The Jewish Floridian

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02813

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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,55-Number53
Three Sections Miami, FloridaFriday, December 31,1982
f,.$(wc..i mnuHmemum
Price 50 Cents
opes and Uncertainty Mark Talks
nigs
Israel-L ebanon
pry4-
*&,
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
An Israeli negotiating
team, supervised by a com-
mittee of senior Cabinet
ministers, sat down with
Lebanese representatives
at a hotel in Khalde, just
south of Beirut to begin
discussions the Israelis
hope will lead to normaliza-
tion of relations between
the two countries, and pave
the way for an eventual
peace treaty.
But there is uncertainty here
as to just how far the Lebanese
are prepared to go at this time
toward establishing normal rela-
tions with Israel. Premier Mena-
chem Begin, appearing before the
Knesset's Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee, conceded
that the Lebanese had declined to
sign the document Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon brought
back from Beirut 11 days ago and
hailed as a "breakthrough" and
an "agreed framework" for talks.
But it will serve as the basis for
the negotiations, Begin said, ex-
plaining that the Lebanese had
Continued on Page 3-A
i-*C
Draper Will Play
'Active' Role At Talks
32-^
W
[ital Sharansky (left) and other immgrants from the Soviet Union dedicated a grove
fcently in honor of her husband, prisoner of Zion Anatoly Sharansky, in the Jewish
Ctional Fund's Soviet Jewry Forest near Messilat Zion, west of the Jerusalem hills.
Four Senators
Urge Reagan to Cancel Helicopter Sale
By HELEN SILVER
ASHINC.TON (JTA) -
ir leading Senators have sent
letter to President Reagan
ling for a halt in the shipment
|U.S. made helicopters to Iraq
because the transaction is "not in
the best interests" of the U.S.
The letter was initiated by Sen.
Alan Dixon (D., III.) and signed
by Sens. Charles Percy (R-, 111),
who is chairman of the Senate
viet Emigre Claims
He Talked With
Raoul Wallenberg
By HUGH ORGEL
[TEL AVIV (JTA) Asher Hanukaiev, a rectt immigrant from
Soviet Union, claims he met and spoke witn"*Hissing Swedish
lomat Kuoul Wallenberg in a Sverdlovsk prison more than 10 years
_> He said Wallenberg told him he was arrested because he had
piped save Jews.
Wallenberg was sent to Budapest during World War II on a special
pbmatic mission. He is credited with saving the lives of thousands
Hungarian Jews by giving them shelter at the Swedish Embassy
by other means that enabled them to avoid deportation and
most certain death in Nazi concentration camps.
Wallenberg was arrested when the Red Army entered Budapest in
M5 and has not been heard from since. The Soviet authorities claim
died in prison more than 30 years ago and strenuously deny that he
till be alive. But over the years, former inmates of Soviet prisons
d to have seen him.
nukaiev, visiting friends in Beersheba last week, told them he
gent four days with Wallenberg in a Sverdlovsk prison cell in March.
F2. He said "Wallenberg lay then on a stretcher and he told me he
O stomach trouble," according to a report in a Beersheba
*spaper.
Foreign Relations Committee,
Rudy Boschwitz (R-, Minn.) and
Larry Pressler (R., S.D.).
DECLARING THAT "our
belief is that this transaction is
not in the best interests of the
U.S.," the Senators warned that
the sale "could well violate our
policy of neutrality in the Iraq-
Iran war ... We strongly urge
that you halt shipment of the
helicopters that are scheduled for
delivery within the next week or
two."
At least 12 of the helicopters
are manufactured by the Hughes
Helicopter Corporation have
already been delivered as part of
a sale that will include the trans-
fer of 60 helicopters.
According to the letter, "It is
only reasonable to assume that
the Iraqi government will employ
this large number of helicopters
in its war with Iran whether for
artillery spotting of otherwise."
BECAUSE THE helicopters
weigh less than 10,000 pounds
each, they are classified as civil-
ian helicopters that do not
require an export license. But the
Commerce Department however,
did grant such a license to the
Hughes Corporation, an action
which the Senators claimed in
their letter to Reagan has
"another example of the weak-
ness in the export control
process." They said the new 98th
Congress to take office in
January will "examine methods
for tightening the control mech-
anism" of the export licenses.
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) U.S. special
Middle East envoy Morris
Draper will be participating
in the talks between Israel
and Lebanon scheduled
State Department deputy-
spokesman Alan Romberg
said.
"Ambassador Draper will be
the leader of our team which will
be at the table as an active par-
ticipant in the talks between
Lebanon and Israel. He will be
joined from time to time by Am-
bassador (Philip) Habib,"
Romberg stated. Romberg said
he knew of no specific time for
Philip Habib
Continued on Page 2-A
Germany Appeals to Holland to
Release Two Nazi War Criminals
By HENRIETTE BOAS
AMSTERDAM -
(JTA) Premier Rudolph
Lubbers has expressed
"surprise" that the West
German parliament has de-
cided to renew its appeal to
the Dutch government to
release the last two Nazi
war criminals incarcerated
in Holland.
They are Franz Fischer, 80,
and Ferdinand Aus der Fuenten,
70, serving sentences in Breda
prison, who were the subjects of a
similar appeal by Bonn in 1979.
Aus der Fuenten, and another
war criminal held in Breda, Willy
Lages, now deceased, were in
charge of the mass deportation of
Jews from Holland during World
War II.
The Bundestag unanimously
adopted a resolution requesting
The Netherlands and the govern-
ments of five other countries to
free the last German war
criminals imprisoned by them for
"humanitarian reasons." Lub-
bers said that no such request
has reached his government and
said he considered it "a purely in-
ternal matter of the West Ger-
many Federal Republic."
Justice Minister Frits Korthals
Altes said he has no plans what-
ever for the early release of the
two prisoners at Breda. The lower
house of the Dutch parliament
reacted to Bonn's plea with
reservations.
The Bundestag also asked the
Italian government to release war
criminal Walter Reder, a native
of Austria. A similar request was
made recently by the Austrian
government. The U.S., Britain,
France and the Soviet Union
were asked to free Hitler's one
time deputy fuehrer Rudolph
Hess, convicted at Nuremberg,
who is serving a life sentence at
Spandau prison in Berlin.






1/ Friday, December 10.IMS
MmMMttM

Israel As Siamese Twin: Independence Farther Removed Than Ever
In its pre-natal existence, Zionism
swam the waters of the womb indifferent to
the enormous possibilities of its Turkish
host. Later, it was born to the horror of life
as a Siamese twin of the ugliness of British
rule. With the coming of independence in
1948, modern Zionism still found itself
attached, this time to the ugliness of
American rule.
That rule has never been uglier than
today. Nor has Israel's independence ever
seemed a greater travesty, its Siamese
status by now utterly inseparable from the
stupidity and self-interest of an obtuse
President and a State Department mired in
the mythology of Arab virtue.
The visit of Jordan's King Hussein
last week showed Secretary of State Shultz
and Mr. Reagan at their worst. A perfect
schizoid, the King had come in the cause of
a new Palestinian state at the head of which
would stand Yasir Arafat; little more than
a decade ago, Hussein blasted the PLO out
of its Jordanian fortress and sent it
scurrying for its life into Lebanon.
In the interim, the King stood aloof of
the Yom Kippur War. fearful that he would
lose even more ground than he did on the
V. st Bank in the Six-Day War of 19b7.
Since then, he has rigorously abjured the
Camp David accord to which Mr. Reagan
is. by his own campaign promise, com-
mitted and which he has tried to get
Hussein to join since his incumbency.
Last week, both Shultz and Reagan
rewarded the Jordanian monarch's
recalcitrance by promising him all sorts of
goodies if only he would plead the cause of
the so-called Reagan peace initiative of
Sept. 1 with his Arab brethren a plan
designed to establish a Palestinian entity
on the West Bank in confederation with
Jordan which would, of course and in short
order, become the new Palestinian state
Yasir Arafat has been struggling for just as
a starter in his war of liquidation against
Israel.
The trouble with the President's
initiative is that it is a flagrant violation of
the very Camp David process he has at-
tempted to interest Hussein in; needless to
say, that is why the King is modestly
enthusiastic. Furthermore, nowhere in all
of this feverish activity has a single
American official yet come to his senses to
recognize both the weakness and the
danger inherent in the Reagan plan, whose
ultimate end will be little different from
Secretary of State William Rogers' plan in
the early days of the Nixon
Administration: complete amputation of
Israel back to its 1948 condition.
Nor has anybody distanced himself
sufficiently from the media to recognize the
original purpose and remarkable
achievement of Israel in Lebanon the
possibility of peace under independent
Lebanese rule. On the contrary, punish-
ment of Israel is the main objective of the
Reagan Administration for having dared to
set up new and hopeful possibilities in the
Middle East without meddlesome and,
needless to say, bungling interference on
the part of Mr. Reagan and all of his
Bechtoil men.
Meanwhile, back at home, Israel
continues to lacerate itself with its inquiry
into Shatila and Sabra as a hypocritical
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world judges its morality negatively and
helps Uncle Sam plot the demise of his
Siamese captive with greater enthusiasm
than ever.
It Works Both Ways
Friends of Israel in the United States
were treated to their first dose of interna-
tional hypocracy American style. The
event centered upon the recent rift between
Jerusalem and Washington over the Israel
government's requirement that all
foreigners seeking work permits on the
West Hank sign a pledge to refrain from
'any act or rendering of any service to the
FLO or any other hostile organization as
defined bv law."
So far 21 foreign lecturers and teachers
employed at Bir Zeit University and Al
Najah, both on the West Bank, have been
forced to leave the country because they
refused to sign the pledge on the grounds
that it was a political document that in-
fringed on academic freedom. Secretary of
State George Shultz, reminding all of his
former life in the academic community as
dean of the graduate school of business at
Chicago University, compared the pledge
requirement to that of loyalty oaths
demanded by certain American universities
in the 1950s and urged the academic com
munity to speak out against it.
But the-Israel-Embassy was quick to
retort that the pledge requirement was
similar to that being required of aliens
seeking entry into the U.S. The U.S. law
bars temporary visas to persons including
teachers, who are anarchists, Communists,
Nazi war criminals and groups whose aim is
to overthrow the government.
This stipulation has been used by the
U .S. to exclude professors from East
European countries and other Marxists, as
well as members of the PLO. The FLO, to
remind those whose memory fails them, has
stated repeatedly, and in fact has tried to
sec are its goal of liquidating the Jewish
State. A reading of the PLO charter and its
stated aims and public comments bj lead-
ing officials in the organization might help
refresh one's memory.
So it was with a bit of irony that a
mere week after the Shultz castigationof
Israel, the State Department chose to bar a
leading Palestinian poet and PLO sym
pathizer Mohmoud Darwish. from par
ticipating in the New York City poetry
reading to raise funds for the United
Nations Children's Fund relief work in
Lebanon because of his ideological views.

MMMMMMMMMMMMM"
David Friedman
Camp David Accords A Major Achievement
Friday. December 31. 1982
Volume 55
15TEVETH5743
Number 53
WASHINGTON Even the
most adamant detractor of
former President Carter has to
admit that the Camp David ac-
cords were the major achieve-
ment perhaps the only lasting
accomplishment of the Carter
Administration.
Carter's recently published au-
tobiography, "Keeping Faith"
(Bantam $22,501 is much like his
Administration, superficial for
the most part, but then it comes
alive and interesting for the
quarter that is devoted to the
Camp David talks in September.
1978. He kept meticulous notes
during the 13 days he spent at
the Maryland presidential retreat
with Israeli Premier Menachem
Begin and Egyptian President
Anwar Sadat and gives a day-by-
day account which makes this
book a must reading for all those
interested in Israel and the Mid-
dle East.
The Camp David account as
well as other sections of the book
display Carter's good points. His
commitment to the search for
peace, his willingness to work
hard and to acquire a thorough
knowledge of any subject with
which he dealt he spent hours
studying about Begin and Sadat
before they arrived at Camp Da-
vid and his ability to stick
with the issue and determination
to see it through are the ingredi-
ents that brought success at
Camp David.
BUT OTHER qualities are re-
vealed to Carter's detriment and
show why many judge his Ad-
ministration to be a failure: his
aloofness from many in Wash-
ington who he needed to help him
advance his programs and his
pet tmess toward those who he
felt opposed his views. Begin was
not the only foreign leader in this
group: most ol the West Euro-
pean leaders were included.
The book also confirms the
feeling that many had. and not in
the Jewish community alone,
that Carter while supporting Is-
rael was tilting toward the Arabs.
Carter starts his discussion of Is-
rael by noting the "affinity" he
had for the Jewish State when he
was elected. "But now I had been
elected President and needed a
broader perspective," he writes, a
not unusual development when
supporters of Israel are elected or
become Prime Ministers of West
European countries.
This perspective led Carter to
seek rights for the Palestinians
which he listed as "the right to
vote, the right to assemble and to
debate issues that affected their
lives, the right to own property
without fear of being confiscated
and the right to be free of mili-
tary rule." It was this belief that
Israel was depriving the Pales-
tinians of these rights that put
Carter into conflict with Israel
and with American Jews.
BUT THERE were also per-
sonality problems. Carter called
Sadat along with the then Japan-
ese Premier Masayosho Ohira "s
special friend" among foreign
leaders. Writing of his first
meeting with Sadat, he said "a
shining light burst on the Middle
East scene for me." He rightly
praises Sadat for his courage in
going to Jerusalem and seeks to
take credit for encouraging the
move, although most observers
believe Sadat was acting to pre-
vent the Carter Administration
from including the Soviet Union
in Middle East negotiations.
While Carter likes Sadat, he
clearly does not like Begin, who
he sees as inflexible and obstinate
and accuses of breaking agree-
ments He reportedly was even
harsher originally but was per
suaded to tone down his remarks
But while finding both Begin and
Sadat inflexible on issues at
Camp David. Carter was more
willing to excuse Sadat and
seemed to side more often with
him.
He notes that if he wanted W
win a concession with the Israelis
he would go to Begin s subordi-
nates Foreign Minister Moshe
Dayan. Defense Minister But
Weizman and Attorney General
Aharon Barak while with the
Egyptians he went Straight to
Sadat himself. Carter is not the
inly U.S. President who finds it
easier to deal with leader- of non-
democratic regimes.
Carter accused Begin ol violat-
ing the Camp David agreements.
I le repeated this charge in a press
conference in Washington in No-
vember promoting his book. I
am not satisfied that Prime Min-
ister Begin is committed to the
principle and the spirit and the
letter of the Camp David agree-
ment, he said. Carter conceded
that Begin "performed well in
searching for peace" and asserted
that no other Israeli leader
"would have had the political
courage" Begin did to sign the
peace treaty with Egypt, have
the Sinai settlements removed
and to evacuate Israeli troops
from the Sinai.
"But my hopes and dreams for
the Camp David agreements
have not been reached, he
added. "Part of the blame I thBW
falls on Prime Minister Begin.
HE DESCRIBED his hopes as
autonomy for the Palestinians on
the West Bank and Gaza, ti
participation of the Palestinians
Continued on Page 9-A
0


Frid.v.De Special Interview
The Plight of Soviet Jewry
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) A West-
hester Jewish businessman and activist
Zs returned from a brief visit to the
Sviet Union, during which he managed
to meet personally with some 20 Jewish
-fuseniks, with the conviction that their
Suation was hopeless, a conviction he
laid would spur him to even greater
efforts to try to help get them out of the
USSR.
Leonard Kesten of Bedford, NY. described his
viJfand his concern for the future of the Jewish
Jseniks in an interview with, the Jewish
lEaphic Agency, expressing the fear that
Z could be in physical danger He said he went
Hhe Soviet Union as a member of a group of
len tourists, which included his wife another
couple, a single woman and two young American
Kesten 49, who was on a commercially-
orl!anized tour, was not simply a visitor in search
, new tourist experiences. He is well-informed
L has a solid background on the status and
rniblems of Soviet Jewry through his work in
MAS of which he is a board member; the United
Jewish Appeal in which he is very active; and
through other American Jewish organizations.
But he stressed to the JTA that he had not
Mde his visit to the Soviet Union as a
representative of any American Jewish
organization, though he and other members of his
poup brought with them names and addresses of
refuseniks because they wanted to talk to some.
Kesten said he was convinced that he and the
other American Jewish visitors were under
constant surveillance by the KGB. He said that
while the refuseniks he and the other American
Jewish visitors met and talked to showed no signs
of fear about such meetings, both the refuseniks
and Soviet Jews he saw, but did not meet
directly, occasionally showed signs of paranoia
which he came to feel was amply justified.
A Typical Experience
He said he and other Jews in his group met
with about 20 refuseniks in Leningrad and about
30 in Moscow. He said it was a typical experience
lo meet Russian Jews, both young and old, who
had immediately lost their jobs when they applied
for emigration to Israel. In a society in which
government is the sole employer, a substitute
source of income is a severe problem, he observed.
Hesten said that, after two days in Leningrad,
the Americans proceeded to Moscow where they
remained until they left the Soviet Union.
Kesten said the refuseniks repeatedly asked the
American visitors what help American Jewry
could provide them to enable them to live as Jews
in the USSR. He said that the frequency of that
appeal left him with the impression that the
refuseniks had reluctantly accepted the con-
dusion they would probably never be allowed to
emigrate.
Kesten related that impression to the drastic
drop of a peak of 50,000 emigrating Jews in 1979
to around 250 in September. Kesten's group was
the first to visit the Soviet Union to learn about
the impact of that drastic drop in emigration
rates and emigration hopes of Russian Jews who
had planned to leave.
On a visit to the apartment of one of the
refuseniks. Kesten related, three other young
refuseniks came to the apartment to meet the
Jewish visitors from America. Each time one of
the visiting refuseniks rang the doorbell for
admittance, such was the paranoia of the host
couple that "their heads just spun around,"
Kesten said.
He said "it was like viewing a movie film about
the 1930s; one would think of what had happened
in Germany, every time there was a knock on the
door or the doorbell rang" in that apartment.
Kesten, who is also a member of the Board of
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency, said the visitor
encountered many moving experiences. One
involved a visit to the Moscow home of a
refusenik denied emigration ten years previously.
The refusenik had a map of Israel on a wall of
his apartment, which he indicated to his visitors
was the closest he ever expected to get to Israel.
Kesten said that meeting took place on a
Saturday and that he and his wife expected to be
enroute Monday to Israel.
He said it was "a very tough feeling" to know
their host would probably never get there. But,
when the Kestens told him about their pending
visit to Israel, it appeared "comforting for him to
know that here were two Jews in his apartment
who in two days were going to be in Israel."
A 'Catch-22' Situation
Kesten said he agreed with the viewpoint of
concerned Jews that it was as much a duty of
world Jewry to try to make it possible for Russian
Jews who could not or did not want to leave the
Soviet Union to be permitted to live freely as
Jews, as it was to try to get those out who wanted
to leave.
Asked whether his experiences had left him
with a feeling that Soviet Jews could neither leave
as Jews nor live as Jews, Kesten responded
"that's correct." He said it was a "catch-22
situation" He said the refuseniks asked the
American Jewish visitors for help "in the sense
that if a husband or breadwinner is incarcerated,
they need help to get an attorney, or help to
support the family while the father is in-
carcerated." He added, sadly, "they don't know
how we can actually help them."
Asked if he and his fellow-visitors found any
evidence to support any possibility that the Jews
forbidden emigration can live freely as Jews in the
USSR, Kesten replied "the young Jews we talked
to don't think so."
'Heroes Of The Jewish People'
Kesten said that while he and his fellow visitors
had talked only to refuseniks, he had the im-
pression that the majority of Russian Jews
followed a policy of "keeping a low profile; they
don't make waves." Nevertheless, he added,
despite the harassment visited on the refuseniks
there is a minority who are "in the forefront of
continuing with Jewish education, with teaching
their children Jewishness," despite formidable
difficulties.
He expressed astonishment that, with all the
abuse that their elders the Russian Jews in
their late 60's or early 70's have known, there
are still Jews now, in their 20s and 30's, who are
starting to subject themselves to the role of
behaving as Jews, "knowing that they are going
to be harassed and knowing that they are willing
to "pop up and are willing to associate with and
be involved with Jewish movement."
Kesten called such young Russiani Jews
"heroes of the Jewish people, who for whatever
reasons, are standing up to be counted with the
Jews of the world."
Judaism and Sexual Morality
By RABBI MARC H. TANENBAUM
THE WIDELY PUBLICIZED sex-and-
drug scandals of the Pulitzer and Kimberly
families in Florida are sickening in them-
selves to any sensitive moral conscience. But
they assume greater importance if viewed as
a dramatic illustration of the declining
sexual morality in America and its
devastating human consequences.
For much of American history, the Puritan
moral code dominated with its stringent
emphasis on sex as sinful leading to
f "Pressive sexual behavior and inevitable
Putt- Then in the counter-culture of the
7 s' a rebellion took place and the pen-
roium swung in the opposite direction. Now
everything was permissible and self-
mduigence became the new idolatry. If it
reels good, do it. Never mind its moral or
human consequences.
MEN AND WOMEN felt free to exploit
each other as sex objects, playthings for
instant gratification. Pre-mantal, extra-
marital relations, menage-a-trota
homosexuality, lesbianism, incest were all
justified by the new narcissism as
"recreational sex."
Sexual freedom became perverted into
license, whose consequence has been much
unhappiness. human degradation and
debauchery an assault on the dignity of
the human person.
Jewish morality has always advocatodjthe
ffolden mean, an avoidance of extremes.
3 relationships, Judaism teachesjnust
be an expression of genuine love "^ respect
between two people. Tzniut modesty, self-
rSJalnt mist characterize all healthy
sexSdfty. 55 Florida scandals and others
SeTwiuld never happen were the balanced
and humane Jewish sexual code taken
seriously.
Yehuda Blum
Israel's Basic Positixm
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA) Israel's basic interests and posi-
tion at the United Nations did not change during the 37th session of
the General Assembly, Ambassador Yehuda Blum of Israel told re-
porters here at a briefing.
Blum said, however, that it is expected that next year the Arabs will
attempt again to suspend Israel from the Assembly. He added that
the composition of the Security Council will be "worse" next year be-
cause Pakistan will replace Japan, Nicaragua will replace Panama and
Malta will replace Ireland as part of the rotation of seats.
The envoy noted that the Assembly, which concluded after being in
session for three months, opened a few days after the massacre of
Palestinian civilians in Beirut and marked the first time Israel had
participated in an international forum since the "Peace for Galilee"
operation was launched June 6.
"The timing was not in Israel's favor," Blum said, referring to the
proximity of the events in Lebanon and the opening of the Assembly
session. "But at the end there was not a great deal of change as far as
Israel is concerned. We knew that there would be a series of anti-Israel
resolutions (in the Assembly), as in previous years, but all in all Israel,
at the conclusion of the Assembly, is more at ease than when the As-
sembly opened."
A Failure' For The Arabs
Blum claimed that the Assembly session could be viewed as a "fail-
ure" for the Arabs. He noted that when the session began it seemed
that the Arabs were going to try to use their diplomatic muscles to
make up for the military defeat in Lebanon and the lack of concerted
Arab reaction to the Israeli operation. But the Arab delegations did
not succeed, Blum said.
"The Arabs at the UN have realized that the Palestine Liberation
Organization was crushed militarily and politically in Lebanon," the
Israeli envoy said. As a result, he observed, the Arabs, in order to
sweeten the bitter pill of defeat the PLO had to swallow, supported
even more extreme resolutions in the Assembly dealing with Pales-
tinian rights than they did in the past.
But. behind the scenes, It was dear that the PLO had lost ground
with the Arab delegations, Blum said. "This became particularly clear
in relations between Jordan and the PLO," he said. He noted that the
division of interests became evident "with the struggle and sharp ex-
changes" between the two sides.
Dissappointed With Europeans
Blum expressed disappointment about the attitude of the European
countries toward the Mideast conflict. He said that while the Euro-
pean countries voted against the extreme pro-Palestinian resolutions
last year, they preferred to abstain this year. This was clearly demon-
strated Monday when the European countries abstained on a resolu-
tion calling for the establishment of a Palestinian state under the
leadership of the PLO. Blum said. He also expressed "disappoint-
ment" that a number of Latin American countries supported this year
the anti-Israeli resolution on the Mideast.
Blum said that Israel was successful in thwarting the Arab move to
suspend Israel from the Assembly. He said that this was possible be-
cause the United States took a very firm position against the Arab
plan.
As for the role of Egypt in this year's Assembly, Blum said that the
Egyptians used the occasion as part of their campaign to return to the
Arab fold. As a result, Blum said, the Egyptian rhetoric at the UN
was very unpleasant to Israeli ears. "It began in April, when Israel
completed its withdrawal from the Sinai. The Egyptians suddenly
started sharpening their rhetoric" against Israel, Blum said, noting
that the Egyptian speeches at the UN during the Lebanon war were
among the sharpest attacking Israel.


1/
Friday, December 10.1982
Page 6-A The Jewish FToridian / Friday, December 31,1982
Albert Einstein
Honors Distingli
Dr. Norman Lamm, Yeshiva University president, welcomes
the more than 300 guests to the Florida Friends of Albert
Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) Annual Achievement
A ward Dinner Dance.
Arthur Pearlman, (left) chairman of the board of trustees of
Mt. Sinai Medical Center takes a moment to pose with Ted
Baumritter.
4 M' -" >'
Senator Claude Pepper chats with Carol Samet and her hus-
band. Dr. Philip Samet, chief of cardiology at Mt. Sinai
Medical Center.

rW* ^H H


BL **^^^B ^1 nybrvBv IS* r>~ > I J
% A
M f < fj flRjjritfv**^ r ***" H
J H ^ L J
Former Governor Reubin
local businessmen: Lawrence
were honored for communitvl
Friends of Albert Einstein*
Annual Achievement Award
Hotel.
The college located iny
University's medical school.,
medical centers in the world I
College of Medicine is a voii
community leaders devoted
cially and through personal irW
"Former Governor Reubir
Humanitarian Award for his u
Florida, but to the rest of 3
bassador and U.S. Trade Ri
Weiss, co-chairman of the Ac
"It is gratifying to give the;
so much to the welfare of!
Askew is currently an alto
Miami law firm of Greenbera,
Quentel and Wolff, P.A. Duri
his thanks to the board of l
about the man for whom the a
l As!
lAusI
r or
"I applaud the college for
science and humanity," said
honor you have bestowed upoi
to be associated with the en i
enhance human life and nouri md
that the Albert Einstein College Hec
Also, honored during the di
by more than 300. was Lawre
Communications. Austin w
Distinguished Achievement A
accomplishments in the lie! f c
contributions to the welfare o
Dr. Weiss.
., o-j r r\i *t_ Avff\\M Dr. Norman Lamm, president of Yeshiva University thanks
Dr. Norman Lamm presents Sidney L. Olson with the AECOM Wollowick (left) and Mrs. Florence Baumritter for
Distinguished Achievement Award their generous contributions to the school.
"The Albert Einstein Code
1 and
is:
;r
isr
cor
*ew
Ai
r d
sell
Ji
of
Eddie Cohen, national director for development of Yeshiva Yeshiva University President, Dr. Norman Lamm joins
University hands Mrs. Florence Baumritter pledge cards Metro Commissioner Barry Schreiber and his wife Bunny to
given to him by dinner dance attendees. discuss Yeshiva's successful fundraising efforts.
University is a testament to the en;
and their will to do what they i I, e
impossible," said Austin.
During the dinner progranAyt
Electronics was invested to Itx
Medicine's Board of Overseers ad
the founder of the national el ron
board of directors of both Mt.
Beach and in Shaare Zedak HosA
Award recipients were ch
chairman of the AECOM Boarx
Lamm, president of Yeshiva Un sit]
According to Chaim H. Frierx lire
Yeshiva University, Southeaste lee
in donations was pledged at tl din
still receiving contributions ul{
pleased," he added. "And we la in
aid in the advancement of AECC in
humanity."
nai
ir
0


- ______...ri fcM^ -.>hr.pl t""^'>n '
M-fc => *
Friday, December 31,1962 / The Jewish Plorklian Page7-A
r
liege of Medicine
ished Achievers
u
Askew and two prominent
Lstin and Sidney L. Olson,
i during the recent Florida
', of Medicine (AECOM)
Dance at the Konover
_ New York Is Yeshhra
*ed as one of the top eight
,,, Friends of Albert Einstein
f organization of prominent
rting the college flnan-
nt.
, was given the Einstein
J commitment, not only to
jon and the world as am-
lative." said Dr. Charles
.it Award dinner dance.
man who has contributed
la and Israel."
and senior partner with the
rig, Askew, Hoffman, Lipoff,
is speech Askew expressed
irs of AECOM and spoke
is named.
continuing service to both
I am grateful for the
And I am proud, as always,
struggle to preserve and
sustain the human spirit
Heine pursues."
dance which was attended
B. Austin founder of Austin
wa selected for the Einstein
t A rd because of his superior
ielr I communications and his
3 0 eJewish people," explained
olio of Medicine and Yeshiva
the tensity of the Jewish people,
y n t, even when the task seems
aril sydney L. Olson of Olson
to /bert Einstein College of
ers addition to his new duties,
I el ronics chain is also on the
Mt. lai Medical Center in Miami
ios I in Jerusalem.
ch< n by Burton P. Resnick,
r< Overseers and Dr. Norman
Un sity.
ierx Krector of Florida Friends of
isle legion, more than $700,000
it tl (inner dance. "And, we are
My. We are extremely
b irward to seeing these gifts
E(X and in turn the well being of
S'W 0lsn on his award.
i
The evening's honorees take a moment to pose with Dr.
Norman Lamm, (center) and Metro Commissioner Barry
Schreiber, (right). Lawrence B. Austin, (left) former Governor
Reubin O'D. Askew, and Sidney L. Olson, (second from right)
received distinguished achievement awards for outstanding
community service.
Lawrence B. Austin shows his distinguished achievement
award to Commissioner Barry Schreiber, (right) who is a
Yeshiva graduate.
Lawrence Austin receives a warm handshake of congratula-
tions from Dr. Norman Lamm, (left).
Chaim H. Friend, (right) takes a moment to chat with Senator
Claude Pepper, one of the special guests at the dinner dance.
/^""^^'^^^B
W h* VJ
1 \ .- ^ 1
I..
^Bt 9m
Reubin Askew takes time out from the gala festivities to pose
with Rabbi Irving Lehrman.
Dr. Mathew Zuckerman, chairman of Florida Friends of
Yeshiva University and his wife Cookie take a moment to pose
for a picture after a spin around the dance floor.
Dr. Charles Weiss, (left), Mr. and Mrs. Gary Gerson and Ted
Baumritter take a second to discuss Yeshiva's current fund-
raising efforts.
Reubin Askew takes a moment to show his distinguished
achievement award to Sidney Olson, (right) who also received
honors during the evening.
Dr. Philip Frost, (right) and Reubin Askew pose with Mrs
Florence Baumritter.
* H. Fnend, (left) and Reubin Askew both
Mat the Annual Achievement Award
"Vance was a great success.
Commissioner Barry Schreiber (L) shares a
moment of laughter with Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence
Austin.
Mr. and Mrs. H. Jerome Joseph (Li chat with
Yeshiva University President, Dr. !\nrman Ixanm.
Pdiadv


rrmwy, December 10.192

1'age 10-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 31, 1982
U.S. and Canada
Council of Jewish Federations
Monitoring Jewish Communal Life
By BORIS SMOLAR
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions, keeping its finger on the
pulse of Jewish communal life in
the United States and Canada,
has been monitoring during the
now-ending year the impact
which the economic difficulties in
the country and the federal
budget cuts were having on
Jewish families and individuals.
The CJF undertook a fact-
finding survey of 50 key Federa-
tions. They were a representative
sample of all the 200 organized
Jewish communities. The study
concentrated on establishing the
extent to which lower income and
middle income Jewish families
have been affected by the econo-
mic recession. The findings were
discussed with representatives
from national Jewish agencies
engaged in social services and in
education. The latter were ad-
vised by the CJF to make similar
studies in their own fields. The
survey was conducted under the
direction of Lester Levin, the
head of the CJF Community
Planning Department.
The Federations contacted by
the CJF all expressed concern.
They included communities with
a Jewish population of 40,000 and
over such as Baltimore,
Detroit. Cleveland, Newark,
Miami, Philadelphia as well as
intermediate communities with
populations ranging between
15.000 and 40,000 Jews, like
Atlanta. Cincinnati, Houston,
Rochester and others. They also
included small intermediate com-
munities numbering from 5,000
to 15,000 Jews, like Indianapolis.
Louisville. Memphis. Nashville,
Omaha. St. Paul, Seattle,
Syracuse, Richmond.
Almost all of the respondents
indicated that not only lower
income groups who are often
dependent on services provided
by local Jewish agencies are
being affected by the present
economic conditions, but also
significant numbers of middle
income Jewish families and
individuals. Some reported
unemployment in their com-
munities; others emphasized the
difficulty among Jewish college
graduates in finding employment
and the increasing numbers of
Jewish married women entering
the work force to supplement the
family income.
In general, the Jewish com-
munal service agencies were
concerned about growing case-
loads and requests for services
and the potential inability to
meet these growing needs due to
limitations in their budgets
resulting from federal budget
cuts.
The national Jewish Welfare
Board, which was one of the
national Jewish agencies that
followed the advice of the CJF to
conduct surveys of their own
among their member agencies in
order to gain additional factual
information, established the
following fact:
80 percent of the Jewish
Centers affiliated with the JWB
indicated that their members had
difficulties in making fee
payments; also that there was a
40 percent increase in member-
ship defaults.
There was an increase in
membership dropouts.
There was an increase in the
number of scholarships requested
for both annual dues and camp
fees.
There is a declining enrol-
lment in fee programs simultan-
eously with an increased enrol-
lment in free programs.
50 percent of the reporting
Centers have now fewer contri
buting members.
40 percent reported in
creased use of Center activities a;
a replacement for more expensive
commercial leisure time activi-
ties.
There is an increased in-
terest in programs and lectures
dealing with economic issues.
Centers are serving more
meals, with seniors having higher
incomes "participating."
Some families with higher
income levels are requesting
scholarships, while others are
choosing to drop their member-
ship in the Centers rather than
request assistance.
Some see the Center day
camp fee as so far beyond their
means that they are not even
bothering to inquire as to finan-
cial aid or enrollment.
A picture also emerged from
reports coming from 65 Jewish
Centers showing that more
middle class members are taking
longer to pay memberships. In
some cities Jewish middle class
members, being hardest hit by
economic difficulties and in-
flation, are hesitant to apply for
reduced membership fees and are
foregoing Center services. Middle
class families in some com-
munities can no longer afford full
fees even for nursery schools.
Senior adults are worried because
of the high cost of living and the
threat of Social Security cut-
backs. More middle class
management husbands are losing
their jobs.
In the field of Jewish educa-
tion, a survey conducted by the
Jewish Educational Services of
North America shows that there
is a declining enrollment and
participation in Jewish com-
munal education; that unem-
ployment and inflation increased
the number of middle class Jew-
ish families who cannot afford to
pay now tuition for their children
in Jewish schools; that staffs
have been curtailed in the schools
and lunch programs have been
reduced there in quantity and
quality; and that there are in-
creasing numbers of requests for
scholarships from non-eligible
income groups. As a result of the
impact of the economic crisis on
Jewish families, Jewish educa-
tional institutions anticipate a
further decline in enrollment in
schools and in summer camps.
The Council of Jewish Federa-
tions advised local Federations to
continue to monitor the impact of
the present economic situation
locally, as the numbers of indi-
viduals affected are growing. It
suggests some short-term solu-
tion for the communities to
explore. They include develop-
ment, or expanding, small loans
to middle-income families for
participation in Jewish
programs, the expansion of
scholarship fund dollars, and the
financing of a revolving loan
fund. supported by non-
camuaitin sources including
endowment allocations, corporate
and foundation
special gifts.
grants and
Israel Has New
Sea-to-Sea Missile
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) The
Israel Aircraft Industries (IAI)
announced it has a new sophis-
ticated sea-to-sea missile in ad-
vanced stages of development.
It is the Gabriel Mark 3 sea-to-
sea missile a new development
based on the IAI-designed and
produced Gabriel sea-to-sea mis-
sile, which has had a great suc-
cess in Israeli sea battles, with a
very high hit rate.
The new missile can be luanch-
You have the power to Will the future by
leaving a legacy to Hadassah today!
Your Will can continue Hadassahs achievements
in Israel for a better tomorrow.
hadassah
ed from a wide variety of aircraft
at an undisclosed maximum
height. Fitted with a radar
target-seeking device, the missile
drops to near sea level and can
then continue to its target in
either one of two ways.
It can be sent in the general
direction of the target with its
course amended by the aircraft
pilot, or it can be fired to use its
radar to seek its target independ-
ently of its launching aircraft
which can then leave the area.
The range of the Gabriel Mark
3 is over 36 miles. It strikes its
target just above the waterline.
It is fitted with a 150-kg war-
head.
Once Upon A
Time In America
By HERBERT G. LUFT
HOLLYWOOD Arnon MH-
chan. the Israeli industrialist and
heir to a vast petro-chemical for-
tune, who financed and co-
produced the monumental televi-
sion feature, "Masada," has
moved the center of his motion
picture activities to New York
completing "King of Comedy"
with Robert De Niro and Jerry
Lewis under Martin Scorsese's
direction. Lewis portrays a
Johnny Carson-like TV host who
is being kidnapped, in a humor-
ous vein. Simultaneously, Mil
chan is committed to the produc-
tion in Israel of "The Pirate,"
with Roman Polanski directing.
Milchan's second U.S. picture,
"Once Upon a Time in America,"
is currently before the cameras in
the Williamsburg neighborhood
of New York. Based on a novel,
"The Hoods." it deals with the
rise of a couple of "Jewish"
gangsters tracing their lives from
the 1920s to 1968 with Robert De
Niro and James Woods (known
to us from the TV series "Holo-
caust. "I portraying the leads.
Elizabeth McGovern and Tues-
day Weld are their female com-
panions and Treat Williams is a
union boss.
Italian film director Sergio
I .cune. making his second film in
America (after "Once Upon a
Time in the West"), is being
quoted as having said that he is
making a film about Jewish
gangsters "because there are al-
ready too many films with Italian
gangsters."
Leone, who came first to our
attention with the spaghetti
Westerns of the 1960s starring
Clint Eastwood, in his current
effort evidently wants to accen-
tuate the human side that leads
to crime, the misery of the slums
and ghetto, and the ignorance of
the people in the decaying neigh-
borhoods.
Milchan. however, who is
spending a reported sum of S30
million on the "Godfather-like"
epic, hopefully is toning down the
Jewish angle of the film. There is
already enough anti-Semitic pro-
paganda in the world and there is
no need to over-accentuate the
criminal element among the Jew-
ish people.
A few years ago, Menachem
Golan, after the success of his Is-
raeli pictures "Sallah" and "Kas-
ablan," came to Hollywood not to
make a film mirroring the
positive aspects of the Jewish
people but to castigate American
Jewish gangsters. The film,
dealing with the life and death of
the hoodlum Bugsie Siegel ad-
vaneed the theory that Bugs*
chose the way of crime because he
was the product of hnkJ
T\ 5tsmce Busi "3
utterly ruthless in his methods t6
attain wealth and power, there!
was no sympathy for the Jewish I
S 7S?Kr7Vro,n 5" *""
Yet, both Golan and Milchan
seemingly out of sense of fairness
want to prove that Jew, have
their share of bad apples. Neither
one understands what distorted '
films helped to create within the
German mind 50 years ago.
Mel Brooks, aside from his
achievements as comedy
producer, writer, director and
performer, a few years ago
created Brooksfilms Ltd. to ad-
vance new talents in the film in-
dustry. The venture was laun
ched in conjunction with
Britain's EMI with "The
Elephant Man." In association
with Michael Gruskoff, Brooks
produced "My Favorite Year,"
with Richard Benjamin directing,
now in the theaters.
"Frances constitutes Brooks'
third collaboration on a serious
motion picture without him as
star and director. The devastat-
ingly tragic story of Frances
Farmer's life deals with the vears
between 1931 and 1948. through
her final release from a mental
hospital. It is an account of sur-
vival against all odds of a rebelli-
ous young woman who refused to
compromise and achieved a
measure of dignity, in spite of de-
gradation
Under Graeme Cliffords direc-
tion. Jessica l.ange renders a
deeply moving portrayal of the
unhappy actress who was cnici
Red by the Hollywood commu-
nity because she refused to play
the game. Today, cur society
would not likely allow the de*
(ruction of a brilliant performer
for pseudo-moral and political
reasons. We hope that the time
for witchhunts, which caused the.
demise of Frances farmer and
ot her talented artists, is gone for-
ever.
American
Israeli
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Friday, December 31. MM /The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Empire of Mustafa Dude in Is Growing
ByHYAMCORNEY
Undon Chronicle Syndicate
The empire of Mustafa
Jdetois^wing. Hither-
KKttS the Village
^gue in the Hebron area,
[! has now been elected
rhairman of the West Bank
Village League movement
JT whole, which com-
prises Bethlehem, Ramal-
ETjeniii, Tulkarm and
In the western media, Dudein
is portrayed as a puppel of Israel.
True he is willing to negotiate
with the Jewish State- and was
also willing to talk to a group of
West European public relations
experts working on behalf of the
Israeli cause but only because
he believes that this is the best
course of action for the future of
the West Bank.
He does not endorse all the
policies of the Begin Govern-
ment, particularly with regard to
the West Bank settlements. "We
oppose the creation of any new
settlements at present which we
regard as obstacles to peace."
Hardly the words of a "puppet of
Israel."
DUDEIN, a well-built figure
accompanied everywhere by even
better-built colleagues, is a
former minister in the Jordanian
government. He came back to
the West Bank in 1977 after
falling out with King Hussein
and found "severe negligence" in
the area. "There was a shortage
of roads, water, electricity and
medical supplies. Millions of dol-
lars were being given to mayors
who were agents of the PLO but
they passed none of it on to the
villages.
"We came to the conclusion
that we needed a central associa-
tion to save these villages. In
July 1978, we set up the first vil-
lage league in Hebron. We had
harassment from Arab and Jew
alike."
Undeterred by the harassment
or even by the assassination of
the Rama Hah Village League
chairman and his son Dudein
and his colleagues have since
opened 50 miles of roads and 25
schools and have supplied 30 vil-
lages with electricity. I saw for
myself a couple of weeks ago one
of the modern medical centers
built in Tafouah, a village some
four miles form Hebron.
DUDEIN is a pragmatist, as
well as an ambitious political
leader. "The Arabs can't throw
the Jews into the sea, and the
Jews can't throw the Arabs into
the desert," he told me.
"We are telling our citizens
that there is no other choice
except negotiations between Is-
rael and the Palestinian Arabs.
In the coming months, we will
hold a conference of all the village
leagues to find a common lan-
guage and a unified policy, and
then we will call on Israel to start
negotiations.
We hope that Israe will com-
promise on the national demands
of the Palestinians. We recognize
the Israeli State, and **
them to recognize our rights on
our soil."
The leagues claim to represent
some 42.000 people a small but
growing percentage of the
800.000 West Bank Arabs.
Dudein is bitter, not so much
about his "puppet image in the
western media, but rather be-
cause neither the American con-
sulate in East Jerusalem nor the
consulates of Britain or France
give him or the leagues any sem-
blance of encouragement. 1 hey
refuse, in fact, to come and talk
to him.
But Dudein is confident that
the influence of the leagues will
increase as that of the PLO dim-
inishes in the wake of its defeat in
Lebanon.
The threat of the PLO has
declined and in a short time will
be no threat at all."


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fhiJDC Story
Helping Jews Live As Jews
enry Kissinger to Spe*
At Temple Emanu-El
By LISA RUBENSTEIN
On a recent trip to South
Florida. Donald Robinaon. chair-
Ln of the American Jewish
loint Distribution Committee or
me and his wife Sylvia, who
,rvels with him extensively,
Supped by The Jewish Floridian
!Zes to talk about their work.
Robinson had found a disturbing
wit of knowledge among Ameli-
as about the 69-year-old JDC,
which supports life-sustaining
jocial welfare, community de-
velopment, and disaster relief
programs in 30 countries around
[he world. As chairman of an
organization spending $43 mil-
lion on services touching 350,000
people and funded by the United
Jewish Appeal, Robinson ex-
pressed concern that American
jews had no idea where and how
their contributions were being
spent.
To describe the JDC in a nut-
shell or even a full-sized article is
dose to impossible because it
does so many things in so many
places. Primarily seeking to fill
the void in the lives of Jews less
fortunate than those in this coun-
try, the JDC, Robinson says sim-
ply, helps Jews around the world
live as Jews."
Because of the organization,
homes, clothing, kosher kitchen
services, services for the elderly,
Passover kits, and firewood are
available to the 30,000 Jews of
Rumania, all of whom are Holo-
caust survivors whose average
age is 70.
A high level of sophistication
marks JDC projects in Israel. Af-
ter all. the basic needs are filled
by the Israeli government. While
in the past the JDC helped newly
arrived immigrants there, today
it chamDions mental health
plans, rehabilitation centers, and
community development and
manpower training programs.
Community centers with leader-
ship training agendas as well as
an institute studying problems of
the aged are also JDC-sponsored.
The organization supports
Jewish day schools in France to
meet the needs of a large Jewish
population there, and emigrating
Soviet Jews who go to places
other than Israel are maintained
by the JDC until they are settled.
Recently, the organization un-
dertook an enormous effort to
start picking up the pieces in war-
torn Lebanon, where more than
$1 million has already been spent.
The homeless and hungry were
supplied with food, shelter, cloth-
ing, and medicines, and JDC do-
nated bulldozers to get recon-
struction underway. Robinson
ignores criticism that claims JDC
efforts in Lebanon support
propaganda of Israel as guilty for
the problems there. "I don't ac-
cept that," he states bluntly.
The JDC's top priority, Robin-
son says, "is watching those
countries where we think there
might be a Jewish crisis, where a
lot of anti-Semitism exists. If
something happens to Hassan in
Morrocco, for example," he ex-
plains. "18,000 Jews would be in
jeopardy. If Hassan's moderation
were removed, there would be
peril for the Jewish community."
"Tunisia is a country we also
watch closely," he continues.
With the PLO now headquar-
tered there, Jews are in physical
danger."
He goes on. "We also keep our
eyes on Syria, where 4,000 Jews
live as prisoners, unable to leave
or even go from city to city with-
out notifying the police. South
American Jews are also a top
concern."
"Of course," he concludes, "we
are very worried about Jews in
the Soviet Union where they are
suffering a spiritual Holocaust
and blatant discrimination."
If Robinson seems well-in-
ormed on Jewish affairs, it's not
y chance. The angular and easy-
Donald Robinson
going 57-year-old has worked for
more Jewish organizations than
many could name. He's on the
Executive Committee Council of
Jewish Federations, Inc., and is
chairman of the Public Social
Policy Committee Council of
Jewish Federations, Inc. He has
served as a national chairman of
the United Jewish Appeal, a
board of governors member of the
Jewish Agency, and a board of
directors member of United Is-
rael Appeal, to name a few. And
his wife. Sylvia, fills the position
of partner and confidente.
Surprisingly, communist coun-
tries have not posed any obsta-
cles to JDC operations in their
countries. In Rumania, Robinson
says, the organization operates
openly and with the "govern-
ment's blessing." The Hungarian
regime will not officially recog-
nize the JDC but does nothing to
stop it from offering services
through other organizations
either. While communist govern-
ments might not openly accept
official American groups, they
are indeed glad for programs
helping their poor, Robinson
says.
One JDC case history is the
story of the last remaining Jew in
Harbin, China, a city that once
housed 10,000. The financial help
she needs to survive comes from
the JDC's Hong Kong office. A
nine-year-old Jewish boy in Bom-
bay, India is also helped by the
organization. It pays for his
school lunches as he attends an
ORT school there.
The JDC, along with Church
World Service and Catholic Relief
Services, also sponsors the Inter-
faith Hunger Appeal, established
to fight world hunger and of
which Robinson serves as presi-
dent. By working overseas with
people on the grass roots level,
local leaders are organized and
trained to manage development
projects using local resources.
While the group also responds to
emergency situations, the Appeal
is primarily committed to train-
ing people of the Third World to
develop their own agricultural re-
sources.
Robinson, who has been on the
executive committee of the JDC
since 1972, gravitated towards
the organization because of "its
unique approach and great his-
tory," he says. "It accomplishes
things I can see, touch, feel. We
can see results."
The Robinsons spend time
each year in Boca Raton and visit
his father, who lives on Miami
Beach.
Austrian Chancellor Mediated
Between PLO and Israel
Austrian Chancello Bruno Kreisky recently confirmed reports
that he had acted as a mediator between Israel and the Palestine
Liberation Organization over arrangements for the exchange of
prisoners.
In a telephone interview with Austria Radio, Kreisky said
that both parties had requested that he mediate.
Israel Will Continue to Insist
On Normalization With Lebanon
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) Israeli negotiators in talks with
Lebanon will continue to insist that normalization of relations be
a key item on the agenda, although they will not hold out for the
use of that specific term.
At a briefing session Wednesday, Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir and Defense Minister Ariel Sharon instructed the Israeli
team to stand firm on this issue which has already become the
main bone of contention after the opening session of the negotia-
tions in Khalde near Beirut on Tuesday.
The Israeli, Lebanese and American delegations were to have
convened Thursday morning at Kiryat Shmona, the northern
border town, thus setting the pattern for twice weekly meetings
alternating between Lebanon and Israel.
Israeli sources said that they did not expect the wrangling
over the agenda to be ironed out in Thursday's session, it would
probably take longer than that, but presented an upbeat per-
spective of the overall talks, stressing the historic aspect aspect
of Israeli's sitting in direct dialogue with an Arab country,
which they said, transcended the immediate and transient dif-
ferences. In the long run, the talks begun in Khalde this week
should be seen as an important step along the long road of Is-
rael's eventual integration into this area, they added.
On Tuesday, the two sides exchanged draft agendas with Is-
rael, as expected, proposing that the normalization be the first
item of discussion and the Lebanese stressing the withdrawal is-
sue.
Some Israeli observers argued that the influence of Premier
Shaffik Wazzan had perhaps been underestimated. Sharon had
negotiated secretly with men close to Amin Gemayel, the presi-
dent, but the prime minister and other Moslem circles in Beir t
were apparently less eager than Sharon's interlocutors to pro-
ceed toward a normalization of ties with Israel.
Henry Kissinger, 56th U.S.
Secretary of State, will speak at
Temple Emanu-El Thursday,
Jan. 13 at 8 p.m.. opening the
temple's 40th Anniversary 1983
Forum Series. Others to take part
in the series include Roberta Pe-
ters, Marvin Kalb, and Dr. Max
Lerner, Carol Greenberg, temple
president, Ron Wayne and
Edward H. Weiner, chairmen of
the series committee, announced.
As the nation's first Jewish
Secretary of State. Kissinger
served in the cabinets of both
Presidents Gerald Ford and
Richard Nixon. He also served as
assistant to the president for
National Security Affairs.
Upon leaving the Department
of State, Kissinger accepted the
positions of university professor
of diplomacy at the School of
Foreign Service and counselor to
the Center for Strategic and
International Studies, both at
Georgetown University. He is a
director of the Foreign Policy
Association, a counselor of the
Chase Manhattan Bank, a
member of its International
Advisory Committee and a
member of the Council on
Foreign Relations. He also serves
as chairman of the board of
International House, trustee of
the Rockefeller Brothers Fund,
Henry Kissinger
and trustee of the Metropolitan
Museum of Art.
Kissinger received the Nobel
Peace Prize in 1973 and the
Presidential Medal of Freedom,
this nation's highest civilian
award, in 1977.
He is the author of "Nuclear
Weapons and Foreign Policy,"
"Necessity for Choice: Prospects
of American Foreign Policy,"
"White House Years," and "For
The Record: Selected State-
ments."
Miami Holocaust Memorial
Center President Chosen
Harry A. (Hap) Levy has been
named as president of the
Greater Miami Holocaust Memo-
rial Center, Norman H. Lipoff,
president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, announced.
Levy is immediate past presi-
dent of the Federation and has
served as Federation vice presi-
dent, planning and budgeting
chairman, and chairman of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign. He
has worked as a national exe-
cutive committee member of the
UJA, a United Israel trustee, a
vice president of the Council of
Jewish Federations, and a chair-
man of the South Florida Chapter
of American Friends of Hebrew
University. Levy has also served
as president of Temple Emanu-
El, a Mount Sinai Medical Center
trustee, and a vice president of
the Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged.
"Hap's great sensitivity and
interest in continuing Jewish
survival are special qualifications
that make him the ideal choice for
the position," Lipoff said. "I am
confident that his considerable
talents and energy will help
intiate exciting and meaningful
programs for the center."
The Greater Miami Holocaust
Memorial Center has been
founded as a living memorial to
the six million Jews who were
murdered by the Nazis during
World War II. Its offices are
currently housed in the Federa-
tion Building, but a new facility
is expected to be constructed in
the near future to provide a
variety of Holocaust-related
exhibits and educational forums.
Organization and coordination
of the center is being executed
under the United States Holo-
caust Memorial Council, which is
chaired by author and scholar
Elie Wiesel.
"Greater Miami has the second
largest concentration of Holo-
caust survivors in the Diaspora,"
Levy said. "It is, therefore, of
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
crucial importance that this
Jewish community provides a
special memorial to those who
perished in the Holocaust and a
remembrance of Nazi genocide
for generations to come."
Marc Pollick, director of the
Greater Miami Holocaust Memo-
rial Center, announced that a
number of community-oriented
programs will be offered during
the course of 1983 to heighten
awareness and sensitivity about
the Holocaust.
The center is coordinating
South Florida's representation at
the American Gathering of Jew-
ish Holocaust Survivors to be
held April 11-14 in Washington,
D.C., under the auspices of the
United States Holocaust Memo-
rial Council. A steering com-
mittee is now being formed.
A cooperative venture is also
being organized by the center to
provide Holocaust educational
programs in the community, and
a Holocaust Education Coordina-
ting Council has been formed to
be comprised of all groups within
the community involved in Holo-
caust education. A spring
conference for Dade and Broward
public school teachers is planned
as a training workshop for the
Continued on Page 4
eJewisfa Floridian




Miami, FloridaFriday, December 31,1982
Section B


ae Jewish Floridian/ Friday, December 10.1982
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 31,1982
Bonds Reaches $6 Million
in Aid to Israel
NEW YORK (JTA) Cash
receipts of the Israel Bond
Organization since its inception
in 1951 passed the $6 billion mark
following a nation-wide cash
collection effort in honor of Sam
Rothberg, its General Chairman,
for his 40 years of service to
Israel, it was announced here by
Rabbi Leon Kronish, National
Campaign Chairman.
The special campaign, which
began on November 1 produced
more than $91,289,000 in cash.
The $6 billion cash figure was
reached on Tuesday, Decembei
21. Cash receipts of the Bond
Organization for the 1982
campaign, which will be comple-
ted on December 31, are expected
to exceed $500 million.
KRONISH DECLARED:
"This accelerated cash campaign,
which achieved our $6 billion
milestone, was the most
meaningful possible expression of
our deep appreciation to Sam
Rothberg for his leadership of our
organization and his lifetime of
service to Israel. There is not a
single Jewish community in the
United States, Canada, Europe
and Latin America which has not
been touched by his dynamic
leadership and his forcefulness in
behalf of Israel."
Of the $6 billion in Israel
Bonds which have been sold since
1951, a little over $3 billion has
been repaid by the State of Israel.
Every Israel Bond which has
matured has been redeemed fully
and on time, and all interest pay-
ments have been made promptly.
It took 16'/ years for the Bond
Organization to raise the first bil-
lion dollars and only slightly
more than two years to produce
the sixth billion.
New Israel Bonds President
Meets With Miami Leaders
General Yehudah Halevy, the
newly appointed president and
chief executive officer of the
International Israel Bonds
Organization, is currently
visiting Miami to meet with Jew-
ish communal leaders.
General Halevy last served as
League for Israel
Plans Council Meeting
Women's League for Israel will
hold an Open Florida Council
Meeting Friday, Jan. 7 at 10 a.m.
at the LaMer Building, Hallan-
dale.
Anna Neiditz, honorary na-
tional president, will speak, a dis-
cussion will be held on a new
project for Hebrew University
and a second reading of a new
WLI Constitution is planned.
Aventura and LaMer Shalom
chapters will co-host the event.
General Yehudah Halevy
head of the Manpower Division ot
the Israel Defense Forces "where
he established an outstanding
record as an administrator,"
Gary R. Gerson, Greater Miami
general campaign chairman, said.
"He is well equipped to run the
Bonds Organization and we know
that he will do a superlative job."
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THE "SUPERSTAR" OF YIDDISH THEATRE
MARY SOREANU ,
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Lydia
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FOR TICKETS & GROUP SALES CALL 673-8300
Theatre of the Performing Arts, 1700 Washwjlon Aw., Mum Beach 33139
TICjnSONSAlfATJOjy)^
K
*
f\

Dr. Erich Goldhagen, third from left, was the
featured speaker at the opening lecture of
Florida Friends of Yeshiva University's
Issues of Our Times seminar series. Gold-
hagen, a professor at Harvard University's
Associate Harvard Russsian Research
Center, talked on "American-Israel Re-
lations. Joining Goldhagen were seminar
series committee members, from left. Rabbi
Menachem Raab, Rabbi Yaakov Sprung
committee chairman; Rabbi Warren KasztL
Rabbi Barry Konovitch, and Rabbi Max
Lipschutz. The next lecture, "Jewish Medi-
cal Ethics," will be given by Dr. FredRos-
ner, director of medicine at Queens Hospital
Center in New York, to be held Jan. 3 at 8
p.m. at the Konover Hotel.
.'i ..
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theater is almost as much a pan of
the entertainment as the perform-
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Coffee is always right on cue to help
get the good conversation going. A
lively discussion after is a big part of
the enjoyment.
Along with the fun of recalling a
particular scene, a bit of action or
memorable linegoes the
flavor of Maxwell House
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Maxwell House
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niaxT
MMIUfOOM
GraffM/finA
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century 1


Friday, December 31. 1982 /The Jewfeh Florida; Page 3-B
Morris and Helen Spitz
Bonds to Honor Eden Isles Couples
. laidents of Eden Isles in
I fath Miami Beach will celebrate
Lanital Night in Israel in sup-
l-tof the State of Israel Bonds
Itanization on Monday, Jan. 10
Li p.m. in the Eden Isles Play-
Ifoise. Norma Gold, chairman of
|ll* event, announced.
The Israeli Scroll of Honor
Liard will be presented to
likon and Mary Meltzer and
I Horns and Helen Spitz in recog-
I union of participation in Jewish
lanmunal affairs.
The Meltzers have been active
the Zionist movement for
lainv years and also with B'nai
IB nth. Meltzer is on the board of
[factors of B'nai B'rith and Mrs.
Meltzer is a member of Pioneer
Women, ORT and the American
Jewish Congress.
The Spitzes are equally active.
Spitz is vice president of Eastern
Shores B'nai B'rith and served as
president of the Eastern Shores
Civic Association. Mrs. Spitz is a
member of Hadassah and a mem-
ber of the executive committee of
the Miami Region. She has
served as president of her
chapter.
Special guest will be Emil
Cohen, American Jewish
humorist. Honorary chairmen of
the event are Milton and Bert
Samuels.
Jewish Hospital
Groups Set
January Agenda
National Jewish Hospital and
Research Center-National Asth-
ma Center chapters have
scheduled meetings for the
month of January.
First Miami Chapter will meet
Tuesdays, the 11th and 25th, at
the American Savings and Loan
Association, Washington
Avenue.
North Dade-Broward Chapter
will meet Jan. 11 at the California
Club Mall, Ives Dairy Road, at
7:30 p.m.
Breath of Life Chapter will
meet Monday, Jan. 10 at 10 a.m.
at the Bird Bowl Restaurant.
Serendipity Chapter will meet
Tuesday, Jan. 4, at 7:30 p.m.
Lorber Chapter will meet
Tuesday, Jan. 11 at 10:30 a.m.
The speaker will be Walter Dart-
land, consumer advocate.
Swiss Goverment Rejects
Trifa's Bid for Residency
DETROIT (JTA) The
pvemment of Switzerland has
Wormed the U.S. Justice De-
|lrtment that it will not accept
I Archbishop Valerian Trifa of
I Grass Lake, Mich., for residency
in Switzerland, according to a
Import in The Jewish News by
[Alan Hitsky, news editor.
Trifa. who heads the Rumanian
I Orthodox Episcopate in America,
voluntarily accepted deportation
in October rather than continue
I his fight against U.S. charges
I that he lied about his ties to the
I fascist Rumanian Iron Guard
Ithen he entered the U.S. in the
[early 1950s and when he applied
I lor American citizenship.
Women in the
Bible To be Discussed
Tower 41 Study Group is
l^onsoring a lecture series on
I Great Jewish Women beginning
IWednesday at 10 a.m. featuring
IRebbetzin Helen Felman talking
on Outstanding Women of the
I Bible."
Felman was born in Jerusalem
land graduated from Gratz He-
Ibrew Teachers College in Phila-
delphia She has taught in the
[New York Public School system
h well as Yeshivoth. She was
We first president of Brooklyn
[Chapter of Orthodox Jewish
I Congregations of America and a
I former vice president of the Rab-
I Had Council of America.
| Temple Features Brunch
Congregation Bet Breira will
Wd a College Brunch Sunday in
the Social Hall at 11 a.m. Rabbi
| tabachnikoff will attend.
Second trimester adult classes
| "gin Jan. 5.
Young Israel Holds
\beakfast Talk Series
J,un Isel of Sunny Isles
" its Men's Chib will sponsor a
S *Touch the Torah"
M* ToSeries benn"g this
* at 9 a.m., Teddy Gartner,
g^ent' and Charles Skupsky,
J^dub president. "S
Rabbi Rubin Dobin will speak
far n Wisdom <* Maimonides
52" A discu8sion will
I
Under the agreement reached
in Federal District Court in
Detroit, Trifa asked to live in
Switzerland. Allan Ryan, Jr.,
director of the Justice Depart-
ment's Office of Special Investi-
gations, told The Jewish News
that the U.S. "is now making the
inquiries and arrangements to see
if Trifa can go to other coun-
tries," Hitsky reported.
"Switerzland was his first
choice," Ryan said. "Under the
law we were obligated to wait for
that decision." According to
Hitsky, Ryan was reluctant to
discuss the countries that would
be approached or the length of
time it would take. "It will take
some time," Ryan said. "The
decision will have to be made in
the capitals of these countries,
not at their U.S. embassies. It
will take some time, but I am
hopeful it will not be an inor-
dinate amount of time."
Trifa has been accused of being
the leader of the student move-
ment of the Iron Guard and
inciting a pogrom in Bucharest in
January, 1941.
Mary Soreanu stars in a Yid-
dish production of Samuel
Steinberg's "The Showgirl,"
which is part of a celebration
of the 100th birthday of the
Yiddish Theatre in America.
Coming from Broadway, the
musical will run at Miami
Beach Theatre of the Perform-
ing Arts from Jan. 12 through
15 and at Bailey Concert Hall,
Fort Lauderdale, on Jan. 16.
CMC Speaks Out on Jordan
The Community Relations Committee of the Greater Miarr.
Jewish Federation has urged President Reagan to link any a. ins
deal with Jordan to that country's entry into peace talks with
Israel and Egypt. In a telegram to the president, Community
Relations Committee Chairman David Fleeman expressed
dismay about reports that arms talks with Jordan's King
Hussein have not been tied to the status of regional negotia
tions.
"We are disturbed at reports that the issue of Hussein's
entering negotiations is considered unrelated to the question of
the proposed arms sale," Fleeman wrote. "The history of the
region suggests that without an agreement, the ultimate target
of new weaponry will likely be Israel. We urge that there be no
consideration of additional arms to Jordan until she enters the
negotiating process."
Fleeman said Hussein's visit to Washington spotlighted
President Reagan's plan to reinitiate the Mideast peace process.
The king has hesitated, thus far, to assume a leadership role
urged upon him by the Reagan administration, although there
have been indications that he would like to assume that role, he
said.
" More than 60 percent of Jordan's population is Palestinian
with strong kinship ties to the Palestinians of the West Bank
and Gaza Strip," Fleeman said. "Hussein is in a position to
negotiate agreements with other sovereign states, while the
PLO terrorists are committed to the destruction of Israel and
therefore are unacceptable to Israel as negotiating partners."
Fleeman said Hussein is expected to present Reagan with a
list of sophisticated planes and missile systems desired for
Jordan. He added that the king is expected to assure U.S. of-
ficials that these weapons will not be used against Israel, but
solely to protect Jordan against destabilizing elements in the
region, an assurance he has given as part of previous arms deals.
However, U.S. weapons sold to Arab countries were among the
massive caches of arms found in Lebanon after the PLO was
expelled.
Peacekeeping Force to Stay Put
Paula Hyman, dean of the
Seminary College of Jewish
Studies and professor of
Jewish History at the Jewish
Theological Seminary of
America, will be the featured
speaker as part of a Sixth An-
nual Temple Beth Sholom
Sunday Omnibus Series on
Jan. 9, at the temple. Her
topic will be the Holocaust in
Historial Perspective.
PARIS (JTA> France
and the United States have
agreed to maintain their forces in
Lebanon as long as the country's
internal situation warrants it and
to strive to obtain the evacuation
of Israeli, Syrian and PLO forces.
President Francois Mitterrand
and U.S. Secretary of State
George Shultz, who met for close
to three hours here, were reported
to have been in near agreement
on most of the concrete issues
dealing with the Middle East.
The Lebanese situation was
analyzed at length by Shultz and
Defense Minister Charles Hernu.
The two agreed to cooperate
closely in the multinational force
now stationed in Beirut, which
also includes Italian contingents,
and to "seriously consider" any
call by the Lebanese government
for strengthening the MNF*
Hernu later told the press that
Shultz had warned, however,
against involving the MNF in
any operation against any foreign
troops. He said the task of the
MNF must be to support the
government of President Amin
Gemayel "to restore Lebanon's
sovereignty and enforce the
government's authority.
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il Jewish FioridiM/ Friday, D*mbr 10.1982
. ^v i He oewisn r lonaian / Friday, December 31, 1982
Governor Bob Graham visits Lillian Stein, 88, who is
homebound to an efficiency apartment in downtown Miami.
Graham is in the process of visiting infirm, elderly citizens who
participate in United Family and Children's Services'
Operation Mainstream, which serves emotional, psychological,
and basic need* of its clients.
Miami Holocaust Memorial
Center President Chosen
Continued from Page I
new two-week Holocaust curri-
culum which has been accepted
for implementation in Dade
County. The center also is plan-
ning South Florida's first Holo-
caust Education Week which will
involve cultural and educational
events that will culminate in
"Yom Ha'Shoah" (Holocaust
Memorial Day).
The center is continuing to
collect archival material as well
as documents and books for the
establishment of a major Holo-
caust library. Together with Dr.
Helen Pagin of the University of
Miami's Judaic Studies Program,
the center is coordinating and
cataloguing material provided by
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
The Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami is organizing a'
Rabbinical Advisory Council that
will be affiliated with the center.
Plans also have been discussed to
establish a Mayors Advisory
Council, which would be com-
prised of local mayors and
prominent community leaders.
A Journey of Conscience of
Holocaust sites in Eastern
Europe and to Israel is being
planned for the summer of 1983.
Mid rash a Committee
To Feature Author
North Dade Midrasha Com-
mittee of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, continuing its
"Journey Through Culture"
lecture series, will feature Rabbi
Harold S. Kushner, author of
"When Bad Things Happen to
Good People.
To be presented at Beth Torah
Congregation on Jan. 9, the talk
is co-sponsored by Aventura
Jewish Center.
NCJW to Convene
National Council of Jewish
Women, Lakes Division, will hold
a membership meeting Jan. 5 at
10:30 a.m. at Golden Glades
Masonic Lodge, North Miami
Beach.
Fay Schweitzer and
Ginsburg will entertain.
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Friday, December 31, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 6-B
Wedding
jodi Beth Miller, daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
u.rvev Miller oi Miami, and Bradley Steven
SET son of Mr. and M. Richard Weiae of
uami. were married Dec. 26 at Temple Judea.
tobbl Michael B. Eisenstat officiated.
Maid "' honor waa Jodi'a first cousin Hoilis
amer and bridesmaids were Brad's sisters
Ljvl Lisa and Lori Weiaa; Cookie Schachter
^Lo'nSwichkow.
Flowergirls were Laura Cohen and Cheryl Lev-
sithal.
Serving as best man was Hal Brown, while
njhers were Bruce and Stephen Miller, Hal
Kessler. BUI Holliman and Jeff Goliver.
The bride s gown waa designed with silk organza
,! ,dk Venice lace, beaded with pearls.
Jodi received a bachelor's degree in accounting
bom University of Florida and is currently an
accountant for Price Waterhouse.
The groom received a bachelor's degree in
finance from University of Florida and is
currently continuing his studies in accounting at
University of Miami.
1 After a honeymoon in Jamaica, the couple will
settle ui Miami.
Engagement
LABOVITfc- SLOMOVIC
Temple Ner Tamid will
host a kiddush in honor of
the engagement of Shin
Alyssa, daughter of Rabbi
and Mrs. Kugene Labovitz,
to Freddie Slomovic, son of
Dr. and Mrs. Bliezer Slomo-
vic of Los Angeles, Ca.
Mm Bradley Stet en Weiss
Jewish Karate Champions Refused
to Try-Out on Rosh Hashana
By HASKELL COHEN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Two American women
karate champions. both
denied places on the United
States amateur Karate
team for refusing to partici-
pate on tryouts scheduled
lor Rosh Hashanah. have
won federal court orders
that they be accepted as
full team members.
Lea Sukenik of New York City
and Pam (i laser of Newton.
Mass.. both had advised the
Karat* Vssoi .ation that, as ob-
ervant Jews, they could not join
the tryouts Became both were
national title winners, they were
told they would be (liven special
consideration far membership.
The U S. team will #. r_o Taiwan
tor the international champion-
ibip competition Nov 27-28
BIT THE Amateur Athletic
Union VA1 |, which runs the
tram, refused to abide bv the
promise and the two women
champions took their case to the
federal courts.
On Monday, Federal District
Court Judge Robert Carter in
New York City and Federal Court
Judge Rya Zobel in Newton
ordered the two athletes be ac-
cepted as full participating U.S.
team members.
Sukenik. a graduate of the
Beth Jacob Yeshiva of Forest
Hill. NY., and of Brooklyn Col-
lege, has been an instructor in a
karate school of Brooklyn She
now teaches at the Shokotan
Karate Institute in Forest Hills
GLASER WON" a place on the
I S team in floor competition
-aI years ago Experts con-
sider her one of the lies- in the
nation
The suit forGlaserwas Bled
Vmerican Jewish Congress
. in Boston. Sh<
that -h>- had notified the \ \L
itedly about her relig
iked tor a reschedul-
ing ol the tryouts.
Technion Institute
Offical to be
Honored Here
Carl Alpert. executive vice
chairman of the Technion-Israel
Institute of Technology Interna-
tional Board of Governors, will be
the speaker and guest of honor at
a luncheon on Jan. 12 at the
Konover Hotel sponsored bv the
Greater Miami Chapter of
American Technion Society,
Gerald Engel, chapter president,
announced.
A native Boslonian who has
lived and worked in Israel for 30
years. Alpert is an internation-
ally syndicated columnist in the
Anglo-Jewish press and the
author of a book on the history of
Technion. Alpert has served for
26 years as the university's direc-
tor ot public affairs.
Sunday Talk Planned
Temple Beth Sholom's Coffee.
Culture, and Conversation series
will feature speaker, Bill Saulson,
Head Star counselor, who will
talk on "Outlook for Soviet
Jewry in 1983."
The program will be held
Sunday at 10:30 a.m.
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Dr. Ivor Fix, chairman of the
Department of Radiation
Therapy of Mount Sinai
Medical Center, and Bee Katx,
Women's Cancer League vice
president, are shown at a
WCL cocktail buffet held
recently honoring donors.
Talk On Klan Planned
Greater Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee will
present Jerry Thomson, author of
My Life in the Klan and reporter
for the Nashville Tennessean who
lived undercover with the group
for a year, Wednesday, Jan. 12 at
Temple Beth Am at 7:30 p.m.
Thompson will speak after a
film, "The New Klan"' is shown.
Zohara To Have Film
Zohura Chapter of Hadassah
will meet Monday, Jan. 10 at
12:30 p.m. at Aventura Jewish
Center. Dr. Michael Leinwand,
executive director of the Zionist
Organization of America, South-
east Region, will present a film,
"Jerusalem, City of Peace."
Elections for a nominating
committee will follow.
Betty Kestenbaum of North
Miami Beach, president of
Miami Beach Region of
Hadussuh, participated 08 ii
Hadassah delegate in the 30th
World Zionist Congress in
Jerusalem. She is pictured
it a tiding in front of a intrtrait
of Theodor Henl, founder of
the Zionist movement.
Galil Sets Agenda
Gali! Chapter ol Vmerican
\i tchi Women will bold a
ah Luncheon on Sum
Jan Rest auranl VI ami Beach.
\ um u heduled
ind 24.
One Week Left To Ponevez Dinner
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"Children's Village''
Sunday, January 9. 1983/24th of Teveth
THE CROWN HOTEL
Collins Avenue and 40th Street, Miami Beach
RABBI PHINEAS A WEBERMAN
Honor ee
1 BO Hack, Chairman
t'.manuel b.delslein, Co-Chairman
Rabbi David Lehrfield
Guest Speaker
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-T3&-ZF1T
me Jewwfa Fkmdian/ Friday, December 10. 1982
iPiuun m i
Png*--> B -The .jota-ish Floridian Friday. December !H. 198J
I
Bond Pledges Were Made at Area Events MQgt us mth miah ^ I
Performed by Religious Law
North Dade-South Broward New Leadership
Division, State of Israel Bonds Organization,
held an evening cruise aboard the Southwind
to pledge support for Israel's economic
development through the purchase of Israel
Bonds Pledging support for the Sabra
Society, representing a minimum $1,000pur-
chase, were, from left, Drew and Sherry
Pichard, chairmen; Gary and Sandy Dix, co-
chairmen and Roberta and Larry Gotlieb,
regional chairmen.
=1 |
Ir )i k 1 aW 1 w^mmm^^ *
^H H a I
^H fl^ si
r< flB Mr-"
1
t
JSmir* --- V^^al ^m ML.1**' *1 ** ^
\A
Residents of Maison Grande, Miami Beach,
celebrated an annual Salute to Israel on
behalf of the State of Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion where amounts were pledged for the
purchase of Israel Bonds. From left, are,
Louis and Elsie Friedman and Sidney and
Birdie Bernbaum, co-chairman; and Bea and
Meyer Levinson, chairmen of the event.
Brandeis To Host MI)
Brandeis District, Zionist
Organization of America, will
feature guest speaker. Dr. Henry
Weisberger Sunday. Jan. 9 at
1:30 p.m. at Miami Beach Civic
Center.
Weisberger*s subject will be
"Misuse of Medicine by Senior
Citizens," Louis Hoberman,
Brandeis District president, an-
nounced.
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Mali* ANdMCk* NyHllH"THJWtH FLORIOIAN")
P.O. tt-tm. Miami, PkirMa M1
laMamarvvMa
By BEN GALLOB
(Copyright 1982, Jewish
Telegraphic Agency, Inc.)
A founder of the Brith Milah
(ritual circumcision) Board of
America estimates that as many
as 80 percent of the circumcision
which virtually all American
Jews arrange for their newborn
sons are not done in accordance
with Jewish religious law.
Rabbi Eugene Cohen, who is
also coordinator of the Brith
Milah Board of New York, said
the figure was a "guesstimate"
since he knew of no study on the
subject. But, he added, his
"guesstimate" was based on ob-
servations of laymen, rabbis and
mohelim (ritual circumcisers)
throughout the United States.
Cohen said the most common
deviation from halacha is the ten-
dency, which he said was growing
since World War II, by parents
to have their sons circumcised in
the hospital before the mandated
eighth day. He said that while
the rite must be postponed when
it must not be done for medical
reasons, a halachically-valid cir-
cumcision may not be done before
the eighth day.
He pointed out that, before the
war. the maternity in-hospital
convalescence period lasted as
long as 10 days "so parents
would automatically decide to
have the circumcision on the
proper day." He added that such
a decision also was convenient
because many hospitals provided
or made arrangements for the
services of a mohel in a special
room for that purpose.
Now. however. Cohen declared,
mothers usually go home on the
third or fourth day after delivery.
Parents have to make a conscious
choice to postpone the circumci-
sion rite until a number of days
after the mother and son have left
the hospital. Their choice, the
rabbi said. "Is not always" an
automatic decision to postpone.
Cohen commented that "hav-
ing just entrusted their lives and
the lives of their newborn babies
to their physicians, many moth-
ers feel that a circumcision per-
formed in the hospital by that
same physician would be a safer
one in the event that complica-
tions arise." He said their atti-
tude is: what difference do a few
days make, anyway??
He declared that the difference
is that there is no difference be-
tween a circumcision performed
for religious reasons "before the
eight day" and a purely medical
circumcision" halachically,
both are "not kosher."
Cohen said he has received an-
guished calls from young Jews
seeking to live a more religiously
observant life who want to know
whether the cicumcisions per-
formed on them as infants were
"halachically valid." Cohen
pointed out that some Jewish
parents may not be aware that
the roots of Brith Milah are reli-
gious, and not just health, social
and ethnic. He said those parents
need consicousness raising.
He stressed that few parents
realize how rare complications are
from circumcision. He quoted a
finding by Dr. Elliott Leiter, a
practicing pediatric urologist and
chief of urology at New York
City's Beth Israel Medical Center
that ritual circumcision, "when
expertly performed by a trained
mohel, has a minor complication
rate of less than 0.13 percent."
Leiter has added that "most of
these complications consist of ex-
cessive bleeding," which can be
corrected without permanent af-
tereffects.
Cohen stressed that people are
seldom aware of the 'incredible'*
safety record that certified
mohelim have maintained He
said mohelim are trained by the
"preceptor" method, by which
the mohel observes performance
of a great many circumcision be
fore he is allowed to perform one.
Even when the new mohel is
ready. Cohen explained, he learns
the technique "in stages "and he *<
is under expert supervision
Cohen said that "a mohel may
have performed 1,000 circumci-
sion and still be considered a be-
ginner by the Board when he
seeks certification."
The New York Brith Milah
Board, which he said has served
as a model for similar organiza-
tions in other parts of the United
States, Canada and even Israel,
certifies mohelim, and thus
fosters high standards for the
profession. The Board is affi-
liated with the New York Board
of Rabbis, a subvention agency of
the Federation of Jewish Philan-
thropies.
Cohen said that, in deviating
from halacha. Jewish mothers
may also allow non-medical,
pragmatic considerations sur-
rounding circumcision to affect
their decisions. He said they may
feel that a hospital circumcision
is preferable because the) are in
"too weakened a condition" to be
hostess to a party in their home-
so soon after delivery, and 1
cause their homes are too small
for such festivities
Since the tradition of holding a
festive gathering after a brith
milah is as old as the rite itself
Abraham's party for Isaac.
Cohen remarked, was the first
catered affair in Jewish history
the rabbi insited that concerns
of mothers about such practical
difficulties be taken seriously.
He suggested that "a prag-
matic and desirable solution
would be a return to the practice
of having the circumcision per-
formed in the synagogue." add
ing that this practice was be-
coming much more common in
the United States among mem
bers of all branches of Judaism
He said most synagogues have
facilities for collations, removing
one additional burden from the
recuperating mother.
He said another advantage of
synagogue circumcision is that a
greater number of guests can be
invited and a relationship be
tween the family and the syna-
gogue community is strength
ened. The synagogue, he as
serted. is where the "kedusha
(holiness) of the ceremony right-
fully belongs."
Joseph Teicher, new president
of Haifa University in srae
and Mrs. Teicher w,U wj*
South Florida Jewish com
munity leaders Jan. 7 throagh
11, Edmund Abmmson. pre*
dent of the South Florida
chapter of the **<"?.
Fronds of Haifa University.
announced.


PLO Propaganda Infiltrates
United Nations Women's Conference
Friday, December 31.1982 / The Jewish Floridian PageT-B
NEW YORK (JTA) -
A charge that the United
Nations "Decade for Wom-
en" activities have been
hijacked" by PLO sup-
porters and sympathizers
was made here in a position
paper released by the Na-
tional Jewish Community
Relations Advisory Coun-
cil.
The nationwide coordinating
council expressed fear that the
Decade's final conference, sched-
uled for Nairobi in 1985, might be
marked by attempts "to mani-
pulate the conference" by "forces
indifferent and even inimical to
women's programs" as were the
Decade's two previous confer-
ences.
THE NJCRAC position paper
pointed out that the Decade ac-
tivities, launched in Mexico City
in 1975 to improve the status and
condition of women, had become
"deeply politicized," and
'despite its lofty ideals," have
been "in large part subverted as
yet another vehicle for the PLO
and Soviet bloc propaganda at
the expense of women."
It noted that the 1975 Interna-
tional Women's Year Conference,
which launched the Decade, "is
remembered, in many quarters,
less for its significant achieve-
ments on behalf of women, than
for the adoption of the Declara-
tion of Mexico which equated
Zionism with racism.
The Mexico City Conference
marked the beginning of the in-
tensive assaults against Israel
and the democratic Western na-
tions in United Nations confer-
ences. In fact, that conference be-
came a forum for vituperative
attacks by those governments
which suppress women most
against those countries whose
freer atmosphere permits women
to improve their status."
CONTINUING, the NJCRAC
statements said: "As outragous
las the Declaration of Mexico was,
I the working document, The
World Plan of Action, adopted
.separately, was not contaminated
with the anti-Zionist venom
which was contained in the Dec-
laration of Mexico. The World
Plan of Action was, therefore,
used as a basis for a U.S. Nation-
al Plan of Action, supported by
the women's movement and
many in the Jewish community.
"Unfortunately, the 1980 Mid-
Decade Conference in Copen-
hagen began where the Declara-
tion of Mexico left off. From the
outset of preparations for Copen-
hagen, procedural rules were
ignored and extraneous politial
considerations were allowed to
dominate. Parliamentary
Drocedure was disregarded when
Irvin W. Katz \i i
College Admission
Counseling'
School Selection and
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Aptitude Testing.
Career Guidance.
Test Preparation:
S.A.T./L.S.A.T.
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it did not meet the needs of those
who had hijacked* the confer-
ence, namely, the PLO and their
Arab and Soviet bloc allies.
"Waiving all the rules, an offi-
cial conference document rewrit-
ing the history of Palestine and
Israel and viciously slandering
the Jewish people was accepted
as a basic reference for the con-
ference. It was prepared by the
UN Economic Commission for
Western Asia (ECWA) composed
primarily of Israels hostile
neighbors who had denied Israel
her rightful membership in that
body."
IN ADDITION, the Copen-
hagen conference not only
equated Zionism with racism, but
also provided that "United Na-
tions aid to Palestinian women
should be given in consultation
and cooperation with the PLO"
items strongly opposed by the
United States, the NJCRAC
Emanuel Edelstein, pictured,
will co-chair Friends of
Poneuez Yeshiva's Annual
Dinner Sunday, Jan. 9 at the
Crown Hotel Rabbi Abraham
Kahaneman, president of
Ponevez Yeshiva, will attend;
Rabbi Phineas Weberman will
be guest of honor; and Rabbi
David Lehrfield will be the
guest speaker.
Yiddish Writers to
Be Highlighted
Yivo Committee of Greater
Miami, as part of a 36th lecture
series, will present Yehudah
Elberg, scholar, author, and
journalist from Montreal, on
Wednesday, Jan. 12 at Temple
Beth Sholom at 1 p.m.
To be spoken in Yiddish, his
lecture will be on Chaim Grade
and Rochel Korn, writers of
modern Yiddish. Selected read-
ings from their work will be
recited by Rose Lusky.
statement said.
However, it continued, "des-
pite the outrages perpetrated at
Copenhagen and, for that matter,
in many other United Nations
agencies, critical participation
remains a part of our own ap-
proach to the Women's Decade."
But past experience with the
Decade's activities "leads us to
fear that, at the third and final
conference scheduled for Nairobi
in 1985, similar attemps to mani-
pulate the conference will be
made for their own political pur-
poses by forces indifferent and
even inimical to women's pro-
grams," the NJCRAC position
paper charged.
IT NOTED that during the
first stages of planning for Nai-
robi at the Vienna UN Conference
on the Status of Women earlier
this year the U.S. "played a more
forceful hand and in some cases
blunted the most radical initia-
tives of those antagonistic to
both Israel and the United
States. However, the Vienna
planning conference once again
adopted the proposed inclusion of
Palestinian women as a major
agenda item and included several
anti-Zionist resolutions, thereby
demonstrating that the planning
process for 1985 remains under
the control of the same anti-dem-
ocratic forces."
The NJCRAC's concerns were
expressed to Nancy Reynolds,
President Reagan's representa-
tive to the UN Commission on
the Status of Women. The Jewish
group called on the U.S. govern-
ment to "use its excellent
resources to overcome disruptive
exploitation of women's issues"
in future UN Women's Decade
activities.
The NJCRAC statement's re-
lease was timed to coincide with
the fifth anniversary of the U.S.
National Women's Year Confer-
;nce in Houston, Texas the
American convocation which de-
veloped a "Plan for Action for
Women" for the United States.
The policy paper was prepared by
NJCRAC's Ad Hoc Committee
on the United Nations, chaired
by Shirley Joseph, of Buffalo,
New York.
Temple to Have Revue
Mr. and Mrs. Social Club of
Temple Adath Yeshurun will
feature the musical revue, "Off
Broadway" with Tony and
Company Sunday, Jan. 9 at 7:30
p.m.
All proceeds will benefit the
Temple Endowment Fund.
American 'Jewish Mother'Syndrome
Not Found in Israeli Literature
NEW YORK (JTA) An
Israeli writer has asserted that
"in Israeli literature there is no
'Jewish mother' like the one that
exists in American Jewish fic-
tion." That is the view expressed
by Rochelle Furstenberg in
Volume 40 of the Jewish Book
Annual, published by the JWB
Jewish Book Council.
She writes in "Images of
Woman in Israeli Literature,"
that "One searches in vain for
Sophie Portnoy in Israeli litera-
ture. In contrast to the notorious
involvement of many Jewish men
with their mothers, Israeli male
writers seem to be 'hung up' on
their fathers."
She added that "this is due, in
part, to the fact that, in compari-
son with the emasculating Mrs.
Portnoy, the ambitions and
energies of Israeli women have
out of necessity been less directed
to their children's success and
more to the general demands of
survival under difficult con-
ditions."
Jacob Kabakoff, the Annual's
editor, reported other articles and
studies in the tri-lingual volume
cover a wide range of literary
subjects and personalities. These
include Midrashic material;
Canadian Jewish writers; and
Jewish "Samizdat," under-
ground material in the Soviet
Union.
Kabakoff reported also that
Volume 40 includes a cumulative
index for volumes 26-40; and
seven bibliographies of 934 works
of Jewish interest in English,
Yiddish and Hebrew published
during 1981-82 in North America,
Israel and Europe.
He noted that Elias Canetti.
who won the 1981 Nobel Litera-
ture Prize, is a Bulgarian-born
Sephardic Jew and commented
on the variety of literary forms in
which Canetti has distinquished
himself. Kabakoff declared that
"Canetti affirms his Jewish
background and views Jewish
persecution as a symbol of the
depravity to which the untram-
meled use of power can lead
mankind."
Einstein Archives
Moved to
Hebrew University
NEW YORK (JTA) The
Albert Einstein Archives, con-
taining 43,000 documents includ-
ing much of the scientist's cor-
respondence and more than 30
unpublished scientific manu-
scripts, has been transferred to
its ultimate home at the Hebrew
University of Jerusalem.
Scholars at the university will
immediately begin work with the
papers, said Prof. Reuven Yaron,
who has overall charge of the
archives.
Since Einstein's death in 1955,
the papers were housed at the
Institute for Advanced Studies in
Princeton, N.J., where the scien-
tist spent the last years of his life.
They were flown to Jerusalem a
week ago. According to Yaron,
the Hebrew University will
undertake the preparation of a
detailed catalogue of the contents
of the archive which, he said, he
hoped will be published by
Princeton University Press.
rurtia'i Mitt Ctapltlt Iifliik-Itwiik kit
Prints In KnglUh
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se Jewish Fkatdmn/ Friday, Dacamber 10.19H2
.
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridisn / Friday. December 31,1982
S1ART OFF 1983 WITH A BANG!
Make a resolution!
Sh
I I
ITEMS AND PRICES GOOD
DEC. 30-JAN. 5, 1983
Pantry Pride
and Save!
EMPEROR
cPiIde
COLD DOCK. WHTlT OR PINK
750 ML BTl. ___._
OR.
Andre ci /offfl
Champaqne
(SMC SI 00)
SAVE
TAYLOR CHABLlS CMENIN BLANC FRENCH COLOMBARO
RHINE ROSE OR BUROUNOY
California Cellars & 4.991 oo
Sangria.........'"."2.99 eo
LAM8RUSCO AND BIANCO
CeftaWlne......,s. 4.99100
TAYLOR NEW YORKWHITE PINK OR COLD DUCK
Champagne.....'*& 6.99140
PAUL MAS90N-CHA8LIS OR ROSE
Light Wine......".7l4.99 so
750-ml BTL.
LAMBRUSCO. ROSATO. BIANCO
Riurute ^r%QQ
Wines ttS2"
(SAVE 1.00)
6 PK. 12-OZ. BTLS. REG. OR LIGHT
STROH^S
(SAVE70C)
HALF OAL. ASSORTED FLAVOR?
SEALTEST
Ice Cream
$199
(SAVE 80C)
FROZEN
OOWNVFlakE BUTTERMILK OR HOMEMA0E SAVE
Waffles..........% .79 20
PANTRY PPJOE-REG OAPW
Lemonade.....2 28 1.00 ie
SNACK TRAY
Jam's Pizza.....''.31.89 20
PANTRY PBKJE-PLA* EGG OR
Onion Bagats ...W. .59 20
-HEALTH & BEAUTY?
AMkaSattBar.....^1.87 72
FAST PAn RE lit f
Bayer Aspirin ...'Sl 1A7 62
UpUO
PaptoBismol.....^2.17 62
GEL MINT REG
tube l.lf 52
CONC-liONE on ____
"1.27 42
FIRM, RIPE. SALAD SIZE
U.S. MO. 1 ALL PURPOSE WHITE
Tomatoes Potatoes
BONC.
BUY
6
IN
PXO:
39
g
*
FRESH CUT-ASSORTED COLORS
Floral Bouquet............. 1.69
CRISP ANOCRUNCHV u PICK
Groan Poppers ........... .49
LOWELL S GARDEN FRESH
Btackayed
NORTHWEST EXTRA LARGE I '0 SIZE
Anjou Pears..............LB .59
flavorful and refrf.shmg
Sunkhst Lemons
10 0* M
pkg .W
,5S .79
>79
BAG ^^
GAROEN FRESH-CRISP AND TENDER
Green Cabbage...........lb .19
U S NO I ALL purpose U PICK
Yellow Onion*............lb .19
TOPS IN VITAMiN A
Garden Freeh Carrots 2, .59
ADO JEST TO SALADS-FRESH
Florida Avocados......2 for .8g
KRAFT -Pl>RE ORANGE and
Pineapple Juice.......
"1.89
7-OZ. BAG REG. OR LIGHT
GROCERIES
WISE
6 PAK 12-OZ. CAN
Chips
EARTH S FST SOFT DRINK
i ei i lei
CANADA ORY REGULAR OR DIET (PLUS DEP p
rale.....
I REGULAR OR OP
I
PANTRY PPJOt
rrena
l SoloP
SWEETHEART IMAGE 10'. KCh
HEMZ om OR
Beer $159
(SAVE 40C)
I
SAVE
13 Ol
BTL
.69
3 1 LTR
wr b'l
PANTRY
36
'bag .79 20
.89
.89 20
2oz
BAGS
SAVE
GOOONUFF-REGULAR OR UNSALTED
Dry Roasted Peanuts 1.49 64
VALLEY
wiarascnino v^nemaa jar >ov 1 o
OCEAN SPRAY 46 02 JUG REGULAR OR LOW CALORIE
Cranberry Jiaca Cocktai 1.59 20
SMALL PJPE
~1.09 12
20CT
, PKG
."pro 1.89 .10
PANTRY PWOe
EUackeyed
PANTRY PRK3E
18 OZ BTLS
PANTRY PPAOt-ASSORTEO GRWOS
Coffee..........
STONE GROUND HORSERADISH
JAR fV
.PACK 1.39
..21.89
20 jar rw
30
10
20
10
SACRAMENTO I202 CANS
SUNSHWE
HIHo
PANTRY PROS
Snackl
NON OAWY COFFEE CREAMER
.......CAN
....3 c5a2s1.00 .09
.... 3^1.00 .10
....s&um 14
...."i .89 30
....el .59 10
iboz
, JAR
.64
$-129
COKE*
2 LTR. M.R. BTLS.
TAB. SPRITE.
SCHWEPPES.
GINGERALE OR
8-OZ. SOCIALBLES. B'/j-OZ. SWISS CHEESE,
9V-OZ. TRISCUITS. 10-OZ. BOX WHEAT THINS
(SAVE 34C)
NABISCO
Snack ^ */
Crackers
QQc


From Counter to Counter
pantry Pride is fighting
inflation! At the Checkout
Counter, the Grocery
Counter...
PEN NEW YEAR'S EVE
UNTIL 9p.m.
PEN NEW YEAR'S DAY
9a.m.7p.m.
Friday, December 31, 1982 / The Jewish FloridUn Page 9-B
. ,. ,
the Meat Counter... all over
the store! We have
Special
Prices...

^Special
Savings!
PERFECT PARTNER
SPECIAL PRICE
FLAVORFUL
NUTRITIOUS
FRESH
Mushrooms Sirloin Steakl
^^^ U.S. CHOICE BEEF LOIN
99* s $1"
POUND
U.S. CHOICE BEEF BLADE
Chuck
Roast
U.S. CHOICE GEN. AMER.
Lamb Shoulder
$-139
1
PORTERHOUSE STEAK LB. 2.99
U.S. CHOICE BEEF BLADE
Chuck
Steak
$149
1
LB.
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
3 BREASTS & 3 LEG QTRS. W/BACKS. 3 GIB. PKS.)
(3 BREASTS & 3 LEG QTR!
tan Chops $199 {fc,B49<
U.S. CHOICE GENUINE .^^ ir -wm-wm AMERICAN SHOULDER BLADE
TYSON ALL VARIETIES 12-OZ.
s& -si79 asr *&
Quick
FAMILY PAK MEATS
SAVE WHEN YOU BUY 3 LBS. & OVER
us choice genuine amefbcan
Lamb Shoulder
Bade Chops............... 1.69
FlOROA 0R SHIPPEO PREMIUM FRESH
"GhS BREASTS DRUMSTICKS
Fryer
Combo Package........... 1.19
fV CXOCE BEEF CMOCK
Blade Chuck
8toak.....................1.39
U S CMOCE BONELESS BEEF CHUCK
Steak
1.89
U S CHOICE BONELESS
Stowing
1.89
PANTRY PRIDE
Jl Bet-
Franks
99*
12-OZ.
PKG.
SERVICE DELI
Genoa Salami...........n.1.99
IT' CA'tRING
'OkeyBraatt..........mal.1.89 29
*0SHtps,l4MIOB
Bologna................."SUM 20
SMOKED
'urkey Breast...........ll 1.19
AVAILABLE AT STORES HAVING SERVICE DELI COUNTERS
SAVE
19
SAVE
Jarisberg Cheese....... lb1.99 78
Egg & Potato Salad......lb .99 10
HOT FOODS'
g"C-.XE PARE
""fctfBeef..............HAtB2.79
***ed Salami........."S 1.39
s*iss Cheese..........MAte1.89
''fc OR
*"*dcan Cheese......"*S1.49
10
39
10
29
10
AVAILABLE AT STORES HAVINQ FRESH BAKERIES
Kaiser Rods...........8 for .79 39
RyeBread..... .........."1.39 20
STRuSSEL 'OP mt*
CoffeeCake..............1. 20
Giazed Donuts..........ooz1.79 20
OVEN FRESH QQ
French Coconut Pie.....u 1.119 10
cPilde
DAIRY-DELI
i>:
TROPICANA PURE CHILLED FLORIDA
Orange $-|49
Jinoe/jA?
HALF GAL. V^i'
Oa #
PANTRv PRIDE ^"^
Sour Cream------
'6 0Z 7A
. CUP 1"
aioum* AbsonTEo flavors ibuv get i freei
Soft Cheese........... 1.69
ASsORIEO FLAVORS-8 07 CONTAINERS
Dean's Dips.........2 for .99
BOROENS-COLOREO OR WHITE
American Singles .... ^ 1.89
MAGGiO
, cont 2.79
Ricotta Cheese
SILVER FLOSS
Sauerkraut
59
2 LB. BAG
BAKERY
SAVE
SELF SERVICE
PANTRY PRIOE
Rye Bread------
16 IN PKGlMEVEfl S FIBRE or
Raisin Muffins 2>. .99 59
LOAF ,oy 10
AUNT HANNA
4 ROLLS 7Q
IN PKG /> 20
.'SS .89 .20
.'&E1.29 20
Jelly Rolls.....
AOlER SJEWISH
Rye Bread ...
VELVETS CREME
Glazed Donuts
A A C ONON ROLLS OR
Italian SpoJettes..... .78 is
PANTRY PRIDE (PKG. OF 8) t^fflfj
Hot Dog g*
(SAVE49C) +*' J^


Jt.wu.fa Fioridian/ Friday, December
10.1982
me.
/
Page 10-B The Jewish Fioridian/ Friday, December 31.1982
\
Professor Challenges Belief That
UJSL-Maraeli Relations are Strained
Book Group to Discuss Israel, E^ypt
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The common per-
ception since the start of
Israel's "Peace for Galilee"
operation last June is that
Israel and the United
States are at loggerheads
and are drawing apart. This
is a view that has been en-
couraged by the statements
of some Israeli and Ameri-
can officials and of course,
the press.
But at a panel discussion on
"U.S. Influence in a Changing
Middle East" during the Ameri-
can Enterprise Institute's recent
Public Policy Week, this view
was challenged by Robert
Tucker, a professor of interna-
tional relations at Johns Hopkins
University's School of Advanced
International Studies in Wash-
ington.
NOTING THAT the Reagan
Administration has taken a
basically passive attitude toward
the actions of the government of
Israeli Premier Menachem Begin,
Tucker said that Israel has not
been perceived in Washington as
pursuing policies which are seen
as "fatal to American interests."
But. he added, "where that point
comes, and particularly if it in-
volves oil_you yyitt see very dif-
ferent behavior on the part of any
government, any government, in
Washington."
Tucker noted that while Israel
is both an asset and a liability to
(he U.S., it has been mostly an
asset. He stressed that when the
war in Lebanon ended "the
American position in the Mideast
was a good deal stronger than it
had been before."
A "lack of congruence" be-
tween Israel and the U.S. would
"become very apparent," Tucker
argued, if King Hussein of
Jordan "shows up at that famous
negotiating table" as President
Reagan has urged in his Septem-
ber 1 peace initiative and if the
Begin government then main-
tains its intransigent opposi-
tion" to the Reagan proposals.
This "could have very serious
consequences," Tucker warned,
adding, "before that occurs the
argument is largely in the ab-
stract."
TUCKER ALSO did not ap-
pear to be too much concerned
about Israel's refusal to heed
Reagan's plea for a freeze on the
establishment of Jewish settle-
ments on the West Bank. He said
that while the Arab states attach
significance to the Palestinian
issue they did not see it as "that
significant" that they would en-
danger American and European
interests in the Persian Gulf.
On this point, there was sharp
disagreement from Tucker's col-
league at SAIS, Fouad Ajami,
who is director of Middle East
studies at the school. While
saying that he agreed that the
Arabs do not care about the Pal-
estinians, Ajami said they do
care about having their weakness
"put on display." He said that if
this continues it could threaten
Beth Din Offico
Of Florida /
RABBI
DR TinORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and loreign
countries.
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Tel 534 1004 or 672 0004
U.S. interests in the Persian
Gulf.
The panel discussion was
based on a paper by Judith Kip-
per and Harold Saunders, AE1
resident fellows. Saunders, As-
sistant Secretary of State for
Near Eastern and South Asian
Affairs in the Carter Administra-
tion, in outlining the paper
stressed the need for the U.S. not
only to deal with Mideast gov-
ernment but also to take into
account the various groups
within a country which that
country's government has to
satisfy. Insensitivity to the con-
stituencies upon which govern-
ments depend can undercut them
and damage U.S. interests," he
warned.
SEVERAL PERSONS present
suggested that this view might
encourage interference in the in-
ternal affairs of other countries.
Saunders rejected this. He said
that in dealing with democracies
like Israel, any thing the U.S.
does tend to create an internal
debate as is occuring now with
Reagan's peace initiative.
But he said all governments
have constituencies and this
should be taken into account as a
"fact of life." He stressed that
the U.S. must be able to under-
stand what a government is able
to do before it is asked to do
something.
Community Corner
Mount Sinai Medical Center's Women's Cancer League will
hold a 24th annual fundraising luncheon Jan. 11 at the Fon-
tainebleau Hotel.
The Epilepsy Foundation of South Florida will meet
Wednesday in the First Floor Conference Room of the Mam
Building of South Miami Hospital from 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Dr. Hubert L. Roeomoff, chairman of the department of
Neurological Surgery, University of Miami School of Medicine,
received the Jeremiah J. Fix Award for contributions and
service to rehabilitation from Dade County Chapter of the
Florida Rehabilitation Association.
Opti-Mrs. of Miami Beach will meet at Harbour House
South, Bal Harbour, on Jan. 12 for a luncheon. Al Rantel of
WNWS radio will speak.
Miami Beach Symphony, Alfredo Munar, conductor, as
part of a Winter Concert Series, will perform with cellist and
arranger David Heiss, who will play the Saint-Saens Cello
Concerto. The concert will be held Jan. 9 at the Theatre of the
Performing Arts.
B'nai B'rith Sholem Lodge 1024 will have a Past Presidents
Dinner Jan. 9.
"How To Get the Most from Your Medication" will be
discussed at a Mount Sinai Medical Center's Lung People Club
meeting Jan. 3 at 1:30 p.m. in the Wolfsoh Auditorium.
A series of workshops for families with cult or missionary
problems will be conducted under the sponsorship of the Jews
for Jews Organization starting Jan. 5.
Hebrew Academy
Adopts Free
Lunch Policy
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy of Greater
Miami has adopted a policy for
free and reduced price meals for
children unable to pay the" full
price of the meals served under
the National School Lunch
Program.
Family size income criteria for
determining eligibility has been
adopted by the school.
Ner Tamid Sisterhood
To Have Book Review
Temple Ner Tamid Sisterhood
will have a Book Review and
Luncheon Tuesday at 10:30 a.m.
in the Louis and Goldie Cohen
Chapel. Arlene Ditchek and Lana
Goldberg will review "An Orphan
in History," by Paul Coward.
The luncheon will be held at
noon in the Sklar Auditorium,
Essie Glickman, chairman, and
Mollie Frankel, co-chairman,
announced.
STUDIO
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closed Mondays
Harriet Green, national vice
president and Florida Council
president of Pioneer Women Na-
A'mat, will explore Israeli-Egyp-
tian relations at a Great Jewish
Books Discussion Group meeting
on Thursday at 1:30 p.m. at the
Miami Beach Public Library.
She will review the book,
"Egypt and Israel," written by
Howard Sachar, professor of
modern history at George Wash-
ington University and author of a
number of works on Zionism and
Israel. The book tells of political,
diplomatic, and military events
involving the two countries.
Green has served as immediate
past president of the American
Zionist Federation, vice-presi-
dent of the Womens Division of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation, and area director for
United Fund.
Samuel Reiser, founder and
consultant to the discussion
group, noted that "the group
seeks to bring to the attention
books of topical interest that ex-
plain the nature of the forces af-
fecting Israel and the Jewish
people throughout the world.
This book probes the relation-
i
Si
Harriet G
reen
ships of two countries that are
seeking peace in the troubled
Middle East."
The group is coordinated by
the Central Agency for Jewish
F,ducation under the direction off
Rabbi Norman Lipson.
A merican Red Cross President George M. Elsey, left, accepts'
the International Humanitarian Award of American Red
Magen David for Israel from Joseph Handleman, ARMDI
national chairman, and Louis Rosenberg, ARMDI national
president, at a ceremony held at the Red Cross National
Headquarters in Washington. Elsey was honored for national
and international achievements during his tenure as president
of the Red Cross for the past 12 years.
tooooooeoeooooeot
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Now under Supervision is proud to
announce that we are now located in the
Beautiful Sasson Hotel, 2001 Collins Ave.
Friday Dinner prepaid or
PAID by 5 PM Fri.
WEISS FAMILY
538-5401
For those who want
to be home by 7 P.M.
Sea Gull ^KOSHERJ
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4:30 to 6 P.M. Monday through Thursday**
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.Ocean at 21 at St Miami Beach Sea Gull Hotel Mgmr


L Reagan Galls Rumanian
Education Tax 'Draconian'
f
B, DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
I |JTA> The ReaSan
Administration has called
the education tax the
Rumanian government has
Loosed on would-be
emigrants a "Draconian
neasure" and warned that
,i will jeopardize Rumania's
IMost Favored Nation trade
[status with the U.S.
State Department spokesman
John Hughes said the tax "will
I make it much more difficult for
the President to continue to
I recommend waiver of prohibition
I on extending trade concessions to
Ja country that restricts
^migration."
Congress this fall extended
MFN to Rumania for another
year while warning that it will
natch closely whether Rumania
eliminates prohibitions that are
hampering the emigration of
Jews and others. In that con-
nection. Hughes said on Oct. 19
that the President will decide
next spring whether lo recom-
mend MFN lor Rumania "not on
Rumanian pledges but Rumanian
priormance on human rights
RKS
AS PART of the effort to get
Rumania to loosen emigration
mtrictions. Klliott Abrams,
Assistant Secretary of State for
Human Rights and Humani-
tarian Affairs, visited Bucharest
October 6-7 to discuss human
rights procedures. On his return,
Abrams said President Reagan
tould base his decision on
imtinued MFN for Rumania on
hi'ihi'r Rumania eases its
restrictions.
But Hughes warned that the
education tax which the
Rumanian press published last
recently "is not the nominal
sum" referred to in the Jackson-
Vanik Amendment to the For-
eign Trade Act which links U.S.
trade benefits to emigration pro-
cedures.
"Rather. the Rumanian
education tax appears to be a
burden that will run into the tens
of thousands of dollars in hard
currency for those Rumanian
citizens who have received free
education through the secondary,
university and graduate school
tvels. Hughes said reading
from a prepared statement.
"WE VIEW the imposition of
this tax as contrary to the UN
Declaration of Human Rights
*h'ch provides for the right to
leave ones country of birth." the
State Department spokesman
continued. "By imposing this
Draconian measure, beyond the
average citizen's ability to pay,
the Rumanian government
appears to be closing the
emigration door to most citizens.
If that is the case, the Rumanian
government has gravely jeo-
pardized its ability to maintain
its MFN status."
Hughes said in reply to a
question: "Our Embassy in
Bucharest will be discussing the
education law with officials of the
Rumanian government. Once we
have further information from
our Embassy, we should be in a
position to decide how to respond
to the Rumanian government
action."
In New York, meanwhile.
Julius Berman. chairman of the
Conference of Presidents of
Major American Jewish Organ-
izations, charged that the
education tax comes as
"shocking repudiation of pledges
by Rumanian leaders that they
would ease the flow of Jews
seeking to emigrate." Berman
praised the State Department's
criticism ot the Rumanian action
as a clear violation of the Jack-
son -Vanik Amendment.
HE RECALLED THAT A
Presidents Conference spokes
man had testified in Congress in
support of M FN for Rumania "on
the basis of assurances given to
us that no impediments would be
placed in the way of Jews wishing
to emigrate." Berman added:
"While the pace of that
emigration has been disappoint-
ingly slow, we were satisfied that
sufficient progress had been
made in facilitating Jewish
emigration to warrant our
continued support of MFN for
Rumania. The report of the
onerous education tax means
that severe hardship will be
imposed on Jews seeking to
emigrate, sharply reducing the
numbers able to leave. The ef-
fects of the lax on the Rumanian
economy, by imperiling MFN
trade status, would cause severe
hardship on all the Rumanian
people."
Hadassah to
Show Film
Forte Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will meet Monday.
Jan. 10 at the West Avenue
Auditorium.
A Young Judea Youth Activi-
ties program is planned, and the
movie. "Days that Change
Lives" will be featured.
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"And it came to pass on the third day, when it was morning,
that there were thunders and lightnings and a thick cloud upon
the mount, and the voice of a horn exceeding loud
(Exod. 19.16).
YITRO
VITRO Word reached Jethro, Moses' father-in-law, and a
Pnest of Midian, of what God had done for the Israelites. He
went to meet Moses in the desert. Jethro advised Moses to ap-
point judges, in order to ease the burden of his sole leadership:
Moses should confine himself to the most difficult questions. In
the third month, the children of Israel heard the Ten Command-
ments at Mount Sinai. God's voice declared: "I am the Lord thy
0d .. Thou shalt have no other gods before Me. Thou shalt
not make unto thee a graven image Thou shalt not take the
name of the Lord thy God in vain Remember the sabbath
oay, to keep it holy Honor they father and thy mother. .
l nous shalt not murder Thou shalt not commit adultery .
'nou shalt not steal Thou shalt not bear false witness
against they neighbor Thou shalt not covet they neighbor s
house wife ... nor any thing that is thy neighbor's (Exodus
mmZriPS***^ Weekly Portion of MM Low is extracted and M
Tum.r ^.r,,,n'c H'*orv ol tho Jewlth Heritage:," od.ted by Wollrr
Laa? m ,,s'"""lithod by Shonoold. Tho volume If available t 75 Mo.-..
lou'ing the volume.)
bo sod
Wollmon
Maiden
Reinhard
Mai sc hick
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
SARA GOLDBERG
Sara Amy Goldberg, daughter
of Dr. and Mrs. Lee Dresden
Goldberg, will present a Torah
discussion in celebration of her
Bat Mitzvah at Beth Israel
Congregation social hall on Sun-
day. A party for family and clas-
smates will follow.
Sara has been on the Hebrew
and English honor rolls every
year at the Hebrew Academy,
where she is a seventh grade
student. Last year she was presi-
dent of the elementary school.
Sara recently attended a com-
puter course for gifted children at
the University of Miami.
In honor of the occasion, Sara
and her family are making dona-
tions to charities in Jerusalem
which Sara personally visited.
FELISA REINHARD
Felisa Deborah Reinhard,
daughter of Dr. and Mrs. David
Reinhard. will give a D'var Torah
at her Rat Torah celebration on
Sunday at the Friedland
Ballroom of Temple Emanu-el.
Felisa is a seventh grade
student at the Rabbi Alexander
S. Gross Hebrew Academy.
Family and friends will help
Felisa celebrate. Among the
honored guests will be Felisa's
grandmother. Marie Malman of
Cincinnati. Ohio and her grand-
parents. Mr. and Mrs. Seymour
Reinhard and her great-grand-
mother. Beckie Reinhard, all of
Miami Beach. i ''
JEFFREY MALSCHICK
Jeffrey Allen Malschick, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Malschick,
was called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah Saturday, Dec. 18 at
Temple Beth Sholom of Greater
Miami. Dr. Leon Kronish offi-
ciated.
Jeffrey is a student of the Con-
firmation Class of 5744.
Pioneer Set Agenda
liana Chapter of Pioneer
Women-Na'Amat will hold a
mini-luncheon on Monday at
noon at Winston Towers 400,
Sunny Isles.
Masada Chapter will meet
Wednesday at 12:30 p.m. in the
American Savings and Loan
Association Auditorium. The
novel, "The Ring" by Danielle
Steel will be reviewed by Bertha
Liebman, chapter president and
South Florida Council vice
president.
Culture Club to Meet
Jewish Culture Club will hold a
Literary Musical Afternoon Jan.
3 at 1 p.m. at the Financial
Federal Bank. Washington, Ave.
Chava Kaplan of Montreal will
speak on Z. Segalovitch, Jacob
Gorelick will sing, and Helen
Helfant will recite.
Miami Beach
ERUV HOTLINE
6530914
Call within 2 hours
before shabbos
Rabbinical Council ol America
Florida Region
National Hebrew
Israeli Gift Center Inc.
Rel.gious'Bar Mitzvah sets
Crystal'Gitts
1507 Washington Avenue
(3051 532 2210
- or- *" *'
Friday, t)'ecbrnbr 31, 1982 I The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Mizrachi Women Plan Two-Day Convention
American Mizrachi Women
Florida Council will hold a Mini-
Convention at the Casablanca
Hotel Monday. Jan. 10 from 9:30
a.m. to 3 p.m. and Tuesday. Jan.
Ilat6:30p.m.
Murial Schuchatowitz, organi-
zation coordinator from National
American Mizrachi Women, will
conduct a leadership segment,
and a luncheon will be served
Monday and a dinner. Tuesday.
Stanley Rosenblatt will be the
guest speaker.
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting Time: 5:20
TEMPLEADATHYESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gordons Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Simcha Froodmon
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
M, 0:15 pm. Shabboe DbMOr,
CandlaS-22
Mlnyona
Sun.. Sam and 5pm
Mon. through Frl. 7:30 am and S pm
Sat. 6:30 am and 5 pm_______
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saltzman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchlnsky, Cantor
Fri.. 9:15 pm
Sal .8.45 am
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami 6676667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hottman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein. Associate
Rabbi
Fit, 8 15 pm. "Havurat Mlahpahat Ahavah"
Liturgy sung and raad by all. Bat Mitzvah,
JIM Ralaman. Onag Stiabbat to follow.
Sol., 11:15 am. B'nal Mitzvah. Sandra Tlktln
and Andrew Wengar
BETH 0AVI0 CONGREGATION
Coral Way: 2625 S W 3rd Avenue
South Dada '500 S w t20th Straal
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Oada Chapel
Frl., 8 pm. Shabbat Eve Sarvlcaa Rabbi
Auarbach will apaak on "Now Vaar'a and the
Calendar'1 Slatarhood Onag Shabbai to lollow
Coral Way Sanctuary
Sat.. 9 am. Shabbat Sarvlcaa Rabbi Auarbach
will apaak on "Jacob and Joaoph: A Corrtraat."
BETHKODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 658-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Sat.. 8 45 am and S pm
Sun.. 6 am and Spm
Dally Mlnyan Sarv.. 1 45 am and S pm
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorfinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
f n. 8 pm. Sermon "Shabbat or Now rear'a
Eva?" Sot, 9 am, Sormon: "Be Strong Ba, Ba
Strong. Let Ua Strengthen One Another '
Bar Mil/van. Denial SarbOf.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefterson Ave.. M.B. Fl. 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Or. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. ax 41st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor Oavid Conviser
Frl.. 8 15 pm, Rabbi Kronlah will apaak on
Peece On Earth Good Will Toward! Men "
Sat. 10:4$ am. Bar MlUvah, Michael Cantor
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Or. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Zvee Aronl, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Irl .5 15 and 8 pm
Sat. 9:30 am and 5:15 om.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schitt
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses ot Worship
Phone 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Of lice
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvl Adler, Cantor
Late Frl. Eva. Sarv 9 pm
Rabbi Ma.wel Bargar will pfaach on
" 83 For You ond Molt"
Sat. Morn Sarv 9 em
Of. Lehrman will preach at 10 30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive. Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiff
TEMPLE ISRAEL Ol Greater Miami
Miami's Pionmtr Rttotm Congrtgttion
137 N.E. 19th St.. Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskell M. Bernat
Asst. Rabbi: Jell rev K. Salkln
CantorJacobG Bornstein
Student Cantor: Rachoiio Nelson
Frl., 9 pm. Downtown, Rabbi Salkln: "Jaw.ah
Boy Makai Good Liturgy, Harvay Kaufman.
Kendall, Rabbi Bernai will laad dlacuaaion on
major avanta allectrng Jews and Judaism In
1992. Liturgy Student Cantor Nelson
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frl., 9:15 pm. Sabbath Service Weekly Torah
Portion Vayehl Genesis 47 28 50 26
Maiiereh i Klnga 2:1-12
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
EDWARD BARON. Cantor
Frl.. 7.30 pm
Sat.. 9:30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
820 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat. 9 am
TEMPLE NERTAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Frl.. 9:15 pm
Sat. 9:45 am
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
15410 SW 75 Circle Lane
Miami. Fl. Modern Othodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 382-3343
Frl., 5:15pm. Sabbath Services
Sat.. 9:30 am and 5:30 pm Mlnctia
Dally Morning Mlnyana. M 4 Th. 6:45 am
T.W,F7am
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kirtgsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook. Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay. Administrator
Fri.. 9:16pm. Worahtp Sarvlca Guest epeakir
Collegian. Wayne Firestone Sat.. 10 30 am,
Torah Portion Vayehl Genesis 47:29-50:26;
Hattarah I Klnga 2:1-12
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Or. Norman N. Shapiro. Rabbi
Mlnyan Sarvlcaa Mon. 4 Thura. 7 am
Seboaih Eve Services 8 15 pm
Sabbath Sarvlcaa 9 am
Ouaata Are Welcome
Friday. Sabbath Ee Sorvtcoa.
"Meppy New Veer."
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 163rd St., N. Miami Baach Fl 33162
947 6094 Harold Wishna. evecutiv, director.
Franklin 0. Krautiar. regional proatdont
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park. 3785
NW 82 Ave.. Suite 210. Miami. Fl.
33166. 592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Littman, regional director


^W5H^ i ne Jewish FWyridJan / Friday, December~19
j /
/
Page 12-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 31, 1982
Reminders Issued to Cemeteries
Public Notice Public Notice
31
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) Let
ters have again been sent to New
York cemeteries serving the
Jewish community and to the;
New York Gravediggers Union,
asking for their full cooperation
in meeting requests for burials
of Jews on legal holidays, as re-
quired by state regulations, when
the cemeteries are usually closed,
the National Jewish Commission
on Law and Public Affairs, which
sent out the reminders, reported.
Howard Zuckerman, COLPA
president, said an advisory letter,
containing a summary of the
burial rules promulgated by the
New York State Cemetery Board,
phis a copy of the full text, was
also sent to the counsel for the
New York State Cemetery Asso-
ciation, James Flynn; to the 40
directors of funeral homes,
members of the cemetery associ-
ation which serve the Jewish
community: and to major Jewish
organizations.
DENNIS RAPPS, COLPA ex-
ecutive director, said the effort to
publicize the rules was again
based on COLPA's experience
that much confusion arises
during the period beginning with
Thanksgiving and ending with
Washington's Birthday.
Rapps said that many Jews
and even some directors of
funeral homes serving Jews have
turned out to be unaware of the
fact that burials may, under law,
be arranged on legal holidays
which normally are contractually
set up as non-working days for
gravediggers and cemetery
personnel.
Rapps said the rules were de-
veloped by the Cemetery Board
in response to a COLPA effort
prompted several years ago by
bereaved families being unable to
obtain burials on legal holidays,
in compliance with Jewish reli-
gious requirements for speedy
burial after death.
CEMETERY BOARD rules
require that the bereaved family
must make its request by 9 a.m.
of the holiday. In the absence of
Washington Approves New
B'nai B'rith Projects

By BEN GALLOB
Federal approval of three more
senior citizens apartment
projects under B'nai B'rith spon-
sorship has been announced by
the Jewish service agency. In an-
nouncing the approvals by the
Federal Housing and Urban De-
velopment department (HUD),
Abe Cramer, chairman of the
B'nai B'rith Senior Citizens
Housing Committee, denounced
plans of the Reagan Administra-
tion to cut back heavily on the
program.
Cramer said the new B'nai
B'rith projects are to be built in
Scranton. Pa.. Edwardsville, a
suburb of Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; and
Silver Spring. Md. He said the
three projects are among eight
applications filed by B'nai B'rith
and that each of the three will be
the second such housing project
in each of the three cities. He said
HUD had approved 150 projects
nationally out of 1.540 applica-
tions. All of the apartments must
be rented on a non-sectarian,
first-come-first served basis, he
said.
CRAMER REPORTED that
during the past 15 years B'nai
B'rith has sponsored erection of
15 apartment buildings for senior
citizens Two others are under
construction. He said the 250
units in the three new projects
will bring the total of B'nai B'rith
sponsored units in the United
States to 2.990. Cramer said
B'nai B'rith has built or is build-
ing similar residences in Canada.
Britain. Australia. New Zealand
and Israel.
The three new projects, like
those already in operation or
under construction, are designed
fr..- the special needs of the
elderly. Cramer said. The apart-
ments are fireproof. They have
such facilities for the infirm as
ramps, bathroom grab-bars, and
low-control panels for elevators
and lights. Most of the apart-
ment buildings also have recrea-
tion rooms, lounges, common
dining rooms, arts and crafts
rooms, and laundry rooms.
Cramer said all the apartment
buildings are located in popu-
lated areas to enable residents to
participate in and contribute to
their communities. He said B'nai
B'rith exerts maximum efforts to
avoid warehousing" the elderly,
adding "we want them to enjoy
their sunset years to the ut-
most."
ALL OF the B'nai B'rith hous-
ing in the United States and most
of it elsewhere is government
-ubsid'zed. Cramer said In the
l.'nited States, the federal gov-
ernment, through section 202 of
the housing law, authorizes direct
loans to non-profit agencies for
the construction of "independent
living" apartments for elderly
and handicapped persons.
Cramer said housing projects
built under section 202 include a
commitment for rent subsidies
for residents under section eight
of the law. This enables elderly
residents with severely limited
incomes to have to pay no more
than 25 percent of their income
for rent.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In buslneai
under the fictitious name of
SYNC STUDIOS at number
7541 Blscayne Boulevard, In the
City of Miami, Florida. Intends
to register the said name with
the Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida this
31st day of December, 1962.
FRANK FALESTRA,
President
Sync Studios, Inc.
JOSHUA D BASH. ESQ.
Attorney for Applicant
Suite 228
1928 Hollywood Boulevard
Hollywood. Florida 33020
30B-9401200 9221400
18372 December 31.1982
____________ January 7, ujn, l9S3
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FROBATI DIVISION
File Number M-lOfltt
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HAROLD A. CARLSON
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of Harold A. Carlson, de-
ceased, File Number 82-10089.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which la 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida SS128. The
names and address of the per-
sonal representaUve and the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objecuon by an Inter-
ested person to whom this no
Uce was mailed that challenges
the validity of the will, the
qualifications of the personal
representaUve, venue, or Jurts-
dlcUon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TION NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this NoUce has
begun on December 81,1982.
Personal RepresentaUve:
CENTRAL BANK A
TRU8T COMPANY
By: 8TUARTJ. MILLER
1318 N.W 88th Street
Miami. Florida 88142
Attorney for Personal
RepresentaUve:
CASSEL A CASSEL. PA.
By:THEUSJ. SHEIL
100 N Blscayne Blvd.
Suite 1011
Miami. Florida 88182
Telephone: 371-1400
18388 Decembers!, 1883;
January 7.1988
compelling reasons barring ac-
ceptance of such requests, the
cemetery officials must by 10:30
, a.m. of the holiday, advise the
I funeral director, the bereaved
family and the person making the
request, that the cemetery can
comply, and fix the time of the
burial at that point.
If the cemetery cannot comply
with the request, it must so
advise the family and funeral di-
rector orally and by letter, ex-
plaining why; and send a copy of
that statement to the Cemetery
Board.
In addition to the regular ap-
proved burial charge, identifiable
extra costs incurred in the burial
may be charged if the total
amount to be paid is stated in
writing to the bereaved family at
the time of its request for the
burial, with a copy of that state-
ment simultaneously filed with
the Cemetery Board. This is a
reference to the provisions for
overtime pay in the contract be-
tween the Cemetery Association
and the Gravediggers Union.
Local 365.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE; SIRVICB
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THC ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 13 19111
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ARSENIA LAZO
and
RENEDELAPAZ.
TO: MR. RENE DE LA PAZ
Butner, North Carolina
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
RAFAEL E. PADIERNE.
ESQ.. attorney for Petluoner,
whose address la 1487 SW
First Street, Miami. Florida
SSlSS. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before February 4,
1983; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petit Ion
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 28 day of De-
cember. 1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC. P.Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Rafael E. Padlerne. Esq.
1437 S.W. First Street
Miami. Florida 33138
Telephone (3051 849-5488
Attorney for Petitioner
18369 December 31.1982:
January 7.14. 21.1983
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-H9S
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
ESSE R. ADLER.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The admlnlstraUon of the
estate of ESSE R. ADLER,
deceased, File Number 83-9896.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 West Flagler
Street. Miami, Florida 3S1S0.
The names and addresses of
the personal representaUve
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set froth
below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom noUce
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the wUl, the qualific-
ation* of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
PubllcaUon of this NoUce has
begun on December34,1982.
Personal RepresentaUve:
ARTHUR A. ADLER
11 Island Avenue
Suite Penthouse 3
Miami Beach. Florida 83139
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
KATHLEEN MAKKEY
Myers. Kenln. Levlnson.
Ruffner, Frank A Richards
1438 Brirkell Avenue.
Miami. Fl. 33131
Telephone: 871-9041
18354 December 24. 31, 1982
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADR COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number S2-M2I
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MAX WEINBERG
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ESTATE AND
ALL OTHER PERSONS IN-
TE RESTED IN THE
ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the admlnlstraUon
of the estate of MAX WEIN-
BERG, deceased, File Number
83-9828, Is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which la 78 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
SS1S0 The personal represen-
tative of the estate Is DAVID
WEINBERG, whose address la
1M1 Liberty Avenue, Apt. No.
25, Miami Beach. Florida. The
name and address of the
personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the eatata are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentaUve.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
NoUce of AdmlnlstraUon has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
taUve. or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Admlnlstra-
Uon: December 34.1982.
DAVID E. WEINBERG
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MAX WEINBERG
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Kwltney, KroopA
Schelnberg. PA.
420 Lincoln Road. Suite 512
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Telephone: 538-7575
18345 December 24, 31.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
FAMILY DIVISION
No. 2-17104 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
MARTHA LIGIA
PEDROZA.
PeUuoner-WUe.
and
HAROLD UMBERTO
PEDROZA.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: Mr. Harold Umberto
Pedroza
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for Dlsso-
luUon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to aerve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
Bruce M. Singer, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
1090 Kane Concourse. Bay Har-
bor Islands, Florida SS154, and
ftle the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before February 4, 1983: other
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
Utlon. *^
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 38 day of De-
cember, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByC. L Alexander
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
BRUCE M. SINGER
1090 Kane Concourse
Bay Harbor Islands.
FL 33154
Attorney for Petluoner
Telephone: (305)888-8738
18370 December 81,1983;
January 7.14. 21.1988
IN
TM
CON^R'ulTrvE^,
'N0PR0PEBtv,V'CE
snKSSfa
CIRCUIT OF"lo{m5'*1
ANDFORDADtfcoS*!1"
m RE: TOE MARKUP,,.
FTX>RLUCrNAARCE
__ "pondent-Wlf, '
Tlbas, Cludadela
Leon No. 13. Case'No n
lutton of Marriage ha. kZI
filedI against EftkJV"
r^uu-ed to serve, cop/S^S
written defenses. If anv tnh
EMTLIO C. PASTOfc.CS
for PeUtioner. whose addiWi
38 West Flagler WtW
302, Miami. VtoridVaA
the original with 5^ g
above styled court on or beta
January 14, 1988: other*)*".
default will be entered anUM
you for the relief demandidto
the complaint or petition
Thie notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secuUve weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand md the
seal of said court tt Miami
Florida on this 1st day of Dec
1962.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. H. Hartnett
Ad Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal 1
EMILIOC. PASTOR, ESQ.
28 West Flagler Street,
Suite 303
Miami, Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
18307 December 10, IT;
34.SI,116
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORID*
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12-10134
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALMA POURROY
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE: YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that the
admlnlstraUon of the estate of
ALMA POURROY, deceased
File Number 8210134, Is pend-
ing in the Circuit Court for
DADE County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which is Dade County Court-
house. 73 W Flagler St.
Miami. Florida 33130 The per-
sonal representative of the es-
tate Is BERNICE H, TURNER,
whose address ll 1322 Avocado
Isle. Ft I-auderdale. FLJSSIS
The name and address of the
Grsonal representative's li-
mey lire set forth below.
All persons having, claims or
demands against :hc estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE ton*
with the clerk of the above
court .. written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be m
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed If the claim is
not yet due. the date when it
will become due shall be
stated If the claim Is conlln
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall m
stated. If the claim Is """"J
the security shall be descrlhea
The claimant shall deliver sur
ficlent copies of the c laim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re
presentaUve. h
All persons Interested In the
state to whom a copy of 1
Notice of AdmlnlstraUon has
been mailed are "quired.
WTTHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF TTO
FIRST PUBLICATION w
THI8 NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may pa**
challenges the validity of *
decedent's will, the qualifies
uons of the personal represw
tatlve. or the venue or Juriacuc
tion of the court. ^
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT 30
FILED WILL BE FOREVTK
BARRED. M
Date of the first ***
of thla Notice of AdmlrUitr.
tion: December31 1B82.
BERNICE H TURNER
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
ALMA POURROY^
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
H. Lawrence Aeher fcsq.
18311 Northeast 13th Ave.
North Miami Beach.
FL 33183
Telephone:
(3061 949-3867 (DADE)
8301178, BROWARD) ^
18871 Decembers 1. .g
January'."*^



Friday. December 31. 1982 The Jewish Floridian Pge 13B
iblic Notice
jurisdiction
division
"orilUAPAUfc.
Petitioner-Wl
"flERRE PAUL
Respondent Husband
prjfttRE PAUL
Rt, 1 Box 8y
Brousaerd. Louisiana
NOTICE or
PUBLICATION_____
T0U ABB ""SJ
WIED that a PeUUon For
Ration Of Marriage hu
J Wed against you and you
' Suite tu. Blseayne
19 Went Flagler
, "Miami. Florida SMM
I flit the Crtuial AniwM-at-
tln. tn the Office of the
ult Court Clerk, on or be-
-_rt the 14th day of January.
I,_, If you fall to do so judr
I writ by default wUl be taken
Gnat you for tha relief l*-
Landed in tald P^tton.
I done and oumn at
| Miami. Dade County. Florida.
InudsyofDec 7 IBM ____
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
[|T:K SEIFRIED
iDgayCle Deo,mb#ri0ilT
1 34.31. IBM
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CKCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FORDADECOUNTY
Civil Action N0.I1-U1M-FC
aiON FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
| IN RE. MARRIAGE OF:
MARIA TERESA BEDOTA
land
FABIO DE-JESUS BEDOYA
ITO FABIO DE-JESUS
BEDOYA
I Residence Unknown
TOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
IFIED that an action for Dlssol-
loUon of Marriage haa been
I filed against you and you are
I required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It
Ion STANLEY E. GOODMAN
I attorney for Petitioner, whose
Iaddress Is BOB East Eighth
[Avenue. Hlaleah. Florida
IDOIO. and file the original with
I the clerk of the above styled
court on or before January 38.
liK3. otherwise a default will
[be entered against you for the
Irelief demanded In the com-
IplalntorpetlUo"--
This notice shall be published
I once each week for four con-
I native weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FI.ORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
leal of said at Miami. Florida
Ion this 16 dav of December.
|lM2
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A. MINGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18J0 December 24. 31 1082
January 7.14 1B83
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
WTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
7HE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 12-11373
''ARRIAGEOF:
PABLO CARRERA.
and
MILIA 0. CARRERA
TO: EMILIA G. CARRERA
El Silio Juan Diaz
Casa No. 20. Cuarto No. 1
Panama Republic,
of Panama
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
VOL ARE HEREBY NOT1-
22 ff-l petlUon for Dlsso-
s2?JiJmu MAT"*** haa
wen filed and commenced In
H"s court and you are required
uSH a.c.opy of yur wrl,,en
wense,, if any. to It on R. A.
?.,rino' E"> attorney for
PeUUoner. whoae address Is
li?. ?1 F1glr Street
"taml. Florida 3S1S6 and file
g original with the clerk of
) above styled court on or be-
wTi Jan,ufry I"": other
* e,ault *'" entered
Sv"",y" 'or the relief
mmon rU,thecomplalntor
This notice shall be published
Suii?Ch *eek ,or four con-
SVn*"k' > THE JEW-
...EJ-OKIDIAN.
wrrNEaa my hand and the
Sb1?."",^', day of Dec. 10.
A^r?1ARDP BRINKER.
a Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByA.Mlnguez
As Deputv Clerk
LA*DELPlRo^
to.*1eS1r,*'w Street
*mi, Florida831S6
^'V'orPetlUoner
" Decemberl7.24,3I.l2
January 7.1883
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADC COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CsieNe.ll 141JS
NOTICE OF ACTION
VICTOR MTTRANI,
Plaintiff,
M.
AMERICAN METAL CON-
TAINERS. INC.. a Florida cor-
poration, previously known aa
MITRANI INDUSTRIES,
INC.. a Florida corporation.
Defendant
TO: DEFENDANT. AMERI-
CAN METAL CONTAINERS.
INC., Florida corporation.
previously known aa MITRANI
INDUSTRIES. INC., a Florida
corporation, MM N.W. Tth
Avenue, Miami. Florida.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a chattel
mortgage on the following per
aortal property tn Dada County.
One 7% Ton Overhead
Crane, one % mild IS PL
Cincinnati Shear Ult No.
UaSS. one S" StrokBs Wit
constn Press Brake IS PL
ISO ton. Model IS FM a-a
71304. one Klngsland Power
Metal Works Modal J1S (A
04B70). one Powtjrmatlc
nnii Praaa Modal ijoo 8-N
S-SOTB-S. one Porto Hydraul-
ic Band Saw. one R SS-SH
Ware Lincoln Arc Welder S-
N AC 3*1347. fourteen Un-
coln-Norbart Welding
Machines S-N: AAW74S21.
AAWTSSTS. 78344. 7381 511
7301-407. 7SSS-70S, ATOSITT.
ASSSSIS. AMUtT, A708001.
AT180W. A727817. ASMSM.
A7iaoo8. on* Victor Pan-
tofimph Model DO 34008-N :
34380, six Overhead Fans,
two Scaffe Air Com
Srestors. two Portable
rtndera, one Balcrank
greaser S-N 144BS. two
Devllbls Paint Sprayers
three Portable Welders, one
Btnka Paint Pumper, one
Dayton Portable Sander,
one Fontaine Trailer Modal
DPT 2-6042 ID 20BT7 Mfg 1-
74. and one OSHA-approved
Paint Shed
haa been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defense*.
If any. to It on HAROLD A.
TURTLETAUB, plaintiffs at-
torney, whoae address Is 8885
South Dixie Highway, Suite 307,
Miami. Florida 33158. on or be-
fore January 28. IMS, and file
the original with the clerk of
this court either before service
on plaintiff's attorney or im-
mediately thereafter: other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
petition
Dated December 18,1B82
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
As Clerk of the Court
BY A. MINGUEZ
Aa Deputy Clerk
18348 December 24,31. 1B82
January 7.14. IBM
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name A. P
S. Wholesale, at 4401 NW 7 St..
Miami. Fla. 33128 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Associated Plumbing
Stores. Inc.
18347 December 24, 31.1BR2:
January 7. 14. 1B83
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CassNo.S2-ill7FC
NOTICE OF PETITION
FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JESUS ALVAREZ-GARCIA,
a-k-a JESUS ALVAREZ.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
BARBARA C. POZO
BETANCOURT,
Respondent-Wife.
TO: BARBARAC. POZO
BETANCOURT
29 B No. 7428
Entre74y78Playa
Habana, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
the written defenses, If any, to
It on: PEDRO F. MARTELL,
ESQUIRE: 1401 Ponce De Leon
Boulevard: Suite 200: Coral
Gablea, Florida SS1S4 and file
the original with the Clerk of
the above styled Court on or be-
fore the 14th day of January.
IBM, otherwise a Default will
be entered against you for the
relief prayed for In the Petl
tlon.
Thla Notice shall be pub-
lished each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
Seal of aald Court at Miami.
Dade County. Florida, on this
day of December 8.1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
by: M.J.Hamett
Deputy Clerk
1881B December 10. IT;
24. SI. IMS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
f lit Nambtr SS-tMt
OhrisaMtl
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELIZABETH FABRTTZKY.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED TN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of ELIZABETH
FABRITZKT, deceased. File
Number 82 8888. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33131. The personal
representative of the estate la
dare fabrttzky. whose
address U Apartment ISM. ISM
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach.
Florida SUM. The name and
address of the personal repre
aentaUre's attorney are set
forth bt low
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS PROM THE DATE
OP THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOnCE, to Ole
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
hare. Each claim must bt la
writing and must Indicate the
basts for the claim, the name
and addreaa of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration haa
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jection! they may have that
challenge! the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first Dubliratinn
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: December 24,1882
IMRE FABRITZKY
As Personal Representative
qf the Estate of
ELIZABETH FABRITZKY
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J WEISS
407 Lincoln Road,
Penthouse N-E
Miami Beach, Florida 33138
Telephone 534-4721
18355 December 24, 31,1M2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OADC COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROS.ATE DIVISION
Piihave No Ij-t7i
Divines :M
IN RE ESTATE OF
MARION TUGENBERG.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVTNG
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST SAID ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS IN-
TERESTED IN SAID
ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FTED that the administration
of the Estate of MARION
TUGENBERG. deceased, late
of Dade County. Florida, haa
commenced tn the captloned
proceeding
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED AND REQUIRED
to file any claims and demands
which you may have against
the Estate and to file any chal-
lenge to the validity of the Last
Will and Testament offered for
probate. If any. or any objec-
tion to the qualifications of the
Personal Representative,
venue or JurisdlctJoti of Has
Court, with (he Court. Dade
County Courthouse. 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS PROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE OR
YOUR RIGHT TO DO SO WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WTLL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First Publication of this No-
tice on the 34 day of December.
IMS
MarctaMeraon
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MARION TUGENBERG,
Deceased
500 Three Island Blvd No 810
Hallandale. Florida MOM
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
HERBERT JAY COHEN.P. A
8400 S Dadeland Blvd. Suite
300
Miami. Florida33158
Telephone: i 3061 888-0401
1M4S December 34. 31.1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 82-17737 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
CARMEN Jl I.1AO. Former
lv known as:
CARMEN JUUAOLUNAS
Petitioner-Wife
and
,K \KI.ZORRILLA
I. AM 'INEZ
Respondent-Husband
TO MR. RAFAELZORRILLA
LANDINEZ
Calle21
No. 12-55
Armenia. Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
AIAN H. MILLER. ESQ.. at
tomey for PeUUoner, whose
address Is 10871 Caribbean
Blvd.. Suite 305, Miami, Flor-
ida 3318B. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
January 14. 1883; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or peUUon.
This noUce shall be publlsheo
once each week for 'our con
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
.seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 2nd day of De-
"wSiAWJP BRINKER
As Clerk of Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A. Mlnguct
As Deputy Clerk
.Circuit Court Seal I____
ALAN H. MILLER, ESQ.
10871 Caribbean Blvd .
Suite 306
Miami, Florida 33188
Telephone: (SOBI 2381080
Attorney tor PetlUoner
18308 December 10.17,
1SW 24.31,1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROP*RYY)
IN THI CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
Nt 12Mil FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
SOCORRO SCOTT.
PeUUoner Wife
and
JESUS SERPA.
Respondent Husband
TO: JESUS SERPA
la Avenlda N orte
No 23 Dn 34
3do Pun.
Call. Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage haa
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, If any. to
K on A KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW. P.A. altarnay tor PeU-
Uoner. whoae tdftrsss Is 1M
N.W. tSttt Avenue. Miami.
Florida BBSS, and the Me the
original with the clerk of Dm
above styled court en or sefore
January 14. 1MB; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded la
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks tn THE JEW-
ISH FLOfUDIAM.
WITNESS my hand and tha
seel of said court at Miami.
Florida on thla 1 day of
December. IMS.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa dark. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A Mlnguet
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MARIANO SOLE ESQ.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida SSi38
Telephone: (308) 336 8844
Attorney for PeUoner
18310 December 10. IT
34.' IMS
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUOICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cte No. B2-1IJ44
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
HARRIET BRENNEN.
PeUUoner-Wlfe.
and
CURTIS BRENNEN.
Respondent-Husband.
TO: CURTIS BRENNEN
Bailey Town
Blmtnl. Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a PeUUon For
Dissolution Of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to
said petition on petitioners
attorney. GEORGE T.
RAMANI, ESQ. Suite 711.
Blscayne Building. 18 West
Flagler Street, Miami. Florida
33130 and file the Original
Answer or Pleading In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 14 day of
January. 1883. If you fall to do
so Judgment be default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said petition
DONE AND ORDERED a!
Miami, Dade County. Florida.
tr,l:thdayofDec.lB82
RICHARD P BRINKER
Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
Bv: K. Self tied
Deputy Clerk
,s.j;i December 10. 17,
24. 31 1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT INANOFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 12 1872*
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
CLEMONE JENKINS.
PeUUoner-Wlfe
and
MERDICE JENKINS
Respondent-Husband
TO MERDICE JENKINS
Residence Address:
278 Rldgewood Avenue
Newark. New Jersey
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an acUon for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
Bruce N. Crown, Esq. 1MM
N.W. 7th St., Suite 205 Miami.
Florida 33188 on or before Jan-
uary 28, IMS and file the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on PeU-
tloner's attorney or Immedi-
ately thereafter; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition.
DATED: December 18. 1882
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit Court
I Circuit Court Sean
By: LolaH. Currier
as Deputy Clerk
18348 December 24. 31,1882:
January 7.14. IBM
IN TNR CIRCUIT COURT OF
TNI ELEVENTH JUOICIAL
CIRCUIT. IN A NO FOR
DADS COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Cs.t Nvmeer 2 IBBJ4
NOTICI OF ACTION
FOR DISSOLUTION
OFfctARRIAOR
IN RE: The MarrtageOf
FRITZ VOLEL.
PeUUoner.
and
CLAIRE MARIE
ETTENNE VOLEL.
Respondent
TO: CLAIRE MARIE
ETTENNE VOLEL-
if alive, and If
known apouaeisl.
see, giant ass. crawivii
ottiar parties claiming by.
through, under or against hlm-
har-them. _____ __.
you are Norrrt-o that
an action Mr tMtSMMBS*
marriage haa heal
against you
I quired to
NOTICS! OF ACTION
CONSTRUCT1TVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY/
EN THE CIRCUIT COURT OP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL-
CIRCUTT OP FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
civil AcUon
No. 82-17BMFC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
WIENER HENRIQUEZ
PeUtioner-Husband
and
JOCELYNE MEROLUS
HENRIQUEZ
Respondent-Wife
TO: JOCELYNE MEROLUS
HENRIQUEZ.
1442 Troy Avenue
Brooklyn. NY 11203
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a peUUon for Dlsso-
i lUon of your Marriage has
en filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to It on LAW
OFFICE OF LLOYD M.
ROUTMAN attorney for PeU-
Uoner. whose address Is Suite
818. 7800 NE 2nd Avenue.
Miami FL SS1S8 and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
January 14. 1883. otherwise a
dafault will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this day of Dec 1.
IMS,
RICHARD V BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
.Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICE OF LLOYD M
ROUTMAN
Suite 615.7Boo NE 2nd Ave.
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for PeUUoner
IS306 December 10.17:
24, 31.1M2
_ (MIST
tetrUon of DarM A...
before January MMa, _
nie the original with tea Clerk
of the Court either
ice oa PeUUoner-1
tmmediately thereaRer
wise, a Default wUl ha l_
agalnst you for the relief de
manded to toe Cwnaatetnt or
PeUUon filed herein.
This noUce snail be published
once each week Mr Mur (
consecuUve we ska to The Jew-
tsh FtortdUn.
WITNESS MY HAND and toe
teal of aald Court at Miami.
Dade County. Florida. Ode Snd
day of December. IMS. __
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Osurt
By: OartndaBrown
AsDeputyderk
JAVTTS ft KARP
3660 Blscayne Boulevard
Suits 504
Miami. Florida M1S7-SSTS
elephone: (SMlBTS-dBM
By David A Karp
.18308 December 10. IT;
' M. 31. IMS
TO:
NOTICE OF ACTION
(NO PROPERTY)
IN TNR CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUOICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
Case NO. 82-117S4
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOHN PETER ROSS.
Husband
and
LOUISE ROSS.
Wife
Louisa Rosa
Residence Address
18 Pennlngton Road
New Brunswick,
New Jersey
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses If any. to It on
Bruce N Crown. Esq 15480
N.W 7th Avenue. Suite 206
Miami. Florida SS1M on or be-
fore January 28. 1883 and file
toe original with toe Clerk of
thla Court either before service
on PeUUoner's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter, other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the PeUUon.
Dated Dec 17.1882
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of Circuit four.
By: N A. HEWETT
as Deputy Clerk
18352 Decembet
January 7 14
1882
IBM
NOTICE UNDER '
FICTICIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GP/EN that toe undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUUous name LA
MEJOR COIN LAUNDRY ft
CAFETERIA at 26 S.W. 18th
Avenue. Miami. Florida 33136
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of toe Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
JAVIER GONZALEZ
1334 SE 8th Avenue
Hlaleah, Florida 33010
18328 Dec. 10.17
24.31,1882
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
the flcUUous name Personal-
ised Poems by "Yourt Truly"
at 18660 S.W. 82 Avenue Miami,
Fla. Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Donna Cohen
Martin Cohen. Esq.
Attorney for Donna Cohen
18318 December 1". 17;
24, 31, 1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No.81-181*3 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
SHARON K.ROUKAS.
PeUUoner Wife
and
MATTHEW O. ROUKAS.
Respondent-Husband
TO: MATTHEW O ROUKAS
624 Bomb Squadron
Wurtamlth. Michigan 48753
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
STANLEY E. GOODMAN,
attorney for PeUUoner. whose
address Is 808 East 8th Avenue.
Hlaleah, Fla. 8M10. and file the
original with the clerk of toe
above styled court on or before
January 38. IBM; otherwise a
default wUl be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
toe complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and toe
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on thla 18 day of Dec.
1882
RICHARD P. BRINKER
At Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A M1NGUKZ
As Deputy Clerk
18S61 December 24. 31 1882
January 7 it 188"


! *4-D
ine jewiah Floridfaa/Friday, December 10.1982

Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday. December 31,1982
Public Notice
IN THC CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-4634
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ELISE VOOROS
a-k-a ELISE M VOOROS
Deceased
NOTICE or
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of ELISE VOOROS a-k-a
ELISE M. VOOROS. McUMd,
File Number 83-9806. la pending
In the Circuit Court for Dado
County. Florida, Probato Divi-
sion, the address of which la 78
W Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 88180. The namea and
addreaaoa of the pereonai rep-
raaentatlve and the pereonai
repreoontativo'e attorney are
eat forth be low.
All Intoraatad paraona are re-
quired to file with thla court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the eatate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom tlda
notice was mailed that chal-
lenges the validity of tbe will.
the qualifications of the per-
sonal representative, venue, or
Jurisdiction of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of thla notice has
begun on DecemberSl, 1983
Pereonai Representative:
Sophia H. Slack
a k a Sophia Black
B3SN.E. 119 Street
Blacayne Park. Florida 88161
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY M. WAITZKIN
740-71 st Street
Miami Beach, Florida88141
Telephone: (806)866-0868
18866 DecemberSl. 1963:
January 7.1988

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
DORIS H. TILES INSTALLA-
TION at 2890 NW 86 St. Miami.
Florida 88143 Intends to
register said name with the
Clark of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Owner:
TORIBIO A. HERNANDEZ
18861 Decembers!. 1962;
January?. 14,31.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engsge in business
under the fictitious name
Sounds Great Stereo at 8601
South Dixie Highway Miami,
33138 Intends to register aaldl
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florid*. December 81,1962;
18364 January 7, 1*211988
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THC ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA
N*. 82-243*4
OCNERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE SY
PUBLICATION
JANICE ROEDER.
Plaintiff.
SHERMAN R. KAPLAN,
ROBERT A. GREENGOSS,
MELVIN A. KATTEN;
GREAT AMERICAN MORT-
GAGE INVESTORS, a Massa-
chusetts business trust,
authorized to do business In the
State of Florida; AEROSPACE
FABRICATION. INC.. HI-
SPEE CONSTRUCTION.
INC.; SYLVIA JUNOREIS.
Defendants
TO: SYLVIA JUNGREIS
166 West 66 Street
New York. NY
TO: ROBERTA.
GREENGOSS
c-o Dolly Greengoee
8400 Lakeshore Drive
Chicago. IL ____
TO: MELVIN A. KATTEN
136 S.Clark Street
Chicago. IL60606
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition has been
Bled to Discharge of Record
Judgments against Plaintiff
JANICE ROEDER, by you
and you are required to
serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on Bruce
Lamchlck. Esq.. Lamchlck.
Glucksman Johnston. Plain-
tiff's Attorneys, whose address
la: 10661 North Kendall Drive.
Suite 317. Miami. Florida 33176.
on or before January 38. 1988.
and file the original with the
Clerk of thla Court either be-
fore service on Plaintiff's
Attorneys or Immediately
hereafter; otherwise a default
N be entered against you for
relief demanded In the
NESS my hand and the
Ms Court on December
RDBRINKER.
V the Court
Sairried
TCtor*
>r 24, 31. 1982;
l", ,J. ryT.14.19SI
>ubs id ft
i nited Su
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVS SSRVICS
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THS CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SLSVSNTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADS COUNTY
Civil Action No 12-18420-FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
FIGUEROA. JOSE
and
FIGUEROA. TERESA
TO: TERESA FIGUEROA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT1
FIED than an action for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve s copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
M. CRI8TINA DEL-VALLE.
ESQ attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is I960 8.W. 37
Avs. Miami Florida 88146.
(306) 445-0272. and Hie the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
January 31. 1988; otherwise a
default will be entered against 1
Ku for the relief demanded in I
e complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published '
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on thla 14 day of Dec.
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
by M. J. HARTNETT
Aa Deputy Clerk
18344 December 17. 34.811983
January 7.1988
I
IN THS CIRCUIT COURT!
OF THS SLSVSNTH
JUDICIAL CIRCUIT
IN ANDFOR
DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA)
FAMILY DIVISION
No. 83-18303
IN RE: The Marriage of
CLARA POPESCU
Petitioner.
and
LUCIAN POPESCU
Respondent'
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LUCIAN POPESCU
c-o Victor Pope ecu
1693 Chape lhlll Drive
Toungstown, Ohio 44611
YOU. LUCIAN POPESCU."
are hereby notified that a
Petition For Dissolution of
Marriage has been filed'
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your'
written defenses to the Petition
For Dissolution of Marriage on
the Petitioner's Attorney,
Harold A. Turtletaub. Esquire.
9656 South Dixie Highway.
Suite 307. Miami. Florida 88166
and file the original written de-
fenses In the office of the Clerk.
Circuit Court on or before the
38th day of January. 1988. If,
you fall to do so, judgment by
default win be taken against
'you for the relief demanded In
the Petition.
This notice shall be published .
once each tor four consecutive
weeka In the JEWISH ,
FLORIDIAN.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County, Florida,
thla 14th day of December
A.D.,1963.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A Mlnguei
Deputy Clerk
HAROLD A. TURTLETAUB
Attorney for Petitioner
9666 S. Dixie Highway. Suite
807
Miami. Florida33156
(306)666-1882
18843 December 17.24, 31,1982
______ January 7,1983
IN THS CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FROBATS DIVISION
File Number 82-3255
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
JULIUS FRANK
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of JULIUS FRANK, de-
ceased, File Number 82-5266. la
pending In the Circuit Court for
DADE County, Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida. 33130 The
namea and addresses of the
ErsonsJ representative and
a personal representative's
attorney are eet forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(S) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of thla Notice has
begun on December 81.1982.
Personal Representative:
LARRYFRANK
Indian Mill Road
Coscob. Connecticut 08607
Attorney for Persons!
Representative:
ABRAHAM A. GALBUT.
ESQUIRE
GALBUT. GALBUT A MEN IN.
P.A..
999 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach Florida. 88189
Telephone: 672-3100
18800 DecemberSl, IMS
January 7.1988
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVS SSRVICS
(NOFROFBRTY)
IN THS CIRCUIT COURT OF,
THE SLSVSNTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OAOS COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
Ne. 82 18411
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
WALTER MARIANO ROMAN.
Petitioner-Husband
and
GEOROINA ROMAN.
Respondent-Wife
TO: GEOROINA ROMAN
Residence address un-
known. I
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-!
FIED that an action for Dleso-,
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of yourl
written defenses. If any, to it on
ALBERT L CARRICARTE..
P.A., attorney for Petitioner.i
whose address Is 3491 N.W. Tth.
Street, Miami. Florida S81SB.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court,
on or before 2lst January, 1988:
otherwise a default will be en-
tared against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petition. ',
Thla notice shall be published
once each week for four conse-
cutive weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this day of Dsc. 14
1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
AsClsrk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By CARINDA BROWN
Aa Deputy Clerk
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
PA.
Attorney for the Husband
3491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33126
Telephone: (806)649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
18841 December 17. 34.81.1983
January 7,1968
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVS SSRVICS
(NOPROFERTY)
IN THS CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE SLSVSNTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADS COUNTY
Civil Action No. 82 18387
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOS
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JOCELYNE OUILLAUME.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
VOGUEL OUILLAUME,
Respondent-Husband.
TO: VOGUEL OUILLAUME
No. 368 Rue do Ramparts
Port-au-Prince, Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT1
FIED that a petition for Dlaao-
lutlon of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
thla court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on Lloyd
M Routman. Esquire, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
7900 N.E. 2nd Avenue. Suite
616, Miami, Florida 88188, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before January 21. 1988; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petltto.
Thla notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on thla 9th day of De-
cember, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByN. A.Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Lloyd M. Routman, Esquire
7900 N.E. 2nd Avenue.
Suite 615
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18380 December 17. 34, 31.1983
January 7, 1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVS SERVICE
(NOFROFBRTY)
IN THS CIRCUIT COURT OF
THS BLSVBNTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADB COUNTY
Civil Action NO. 82-184*6
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOS
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ERNESTO ALONSO.
Petitioner-Husband.
and
ESTHER REINA MAR-
TINEZ,
Respondent-Wife,
TO: ESTHER REINA MAR-
TINEZ
Ave. 89 No. 16316
La Lisa
Havana, Cuba.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has boon
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defanaaa, if any. to it on
MARIO QUINTERO JR.,
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 3600 Douglas
Rd. Suits 700, Coral Gables.
Florida 88184. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
January 31. 1988: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
Thla notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 18 day of
December. 1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N.A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LAW OFFICES OF
MARIO QUINTERO JR.
2600 Douglas Road. Suite 700
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone: (306)444-6464
Attorney for Petitioner-
Husband
18336
December 17, 24. 81.1983
_________________January 7,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAMB LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
METRO PICTURE FRAME
CO. at 80 West 31at Street
Hlaleah. Florida 38010, Intends i
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida. |
RICOSTA CORP.
By: RICARDO ACOSTA.
President
TED E. TSOUPRAKE LAW
OFFICE
Attorney for RICOSTA CORP
330 Miracle Mile. Suits 333.
Coral Gablee. Fla. 88184 ,
18338 '
December 17,34,81,1883
January 7.1888
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAMB LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that undersigned, de-
siring to engage In business un-
der the fictitious name JEN OT
D4STUT dE BEAUTS at 10345
Collins Ave. Bal Harbour Fla.
88164 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dads County.
Florida
JEANNETT RE NTA.
President
188M Decembers, 24.31. 1982
January 7.1988
ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT COURT
DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case No. 82 14403
IN RE: The Marriage of:
YOEL REYES
Petitioner-Husband
and
DAPHENE REYES
Respondent-Wife
TO: DAPHENE REYES
Residence, unknown,
shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS.
Attorney. 813 N.W. 13th
Avenue Miami, Florida. 88188.
and file original with Court
Clerk on or before January 14,
1983. otherwise a default will be
entered
Decembers. 1982
RICHARD BRINKER
aa clerk of the Court
By A Mlnguei
Deputy Clerk
18818 December 10.17;
_______::______HJU
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAMB LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name)
"CONTIGO EN FLORIDA" -
"WITH YOU IN FLORIDA" at
940 Lincoln Rd. Suite 338.
Miami Beach. FLA 88189. In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Julian Pardo
Productions. Inc.
18327 December 17.24. 81.1982
__________________January 7.1988
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case No. 82-14775 FC
IN RE: The Marriage of
PHYLLIS D. DEAN
Petitioner-Wife
vs.
MARVIN DEAN
Respondent-Husband
TO: Marvin Dean
Residence unknown, shall
serve copy of your Answer to
the Petition for Dissolution of
Marriage upon GEORGE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 612 N.W.
13th Avenue. Miami. Florida,
33136, and file original with
Court Clerk on or before Jan-
uary 21, 1988. otherwise i
default will be entered Dated:
December8,1982
RICHARD BRINKER
aa clerk. Circuit Court
By: A. Mlnguei
Deputy Clerk
1SS21 December 10,17;
_________________ 84. H. 1963.
SLSVSNTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case No. 83-18874
IN RE: The Marriage of
NICOLE AZOR. Petitioner-
Wife,
vs.
CARLO AZOR.
Respondent-Husband
TO: CARLO AZOR
67 St. PaulsPIace
No. 3-B
Brooklyn.
New York 11226
shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, Attor-
ney, 613 N. W. 13th Avenue.
Miami. Florida. 88186. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before January 3*. 1888. other-
wise a default will be entered.
Dated: DecemberSl. 1883.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: C. P. Oopeland
18807 December 24, 31.1982;
JaisuaryT.l4.i8g8
IN THS CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADS COUNTY, FLOSIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 62-M15
Division 44
DIRE: ESTATE OF
HARRY LOWE.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of tho es-
tate of HARRY LOWE, de-
ceased. File Number 83-9610, la
Sndlng In the Circuit Court
r Dade County, Florida, Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is 78 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida. The namea
and addressee of the personal
representative and the person-
al representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with thla court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
TRHE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
waa mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cation of the pereonai repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on December 34,1983.
Personal Representative:
ROSE H. LOWE
3030 Marcos Drive
North Miami Beach.
Attorney for Persona)
Representative:
Leff, PeeeUky A Zack. P.A.
by: Samuel I Left
1867 N.E. 182nd Street
North Miami Beach.
Florida 88169
Telephone: (806)946-7001
18868 December 34. 81.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICITITIOUS NAMB LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
DEPECHE MODE M 8T84
Sunset Drive rear. In the
City of South Miami. Florida,
intends to register tho said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dado County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, thla
8 day of December, 1889.
DAJE. INC.
BY: JENNINE A. JAFFE
President
BY: S.DAVID JAFFE
Secy Tres.
S. DAVID JAFFE
Attorney for Applicant
8680 Blacayne Blvd. Suite 604
Miami. FL 38137
Tele: 679-6460
18884 December IT. 34, 811889
January 7.1888
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
D*-c\SU^V^WSIDAT
(,CCaseNa.92.itu
EiRJLTne Marrtageof
ESPERANTA BURNS
Petitioner Wife
vs.
JONATHAN BURNS
R*!J5ndem H"ba'nd
TO: JONATHAN BURNS
Residence unknown, shall
STtHB J Answer to
the Petition for dissolution of
NICHOLAS IT" GERCE
NICHOLAS. Attorney. 812 N W.
m Zu,m"taml' Fl0,1d'
33136 and file original with
JS" Clerk on or before Feb 4
1983. otherwise a default will be
entered. Dated: December 23,
1982.
RICHARD BRINKER
By:M.J. Hartnett
_____ Deputy Clerk
18867 December 31 i82-
___________January 7,14,21, i83
IN THB CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADS COUNTY, FLORIDA
FROBATS DIVISION
File Number 62-4444
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF:
MORRIS KRIEGER.
Deosassd
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of tho
estate of MORRIS KRIEGER
deceased. File Number 82-9664.
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which is 78 W. Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of tho
personal representatives and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are
required to file with thla court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom this
notice waa mailed that
challenges the validity of the
will, the qualifications of the
personal representative,
venue, or jurisdiction of the
court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT 80 FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of thla Notica has
begun on December 81.1889
Personal Representatives:
IRVING KRIEGER
And
SYLVIA STEIN
CO Henry M. Waltsktn, Atty.
740 71st Street
Miami Beach. Florida 88141
Attorney for Personal
Representatives:
HENRY M. WAITZKIN
740 -71 st Street
Miami Beach, Florida 88141
Telephone: (308)866-0868
18366 December 81.1989;
January?. 1988
NOTICE UNDBR
FICTITIOUS NAMS LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
da airing to engage In business
ssdar the fictitious name
OEORGE MEAT A FISH at
86*7 SW. 160 St.. Miami. Fla.
Intends to register said name
with the dark of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
George Garcia.
Owner
18866 December 24. 31, 1963
January 7, 14.1988
NOTICE UNDER
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
22" that the underetorJ.4
desiring to engage in business
under the flctlclous name of
SUNRISE MOTEL APT8 ,J
9840 Collins Avenue, Surfs'lde
Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade Countv
Florida.
NATHANIEL AMBERS
EMMA AMBERS
FRANK. STRELK0W a GAY
Attorneys for THE AMBERS
603 Capital Bank Bldg
1666 Kennedy Causeway
North Bay Village, Florida
33141-4196
(308)868-4711
18863 DecemberSl, 1(82;
January 7,14.21.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTICIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
SOUNDS GREAT STEREO at
14016 South Dixie Highway
Miami 3S1S8 Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
18363 December 31,1932;
January 7,14.21,1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name LBT
and BVG at 7700 SW 100 St..
Miami. Fla. Intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Co-owners.
VIRGIL HALE.
GARY HALE.
TREVA WARD.
BEVERLY CRIESEMER.
BARBARA TOREN0.
LINDA VEAL
18369 DecemberSl. 1952;
January 7,14.21.1913
IN THB CIRCUIT COURT OF
THB BLSVBNTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADS COUNTY, FLORID*
FAMILY DIVISION
Case No. 82-1N27
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALFRED H. EBNER.
Husband
and
EDELTRAUD EBNER.
Wife
TO: EDELTRAUD EBNER
Mortis. Seelerg
l-60-19Vlenna
Austria 1100 __,
YOU ARE HEREBY N0TI
FIED that a Petition for Dli
solution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
hereby required to serve a copy
of your answer or other plead-
ing to the Petition on the
Husband's Attorney. FRED *
DROESE. whose address u
1454 N.W. 17 Avenue. Miami.
Florida 33126. and file tj
original with the Clerk of tne
above styled Court on or before
this 21 day of January. 1983. or
a Default will be entered
against you. ,
DATED this 15 day of
December 1982. ,._
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
ByC.PCOPELAND
Deputy Clerk
18MS December 17.2V 31. B
Janus rv7J_
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA"
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersign**
desiring to engsge In business
under the ***" S
UNITED ART A SIGN Sir
PLIES at 9S4 Hlaleahi-DrrtJ.
Hlaleah. Fla. SSOIO Intend.
register said name *'u,.u*'.
Clert of the Circuit Court 0!
Dade County. Florida
Outdo Da La Ross,
Owner ,.
18300 December 10. i>.
ss** 24, a, 1*3
NOTICE UNDIB
FICTITIOUS NAMII LAW
NOTICE IS HEFttBJ
GIVEN that the under**"*
desiring to engage in busWjs
under the fictitious name DSP
RICK STEWART at 14778 JUJ.
S3 Court. Opa Locka. *Tj-"?J
intends to register said1 ran*
with the Clerk of the Or
Court of Dade aunty, Flo"**.
DERRICK STEWART.
OWNER .
irnment. thrv
1






.i*vitt. vice president of
[foinstein Memorial
^ been elected pres.-
i he Jewish Funeral Direc-
sident of Jewish Funeral Directors Chosen
*--- -' directors meet to discuss family
life in America, and the import-
ance of the Jewish culture, reli-
gion, and traditions as they affect
the funeral industry," Levitt
stated. "Being actively involved
in associations like these allows
the Levitt-Weinstein organiza-
tion to maintain its sensitivity to
the needs of the Jewish com-
munity."
Levitt-Weinstein is associated
\merica during a recent
'in Carlsbad. California.
V. been a prominent
; tolleral director for many
IFDA is the national
.L Whfch Jewish funeral
?wi$h Congress Seminar to
m Media Responsibility
heast Region of American
i Congress, responding to
lBS articulated in the wake
lwi Israel-Lebanon situation,
I bold a day-long seminar on
^Responsibility of the Media
i Democratic Society," at
Jk Beth Sholom on Tues-
[foi. II, from 9:30 a.m. to 2
program will feature Phil
national associate ex-
director of the
.ess; Howard Kleinberg,
J The Miami News; and
Renick, vice president -
idirector of WTVJ-Channel
vision. Rabbi Ralph P.
ley, president of the south-
region, will serve as
ltor.
n, an attorney, is director
[ lie Commission on Inter-
Affairs of AJCongress
as associate executive
l, He has participated in
on before the U.S.
: Court and other courts
il rights, church-state
hip, and immigration.
: coordinated American
i Congress' annual Ameri-
Dialogue in Israel, a
i for the exchange of views
i both countries, and is the
or of the White Paper on the
) Campaign Against Amer-
Nobel
Laureaute
iByMAURICE samuelson
|L0NDON (JTAI Dr.
iron Klug, this year's Nobel
* winner for chemistry, is the
st of a long list of Jewish
W Laureates, but he is prob-
r the first former member of
Habonim (Labor) Zionist
th movement to be so
red. Klug belonged to the
tonim-Hechalutz in South
*a where he was brought up
(educated before settling in
"bridge, in 1949.
He won the Nobel Prize for
mistry for developing electron
icroscopy which helps explain
wgical functions an the basis
polemical structure.
[Wy years ago, Max Per-
M Cambridge scientist, who is
1 Jewish, was joint winner of
' same award. For the past 20
P Klug has worked at Carn-
age University's molecular
"own run by the Medical Re-
ran Council.
His wife, Lieve, is the daughter
[Alexander Bobrow, who imme-
Wy after World War I estab-
] the Cape Town Jewish Or-
"age for children whom he
wgnt out of Russia under the
Vices of the Joint Distribution
irmttee.
[Since settling in Cambridge,
Vrifi have retained their
V in with Judaism and
FJ Mug. who says he regards
C as a traditional Jew, is a
" of the local Jewish Resi-
Association which runs the
Ls synagogue. Their elder son,
*year.old econometrics re-
Zlr 8t Tel Aviv University,
hSEft married '" Israel to
nntish-born woman. Their
cs at London University.
ican Jews,'' which was instru-
mental in obtaining a Senate
resolution on the subject. He
published a monograph on "The
Palestinians: What Is Real and
What is Politics" and "Anti-
Semitism in the U.S. and
Abroad: Its Extent and its
Portent."
Howard Kleinberg has been
with The Miami News for 30
years and has been a sports
writer, executive sports editor,
managing editor, and was ap-
pointed editor in 1976. Kleinberg
has covered the Middle East, in-
cluding Israel, Egypt, and
Jordan, major national political
conventions, the Miami black
community, and U.S.-Latin
America affairs.
Kleinberg is a former member
of the Associated Press Manag-
ing Editors Association, a cur-
rent member of the American
Society of Newspaper Editors, a
member of the Press Freedom
Committee of the Inter-American
Press Association, a former pres-
ident of the Greater Miami Chap-
ter of Sigma Delta Chi, and a
winner of the Reuben Askew
Black American Award present-
ed by the Urban League of
Greater Miami.
Ralph Renick was the first
news director of the first TV
station to go on the air in Florida
and was the first in the nation to
undertake daily television
editorials. Renick has written and
aired more than 4,800 of his
"Tonight's Editorial." He is also
vice president of News Opera-
tions for Wometco Enterprises
covering TV stations across the
country.
Renick traveled to Israel and
Lebanon in August and reported
on the Israeli-Lebanon action in
the news and in a documentary,
"Lebanon: A Reporter's Impres-
sions."
Renick was appointed a mem-
ber of the National News Council
which handles complaints
concerning inaccuracy and-or
fairness in news coverage and
works to uphold the principles of
the First Amendment. He is past
president of Associated Press
Broadcasters Association and
served on its board of directors
and is also a past president of the
Radio-Television News Directors
Association.
Friday, December 31,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
Obituaries
Sonny Levitt
with Weinstein Brothers Memo-
rial Chapels in Chicago and WU-
mette, Illinois. Norman Cutler, of
Weinstein Brothers, was also
elected an officer of the JFDA.
Levitt-Weinstein Memorial
Chapels are located in Holly-
wood, North Miami Beach, West
Palm Beach, and Pompano
Beach.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every Day Closer) Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888

Jt6 i'i
8T:0
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Sireel
Tel 261 761?
HONIOMAN
Jean K, 78, an 18-year resident of North
Miami Beach, coming from NY, died
December 38. She la survived by hus-
band, Henry: sons, Michael and
Richard of CA; sisters, Rose Singer of
CA and Matilda Kaplowlti of North
Miami Beach; and brother, Samuel
Kaye of Miami Beach. Services were
held December 38.
PERLMAN
Freda. 79, of Miami Beach for 38 years.
originally of Philadelphia, died Decem-
ber 37. She was a life member of Hadas-
sah. ORT. and the Miami Opera OuUd.
She ls survived by husband, Bernard;
sons, Clifford of North Miami and Stuart
of Miami Beach; daughter, Marilyn
Tredwell of North Miami Beach; slater.
Rose Hockman of Philadelphia; 13
grandchildren, and 6 great-grandchil-
dren. Services were held December 28
at Riverside.
ZELLER
Belle, a Miami Beach resident since
1964, formerly of Brooklyn, N.Y., died.
She was the mother of Roslyn Schwartz
of Miami Beach and sister of Samuel
Gottlieb of Enclno. CA. Services were
held December 34 at Rubln-Zllbert
Memorial Chapel.
MAYEROWITZ
Harry, 79. a Coral Gables resident for 39
years, originally of N.Y.C., died
December 38. He was the former owner
of the Glorified Delicatessen in Miami
for 3S years, a member of the Israelite
Center, and a member of the Wleloner
Benevolent Society. He was the husband
of Lillian, father of Marshall Major of
Coral Gables, Anita Schwartz of South
Orange, N.J.. and grandfather of seven.
Services were held December 38 at
Gordon Funeral Home.
SCHINOLER
Blanche, an area resident for 18 years,
coming from Philadelphia, passed away
December 32. She ls survived by a
daughter, Leah Kohn of Rockvllle, MD;
grandchildren, Steven and Daniel: sis-
ter. Bess Schwartz, and brother, Max
Schwartz, both of Johnstown, PA. She
was a member of the North Bay Village
Jewish Center and Its sisterhood. Serv-
ices were held December 36 at River-
side.
MANDEL
Rose. Miami resident since 1988, passed
away December 28. She was the mother
of Frleda Cohen of N. Y., Morris Mandel
of NY., Hy Mandel of Miami, and Cye
Mandel of Miami, Also survived by a
sister and four grandchildren. Services
were held In NY.
FARBAISH. Isidor. Miami Baach,
December 18. Rubln-Zllbert. Star of
David.
HIRSCH, Rea B East Orange. N.J.,
December Si. Temple Beth Sholom.
STERN, Leo. Miami Beach, December
( 38. Rubln-Zllbert
, ELTON. Sol. December 39. Rubln-ZH-
na bert.
STAMBOR, Leo, 68. Miami Beach,
December SO. Levitt-Weinstein
TERRIS, Jerome. 68. Bay Harbor,
December SO. Riverside.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
7610 Northeast 2nd Avenue
759-1669
IKANANACK. Rose. 79. Miami Beach.
December 39. Riverside.
KATZ. Anna, Miami Beach. Rubln-
Zllbert.
ZLOTOLOW. Mattle. North Miami
Beach. Rubln-Zllbert.
wandler. Teasla. Miami. December
39. Blaaberg. _
STEINBERG. Rose Beck. Decembers*.
'Blaaberg.
PICKOVER. Ida. 74. North Miami.
December 39. Levitt-Weinstein
PLATOFF. Morris. Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert.
KATZ. Irving. 67, Miami. December 38.
Menorah.
MrLLER. Frances
MOSKIN. Sonya. 78. Miami. December
36 Riverside. Star of David.
SCHULBAUM. Barnett. Miami Beach.
December 38. Blasberg-
HAGAN, Samuel. December 38. River-
side.
KRULEWITZ, Noah. Miami Beach.
December37. Riverside.
McETTRICK. Mae. 78. Miami. Decem-
ber 27. Gordon. Star of David.
MOSS, Irving, North Miami Beach.
December27 Rubln-Zllbert.
SCHWARCZ. Perry. 88, North Miami
Beach. December 38. Levltt-Weln-
steln. Star of David.
ROTHENBERO, PhUlp. 67. December
37. Riverside.
BAKER, Gertrude, 79. Miami Beach.
December 38. Riverside.
FRIED. Llbby, Miami Beach. Decem-
ber, 37. Rubin Zllbert
LESSER. Paul. 83. December 17. River-
side
ZUCKERMAN. Estelle. 99. December
32. Riverside.
MANDLER. Selma. 66. December 33.
Riverside.
\>e*V

c,PCP" o*,a>
\e'
<1
JO*
When a loss occurs
away from home.
SIM1TZ BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to .assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd
18840 West Dixie Hwy
Represented by > levitl, *-*.
New York: (212) 263-7600Queens Blvd ft r"6lhRd .ForeslHills N V
Worki ng Tbgethe r
Traditions established through
four generations of family ownership
.. careful attendance to the family's
wishes dedication to the time honored
customs of lewish law compassionate guidance
when the hour of need arises
in Florida
Bmatjne Bltrf and 209|*i SI N Miami Brarh. FL 11180
105945-1919
2105 W IIMlfaw BM LVrrfirtd Bra*. FL 1144 I
105/427-4700
591 5 Par* Dnw at U S 441. Margate. FL 11061
105, 427-4700
68 Fl Lauderdale iSiinrisrl. FL 111 11
105 742-hOOO
Palm Bearh 105 811-0887
fistein
i i '
IV I K
HERSHEv
JOEL A ROt
iii
^


ne Jewish Floridian / Friday, Dec.mb-10.19R2
Page 16-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 31,1982
:)
1
THE FLORIDA FRIENDS OF
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY
IS PROUD TO PRESENT
ITS FIRST ANNUAL
ISSUES
OUR TIMES
SEMINAR SERIES
Monday, January 3rd
"Introduction to Jewish Medical Ethics"
Speaker: Dr. Fred Rosner
The second lecture of a four-part series will feature Dr. Fred Rosner,
director of medicine at the Queens Hospital Center in New York and pro-
fessor of medicine at the State of New York University at Stonybrook. A
graduate of Yeshiva University's Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Dr.
Rosner has written about and lectured extensively on hematology, Jewish
medical ethics, Jewish medicine and Jewish medical history.
He has co-authored, (along with Rabbi J. David Bleich, the third seminar
speaker) the widely-acclaimed book on Jewish medical ethics entitled,
Jewish Bio-Ethics.

Monday February 7th
"Who Shall Live And Who Shall Die"
Speaker: Rabbi J. David Bleich
Rabbi J. David Bleich is a professor of Talmud at
\eshiva University and a professor of Jewish law
and ethics at the University's Cordozo School of
Law In addition to collaborating with Dr. Fred Ros-
ner (the second seminar speaker) on the book
Jewish Bio-Ethics, Rabbi Bleich is also the sole
author and editor of many books and publications
on Jewish law and ethics.
Monday March 7th
"Jewish Mysticism-Secrets Of Our Times'"
Speaker: Rabbi Benjamin Blech
Rabbi Benjamin Blech, assistant professor of
Veshiva University's James Striar School of General
Jewish Studies, has given more than 100 talks
across the U.S., Israel arid Europe. He received the
1971 coveted "Outstanding American Educator'
award in recognition of his far-reaching efforts and
influence worldwide. In addition. Rabbi Blech has
served on many committees since he became or-
dained in 1956 at the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theo-
logical Seminary at Yeshiva University
FLORIDA FRIENDS OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY composed
of graduates and non-graduates alike supports the New
York-based University in appreciation of the many skilled
and talented graduates that return to serve the South Florida
community
Founded in 1886, Veshiva University is the oldest and largest
university under Jewish auspices and has always operated
under the philosophy that a great educational institution can-
not stand apart from its environment It is firmly committed
to advancing the well-being of the Jewish community and the
nation using all resources available.
In keeping with that tradition, the Florida Friends of Yeshiva
University is proud to bring the University's resources closer
to the South Florida community through the "Issues Of Our
Times" seminar series.
ALL SEMINARS ARE FREE OF CHARGE AND OPEN TO
THE PUBLIC. Each begins promptly at 8 p.m. at the Konover
Hotel (5445 Collins Ave., Miami Beach). Special provisions for
parking will be arranged.
FOR RESERVATIONS or more information on the first
annual "Issues of Our Times" seminar series, please contact:
Mr. Chaim H. Friend
Director of Development-Southeastern Region
Florida Friends of Yeshiva University
"Issues Of Our Times" Seminar Series
220 71st Street. Suite 212
Miami Beach, Florida 33141
(305)861-3365
SEMINAR SERIES COMMITTEE
Rabbi Yaakov Sprung (Chairman)'
Ms Sheryl Bellman*
K.1UOI Edward Davis*
I i ran Ly Eisenberg
Df Philip Frost*
Mr Mauncio Gluck*
Mr E Peter Gotdrng
Mr Leo Hack
Rabbi Warren Kasztl*
Rabbi Barry Konovitch*
Dr Max Opschitz*
Or Randy Makovsky*
Rabbi Menachem Raab*
Judge Steven D Robinson
Comm Barry Schreiber*
Or Joseph A Singer*
DrEdward N Smoler*
Dr'Charles Sprung
Dr. Charles Weiss*
Mrs. Charles Weiss
Mr Marvin Zalis
Dr. Matthew Zuckerman"
Mrs. Matthew Zuckerman
alumni of Ytfshiva
crnmrnt. tnr\



December 1982
Super Sunday
February 6,1983
BE THERE.
Jewish Floridian, Section C. December 31,1982


i ne Jewish Ftoridian/ Friday, December 10. i82
Page-2
Federation, December, 1982

Contents

,
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Fioridian Supplement
December 31,1982 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
president
Norman H. Upoff
Executive vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Public Relations committee
Eli Timoner
SUPER SUNDAY
PAGE 3
On February 6, thousands of dedicated individuals will participate
in this massive outreach program. Join them.
SPECIAL ISRAEL
EMERGENCY FUND
Your support aids the people of Israel whose humanitarian services
touch the lives of thousands.
PAGE 4
CAMPAIGN
PAGE 5
1983 General Campaign Chairman Aaron Podhurst outlines the goals
of the CJA-IEF effort.
The High-Rise Division undertakes a series of upcoming programs
to involve members of the Jewish community.
YAD/JVS
PAGE 6
The Young Adults Division is offering a special opportunity to visit
and view Israel through the Yachad Mission.
The Jewish Vocational Service provides a series of career counseling
and placement programs.
JEWISH HIGH SCHOOL/
CAMPAIGN
PAGE 7
Parents take an active involvement in the operation of the Jewish
High School of South Florida.
The Builders, Real Estate and Allied Trades Division will hold a
computer seminar.
CAMPAIGN
PAGES 8 & 9
The Pacesetter Dinner and the Campaign Opening Dinner start the
1983 CJA-IEF at a record pace.
CAMPAIGN/SOVIET
JEWRY/JF&CS
PAGE 10
The Women's Division offers a lavaliere to contributors of $2,500 to
the 1983 CJA-IEF.
A special Sabbath service will highlight the plight of Soviet prisoners
of conscience.
The Jewish Family and Children's Service opens new offices to provide
improved community outreach.
SOUTH DADE
PAGE 11
The South Dade Branch undertakes a variety of programs to enhance
community involvement in the campaign.
WOMEN'S DIVISION
PAGE 12
A deep sense of commitment to the needs of the Jewish people is
displayed at the Lion of Judah Luncheon.
The Southwest Dade Women's Division Luncheon and fashion show
will be held on Wednesday, January 12.
A special January 17 luncheon has been organized at the Westview
Country Club.
FOUNDATION
PAGE 13
The Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies provides five grants to aid
Israel and the Greater Miami Jewish community.
CALENDAR
FOUNDATIOl
PAGE 14
PAGE 16
A guide to charitable contributions of remainder interests and QTip.
trusts.

lAtMfl*
COUNCIL OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS
_
Wfliwm. mr\
/


Federation, December, 1982
Pge3
Super Sunday Depends on Tou
uarv 6 will be Super Sunday for Jews ^^
hnut Dade County. A massive event on
, I munity happening _
munity. and only you can make it work. BE
there
I This vear's Super Sunday will again be held at
Mole Israel of Greater Miami, 137 NE 19 Street,
d is expected to intensify community involve-
nt in the campaign and acquaint people with
, critical challenges facing Jews around the
khL
K massive phonathon designed to reach every
lie* in the community, Super Sunday is the one
\Z every year when it is vital that Jews work
Inrether to support humanitarian services. It's a
[low of solidarity at home that will help the
Ijeople of Israel, Jewish political prisoners in the
Soviet Union, Jews in need in our community and
lebewhere.
More than any other day of the year, Super
[Sunday is a day when we reach out to our fellow
Ijews in Greater Miami and ask them to reaffirm
lour valued tradition of tzedakah by supporting
lour efforts to provide social services to Jews in
Ineed, said 1983 CJA-IEF General Campaign
I Chairman Aaron Podhurst. "At a time when the
| needs facing Jews everywhere are more pressing
| than ever, especially those confronting the people
Iof Israel, it is crucial that we be sensitive and
I responsive. The contribution each of us makes can
[Bake a difference, and the extent of our commit-
I rent must be at its utmost."
A record number of organizations, agencies and
[synagogues will be involved in the coordination
land activities of Super Sunday, which will take
| place from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Among the groups
| represented on the Super Sunday Executive
|Committee are B'nai B'rith Youth Organization,
J'nai B'rith Men, B'nai B'rith Women. Pioneer
.Aonun. Central Agency for Jewish Education.
School in Israel, Young Judea. Mount Sinai
Medical Center. University of Miami Hillel.
Association Serving Singles, Jewish
I onal Service, Hadassah. Community
[ iaincy Service, Jewish High School of South
I i ish Junior High School ol South
i Jewish 'A ar Veterans, Miami Jev
al lor ged, National
ti Jewish Women I V.
The Super Sunday Executive Committee.
More than 2,600 Super Sunday volunteers
raised $1.4 million for the 1982 CJA-IEF, and this
year's event is sure to get an extra added boost
from the close involvement of area Jewish youth
organizations. L'Chaim of B'nai B'rith Youth
Organization is actively soliciting members of
other youth groups to become Super Sunday
volunteers. As many as 30 such organizations will
be represented at Super Sunday, and their
members will make their commitments to the 1983
CJA-IEF campaign prior to Super Sunday.
Another facet of the event of educational in-
terest is the Expo Center, which will feature
displays and multi-media demonstrations by
Jewish agencies and organizations. The Expo
Center will inform the public about the range of
services supported by the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the Jew amunity's united
ion and concern.
The day participation of
ninent celebrities, pottl lea are and per-
sonalities, as well as musical entertainment
supplied by Dade County high school bands.
Among the luminaries expected to take part in the
activities are Senator Lawton Chiles and
Congressmen Dante Fascell and William Lehman.
The 12-hour event will be catered by the Jewish
Vocational Service Kosher Kitchen program.
So mark the day on your calendar, and get
ready to be part of the most exciting annual event
of the Greater Miami Jewish community. Super
Sunday 1983 Chairmen Lydia Goldring. Frances
B. Levey, David Rosenbaum and Gerald K. Sch-
wartz, expect that increased participation will lead
to the greatest Super Sunday this community has
ever seen.
Please send in the attached registration form
today. For further information about Super
Sunday fall the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
at 576-4000, ext. 278.
February 6 Super Sunday 1983. BE THERE.
And bring a friend
1983 Super Sunday
Executive Committee
Lydia Goldring
Frances B. Levey
David Rosenbaum
Gerald K. Schwartz
Chairmen
Irene Baros
Tim Cohen
Maurice Donsky
Ellyn Elkins
Dr. Robert Ennis
Sid Fagin
Howard Feinberg
Pat Feldman
Abe Franklin
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Joel Friedland
Hope Fuller
Morris Futernick
Al Golden
Philip Goldin
Harriet Green
Alex Greenwald
Claire Greenwald
Gene Greenz weig
Leo Hack
Robbie Herskowitz
Kenneth Hoffman
Norma Jay
Phil Kates
Bruce Kaye
Rabbi Morris Kipper
Bruce Klasner
Kitty Levy
Norman Lipoff
Rabbi Norman Lipson
Ellen Mandler
Bluma Marcus
Penny Marlin
Aida Mitrani
Eli Mitrani
Monique O'Hayon
Deborah Oltchik
Sidney Olson
Terri Packar
Aaron Podhurst
Dianne Raulson
Rose Rice
Gerald Robins
Miton Samuels
William Saulson
Marvis Schaecter
Barbara Schwartz
Maxine Schwartz
Aley Sheer
Susan Sirotta
Vivian Smolarchik
Charlie Sokol
Guillermo Sostchin
George Spitzer
Brenda Stein
Susan Thomas
Eric Turetsky
Steven Weisberg
Harry Weitzer
SUPER SUNDAY
February 6
BE THERE.
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
137 N.E. 19 Street
Volunteer Registration Form
Name.
Address
City ___
.Zip Code_
.Phone.
I Will be Representing:
Youth Group ________
Synagogue _
Organization
GMJF Women's Division ___________________
On Super Sunday I Would Like To Be A:
( ) Phone Volunteer ( ) Non-Phone Volunteer
Please Indicate the Session(s) You Prefer:
( ) 9 a.m. -12 mob ( > 11 a.m.-2 p.m.
( I lp.m. -4 p.m. ( ) 3 p.m.-6 p.m. ( ) 5 p.m. 9 p.m.
Session Includes Registration & Training.
Return this form to:
Super Sunday
GMJF
4200 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Florida 33137


ine Jewish Floridian/ Friday, December 10.1982
*te>Mm*rm^--te-:r~i
Pge 4
Federation, December, 1962
How Move Than EverThe Case for 1983
You can make a difference in the lives of Jews in
Israel. The handicapped, the infirm, the elderly, the
young, they all count on support provided through the
Special Israel Emergency Fund, a one-time effort to
help Jews in need at this time of financial crisis in
Israel.
By supporting the Special Israel Emergency Fund,
in addition to your Regular Campaign gift, you are
aiding a full range of humanitarian services that might
otherwise face severe cutbacks or terminations.
These are just two descriptions of services affected
by your Special Israel Emergency Fund gift. There are
thousands of other persons in Israel who also are coun-
ting on you.
Hope for the Handicapped
By L. E. EZER
One of the most difficult challenges facing a
child upon being discharged from the Alyn
Hospital for Crippled Children in Jerusalem is
adjusting to a strange, seemingly hostile environ-
ment. For many years he had been living in the
protected environment of the hospital together
with other physically handicapped children.
Suddenly, he feels dismay that he will shortly be
on his own.
Nor really, for before he leaves the hospital a
social worker has been constantly with him,
reassuring him that he would be assisted at every
turn after leaving the institution.
The adjustment of a crippled child or young
adult to his family, neighborhood and community
is vital if a patient is to be rehabilitated. Intensive
after-care service is essential to ease the way for a
patient to return to his home environment or to a
new one.
Alyn's Social Service Department, which was
greatly expanded in 1973 with the aid of a con-
tinuing grant from the American Jewish Joint
Distribution Committee, intervenes on behalf of
the youngster to ensure that he has a home to go
to either an especially adapted apartment with
his family, or if he intends to live independently,
in a flat equipped to meet his needs. With the
cooperation of municipalities and various
A Reason to Get Up
By LORI GOODMAN
Each day from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m., Avi is busy
weaving multicolored cloth into carpets, or bed-
spreads, table mats and other products. After a
lunch break, he goes into a small classroom for
lessons in reading, writing and simple math. At
three he meets his co-workers in the social club.
Avi is diligent. He is also retarded.
Avi, aged 25, is employed at the Beit Ariga
Sheltered Workshop in Jerusalem, a rehabilitation
center, administered by AKIM the Israel Asso-
ciation for the Rehabilitation of the Mentally
Handicapped which provides learning, work
and social services.
The 50 trainees, ranging in ages from 20 to 56,
are becoming productive, partially self-supportive
citizens.
"Without this workshop these young adults
would be out on the streets at the mercy of
vagrants and criminals, or would degenerate in
their homes, idle, and a burden upon their hard
pressed families and society," says Chaim Reich-
man, director of Beit Ariga.
The center, established in 1955, had functioned
for 14 years in unsatisfactory conditions. In 1969,
with the aid of a grant from the Central British
Fund via the American Jewish Joint Distribution
Committee (JDC) in Israel it was transferred to its
present three story, especially equipped building
containing workshops, a dining room, kitchen, of-
fices and storage area.
Orit, one of the 35 adults who are engaged in
light assembly work and packaging, comes from a
family of eight. She lives with her parents,
originally from Morocco, in one of the poorer sec-
tions of the city.
Orit works in the department which sends out
bills from government offices and promotional
materials from private firms. Often during the day
she willtop her own work to assist her co-worker,
, a blind girl sharing her table.
Many of those at the shelter suffer from celebral
palsy, speech and hearing difficulties, autism and
epilepsy, in addition to varying degrees of re-
tardation. Almost all have emotional problems
and display secondary behavior disorders which
require attention. For this reason, the staff of four
instructors encourage the workers to develop so-
cial contacts.
Fifteen weavers produce table mats, table-
cloths, bedspreads, pillow-covers, carpets, and
shawls, which are sold in Israel and abroad. They
also make floor rugs which are marketed in public
institutions, industrial enterprises and supermar-
kets.
The profits help pay for wages, costs of raw
materials and some overhead expenses. The bud-
get for the workshop is covered by the Ministry of
Labor and Social Affairs, by AKIM, by the Jeru-
Continued on Page 10
government ministries some children who had
been hospitalized for most of their lives have been
able to strike out on their own.
According to Mrs. Tirza I Ian. the head of the
Social Service Department, Alyn, with the
assistance of the Ministry of Education has
enabled badly crippled youngsters to enter the
public school system.
To ensure that a disabled child has the
necessary assistance to enable his to function after
his discharge, JDC established a Rehabilitation
Fund to secure necessary medical equipment such
as urological and othopedic appliances (crutches,
calipers, braces, wheelchairs) and provide physical
modifications of the home (widening doorways,
installing ramps), home nursing aid,
physiotherapy, domestic help, special tutoring
lessons and occupational therapy.
Alyn's outpatient clinic handles more than
4,000 visits a year. "We encourage the children to
return for checkups and treatment, and provide
psychological and down to earth practical
assistance working through a variety of com-
munity agencies," emphasized Ilan. "We've
also started a campaign to acquaint those coming
in contact with the handicapped with the special
problem faced by these children. Our goal is
maximum habilitation to try to get as many of
our youngsters as possible to ultimately become
self sufficient. Some may have to be bedridden all
their lives; but others, with proper help and
guidance, may some day be able to make it on
their own."
Despite being blind, Leah and Tamar are able to do light packaging for local
firms at the Akim Sheltered Workshop in Jerusalem.


Federation. December, 1982
Page 5
|i Message from General Campaign
Chairman Aaron Podhurst
Thousands of Jews in Greater Miami already
_ve made their commitments to support Jews in
-ed throughout the world by participating in the
[983 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
fund. Their generosity has given the campaign its
strongest start ever. But it is up to you to keep
Ibis record-setting pace constant.
We began the campaign year with the most suc-
(cessful Pacesetter Dinner and Campaign Opening
I pj'nner in the history of the Greater Miami Jewish
[Federation. The level of commitment expressed
during these events graphically displayed an und-
erstanding and concern for the growing needs of
'theJewish people.
But this merely marks the beginning of the
campaign. Kach of us must do the utmost to
maintain the momentum of our campaign by
meeting the guidelines set to answer the particular
crises faced by Jews everywhere this year.
We are asking that you increase your gift to the
Regular Campaign by a minimum of 10 percent to
meet the growing needs of our people at home and
abroad.
Additionally, we are requesting a one-time
commitment equaling at least one third of your
1982 gift for the Special Israel Emergency Fund,
which will support human service programs in
Aaron Podhurst
Israel in this time of great financial stress.
In meeting the guidelines, you are allowing your
fellow Jews to receive the social service aid they so
desperately need. You will be providing life and
hope for individuals and families who would
otherwise live in desperation or isolation. You will
be aiding more than 50 vital agencies servicing
Jews in Greater Miami, in Israel and in Jewish
communities worldwide.
Your gift to the Special Israel Emergency Fund
will involve you in the response of world Jewry to
the worst financial circumstance in the history of
the State of Israel. There are thousands of Jews in
Israel counting on us to maintain the quality of
the humanitarian services upon which they de-
pend. These services will be forced to cut the
programs they provide, unless each of us come* to
their aid.
Last year, we were proud to hail the 1982 cam-
paign as the most successful in the history of our
Federation. This year, the needs of the Jewish
people are far greater, pur resolve to aid our fellow
Jews has grown and the responsibility each of us
accepts must surge.
We must declare that we will BE THERE when
we are needed in Greater Miami, in Israel or in any
Jewish community abroad. The campaign is the
most important expression of this commitment, of
our pledge to the principles and heritage of the
Jewish people. Together we can achieve great ac-
complishments of lasting and crucial value.
BE THERE.
High-Rises Begin Ambitious Campaign
The expression "Home is where the heart is,"
takes on all new meaning for leaders of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's High-Rise Division,
which is undertaking its most ambitious cam-
paign ever on behalf of the 1983 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
High-Rise Division Co-Chairmen Alfred Golden
and Sidnev Olson have announced a series of
events geared to galvanize the commitment of the
Jewish high-rise residents', to the needs of world
Jewry.
The following events have been scheduled for
high-rise buildings during the months of January
and February:
Harbour House and Carlton Terrace will hold
their annual fundraising meeting on Sunday,
January 9 at 10 a.m. at the White Cypress
Restaurant. Federation Vice President and Past
Campaign Chairman Norman Braman will be the
featured guest speaker.
Seacoast Towers East will honor Hy Rubin
for his dedication to the Jewish community on
Sunday, January 16 at 10:30 a.m. in the
Playhouse. The 1983 campaign film "Be There"
also will be shown to describe the goals and objec-
tives of the 1983 CJA-IEF.
Arlen Houses will sponsor a meeting on
Sunday, January 23 at 10 a.m. in the auditorium,
featuring a special keynote speaker.
Crystal House will hold its annual cocktail
reception on Tuesday, January 18, at 4:30 p.m.
with CJA-IEF General Campaign Chairman
Aaron Podhurst serving as guest speaker.
Seacoast Towers V will sponsor its annual
campaign brunch on Sunday, January 30 at 10:30
am. in the Embassy Room."
1 he Corinthian will hold its annual campaign
meeting on Sunday, January 30 at 10 a.m. in the
home of Samuel M. Charin.
Seacoast Towers South campaign leaders are
Planning their annual campaign meeting, which
"as been scheduled for Sunday, January 30,
Chairman Albert Shulman announced.
The Imperial House Campaign Committee is
organizing a fundraising meeting to be held in the
atter part of January.
Maison Grade Campaigners expect to hold a
campaign meeting for their fellow tenants during
, ----O" WCUUg IUI
we month of February.
H-FurD0re ^formation about these and other
JJgh-Rise Division events, call Federation at 576-
A TIME FOR MIRACLES
Avi made a heroic sacrifice to keep Israel
free from terrorism. He used to carry his
kid brother on his shoulders. Now his
kid brother carries him into bed each
night. Avi still dreams of becoming an
engineer. With his will and courage,
he'll soon start realizing that dream.
There will be a place for him in an
Israeli university through funds
received from the CJA-IEF.
Mrs. Baum. a widow on Miami Beach,
suffers from congestive heart failure. The
Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida arranged for her to be protected
by the Automated Response Monitoring
System. Just three months later she had
a heart attack. Mrs. Baum pressed a
button in her apartment and medics
from Mount Sinai Medical Center were
on their way. She is better now .
through a life-saving service made
possible by members of Federation's
family of agencies.
Only by multiplying these two people,
or any two people you are helping, by
two million others can you begin to
grasp the miracles your support of the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund creates in Israel, in
Greater Miami and in 33 other lands.
I urge you to pay your pledge now to
the CJA-IEF Campaign because cash is
needed now as never before.
Your payment can make this a time of
miracles for all of our people.
Harry A. ^lap) Levy
Cash Chairman
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
4200 Biscayne Boulevard, Miami, Florida 33137


1 no Jewuh F
/ Friday, December 10.1
Pag6
.
Federation, December, 1982
Yaehad Mission Offers
Togetherness in Israel
parts at this exciting time of the 35th
sary."
Some notable occasions planned for the Ya hJ
Mission include: ctl*
Special Holocaust Day remembran
ceremonies at U.S. regional departure airports
A celebration of Israel's 35th anniversary wi
the people of Israel on April 18, Yom Ha'Atzm.
Israel Independence Day.
Participation in Israel's April 19
memoration of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising.
Home hospitality get together with
Israelis.
youn
An
The Hebrew word "yaehad" means together.
And the upcoming Yaehad Mission to Israel, from
April 10-20, will offer young area Jews a once in a
lifetime opportunity to join together with 1,500
other young American Jews in a very exciting and
special experience.
The Yaehad Mission, jointly sponsored by
United Jewish Appeal's Young Leadership
Cabinet and UJA's Young Women's Leadership
Cabinet, will bring together single and married
Jews from all walks of life with the people of Israel
as they celebrate Yom Ha' Atzmaut, the 35th anni-
versary of the Jewish State.
Because this mission promises to be very
popular, the Greater Miami Jewish community
has been allocated a limited number of spaces that
will be filled on a first-come first-served basis, said
Judy and Michael Adler, and Ezra Katz, Florida
regional chairpersons for the trip.
"We're expecting over 100 young leaders from
our Miami community on this mission," Michael
Adler said. "We want to join our Israeli counter-
opportunity to interact with you
political, military and business leaders in th
Jewish State.
"We're seeking to attract people with leadeij
ship potential," Katz said. "We hope to fill 011
allotment of the national mission by the end 1
January."
Judy Adler said she's looking forward to a lara
contingent of women on the mission, which
geared to help develop future leadership in tb
Jewish community. She also pointed out
some events on the mission will be orienu
towards single professional women.
Participants on the mission will make a lb
minimum gift to the 1983 Combined Jewish!
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. Because tha
Greater Miami Jewish Federation is placing great!
importance on this mission, it has agreed to 1
each participant a very special financial packag
for the trip.
For more information about this excitin
mission, please contact Milton Heller at
Federation office, 576-4000.
*lVH Offers Career Service*
The Jewish Vocational Service offers a myriad
of career counseling and job assistance services
through the auspices of its Community Services
Department, which aids the Jewish community
throughout Dade County.
The JVS, a member of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's family of agencies, offers
these programs to adults and teenagers to make
them more aware of their potential within the
changing job market. The services provided
extend from the actual selection of an employment
field to job placement assistance.
CAREER PLANNING What is it?
The JVS Career Planning Service is an indivi-
dualized, comprehensive program designed to
assist people interested in choosing or changing
careers. Vocational testing, counseling and oc-
Yonng Professionals
Reception
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's Young
Adults Division will sponsor a Young Business
and Professional Advance Gifts Reception on
Thursday, January 13 at Grove Isle, the first
event it is conducting on behalf of the 1983
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
The cocktail reception, which will be hosted by
Federation President Norman H. Lipoff and his
wife, Nancy, is part of an intensive effort by YAD
to reach out to uncommitted young Jews in the
community and involve as wide a spectrum of
them as possible in the campaign. There will be a
$250 mimimum gift per person or married couple
to the CJA-IEF to attend the function.
"The focus of the campaign is to contact the
thousands of unaffiliated young Jews in the
Greater Miami community and to acquaint them
with Federation and Young Adults Division,"
said YAD Campaign Chairman Louis Berlin.
"We're confident that this important kickoff
event will succeed in getting new young people
involved with the campaign and give them the
opportunity to meet other young Jews."
Berlin said that YAD's campaign is off "to a
fantastic start," noting that 75 of its members
were represented at the Campaign Opening
Dinner. He added that people who will attend the
Advance Gifts Reception are being asked to bring
a friend to the function.
For more information about the reception or Members of the New American Jewish Social Club present a checTfor the 1963 Combined Jewish-
ul tvL-t^Snln*96 Isnel Em'rgy Ft"* Campaign to Greater Miami Jewish Federation Executive Vice President My***
Heller at Federation, 5^6-4000. Brodie (center).
cupational information are used in this decision-
making process. Group counseling sessions are
also held periodically at its two JVS facilities.
Who can benefit from Career Planning?
Youth interested in establishing a career
direction and planning their education. Adults
interested in exploring a new vocational direction
or making a career change. Homemakers who, by
choice or chance, desire to enter or re-enter the job
market.
FEES A sliding scale based on ability to pay is
used to determine fees for Career Planning Ser-
vices.
This year JVS presented three "College Night"
workshops which were held at various Jewish
Community Centers throughout Dade County.
These "College Night" workshops were en-
thusiastically received by both students and
parents. Local experts were available to discuss
current financial aid, career choice and the college
selection process. Future college workshops are
already being planned for Fall '83.
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE What is H?
The function of the JVS Employment Service is
to meet the needs of employers and job seekers in
Dade County.
JOB PLACEMENT The JVS Employment
Service offers assistance to individuals seeking
employment in their chosen fields. Counseling is I
available to help develop effective job-seeking|
skills and interviewing techniques.
JOB BANK JVS maintains a job Bank listing I
of local job openings. Our employment counselor
works toward "matching up" the employer with a |
qualified applicant.
RESUME PREPARATION A JVS counselor!
will evaluate existing resumes and create new ones j
as part of this all-inclusive service. A fee of $15 is
charged for resume typing. There is an additional
charge for printing if copies are desired.
THERE ARE NO FEES FOR JOB PLACE
MENT SERVICES.
Group programs are held periodically to explore |
the hidden job market and add to clients more
effective job strategies.
Who can benefit from JVS Employment Sw
vice?
Persons of varied backgrounds and ages, recent j
graduates, career changers or people looking to
advance their careers can benefit. People new to
the community can gain valuable information
regarding the local job market. Those people
seeking part-time employment can also utilize
JVS services.
For further information, contact Beth K. Wald
community services coordinator, at Main Office.
576-3220 or South Dade Office: 235-9482.


Federation, December, 1982
Jfo
parents of Jewish High School Step In
The Jewish High School, now in its second year,
ntinues to grow. This year for the first time, a
pent-Teacher Association was formed. This
organization is working diligently to establish a
*rong foundation.
The Association planned a series of evening
ffees to help the parents acquaint themselves
,u one another, as well as with members of the
faulty Tne theme of these coffees was, "What
L your child do in school today?" Each evening
had representatives from one of the four depart-
ments at the Jewish High School: Jewish Studies,
Humanities, Science and Technology and Educa-
tional Resources.
The Adult Education Committee of the Parent
Association is planning four lectures given by
faculty members. These lectures, which will take
place later in the school year, will give the parents
exposure to the specific content of courses offered
at the Jewish High School.
Kitty Levy, chairperson of the Public Relation
Booth Committee from the Parent Association,
has become involved with planning and working
on Super Sunday. Jose Levy, an architect and a
parent from the school, has designed our booth ac-
cording to the specifications of the Super Sunday
Committee.
The newly elected Parent Executive is as
follows: Carol Freed and Linda Levine, co-chair-
persons, Florence Roth and Jackie Sheir, vice
presidents, Kitty Levy, secretary. Myrna Rubens,
treasurer and Dr. Arnold Sheir and Dr. Leon
Roth, representatives to the School Board. The
faculty representative is Gary Felilich.
On December 10 the eleventh grade class repre-
sented the Jewish High School at the Federation
Women's Plea for Soviet Jewry. In co-operation
with the efforts of Myrna Loman, assistant
director of community relations at the Miami
Federation and Merle Saferstein, administrative
assistant at the Jewish High School, the students
lit candles to usher in Chanukah and to remind
others of the Soviet Jews who are in prison. The
touching dedication ceremony was made more
meaningful by the presence of the eleventh
graders.
The Jewish High School is the first Federation-
initiated high school in our country. A junior high
school has also been established at Federation's
initiative this year in southwest Miami. A number
of other Federations throughout the country are
closely watching the developments in Miami with
the hopes of instituting similar programs. With
the continuing support from Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation, the Jewish Federation of South
Broward and the Jewish Federation of Ft. Laud-
erdale, the Jewish High School is successfully
flourishing.
The Jewish High School is also unique because
of its affiliation with World ORT supervises seven
hundred schools throughout the world. The
Jewish High School is the only American day
school under the aegis of ORT. Because of the
sponsorship of American ORT Federation, the
high school was able to set up its fine,
sophisticated computer program.
Computer* Seminars Planned for Builders
Richard Zinn, chairman of the Builders, Real Estate and Allied Trades Division speaks at the
division '$ recent computer seminar.
The Builders, Real Estate and Allied Trades
Division of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
is sponsoring a series of educational seminars
dealing with the use of computers in the real
estate and development businesses. Computers
are revolutionizing these fields, and each of the
seminars is designed to offer professionals
valuable information about how they can use
these modern electronic tools to improve their
business.
On Thursday, January 13 at 2:30 p.m., a
seminar will be for single family and condominium
brokers. On Thursday January 20 at 2:30 p.m.,
there will be a seminar on computer applications
for builders and developers.
The first seminar in the series, held on
December 7, attracted a packed house, so we urge
you to make a reservation as soon as possible for
upcoming sessions since space is limited. The
final event in this educational series will be a
Builders Hound table in February. There is no
charge for the seminars, which are being offered as
part of Federation's 1983 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
Richard Zinn is chairman of the Builders,
Real Estate and Allied Trades Division, and
Leonard A. Wien, Jr. is its educational chairman.
For more information and reservations,
please call Mr. Wien at 576-4000. If he is not
available, a Federation staff member will handle
your call.

Hillel Alumni Organize
BNAI BRITH HILLEL FOUNDATIONS
OF GREATER MIAMI ALUMNI SEARCH
For forty years B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
of Greater Miami has been serving the needs of
our Jewish college students and the larger
Jewish community. Hillel is proud of its past of
the many students who, by coming through its
doors and sharing in the Hillel experience, have
become better citizens; better Jews.
For us and for our children Hillel has been
there. Serving as a Jewish home away from home,
Hillel offers students a place to study, a place to
worship, a place to grow, a place to meet with
other Jews.
In this, its fortieth year, Greater Miami Hillel is
forming an alumni organization for all graduates
of Dade County colleges and universities. Hillel
needs your help in identifying and reaching our
alumni. If you, or someone you know is an
alumnus of a college or university please contact
Marilyn Stern Emas at the Hillel Area Office,
1100 Stanford Drive, Coral Gables. Florida 33146,
or by calling 661-8549.
Help Hillel to break ground on the first Hillel
alumni organization in Florida.
Let Hillel continue for another forty years. Help
m identifying those who shared in the Hillel
experience, join in building a stronger Hillel for
tomorrow.
jr
Join the celebration of Israel's
thirty fifth anniversary
at
ISRAEL 35
A Communitywide Festival
Sunday, April 24
A dav of celebrities, crafts, games, cuisine, displays and activities in recognition of this
occasion for the Jewish people. It's all taking place at the Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center in North Dade and the South Dade Jewish Community Center. Help
us make this special event an overwhelming success by volunteering your assistance and
involvement.
For More Information
251-1394 (In South Dade)
935-2440 In North Dade)
Sponaorad by Uw Jawiah Community Canlar* of South Florida


113 Jewish FJoridian/ Friday, Dacambr
P**vS
10.1982
Federation. December, 1982
1988 CJA-IEF Campaign KiC]
The 1983 Combir I jewj<
Campaign began at a record
cesses of the Novemh 23 pa(
Campaign Opening Dinner.
The Pacesetters enj i .yed ai
performance by fair comi
Hamlisch. They also press*
Jews in need at home and abi
truly "set the pace" for he cai
The Campaign Opening
attendance ever at such an evei
ander M. Haig, Jr. delivered
need for continued sup iforl
Mn* H*mh$ck
The participants hese
declaring the Greater Miami
BE THERE when the ishi
4 r*. .*-'.>. .v ** if*b Fmmt Hats. GHJF .Nnaw: Ku imi Lw
San. Gtorrmex ~^om iefti Ha-> A Hmp> Ln-y. Ron Age
Dmmmm LeHam*
Pw* ir*


Federation, December, 1982
Page 9
at Record -Breaking Face
^.Israel Emergency Fund
jc< purred by the suc-
inner and the December 2
of rlegance and a special
sicis11/entertainer Marvin
sen se of commitment for
[display of dedication that
is marked by the largest
31 Secretary of State Alex-
iot address, stressing the
anc State of Israel.
>r events took the lead in
Community's intention to
Is support.
General Alexander M. Haig, Jr. (from left), Patricia Haig, Campaign Opening
Dinner Chairman Bunny Adler, Federation Vice President Samuel I. Adler.
\'
c>
f,
pro/ Alexander M. Haig, Jr. (from Left), Patricia Haig, Batya Arnon,
el Consul General Joel Arnon. Campaign Opening Dinner
er Attendance and Table Captains Chairman for the Campaign Opening
er ax Knvit*> (from left), Patricia Haig. Wendy Kravxtz, General Maria Beguiristein (from left). Ed Shohat, Judy Adler, Michael Adler, Howard
ander M. Haig, Jr. Frank, Merle Frank, Ezra Katz, Debra Puyanic, Peter Luria and Abby Penson


ine Jewish FloridJan/ Fridw, DkmIw 10. IMS
P"
W

Page 10
Federation, December, 1982
Women Guardians to
Receive ]ew Award
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's
Division has introduced a new award for women
who become Guardians by making a gift of $2,500
or more to the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund.
The new trademark of the Guardians will be an
elegant 14-karat gold lavaliere that has the He-
brew word "shomer" which means "guardian"
in English on it. The beautiful piece of jewelry
was created especially for the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation by Balogh Jewelers of Coral
Gables.
"The Guardian lavaliere will be a proud symbol
to be worn by all women whose commitment to the
timeless tradition of tzedakah makes them a
Guardian of the Jewish spirit," said Women's
Division Campaign Chairwoman Ellen Mandler.
"Based on the overwhelming response the piece
has already received among high-rise leadership,
we are sure its success will be tremendous with the
entire Greater Miami Jewish community, as well
as the Women's Division."
Last year, the Guardians held a reception at
Gucci in Bal Harbour, and plans are now under-
way for a 1983 function.
For further information about the Guardians,
please call the Women's Division office, 576-4000.
POC Shabbat Decries Soviet Jewish Plight
Novosibirsk, USSR: Feliks Kochubievsky,
Soviet Jewish activist has just been sentenced to
2'/j years in a Soviet labor camp. The 52 year old
electrical engineer was convicted of "defaming
Soviet state and social system."
Kochubievsky, described by friends as "the last
idealist," has been the target of KGB harassment
since his 1978 application for a visa to Israel,
which he filed with his wife, Valentine. He was
denied permission to join his two sons there on the
grounds of "regime considerations." His sub-
sequent efforts to reestablish a USSR-Israel
Friendship Society exasperated his already
strained situation. He was denounced by the
Soviet authorities as a "counter-revolutionary"
although at one time he had been awarded The
Soviet Order of Merit for Patriotic Work and has
earned his Candidate of Technical Sciences degree.
ANOTHER PRISONER
OF CONSCIENCE
HAS BEEN CLAIMED
Prisoners of Conscience (P.O.C.s) are Soviet
Jews who have been sentenced to labor camps or
internal exile to Siberia on a variety of charges as
a consequence of their desire to emigrate to Israel.
Their sentences range from 1 to 15 years. Trials
almost inevitably are closed and it is usual for the
defendent to be denied permission to introduce
evidence on his behalf or to be given a lawyer of
his choice. Prisoners of Conscience are being
punished and used as examples to frighten and
deter other Jews from applying for exit visas.
Their situation is one of grave concern.
When released, Prisoners of Conscience are no
longer permitted to emigrate with their families
once they have completed their sentence. They
remain part of the refusenik population
waiting, waiting .
In response to the plight of these brave people,
the Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami has
declared January 28th-29th Prisoner of Consci-
ence Shabbat. Congregations throughout the
community will be dedicating their services to
Soviet Jewry and the Prisoners of Conscience. A
special service has been prepared by the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry. In addition, a
dedication reading will be offered from the pulpit
by many Rabbis.
Among the famous Prisoners of Conscience still
being held hostage in the Soviet Union is Anatoly
Shcharansky still on a hunger strike since Yom
Kippur. Yuri Federov andAlexei Murzhenko.both
non-Jews imprisoned since 1970 and sentenced to
14 years in a prison camp. Murzhenko and
Federov tried in the first Leningrad trial and
utilized by the Soviet authorities as a warning to
JF&CS Opens New Facility
Effective January 3, Jewish Family and'
Children's Service will open new offices at 7455
Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. The Collins Avenue
facility is one of five located throughout Dade
County in an effort to make services available to
all members of the Jewish community.
According to David Salt man, JFCS executive
director, the decision to locate in the North Shore
area was prompted by a need to reach out to a
greater population of Jewish people living on
Miami Beach.
"Shifts in population over age 60 during the last
few years and an increase in the number of
families with children in the area make this an
ideal place to attract new clients to our many
professional services," he said. "A large portion of
specially-trained staff of our Department of
Services for the Aged will be based there
AKIN Continued
from Page 4
salem Municipality and by private donors.
Each worker is assured a basic wage, plus a pre-
mium based on output. Wages are augmented by
payment from the National Insurance Institute.
Most of those at the workshop have received lit-
tle formal education. They come to Beit Ariga on
their own initiative or are recommended by social
workers connected with the Municipal Rehabilita-
tion Department or with Public Welfare Bureaus.
Those with physical handicaps are provided with
transportation.
A special (utoring program includes the three
"Rs." The teacher encourages her students to de-
velop self-expression. A few can read and write
fluently, and enjoy keeping a personal diary. Some
correspond with retarded pen-pals in the United
States.
providing improved coverage to that area of the
county."
Programs for elderly persons include individual,
marital, family and group counseling on a variety
of issues related to growing older. Ruth Sale,
department director, stated that her staff is
particularly skilled in helping clients with ad-
justment to retirement, death of a spouse, divorce,
second marriages and issues dealing with adult
children.
"Of course, even though our offices will be
newly renovated and very comfortable, we are
always prepared to provide in-home service for
persons unable to come to us," she said.
Agency home visits often occur when family
members contact JFCS with their concerns about
elderly relatives. She added that "... in many
Soviet citizens not to "align themselves with,
Jews." Victor Brailovsky, Doctor of Compute!
Science and Applied Mathematics, arrested iij
1981 and forbidden to leave the USSR for Israe
since 1972. There are now 13 Prisoners of Zion
Former Prisoners of Conscience such as
Nudel, Victor Slepak, Boris Chernobilsky, havJ
been released and yet remain prisoners in th2
Soviet Union unable to reach their fondest dreams
Eretz Israel.
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff, president of the|
Rabbinical Association said "The lesson of
Holocaust would be of no value unless we continue
today to act on what we have learned about thel
necessity for vigilance and protest. As we mournl
the loss of 6,000,000 Jews, let us not forget thatl
our present silence will allow one-quarter of thel
world's Jews, those who live in the Soviet Union.|
to be destroyed slowly, quietly through assi-
milation and the lack of Jewish culture and|
education and dramatically, through the impris-
onment of those courageous Jews who become |
Prisoners of Conscience."
Any congregation wishing to have more infor-J
mation as to P.O.C. Shabbat Service should!
contact South Florida Conference on Soviet
Jewry, Department of the Community Relations
Committee of Greater Miami Jewish federation at |
576-4000.
instances an adult child residing in another city
calls regarding a parent in Miami. JFCS provides I
an evaluation encompassing physical and
emotional health, activities of daily living and
racial relationships. Two purposes are ac-1
com pi i shed: a full awareness of the persons needs,,
is established; we secure the family's involvement
in assuming responsibility for the elderly
relative's care."
JFCS will also shift the location of service to the
South Beach area to its office at Ida Fisher
School, 1424 Drexel Avenue. That change will
follow the closing of its Washington Avenue
facility. Fees for services are charged based upon
ability to pay. Inquiries regarding services can be
made by calling 445-0555.
JFCS is a beneficiary agency of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and is supported in part
by United Way of Dade County.
There are many new immigrants at the shelter Federation Executive Vice President Myron J. Brodie (from left), Holocaust Memorial Center Director Marc
to have difficulty speaking Hebrew. Often, older PoUick, Dr. Norman Morrison and Federation President Norman H. Lipoff view an exhibit of photographs
who
members, who had come to Israel years before, as- takm of Auschwitz in 1981 by Morrison.
sist them.


Federation, December. 1982
Page 11
South Dade Initiates New Programs
Innovation and renewed commitment accent
the participation of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation's South Dade Branch in the 1983
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign.
A number of new programs have been initiated
under the leadership of South Dade Campaign
Chairman Harry Weitzer, including events and
projects which will target particular professional
groups within the Jewish community.
"We have been extremely pleased by the in-
creased activity and growing sense of community
experienced in South Dade," Weitzer said. "We are
reaching individuals who have had minimal in-
volvement in past campaigns, but are accepting
major commitments this year."
Weitzer noted that the December 2 Campaign
Opening Dinner attracted the largest response
ever from members of the South Dade Branch. He
also said 17 South Dade Branch Board members
served as table captains at the event.
The major campaign events have been planned
to emphasize the growth of commitment within
South Dade. The Third Annual South Dade
Cocktail Reception will be held on Thursday,
February 17 at the Kings Bay Yacht Club.
Participants in this event make a minimum gift of
$500 to the 1983 CJA-IEF Campaign. Special
guest at the reception will be Emmy Award
winning actor Michael Moriarity, best known in
his role as Captain Dorf in the television series
"Holocaust." The cocktail reception will em-
phasize the growing sense of Jewish community
spirit in South Dade, and will include booths and
displays presented by various Jewish agencies
and organizations serving that section of Dade
County. Joel and Paula Levy are serving as
chairmen of the reception, with Richard Kohn
chairing the program, Robbie Herskowitz and
Linda Hoffman serving as food chairmen, Marlene
Kohn serving as decorations chairman, and
Sydney New mark chairing attendance.
A second cocktail reception is being launched
for the first time this year on Saturday, March 12
at the Lowe Art Museum. Participants in this
tirst-time event make a minimum gift of $250 to
the 1983 CJA-IEF Campaign. Bruce Weitz, who
plays Detective Michael Belker in the popular
television program "Hill Street Blues," will be
special guest at this reception. The chairmen of
this reception are Fran and Robert Benin.
Dr. Robert Marlin, chairman of Federation's
Dentists Division, announced a series of programs
that have drawn particular attention from dental
professionals in South Dade. He explained that
the dentists received special training in person-to-
person solicitation during a campaign worker
training session led by Federation leader Kenneth
J. Schwartz and arranged by South Dade Training
Chairman Cornelia Philipson. Additionally, two
educational meetings have been held for the
dentists, resulting in increased activity within the
division.
Marlin also said worker gifts within the Den-
tists Division have increased by 135 percent thus
far. In addition, the dentists will participate in an
April 2 lMay 4 mission to Israel, for which parlor
meetings will be held during the month of
January.
The South Dade branch of Federation's Physi-
cians Division also has undertaken a series of new
programs to draw new involvement from area
" doctors. Dr..Harry Graff, chairman of the South
Israel 35
South Dade will join the worldwide celebration
of Israel's 35th anniversary with an "Israel 35"
festival to be held on April 24 at the South Dade
Jewish Community Center. Dror Zadok, who
chaired the 1982 "Yom Ha'Atzmaut" celebration,
has been named as South Dade chairman of this
event.
. A second festival will be celebrated
simultaneously at the Michael-Ann Russell
Jewish Community Center in North Dade,
providing even greater exposure for Israel Inde-
pendence Day, which was observed only in South
uade last year. Thousands of Jews from
municipalities throughout Dade County joined in
craft CV!nt" Which was highlighted by expositions,
raits displays, entertainment, and Israeli and
American cuisine.
orriinlil!?teers are **" ^Sht to assist in the co-
inW ?" ^ ^ganization of Israel 35. For more
CommSV00111801 the S^h Dade Jewish
community Center at 251-1394

*
Dr. Harry Graff
Dade physicians program, explained that events
are being held to sensitize the medical community
to the growing needs of world Jewry and the
necessary sense of commitment to be sought from
the local Jewish community.
This year, programs have been organized for the
staffs of the three major South Dade hospitals,
with Dr. Joel Levin and Dr. Sam Steiner chairing
programs at Coral Reef Hospital; Dr. Yale Samole
serving as South Dade Hospital campaign
chairman; and Dr. Jerrold Young chairing the
Baptist Hospital effort. Doctors at Coral Reef and
South Miami hospitals held educational meetings
with Dr. Norman Morrison, executive vice
president of Knight Ridder Newspapers, deliver-
ing the keynote addresses. Baptist Hospital
physicians held a meeting with Morton Silberman,
national president of the America-Israel Public
Affairs Committee and past president of
Federation.
South Dade Federation members also are being
asked to take special part in the February 6 Super
Sunday program, with a special recruitment effort
being made for South Dade Board and Advisory
Committee members to assume an extra two
hours of telephone solicitation duty in the New
Gifts room. South Dade Super Sunday Chairman
Bluma Marcus explained that a total of 1,500 new
gifts are being sought in South Dade during the
course of the 1983 campaign. Special worker
training will be provided in South Dade for new
gifts solicitation, she added.
"We expect to meet with unprecedented success
in our efforts to draw new blood into our campaign
efforts," said South Dade Branch Chairman Mikki
Harry Weitzer
Dr. Robert Marlin
Futernick. "And we are confident that the Jews of
South Dade will provide their maximum support
and commitment to help Jews in need worldwide."
For more information about these and other
programs to be presented in 1983, contact Federa-
tion's South Dade Branch Office at 251-9334.

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i Jri.h Floridkn/ Friday. December 10.1982
i*mm**mm*

.
Federation Women Demonstrate
Commitment at
Lion of Judah Luncheon
An event distinguished by the sophistication
and elegance of an ocean liner setting, the
December 5 Lion of Judah Luncheon, one of the
annual gala events of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division, was a tremendous
success.
Held aboard Carnival Cruise Lines' Mardi Gras,
this year's luncheon paid special tribute to women
Pacesetters, those individuals who made a
minimum gift of $10,000 to the 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
The Lion of Judah Luncheon is held annually
for Women's Division Trustees, women who
makes a minimum gift of $5,000 to the Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. The
Trustee trademark is the Lion of Judah gold pin, a
symbol that has been adopted by several other
Federations around the nation.

"We were all extremely pleased with the day's
turnout and the support raised on behalf of the
campaign. The 130 women who attended the
luncheon demonstrated their deep commitment to
the needs of world Jewry," said Women's Division
Campaign Chairwomen Ellen Mandler. "I'd like to
personally thank everyone who helped make the
day a success, and I want to offer my gratitude to
Lin and Ted Arison for donating the facilities and
services of the Mardi Gras."
A function filled with many highlights, the
morning portion included the presentation of the
Pacesetter Judaic Sculptures and Medallions to
new Pacesetters. Women's Division President
Maxine E. Schwartz presented the stylish bronze
works, designed by renowned Miami artist and
sculptor Kenneth Treister, and praised the
Pacesetters for their sense of responsibility for
their fellow Jews and generosity of spirit.
Guest speaker Sylvia Hassenfeld, a national
vice chairman of United Jewish Appeal, discussed
the new political realities in the Middle East
resulting from the summer conflict in Lebanon
and made an impassioned plea on behalf of the
people of Israel who are grappling with a critical
economic situation.
"We confront a very grave crisis peace will
not happen (in the Middle East) unless there's
Westview
Country
Club Iviiiiclicron
for CJA-IEF
The Westview Federation Women's Division
Luncheon, on behalf of the 1983 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, will be held on
Thursday, January 27, beginning at 9 a.m.
A day that promises to have something for
everyone, the event will feature a morning tennis
tournament and an afternoon of backgammon,
bridge and card games. Guest speaker at the
luncheon will be Marjorie Scott, a member of the
National Campaign Policy Board of United Jew-
ish Appeal and a National Board Member of UJA
Women's Division.
"We're looking forward to a most successful
event," said luncheon Co-Chairwoman Elaine
Berkowitz, who added that it should attract
record attendance.
"We're really excited about it, and we're look-
ing for a lot of new participants," added luncheon
Co-Chairwoman Selma Newman.
Scott also serves on the board of the Jewish
Community Federation and the Jewish Communi-
ty .Foundation in New Jersey. In partnership with
an Israeli firm, she imports and distributes
laboratory glassware manufactured in Jerusalem.
Gail Gidney is organizing the tennis tourna-
ment, Rita Seamon is arranging the bridge and
card games, and Sandy Tate and Suzin Herzfeld
are handling decorations.
This event is only open to Westview Country |
Club members. For futher information, please call
the Federation Women's Division Office, 576-
4000.
Pacesetter-Trustee Chairwoman Paula Friedland (from left). Women's Division Campaign Chairwoman]
Ellen Mandler, National Vice Chairman of UJA Sylvia Hassenfeld, Pacesetter-Trustee Chairwoman Ghria]
Scharlin and Women's Division President Maxine E. Schwartz at the Lion of Judah Luncheon.
prosperity (in Israel)," Hassenfeld said. "Israelis
are ready to die for Israel, but they find it very
hard to live there."
The event concluded with a fashion show by
Martha Inc. of Bal Harbour, which displayed the
latest in cocktail and evening wear designed by
Stavropoulos of New York City.
Pacesetter-Trustee Chairwomen Paula
Friedland and Gloria Scharlin were in charge of
arrangements for the luncheon.
Southwest Dade Reception
oil January 12 M
A Southwest Dade Women's Division luncheon
and fashion show, on behalf of the 1983 Combined
Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, will be
held on Wednesday, January 12 at the Sheraton
River House, 3900 NW 21 Street, Miami.
Southwest Campaign Chairwoman Sandy Miot
said the event will feature guest speaker Vicki
Agron, director of national United Jewish Ap-
peal's executive vice chairman's office, and a
fashion show by Ophelia art to wear, a Miami
clothier.
"We have many young families in the South-
west Dade area," Miot said. "We aim at getting
new people involved with Federation's Women's
Division and the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund Campaign."
Vicki Agron has served as a delegate to the
General Assembly of the Jewish Agency, and is a
former executive committe member of the Council
of Jewish Federations and a past chairman of
United Jewish Appeal's National Young Women's
Leadership Cabinet.
Women who attend this function make a $52
minimum gift to the 1983 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal-Israel Emergency Fund. Marlene Kohn and
Ineke Kreeger are the luncheon chairwomen.
For further information about this and other
upcoming events, please call the Federation
Women's Division Office, 576-4000.
Vicki Agron
*
South Dade Branch Chairman Mikki Futernick, Federation President Norman H. Lipoff and noted Israeli
author Danny Pinkos share a moment during a Women *s Division Campaign Training Session.



Federation. December, 1882
Pagatt
-foundation
|^nnonnces>
(five Grants
Committed to providing financial support for
lumanitarian programs serving the Jewish com-
,unity, the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies has
located seed money for four new important
projects.
Stressing that "an expanding foundation is
asent ial for insuring the continuity and future of
federation programs," Foundation Chairman Jay
I Kislak, announced "we are most pleased to be
ibli' to meet the needs of fellow Jews with these
pants from our current assets."
The Foundation's Board of Trustees approved a
pint of $12,450 for the newly formed Greater
Miami Jewish Federation Task Force on Cults and
Missionary Activities, and a grant of $4,250 to the
Federation Community Relations Committee's
South Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry. It also
jiovided a $5,000 grant to the "My Brother's
Keeper" program of the Hillel Jewish Student
Center at the University of Miami. These
programs are detailed in the adjoining articles on
this page.
The Foundation Board also allocated $14,200
for the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's share
of membership dues in the Florida Association of
" II federation Government Affairs Office. Now in its
io H second year, the office has strengthened relations
between government officials and Jewish com-
munity leaders on the statewide level, and has
created support and important working arrange-
ments between various human service agencies.
Jay I. Kislak
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies was created
in 1972 to help assure the survival of Jewish
values and culture in South Florida. Responsive to
the changing needs of the Greater Miami Jewish
community, the Foundation provides support for
emergencies and pilot projects serving the
community. A variety of legacies, bequests and
philanthropic funds form the asset base of the
Foundation from which grants may be allocated.
Grant Aids
Special Israel
Emergency Fund
Responding to the severe economic crisis that
currently exists in Israel, the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation's Foundation of Jewish Philan-
thropies has made a $100,000 emergency grant to
the 1983 Special Israel Emergency Fund.
"Breaking its tradition of making allocations
only from Foundation income, the Board of
Trustees responded to the emergency request
from United Jewish Appeal with a $100,000 cash
appropriation to be drawn from the "corpus" or
principal of the Foundation," Foundation Board
of Trustees Chairman Jay I. Kislak announced.
"The fact that the people of Israel are con-
fronted by a grave economic situation which
threatens the continuation of vital programs
speaks to the heart of the Foundation. It is in-
cumbent upon the Foundation to offer its
resources to meet this kind of emergency," Kislak
added-
Upon learning of the grant, Aaron Podhurst,
General Campaign Chairman of the 1983 Com-
bined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, said
the Foundation action will help ensure the im-
mediate maintenance of social service programs
needed by the people of Israel.
"We greatly appreciate the responsiveness
Foundation has demonstrated to help the Israelis
in these critical times," he said. "The people of
Israel have paid the price for Jews everywhere,
and we must be there when they need our help."
Soviet Jewry Programs Gain Support
Greater Miami's organized effort to educate the
community about the plight of Soviet Jews and
initiate action on their behalf has received a major
boost from a special grant awarded by the Found-
ation of Jewish Philanthropies to the South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry.
The South Florida Conference is a subcommit-
tee of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Community Relations Committee which is
charged with a wide range of community and
public relations projects.
"The Foundation's grant will help us promote
new and expanded programs on behalf of Soviet
Jewish refuseniks and prisoners of conscience,"
said Hinda Cantor, chairman of the South Florida
Conference. "The plight of these Soviet Jews
cannot be forgetten and we intend to present
events and educational programs that will express
our concern for their fate."
One major aspect of the South Florida Con-
ference's agenda is a March 6 rally that is ex-
pected to draw several thousand participants.
Important local personalities, celebrities and
community leaders are expected to join this
program as an expression of full communal
concern for this issue.
Another of the South Florida Conference's
upcoming programs will be a cultural series ac-
centing the issue of Soviet Jewry through a
variety of media. The series is scheduled to begin
this spring and will include musical, theatrical and
other types of performances.
"The Soviet government has halted virtually all
Jewish emigration and has imprisoned leaders of
the emigration and Jewish cultural movement,"
Cantor said. "We have committed ourselves to do
all that is possible to liberate our fellow Jews in
Russia and the Foundation's grant will allow us to
undertake the most far-reaching programs ever on
their behalf."
For more information about the activities of the
South Florida Conference, contact Myrna Loman
at 576-4000, extension 291.
Cult Task Force Program Initiated
In response to the increasing threat posed by
deceptive cults and religious groups actively
engaged in attempting to convert Jews, the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation has formed a
Task Force on Cults and Missionary Groups.
Experts estimate that as many as 10 million
persons are involved in cult or missionary groups,
with a disproportionately large number of those
individuals being Jewish youth. Studies have
shown that this not only poses a threat to the
future of the Jewish people, but also has a serious
emotional and psychological impact on families
^involved.
"The overall goal of this program is to project a
unified response by the Jewish community," said
Rabbi Brett Goldstein, chairman of the Task
force and spiritual leader of Temple Shir Ami.
"Up until now, we've had individual efforts,
"eating unnecessary duplication of efforts. In
focusing our efforts together, we will be able to
maximize our community potential to respond in a
constructive manner."
Goldstein explained that the vast majority of
the Jewish community is not aware of the
magnitude of cultic activities in Greater Miami
and nationwide. He noted that the current high
rate of unemployment also acts as a factor in cult
vand missionary group recruitment practices.
A large part of the Task Force's work will in-
volve preventative efforts aimed at publicizing
*k ating the Jewish community about the
wtics and variety of cults and missionary
jp-oups Among the individuals to be enlisted in
"us effort are rabbis, mental health professionals,
social workers and teachers.
The task Force also plans to compile a library,
wen as disseminate printed material to increase
public awareness about the problems. Seminars
will serve to educate the community in order to
sensitize as many people as possible to the per-
nicious threat posed by cults and missionary
groups attempting to convert Jews through
deceptive practices.
The Task Force is operating through a special
grant provided by the Foundation of Jewish
Philanthropies of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation. For more information about this vital
community program, contact Helen Friedman at
Federation, 576-4000.
Hillel Begins Service Program
A vast new resource for social service programs
in the Jewish community has been targeted
through the initiation of the "My Brother's
Keeper" program of the University of Miami's
Hillel Jewish Student Center. The project, which
will include the participation of 50 to 90 future
Jewish leaders, recently received a grant from the
Foundation of Jewish Philanthropies of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation to provide "on
the job" learning experiences.
The Hillel Jewish Student Center is a member
of Federation's family of agencies.
"Our main goal is to reawaken within Jewish
students a sense of responsibility toward the
Jewish community," said Rabbi Mark Kram,
Hillel director at the University of Miami. "This
program will encourage students to be active in
Jewish life in all forms."
The program will be available to all students on
the campus and will provide course credits in
return for work experiences. In its initial phase, a
coordinator will be assigned to the program with
specific duties to initiate its preliminary
organization. Among these duties, the coordinator
will create a student board, develop marketing
and recruitment materials, deepen involvement of
the university staff, finalize relationships with the
Jewish agencies to be involved, plan orientations
and learning sessions, and recruit students.
A full training program will follow to prepare

students for internships within the agencies.
Students will be drawn from four areas of study:
medical, business, human services and academic
studies, such as law.
Members of Federation's family of agencies
already have been contacted for participation in
the program. Among those agencies that have
requested interns are the South Florida Confer-
ence on Soviet Jewry, the B'nai B'rith Youth Or-
ganization, the Central Agency for Jewish
Education, the Jewish Vocational Service, the
Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged, .
Mount Sinai Medical Center, the Rescue and
Migration Service of the National Council of
Jewish Women, the American Jewish Congress
and the Jewish Community Centers of South
Florida.
"College students have shown enthusiasm
toward the idea of working in the community
where they can utilize their college learning for
real life experience," Kram said. "The future lead-
ership of our organized Jewish community spends
a minimum of four years at a university and a
linkage with the organized Jewish community for
these students is a most positive way of creating
- involvement and investment in our Jewish
future." iv.
For more information about this program,
contact Rabbi Kram at the Hillel Jewish Student
Center of the University of Miami, 665-6948. ;


^loridian / Friday, December 10.1982
Page 14
Federation, December, 1982
MONDAY, JANUARY 3
Dr. Fred Rosner, noted doctor of Jewish medicine
will give an "Introduction to Jewish Medical
Ethics" focusing on the ethical questions raised
by organ transplants, this evening at 8:00 at the
Konover Hotel, 5445 Collins Avenue, Miami
Beach. This lecture is part of a series of four lec-
tures being sponsored by the Florida Friends of
Yeshiva University. For more information, call
Chaim Friend, Director of Development, South-
eastern Region of Florida Friends of Yeshiva Uni-
versity at 861-3365.
MONDAY, JANUARY 3
The Galil Chapter of American Mizrachi Women
will hold a regular meeting today at Noon at the
Young Israel of Greater Miami, 990 NE 171st
Street, North Miami Beach. Morris Zellner will
speak on nutrition. For more information, call 531-
5344.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 4
Dr. Robert Sandier will discuss the '' Struggle for
Civilization: Are we Winning or Losing?" at the
Forte Forum lecture series today at 1:00 in the
Forte Towers Auditorium, 1200 West Avenue,
Miami Beach. For more information, call Elsie
Rubin at 673-1979.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 6
The Hadar Chapter of American Mizrachi Women
will hold its paid-up membership luncheon today
at Noon, at 1132 Kane Concourse, Bay Harbor.
Ruth Zellner, Chairman of the Board of the
Florida Council of American Mizrachi Women,
will be the guest speaker. For more information,
call 531-5344.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 9
Norman Braman will be the guest speaker at the
fundraising breakfast for the Harbour House and
Carlton Terrace condominiums this morning at
10:00 at the White Cypress Restaurant, 10275
Collins Avenue, Bay Harbor. For more informa-
tion, call Bernie Bendheim at 576-4000.
MONDAY, JANUARY 10
Alvin Samet, supervisor of radar and public serv-
ice, U.S. Department of Commerce. National
Weather Service, will be the guest speaker at the
Torah Chapter of Hadassah meeting today at
12:30 at Temple Zamora. Coral Gables. His topic
>l discussion will be "Hurricanes and Weather in
-k)uth Florida.' For more information, call
Jorot or at 667-9901.
MONDAY JANUARY 10
he Sandra Goldstein Memorial Luiuheon Forum
ill be held at Noon today at Reflections on the
a\ taum, associate national executive
oi trie American Jewish Congress will
l)SCU8i The International Terror Network For
oore information, call the Leadership Develop-
i i pertinent at Federation. 576-4000.
TUESDAY. JANUARY 11
Dr. Edward Ureyer will discuss "Strategic Wea-
pons: .he Prospect for Nuclear War" today at the
Forte Forum lecture series at 1:00 in the Forte
Towers Auditorium, 1200 West Avenue, Miami
Beach. Admission is free. For more information,
call Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
TUESDAY. JANUARY 11
The Women's Cancer League of Mount Sinai
Medical Center will be holding their annual fund-
raising luncheon today at 11:30 a.m. at the Fon-
tainebleau-Hilton Hotel, Miami Beach. For more
information, call Susan Pulaski at 674-2600.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 13
Dr. Henry Kissinger, 56th Secretary of State of
the United States, will speak at Temple Emanu-El
tonight, to open the 40th Anniversary 1983 Forum
series of the Miami Beach congregation. The talk
is scheduled for 8:00 P.M. in the main sanctuary,
1701 Washington Avenue. For reservations and
tickets, call 538-2503 or visit the Temple box of-
fice.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 13
The Young Adults Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will be holding their advance
gifts campaign reception this evening at 7:30 in
Grove Isle. A minimum gift of $250 to the 1983
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign is required. For more information, call
Milt HeUer at 576-4000.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 13
The Builders, Real Estate and Allied Trades Divi-
sion of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation is
sponsoring a series of educational seminars deal-
ing with the use of computers in the real estate
and development businesses. Today, at 2:30, in
the Federation Building, a seminar will be. held for
single family and condominium brokers. There is
no charge for the seminar. For more information
and reservations, please call Federation at 576-
4000.
Calendar
SUNDAY, JANUARY 16
The second annual B'nai Zion Southeast Region
Mid-Winter Conference will be held today at 11:00
A.M. at the Sheraton Bal Harbour Hotel, 9701
Collins Avenue, Bal Harbour. The guest speakers
for the event include the Consul General of Israel,
Joel Arnon; Barbara Studley, WNWS talk show
host and Sidney Wiener, national president of
B'nai Zion. The topic of the conference will be
"Zionism in the 80's." Registration is $12.50 per
person including a brunch-luncheon, music and
entertainment. For further information and
reservations, please call the B'nai Zion Regional
Office at 940-0420.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 16
Brandeis University National Women's Commit-
tee will be sponsoring a luenheon today at noon at
the Doral Beach Hotel. Stephen Whitfield, asso-
ciate professor of American Studies at Brandeis
University will discuss "Moral Majorities in One
Nation Under God." For more information, call
Sarah Schwartz at 865-5252.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 16
Hy Rubin will be honored at the Seacoast Towers
East fundraising meeting today at 10:30 A.M. at
The Playhouse, 5151 Collins Avenue, Miami
Beach. The 1983 CJA-IEF Campaign film "Be
There" will also be featured. For more informa-
tion, call Bernie Bendheim at 576-4000.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 16
The Young Adults Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will be having a Shalom
Brunch for new members this morning at 11:00 at
the home of David Perkins. For more information,
call Mill Heller at a76-4000.
TUESDAY. JANUARY 18
Abraham Gittelson, associate director of the Cen-
tral Agency for Jewish F.ducation. will be the
guest speaker at the Forte Forum lecture series
todaj at '.:wo. His topic of discussion will be "The
Future ot American Judaism: Reform. Conserva-
tive and Orthodox. The lecture will be held at the
Forte lowers Auditorium. 1200 West Avenue.
Miami Beach. For more information, call Elsie
Rubin at 673-1979.
TUESDAY. JANAURY 18
Aaron Podhurst. general chairman oi the 1983
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign, will be the guest speaker at the Crystal
House fundraising cocktail party today at 4:00 at
the Crystal House Restaurant, 5055 Collins
Avenue, Miami Beach. For more information, call
Bernie Bendheim at 576-4000.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 19
The first of a two part Torah Seminar sponsored
by the Talmudic University of Florida in conjunc-
tion with the Young Israel Congregation of Sky-
lake and the Young Israel Congregation of Holly-
wood, begins tonight at 8:00 at the Young Israel
of Sky lake Synagogue, 1850 NE 183rd Street,
North Miami Beach. Rabbi Yochanan Zweig,
Dean of Talmudic University, will be the guest
speaker. His topic will be "Galuth Exile." A
question-answer period will follow the lecture. Re-
freshments will be served and admission is free.
The seminar concludes on January 26th at the
Young Israel of Hollywood synagogue. For more
information, call 945-8712.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 20
The Hatikvah-Miami Beach Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will hold a regular meeting today
at 12:30 P.M., at the Kneaeth Israel Synagogue,
1415 Euclid Avenue. A book review will be given
by Shulamit Cohen. For more information, call
531-5344.
THURSDAY, JANUARY 20
A seminar on computer applications for builders
and developers will be held at 2:30 today at the
Federation Building, as part of the series of edu-
cational seminars dealing with the use of com-
puters in the real estate and development busi-
nesses. Sponsored by the Builders, Real Estate
and Allied Trades Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation, the seminar is free of charge.
For more information, call Federation at 576-4000.
FRIDAY, JANUARY 21 *
The annual Challah Weekend, sponsored by th*
Beth David Congregation Sisterhood, beirins m
evening at 6:30 with a Shabbat dinner held ."
Congregation, 2625 SW 3rd Avenue. Miami6
Moshe Waldocks, co-author of "The Big Book f
Jewish Humor," will be the guest speaker at 8 15
following the dinner. For more information r.il
Diana Bailey at 666-9654. cau
SATURDAY, JANUARY 22
A benefit for the Hadassah Medical Organization
featuring the Frankie Kein Show, will be held to-
night at 8:30 at the Marco Polo Hotel, Miami
Beach. The event is sponsored by the Ko'ach
Chapter of Miami Beach Region of Hadassah. For
more information, call Jackie Hechter at 532-4741
SUNDAY, JANUARY 23
The Arlen Houses fundraising brunch meeting
will be held today at 10:00 A.M. in the Arlen
House auditorium. For more information call
Bernie Bendheim at 576-4000.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25
The Young Adults Division of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation will begin their Winter Learn-
In series this evening. The event will run for four
consecutive Tuesday evenings. The subject of this
years' Learn-In will be "Varieties of the American
Jewish Religious Experience. For more informa-
tion, call Milt Heller at 576-4000.
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25
Dr. Farrokh Jabwala will be the guest speaker to-
day at 1:00 at the Forte Forum lecture series held
in the Forte Towers Auditorium, 1200 West
Avenue, Miami Beach. His topic of discussion will
be "The United Nations and Human Rights." For
more information, call Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26
Ruth Rosenberg, a member of the Middle East
and Foreign Jewry Committee of the Federation's
Community Relations Committee, and who serves
on the Florida Israel Chamber of Commerce, will
be the guest speaker at the Natanya Chapter of
Hadassah fundraising meeting today at 2:00 at
the Doral Beach Hotel. Miami Beach. For more
information, call Mrs. Sheroff at 931-1
WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 26
ibbi Yochanan Zweig, Dean of !
versity, will discuss "Geulah iit
night at 8:00 during (he second pai f thi
part i orah seminar being held at hi
Hollywood Synagogue. 1291 S
:. The seminar, spon
mudic University oi Florid
Young Israel Congregate
Young ongregat ion 1
followed by a question-answei pe
ment will be sen ed and ai
more information, call941
SUNDAY. JANUARY 30
Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Charin wil
nual fundraising meeting for the Corinthian I
dominium in their home. 5825 Collins Avenue,
Miami Beach, this morning at 10:30 A.M. For
more information, call Bernie Bendheim at 576-
4000.
SUNDAY, JANUARY 30
The Seacoast Towers V annual fundraising break-
fast will be held today at 10:30 A.M. in the Em-
bassy Room, Seacoast Towers V Restaurant. 5700
Collins Avenue, Miami Beach. For more informa-
tion, call Bernie Bendheim at 576-4000.
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for February events ia January 20.1983
Organization.
Event_______
Place.
Date_
-Time_
|a.m.{)p.n-
Your name_______________
Title____________PhoneNo^
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137


Federation, December, 1982
Page 15
Be There with the people of Israel.
Be There with Jews in need
in Miami and around the world.
Be There on Super Sunday, February 6th.
To stand strong for Jews everywhere, (i
To work for everything you believe in.
Be There when it counts.
What:
II A massive phone-a-thon
being sponsored by the Greater Miami
| Jewish Federation
When:
Sunday, February 6,1983
Where:
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
137 N.E. 19th Street
Need:
Volunteers to handle phones.
To stuff envelopes. To sort pledge cards.
In short, To Be There When It Counts.
Goal:
To reach out and unite
our fellow Jews in a show of solidarity
that will help the people
of Israel and keep the spirit
of Jewish brotherhood alive
everywhere on earth.
Bed
Super Sunday
volunteer!
Call the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
at 576-4000 today!


le Jewish Floridian / Friday, December 10.1982
m
Page 16
Federation, December, 1982
i
JevnsH^iLANrHRpPies
of the greater Miami Jewish federation
Charitable Gifts of Remainder
Interests and the QTip Trust
By FREDRIC HOFFMAN, Attorney
With the passage of the Economic Recovery
Tax Act of 1981 (ERTA), the marital deduc-
tion allowed for estate and gift tax purposes
was radically changed. A husband and wife
are now treated as one economic unit for
transfer tax purposes, subjecting a couple's
property to estate or gift taxation only once.
This theory was implemented by providing
for an unlimited gift and estate tax marital
deduction for certain qualified transfers of
property between spouses.
While the enlarged marital deduction is not
directly related to charitable gifts, it is ex-
pected to have significant impact on charita-
ble giving as well. The non-tax motives for
charitable giving are, of course, unchanged
but the interplav between the marital and
charitable deductions will have a bearing on
the structure and timing of such gifts.
In addition to enlarging the quantitative
aspect of the marital deduction, Congress also
broadened the qualitative aspect of the de-
duction. In order to insure that property
transferred between spouses is taxed at least
once, the marital deduction is not extended to
certain interests in property, referred to as
'terminable interests." A terminable interest
is one which will terminate or fail on the lapse
of time of the occurrence or failure to occur of
some contingency. An example of a termina-
ble interest is a life estate in property given to
a surviving spouse where the remainder in-
terest is given to a different beneficiary. Since
the spouse's interest in the property ter-
minates on his or her death, thereby exclud-
ing the value of such property from his of her
gross estate, the interest will not qualify for
the marital deduction in the estate of the first
spouse.
QTIP TRUST
ERTA allows certain terminable interests
to qualify for the marital deduction by creat-
ing a new concept of "qualified terminable in-
terest property" (QTIP). To qualify as
"qualified terminable interest property" the
following requirements must be met:
1. Property must pass from the donor or
decedent spouse to the donee spouse;
2. The surviving or donee spouse must be
entitled to all of the income earned by the
property payable at least annually;
3. No person (including the recipient
spouse) may have the right to appoint (to dis-
pose of) any part of the property during the
spouse's lifetime to anyone other than the
spouse.
If all of the above conditions are satisfied,
the property will qualify for the marital de-
duction if an election is made either by the
donee's spouse in the case of a lifetime trans-
fer, or the decedent's personal representative,
in the case of a testamentary transfer. To as-
sure that transfer taxes will be paid on
property underlying the qualified terminable
interest, the disposition of the interest during
the recipient's lifetime subjects its entire
value to gift tax. If the recipient retains the
interest until death, it will be part of his or her
gross estate at that time. In either case the
Fredric Hoffman
ultimate recipient of the property can be
called upon to repay to the donee spouse, or
his or her estate, any transfer taxes paid on
the property.
CHARITABLE REMAINDER TRUSTS
Congress has also allowed the income in-
terest of a charitable remainder unitrust or
annuity trust to qualify for the marital deduc-
tion providing the spouse is the only non-
charitable beneficiary. A charitable remainder
annuity trust is one under which a certain
sum, equal to not less than 5 percent of the
initial net fair market value of all property
placed in trust, is to be distributed, not less
often than annually, to a non-charitable bene-
ficiary, with the remainder to be distributed
to, or used for, the benefit of a qualified
charity. A charitable remainder unitrust is
one under which a fixed percentage of the
trust corpus, is to be distributed not less often
than annually to a non-charitable beneficiary
with the remainder to be distributed to, or
used for, the benefit of a qualified charity.
Congress reasoned that since no tax would be
due if the entire property were given to a
spouse, and no tax would be due if the entire
property were given to a charity, there is no
justification for imposing the transfer tax on
a transfer which is split between them.
IMPACT OF NEW RULES
It is not likely that anyone contemplating a
significant lifetime gift to charity would
divert the gift to a spouse merely to pass the
property free of transfer taxes under the new
unlimited marital deduction. Obviously, the
motives for such a gift generosity, belief in
the charity's goals, religious conviction are
not satisfied by a gift to a spouse. The impact
of the new rules will, therefore, have little ef-
fect on outright lifetime gifts to charity.
This is not the case, however, when one is
contemplating a charitable gift at death.
Here, the new rules have broadened the possi-
bilities for structuring and timing a charitable
bequest so that the testator now has new i
tions available. In the first instance, it is
sible to lessen the income tax burden of*tl
surviving spouse by allowing him or her]
make the charitable gift directly rather thl
have the gift be made from the estate, Fl
example, if a testator is considering donatin
$10,000 to charity, he could, instead, leave tl
money to his wife. Since there is an unlimiu]
estate tax marital deduction, there is no ta.
on this transfer. The survivor, in turn, can d|
nate that amount to charity and receive an ij
come tax deduction for her donation.
This technique can also be used in the ere
tion of charitable remainder gifts. RathJ
than creating a testamentary charitable r\
mainder trust, the testator can leave th
property, with which he would have fundel
the trust, to his wife, again, free ot transfa^
tax. She can then create the trust and get th
benefit of the income tax deduction tor the ri
mainder portion. These techniques, however]
presuppose a cooperative spouse and willing
ness by the donor to commit the ultimate dis
position of the property to the surviving
spouse
UTILITY OF QTIP TRUST
If the testator is unwilling to relinquisH
control over who is to eventually receive hi^
property, the QTIP trust, combined with
charitable remainder interest, affords flexl
ibility in providing for the surviving spousa
and in making a charitable bequest. Thij
method of deferred giving ensures that thi
spouse is supported for the rest of his or hen
life, while the testator's charitable intent ia|
carried out.
There are several advantages of the QTIP
arrangement as opposed to the charitable re!
mainder unitrust or annuity trust. The most
important of these is the trustee's ability to
invade the trust corpus for the benefit of the
surviving spouse during her lifetime. Addi-
tionally, the requirements for the governing
instruments of both unitrusts and annuity
trusts are very burdensome.
On the other hand, it should be noted that
neither the unitrust nor the annuity trust,
themselves, are subject to income tax so that
there would be no tax due on any income or
capital gain which is not distributed to the
non-charitable beneficiary.
Both of these techniques (the QTIP trust
coupled with a charitable remainder and the
unitrust or annuity trust having the spouse as
the only non-charitable beneficiary) allow the
total estate to pass tax free. The testator can
choose either or both, depending on the
property that will be used to fund the trusts
and goals for the disposition of his property.
Thus, ERTA has provided additional flexi-
bility in planning for the disposition of ones
estate between charitable and non-charitable
beneficiaries. Use of the various techniques
discussed can benefit charitable organizations
as well as reducing income and estate tax
burdens.


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