. In recent years, however,
extruded rubber profiles and a broad
array of automobile accessories have
come to account for an expanding share
of Israel's rubber export.
Plastics
In the plastics branch, a great part of
production for export is based on modern
injection-molding techniques. An
especially significant share of total
output consists of various types of
irrigation and agricultural equipment
innovated in conjunction with
agricultural development. Recognized as
the most advanced in the world, these
products are exported around the globe
and have earned Israel's plastics in-
dustry an outstanding international
reputation.
At the sarr e time, the expansion of
exports has jeen connected to
developments in packaging, as
traditional materials give way to sturdy,
light-weight plastics like polypropylene
and high-density polyethylene knitted
and woven bags for bulky consumer
goods, or special polypropylene, extra-
strength giantbags which hold up to one
ton of detergents or phosphates. Plastic
drums for storage and transport, blister
packs, disposable trays, cups and lids for
foodstuffs, shrink films, pallet covers,
and laminated film for seal wrapping are
features of Israel's advanced packaging
industry.
The building trades are also major
consumers of plastics from Israel, as are
such other fields as agriculture
The rapid growth of Israel's plastic
industry is one of the country's out-
standing achievements. Today, that
industry is world-renowned for its ad-
vanced technology, product quality,
uncompromising precision and
guaranteed delivery dates. Several
hundred plants located throughout the
country manufacture virtually
thousands of products in the fields of
agriculture, industry, construction and
defense. And the plastics industry,
which started out in Israel to seek
substitutes for the vital natural
resources Israel lacked, exported over
$60 million worth of product in 1981
mostly to developed countries with
highly demanding standards.
Israel currently exports a broad range
of finished products and raw materials as
well. The main objective over the past
decade has been to specialize in the
manufacture of sophisticated products
based on polyethylene, P.V.C. and
polystyrene. Recently, the fastest
growing field has been packaging.
Irrigation components and an unusual
plastic sheeting are other outstanding
exports. New developments in solar
energy research have resulted in the
pioneering of revolutionary solar
collectors made entirely of plastic.
Pharmaceuticals Filling
Export Prescription
From a handful of companies in the
early days of independence, the Israeli
pharmaceutical industry has grown to
more than thirty companies which
employ some 3,000 people. The combined
sales of the industry have been growing
over the past five years at a rate of five
to ten percent per year in real terms, to
about $105 million in 1982. Israel's
pharmaceutical exports have nearly
doubled over the past five years, from
$25 million in 1978 to 645 million in 1962.
The key to the industry's dramatic
growth, like comparable achievement in
other Israeli high-technology industrial
sectors, is R&D, and although Israel has
not yet developed a cure for cancer,
Israeli firms are currently developing a
new generation of pharmaceutical
products, such as advanced antibiotics,
human diagnostics and medical in-
strumentation, and interferon-related
i reatments. as well as cardiovascular
^ents. and anti-cancer drugs with lower
I 'xicity and improved efficacy.
EVERY PRECIOUS DROP
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.


Page 10-D The Jewish Floridian / Friday. AprU 22, 1983
INTRODUCING
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HOTEL MOTEL OWNERS, DO YOU NEED
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CALL TO FIND OUT YOUR NEAREST DISTRIBUTOR
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W "tipd np-lvrcr msin n


Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 1 ID
Metals & Electronics
Recount for 40% of Overall Exports
The metal and electronics branches
, Jav account for more than 40 percent
(Israel's overall industrial exports
ciuding diamonds. The percentage
chare has been increasing rapidly, and
similar dramatic growth is expected in
the coming years.
The most distinguishing feature
about Israels exports in this sector is
E hiilh ratio of sophisticated products
Led on advanced technology or derived
fromscientific research and
Klopnu-nt. At one point, the.n-
Sjtries were primarily dependent upon
unported knowhow Today, original
krael research and development is the
source of most of the output. In fact.
nl(,re than 50 percent of all industrial R
d D in Israel is conducted within these
branches Together with current in-
vestments to expand existing plants and
establish new ones, this ensures that
both the production and export growth
achieved to date will continue through-
out the 1980s
Electronics
One hundred electronics companies
now operate in Israel, and six may be
considered major firms. Though the
25.000 people the) employ only con-
stitute aboul Spercent of the nation's
industrial work force, this includes
approximate!) lOparcenl of the total
numbero! industrial engineers in the
count r\ .1 reflection of the high degree
[>[advanced technology and knowhow
which characterizes production. The
industry 's major divisions are the
military, tin dical .md industrial bran-
ches, telecommunications and control
systems, computer equipment and
mmponents
Metals
Urn-rally speaking, the metal in-
dustry encompasses four distinct
divisions, In basic metals, Israel's ex-
ports include pipes and the varied
production of iron and steel industries
and foundries as well as that of non-
(errous metal plants. A second category
covers a wide array of manufactured
mods ranging from wire products to
hand tools, plumbing fixtures to kit-
chenware. and airconditioning to fur-
niture.
Israel's industrial machinery and
equipment manufacturers, who comprise
a third distinct division, have achieved a
di'gree of quality and diversification on a
par with the most advanced nations. In
this field, the rich assortment of
products includes irrigation and control
equipment, valves, pumps, heat ex-
changers, notching, punching and
folding machinery, fitting of all sorts,
tools and bits, discs and molds just to
name a few. Indeed, the branch fills the
needs of numerous specialized industries
such as metal working, electronics,
chemicals, agriculture and food
processing, construction and
engineering, material handling and
many more.
The metal industry's fourth branch
manufactures and exports sophisticated
transportation equipment and parts for
air. sea and land use a field of activity
whose foreign sales have more than
doubled since 1977. In addition, exports
derived from subcontracted general
machining and the construction of
complete metal industry plants are
beginning to account for an impressive
share of overall foreign sales.
Israeli Software Houses
Report Growing Exports
After many years of preparation,
Israel's computer software industry is
now growing into an increasingly im-
portant exporter, with several Israeli
software houses announcing sales of
their computer programs to customers
abroad.
Mashov Ltd., a leading firm in the
field, has announced the sale of twenty of
its hotel-reservations and guest-
re;; Lstrations software packages to a
major customer in the United States, a
deal reportedly worth more than a
quarter of a million dollars.
Architectural Computer Aids Ltd. of
Tel Aviv reports having sold a $200,000
computer-aided design program which
simplifies and speeds preparation of
detailed construction plans, to a London
firm, the first transaction in a $3 million
package And a third firm, Ariely
Programing and Computers of Tel Aviv,
says it has concluded an agreement with
B major U.S. company for the
distribution of its software package for
printing firms.
Color image processing at console
of automatic pre-press system for
color graphics by Scitex Cor-
poration of Herzlia, an innovator in
interactive system for computer-
aided design.
Telecommunications
Industry Sending
Strong Signals Abroad
One of the strongest areas of elec-
tronics for industry is telecommunica-
tions, an area in which Israel excels in
sophisticated and unusual equipment
anil exports. Tadiran Israel Electronics
Industries and Electronics Corporation
of Israel I ECU were recently awarded
the coveted Rothschild Prize for ad-
vancement in communication tech-
nology.
Tadiran was singled out for its de-
velopment of Shamir, a tactical radio
connection in which the sender can
-w itch frequencies at will to avoid enemy
interference. The firm is Israel's leading
electronics manufacturer, supplying
both military and civilian markets at
home and abroad with sophisticated
electronic equipment. Tadiran's 1982
sales approached 8400 million.
EC1 was recognized for its telephone
line doubler. in which the number of tele-
phone conversations carried on the same
line can be multiplied by using a com-
puter to exploit the natural pauses in
speech.
Telrad. a division of Israel's giant
Koor Industries and the country's lead-
ing manufacturer of telephones and re-
lated equipment, projects $25 million in
exports for 1983. Its leading product
now is its Key BX automatic business
telephone exchange. This svstem's ad-
vanced features include a memory of up
to 160 numbers, conference calls and the
automatic transmission of recorded
messages. Marketed so far solely in the
U.S., the Key BX has won great
popularity here. Telrad is currently
negotiating a $50 million sale with a
major U.S. firm which operates a chain
of retail outlets for sophisticated elec-
tronics.
Tadiran Opens St. Pete
Telecommunications HQ
The American business and hotel-
motel communities can now take ad-
vantage of "the most sophisticated
electronic communication system in the
world today," the made-in-Israel
TADEXfami', of communication
systems.
Tadiran (United States), Inc.. a
subsidiary of Tadiran Israel Electronic
Industries Ltd.. only last month
established its Telecommunications
Division headquarters in St. Petersburg.
Florida. The St. Pete office furnishes
total sales and engineering support, as
well as full repair services for its
equipment.
TheTADEX fiOXFBand the
TADEX-124XF offer business and hotel-
motel owners (up to 124 extensions) "the
most modern features available to in-
crease efficiency and customer
satisfaction."
Versatility Key to
Automatic Phone System
Telrad's automatic business telephone
system, which offers an unusual array of
built-in features, is gaining momentum
with small and medium-sized businesses
in the United States.
A fully micro-processed telephone
system that can be expanded Jor in-
creased capacity. Telrad's Key BX is
extremely flexible. It can work with or
without a central attendant; as a regular
phone system (outside lines), intercom,
pager, speakerphone or conference
phone. Display or standard models are
available with up to sixteen lines and
sixty-four stations.
While sophisticated, the Key BX is
also simple to use. Access to the system
is through "dedicated" feature buttons,
not complicated entry codes. Economy,
through increased office efficiency,
improvement in worker productivity and
reduced telephone equipment expenses
are further plusses of "the first business
phone system that really makes a lot of
cents."
Jarvis Corporation, which has offices
statewide, is the exclusive Telrad dealer
in Florida.
IfS MORE THAN A CONVERSATION PIKE
15-Element Display Shows:
How bug you 've been
talking
The number dialed
If there's a message waiting
Who is calling
If a call is being forwarded
Time Saving Features Include:
"Hands-free" dialing
Automatic speed dialing
Storage and repetition of
numbers
Message capacity
Outside line queuing
The Key bx display phone is not a conventional phone.
It's part of a remarkable, fully micro-processed system that's
an outside line phone, a paging system, and an intercom all
in one. And you can specially program individual stations
or the entire systemwithout costly shutdowns. Flexible,
easy-to-use features increase office efficiency and produc-
tivity. But, above all, the Key bx system gives you more
phone for less money. Because it actually costs less than
rental phone systems.
For more information, contact Jarvis Corporation, 2145
West Davie Blvd., Ft. Lauderdale, Fla. 33312. Broward
County (305> 791-8172. Dade County (305) 947-5357, West
Palm Beach (305) 737-0773. or contact Solcoor, Inc.. Tele-
communications Div.. 4215 Crescent St., Long Island C
N.Y. 11101, 1-800-221-8904.
Telra
r
lal


Page 12-D The Jewish Floridian / Friday, AprU 22,1983
Industrial
Research
& Development
Excluding diamonds. Israel's gross
indusl riit 1 exports amounted to about So
billion in 1981: and approximately one-
11, d, or SI .7 billion, consisted of locally
developed innovative products, systems
:ir,d industrial processes, il'reliminary
for 1982 indicate thai thepercen-
his year is closer I i U) percent.)
This represent* significant increa i
over previous years; and given the
present growth rate of approximately 40
percent annually, industrial exports
ba ied on original Israeli research andde
velopmenl will exceed $2 billion in 1986.
and constitute at least 50 ;*! cent of total
indusi rial l< reign --ales.
The impressive achievements to date
are diK- to a concerted -lonal effort to
expand the output of high-technology
and science based industrial products for
export which will have a minimum of im-
ported components and a maximum
added \ alue. thus exploiting Israel's
relative advantage in trained manpower.
There are now 48.000 scientists and
engineers at wcrk in Israel. Of these,
about 10.000 are currently employed in
export indust ies. including some 3,000
in advanced research and development.
In light of the fact that the total popula-
tion is slight ly less than 4 million, this
means that Israel has one of the highest
proportion < of trained a id scientific
manpower in the world
A survey of 681 research and develop
ment projects suppo'ted in the past
shows that 41 percent of them resulted in
commercial produces, and that 26 per-
cent of these were -considered a success in
the export market. This is at least twice
the success rate for R & D projects in
Europe and America. Experience indi-
cates that any dollar invested in R& D
in Israel results in $12-18 in exports of
locally developed products.
R&D Support Programs
While Israel has always been among
the top 10 countries in the world in terms
of percentage of GNP invested in R & D,
only recently has industrial R&D
become a significant factor. The main
impetus in promoting industrial projects
has been the Office of Chief Scientist
IOCS) of the Ministry of Industry and
Trade, which now invests some $30
million annually in export-oriented R &
I) projects. Foreign-owned firms or joint
ventures can also benefit from this
financial support Within five years,
Israel should reach the 70-80 percent
expenditure on industrial R&D the
usual level in < >i her advanced countries
without sacrificing its lead in basic
research
More than 150 foreign firms
participate in technological projects in
Israel today, either within the
framework of their own subsidiaries'
operations or in joint ventures and
investments of various kinds.
In 1981. the OCS supported more than
600 projects in over 300 companies,
usually on a matching basis equal to the
amount invested by each firm.
Another important source of support
is the US -Israel Rinational Industrial
Research and Development Foundation
which was endowed with $30 million by
each of the two governments and has. as
a result, substantial resources to assist
seloctud projects conducted on a joint
basis by United States and Israel
companies. In addition, a new company
has been established in the United
Kingdom to promote technological
cooperation between Israel and Great
Britain as well as other European and
Commonwealth countries.
Fields off Activity
Among the many fields in which
export product-yielding R & D is being
conducted areagrotechnology. medical
science, electronics, metals and
machinery, and energy sources.
Universities, institutes and commercial
enterprises throughout the country have
achieved worldwide recognition as
centers of advanced research, and Israel
has established itself as a first-rate
power in industrial R&D.
In the last two years alone, more than
fifty new high technology companies
were founded in Israel, mainly in the
fields specified above. Many of them were
established as subsidiaries of foreign
ns which had l>een ittracted to Israel
Hiding technological
enl Among the more notable
! H i ess in Israeli teihnologv
Robotics Targeted as Special
Growth Area
Robots have been targeted as a special
growth area by Israel's Chief Scientist.
wit h $40 million earmarked for invest-
ment in robot development in Israel in
the next few years.
At present, Israel has 22 industrial
robots, compared with 16.000 in Japan.
7.000 in the U.S. and 4,000 in the rest of
the world. Hut a concerted effort is
underway on many fronts. Technion, Is-
rael's technological institute, has
established a robotics laboratory toward
creating an Israeli capability in the field,
and is already involved in ten specific
robotics research projects. Israel's
highly trained manpower, knowhow in
electronics, control theory, computer
software and hardware and image
processing, are expected to provide a
head start for the fledgling robotics
industry.
Hebrew University scientist engaged in the study of the formation of proteins
from inorganic compounds.
Technion ~
Engineering a BetteJ
Tomorrow for Israe]
The unique contribution of TVchni
Israel Institute of Technologyfiff*
development of Israel, has ,1;^^
siderable in numerous are.,. TeelwL i
advances in science and technokwv?''
made Israel an acknow,..,i,;;r^h^
leader in h.gh-technolo^ wd research
and development Jritl
Technion. which opened : d(ll^
Haifata 1924 is Israels
devoted to technical education E$|
the university plays act inuifu
helping Israel strengthen itsdi fenae
forces. f,nd alternative energy s(mrtes
and develop hightechnologybased
industries capable of compel ing the
international market. It isoneofonjy
two technical universities in the world
having their own medical school therebvl
being able to bridge the gap between
medicine and technology.
During more than half a century.
Technion has trained over 20.000
engineers, scientists, architects and
physicians, and adds 1200 new
graduates each year to Israels trained
technological manpower pool. More than
70 percent of Israel's engineers are
Technion-trained; therefore, the in-
stitute has influenced most important
technological developments in the
country.
Technion's research institutes and
laboratories encompass a wide number of
fields. The Technion Research and
Development Foundation, which
coordinates all sponsored research work,
makes available Technion's resources to
outside agencies. Technion also shares
its intellectual and material resources in
a program of technological service to
industry and commerce through the
Industrial Liaison Service
Tomographic Scanner Elscint Ltd.
developed a computerized whole-body
scanner which captured a large share of
one of the world's most sophisticated
and complex markets, that of medical
diagnostic devices.
Computerized Printing Systems Sci
Tex Ltd. now leads in computerized
textile and paper color printing systems
in which color graphics are translated to
printing with large savings in manpower
and time.
Solar Ponds and Turbines The
Ormat and Solmat companies have
pioneered a system of turbines and solar
ponds to supply electricity derived from
the sun or other readily available heat
sources. This has already led to
substantial exports and many help solve
Israel's energy problems.
Efficient Irrigation Motorola Israel
Ltd. and a host of plastics producers
have developed drip irrigation Systems
which can be computer-controlled to
increase the efficiency of agricultural
water usage and, at the same time,
improve crop yields.
Israel is unique among the world's
industrialized nations in that it has an
excess of innovative capacity compared
to its ability to commercialize its own
inventions alone. This creates a unique
opportunity for foreign companies to set
up subsidiaries or joint ventures in
Israel, where a product developed with
Israel technology can be manufactured
and exported, with a fair share of the
proceeds going to the foreign company.
Opportunities also exist for foreign
investors to support Israel companies
and their projects with government
financial assistance.
A new battery has been developed at Tel Aviv University which can be used
for up to a ten-year period.. It is 50 to 100 percent higher in energy- intensity
per weight than today's long-term batteries and thus more compact, cheaper to
construct, and can be used for a wide variety of purposes. The new battery
is useful in appliances and instruments that require long-term lower power,
such as pacemakers, calculators, electronic watches and smoke detectors.
TECHNION-ISRAEL INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
Vital to the peace and security of Israel
and the entire Middle East.
Sponsored by the American Technion Society.
Greater Miami Chapter, Gerald Engel, President.
Suite 605. 300 71 st Street. Miami Beach. FL 33141 (305)868 5666
From Israel to U.S.
Defense to
Entertainment
Dade County television viewers who
subscribe to UltraCom Cable TV, may be
surprised to learn that UltraCom is a
wholly-owned subsidiary of Israel's AEL
Industries, which has played a sub-
stantial role in the growth of Israel's
military electronics industry for the past
sixteen years and made a significant
contribution to its defense AEL,
whose 1981 sales topped $45 million, is a
major supplier of electronic warfare
components, equipment and systems to
all branches of the Israeli Defense
Forces. Exports account for about 20
percent of its business .
The Sabra Trade Company
Importers of made-in-Israel products:
Quality Electronic & Electric All-Purpose Testers
Quality Home-Improvement Fixtures
Quality Educational Construction Games for Ages 4-5
DistributorsFor further information we are at your servic
24 hours a day.
9452 S.W. 77th Avenue, Suite R#7, Miami, Florida 33156
(305) 279-1830 Telex: 264006-teltex-ur-sabra.


Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-D
jdemiaandBusin*
in Forces for Progress
The unusually close cooperation be-
n Israel's government, private busi-
Wand university sectors, is responsi-
formurh of Israel's impressive prog-
Lin industrial development, par-
u,arly d.\ clopment based on research
divelopment
Ihbie* University of Jerusalem,
wha--s!ablishedinl918asanin-
Lual and spiritual center for the
ople today plays an in-
MJntf) importanl role in innovative
..rch and development
Cooperation with industry in Israel
jdabroad has bean institutionalized at
Zmv University. Two separate
tjnizations each completely con-
riled'bv the university, handle dif-
nnt aspects of such relationships. The
JJthority for Research and Develop-
SaW develops sources of funding for all
search activit ies, disseminates fo-
rmation on availability of funding, and
Ministers research grants and con-
cts on behalf of the researchers.
The Yissum Research Development
lo.administers those applied research
>jects which have prospects for com-
IB^rcial application. During the academic
fear 1980,200 new research projects
i a wide variety of fields were ini-
ited at Hebrew University. For the
_me period, t he volume of all the uni-
versity's research activity on a contrac-
ill basis reached $17.8 million. Strictly
gi the applied industrial research
irojects which Yissum administers.
rcnue from research contracts, sales of
jducts and services and patent
Royalties, reached SI million. An ad-
jtional $800,000 income was realized
foreign industrial contracts during
it time.
I Aviation Exports
In*
Sophisticated transportation equip-
Intent and services are today a major I s-
Iraeli world export. Aviation accounts for
[tie bulk of these exports, and in recent
[years, Israel has won international
[recognition for its aviation-aerospace
[products and the rapidly growing ser-
vices it suppbes.
Most of the credit goes to Israel Air-
Icraft Industries Ltd.. which from a
[mndeM beginning as a repair and over-
[fiaul station, has grown into a 25,000-
|l,r,.cin. multi-unit organization now
|to'>gni/nl as ,i major contributing
InvmlMThi the world's aviation com-
punity
1 Vj.'a w. 11 known Westwind series of
[txn'utiw (business) jets has captured
[iboul 27 percent of the entire world and
jt-S. market Mon- than 225 have been
[Mivered in the less than five years the
[Hesiwind has been in production.
IAI. also manufactures the Arava
Israeli Experts Provide Fresh Drinking Water
For Virgin Islands
ST0I.
passenger transport-cargo
jpane described as "a rugged versatile
ptraft designed for maximum capa-
city with minimum maintenance;" the
i Scan maritime surveillance plane
iScout Mini, remotely piloted vehicle.
The successor to the Westwind, the
l!upt',?ng Astra- wil1 ^ introduced to
|* market later this year. According to
|sdesigners, the Astra 1125 is "the
psutwejet of the future" whose
L"perc!',l,ca1'" win8 will give greater
E?;alllludl'and sPeed than the West-
C?)et ll is t(> replace. The Astra will
liaiure intercontinental range, mach 0.8
E"J sPeds and exceptional fuel ef-
ISCy'whik' maintaining the West-
1" s economical life Shi?! blg at'rospace news this year, was
|fcTnc5ment of P,ans t0 develop and
IZ ? Is next generation combat
CS lry-The Pri--t s estimated to
iW, 0,Xo^s of $1 biUion a^ will
EM,00 P***- U is scheduled to
lhii)r0duclion bvthe hite 1980s. A
tSl!^9 of new technologies is ex-
HJ result from development of the
I >ircraftdeiS manufact"re and export of
I Israel 'its subsidiaries and other
EZr aviatlon manufacturers export
E^i810 lhe worid,s leading com-
fc muthe field. often on a subcon-
L* "gbas's In addition, skilled serv-
Kmfif g overhaul, maintenance,
b L'i'.pr^,sion machining and finish-
Ranef.areofferedtmany
Seawater desalinization plants de-
signed and built by Israel Desal-
inization Engineering (IDE) of Tel
Aviv are now in operation in St.
Thomas and St. Croix, Virgin Is-
lands. Each is located next to a
generating unit that supplies low
pressure steam for the desalinization
operation.
Based on the company's extensive
experience with the removal of un-
desirable solids from solutions, IDE has
perfected a simple-to-operate and ef-
ficient wine processor. The processor is
said to save between three and five
weeks of conventional production time,
while increasing yields by up to 30
percent. Retention of bouquet and flavor
have also been improved significantly.
IDE's Western Hemisphere
Operations offices are located in Miami.
Luz's solar energy system, designed to meet the energy needs of U.S. Industry.
Three installations are already in operation at major textile mills; another, for
Southern California Edison, is nearing completion.
Medical Technology
Healthy Export Sector
Israel's healthcare industry has
earned a steadily growing international
reputation for its development, produc-
tion and export of high-quality, in-
novative equipment and supplies for
hospitals, laboratories and treatment
facilities.
Over 100 manufacturers turn out a
wide range of products from simple to
sophisticated, including: advanced
micro computer supported products for
critical-care applications; care-oriented
modules; electro-medical instruments for
clinical diagnosis, treatment and
research; nuclear medicine and
laboratory instrumentation; cryogenics
and vacuum systems; miscellaneous in-
struments and equipment for diagnosis,
nursing and treatment; laboratory
equipment; orthopedic devices and
artificial organs; optical equipment;
dental equipment for laboratories and
treatment.
One of Israel's fastest growing high-
tech areas is the medical technology
industry, especially electronic medical
equipment which covers a broad range of
applications: intensive care, coronary
care, operating rooms, emergency units,
pulmonary care units and obstetrics
clinics. Israel has in fact developed a
number of innovative medical in-
struments, and played a leading role in
several major industry breakthroughs.
Elcint Ltd. of Haifa is a world leader
in nuclear imaging equipment. Their
CAT (computerized axial tomography)
scanners have captured a sizable portion
of the American market. Essentially,
these computerized machines make it
possible to see inside the body. They
survey data about the body and convey
information on the function of organs to
TV monitors for rapid analysis.
Although competing against giants in
the international market, Elcint's
annual sales already exceed $100 million.
Israel has also been a pioneer in laser
surgical instruments. Laser Industries is
the world's leading developer,
manufacturer and marketer of carbon
dioxide laser systems for freehand and
microsurgery. Of every 25 CO-2 lasers in
use in the U.S., it is estimated that 17
are Laser Industries.' The device, which
takes the place of a scalpel, allows
surgeons to destroy and cut tissues
selectively and precisely with minimum
blood loss and maximum sterility. The
laser units can be used for neurological,
reconstructive and gynecological
surgery.
Safety Products
Securing Export Growth
The diversified activities of Israel's
defense industry have been an important
factor in the growth of the country's
civilian security industry. In a con-
tinuing effort to ensure domestic
security, many extremely sophisticated
and technologically advanced systems
and devices have been developed.
Central station systems, detectors,
control panels and electronic fence in-
trusion detection systems are today an
integral feature of the design and
equipment of modern enterprises and
institutions. More and more. Israeli
security manufacturers and experts are
not only selling their products abroad,
but providing their knowhow in custom
design according to the client's needs
and nature of the project.
Burglar alarms and perimeter barriers
are a strong segment of the industry.
Motorola Israel Ltd.'s broad range of
products includes a radio remote control
and status-alarm monitoring system,
which utilizes FM frequencies to convey
security-coded digital messages between
its remote and central stations. Smaller
companies also offer reliable and in-
novative control units. One system
combines three different communication
options: radio, telephone and dedicated
lines.
Forecast Sunny for
Israeli Solar Energy
The solar energy field has, in recent
years, become a major growth sector in
Israeli industry. Israel is a world leader
in this area, and as a result, solar energy
systems for buildings of all types have
become an important export item.
Various methods of solar absorption
and collection are available today, and
these are linked into systems which
range from water heating installations
for private homes and swimming pools
to sophisticated systems for large-scale
buildings like apartment blocks, fac-
tories, hospitals, hotels and other insti-
tutions.
Apart from water heating, several
systems have been developed for space
heating, to power central air-condition-
ing units and to supply other energy
needs, including those of industry.

Automotive Exports
in High Gear
Israeli automotive products
manufacturers have been gaining a
steadily larger share of the world
market, with a wide range of auto parts
and accessories.
New or improved products which have
been receiving particular attention
include a generator-alternator lest bench
designed for off-vehicle testing of 6, 12
and 2-1 volt charging systems. Other
recent innovations include air filters
using new binding techniques for op-
timum flexibility: a new rangeof
superior clutch plates (manufactured by
one of the world's few producers of
friction plates): a polyurethane vehicle
tire which when punctured does not go
flat, but which will continue to support
the car for a substantial period of time;
and a unique vehicle speed regulator.
Also offered are safety devices and
fire-fighting equipment; diagnostic and
testing equipment; engine and brake
parts; and sophisticated electronic in-
struments. Examples of especially
successful automotive exports are:
steering and gear lever knobs, fog light
sets, sun-protection screens, rubber car
mats, seat covers, anti-theft devices,
engine protection devices, air-ionisers,
engine cooling and refrigeration systems
and air conditioners.
Construction Components
Building Export Sales
Prefabricated structures, building
systems and construction components
are a thriving export industry for Israel.
A particularly rapidly growing sector,
thanks to recent breakthroughs in the
field, is building systems; and, often in
combination with knowhow or
technology from another industry, Israel
is implementing a growing number of
turnkey projects in many parts of the
world.
Among the extensive and diversified
building materials and supplies Israel
exports are: construction machinery;
aluminum extrusion products; plumbing
supplies, sanitary fittings; bathroom
accessories; builders' hardware; ceilings
and partitions; conventional cooling and
heating systems and solar energy
devices: doors, windows, frames and
profiles; electrical accessories; elevators;
locks and safety locks: plastic extrusion
products; pipes, tubes and fittings:
Venetian blinds and shutters; and in-
dustrial building accessories. Glass,
asbestos, cement, marble and ceramic
tile are other substantial exports.
The most successful lines in the U.S.
market to date include floor coverings:
glazed tiles, mainly for sanitary installa-
tions; decorative ceramic floor tiles;
glazed wall tiles; refractory bricks;
terazzo tile; natural marble and other
stone facings; wall coverings: paints and
other special-purpose coatings, glues and
varnishes. Solar energy is of course a
major export growth division of the
industry.
Israel Solar Mf rs.
Opt for Florida
Given Florida's sunny climate, it is
not surprising that a growing number of
Israeli solar energy manufacturers are
turning their attention here, and
Floridians can expect an ever-increasing
choice of quality Israeli solar collectors
and other innovative solar heating
systems in the future.
Among Florida-based Israeli solar
firms is Marsol, which has opened a
Miami Beach office. The first containers
of Marsol solar collectors in fact arrived
in Miami only a few weeks ago. The
shipment represents a quarter-million-
dollar deal with a central Florida solar
energy firm; and Marsol is currently
negotiating for distribution across the
U.S. from its South Florida
headquarters.
North Miami Beach's Helios
represents Israel's Elect ra: Fort
Lauderdale's Aurora handles Amcor's
solar water heater; and Gould Solar of
Titusville represents Miromit ~os.
and Ashkelon .


Page 14-D The Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22,1983
Jewelry Exports
It's "Pure Gold"
Israel's jewelry industry is a success
story which has unfolded in less than a
decade. In 1974, jewelry exports totalled
$3 million. Just seven years later, in
1981, exports had climbed to $115
million. The rising demand for Israeli
jewelry is eloquent testimony to Israeli
quality and ability to compete.
Characterized by creative design
concepts and skilled craftsmanship,
Israel's jewelry industry reflects a
harmonious blend of ancient traditions
and modern trends. Israels high-tech
boom has also played a major role in the
jewelry industry's success. Originally
importing manufacturing equipment
from Italy, local jewelry manufacturers
have since developed their own
technology. Today, Israel is an exporter
of sophisticated equipment for use in the
production of jewelry.
The main sources of jewelry have
traditionally been Italy, the U.S. and
Germany, all known for their fine
products. In recent years, however,
Israel has been able not only to match
their qualitative standards, but also
their prices. Because, in the case of the
U.S.. Israel benefits from the GSP
agreement which eliminates tariffs on
Israeli jewelry imports, Israel gains an
advantageous competitive edge, which
results in lower costs, about 10-12
percent below market. Gold jewelry was.
in fact. Israel's number-one consumer
export to the United States in 1981
Of gold jewelry, chains hand- and
machine-made are the most popular
export items. In a continuing effort to
increase even the most successful export,
manufacturers have begun to innovate
by making chains thinner and lighter:
and experimenting with innovative
techniques, such as lightweight (and
therefore more economical) gold jewelry,
often set with precious or semi-precious
stones.
While gold commands the lion's share
of jewelry exports about 90 percent
silver and costume jewelry are also
gaining momentum.
Beautifully designed and crafted gold jewelry is Israel's premiere consumer
export to the United States. Chains are number-one item.
Israeli Jewelry's
New Look
Jewels and baubles; precious, semi-
precious and costume: in traditional,
stark modern and folkloric designs: all
finely made, high quality, in exquisite
taste this is the hallmark of Israel's
jewelry industry.
Gold chains are the single most
popular Israeli jewelry item in the U.S..
both hand-made and machine-made. But
the selection of made-in-Israel gold
jewelry is extremely wide, and include
earrings, pendants, necklaces, bracelets,
pins, rings and charms. Many
manufacturers also produce sterling
silver lines. Some pieces are set with
diamonds or emeralds, or other precious
or semi-precious stones.
Designs run the gamut from modern
to traditional to antique reproductions.
A distinctive Israeli style has also
emerged as professional designers blend
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Middle Eastern and Mediterranean
influences with the contemporary styles
they study at home and abroad.
Today. Israel's jewelry industry has
entered a new era. The Stars of David,
the chais and the mezuzahs are still
there, of course. But much Israeli
jewelry today is vibrant, sophisticated
and up-to-date. Some retains just a hint
of Middle Eastern flavor. Much, though.
is international: it defies identification
with any place or people. New young
designers have broken free from
restraints of the past.
In trying to meet market needs, many
manufacturers have come up with
lightweight lines. Some use newer
methods, like stamping, to reduce
weight; or traditional techniques, like
casting, changed slightly. Some have
maintained the heavy look of their
traditional styles, while dramatically
reducing weight.
Diamonds &
Glittering Stones-
Glittering Success
Not only does Israels diamond
industry represent a very >mporlt
sector ,n the nation's economyT'
a significant factor in the world di^J
trade Today, more than half of the*!
supply of diamonds in jewelry is Z*J
polished in Israel. The United Sta.il
with a 33 percent share, is thl&l
export market for diamonds from lj|
I 'f K?r!'diamond exPrts peaked ,1
$1.4 billion, representing 26 percentoi
Israel s total exports. While fijruresi
down slightly for 1982. mainly becau
of the recession in the West, 1983 ex
sales are already showing signs of
recovery.
The majority (80 percent of the
world's total production in this field)a
export diamonds are melees, small a
medium-size stones which form the bd
of almost all jewelry settings But thel
industry now polishes more and more
larger stones of one to ten carats in
weight, and has succeeded in specializj
in other types as well, including fanciet
Another development has been in th
field of investment diamonds, larger
stones of unique color, weight, clarity
and cut specifications that are
increasingly favored as alternative or
complementary investment instruroen
Apart from diamonds. Israel alsocu
and polishes precious and semiprecio
stones. About 90 percent of these
exports are diamonds, the balance are |
rubies, sapphires, pearls, topaz,
tourmaline and turquoise. Israel alreadj
exports 40 percent of the world's
production of emeralds, valued at abou|
S50 million annually.
Israel's skilled workers are the key tj
the success of this industry. But like
other industrial sectors, technological |
advancement plays an increasingly
important role. Today, the world's
largest concentration of automated
cutting and polishing machinery aswel
as other modern equipment is found in J
the world's biggest diamond complex
around the Israel Diamond Exchange^
Ramat Gan.
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Friday, April 22, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-D
rael's
ts & Crafts
icated to Quality
and crafts in Israel span a broad
Lf skills, tradition*, techniques
dia Many Israeli artists and
Msarc'internationally known. Their
E. gflver sculptures and tapes-
C'd'isplaved in museums through-
Xworld. Ol here are fresh young
[experimenting and developing
Itechniques.
i craftsmen today are creating at
jjgiouspace. mainly in the areas of
.making, metals, antiquities, tapes-
teramics. olivewood and religious
; While most of the items are
_deobjects treated in small work-
by one person; if the type of object
itself to more flexible techniques, a
fictory of craftsmen produce in
. volume. The companies that do
have worked for years to develop
iques for making objects without
[firing quality.
^capacity for these industries will
fsbe limited in Israel, since the
einvolved in the work are mostly
sand so cannot produce in large
lilies; and will not, if it means
jjlheir uniqueness. However, allef-
liremade to direct the vast re-
sof artistic talents and skill
] the export market, by guiding
nen in concept and techniques,
aintaining a vital link between the
licraftMiian and manufacturer and
eign market s Combined efforts
^possible noi only mass production
eWorld's markets, but also the
lelingof minimum quantities from
ingle unique pieces of a master
Lman to limited editions now so
tun demand
Me production limitations, ex-
rhich currently exceed $7 million
'.arccimtinuallv rising. Rut export
do not represent the entire pic-
|Thc) are but a partial reflection of
idly expanding popularity of Is-
|kn and ceramics abroad. These
Id areas that hax e been able to pro-
quantiiie-ol work without affecting
piftsmanship.
Iwimated thai this figure is actually
Dimes higher It should also be noted
[there an select items for which Is-
5Ihelargest international exporter,
kample, Israel bads the world ex-
Imarkci in religious artifacts.
ithermore, thi -7 million figure
|t include the large number of
whopurchase objects in Israel.
World-renowned Israeli artist Yaakov Heller is best known for his silver
sculptures based on biblical subjects. Pictured, Heller's "Moses oln Sinai".
Publishing, Printing
Inking Export Sales
Recent surveys show that Israelis' per
capita expenditure on books is among
the highest anywhere, and this charac-
teristic has been an important factor in
the development of Israel's publishing
industry. Today, the number of titles
brought out each year is also one of the
highest on a per capita basis, and ex-
ports are increasing at a significant rate.
The development of publishing
created the conditions for a similar
growth in the printing and binding in-
dustries, with the result that Israel now
possesses a modern printing sector
which serves not only local needs but
also many well-known publishing houses
and other clients outside the country.
Currently, most exports are in publish-
ing, where output covers a variety of
fields.
Since Israel is the birthplace of the
three major world religions, it is not sur-
prising that books dealing with topics
sacred to Judaism. Christianity and
Islam account for a large export market,
as do those dealing with such related
fields as the history, archaeology and
geography of the Holy Land. All these
are published in many languages.
In recent years, the biggest growth
field has involved scientific books and
translations.
Toys, Games
on Upswing
Toys and games are no child's play in
the Israeli economy. It is estimated that
there are now about a hundred
manufacturers of toys and games:
stuffed animals and dolls, crayons and
paints, blocks, puzzles, wooden toys and
games, plastic toys, educational and
laboratory games. Exports account for
40-50 percent of total production, and
foreign sales of Israeli-made toys and
games increased by 30 percent in 1981 to
$15 million.
Of the sixty or so companies that do
export, only a dozen had exports in 1981
in excess of $100,000. Among the most
successful is Orda Industries, one of the
most experienced firms in the field,
which manufactures a large variety of
educational games and jigsaw puzzles.
Ahmad produces audio-visual
equipment, logic games and teaching
aids. And the Toy land division of
Caesarea-Glenoit Industries has
conquered many foreign markets with its
stuffed animals made of artificial fur.
Toys and games may be fun for the
user, but they are a serious business for
the industry. Emphasis is placed on
innovation, and learning toys and games
and teaching aids area specialty. Many
firms, in fact, employ consulting
psychologists and educators for product
development.
Motion Pictures
Exports "Star"
Israel's motion picture industry's 1982
exports are projected to reach $ 10 mil-
lion, a 25 percent increase over 1981
figures. This includes the sale of Israeli-
produced movies to foreign distributors
as well as the provision of services to for-
eign producers working on location in Is-
rael. Eleven full-length feature films
were produced in Israel in 1982. Six new
films are currently in progress, with
work scheduled to begin soon on at least
two more.
In addition, there was a large number
of completed projects involving televi-
sion films and documentaries for the
local and foreign market.
Because of such assets as excellent
climate, varied scenery, modern tech-
nical facilities and highly skilled tech-
nical and artistic crews. Israel has be-
come an important filming location for
many international productions, several
of which are also co-produced with local
companies. In order to expand this
activity, the government provides a
variety of incentives to help finance
production costs.
Israel's Arts & Crafts
Mosaic of Country
Like the artisans who design and pro-
duce them, Israel's arts and crafts reflect
a mosaic of the country itself: alive,
dynamic, a pageant of human history,
interacting daily with its ancient her-
itage and constantly striving to tell Is-
rael's story through unique and diversi-
fied forms of beauty.
Israel has never ceased to be the fertile
land of creation that it was in Bible days.
Today, its craftsmen bring to their work
the cultural differences and influences of
over a hundred national backgrounds.
This creativity is reflected in a wide
range of designs in gold and silver
jewelry, jeweled settings in precious or
semi-precious stones, decorative and
functional ceramics and glassware,
leather craft, wood carvings, metalcraft
and religious articles, carpets, wall
hangings, batik fabrics and embroidered
and woven articles.
A distinctive style emerges both
through the perfection of ancient skills
passed from one generation to the next
and through employment of present-day
tools and methods to create "futuristic-'
shapes. While embracing the past, the
present, the Orient and the Occident;
this style also characterizes the Israel
landscape: its desert, sea. mountains,
farmland, arid rock and archaeological
excavations, with all their varied colors
and textures.
tfttflUM S&MWKHMtA
Come in and
register to
receive our
catalogs and
flyers.

Ca,a4o?&-
Save money on Spring and Summer's newest
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and Summer Catalog is packed full of values
in every department. You'll save money on
diamonds and gold jewelry, lawn furniture,
grills, lawn and garden equipment, sporting
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Use the handy mail order form inside the
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Open Daily 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Sunday Noon to 5 p.m.


Pay 16-D TiJewihFli>rldiB/Friday. April 22,1983
Israeli Furniture at Home
In United States
. i
Furniture is today one of Israel'9
fastest growing consumer exports, and
Israeli furniture manufacturers are mak-
ing a concerted effort to penetrate the
international, and especially American,
market to an even greater degree.
There are currently more than 1,500
separate furniture enterprises in Israel,
ranging from the small-scale carpenter to
large factories. But only about 30 of
these, medium and large companies, are
engaged in export, and are responsible
for Israel's total furniture exports of $15
million in 1981 primarily to the U.S.
Diversity is the key to Israel's furni-
ture industry, which produces a wide
variety of furniture products for home
and hotel, library and laboratory, kit-
chen and classroom, office and outdoors.
The consumer can choose from strikingly
handsome "antique" French-style living
room ensembles to the most modem and
well-equipped modular system. Chil-
dren's furniture for home and schools is a
particularly strong sector, as is outdoor
furniture, made of wood, plastic and
metal.
Because the rooms in most Israeli
homes are fairly small, Israeli furniture
designers have specialized to some ex-
tent, and achieved international market
success, in well-made stylish furniture
that takes up a minimum of room. This
multifunctional, space-saving furniture
is sometimes of wood, but often of
plastic or other newer materials (them-
selves almost all produced in Israel) for
durability and easy care. Interesting
colors and sharp, clean lines are design
characteristics
The bulk of furniture exports to the
U.S. today distance alone suggesting
knockdown design is wall systems
and modular case-type product, such as
youth furniture in the middle market
range efficiently shipped in con-
tainers. As more and more lines are
specifically geared to the American
market, as additional Israeli
manufacturers learn the production and
delivery requirements of the U.S., and as
rising building costs lead to smaller and
smaller homes for which much Israeli
furniture is especially suited exports
to the U.S. are expected to mushroom
To get the message and the product
itself to the American businessman
and consequently the consumer, an in-
creasing number of Israeli manufac-
turers are participating in national U.S.
furniture exhibitions. Others are estab-
lishing ongoing relationships with major
U.S. importers and wholesalers. And
still others are establishing their own
sales and-or warehouse and assembly
operations in the U.S.
Israel Furniture
Mf rs. Choose
Florida Settings
Within the last two years, several
major manufacturers and importers of
Israeli furniture have established Florida
operations. Rim, Israel's largest fur-
niture maker (with an annual volume of
$25 million of which $3 million is ex-
ports) has offices-assembly facilities in
Miami. Exclusive Furniture Showrooms
in Hallandale represents J.K. Mfg.; and
Sharut Furniture Imports, Hollywood,
handles Berg, Mabat, Mor Carpentry,
Furniture Industry Hazorea and Kib-
butz Shomrat. Several other firms,
including Scala, are eyeing South
Florida as site for primary or regional
sales offices-warehouses.
We wouldn't dream
of having you fly overseas
to a home furnishings show
if we didn't have
a great deal to offer.
First-time showing in six years of updated furn-
ishings by American designers for today's
market.
First-time showing of lighting, accessories,
floorcoverings and tapestries.
First-time gathering of more than 200 of Is-
rael's home furnishings manufacturers.
First-time showing of Israel's finely crafted
furniture from streamlined, automated factories
with full-service capacity.
JERUSALEM.!If it's not the first city that comes to
mind when you think furniture, lighting and
accessories, think again.
ISRAEL FURNITURE WEEK
SEPTEMBER 12-15,1983
JERUSALEM
For more information contact Moshe Netanel, Govern-
ment of Israel Investment & Export Authority, 330 Biscayne
Boulevard, Suite 510, Miami, Fla. 33132. Tel. (305) 358-8140
to j4' M O.J 1 _" _*L II II
- X-Il 11 j 1^
Versatile space-saving modular furniture made in Israel, is a popular exa
Pictured here, juvenile group by Berg Furniture, represented in Florid*
Sharut of Ft. Lauderdale.
Fashion Plus: Textiles from Israeli
Feature High Standards,
Top Quality
Israel's textile, clothing and leather
industries achieved exports of close to
$500 million in 1981. a figure which con-
stituted about 15 percent of total indus-
trial exports (excludingdiamonds), and
made the sector Israel's third largest in
foreign sales.
After several years of approximately
37 percent annual export growth, the
rate slowed somewhat for 1981, and 1982
fashion exports are expected to reach the
same figure as 1981 considered a
favorable achievement in light of the
world recession.
The industry is continuing to develop
by stressing export-quality products.
Approximately 30 percent of the in-
dustry s output is already exported, a
direct result of the deliberate strategy to
produce to the demanding standards of
sophisticated overseas markets.
Industry analysts predict record ex-
ports for 1983. thanks partly to im-
proved international economic condi-
tions: to technological advanct s within
the industry; and to buyer iden-
tification of Israel as an important
resource for medium-price fashions of
high quality and standards and sophis-
ticated design. A recent agreement with
the U.S.. under which certain Israeli tex-
tile imports are eligible for reduced
duties, is expected to have an extremely
positive effect on the U.S. market.
Some 90 percent of Israeli's ready-to-
wear and textile exports at present go to
Europe, most of the balance to the U.S.
Britain is Israel's foremost fashion cus-
tomer: with West Germany second:
France, third; and Holland, fourth.
Rising Exports
In the textiles branch, there has been a
significant increase in the export of such
high value-added products as synthetic
yarns, carpets, camping and military
equipment and household textiles which
are manufactured alongside such
standard goods as cotton yarns and
fabrics. This sector accounted for $150
million in exports in 1981.
In ready-to-wear, the main export
items are pants, suits, jackets, skirts,
active sportswear, bathing suits and
underwear. The production line covers
the full spectrum of apparel for men,
women and children. By concentratii
on high quality workmanship and
materials as well as creative design
within the dictates of current fashion,!
and by offering its goods in the medk
price range, Israel has been able to
penetrate the major fashion markeUo
the world. Israel's 1981 fashion export
(clothing and knitwear) totalled $284 |
million.
Leather garments are important
fashion exports, as are leather
accessories, such as wallets, purses.I
cases, handbags and belts. In footwa
Israel exports more than a million!
half pairs of shoes, boots and sand
each year: although women's fashion I
boots made of injection-molded orslm
molded plastic are the most signifies
items. Most surprisingly, perhaps.
considering its climate. Israel has a
thriving fur industry, directed, ofcou^
almost entirely to export. In 1981,
leather, furs and shoes combined.
amounted to close to $30 million in
exports.
Advanced Tech noh
While there are some 1.500comp
which manufacture textiles and cloth
in Israel, only about 300 are involved
export. Of these, about 100 manufac-
turers who cover virtually every
ready-to-wear merchandise category,
every" P"ce and style range accouri
for the bulk of Israel's fashion export-l
And ten large companies account for J
fully 50 percent of the industry's foraj
trade.
As is the case in other advanced M
tries, these leading concerns are verti
ly integrated operations whose sctiv
ties cover all phases of production fro
the processing of raw materials to tn
manufacture of intermediate proouci
and. then, final goods. Moreover, t"
firms arc equipped with state*""
machinery which enables them to
achieve the highest production stan-
dards and maximum cost efficiency.
While fashion plants in Europe are I
closing down, in Israel they are expw
ing. Efficiency is the keynote, with I,
growing trend toward verticalizaUonj
more and more manufacturers begin"
realize that quality and supply
tec that production capacity will *
to the full.
AMERICANS FAVOR ISRAELI PRODUCTS
A recent market research report indicates that American awareness o^^
products is extremely high The national telephone sampling ol I,WF
heads of household was done for the Israel Trade Center in New ^
determine the American consumer's attitude toward buying Israeli p g
. Nine out of ten shoppers are aware of at least one product BffMfgSL
Israel, and more than half could list four or more itema The REgS
and the most frequently purchased, Israeli products are food|. vet com-
jewelry. Israeli products were rated aa above average in $H?5 ViZwIe
petitively priced The results of the survey are now being utiluea w u
a marketing plan for expanding Israeli exports to the U.S.
v -




;FtM4yMprita2>:i988'>-,FhfeU^i*h!F^{diaiT Wajii 17-L
\Bnth European and American women, noted for their demanding taste for style
land quality, are buying and wearing with pride the finest in fashions "made in
Israel"
FOOTNOTES...
Although ten million pairs of shoes were manufactured in Israel last
year, alxiut 9U percent went for local demand. Israel exported only 1.5
million pairs, valued at $11 million Biggest footwear export was
high-fashion ladies' plastic boots. While most of the output is produced
by injection molding, Israel has one of the few slush-molding footwear
plants in the world, which features an automatic process resulting in a
more fashionable product Currently, leather footwear exports
consist mainly of Israel's famous "Bible Sandal," simply a sole, strap
and band. The remaining overseas sales are largely various types of
non-leather shoes, slippers and commando boots Given the array of
loolwear products manufactured in Israel, the sector's potential is
considered extremely large; and manufacturers are now turning their
marketing attention abroad ... It is expected that more and more
discriminating consumers around the world will be finding that the
Israel shoe fits, and wearing it. .
mi^mmmimmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmemm
BORN IN FRANCE.
RAISED IN ISRAEL.
ENJOYED WORLDWIDE.
li began in 1882 when hand picked vines Irom
th* lamous French vineyards of Baron Edmond
deRoihschna were planted in the rich Israeli soil
Lovingly nurtured by gentle hands and the warm
Mediterranean sun. these vines have matured to
produce distinctive offspring from a proud ancestor
Carmel Selected wines of exceptional quality and
value the superb result of a patient 100 years
Elegant Sauvignon Blanc and robust
Cabernet Sauvignon time has been kind
*>CA Ft IV! E L
**** cWi*ies
C*'"| Wine Co Inc 271 Madison Avenue New Vo' NV 10016 (2121 532-4016
dtfe
hodlavan
Turkey Products
from Israel
NOW AVAILABLE IN FLORIDA
ASK FOR IT
AT YOUR SUPERMARKET OR DELICATESSEN
Dlst. by Seldman & Adoltson
*0SHER 6151 Miramar Pkwy. Mlramar, FL 33023 (305) 987-5060
Fashion Forecast:
Sunny & Bright
Unprecedented export growth is
predicted by Israeli fashion industry-
officials, encouraged by recent trends.
Kcss-than-record foreign sales during
1981 and the first half of 1982. had
caused concern in Israel's textile and
fashion houses. World monetary
conditions, recessions in many countries
(particularly in Europe. Israel's premier
fashion market), and increased
competition from the Far East, had all
taken their toll on Israeli exports.
Rut Summer 82s Fashion Week gave
a glimmer of a brighter future, and
signaled thai a turnabout was in the
offing for the Israeli fashion industry.
The most recent Israel Fashion Week.
which was held in February. confirmed
that optimistic outlook. The consensus:
the enthusiasm for Israel design is keen
as always, but buyers are now getting
t he message that I srael is no longer a
cheap-labor country, and that quality
has us price. The orders written indicate
th;it international buyers are prepared to
pay the price that quality demands.
In the earlier stages of Israel's
development, clothing and textiles were
a significant export. But fashions
competed largely on the basis of low
price, and the categories of ready-to-wear
exports were limited. Over the past few
years. Israel has had to work hard for
recognition in the fashion world, and has
achieved it: recognition for its ability to
interpret fashion trends, to create good,
contemporary marketable collections.
The realization that Israel can indeed
produce high-quality middle-market
clothes at competitive prices, is enabling
I srael to win a steadily larger share of
the buying programs of major
department stores, specialty stores and
boutiques in major cities around the
world.
High-fashion swimwear and suedes
and leathers have always been
appreciated by fashionable women
around the world. But characteristic
Israeli quality and design are making
Israel an increasingly important source
in all sectors of the fashion field.
Israeli Fashion Mf rs.
Have Designs on
American Women
Fashion-conscious American womei.
can look forward to a wider-than-ever
selection of Israeli fashions in the years
and even months ahead.
While fashion exports to the U.S. have
been rising modestly in recent years, a
concerted effort on the part of Israel's
ready-to-wear manufacturers to gain a
bigger share of the American market, is
already beginning to show results.
As it is. several large American com-
panies, especially major department
store chains, now maintain permanent
buyers in Israel: and more and more
American buyers ;tr- lomingto Israel for
Fashion Weeks
Hut rather than simply waiting for the
American buyers to come to Israel. Is-
raeli manufacturers are coming to
America Spacious display suites have
already been set up adjacent to the lsrae!
Trade Center's offices in the Empire
State Building in New York An increas-
ing number of Israeli manulacturers are
opening permanent U.S. showrooms, or
arranging for U.S. representation of
their lines: and many more are traveling
to the States to participate in fashion
market weeks here.
Also planned are Israel Weeks, in-
store promotional campaigns for made-
in-Israel products of all types, including
fashion yoods. Israel Solo Shows Is-
rael-only fashion shows mounted by the
manufacturers two times a year in major
markets will soon be inaugurated in
the U.S. Similar promotional efforts
have been successful in Europe.
Expected to have considerable impact
on Israel fashion exports to the U.S., is a
new reciprocal trade pact, whose terms
include gradual American duty
reductions or exemptions on Israeli
textiles, clothing and leather goods. The
agreement, which began on January 1,
1982, is scheduled for implementation in
stages through to 1986. These con-
cessions, it is anticipated, will make
Israeli goods more attractive to U.S.
importers at all levels of the marketing
chain.
CARMEL
CARPETS
NOW AVAILABLE IN FLORIDA
AT MODERNAGE
USA OFFICE: CLENOIT MARKETING CORPORATION
111 W. 40 ST., NY, NY 10018 TEL. (212) 391-3915


V
Page IMF The 3 "Land of Milk and Honey" Fulfills Promise
Israel's Agricultural Exports Top $1 Billion
The Bible describes the Promised
Land as flowing with milk and honey,
and rich in grapes, pomegranates and
figs. The "promise" of ancient Israel has
been fulfilled by modern Israel.
Today, the tiny nation grows an
astounding array of crops. In fact, with
the exception of wheat, meat and sugar
(all partially imported) and food and
grain oils (fully imported), modern Israel
has achieved self-suffiency in food
supply and has emerged as a major
exporter of fresh and processed foods.
I.ast year, Israel exported well over $1
billion in food, beverages and
agricultural products to the four corners
of the globe.
Agricultural Produce
Natural year-round sunshine, high
productivity and innovations based on
original research and development are
the distinguishing features of Israel's
agricultural sector. In 1981. Israel's
farmers exported more than $606 million
of fresh fruits and vegetables, flowers,
cotton and miscellaneous fresh produce.
Most of these sales go to Europe for
which Israel has literally become a
winter garden, supplying out-of-season
fruits and vegetables, like tomatoes,
peppers, melons, strawberries, celery,
avocado, onions, lettuce, aubergines and
an infinite variety of other products.
Although Israel's area is relatively
small, it contains several distinct
climatic and soil zones a fact which
enables the nation's farmers to cultivate
and export virtually every kind of fresh
produce.
While citrus now accounts for about
40 percent of Israel's produce exports,
this represents a significant change from
the early years of the State when the for-
eign sales of other farm products were
almost non-existent. Since then, how-
ever, the agricultural sector has diversi-
fied considerably. Non-citrus exports
include nearly 50 different types of de-
ciduous fruits and vegetables, in addi-
tion to cut flowers, bulbs, honey, fish
(much of it raised in inland breeding
ponds), poultry, eggs and livestock.
In the near future, ornamental plants
will constitute a greater share of Israel's
total farm exports. Already one of
Europe's main suppliers of flowers
during the winter, Israel expects to
achieve a similar marketing position in
ornamental plants within a few years.
Products derived from organic agricul-
ture are also increasing in importance in
response to changing tastes of con-
sumers everywhere. Cotton, peanuts and
crop seeds are other products which add
to Israel's year-round variety of fresh
exports.
Up-to-date mass production techniques applied to manufacture of pasta and
bakery items. Modern technology today characterizes all sectors of Israel's
agricultural produce and processed food industries.
ports are: dehydrated vetetables for
soups and other purposes; prepared and
frozen foods: wine and spirits: chocolate
and sweets; pasta and baked goods;
spices and additives; oils; snacks and
many other categories of products de-
signed to please the most discriminating
palates of modern consumers every-
where.
While fresh agricultural produce is
still the industry leader, Israel's
processed food exports are gaining
rapidly. In 1981, Israel exported close to
$350 million in processed food, mainly to
the United States and Europe, an indica-
tion that Israel's food industry is geared
to the needs of the most sophisticated
markets in the world.
Citrus products constitute the largest
export category of processed foods from
Israel. Based mainly on the world-
famous "Jaffa" brand citrus crop, the
line includes non-frozen, frozen, concen-
trated and comminuted juices, concen-
trates, chilled and non-chilled segments,
aromatic and natural bases, essential oils
and essences, and a variety of other so-
phisticated products.
Fifty varieties of non-citrus fruits and
vegetables are marketed abroad under
the "Carmel" label. Tomato products are
especially important, with juices, puree,
sauce, and crushed or peeled tomatoes
the main items in this field. Other fruit
and vegetable foodstuffs cover the full
spectrum, ranging from specialties like
instant mashed potatoes and celery
hearts to standards items of all kinds
and a variety of subtropical delkacies.
Poultry products are another substan-
tial export, with turkey products par-
ticularly successful, because of their
widely appreciated qualities of being
non-fattening and having a low albumin
content. Goose livers and meat have
become an export specialty alongside
smoked, roasted and frozen poultry.
Other important processed food ex-
R&D
In
Important Factor
Like other industrial sectors, Israel's
processed food industry is marked by a
high level of R&D. Israel now derives a
sweetener from aromatic and dye ad-
ditives extracted from citrus peels.
Cotton seeds are processed to yield high-
protein flour, sweetener and oil. And
betacarotene, a natural food color
present in carrots and essential to the
body for the manufacture of Vitamin A,
is being produced on an experimental
basis from sea algae, which can also yield
high-quality protein food and glycerol,
an important component in many
processed foods.
Other innovations include: instant
powdered yoghurt; a non-alcoholic
natural wine substitute beverage: meat
analogs of exceptional taste and texture
made from vegetable proteins; a soybean
fiber food enricher; and oils extracted
from palms and avocado. Israel, in-
cicentally, has one of the world's few
plants to produce frozen avocado
products.
Israeli Food MIr.
Export Knowhow
Increasingly, Israeli food manufr
turers are exporting knowhow in ad
dition to products, a trend that is
beneficial to Israels economy, as well.
to the company involved... H L S I
engineering group spun off from a
veteran edible oil manufacturer in Peuh
Tikva, has built oil extraction and
margarine plants on four continents
. .Another firm supplies its skills for
erecting instant coffee factories in
various countries .... Deco Ltd. of
Kibbutz Bror Hayil recent Iv undertook
to supply its highly advanced vegetable
dehydration knowhow for a large facility
in Mexico .... And Proteins and
Enzymes Development Company
(PEDCO) of Bnei Brak is participating
in meat analog (vegetable substitute for
meat) production in upper New York
State. .
Agricultural Research
Bears (New) Fruit
Continuous research and innovation
have placed Israel at the forefront of
modern agriculture. Among the many
notable achievements in recent years:
Pistachio trees for commercial export
crops were planted for the first time in
the Negev in the summer of 1981.
Thanks to ideal growing conditions.
pistachio nuts will become Israel's
newest export crop within five years.. .
A new watermelon, the "Helena''
variety, has been developed to ripen into
a deep inner-red. reduced-seed fruit at a
time when other varieties are pink with
an abudance of seed ....
Promising results have been achieved
from the initial planting of mangoes,
lichee and a new persimmon called the
"Sharon Fruit," which, unlike the
Italian variety, is hard and seedless
In the non-produce agricultural sector,
male Barbary canards and female Peking
ducks have been cross-bred to produce
' milliards." which require relatively
small amounts of feed, and which can be
raised in conjunction with fish-breeding
activities and yield superior meat
Freshwater shrimps have been im-
ported from the Far East to expand the
export breeding range of Israel's in-
dustrialized fishponds.. .
Mariculture (salt water marine far-
ming) is progressing to the point of
commercial exploitation in connection
with the breeding of sea breams in
floating off-shore cages or in newly-
conceived salt-water ponds....
"Oo la la" for Israeli Foie Gras
French gastronomes Gault and Millau, leading Gallic authorities on food,
surprised continental devotees of foie eras when they rated Israel's product as
superior to the French! What really cooked the French goose was that not
all of the Israeli product came from geese. Israelis have succeeded in force-
feeding ducks to produce liver suitable for the delicacy.
Experts praise Israeli Wines
Last year at the prestigious Oenologique Club in London. Carmel .Mizrahi s
Petite Sirah won a gold medal, Grenache Rose a silver medal, and Sauvignon
Blanc a bronze medal. Although Carmel Mizrahi has won prizes before, tnis
is the first time the less well-known Petite Sirah has competedm the taste test.
"and a river flowed
from eden...
(Genesis Ch. 2,10)
NOW AVAILABLE IN FLORIDA
EDEN
HOLY LAND NATURAL
MINERAL SPRING WATER
PRODUCT Of ISRAEL
ASK FOR EDEN AT YOUR FAVORITE
STORE OR RESTAURANT
Distributed by
Hartley & Parker, 15800 N.w. 15th Ave., Miami, fl 33165
(305) 625-8461
MACCABEE
BEER
NO.1 IN ISRAEL
NOW IN FLORIDA
Ask for it wherever you buy beer.
Imported by International Beverages, Inc., Woburn, MA.
DISTRIBUTED BY SOUTHERN WINE & SPIRITS, INU


Friday, April 22,1933 / Tb# Jewiab Florida Pf* 19-p.
ERVICES
,rt of 8rvc
i Israels export of services has
L'eloped rapidly over the past decade
La. a pace resembling that of mer-
iandise exports. Total foreign sales of
Ss reached $5.2 billion in 1981,
Lout 21 percent more than in 1980. The
f^export service branches are
Lnsm. transportation, contracting and
inning, transfer of scientific and
Khnological knowhow and banking.
tanfportation Services
Eioorts in this branch amounted to
nerSl billion in 1981. This sum
jcludes income from passenger fares.
ireiaht shipments from Israel and freight
thipments between foreign ports, as well
L bunkering and other port services in
Israel.
| El Al Cargo Services
During the fiscal year ending March
31,1982. El Al carried 68,700 tons of air
Icargo. two-thirds in widebody freighters
land the balance aboard scheduled
[passenger flights. This figure, which
[represents the largest tonnage ever
[transported by the company in a single
(rear, constituted about 75 percent of the
Itotal cargo moved at Ben Gurion Inter-
national Airport, apart from agricultural
leiports by air carried exclusively by El
I Al Aircraft. Cargo also contributes
[approximately 25 percent of El Al's
loverall revenue.
El Al's cargo system has a network of
lair routes spread over 23 cities on four
[cuniineius. supported by an in-
[frastruclureol offices. Major cargo bases
|arclocated in Tel Aviv, New York,
[London, Paris, Amsterdam, Frankfurt,
|Zurich. Home and Johannesburg.
tt ith these facilities, the company has
Ipaved the way for the dramatic growth
in Israel's agricultural exports through
[massive air shipments of fruits,
[itgvtatiles and flowers"to Europe. North
America and Africa.
Zim Cargo Services
Zim, Israel Navigation Company Ltd.,
Israel's national maritime firm, and the
world's second largest container carrier
provides cargo services throughout the
world. Currently, it operates a fleet of
some 100 vessels with a total deadweight
of about 2.2 million tons.
With its main offices in Haifa, Zim has
30 branch offices and affiliated agencies
abroad, and is also represented by about
200 agents throughout the world. Its
vessels called at more than 250 foreign
ports on five continents. The company
carries about 5 million tons of dry cargo
each year and transports another 2.5
million in bulk carriers.
Zim is in the process of replacing its
older 30.000-ton vessels with ships that
have twice that capacity. Over the past
four years. Zim has bought thirteen new
sophisticated ships at a total investment
of $200 million, and has four more
vessels under construction valued at
$160 million.
Zim is a member of about 40 Line
Conferences. It maintains regular
worldwide cargo transport services, the
most important of which is the "Long
Line" service of container ships calling
at four continents and joining the
regular service with the fifth.
In addition, the company is involved
in tramp shipping, fuel transport and a
variety of other freight activities
many of them conducted directly be-
tween foreign ports. Moreover, the
company has founded or participates in
80 enterprises of different kinds, all
involved, either directly or indirectly,
with the shipping business.
In the what'U-they-think-of-next
department: Several container-loads of
Dead Sea mud and salts arrived in
Miami recently, destined for a new
health and beauty clinic-type spa here
. Dead Sea mud has long been
regarded as possessing therapeutic
benefits for arthritis, bursitis and
rheumatism .
El Al Israel Airlines
Flying High
Although El Al Israel Airlines began
flying to Miami only three years ago,
Miami has quickly become El Al's
second biggest U.S. moneymaker after
New York, and El Al the principal link
between Miami and Tel Aviv.
Following the restoration of El Al
passenger operations last month. El Al
has resumed its Miami-Tel Aviv con-
nection each Monday. Service will be
increased to two flights weekly on
Monday and Wednesday starting
May 2.
In recent years, El Al has earned a
recognition for its high standards in
equipment and personnel. It boasts one
of the best on-time performance records
in the industry, and a high degree of
passenger satisfaction. The airline's
continuing effort to improve inflight
services has led to El Al's increasing
worldwide reputation for excellence.
Smooth Sailing for Zlm's
Miami-Area Routes
Zim. Israel's national maritime car-
rier, has won a substantial share of the
Caribbean cargo market since
establishing a Miami office in 1979 ....
Zim's major Miami-area routes are its
Mediterranean Service, which twice a
month sails between Haifa and Port
Everglades; and its Far Eastern Ser-
vices, which calls three times a month at
Savannah, Georgia (where cargo is
moved by rail to Miami), Kingston,
Jamaica, and Haifa. Zim also operates a
container shuttle service between several
Caribbean ports.
Zim's agents in Miami are S.E.L.
Maduro.
Miami Business Booming
Israel Tour Operator
Having decided that Miami was the
second largest potential source of travel
to Israel in the U.S.. mainly because of
its large Jewish population and
proximity to the Southeast's "Bible
Belt," Israel's Kopel Tours opened its
Miami office three years ago. Another
influencing factor was the million or
more Latin Americans coming through
Miami each year, who might be en-
couraged to add Israel to their itinerary.
In 1979. Kopel sent 500 tourists from
Miami to Israel. In 1981. that figure was
over 3.000 a figure which would be
even higher but for much of Miami's
business being handled through Kopel's
New York office.
As Israel's largest tour operator,
Kopel has been in operation for forty-
four years, has 17 offices in Israel, 700
employees, its own rental car company
and a fleet of limousines with guides.
The company also has offices in Ger-
many, England and New York.
Florida Alligators Relocate to Israel
The largest recorded single movement of Florida alligators took place last
year, when 120 gators emigrated to Israel in specially constructed crates
to prevent bites and tail-slashings-aboard El Al Israel's Miami-Tel Aviv flight
. The reptiles were bound for their new home at Hamat Gader Hot Springs,
north of Tiberias, where they are now starring at one of the country's newest
attractions. The ten-acre parkland and recreation facility is a joint project of
the three southernmost Golan Heights kibbutzim, and is fashioned after
Florida gator attractions .
Developing
the
solutions
in
M
I
Since 1975 Bank Leumi has been here assisting international trade. As
a member of the Bank Leumi group, our Miami office provides a full
complement of banking services including IBF, at this crossroad of the
Americas.
Both in Miami and around the world. Bank Leumi offers you expertise.
Our resources are considerable. With over 450 branches, offices and
subsidiaries of which 66 are located overseas. With assets in excess of
US $20 billion. Over 80 years experience has taught us how to use
those resources for you.
Because there are no simple solutions.
bank leumi le-israel '1111**1 pia
Bank Leumi
407 Lincoln Road Mall. Suite 7B
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Tel: (305) 531-3378/9
Telex: 264112
Cables: Leumiami
Head Office:
24- 32 Yehuda Halevi St.
Tel Aviv 65546
Tel: (03)632111
Telex: 33586 BLITAIL
New York
Los Angeles
Miami
Chicago
Philadelphia
London
Paris
Marseille
Strasbourg
Lyon
Nice
Zurich
Geneva
Frankfurt a/M
Milan
Brussels
Antwerp
Montevideo
Mexico City-
Pa nama City
Caracas
Sao Paulo
Buenos Aires
Cayman Islands
Toronto
Curacao
Bahamas
Johannesburg
Hong Kong
r-_____.



Page 20-D The Jewish Floridian / Friday, April 22,1983
Contracting &
Planni ng/Ser v i ces
Today, about 80 Israeli companies are
involved in approximately 400 projects
in 30 developing countries in Africa,
Asia and Latin America. The total value
of these contracts is approximately $2
billion, while the yearly production
turnover is close to $450 million.
As a result of these activities, close to
$70 million were transferred to Israel in
added value in 1981. The export of
contracting and planning services also
brings about a growth in the foreign
sales of products (materials and
manufactured goods) and equipment
from Israel, thus contributing even
further to the strength of the country's
overseas trade.
Public works constitute a major
category of activity in this branch.
Apart from the construction of roads and
water works, Israeli firms working
abroad erect every conceivable type of
structure, including bridges, apartment
blocks, commercial and community
centers, hospitals, banks and schools,
large complexes ranging from airports
and harbors to bus terminals and
university campuses.
In addition to general contracting,
Israel also offers specialized sub-
contracting services for earthmoving
including the preparation of terrain for
railroads) as well as the installation of
electrical, sanitary, heating and
ventilation systems, the erection of
frames or shells for buildings, and many
other needs. In many cases, projects,
especially industrial factories, are
undertaken on a complete turnkey basis.
In the sphere of planning, Israel
provides comprehensive services
including feasibility studies, preliminary
research and preplanning, general and
specific planning, as well as regional and
community planning. Related activities
include supervisory and consulting
services during planning and
implementation, management services
for finished projects, and manpower
training.
Research & Knowhow
As a result of its advanced work in
research and development, Israel
exports sophisticated know-how in the
form of industrial processes and other
techniques.
Foreign sales in this sphere involve
licensing agreements in exchange for
royalties or the outright marketing of
new inventions which may be patented
systems for previously unknown
technologies, or improvements on
existing processes.
Apart from industrial companies.
Israel's universities and other
institutions of higher learning are active
in this field since they specialize in
applied research, the results of which are
marketed through their own commercial
arms.
Many of these centers undertake
research in the framework of contracts
with foreign clients. The testing of
materials or concepts is a major aspect of
activities in this field.
Bank Hapoalim
For more than sixty years. Bank
Hapoalim has been a leading force in
Israel's growing economy, by con-
sistently providing major corporations
and institutions with the professional
services and expertise expanding
businesses require in Israel and
abroad. Backed by assets of more than
$22 billion. Bank Hapoalim has been
Israel's leading bank in growth and
profits.
Hapoalim currently has 343 branches
throughout Israel, and more than thirty
branches and offices abroad. In the
United States there are now eight
including Hapoalim's Miami Beach
office, which is also Latin American
Regional Office with two more under
construction.
Banking:
Israel's "Top Three** Represented in Miami
INNOVATION RECOGNIZED
An Israeli-developed system for medical diagnostics has been named as one
of the 100 most significant products of 1982 by the prestigious "U.S. Industrial
R&D Magaine." The system, produced by the Lidex Corporation of Haifa,
features the liquid-liquid and solid-liquid separation devices, which improve the
speed and safety of medical and industrial testing Worldwide exports of
this product are expected to reach the $1 million mark this year. ..
Israel's well-developed commercial
banking system has become an
important factor in the global financial
community, a fact which enables it to
contribute to the country's total export
of services. The country's three biggest
banks are ranked among the 200 largest
banking groups in the world.
With an extensive network of overseas
branches (more than 120), subsidiaries,
affiliates and correspondents, these
institutions play an important role in
financing Israel's import and export
trade as well as facilitating investment
activity in both directions.
The scope of Israel's international
business is considerable. At the end of
1981 the total balance sheets of Israeli
bank offices abroad came to $15.3 billion,
a 60 percent rise in two years in dollar
terms.
Banks operating inside Israel held a
further $ 10 billion worth of deposits from
abroad, split more or less evenly between
those of banking correspondents and
those of a range of private and
commercial customers.
Israel Discount Bank
Established in 1935. Israel Discount
Bank Limited, headquartered in Tel
Aviv, ranks among the 200 largest
commercial banks in the free world. With
assets exceeding $10 billion, the Bank
has more than 170 offices in Israel and a
broad range of banking and financial
subsidiaries worldwide, including Israel
Discount Bank of New York, a N.Y.
State-chartered bank and member of the
F.D.I.C. As of December 31, 1982. Israel
Discount Bank of New York was ranked
the 65th largest commercial bank in the
U.S. and the fifteenth largest in New
York State, in terms of deposit.
In 1978. after receiving one of the first
licenses to establish an international
banking agency in Florida, Israel
Discount Bank Limited opened its first
office on Lincoln Road in Miami Beach,
offering its international clientele a wide
selection of personal banking services.
Subsequently, in June of 1981, it opened
a second office on First Avenue in
Downtown Miami, specializing in im-
port-export financing, letters of credit,
collections and money tranrfers.
Israel Discount Bank is a member of
thelDB Bankholding Group of corn-
Foreign currency items today also
make up about half the balance s, of
the Israel, bank.ng system. reflecUng "
both the scale of our international
commerce and some of the technique.
which have been adopted to deal with
Israel s high rate of inflation
In addition to ordinary commercial
banking services, Israels banking
system provides the country's lone-tarm
savings arrangements, operates the
longterm credit system for industry
agriculture and home buyers, and
provides capital market and
stockbroking services through country
wide branching networks. In short '
Israel has a universal banking system
patterned after the continental Eurooean
tradition. *^
The highly comprehensive character of
this service has its origins in the history
of Israel's financial system Many of its
institutions, including the Tel Aviv
Stock Exchange, can trace their origins
to bank-inspired initiatives In coming
years, the export of financial services
will make an even more significant
contribution to Israel's foreign trade.
Bank Leu mi le Israel
Bank Leumi le-Israel. which ranks
among the world's hundred largest
banks, is Israel's largest financial group. \
Bank Leumi's total assets are in excess I
of 820.4 billion, and it maintains 452
branches and offices, seventy of these in
business centers overseas
Recently. Leumi completed the
biggest new issue in Tel Aviv stock
exchange history, an underwriting of
more than S94 million, designed to in-
crease the financial resources of the bank
in view of its activities in Israel and
abroad during 198li and programs
projected for the coming year.
leumi's Miami Beach office also
serves as regional Latin American
headquarters.
panies. the first bank holding company
in Israel. Today, it is one of the largest
business enterprises operating in the
private sector of the Israeli economy.
Through its two main subsidiaries,
Israel Discount Bank Limited and IDB
Development Corporation. IDB
Bankholding engages in diversified
banking, financial and investment
operations in Israel and throughout the
world.
Wherever your
business takes you,
take us.
At Israel Discount Bank, our team of experienced
professionals will handle all your financial transactions in the
most reliable and efficient manner.
IDB ranks among the 200 largest banks in the free world, with
total assets exceeding $10 Billion. So wherever your business
takes you, take us.
l>! Israel Discount Bank
Over 280 Branches and Offices in Israel and Abroad
Head Office. 27 Yehuda Halevi Street. Tel Aviv
In Miami:
14 N.E. First Ave.. Miami (305) 579-9200
420 Lincoln Road. Miami Beach (305) 579-9260
In New York: Israel Discount Bank of New York
Main Office: 511 Fifth Avenue (212) 551-8500
In Toronto Israel Discount Bank of Canada
150 Bloor Street, West (416) 926-7200
Los Angeles Agency 206 North Beverly Drive. Beverly Hills (213) 275 1411
Montreal Representative Office 2000 Peel Street (514) 849 1237

Total Consolidated Assets Exceed $10 Billion


Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 21-D
TOURISM
jm Israel's Biggest
Mar-Earner
[total of nearly one million visitors
Wound the world travelled to Israel
82 Translated into dollar terms,
.visitors represented $1 billion in
nefor Israel; making tourism one
fgels more important sources of for-
Icurrency.
[ore significant than the numbers per
bthe fact that the "added value" for
gism is 85 percent, meaning that the
list industry earned a net income in
ni currency of about $850 million,
X outranking all other major ex-
Iindustries in this respect.
fo further illustrate tourism's
fcomic impact, recent figures combm-
[tourism and El Al Israel Airlines
femes, indicate that in 1981, tourism
Hinted for one-fifth of Israel's ex-
1 of services, and constituted 11
.lit of the country's total exports
dsplus services).
^tyear, Israel's tourism industry
Cnenced one of its roughest periods.
From 1980, when the number of tourists
visiting Israel peaked at 1.17 million, the
figure dropped to 1.07 million in 1981;
and to 996,000 in 1982 a 12 percent
decrease from the previous year.
Three main factors are held respon-
sible for the decline: the worldwide
recession, the Lebanese war and its
aftermath, and the interruption in El Al
service.
Tourism officials predict a return to
the upward trend in 1983, with the reor-
ganized El Al back in business, an agres-
sive marketing campaign by the Israel
Government and private tourism sec-
tors, and improvement in the interna-
tional economy.
In addition to the vital financial bene-
fits, another important plus of tourism
on which no dollar figure can be
placed is that visitors usually leave
the country with a "more balanced view"
than they might have had, relying on the
media back home.
U.S.Israel
Tourism Up
While overall tourism to Israel was
down in 1982, U.S.-Israel tourism was
up. American tourism to Israel grew by 1
percent in 1982 over the previous year,
with some 237,561 U.S. citizens
vacationing there.
The rise is admittedly modest, but
tourism officials note that in the light of
the economic situation in the United
States, the interruption of El Al service
and the events in Lebanon, "any in-
crease is especially gratifying."
Officials believe that the potential of
the huge U.S. market which already
accounts for about 25 percent of Israel's
tourists has barely been tapped.
Thus, the U.S. has been targeted for spe-
cial attention this year, and a multi-
faceted marketing campaign planned.
In January, the Israel Ministry of
Tourism launched a major national ad-
vertising campaign; and TWA has ini-
tiated a nationwide promotion program
to promote its service to Israel. Both the
Israel Government and the private tour-
ism industry sector have intensified ef-
forts to lure an increasing number of
Americans to "Israel the Miracle on
the Mediterranean."
The new yacht-marina at Kakar
Atarim attracts sailors from all
over the world to Israel.
In addition to pushing for increased
tourism in general, on the basis of Is-
rael's traditional attractions religious,
historic, cultural, and "sun & fun" at-
tention is also being given to specialized
approaches to attract new sectors of the
public. The Tourism Ministry's Special
Projects division directs its efforts
toward both professional and special in-
terest tours.
a
i
lore Tourist
tractions Planned
Lrael as a tourist destination offers an impressive
fcber of unique and attractive lures for the international
feler. But continual attention is paid to improving and
nding "the tourism product" hotels, restaurants.
sand entertainment facilities, ground transportation,
I other services and amenities.
i fact, despite the '82 decrease in tourism, there has
i no letup in the construction of hotel rooms. Some
) new hotel rooms are under construction, and another
planned, to supplement the present 26,000 hotel
nsin Israel.
^Isoin the works are three specialty tourist attractions,
ha total budget of more than $13 million. Ein Geddion
|Dead Sea will get bathing facilities; Tiberius on Lake
ineret, a marina; and Tel Aviv, a new convention
i the drawing-board stage is a water-theme park; and
Ifa. to take full advantage of its dramatic topography.
Manning a cable car tourist center.
|he list of novelty attractions, which includes the
pous alligator farm in the Jordan Valley, and an annual
held at Alula, continues to grow. And the special
fits calendar similarly reflects more and more diver -
I events, ranging from international trade shows and
(ferences; to cultural, educational and entertainment
pis ol every description.
pn.v of Israel's tourist facilities are being financed
abroad. To encourage foreign investors, the
Mnunent otters considerable financial incentives.
Wing loans ol up to 60 percent (depending on the
p>n within Israel) at 3 percent interest for twelve
ael Tourist Office
ited for Miami
ns to open an Israel Government Tourist office in
"were announced by Tourism Minister Avraham
r during a recent visit here. The office is scheduled to
'operation by next fall.
t State of Florida is currently served by the Southern
*lsrael Government Tourist Office headquartered in
"Ion, Texas.
Sharir cited as factors in the decision, South
s sizeable Jewish population as well as the great
MM of the Christian market here; the importance of
as a gateway from Latin America, and its
"ce as a national and international business and
eial center.
[^,0rdlne > Arie Sommer, Director of the Southern
i St Uov''nment Tourist Office, Florida is now the
Producer of tourism from the south and the fourth,
inwide.
of. ulk of EI M'* volume of cargo is the usual
. *8ncultural and industrial products, the airline has
faiimf S u of more exotic shipments as well ... In
in Fl w lar8e9t ever air shipment of alligators, 120
U to lsrael> El Al's cargo manifests have in-
ternV0,66" sniPmnt totalling 185 pregnant cows, a
Tt*r tal' female giraffe and several hundred day-old
UDerf u Lar8e8t single piece of cargo ever flown in
iri or re8ular plane, was a fifty-ton rotor
J, tTU!rbo generator which made a round-trip from
"na to Tel Aviv! .
Come to the country where cobblestones pave
the way from one century to the next...where
breakfast is a tradition worth getting up for...
where hotels are surrounded by
sparkling seas and flowering cactus...
Come to Israel. The miracle on the Mediterranean:
For a wowfcrful vxatm any time of thr year, comacl a Trmet fluent or vnU tte lynd Qwtnwvnl Tourist Offiu. 350 Fi/tA JtmmMm
i York, bltw MM- V


CONSUMERS9
GUIDE TO
ISRAELI GOODS
MAPE-IN-ISRAEL PRODUCTS & SERVICES ~
More Israeli Wares
Offered Locally
In keeping with the trend toward
increasing local availability of Israeli
products, several additional wholesalers
and retail shops are now stocking made-
in-Israel wares.
High-quality Israeli graphics, posters,
greeting cards, books, jewelry. Judaica
and arts and crafts, are now available to
Florida retailers and organizations
through LBM Trading of Miami, which
represents about a dozen Israeli
manufacturers. All of the items are
stocked in the U.S.
What is believed to be the only store in
Florida dedicated exclusively to Israeli
crafts recently opened at the Cross
County Mall in West Palm Beach. "The
Burning Bush" is billed as "a showcase
of Israeli crafts." The shop features the
work of many prominent Israeli artists,
in glass, ceramics, jewelry, mosaics and
Judaica. all personally selected by the
owners.
In North Miami Beach, the recently
opened Judaica Enterprises stocks many
gift items, books, jewelry and religious
articles from Israel. Hallandale's ZaZa
Enterprises imports the popular hand-
painted Israeli glassware. Miami's Whiz
carries loveable soft dolls made on an
Israeli kibbutz. And Plantation-based
Jewelry from Jerusalem is representing
the Porat line of Gold jewelry, plus ritual
and ceremonial items for home and
synagogue.
Quench Thirst
with Israeli...
Wine...
Israel's popular Maccabee Beer is now
being imported into the United States,
and is debuting in Florida retail shops
and restaurants this month. The first
container of Maccabee, which is im-
ported into the U.S. by International
Beverages of Woburn. Massachusetts,
and distributed in the Florida market by
Southern Wine & Spirits of Miami,
arrived at Port Everglades only a few
weeks ago.
Maccabee is Israel's best-selling beer,
outstripping not only all other domestic
brands, but also outselling the total
volume of all imported beers in Israel
combined.
Beer...
Designed to meet the demands of
consumers seeking fewer calories and
less alcohol in the wines they drink.
Car me!'s Light Dry White and Dry Red
wines are making their debut in retail
stores across the U.S.
Pressed from fully matured grapes,
from which some of the alcohol and
therefore the calories have been
removed, Carmel Light wines are cold-
fermented to near dryness and contain
25 percent fewer calories than other table
wines, while still exhibiting delicate
aromas, superior taste and excellent
balance. Carmel's Lights average 9
percent alcohol volume by content, and
just 58 calories per 100 ml. serving. The
red is the only light red wine on the
market.
and Water
Israel exporting water??? For the first
time, Israel is indeed exporting water
bottled mineral water. The product's
name, Eden, was inspired by a biblical
quotation: "... and a river flowed from
Eden." The pure, natural mineral water
is drawn from an underground spring,
which is one of the sources of the Jordan.
The first containerload of Eden
arrived in Miami only a few weeks ago,
and, according to its distributors.
Hartley & Parker, has already won
excellent retailer and consumer ac-
ceptance. Eden is offered in light-weight
plastic bottles in two sizes: 1.5 liters (51
fluid ox.) and 0.5 liters (17 fluid oz.l. and
sells for below most other imported
waters .
"B.I.G. Idea"
By BARRY SCHREIBER
Chairman, BIG WEEK
While the America-Israel Chamber of
Commerce works in many ways year-
round to promote made-in-Israel
products and services in our area, last
year we initiated B.I.G. (Buy Israel
Goods) Week to focus community at-
tention on the wide variety of diverse
Israeli goods available in Florida. B.I.G.
Week is timed to coincide with the
anniversary of Israel's Independence.
Most of us are aware that Israel ex-
ports bathing suits, chocolates, citrus
and gold chains An increasing number
know that Israel has made tremendous
inroads in the high-technology sectors.
But few are aware of the incredible array
of consumer, industrial and high-tech
products that Israel today produces and
exports to the United States.
This is not surprising when it is
realized that Israel's dramatic industrial
development has taken place in an
extremely short period of time. Too.
until recently, many Israeli products
that were exported to the U.S. did not
Ket as far as Florida but. as you will
see on the pages of this report that
situation is changing rapidly, as Florida
and Miami become a top-priority
market for Israeli manufacturers.
Another reason why many consumers
are not fully familiar with the range of
Israeli exports, is that, less and less are
these goods identifiable as such. While
distinctive giftware. jewelry, food
products and fashions from Israel are
still widely available, increasingly, even
consumer products are becoming less
"Israeli" and more competitive with
well-designed, well-made merchandise of
other sophisticated nations.
Even when purchasing Israeli
products, buyers today are oftentimes
unaware that they are doing so from
automotive parts to lawn sprinklers,
from electronic equipment to wall units.
They are probably similarly unaware
that the American-made shoes they are
wearing were sewn on an Israeli-made
machine: that the private jet in which
they have flown is Israeli-made; and that
the laser used in the surgery they just
underwent, was developed and made in
Israel.
There is no question that the volume
and variety of Israeli exports to the
United States will continue to grow.
I srael 's .concerted efforts to expand
farther into the U.S. market, increasing
appreciation by the American
businessman and consumer of Israeli
products, and recognition of the enor-
mous potential of the Florida market will
ensure this trend.
Friends of Israel who wish to "buy
Israeli" whenever possible, will have to
l>e continually alert for Israeli-Made
merchandise of all types, to look for and
retjumt products made in Israel for all
their needs.
Even though we have witnessed a
tremendous increase in Israeli goods
available in Florida in the last couple of
years, it is still only the beginning. We
have every confidence that Floridians
will in the future experience am unprece
dented selection of attractive, high-
quality, innovative products made in
Israel.
am
Consumer Power
Individuals Can Make The Difference
Those of us who wish to support
Israel, to help ensure its continued
development and growth, often feel
helpless to translate our thoughts into
action.
There are, in fact, many ways in
which, singly and collectively, we can
make a meaningful contribution to
Israel's well-being, and one of those
ways is with our "purchasing power," as
consumers.
What Can We, As Individuals, Do?
As individuals, we can be
instrumental in reducing or even
eliminating Israel's trade deficit, and
helping it to achieve a viable economy
through normal channels of trade, by
simply "buying Israeli."
The first step is to become aware of
the wide variety of quality Israeli
merchandise available in our area. In
addition to the more widely known
consumer products such as fashion, food,
jewelry and giftware: you'll find many
industrial products, from lawn sprinklers
to solar energy collectors: and the latest
innovations in high-technology, from
computers to telecommunications.
Let Your Voice Be Heard.
How can you. as a consumer, be most
effective in promoting Israeli exports to
the U.S.?
First of all. realize your power as a
consumer The business community is
always responsive to the needs and
desires of the consumer. It is up to all of
us to let our retailer know that we want
them to Stock an ever-increasing
inventory of Israeli merchandise, and
that we will support their efforts.
Now t hat you know what can be
purchased, and how to help get Israeli
products Blocked, we come to the most
important step buying Israeli goods
Israeli Arts & Crafts
Special Gifts for
All Occasions
A wide selection of Israeli arts and
craft s. including many unique and one-
of a kind items, offers appropriate gift
choice* for all occasions.
Fine art is always a special gift, and
Israeli artists .ire well-represented in the
U.S.. with original paintings,
lithographs, serigraphs. print.', wall-
hangings, sculpture, tapestries and
museum reproductions.
Jewish ceremonial art. usually of
sterling silver, makes gifts of particular
beauty and value. Objects include spice
boxes, wine cups, covers for religious
scrolls and other sacred objtcts. Candle-
sticks, candelabra and goblets are also
popular choices.
Olivewood is used for religious
figurines, all types of boxes and an array
of other objects for household and
decorative uses. In many cases, crafts-
men combine olivewood with other
materials, such as mother-of-pearl in-
lays.
Israel is particularly noted for glass-
ware, including vases hand-blown ac-
cording to ancient techniques; and -
decorative and often hand-painted
-which is really a three.partprocJ
"Think." "Buy" and Tell" J
1. THINK ISRAELI. Whenever
shopping .get into the habi of QL
for the "Made in Israel" label nX
what type of wares you are seeking
become second nature for vou inui
ask for and buy. Israel, gooX^?'
and wherever possible
2. BUY ISRAELI. Try to buy
something from Israel every time vou
shop. Particularly in the case of
consumer products for which Israeli J
well known products which are *
stocked throughout our area, such as
giftware. food. wine, jewelry; makea
special effort to "buy Israeli Make,
conscious commitment as a friend of
srael to spend a regular amount
(perhaps $3 or $51 on Israeli products
each and every week Iks easy enoue
to accomplish this just at vour i
neighborhood supermarket.) Through
this action alone. Israel s tradedeficit
could be erased in short order, and it"
economy strengthened greatly
3. TELL YOUR FRIENDS. Pass
these suggestions on to your family am
friends. If your temple or organization]
holds meetings or affairs on a regular
basis, suggest utilizing Israeli foods a
beverages, gift items (as prizes), etc.
When you hold special promotions or
activities relating to Israel, feature
Israeli products of a wide variety.
We can make our voices lie heard ana
our purchases be felt We win all then!
around. We enjoy quality Israeli good
and help Israel's economy at the same \
time.
It only takes a little to do a lot.
Think "B.I.G."
Buy Israeli Goods
Israeli Turkey
True Taste Treat
Premiering in South Florida sup
markets and delicatessena this moid
the well-known Hod I.avan turkey
product line from Israel
Hod Lavan is one of Israel's most]
modern plants for the production of |
further-processed turkey and other
poultry products. Their specialties J
elude such delicacies as smoked or o\|
roasted turkey breast, turkey pastr
smoked goose breast and a full rang
turkey rolls and sausages. All are
kosher.
Hod Lavan's oven roasted turkey]
breast is already available in sek
South Florida food shops and deli
counters.______________^^^^
glass ranging from bottles and bowb
wall hangings and stained-glass pa-
in the field of ceramics. Israel pn
duces high-quality porcelain dinner
vases and candlesticks, as wellasotl
diet Inctive stonewear lor a variety oj
household and decorative items.
Acrylic, brass, copper, china, crysl
enumcl. lucite. marble, mother-of pad
and pewter are other materials oftenl
utilized in Israel's arts and crafts; -"
designs including traditional. conU
porary and Middle Kastern.
Excellence is the Hallmark
of Produce...
The simple yet distinctive "Made in Israel" label, in blue and
White, or black and white, makes it easier for consumers in
markets around the globe to identify Israel merchandise
quickly. .
Only firms granted "Approved Exporter" status by the israe
Ministry of Industry and Trade are permitted to affix the iaoe
to their goods. ...
Today, the "Made in Israel" label can be found all over w
worldmarketing quality Israeli-made products ranging r
sophisticated electronic equipment to swimwear, wines a
confections.





in


Friday, April 22,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 23-D
m & Games
00 Urael
jht All Age*
kjldren of allays- and their
nisand grandparents will be
L(,lrtl with a toy. game, hobby kit or
I from Israel.
the smallest child, choose from a
irse selection of dolls and toys of all
Cwooden. plastic or fabric: or a
fstuffed animal of almost any
at
mel excels in educational toys and
B Educational learning materials
[machine aids of all description are
4 including electrical, electronic
Imtt-hanical training systems and
Leal and mobile training centers.
Idonr play equipment is also a very
rtssful Israeli export.
Mult games include the popular
Ena(Beach tennis) and Rummikub
irdgami'l- For children, dominoes.
oand puzzles are always good
lices.
Mby enthusiast? A wide range of
oVI tar and airplane kits.
(dlepointer? A wonderful range of art
Qrwork, needlepoint canvases and
r boxed kit- for needlepoint, rug
voider) and latch hook rugs.
for the collector, consider coins,
sand stamp- from Israel. For the
Unify oriented, an instrument such
L recorder or tambourine.
thestationery line, Israeli posters
rti-tic. travel and pop are popular
[choices; a- are decorative) carved
silver ballpoint pens. (All gifts should,
naturally, be accompanied by Israeli
greeting cards, available boxed and
individually, for Jewish holidays and
most occasions.)
Israeli recordings make excellent gifts
for all ages, as do books. Israel is known
for fine-quality liooks dealing with topics
sacred to Judaism, Christianity and
Islam; and related fields, Buch as
history, archaeology and geography of
(he Holy I,and Many are notable for the
beauty of their color artwork and most
are printed in several languages.
Miscellaneous gift ideas include
smokers pipe-, niacrame items,
perfumes and colognes, natural
cosmetics, bath salts and candles.
Lanson's, the well known men's apparel
chain, features fashionable bullet-proof
clothing produced in Israel by Emgo .
Israeli Art
Showcased
An unusually wide representation of
Israeli fine art, graphic arts and hand-
crafts, will be showcased at
ISRAELARTS '83, sponsored by the
America-Israel Chamber of Commerce-
Southeast Region.
The exhibit-sale, a highlight of
"B.I.O. Week" and the Chamber's
salute to Israel Independence, is
scheduled for Tuesday, April 19, at
Temple Israel of Greater Miami, from 5-9
p.m. A private preview showing-cocktail
reception will be held the previous
evening.
ISRAELARTS is unique in that it will
run the gamut from original works of art
by world-renowned Israeli artists and
lesser known up-and-coming artists, to
limited-edition lithographs and prints;
to the graphic arts, such as posters,
greeting cards, stationery and calendars.
Also displayed will be a collection of one-
of-a-kind handcrafts and Judaica, in-
cluding sculpture, tapestries and
ceramics.
Decorate Home '
Israeli-Style
Decorating one's house or apartment
with made-in-Israel furniture and home
furnishings is getting simpler every day.
Foremost export items to Florida area
are room separators, wall units and
organizers, .ind r dular units of all
kinds, available ai many fine area
furnitures stores. including Modernage
and Jordan Marsh isome locations)
M >dernage al- handles famed Carmel
Oriental-style carpets. Israeli ceramic
floor and wall tiles are imported to
Florida by Negev Ceramics, which just
entered the U.S. market with establish-
ment of a Plantation oflice.
Home furnishings and accessories
from Israel cover a wide variety of
possibilities.
Lamps and lighting fixtures are
widely exported Israeli fabrics in the
form of draperies, tablecloths, bedspreads
and towels decorate many American
homes. And choices for just the right
final touch" are virtually limitless,
from ceramic vases Lo mosaic wall clocks
to fine paint ings and graphics.
Israeli Swim wear Suits Florida Lifestyle
Israeli Taste Treats Only as Far Away
as Your Neighborhood Supermarket
To treat yourself and your family to a wide selection of
fine Israeli foods and beverages, you won't have to travel
any further than your favorite supermarket.
The Publiz, Winn-Dixie, Pantry Pride and Grand
Union chains all carry a good variety of Israeli food
products on a regular basis (with availability somewhat
dependent on store location; and with added products
featured at holiday times).
Many smaller chains and local food stores and
delicatessens also stock Israeli delicacies; and Middle
Eastern and Mediterranean groceries handle many of the
more exotic, ethnic-type products.
Israeli wines and beers are available at most
supermarkets, and the majority of liquor stores offer
Israeli v. ines, beers, liqueurs and spirits.
Candies, cookies and other confections from Israel are
also found al giftshops, candy stores and drugstores. And
flowers from Israel especially carnations, mums and
roses are featured by many chain and independent
florists.
While Israel exports clothing of
virtually every description for every
occasion, there is no doubt that ladies'
swimwear is Israel's "hottest" fashion
export.
Gottex. Diva and Gideon Oberson are
probably the best-known names in high-
fashion Israeli beach wear, and regularly
make the editorial pages of "Vogue" and
"Bazaar."
Here in Florida, all fine department
stores including Burdines. Jordan
Marsh, Saks. Neiman-Marcus and
Bonwit-Teller carry an excellent
selection of made-in-Israel swimwear for
women; as do most better specialty
stores.
Beachwear means, in addition to
bathing suits, matching coverups, long
skirts, caftans and robes. Israeli beach-
wear design is distinctive for its
sophisticated design, and dramatic
textures and bold patterns.
pe first American beer to be produced in Israel. Anheuser-
ch beer will be brewed and distributed in Israel, under a
inly signed license agreement with National Brewery Ltd. .
cnserBusch manufactures Budweiser. the world's largest
" beer and leader in the U.S. premium market category, as
las Micbslob and Busch. National Brewery produces 90
Nt o! all birr brands marketed in Israel. (The remainder is
Med from Europe.) National's excellent facilities and rigid
pfiratiotiN lor taste and quality control were cited by Busch in
H the announcement. .
Milors to the Israel Consulate in Miami, established only last
|. inevitably comment on how attractive the offices are ... All
"*fe gratifying because the Consulate is furnished and
orated exclusively, and equipped largely, with Israeli products
| s such, it is a showcase of well-designed, high-quality made-
rrae jjjniiture and decorative accessories, from the desks,
and tables to paintings and graphics even the
PWMed telephone system____
jorh r'la" snoPPer- asked whether Israel is represented in
I ner supermarket, might reply: "Yes. my store carries certain
il h mUl11 '" ,srael Tnis would be true, of course, but only
reui i sl"rv Every time you purchase a food or phar-
t .'? Prduct manufactured or packaged by one of these
firms Abbott Laboratories. American Can Company.
lyou |rTm>' Laboraloes. Pillsbury. Swift and 3M chances
I An n l)u-v'ng Israeli; only this time, Israeli expertise.
teufl*"ba company, TEC, world leader in integrated
TOer*1 SVsU'ms- turned to Israeli engineers to design new
fcesth U*UI* slate-'-the-ait technology which significantly
EfiJi lL"st "' Packaging.. More and more of the machinery
*>"*> being produced in Israel. .
I *
Ithefiw^' 0lvmPcs souvenir bag and other plastic bags used
I ( *4 Olympic Games in Los Angeles, will be made in Israel.
Iran Jssfeiler Industries of Holon has signed an exclusive
i a lhe L A Olympic Organizing Committee after having
inu ik tender for the supply of plastic bags. ... The bags,
it ,,19M 0'ympics emblem, will be sold throughout the
well as at the Olympic Games site.
you check your blood pressure at your neighborhood
tic'hi^f S a good chance that the equipment is Telkoor's
Bj 8 q3?S pressure testing machine, imported from Israel by
ZIM
SERVING ISRAEL'S
COMMERCE
IN 250 PORTS
38 COUNTRIES
7 CONTINENTS
? ***
***
to smgjpore and Rotterdam. 10 Sydney and
Capeiown.io tondonand Dar-ts-Salaam, to ports
the world over Zim '| (leei is at your service.
Zim Israel Navigation Compans operates the
second largest container fleet in the world and
setves as the main artery (or Israel's import and
export trade.
Zim s contribution to Israel s economy is not only
a*i main source of foreign cunency. but as a
Soodwill ambassador across the seven seas,
whatever your cargo, ship it by Zim and enjoy
the renowned service we otfet reliable and
efficient.
ZIM SEVEN STAR SERVICE.
Q'S
i
J


-V Page 24-D The Jewish Floridian / Friday. AprU 22,1983

L
S MODERNAGE
a principal importer
of Israeli products.
Namely, a wide range of styles
in wall cabinets by Mobilia
and magnificent Oriental
area rugs in all-wool and
all-silk from Carmel.
FOR OVER 42 YEARS Modernage has
been a by-word with discriminating home-
makers. In keeping with our policy
of making good taste more affordable,
our Island Treasures are direct
imports of hand crafted furniture
and accessories. For traditionalists
the magnificent Pennsylvania House
Gallery. Wall cabinets, modular
seating and bedroom units, bedding
and other special departments
offer vast selection. The Master-
piece Gallery is for those who
demand excellence. A vast
panorama of premier quality and
superb craftsmanship from
around the world. An ever-
changing vista of color and
design, of beautifully
coordinated settings that flow
together, that fire your
imagination with new ideas for
your Florida life style.
In N. Dade at the sign of
the great arch
1200 N.W. 163rd Street
tertioci
MIIMRl V STATED
HUMBLY STATED W '*'
MOST PHENOMENAL FURNITURE STORES ANWVHl
also in Ft. Lauderdale and W. Broward in Lauderhill


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