The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02816

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Volume 56 Number 3
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, January 21,1983
fnd Shochu
Sy Mall M Cants
Price 50 Cents
The SAMS, the Soviet Union's biggest surface-to-air missile, which
Moscow Intends to supply to Syria. Two launching sites are being prepared
deep Inside Syrian territory for the missiles, which are 54 feet long
Syria's SAM-5 Missiles Cause Alarm
By YORAM KESSEL
London Chronicle Syndicate
JERUSALEM Moscow's renewed
supply of high-quality weaponry to the
Syrians as part of the Soviet reequipment of
the Syrian armed forces is viewed in I reel as a
serious development.
It is being taken here as a clear signal to the United
States that the Russians have no intention of giving up
their close involvement with Damascus.
AMONG THE arms in the pipeline are long-range
SAM-5 ground-to-air missiles, and this build-up could
adversely affect the outcome of the current talks with
Are They Only
Paper Threat'?
Lebanon about the withdrawal of all foreign forces from
I-ebanon and the normalization of Israeli-Lebanese
relations.
If. as some officials here believe, the Soviet intention
is to encourage the Syrians to back-track on their
previously stated readiness to withdraw from Lebanon,
this would put in jeopardy the entire effort put
together by the United States to produce a stable
situation by bringing about the withdrawal of all
foreign troops from Lebanon.
Another reason for the Soviet Union's willingness to
supply SAM-5s to the Syrians, it is thought here, is the
desire to counter the impression given by the fighting
in Lebanon last year that Soviet weaponry is inferior to
that of the West.
ISRAEL'S CONCERN was underlined recently
when an Army spokesman gave the first public in-
dication that the Russians plan to deploy SAM-5s in
Syria the first time that they will have been sent
outside Russia.
Continued on Page 19-A
Israel Angered by Reports
Begin's Visit May be Postponed
resident von Hindenburg (right) congratulates Adolf Hitler,
vhum he has just named chancellor. January, 1933.
50 Years Ago
rhis Month
How Hitler Took
Over Germany
By HENDRIK PETERS
BONN (DaD) January 30, 1933, the day Adolf
(itler came to power in an economically and socially
isrupted Germany, was the blackest day in recent
erman history. But few realized its importance 60 years
Everyone had false hopes.
Among conservatives, Hitler was felt to be a useful
it whose Utopian ideas might enable the Reich to regain
iperial power. Left-wingers, including Social Democrats
id many outside observers, felt the Nazi regime
wouldn't last. Hitler, they imagined, would be here today
~d gone tomorrow.
Continued on Page 8-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Premier Menachem
Begin'8 office has reacted
angrily to reports from
Washington hinting that
unless there is quick prog-
ress in the negotiations be-
tween Israel and Lebanon,
Begin's visit to President
Reagan at the White House
next month might be post-
poned.
Begin's media spokesman, Uri
Porat. denounced reports to that
effect carried on the State-owned
Kol Israel Radio as "ridiculous"
and "calculated to fabricate his-
tory." It is inconceivable, he said,
that a superpower would base its
policy decisions on "the caprices
of certain officials and journal-
ists."
He denounced the "infantile
standards" reflected by such re-
porting and insisted that the U.S.
delegation, far from being impa-
tient with Israel over the lack of
progress in the negotiations to
date has in fact "drawn very,
very close to Israel's starting
position" which centers on draft-
ing an agenda for the talks.
Nevertheless, the Reagan Ad-
ministration appeared to be sig-
Continued on Page 16- A
Reagan is Key
Press for Normalization,
Jews Plead With Shultz
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) A group of
American Jewish leaders
urged Secretary of State
George Shultz to put the
United States behind Is-
rael's efforts to normalize
relations with Lebanon in-
stead of opposing it.
Julius Herman, chairman of
the Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish
Organizations, also said that
Shultz was told that while it was
the Arab countries that were
"procrastinating" on President
Reagan's Middle East peace ini-
tiative, Israel was being blamed
for the lack of progress.
BERMAN SPOKE to re-
porters after he led a group of 14
members of the Presidents con-
ference and leading Jewish Re-
Continued on Page 18-A
Secretary Shultz
Did Canada Try to Keep Jews
Out After WWII?. Page 8 A


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Page 2A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 21,1963
At recent dedication ceremonies of the new
Mazer Fund at Tel Aviv University are (left*
to right) William Mazer, of New York; Prof.
Haim Ben-Shahar, president of Tel Aviv
University, presenting a plaque; Daniel
Ross, New York; and Benno Gitter,
chairman of Tel Aviv University's Executive
Council.
Headlines
Einstein Archives Going to Hebrew U.
The Albert Einstein Archives, containing
43,000 documents, including much of the
scientist's correspondence and more than 30
unpublished scientific manuscripts, has been
transferred to its ultimate home at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem.
Scholars at the University will immediately
begin work with the papers, said Prof. Reuven
Yaron, who has overall charge of the archives.
Since Einstein's death in 1965, the papers,
were housed at the Institute for Advanced
Studies in Princeton, where the scientist spent
the last years of his life. They were flown to
Jerusalem recently.
Charles D. Lowenstein of Atlanta has been
named national chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal's Operation Upgrade, a nationwide
program of leadership development and solicitor
training, UJA National Chairman Robert E.
Loup announces.
Lowenstein, who succeeds UJA National
Vice Chairman Bud Levin of St. Louis in the post,
will work with communities across the country to
develop and to strengthen programs to upgrade
giving and to improve skills of volunteer
solicitors.
The new Operation Upgrade chairman is a
member of the Executive Committee of the UJA
National Campaign Cabinet State of Israel
Bonds.
Avi Feingiass, director of public relations for
the American ORT Federation, has been elected
to a second year of office as president of the
American Jewish Public Relations Society.
Founded in 1957, the AJPRS is the
organization of public relations practitioners in
the field of Jewish communal service, dedicated to
the advancement of professional standards for
public information and interpretation of Jewish
affairs in the United States and abroad.
Other officers elected include vice presidents,
Barbara Rogoff, of the East Orange New Jersey
Jewish Community Federation; Martin War-
mbrand, City University of New York; Hyman
Kuperstein, Anti-Defamation League of B'nai
B nth, and Frank Wundohl of the JWB.
Secretary is Marth Loewenstein, and
treasurer is Hyman Brickman of HI AS. Toby
Willig of Emunah Women was elected Israeli-
Diaspora relations officer, and Dorothy Steinberg
was elected publications editor.
A top-leva] Brandek University delegation
led by President Marver H. Bernstein was invited
to the People's Republic of China late in
December to meet with senior government of-
ficials and lecture at universities on policy issues
in education, economics and social welfare.
The trip, initiated by Brandeis Heller
Graduate School economist Leonard J. Hausman,
is expected to provide American academicians a
rare opportunity to learn first-hand how Chinese
social policy operates in the area of human ser-
vices.
"The People's Republic is anxious to learn
how our society is dealing with the problems of
aging, unemployment, health care and other
socio-economic concerns," Bernstein said.
Louis Brause, chairman of the Real Estate
and Construction Industry Division of ORT, will
be honored as ORT Man of the Year at the 1983
American ORT Federation National Conference
luncheon Jan. 22 in New York.
The award is "in recognition of his out-
standing support of ORT's program of vocational
and technical education in its network of 800
schools and training centers serving Jews of all
ages throughout the world."
In addition to his work for ORT, Brause has
long been active in the Real Estate Division of
Israel Bonds. He is past vice president of the
B'nai B'rith Real Estate Lodge in New York, a
leader of the Real Estate Division of the UJA, a
senior member of the National Association of
Review Appraisers, and past co-chairman of the
Education Committee of the Real Estate Board of
New York.
Forty-eight Israeli university students
seriously wounded in the fighting in Lebanon will
receive special grants from the Memorial
Foundation for Jewish Culture, it was announced
recently by Dr. Jerry Hochbaum, Foundation
executive director.
At the Foundation's annual meeting, which
took place in Paris during the Lebanon conflict,
the Board of Trustees voted to allocate $50,000
for "special grants for students in Israeli
universities and yeshivot hesder who were
wounded in the Lebanon campaign."
The Executive Board of the North American
Aliyah Movement announces the appointment of
Marsha Kirshblum as executive director for 1982-
83. Kirshblum, an American who made aliyah and
has been living in Jerusalem since 1969, has been
NAAM's Israel liaison for the past year. She
succeeds Rabbi Moshe Berliner who recently left
the position to make aliyah.
Kirshblum, a resident of Rechavia,
Jerusalem, was assistant principal of an
elementary school in Beit Shemesh, and program
coordinator for the Jewish Agency's Institute for
Leadership Development in Jerusalem.
A new high-technology company has
recently been founded by the Technion Research
and Development Foundation Ltd. and a team of
Technion scientists.
The company will make use of advanced
genetic methods and technology in the
development of vaccines against animal and
human viral diseases. This involves the ap-
plication of knowledge in the area of recombinant
DNA gained through the years by the company's
scientists.
The scientists in charge of directing this
research are Dr. Jonathan Kuhn and Prof. Haim
Manor of the Technion Department of Biology.
Their team includes other experts with PhD or
MSt degrees, technicians and other laboratory
workers.
Chief Rabbi Says Mastic Heart
Patient Forfeits Status as Human
TEL AVIV (ZINS) In an interview with the
weekly journal, Koteret Rashit, Chief Rabbi Goren said
that an individual who receives a plastic heart forfeits his
status as a human being as the artificial device cannot
fulfill the symbolic functions of the living organ. He said
that someone who kills an individual with a plastic heart
could not be accused of homicide. But he emphasized that
the recent operation in the United States in which a man
received an artificial heart was justified, for the Jewish
law required that everything be done to save a life.
Attempt Being Made in Rome
To Bridge Gap Back to Jews
By lisa bulk;
ROME (JTA) The
first meeting between
leaders of Rome's Jewish
community and the power-
ful leftwing Italian General
Confederation of Labor
marked an important step
forward in the relations be-
tween Roman Jews and the
labor movement.
The Italian left has been ac-
cused by Jews here of having
actively fostered the climate of
anti-Semitism that led to the
bombing of Rome's main syna-
gogue on Oct. 9 in which a two-
year-old child was killed and 37
persons were wounded.
AFTER THE Jewish, com-
munity's initial shock at the
tragedy and its self-imposed
withdrawal from the rest of the
city, Roman Jewish leaders cau-
tiously accepted the idea that it
would be beneficial to have meet-
ings with labor leaders so that
each side could engage in some
soul-searching about the anti-
Semitic climate in Italy and the
responsibility each side had in
finding ways to work together to
eliminate that climate.
At the meeting here attended
by Chief Rabbi Elio Toaff and
labor leader Luciano Lama, along
with experts from both sides, the
Confederation of Labor an-
nounced a concrete plan of action
to combat anti-Semitism at a
forthcoming meeting between the
Jewish community and the all-
embracing Federation of Italian
Unions.
One element of the plan calls
for an initiative on the part of
city officials, teachers, students
and parents to be more attentive
to the selection of textbooks
which avoid distortions of Jewish
history and to reject those text-
books that present "distorted in-
formation on the Jewish ques-
tion'' and contain "stereotypes
and generalizations." This effort
would also include the eventual
replacement of the current
standardized teaching of religion
Catholicism with the teach-
ing of "the history of religions'
in public schools.
THE PLAN also calls for the
""restoration of the ghetto which
is to be considered one of the
most interesting areas of the his-
torical urban center;" and for co-
operation between the Jewish in
stitutions and the mass media to
develop a project on the Jews in
Rome that would include a
photographic exhibition of
Roman Jewish life from 1870 to
today.
Another element of the plan is
for the knowledge of Jewish his-
tory and culture "an impor
tant part of the city's life" to
be presented to all segments of
Rome's society in an organized
way through conferences, de-
bates, exhibitions and the con-
servation of the city's Jewish cul-
tural heritage. This would include
the "delicate relations between
Christian and Jewish culture in
Rome."
The plan was developed. Toaff
and Lama pointed out, in the be-
lief that incipient working class
anti-Semitism, which they cau-
tioned should "be neither exag-
gerated nor minimized." is best
fought with the tools of educa-
tion.
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-" a

"
News in Brief
Ford, Carter Rap Israel for Settlements
By JTA Services
WASHINGTON Former
Presidents Ford and Carter have
called Israel's settlement policy
on the West Bank the "major ob-
stacle" to moderate Arab coun-
tries joining the Middle East
peace process.
"Israel must halt its settle-
ment policy a move that alone
might break the diplomatic log
l*jam." the former Presidents said
in a jointly copywritten article in
the forthcoming February
Readers Digest-
Ford and Carter, bitter rivals
in the 1976 Presidential cam-
paign, became friends when they
went to the funeral of Egyptian
President Anwar Sadat. They
| have issued several joint state-
ments on various subjects but
is their first on the Middle
]ast. Their article was in re-
| sponse to a request from Readers
Digest for their analysis on how
to achieve peace in the Mideast.
The two former Presidents also
I called n the Arab countries to
demonstrate "the courage to step
forward to negotiate for a Pales-
tinian homeland with an Israel
that they recognize as a fellow
nation In particular, they urged
Kinn Hussein of Jordan to join
[the autonomy negotiations which
Ithey said would be a "dramatic
gesture" that could put the
government of Israeli Premier
Menachem Regin "under im-
mense pressure to reciprocate."
Panel of Inquiry
[.Holds Final Session
JERUSALEM The com-
kiission of inquiry into the Beirut
refugee camps massacre held its
[final session Sunday. The panel,
|mceting behind closed doors,
heard attorneys for six of the nine
witnesses who had been warned
last November that they might
IIm' harmed if certain conclusions
Iwere drawn on the basis of their
original testimony.
.Since the warning was issued,
jsix of the nine senior political and
military officials either reap-
nearad before the commission,
lucre represented by legal counsel
lor submitted written responses to
questions posed by fellow wit-
Inesses
Premier Menachem Begin.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
land chief of army intelligence
ICien Yehoshua Saguy did not
|a\ail themselves of the oppor-
tunity to reappear, examine evi-
Idence and question witnesses.
Each submitted letters to the
Kommission essentially reaffirm-
liiif; their original testimony with-
lout explanation or embellish
bent
I he commission will now have
sift through 12.000 documents
and other evidence collected over
e past 2' i months. There was
to indication as to when its final
i port and recommendation will
e ready.
I Bolivia May Kick Out
'Butcher of Lyon'
?ARIS The Bolivian public
[prosecutor. Hernando Acha Siles.
has asked the Supreme Court to
An-nell
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Kosher
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Maahaiach a Synagogue
on Premises
TV Live Show-Movies
Special Diets Served
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_Wrlle lot son Rait
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extradite Klaus Altmann, who as
Klaus Barbie was known as the
"butcher of Lyon" during the
Nazi occupation of France, to
West Germany, according to
French radio reports from La
Paz.
Acha Siles told the court that
West Germany had demanded
his extradition for war crimes and
genocide and that the extradition
request should be honored be-
cause the two countries have an
extradition treaty.
Barbie, who fled to South
America after the war and ob-
tained Bolivian citizenship under
the name of Altmann, has been
accused of the deportation and
death of thousands of Jews and
French resistance fighters.
The French government, which
sentenced him to death in absen-
tia after the war tor crimes he
committed while he served as a
gestapo chief in Lyon, has several
times asked for his extradition.
Panel Recommends
Palestinians' Release
TEL AVIV A special ap-
peals committee recently set up
by the Israel army has recom-
mended the release of 150 Pales-
tinian prisoners of the 5,400 de-
tained for the past eight months
at Ansar camp in south Lebanon.
Armv sources said some of the
detainees have already been
turned over to the International
Red Cross for return to their
homes. The appeals committee so
far has heard the cases of only
1.100 detainees.
I^eah Tzimel, a Jerusalem
lawyer who frequently defends
members of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization, charged that
the army established the appeals
committee only under interna-
tional pressure and just a day be-
fore the Israel Supreme Court
was to hear an appeal agr-inst the
Ansar detentions last November,
six months after the war in Leba-
non started.
Thousands Demonstrate
Against Settlements
JERUSALEM Thousands
of demonstrators protested Sun-
day against settlements in
Judaea and Samaria. The protest
rally took place in the brand new
partially completed town of
Efrat, halfway between Bethle-
hem and Hebron.
Peace Now activists joined
forces for the first time with
activists from poverty neighbor-
hoods who charged that the
government was taking money
away from public housing
projects and investing it in West
Bank settlements.
The demonstrators arrived in
about 20 buses and more than
100 private vehicles from all over
the country. Organizers kept the
protest top secret and staged a
diversionry demonstration in
Elkana near Nablus to prevent
pre-emptive action by the
security forces. The Efrat protest
ended without incident-
Mitterrand Enjoys
Goldenberg's Deli
PARIS President Francois
Mitterrand returned last week to
the Rue des Rosiers restaurant
where an Arab hit squad killed
six people last August. Mitter-
rand this time came just for the
pleasure of a typical Jewish meal
at Jo Goldenberg's deli where the
attack had taken place.
The President, accompanied by
his Jewish brother-in-law, Roger
Hanin, and a young Jewish poli-
tician, Roger Gerard Sch-
wartzenberg, arrive unannounced
and unexpected. Last time Mit-
terrand visited the Rue des
Rosiers was on the day following
the attack when he attended
funeral services for the victims.
This time, the President, in a
good mood, chose a shmaltz her-
ring, piroshkis and boiled beef
with horseradish, washed down
with a glass or two of vodka.
It was not just a gastronomic
treat. Eyewitnesses told the Jew-
ish Telegraphic Agency, Mitter-
rand also wanted to show his
solidarity with the people in the
"Pletzel," the old Jewish ghetto.
He sat for close to three hours
with Jo Goldenberg and some of
his customers to "chew the fat"
and discuss the situation.
Israel, Lebanon
Hold Parallel Talks_______
JERUSALEM The negotia-
tions between Israel, Lebanon
and the United States switched
to a double track over the week-
end. The official talks being held
alternately in Kiryat Shmona and
Khalde will continue on the basis
of the agenda agreed to last
Thursday. But parallel negotia-
tions involving U.S. special Am-
bassador Philip Habib with Is-
raelis and Lebanese apparently in
shuttles between the two coun-
tries will proceed apace.
Premier Menachem Begin, who
announced the scheme at Sun-
day's Cabinet meeting, appointed
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Friday, January 21, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
tor general of the Foreign Minis-
try, to comprise the negotiating
team with Habib.
Begin explained that the
Shamir-Sharon- Kimche team
would seek to reach agreements
in principle with Habib. The de-
tails would be worked out at the
official talks at Khalde and Kir-
yat Shmona.
Shamir. Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon and David Kimche. direc-
French Protest Anti-Israel Bias
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) The Representative Council of
French Jewry protested against French policy in the Mid-
dle East and against Foreign Minister Claude Cheysson's
recent declarations which are perceived to have a strong
anti-Israel bias.
CRIF ALSO CALLED on the French government to
close the PLO office in Paris and to expel its representa-
tive.
The CRIF, in a communique, charged that Cheysson's
statement last week in Cairo claiming "there is no Israeli
peace plan" was tantamount to a denunciation of the
Camp David agreements.
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""*"**-----* ---- T-...______ t in....
Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 21,1983
The Party in Beirut to Which Israel Wasn't Invited
Nobody trusts anybody else. Least of all,
do the Israelis trust either the Syrians, or
the Lebanese, or the United States. And
why should they?
There was a party thrown by Lebanon's
Am in Gemayel in Beirut the other night.
Everybody was there, including the
French, Italians and Americans, all of
whom are part of the UNIFIL forces in that
beleaguered country. The party was in
celebration of the unification of Beirut and
the new independence of that nation.
Naturally, the Israelis weren't even
invited. Who liberated the city from the
clutches of the PLO and the Syrians? Who
created the circumstances that led to
Gemayel's presidency? As one Israeli
newspaper editorialized: The French? The
Italians? The Americans?
And yet, Israel wasn't invited. Why
should the Israelis trust anybody? The
victory they forged is being turned into a
defeat. President Reagan's own peace ini-
tiative of Sept. 1 will assure the ultimate
triumph of Yasir Arafat. Even skilled
Israeli observers are finally coming to
realize that few of the objectives envisioned
at the time of the start of the war have been
realized.
Israeli-Syrian Partnership?
But all this is from the Israeli point of
view. In what sense do the others not trust
the Israelis? One obviously is that the
Israelis are insisting upon the exit first of
the Palestinians, followed by the Syrians,
after which the Israelis themselves say
they will depart.
Another is Israel's call for Early Warn-
ing Systems to be set up in southern
Lebanon and the exclusion of UNIFIL
forces within the 25-mile area north of the
Israeli-Lebanese border.
This is a demand that suggests especial-
ly to the Arabs that Israel has secret ambi-
tions for a chunk of Lebanese territory.
Both together were the substance of the
bruhaha surrounding the early stages of
the negotiations which the Lebanese found
absolutely unacceptable. .
In the face of all of this suspicion, do the
talks as they now shape up seem destined
for success? Hardly, for new rumors seem
to be brewing of the most impossible
alliance of all.
Monday, the Israelis found it necessary
to deny reports that they have arrived at a
secret agreement with the Syrians no less,
an agreement establishing spheres of in-
fluence in Lebanon for each.
Why not such a rumor? It establishes for
the Arabs the credibility of their belief that
the I sraelis have wanted a chunk of
Lebanon from the beginning. In the end,
the negotiations hardly matter, since
events will take their turn in Lebanon in
the same way that they took their turn in
Egypt following the Camp David accord.
Despite the talk to the contrary. Despite
the rumors.
Happy State of Affairs
In Dallas, Tex., the other week, there
was a real breakthrough in relations
between Jews and Christians. Site was a
conference bringing together seminary
students and faculty from major Catholic,
Jewish Florxdiar.
nrriCEan4n.AVT-110Mi: HkM Mian II. JJIJi r
PO BoaOlltTJ Man Florida UIOI
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Protestant and Jewish institutions
throughout the nation.
By all accounts, the results were
phenomenal. It turned out that not one of
the Christian seminarians had ever talked
in any meaningful way with a Jew before
a pretty dismal state of affairs for future
leaders of American Christendom.
By the end of the two-day seminar spon-
sored by the American Jewish Committee,
young Christian men and women testified
that this had been one of the most
important religious experiences of their
lives. They were, they declared, now
determined to wash themselves clean of the
negative stereotypes they held about Jews
and Judaism.
They were, they asserted, now
determined to develop a positive apprecia-
tion of Judaism and the Jewish people. If
true, this is indeed a happy state of affairs.
Journalism's Arrogance of Power
sum* mi-iins KArt.s i
Vaara Mtao H.aali.aii.i I
Owl of town roiMHrv wnon
Advanra .local Ami (Ma Yrar tin 00 Tno Iran tJ4 <*l TV*.
-"Loral Ami l.a.1 Fndar oara month no Iraor*. Sam Jan. II Si,
Friday, January 21, 1983
Volume 56
7SHEVAT5743
Number 3
THE FINDINGS of the com
mission of inquiry into the
Shatila and Sabra massacres
have yet to be published. But
ABC-TV has already produced
and rushed into an airing of its
own verdict in a program called,
"Oh. Tell the World What Hap-
pened."
This means that ABC-TV has
acted as both judge and jury in
the tragic event, short-circuiting
the conclusions of the commis-
sion of inquiry as if it were an ir-
relevancy to its own 'findings."
Furthermore. "Oh. Tell the
World What Happened" com-
pounds its chutzpah with the
kind of defective, one-sided re-
porting of the events that led up
to the massacre reminiscent of its
fictional treatment of the war in
Ix-banon in the first place.
IT IS a case of crippled jour-
nalistic standards not unique to
ABC-TV throughout the war, but
characteristic of the electronic
and printed media in general.
"An arrogance of power." is
how Phil Baum puts it in his dis-
cussion of the media as they have
evolved over the past two
decades. Baum is associate
executive director of the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress, who was in
Miami last week to discuss with
editors and TV newscasters the
quality of their reporting of the
recent Lebanese agony.
Speaking of the arrogance of
the media's power. Baum says
that "it goes beyond Lebanon.
America is a news-hungry nation
interested in information as
quickly as possible. The tragic
informational distortions we be-
came aware of in Lebanon exist
in too many other areas of news-
gathering also."
ARGUES BAUM: The
American people want to know.
The increasing question is: what
are they being given as fact?"
With respect to the printed
word. Baum points out the para-
dox in a country proud of the
speed and presumable accuracy
of its reporting. "In too many
cities, there is only one news-
paper." he says. Times are hard,
and the number of newspapers, iri
some cases major newspapers,
that have gone bankrupt is le-
gion.
"I'm not offering anyJ'acciiM
here, says Brown, referring to
the recent indictment bv Norman
Podhoretz of the media's han-
dling of the war in Lebanon. "But
the truth is that as the number of
newspapers decline, their power
tends to concentrate."
Baum is quick to explain: "We
don't have to look to deliberate
editorial malice to understand
what is happening. In any given
newspaper, there is a limit dic-
tated by the availability of space
to the amount of information that
can be presented. Even if an
editor or reporter sincerely be-
lieves he is being objective in his
reporting, the fact is that he must
choose between what will be
printed and what lack of room
forces him to leave out."
THE CATCH here is "objec-
tivity because, as Baum sees it
editorial discretion in the choos-
ing process is by its nature sub-
jects. If there were no other
reason U>;if-yei.**iwwlQt.bjrA
PHIL BAUM: Monopoly of truth
1
1

I
;.;
I Mindlin
I !
the choosing process in itself
opens the door to bias.
Hut for people at home." says
Baum. "When they read their
paper, that is the whole of reality.
For people at home, there is little
awareness that what they have
been reading is what some editor,
some reporter would like them to
read, which is merely a part of a
larger whole reality."
I remind Baum that this has
always been true. "Yes," he
agrees Hut it has grown much
worse since the '60's. Today's
media, especially the electronic
media, are both sanctimonious
and arrogant.
"Their rise to these heights of
power began with the civil rights
movement and the burning of the
major cities. From there, the
journey took the media through
\ .etnam and the Watergate era."
SAYS BAUM: In each case. '
the media did more than report or
even interpret the meaning of the
news In each case, the media
preached they reported the
news selectively as they saw it
and then they editorialized.
The method caught on like
wildfire u developed, says
Baum "the world of personal
journalism, the neu journalism"
of word-practitioners like Nor-
man Mailer, who reported more
how thev felt about events than
the events themselves
In terms of Israel and its
perat.on ,n Ubanon. this has
wto devastating iMM0_MM.
Says Baum: "The American
media have fallen for the
mythology that the Palestinians1
have never had a fair shake -
that Israel has preoccupied them
lor far too long. And so in Leba-
non, they began repairing their
earlier preoccupation. Now. they
are 'redressing' the imbalance
their belief that Israel has had
it too good in the past."
I ASK Baum: How do you
reconcile freedom of the press
with calling upon editors and re
porten to be less self-righteous,
less sanctimonious?
Says Baum: "That depends
upon how you view the First
Amendment protection clause
within the limits of your own V*'*
spective."
He adds: "I was in Vietnam
during the war with Clark Kerr.
former chancellor of the Univer-
sity of California and later presi-
dent of the Carnegie Endowment
Fund Our backgrounds and
viewpoints had their clear dif-
ferences, but we both arrived at
the same conclusion: The ac-
counts of the war in the news-
papers and on television simply
didn't square with what both of
us agreed we saw."
In the end. both Baum and
Kerr were persuaded that the
media reports from Vietnam were
personal and private. "They were
not objective and valid," Baum
believes. "They were not in-
tended to inform public opinion
so much as to mold it"
HOW DOES Baum see jour
nalism shaping up now?
"Particularly in the electronic
news media," he answers. >
foresee an increasing collision be- f
tween those who purvey the new]5
and those who read it. Or watch it
and listen toil.
"As this grows, the problem
will grow, and not just for readers
or listeners. I mean." says Baum.
the lack of diversity. It's more
C**ttl...d on Pag 17-A


r- Was Garden of Eden
Near Israeli Kibbutz
Called Afikim?
Friday, January 21, 1983 The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A

By DVORA WAYSMAN
The rather whimsical
story began in a British sci-
ence magazine called
"Nature." The headline
proclaimed, "Garden of
Eden may have been near
Afikim," which of course
caused ripples at this Israe-
li kibbutz in the Jordan
Valley. The report emanat-
ed from an article dealing
with the estimated age
700.000 years of fossils
and tools found at the near-
ly excavated site of
Ubeidiya.
Kibbutz Afikim was quick to
quote reactions in its internal
newsletter, such as mothers knit-
ting fig leaves for their families;
bachelors requesting that no
apples be served in the dining-
room; warnings against poison-
ous snakes; and watchmen being
posted at the gates with flaming
swords and wings.
BUT ALL joking aside, what
do we really know about the Gar-
den of Eden? It is described with
great beauty in Genesis, as part
of the story of creation a gar-
den planted by the Lord and the
first dwelling place of Adam and
Eve. The name "Eden" is
umerian and means "plain." In
the Midrash HaGadol. it states.
"Eden is a unique place on earth,
but no creature is permitted to
know its exact location. In the
future, during the Messianic
period. God will reveal to Israel
the path to Eden. Just as
heaven is lined with rows of stars,
so the Garden of Eden is lined
with rows of the righteous who
shine like the stars."
There is much to learn from the
'jiblical story, with regard to the
profound psychology of tempta-
tion and conscience. It shows the
beginning, the progress and the
culmination of temptation, and
the consequences of sin. It has
been written, "Every man who
knows his own heart knows that
the story is true; it is the story of
his own fall. Adam is man, and
his story is ours" I McFadyen)
Contrary to popular belief,
there is no difficulty in recon-
ciling the creation story with
Darwin's theory of evolution. It
really is unimportant if the
narrative is literal or figurative
Judaism admits that the Bible
often conveys deep truths of life
and conduct by means of
allegory.
THE RABBIS often taught by
parables, and eminent Jewish
thinkers like Maimonides and
Nachmanides interpret this
chapter as a parable, with the
serpent and the personification of
man's sinful tendencies the
yttimr hara. the evil inclination.
According to the theory of
evolution, the long, slow climb
from the amoeba to man took
place over millions of years. In
the literal interpretation of
Genesis, all things were created
in six days, less than six thous-
and years ago, and man came
"from the dust of the earth."
Rabbi Israel Lipschutz (1782-
1860), in his famed Mishnah
commentary "Tiferet Yisrael."
relies on the Kabbalistic theory
that there are cycles of creation,
and the one described in Genesis
was not the first creation but the
beginning of a new cycle. The
dinosaurs and skeletons of
primitive men were the remains
of creatures from a previous
cycle.
More recently. Rabbi A. Kook
(1865-1935) declared that the
theory of evolution was in full ac-
cord with Kabbalah, with the
whole creation striving to express
itself in ever higher forms even-
tually leading to God. He main-
tained that there is no conflict
because the creation narrative
belongs to "the secrets of the
Tore''*' which must not be under-
stood literally.
NOR IS there need for the
religious to worry that the theory
of evolution degrades man. Man
can feel humble (and humility is a
virtue) because his origins are
lowly. Yet at the same time he
can be proud of his uniqueness as
the culmination of evolution.
What Jews must remember,
even in the process of evolution,
is that God planned the creative
activity. God was responsible for
both the arrival and survival of
the species. A man of faith is not
prevented by new theories or
scientific discoveries from seeing
the hand of the Maker in all His
works.
The Garden of Eden led to dif-
ferent interpretations in Jewish
and Christian doctrine. The latter
subscribe to Original Sin, accom-
panied by vilification of Woman
as the author of death and all
Continued on Page 14-A
Will Andropov Free Sharansky?
Was this how the Garden of Eden looked?
Photo was taken within walking distance of
Afikim near a local water source which the
Arabs called
strength').
Juni' ('mother
my
New Balance of Power
Andropov in Hurry to Get Things Done
Prisoner of Conscience Anatoly Sharansky
By DR. LEONID KOSSMAN
The selection of Yuri V.
Andropov as Secretary
General of the Communist
Party of the Soviet Union
marks a new era in Soviet
history. The appointment
of a former chief of the
KGB as the new party
leader is symptomatic of
the new balance of power in
the Kremlin.
On November 22, 1982, the So-
viet Central Committee promoted
Geidar Aliyev, the 59-year-old
head of the party organization in
the Transcaucasian Republic of
Azerbaijan, from candidate to
full membership in the ruling
Politburo. Aliyev was evidently
Andropov's choice. Aliyev is not
only a full member of the Polit-
buro but is also first Deputy
Prime Minister of the USSR.
TAKING INTO account the
age of Prime Minister Nikolai A.
Tikhonov, 77, no special far-
sightedness is needed to realize
that Aliyev, a former career of-
ficer of the security police, is be-
ing warmed up for replacing Tik-
honov in the near future. Thus,
the two top positions in the
Kremlin's hierarchy the post
of Secretary General of the CPSU
and that of the Prime Minister of
the USSR would be in the
hands of former high-ranking of-
ficials of the Soviet security and
intelligence service.
From the 16 full members of
the Politburo who were elected at
the 25th Party Congress (1976),
only eight have remained in of-
fice. The eight other members of
the "old guard" have either pass-
ed away or have been dropped.
When perusing the present
balance of power in the Politburo,
one can expect Andropov to alter
by means of effective KGB
control the party's power
structure. The symbiosis of the
CPSU and the KGB was not at
all beyond expectation. The party
veterans have displayed complete
inefficiency in handling the econ-
omy and foreign and interior af-
DR. LEONID KOSSMAN, a
former Assistant Professor
at the Moscow State Insti-
tute for Foreign Languages,
is presently a freelance
translator and journalist.
He is a political analyst for
the German-language news-
paper, 'Aufbau,' published
in New York City.
Yuri Andropov
fairs. In present-day Russia, the
KGB is the best informed and
probably the most efficient state
organization of the huge empire.
ANDROPOV is 68 years old.
Undoubtedly he is in a hurry to
have things done. At best, he can
stay in power for about a decade.
The predominant role of the
KGB in the new party hierarchy
of the USSR has created a com-
pletely new situation. It is by no
means a kind of liberalization.
Nevertheless it can be assumed
that the CPSU-KGB alignment,
which apparently has the support
of the upper echelons of the So-
viet armed forces might bring
about some degree of de-ideolo-
gization of Soviet policies.
In his speech to the Party's
Central committee on Nov. 22,
Continued on Page 15-A
He Would Have Been 58
This Month
How King Ignited
Jews to Tradition
By RABBI
BENJAMIN A. KAMIN
Martin Luther King, Jr.
would have been 54 years
old on Jan. 15. Since his
death at the age of 39, Dr.
King's dreams have evapo-
rated, and most Americans
have turned inward.
It is getting harder and harder
to remember how King ignited
us, changed us, and returned
American Jews to their prophetic
tradition. But he did.
The Jews, a people with gener-
ally decentralized patterns,
responded to King as to no other
American in the country's histo-
ry. In effect, he became the living
moral flagship for the nation
and especially for the liberal Jew-
ish community in the 1960's.
THE JEWS had applauded
Harry Kennedy Truman's cour-
ageous endorsement of Israel in
1948 and gathered around Bobby
Kennedy in the 1960's, but had
never involved themselves emo-
tionally and physically as was the
case with Dr. King. With unchar-
acteristic exuberance, and real
bravery, Jews trusted and
worked for Matin Luther King.
Albert Vorspan. vice president
of the Union of American Hebrew
Congregations and director of its
Commission on Social Action,
RABBI BENJAMIN A.
KAMIN is North American
director of the World Union
for Progressive Judaism.
was an associate of King in the
civil rights movement. He recalls
that the Black-Jewish alliance
was at the heart of the move-
ment. "He had an extraordinary
impact upon us," Vorspan
recalls. "Like no other non-
Jewish partner, American Jews
gave to Dr. King a blank check of
commitment."
A remarkable Black-Jewish
partnership was galvanized by
Dr. King. In the great struggle to
desegregate the South, rabbis
were hosed and beaten and jailed
alongside King and the many
other freedom fighters of all
backgrounds who joined the
battle against the tyranny of
racism.
JEWISH representation was
disproportionately high in the
dangerous Mississippi summer of
1964 and in every anti-
discrimination effort of those
times. The notorious and cold-
blooded executions in Philadel-
phia, Miss, of three young civil
rights workers in 1964 took the
lives of two Jews and one Black.
At the great March on Wash-
Continued on Page 15-A


ll-------in n
'->.- r*~:j___ t-________*
i r\nn
Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. January 21,1983
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Stand-up Comic at U of F
Friday, January Hi', i#83/ the Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
1
But She Gets Experience in Lauderdale Club
By KEITH KRIEGLER .
A North Miami Beach
resident explained that
weight was not the only
thing she gained while at
college. Marlene Kurtzack,
21, attends the University
of Florida in Gainesville
and hopes one day to be-
come the Brooke Shields of
comedy.
Marlene, daughter of Dr. and
Mrs. Irwin Kurtzack, has lived in
the Sky lake area of North Miami
Beach for 21 years. She is pre-
sently in her senior year at UF
and is majoring in public rela-
tions. Her ambition is to become
an aspiring young comedienne.
"EVERYONE needs to laugh
a little each day to make life's
toughest moments easier to get
Marlene Kurtzack
through," Marlene said as she
sipped a cup of coffee.
Dieting, "typical families,"
school, teachers and anything
else in life that frustrates people.
Marlene is sure to attack. When
speaking about her family,
Marlene remarked that education
was highly stressed. In fact, she
says "stress was highly
stressed."
For the past four years,
Marlene has been writing her own
original material and performing
her comedy routines in the
Gainesville area and in Ft. Laud-
erdale.
ONE OF Marlenes most
exciting performances came when
she was given the opportunity to
perform in her own "home
territory." The Comic Strip
Comedy Club in Ft. Lauderdale
has an amateur night every
Monday, and since "the audience
else,
was laughing at everythinj
why not me," Marlene joked.
"I want a future in comedy,
and I knew this experience would
give me the insight I needed to
test my abilities as a stand-up
comedienne," Marlene said. "I
don't know if I would be good in
stand-up, since Jewish girls don't
like to be on their feet too long.
Needless to say. I was exhausted
after my five minutes."
AN IMPORTANT part of
Marlene's act are the costumes
she uses. Girl Scout uniforms and
shmatas are a part of the attire
Marlene feels is necessary to act
out the character.
"Costumes help to emphasize
the characters I portray,"
Marlene said "They help to
separate myself from the
audience."
Marlene has performed in
coffee houses, banquets, parties,
clubs and plans to continue
comedy on a professional level.
"People may as well listen to
me now." Marlene said, "because
tickets in Vegas will cost an arm
and a leg when I hit the big
time."
\
Jewish Homes Escaped Flood Damage
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) The
president of the United Jewish
Charities of Northeast Louisiana
in Monroe, Morris Mintz, said
that the UJC had no information
that any Jewish homes, factories
or institutions in the area had
been damaged by the floods
which have ravaged the area last
week, causing estimated
damages of $100 million.
Mintz told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency, in a telephone
interview, that the UJC had
learned of one case in which a
Jewish-owned home in the Mon-
roe area had come close to being
damaged by the rampaging flood
waters but actually was not
damaged.
JEWISH
rVUKXlAL
FIHID
Come and Rejoice in the Celebration of Purim
and the Reclamation of the Land of Israel
tJ&nn444iJ dbcu/ttlovuij Sleie&n SbiAeb tlPa/um SBtiM
/Pntn 4t<4< h 4983



jfiuneete
ANNEACKERMAN
tAl&uleoeU
MARY GOLDMA
ABRAHAM BODOW
CfCobAe* Vnuibine
{Su^u/ay, iAIiiacA 6, 4983 42:00 jVc&n
5445 Collins Ave.,
Miami Beach, Florida
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn JNFFdtn
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board
Ernest Samuels
V.P. JNF Gr. Miami
For Information and Reservations:
JEWISH NATIONAL FUND 420 Lincoln Rd., Suite 353, Miami Beach, FL 33139
Phone 538-6464
Jewish National Fund Strengthens Israel
(iufof Strengthen the Jewish National Fund
IBBBI



Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 21, 1983
How Hitler Managed
To Take Over Germany
Continued from Page 1 A
THEY WERE all wrong. The Nazi minority in the
conservative Hitler-Papen Cabinet were soon in control,
and 18 months later, when Hindenburg died, Hitler took
over as head of state too. That was exactly a decade
before the unsuccessful July 20, 1944 bid to assassinate
Hitler, which came 10 years too late.
In retrospect a number of unfavorable factors can
be said to have been to blame. Historians nowadays
particularly emphasize the following:
The Weimar Republic, a democracy backed by
workers and many liberal members of the bourgeoisie
after the First World War, was felt to stand little chance
of success because of the burden of reparations imposed
on Germany at the Treaty of Versailles.
The hard-hit economy staggered from hyper-
inflation to the Depression. Mass unemployment made
many people support the Nazis and Communists, who
made democratic coalition majorities in the Reichstag
impossible, the Nazis emerging as the largest single
party.
Many farmers and industrialists felt the new
regime would mean government orders and contracts.
Hitler had the capitalists on his side, which was most
important.
HITLER EARLIER speculated that an ad-
ministrative and Army elite, frustrated by the weakness
of the Weimar Republic, would fall for his Reich idea,
which was long sold abroad as a national working class
movement.
He fostered disintegration among the bourgeoisie
and the working class, enabling the Nazis to establish a
feeling of total power that horrified first Germany, then
the World, until the end of the Second World War and
Hitler's suicide. After a mere 12 years of self-destructive
power, the Nazi dream of a 1,000-year Reich ended in
ruins.
Israel-Lebanon Unit Will
Deal With Ways Of
Ending State of War
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A subcommittee to deal
with ending the state of war
between Israel and Leba-
non was set up by delega-
tions of the two countries
meeting in Khalde Monday
morning. It is the first of
several subcommittees
which will negotiate the va-
rious items on the agenda
agreed to by Israel and
Lebanon last Thursday, an
Israeli spokesman said.
The state of war subcommittee
is headed jointly by the chief
I^ebanese negotiator, Antoine
Katale and Elyakim Rubinstein,
legal adviser to Israel's Foreign
Ministry. Israel Radio said that
the subcommittee might meet
more frequently and on a differ-
ent sequence of days than the full
negotiating teams. The latter
have been meeting twice weekly
for the past three weeks, alter-
nating between Khalde, just
south of Beirut, and the Israeli
border town of Kiryat Shmona.
AS THE talks got underway,
U.S. special Ambassador Philip
llabib waited in Jerusalem for
word of any substantive pro-
gress. He met at length earlier
with Israeli Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir. Defense Minis-
ter Ariel Sharon and David Kim-
che. director general of the For-
eign Ministry who heads the Is-
raeli negotiating team.
According to Israeli sources,
llabib said he thought agree-
ments in principle could be
worked out within a week. The
sources said Habib would try to
persuade the Lebanese govern-
Were Jews Barred in World War U?
ment to accept an agreement he
worked out with the Israelis.
The negotiations are now pro-
ceeding on parallel tracks. The
Israeli, Lebanese and U.S dele-
gations continue to meet regular-
ly, while Habib talks separately
with the Shamir-Sharon-Kimche
team and with Lebanese officials
in an effort to bring the two sides
together. The American diplomat
has already impressed on the
Israeli ministers President Reag-
an's urgent desire that progress
be achieved without delay.
OBSERVERS HERE said
that Habib's presence in the area
and the fact that he derives his
authority directly from the Presi-
dent will spur the Israelis and
Lebanese to make swift progress
toward an agreement. Habib is
said to be waiting for the oppor-
tune moment to draw Syria into
the negotiating process, utilizing
shuttle diplomacy for the time
being rather than direct talks be-
tween the three countries.
Syrian cooperation is the pre-
requisite for the early withdrawal
of all foreign forces from Leba-
non. Reports from Damascus said
the Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation leadership there has begun
practical discussions on the
removal of the estimated 6,000
PLO fighters from Lebanon. Is-
rael insists that the PLO forces
pull out first to be followed by the
simultaneous withdrawal of
Israeli and Syrian forces.
At the opening of Monday's
negotiating session. Kimche rei-
terated Israel's denial o Beirut
press report that the Israelis
and Syrians had reached a see ret
understanding to part it u>: Leba-
non into spheres | |.-;.
Fatale thanked Kimche for
clarifying that matter.
By ARNOLD AGES
TORONTO (JTA) -
Shock waves are still
reverberating over Canada
in the wake of a book
published in Toronto a little
over four months ago. The
book, "None Is Too Many"
(Lester, Orpen and Denys),
by historians Irving Abella
and Harold Troper, both
residents of Toronto, re-
veals that before and
during World War II, the
Canadian government pur-
sued a policy of actively
excluding Jews from entry
into the country.
This revelation, the result of
monumental archival excava-
tions conducted by the two
researchers in Ottawa, has come
as a surprise to most Canadian
Jews. While there was a percep-
tion that the Canadian govern-
ment between 1933 and 1948 was
reluctant to facilitate Jewish
immigration to Canada, no one
before Abella and Troper ever
realized the scope and intensity
of Canada's anti-Jewish bias.
ABELLA AND Troper in
dicate in their book that one man.
Charles Blair. was the major
executor of Canada's exclusion-
ary immigration policies towards
Jews. As a Deputy Minister for
Immigration. assigned. for
obscure bureaucratic reasons, to
the Department of Mines and
Technical Surveys. Blair had the
responsibility to discharge the
policies of the government of
Prime Minister Mackenzie King.
Blair discharged them with a
cruel zeal. Authors Abella and
Troper show in their devastating
indictment that Blair was an
unrepentant anti-Semite who was
so secure in his position that he
left behind ample documentation
filled with scurrilous anti-Semitic
remarks. At one point during the
early years of the war. Blair
described Jews trying to get into
Canada as "pigs at the feeding
trough."
While Blair was the main
instrument in blocking Jewish
immigration into Canada he was
not, according to Abella and
Troper. acting unilaterally. In
fact, he was expressing the views
of the Cabinet and the Canadian
people, especially the inhabitants
of Quebec. Canada's French-
speaking province.
DURING THE 1930s, more
than KM),000 signatures were col-
lected on a petition organized by
a French Canadian group to
protest the prospective immigra-
tion of European Jews. News-
papers in the province of Quebec
published flagrantly ami Semitic
articles.
In their meticulous research
into the period. Abella and
Troper have unearthed details
about certain Canadian political
figures who later rose to great
prominence in Canada. The
information does not reflect well
upon them.
Vincent Massey (brother of
movie great Raymond Masseyi,
lionized by the Canadian Jewish
Congress in the 1950s as "t
righteous gentile," emerges in
the Abella-Troper document as
an eminence grise who. during his
days in London, as an official
Canadian diplomat, sent cables
to Prime Minister King aspersing
the quality of European Jews in
language of an unsavory tone,
and suggesting that Sudenten
Germane would make much
better immigrants for Aryan
Canada.
CHARLOTTE WHITON, now
deceased but once the most flam
boyant and feisty mayor of Otu
wa. worked indefatigablv m the
early 1940s to prevent the rescue
of Jewish children from the Euro-
pean cauldron. Her interests were
devoted exclusively to saving
British children.
Letter Pearson, later to
become Prime Minister, the win
Continued on Page I.l-A
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 21,1983
After Faltering Start.
El Al Back in Skies
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
After a faltering start last
week. El Al appeared to be
back, in business following
an unexpected agreement
between the pilots and
management. A scheduled
flight took off Monday
morning for Zurich and
Rome. The airline manage-
ment expressed hope that
schedules would be
"completely back to
normal" by Passover.
El Al, grounded for the last
four months and facing liquida-
tion, resumed service last week
with a return flight to Nairobi
and Johannesburg on Wed-
nesday. But 73 passengers
booked on Friday's flight to
Istanbul had to be placed on a
chartered aircraft because El Al
pilots refused to fly under the
new contract recently concluded
between the company and
Histadrut.
THE PILOTS announced
Monday that they ended their
strike at the urging of Finance
Minister Yoram Aridor. They
said they were promised special
tax rebates on severance pay to
pilots who are dismissed. They
agreed that six pilots would be
Background
dismissed and 15 others would
take early retirement. El Al is
reducing its personnel in all
categories by about 10 percent as
an economy measure under a re-
organization scheme approved by
the government.
The pilots have other disputes
with management which they say
are safety related. But they
promised today to pursue them
without interrupting flights.
Meanwhile, the Knesset
Finance Committee agreed to
give the new El Al management
another $15 million to allow for
payment of the increased separa-
tion compensation for El A)
workers to be dismissed under
the reorganization plan.
SOME COMMITTEE
members objected to the piece-
meal payments to the national
airline and said it should either be
brought back to good health im-
mediately or sold off to private
entrepreneurs.
Transport Minister Haim
Corfu said there was now no in-
tention to sell the company, say-
ing this had only been a "sug-
gestion" put forward at one point
in the negotiations with the staff.
The Finance Committee is to
meet again in a month's time, to
reconsider El Al's financial
position and government
promises to provide it with
further funds under the reorgani-
zation plan.
To Nth Hour, Pilots
Still Refused to Sign
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) El Al's
first passenger flight in four
months took off from Ben Gurion
Airport for Nairobi, Kenya and
Johannesburg. South Africa. All
seats were filled, and there was a
long waiting list, airline sources
said.
Eitan: Israel
Should Stay
Until War
Purposes Won
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Chief
of Staff Gen. Rafael Eitan said
that the Israeli army should
remain in Lebanon until Israel's
political aims are achieved. Ex-
plaining those aims, Israel's
military leader, who has fre-
quently been criticized by the op-
position parties for making
political statements, told high
school students in Eilat that the
war in Lebanon "was meant to
beat Syria and the PLO to the
gun to attack them before they
began a war against us."
Eitan said that if Israel had
allowed them to take the
initiative, Israeli losses would
have been far heavier. "No
sovereign state can allow such a
thing to happen and it does
everything in its power to
protects its citizens," he said. He
stated that if the Syrians had not
requested a ceasefire, "not one of
them would have been left alive
in Lebanon."
The Chief of Staff said the PLO
was ejected from west Beirut
only through Israeli firepower
and stubbornness. "We must
make certain that the diplomatic
results of the war equal the
military tory."
The national air carrier had
been grounded since September,
except for a scattering of cargo
flights, and was placed in the
hands of a temporary receiver
pending a decision whether to
liquidate it or reorganize it on a
more efficient basis. A far-reach-
ing agreement between
Histadrut. the receiver and man-
agement made the resumption of
service possible. But it was by no
means certain that the airlines'
new schedule would be met or
that other flights would follow.
EL AL PILOTS refused to
sign the new labor contract on
grounds that their differences
with management involve safety-
related work rules which
precludes Histadrut from acting
as their bargaining agent. The
pilots filed for injunction in Jeru-
salem district court to invalidate
the new labor contract.
With the court decision still
pending, the pilots staffed the
flight to Africa but insisted they
were doing so under terms of
their old contract. El Al manage-
ment and the receiver claimed the
new contract is applicable.
Future flights apparently depend
on what the court decides and
how the pilots react to the
decision. Management said a new
timetable and additional routes
will be introduced gradually.
(An El Al spokesman in New
York quoted the company's new
president, Rafi Harlev, as saying
that flights to Europe and Africa
would resume within the week,
and service to New York will
begin Jan. 30.)
In honor of the resumption of
flights, a special fare of $499 from
New York to Tel Aviv is being
offered until March 5, the
spokesman said. Children from 2-
12 can fly for $399: infants $50.
There are no restrictions on
advanced purchased of tickets,
and passengers may remain in
Israel anywhere from 6-60 dsvs.
OkayIf Charter Changes, Says Navon
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
President Yitzhak Navon
indicated that Israel may
consider negotiating with
the Palestine Liberation
Organization if the PLO
would change the article in
its covenant which calls for
the destruction of the Jew-
ish State. But until such
action is taken, Navon said
the consensus opinion
within Israel remains that
the PLO is "an organiza-
tion of terror" with which
Israel will not conduct ne-
gotiations.
According to Navon, who ad-
dressed some 500 people at a
United Jewish Appeal luncheon
at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel
here last week, Israel would have
to "take into consideration" any
change in the PLO covenant. The
same 33 articles of the PLO cove-
nant call for the "liberation of
Palestine" and the "elimination"
of Zionism in Palestine through
"armed struggle" and
"revolution."
THE ISRAELI leader, whose
address to the UJA luncheon was
part of a four-day visit to New
York, reiterated what he termed
were the "common denominat-
ors" of the political platforms of
the various parties in Israel.
Throughout his visit to the
United States, during which he
met with President Keagan in
Washington and with Jewish
groups there, in Boston and New
York, Navon spoke of consensus
issues and dealt gingerly with
controversial topics affecting
Israeli-U.S. relations.
In his address to the UJA
gathering, Navon said both the
ruling Likud coalition govern-
ment and the opposition Labor
Alignment share the same views \
on the following:
That a return to the pre-1967
borders is unacceptable; that the
PLO is a terrorist organization:
that the establishment of a Pal-
estinian state on the West Bank
would pose a security threat to
the State of Israel and also act as
a base for Soviet intervention
into the region; and that Jerusa-
lem will remain the undivided
capital of Israel.
ON THE subject of Israeli-
Egyptian relations, which he de-
scribed as "frozen," Navon
charged that Egypt has reneged
on its agreements signed with Is-
rael as part of the Camp David
process. He indicated that these
agreements include normaliza-
tion issues such as trade and
tourism.
Beyond normalization, Egypt
recalled its Ambassador to Israel,
Saad Mortada, last September
following the massacre of Pales-
tinians at the Shatila and Sabra
refugee camps by Christian Phal-
angist forces, and, coupled with
the continuing dispute over the
Taba region on Sinai, relations
between the two countries have
deteriorated significantly, the
President noted.
Navon affirmed, however, that
he thinks Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak "basically"
seeks peace. But he said that if
the accords between Israel and
Egypt represented a "model for
peace" that Israel can expect
with its other Arab neighbors in
the future, then, he added. "I
don't think it will be a very en-
couraging example." He said
that just as there can be cold war
policies between two nations,
there can also be a state of "cold
peace."
BEFORE ARRIVING in New
York, Navon spoke to some 2,500
people at a suburban Boston syn-
agogue, where he informed the
audience he had told President
Reagan earlier that the consensus
in Israel is that Israel cannot re-
turn to the pre-1967 borders be-
cause they presented a risk to the
safety and survival of the state.
Navon. accompanied by Isra-
el's Ambassador to the United
Nations Yehuda Blum and
Israel's Ambassador to the
United States Moshe Arens, also
spoke to some 1,200 students and
faculty members at Yeshiva Uni-
versity. He stressed the theme of
Jewish unity and the continued
importance of education to help
resolve some of Israel's pressing
problems.
Navon was presented with a
leather-bound copy of a catalogue
from the university museum's
current exhibit, "Raban Remem
be red," which includes some 300
works of the long forgotten Jeru-
salem artist, Zeev Raban
Mounted on the catalogue was a
mother of pearl medallion made
by students of the President's
father. Yosef Navon, who taught
handicrafts at the Alliance Israe
lite Universalle schools in Jeru
salem in the early 1900s.
ALSO LAST week. Navon ad
dressed some 500 high school and
college students at the Roosevelt
Hotel here in a meeting spon
sored by the University Service
Department of the American
Zionist Youth Foundation
Earlier, he addressed faculty,
students and lay leaders on the
relationship between American
Jews and Israel at the Hebrew
Union College-Jewish Institute of
eligion's Brookdale Center.
Navon was awarded the Presi
dent's Medal of the Citv Univer-
sity of New York Graduate
School. The medal, inscribed
"Yit/.hak Navon. President.
Stale of Israel. Scholar.
Humanitarian. Statesman." is in
recognition of Navon's accom-
plishments as an author, scholar
and linguist, in addition to his In
ternalional stature as an Israeli
leader, according to the Graduate
Center
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Friday, January 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
THIS YEAR,
VISIT YOUR COUNTRY HOME
Israel. Where the warmth of belonging begins.
And you feel content in a way you've never felt anywhere else.
Vacation in Israel this year. See the sights of your
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r----------------- a i*-\n
-
Page 12-A The Jewish FToridian / Friday, January 21,1963
Experts Differ
Hussein May/May Not Join Peace
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) -Twoforeign affaire
experts differ on whether
the United Statee can ex-
pect King Hussein of Jor-
dan to join the Middle East
peace process.
Richard Allen, who was Presi-
dent Reagan's first National
Security Adviser, and Edward
Luttwak, a senior fellow at
Georgetown University's Center
for Strategic and International
Studies, presented their opposing
views during a roundtable dis-
cussion on "Looking Ahead in
the Middle East, sponsored by
the Heritage Foundation at the
University Club here.
"I feel that Jordan has come a
long way and is moving in the
right direction," Allen said. He
said Hussein's meetings with
Reagan at the White House last
month were "productive"
ALLEN, now a distinguished
fellow at the Heritage Founda-
tion and a senior foreign policy
counselor for the Republican Na-
tional Committee, said he be-
lieves that Hussein realizes that
the U.S. is an "important gua-
rantor" of his and his country's
security and continuing supply of
arms.
But Luttwak disagreed, saying
he admired Hussein because of
his "ability to attract the atten-
tion of successive foreign suitors
Crime Czar Lansky
Dead on Beach at 81
Meyer Lansky, an ac-
knowledged financial
wizard and one-time re-
puted czar of organized
crime in the U.S. and many
points overseas, was buried
here Sunday in a simple
Orthodox service attended
by family and friends. He
died of lung cancer at Mt.
Sinai Hospital Saturday.
His age was given as 81.
Rabbi Shmaryahu Swirsky,
who conducted the 15-minute
service in Hebrew and English at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery, eulogized
Lansky as a man whose "heart
beat for everybody." Although
he was said to have amassed a
fortune of between $100 $400
million, Lansky lived his last
years in relative modesty in a
condominium on Collins Ave.
ACCORDING TO federal au-
thorities and other law enforce-
ment agencies, Lansky master-
minded the finances of the vast,
legendary underworld network
known collectively as the Mafia.
He was associated, during his
long life with such convicted
racketeers as Charles "Lucky"
Luciano and Benjamin "Bugsy"
Siegel. both boyhood chums,
"Dutch Schultz, Al Capone and
Louis "Lepke" Buchalter, the
"hit man" of the notorious
"Murder Inc."
But although linked to illicit
gambling and other forms of vice,
Lansky was never convicted of a
serious crime. He went to jail
only once a two-month senence
in 1953 on a gambling conviction
in Saratoga. N.Y.
He became an international
cause celebre when his retirement
in Israel in 1970 touched off a 26-
month legal battle. Lansky
claimed that as a Jew, under the
Law of Return, he was entitled to
citizenship and a permanent
haven in the Jewish State. The
Israeli Supreme Court thought
otherwise, ruling that he was not
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entitled to citizenship because he
was a "danger to public safety."
The Israelis apparently did not
want the onus of harboring an
alleged international criminal.
HE WAS arrested on his
return to the United States on
charges of tax evasion but a
judge ruled, on the basis of
medical evidence, that he was too
ill to stand trial.
Lansky was born Maier
Suchowljansky in Grodno,
Russia and was brought to the
United States by his parents in
1911. Reportedly, they could not
remember his birth date. An
immigration official on Ellis
Island listed his brith as July 4,
1902.
Lansky grew up on
Manhattan's Lower East Side
which prouduced its share of
solid citizens, geniuses and
criminals. Although a high school
drop-out, Lansky was recognized
early as a financial genius.
Allegedly, he turned to crime
instead of legitimate business.
Law enforcement officials who
spent decades in futile attempts
to obtain convictions, expressed
grudging admiration for the
alleged racketeer. "He could have
been president of General
Motors," one FBI agent was
quoted as saying.
without actually ever delivering
anything." He beted these
suitors as first the British, then
the Israel Labor Party and now
the U.S.
*'I can't be hopeful, I can't see
him delivering," he said. "If he
does, it will be a real departure of
character."
As for Israeli Premier Mena-
chem Begin, Allen predicted a
"difficult' meeting when the Is-
raeli leader sees Reagan at the
White House next month. He
said the President should reaf-
firm the U.S. relationship with
Israel and stress that it still con-
siders it a "stategic ally" and an
"asset."
ALLEN SAID Reagan should
also tell Begin that the U.S. will
not take any steps to endanger
Israeli security. But he also said
Begin should be told a freeze on
building any new settlements on
the West Bank is the best way to
achieve progress toward peace.
On the Lebanese situation,
Allen said the withdrawal of all
foreign forces from Lebanon
Israeli, Syrian and the Palestine
Liberation Organization is
urgent for the reconstruction of
Lebanon. But he noted that the
Israeli troops will not leave until
the others do and that Lebanon
does not want them to do so.
He stressed that israel should
be assured that "we will not exert
undue pressure" unless there is a
clear indication that the Syrians
and PLO are willing to leave and
Israel refuses.
LUTTWAK SAID Lebanon is
correct in trying to regain its
sovereignty by asking that the
foreign forces leave, but it is
wrong to be willing to relinquish
some of its sovereignty by
bending to outside pressure not
to normalize its relation with Is-
rael. He warned that if Lebanon
waits too long for an agreement
with Israel, it could lose what has
already been achieved by Israel's
military action.
Luttwak added he could envi-
sion the possibility of a "deal"
between Israel and Syria in which
the Israelis control southern Leb-
anon through a surrogate such as
Maj. Saad Haddad, and Syria
controls eastern Lebanon. He said
the two countries were capable of
making such a deal as they had
shown during the fighting in
Lebanon.
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at 12:00 Noon
Tickets: $20 Per Person
For Reservations & Information Call: 531-8329


Friday, January 21, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
hock Waves in Canada
Were Jews Barred in World War II ?
itinued from Page 8- A
I the Nobel Peace Prize in
t>r his role in the creation of
lited Nations Emergency
is portrayed as an ambi-
mlit ician who was ready to
rig with Mackenzie King's
^wish rulings.
pst Lapointe, King's Que-
llleague. is depicted in the
]-Troper volume as the
sntative of Quebec's
anti-Jewish public
He warned the Canadian
iMinister that the entry of
Twould alienate Quebe-
|he major supporters of the
Party. King accepted
|tc's warning.
Al>ellaTroper volume,
deliberately in a flat
prose style without a suggestion
of hysteria, has been widely
praised by Canadian critics. The
torment of European Jews so
amply described by the authors
has produced a wave of mea
culpas among book reviewers all
across Canada. The only excep-
tion is a recent review in The
Canadian Forum in which the
reviewer suggests in an un-
believable non sequitur that
Canadian soldiers died fighting
to save European Jewry.
ABELLA INDICATES that
his research has already produced
three results. Ron Atkey. Min-
ister of Immigration in the short-
lived Joe Clark government, said,
after being exposed to Abella's
revelation, that he did not want
to go down in history as "the
Charles Blair of the 80s" during
discussions about the admittance
of Vietnamese "boat people."
Canada's current Minister of
Immigration, Lloyd Axworthy,
said recently, in a meeting where
Abella had spoken, that he
wished to apologize for the
conduct of his government
during the war years. In addition,
the Canadian government, as a
result of the Abella-Troper book,
has removed a sentence in the
advertising brochure which
boasted about Canada's role in
rescuing European Jews during
the war.
The Abella-Trope volume is
now into its fourth editions, and
unprecedented development for
Canadian books, and an unusual
one for such a scholarly volume.
C Declaration Recognizes PLO 'State'
> EDWIN EYTAN
^SBOURG (JTA) -
luropean Parliament, the
Iva body of the 10
fs-state European Eco-
Community, called on
land the Palestinians "to
be each other's existence"
^rt peace negotiations. The
lent also adopted by a
lajority a resolution call
psrael "to stop at once the
i of new settlements in the
territories."
European Parliament, for-
leaded by Simone Veli of
used to be one of the
ist pro-Israel interna-
^rums. However, since the
1 tin- war in Lebanon last
June, the climate has changed,
diplomatic observers say. The re-
solution submitted by the
Socialist group, were the most
anti-Israeli yet to be adopted.
One of the resolutions asserts
the Palestinians' right to self-
determination "which could lead
to the eventual creation of a Pale-
stinian state." This is the first
time the EEC Parliament has
mentioned this possibility which
all previous joint European com-
muniques, such as the Venice De-
claration of 1980. have systema-
tically avoided.
The Parliament also agreed
that a "favorable political
climate" now prevails and paid
special tribute to the Venice De-
claration. President Reagan's
peace proposals and the Arab
league plan drawn up at their
summit meeting in Fez, Morocco
last September. The Parliament-
arians also stated that the PLO
should normally and legally take
part in future Mid-east peace ne-
gotiations but affirmed that the
PLO must first remove from its
convenant all articles which call,
directly or indirectly, for Israel's
destruction.
The Strasbourg-based body
has only an advisory role but its
resolutions generally influence
the EEC's governments and also
tend to reflect public opinion in
the member states. The
Parliament's deputies are elected
by popular vote in the 10 nations.

Sharon Arrives on Visit to Zaire
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon arrived at Kinshasa, Zaire Monday morning on a
five-day official visit during which he is expected to
discuss Israeli military training and equipment for that
central African nation with its leader, President Mobutu
Sese Seko, as well as agricultural projects.
Israeli journalists accompanying Sharon reported
that the Defense Minister and his escort party of about 90
people landed at Kinshasa at 8:30 a.m. local time in an
Israel Air Force Boeing transport. He was greeted at the
airport in a brief welcoming ceremony and was scheduled
to meet twice Monday with Mobutu.
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_. t 4 wwto
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Page 14-A The Jewish Ftoridian / Friday, January 21,1983
Filling in Background
Breakthrough at Kiryat Shmona Talks
Sharon Claims Credit
For Agenda Agreement
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel and Lebanon,
with the active partici-
pation of the United States,
have achieved a break-
through on an agenda for
the negotiations between
them.
The elements of the agreement,
which the Israelis termed highly
satisfactory, were announced as
the delegations from the three
countries held their sixth
working session at the Israeli
border town of Kiryat Shmona.
All points of the agenda will be
dealt with "concurrently," ap-
parently by means of subcom-
mittees.
David Kimche, director general
of the Israeli Foreign Ministry
who heads the Israeli negotiating
team, told reporters that discus-
Is Garden
Of Eden
Near Afikim?
Continued from Page 5-A
earthly woes. Judaism rejects
this, believing man was always
mortal and death did not enter
the world through Eve's trans-
gression. "My God, the soul
which Thou hast given me is
pure" Jews pray every day.
INSTEAD OF the Fall of Man.
we preach the Rise of Man, each
age being capable of reaching the
highest peaks of a moral and
spiritual life. "There is no
generation without its Abraham,
Moses or Samuel," says the Mid-
rash.
Whether Nature magazine has
correctly identified the site of the
Garden of Eden or not, the
kibbutzniks of Afikim have the
last word. They maintain: "We
always knew that we lived in
Paradise."
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sion has already begun on the
first agenda item an end to the
state of war between Israel and
Lebanon. Israeli sources said this
had been the consistent aim of
Israeli policy from the outset and
applies not only to Lebanon but
to all of Israel's neighbors.
THE SECOND agenda item is
titled "Security Arrangements."
The third covers the long-
disputed matter of "normal-
ization." Although the word
"normalization" does not appear
in the agreement, the Israelis
said they were deeply gratified
because the item does contain
mention of key elements of
normalization.
The item, read to reporters by
Kimche. is titled "A Framework
for Mutual Relations" and gives
specific examples. including
trade ties, the passage of goods
and people across the border, and
communications.
The fourth agenda item deals
with plans for the eventual with-
drawal of foreign forces from
Lebanon. The final item is
concerned with possible "guaran-
tees" of the envisaged settlement
and security arrangements.
THE BREAKTHROUGH.
after a three-week deadlock, came
to an opportune time for Israel.
U.S. special Ambassador Philip
Habib. who returned to the
Middle East last week at Presi-
dent Reagan's explicit instruc-
tions to achieve an agreement
without delay, met privately with
Premier Mehachem Begin at the
Prime Minister's Office.
The meeting was attended by
U.S. Ambassador to Israel
Samuel Lewis and Begin's
personal aide. Yehuda Avner.
both of whom took notes. Neither
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
nor Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon had been invited to at-
tend.
The meeting was held against
the background of unofficial U.S.
expressions of impatience with
the slow progress of the talks to
date. According to American and
Israeli media reports in recent
days. the Administration's
impatience. from President
Reagan down, was directed
primarily at Israel.
BEGIN'S MEDIA
spokesman. Uri Porat, told
reporters later that the meeting
had been "friendly" and that
Habib had brought a "friendly"
letter from Reagan to Begin.
Porat had denied vehemnetly
that the President had sent a
"tough" letter to the Israeli
Premier.
Porat gave no further details of
American $
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Begin's conversation with Habib.
He did report that no final date
has been set yet for Begin's
forthcoming visit to Washington.
Some U.S. media and Kol Israel
Radio reported last week that the
Americans were holding up the
visit pending progress in the
negotiations with Lebanon.
The head of the Lebanese
negotiating team, Antoine
Fatale, stressed to reporters his
delegation's praise for U.S.
special envoy Morris Draper in
bridging the gaps which had kept
the two sides apart during three
weeks of talks. Draper, Habib's
deputy, has headed the American
delegation from the outset.
HINTS OF progress were
dropped earlier by Defense Min-
ister Sharon who expressed satis-
faction with what he called the
unofficial normalization process
underway between Israel and
Lebanon even while the two sides
were deadlocked. He told
reporters at the Metullah border
crossing point that he was sure
Israel would achieve its aims,
though he counselled patience.
Sharon noted that since Nov.
15. when Metullah. Rosh Hanikra
and another site were declared
official border crossing check-
points. 12.000 people had crossed
from Lebanon into Israel and
1.100 vehicles made the crossing.
Another 1.100 vehicles crossed
from Israel into Lebanon in the
two-month period. This was clear
proof that real normalization was
working. Sharon said.
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon has claimed person-
al credit for the agenda
agreement just concluded
between
Israel and
at their sixth
talks at Kiryat
Lebanon
round of
Shmona.
According to Sharon, all of the
provisions of the agreement,
announced at an official press
conference held by the Israeli,
Lebanese and American delega-
tions at Kiryat Shmona, were
contained in a working paper he
himself had drafted in weeks of
secret negotiations with
unidentified Lebanese officials.
HE ALSO credited the
"breakthrough" to the "stead-
fastness" of the Israeli soldiers
who were prepared in endure
great hardships under difficult
conditions in Lebanon. "Their
steadfastness enabled the
politicans to reach a better agree-
ment." he said.
Sharon gave his version of
events to reporters at a press
conference he called at Kiryat
Shmona at about the same time
the official press conference was
underway. The Defense Minister
had been on an inspection tour of
Israel army positions in Lebanon.
He rushed to Kiryat Shmona
upon receiving news that the
deadlock over a negotiating
agenda had been broken.
"The agreement on the agenda
contains the main and most
essential details contained in the
working paper we discussed dur-
ing many weeks with Lebanese
government representatives,"
Sharon said.
HE CONCEDED that "There
are also other points raised by the
Lebanese, just as there are in any
negotiations." But he hailed
today's agreement as the first
step on the road to a true and
lasting peace in the Middle East.
Sharon was embarrassed
several weeks ago when he
returned from Beirut with a
document he described as an
agreement with the highest level
l^banese authorities, affirming
Israel's terms. The Cabinet
endorsed the document, only to
discover that it had not been
signed by any I.*banese official.
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_l*J
tinned from Page 5-A
avoided the customary
demagoguery. He even
lized that "problems can
I solved by slogans alone."
self-evident that a de-
ition in the Kremlin
t mean any abandonment
kily adaptable propagandis-
ms (ongoing support for
[ Castro's endeavors to de-
i the political situation in
America, stirring up anti-
can tendencies in Western
b, etc.). However, the new
f-KGB alliance in the Polit-
lifies a lessening of idea-
lly motivated criteria in the
n making process. The de
ition has already start-
ice the death of Mikhail
t, the keeper of the "pure
of Marxism-Leninism,"
ch, 1982.
SHE DOES not exist a
lithic Communist world
sent. Even if Moscow and
should arrive at some
>f detente, it would not
any rapprochement be-
the two biggest Commun-
tiesof the world.
iarity between Europe's
rnal Communist parties"
^- fictitious lonn ago. The
Communists have gained
(ndenct* from Moscow since
rly seventies. In Greece and
Socialist parties have
|to power and have out man
d their rival parties. In
|e, the Socialists have out-
ed under President
>is Mitterrand's leadership
le once so powerful Corn-
et Party.
jartkular case is Poland,
the bankruptcy of Com-
It ideology has been
It to light as one of the
Iramatic events of our time.
I General Jaruzelski's mili-
1 dictatorship could save
Communist rule.
Andropov is undoubtedly
aware of the disastrous blunders
caused by a predominantly ideo-
logical approach to economic and
political issues. He is certainly
shrewd enough to realize that
Marxism-Leninism is no cure-all.
Therefore there can be expected
Soviet political moves which are
not motivated by the traditional
dogma, no matter how these
actions are veiled. Under
Andropov, ideology will be
applied as a useful" tool, but it
will hardly serve as a starting
point of major political decisions.
WHAT IMPACT could the
changes in the Kremlin have on
Soviet Jewry, its prospects and
hopes?
When trying to predict
Andropov's future approach to
the emigration issue, one should
keep in mind that it was the KGB
under whose direct control about
270.000 Soviet Jews would leave
the USSR in the last 12-15 years.
Andropov's goal was clear and
understandable enough even
to an outsider's view. His efforts
were aimed at making sure that
the reunification of families
would not turn into a free
emigration movement. Being
chairman of the KGB for more
than a decade. Andropov suc-
ceeded in turning the endeavors
of any Jewish would-be-emigrant
into an unpredictable gamble.
From the start of the mass
emigration in the early seventies
to the present-day difficult situa-
tion, no single Jewish would-be-
emigrant (as well as German or
Armenian applicants) could be
(or cannot be) sure of the out-
come. The risk of an exit visa
refusal is always present.
About 270,000 Soviet Jews
took their chances and got out.
But more than 10,000 visa ap-
How Martin Luther King
united Jews to Their Tradition
itinued from Page 5-A
in 196:1 and in St. Augus-
id Birmingham and Selma
Montgomery and Memphis,
involvement in the lifeline
Irtin Luther King's cam-
for human dignity was
Through it all. it was the
I and awesome dynamism of
Ling himself that moved
|and others beyond them-
admiration Jews felt for
Ing. and the strong histori-
Jfinity of the Jews to the
experience, was by no
one-sided. When he spoke
l convention of the Union of
|can Hebrew Congregations
igo in 1963. King related
earn to the proven ability of
i to transcend discourage-
id despair.
^is later writings, the Black
wrote: "The lesson of
mass involvement in
[and political action and ed-
is worthy of emulation."
encouraged his own broth
id sisters to become active
politically, as Jews had done, in
order to assure a more equal role
in society.
In 1983. however, it can be
fairly asked what has become of
Dr. King's historic struggle.
DOES THE dream he articu-
lated and shared with so many of
so many differing background
speak to us still? Certainly, the
times are different, the issues
blurred by overriding economic
obsessions. But one is saddened
by those whose recollections of
those urgent and heady days
have diminished into nostalgia.
Not enough youngsters, Black or
white, know much about Martin
Luther King today, and America
in general has fallen into a
resigned non-concern.
That Martin Luther King's
dream of full equality in a free so-
ciety for all Americans remains a
vision too far from realization is
our failure, not his. But because
Jews shared so much of what was
his, they remember him now, on
his birthday, with special warmth
and identification and love.
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plicants became the victims of
this KGB stratagem. The lot of
dozens of Soviet Jews has be-
come especially harsh: they have
been arrested and sentenced to
many years in Soviet labor
camps.
MOST TRAGIC is the fate of
Anatoly Sharansky who was sen
tenced to a 13-year prison term
on charges that he allegedly had
worked for the CIA, an allegation
denied by President Carter. Since
the end of September, Sharansky
has embarked on a hunger strike
to protest the cutting off of his
few letters and visits that he had
been permitted before.
Emotional involvement not-
withstanding, it was Andropov's
job to prevent reunification of
families from becoming a free-for-
all emigration movement. For
attaining his goal, he has used
various kinds of means un-
predictability of the outcome of
individual applications, exit visa
refusals under a great variety of
pretexts, arrests and harrass-
ment of Jewish activists. Despite
all this pressure. 270.000 Soviet
Jews are out of the USSR now.
Friday, January 21.1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page lo-A
high regard for the American
Jewish lobby. In that way,
serious progress could eventually
.be secured for the fate of the
Prisoners of Conscience, for
thousands of refuseniks, for the
reunification of families, and for a
promotion of Jewish culture in
the USSR.
Ovsishcher
Dead in Minsk
As a non-dogmatist, Andropov
is probably flexible enough to
revive Jewish emigration if such
a course seems expedient to the
Kremlin. American-Soviet re-
lations are the focal point of the
Jewish emigration from the
USSR. A well-balanced American
human rights policy is the Mine
qua nan of the emigration issue.
As Ariyeh Neier, vice chairman
cf the American Watch and the
Helsinki Watch, wrote in The
New York Times (December 10,
19621, the Reagan Administra-
tion "continues to do a disservice
to the cause of human rights."
During the first two years, the
Administration has lost credib-
ility as an advocate of human
rights. There is little hope that
the Administration will be active
in promoting human rights in the
coming two years.
THEREFORE, it seems im-
portant for the major American
Jewish organizations, in concert
with the Congress, to negotiate
with the Soviets in concrete
terms. It is an issue of greatest
significance for Soviet Jews. The
Kremlin, rightly or wrongly, has
NEW YORK The National
Conference on Soviet Jewry has
just learned of the death of Nade-
chda Ovsishcher in Minsk, on
Jan. 12. Mrs Ovsishcher. the
wife of former Soviet Army Colo-
nel and Jewish activist, Lev Ov-
sishcher, suffered from a deterio
ating heart condition and trad
been hospitalized several times in
the past year.
The Ovsishcher** applied to
emigrate to Israel in 1972. Since
that time, they have been singled
out for special harassment by
local authorities. Col. Ovsishcher
was deprived of his rank and mil-
itary pension, and had been re-
peatedly attacked and maligned
in the Soviet press as a "Zionist
provocateur."
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, January 21, 1983
Bonn Students Reveal
Concentration Camp
Prisoner Saved Lives
By DAVID KANTOR
Bonn (JTA) A re-
search project by high
school students in Kassel
has produced evidence of a
political prisoner at the
Buchenwald concentration
camp who saved the lives of
158 Jewish children and
youths during his in-
carceration there.
The prisoner. Wilhelm Ham-
mann. died in 1955. The pupils of
the Gerhart-Hauptmann Real-
schule in Kassel believe he
deserves to have his name en-
shrined in the honor role of the
Yad Vashem in Jerusalem. They
are urging survivors of children's
cell block 8 at Buchenwald to
come forward with corroborative
evidence that will make this
possible.
THE YOUNGSTERS con-
ducted their research in 1981
when they were between 14-15
years of age and wrote a book on
their discoveries which will be
published next spring by the
Deutscher TaschenbuchverUxg.
All 32 engaged in the project
have since graduated and are
Court Upholds
Conviction Of
Flatto-Sharon
JERUSALEM-(JTA)-A
Jerusalem district court has up-
held the conviction of Samuel
Flatto-Sharon and ordered the
former independent MK to report
to police on Mar. 1 to begin ser-
ving a nine-month prison sen-
tence for bribery and other viola-
tions of the law in his election
campaign for the Knesset in
1977.
working or attending schools of
higher learning. But between 18-
22 of them continue to meet
regularly, and they plan to spend
the proceeds from the sale of their
book to visit Israel.
Meanwhile, they are busy
spreading the story of Wilhelm
Hammann. He was a school
teacher who the Nazis sent to
Buchenwald in 1935 because he
was a Communist. In 1944. he
was put in charge of children's
block 8 and from then until the
camp was liberated by the Allies
in 1945. he risked his life daily to
save Jewish children from ex-
termination.
The youngest of his charges
was aged four and a half at the
time. Most were of Polish.
Hungarian or Czechoslovakian
extraction and could not speak
German. Hammann protected
them in various ways. He
coached them never to step
forward at the daily roll-call by
SS officers because those too
young or too weak to work would
invariably be sent to Auschwitz
and other death camps.
BENYAMIN ARMON,
director of the Yad Vashem, has
confirmed that any evidence of
Hammann's activities at
Buchenwald would be given
serious study for inclusion in the
list of heroes and martyrs of the
Holocaust. Hammann's widow is
still alive and well though over 90
years of age.
The leader of the original re-
search by the Kassel high school
students is the son of an itinerant
worker from Spain. The rest are
Germans. They have asked Jew-
ish publications to aid their re-
search efforts by informing the
Jewish public on the matter.
Buchenwald survivors who
knew of Hammann's activities
are asked to send any informa-
tion they have to Ms. Deborah
Goldberger of the press section at
the Israel Embassy, Simrockallee
2, D-5300, Bonn 2, or directly to
the Yad Vashem in Jerusalem.
Elizabeth Taylor is shown making an exten-
sive tour of desert research programs at the
Ben-Gurion University's Jacob Blaustein
Institute for Desert Research at Sde Boker.
BGU President Shlomo Gazit (right) showed
Taylor and her companion, Mexican lawyer
Victor Luna, programs being conducted on
solar energy, desert hydrology, agriculture, v
closed system agriculture, comparative
medicine, and desert architecture and
ecology. The American Associates of Ben-
Gurion University served as co-sponsor of
Taylor's tour in her recent visit to Israel
Prisoner of Conscience Must Serve Time Again
NEW YORK Simon Shnir-
man, a 25-year-old Soviet Jew
who served two and half years in
a labor camp for alleged draft
evasion, was rearrested on Jan.
12 on similar charges, the Na-
tional Conference on Soviet
Jewry reported. If tried and con-
victed Shnirman faces up to five
years in a labor camp.
Shnirman. who lives in the
small Ukrainian town of Kerch
applied to emigrate to Israel in
1977, to join his father, but was
denied permission on the pretext
that "he did not work long
enough to pay for money in-
vested by the State in I his
studies." When called to serve in
the army, he refused on the basis
of his pending emigration
plication.
ap-
Israel Angered by Reports
Begin Visit May Be Postponed
Continued from Page 1-A
naling Israel that it wants a
speedy agreement on the with-
drawal of Israeli troops from
Lebanon. The Kol Israel broad-
cast, which cited official U.S.
sources, and a Washington Post
report, intimated that Reagan
sent a tough letter to Begin
through his special Ambassador,
Philip Habib. who returned to
Jerusalem recently. Porat in-
sisted there was no such letter.
STATE DEPARTMENT
spokesman John Hughes has de-
nied that a date for Begins meet-
ing with Reagan would not be
scheduled until there is move-
ment in the negotiations with
Lebanon. But Hughes also de-
nied that any specific date
existed at this time. Begin had
been scheduled to meet with Rea-
gan last November but was
forced to cancel because of the
death of his wife, Aliza.
The Kol Israel report said U.S.
officials were weighing other
factors in considering whether or
not to postpone the Reagan-
Begin meeting. These factors
were said to include President
Yitzkah Navon's promise to an-
nounce shortly whether he will
reenter politics when his term of
office expires later this year, and
the findings of the commission of
inquiry into the Beirut refugee
camps massacre which are ex-
pected to be announced within
the next few weeks.
Navon, a former Labor Party
MK, has been mentioned as a
possible rival to Begin in the next
Knesset elections, should he re-
turn to politics. The findings of
the commission, if adverse to the
Begin government, could have a
serious impact on its political
fortunes.
On June 27, 1978, he was tried
and sentenced to two and half
years in a labor camp. During
that time, he worked with com-
mon criminals and was singled
out by camp authorities for spe-
cial punishment non-delivery
of mail and food parcels and
denial of visits from his mother.
After serving his term, Shnirman
was released on November 29,
1980.
In a town with few Jews and no
other refuseniks Shnirman and
his mother live day-to-day,
waiting for permission to join his
father and sister in Israel. His
application to emigrate was offi-
cially refused just a week before
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Friday, January 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 17-A
Journalism's New Rise
On the Bookshelf
*o Arrogance of Power Despite Military Lingo, Worthy Work
United from Page 4-A
it, in some towns, there is
|>ne newspaper and that
pre newspapers are going
vith regular frequency."
a(lil-. "I mean, there are
[tree networks in the elec-
|media. I mean ugly feel-
about monopoly and
it-control."
AMERICAN Jewish Con
[ and other organizations
nth the major newsexecu-
i discuss this?
Mainly, we try to meet
Baum asserts. In that sense, ter-
rorism was an act of war, "but
today, there are no innocents. No
one can claim immunity."
I WONDER out loud: Do the
media really romanticize terror-
ism?
"In the case of the Pales-
tinians, no doubt," declares
Raum.
Then what to do about the
media? English-language Jewish
journalism apart, can Jews open
up a shop of their own with
equivalent national coverage to
disseminate the truth as they see
Leo Mindlin
hem as action rather than
n when there was
kg recent in the newspapers
[TV to complain about
essentially to discuss our
Im describes a Catch-22
Ion. "You meet with an
He regards you sus-
sly as having a Bill of Com-
t-s against him. Either he
the banner of freedom of
i'ss. which he sees you as
}plingto violate.
else, he says: 'We merely
the news: we don't create
message of the news may
ri fur you. but you're blam-
messenger for the bad
go, We have no control
Ihi1 message."
OF COURSE, he dan
rnnirol ovat the message, I
fc'e. And in many cases, he
BDOrUng the news; he may
pt, but he it making it.
im agrSta: "There are many
nerica today who believe it is
Ito stand up for the 'little
There is a romantic sym-
for anti-Establishment
wnts, just like in the Viet-
i'ra. and the media are to a
[extent responsible for this.
en when it comes to terror-
|such as the PLO," says
). "the media tend to inspire
>f apology in their behalf.
Ixample: What else can these
[people do. if not shake the
by the scruff of the neck?
else will anyone listen to
result is that, in the new
I order of terrorism, raised to
fcf glories by the media, all
:iety is hostage, and each of
it hazzard.
the past" he says, "terror-
teemed 'acceptable' against
I established order only,"
it?
"In the case of the electronic
media, nothing can be done. I
said before." Baum opines, "that
the electronic media constitute an
absolute monopoly over the air-
waves which, presumably, are
owned by the people a
monopoly sanctified by the
federal government. In the case
of the printed word, little more.
Newspapers are going out of
business every day. The cost of
starting a new one would be pro-
hibitive. And who would invest in
one these days?"
REMINISCES BAUM: "In
the old days, there were other
forms of encounter, but in our
own times, given the heights of
unexpected importance they have
never experienced before, the
media are a grave cause for con-
cern
"They must reacquire some
sense of obligation to accuracy
iK'yond what they believe is the
certainty of their own view be-
cause it is this certainty that can.
and does, also lead to terrible
mistakes in fact."
In the end. the media must
come to regard complaints
against them as more than a hos-
tile act. It is not, says Baum. "an
invasion of a TV or a newspaper's
right to see another view. Offer-
ing another view is not neces-
sarily censorship."
I ask: Do you think these
arguments have some future?
SAYS BAUM: "What we are
talking about is journalistic arro-
gance, sanctimoniousness,
omniscience. This pretty much
apeOa monopoly also."
He does not say so. but Baum
is talking about bleakness, too,
an era of managed news sanc-
tified by First Amendment
guarantees to the boardrooms of
cartel journalism enterprise.
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The Arab-Israeli Wars: War and
Peace in the Middle East. By
Chaim Herzog. New York:
Random House, 1982.392|Pp..
$20.
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Book Editor
When people go on and on
about a particular subject, ela-
borating in tiresome detail every
single fact, large or small, they
are said to be "circumstantial."
Rather than being so professor-
ially precise, we can also refer to
such people as telling us more
about penguins than we would
ever want to know.
Whether you prefer the term
"circumstantial" or the punch
line of the old joke about pen-
guins, the truth is that each pro-
vides an apt description of Chaim
Herzog's book. He overwhelms
us with details and data. Fact is
piled upon fact. The names of
colonels, generals, brigades and
divisions overwhelm us. It i9
small wonder that this book was
a "main selection" of the Military
Book Club. For professional
soldiers, it is undoubtedly a trea-
sure trove. For most of us, it is
tedious and difficult to follow.
NEVERTHELESS, despite its
limitations, the book is worthy of
our attention. The brief chapter
on Entebbe, refreshingly free of
military jargon, gives a clear pic-
ture of that exciting triumph.
What also comes through clearly
is Herzog's political preferences.
He paints a picture of the events
leading up to the landing at
Uganda's airport as including a
reluctant Prime Minister. Yit-
zchak Rabin, ready to yield to the
demands of the terrorists.
Only with great misgiving, ac-
cording to Herzog. did Rabin
finally succumb to the pressures
of his advisers, authorizing the
operation, beset by doubts. By
contrast. Shimon Peres, then
Minister of Defense, is portrayed
as daring and determined. The
policy of never yielding to terror-
ists is ascribed to him. It is his
leadership, according to Herzog,
that led to the decision to go
forward with the brilliant plan
formulated by Gen. Dan Shom-
ron.
Herzog's biases are also
evident in his treatment of Ariel
Sharon, now Israel's Minister of
Defense. Sharon is depicted as a
"swashbuckler." "assertive."
and "accused of dictatorial ten-
dencies ... of insubordination
and dishonesty." On the other
hand. Herzog grudgingly credits
Sharon with military feats in
1956. 1967. and 1973. His persis-
tently negative attitudes towards
Sharon were manifested as re-
cently as December 26. 1982
when, in the Jerusalem Post,
Herzog accused Sharon of conti-
nually ignoring the Israeli
cabinet.
CAPSULE COMMENTS are
made in the book about the Is-
raeli commanders. They are in-
variably pictured as "decisive,"
"soft-spoken." "self-effacing,"
"brilliant," "articulate." "out- f" jl(-"
Policeman Wounded
TEL AVIV (JTA) An
Israeli border policeman was
slightly wounded in Lebanon
Sunday evening when on explo-
sive charge went off as a border
police vehicle passed along a road
south of the Rashadiye refugee
camp south of Tyre, the army
spokesman said. Army sources
said the charge had been remote-
ly-controlled.
Aft
Chaim Herzog
standing." "attractive." "self-
confident." After a while, the
complimentary adjectives pall
and lose their meaning, especially
since Herzog acknowledges that
Israel's military victories are due
in part, at least, to errors by her
opponents and to their poor lead-
ership.
One way to read this book is to
concentrate on the prologues and
the summaries which Herzog
gives us for each of Israel's wars.
The longer sections, which give
overly detailed, blow-by-blow de-
scription of each battle, can be
skimmed.
The book begins with the War
of Independence in 1948-49 and
ends with the war in Lebanon of
1982. In between. Herzog de-
scribes the Sinai campaign of
1956. the Six-Day War of 1967.
the War of Attrition, 1967-1970,
theYom Kippur War of 1973, and
the War Against Terrorism, En-
tebbe. 1976. The list is long, and
its very length is depressing
evidence of adamant refusal by
Israel's intransigent neighbors to
live in peace with her.
HERZOG CORRECTLY
states that "Israel is a country
that remains dependent for its
survival on military ability. Yet
it is a country that rejects mili-
tarism." Israel's future, says
Herzog, is "both sobering and
alarming." and its past is "one of
the more intriguing, imaginative
and encouraging stories of
modern times."
Unfortunately, because of im-
placable Arab enmity, that story
has to emphasize military
prowess, a characteristic for
which Jews have not previously
been noted. Fortunately, out of
sheer necessity, the Israelis have
developed that characteristic.
We can only hope that the time
will soon come when they can
concentrate on furthering the
more typical Jewish characterist-
ics of intellectual and spiritual
achievement.
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Page 18-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 21,1983
-
7
President Yitzhak Navon of Israel (left) is awarded the
Founders Medal of Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of
Religion by Dr. Alfred Gottschalk, president, while visiting the
college in New York City Jan. 11. President Navon spoke before
a group of 300 students, faculty and college leaders, and urged
the strengthening of Jewish education andaliyah as the two top
priorities for the Jewish community.
U.S. Leaders Meet Chirac
To Protest Anti-Semitism
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A delegation of American
Jewish leaders, represent-
ing the Conference of Presi-
dents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, met
with Mayor Jacques Chirac
of Paris here to express
their concern over terrorism
and anti-Semitism in
France and their solidarity
with the policies of the
Israeli government, many
of which are opposed by the
French government.
The interview, at Chirac's
Hotel Carlyle suite, was arranged
through Mayor Edward Koch of
New York and his aides. Koch
was Chirac's guest in Paris in
1978. He is a prominent figure in
French national politics which go
beyond the office of Paris Mayor.
THE 15-MEMBER delegation
of the Presidents Conference
made it clear that they are
dismayed over manifestations of
anti-Jewish terrorism and anti-
Semitism in France in recent
months, particularly since
Israel's campaign in Lebanon.
Chirac insisted that anti-
Semitism is virtually non-
existent in France. He said only a
fraction of one percent of the
French population could be called
anti-Semitic and that French
Jews are regarded as Frenchmen
without qualification.
Chirac conceded that terrorism
was a problem and said he has
been trying during the past six
years to persuade previous gov-
ernments and the present gov-
ernment of Socialist President
Francois Mitterrand, to act more
vigorously against terrorism, but
without much success.
The JewisJi delegation stressed
the strong support in the
American Jewish community for
Israel's opposition to a
Palestinian state, its rejection of
the Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation as a participant in the
Middle East peace process and
No Exit
TEL AVIV (JTA) For-
mer Prime Minister Yitzhak
Rabin said last week that the La-
bor Party was firmly opposed to
any withdrawal back to the 1948
"green line" which served as the
Israeli border up to the 1967 Six-
Day War.
Rabin said he would be
very pleased if Jordan joined the
peace talks on the basis of the
Camp David accords.
its assertion that Jewish settle-
ments in the occupied territories
are neither illegal nor an obstacle
to peace.
THEY REITERATED
support for Israel's position that
Jerusalem must remain a united
city under Israel's sovereignty.
Thi > expressed dismay over
continued Arab refusal to come
to the peace table with Israel.
They said this was the overriding
impediment to peace. They also
expressed continued support for
the Camp David peace process
which the French government
has dismissed as no longer viable.
Chairac agreed on the PLO. He
said he had never met with PLO
chief Yasir Arafat, opposed such
a meeting and also opposed the
opening of a PLO office in
France. He said he regarded
himself as a great friend of Israel
but he does not agree with the
policies of Premier Menachem
Begin's government.
According to Chirac, there
must be an end to settlement in
the occupied territories. He
would approve a Palestinian
state and he believes Israel's pre-
1967 borders could serve as a
kind of guideline to a settlement
setting up permanent boun-
daries.
Reagan is Key
Jews Press Shultz on Normalization
Continued from Page 1-A
publicans in a two-hour meeting
at the State Department with
Shultz. Deputy Secretary Ken-
neth Dam; Nicholas Veliotes,
Assistant Secretary of State for
Near Eastern and South Asian
Affairs; and Richard Fairbanks,
the special envoy for the
autonomy talks, were also in at-
tendance. The meeting was re-
quested by Shultz.
"We would hope it (the meet-
ing) was helpful to the Secretary
in formulating the future policy
of the State Department and the
recommendations to the Ad-
ministration and to the Presi-
dent," Berman said. But he noted
that before judgment could be
made on whether the comments
of the Jewish leaders had any af-
fect, they would have to see what
proposals are offered by special
Mideast envoy Philip Habib in
Beirut.
Berman stressed that he could
not reveal what Shultz and the
other Administration officials
said but could only report on
what the Jewish leaders told the
officials. He said there is a "per-
ception" in the community that
the U.S. is "not helpful" in the
efforts to achieve normalization
of relations during the negotia-
tions on the withdrawal of foreign
forces from Lebanon.
"NORMALIZATION is a step
backwards from the peace treaty
that Israel initially wanted."
Berman said. "But it is the type
of normalization that leads to an
ultimate peace."
He said that "Lebanon is
amenable for such relations (with
Israel) and we believe it is very
important that the United States
support that approach and
suggest to the Lebanese govern-
ment that they will back them in
such further discussion."
On the Reagan peace initiative.
Berman said it is "clear to us that
the Arab leaders are not prepared
to come to the (negotiating)
table." He said the Arab
league's Fez communique of last
September offers peace based on
a PLO-Palestinian state, in the
pre-1967 borders with East Jeru-
salem as its capital. Berman said
this "is the heart of the Reagan
proposals thrown into the gar-
bage." He said "no indication of
any forward movement" was
given on Jordan entering the
peace process.
HOWEVER, Berman stressed.
Israel repeatedly has said "It is
prepared to go to the table with-
out any preconditions whatso-
ever." He said despite this, "the
impression is conveyed in the
community, not only in America,
but in the world, that somehow it
is the intransigence, or the
alleged intransigence, of Israel
that is the stumbling block." He
said Shultz was told this is
"clearly not the case."
Berman said there was no dis-
cussion of the possible visit of Is-
raeli Premier Menachem Begin to
Washington. Begin had to post
none his meeting with Reagan
last November when his wife.
Ali/.a, died while he was in Los
Angeles. The % isit was reportedly
to have been rescheduled for
February,
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can^'
ortceoWrarKSadaV
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Friday, January 21, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 19-A

Continued from Page 1 -A
nan said that two SAM-5 sites were being
i inside Syrian territory.
9, first displayed in Moscow in the mid-
[ sufficiently long range and a high enough
tiling to be used by the Syrians to attack
; in Israeli air space.
ces here have noted the possibility that
may be planning to man the sites
kRCES have also pointed out that the
accelerated rate of the Soviet build-up of Syria's forces,
after the mauling they received during the fighting in
Lebanon, means that these forces will have been fully
reequipped and retrained by 1984.
A spokesman for the International Institute of
Strategic Studies said in London that the SAM-5,
known as the "Gammon," was "a bit of a paper
threat."
The 54-foot long SAM-5 is the Soviet Union's biggest
surface-to-air missile.
It is a medium-to high-level weapon with a maximum
slant range of 155 miles and an effective ceiling of
almost 100,000 feet.
THE SPOKESMAN. Col. Jonathan Alford, said that
there had been "a lot of teeth-sucking" about the
performance of Syria's Soviet weapons after the war in
Lebanon.
Syria has evidently complained to the Russians, who
had offered them the Gammon.
However, it was "totally inappropriate against very
low-level attack." It was unlikely, therefore, that the
Israelis, once having discovered the Gammon's
frequencies, would fly at high levels.
en you have these
nergy savers added,
well subtract
part of the cost.


Ceiling Insulation
An Efficient Heating/Cooling System
An Efficient Yteter Heater
FPL will actualry pay you to conserve electricity
four ways:
Our Cooling & Heating Incentive. FPL will pay up to
several hundred dollars towards the cost of having an older,
inefficient air conditioning system or heat pump replaced with
a qualifying high efficiency system.
Our Ceiling Insulation Incentive. FPL will pay up to
$300 towards the cost of having ceiling insulation installed.
Our Water Heating Incentive. FPL will pay up to several
hundred dollars towards the cost of having an inefficient water
heater modified or replaced with a solar water heater, water
heating heat pump or heat recovery system.
Our Solar Film Incentive. FPL will pay up to $150
towards the cost of having solar-reflective film installed.
lb qualify for the last three incentives, work must first be
recommended by an FPL Home Energy Audit.
Will everyone benefit from Watt -Wise incentives?
lies.
These incentives are less costly than the oil necessary to
I generate the electricity wasted by inefficient homes. Every 600
kilowatt-hours of electricity not used is a barrel of oil no one
has to pay for. This also helps us postpone the building of expen-
sive power plants. The less oil we use, and the less new building
Solar Film
we have to do, the more we can help hold the line on everyone's
electric bill.
R>r more information on how to qualify or to arrange for a
Home Energy Audit, send us the coupon or call the Watt-Wise
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The Watt-Wise Products Program. Another way we're work-
ing hard at being the kind of power company you want.
I'd like more information on the following watt-Wise incentives:
? Coolingfi Heating ? Water Heating
? Ceiling Insulation D Solar Film
? I would like to'have an FPL Home Energy Audit.
Name_
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Mail to: Energy Conservation Department,
Florida Power & Light
RO. Box 529100, Miami, FL 33152
f=PL?fiSP
JFj





Pige 20-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. January 21.1963
NORTON
SINCE 192<
TIRE CO.
SAKTY
SERVICE
CfHTEi
IS MEASURED BY MORE THAN PRICE
iWl
._- M0 **
ilFGoodrich
BELTED CLM
P METRIC POLYESTER CORD
FIBERGLASS BELT WHITES
P155/80B12
Plus 1 49 FE.T
SIZE
PRICE
FE.T.
P155/80B13
31.97
1 44
P165/SOB 13
33.81
1 50
P175/80B13
35.75
1 63
P185. 80B13
P175/75614
37.93
1 69
38.79
1 70
P185/75B14
P195/75B14
P205. 75B14
39.88
1 79
41.82
1 95
42.92
P215.75B14
44.25
P225, 75B14
46.57
P155/80B15 35.75
P165,80815 37.44
2.07
IK.
235
1 68
1 83
P205. 75B15
44.14
P215/75B15
45.60
P225/75B15 47.78
P235/75B15 50.10
2.15
2.34
2 -m;
2 65
< NOATON TIRE CO LIMITED WARRANTY $>
I SATISFACTION GUARANTEED %
% OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED %
fi it !<* any i-ason t not comielt' sjiulirt .Wi any it* ^
J jaCTge- c* :t ou am 'torn lomm ""' :o '"' 'g.
Of-- iionq iHl .oui DiiQinai noiCf mm !0 Hyl K 6M M J*'
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iFGoodrichl
LIFESAVER XLM
STEEL BELTED RADIALS
4
p-55/80R13
fPius1 53F.ETI
MAXI-TRAC
HIGHWAY RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
5IZE
SALE PRICE FE.T
P165 80R13 46.86 169
P175.80R13 48.57 178
PI85 80R13 49.85 192
P165/80R13
Plus 1 67 FET
SIZE
PRICE
FE.T
P175/80R13 38.39
1 64
P185/80R13 I 40.09
P185/75R14 i 41.25
1 93
P195/75R14 42.62
: :6
P205/75R14 L 43.90
2.31
P215.75R14 45.89
2.47
P215/75R15 46.28
249
P225/75R15 I 48.77
2 70
P235/75R15 I 53.61
2 89
P195. 70R13 50.82 M
P205 70R13 52.32 2 14
P205.70R14 56.92 2 23
P175 75R14 47.50 183
P185 75R14 52.32 2 04
P195 75R14 56.92 2 18
P205/75R14 59.37 234
P2T5.75R14 60.45 2 48
P225 75R14 64.62 2 68
P195/75R15 59.70 2 33
P205/75R15 61.73 2 47
P215/75R15 64.09 2 59
P225/75R15 66.44 i 2.78
P235 75R15 71.26 I 3d
IRE
RADIALS
Low Cost
'High Mileage
Outstanding Value
155SR12 41.51
1 19
145SR13 36.63
1 15
155SR13
43.35
1 24
165SR13 47.01
1 53
175SR14
53.72
186SR14
56.78
165SR15
54.95
1 81
2 11
1 71
THE SOUTHS MOST
COMPLETE INVENTORY
SPECIAL
PURCHASE
FOR LUXURY
SIZED CARS
P235/75-15
8695
BE SURE TO GET OUR
PRICE ON ALL SPORTS.
PASSENGER OR TRUCK
TIRE REPLACEMENTS.
irvj
^pn
PREMIUM 4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITEWALLS
SIZE
PRICE
FE.T
PREMIUM
GRADE
HIGHWAY
FOR TRUCKS. VANS. RVs
A78 13
C7813
700 < 15
I .r>..\s
700 '15
am -uo irp.
750 <16
oW'uo. 'TO.
800 -16 5
875 < 18.5
SotvruOMw
950 '6.5
51.80
45.05
57.42
3.54
58.05
334
61.83
3 78
C78 <14
E78x14
F78x14
G78x14
H78x14
25.01
27.91
28.53
29.73
1 59
1 80
1 88
31.16
32.85
2 01
2.12
226
34.39
G78x15
H78x15
32.93
34.61
L78X15
68.18
WE SERVICE NATIONAL. ACCOUNTS
4 21 Awailatte m 2 Ply onty
2 49
2 35
254
279
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'275 49$| 922 2500
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I 9 7744443


NY Jews Praise
:n
Councils
In City-Wide Survey
INEWYORK-(JTA)-
vs served by community
jncils funded by the
Btropolitan New York
jrdinating Council on
tish Poverty, respond-
to a city-wide survey,
/e praised those services
quality and effective-
's, according to the
utive director of the
jordinating Council.
abbi David Cohen said the
vey of the delivery of social
irices at eight local Jewish
imunity Councils was un-
takcn as a result of a year-long
cess of review and evaluation
\\w complete range of the Co-
inating Council's programs
I activities.
OH EN SAID that more than
i questionnaires were mailed to
nts of eight community
cils funded by the Coordi-
iii'.i: Council under contract
the Human Resources Ad-
listration, the city's key social
(fare agency.
lolu-n said the councils in-
led were in Boro Park,
jhton Beach. Canarsie, Crown
?hts. Coney Island and
tbush in Brooklyn, Wash-
Heights-In-Wood in
ill.man and the Queens Jew-
ICommunity Council in Forest
Is
lohen said that by last Oct. 15,
cut-off date for response,
its had returned 194 of the
ns 27 percent to the Co-
iling Council.
said the Coordinating
incil was "gratified both with
magnitude of the response
with the degree of satisfac
elicited from the clients
t the quality and effective
I of the local council's delivery
L"ial services."
IE SAID two-thirds of those
ending reported that they
received the services they
requested. In the analysis of
responses of those reporting
s had not received requested
Wcas, the Coordinating
incil found that the largest
i category involved housing.
In report noted the "basic
istkity" of the supply of de-
lable housing in the
propolitan area, as well as the
Ithy waiting period for either
tin eight housing, referring
|" provision of the Federal
using Law under which rents
he poor are subsidized; and
lie housing.
Menachem Shayovich, Coordi-
nating Council president, said
that "increased housing
availability for low income clients
is an important area for con-
tinued strong advocacy" by the
Council.
HE REPORTED that there
was "strong indication" that the
function and activities of the
community councils are well
known in the eight areas that
were surveyed. The responses
showed that more than 70 per-
cent of the respondents knew
about the community councils
through "word of mouth," and
that 70 percent also said they had
not visited any other Jewish or
governmental social service
agencies.
The data also showed that 154
clients out of 163 indicated they
were satisfied with the courtesy
and helpfulness of the worker and
174 out of 180 97 percent of
the respondents said they would
refer a friend or relative to a com-
munity council.
M
Archaeologist Says He Pound
Oldest Reference to God
By (ill. SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A young Tel Aviv Uni-
versity archaeologist be-
lieves he has found the old-
est Hebrew reference to the
name of God in a treasure
trove of coins, amulets and
other ancient objects
yielded by an ar-
chaeological dig on a hill
facing Mt. Zion in Jeru-
salem.
Gabriel Barkay, who con-
ducted the excavations three
years ago, told a lecture audience
at the Rockefeller Museum here
that the nature of the discovery
was unravelled only last month
by a special technique applied in
the laboratory of the Israel Mu-
seum. The objects under study
were two pure silver Hebrew
prayer scrolls dating from the
Seventh Century BCE.
THE TEXTS were scratched
with a sharp instument and, ac-
cording to Barkay, extremely dif-
ficult to read. One of them con-
tained the Hebrew letters "yud,"
"heh," "vav," "heh," trans-
literated as Yaweh or Jehovah,
the name of God which pious
Jews are forbidden to write or
utter. Barkay would not identify
the other texts, save to say he
was still trying to decipher them.
He said he kept his research on
the objects more or less secret up
to now to avoid agitating ultra-
Orthodox Jews who might accuse
him of desecrating ancient Jew-
ish graves.
The excavations, alongside St.
Andrews Church above the Hin-
7*4
inders of Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
IM 'irst.^inner meeting of 1983 at Douglas Gardens. George
t'don, right, Tampa attorney and former member of the
V. a House of Representatives, addressed the meeting and
r1"1 legislative priorities for the elderly. Also shown are
f, e<*tter, president of Founders, and Arthur Pearlman,
t'rman 0f the development committee and vice president of
1 Miami Jewish Home.
nom Valley, were described by
archaelogists as the "most sensa-
tional" in 150 years of digs in and
around Jerusalem.
THEY YIELDED the largest
amount of jewelry ever found at a
Jerusalem site and the oldest coin
ever found in the country a 6th
century BCE coin in the shape of
a crab from the Aegaean island of
Kos. Barkay said he found the
two silver prayer scrolls in an un-
derground tomb chamber filled
with gifts placed alongside the
bones of the deceased.
He explained that earlier He-
brew references to God's name
have not been found because they
were on papyrus or other perisha-
ble material. God's name would
not appear on stone inscriptions
because they were not tradi-
tionally religious texts, he said.
F.E. (Genet Autrey, executive
vice president and chief
operating officer of the South-
eastern Public Service
Company, has been appointed
1983 general campaign chair-
man of United Way of Dade
County. Active in the organi-
zation since the early 1960s,
Autrey currently serves as
vice president and chairman of
Corporate Services Division.
Congressman Lehman
To Be Honored
Congressman William Lehman
will be honored at a Testimonial
Dinner Saturday at 6:30 p.m. at
the Hyatt Regency James L.
Knight Center, Miami. The din-
ner is co-sponsored by the North
Dade Chamber of Commerce and
the Concerned Citizen's of North-
east Dade County.
Milton T. Hornstein, president
of the Chamber, said special en-
tertainment and surprise guests
will attend. Jule Littman, presi-
dent of Concerned Citizens,
stated, "The people now have an
opportunity to thank the con-
gressman in person and share
this special event with him."
Combined Jewish Appeal
Shabbat Set for Feb. 4, 5
The Rabbinical
Association of Greater
Miami has declared Feb. 4
and 5 to be Combined Jew-
ish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Shabbat.
According to Rabbinical
Association President
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff,
spiritual leader of Congre-
gation Bet Breira, the
special Shabbat has been
planned to coincide with
Super Sunday on Feb. 6.
On Super Sunday, over 3.000
volunteers from the Greater
Miami Jewish community will
telephone more than 60,000 Jew-
I ish households in Dade County to
enlist their support for the 1983
CJA-IEF. The campaign sup-
ports social service programs in
Greater Miami, in Israel and in
Jewish communities around the
world.
"THIS YEAR, when world
Jewry is faced by urgent crises, it
is especially important that
rabbis take the time during
Shabbat services to explain the
needs of the CJA-IEF cam-
paign." Tabachnikoff said.
"The people of Israel are faced
with an economic crisis that
threatens the fabric of the na-
tion's social service programs. In
our own Greater Miami com-
munity, human service agencies
are trying to cope with growing
lists of needy clients and
shrinking federal grants. The
community must unite in a show
of solidarity to maintain and
expand our efforts to assist Jews
everywhere."
The special Shabbat also was
coordinated under the aegis of
the National United Jewish Ap-
peal, in celebration of UJ A's 44th
anniversary and the major role of
local Jewish Federations within
Jewish communities throughout
the United States.
RABBI Haskell Beraat. spiri
tual leader of Temple Israel of
Greater Miami and national
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal Rabbinic Cabinet, and
Rabbi Ralph Kingsley. spiritual
Wader of Temple Sinai of North
Dade and national coordinator of
the Shabbat. noted that this is
the seventh annual Shabbat
observance to highlight the
importance of the CJA-IEF.
Members of the Rabbinical
Association. representing all
branches of Judaism, encourage
support for the campaign in their
individual congregations and
work with community leaders to
develop an understanding of the
Jewish dimensions of tzedakah
and commitment.
"Our faith and ethics teach us
that every Jew has a responsibili-
ty to help build and strengthen
the community." Tabachnikoff
pointed out. "Our response to the
crises that face our people today
will make a spiritual and material
contribution to our people's
future."
30 Jewish Organizations to
Join Super Sunday Exhibition
A wide range of Jewish com-
munity organizations and
agencies will display their serv-
ices and programs on Sunday,
Feb. 6 at a Super Sunday Expo
presented at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami. The exhibition
will be shown as more than 3,000
volunteers reach out to 60,000
households in Greater Miami on
behalf of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation's 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign.
Expo Center participants in-
clude the Hillel Foundations of
Florida, the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization, the Jewish Voca-
tional Service, the Samuel Scheck
Hillel Community Day School,
the Jewish Family and Children's
Service, Pioneer Women, the
Jewish High School of South
Florida, B'nai B'rith Women,
Chabad House, Mount Sinai
Medical Center, B'nai B'rith
Lodges, the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, the
High School in Israel, the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged, the Lehrman Day
School and the Jewish Junior
High School of South Florida.
Other participants are the
South Florida Conference on So-
viet Jewry, the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America, the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
the Florida Friends of Bar Han
University, the Women's League
for Conservative Judaism the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Council on Cults, the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women,
American Mizrachi Women.
Hadassah. Young Judea. ORT.
Yeshiva University, the Federa-
tion Israel Programs Office, the
Workmen's Circle, the Jewish
War Veterans and El Al Israel
Airlines.
"The involvement of so many
Expo Center participants dis-
plays the unity of our Jewish
community on Super Sunday, a
day on which we display our
commitment to Jews in need
worldwide," said 1983 CJA-IEF
General Campaign Chairman
Aaron Podhurst. "These organi-
zations and agencies stand with
us and share our hopes and vi-
sions for the future.
Women's Division Hosts TV Personality
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division
annual luncheon for Patrons,
Sponsors and Donors from South
Dade, Southwest Dade and
Miami Beach will be held on
Wednesday. Feb. 9, 10:30 a.m..
at the Four Ambassadors Hotel.
The function will feature a
fashion show by Cache and guest
speaker Michael Medved, author
and television personlity.
Medved's published books
include "What Really Happened
to the Class of "65," "Hospital
People," "The Shadow Presi-
dents," and "The Golden Turkey
Awards," which he co-authored
with his brother, Harry. He has
been a frequent guest on all the
major network television talk
shows.
Medved is president and co-
founder of Pacific Jewish Center,
a community facility in Venice,
Calif. In public appearances and
lectures across the nation,
Medved has become a leading
spokesman for the return to Jew-
ish affiliation and tradition that
is taking place among tens of
thousands of young Americans.
Women who attend the event
make a $125 minimum gift to the
1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund. Joan
Morrison is chairwomen of the
event, and Pat Lieberman is co-
chairwoman.
(Jewish Flor idiaan
Miami, Florida Friday, January 21,1983
Section B


Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. January 21. 1983
Justice Goldberg to be Honored,
Peres to Speak at Histadrut Event
A 17th Annual Mid-Winter
Conference of the Israel Hia-
tadrut Foundation will take place
Feb. 19 through 21 at the Kon-
over Hotel, Rabbi Leon Kronish,
chairman of the national board of
directors, announced.
Justice Arthur J. Goldberg will
receive the Histadrut Quality of
Life Award at an Inaugural As-
sembly to be held Feb 19 at 7:30
p.m.
Justice Goldberg was the
founding chairman of Israel His-
tadrut Foundation in 1960. He
served as secretary of labor of the
U.S. in 1961 and 1962 and was
associate justice of the U.S.
Supreme Court from 1962 to
1965.
As a permanent representative
of the VS. to the United Nations
from 1965 to 1968, he was the
Resolution 242. Recently, Justice
Goldberg served as ambassador-
ai large and chairman of the U.S.
Delegation to the Conference on
Security and Cooperation in
Europe.
Shimon Peres, chairman of Is-
rael's Labor Party, will speak at a
Gala Award Banquet on Feb. 21.
Irving Polsky of New York City
and Daytona Beach will receive a
Israel Histadrut Foundation $75
Million Award.
Entertainment at the
Inaugural Session will be
presented by Soviet tenor Misha
Alexnndrovich with accompani-
ment by Maestro Shmuel Fer-
shko.
Samuel H. Landy, Philadel-
phia attorney and member of the
Foundation board of directors,
will chair the dinner.
principal draftsman of U.N
T>)iiSiTatlveTJoveTirenTSet8 Talks
A Florida outreach program of
the Conservation Movement in
American Judaism, sponsored by
the Southeast Region of United
Synagogue of America, the
Southeastern Branch of the
Rabbinical Assembly, and the
Jewish Theological Seminary of
America, will feature 12 lectures
on the overall theme "The
Challenge for the 80fs Con-
wservative Judaism Responds."
The first lecture will feature
Dr. Mayer Rabinowitz. dean of
the graduate school and associate
professor of Jewish Theological
Seminary of America. He will
speak on "Conservative Judaism
Confronts the 21st Century" at
Beth Israel Congregation in Fort
Lauderdale.
The outreach program was
planned by a committee that
included Rabbi David Auberbach
of Beth David Congregation;
Rabbi Jerome Epstein, chairman
of regions for United Synagogue
of America; Franklin D.
Kreutzer, president of Southeast
Region of United Synagogue;
Robert Novaek of the Seminary's
office here: and Harold Wishna,
director of the Southeast Region
of United Synagogue.
Red Cross Head Honored by ARMDI
. George M. Elaey, president of
the American Red Cross, recently
received the International Hu-
manitarian Award of the
American Red Magen David for
Israel for his national and inter-
national humanitarian
achievements.
Previous recipients of the
honor include former President
Jimmy Carter, Israeli Prime
Minister Menachem Begin, and
Egyptian President Anwar
Sadat.
Elsey, executive officer of the
Red Cross since 1970. has served
as executive assistant to former
presidents, as corporate vice
president, as volunteer chapter
leader, as special assistant to the
chairman, and as president.
The American Red Magen
David for Israel works in the U.S.
on behalf of Magen David Adorn,
an Israeli society that serves
needs equal to those the
American Red Cross serves in
this country. Made of Steuben
glass, the award was presented
by ARMDI Chairman Joseph
Handelman in a ceremony at Red
Cross national headquarters.
Introducing
nightly dinner
specials at the
spec
Dora
ral Hotel
Each evening a sumptuous
dinner specialty is being
offered in the
ICI'I
RESTAURANT
from 530 pm. to 930 pm.
Price includes
a delicious entree, soup,
salad, potato or vegetable,
rolls & butter, dessert and
coffee, tea or Sank a
Complimentary
^~\ Vatot Parking
HotrtOn-o>-Ocean
48th CoBins/Mtami Beach
Rena Genn, director of the
Educational Enrichment
Program of the Israeli
Ministry of Education in
Western Galilee, will speak at
"Prisoner of Conscience
Shobbat" at Temple Shir Ami
on Friday, Jan. 28 at 8 p.m.
She has recently returned
from a visit to the Soviet
Union and will speak on her
findings.
At a recent JNF-100 Lincoln Road Traditional Function, k.
Jehuda Melber, spiritual leader of Temple Beth RaJnM
guest speaker, presented a plaque to honoree^H^'
Bolotin. Looking on, from left, are Cantor Saul H Brt*
chairman for Special Activities, and Sadie and Mot R,
function chairpersons.
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS F0*M
' 0 / /
HOWARD
apih a
ACKAGIN(,
Hi
l?CI N f 45 STB{-
1 j c i' r a,;
Maxwell House'Coffee
Is After Shopping Relaxation.
Shopping for a "good buy" has be-
come one of Amenca's favorite pas-
times. It's always fun to find new
things, see the new fashions and
perhaps pick up something new for
the house or family.
Another favorite pastime is to come
home from shopping, kick off the
shoes and relax with a good cup of
coffee. Maxwell House" Coffee The
full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying flavor is
the perfect ending
to a busy shop-
ping day. Espe-
cially when
relaxing with
a close friend. The good talk. The
good feelings. The warmth are some
of the things that go along with
Maxwell House? Perhaps that's why
many Jewish housewives don't shop
for Maxwell House? They simply
buy it. It's the "smart buy" as any
balabusta knows!
So, no matter what your prefer-
enceinstant or ground when
you pour Maxwell House? you pour
relaxation. At its best.. .consis-
tently cup after cup after cup.
Daxweu
HOUSf
K Certified Koaher
c neo
Aliving tradition in Jewish homes far over half a century


Friday, January 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Hebrew Home Satellite Scheduled to Open in June
truction is on schedule for'
rt phase of a new satellite
of the Hebrew Home for
in North Miami Beach.
ere of the residential and
care facility are aiming
a mid-1983 opening.
Siegel, administrator,
[that plans are being made
June occupancy."
first phase of the satellite,
fill house 76 residents, will
Iboth one-bedroom and
| apartment with kitchen-
clinic, laundry, special
facility, kosher kitchen,
ind 4,000 square foot dining
room will also be included.
The three-story addition to the
Hebrew Home will expand
current facilities at the Samuel
and Corrine Kraver Pavillion
which already houses 50
residents.
According to Siegel. two types
of residential space will be
available, the apartments for
those individuals who are able to
live independently and total life-
care spaces available for those
requiring complete care. Medical
care, meals, and housekeeping is
Officials to Roast Commander
sh War Veterans. South
Post 778. will have a Roast
rig Past Commander
[Stricoff on Sunday at 10
jt Her-Bets Restaurant,
mder Milton Dockler
Dad.
iff is Veterans Adminis-
Veterans Service officer
Department of Florida at
|iami V.A. Hospital. Be-
lli his work for wheelchair
^s taken to University of
football and baseball
roasters will include
Coach Ron Frazier and Coach
Howard Schnellenberg.
Other roasters will include
Irvin Steinberg, past national
commander, and Sam Mindell.
Department of Florida com-
mander.
Leo Schlachter, past depart-
ment commander for Con-
necticut, will make a presenta-
tion, and Alvin Rose, past de-
partment commander, will act as
master-of-ceremonies and will co-
chair the affair with Evelyn
Clein. past auxiliary president.
available as needed to apartment
residents.
The new facility will be
equipped with a call system
capable of summoning help from
the Home's medical clinic on a 24-
hour basis.
The facility will be named after
Anna and Morris Newmark of
Miami Beach for their contribu-
tions to the Home and other
charitable causes.
The new infirmary will be
named to honor Secretary of
State George Firestone and his
wife. Nola. for their charitable
work. The Firestone's were
recently honored by the Home as
"Man and Woman of the Year."
1
Work progresses on the first phase of a new 212-bed addition to
Miami Beach Hebrew Home for the Aged, North Miami Beach.
Cable to Air Talks With
[olocaust Gathering Chairmen
program and preparations
American Gathering of
Holocaust Survivors
iltil to be held in Washing-
!>m April 11 through 13 will
subject of a nationwide
rv telecast via satellite on
fcy at 1 p.m.
-views with Benjamin
I president of the American
fring. and Sam E. Bloch. a
vice president, to be
Point East Bonds Salute Set
conducted by Laurel Vlock, will
be featured on "Jewish Spectrum
National Jewish TV" at 3 p.m.
Vlock. of Woodridge. Conn,
had conducted interviews from
Jerusalem during the 1981 World
Gathering of Jewish Holocaust
Survivors. Meed and Bloch had
been officers of that event.
The program will be aired over
Cable Channel eight.
Idents of Point East in
Miami Reach in associa-
[with the Israel Bonds
|ization will hold an annual
to Israel on Thursday at
|p.m in the Point East
Drium.
ris L Tobman. Point East
Honds chairman for six
said the condominium is
le forefront of Israel Bond
kea in this community."
In is a member of Temple
i Yeshurun and other
hropic and civic groups.
jerican-Jewish folk
Bet, Kddie Schaffer. will be
EUBSt speaker. Ernest
s is honorary chairman,
Idish Lecture on
>men to be Held
[<> Committee of Miami
lies its 1983 YIVO Forum
Isday Lecture Series with a
f Dr. Sheva Zucker. profes-
Yuldish Literature, on Jan.
ITemple Beth Sholom at 1
(topic will be "The Woman
mh Literature." Lydia
*ill perform Jewish songs
Jerry Carretta accom-
|K on piano.
f, 000 Expected at
loch Arts Festival
[inth Annual Miami Beach
Tl for the Arts wUI be held
_ and 6 and is expected to
more than 150,000 people.
Vng to Miami Beach Mayor
}n Ciment.
ii Beach Suymphony
Jlra. American Balalaika
fny Don Goldie and the
I Express, the Ballet
?ny of the Cultural Arts
V of Honda, Opus Three
P- 'he Miami Beach High
Ensemble, and others wUI
ured.
und vice chairpersons are Anne
Ackerman. Arthur Miller, Mollye
Lovinger. and Mollie Shapiro.
Igor Schultz
Co-Chairman
For Reservations Phone Temple Office 538-4112
JNF Strengthens Israel Strengthen the JNF i
131 ways to (urn Friendship
info love.
The new Friendship Dairy Cookbook
contains 131 ways to vary the dairy In your
diet with the fresh, clean taste of Friendship
cottage cheese, sour cream, yogurt, farmer
cheese or buttermilk.
To get yours, mall the coupon below with
$3.00. Well send you our new cookbook.
You 11 also get 01.00 In coupons for
Friendship Dairy Products.
If it's not made with Friendship,
It wont taste the same.
Love begins wife Friendship:
Mall lo: Friendship Cookbook Oiler
RO. Box 7134 Slratmar Station
Bridgeport. CT 06650

Enclosed is S3.00 (check or money order).
Please send me by return mall the Friendship
' Cookbook and 81.00 In coupons.
D..1
Name.
Address.
City____
Zip-------
.State______
Please print.
| Allow 6-8 weeks for delivery. Offer void where
prohibited or taxed. Valid only In contlneni.il U !


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. January 21,1963
Ulpan Classes Now Being Taught
Central Agency for Jewish
Education. American Zionist
Federation. Israel Aliyah Center,
and the Department of Education
and Culture of the World Zionist
Organization is sponsoring com-
munity Ulpan Modern Hebrew
classes through Feb. 9 and 10.
The classes are held at Temple
Beth Sholom Monday and Wed
nesday mornings from 9:30 to
9:30 p.m. and Tuesday and
Thursday evenings from 7:30 to
9:30 p.m.. at Michael-Ann Rus-
sell Jewish Community Center
Monday and Wednesday mor-
nings from 9:30 to 11:30 am. and
Monday and Wednesday eve-
nings from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.; and
at the South Dade Jewish
Community Center on Monday
and Wednesday evenings from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. and Tuesday
and Thursday mornings from
9:30 to 11:30 a.m.
rt

*i
Charles Merwitzer and Isadore Abrams recently presented
American Red Magen David with a fully equipped ambulance
for Israel Howard Kaufman, Miami Beach Chapter president,
not pictured, presided over the dedication. The ambulance was
donated in the memory of Mr. and Mrs. Louis Merwitzer.
Temple Sinai Holds UJA Sabbath
A musical tribute to ORT Around the World
recently highlighted an annual Honor Roll
Luncheon of the Southeastern Florida
Region of Women's American ORT. Shown
from left, top, are Ann Speroni,past Region
president and District VI Honor Roll
chairman; Leslie Riesenberg, chairperson of
the day; Stephanie Hirsch; Hilda Katil
Marge McSherry, manager of the Regul
ORT Thrift Shop; and Shirley Schulti. Fm\
left, bottom, are Dale Flam. Repii
president, Mimi Weiner, Executive Coul
mittee chairman; Jean Rose, and Miidrel
Feld.
Aliyah to Convene jfiUel Centers Set $3 Chacurah
Temple Sinai of North Dade
will feature Aaron Podhurst,
campaign chairman of the Great-
er Miami Jewish Federation's
Combined Jewish Appeal and
past president of the temple.
speaking on Friday. Jan. 21 at
8:15p.m.
The weekend of Jan. 21 and 22
has been designated nationally as
UJA Sabbath and commem-
orates the work that UJA accom-
plishes.
Rabbi Ralph P Kingsley.
spiritual leader, is chairman of
UJA Sabbath for the Rabbibic
Cabinet of UJA on whose execu-
tive board he also serves. Temple
Sinai holds an internal campaign
on behalf of the Combined Jewish
Appeal annually.
Aliyah Chapter of Hadassah
will have a Shabbat Dinner and
family service on Friday. Jan. 28
at Pumpernik's Restaurant.
South Miami.
The service will feature
Cantoress Jackie Bemey. who is
Aliyah's education vice presi-
dent.
Harmony Lodge to Meet
Harmony Lodge of B'nai
H'rith will meet Monday at 8
p.m. at Pythian Hal!. North
Miami Beach.
The topic of discussion will be
"The Three Sons." with Herman
Geller. South Florida Council
presidentelect, as moderator.
South Dade Hillel Jewish Stu-
dent Centers. Miami-Dade Com-
munity College. South Campus,
and Florida International Uni-
versity. Tamiami Campus, have
finalized plans for 1983 Chavurah
events. All South Dade Chavurah
bi-weekly Shabbat services, din-
ners and talks are planned by
students for students.
"Planning programs for com-
muterstudents. who don't have
the luxury of on-campus living
arrangements can be difficult."
Rabbi Dennis Wald. South Dade
Hillel director, stated. "Our stu-
dents answered the problem
themselves by designing a Chav-
urah to meet their unique needs."
Jonathon Kessler. director A
leadership development for U>|
American Israeli Public Affasl
Committee, will be featured ui|
Jan. 21 Shabbat.
Soviet Jewry Talk k\
Ron Morris, who receoH
returned from Russia where ill
visited with refuseniks, ill
present a workshop on SovhI
Jewry for high school studentsgfl
Beth Torah Congregatxj|
Harold Wolk Religious School
To be held in the Rossm;!
Nacron School Chapel, theevajl
will take place on Monday fronij
to 8 p.m.
LIVE IN
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open daily 10 a.m.-dark
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Friday, January 21, 1983 The Jewish Floridian PaKe 5-B
1fc
lAUchael Stolowitsky greets actress Liv Ullman at a recent
YTechnion dinner where she was the guest speaker.
Michael Stolowitsky Celebrates
Kopel Tour's 4th Year Here
V
Israel has been a popular
lestinat ion for the past 3,000
ears, and there is no reason that
Ihould change now," Michael
Itolowitsky. executive vice
resident and general manager of
lopel Tours. Miami, proclaims.
Three years ago his company
ided that Miami was the
econd largest potential source of
ravel to Israel in the U.S.,
painly because of its large Jew-
ih population and proximity to
he Southeast's Bible Belt."
hich. Stolowitsky claims, "is
future of travel to Israel."
Stolowitsky conducts special
pminars on Israel for the clergy
an effort to garner interest in
He idea of visiting the Holy
land.
And he doesn't stop there.
Itolowitsky sees the large Latin
Imerican market that passes
firough Miami each year as yet
not having been touched." He
Mild like to convince as many as
pssible of the million or more of
hem to make Israel their
llimate destination, or at least a
lop on their trip.
In Miami.'' Stolowitsky
pserves, "we have only touched
B lip of the iceberg."
Looking at Kopel Tours'
[ami operation's past and
irrent successes. Stolowitsky
perves, The growing figures
|>eak lor themselves." In 1979,
pel, Miami moved 500 tourists
Israel: ,n 1980. 1.500: and in
jWl. owr .1.000. El Al Airlines
dded an additional flight to
irael at Kopel s request, and
is now El AI's largest
ustomer here. And Miami has
Nome the airlines' second
pgest market in the U.S.
Located in North Bay Village.
4* t ^
mcs,
Irvin W. Katz \i Ed p a
College Admission
Counseling.
School Selection and
Placement.
Aptitude Testing.
Career Guidance.
Test Preparation:
SA.T./L.S.A.T.
MC.A.T./G;R.E.
SSA.T./G.M.A.T.
GED./T.OE.F.L.
PS.A.T.
95-1775
l50 Biscayne Blvd.
2742711
;oos.w.8iTi,Hvr
"V appointment
Kopel. Miami is celebrating its
fourth year here. As Israel's
largest tour operator, the mother
company has been in operation
for 43 years and has 700 em-
ployees on its staff, 17 offices in
Israel, its own rental car com-
pany, and a fleet of limousines
with guides. The company also
has offices in Germany, England,
and New York.
In celebration of its fourth
year, the Miami office is offering
a new bargain package to Israel
that includes eight nights in
Israel, one in London, and round-
trip airfare from Miami.
Stolowitsky speaks seven
languages and has worked exten-
sively throughout Europe and
Israel. He prides himself in
knowing "every tour guide and
hotel manager in Israel by his
first name."
Fernando Bujones, pictured left, center,
Miami-born principal dancer with American
Ballet Theatre, recently joined the Miami
Premiere Committee, formed to encourage
the creation of new works by young
choreographers, donating the necessary
$1500 to become a full member. He is shown
Temple Open House
Beth Torah Congregation will
feature Dr. Ann Ruben, psychol-
ogist and author, as the guest
speaker at an Early Childhood
Department Open House on
Wednesday at 8 p.m. in the
Rosemary Nacron School Chapel.
She will discuss "How to be a
First-Rate Mate."
Rummage Sale Set
Temple B'nai Zion Sisterhood
will hold an Annual White Ele-
phant Sale and Mini Bazaar in
the Temple Auditorium on Sun-
day. Monday, and Tuesday from
10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monthly meetings are held
every second Tuesday in the Au-
ditorium at noon.
with Audre and Herbert Mendel, un-
derwriters of an American Ballet Theatre
Apres-Gala performance party. At right,
Stanley Levine, Miami attorney and
secretary of the JND Concert Foundation
greets Dahlia and Saul Glottman, who
hosted the event in Bujones' honor.
An Exciting New Food Store!
SCANDINAVIAN FOODS
Gourmet Foods At Super Market Price $
SPECIALS
Smoked Swedish Salmon 8.99 lb.
Finnish Emmenthaler Cheese 2.75 lb.
Swedish Herring in Onion Sauce 3.50 Valb.
A Variety of Imported Seafood & Specialites
524 Biscayne Blvd. 372-9519
Free Parking Corner of
Bisc. Blvd. and N.E. 5th St.
Open 10-6
Mon.-Sat.
Nu from Kraft!
Fantastic Soft"Philly"in]
with real fruit or vegetab
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Announcing anothei first from the cream (h-es' experts'
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridia. Friday. January 21- 19W
Barbara Studley
A Friend in the Media
By LISA KUBENSTEIN
Jewish Floridian Staff Writer
Eleven banks have voting
rights to 38.1 percent of the
common stock in the Columbia
Broadcasting System (CBS)."
Barbara Studley declares.
"Eight banks have voting
rights to 34.1 percent of the
American Broadcasting Com-
pany (ABC). and Chase
Manhattan and Banker's Trust
together have voter's rights to
19.8 percent of CBS. The same
two banks own 17 percent of
ABC." she states further.
Studley. who has researched
and studied the issue, also finds
that, according to a Senate sub-
committee report dealing with
disclosure of corporate owner-
ship, stockholders of the three
major networks and of top banks
are often the same stockholders
of oil companies.
She draws her own conclu-
sions. "I don't believe it's by
chance that on one given day
every major network went from
being pro-Israel to pro-PLO," she
says. "When you look at the
ownership of the networks, you
begin to understand why policy
at each is the same."
Studley hosts the Conservative
View, a radio talk-show program
on WNWS. a news-talk station
in South Miami. Her opinions in
an interview here explain why on
her show she is consistently pro-
Israel and displays uncommon
Betty Weir Alder son, interna-
tional director of the Ameri-
can Jewish Congress' travel
program, will discuss the Con-
gress' 1983 travel program at
Dade County tour meetings on
Jan. 31. Feb 1. and Feb. 3.
lbdti
jllorura c Jprgrc
aJBto
Prince 2)amlrt
Danish Rrftaurant
8J01 Biscayne Boulevard
Reservations: "54-4400
"H it a
Beth Dm Office
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Se'vicmg Local and foreign
countries
1532 Wasnmgton Avenue
M'aniBea-r c>onda 33139
Te> S34.1004Or67?-0O04
Barbara Studley
sensitivity to the problem ot anti-
Semitism.
Studley's devotion to Israel
and her great knowledge of and
respect for the Jewish faith have
brought her to the attention of
many, including the Israeli gov-
ernment which recently extended
her an invitation to visit.
In covering and speaking out
on the Lebanese war. her spirited
pro-Israel stance in the midst of
often blatant anti-Israel coverage
over other media made her call-in
show highly charged and highly
rated.
Studley is the first to get emo-
tional about media distortions.
"It's propaganda when a two-
year-old Jewish boy killed in
Rome is never shown, but
Palestinian mothers with empty
carriages and crying over graves
are repeatedly shown," she says.
Of the Israeli operation in
Lebanon. Studley declares.
"What Israel did. uncovering all
those stockpiled weapons, was to
do the world a favor. We should
support them for this." And of all
the anti-Israel sentiment gener-
ated during the war. she urges.
"You should judge a people by
their character."
Says Studley. "I deeply re-
spect Prime Minister Begin and
Sharon I didn't demand Begin s
resignation as others in the media
did after the massacres War is
not a tea party unfortunately
people die
"Who are we to sit in our air-
conditioned apartments and
judge what's happening in that
very volatile area of the world?"
she asks.
Her personal commitment in
the bleakest hour of the war
became obvious when she placed
an advertisement in the Miami
Herald stating that "As a
member of the broadcast media. I
am appalled at the distorted
reports covering the Lebanon-
Israeli war. The efforts of the
media to portray the PLO as
innocent victims and to cast
blame and guilt on Israel are
showing signs of success.
Studley is filled with concern
about that success The Herald
ad went on to urge Americans to
write to Prime Minister Begin to
"let him know that the
American press does not speak
for the American people" and
also to advocate writing the
President.
Studley. whom her critics call
ultra-conservative, is active in
politics and travels often to
Washington and Tallahassee.
She's a registered lobbyist, and
worked to put President Reagan
in office.
He has now disappointed her,
she admits. "For one thing, he
should never have sold the
AW ACS to Saudi Arabia," she
states.
On an arms deal with Jordan,
she is emphatic: not unless that
country signs the Camp David
Accords.
"And Israel should give up
nothing." she adds. "Israel is es-
sential to our security and the
only one we can absolutely rely
on in the Persian Gulf."
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The Canyon Ranch Spa is a complete vacation and fitneti
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Guests at the Spa are treated to a unique 800 calorie^kv
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While guests are encouraged to eat less they are also en-
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The Sanka Canyon Spa Sweepstakes also offers Second and
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Entries may be sent to Canyon Ranch Spa Sweepstakes. P.O.
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(305|SMf


Friday, January 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Community Corner
Two hundred musk teachers in Dade County are expected to
participate in clinics, workshops, demonstrations, and perfor-
mances during the Fourth Annual University of Miami Educa-
tion Days to be held on campus Jan. 28 and 29.
University of Miami Jazz Vocal Ensemble will perform in
concert at the South Dade Jewish Community Center on
Monday at 8 p.m., under the direction of Larry Lapin.
PACE will present a 5th Annual Big Orange Festival
Jan. 29 through Feb. 25 featuring 21 Latin, contemporary, and
classical music concerts in Miami and Miami Beach.
Ira Sheskin, University of Miami assistant professor of
geography, will address the "Future of the Jewish Community
in Dade County" at a sit-down Oneg Shabbat on Jan. 28 at
Temple Samu-El.
An 18th annual WPBT Auction will be held April 8 through
17 and will feature art, merchandise, services, and gift cer-
tificates up for auction.
Musicians Club of America will feature a book review of Pava-
rotti's My Own Story on Jan. 23 at the Musicians Club of
America building. Coral Gables, by Nancy Huated.
Congregation Bet Breira will hold a "Prisoner of Conscience"-
Shabbat on Friday, Jan. 28 at 8:15 p.m.
Miami Beach Jewish Community Center will honor its volun-
Iteers on Jan. 28 at 9 a.m. JCC President Ruth Shack will speak
land present certificates of appreciation, and a film, "Because
|They Care,"' will be shown.
United Cerebral Palsy Association of Miami, Inc. will hold a
J1983 Weekend with the Stars Telethon Jan. 22 and 23, to be held
at the Cutler Ridge Mall and televised over WCIX-Channel 6.
| John Kiiicr. Paul Anka, and Dennis James will attend.
The City of Miami Beach will sponsor motion picture
[travelogue, "Israel-The Miracle Land" on Wednesday at 1:30
|and 2:30 p.m. in the Miami Beach Public Library Auditorium.
Aventura Jewish Center will hold a Tu B'Shvat Breakfast fol-
lowing services on Monday, Jan. 31 at 8:15 a.m.
Mollie Kahaner Sisterhood of Beth Torah Congregation will
[celebrate Women's League for Israel's 65th anniversary at a
|Shabbat Dinner and services on Jan. 2T at 0 p.m.
Metro Commissioner Ruth Shack will address a Learn to Read
I Volunteers annual meeting on Jan. 22 at 10 a.m. at Dade County
Main Library. Her topic will be "You Can Make a Difference:
J Volunteers as Partners in the Library System."
The week of Jan. 31 through Feb. 5 has been proclaimed
Juvenile Diabetes Week throughout Florida by Governor Bob
I Graham. UM's Diabetes Research Institute is organizing a "Hi-
jVVay Hold-Up" canister drive. Foundation board members,
Sheryl and Courtney Keller and Bob Sabin, co-chairmen, an-
| nounced.
iooCity of Hopei New Horizons Singles, will hold a dance on Jan.
\a at 8 p.m. at the Hallandale Jewish Center.
An Evening with Herecbel Bernard! will be featured at Tem-
ple Judea on Saturday at 8 p.m. All seats are reserved.
Older adults in need of services can find help, free of charge,
from Community Resource Counselors at the Surfside Com-
munity Center. Social Security Office, Miami Beach, and Social
Security Office, North Miami Beacb, from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
John H. Ramsey has been elected senior vice president of
Pi '.jpmenl of American Savings and Loan Association of
'orma, Morris N. Broad, president and chief executive officer,
announced.
develo
American Savings and Loan Association appointed seven
managers to assistant vice presidents: George Norton, Yunis
lit Ricardo Mejias. Maria Sxydlo. Richard Rizzo. Armando
*ngelbello, and June Messinger.
Business Notes
Rsaw i o ,ev,in has been elted vice president of Jefferson
ll)evl? -ii Barton S- GoMberg. president, announced.
JeffZ Ln?im his Potion as vice president and cashier of
suh7?n ,ygi BaBk S"^ W"i n affiliated bank and
I compan Jeffo"on Bancorp, Inc.. a publicly-held holding
First Graders to Receive First Hebrew Prayerbooks
Samuel Scheck Hillel Com-
munity Day School of North
Miami Beach will hold a Siddur
presentation on Tuesday mor-
ning at 9 in the school's Fried-
man-Uhlar Auditorium. A siddur
will be presented to 68 first grade
students whose teachers are Ruth
Spectre and Rhea Schwarzberg.
"The presentation of the
siddur marks the entrance of
literacy in the Hebrew
language," said Rabbi Dr.
Joshua Tarsis, principal of Hillel.
who will make the presentation.
Israel Launches Advertising
Campaign to Promote Tourism
American tourism to Israel
grew by one percent in 1982 over
the previous year, with 273-561
United States citizens
vacationing in the country, Uzi
Michaeli, Israel's Commissioner
for Tourism to North America,
announced.
"It has been a difficult year,"
said Michaeli, referring to the
economic situation in the United
States, the temporary flight
stoppage by Israel's national
airline El Al, and events in
Lebanon, "so that any increase,
however modest, is especially
gratifying." A total of one million
visitors from around the world
travelled to Israel in 1982.
An advertising campaign
sponsored by the Israel Govern-
ment Tourist Office is being
launched in January throughout
America. The New York Times'
travel section and Magazine, the
New Yorker, national Christian
and Jewish magazines, and 44
anglo-Jewish papers in 20 states
will carry advertisements en-
couraging Jewish Americans to
New Yiddish Group
Workmen's Circle, Southern
Region, has formed a new
Yiddish branch, and the first
meeting will be held Tuesday at 1
p.m. at the Aztec Hotel, North
Miami Beach.
The group will carry on the
Jewish fraternal organization's
social and cultural activities.
Entertainment will be provided
by Lydia King.
"This year, visit your country
home."
A second stage of Israel adver-
tising will be a nationwide
campaign sponsored by Trans
World Airlines. "As a result of
the El Al flight stoppage."
Michaeli continued, "TWA and
several European airlines in-
creased their service to Israel and
strengthened their ties and pro-
motional efforts with the Israel
Government Tourist Office, so
that Israel-bound travelers were
inconvenienced as little as possi-
ble.
The children receiving their tint
Hebrew prmyerbook are: David Almog,
Evan Bloom, Philip Chusld. 1.1st Cohen.
Daniel Courtney. Deborah Daniels. Hlla
Dror, Steven Frankl, Anna Genet, Marc
Goldberg. Iris Goldenholz. David
Itskowltx, Lisa. Jacobs, Ilan Konover.
Jordanns. Konovltch, Michael Levlne.
Jessica Michael. Daniel Schwartz.
Oranlt Shaked. Michael Slnnrelch.
Robert Tlttmann. Mlka Yemln. Shlra
Shuman, andSlvan Al Amary
Allen Anldjar, Hedva Assaraf,
Jenette Avldon. Chad Benenfeld.
Bridget Botton. Ruth Decalo. Adam
Dlnce, David Follc. Yshal Goldflam.
Harm Goldwaser. Dawn Harris,
Rebecca Harris. Rachel Klein. Jennifer
Mack. Debbie Mline. Orl Onn. Brian
Roffe. Jay SchanU. Matthew aica,
Karen SUberman, Kathy Susyn,
Deborah Benalm. Sandra Besso, LeslU.
Binder. Davin Black. Ikey Dweck, Keith
Goldmann. Isaac Gorln, Lome Cost-
(rand. Natalie Greenrock. Debra
Hllsenroth. Scott Jacoby, Brenda
Kllnger. Andrea Koplowlti. Michelle
Lederman, Leon Maratchl, Tammy
Mlldenberg. Claudia MlUner. Miriam
Mlzrachl. Tal Plotkln. Url RoUewlci,
Vanlna Serber. Miriam Sostchln, and
Alexander Wander will also par
Uclpate.
Children will also present a
choral program for parents,
grandparents, and friends who
have been invited to attend.
"Hopefully, we shall have a
year of peace:' he added. "El Al Men's Club Sets Event
will shortly be flying again, and
The Men's Club of Temple Ner
Tamid will present a Narration
and Musical Dialogue of Jewish
Life from 1860 to Date at a
breakfast meeting on Sunday,
Feb. 6 at 9:30 a.m., Paul Forand
announced.
as Israel represents excellent
value for money with comparison
with many other destinations, I
am confident that we shall con-
tinue to be less affected than
many countries by the U.S. re-
cession."
WELCH PAWN SHOP, Inc.,
In business 65 years, is looking for individual
with pawn shop experience for management
position. Benefits available. Salary negotiable.
Contact
Eric Richman
401 E. Broughton Street
Savannah, Georgia 31401
1-912-233-1356
Manischewilz.
1983 PASSOVER RECIPE GUIDE
Includes 400 in coupons!
Our new 1983 Passover Recipe Guide is more beautiful than ever! And we at
Manischewitz hope it will make your holiday celebration more beautiful than ever,
too. Our Guide features two menu suggestions plus special recipes tor dishes like
Gan Eden Chicken. Carrot Timbales and Lemon Meringue Charlotte.
You'll also find a 25< coupon for delicious MilauhewIti Egg Mmtmo Crack era
and a 15$ coupon tor any Mwilectiewlfi Cake Mix. Send tor yours now and
have a very happy and Kosher Passover!
COUPON EXPIRES APRIL 8.1963
Mail coupon to: RECIPE GUIDE. RO. BOX 484A. JERSEY CITY. N.J. 07303
Please send the Manischewitz Passover Recipe Guide to:
Name---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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State-
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One Rsope Guds Per Request f^Qutsi w* not & proctor w*hout z,p code PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY
I___________


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 21, 1963
Membership Drive, Theatre Party J
Mark 20th Year of Tel Aviv IW
man H. Lipoff as chairman A
Southeast Region, is chairnll
the board of American tJ
Pictured from left, seated, are Muriel Rus- Marcus. Bette Shalloway. Nitty Gerson.
sell Sharon BrizeL Carole Samet, and Bea Leonore Bloch. Meryle Loring. and Lynn
Fernbok. From left, standing, are Bluma Leigh t.
A community wide drive to in-
crease the membership of the
\merican Friends of Tel Aviv
University. Southeast Region.
will culminate on Saturday. Jan
29. with a theater party, recep-
tion, and supper.
In celebration of Tel Aviv Uni-
versity's 20th anniversary, and
as a "tribute to its Faculty of
Visual and Performing Arts. 1983
membership includes a gift of one
orchestra seat for the Jan. 29 per-
formance of the American Ballet
Theater, directed by Mikhail
Baryshnikov.
American Friends of Tel Aviv
University, said local Chairman
Haim Wiener, a real estate devel-
oper. 'is committed to expanding
and improving higher education
in Israel through its support of
it~ largest university '" In an-
nouncing the membership drive.
Wiener expressed deep gratitude
to !>r George S Wise of Miami
Beach, who founded Tel Aviv
University and serves as Chan-
cellor For Life.
Through Dr Wises vision
and continued dynamic leader-
ship. Tel Aviv University is rec-
ognized as one of the great aca-
demic institutions in the world
today." he said
Wiener, who succeeded Nor-
Shalon '83. a musical revue from Israel
featuring folkloric and modern themes and
dances and songs of Israel, the Orient,
Rumania, the Middle East, and America, will
be presented by Arie Kadun. Miami Beach
promoter. The 30-member Israeli troupe will
perform at the Miami Beach Theatre of the
Performing Arts on Saturday, Feb. 12 at
8:30p.m.: Sunday, Feb. 13at2:30p.m. and
Monday and Tuesday. Feb. 14 and 15 at 2:30
p.m. and 8 p.m. As an added attraction.
Habibi. an Israeli Harp of David Award
winner for Best Musical Group and
representatives of Israel in the Eurovision
Contest in Ireland, will perform tunes from
the 1940s through 1970's.
Dr. Israel Mowshowitz, rabbi
of Hillcrest Jewish Center in
Sew York, will be featured as
a Scholar-in-Residence at Beth
Torah Congregation at a Kal-
lah Jan. 21. 22. and 23. The
theme of his addresses will be
"The Jew Faces the World
Today. "
Labor Zionism Talk Set
Chaim Weizman Farband
Branch Wl of Labor Zionist
Alliance will meet Monday at
12:30 p.m. at American Savings
Hank Lincoln and Alton Roads
Pinchas Cruso will speak on
the present situation in the Labor
Zionist movement. President
Isadore Hammer announced.
ncan ,
International Corporation;!
Miami. A resident of u
Beach, he was born and edu"
in Israel, and has lorn,
active in social, cultural ^1
ucational programs in the Sol
Florida Jewish communit)^L|
American Equity Group is hS
ing an after-theater recepto^l
late supper at Club Athjjkl
Miami Beach. '
The theater party is bebui
ranged by the Women's Schi
ship Committee, chaired
Muriel Russell Planrunifth.,
ning are committee men
Mimi Abel. Bunny Adkr
rence Baumntter ignore Bio
Klaine Bloom. Sharon Bn
Mitti Center. Tern Dr
Ix-nore Flias. Bea Fe
Mikki Futernuk. Kllie Gt
Niety Gerson. F.dna Golan.I
Katz. and Gianmna Kirstein
Lynn Leight. Paula
Nancy Lipoff. Meryle
Bluma Marcus. Phyllis MI
Svd Nacron. Hannah PolansJ
Phyllis Rosen. Ellen Roth.Cn'
Samet. Maxine Schwartz,
Bette Shalloway are also on J
committee
WWnSurvivoiA
Hold Reunion
The Klobucher liathenng.e
sitting of 150 survivors oil
Holocaust, will be meeting nil
Marco Polo Hotel Ian 21-30
Participants will gather I
from many parts of the lij
\ustralia. Sweden. BeUjiumi
Prance
Coordinating the reunwi
Guaaia Zaks. a survivor
Bergen Bel sen. w hose husbudij
also a survivor of the sarneu
and whom she met in the U.S.
Also on hand will be Sal
Blochman. one of the few ewrll
escape from Treblinka M
organization is named after I
town of Klobuch in Poland. *b[
Mrs. Zaks was born
Poetry Competitioi|
to Award $1,000
A $1,000 prize will beawddl
by World of Poetry. tVM\
newsletter for poets, in
English Annual Poetry C
petition.
Poems of ail styles and onifj
subject are eligible tocompeWl
the prize or for the 99 othT?"|
or merchandise awards. wua||
over $10,000. to be given
Contest Chairman J#
Mellon said. We are
couraging poetic talent of r*
kind, and expect our conu
produce exciting discoveries

.
FREE MOVIES ALL WEEKEND!
January 21-23
On ULTRACOM Cable Channel "3" (Access Channel)
Ultra Com subscribers can enjoy an exciting
FREE WEEKENO OF THE MOVIE CHANNEL,
and take advantage of a limited time offer:
! $5.00 INSTALLATION OF THE MOVIE CHANNEL.
Reg. $20. You SAVE $15.00!!
Call 861-1564 TO ORDER TODAY
ULTRACOM Cable TV
"The Batter Way"
Serving Miami Beach and South Miami
offer good in cable areas only
offer expires 2/28/83
RESERVATION AGENT FOR COSTA LINES
AND ALL OTHER CRUISE LINES
Cruises and Travel
of America
New LocationCruise Specialist-
18737 W. Dixie HWY., No. Miami BCH.
931-0902
WANTED
Full time experienced principal-administrator
For a small special education program w
Judaic background. Program geared for Hjj
dicapped children ages 8 1*. &e
curriculum to Keren Or. Program
9299 SW152 St., Suite 201
Miami, Florida 33157


Friday, January 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
Wedding
PERTNOY -BLUMENSTEIN
Sandi Ann Pertnoy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Earl Pertnoy of Miami Beach, and Joseph
Blumenstein, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey
Blumensiein of Key Biscay ne, were married Jan.
8 at Temple Emanu-El. Rabbi Irving Lehrman
officiated.
Lois Weingarden, sister of the bride, served
as the Matron of Honor, and Robert Rapp,
brother-in-law of the groom, was the Best Man.
Serving as bridemaids were Amy Weingarden
and Jenny Pertnoy, nieces of the bride, and
Samantha Rapp, the groom's niece.
Jenny Pertnoy was the flower girl, and the ring
bearer was Josh Pertnoy, a nephew of the bride.
Dr. John Guben, Walter Morris, Dr. Douglas
Reed, Ronnie Weingarden, Sid Pertnoy, and
Ronnie Pertnoy served as ushers.
The bride was born and raised on Miami Beach
and graduated from Miami Beach High School
and the University of Miami with a degree in edu- I
cation. She has taught in the Dade County Public I
School System for six years.
The groom was born in Atlanta, Ga. and grad-
uated from the Gunnery Prep School in Con-
necticut. He worked in Atlanta and Chicago
before joining the staff of Southern Wine and
Spirits in a management capacity.
The couple will honeymoon in Europe during
the coming summer and will reside in South
Miami.
Mrs. Joseph Blumenstein
SHOPSIN SHAPIRO
Engagement
Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shopsin of Kendall have
announced the engagement of their daughter.
Mirhele Shopsin Leatherwood to Dr. Norman N.
Shapiro.
A local resident for 18 years, Michele attended
schools in New York City, receiving a certification
as a court reporter from Hefley Browne College of
the Community College of New York.
Long active in Jewish organizations, the bride-
to-be has served on the executive board and board
of directors of Temple Zion and currently serves
as a vice president of the temple's sisterhood.
Dr. Shapiro, a native of Minneapolis,
graduated with honors from the University of
Minnesota College of Education, and Beth
Hamidrash, the college department of Min-
neapolis Talmud Torah. He's a graduate of the
Jewish Theological Seminary of America with a
master's degree in Hebrew Literature and a
Doctor Divinity degree.
Rabbi Shapiro has been active as a leader in the
conservative movement in the rabbinate nation-
ally and in Canada. He has served as spiritual
leader of congregations in Toronto and Dallas and
in Miami .at Beth David Congregation. He
currently is in his 13th year of serving as rabbi of
Temple Zion.
Dr. Shaprio has served on inter-faith and com-
munity relations committees and is the past
president of Kallah of Texas Rabbis and imme-
diate past president of the Greater Miami Rab-
binical Association.
ladassah's Jewish Education Day
Miami Beach Region of
ladassah will hold a Jewish
lucation Day and brunch at the
eville Hotel Monday from 10
i.m to 2:30 p.m., Betty
lestenbaum, president, an-
Dunced.
The roster of speakers includes
)r. Sol Landau, rabbi of 17 years
nd director of Mid-Life Services;
laxine Schwartz. Federation's
Women Division president; Dr.
Louis Lederman, rabbi of Temple
Beth Moshe; and Consul General
Joel Arnon, who made aliyah in
1937 with Youth Aliyah, fought
with Haganah, and helped Jews
in Germany get to Israel after the
Holocaust.
The overall theme is "All Israel
is Responsible One for the
Other."
tOYAL HUNGARIAN IfflRESTAUl
Now under Supervision is proud to
announce that we are now located in the
Beautiful Sasson Hotel, 2001 Collins Ave.
Friday Dinner prepaid or
PAIDby5PMFri. coo can-l
WEISS FAMILY 00-04U I
ll BlUE RIDGE h
J h CAMP and RESORT M V
For Boys ft Girla 6-16 U \
^fOVn MOUNTAIN Q FUN Where Spring ]
Comti Spends the Summer -*^5pV
MOUNTAIN CITY ga 1 *
A" Water Sports in Our Own Twin Spring Fed Lakes
White Water Canoeing Ml. Trail Hike* Lapidary
tennis Arts Crafts Sailing Skiing Gymnastics
and Oance Go Carts Trips by Canoe
och Climbing Basketball Soccer Softball
Hockey Zoological 6 Science Program
' All Dietary Laws Observed** Shabbat Services
Medical Staff Available at All Times
accredited Member American Camping Association
CTUDI0
^afa*
iflA*
Your Camp Directors
COACH J.I. MONTGOMERY
MORRIS I SHEILA WALOMAN
STAN A BARBARA MINTZ
d.
Miami Beach Phone 305-538 3434 or Write
P.O. Box 2888, Miami Beach. Fla. 33140
NEW COMPUTER PROGRAM
" '1111111111"" *""
Continental
Cuisine
FREOJOSSI
wflcomtl
you Mc 10
hIB renownad
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
for a unique
dining axpananca.
Match your table to your
mood in one ol 5 individual
rooms The Tent
Wine Cellar. Studio. Place
Pigalle. Swn> Chalet.
Fine Entertainment
at the Piano
Also violin playing
for your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(private Luncheons arranged/
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THE GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREDIT CARDS
HONORED
" 2340 SW 32 AVE.
445-5371
dosed i
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I Mondays 4
tiiisl

Bay Harbor Islands residents kicked off their 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign with a joint
meeting at Lancelot Hall honoring Esther Silverman for many
years of service to the Jewish community. Shown, from left, are
former Bay Harbor Islands Mayor Ted Nelson, Coral Sea
Towers Chairman Gladys Israel, Lancelot Hall General Chair-
man Jack Kasdan, Esther Silverman, and guest speaker, Jerry
GleekeL
Temple to
Honor Rabbi
Rabbi Jacob S. Green of Tem-
ple B'nai Zion will be honored by
the temple for five years of serv-
ice on Sunday evening, Feb. 13.
The dinner will be held in the
Temple Social Hall, dinner com-
mittee chairman Harry Giber,
said.
Rabbi Green features a
Monday morning lecture series
every week from 10 to 11 ajn. in
the Temple Auditorium.
An Annual Harbour House-Carlton Terrace Breakfast raised
more than $246,000 on behalf of the 1983 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign, representing an in-
crease of 42 percent above last year's campaign gifts. Shown at
the breakfast, from left, are Mrs. Hank Wolfe, Mrs. Elton
Resnick, Dr. Elton Resnick, guest speaker. Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Vice President Norman Braman, and Ruth
Herscher.
Social Security Assistance
Claims 'Benefit Determinations
Hearings 'Special Problems
Medicare 'Supplemental Security
Income
When you have problems or need help with the Social
Security Administration, call the experts.
CALL CHARLES ROGERS
CHARLES H. ROGERS & ASSOCIATES
8101 Biscayne Blvd. 757-0021________Accountants A Auditors
Bock ftau South
formerly
Jennifers
Restaurant
Isfllive&Wcllond
Doing Business Doily
Lunch II 30 to 3 Phil Ruedy at the Piano
Dinner 5 to 12 John Cole Tno
floppy tlour 4to7
The music of
Tony & Lindo
Thomos
Restaurant
555 NE 15th Street
PLAZA VENETIA
Venetian Causeway
on OiscByr* Day
Music Dancing at Dinner Reservations 374-6144


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, January 21. 1983
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TASTE n* 3cEnrCi QUALITY MAKES ILARGE StfEl
n^i M .it. it. i i w-a M________-
u nonw nawiMnfi tineappte
CO St TO SalaOS-'P*S
..........2.o. .89
SWEET AN0 JUICY
EASY TO PEEL
EXTRA FANCY NOA'HWtS'CI*.
.10"*S-S1.59
FLAVORFUL wo ncfntsnmG ( PXO
Sunkist Lemons .
CROP AAC CKUNCM -uAROEM FRES
U-PICK
FROM A LOOSE
DISPLAY
89
10
.ea .79
eu .39
FOR
rsTrTT
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE & ________ ESAVE
NESTLE'* REG M* MARSHMALLOrV 2 LTR BTL
Hot Cocoa $fl9 White Rock *JC%C
Mix.....40ZCONT M. Seltzer 7
,-SAVE
'5J1.19 80
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NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
ME C WATER. MED UQHT ^ ja r>i->
5-^ POT FLAMNO SWORO Sl|!f9
MB IMTEM CO JCXT fat* lOOMWO
BjvyunBee.......... *c- w
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Tomato Juice 4ri .79 oe Tee Begs ... .'x, 1.69 30 S*~____ m -
44 ivI^-~ -a ji 40
|#99JsjVv9s1K..... vsjt
20 Btosoh........'% ^ 40
.59 26 towels.....2 1.00 ta fZZZZT**** *a*.ji-O0
.99 30
10MEWC STEMS iPSCtS
.49 20 e.*MMMMm *, .48 37
.79 07 Coffss........^1.89
p/wrrT PMOE-AssonTco colors papw
f.tgo-assoo'e; f^avops
Rrrj-ASaOOTEC Fi^,voS
CRTSTAt-REG 0" nrSTv-0 StKSWtET
Wsftsr.........H .59 10 Prune Juice
PAA.-B. PR_A_ .EOCTAaU PAMTW. PRCC-lOMS 0RAP.
.6 ='.21 .95 54

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1.39
20
.59 40
J


Friday, January 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD
JAN 20-JAN 26. 1983
(3 LBS. AND OVER)
I OP BEEF LOIN ^m*^*%.
79*iSksl"
PED PREMIUM FRESH
Iqtrs Backs gibiet pks )
Of
ten
ARMOUR GRADE A FROZEN
49* SS $119
U S CHOICE
ioulder$^69 L^mb Shoulder$-|89
Chops 4Ei Blade Chops JL,
2
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Frankfurters.......
ARMOUR
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2 2VO*
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SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
1 PRICES GOOD
JAN 26, 1983
. utbicatbi
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mm* tummic*
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l*M "* '"v ** 9ii sna
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Bath
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Laundry $-| 19
Detergent JL
8ELF8ERVIC1
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PAN'Rv PHtOE-100*. WHOLE WHEAT
Bread.........?<$
a .02
, PKG
SAVE
.59 10
.99 20
PECAN FUOG
Brownies
ME'ER S-NAT SR DOUGH OR APPLE CINNAMON it X PKOl
Muffins.....2 for .99 33
A ( C GARLIC STICKS OR
Garlic Bread..
VELVET CREME-CRULLERS OR
CHOCOLATE
Donute .......
AOLER S-Jtwish
8 02
, PKG
BO>
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Rye Bread
iao2
LOAF
.65
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04
10
20
HEALTH & BEAUTY AIDS I
62
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USTERME
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52
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80 C11.97 62
SERVICE DELH
NOT AVAILABLE AT ALL STORES
BM.-MAR OVEN BROWNED
Shave Qel.....cS1.67
BBj VALUABLE COUPON
SAVE 54*
I LIGHT CHUNK IN OIL OR WATER
Bumble Bee
4SATTVE
7 52
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OUN SALAMI OH BH.-MAH uvtn bmuwmcu ^-^^ ^^_
UUIUUIIQ B)k1/2LB mmmmmmmmmm~mmmwmmmmmmmm mm .MIOM CAN WITH $10 OROER EXCL TOBACCO PROOUCTS _
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MANBH. I ORCTEL
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JEWISH STVLE WITH (JB WITHOUT SEEDS
Turkey Ham .....n.1.39 Rye Bread
LOW IN CMOLESTROl
EXCELLENT FOR SANOWICHES-OLIVE OR
P & P Loaf
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HALF
ui
1.39
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69 SAVE56' 01
.89 PANTRY PRIDE GR A' ^m\Z
"l*& 29*!
| ^iW DOZEN BBBbI WmW
OREAT FOR SANOWICHES
Hoagie Rons
CHOCOLATE COVERED
FOR
.98
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i 2 BOO CHICKEN 2 VEGETABLES 4 ROLL
Chicken Dinner
DOZEN
LIMIT ONE DOZ WITH $10 OROER EXCL TOBACCO PROOUCTi
LIMIT ONE DOZ WITH l 0 OROER EXCL TOBACCO PROOUCTS
1 m V m m mWm wk'M M m m I



Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, January 21, 1983
Israel Summer Family Trip
Hoped to Promote Aliyah
By LISA RUBENSTEIN
Jewish Flondian Staff Writer
"Be One of the 1,000!" is the
theme of Mivtza Elef-Operation
1,000, a Jewish Agency and Is-
rael Aliyah Center-sponsored
project aiming to bring 1,000
North American and Western
European families to Israel next
summer.
Families will spend a month
either working in a JN F forest in
Galilee or Negev, farming a Gali-
lee settlement, living kibbutz
style, staying on a settlement in
Judaea or Samaria, pursuing
Torah study at a yeshiva, work-
ing with the Israel Defense
Forces, or touring the country as
a whole.
Mordechai Chwat. a repre-
sentative touring North America
to promote the project, admitted
that at its core, and indeed the
core of all programs bringing
Jews to Israel, is aliyah. "Aliyah
has to become a movement rather
than an organization." he says.
"a grass roots movement bring-
ing the Jewish people back to Is-
rael."
Having made aliyah himself
five years ago from the United
Stales and loving his life in Isra-
el. Chwat is not hard-pressed to
speak convincinglly about Oper-
ation 1.000. But. he doesn't
expect his task to be easy.
"Over 90 percent of American
Jews have never been to Israel."
he states. "We had more West
German non-Jewish tourists in
Israel last summer than Ameri-
can Jews."
The project was initially con-
ceived to put Diaspora Jews in
touch with the much debated set-
tlement issue by actually con-
fronting them with the settle
ments, having them come to livt
with and get to know the people
of Judaea and Samaria before de-
ciding where they stood on the is-
sue Eventually, however, the
idea grew into a larger, more
generalized program.
Each family will be guided
through the visit by a host Israeli
family. "In this way," Allan Mil-
stein, regional director of the
Miami Aliyah Center, says.
"American families will really ex-
perience what living, and study-
ing in Israel is like."
Bcnk Offers New Service
AmeriFirst Federal's 41st
Street office is offering a metal
Medicare or Social Security card
to visitors and customers from
Jan. 27 through Feb. 4 from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m.
Barry Eber. vice president and
manager, said visitors can have
information from a Social
Security or Medicare card
transferred to a permanent metal
one.
Ruth Shack to Speak
Lincoln B'nai B'rith Women
will hold an annual Membership
Meeting and Kosher Box Lunch
Wednesday at 11:30 a.m. at the
Lincoln Road Chibroom.
Dade County Commissioner
Ruth Shack will speak.
Deauville
Haiti WanMk With
Kractan HwpiUlrty
4 MEML FAMILY
In AmcJMJw WWi Tht
IERK0WITZ FAMILY
Mom
QE UTT
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PASSOVER ONLY
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mm MH Mm
Smtfay Marc* 27
Ta April 5 ARar Oirmtr
wmrs* Swell 2
m 9 PrtatM T
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USUSM ******* WIN to

For Complete Information CaN
865-8511
Evening & Weekends Call 532-0995
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99
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I For many nmatc* charjw. a pay* ma m-
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Underwritten by lSBJ
oaya
Mutual Ufa incur anoa
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99



[Temple Judea will honor Sam
Elizabeth Levine at the Bar
hzvah of their great-grandson,
Jinii'l Stephen Rakofsky on
(turday. The I^evines, who live
1 Queens. NY., are natives of
lessa, Russia who fled that
untry in 1907.
Vhen Kabbi Michael Eisen-
^te calls Daniel to the Torah, he
I also call Misha Lyubtchenko,
Intel's twin" in the Soviet
pxm because Misha s BarMitz-
and other Jewish religious
ictices are forbidden there.
Misha a family has applied for
nission to immigrate to Israel
i\ times, but permission has
en denied. A close relative lives
Israel who their entire family
Lshes to join.
(Daniel is a graduate of Temple
pth Am School and now attends
iiUiver Academy, where he is on
basketball team. A member
leth Am choral groups, Daniel
ys the drums.
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"And ye shall eat it in haste it is the Lord's passover"
(Exod. 12.111.
"The Lord smote all the first-born in the land of Egypt"
112.29).
BO
BO God sent Moses to Pharaoh once more with the following
words: "Go in unto Pharaoh and tell him:'. If thou
refuse to let My people go. behold, tomorrow will I bring locusts
"to thy border'" (Exodus 10.1-4). Pharaoh would not be moved.
'hen God punished Egypt with a thick darkness. Yet Pharaoh
remained adamant. Finally, Moses warned the King of Egypt
that g^ would send the most fearful plague of all, the death of
a" the firstborn in the land, both of men and beasts. The Is-
raelites were given the ordinance of the Passover, so named be-
cause God passed over the homes of the Israelites when he killed
the first-born of the Egyptians, on midnight of the fifteenth day
01 the fust month (Nissan). Pharaoh was shaken, at laat. He
*nt the children of Israel from the land. They consisted of
: MOW six hundred thousand men on foot, beside children." In
tneir haste to leave Egypt, the Israelites baked matzoth from
l fwg leavened bread on Passover.
bSBtSSSi PJS& w*" pr,*n m
iTw|,rTi.a?gHWecV 1 tht Jewish Hare
lUns, MJ-\fi?"'"' ft $hneow. Tht veiui
Mi* Law it extracted and batad
rlUflt," edited by P. Wollman
. ..* volume it available at 75 Maiden
[ "-'outma tn.' N Y- ,001( Joseph Scttlang It president of tht society dis
""9'he volume.)'
Bar
Mitzvah
Brafman
., and Evelyn Zimmerman, left, of New Jersey and Miami
teach, attended groundbreaking ceremonies of Children's Park
t Boys Town. Jerusalem, named in their honor, with Rabbi Al-
xander Linvhner. the institution's founder, and Philip Ratner,
Washington artist, who executed the sculpture. The park will
lace Judaism from the days of Abraham through modern
lines. The Zimmermans have been long-time supporters of
toys Town.
Soviet 'Twin' to Become
Bar Mitzvah At Temple Judea
His grandmother, Dorothy
.Lane, is national Hadaasah liai-
son with Soviet Jewry,-arid hi
parents, Dr. and Mrs. Sanford
Kakofsky live in Coral Gables.
In Daniel's closing Benedic-
tion, he will add a prayer for the
safe deliverance of Misha and the
Lyubtchenko family to Israel.
Chug Aliyah to Meet
South Florida Chug group of
the Israel Aliyah Center will meet
Sunday at 7 p.m. at the Jewish
Federation building.
Impressions of Israel will be
discussed by a panel of Chug
members who recently returned
from Israel.
Card Party, Lunch Set
Hadar Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will hold a
Luncheon and Card Party on
Thursday, Feb. 3 at noon at First
Nationwide Savings and Loan
Auditorium, Bal Harbor.
Miami Beach
ERUV HOTLINE
653-0914
Call within 2 hours
before shabbos
ftabbintcel Council of America
Friday, January 21, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Benefit for Soldiers To Host Israeli Talents
A benefit performance for the
Association for the Welfare of
Soldiers in Israel, featuring
Israeli singer, Rut hie Navon and
Israeli television comedian, Dudu
Topaz, will be held Saturday at
. the Konover Hotel at 8 p.m.
Proceeds will go to the Asso-
ciation, a non-profit agency
which provides USO-tvoes of
services to Israeli soldiers and
.airmen during both war and
peace time, according to Miami
Beach City Commissioner Sy
Eisenberg. Florida State
chairman.
Navon will sing in English.
Hebrew. Yiddish, Spanish, and
French, and Topaz's performance
will be in Hebrew.
JACOB BRAFMAN
Jacob Brafman will be called to
the Torah as Bar Mitzvah Satur-
day at 10:30 a.m. at Temple
Menorah.
The celebrant is a student in
the Temple Menorah Heh Class
and is active in Kadima. He at-
tends Nautilus Junior High
School where he is in the seventh
grade.
Mrs. Brafman will host the
Kiddush following services in
honor of the occasion and a re-
ception Saturday at Temple
Menorah Social Hall.
Rabbi Yochanan
Zweig To Lecture
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig, Presi-
dent and Rosh HaYeshiva of
Talmudic University of Florida,
will speak on "Geulah Re-
demption" Wednesday at 8 p.m.
at Young Israel of Hollywood
Congregation.
His talk will be followed by a
question and answer period. The
locture is co-sponsored bv the
synagogue and by Talmudic Uni-
versity, the largest Jewish instit-
ution of higher learning in the
Southeastern United States and
headquartered in Miami Beach,
according to Rabbis Edward
Davis and Dov Ridnick, co-
chairmen of the University's I
North Dade South Broward
lecture series.
Stock To Go Public
The board of directors of
Ampal-American Israel Corpora-
tion have authorized an applica-
tion for listing the company's
Class A stock on the American
Stock Exchange, upon revised
terms and conditions, Michael
Jaffee, company president, an-
nounced.
Jaffe noted that a favorable
preliminary opinion had been
given.
Rabbi Labouitz to Talk
Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood
will meet on Wednesday at noon
in the temple's Sklar Auditorium.
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz will
deliver a Dovar Torah message
dedicated to the Torah Fund
Residence Hall.
A film, "The Jewish Theologi-
cal Seminary," narrated by Joyce
Binstock. will also be featured,
Rose Esgar, chairperson of the
day, announced.
ABT to Otter Classes
American Ballet Theatre,
which will perform for two weeks
in Miami beginning Jan. 25, will
offer eight master classes for
local dance students during the
same period. Judy Drucker.
cultural director of Temple Beth
Sholom, ABT's Miami sponsor,
announced.
A spokesman for ABT said
this is the first time such classes
have been arranged by ABT in
any of its tour cities.
National Hebrew
Israeli Gift Center Inc.
ReiigiousBar Mit.'.ari sets
Crystal'Gifts
1507 Washington Avenue
1305)532-2210
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting Time: 5:36
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Frl.. S:1S. sisterhood Shabbat Service.
Candles. 5 M pm Ssi 8 30 am. Bar MlUvah,
Jeffrey Qoiheii
Mlnyont
Sun. 8 am end 5 pm
Mon through Frl.. 7:30 am and S pm
___________Sal >:30am andSpm__________
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami, Fl
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saltzman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchlnsky, Cantor
Dally. 8:30 em and S 1S pm Frl. 8:1S pm.
Sisterhood Sabbath" Sal. 8 45 am.
Kiddush. 5 pm, Seuds Shelishiet
TEMPLE BETH AM Or. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoftman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein. Associate
Rabbi
Frl 8 15 pm. New Prayerbook Dedication
Norman Llpoll will apeak Sat. 9 15 em.
Brin Mitzvah. Sidney Fine. Michael Singer.
1 1 15 am Graig Gould Jamee Panneva
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way 262SSW 3rd Avenue
South Dade '500 S w 120th Street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Dade Chapel
Frt., pm. Sheboel Eva. Services
Sat.. 10 am. Junior Congregation Services
Coral Way Sanctuary
Frt, pen. Sisterhood Kalian
Sal.. em. Shetobel Morning Service.
Sisterhood Kallah
TEMPLE EMANU EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Or. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvl Adler, Cantor
Lete Friday Evening Service
8pm
Sebbeth Morning Service
Bam
Sermon et 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schitt
TEMPLE ISRAEL Of Greater Miami
Miemr's Pioneer Reform Conoreoefron
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskell M. Bernat
Asst. Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Salkln
Cantor: Jac D G. Bornstein
Student Cantor: Rachalla Nelson
Frt., pm. Downtown Rabbi Bernat
Rediscovering Reform Judaism Part 2
Kendall Rabbi Salkln. Tootsia
Mala end Female He Creeled Them' "
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667-5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frl.. 8 15 pm. Sabbath Service. Weekly
Torah Portion 80 Eiodua 10:1-13:1*.
______ Heltareh Jeremiah 48 13-2S.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
j EOWARD BARON, Cantor
BETH KO0ESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Frl. 8 15 pm. RebtM Sheplro will
discuss "We at* Betr eyed'
Sat .8 45 am and 5 pm
Sun 8 am and 5 pm
Dally Minyan Serv 7 45 am and 5 pm
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorfinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Frl.. 8 pm. Sisterhood Sabbath
Sat., am. Sermon "Why a Lamb?
Bat MlUvah. Abba Colodny. Twilight.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B. Fl. 33139
Tel 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. A 41st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Conviser
Frt.. 8 15pm
Sat. 10-45 em
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Sat Bar Mltiveh. Nell Saienl
Afternoon. Noel Qleoer
Frt .5 15 end 8 pm
Sat.. S: 30 em end S 1S pm
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon SchilI
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone_ 57&4OO0
Rabbinical Association Office
Frl.. 7.30 pm
Sat B 30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
820-75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat.. 9 am
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave..
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein m a t s pm
Sat 8 45 am
Dally morning eorvtoea at 8 am.
Sunday morning services al 8 30 am.
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
15410 SW 75 Circle Lane
Miami. Fl. Modern Othodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 382-3343
Frl.. 5 15 pm Sabbath Services
Sat 9 30 am and 5 JO pm Mwvcha
Daily Morning Mm vans. M Th. 6 45 am
T.W.F7am
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade s Reform Congregation
Ralph P Kingsley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Frt. 8 15 pm, Worn* Service
Sat.. 10.30 al. B not Mltxvah. Julia
Mendel I. Deana Tammare
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi
Minyan Services Mon. 4 Thurs 7 am
Sabbath Eve Servrces 8 15 pm
Sabbath Services am
Quests Are Welcome '- ZlN
99
Friday. Adult Forum Service. Or Norman N.
Shapiro lo oltlclate
Fiw-BjeglBtrBttoTi for FVeHeuoue Schools
1M3*4. KMoevgerlen thru Confirmation
I
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
uiONE H3rdSi.N Miami Seech Fl 331*2
eVtr-eXXM Herald Wishna. e.eculiv, director
Frankltn D. Kreutrer regional president
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Dor al Executive Office Park. 3785
NW 82 Ave.. Suite 210. Miami. Fl.
33166.592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Llttman. regional director


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian/'Friday, January 21, 1983
Roberta Peters, who recently
celebrated a 90th consecutive
season with the New York
Metropolitan Opera, will
present a concert at Temple
Emanu-El on Wednesday,
Feb. 2 at 8 p.m., as a second
event in the congregation's
1983 Forum Series.
Muriel Lunden
Emanu-El to Host WLI
Muriel Lunden, Florida Coun-
cil president of Women's League
of Israel, will celebrate WLI
Sabbath at Temple Emanu-El on
Jan. 28 at 8 p.m. She will address
the congregation.
Mount Sinai,
Area Blood
Bank Unite
Mount Sinai Medical Center
and South Florida Blood Service
have joined forces in the recruit-
ing of blood donors and in the
distributing of donated blood
components.
South Florida Blood Service
will now assume responsibility
for collecting blood throughout
the community for Mount Sinai
patients as well as other Dade
County hospital patients. Mount
Sinai had operated its own blood
drive program previously.
"While we will maintain an in-
dependent blood bank capable of
processing blood for the needs of
our patients, but we will not com-
pete with I South Florida Blood
Service for donations. Rather, we
will work with them in recruit-
ment efforts," Dr. Jack Lubin,
pathologist in charge of Mount
Sinai's blood bank, stated.
"Miami Beach residents and
workers will be able to use the
Mount Sinai Blood Bank as a
convenient donation site, helping
to support the communitywide
effort to provide blood for those
in need," he added.
NCJW toHmt
Therapist
National Council of Jewish
Woman, Kendall Evening
Division, will meet Wednesday,
Feb. 2 at 7:15 p.m. at the South
Dade Jewish Community Center.
Holly Zwerling, ACSW.
Family Life therapist, will speak
on "Interganeratkmal Com-
munication.
Colgate
Gel4.6oz.l.19
6.4 z.l.49
Colgate
Toothbrushes Soft-Medium-Hard **/
Ultra Brite
Toothpaste
6oz.
1.
19
Flourigard
Mouthwash
lOoz. I.59
1C 1 "
lboz. 1.
Cashmere Bouquet
Talc 10 oz.
1.
Colgate
Shave Cream
11 oz. .89
Dermassage
Lotion
6oz.l.49
lOoz.2.19
15 oz. t.
Anacin ^ 1 96
tablets I ^^ SCs
l.
Anacin
Arthritis Pain Formula
Aspirin Free
Tablets
Q
75'stJa
36
Anacin-3
Tablets
* tfffcnft
30's
1.
53
Denorex
Shampoo
12 oz.
4.
39
Denorex
Shampoo
4 oz. -*- a
96
Dristan
Nasal Mist
30cc
2.
99
Dristan
Nasal Mist Menthol
DRISTAN
30 cc
2.
99
Curad
Adhesive Bandages s/" 60's .79
Curity
Cotton
loz.
.63
Curity
Sof-Puffs
iocs .79
260's .79
Telia
Sterile Pads
l1/2"x2"10's.69
Waldorf
Toilet Paper
4 Roll A *
09
Soft n' Pretty
Toilet Paper
4 Roll -La
29
Dristan
Long Lasting Nasal Mist
TOllSTAN
30 cc
3.
19
Dristan
Tablets
DRISTAN
24's2.,,
50's4.M
Dristan
Aspirin Free Tablets
100's
6.
39
Preparation H
Ointment
igfSl
loz. 1*
2 oz. o.
1
Neo-Synephrine Nasaispray W%1
NMalDrOD61/4%l*
Nasal Drops
Nasal Drops 1%
PhisoPuff
Cleansing Sponge
1.
69


FflSay, j anuary 21, 19837 The Jewish" Floridian Page &&
I
Ugh School in Israel student with his small friend, Assi.
{American Teens in Israel
be Long-Remembered
111
"Our kids feel that they receive
lot from Israel, and they want
give something back," says
abbi Lee Diamond, principal of
ligh School in Israel, a program
ffering two-month courses in
ih History to American
enagers.
So the 77 students attending
he current session have
olunteered to take part in a
pries of activities that will forge
close connection between them
nd Israelis of every age.
For one thing, they tutor
purth and fifth graders at a local
Irimary school in English on a
|nt' tonne basis.
"It's good to know we can help
kern" grins Jason Van Leeuwen
Ulica. N.Y.. his arm around
In year-old Assi "We talk about
lings we both understand, like
wrts. and I explain the simple
rirds Assi. for his part, clearly
Pun's the attention of his new
fiend from America.
I The HSI students also have
llimed themselves to be
adopted" by an 11th grade class
I Mosenson High School in Hod
lasharon. where HSI shares a
tmpus with the school. It all
Man when the American group
jrived and they were greeted at
Bate with welcomes and
Lowers Parties and discussions
lowed The American group is
f'pnning to have an under-
anding of what growing up in
?rai-l is like.
I '' teenagers also have
fU'loped contact! with teenage
Ambers f the Youth Zionist
foumil ,n Israel, the national
Pganization of students which
f** to foster Zionist activities
Israeli schools. Outings.
""'Vs. and weekends together
p punned,
We an- eager to get to know
ynenean students at HSI,"
f>>s C hen Dagan. a young Israeli
[Pnizer f the Youth Zionist
"uncil, who recently spent a
P"fning visiting HSI and sitting
F on classes with her American
^temporaries.
, netting to know the residents
' ine town of Or Akiva, which is
finned under the project
fcnewal scheme with Miami, is
' ""di'ftaken by the HSI
""Pants. To initiate the
Ksii i [elationsWp. students
. W the community. There
ftended by the mayor and
JKf They spent the
*^nu at their homes
Sa> s Rabbi Diamond. "When
our kids go home they are full of
energy and good will, but they
often don't know how to focus it.
Knowing about Project Renewal
and actually being familiar with
the people may help to give them
a concrete way to become in-
volved."
"From the other end, people in
Or Akiva know that there is a
vague entity out there called the
United States. but it
doesn't really mean anything in
human terms. Meeting our teen-
agers should help develop real
human contact."
Fershkos Music
Survived Despite
Obstacles
I Sarah and Hayim Fershko, in*
ternationally noted musicians;
who have given concerts
throughout Europe and in Israel,
New York, Canada, and Central
and Latin America, will perform
at the Konover Hotel on Jan. 31
at 2 p.m.
Fershko was a concert pianist
with the Warsaw Symphony be-
fore World War II. and Sarah
was concert violinist. As Jewish
musicians at the time of the Hol-
ocaust, each had had the left arm
amputated.
Sarah explains her determine-
tion to remain a musician this'
way. "I transplanted the warmth
with which the violin must be
played to my voice."
Hilary Hemingway and Susan
Lesko, two University of Miami
students, will record the concert
on film. The film will serve as a
reminder "of the horrors of the
Holocaust so that it will never
happen again," Ralph Clemente,
Hemingway's professor, stated.
Culture Group to Meet
Nachman Arluck Culture
Circle will meet Friday, Jan. 28 at
10 a.m. at the American Bank
Auditorium, Lincoln and Alton
Roads.
Morris Becker will speak on
the life and works of Yiddish
poets, Mordchai Gebirtig and
Mark Warshawsky, President
Isadora Hammer announced.
Temple Host Dobin
Young Israel of Sunny Isles
will hold a "Touch the Torah"
breakfast Sunday at 9 a.m.,
Charles Skupsky, temple presi-
dent, announced.
Rabbi Rubin R. Dobin will
speak on "The Torah View of
Marriage and Divorce."
Jewish American Latin Singles (J.A.L.S.) 30 55
request the honor of your presence
"Wine & Cheese Party"
With lots of music, entertainment, munchies. Wednesday, January
268:30 p.m. Cuban Hebrew Congregation, 1700 Michigan Avenue,
Miami Beach. Donation: $4.00. Information: S53-A330/6M-4034.
"Young, Pretty, Single, Female) Foreigner visit*
America often interested in meeting gentlemen age 30-
45. Respond including telephone number address and
photograph to P.O.B. 45177, Tel Aviv 61451, Israel.
High School In Israel
In it's expansion has new openings:
1. assistant registrar
2. executive secretary
Respectable compensation and benefits
Call: 576-3286
_
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t'age 16-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. January 21. 1983
Attorney Relocates
*\
Arthur L. Rothenberg. a mem-
ber of the Florida and California
Bar and recent candidate for
INTME CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 13 247
Division (01)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EDITH ALICE
SITTENFELD.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of EDITH ALICE
SITTENFELD. deceased. PUe
Number 83-247. is pending In
the Circuit Court for DADE
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which Is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of the estate Is
HERBERT F. SITTENFELD.
whose address Is 1500 Bay
Road. Apt 1114. Miami Beach.
Florida 33139. The name and
address of the personal repre-
sentaUve's attorney are set
forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are '
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to fUe
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when it
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
NoUce of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to fUe any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
taUve. or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date Of the first publication
of this Notice of Adminlstra
lion January 21, 1083
H. F. Slttenfeld
As Personal Representative .
of the Estate of
EDITH ALICE
SITTENFELD
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HENRY NORTON
Suite 1X1,
19 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: 374-3116
18409 January 21. 28.1983
Dade County judge, has relo-
cated his offices to the 2400
South Dixie Highway building in
Coconut Grove.
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
N*. 13-1 *24 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The marriage of
UX)YD JOSEPH
WEDDERBURN. husband
and
LYNDA G.
WEDDERBURN. wife.
TO: LYNDA G.
WEDDERBURN
RESIDENCE
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
ARTHUR H. LIPSON. attorney
for PetlUoner. whose addreas Is
1930 Tyler Street. Hollywood.
Florida 33020. and Hie the orlgl
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Feb-
ruary 26. 1983; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 17 day of Jan-
uary. 1981.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
16406 January 21,28,
February 4. 11.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
No. 12-31043 CA 11
NOTICE OF SUIT
TO
FORECLOSE MORTOAGE
BARNETT BANK OF SOUTH
FLORIDA, N.A..etc..
Plaintiff,
vs.
CHARLES SCHNIER. etc.. et
al.,
Defendants.
TO: CLIFFORD WAXMAN. as
Trustee
YOU. CLIFFORD
WAXMAN, as Trustee, are
hereby notified that an
Amended Complaint to fore-
close a mortgage on the follow-
ing described real property, to
wit:
Unit Nos 602, 802. 1802, 404,
804. 708. 610, 910, 420, 520. 429.
634, 736. 836, 438. 538. 740. 1240.
544. 644. 1244. 1644. 746. 1046.
448, 548, 450, 950. 1050. 1750. 520.
429. I'H-M, Cabana Nos. 10, 11.
12. 14. 15 and 16 of the Triton
Tower Condominium, ac-
cording to the DeclaraUon of
Condominium thereof,
recorded on July 12. 1979. under
Clerks File No. 79R-196172 of
the public records of Dade
County. Florida, has been filed
against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or pleading to the
Amended Complaint on Plaint-
iffs attorney. PATRICIA M
SILVER. Attorney at Law.
Smith and Mandler. P.A., 1111
Lincoln Road Mall. 8th Floor.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139.
and file the original Answer or
pleading in the Office of the
Clerk of this Court on or before
the 26th day of February. 1983
If you fall to do so. Judgment
by default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In
the Amended Complaint.
This Notice shall be
published once each week tor
four consecutive weeks In The
Jewish Floridian.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 12th day
of January, 1983. (Circuit Court
Seal)
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk. Circuit Court
By A. Minguez
Deputy Clerk
SMITH AND MANDLER. PA.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
1111 Lincoln Road. 8th Floor
Miami Beach. FL 33139
Telephone: (306)6731100
January 21, 26;
18398 February 4,11, 1981.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY I
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. S3 1523
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OT MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
LUIS F. CHAVEZ.
Husband Petitioner
and
ALICIA CEPEDA DE
CHAVEZ.
Wife-Respondent
TO: ALICIA CEPEDA DE
CHAVEZ
Indlco4639. Dept. 41
Gomez Carreno
Vina del Mar. CHILE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marralge has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
PA., attorney for PetlUoner.
whose address Is 2491 N.W. 7th
Street, Miami, Florida 33125.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 25, 1981
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
peUUon.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal ot said court at Miami.
Florida on tills 17th day of Jan..
1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM.J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(CircuitCourt Sea! i
ALBERT L CARRICARTE,
PA
Attorney for the Husband
2491 NW 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33125
Attorney for PetlUoner
Telephone: 13061 649-7917
i**04 January 21,28.
February 4,11,1981
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANOFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No 11-1701
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
MODESTA E ETAYO
Petitioner
vs.
FRANCISCO ETAYO
Respondent
TO: FRANCISCO ETAYO
63-94 Austin Street
RegoPark. NY 11374
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
hereby required to serve a copy
of your answer or other plead-
ing to the PeUtlon on the Peti
Uoner Attorney, HARVEY D.
ROGERS, whose address Is:
1401 N.W. 17th Avenue. Miami.
Florida 33125, and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above styled Court on or before
this 25th day of February,
1983
DATED this 17th day of
January, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By K Selfrled
18405 January 21, 28
February 4. 11.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
OrVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engsge in business
under the flcUUous name
DORIS H. TTLES INSTALLA-
TION at 2390 NW 36 St. Miami.
Florida 33142 intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Owner:
TORIBIO A. HERNANDEZ
18361 December 31, 1983;
January 7,14.21.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 13 352
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX BESSEN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of MAX BESSEN,
deceased. File Number 88-352.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is 73 W. Flagler Street.
2nd Floor, Miami, FL 33130.
The personal representative of
the estate Is ROSE BESSEN,
FANNIE BESSEN k MIL-
DRED BESSEN. whose ad-
dress Is 230-174 Street, No. 714.
Miami Beach. FL 33160. The
name and address of the per-
sonal representative s attorney
are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing snd must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured.
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
NoUce of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Adminlstra
tlon: January 21.1983.
ROSE BESSEN
FANNIE BESSEN
MILDRED BESSEN
As Personal RepresentaUves
of the Estate of
MAX BESSEN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Richard A. Golden, Esq.
1876 N.E. 163 Street
North Miami Beach, FL 33162
Telephone: (3051 946-4263
18407 January 21, 28, 1983
IN THE. CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Fll Number 13 433
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OK
JUAN MANUEL HUERTA
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of JUAN M HUERTA.
deceased. FUe Number 83-432.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for DADE County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida. 33130
The names and addresses of
the personal representaUve
and the personal representa-
Uve's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any obJecUon by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this NoUce has
begun on January 21. 1983
Personal Representative.
Jose Gulllermo Huerta
3915 S W 62 Court
Miami. Florida 33155
Attorney lor Personal Repre-
sentative:
HY MAN P. GALBUT
V. AI.Hl T. GALBUT k MENIN.
P.A..
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida, 33139
Telephone 672 3100
18408 January 21.28.1983
NOTICE OF ACTiwn
(NO PROPERTY!
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANOFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case NO. 13-1173*
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CLEMON E JENKINS.
Petitioner Wife
and
MERDICE JENKINS
Respondent-Husband
TO: MERDICE JENKINS
Residence Address
278 Rldgewood Avenue
Newark. New Jersey
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
Bruce N Crown. Esq. 15490
N.W. 7th St.. Suite 206 Miami.
Florida 33169 on or before Jan-
uary 28, 1983 and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on PeU-
tloner's attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition
DATED: December 16.1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By Lola H. Currier
as Deputy Clerk
18348 December 34. 31.1982.
January 7.14, 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number i2-tj*
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ULLIAN KUSHINSKY.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of Lillian Kushlnsky, de
ceased. File Number 82-9839. is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
is 73 W. Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130 The names and
addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE (1. all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an inter-
ested person to whom this no
tlce was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TION NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this NoUce has
begun on January 21,1983.
Personal Representatives:
NORMAN R. GALINKIN
and
RAYMOND RICHARD
KUSHINSKY
c-o Kushlnsky.
Gans k Chapllck
57 East Water Street
Toms River.
New Jersey 08758
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY M WAITZKIN
740 7ist Street
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Telephone (306) 866-0363
18410 January 21, 28,1988
INTHE CIRCUITCOURr
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 11-345
Division 02
IN HE ESTATE OF
PERRY JSCHWARUZ
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS ll,\\ Bin
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI.
FIED that the administration
of the estate of PERKY j SCH
WARCZ. deceased Fll,
Number 83-345. Is pending in
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Dm
slon. the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street Miami
Florida 33130. The persona,
representaUve of the estate is
STEPHEN E. BUSK EH Ego
whose address is i se 3nJ
Avenue, Suite 2250. Miami
Florida 33131. The name and
address of the personal
representaUve's attorney are
set forth be low
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate art
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement o(
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate th,
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim u
not yet due. the date when it
wUI become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture ol the uncertainty shall be
stated If the claim Is secured
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re
presentatlve.
Ail persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mal'ed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any Ob
jectlons they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifies
tlons of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or junidic
lion of the court
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
nUBO WILL HE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication
of this Notice ol Administri-
lion. January 21. 1983
Stephen E. Busker
As Personal Representative
of the Estate ol
PERRY J. SCHWA I a /
Dei eased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Stephen E. Busker Bsq
1 SE 3rd Ave.. Suite 22&u
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone 13081 377 9353
18400 Januarys -'' 1M
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 12 "U2
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFAAARRAIAGE
IN RE. THEMAKHIAOKOF
JALE J POWELL.
Petitioner Wife,
and
DENNIS L.POWELL.
Respondent Husband
TO: DENNIS 1, POWELL
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action (or Dissol-
ution of Marriage lias been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy ol your
written defenses, il any 10 on
ricks ci 1.1.en attorney W
Petitioner, whose address l
2271 Chestnut Court. Pembroke
Lakes. Florida 33026. and fll*
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court onor
before February i 19M.
otherwise a default will b.
entered against you for We
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secuUve weeks In THE JE"
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and in*
seal of said court at Miami-
Florida on this 13 day "
January. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY A MInguel
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
RICK S. CULLEN. ESql IK*-
2271 Chestnut Court
Pembroke Lakes Florida W""
Attorney for Petitioner
January Hj
February *"lwo
18401


Friday, January 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Numbac 63-127
Division 02
IN RE ESTATE OF
ANDREW J. SWEET,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THK ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED thai the administration
of the eitate of ANDREW J.
SWEET, deceased, File Num-
ber 83-127. is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130 The co-personal repre-
sentatives of the estate are
Nelan and Audrey Sweet,
whose address Is 4601 North
Bay Road. Miami Beach.
Florida 33140 The name and
address of the personal repre-
sentatives attorney Is set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due. the date when it
will become due shall be
staled If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
slated. If the claim Is secured.
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
terlt to enable the clerk to mall
one ropy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
1HIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
thallenges the validity of the
tcedsnt'i will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
IAN 11 OBJECTIONS NOT so
FILED W1U. BE FOREVER
PARKED
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Admlnlatra
| uon January 14.1883.
Nelan Sweet, as
Co-Personal Representative
of the Eatate of
ANDREW J SWEET.
Deceaaed
Audrey Sweet, as
Co Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ANDREW J SWEET.
... Deceaaed
I Dennis K Turner
| Attorney for the
Penonal Representatives
Arky. Freed. Stearns.
[Walsoni Creer. PA.
J>ne Biscayne Tower. Suite 2800
*lami, Florida 33131
'3051 374-4800
January 14 21.IBM
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
'*[THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
'HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADECOUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
,,. CASE NO. 11-410
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
OLGA ADAMSON
petltioner-WIFE
land
AUSTIN ADAMSON
Respondent HUSBAND
|TO AUSTIN ADAMSON
Residence Address:
Vrlif S'DENCE UNKNOWN
OU ARE NOTIFIED that
In?.,1";"0" ,or """solution of
.n*e h" Deen "led
K* ^ mnd *" re *
In w &. Crown' "! "km
MlL 25 AV" Sv^ 208.
Florida 33168-on or be-
1983 and file
Khe?injary 18'"
rt*ni wllh the clerk of
oni iSSS "U,er be,ore """"*
mU,..U oner rney or lm-
' Jwnt, ault wlU entered
.gainst you for ^ .
1 iX Jh"ry8.198S.
RICHARD PBRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
iLlrcuit Court Seal)
Bv N.A.Hewett
11839! MDfy Clerk
January 14, 21,28;
February 4,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case NO. 63-642
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALPHA BANKS. WIFE
and
FREDDIE A. BANKS.
HUSBAND
TO: FREDDIE A. BANKS
Residence Address:
2903 Market Street.
Apt. No. 7
Oakland.
California 94604
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq.. 15490
N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite 206.
Miami, Florida 33169 on or be-
fore February 18, 1983 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter' other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition
DATED: January 10,1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: C. Moore
as Deputy Clerk
18396 January 14. 21.28;
February 4.1983
NOTICE OF
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 12-7621
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
DEBORAH LYNE RAGAN
Petitioner Wife
and
JERRY WAYNE RAGAN
Respondent-Husband
TO: JERRY WAYNE
RAGAN
ID 11273
Cell Block C
Hartford County
Detention Center
1030 Rocksprlngs Ave.
BelAlr.Md 21014
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
PeUtloner. whose address Is
1190 N. E 183 Street. Miami.
Florida i Room 315). and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore February 18. 1983; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or pe-
tition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 11 day of Jan
nuary. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
RAY FRIEDMAN. Esq
1190 N.E. 163 Street
Miami. Florida
Telephone: 949 8925
(Room 3151
Attorney for Petitioner
18396 January 14.21, 28;
February 4. 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 63-142
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
SAINT HOMERE
JEAN BAPTISTE.
Petitioner-husband,
and
ROSE CASSILIA
JEAN BAPTISTE,
Respondent-wife,
YOU. ROSE CASSILIA
JEAN BAPTISTE. residence
unknown, are required to file
your answer to the petition for
dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court
and serve a copy thereof upon
the petitioner's attorney, Mar-
tin Cohen. Esq.. 622 S. W. 1st.
Street, Miami. Fla. 83130. on or
before February 18. 1983. or
else petition will be confessed.
Witness my hand and the seal
of this Court, at Miami, Dade
County. Florida, this 5th day of
January, 1983.
Richard P. Brlnker
Clerk. Circuit Court
By: A. Mlnguez
Deputy Clerk
18378 January 7,14;
21,28.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 63-S30
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
GLADYS JIMENEZ,
Petltloner-Wlfe.
and
JOSE JIMENEZ.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: JOSE JIMENEZ
Almacenadora Jimenez
Avenlda Perlmetral
Cumana
Estado de Sucre.
Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defense. If any. to it on DAVID
I. SCHLOSBERG. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
525 N.W. 27th Avenue. Suite
100. Miami. Florida 33125, and
file the original with the clerk
. of the above styled court on or
before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary, 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
AsClerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.Moore
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID I SCHLOSBERG
625 N.W. 27th Avenue.
Suite 100
Miami. Florida 33125
Attorney for Petitioner
18387 January 14.21. 28;
February 4.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND POR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
No. 62-17804 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTHA LIGIA
PEDROZA.
Petltloner-Wlfe,
and
HAROLD UMBERTO
PEDROZA.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: Mr Harold Umberto
Pedroza
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to B9rvt a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce M Singer, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
1090 Kane Concourse. Bay Har-
bor Islands. Florida 33154. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 4. 1983; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID LAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of De-
cember, 1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByC. L. Alexander
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
BRUCE M SINGER
1090 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands.
FL 33164
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (305)865-6736
18370 December 31.1982;
January 7. 14.21.1983
NOTICE OF
WAREHOUSEMAN'S
SALE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GI-
VEN that by virtue of Chapter
678. Florida Statutes annotated
(1941) Warehouseman and
Warehouses Receipts wherein
Abbot Moving A Storage Co.,
Inc.. a Florida corporation, by
virtue of Its warehouse liens
has In Its possession the follow-
ing described property:
Household goods Lot. 1583 as
the property of CRAIG MOSS
whose last known address was
252 N.W 42 St. Miami Ft. 33127
and that on the Feb. 5, 1983.
during the legal hours of sale
mainly between 11:00 forenoon
and 2:00 In the afternoon at the
undersigned shall offer for sale
to the highest bidder for cash In
hand the above described
property of CRA1G MOSS
Dated at Miami, Florida this
Jan. 12.1983.
18399 January 21. 28. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 63-466
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MASILLON ST. FORT.
Petitioner Husband,
and
DEL1VERENCE
MITCHEL ST FORT,
Respondent-Wife,
TO: Deliverence
Mitchel St. Fort
Fox Hill
P.O. Box 939
Nassau. Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. ES-
QUIRE, attorney for Petition-
er, whose address Is Suite 616,
Bamett Bank Building, 7900
N.E. 2nd Avenue. Miami, Flor-
ida 33138, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Feb-
ruary 18. 1983; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. Esq
Suite 616,
7900N K 2nd Avenue
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18386 January 14, 21,28;
________________February 4.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 82-1*11*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MICHEUNE McCOY
Petitioner Wife
and
JOHNNY MACK McCOY
Petitioner-Husband.
TO JOHNNY MACK McCOY
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
Harvey D. Friedman, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
420 Lincoln Road Suite 379.
Miami Beach, Fl. 33139, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary. 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Harvey D. Friedman
420 Lincoln Road Suite 379
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (3061531-0391
Attorney for Petitioner
18384 January 14, 21.28;
February 4.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Sounds Great Stereo at 3601
South Dixie Highway Miami
33113 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida. December 31. 1982:
18364 January 7.14 211983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Sun-
shine Care Center at 2467 S.W.
5th St., Miami Fla 33135 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Owner Beatrix M. Prado
18393 January 14.21.28,
February 4, 1983
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 63-613
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
EDWARD W.BERRI
Petitioner-husband
and
MARIA MELITIN A BERR1
Respondent-wife
TO: MARIA MEUTINA
BERRI
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2750 N E 193rd Street. Miami,
Florida 33180. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Feb-
ruary 18, 1983, otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
The notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C Moore
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
KAY FRIEDMAN, Esq.
2750 N E 193 Street
Miami, Florida 33180
Telephone: 949-8925
Attorney for Petitioner
18386 January 14.21, 28;
February 4,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Aclion
No 12 1S279FCI1*)
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
ALIAS
IN RE: The Marriage of
OSCAR SANCHEZ.
Petitioner,
and
CECILIA SANCHEZ,
Respondent.
TO: CECILIA SANCHEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1850 S.W. 8th Street.
Suite 208, Miami, Florida 33135,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 18, 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 7 day of Jan-
nuary. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18390 January 14.21,28;
February 4, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
Diamond Video Productions at
11927 N.E 6th Avenue. Bis-
cayne Park, Florida 33161 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florid*.
Arthur David
"Jack" Diamond
Cypen A Cypen
Attorney for Diamond
Video Productions
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (306)632-4721
18379 January 14, 21.28;
February 4.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
SHERI INTERIORS at 10300
SW 126 St., Miami. Florida
33176 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Shert Hlrschfield
18394 January 14.21, 28;
February 4,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-43*
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
OVIDIOVALDES.
Petitioner,
and
OLGASUSANACORVO.
Respondent.
TO: OLGA SUSANA CORVO
Relna No. 401
Entre Gervaslo A
Escobar
Havana 2. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
Melvln J Asher. Esq.. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
1860 S W 8th Street. Suite 206.
Miami. Florida 33135. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore February 18. 1983. other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or pe-
tition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 7 day of Jan-
uary. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM J.Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal I
18389 January 14. 21.28;
February 4,1983
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12 ??<
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JULIUS SHESLOW
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of Julius Shesiow,
deceased. File Number 82-9899.
is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which is 73 Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida. The personal
representative of the estate is
NETTIE SHESLOW, whose
address Is 6770 Indian Creek
Drive, Miami Beach. Florida.
The name and address of the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated If the claim is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentaUve.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity 04 the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS M)T SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: Jannuary 14. 196:
Nettie Shealov
As Personal Representative
of the Estate o
Julius Shealov
Dei-eased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
ByHylanH Kout
Charles Gertler A
HylanH Kout
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla. 33130
Telephone: 638-0832
18392 J anuary 14, 21. 1983


Page 18-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 21. 1983
Public Notice
UNITED STATES
DISTRICT COURT
SOUTHERN DISTRICT
OF FLORIDA
IN ADMIRALTY
Cat* No: 2 21*3 civ SMA
NOTICE OF ACTION
TEC LINES. LTD.
Plaintiff
-v-
ROBLANT INTERNATIONAL.
CORP.
Defendant
TO: JOSE A. ROLEJO.
President
Roblant
International Corp.
7315 N.W. 79th Terr.
Miami. Florida
TO: CARLOS ANTONINI.
Resident Agent
Roblant
International Corp.
7316 N.W. 79th Terr
Miami. Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY notified
that an action for ocean freight
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any. to it on ARTHUR ROTH.
Plaintiff's attorney, whose ad-
dress is: till Israel Discount
Bank Building. 14 N.E. 1st Ave-
nue. Miami. Florida, 33132. on
or before February 18. 1983.
and file the original with the
clerk of this court either before
service on plaintiff's attorney
or immediately thereafter,
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
Dated on January 5th. 1983
ROBERT M. MARCH
as Clerk of said Court
BY PamThaggard
Deputy Clerk
18381 January 14.21. 28;
February 4. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION NO. Il-IM*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
JUAN D. GARCIA
and
ROSA JULIA GARCIA a-k-a
ROSA JULIA CORDERO
TO: ROSA JULIA GARCIA
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
STANLEY E. GOODMAN. At
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 909 East 8 Ave .
Hialeah. Fla 33010. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
Feb. 25. 1983: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 17th day of Jan.,
1983
RICHARD P BRJNKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
18403 January 21. 38
February 4.11.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Ster-
ling Hotel Co. at Miami. Dade
County. Florida intends to reg-
ister said name with the Clerk
of the Circuit Court of Dade
County. Florida
Samuel M Rosner.
President
Gloria C. Rosner.
Secretary
18411 January 21.38;
February 4. 11. 1983
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC Case No. 82-19014 i
IN RE: The Marriage of
ESPERANTABURNS
Petitioner Wife
vs.
JONATHAN BURNS.
Respondent Husband
TO: JONATHAN BURNS.
Residence unknown, shall
serve copy of your Answer >
the Petition for dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 812 N.W ,
12th Avenue. Miami, Florida |
S31S8. and file original win j
Court Clerk on or before Feb 4 |
1983. otherwise a default will b. .
entered. Dated: December 23 I
1982.
RICHARD BRINKXR
By: M J Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
1SM7 December 31.1982
January 7.14.21.19K>t
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. I3-4I7
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
LESLY G. PRESSAGE,
Petitioner-Husband,
and
YANICK PRESSAGE.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: YANICK PRESSAGE
9 Fairmont Avenue
Apt. M2
Havers traw.
New York 10927
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-I
FIED that a petition for Dlsso-I
lution of your Marriage hasl
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. ES
QUIRE, attorney for Petition
er. whose address is 181 North-
east 82nd Street. Miami, Flor-
ida 33138. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Feb->
ruary 18. 1983; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published'
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6th day of Jan-
uary. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. Esq
181 Northeast 82nd Street
Miami, Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (3081 767-5800
18382 January 14. 21.28:
Feb ruary 4,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT Of FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. t2-l*lII
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ARSENIALAZO
and
RENE DE LA PAZ.
TO: MR. RENE DE LA PAZ
Butner. North Carolina
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
RAFAEL E. PADIERNE.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address la 1487 S.W.
First Street Miami. Florida
33 ISO, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
ourt on or before February 4.
.983; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 28 day of De-
cember, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC. P Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Rafael E. Padleme. Esq.
1437 8 W First Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Telephone: (300)649-5488
Attorney for Petitioner
18369 December 31.1982:
January 7. 14. 21. 198:
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
"ider the fictitious name
GEORGE MEAT FISH at
9687 S.W 160 St.. Miami. Fla.
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
George Garcia.
Owner
18306 December 24. 31. 1982 i
January 7.14.1981 ,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-4*4
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE : THE MARRIAGE OF
LAWRENCE CLARKE.
Petitioner Husband.
and
LORNA B. CLARKE.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: LORNA B. CLARKE
Address*
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a coov of vour written
defense. If any. to It on LLOYD |
M. ROUTMAN. ESQUIRE, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 181 Northeast 82nd
Street. Miami. Florida 33138.
and file the orlglanl with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByN A Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN, Esq.
181 Northeast 82nd Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18383 January 14, 21.28:
________________February 4.1963
NOTICE UNOER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name LBT
and BVG at 7700 SW 100 St. I
Miami. Fla. Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
Co-owners.
VIRGIL HALE,
GARY HALE.
TREVA WARD.
BEVERLY GRIE8EMER.
BARBARA TO RENO
LINDA VEAL
18309 December 31 1982.
January 7. 14. 21. 1981,
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12-7617
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HERMAN BLAUSTEIN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate Of HERMAN BLAU-
STEIN. deceased. File Number
82-7017. is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for DADE County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal rep
resentatlve's attorney are set
forth below
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) ail
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJ EC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVERBARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on Jannuary 14.1983
Personal Representative
WILLIAM BLAUSTEIN
1452 South Cardiff Avenue
Los Angeles.
California 90035
Attorney for Personal
Representative
ABRAHAM A CALBUT. Esq
GALBUT. GALBUT A MENIN,
PA
909 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 672-3100
18388_______Jj!lUrrr '* ?l "*-* I
NOTlMUNDER
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flctlcious name of
SUNRISE MOTEL APTS. at
9340 Collins Avenue. Surfslde.
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dad* County.
noises)
NATHANIEL AMBERS
EMMA AMBERS
FRANK, STRELKOW A GAY
Attorneys for THE AMBERS
502 Capital Bank Bldg
1666 Kennedy Causeway
North Bay Village. Florida
33141-4196
(S05I868-4711
18362 December 31.1MB;
January 7.14.21. HOI
NOTICE UNDER
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
SOUNDS GREAT STEREO at
14015 South Dixie Highway
Miami 33158 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
18363 December SI 1982.
January 7, 14.21,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CaseNe:l3-lt7
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CLETUS JERNIOAN
Petitioner-Husband
and
MAXIE JERNIOAN
Respondent Wife
TO: MAXIE JERNIOAN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED thst
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been fll
against you and you are re
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq. 1M<
N.W. Tth Ave, Suite 200 Miami.
Florida 13169. on or before
February 11. 1983 and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or lmme
dlately thereafter: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition.
Dated: Dec. 301982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: Steven M Bobea
as Deputy Clerk
18373 January 7.14.
_______________________yi >* ina*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 13-1440
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
IVOR CLARKE.
Pe tit lone r Husband.
and
LOUISE E CLARKE.
Respondent-Wife
TO: LOUISE E CLARKE
Passage Fort St Calhem
Catherine
Jamaica W.I.
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said
petition on petitioner's attor-
ney. GEORGE T. RAMANI.
ESQ.. Suite 711, Blscayne
Building. 19 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 33130
and file the Original Answer or
Pleading In the Office of the
Circuit Court Clerk, on or be-
fore 23 day of February. 1983.If
you fall to do so, judgment by
default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In
said petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County, Florida,
this 13 day of January. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
By: K. SEIFR1ED
Deputy Clerk
18402 January 21.28
Februarv4. 11. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13 1210
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
WILFREDO MUNOZ.
Petitioner-Husband
and
MARIA de los
ANGELESLUGO.
Respondent-Wife
TO: MARIA de los
ANGELES LUGO
Caile 64 E dil
No 20 Apart 8
2nd Floor Bouelvard
Guinea,
Havana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 101 N.W 12th
Avenue Miami, Florida 33128,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 12 day of Jan-
nuary, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByMJ Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARIANO SOLE. ESQ
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Telephone (3001320-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
18760 January 14, 21. 28.
February 4. 1963
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number HUM
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LOIS BEVERLY JAMES
a-k-a LOIS B. JAMES.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of LOIS BEVERLY
JAMES a k a LOIS B JAMES,
deceased. File Number 82-8220,
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of
' which is 73 W Flagler Street.
I Miami. Florida 33130 The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
i the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
qutced to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE. (1) all
claims against the estate and
121 any objection by an Inter
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 14.1983
Personal Representative
William H James
a-k-a
William Harris James
6989 Collins Avenue
Apt 904
Miami Beach. FL 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representative
HENRY M WAITZKIN
Tin Tlst Street
Miami Beach. FL 33141
Telephone 305-K65 0353
18380 January 14.21. 1983
. 10 '
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 12-1*204
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
YVES SANON-JULES
Petitioner-HUSBAND
and
JESSIE SANON-JULES
Respondent-WIFE
TO: JESSIE SANON-JULES
Residence Address:
8730 144 Street
Jamaica,
New York 11480
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq.. 15490
N.W. 7th Ave.. Suite 200.
Miami. Florida 33169 on or
before February 11, 1983 and
flic the original with the clerk
of this Court either before serv-
ice on Petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
DATED: December SO. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
BY: Steven M Bobes
as Deputy Clerk
18374 January 7.14;
21, 28. IMS
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 12-111 U-FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SHARON K. ROUKAS.
Petitioner Wife
and
MATTHEW O. ROUKAS.
Respondent Husband
TO: MATTHEW O ROUKAS
524 Bomb Squadron
WurUmith. Michigan 48753
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
Fl ED that an action for Dlaaol
utlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
STANLEY E. GOODMAN
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 909 East Ith Avenue.
Hialeah. Fla 33010. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
January 28. 1983. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 16 day of Dec
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A MINGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18881 December 34.11 1982
January?. 14 1963
In th! Circuit couifo?
""^SeJ'aL^
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Case No. |]-i it j|
NOTICE OF ACTION
VICTOR MITRANI
Plaintiff.
AMERICAN METAL COB.
TAINERS. INC.. a FtertdAc.
poration, previously known ..
MITRANI INDUSTRY?
INC. a Florida corpor.oo^8
Defendant
TO: DEFENDANT AVrrm
CAN METAL CONTAWtjg
INC.. a Florida corpontkm
previously known as MITTuS
INDUSTRIES. INC a Fiona,
corporation. 2080 N W Ttt
Avenue. Miami. Florida
YOU ARE NOTIFIED (tit-
an action to foreclose a chilis'
mortgage on the following per
sonal property In Dade County
One 2S Ton Overheat
Crane, one V, mild 12 ft
Cincinnati Shear ldij No
38622. one S" Strokes Wla.
consul Press Brake 12 Ft
180 ton Model 12 FM -n
72304. one Klngsland Powtr
Metal Works Model Ju ,*.
04970). one Powermttlc
Drill Press Model 1200 S-N
2-3679-2. one Forte Hvdrsul-
Ic Band Saw. one R 36-290
Wire Lincoln Arc V> elder S-
N AC 291247. fourteen Un-
coln-Norbart Weidlne
Machines S-N: AAW74822
AAW75372. 78244. 7381-612.
7361-407. 7533-703, A7C0177
A095249. A695247. A 708001
A716O0B. A727617 A0M348.
A716068. one Victor Pan-
tograph Model DO-2400S-N'
24290. six Overhead Fans,
two Scaffe Air Com-
pressors, two Portable
Grinders, one Balcrank
greaser S-N 14-4998. two
Devilbls Paint Sprayers,
three Portable Welders, one
Blnks Paint Pumper, one
Dayton Portable Sander
one Fontaine Trailer Model
DPT 3-0042 ID 2UB77 Mfg |.
74. and one OSHA approved
Paint Shed
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve t
copy of your w utter, defenses
If any. to It on HAROLD A
'n'RTLETAUB. plaintiffs it
tornev, whoae address is MM
South Dixie Highway Suite307
Miami, Florida 33150 on or be
fore January 28. 1983 and file
the original with the clerk of
this court either before service
on plaintiff's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition.
Dated December 15.1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk of the Court
BY A. MINGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18346 December 24 31 19B
January 7.14,19M
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. M-147SI
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CLOTIDE LAURENT.
Petitioner. Wife,
and
DIEUSEUL LAURENT.
Respondent Husband
TO: DIEUSEUL LAURENT
UNKNOWN address
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition For
Dissolution Of Marriage hat
been filed against you and you
are required to serve s copy
your Answer or Pleading
said petition on petitioner!
attorney. GEORGE T.
RAMANI. ESQ. Suite 711.
Blscayne Building. 1 '*
Flagler Street. Miami. Florid*
13130 and file the Original
Answer or Pleading In 0V
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before February
11. 1983 If you fall to do >.
Judgment by defsult *U1 be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said petition
DONE AND ORDERED M
Miami. Dade County Florida
this 3rd day of January 19SJ
RICHARD P BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
By: A. Mlnguei
Deputy Clerk
18*76 January 7JJ
------------NtJTieiUNDEF!
FICTICIOUS NAM8 LA*
NOTICE IS HEREBJ
GIVEN that the undersea
desiring to engage In buslnesi
under the fictitious nsme <
SYNC STUDIOS sl """!
T941 Blscayne Boulevard, mow
City of Miami. Florida lnten*
to register the said name >
the dark of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
Dated at Miami Florida ts
list day of December. |
FTIANKFALESTRA
Preside"'
Sync Studio*. U*
JOSHUA D BASH. ESQ
Attorney for Applicant
Suite 220 -
1926 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florida 33030
108-940-1200- 922-1400
18372 December 31. sWA
January 7.14.21. l*
'*,


Holocaust Survivors Form
New National Organization
Friday, January 21, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 19-B
Ijewish survivors of the Nazi
olocaust have joined together
i a new national organization.
Lthering of Jewish Holocaust
girvivors, reported Sender
iajsman, chairman of the Miami
ering committee, and Ludwik
odzki and David Schaecter,
Itionai vice presidents. There
V similar councils in Canada,
tgland and France, and or-
nizing committees are at work
other countries around the
bbe.
The newly-created group is an
tgrowth of the World Gather-
of Jewish Holocaust Sur-
vors, which was held in Israel
[June. 1981.
I Ben Meed, a prominent com
jnity leader in New York, and a
ViceChairman of the World
fthering, has been elected
fesident of the American
fthering in Washington, D.C.
nest Michel, who had been
airman of the international
nmittee which conducted the
orld Gathering in Israel, is
jrary chairman of the Na-
Lnal Executive Committee.
I In addition to David Schaecter
Ludwik Brodzki as vice
esidents, the Southeastern
orida Committee is represented
Sender Wajsman, chairman of
area, and a number of others
the National Executive Com-
Rttee.
The newly-elected president of
American Gathering, Ben
1 will visit Temple Beth Is-
fel. Fort Lauderdale, at 2 p.m.,
nday, January 23, and at the
illandale Jewish Center,
irtesy of the Ben Gurion Club,
,7 p.m. that same day. Mr.
' will meet leaders and mem-
h of the survivor's community
1 leaders of the organized Jew-
| community.
y < iiuiiaiit/y .'/inrr /.V./.v
fictt/vtt
3*metoU vfCome
ORTHODOX
REFORM
CONSERVATIVE
IKE GORDON,F.D.
jlAMESB GORDON,F.D.
(HARVEY GORDON,F.D.
rAMlLYOWNEO* OPERATED
710SW12A
858-5566
One of the major objectives of
the National Gathering is a mass
reunion of Holocaust survivors in
Washington, DC. on April 11-U,
1983, to commemorate the 40th
Anniversary of the Warsaw
Ghetto Uprising.
GREENZWEIC
Max. 81. of Miami Beach puKd away
on January 14. He l. survived by m am
2aE gfttl'a <>""*: tnaS
"'* tr. Service, were
h^d ta Nw York at Riverside on Jan-
HARRISON
Fred. 76. of Miami for the peat 40 years.
originally from Brooklyn, died January
14. He waa a member of the American
PharmaceuUcal Association. He waa
the husband of Ann. father of Bernard of
Miami, brother of Benjamin and Mur-
ray of Miami and Maxwell of Wood-
mere, N.Y., and grandfather of Lorl and
Maria. Services were held January 1* at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery. Arrangements by
Gordon Funeral Home.
DECKER
Bessie. SO, o( North Mlaml Beach, a
resident since 1848, died January IT. She
la survived by son, Edward; daughters.
Miriam Koenlg. Lillian Goldstein, and
Evelyn Obemlck, all of North Miami
Beach: nine grandchildren, and ten
great grandchildren She waa a mem-
ber of ILOWU and a founding member
of Congregation Beth Moahe. Services
were held at Riverside on January IB.
KRAMER
Eleanor. 52. of Miami Baach. a local
resident for 23 years, passed away
January 18. She waa a member of the
Miami Design Preservation League and
worked for the Pioneer Years of MDPL
and for Shaare Zedek Hospital Founda-
tion. She la survived by sons, Richard
and Jeffrey, daughters, Karen and
Julie: parents, Saul and JeaneUeOoIe.
and sister. Roberta. Services were held
January 20 at Riverside.
DUBNER. Prlscula. SB. January 9.
Bias berg.
FREEMAN. Florence. BO. Januarys.
GOLD IN, Raymond. 88. January 9.
Riverside.
KARP. Albert. 88. January 11.
STRAUCHEN. Fanny. 88. January 14.
Riverside.
HECHT. Abe. 88. Miami Beach.
January 18. Levltt-Welnateln. Mt.
Nebo.
1SACKSON. Thomas. Rubln-ZUbert
RUDORFER. Helen. Miami Beach.
January 17. Riverside.
EILEN. Bertha. 77. Miami Beach.
January 17. Riverside.
FREEDMAN. Ray. 70. North Miami
Beach. January 17 Riverside. Mt.
Nebo.
FRIEDMAN, Susan EUen. 2B. Miami.
January 17. Rubln-ZUbert
DUBIN, Henrietta. 77, Miami Beach,
January 17 Rubln-ZUbert.
SOLOMON. Fannie, Miami Beach. Jan-
uary 18. Riverside.
BE jar-. Jose. Hlaleah, January 18.
Riverside.
REISER. 8ylvla, 73, Miami. January 17.
Gordon.
SOBOL, Glenn Stuart. 23. Riverside.
WE1SSBERG, Stella. January 18. Riv-
erside
GORDON. Dorothy, Jan. 14 A IB. River-
side.
REINMAN. Anna, Miami Beach.
Rubin ZUbert.
WEINBAL'M. Ruth. Miami Beach.
ABRAMOWITZ, David. Miami Beach.
January 14. Riverside
ANOPOL, Henrietta Blasberg.
COHEN. Alexander. 84, Miami,
January 18.
MATUSOFF, Ruth. North Miami
Beach. January 14. Riverside.
STRAUCHEN. Fanny. 88, Miami
Beach. January 14. Riverside. Mt.
Nebo.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here to assure swift and
understanding service.
[ Dade County
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Broward County
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,_" Y0ffc:(2121 263-7600 QuevnsBlvd & 76th Rd Forest Hills. NY
10,000 Mourn Haya Freedman, 50-Year Resident
Rabbi's Death
Ten thousand people attended
the funeral of Rabbi Lipa Teitel-
baum last Sunday in Brooklyn.
He died Saturday evening in
Miami Beach.
The rabbi was a descendant of
the Teitelbaum-Halberstam rab-
binic dynasty that traces its
origins to 17th century Easter
Europe.
A survivor of the Holocaust,
Rabbi Teitelbaum came to the
U.S. 35 years ago and had served
the New York Chasidic com-
munity.
Riverside Chapel, under the
guidance of vice president and re-
ligious advisor, Leo Hack, helped
engage a charter flight to New
York to bring the rabbi's body
back for the funeral services that
were held the next morning.
Rabbi Teitelbaum is survived
by a wife, two sons, and many
grandchildren.
MILLER
Arthur. 80. a resident of Miami for the
past 20 years, died. He was a past presi-
dent and member of the South Florida
Chapter Federal Bar Association. Up-
per Keys Bar Association, a member of
the American Legion. Elks. Kendall
Camera Club, and Keys Jewish Com
munlty Center. He waa the husband of
Deborah, father of Robert and Carol,
grandfather of Sara. Services were held
January 14 at Riverside Chapel with In-
terment following at Mt. Nebo Ceme-
tery.
FISHMAN
Max. 78. of Miami for 40 years, passed
away January 11 He waa an owner of
the New York Bakeries and Butter-flake
Bakery He was a member of Beth
David Synagogue and Jewish War
Veterans. He Is survived by a wife.
Mi eons. Morris of Tallahassee and
Victor of Austin. TX. a daughter. Susan
Plotkln of Pleasanton. CA; a brother,
Louis of Miami Beach; sisters. Betty
Frun of NY and Rae Barg of Miami
Beach; and four grandchildren Serv-
ices were held January 12 at Gordon
Funeral Home.
Haya Freedman. a 50-year res-
ident of Miami Beach and a
founder of Pioneer Women-
Na'Amat, Farband, Poale Tzion,
and Moadon, died January 14 at
Mount Sinai Medical Center. She
was 86.
Born in Lipnick, Russia,
Freedman was also a poet whose
work was published in various
Hebrew journals. Her husband,
the late David Freedman, was a
pioneer in Hebrew education here
and one of the first Hebrew reli-
gious instructors in Dade
County.
She was the sister of the late
Yekethial Ginsburg, a mathe-
matician at Yeshiva University
in Israel and Columbia Univer-
sity in New York.
Services were held at Rubin
Zilbert Funeral Chapel on Jan-
uary 16.
Meyer Lansky Passes
Meyer Lansky died of lung
cancer last Saturday at Mount
Sinai Hospital. He was 80 years
old.
A daughter and a son and
Lansky's widow, Thelma, at-
tended the simple Orthodox
service held for him Sunday at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery. Rabbi
Shmaryahu Swirsky of Beth
Jacob Synagogue, of which
Lansky was a member for seven
years, conducted the service in
Hebrew and English.
Lansky was born Maier
Suchowljansky in Grodno,
Russia and came to the U.S. with
his parents in 1911.
ARONSON. Murray K Bal Barbour.
DROPKIN. Jack. 78. Miami Beach.
January IB.
RUBIN. Sam. 70. Miami. January IB
Gordon.
GLASSBERG. Bernard. 81, Miami
Beach. January 20. Levitt-Welnstetn
GOLDSTEIN, Moe. North Bay Village.
January 20. Rubln-ZUbert
GRUB. Burtle. Miami Beach. January
IB. Riverside.
WALTERS, Anne E., 7B, Miami.
January X. Riverside. Star of David.
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIE S. BLASBERG MICHAEL C. BLASBERG
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Page 2frB The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 21,1983
ELAL
ANNOUNCES
THE GRANDEST
TAKEOFF
OF ALL
T^ke off 1300 on our low, roundtrip SuperStar Fare from New York
and take off to Israel for only
'499.
Starting on Sunday. January 30th, when El Al goes
up. the airfare comes down. You can take off for Israel
any time until March 5th and take advantage
of this extraordinary $499 offer. (If
your child is 2-12 years old.
you can take him or her
along for only $399. Infants. $50.) We've
even taken off all restrictions on
advance purchase of tickets. You
can visit your Travel Agent or
stop by your nearest El Al office
and arrange your trip anytime- mm __
EL7J/AC7A/.
starting today. Stay in Israel for 6 days. Or stay
for weeks. Just return home within 60 days
from your date of departure. Yes. the only
scheduled airline with non-stop
747 service from N.Y to
Israel is back. And now is
the time to take your
dream vacation. Now is the time to take your whole
family. Because when El Al takes off they really
take off.
Come celebrate our new beginning

* No stopovers permitted Blackout period. Apt 4 8
westbound to N Y_
The Airline of Israel


Full Text
lock Waves in Canada
ere Jews Barred in World War II ?
Friday, January 21, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
inued from Page HA
he Nobel Peace Prize in
This role in the creation of
ted Nations Emergency
portrayed as an ambi
|litician who was ready to
with Mackenzie King's
Fish rulings.
|t Lapointe, King's Que-
eague, is depicted in the
proper volume as the
itative of Quebec's
anti-Jewish public
I He warned the Canadian
linister that the entry of
rould alienate Quebe-
major supporters of the
Party. King accepted
s warning.
Abella-Troper volume,
deliberately in a flat
prose style without a suggestion
of hysteria, has been widely
praised by Canadian critics. The
torment of European Jews so
amply described by the authors
has produced a wave of mea
culpas among book reviewers all
across Canada. The only excep-
tion is a recent review in The
Canadian Forum in which the
reviewer suggests in an un-
believable non sequitur that
Canadian soldiers died fighting
to save European Jewry.
ABELLA INDICATES that
his research has already produced
three results. Ron Atkey, Min-
ister of Immigration in the short-
lived Joe Clark government, said,
after being exposed to Abella's
revelation, that he did not want
to go down in history as "the
Charles Blair of the 80s" during
discussions about the admittance
of Vietnamese "boat people."
Canada's current Minister of
Immigration. Lloyd Axworthy,
said recently, in a meeting where
Abella had spoken, that he
wished to apologize for the
conduct of his government
during the war years. In addition,
the Canadian government, as a
result of the Abella-Troper book,
has removed a sentence in the
advertising brochure which
boasted about Canada's role in
rescuing European Jews during
the war.
The Abella-Trope volume is
now into its fourth editions, and
unprecedented development for
Canadian books, and an unusual
one for such a scholarly volume.
Declaration Recognizes PLO State'
EDWIN EYTAN
LSBOURG (JTAI -
p-opean Parliament, the
ye body of the 10
-state European Eco-
"ommunity. called on
|nd the Palestinians "to
each other's existence"
peace negotiations. The
^nt also adopted by a
jority a resolution call-
irael "to stop at once the
| of new settlements in the
territories."
jropean Parliament, for-
haded by Simone Veli of
[used to be one of the
kt pro-Israel interna-
hims. However, since the
the war in Lebanon last
June, the climate has changed,
diplomatic observers say. The re-
solution submitted by the
Socialist group, were the most
anti-Israeli yet to be adopted.
One of the resolutions asserts
the Palestinians' right tc self-
determination "which could lead
to the eventual creation of a Pale-
stinian state." This is the first
time the EEC Parliament has
mentioned this possibility which
all previous joint European com-
muniques, such as the Venice De-
claration of 1980, have systema-
tically avoided.
The Parliament also agreed
that a "favorable political
climate" now prevails and paid
special tribute to the Venice De-
claration. President Reagan's
peace proposals and the Arab
league plan drawn up at their
summit meeting in Fez. Morocco
last September. The Parliament-
arians also stated that the PLO
should normally and legally take
part in future Mid-east peace ne-
gotiations but affirmed that the
PLO must first remove from its
convenant all articles which call,
directly or indirectly, for Israel's
destruction.
The Strasbourg-based body
has only an advisory role but its
resolutions generally influence
the EEC's governments and also
tend to reflect public opinion in
the member states. The
Parliament's deputies are elected
by popular vote in the 10 nations.
\
Sharon Arrives on Visit to Zaire
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon arrived at Kinshasa, Zaire Monday morning on a
five-day official visit during which he is expected to
discuss Israeli military training and equipment for that
central African nation with its leader, President Mobutu
Sese Seko, as well as agricultural projects.
Israeli journalists accompanying Sharon reported
that the Defense Minister and his escort party of about 90
people landed at Kinshasa at 8:30 a.m. local time in an
Israel Air Force Boeing transport. He was greeted at the
airport in a brief welcoming ceremony and was scheduled
to meet twice Monday with Mobutu.

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Friday, January 21,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
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n-~
TIU ._J_t
I : J."___
:j. t----------------i
Pagel2A The Jewish Floridian/ Friday, January 21,1983
Experts Differ
Hussein May/May Not Join Peace
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Two foreign affairs
experts differ on whether
the United States can ex-
pect King Hussein of Jor-
dan to join the Middle East
peace process.
Richard Allen, who was Presi-
dent Reagan's first National
Security Adviser, and Edward
Luttwak, a senior fellow at
Georgetown University's Center
for Strategic and International
Studies, presented their opposing
views during a roundtable dis-
cussion on "Looking Ahead in
the Middle East, sponsored by
the Heritage Foundation at the
University Club here.
"I feel that Jordan has come a
long way and is moving in the
right direction," Allen said. He
said Hussein's meetings with
Reagan at the White House last
month were "productive."
ALLEN, now a distinguished
fellow at the Heritage Founda-
tion and a senior foreign policy
counselor for the Republican Na-
tional Committee, said he be-
lieves that Hussein realizes that
the U.S. is an "important gua-
rantor" of his and his country's
security and continuing supply of
arms.
But Luttwak disagreed, saying
he admired Hussein because of
his "ability to attract the atten-
tion of successive foreign suitors
Crime Czar Lansky
Dead on Beach at 81
Meyer Lansky, an ac-
knowledged financial
wizard and one-time re-
puted czar of organized
crime in the U.S. and many
points overseas, was buried
here Sunday in a simple
Orthodox service attended
by family and friends. He
died of lung cancer at Mt.
Sinai Hospital Saturday.
His age was given as 81.
Rabbi Shmaryahu Swirsky,
who conducted the 15-minute
service in Hebrew and English at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery, eulogized
Lansky as a man whose "heart
beat for everybody." Although
he was said to have amassed a
fortune of between S100-S400
million, Lansky lived his last
years in relative modesty in a
condominium on Collins Ave.
ACCORDING TO federal au-
thorities and other law enforce-
ment agencies. Lansky master-
minded the finances of the vast,
legendary underworld network
known collectively as the Mafia.
He was associated, during his
long life with such convicted
racketeers as Charles "Lucky"
Luciano and Benjamin "Bugsy"
Siegel, both boyhood chums,
"Dutch Schultz, Al Capone and
Louis "Lepke" Huchalter, the
"hit man" of the notorious
"Murder Inc."
But although linked to illicit
gambling and other forms of vice,
Lansky was never convicted of a
serious crime. He went to jail
only once a two-month senence
in 1953 on a gambling conviction
in Saratoga, N.Y.
He became an international
cause celebre when his retirement
in Israel in 1970 touched off a 26-
month legal battle. Lansky
claimed that as a Jew, under the
Law of Return, he was entitled to
citizenship and a permanent
haven in the Jewish State. The
Israeli Supreme Court thought
otherwise, ruling that he was not
'OPEMS TUESDAY JAM. 25
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entitled to citizenship because he
was a "danger to public safety."
The Israelis apparently did not
want the onus of harboring an
alleged international criminal.
HE WAS arrested on his
return to the United States on
charges of tax evasion but a
judge ruled, on the basis of
medical evidence, that he was too
ill to stand trial.
Lansky was born Maier
Suchowljansky in Grodno,
Russia and was brought to the
United States by his parents in
1911. Reportedly, they could not
remember his birth date. An
immigration official on Ellis
Island listed his brith as July 4,
1902.
Lansky grew up on
Manhattan's Lower East Side
which prouduced its share of
solid citizens, geniuses and
criminals. Although a high school
drop-out, Lansky was recognized
early as a financial genius.
Allegedly, he turned to crime
instead of legitimate business.
Law enforcement officials who
spent decades in futile attempts
to obtain convictions, expressed
grudging admiration for the
alleged racketeer. "He could have
been president of General
Motors," one FBI agent was
quoted as saying.
without actually ever delivering
anything." He lieted these
suitors as first the British, then
the Israel Labor Party and now
the U.S.
"I can't be hopeful, I can't see
him delivering," he said. "If he
does, it will be a real departure of
character."
As for Israeli Premier Mena-
chem Begin, Allen predicted a
"difficult' meeting when the Is-
raeli leader sees Reagan at the
White House next month. He
said the President should reaf-
firm the U.S. relationship with
Israel and stress that it still con-
siders it a "stategic ally" and an
"asset."
ALLEN SAID Reagan should
also tell Begin that the U.S. will
not take any steps to endanger
Israeli security. But he also said
Begin should be told a freeze on
building any new settlements on
the West Bank is the best way to
achieve progress toward peace.
On the I .i"liant'Sf situation,
Allen said the withdrawal of all
foreign forces from Lebanon
Israeli. Syrian and the Palestine
Liberation Organization is
urgent for the reconstruction of
Lebanon. But he noted that the
Israeli troops will not leave until
the others do and that Lebanon
does not want them to do so.
He stressed that israel should
be assured that "we will not exert
undue pressure" unless there is a
clear indication that the Syrians
and PLO are willing to leave and
Israel refuses.
LUTTWAK SAID Lebanon is
correct in trying to regain its
sovereignty by asking that the
foreign forces leave, but it is
wrong to be willing to relinquish
some of its sovereignty by
bending to outside pressure not
to normalize its relation with Is-
rael. He warned that if Lebanon
waits too long for an agreement
with Israel, it could lose what has
already been achieved by Israel's
military action.
Luttwak added he could envi-
sion the possibility of a "deal"
between Israel and Syria in which
the Israelis control southern Leb-
anon through a surrogate such as
Maj. Saad Haddad, and Syria
controls eastern Lebanon. He said
the two countries were capable of
making such a deal as they had
shown during the fighting in
Lebanon.
'tiff- _ra4/C Pri'si'tits Direit trim, ISRAEL A Sensation.il Revue'
BIGGER AND BETTER THAN EVER!
"'iT.i'VnNGS.- CAST OF 30 ENTERTAINERS
MUSK"" J>*-" SHALOM '83 REPRESENTS ISRAEL
D A N C E S Dlraclad and Choraographad by GAVRl LEVl
ALL NEW!
SHALOM '83
83 Dl7A?

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PRICES: SAT. & SUN. $11 $13 $15 MON. & TUES. $9 $11 $13
TICKETS ON SALE AT:
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tf.ll Onto.. ACCOM P>MM S.WI Sl.mpM. S.II AM.MMd EnMlOM ChM. O. Mom, 0*m
THEATRE BOX OFFICE: 673-7302 JORDAN MARSH SUPERTIX AGENCIES
SAOWtCmtO gr IfUHE KINS SOIOMOH
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AWSVvLlE.RoN's GoBHA ,n
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ft ..*'?
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There are still
some things we have
yet to imagine.
SOPHIE'S
CHOICE
aa> 'If.' I man* On
Start. TODAY
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CinemoFoi
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22J
CHECK YOUP. LOCAL PAPEP. FOB SHOWTIMES AND ADDITIONAL THEATRES!
South Florida Women's Committee
American Committee
for Shaare Zedek Medical Center,
Jerusalem
INVITES TOM TO

THE SIXTH ANNUAL
LUNCHEON
GUEST SPEAKER: EM lESHAN, CBS COMMENTATOR
RENOWNED PSYCHOLOGIST AN0 AUTHOR
IN HONOR OF
ETTA AR0NS0N
Wednesday, January 26th, 1983
Friedland Ballroom, Temple Emanu-EI f
at 12:00 Noon
Tickets: $20 Per Person
For Reservations & Information Call: 531-8329


p.
Page 20-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. January 21.1983
NORTON
SINCE 1324-
TIRE CO.
SAFETY
SERVICE
CENTER
IS MEASURED BY MORE THAN PRICE
I TMiUMillilUilliii.
**________ ^-
IBIFGoodrich
BELTED CLM
P-METRIC POLYESTER CORD
FIBERGLASS BELT WHITES
P155/80B12
Plus 1.49 F.E.T.
SIZE
P155/80B13
P165/80B13
P175/80B13
P185/80B13
P175/75614
P185/75B14
P195/75B14
P205/75B14
P215/75B14
PRICE
F.E.T.
31.97
1.44
33.81
1 50
35.75
1.63
37.93
1 69
38.79
1 70
39.88
41.82
42.92
44.25
P225/75B14 46.57
P155/80B15 35.75
P165/80B15
37.44
P205/75B15
44.14
P215/75B15
P225/75B15
P235/75B15
45.60
47.78
50.10
1 79
1 95
2 07
2 20
2 35
1 68
1 83
2.15
234
2 46
2 65
A NORTON TIRE CO I. LIMITED WARRANTY
I SATISFACTION GUARANTEED
1 OR YOUR MONEY REFUNDED
^S? K io< j*i 'too* ion tit not CO"*'*'*1* "*< "" *"* ** $
jQ gjueagt' cj tat km Mrr *"* BortBa Tt Co tin" it ^
^ axcius* to* iw "* '** aw o *
55 tioi Jt' 0J .JJJ'ds BBBMRI >
^tf-
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MAXITRAC
HIGHWAY RADIAL
WHITEWALLS
P165/80R13
Plus 1.67 F.E.T.
SIZE PRICE FET
P175/80R13 38.39 1.64
P185/80R13 40.09 1.78
P185/75R14 41.25 1 93
P195/75R14 42.62 206
P205/75R14 43.90 231
P215/75R14 45.89 2.47
P215/75R15 46.28 249
P225/75R15 48.77 270
P235/75R15 53.61 2 89
r* mf

i[FGoodrich|
UFESAVER XLM
STEEL BELTED RADIALS
P155/80R13
'Plus 153 FET I
SIZE
SALE PRICE FET
P165/80R13 46.86 169
P175/80R13 48.57 178
P185/80R13 49.85 192
P195/70R13 50.82 198
P205/70R13 52.32 2 u
P205/70R14 56.92 2.23
P175/75R14 47.50 183
P185/75R14 52.32 i 2 04
P195 75R14 56.92 218
P205/75R14 59.37
P215/75R14 60.45
P225/75R14 64.62
234
2 48
2 68
P195/75R15 i 59.70 233
P205/75R15 61.73
P215/75R15 64.09
P225/75R15 i 66.44
P235/75R15 71.26
2 47
259
2 78
3 01
IIRELLI
RADIALS
Low Cost
'High Mileage
Outstanding Value
155SR12
145SR13
155SR13
165SR13
175SR14
185SR14
165SR15
4151
36.63
4335
47.01
53.72
56.78
54.95
119
115
1.24
1 53
1 81
2.11
1.71
THE SOUTHS MOST
COMPLETE INVENTORY
SPECIAL
PURCHASE
FOR LUXURY
SIZED CARS
P235/75-15
8695
BE SURE TO GET OUR
PRICE ON ALL SPORTS,
PASSENGER OR TRUCK
TIRE REPLACEMENTS.
PREMIUM
GRADE
HIGHWAY
FOR TRUCKS, VANS, RVs
700 15
6p>ytuC<.wu
700'15
6 MfMji-ftM
750x16
My tuo. tye.
800-16 5
IWj.....I
875 16 5
Pytuoalaaa
950x165
Iptyru
51.80
45.05
57.42
58.05
61.83
68.18
3 07
2 81
354
334
3 78
PREMIUM 4 PLY
POLYESTER CORD WHITEWALLS
SIZE
*A78x13
*C78x13
*C78x14
E78X14
F78x14
G78x14
H78x14
G78x15
H78x15
L78x15
PRICE
25.01
27.91
28.53
29.73
31.16
32.85
34.39
32.93
34.61
36.56
I WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
4.21 [ Available m 2 Ply only
FET
1 59
1 80
1 88
201
212
226
2 49
2 35
2 54
279
tB N 12 Aw 593 "040
NORTON
TIRE C
IMTT
rMUTIRCAM VISA
MCMI0MU
MKfl-.ttM
CORAL GABLES
Bd a Douglas Rod 446-8101
NORTH MUM
'3360MM 7ti*M 611(541
N MAM BEACH
1700N l*dSl 945-7454
MUM BEACH
t14 Mon o*9 672 5353
SO4JTH0AOE
9001 S DuMn M7 7575
CUTLER R*W*
70390 S Ouy 233-5241
.MULEAH/WMJM 9RRWQ8 MLE
1275 49* SI 822 2500
'' MIAMI AaTTOflT
N 25 SI aaMtmOayyfld 593-1191
WEST MAM
B.'0 a GjHowjy R* 552 6*56
MMQAU. OH HIGATE SQUARE
13872 Si* 88BiSl 367 0128
HOMESTEAD
30100 S IMtraHay 247 1672
HOtLVWOOO
?97 S SOaiR. 7-0450
rr LAUOEROALE
1740! SuiwiMBivd 463'588
PLANTATION
381 N SUN Rd 587 2186
TAJAARAC
44H* Commtiaw BM! 735-2772
TAMARAC
N LHveryOr 4 Mctt> Rd 721 4700
.ROMRANO BEACH
3151 N H*# Hw, 943 4200
WEST .LM BEACH
515 Sou* Omi 832 3044
DAWK SI Rd 64 ua ot uontrvty Dr 47>4700
LAKE RANK N PALM BEACH
532 N LJktBkx] 648 2544
DEERFIELD BEACH
2265 HAUIXKO 6M 477 8800
2604 SouBi 401 SI 464-8020
VERO BEACH
55 21st Si-wi 56" 1174
DAYTONA BEACH
907VOAlM*t 255 48"
NARIES
20651 ami 774 4443


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n29 Canada Dry ^l19
Heinz Beans 2/89* Applesauce 69*
KosherDils 99* PintoBeans 2/sl
Green Giant 2/89* Ksti Detergent 69*
SAVE SAVE SAVE SAVE
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Jews Praise Local Councils
In City-Wide Survey
Combined Jewish Appeal
Shabbat Set for Feb. 4, 5
EWYORK-(JTA)-
fs served by community
icils funded by the
tropolitan New York
rdinating Council on
fish Poverty, respond-
! to a city-wide survey,
praised those services
quality and effective-
according to the
cutive director of the
[rdinating Council.
Ibbi David Cohen said the
fey of the delivery of social
cts at eight local Jewish
nunity Councils was un-
*en as a result of a year-long
In f review and evaluation
complete range of the Co-
ating Council's programs
rtivities.
ftHEN SAID that more than
rsiionnaires were mailed to
of eight community
Eils tunded by the Coordi-
Council under contract
fine Human Resources Ad-
oration, the city's key social
re agency.
hen said the councils in
were in Boro Park.
Iton Beach. Canarsie, Crown
Its, Coney Island and
^ush in Brooklyn. Wash-
Heights-In-Wood in
it tan; and the Queens Jew-
ommunity Council in Forest
hen said that by last Oct. 15,
rut-off date for response,
l> had returned 194 of the
27 percent to the Co-
ating Council.
said the Coordinating
K'il was "gratified both with
nagnitude of the response
vith the degree of satisfac-
elicited from the clients
the quality and effective-
of the local council's delivery
fcial services."
SAID two-thirds of those
knding reported that they
received the services they
requested. In the analysis of
esponses of those reporting
[had not received requested
fces. the Coordinating
cil found that the largest
category involved housing.
report noted the "basic
iticity" of the supply of de-
jl>le housing in the
bpolitan area, as well as the
ny waiting period for either
pn eight housing, referring
provision of the Federal
ling Law under which rents
poor are subsidized; and
I housing.
>.
Menachem Shayovich, Coordi-
nating Council president, said
that "increased housing
availability for low income clients
is an important area for con-
tinued strong advocacy" by the
Council.
HE REPORTED that there
was "strong indication" that the
function and activities of the
community councils are well
known in the eight areas that
were surveyed. The responses
showed that more than 70 per-
cent of the respondents knew
about the community councils
through "word of mouth," and
that 70 percent also said they had
not visited any other Jewish or
governmental social service
agencies.
The data also showed that 154
clients out of 163 indicated they
were satisfied with the courtesy
and helpfulness of the worker and
174 out of 180 97 percent of
the respondents said they would
refer a friend or relative to a com-
munity council.
Archaeologist Says He Found
Oldest Reference to God
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A young Tel Aviv Uni-
versity archaeologist be-
lieves he has found the old-
est Hebrew reference to the
name of God in a treasure
trove of coins, amulets and
other ancient objects
yielded by an ar-
chaeological dig on a hill
facing Mt. Zion in Jeru-
salem.
Gabriel Barkay, who con-
ducted the excavations three
years ago. told a lecture audience
at the Rockefeller Museum here
that the nature of the discovery
was unravelled only last month
by a special technique applied in
the laboratory of the Israel Mu-
seum. The objects under study
were two pure silver Hebrew
prayer scrolls dating from the
Seventh Century BCE.
THE TEXTS were scratched
with a sharp instument and, ac-
cording to Barkay, extremely dif-
ficult to read. One of them con-
tained the Hebrew letters "yud,"
"heh," "vav," "heh," trans-
literated as Yaweh or Jehovah,
the name of God which pious
Jews are forbidden to write or
utter. Barkay would not identify
the other texts, save to say he
was still trying to decipher them.
He said he kept his research on
the objects more or less secret up
to now to avoid agitating ultra-
Orthodox Jews who might accuse
him of desecrating ancient Jew-
ish graves.
The excavations, alongside St.
Andrews Church above the Hin-

iers of Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged
first dinner meeting of 1983 at Douglas Gardens. George
tl^ii '^amPa attorney and former member of the
ia House of Representatives, addressed the meeting and
on legislative priorities for the elderly. Also shown are
leatter, president of Founders, and Arthur Pearlman,
tan of the development committee and vice president of
fiami Jewish Home.
nom Valley, were described by
archaelogists as the "most sensa-
tional" in ISO years of digs in and
around Jerusalem.
THEY YIELDED the largest
amount of jewelry ever found at a
Jerusalem site and the oldest coin
ever found in the country a 6th
century BCE coin in the shape of
a crab from the Aegaean island of
Kos. Barkay said he found the
two silver prayer scrolls in an un-
derground tomb chamber filled
with gifts placed alongside the
bones of the deceased.
He explained that earlier He-
brew references to God's name
have not been found because they
were on papyrus or other perisha-
ble material. God's name would
not appear on stone inscriptions
because they were not tradi-
tionally religious texts, he said.
F.E. (Gene) Autrey, executive
vice president and chief
operating officer of the South-
eastern Public Service
Company, has been appointed
1983 general campaign chair-
man of United Way of Dade
County. Active in the organi-
zation since the early 1960's,
Autrey currently serves as
vice president and chairman of
Corporate Services Division.
Congressman Lehman
To Be Honored
Congressman William Lehman
will be honored at a Testimonial
Dinner Saturday at 6:30 p.m. at
the Hyatt Regency James L.
Knight Center, Miami. The din-
ner is co-sponsored by the North
Dade Chamber of Commerce and
the Concerned Citizen's of North-
east Dade County.
Milton T. Hornstein, president
of the Chamber, said special en-
tertainment and surprise guests
will attend. Jule Littman, presi-
dent of Concerned Citizens,
stated, "The people now have an
opportunity to thank the con-
gressman in person and share
this special event with him."
The Rabbinical
Association of Greater
Miami has declared Feb. 4
and 5 to be Combined Jew-
ish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Shabbat.
According to Rabbinical
Association President
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff,
spiritual leader of Congre-
gation Bet Breira, the
special Shabbat has been
planned to coincide with
Super Sunday on Feb. 6.
On Super Sunday, over 3.000
volunteers from the Greater
Miami Jewish community will
telephone more than 60,000 Jew-
, ish households in Dade County to
enlist their support for the 1983
CJA-IEF. The campaign sup-
ports social service programs in
Greater Miami, in Israel and in
Jewish communities around the
world.
'THIS YEAR, when world
Jewry is faced by urgent crises, it
is especially important that
rabbis take the time during
Shabbat services to explain the
needs of the CJA-IEF cam-
paign," Tabachnikoff said.
"The people of Israel are faced
with an economic crisis that
threatens the fabric of the na-
tion's social service programs. In
our own Greater Miami com-
munity, human service agencies
are trying to cope with growing
lists of needy clients and
'shrinking federal grants. The
community must unite in a show
of solidarity to maintain and
expand our efforts to assist Jews
everywhere."
The special Shabbat also was
coordinated under the aegis of
the National United Jewish Ap-
peal, in celebration of UJ A's 44th
anniversary and the major role of
local Jewish Federations within
Jewish communities throughout
the United States.
RABBI Haskell Bernat, spiri
tual leader of Temple Israel of
Greater Miami and national
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal Rabbinic Cabinet, and
Kabbi Ralph Kingsley. spiritual
leader of Temple Sinai of North
Dade and national coordinator of
the Shabbat. noted that this is
the seventh annual Shabbat
observance to highlight the
importance of the CJA-IEF.
Members of the Rabbinical
Association. representing all
branches of Judaism, encourage
support for the campaign in their
individual congregations and
work with community leaders to
develop an understanding of the
Jewish dimensions of tzedakah
and commitment.
"Our faith and ethics teach us
that every Jew has a responsibili-
ty to help build and strengthen
the community." Tabachnikoff
pointed out. "Our response to the
crises that face our people today
will make a spiritual and material
contribution to our people's
future."
30 Jewish Organizations to
Join Super Sunday Exhibition
A wide range of Jewish com-
munity organizations and
agencies will display their serv-
ices and programs on Sunday,
Feb. 6 at a Super Sunday Expo
presented at Temple Israel of
Greater Miami. The exhibition
will be shown as more than 3,000
volunteers reach out to 60,000
households in Greater Miami on
behalf of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation's 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign.
Expo Center participants in-
clude the Hillel Foundations of
Florida, the B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization, the Jewish Voca-
tional Service, the Samuel Scheck
Hillel Community Day School,
the Jewish Family and Children's
Service. Pioneer Women, the
Jewish High School of South
Florida, B'nai B'rith Women,
Chabad House, Mount Sinai
Medical Center. B'nai B'rith
Lodges, the Jewish Community
Centers of South Florida, the
High School in Israel, the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged, the Lehrman Day
School and the Jewish Junior
High School of South Florida.
Other participants are the
South Florida Conference on So-
viet Jewry, the Zionist Organiza-
tion of America, the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
the Florida Friends of Bar Ilan
University, the Women's League
for Conservative Judaism, the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Council on Cults, the Na-
tional Council of Jewish Women,
American Mizrachi Women.
Hadassah, Young Judea. ORT.
Yeshiva University, the Federa-
tion Israel Programs Office, the
Workmen's Circle, the Jewish
War Veterans and El Al Israel
Airlines.
"The involvement of so many
Expo Center participants dis-
plays the unity of our Jewish
community on Super Sunday, a
day on which we display our
commitment to Jews in need
worldwide," said 1983 CJA-IEF
General Campaign Chairman
Aaron Podhurst. "These organi-
zations and agencies stand with
us and share our hopes and vi-
sions for the future."
Women's Division Hosts TV Personality
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division
annual luncheon for Patrons,
Sponsors and Donors from South
Dade, Southwest Dade and
Miami Beach will be held on
Wednesday, Feb. 9, 10:30 a.m..
at the Four Ambassadors Hotel.
The function will feature a
fashion show by Cache and guest
speaker Michael Medved, author
and television personlity.
Medved's published books
include "What Really Happened
to the Class of '65," "Hospital
People," "The Shadow Presi-
dents," and "The Golden Turkey
Awards," which he co-authored
with his brother, Harry. He has
been a frequent guest on all the
major network television talk
shows.
Medved is president and co-
founder of Pacific Jewish Center,
a community facility in Venice,
Calif. In public appearances and
lectures across the nation.
Medved has become a leading
spokesman for the return to Jew-
ish affiliation and tradition that
is taking place among tens of
thousands of young Americans.
Women who attend the event
make a $125 minimum gift to the
1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund. Joan
Morrison is chairwomen of the
event, and Pat Lieberman is co-
chairwoman.
tlewisfa Floiridiajtn
Miami, Florida Friday, January 21,1983 Section B


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