The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02814

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
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Volume 56Number 1 Two Sections
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Miami, FloridaFriday, January 7,1983 cfmmocm i.m.hhm.
Price 50 Cents
Normalization Still
An Issue in Talks
I e'^diot Acnronol (Courtesy WZPS. Jerusalem)
Vatican Red-Faced
Ex-lStofci Heads
Scandal Probe
ROME (JTA) One of four experts appointed by
he Vatican to investigate the Banco Ambrosiano scandal
allegedly a former Nazi, Hermann Abs, who was once a
i > financial advisor to Hitler.
THE NAZI war crimes documentation center in
ritnna. headed by Simon Wiesenthal, identified Abs and
urging the Vatican to remove him from the panel. A
lunilar call was issued by the Simon Wiesenthal Center at
\\ shiva University in Los Angeles.
Abs is presently honorary chairman of West Germany's
)eutsche Bank. According to Wiesenthal, he headed the
ugest bank in Nazi Germany from 1941-45, supervised
the expropriation of private businesses and participated
nth I. G. Farben in building a synthetic rubber plant
ktaf fed by slave labor. The Vatican was reportedly embar-
rassed by these disclosures.
Navon in U.S.
For Talks With Reagan
And Jewish Community
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
P'i'A) Israeli President
fuzhak Navon arrived here
Tuesday morning for an of-
icial working visit in which
le was to meet with Presi-
dent Reagan at the White
House.
The White House meeting was
to take place Wednesday morn-
ing after which Reagan was to
hold a luncheon for the Israeli
President. Upon their arrival at
Andrews Air Force base. Navon
and his wife. Ofira, were greeted
by Secretary of State George
Slnilt/ and his wife. Helena.
NAVON DID NOT have the
hectk round of meetings with
government officials as is the
case when Premier Menachem
Begin or other top-ranking mem-
bers of the Israeli government
come here. The Israeli President
is head of the state, but his duties
are largely ceremonial. The Pre-
mier is the head of the govern-
ment.
In addition, there is a feeling
here that the Reagan Adminis-
tration does not want to be ac-
cused, in Israel, of seeming to
promote Navon as an alternative
to Begin. The popular Israeli
President, a Sephardi and fourth-
generation Jerusalemite, is fre-
Continued on Page 6-A
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Government sources
said this week that Israel is
fairly satisfied with the
progress of the Israel-
Lebanon negotiations to
date even though a stale-
mate persists over the de-
finition of the "nor-
malization" item on the
agenda.
Speaking after a weekly
Cabinet session, the sources
stressed the very warm atmos-
phere that had prevailed during
the first two rounds of the talks,
at Khalde in Lebanon and Kiryat
Shemona last week. There was to
be another round at Khalde,
Monday where renewed efforts
were to be made to resolve the
normalization issue, followed by
a round again at Kiryat Shemona
Thursday.
THE CABINET is understood
to have confirmed the earlier
policy line adopted by Premier
Menachem Begin and Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir and
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon:
That Israel can forego the use of
the word "normalization" but it
insists on retaining the concept
as an item on the agenda.
On last Thursday, the delega-
tions made unsuccessful efforts
to find acceptable substitutes for
"normalization." Lebanon's use
of the term "future relations" is
unsatisfactory to Israel and
Israel's proposal of "normal
bilateral relations" is rejected by
Lebanon.
The Israeli government
sources stressed the complexity
of the political situation inside
Lebanon which reflects itself in
the caution and hesitancy of
Beirut's negotiators.
THERE WAS no confirmation
here of reports from Beirut that
the senior U.S. special envoy
Philip Habib, will be back in the
area this Wednesday and will
lead the American team at
Thursday's session at Kiryat
Shemona. Nor was there any
word here of progress on the
Continued on Page 13-A
King Hussein
Diplomat Says
Hussein Will Be Sitting
Down at Table With Israel
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
King Hussein of Jordan
will announced in a few
weeks that he will join the
Middle East peace talks
with Israel, according to
William Quandt, who was
the Mideast expert in the
National Security Council
during the Carter Adminis-
tration.
Quandt, who is now a member
of the prestigious Brookings In-
stitution, is touring the Mideast
and arrived Sunday in Israel
from Jordan where he met with
senior government officials over
the weekend.
IN A LECTURE at the Ameri-
can Cultural Center in Tel Aviv,
he said he had "a strong impres-
sion" that Hussein would an-
nounce his intention to enter the
peace talks. Quandt said Jordan
would send a delegation which
would include Palestinians who
are not members of the PLO but
are accepted by that organiza-
tion.
He said he had asked the Jor-
danians what message he should
take with him to Israel, and he
quoted the following response:
"Tell them that this would be an
historic opportunity which
should not be missed. After many
hesitations, we are now willing to
accept Israel, and we feel that we
can develop much better relations
with her than those which now
exist between Israel and Egypt.
If this opportunity is missed, we
do not know whether our young
generation, which is much more
extremist than us, will be ready
to do in 10 years what we are pre-
pared to do now."
Quandt expressed confidence
that Hussein would indeed join
the peace talks because he real-
izes that maintaining a passive
attitude would cause him more
harm than becoming involved.
However. Quandt added, prior to
Continued on Page 10-A
Deep Dark Secret
Behind Israel's Arms Industry
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The fact of Israel's arms
sales to many countries
throughout the world both
of new Israeli-designed and
manufactured items and
also of used war material
is an open secret.
But details of what is sold, in
what quantities and to whom, is a
closely guarded secret. There is
much speculation and many peo-
ple not in the know appear to
make statements, to the press
and elsewhere. But those who
know, don't say anything. A re-
quest for details is met with a
blank stare which seems to say:"
"How silly can you be to ask such
a question?"
SOME OF the smaller Israeli-
produced items which are sold
abroad are not such a secret,
though little information is
available apart from photo-
graphs in the press and on televi-
sion. When the President's
guards or secret service opera-
tives, or anti-terrorist squads are
in action, they frequently are
seen carrying Israeli-made Uzzi
sub-machineguns.
These weapons are also sup-
plied to NATO countries. In an
attack on President Reagan last
year, his security guards were
seen brandishing such Israeli-
made weapons. Other Israeli-
manufactured war equipment on
Continued on Page 10 A


.... Ml -.......' *****
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 7,1983
How Riverside made its name.
It takes years to build a name that is
second to none.
It takes nearly 70 years of experience
and commitment to Jewish tradition.
It began with Riverside's founder,
Charles Rosenthal. He believed that being a
Jewish funeral director was more than just a
business. It was a very special calling that
demanded absolute integrity, genuine
compassion, true charity and a dedication and
deep involvement in Jewish life.
Today, Charles Rosenthal's beliefs are
Riverside's policies. People like Carl Grossberg,
Alfred Golden, Leo Hack, Andrew Fier and a
new generation of Jewish management are
seeing to it.
At Riverside, we've always tried hard
to be the best. And to us that means no let-up of
effort. No compromising of standards. And no
cutting of service.
That's how Riverside got its name.
That's how we intend to keep it.
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, Vice President, Religious Advisor
Andrew Fier, Vice President
RIVERSIDE
Memorial Chapel. Inc./Funeral Director! .
The most respected name in Jewish funeral
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I.IWU; lliflJUWUMrWUUUUl rag" .-
Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
El Al Cliff-Hanger:
Planes May Fly Soon

By JTA Services
TEL AVIV The El Al cliff-
hanger teetered over the week-
end but came up Sunday point-
ing skyward. Airline and court
sources said some planes may be
airborne within the next week or
so, probably on the route to
South Africa which the company
apparently found its most lucra-
tive in the past.
Israel's national air carrier,
"grounded for more than three
months, was facing liquidation,
by decision of its shareholders,
meaning the government which
holds 98 percent of its shares.
Talks about reorganization broke
down last Thursday night and a
Jerusalem district court said Fri-
day it would appoint a permanent
receiver this week to wind the
company up and sell its assets to
private interests.
But Sunday night, at a meet-
ing at his Jerusalem home, dis-
trict court Judge Yaacov Bazak
gave the temporary receiver,
Amram Blum, permission to try
to get the idle aircraft back into
service as soon as agreement is
reached on backpay for fur-
loughed employes and severance
and other entitlements for the
manv who will be dismissed.
Shamir Admits Contacts
With PLO About POWs

JERUSALEM Foreign
Minister Yitzkah Shamir in-
directly acknowledged Monday
that Israel has had contacts with
the Palestine Liberation Or
ifannization in an effort to free six
Israeli soldiers being held as
prisoners of war in Lebanon by
the PLO.
Shamir told a meeting of the
Knesset Defense and Foreign Af-
fairs Committee that Israel was
doing "everything" to free the
I'OWs. "Redemptionof prisoners
runs deep in Judaism," he said.
Israel rejects no means to
achieve this end, and therefore
initiated steps which we had dis-
approved of from the political
> point of view."
Shamir refused to disclose any
details regarding the negotia-
tions with the PLO. "As long as
there are no substantial results, I
will not make any announce-
ments." he said.
Britain's Arab Ties
Souras'83Baglns
LONDON Britain's rela-
tions with the Arab world in 1983
have begun on a sour note, with
Saudi Arabia cancelling a visit by
Foreign Secretary Francis Pym.
The move is seen as retaliation
for the continuing deadlock over
a visit to Britain by the Arab
League delegation formed last
September to explain the Fez
summit proposals to the five per-
manent members of the United
Nations Security Council.
Prime Minister Margaret
Thatcher has refused to meet the
delegation if it includes Farouk
Kaddoumi, a senior PLO official,
ind the Arabs just as adamantly
say he must come.
Some British industrialists
have expressed concern that the
new strain in Anglo-Saudi rela-
tions could endanger the trade
between the two countries, put at
r>.r> billion Pounds Sterling.
Yiddish Paper Planning
To Go Weekly
NEW YORK The Forward
Association announced Monday
t'rtat. because of continuing in-
creases in operating costs, it was
giving up its "struggle" to con-
tinue publishing the Jewish Daily
Forward on its current Tuesday
through Friday basis and would
begin publication as a weekly on
The Association, noting that
the Yiddish daily had begun pub-
lication as a daily on April 22,
1897, said the last issue of the
Yiddish daily would be published
on Jan. 28. In its statement, the
Association said that the recent-
ly-started English-language
weekly supplement would con-
tinue.
Liz Taylor Makes
Medical Headlines Again
TEL AVIV Screen star
Elizabeth Tavlor who checked
into Beersheba's eye, ear, nose
and throat clinic briefly last
Thursday for treatment of a sore
throat and other cold symptoms,
required medical attention again
this week.
This time it was for a slightly
bruised foot Ms. Taylor suffered
when the car she was riding in to
pay a call on Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon at his Negev ranch,
skidded on a rain-slicked road
and ran into the car ahead of it.
The superstar, on a voluntary
good-will and peace-keeping visit
to Israel, made it to the Sharon
spread where she and her party
spent several convivial hours
with the Sharon family. A physi-
cian was summoned to apply
necessary treatment to the ter-
minal end of the Taylor ver-
tebrae. She returned to her Tel
Aviv hotel later in the evening
without further incident.
Sephardi Jew Given
Life Peerage by Queen
We Did Not Condemn Begin's Policies'
LONDON Sir Derek Ezra,
former chairman of the National
Coal Board, has been given a life
peerage in the New Year honors
list. He will support the Liberal
Party in the House of Lords.
The son of a Sephardi Jew from
Bombay. Ezra was born in Tas-
mania 61 years ago. Brought to
Britain as a boy, he was educated
at Cambridge University where
he was a friend and contemporary
of Abba Eban the former Israeli
Foreign Minister.
During World War II, he
served in the Intelligence Corps,
reaching the rank of Lieutenant
Colonel. On demobilization, he
joined Britain's newly national-
ized coal industry and headed the
coal board's marketing depart-
ment before becoming its chair-
man 11 years ago.
IDF Finds Soviet Rockets
Aimed at Galilee Again
TEL AVIV An Israeli army
patrol on a routine search dis-
covered five Katyusha rocket
launchers in southern Lebanon
about three miles east of the
Galilee panhandle kibbutz of
Manara, an army spokesman an-
nounced. The launchers, which
were discovered last Friday, were
aimed toward the panhandle area
where many Katyusha rockets
fell in the years before the "Peace
for Galilee" operation was under-
taken last June.
The launchers were destroyed
by the army which has been
scouting the area since they were
found in an effort to find those
responsible for placing the wea-
pons there. It is not known when
they were brought to the area.
Israel Radio suggested that
the launchers might have been
set up to disrupt the Israel-Leba-
non talks which were held in Kir-
yat Shemona last Thursday and
are to continue there this week,
also. The mobile launchers were
placed near the Lebanese village
of Magdal Saloum, whose resi-
dents were known to have col-
laborated with the PLO in the
past, the radio said.
NEW YORK (JTA) -
the 30th World Zionist
Congress in Jerusalem did
not vote to condemn the
settlement policies of
Premier Menachem Begin's
government, contrary to
"false and misleading press
reports" to that effect, Ivan
Novick, president of the
Zionist Organization of
America and a delegate to
the Congress declared here.
Novick, chairman of the
Congress' Committee on Political
Affairs, Information and
External Relations, said the
Congress ended with a "hear-
tening display of Jewish unity"
and the adoption of a series of re-
solutions affirming the
"inalienable right of the Jewish
people to Eretz Israel." It also
resolved that "no Arab state will
lie established west of the River
Jordan."
THE DISPUTE over Begins
settlement policies arose when
the Congress plenum approved a
Labor Alignment resolution
opposing continued settlement in
the heavily Arab populated areas
of the West Bank and Gaza Strip.
The Congress Presidium refused
to accept the vote and a "good
will" committee, consisting of
representatives of all political
factions, was appointed to try to
achieve a consensus. The result-
ing resolution conceded however
that "The Zionist Congress could
not reach a consensus on the
settlement issue."
Novick acknowledged that
"There was wall-to-wall agree-
ment on every major political
question except the issue of set-
tlements." But "Even on that
issue, the Congress re-affirmed
that 'settlement constitutes a
central expression of the Zionist
idea," he pointed out.
He said the Congress subcom-
mittee on political resolutions
refused to consider a freeze or
moratorium on settlements, "but
this was ignored by the media."
NOVICK SAID he returned
from Jerusalem "encouraged and
uplifted" by the consensus that
emerged from the Congress and
by "the commitment to achieve
agreement that Zionist groups
from extreme left to extreme
right made manifest." He noted
that the nine resolutions present-
ed to the Plenum were
unanimously adopted by the 651
delegates.
"The World Zionist Congress
demonstrated once again that
diversity in the Zionist move-
ment is not to be equated with
disunity." the ZOA president
said. "Every delegate supported
the resolution reading: 'The
Zionist movement and Jewish
people support the State of Israel
in its goal of achieving security
and peace. The Jewish people will
continue to identify with the
Jewish State, which fulfills the
yearnings of generations and the
vision of national redemption "
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Page 4-A The Jewish FJoridian / Friday, Januaiy 7,1983
Some
The American Jewish Committee is
expressing regret that the 97th Congress
failed to enact the Immigration Reform and
Control Act. Harry Truman once set his
sights on the 84th Congress as the "do
nothing" Congress and drubbed it mer-
cilessly.
The 97th Congress, by contrast, can not
be so critically described. Still, the
American Jewish Committee makes a good
point. What we are not so sure about are
the AJCommittee's reasons, which praised
the act because it "retained generous
provisions for family reunification and
provided for a fair legalization and amnesty
system to regularize the status of aliens
who entered the country illegally before
certain dates."
These days, we find ourselves hard-
pressed to point positively to the British
for little if anything. Still, the Thatcher
Government has just rammed through an
immigration reform act that recognizes the
realities of Britain's capabilities today so
far as its capacity is concerned to absorb
the untold millions of would-be settlers
there from its far-flung Commonwealth.
The upshot of the Thatcher success is a
rising alarm that the reform act there is
racist that it is directed against Third
World blacks, Pakistanis and Indians who
have been coming to the Islands in droves
over the past decade and more.
Undoubtedly, the 97th Congress failure
to pass our own Immigration Control and
Reform Act stems from a similar
grassroots sentiment in America to stem
the tide of what appears to be an almost at-
will flood of immigration from Latin
America and the Caribbean, so much of it
illegal and placing a burden on broad
segments of the country by competing on
the labor market against them.
Far from pressing for an amnesty system
for an untold number of illegal aliens and
because, as the American Jewish Com-
mittee opines, the Immigration Control and
Reform Act "rejected a single numerical
limitation for the entry of refugees into the
United States," the 97th Congress clearly
avoided acting on this legislation because
its sentiments ran in precisely the opposite
direction.
Things Are Looking Up
Things may be looking up. As the New
Year begins, it looks like El Al may soon be
flying again. A paralyzing general strike
was averted when civil service employees in
Israel were given an across-the-board 12
percent wage hike.
And then there's old King Hussein, who
last week let out the message that he's fin-
ally prepared to recognize Israel and do an
even better job of establishing friendly re-
lations than the Egyptians.
Well, that wouldn't be hard, not by a
long shot. The hitch is what the King wants
in return. And what he wants has already
started the tongues of wags wagging with
the witticism that it will be easier to get
talks between Israel and Jordan going than
it will be to get the talks to accomplish
anything.
Still, we must be grateful for good news
under any circumstances, even slender cir-
cumstances. And so, the New Year's begin-
ning deserves our toast
Jewish Floridiain
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Friday. January 7,1983
Volume 56
What might happen to Jews behind the Iron Curtain?
Undoubtedly, there will be those who will
call this racist, too. Particularly for the
Jewish community, there are profound
difficulties involved in showing sympathy
for the 97th Congress' sentiments. We need
only point to the many Jews from behind
the Iron Curtain who are entering the
United States and what might happen to
them were quotas to be strengthened,
particularly in terms of national origins.
The American Jewish Committee ap-
parently has these dangers in mind when it
presses for the Immigration Reform and
Control Act as it stands even if, as it ad-
mits, "the measure is not perfect in all
respects." Still, we are bound to say that,
just as the British have discovered, there
must be limits to the amount of im-
migration absorption that America can
stand.
'Somehow, Overtown Will Survive'
But the U.S. Black Must Prevail
22 TEVETH 5743
Number 1
THE SUNDAY paper
declared: "Somehow, Overtown
Will Survive." No reasonable
person can doubt this prognosis
for the Miami community that
went berserk the other week
when a Cuban policeman shot
and killed a black resident there.
The trouble is whether sur-
viving is enough. I have in mind
the acceptance speech by William
Faulkner of his Nobel prize in
literature when, addressing the
Swedish Academy, he said that
mankind must do more than
merely survive; after all, it has
been doing just that for millenia.
The trick, he said, is for mankind
to prevail, to overcome its primi-
tive roots, to rise above the
primordial. Somehow to "catch a
falling star." as John Donne put
it.
WHAT WE must come to
grips with and now, once and for
all. is why the American black
does little more than survive
and frequently hardly even that.
What we must come to grips with
and now, once and for all, is why
the American black shows little if
any capacity to prevail.
This is a critical question. The
answer concerns not only Miami.
The answer concerns the entire
nation because there are black
communities in every major
American urban center, and they
are ripening, and festering,
toward some terrible explosion.
The reason for a resurgent
black violence is apparent in the
unemployment statistics that
burden the nation as a whole.
Among blacks, the unemploy-
ment rate is disproportionately
higher. The civil libertarians will
add to this the unyielding preju-
dice among whites that keeps
blacks down politically and
socially, as well as economically.
IN MIAMI, both these issues,
unemployment and prejudice,
have taken a special toll because
of the Cuban influx over the past
two decades an influx that has
changed the shape of the entire
community, making large areas
of it foreign from the point of
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view of culture, language and
attitude.
Blacks have reacted to the
change in Miami with a special
agony, for refugees who have
come to the city these past two
decades at the bottom of the
ladder stand in significant
numbers today at the top in
every capacity government,
banking, education, the arts and
sciences.
Furthermore, prejudice against
Cubans has, if anything, been
stronger in all that time than
against the native blacks, who
managed to inspire in whites a
unique sense of sympathy for
their plight, if not an outright
fear of the consequences of the
black displacement. Not only
have Miami's blacks had to
watch these victims of bigotry
succeed in any case. But they
have also had to suffer the Cuban
rise to prominence made, as
blacks see it, on the bridge of
their own backs.
MIAMI'S BLACKS have felt
themselves displaced from the
most menial jobs, traditionally
their province, as Cubans and
other Latins moved up the
refugee ladder from the status of
have-nots to haves, taking on any
employment they could to tide
them over. Is there any wonder
that when a Cuban policeman
shot a black resident of Overtown
that Overtown went berserk?
But this is the question at
which civil libertarians, social
workers and others always stop
in rationalizing black violence. It
is a question they love to ask be-
cause the answers they give are
always the same, and they come
easily. It is a question they had
bettaT avoid now and concentrate
instead on why blacks fail to pre-
vail, on why it is that they have
never viewed their low place in
the American social order as
temporary in the same way the
arriving refugees over the past
two decades viewed it as tem-
porary, as something to tide
them over.
Needed to be asked instead is
what, for instance, makes Amer-
ican blacks different from other
blacks elsewhere, so many of
whom seem more enterprising
and more skilled in the various
disciplines and occupations that
can help them along to become an
effective part of the bourgeois
community.
THE CIVIL libertarians and
social workers instead must ask
why it is that, despite every
conceivable civil rights guarantee
of equal opportunity, as well as
ancillary quarantees to help
achieve that opportunity, blacks
remain at the bottom of the
ladder, directing their energies
not so much at rising as at
seething at whiter for their
failures.
If the ready explanation is pre-
judice against blacks and lack of
education, so too can other large
groups of cultures that have
come to America experienced
prejudice and suffered want of
education and skills: Jews.
Italians, Irish, Greeks, Swedes.
Turks. Let alone the Latins of
most recent vintage. And. except
for the Latins, what other groups
were guaranteed their start
upward, including educational
and skills guarantees in the form
of grants and a national displace-
ment downward of academic and
other achievement levels to arrive
at a cosmetized satisfactory'
performance standard?
Indeed, the black American
experience suggests growing
isolation rather than a struggle to
enter the mainstream
Increasingly, for example, they
Continued on Page 13-A


-,

r*eii-t r .t.t.i **--* I -iiTi^-ll
,ff t-..i* Wto.^.i.1 ^jt AJ-f *k Friday, January 7,-198) / The Jewish Fforidian Page5-A
Hussein Given Full Treatment
By STEWART AIN
And WILLIAM BOLE
WASHINGTON The
upcoming American arms
sale to Jordan will be en-
dorsed by the Reagan Ad-
ministration without any
precondition that Jordan
embrace the Camp David
peace agreement, according
to Presidential Counselor
Edwin Meese.
In an interview in his White
House office. Meese said that
whether Jordan accepts the
Camp David accords is "un-
related" to the arms sale. He said
that although President Reagan
has expressed the hope that mod-
erate Arab states will come to the
peace table, "I don"t think one is
a quid pro quo for the other ... I
don't see them linked."
ASKED WHETHER he
believes the Administration has
been pleased with the actions of
the Saudi Arabian Government,
which last year received the con-
troversial Congressional approv-
al to buy sophisticated AWACS
radar planes. Meese said flatly:
"I think so. I think that the
Saudi Arabian leadership has
been very helpful and we con-
tinue to work with them with the
hope that they will become in-
creasingly involved in the peace
process."
Meese said also that Reagan
has no plans to travel to the Mid-
dle East to personally push for
his peace plan, and he said he dis-
agrees with Julius Merman.
chairman of the Conference of
Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations, that the
peace plan is dead.
"We think the peace plan is
very much alive, that it is receiv-
ing additional advocates as time
goes by. and we think it is the
only existing and viable means
for achieving peace in the Middle
East." Meese said.
ASKED WHETHER the U.S.
p could rightly be perceived to be
STEWART AIN is a con-
tributing editor, and
William Bole is a staff
writer for the Long Island
Jewish World. Their in-
terview with Presidential
Counselor Edwin Meese is
reproduced by The Jewish
Floridian by special
arrangement with Publisher
Jerome W. Lippman.
Heart-Shaped Stones
Among Hasmonean
Period Palace Remains
An arms sale to Jordan is 'unrelated' to whether or not King
Hussein joins the peace process as set forth in the Camp David
accords: Presidential Counselor Edwin Meese.
Free- Wheeling Arms
Deal Going to Jordan
"leaning on Israel," Meese was
quick to respond that the U.S.
isn't leaning on anybody. "We're
talking about our dealings with
another sovereign nation with
whom we have the friendliest of
relations. What we are doing, I
think, is consulting and talking
in good faith with them about
now we can together achieve a
mutual objective that is peace
and stability in the Middle
East."
Meese said also that despite
the fact the Administration does
not wish to go along with a Con-
Continued on Page 12-A
JERUSALEM The
remains of a palace from
the Hasmonean and the
Herodian period were
unearthed in the recently-
concluded second season of
excavations at the fortress
of Sartaba-Alexandrion,
overlooking the Jordan Rift
Valley. Heading the dig
were Dr. Yoram Tsafrir of
the Institute of Archaeo-
logy at the Hebrew Univer-
sity of Jerusalem, and
Itzhak Magen, staff officer
for archaeology in Judea
and Samaria.
An important fortress in Judea
during the Second Temple period,
the site also served as a station at
which fires were lit to herald the
beginning of each new month.
On the summit of the hill the
remains are visible of a large
fortified structure which
collapsed. The excavation was
carried out on the slopes below
the summit, at the edge of the
ruins.
A LEVELED area was
discovered, partially hewn out of
the rock, on which stood an
imposing hall (about 20 x 20
meters) encircled by columns
from the inside, forming a peri-
style. The columns were coated
with colored plaster of various
shades and ornamented with
Corinthian capitals. A largely
destroyed mosaic floor was found
in the center of the hall.
This hall was probably the
lower level of a splendid Herodian
palace which was built in terraces
on the slope.
Beneath the floor of this hall,
large, well-executed Doric capi-
tals were found, along with
drums of columns from an im-
pressive structure of the
Hasmonean period. It is probable
that this was part of the Hasmo-
nean building constructed during
the time of Alexander Yanai or
Queen Shlomzion (Alexandra)
and destroyed, according to
Josephus Flavius. by order of the
Roman Governor Gabinius. This
took place after a siege in which
Marc Antony was commended
for his valor in battle.
AMONG THE finds were a
large number of ornamented
stones from the Hasmonean
building and the Herodian
building, fragments of stucco and
of fresco, a mold for the
manufacture of slugs for coins, as
well as many potsherds, some of
them bearing inscriptions in
Hebrew and Greek.
An earthquake which occurred
after the structure was no longer
in use. damaged the remnants.
The dig is being carried out by
the office of the staff officer for
archaeology in the Judea and
Samaria Civilian Administration
and by the Institute of Archaeo-
logy at the Hebrew University of
Jerusalem. Assistance has come
from the Jordan Rift Valley local
council, the Ma'aleh Ephraim
local council and the Ma'aleh
Ephraim field school.
Kiruat Shemonak Blasted bu PLD Guns for Years.
Now Hosts Peace Talks With Lebanon
Town Free to Look to Future With Hope
By HADASSAH BAT HAIM
Since it s beginnings in 1948,
the population of Kiryat
Shemonah has been an uneasy
mixture of immigrants from
many lands, with the largest
numbers coming from North
Africa. It has had to digest
thousands of relatively unskilled.
and in some cases unlettered,
newcomers often from harsh
backgrounds engendering widely
divergent cultural habits and
inclinations. The difficulties have
been compounded since 1967, the
year which saw the start of the
continuous harassment from the
guns of the PLO over Israel's
northern border.
Now. after 14 years of living
in the shadow of terror, the
town (official population 14,000)
is free to take stock of its assets
and look to the future. For the
first time the townspeople, hav-
ing been welded into an entity by
violence from outside, are think-
ing of themselves as a com-
munity. Ethnic divisions are
sinOA
Youngsters at Kiryat Shemonah. There will be no more shelters for them.
pushed aside in the communal ef-
fort to develop the town for
everybody.
THE PEOPLE are still some-
what dazed by the suddeness of
the way in which peace broke out,
and the completeness of the
change. It will take some time to
adjust but plans are already un-
der discussion for more industry
and improved social amenities.
The years 1981-1982 had been
the worst in the history of the
town in terms of rocket and shell-
fire attacks, so when the military
operation to silence the guns be-
gan, the people of Kiryat
Shemonah rushed to express
their thanks to the army. They
were the first to set up way-sta-
tions with drinks and cookies for
the troops.
On the first day of the war.
35,000 shekels was donated in
neighborhood collections for the
soldiers' welfare funds. Tele-
phones were set up at once giving
free calls for servicemen. Many
local boys were in the first wave
of assault troops to cross the
border and the citizens felt that
at last something active was be-
ing done to counteract the
bombardment which had been
their lot for so long.
ACCORDING to Marcia
Brown, a community worker,
there were four stages of accept-
ance of the new situation. First, a
tremendous relief as if an un-
bearably heavy burden had been
lifted from weary shoulders. "We
could suddenly see the sun shin-
ing," was the way that one teen-
ager expressed it.
Second, there was pride. Pride
in the achievements of "our
Continued on Page 14-A


Page 6-A The Jewish Fiorirfian / Friday, January 7,1983
Navon in U.S.
For Meeting at White House
Continued from Page 1-A
quently being mentioned as a La-
bor Party candidate in the next
election.
However, Navon was to be
making a major address before
the National Press Club Thurs-
day, and during the question and
answer session at the luncheon,
he probably will be asked not
only about events in Israel but
about bis own political future.
MEANWHILE, Navon. who
has frequently stressed the need
for aliya before Jewish audiences,
will devote much of his visit in
Washington and in Boston and
New York to speaking to the
Jewish community. A dinner for
Navon and his wife was being
hosted Wednesday night by the
Jewish Community Council of
Greater Washington, which is
also sponsoring an address by the
Israeli President to the Jewish
community at the Washington
Ophira Navon
Hebrew Congregation.
Also on Navon's schedule in
Washington is a breakfast meet-
ing with Lane Kirkland. presi-
dent of the AFL-CIO. and visits
to Mount Vernon and the Library
of Congress, particularly its Ju-
daica collection. Ambassador
Moshe Arens and his wife,
Muriel, hosted a reception for the
Navons at the Israel Embassy
Wednesday night.
On Thursday afternoon, Navon
was to go to Baltimore where the
Jewish community will sponsor a
reception for him at Convention
Hall. Later that evening, he was
to receive an honorary degree
from Johns Hopkins University,
preceded by a reception hosted
by the university's president,
Steven Muller.
Navon leaves Washington Fri-
day morning for Boston and
goes to New York on Sunday.
Spanish-Language Papers
Given the AJComm. Story on the PLO
NEW YORK (JTA) An
eight-page newspaper supple-
ment in Spanish, titled "PLO:
Victim or Executioner," has been
sent to more than 800 Spanish-
language newspapers and radio
and television stations in the
United States by the American
Jewish Committee, it was an-
nounced this week by Jacob
Kovadloff, AJC's director of
Latin American Affaris
The supplement had been
created and published in
Argentina by the Center for
Social Studies of the DAIA (the
representative body of the
Argentine Jewish community),
and was distributed as a paid ad-
vertisement in the most im-
portant Argentinian daily
newspapers.
"More than a million and a half
copies were circulated through-
out Argentina," Kovadloff
stated, and added that it was "an
occurence without precedent in
Argentinian Jewish life."
THE PURPOSE of the supple-
ment was to counteract PLO
progaganda in Argentina, and
especially to answer criticisms of
Israel's recent actions in Lebanon
voiced by a small group of intel-
lectual politicians and leaders
who, Kovadloff said, "do not
reflect the feelings of the
majority of the population, but
who are important because they
are prominent people."
The publication "has been
received warmly, both in
Argentina and the United
States," Kovadloff stated He
noted that each Argentinian
newspaper permitted the use of
its front-page logo on the first
page of the supplements it
carried, and declared that "this
can be interpreted as implicit
support for the contents." He
added.
"One factor that probably con-
tributed to the acceptance is
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Argentina's sensitivity to inter-
national public opinion concern-
ing charges of human rights vio-
lations and to terrorist and
guerrilla actions that have tended
to destabilize the country."
..ON THE other hand, he
pointed out. "less than two weeks
after publication of the supple-
ment, Argentina gave
'diplomatic status' recognition to
the Arab League." The League
had had an office in Argentina for
more than 30 years, but had
never been granted this status.
Kovadloff explained this by
saying:
"This recognition took place on
October 13. 1982. two weeks
before the UN General Assembly
voted on the Falkland Islands
(Malvinas) issue, and was an
obvious attempt to ensure the
maximum Arab votes for
Argentina.
The eight-page supplement
contained a variety of articles
and pictures illustrating the
terrorist nature of the PLO, its
close links with other terrorist
movements around the world, its
declared intent to destroy the
State of Israel, and its attempt to
inject its influence into the
democratic countries of the
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Our Readers Write: American Jews
'Have the Right to Disagree'
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I thoroughly agree with your
editorial, "Jewish Self-
Criticism Jews in America have
the right to disagree with the
policy of Israel as we do our own
government, but there is a fine
line that dares not be threaded
over.
The outcry for publicity from
egotistical Jewish leaders like
Rabbi Alexander Schindler and
Jacobo Timerman only give im-
petus to the enemies of Israel.
Ti.ev not only exercise their right
to criticize but wish to dictate the
policy of Israel and Prime Minis-
ter Begin.
Schindler argues that those
who dissent are not guilty of
treason. It is useful to keep in
mind that enemies will use their
remarks to create anti-Semitism.
If the government of Israel is to
be changed, it should be done by
Israelis, not Americans.
The Schindlers and Timermans
would be more effective if they
shed their pretense of sophistic*
tion and followed a simple rule:
oppose your enemies, and sup
port your friends. Sometimes our
friends will make mistakes, eves
ones who offend our moral sen
sibilities. But, in the final analy
sis, our friends are our friends
precisely because, by the relative
standards of an imperfect world,
they tend to share the moril
values we defend rather than the
ones we oppose.
MONTY MORRIS
Clearwatw
EDITOR. The Jewish Flondian.
Your editorial in Friday's issue
of The Jewish Floridian (Dec. 171
was excellent, as are all of your
editorials. They are hard-hitting
and to the point.
I enjoy very much reading The
Floridian, as it is a very informa
live paper. t
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tfimy, JWiuary ;, iyj' me jbwhh ,
A/ew Appointment
Halevy to Preside Over Israel Bonds
NEW YORK Gen.
Yehudah Halevy has
assumed the post of presi-
dent and chief executive of-
ficer of the Israel Bond Or-
ganization as of Jan. 1, it is
announced by Sam Roth-
berg, general chairman and
chairman of the Executive
Committee of the Develop-
|* ment Corporation for Is-
rael, the corporate struc-
ture of the Bond Organiza-
tion.
In his announcement. Roth-
berg said that Gen. Halevy last
served as head of the Manpower
Division of the Israel Defense
Forces, where he established an
"outstanding record" as ad-
ministrator.
Yitzhack Rager, who has
served as president of Israel
Bonds for the past three years, is
returning to Israel after complet-
ing his term.
HALEVY ROSE from the
ranks to become a Brigadier Gen-
eral in the Israel Defense Forces
from which he is now retiring. He
has fought in all of Israel's wars
and was on active service during
"Operation Peace for Galilee" in
Lebanon, where he played a key
New Book
Gen. Yehudah Hale
role in rapidly mobilizing civilian
reserves who make up the bulk of
the Israel Defense Forces.
During the Yom Kippur War in
1973, he served in the Sinai. Ear-
lier, during the Six-Day War of
1967. he was with the elite
Seventh Brigade, the first brig-
ade to reach the Suez Canal. He
held a series of command and
staff positions in the Armored
Corps, the Southern Command
and the Manpower Division.
Born in Shanghai in 1937,
Halevy arrived in Israel at the
end of 1949 at the age of 12. He
went to high school at night and
worked during the day. At the
age of 18, he entered the Israeli
Army and has spent his adult life
in the Israel Defense Forces until
his current appointment as Presi-
dent of Israel Bonds.
HIS PERSONAL history is a
reflection of Israel's ingathering:
bom to Iraqi parents in China,
settlement in Israel, a magna
cum laude graduate of Bar I Ian
University, and married to a
Sabra of Polish extraction who
was a sergeant and judo instruc-
tor in the Israeli army. They have
two sons, one of whom is now
serving in the army.
Halevy helped institute a spe-
cial army education project which
helps "marginal youth" other-
wise exempted from service. As
one of those involved in this pro-
gram, he pointed out that the ex-
perience of army duty was a com-
mon denominator of responsible
Israeli citizenship and that in-
clusion of these youth is in the
essential interest of the in-
dividual and Israeli society.
Says Military Presence Still Needed
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
An Israeli military presence
on the West Bank will be
required for some consider-
able time after any peaceful
arrangement is concluded
on Israel's eastern border,
[f whatever entity comes into
being there. This is the
opinion of Brig. Gen. (res.)
Aryeh Shalev, deputy di-
rector of Tel Aviv Univer-
sity's Center for Strategic
Studies in a book just pub-
lished here.
Shalev, a former deputy direc-
tor of military intelligence, told a
press conference that demilitar-
ization of the area would not be
sufficient during a lengthy tran-
sition period, until whatever
peace is reached has been tested
by time.
HE SAID that because of the
topography of the region and the
narrow width left between Israel
and the hilly areas of Judaea and
Samaria, early-warning stations
would be required, as well as
small army units controlling the
east-west road axes.
In his book, "The West Bank:
Line of Defense," Shalev, a
frequent critic of the Likud gov-
ernment's West Bank policies,
says it is inconceivable that any
Israeli government, whatever its
political complexion, could or
would dismantle the existing
Jewish settlements there.
But, he says, their value is of
greater political significance than
defense value, even though the
limited number of military-age
males they represent form a use-
ful addition to Israel's small
standing army, in the first crucial
hours of war until the reserves
can be mobilized.
SHALEV STRESSED that
his book is "entirely theoretical."
He says it lays down no time
scale, but merely examines vari-
ous defense options open under
various scenarios: an independ-
ent Palestinian state on the West
Bank; an entity affiliated with
Jordan; continued Israeli
presence with local autonomy; or
any other agreed arrangement
with the Arabs.
But after a lengthy transitional
period, Israel might be able to
trust a peace agreement. How
long this is likely to be, Shalev
would not hazard to guess.
?iwarv 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Energy Minister Decides on Nuclear
Power Plant for Israel
.
JERUSALEM(JTA)Energy Minister Yitzhak
Modai announced that he has decided in principle to build
a nuclear power plant in Israel. He said he would present
his proposal to the Cabinet shortly, after completion of a
feasibility study by a committee of experts.
The committee, headed by Amos Horev of the Haifa
Technion, has already concluded that nuclear power will
be cheaper than that produced by coal-fired plants. But it
will not be feasible for Israel to build a nuclear plant until
the mid-1990s. The committee is recommending that in
the interim, Israel purchase a nuclear power plant over-
seas. Madai reportedly has begun preliminary negoti-
ations for such a purchase.
Ashkenazic Jews Hit in Jerusalem
After Oriental KiUed by Police
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A wave of vandalism
and defacements directed
at Ashkenazic Jews has
spread to Jerusalem. It
originated in Tel Aviv last
week after police fatally
shot a 29 year-old Oriental
Jew, Shimon Yehoshua, in
a clash with residents of
Kfar Salameh, a slum
neighborhood in the south-
ern part of the city.
Swastikas and slogans, some
of which read "Ashkenazis to
Auschwitz and Treblinka," were
smeared on the home of Interior
Minister Yosef Burg, on the walls
of the Jerusalem Theater and on
the Bank Leumi branch in the
wealthy Rehavia district. Tires of
parked cars were slashed in sev-
eral Jerusalem districts last
night.
CHRISTIAN religious institu-
tions were also smeared with
swastikas and the warning, "Get
Out."
President Yitzhak Navon con-
demned the vandalism and the
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES a
shooting incident which appar-
ently triggered it, in a statement
here. "The deep sorrow occa-
sioned by the Kfar Salameh
tragedy is shared by all of us," he
said. "The full facts of this inci-
dent must certainly be investi-
gated, but nothing can justify the
criminal exploitation of this
tragedy by irresponsible indivi-
duals."
Tel Aviv police said they were
summoned to Kfar Salameh be-
cause members of a large family
hurled rocks at municipal
workers sent to demolish a build-
ing declared unsafe, in which the
family was living. They said they
were fired on by Yehoshua and
returned the fire, hitting him. He
died at a hospital.
Polish 'Truth'
GENEVA (JTA) An
organization called "Zomo." set
up in Poland to fight the Solidar-
ity movement, told its recruits
that Solidarity was created and
manipulated by Jews, according
to Vino Grodski, a Polish politi-
cal refugee living in Germany.
776-6272
HOWARD
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ACKACING
1201 N E 45 STREET
FORT IAUDERDALE
JNF Names Grunspan'
To Controller's Post;
Succeeds Moskowitz
NEW YORK Dr. Samuel I.
Cohen, executive vice president
Jack Grunspan
of the Jewish National Fund, has
announced the appointment of
Jack Grunspan as controller of
the JNF. Grunspan previously
served as associate controller.
Grunspan was born in New
York and after attending Yeshiva
University graduated with a BA
degree in accounting from the
Baruch College of the City
University of New York. Fol-
lowing several years service with
various public accounting firms,
he became controller of B'nai
Zion. filling that post for two
years before his appointment as
associate controller for the JNF
in February, 1982. He succeeds
Samuel Moskowitz who retired in
October of this year after 38
years as JNF's Controller.
The Jewish National Fund is
the agency responsible for af-
forestation, land reclamation and
9ite development in the land of
uvmL
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Page 8-A The Jewish Florida Friday. January 7,1983___
Rumania's Prexy
Blames 'Brain Drain' for His Policy
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Rabbi Arthur Schneier,
president of the Appeal of
Conscience Foundation,
met recently with President
Nicolae Ceausescu of
Rumania in Bucharest.
They reviewed U.S.-Ruma-
nian relations, international
issues including the Middle
East situation and discussed at
length the new law requiring
Rumanian nationals seeking to
emigrate to repay the govern-
ment for the free secondary and
higher education they received,
the Appeal of Conscience Found-
ation announced.
Sharp Differences Divide Israel,
Lebanon Despite Hopes for Peace
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel and Lebanon ex-
changed agenda proposals
late last week supporting
sharply different priorities
as talks got under way be-
tween the two countries
with the United States sit-
ting in as an active partici-
pant.
As expected, Israel proposed
that normalization be the first
item of discussion. The Lebanese
stressed the withdrawal of Israeli
forces from their country. The
talks opened in Khalde. a seaside
resort just south of Beirut. They
resumed at Kiryat Shmona. an
Israeli town on the Lebanese bor-
der and will alternate between the
two sites thereafter.
Israeli sources said that they
did not expect the wrangling over
the agenda to be ironed out soon.
The outlook at present is for long
and arduous U Mts. But Israeli of-
ficials appear optimistic that in
the long run the talks will suc-
ceed.
THEY ARE stressing the his-
toric aspects of Israel sitting
down with an Arab neighbor
which transcends the immediate
and short term differences. They
see the talks with Lebanon as an
important step toward Israel's
eventual integration into the re-
gion.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir and Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon have instructed the
Israeli negotiating team to stand
firm on the issue of normalization
of relations with Lebanon as the
key agenda item, though they
may not insist that the term
"normalization" must be em-
ployed. The Israeli team is head
od by David Kimche. director
general of the Foreign Ministry.
Shamir and Sharon are members
of a senior ministerial super-
visory committee on the policy-
making level.
While there was no meeting of
minds on the agenda, there was
agreement between the two sides
to proceed on parallel courses.
Sulicommittees are expected to
Ih' set up to deal with three issues
that have been agreed to in prin-
ciple as part-s of the negotiations.
They are a termination of the
state of war; establishment of se-
curity zones; and the withdrawal
of all foreign forces from Leb-
anon.
ANTOINE FATALE. head of
the Lebanese delegation, argued
that no state of war has existed
between Israel and Lebanon since
the 1949 armistice. Israel and
Lebanon have, in fact, never en-
gaged in military hostilities. But
Kimche insisted that the 1949
armistice was voided when Leb-
anon sided with Israel's Arab
foes in the 1967 Six-Day War and
later signed the Cairo agreement
which allowed the Palestine
Liberation Organization to
establish its "state within a
state" on Lebanese soil.
The dispute however was
legalistic. If a state of war does
indeed exist. Israel can demand
an agreement of non-belligerence
with Lebanon. If there is no state
of war. as Lebanon contends,
there is no need for the Lebanese
to sign such an agreement.
The Israelis seemed pleased
that Fatale stressed that point
however and would be satisfied if
it was enshrined in a formal ac-
cord binding on both sides.
ISRAELI SOURCES were
clearly embarrassed when asked
to explain what happened to
Sharon's vaunted agreement
with the Lebanese on a "frame-
work paper" that was to have
served as the basis for an agenda.
Sharon brought the document
home from Beirut two weeks ago,
hailing it as a "breakthrough." It
transpired later that no Lebanese
official had signed it. The Leb-
anese with whom Sharon
negotiated were never identified,
though it was strongly hinted
that they were very close assoc-
iates of President Am in Gemayel.
But observers believe the Is-
raelis may have underestimated
the influence of Lebanon's
Moslem Premier. Shafik Wazzan
and other Moslem circles who are
less than eager to proceed toward
normalization with Israel.
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SCHNEIER, who is spiritual
leader of the Park East
Synagogue here, said Ceausescu
justified the law on the basis of
'brain drain" and stated that
"while the law cannot be
repealed, any diplomatic solu-
tions that will take into account
the principles of our sovereignty
will be considered."
In that connection, President
Reagan has named Lawrence
Eagleburger. Undersecretary of
State for Political Affairs, as a
special envoy to Bucharest to
discuss all aspects of U.S.-Ru-
manian relations. including
most favored nation status,
Schneier reported According to
U.S. law, MFN for East
European Communist bloc
countries is linked'to their emi-
gration policies.
Schneier said Ceausescu
showed appreciation for the re-
unification of Rumanian Jews
with their families in Israel. The
new education tax law. published
last Nov. 6. primarily affects
Rumanians of German descent
who wish to emigrate to West
Germany. Rumanians seeking to
go to the U.S. and Rumanian
Jews who wish to go to Israel.
SCHNEIER TOLD the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that "Jews
who are leaving at this point have
not been affected by the new
law." Ceausescu did not refer, in
his hour-and-40-minute meeting
with Schneier on Dec. 9. to the
assertion by Chief Rabbi Moses
Rosen of Rumania on Nov. 24
that Jews seeking to immigrate
to Israel will be exempted from
the education repayment law.
Rosen said at the time that the
Rumanian authorities made a
distinction between emigration
and "aliya." A Jew who goes to
Israel to be reunited with his
family is not an "emigrant" and
"his problem was treated in a
totally different way." the Chief
Rabbi said.
Schneier flew to Jerusalem
after meeting with Ceausescu to
report on his conversations to
Premier Menachem Begin and
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir. He has only recently
returned to the United States. He
said. "It is my clear impression
that President Ceausescu was not
interested in a collision course on
this issue." referring to MFN
status. "If anything, he seeks an
improvement in the U.S.
Rumanian bilateral relationship
that has seen some strains in the
last year."
Inquiry Board Ends Hearings
Without Calling Sharon Anew
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The commission of in-
quiry into the west Beirut
refugee camps massacre of
last Sept. 16-18 ended its
formal hearings Sunday af-
ter it became unnecessary
for Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon to appear before the
body a second time.
He had been summoned by
chief of army intelligence Gen.
Yehoshua Saguy for cross
examination on certain points of
his original testimony. But attor-
neys for the two men agreed at
the last minute that Sharon
would make written replies to
two key questions.
THE HEARINGS, in progress
since last Oct. 20. would have
concluded their second round
with Sharon's scheduled re-ap-
pearance. The panel is now ex-
pected to finish work and submit
its recommendations within the
next few weeks.
Sharon and Saguy were among
nine senior Israeli political and
military figures warned by the
commission in November that
they might be harmed if the panel
reached certain conclusions on
the basis of their original testi-
mony. The law provides that per-
sons so notified may re-appear to
give additional testimony.
examine evidence and question
witnesses. But this is not manda-
tory.
Sharon was summoned by
Saguy to answer questions about
two documents prepared by Is-
rael army intelligence on Sept
15. a day after the assassination
of Lebanon's President-elect
Bashir Gemayel which precipi-
tated the Israel army's entry into
west Beirut.
THE DOCUMENTS were said
to have discussed the possible ef-
fects of the entry into the Sabra
and Shatila refugee camps by ele-
ments of the Christian Phalan-
gists. the Lebanese armed forces
controlled by Gemayel The
Phalangists perpetrated the mas-
sacres.
Sharon, in his testimony before
the commission, said he had not
received the army intelligence
documents until the afternoon of
Sept. 17. when the massacre had
been going on for more than a
day. He was subsequently
warned by the commission that
he might be harmed if it were
found that he neglected to con-
sider the danger of revenge and
bloodshed by the Phalangists or
neglected to take precautions to
avert such danger.

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7
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The relationship between
the American Jewish com-
munity and Israel "is very-
unhealthy and gives every
sign of becoming worse,"
according to Irving Howe,
author and frequent critic
of the policies of the
| -government of Premier
Men ache m Begin, who ex-
pressed this view in an ad-
dress last Sunday to the
11th annual national
editors conference of the
Jewish Student Press Serv-
ice here at the Martin
Steinberg Center for the
Arts.
The author of "World of Our
Fathers," and the recently pub-
hahed, "A Margin of Hope: An
Intellectual Autobiography," ad-
dressed some 60 editors and re-
porters from Jewish student
newspapers throughout the
country. It consisted of a reading
from a yet unpublished essay on
his feelings of the current state of
the American Jewish community,
which Howe said is developing
toward a position of uneasy
malaise.
HOWE VIEWED the policies
of the Begin government and his
Defense Minister, Ariel Sharon,
to be detrimental to the Jewish
State and its people. And he
placed considerable blame for
what he said appears to be un-
critical support for the actions of
Begin and Sharon at the door of
the lay leadership within the
diaspora who "tacitly, half
heartedly" go along with many
actions of the Israeli government,
particularly
West Bank.
Egypt Worried by Sharon's
Statement on Disputed Taba Area
By JUDITH KOHN
CAIRO (JTA) Egypt has requested an ex-
planation from the Israeli government of a statement
attributed to Defense Minister Ariel Sharon that the
disputed area of Taba in northern Sinai would remain
under Israel's control.
In an official memo submitted
to the Israeli Ambassador here.
Moahe Sasson. the Egyptian
government also protested what
|Ait charged were Israeli violations
<>t the agreement concluded be-
tween the two sides last April for
maintaining the status quo in
that area until the dispute was
resolved. A similar protest was
submitted several weeks ago.
SHARON TOLD reporters
during a visit to Taba last week
that there would be no com-
promise over the territory south
<>l Kilat. This prompted an angry
reply from the Foreign Ministry
ijfxikesman here, who called
Sharon's statement "a further
complication of the situation."
He added at the time that
"Taba is and will remain an in-
tegral part of Egypt and we shall
not relinquish any of it."
The issue of Taba has been
taken up with renewed vigor by
the press here over the last few
days, and some of the commen-
tary has been particularly biting.
In an editorial published yester-
day. Al Akhbar asserted that
"there is nothing which gives (Is-
raeli even an issue or the right to
differ on this subject."
Egyptian Paper Predicts Arafat
Will Visit Cairo This Month
CAIRO (JTA) PLO
chief Yassir Arafat will
visit here this month, it was
reported in the Egyptian
news daily Al Gomhuriyya.
But a source at the Foreign
Ministry told the Jewish
ITelegraphic Agency that no
huch visit had been sched-
uled, but added that the
' L0 chief "would be wel-
come here at any time."
The report cited a Palestinian
Sjmcial in Cairo as saying that
jArutat would visit Cairo follow
Png the upcoming meeting of the
U alestme National Council
enedulad for Feb. 14 in Algeria.
Vmong the items on the Coun-
s agenda is the restoration of
. l.O relations with Egypt, the
pncial reportedly said.
THE PLO had announced dur-
P,K.a I?**01 meeting of its Coun-
T" m Damascus that resumption
J.k- !?ns with EKyP1 couW be
pnieved without Egypt's reneg-
? on the Camp David accords.
juniors of a rapprochement be-
ween Egypt and the PLO have
*n,Lnff over the P"^ few
tWn Ut have generally come
pm Palestinian sources.
.n related news, Iraqi Deputy
mister Tarez Aziz was quoj.ii
saying he was prepared to dis-
establishment of dip-
pnatic relations between his
Bjintry an interview with the semi-
nuai news daily Al Ahram.
said. "I am personally pre-
dm i1?,"*1'1 l linisterl
State for Foreign Affairs)
Routros Ghali in Cairo or Bagh-
dad to hold direct talks on this is-
sue." He added: "As an Arab, I
say the resumption of Cairo-
Baghdad diplomatic relations
should be made now."
Howe pointed out that this
policy of the American Jewish lay
leadership which he was quick to
say does not speak for him, is not
new and actually began during
the days when Israel was led by
the Labor Party.
He warned that this unflag-
ging, uncritical support could re-
sult in a deterioration of the
status of the American Jewish
community and reduce it to a
"puppet" to the State of Israel.
AS AN example of this sup-
port, Howe recalled the stir in the
Jewish community following the
announcement on Sept. 1 by
President Reagan of his Middle
East peace initiative which was
quickly rejected by the Israeli
government. According to Howe,
the American Jewish leadership,
while maintaining its public con-
tempt for the Reagan initiative,
nevertheless privately found it an
appealing proposal worthy of
more thoughtful consideration.
Howe, who is also co-editor of
the quarterly, "Dissent," con-
tended that there is contempt
among Israelis toward American
Jews, for among other things,
that these Jews would give
everything to Israel but them-
selves, making aliya.
As for the growing "malaise,"
Howe assessed this as a symp-
tom of a "growing smugness"
and "self satisfaction" and also
the turning away of many Ameri-
can Jews from social causes along
with a decline in religious faith.
BUT ACCORDING to Howe,
there remains much vitality in
the American Jewish community
outside the institutionalized
structure, especially "outside the
fundraising establishment." The
source of this strength, he con-
tinued, seems to be "marginal,"
focusing on secular Jews, indivi-
duals rabbis and others who
maintain their seriousness
toward these pressing issues.
"In this context, as it seems to
me, both because of what I re-
gard as an inner hollowness of the
American Jewish community and
because of what I regard as the
mistaken policies, the fatefully
mistaken policies of the Begin
government, dissent within and
from that community becomes
not just a necessity, but becomes
an avenue of health," Howe de-
clared. "So to me the question of
whether dissent is acceptable in
Jewish life is not even a question.
The real problem is how to ex-
press it creatively ."
Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
^1 I I MI I IilllI I I I I III I II I I 9II I I I I II I I I I I I I I I '>'_
Israel-U.S. Jewry Tie Growing 'Worse' !
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Diplomat Says
Hussein Will Talk With Israel
UJSL Sees Start of Negotiations
With Lebanon as Wstoric'Act
Continued from Page 1-A
announcing Jordan's participa-
tion in the talks. Hussein would
seek to obtain maximum support
from other Arab leaders and at
least a tacit agreement from the
PLO. The only country which
Hussein feels will not support
him in this venture is Syria,
Quandt said.
HE PREDICTED a "big argu-
ment" between Israel and the
United States, should Hussein
decide to enter the peace talks,
over the issue of Israeli settle-
ments on the West Bank. Quandt
also said he was less optimistic
about the prospects for the suc-
cess of ongoing Jordanian-Israeli
talks than about the prospects of
beginning the talks.
During his visit to Washington
last month, Hussein reiterated
his support of President Reag-
an's Mideast peace plan. But
after meeting with Reagan, there
was no indication that the Jor-
danian monarch was willing or
able to join the U.S., Egypt and
Israel in negotiations based on
the Camp David accords.
Nor was it clear whether Hus-
sein's recent consultations with
PLO chief Yasir Arafat resulted
in a mandate, direct or implicit,
Jordan to represent Palestinian
interests in peace talks with Isra-
el.
MOST OBSERVERS here and
in Washington believe that if
Hussein joins the peace negotia-
tions, his chances of getting U.S.
weapons would improve consid-
erably. Until now, the King has
spurned the Camp David peace
HOCUS POCUS.
^\JTA
process. He still considers him-
self bound by the 1974 Arab
League summit conference in
Rabat, Morocco. which
designated the PLO to be the sole
and legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people. The Arab
League summit in Fez, Morocco,
last September did not rescind
that decision.
Meanwhile, in Cairo Sunday
Arafat was quoted in the Egyp-
tian political weekly Rose al Yus-
sef as saying that the PLO would
continue military "option"
against Israel because the U.S.
will not pressure Israel, "even
within the limits of the (Reagan
peace) plan which it put forward.
"But" he added that "we support
every constructive aspect in any
offered initiative.
Behind Israel's Arms Industry
Continued from Page 1-A
sale can be seen at Israeli
pavilions at international air
shows such as the prestigious Le
Bourget show near Paris.
Here, in addition to Israeli-
made aircraft, Israeli-designed
and produced sophisticated elec-
tronic equipment, including radar
and guidance systems, are on
display and obviously not for
prestige or public relations pur-
poses but rather for sale to any-
body or any country interested.
The sales are understood to be
highly satisfactory.
BUT WHILE there are few
problems in the sale abroad of
such wholly Israeli-produced
items, there are far more prob-
lems with the sale of major items
such as aircraft and tanks, part of
which especially engines are
imported from countries such as
the United States which demand
veto rights over the final disposi-
tion of the weapons.
Israel is known to have offered
for sale its Kfir fighter aircraft to
a number of European and Latin
American countries. These po-
tential customers have expressed
interest in the Israeli product,
but sales have been blocked by
American refusal to allow the
deal to go through because of the
U.S.-made engines.
Recent visits by Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon and For-
eign Minister Yitzhak Shamir to
Latin American countries have
focussed interest on the reported
sale of used military equipment,
including captured Soviet-made
weapons to those countries.
THE INTEREST has been
aroused in part because of the
non-democratic nature of many of
those countries, as well as other
countries in Africa. Feelings have
been expressed that Israel should
play no part in arms sales to such
regimes.
What is overlooked in almost
all such criticism is the fact that
other democratic countries, in-
cluding the U.S., Britain and
France are also engaged in secret
arms sales to those same coun-
tries, despite their dictatorships
and other unpleasant charac-
teristics.
Other sales of captured war
material which have raised eye-
brows throughout the world have
included reported sales to Iran
and to Argentina before and dur-
ing the recent British-Argentine
war.
CRITICISM HAS also been
expressed about arms sales to
South Africa, because of its
apartheid policies. But in none of
these cases are any details
available about what is being of-
fered or sold, in what quantities
and at what prices.
Also undisclosed is whether
such sales are direct deals be-
tween governments, or whether
they are the result of aggressive
sales campaigns by Israeli arms
__________________ merchants who are known to
Jack Levine'a painting,'Maimonides,' was recently donated to E?-.much f thei1rJtiimf tvat
the Jewish Theological Seminary of America by George A. ZizSS^^SiJ^AfT
Strichman, chairman of the Board of Colt Industrie, ft .ill TSSZ^SS^StS^S,
hang m the Seminary s new Library building, which is still OT offering for sale equipment
under construction. produced by Israel itself.
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The United
States, calling the start of
"formal negotiations" be-
tween Israel and Lebanon
"historic," declared that it
was "extremely pleased"
that the talks had opened in
the Lebanese town of
Khalde.
"The meeting represents a his-
toric first step in efforts to ar-
range the departure of all extern-
al forces from Lebanon, to restore
the full sovereignty to that coun-
try and to insure the security of
northern Israel," State Depart-
ment deputy spokesman Alan
Romberg said.
ROMBERG OMITTED again
any mention of Israel's desire for
normalization of relations with
Lebanon. The Reagan Ad-
ministration has made clear that
it would like for the talks to con-
centrate on troop withdrawal.
Romberg refused to comment on
any of the issues raised at the
opening session. At the same
time, he stressed that the U.S.
remains "fully engaged in the ne-
gotiating process as an active
participant."
Romberg could give no infor-
mation on when talks would be-
gin between Lebanon and Syria
and the Palestine Liberation
Organization for removal of these
external forces from Lebanon. He
said this is up to the parties in-
volved.
Meanwhile. Romberg stressed
the Reagan Administration con-
tinues to oppose Israeli sover.
eignty or permanent control over
the West Bank. His remarks were
made when asked to comment on
an article in the Washington Post
by Ben Netanyahu, Deputy Chief
of Mission at the Israel Embassy
here, in which Netanyahu argued
that Israel must retain control of
Judaea and Samaria for its own
security.
"Peace is the issue," Romberg
said. "It is our continuing con-
viction that Israeli security can
best be assured through genuine
peace between Israel and all her
neighbors. As the President said
on Sept. 1, that peace cannot be
achieved either by the formation
of an independent Palestinian
state or on the basis of Israel
sovereignty or permanent control
over the West Bank and Gaza."
IN HIS ARTICLE, the Israeli
official said that "given modem
technology and advances in war-
fare, he who controls the heights
of Judaea and Samaria controls
Israel." He maintained that Is-
rael continues to be viewed by
"most Arabs" in the region as an
"intolerable affront."
"Israel's current superiority
over the Arabs could be trans-
formed overnight into extreme
vulnerability if Israel were to lose
military control over Judaea and
Samaria," Netanyahu wrote. He
ruled out demilitarization of the
West Bank and said: "Where
hostility is so deeply rooted, arms
so readily available and distances
so compressed, demilitari-
zation is wishful thinking. No
country can take such a risk with
its national security."

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Wing in Background
Khalde Launched Hopeful Negotiations for Peace
9y DAVID LANDAU
JRUSALEM (JTA)
jrael and Lebanon last
began their long
Ited negotiations with
1 United States as an
\e participant, aimed at
jlishing a framework
Ifuture relations. The
ites of the three coun-
met at the Lebanon
Hotel in Khalde, a
le resort just south of
it. The talks shifted
Thursday to Kiryat
>na, an Israeli town
to the Lebanese
BT.
Lanon is the second Arab
[to enter into formal nego-
ns with Israel. The heads of
[ delegation made opening
nents for the benefit of the
news media, after which
I'ssion was closed to the
[and both sides began work
an agenda. Discussions of
intive matters began at the
kday meeting.
IE CHIEF of the Lebanese
ai inn. Antoine Fatale, a
aide to President Amin
^yel, stressed, in his opening
U, his country's desire for
rly withdrawal of all foreign
i from its soil.
pV-id Kimche, director general
Israeli Foreign Ministry,
Iheads Israel's negotiating
[emphasized Israel's desire
:-l at ion ship of "good neigh -
ess" with Lebanon and its
that the current talks
result in an accord "but a
[away from a full, final, for
eace treaty."
special envoy Morris
er spoke of his government's
fpathy and support for many
key objectives of the par-
He mentioned specifically
[restoration of Lebanon's
>rial integrity and Israel's
ence on security arrange-
LAPER, who holds the rank
ibassador. said there was a
basis for optimism since
ll has declared repeatedly
pi has no territorial claims on
ion and wants to pull its
out of that country. Leba-
Ifor its part, has pledged not
plow its territory to become
a base for hostile actions
ist Israel, Draper said.
it substantial differences
(ri-fn the Israeli and Lebanese
lints were apparent from
|outset, though they were
essed in polite and friendly
Fatale made it clear that
juntry could not step out of
I with the rest of the Arab
and take separate initia-
in establishing a rela-
^hip with Israel,
spoke of Lebanon's strong
for peace, security, sover-
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eignty and integrity. "The first
step" toward this goal must be
the withdrawal of all foreign
forces from the country as
speedily as possible," he said.
But he also spoke of Lebanon's
"historic mission within the Arab
nation."
KIMCHE HAILED the
meeting as "an auspicious oc-
casion" for the Middle East and,
for him, personally, the culmina-
tion of several years of dose
involvement in developments in
Lebanon. He said he was sure
that all three delegations and
their governments "want to see
the two peoples (Lebanese and
Israelis) living in peace."
Israel wants to see Lebanon
restored to full sovereignty, inte-
grity and security, Kimche said.
Israelis have "no feelings of
enmity" towards Lebanon, a
country with which it had never
engaged in military hostilities.
He said the recent "military
effort" by Israel was not against
Lebanon but against the
"terrorists" who had used Leba-
non as a base for aggression
against the will of the Lebanese
people.
The Palestine Liberation
Organization military infrastruc-
ture in Lebanon had been "a
danger" to both Lebanon and
Israel, he said. Now that it has
been removed, there is "nothing
to prevent good neighbor
liness friendship and secu-
rity."
THE DISCORD that arose
between Kimche and Fatale
concerned the issue of whether
the 1949 armistice agreement
between Israel and Lebanon is
still valid. Fatale insisted that it
was. He read from Article 8
which states: "This agreement
. shall remain in force until a
peace settlement between the
fnuuy,january ivrvop/meut*~-----
-JflT
Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
'Israel hoped for an accord that
would be "but a step away from a
full, final and formal peace treaty
which we would wish to see come
about" in the future.
Observers noted that the legal-
istic argument over the validity
of the 1949 armistice could have
an important bearing on the
current talks. Israel wants them
to produce a declaration of non-
belligerency by the two states.
The Lebanese appeared to be
saying that there is no need for
such declaration since the armis-
tice is still in effect and its key
article pledges the two sides not
to resort to armed force.
Israel to Make
'84 Olympic Bags
TEL AVIV official Olympic souvenir bag and
other plastic bags in use at the
Los Angeles Olympic Games in
1984 will be made in Israel. The
Gal-Weissfeiler Industries of
Holon signed an exclusive con-
tract with the Los Angeles Olym-
pic Organizing Committee after
having won a world tender for the
supply of plastic bags.
parties is achieved."
Fatale refuted the claim made
in 1967 by Israel's then Foreign
Minister Abba Eban that Leb-
anon had voided the armistice by
warlike statements before and
during the Six-Day War.
Kimche, in response, digressed
from his prepared text to "take
issue with the honorable delegate
from Lebanon." He claimed that
Lebanon, in 1967, had "declared
its association with the Arab
armies" and had refused to meet
with Israeli representatives
"saying a state of war exists."
Worse still, according to Kimche,
Lebanon later signed the Cairo
agreement with the PLO "allow-
ing the terrorists to establish a
state within a state."
IN ANY EVENT, Kimche
said, Israel hoped the present
negotiations would produce an
agreement that would render the
1949 armistice accords irrelevant.
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Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. January 7,1983
Exclusive Interview
'.
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Continued fiom Page 5-A
gressional move to increase the
Israeli foreign aid bill by $475
million, the Administration be-
lieves it has been "extremely
forthcoming in aid to Israel." He
said that this aid represents
about 30 percent of America's
total foreign assistance package
and that the 1983 budget in-
cludes increased aid.
He said that to increase Isra-
el's allocation would simply mean
that other smaller nations would
receive a smaller portion of the
pie and that it would "not be a
good idea."
AND HE INSISTED that the
Administration's refusal to go
along with Congress on this mat-
ter is not tied to political consid-
eration in the Middle East.
Meese said also that he under-
stands the "trauma" the Ameri-
can Jewish community is facing
with President Reagan continu-
ing to advocate a peace plan that
Israel has firmly rejected. But he
asked American Jews to under-
stand Reagan's position and to
realize that he has a continuing
"commitment to the stability and
security and existence of Israel."
The following is a complete
transcript of Meese's comments:
Question: Is it reasonable to
expect that in exchange for
American military weapons, Jor-
dan will accept the Camp David
Accords?
Edwin Meese: The President
has always indicated his hope
that, separate and apart from an
arms sale situation, moderate
Arab states, including Jordan,
would be brought into the peace
process. I think that it's his feel-
ing, along with the Secretary ol
State and others, that this is a
real possibility.
Q.: Would the sale go through
without that commitment?
Meese: I think the two are un-
related. I don't think one is s
quid pro quo for the other.
Q.: So they won't be linked?
Meese: I don't see them being '
linked, no.
Q.: Have the Administration's
hopes been realized with respect
to Saudi Arabia?
Meese: I think so. I think that
the Saudi Arabian leadership has
been very helpful and we con-
tinue to work with them with the
hope that they will become in-
creasingly involved in the peace
process.
Q.: Is the Administration
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us leaning on anybody.
We're talking about our
dealings with another sov-
ereign nation with whom we
have the friendliest re-
lations.
aware of the trauma the Ameri-
can Jewish community is faced
with vis-a-vis the Reagan peace
plan and the Begin Government's
adamant rejection of it?
Meese: I think so. I know that
some members of the American
Jewish community indicated
their support for it and others
have expressed their concerns.
But I think he certainly under-
stands the trauma and he hopes
for understanding of his position,
and that is a continued commit-
ment to the stability and security
and existence of Israel and to
support for the attempt of the
United States to work with the
various parties to find a long-
term solution that will bring
peace and stability to the Middle
East. He looks to the American
Jewish community for support in
this effort.
Q.: The chairman of the Con-
ference of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations,
Julius Berman, told us recently
that he believes the Reagan peace
plan is now dead because of the
action of the Arab nations. Is this
a blow to the Administration?
Meese: I think that we would
respectfully disagree.
We think the plan is very much
alive, that it is receiving addi-
tional advocates as time goes on,
and we think it is the only exist-
ing and viable means for achiev-
ing peace in the Middle East.
Q.: There was a recent request
from the Lebanese Government
for additional American troops in
that nation. Can you tell us the
I status of American troops there?
Meese: That's now under con-
sideration by us in consultation
with the other nations that are
involved in the multinational
force, and so I wouldn't be able to
answer that definitely at the
present time as to what we plan
to do. But we are consulting with
the Government of Lebanon and
the other nations that are partici-
pating in the multinational force
about it.
Q.: How long do you believe
American troops will remain
there?
Meese: I don't think anybody
can say for sure. Their purpose is
to provide a presence which will
assist the Government of Leba-
non to consolidate its authority
and to reorganize and revitalize
its military and security forces so
that they can maintain stability
in Lebanon. The main thing that
needs to be done now is the with-
drawal of all foreign forces as
rapidly as possible.
Q.: U.S. Ambassadors Philip
Habib and Morris Draper have
been in the Middle East to try to
get the peace process going
again. Do they have any special
instructions?
Meese: Their instructions are
to continue to work with all of the
countries involved to attain the
original objectives, which are the
strengthening of the central gov-
ernment of Lebanon, the main-
tenance of stability within Leba-
non, the immediate withdrawal of
all foreign forces and the arrang-
ing of conditions in Lebanon so
as to get on with the main objec-
tive, which is continuing with the
peace process in the Middle East.
Q.: Will they be doing this in
the form of shuttle diplomacy or
by bringing all sides together?
Meese: I think the actual
tactics of the consultations will
have to be left up to them,
because one of the things we
know is that things change,
depending upon the situation.
Q.: Does the President plan to
travel to the Middle East himself
to further his peace proposals ?
Meese: There are no plans to
travel anywhere, at the present
time, outside of the United
States.
Q.: Do you think that it might
be helpful for him to fly to the
Middle East to take a direct role
in the negotiations?
Meese: I don't know whether it
would or not. There's been no
suggestion that he do that and I
don't know at this point that it
would be particularly helpful.
Q.: Are there any plans for the
President to meet personally with
Israeli Prime Minister Menachem
Begin ?
Meese: I think Mr. Begin had a
visit planned here which un-
fortunately had to be postponed
because of the unfortunate death
of his wife. We will see at some
future time, probably, that that
visit will be rescheduled. I can't
tell you any definite plans right
now.
American
aJ
Israeli
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Q.: A group of American
Congressmen will be meeting
with some moderate Arab leaders
next month. Does the Adminis-
tration plan to open itself to their
point of view?
Meese: I can't tell you right
now what those plans are. You'd
have to talk with the State
Department and I don't know at
this point of any specific plans
with respect to meetings that
might be arranged.
Q.: Why was delivery of the 75
F-16s that Israel bought delayed
and why is it continuing to be
delayed ?
Meese: The delivery, as you
know, was originally postponed
for a variety of reasons. At an
appropriate time I am sure those
deliveries will be resumed. This is
now in the hands of the Pentagon
as far as any recommended
schedule, and it's not something
that's appropriate for me to
particularly go further and
comment on.
Q.: You can't shed any light on
what conditions might make it
ripe for the planes to be
delivered?
Meese: I wouldn't want to
comment on that right now. I'm
not trying to dodge your
question. You're talking about
areas that I think it's more
appropriate for you to talk to the
National Security Council people
or the State Department people
or the Pentagon people.
Q.: There has been an impres-
sion among many persons that
the Administration is leaning on
Israel, with respect to a freeze on
the settlements and the delay of
delivery of the F-16s, for in-
stance. How do you respond to
that criticism?
Meese: I don't see us leaning
on anybody. We're talking about
our dealings with another sover-
eign nation with whom we have
the friendliest of relations. What
we are doing, I think, is con-
sulting and talking in good faith
with them about how we can
together achieve a mutual objec-
tive, that is, peace and stability
in the Middle East. It's only na-
tural that there should be some
some differences of opinion as to
how we get there, ana I think one
of our purposes is to be very
persuasive based upon our
analysis of the situation as to
how this peace and stability can
be achieved.
Q.: How do you believe the
Israeli incursion into Lebanon
changed the balance of power in
the Middle East and affected the
peace process ?
Meese: I think it's too early to
give an analysis of that. What I
do know is that the early with-
drawal of all foreign forces, in-
cluding the defense forces of
Israel, is very important as far as
the United States is concerned,
and very important as far a&
obtaining peace and stability m
the region.
Q.: Is the Administration
taking a bum rap in terms of
criticism leveled at it for oppo-
sing an increase in foreign aid to
Israel?
Meese: This is something
where I think that any reasonable
person would see that the United
States has been extremely forth-
coming in aid to Israel, when in
fact they are receiving some 29
percent or 30 percent of all
foreign assistance and we have
increased our foreign assistance
to them this year, particularly in
the new budget for fiscal '83,
including foreign military assis-
tance. This extra amount that
had not been requested, that was
just added by certain members of
Congress, we think would not be
a good idea. It's not a matter of
helping Israel, we're already
committed to doing that.
But it means that that money
would have to necessarily, in this
era of limited resources, be taken
away from other smaller coun-
tries that are getting a much
smaller share of foreign assis-^
Lance. So it's just a matter of
fairness and how you can try to
apportion limited funds equitably
among a variety of countries,
where Israel is getting the big-
gest share in the world.
Q.: There are those who believe
that this foreign aid package is
Continued on Page 13-A
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Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
On the Bookshelf
Novels Show Good, Evil Spirits
graham, Isaac, Jacob and Zeb.
3y Jerry Marcus. Chicago:
tattany Publications, 1982.
225 pp., $13.95.
omise the Earth. By Clive
Irving. New York: Harper and
low. 1982. 403 pp., $15.95.
| By MORTON TEICHER
twish Floridian Book Editor
[he good and evil spirits
ch, according to Jewish tradi-
inhabit each individual's
|y, are personified in the first
hese two novels as the Laugh-
Angels and the Righteous
ks. They vie with each other
[control of Zev Segal, the hero
lie story by Jerry Marcus.
Ve meet him and his rivalling
[its in 1950 when he is 12 years
He is the son of an Orthodox
i)i. living in Brooklyn, study-
at Yeshiva but also spending
H- .is a basketball and baseball
yer. He leaves the Yeshiva to
lad a public high school where
|is on the varsity basketball
VE ARE introduced to his
pids. both male and female,
we are given a play-by-play
Icription of a championship
pketball game which Zev's
team loses. He then moves to
Cleveland where he enters a
Yeshiva, makes new friends,
including a gambler on sports
events, is ordained as a rabbi,
and then, to the dismay of his
parents and teachers, accepts a
Reform pulpit in Washington.
While there, he maintains
contact with the gambler, ear-
ning extra money through his
betting. This odd combination of
rabbi and gambler plainly
represents the inner forces of
good and evil. Peculiarly, how-
ever, it is not his gambling which
leads to his downfall. Rather, be-
cause he insists on reminding
congregation members of their
obligations to Jewish tradition,
his contract is not renewed.
The day of his farewell sermon,
he meets Hope Elliot, a Senator's
daughter. They fall in love and
live together, but she soon dies of
a brain tumor. Zev is despon-
dent: he moves to Chicago where
he gambles unsuccessfully and
where he drifts from job to job.
Finally, he calls a friend in
Washington and obtains work in
public relations.
THIS DEVELOPS satisfac
tonly, and we leave him on an
Lebanon Normalization
Still Issue for Israel
Continued from Page 1 A
allel front: that of diplomacy
led at the withdrawal of Israeli
I Syrian forces from Lebanon.
Then Habib was in the region
December he spoke with some
imism of the prospects, but
kinet sources said nothing
Iher had been heard from the
lencans. Withdrawal of
lign forces is to be an item on
[Israel-Lebanon talks agenda.
[ol assumes that Lebanon will
duct parallel discussions with
Syrians.
abinet sources were tight-
k-d about reports of an Israel
pstine Liberation Organiza-
indirect dialogue over a
oner exchange. The sources
Israeli policymakers in-
led enormous effort
Jgh a variety of unconven-
al means and contacts to
|e headway on this issue. But
refused to confirm or deny
rts that Austrian Chancellor
po Kreisky and leftwing
pli politician Arieh Eliav are
Ived in these efforts.
THE CABINET heard exten-
sive reports from army officers
and intelligence officials on the
situation in the Shouf mountains,
where violence between
Christians and Druze is taking a
toll of local lives, sometimes in-
volving Israeli soldiers.
Sunday's Cabinet communique
said the ministers heard of "steps
taken to maintian security in the
area and to increase precaution-
ary measures to avoid IDF
soldiers being hit." Cabinet
sources stressed that in fact only
very few IDF men had been hit in
the Shouf: most of Israel's
casualties currently are in the
coastal area or around Aley
village. near the Beirut-
Damascus road.
The sources said Israel was
determined to retain its deploy-
ment in the Shouf range until
Syria indicated its readiness for a
mutual partial pullback in which
both armies would vacate the
mountains. Israel southwards
and westwards and Syria
eastwards.
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upbeat note as he meets the
infant daughter of Kay, Hope's
sister. Kay has converted to
Judaism, moved to Israel,
married, but her husband died.
She has named her daughter,
Hope, and so we are left with the
promise of a happier future.
There are obviously many
elements of soap opera in the
story, along with the seemingly
obligatory sex scenes. Marcus
has clearly been influenced by
Eric Segal's Love Story and by
Chaim Potok's The Chosen.
However, his characters are fairly
interesting and the tale flows
smoothly enough. The curious
mixture of rabbi and gambler
symbolizes the contending forces
of good and evil. It also offers
fertile ground for their struggle.
Good apparently wins out in
the end, although Zev is still
under the age of thirty when the
story ends so who knows?
We do not know, but we would
like to find out what happens to
Zev. Having caused us to care
about the characters he created,
Marcus has done well in his first
novel. We look forward to the
next installment.
FOR CLIVE IRVING. "Pro-
mise the Earth" is a second
novel. Unlike Marcus' book, this
one is set in a different time
period 1916 to 1919 and in a
different place, since it primarily
depicts events in the Middle
East. Historical figures such as
Chaim Wiezmann, Lawrence of
Arabia and General Allenby
appear in the story.
Central emphasis, however, is
placed on the Aaronsohn family
and their associates in NILI, a
spy network that helped Allenby
and his forces to capture Pales-
tine from the Turks. The stirring
story of Aaron Aaronsohn and
his sister, Sarah, is not suf-
ficiently well-known. They and
their colleagues were significant
elements in the steps that led to
the founding of Israel.
They both paid with their lives
she by torture and he in a
mysterious plane accident for
their important contribution to
what eventually became the state
of Israel.
THEIR MARTYRDOM and
patriotism are excitingly cap-
tured in this excellent novel. We
sorely need the historical pers-
pective which the book provides
as we get caught up in the im-
mediacy of today's latest news
bulletin from the Middle East,
losing sight of the long view.
Irving reminds us that there
are antecedents to Israel, and we
need to remind ourselves that
contemporary events are merely
an episode between the past and
the future.
DON'T MMD ME...
I'LL JUST KIBBITZ!
Leo Mindlin
The U.S. Black Must
Come to Prevail
Continued from Page 4-A
develop a language all of their
own to set them apart even more.
And while other Americans
accept this language with great
good humor and even to some
extent adapt it to their own
needs, the net effect is to separate
blacks further. Cubans, by con-
trast, are already responding to
the need to make effective use of
English as a means of success
despite their earlier, rather hot
rhetoric on bilingual ism.
THIS IS no vain exercise in
bigotry. It does not call upon the
racist principles of say, B. F.
Skinner. It perfectly well recog-
nizes the unique agony of the
prejudice against blacks and the
results of that prejudice. But it
also suggests that blacks may
not be doing enough on their own
to lift themselves up by the boot-
straps of their despair.
One explanation, and it is only
an explanation, may lie in the
American black's southern roots.
Even the white south lay in a
running cycle of indolence and
futility after the Civil War, doing
little or nothing to reconstruct
itself except for occasional fits of
violence directed against its two
mortal enemies, Yankees and
blacks who, as the south saw it,
brought its unique medieval
universe low.
It was a cycle that remained
unbroken until World War II.
when Yankee industrialists des-
cended upon the south in search
of cheap real estate for the ex-
pansion of its war industry
factories and for cheap labor.
IN EFFECT, it was an ex-
ternal force, not the south s own
devices, that put an end to it all.
Such shocking lassitude in the
face of vast community tragedy
was almost precedent elsewhere.
What is it in the nature of the
south that encouraged it?
Whatever it was. there is at
least the possibility that blacks
are still seized by the malady in
their own anguish today. But
that is pure speculation. Needed
are answers and now. Not the
old stuff of the comfortable civil
libertarians which didn't prevent
Liberty City in 1979 or Overtown
in 1982.
Needed are answers to which
blacks themselves must contri-
bute and in a meaningful way, or
the lack of them may engulf us all
in ever newer gyres of senseless
violence as the New Year gets
underway. Needed are means of
encouraging American blacks to
"catch a falling star." To prevail.
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Reservation* Suggested J74-7111 tree Valet Parking
Continued from Page 12-A
linked to political affairs in the
Middle East.
Meese: No, it is not, in the
minds of this Administration. It
is strictly on the merits of how we
apportion the available funds
among the various commitments
and in which, as I say, Israel has
the top priority.
Q.: Will the President run for
reelection ?
Meese: He hasn't made up his
mind. My own view, if I had to
guess or speculate is that he
probably will.
Q.: What about you? Will you
be taking a judgeship f
Meese: No. I don't have any
plans either for continuing or
' changing as far as the future.
That will take care of itself when
the time comes.
Q.: There are those who are
saying that the Administration is
dragging its feet on legislation
for tuition tax credits. Is that
true?
Meese: Not at all. The
Administration's commitment
has always been to pass a bill for
tuition tax credits. Any delay in
taking it up is really due to the
press of other legislative busi-
ness, where necessesarily, for ins-
tance, things like the appro-
priations, including the con-
tinuing resolution that includes
foreign military assistance and
security assistance which has a
deadline on it, namely that the
existing resolution expires on the
17th of December, has taken a
priority on the legislative agenda.
But as far as our overall priori-
ties, tuition tax credits remains
extremely high.
Q.: Do you have any message
to the American Jewish com-
munity?
Meese: The message is that
this Administration has the same
commitment to Israel and the
same objective to peace and
stability in the Middle East that
we had before the President took
office and since the President
took office. We have not wavered
in our commitment to the
security of Israel and to the sear-
ch for peace. We will do every-
thing necessary to work with
Israel and the other states in the
region to attain that peace and
we would hope that the American
Jewish community, in their
support for these goals, would be
very alert to the kinds of things
that this Administration is pro-
posing and would likewise engage
in a dialogue with the Admin-
istration so that we can com-
municate on a two-way basis our
mutual concerns.


r-age 14-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 7,1983
Latest Anti-Semitic Violence
Spreads Latin American Fears
Yeshiva University's 58th annual Chanukah
dinner honored Mrs. Max Stern, widow of
the noted philanthropist, who was vice chair-
man and member of the University's Board
of Trustees. At the dinner, more than $8
million in gifts and pledges were announced,
Kiryat Shemonah
including a $1 million gift from son, Leonard
N. Stern, Left to right are another son,
Stanley E. Stern; Leonard N. Stern; Mrs.
Max Stern; Herbert Temer, Board of
Trustees chairman; and Dr. Norman Lamm,
University president.
Digs Out of the Rubble
Continued from Page 5-A
Government," "our boys." "our
Army.".Tales of heroism and
examples of Israeli concern for
Lebanese civilians were the cur-
rency of daily conversation.
After the waves of euphoria
came the feelings of guilt for the
high price the country has had to
pay for its security. The figure of
368 dead emphasized the darker
side of victory. This feeling was
exacerbated by the phone calls
and letters received by some of
the residents from families of
fallen soldiers: "Our boy has died
to keep you safe;" "this war was
on your account."
Yvonne Silverberg. a long-time
householder, thinks that it was a
mistake to name the operation
"Peace for Galilee."
"The county is one." she said.
"Bombs in Kiryat Shemonah are
a threat to Tel Aviv." She said
that throughout the years there
has been resentment because of
the attitude of the rest of the
country.
THE TOWN bears the name of
Yosef Trumpeldor and his seven
comrades who fell in the defense
of Tel Chai in 1920. Trumpeldor s
dying words, as we know, were,
"Never mind, it is good to die for
our country" (Ein davar, tov
lamut be'ad arUenu). Surely he
Runner Second
TEL AVIV (JTA) Yair
Kami, Israel's marathon cham-
pion runner, came in second in
the 6th Annual Sea of Galilee
International Marathon Race.
His time was 2 hours 18 minutes
and 32 seconds.
meant the whole of our coun-
try .. .
"When we were crowded into
the shelters all last summer we
read and heard about improved
beaches in Tel Aviv, of festivals
in Jerusalem. As near as Haifa
everything was normal, while less
than 80 miles away people were
being killed and homes des-
troyed. Surely if there is war in
Galilee, there can not be peace in
Netanya."
Finally, there is the overall at-
mosphere of uncertainty. Many
families who left over the 14
years of stress have come back
and are anxious to make their
contribution to the town. But
with the removal of danger there
is a possibility that the special
consideration shown by the
Government will no longer be
manifested. Subsidies for the new
enterprises may not be available,
and deep down, never expressed,
is the lurking doubt as to whether
it really is over. The shelters are
all cleaned out and ready just
in case.
ONE POSSIBILITY of in-
creased employment may be the
Tourist Industry. The air is clear
and cool at this height giving a
welcome contrast in the summer
to the humidity of the coast. The
surroundings are superb and the
people are friendly. Israeli tour-
ism, which is in the doldrums,
needs new ideas.
If the open border with Leba-
non really becomes free for both
sides there will be a considerable
traffic back and forth. The Leba-
nese are no strangers to the
northern towns. Workers cross
daily into the factories and farms,
the shops and restaurants.
Sports matches are frequent.
Lebanese children get instruction
at the Tennis Center.
"The Lebanese are our part-
ners in suffering. We know that
they have been victims of the
PLO just as we have, and we
would like to establish some joint
ventures, mainly with regard to
tourism, together with them."
said an official in the town.
The word "peace" in Kiryat
Shemonah has many connota-
tions. Freedom to get on with liv-
ing unhampered by the need to
locate the nearest shelter. In-
creased industry, which will in
turn attract more citizens. Pros-
perity that is not crippled by the
demands of security. Friendship
with the Lebanese neighbors and
open borders. The thought of
peace unites all the people of the
region no matter what their po-
litical or national affiliation. On
all their lips are the words, "We
are all praying that it will last."
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Recent attacks against a
synagogue in Peru and one
in Columbia were the latest
in a growing wave of anti-
Semitic violence that has
alarmed Latin American
Jews in recent months, ac-
cording to Rabbi Morton
Rosenthal, director of Latin
American Affairs for the
Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith.
He warned that terrorism in-
spired by the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization and other Arab
groups is sharply on the increase
in Latin America.
Both synagogues were at-
tacked on the evening of Dec. 3.
In Lima. Peru, the Great Syna-
gogue was bombed, leaving win-
dows shattered, moments after
after several hundred worship-
pers had vacated the premises. It
was the first time that a syna-
gogue had been attacked in Peru,
a country where violence has
never been directed against
houses of worship. Rosenthal
said.
THE ATTACK was denounced
by Peruvian President Fernando
Belaunde Terry, who said it was
linked with organized interna-
I ional terrorism. Peruvian Jewish
leaders subsequently issued a
statement declaring that since
the opening of a PLO office in
Peru, that country has been
flooded with anti-Semitic and
hate-filled propaganda inciting
Peruvians to acts of violence.
In the second attack, six
masked persons wielding
machine-guns invaded a syna-
gogue in Medellin. Colombia. The
attackers ordered a small group
of elderly Jews to line up against
a wall.
Then they proceeded to dese-
crate the synagogue. Rosenthal
said, burning and scattering
Torah scrolls, setting the reader's
desk on fire, splashing acid on
draperies and smearing pro-PLO
slogans on the walls with red
paint. One of the worshippers
was burned by the acid.
THE TERRORISTS swore
"vengeance" for the Beirut
camps massacres and pro-
claimed, "Death to Israel and
Yankee imperalism," according
to Rosenthal. Then they unfurled
two flags which they had brought
with them an Israeli and an
American and burned them
before the horrified worshippers. ''
The hand of the PLO was also
evident in another attack, two
months earlier, on the Jewish
Center of Maracaibo. Venezuela,
Rosenthal said. In that attack,
bus loads of university students
shouted "Zionists, murderers" as
they scrawled "PLO" in black
paint on windows, walls and
floors of the building.
Rosenthal pointed out that.
PLO-inspired vandalism of Jew-
ish institutions has also taken
place in Mexico. Bolivia and
Fcuador. and bomb attacks have
been directed against Israeli em-
bassies in Colombia. Ecuador and
Guatemala.
ARAB TERRORISTS and na-
tive Latin Americans linked to
them. Rosenthal said, have es-
tablished a clandestine network
of terror in Latin America which
they are willing to acknowledge
publicly.
A Colombian terrorist who
identified himself as "Com-
mander Four" told a reporter for
the Colombian magazine
"Cromos" late last year that he
was organizing a guerrilla force
to oppose "Jewish and North
American imperialism."
Rosenthal said the incursion
into the synagogue in Medellin
"may well be linked to the forma-
tion of such a guerrilla force." He
added: "Not only do these terror-
ist groups pose a danger to Jew-
ish communities but they create
additional instability in nations
which are already beset by social
and political unrest."
S
It's Easy to Feel Like a Mion
Without Spending a Dime
At first glance, its just a living room
filled with furniture. Or maybe it's
a garage filled with tools. Or a closet
filled with clothes.
It might not be worth much to you,
but to us it's worth millions. It's worth
medicine and medical supplies for
indigent residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged
Everything you donate to the
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is
tax-deductibte. Of course, we will be
glad to pick up your merchandise at
your convenience. A licensed
appraiser is available upon request.
Call the Douglas Gardens Thrift
Shops-when you re-decorate your
home, clean out your garage and
straighten up your closets.
Its that easy. And you'll feel like a
million without spending a dime.
CaM-
751-3988 (Dade)
(
5713 NW. 27th Ave
500N.E.79thSt.
(3149 Hallandale Beach Brvd
Irving Cypen, Chairman of the Board
Harold Beck. President
Aaron Kravitz. Chairman. Thrift Shop
Committee
Fred D Hirt. Executive Director



mum iup'u.
Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A

WE GIVE YOU
CREDIT FOR YOUR AOE
..V-
^
SErT.
Announcing the
20% Senior Discount,
For years, we've given you
special vacation rates, weekend
specials, dinner discounts and
lots of other good reasons
to stay with us. But
beginning October 1st,
we're really going to
spoil you.
You Only Have to Be 55 to
Get 20% Off Your Hotel Bill.
From October 1st through
January 31st*a great time to
see FloridaHoward Johnson s
participating lodges will offer
all senior citizens a 20% room
discount And that's not all.
You'll Even Get a 10% Discount on Your Dinner.
Not just a 20% discount on your room, but
10% off your dinner, too. For participating lodges
and more information on the way we treat senior
[citizens, call toll free 1-800-654-2000, and
ask for the Senior Double Discount offer, or
I bring this ad to a participating Howard
Johnson's Motor Lodge.
At Howard Johnson's, we give
you credit for the things
that count most
HOWARDjOUIISOri]
All rooms subject to availability. 'Offer not valid December 20 through
January 2, or in conjunction with any other Howard Johnson's offer.
&j~
O Howard Johnson Co. 1982


.
i^age 16-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, January 7,1983
NORTON
SINCE 1924-
H
SAFETY
SERVICE
CWTTR
IS MEASURED BY MORE THAN PRICE
YOU'LL FIND IT ALL AT NORTON!
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Plus 149 RET.
SIZE
P155/80B13
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PRICE
31.97
33.81
35.75
P185/80B13
P175/75B14
P185/75B14
P195/75B14
P205/75B14
P215/75B14
P225/75B14
P155/80B15
P165/80B15
P205/75B15
P215/75B15
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37.93
38.79
39.88
41.82
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44.25
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50.10
F.E.T.
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MAXITRAC
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P165/80R13
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SIZE PRICE F.E.T.
P175/80R13 38.39 1.64
P185/80R13 40.09 1.78
P185/75R14 41.25 1.93
P195/75R14 42.62 206
P205/75R14 43.90 231
P215/75R14 45.89 2.47
P215/75R15 46.28 2.49
P225/75R15 48.77 2.70
P235/75R15 53.61 2.89
r*wj

IFGoodrichl
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P185/80R13! 49.85
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50.82
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ffflgfjmnp i. i i3 i n ^ 'Ul! lum11
PU^U J-U
?#Mlfor Gary 2farfc 'Consistent Friend AJC Official to Speak on Terrorism
4&OT
At Federation Memorial Luncheon
Jy MORRIS J. AMITAY
WASHINGTON One
tie more prominent new-
in the Democratic
idential sweepstakes
[1984 is Sen. Gary Hart
folorado. Hart, 45, who
elected in 1974 and re-
ted in 1980, first came
lational attention as
Lpaign manager of Sen.
krge McGovern's 1972
j idential campaign.
jt unlike McGovern, whose
on the Middle Fast dis-
ed supporters of Israel, Hart
been a consistent friend. He
made his mark as an early
ardent advocate of reducing
dependence on imported oil,
is also an influential mem-
the Armed Services Corn-
art regularly votes for for-
i aid bills containing substan-
Bums for Israel and has de-
ed U.S. support for Israel as
noral and strategic commit-
VRT WAS a cosigner of the
lc Letter of 76. and opposed
[the F 15 and AWACS sales
(auili Arabia. He has not
many opportunities to
out on behalf of Israel dur-
inate initiatives, and was
bf few to publicly express
Standing for Israel's de-
|ti<>n of the Iraqi nuclear re-
last year.
|re recently, he initiated a
to President Reagan op-
J an anticipated arms sale
rdan. and issued a suppor-
tatement regarding Israel's
ry operations in Lebanon.
ier, he has publicly ex-
pd his concern over Israeli
risibility for the kHling of
Ins in the refugee camps in
Ion.
I sum. Hart has a strong
I of support and a future
Itional politics extending
Id 1984. As of now, his pros-
|for the 1984 nomination are
behind those of Mondale
Blenn. But if Jimmy Carter
?- taught us anything, it's
m horse is too dark.
NOVEMBER Congress
actions left a single impor-
vacancy on the Senate For-
| Relations Committee and
the House Foreign Affairs
ven Democrats and three
blieans. While the House
[have not yet been filled, the
"lican caucus selected Sen.
Murkowski of Alaska to
I in place of the retiring Sen.
Hayakawa of California.
"gin Backs
roren, Yosef
for Reelection
Given the views on the Middle
East of a number of other Repub-
lican Senators who expressed in-
terest in serving, Murkowski's
selection is a welcome addition.
Although he voted in favor of the
AWACS sale, Murkowski, who
was elected in 1980, has been
voting for foreign aid and has
been positive on other arms sales
and UN-related issues.
On the House side, it will be
hard to make up for the loss of
such stalwarts as Jack Bingham
(D., N.Y.I, Millicent Fenwick (R.,
N.J.), Bob Shamansky (D.,
Ohio), Bob Dornan (R., Cal), and
Ed Derwinski (R.. 111.), who was
recently appointed Counselor to
the State Department.
SERVICE ON this Committee
is generally not regarded too
highly because of the lack of op-
portunities to please constit-
uents. Foreign Affairs is not con-
sidered a "bread and butter"
Committee. However, for those
concerned for Israel's security
and well-being, the Committee
remains a vital one.
In 1984, no less than nine of
the 17 members of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
face reelection which could pro-
duce significant changes in the
composition of this Committee.
Since 1980, the orientation of the
Committee has become more
negative with regard to Israel,
particularly since Chairman
Charles Percy of Illinois replaced
Frank Church (D.. Idaho) who
was a firm friend of Israel.
Those Senators on the Com-
mittee who face reelection are
Howard Baker (R.. Tenn.), Jesse
Helms (R., North Carolina),
Nancy Kassebaum (R., Kansas),
Rudy Boschwitz (R., Minn.),
Larry Pressler (R., South
Dakota), Claiborne Pell (D.,
Rhode Island), Joseph Biden (D.,
Delaware), Paul Tsongas (D.,
Mass.) and Chairman Charles
Percy (R.. III.).
PLO Katyusha Launchers
Found Aimed at Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
Tel Aviv JTA
Disclosure today that four more Katyusha rocket launchers
have been discovered in South Lebanon, aimed at Israeli mili-
tary installations has aggravated Israels angry dispute with the
United Nations Interim Force In Lebanon (UNIFIL) and added
to the political embarrassment of Premier Menachem Benin's
government.
The army disclosed yesterday that five launchers were dis-
covered last Friday aimed at Kiryat Shmona, the Israeli border
town serving as a site for negotiations between Israel. Lebanon
and the United States. The launchers were destroyed, but Israel
promptly accused UNIFIL of laxity in permitting terrorists to
enter the area under its control. The launchers were found near
Magdal Saloum. a village in the zone patrolled by the Ghanaian
contingent of UN IFIL.
The four additional launchers were found in the same region,
aimed at the Israel base on Lebanon's coastal plain. Although
no rockets were fired and none was even found, the presence of
the launchers indicated that Palestine Liberation Organization
elements were still hiding in the area, were able to cache weap-
ons there and had sufficient freedom of movement to set up the
launchers. The possibility exists that they could have been fired.
This embarrassed Begin and Defense Minister Ariel Sharon,
both of whom promised months ago that "not a single Katyusha
will fall on Kiryat Shmona or Northern Galilee."
Israeli sources stress that the rocket launchers were not newly
introduced into the region, but probably had been hidden there
some time ago by small groups of PLO terrorists who managed
to slip through Israeli army dragnets.
Nevertheless, Israel has come down hard on UNIFIL. Its
mandate is up for renewal shortly and Israel is expected to
oppose any extension on grounds that the international force is
useless and unnecessary. Israeli forces in the Israeli backed
militia of Major Saad Haddad are adequate to maintain order in
the region, Israel contends.
Non-Government UN Body
Won't Help Palestine Event
ERUSALEM Premier
(u h.m Begin intervened per-
H'.v at Sunday's Cabinet
l|B m favor of amending an
Png law so that Israel's two
Vbent chief rabbis can stand
flection to second 10-year
pn was opposed on this
F y Yosef Burg, Interior
Bt" and Minister for Reli-
Affairs who is a leader of
Mtional Religious Party, and
fee Minister Moshe Nissim. a
fF f the Liberal Party
lot Begin's Likud. The law at
pnt limits a chief rabbi to one
Fw term. Shlomo Goren is
^hkenazic Chief Rabbi and
I'll ,Xosef is the Sephardic
' Kabbi.
g'n originally wanted Goren
, sef to be 8>ven tenure until
reach age 70, without elec-
t."e agreed to elections on
[lln that the two incum-
e allowed to run.
NEW YORK (JTA) The
World Jewish Congress success-
fully blocked a last minute at-
tempt to associate the coord i-
natimg body of Non-Govern-
mental Organizations (NGO's)
with a UN-sponsored conference
on Palestine next year, the WJC
reported here.
The attempt was made at the
executive session of the Con-
ference of NGOs at UN head-
quarters in Geneva to involve
them formally in preparations for
the International Conference on
the Question of Palestine to be
convened next year by the UN in
Paris.
The Executive Committee of
the Conference of NGOs, the
umbrella body of non-govern-
mental groups having consul-
tative status with the UN, was
concluding its first session since
last month's elections at which
the WJC succeeded in attaining a
seat.
As the session drew to a close.
a surprise motion was introduced
urging the NGO grouping "to co-
operate in the preparations for
the International Conference on
the Question of Palestine conven-
ed under General Assembly
resolution 36-120, to take place at
UNESCO in Paris, in August
1983." The motion specified that
NGO cooperation be through "a
commission or working group."
Gerhart Riegner. WJC secre-
tary-general, was the lone voice
to speak in opposition. He argued
that the Executive should deal
with matters that unite NGOs,
not divide them. The Executive,
he added, had the right to review
all UN conferences but was under
no obligation to deal with each of
them.
Following difficult negotia-
tions behind closed doors, agree-
ment was reached that the NGO
Executive would not consider
questions relating to NGO
participation in the Palestine
Conference.
The Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division
will hold an annual Guardian-
Benefactor reception on behalf of
the 1983 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
on Saturday, Jan. 15 at Gucci in
Bal Harbour.
The gala will be highlighted by
the introduction and presentation
of a new 14- karat gold Shomer
lavaliere to new Guardians, a
fashion show by Gucci, and guest
speaker Wolf Blitzer, Washing-
ton correspondent for the Jerusa-
lem Post.
"The lavaliere will be a proud
symbol to be worn by all women
whose commitment to the
tradition of tzedakah makes them
a Guardian of the Jewish spirit,"
said Women's Division Cam-
paign Chairwoman Ellen
Matullcr. "It is appropriate that
this elegant new lavaliere has the
Hebrew word shomer,' which
means guardian in English, on
it."
Women who make a $2,500
minimum gift to the CJA-IEF
are Guardians, while those who
make a SI,000 minimum gift are
Benefactors.
Wolf Blitzer
Irma Braman and Elaine Rich-
man are co-chairwomen, and
Dorothy Podhurst is Guardian
chairwomen. Miami Beach
Benefactor chairwomen are Alice
Vinik and Dorothy Sussman;
Wendy Kravitz and Marlene Olin
in North Dade; and Diane
Eisenberg and Bobbi Berkan in
South Dade.
Women's Division to Host Gucci
Show and Jerusalem Post Reporter
Phil Baum, associate executive
director of the American Jewish
Congress, will address the topic
"The International Terror
Network" during a third session
of the 1983 Sandra C. Goldstein
Memorial Luncheon Forum on
Monday, Jan. 10 at noon at Re-
flections on the Bay restaurant.
Baum serves as AJC's director
of the Commission on Interna-
tional Affairs and has coordi-
nated the organization's annual
American-Israel Dialogue in
Israel, a forum for the exchange
of views among leading Jewish
intellectuals from both countries.
He also authored the AJC White
Paper on the "Arab Campaign
Against American Jews" which
helped obtain a Senate resolution
on that subject.
The luncheon forum is being
presented in cooperation with the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion's Chazak and Leadership
Development departments and
the American Jewish Congress.
"Established in memory of
Sandra Goldstein whose
dedication and commitment to
the continuity of Jewish life
touched many members of the
Phil Baum
Greater Miami Jewish communi-
ty, the forum is offered to
enlighten, enrich and inspire par-
ticipants to advance the work
that was so much a part of her
life," Alan Gold, program
chairman, stated.
PLO Fails to Gain Seat
For Palestine'in UN
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
The Palestine Liberation
Organization failed to gain the
support of the Arab countries for
its proposal that the General As-
sembly will reserve a seat in the
Assembly hall for Palestine."
Israeli diplomats and observ-
ers here said that during the 37th
session of the General Assembly,
the PLO was unsuccessful in its
bid after it ran into strong op-
position to the proposal from
moderate Arab states. Jordan, it
was disclosed, was the major
force lobbying against the PLO
initiative.
In the view of diplomats here,
the PLO failure demonstrates the
organization's decline following
its military and political defeat in
Lebanon this summer. The PLO
finally decided to drop its initia-
tive after it was convinced that a
vote in the Assembly on the issue
would only further humiliate the
PLO.
Israeli diplomats claimed that
had the PLO been successful in
its drive to gain a seat for "Pales-
tine" in the Assembly, it would
have represented a major pro-
paganda victory. But, they
noted, such a move would not
have threatened Israel's status at
the Assembly.
eJewislhi Floridianni
Miami, FloridaFriday, January 7,1983
Section B


"Page 2-B the Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 7,1983
From the Pulpit
The Tootsie in All of Us
/]
By RABBI
BRETT S. GOLDSTEIN
Temple Shir Ami
One of the most puzzling and
provocative verses of the Book of
Genesis occurs in the very first
chapter of creation. After the for-
mation of the fish of the sea, the
foul of the heavens, and the
beasts of the field, God fashions
the pinnacle of his creative ef-
forts: man. And so the verse
reads. "God created man in His
image male and female. He
created them.
From where does the female
counterpart emanate? How do
scholars explain the sudden and
spontaneous appearance of both
sexes? The commentator, Rashi,
reasons that God created man
with two faces, with the male and
the female aspects and then He
divided them. Such is to say, that
Adam was created androgynous,
with the elements of both of the
sexual characteristics.
SOME avant-garde explana-
tion, is it not? We cannot help
but wonder how Rashi might
have reacted having been af-
forded the chance to see this
year's resoundingly successful
movie. "Tootsie." Perhaps in his
own academic manner, he would
be laughing as uproariously as
we. For those of you who have
not as yet seen this current Dus-
tin Hoffman film, allow me to
summarize briefly the plot.
M ichad Dorsey is portrayed as
a young, undiscovered actor who
is counsumed with love for his
theatrical endeavors. His passion
for the profession and his extra-
ordinary talent have always been
paramount to him. When he be-
gins to panic over his protracted
state of unemployment, he
decides to earn a few extra dollars
by means of dubious distinction.
He is lulled into compromising
his ideals for the acting profes-
sion and. of all things, auditions
for a female part in a daytime
soap.
Meticulously dressed in a
woman's apparel and gingerly
made-up with facial preparations,
Michael Dorsey (now renamed
Dorothy Michaels) becomes the
female impersonator of a General
Hospital character. Not only does
he (shel get the part, but he also
wins the hearts of hundreds of
thousands of impassioned view-
ers. As for Michael Dorsey, he is
launched into the midst of suc-
cess beyond his wildest dreams.
Vets Set Agenda
Four Freedoms Ladiet
Auxiliary 402. Jewish War
Veterans, will hold a Card Party
Tuesday at the Sherry Frontenac
at noon.
A regular meeting will be held
Thursday, Jan. 20 at noon, also
at the Sherry Frontenac, Presi-
dent Ruth Geoghegan an
nounced.
Rabbi Brett S. Goldstein
YET MICHAEL'S new-found
notoriety soon gives way to the
beginnings of despair. Our own
tradition tells us that one decep-
tive deed quickly brings another
in its wake, and another and
another. In a riotous, but equally
as serious, predicament, Dorsey
is exposed to a beautiful young
blonde co-star, who readily re-
veals her innermost secrets
thinking, "she is another
woman." Yet he continues the act
and proceeds to deceive her,
falling deeper and deeper into his
own series of lies.
To add insult to injury, this
same young blonde's father falls
head-over-heels for Dorothy Mi-
chaels with a proposal of mar-
riage. Once again. Dorothy fails
to come straight with him. Dor-
sey's roommate is abused and in-
convenienced to no end; and as
for his own girlfriend, he continu-
ally disappoints her. deceives her,
and dumps her. In short. Michael
Dorsey's life begins to crumble
before him.
Our tradition tells us that a few
hours before his death. Rabbi
Meir said, "In the world to come,
I will not be asked "Why were you
not Moses?' or 'Why were you
not Abraham?' I will be asked.
'Why were you not Rabbi Meir?"
We learn from this that we
must be true to ourselves. At all
costs, we must be who we really
are. So may we be inspired for
this New Year to come.
Jules Block, director general of ORT France, was honored at a
cocktail party in the home of Mr. and Mrs. Bart Brown. He is
shown with his wife, Jaquline, JoAnne Brown, Golden Circle-
Capital Funds chairman, and Mary Ellen Peyton, president of
ORT's Dade South Region.
Hadassah to Honor National Leader
Miami Region of Hadassah will
honor Molly Picon in absentia
and Dr. Miriam Rosenthal,
Hadassah national historian, at
an Annual Myrtle Wreath event
on Jan. 13 at Temple Beth Torah,
North Miami Beach.
Rosenthal is a past national
president who persuaded Marc
Chagall to create stained glass
windows in the Hadassah
Medical Center Synagogue in
Jerusalem. She is the author of
"Jewish Merchants in Colonial
America" and "Jewels for a
Crown." She received her doc-
torate in American history at
New York University.
Edythe Zimmerman is chair-
man of the day. Linda Minks is
president of the Region.
Hazel Cypen, third from left, was recently honored as "Wo*
of the Year" bv the Greater Miami Women's Auxiliary oft
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged. From Ufa
Fred D. Hirt, Home executive director; Judge Irving C
chairman of the board; Harold Beck, president; Myn
luncheon chairperson; and Mollie Silverman, fundni%
chairperson.
New Haifa University President
To Visit South Florida Leaders
Joseph Teicher. new president
of Haifa University in Israel, will
speak to Consul General Joel
Arnon and other South Florida
Jewish community leaders at a
luncheon at the Konover Hotel on
Tuesday at noon. The event will
be hosted by founders of Haifa
University and members of the
board of South Florida Chapter
of the American Friends of Haifa
University. Edmund Abramson.
chapter president announced
One of the founders of the tire
industry in Israel. Teicher is
former president and general
manager of the Alliance Tire
Company, one of the first Israeli
companies to have shares listed
on the American Stock Ex-
change. He served Alliance for 22
wars before shifting to an
academic career. He earned
master's and bachelor's degrees
from the University of Glascow
in Scotland in both chemistry
and psychology.
Regional offices of the
American Friends of Haifa Uni-
versity have been opened in the
Harriett Bank Building. Mi
Beach. Gerald Schwartz, natit
vice president of the Anxrt'
Zionist Federation, is South
Region director.
Dr. George S. Wiseishonm
president of the Florida chap
and he and his wife an? (oum
of the university. Otherfoim
include Stephen Muss. Flora
and Theodore Baumritter. .
and Jerrold Goodman. Ec
and Allen Gordon. JeromeGn
Kllie and Herbert Kau
Herl>ert Sadkin.
Members of the board inc;
l)r Irving Ix-hrman. Nora
Braman. Robert II Trie
Morton Silberman. i
Rosenhaus. Rabbi \|r
Abramowitz. Allen Aufa
Circuit Court Judge Fredn
Barad. Benjamin Botvuz
Jack Chester. Vice Mn
Malcolm FromberK. Gary
Geraon, Barton S. Goldbs
Harriet Green. J.I. Kfii
Harold I.. Miller. Joan Cats
Miller. Paul Weiner and M
Abramson.
Dr. Miriam Rosenthal
Temple King Solomon
910 Lincoln Rd. Miami Beach
Proudly Presents
Musical Portrait of
Golda Meir
Entitled "She's the Best Man in My Cabinet
By Renee Brandes
With
Linda Washburn. Soprano
Patrick Matthews, Baritone
Kay Sestok, Accompanist
Sunday, January 16,1983 8:00 P.M.
Tickets at the Temple are '10.00 & $7.50
Phone 534-9776; Shoshanah 673-1759: Esther 532-960*
For those who want
to be home by 7 P.M.
Sea Gull KOSHERJ
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Ocaan at 21st St. Miami Beach Sea Gull Hotel Mgmt
CONGREGATION AGUDATH ISRAEL
7801 Corlyle Avenue, Miami Modi, Flo.
MOUOLY ftCSINTS
January 8, 1983-8:30 a.m. j&w a^"DD rotr
The World Renown Cantor
Matus Radzivilover
Rabbi Sheldon Ever
will speak about
"Israel and World Jewry's
Responsibility Today."
Cantor Matus Rodziv
Please be in time.
The Board of Governors
Rabbi Sheldon Ever
Invitation is extended
to all our worshipers


WWW^^PUAI
nralanriun m iiinjimn
tRabbi Irving Lehrman of Temple Emanu-El will review "When
\Bad Things Happen To Good People" by HaroldS. Kushnerat
Sisterhood and Parent-Teacher Association's Mid-Winter
[Coffee, to be held in the Friedland Ballroom at 10:30 a.m. on
Wednesday. Planning the event are, from left, Arlene Harris,
tchairman of the day; Lorraine Greenberg, Sisterhood presi-
ment: and Roslyn Richelson, program co-chairman.
[Hadassah National Official to Speak
Miami Beach Region of
Bladassah will feature Rose
[M.u/kin of Delray Beach; past
lational president, as the guest
raker at a Major (iifts Lunch-
bo n at the Kontainebleau Hotel
unday at noon. Betty Kesten-
kum, Miami Beach Region
resident, announced. Mat/.kin
lurrently is honorary vice presi-
dent
Mat/kin has been a Hadassah
|elegate to the World Zionist
ingress in Jerusalem for many
Sessions and is a member of the
Zionists to Convene
Miami Beach Zionist District
if the Zionist Organization of
I America w'll feature Mario Al-
non. chief clinical nutritionist of
I %! Hint Sinai Medical Center, at a
(monthly meeting on Monday,
jjan. IT at 1 p.m. at American
Savings and Loan Auditorium.
Itnrner of Alton and Lincoln
IRoads
ORT Men to
Hold Gala
Greater Miami Men's Chapter
lot American ORT Federation will
hold a 22nd Installation of Offi-
cers and Directors on Jan. 16 at
11:30 a.m. at a gala luncheon in
the (irand Ballroom of Temple
Kmanu-Kl.
Richard J. Kssen. lawyer, will
talk about Israel and ORT's role
in education. Philip Morriss will
entertain.
AJCongress to
Feature Renick
American Jewish Congress'
Jewish Affairs Seminar will fea-
ture Ralph Renick, Howard
Kleinberg, and Phil Baum speak-
ing on "Responsibility of the
Media in a Democratic Society,"
to be held Jan. 11 from 9:30 a.m.
to 2 p.m. at Temple Beth Sholom.
Renick is vice president and
news director of WTVJ televi-
sion : Howard Kleinberg is editor
of the Miami News: and Phil
Baum is associate executive
director of the American Jewish
Congress.
Rabbi Ralph P. Kingsley.
president of Southeast Region of
AJCongress. will moderate.
Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
Midrashot to Feature Author Kushner
North and South Dade
Midrashot, a consortium of area
congregations. Jewish Com-
munity Centers, and the Central
Agency for Jewish Education,
will present Rabbi Harold S.
Kushner, author of the best-
seller, "When Bad Things
Happen to Good People." at Beth
Torah Congregation on Sunday
at B p.m.. hosted by Aventura
Jewish Center, and at Temple
Beth Am on Tuesday at 8 p.m.
"Harold Kushner's compas-
sionate and deeply moving book
brings us renewed faith, comfort,
and inspiration, and most of all.
the promise that we are not alone
in our pain." Dr. Silvano Arieti.
past president of the American
Neighborhood Crime Watch to Have Talks
Hose Mattkin
executive board of the World
Confederation of United Zionists.
She serves on the boards of the
Institute of Jewish Affairs in
London and American Zionist
Federation.
Matzkin also serves on the
executive committees of the
American-Israel Public Affairs
Committee and National Con-
ference on Soviet Jewry and is
Hadassah representative to the
board of governors of Hebrew
University.
Louella Shapiro is chairman of
the event.
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How to Protect Yourself. Your
Home, and Your Neighborhood:
Tips on Personal Safety: and
Home and Auto Security will be
the topics of discussion during a
Neighborhood Citizens' Crime
Watch seminar series Kach talk
Book to be Reviewed
Miami-Coral Gables Chapter.
Women's Division of American
Technion Society, will meet Jan.
IT at noon at Temple Zamora.
Natalie Lyons will give a book re-
view.
will feature a police officer and a
Crime Watch representative.
The talks will take place Mon-
day at the Alton Road office of
AmeriFirst from 4:30 to 6 p.m;
Tuesday, at the 4i Street office
from 4:30 to 6 p.m.; Wednesday,
ut the Pay Harbor office at the
same time: Thursday at the Nor-
mandy Isle offk-e from 4.15 to
5:46 p.m.; Monday. Jan. 17 at
the North Shore office from 4:30
to <> p.m.: and Tuesday. Jan. 18
at the Winston Towers office
from 4 to 5:30 p.m.
Rabbi Harold Kushner
Academy Of Psychoanalysts, has
staled.
Sharon Horowitz. North Dade
Midrasha administrator, said
that "the Midrasha concept has a
great potential behind it and over
the next few years we hope to
even further develop the program
toils fullest extent
Rabbi Norman Lipson is
director of the Institute of Jewish
Studies at CAJK and South Dade
Midrasha administrator.
Maxwell Home; Coffee
Is Hospitality.
Lox 'n bagels 'n cream cheese is al-
most as much a pan of a traditional
Jewish household as the Mezuzah on
the door. And the most natural ac-
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The full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying
good flavor of
Maxwell House
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food for half a century. And why not ?
Who would ever think of serving
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instant or goundwhen you pour
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A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, January 7, 1983
Satre Defended Massacre
South Florida Chaplains Association recently held an Annual
Holiday Dinner in Mount Sinai Medical Center's Founder's
Dining Room. Pictured from left are Reverend Robert W.
Jacobi, Baptist Hospital chaplain and president of the
organization; guest speaker. Dr. Martin Cohn, director of
Mount Sinai's Sleep Center; Rabbi Solomon Schiff, chaplain
and director of the chaplaincy at the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation; and Joel Lefkowitz. assistant director.
mm > ->
i C i 1 vP^^H afl
5 jr E*
w H
Junior Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged at Douglas Gardens celebrated 26 years of service to.
the community at an annual luncheon recently. The event was-"
chaired by Gladys Israel, far left. Others shown are, from left,
Esther Schneiderman, president; Rose Banner; and Jean,
Tesser.
By ARNOLD AGES
TORONTO (JTA> -
French literary and political
circles were stunned recently
when it was revealed that in a
little-known article written in
1972 the eminent French philo-
sopher and novelist Jean-Paul
Sartre had defended the massacre
of Israeli athletes at the 1972
Olympic Games in Munich.
Until his death two years ago.
Sartre was internationally recog-
nized as one of the worlds
greatest figures in literature and
philosophy. A playright. essay-
ist, journalist and critic. Sartre
was also deeply involved in leftist
circles. After World War II Sar-
tre wrote 'Anti-Semite and
Jews." a seminal work on the
psychodynamics of aqti-
Semitism.
Sartre was always meticulous-
ly fair in his discussions about
the Mideast. He had been to Is-
rael, had many Israeli friends and
on one occasion used the pages of
Le Temps Moderne. a French
monthly to bring together Arab
and Israeli intellectuals for a
symposium on the elusive search
for peace in the Mideast.
While critical of certain aspects
of Israeli politics. Sartre was al-
ways careful to eschew the ex-
treme rhetorical modes of some of
his leftist allies. Until 1972.
Then, in an issue of a little
known Maoist publication called
"Cause de Peuple J'accuse."
Sartre wrote an article which, for
reasons that are unknown,
aroused virtually no comment
and which disappeared quickly
from public scrutiny. The article
has now surfaced as a result of
Sartre specialists in France who
are collecting everything which
; the "master" ever wrote. The ex-
plosive piece was reprinted in
toto in a recent number of the
I Paris weekly Les nouvelles Lit-
teraires.
In his article in the Maoist re-
view, Sartre justified the mas-
sacre of the Israeli athletes at
Munich by arguing that a state of
war existed between Israel's "es-
tablishment" and the Palestin-
ians.
Sartre said that in this uneven
combat the only effective weap-
ons which the terrorists can
muster is terrorism. In his
polemic on behalf of the assas
sins. Sartre made the comparison
between the revolutionary forces
that fought the French in Algeria
and the Palestinian struggle
against Israel. One cannot sup-
port the first, he said, without the
second.
Sartre admitted that the ter-
rorism weapon is execrable but
that it is the only thing which
poor and oppressed people
have recourse to. The Palestin-
ians, he argued further, chose the
Olympics as a venue for their
deed because it had world signifi
cance. "Denied representation at
the UN. they were forced to
choose this method to publicize
their cause." he wrote.
After castigating the Israeli
government for its inflexibility in
the Munich affair. Sartre said:
' Thus the Olympic Games attack
showed everyone the despair of
the Palestinian fighters and the
horrible courage which this des-
pair gives them. It does not tacti-
cally advance their cause, but it
demonstrates it and proves
better than any UN speeches that
the Palestinian problem must be
resolved immediately and that
the Palestinian problem has be-
come everyone's problem."
The response to Sartre's 10-
year-old article has been swift.
Michel-Antoine Burnier. an es
sayist. writing in the same peri-
odical which featured Sartre's
piece, called the latter "a dirty
surprise." Burnier pointed out
that the Maoists themselves were
embarrassed by the Munich mas
sacres and disassociated them
selves from the Arab attack. He
also stated that Sartre's rationale
is an explanation of why there is
now an open hunting season on
Jews in France today.
Of Sartre. Burnier wrote:
"Sartre himself taught us that to
be quiet is a form of speaking,
and one is responsible for one's
writing, even the consequences
thereof. Those sentence have
tarnished the image of a man."
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Mary Soreanu entertains in a Parisian nightclub in a scene from
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Students from Florida enrolled at the World Union of Jewish
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Sharon Will Visit Zaire
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Israeli De-
fense Minister Ariel Sharon was
expected to pay an official visit to
Zaire this week, Kinshasa Radio
announced. According to Zaire
sources. Sharon is accompanied
by his top military advisor, Maj.
Gen. Abraham Tamir and For-
eign Ministry aides. He will be
the second Israeli Minister to
visit Zaire in less than a month.
Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir
visited Kinshasa in November as
the guest of President Mobutu
Sese Seko.
Western sources believe Shar-
on's trip is linked to negotiations
on security, defense and agricul-
tural projects. Israeli army per-
sonnel have been training a spe-
cial Zairian crack unit. The Presi-
dential Brigade, since early this
year. After the resumption of di-
plomatic relations between the
two countries last May. addition-
al Israeli army technicians and
logistic experts arrived in Kin-
shasa.
The Israeli press announced at
the time of Shamir's visit that Is-
rael had sold $8 million
worth ol military equipment to
Zaire and thai additional
sales were in offing. The Israelis
also said Gen. Tamir had pre-
pared a comprehensive strategic
plan for Zaire's defense. It is be-
lieved this plan as well as the
supply by Israel of additional
military equipment will be dis-
cussed during Sharon's trip.
Israeli agricultural experts
have also been stationed in Zaire
for several years. A dozen are
working in the north of the coun-
try and about 30 are running the
Presidential farm at N'sele which
supplies most of the food used by
the capital's growing population.
Sharon's trip to Kinshasa is his
Judea to Feature
Adult Education
Temple Judea will present an
Adult Education program. Win-
ter Term, from Jan. 18 to March
1, featuring seminars and lec-
tures on Mondays at 9:15 to
10:30 a.m. and Tuesdays at 7:30
to 9:30 p.m.. Ernestine and Mor-
ris Richman, co-chairman, an-
nounced.
Some of the scheduled lectur-
ers include Dr. Yehuda Shamir of
the University of Miami: Molly
Turner of Channel 10: Rabbi Mi-
chael B. Eisenstat, spiritual
leader of Temple Judea: Judge
Gerald Kogan of the circuit
court; and Rabbi Solomon Schiff,
executive vice president of the
Kabbinical Association of
Greater Miami.
B'nai Zion to Address
'Zionism in the 80's'
A Second Annual B'nai Zion
Southeast Region Mid-Winter
Conference will be held Sunday.
Jan. 16 at 11 a.m. at the Sheraton
Hal Harbour Hotel. Florida Con-
ference Chairman Sam Aboulafia.
announced.
Guest speakers will be Consul
General of Israel Joel Arnon,
Barbara Studley, WNWS talk
show host, and Sidney Wiener,
national president of B'nai Zion.
The topic will be "Zionism in the
80s."
I >
second to that central African
country. Last November he paid
a secret visit to Zaire during
which the groundwork was laid
for the resumption of diplomatic
relations with Israel.
Police Shooting of Oriental
Calk for Judicial Inquiry
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Knesset has called for a judi-
cial inquiry into the fatal shoot-
ing by police of a resident of the
Kfar Salemeh slum quarter of Tel
Aviv last week. Interior Minister
Yosef Burg appointed an exa-
mining judge.
The victim. Shimon Yehoshua,
a 29-year-old Oriental Jew, alleg-
edly opened fire first on police
who were summoned to the quar-
ter to quell a disturbance there.
The incident touched off a wave
of vandalism and defacements
against Ashkenazic Jews in Tel
Aviv which spread last week to
Jerusalem.
THE INQUIRY was sup
ported by all Knesset factions.
But during the debate, Likud
MKs accused the Labor Align-
ment of exploiting the incident
for political reasons. The Labor -
ites accused Mayor Shlomo Le-
hat of Tel Aviv, a member of
Likud, of "selectivity" in enforc-
ing demolition orders.
The trouble arose in Kfar Sal-
ameh when municipal workers
were sent to demolish an exten-
sion to a dwelling occupied by a
large family who allegedly added
a room without the requirement
permit. | Family members and
their neighbors pelted the
workers; with rocks and burned
tires in the street.
Taylor is 'Peacemaker'
In Sweep Through Israel
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Elizabeth Taylor, superstar of
the silver screen and volunteer
peacemaker, made regal progress
through Jerusalem last week
escorted by the latest man in her
life. Mexican lawyer Victor Luna,
and followed by a small army of
media cameramen and reporters.
She was here, she! declared, be-
cause she cares about peace, she
told Ophira Navon, wife of Presi-
dent Yitzhak Navon of Israel.
Mrs. Navon was the first person
.ailed on by Taylor in her 10-day
tour of Israel and Lebanon which
included visits with Premier
Menachem Begin and President
Amin Gemayel.
The actress, resplendent in a
flower-print dress, I curly hair
style and very high heeled shoes,
swept through the opulent lobby
of the King David Hotel as
tourists and locals gawked.
Later, she created near pande-
monium at the Western Wall as
the host of male photographers
followed her into the section
reserved for women. At her
request, they laid down their
cameras, while Taylor, who con-
verted to Judaism many years
ago, bowed her head in a moment
of meditation beside the ancient
stones.
Later in the day. Mayor Teddy
Kollek of Jerusalem shepherded
his distinguished guest and her
caravan of "paparazzi" to the An
Akim home for marginally
retarded children. Nuggest-sized
diamonds flashed on her fingers
as she petted and played with the
awed youngsters.
Taylor is immensely popular in
Israel, not simply because she
adopted the Jewish faith.That, in
fact, has been only nominal. But
she has always retained a warm
regard for the Jewish people and
the Jewish State.
Russell JCC to Hold
Upcoming Lectures
Michael Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center, as part of its
Art Lecture Series, will feature
Helen Kohen, Miami Herald art
editor, speaking on "The ABC's
of Criticism" on Thursday, Jan.
20 at 8 p.m.
The Center will feature Nor-
man Rrafman of the National
Conference of Soviet Jews to
speak on "Jews in Crisis" on
Tuesday, Jan. 18 at 8 p.m. A col-
lection of photographs, taken by
Lazar Guliansky of the Soviet
Union, entitled "The Gates are
Closing," will be on view.
Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
'
Linda Washburn Patrick Matthews
Temple to Present Musical on Meir
"She's the Best Man in My
Cabinet." a musical portrait of
the life of Golda Meir. will be pre-
sented at Temple King Solomon
Sunday.Jan. 16 at 8 p.m.
Written and produced by au-
thor and composer. Itenee Bran-
(k-s. the cast will include Linda
Washburn. soprano, and Patrick
Matthews, baritone, with Kay
Sostok accompanying on piano.
Rabbi Dr. David Raab, direc-
tor of the temple cultural and
musical series, will relate high-
lights in the life of Meir, and Dr.
Alfred Reed, conductor at the
University of Miami, will be hon-
ored.
Mayor Norman Ciment and
Zev Bufman. Theatre of the Per-
forming Arts promoter, will
attend.
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Wge ti-B The Jewish Floridian"/ Friday, January 7. 1983

Pioneer Chapters
Set Area Events
Discussions of the recent 30th
Zionist World Congress in Jeru-
salem will highlight upcoming
meetings of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat chapters.
Sharon Chapter will feature
Shirley Bogen of New York City,
a former national board member
an Monday at 1 p.m. in the 15th
floor community room of Four
Freedom's House. Bogen is at
present a membership vice presi-
dent of the Brooklyn Council.
Club II Chapter will hold an
affair for prospe< < ive members on
Wednesday at 1 p.m. in the
American Savings and Loan Au-
ditorium. Miami Beach.
Beba Idelson Chapter will fea-
ture Yiddish and Hebrew songs
and a speech by Shirley Bogen on
Wednesday in the auditorium of
First Nationwide Savings and
Loan Association. Miami Beach.
"When Bad Things Happen to
Good People,'" by Harold Kush-
ner. will be reviewed by Harriet
Green Sunday at the Kinneret
Chapter meeting at noon in the
First Nationwide Savings and
Loan Ass-xriation auditorium.
Former City
Attorney to be
Invested as Judge
Dade County Circuit Court
Judge Sidney B. Shapiro will be
invested Friday, Jan. 14 at cere-
monies in Courtroom Six-One of
the Dade County Courthouse at
12:15 p.m. with Chief Judge Ger
aid T. Wetherington presiding.
Shapiro has been appointed to
the Juvenile Division of the Cir-
cuit Court, replacing Judge N.
Joseph Durant. whom he de-
feated in the primary election last
September.
Speakers will include Richard
Cole, president of the Dade
County Bar Association; Howard
Lenard. who succeeded Shapiro i
as City Attorney of North Miami
Beach: North Miami Beach
Councilman Harry Cohen, and
Senator Kenneth Myers.
Shapiro's wife. Lynn and his
father-in-law. Dr. William Kob-
lenz, will robe him. and Rabbi Dov
Bidnick of Young Israel of Sky
Lake will present an invocation.
Brandeis Women Set
Upcoming Events
Miami Chapter of Brandeis
University National Women's
Committee will hold a luncheon
at the Doral Beach Hotel on Jan.
16 at noon featuring guest
speaker. Professor Stephen
Whitfield. His subject will be
"Moral Majorities in "One Nation
Under God!"'
Cynthia Shulman of Newton.
Mass., national president, will
visit the chapter on Feb. 8.
Co-presidents of the chapter
are Josephine Friedman and
Helen Glazier.
Beth Israel Presents
Educational Series
The second program in a Cul-
tural Series sponsored by Beth
Israel Congregation, will feature
Rabbi Herbert W. Bomzer, Ye-
shiva University professor, on
Sunday at 10 a.m.
His subject will be Yeshiva
Education How Successful
Have we Been? Rabbi Stanley
Bronfeld, principal of Rabbi Al-
exander Gross Hebrew Academy,
and Rabbi Herbert Glass, Princi-
pal of Toras Ernes Academy, will
present viewpoints.
Rabbi Dr. Meir Feldman is
chairman of the series.
V05
Hairdressing Tube
V051
1V05
1.5 oz.
l.
79
V05
Hot Oil Treatment f
4's
3.
39
\L^
FDS
Feminine Hygiene Spray
IK 1 79
1.5 oz. 1.
2.5 0Z.2.39
Brylcreem
Hairdressing 5.5 oz.
3.
16
Massengill
Disposable Douche 6 oz. Twin Pak
l.36
Aqua-Fresh
Toothpaste
8.2 oz.
l.
69
Milk 'n Honee shampoo 16oz. I.79
179
Milk 'n Honee
Beauty Bar
3.25
l.
29
Vaseline
Intensive
Care
Baby Powder 24 oz. 2.16
Baby Oil 16 oz. 2.16
Baby Shampoo 16 oz. 2.18
43
Ponds 8oz.l.
Cream & Cocoa Butter Lotion 12 oz. 1.
Ban 9 19
Roll-on Anti-Perspirant 2.5 oz.
2.
Excedrin
ExcedrinPM
Tablets 60's2.38
Tablets 50's 2.63
Bufferin
Tablets
100's
2.
69
Comtrex
Capsule
36's
4.
09
Ultra Ban c%
Roll-on Anti-Perspirant 2.5 oz.
2.
Ultra Ban II
An ti-Perspirant
5oz.
1.
96
Ultra Ban
Solid Anti-Perspirant
2oz.
l.
69
Vitalis
Hairgroom Liquid
12 oz.
2.
96
Dial
Anti-Perspirant
6oz.
2.
09
Cashmere Bouquet
Soap Bath Size 3 Bar .OO
Irish Spring
Soap
5oz. 4 Bar
l.
63
Centrum. Jr.,
Centrum Jr. "-""^
Children's Chewable Vitamin 60's
3.39
Dial
Soap
5 oz. 4 Bar
l.
63
Tone
Soap
4.75 oz. .40
Earthenwear
2 99
3 39
O 39
Elastin Collagen Complex Cream 4oz. O.


s
Professor David Altshuler will
speak on "The American
Dream The Jewish
Nightmare?" at Temple Shir
Ami Friday evening, Jan. 14,
at 8 p. m. He is a professor of
Judaic Studies at George
Washington University and
director of the Judaic
Institute in Jerusalem and
Cairo.
State Rep Moves
Office To Cover
Robert M. Levy receives Realtor Associate of the Year plaque
from Deve Cobbs, 1981 recipient.
Beach Realtor Board Presented Awards
New Area
Miami Beach Board of Real-
tors, at a recent 54th Annual In-
stallation Luncheon at the Fon-
tainebleau. presented an Out-
standing Citizen Award to Ste-
phen Muss, a Silver Star Award
to Harold A. Rosenfeld, a Realtor
of the Year Award to Renee Sch-
wedel. and a Realtor Associate of
the Year Award to Robert M.
Levy.
Ramon B. Fisch was installed
as president; Daniel Levine, first
vice president. Allen D. Gold-
berg, second vice president;
Christine Justice, third vice pres-
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
ident; and Harold J. Segal, treas-
urer.
Installed as directors were
Frank N. Arata. Nancy Conli,
Eugene J. Davidson, Sr., Jay
Davidson. Sheldon Greene, Bill
Hayes, Moises Rotbart, Renee
Schwedel. and Harley C. Willner.
Stephen M. Kramer was installed
as corporate secretary; Norman
Marcus as chair of the Realtor
Associate group; and Cyndi Ros-
enfeld. vice chair.
Torah to Talk Weather
Torah Chapter of Hadassah
will meet Monday at 12:30 p.m.
at Temple Zamora. January is
Cancer Seal Month.
Alvin Samet, radar and public
relations supervisor of U.S. De-
partment of Commerce, National
Weather Service, will talk on
"Hurricanes and Weather in
South Florida," President Rose
l.uuretz announced.
20 TUBS
CATNNM TO
TNI At
MITZVAN MT
NATIONAL BRANDS
Pierre Cordin
Polm Beoch
I Others
Regulars
Huskies
Slims All Sizes
"*! ^^ lM ^11 *1J *l '
. ^ 1^ I ^^^^^l^^^^<
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-6554
and let me quote you
rates. Also local moving &
long distance moving
anywhere in the U.S. or
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami) _____
Representative Hal Spaet. suc-
cessfully reelected democrat both
in the primary and November
elections in Florida House Dis-
trict 105, an area he has repre-
sented for four years, has moved
his offices to the Lindsey Hop-
kins Building in Miami.
Due to reapportionment,
Spaet's district, which was solely
in Miami Beach, now covers some
of downtown, south of Brickell
Avenue and west to Little
Havana.
Commissioner to Speak
Temple Beth Moshe will hold a
semi-annual congregation meet-
ing on Tuesday at 8 p.m.
featuring Dade Commissioner
Barry Schreiber.
Schreiber will speak on "Im-
pressions on the 30th World
Zionist Conference." He recently
returned from attending the
conference in Jerusalem.
Sholem to Host Judge
B'nai B'rith Sholem Lodge
1024 will hold a meeting in the
Social Hall of the Israelite Center
Temple on Sunday at 11 a.m.
The speaker will be Joseph P.
Farina, Dade County circuit
judge, and his topic will be "Jew-
ish Tradition on the Bench."
Menorah to Have Music
Monorail v n,i|nt-i oi nadassan
will celebrate Jewish Music
Month at a meeting Monday at
Temple Israel at 12:30 p.m.
Evie Fineberg and Irene Hugel
will present Yiddish and Hebrew
music.
Irvin W. Katz \i Ed P \ INJURED?
College Admission Counseling. School Selection and Placement. Aptitude Testing. Career Guidance.
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Law Offices Of SARAH WEISSBARD 940-7599


A State of Israel Bonds Gates of Jerusalem Medallion was
presented to Dr. Jules and Linda Minkes at a Israel Bonds
Tribute held in their honor at Congretation Beth David. The
Minks have been active for Israel Bonds and other Jewish and
civic organizations.
New Leadership Division members of the State of Israel Bonds
Organization met with General Yehudah Halevy, newly elected
president of the International Israel Bonds Organization,
recently. From left are Larry Gotlieb, New Leadership regional
chairman; M. Ronald Krongold, national New Leadership
chairman; Robert Benin, South Dade New Leadership co-
chairman, and Halevy.
GAIL C. EISENBERG, M.D.
Announces the opening of her office for
the practice of Adolescent and Adult Psychiatry
at
2131 Hollywood Boulevard
Suite 504
Hollywood, Florida 33020
Diplomats of the
American Board of Psychiatry and Neurology
Telephone
(306)922-7900


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / FrW v January 7,1983
Resolve
Jo Save You Money
At Rantry Pride Your Savings
Are In Cash. Come On In!
Check It Out! Start The New Year Right!
Save More Money On Food.
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD JAN 6JAN 12. 1983
750-ml BTL.
LAMBRCISCO. ROSATO.
BIAMCO
Riunite
ga Wines
DINNER WINES:CHABLIS. BURGUNDY, NECTAR
ROSE. RHINE. CHENIN BLANC. OR FRENCH
COLOMBARD 1.5-LTR. BTL.
Florida Oranges .......8
Yellow Onions............
Fresh Carrots............
Avocados..............2
a .
.89
.19
.59
.89
CRISP. CRUNCHY. GARDEN FRESH U PICK JM0%4*
Green Peppers 4tr
BAKING
P(
BAG ^m Wl^^
"_?< lOOSE OSPlA. *OiANRlvER E LARGE ?r Sc
Florida Grapefruit......4 .99
Delicious Apples.........' 1.50'
Floral Bouquet..........**<-1.69
Celery Hearts.............A3 .49
NORTHWEST EXTRA LG. I 10 SIZE U PICK ^m *\
IA LG I I 0 SIZE O PICK H ^*tj
Rears 59"
PERFECT PARTNERS
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Pantry Pride Pretzels oz. pkg.
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NABISCO
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L s
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2forS9C Kraft Colby Cheese
16 OZ. BOX
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$1.3*
t^nWAl 8-OZ.PKG.
......CANS
OCEANSPRAv COCKtAll REG i lOW CAi
Cranberry Juice
SUNSHINE
HI Ho Crackers
PANTRv PfltfX
Snack Crackers... "^
PANTHY POC
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1.59
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Pickles....."8
PIOCMMANS STONE GRCXINO
HORSERADISH
?OCW
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TQ GtAD-TAu. __
79 Kitchen Begs .99
TJ_ PAK
VAllI V MARASONO
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S 1.39
I0 JAN
*c wsposwu
2SCT
PUGS
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SACRAMENTO* PAK BtOO0< MAR*
Mix.........V, 1.59 Dexetrim
IR Rf G CAf FEME FREE V1T f0'
.wpkcg2.97
PANTRY PRIDE
Bath Tissue
6 ROLL
PACK
SIX l^ CV CANS
Ritz Sodas .............95
$"11 *% PANTRY PRIDE ASSORTED COLORS S*100
l13 Paper Towels 2 ^;"I
VOA, SASSOON REG OR X GENIIE CREMC
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Shave Cream
CAN 1.97
79
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2 LITER BOTTLE
Trash Bags ^.1.49 Bags
BOROES
Cremora....-2R
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PANTRY pRtrjf _mi ucc
2 4 aa WBtmmtu^HSoi
BOX
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CAN
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MOTTTS

Juice
$149
1


Friday, January 7,1963 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B

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J A lUHUiUll
A 11UU/ Oi*lfc4**J'
Community Corner
Fine Arts of Beth David Congregation will hold a "Beth
David Collects" Exhibit of works from private collections of
members on Sunday from 2 to 5 p.m. in Specter Hall.
Rabbi Samuel Silver will be the guest host on the Alan
Burke talk show Monday from 8 p.m. to midnight. Spiritual
leader of Temple Sinai, Silver has authored five books.
Temple Or Olom will present "An Evening of Art at
Auction" on Jan. 15 at 7 p.m. A buffet will be served.
Greater Florida International Coin Convention will have a
Fifth Annual Convention at the Diplomat Resort and Country
Clubs, Hollywood, Jan. 13 through 16.
Congregation Shaare Tefillah of Kendall Sisterhood will
hold a rummage sale on Sunday, Jan. 16 from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
the temple.
United Family and Children's Services will offer an eight
session series on Anger Management to begin Wednesday, Jan.
19 from 7 to 9 p.m.
Dr. Martin Bilsker, Department of Cardiology, and Dr.
Nicholas Lodge, Division of Pediatric Cardiology, Department
of Pediatrics, of the University of Miami School of Medicine,
have been appointed to a new research investigatorship
established by the American Heart Association, Broward
County Chapter.
Bewildered Parents, a support group for parents with
troubled teenagers and young adults, meets every Thursday at
Temple Adath Yeshurun at 7:30 p.m.
Tel-Med, a telephone health information service, is
available Monday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The
number is 326-1177.
"The Resource Guide of Services for the Elderly," a
comprehensive listing of services and programs published by
Stein Gerontological Institute at Douglas Gardens, is now
available.
Morton Towers Chapter of Hadassah will meet Monday at
11:30 a.m. at American Savings Bank, Miami Beach.
The Hebrew language will be taught through South Miami
Junior High Adult Education by Sarah Cohen, who has a
certificate from Hebrew University and a degree in education
from Florida International University.
Dade County Judge Joan A. Stember will speak on "Pro-
fessional Opportunities for Women" at a meeting of the Busi-
ness and Professional Women's Club on Monday at 6:30 p.m. at
Brickell Point Holiday Inn.
A second concert by the the Miami Chamber Symphony.
1982-83 season, to be conducted by Burton Dines, will be per-
formed Sunday at 4 p.m. at the First Methodist Church of South
Miami.
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A con-
troversy is boiling in West
Germany over an alleged Air
Force salute to the late Hans-
Ulrich Rudel. a World War II
Luftwaffe ace and Nazi activist
whose funeral, held at Dor-
nhausen, Bavaria December 22,
was attended by neo-Nazi leaders
and disciples. Many of the
thousands at Rudel s burial
displayed swastikas and gave the
Nazi salute, acts barred by law in
this country.
But the "scandal" was the
flight of two U.S. made
Phantam jets over the cortege.
The Defense Ministry insists
they were on a routine training
mission with the NATO allies.
Eye-witnesses maintain that the
German pilots clearly wanted to
honor the man who was the
Luftwaffe's most decorated
fighter pilot in World War II.
Media commentary has been
largely critical of the authorities
and of the right-wing activists
who gave Rudel's funeral the air
of a state event. West German
newspapers are now flooded with
letters denouncing the critics and
demanding why Germans should
not have the right to honor a war
hero.
Germans Gave Nazi Salute
At WWII Pilot's Funeral
A local newspaper in
Nuremberg reported that hours
before the funeral, two German
Air Force jets flew over Dor-
nhausen on courses which formed
a cross in the sky with their
exhaust streams. Meanwhile, the
state prosecutor in the nearby
town of Ansbach has opened an
investigation of the persons who
gave the Nazi salute at the
funeral.
Registration for JCC
Classes in Progress
Registration for classes at the
Michael-Ann Russell, Miami
Beach, and South Dade Jewish
Community Centers are in
progress.
South Dade JCC will feature
classes in Calligraphy, Knitting
and Needlepoint. Gourmet Cook-
ing, and Physical Fitness. Miami
Beach JCC will feature Mommy
and Me, Pre-Ballet. Basic
Gynastics. Sports, and Dance.
Michael-Ann Russell JCC will
offer classes in Health Care Edu-
cation. Sports. Fitness, Stock
Market. Jewish Cooking, Bridge,
and others.
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue Miami, Florida
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^^^^^

Friday, January 7.1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
JL HERSHKOWITZ
Hershkowitz, son of
Irs. Igor Hershkowitz,
a Bar Mitzvah at
Menorah Saturday.
^yer Abramowitz wui
is an eighth grader at
Academy and plays
it ball team.
Mrs. Hershkowitz will
lush following services
iption and dinner Sun-
SANZUSMER
Jusmer, son of Dr. and
Zusmer. will be called
rah as a Bar Mitzvah
t TVmple Beth Sholom
Miami at 10:45 a.m.
(ronish will officiate.
a student of the Con-
ICIass of 5744.
Hershkowitz Zusmer
SCOTT PESETSKY
Scott Pesetsky. son of Mr. and
Mrs. Walter Pesetsky, will be-
come a Bar Mitzvah on Saturday
morning at Beth Torah Congre-
gation with Dr. Max A. Lipschitz
conducting the services.
Scott will be inducted into his
responsibilities as a member of
the adult Jewish community. A
Kiddush cup will be presented to
him on behalf of the Mollie
Kahaner Sisterhood, and a Bible
on behalf of the Men's Club of
' Beth Torah Congregation. Scott
will conduct a portion of the Sat-
urday morning service.
Scott is an eighth grade stu-
dent at Highland Lakes Junior
High School and a student at
Beth Torahs Harold Wolk Reli-
gious School, where he attends
the Hebrew High School classes.
His parents will sponsor the
Kiddush. following the services,
in Scott's honor.
Dade County Judge Stanley
M. Goldstein will be invested
on Wednesday at 12:15 p.m.
in Courtroom Six-One of the
Dade County Courthouse with
Chief Judge Gerald T.
Wetherington presiding.
Speakers will include former
Dade State Attorney Richard
E. Gerstein and Circuit Court
Judge Gerald Kogan.
Goldstein was assistant state
attorney under Gerstein.
fnators Urge Reagan to
tit Helicopters to Iraq
IELEN SILVER
IH1NGTON -
Four leading Sen-
ve sent a letter to
Keagan calling
in the shipment of
le helicopters to
mse the transac-
lot in the best in-
)ftheU.S.
ir. dated Dec. 23. was
Sen. Alan Dixon (D..
led by Sens. Charles
11.). who is chairman
lite Foreign Relations
Rudy Boschwitz (R.
Larry Pressler (R..
ING that "our belief
transaction is not in
terests of the U.S.."
s warned that the sale
II violate our policy of
in the Iraq-Iran war
rongly urge that you
?nts of the helicopters
:heduled for delivery
within the next week or two."
At least 12 of the helicopters
which are manufactured by the
Hughes Helicopter Corporation
have already been delivered as
part of a sale that will include the
transfer of 60 helicopters.
According to the letter. "It is
only reasonable to assume that
I he Iraqi government will employ
this large number of helicopters
in its war with Iran whether for
artillery spotting or otherwise."
BECAUSE THE helicopters
weigh less than the 10,000
pounds each, they are classified
as civilian helicopters that do not
require an export license. But the
Commerce Department however,
did grant such a license to the
Hughes Corporation, an action
which the Senators claimed in
their letter to Reagan was "an-
other example of the weakness in
the export control process."They
said the new 98th Congress to
take office in January will "ex-
amine methods for tightening the
control mechanism" of the export
licenses.
opsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
j he looked, and. behold, the bush burned with fire, and
icas not consumed"
(Exod. 3.2).
\ Moses hid his face; for he was afraid to look upon God"
13.6).
SHEMOT
The children of Israel increased and multiplied and
of Goshen was filled with them. But a new king arose in
! one who had not known Joseph. He said to his people:
lildren of Israel are too many and too mighty for us;
M us deal wisely with them, lest they multiply, and it
pass, that, when there befalleth us any war, they also
pniselves unto our enemies, and fight against us, and get
out of the land" I Exodus 1.9-10). The new Pharaoh
laves of the Hebrews. He also commanded that every
m male infant was to be cast in the river Nile. However,
Iwas saved from this infanticide by the king's daughter
w up in Pharaoh's court. He was forced to flee Egypt ai-
ding an Egyptian whom he found mistreating a Hebrew
[Moses went to Midian, where he tended sheep for his
pi-law Jethro in the desert near mount Horeb. God ap-
to Moses in a burning bush and told him to return to
for it was his mission to liberate the children of Israel
d them to the land of Canaan. With the help of his
Aaron. Moses united the Hebrew slaves into a people,
he came before Pharaoh with God's demand
i" let My people go."
[recounting of the Weekly Portion of tht Law it extracted and based
'" Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Woliman-
115, published by Shengoid. The volume is available at 7$ Maiden
7n ork# '' Y ,00M- Joseph Schiang is president of the society dis-
"Mne volume.)
Sarah Kaufman was honored
at an Annual Spiritual
Adoption Luncheon of the
Beba Idelson Chapter of
Pioneer Women-Na'amat
recently for more than 40
years of support for Zionist
organizations. She reported
that $12,000 was brought in to
support the program of adopt-
ing children in need in Israel.
Kaufman currently serves as
president of the chapter.
CAJE Leader Attended
Education Conference
Abraham J. Gittelson,
associate director of the Central
Agency for Jewish education,
recently attended a Jewish Edu-
cation Service of North America.
Inc. Annual Mid-Winter confe-
rence for directors of bureaus of
Jewish education.
Gittelson and Dr. Alvin I.
Schiff of the Board of Jewish Ed-
ucation of Greater New York led
a session dealing with day
schools.
Shalom to See Film
Shalom Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will hold a
meeting Tuesday at 100 Lincoln
Road Clubroom at noon. A
luncheon, and a film. "The Immi-
grants." will be presented.
Miami Beach
ERUV HOTLINE
653-0914
Call within 2 hours
before shabbos
Rabbinical Council of America
Florida Region
National Hebrew
Israeli Gift Center Inc.
Religious'Bar Mitzvah sets
Cr.yslal'GiftS
1507 Washington Avenue
(3051532 2210
Area Temple to Host Noted Cantor
Cantor Matus Radzivilover.
noted interpreter of original rite
and version of "Vohlin." will per-
form at services at Agudath Isra-
el Hebrew Institute on Jan. 8 at
8:30 a.m.
Rabbi Sheldon Ever will de-
liver a sermon on "Israel and
World Jewry's Responsibility
Today."
Cantor Radzivilover studied
liturgical music in Warsaw,
Poland and was engaged by the
Slonimer Congregation in New
York City when he came to the
U.S. He has appeared as a guest
cantor in Israel. Canada. Mexico,
and in various American cities.
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting Time: 5:25
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 047-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conaerva tive
t Jllllli'lSK: *' ""*** Co1 Ram.
Twinning with Ruaalan. Marina Bernaht..,,
Sal.. t.M am. Bar Mllxrah. Han
Kanfor. 8 pm. Bar Ml mar Darren Sussma n
Mlnyona
Sun am and 5 pm
Mon. through Frl., 7 30 am and 5 pm
____________Sal a 30 am and 4 pm
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B Saltzman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchlnsky. Centor
Frl. 8:15 pm
at, fees an
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 667 6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoflman. Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein. Associate
Rabbi
Frl.. 7:30 pm. Rabbi Baumgard will
peak on The Burmgn Buah." Onag
Shabbat lo Follow.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvl Adler, Cantor
Lai. Frl. Eva. Sen. a pm
Sat.Mom Sera Sam
Or Lehrman will praach at 10:30.
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
5326421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schili
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way 2625 S W 3rd A.enua
SoulhOada 7500 SW 120th Street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Dade Chapei
Frl.. 8 pm. Shabbat Eva. Services Onag
Shabbat lo lollow Sal.. 10 am. Junior
Congregation Servleea.
Coral Way Sanctuary
Sat., t am, Shabbat Santcea with Rabbi
Auerbach and Centor Llpeon
Bat Mltnah Pamela Hlger
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Frl.. 8 15 pm. Rabbi Shapiro will dlacuaa
Promlaea. Promlaeel" Onag Shabbat to
lollow.
Sat. 8:45 am and 5 pm
Sun.. 8 am and 5 pm
Oally Mlnyan Sen.. 7:48 am and 5 pm
TEMPLE ISRAEL 01 Greater Miami
Miami i PiOAHr Rmtorm Congrogition
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595 5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskell M. Bernat
Asst. Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Selkin
Cantor: Jacob G. Bornstein
Student Cantor: Rachelie Nelson
Frl.. 8 pm. Oowntown: Rabbi Bernat
-Trivializing the Holocaust and other
Dam.nn Kendall: Rabbi Salkin. "Wanted:
A Faw Good Heroes "
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frl.. 8:15 pm. Sabbath Service. Weekly Torah
Portion Shemot Eiodus 1-141.
Htltarahlsalah 27:828 13. 29 22-23
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
EDWARD BARON, Cantor
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami, Fl 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorfinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Frl., 8 pm. Sermon: "Moeee"
Sat.. 9 am. Sermon: "Free"
Bat Mltrv.h, Ellen QoMln.
Twilight Sarvlca.
Fn.. 7:30 pm
Sat. 9 30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
820 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat., 9 am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B. Fl. 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
TEMPLE NERTAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave..
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Frl. 8:15 pm
Sat. 8.45 am
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
15410 SW 75 Circle Lane
Miami. Fl. Modern Othodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 382-3343
Fri.. 5 is pm Sabbath Semcas
Sat., 9:30 am and 5:30 pm Mincha
Oally Morning Minyans. M 8 Th 8 45 am
T.W.F7am
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish. Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Conviser
Frl.. 8.-18 pm. Rabbi Harry Jolt will speak on
"The Dey* of Our Veere" How Can We Meka
Each Day Count? Sat.. 10.-48 am. Bar Mhinsh
of Dean Zusmer
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade s Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kings ley. Rabbi 932 9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes. Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl.. 7:30 pm. Family Worship Service.
January Birthdays
Set.. 10:30am. B'not Mltnah, Stacy
Ooid.mith and Abby Turnoll.
Torah Portion Shemot Eiodus 1:1*1
Haltarahlaaiah 278, 28:13:29:22-23
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Frl.. 8 pm, Shabbat Service honoring new
f .mine. Special Onag Shabbat to lollow.
Sat.. Bar Mltnah. Scott Pesetseky.
Afternoon, Kralg Walaa.
Frl. 8:15 end 8 pm
Set., 8:30 am and 5:1S pm.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Office
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi
Mmyan Saraices Mon t Thurs 7 am
SsbbaittEve Services 8 1S pm
Sjbbalh Saraices 9 am
Oueats Ara Welcoma
Friday, Family Sabbath Seratcee. Or Norman
N. Shapiro will blass chlWren with
January birthdays
im
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 183rd St.. N Miami Beach Fl 33182
947 8094 Harold Wlshna. e>ecuti. director
Franklin 0 Kreutrer. regional president
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park, 3785
NW 82 Ave.. Suite 210 Miami. Fl
33166. 592 4792 Rabbi Lewis C.
Littman. regional director


>
*.
Page 12-B The Jewish Florjdian/ Friday, January 7,196a
Arabs Protest Bonn's
Pro-Israel Shift
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) The Bonn
government has been the target
of mounting pressure from the
Arab world because of a per-
ceived pro-Israel shift in its Mid-
dle East policy. West German
diplomatic sources said here.
The pressure is being exerted
now. they said, because Bonn will
assume the rotating chairman-
ship of the Euiopean Economic
Community (EEC) Council of
Ministers, beginning January 1,
1983. Since taking office in Octo-
ber. Chancellor Helmut Kohl has
indicated that he wants to im-
prove relations with Israel. Un-
like his predecessor. Chancellor
Helmut Schmidt, Kohl has
ivoided public criticism of Israeli
policies and announced his inten-
tion to visit Israel some time next
year.
The diplomatic sources said
alarming reports*' are coming in
from German embassies in vari-
ous Arab countries and Arab am-
bassadors accredited to Bonn are
protesting what they termed
West Germany's "unconditional
surrender to Israel."
The sources noted that Pales-
tine Liberation Organization
chief Yasir Arafat singled out
West Germany as a country
which 'disappointed" the Arabs,
in his talks this week with Chan-
cellor Bruno Kreisky of Austria.
The sources revealed that Deputy
Foreign Minister Juergen Moel-
lemann. who strongly favors the
Arab cause in the Middle East
conflict, failed to receive the invi-
tation he sought to visit Saudi
Arabia. Moellemann is planning
a good-will tour of Arab capitals.
PLO, Israel POW Exchange
Talks Going On for Weeks
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) Represen
tatives of the Palestine Libera-
tion Organization in Western Eu-
rope said that unofficial talks on
a prisoner of war exchange be-
tween Israel and the Palestinians
have been going on for the past
few weeks in several European
capitals. Paris and Vienna among
them. Abdullah Frangi, the PLO
representative in Bonn, formally
confirmed the talks but refuse to
name the negotiators.
Chancellor Bruno Kreisky of
Austria, who met with PLO chief
Yasir Arafat at Palm* De Ma-
jorca last week, said in an Aus-
trian television interview that he
had been contacted by families of
Israeli prisoners held by the Pal-
estinians and agreed to serve as a
go-between "for humanitarian
reasons." He refused to give any
details of his talk with Arafat or
to confirm that the subject of a
prisoner exchange was discussed.
The PLO reportedly holds
eight Israeli soldiers captured in
Lebanon who Israel wants freed.
It insists that Israel agrees to re-
lease the thousands of Palestin-
ians now imprisoned in south
Lebanon and in Israel.
Technion Finds Ancient Bedouin
Diabetes Treatment to Work
HAIFA (JTA) A cen-
turies old Bedouin treatment for
diabetes has been proved by
scientists of the Haifa Technion
Medical School to lower glucose
levels in tests on animals. The
results of the research have been
discussed at the annual scientific
meeting of the Israel Diabetes
Association at the Technion.
The ancient Bedouin cure used
the roots of the "sira kotzanit."
poterium spinosum plant, found
on the hills of northern Israel and
in Syria and Armenia. "The
Bedouin mix the roots with tea
and administer the potion to
diabetics," it was explained by
Dr. Yorem Kanter, a medical
school lecturer and head of the
diabetes unit at the Rambam
Hospital.
He said researchers at the
Technion's faculty of chemistry
have isolated the active
ingredient of the thorny plant,
which is mentioned in the
Talmud, and subsequent tests on
animals have proved it lowers
blood glucose levels. Experi-
ments will be carried out with
human volunteers. Further re-
search will aim to identify the
chemical structure of the active
agent to see if it can be syn-
thesized, said Kanter.
Technion Plans Lunch
Miami Beach Chapter of
American Technion Society,
Women's Division, will hold a
January Luncheon meeting fea-
turing a medical engineering
program on Thursday at noon at
the Shelborne Hotel.
Lillian Kneller will be honored
and Madeline Kern, vocalist, will
entertain.
New Cardiac
Support Lab
Opens at UM
A first permanent Advanced
Cardiac Life Support training
laboratory in Dade County will
be officially dedicated Friday.
Jan. 7 at 1:30 p.m. at the Uni-
versity of Miami School of
Medicine. The equipment was
purchased through a grant from
the American Heart Association
of Greater Miami.
The laboratory contains
specialized Advanced Cardiac
Life Support equipment. ACLS is
a life-saving technique whereby
Life Support are supplemented
by the use of special heart drugs
and defibrillation. The technique
is used to revive victims of
cardiac arrest. drowning,
choking. electrocution, auto
accident, or any situation in
which breathing and pulse have
stopped.
The University of Miami was
selected by the Heart Association
as the site to house the equip-
ment in its Medical and Teaching
Simulation Laboratory. The
selection was made after the uni-
versity announced that graduat-
ing medical students are required
to be certified in the ACLS
procedure.
Mizrachi Art Auction
To Feature Picasso,
Dati, Chagall, Colder
American Mizrachi Women
will hold an Art Exhibition and
Auction to benefit the Beth
Hayeled Children Haven in Jeru-
salem at the Konover Hotel |on
Sunday, Jan. 16 at 7 p.m.
Artists to be featured include
Agam. Barrett. Boulanger
(alder, Cole. Chagall. Delacroix,
Dali. Hibel, Kranjanskty,
Lalande. Miro, Nesbitt, Neimajn,
Noyer, Picasso. Papart, Rot he,
Simbari, and Vasarely.
Proceeds will be dedicated to
the children's educational and so-
cial care facility, which houses
200 disadvantaged live-in chil-
dren, on April 13 in Israel.
Beth Am Hosts Talk
On Futuristic Society
Temple Beth Am's Brother-
hood Breakfast Forum will fea-
ture a discussion on "How Can
Judaism Cope with a Futuristic
Society?" on Sunday, Jan. 16 at
9:30 a.m. in the Temple Youth
Lounge.
Participants will be Jerome
Bienenfeld. president of Beth El
Synagogue: Franklin Kreutzer,
president of United Synagogues
of America: and Naomi Olster,
president of Bet Breira Sypa-
gouge. Al Leibert, Temple Beth
Am president, will serve as mod-
erator.
Th* Jt?wfe?lh FHpiriidliioiin
ll.rUi'i Mail CtapUtt Iiflith-Jt.iih Wtaki;
Printed In Englith
Ac/AVWfMyM,Ater/ss*,*/
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P.O. a** ti.wj. Miami. Ftorta* mji
jqaWaMfw m MaatiHifcaeaf mavc.
Sky Lake Gardens in North Miami Beach held a Salute to Israel
recently to benefit the State of Israel Bonds Organization.
Pledging support for the Jewish State through the Israel Bonds
program were, from left, Charles Lang, chairman of the event,
Leon and Anna Yudoff, who received Israel's Scroll of Honor
Award, and Sol Donsky, co-chairman.
Residents of Winston Towers in North Miami Beach celebrated
an annual Salute to Israel and pledged support for Israel's
economic growth and security through the Israel Bonds pro-
gram. Herman B. Altman received the Israel Bonds David Ben-
Ciurion Award. From left are Mannie Pearl, committee member,
Henry Cron, Winston Towers 400 chairman, Altman, David
Herman, Winston Towers 100 chairman, and Joseph Conway,
committee member.
Public Relations Firm Chosen by
Yeshiva Friends for Area Promotions
Florida Friends of Yeshiva
University, composed of gradu-
ates and non-graduates of the
New York-based Yeshiva Univer-
sity, has named Bruce Rubin As-
socieutes. Inc., public relations
counselors, to create and imple-
ment a public relations-commu-
nications program for the group.
Founded in 1H86. Yeshiva is
the oldest and largest university
under Jewish auspices and has
operated under the "philosophy
that a great institution cannot
stand apart from its environ-
ment." Chaim H. Friend, director
of the Southeast Region of Flor-
ida Friends, said. More than 270
Yeshiva alumni live in South
Florida.
I-ocal alumni include Dr. Philip
Frost, chairman of Dermatology
at Ml. Sinai Medical Center and
chairman of the board of Key
Pharmaceuticals; Dr. Charles
Weiss, chairman of Orthopedics
and Rehabilitation at Mt. Sinai;
and Metro Commissioner Barry
Schreiber.
"Yeshiva University and its
affiliated schools offer quality ed-
ucational opportunities to indi"*
duals of all nationalities and reli-
gions." said Friend. "The univer-
sity operates one of the eight
highest ranked medical schools in
the country the Albert Ein-
stein School of Medicine."
Matthew Zuckerman and
Sidney Olson, co-chairman of
Florida Friends. Southeast Re-
gion, said that Bruce Rubin As-
sociates will implement general
counseling in addition to the pro-
motion of the First Florida
Friends' "Issues of Our Times"
seminar series, special events
sponsored by the university and
the Albert Einstein School of
Medicine, design and production
of informational literature, and
general news dissemination.
Justice Department's Move
To Deport Nazi Hailed
NEW YORK (JTA) A
move by the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special Investi-
gations to deport a war criminal
was hailed here by Richard Ber-
man, chairman of the Jewish
Community Relations Council's
Commission on the Holocaust
and the Prosecution of Nazi War
Criminals.
A deportation order was signed
in Chicago on Dec. 23 against
Hans Lipschis, a 63-year-old re-
tired factory worker. Lipschis,
who served under the Nazis as a
member of the SS death's Head
Battalion at Auschwitz and Bir-
kenau and as a camp guard, was
ordered to leave the U.S. in 120
days. He was chosen to go to
West Germany. He agreed not to
contest charges that he had lied
to immigration authorities about
his past activities when he en-
tered the U.S. illegally in 1966.
Allan Ryan, director of the
OSI. said that Lipschis had been
among those "intimately caught
up in the process of killing as
many people as possible as
quickly as possible" at the Nazi
death camps. Herman expressed
hope that the speedy resolution
of the case would serve as a
model for a number of similar
cases pending in the New York
metropolitan area and that it
could be the first deportation of a
Nazi war criminal from this coun-
try since World War II.
Menorah Sets Agenda
Temple Menorah Sisterhor '
will hold an Annual Stairway
the Stars luncheon Thursday u
noon at the Carillon Hotel. Rhod
Geist is chairperson.
The sisterhood will have
meeting Jan. 19 at noon in the
Temple Social Hall. Patricia
Gayle will entertain.



ic Notice
IE CIRCUIT COURT OP
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
ICUITINANOFOR
! COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
I JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CimNo.IIMIU
3TICE OF ACTION
t MITRANI.
ICAN METAL TON-
ERS, INC.. a Florida cor
Bn. prevloualy known aa
tANI INDUSTRIES,
i Florida corporation,
indant
DEFENDANT, AMERI
(ETAL CONTAINERS,
[ a Florida corporation.
ualy known aa MITRANI
BTRIES. INC., a Florida
kUon, 3066 N.W. 7th
. Miami. Florida
ARE NOTIFIED that
jn to foreclose a chattel
i on the following per
fcroperty In Dade County,
2H Ton Overhead
one 44 mild IS Ft.
Bnatl Shear 1813 No.
one 3" Strokes WIs-
Presa Brake 13 Ft.
Model 13 FM an
i one Kings land Power
1 Works Model J1H i A-
one Powermatlc
Press Model 1300 S-N
^2, one Forte Hydraul-
Saw. one R 36-360
Lincoln Arc Welder S-
I 391347, fourteen Lln-
iNorbart Welding
es S-N: AAW74823,
pS73. 78344. 7361-613.
7833-703, A703177.
49 A686347. A708001.
A737617, A696348.
. one Victor Pan-
ph Model DO 34003 N
alx Overhead Fans.
Scaffe Air Com
ora, two Portable
era. one Balcrank
er S-N 144*98. two
bis Paint Sprayers,
(Portable Welders, one
Paint Pumper, one
>n Portable Sander
ntalne Trailer Model
1-6043 ID 30877 Mfg 1-
I one OSHA approved
Bhed
filed against you and
required to serve a
your written defenses.
Ho II oil HAROLD A.
TTAUB. plaintiff's at-
[whose address is 9666
xle Highway, Suite 307.
riorlda 33166, on or be
uary 38. 1983. and file
nal with the clerk of
t either before service
Itlff's attorney or Im-
ly thereafter; other-
efault wUl be entered
[you for the relief de-
Tin the complaint or
{December 18,1982
kRD P. BRINKER,
?l*rk of the Court
A. MINGUEZ
Is Deputy Clerk
December 34, 31. 1983
January 7, 14,1983
riCE OF ACTION
[RUCTIVI SERVICE
10 PROPERTY)
CIRCUITCOURTOF
-EVENTH JUDICIAL
1IT OF FLORIDA IN
FORDADECOUNTY
Action No. 82-161 S3-FC
I FOR DISSOLUTION
)F MARRIAGE
["HE MARRIAGE OF:
ION K ROUKAS.
ftloner-Wlfe
IEW O. ROUKAS.
Dondent- Husband
THEWO ROUKAS
lb Squadron
lith. Michigan 48783
|ARE HEREBY NOTI-
it an action for Dlasol-
Marrlage has been
llnst you and you are
I to serve a copy of your
lefenses, If any. to It on
pY E GOODMAN,
for Petitioner, whose
[Is 909 East 8th Avenue.
] Fla. 33010. and file the
[with the clerk of the
pled court on or before
38, 1983; otherwise a
fill be entered against
phe relief demanded In
plaint or petition.
Mice shall be published
ch week for four con-
weeks In THE JEW
iRiniAN.
CSS my hand and the
laald court at Miami,
Ion this 16 day of Dec.
|ARDP. BRINKER
ilerk, circuit Court
He County, Florida
*' A. MINGUEZ
b Deputy Clerk
DecembrS4,l 982
January?, 14 1963
lOTICE UNDER
ITIOUS NAME LAW
^E IS HEREBY
I that the undersigned,
k en*"*e ta business
he fictitious name
GO EN FLORIDA" -
[YOU IN FLORIDA" at
coin Rd. Suite 223.
Ch. FLA 83139. ln-
reglster said name
.Clerk of the Circuit
'Dade County, Florida.
Julian Pardo
uctlons. Inc.
cembern. 34,11.1982
January T.iafj
loi
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
civr ActtM n. ti-itua.
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ARSENIA LAZO
and
RENE DE LA PAZ
TO: MR. RENE DE LA PAZ
Burner. North Carolina
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
RAFAEL E. PADIERNE,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner.
whose address Is 1437 8.W.
First Street, Miami, Florida
3S1S6, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
rourt on or before February 4,
983; otherwise a default will
e entered against you for the
ellef demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 38 day of De-
cember. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC. P Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Rafael E. Padleme. Esq.
1437 S.W First Street
Miami, Florida 33136
Telephone: (306)649-6486
Attorney for Petitioner
December 31.1983;
January 7, 14.31.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 82 181 54 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
MARIA TERESA BEDOYA
and
FABIO DE JESUS BEDOYA
TO: FABIO DE-JESUS
BEDOYA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It
on STANLEY E. GOODMAN
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 909 East Eighth
Avenue. Hlaleah. Florida
33010, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 38,
1983; otherwise a default win
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said at Miami, Florida
on this 16 day of December.
1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A MINGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18380 December 24, 31 1983
January 7.14 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 82-18373
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF:
PABLOCARRERA.
and
EMILIA G. CARRERA
TO: EMILIA G. CARRERA
ElSllloJuanDlax
Casa No. 30, Cuarto No. 1
Panama Republic,
of Panama
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on R. A.
del Pino. Esq. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33136 and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore January 21, 1983; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this day of Dec. 10,
1983. RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
Aa Deputy Clerk
R. A. DEL PINO, ESQ.
1401 West Flagier Street
Miami. Florida 33186
Attorney for Petitioner
18333 December 17, 24. 81.1982
January 7,19SS
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
No. 83-17694 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
tN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTHA LIGIA
PEDROZA.
Petitioner Wife,
and
HAROLD UMBERTO
PEDROZA.
Respondent Husband
TO: Mr. HaroldUmberto
Pedroza
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
Bruce M Singer, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
1090 Kane Concourse. Bay Har-
bor Islands, Florida S3164, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 4, 1983; other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of De-
cember, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC. L. Alexander
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
BRUCE M. SINGER
1090 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands.
FL 33164
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone: (306)866-6736
18370 December 81.1983;
January 7.14.31,1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number (3-16114
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALMA POURROY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE; YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that the
administration of the estate of
ALMA POURROY, deceased.
File Number 83-10184. Is pend-
ing In the Circuit Court for
DADE County. Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is Dade County Court-
house. 73 W. Flagler St..
Miami, Florida 33130. The per-
sonal representative of the es-
tate Is BERNICE H. TURNER,
whose address Is 1323 Avocado
Isle. Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316
The name and address of the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifies
Uons of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: December SI. 1983
BERNICE H. TURNER
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ALMA POURROY
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
H. Lawrence Aaher, Esq.
16311 Northeast 13th Ave.
North Miami Beach.
FL 83163
Telephone:
1306 ) 949-3667 (DADE)
836-1178 (BROW ARD)
18S71 December 81.1983
January 7,1983
m>.[ YTBunst .vabrr . .-
Friday, Januafy 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
Culture Group to Meet
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 82-16784
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN PETER ROSS.
Husband
and
LOUISE ROSS,
Wife
TO: Louise Ross
Residence Address
16 Pennlngton Road
New Brunswick.
New Jersey
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce N Crown. Esq. 16480
N.W. 7th Avenue. Suite 306
Miami. Florida 33169 on or be-
fore January 38. 1983 and file
the original with the Clerk of
this Court either before service
on Petitioner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition
Dated: Dec. 17. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
By: N.A. HEWETT
as Deputy Clerk
18363 December 34. 31.1983
January 7,14,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 82 16724
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CLEMON E. JENKINS,
Petitioner Wife
and
MERDICE JENKINS
Respondent -Husband
TO: MERDICE JENKINS
Residence Address:
278 Rldgewood Avenue
Newark. New Jersey
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce N Crown, Esq. 15490
N.W. 7th St.. Suite 306 Miami.
Florida 33169 on or before Jan-
uary 38, 1983 and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service or. Peti-
tioner's attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition
DATED: December 16, 1983.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Clrcbft Court Seal)
By: LolaH. Currier
as Deputy Clerk
18348 December 24,31,1982:
January 7,14,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name A. P.
S Wholesale, at 4401 NW 7 St.,
Miami, Fla 33126 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Associated Plumbing
Stores, Inc.
18347 December 24. 31.1982;
January 7.14.1983
Yiddish Culture Winkle will
- hold a cultural meeting Jan. 13 at
10:30 a.m. at Temple Ner Tamid.
Jacob Blank will speak on the
writings of Moishe Leib Halpern,
Yiddish writer and poet. Cantor
Zvi Adler will perform accom-
panied by pianist. Shmuel
Fershko.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 82-164*6
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
' E RN ESTO ALONSO.
Petit loner-Husband.
and
ESTHER REINA MAR-
TINEZ.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: ESTHER REINA MAR-
TINEZ
Ave. 89 No 16216
La Lisa
Havana, Cuba.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has been
filed against you and ynu are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
MARIO QUINTERO JR..
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner.
whose address Is 2600 Douglas
Rd.. Suite 700. Coral Gables.
Florida 33134. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
January 21. 1983; otherwise a
default will be entered agalnat
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or peUtlon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 13 day of
December, 1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N.A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF
MARIO QUINTERO JR.
2600 Douglas Road. Suite 700
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone: (306)444-6464
Attorney for Petitioner
Husband
18336
December 17. 24. 81.1982
January 7. 1988

INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82 5255
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JULIUS FRANK
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of JULIUS FRANK, de-
ceased, File Number 82-6366, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida. 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfl-
csUons of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice haa
begun on December 81.1803.
Personal Representative:
LARRY FRANK
Indian Mill Road
Ooacob. Connecticut 08607
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT.
ESQUIRE
GALBUT, GALBUT* MENIN.
PA.,
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida, 33189
Telephone: 673-8100
18360 December 81.1982
January 7,198S
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 82-18*77
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALFRED H. EBNER.
Husband
and
EDELTRAUD EBNER.
Wife
TO: EDELTRAUD EBNER
Mortlz, Seelerg
1-60-19 Vienna
Austria 1100
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition for Dis-
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
hereby required to serve a copy
of your answer or other plead-
ing to the PeUtlon on the
Husband's Attorney. FRED W.
DROESE. whose address Is
H54 N.W. 17 Avenue. Miami.
Klorlda 33126. and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above styled Court on or before
this 21 day of January, 1983. or
a Default will be entered
.igalnst you.
DATED this 16 day of
December 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
ByCP.COPELAND
Deputy Clerk
18343 December 17, 24, 31, 1982
JanuarvT. 1983
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 63-142
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: The marriage of:
SAINT HOMERE
JEAN BAPTISTE,
Petitioner husband.
and
ROSE CASSILIA
JEAN BAPTISTE,
Reaponde nt wife.
YOU. ROSE CASSILIA
JEAN BAPTISTE. residence
unknown, are required to fUe
your answer to the petition for
dissolution of marriage with
the Clerk of the above Court
and serve a copy thereof upon
the petitioner's attorney, Mar-
tin Cohen. Esq.. 622 S W. 1st.
Street. Miami. Fla. 33130, on or
before February 18, 1983, or
else peUUon will be confessed.
Witness my hand and the seal
of this Court, at Miami, Dade
County, Florida, this 5th day of
January. 1983.
Richard P. Blinker
Clerk. Circuit Court
By: A. Mlnguez
Deputy Clerk
18S78 January 7.14;
21. 28. 1983


*"* A*-0 ne jewisn t londian t nday, January 7, 1983
'
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DA OR COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number U-MM
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELISE VOOROS
a k -a EUSE M VOOROS
Deceased
notice or
ADMINISTRATION
TTie administration of the
estate of ELISE VOOROS a-k-a
EUSE M VOOROS. deceased.
File Number 83-RUB. la pending
In the circuit Court for Dad*
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which la 73
W. Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33130 The names and
addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and t-ie personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below
All Interested persona are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom this
notice was mailed that chal-
lenges the validity of the will,
the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this notice has
begun on December 31. 1983
Personal Representative:
Sophia H Slack
i-k-a Sophia Slack
526 N E 119 Street
Blscayne Park. Florida 33161
Attorney for Personal
Representative
HENRY M\ WAITZKIN
740-71 st Street
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
Telephone: I 3061 868-0353
18366 December 31. 1983:
January 7. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
DORIS H TILES INSTALLA-
TION at 2380 NW 36 St Miami. '
Florida 33142 Intends to
register aald name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Owner
TORIBIO A. HERNANDEZ
'.8361 December 31. 1982:
January 7.14.31. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business,
under the fictitious name
Sounds Great Stereo at 3801
South Dixie Highway Miami
33133 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida. December 31.1982:
18364 Januarv 7,14 21 IMS
IN THE CiRCUlT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Ne. 82 24 W4
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
JANICE ROEDER.
PlalnUH.
v.
SHERMAN R. KAPLAN.
ROBERT A. GREENGOSS.
MELVIN A. KATTEN;
GREAT AMERICAN MORT-
GAGE INVESTORS, a Massa
chuaetta business truat.
authorised to do business In the
State of Florida: AEROSPACE
FABRICATION. INC.. HI-
SPEE CONSTRUCTION.
INC.; SYLVIA JUNG RE IS.
Defendants
TO: SYLVIA JUNOREIS
166 West** Street
New York, NT
TO: ROBERTA.
GREENGOSS
c-o Dolly Greengoss
MOO Lakeahore Drive
Chicago, IL
TO: MELVIN A. KATTEN
USE. Clark Street
Chicago, ILeOSOS
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT! .
FIED that a Petition has been
filed to Discharge of Record
ludrmente aralnat Plaintiff
JANICE ROEDER. by you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defames. If any. to It on Bruce
Lamchlck. Esq.. Lamchlck.
Glucksman A Johnston. Plauv
Uff s Attorneys, whose address
la: 10*61 North Kendall Drive.
Suite 217. Miami. Florida 33176.
on or before January 28. 1983.
and file the original with the
Clerk of thla Court either be-
fore service OB Plaintiffs
Attorneys or Immediately
thereafter: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
Petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court on December
20.1982. _
RICHARD BRINKER.
Clerk of the Court
By K Selfrled
Aa Deputy Clerk
18363 December34.31.ltSI;
January 7.14. IMS
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN YHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action Ne. 12-1M20-FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
FIGUEROA, JOSE
and
FIGUEROA. TERESA
TO: TERESA FIGUEROA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT1
FIED than an action for Dlssol
utlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
M. CRISTINA DEL-VALLE.
ESQ. attorney for Petitioner.
whoae address is 1900 SW. 27
Ave. Miami Florida 33148.
13081 448-0272. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
January 21. 1983: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 14 day of Dec
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
byM J. HARTNETT
Aa Deputy Clerk
18344 December 17. 24. 31 1982
January 7.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
OF THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
INANDFOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
No. IMIS05
IN RE The Marriage of
CLARA POPESCU
Petitioner
and
LUCIAN POPE SCI'
Respondent
llOTZCS OF ACTION
TO: LUCIAN POPESCU
c-o Victor Popescu
1892 Chapelhlll Drive
Youngstown. Ohio 44811
YOU. LUCIAN POPESCU.
are hereby notified that a
PetlUon For Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses to the Petition
For Dissolution of Marriage on
the Petitioner's Attorney,
Harold A Turtletaub, Esquire.
9888 South Dixie Highway.
Suite 307. Miami. Florida 33186
and file the original written de-
fenses In the office of the Clerk.
Circuit Court on or before the
28th day of January. 1983. If
you fall to do so. Judgment by
default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In
the PetlUon.
Thla notice shall be published
once each for four consecutive
weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Florida,
thla 14th day of December
A.D.. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByA.Mlnguez
Deputy Clerk
HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB
Attorney for Petitioner
9686 S. Dixie Highway. Suite
307
Miami. Florida 33166
{3081668-1882
18342 December 17.24. 31.1983
_______ January 7.1983
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC Case Ne. u;
IN RE: The Marriage of
NICOLE AZOR. Petitioner-
Wife.
VB.
CARLO AZOR,
Respondent Husband
TO: CARLO AZOR
67 St PaulsPlace
No. 3-B
Brooklyn.
New York 11336
shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS. Attor-
ney. 813 N. W. 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida. 88136. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before January 2*. ISM. other-
wise a default will be entered
Dated: December a. IMS.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: C P. Copeland
18387 December 34. 31. 1983;
January 7.14. IMS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name LBT
and BVG at 7700 SW 100 St..
Miami. Fia. intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Co-owners.
VIRGIL HALE
GARY HALE.
TREVA WARD.
BEVERLY GRIESEMER.
BARBARA TORENO.
LINDA VEAL
18309 December 31. 1862,
January 7, u. XI. ISM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. S3-IM1J
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
WALTER MARIANO ROMAN.
Petitioner-Husband
and
GEORGINA ROMAN.
Respondent -Wife
TO: GEORGINA ROMAN
Residence address un-
known.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
ALBERT L CARRICARTE.
P.A.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 2491 N.W. 7th
Street. Miami. Florida 33126.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before 21st January, 1983:
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four conse-
cutive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this day of Dec. 14
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By CARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
ALBERT L CARRICARTE
P.A.
Attorney for the Husband
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33128
Telephone 3081 649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
18341 December 17. 24.31.1982
January 7.1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-Me4
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MORRIS KRIEGER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of MORRIS KRIEGER.
deceased. File Number82-9664.
Is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 W. Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representatives and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with thla court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom this
notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative.
venue, or Jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 7,1988.
Personal Representatives
Irving Kriegera Sylvia Stein
c-o Henry M. WalUkln. Atty.
740 71st 8treet. Miami Beach.
Florida 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
HENRY M. WAITZKIN
740 -71 st Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Telephone: (3081 866-0363
18376 January 7. 14, 198
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
METRO PICTURE FRAME
CO. at 80 West 31st Street
Hlaleah. Florida 33010. Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
RJ COST A CORP
By: RICA RDO ACOSTA.
President
TED E. TSOUPRAKE LAW
OFFICE
Attorney for RIOOSTA CORP
230 Miracle Mile. Suite 233.
Coral Gables. Fla. 33184
18SU
December 17, 34. Si. 1983
_______________January 7, IMS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that undersigned, de-
string to engage In business un-
der the fictitious name JENOT
INSTUT de BEAUTE at 10246
Collins Ave. Bal Harbour Fla.
83184 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dads County.
Florida
JEANNETTE RENTA.
President
1MM December 17 34.31. 1983
January 7,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL ,
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action Ne. 12 18117
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION .
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOCELYNE GUILLAUME,
Petitioner Wife.
and
VOGUEL GUILLAUME.
Respondent Husband
TO: VOGUEL GUILLAUME
No. 3B3 Rue de Ramparts
Port-au Prince. Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
thla court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on Lloyd
M. Routman. Esquire, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
7900 NE. 2nd Avenue. Suite
616. Miami. Florida 33138. and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before January 31. 1983: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petltlo.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 9th day of De-
cember. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByN A Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
Lloyd M. Routman. Esquire
7900 N E 2nd Avenue.
Suite 618
Miami. Florida33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18330 December 17. 24. 31,1982
January 7\ 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No: 12 1*207
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CLETUS JERNIGAN
Petitioner-Husband
and
MAXIE JERNIGAN
Respondent-Wife
TO: MAXIE JERNIGAN
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTTFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
Bruce N Crown. Esq. 18490
N.W 7th Ave. Suite 206 Miami.
Florida 33169. on or before
February 11. 1983 and file the
original with the clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or Imme-
diately thereafter: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition
Dated: Dec 301982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal I
By: Steven M. Bobes
aa Deputy Clerk
18873 January?. 14.
31.28, 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82 1009*
Division 01
IN RE ESTATE OF
HAROLD A. CARLSON
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of Harold A Carlson, de-
ceased. File Number 83-10089.
la pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is 78 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33128. The
names and address of the per
sons! representative and the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with thla court,
WTTHTN THREE MONTHS Or
THE FTR8T PUBLICATION
Or THIS NOTICE: (l) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom thla no-
tice was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TION NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 31.1983.
Personal Representative
CENTRAL BANK A
TRUST COMPANY
By: STUART J. MILLER
1313 N.W 36th Street
Miami. Florida 33142
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
CA88EL A CASSEL. P.A.
By:THEUSJ. 8HEIL
100 N. Blscayne Blvd.
Suite ion
Miami. Florida 33133
Telephone: 871-1400
December 81,1M3:
_______ January 7. IBM
NOTICE UNDER
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the ftctlcToua name of
SUNRISE MOTEL APT8. at
9340 Collins Avenue. Surfslde.
Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
NATHANIEL AMBERS
EMMA AMBERS
FRANK. STRELKOW A GAY
Attorneys for THE AMBERS
802 Capital Bank Bldg
1666 Kennedy Causeway
North Bay Village. Florida
33141-4196
(308)888-4711
18382 December 31.1982:
January 7,14.31.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
SOUNDS GREAT STEREO at
14018 South Dixie Highway
Miami 33188 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
18M3 December 31.1982:
January 7.14. 21.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT INANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 82-1*204
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
YVES SANON-JULES
Petitloner-HUSBAND
and
JESSIE SANON-JULES
Respondent-WIFE
TO: JESSIE SANON-JULES
Residence Address:
8730 144 Street
Jamaica.
New York 11438
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
Bruce N Crown. Esq.. 18490
N.W. 7th Ave.. Suite 208.
Miami. Florida 33169 on or
before February 11. 1983 and
file the original with the clerk
of this Court either before serv-
ice on Petitioner's attorney or
Immediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
DATED December 30. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
(Circuit Court Seal I
BY: Steven M. Bobes
as Deputy Clerk
18374 January 7.14:
21.28.1983
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FC Case Ne. 12 1 to m
IN RE The Marriage of
ESPERANTA BURNS
PeUtloner-Wlfe
JONATHAN BURNS.
Respondent-Husband
TO: JONATHAN BURN8.
Residence unknown, shall
serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 613 N.W.
13th Avenue. Miami. Florida.
331S6. and file original with
Court Clerk on or before reb. 4.
1983. otherwise a default will be
entered. Dated: December 33,
1983.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: M.J. Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
18367 December 81. 1983:
January 7. 14.21. 1983
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12-9*44
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
MORRIS KRIEGER.
Deceased
notice or
ADMINISTRATION
The admlnlatraUon of the
estate of MORRIS KRIEGER
deceased. File Number 829664.
la pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representatives and
the personal representative's
attorney are act forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with thla court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom this
notice was mailed that
challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal repreaentatlve.
venue, or jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Nodes has
begun on December M. 1SS2
Personal Representatives
IRVING KRIEGER
And
SYLVIA 8TEIN
CO Henry M. Waltakln. Atty.
740-71st Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representatives
HENRY M. WAITZK IN
740 71 at Street
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
Telephone: 13081 888-0863
18368 December SI. 1982:
January 7. IMS
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
futor the fictitious name
GEORGE MEAT a FISH at
9687 SW. 180 St.. Miami. Fla
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
George Garcia.
Owner
18366 December 24. 31. 1982
January 7.14. IMS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-tf 82
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BENJAMIN SAEWTTZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of Benjamin Saewlts.
deceased. File Number82-9982.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 W Flagler St..
Miami. Florida 33130 The
names and addresses of the
persona] representative and
the personal representative's
attornev are set forth below
All interested persons are
required to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PIBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE (11 all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representative, venue, or Juris-
diction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on January 7. IMS.
Personal Representative:
TOBY SAEWITZ.
8600 So Collins Ave No 402.
Miami Beach. Florida 33140.
LYNN W. FROMBERG.
Esquire
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
FROMBERG. FROMBERG.
ROTH. GROSS. COHEN.
SHORE A BERKE. P.A.
No. 800. 2800 E Hallandale
Beach Blvd Hallandale.
Florida 33009
Telephone 940-0709
18377 January 7.14.1983
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO 12 1475*
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CLOTIDE LAURENT.
Petitioner. Wife,
and
DIEUSEUL LAURENT.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: DIEUSEUL LAURENT
UNKNOWN address
NOTICE OF PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition For
Dissolution Of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to
said petition on petitioner's
attorney. GEORGE T.
RAMANI. ESQ. Suite 711.
Blscayne Building. 19 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 and file the Original
Answer or Pleading in the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before February
11. IBM. If you fall to do so.
Judgment by default will be
taken against you tor the relief
demanded in said petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami, Dade County. Florida,
this 3rd day of January. IMS.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
By: A. Mtngues
Deputy Clerk
leSTS January 7.14.
21.SS.1MS.
NOTICE-unMr
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
8YNC STUDIOS at number
7841 Blscayne Boulevard. In the
City of Miami. Florida, Intends
to resistor the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
Dated at Miami. Florida thla
31st day of December. IMS.
rRANK r ALESTftA.
President
Sync Studios. Inc.
JOSHUA D. BASH. ESCj.
Attorney for Applicant
Suite 228
1926 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood, Florida 83020
306-940-1200 933-1400
1M72 December Si, 1983:
January 7. 14,21, 1983


Angeles Changes Ballot
law to Combat Bigotry
ANGELES j to bigotry will no longer
ved on election ballots of
iy, it was announced by
Tox, chairman of the Civil
Committee of the Anti-
lation League of B'nai
Ihere.
a result of an ordinance
_ by members of the ADL
Rights Committee, the City
|il has passed and Mayor
Jradley has signed a law
Twill prevent references to
b of candidates for municipal
Ion Los Angeles ballots,"
kid.
urncii out that the ADL's
interest in this matter was
prompted by a recent primary
ballot here in which a candidate
for mayor described himself as a
"Christian businessman."
Fox said that at the time, the
ADL inquired of the City Clerk
as to why such a designation was
permitted. "We were informed
that Los Angeles was exempted
from the California Election Code
section barring such designations
in state elections," Fox said. "We
then proceeded to draft a statute
which was introduced by Coun-
cilman Zev Yaroslavsky." The
ADL officials said the law will
take effect in time for the April,
1983 Los Angeles primary
election.
foundation Established
for Polish Educator
|y HENRIETTE BOAS
ISTERDAM (JTA) A
is Korczak Foundation"
Jeen established in Holland
ep alive the memory of the
Jewish educator and his
Jrczak. whose real name was
vk Goldszmit. was born in
[and died in 1942 in the Nazi
tniration camp to which he
leportad from Warsaw along
700 children of the Jewish
|anage in Warsaw which he
* Foundation intends to
Ish translations of his books
|l)uich and promote an in-
in In- books on child
re and education. Some of
looks have already appeared
hitch translation and the
cation ol another number of
I is in preparation.
kanwhile. another committee
has been formed to erect a
memorial at the site of the former
concentration camp of
Mauthausen in Austria for the
Dutch victims of the Nazis who
perished there during the years
1940-1945. They were mainly two
groups of young Jews from
Amsterdam, numbering about
400 each who were rounded up in
February and June, 1941. That
was more than a year before the
mass deportation of Jews
started. All perished after only a
few months. The committee
refers to them as Dutchmen, not
as Jews.
Lincoln Meetings Set
Lincoln Chapter of Hadassah
will meet Monday at the Lincoln
Road Clubroom.
A Card Party on Monday. Jan.
17, at the Clubioom is also
planned.
Eg?
*****

nil i ii
S:0
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 761?
PORTMOV
Irving, of Miami Beach, passed away.
He waa the husband of Henrietta, father
of Marilyn Olaaa. Sheldon. Joyce
Markowlts, and Michael of Miami,
grandfather of nine, and brother of
Abraham of Ft. Lauderdale and David
and Ray of Miami Beach. He waa a paat
master of Farragut Lodge, F and AM.
NY. Service! were held December 80 at
Rubln-Zllbert Memorial Chapel.
TERRIS
Jerome. 68. a Bay Harbor resident of IB
yeara, originally from NYC. died. He la
survived by a wife. Betty; daughter,
Lana Sllveritetn of NY; son. Jay of NY.
two grandchildren; and sisters. Marlon
Schneider and NetUe Corenzwlt. both of
Lauderdale Lakes Services were held
December 80at Riverside
KUBUN,
Rose P.. 81. of Miami, passed away
December 21. She waa a resident since
19S8. She waa a member of Shaloma
Chapter of Hadassah. The Greater
Miami Jewish Federation. The
American Institute of CPAs. The
Florida Institute of CPA. the Dade
County Chapter of Florida Institute
CPAs and Associate member of the
Israeli InsUtute of CPAs. She Is sur-
vived by husband. Milton, sisters. Mae
Paul and TUUe Friedman; brothers-in-
law. Abe and Charles; and sister In-law.
Frieda: nieces and nephews; grand-
nieces and grandnephews. Graveside
services were held December 28 at Star
of David Memorial Park, arrangements
by Riverside Chapel.
O0HEN
Bemlce Mayer. 74, of Blscayne Park,
paaaed away January 8. She lived In the
area since 1967, coming from San Fran-
cisco. She Is survived by a husband. Al-
exander. LT. COL. USA (ret.) of Bis
cayne Park: son, Kenneth; grand-
daughter, Julie; and grandson. David,
all of Miami. Services were held Jan-
uary 6.
EICHENBAUM. Irving, 77, Miami.
December 80. Levltt-Welnsteln. Star
of David.
C-LUSMAN, Dora. Rubln-Zllbert.
LEFKOWITZ. Rose. Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert. Mt. Nebo.
SINGER, BetUe. 61, North Miami
Beach. December 80. Levitt-Weln-
steln.
HOFFMAN, Kate. North Miami.
January 4. Rubln-Zllbert.
OSTROV, Nathan, 88, North Miami
Beach. Januarys. Levltt-Welnsteln
LOGUN. Samuel, 66, North Miami
Beach, January 4. Riverside.
DAITCH. Nathan, 82. Miami Beach.
January 6. Riverside.
JASLOW, Sydney Sol. 68. North Miami
Beach, January e Levttt-Welnataln.
LAZAN. Carl. Miami. January 6. Rubln-
Zllbert.
LEWIS. BeUe. 76. North Miami Beach,
January Gordon. Star of David.
DARCY. Fannie L., 82, December 26
Riverside
NEARNBERG. Sadye, 78. December
26. Riverside.
DE YOUNG, Allan. 81. December 26.
Riverside.
JACOBSON. Thelma. 82, December 26
Riverside.
WAX. Max, December 27. Levltt-Weln-
steln.
KATZ. Irving, 67. December 28
Menorah.
LEFKOWITZ, Rose. 68. December 80.
FISCH. Ida. 72, Miami Beach. January
3. Riverside.
L.l'RIE. Norman B 78. Miami Beach.
Riverside.
PUFELES, Martin. 76. North Miami
Beach, January 8. Riverside.
BLOOMFrELD. Sol, 96. Miami Beach.
January 2. Riverside.
BU'ESTEIN. Selms, 76. North Miami
Beach. January 2. Riverside.
COHEN. Frank I.. 88. North Miami
Beach. Riverside.
MUSTO. Joseph R.. Miami Beach,
January 2. Rubln-Zllbert.
SHAPIRO. Irving, Miami Beach.
Rubln-ZUbert.
SCHWARTZ, Joseph J., December 81.
Temple Israel of Great Neck.
KANANACK. Rose. 79. Miami Beach.
December29. Riverside.
KATZ. Anna, Miami Beach. Rubln-
Zllbert.
ZLOTOLOW. MatUe. North Miami
Beach. Rubln-Zllbert.
WANDLER. Tessle. Miami, December
29. Blasberg.
STEINBERG. Rose Beck. December 28.
Blasberg.
***# SAr;/,44A '<<,4*MtYy Wine* SJIfcV
IllilII
ORTHODOXREFORMCONSERVATIVE
IKE GORDON. F.D.-JAMES B. GORDON, F.D.
HARVEY GORDON, F.D.
*. y OWNED i OPERA TED 858-5566
710SW12AV*
^^asTyBDnH mmm i mm m i wm m;
Friday, January 7,1983 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Estelle Zuckerman, 50-Year Resident
Estelle Freeman Zuckerman,
longtime Miami Heart Institute
benefactor and Miami resident
for over 50 years, died December
20.
A Jewish War Veteran,
Zuckerman participated in
ALEXANDER
Hannah, mother of Dr. Gerald of Miami
Beach and Sylvia Sldran of Seattle.
Wash., passed away. She waa a member
>t Congregation Ohev Shalom. Services
were held at Rubln-Zllbert Memorial
Chapel.
COHN
Hazel, 79. a 46-year resident of Miami
Beach, coming from Memphis. Tenn .
died December 81. She waa a member of
Temple Israel and Past Matron and life
member of Emunah Chapter 178 OE8.
She was a former Grand Representative
of New Mexico to Florida. She Is sur-
vived by a sister. Elsie Harris of Miami
Beach, three grandchildren, and three
great-grandchildren. Services were
held January 8. Gordon F'uneral Home
made arrangements.
DECKY
Harry, 72, a resident of Miami Beach for
46 yeras, died. He was a member of
Miami Beach K a- P Lodge 170, JWV. the
Elks, and the Democratic Club. He la
survived by his daughters. Sellna and
Zena of Miami Beach and sister, Essie
Tropp of Deerfleld Beach. Services
were held January 4 at Riverside.
CRUEN
Leo, 91, Miami resident for 82 years,
passed away. He was the husband of
Ruth: father of Reglna Welasler of Key
Blscayne. and Irene Jablon of Colum-
bia. SC: and grandfather of four. Serv-
ices were held January 2 at Riverside
Chapel.
LEBOW
Maurice H 87, a North Miami Beach
resident for 24 years, originally of
Chicago, died December 81. He Is sur-
vived by a wife, Goldye. four daughters,
ll grandchildren. 10 great-grandchil-
dren, and three sisters. He was a mem-
ber of Temple Slnal of North Dade.
Services were held January 2 at River-
side
ASKOVMTZ
Audrey. 80. a resident of Miami for the
past 87 years, originally from Los An-
geles, died January 8. She was the
daughter of David Stein of North Miami
Beach; mother of Dr. Michael S. Aa-
kowltz of Chicago and Cathy Kaplan of
Miami; sister Leonard Stein of Los An
geles; and grandmother of Ellsha.
Services were held January 8 at Gordon
Funeral Home. Interment followed at
Star of David Cemetery.
volunteer work for Veterans
Hospital in Miami.
Survivors include a niece, Ruth
and newphews, Harry and Ben
Kessler, Edwin Palmer, and
David Freeman.
OETTLEMAN
Charles E.. 68. of Boynton Beach,
passed away December 20 In Atlantic
City. N. J. He la survived by his mother,
Elizabeth of Bay Harbor Island, wife.
Doris Rohne GetUeman: sons, Dr.
Lawrence GetUeman of New Orleans
and Robert GetUeman of Chicago; sis-
ters, Sarah SUberman of Silver Soring.
Md Edith Pertman of CinclnatU. and
Frances Rosenswelg of Bay Harbor la-
land; stepdaughters, Ton! Bracey of
New Jersey and Nancy Dorauk of New
Jersey, and six grandchildren. He waa
the husband of the late Boots GetUe-
man. was born In Philadelphia, grew up
In AUanUc City, attended Franklin *
Marshall College, and graduated from
Rutgers University In 1986 with a degree
In Journalism. He then entered business
with his father, M. GetUeman Furs of
Atlantic City and later Miami Beach. He
waa also a mink rancher in Freehold.
New Jersey. He was a resident of Miami
Beach for 89 years and after rearing
from the fur business, was a co-oro-
prletor of Miami Marine Boat Yard and
later of Pan American Marble a Stone
Co. He was active In the Boy Scouts 4
Sea Scouts and a supporter of the Miami
Heart InsUtute. Services were held
January 8 at Blasberg Chapel, followed
by Interment In Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
Contributions In his memory may be
made to the Miami Heart InsUtute.
HERSHFIELO
Milton, 66. of North Miami Beach,
passed away January 1. He had been the
manager of New Era Lighting for 20
years. Survived by wife. Selma; sons.
Michael of S. Miami and Benjamin of
North Miami Beach; daughters, Karen
O'Tooie of Miami and Tana Kokol of
New York; sisters, Helen GUner of
North Miami Beach, Florence Bern of
Miami, and Madeline Singer of Vir-
ginia: and a number of nieces and
nephews. Services were held January 1
at Levltt-Welnsteln
PODUPSKY
Cella, 87. Miami resident for 88 years,
died December 80. She Is survived by
daughters. Elaine Salzburg of Coral
Gables. Esther Fein of Milwaukee,
three grandchildren; and three great-
grandchildren Services were held
January 2 at Gordon Funeral Home.
RISKIND
Barbara, a Miami Beach resident for 2t)
years, originally of Chicago, died
January 2. She Is survived by a hua
band, Albert. She waa a member of
Temple Emanu-El. Services were held
January 4 with Interment at Mt Nebo
Cemetery. Arrangements by Riverside.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd
18840 West Dixie Hwy
Represented u> Levitt, r.O.
New York: (2121 263-7600 Queens Bhsd & "6ih Rd Fnresl Hills N.Y
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL #
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Three Generations of our
Family Serving You in
Dade The omy Broward
Miami Beach Guaranteed Hallandale
1701 Alton Road Pre-Arrengement. 100 & Dixie Hwy.
538-6371 No Money In Advance 456*4011
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