The Jewish Floridian

MISSING IMAGE

Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02818

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Jewish Floridian and Shofar of Greater Hollywood
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Jewish Floridian of South Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of North Broward
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of greater Ft. Lauderdale
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach County, Fla. : 1975)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Jewish Floridian of Palm Beach County (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1985)
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Pinellas County
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Jewish Floridian of South County
Related Items:
Jewish Floridian of Tampa
Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


This item is only available as the following downloads:


Full Text
THE
ime 56Number 5
0
Itjiyr* ill?)*!* i
Three Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, February 4,1983
h
FrlShochtt
BvMaMMCnti
Price 50 Cents
jper Sunday: Be ThereOn the Phone, Or At Home
to Answer
I is Sunday Super Sunday each
jer of the Greater Miami Jewish com-
ty will be asked to take a stand on behalf
ewish survival by offering maximum
jrt for the Greater Miami Jewish
ration's 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-
1 Emergency Fund Campaign.
per Sunday Chairmen Lydia Goldring,
:es B. Levey, David Rcsenbaum and
Id K. Schwartz announced that all
arrangements have been finalized to un-
dertake the largest community outreach
program ever attempted in the Jewish
community. Some 3,000 volunteers have
offered their services to reach 70,000
households in Dade County on behalf of the
campaign, they reported.
ADDITIONALLY, community leaders,
entertainers and other well-known public
figures will join in the day-long effort at
Temple Israel of Greater Miami. Joining the
volunteers will be Sen. Lawton Chiles and
Congressman William Lehman.
Performers scheduled to entertain the
volunteers include singer David Stollman, the
Chosen Children Performing Troupe, Beth
Continued on Page 8-A
k/ashington Report
Lehman Sees Hostility
In Reagan's State
Of the Union Message
ressman William
(D., N. Dade),re-
to President Rea-
Jtate of the Union
| this week expressed
about U.S.-Israeli
|s.
attended ten State of
addresses under four
3." Lehman said, "and
8 first time in memory
lief Executive baa not
nerican support for Is-
year, Reagan erapha-
role of foreign aid in
5 U.S. interests abroad,
sident seems to have
his tune this year. Al
|iere was no statement of
commitment to Ia-
iirity. there was an in-
iication that the Ad-
lion will continue to
its Middle East peace
which Israel has re-
tN, a member of the
)perations Appropria-
committee which has
Nsdiction over foreign
ms, made his remarks
fcfter the President's
hey came on the heels of
hat the Administration
an invitation to Prime
iegin to visit Washing
I agreement between Is-
Congressman Lehman
Israel Seen Pressing
For Military Outposts
Talks With Lebanon Mark Time as
U.S. Charged With Blocking Settlement
rael and Lebanon on troop with-
drawals.
"In view of the President's
speech and the conditions the
Administration has put on
Begin's visit, I am concerned
about the President's intent,"
Lehman said. "While the United
States must be a catalyst for
peace in the Middle East, we
must not use our power to dictate
hurried solutions to complicated
problems."
"It would be disastrous," Leh-
man continued, "if the United
Continued on Page 17-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israeli-Lebanese discus-
sions are marking time
until U.S. special Ambas-
sador Philip Habib returns
to the Middle East from
Washington, possibly with
New American proposals to
break the negotiating stale-
mate.
They said that was the real
reason why the subcommittees
set up last week to deal with var-
ious agenda items did not hold
their scheduled meetings. The of-
ficial reason was that the Israelis
and Lebanese could not agree on
a site. Israel wanted the subcom-
mittees to meet in Herzliya, a
seaside resort just north of Tel
Aviv, while the Lebanese prefer-
red Nahariya near the Lebanon-
Israel border.
THE DIFFERENCE over
venue was called "minor and
technical" by Israeli officials
with each side's preference mo-
tivated by "convenience." But
the fact that such a small matter
could not be settled gave cre-
dence to reports that the Israelis
Continued on Page 22 A
irfdren of Divorce
ey Hope, Somehow,
? All A Bad Dream
*RIE EISENSTADT
t Baltimorr Jewish Times
*y Special Arrangement
J says he doesn't re-
[feeling angry when
pits separated nine
[go. The divorce
lade that much of a
\e in his life, he in-
at as he tells the
iis parents' bitter
his anger seeps
through.
At one point, he says force-
fully, "I feel vengence toward
both my parents, but that part of
my life is over with. When I sit
here and talk about it I feel in-
tense anger. I couldn't wait until
I was old enough to get out of it."
UNFORTUNATELY, there
are, literally, millions of Adams
today. And the scope and sever-
ity of the problem of children's
reaction to divorce now occupies
a substantial share of the re-
search carried out by child psy-
chologists and social workers.
How does divorce affect a young-
ster's feelings about his family
and himself? How will it alter his
perception of marriage and
family life? The implications are
awesome.
The lives of roughly 1.2 million
families are irreparably altered
by divorce each year in the
Continued on Page 14-A
Sharon Insists
There's No Confrontation
With U.S.Only Difference
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon insists that there is
no confrontation between
Israel and the U.S., only
disagreements. But those
disagreements, he conten-
ded concern "crucial ques-
tions which are matters of
life and death to us."
Sharon spoke to a visiting
group of Israel Bond officials
from the U.S. He explained why
Israel considered it crucial that it
alone man the early warning sta-
tions projected for south Leba-
non, once the bulk of Israeli
forces withdraw from that
country.
Sharon maintained that Israel
required a broader intelligence
gathering system than electronic
surveillance alone could provide
in order to make sure that
terrorists do not again infiltrate
south Lebanon. He said this
would include constant liaison
with the local population and an
important role for Israel's main
ally, Maj. Saad Haddad's
Christian militia.
FOR THOSE reasons, Sharon
contended, the early warning
stations should be manned "by
people who know the terrain,"
who are familiar with the local
population. He made it clear that
he meant Israeli troops.
"They (the local population)
have to give us information about
any attempt by the terrorists to
re-establish their infrastructure
in southern Lebanon," he said.
"It's not certain electronic in-
formation that one may get and
Qen. Sharon
transfer to somebody else. And it
cannot be done by American
soldiers or troops or officers or
any others from any European
countries. That must be done by
people who know the terrain, who
know the languague. who may
recognize between Druze and
Maronities and the Christians
and the Shiites and the Sunnis
and all the others."
Sharon estimated that his plan
would require somewhat fewer
Continued on Page 10-A
Fabulous
Story
0Micha Aidlin nearly
burned to death as he fell
through a geyser in El
Tatio. The fabulous story
of how people and events
combined to save his life,
from Chile to Israel to
Miami, makes for
fabulous reading. .
See Page 18-A
eater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement. .Special Insert


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4,1963
2
i
Ws not easy to be a Riverside.
I
I
S
K
I
Being the best at what you do is
never easy.
There can be no let-up of effort.
No compromising of high standards.
And no cutting of necessary service.
For nearly 70 years, we've tried hard
to be the best. It began with Charles Rosenthal,
Riverside's founder.
It continues today in the hands of
Carl Grossberg, Alfred Golden, Leo Hack,
Andrew Fier and a new generation of Jewish
management.
It is the kind of leadership which,
working closely with Orthodox, Conservative
and Reform Rabbis, actually helped set the
standards for Jewish funeral service.
They understood that being a Jewish
funeral director had to be more than just a
business.
They knew it was a very special calling
that demanded a total commitment to Jewish
tradition.
And the knowledge and resources to
provide funeral service that was truly Jewish.
That's why today, Riverside is the most
respected name in Jewish funeral service in
the world.
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice P3IJe"
Leo Hack, Vice President, Religious Ad\ w
Andrew Fier, Vice President
RIVERSIDE
Memo.-I C..pl. Ie./Ful Dlrtori ^J
The most respected name in Jewish tune
service in the world. $g&
'*>
^poutoritmThtGumMiaitriamffrmmn^^Fvntnl '"%+


New in Brief
U.S. Denies Clash With Israeli Forces
Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By JTA Service
WASHINGTON The State
I Department denied as being
Iwithout "substance" a charge by
[an Israeli general that the zone
Ibeing patrolled by U.S. marines
[in Beirut had become a "buffer"
[used by Palestinian terrorists to
[attack Israeli troops and then flee
|to safety.
'We have no information to
Isujjgest that the PLO are slip-
[pintf through the marines'
cordon." Department spokesman
John Hughes said. He added that
gf that was the case there "cer-
Uiinlv are adequate mechanisms"
yhicn the Israelis could use to
liscusa the situation with the
I S
he charge was made by Maj.
(,. i \mir Drori. the Israel army
irthern commander. His
[marks were explained later by
army's chief spokesman.
In^r. (Jen. Yaacov Even, who
Oted that since Dec. 22 there
lave been nine incidents near the
S lines in which one Israeli
ras killed and 25 wounded.
lutcherof Lyon
krrested in La Paz
P \KIS Klaus Barbie, the
iBmcher of Lyon." was arrested
La Paz, Bolivia, where he is
eing hold while the Bolivian
? :- ;.
Supreme Court is studying the
West German request for his
extradition. Barbie is wanted for
war crimes and for his partici-
pation in the deportation of
thousands of Jews of Lyon,
where he served during the Nazi
occupation of France as chief of
gestapo.
The French press quotes the
Bolivian Minister for Foreign
Affairs, Mario Velarde, as
saying. "We shall go ahead with
his extradition." The minister
also said that Barbie, who in
Bolivia uses the name of Klaus
Mi miinn. was arrested for a local
criminal offense. He is charged
with fraudulently obtaining
$10,000 from a state-owned
company. Comibol, in 1975.
Barbie was sentenced to death
after the war by a French
military court which judged him
in absentia.
Let My Husband Go,
Avital Tell Andropov
NEW YORK Avital
Sharansky, wife of Prisoner of
Conscience Anatoly Sharansky,
said here that she has been
"unable to independently verify a
report from Moscow" that her
husband has ended the hunger
strike he began last Sept. 26.
She called upon Soviet Com-
'r$|M
*

*d

<*
w
munist Party leader Yuri Andro-
pov to "allow me personally to go
to the Soviet Union and see my
husband, together with my
mother-in-law, Ida Milgrom."
Mrs. Sharansky made this
appeal at a news conference
convened by the Greater New
York Conference on Soviet
Jewry, the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry and the Student
Struggle for Soveit Jewry. She
was responding to reports that
Andropov, in a letter to French
Communist Party leader Georges
Marchais. stated that Sharansky
had ended his hunger strike, that
he is in "satisfactory condition."
and that "recently he was in
contact with his mother."
Arafat Asked To
Support New Delegation
CAIRO The Mayor of Beth-
lehem. Elias Freij. called upon
PLO chief Yasir Arafat to sup-
port the formation of a joint
Palestinian-Jordanian delegation
to participate in Middle East
peace talks.
Emerging from a one-hour
meeting with Egyptian Foreign
Minister Kamal Hassan AH. the
mayor, who arrived in Cairo List
week, was asked by reporters if
he would urge the PLO leader to
raise the issue before the
Palestine National Council.
scheduled to meet in Algeria next
month.
"He has to do so." Freij
responded, "he has to do that if
he wants to save the West Bank
as an Arab territory."
Coalition Beats Back
No-Confidence Motion
JERUSALEM The coali-
tion easily defeated two no-
confidence motions on the
government's social policies in
the Knesset last week. The vote
was 60-51.
The motions were presented by
the Labor Alignment and the
Hadash (Communist) party on
the basis of surveys showing that
poverty has increased in Israel
under the Likud-led government.
According to the surveys,
published by the National
Insurance Institute, more than
300.000 Israelis live below the
poverty line.
These include 70.000 children
and 155.000 elderly persons. The
poverty line is defined by a
monthly income of 16,000
Shekels for a family of four.
Speaking for the Alignment,
MK Rafael Edri said the figures
were ample proof of the govern-
ment's failure to cope with
poverty. Charlie Biton of Hadash
claimed that people were actually
lining hungry in Israel. He said
people could be seen scavenging
garbage cans for food in the
cities.
Naipaul Wins Coveted
Jerusalem Prize
TEL AVIV VS. Naipaul,
the 51-year-old writer born in
Trinidad of Indian Brahmin
parentage and a long-time
resident of Britain, is to be
awarded the 1983 Jerusalem
Prize for literature, at a ceremony
at the 11th Jerusalem Interna-
tional Book Fair on Apr. 27,
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek
and the award committee an-
nounced at a press conference
last week.
The jury, whose other mem-
bers are Hebrew University
philosophy professor Yirmiyahu
Vovel and writer A.B. Yehoshua,
cited Naipaul for his "successful
portrayal of the struggle of the
individual to maintain freedom
and independence."
Be there
for'Belhere:
Iv- there in spirit v.ilh the
people "i Israel on Supei
Sunday February 6th.
Join hosl Kiihert Klein this
Sunday .it II .to VM on
WCKT South Florida* 7
\tor a fascinating l<*>k .it the
people of Israel
'Be There.' A film
presented b\ WCk V
South Florida's 7 and the
(ireater Miami Jew ish
Federation
4 ?>
Bobby Bravo.
In February, the Bravo lazz Festival is
delighted to present an evening with one of
the finest jazz singers in the world. Mr
Bobby Short.
Recorded in New York's Cafe Carlyle. on
the occasion of Mr Short's 14th anniversary
at the club, this program features the music
of Cole Porter and George Gershwin along
with an enthusiastic audience that included
Tony Bennett and Alice Fay. And on every
song. Mr Short is at his swing-style best,
proving once again that he is without a
doubt the world's most glamourous saloon
singer.
Also in February, you can enjoy the Festival
of Women Filmmakers. A special showing of
THE ATOMIC CAFE Plus much more.
So call your local cable operator and get
to know Bravo
You re going to see the best.
Call
ULTRACOM
Cable TV at
861-1564
To Order Today
Serving Miami Beach K South Miami 1963
BRAVO is d service mark ol Bravo Co e Bravo 1983
JEFFERSON NATIONAL BANKS
COMBINED
STATEMENT OF CONDITION
DECEMBER 31.1982 AND 1981
(UNAUDITED)
iei
S 17.264.669
11 684.963
8380.362
IffM
Assets
Cash and due trom banks $ 16.S32.647
Investment securities
US Treasury securities ..... 9.973.683
Securities ol other U S Government
agencies 23.077.456
Obligations ot states and
political subdivisions
Other securities
Total Investment securities
Federal funds sold ......
Loans, net
Premises and equipment, net .....
Other assets
Total assets ...............
Liabilities and capital
Liabilities:
Deposits ........
Borrowings
Total deposits and bo now lugs
Other liabilities ..........
Total liabilities..............
Capital:
Common stock..... .......
Capital surplus...............
Undivided proms ...............
Total capital ....
Total liabilities and capital
Note Interbank balances have been eliminated *% Jl, ..Ulf),
,j^Couf4um
31.149.334 4.317.7S6 28.509.682 3.800.353
66.516.659 52.375.360
2.300.000 4S.1S4.070 8.101.497 3.403.636 8.150.000 49 536.071 5.222.905 2.554.065
$141,310,911 SI 35.103.070
113.469.252 12.369.549 113.052.707 9.376.909
123.S3S.797 I.27S.S29 122.429616 614.517
127.117.322 123.044.133
6.006.290 2.190.000 m sjs 6.056.250 2.150.000 3,852.687
Z. 14.193.1S0 12.058.937
$l'l. Jiffs 111 SI 35.103.070
JEFFERSON
NATIONAL BANKS
* *
OUR STRENGTH IS YOUR SECURITY.
MIAMI BEACH with Trust Department. 301/300 Arthur Godtrey Road and 975 Arthur Godfrey Road
532-6451 NORMANDY ISLE 948 Normandy Drive 532-6451 KET BISCATNE 600 Crandon Boulevard
361-6451 NOBTHDADE 290 Sunny Isles Boulevard and 18!90 Collins Avenue 949-2121
SubSidianesotJetlerson Bancorp Inc Members FDIC


Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4,1983
Want to Do More Than Just Talk About ProbU;rw?-Give to CJA-IEF
This is it. Super Sunday. Thousands of
volunteers will meet all day Sunday at
Temple Israel of Greater Miami to operate
telephones and make calls upon families
throughout the area. They will be asking
Miami's Jews to give as much as they can
in the cause of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1983 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Everyone knows the story of CJA-IEF's
commitment to Israel in support of its pro-
grams at a time when the State of Israel
was never more beleaguered, never more
isolated in the world community. The Jew-
ish State has just been through a war in
Lebanon that is almost universally misun-
derstood as a result of media propaganda in
the cause of Israel's enemies.
An apt parallel would be to events in
Cuba just prior to Fidel Castro's triumph
and the installation of an iron-fisted Com-
munist regime in that hapless country. Un-
til the last moment, the world's press hailed
Castro as a deliverer of his people, a true
democrat who would sweep out the old dic-
tators and bring true freedom to the
Cubans.
Everyone knows what happened within
days after Castro's arrival in Havana, and
there were no apologies from the press,
either.
We can not permit Israel to suffer the
same fate. There will be no apologies
(again) from an arrogant avalanche of ar-
rant nonsense being reported in the press
and on television since the early days of Is-
rael's Lebanese operation to rid itself, and
Lebanon too, of the terrorism of the Middle
East's Castro, Yasir Arafat, should Israel
falter and fail.
CJA-IEF monies are needed to help pre-
vent this. And now. Now, more than
ever. And so, when the telephone rings in
your home, make sure you frustrate the
worst-laid plans of the media moguls in
their latest anti-Israel sentiments. Give.
Until it hurts. That may be just enough to
guarantee their failure.
Alternative Suggestion -
But your gift to Federation's 1983 cam-
paign this Super Sunday will do more than
assist Israel. Federation funds support a
host of Jewish causes elsewhere interna-
tionally than in Israel, as well as in the
United States and right here in the Greater
Miami community.
Want to talk about Russian Jewry and
their fate the desperate need to pry open
the gates of the Soviet Union so that they
may emigrate? Want to talk about the
growth of anti-Semitism (fostered by the
recent media reporting about Israel) abroad
and here at home, too? Want to talk about
the eroding value of the dollar and its im-
pact on the social and welfare programs of
Jewish community agencies across the
United States and in South Florida? Want
to talk about Jewish survival and the need
for an expanded network of Jewish educa-
tion? Want to talk about the needs of the
Jewish elderly and the frankly Jewish
poor?
Do you want to do more than just talk
about these questions? Do you want to do
something about them? Then volunteer to
help man those telephones on Super Sun-
Jewish Floridian
(WB-l-..M5LSBl>S
rUOK SMOCHtT
si MSM Mill. HIT
oinHi miiii Mihiiiic......
4 wikte ewr r***j mi itrT yj rw j**.* non*a
> fii in roiaK mn. 11m
day this weekend. And if you cant do that,
then stay at home and answer the ring
when you are called. And give to the lyod
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
gency Fund. After it starts hurting, get ac-
customed to the hurt. And give some more
Only imagine how much it hurts Israel,
how much it hurts the needy elsewhere.
Their hurt doesn't stop so easily. Ours can
simply by giving.
Holocaust Obession Needs Rethinking
flUMCllimOM KATTA ( A*v T~-- HI InhiUoIAimiImi Fna Mrk mmLk 110 InmSm Jim IJM
Friday. February 4.1983
Volume 56
21 SHE VAT 5743
Number 5
PERHAPS it was in anticipa-
tion of this week's 50th anniver-
sary of the accession to power of
Adolf Hitler in Germany. In any
case, Simone Veil, the former
president of the European Parlia-
ment, said that she has "had
enough" of the Holocaust es-
pecially the trials and attempted
trials of Nazi war criminals.
Veil's comment was inspired
some ten days ago by the formal
charging of Maurice Papon with
crimes against humanity during
World War II, when he served in
the Vichy government and al-
legedly collaborated with the
Germans in the deportation of
over 1,000 Jews from Bordeaux
to concentration camps in East-
ern Europe and eventual exter-
mination.
VEIL'S apparently new-found
feelings about passionate Jewish
attitudes toward the Holocaust
and obsessive Jewish determina-
tion to keep the Holocaust alive
are rather surprising. Veil, her-
self, is Jewish. Veil, herself, is a
survivor of the Auschwitz con-
centration camp, where she lost
virtually all of her family.
It is not that she wishes to for-
get, she explains, as that, from
the beginning. Veil has opposed
the French Parliament's lifting of
the statute of limitations for war
crimes and crimes against
humanity, a legal rationale she
appears to be using for her belief
that such criminals experience
sufficient punishment from pub-
lic condemnation of their acts
once they are found out.
My initial reaction to Veil's of-
ficial announcement that she has
"'had enough" was frank an-
noyance. There. I thought, goes
another super-civilized Jew who
believes that everyone else is
super-civilized too. Let contume-
ly punish the Nazi murderers
as if contumely alone can punish
the act of murder at all. As if
those incapable of remorse can
suddenly feel the withering
paralysis of shame. Nonsense.
BUT THE fact is. if for differ-
ent reasons, I have myself spoken
out against the Jewish obsession
with the Holocaust. It is not the
former Nazi butchers who are
still around that I pity for our re-
lentless pressure to uncover their
whereabouts and try them.
It is we, ourselves, whom I
pity. To begin with, the obsession
with the Holocaust is by now
counterproductive. In our effort
to teach it to others, we have
come to the point of public rela-
tions super-saturation.
Indeed, if the revisionists of
Nazi history are making any
gains at all these days with their
theory that the Holocaust never
occurred, it has our holocaustic
obsession to thank for this, no
matter what the Jewish com-
munity relations agencies may
say to the contrary. The more we
push the Holocaust, the more re-
sistant to it the public becomes.
LET'S BE crude about it:
Take, for example, the incessant
scheduling on television of some
new grand-scale production cen-
tered on the theme. Herman
Wouk s "The Wings of War" is
the latest of these clinkers
scheduled to begin this weekend.
It ought to be a sine qua non that
if these productions were "good
for the Jews," if we wanted to
stage them there ourselves as
worthy object lessons in history
and as a warning against bigotry,
all televisions channels would in-
stantly be closed to us.
Former European Parliament President Simone Veil
^rSK^r^SftWfc^Wj^s^iJa^
Precisely because they are no
such thing, precisely because
they are maudlin soap opera
statements that place the Holo-
caust into instant lack of cre-
dibility, or because they show the
Holocaust as but a moment of
exaggerated unpleasantness in
the sad saga of World War II,
while almost always somehow
managing to star questionable
personalities in the cause of Jew
ishness (Vanessa Redgrave is
only one example of this), ought
to tell us something about want-
ing to have nothing to do with
them
And so, an even more impor-
tant reason that, in the end, Veil
and others who are beginning to
think like her may be right is that
the Jewish obsession has begun
to hurt the Jews themselves.
THE BRITISH critic. Brian
Glanville, in a rare interview with
the Argentinian writer a half-
dozen years or so ago, Jorge Lub
Borges, refers to Borges' anti-
pathies toward the State of Is-
rael. Says Borges: Have you
been to Israel? I don't advise you
to go. Perhaps persecution and
banishment are important to Is-
rael."
Borges. whose literary' Pr0*k
tivity may be small, is neverthe
less a world-rank artist, and w
opinions are studied eager!)
What Borges believes can not be
easily dismissed, say. on the
basis that as a writer of suture
he is not necessarily an expert on
politics. For Borges' assessment
of Israel is not political. Besid*
his own agonies in his st***
with Argentina's dictator. JuD
Peron, have made him pouticau)
savvy enough.
Nor can Borges be accused of
anti-Semitism or of "typ"*1
Christian anti-Jewish attitudes
a lesser lethal order One ot t
most profound influences on
Borges' literary UfaJ*2
Franz Kafka, the sublime Un
Jewish writer. And. as^ Borg*
told Glanville: "I met the rW
dent there (in Israel). I really^
my best to like the country, dui
didn't like it. and yet most biw
friends are Jewish" not ion*
as the old saw says, but most
AND WITH respect to Chj
tianity in general and n
Continued on Page 21-A


Friday, February 4, 1983 / The Jewish Flondian Page 5-A
New Settlements
In Judea and Samaria
Qraatw
T* Avrv
Samaria
Foothills
SartJamann
Jordan
Vallay
Sartlamann
Jarutalam richo
RVoii
Sartiamana i

^
Qaia i
.VtSml

Built-up urban areas
......... Araa of dama Arab population
dll ArM of new Jewish settlement
a Jewish settlement (post 1977)
istence of Israel
It Depends Upon
Maintaining Territories
By BEN NETANYAHU
lowever plausibly and
Khingly Arab opposition
presented to Western
liences, the very exis-
ice ol Israel is still
kwed by most Arabs as
|intolerable affront.
This hostility to Israel is
W rooted. Virtually the same
opposition to Israel that
ted m the early part of this
ury exists today a
Bt.l.ty that would extend to
other non-Arab or non-
pslim sovereignty in the area if
Ph were to exist. Even the
treaiy with E*ypt.which
en cited as an example to the
Ptrary has shown disturbing
ol having been regarded by
y Egyptians as merely a
cai arrangement to regain
!inai with no intention of
sieving genuine normalization.
UT WHEN it mmea to
on their thin sliver of land. In
1967, that sliver again proved too
tempting a target to resist.
Nasser moved 100,000 troops
into the Sinai and booted out the
UN. proclaiming: "Our basic
objective will be to destroy
Israel." Similar sentiments
echoed from Morocco to the Gulf.
Syria and Jordan joined Egypt.
But this attempt, too. failed.
The Six-Day War in 1967
immeasurably improved Israel's
Continued on Page 12-A
Four Senators 'Stand Out'
They're Unusually Hostile
By MORRIS J. AMITAY
WASHINGTON -
Among the 33 incumbent
Senators whose terms ex-
pire in 19M4. four stand out
for their unusually hostile
stances on issues of deep
concern to friends of Israel.
The (iang of Four are Sens.
Charles Percey (It.. 111.),
Jesse Helms (R., N.C.),
Mark Hatfield (R., Ore.)
and James McClure (R.,
Idaho).
Percy, the 63 year-old chair-
man of the Foreign Relations
Committee, will be seeking a
fourth term. Mindful of his nar-
row victory in 1978. Percy is al-
ready gearing up his fundraising
efforts for 1984 and will un-
doubtedly again be seeking sup-
port from Chicago's sizeable and
politically active Jewish com-
munity.
HIS TWO YEAR stint as
chairman has provided Percy
with a high-profile platform to
espouse his criticism of Israel.
This was exemplified by his 1980
trip to the Soviet Union, where
Percy was quoted by accompany-
ing State Department officials as
supporting "Arafat's dream" of a
West Bank Palestinian state.
Previously he had refused to sign
the Letter of '76, which rejected
the Ford plans to "reasses" U.S.
relations with Israel, despite per-
sonal pleas by his friend and
long-time political ally, former
Sen. Jack Javits.
There are numerous recent
Percy statements criticizing Is-
raeli actions and supporting U.S.
sanctions in response. Percy has
supported both major sales to
Saudi Arabia but surprisingly,
now that reelection is looming
closer, the Illinois Senator has
l>egun to modify his Middle East
stance in hope of obtaining Jew-
ish support which he clearly does
not deserve based on his actions.
A strong primary challenge is
expected from Rep. Tom Cor-
coran, a firm friend and initiator
of the House letter rejecting a
sale of sophisticated arms to Jor-
dan.
HELMS IS presently the third
ranking member of the Foreign
Relations Committee behind
Percy and Sen. Howard Baker.
Helms' symbolic position as
leader of the far-right conserva-
tive cause guarantees his status
of top target for defeat of every
major Democratic and liberal
group in the country. Washing-
ton observers have serious ques-
tions, however, as to which office
Helms will run for in 1984.
Sen. Charles Percy
There are numerous recent Percy statements
criticizing Israeli actions and supporting U.S.
sanctions in response.
Many believe Helms will opt
for a run for the Presidency,
given the difficult reelection ef-
fort he would face against Demo-
cratic Gov. James Hunt.
In terms of Israel-related is-
sues. Helms has the dubious dis-
tinction of a nearly 100 percent
negative record since entering the
Senate in 1973. The North Caro-
linian has consistently voted
against foreign assistance for Is-
rael and in favor of reductions in
U.S. aid to Israel.
In character with his stance on
aid to Israel. Helms has also sup-
ported both the 1978 and 1981
sales of sophisticated weaponry
to Saudi Arabia. He has been
harshly critical of Israeli actions
over the past two years, often
chiming in with Chairman Percy
at Foreign Relations Committee
meetings.
HATFIELD HAS served three
terms in the Senate and became
the chairman of the powerful Ap-
propriations Committee in 1981.
For 16 years, Hatfield compiled
one of the most negative voting
records relating to Isreal, and has
been an outspoken critic even
before it became fashionable.
Not only content to vote
against aid for Israel, Hatfield
initiated an effort in 1979 to
punish Israel by cutting U.S.
military assistance by 10 percent.
His amendment was defeated by
the full Senate, 78 to 7. More re-
cently, the senior Senator from
Oregon led the Reagan Adminis-
tration's attempt to deny Israel a
1983 aid increase. Again, Hat-
field could not line up enough
support and he subsequently
gave up his effort.
Washington analysts believe
Hatfield is leaning toward a 1984
retirement, based partly on
ideological differences with con-
servative Reagan policies. Said to
be waiting in the wings is former
Mayor of Portland and Secretary
of Transportation in the Carter
Administration. Democrat Neil
Goldschmidt, who is Jewish.
McCLURE IS a 10-year Senate
vetera after serving three terms
in the House. He is the chairman
of the Energy and Natural Re-
sources Committee and ranks
fourth on the Appropriations
Committee. He was easily re-
elected in 1978 with 68 percent of
the vote and is not considered to
be particularly vulnerable in
1984.
McClure can match Helms in
terms of his anti-Israel voting
record. Actually he has had only
two supportive votes in the past
ten years, in favor of the 1977
Export Administration Act (anti-
boycott provisions), and in favor
of the 1979 Supplemental Appro-
priations for the Camp David Ac-
cords. McClure has voted twice
for cuts in aid to Israel support-
ing the Hatfield and Stevenson
amendments.
Interview With Kamal Hassan Ali
He Vows Egypt Will Press Israeli Settlements Issue
lually
WHEN
waging war, there has
F" a slowly evolving shift in
Perceptions of Israel's
Bn-u1 Pwer Continuing and
Mgthening this shift is the
to achieving a sustainable
-e wtween
lbs
Israel and the
IL!9,i8' the Arab **
pgju they would have no diffi-
r "> wipmg out 600,000 Jews
NATANYAHU is
eW\ chief of mission at
\l JSneli Embassy in
Washington.
By JUDITH KOHN
CAIRO Foreign
Minister Kamal Hassan Ali
said that Egypt's Ambas-
sador to Israel would return
to Tel Aviv as soon as an
agreement was reached on
the withdrawal of Israeli
forces from Lebanon.
In an interview, the Foreign
Minister also reiterated Egypt's
claim to the disputed area of
Taba, but said that should the
dispute be submitted to arbitra-
tion, Egypt would abide by the
ruling of the arbitraiton panel,
even if it meant conceding the
I am still optimistic that our meetings will be resumed because
it is obligationan Egyptian-Israeli obligation which was signed on
the day of the final withdrawal from SinaiKamal Hassan Ali.
territory to Israel.
SPEAKING about his
scheduled visit to the United
States/ where he will be accom-
panied by President Hosni
Mubarak, Ali said that the
Egyptian side would press the
question of Israeli settlements in
the West Bank, "as one of the
major points to be raised with the
(Reagan) Administration."
The following is
an abridged transcript of the in-
terview:
Q. Egypt's Minister of State
for Foreign Affairs, Dr. Boutros
Ghali, was quoted recently as
saying that improved relations
between Egypt and Israel re-
quired that Israel
withdraw from Lebanon, start
peace talks on the Palestinian
issue and agree to negotiate the
future of Taba. Does this mean
that the normalization process
will remain frozen until all of
these conditions are realized?
A. Well, I would like to dis-
agree at the beginning about the
normalization being frozen, be-
cause, in fact, the normalization
was not frozen. For instance, im-
__ Continued on Page 16A
mmmmmmimmammi


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4,1983
-
State of Union Message
Reagan Pursues His 'Peace Initiative'
Our Readers Write: He Explains
His Schindler Remark
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Reagan
vowed last week to con-
tinue his efforts for Mideast
peace as outlined in his
Sept. 1 peace initiative.
In his State of the Union
address, devoted chiefly to
economics, Reagan noted
that in his peace initiative
"I outlined principles to
carry on the peace process
begun so promisingly at
Camp David.
All the people of the Mideast
should know that, in the year
ahead, we will not flag in our ef-
forts to build on that foundation
to bring them the blessings of
peace."
NOTING THAT "we should
be proud of our role as peace-
makers," the President stressed
that the U.S. "played a major
role in ending the tragic fighting
Churches Say PLO Must
Come to Recognize Israel
By TAMAR LEVY
GENEVA (JTA) An
official of the World Council of
Churches declared here that the
? ime has come for the Palestine
Liberation Organization to
recognize Israel.
According to Ninan Koshy. in-
ternational affairs director of the
WCC, "a declaration of inten-
tion" by the PLO to recognize
Israel's right to exist as a state
would strengthen the present
political momentum for a genuine
peace in the Middle East. Koshy
spoke on occasion of the Interna-
tional Day of Solidarity with the
Palestinian People.
He said the situation
demanded that the PLO take
advantage of the favorable
factors in order to capitalize on
the good will it has earned and to
take bold steps. Those remarks
by a representative of an organi-
zation that has always been
sharply critical of Israel's policies
came as a surprise.
The WCC represents more
than 300 Protestant denomina-
tions in 100 countries. Koshy said
that it supports the efforts of the
peace movements in Israel and
among sections of the Jewish
people around the world who also
affirm the rights of the
Palestinian people and appeal for
co-existence between Israelis and
Palestinians in two mutually re-
cognized states.
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in Lebanon and negotiated the
withdrawal of the PLO from Bei-
rut."
This theme was also stressed in
the Administration's midterm re-
port on Reagan's two years in of-
fice. The 118-page report, which
only mentions the Mideast brief-
ly, was issued by the Whit*
House. Among 10 major accom-
plishments the report said were
made in Reagan's first two years
in office was that the "prospect
for Mideast peace advanced"
through the peace initiative and
the efforts in Lebanon.
Reagan's proposals for Mid-
east peace "launched a fresh start
toward a settlement of conflict
there that would ensure Israel's
security and the legitimate rights
of the Palestinians," the midterm
review said in its introduction.
"The year ended with historic
talks ongoing between Lebanon
and Israel (with U.S. participat-
ing) on the removal of foreign
. forces from Lebanon."
| THE REVIEW also noted that
"the U.S. was instrumental in es-
tablishing a multinational force
and observers for the Sinai in the
context of helping Israel and
Egypt work out the details per-
mitting completion of the Israeli
withdrawal from Egyptian terri-
tory and full implementation of
the Egypt-Israel peace treaty."
The review said that primarily
due to the efforts of the President
and Ambassador Philip Habib.
"the U.S. helped stop the war in
Lebanon and achieved the with-
drawal of PLO forces from Bei-
rut. Working closely with Leba-
non and other states involved,
the President has emphasized the
urgency of achieving a with-
drawal of all foreign forces from
Lebanon."
On Reagan's peace initiative,
the review? noted the "highly con-
structive" visit by an Arab
League delegation to the White
House last year as "illustrative of
the positive movement which has
taken place in the direction the
President outlined."
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian:
I do not wish to use your news-
paper as a forum; however. I find
it necessary to reply to the many
calls I received after my recent
letter appeared in the Jewish
Floridian. Some were critical, and
many were complimentary of my
criticism of Rabbi Schindler.
The critics believe no one may
speak out publicly against the
regime or powers that be. In fact,
it is my belief, anyone should be
encouraged to voice their opinion
on public matters even as edi-
torial writers do.
live
democracy where freedom I
speech is guaranteed by ourr *
stitution. It is precisely b?
United States where cities*
allowed to criticize tho* t
whom criticism is due or whrL,
ideology conflicts with
standards.
moni
Fortunately, we
m a
The mere mention of critics
of a clergyman is cause for m.
criticism. But Rabbis are nw2
beings like anyone else an make mistakes. There seemsj,
be difficulty in believing
clergymen are every bit likely,
be as foolish as any other man
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Media Pursue Story
Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Three Arabs Go on Trial For
Britain's Row With Saudi Arabia Unfolds *"** Envoy Argov
IflNinnN I.1TA Throe Arakd iA0r,t^
LONDON (JTA) -
fhile the British Foreign
ffice is attempting to play
jwn Britain's latest row
8th Saudi Arabia, leading
jndon newspapers are
st as intent on playing it
J Editorials in The Times,
financial Times and Guardian
luminously blame Britain for
e row following Prime Minister
argaret Thatcher's refusal to
ceive PLO representative
k Kaddoumi as part of an
rab League delegation. The
kudis have retaliated by cancel-
a visit by British Foreign
cretary Francis Pym.
What is required is not soft-
ss on principle but greater
rity. consistency and serious-
j in applying our principles to
Palestinian issue," says The
nes.
The Financial Times, alleging
confusion in Britain's attitude to
the PLO. says that "quite apart
from the possible damage to
trade relations, it is regrettable
that a cooling in relations (with
Saudi Arabia) should take place
just as Britain and the more
moderate members of the Arab
world appeared to be moving
closer towards a common ap-
proach to a Middle East peace
settlement."
THE GUARDIAN suggests
that the Foreign Office and Dow-
ning Street "are even now cons-
tructing the form of words which
will allow Mr. Kaddowmi or one
of his colleagues both to be
received and not deflect Britain
from giving its full support to the
Palestinian people, whether or
not represented by the PLO, in
what may be their last chance of
securing a home..."
But Mrs. Thatcher's refusal to
meet a PLO representative won
warm praise from the Anglo-Jew-
ish community's representative
body. Arye Handler, chairman of
the Board of Deputies of British
Jews, urged the Prime Minister
to remain firm in her resolve "and
resist odious Arab threats."
But this may not prevent the
anti-British mood from spreading
to other* parts of the Arab world.
The strength of Saudi feeling
was evident in an emotional letter
to The Times by Prince Bandar
Ben Abdullah, the Saudi Assis-
tant Deputy Minister of the
Interior, advising fellow Arabs
"to emulate the Saudi way,
namely, hit the Westerners where
it hurts, in their pockets, for they
have no hearts."
AMONG THE epithets which
the Prince levelled at Britain
were that it was "foolhardy in
humiliating the Arabs" and that
"the average full-blooded Arab"
was "nauseated by British hypo-
crisy.'' He called Britain merely
"an appendage" of the United
States and "almost irrelevant" in
the Middle East.
BQBDPP
oooooow
LONDON (JTA Three Arabs identified as mem-
bers of a PLO splinter group went on trial here last week
for the attempted murder of Shlomo Argov, the Israeli
Ambassador to Britain, who was shot and severely
wounded last June 3 outside a London hotel.
The defendants, Hussein Ahmad Ghassan Said and
Marwa Al Banna, both Jordanians and Novoff Nagib
Meflehel Rosan, an Iraqi, pleaded not guilty to the
charges of shooting Argov and his police bodyguard. Ac-
cording to a prosecutor, Argov was shot in the head by
Said who was wounded by police when he attempted to
escape.
THE THREE MEN were identified as members of the
Palestine Liberation Movement, a little-known breakaway
faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization. Accord-
ing to Scotland Yard, they had a "hit list" of prominent
Israelis targeted for assassination. Argov suffered brain
damage and remains hospitalized.
The PLO disclaimed responsibility for the assassination
attempt. Nevertheless, Israel retaliated for/ the shooting
of Argove by bombing PLO bases in Lebanon on June 4
and on June 6 Israeli forces invaded Lebanon with the
then stated intention of securing a 25 kilometer terrorist-
free zone in south Lebanon.
3PQBBBI
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FAY GOLDBERG
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Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board
Ernest Samuels
V.P. JNF Gr. Miami
Abraham Grunhut
Pros. JNF Gr. Miami
Jewish National Fund Strengthens Israel
IWP oo no poo bpbp cancan
For Information and Reservations:
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND 420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 353, Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone 538-6464


Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. February 4.1963
Super Sunday: Be ThereOn the Phone, Or At Home
Continued from Page 1A
Americans of Temple Beth Am, Nitzanim
Israeli Dance Group. Miami Beach High
School Rock Ensemble, North Miami Beach
High School Stage Band, Sunset School Show
Chorus, Miami High School Stage Band, and
Palmetto High School Stage Band.
More than 35 organizations and agencies
will present special displays at the Super
Sunday Expo Center. They will provide in-
formation about services offered within the
Greater Miami Jewish community.
"WE ARE all pulling together on Super
Sunday to aid Jews in need everywhere."' said
1983 CJA-1EF General Campaign Chairman
Aaron Podhurst. "It will be a day in which we
will display strong community spirit and a
true sense of commitment to Jews at home
and abroad. We are counting on everyone to
make the maximum possible gift to the 1903
Campaign when our volunteers call."
Podhurst also urged Jewish
- ~------- """i-----""" community
members to call Super Sunday Headquarter
at 573-7333, if volunteers are unable toreac
them. He stressed that "the community
complete cooperation will ensure record
breaking results on Super Sunday."
Contrary to Popular Opinion
Unemployment Said To Be Hitting Jews Especially Hard
NEW YORK -
Contrary to popular opinion,
unemployment is hitting Jews
especially hard, according to
Alfred Miller, the executive
director of the Federation
Employment and Guidance
Service (FEGS).
From the last-hired, first-fired
Jews in executive suites, to Rus-
sian immigrants at entry-level as
well as professional-level jobs, to
many professionals in the area of
human services a disproportiona-
te number of Jew* are out of
work. Miller said.
While people think the
unemployment rate, now ap
proaching 11 percent i not that
bad in the Jewish community
budget cuts and economic
problems have occurred in areas
where there's a high Jewish
concentration." he told a meeting
of the United Jewish Appeal-
Federation Women's Campaign
Advisory Board.
ACCORDING TO Herbert
Bienstock. former regional labor
commissioner for the Bureau of
Labor Statistics of the Depart-
ment of Labor, now head of
CUNY Queens College Center for
Urban Affairs and consultant of
FEGS. close to 100.000 Jews are
unemployed in the New York
City area Probably some 250.000
to 300.000 Jews are unemployed
nationally, according to his
figure.*-
Miller pointed out that some
5,000 Jewish professionals in the
Greater New York area are
registered witn FEGS. This
numtier. which represents only
the people who have come to
FEGS for help, is up approxima-
tely 30 percent from a year ago.
The number a year ago was up 40
percent from the previous year.
Of the 5.000 professionals, about
500 to 750 are from the communal
service and social service sectors.
THE REST of the unemployed
- mistered Jewish professionals
have been laid off from
businesses They include ac-
countants, architects chemical
neers. architectural
engineers, electrical engineers,
mechanical engineers. office
managers. lawyers. business
administrators, and computer
programmers. In fact, about 10
percent, or a total of 400, are
computer programmers. ac-
cording to Miller
"Nobody is safe from this.''
Miller said. "Unemployment la
permeating the entire Jewish
community, the whole gamut of
the Jewish economic base." He
noted that, in addition. "Hun-
dreds of professionals such as
social workers, psychologists,
rehabilitation counselors,
teachers, as well as Jews whose
small businesses have failed.
American 0
Israeli
LARGE SELECTION OP
TALAISIM IN WOOL or RAYON
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Everything lor all yar around
Specializing in Bar Mitzvah Sets
We Have A Sofer
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1357 WASHINGTON AVE.
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have registered with FEGS for
jobs."
In presenting a breakdown of
the areas of unemployment and
the changing nature of the
jobless. Miller said that in the
past. FEGS has helped
traditionally unemployed, not
professionals. In the past. FEGS
would handle job placements for
2 I Jewish professionals,
compared to the present number
of 5.000. I.ast year, he said, with
the impact of federal budget cuts.
FEGS was handling unemployed
social service professionals. This
\<-ur. Miller said, it's business
professionals from the private
sector.
FEGS, he noted, is also seeing
an increasing number of Russian
Jewish immigrants who were the
last hired and first fired not only
from entry-level jobs but also
from professions. including
engineers, office workers, and
workers in the skilled trades.
The agency's Executive Suite
Program, a joint undertaking
with the American Jewish Com-
mittee to get Jews into the upper
echelons of major corporations, is
also feeling the effects of in-
creased layoffs. "We're seeing a
tremendous amount of people
who finally got into corporation
hierarchies suddenly being let
go." Miller said.
In addition to job placements.
FEGS provides vocational
training along with mental health
treatment services and a variety
of developmental business and
industry projects in New York
and abroad Miller stressed that
six percent of the FEGS budget
received from UJA-Federation
Campaign provides leverage for
the agency's $17 million funding
for programs in 50 locations
throughout New York City, and
N MMU, Suffolk and Westchester
counties Some 50 to 60 percent
of FEGS' 70.000 clients are
Jewish
FEGS' far-reaching pro^
include the Amencan-Im
Technical Assistance Comma
formed eight years ago n
Israel's Ministry of Labor to U
the Jewish state'* handicap^
"Eighty percent of the Atari
organizations that loiad
provide technical assiatUCM
non-Jewish." Miller said
had helped them develop gnel
and programs in their hour
need. >w they helped us in ours."
FEGS is currently heading a proje I reviti
Israel's jewelry industry IrofB
will be trained to create setuaj
THE FLORIDA FRIENDS OF
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY
IS PROUD TO PRESENT
ITS FIRST ANNUAL
ISSUES OF
OUR TIMES
SEMINAR SERIES
Monday,
Feb. 7th
"Who Shall Live And Who
Shall Die-
Speaker: Rabbi J. David Bleich
Rabb: J David Bieich is a professor
of Talmud ar Yeshiva University and
a professor of Jewisn law and ethics
presents its
Third Seminar
of a four-part series
at tne Umversit> s Cordozo Scnooi o'
Law In addition to collaborating v\
Dr. Fred Rosner Itne second sem
speaker) on the boo* Jewish Bio-
Ethics, Rabbi Bieich is also the sole
author and editor of many books and
publications on Jewish law and ethics.
Monday,
March 7th
"Jewish Mysticism -
Secrets Of Our Times
Spcaker.Rabbl Benjamin Blech
RaODi Benjamin Biech assistant professor of Yesl
Unive'S'rv s James Stria' School of Genera: Jewis*"
I n. nas given more than 100 :'
ind Europe He received the M
Outstanding American Educator
tion of his far-reaching efforts and (
m addition. Raob. Blech nas sen
committees since he Decame ordair'e-J
RaoDi Isaac Ekrhanan Theological Sermnar) '^-rwi
Universe.
FLORIDA FRIENDS OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY composed
of graduates and non-graduates alike suppots the New York-
Dased university m appreciation of the many skilled and talented
graduates that return to serve the South Florida commu- tj
Founded m 1886 Yeshrva Universe a the oldest and largest uni-
versity unde' Jewisn auspices and nas always operated under tne
philosophy that a great educational institution can no> stand apart
from its environment It is firmly committed to advancing the well-
being o' the Jewish community and the nation using all resources
available
In keeping with that tradition, the Florida Friends of Yeshrva univer-
sity is proud to bring the University's resources closer to the South
Florida community tnrougn rhe "issues Of Our Times" seminar series
ALL SEMINARS ARE FREE OF CHARGE AND OPEN TO
THE PUBLIC. Each Degms promptly at t pjw. a: Konovef
15445 Collins Ave Miami Beach) Special pre*
will be artsnged
FOR RESERVATIONS or more information on tne to
Issues of Our Times" seminar series, please contact
Mr Chaim H Friend
Director of Development-Southeastern Region
Florida Friends o' Yeshiva Unrve^ir,
"issues Of Our Times' Seminar Series
220 71st Street Suit* 212
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Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
Full Partnership'
Mubarak, Reagan Decide How They'll Deal With Israel
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
FT A) President Reagan
id President Hosni
lubarak of Egypt, after a
>-hour meeting at the
Vhite House last Thurs-
|ay, declared that there
tras a "full partnership"
between the U.S. and
Egypt m efforts to achieve
comprehensive Middle
East peace and to restore
jbanon's territorial in-
Bgrity, independence and
svereignty."
In his farewell remarks to
lubarak at the diplomatic en-
Knce to the White House facing
South Lawn. Reagan did not
bention Israel directly. But
lubarak in his departure state-
n.ni did, calling on Israel to
kithdraw from Lebanon and de-
jaring that the settlements on
West Bank were a "serious
jstaclt' to the peace efforts. He
\x$\'& Israel to freeze its settle-
ncnt activities.
MUBARAK ALSO urged his
km Arabs, particularly Jordan
ad the Palestinians, to join the
eace process. "I believe that a
DluYn opportunity exists, and it
,i Id be a grave mistake to miss
he said.
On Lebanon. Reagan stressed
hai the restoration of Lebanon's
kvereignty requires that "there
Lust be an early withdrawal of
ll foreign forces," a reference to
be Syrian and Palestine Libera-
:>n Organization forces as well
Israel's. Mubarak, however,
essed that "top priority must
given to the withdrawal of Is-
keli forces. Upon achieving that,
I her aspects of the problem
Duld be easier," he said.
A Senior Administration of-
pial explained later that there is
| belief in Egypt as well as in
Washington that if Israel agrees
and should use that influence to
persuade Israel to leave Lebanon,
since a continued Israeli presence
would make it difficult for Arab
governments, such as King Hus-
sein's, to join the peace process.
The official noted that Reagan
also stressed he was impatient to
have the Lebanon situation re-
solved.
Reagan thanked Mubarak for
his support of the peace initiative
since the President announced it
last September 1. He said their
two countries would work to-
gether for a comprehensive peace
agreement that would "permit all
the states in the region to live in
peace while meeting the legiti-
mate rights of the Palestinian
people."
Mubarak, however, said "the
centrality of the Palestinian
problem" in the Middle East con-
flict is "self-evide',*" and urged
the U.S. to do n. to support
"the right of the Pa. itinian peo-
ple to self-determination." The
Administration official said later
that the Camp David agreements
and the Reagan initiative pro-
vided adequate means for the
Palestinians to express their
rights.
Cancer Research Program, Anti-Israel
Lobby Mail Report Getting Mixed Up
In 'Happier' Days: President Mubarak and Prime Minister
Begin in Cairo, where there was still hope for the future.
to withdraw from Lebanon, an
agreement for Syrian and PLO
withdrawal will follow quickly.
The official said Mubarak as-
sured Reagan that once there is
an agreement for withdrawal of
all foreign forces from Lebanon,
the Egyptian Ambassador would
return to Tel Aviv. Mubarak also
said Egypt is committed to its
peace treaty with Israel, the of-
ficial said.
BUT THE official noted that
while Mubarak is encouraged
that there is progress on Presi-
dent Reagan's peace initiative,
failure of movement in Lebanon
could have a negative impact on
it. He said the Egyptians believe
the U.S. has influence on Israel
NEW YORK A mailing
which combined two fund-raising
appeals one from the Ameri-
can Institute for Cancer Re-
search, the other from an anti-
Israel lobbying and propaganda
group is the result of a mix-up
at the mailing house which had
both as clients, it is disclosed by
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'naiB'rith.
The League investigated the
mailing after its regional offices
in New York, New Jersey, Ohio.
Connecticut. Illinois, California,
Georgia and Texas received com-
plaints. At first glance, the mail-
ing appeared to be an attempt by
an anti-Israel group to finance its
cause by exploiting popular sup-
port for medical research.
Accordng to Irwin Suall, direc-
tor of ADL's Fact Finding De
partment. a Virginia mailing
house mistakenly enclosed a
questionnaire on "diet and breast
cancer" instead of an opinion poll
on Middle East issues in many of
the envelopes containing an ap-
peal for funds from Americans
Against Arms to Israel.
The anti-Israel propaganda
was signed by David Sadd, exec-
utive director of the propaganda
group and of the National Asso-
ciation of Arab-Americans, a
major anti-Israel lobbying group
in Washington. D.C.
The League said the mail house
and the American Institute for
Cancer Research "offered
credible assurance that the
mixed up mailing was the result
of an unfortunate, costly and
much regretted error."

Id*
|When a mobster
3oes up against this
[ough street cop.
[that's messing with
darky's
lacfiine
Tune in to hard-edged
action this month on
DOIT
FOR ISRAEL
BY DONG IT
IN ISRAEL.
Have a swim in the cool Mediterranean.
Take a hike up breathtaking Masada.
Or enjoy a delicious dinner
overlooking ancient Jerusalem.
This year, do it in Israel.
Because now more than ever.
when you do it in Israel, you'll be doing it for Israel, too.
You'll be having more than the best vacation ever.
You'll be showing Israel you love her
when she needs it most
So this year,
take that special vacation in Israel.
For Israel. And for you.
ISR^RIOtTNOW.
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Page 10-A The Jewish Flondian Friday. February 4. 1983
State Dep't. Rejects Sharon
Stand on Troops in Lebanon
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department
has rejected Israeli Defense Minister Ariel Sharon's con-
tention that Israeli troops must man the early warning
stations projected for south Lebanon. "Our position is
clear," Department spokesman John Hughes said. "We
want\o see all PLO, Syrian and Israeli forces out of Leba-
non."
SHARON, addressing a group of American Jewish
leaders said the outposts had to be manned by people
familiar with the various groups in south Lebanon, who
knew their language and knew the terrain.
Hughes refused to comment directly on reports that Is-
rael is arming various militias in south Lebanon. But he
said. U.S. policy "in general" has been the same as that of
the Lebanese government which is that "all armed groups
in Lebanon should come under the control of the central
government, the authority of which should extend
throughout the country. Only when this is accomplished
will Lebanon enjoy lasting stability.'* Hughes said. He
added that "The government of Israel is fully aware of our
views on this matter."
There's No Confrontation
With U.S.Only Difference
By GIL SEDAN
AadI HUGH OBGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon said that Israel was
not unduly disturbed by
the missile sites it claims
Syria is building to accom-
modate the Soviet Union's
long range surface-to-air
SAM-5 missiles.
Asked on a television interview
about the possible consequences
should the Syrians be supplied
with the weapons. Sharon said
Israel could cope with them He
hoped the solution would be po-
litical, not military, but observed
that Israel has lived with long
range missiles in the hands of the
Syrains and Iraqis.
CHIEF OF Staff Gen. Rafael
Eitan suggested that any Soviet
missiles deployed in Syria would
be manned by Soviet technicians
whose presence would deter the
Svrmns from 'hasty action.*' He
also suggested that the missiles
would serve Soviet strategic pur-
poses, noting that their range
would make them a threat to the
U.S. Sixth Fleet which often
operates in eastern Mediter-
ranean waters.
The SAM-5S. a highly sophis-
ticated missile with a range of
nearfv 200 miles, has never been
deployed outside the borders of
the Soviet Union and its Com-
munist-bloc allies.
The SAM-5 is a defensive w
pon for use against high altitude
aircraft and missiles
equipped with a radar de&ctoj
which can be combined with t
radar target-seeking system.
SHARON WOULD not
speculate as to why Moscow
might supply them to' Svria. He
said it could be a Soviet response
to the American presence
Lebanon. He also suggested the
new missile sites were also meant
as a gesture to restore Russian
prestige lost by the comparative
ease with which Israel.
using
U.S.-built aircraft, destroyed So-
viet-built Svrian missiles
Sharon said he hoped that u*
USSR has no interest in a further
deterioration of relations
( ontinued from Page 1-A
than 750 Israeli military person-
nel to remain indefinitely in south
Lebanon The Lebanese govern-
ment objects on grounds that the
continued presence of Israeli
troops on its soil would compro-
mise Lebanon's sovereignty.
THE U.S. apparently sym-
pathizes with Lebanon's position
and is insisting on the complete
evacuation of all foreign forces
from Lebanon Israelis. Syrian
and Palestine Liberation
Organization.
AJComm. Tries
Solution
NEW YORK The
American Jewish Commit-
tee is seeking to help solve
serious problems of anti-
Semitism facing the Jewish
community of Guadalajara,
Mexico.
Sergio Nudelstejer. director of
AJC's Office for Mexico and Cen-
tral America, has reported that
be has discussed the activities of
extreme right-wing groups that
frequently distribute anti-Semitic
propaganda with Bernardo Weit-
zner. president of the Central
Jewish Committee, the leading
body of Mexican Jewry, located
in Mexico City.
In the past few months. Nudel-
stejer revealed, the Guadalajara
Jewish community has suffered
two serious attacks. The first was
a bomb placed near the "syna-
gogue, which was discovered and
deactivated. The second was an
attack on the Jewish cemetery, in
which a number of tombstones
were destroyed.
THE SECOND largest city in
Mexico, Guadalajara has becoame
the center of groups distributing
vicious anti-Semitic material,
Nudelstejer stated. One of the
journals distributed, called
Replica, is issued by the Federa-
tion Anti-communista Mexicans
(Mexican Anticommunist Feder-
ation), a facist, anti-Jewish group
in contact with similar organiza-
tions worldwide.
The Jewish community of
Guadalajara numbers 220 famil-
ies who support a synagogue, a
sports center, and a Jewish
school, with kindergarten, gram-
mar, and high school levels.
It is expected that the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee and the
Central Jewish Committee will
meet soon with representatives of
Jewish communities in the
provinces.
Sharon repeated his accusation
that the U.S. was putting ob-
stacles in the way of Israel's poli-
tical aims in Lebanon. He con-
tended that Israel was "closer to
peace with Lebanon than with
any other Arab country' We
could achieve peace within a very
short time if we had the
backing."' of the U.S.. the
Defense Minister claimed.
Meanwhile. U.S. Ambassador
Samuel Lewis rejected charges
that the U.S. was exploiting Leb-
anon for political gains in the
Middle East. Addressing the
Rotary Club in Haifa. Lewis
declared:
. "WHAT U.S. policy is not is a
desire to steal the fruits of
Israel's victories (in Lebanon)
from it. What U.S. policy is not is
a determination, for our own
strategic reasons, to take the
play away from Israel and
establish ourselves, the United
States, militarily and politically
in Lebanon in a way that would
enhance, in some fashion, our
influence in the East-West
struggle against the Soviets,
U.S. policy is not in any way,
shape or form designed to prove
to anybody that we can bring
Israel to heel."
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Friday, February 4,1 Ate? The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
German Law Student
Tells Story of the Day Hitler Was Appointed to Power
By GERHART RIEGNER
LONDON I belonged
[to a well established bour-
Igeois family which had
Istrong roots in Germany
|and was deeply imbedded
in the German Jewish hu-
lanistic tradition. Louis
,ewandowsky, the com-
ber of modern synagogue
lusic, and Hermann
^ohen, the neo-Kantian
)hilosopher, were close rel-
ieves of my grandparents.
We were also deeply interested
..i politics. My father was asso-
ciated in his legal practice with a
Socialist member of the Reich-
pt;if^. who was also one of the
Country's foremost criminal
iwyers. My mother was active in
ie Democratic Party.
AS A STUDENT I myself had
Liken part in the electoral fights
it the universities of Freiburg
\m\ Heidelberg in 1929 and 1930
there, as Republican supporters.
tie fought a courageous but
topeless battle against the Nazi
tudents who already formed the
kverwhclming majority of the
Jtudent body.
It was at the universities that I
bad my first direct encounters
vith the Nazi terror and I re-
nember vividly when we Jewish
tudents were chased out of the
Diversity in Berlin by SA
roops and had to jump out of the
windows in order to avoid being
eaten up.
The day Hitler was appointed
lancellor was an enormous
hock for us. For years, we had
it-en aware of the danger of such
development. But in the general
lections only a few weeks earlier
he Nazi Party had suffered its
Irst great defeat, losing more
nan a million votes.
IT WAS DUE mainly to a fi-
ancial scandal involving the
t Prussian Junkers, belong-
ng to President Hindenburg's
fitourage, that the alliance be-
veen the National Socialists and
German Nationalist Party
ame about, opening for Hitler
way to power.
I particularly remember the
vening of January 30, 1933,
bhen tens of thousands of Nazis
parched with torches through
streets of Berlin, giving a
ttretaste of what was to come. I
ember, too, the radio
leeches of Hitler, Goering.
Boebbels, in the first weeks.
pouting insults and threats at
ne Jews and other political
rtemies.
They created an unbearable at-
Bosphere in our homes, finally
Busing us to turn off the radio
^together. The terror system
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which was thus installed very
soon showed its real face.
ONE OF the most spectacular
events was, of course, the bur-
ning of the Reichstag (Parlia-
ment) building, destined to in-
fluence the general elections of
March 5. Nobody doubted who
had really committed the crime.
Soon we learned of the places in
Berlin where the Nazis were beat-
ing up and torturing their politi-
cal enemies, and of the first con-
centration camps in Oranienburg
and Sachsenhausen.
The first judicial measures
against Jews were taken during
the months of March and April.
What sticks particularly in my
mind is the Boycott Day, the first
of April, when throughout Ger-
many, SS and SA men were
posted as boycott guards in front
of every Jewish shop, the office of
every Jewish physician and every
Jewish lawyer and when hun-
dreds of individual Jews were
dragged through the streets, in-
sulted and beaten up.
THE FIRST of April, in fact,
brought the great change in my
life and that of my family. On
that day, I was suspended at the
tribunal where I worked. My
father was suspended as a
lawyer, my older sister was sus-
pended as a high school teacher,
and my younger sister was
thrown out of the school she at-
tended as a pupil. On that day,
the lives of four members of a
family of five were completely
turned upside down.
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The same evening, we had the
special privilege of a visit by 20
or 30 SA men who demonstrated
before our house, a villa in the
Berlin suburbs, shouting curses
at us and threatening us for half
an hour or more until they finally
dispersed.
Events like this came as a deep
shock to the Jews of Germany.
Although they had witnessed the
dangers for many years, they had
never really believed that it
would happen and were not pre-
pared. The great majority
believed they were an inseparable
part of the German people and
did not understand what was
happening. Only a minority had
been Zionists and had warned
what might be at stake
THE CENTRAL institutions
of German Jewry had fought well
against the Nazis and their
columnies. But they had done so
by trying to persuade the enemy
of the insanity of its theses by ra-
tional arguments. They had
never realized that they were
completely missing the point,
that the enemy's beliefs came
from deep irrational, emotional
and mythical sources which no
logical argument could overcome.
There was even a small group
of German "nationalist" Jews
who had sympathy with the Ger-
man 'a national "awakening."
I It was the Zionists who gave
leadership in those days of panic.
There was the unforgettable
article of the late Robert Weltsch
in the Jewish newspaper,
Juedische Rundschau, with its
slogan: "Wear the Yellow Badge
With Pride."
And there were the unforget-
table speeches of Martin Buber
and the sermons of Rabbi
Joachim Prinz, which later
helped to re-establish the morale
of German Jews and notably of
the Jewish youth.
JTA Feature
President von Hindenburg (right) congratulates Adolf Hitler,
whom he had just named chancellor. The picture was taken in
January, 1933.
Sunday, Jan. 30, was the 50th anniversary of Adolph
Hitler's becoming Chancellor of Germany. Dr. Gerhart
Riegner, secretary general of the World Jewish Organiza-
tion, was then a 21-year-old law student, working as the
assistant of a district judge in Berlin. In reply to questions
from the Jewish Telegraphic Agency's London correspon-
dent, Maurice Samuelson, Riegner gives the following
personal memories of the birth of the "thousand-year
Reich," its immediate impact on the 600,000 Jews of
Germany, his feelinigs about present-day Germany, and
the anniversary's lessons half a century later.
Left-Wingers Voice Protest
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Three
leftwing components of the His-
tadrut Mapam, Sheli and the
Communist Party have
strongly protested at a Histadrut
decision to allow the labor federa-
tion's construction companies to
continue to operate within the
West Bank.
The labor federation's holding
company Hevrat Ovdim decided,
after a lengthy debate, that the
Histadrut had on this issue to be
governed by economic considera-
tions, and not by political philo-
sophy.
It said the Histadrut construc-
tion companies would have to
dismiss workers if it did not win
tenders for occupied area
housing. If the Histadrut's Solel
Boneh and other companies did
not build there, other private
companies would do so.
The Hevrat Ovdim said that
the decision to build should be
taken on sensible economic
grounds, and not to make a quick
profit. Opponents of continued
Judaea and Samaria building
said that by accepting housing in
the occupied territories, the His-
tadrut and its majority Labor
Party component were compro-
mising their ideals.
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Music Dancing at Dinner Reservations 374 6144


Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. February 4,1983
Existence of Israel
Depends Upon Keeping Bank Territories
Continued from Page S-A
strategic position. Having failed
to persuade King Hussein of
Jordan not to enter the war.
Israel found that among the
fruit* of its victory were Judea
and Samaria (or the West Bank.
i- the Jordanians renamed that
part of western Palestine that
Jordan had seized in 194*1
FOR THE first time. Israel's
population centers and airfields
Pen removed from the possi-
bility of ground attack. When
S3 ria and Egvpt attacked Israel
:n October. 1973. Jordan had to
consider whether to join the fray.
Faced with the prospect of
fighting across the Jordan Valley
and up the Israeli-held Samarian
and Judean mountains, it chose
to sit out that war.
Rut had Jordan retained
control of the territory and had it
joined the Egyptian-Syrian
attack in 1973. Israel might not
exist today: Jordanian tanks
could have cut the country in two
along the 10-mile-wide coastal
strip.
Thus, while in 194$ five Arab
armies invaded Israel, and in
1967 three Arab armies fought, in
197? only two Arab states at-
tacked And in the 1982 cam-
paign against the PLO in
Lebanon only one Syria
entered into a limited war with
Israel
This declining number of
warring Arab states reflects an
underlying reality: peace bet-
ween Israel and its neighbors
depends on Israel's undiminished
ability to defend itself and react
decisively to any would-be
aggressor
THERE IS nothing surprising
about this. It is the classic
doctrine of deterrence. It is not
the lack of desire that prevents
the Soviet Union from attacking
the West, but rather the Soviet
fear of retaliation. Similarly,
what has decreased the likelihood
of a joint Arab assault on Israel
is not the absence of hostility but
the fear of failure.
The recent Israeli victory in
Lebanon may obscure, however,
a central truth: Israel's current
superiority over the Arabs could
be transformed overnight into
extreme vulnerability if Israel
were to lose military control over
Judea and Samaria For Israeli
power depends on three main
factors: It Israel's military
strength relative to the Arabs: 21
the warning time Israel has to
mobilize its forces: 31 the
minimum space that Israeli
forces require in the face of
potential threats.
As to the first factor, the Arab
arms advantage is mounting
steadily against Israel. In the
last decade, the Arabs have spent
nearly $100 billion on arms and
military facilities. Saudi Arabia
alone matches Britain in its
annual expenditure on its
military. Syria now has more
tanks than the German army
used to invade Russia. Add to
this AWACS planes and
Sidewinder missiles for Saudi
Arabia and potential sales of
Hawk missiles. F16s and F20s to
Jordan.
TO BE SURE. Israel has
morale. training and other
qualitative advantages over the
Arabs But we are fast reaching a
point beyond which Arab
quantity translates into quality.
The enormous Arab advantage in
Unconstitutional for State
To Employ Paid Chaplain
NEW YORK It isun
constitutional for a state
legislature to employ a
salaried chaplain of one
particular faith for an ex-
tended period of time, since
such a policy suggests the
chaplain s sect is the "of
ficial religion" of the state.
says the American Jewish
Congress.
In a friend-of-the-court brief
filed in the U.S. Supreme Court,
the Jewish organization contends
the practice of the Nebraska
legislature of having a chaplain of
a single faith open each day's
session with a prayer violates the
constitution's "Establishment
Clause'' which requires separa-
tion of church and state.
The current chaplain, the Rev-
erend Robert E. Palmer, a Pres-
byterian minister, has been serv-
ing in the same post since 1965.
receiving a salary of slightly over
$300 a month for his services.
IN ADDITION, says the brief,
whose filing was announced by
Norman Redlich. co-chairman of
the AJCongress Commission on
Law and Social Action, the orig-
inal violation was compounded
bv the Nebraska legislature's
practice in 1975. 1978 and 1979 of
printing Chaplain Palmer's in-
vocations at state expense and
distributing copies to all mem-
bers of the body and the public
Court action in the case, which
is known as Marsh v. Chambers,
was initiated in 1979 in a suit
brought by Ernest Chambers, a
Nebraska legislator, who asked
the U.S. District Court for Neb-
raska to prohibit the legislature
from continuing the practice of
aMshf each day's session with
Reverend Palmer's prayers.
He noted that as a non-Chris-
tian, he felt so uncomfortable
that he ordinarily absented him-
self from the chamber during the
invocation period Moreover,
legislative leaders acknowledged
during court testimony that a
non-Christian has no chance of
being appointed chaplain in Neb-
raska.
THE DISTRICT Court agreed
with Chambers that it was un-
constitutional for the State of
Nebraska to pay the chaplain's
salary or publish his invocations.
But it held that the Constitution
did not prohibit a legislature
from opening its daily session
with a prayer.
Chambers and the Nebraska
legislature filed cross appeals
with the U.S. Court of Appeals
for the Eighth Circuit. The
appeals tribunal upheld the lower
court by ruling that the retention
of one chaplain over an extended
period and the printing of prayer
books at state expense contain-
ing only Reverend Palmer's
prayers violated the "Establish-
ment Clause'' of the Constitu-
tion. But it refrained from ruling
on the more general question of
whether it was unconstitutional
for the legislature to open its ses-
sions with a prayer.
The Nebraska legislature ap-
pealed to the US Supreme Court
to hear the case. The high court
agreed to do so. but has an-
nounced k will limit itself to the
question of whether the retention
of a legislative chaplain of one
faith to deliver daily invocations
over an extended period of time
was a constitutional violation.
IN ITS amicus brief, the
AJCongress claims it is uncon-
stitutional for government to
"throw its support behind relig-
ious tenets by formally declaring
that one church or the other is the
official stttt>Mlgion "
arms, which Israel cannot
possibly match, makes the two
remaining factors of Israel's
security even more critical.
For Israel, warning time is a
pre-condition for survival. Israel
needs 48 to 72 hours to mobilize
the civilian reservists that make
up the bulk of its army. In with-
drawing from the Sinai. Israel
took upon itself extraordinary
risks, but not those that imme-
diately jeopardize its existence.
For if the Egyptians were to
violate the peace treaty by mov-
ing substantial forces in to the
Sinai, it would still take them
several days to cover the 150
miles from the Suez Canal to the
border of Israel.
By contrast, the distance from
the Jordan River to Jerusalem
across Judea is a mere 20 miles.
Were this area vacated by Israel,
hostile forces could cover this
distance in a matter of hours.
A THIRD, irreplaceable com-
ponent of Israeli deterrence is
space and topography. To meet
the Arab threat. Israel's army-
must have the minimum physical
space to deploy men arid hard-
ware at the outbreak of war.
Already squeezed in the existing
boundaries, it could not ef-
fectively deploy its fighting
formations if Judea and Samaria
were lopped off. The distance
between greater Tel Aviv and the
new border would then be exactly
one mile. Topographycally. :he
Judean and Samarian mountains
dominate the narrow coastal
plain in which two-thirds of
Israel's population and industry
are concentrated. including
important airfields, power plants
and communication centers.
No amount of electronic
gadgetry can substitute for the
control of artillery positions and
armor routes that lead from
Jordan to the Mediterranean.
Given modem technology and
advances in warfare, he who
controls the heights of Judea and
Samaria controls Israel.
Those who argue that the key
to peace is Israel's relinquishing
of the West Bank ignore the
evidence The central fact is that
the Arabs twice went to war
against Israel when it did not
possess that very area; and the
PLO itself was formed when
Judea and Samaria were still
under Arab control. Arab
military strategy is simple:
squeeze Israel into the pre-1967
armistice lines, subjecting it to a
state of intolerable vulnerability
Israel cannot and will not
tempt aggression so invitingly.
Demilitarization of the West
Bank is not an answer. Where
hostility is so deeply rooted, arms
so readily available and distances
so compressed, a demilitarized
zone" is wishful thinking. No
country can take such a risk with
its national security.
WHATEVER THEIR dif-
ferences, nearly everyone in
Israel whether of Likud or
Labor, coalition or opposition
agrees that Israel must not relin-
quish strategic control of Judea
and Samaria. Whatever their
views on how best to establish a
modus vivendi between Arab and
Jew in the territories, few ques-
tion the necessity for continued
Israeli military control To
achieve a sustainable peace.
Israel must maintain a credible
deterrence long enough to effect a
lasting change in Arab attitudes.
In those parts of the world
where peace is the norm, borders,
territories and strategic depth
may appear unimportant. In the
Middle East they are of decisive
importance. Given the specifics
of the West Bank, the slogan
"territory for peace" is singularly
inappropriate: it is precisely
Israel's control of this strategic
territory that has deterred all-out
war and has made eventual peace
more likely.
I
Protestant Leader Feels 'Shame'
TORONTO (JTAI -
The head of Canada's larg-
est Protestant denomina-
tion has expressed his
shame at the spectacle of
Christians"' perpetrating
"a pogrom'' in the Shatila
and Sabra refugee camps in
west Beirut.
In a sermon delivered in Acron.
Ontario, the Rev. Clarke Mac-
Donald, recently
Moderator of the UnitedChn
of Canada, declared. Thet
quent. almost total silence ond
part of the Christian commui
in Canada regarding events 1
Middle East, espev ially the 1
sacres which took place at Shi
and Sabra. speak-- volumes. Ail
one of the leader* in that coil
munity. I admit complicity il
this silence, although 1 ouid|
ject the notion that it is a co>|
-piracy of silence
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Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
THIS SUNDAY,
FEBRUARY6TH,
YOUR CONSCIENCE
WILL
CALLING.
THIS SUNDAY
IS SUPER SUNDAY.
When your phone rings this Sunday, February 6th, Be There to answer it. Answer it for Jewish
political prisoners in Russia who cannot speak out for themselves. Answer it for the people
of Israel overburdened as never before in their history with massive defense debts. Answer it
for our aged here at home, desperate in their economic need because of government
cutbacks. And answer it for yourself, as a Jew, willing to step forward in support of the
values you share with your fellow Jews all over the world.
This Sunday, February 6th, phones will ring out in Miami along with millions j
of others all across the United States in a message of love and support
for Jews in need. jtUijj
Be There to answer your phone.
Be There. With the people of Israel.
With Jews in need, in Miami. And
around the world. Be There, when it counts.
Support Super Sunday. Stay
home and answer your phone.
Super Sunday
Headquarters,
Temple Israel
of Greater Miami
Super Sunday call-in
phone 573-7333 P\
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal Israel
Emergency Fond
*
'.v.ywA}>w^4V*5;..
^^^


Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4, 1983
Continued from Page 1-A
United States. According to the
1980 Census, there are 12 million
children under age 18 in the U.S. '
whose parents have divorced.
The notion that the Jewish
family is somehow protected
from this bleak picture is no
longer true; Jews are believed to
divorce as often as their non-Jew-
ish neighbors.
THE STRIKING statistics
and the significant research find-
ings, however, do not tell the
story as vividly as the children
themselves. Although the young-
sters' accounts sometimes stray
from the facts, when examining
the effects of divorce on children,
perceptions are as important as
reality.
One night, when his parents
had fought. Adam's father left
the house. Permanently Adam
iall of the children's names in the
tory have been changed) was
nine-years-old. his brother almost
fight. Their mother told them of
the separation the next morning.
I didn't understand why it was
happening.'' Adam recalls.
Children almost universally re-
act to their parent's separation
with profound confusion and
shock. Even when there are clear
signals of a faltering marriage
unspoken tension and uneasi-
ness, sharp glances and frowns or
even shouting, arguing and hit-
ting most children are unpre-
pared for their parent's separa-
tion.
MANY CHILDREN and
parents cling to the fantasy that
no matter how difficult condi-
tions have been at home, some-
how things will work out.
In their account of their
parent's separation six years ago.
Carol and Gayle. two high school-
aged sisters, place great em-
phasis on how shocked they felt.
There is a distinct undercurrent
of sadness, disappointment and
at times, anger, running through
their account of the divorce.
Overall, though, they adjusted
well to the divorce and their
father's remarriage. They say.
"We had no idea; we thought
everything was going well,"
Gayle begins. "It was shock
when they told us," she adds,
with a slight sense of having been
betrayed.
"Every now and then they
would fight, but we just thought
that was normal." adds Carol.
"THE FIRST thing I remem-
ber was just sitting there and
crying," Gayle says. "When they
told us, we were confused. We
didn't know whom we would be
with. We thought we'd never get
to see any of our other family
age in. We thought we wouldn't
^et to see my father or my grand-
parents anymore. We thought
we'd just get to see my mother. It
vas just confusing." Gayle con-
inues.
Eleven-year-old Marc recalls
cling the same way when his
arents separated three years
.go. "I didn't know what would
lappen. I didn't know if it would
>e different or not or when my
tad would move out or how. I
jvas sad because I wouldn't be
tble to see my mom and dad at
. he same time."
Hilary, a junior in high school,
never suspected her parents'
marital troubles even though
some mornings she would enter
her parents' bedroom to find that
In an earlier feature article, The Jew-
ish Floridian examined the unprece-
dented growth in the American divorce
rate. Equally unprecedented, has been
the introduction of Jewish men and
women into this unhappy aspect of the
American mainstream. Once inspiring
awe in their non-Jewish counterparts for
now
steadfast marriage habits, Jews
contribute to the American divorce rate
regularly and in proper proportion to
their numbers. In this article by Meme
Eisenstadt, we examine the effect on
children of this newest sociological
wrinkle in the AmericanJewish condi-
tion.
them up. Who meets th*,
home.
TODD PROTESTS
about feeling "dizzy" fr
back and-forth visits bet
parents' two homes. Marci
he is sometimes frustrated v
he has to tear himself away t
one group of friends wh,
parent or the other comes to.
him up.
Carol and Gayle feel u
ble with their visit patterns!
stay with their father one \
night each week and
another night with him
weekend. They say more I
once that "they have it
good" because their fatb
taken an active interest
parenting. In addition.
parents basically "get
acquaintances.
Hilary's case is different
parents still fight. soma
placing her in the middle
though she sees her dad mors|
quently now, she still wishesj
had a regular visiting times
him each week. Her fathers
they should see each others
they want.
"We don't go out often. I
lary says, "and when wedo,J
go clothes-shopping He lovcsi
and everything, but in a i
he's trying to buy my love I
rather he'd be with me more.
ADAM ALSO can ren
his parents pulling h
with their bad-mouth
other in front of the ch
"We were put in the i
mother would always say I
things about my father
when I would go out with I
he'd say nice things about I
Overall mother did moreoltl
bad-mouthing, leaving hims
the "impression my fathersstl
bad guy." I think I sidedwkiij
mother because it was
since I lived with her." Hei
"I really resent her for thes
she turned me against
father."
His parents' feuding 1
separation had them sn
into each others residences s
"stealing furniture They'
always going to court I
imagine living like that wh
an adult.
"They were just the n
mature children you cani
It's kind of sick when youl
you're more mature than
her father hadn't come home that
night. Her parents' separation
two years ago "came as a shock
because they were married for 23
years. I couldn't believe it was
happening." Hilary says.
AT ABOUT the same time, her
older sister was separating from
her husband after six months of
marriage, and another grown sis-
ter was leaving home. When her
father left, her mother was hos-
pitalized for a nervous break-
down. "I felt the whole family
was separating," Hilary says.
Teen-agers like Hilary, Adam
and Carol and Gayle also em-
phasize their parents' changing
social habits, namely, dating and
remarriage, when talking about
their adjustment to divorce.
In contrast. Marc and his
eight-year-old brother, Todd,
seem less concerned with those
changes and more preoccupied
with their everyday routine:
which parent gets them on which
days and times. V ho takes them
to Hebrew school and who picks
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Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 1-A
They are still im-
iire"
|KE ADAM'S parent*, Hil-
ls folks mainly argue about
Ly during this separation
Jjd Her mother is not work-
Lnd her father, a lawyer, is
Tlate paying the bills. Hilary
[put in the middle: one time
1 her father hadn't paid some
fce bills, Hilarys mother pre-
her from going on a trip
[her father.
The moeny situation, that
I me a lot," the sensitive 15-
fold says. "If he doesn't pay
bills then that bothers (my
er) and that hurts me."
Bams father, a successful
hessman. also used the
by weapon to get even with
lews are believed
divorce as often
is their
\on-Jewish
\eighbors._______
bother. "He just liked the en-
lent of putting my mother
Igh whatever he liked put-
tier through."
!REE YEARS after the
ration, Adam's mother still
fcot receiving child support
Mnts regularly. For this
in and because "she was on
bf those. I need to find my-
Ithings,' Adam's mother
I his father custody and left
ate.
where does that leave
Adam continues, his voice
"My mother's over here,"
lys stretching his arm out,
1 my fat her never sees me. I
like both my parents aban-
me Physically and men-
That's the kind of people
ire. though. I was too young
(time to see it."
^t as children usually are
ipared for their parents'
e. remarriage comes as a
Children tend to cling to a
BV of a magical reconcilia-
tween their parents. When
jarriage is announced, that
is torn apart, and often the
en feel angry at the parent
ling disloyal" to their other
It and furious at the step-
It for ruining any chance of
ciliation.
REMEMBER the night be-
|he wedding, I was upset,"
says of his father's remar
(eight years ago. "It hit me
I that any chance of a recon-
on was over. "You think
[s always a chance. Now, I
it imagine them in the
foom together."
ol and Gayle cried through
I of their father's marriage
T>ny. His second wife is 25-
old; she was 21 when they
i dating. "To us. she was
kid. Carol says.
(just got really upset," she
"Deep down inside I felt
by change or luck they'd
ck together again."
ol and Gayle are critical of
[stepmother, apparently re-
V of having to share their
" s affection and time with
pepparent can become a
at target upon which
displace hostility har-
favits Cited
p YORK jacob K.
who served 24 years as a
' WMM Senator from New
has been selected as the
TL I l 18th Charles
in,,ugh'Go" Medal of the
fci.J Conference of
*U, and Jews, the organi-
tnced I"8, award-
I na,iyiIrvi.n MktcheU
L nat,ona chairman of
M Executive Board.
old 2L& Pre9entod with
W medal at the Charles
on Mar. 7 in the Grand
fm of the New York
bored against their natural
parent. In many cases even when
the children feel positively
toward the new stepparent, they
hold back, worrying that they are
being disloyal to their biological
parent.
ADAM CAN'T trace his
"hatred" of his stepmother to
anything in particular,'! didn't
have any personal thing against
her. I just didn't like the fact that
she was going out with him (his
father). Now I guess I have a lot
or revenge toward her." He con-
cedes that he might have re-
sented his stepmother for 'tak-
ing his father away' from him.
But he quickly adds, "It's not as
if I saw him that much before
anyway," referring to the post-
separation period.
Adam moved from one house
to another after his mother
turned over custody to his father.
For two years, he lived with his
father and stepmother. Then, be-
cause of the fighting between him
and his stepmother, Adam
moved into his father's parents'
home. Later, when his father
moved into a larger home, Adam
moved back in. That lasted two
months.
"That was the worst, when I
tried to move back in. I was al-
ways punished. That was the
worst," he repeats. Adam lived
with another relative until the
end of high school. During the
summer before college, he lived
with a friend. Now he says he has
no family to visit during school
vacations.
Children tend to
cling to a fantasy
of a magical
reconciliation
between their
parents. When a
remarriage is
announced, that
dream is torn
apart.
pa ted, but now Carol and Gayle
say the strains on the family have
returned.
"I think she (their stepmother)
is jealous because she didn't
come from a very rich family and
my father does okay, and we
basically get what we want,"
Gayle said. "I think it's hard for
her to accept that we get a new
car when we get our licenses."
"And she had to pay for hers,"
Carol chimes in.
"And we get gas money every
week," Gayle says.
THE CONVERSATION takes
a sudden turnaround: "Some-
times we feel he spends more
money on her than he does us.
You sort of feel jealous because
she's getting this nice thing and
we're getting whatever."
The girls also complain of their
stepmother "always getting her
way" when it comes to making
plans for family outings.
Hilary has a hard time imagin-
ing either of her parents remar-
ried. Her mother hasn't dated
much since the separation two
years ago. Of her father's dating,
Hilary says, "when he dates, it
hurts me. It makes me feel like he
just wants to run around with
girls. It would make me feel hurt
if he remarried." she adds, "be-
cause he and my mom were to-
gether so long and I'm close to
my mom."
Marc and Todd. who are still in
elementary school, say they are
glad when their mother dates.
Says Marc. "I'm glad to see my
mother have fun and that she is
trying to make it better for us
and make it like it was before."
AH Publication Rights Reserved
NEXT WEEK: Children of
divorced parents dream of
'Like it was before.' Can it
ever be? The experts talk.
pAce ey Piece
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CAROL AND Gayle's rela-
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even mentioning her name in
front of their mother, the girls
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presence, the girls generally ap-
pear quiet and shy. When they
talk about their 25-year-old step-
mother in her absence, though
the girls' resentment is apparent.
"At first she would try to be
our mother and none of us used
to get along at all, Gayle says.
For a while the tension had dissi-
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. February 4,1983
Egypt Denies Israeli
Belief Normalization
Is At Dead End
Begins on ABC-TV Sunday Night
Wouk's Winds of War' in Mini-Series
Continued from Page 5-A
piemen tat ion of the Egyptian-Is-
raeli treaty is going on in most of
its articles and in most of its
spirit also. The liaison commis-
sion, the joint Egyptian-Israeli
commission, meets periodically,
as mentioned in the treaty.
We received the Israeli delega-
tions for purchasing our oil, and
it is not a commitment in the
treaty. But we still sell our oil to
Israel. We received at the end of
November. 1982 a delegation
from Israel, and we sold about
two million tons. Again, some Is-
raeli purchases have been imple-
mented by the government, be-
cause all the sources of export in
>hese fields are governmental
organizations.
So. officially the normalization
has never been affected, except in
those areas where there is a pos-
sibility of affecting the popula-
tion, as in the cultural field, for
instance. Of course, you cant de-
pend much on getting a professor
from Tel Aviv University or Ben
Gurion University in Egypt dur-
ing the massacres going on in
Lebanon. We have to tackle such
areas very delicately because we
do not want to affect the nor-
malization.
Q. What about more specific
aspects (of diplomatic relations),
such as the return of the Israeli
Ambassador? Is this linked up
with those three conditions that
Dr. Ghali had mentioned?
A. No, it is not linked with the
Taba issue. It is not linked with
the normalization, but it was
linked by only one incident
that is the Israeli bombing and
series of massacres in West Bei-
rut. So. it was linked in this area
only.
Q. Does that mean that once
Israel withdraws from Lebanon
A. No, even once Israel gets to
an agreement with Lebanon and
the United States on an agreed
schedule for withdrawal, our Am-
bassador will be back again to Tel
Aviv.
Q. Dr. Ghali also maintained
that fc-gypt would only take part
in negotiations with Israel on the
transitional period and the Pales-
tinian issue in the presence of a
Palestinian delegation. Does this
mean that the participation of
representatives from the PLO
specifically, whether in their own
delegation or as part of another
delegation, is now a prerequisite
for resuming the peace process?
A. You know, we are linked to
the framework for peace in the
Middle East, which was signed
by the three countries Egypt,
Israel and the United States.
And it calls for a participation
from Jordan and the Pales-
tinians, who will be attached or
be an organic element in the Jor-
danian or Egyptian delegation.
So we are tied to this.
Q. So it doesn't necessarily
have to be the PLO?
A. As we all know, all the
mayors of the West Bank and
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Gaza are PLO members. So it is
only a formal appearance that a
separate or an integral part of the
Palestinians will be in the delega-
tion of Jordan or Egypt.
Q. Do you think the participa-
tion of the Palestinians could
take place without the explicit
approval of the PLO, and do you
think that under such conditions
Israel would agree to negotiate
with the delegation?
A. We have, in this respect, to
implement the framework for
peace, and in this sense it is for
the Jordanians and the Pales-
tinians to agree together about
the formation of the delegation.
Q. By the "Palestinians,"' you
are not referring specifically to
the PLO as an organization?
A. They can agree to that to-
gether. It is not for Egypt or
anybody to urge the West
Bankers or the PLO members to
insist this or that.
Q. Has communication be-
tween Egypt and Israel on the
Taba dispute reached a total im-
passe, or is there reason to be op-
timistic about an early break-
through at least an agreement
on a negotiating framework
with the help of U.S. mediation?
A. I am still optimistic that our
meetings will be resumed, be-
cause it is an obligation an
Egyptian Israeli obligation which
was signed on the 25th of April,
1982 the day of the final with-
drawal of Israel from Sinai. And I
am quite sure that both countries
are keen to implement all the
agreements, and these meetings
are aiming to start the concilia-
tion, not as negotiations, but the
conciliation, on the Taba issue.
And I would like to tell you
something about this issue. It
was needless to raise it. It was
needless. Because whenever there
is a frontier dispute, between two
countries, you know, the full rela-
tions will be absent. And, as
everybody knows, all the docu-
ments are very clear that this
area is an Egyptian area.
Whether it is one kilometer or one
centimeter, it doesn't matter. But
it is the principle. So we have to
solve this dispute in the nearest
future for the sake of the peace
and for the sake of the full rela-
tionship between the two coun-
tries.
Q. You spoke of conciliation,
which, according to the peace
treaty provisions on resolving
border disputes, is supposed to
come before arbitration. Are you
at all confident though that it
could be resolved through con-
ciliation, or do you expect it to
eventually have to be submitted
to arbitration?
A. There is always the possi-
bility of differences in concilia-
tion, and then we can transfer to
arbitration. During the negotia-
tions for the conciliation we can
agree together that we can auto-
matically, if we do not agree on
conciliation, transfer to arbitra-
tion so as not to lose time.
Q. Egypt has stated repeatedly
that it would never cede an inch
of the Taba area and that it is
Egyptian territory. Should the
issue be submitted to an arbitra-
tion panel, has your government
entirely ruled out the possibility
that the panel might decide in Is-
rael's favor?
A. If the arbitration will con-
clude that this land it not Egyp-
tian, we will respect it, because
an agreement is an agreement.
But what we are sure about it
that all the documents (show).
and in its nature, it is our terri-
tory."
JTA Feature Syndicate
The betrayals and butchery,
deals and deceptions that turned
Europe into a battlefield in 1939
are experienced through the
personal insight and involvement
of an American Navy officer and
his family in Herman Wouk's
"The Winds of War." and "ABC
Novel for Television" presen-
tation which will air on ABC in
seven parts beginning Sunday, at
8 p.m.
The Paramount Television
production is produced and
directed by Dan Curtis and stars
Robert Mitchum and AH Mac-
Graw in the adaptation written
by Wouk
Jan-Michael Vincent. John
Houseman. Polly Bergen. Lisa
Eilbacher. David Dukes. Topol.
Ben Murphy. Peter Graves, Vic-
toria Tennant. Jeremy Kemp and
Ralph Bellamy as Franklin De-
lano Roosevelt are also starred in
the 18-hour presentation.
FILMING OF "The Winds of
War" began aboard the Queen
Mary in Long Beach. Calif., on
Dec. 1. 1980 and was completed
(except for "miniature photo-
graphy ") on Dec. 8, 1981. in Port
Hueneme. Calif., with the recrea-
tion of the Japanese attack on
Pearl Harbor in 1941.
A total of 404 additional sites
were involved as the production
moved through locations in Zag-
reb. Opatija and Rijeka. Yugo-
slavia; Vienna. Rome. Florence.
Siena, Milan and Venice, Italy:
Berchtesgaden and Munich, Ger-
many; London; the United
States Naval Facility at Bremer-
ton, Washington, and various lo-
cations in southern California.
The mammoth project, which
wound up four days ahead of its
206-day shooting schedule, is the
most ambitious ever undertaken
for television. Filming of the
script's 962 pages and 1,785
scenes involved some 4,000
camera setups, a million feet of
exposed film. 285 speaking parts
and thousands of extras.
Ostensibly a military attache
in a series of European capitals.
Pug Henry (Mitchum) meets the
leaders of the time Hitler,
Stalin. Churchill, Mussolini as
a personal (though unofficial)
emissary of President Franklin
D. Roosevelt. Simultaneously,
the inner workings of the German
High Command are revealed
through the eyes of an anti-Nazi
military leader. Gen. Armin von
Roon (Jeremy Kemp).
Ali MacGrau: in her first television appearance, is Satalk
Jastrou: and Robert Mitchum is Pug Henry in the ABC
Television Network's presentation of Herman Wouk's TV
Winds of War.' which airs in seven parts as an ABC Novdft
Television beginning Sunday, Feb. 6, at 8pm.
While generals and diplomats
bargain and lie to one another,
Pug's son. Byron (Jan-Michael
Vincent), and Natalie .lastrow
(Ali MacGraw), the fiery Ameri-
can-Jewish girl he loves, deal
with the war on the most direct
personal level: trapped in Poland
with a mass of refugees, they are
harassed on the ground by
soldiers and strafed from the air
by a German fighter plane.
NATALIES UNCLE, the
American philosopher and writer.
Aaron Jastrow (John House-
man), sits through all the early
warnings in his Siena, Italy,
home, convinced that the spread
of fascism in his adopted country
will not threaten him. By the
time he realizes how deadly that
threat really is, it may be too late.
His passport has been confis-
cated. It is up to Natalie's and a
handful of friends to smuggle him
out of Europe.
While the Henry famOr,
being assaulted on all sxtalij
the hard fact of the onra*
war. Pug's personal life is bi
tossed by other winds: his i
(Polly Bergen), feelingboredi
unloved, has turned forsolw
the arms of a gentle, lonelyi
(Peter Graves) who needs to
ways Pug never has.
Pug, grimly faithful toil
riage he knows has lost its!
has a temptation of his on
face: Pamela Tudsbury iVia
Tennant), a beautiful
English girl who adores I
And, as they huddle togetto
bomb-torn London, <
stands between them but his*
principles.
Hitler's aggression is C
bounded. Poland is era*
France is occupied. Engw
near defeat.
And then Pearl Hartw
bombed.
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Fact-Finders
Back from Study of Mexican Jewry
klFW YORK (JTA) ( B,Pf' Brith' a*"1 Philip Aronoff Jewish community
V ? fiHinr minion nf 21 5 Houston-Te* chairman of the held in high esteem
lfart lind11 Young Leadership Committee of
Ifact finding
lerican Jewish commu-
leaders has just re-
rned from Mexico reas-
ed about the situation of
sxican Jewry.
The mission spent five days in
Ixico investigating two con-
ns of the Jewish community
a barrage of anti-Zionist
anti-Semitic propaganda
ring and after the war in Leba-
i and the possibility that Jews
aid be scapegoated for the
Entry's severe economic crisis.
i,ED BY Alvin Steinberg of
.shington. D.C.. chairman of
i Community Service Division
Pie -\nti-Defamation League of
ADL's Southwest regional office,
the group met with Mexican
government officials, the ambas-
sadors of the United States and
of Israel and leaders of the
Comite Central Israelite, the
umbrella organization of the
Mexican Jewish community.
According to Steinberg and
Aronoff, anxieties about Mexican
Jews possibly being singled out
for blame for the nation's
economic woes have been allayed
as a result of assurances by gov-
ernment representatives that
Jews would not be discriminated
against or scapegoated for what
is a national problem.
The cochairmen added that the
seemed to be
for its signifi-
cant contributions to Mexico's
industry, commerce and culture.
They said that the members of
their delegation were impressed
by the dynamic, vibrant Jewish
life clearly evident in the syna-
gogues, sports centers, schools
and other communal institutions
they visited.
ACCORDING TO Rabbi Mor
ton Rosenthal, director of ADL's
Latin American Affairs Depart-
ment, and a member of the dele-
gation, "the Jewish community
remains troubled by the persis-
tent wave of anti-Israel propa-
ganda emanating from Mexico's
well-staffed, well-financed office
of the Palestine Liberation Orga-
nization, particularly since the
Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 17-A
In discussing how Americans
could be helpful, Mexican Jewish
leaders told the delegation that
iincreased tourism would bolster
the economy and improve inter-
national understanding.
Among those with whom the
mission met were Enrique Savig-
nac. Minister of Tourism in Pres-
ident Miguel de la Madrid's Cab-
inet; Ravi Vieyra, editor of the
leading Mexican daily,
"Excelsior"; John Gavin, U.S.
Ambassador to Mexico; and Is-
rael Gur-Arieh, Israel's Ambas-
sador.
war in Lebanon."
Noting that much of this PLO
propaganda is "anti-Semitic as
well as inflammatory," Rosenthal
said that anti-Semitic graffiti has
appeared throughout Mexico
City and there have been several
public demonstrations denounc-
ing Jews, Zionism and Israel.
Lehman Sees Hostility In Reagan
State of Union Message
just to delay progress."
Continued from Page 1-A
States sent signals to the Arab
countries that U.S. support for
Israel was contingent on the
speed of negotiations. It would
give the Arabs every incentive to
invent roadblocks to agreement.
Lehman added that, despite
his concerns about the Adminis-
tration's policies, he feels that
Congressional support for Israel
is "as strong as ever."
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Page 18-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4.1983
Dramatic Sequence
Burn Victim Made It With Good Luck
By LISA RUBENSTEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
In a dramatic sequence of
events that involved mid-
night telephone conversa-
tions, ham-radio communi-
cations, and maneuverings
of people and equipment
over thousands of miles
across three continents, the
value of single human life
was sharply brought to
fore.
Israeli embassies in Chile, New
York, and Miami, the govern-
ment of Israel, and the American
embassy in Chile worked unre-
lentingly with doctors, nurses,
customs officials, and an air-
ambulance company throughout
the day and night hours of Dec.
23 and 24 in an unbelievable tale
of human caring that saved a
young Israeli from almost certain
death.
Mic ha Aidlin. a 28-year-old
kibbutznik from Kibbutz Samar
near Eilat. Israel, is by now
safely on his way home, but only
after a two-month ordeal that
took him to death's door.
IT ALL began when Micha
and three others from Kibbutz
Samar were granted a tour
through Mexico and South
America by their kibbutz. Being
an ardent lover of nature and a
tour guide with the Society for
the Protection of Nature, a field
center sponsoring tours through
the Gulf of Eilat and Sinai, Miche
was naturally thrilled.
With just backpacks and much
enthusiasm, he and his friends
began their tour in Chile. They
were anxious to visit the famed
f;ysers and hot springs of El-
a'tio. high in the northern
Chilean Andes.
A Chilean driver took the Is-
raelis up the dangerous, rocky
roads, and upon arrival, the four
split up, following their own curi-
ousities. Micha, alone, began
taking pictures of the beautiful
steaming pools, trying to get as
close as possible.
WHILE STANDING on a
rock over one of the boiling gey-
sers, the ground suddenly gave
way, and Micha plummetted
downwards into the scalding
well. Submerged from the chest
down, and with no one in sight to
help him, Micha's arms moved
quickly, instinctively catapulting
his body out of the water.
"I threw myself up very fast,"
he remembers. "I don't know
what I thought or felt. It seemed
like an instinct just made me
throw myself out."
When his friends discovered
Micha, laid out on the ground in
excrutiating pain, he had suffered
second and third degree burns
over 60 percent of his body. They
worked quickly to get him into
the jeep and drove to a nearby
workers camp two to three miles
down the road.
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THERE, the Israelis changed
care and rushed to the nearest
hospital, a small unit in Calama.
Utilizing a technique they had
learned in the Israeli army, the
three wrapped Micha in an
aluminum cover to stave off in-
fection, the most common cause
of death to burn victims. Upon
arrival at the hospital. Micha was
given morphine to relieve his suf-
fering.
Disoriented and in terrible
pain, Micha spent a number of
days between that and another
hospital in Antofagasta. Neither
place had the facilities or medica-
tions appropriate for treatment of
burns of that intensity. His con-
dition worsened, and his legs
began to become infected.
Micha's doctor, a Jewish
Chilean named Rappoport,
decided to move Micha to a
better-equipped facility in the
capital. Santiago. Laid out flat in
a small, cordoned-off area on a
regular passenger plane, he flew
to that city with his doctor.
HIS FRIENDS followed faith-
fully in their car. They weren't al-
lowed to see Micha. so they sent
letters through the hospital
wings to let him know of their
presence and their prayers.
Meanwhile, they and Micha's
Continued on following page
Micha Aidlin, his legs bandaged to protect burns he suffertikf
his recent accident while on an expedition in Chile.
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Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 19-A
The Luck of a Burn Victim
ontinued from preceding page
ctor contacted the Israeli
abassy in Santiago.
(Though the Santiago facility
as more modern, Micha's condi-
gn continued to worsen. "They
fced their best," he says, "but
stead of getting better, things
emed to go wrong. They made
istakes. They didn't know how
(stop the infections on my legs,
hey didn't have the right anti-
otics"
Even my doctor and the Is-
.li embassy knew it would be
st if I could get to the States."
[WHAT MICHA found most
Imforting during this frighten-
time was the knowledge that
'many cared. Despite being a
ranger in a strange land, he had
doctor committed to his surviv-
I and embassy officials working
ound the clock deciding where
[should be sent.
|Micha remembered fondly how
?hilean stewardess he had met
l the flight from Antofagasta to
ntiago had later visited him in
hospital. And the embassy
ide sure Micha's parents in
ael were informed of the
tody-
It was decided that Micha
ould go to Jackson Memorial
bspitul's Hum Unit in Miami,
of the best of its kind in the
untrv The Santiago embassy
|mt to work trying to contact
Israeli embassy here but
Jed
TIME WAS running out.
Ichn's condition continued to
leriorate, and he was losing
Jighi rapidly. Frantic, an em-
official remembered an Is-
^h friend. Avi Seatton. who
prated a ham radio out of San-
|gO. When Seatton learned of
siiuation. he radioed a friend
his in New Jersey, one Jim
lishna. who also was an
hateur operator.
a letter he subsequently
ht Micha in Miami, Wishna de-
nbed that late-night radio com-
|nication in detail.
got a call from my good
fend in Santiago. Avi Seatton,"
writes, telling me that he was
gently trying to phone the Is-
lli consulate in Miami but
aid not get through. He asked
(to phone the Israeli consul in
York."
spoke to someone at the
York embassy by radio tell-
[ them to make urgent hospital
igements. For a few minutes
established radio contact with
ri in Santiago, and Avi and
Ml, of the New York embassy.
a very clear conversation in

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Hebrew, and the initial contact
was completed."
ONE WOULD think with the
New York contact complete, all
would be settled. In actuality, the
problems of moving Micha were
only beginning to unfold.
Among the logistics involved
were engaging a special air-am-
bulance, notifying Miami airport
customs officials, arranging for a
nurse to fly to Santiago, and
taking a Chilean Jewish doctor
out of bed in the middle of the
night.
And more pressing, Jackson
Memorial Hospital in Miami was
demanding a written commit-
ment for all expenses that would
be incurred and a deposit of
$50,000 on account. And the air-
ambulance company needed a
guarantee of $26,000.
Israeli Consul General in
Miami, Joel Arnon. remembers
the night vividly when he first
knew something was wrong.
He says he "literally phoned all
over the globe.
HE CALLED the Director of
Finance in Israel who in turn
contacted the Director General of
the Ministry of Foreign Affairs,
the authority with power to grant
the monetary guarantees.
"Considering he might have
died." Consul General Arnon
states, "they were very quick to
okay payment." Within 12 hours,
payments were promised.
While Arnon was phoning Is-
rael, other Miami embassy offi-
cials. Jackson Memorial doctors
and nurses, and the Santiago
people were continously in touch.
Preparations were being finalized
so that when the monetary con-
cerns were in order, all would
move smoothly and rapidly.
On the other side of this coun-
try, still more strategies were
evolving. Eddy Lowenstein of
American Aerovac air-ambulance
service in Canoga Park. Calif.,
clearly remembers the night his
answering service phoned with an
urgent message from the Israeli
consulate in Miami.
Lowenstein took his sleeping
bag to the office and worked
through the night coordinating
the take-off of a plane based in
Miami and locating fueling
points. He phoned the U.S. State
Department and the American
embassy in Chile and also ar-
ranged for a nurse to fly out of
Miami.
"THINGS WERE very
sketchy," Lowenstein recalls.
"We couldn't get through to the
Chilean hospital and also were
experiencing language barriers.
We contacted the American em-
bassy in Chile so they could coor-<
dinate for us on that end. and we
also called the State Department.
You don't just blast off. This was
a Socialist country we were flying
to. We wanted someone to know
we were going."
The following morning, after
his $26,000 had been guaranteed,
his plane was ready to go.
By the time Micha was
whisked through the cordoned off
area in Miami International Air-
port studded with red flashing
lights, his condition was critical.
The consul received him and Dr.
Rappoport and then rushed them
to the Burn Unit, where the
doctors involved were waiting.
MICHA'S PHYSICIAN there,
Dr. Gillon Ward, wasn't certain
Micha would live. "He was in-
fected," he says, "and had a large
burn. A certain percentage of
patients with that size injury do
not make it."
What surprised the doctor
most about the case was not the
injury, but that so many people
cared. "Our staff was most im-
pressed," he says. "The consul-
ate really did an excellent job.
And Micha picked up on the
caring."
Indeed, two of Micha's closest
friends, a girl he had grown up
with on Kibbutz Revadim in Is-
rael, and her American husband,
who had visited Micha in Israel
recently, Noja and David Ber-
man. live in Coral Gables. What
was strangely coincidental was
that Noja was a nurse in Jack-
son's Intensive Care Unit.
Meanwhile, Micha's three
traveling companions were in
close contact through an Israeli
embassy in Brazil. His Chilean
doctor, who had flown home, also
called and wrote often. Consul
General Arnon and his wife, and
Vice Consul Oded Ben-Hur
visited Micha very often, and
kept up on his progress continu-
ally. Also, Micha's insurance
company, Araraf, called Arnon to
assure that all payments would
be met.
WHILE UNDERGOING
treatment at Jackson, Micha's
condition improved markedly
and uneventfully. Within three
weeks, he was ready for out-
patient status. "I realized all the
mistakes they made in Chile once
I was in Miami," he says.
"Many governments would not
have done what we did, and have
done it so quickly," Consul Gen-
eral Arnon states. "Bureaucracy
alone would hold most govern-
ments up for weeks. It was truly
a dramatic example proving that
we believe and practice the
saying. He who saves a single
soul, is as if he has saved the
I whole world." "
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I
Page 20-A The Jewish Florkiian / Friday. February 4, 1983
No Comment
Fascell Wants to Repeal
U.S. Mum on Hussjein and Arafat Withholding on Dividends
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The State De-
partment has refused to
make any direct comment
on the meetings in Amman
between King Hussein of
Jordan and Palestine Lib-
eration Organization Chief
Yasir Arafat, even as to
whether they advanced or
hindered President Reag-
an's peace initiative.
Ma'ariv
Thanks U.S.
TEL AVIV (ZINS) The
afternoon Hebrew daily, Ma'ariv,
in an editorial comment on the
situation in Lebanon, writes as
follows: "If the situation in
Lebanon is stabilized, it will be
thanks to American infludence.
The Israelis, who risked so much
and paid so heavily in blood to
alter the politicial situation in
Lebanon, will have little if any
influence on what develops there
in the way of a politically stable
state."
THE NEWSPAPER, which is
friendly to the Likud regime,
continues: "The broad coalition
on which the new president of
Lebanon depends includes all of
the anti-Israel factions. Whoever
believes that there is hope of a
quick peace treaty between Israel
and an independent Lebanon, is
merely engaging in wishful
thinking. The character and
quality of the new Lebanese
regime will be determined by the
Americans perhaps with the
help of the French. Israel will
have no practical influence on the
new political configuration.
"The new Lebanese regime will
help Washington find a conduit
to closer relations with Syria. All
pro-Syrian factors in Lebanon are
expected to participate in a
Lebanese regime. This is the new
reality which does not conform to
Israel's hopes and expectations.
It is. however, a fact that Israel
can do very little about," the
newspaper observes.
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS-LABELS
BAGS-BOXES
Department deputy spokes-
man Alan Romberg would not
even say whether the U.S.
thought the meetings were "nec-
essary" for Jordan to be able to
negotiate for the Palestinians in
the autonomy talks on the West
Bank and Gaza Strip, as Reagan
has urged. However, he conceded
that for Jordan to enter the nego-
tiations, it needed "sufficient
support from other Arabs and the
Palestinians."
ROMBERG TOOK a more
general tone, noting that the U.S.
felf it was "important that the
procedures, talks move forward"
and that Jordan was an impor-
tant participant in these talks.
According to reports from Am
man, Hussein asked Arafat to
allow Jordan to represent the
Palestinians in the autonomy ne-
gotiations, but no such permis-
sion was given. In fact, as the
talks began, Syria's Minister of
Information, Ahmed Iskandar
Ahmed, said in an interview that
Arafat had no authority to speak
for the PLO since the Palestine
National Council has not acted on
the Reagan initiative.
Arafat reportedly said he
might consider a West Bank-
Gaza federation with Jordan, as
Reagan has proposed, but only
tfter a Palestinians state was es-
tablished.
While Romberg was not asked
directly about this, he was asked
about reports that Arafat said
changes were needed in Reagan's
proposals if the PLO were to
accept them.
ROMBERG REPLIED that
the position outlined by Presi-
dent Reagan for his "fresh start"
in the Middle East is the
"position the President is pre-
pared to support in the talks, and
the important thing we think now
is to move ahead for such talks."
The Reagan Administration is
apparently waiting for an Arab
League delegation to meet here
with President Reagan Friday to
see whether Jordan will get an
Arab mandate to represent the
Palestinians in the autonomy ne-
gotiations. Jordan did not get
such a mandate at the Arab
League's summit conference in
Fez.
The delegation to Washington
NDHIM l)AOi
9 4 4 7 0 7 7
| R O W ARO
APER A
ACKACING
will be headed by the Arab
League's chairman. King Hassan
of Morocco, and will include the
Foreign Ministers of Syria. Saudi
Arabia and Tunisia.
REAGAN'S initiative was also
discussed when Israel's Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir met
with Secretary of State George
Shultz in Washington last week.
However, their agenda was large-
ly dominated by discussion of the
withdrawal of Israeli. Syrian and
PLO forces from Lebanon.
The Lebanese situation was
also discussed here when Presi-
dent Amin Gemayel of Lebanon
came to Washington
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Congressman Dante Fascejl
(I) Fla.l will co-sponsor legisla-
tion to repeal the withholding of
taxes on dividend and interest
income when the Congress
reconvenes later this month.
Unless this legislation is
enacted, taxes on such income
will be withheld beginning on
July 1. as a result of a provision
added to a tax bill by the U.S.
Senate last year. The House of
Representatives never had a real
opportunity to study or fully
consider the measure.
Fascell noted that the provi-
sion was intended to catch
taxpayers who try to cheat the
federal government by m ,
porting income from interest J
dividends. However, he tv,iij|
out that the vast majoSH
taxpayers are hom-i and shoaul
not be penalized for the saked.1
few.
"Instead of instituting
complicated procedure which *j||
not only deprive many citizensojl
income they can use immediately I
but which will also add consider
ably more paperwork for banljl
and investment companies, i
should improve reporting rJ
quirements to ensure that would-1
be cheaters are discouraged."
Fascell said.
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r
On the Bookshelf
Books About Women Unmask Sexism
Friday, February 4, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 21-A
. American Jewish Woman,
1654-1960. By Jacob R.
larcus. New York: Ktav Pub-
lishing House, 1981. 231 Pp.,
>15.00.
If American Jewish Woman: A
cumentary History. By
Jcaob R- Marcus. New York.
Cuv Publishing House, 1981.
|047 Pp.. $35.00.
These books Marcus" remarka-
answer to his own assertion
it historians, by and large,
|ve treated American Jewish
nen as non-persons. His
Jnion is important since he is
eminent historian, having
^tten many book son Jewish
tory and having had two
punas of essays published in
honor. He is a professor at
brew Union College and the
ctor of the American Jewish
knives.
larcus was undoubtedly in-
Inced in writing these books
the feminist movement which
teeded in raising the con-
|usness of many men and
nen. Indeed, of the three
movements of the 1960's civil
rights, anti-Vietnam and
women's liberation it is un-
doubtedly the women's move-
ment which will have the most
lasting significance. These two
volumes provide ample basis for
that forecast.
THE FIRST book is a chrono-
logical narrative of American
Jewish history, featuring the
roles and contributions of Ameri-
can Jewish women or "Jew-
esses," as Marcus insists on call-
ing them. Similarly outdated
usages are his references to
"clubwomen" and to "girls"
when he writes about grown
women.
In traditional fashion, Marcus
begins his history with the 23
Jews who landed in New Amster-
dam in 1654, but he gives them
short shrift and quickly moves on
to the American Revolution. He
then gives a fine picture of the
19th Century which, for Ameri-
can Jewish women, according to
Marcus, was a period of content-
ment and fulfillment with
Dramatic Story of Technion
Told by Carl Alpert
Le dramatic 74-year history
reel's oldest technological
Irsity is now available in a
look, "Technion: The Story
Frails Institute of Tech-
|jym" by Carl Alpert.
kert'a chronicle traces
lion's growth from a small
lical school, struggling to
It he engineering demands of
lurgioning new nation of Is-
Itu it1- present day status as
Iternational center of tech-
engineering, medical re-
and applied science.
hg the many items Alpert
|nt- are
low the Institute was creat-
|ut of the same political
nil and rivalries that also set
Jageof World War I.
low three successive oc-
ng armies used the build-
^nd faculties of the Technion
Urposes quite different than
urn;
Im Hebraists struggled to
; an ancient language to ex-
scientific terminology and
pts:
How Technion's workshops
lied war material to the
p to stop Rommel before he
1 Palestine.
fTER READING
Imion: The Story of Israel's
lute of Technology," it be-
comes clear that the story of the
Technion is also the story of one
of the most critical eras in all of
Jewish history, spanning two
world wars, the Holocaust, and
the birth of the State of Israel. It
is. ultimately, the story of the
Jewish people's determination to
establish itself in its ancient
homeland using the tools of
modern technology.
Carl Alpert is perhaps the only
man who could adequately tell
the full story of the Technion's
struggle for survival. His 30-year
association with the Institute has
enabled him to witness and par-
ticipate in much of its history, as
well as draw upon the reminis-
cences and personal recollections
of the men and women who
shaped the course of the In-
stitute.
Alpert has served for many
years as executive vice chairman
of the Technion's Board of Gov-
ernors. His weekly column,
"Report from Israel," is ex-
tensively syndicated throughout
the Jewish press in the United
States and abroad, and he is the
author of many books on Israel
and Zionism.
"Technion: The Story of Is-
rael's Institute of Technology"
can be ordered from the Ameri-
can Technion Society, 271
Madison Avenue, N.Y. 10016.
Discover Chela's!

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^"trxaiionssn^...,...! -v*--lll i ,,.,. v,l.i P-irkinu
primary emphasis on home and
family.
The first two decades of the
20th Century saw Jewish women
emerging, first into factories and
later into community and social
work. The next 40 years were an
era of "enlargement and expan-
sion," followed finally by the
"women's revolt" from 1963 to
the present.
ALONG THE way, Marcus of-
fers fascinating vignettes and
short biographies. He gives good
accounts of the founding of
Hadassah and the National
Council of Jewish Women. Many
little known facts are recorded.
For example, did you know that
Wyatt Earp's wife was a Jew who
saw to it that the Western gun-
fighter and sheriff was buried in a
Jewish cemetery?
Or, that in addition to Polly
Adler of "A House is Not a
Home" fame, was another Jewish
madam (unnamed by Marcus)
who ran for a seat in the Nevada
State Legislature?Orthat Florida
elected a Jewish Senator in 1845
named David Levi Yulee? More
important, of course, is the atten-
tion he gives to Golda Meir, Hen-
rietta Szold, Hannah Solomon
and other Jewish women leaders.
The companion volume, as its
name implies, is a collection of
documents pertaining to Ameri-
can Jewish women. These are raw
data for the historian, but they
make good reading for everyone
interested in Jewish affairs or the
women's movement. The docu-
ments include letters, speeches,
poems, memoirs and diaries.
THERE ARE epitaphs and
obituaries, newspaper and
journal articles, as well as or-
ganizational constitutions and
minutes Both volumes contain
numerous illustrations, and each
is meticulously indexed. They are
useful reference works for
scholars or for others who want
to find out about a particular
Jewish woman.
The first book is worth reading
as a relatively brief American
Jewish history from an unusual
viewpoint, and the second is
worth looking into from time to
time to remind all of us, men and
women, of our rich heritage in the
writings, the deeds and the work
of our women predecessors.
Jews Aid
Lubavitcher
NEW YORK (JTA) More
than five million Jews through-
out the world have participated
to date in the Lubavitch project
through which Jews purchase a
letter in a Torah Scroll produced
in Israel, delegates to the 27th
annual international convention
of the Lubavitch Youth Organi-
zation were told.
Rabbi Shmuel Butman, direc-
tor of the youth unit and chair-
man of the recent convention,
reported on the Sefer Torah cam-
paign which was initiated some
18 months ago by Rabbi.
Menachem Schneerson, the
Lubavitcher rebbe. The conven-
tion was held at the world head-
quarters of the Hasidic move
ment in Brooklyn.
BUTMAN SAID the conven
tion had "a particular signifi
cance" because it was dedicated
to Schneerson's 80th year. He
said the five million Jews had re-
gistered in 19 Torah Scrolls.
Rabbi S. Gurary, Schneerson's
brother-in-law, and chairman of
the executive committee of the
United Lubavitcher Yeshivos,
reported that more than one
million Jews had registered for
their own letters in the four
Torah Scrolls, of the total of 19,
underwritten by the United
Lubavitcher Yeshivos. He said
three had been completed.
Isaac Stern (left), distinguished world-class violinist, receives
an honorary doctorate of Tel Aviv University from Prof. Haim
Ben-Shahar, president of Tel Aviv University, and Prof Yoram
Dinstein, rector, at recent ceremonies in Tel Aviv. The degree
recognizes Stern's 'outstanding stature as a musician and
violinist.'
Leo Mindlin
Our Holocaust Obession
Needs Some Rethinking
Continued from Page 4-A
Catholicism in particular, Borges
has declared of the distinguished
British author, G. K. Chesterton,
imagining as Borges was some
devoutly to-be-hoped-for proba-
bilities: "I can think of Chester-
ton not being a Catholic. What a
pity Chesterton became a
Catholic, eh? One of the major
tragedies of world history." So it
is not anti-Semitism, either, that
formed his opinion of Israel.
The point is that like the ulti-
mate artist Borges is, he has ar-
rived at a remarkable perception
about persecution and banish-
ment as important to Israel.
There is no doubt that this was
true in pre-biblical Jewish his-
tory.
And it is also true that it be-
came characteristic of Jewish ex-
perience after the Roman con-
quest and the Jewish flight to
exile in the Diaspora.
ONE WOULD have hoped
that, with the reestablishment of
modern Israel, this would no
longer be so. And for a while, say
from 1950 to the Yom Kippur
War in 1973, this was nor so.
But that war with Egypt and
Syria, so nearly lost, cut the
heart out of the new Israeli spirit.
A sense of emotional inward-
turning on a national scale
demonstrated to the Israelis that
their major bargaining chip, a
reliance on western sensitivity
and even guilt about the Holo-
caust, particularly in the United
States, had lost its value over-
night.
The Holocaust was a major Is-
raeli production from the begin-
ning of statehood, but it never
became so obsessive a considera-
tion as since the 1973 war. The
premiership of Menachem Begin,
starting three years later, dove-
tailed perfectly with Israel's na-
tional recommitment to an
eternal holocaust ic Yom Kippur.
For Begin, the never-enaing
awareness of the Holocaust is an
essential fact of Jewish and Is-
raeli life.
YAD VASHEM in Jerusalem,
the museum dedicated to the
Holocaust, is the crowning glory
of this recommitment. What
traveling statesman to Israel
does not consider it a proper duty
to visit Yad Vashem. complete
with yarmulke set as a crown
upon his alien and uncertain
head? And complete with photo-
jgraphers, of course, to record the
(visit.
In the same way that Vic-
torianism both elevated and crip-
pled British civilization, so too is
the Israeli commitment to cele-
brating the Holocaust crippling
the elan vitale of that nation.
This is what Borges meant when
he remarked to Glanville that
without a sense of persecution
and banishment, "they (Israeli
become! s| a country like any
other."
Perhaps the roots of this are in
the Jewish biblical imperatives
themselves. But they are not en-
viable. Neither is the obsessive
cleaving to the Holocaust,
whether the cleaving is done in
Israel or elsewhere in the world
Jewish community.
CERTAINLY, that is what
Borges would say were he to
speak of the Holocaust specifical-
ly. And undoubtedly that is what
Simone Veil meant, although she
couched her comment in legal-
isms, maybe because she knew
that to speak this way invites the
wrath of the Jewish Establish-
ment. Even when it is a survivor
of Auschwitz who says so.
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Page 22-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4, 1983
\
Talks Mark Time
Is Israel Pressing for Military Outposts in Lebanon?
Continued from Page 1-A
and Lebanese have nothing to
talk about until Habib returns.
They met at Khalde where each
side reiterated its position in
what was described as an ex-
change of "hardline" speeches.
Habib returned to Washington
with no progress to report after a
week of intensive talks with top
Israeli officials.
In the expectation that the
U.S. will blame Israel for block-
ing an agreement on the with-
drawal of foreign forces from
Lebanon. the Israelis have
mounted their own offensive, ac-
cusing Washington of counseling
the Lebanese not to accept the
Israeli positions.
THE ISRAELIS are also
blaming Saudi Arabia for putting
pressure on Lebanon. Haaretz re-
ported today that the Saudi gov-
ernment has sent a strong, clear
message to President Amin
(iemayel of Lebanon that it
would view with grave disfavor
any r* rmalization of ties between
Lebanon and Israel.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir told i group of visiting
members ol the Australian par-
liament this week that Arab
pressure was the "main problem"
holding up the negotiations.
He made the same point in the
Knesset. According to Shamir,
"the lA'banese people by and
large harbor friendly feelings to-
ward Israel. If Lebanon were
allowed to act according to its
own sovereign will, it would de-
cide to maintain good neighborly
relations with Israel." Shamir
said
The term "good neighborly re-
lations" was a point of contention
in the recent negotiations over an
agenda. The Lebanese rejected it
as too far-reaching and the Israe-
lis finally settled for the more
ambiguous phrase, "mutual re-
lations."
PREMIER Menachem Begin
told a visiting group of pro-Israel
American lobbyists that Israel
wants to avoid a confrontation
with Washington over its securi-
ty demands and seeks to solve
outstanding problems through
dialogue. Begin also cited Saudi
pressures on Lebanon as the
prime cause of Beirut's rejection
of Israel's terms.
One of those terms Israel's
demand that its own soldiers
alone man the early warning sta-
tions in the security zone in south
Lebanon was criticized by-
Labor Party Chairman Shimon
Peres. The opposition leader told
an audience in Jerusalem that
such stations were not necessary
because they would not be effec-
tive in the thickly populated ter-
ritory of south Lebanon.
Peres contrasted that territory
with the virtually empty stretch-
es of Sinai where electronic warn-
ing stations, manned by Ameri-
cans, functioned until all of Sinai
was returned to Egypt last
spring.
BUT IT became clear from
Cabinet leaks that the govern-
me is seeking not simply ad-
vance warning stations but per-
manent Israeli military outposts
in south Lebanon from which sol
diers could track down and pur
sue terrorist infiltrators.
Clubs' Bias Needs Banning
NKW YORK The
American Jewish Commit-
tee is urging the nation's
governors to issue direc-
tives barring their states'
officials from conducting
state business in clubs that
discriminate on the basic of
race. religion, national
origin, or gender.
Noting that Governor Hugh
Carey of New York issued such a
directive in 1980. Maynard I.
Wishner. AJC national presi-
dent, pointed out, in letters to
other governors, that states that
lacked similar regulations were in
effect supporting discrimination.
"PRIVATE CLUBS that art
discriminatory in their member-
ship practices are the last bas-
tions of legalized bigotry in the
nation." declared Mr. Wishner.
adding: "It is particularly
distressing that these discrimi-
natory clubs often receive in-
direct government support, both
because business expenses in-
curred by members are tax-
deductible, and because govern-
ment business is often conducted
in these clubs."
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tronso*to r rtitm nine soiouoh
Peres also differed from the extend the UNIFIL mandate for
government over the role of the another six months despite
United Nations Interim Force in strong bject.ons frorn*}
Lebanon (UNIFIL). The UN Se- Peres said he thought UNIFIL
curitv Council voted last week to could play a useful role and sug-
gested that it be used to,
Palestinian refugee i
throughout Lebanon, ^2
the north of that counTr??
as the south where UNIFII
ently operates. *l
Peres did agree withtK.,
ernments position that
&*ad Haddads Christff,
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Rate subject to restrictions and increase


Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 23-A
THIS YEAR,
VISIT YOUR COUNTRY HOME.
Israel. Where the warmth of belonging begins.
And you feel content in a way youVe never felt anywhere else.
Vacation in Israel this year. See the sights of your
ancient homeland from the balcony of your modern hotel.
Swim in its bright, blue seas.
Let its sunshine warm you. And its people. Israel.
Another country. Yet, somehow your own.
COME TO ISRAEL.
The Miracle On The Mediterranean:
Israel is much less expensive than many people think. For information on low-cost packaes. call your travel a^ent. Israel Government Tourist Office. 4151 S.W. Freeway. Houston. Texas 77027.


Page 24-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, February 4,1983
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44.70 164
59.55
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36.26
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SOUTH DADE
9001 S OineHwy 667-7575
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20651 TarmarmTr 774-4443


From Israel to South Florida
Cable Co. 's Electronic Know-How Runs
Gamut from Defense to Entertainment
UltraCom Cable TV is a
successful cable TV opera-
tion in the Miami Beach
area. But UltraCom,
through its Israeli-based
parent company, AEL
Industries, Inc., has been
making a substantial com-
mitment to the growth of
Israel's military electronics
industry for the past 16
years and a significant
contribution to its defense.
According to UltraCom
[president. Jesse H. Riebman, the
parent company established the
(subsidiary, AEL Israel, Ltd., in
[196fi as one of the initial science-
jnriented companies for the
[purpose of broadening the scien-
tific community and counter-
lacting the recognized "brain-
Brain occurring in Israel at that
|t mil'.
ULTRACOM S sister com-
pany, located in a suburb of Tel
iviv Ix'gan with a staff of 14 and
today employs over 1,100 per-
ms, 160 of whom are graduate
rineera. Sales have grown
Steadily from $1 million in 1968
ko over 545 million today. The
company is a major supplier of
fleet ronic warfare (EW) com
anents. equipment and systems
all branches of the Israeli
Defense Forces. Exports account
Jesse H. Riebman
for about 20 percent of its
business.
UltraCom's parent had long
been active in furnishing Israel
with sophisticated electronic
systems and equipment for
defense needs and has been in-
strumental in attracting
numerous other technically
oriented companies to also set up
operating plants there.
"Our capability there, as in the
U.S.. is in the development and
manufacture of advanced elec-
tronic warfare systems, including
radar warning and radar jam-
ming," Riebman says. "Both
were used effectively in
neutralizing the Russian missiles
and protecting Israeli aircraft
during the war in Lebanon. No
one will easily forget that Israel
was able to destroy all of the
missile launch sites without
losing one aircraft.''
RIEBMAN, who is also a vice
president and treasurer of the
parent company, is clearly proud
of AEL's contribution to Israel's
electronics industry and to the
defense of the country. "AEL
Israel." he says, "now ranks as
the third largest, privately-owned
electronics firm in that nation."
Here in the U.S., AEL is a
multi-division research, develop-
ment, and manufacturing firm
specializing in state-of-the-art
electronic equipment for military
and industrial applications. From
the beginning, more than 32
years ago, the company has
experienced increasing techno-
logical growth and diversifica-
tion, particularly in areas asso-
ciated with electronic warfare
technology. Corporate head-
quarters are located just north of
Philadelphia, in Montgomery -
ville. Pa.
Riebman is equally proud of
UltraCom's rapid success in
establishing its major franchises
here in Dade County. Since its
Continued on Page .'IB
Miami Mourns His Passing
Mitchell Wolfson Felled At Age 82
Wometco Enterprises Chair-
man and President Mitchell
Wolfson. a communications
Iiiom. i and one of Florida's most
distinguished public servants,
died here last Friday at the age of
resulted from
|82.
His death
|cardiae arrest.
Wolfson founded Wometco.
[originally called Wolfson-Mever
Theatre Company in 1925. He
[was a pioneer in both motion
|n nir. exhibition and television
[broadcasting, opening his first
It heat re. the Capitol, in 1926. In
11949. he established WTVJ.
[Channel 4, Miami, as the first TV
ftation in the State of Florida.
WHILE Mr. Wolfson was
known for his varied successful
business interests, he was equally
pnown as a man who pursued
pith vigor and enthusiasm his
interests beyond the corporate
world He was currently a
inember of the board of Miami
Bade Community College
foundation, having been a
founder of the college .and
fnairman of the board of trustees
from lW8tol978.
He was also chairman of the
fy of Miami Off-Street Parking
Authority and trustee of Mt.
nai Medical Center. He had
(wved as director of the United
a.v "f Dade County and was a
!*mber of the original Dade
,)Unty Metropolitan Charter
loard.
He
94.1.
HI
Mitchell Wolfson
chairman of its precedessor,
Theatre Owners of America.
For his community and
humanitarian efforts, he received
numerous honors and awards. In
January, 1982, a resolution by
the Florida House of Represen-
tatives commended him "for his
outstanding accomplishments
and for providing support and
leadership to worthy and
meaningful endeavors on behalf
of the citizens of the State of
Florida."
Also in 1982, he was given the
Distinguished Service Award of
the Florida Association of
Colleges and Universities and
was honored in a "Tribute to
Mitchell Wolfson' by Miami-
Dade Community College in
November.
OTHER AWARDS included
the Sherrill Corwin Award, Na-
tional Association of Theatre
Owners, presented for out-
standing service to the motion
picture exhibition industry
Continued on Page 14 B
Women's Division to Feature TV
Personality at Annual Luncheon
also served one term, in
M mayor of Miami Beach
r two terms as city council-
n 1965 and 1982, he
ved that city's Outstanding
en Award.
ceived
ptfam Award.
.AMONG OTHER business
Mr. Wolfson was
''atKins
pairman of the board of Finan-
tfite1 Svin*s a"d Loan
J Honda House in Washington.
Addifonally. he was director
,a member of the executive
Rational Association of
I L j ers of America, and
^ed as president and
Author, television personality,
and Jewish community activist
Michael Medved will be the guest
speaker at Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's Women's Division
annual luncheon for Patrons,
Sponsors and Donors from South
Dade, Southwest Dade, and
Miami Beach. The function will
be held Wednesday at 10:30 a.m.
at the Four Ambassadors Hotel.
Medved s published works
include What Really Happened
To The Class of '675. Hospital
People. The Shadow Presidents.
and The Golden Turkey Awards.
which he co-authored with his
brother. A regular guest on
television talk shows including
Today, The Tonight Show. The
Tomorrow Show. Good Morning
America and Dinah Shore,
Medved is scheduled for appear-
ances on Merv Griffin and Phil
Donahue in the coming weeks.
He is the current president and
co-founder of Pacific Jewish
Center of Venice, California.
Medved is a spokesman for the
recent return to Jewish affiliation
and tradition that is taking place
among many young Americans.
The event will also feature a
fashion show by Cache.
Women who attend this event
make a $125 minimum gift to the
1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund. Joan
Morrison is chairwoman of the
event and Pat Lieberman is co-
chairwoman.
AJCommittee Executive
On Israel: Criticism is
Form of Involvement
By LISA RUBENSTEIN
Jewish Ftondian Staff Writer
"A Third World Ideo-
logy" has developed in
which Israel, identified
with the West, must be
bad, while the Arabs, iden-
tified with national libera-
tion groups, must be
good,'' Dr. Donald Feld-
stein declares.
He warns that because the
Third World movements are
"closely affiliated with Commu-
nist movements, they are attrac-
tive in Western circles sympath-
etic to communism." The recent
rallying behind the Arab cause
among many people and coun-
tries in the West is due, in Feld-
stein's view, to such a phenome-
non.
FELDSTEIN is executive vice
president of American Jewish
Committee and is filled with
concern about such trends, which
he sees as dividing the once solid
support Israel received through-
out the West.
On the other hand, he doesn't
worry about a supposed lessening
of support for Israel among
American Jews after Israel's
recent operation in Lebanon.
"We did a survey recently," he
asserts during an interview this
week, "and 80-something percent
said that if something happened
to Israel, it would be a terrible
personal loss to them."
Feldstein draws a sharp line
between support of Israel and ex-
pressing criticisms. "We have to
be and are supportive of Israel
completely," he explains, "but
while also expressing our critic-
isms."
Dr. Donald Feldstein
"But then." he smiles, "any
criticism must be approached
with a certain amount of fear and
trembling."
TO LET ISRAEL misread
when- American Jews are coming
from, he believes, would be to do
it a great disservice. "Israel must
lx> made to understand our posi-
tions, always knowing that our
support is solid."
Feldstein fears that if Ameri-
can Jews relinquish their right to
express criticism towards Israel,
they will eventually turn away.
"Criticism is a dynamic form of
involvement." he states.
Feldstein speaks with
animation of "responsible critic-
ism." American Jewish Commit-
tee, he asserts, provides Ameri-
can Jews with "a responsible
vehicle," a go-between them and
the Israeli government.
"We provide information and
Continued on Page 14 -B
Justice Arthur Goldberg
Shimon Peres
Histadrut Meeting to Host
Justice Goldberg, MKPeres
Israel Histadrut Foundation
will hold a 17th Annual Mid-
Winter Conference in celebration
of "the $5 Million Dollar Year"
Feb. 19 through 21 at the Kono-
ver Hotel. Justice Arthur J.
Goldberg, former U.S. Ambas-
sador to the UN. and founding
chairman of the Foundation, will
be the guest of honor, and
Shimon Peres, MK. chairman of
the Labor Party of Israel, will
also be honored.
Goldberg will speak at an
Inaugural Assembly Feb. 19 at
7:30 p.m., Harry B. Smith, chair-
man of the Assembly, an-
nounced. George M. Leader,
former governor of Pennsylvania,
will also speak. A musical
program will follow featuring
Misna Alexandrovich, Soviet
dTewislbi Floridiaim
Miami, Florida-Friday. February 4.1983
Section B
tenor, accompanied by Shmuel
Fershko, conference musical
director.
A Yiddish Session Brunch to
be held Feb. 20 at 11:30 a.m. will
feature a symposium on "Israel
After Lebanon." to be addressed
by Dr. Sol Stein, president of
Israel Histadrut Foundation, and
Shimon Weber, editor-in-chief of
the Jewish Daily Foward.
Entertainment will be provided
by Ben Bonus and Minna Bern
portraying "Mangeriyade." Itzik
Manger in word and song. Chair-
man of the day is Morris Fisher.
A Festive Banquet closing the
conference on Feb. 21 at 6:30
p.m. will be addressed by Peres
and will feature a presentation of
a $75 Million Award to Irving
Polsky, founder of Polsky Geria-
tric Center in Raananah. Israel.
Dr. Leon Kronish, chairman of
the Foundation board of direc-
tors, will also be tributed, and
greetings will be offered by
Consul General of Israel Joel
Arnon and Meir Gatt, Histadrut
representative to the U.S. and
Canada. Chairman of the closing
event is Samuel H. Landy.


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4, 1983
Ftan ft&fidrit
Best Things in Life Not Free
By RABBI
SOLOMON SCHIFF.
Director,
Community Chaplaincy Service
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation
During the month of January,
wc launch the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign. We hope that this will
help bring the official launching
of the 1983 campaign to a re-
sounding success.
I see a direct parallel between
this and the highlight of this
week's scriptural reading, name-
ly, the giving of the Torah at
Mount Sinai.
The major test for the Israel-
ites to be given the Torah and to
be allowed to keep it, was their
willingness to pay for it. Their
unanimous proclamation Noose
Venishma "we will perform
and we will listen" was the
magical password to release the
Divine treasure to their custody.
They said, in effect, "We shall
pay any price, bear any burden,
meet any hardship to assure the
survival and success of our
faith."
THE JEWS kept that pledge.
Through the Baylonian exile, the
Roman oppression, the Spanish
Inquisition, the Russian
pogroms, and the Nazi smoke
factories, the Jews paid every
price to keep that ancient
treasure.
In 1948. the Jews of the world
were presented with another
treasure the State of Israel.
Once again a test had to be
passed, and it was. The Jews of
the world proclaimed once again,
"We shall pay any price, bear any
burden, meet any hardship to as-
sure the survival and success of
the State of Israel."
We have been subjected to that
test continously ever since. The
question before us is: Can we in
1983 pass that test, which is
greater than ever?
SOME TIME ago. there was a
popular song. "The Best Things
in Life Are Free." The song was
nice, but the statement not quite
true. Democracy is not free. It
costs plenty to preserve it.
Freedom is not free. It Lakes
blood and guts to defend it.
Education is not free. It takes
fortunes to build schools and
train teachers.
There are things that are free:
poverty, misery, disease and ig-
norance are free. It costs nothing
to let people starve. It costs
plenty to feed them.
Temple Sinai to
Honor Boy Scouts
As part of Family Worship
Services at Temple Sinai of North
Dade on Friday evening. Feb. 4,
the synagogue's Boy Scout
Troop 350 will be honored.
Boy Scout Sabbath has been
observed at Temple Sinai on the
first Friday evening in February
for many years in recognition of
scouting and in gratitude to the
men who volunteer to help carry
out the scouting program.
'LMfTOUSAfiUKMT
siMlataa
ttttmmt
AMEN
NO
TOPER
HOWWW "III
p35o< xsszr
BURSTHN KMMFroM
cai fcuu
^.rV\
SHUL-AMITH
**n*i3nw-
_ 1 JO 00 HOU M.
THUS 1 00 H 10 II I
TICTCiU.00lC aM-1100
jill wII H
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
No, the best things in life are
not free. They are costly. We get
what we pay for. We got nothing
for nothing.
WHEN I hear of someone who
is tired of giving to the CJ A-IEF,
I think of the man who was tired
of paying his son's bills. He com-
plained about the doctor bills,
clothing bills, grocery bills, col-
lege tuition bills. "Son, you are
costing me a lot of money. I never
seem to stop paying for you."
Suddenly the son took ill, and
before long he died. The father
didn't have to pay any more bills.
The boy hasn't cost him one cent
since.
A strong vibrant Israel is cost-
ly. An Israel able to stand off hos-
tile millions dedicated to her des-
truction is costly. It is not cheap
to do this and at the_s_ame time
say to the nations in which there
are oppressed Jews, "Give me
your tired, your poor, your hud-
dled masses yearning to be
free. Send these, the homeless,
tempest-tossed to me."
If. however, we feel that Israel
is worth having, we must pass
the test and help pay for her sur-
vival.
IF WE feel it is necessary to
have a vibrant American Jewish
community, we must pay the
price for that too. The various
local, national, and overseas
agencies sponsored by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, must be provided for if they
are to continue their vital serv-
ices.
Our resolve must be that we,
the Guardians of the People of
Israel, neither sleep nor slumber.
As Jews, some of the best things
in life are a strong and indepen-
dent Israel, a proud and self-sus-
taining American Jewish com-
munity, and a vibrant and grow-
ing Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity. Our commitment to
these goals will be met, whatever
the cost.
American Red Magen David of Israel, the sole supporter of
Magen David Adorn in Israel donated an ambulance to tht
people of Israel recently at Temple Or Olom. Shown at tht
dedication, from left, are Bob Schwartz, ARMDI director
Sherri Finn, Temple Or Olom Sisterhood president; Raoo)
Samuel Rudy, and Rubin Offenbach.
Be there
fbr'Belhere!
Be there in spirit with the
people of Israel on Super
Sunday February 6lh.
Join host Robert Klein tin-.
Sunday at 11:30 A.M on
WCKT South Florida's 7
for a fascinating look at the
people of Israel.
'There: A Mm
presented by WCKT
South Florida's 7 and the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
M
* -
M
8
You go to buy
Empire
Kosher
Poultry,
but can't
find any.
9
I
What to
If you don't see Empire
products in your Kosher
Butcher Shop, Food Store
or Deli, could be it's
because they're sold out.
Or, could be your merchant
expects you to settle for"second choice".
Call the Empire Distributor:
Mendelson, Inc.
Miami Beach (305)672-5800


'

'

Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Ultra Corn's Know-How
Serves Entertainment
Needs of Dade Viewers
Continued from Page 1-B
formation by AEL in 1971,
llltraCom has experienced steady
End consistent growth and
presently owns and operates 15
UltraCom's
Philosophy
Breadth of experience
and geographic diversity
qualify UltraCom and
demonstrate the company's
broad-based experience in
designing complex distribu-
tion systems, as well as its
expertise in management of
cable operations:
In-depth company staff
by qualified personnel, sensi-
tive and responsive to all
residents of the community.
Philosophy of operation is to
construct a cable system
thai is state-of-the-art with
the capacity to grow and the
( apacity to expand for future
needs;
Community involve-
ment leads to the capability
to expand and accommodate
future exotic and imagina-
tive developments in cable
communication;
Emphasis placed on an
intangible design future.
til her overlooked or mini-
mized by some, but carefully
included in the company's
system design so that
I'ltraCom can. when called
upon, become of paramount
importance in service.
cable systems serving 33 com-
munities in eight states.
Through its wholly-owned
UltraCom subsidiary, the
company recently completed a
major portion of its system
construction in Dade County and
is presently providing cable
service to residents in Miami
Reach. North Bay Village,
Surfside, Bay Harbor Island, Bal
Harbour. South Miami and
certain unincorporated areas of
Dade County, including Sunny
Isles. Construction is continuing
in Golden Beach and a small por-
tion of Miami Beach, with
completion expected this year.
RIEBMAN characterizes
UltraCom as "a professionally-
managed company with senior
management and engineering
personnel collectively
representing over 125 years of
experience in the fields of
business. CATV management
and engineering." Today the
company's cable systems pass
approximately 200.000 homes
and provide cable service to over
65.000 customers.
Riebman believes that "a
technologically sophisticated
cable system is more than mere
transportation of off-air tele-
vision signals and more than a
wide spectrum of special pro-
gramming channels. It must also
be a reliable community resource
consisting of tested and proven
components."
"The properly designed and
managed communication
system," he says, "will become
as much of a community resqurce
as a transportation or water


ftraC
, '.-."
UltraCom Cable TV trucks can be seen
throughout the community on Miami Beach
and in South Miami installing cable network
service in subscribers' homes.
supply system. UltraCom
designs communications systems
carefully tailored for the specific
community it serves. Initial
design of the UltraCom com-
munity communications system
was the result of a complete
analysis of technical, physical,
demographic. and economic
factors. The ultimate success of
the system whether it be
measured by performance, public
use, or any other yardstick, is
largely dependent upon the
original design plan for the given
community."
SUBSCRIBERS to basic cable
receive all local major networks
and independent broadcast
stations Cable News Network
(CNN). Jewish Television
Network. Cable Health Network,
USA Network (live sports),
DOW-JONES (financial and
national news). ESPN (enter-
tainment and sports),
Nickelodeon Arts (children's
programs and performing arts),
and numerous other channels.
In addition, UltraCom sub-
scribers have a choice of six
different premium movie and
entertainment channels:
Showtime, Home Box Office
(HBO), the Movie Channel.
Playboy, Bravo and Galavision.
Riebman feels that the Jewish
Television Network (JTN) and
the Cable Health Network (CHN)
are two specially informative and
educational channels that appeal
to viewers in the Miami Beach
area, many of whom are Jewish
and in the over-50 population.
JTN's programs range from
current affairs and entertainment
to religious topics. CHN offers a
full complement of programs
devoted exclusively to health,
science, and better living.
Programs cover physical fitness,
healthy relationships, human
interests and lifestyles, self-help
and medical care, growing up and
getting older. Medical advisory
boards of doctors, dentists,
psychologists, and other health
experts consult on the content of
the program.
Low-keyed, with a gentle voice
and boyish smile, Riebman is in
fact a self-assured executive with
an array of solid credentials to his
credit. He has over 26 years of
diversified experience in all facets
of business and finance. 23 of
them as an executive with AEL
Industries, Inc.
Riebman joined AEL
Industries, as comptroller in
1959. was elected treasurer and
assistant secretary in 1964. and a
vice president in July. 1980.
Since UltraCom's formation in
1971, he has served as its chief
financial officer, first as treasurer
and subsequently as vice
president and treasurer.
RIEBMAN WAS elected
president of UltraCom and its
subsidiaries in March. 1980 and
serves as chairman of the Board
of Directors. He retains his
position as vice president and
treasurer of the parent company,
AEL Industries. Prior to joining
AEL, he was employed by the
international public accounting
firm of Arthur Andersen and Co..
Philadelphia.
Riebman commutes weekly
between his offices in North Bay
Village and UltraCom's
headquarters in Pennsylvania.
"Miami Beach has become my
second home," he says.
Cable in Israel
Ultra-Corn's Israel-Based
Co. 'Watching' Outlook
What are the prospects for cable TV in Israel? 'It
is something we are watching at the present time,*'
Jesse H. Riebman, president of UltraCom, explains.
"Our sister company there has constructed a small
cable system for the government, and other projects
are under review. Programming availability is
limited in Israel, and cable television as we know it
here in the U.S. is not viable there at the present
time."
Although this might change in the future, it de-
pends upon whether there is a growth of program
sources and a rise in demand for quality cable serv-
ices. "Certianly, we expect UltraCom and AEL, Is-
rael to play a role in the future development of cable
TV in Israel."
Broad Selection of Programs
om serviceman installs line from telephone system
., Y ',nto tne subscriber's home. From then on, reception is
"Ultracom Cable TV plays a very important
role in the lives of residents in the communities
served by its cable system," says UltraCom Pres-
ident Jesse H. Riebman. "Most people perceive a
cable system as providing television program-
ming and once they subscribe to the service they
must watch it frequently."
Riebman emphasizes that this is not the pur-
pose of cable television. "Subscribing to cable tel-
evision is -really the same as buying telephone
service from the telephone company or buying a
toaster. You have a telephone in your home so
that it is there when you want to use it or when
you need to use it. You don't make toast in your
toaster all day and all r ,.it but only when you
have a desire for toast."
brings you a broad selection of quality movies,
theater and other entertainment for that time
during the day or evening when you want to sit
and watch it. It also brings you special education-
al and informative programming that keeps you
abreast of the current news, stock market reports,
health subjects and many others too numerous to
mention."
A special service to subscribers of UltraCom
Cable TV is the weather channel where the local
weather is presented continuous and when there
is a weather emergency .conditions in the area are
reported with the most current, up-to-date reports
from the Hurricane Center. "All of these services
are what makes cable television not only desirable
.but an important facility to have in the home "
I Riebman stressed.


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4, 1983
Seminary Women's Patrons
Honored Sternberg
Rabbi Abramowitz to Sjpeak on Qibm Jem
The National Women's
Patrons Society of the
Jewish Theological Semin-
ary held its annual Florida
invitational luncheon on
Monday in Bal Harbour.
Henrietta Sternberg, who
has been an active leader in
the Seminary's fund-raising
campaigns for many years,
and a participant in its
Florida programs, was
guest of honor at the event.
She was awarded the
Seminary's Solomon
Schechter Medal, one of its
highest honors.
The Schechter Medal is given
in recognition of "particularly-
distinguished service to the cause
of Judaism" in the tradition
exemplified by Dr. Schechter,
who was the second president of
the Seminary.
THE GATHERING was
addressed by Dr. Gerson D.
Cohen, chancellor of the
Seminary. Mrs. Sol Henkind, na-
tional chairman of the Women's
Patrons Society, presided. The
luncheon meeting was part of the
Seminary's 24th Annual Winter
Convocation Program in Florida.
Mrs. Sternberg is the wife of
the late Dr. Louis Sternberg, who
was one of the first research
allergists in this country. She has
distinguished herself as the
author of a weekly column on
gardening, entitled "Henrietta
Says." published in the New
York Times for many years.
Both were members of the East
Midwood Jewish Cent or for many
years, and Mrs. Sternberg served
on the congregation's board of
directors. She was also one of the
first chairmen of the Seminary's
Torah Fund campaign in the
East Midwood Sisterhood. The
Center is In Brooklyn. N.Y. Mrs.
Sternberg now lives in
Manhattan.
Henriette Sternberg
MRS. STERNBERG has been
active in Hadassah, UJA and
Israel Bonds from the very
beginning, as well as for
Women's League for Israel. A
lectureship has been endowed at
the Hebrew University in Jeru-
salem in memory of her husband
and in her honor. She is herself
the donor of a room in the Jewish
Theological Seminary's Mathilde
Schechter Residence Hall for
students.
The Jewish Theological Semin-
ary is now in its 97th year. It is
the parent body of Conservative
Judaism, the largest Jewish reli-
gious group on the American
continent. The Seminary is the
training ground for Conservative
Jewish religious leaders and
educators.
It is also a leader in developing
interfaith understanding and
action and is widely known for its
"Eternai Light" radio and tele-
vision broadcasts on the NBC
network. It sponsors the world-
famous Jewish Museum in New
York. The Seminary is now
completing a new library complex
to house its collections of Jewish
and Hebrew works, which are
widely considered to be the
world's greatest.
Two U. of Florida Students
Co-Chair UJA Drive
By CAROLYN GILBERT
GAINESVILLE Miami
residents Amy Brenner and Da-
vid Weiss are co-chairing the
Campus United Jewish Appeal
campaign at University of Flor-
ida this year.
On their recent mission to Is-
rael, Brenner and Weiss saw,
firsthand, how United Jewish
Appeal can and does make a dif-
ference with their social service,
welfare and educational pro-
grams in Israel. The mission
focused on more than just UJA
related items though. It func-
tioned in a total context includ-
ing history, politics, religion and
economics.
BRENNER is a member of
Temple Beth Am and an alumna
of High School in Israel. She at-
tributes to both of these a large
part in developing her sense of
responsibility and commitment
to herself and the Jewish people.
"One of the things I like best
about my involvement with UJA
is that the personal solicitation
process is thought provoking.
Students take time out to think
bout themselves and their roles
as Jews when otherwise they
might not." Brenner said. "In
addition, a financial commitment
in the form of a pledge gives the
least as well as the most active
students the chance to become
personally involved in the devel-
opment of the Jewish commu-
nity."
Weiss, who is a member of
Temple Sinai, has been active in
University of Florida's UJA
campaign for the past three
years.
"When I ask students to make
a pledge. I 'm just scratching the
surface of CUJA's purpose."
Weiss said. "What I'm really
asking for is a commitment to
care, an obligation to be aware
and a part of our people."
WITH A major in public rela-
tions and a minor in business ad-
ministration, Brenner plans to
work in Miami next year. She
then will go back to school for a
Master's degree in business ad-
ministration.
Weiss will graduate this April
with a major in finance and then
plans to attend law school.
Both Brenner and Weiss see
possible futures for themselves in
Miami. Wherever they are
though, they intend to remain in-
volved with UJA.
Adoption
Happily married professional
couple with loving home wants
to adopt white infant. All expen-
ses paid.
Call Colltct (212) 778-2050
Wall Known Local Rabbi
Excellent speaker wide range
experience, is looking for pulpit.
Nominal Salary
Box WKL c/o Jewish Floridian.
P.O. Box 012973, Miami. Fl 33101
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz.
spiritual leader of Temple
Menorah, will discuss "The His
tory of the Cuban Jewish Com
munity" Wednesday at an open
meeting of the Jewish Historical
Society of South Florida at the
auditorium of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, at 8 p.m.
With the Miami Beach congre-
gation for the past 30 years.
Rabbi Abramowitz's synagogue
has a significant number of fam-
ilies who are former Cuban Jews.
After serving during World
War II as the chaplain of Third
United States Infantry Division.
Rabbi Abramowitz remained in
Europe as a representative of the
American Joint Distribution from Displaced Persons camn.
Committee for several years, the State of Israel. ^,I
Born in Jerusalem, he helped in Harriet Green is ntHi
the rescue of thousands of Jews the Society. es'nt,
Executives Club Awards 'Man of Yetf
ferment of the community n
is the 86th award whichKS
hasrece.vedforhisdedicatS
Civic and youth activi,"
Miami Beach and J^S"
communities. ^
William J. Schusel, vice presi-
dent of Jefferson National Bank,
received the "Man of the Year"
award from Executives Club of
Miami Beach at an annual
meeting recently at the Sheraton
Bal Harbour Hotel.
Schusel. who served as pro-
gram chairman of the club for
several years, was honored for
continued activities for the bet-
Natalye Brown, also *,
president of Jefferson NatioS
Bank, was installed as an 2
ary member of the Execut
'ravioli saute special >--------------
The Jewish Homemaker's Guide to Delicious Italian Cooking \
Makes the Most of Chef Boy-ai^dee Cheese Ravioli
Vt cup chopped or whole small
onions
Vi cup chopped carrots
2 tablespoons butter or margarine
Vi package (lOoz.) frozen whole
green beans, cooked and drained
1 can (15 Oz.) Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli in Tomato Sauce
dash gartc salt
1 tablespoon chopped fresh
parsley
W cup water
1. Saute onions and carrots in butter in medium-sized
saucepan.
2. Add remaining ingredients; cover and simmer for
15 minutes. Serves 4.
Maxwell House; Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox 'n bagels 'n cream cheese is al-
most as much a part of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mezuzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
companiment to this American
gastronomicaJ innovation is Maxwell
House Coffee.
The full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House
has been delighting lovers of good
food for half a century. And why not ?
Who would ever think of serving
first-rate food without great coffee!
So, no matter what your preference-
instant or goundwhen you pour
Maxwell House you pour flavor. At
its most satisfyingconsistently cup
after cup after cup
toxwr.it
/H0U?
K Certified Kosher
im
' *
jjAXWfU
H01#

**** *oao
pffH
lr'. A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century^


[Actor Michael Moriarty to
Speak at CJA-IEF Affair
Friday, February 4, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Actor Michael Moriarty will be
led-' g-e9t speaker at a Third
fnual CockUil Reception of the
Later Miami Jewish Federa-
lns South Dade Branch on
Lursday, Feb. 17 at the King's
ly Yacht and Country Club.
The reception is being held on
half of the 1983 Combined
vish Appeal-Israel Emergency
lnd Campaign. Participants
Ike a minimum gift of $500. In
dition to Moriarty's address,
deration Vice President and
I A-IFF Vice Chairwoman
Vi'yn K. Smith will speak to
I reception audience.
Moriarty first came to national
ention for his performance in
, film "Bang the Drum
hwlv," the television version of
|ne Glass Menagerie," for
lich he received his first Emmy
lard, and the play, "Find Your
Lv Home." for which he
received Tony, Theater World,
and Drama Desk awards.
The cocktail reception is being
chaired by Paula and Joel Levy.
Richard Kohn is serving as
program chairman; Robbi
Herskowitz and Elaine Ross are
chairing the Food Committee;
Marlene Kohn is serving as
decorations chairman; and
Barbara Kasper has been named
as attendance chairman.
The event will also be high-
lighted by an exposition of
services and programs provided
within the Greater Miami Jewish
community, South Dade
Campaign Chairman Harry
Weitzer said.
"Our reception will be a special
occasion, perticularly for persons
newly involved in activities of the
Federation," said South Dade
Branch Chairperson Mikki
Futernick.
tiami Resident Elected to
lead UF Student Union
By AMY BRENNER
SAINESVILLE Michael
cher, a Miami resident, was
ted president of the Jewish
dent Union at the University
Florida last month.
The purpose of the Jewish
ent Union is to further the
national, social and cultural
iIs of the Jewish student. It
esents more than 3,500 Jew-
students at the university.
lischer. 20, says he wants to
Jngthen the Jewish identity of
students on campus, and says
an be done through this or-
zation.
3NE OF the most important
kgs I've learned is that you
to know who you are and
you come from. Being
lish is a large part of us which
|must never ignore," Fischer
pscher says his Jewish roots
s planted the moment he was
His Hebrew school educa-
I helped him form his Jewish
|tjty, and his High School in
el experience instilled this
l further.
Ischer attended Tel Aviv
Iwrsity as a sophomore in col-
Iwhere he became politically
Nted in the state of Israel as
Jas the Jewish diaspora. He
\m back with him the
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motivation to help instill a
stronger Jewish identity in other
students at University of Florida.
"WE WANT the Jewish
students on campus to feel a spe-
cial belonging. We try to touch
each of them in some way or
another through a variety of pro-
grams," Ficher said.
The Jewish Student Union
events vary from semester to
semester, depending on the cur-
rent president's goals. Still, the
aim of all the programs are to
promote unity by bringing Jew-
ish students together in some
way, Fischer said.
See What You're Missing...
Jewish Television Network
Dow Jones Financial News
ESPN 24 Hour Sports
USA Network
Music Television
Modern Satellite Network
Nickelodeon
Cable Health Network
Daytime
Arts
C Span
Cable News Network
The Learning Channel
Christian Broadcast
Network
Home Box Office
Showtime
The Movie Channel
The Playboy Channel
Bravo
GalaVision
Satellite Program Network
WOR New York
WTBS Atlanta
Local Weather and Radar
Local Community Channel
All Local Networks
Stations
All Local Independent
Stations
ON ULTRACOM CABLE TV!!!
If you don't have all these channels,
you don't have UltraCom!
Call us at 861-1564
And We'll Tell You About Our February
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offer expires 2/28/83
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4,1983
Community Corner
Temple Or Olom will hold an annual picnic Feb. 13 at 10 a.m.
at Bird Drive Park and a Shabbat Feb. 18 at 6:15 p.m. at the
temple.
Miami Beach Symphony, Alfredo Munar, conductor, will fea-
ture Jean-1vpn Thibandet, pianist, playing Grieg's Piano Con-
certo on Feb. 13 at Theatre of the Performing Arts. The orches-
tra will play Tchaikowsky's symphony 6, the Pathetique.
B'nai B'rith Sholem Lodge 1024 will hold an Anti-Defamation
League meeting on Feb. 13
League of Women Voters will hold a Meet Your Legislators
Luncheon at Reflections on the Bay Feb. 8 at 11:30 a.m. The
event is co-sponsored by Coalition of Hispanic American
Women.
Aventura Jewish Center will sponsor a Sisterhood bus trip to
Miami International Mall on Monday.
Senator Jack Gordon and State Representatives Hal Spaet,
Mike Freidman, and Barry Katun will hold a public hearing Fri-
day, Feb. 18 from 1 to 4 p.m. at City Commission Chambers of
Miami Beach City Hall.
Peppy Fields 14th Annual Night of the Stars will be presented
at the Theatre of the Performing Arts on Sunday at 8 p.m.
A classical music concert by Pro Musica Orhestra. under the
baton of Barry Diamond, a Miami conductor who has led the
group since its founding in 1978, will be presented Tuesday, Feb.
22 at Congregation Bet Breira. The 30-piece group will perform
Vivaldi, Stravinsky, Haydn, and others.
Temple Women of Temple Beth Moshe will hold an Annual
Torah Fund Luncheon on behalf of the Jewish Theological
Seminary on Thursday at noon at the temple.
Miami Beach Symphony will play "Die Fledermaus" on Feb.
5 on the lawn of the Miami Beach Convention Center. The event
will be the kick-off of the Ninth Annual Miami Beach Festival of
the Arts, performing arts section.
Israel's' Bat-Sheva Dance Company will perform Igor
Stravinsky's ballet, Pulcinella on WPBT-Channel 2 on Monday,
Feb. 21 at 10:30 p.m.
Rabbi Barry I abachnikoff of Temple Bet Breira. Father
James Fetcher of St. Louis Catholic Church, and Reverand
Luther Jones, chaplain at Jackson Memorial Hospital, will ap-
pear on WPBT-Channel 2's public affairs program. Viewpoint
The death penalty will be discussed.
Claude Pepper will receive a Humanitarian Award at Miami's
1983 benefit for the National Jewish Hospital-National Asthma
Center. The award is presented here and in other cities to recog-
nize persons who show humanitarian concern.
National Council of Jewish Women, Bay Harbor Division, will
have a Luncheon and Card and Game Party Tuesday, Feb. 15 at
11:30 a.m. at First Nationwide Saving Auditorium, Bay Harbor
Island.
Bay Harbor Chapter of Hadassah will feature Barbara
Studley, WNWS-Radio talk show hostess, Monday. Feb. 14 at
noon at First Nationwide Savings Bank.
Temple Ner Tamid will hold a Gala Dinner Sunday evening,
March 6 in the Sklar Auditorium in celebration of the temple's
25th Silver Anniversary. Rabbi Eugene Labovitz, spiritual
leader, will be honored for his 25 years of service.
Beth David Sisterhood will present "A Stroll Down Broad-
way" Saturday and Sunday, Feb. 12 and 13 at the Coral Way
location, Spector Hall.
Army Reserve Private Randy S. Baskin, son of Marvin S. and
Joyce L. Baskin of Miami, has completed basic training at Fort
Leonard Wood, MO.
Beth David Congregation will hold a Men's Club Breakfast
Sunday at 9:30 a.m. at the South Dade Social Hall. Janet Reno
will speak on "Crime and Punishment." The congregation will
feature the film. The Mad Adventures of Rabbi Jacob on Tues-
day-
Beth Kodesh Men's Club will honor Mr. and Mrs. Sydney
Daniels at a breakfast Sunday in the Elaa Krautzer Auditorium
at 9:30 a.m. Daniels is congregation president, and Mrs. Daniels
nerved as Sisterhood president.
Temple Beth Am and a reform congregation in Rio de Janeiro,
Brazil are participating in an exchange program. Two Brazilian
tMB were hosted by families in Miami recently, and
students from Beth Am will go to South America during the
- v *'' '~'"'-
i.VOA*
Beth Torah, Israel Bonds to Honor Baltuchs at Dinner
Beth Torah Congregation of
North Miami Beach will hold an
annual Israel Bonds Dinner
honoring congregational leaders,
Marshall and Rochelle Baltuch
on Feb. 13. 6 p.m.. in Deakter
Hall. Raquel and Michael Scheck.
tribute chairmen, announced.
The Baltuchs have long been
active in Jewish communal af-
fairs in South Florida. Baltuch is
president of Beth Torah Congre-
gation and is executive director
of the Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
ElAl Won't
Fly on Sabbath,
Holidays
NEW YORK As part of the
new labor agreement that has
enabled El Al to resume its
worldwide operations, the airline
announces that it has suspended
all flights on the Sabbath and
Jewish holidays worldwide. For
Jews, the Sabbath starts at sun-
down on Friday and ends at sun-
down on Saturday.
El Al never had flights on the
Sabbath between Israel and
North America. There were only
some Sabbath flights between Is-
rael and Europe. After a four
month hiatus, passenger service
resumed on Jan. 12 with service
from Tel Aviv to Nairobi and
Johannesburg. U.S. service
began on Jan. 30.
RAFI HARLEV. newly-ap-
pointed president of the airline,
said. "We will abide by the
Government's decision concern-
ing the suspension of Shabbat
service and will do everything we
can to overcome all past difficul-
ties for the good of our pas-
sengers and the company."
"We believe." continued the
president, "that El Al. the airline
of Israel, is also the airline of the
Jewish people, and that our re-
sponsibilities extend to Jews
everywhere. We will continue to
maintain the highest standards
of Kashruth. and remain sensi-
tive to the special needs of every
passenger. Our duty is to serve
Israel and her people in every
possible way."
Technion to Gather
Miami Beach Chapter, Wom-
en's Division of American Tech-
nion Society will hold a February
Luncheon Meeting honoring life
members and trustees on Thurs-
day at noon at the Shelborne Ho-
tel. Dorothy Arthur, presidium
president and chairman of the
day.announced.
Marshall and Rochelle Baltuch
munity Day School. He is a
member of the Educational Scho-
larship Committee of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, the Principals Committee of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, and the Principals
and Administrators Council of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education. He also serves as
vice-president of United Syna-
gogues of America, Southeast
Region.
Mrs. Baltuch. equally involved
in Jewish communal affairs, is a
member of the Women's Le^,
for Conservative Judaism^
ing served in leadership position,
in that organization. She h
served as president of BethTW
Sisterhood and currently is aa?
Education chairman. She u
member of Beth Torah board.!
directors, serves on the Ed "
tion and Religious Commiui
and is corresponding secretary*
life member of Hadassah M
Baltuch is also active in Nation,'
Council of Jewish Women Shr
has worked for United Syr**!
gues of America and, along ^
her husband, has been actm
with Hillel Community l'w
School. ^
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Beta
Torah spiritual leader, noted the
Baltuchs are "a unique coupfc
who have dedicated their lives to
the continuity of Jewish life ml
have diligently worked fet
numerous Jewish causes in U-
rael. throughout the United
States, and especially here i
South Florida. I am proud tint
they have been named to recem
the Gates of Jerusalem Award
and know that the tradition ofi
strong Israel Bonds campaign it
Congregation Beth Torah ml
continue."
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Quisisono cuisine par excellence from
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ionover Presents 'Shulamith,'
iddish Operetta from Talmud
By JOSEPH A. NEVEL
Shulamith,'' a delight-
j| Yiddish operetta, loose-
based on an ancient Tal-
jic legend, opened this
eek at the Konover Hotel
leater. "Shulamith" was
kt presented over 100
fears ago in New York
|ty, and is being revived
Producer Ben Bonus be-
luse "its story is timeless,
fcd its melodic score is just
lovely today as it was
hen first presented.''
One of the changes introduced
j the operetta is the occasional
jearance of a young American
iiple. explaining in English the
lion of the play as it goes
ig. thus making it intelligible
enjoyable even to non-Yid-
^h speaking theatre-goers.
Shulamith" stars two Israelis
IZoya Amen as Shulamith. and
Toper as her ill-fated lover.
to in the cast is guest star
sach Hurstein. a veteran of the
dtlish theatre, who was first
|r.niui< ii to American audien-
by IlorisTomashevsky.
THE PERFORMANCE opens
a lively rendition, by a fine
ir piece orchestra of Yiddish
mlmhs music, and the musical
Inmpaniment throughout the
etui adds a dimension of
jnancy. and at times drama.
quick moving action on the
the story, told in music and
try, tells of a young maiden,
accompanies her patriarch
her part way on his pilgrimage
lerusalem. He sends her back.
fr a little while, for fear that
would lose her way if she
it any further with him.
{nd. of course, she does lose
way In her anguish, she
prays for help, and it is given to
her by way of a hidden well of
water that is accidentally un-
covered for her. Lacking a cup to
draw water from the well,
Shulamith leaps into the well,
and cannot get out.
SHE IS found by Avisholem, a
young warrior, and it appears to
be love at first sight. They pledge
their troth, on the spot, and
Avisholem vows to return to
make her his bride.
Shulamith, the reigning beauty
of her region, rejects all suitors
and awaits the return of her
betrothed. But alas, the fickle
Avisholem, on returning to his
home, falls in love with another,
and marries the young and
beautiful Avigael. Their
marriage, however is ill-fated,
and one of the most superb
dramatic scenes that this
reviewer has ever witnessed in
Yiddish theater is performed by
Kaquel Yossifon (Avigael) as she
l>emoans the death of her two
infant children.
Throughout the operetta, a
superb group of young dancers
recreate the mood of ancient
times. For those who hunger to
hear a Yiddish word spoken,
"Shulamith" offers a cornucopia
of delight.
FOR ALL others,
"Shulamith" offers an evening of
high drama, comedy, and dance
that will be remembered. The
unusual, surprise ending (for
those of us who are not Talmud
scholars) will be food for thought
and discussion.
Performances are held nightly
at 8 p.m. with matinees on
Wednesdays. Thursdays and
Sundays at 2:30 p.m. There will
!*' no performances on Fridays.
The Saturday evening perfor-
mance will be at 8:30 p.m.
Tickets are available at the box
office at the Konover Hotel.
Shenkman. left, notes the date that will mark the end of
I19H3 Winter Convocation Program at a leaders meeting last
ft- With him are Seymour Smoller and Norman Sholk.
aninary Holds Educational Program
Nek Shenkman. builder and
punal leader who resides in
roit and Pompano Beach, has
named chairman of a 1983
ter Convocation Program of
Jewish Theological Seminary
America. a month-long
nal and fund-raising
ring in the leadership are
ki j Cohen- Samuel N.
P'and, and Louis Stein, all as
frary chairmen. Serving as
pairmen are Jack Friedman,
Carol Cireenberg. M. Henry Hess.
Morris B. Kaufman. Morris
Ratner, Clara Smoller, Seymour
Smoller. and Paul B. Williams.
Shenkman is a member of the
Seminary's board of overseers
and is a former president of Beth
Aaron Synagogue and the United
Hebrew Schools in Detroit.
The 1983 Florida program is in
its 24th year and will culminate
in an Academic Convocation and
Convocation Dinner at the
Diplomat Hotel Feb. 20.
Yeshiva U. Prof. Of Talmud and
Law To Lecture Monday
ously for the Issues of Our Times
series.
The rabbi will talk on "Who
Shall Live and Who Shall Die," a
lecture about euthanasia.
Many Yeshiva graduates are
serving on the seminar commit-
tee, which is headed by Rabbi
Yaakov Sprung. Chaim H.
Friend is director of development
for the Southeastern Region of
Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Rut hi Navon, Israeli vocalist
and entertainer who currently
resides in Miami, will be the
featured performer at a 20th
Annual Spiritual Adoption
Luncheon of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat South Florida Coun-
cil Sunday, Feb. 13 at noon at
the Eden Roc Hotel. She
began her career in Israel's
Army Entertainment Group
and has appeared in plays,
musicals, concerts, and on
television.
Hem she kh to
Have Music
Club Hemshekh will sponsore a
Literary Musical Afternoon on
Feb. 7 at 1 p.m. at Financial
Federal Bank on Washington
Ave.. and 8th St. Shifre Bern-
stein will sing in Yiddish and He-
brew, and Rebecca Horowitz and
Ida Speizer will conduct a sing-
along, accompanied by two man-
dolinists.
Helen Helfant will speak about
Kadia Molodowska.
r
w7bVrmZ^PetPlfl8a^er^A0pay tHbute ^RabbiPinchas
Weberman spiritual leader of Ohev Shalom Congregation and
reZT T^tr?^0^ *"*! CUncil of &JSXSZ
turedLl l *** sponsored by Ponevez Yeshiva. Pic-
tured from left are Rabbi Chaim Feiffer, Ponevez executive
ShTm T^ WeberTT SamUel > Present ooTel
Shalom, who presented the award; Leo Hack, dinner chairman
rt,^! Pre5ldnLari:el[8i0US advisor of Riverside Memorial
Chapels; and Rabbi Abraham Kahaneman, president of Pone-
7LllnT T fits[ou,nder- Rabbi David Lehrfield, spir-
itual leader of Knesseth Israel Congregation, was guest
speaker, and Emanuel Edelstein, Beth Israel Congregation
treasurer, served as dinner co-chairman.
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nar series will continue with
"""> by Rabbi J. David
Professor of Talmud at
P and Ethics at the univer-
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fbbi Bleich co-authored the
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Tel (213)658-7350


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, February 4,1983
Penny Martin, right, coordinator of UF&CS Annual Meeting
and Banquet, greets Robert Gardner, board member, and his
wife. Sue.
Martin Reelected to UF&CS Board
Penny Martin of Kendall has
been re-elected to the executive
board of United Family and
Children's Services.
Assistant director of Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies
of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, Martin was installed
as second vice president of the
board of directors at the UF&CS
Annual Meeting at Omni
International Hotel recently.
UF&CS is an United Way-
funded social services agency
which offers counselling and
community aid programs
throughout Dade County.
Martin served on the executive
board in 1982 and also chaired
the Community Information
Committee. She has also worked
with Dade County Master Plan
Task Force and Florida Bar
Grievance Committee and is
currently vice chairman of
Housing and Urban Develop-
ment Advisory Board.
ORT Fundraiser to Aid Israel School
Southeastern Florida Region of
Women's American ORT will
hold an annual luncheon on
behalf of the School of
Engineering in Israel on Thurs-
day at the Eden Roc Hotel at
11:30 a.m. "Dedication is Not an
Ending but Only a Beginning"
will be the theme.
A musical portrait of Golds
Meir, "She's the Best Man in My
Cabinet." will be featured. Hilde
Smissman. chairperson, an-
nounced.
Also to highlight the affair will
be the introduction of
and presentation of awards to
new Golden Circle members and a
drawing to support ORT's EPIC
project to help students develop
new skills and retrain those whose
skills have become obsolete.
"This luncheon will be our
major fundraising vehicle for the
second phase of the ORT School
of Engineering in Jerusalem."
Smissman stated. "There will be
no solicitation of funds as the
price of a ticket Double Chai
will be a gift helping to
Dr. William Lee
Jewish Theological
Seminary Prof.
To Lecture
Southeast Region of United
Synagogue of America, the
Southeastern Branch cf the Rab-
binical Assembly, and the Jewish
Theological Seminary of Ameri-
ca, all embracing the Conserva-
tive movement in Judaism, are
sponsoring lectures on the overall
theme "The Challenge for the
80's-Conservative Judaism
Responds."
Touching many areas through-
out the Southeast. Florida's pro-
gram of lectures was planned by
a committee that included Rabbi
David Auerbach of Beth David
Congregation in Miami; Rabbi
Jerome Epstein, chairman of
regions for United Synagogue of
America: Franklin D. Kreutzer,
president of Southeast Region of
United Synagogue: Robert
Novack of the Theological Semi-
nary office in Miami: and Harold
Wishna. director of United Syna-
gogue's southeast region.
As part of the program. Dr.
Gerson Cohen, chancellor and
professor of History at the Jew-
ish Theological Seminary, will
speak on "Our Modern Jewish
Agonies and Triumphs." He will
talk on Monday. Feb. 14 at Beth
David Congregation.
Temple Beth Am
Features Concert Trio
Cultural Arts Committee of
Temple Beth Am will have an
Evening of Music featuring
Frank Cooper on the harpsichord.
Nina Gordon on cello, and Stuart
MacDonald on Violin, on Sun-
day. Feb. 13 at 7 p.m. in the tem-
ple Sanctuary.
Frank Cooper will give a
lecture-recital of baroque music
ranging from Trio Sonata by An-
tonio Lotti to Bach's Chromatic
Fantasy and Fugue in D-minor.
Doreen Marx and Bernita King
are chairing the event.
Rabbi Tibor Stern, chairman of the Eruv Commission, iij-i
sented with a proclamation establishing an Eruv Day JJ
City of Miami Beach. Mayor Norman Ciment presents tk]
plaque to Rabbi Stern and his wife. '
Allied Stores Announces Promotiwil
William S. Ruben has been
appointed president and division
chief executive officer of Bon wit
Teller. New York, and William D.
Frederick, president and division
chief executive officer of Jordan
Marsh-Florida, both effective
Feb. 1. Thomas M. Macioce.
president of Allied Stores Cor-
poration, announced.
Ruben joined Allied in 1950
and in 1958 was appointed sales
promotion manager of Jordan
Marsh-Florida. After promotions
to vice president-general mer-
chandise manager and executive
vice president and managing
director. Ruben was appointed
president and division chief
executive officer in 1966 and
chairman of the board in 1979.
Frederick has been president
and chief operating officer of
Jordan Marsh-Florida since 1982.
His Allied career began in 1959 at
Maas Brothers, where he was
appointed vice president-sales
promotion. He was promoted to
vice president-director of stores
for Joske's, Houston in 1977 and
returned to Maas Brothers in
1979, as executive vice president-
merchandising and sales promo-
tion. He became a senior execu-
tive vice president of Maas
Brothers in 1980.
William D. Frederick
continue ORT's work."
Among the honored guests will
be Dr. William Lee, provost and
executive vice president of the
University of Miami
Cookie Schectman and Esther
Schermer are co-chairmen of the
event.
Fine Named Mercy Hospital Trustee Ein Karem Featum\
NY Media Personam
SHARE A SEDER
// you wish to have a guest who doesn't have a
Seder to join you at your Seder, Monday,
March 28, and/or Tuesday March 29, Please
call Rabbi Richter or his secretary Raquel
King at 921-8810.
Also, if you'd like a guest for your Purim
Seudah (Feast) Sunday, February 27, call at
the above number.
Florida's Oldest
42nd Annual Antique
Show&Sale
FEBRUARY 10,11,12,13,1983
B A YFRONT AUDITORIUM
5th ST. at BISCAYNE BLVD.
MIAMI, FLORIDA
Admission $3.00
Show Hour*: 1 to 10 p.m. Last Day 1 to 6 p.m
Martin Fine. Miami attorney,
has been named a member of the
Board of Trustees of Mercy Hos-
pital.
A senior partner in the firm of
Fine, Jacobson, Block. Klein,
Colan and Simon, and member of
the board of the City National
Bank of Miami. Fine has long
been active in community serv-
ice.
He is a Trustee of the United
Way, and serves on the boards of
the National Council on Aging,
the City of Miami Downtown De-
velopment Authority, the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, and the Greater Miami
Chamber of Commerce, chairing
the New World Center Action
Committee.
Fine attended Temple Univer-
sity, Philadelphia, and is a
graduate of the University of
Miami Law School.
Lowe-Levinson Gallery
Shows Prints, Enamels
The Lowe-Levinson Art Gal-
lery of Temple Beth Sholom.
Miami Beach will exhibit the
works of Audrey Komrad and
Ann Reiter in a month long show
entitled "Contemporary Crea-
tions of Two." It will run Feb. 6
through March 7.
Audrey Komrad is an enamel-
ist. and Ann Reiter a print-
maker.
The preview opening will be
held Sunday from 5 to 8 p.m. at
the gallery.
Humanistic* Set Events
Society for Humanistic Juda-
ism will hold a Thirteenth Annual
Meeting at the Deauville Hote!
Feb. 11.12, and 13.
Speakers from all over the
pate in the various sessions
Ein Karem Chapter of Hadl
sah will feature Miriam Roth|
viewing the book. ScAiihbVM
List by Thomas Keneally it i|
regular monthly meeting FA I
in the Star I-akes Xuditorium.
Roth lectured for the Jw*
Welfare Board Lecture Burnt H
New York for 25 years. andk|
talked on such topics as tbeaoal
journalism, radio, and teleusil
She had a syndicated column^
Broadway, that appeared III
York newspapers, and curT*jj
conducts radio interviews *l
Jewish personalities for theJi*l
ish Book Council of Amend
Martin Fine
RN WANTED
For children's overnight summer camp in N.E.
Georgia. 4 weeks employment June 16 M
17 or 1 week employment Aug. 14 Aug.*1-
Excellent working conditions, salary cm I
collect for application.
Mrs. Taylor 305-592-4792
FIRST LADY CANTOR
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Cantor
Mimi Sloan
Now Available For
Passover Sedorirn
868-4961


Wedding
REYLERLICHTER
David Henry Lichter. son of Dr. and Mrs.
Solomon Lichter, and Mayra Cecilia Reyler,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Felix Reyler. were mar-
ried Jan. 1 at Temple Beth Sholom, Miami Beach,
in a double ring ceremony with Rabbi Leon
Kronish officiating. A reception and dinner dance
followed and the couple honeymooned in the
Islands of San Maartan.
Mayra is a Magna Cum Laude graduate of
Brown University and also won the Latin-Ameri-
can Studies Award. She is presently in her final
year of law school at the University of Florida.
She received a fellowship to teach freshman law
students this year and also won top prize as an
oralist in Moot Court Competition. She will
graduate in May with a degree specializing in In-
ternational Law.
David received his Bachelors Degree Cum
Laude from Brandeis University. Last May he
graduated from Georgetown University Law
School where he served as topics editor of the
American Criminal Law Review and was presi-
dent of the Taft Chapter of Phi Alpha Delta Law
Fraternity.
David also received the International Academy
of Trial Lawyer's Award for Distinguished
Achievement in Advocacy and later published an
article in Law Review.
The groom, now a member of the Florida Bar,
serves as law clerk to Howell W. Melton, United
Slates district judge in Jacksonville.
The couple will return to Miami in 1984.
Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Socially tor Singles, offering the opportunity lor paid advertisements to Be published
as Singles individuals and organizations send them to us We rely on the integrity of those
who will Be seeking advertising space that their activities are honestly described and that
they perform a worthy service tor serious Singles We cannot, however assume
responsiBiiily or incur obligation tor material in these columns THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN
RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY AO FOR ANY REASON
Replies must Be directed to the individual advertiser and not (o the newspaper
Rale mlormation is available By written inquiry to The Jewish Floridian. PO Bon
.012973 Miami Florida 33101 Attention Mary Morgan
Jewish American Latin Single* cordially invites you to a "Latin
Fiesta-Dance" Saturday, February 12-9:00 PM. Cuban Hebrew
Congregation, 1700 Michigan Avenue, Miami Beach, R.S.V.P.:
553-8330. Donation: $6,00 (includes on drink & lots of munchies) "A
Friendly Way to Meet Interesting People.like Yourself" Also... "Sing
Along With. Karen" on Wednesday, February 9-8:30 PM. Donation:
$4.00 (includes refreshments). For information on above two events:
868 4034 / 553-8330.
Cantor's Grandson Celebrated Bar Mitzvah Twice
Cantor and Mrs. Saul Meisels
ttended double celebrations
kht'ii their grandson, Joshua
prison, son of Harold and their
aughter Florence, became a Bar
litzvah, in Miami and in New
ork. A "Pre-Bar Mitzvah" Sab-
ath service held here took place
Del Prado M in van, where
tantor Meisels officiates. He and
(is grandson participated in the
ervice, and Joshua was called to
i Torah to chant the Bar Mitz-
h prayers.
Rabbi Joshua L. Goldberg,
who served during WWII as a
naval chaplain, spoke. He had
originally married Cantor and
Mrs. Meisels and was the first
rabbi with whom the cantor had
officiated. Rabbi Joseph Gor-
finkel of Beth Moshe also ad-
dressed the congregation, and
Rabbi Michael Berenbaum of
Washington, a leader of the Na-
tional Holocaust Commission,
presented the sermon.
to Honor El Conquistador Couple
pig
Residents of El Conquistador
ill celebrate an annual Night in
rael to pledge support for the
onomic development of the
ate of Israel through the Israel
mds program on Saturday eve-
r, Peb. 12. at 7:30 p.m.. in the
II Qmstador Club House.
At the same time, Alvin and
llian Schainholtz will receive
Mel's Scroll of Honor Award
ogni/ing participation in B'nai
rith. Israel Bonds Organiza-
n. Zionist Organization of
nerica, and other Jewish orga-
lations.
(Special guest will be Eddie
chaffer, humorist. Chairman of
event is William Gabeloff,
co-chairmen are Julius
px>m. Joseph Fleekop, and An-
ony Penaccio.
The official Bar Mitzvah took
place in Roslyn, L.I. at Shelter
Rock Jewish Center two weeks
later. Once again Cantor Meisels
and Joshua performed the service
together. Joshua, in his address,
spoke of a Russian boy, Itzchak
Muleris of Kovno, Lithuania,
with whom he was sharing his
Bar Mitzvah. Joshua expressed
gratitude that he, unlike his Rus-
sian "twin," was free to practice
his religion.
Family and friends celebrated
in the Nelson home on Sunday
afternoon. The three generations
present, Joshua, his mother, and
his grandmother, Ida, played a
Bach concerto together, and
Joshua then joined Cantor
Meisels in a duet in Yiddish.
17268
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Enrolled campers, former campers, prospective campers and staff
LUNCH-FAVORSGAMES-FAMILY FUN-SLIDE PRESENTATION OF
OUR CAMPS.
Call 261-1500 in Miami for a reservation to join us.
These outstanding camps have been owned and directed by a Miami
family since 1929. We will be happy to call on you in person if you
cannot make the reunion.
Alvin and Lillian
Schainholtz
H
Pioneer Women Set Week's Agenda
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The most revolutionary channel in history has
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So get in on the fun &-rf Call today.
PLAYBOY
II Rise Tikvah Chapter of Pio-
Women-Na'amat will hold
annual Child Rescue Lunch
i Tuesday at noon at the Shel-
|roe Hotel. National Vice Presi-
*& Harriet Green will address
group.
Green also serves as president
south Florida Council, nation-
vice president of American
>nist Federation, and president
Jewish Historical Society of
'uth Florida.
A musical interlude will also be
on the agenda, Sally Gersten,
chapter president, announced.
Beba I del son Chapter will hold
a Purim meeting Wednesday at
noon in the civic auditorium of
First Nationwide Savings, Miami
Beach. Esther Weinstein, vice
president, will read from the
Megillah.
Sarah Kaufman is president of
the chapter.
CC Concert to Host 6 Area Choirs
Peace-Shalom" is the theme
[South Dade jewish Cma^
n.nity Center's celebration of
EJL \nnual Jewish Music
Mth, which begins in February
ro"ghout the nation.
To commemorate the month.
JU, will host a community
Pcert on Wednesday at 7:15
F- at Temple Judea, Coral
K. 'eBtUrin children and
wu choirs from six area
35? JPPlbi variety of
Wb, Yiddish, English, tradi-
m, and modern tunes.
W hope that through our precede at 10 ai
music the desire for peace will be
expressed," said Marsha Botkin,
JCC adult and cultural arts
program supervisor.
Nutritionist to Talk
Menorah Chapter ot Hadassah
will meet Monday, Feb. 14 at
12:30 p.m. at Temple Israel,
Kendall.
Jay Foster, nutritional
biochemist, director, at Body
Chemistry Association, will
spean on "Common Foods in the
Diet." A board meeting will
m.
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Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, February 4,1983
Miami Beach Boxing Commission held an annual banquet at
Ember's Restaurant recently in honor of its staff. Among those
attending were, from left, Sid Gersh, secretary-chief inspector;
Dr. Robert LaVey, medical staff; Mel Ziegler, commission
chairman and World Boxing Association vice president;
Commissioner Alex Daoud; and James Resnick, commission
vice chairman.
UN Chief Calls For
Compromise Formula
tary General said that the UN
could provide the 'framework'*
for negotiations for a Mideast
solution once there is an agreed
plan by all the parties concerned.
De Cuellar said in response to a
question that it is not the role of
the Secretary General to initiate
peace proposals. "The Secretary
General must be judicious and
should not come up with sugges-
tions if he is not sure that they
are going to be helpful and
conducive to the parties in-
vovled," he said.
UNITED NATIONS
Secretary General Javier Perez
De Cuellar said that the Middle
East conflict could be settled
through a "compromise formula"
which will include "all the
positive elements" in the various
Mideast peace plans. He cited the
Reagan plan, the Fez plan and
the Franco-Egyptian plan as
those that can contribute to the
"compromise formula."
Speaking at a press conference
here, his first for 1983. the Secre-
Ryan Defends OSI
Judicial Process
NEW YORK The director of
the Justice Department's Office
of Special Investigations (OSI)
said here that while the judicial
process for securing a conviction
against an alleged Nazi war
criminal in the United States is
"far from perfect," it neverthe-
less remains essential to the
rights of all citizens that the
process be upheld and applied
judicially to those accused.
Asserting that citizenship is
"our most precious right" the
director of the OSI, Allan Ryan,
Jr. said, "Citizenship is not and
should not be revokable by order
of the Department of Justice, no
matter how conscientious the
official, no matter how despicable
the defendant. The machinery
is far from perfect but the princi-
ple is essential.
"The rule of law is in the end
what distinguishes a just govern-
ment from the government of
tyranny that threatened to engulf
the world in the 30s and 40s."
Ryan told some 100 persons at a
reception honoring his efforts,
OSI deputy director Neal Sher,
and the 48-member staff of the
OSI for its continued efforts to
prosecute war criminals residing
Bet Breira Hosts Federation Shabbat
Congregation Bet Breira is
hosting a Federation Shabbat on
Feb. 4 at 8:15 p.m. The service is
in recognition- of members who
are active in Jewish Federation
Agencies as professionals and as
volunteers. Rabbi Barry Tabach-
nikoff and Cantor Pittle will
officiate.
The Congregation will host a
special presentation on Friday,
FEb. 18 at 8:15 p.m. featuring
'Art Can* Opens
Barbara Gillman Galary of
Miami will host Tulane parents
and alumni at the opening of Art
Cars. Small model cars tran-
sformed into works of art, the
exhibit was created by Tulane
MFA, Emery Clark.
The reception will be held
Thursday. Feb. 3 from 8 to 10
p.m. and Clark will attend.
Congregation members Hind a
and Howard Cantor speaking on
and showing slides of Russia as
they report on their mission
visiting Jewish refuseniks.
Coward Play Opens
Noel Coward's Fallen Angels, a
comedy about the complications
of love and marriage, opens at the
Players State Theatre Feb. 4 and
runs through Feb. 27.
The play, written in 1925, is di-
rected by Frith Ban bury, English
theatre personality. It is the first
Coward comedy to be performed
by the theatre.
Shaare Zedek to Meet
South Florida Womens Com-
mittee, Shaare Zedek Medical
Center of Jerusalem, will distrib-
ute "Life Membership Pins" on
Thursday at a meeting at noon at
the Casablanca Hotel.
A book review by Bea Young
will be featured.
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Jack Chester
Torah Vodaath to Honor
Jack Chester as
Man of the Year
Yeshiva Torah Vodaath of
Brooklyn, New York will honor
Jack Chester as Man of the Year
for donations to and support of
the Yeshiva at a dinner at the
Crown Hotel Feb. 15. Isaac and
Elsa Silberberg, supporters of the
school, will also be guests of
honor.
Merill Simon, author, political
writer, and electronics industry
leader, will speak at the dinner,
Sol Benson, general chairman,
announced.
Chester, who had been interned
in Nazi concentration camps,
immigrated to Cuba after World
War II. He established himself
there in the electronics industry
and moved to Miami in the
1950s.
Chester is an active trustee of
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion, Israel Bond Organization,
Bayit L'Platot, and Hadassah
Hospital in Israel. He is a
founder of Mount Sinai Medical
and Cedars Medical Centers.
Miami's Cuban Hebrew
Congregation, through Chester's
assistance, was able to build a
new congregation dedicated to
the memory of Chester's parents,
Beth Knesseth Misnpachat
Schechter.
Born in Poland, Silberberg is a
Holocaust survivor, emigrating
to Israel in 1947. Both he and his
wife have been active in Jewish
communal causes.
Speaker Simon is national
political editor of magazine,
Israel Today. As vice president of
marketing of Veeco Instruments
and a frequent visitor to Israel,
Simon helped establish an elec-
tronics facility in Karmiel, Israel.
He was recently appointed a
research associate of the Center
for Strategic Studies. Tel Aviv
University, and president of
Mcrvuz Haftorah. Torah Insti-
tute for Rabbinical Studies in
Jerusalem.
Simon also serves on the board
"I directors of AMPAL and on
i In advisory board of the Center
for International Security. He is
currently a member of theexecu-
live committee of the National
Labor Zionist Alliance.
Sol Benson
Isaac and Elsa Silberberg
\M N' Stern fleft), eh** of the Board of the Hartz
mountain Corp. and Dr. Norman Lamm, president of Yeshiva
\A?kiersity' insPect designs.for the proposed Max Stern
""c Center. To be built on the University's Main Center
Af""^5 'n tne Washington Heights section of Manhattan, the
*tern Athletic Center will include a modern, regulation-
\st a gymnas*um> something Yeshiva University coaches and
dIhL* have dreamed about for the last 50 years. Stern has
IP'eaged $1 million toward the building of the Athletic Center.
Friday. February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 1 IB
Ronald G. Kalish
Kalish Named
Burdines V.P.
Ronald G. Kalish has been pro-
moted to executive vice president
of Burdines, Richard W.
McEwen, chairman of the board,
and Howard Socol, president, an-
nounced.
Kalish joined Burdines as vice
president-controller in 1976, be-
came vice president of finance in
1977 and senior vice president of
finance in 1978. He was made
senior vice president of finance
and selling supporting services in
1982, a position he held until this
promotion.
Prior to joining Burdines,
Kalish had held financial posi-
tions with General Electric Com-
pany for six years and Jacobson
Stores, Inc. for eight years.
Born in New York in 1940,
Kalish is a graduate of Miami
Beach High School. He attended
Duke University where he re-
ceived a BS degree in mechanical
engineering and later received a
MBA degree in finance from Col-
umbia University Graduate
School of Business.
Recently elected to the board
of Sun Bank, Miami, Kalish is
also a board member of Economic
Society of South Florida and is
active in the Greater Miami
Chamber of Commerce. He was
previously treasurer and director
of Ihe Florida Philharmonic, a
Ixiurd member of Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, and a board
member of Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida.
Southern Bell Lists Payment Agencies
Southern Bell has four locations in the Miami Beach area at
which customers may make telephone bill payments. These
payment agencies can save customers who desire to pay their
phone bills in person both time and fuel.
John Thomas, Southern Bell's spokesman said, "Of course
customers can always mail their payments in by using the
payment card and convenient return envelope that are included
with the bills. The vast majority of our customers simply mail
payments into us. But a small minority prefer to pay in person.
We try to accommodate those customers with our payment
agencies."
Locations accepting telephone payments in this area include:
Barnett Bank of Bay Harbor Islands
1108 Kane Concourse
Flagler Federal Savings & Loan Association of Miami
446 Collins Avenue and 1050 Alton Road
Lincoln Savings and Loan Association
360 41 Street
Emanu-El Young Adults Hold 25th Reunion
A 25th anniversary reunion of
Young Adults of Temple Emanu-
El. an organization which dis-
Temple Beth Am to
Rededicate Hall
Temple Beth Am's refurbished
Social Hall, which is the benefici-
ary of a contribution by Cliff and
Betty Suchman. will be rededi-
cated Suchman Social Hall on
Friday. Feb. 11. The look of and
the acoustic quality in the hall
have been improved.
Rabbi Baumgard will speak on
"The Changing Role of the Syna-
gogue in Modern Tunes." The
dedication will take place at serv-
ices.
Collage Exhibit on
View At Federation
The work of Leslie Miller
(Levi) will be shown during the
mouth of February at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
Some of her collages are the
same ones shown in Israel where
Leslie had two shows in 1981.
Leslie is the wife of Uri Levi of
Miami. Both studied at the
Boston Museum School where
they met. They lived and studied
for a year in Israel.
Her work can be viewed
bet ween 6 and 8 p.m.
banded in 1958. will be held Sun-
day. Feb. 13, at 4 p.m. at the
home of Paul Kwitney, North
Bay Village.
Kwitney. a Miami Beach attor-
ney who was one of the founders
of the group, announced that Dr.
Irving Lehrman, rabbi of the
congregation, will attend.
m

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4fe:';-
^^ X--^p
V a'.M ^ff^^^
^^k
j

Linda Minkes, president of
the Miami Region of Hadas-
sah, attended a Midwinter
Meeting of the National Board
of Hadassah at Kiamesha
Lake, N.Y. Also attending
from Miami were Charlotte
Wolpe and Helen Weisberg.

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Pagel2-B The Jewish Ftoridian / Friday, February 4,1983
Something's
-s*^
Perking
in our
Pantry
EIGHT
O'CLOCK
BEAN
ONLY AT
cPtIde
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD
THURS., FEB. 3WED., FEB. 9, 1983
V^5
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Join us for a cup of fresh
j8 O'Clock Coffee every Sunday
as you shop. And it's all Free.
of course! (With donut.) From
8a.m.11a.m. every Sunday.
(ioHic a shown r\ a cup from ihe beautful
Stoneware Cc*eajon "Sweet Flowers )
Fresh ground coffee!
Americans have been enjoying famous Eight O'Clock whole
bean coffee lor over 100 years. It is most unique because it
is packaged fresh dairy, is roasted, dated and promptly
shipped to your grocer. It is freshly ground to order at time
of purchase. D'licious.
Keep in covered
container in your
refrigerator.
Now! Exclusively at Pantry Pride!
MeHo, rich and always fresh!
Something else is perking at Panby Pride!
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32 pieces for only 93.92
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two patterns consist erf Dinner Rate.
Cup. Saucer and Dessert Dish.
(See details In store.)


Friday, February 4, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
[here's no chicken Ike chicken fresh
from our Pantry. We buy only the best
to give you, our customers, only the best
Our chickens are always fresh. That
means Florida fresh and shipped to you
that way-packed in ice. Pantry Pride
chickens are always shipped this way.
Premium shipping means a premium
taste, but never a premium price.
They look good and taste so good! They
cook up juicy and tender with lots of white
meat! Whether you boil, broil, bar-b-q, fry
or roast-you're going to love our chicken.
They're fresh from our Pantry.
our
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Pte 14-B The Jewish Floridum / Friday, February 4,1963
JNF Names 1983 Traditional
Purim Ball's Queen Esther
Mitchell Wolf son
Felled At Age 83
Rabbi Irving Lehrman, Jewish
National Fund Foundation chair-;
man, and. Abraham Grunhut,
JNF Greater Miami president,
have announced that the forth-
coming Jewish National Fund
Traditional Queen Esther Purim
Ball will be held Sunday, March 6
at noon at the Konover Hotel.
Queen Esther for 1963 is Anne
Ackerman She is active in many
humanitarian, political, and civic
concerns. "She is a pillar of the
cultural Jewish life in her com-
munity," Lehrman stated. Her
love for Israel is unparalleled.
Her devotion to Jewish National
Fund is legendary."
"A a token of the great ap-
preciation, love, and esteem JNF
holds towards her, she has been
selected as JNF reigning Queen
Esther for 1963."
Purim Princesses are Mary
Goldman and Fay Goldberg,
"who have distinguished them-
selves in their dedication and
single minded devotion to JNF
Ann, Ackerman' Mary Goldman Fay Goldberg Abraham Bodow
and its principles of land re-
clamation and redemption in the
State of Israel," Grunhut said.
Mordecai for 1983 is Abraham
Bodow, who served in the Mule
Corps with the late David Ben
Gurion in World War I in the
Dardenelles. Bodow is also a
supporter of JNF.
A musical program is being
arranged under Maestro Shmuel
Fershko, and dancing will be pro-
vided by Hy Fried and his
Orchestra.
"The Purim Ball is always an
unusual and beautiful event,"
said Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz.
JNF executive board chairman,
"and this year it promises to be.
as usual, a most illustrious event
of the JNF season. I invite the
Jewish community to join with
the JNF in this gala celebration
and personal participation in the
work and achievements of JNF."
AJCommittee Executive
On Israel: Criticism is
Form of Involvement
Continued from Page IB
can confer with Israelis in private
communications or advice," he
says. "We may suggest to Israel
the American public's criticism if
appropriate."
FELDSTEIN POINTS out
that as a "mainstream organiza-
tion, but with a shade more inde-
pendence," AJCommittee is
trusted by Israelis and Ameri-
cans alike. "We can provide a
model for criticism without
feeding into the hands of Israel's
enemies."
AJCommittee works closely
with Christians in an effort to
garner support for Israel and to
create interfaith understanding.
The result of such efforts, Feld-
stein concedes, is a "mixed bag."
"Jews have had problems with
liberal protestant sects those
most touched by Third World
Ideology,' but on the other hand,
the National Council of Churches,
a Christian umbrella group, did
not express the anti-Israel state-
ments expected during the war in
Lebanon."
"We do believe the world is re-
deemable," Feldstein adds,
smiling. "There are battles to be
won and friends to be made"
HE EXPRESSES skepticism
about the theory that the new
pro-Israel Christians always
translate their views into "prior-
ity political consideration."
They don't get as emotional
*.oo v
about our concerns as they do,
say, about abortion,"he declares.
"When the votes were finally
counted on the AW ACS sale, all
the old, liberal left were against,
while our new group of friends,
the right-wing conservatives,
voted with Reagan straight down
the line, approving the sale."
AJCommittee was originally
formed to fight anti-Semitism
and to promote Jewish interests
here and abroad. "We fought the
old form of anti-Semitism then
personal discrimination against
Jews," says Feldstein. "Now we
are concerned with the new form
discrimination against Jews as
a group."
"A different standard, for
example, is held for Israel than
for other nations," he explains.
"And charging American Jews of
dual loyalty is discriminatory,
when Greek Americans are
known to promote Greek inter-
ests, and Polish Americans are
known to promote Polish inter-
ests."
"WE ALSO fight the Arab in-
fluence," Feldstein continues,
"like the Arab Studies groups es-
tablished at colleges that are
really a front for a spreading pro-
paganda."
As a secular organization,
AJCommittee has the freedom
to explore different approaches
to Judaism without offending
an., one, Feldstein asserts. The
group has helped the Havurah
movement, for example, where
families, either belonging or not
belonging to synagogues, join
together to celebrate holidays.
AJCommittee provides seed
grants to such experiments while
taking the position of uninvolved
observer overseeing results.
Another project on AJCom
mittee's agenda is reviving the
Jewish role in America's civic
program. "Before the 60's,"
Feldstein explains, "Jews formed
a liberal consensus on a wide
j spectrum of issues. Today, there
are Jewish democrats and repub-
licans, and we have less a voice
because of the splintering. We
want to unite conservative and
liberal Jews around different
issues."
Feldstein was elected executive
vice president last August and
was in Miami this week as part of
a new orientation. He met with
tfte Miami Chapter board and
spoke at a kickoff of a national
fund-raising campaign held in
Palm Beach.
Fan Levy of the national
board of Hadassah will ad-
dress Haim Yassky Chapter
at a Youth Aliyah Luncheon
on Tuesday, Feb. 15. The
event will take place at the
Sherry Frontenac Hotel at
noon.
Ocean Pavilion to
Honor Israel's 35th
Ocean Pavilion on Miami
Beach will celebrate the upcom-
ing 35th anniversary of the State
of Israel at an Israel Bonds
luncheon on Sunday. Feb. 13. at
noon, in Ocean Pavilion Restau-
rant. Chairmen Silvia Drosnes
and Laurette Rosenthal an-
nounced.
The annual event is being held
to gain support for Israel's eco-
nomic development and welfare
through the Israel Bonds
program. "We have always been
staunch supporters of Israel
Bonds in the Ocean Pavilion and
this year we expect a better cam-
paign than all previous," they
noted-
Special guest speaker will be
Jerome Gleekel, political scientist
and noted Mid-East authority.
Honorary chairman is Victor
Hazan.
Yiddish Lectures at
Beth Sholom Continue
YIVO Committee of Miami
continues a 1963 YIVO Forum
Wednesday Yiddish Lecture
Series with a talk by Dr. Heszel,
scholar, historian, author, and re-
cipient of Best Essayist of 1982
award from World Yiddish Cul-
ture Congress.
He will speak on "The Jewish
Impact on Western Civilization"
at Temple Beth Sholom on Feb. 9
at 1 p.m. Singer Moshe Buryn
will perform with Mimi Ret skin
at the piano.
Coatiaaed from Peg* 1-B
(1981); the Governors Award,
Miami Chapter of the National
Academy of Television Arts and
Sciences, presented for "his
pioneering spirit" in obtaining
the license to build Florida's first
television station 30 years earlier
(1978); "Mitchell Wolfson Pier
Park," dedicated by the City of
Miami Beach (1977); "Florida
Patriot," Bicentennial Com-
mission of Florida (1976); Miami
Heart Institute's Humanitarian
Award (1976); the Leonard
Abess Human Relations Award
of the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith (1975); the Walt
Disney Humanitarian Award
from the National Association of
Theatre Owners (1972).
Also. Special Award by the
National Broadcast Editorial
Conference. Board of Directors,
for "Pioneering Work in Broad-
cast Editorials" (1972); the
Silver Medallion, National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews
(1962); Honorary Doctorate of
Laws. University of Miami
(1955); the Variety Club's Good
Samaritan Award (1954); and the
naming of a Learning Resources
Center in his honor by Miami-
Hack- Community College (1967).
Mr. Wolfson was well-known
as a breeder of thoroughbred
racing horses and was a member
of the Committee of the State of
Florida Pari-mutuel Commission
to study the effects of drugs on
race horses. A member of the
Florida Thoroughbred Breeder's
Association, he was former owner
of Pebble Hill Farm and owner of
Key West Stables.
Known to many as "Colonel."
Mr. Wolfson's military rank was
earned during World War
II.when he served wtkj
t as a lieutenant cofcJ
Army, aeong action m aS
Europe. He w
meritorious servke 2
beyond the call of 3
which he received fcl
Star and the French C
Guerre.
MR. WOLFSON wu i J
of Key West, born then 1
He and his late wife, \
saved from destruction
restored in 1960 t Kit
home of great historic
that is known as the 1
House. The Wotfsona
with the Audubon
sparked the restoiJ
movement throughout
Florida Keys.
His fraternal membi
included Mahi Shrine. Q
Rotary.
Mr. Wolfson is survmi
daughter, Mrs. Elton M(
son, Mitchell. Jr., at
grandchildren, Lyndi 1
Wolfson, Louis Wolin
Franci Jo Wolfson. Jen I
Waxenberg and Jaci
Frances Waxenberg.
Burial was privm.
memorial service held onU
at Gusman Cultural Cents
Economist to
Yiddish Culture Winkk|
meet Thursday at 10:301
Temple Ner Taraid.
Professor Arthur Una
sayist and economist, wii
on "How Serious is the I
Anti-Semitism and
Nazism?" Cantor MosbeFi
will sing Hebrew ind B
lithurgy
PUBLIC LECTURE
by the noted
HISTORIAN...RABBI...AUTHOR
DR. GERSON D. C0H9
Chancellor, Jewish Theological Seminal)
"Understanding Modem Jewish
Tragedies and Triumphs"
Admission Free
MONDAY, FEB. 14,8 W*-j
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION (SANCi"
2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue, Miami
Part of the united
OUTREACH PROGRAM
sponsored by the
United SynagoQue of America (Southeast Reg
Jewish Theological Seminary of Ame
Rabbinical Assembly (Southeast Reg


:
Friday, February 4.1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
v V
X
"A
L I
.
-
al Towers of North Miami Beach's Holiday Fund
nittee recently presented a contribution to the
Vw Home for the Aged, North Dade. Shown, from left, are
Waldner, officer of the committee; Irene Fink, corn-
members, not shown, are Samuel Braun, Louis
tman. Jack Pritzker, William Tamarkin, Irving Meltzer,
IBrody, Alfred Kohlman, Herman Matfus. Max Spieler,
i Morris. Ethyl Evans, Florence Braun, and Libby Cohen.
ICream Packaging Reduces Defects
Dairy Group has
it- method of packaging
km to avoid all problems. A
live clear plastic wrap,
lirrap tear strip, lift-up lid,
eal. and rectangular box
een added or improved on
cream products that Kraft
jroup packages.
outer wrap is tamperproof,
f. and locks in freshness,
he newly added outer tear
Simplifies wrap removal.
fft-up lid opens without
and recloses tightly and
and the inner seal was
p protect freshness and to
lid from freezing to the
contents. Packaging all ice cream
products in a rectangular box has
also been standardized by the
company to make scooping easy
and add efficiency in storing.
Temple Lectures Open
Young Israel of Sunny Isles
will hold a series of lectures on
the general theme "Jews in Many
Lands" on Sunday mornings at 9
a.m., starting Feb. 6.
The first lectures will be given
by Max Wein on "A Visit with
Jews in Australia and New Zea-
land." Rabbi Rubin Dobin, coor-
dinator of the series, will hold a
discussion after the lecture.
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v
Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, February 4, 1983
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where shopping is a pleasure | Publfr


Jebrew Univ. Women's Division to
fold Woman of the Year Luncheon
Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
American Zionist Federation Elects New Officers
Helen Cezer Katzman will re-
L a Woman of the Year award
- the Greater Miami
Imen's Division of the Ameri-
Friends of the Hebrew Uni-
bity, Elma Kaufman, chair-
a of the board, announced.
[atzman was chosen to receive
[honor in recognition of civic,
Lral. educational, and philan-
bpic achievements. Presenta-
i of the award will take place
I Woman of the Year luncheon
Ithe Doral Beach Hotel on
Irsday. Feb. 17. at 11:30 a.m.
ur Woman of the Year
Xheon has grown to be one of
outstanding honors bestowed
fa member of our community
[dedication to the welfare of
fers both here and overseas"
Cfman stated. "Katzman rich-
Heserves this award for her
ership and dedication to the
Jmunity, to civic and educa-
ial institutions and programs,
to the welfare of her fellow
.csentation of the award will
nade by Dr. Irving Lehrman,
brary fellow of the Hebrew
jversily and spiritual leader of
ppU- Emanu-El. Dr. Bernard
Tick, vice president of He-
University, will be guest
kker. A Musical Interlude is
[scheduled.
atzman was formerly a
Jier in New York City. She
[active there with Red Mogen
lid. Israel Bonds, Hadassah,
I Jewish National Fund. She
helped organize and became
Helen Katzman
the first president of Sisterhood
of Congregation Adath Israel of
Newtown, Conn.
Katzman is active locally with
Hadassah, Women's American
ORT, and Technion. She is a
founder of the American Friends
of the Hebrew University, and
with her late husband, Isidor,
dedicated a room at the school.
"Growth through Education"
is the luncheon's theme. Commit-
tee members include Thelma
Anton. Gilda Davis, Sara Gould,
Stella Topol, Elizabeth Mintz,
Ida Cohen, Sonia Meisel, and
Irene Raczkowski. Florence D.
Feldman. director of the
Women's Division, is coor-
dinator.
}brew Union Prof, to Lecture on
'Economics and Jewish Survival'
Drth and South Dade Mid
Dt. a consortium of area con-
ations. Jewish Community
ers. and the Central Agency
Jewish Education, continuing
ries of speakers on the Jewish
pence, will present Dr. Ellis
kin. Adolph S. Ochs professor
Jewish History at Hebrew
bn College Jewish Insti-
of Religion in Cincinnati.
will speak on "World
kmics and Jewish Survival"
Monday. Feb. 7 at 8 p.m. at
[rogation Bet Breira and on
day evening, Feb. 8 at Tem-
Imai of North Dade.
\ Etivin, writer and historian.
' author of A Hidden Revo-
. a work on the Pharisees.
I' he Shaping of Jewish His-
|a new interpretation of the
ph experience world-wide,
fewest work. What Crucified
t will be published by
gdon Press shortly. Dr.
pn is listed in Who's Who in
|rica.
khbi Norman Lipson, director
V Institute of Jewish Studies
Untral Agency for Jewish
fation. a former student of
Dr. Ellis Rivkin
Dr. Rivkin, said "Ellis Rivkin is
one of the most exciting and
dynamic professors I have ever
had in the seminary. It pleases
me no end to know that now
everyone will get to hear and see
his dynamism and experience
firsthand the excitement his
theories and ideas create in the
classroom. The lectures will deal
with the inter-relationships, con-
flicts and harmonies of the world-
wide economic forces of Capital-
ism, Communism, and the Jews."
World's Largest'Antique Show Opens
hundred national and in-
"tional dealers will display
M^'ques, including English
rn and Early American fur-
fiSff* Cameo, Steuben,
l Belleek. Tiffany. Galle, and
Nancy glass. Lalique
'.. and more, at "The Original
' Beach Winter Antique
>VAL HUNGARIANHBRESTAUI
Now under supervision is proud to
i nrr*urce that we are now located in the
I oeautiful Sasson Hotel, 2001 Collins Ave.
Fri Dade County Commissioner
Barry Schreiber. North Miami
Beach attorney and civic leader,
has been elected president of the
American Zionist Federation of
South Florida for 1983. He suc-
ceeds Miami Beach attorney Josh
Rephun, who was elected honor-
ary president.
Schreiber is president of local
units of Zionist Revisionists,
Hemt-USA, and of the Religious
Zionist Organization of America.
He was also elected to the na-
tional board of directors of AZF
an umbrella and coordinating
agency for 1,100,000 Zionist
member families in the U.S.
Harriet Green of Miami Beach
and Coral Gables was reelected
chairman of the board of the AZF
of South Florida and also was
elected to the national board, of
which she is a former national
vice president. Green is president
of the Pioneer Women Council of
Temple Israel to Host Ferre's Special
Overtown Committee Leader
Rev. Winston Rudolph will
address Temple Israel of Greater
Miami's Committee of Concern,
newly formed in response to the
recent Overtown disturbances, at
a luncheon meeting Wednesday.
Pastor of Mt. Zion Baptist
Church, Rev. Rudolph heads a
Special Committee appointed by
Miami Mayor Maurice Ferre
investigating the disturbances.
The area is of interest to Temple
Israel because it has been a dose
and cooperative neighbor of that
black community for 55 years.
Under the direction of Rabbi
Haskell M. Bernat, who also
serves on the Special Committee,
the Committee of Concern is a
forum to discuss social issues and
to create campaigns and projects
in matters of local, national, and
international concern. Dorothy
Serotta, civic activist, chairs the
committee.
Temple Israel has worked with
its black neighbors often and
underwrote one of the country's
first Head Start programs with a
class of 15 black children. The
temple has been a meeting place
for black organizations and last
year provided space for the
Urban League following a fire in
West Miami Vets Set
Upcoming Events
West Miami Auxiliary 223,
Jewish War Veterans, will meet
Thursday at 8:15 p.m. at the
home of Thelma Potlock in
Miami.
The meeting will be chaired by
President Charlotte Mittler and
will include nominations of offi-
cers for 1983-84. a report by Shi-
ley Achtman, chairman, of an
annual donor to be held March
19. and a report by President
Mittler on a recent Department
meeting hostessed by the auxil-
iary in honor of Department
President Carol Gold.
The West Miami Post and
Auxiliary will have an Annual
Lucky Games Night on Wednes-
day. Feb. 16 at 8 p.m. at Temple
BethTov.
CTUDI0
o __*
-gOt^
lArtt
Show," scheduled for Feb. 4
through 9 at M\mi Beach Con-
vention Center.
Occupying 800 booths, the
show is acknowledged to be the
world's largest and is the succes-
sor to D. S. Clarke Show, accord-
ing to producers Lou Baron of
Miami Beach and Ray Grover of
Naples.
Ph
mi"'
'"mini
Continental
Cuisine
FRED JOS*
wel comae
you back to
hit renowned
studio
restaurant
for a untqua
dining eiperienca
Match your table to your
mood in ona of 5 individual
room*. The Tent
Wine Callar, Studio, Plaoa
Pigaiia. Swiss Cnaiet
Fine) Entertainment
at tha Piano
AIo violin playing
for your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(private Luncheons arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
' 2340 SW 32 AVE.
its offices.
Members of Mt. Zion Baptist
Church will join Temple Israel
members at the meeting, which
will also consider proliferation of
nuclear weapons.
South Florida, president of the
1 Jewish Historical Society of
South Florida, and national vice
president of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat.
South Florida's third member
on AZF's national board is
Gerald Schwartz of Kendall, as
national vice president. He also
serves as Southeastern regional
director of the American Friends
of Haifa University in Israel.
Other officers elected by the
AZF of South Florida include
Jean Feinberg of Miami Beach,
Linda Minkes of South Dade,
Seymour B. Liebman of South
Dade. Lillian Stone, and Joseph
Morley of Miami Beach, vice
presidents; Margot Bergthal of
Miami Beach, secretary-treasur-
er; and Lillian Chabner of Miami
Beach, recording secretary.
CAJE Offers Classes for Religious
Teachers Working Towards License
Central Agency for Jewish
Agency's Winter semester of
courses for its Institute of Jewish
Studies Department were recent-
ly made public. According to
Rabbi Norman Lipson, US direc-
tor, "All courses are for teachers
in religious and day schools who
are working toward licensing or
maintaining their professional
teaching status."
"In addition to teachers we are
also opening these courses up to
any adults in the general com-
munity interested in advanced
Judaica studies," he added. The
following are the locations and
courses offered beginning the
week of Feb. 7, in all parts of
Greater Miami.
Efrat Afek, on Tuesdays, for
six weeks, will teach "The His-
tory of the Land of Israel from
Biblical Times to Today," and
Rabbi David Lehrfield, on Thurs-
days, will teach "The Torah and
its Relevancy to Modern Times."
Both courses are held at Beth
Torah Congregation, North
Miami Beach.
Rabbi Mordecai Shapiro will
start a class, to go for seven ses-
sions on Mondays on "Mitzvot
Between the Man and Man
The Torah's Approach to Con-
temporary Life." It will be held
at Beth Israel Congregation.
\ Miami Beach. Dr. Howard Mes-
singer will teach "Modern Jew-
ish History: French Revolution
Through the State of Israel" for
seven sessions on Tuesdays at
Temple Beth Sholom, Miami
Beach.
In the South Dade area, start-
ing Wednesday to run for seven
sessions, Dorothy Herman, will
teach"Techniques and Strategies
for Effective Teaching" at Tem-
ple Beth Am. Efrat Afek will
teach "The History of the Land
of Israel From Biblical Times to
Today" Thursdays, for six ses-
sions, at Congregation Bet
Breira.
All classes begin at 7:30 p.m.,
with the exception of Rabbi
Shapiro's which start at 8 p.m.
Afek's classes at Beth Torah
Congregation and at Congrega-
tion Bet Breira will be conducted
in Hebrew.
Crime Seminars
Citizens' Crime Watch of Dade
County, Inc. aad AmeriFirst
Federal Savings^uid Loan will
host a third series of crime
prevention seminars featuring
guest speakers from Citizens'
Crime Watch of Dade County
and local law enforcement
agencies, beginning Monday,
Feb. 7.
-: U
THE MOST TALKED
ABOUT ISRAEL BAR/
BAT MITZVAH TOUR
IN THE COUNTRY.
Sponsored by Israel Travel Advisory Service and
Temple Israel of West Palm Beach
Featuring tit* new deluxe
Uromma Jaruiilam Motel!
February 17-27 $1.42600
March 77-April 10 $1.982 00
(Passover)
April 17-May 1 $1.882 00
June 18-July 3 $1945 00
(one extra day)
July 2-17 $2 12600
(one extra day)
August 1-15 $1 943 00
(Revisited tour
available on this date)
August 22-Sept 5 $1.94300
November 17-27 $1,426 00
December 22-Jan 1 $1.626 00
(Revisited tour available on this date)
Including
. Round trip bus to Miami Inter-
national Airport
Round trip jet flight (optional
Miami connection)
5 Star super deluxe hotels
In depth itinerary via private
deluxe motorcoach
Israeli breakfast throughout
(11 day tours)
Israeli breakfast and UNLIMITED
A LA CARTE DINNERS through-
out (16 day tours)
Optional bar/bat mitzvah on Masada
Gala Banquet (15 day tours only)
Licensed Israeli guide,
i porterage entrance lees
transfers hotel taxes
VIP receptions
Optional extensions in Israel
Egypt and or Europe
Groups designed to include
families with children of
similar aqes
Couples' buses on most tours
when traveling without children
MAY, OCTOBER NO BAR'BAT
MITZVAHS: ADULTS ONLY
Couples only
May 2-16 $1,882 00
May 16-30 $1.882 00
October 10-24 $1,893 00
(Revisited tour
available on
this date)
Add to above prices $140 00
for round trip air from Miami
Int Airport An exciting and
meaningful experience for
you and your children'
Deposit $100 00 per person
(make check to Temple Israel)
45-day cancellation provision
Mail to Temple Israel
1901 North Flagler Or
"W Paim Beach
For information call
Temple offices
622-1435-Vv Palm Beach
753-4097-Coial Springs
893-9882-N Miami Beach
< *jfce> t "' Change rc or0K*y
gov*.v-w' requ.aiKC'5


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4, 1963

Temple Zion Rabbi and Fiancee to be Btmtl
Abel Holtz, right, president and chairman of the board of Capi-
tal Bank, discusses the latest situation in the Middle East with
Israel's Ambassador to the United States, Moshe Arens. Holtz
recently met with Arens and pledged Capital Bank's continued
support of Israel's economic growth and development with the
purchase of a $1 Million Note to be used for agricultural
projects and the building of development towns and roads in
the Jewish State.
An Annual Salute to Israel on behalf of the State of Israel
Bonds Organization was held by residents of Tower 41 at which
time Abraham and Faye Cohen were honored with Israel's
Negev Award, recognizing participation in Jewish philanthrop-
ic and service organizations. The Cohens have been active in
synagogue affairs, as well as the Israel Bonds Organization and
other Jewish causes. The award was presented by Howard
Klein. Israel Bonds executive director, at left.
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"And it came to pass on the third day. when it was morning
that there were thunders and lightnings and a thick cloud upon
the mount, and the voice of a horn exceeding loud"
tExod. 19.16).
YITRO
YITRO Word reached Jethro. Moses' father-in-law, and a
priest of Midian. of what God had done for the Israelites. He
went to meet Mosto in the desert. Jethro advised Moses to ap-
point judges, in order to ease the burden of his sole leadership;
Moses should confine himself to the most difficult questions. In
the third month, the children of Israel heard the Ten Command-
ments at Mount Sinai. God's voice declared: "I am the Lord thy
God Thou shalt have no other gods before Me. Thou shall
not make unto thee a graven image Thou shalt not take the
name of the Lord thy God in vain Remember the sabbath
day. to keep it holy Honor they father and thy mother .
Thous shalt not murder Thou shalt not commit adultery .
Thou shalt not steal Thou shalt not bear false witness
against they neighbor Thou shalt not covet they neighbor's
house wife ... nor any thing that is thy neighbor's (Exodus
20 2-14).
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History ol the Jewish Heritage.'' edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir. si s. published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane. New York, fi.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.) ______
BarMitzvah
JOYCELYN BEJAR
Joycelyn Bejar, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Jose Bejar, will be
called to the Torah as a Bat Mitz-
vah Friday evening, Feb. 4 at
Temple Menorah.
The celebrant is a student in
the Temple Menorah Heh Class
and is active in Kadima. She at-
tends Nautilus Junior High
School where she is in the sev
enth grade. Joycely is an honor
student.
Mr. and Mrs. Bejar will host
the Oneg Shabbat following serv-
ices in honor of the occasion.
PETER KLEIN
Peter William Klein will be-
come a Bar Mitzvah on Feb. 5 at
Temple Emanu-El. Dr. Irving
Lehrman will officiate.
Peter is a student at Lehrman
Day School and is in the seventh
grade. He has been on the
Rabbi's Honor Roll numerous
times and is in the gifted
program at the school. Peter is
interested in science, and he en-
joys playing the piano and ice
skating.
Special guests celebrating with
Peter will include Betty Gellen.
Maria Koranyo, Laslo Smeltzer.
Ruth Aaron, and Mendel and
Anne Klein.
There will be a reception Feb. 6
at the Konover Hotel.
Brandeis Luncheon
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee, Miami
Chapter, will hold a luncheon in
the Blue Room of the Imperial
House Feb. 8 at noon honoring
Cynthia Shulman of Newton.
Mass.. national president.
Co-presidents of the chapter
are Josephine Friedman and
Helen Glazier.
Miami Beach
ERUV HOTLINE
653-0914
Call within 2 hours
before shabbos
Rabbinical Council of America
Florida Region
National Hebrew
Israeli Gift Center Inc.
Religious'Bar Mitzvah sets
CrystalGifts
1507 Washington Avenue
(3051532 2210
n Jewish FloddbiguQ
riarUa'i HtH Ctaplttt liflith-ltvish *
Ptintmd In Engliuh
WC vflflf to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
may keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world.
Enclosed please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
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te'THB JBWISM FLOKIDIAN")
P.O Beat ei-wr/i. MlewL Mart* awi
HaHlliPlfjijiei
mmmniHtoUf inmii' iuwihhwi' >-" *m.-.~^~.mm^m
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro,
Temple Zion spiritual leader, and
his fiancee, Michele Shopsin
Leatherwood. will be arueets of
honor at a special Oneg Shabbat
given by the temple following
late services, Friday. Feb. 11.
The bride-to-be's parents, who
long-time temple
congregants, are hosti
event in celebration
couple's engagement.
,n the
o|
ib
are
Ur. Shapiro, who will oftM
?L lhefe?'ues,wi"beJoinu
the pulpit by a cantor TenrjJ
Zion Choir will perform ^
Avron Smolensky, choir direcu* f
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting Time: 5:47
TEMPLEADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedmen
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Fri.. 8:15 pm
Set.. 8:30 em
Minyona
Sun.. 8 am and 5 Dm
Mon through FA. 730 am and S pm
________Sal 8 30 am and i pm
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Avenlura Blvd. Miami. Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saltzman. Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchinsky, Cantor
Frt.. 8:15 pm. Yiddish lo replace Hebrew reed-
Inge. Meeeege delivered In Yiddish.
Sal. 8:45 am
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate
Rabbi
Frt.. 8:15 pm
Sat 9 15 am ana 11:15 em
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way 2625 S W 3rd A.true
South Dade 7500 SW 120th Street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Dade Chapel
Frt.. 8 pm. Hedaaaah Shabbat.
Set.. 10 am. Junior Congregetlon Services
Corel Way Sanctuary
Set.. 8 am. Shabbat Services with Rabbi
Auorbech and Cantor Lipaon Bat MlUvah.
Suisnne Heller
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvl Adler, Cantor
Late Friday Evening Service
8 p.m.
Sebbeth Morning Sanies
Sam
Sermon at 1030
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W 12 Ave
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858 6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Frl.. 8:15 pm. Rabbi Shapiro will discuss
"A Life's Dream."
Sat 8 45 am and 5 pm
Sun.. 8 am snd Spm
Daily Mlnyan Serv 7 45 am and 5 pm
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorfinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Frl.. 8 pm
Sat.. 8 am. Leonard Relsman.
Bar MlUvah. twilight
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M B. Fl 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish. Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Conviser
Frl.. 8:15 pm. Dr. Kronish will speak on
Me recent trip to Israel.
Set.. 10 -V services
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Friday Evening. Bet MlUvah of Rebecca
Wllensky. Saturday Morning, Bar Mitzvah ol
Adam Zuckerman.
Frl.. 5 15 and 8 pm
Set. 8:30 em and 5:15 pm.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576 4000
Rabbi Solomon Schitt
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses ol Worship
Phone^ 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Ollice
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schill
TEMPLE ISRAEL Ol Greater Mum,
Miemi's Pioneer Reform Congraeation
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595 5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskell M. Bsmat
Asst. Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Salkm
Cantor Jacob G. Bornstein
Student Cantor: Rachella Nelson
Frl.. 8 pm. Downtown. Rabbi Bemal and
Norman Llpoff. "Super Shabbos XsraM
Cantor Bomalem. "The World's First ScrMme
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Relorm
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstal. Rabbi
Frt.. 8:15 pm, SsbDath Semci
Weekly Torah Portion Vitro
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534 9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
EDWARD BARON. Cantor
Frl. 7.30 pm
Sat. 8 30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
620-75th St.. Miami Beach 331*1
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat.. 9 am
TEMPLE NERTAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave..
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Frl. 8:15 pm. Sat 8 45 am
Dally morning services at 8 em.
Sunday morning services st M <"
Esnlng Servlc" t s 30 pm
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
15410 SW 75 Circle Lane
Miami. Fl. Modern Othodw
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 382-3J4J
Rabb, Speaks on Torah porton Saturday
Fri. 5 15 pm. Sabbat" Seryicei
Sat 8:30 am and 5 30 pm M.nerla
Daily Morning Minyans M 4 Ih 6 45
T.W.F 7 am -
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE22A.*
North Dado's Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932m
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrate
Fri.. 7:S0 pm. Family "JJ**^ ,
February Birthday. Sery.ce 8*W
8thOr.de Set. 10am."Miff
Toreh Portion Yltro 1X8*88 '[*
Haltareh-lselah8 1 i3.7t"
TEMPLE ZION Con,,,.?n
8000 Miller Dr. 2''"
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rbi
Mlnyan Serwee. Men Thuri '
Sabbath Eve Services 8 15 pm
Sabbath Services am
Quests Are Welcome
Friday. Femlly S^,M f^'"'****
will bless all children with *E%!Em
Rellgloua School Student Parties
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 183rd St.. N Mlem, MaeF
847 8084 Harold Wl.hn.....eu.i.^1
Franklin 0 KreuUer. teg.onel H8i ^
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW OOMOMOATgSl
Ooral Executive OfficP^F|
NW 62 Ave.. Suit. 210. M'^
33168.592-4792 R.bbL.wi.
Unman, regionali dlracw
ali


I Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
Of InterestAll AgesTeens to Adults
By ANNETTE LABOVITZ
Of Interest All Ages Teens to Adults' herewith
presents material of a religious, historical, and general educa-
tional nature. Author is Annette Labovitz, whose credentials
for writing in this field are enviable. Her soon-to-be published
volume under the imprimatur of the CAJE, 'Secrets of the
Past, Bridges to the Future,' is a Jewish history resource
book exploring the past through the mythology and tradi-
tions of the Jewish people, and chronologically arranged ac-
cording to theme.
Mrs. Labovitz served as a presenter at the Coalition for Al-
ternative to Jewish Education Conference at Oberlin College.
She is a member of the Junior-Senior High School faculty of
the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy, specializing
in Judaic studies, the Bible, and Jewish history.
A graduate of the Teacher's Institute of the Hebrew The-
ological College at Skokie, 111., Mrs. Labovitz is also a gradu-
ate of Barry University and the University of Miami.
She is married to Rabbi Eugene Labovitz, spiritual leader
of Temple Ner Tamid, Miami Beach, and they are the parents
of four children.
Events from the Jewish Past For the Month of Shevat
Shevat is the eleventh month of the Jewish calendar
[year. The symbol of the month is an overflowing pitcher
of water since most of the winter rainy season in Israel
lhas passed; the wells, cisterns, rivers, lakes are filled to
I capacity.
1 Moshe Rabaynu, Moses our teacher, began
[reviewing the entire Torah on Rosh Chodesh Shevat
|(lhe first day of the month of Shevat), in the year of his
death, forty years after the Exodus from Egypt. The
review, commonly called the Mishne Torah
llDeuteronomyl lasted exactly thirty-seven days.
1 The first Bintele Brief, a cross between letters to
the Editor and Dear Abby. which became an important
source of advice and support for Jewish immigrant
Jsettlers in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, was
(published in the Jewish Daily Forward, 1906.
2 Alexander Yannai, King of Israel, a descendant of
he Chashmonoean Maccabbees. died in the year 3688,
bout eighty years after the first Chanukah.
4 Jerusalem was proclaimed the capital of modern
Israel. 1950.
5 Moses Mendelson (1729-1786), leader of the
Haskalah (the Jewish Enlightenment Movement), in
Germany, died. 5546. His major work JERUSALEM
Ihows the non-conflict between Judaism and
rationalism.
15 Tu B'Shevat, the New Year for Trees (Jewish
Arbor Day). It is customary to eat new fruits and
glorify the seven species which are peculiar to the
vegetation of Israel: wheat, barley, grapes, figs,
pomegrantes, olives, dates.
15 Shabbat Shira (The Sabbath of Song) so called
because the Torah reading for this Sabbath contains
the Song of Thanksgiving which Moses and the Jewish
people sang after the splitting of the Red Sea and their
miraculous deliverance from the Egyptians.
21 Shabtai Karakushansky (1901-1977), author of
the first Yiddish book printed in Brazil and founder of
the first Yiddish daily newspaper in South America,
died 5737.
29 Shabbat Shekalim (The Sabbath of Shekalim).
An additional text is added to the regular Torah
reading which describes the assessment and collection
of half shekels for the upkeep of the sanctuary. The
money was collected during the month of Adar
(preceding the Passover holiday) in order that all
preparations in the Holy Temple would be complete
before the arrival of the pilgrims who came to
Jerusalem for the Passover festival. By reading this
additional text, we remind ourselves of our yearning for
the redemption of the Jewish people from exile.
Zion Wilt Thou Not Ask
Zion. wilt thou not ask if peace be with thy captives
Ihat seek thy peace that are the remnant of thy
I flocks?
from west and east, from north and south the
greeting
peace Ironi far and near, take thou from every side
|And greeting from the captive of desire, giving his
I tears like dew
pHennon, and longing to let them fall upon thine
1 hills .
u lliS life' Kabbi Yehuda Halayvi yearned to step on
We soil of Kretz Yisrael where he could pour out his soul
Mr. F where the Divne Presence dwells. He
preamed of settling in Eretz Yisrael so that he might
pa spiritual life in holy surroundings.
Lk'h' s^ndinK lhe majority of his life in exile, Rabbi
enuda Halayvi decided to undertake the very
azardous trip to Eretz Yisrael. He was sixty years old.
niinHH1 Up?" which he sailed the Mediterranean was
inrT ?lth vlolent windstorms and the sailors feared
R their lives. Rabbi Yehuda Halayvi was so confident
that his yearning for Eretz Yisrael would culminate in
his standing at the Western Wall in prayer, that he
remained calm throughout the voyage.
According to one version of the story, as soon as the
boat docked in Eretz Yisrael, Rabbi Yehuda Halayvi
started his pilgrimage up toward Jerusalem. When his
eyes beheld the gates of Jerusalem, a vision that had
filled him with burning desire for years, he became very
emotional; and upon witnessing the desolation of
Jerusalem, he tore his clothes and cried. He bent down
to kiss the holy soil, and the words of "Zion, Wilt Thou
Not Ask,"' blurted forth from the depth of his soul.
Then he proceeded to the "Kotel," (the Western Wall).
He realized that he had achieved his dreams. Rabbi
Yehuda Halayvi wrapped himself in "talk and tefillin,"
(prayer shawl and phylacteries) his hands outstretched,
touching the stones of the Holy Wall, his eyes
streaming with tears. As he was praying, an Arab
horseman, seeing a Jew expressing such intense love for
Eretz Yisrael, trampled him. He died in front of the
Western Wall. He was buried in the village of Kabul, in
the territory allotted to the tribe of Asher, in the
Galilee.
A Word Game for Children .
hll in the blanks with the Hebrew letters. You will have
a s blessing to Patriarch Isaac and his descendants.
Cut it out. Paste it on a cardboard. Decorate it.
wake it into a plaque. Fill in the Hebrew letters.
Jguwill be able to hang it on your bulletin board.
10 5 l 6 22 1 7 6 18 20 1 2 20 6 3
TT 20 2 T I if 13 le"
"^e n thi. Id: I wfll be with yet, >d
i you i
Ge*ais26:3
Mll
.
nnmasK
8 7 6 5
3 2
d : d^^b
15
14 13 12 11 10 9
nenpsay
22 21 20 f|19 18 17 f* 16
Gur Baatete Haxot Veahyeh Emchah
IVaavarechechah." (Transliteration)
Values Clarification Series
Imagine This Situation!
A golden opportunity to make peace in the Middle
East is proposed by King Hussein of Jordan who has
called upon the PLO to recognize the right of Israel to
exist. The PLO has agreed to recognize Israel for a
period of ten years in exchange for Judea, Samaria, and
Gaza (the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). The in-
tention of the PLO is the creation of an autonomous
Palestinian State.
Write a telegram to the Prime Minister of Israel in
order to communicate to him your feelings on this
subject. The telegram must be fifteen words or less.
Mail your "telegrams" to THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN. The Editors will print sample telegrams
so readers might share each other's feelings.
Play Geography
The following are famous Biblical or historical sites.
Can you locate them on the map of modern Israel?
1 Abraham made a treaty with Avimelech, King of
the Phillistines in...... (Genesis 21:31)
2 The mountain where the binding of Isaac oc-
curred on......(modern day Jerusalem).
(Genesis 22:2) (Genesis22:2)
3 The Patriarchs and Matriarchs were buried in a
four-tiered cave in...... (Genesis 23:9, 17)
4 Jacob dreamed that angels were ascending and
descending a ladder which stood on land that would
belong to his children in...... (Genesis 28:19)
5 Jacob bought a plot of land in Israel as a down
payment on the property which G-d promised his chil-
dren in...... (Genesis 33:19)
6 Our Matriarch Rachel was buried in.......
symbolic that her children would pass her grave when
they return home from exile. (Jeremiah 31: 15,16)
7 The cities of..............and......were
on Samuel, the prophet's circuit as he travelled around
teaching the Jewish people. (I Samuel 7:11, 17)
8 David hid in the desert of......when he fled
from King Saul. (I Samuel 24:1,2)
9 ......(modern day Eilat) was the southern port
for King Solomon's trading ships. (I Kings 9:26)
10 Eliyahu the prophet proved the existence of One
G-d on...... (I Kings 18:19)
11 Rabbi Akiva was buried on the outskirts of
......In modern times, the city is noted for its hot
spring baths.
12 Rabbi Moses ben Nachman (Ramban)
established a Yeshiva in......after he fled from
Christian Spain in the middle of the thirteenth century;
thus paving the way for increased settlement in the
Holy Land.
13 The mystics ascended to the heights of the
mountains of......to greet the Sabbath Queen.
14 A group of Jewish residents bought two
stretches of sand dunes in 1909 and built a garden
suburb which they called.....
15 ......Airport.
MMMH
-si hn -#! ;jaA asms mu immm '*
Irtne / fa*pri -t rwmm aiwpsm t 'ia Ha >
immm *tfMpMMM iuw -t 'aaMaw -m -t Java i


Page 20-B The Jewish FToridian Friday. February 4. 1983
Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOFROF1RTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO.imii
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
MARTYL CASSEUS.
Petitioner Husband.
and
KERLINE CASSEUS.
Respondent. Wife
TO: KERLINE CASSEUS
Rim Paul Prompt No. 13
Gonalves, Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
DUaohitJon of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In thla court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
LLOYD M ROUTMAN
ESQUIRE. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
181 Northeast 82nd Street.
Miami, Florida S81S8. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before March II. 198S:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief prayed for In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
sal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 1st day of
February. IMS.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C Moore
Aa Deputy Clark
(Circuit Court Seal)
Lloyd M Routmao. Esq.
181 N.E S3 Street
Miami. FLSSlSa
Attorney for Petitioner
February*. U.
is. a
IN THC CIRCUIT COURT f
INANDFOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORID'
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CA5IHO.IMD11
NOTICE OF ACTION
(PROPERTY)
HELEN HALPER and JOHN
E MANDABLE.
Plain Uffa.
va
MARVIN M. GREEN. TRUS-
TEE, and HARRY J. SHER-
MAN.
Defendants.
TO: Harry J. Sherman
2668 Birch wood
Chicago,
IlllnoaeOMo
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property
In Dade County. Florida:
Lot 1. in Block T. of ALTOS
DEL MAR No. 6, according to
the Plat thereof, recorded In
Plat Book 8. at page 1M. of the
Public Recorda of Dade
County. Florida; together with
the Improvements thereon and
the appurtenances thereto, and
all of the furniture, furnishings,
fixtures and equipment therein
contained,
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any, to It on HENRY M
WAITZKIN. plaintiffs' at-
torney, whose address Is 740 '
Tlst Street. Miami Beach. Flor-
ida. 83141. on or before March.
4.1983 and file the original wlUV
the clerk of thla court either be-
fore service on plaintiffs' attor
ney or immediately thereafter:
otherwise a default will be en-
tared against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on January
3T.ua.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk of The Court
By A Mlnguex
As Deputy Clark
18480 February 4,11,
is.as.isw
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 83-487
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
LESLY G. PRESSAGE.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
YANICK PRESSAGE,
Respondent-Wife.
TO: YANICK PRESSAGE
B Fairmont Avenue
Apt M3
Havers traw.
New York 10977
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dlsso
lution ol your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on'
LLOYD M ROUTMAN, ES-
QUIRE, attorney for Petition
er. whose address Is 181 North-
east 82nd Street. Miami. Flor-
ida 33138. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Feb->
ruary 18. 1983; otherwise a de-
fault will be enured against
you for the relief prayed (or the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published'
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8th day of Jan-
uary. 1883.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. Esq.
181 Northeast 82nd Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (905)757-8800
18382 January 14. 21.28:
________February 4.1883
NOTICE UNDS5R
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
"Ptsrglorgio" at 1889-1873
N.W. 79th Avenue. Miami,
Florid.. 31128. Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk ol the Circuit Court of
I ade C nty. Florida.
T/IRAI SSO PIERGIORGIO
>F FLORIDA
*418 January 28
ebruary4. 11. 18.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TNI CIRCUIT COURT OF
THC ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORI DA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 83-1338
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage ol
MARIA REDZIO MODZE-
LEWSKI
Petitioner-Wife
and
STANISLAW PIOTR
MODZELEWSKI
Respondent-Husband
TO: STANISLAW P10TR
MODZELEWSKI
117 Eckford Street
Brooklyn. New York 11222
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
HYMAN P. OALBUT. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
899 Washington Ave Miami
Beach. Florida. 33139, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before March 4, 198S; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week (or four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 27th day of
January, 19SB.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. Moore
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HYMAN P. OALBUT.
ESQUIRE
GALBUT. GALBUT A MENIN
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Florida S3139
Attorney for Petitioner
18439 February 4.11.18.38,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
MUSIC A UNICA PUBLISH-
ING (B.M.I.) at 10134 N.W 80
Avenue, Hlaleah Gardens. Fla.
33018 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
UNIMUSICA. INC.
10124 N.W 80 Ave.
Hlaleah Gardens. Fla. 33018
Maria Flores.
Administrator
558-2722
Maria Flores
Agent (or undersigned
18420 January 28:
February 4.11.18.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-484
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LAWRENCE CLARKE.
Petitioner-Husband.
and
LORN A B CLARKE.
Respondent-Wife
TO: LORNAB.CLARKE
Address*
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-i
FIED that a petition (or Dlsso-'
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a coov of vour written
defense, if any. to It on LLOYD
M. ROUTMAN. ESQUIRE, at
tomey for Petitioner, whose
address Is 181 Northeast 82nd
Street, Miami. Florida 33138.
and file the oiiglanl with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 18. 1983:
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week (or (our con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. Esq.
181 Northeast 82nd Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18383 January 14. 21.28;
February 4.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FIN) Number 83 (401
Division 84
DM RE: ESTATE OF
EFRAIN RIVERA
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of EFRAIN RIVERA,
deceased. File Number 82-8401.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler St.
Room 307, Miami. Florida
33130. The names and ad
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 28,1983.
Personal Representative:
DELIA RIVERA PEREZ
11430 N.W. 17 Avenue
Miami, Florida 33167
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative :
DELVALLE A NETSCH. P.A.
1900 S.W. 27 Avenue
Miami. Florida 33145
Telephone: (305) 445-0272
18423 January 38;
February 4.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 83-181 ftS-FC-42
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FRANCIS BAPTISTE
Petitioner
and
LUCY BAPTISTE
Respondent
NOTICE OF
ACTION
TO: LUCY BAPTISTE
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of'
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. on
ROBERT M. ZIEJA. ESQ., At-
torney (- Petitioner, 633 N.E.
167 St. N.M.B.. Fl. 33183 on or
before February 25, 1983. and
file the original with the clerk
of this court; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you. Dated: January 24. 1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Clerk
By: A Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
18417 January 28;
February 4, 11.18,1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO 83-1440
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
IVOR CLARKE.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
LOUISE E. CLARKE,
Respondent Wife
TO: LOUISE E. CLARICE
Passage Fort
St. Catherine
Jamaica W.I.
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said
petition on petitioner's attor-
ney. GEORGE T. RAMANI.
ESQ.. Suite 711. Blscayne
Building. 19 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130
and file the Original Answer or
Pleading In the Office of the
Circuit Court Clerk, on or be-
fore 25 day of February, 1983.If
you fall to do so. Judgment by
default will be taken against
you (or the relief demanded In
said petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami, Dade County, Florida,
this 13 day of January. 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER,
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
By: K SKiFRIED
Deputy Clerk
18402 January 21,28
_____________Fehniarv 4-11.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 83-180*
N RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
LUZTORRES
Petitioner-Wife
ind
ANGELTORRES
Respondent-Husband
TO: ANGELTORRES
Residence Address:
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been (lied
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq. 15490
N.W. 7th Ave. Suite 305 Miami.
Florida 33169 on or before Feb-
ruary 25. 1983 and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of this Court
either before service on Peti-
tioner's attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition.
DATED: January34.1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: V Hark ley
as Deputy Clerk
18422 January 28.
February 4.11.18.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83 1110
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
WILFREDO MUNOZ.
Petitioner Husband
and
MARIA detoe
ANGELESLUGO,
Respondent-Wife
TO: MARIA delos
ANGELES LUGO
Calle M E dif.
No. 30 Apart. 8
2nd Floor Bouelvard
Gulnes,
Havana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 101 N.W. 12th
Avenue. Miami, Florida 33138,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 13 day of Jan
nuary, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARIANO SOLE, ESQ
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33138
Telephone: (306)335-8844
Attorney (or Petitioner
18760 January 14.21. 28.
________________February 4.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 6J-4J4
Di vision 93
IN RE ESTATE OF
ALEC COLMAN a-k-a
ALEX COLMAN a-k-a
A. COLMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
ol the estate of ALEC COLMAN
a-k-a ALEX COLMAN a-k-a A.
COLMAN, deceased. File
Number 83-454 (03), Is pending
in the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
1.1 73 W Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130 The personal
representative of the estate Is
RABBI SHELDON BLANK.
whose address Is 1423 Lenox
Ave. Miami Beach. Florida
33139. The name and address of
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement ol
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis (or the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed, if the claim is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim la secured,
the security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date oi the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: January 28,1983.
Rabbi Sheldon Blank
As Personal Representative
ol the Estate of
ALEC COLMAN a-k-a
ALEX COLMAN a k-a
A. COLMAN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Joseph W. Malek
350 Lincoln Road No. 501
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (305)538-4431
18418 January 28
February 4.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO 43 -1M
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
JUAN D. GARCIA
and
ROSA JULIA GARCIA a-k-a
ROSA JULIA CORDERO
TO: ROSA JULIA GARCIA
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an acuon for iu
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
STANLEY E. GOODMAN. At-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 809 East 8 Ave .
Hlaleah. Fla. 33010. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
Feb 25, 1983; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17th day of Jan..
1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
At Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByN.A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
18403 January 21. 28
February 4.11,1983
IN TNR CIRCUIT COOS?"
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORltu
PROBATE DIVISION*
File Number 1 jM,
Division OJ
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HUGH J. CANNY. SR
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration o( n
estate of HUGH J CaNNv
SR. deceased. FileNumberJ
?89. is pending in the cirt
Court for Dad. couniT
Florida. Probate Division
address of which is t^
Root. Dade County cw
house. 73 West Flagler Sir**?
Miami. Florida 33130 Th.
names and addresses of tba
personal representative tat
the personal representative'
attorney are set forth below
All Interested persons art.
quired to (lie with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS!*
THE FIRST PUBUCAT10(
OF THIS NOTICE II, ^
claims against the estate au
(2) any objection by an S
terested person to whom notic.
was maUed that challenges On
validity of the will the quallfr
cations of the personal reprt-
sentatlve. venue or juristic
tlono( the court
ALL CLAIMS AND 0BJF.C-
TIONS NOT SO FILED Wm
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication oi this NutletDatj
begun on January 28. 193]
Personal Representative
HUGHJ CANNY. JR
1270 Plover Avenue
Miami Springs. Florida 331*4
Attorney (or Perioul|
Representative.
JOSEPH D1BARTOLOME0
ESQ
8400 Bird Road. Miami. Fiona]
33155
Telephone 226-2276
18416 Januarys
February t.lRtJ
INTHKClRCUFT COURT
FOR
DADC COUNTY. FLORID*
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 43111
Divisional
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EMIL WOLFS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The Administration ollhto
tate of emu. WOLFS. s>
ceased. File Number 83-111.
pending In the Circuit Court to
DADE County. Florid*
Probate Division, the adtos
of which Is 73 West Flarkt
Street. Miami. Florid*, Ma
The names and addresses i
the personal represent***
and the personal represent*
tlve s attorney are set (ortn be
low.
All Interested persons in n-
quired to file with this coal
WITHIN THREE MONTrBOf
THE FIRST PVBUCATIOJ
OF THIS NOTICE: 0)
claims against the esute u*
(2) any objection by n tote1
ested person to whom notW
was mailed that challenge! IK
validity of the will, the sjasl
cations of the personl repn-
sentatlve, venue, or Juris-
Uon of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WIU
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice ha
begun on February t1**
Personal Represent*""
ABRAHAM A GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florid*
Attorney for Persons!
Representative:
RICHARD J MENIN
GALBUT, GALBUT a MEM"
PA..
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florid* Sl
Telephone: 872-3100
J8437 FebruarytJiJS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT*
THE ELEVENTH JUgg*
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORID*
FAMILY DIVISION
CaseNo-IHTM
NOTICE 9V
PUBLICATION
MODESTA E. ETAY0
Petitioner
FRANCISCO ETAV0
Respondent __,._
TO: FRANCISCOETATO
63-94 Austin Strest
RegoPart.NV.il>'*
YOU ARE HEREBY W
FIED that-a Petition for u
lution of Marriage Is*
filed against you and yo>
hereby required to serve '
of your answer or other p-
tngtothePeUliononW;,
tloner Attorney. "*' |
ROGERS, whose ^Tjl
1401 N.W. 17th Avenue.**'. I
Florida 33126. "J!,,
original with I**,!
above styled Court ori'* .
this 38th day ol F
' DATED this I"" "
Clert of Circuit Court
By: K. SeKrled ,
18406 ^
Februsry "


Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 21-B
Public Notice
N IS PROPERTY)
rlr CIRCUIT COURT OF
ffivENTH JUDICIAL
(|cUIT.NANDPOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. I2-M03 FC
TION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
;RE The Marriage of
PHANIEFERNANDKB,
-"-Utloner
^.RRY DENNIS FER
KnDER,
Tak*V HENN.S FER
"RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
01 ARE HEREBY NOTI
D that an acUon for
iolution of Marriage ha
n Wed against you and you
required to serve a copy of
ur written defenses, If any. to
w STEPHEN J. POLAT-
attomey for Petitioner,
address Is 1444 BUcayne
alevard Suite 201. Miami,
ir)d 33132. and file the
jin,l with the clerk of the
}ve styled court on or before
bruary 26. IBM. otherwise a
'wit "HI be entered against
i lor the relief demanded In
complaint or peUUon.
Tils notice shall be published
t each week for four con-
utlve weeks in THE
WISH FLORIDIAN.
UTNESS my hand and the
I of said court at Miami,
rlda on this 21 day of
IUry. 11*3
RICHARD P BRINKER
AiClerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
cult Court Seal i
14 January 28
February 4.11,18,1B83
THECIRCUITCOURTOF
IE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
IRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
NO FORDADECOUNTY
Civil Action
No. 11-1424 FC
TION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
RE The marriage of
OYDJOSEPH
ODERBL'KN. husband
RTMO.
;DDERBL'RN. wife
LYNDA G
WEDDERBt KN
RESIDENCE
ADDRESS fNK.NOWN
'01 ARK HEREBY NOTI-
El) that an action (or Disso-
l of Marriage has been
(gainst you and you are
utred to serve a copy of your
ilten defenses, it any. to It on
THIKH LIPSON,attorney
Petitioner, whose address Is
) Tyler Street. Hollywood.
irida 33020, and file the orlgl
lith the clerk ol the above
led court on or before Feb-
29, 1883. otherwise a de-
It will be entered against
tor the relief demanded In
tomplalnt or petition.
VITNESS my hand and the
I of said court at Miami.
mdaon this 17 day o( Jan
ry, IBM
RICHARD P. BR1NKER
A'Clerk, Circuit Court
UadeCounty. Florida
By Clannda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
CultCourtSeali
January 21.28;
February 4. 11.1983
*22 OF ACTION
I NO PROPERTY)
"CIRCUIT COURT OP
C,RLrf,yTEN JUDICIAL
,C'RFCrU'T'NANDFOR
,AOfE"yNTV,FLOR.DA
FAMILY DIVISION
, "M NO. IJ-410
^EMARRIAGEOF
tlUoner-WlFE
WST-NADAMSON
^""Address:
MOaT. NOTIFIED that
'u hi "'""""on of
Count lh 5* clerk
** "Circuit CoUrl
2 A Hewett
MDPuty Clerk
January 14. 2128.
February 4,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Cast NO. i3-M2
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALPHA BANKS. WIFE
and
FREDDIE A. BANKS.
HUSBAND
TO: FREDDIE A. BANKS
Residence Address:
2B03 Market Street.
Apt. No. 7
Oakland.
California 84604
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action (or dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq., 15490
N.W. 7th Avenue, Suite 206,
Miami, Florida 33186 on or be-
fore February 18. 1988 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter' other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the PeUUon.
DATED: January 10, 1B83.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: C. Moore
as Deputy Clerk
18385 January 14, 21.28.
February 4.1B83
NOTICE OF
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 17.7178
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
DEBORAH LYNE RAGAN
PetlUoner Wife
and
JERKY WAYNE RAGAN
Respondent-Husband
TO: JERRY WAYNE
RAGAN-
ID. 11273
Cell Block C
Hartford County
Detention Center
1030 Rocksprlngs Ave
Bel Air. Md 21014
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
KAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la
1190 N. E. 163 Street. Miami,
Florida (Room 3151. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore February 18. 1983; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secuUve weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 11 day of Jan-
nuary. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A. Mlnguez
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
RAY FRIEDMAN. Esq.
1190 N.E 183 Street
Miami, Florida
Telephone: 949-8926
(Room 3161
Attorney for PettUoner
18398 January 14. 21. 28;
February 4.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name
UNITED ZIONIST-
REVISIONISTS OF FLORIDA.
INC.. a-k-a HERUT ZIONISTS
OF FLORIDA, at P.O. Box
390148, Miami Beach, Florida
SSI41. Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
UNITED ZIONISTS REVI-
SIONISTS
OF FLORIDA. INC.
18485 February 4.11.
18.16. 1B8 3
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name of
FIN AN CIA at 2456 Le Jeune
Road, Suite 684. Coral Gables.
Florida 8S1S4. Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
DARLENE V. SHANE
ELAINE DOYLE ROSEMOND
Attorney for FIN ANCI a
18440 February*,11.
18. 26, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83 530
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
GLADYS JIMENEZ,
PeUtloner-Wlfe.
and
JOSE JIMENEZ,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: JOSE JIMENEZ
Almacenadora Jimenez
Avenlda Pertmetral
Cumana
Estado de Sucre.
Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a peUUon for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defense, If any. to It on DAVID
I. SCHLOSBERG. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
628 N.W. 27th Avenue. Suite
100. Miami. Florida S3125. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 8 day of Jan-
uary. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. Moore
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID I. SCHLOSBERG
525 N W 27th Avenue.
Suite 100
Miami. Florida 33128
Attorney for PetlUoner
18387 January 14,21.28;
February 4, 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83 403
Division 04
IN RE : ESTATE OF
MAX ROSENSWEIG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
riie administration of the es-
tate of Max Rosenswelg. de-
ceased. File Number 83-403. Is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the person-
al representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (a) all
claims against the estate and
(2| any objection by an Inter-
ested persons to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualm
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurlsdlc
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
PubllcaUon of this NoUce has
begun on January 28.1983.
Personal RepresentaUve:
Ruth Rosenswelg
40189 Street
Miami Beach. Fla.
Attorney for Personal
RepresentaUve:
Louis H. Stall man
407 Lincoln Road.
Miami Beach. Fla.
Telephone: 632-9939
18413 January 28;
___________February 4, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name
SHERI INTERIORS at 10800
SW 126 St., Miami, Florida
33178 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Shert Hlrschfleld
18394 January 14,21. 28;
February 4.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name Cen-
tre Medico "AbalU" at 790 S.
W. 6 Ave.. Miami. Florida In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Felix OUva
Constantino Carre no
Hector Aleman
18421 January 28;
February 4.11.18.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
No. 82-71043 CA 31
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO
FORECLOSE MORTGAGE
dARNETT BANK OF SOUTH
FLORIDA. N.A.. etc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLES SCHNIER. etc.. et
at,
Defendants.
TO: CLIFFORD WAXMAN, as
Trustee
YOU. CLIFFORD
WAXMAN. as Trustee, are
hereby notified that an
Amended Complaint to fore-
close a mortgage on the follow-
ing described real property, to
wit:
Unit Nos. 602. 802. 1602, 404.
804. 708, 610, 910. 420. 520. 429.
634. 738. 836. 438. 638. 740. 1240,
644. 844, 1244, 1644, 746, 1048.
448. 648. 460. 960. 1060. 1760. 520.
429. PH-M. Cabana Nos. 10, 11,
12. 14. 15 and 16 of the Triton
Tower Condominium, ac-
cording to the Declaration of
Condominium thereof,
recorded on July 12.1979, under
Clerk's File No. 79R-196172 of
the public records of Dade
County. Florida, has been fUed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or pleading to the
Amended Complaint on Plaint-
iffs attorney. PATRICIA M.
SILVER. Attorney at Law.
Smith and Mandler, PA.. 1111
Lincoln Road Mall. 8th Floor,
Miami Beach, Florida 331S9.
and file the original Answer or
pleading In the Office of the
Clerk of this Court on or before
the 25th day of February. 1983.
If you fall to do so. Judgment
by default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In
the Amended Complaint.
This Notice shall be
published once each week for
four consecutive weeks in The
Jewish Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 12th day
of January. 1983. (Circuit Court
Seal)
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By A Mlnguez
Deputy Clerk
SMITH AND MANDLER. PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
1111 Lincoln Road. 8th Floor
Miami Beach. FL33139
Telephone: (3061673-1100
January 21. 28;
18398 February 4.11.1983.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 82-19142
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRAIACE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JALE J. POWELL.
PeUtloner-Wlfe.
and
DENNIS L POWELL,
Respondent -Husband.
TO: DENNISL POWELL
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
RICK S CULLEN. attorney for
PeUUoner, whose address Is
2271 Chestnut Court, Pembroke
Lakes. Florida 33026. and fUe
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before February 26. 1983;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this IS day of
January. 198S.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY: A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RICK S. CULLEN, ESQUIRE
2271 Chestnut Court
Pembroke Lakes, Florida 33026
Attorney for PetlUoner
18401 January 21, 28
February 4. 11 1983
1
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the flcUUous name Sun-
shine Care Center at 2467 SW.
5th St.. Miami Fla. 33136 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Owner Beatrlz M. Prado
18393 January 14,21.28;
February 4.198S
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-411
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
EDWARDW BERRI
Petitioner-husband
and
MARIA MELITINA BERRI
Respondent-wife
TO: MARIA MELITINA
BERRI
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an acUon for Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2750 N E 193rd Street. Miami.
Florida 33180, and file the orlgl
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Feb-
ruary 18. 1983; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or peUUon.
The noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary, 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. Moore
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAY FRIEDMAN. Esq.
2750 N.E. 193 Street
Miami. Florida 33180
Telephone: 949-8926
Attorney for PetlUoner
18385 January 14,21. 28;
February 4,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OK FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 87 15279 FC( 19)
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
ALIAS
IN R E: The Marriage of
OSCAR SANCHEZ.
I'etitioner.
and
CECILIA SANCHEZ,
Respondent
TO: CECILIA SANCHEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you art
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
MELVIN J ASHER. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1850 SW 8th Street.
Suite 208. Miami. Florida 33135,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
peUUon
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 7 day of Jan
nuary, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Se-Jj'.
18390 January 14.21, 28;
_ February 4,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTYI
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR DADE
COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 13-3174
IN RE The Marriage of
S ALL IE HARGRETT
PeUUoner
and
CURTIS C. HARGRETT
Respondent
TO: CURTTSC. HARGRETT
Residence address:
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
dtssoIuUon of marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on BRUCE N. CROWN. Esq.
whose address Is 16490 N.W. 7th
Ave. Suite 206 Miami, Florida
38189 on or before February 28.
1988 and file the original with
the clerk of this Court either
before service on PeUUoner's
attorney or Immediately
thereafter; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
PeUUon.
DATED: January 27. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: C.Moore
aa Deputy Clerk
184SS February 4.11.
18. 26, 198S.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No 83 1572
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
LUIS F.CHAVEZ.
Husband-PeUUoner
and
ALICIA CEPEDA DE
CHAVEZ,
Wife-Respondent
TO: ALICIA CEPEDA DE
CHAVEZ
Indlco4639. Dept 41
Gomez Carreno
Vina del Mar, CHILE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marralge has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
P.A., attorney for PetlUoner.
whose address Is 2491 N.W. 7th
Street, Miami. Florida 33126.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 25, 1983
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
peUUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17th day of Jan..
1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Cuui if ai:
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
PA.
Attorney for the Husband
2491 N.W 7th Street
Miami, Florida 33125
Attorney for PetlUoner
Telephone: (3051 649-7917
18404 January 21.28,
______________February 4.11. 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83.704
Division 0)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EDWARD P. CLORAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the en
tate of EDWARD P CLORAN.
deceased. File Number 83-706.
is pending In the Circuit Court
for DADE County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 331SO
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal representa-
Uve's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom noUce
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfi-
catlos of the personal represen-
taUve, venue, or Jurisdiction of
the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
PubllcaUon of this NoUce has
begun on January 28,198S.
Personal RepresentaUve:
HYMAN P. GALBUT
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida SS1S9
Attorney for Personal
RepresentaUve:
Abraham A. Gal but
KJALBUT, GALBUT*
1MENIN. P.A..
W99 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 872-8100
1081713 January 28;
________________February 4.1988
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FCCASE
NO. 83-3388 FC
IN RE: The Marriage of
JACQUES EVARISTE
Petitioner Husband
and
CLEANE FRANCOIS
EVARISTE
Respondent-Wife
To: CLEANE FRANCOISE
EVARISTE.
Residence unknown.
shall serve copy of your
Answer to the PeUUon for Dls-
soluUon of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attor-
ney. 812 N.W. 13th Avenue.
Miami. Florida, 33136, and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before March 4,1983. otherwise
a default will be entered.
January 28.1983
RICHARD BRINKER
Clerk
By: N. A. Hewett
DC.
184S8 February 4.11;
18.26,1983


Page 22-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, February 4, 1963

Public Notice
NOTICE Of ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT OF
THE ELE VE NTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
NO IHWFC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUT lOr,
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAG E OF
RENE BORUNET.
Petitioner Husband,
and
ENEIDA SANCHEZ
VELXZ dc BORUNET.
Respondent-Wlte.
TO: ENEIDA SANCHEZ
VELEZ de BORUNET
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution at Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
TED E. TSOUPRAKE. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress-Is 230 Miracle MUe-Sulte
222. Coral Gables. Fla 33134.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before March 11. 1983:
otherwise a default wtll be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petltlon.
Thls notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said at Miami. Florida
on this 28 day of Jannuary
MM.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC P Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal
TEDE TSOUPRAKE
220 Miracle MUe-Sulte 222
Coral Gables. Fla. 33134
Telephone: <30Gi 443-1857
Attorney for Petitioner
18429 January 28.
February 4. 11.18, 1083
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. 83-32 1
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SHEILA VELEZ RODRU '
GUEZ.
and
LUIS FEN VELEZ.
TO MR LUIS FEN VELEZ
Middlesex County Adult
Correction Center
P.O Box 268
New Brunswick. New-
Jersey 08003
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
LIEBERMAN A BENJAMIN,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address la 8800 S.W. 107th
Avenue. Suite 208. Miami,
Florida 33178, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
March 4. 1083: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this day of January
27.1083.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By V. Berkley
As Deputy Clerk
LIEBERMAN A BENJAMIN
8000 S.W. 107th Avenue Suite
208
Miami. Florida 33178
(SOB)BM-MM
Attorney far Petitioner
18433 February 4. U;
18, 28. 1083
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
Diamond Video Productions at
11027 N.E. 8th Avenue. Bin
cayne Park. Florida 33181 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Clrcultl
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Arthur David I
"Jack" Diamond
Cypen A Cypen
Attorney for Diamond
Video Productions
828 A rthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (3081582-4721
18370 January 14. 21.28:
February 4.1083
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLOttlDA
PRORATE DIVISION
File Number 83-IN
Division 81
IN RE ESTATE OF
MINNIE FAINE.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
0( the estate of MINNIE
FAINE. deceased. File Num-
ber 83-130. Division 01. Is pend-
ing In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
Is Dade County Courthouse. 73
West Flagler Street Miami.
Florida 38130. The personal
representative of the estate Is
FRANCES GETZ. whose ad-
dress is 2000 N E. 187 Drive.
North Miami Beach. FL 33170
The name and address of the
personal representatives at-
torney are set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. V.ITH1N THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PL BLICA
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim Is
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated If the claim is secured,
the security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver suf-
fic lent copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mail
one copy to each personal rep-
resentative
All p- rsons Interested in the
estate to v> horn a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion. January 28.1083.
Frances Gets
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MINNIE FAINE
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
WELLISCH AND METZGER. !
PA
Suite 200-E. 161 Almerla
Coral Gables. FL 33134
Telephone: 1308)440-7084
18438 January 28;
_______________ February4,1088
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN .
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-81*
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
OVIDIO VALDES,
Petitioner,
and
OLGA SUSAN A CORVO.
Respondent.
TO: OLGA 8USANA CORVO
Relna No. 401
EntreGervasio*
Escobar
Havana 3, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of you
written defenses, If any. to Hoi
Metvin J. Asher.Esq.. attorn*
for Petitioner, whose address l
i860 S.W. 8th Street. Suite 30t
Miami. Florida 33136. and nl<
the original with the clerk o
the above styled court on or be
fore February IS, 1983; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 7 day of Jan-
uary, 1083.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByM J Hartnetl
As Deputy Clerk
(CircuitCourt Seal)
1838S January 14. 21.28.
____________ February 4,1083
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FIN) Number 13 7t
Divide*) (M>
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HERBERT SELIG.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of HERBERT SELIG de-
ceased. File Number 83-8709. 1*
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida Probate
Division, the address of which
is 71 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida SS1S0 The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE (1) all
claims against the estate and
I3> any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 4. 1083
Personal Representative:
ROSE RUTH SELIG
18370 Collins Avenue.
BuildingC. Apartment 1318
Miami Beach. Florida 33180
HENRY NORTON. ESQUIRE
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
1301 Blscayne Building
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida33130
Telephone: 374-3116
18446 February 1. ;i imi
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83-420
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
H JOSEPH TANAKA
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of H JOSEPH TANAKA,
deceased. File Number 83-630.
Is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 W Flagler St..
Miami. Fla. 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the person-
al representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
i 3) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on February 4.1083
Personal Representative.
TARA VIRGINIA TANAKA
2107 Longvlew Drive
Tallahassee. Fla.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
DAVID BOLTON
HOGIralda Ave
Coral Gables, Fla. 38134
Telephone: 446-5088
lillT----------February* 11 HSU
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 83 3580
IN RE: The Marriage of
BARBARA GREEN.
Petitioner Wife
and
JOHN GREEN.
Respondent-Husband
TO: JOHN GREEN
Residence and mailing
address unknown
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition For
Dissolution Of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
ro required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to
said petition on petitioner's
attorney. OEOROE T.
RAMANT. ESQ., Slate 711.
Blscayne Building, 19 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 and file the Original
Answer or Pleading In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before the 4th day
of March. 1988. If you fall to do
ao, Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said petition
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County, Florida,
this 3lst day of January, lgsj
RICHARD P BRINKER,
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County, Florida
BY: C.P. COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
18442 February 4,11, 18, 26,1983
I
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF ,
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOE DADE COUNTY
Civil ActieaNe 81-Msr?
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOE DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
EXTLLON PAUL.
Petitioner Husband,
and
VTERGEPAUL,
Respondent-Wife
TO: VTERGE PAUL
34 Avenue Miller No. 84
Port-au-Prince. Halt!
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to it on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN.
ESQUIRE, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
7900 N.E. 2nd Avenue. Suite
618. Miami. FL 33138. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or
before March 11. 1983:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE
JEWISH FLO RID LAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 1st day of
February'- '"83
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC Moore
As Deoutv Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
Lloyd M Routman. Esq
7900 N.E 2nd Avenue
Suite 615
Miami FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18445 February 4.11;
_______ _______18,25.1933
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 82-1*114
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
MICHELINE McCOY
Petitioner", ife.
and
JOHNNY MACK McCOY
Petitioner-Husband
TO JOHNNY MACK McCOY
Residence unknown
YOl ARE HEREBY NOTI
RED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
Harvey D Friedman, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
420 Lincoln Road Suite 379.
Miami Beach. Fl. 33139. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 18. 1983.
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIU1 AN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary. 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Harvey D. Friedman
420 Lincoln Road Suite 379
Miami Beach. Florida 36139
Telephone (3051 531 -0391
Attorney for Petitioner
18384 January 14. 21,28:
_____ February 4,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of (a)
MARKETING ENERGY
TRANSPORTATION AL-
TERNATIVES; (b) URBAN
PLANNING MANAGEMENT:
(e) COMPUTER SOFTWARE
DEVELOPMENT; (d)
TRANSPORTATION OPERA-
TIONS at number 20310 SW 93
Ave. In the City of Miami.
Florida. Intends to register the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Dated at Dade County.
Florida, this 34 day of January.
1983.
METASYSTEMS. INC.
BY: CLARENCE MARSELLA.
President
Attorney for Applicant
JAVITS A KARP
3560 Blscayne Boulevard. Suite
504
Miami. Florida 33137-3879
1306)576-6525
18434 January 28.
__________February 4,11.18.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOE
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 83 144
Divisran (84)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX ZUCKERMANN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of MAX ZUCKER-
MANN. deceased. File Number
83-246. Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Dade County.
Florida, Probate Division, the
address) of which Is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
121 any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal rep-
resentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 28.1983
Personal Representative:
DORA PERLING
1500 Bay Road. Apt. 1833
Miami Beach. Florida 33189
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative
HENRY NORTON. ESQ
Suite 1301. 10 West Flagler
Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone 374-3116
18423 January 28;
February 4 1083
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 83-3115
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
ANNIA SOLANOCRUZ.
Petitioner-Wife
and
ISIDROCRUZ.
Husband-Respondent
TO: ISIDROCRUZ
Plcaban de Guaplles.
Qatnao)
San Jose. Costa Rica
CENTRO AMERICA
YOL ARE HEREBY NOTI
F1ED that an action for Dtsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ALBERT L CARRICARTE.
PA attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 2191 N W 7
Street. Miami. Florida 3312S
Eslades Unldos de America
i USA i. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before March
Uth. 1983. otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 1st day of Feb-
ruary. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByV Berkley
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Albert L. Carrtcarte. P.A.
2491 N W 7 Street
Miami. Florida 33126
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (308)649-7917
18448 February 4.11:
JJMA
nhr-
NOTICE UN
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
(Issuing to engage In business
under the fictitious name
ARIES ENTERPRISE DIS-
TRIBUTORS INC. at 6491 8.W.
U St. W. Miami. FL 83144
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
MARIO CORTES. President
FELICTTA CORTES.
Sec Trees
18441 February 4, 11,
18, IS. 198*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Stor-
ting Hotel Co. not Inc. at
Miami. Dade County. Florida
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Samuel M. Roener.
Gloria C. Roener
18411 January 38;
February 4. 11.18, 1988
NOTICE OF ACTlfts
CONSTRUCTIVE soli
(NOFROPERTY,1*
IMTHE CIRCUITCOuL
THE ELEVENTH JU0fTL
CIRCUIT OF FLORin.^
AND FOR DADE CflStr,
CIVIL ACT 10*'
NO. 8J.JSS4
FAMILY DIVISION
mot,coV2:.dr:H
IN RE: The Mar ruse of
MELTNA ANTOrNr.
Petitioner Wif
and
DEJANORDANTODflJ
^e*Ponar HusbtM'
TO^IUANORDANTTJB.
D"tuu 2! Apt
~Por,,u Pnnc* Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY\n
FIED that a p,^*.
Dissolution of your s_J
!n",,he,rn*dandco''2
in this court and ,/_
required to serve a coptivJ
LLOYD M RovriJ
ESQUIRE, .ttnmey ,J
Honer. whose addreti i
Northeast 83nd Street )l|L_
FL 33138, and file the cm*
with the clerk of th^J,
styled court on or be fore kti
11. 1983; otherwise i djfr
will be entered against ,
the relief prayed for k |
complaint or petition
This notice shall be pubDsj
once each k for fourn
secuUve week.. :r. the JEWB
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my handuui
seal of said court at lusjfl
Florida on this m __.,
February, 1983
RICHARD p BRIXKn
As Clerk Circuit Court
DadeCoumv Flort*
ByC Moore
AsDeputyCleri
(Circuit Court Seal.
LAW OFFICES OF
LLOYDM RolTMAN
181 Northeast *:nd St
Miami FI
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone 306 57-58)0
18443 Februaryl
ii. a

NOTICE OF ACTIO, .
CONSTRUCTIVESERVk'
(NOPR0PERTYI
IN THE CIRCUIT COUITJ
THE ELEVENTH JUDICK
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA"
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No SV*
FAMILY OIVISI0
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTM
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MAKRlAGEu?
MASILLONST FORT.
Petitiuni-r H
ad
DELIN ( R
IfJTCrU : -: FORT,
To. Dellven
Mltchl. SI Kort
to Hill
P 0 .(
Nassa iunamas
ViK \i.r HEREBY 8j
FIED thai .. petition 1*1
lution ol your Marriage I
been Bled and commrncsll
this court and > ou are res*
to serve a copy of yourwra
defenses, if any lc j
LLOYD M KOI T.MA.V I
QUIKE. attorney for Petal
er. whose add ress u Su*
Bamett Bur.k Buildinj _"
N E 2nd Avenue. Viami.rs
Ida 33138. and file Ihf onnr_
with the clerk of the >>
styled court on or before*
ruary 18. 1983. other**!1
fault will be entered N
you (or the relief prsyedrtf
the complaint or petition
This notice snail be puM
once each week for four"
secutive weeks in Uie JEW
FLORIDIAN .
WITNESS my hand u"
seal of said court al ""
Florida on this 6 day <*'
RICHARI'I BRINK**
As Clerk. CircuHCw"
Dade County. Florlsi
ByN A Hewett
AsDeputyCleri
(Circuit Court Sesl I 1
LLOYD M ROITMAN.
Suite 818.
7900 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for PetlUonw.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NA*Vj
NOTICE IS HIW,
GIVEN that the u7*hr"
desiring to engage W ws-j
under the W-J
LIBRERIAA\TLAat*
8th Street. Miami. *"
intends to register m
with the Clerk '
Court of Dade County'
JSSiSSS&,
Attorney for AVIU
PORAXION
18436 ., il
February 4. n. I''"


UNITED STATES
I DISTRICT COURT
SOUTHERN DISTRICT
W OF FLORID*
. |NADMIRALTY
f NOTICE OF ACTION
Junes, ltd.
Ka In tiff
ftuNT INTERNATIONAL
I
ffendanl
jOSE A ROLEJO.
I president
B Roblant
international Corp.
17315N.W.7h Terr.
I Miami, Florida
CARLOS ANTONINI.
I Resident Agent
I Roblant
international Corp.
nN.W. 79th Terr.
I Miami. Florida
Ol ARE HEREBY notified
Ian action for ocean freight
been filed agalnat you and
I are required to aerve a
.< of your written defenaea,
By, to It on ARTHUR ROTH.
Kitiff's attorney, whose ad-
Kj u: nil larael Discount
EBuilding 14 N.E. 1st Ave-
Miami, Florida. 3S1S2, on
Before February 18. 1983.
(Ue the original with the
L of this court either before
Kce on plaintiff's attorney
immediately thereafter;
raise a default will be en-
Id agalnat you for the relief
landed In the complaint or
lion.
ledon January Slh. 1983
Robert m march
lii Clerk of said Court
BYPamThaggard
Deputy Clerk
January 11.21. 28.
February 4. 1983___
THE CIRCUIT COORT
FOR
Ml COUNTY, FLORIDA
Iroiate division
Fill Number IJ-Ul
DIvMrMM
I ESTATE Or
hschoenbero.
notice or
administration
III persons having
la or demands
nst the above ES-
i and all other
Ions interested in
estate
I are hereby noti-
that the administration
lie estate of RUTH
IenberG. deceased.
lumber 13-131. Division
pending In the Circuit
for Dade County.
la. Probate Division, the
si of which Is 73 West
Ir Street. Miami, Florida
1 The personal rep-
stives of the estate Is
LAY H SHERMAN and
US BEEKMAN. whose
uei are 1087 Lakehouse
Saraaola. Florida 33581.
lW34 Stonehaven Rd..
1 Lakes. Florida 33014.
lively The name and
of the personal rep-
stive's attorney are set
...
Bersuns having claims or
> against the estate are
d. WITHIN THRKE
JJS FROM THE DATE
HE FIRST 1'IBLICA-
|0F THIS NOTICE, to file
|W* clerk of the above
a written sutement of
aim or demand they may
Esch claim must be In
m and must indicate the
I*"' the claim, ihe name
wen of the crtdltor or
M or attorney, and the
m claimed If the claim Is
|" due. the date when It
become due shall be
P- the claim la contln-
|r unliquidated, the na-
if We uncertainty shall be
W" the claim Is secured
|f"ty shall be described
Pa'mant shall deliver auf-
| copies of the cla,m to the
|nable the clerk to mail
|uUveeaCh P*0""1 re"
fZMn' '^rested in the
I .J^tatatration ha.
llv t *" rJ"'red.
rURSSa MON
* 'ME DATE OF THK
feuArN
r "-". to file any ob-
li.?th.m*rhttve ,h<
PM the validity of the
l0B^r^,SA DEMANDS.
V *ILL BE FOREVER
P^y H.Sherman
' and
Obituaries
-"'present
fe-4'
raasasf
'ebruary 4, igaj
KANTOR, Prances. Blasberg
RICE. Fannie. 89. Miami Beach.
January 38. Rubin Zllbert
SCHNEIDERMAN, Joseph. 82, Miami
Beach, January 28. Rubin-Zllbert.
SIEGEL, Samuel B., 80. Miami Beach.
January 28. Riverside.
VISNICK, Samuel, 72, Miami. January
27 Menorah
WOLFS, EmU, January 27. Rubin-
Zllbert.
ALLER. Tanla, 83. North Miami Beach.
January 27. Levitt Welnateln
BERLIN. Fanny. January 28. Blasberg
fJAi.PERlN, Fannie. January 27
Kubln-ZUbert. Mt. Nebo.
KAPLAN. Pauline. 79. Miami. January
IT. Gordon
MARLIS. Emanuel. 84. North Miami
Beach. January 28. Riverside.
MATTISON, Syd Ruth. January 27.
Blasberg.
SADOCK. Jamea Q., 74, Miami Beach,
January 27. Riverside.
SISKIN. Birdie. 88, North Miami Beach.
January 27. Riverside.
STRONGIN, Herman. 78. North Miami
Beach. January 27, Menorah.
ROSSMAN. Harry. February 5. Miami
Beach Public Library.
DURCHSLAG, Florence. 87, Bay Har-
. bor Island. January 28. Levitt-Weln-
ateln.
Friday, February 4,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 23-B
S UMortlmCe" of Miami Shore, passed MUUIW HOTOWitZ
away January 29. He waa a resident
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No ail soil
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
1>IANN McCAMMON.
WIFE
and
LARRY S. McCAMMON,
HUSBAND
TO: LARRY S. McCAMMON
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
BRUCE N. CROWN, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1M0O NW 7 Avenue. Suite 205.
Miami. FL 33169 and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
March 4. 1983. otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this M day of Jan-
uary. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A Mlngues
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
BRUCE A CROWN, ESQ.
Attorney for wife
15490 NW 7 Avenue
Suite 208
Miami. FL 33188
Telephone: SH7-3900
Attorney for Petitioner
18428 January 28.
________KsssTEEO *- P-lg- '***
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. U llei
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: GUSTAVO A. RIN-
CON.
and
MARIA M. PILLIGUA.
TO: MARIA M. PILLIGUA
UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It
on. attorney for Petitioner.
MARIANO SOLE. ESQ. A.
KOSS, ATTORNEY AT LAW,
PA. whose sddress Is 101 N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami, Florida
33128. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before March 4,
19SS; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this day of January
27,1988.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
MARIANO SOLE. ESQ.
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW. P.A.
101 N W 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 88128
(800)820-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
18484 February 4.11;
18.26. its*
STEIN
Stanley G.. 71. an Insurance salesman
for Prudential Life Insurance Company,
passed away January 28. He had been a
realdent of Miami for the past 36 years,
coming from Bayonne, N.J He was a
veteran of WWII and a member of JWV
He Is survived by wife, Lena; daughter,
Carol Harris; sister. Irma Lucas: and
granddaughter. Jody Harris Services
were held January 30. Interment was at
Star of David Cemetery.
BERLIN
Fanny, died January 26. She la survived
by a daughter. Gladys Oppenhelm; two
grandchildren. Shelly and Michael. She
waa the widow of Irving Berlin and co-
founder of Irving Berlin Men's Shops In
South Florida. Graveside service was
held January 28 under the direction of
Blasberg Chapels.
ROSEN
A.A. (Joe). 82. a resident of the Miami
area for the past 88 years, passed away.
He was a member of Homestead Jewish
Center and a Mason. He waa the
husband of Minnie; father of Robert of
Baltimore, Leonard of Lets Vegas, and
EUle McCullough of Miami; grand-
father of seven; and great-grandfather
of one. Services were held February 1 at
Riverside Chapel. Interment followed at
Mt Nebo Cemetery.
SHUBIN
Sophy, 81, of Miami Beach, passed away
January 20. She had been a resident
here for 42 years. She Is survived by a
son and daughter-in-law. Arnold and
Lillian Scher. Services were held
January 81 at Temple Israel. Riverside
waa In charge of arrangements.
HOROWITZ
Minnie. Beloved wife of Harry; dear
mother of Arthur (Bunny I. Herbert, and
Marilyn Bile (Dr. Martin), all of
Miami; adored grandmother of Jeffrey,
Steven, and James Horowltt, and
Kenny (Helens) Belle; great-grand-
mother of Jennifer and Michael Belle.
Services were held January 27 at River-
side Chapel. Interment Lakeside Me-
morial Park. Contributions may be
made to the Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration.
LIEIERMAN
Arthur. 71. a realdent of Miami for the
past 86 years, died. He was a member of
Police Benevolent Association. Ha was
the husband of Mona; father of Dr.
Eleanor Levlne of Miami; grandfather
of Jerry and Randy Levlne; great-
grandfather of Heather and Shane; and
brother of Joseph of North Miami Beach
and Lillian Sherman of North Miami
Beach. Riverside waa In charge of ar-
rangements.
LIOHT
Sydney I, 87, of North Miami, a realdent
here for 28 years, originally of NY.,
passed way. He was formerly In the
printing business In N.Y. He was the
husband of Rose; father of Sol. Dr. Da-
vid. Doris Frants. and Adele Frankel;
grandfather of six; and great-grand-
father of two. He waa a Shrlner. 32nd
Degree Mason, and a member of Mar-
shall Lodge FAAM of N.Y. and the Key-
stone Homeowners Association. Serv-
ices were held January SO at Rubln-Zll-
bert.
RUDNICK
Ruth, a resident of Miami Beach for the
past 22 years, passed away. She waa a
member of Hadassah and the Cancer
League. She was the mother of Herbert
of NYC. Stanley of Miami Beach, and
Adeline Powell of NYC; grandmother of
four: great-grandmother of four; and
sister of Saul Tomberg of Miami Beach
and Sylvia Tanenbaum of NYC. Serv-
ices were held January SO at Riverside.
ADELSON. Max. Blasberg
BASS. Herman. Romont Gardens.
Levttt-Welnstein.
BERGER. Lewis. 60. Miami, January
80.
COHEN. Jean. North Miami Beach.
Levltt-Welnsteln.
FINKELSTEIN. Viola A., 88. Mt. Nebo.
GINSBURG. Harry. Blasberg.
KNOBLER. Ralph. 66. North Miami.
February 2. Levltt-Welnsteln.
KORNFELD. Jacob. Blasberg.
PALL.E8. Gertrude, 70. Chicago.
February 2. Levltt-Welnsteln.
SAILOFSKY. Sybil Sarah. Blasberg.
BURSON, Sam. 82. North Miami Beach.
January 27. Levltt-Welnsteln.
COHEN. Rubin. Miami Beach. January
SO. Huhln Zllbert Star of David.
LEWIS. Lou. 60. Miami Beach, January
80.
here since 1988. coming from Atlantic
City, N.J. He is survived by a wife.
Rose. He was a power boat racer and
won numerous world competitive
records. In 1938, he won the Duke of
York Torphy for the U.S. at Torquay.
England with Emancipator VII and waa
selected outstanding driver of the year.
Services were held January 81 at River-
side. Interment followed at Mt. Nebo
Cemetery.
PHILLIPS
Iris. 67. of North Miami Beach, died
January 28. She had made her home In
Miami for the past 30 years. She Is sur-
vived by a brother, Leslie of Los
Angeles; an aunt. Johanna Hermanns of
North Miami Beach; and a cousin.
Susan Cohen of Miami. Graveside serv-
ices were held January SO under the
direction of Gordon Funeral Home.
NELSON
Shepard N., of Miami, passed away. He
was the son of Lillian and brother of
Judith Drucker, Ted. and Don.
Graveside services were held. Rubin-
Zllbert waa In charge of arrangements
Minnie Horowitz, mother of
Arthur Horowitz, restaurateur,
died. Services were held January
27 at Riverside Chapel.
She was the wife of Harry;
mother of Herbert. Marilyn Belle,
and Arthur: grandmother of four,
and great-grandmother of two.
WALLACK, Ian. 66. Pembroke Pines
January 31 Riverside.
WEINSTEIN. Harry. North Mian
Beach.
HELD. Ema. Miami Beach. Rubln-Zll
bert
JOSEPH. Sarah. Miami Beach. Rubin
Zllbert.
KATZIN. -Edwin Eugene. 66. North
Miami Beach. January 80. Levitt
Welnsteln
KLEIN. Fannie. Miami Beach. Rubin
Zllbert
LeBOYER. Abraham, Miami Beach
Rubin Zllbert
LIEBSON. Sonla, 94. January 24. River
side.
BUDARIN, Ruth. 81. January 26.

ORTHODOXREFORMCONSERVATIVE
IKE GORDON, F.D.-JAMES B.GORDON FD
HARVEY GORDON, F.D.
FAMILY OWNED l OPERATED 858-5566
MO fW 12 Am
Through years of dedica ted service. '
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
isfmmtma Sonera/ wna/ie/
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN-
LARRIES. BLASBERG MICHAEL C. BLASBERG
Funeral Director
Pssl President Jewish Funeral
Directors ol America
? SEVENTY- FIRST STREET
Funeral Director
865-2353 miami beach, flqrioa mmi
/"
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
18840 West Dixie Hwy
Keptesented uy 3 levin, t u.
New Yorkrl.'l.'l 263-7MX)Queens Blvd c. 76th Rcl Forest Hrlls. N Y
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL $
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Three Generations of our
Family Serving You in
Dade th* omy Broward
Miami Beach Gu.rrantMd Hallandate
1701 Alton Road Pre-Arr.ngem.nt. 100 S. Dixie Hwy.
538-6371 No Money In Advance 456-401 1


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. A
V4
February 1983
This Sunday
undreds of thousands of Jews
will be counting on you.
In Israel. In Greater Miami.
Throughout the World.
ON SUPER SUNDAY
BE THERE.
-19
. HMMBBW
Supplement to the Jewish Floridian. Section C. February 4,1963


Page 2
Federation, February. 1983
Contents
SUPER SUNDAY
PAGE 3
This Sunday, the Greater Miami Jewish community will mobilize on
behalf of Jews in need everywhere.
CAMPAIGN/MJHHA PAGE 4
General Campaign Chairman Aaron Podhurst reports on the progress
ofthel983CJA-IEF.
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged coordinates an in-
novative program of community care for the elderly.
CAMPAIGN
PAGE 5
U.S. Senator Frank R. Lautenberg will address the annual Aven-
tura/Turnberry Isle Cocktail Reception on February 9.
Federation Missions offer unique opportunities to view Israel.
February 4-5 has been declared as CJA-IEF Shabbat by the Rab-
binical Association of Greater Miami.
SPECIAL IEF
PAGE 6
The Special Israel Emergency Fund meets the social service needs of
thousands of Jews in Israel.
HOLOCAUST MEMORIAL
CENTER PAGE 7
A display depicting the horrors of Auschwitz will be appearing in
several South Florida locations.
A local delegation is being formed to attend the upcoming American
Gathering of Holocaust Survivors.
TELEVISION/JEWISH HIGH
SCHOOL/JVS PAGES 8&9
The Winds of War" will provide a detailed view of the rise of Nazi
Germany before the Holocaust.
Students of the Jewish High School of South Florida learn in a unique
computer program.
Middle class unemployment is a growing phenomenon to which the
Jewish Vocational Service responds.
JCCs
PAGE 10
The Jewish Community Centers of South Florida offer camp
programs for local youngsters.
Israel 35 will celebrate Israel Independence Day. providing diverse
programs in North and South Dade.
CAMPAIGN
PAGE 11
Former Vice President Walter Mondale will address the annual West-
view Federation Dinner.
The New Gifts Program initiates new involvement in the 1983 CJA-
IEF Campaign from within the Jewish community.
WOMEN'S DIVISION
PAGE 12
Sandi Miot climbs through the leadership, exemplifying community
spirit and sensitivity to the needs of the Jewish people.
Patrons, sponsors and donors are invited to attend a special luncheon
at the Four Ambassadors Hotel.
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Fiorldlan supplement
February^ 1983 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
president
Norman H. Upoff
Executive vice President
Myron J. Brodle
Chairman, PuWk Relations committee
EUTimoner
SOUTH DADE/
PROJECT RENEWAL
PAGE 13
Actor Michael Moriarty will address the annual South Dade Cocktail
Reception.
Project Renewal offers hope for the impoverished Israeli settlement
town of Or Akiva.
FOUNDATION PAGE 14
A guide to the creation and benefits of Personal Philanthropic Fun s.
its assets by M
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies increases
million.
CALENDAR
PAGE 15


Federation. February. 1983
Cclcbiiti^sjoiM^uper^iiMdajdBrog
Page 3
ram
A Day for Unified
m mi t men t and Action
~*-\
ose Ferrer
Congressman William Lehman
Prominent celebrities, politicians and community lead-
's will be joining 3,000 volunteers this Sunday Super
bday as they seek the support and commitment of the
reater Miami Jewish community on behalf of the 1983
ombined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
fetor Jose Ferrer, Senator Lawton Chiles
I Congressman William Lehman will be
png the prominent personalities dedicating
V time to aid more than 50 human service
ncies in Israel, in Greater Miami and
Dughout the world.
[The number of individuals expressing
m-interest in Super Sunday participation
* been unprecedented,*' said 1983 CJA-IEF
"? amPaign Chairman Aaron
imrst. "The Jewish community is cer-
wy sensitized to our goals of providing
m social services for Jews in need world-
* We anticipate a record-breaking
IPonse to our calls this Super Sunday, as
members of this Jewish community
m the critical challenges facing us this
)Sl ? Jewish community's moat
ticinBnLagencie^ and organizations have
ES fi m th,e coordination of Super
fdriL STf Sunday Chairmen Lydia
P 8. Frances B. Levev David
rsv?Genud k- sSstuSSd
ritr^Jk ^repre8ented the communal
'usea by the program.
&SH ItlZen8- concerns vide? fh?n Pure^nt the Smutof ^rvicee
Rfifl&iS1! Combii Jewish Ap-
K of he .^ Iwael Emergency Fund.
RH" ^organizations they
FS?A their I** at the
6t mSiS K^at TemPle Israel f
"Super Sunday is an occasion to come
together as one community, with common
goals and commitments," Pod hurst said. "It
is a day on which we put our ideals to work.
We turn our dreams into action. When a
Super Sunday volunteers calls you, or when
you call us, make your maximum possible gift
to the 1983 campaign.
"This Sunday is the time to act. It is the
time to do your utmost for Jews everywhere
who are counting on you. Together we must
BE THERE."
Senator Lawton Chiles
Aaron Podhurst
[plunt
aum ii,nS ,Dade County, urging
*Sb2SE for S* 1983 CampaigZ
"^ JSZchSS-' 673-7333*
Federation Young Adult Division Super Sunday coordinators Susan Sirotta and Deborah Oltchick. and
Super Sunday Chairman Gerald K. Schwartz.


Page 4
Federation. February. 1983
Message from
Campaign
Chairman
Aaron
Podhurst
The 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign is
setting new levels of achievement, as a
result of the generosity and commitment
of the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity. Thus far. we have raised more
than $12 million to ease the plight of our
fellow Jews in Israel, in Greater Miami
and throughout the world.
This amount represents $10.13 million
pledged to the Regular Campaign and
$1.9 million to the Special Israel
Emergency Fund. The overall campaign
is 36 percent ahead of the 1982 pace,
which breaks down to a 15 percent rise in
the Regular Campaign and a 21 percent
increase from the Special IEF.
SUPER SUNDAY: On Sunday.
February 6. we will be reaching out to
60.000 households throughout Greater
Miami on behalf of the 1983 CJA-IEF.
We will be asking our fellow Jews to
search their hearts and their consciences,
and support Jews in need now more than
ever. We will be asking them to BE
THERE to help ensure a strong Jewish
future at home and abroad.
If you have not already made your gift
to the 1983 CJA-IEF Campaign. I urge
you to do so now. And please be as
generous as possible so that we may
respond effectively to the many new
crises facing Jews everywhere.
If you have already made your gift,
please help us in reaching out to this
Jewish community.
HIGH RISE DIVISION: In January,
we kicked off our campaign in many of
the high rise buildings throughout
Greater Miami. Numerous other high
rise events are scheduled for the month
of February, offering interesting
programs, opportunities to meet other
members of our Jewish community and
chances to take part in our vital 1983
Campaign. These upcoming events are
listed in the calendar on Page 15 of this
publication. BE THERE. And bring a
friend.
TRADES DIVISION Physicians,
dentists, builders, realtors, merchants,
attorneys, accountants and many other
professionals in Greater Miami have
been taking part in the campaign
through our many trades division. A
number of events geared to particular
professional groups will be presented
during upcoming weeks. Please refer to
the calendar on Page 15 for programs of
interest to you, which will introduce you
to many of the most prominent
professionals in Dade County.
VOLUNTEERS Our many
divisions and events are dependent on
the dedication of local leaders who give
their time and energies to make the
campaign a success. Your involvement
can make a difference in the success
achieved by our programs. If you are
interested in being a part of the 1983
CJA-IEF drive, please call Federation at
576-4000.
The results of the 1983 CJA-IEF Cam-
paign depend on you. Your gift and
involvement will help us to aid thous-
ands of Jews at home and abroad. They
are counting on us. They are depending
on you. Join in our efforts to BE
THERE.
JSTew Program
Offers Kcw Hope
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged has been selected as one of 10 sites
in the United States to provide a new
program offering community-based care for
senior citizens who might otherwise require
nursing home facilities.
The program, known as Channeling, was
initiated in mid-1982 and currently provides
services for 181 clients, with an active case-
load capacity of 450 clients. It is receiving 60
percent funding from Medicare and 40 percent
from the Florida Department of Health and
Rehabilitative Services.
The goal of this new program is to deter-
mine whether one agency, like the MJHHA,
can coordinate community-based services to
meet the needs of elderly clients, while main-
taining cost-effective methods of service pro-
vision. Funding is available to support this
program through 1984 and results of individ-
ual cases are being tabulated by Mathmatica
Policy Research of Princeton, N.J.
"Channeling is an enormously gratifying
project and we're thrilled to be instrumental
in determining national policies while at the
same time helping hundreds of elderly in our
community,*" said Barbara Brodbar. project
director.
The Channeling program is open to all
residents of the cities of Miami, Bay Harbor
Island. Bal Harbor, North Bay Village. Surf-
side and Miami Beach who are 65 years old or
older, and provides personalized packages of
services tailored to meet the needs of each
client. Referrals into Channeling are made by
health or social service professionals or family
members whose analyses of clients indicate
that community-based services would be both
sufficient and warranted.
Another advantage of the Channeling
program is the total absence of income
eligibility restrictions. A sliding scale of
payments is available for those earning more
than $700 per month. Those earning less than
$700 per month receive services at no cost.
Although the program is geared to provide a
wide range of services which might otherwise
require institutionalization, it is targeted to
spend an average of 60 percent of the amount
that would be charged for nursing home care.
Once accepted into the program, each client
is assigned to a caseworker who analyses in-
dividual needs and determines the types of
services required. Among the services readily
available to clients are adult day care, in-
home care services, mental health services,
transportation, housing assistance, adult
foster care, and adaptive and assistive equip-
ment programs. Other types of services can
also be made available to clients, dependent
on each determination of particular need and
cost effectiveness.
Brodbar explained that one aspect of the
Channeling
A program to provide
more care at less cost
for the elderly
in need.
program that will prove to be particularly
interesting is the documentation of new needs
expressed by Channeling clients. She said the
results of the overall program will allot
agencies nationwide to turn service care
statistics away from the dominance of nur-
sing home care, allowing senior citizens to
remain at home and within the community.
She emphasized that those applicants not
accepted into the program also play a signi-
ficant role in the research aspect because their
needs and situations are tabulated into the
overall study, and will have an impact on the
future provision of community-based care.
"We are particularly proud of the fact that
the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged is the only non-government agency in
the United States providing a full Channeling
program." said Fred D. Hirt, executive
director of MJHHA. "It allows us the op
port unity to provide a new dimension of pro-
gramming that will be the wave of the future
for the elderly of our community."
Health or social service professionals or
family members who wish to refer Channeling
clients are encouraged to call 545-5667.
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged is a member of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's family of agencies and a
beneficiary of the Combined Jewish Appeal
Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
KRrtt=S2BBfflSsSSKS=g ~*-"-


Federation, February, 1983
Page 5
AvcriiJiira Tni-iil*
The Hon. Frank R. Lautenberg, U.S.
senator from the State of New Jersey and
former general chairman of National UJA,
will deliver the keynote address at the annual
Aventura-Tumberry Isle Cocktail Reception
on behalf of the 1983 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, to be held on
Wednesday, Feb. 9 at 4 p.m. in the Garden
Room of the Turnberry Isle Country Club.
Lautenberg was elected to his Senate post
in November 1982, after entering the race as a
virtual unknown. He conducted his uphill
campaign against nationally known Con-
gresswoman Millicent Fenwick, in a contest
that made headlines throughout the country.
The senator is president and founder of
Automated Data Processing, Inc., the largest
data processing service in the world.
In 1975 and 1976, Lautenberg served as
general chairman of the National United Jew-
ish Appeal. During his tenure in that
position, he initiated active liaisons with
community leaders around the country,
to Hear Lautenberg
Senator Frank R. Lautenberg
visited Israel frequently for top-level leader-
ship consultation and participated in the work
of the Jewish Agency.
"In a world unconcerned with decency and
common respect for humanity, for us to de-
monstrate our solidarity with the people of
Israel is to bear witness to the eternity of the
Jewish people," he said.
Lautenberg is an honorary president of the
Hebrew University and established the
Lautenberg Center for General and Tumor
Immunology at the university's Medical
School. He also has served on the Board of
Governors of the American Jewish Commit-
tee.
Jack Bellock is serving as chairman of the
Ayentura-Turnberry Isle Cocktail Reception,
with Joseph Bowman serving as Aventura
chairman and Arnold R. Meyer chairing for
Turnberry Isle.
For more information about this event, call
Irving Kalman at Federation, 576-4000,
extension 216.
Experience Israel as Never Before
An integral part of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund campaign,
the greater Miami Jewish Federation's in-
novative missions program offers persons
the opportunity to see Israel and other foreign
pinds in a manner far more meaningful than
ny regular tour.
As an ordinary tourist, one only sees the
bights and places at which the sightseeing bus
btops. But on a Federation mission you have
special chance to explore places and meet
ople that most tourists never see. A
IA-I i:r Shabbat
The Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami has declared February 4 and 5 to be
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Shabbat. According to Rabbinical
Association President Rabbi Barry
Tabachnikoff, spiritual leader of
Congregation Bet Breira, the special Shabbat
has been planned to coincide with Super
aunday on February 6.
On Super Sunday, over 3,000 volunteers
irom the Greater Miami Jewish community
win telephone more than 60.000 Jewish
households in Dade County to enlist their
support for the 1983 CJA-IEF. The campaign
supports social service programs in Greater
wiami, in Israel and in Jewish communities
I wound the world.
r JiC Shabbat is Part of a national program,
Sa1*1 U,ndLer the "* of the United
Jewsh Appeal, honoring the UJA on its 44th
ZZT2- nTh\ UJA reCeiveS its fund8
wough the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign.
ur2ntS ye&T' *hen world Jewrv is faced by
rabSSf?i lt -is ^Pocially important that
o e,ni C lhe time durin Shab*>at services
**? h\nefds of the CJA-IEF cam-
Is SJ? ^J^0" said- "The People of
tCLn, tCed^,th economic crisfc that
Snrn^ ^ f the nation'8 80ciaJ
wmmunT^T8- In our own Greater Miami
Itrvintr?!, huma.n service agencies are
its n$0Pt 58 P^ing lists of needy
Cmun^v Shrmkin8 federal grants. The
|toS&mu? Unite m a 8how of solidarity
|Je^eveSwSere"Pand OUr effrtS to a88ist
remdUo^M'^eraat, spiritual leader of
l^airman "3 /uGreater Miami and national
hbScCaL ,C ^ted Jewi8h Appeal
pSSiiiSS??^ Rab,bi RaJPh Km<$ey.
fd nat onf T!mple Sinai of North ade
Wthatthi,000^8101 of the Shabbat,
NnSS, to kS ft0 !eventh "Shabbat
CJA-IEF to hlbhght the importance of the
Federation mission is an absorbing, intimate
immersion into the contemporary reality of
life in Israel.
"When you take people on a mission, they
see the wonders, the problems and the pluses
of Israel," said Marcy Left on. who co-chaired
Federation's Community Mission to
Czechoslovakia and Israel this past fall.
'Nothing tells the story of Israel better than
a mission. Until you understand and see the
dreams, you can't understand the reality. It
gives you quite a perspective of Jewish
history."
Mission participants meet with top Israeli
government officials and enjoy home
hospitality during part of their trips. These
mission aspects provide an inside look at the
people of Israel, their concerns and their lives.
Many missionaries have traveled to Israel
before, but return from their missions
commenting about new sites and perspectives
they experienced. Others visit Israel for the
first time on missions and come away with
unique introductions and experiences in the
Jewish State.
Special missions have been arranged for
professional groups, community leaders,
young adults and general groupings of in-
dividuals. Each is uniquely geared to meet
the interests and needs of the participants in a
manner that has proved to be both enjoyable
and memorable. Upcoming trips include the
"Yachad" Young Leadership Mission from
April 10 through April 20, and the Family
Mission scheduled for July 28 through
August 11.
For more information about missions, call
Joan Scheinerat Federation, 576-4000.
Be there
fbr'BeThere!
Be there in spirit with the
people of Israel on Super
Sunday, February 6th.
Join host Robert Klein this
Sunday at 11:30 A.M. on
VVCKT-South Florida's 7
for a fascinating look at the
people of Israel.
Be There.' A film
presented by WCKT -
South Florida's 7 and the
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation.
@


Page 6
Federation. February, 1983
The House with a Heart
ByL. E.EZER
Rafi is 30 inches tall He lies on his bed
almost motiomess most of tne day. A slight
rolling of his head or the fluttering of his
hands are the only signs of life he display?
Rafi suffers from brain atrophy, cerebral
palsy, profound mental retardation and
blindness. He is eighteen years old.
Benny looks up uncomprehendingly at the
visitors" who have entered the Hattena Day
Care Center for Severely Retarded Children in
Jerusalem. He shuffles from room to room
seemingly oblivious of what is going on about
him. Benny, aged 12, is severely retarded and
orthopedically impaired.
Every morning at 8:00 a.m. a sad
procession enters the Hattene Center: fathers
and-or mothers bringing (in some cases
carrying) their severely retarded children,
many of whom suffer from multiple han-
dicaps. Their ages range from one year to
eighteen. They will spend the next seven
hours in the center where a devoted staff of
twenty care for the 42 children, teaching them
how to eat, how to swallow their food, how to
bathe, how to use the toilet, how to dress
themselves, and how to relate to their peers.
Five of the staff come from the U.S.
The center is administered by AKIM, the
Association of Parents of Retarded Children.
It is aided by SHEKEL, the Association of
Services for Handicapped Children and the
Retarded, which funds the center's dental
care, eye examinations, in-service training for
teachers aids, teacher training and coun-
selling for parents. SHEKEL in turn is
supported by the Joint Distribution Com-
mittee in Israel.
"The birth of a defective child almost
always causes a trauma to its family," notes
Curt Arnson, the director of the Center. "We
try to persuade the parents to keep the child,
rather than have him committed to an in-
stitution. Interdisciplinary teams consisting
of teachers, psychologists, speech, hearing
and occupational therapists, and social
workers work with both parents and children,
trying to enable them to cope with the
handicaDS and get the child to function within
the limits of his capabilities."
The average IQ of the Hattene Children is
below 30. Most were born handicapped, but
others became so as a result of illness or
accident, lincluding auto- -bile accidentsi.
Manv of the youngsters are from new im-
migrant families who brought their han-
dicapped children with them.
In almost all cases.- notes Arnson. "we
accept children no other institution will take.
We involve the parents in caring for the child,
and. wherever possible, work with siblings
The strain of caring for a handicapped child
can often break a family, hence the need to
show the parents and family how to adjust to
what appears to be an impossible situation."
Most children who are admitted to thi
center will spend their childhood ana
adolescence there, and will go on to live-in
institutions. Some can be taught a vocation
entailing few skills, and can be employed in
sheltered workshops.
"Almost all of the voune children we admit
still wear diapers." adds Arnson. "With
patience most of them can be toilet trained.
Unfortunately, some ailments are
progressive: spastics tend to become worse,
as do those suffering from muscular distrophy
or brain atrophy."
The Hattena center has an annual budget
of $200,000. Arnson ticked off the ex-
penses: to maintain a child in the center costs
2.300 shekels per month (about $380) which
includes salaries, administrative costs, and
transportation for children whose parents
cannot bring them (the center has 3
minibuses, and transportation alone costs
$40,000 each year). Some $8.000-$10.000 a
year are required to replace broken or worn
out equipment.
"$380 per month to care for each child in
the Hattene center is not large when one
considers the fact that care for a child in a
live-in institution, if corresponding services
were offered, would range from $500 to $2,000
per month." notes Arnson.
Each child receives three meals daily at the
center, which saves considerable costs ^
even more strain to their families "Ij tne
children were not brought to Hatt
observes Arnson. "many would be left toli
neglected in some comer of the hoi
The Ministries of Health, Education. Laoor
and Social Welfare and AKIM heip cover
most of the budget. About one-third of the
funds is derived from private contributions.
The families of the handicapped pay t
graduated fee .depending on their income.
Over half of the families receive welfare
payments.
Because of the urgent need to accommodate
more children. Arnson would like to
expand the premises to include the upper
storey of the two storey structure and thus
make room for another 30 school aged
children and ten toddlers.
"Again it's a question of money.'' he sighs.
"We need $40,000 to repair the roof; another
$20,000 is needed for equipment. A hundred
thousand dollars would oe required for caring
for the additional children for one year. It's
hard to turn down parents, but these are the
facts of life in Israel today."
The phone rings. Arnson is urgently needed
in another room.
The children stare at us curiously as we
leave. We marvel at the patience and com-
mitment of the staff and maintenance help
who work in this setting year in and year out.
"It's wearing, but it has its rewards.' says
Arnson at the door. "Getting a child totakea
step, to learn how to dress, or to manage to
say a few words may appear to be rather
insignificant, but for the child it's a major
achievement. It's the smile that comes with
that achievement that makes our day.''
Aside from its assistance to the mentally
retarded. JDC extends aid to other types of
handicapped children and young adults, and
helps train staff to work with them
JDC receives most of its money from
Federations of Welfare Funds through the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergent
Fund.
Getting Kids Involved in the Community
By MIRA JACOB
It is a universal problem: how to get
teenagers involved in community activities?
Israel is trying to come up with an answer
by using the community center to reach out to
young people and offer them meaningful
social involvement through a challenging
program called Noar Le Noar (Youth to
Youth).
In Yahud, a lower-middle class township
ten miles south of Tel Aviv, Noar Le Noar
participants are installing security devices in
the homes of the elderly; leading activities for
institutionalized children; and serving
refreshments to soldiers waiting on the road
for rides to their base. The Sol M. Steinberg
Community Center in Yahud is the
headquarters of the program and the base for
these and many other activities.
Organized in cooperation with the B'nai
B'rith Youth Organization, the program is
one of the "new generation" of projects of the
American Jewish Joint Distribution Com-
mittee in Israel and the Israel Association of
Community Centers.
"Since Noar Le Noar is a youth
organization, and the centers offer activities
for teenagers, it only seemed natural to bring
the two organizations together," said Hank
Havassy, head of community center
programs for JDC in Israel. "The center
provides teenagers with a framework that
meets their needs while helping them develop
an awareness of the needs of their com-
munity. It also provides the tools necessary
to get on with the job!''
Community centers in Israel are often
located in disadvantaged urban areas or in
development towns in order to help narrow
the socio-educational gap. Still in its ex-


fcrJRS*
peri mental stage, the program involves the
setting up of a Noar Le Noar chapter as part
of the local centers in each of ten com-
munities .
In the small town of Kiryat Tivon, nor-
theast of Haifa, youngsters have volunteered
to be "big brothers" to younger children,
helping them with their homework and with
their personal problems; they organize joint
activities with the elderly to bridge the
"generation gap" and have started a disco
club for themselves. Chapter Youth Worker
Hanan Horowitz of Kiryat Tivon has
developed a close relationship with municipal
employees who at times call him for volun-
teers to help out at the First Aid Center, sell
benefit theater tickets and-or collect
donations for city wide charitable campaign-'
Sixteen-year-old Dalia Finklestein. *h
heads the Yahud chapter, admits that wm
originally brought her to Noar Le Notfw
"just to have fun." But after a few monu
she became aware of the impact tha\.We
project had on the wider community ^
choose our own leadership and decide
project had on the wider community
"We choose our own leadership |a d*
what projects we would like to undertae*.
says Dalia.
Through the Noar Le Noar-Commung
Center programs these kids are learn w&
skills necessary to take an active role id
community and become future leaders.


Federation. February. 1983
Page 7
Four decades have passed since the Nazi
eath camps produced the greatest act of
enocide in world history, but the painful at-
mosphere of death still pervades Auschwitz.
Hie anguished voices of 2 million murdered
Jews still seem to cry out from the long cold
ematoria and the empty gas chambers. The
bite still conjures up thoughts of un-
attainable acts of inhumanity committed
zainst innocent men, women and children.
Those are the sentiments expressed by
hAnd Thou Shalt Speak of Them," a
photographic exhibition presented by the
Jreater Miami Holocaust Memorial Center.
display premiered in November at the
jreater Miami Jewish Federation Building
nd is currently being shown at the South
Jroward Federation headquarters in
lollywood. It will then be exhibited in the
[night-Ridder Corporate Headquarters in
liami, beginning on February 20.
Of the 33 photographs included in the
presentation, 28 were taken by Dr. Norman
lorrison of Hollywood. Morrison is vice
president of research for Knight-Ridder
Newspaper and executive vice president of
^night-Ridder's Viewdata Corp. of America
ubsidiary.
Morrison explained that the Auschwitz
biotographs were taken during a four-day
federation mini-mission to Poland which
receded an October 1981 mission to Israel.
he mini-mission included stops in Warsaw,
racow and Auschwitz.
All remnants of the Warsaw Ghetto, where
ews staged a heroic armed revolt against
lazi troops, have been cleared away, Morri-
pn said, expressing disappointment that the
te had not been preserved as a memorial.
He also noted that the Jewish cemetery in
mow, where millions were buried, is in
srepair and in danger of being eliminated by
Polish authorities.
The caretaker at the Cracow cemetery
(n't take care of it alone," Morrison ex-
ained. "He is assigned to tend 3 million
faves. The caretaker told us that what will
obably happen is that when the cemetery is
sufficient disrepair some bureaucrat will
cide to pave it over and build a high-rise. '*
I In describing Auschwitz, the most
ominent remnant of Nazi genocide in
Dland, Morrison said the site opened a flood-
[te of lasting emotions for the mini-mission
Mtieipants and communicated the absolute
prror of the Holocaust.
rl had done a lot of reading on the subject
*tore we got there, but the impression Au-
WW left is 100 percent bigger," he said.
rou don t realize it when you're there, but it
Exhibit displays the
Horror of Auschwitz
Dr. Norman Morrison and Greater Miami Holocaust Memorial Center Director Marc Pollick view
photographs in the display at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Building.
hit us a few weeks later. The total unreality of
it was staggering."
Two million of the 6 million Holocaust
victims were put to death in the Birkenau
facility of Auschwitz. The death trains
arrived daily delivering the victims directly to
the camp.
"In simple language, the laws of creation
and humanity were changed," Morrison said.
"It set new levels of inhumanity."
The mini-mission then proceeded to Israel,
which Morrison felt was logical conceptual-
ization of history because "the Holocaust and
Israel are inextricably bound. One is the
affirmative response to the other."
The events of the Holocaust have a par-
ticular bearing on the world political
situation, especially pertaining to attitudes
toward Israel, he said, adding that all
countries of the world which now attempt to
criticize Israel were in some way guilty of
allowing the Holocaust to occur.
"No country can preach morality to
Israel," Morrison said. "No country's record
was unblemished, whether it's because they
participated in the slaughter or they refused
to bomb the train tracks leading to the death
camps. The Allies bombed targets all around
the camps and knew about the genocide, but
refused to do anything to stop it."
In explaining the title he chose for the
{ihotographic exhibition, Morrison said he
elt one particular biblical quotation from
Deuteronomy 6:7 was fitting: "And thou
shalt speak of them when thou sittest in thine
home and when thou best down, and when
thou risest up."
Although the photographs themselves
compositionally stand on their own, Morrison
said, he wrote annotations for each that tell
the sad history of Auschwitz and add to the
emotional impact of the exhibit.
For more information about "And Thou
Shalt Speak of Them," contact the Greater
Miami Holocaust Memorial Center, an
agency of the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
Washington to Host American
Gathering of Holocaust SurviTors
Ptt.y*WW* the Nazi Holocaust
VJ2Z2 SH?" m a new national
gwzation, with the close cooperation of the
hSBSwJC p>n?niunity of the nation,
I naS -thue Jeh P~Pta in defense of
I **$#* the Jewi8h P*** *nd
k. inT f ? State of larael, and to aid
Nazi meir 8tru*gte against the resurgence
F movements throughout the worioT
KI tHS 0f n** communities
Prican7a?ZE5Z ^ rePrewnted in the
Gvivora Gatherm f Jewish Holocaust
Ldwik mJBF* S&Pn* committee,
^IvbnS and David Schaecter,
*iJjcLEuli?- Thm are similar
a^ing cn^?lAEnland and France, and
jSSESSLC at Wrk ta "*"
*3h33 ^P ta ** outgrowth of
****, wlSkgi.of Jewi8h Holocaust
w*>ch was held in Israel in June,
1981. At that time, the President of Israel,
Yitzhak Navon, said: "You have performed a
miracle, in organizing this world gathering.
Do not disband this organization. Use it!"
Ben Meed, a prominent community leader
in New York, and a past Vice-Chairman of the
World Gathering, has been elected president
of the American Gathering in Washington,
DC. Ernest Michel, who had been chairman
of the international committee which con-
ducted the World Gathering in Israel, is
honorary chairman of the National Executive
Committee.
In addition to David Schaecter and Ludwik
Brodzki as vice presidents, the Southeastern
Florida Committee is represented by Sender
Wajsman, chairman of the area, and a
number of others on the National Executive
Committee.
The newly-elected president of the
American Gathering, Ben Meed, will visit
Temple Beth Israel, at 7100 W.Oakland Park
Blvd., in Fort Lauderdale, at 2 p.m., Sunday,
January 23, and will be at the Hallandale
Jewish Center, 416 NE 8th Avenue,
Hallandale, courtesy of the Ben Gurion Club,
at 7 p.m. that same day. Mr. Meed will meet
leaders and members of the survivor's
community and leaders of the organized
Jewish community.
One of the major objectives of the National
Gathering is a mass reunion of Holocaust
survivors in Washington, D.C.on April 11-
14, 1983, to commemorate the 40th
Anniversary of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.
This is envisioned as the central event of the
American Jewish community's observance of
that historical battle against the Nazis, which
took place in 1943.
For further information, contact the
Greater Miami Holocaust Memorial Center at
576-4000, extension 369, or Mr. Sender
Wajsman, 931-1622.


r*g8
Federation, February. 1983
"Winds of War" Depie
Before thi
A shtetl wedding is recreated in "The Winds of War"
A milieu that is now only a memory
consigned to history and the recollections of
those who lived it, will be vividly recreated in
Herman Wouk's "The Winds of War," the
epic 18-hour, seven-part film that will air on
the ABC television network (WPLG-Channel
10) beginning Sunday, February 6 at 8 p.m.
The milieu is the shtetl, the small villages
that Eastern European Jewish life was
centered around before the Holocaust. The
systematic murder of the Jews by the Nazis
meant not only the loss of life, but a way of
life. The shtetls are gone; there is not a hint of
their existence anywhere in the world today.
Wouk's work, set in the years immediately
preceding the bombing of Pearl Harbor, is a
study of the people, the events and the forces
that brought the world to brink of oblivion.
Seen principally through the eyes of an
American naval captain, his wife, his son, a
young Jewish girl and her uncle, the story
dramatizes the cancerous rise of Nazi Ger-
many and its inevitable consequences.
To film the shtetl scenes, actors, musicians
and technicians gathered on a quiet back
street in Zagreb, Yugoslavia. Members of the
Warsaw Jewish Theatre, who had come to
Yugoslavia especially for this filming,
brought along the costumes many of them
40 or 50 years old that would carry them
back in time to 1939 and a wedding in the
fictional village of Medzice, Poland.
It is ironic that a Jewish village wedding is
part of the repertoire of the Warsaw Jewish
Theatre. Their production of "This is My
Computer Craze Hits Jewish High School
The Jewish High School of South Florida
has made leaps forward in computer
education. Whereas in most schools in South
Florida computers are used by students for
programming only, in the Jewish High School
students are using computers in a multitude
of academic areas.
Dr. Giora Mann, on leave from the Hebrew
University in Jerusalem, is the head of the
Division of Science and Technology at the
Jewish High School. He has introduced a
college level computer class for calculus, as
well as several programming and literacy
classes. Working with Dr. Mann, Mrs.
Lenore Senfeld, who received her computer
education in an ORT sponsored training
session in London, uses the computers with
her ninth grade algebra classes.
Dr. Martin Franklin exposed his physics
students to the computers before completing
the study of a unit on mechanics. They
programmed labs dealing with momentum,
motion, energy and free fall. Simulations of
stones being thrown from buildings and
objects being shot from cannons appeared on
the computer screens. Dr. Franklin said,
"Using the computer this way was a much
more meaningful technique for learning these
concepts."
The students in biology classes at the
Jewish High School are preparing to use
computers in their studies. They will be
programming genetics problems and working
on simulations of various probability ex-
periments.
Students are given the opportunities to
explore a wide range of computer techniques
and to pursue personal interests. Two
creative students, Elana Roth and Jay Sein-
feld, programmed musical tunes on the
computer. Mark Lamdanski, a tenth grader,
won the schoolwide Chanukah computer
contest by programming the lighting of the
menorah accompanied with music of
Chanukah. Natalie Sebag, a senior, produced
a series of Hebrew words on the computer b\
using the coordinates to plot and form each
letter. This program could be used to play the
Chanukah dreidle game. Jonathon Passik, an
eleventh grader, programmed the building of
a cube while he learned about perspective and
reduction drawing.
Other students at the Jewish High School
produce artistic pieces on the screen. With
sixteen color choices possible in the computer,
students can use it as an artist uses his brush.
A senior at the Jewish High School, How-
ard Fellman, said, "I've enjoyed seeing the
wide range of possibilities of picture drawing
one can do on these computers. More impor-
tantly, using computers is a great educational
experience for me. Along with learning the
techniques of computer programming, I'm
also learning to better understand calculus
and physics by the visualization of the
problems."
American ORT Federation and Women's
American ORT sponsor the computer
program at the Jewish High School. Experts
of World ORT Union researched a variety of
computers and chose the BBC Acorn com-
puter for several reasons. The educational
resources available within the BBC, as well si
the computers' ability to produce a wide
range of graphics makes the computer i
valuable learning tool. A network system g
expected to be provided by ORT whfchi"
enable a teacher to monitor all the students'
computers as if they were terminals of a larger
computer. It is the goal of ORT and the
Jewish High School to eventually expo*
every student to the use of the computers.
The Jewish High School is a member of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's family*
agencies and a beneficiary of the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Cam-
paign.
Students of the Jewish High School of South Florida.




Federation, February, 1983
Rise off Kaai Germany
olocaust
Page 9
is regularly performed in Poland,
\a what was once a vibrant slice of
[jewish life. However, the Warsaw
heatre plays almost exclusively to
s, so the audience must wear ear-
hear the Yiddish translated into
_oce a nation with more than 3
lews, today the Jewish population of
I no more than 6,000.
| wedding begins, two "outsiders"
}m America look on and then
nvolved in the ceremony and celebra-
outsider is Natalie Jastrow, por-
Ah" MacGraw, an American Jewish
|has come to the village in search for
roots. The other "outsider" is
Enry, portrayed by Jan-Michael Vin-
entile in a world totally new to him.
Intel's leading star who appeared as
The film "Fiddler on the Roof," plays
fPolish cousin, Berel Jastrow.
nilieu described by Wouk and
in the film "can no longer be seen
i in the world. The shtetl is gone,"
[Karlikow, foreign affairs director of
lean Jewish Committee.
Inting on this lost part of Jewish life,
lid, "Yes, the shtetl is gone.
pal of the traditional wedding lives
j the religious communities in Israel,
; American Hassidim and yeshiva
but the setting in which it
and flourished for hundreds of
destroyed forever by the Nazis in
'rll."
Middle Class Unemployment:
An Emerging Jewish Crisis
I Allan S., a 36 year old married man with
to young children, lost his job as a graphic
EPS1" ? a,local busine*8 September of
IB. He has been out of work since that time
pa recently came to Jewish Vocational
,,. Jb P^cement services. Allan
orts feeling of deep frustration about his
^employment status and wonders how long
t can continue to make ends meet since his
^employment compensation does not cover
LSnSiSR"11 and hia **yings are
R5 ,dii' A *"* Vocational
pvice Job Placement Counselor is working
Wsh^iH ud!Ve,0p a Jb findin campaign
I*8hould k*d to re-einpteymenT
*aJ?J? of more ttma mmion
JlffJ0 ffPreaent the highest jobless
W whirr?- *! mduded a
El! ),Jewuh Social Service Agency
fa tnfftJ7i8h 8S^ 8^- oelie^eto
hrtSdwh"1 numb? of Jewiflh head9 of
[pSorted 11 Cann? find work Federation
rvKnHg6nCie8, mvolvi in vocational
M^aiSlS health coimseling report
USTSufi11 numb* of Jewish
KKL2*lh management workers
Ping new "ohf 3 8eeking "itance in
B oT "* Jcareer8- A "** to-
mtSn^hKi^ P1 problems
ady bcZ, u y ^e auma of not having a
p^^srte i^po^d- Mo^f
ed eon** ^ ^ mt' ^th by our
SmSS* and *2? cutbacks in
Whi8^ifrva^ mdutry activities.
*S52Sfl ^pounded by an
aw of small business failures.
C ha? LJewi8h *"! class unem-
^ttKrfi? JCtJlL! number of
* f the Con?', TWashmgton Action
*u-_,, e Counsel of .Ton,,-i, ILi___4i___
embarrassed by it, is really what has struck
people at the Federations."
Herbert Bienstock, the former head of the
U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics and currently
a professor at Queens College, points out that
the jobless rate among Jews in the profes-
sions is probably higher than that of other
professionals.
In other words, Jews may have a better
chance of being out of work than do their
peers. The reason for this according to Bien-
stock, is that "the Jewish tradition of social
service has attracted Jews disproportionate-
ly into the people-serving professions which
have lost the most jobs as opposed to other
occupations such as engineering."
Eugene Greenspan, Executive Director of
the Miami Jewish Vocational Service reports
that, "Jewish Vocational Service has experi-
enced a 60 percent increase in applications for
job placement services over a three month
period. Much of this increase can be attrib-
uted to professionals and management per-
sonnel, many of whom have never before had
an extended period of being unemployed."
Jewish Vocational Service is gearing up to
handle what is viewed as a critical community
problem by expanding the job development
capabilities of the agency.
Community members in need of employ-
ment can call the Job Placement Department
at either the Central Facility, 576-3220 or the
South Dade Branch Office, 235-9482.
CK/?300,^^ Federations
SjS^l. ^ indicated "the
t> number offSS i 2*5?^ *
Ple coming h?7nei[nPloyed middle class
F Wated a,T;.;r "wtance who have
m distance before and who are
Louis Corman and Joseph Ainbinder of the Detroit Club of North Miami Beach present the club'* /OR?
CJAIEFgift to Campaign Associate Barry Leftin. w


Page 10
Federation, February, 1983
Give Your Children a
Summer to Treasure
"Give your children a summer of treasure,"
announced Ruth Shack, president of the
Jewish Community Centers of South Florida.
Children know what camp is for. "Fun."
"Swimming." "New Friends." "Different
Activities." The JCCs of South Florida day
camps are all that, and more.
It's a great place for children to have fun in
a versatile setting. A place where your child
will share group experiences that build
caring, cooperation, and friendship. A JCC
camper stretches his or her horizons daily,
tries new skills, grows stronger physically
and emotionally with each camp experience.
Camping at the JCC promotes respect for
nature and stimulates a desire to conserve our
precious national resources.
And uniquely, the Jewishness of the camp
environment and program adds a dimension
impossible to find anywhere else. Through
Hebrew songs, Shabbat celebrations, camp
events on Jewish themes and Jewish artistic
projects, the JCCs foster in campers a sense
of being part of an even larger group than
their bunk, unit or camp that of the Jewish
people.
The Day Camp offers a unique combination
of camping and Jewish cultural activities.
The program has been designed to provide
campers with the opportunity to have fun and
excitement, the prime ingredient in camp life,
in a variety of constructive and creative ways.
(A) Learn new skills; (B) Recognition of
growth; (C) Increase understanding and
identification with Jewish heritage; (D) Dev-
elop a positive self image; (E) Exposure to
concepts of decision-making; (F) Socialization
and being part of a group.
The JCCs continually strive to develop
campers into responsible human beings,
enriched by the variety and depth of a
common Jewish heritage.
Your child can take part in a general camp
program; creative arts camp; co-ed sports
camp; gymnastic and tennis camp; or a
C.I.T. program.
The Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida will conduct camps at the Michael-
Ann Russell JCC, South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center, and a joint camp with the
Hebrew Academy on Miami Beach.
For your teenage child the JCCs will once
again sponsor its teen travel program. Your
youngster can select one of three comprehen-
sive and momorable travel programs: Trip 1:
3 weeks U.S.A. and Canada; Trip 2: Great
outdoors and Island cruise; Trip 3: A six week
teen adventure in Israel.
Space in our Teen Travel Camps is limited |
and early registration is required.
For more information please call: Annchar-
lene Dresner, Michael-Ann Russell JCC, (932 |
4200); Dori Smargon, South Dade JCC, (251-
1394); Jerome Libbin, Miami Beach JCC J
(534-3206); and Gail Weisberg, Teen Travel (
Camps (576-1660).
Two celebrations highlight
Israel's 35th Anniversary
atmosphere of the day will be decidedly
Israeli, with a variety of entertaiment,
exhibits, food and ceremonies celebrating
Eretz Yisrael.
"The JCCs are delighted to coordinate this
event for the community," said JCC
President Ruth Shack. "We feel this is a way
of uniting the Jewish community and also a
way of introducing the centers to the general
public. We welcome the participation of the
entire community on this joyous day."
The JCCs are now in the process of J
recruiting volunteers to help on Yom
Ha'Atzmaut. If you're interested in offering
your services, please call the JCCs at 576-
1660.
Ruth Shoe/.
Plans are now being readied for this year's
Yom Ha'Atzmaut (Independence Day) event,
"Israel 35" on Sunday, April 24, which will
celebrate the 35th anniversary of the Jewish
State. Coordinated by the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, in cooperation with
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, this
year's celebration will bring the Dade County
Jewish community together at two locations:
the Michael-Ann Russell JCC in North Miami
Beach and the South Dade JCC.
The event will demonstrate the unity of the
Greater Miami Jewish community and its
support of Israel in two walkathons, on behalf
of the 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, which will precede
festivities at the two locations. Although the
event will have a South Florida setting, the
Refuseniks' Plea:
"SAVE OUR
CHILDREN!"
A Public Demonstration j
on Behalf of Soviet Jewry
Sunday, March 6,1983 2-4 P.M. I
Peacock Park, Coconut Grove j
Join thousands of your fellow Miamians at a rally in sup-
port of our fellow Jews in the Soviet Union who live under
constant government oppression and harassment. Show
that we have not forgotten them.
BETHERE


Federation, February. 1983
Page 11
Mondale to Address
Westview Federation Dinner
Former Vice President Walter F. Mondale
rill deliver the keynote address at the annual
Aestview Federation Dinner on behalf of the
[gg3 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emer-
ency Fund on Sunday, February 13 at the
Vestview Country Club. The country clubs
nembership is invited to attend.
Mondale first served in public office in
I96O. when he was appointed to the position
U attorney general for the State of Min-
nesota. He was subsequently elected to that
hffice in 1962 and served until 1964, when
governor Karl Rolvaag appointed him to fill
he U.S. Senate vacancy created by Hubert
lumphrey's election to the vice presidency.
dondale was re-elected to the Senate in 1966
ad 1972.
During his 12 years in the Senate, Mondale
ierved on numerous key legislative panels.
and served as chairman of the Senate's Select
Committee on Equal Educational Oppor-
tunity, the Intelligence Committee's Domes-
tic Task Force, the Subcommittee on Children
and Youth, and the Subcommittee on Social
Security Financing.
Mondale was elected the 42nd vice presi-
dent of the United States on November 2.
1976. He has since authored a book The Ac-
countability of Power: Toward a Responsible
Presidency.
Edward Harris, is serving as chairman of
the Westview Federation Committee, with
Richard A. Berkowitz serving as vice chair-
man.
For more information about the Westview
Country Club Dinner, call Michael Fischer at
Federation, 576-4000.
Walter Mondale
New Gifts Effort Creates i\cw Involvement
Created with the intent of increasing com-
junitywide participation in the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, the
Ireater Miami Jewish Federation's New
fcifts Division is now putting into practice its
pultifaceted pian to involve non-contributors
11 the campaign.
A special New Gifts Room at Super
unday, outreach direct mailings, a discovery
Bmpaign ior new contributors, a synagogue
Junpaign and the formation of an Attorneys'
lubcommittee. are just a few of the strategies
king put into place to expand the base of the
lederation campaign. Despite the success of
1st campaigns, demographic studies in-
Pcate that iess than 30 percent of Jewish
puseholds in the United States make a
npaign gift and approximately 80 percent
I current contributors are over the age of 55.
[New Gifts Division Co-Chairmen Forrest
bd Leroy Raffel both noted that efforts are
peceeding in identifying new prospects
oughout Dade County. The basic aim of
W division is to attract a new group of Con-
tibutors which will constitute 8 to 10 percent
the total campaign by 1985 and 20 percent
r1981.
I feel that organizationally we're doing
fry weU for a first year program," said
forest Raffel. "We have excellent people
wking with us and we're developing a good
"jjtui-e Although we're concentrating
1 we campaign, we're trying to involve new
opie to Federation's activities through the
W Gifts effort."
I We think we've had some success in the
Calling All
Volunteers
htion !!,v' T!?e Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
Km oTf1 nneW "T*0- that remains a
k ELIM' Providi social services.
r Ration Information and Referral
Km,TtS yWdwb in finding the
nSt ann f need" Its main focus hman
m and its resource is volunteers.
iveseannnfrmati0Il and Referral S6"5
fcrams n, $& and descriptions of
E di?V,ded by local ^encies. This
wS Zu! peurSOn8. need to the proper
in search of the proper agency.
kdpSllur8 being sought
|>vided \T$?\ Jhe ^aUty assistance
fa*- Individ J^nMtion and Referral
^thX1,?11^8 "^rested in participat-
hC ht* ^Uld ^e to dedicate at
NCSRI week' Tbey wUl be trained
K^!an7agrciesqUlrie8, *** h identi"
^^Safior^8^0" xbout involvement
early stage finding potential new givers
throughout the community," added Leroy
Raffel. "I also feel very good about the high
calibre of the committee members who are
working on this project."
On Super Sunday, the New Gifts Room will
have specially trained workers contacting
close to 15,000 new prospects in the Jewish
community, Forrest said. These new
prospects will receive a special mailing prior
to the February 6 phonathon.
A synagogue effort is also underway, under
the leadership of Co-Chairmen Eric Turetsky
and Elaine Rackoff, whereby three participa-
tory campaigns will be organized in
synagogues in North and South Dade.and
Miami Beach.
An Attorneys Subcommittee, chaired by
Michael Olin, is identifying and approaching
potential new givers in the legal profession.
Other ongoing efforts include a Major Gifts
Committee chaired by John Kislak; prepara-
tion of a display for the Federation building
lobby requesting new prospects referrals: an
Outreach Committee chaired by Gwen
Weinberger, which is developing a short-
range plan to welcome new Jewish families to
the community, and a long-range plan to
expose the community to Federation and its
Campaign.
What is the Crisis Facing
the People of Israel?
$300,000,000 cutback in government support will af-
fect social services to:
2,400 elderly in old age homes
5,000 elderly and handicapped in sheltered workshops
7,500 blind in rehabilitation centers
Hundreds of students in colleges and universities
Thousands of disadvantaged youngsters in 120
special centers
10,000 pupils in technical training schools
2,400 disadvantaged young people in special
education programs
Thousands of teenagers in 13 youth movements
57,000 disadvantaged children whose parents cannot
afford pre-kindergarten
1,000 children, ages 5-15, in danger of becoming
dropouts unless boarding and training are provided.
What Can You Do To Help?
Pay your pledge today to the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
The people of Israel need our support now as never before. They are in desperate
need of cash, a vital resource that only you can supply. Your pledge was your
promise to do your share. Your payment represents your act of commitment.
BETHERE
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Cash Chairman


Page 12
Federation. February, 1983
Turning Ideals into Reality
"It is our responsibility to see that other
people who need help get that help .. B
really makes roe feel good that what I do in
Southwest Dade helps a child in Israel or an
elderly woman on Miami Beach.
Sandi Miot, Southwest Dade campaign
chairwoman of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division, understands
the timeless Jewish traditions of tzedakah
and commitment. But to her. they are not
merely concepts they are living values that
must be practiced in day to day life.
"To not do something meaningful is waste-
ful of one's abUity," she explained. "And my
way of accomplishing something productive
is through my work with Federation."
Miot, married to husband Sandy (with a
"y"), is the mother of four children, aged two
to 15. A native of Washington. D.C.. she has
lived in the Miami area for the past 10 years
and became involved with Federation through
a personal friend. Helene Berger. a former
Women's Division president.
"I was looking around to see what I could
become involved with," Miot said. "I went to
some Women's Division functions and found
Sandi Miot
the women to be just lovely. They are really
some of the nicest people around.''
Since her initial involvement with Federa-
tion's Women's Division three years ago,
Miot has been part of many activities, and
she now finds herself at the helm of the cam.
paign effort in Southwest Dade. That portion
of the county has undergone tremendous
growth in the past few years, and there has
been a large influx of young Jewish singles
and families into the community.
"Our division down here is so new; we
really need people to get involved," Miot
said. "There's so much potential for people to
get involved and make a contribution."
The Southwest Dade Division sponsored k
luncheon and fashion show last month on be-
half of the 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-Is.
rael Emergency Fund, and other campaign
events are planned for the spring. In the
meantime, Miot said she and her fellow
workers will concentrate on letting new-
comers know about Federation and its vital
role in the community. "This is the way to get
to know your community by becoming part
of the total Miami Jewish community."
"I get a lot of personal satisfaction out of
my work with Federation," Miot concluded.
"I feel I'm doing something meaningful that
means something to other people."
Intcrfaith Day
to be Observed
Sandi Simon
Interfaith Day, the annual observance
of unity among women of all faiths, will
take place on Tuesday, February 15 from
9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Kendall United
Methodist Church, 7600 SW 104 Street.
Sponsored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Women's Division,
Church Women United and the Arch-
diocese Council of Catholic Women, the
theme of this year's Interfaith Day is
"Harmony In School, Home and
Community." Selma Rappaport is
Women's Division chairwoman of this
event.
"It is important for Jewish women to
participate in this communitywide
event," said Women's Division Com-
munity Education Vice President Sandi
Simon. "This is an opportunity to build a
spirit of harmony between the Jewish
community and our faiths."
Registration for the program is $1. For
further information, please call the
Women's Division office, 576-4000.
The annual luncheon meeting of the Southwest Dade Board of Federation's Women's Division, held at
the Sheraton River House, drew an unprecedented level of response to the needs of world Jewry. Snow*
above at the luncheon are, from left. Women's Division Campaign Chairwoman Ellen Mandler, Luncheon
Co-Chairwoman Ineke Kreeger, Southwest Dade Board Chairwoman Marilyn Kohn, Former I JA tounf
Women's Leadership Cabinet Chairwoman Vicki Agron, Women's Division President Maxine Schuartt
and Luncheon Chairwoman Marlene Kohn.
Special Event for Patron*
Sponsors and Donors
talk shows, including The Tonight Show.
The Tomorrow Show, Dinah Shore.
Today and Good Morning America
Medved is the current president ana
founder of Pacific Jewish Center, an in-
novative community facility in veffl
California. In public appearances n
lectures across the nation, Medved nw
become a leading spokesman for
return to Jewish affiliation and tradiu
that is taking place among tens ol tno
ands of young Americans.
Women who attend this event make*
$125 minimum gift to the 1983 Comb"*"
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency ru
Joan Morrison is chairwoman oi
event and Pat Lieberman is cc-chairwon
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Women's Division annual luncheon for
Patrons, Sponsors and Donors from
South Dade, Southwest Dade and Miami
Beach will be held on Wednesday,
February 9 at 10:30 a.m. at the Four
Ambassadors Hotel, 801 South
Bayshore Drive.
The function will feature a fashion
show by Cache and guest speaker
Michael Medved, renowned author, tele-
vision personality and Jewish commu-
nity activist.
Medved's published books include
"What Really Happened To The Class of
'65," "Hospital People," "The Shadow
Presidents," and "The Golden Turkey
Awards," which he co-authored with his
brother Harry. He has been a frequent
guest on all the major network television
For more information, call
Women's Division office at 576-4UW
M


Federation, February, 1983
Page 13
South Dadc Reception
Accent*Community Spirit
The spirit of communal unity and commit -
bent will be celebrated at Third Annual
cktail Reception of the Greater Miami Jew-
Federation's South Dade Branch on
faursday, February 17 at the King's Bay
[acht Club. The event will support the
reater Miami Jewish Federation's 1983
ombined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
and.
Special guest at the reception will be
vard-winning actor Michael Moriarty.
deration Vice President and CJA-IEF
jipaign Vice Chairman Marilyn K. Smith
so will deliver a keynote address.
Chairmen of the event are Paula and Joel
evy. Richard Kohn is serving as program
liairman, Robbi Herskowitz and Elaine Ross
chairing the Food Committee, Marlene
ahn is chairing decorations, and Barbara
sper is serving as attendance chairman.
I Moriarty first came to national attention
\r his performance in the film "Bang the
m Slowly;" the television version of "The
Menagerie," for which he received his
st Emmy Award; and the play "Find Your
[ay Home,'' for which he received the Tony,
iMidrashot
Lectures
The North Dade Midrasha is composed of
following institutions: A venture Jewish
liter, Beth Moshe Congregation, Beth
rah Congregation, Michael-Ann Russell
wish Community Center, Temple Adath
phurun, Temple Sinai of North Dade and
(Central Agency for Jewish Education. Its
ter Midrasha of South Dade is made up of:
t Breira Congregation, Jewish Community
ater of South Dade, Temple Beth Am,
aple Judea, Temple Or Olom, Temple
nu-El. Temple Shoresh Chadash, Temple
In and the Central Agency for Jewish
ucation. The Midrasha format forms the
lest network of educational cooperation be-
n community centers and agencies for
rish Education and synagogues in Florida
'the Southeast.
[)n January 9th and 11th, Rabbi Harold
shner, author of When Bad Things
PPen to Good People, spoke to tremendous
fences at both Temple Beth Am and Beth
pn Ungregration. The next lecture in the
P w"' e held by the North Dade Mid-
fa on January 18th, at 8:00 P.M., at the
ErSS Russell Jewish Community
fc I?900 N_E. 25th Avenue. The speaker
f!L vlorris Brafman of the National
terence of Soviet Jewry. His topic will be:
Jn w :JSoviet Jewry." In addition
u be a display of Soviet Jewish ar-
^aFqte7,th' at 8:0 P-m- TemPk Bet
i Rivtf SW; 87th Avenue. w" hXst Dr.
onTnU P^801- of history at Hebrew
n toiiege Jewish Institute of Rehgion.
nTmir ^ ,n the theme of: "Worid
KSlffi Jtwi8h Surviv8j." to the
conrS ,drasha- Dr Rivkin will also be
12*im? sp^ker fr tne Nortn Dade
M e vJf 8peak at TemPle Smai
lp.m Avenue, on February 8th, at
* final swaker of the South Dade series
ible M h? i V0,^18. professor emeritus
wlPhe JJW"h Theological Semnary.
I speak Z ?? t*16010^. Rabbi Gordis
ShTrnHv P-C f ',Love "* m
da RfvH lnV, at TemPle Jdea, 5500
in 52L2 Fel?ruary 22nd, at 8:00
PQririrSggjy.^ the Meyer Baskin
L ..^^e Series of the Temple.
|8eries *vJTcCon?i8ion of the entire Lec-
1. X. fh So.uth D- Midrasha is plan-
Michael Moriarty
Theater World and Drama Desk Awards.
He won his second Emmy and Golden
Globe Award for his portrayal of SS Officer
Dorf in the television mini-series "Holo-
caust."
In 1981, Moriarty received a special cer-
tificate of achievement from Yeshiva
University, recognizing his "outstanding
versatility in the arts, demonstrated dedica-
tion to the pursuit of Holocaust Studies, and
devotion to the betterment of mankind."
South Dade Campaign Chairman Harry
Weitzer explained that one area of emphasis
for the 1983 reception is the introduction of
new contributors as a focus of the program.
"We feel it is particularly important that
those who are newly involved in our campaign
meet those persons with longstanding in-
volvements, so that we can give them a
feeling of belonging," Weitzer said. "This
campaign is a community wide effort and the
cocktail reception will emphasize community
spirit."
Participants in the February 17 cocktail
reception make a minimum gift of $500 to the
1983 CJA-IEF Campaign.
Another feature of the event that is ex-
pected to be of special interest will be a dis-
play of booths and exhibits presented by
organizations and agencies of the Jewish
community. The reception chairmen said
these displays will introduce new contributors
to programs available to them and familiarize
them with the services their gifts make
possible.
"We are confident that Jews in South Dade
understand the importance ana need for
involvement in the 1983 Campaign," said
South Dade Branch Chairperson Mikki
Futernick. "It will be the spirit of unity and
our joint commitment to support Jews in need
everywhere that will make this event most
memorable."
For more information about this major
event, contact David Goodman at
Federation's South Dade Branch Office, 251-
9334.
Project Renewal
Provides Hope
!oUr fijjj
larch
classic
j'ish cinema series
Project Renewal, the cooperative part-
nership between the Greater Miami Jewish
community and the Israel community of Or
Akiva, is heightening local Jewish iden-
tification with the people of Israel.
Thanks to the financial support the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation provided to Or
Akiva last year, the community was able to
construct a new dental clinic and day care
center, as well as upgrade its utilities, and
educational and social service programs. The
Federation has agreed to commit up to $1
million per year for the next three years, an
investment which is sure to yield further
positive results.
But Federation's commitment to Or Akiva,
located one kilometer east of Caesarea
midway between Haifa and Tel Aviv, is more
than just new public facilities and services. It
represents hope for Or Akiva's residents, who
have lived in a depressed environment outside
the mainstream of Israeli society. It is an
investment in the quality of life for
economically disadvantaged Israelis.
"The purpose of our upcoming trip in
March will be to review the budget Or Akiva
has prepared," said Stanley C. Myers,
chairman of Federation's Project Renewal
Committee. "Along with several other
committee members and a Federation staff
member, well consult with Or Akiva's
citizens council steering committee and give
them the benefit of our experience and know
how."
Additionally, agencies supported by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation are
building their own relationships with Or
Akiva. The Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida plan to have two Or Akiva
Stanley C. Meyers
teenagers work at their camp this summer
and live with local families. Seven students in
the High School in Israeli program spent two
Shabbats with families in Or Akiva. And
students at the Lehrman Day School are now
writing letters to their pen pals in Or Akiva.
"There has been a tremendous im-
provement in conditions in Or Akiva, and its
people are feeling good about their com-
munity," Myers said. "The Miami Jewish
community can be very proud of the
progress."


Page 14
Federation. February, 1983
'i
Personal Philanthropic Funds
By JAMES R. SLOTO, Esquire
It is a rare opportunity to be able at the
same time to create a means of providing for
both charitable contributions during your
lifetime and an endowment for future
generations. A Philanthropic Fund ("Fund")
with the Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
("Foundation") provides an excellent vehicle
to accomplish these objectives, and in ad-
dition, provides several significant estate and
income tax advantages.
A Philanthropic Fund is a permanent
endowment in your name or in the name of
another person you wish to memorialize or
honor. Contributions to the Fund may be
made by you, your family, associates, friends
or corporate sources, and all such con-
tributions are treated as gifts to a public
charity. One of the most significant features
of a Philanthropic Fund is that you may
recommend when and in what amounts
distributions from the Fund may be made for
charitable, educational or religious purposes
or any combination of such purposes.
Through compliance with IRS directives
relating to management of Philanthropic
Funds, the Fund may avoid the status of a
private foundation, thereby avoiding added
expenses of establishing a private foundation
and the expenses of record keeping, preparing
federal tax returns and state annual reports
required of private foundations.
After receiving the assets to establish the
Fund, the Foundation directs the investment
of fund assets into safe, high income in-
vestments. The Foundation maintains all
financial records including subsequent
contributions to the Fund, income earned by
the Fund, and distributions made from the
Fund. The Foundation advised you each year
of the amount of income earned by the Fund
which must be distributed and the amount of
principal of the Fund which may be
distributed.
Types of property that are frequently used
to create a Philanthropic Fund include ap-
preciated securities or interests in real estate
(5) give Mr. Levy the satisfaction of
lifetime gift rather than making a bequest in
his will. '
Comparison of an outright sale of the
$100,000 asset to the creation of a Philan.
thropic Fund is reflected in the following
chart, based on the assumption that Mr
Levy is in a 50 percent tax bracket.
Philanthropic Outright I
Fund Sale
James R. Sioto
where it is no longer favorable for you to
retain the property. However, any asset,
whether or not it has appreciated in value
during the period of your ownership. may be
used to establish a Philanthropic Fund.
The income tax advantages which are
available from the creation of a Philanthropic
Fund may best be illustrated by the following
example: Mr. Levy is in the 50 percent income
tax bracket and wishes to shelter some of his
1983 income from taxes. He would like to
maintain his current annual $10,000 level of
giving to the Federation and would also like
to leave a memorial fund in his parents'
memory. Mr. Levy has an asset which he
purchased as an investment ten years ago for
$20,000. which asset has a value today of
$100,000. He is aware that the sale of the
asset in 1983 will create significant capital
gains taxes.
Creation of Philanthropic Fund would:
(1) eliminate the liability for capital gains
tax (up to 20 percent);
(2) create a sustantial charitable deduction
in 1983;
(3) remove a $100,000 asset from Mr.
Levy's estate;
(4) relieve Mr. Levy of paying taxes on the
annual income earned through investment of
the Fund's assets;
Sale of asset -0-
Original cost $20,000
Capital gain -0-
Capital gains tax -0-
Charitable deduction 100.000
After tax value of
charitable deductions 50.000
Balance in
Philanthropic Fund 100.000
After-tax Proceeds
to Mr. Levy 50,000
sioo.ooo
20.000
80.000 j
16.000
0-
84,000
? (Resulting
deduction)
from charitable contributions
The result of this transaction is that
$100,000 fund has been created at a one-time
cost of only $34,000 ($84,000-$50.000). Mr.
Levy will be able to recommend charitable!
distributions from the earnings of the Fund
which, assuming a return of 10 percent, may
assist in maintaining his current level of I
annual giving to the Federation for the rest t
his life. Upon his death the principal balance I
of the Fund will create a $100,000 memorial to I
his parents in accordance with his wishes.
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropio I
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation his I
prepared a brief Philanthropic Fund i
Agreement to facilitate the creation of a]
Fund. If the concept of a present gift coupled
with a memorial fund for future generations
appeals to you and you have assets which
might be well-suited for the creation of i
Fund, please call Joseph Imberman, director
of the Foundation at (305) 576-4000. Of
course, any donor who is considering creating
a Fund should consult with his tax advisors [
to ensure that the making of the gift will
accomplish the desired results.
Foundation Assets Up by $4 million
Jay I. Kislak, chairman of Federation's
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies, has
announced the expansion of the Foundation
by more than $4 million in assets contributed
during 1982. These recent gifts of cash, real
estate and stock bring the value of the
Foundation's holdings to $22.9 million.
The creation of 12 new philanthropic funds
as well as additions to existing funds account
for almost $4 million of the increase. The
balance represents cash contributions to the
Foundation from bequests and trust funds.
Assets of the Foundation are invested to
insure the maximum growth and safety of its
resource base. Grants from the undesignated
funds of the Foundation are allocated upon
Board approval for emergencies and special
projects, as illustrated by the recent grant of
$100,000 to the Israel Emergency Fund.
"We are extremely pleased with the recent
growth of assets held by the Foundation,"
Kislak said. "It is this type of growth that
allows us to be a major philanthropic force for
local and national programs. We are looking
forward to continued progress, which is made
possible through the generosity of our Jewish
Community."
Philanthropic fund donors have the op-
portunity to recommend allocations to a
variety of specific beneficiaries. In December,
a total of $310,000 was approved for
distribution to several charitable and non-
profit institutions which further the broad
goals of Jewish culture, social service and
health care.
Medical facilities including Mount Sinai
Medical Center, the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, National Foundation
for Ileitis and Colitis, and the University of
Miami Medical College gained $9,500 in
support through the Foundation.
An additional $34,850 was distributed to
educational institutions including the
University of Miami, Barry College, Hebrew
University, Brandeis University, Bar-I Ian
University and Tel Aviv University.
Local agencies to receive Foundation funds
include the Jewish Community Centers of
South Florida, Metatherapy Institute, Lend-
a-Hand Inc., the United Way of DadeCounty]
and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
In the arts, grants were made to the
National Foundation for the Advancement of
the Arts, the American Ballet Theatre, |
WLRN Radio and WPBT, Channel 2
For more information about the Foun-
dation of Jewish Philanthropies and tax
advantages which it provides to donors, all
576-4000.
MilmTIhXult'l ^SiSLH^f^ donated by Dr PhilUP Fr** ^ the University of


k.


Federation, February, 1983
Page 15
SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 6
Tnrfav is Super Sunday, a maaaive phonathon be-
nff sponsored by the United Jewiah Appeal,
Iterations across the country, and locally by the
Kter Miami Federation. 2,500-3,000 volunteers
lSl be calling over 60,000 households in Miami,
En 900 a.m. to 9:00 p.m.. urging them to give
Is much as they can to insure Jewish survival. For
Imnre information about Super Sunday, please call
C Federation at 576-4000, ext. 278. BE THERE.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 6
rrhe Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith will
hold their annual Regional Board breakfast meet
ne and the Leonard L. Abess Human Relations
Vward luncheon today beginning at 8:00 a.m. and
2 00 noon, respectively, at the Konover Hotel,
Miami Beach.
MONDAY. FEBRUARY 7
Jerome Gleekel. currently serving on the Middle
East and Foreign Jewry Committee of the Com-
munity Relations Committee of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, will be the guest
Speaker at the Admiral's Port Condominium
fundraising drive this evening. The event begins
kt 800 p.m. in the card room of the Admiral's
Port Condominium, 2851 NE 183rd Street, North
Miami Beach. For more information, call Midge
Jlumberg at 576-4000.
0NDAY, FEBRUARY 7
>. Ellis Rivkin, Jewish historian and economist,
vill discuss "World Economics and Jewish Sur-
vival." this evening at 8:00 at Temple Bet Breira,
^400 SW 87th Avenue, Miami. The lecture, spon-
ored by the South Dade Midrasha and the Cen-
tal Agency for Jewish Education, is free to the
kublic. For more information, please call CAJE at
176-4030.
0NDAY, FEBRUARY 7
bbi J. David Bleich, professor of Talmud at
eshiva University and professor of Jewish law
d ethics at the Universtiy's Cardozo School of
w, will be lecturing on "Who Shall Live and
ho Shall Die" this evening at 8:00 at the Kon-
er Hotel. 5445 Collins Avenue, Miami Beach.
is lecture is the third of a series of four lectures
ing sponsored by the Florida Friends of Yeshiva
Pniversity. For more information, call Chaim
end. Director of Development, Southeastern
gion of Florida Friends of Yeshiva University
861-3365.
Jl'ESDAY. FEBRUARY 8
the Women's Division of the Greater Miami Jew-
lh Federation is sponsoring an open house for
*tin Women this morning at 10:00 at the home
f Anita Feld. Linda Lilly Rosenthal will be giving
I make-up and facial demonstration. For more in-
prmation, call Maxine Schwartz at 621-2068.
UESDAY, FEBRUARY 8
he North Dade Midrasha and the Central
Igency for Jewish Education, are sponsoring a
"jcture given by Dr. Ellis Rivkin. Jewish historian
1 economist, this evening at 8:00 at Temple
i of North Dade, 18801 NE 22nd Avenue,
rth Miami Beach. His topic of discussion will
[ world Economics and Jewish Survival." For
ore information, please call CAJE at 576-4030.
UESDAY, FEBRUARY 8
MS"** Monroe will be the guest speaker today
1:00 at the Forte Forum lecture series held in
r "rtf Towers Auditorium, 1200 West Avenue,
[ami Beach. His topic of discussion will be "The
P and China: An Alliance Against Russia?"
w^more information, call Elsie Rubin at 673-
FEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9
P Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Women's
[? annual luncheon for Patrons, Sponsors
I M?nr8nfrom "* Dade. Southwest Dade
'Miami Beach will be held today at 10:30 a.m.
knS" A^ssadors Hotel, 801 South Bay-
Ithnr. f\ Mlami- M>chael Medved, renowned
f^or and Jewish community activist will be the
if, a' A fashion show by Cache will also
lomlnfrT For more information, call the
pen sDivision at 576-4000.
[EDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 9
South Dade children and adult choirs from
BitoDP 7and the JCC ^ ive a concert this
nj/i715 Pm. at Temple Judea. 6600
W concert is part of the Third Annual
'Snii/knn JJewi8h Music Month sponsored by
mtjkI Dade JCC. The theme of the Celebra-
*as6"jasr info^nation
EDNESDAY.FEBRARY9
kS^ R Lautenberg, U.S.
F* Aventur!VeTy> wU1 the 8Pecial g"8*
l*B today ?dIUPberry Annual Cocktail Re-
Urnberrv i i oPm' m the Garden Room at
at'on calliL LTountry Club. For more in-
,CallIrvmgKalman at 576-4000.
lorth
Calendar
THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 10
The Southeast Region of ORT will be holding a
school of engineering luncheon today beginning at
11:00 a.m. at the Eden Roc Hotel, Miami Beach.
931-6423.
THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 10
"She's The Best Man In My Cabinet." a musical
production about Golda Meir, will be presented
today at a luncheon sponsored by ORT. The event
begins at 11:30 a.m. in the Pompeii room of the
Eden Roc Hotel, Miami Beach. Dr. William F.
Lee, provost and executive vice president of the
University of Miami will be the special guest. All
proceeds will go to the School for Engineering in
Jerusalem. For more information, call Renee
Brandes at 931-2737.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 13
Pioneer Women-Na'amat will hold their annual
Spiritual Adoption Luncheon at noon today in the
Pompeii Room of the Eden Roc Hotel, 4525
Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. The public is in-
vited to attend. For more information, call 538-
6213.
SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 13,
Ben Essen, trustee of the Florida Regional Board
of the Anti-Defamation League of B'nai B'rith,
will be the guest speaker at the Del Prado Condo-
minium annual fundraising breakfast this mor-
ning. The event begins at 10:00 a.m. at the Del
Prado Condominium, 18050 Biscayne Boulevard,
North Miami Beach. For more information, call
Midge Blumberg at 576-4000.
SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 13
Former Vice President Walter Mondale will be the
special guest at the Westview Federation Dinner
this evening. Cocktails begin at 6:30 with dinner
at 7:30. For more information, call Michael
Fischer at 576-4000.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15
The Forum Condominium, 1398 NE 191st Street,
North Miami Beach, will have their fundraising
drive this evening at 8:00 in their recreation hall.
For more information, call Midge Blumberg at
576-4000.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 15
Dr. Richard Pfau will be the guest speaker today
at 1:00 at the Forte Forum lecture series held in
the Forte Towers Auditorium, 1200 West Avenue,
Miami Beach. His topic of discussion will be
"Current Trends in the Mid East." For more in-
formation, call Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 17
The South Gate Chapter of Hadassah will be
sponsoring the Annual Youth Aliyah luncheon to-
day at 12:00 noon at Temple Emanu-El. For more
information, call Ruth Katz at 672-5127.
THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 17
Helen Cezer Katzman will receive the Woman of
the Year award of the Greater Miami Women's
Division of the American Friends of the Hebrew
University today at the Woman of the Year lunch-
eon at the Doral Beach Hotel. Rabbi Irving Lehr-
man, spiritual leader of Temple Emanu-El, will be
the guest speaker and present the award. The
luncheon is open to the public and reservations
may be made by calling the office of the American
Friends of the Hebrew University at 868-7600.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17
Rabbi David Saltzman, spiritual leader of the
Aventura Jewish Center, will be the guest speaker
this evening at the New Horizons Condominium
annual fundraising drive this evening. Mr. and
Mrs. Alfred Teicher will be the guests of honor.
The event starts at 7:30 and will be held in the
auditorium of the New Horizons Condominium,
19001 NE 14th Avenue, North Miami Beach. For
more information, call Midge Blumberg at 576-
4000.
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17
Michael Moriarty, best know for his portrayal of
SS Officer Dorf in the television mini-series
"Holocaust," will be the special guest at the Third
Annual South Dade Cocktail Reception on behalf
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federaiton's 1983
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
The event starts at 7:00 this evening at the Kings
Bay Yacht and Country Club, 14401 SW 62nd
Avenue, Miami. The cover is $25 per person, with
a minimum family gift of $500 to the 1983 CJA-
IEF. For more information, call the South Dade
office at 251-9334.
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 19
The Hollywood Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged will sponsor "A
Fabulous Night of Entertainment," starring co-
median Buddy Hackett at 6:30 this evening in the
Cafe Cristal in the Diplomat Hotel. A $150 per
person contribution includes a reception and din-
ner. For more information, call Cornelia Philipson
at 751-8626.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Charin will host the an-
nual fundraising meeting for the Corinthian Con-
dominium in their home, 5825 Collins Avenue,
Miami Beach, this morning at 10:30 a.m. For
more information, call Bemie Bendheim at 576-
4000.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20
The Maison Grande Condominium, 6039 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach, will hold their annual
fundraising meeting this evening at 8:00. For
more information, call Bemie Bendheim at 576-
4000.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20
The Association of Parents of American Israelis
will be holding a mini-bazaar today at 1:30 p.m. at
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Building,
4200 Biscayne Boulevard. The bazaar will feature
new merchandise and the public is welcome. For
more information, call Symme Price at 864-3932.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 20
Stratford House Condominium, 2841 NE 163rd
Street, North Miami Beach, will have their annual
fundraising breakfast meeting this morning at
9:30. "Be There," the new Greater Miami Jewish
Federation campaign film will be shown. For more
information, call Midge Blumberg at 576-4000.
SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 20
The 100 Lincoln Road Condominium will be hold-
ing their annual fundraising meeting this morning
at 9:30 a.m. For more information, call Sender
Kaplan at 576-4000.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 21
Ruth Rosenberg, a member of the Middle East
and Foreign Jewry Committee of the Federation's
Community Relations Committee, and who serves
on the Florida Israel Chamber of Commerce, will
be the guest speaker at the City of Hope Aven-
tura-Turnberry Chapter monthly meeting today
at 1:00 p.m. For more information, call Lee Karas
Beskin at 456-5047.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22
Jerome Gleekel, expert on the problems of the
Middle East, will be the guest speaker at the Surf-
side Towers annual fundraising drive this evening.
The event begins at 7:30 at Surf side Towers, 9511
Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. For more informa-
tion, call Midge Blumberg at 576-4000.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22
Dr. Carl Jacobson will be the guest speaker today
at 1:00 at the Forte Forum lecture series held in
the Forte Towers Auditorium, 1200 West Avenue,
Miami Beach. His topic of discussion will be "The
U.S. Soviet Arms Race." For more informa-
tion, call Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 22
Dr. Robert Gordis, biblical scholar and philoso-
pher, will be the guest speaker this evening at
Temple Judea, 5500 Granada Boulevard, Coral
Gables. Sponsored by the South Dade Midrasha
and the Central Agency for Jewish Education, the
lecture is free to the public. For more information,
please call CAJE at 576-4030.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23
The Gallahad Dade Condominium, 19370-80-90
Collins Avenue, Miami Beach, will hold its an-
nual fundraising meeting this evening at 8:00. For
more information, call Bemie Bendheim at 576-
4000.
WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 23
The Young Adults Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will be sponsoring a Holiday
Workshop on Purim this evening at 7:30 at the
Federation, 4200 Biscayne Boulevard. The Work-
shop will be led by Rabbi Simcha Freedman. For
more information, call the Young Adults Division
at 576-4000.
SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 27
Seacoast Towers West. 5600 Collins Avenue,
Miami Beach, will hold their annual funaraising
breakfast this morning. For more information, call
Bernie Bendheim at 576-4000.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28
The area-wide Day School Teachers In-Service In-
stitute will take place today at the Rabi> Alex-
ander S. Gross Hebrew Academy in Miami heach.
The Institute is under the direction of Dr. Ivlena-
chem Raab, Day School Department director of
CAJE and Sharon Horowitz, coordinauii' For
more information, please call the Central Agency
for Jewish Education at 576-4030.
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 28
There will be an all-day Institute of the Jewish
Council of Early Childhood Educators today from
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. at Temple Adath Yeshurun,
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive, North Miami
Beach. Lectures will be given on curriculum,
teaching methodology, parent-school relation-
ships, child development and others. For more in-
formation, call the Central Agency for Jewish
Education at 576-4030.


Page 16
Federation. February, 1983
THIS SUNDAY,
FEBRUARY 6TH
IS SUPER SUNDAY.
WHEN YOUR PHONE
RINGS, LET THE WORLD
HEAR YOUR ANSWER.
This Sunday your phone will be one of millions united together
in a message of love throughout Miami and the world. It will
be the largest effort ever undertaken to unite Jews
throughout America in support of the ideals and values
we share as one people. And your support has
never been needed more than it is right now.
When your phone rings this Sunday, make sure
you're at home to give the world your answer.
If we don't reach you on Super Sunday,
please call us at 573-7333 to make
your gift.
Super Sunday
Headquarters,
Temple Israel
of Greater Miami
137 N.E. 19th Street,
Miami
4
Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Campaign.



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Friday, February 4,1983/ The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
Of InterestAll AgesTeens to Adults
m
By ANNETTE LABOVITZ
Of Interest All Ages Teens to Adults- herewith
presents material of a religious, historical, and general educa-
tional nature. Author is Annette Labovitz, whose credentials
for writing in this field are enviable. Her soon-to-be published
volume under the imprimatur of the CAJE, 'Secrets of the
Past, Bridges to the Future,' is a Jewish history resource
book exploring the past through the mythology and tradi-
tions of the Jewish people, and chronologically arranged ac-
cording to theme.
Mrs. Labovitz served as a presentor at the Coalition for Al-
ternative to Jewish Education Conference at Oberlin College.
She is a member of the Junior-Senior High School faculty of
the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy, specializing
in Judaic studies, the Bible, and Jewish history.
A graduate of the Teacher's Institute of the Hebrew The-
ological College at Skokie, 111., Mrs. Labovitz is also a gradu-
ate of Barry University and the University of Miami.
She is married to Rabbi Eugene Labovitz, spiritual leader
of Temple Ner Tamid, Miami Beach, and they are the parents
of four children.
Events from the Jewish Past For the Month of Shevat
fshevat is the eleventh month of the Jewish calendar
The symbol of the month is an overflowing pitcher
vater since most of the winter rainy season in Israel
passed; the wells, cisterns, rivers, lakes are filled to
pacity.
Moshe Rabaynu, Moses our teacher, began
(towing the entire Torah on Rosh Chodesh Shevat
i first day of the month of Shevat), in the year of his
bth. forty years after the Exodus from Egypt. The
liew. commonly called the Mishne Torah
puteronomy) lasted exactly thirty-seven days.
The first Bintele Brief, a cross between letters to
Editor and Dear Abby, which became an important
krce of advice and support for Jewish immigrant
tiers in the Lower East Side of Manhattan, was
Wished in the Jewish Daily Forward. 1906.
Alexander Yannai. King of Israel, a descendant of
i t'hashmonoean Maccabbees. died in the year 3688,
>ut eighty years after the first Chanukah.
Jerusalem was proclaimed the capital of modem
M, 1950.
Moses Mendelson (1729-1786), leader of the
talah (the Jewish Enlightenment Movement), in
nany. died, 5546. His major work JERUSALEM
n the non-conflict between Judaism and
rationalism.
15 Tu BShevat, the New Year for Trees (Jewish
Arbor Day). It is customary to eat new fruits and
glorify the seven species which are peculiar to the
vegetation of Israel: wheat, barley, grapes, figs,
pomegrantes, olives, dates.
15 Shabbat Shira (The Sabbath of Song) so called
because the Torah reading for this Sabbath contains
the Song of Thanksgiving which Moses and the Jewish
people sang after the splitting of the Red Sea and their
miraculous deliverance from the Egyptians.
21 Shabtai Karakushansky (1901-1977), author of
the first Yiddish book printed in Brazil and founder of
the first Yiddish daily newspaper in South America,
died 5737.
29 Shabbat Shekalim (The Sabbath of Shekalim).
An additional text is added to the regular Torah
reading which describes the assessment and collection
of half shekels for the upkeep of the sanctuary. The
money was collected during the month of Adar
(preceding the Passover holiday) in order that all
preparations in the Holy Temple would be complete
before the arrival of the pilgrims who came to
Jerusalem for the Passover festival. By reading this
additional text, we remind ourselves of our yearning for
the redemption of the Jewish people from exile.
Zion Wilt Thou Not Ask
pon. wilt thou not ask if peace be with thy captives
at seek thy peace that are the remnant of thy
locks?
[>m west and east, from north and south the
pasting
pee from lar and near, take thou from every side
I greeting from the captive of desire, giving his
hars like dew
ermon. and longing to let them fall upon thine
lls ."
I his life. Rabbi Yehuda Halay vi yearned to step on
soil of Brett Yisrael where he could pour out his soul
line place where the Divine Presence dwells. He
amed of settling in Eretz Yisrael so that he might
a spiritual life in holy surroundings.
j|fter spending the majority of his life in exile, Rabbi
l>uda Halayvi decided to undertake the very
ardous trip to Kretz Yisrael. He was sixty years old.
boat upon which he sailed the Mediterranean was
wea with violent windstorms and the sailors feared
u lives. Rabbi Yehuda Halayvi was so confident
that his yearning for Eretz Yisrael would culminate in
his standing at the Western Wall in prayer, that he
remained calm throughout the voyage.
According to one version of the story, as soon as the
boat docked in Eretz Yisrael, Rabbi Yehuda Halayvi
started his pilgrimage up toward Jerusalem. When his
eyes beheld the gates of Jerusalem, a vision that had
filled him with burning desire for years, he became very
emotional; and upon witnessing the desolation of
Jerusalem, he tore his clothes and cried. He bent down
to kiss the holy soil, and the words of "Zion, Wilt Thou
Not Ask,"' blurted forth from the depth of his soul.
Then he proceeded to the "Kotel," (the Western Wall).
He realized that he had achieved his dreams. Rabbi
Yehuda Halayvi wrapped himself in talit and tefillin,"
(prayer shawl and phylacteries) his hands outstretched,
touching the stones of the Holy Wall, his eyes
streaming with tears. As he was praying, an Arab
horseman, seeing a Jew expressing such intense love for
Eretz Yisrael, trampled him. He died in front of the
Western Wall. He was buried in the village of Kabul, in
the territory allotted to the tribe of Asher, in the
Galilee.
A Word Game for Children .
Fill in the blanks with the Hebrew letters. You will have
U* s blessing to Patriarch Isaac and his descendants.
Cut it out. Paste it on a cardboard. Decorate it.
Make it into a plaque. Fill in the Hebrew letters.
_You will be able to hang it on your bulletin board.
|10 5 1 6 22 1 7 5 18 20 1 2 20 6 3
11 11 20 2 1 6 11 13 16
Live in this kad: I will be with you and
GeaeaUj26:3
you.
nnmasH
am l*m rm MM *M Mm*
8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1
d : DSs'fi
15
14 13 12 11 10 9
22 21 20 '119 18 17 V 16
"Gut Baaretx Haaot Veahyeh Emchah
IVaavarachacfcah." (Transliteration)
Values Clarification Series
Imagine This Situation!
A golden opportunity to make peace in the Middle
East is proposed by King Hussein of Jordan who has
called upon the PLO to recognize the right of Israel to
exist. The PLO has agreed to recognize Israel for a
period of ten years in exchange for Judea. Samaria, and
Gaza (the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). The in-
tention of the PLO is the creation of an autonomous
Palestinian State.
Write a telegram to the Prime Minister of Israel in
order to communicate to him your feelings on this
subject. The telegram must be fifteen words or less.
Mail your "telegrams" to THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN. The Editors will print sample telegrams
so readers might share each other's feelings.
Play Geography
The following are famous Biblical or historical sites.
Can you locate them on the map of modern Israel?
1 Abraham made a treaty with Avimelech, King of
the Phillistines in...... (Genesis 21:31)
2 The mountain where the binding of Isaac oc-
curred on......(modern day Jerusalem).
(Genesis 22:2) (Genesis22:2>
3 The Patriarchs and Matriarchs were buried in a
four-tiered cave in...... (Genesis 23:9, 17)
4 Jacob dreamed that angels were ascending and
descending a ladder which stood on land that would
belong to his children in...... (Genesis 28:19)
5 Jacob bought a plot of land in Israel as a down
payment on the property which G-d promised his chil-
dren in...... (Genesis 33:19)
6 Our Matriarch Rachel was buried in.......
symbolic that her children would pass her grave when
they return home from exile. (Jeremiah 31: 15,16)
7 The cities of..............and......were
on Samuel, the prophet's circuit as he travelled around
teaching the Jewish people. (I Samuel 7:11, 17)
8 David hid in the desert of......when he fled
from King Saul. (I Samuel 24:1.2)
9 ......(modern day Eilat) was the southern port
for King Solomon's trading ships. (I Kings 9:26)
10 F.liyahu the prophet proved the existence of One
G-d on...... (I Kings 18:19)
11 Rabbi Akiva was buried on the outskirts of
...... In modem times, the city is noted for its hot
spring baths.
12 Rabbi Moses ben Nachman (Ramban)
established a Yeshiva in......after he fled from
Christian Spain in the middle of the thirteenth century;
thus paving the way for increased settlement in the
Holy Land.
13 The mystics ascended to the heights of the
mountains of......to greet the Sabbath Queen.
14 A group of Jewish residents bought two
stretches of sand dunes in 1909 and built a garden
suburb which they called.....
15 ......Airport.
MMMH
-MMOO
"i si '** Mi m -si latno 'aasi a f 'ianm) awaj t .'u u
tmm miummmm immw -t 'sw*w -w i '**$ jsaa. i


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, February 4, 1983
*"/
Temple Zion Rabbi and Fiancee to be Bm
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro,
Temple Zion spiritual leader, and
his fiancee. Michele Shopsin
Leatherwood. will be guests of
honor at a special Oneg Shabbat
given by the temple following
late services. Friday. Feb. 11.
The bride-to-be's parents, who
are long-time temple
Abel Holtz, right, president and chairman of the board of Capi-
tal Bank, discusses the latest situation in the Middle East with
Israel's Ambassador to the United States, Moshe Arens. Holtz
recently met with Arens and pledged Capital Bank's continued
support of Israel's economic growth and development with th*
purchase of a SI Million Note to be used for agricultural
projects and the building of development towns and roads in
the Jewish State.
An Annual Salute to Israel on behalf of the State of Israel
Bonds Organization was held by residents of Tower 41 at which
time Abraham and Faye Cohen were honored with Israel's
Negev Award, recognizing participation in Jewish philanthrop-
ic and service organizations. The Cohens have been active in
synagogue-affairs, as well as the Israel Bonds Organization and
other Jewish causes. The award was presented by Howard
Klein. Israel Bonds executive director, at left.
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"And it came to pass on the third day. when it was morning
that there were thunders and lightnings and a thick cloud upon
the mount, and the voice of a horn exceeding loud"
tExod. 19.16).
YITRO
YITRO Word reached Jethro. Moses' father-in-law, and a
priest of Midian. of what God had done for the Israelites. He
went to meet Most.* in the desert. Jethro advised Moses to ap-
point judges, in order to ease the burden of his sole leadership;
Moses should confine himself to the most difficult questions. In
the third month, the children of Israel heard the Ten Command-
ments at Mount Sinai. God's voice declared: "I am the Lord thy
God Thou shalt have no other gods before Me. Thou shalt
not make unto thee a graven image Thou shalt not take the
name of the Lord thy God in vain Remember the sabbath
day. to keep it holy Honor they father and thy mother .
Thous shalt not murder Thou shalt not commit adultery .
Thou shalt not steal Thou shalt not bear false witness
against they neighbor Thou shalt not covet they neighbor's
house wife nor any thing that is thy neighbor's (Exodus
20.2-14).
(Tht recounting of the Weekly Portion of the Law it extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History ol the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, SIS, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, M.V. 1M3S. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.)
Bar Mitzvah
JOYCELYN BEJAR
Joycelyn Bejar. daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Jose Bejar, will be
called to the Torah as a Bat Mitz-
vah Friday evening, Feb. 4 at
Temple Menorah.
The celebrant is a student in
the Temple Menorah Heh Class
and is active in Kadima. She at-
tends Nautilus Junior High
School where she is in the sev
enth grade. Joycely is an honor
student.
Mr. and Mrs. Bejar will host
the Oneg Shabbat following serv-
ices in honor of the occasion.
PETER KLEIN
Peter William Klein will be-
come a Bar Mitzvah on Feb. 5 at
Temple Emanu-El. Dr. Irving
Lehrman will officiate.
Peter is a student at Lehrman
Day School and is in the seventh
grade. He has been on the
Rabbi's Honor Roll numerous
times and is in the gifted
program at the school. Peter is
interested in science, and he en-
joys playing the piano and ice
skating.
Special guests celebrating with
Peter will include Betty Gellen.
Maria Koranyo. Laslo Smeltzer.
Ruth Aaron, and Mendel and
Anne Klein.
There will be a reception Feb. 6
at the Konover Hotel.
Brandeis Luncheon
Brandeis University National
Women's Committee. Miami
Chapter, will hold a luncheon in
the Blue Room of the Imperial
House Feb. 8 at noon honoring
Cynthia Shulman of Newton.
Mass.. national president.
Co-presidents of the chapter
are Josephine Friedman and
Helen Glazier.
Miami Beach
ERUV HOTLINE
653-0914
Call within 2 hours
before shabbos
Rabbinical Council ol America
_________Florida Region
National Hebrew
Israeli Gift Center Inc.
ReligiousBar Mitzvah sets
Crystal'Gifts
1507 Washington Avenue
'305.532 2210
Tim Jewish Bondfap
rurll.fi ItKfteti iMlUh'ltvisft Wttfetf
Printed In English
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>n*i

hi
V. t
congregants,
event
f" host
V
sven ,n celebration 1
BOUpk s engagement. '
Dr. Shapiro, who Wi|| offa
at the services, will u 1 *1
Zion Choir will perf '"
Avron Smolensky. choir?
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting Time: 5:47
TEMPLE ADATHVESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Orlve
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
Frt..H5nn
Sal. 130 am
MM
Son 6 am end 5 pm
Mon through Frl.. 7 30 am end S pm
Sal 6 30 am and 5(
ipm
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Avenlura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saltzman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchinsky. Cantor
Frl.. 8:15 pm. YKJdUh le replace Hebrew reed-
ing* Manage delivered In Yiddiah
Sat ,8:45 am
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hollman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein. Associate
Rabbi
Frl 8 15 (Hi.
Sal 9 '5am and 11 15am
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Zvl Adler. Cantor
Late Frlde, Canines^
8 pm
***> Morning ^
9 am
Sermon at 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami B.*~
532-6421 W
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schilf
TEMPLE ISRAEL Ol QTmSiB
Miami's Pionaai Ra/oim Coneraoaha.
137 N.E.191h St.. Miami. 57JS9U
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595 5055
Senior Rabbi: Hatkell M. Bornii
Assl. Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Salkin
Cantor Jacob G. Bornitgirt
Student Cantor: Racheiie H*n
Frl 8 pm. Downtown Rabbi Banyi m ,
Notmen Lipotl. Super Shabbo* mnm
Cantor Bom* lain. "Tha world" i F,m s
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral War 2625 SW 3rd Avenue
South Dad* 7500 SW 120th Street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Oade Chapel
Frl.. a pm. Hedaeeeh Shabbat
Set.. 10 am. junior Congregation Service.
Coral Way Senctuary
Sat., am. Shabbat Servlcea with Rabbi
Auerbach and Cantor Upaon. Bat Mltnah.
Suzanne Heller
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Rion|
Coral Gables 667<5t?|
Michael B. Eisenslat. Rabbi
Frl. 8:15 pm. Sabbath S*rvw
Weekly Torih Portion Mr.
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 SW. 12Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858 6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Frl.. 8:15 pm. Rabbi Shapiro will dlacuaa
"A Llfe'a Or**m "
Sal. 6 45 am and 5 pm
Sun 8 am and 5 pm
Daily Mlnyan Sen 7 45 am and 5 pm
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
891 5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorfinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Frl. 8 pm
Sal.. 9 am. Leonard Relaman.
Bar Mltnah. twilight
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave MB. Fl. 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. A 41st St. 538 7231
Dr. Leon Kronish. Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Conviser
Frl 8 15 pm. Dr Kronl*h wllI apeak on
hie recent trip to lerael
Sat.. 10 -\ eervtcea.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Friday Evening. Bel Mltnah of Rebecca
Wlleneky Saturday Morning. Bar Mitzvah ol
Adam Zuckermen.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel 534 9776
OR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
EDWARD BARON. Cantor
Frl. 7 30 pm
Sat .*30em
TEMPLE MENORAH
62075th St Miami Baach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sal.. 9 am
TEMPLE NERTAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave..
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Fn, 815pm. Sal. 645 er
Dally morning iervice* it I *"
Sunday morning *ervicet it a X"
________Evening Service! 5 30 0" _
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDAUl
15410 SW 75 Circle Lane I
Miami. Fl <*'" """SI
Rabbi Warren Kas:tl M""!
Rabbi Spaeka on torah poraon Srt/4*
Fn 5 15 pm SaDbalh ServKM
S*l 9 30 *m nd 5 30 pm Mi"c-ii
Daily Morning Minyant M 41" >
IWFIl"
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE22*
North Dade's Reform Coflcjteyw L
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi JS*M
Julian I. CooK. Associate Riw
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S.Ramsay. Administ'i*
Frl.. 7:30 pm. Family -""^S.
Februery Birthday. ^SSm
Toreh Portion YUrotj**-"*
Haiierar.-leeleh6' 13.7 n^
Frl. 5 15 and 6
Set. 6 30 am end

RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schlf I
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone, 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Office
TEMPLE ZION <*"Sj|
8000 Miller Dr. /' "
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. RW
M,n,.nS.~.c..Mo"41h.'.'"
Sabbath Eve Serve*" WP
Sjbbath Service!lei"
Queete Ar. *'"" a j
Fn^. Family S^ ***,,
.HI Weea all children"5r6#
Retlgioue School Slue** "
B
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UNITED SYNAGOGUE
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Ml ot4 M.,oid *fZ*ZSt>i
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HEBREW CONGREGA^^
Doral Executlv. Off*&
NWa2Ave..Sui2^M'^,cf
33166.592-4792 R^^ I
LHtman. reglo"'1 dl^,^