The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02815

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
U.S. Luther Stamp Defies History of The Worst Evil Genius'
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
Martin Luther, whose
,attle against the Roman
Catholic Church was fiery
aut not nearly as ferocious
as his fulminations against
Jews, is going to be honor-
ed in 1983 by the Postal
Service of the United
States. To mark the 500th
anniversary of Bis birth, the
Board of Governors of our
huge mail moving opera-
tions has authorized Post-
master General William
Bolger to strike a stamp in
his honor.
Why? Well, as Bolger puts it,
because "of his views on freedom
of religion and press, his expand-
ed knowledge for the printing of
books, and his support of univer-
sal education."
LET'S TAKE these categories
one by one: (1) Freedom of
religion. Luther rebelled against
his own church because of his
distrust of Rome, but not actual-
ly because he felt freedom was
squelched there. More to the
point, he campaigned for the de-
struction of synagogues, for the
confiscation of any wealth pos-
sessed by Jews, and for their ex-
pulsion from Germany. (2) Free-
dom of the press. There wasn't
much of a press in Luther's time
(1483-1546), but he made use of
the little there was by publishing
such writings as the anti-Catholic
"Babylonian Captivity of the
Church" and "Concerning the
Jews and Their Lies." He recom-
Continued on Page 11-A
THE
/olume 56 Number 2
Two Sections
Miami, Florida Friday, January 14,1983
FrtdShochti
B Mall M Cam*
Price 50 Cents
avon Says: I Warned Reagan About
NORMAL RE.
nlB IS H
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New Egyptian
Intransigence
^
'***
Divorce and Its Aftermath
Happy Even AfterReally?
By ELSA SOLENDER
{Copyright Baltimore Jewish Times
Reprint by Special Arrangement
So Cinderella and the prince
rm> married, and they lived hap-
Jily ever after right?
Not so. If the glass slipper girl
nil Hit prince are still together,
he scenario probably went some-
ping more like this:
They were married. A year or
later, the honeymoon unmis-
ak.ibl.y over, they had to buckle
town and work at husband and
|ifehood, No easy business.
NEXT, they might have gone
on to have their first baby and
another marital crisis. If they
survived the stresses of new
parenthood together, harmony
may have reigned until sometime
around their seventh wedding
anniversary, or age 30, where-
upon new stress struck: the
proverbial "Seven Year Itch."
Past that turmoil, their rela-
tionship may have endured in
relative calm until he or she
reached age 40, or thereabouts,
and began to wonder, "Is this all?
There must be something more."
If "something more" didn't
translate into "someone else,"
the twosome may have continued
together until their children left
the nest. At which point they
may have discovered, with some
pain, that they had nothing left
to say to each other: or they may
have rediscovered, with some
pleasure, the things that they en-
joyed doing together exclusively
as a couple.
COUPLEHOOD reconfirmed,
they may have made it to retire-
ment, with perhaps a shaky in-
terval when he always seemed to
be underfoot around the house.
Oil painting, foreign travel, golf
Continued on Page 5-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Yitzhak
Navon of Israel said last
week that he had warned
President Reagan at their
White House meeting that
Egypt's refusal to expand
peaceful relations with
Israel threatened chances
for broadening the Middle
East peace process.
"If this is the model, if this is
what happens to peace, what sort
of encouragement is that for the
peace process?" Navon said in
answer to questions at a National
Press Club luncheon. "What sort
of contribution does it give to the
will for peace, the will for sacri-
fice, the will for giving up
things?"
NOTING THAT Israel has
given up Sinai, two air bases and
its oilfields and forcibly removed
settlements for the sake of peace
with Egypt, Navon said that
Egypt has "frozen" its agree-
ments with Israel. He said not
only does Egypt criticize Israel,
but the Egyptian press is full of
anti-Semitic articles and car-
toons.
In addition, he accused Egypt
of discouraging President Amin
Gemayel of Lebanon from
reaching a peace agreement with
Israel when it should be en-
couraging another Arab country
Continued on Page 14-A
ADL Report____________________
Anti-Semitic Vandalism Took Drop in '82
NEW YORK (JTA) -
^fter more than doubling
ir three years in a row,
knti-Semitk vandalism in
(he United States declined
^oticeably in 1982, accord-
ig to the annual audit con-
lucted by the Anti-
ifamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
The survey disclosed 829 re-
ported incidents this year in 35
states and the District of Colum-
bia as compared to 974 in 31
states and the District in 1981
a drop of 14.9 percent.
In making the findings public,
Nathan Perlmutter, ADL's na-
tional director, noted that the
number of arrests in connection
with the anti-Semitic episodes in-
creased nearly 50 percent from
114 in 1981 to 167 in 1982. Of
those arrested, he said, more than
80 percent were under the age of
20.
THE ATTACKS included the
defacement of Jewish institu-
tions, stores, homes and public
property with swastikas, anti-
Jewish slogans and graffiti. Of
the 829 total, there were 14 cases
of arson or attempted arson as
against 16 in 1981, and three
bombings as against four last
year.
The audit was prepared by the
Research Department of ADL's
Civil Rights Division based on
information provided by the
Continued on Page 6-A
U.S. Jewry Study Going Out of Business.. .Page 2-A
Gesture
Of Agony
!?
Wiesel
Turns On
TimermJtn
By ARNOLD AGES
Eli Wiesel, probably the
world's most widely-read
Jewish novelist, essayist
and commentator, has had
some disquieting experien-
ces in recent months.
In an interview on Miami
Beach. Wiesel revealed that he
had been in Israel when the inva-
sion of Lebanon occurred. While
he had some reservations about
the implications of the war.
Wiesel has been scandalized by
some of the reactions to it.
notably that of Jacobo Timer-
man, the former editor of a news-
paper in Buenos Aires who was
arrested by the Argentine
authorities and who is now living
in Israel.
"I WAS one of those people
who went to Argentina to plead
Continued on Page 13-A
Etit Wiesel
S ,



Pa&e 2-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. January 14, 1983
Study of Jewish Community
AJCong. Executive Baum
Commission Going Out of Business In Miami to Meet Newsm
By WILLIAM SAPHIRE
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The failure of promised fi-
nancing to materialize for-
ced a commission of distin-
guished American Jews to
abandon its study of what
the organized American
Jewish community did or
might have done to save
European Jews from the
Holocaust during the years
1939-1945, the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency was in-
formed by two leading
members of the panel.
Former U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Arthur Goldberg, who
headed the project, the American
Jewish Commission on the Holo-
caust, which was privately
undertaken in September. 1981.
and Prof. Seymour Finger, of the
City University of New York
Graduate School, who was its
research chief, confirmed that the
sponsor, businessman and con-
centration camp survivor Jack
Eisner, failed to meet his finan-
cial obligations. Eisner was not
immediately available for com-
ment
GOLDBERG, reached by the
JTA's Washington Bureau, and
Finger, who spoke to the JTA by
telephone in New York, were
commenting on a report in the
New York Times by Bernard
Weinraub. that the project was
aborted because of dissension
among the various participants
over the nature and content of
the commission's report.
The Times quoted Eisner as
saying he withheld funds because
the Jewish establishment was
exerting heavy pressure to pro-
tect the good name of many
mainstream American Jewish
organizations which had not act-
ed as forcefully as they could
have on behalf of European Jews
in the years under review.
But Finger, a professor of
political science and former
deputy chief of the U.S. Mission
to the United Nations, told the
.JTA. "The commission was dis-
solved for one simple, all-compell-
ing reason. The sponsor did not
come up with the money pro-
mised." He denied Eisner's re-
marks to the Times but would
not speculate as to whether busi-
Official Says Iraq Won't Oppose
Negotiations With Israel
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Vice
Premier Tapek Aziz of Iraq
said here that his govern-
ment "is not opposed to
negotiations between Israel
and the Palestinians" and
that Iraq wants to see Syria
withdraw its forces from
Lebanon "so as not to give
Israel a pretext to maintain
its forces there."
Aziz's remarks in an interview
with Le Monde last Friday came
a few days after the Iraqi govern-
ment made public a conversation
President Saddam Hussein had
with U.S. Rep. Stephen Solarz
il) N.Y.I on Aug. 25 in which
the Iraqi leader was quoted as
having linked his call for the
security of Israel with a demand
for the creation of a Palestinian
state. Hussein said he believed in
the "existence of an independent
Palestinian state accepted by the
Palestinians and it is also neces
seray to have a state of security
for the Israelis."
IRAQ HAS long been one of
Israel's most implaccable foes
Bonn Planning
To Draft
Young Jews?
BONN (JTA) The West
German army (Bundesuehr), ex-
pecting a shortage of manpower
over the next two years, is
reexamining a long-standing
unofficial arrangement whereby
Jewish young men of military age
have been exempted from the
draft for historical and political
reasons.
The Jewish Telegraphic
Agency has learned of several
cases recently where young Jews
have experienced difficulty ob
Laming exemptions. This is be-
cause all 18-year-olds are now
needed to fill draft quotas. Such
had not been the case in the past.
The recruitment of Jews has
become a subject of discussion by
State officials and by various
Jewish institutions.
and diplomats could not recall
any previous such statements by
Iraqi leaders. There was no
explanation why Iraq decided to
release the text of the conversa-
tion at this time.
In his interview with Le
Monde, Aziz also called for
Egypt's "unconditional" rein-
tegration into the Arab world. He
said "we must reestablish a
dialogue with Egypt. There are
no conditions as far as we are
concerned."
The Iraqi Vice Premier, who
conferred with President Fran-
cois Mitterrand. Premier Pierre
Mauroy and half a dozen French
ministers during his three-day
stay here last week, reportedly
negotiated an extension of Iraq's
debt repayments to France.
Baghdad owes France close to $2
billion for various arms pur-
chases in 1981 and 1982.
FRENCH SOURCES said that
Aziz also obtained additional
credits for future arms sales.
Baghdad, according to reports, is
counting on France to modernize
and to re-equip its armed forces.
It plans to acquire a large
number of Mirage-2000 combat
planes as well as French-made
missiles, gun boats and electronic
equipment. Some sources say the
new arms deal is for close to $3
billion.
According to French sources,
Aziz did not raise, more than in a
perfundory way, the issue of the
nuclear reactor in Tamuz
destroyed by Israel in June, 1981.
While here, Aziz had an un-
scheduled meeting with Egyptian
Minister of State for Foreign Af-
fairs Boutros Ghali. It was the
first such encounter between an
Iraqi and Egyptian minister
since 1979, when Iraq, as well as
most of Arab states, severed
diplomatic relations with Egypt
in retaliation for President
Anwar Sadat's historic visit to
Jerusalem and his subsequent
signing of a peace treaty with
Israel.
Three other Arab states
Jordan. Morocco and Lebanon
have also renewed their contacts
with Egypt since Hosni Muba-
rak's election as President.
Mubarak also attended the
funeral of Saudi Arabia's King
Khaled in Riyadh last summer.
ness reverses may have been re-
sponsible. According to the
Times. Eisner had pledged
$138,000 but supplied only
$40,000.
FINGER conceded that "there
had been some dissension" with-
in the commission when it met
last June to consider various
drafts. He stressed, however,
that differences had been expect-
ed from the outset and "not all
criticisms were wrong." He him-
self edited and revised five
separate draft reports.
"I had every expectation that
we would come up with a (final)
report." up to the time Goldberg
informed the commission mem-
bers, last August 17. that the
project had to be abandoned for
lack of funds. Finger told the
JTA.
Goldberg told the JTA the
sponsor "wouldn't put up the
money to complete our work"
and that he himself could not
afford to finance it. He said he
would however, pay for a re-
search assistant so that he and
Finger could complete a book on
the subject by the end of this
year.
GOLDBERG denied emphat
ically that he succumbed to pres-
sure from establishment organi-
zations. He recalled that when he
undertook to head the project
over two years ago. he said "let
the chips fall where they may"
and that determination will guide
the book he intends to write.
"I have not lost belief that the
truth will come out. At this stage
of my life no one could scare me,"
the former Supreme Court Jus-
tice and former U.S. Ambassador
to the UN told the JTA.
The Times reported that one
draft singled out for criticism
Rabbi Stephen Wise, a towering
figure in American Jewish life at
the time of the Holocaust, for al-
legedly rejecting a plan for sav-
ing European Jews because it
failed to demand that the British
open Palestine to them.
WHEN THE American Jewish
Commission on the Holocaust
was formed in New York it was
announced that it would under-
take a two-year study that would
explore the following:
When did the American
Jewish leadership learn about the
Nazi plan to exterminate all
European Jews and when did
they become alarmed about it?
Which Jewish groups were
active on the American scene and
what did they do or fail to do?
Why were so many Ameri-
can Jews passive or relatively
unconcerned about the plight of
European Jews? Regarding this
point, the Commission will seek
to explore whether it was the lack
of information, interest, the in-
ability to fathom the dimensions
of the Holocaust or a preoccupa-
tion with other concerns.
Did prominent Jews try to
influence U.S. Policy, and if so,
what impact did they have?
Was the Holocaust preor-
dained by a cruel destiny so that
nothing could have been done to
prevent, stop, alleviate or limit
it? Or, if the Jews in this country
had shown greater concern and
exerted their influence and power
on the political body, could the
tragedy have been prevented?
In retrospect, with the abun-
dance of documentary material at
the Commission's disposal, what
is the truth about the possibility
of saving great numbers of Jews?
Why were these opportunities
not fully explored, or neglected?
Goldberg said at the time
that the conclusions of the report
might be "unpleasant" to some
Jewish organizations, but added
that whatever "good, solid re-
search" is uncovered will in the
end be published.
M-1-14-M
eg
Phil Baum, associate executive director of the Am
ican Jewish Congress, was in Miami this week to speajtt
top executives here in the news media about reporting \
the recent war in Lebanon. ^0I
Baum was to meet with Ralph Renick, vice preside!!
in charge of news for WTVJ, Ch. 4, and Howard 35
berg, publisher of the Miami News, as well as with other
local journalists.
While in Miami, Baum was also to meet late TW
day with officials of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
to discuss problems relating to the display or religion
symbols on public property.
Pilots to Back El Al Buddies
TEL AVIV (JTA) The International Federi
tion of Airline Pilots Associations will back the El Al
pilots if the government tries to replace them with foreign
employees. IFALPA president Robert Tweedy, whoiaij
Israel to examine the possibility of holding the IFALPA
1984 convention in Israel, said that if El Al pilots asked
his association for aid "we would certainly back them.
He noted that IFALPA had been "pretty successful" a
preventing airlines from recruiting pilots in foreign coun-
tries in cases of disputes and strikes or lockouts in air
lines.
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Friday, January 14,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A.
News in Brief
Optimism Following Meetings With Begin, Hussein
By JTA Services
JERUSALEM Sen. Paul
Tsongas (D., Mass.) appeared
optimistic over prospects for
Middle East peace after meeting
with Premier Menachem Begin
here last Friday and an earlier
meeting with King Hussein of
Jordan in Amman. Israeli
sources said Tsongas brought no
message to Begin from the Jor-
danian ruler.
Begin told the American law-
maker that he would welcome
Hussein's entry into the peace
process but insisted that Israel
would never accept a freeze on
settlement activity as a condition
for broadening the peace talks.
Tsongas, for his part, could cite
no specific statement or com-
mitment by the King indicating
that he was ready to join the
talks.
To the surprise of many Israe-
lis, the Massachusetts Democrat
seemed convinced that Syria was
currently the obstacle to peace
and indicated that if the Syrians
refused to pull their forces out of
Lebanon he. personally, would
not disapprove the use of force by
Israel to get them out.
Percy Backs Israel
On Troop Withdrawal
WASHINGTON Sen.
[Charles Percy (R., 111.), chairman
[of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee, backed Israel's posi-
tion that the withdrawal of its
forces from Lebanon should be
accompanied by what he called
the establishment of "busines-
slike relations" between the two
countries.
"This would ensure peace and
security on their common border
and thus satisfy Israel that the
withdrawal of her forces would
not endanger Israel's border
towns." Percy said in a state-
, ment issued by his office here.
"In my judgment, there is
I justification for the Israeli posi-
tion that businesslike relations
' with Lebanon must be a
priority."
12 Persons Wounded
In Grenade Attack
TEL AVIV More than 100
persons have been detained for
Questioning since police dragnets
iH'gan rounding up suspects in a
-renade attack that wounded 11
passengers and the driver of a
bus near the central bus terminal
here last Saturday night.
Most of the injuries were
slight, police said. But the attack
was the most serious in Tel Aviv
since 1975 and was the subject of
a briefing by security officials at
Sunday's Cabinet meeting. The
public has been alerted to a pos-
sible wave of terrorist acts inside
Israel coincidental with the cur-
rent negotiations for the withdra-
wal of Israeli forces from Leba-
non.
Israel Bond Managers'
Strike is Deadlocked
NEW YORK A strike bv 58
city managers working in offices
throughout the United States for
the Development Corporation for
Israel, the Israel Bond Organiza-
tion, remained deadlocked with
no new negotiations scheduled,
according to statements by both
sides.
Martin Cohen, president of
Local 1881 of the American
Federation of State, County and
Municipal Employes, said the ci-
ty managers for the Israel Bond
offices, who he said are respons-
ible for Israel Bond sales in 60
geographic regions and divisions,
went on strike Jan. 3 after nego-
tiations for a new contract broke
down on issues of job security.
Cohen said that a two-year
contract, scheduled to expire at
the end of 1981, had been exten-
ded for a year by Local 1881, with
no effort by the union to seek the
changes for which it struck last
Jan. 3.
(The city manager's office of
the Greater Miami Israel Bond
campaign declined comment
when asked this week whether or
not it was participating in the
strike.)
U.S. Warns Rumania
Against Education Tax
BUCHAREST U.S. Under
secretary of State for Political
Affairs Lawrence Eagleburger
arrived here, reportedly to warn
Rumania that it risks losing its
most favored nation status if it
imposes the special education tax
decreed last year. Eagleburger,
who will spend one day in
Bucharest, was to meet with
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President and Community Party
leader Nicolae Ceausescu.
Ceausescu announced last
November that Rumania will
introduce a special tax on all emi-
grants. According to this decree,
emigrants will have to reimburse
the state for their educational
expenses covering their last two
years in high school, university
studies and post-graduate cour-
ses.
Two U.S. Scientists
Win $100,000 Award
TEL AVIV Two American
scientists are to be awarded the
prestigious Wolf Foundation
Prize for physics for 1982, the
Foundation announced last
Friday.
They are Prof. Leon Lederman,
of the Fermi Laboratory of
Chicago, and Prof. Martin Perl,
of Stanford University, Calif.
They will be awarded the
$100,000 prize by President
Yitzhak Navon at a ceremony in
the Knesset in May for their
independent experimental
discoveries of unexpected new
particles establishing a third
generation of the tiniest building
forms of matter inside the atom
quarks and leptons.
size and importance to the Nobel
Prizes, and at least four of the 42
winners since the Foundation's
establishment in 1978 have later
won Nobel Prizes.
Israel to Agree
To UNIFIL Extension?
JERUSALEM Israel is pre-
pared to agree to a two-month
extension of the mandate of the
United Nations Interim Force in
Lebanon (UNIFIL). which is
scheduled to expire Jan. 14. Most
of the countries contributing
contingents to UNIFIL also
want a two-month extension in
view of the uncertain situation in
Lebanon. Lebanon itself would
have preferred a six-month
extension.
Last week. Israel accused
UNIFIL of laxity in preventing
terrorists from infiltrating the
areas it controls after nine
Katyusha rocket-launchers were
discovered in southern Lebanon
in the zone patrolled by
UNlFIL's Ghanian contingent.
The army disclosed that five of
the launchers were aimed at
Kiryat Shmona, the Israeli
border town serving as a site for
negotiations between Israel.
Lebanon and the United States.
and four of the launchers were
aimed at an Israeli military base
on the Lebanese coast.
The UN Undersecretary
General. Brian Urquhart, has
been visiting Syria, Lebanon and
Israel. He was scheduled to meet
with Premier Menachem Begin
and Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir in Jerusalem.
French Delegation in Jerusalem
The Wolf
are regarded
Foundation prizes
as second only in
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
French official delegation will be
in Jerusalem this week
negotiating a new two-year
cultural protocol within the
framework of the 1959 cultural
accord between the two coun-
tries.
Israeli officials are particularly
pleased at this event, since
France postponed the session in
July when it was originally
scheduled because of the
Lebanon war. Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir mentioned the
meeting at the Cabinet meeting
as an indicator of improving ties
with France.
Some official observers here
ire seeking to set President
Francois Mitterrand's invitation
to President Yitzhak Navon to
visit Paris within the same
context of improving relations.
The invitiation was conveyed by
the French Ambassador in
Washington last week but it
now appears that Navon will be
unable to take it up on his way
home from the U.S., as originally
intended, because the prospective
host, Mitterrand, will be abroad
at that time.
Israeli sources said there had
been a mix-up on the French side.
come in many forms. For those who wish to take their pleasure with
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For those who deserve the very best.
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Custom Car Loan *


Page 4-A Ths Jewish Floridian / Friday. January 14. 1983
Conserve Energy in Struggle Against Anti-Semitism
It all began a while back. A Miami Beach
resident ate at a Bay Harbor Island
restaurant. A row occurred, the details of
which are irrelevant except to slurry
journalism. Still, somewhere along the line,
the chef is alleged to have remarked that
"Hitler should have finished the job.'*
Needless to say. the diner was Jewish.
The upshot now is a $5 million suit
against the diner, who the restaurateur
declared has severely hurt his business by
inaugurating a letter-writing campaign
against Him and his establishment. A
second $15 million suit by the restaurateur
is also pending against a condo executive
for posting one of the diner's letters on a
bulletin board in his condo. thus promoting
the diner's alleged boycott campaign.
Is this an important or a trivial situ-
ation? In the case of anti-Semitism, we can
never really dismiss anything as trivial.
On the other hand, given the number of
anti-Semitic comments made by bigots,
not only in South Florida, but throughout
the world, why was this occurrence
especially significant?
It wasn't. In fact, the whole bruhaha has
been known for a long time now. Stories
about it have been circulating in the
community ever since it first occurred, and
circulating with them have been copies of
letters by the diner, including anti-Semitic
comments purported to have been made to
him by the restaurateur in a subsequent
telephone conversation; testaments calling
for a boycott of the restaurateur and his
establishment by the condo executive; and
more.
Then what elevated this affair to a cause
celebre? The Miami Herald, in an un-
precedented display Sunday of the power of
journalism unhappily tainted by the spectre
of inappropriate opportunism, published a
multi-page report of the affair replete with
interviews of the principals and statements
by Jewish community leaders, including
executives of local agencies of national
Jewish community relations agencies.
The line-drawing introducing the
Herald's extensive coverage in its Living
Today section is a masterpiece of non-
communication that says nothing. But
with its Star of David on a wounded
leaping lion, the drawing's vagueness of
intent becomes suspicious to the critical
Jewish eye and, we venture, something else
to the non-Jew: a farce, a reduction to
absuridity, a marionette Punch and Judy
Show in which charges of bigotry, and
indeed anti-Semitism itself, are pictured as
something downright funny, say, an
opera by Rossini.
In short, a not-so-important alleged anti-
Semitic occurrence is presented at cross-
purposes to the awesome importance and
danger of anti-Semitism itself which,
somehow, winds up in the same category as
a sound and a fury signifying nothing.
Journalism Was Wounded
What, in short, has been served? Not a
serious handling of anti-Semitism, but
opportunism instead. Who, if anyone, is
wounded? Not really the principals, cer-
tainly not they, especially not if their
wounds can be healed by millions.
Rather, we have in mind, the viciousness
of anti-Semitism as a phenomenon that has
been wounded because it has been
Jewish Florxdiar*
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i ai W imwm. em try. presented as a portrait of those funny little
people making all of that irrational noise.
And, of course, journalism itself has been
wounded. Once again, as in the reporting
from Lebanon, a fictionalized view of
reality all rapped up in a highly-
personalized bow with highly-personalized
reasons for the giving of it.
Of course, we can not tell another
publication how to conduct its affairs We
can only react to how it conducts its affairs.
But we can appeal to the Jewish com-
munity to be more intelligent in these
matters than to permit itself to be exploited
in the marketplace of sensationalism. We
can suggest to the Jewish community that
what was at stake was far too serious to
have subjected it to burlesque. We can
remind the Jewish community that it must
conserve its energy in the field of human
relations for far more genuine efforts in the
cause of understanding than to expend
them purposelessly and to such terrible
disadvantage as it has now done.
Was Assad Invited Back to Lebanon?
Friday, January 14. 1983
Volume 56
29TEVETH5743
Number 2
WHEN ISRAEL was fighting
the I'I,0 in Beirut, many Jews
charged the world's "news-
gathering" agencies ami. in fact,
governmenU as well, with anti-
Semitism because of their fic-
tional accounting of what was oc-
curring in Lebanon.
The sad story in Tripoli today
is. all by itself, justification for
those charges. What do you know-
about the street-slaughter in
Tripoli? Who is involved? What
is the casualty rate? What are the
stakes?
THE STAKES in Tripoli are
no lower than they were in Bei-
rut, which is to say. the survival
of I .el:,iimii as an independent
nation. But you would never
know it from the hohum report-
ing from Tripoli in the press now.
or from watching the TV
coverage. Somehow, what is hap-
pening in Tripoli seems hardly as
worthwhile from the point of view
of television news producers as
what occurred in Beirut.
When Israel handed the I,eba-
nese their independence back in
Beirut, what they got for their
trouble was the kind of calumny
reserved for outcasts and un-
touchables.
As the various factions in
Tripoli are trying to take that in-
dependence away again, what the
TV cameramen are giving this
agonizing subject is the blahs
the same indifference they gave
Yasir Arafat's campaign to rip up
and take over Southern Lebanon
before the Israelis came there to
stop him.
IN TRIPOLI, the Ubanese are
being handed a new death war-
rant, and the new Lebanese
government, seized by the sam?
Israelophobia that is characteris-
tic of Arabv and that seizes other-
countries of the so-called civilized
world as well, is willing to make a
pact with the devil to avoid the
truth.
The plan of Lebanon's Prime
Minister Shafik Wazzan to im-
plement what he considers to be a
life-saving maneuver for his
country is a case in point. Waz-
zan is a doctrinaire Moslem
whose ant i-Israel attitudes sim-
ply won't let him accept the fact
that, without Israel, Lebanon
would still be under the heel of
Arafat's Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization.
What Wazzan did was to fly to
Syria last week to discuss with
President Hafez Assad ways of
putting a halt to the fighting in
Tripoli. Not only do your televi-
sion stage productions, which
portrayed Israel as a monster in
Beirut, not bother very much, if
at all, with the Tripoli carnage.
BUT YOU would never know
from TV or from your favorite
morning rag the essential sub-
stance of the Wazzan plea in
Damascus: to do whatever is
necessary, including a show of
force, to put a stop to the fight-
ing. This is significant for four
reasons:
It shows that the new Leba-
nese government is still incapable
of taking charge of its own
domestic affairs, a fact that
brought the PLO and then Syria
&*X*V^^

I
s
I
Mindlin
and finally Israel into I^banon in
the first place;
Wazzan's plea demonstrates
a remarkable insensitivity to the
current Israeli-Lebanese talks in
which Israel presents a simple
doctrine that shatters the Is-
raelophobic minds of everyone
else involved, including the Rea
gan Administration: it will not
teave Lebanon until everyone else
leaves to wit. the remaining
I alestmian war forces and Syria
When Wazzan opens the door for
a triumphant return of the
Syrians, who were plainly con-
quered by Israel in Lebanon and
given safe conduct out of Beirut
toward Damascus, it makes the
talks with Israel moot;
The return of Syria at the in-
vitation of the Lebanese is in ef-
fect an Arab maneuver to erase
the ultimate purpose of the Is-
raeli "victory'- in I^ebanon. which
c learly the Israelis can n'ot per-
mit;
Perhaps most important, the
Wazzan invitation to Assad calls
to mind a devastating parallel
with the American tragedy in
Vietnam, which can not be lost on
the Israelis as a warning to them
to avoid its full consequences
ANYONE with a sense of his
tory should understand the clear
relationship between the first and
the last of these points. The
second and the third are. at least
superficially, mere footnotes to
them.
It was because of South Viet
nnm'i inability to protect itself
against the northern "liberating
Communist forces of Ho Chi
Minh that the U.S. went to war in
the cause of Saigon.
It was the media thai
weakened the American resolve
to win. filling its columns and
prime time television with a fic-
tionalized view of our role there.
(Behind this resolve stands our
own schizophrenic attitude
toward the Vietnam war even to-
day.}
THE RESULT was a stale-
mate armistice giving rise to
Continued on Page 13-A


Friday, January 14, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 6-A
Divorce:
Continued from Page 1 A
or gin rummy may have
smoothed over that wrinkle in the
relationship.
So Prince and Princess Charm-
ing, declaring themselves older
and wiser than they were in the
glass slipper days, may be con-
gratulating themselves today aa
thev approach the celebration of
their golden wedding an-
niversary.
Or there may have been a dif-
ferent scenario: at one of those
critical turning points. Prince
and Princess Charming may have
gotten a divorce.
You don't have to look far to
discover couples you know who
split up on, or close to, one of
those "classic" stress points of a
marriage. You turn the pages of
your address book and the names
seem to spring from the pages:
entries with an address crossed
out. or with just one name erased,
or with an additional address
jotted in the margin.
"Andrew" and "Sara" (names
introduced in quotations are fie
ticious) seemed to their families
and friends to epitomize the
bright, liberated newlyweds of
our era. They lived together for a
year before marrying while she
earned her MBA and he sup-
ported them both by working at a
department store. When she got
her first job, they were married,
and he enrolled in an MBA pro-
gram while she supported them.
THEY SHARED the cooking
cleaning and shopping, just as
they had before they were mar-
ried. He respected the rules of
kashruth that she wanted them
to observe at home: he even tried
to keep kosher outside their home
for a while, but eventually he
succomed to temptations of the
local shellfish.
Their mothers, especially,
pointed to Sara and Andrew as a
wonderfully intelligent, mutually
supportive couple, sharing the
homemaking and breadwinning
responsibilities in an egalitarian
spirit virtually unheard of, as the
mothers put it, "in our day."
It wasn't until Andrew got his
own graduate degree and a good
job offer in Chicago that
their first open conflict de-
| \eloped. Sara loved the company
she worked for. and she was mov-
ing up its managemeni ladder
nicely. She agreed that Andrew
had no local job prospect to
match the Chicago offer.
BUT WHY couldn't he bide his
time with a lesser job for a while.
until something better came
along? After all. she was begin-
ning to make good money. They
wouldn't be hurting financially.
Andrew really wanted the
Chicago job. He'd postponed his
inlucation so she could move
ahead, he argued, now it was her
turn to make the saccrifice.
After a month of arguing, Sara
gave in. She found a job in
Chicago that didn't really excite
her. but she agreed to give it a
try.
They moved in July. They were
living apart by mid-October.
SARA HATED her new job.
And Chicago. "Why not just quit
and lets have a baby?" Andrew
had suggested. He loved his own
job.
"A baby! Who said anything
about babies?" Sara demanded.
Now or ever! Why. there'd be
all kinds of complications. And
besides, just because I don't like
one job doesn't mean I'm willing
to chuck my whole career. I
didn't invest all that time and
education so I could stay home
and change diapers! And you're
not making enough money to
Keep us from really having to
When the Princess Kicks Her Glass Slipper
7 Never Loved That Man-
I Just Married to Leave Home'
Father to Daughter:
'At Least He's Getting Some
Happiness Now That He's Left You'
exhaustion and headaches.
A YEAR after they had sepa-
rated, they were divorced.
Andrew had already found
another love interest, a non-Jew-
ish woman, a lawyer. He was
thinking of going to law school.
Sara had found another job. She
had begun to like Chicago.
Both sets of parents were
shocked and hurt when their chil-
dren first parted. Sara's father
said at first that young people to-
day just don't seem willing to
work at marriage.
After a while, though, he re-
marked that it was probably bet-
ter that they ended their mar-
riage quickly, before they'd suf-
fered miserably for years instead
of recognizing that they'd made a
mistake.
Andrew and Sara happened to
meet by chance months after
their divorce. Andrew remarked
later that he honestly couldn't re-
member what it had been like to
make love to his ex-wife.
ITS HARD for friends of
"Sherman and Claire" to re
call that their 19-year-old son,
Evan. Ls not Sherman's biological
child. They have such a warm
father-son relationship. Even
though they didn't look alike.
Evan obviously models himself
after his adoptive father. He even
walks likeSherm.
Sherman married Claire 17
years ago, when Evan was barely
two. She had been divorced from
her first husband for close to a
struggle if we take on the expense year. Sherman and his first wife
of a baby now." had als
Their sexual relations became
strained. She accused him of try-
mg to trick her into getting preg-
nant. He accused her of faking
so parted shortly after their
own son was born.
Sherman hasn't seen that child
since the divorce. Neither has
Clare seen her first husband, or
Evan his natural father. Claire
says it would distress her very
much if Evan ever felt he needed
to meet her former husband.
"I NEVER loved that man.
she explains. "If you ask me why
I married him. I'd have to admit
that I did it because I wanted to
leave home, and getting married
was how you did that in those
days. He seemed suitable, good
looking, with a good job. And he
asked me. To tell you the truth. I
wondered at that time if anyone
ever would.
"A few months after Evan was
born. I finally did something
smart." Claire recalls. "I con-
fided in my mother that I hadn't
had sexual relations with my
husband in a year. I admitted
that I didn't love him. not even a
little. I begged her not to tell my
father. But she did. Thank good-
ness. The next day I was in a
lawyer's office."
Claire and Sherman met and
married soon after the divorce.
Their daughter. Nina, was born
four years later. Interestingly.
Claire's first husband and Sher-
man's first wife were also remar-
ried shortly after the divorces.
"ELEANOR'S" friends all
agree that "Nelson" "handed her
a raw deal" when he walked out
on her. They'd been college
sweethearts and had married
right after graduation. Elbe's
working as a guidance counselor
and extra help from her pros-
perous parents had made Nel-
son's leisurely acquisition of
numerous graduate degrees in
molecular biology, and his slow
progress up the academic ladder
relatively painless.
They always had a nice house.
which she ran graciously, and
they had two bright, attractive
children, whom she raised intelli-
gently and lovingly. Ellie had
cultivated a pleasant circle of
friends who forgave Nelson his
absent mindedness when it came
to small talk and other social
obligations: everyone understood
that Nelson's mind was really in
his lab most of the time. Wasn't
he lucky to have Ellie?
One day. just after he had
turned 40 and just before she did,
when they'd been married for 19
years. Nelson announced that he
wanted to leave academia and
join a highly speculative genetic
engineering firm.
It would mean a substantial
investment, and he'd have to
travel a good deal to help market
new products and the firm itself.
ELLIE BALKED. Nelson had
had everything his way up to
now. she said. She'd assumed the
major responsibility for their
home and their family while he
was in his lab doing precisely
what he liked. It happened that
she was planning a career change
for herself, which would involve a
couple of years additional study.
It was time for Nelson to stay
put and provide some stability
for a while. It was high time too
that he paid more attention to the
children instead of leaving all the
decision making and disciplining
to her. Sometimes it seemed to
her as if he'd been just like a third
child around the house. She
thought his behavior was terribly
immature.
That was not the way it had
been at all, Nelson insisted
angrily He'd done precisely what
Ellie wanted, dutifully pursuing a
safe, prestigious career, living in
the house that she and her
mother chose, fitting into the
family arrangements and lifestyle
she had dictated, spending time
with friends he never really liked.
NOW HE wanted to make big
money on his own. He wanted to
get some kicks out of life, to have
some breathing space, before it
was too late.
Their bitter quarrels stretched
over several months. Then a cool-
ness developed between them.
The nighuhe walked out, taking
only the clothes on his back and
their four-year-old second car, he
told her he really didn't give a
damn what she said or thought
any more.
Nelson moved in with a
bachelor friend at first, and then
borrowed money to buy into the
firm. A few months later, he
moved into his own apartment.
In which he was soon joined by
one of the laboratory technicians
at the new firm, a young woman
some 13 year his (and Elbe's)
junior.
They weren't divorced for three
more years. During the separa-
tion, their teenage daughter.
Janice, was angry first at her
father, then at her mother. One
day. soon after the actual
divorce, she told Ellie she was
glad that her father had left and
found himself a pretty young
girlfriend: "At least he's getting
some happiness now. instead of
being stuck with you."
THAT WAS the day Elbe took
a good look at herself in the mir-
ror, and called her hairdresser.
She had the gray rinsed out of her
hair, then invest in a new war-
drobe and regular manicures and
facials. She started going to
events run by Parents Without
Partners, first locally, then in
Philadelphia.
Ellie recently remarried. Nel-
son is living with a different lab
assistant. He says he's "been
burned once" and he has no plans
to marry. His business is pros-
pering the most promising
product is a calorie-less pasta. He
worries that his college age chil-
dren, who now make their home
with their mother and her new
husband in Delaware, don't have
much time to spend with him. He
misses them.
AND SO it goes. You hear
about one divorce case, and you
think, "I know another case just
like that."
"Sure, we all know those cri-
tical turning points, but no one
learns from it." remarked
"Anne." 32. a journalist she
was divorced a year ago. after
seven years of marriage.
"Roberta," 46. a psychologist
and family therapist, catches
herself complaining about her ex-
husband's unwillingness to disci-
pline their teenage son. his ex-
travagance, his irresponsibility.
Her voice has taken on the same
angry, carping tone it used to
have when they used to quarrel
before their divorce. "We're
using that boy as a weapon to
hurt each other," she observed.
"But just because you know how
to identify the problems, and
even if you tan help other people
with them, doesn't mean that you
can help yourself." she admitted.
"OUR School for Brides and
Grooms' ought to be our most
popular family life education
workshop," observers Stella
Usem, a social worker with the
Baltimore Jewish Family and
Children's Service. It isn't. On
the other hand, the "Separation-
Divorce Adjustment" workshop
that Usem leads for the agency is
invariably well attended.
Who. in the full flush of ro-
mance, wants to "develop com-
munication skills and work on the
realities of marriage" the
stated goal of the "School for
Brides and Grooms"? Fatalism
Continued on Page 12-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 14, 1983
ADL Report
Anti-Semitic Vandalism
Took Drop in '82
Continued from Page 1-A
ADL's 27 regional offices in this
country. It attributed the decline
in vandalism, arson and bomb-
ings to a nuclear of factors, in-
cluding:
Exposure of the facts about
anti-Semitic vandalism and other
anti-Jewish activity, leading to
public awareness of the problem;
The enactment of laws in
several states against religiously
motivated vandalism:
Stricter law enforcement ir.
problem areas:
Security conferences
many sponsored by ADL in
cooperation with law enforcement
authorities, educators and reli-
gious leaders which have led to
increased police and civilian
vigilance:
Educational programs in the
schools thai have focused on the
evils of bigotry and prejudice.
THE AUDIT also revealed
that while there was an increase
in the number of harassments
against individual Jews or their
institutions 593 as against 350
recorded for 1981 the rate of
increase was lower. In 1982. the
rate of increase was 69 percent
higher than the previous year.
The 350 recorded in 1981. how
ever, was 212.5 percent higher
than the 1980 total of 112.
In assessing the results of the
report, Perlmutter warned that
"the downturn in vandalism,
welcome though it is. should be
kept in perspective. Hundreds of
anti-Semitic episodes sadly sug-
gest that any relaxation of
vigilance or of prosecution of of-
fenders would be premature."
He went on to point out that
while anti-Semitic vandalism was
declining in the United States,
there was a "disturbing increase"
in anti-Jewish violence in West-
ern Europe which resulted in the
deaths of six persons and the
wounding of 216 others in 1982.
ACCORDING TO an ADL
survey made public in October
there were 41 episodes of terror-
ism including bombings and
shootings in six West Euro-
pean countries in 1982 compared
to 15 such terrorist attacks
against Jews and Jewish in-
stitutions in 1981. The overseas
audit was conducted by ADL*s f
European office headquarters in
Paris.
Almost two thirds of the 829
anti-Semitic incidents in the U.S.
occurred in four states.
New York, with 272 down
from 326 the year before still
led the nation. Next was Califor-
nia with 134. down from 150 in
1981: New Jersey with 69. down
from 94: and Massachusetts with
62. compared to 59 in 1981. The
total of 537 in these states was 92
less than the previous year a
decline of 14.6 percent, mirroring
the percentage decrease national-
ly
The ADL audit also showed
that:
The Northeast, with 467 in-
cidents or 56.3 percent of the re-
ported anti-Semitic episodes, was
once again the geographic area
reporting the greatest number.
The 1982 total, however, went
down 16 percent as contrasted
with the previous year.
In the Middle West there
were 73 reported anti-Semitic in-
cidents in 1982. a decrease of 46
compared to the previous year. In
percentage terms, this repre-
sented a 38.7 percent decrease;
Although California was
once again the Pacific Coast state
reporting the greatest number of
anti-Semitic episodes, its total
was 10.6 percent below 1981. The
other West Coast states
Washington and Oregon again
reported small numbers: Four
this year, the same as in 1981.
THE SOUTH. including
Texas, however, was an excep-
tion to the audit. These southern
states reported 91 incidents in
1982 compared to 81 in 1981. an
increase of 12.4 percent.
Hope is expressed by the ADL
that other states would follow the
lead of the 12 thus far Arizona,
California. Colorado. Florida.
Illinois. Maryland, New Jersey,
New York. Oregon. Penn-
sylvania. Rhode Island and
Washington which have
enacted laws imposing stiffer
penalties for persons convicted of
religious or racial vandalism or
other acts motivated by bigotry.
Some of these statutes were
based on a model law drawn up
by the ADL.
Rep. Rosenthal Felled
By Cancer at Age 59
WASHINGTON -
Rep. Benjamin Rosenthal
(I) NY I. the senior Jewish
member of the House Foreign
Affairs Committee, a staunch
supporter of Israel in Congress,
an opponent of the Vietnam war
and a leading consumer advocate,
died last week at the age of 59 in
Georgetown University Hospital
after a long battle with cancer.
His death reduced to 37 the
number of Jewish legislators in
the House.
Rosenthal, of Queens, who was
elected last November to his 11th
term in the House in a newly
drawn Seventh District in
Queens, had been in the forefront
of Congressional battles for
continued support to Israel, such
as increases in United States
financial and military aid to
Israel, and in seeking to prevent
Administration actions he
considered harmful to Israel.
AMONG THESE, he took part
in the unsuccessful battle to
prevent the Reagan Administra-
tion from selling AW ACS re-
connaissance planes to Saudi
Arabia in 1961 and had joined in
warnings to the Reagan Admin-
istration over reports of planned
sales of weapons to Jordan.
Many non-Jewish Congressmen
looked to him for guidance on
issues concerning Israel.
Rosenthal was operated on for
cancer of the colon in January,
1981, and received 10 months of
chemotherapy which left him
gaunt and weak. He managed to
resume his duties in the House,
but his condition became worse
last month, and he was forced to
take the oath of office for the 98th
Congress in his hospital room.
Rosenthal had been elected by
huge majorities from the Eighth
Congressional district since he
was first elected in 1962. At one
point, in 1969, he held the House
in session all night to show his
support for demonstrators who
had come to Washington in
opposition to the Vietnam war.
At that time, he said. "One Con-
gressman with a fair amount of
chutzpah can awaken the public
conscience."
BORN IN The Bronx in 1923.
he attended City College of New
York. In 1949. after wartime
service in Iceland, he returned to
study at Brooklyn Law School,
where he earned his law degree.
Patrick Mulhearn, counsel to
New York City Mayor Edward
Koch, said an interim successor
would be chosen by the Queens
County Democratic Committee.
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Friday, January 14, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
?OOOCH
Jewish National Fund Tag Day
JEWBP
rwnonAL
nmo
Set For January 16,1983
Abraham Grunhut, Pres. JNF Gr. Miami has announced that the Annual Jewish National Fund Tag Day will be held
on Sunday, January 16th. At the Luncheon held recently honoring the Tag Day Champions of 1982, Rabbi Mayer
Abramowitz Chairman, JNF Exec. Board was the Guest Speaker. He stressed the importance of the Blue Box as the
strong link of Jewish tradition, and its meaning throughout the world for the purpose of strengthening the Spiritual
ties between the Jewish people and the redemption of the land of Israel through the JNF. The Blue Box conception
was introduced at the 5th Zionist Congress in 1901 by Dr. Herman Zvi Shapira and Theodor Herzl. It was to serve as
the basis of the Peoples Fund for the purpose of redeeming and reclaiming the land of Israel as a Homeland for the
Jewish People. The JNF started 82 years ago. almost 50 years before the State of Israel was established. Had it not
been for the Jewish National Fund, there would be no State of Israel, for the United Nations partition plan of Israel
alloted to the Jewish People the land held by the Jewish National Fund. Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz praised Beulah
Brodie, Tag Day Chairperson for the last 28 years for her valiant leadership. Rabbi Abramowitz also praised Birdie
Pomper, the Tag Day Champion for her untiring efforts on behalf of JNF, and he applauded the hard work of the
women who go out soliciting for JNF Tag Day with the traditional Blue Boxes, and he reminisced how thousands of
children used to sco with the Blue Boxes in New York and other cities in the past, and praised the women who main-
tain this beautiful tradition. Rabbi Abramowitz called on the entire community when they see the "Wonderful Blue
Box Ladies" to please respond generously and with an open heart.
From Generation to Generation: Time marches on, but the
tradition and spirit of JNF Tag Day remains the same. Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz congratulates the oldest Tag Day par-
ticipant, Mrs. Gus Heyman, and youngest JNF Tag Day par-
ticipant, Adina Slot sky.
Seated from left to right: Augusta Menu Richland, Chairper-
son Women for JNF, Cantor Saul H. Breeh, Chrmn. JNF Spec.
Activities, Abraham Grunhut, Pres. JNFGr. Miami. Standing,
Beulah Brodie, Tag Day Chairperson for 28 years. Rabbi
Mayer Abramowitz, Chrmn, JNF Exec. Board, and Guest
Speaker at Tag Day Luncheon and Birdie Pomper, Tag Day
Champion.
The JNF wonderful and dedicated Tag Day Volunteers at the Luncheon: Getti Bauman, Rose Berkowitz, Miriam
Braverman, Fannie Brodzky, Beulah Brodie, Lee Cohen, Tessie Feder, Ruth Fertig, Mrs. Harry Friedman, Ida Fox,
Rose Ganz, Molly Gladstone, Evelyn Groskopf, Mr. & Mrs. Gus Heyman, Frieda Horowitz, Sadie Kane, Florence
Klein, Anne Kleinrock, Ann Lamhut, Clara Leff. Esther Lipow. Sara Markowitz, Lillian Moch, David and Mollie
Moskowitz. Clara Orkin, Birdie Pomper, Mildred Popik, Sadie Robbins, Hannah Rottenberg, Sally Schwartz. Renee
Singer, Adina Slotsky, Ann Slotsky, Donna Slotsky, Velma Soos, Mollie Stein, Syd Wladaver, Irene Wener, Fannie
Wiener, Fannie Wiener, Mary Wollen, Molly Yusem, Paula Weinreb, Florence Waldman.

JEWISH NATIONAL FUND
420 Lincoln Rd., Miami Beach 33139
Phone 538-6464
oo
ow
HSCM
IBHOi
0(
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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 14,1983
Major Political Row
Pym Cancels Tour of Gulf States
Converted Jew Lustiger Named
Cardinal Prince of Church
By MAURICE SAMUELSON
LONDON (JTA) -
British Foreign Secretary
Francis Pym has aban-
doned his tour of Arab Gulf
states following the refusal
of Saudi Arabia to receive
him. He was to have left for
the region Friday.
The cancellation has triggered
off a major political row in
Britain, with the opposition
Labor Party uccusing the gov-
ernment of "apathy and incom-
petence. "
The Foreign Office was still
trying to salvage Pym's tour
by rescheduling his visits to
Qator, Oman and the Union of
Arab Emirates. But it announced
later that the whole tour had been
postponed.
AT THE root of these develop-
ments is the Arab League's insis-
tence on including PLO spokes-
man Farouk Kaddoumi in a dele-
gation formed to explain the
decision of the Fez Arab summit.
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher had made it clear she
was not prepared to meet
Kaddoumi and was also insisting
on a blanket condemnation of
terrorism by the delegation. But
the Arabs had rejected both
conditions.
Pym was at pains to deny that
the tour was being cancelled be-
cause his other Arab hosts had
closed their doors to him. He also
said the incident would cause no
lasting damage to Britain's
interests and that there was no
question of the Arabs imposing
economic sanction against her.
BUT DENIS HEALY, Labor's
shadow Foreign Secretary, said
the damage to Anglo-Arab rela-
tions would be "very lasting,"
and he accused the government,
especially Mrs. Thatcher, of "un-
paralleled incompetence and
irresolution."
Accusing it of reversing its
position on the PLO, Healy
recalled that Mrs. Thatcher
herself has signed the 1980
Venice declaration of European
leaders alloting the PLO a role in
Mideast peace talks and that a
Reagan Sends Habib
Back to Middle East
To Break Deadlock
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Reagan
said last week that he is
sending his special Middle
East envoy, Philip Habib,
back to the region in an
effort to break the deadlock
in the negotiations between
Israel and Lebanon. Habib
was summoned to Wash-
ington from his vacation in
Florida.
Although the Reagan Admin-
istration is reportedly concerned
about the lack of progress in the
talks, Reagan did not indicate
this feeling in his nationally-tele-
vised press conference. "It is not
unexpected to us," he said. "We
would have liked to have had this
whole thing move faster. But in
view of the situation, not only in
Lebanon but the whole Middle
East, we never had any illusion
that this could be done over-
night."
HE ADDED that the negotia-
tions that are now going on "will
lead to the removal of the foreign
forces." Israel and Lebanon have
not been able to agree on the
agenda for the negotiations be-
cause Israel wants to discuss
some sort of normalization of re-
lations agreement while Lebanon
wants to concentrate on the re-
moval of the Israeli troops from
its territory. Lebanon will also
have to open negotiations with
Syria and with the Palestine Lib-
eration Organization for the
removal of their forces.
Reagan said that it was a
"tragedy" that fighting was
going on in Tripoli. The fighting
is between pro and anti-Syrian
groups. Reagan noted that the
fighting is another reason "why
we want the outside forces out, so
that the new government of Leb-
anon can begin to keep order it-
self and establish its sovereign-
ty."
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Foreign Office Minister had
already met Kaddoumi officially.
Healy accused Mrs. Thatcher of
overruling the Foreign Office and
acting like "a back seat driver."
For its part, Labor would agree
to a ministerial meeting with the
PLO. "You often get nationalist
movements using terrorism,"
Healy added. The present British
Home Secretary. William White-
law, had met representatives of
the political wing of the IRA and
previous governments had held
contacts with the late Arch-
bishop Makarios of Cyprus at a
time when he was supporting
terrorism.
MEANWHILE. Mrs.
Thatcher has given her personal
blessing to a delegation of Con-
servative members of Parliament
due to visit Israel next Sunday.
In e warmly phrased letter to
Michael Fidler, director of the
Conservative Friends of Israel,
the Prime Minister said. "The
people of Britain and Israel
remain bound by a common com-
mitment to democracy and
freedom.
"We in Britain and all our
partners in the European com-
munity remain committed to a
fundamental principle of Israeli
policy the security of the State
of Israel. Our resolve to uphold
that principle will not weaken,
nor will our belief that real
security must come from a just
and lasting peace.
"As one of the founder
members of the Convervation
Friends of Israel, let me say that
I am delighted you are making
this visit. I look forward to hear-
ing how it went."
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -Jem-
Marie Lustiger. the Archbishop
of Paris and a converted Jew. was
appointed a Cardinal and a
Prince of the Roman Catholic
Church. Vatican sources said
that as far as they knew, he is the
first Jew to achieve this rank. He
will be officially installed by Pope
John Paul II during a Vatican
ceremony Feb. 2. Lustiger was
one of 18 new Cardinals named
by the Pontiff.
The 56-year-old prelate, bom in
France to a family of Polish Jew-
ish immigrants, was appointed
Archbishop of Paris in February.
1981. He said at the time. "Yes. I
am Jewish, and I am conscious of
it. I don't feel any sense of be-
trayal towards my Jewish
brethren. Like them. I have
known the scorn, the persecution,
th' rejection and tragedy of his-
tory."
Lustiger said upon his nomina-
tion that he will henceforth
"carry an even greater load." He
said "this (appointment) is more
of an additional responsibility
than an honor." He also said Eu-
ropean culture, civilization and
spirit are based "on Jewish-
Christian traditions."
BORN IN 1926, Lustiger lived
a normal life in a non-traditional
Jewish family till the Nazi inva-
sion of France. Given for safe-
keeping to a Roman Catholic
family in Orleans, he converted to
their faith in 1944. He studied at
the Sorbonne, worked in a factory
and was ordained a priest in 1954,
becoming chaplain to Paris Uni-
versity Catholic students.
His father and his sister.
married to a Jewish doctor, at-
tended the ceremonies which
marked his appointment as
Bishop of Orleans in 1979 and his
installation as Archbishop of
Paris. His mother died in Au-
schwitz where she was deported
by the Nazis.
Both Lustiger and his family
have always refused to discusss
"private affairs." but the new
Cardinal has invariably shown a
keen interest in Jewish affairs
and had said he had planned at
one time to settle in Israel. He
speaks and reads Hebrew
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Friday, January 14, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. January 14,1983
Analysts Agree
Hussein Will Join Peace Talks
Our Readers Write: Jews Need
'Voice' to Combat Media Bias
.
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The possibility that
King Hussein of Jordan
will soon make a move to
join the Middle East peace
talks is gaining ground
among some Israeli
government analysts. They
expect he will do so on the
basis of support for Presi-
dent Reagan's initiative,
announced last Sept. 1, and
on condition that Israel
freezes settlement activity
on the West Bank and Gaza
Strip, as Reagan has urged.
The analysts seem to be in
agreement with William Quandt
of the Brookings Institution, who
predicted in a lecture in Tel Aviv
that Hussein would shortly
announce his intention to join the
peace process. Quandt was the
Kidnapped
Israeli
Found Dead
TEL AVIV-(JTA)-An
Israeli civilian who was kid-
napped last week while delivering
heavy heating fuel oil to Israeli
army units in Lebanon, was
found dead on a deserted road
south of Damour, some six miles
from where his abandoned truck
had been found earlier, an army
spokesman said.
The 32 year-old civilian, who
was not immediately identified,
was discovered with his hands
tied behind his back and a single
bullet in his head, according to
Israel Radio. The army said it is
searching for the assailants.
Army sources said that the fuel
tank driver might have left the
convoy in which the truck had
been travelling to make some
purchases in Lebanon shops. An
army colonel has been appointed
to investigate the incident.
or subsmiiii ohv
SCHECMTERS
meuf
Ik
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CALL FME Ml MIAMI M ACM
Phone: 531-0061
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THE FAMILY JACOBS
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CALL 538-5721
National Security Council's
Mideast expert in the Carter
Administration.
THAT POSSIBILITY
received further support from
Sen. Paul Tsongas (D, Mass.),
who is currently visiting the
region. He told reporters at
Kibbutz Akifim that "specifi-
cally, a decision has been made
(by Jordan) to negotiate as soon
as the environment is correct."
Tsongas said he was informed
of this in conversations with top
Egyptian leaders in Cairo last
week. The "most important part"
of the "correct environment" is
the situation in Lebanon, ac-
cording to Tsongas who went to
Amman for talks with Hussein
and Crown Prince Hassan and
returned to Israel last Friday for
a meeting with Premier Men-
ache m Begin.
According to Israeli analysts,
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion chief Yasir Arafat will
continue to insist publicly that he
has given Hussein no mandate to
negotiate on behalf of the Pales-
tinians. Privately, however, the
two men will have reached an
understanding, the nature of
which Hussein is expected to
convey to Reagan and Secretary
of State George Shultz when he
makes a return visit to Washing-
ton later this month or early in
February.
THE JORDANIAN ruler is
expected to visit the White
House again before Begins visit
which is now scheduled for the
third week of February. Begin
was to have met with Reagan last.
November but was forced to I
cancel because of the death of his
wife, Aliza.
Quandt, who met with Hussein
before coming to Israel, said the
King would seek to obtain max-
imum support from other Arab
leaders before entering the peace
talks. He also said he was more
optimistic over the prospects of
the talks getting under way than
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he was for their successful
outcome.
Israeli Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir warned that if
Hussein entered talks with Israel
under an all-Arab mandate, his
proposals would be unacceptable
"even to the most moderate
Israeli."
ADDRESSING THE sixth
international convention of Bnei
Akiva, the youth movement
affiliated with the National Reli-
gious Party, Shamir said Israel's
experience showed there could be
peace with an Arab state only
when the state freed itself from
pan-Arab pressures, as the late
President Anwar Sadat of Egypt
had done in 1977. According to
Shamir, in terms of hopes for
peace, an Arab "mandate" or a
PLO "mandate" was "an
illusion."
Shamir claimed that over the
years, Hussein's position over
territorial compromise, in secret
contacts with Israelis, was
always "not an inch." The
Foreign Minister implied
strongly that this was also
Israel's position. Israel has "no
need for such slogans," he told
his audience of Orthodox youth.
"We say Eretz Israel (land of
Israel), and I don't have to tell
you in Bnei Akiva what that
means." he declared to wild ap-
plause. "We learned about it. we
yearned for it. we lived it. and we
shall live it in the future. We shall
settle it. and it shall all of it be
ours."
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Your Jan. 7 editorial, "Israel
As Siamese Twin." is a great
editorial. It pinpoints our
problems, but it does not offer
solutions. It's like tilting at
windmills or howling at the wind.
It reminds me of the good rabbis
in our synagogues. When we
come to services, they admonish
those of us who are there. They
must address the multitudes of
our people who are not members
of a Temple (nor even of Judaic-
oriented groups): these are the
ones who must be reached.
You point your finger at the
"Bechtoil" men. Fine. That's
where the worm lies buried. It
rears its ugh/ head higher and
higher. We should stamp down
hard, but we don't. We watch and
become mesmerized some even
begin to believe the clever insinu-
ations and propaganda
emanating from this front. And
we battle each other instead of
our common enemy.
THE ARABS have infiltrated
our country. We don't know for
sure which of the media they
control, which of our industrial
giants. The Arabs and or
Bechtel-Oil interests have the
means to persuade almost anyone
and not too many can resist that
lure.
We have our AIPACs and a
few other such lobbies, but more
is needed.
We need a combined effort,
while we still have the numbers in
our country. I fear tr>al not in the
too distant future the Arabs
might outnumber us.
We need a voice.
We need our own TV and radio
outlets to combat the onslaught
of those who seek to divide and
destroy us. Is there not among us
a group who would form a cor-
poration to purchase such net-
works?
FOR THE past few years, the
media seem to be engaged in a
subtle indoctrination, apparently
aimed at bringing the American
to believe the Arab nations need
our friendship and Israel must
toe the mark. Evidences of the
success of this strategy are all
around us. We must get true, un-
slanted versions of the news
before the public in an effort to
undo some of the effects of the
recent deluge of anti-Israeli pro-
paganda.
Perhaps you can start the ball
rolling and write editorials
toward accomplishing this.
H.Z. SMALL
Hailandale
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian:
In sharing the philosophy of
"Jews helping Jews." I want to
express my wish for Jewish busi-
nessmen and Jewish profession-
als to consider hiring mature
Jewish women who are out in the
Job market today.
With our increasing divorce
rate and the need for women to
work, wouldn't it be lovely and
beneficial to hire us and. in turn,
help each other in our own com-
munity '.'
Charity, if you will, begins at
home.
MAXINE NEWMAN
Miami
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Friday, J an uary 14,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11 -A
,S. Luther Stamp Defies History
led from Page 1 A
seizure and destruc-
lewish sacred books.
INT Luther his due,
lis life, he championed
Bf his day, pointing out
tian religious leaders
them like dogs. But
resisted his demand
convert, he branded
isoners, ritual murder
I than devils, hopelessly
Mid venomous. Hitler
Streicher needed to
t her than the library of
find inspiration for
Jewish diatribes.
some of this spiritual
leader's compositions were so
scatological, even Joseph Goeb-
bels might have blushed on read-
ing them. The Postal Service
might have second thoughts if
one of its researchers came across
Dean Inge's appraisal of Luther:
"the worst evil genius of Ger-
many is Martin Luther." Does
this sound like one who support-
ed universal education?
That the American Luther
stamp will hit the mails in
November, 1983. just when we
mourn the 45th anniversary of
the tragedy of Kristallnacht.
1938, is irony enough to pierce
the heart.
THIS TRAVESTY associated
with the issuance of American
stamps goes miles beyond creat-
ing the restlessness accompany-
ing the long dispute over U.S.
Christmas stamps. From 1789 to
1962, all proposals for issuance of
stamps commemorating religious
holidays were treated by Wash-
ington as potentially violations of
the requirement of religious
neutrality imposed by the Con-
stitution. But in 1962, a Decem-
ber stamp depicting a candle and
a wreath appeared, establishing,
no doubt innocently, a precedent
for breaking tradition.
In 1965. millions of Christmas
stamps imprinted with a drawing
of the archangel, Gabriel, were
sold. Next year, the Postmaster
General said, in effect, why get
upset, you don't have to buy the
Christmas stamps if you don't
want to. That was the year that
the five-cent issue portraying
Hans Memling's Madonna and
Child appeared on Christmas
mail.
Strict constitutionalists ob-
jected. The magazine.
"America," counterattacked
thus: "The hubbub over the
postage stamp is simply one
more proof that what secularism
wants is to purge the government
of power to recognize the culture
of its citizens." The Postal Serv-
ice was tickled with the Christ-
mas stamp revenue. There fol-
lowed the Jan Van Eyck
"Annunciation" stamp in 1968,
and the Lorenzo Lotto "nativity"
stamp in 1970. Along the way,
Thomas J. Dodd, then a U.S.
Senator from Connecticut, want-
ed the government to prepare a
stamp with the message, "Keep
Christ in Christmas," emblazon-
ed thereon.
THOSE WHO champion the
government's printing of relig-
ious holiday stamps advise op-
ponents of the practice to get
busy and remove Christmas from
the list of national holidays.
Actually, the U.S. government
has the legal power to designate
holidays only for the District of
Columbia and for federal em-
ployees. Seven Arts Feature
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, January 14,1983
Divorce: Happiness Ever After?
Continued from Page 5-A
about divorce as a 50-50 likeli-
hood takes on a somewhat dif-
ferent form.
Sandra Liebowitz, who runs a
local bridal salon, reports she
regularly overhears prospective
brides saying, as they admire
their own white-gowned images
in the mirror, "Well, if it doesn't
work out, we can always get a
divorce."
Once upon a time, divorce
seemed like an American rarity.
Even more of a rarity among
Jews. Married couples tended to
stay together despite their dif-
ferences. Why? Because the law
made it tough for them to split
up. Or "far the sake of the chil-
dren." Or to avoid the stigma and
disgrace attached to divorce. Or
because a divorce can be an ex-
pensive proposition.
MUCH OF that has changed.
Today, we have no-fault divorce.
Easier divorce. Relatively respec-
table divorce. Less expensive
divorce. And considerably more
divorce.
The statistics can be confus-
ing. For every two marriages per-
formed annually, there is, rough-
ly, one divorce. That doesn't
mean, though, that half the peo-
ple who get married also get
divorced. Once you've been
through one divorce, the chances
of your being involved in a
second, or a third, are statistical-
ly much greater. Especially if you
remarry quickly. In other words,
some people get divorced several
times.
Nearly half the children in a
given American classroom are
unlikely to be living in a house-
hold headed by both their natural
father and their natural mother.
Divorce accounts for a substan-
substantial number
of people have been trying
divorce, and liking it. At least
after a while. So it's a problem,
yes, but for many it's also a
solution.
tial part of that circumstance.
DIVORCE AS a social
phenomenon in American society
is undoubtedly much more wide-
spread than it has ever been.
While statistics on its occurrence
in the Jewish community are im-
precise, there is considerable evi-
dence indicating that the figures
for Jews pretty nearly approxi-
mate those for all other Ameri-
cans and that includes the
Orthodox segment of the Jewish
community, in which something
more than 40 percent of mar-
riages today are likely to end in
divorce.
Although divorce is frequent,
it is still not a phenomenon that
we regard with equanimity or
complacency. Rather, a kind of
communal ambivalence has de-
veloped about it.
It's a problem, yes. And, yes,
we realize that societal adjust-
ments have to be made to cope
with the problem. Those arrange-
ments more legal modifica-
tions, better support structures,
counseling services, preventive
education, etc. are not yet
satisfactorily in place for every-
one who needs them. Nor do they
operate as well as they should.
But long ago with recognition
of the problem has developed an
interesting modification in peo-
ple's attitudes towards divorce.
If there is a prevalent community
attitude about divorce now, it,
might be best described as "in
flux."
YOU HEAR that the Smiths
or the Joneses, or the Gold-
bergs are splitting up. Some-
one says, "Oh. how terrible." A
conventional reaction. Now-
adays, though, someone else,
possibly a divorced person, pos-
sibly not. is just as likely to re-
mark. "Maybe they'll be better
off." That's relatively new.
Someone will say, "Too bad for
those poor children." Someone
else will say, "They'll get over it.
Kids manage."
"The woman will have a harder
time adjusting."
"Did you see him wandering
around, lost in the supermar-
ket?"
"It's all because of that
Women's Lib stuff. It's destroy-
ing family life."
"He found someone younger."
"She's squeezing him for more
and more money."
"He's always late with the
child support. The judge didn't
give her alimony because she's
working. She has to keep drag-
ging him into court."
NO ONE denies that divorce in
our society constitutes a signifi-
cant problem. A problem with
special ramifications for children,
for women, for men, for Jews, for
the future. Certainly there are
very few people who would go so
far as to advocate divorce as an
experience to be wished for.
something everyone ought to try
at least once!
There is a greeting card that
says on its cover "Congratula-
tions on your divorce." Inside, it
reads, "X is a good name for
him."
Choosing sides. Assigning
blame. Expressing anger. Offer-
ing comfort. Making the best of a
bad situation. These traditional
responses from friends, families
and participants in divorce still
prevail. No one ever had an en-
tirely "happy" divorce.
AND YET, browsing through
a critical bibliography (for pro-
fessional social workers and
counselors) of the rather exten-
sive body of literature that has
developed around the divorce
phenomenon, one encounters in-
teresting commentaries that offer
clues about an important atti-
tudinal change towards divorce.
A 1956 book, praised for its
findings on "positive conclusions
about people changing after
divorce," is also castigated for '-*J
"traditional bias that remarriage^
is the best solution to divorce." A
1969 book is cited for its "pro-
marriage bias." A 1974 book is
criticized because it "reinforces a
somewhat traditional stereotype
that the child is impaired as a re-
sult of divorce." A 1969 manual
chastizes "an unliberated guide
to readjustment ... for helpless
women." Another 1974 book is
praised for offering an approach
to "the personal growth potential
inherent in divorce." Still another
study that year, criticized for
denying "some negative aspects
of divorce," is praised because "it
points out the positive outgrowth
of people who go through
divorce."
We hear about divorce
"trauma," but also about "crea-
tive" divorce.
A CASEWORKER reports
that she asks people who come in
for marriage counseling two pre-
liminary questions: "Are you
each committed to holding this
marriage together?" and "Are
you currently involved in an ex-
tramarital affair?" If one partner
admits to less than 100 percent
commitment to making the mar-
riage work, or if one is involved in
an extra-marital affair, she re-
fuses to do marriage counseling
with a couple, although she will
give individual counseling if they
wish.
Furthermore, if she begins
marriage counseling and there is
no visible progress after eight !
m -sjons. she does not usually
proceed with marriage counsel-
ing, and she may even recom-
mend separation.
The old credo of "Hold the
marriage together no matter
what!" has lost much of its force
and appeal.
Perhaps too many people in the
past stayed together and made
themselves, and everyone around
them, utterly miserable.
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the Bookshelf
Composite Picture of American Jewish Life
History. By Paul
Sarden City. New
julili'dav and Co..
>p SI 5.95.
f Hope. My Irving
fcw York: Harcourt
?anovich. 1982. 353
Ihort. B)
lew York:
ranovich.
Morris B.
1I arcourt
1982. 280
TON TEICHER
idimi Booh Editor
ree autobiographies
iimic pictura of oon-
UiiiTuan Jewish life
Igh the <>- "I three
bant-obsoxveri Pr-
Lei arc increasingly
istory, m literature
rds of psychological
These books fulfill
iin'tions in superior
an autobiography
significance of each
Ii says no to the
one person stand-
lix-s not count for
lan existence does
ing. That Ls the
isage which an auto-
pnds. These men have
sssage with vast skill
isieraable eloquence.
bQRAPHY is an
one's life come out
fffort is best achieved
ife and in his book by
Paul Cowan, the youngest of the
three writers Mis parents were
assimilated Jews. His father,
Louis Cowan (born Cohen), TV
producer of such successful pro-
grams as "The Quiz Kids" and
"The $*>!.(KK) Question." became
president of CBS-TV. His moth-
er, active in the civil rights move-
ment, was a Spiegel, the Chicago
family which established a large
mail-order business and belonged
to the (ierman-.Iewish elite, but
which embraced Christian
Science.
Cowan, a writer, educated at
Choate and Harvard, was an
activist in the struggles for civil
rights and against the Vietnam
war Disturbed by the excesses oi
these movements, he vainly
sought answers as a Peace Corps
volunteer in Ecuador.
Finally, he turned to his
origins as a lew. He helped to re
\ itali/i a synagogue in New York
and found answers for himself
and his family in Jewish identity
and Jewish tradition. This is a
poignant story, ably written and
eminently worth reading.
HOWE, twenty years older
than Cowan, is or was a Trotzky-
ite. a Marxist and a Socialist. He
is member in good standing of
New York's literary and intellec-
tual set through his association
with the Partisan Review group
and his editorship of "Dissent."
Like Cowan. Howe found his
way to Jewish identity. The path
for him was through contributing
to the revival of Yiddish by co-
editing four anthologies of Yid-
dish literature and by writing
"The World of Our Fathers." the
best seller story of American
Jewish roots.
The confessional element of
autobiography appears as self-
deprecation in Howe's book, but
the effort to be contrite and
apologetic does not ring true. For
this failing and for other short-
comings in the book. Midge Dec-
ter has severely criticized it in the
December, 1982 issue of "Com-
mentary." 1 am inclined to
recommend her article more
highly than Howe's book.
ABRAM BELONGS to the
same generation as Howe but
comes from a different back-
ground Hi was born in (ieorgia
mi! was neither a member of
Cowan's New Left nor Howe's
Old Left \s a lawyer, he fought
tor civil rights, claiming respon-
sibility for coining the "one man.
one vote slogan.
He always maintained his Jew-
ish identity, taking an active role
in Jewish life, including several
\ ears as president of the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee. He sees
himself as a politician, but his
two attempts to run for elective
office both failed. He did hold
several important appointive of-
fices
The most interesting segments
of Abram's book deal with his
presidency of Rrandeis Univer-
sity from 1968 to 1970 and his re-
covery from leukemia. The form-
er was a bitter failure, and the
latter was a heart-warming suc-
cess
i Mindlin
ras Assad Invited Back to Labanon?
pd from Page 4-A
issinger's Marx
>iomacy with Hanoi's
in Paris. Years of
Le Due Tho led to a
[agreement in which
lam guaranteed the
integrity of South
way it had done so
nch left Indochina.
in could make a
choice about union
month after signing
the "victorious" Com-
es of Hanoi marched
to "protect" the
tnamese against the
Ipradations of the
American imperialist lackeys by
taking the country over lock,
stock and barrel. The Hanoi
guarantee of a "democratic"
choice for union, never really in-
tended, had been killed by abor-
tion.
By now. the parallel should be
clear: Israel marched into Iyba
non to protect its own terrk'-rial
integrity against the warfare of
the parasite PLO in the same way
that we marched into Vietnam to
protect Southeast Asia (and our-
serves) from further Communist
incursions there.
But a dim-witted media blitz
made Israel the enemy, not the
PLO which had no legal basis for
discover Chela's!
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inn-it Bank ( entre Bricked Avc & S.V( nth st
iTvations Suggested 374-7111 Free VSdel Parking
its Lebanese infrastructure, and
not the clan feuds of the Moslem
fundamentalists, among whose
radical elements secular demo-
cratic government is an ultimate
absurdity.
A NEW phalanx of American
Marx Brothers diplomats, this
time in the form of Philip Habib
and Morris Draper, undertook to
turn democratic victory into end-
less babble and ultimate defeat at
the hands of an improbable coali-
tion of Moslem radicals and PLO
Communists.
Prime Minister Wazzan's plea
to Syria's President Assad exem-
plifies this final phase of the cam-
paign to liquidate Israel's "vic-
tory" and to turn the I^ebanese
back into a warring camp of rival
factions ripe for Muscovite
plucking. It begins with the
Lebanese declaration that it is in-
capable of performing its most
basic democratic purpose the
preservation of domestic Leba-
nese tranquility. It ends with
Wazzan's plea the invitation
to the Marxist wolf to protect the
henhouse.
These days, the Israelis have
their own problems with Mr.
Reagan, who among world
leaders is especially committed to
erasing the Israeli achievement in
Lebanon. It is his devotion to a
principle for which the Arabs, at
least in public, must surely pro-
fess to adore him.
BUT IF as a nation we are still
unwilling to come to grips with
the fruit of our follies in Vietnam,
how sweet it must be for us to
rest age our Southeast Asia fiasco
in the Middle East to watch
the Israelis suffer there as we
have suffered, to observe them as
they tear themselves apart at
home now with commissions of
inquiry precisely as we did.
What does this get us? When
we engage in Marx Brothers
diplomacy, who is there to say?
Friday, January 14, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
tion to reverse discrimination.
His stand is set forth powerfully,
providing strong ammunition for
those who object to quotas in
hiring practices or contract
awards. Miami advocates of set-
asides for minority contractors
should take note
These books are all worth, read-
ing. SSpeciall) these by Cowan
and Abram.
ABRAM'S BATTLE against
discrimination includes opposi-
Gesture of Agony: Wiesel
Turns on Timerman
Continued from Page 1-A
with the authorities there to re-
lease Timerman." Wiesel said.
"It was because of the interven-
tion of Israel and its offer to
accept Timerman that he was
finally able to leave his jail cell."
Wiesel feels that Timerman's
new hook on Israel. "The Long-
est War, Israel in Lebanon"
(Knopf), is unsavory It is in-
tended as an expose ol Israel's
"unwarranted" invasion of Leb-
anon published in advance of
the findings of the judicial com-
mission of inquiry
His recent appearances on
American television notably
the CBS "(10 Minutes" program,
where his unrelenting criticism of
Israel prompted Mike Wallace to
ask. "But is there nothing posi-
tive about Israel?" brought
more of the unsavory in him. He
displays both a lack of grateful-
ness and a certain "shallowness"
in his thinking.
WIESEL IS exercised not only
by Timerman's statements about
the "wickedness" of Israel but
about his assertions of longtime
Zionist and Jewish commitment.
"That's not the impression I got
when I was in Argentina trying
to secure Timerman's release,"
Wiesel stated.
"Members of the Jewish com-
munity there asked me why I was
wasting my time on a person who
had never displayed any Jewish
loyalties.
"When Timerman occupied his
position as editor of one of
Buenos Aires' best newspapers,
he had no time for the Jewish
people or for Israel that's what
I was told by Argentinian Jews."
(Timerman does say in his book.
"Prisoner Without a Name, Cell
Without a Number." that he
wrote about Israel in his paper:
he does not provide details about
the extent of his coverage.)
If Wiesel has had second
thoughts about Timerman. he
has gone through a similar pro-
cess with regard to his own recent
response to the Beirut massacres.
In the wake of the Shatila and
Sabra murders. Wiesel had rush-
ed into print with some strong
articles about the moral lapses of
certain Jews.
"I WENT so far as to suggest
that this calamitous event meant
that we had failed as a people,
that there was something wrong
with our educational system. I
said that the time had come for a
Heshbon Ha-nefesh, a reckoning
with our souls. I could not under-
stand how such a monstrous
thing had transpired."
When the reaction of the
world's press began to filter
through Wiesel's consciousness,
he soon realized that he had been
precipitous in his reaction. The
orgy of condemnation which was
visited upon Israel was too much
for Wiesel. "The condemnation
was not inspired by a sincere
search for truth but by a hidden
agenda, to wipe clean the Holo-
caust slate. The world seemed to
be saying to us: 'Now that you
too have been involved in human
brutality, however indirect, we
can now close the chapter on the
Holocaust.' The relish that ac-
companied the world condemna-
tion of Israel was transparent."
WHILE WIESEL was in
Israel during the war, he is not
prepared to offer analysis of the
political or military aspects of the
conflict. "I am not a political
person and am therefore unable
to comment on whether the
invasion was justifiable or not.
When it comes to matters of
security. I do not presume to tell
the people on the scene what is
appropriate or not."
Wiesel was. however, ready to
make some observations on the
war as he witnessed it from his
perspective
The first inkling I had that
something was wrong was when I
heard a radio announo
Katavenu me Beirut moser mur
correspondent from Beirut re-
ports ") The media coverage
of the lighting was unprecedent-
ed. Hour after hour. Israeli TV
crews filled the screens not only
with shots of the fighting but
with programs featuring debates
among soldiers about the moral
ity of the war all this occurring
while the fighting was going on!
"M\ general impression is that
this was a war. the first one in Is-
rael, that was waged without a
general consensus I felt a cor-
poratS sense ot sadness. The peo-
ple were split, and you could feel
it clearly."
WHILE WIESEL is hesitant
to comment on the moral issue of
the war itself, he is not reticent to
speak to specific aspects of its
conduct.
"I was horrified when, during
the bombing of Beirut, organized
'missions' and tours went to the
city to view the spectacle. Here
was a city in the process of being
mutilated: people were dying,
and tour buses were bringing
people to gawk."
A Midrash from Exodus came
to Wiesel's mind to emphasize
the point: "When the Egyptians
are drowning in the Sea. and you
sing songs of rejoicing."
WIESEL'S moral position is a
simple one. "I do believe in the
double standard when it comes to
Israel. I am not embarrassed by
it. I believe that the State of Is-
rael should be better than other
states. What is Israel's purpose if
it is only to become another
Levantine entity?"
That is the message Wiesel
communicates to the students at
Yale (where he recently received
the Henry Luce Chair in Hu-
manities) and Boston University,
as well as to the thousands of
peoples he lectures to annually.
J TA Featu re Sy ndicatt
Bonn Asked
To Nullify
Acquittals
JERUSALEM (JTA) Ju-
stice Minister Moshe Nissim,
speaking before the Knesset, has
called on West Germany to nulli-
fy the acquital of two Nazi war
criminals and to have the two
placed on trial again.
Wflhelm Westerheide and
Yohanna Zelle. who were tried in
Dortmund on charges of partici-
pation in the murder of 9,000
Jews in the Vladimir ghetto, were
recently acquitted. Nissim spoke
in reply to an urgent motion to
the agenda by an Alignment
Member of the Knesset, Prof.
Shevah Weiss.
Weiss said the fight against
the "deformation of mankind, as
it was expressed in Nazi crimes
during the Holocaust." had to be
fought constantly. He said "it is
not merely a matter of revenge,
although that too is legitimate in
this context."


<
.'age 14-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 14.1983
Filling in Background
Navon Warned Reagan of Egypt's Intransigence
Continued from Page 1-A
to have peace with the Jewish
State.
Navon stressed that he
believed the late President
Anwar Sadat of Egypt was a
"courageous leader" who moved
for peace with Israel, not for
Israel's sake but because he
believed that instead of war.
Egypt needed to concentrate on
improving its economy. He said
he has met three times with
President Hosni Mubarak of
Egypt and believes Mubarak
wants peace for the same reasons.
Navon said he was optimistic
that the Egyptian-Israeli peace
could succeed and that would
lead to additional peace steps."
NAVON. who refused to
answer political questions, said
he also warned Reagan that two
statements in his Sept. 1 peace
initiative could go against the
consensus in Israel. He said that
while Ragan opposed a Pales-
tinian state, his other proposals
could lead to one. In addition,
Navon said. Reagan's statement
about more Israeli withdrawals
for more peace could be inter-
preted as total withdrawal for
total peace, but no Israeli sup-
ports withdrawal to the 1967
boundaries.
The Israeli President denied
that settlements on the West
Bank are an obstacle to peace. He
said that while there is contro-
versy in Israel over where to
place ihe settlements, there is no
controversy over Israel's right to
Navon Meet With Reagan
Exchange of Pleasantries
establish them. He said it was
"absurd" to claim that there is
any place in the Holy Land where
no Jews can live.
With respect to King Hussein
of Jordan joining the autonomy
talks, Navon said Hussein could
make a contribution if he came as
an independent spokesman
representing his own people. But
if he comes as a surrogate for the
Palestine Liberation Organ-
ization, the pre-conditions for his
participation would create diffi-
culties.
ASKED IF Israel would nego-
tiate with the PLO if the latter
accepted Israel's right to exist.
Navon replied that he does not
accept the premise. He said the
right to exist "we got from the
Almighty God. I don't need the
permission from the PLO that I
have the right to exist."
He noted that the PLO
covenant calls for the destruction
of Israel. If they would change
that clause, the questioner would
then have to "ask the (Israeli)
Ambassador what will happen"
because it is the Ambassador, not
Navon. who speaks for the Israeli
government.
Asked about his own future.
Navon said he would make an
announcement in Israel in
February. He said he had three
choices: to seek a second term as
President from the Knesset; to
return to politics: or to retire into
private life to write the many
books he has planned.
ON ANOTHER issue. Navon
denied that Israel's soul had
changed during the "Peace for
Galilee" operation. He said
Israel's high moral calibre could
not be shown on television as was
the destruction caused by war.
Navon. a Sephardic Jew. said
he believed the differences
between Israel's Sephardic and
Ashkenazic population would
disappear over the next 30 years,
principally because of inter-
marriage, education and the
army.
When a reporter proposed a
cross country ski tournament
between Israel, Syria and Lcfca
non as a way to promote peace,
"a sort of slalom for shalom."
Navon replied, "If you promise
me snow. I go."
In an interview with ABC-TV
"Good Morning America" pro-
gram. Navon said the U.S. could
encourage President Amin
Gemayel of Lebanon to resist
Arab pressure and agree to
peaceful co-existence with Israel.
"I wish the United States would
encourage him to the extent they
find feasible. Navon said.
HE NOTED that Israel seeks
two objectives in its talks with
Lebanon: security arrangement
and some form of "civilian co-
existence." He said Israel had
already dropped demands for a
peace treaty.
But we want to know that %e
are living with that neighbor
peacefully and there should be
some way of co-existence."
However, Navon added, "There
are elements in the Arab world
who do not encourage Gemayel to
have these relations."
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Israeli President
Yitzhak Navon met for two
hours with President Rea-
gan at the White House
last week, including a 45-
minute lunch, but ap-
parently only dealt with
generalities rather than the
hard issues dividing Israel
and the United States.
"Your presence here as Presi-
dent of Israel symbolizes the
close ties that have always linked
our two nations," Reagan said in
a departure statement, standing
under an awning that shielded
them from the rain that fell on
the White House south lawn in
front of them.
"Ours is a friendship that has
deepened over time." Reagan
continued. "It is daily expressed
in our unswerving commitment
to the security and well-being of
the State of Israel."
1 WHILE REAGAN did not
directly mention his Sept. 1 peace
initiative, which has been
rejected by Premier Menachem
Begin, he noted that "the
security of Israel is inescapably
connected with peace in the Mid-
dle East."
Navon. in his reply, stressed
that whether Israelis accept "the
American view" as the "basis"
for Mideast peace negotiations or
find it "impossible to accept"
these views, "none of them have
any doubt" as to the "dedica-
tion" and "sincerity" of the
American commitment to peace
and the security of Israel. He said
Israelis were grateful both to
Reagan personally and to the
American people for what they
have done for Israel-
Later, a senior Administration
official, calling the meeting "very
friendly." said that Reagan had
stressed his commitment to
seeking an early withdrawal of
foreign troops from Lebanon and
to continue support for his Sept.
1, peace initiative.
THE OFFICIAL said Navon
had stressed issues on which
there was a "consensus" in Israel
such as that Jerusalem remain
undivided and that there be no
Palestinian state. Other consen-
sus views mentioned by Navon
were the desire for dose relations
with the United States and the
belief that Israel is a strong pro-
Western power in the Middle
East.
The administration official
rejected claims that Navon's visit
was an effort by the adminis-
tration to build up the Israeli
President, a former Labor MK. as
a possible opponent to Begin. He
noted that Navon s visit had
been postponed several times
since November ard was a
strictly "routine" visit.
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Ambassador Moshe Arens
Sidney E. Leiwant
Moshe Arens to Speak at Men's
ORTFederation Conference
[Leaders of Florida Men's ORT
apters will attend an American
IT Federation Conference in
York City from Jan. 21
tough 23. Dr. Steven Gurland.
plywood chairman; Robert M.
try. Greater Miami president;
Dewey Knapp, Greater
imi past president will part ici-
in the series of discussions
I activities geared to plan ORT
i' 1980s, Sidney E. Leiwant.
^F president, announced.
i-atured speakers will include
he Arens, Israel's am-
ladoT to the U.S.; Rabbi
rbc rt V Friedman, president
American Friends of Tel Aviv
k'ersity; Joseph Harmatz,
|ctor-general of World ORT
on. Michael Avitzour.
ictor-general of ORT Israel:
Jean Claude Nedjar. former
Be tor of ORT operations in
liopia
'resident Leiwant will give a
hew of ORT's development
kr his four years of presidency
an annual banquet Saturday.
A new slate of officers will also be
installed.
Founded in 1880 to train poor
East European Jews in basic
industrial and agricultural skills.
ORT today educates in 26
countries.
ORT Sabbath
ORT Sabbath 1983 will be
observed at synagogues
throughout the country on
Jan. It and locally at Temple
Israel with ORT's Brickell
Chapter: at Temple Judea
with Coral Gables Chapter:
at IUt Brain Synagogue
with Kendale Lakes
Chapter; at Temple Samu-EI
with South Dade and Sunset
chapters: at Beth David
Congregation-South with
Southwest Chapter; and at
Temple Beth Am with
Suniland Chapter.

\
Builders, Real Estate and Allied Trades Division of the
eater Miami Jewish Federation will sponsor an educational
linar dealing with the business applications of computers for
tl estate developers and contractors on Thursday at 2:30p.m.
chard Zinn is division chairman, and Leonard A- Wien, Jr. is
icational chairman.
xraeVs 35th Year to be Celebrated
rhe Jewish Community Cen-
of South Florida under the
lership of Miriam Zatinsky,
tutive director, will sponsor a
nmunity-wide celebration of
el s 35th year of indepen
ce, Yom Ha'atzmaut, on Sun-
r. April 24 in North and South
' JCC board member and
11 chairman of the event is
Holtzman.
Jade County Commissioner
lh Shack, South Florida JCC
sident, chaired the meeting to
n the upcoming festivities,
long the event's co-chairmen
Helen Cohen, programming;
Hirsch. publicity; Ruby
>: logistics; Hy Beers, trans-
ition; Judi Sirverman,
ns and children's games;
rman Canter and Erick Fass,
food sales; Richard Averbach
and Sam Lansman, finances, and
Phil Kates, sponsorships.
Community outreach workers
are Charles Skupsky. Evelyn
Schengrund, Molly Lovinger,
Max Kaplan, Milton Samuels,
Harold Tietelbaum. and Sally
Millman.
Festivities will start in North
Dade with a walk-a-thon, with
participation from area syna-
gogues and day schools, to be
chaired by Rabbi Julian Cook
with assistance from Marshall
Baltuch and Rabbi Simcha
Freedman.
Center Director Alan Zucker-
man is in charge at Michael-Ann
Russell JCC, and Fern Canter of
North Dade is the celebration co-
ordinator.
3,000 Expected To Help In
Federation's Super Sunday Event
Three thousand volunteers are expected to take part in Super Sunday, a day-long
outreach program to be held Feb. 6 where 60,000 Jewish households throughout
Dade County will be telephoned to obtain contributions to the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's 1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign,
General Campaign Chairman Aaron Podhurst announced.
Super Sunday Chairmen Lydia Gold ring, Frances B. Levy, David Rosenbaum,
and Gerald K. Schwartz said that 19 Jewish community membership groups organ-
izing Super Sunday "have raised optimism that a record amount of support will be
received." They said the Super Sunday Executive Committee expects to exceed the
$1.4 million raised last year.
"On Super Sunday, the entire Jewish community comes together to express a
unified commitment to aid Jews in need everywhere," Podhurst said. "This year the
Jewish people faces incredible challenges that warrant a communal response. Super
Sunday will be the one day when each of us will have the opportunity to support our
fellow Jews and we must act together."
Organizations coordinating the event are B'nai B'rith Youth Organization, B'nai
B'rith Men, B'nai B'rith Women, Pioneer Women, the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, the High School in Israel, Mount Sinai Medical Center, University of
Miami Hillel, the Jewish Association Serving Singles, the Jewish Vocational
Service, Hadassah, the Community Chaplaincy Service, the Jewish High School of
South Florida, the Jewish Junior High School of South Florida, the Jewish War
Veterans, the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged, the National Council
of Jewish Women, and ORT.
Scholars Deny Saint Was Anti-Semitism
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Allegations that
the recently canonized St.
Maximilian Kolbe was anti-
Semitic have brought sev-
eral scholars to the new
saint's defense.
St. Maximilian, a Polish Con-
ventual Franciscan priest who
volunteered to die in another
man's place at the Nazi con-
centration camp of Auschwitz in
1941. was formally declared a
saint and a martyr by Pope John
Paul II in ceremonies at the
Vatican Oct. 10.
In December,, columnist
Richard Cohen, who writes for
The Washington Post and other
newspapers, said that in Father
Kolbe's canonization the priest's
anti-Semitism "was swept under
the carpet," and the church
treated it "as a negligible blemish
in an otherwise admirable life."
COHEN QUOTED two state-
ments from Father Kolbe's
writings which referred to the
spread of communism as part of a
Rabbi Dr. Paul M. Steinberg,
dean of the New York School
of the Hebrew Union College-
Jewish Institute of Religion,
will speak at Temple Beth Am
at Friday evening services on
Jan. 14 at 8:15 p.m. His topic
will be "The Jewish Treasures
of Prague A Visit Behind
the Iron Curtain." Rabbi
Steinberg just returned from
Prague and Terezin (one < f the
death camps set aside by
Hitler), and he will report on
the unusual Jewish items he
vas permitted to examine.
Masonic conspiracy by Zionists
ti) take over the world.
In a letter to the Post, Eugene
Fisher, executive secretary of the
National Conference of Catholic
Bishops' Secretariat for Catholic-
Jewisn Relations. said the
documentary record of Father
Kolbe's writings and actions
belies the charge of anti-
Semitism.
He cited writings in which
Father Kolbe repudiated anti-
Semitism, and he noted that an
estimated 1.500-2.000 Jewish
refugees were harbored at the
beginning of World War II in the
monastery Father Kolbe founded
and headed in Poland.
Fisher traced the allegations of
anti-Semitism to an article last
April in a leading Austrian paper.
Wiener Tagebuch (Vienna
Journal), but said American
scholars had analyzed the article
and rejected its conclusions last
summer.
THE PRIEST, said Fisher,
"should be not a point of division
but a symbol of unity among all
who would oppose the evil of anti-
Semitism today." The Wiener
Israel, Lebanon
US Proposal to
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The governments of Israel and
Lebanon will be considering new
proposals this week put forward
by the U.S. to solve the proce-
dural problems in the talks be-
tween the three countries. Israel
Army Radio reported from
Kiryat Shmona. where the three
sides met in their fourth session,
that U.S. envoy Morris Draper
had put forward "new ideas" and
both delegations had consulted
by telephone with their leaders in
their respective capitals.
The army radio said the two
delegation heads. David Kimche
of Israel and Antoine Fatale of
Lebanon, had seemed favorably
inclined to the new American
ideas but both are subject to
Tagebuch article had said that
Fat her Kolbe was associated with
"rabid, racist anti-Semitism" and
that he himself was anti-Semitic.
When the assertions were re-
ported in the St. Louis Post-Dis-
patch last June. Daniel L.
Schlafly Jr.. associate professor
of history at St. Louis Univer-
sity, and Warren Green, director
of the St. Louis Center for Holo-
caust Studies, issued a joint
statement labeling the charges
"false."
"Father Kolbe's writings do
contain a few references to Jews
which reflect the common anti-
Semitic beliefs propagated in the
"Protocals of the Learned Elders
of Zion." which was a well-known
forgery, as well as reflected in the
popular Polish-Catholic culture in
the interwar period." They
added:
"These references were only a
tiny fraction of the total works
(of Father Kolbe) and were more
than counterbalanced by his in-
sistence that one must always act
in a spirit of missionary zeal,
charity and prudence," Green
and Schlafly said.
Considering
End Deadlock
instructions from their home
governments. The U.S. ideas are
reportedly on the vexed issue of a
normalization provision for the
talk's agenda.
Earlier, the Israel delegation
spokesman Avi Pazner had
sought to discount media reports
of deadlock and stalemate, noting
that the talks were in their very
early stages and initial pr ^'ems
were bound to arise.
A later round mclu.. an
opening plenary session followed
by an informal meeting between
the three delegation heads. Once
again reporters allowed in briefly
were impressed by the obviously
relaxed and friedly atmosphere
that seemed to pervade the con-
ference chamber, in a Kiryat
Shmona communitv center.
eJewish FloridiaiBiL
Miami, Florida Friday, January 14,1983 Section B


'

. 1 .
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridiaa Friday, January 14, 1983
High Rise Activities for United Jewish Appeal Camapign Set
The High Rise Division of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa
tion is offering a variety of pro-
grams during upcoming weeks on
behalf of the 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign. Division Co-
Chairmen Alfred Golden and Sid-
ney Olson announced.
The co-chairmen said. "The
high-rise population represents a
large portion of the Greater
Miami Jewish community. Thus,
it is of great importance that
high-rise residents be involved in
the campaign, which reaches out
to Jews in need in Israel, in
Greater Miami and throughout
the world."
Upcoming CJA-IEF Campaign
events include, at Balmoral
Apartments. Federation Vice
President and Campaign Vice
Chairman Marilyn K. Smith de-
livering a keynote address at an
annual Balmoral Campaign
Cocktail Reception on Sunday-
evening at 4 p.m. in the Blue
Room: an annual Seacoast Tow-
ers East Campaign Meeting on
Sunday at 10:30 a.m. honoring
Hv Rubin and featuring a CJA-
IEF Campaign film "Be There:"
an annual Crystal House Cam-
paign Cocktail Party on Tuesday
at 4:30 p.m. featuring 1983 CJA-
IEF General Campaign chairman
Aaron Podhurst as keynote
speaker; and an annual Ten
City College Prof. Emerita to Speak
Greater Miami Women's
Division of the American Friends
of Hebrew University will hold a
luncheon meeting on Jan. 20 at
11:45 a.m. at the Versailles
Hotel. Elma Kaufman, chairman
of the board, announced.
A report on a recent Patron
Luncheon. which benefitted
needy students at the university,
will be given, and guest speaker.
Professor Goldie Ruth Kaback.
will report on a Third North
American Conference of the
American. Mexican, and
Canadian Friends held in Wash-
ington recently.
Professor Emerita of City
College of New York, clinical
psychologist, writer, and social
service consultant. Kaback
served as a visiting professor at
Columbia University. Yeshiva
University, the New School of
Social Research, and the Uni-
versity of California.
Isabelle Fogler. former division
president, will present News and
Views in the afternoon.
The luncheon committee in-
cludes Irene Raczkowski. Ruth
Platt. Viola Charcowsky, Helen
Katzman. Bertha Kirsch, May
Shurack. and Stella Topol.
JWV President Hosts Administration Meeting
Carol Gold, president of the
Department of Florida Ladie?
Auxiliary. Jewish War Veterans
will hold a Third Council of Ad
ministration Sunday at 9:30 a.m.
at Temple Beth Tov, Miami.
Representatives from 34
auxiliaries and four area councils
will attend.
A report will be given on na-
tional President Jeanette
Shapiro's upcoming official visit
during the weekend of April 9
and 10 by Leah Eisenman. past
department president.
Also to be discussed will be an
upcoming State Convention the
weekend of June 3, 4, and 5, by
Convention Chairman Charlotte
Mittler and Convention Journal
Chairman Edith Novins.
A luncheon will be served by
West Miami Auxiliary 223 in
honor of President Gold at the
end of the meeting.
Energy Talk Planned
Israel's solar energy field will
be discussed at a luncheon
meeting of the American-Israel
Chamber of Commerce-Southeast
Region, on Wednesday, Jan. 26,
at 12:30 p.m. at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
building.
Guest speaker will be Arnold J
Goldman, president of Luz
International Ltd., a U.S.
company formed to bring an
Israeli-developed solar energy
system to this country.
Introducing
nightly dinner
specials at the
Doral Hotel
Each evening a sumptuous
dinner specialty is being
offered in the
El Cafe to
RESTAURANT
from 530 p.m. to 930 p.m.
for
only
Price includes,
a delicious entree, soup,
salad, potato or vegetable,
rolls & butter, dessert and
coffee, tea or Sanka.
Complimentary
~J~\ Valet Parking
Hotel On-the-Ocean
48th & Collins/Miami Beach
Thousand Plaza Campaign
Breakfast on Sunday, Jan. 23 at
Bay Harbor Islands hosted and
chaired by Mr. and Mrs. Morris
Kirsch and featuring guest
speaker. Abe Gittleson, associate
director of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education.
Maxine E. Schwartz, president
of Federation's Women's
Division, will deliver a keynote
address at the annual CJA-IEF
meeting of the Arlen Houses
campaign, which will be held
Sunday. Jan. 23 at 10 a.m.; Sea-
coast Towers V will have an an-
nual campaign brunch on Sun-
day. Jan. 30 at 10:30 a.m.. Mr.
and Mrs. Samuel Charin will host
NY Rabbinical
Leader to Talk
At Beth Torah
Beth Torah Congregation will
host Dr. Israel Mowshowitz,
rabbi of Hillcrest Jewish Center
in New York, as scholar-in-resi-
dence at a Kallah Scholarly
Convocation on Jan. 21 22. and
23. The theme of his addresses
will be "The Jew Faces the World
Today."
He will speak at an Annual
Sisterhood Shabbat on Jan. 21.
and the topic will be "The Indivi-
dual Rights and Communal
Responsibilities."
Rabbi Mowshowitz will deliver
a sermon entitled "The Indivi-
dual's Freedom Versus Religious
Responsibilities" on Jan. 22 and
a lecture on "The Individual Jew
Faces a Redefinition of Zionism"
at a Jan. 23 breakfast.
Rabbi Mowshowitz is past
president of the New York Board
of Rabbis and presently serves as
chairman of its Committee on
International Affairs.
He was one of a delegation of
rabbis who visited the Soviet
Union in 1956 and is the
representative of the Synagogue
Council of America to the United
Nations.
Rabbi Mowshowitz was a
professor of psychology at the
University of Omaha and is a cer-
tified clinical psychologist in the
State of New York. He was or-
dained at Yeshiva University,
and Duke University awarded
him a degree of Doctor of
Philosophy.
New United Way
Chairman Chosen
F.E. (Gene) Autrey, exec-
utive vice president and chief
opeating officer of Southeas-
tern Public Service Com-
pany, has been named 1983
general campaign chairman
for the United Way of Dade
County.
Autrey has been involved
in the United Way since the
early 1960s, and he current-
ly serves as vice president
and chairman of the Cor-
porate Services Division. He
is in the process of recruiting
a volunteer team and devel-
oping a strategy for the
upcoming campaign.
Beth Din Oflico
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and loreign
countries
'532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
rei 534-1004 or 67?0O04
an annual Corinthian Campaign
Meeting on Sunday. Jan. 30 at
10:30 a.m.; an annual breakfast
meeting of the Four Winds Cam
paign, honoring William
Feinberg. will be held on Sunday.
Jan. 30; an annual campaign
meeting of Seacoast Towers
South will be held Sunday. Jan.
30 at 11 a.m.; and educator and
Zionist leader. Leon Z. Segal will
give a keynote address at an
annual CJA-IEF meeting of
Byron Hall on Monday. Jan. 31
at 7:30 p.m. to round out Hi Rise
activities on behalf of the CJA-
IEF Campaign.
Mount Sinai Clubs
To Sponsor Meeting
Miami Ileostomy
Colostomy Association will J*
at the Mount Sinai M*
Center on Sunday. Jan 2377
Employee Cafeteria at 2 n m >4
William Ludwig. staff pZ*
erologist. will speak on Ta!
withOstomy." ^
"Living with Diabetes"^,
discussed at the Diabetes C,

meeting on Thursday Jw pj
7 p.m. in the OuimU
Auditorium. Wendv Ci.-
MSW will speak "*
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Late Friday Night Singles Services And
Oneg Shabbat Socials Sponsored By JASS
Jewish Association Serving Singles
January 14,1983
10:00 P.M.
Temple Beth Shalom
4144 Chase Avenue
Miami Beach
Rabbi Leon Kronish
Cantor David Conviser
New Series
January 28 J983
" 10:00 P.M"
Themple Israel of Gr. Miami
137 N.E. l9Street
Miami
Rabbi Haskell M.Bernat
Rabbi Jeffrey K Salkin
Call 573-JASS for information about
singles activities in Miami.
THIS SERIES IS OPEN TO ALL SINGLES AT NO CHARGE
JASS is coordinated by
the Jewish Community Centers of South Florida
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Community Corner
Galil Chapter of American Mizrachi Women will hold a
Rummage sale on Jan. 23 and 24.
The Greater Miami Opera will inaugurate its 42nd season with
a new production of Umberto Giordano's Andrea Chenier on
Jan. 17.
Temple Israel Singers, under the leadership of Cantor Jacob
Bornstein. will perform every Monday from 7:30 to 9 p.m. at the
temple.
Congregation Ohev Shalom Sisterhood will meet Wednesday
at the synagugue at noon.
Temple Or Olom Sisterhood and Men's Club will hold a joint
meeting to be followed by an Evening of Entertainment on Jan.
19at8p.m.
Temple Menorah Sisterhood will sponsor a luncheon and card
party on Wednesday. Jan. 26 at noon in the Social Hall.
A Sleep Evaluation and Treatment Center has been
established in the Department of Neurology, University of
Miami School of Medicine, Dr. Peritz Scheinberg, department
chairman, announced.
Congregation Ohev Shalom holds Talmud Study classes on
Sundays from 9 to 10:30 a.m.. conducted by Rabbi Pine-has
Weberman in English. Bible Class is led by the rabbi on
Mondavs from 11 a.m. until noon.
Aventura Jewish Center will hold a Sisterhood Paul I'p
Membership Luncheon on Wednesday, Jan. 26 at noon.
Temple Judea Men's Club will hold a brunch on Sunday at
10:30 a.m. in the Social Hall. Guest speaker will be Morry Alter,
Channel 10 reporter. ______
Congregation Shaare Tefillah of Kendall will have an Israeli
Night on Jan. 15 at 9 p.m. at the synagogue.
Ladies Auxiliary of Jewish War Veterans. South Dade Post
778, will hold a Roast honoring Julius Stricoff on Sunday. Jan.
.10 at Her-Bete Restaurant.
Pulitzer Prize winning columnist Jack Anderson will be the
leatured speaker Jan. 21 at the 13th Annual Meeting of United
Kamily and Children's Services at the Omni Hotel.
Bernardo Benes, civic leader and supporter of Israeli causes,
will speak at a meeting of B'nai BVith Lodge 1591 on Friday.
Jan. 14 at noon.
CTUDI0
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College Admission
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School Selection and
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Test Preparation:
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EOYAL HUN6ARIANHBRESTAURANT
Now under Supervision is proud to
announce that we are now located in the
Beautiful Sasson Hotel, 2001 Collins Ave.
Friday Dinner prepaid or
PAID by 5 PM Fri. CQft.CiAC) 1
WEISS FAMILY DOO-OHU I
Friday, January 14, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian
Page 3-B
Soviet Jewry Activist to Talk
Morris Brafman
Morris Brafman. founder of the
International League for the
Repatriation of Soviet Jewry,
will talk on "Jews in Crisis: So-
viet Jewry" at a third lecture of
North Dade Midrasha's Journey
through Culture lecture series to
be held at the Michael-Ann Rus-
sell Jewish Community Center on
Tuesday at 8 p.m.
Author and lecturer, Brafman
has been an activist leader on be-
half of Soviet Jews throughout
the U.S. and in capitals through-
out the world.
North Dade Midrasha is a con-
sortium of Aventura Jewish Cen-
ter. Temple Adath Yeshurun,
Beth Torah Congregation. Beth
Moahe Congregation. Michael-
Ann Russell JCC. Temple Sinai
of North Dade. and the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
Tropical Cancer League will
hold a luncheon meeting on
Friday. Jan. 21 at the Ocean
Pavilion at 11:45 a.m. The meet-
ing will take place at 1 p.m.
Billy Dichara will entertain.
f
\
You Are Cordially Invited To Attend
Jewish National Fund-Temple Beth Raphael
*A Annual Tribute Luncheon
"SBS* Honoring
.-- --
**
Kosher Cuisine
Couvert
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Spiritual Leader
Cantor Saul H. Breeh
Banquet Chairman
Mr. & Mrs. Max Wagman
Beloved & Dedicated Members of
Temple Beth Raphael
Sunday, February 6,1983
12:00 Noon
Konover Hotel
5445 Collins Ave.,
Outstanding
Entertainment
David Scwanenfeld
President
Igor Schultz
Co-Chair man
For Reservations Phone Temple Office 538-4112
JNF Strengthens Israel Strengthen the JNF
Mature Adult
V.I.P.
Volunteer in Partnership
Program in Israel
unique opportunity to visit Israel not
only as a tourist but as an active participants
in the Israel way of life.
Touring
Free Time
Working in Volunteer Programs
Educational Seminar
Cultural Events
Social Events with American Olim
Dates: May 2 June 1,1983
Price: $2,300
Sponsored by Jewish Community Center ot South Florida, Jewish Community Center ot South Broward,
Israel Programs Office of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation, Jewish Welfare Board.
For Further Information Please Calk
Gail Weisberg 576-1660 or Rena Germ 576-4000


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. January 14,1963
Lincoln Road Clubs Elected Officers
The 100 Lincoln Road Social
Clubs will have an annual instal-
lation of officers and board
members on Sunday, Feb. 6 at
the Shelborne Hotel.
Nwly elected officer* and board
member* tor the Men's Social Club are:
Harry Burns, president. Marty
Aronowitz, vice president Saul Cohen.
vice president. Bruno Loeb.
treasurer; Ellis Campus, financial
secretary; David Gelb. recording
aecrelary; Jaime Blniaconski, Seargant
at Arms: and Sam Chemoff, Seargant
at Arms.
Board members are Harry Abrams.
Harry Aronsberg. Moe Kleiner. Irving
Shapiro. Eric Oleslnskl. Dave Stettner,
Stanley Stockman, Lou Summer, and
Ben Frledlander
Women's Social Club officers are
Betty Gottesman. president Ruth
Block. vice president; Sylvia
Blniaconski, vice president; Shirley
Aronsberg, financial secretary:
Dorothy Nlssenson, treasurer, May
Berk, recording secretary. Helen
Waxman. corresponding secretary'.
Mary Bums. Seargant at Arms; and
Barbara Chemoff. Seargant at Arms.
Board members are: Henrietta
Bolotln Ruth Demsky, Delia Eth. Selma
Gelb. Tina Melses. Sadye Glagovsky.
Julia Greenberg. Sarah Kaufman and
Dorothy Summer
Norman Brown JVW Sets Upcoming Events
The Norman Bruce Brown
Post and Auxiliary No. 174 Jew-
ish War Veterans, will hold a
donor affair and dinner on Satur-
day evening at the Deauville
Hotel at 7:30 p.m. Post Com-
mander Alex Greenwald and
Auxiliary President Belle Swartz
will attend.
The Ladies Auxiliary will hold
a fund raising luncheon with all
proceeds going to the West Point
Jewish Chapel on Jan. 17 at the
South Miami Community Center
at 12:30 p.m. Leonard Kaplan, an
invited guest, is a 1939 graduate
of the West Point Academy who
recently attended the ground
breaking ceremony for the
Chapel. Chairman for the event is
past department President Mae
Schreiber. and Alexander Redhill
is in charge of entertainment.
j|
A Jewish National Fund-Kneseth Israel
Annual Traditional Chanukah Banquet was
held recently at Congregation Kneseth
Israel. Attending, from left are, Harry
Greenspan, Maurice Kusnitz, dinner
chairman; Oscar B. Schapiro, Rabbi David
Lehrfield, spiritual leader of Congregation
Kneseth Israel and guest speaker,
congregation President and Mrs. Albert
Furst. honorees for the evening; and Zev. W.
Kogan. president ofJNF, Southern Region.
American Ballet Theatre to Feature World Premiere
Bosenblum's Art to Exhibit Locally
Sadie Rosenblum's paintings
will be exhibited at the Lowe-
Levinson Art Gallery at Temple
Beth Sholom from Jan. 9 through
30. Having been displayed in the
Museum of Modern Art and
Lowe and Norton galleries and
having decorated United Nations
and UNICEF cards and publica-
tions. Rosenblum's paintings de-
pict children
"I have waited ten years for
this exhibit." Judy Drucker. gal
lery director, said. "Sadie's work
is so popular and so famous that
her time has been completely
booked
Horn in Odessa, Russia.
Miami United to
Receive Defamation
League Award
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith will hold Th<
Leonard L. Abess Human Rela-
tions Award Luncheon on Sun-
day. Feb. 6 at the Konover Hotel.
Greater Miami I'nited of Dade
County. Richard W. McEwen.
FJduardo J. Padron. and Athalie
Range, co-chairpersons, board of
directors, will receive the award
for "creating bridges of commun-
ication and cooperation between
Dade County's many racial and
ethnic groups."
Other Abess Award recipients
include Rep. Dante B. Fascell.
Sen. John C Thomas. Gov.
Reuben Askew, and Rep. Claude
Pepper.
NCJW Offers Ne
Medicare Supplement
National Council of Jewish
Women offers members and their
families supplementary medical
programs at reduced rates under-
written by member companies of
The Hartford Insurance Group,
Hartford, Conn, because the
group feels that "Medicare is
often not enough."
"NCJW's High Option Medi-
care Supplement covers up to 100
percent of the difference between
what Medicare pays and doctor's
fees. It will cover in-patient hos-
pital deductibles and coin-
surance, private duty nursing in
the hospital and at home up to
$50 a day. and doctor's fees and
outpatient expenses," Abbic
Relkin, NCJW spokesperson
stated.
Southgate to Brunch
Southgate Chapter of
Hadassah will have a brunch for
new annual members, life
members who joined in 1982-83,
and $110 members of the Angel
Club on Jan. 20 at noon in the
Terrace Room, President Shirley
Rosenberg announced.
Rosenblum studied art with Rap-
phael Soyer, Yasuo Kuniyoshi,
Ben Zion. Sam Adler. and at New
York's Art Students League and
New School for Social Research.
Temple Beth Sholom and Judy
Drucker. cultural director, and
JND Concert Foundation will
sponsor the American Ballet
Theatre and Mikhail
Baryshnikov. artistic director, in
a world premiere performance of
Erik Bruhn's newly staged
production of La Sylphide.
The performance will take
place at Miami Beach Theatre of
the 1'eforming Arts on Feb. 3 at 8
p.m.. said Drucker, whose Miami
Premiere Committee, co-chaired
by Donald Kahn. is helping to
underwrite the production. A
gala at the Fontainebleau Hotel
will follow, with Baryshnikov and
cast in attendance.
The ballet company's two-week
Miami engagement will also
feature a Miami premiere. Miami
company presentations, and a
new ballet by Lynne Taylor
Corbet!
Fleischmann's Margarine would like
to show you how much healthier
traditional cooking can be with
June Roth's Low Cholesterol Jewish
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like noodle kugel and blintzes made
the sensible way. Fleischmann's
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traditional cooking. Fleischmann's
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Friday, January 14, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
Bonds to Honor Tower 41 Couple
Abraham and Faye Cohen will
receive an Israel Negev Award at
a luncheon in their honor by resi-
dents of Tower 41 Condominium.
Miami Beach. Sponsored by the
State of Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion, the event will be held
Sunday, Jan. 23, Sam and Helen
Cohen, chairmen, announced.
Cohen is president of B'nai
Brith. Aron Shaffer Chesed
Lodge, at Tower 41. He served on
the board of directors of the
Yeshiva Chaim Berlin in
Brooklyn and was a founder and
leader of the Young Folks
Hebrew Association. He also
served as president of the B'nai
Akiva Mizrachi Youth.
Mrs. Cohen is equally involved
in communal affairs and was
associated with Brooklyn College
for more than 25 years, serving as
assistant register. She was
president of the Mr. and Mrs.
Club Hapoel Mizrachi and taught
Sunday School with Hebrew
Educational Society of Brooklyn.
She is a life member of Hadassah
and a member of the Tower 41
r
Abraham and Faye Cohen
chapter. She is also active with
Shaare Zedek Hospital.
Special guest speaker at the
luncheon will be Rabbi Dr. Meir
Felman. former vice president of
the Rabbinical Council of
America.
A Chai (18th) birthday celebration of the
Eilat Chapter of Pioneer Women-Na'amat
was held recently at the Konover Hotel
Pictured at the gala luncheon are the
following past presidents and board
members: standing, left to right, Evelyn
Heitin, Veda Gruber. Don Friend, Frieda
Levitan, Goldie Rubinstein, and Ann Cohen.
Seated from left, are, Barbara Greenberg,
Rose Rubin, Rena Miller, Ida Kovalsky and
Faye Brucker. Gerald Schwartz was guest
speaker and brought highlights of the 30th
World Zion. st Congress held in Jerusalem.
Aliyah Center to Sponsor
Family Stay in Israel
Israel Aliyah Center is spon-
soring a family program. Project
Elef, to bring 1000 North
American families to Israel in the
upcoming summer, Allan
Millstein, director of the Miami
center, announced.
"Project Elef has been created
to give American families a real
taste of life in Israel." he stated.
They will reside in absorption
centers, guest houses on kib-
butzim and moshavim, or in ac-
comodations in settlement towns.
Each family will have the
choice of "experiencing kibbutz
living, harvesting fruit on
moshav, living on a settlement in
Judea and Samaria, going on a
Helen Asher, daughter of
former Chicagoans, Louis and
Rebecca Sussman, who cur-
rently reside in Miami, unveils
the wall plaque at a recent de-
dication of the Helen Asher
ORT Industrial School in Lod,
Israel The school will train
students in aviation-related
skills.
Summer Camp Director
for synagogue pre-school
camp in Southwest Dade.
382-3668
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study." Millstein said.
Sponsored in Israel by the
Jewish Agency's Immigration
and Absorption Department and
department head Raphael
Kotlowitz. families will be guided
through the program by a host
family in Israel.
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Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. January 14, 1983
Beth David to Host Clark U. Prof.
Beth David Congregation Sis-
terhood will sponsor an annual
Kallah weekend Friday, Jan. 21
and Saturday. Jan. 22 at the syn-
agogue featuring guest lecturer.
Moshe Waldoks. co-editor of
"The Big Book of Jewish
Humor." Mrs. Robert Spiegel-
man. Sisterhood president, an-
nounced. He will speak on Friday
at 8:30 p.m. on "The Jewish Ex-
perience as Reflected in Humor.'
and at Saturday morning serv-
ices at 10:30 on "Our Debt to
Eastern Jewry."
Waldoks is currently a lecturer
in Jewish Studies at Clark Uni-
versity in Worcester. Mass. He
has also lectured at the College of
the Holy Cross. Rrandeis Univer-
-ltv. and the Heorew College of
Boston. He has delivered papers
at the Yiddish Research Institute
and at annual conferences of the
Association for Jewish Studies.
Waldoks is completing his doc-
lorial dissertation at Brandeis
University in the field of Eastern
European Jewish intellectual his-
tory. He also studied at the He-
brew University and taught at
Wallenberg to be Featured at Talk
"The Man in the Iron Web. a
book by Elenore Lester on the life
of Raoul Wallenberg, who saved
many Jewish lives during the
Holocaust, will be reviewed by
Marc Polick at a Great Jewish
Books Discussion Group on
Thursday at 1:30 p.m at the
Miami Beach Public Library.
A non Jewish. Swedish
diplomat. Wallenberg rescued
50.000 Hungarian Jews and dis-
papeared during 1944 behind
Russian lines.
Pollick is the executive director
of the Holocaust Memorial
Center of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and a PhD
candidate in Holocaust studies at
Boston University under Klie
Weisel and Nahum Glatzer
Coordinated by the Central
Agency' for Jewish Education,
the discussion group is under the
direction of Rabbi Norman
I.ipson. director of adult
education programming.
Moshe Waldoks
the Pardes Institute for Jewish
Studies.
The Sisterhood will have a tra-
ditional Shabbat dinner Friday
evening and a luncheon following
services Saturday. Mrs. Richard
Bailey is chairman of the week-
end: and Mrs. Jack Pliner and
Mrs. Morris Dan are vice chair-
men. Mrs. Alan Olkes serves as
cultural vice president.
Bill Silver, Gables Candidate
Bill Silver of Coral Gables has
announced his candidacy for a
seat on the Coral Gables City
Commission. The election will be
held April 12.
Silver and his family have been
Coral Gables residents for 20
years. His wife. Marcia, currently
serves on the board of governors
of Coral Gables Home, and his
three sons all graduated from
Coral Gables High School. They
each became Eagle Scouts in
Coral Gables' Troop 64.
His record of service and ex-
perience includes serving as
chairman of the Coral Gables
Planning and Zoning Board, on
which he still sits, and acting as
president of Sunrise Harbor
Homeowner's Association. Silver
served as president of Temple
Beth Am for two years and was a
member of Coral Gables Blue
Ribbon Committee for three
years, appointed by Mayor
Eda LeShan, psychologist,
author, and CBS radio com-
mentator, will address a Sixth
Annual Luncheon of the
South Florida Women's Com-
mittee of Shaare Zedek
Medical Center of Jerusalem
on Wednesday, Jan. 26.
LeShan has produced a televi-
sion series entitled "How do
Your Children Grow, "and has
appeared on the Dick Cavett.
Dinah Shore, Mike Douglas,
and Phil Donahue shows as
well as The Today Show and
Good Morning A merica.
American Mizrachi Women
Cordially invites you and vour guests
to attend an
ART EXHIBITION AND AUCTION
to be held at the
Konover Hotel
5445 Collins Ave., Miami Beach, Florida
Sunday Evening, January 16, 1983
Exhibition 7:00 P.M. Auction 8:00 P.M.
Refreshments: Wine and Cheese
Admission: $2.50 Per Person
Checks for art purchased are made payable to American Mizrachi Women
Proceeds will be used to furnish Beth Hayeled Children Haven in Jerusalem
Bill Silver
Joseph Murphy. He also acted as
a vice president of the Citizen's
League.
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Friday, January 14, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Israelis Challenged US Marines
In Beirut, State Dept. Charges
Sarah Fershko, lyric soprano, and Hayim Fershko, pianist-
composer, will perform at a Fershkos Annual Concert at the
Konover Hotel Theatre on Monday, Jan. 31 at 2p.m. Interna-
tional classics, folk songs, and piano solos will be featured.
Mysticism Class Set
A non-credit course on "Jewish
Mysticism The Way of the
Kabbalist," will be featured by
the University of Miami's School
of Continuing Studies, Jan. 18-
Feb. 22 on Tuesdays from 7:30 to
9:30 p.m.
The instructor. Rabbi Rami
Shapiro, will explore the history,
theories, and practices of the
Jewish mystic with special em-
phasis on the relevance of Kab-
balah to one's spiritual growth.
Talmudic U. Dean to Talk at Area Temple
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig, dean
of Alfred and Sadye Swire
College of Judaic Studies at
Talmudic University of Florida,
will present a lecture on "Galuth
- Exile'' at 8 p.m. Wednesday at
Young Israel Synagogue of Sky
Lake, North'Miami Beach.
The lecture will be followed by
a question and answer period and
refreshments will be served, ac-
cording to Rabbi Dov Bidnick
and Rabbi Edward Davis,
chairmen of the event.
CO-
League for Israel To Hold Council Forum
Women's League for Israel,
Inc. will have a Florida Council
Forum for leaders from South
Beach to Palm Beach on
Thursday at 10 a.m. at the re-
gional office. Sunrise.
Jim Harper. production
director of WINZ-radio, will
lecture on public speaking. A dis-
cussion on leadership will also be
featured. Muriel Lunden. Council
president, announced.
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By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
JTA) The State De-
partment is charging that
Israeli troops "challenged"
U.S. marines several times
in the last few days by try-
ing to go through the
checkpoints the Americans
are manning on roads near
the Beirut airport.
Department spokesman John
Hughes said that while he would
not call the Israelis "threaten-
ing." they had violated an agree-
ment and their attempts were
"not helpful and we don't want it
to continue."
"We have expressed our con-
cern to the Israel government,"
Hughes said, "and have made it
clear that the zone of deployment
of the MNF (the multinational
force consisting of marines and
French and Italian units in Bei-
rut) is closed to all military forces
other than those of Lebanon and
the MNF."
HUGHES SAID he did not
know how many incidents there
were but there were more than
two. News reports from Beirut
said the encounters occurred
when Israel began conducting
sweeps after an Israel army truck
was blown up when it passed a
booby-trapped car parked on a
road less than a mile from the
area controled by the marines.
Hughes said. "This develop-
ment underscores the urgent nec-
essity to get on with the effort to
negotiate the prompt withdrawal
from Lebanon of Israel and other
external forces." In that connec-
tion, U.S. special envoy Philip
Habib met with President Reag-
an at the White House be-
fore going back to Lebanon in
an effort to speed up the negotia-
tions between Israel and Leba-
non.
21 Israelis
Hurt In
Surprise Attack
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Twenty-one Israeli soldiers were
wounded in Lebanon Friday
when their bus came under small
arms and bazooka fire near Kfar
Sil south of Beirut. Two of the at-
tackers were killed in the chase
that ensued, a military spokes-
man reported.
Most of the soldiers sustained
only slight wounds, the spokes-
man said. The attack raised Is-
raeli casualties in Lebanon to six
dead and 25 wounded in the last
three weeks. Responsibility for
the latest attack was claimed by
a group calling itself the Leba-
nese National Resistance Front.
Both the White House and the
State Department denied that
there was any dissatisfaction in
ihe Administration with Nicholas
Veliotes, Assistant Secretary of
State for Near East and Asian
Affairs and Morris Draper, the
special envoy for the negotiations
in Lebanon.
A report in the Washington
Times alleged that Reagan was
dissatisfied with the two officials
because of the lack of progress in
getting foreign troops out of Leb-
anon. White House spokesman
Larry Speakes told reporters that
Veliotes and Draper were "out-
standing individuals'* doing "a
top job."
Montreal Economist
to Speak at
Yivo Forum
Yivo Forum, continuing a
Wednesday Yiddish Lecture
Series, will feature Arthur
Lermer of Montreal, economist
and writer, on Jan. 19 at Temple
BethSholom.
He will speak on Four Pillars of
Jewish Thought in the 20th
Century: Achad Haam. I.I.
Trunk. Shimon Ravidovich. and
Abraham Golomb.
Moshe Fridler will interpret
Jewish songs and Kay Sestok
will accompany on piano.
If you can find a more delicious char-broiled sliced
steak dinner complete with appetizer, salad, potato,
beverage and Arthur's fabulous homemade breads
for just $10.95...buy it.
Other complete dinners from $9.95 \iul
remember, this isn't just iinoihor restaurant. Ilus
is Arthurs, where even nu-.il is .1 v\oi k of art.
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Live music nightly.
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Secured valet parking. Bisc. Blvd. & IMi St Res. 371-1444
ISRAeiito
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plus $3.00 U.S. Airport tax
including:
Roundtrip air transportation Miami /
/Tel Aviv/London/Miami
8 nights at Deluxe Astoria Hotel In Tel
Aviv (room only, per person double
occupancy) Additional nights at
$15.00 p.p.
1 night first class hotel in London
Jerusalem.. $19.00 additional per
night at Deluxe Laromme Hotel In
Jerusalem, inci. Israeli Buffet
Breakfast.
Single supplement $12.50 per night
in Tel Aviv.
combination of Tel Aviv/Jerusalem
available.
EXTENSIONS TO EGYPT AND EUROPE AVAILABLE
For information and Reservations
CALL YOUR TRAVEL AGENT OR CALL

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INC. MIAMI
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Rate subject to restrictions and increase
i
.




Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. January 14. 1963
Multi-Ethnic
Program Approved
For Dade County
"Hands Across the Cam-
pus" a multi-ethnic aware-
ness program, has been ac-
cepted for implementation
as a pilot project in two
Dade County High Schools
for September, 1983.
The Hands program combines
a specially-designed elective
course with a wide variety of
extra-curricular projects. It seeks
to involve the students, parents.
teachers, and the community in
an effort to promote better un
derstanding and relations be
tween individuals of differen
ethnic and religious groups.
THE PROGRAM proposal
was co-sponsored by the Miami
Chapter of the American Jewish
Committee and the Cuban Na-
tional Planning Council. These
organizations are also currently
working with the school system
staff in developing teacher train-
ing, extra-curricular activities
and community involvement
They are also developing a com-
munity-wide effort to raise the
funds needed for the project
Speaking before the School
Board. Barton Udell, a member
of the AJC's National Governing
Board and immediate past presi-
dent of the Miami Chapter, ex-
pressed the gratitude of his or-
ganization for "the cooperation
and enthusiasm" that the staff
had demonstrated in developing
the pilot project.
David Perez-Ginart. deputy
executive director of the CNPC.
also speaking before the Board,
added that this type of project is
"particularly appropriate for
Dade County considering the na
ture of the population's ethnic
mix." He said that today's
"abundant exchange of informa-
tion makes it increasingly diffi-
cult for particular ethnic and ra-
cial groups to live together" and
thus, an effort such as "Hands"
is so timely.
MODEL FOR the Hands
program was developed by the
American Jewish Committee in
Los Angeles in conjunction with
the Los Angeles Unified School
System. Dr. Sidney Brickman.
assistant superintendent of
schools and an AJC member,
helped create the program and
implement it in five high schools.
Now in its second year. "Hands"
had expanded to 10 schools in the
Lot \ngeles area.
The Cuban National Planning
Council is the oldest national
Cuban organization. Formed in
1972. the Council is dedicated to
promoting human rights and as-
sisting Cubans in their adjust-
ment to life in the United States.
Their executive offices are lo-
cated in Miami, with other offices
or representatives located in
most cities with Cuban-American
populations.
Engagement
GADONZENLEA
Louis and Lillian Gadon of
Miami have announced the en-
gagement of their daughter. Sara
to Bruce Jeffrey Zenlea. son of
Mr. and Mrs. Seymour Zenlea of
Farmingham. Mass. The wed-
ding will be held at Beth David
Congregation on May 29 with
Rabbi David Auerbach officiat-
ing.
Town Meeting Planned
Voters. Inc. will hold a Town
Hall Meeting Tuesday at 7:30
p.m. in the auditorium of
American Savings Bank at 1200
Lincoln Road.
Harry Levy, president, will
moderate. Guest speakers are
Circuit Court Judge D. Bruce
Levy and County Commissioner
Barry Schreiber.
Parenting Course Set
Jewish Family and Children's
Service Prevention Department
is offering a Parent Effectiveness
Training Course for all single
parents and couples with chil-
dren.
The program. begins on
Wednesday. Feb. 9 at 7:30 at the
South Dade office of Jewish
Family and Children's Service.
Energy Talk Planned
Israel's solar energy field will
be discussed at a luncheon
meeting of the American-Israel
Chamber of Commerce-Southeast
Region, on Wednesday. Jan. 26.
at 12:30 p.m. at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
building.
Guest speaker will be Arnold J.
Goldman, president of Luz
International Ltd.. a U.S.
company formed to bring an
Israeli-developed solar energy
svstem to this countrv.
********?*****?**********<
Anniversary
A surprise 50th Anniver-
sary Dinner Dance was given
for Mr. and Mrs. Herbert
Gelertner recentey by their
grandchildren. Richard
Gelertner of Calif.. Mr. and
Mrs. Stephen Riker of Stam-
ford. Conn., and Leslie Sil-
verman of Miami. Held at
the Grove Isle Club, the
party was attended by many
friends and members of the
family The Gelertners live in
Coral Gables and were
founding members of Temple
Judea. Mr. Gelertner served
as one of its early presidents
!?*******
Bock Boy South
formerly
Jennifer's'.
Nestouront
Is Alive & Well and
Doing BusinessDaily
Lunch II 30 tO 3 Phl1 Ruedy at the Piano
Dinner 5 to 12 Jonn Cole III0
floppy flour 4 to7
The music of
Tony & Lindo
Thomos
Restaurant
555 NE 15th Street
PLAZA VENETIA
Ve>->'', Cu**~v
Music Dancing ai Dmne- Reservation* 374 6144
tji/ltlWU &/llW&&

Sara & Moyshe
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i promise not tc
for 120 years'
1


Friday, January 14. 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
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where shopping is a pleasure | PubllX


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. January 14. 1983
Residents of Fifty Seven-O-One celebrated an annual Salute to
Israel on behalf of the State of Israel Bonds Organization
recently. The State of Israel Negev Award was presented to
Theodore and Ruth Wolkowitz, right, recognizing participation
in the Bonds campaign and other Jewish philanthropic organi-
zations. Chairmen of the event were Harold and Gen Medow,
left.
Pioneer Women Set Agenda
Pioneer Women-Na'Amat
liana Chapter will have a lun-
cheon and card party on Tuesday
at noon at Winston Towers 500.
North Miami Beach.
Aviva Chapter will have a slide
presentation on Na'Amat install-
ations in Israel by Esther
Weinstein on Wednesday at noon
in the annex of McDonald Senior
Citizen Center. North Miami
Beach.
Philip Denker's book.
"Horowitz and Mrs. Washing-
ton" will be reviewed at a Golda
Meir Chapter meeting by Masada
Chapter President Bertha
Liebman on Thursday at 11:30
a.m. in the lower lobby of 100
Lincoln Road.
For Health Tips By Telephone, Call:
TEL-MED
326-1177
Need free health information in English or Spanish?
Call Tel-Med any weekday from 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. to
listen to taped messages on subjects ranging from
cancer and heart disease, to birth control and first aid.
Let TEL-MED tell you what you need to know.
Tel-Mad Is provided at public service by the doctors of the Dads
County Medical Association.
fi\ ALLOWS IMMEDIATE WALKING
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Services also including treatment of Hammer Toer.,
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Dr. David E. GoldenPodiatrist
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You have the power to Win the future by
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hadassah
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nd me tSsMsesi SMSSM Titty Bkjf a* HtmtmOtno
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Pearl Stahl. associate national
director of American Red
Magen David for Israel, vis-
ited South Florida chapters
recently to report on the orga-
nization's current services in
Israel
YOU can be SURE of the BEST at
TOCfcf'S BONDED FRUIT SHIPPER
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Joseph Shulman of Miami
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director and president of Bank
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has been active in Dade Coun-
ty banking for 26 years and is
a director of Temple Emanu-
El, director of the Hebrew
Home for the Aged on Miami
Beach, and also serves on the
Committee for Resource
Development, University of
Miami Mailmen's Center for
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Friday, January 14, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B

&
fpsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
| Moses and Aaron went in unto Pharaoh"
(Exod. 7.10).
Lord, the God of the Hebrews, hath sent me unto thee.
Let My people go"
(7.161
VAERA
God told Moses that He had first appeared to Abra-
ac, and Jacob as El Shaddai. and had made a covenant
I patriarchs to give them the land of Canaan. Now, hear-
| unhappy cry of the children of Israel, the Almighty was
*d of his covenant. Pharaoh refused to let the children of
it part from the land of Egypt. God brought seven
i on the Egyptians, in an attempt to force Pharaoh's
^lood, frogs, gnats, flies, murrain, boils, and hail. At first
i conceded to Moses, "I and my people are wicked. En-
i Lord, and let there be enough of these mighty thunder
hail; and I will let you go" (Exodus 9 27-28). But. when
Kues stopped, Pharaoh's heart was hardened again, and
'1 to let the Israelites go.
counting of the VVaefcly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
I Graphic History of ID* Jewish Her.tag*." edited by P. Wollman
IIS. published by Shengold. The volume is available at 7S Maiden
Mr York, I y. iooil Joseph Sctilang is president ol the society dis
the volume.) /
JLCH PAWN SHOP, Inc.,
jiness 65 years, is looking for individual
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Contact
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401 E. Broughton Street
Savannah, Georgia 31401
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Medical Staffing Services T.M.
providing Quality Health Care Treatment
Bar/Bat Mitzvah Ko'ach Hadassah to Host Circuit Judge
Ressler
Feldman
tch Mayor Norman Ciment proclaimed Wednesday,
Mary Soreanu Day in the City of Miami Beach,
starring in the Yiddish Musical Comedy Theater
of "Showgirl" at the Theater of the Performing
tpting the proclamation for Soreanu is David Carey, a
of the show.
ELIZABETH FELDMAN
Elizabeth Abby Feldman.
daughter of Mr" and Mrs.
Michael Feldman. will be called
to the Torah as a Bat Mitzvah
Saturday at Temple Beth Sholom
of Greater Miami at 10:45 a.m.
Dr. Leon Kronish will officiate.
Elisabeth is a student of the
Confirmation Class of 5745.
LAWRENCE RESSLER
Lawrence Messier, son of Dr.
and Mrs. Allen A. Ressler. will be
called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah Saturday at Temple
Beth Sholom of Greater Miami.
Dr. Leon Kronish will officiate.
Lawrence is a student of the
Confirmation Class of 5744.
Anti-Semitism Talk
Hosted by Beth Sholom
A "Coffee, Culture, and
Conversion" program of Temple
Beth Sholom of Greater Miami
will feature Rabbi Harry Kat-
chen. member of the Administra-
tion of the Jewish Theological
Seminary of America, as guest
speaker on Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
Rabbi Katchen was a rabbi in
Allentown. Penn. and Flushing,
N.Y. and has contributed articles
to Conservative Judaism. He will
speak on "Anti-Semitism in the
Jewish Experience."
Rabbi Harry Jolt is auxiliary
rabbi in charge of the Adult
Education series.
Sisterhood Plans Party
Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood
will celebrate a 25th Silver
Anniversary Eternal Light
Luncheon on Sunday, Jan. 25 at
noon in the Royal Palm Room of
the Carillon Hotel.
Francis Grossman will be
honored as "Woman of Valor"
with Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
presenting the award.
Wedding Music
Congregation Bet Breira will
i-esent Cantor Stuart Pittle and
ianist, Norman Miller per-
.nrming "Music for the Jewish
Wedding" on Sunday at the
temple.
Yiddish, Israeli, Ladina,
Sephardic, and English selections
for Jewish wedding ceremonies
from the Renaissance to con-
temporary America will be
featured. The Adult Choir will
participate.
Federation President
To Speak
Norman Lipoff, president of
the Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation, will speak at Temple Beth
Am's Friday evening services on
Jan. 21 at 8:15 p.m.
Lipof f s appearance is part of a
broad program to educate Miami
Jewry as to the significance of
the current CJA campaign.
Miami Beach
ERUV HOTLINE
653-0914
Call within 2 hours
before shabbos
Rakbtnteal CouncM o Amartca
Florida RajJja
National Hebrew
Israeli Gift Center Inc.
ReligiousBat Mit/vah sets
Crystal*Gifts
1507 Washington Avenue
(305) 532 2210
Ko'ach Chapter of Hadassah
will feature Circuit Court Judge
Joseph P. Farina as the guest
speaker at a meeting Tuesday at
Jefferson National Bank. Arthur
Godfrey Road, at 8 p.m.. Jackie
Hechter. president, announced.
He will speak on "Jewish trad-
ition on the Bench." Zina Hirsh,
program vice president, an-
nounced.
The chapter will attend The
Frankie Klein Show on Jan. 22.
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting Time: 5:31
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Frl .4:15 om Smarnood Shabbat Sarvlca.
candiaa. SMpm Sal. 9:30 am. Bar Mltnah
Jaltray Uotnalt
Minyona
Sun 8 am and 5 pm
Mon through Fri. 7 30 am and 5 pm
Sat 8 30 am and 5 cm___________
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami. Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
Oavid B. Saltzman. Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchinsky. Cantor
Daily a 30 am and S 1S pm
Frl.. 8 1S pm. "Tha OBI Sabbath"
Sat.. t:4Sam and S ISpm now month
Shavat. walcomad
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate
Rabbi
Fri..9:1Spm
Sat.. US and 11:15am. Torah Sarvlca
B'nal Mlurvah. Rabacca Gotthab Randy
Woita. Haathar Lynn. Ltnda Hach.i
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Or Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler, Cantor
LataFri Eva San 6 pm
Dr lahrman will praach on
Tha Challangaa ol Moral Laadarahip
Sat Morn Sarv 9 am
Tha Rabbi will praach at to 30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532 6421
Cantor. Rabbi Solomon Schifl
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way. K2S S W 3rd Avanua
South Oada 7SO0SW 120ihStraat
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Oada Chapat
Frl.. pm. ORT Sabbath. Oimal Claaa 10
panic I pa ta Sal.. lOarn.
Junior CongragatMn Sarvtcaa
Coral Way Sanctuary
Sat.. am. Shabbat Samicat. ear Mitrvati.
Jama. Qroaa. Judd Naiaon 5 35pm. Mlncha.
Bar Mltnah. Kavln Flrva
BETH KODESH
Modem Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 658-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Fri..8 15 pm. Rabbi Shapiro win dlacuaa
w. Avoid Paaca!" Onag Shabbat lo Ioilow
Sal 9:4S am and Spm
Sun I am and 5 pm
Dally Mlnyan Sarv.. *:4S am and 5 pm
TEMPLE ISRAEL Ol Greater Miami
Miami's Piont Httorm Congrmgition
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskell M. Bernat
Asat. Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Salkin
Cantor Jacob G Bornsteln
Student Cantor: Racheii* Nelson
Fri.. 9 pm. Downtown: Edward Cohan.
"Tha Pollileaol 19*3"
Kandall Rabbi Bamat. "TrtrilUIng tha
Holocaust and othar Oamantla "
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Relorm
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Fri.. pm. Family Worahlp Samoa
Weakly Torah portion Vaara
Eiodua 6 2 9 35 Numbara 28 29 i 5
HattaiahlianhMt 24
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
OR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
EDWARD BARON. Cantor
Fn J 30 pm
Sal. 9 30 am
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
891 5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gortinkel
Daily services 815 a.m. S p.m.
Frl..pm
Sat, (am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave M.B. Fl. 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
TEMPLE MENORAH
820 751 h St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat., 9 am
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave..
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Fri 8 15 pm
Sal 8 45 am
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
15410SW75CirdeLane
Miami. Fl. Modern Othodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 382-3343
Fri. 5 15 pm Sabbath Sarvtcaa
Sal. 9 30 am and S 30 pm Mincha
Daily Morning Minyana. M Th 6 45 am
T.W.FTam
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. 4 41st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Conviser
Frl. ISpm, Rabbi KrorMan wMi apaak on
"SO Vaara Slnca Hltlar'a Mm 90 Powai
Sat. 10:4S am, B'nal Mitzvah, ElUabath
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade's Relorm Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl .1 ISpm, Worahlp Sarvlca
Now Mambara Shabbat
Sal., to so am. Bat Mllrvati, Lauria SHvarman
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd
Dr. Max A. L.pschitz. Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Frl. 5 15 and 9 pm
Sat. I 30 am and S ISpm
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami. Florida 33137
Phone 576 4000
Rabbi Solomon Schif t
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses ol Worship
Phone 576-400C
Rabbinical Association Office
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Mlnyan Sarvicaa Mon. t Thura T am
Sabba'hEvo Sar.icas 9 tSpm
Sabbath Sarvtcaa am
Ouaala Are Wetcome
Friday. Or. Norman N. Shapiro Taste
New Ctiallaneaat Naw Year' "
m
i
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 163rd St N Miami Beach Fl 331*2
947 8094 Harold W.ehne. e.ecutlv. director
Franklin 0 Krouuar. rational praaldanl
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive OH ice Park. 3785
NW 82 Ave.. Suite 210. Miami, Fl.
33166. 592 4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Littman, regional director



Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 14, 1983
Army's Excessive Violence Ok'd Normalization Remains

.
By HUGH ORGEL
^ TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Seven Israeli army officers
and other ranks accused of
using excessive violence to
subdue Arab demon-
strators on the West Bank
continue to insist that they
were carrying out orders by
their superiors which
originated at the highest
echelons of the defense es-
tablishment.
Capt. Mordecai Artzi. identi-
fied as "Operations Officer'* of
the Hebron Military Govern-
ment, bolstered that line of de-
fense in his testimony at a court
martial trial. He said the area
military commander, Lt. Col.
Shalom Lugassi, had given him
and other officers instructions
which included beating up local
residents, harassing them and
smashing their wrist watches as
forms of punishment.
"WE WERE told to collect
them. 150 or 200 at a time, who-
ever happened to be around, it
didn't matter if they had demon-
strated or not. We brought them
back to headquarters for ques-
tioning,'' Artzi said.
He was testifying as a witness
for Maj. David Mofaz, one of the
seven accused of beating and per-
secuting local Arab residents in
the Hebron area during dis-
turbances there last March and
April. Mofaz, who was Deputy
Military Governor, testified last
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADC COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Csse No. 81-141 S8
NOTICE OF ACTION
VICTOR MITRANI.
Plain tlH.
v*.
AMERICAN METAL CON-
TAINERS. INC.. a Florida cor-
^ration, previously known as
ITRANI INDUSTRIES.
INC.. a Florida corporation.
Defendant
TO: DEFENDANT. AMERI
CAN METAL CONTAINERS,
INC.. a Florida corporation
Sevtously known aa MITRANI
DUSTRIES, INC.. a Florida
corporation. JOSS N.W. 7th
Avenue, Miami, Florida.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an acUon to foreclose a chattel
mortgage on the following per-
sonal property In Dads County.
Florida:
One 2H Ton Overhead
Crane, one V, mild 12 Ft.
Cincinnati Shear 1812 No.
38622. one 3" Strokes Wis-
consin Press Brake 12 Ft.
ISO ton. Model 12 FM s-n
72304. one Klngsland Power
Metal Works Model J18 I A-
04070), one PowermaUc
Drill Press Model 1200 S-N
2-3670-2. one Forte Hydraul-
ic Band Saw. one R 30-280
Wire Lincoln Arc Welder S-
N AC 201247. fourteen Lin-
coln-Norbart Welding
Machines S-N AAW74822.
AAW76S72. 78244. 7361-012
7381-407. 7833-703. A702177.
A008240. A696247. A708001.
A716060. A727617. A6BBM8.
A7160B8. one Victor Pan-
tograph Model DO-24008-N:
24200. six Overhead Fans,
two Scaffe Air Com-
pressors, two Portable
Grinders, one Balcrank
greaser S-N 144008. two
Devllbls Paint Sprayers,
three Portable Welders, one
Blnks Paint Pumper, one
Dayton Portable Sander,
one Fontaine Trailer Modal
DPT 2-6042 ID 20ST7 Mfg 1-
74. and one OSHA-approved
Paint Shed,
has been Bled against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses.
If any. to It on HAROLD A.
TURTLETAUB, plaintiff's at-
torney, whose address la 0666
South Dixie Highway. Suite 307.
Miami. Florida 33186, on or be-
fore January 28, IMS, and file
the original with the clerk of
this court either before service
on plaintiff's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter, other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition.
Dated December IB. 1082
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk of the Court
BYA.MINOUEZ
As Deputy Clark
18346 December 24. 31.1882
January?. 14,1883
week that his orders to use
violence came directy from Chief
of Staff Gen. Rafael Eitan and
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon.
Mofaz repeated his allegations!
in court, despite the prosecutor's
insistence that all Israeli soldiers
were under standing orders not to
strike local West Bank residents.
According to Mofaz. "When a
senior officer ordered us to deal
with detainees, we understood
from the spirit behind the words
that we had to beat them up."
The prosecution contends that
the accused acted in a brutal
manner of their own voUtion, in
violation of standing orders. .
THE SEVEN men were or-
dered court martialed after re-
serve officers of the Peace Now
movement who served on the
West Bank, made a series of alle-
gations following their release
from active service.
Peace Now recently urged the
West Bank Military Government
to act quickly to prevent "immi-
nent acts of violence by Jewish
settlers" against local Arab resi-
dents in the territory.
The movement based its warn-
ing on a Military Government
document which disclosed that
Minister of Science and Tech-
nology Yuval Neeman of the
ultra-nationalist Tehiya faction,
and his aide, Tehiya MK Hanan
Porat, are setting up "super-
visory teams" ostensibly to
guard State lands against Arab
encroachment. These "teams''
may well be used to deport
Arabs opposed to Israeli rule
over the territory. Peace Now
warned.
THE MOVEMENT said it
learned that residents of Kiryat
Arba. the Gush Kmunim strong-
hold overlooking Hebron, plan to
"persuade and pressure" shop-
owners in the old market place of
Arab Hebron to get out to make
room for Jewish settlers. They
contend the area belonged to
Jews who were forced to flee dur-
ing the Arab disturbances in He-
bron in 1929.
Neeman. a hardliner who advo-
cates Israel's annexation of all
occupied Arab territories and the
removal of their Arab popula-
tions by one means or another,
holds the Cabinet's newly created
science portfolio. But his activi-
ties since he joined Premier
Menachem Begins coalition
government last year have been
exclusively in connection with
advancing Jewish settlement in
the territories. He is an ardent
supporter of the Gush Emu mm.
Israeli newspaper meanwhile
published photographs of spe-
cially-fitted jeeps operated by the
Gush Etzion Regional Council to
tour the area to track down "ille-
gal Arab buildings" and "protect
State lands."
Major Obstacle in Talks
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAD! COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Cats No: 81-1M87
IN RE: THE MARRI AGE OF
CLETUS JERNIGAN
PeUtloner-Husband
and
MAXIE JERNIGAN
Respondent-Wife
TO: MAXIE JERNIGAN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOnFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq. 16400
N.W. 7th Ave. Suite 208 Miami.
Florida 33168. on or before
February 11. 1083 and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the PeUUon.
Dated: Dec. 801982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: Steven M Bobes
as Deputy Clerk
18373 January 7.14.
21.28. 1083
NOTICE OF ACTiwn
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THC CIRCUIT COURT OF
THC ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADC COUNTY. FLORIOA
FAMILY DIVISION
Cat* No. 82 II7}4
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CLEMON E. JENKINS,
PeUUoner-Wlfe
and
MERDICE JENKINS
Respondent-Husband
TO: MERDICE JENKINS
Residence Address:
278 Rldgewood Avenue
Newark, New Jersey
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an acUon for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to lt on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq. 18480
N.W. 7th St.. Suite 208 Miami.
Florida 33180 on or before Jan-
uary 28. 1983 and Hie the orlgi
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on PeU-
Uoner's attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the PeUUon.
DATED: December 18.1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: LolaH. Currier
as Deputy Clerk
18348 December 24. 31. 1982;
January 7.14.1983
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The formulation of an
agenda item on normaliza-
tion of relations continues
to be the main obstacle de-
laying an agreement on an
agenda in the talks between
Israel and Lebanon. A 90-
minute meeting in Jerusa-
lem between the American
mediator, Morris Draper,
and Israel's Foreign Minis-
ter Yitzhak Shamir appar-
ently failed to produce a
breakthrough on this issue.
Israeli sources said Draper,
who is special envoy Philip
Habih s deputy, had brought
"new ideas" on the issue that had
been discussed between himself
and the Lebanese leadership. But
Israel Radio reported that
Shamir had "rejected" the ideas
and had insisted ths* the concept
of normalization oe clearly
spelled out in the age ida
AFTER THE meeting with
Draper, Shamir and his director-
general. David Kimche. who
heads Israel's delegation to the
talks with the Lebanese, met
with Premier Menachem Begin
and other top aides for a briefing
session prior to a new round of
talks at Kiryat Shmona.
Draper himself sounded upbeat
in brief remarks to reporters after
his meetings with Shamir and
Kimche at the Foreign Ministry.
The talk had been "good" he
said. "The negotiations are going
to go forward We have high
hopes for a successful conclusion
as soon as possible."
Draper's effort was set against
the backdrop of some tough pub-
lic rhetoric from Shamir the eve-
ning before. In a speech to Bnei
Akiva youth movement leaders
from around the world, the For-
eign Minister charged that cer-
tain Moslem leaders in Lebanon
who were opposed to peaceful re-
lations with Israel did not really
represent the great majority of
the Lebanese people but were
"agents of foreign interests."
THESE MOSLEM leaders,
whom Shamir did not nare. were
"the instruments of pressure" in
the hands of the Arab states
Syria. Saudi Arabia, even Egypt,
too" which were urging Leba-
non not to conclude a normaliza-
tion accord with Israel.
"The world is silent, and no
one protests" against this pres-
sure upon Lebanon. Shamir
noted. Instead. Israel is accused,
in a Beirut newspaper, of seeking
to pressure Lebanon into peaceful
relations with her. he said. In
fact, the Foreign Minister said,
such peaceful relations were a
vital common interest shared by
Israel and Lebanon.
Throughout its history, and
especially since 1948, Lebanon
had been a prey to outside pre
sures from Syria and Saudi
Arabia. Its role in the Arab-
Israeli conflict had been forced
upon it against the will of its peo-
ple, Shamir noted. Similarly, in
1969 the "Cairo agreements" by
which Lebanon allowed the PLO
to operate from its territory had
been forced upon it "by Nasser
and his allies," he said.
Israel had "freed Lebanon ,
from these presures. The great
majority of the Lebanese people
want peaceful relations with Is-
rael. That includes a great many
of the Moslems in Lebanon. They
want Lebanon out of the frame-
work of the Israel-Arab conflict."
Shamir said.
AmeriFirst Gives Gifts
AmeriFirst s Bay Habor office
is offering plastic luggage tags to
customers and visitors through
Jan. 21 during regular office
hours. Monday through Friday, 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Free blood pressure readings
will be available at the Normandy
Isle office through Jan. 31 during
the same hours.
Brandeis Prof, to Talk
Brandeis University Women's
Committee will hold a luncheon
in the Regency Room of the Doral
Beach Hotel on Jan. 16 at noon
featuring guest speaker. Profes-
sor Stephen Whitfield.
The Brandeis University
associate professor of American
Studies' topic will be "Moral
Majorities in One Nation Under
God.' "
Chug: Aliyah to Meet
South Florida Chug Aliyah
Group will hold a meeting on
Sunday at 7 p.m. at the Jewish
Federation. Miami.
Impressions of Israel will be
discussed by members who
recently returned from visits
there.
Allan Milstein. director of the
Israel Aliyah Center, will attend
and a film will be shown.
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
rurlia'i Mill CtapUtt Iiflitk-Itwisk Vaaklt
Priatmd in Engliah
may keL rt^^TvJlVt?Z* E JEWISH FL0*'DIAN every week that we I
may keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world.
Enclosed please find check Fntr mu hiem -..___-u !.-_. I
Dlease find check. Enter my NEW subscription for
? 1 Year $18.00 Q 2 Years $34.00
LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ONLY

Name:,
Address:
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. .J'l

Friday, January 14,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
tic Notice
ITEOSTATES
iTRICTCOURT
fHERN DISTRICT
>F FLORIDA
I ADMIRALTY
o 82 2193 Civ SWA
flCE OF ACTION
CS, LTD
INTERNATIONAL
mi
:a rolejo.
ident
ant
"rnatlonalCorp.
|N W 79th Terr,
ii. Florida
LOSANTONINI.
dent Agent ,
mt
tnatlonalCorp
P V.. 79thTerr
11. Florida
IE HEREBY notified
Ction for ocean freight
| filed against you and
required to serve a
fcour written defenses.
Ill on ARTHUR ROTH.
f* attorney, whose ad-
1111 Israel Discount
jldlng. HN.E.lst Ave
al, Florida. 33132. on
February 18. 1983.
[ the original with the
Ills court either before
plaintiff's attorney
ledlately thereafter;
a default will be en
mist you for the relief
s>ct In the complaint or
|on January Sth, 1983
IKI'HI BOGART
ri-Tk of said Court
Pam Thaggard
I leputy Clerk
January 14, 21.28,
February 4.1983
3TICE UNDER
ITIOUS NAME LAW
TE IS HEREBY
I thai the undersigned.
| to engage In business
' e fictitious name
TILES INSTALLA-
|230 NW 38 St. Miami.
33142 Intends to
said name with the
the Circuit Court of
unty Florida
(>wner
HO A HERNANDEZ
I)ecember31. 1982.
January 7. 14.21 1983
)TICE UNDER
|TIOUS NAME LAW
:>: is HEREBY
Ithat the undersigned.
1 In engage In business
She fictitious name
Great Stereo at 3501
KM) Highway Miami
lends to register said
Mi the Clerk of the Clr
un of Dade County
DecemberSl.1982:
Januarv7, 14 21 1983
ICiRCUlTCOURTOF
LEVENTH JUDICIAL
CUITIN AND FOR
(COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. S3 243*4
GENERAL
Jurisdiction
division
notice by
publication
tROEDER.
Iff.
IAN R KAPLAN.
ft A. GREENGOSS.
|N A. KATTEN;
AMERICAN MORT
Investors, a Mam
business trust.
Id to do business In the
[Florida; AEROSPACE
CATION. INC.. HJ-
CONSTRUCTION,
TLVIA JUNGREIS,
dants.
LVIA JUNGREIS
(West 68 Street
' York. NY
IBERTA.
CENGOSS
| Dolly Greengoss
Lakeahore Drive
cago.IX
CLVIN A KATTEN
IB Clark Street
|lc*go. IL606OS
[ARE HEREBY NOTI-
nl a PeUUon has been
Discharge of Record
nu acalnst Plaintiff
ROEDER. by you
Ml are required to
copy of your written .
I, If any, to It on Bruce I
lick, Esq., Lamchlck,
nan A Johnston. Plaln-
Ittorneys, whose address
North Kendall Drive,
17. Miami, Florida SS1T6.
fore January 28, 1981,
lie the original with the
[of this Court either be
| service on Plaintiff s
Jjya or Immediately
"ter; otherwise a default
i entered against you for
ellef demanded in the
1ESS my hand and the
! this Court on December
JCHARD BRINKER
Clerk of the Court
By K Self lied
As Deputy Clerk
DeoomberX.il, 1983.
January 7.14. MM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-487
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
LESLY G. PRESSAGE.
Petltloner-Husband
and
YANICK PRESSAGE.
Respondent-Wife.
TO YANICK PRESSAGE
9 Fairmont Avenue
Apt M2
Havers trw,
New York 10927
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any. to It on
LLOYD M ROUTMAN. ES-
QUIRE, attorney for Petition-
er, whose address Is 181 North-
east 82nd Street. Miami. Flor-
ida 33138. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Feb-
ruary 18. 19H3. otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court al Miami.
Florida on this 6th day of Jan-
uary. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Bj N A Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal i
LLOYD M HOI TMAN, Esq.
181 Northeast 82nd Street
Miami. Florida 331:1*
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone 13061 757 3800
January 14. 21.28;
February 4, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No 12 1 = 118
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
ARSENIALAZO
and
RENE DE LA PAZ.
TO MR RENE DE LA PAZ
Butner. North Carolina
YOI ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed agalnBt you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
RAFAEL E. PADIERNK
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 1437 S.W.
First Street. Miami. Florida
33135, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
roart on or before February 4,
983; otherwise a default will
ie entered against you for the
--ellef demanded In the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 28 day of De-
cember. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC.P Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Rafael E. Padleme, Esq.
1437 S W First Street
Miami, Florida 33138
Telephone: (308) 649-5488
Attorney for Petitioner
18369 December 31. 1982.
January 7, 14.21. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN thai the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
GEORGE MEAT FISH at
9687 S.W. 160 St. Miami. Fla.
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dad* County. Florida.
George Garcia.
Owner
1835* December 24, II. 1982
Januaryr,,14,19M
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name LBT
and BVG at 7700 8W 100 St.
Miami, Fla. Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dado County.
Florida.
do-owners.
VIRGIL HALE.
GARY HALE.
TREVAWARD.
BEVERLY GRIESEMER,
BARBARA TORINO,
LINDA VEAL.
December 11.1MI;
January 7, 14, 21,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13-414
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
LAWRENCE CLARKE.
Petltloner-Husband.
and
LORNA B. CLARKE.
Respondent-Wife.
TO:LORNAB CLARKE
Address &
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT1
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a coov of vour written
defense. If any. to It on LLOYD
M ROUTMAN. ESQUIRE, at
lorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 181 Northeast 82nd
Street, Miami. Florida 33138.
and file the orlglanl with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByN. A Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seali
LLOYD M ROUTMAN. Esq.
1M Northeast82ndStreet
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
IMM January 14. 21. 28.
________________February 4.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 13 7017
Division 04
IN RE ESTATE OF
HERMAN BLAU8TEQS
1 eased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the 01
HERM AN BLAU-
STEIN,deceased,FUe Number
17, is pending in the dr
cult Court for DADE County.
Florida, Probate Division, the
Ii a ui which :.- ?:i v\
Miami Florida
The names and ad-
OS ui the personal repre
in- and the personal rep-
lative s attorney are set
below
All Interested persons are r--
d in die with ihls court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PI HI.ICATION
(ih THIS NOTICE m all
i latmi against the estate and
(i any objection by an inter-
person to whom notice
II mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
ontaUVO, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
Al.. CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
HI-: FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on Jannuary 14, 1983.
Personal Representative
WILLIAM BLAUSTEIN
1452 South Cardiff Avenue
Lob Angeles,
California 90035
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT, Esq.
GALBUT. GALBUT* MENIN,
P.A.
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 672-3100
18388_______January 14, V *
NOTICE0NDCR
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flctlclous name of
SUNRISE MOTEL APTS. at
9340 Collins Avenue, Surfslde.
Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
NATHANIEL AMBERS
EMMA AMBERS
FRANK, STRELKOW GAY
Attorneys for THE AMBERS
502 Capital Bank Bldg
1666 Kennedy Causeway
North Bay Village. Florida
33141-4196
1305)868-4711
18362 December 11,1982;
January 7.14,21.10W
NOTICE UNDER
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
SOUNDS GREAT STEREO at
14016 South Dixie Highway
Miami 33188 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
18MS Decembers!. IBM;
January 7, 14. 21.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. Ill 87 S4
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN PETER ROSS.
Husband
and
LOUISE ROSS.
Wife
TO: Louise Ross
Residence Address
18 Pennlngton Road
New Brunswick.
New Jersey
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq 15490
N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite 205
Miami. Florida 33189 on or be-
fore January 28. 1983 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
Dated: Dec 17. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: N.A HEWETT
as Deputy Clerk
18352 December24.31.1982
January 7.14.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 12-111S4-FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF:
MARIA TERESA BEDOYA
and
FABIO DE-JESUS BEDOYA
TO: FABIO DE-JESUS
BEDOYA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It
on STANLEY E GOODMAN
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 909 East Eighth
Avenue. Hlaleah. Florida
33010. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 28,
1983; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said at Miami. Florida
on this 18 day of December.
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A MINGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18350 December 24. 31 1982
January 7,14 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OFFLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-1210
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
WILFREDO M I No/.
Petitioner Husband
and
MARIA delos
ANGELESLUGO.
Respondent-Wife
TO: MARIA delos
ANGELES LUGO
Calle 64 E dlf.
No. 20 Apart. 8
2nd Floor Bouelvard
Guinea.
Havana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW, attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 101 N.W. 12th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33128.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 18, 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 12 day of Jan-
nuary. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARIANO SOLE. ESQ.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33128
Telephone: (108)838-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
18780 January 14.21, S8;
February 4.1988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-8220
Division 03
IN RE ESTATE OF
LOIS BEVERLY JAMES
a-k-a LOIS B JAMES.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of LOIS BEVERLY
JAMES a-k-a LOIS B JAMES,
deceased. File Number 82-8220.
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which is 73 W Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130 The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below
All Interested persons are re-
qulced to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: ill all
claims against the estate and
IS) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE KOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 14.1983.
Personal Representative
William H James
a-k-a
William Harris James
6969 Collins Avenue
Apt 904
Miami Beach. FL 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representative
HENRY M WAITZKIN
740 -71st Street
Miami Beach. FL 33141
Telephone: 305-8650353
18880_______January 14 21 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 821*204
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
YVES SANON-JULES
Petltloner-HUSBAND
and
JESSIE SANON-JVLES
Respondent WIFE
TO JESSIE SANON-JULES
Residence Address.
8730 144 Street
Jamaica
Now York 11435
YOI' ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq.. 1M90
N W 7th Ave. Suite 206.
Miami, Florida 33169 on or
before February 11. 1983 and
file the original with the clerk
of this Court either before serv-
ice on Petitioner's attorney or
immediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the Petition
DATED: DecemberSO, 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
l Circuit Court Seal)
BY: Steven M Bobes
as Deputy Clerk
18374 January 7.14:
21.28,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 12 111 S3 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
SHARON K. ROUKAS,
Petitioner Wife
and
MATTHEW O. ROUKAS.
Respondent Husband
TO: MATTHEW O. ROUKAS
524 Bomb Squadron
Wurtemith. Michigan 48753
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
STANLEY E. GOODMAN.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 100 East Sth Avenue,
Hlaleah. Fla. 33010. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
January 28. 1983: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 16 day of Dec.
1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Cierfc, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. MINGUE2
As Deputy Clark
18181 December 14.111982
January 7.14 1983
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case No. 82-1*014
IN RE: The Marriage of
ESPERANTA BURNS
Petitioner-Wife
vs.
JONATHAN BURNS.
Respondent-Husband
TO JONATHAN BURNS.
Residence unknown, shall
serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 812 N.W.
12th Avenue. Miami. Florida.
33136. and file original with
Court Clerk on or before Feb. 4.
1983. otherwise a default will be
entered. Dated: December 28.
1982
RICHARD BRINKER
By MJ Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
18367 December 31. 1982;
January 7, 14.21. 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-tf 82
IN RE ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN SAEWITZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
stilt.- of Benjamin Saewltz.
deceased. File Number 82-9982.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 W Flagler St..
Miami. Florida 33130 The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (II all
claims against the estate and
l2i any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris-
diction of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 7.19SZ
Personal Representative:
TOBY SAEWITZ
5500 So. Collins Ave No 402.
Miami Beach. Florida '
LYNN W FROMBERG.
Esquire
Attorney for Personal
Representative
FROMBERG FROMBERG
ROTH, GROSS. COHEN.
SHORE* BERKE P.A
No 800. 2500 E Hallandale
Beach Blvd Hallandale.
Florida 33009
Telephone 94O-07Oe
18377 January 7. 14.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 82-14758
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CLOTIDE LAURENT.
Petitioner, Wife,
and
DIEUSEUL LAURENT
Respondent-Husband
TO: DIEUSEUL LAURENT
UNKNOWN address
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a PeUUon For
Dissolution Of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to
said peUUon on peUUoner's
isttorney. GEORGE T.
RAMANI, ESQ., Suite 711,
Biscayne Building. 19 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 and file the Original
Answer or Pleading In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before February
11. 1983 If you fall to do so.
judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said peUUon.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Florida,
this 3rd day of January. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County, Florida
By: A. Mingues
Deputy Clerk
18876 January?. 14,
___________________SI. 38.1981.
NOTICE UNDER-----------
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name of
SYNC STUDIOS at number
7841 Biscayne Boulevard, in the
City1 of Miami. Florida, Intends
to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dada County. Florida.
Dated at Miami Florida, this
list day of December, 1982
FRANK FALESTRA.
President
Sync Studios. Inc.
JOSHUA D. BASH. ESQ.
Attorney for Applicant
Suite SSS
1926 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florida 18020
06-940 1100-923 1400
18172 December 81, 1982;
January 7. 14.21 1981


"Page TVB "Tne "Jewisti Kionoian / I nday, January 14, l03
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 13-1 27
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANDREW J. SWEET.
Deceased.
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of ANDREW J.
SWEET, deceased. File Num-
ber 83-127. Is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which Is 73 West
flatter Street. Miami, Florida
33130. The co-personal repre-
sentatives of the estate are
Nelan and Audrey Sweet,
whose address Is 4001 North
Bay Road. Miami Beach.
Florida 331*0. The name and
address of the personal repre-
sentatives' attorney la set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contln- ;
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this NoUce of Admlnistra
Uon: January 14. 1983
Nelan Sweet, as
Co-Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ANDREW J. SWEET.
Deceased
Audrey Sweet, as
Co-Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ANDREW J. SWEET.
Deceased
Dennis R. Turner
Attorney for the
Personal Representatives
Arky, Freed, Stearns
Watson A Greer. P.A.
One Biscayne Tower, Suite 2800
Miami. Florida 33131
(306) 374-4800
18397_______January 14.21.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 13-410
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
OLGA ADAMSON
Petitioner WIFE
and
AUSTIN ADAMSON
Respondent HUSBAND
TO: AUSTIN ADAMSON
Residence Address:
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq., 16490
N.W. 7th Ave., Suite 200.
Miami, Florida 3S1M- on or be-
fore February 18. 1983 and Hie
the original with the clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
agalnat you for the relief
demanded in the Petition.
DATED: January 6,1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal)
By: N. A. Hewett
aa Deputy Clerk
18301 January 14, 21.28;
February 4.1883
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case NO. 83-842
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALPHA BANKS. WIFE
and
FREDDIE A. BANKS.
HUSBAND
TO: FREDDIE A. BANKS
Residence Address:
2903 Market Street,
Apt. No. 7
Oakland.
California 94804
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution ol
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
Bruce N. Crown. Esq., 16490
N.W. 7th Avenue, Suite 206.
Miami. Florida 33189 on or be-
fore February 18, 1983 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter' other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
DATED: January 10, 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal l
By: C. Moore
as Deputy Clerk
18396 January 14. 21.28;
February 4.198 c,
NOTICE OF
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 12-7828
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
DEBORAH LYNE RAGAN
Petltloner-Wlfe
and
JERRY WAYNE RAGAN
Respondent-Husband
TO: JERRY WAYNE
RAGAN
ID. 11273
Cell Block C
Hartford County
Detention Center
1030 Rock springs Ave.
Bel Air. Md. 21014
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any; to it on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
1190 N. E. 183 Street, Miami.
Florida (Room 316). and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore February 18. 1983; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLO RIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 11 day of Jan
nuary. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal I
RAY FRIEDMAN. Esq.
1190N.E. 183 Street
Miami. Florida
Telephone: 94S-8925
(Room 316)
Attorney for Petitioner
18398 January 14. 21. 28;
February 4, 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 83-142
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
SAINT HOMERE
JEAN BAPTISTS.
Petitioner-husband,
and
ROSE CASSILIA
JEAN BAPTISTE.
Respondent wife.
YOU. ROSE CASSILIA
JEAN BAPTISTE. residence
unknown, are required to file
your answer to the petition for
dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court
and serve a copy thereof upon
the petitioner's attorney, Mar-
tin Cohen. Esq., 832 S. W. 1st.
Street. Miami. Fla. 33130. on or
before February 18. 1983, or
else petition will be confessed.
Witness my hand and the seal
of this Court, at Miami. Dade
County. Florida, this 6th dayol
January, 1983.
Richard P.Brtnker
Clerk, Circuit Court
By: A. Mlnguez
Deputy Clerk
18378 January 7,14,
21, 28,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-530
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
GLADYS JIMENEZ.
Petitioner Wife,
and
JOSE JIMENEZ.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: JOSE JIMENEZ
Almacenadora Jimenez
Avenlda Perlmetral
Cumana
Estado de Sucre.
Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defense. If any. to It on DAVID
I. SCHLOSBERG. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
626 N.W. 27th Avenue. Suite
100. Miami. Florida 33126. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8 day of Jan-
uary. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. Moore
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
DAVID I. SCHLOSBERG
526 N. W. 27th Avenue.
Suite 100
Miami. Florida 33126
Attorney for Petitioner
18387 January 14.21.28;
February 4. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE '
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
No. 82-17104 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTHA 1.IG1 A
PEDROZA.
Petitioner-Wife.
and
HAROLD UMBERTO
PEDROZA,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: Mr Harold Umberto
Pedrosa
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
Bruce M. Singer, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
1090 Kane Concourse, Bay Har-
bor Islands. Florida 33164. and
me the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 4. 1983; other-
wise a default will be entered
agalnat you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of De-
cember. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC. L Alexander
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
BRUCE M SINGER
1090 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands.
FL 33164
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (306)866-8738
18370 December 81.1982;
January 7,14.21,1983
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC CAM No. 82 14874
IN RE: The Marriage of
NICOLE AZOR. Petitioner
Wtfe.
vs.
CARLO AZOR.
Respondent-Husband
TO: CARLO AZOR
87 St. Pauls Place
No. 2-B
Brooklyn.
New York 11228
shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attor-
ney. 613 N. W. 19th Avenue,
Miami. Florida, SS1M. and Die
original with Court Clerk on or
before January 28. 1983, other-1
wise a default will be en to red
Dated: December 21, 1982.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: C P Cope land
18*87 December 24, 31, 1982,
January 7.14, 1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83-4*8
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MASILLON ST. FORT,
Petitioner Husband,
and
DEI.IVERENCE
MITCHELST FORT.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: Dellverence
MltchelSt.Fort
Fox Hill
P.O Box 939
Nassau, Bahamas
YOL' ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a ropy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on
LLOYD M ROUTMAN. ES-
QUIRE, attorney for Petition
er. whose address is Suite 615.
Bamett Bank Building. 79O0
N.E. 2nd Avenue. Miami, Flor-
ida 33138. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Feb-
ruary 18. 1983: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary. 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. Esq.
Suite 616.
7900 N.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18386 January 14. 21.28;
________________February 4.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 82 19114
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MICHELINE McCOY
Petitioner-Wife,
and
JOHNNY MACK McCOY
Petitioner-Husband.
TO: JOHNNY MACK McCOY
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
Harvey D. Friedman, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
420 Lincoln Road Suite 379.
Miami Beach. Fl 33139. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 6 day of Jan-
uary, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Harvey D. Friedman
420 Lincoln Road Suite 379
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: (306)6310391
Attorney for Petitioner
18384 January 14. 21.28;
__^___________February 4.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name A. P
8. Wholesale, at 4401 NW 7 St
Miami. Fla. 33128 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Associated Plumbing
Stores, Inc.
18147 December 24. 31.1982;
______________January 7.14.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Sun-
shine Care Center at 2467 S.W.
6th St., Miami Fla. 33136 in-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Owner Beatrix M. Prado
18*98 January 14,21. 28;
February 4,1~ ~
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. (3-413
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE. The Marriage of
EDWARD W. BERRI
Petitioner-husband
and
MARIA MELITINA BERRI
Respondent-wife
TO MARIA MELITINA
BERRI
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to it on
RAY FRIEDMAN, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
2750 N. E. 193rd Street. Miami.
Florida 33180. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Feb-
ruary 18. 1983: otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
The notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this day of Jan-
uary. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. Moore
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
RAY FRIEDMAN. Esq
2780 N.E. 193 Street
Miami. Florida 33180
Telephone 949-8926
Attorney for Petitioner
18385 January 14.21.28.
February 4. 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 82 1527* FC( 19)
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
ALIAS
IN RE: The Marriage of
OSCAR SANCHEZ.
Petitioner,
and
CECILIA SANCHEZ.
Respondent.
TO: CECILIA SANCHEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
MELVIN J ASHER. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 1860 S.W. 8th Street,
Suite 208, Miami. Florida 33135.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before February 18. 1983;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 7 day of Jan-
nuary. 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18390 January 14.21.28;
February 4.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
Diamond Video Productions at
11927 N.E. 6th Avenue. Hi.*
cayne Park. Florida 33161 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Arthur David
"Jack" Diamond
CypenA Cypen
Attorney for Diamond
Video Productions
828 Arthur Godfrey Road .*
Miami Beach. Florid* 33140
Telephone: (Swr"*2-4721
18379 January 14, 21,28;
February 4.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
SHERI INTERIORS at 10300
SW 126 St Miami. Florida
33178 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
Shut Hlrschfleld
18394 January 14,21, 28;
February 4,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 83 434
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of
OVIDIOVALDES.
Petitioner,
and
OLGA SUSAN A CORVO.
Respondent
TO: OLGA SUSAN A CORVO
Relna No 401
Entre GervasloA
Escobar
HA van* E Cuba
YOt ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been-"
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
MelvlnJ Asher Esq attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1850 SW 8th Street. Suite 206.
Miami. Florida 33135. and file
the oriKlnal with the clerk of
Ihe above styled court on or be-
fore February 18. 1983; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you lor the relief de-
manded in the complaint or pe-
tition
WITNESS my hand and the-
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 7 day of Jan-
uary. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
AsClerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
K y M I Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seali
18389 January 14.21.28:
February 4.1983
"%.
IN THE CIHCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 8? 9899
IN RE ESTATE OF
Jll.il SSHESLOW
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration
of the estate of Julius Sheslow,
deceased. Kile Number82-9899.
Is pending In Ihe Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, 'iir address of
which is 73 Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida. The personal
representative of the estate Is
NETT1B SHESLOW. whose
address in 6770 Indian Creek
Drive, Miami Beach. Florida.
The name and address of the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with Ihe clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when it
will become due shall be
staled. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be.
suited If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections sney may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or Ihe venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: Jannuary 14,1983.
Nettle Sheslow
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Julius Sheslow
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ByHylanH Kout
Charles GerUerA
HylanH.Kout
420 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
Telephone: 538-0832
18392 January 14.21.1983

i......- .**... ..-.-. ..-.-.. ..-.....


Friday, January 14, 1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Film Folk-Tootsie
SRBERTG.LUFT
Copyright 1983)
elf graphic Agency. Inc.)
fWOOD Dustin
in his current picture
unlikely title of
renders a thoroughly
characterization as an
Jed actor who is shun-
agent and producer
ray because he is im-
handle. Until he de-
Dse as a young woman.
kggling performer be-
heading lady in a tele-
Mp opera and is lauded
fblic with thousands of
ing in to the network
i who are pleased with
lul portrayal of a hos-
linistrator who is one of
| and gains the respect of
luff.
is the nickname the
lor condescendingly has
|Dorothy Michaels who
and unbeknown to
but his roommate and
the versatile Michael
Iwho as a male was
lor years.
Bteresting part of the
th a screenplay by Larry
sin! Murray Schisgal, is
[that this is not another
\'s Aunt" but a realistic-
en yarn dealing with a
gradually comes to the
n that he has to try
ig off-key to gain recog-
Vnd as Sydney Pollack,
lucer-director of the film,
Intedly. "Tootsie" is the
a guy who puts on a
by doing so becomes a
in.
fHE SCREEN. Hoffman
jnded by an ensemble of
performers. from
Lange (star of the
Farmer film). Teri Garr
Coleman (the male
jst of "From 9 to 5"). to
Gaynes. Charles Durning
Iney Pollack, the latter in
Jted role of the busy talent
an has developed his
r delicately and with
ight. There are no cheap
es in "Tootsie." and no
be embarrassed except
Michaels alias Michael
or vice versa. However,
voice objections to one
in the opening scene of
ture, when Hoffman
It" an acting class. Un-
and completely un-
ite comes up with a
hen the Nazis were short
p. they threw some worn-
the furnace." We could
Hoffman if he were a
tor reading some dia-
nished him. But "Toot-
* own co-production with
lo.
K Dustin Hoffman when
ng him with a Golden
kward for Joe Levines
aduate" at a time 1 was
of the Foreign Press in
'inner of the 1979
Award and the New
Jm Critics Award for
vs. Kramer." also
a for an Oscar for "The
" "Midnight Cowboy"
any." Hoffman today is
Jollywood's foremost and
highest paid actors. He
'"be performer with the
I quality to portray a
I of characters who are
different.
We Hope
1 Never Need Us
But If You Do
*'s. Evelyn Sarasohn
y Memorial
Monument, Inc.
Northeast 2nd Avenue
759-1669
IN THE 1964-65 season, he ap-
peared in New York as a hunch-
back homosexual in Ronald Rib-
man's black comedy, "Harry.
Noon and Night." On the screen,
the then 30-year-old essayed the
role of an innocent lad in "The
Graduate," one caught by a
sensual older woman.
Dustin Hoffman grew up in the
motion picture environment. His
father, Harry, was a prop man
and set dresser in Hollywood. At
first, Dustin wanted to become a
concert pianist, entering Santa
Monica College as a music major.
Gradually he took an active
interest in the theatre. Leaving
college, he enrolled in acting
classes at the Pasadena Play-
house.
Upon completion of the course,
he went to New York where he
shared an apartment with two
other former Pasadena students,
Robert Duvall and Gene Hack-
man. While working at such di-
verse jobs as dishwasher and
waiter (not unlike the character
in "Tootsie" in the beginning) as
well as typist and orderly at the
New York Psychoanalytic
Institute, he studied with Lee
Strasberg and himself taught
drama at the boy's club in
Harlem.
He made his stage debut in a
Sarah Lawrence College produc-
tion of Gertrude Stein's "Yes Is
For a Very Young Man." follow-
ed by a walk-on part in "A Cook
for Mr. General" which ran on
Broadway for 28 performances.
He joined a company in Boston
and returned to New York as Ulu
Grosbard's assistant on "A View
from the Bridge." In later years,
Grosbard was director of Hoff-
man's "Straight Time."
IN THE spring of 1966. he was
seen at the American Place
Theatre in New York in "The
Journey of the Fifth Horse." for
which he won the Obie Award as
Best Actor Off-Broadway. He
played one of the three person-
alities of the schizoid hero of
Murray Schisgal's "Fragments"
in Stockbridge. Mass. Inciden-
tally, today Schisgal is one of the
two screenplay authors of
"Tootsie." Off-Broadway again,
he was the cockney boilermaker
in Henry Livings farce, "Eh?",
which won him the Theatre
World and Drama Desk
Vernon Rice Awards.
Director Mike Nichols, then
casting "The Graduate." flew
him to Hollywood to test for the
title role. Unlike the character in
"Tootsie." he didn't have to
change his sex to get the leading
role. For John Schlesinger's
"Midnight Cowboy," the love-
;il>lo young graduate became a
pathetic hustler. Ratzo Rizzo. He
was again nominated for an
Academy Award.
Clara Rubinstein,
Na'Amat Official
Clara Rubinstein, former four-
term national treasurer of
Pioneer-Women Na'Arnat,
passed away. She had been a na-
tional leader for the Israel Bonds
Organization and other Zionist
groups, as well as serving as an
officer of Hi Rise Tikvah Chapter
of Pioneer Women.
Memorial services will be held
on Friday, Jan. 14 at 10:30 a.m.
in the offices of South Florida
Council of Pioneer Women,
Lincoln Road.
SINGER
Max. 74. or North Miami Beach, died
January 8. He was a member of Temple
Adath Yeahurun. Survived by wife,
Blanche; sons. Dr. Ell Singer and Dr.
Joseph Singer, both of North Miami
Beach; alatera. Pauline Gappel. Roae
Teacher. Gussie Katz. and Lillian
Lorey. all of NY; and alx grandchildren.
Servtcea were held January at Levitt-
Welnstein
AAKONSON, Pearl J 81. North Miami
Beach. January 12. Klveralde.
CRYSTAL, Minnie Zarchln, S8. Coral
Gablea. Klveralde.
FELDSHEK. Sarah, 67. Miami,
January 12. Gordon. Star of David.
FRIEDMAN. Jeanne Burger. 82.
Miami, January 12. Riverside.
ESTRIN. Jack, North Miami Beach.
January 7 Levitt Welnstein
LANCIT. Nathan. Miami Beach Blas-
berg
SMITH. Isidore, January 7.
SUFFER. Lena, 97. Miami Beach. Le-
Wtt-Weinsteln.
PRAKIN, Ruth. 75. Miami Beach. Jan-
uary 9. Gordon.
PRINCE. Morris, Delray Beach. Bias-
berg
UNGEK. Harry. Januarys Riverside
HOSENZWEIG. Max. Miami Beach
Biasberg.
LAZAN. Carl. Miami. January 6. Rubin
Zllbert.
KOSENFELD. Murray A. RublnZll
bert
JACOBS. Simon. Miami Beach. Jan-
uary 6 Blasberg.
DUBNER, PrtscUla Hart. Surfalde.
January B. Blasberg Mt. Nebo.
GUMBERG. laador. Miami Beach, Jan-
uary 0. Blasberg.
RUBIN. Minnie, Miami Beach. January
9. Rubin /.ilbert.
BUSIEW1EZ. Esther. 84, Miami Beach.
January V Rubin /.Ilbert
FREEMAN. Florence. Miami Beach,
Januarys. Rubin /.ilbert Ml Nebo.
PERLMUTTER. Anna. Miami Beach
Rubin /'.llli.-it
CHODOSH, Benjamin. Delray Beach
Blasberg
KIR MAN. l .oil is. North Miami Beach.
January 10. Riverside.
LEFKOW1TZ. Sophie. 84. North Miami
Beach. I .evltt. Wrlnstem
MEYERHOFF. Jack. Miami Beach
Blasberg.
SMITH. Minnie. Miami Beach Rubln-
Zllbert.
VOLK. Nina, Miami Beach Rubin-
Zllbert.
JETTLEMAN. Charles E., 68. January
l Blasberg.
l.IPMAN. Arthur H 61. January 3.
KISKIND, Barbara. 71. January 4. Riv-
erside .
RUBENSTEIN
Mae, of North Miami Beach, a resident
for 15 years, coming from NY, died
January 6. She Is survived by a brother,
ixiuls Berlin of Hollywood; sisters. Rose
Hast of North Miami Beach and Edna
Romanoff and Beatrice SUllman of
Forest Hills, NY; and many nieces and
nephews. She was a life member of
Women's American ORT and Hadas-
sah. Services were held January 9 at
Riverside.
GORDON
Milton. 70. a resident of Miami for the
past 26 years, paased away. He was. a
member of NAWCAS. He was the hus-
band of Mildred; father of Lois Hutt.
Sherry Engelken, and Randy Kaplan,
all of Miami; grandfather of seven; and
brother of Tlllle Van Dyne of Miami
Beach, Ida Greenberg of NY, and
Evelyn Sherwood of Miami Beach.
Services were held January 9 at River-
side with Interment following at Star of
David Cemetery.
LINDEN
Jerome D 59. a resident of North
Miami Beach for 23 years, formerly of
Brooklyn, died January 6. He la sur-
vived by a wife, Martlyn; daughter and
son-in-law. Robin and Roy McCullars.
son and daughter-in-law, Nell and Paula
Linden; all of Miami; three-
grandchildren; brother, Marvi
I .thenthai of Miami; sister. Dorothy
Knibn of NY; and mother. Anna 1.1lien
thai of Miami. Services were held Jan-
uary 9 at Klveralde Chapel.
TEITELBAUM
Roae, 80, a resident of Miami Beach for
the past 12 years, died. She was a life
member of Friends of the Retarded, life
member of the City of Hope, and a
volunteer at St. Francis Hospital for the
past six years. She waa the wife of
Morris; mother of Beverly Bayar of
White Meadow Lake. NJ and Eleanor
Fried of North Miami Beach; grand-
mother of six; great-grandmother of
four; and sister of Leah Baumel of NY.
Services were held January 9 at River-
side with Interment following at Ml.
Nebo Cemetery.
EISENSTEIN
Jeanette, 84. of Miami Beach for 15
years, died January 6. She Is survived
by daughters. Laura Post of Virginia
Beach. VA and Beatrice Barrelra of
Braall; son. David of Staten Island. NY ;
three grandchildren, and one great-
granddaughter. She was a volunteer at
Douglas Gardens Miami Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged and a mem-
ber of Pioneer Women In Miami Beach
and NY. Services were held January 9
In N Y. Local arrangements by Menorah
Chapels.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SIMM BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC

Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-16%
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
18840 West Dixie Hwy
Kepresenled by a levin, r.U.
New York: IJ I21 263-7MJ0 Queen, Blvri .. -"Mh Kil Fnrasl Mills. N Y
LEVIN
George G.. a resident of Miami Beach
for the past 17 years, formerly of Pitts-
burgh, died January 6 at the Miami
Heart Institute He Is survived by a
wife. Betty, sons. Philip of Detroit and
Arnold of North Miami Beach, daugh-
ters. Gall Fried of Chicago and Elaine
Levin of Pennsylvania; sisters. Freda
Sandwelss of San Diego. Rose Gould of
Los Angeles, and Llbby London of
Miami Beach; and seven grandchil-
dren. He owned Eaton Hall Apartments
on Miami Beach. Services were held
January 7 at Blasberg.
\
covert
till 'J
l&&
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 No'lli^pst 3rd Street
Tel 26! 761?
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIE S. BLASBERG MICHAEL C. BLASBERG
Funeral Director
Past President Jewish Funeral
Directors of America
7?0 SEVENTV-FlflST STREET
Funeral Director
865-2353 miami beach Florida 33141
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Worki ng Together
Traditions established through
four generations of family ownership
.. careful attendance to the family's
wishes dedication to the time honored
customs of lewish law compassionate guidan..
when the hour of need arises
in Florida
Bis.iiimi- Bin/ mill 2 JOS ujuwil
2 VIS W IHlfMH BM tVrnVW Bf.hi Fl II4 4 I
105 427-4700
S91 S Prtrfc Dmr at U S 441. Marantc Fl UOf.1
105 427-4700
<>800 W Oakland Park BM
Fl LllnrffTsflaV iTlimfTfl FL til 11
105 742-riOOO
Palm Bf*h 105 811-0887
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MAPTMAN MU.L.EP
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Page 16-B The Jewish Flondian Friday. January U. 1963
Support
DON'T MISS THE EXTRA SAVINGS. .
Redeem your Procter 0 Gomble
moiled coupons ot *Jg
JON US fc SUPPOPTiNG SPKUL OLYMPCS Ry eacf coupon you
mtmm *i our store 5y January 22.1983 Procter & Game* toll contribute
5c to Speoal Gtyrpcs A non-profit organcation dedicated to a nappter
more UMng We (or mrihons of mentaty narocapped children and adults
PATfTRY PRIDE AND
PROCTER & GAMBLE
WANT YOU!
Olympics
special items.
MOTTS64-OZ BTL REG OB
NATURAL (SAVE 30c,
Apple Juice
$149
1
GREEN GIANT ASSORTED
12 OZ TO 17-OZ CANS
Vegetables
2/89<
GOLDEN
RIPE
Bananas
FRESH
3 LBS & OVER
23* 99
FARMER GRAY USDA GRADE *
FROZEN w auto POP UP T'Vt"
Ground Beef Turfcev0
LB
irkeys ,u
69
CHUNK LIGHT IN OIL OR WATER
6'jOZ CAN PANTRY PRIDE
Tuna Fish
79
2 LTR BTL
*AB SPRITE OR
Coke
$129
1
MClNTOSH CRISP JUICY
3 LB BAG
79<
FLA OR SHIPPED PREM FRESH U S CHOICE GENUINE AME'
iWHOLE OR SIRLOIN HALF
Lots Of Chicken Lamb Leqs
EA BAG
49
$189
I
-a
PANTRY PRIDE GIANT ROLL
ASSORTED COLORS SAVE 18c
Paper Towels
2/$J00
BREAKSTONE
16-OZ CUP
Sour Cream
U S 1 ALL PURPOSE WHITE HYGRADE BALL PARK
10 LB BAG MEAT OR BEEF 16-OZ PKG
Potatoes Franks
89* 79* $169
STORES RESERVE
THE RIGHT ID LIMTT
QUANTTTTES DOE 10
AVAILABILITY!
PRICES AND ITEMS GOOD
JAN 13 THRU JAN 19 1963 1
"Pride "Pride "Pride I cPride I "Pride


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