The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02808

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
THE
Volume
55-Number48
Three Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday November 26,1982
FrtdShochtl
By Mall SO Cents
Price 50 Cents
olitical Storm Swamps Labor Party
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Mistake of Black and White
65 Years After Revolution,
Jewish Fate Still Complex
By DR. S. LEVENBERG
London ( hronicle Syndicate
IT IS a mistake, 65 years
ter the Communist Revo-
ution, to depict the fate of
oviet Jewry in terms of
flack and white. Their his-
ory is fraught with com-
plexities, due to the charac-
ter of the Communist
regime.
It is futile today to discuss So-
viet -Jewish life in generalities.
Some .lews enjoy equality; others
are victims of anti-Semitism and
discrimination, a phenomenon
not unfamiliar in non-Communist
countries.
Yet no one would have be-
lieved. (i.r> years ago. when Jews
played an important role in the
Communist Establishment, that
they would later be excluded de
facto from the Party leadership,
the diplomatic service, the higher
echelons of the Army, and many
other spheres of public life.
THERE MAY be individual
Jews who continue to play a role,
but they have changed their
Continued on Page 5-A
I Can Prove Leo Frank Innocent'
Atlanta Asked for Pardon
By WILLIAM A. GRALNICK
I The words are stunning for the
ory they tell and how they came
[oe written. They read: "On be-
W of the Atlanta Jewish
deration, the American Jewish
pmmittee. and the Anti-Defa-
ation League of B'nai B'rith,
fe un of these organizations respect-
fully request that you and the
members of the State Board of
Pardons and Paroles grant a full
and complete pardon exonerating
Leo Frank of any guilt for the
crime for which he was convicted
by the Superior Court of Fulton
County, in 1913."
There are some who don't
know who Leo Frank was. He
was, like so many Jews of the
day, a relatively unremarkable
man, who lead a relatively unre-
markable existence in Atlanta,
GA. Yet due to a classic set of
circumstances he became the
Continued on Page 14-A
Opposition Seeks Cut in
U.S. Aid to Pressure Begin
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
A column in the New York
Times by editorial page
editor Max Frankel that
the Labor Party Opposition
wants the United States to
reduce its aid to Israel as a
means of pressuring the
Begin government has trig-
gered a political storm here.
The story broke in the media
after a report on Frankel's
column was sent from New York
by the Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy. The Labor Party flatly denied
Frankel's report, but government
figures lashed out at the oppo-
sition for lack of patriotism.
FRANKEL, in a two-part
series, wrote that "The govern-
ment's opponents, in sum, are
frail and timid" and "thus
reduced to begging America to
break Mr. Begin's political
power. And it now advocates
means that would have been
unthinkable even a few weeks
ago. The startling plea by many
leading Israelis (is) that the
United States reduce its econo-
mic aid to their nation."
Frankel stated that Begins
opponents "acknowledge poli-
tical weakness, which is mainly
due to Mr. Begin'8 success in
rallying the large, resentful com-
munity of Middle Eastern Jews
against the affluent or socialistic
elites of F.uropean origin." The
opposition, therefore, according
to Frankel. wants the U.S. to
help them topple the Begin
government.
And to that end, leading oppo-
sition figures now risk political
oblivion by counselling sharp
cuts in America's non-military
aid of $800 million a year," Fran-
kel wrote. He concluded by
noting: "American diplomats in
Israel resist this anguished
counsel But that so many
prominent Israelis should be
inviting bankruptcy to rescue
their diplomacy is startling
evidence of the fierce passions
that now dominate politics in
Israel."
At CJFWF Assembly
A Call for World Jewish Partnership
By MURRAY ZUCKOFF
|>0S ANGELES (JTA) -
W Dulzin, chairman of the
W Agency and World Zion-
I1 Executives, called for a "new
ranging partnership between
Prael and Jewish communities
youghout the world." He de-
w 'hat partnership as a "unity
of commitment" in confronting
Israeli-diaspora "common tasks
and common agenda" for "the
creative survival of the Jewish
people."
Addressing delegates to the
51st General Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations,
Dulzin noted that there are dif-
ficulties within Israel these days
and between Israel and the dias-
pora, but "we will solve this."
The "reality of Israel is the force
that unites Jews around the
world and is also the unifying
element in Jewish communities in
the United States."
DULZIN SAID the common
tasks and common agenda in Is-
rael-diaspora relations is based
on the Jerusalem Program which
was adopted by the World Zion-
ist Congress in 1968. The five-
point program states that the
aims of Zionism are:
"The unity of the Jewish
Continued on Page 9-A
Shimon Perez
FRANKEL HIMSELF, in a
telephone interview with The Je-
rusalem Post, refused to identify
his sources. But the Post corre-
spondent wrote that Frankel "in-
dicated strongly that they were
top leaders not secondary
party functionaries."
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir, addressing a national
convention of the ultra-rightist
Tehiya Party in Jerusalem, said:
Some of our critics at home even
want to invoke overseas pres-
sures to be brought to bear on the
government but never fear.
They will not succeed. The
government of Israel will never
surrender to pressure."
Shamir called on Tehiya to
give its "verve, enthusiasm and
zeal" to supporting "the govern-
ment, of Israel our govern-
ment ... it is an Eretz Israel
government." He said the
government was under attack at
home and abroad for "strength-
Continued on Page 11 -A
Leon Dulzin


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 26,1982
Jailed Neo-Nazi Regrets His Writings
By DAVID KANTOR
BONN (JTA) A jailed
neo-Nazi leader has admitted
that he erred when he wrote a
preface to a book claiming the
Holocaust never occurred.
"Today, I do know that in Roeder, 53, a former lawyer,
Auschwitz a large number of Was sentenced last June to 13
Jews were killed only because years' imprisonment for heading
they were Jewish," Manfred a rightwing terrorist group and
Roeder said in a written state- incitement against Jews. He was
ment to a Frankfurt court. arrested in 1981 when he returned
to Frankfurt from an El Fatah
camp near Beirut where he had
arranged a military training pro-
gram for young German neo-
Nazis.
The charges against him at his
trial were bolstered by his having
written the preface to book titled
"The Auschwitz Lies," by Thies
Christophersens in 1973. It sold
some 25,000 copies. Christopher-
sens is now wanted by the police
himan 8rreSt Warrant issui I
Frankfurt prosecutor VoU
Schneider appeared skeptic,]"
Roeder srecanUtion.'MaZ1
is showing something |a'
sight the attorney said
another possibility is tyJ*
wants to convince the courLi
free him after he serves tj
thirds of his sentence. "H. 3
surelv low th o,____ ."]
....."T ",a ^numce. "He J
surely lose the support of 13
t"H"w^v Srhn.-i.|..T.,|,Sm'M) 1
What it takes to be a Riverside.
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It takes years.
Nearly 70 years of building a name
people trust.
It takes a special kind of leadership that
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founder.
And which continues today, in the hands
of Carl Grossberg, Alfred Golden, Leo Hack,
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It is this leadership which, in coopera-
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And it is this leadership that has
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standards demanded by Jewish tradition.
That's why, at Riverside, people
continue to find the dedication and the
resources which are necessary to provide
service that is truly Jewish.
And that's why today, Riverside is the
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Carl Grossberg, President
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Leo Hack, Vice President, Religious Advisor
Andrew Fier, Vice President
RIVERSIDE
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The most respected name in Jewish luner^
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M-11 26-82


News
in Brief
Friday. November 26,1982/The Jewish Fkiridmn Page3-A
[praper Begged Israel to 'Stop Massacre'
fiyJTA Report
I JERUSALEM- Bruce Kash-
1the representative in Beirut
(Israel's Foreign Ministry, in
mony before the board of in-
into the Sabra and Shatila
sacre, reported Sunday that
.rial US. envoy Morris Draper
wioboned him the morning of
Eturday. Sept. 18, to insist that
I "stop the massacres" by
_iese Christian forces.
[ht report from the Washing-
L post Service, Draper is
Kited as having accused Israel
stem language of respon-
bility tot the "terrible" and
obscene" massacres.
f Kashdan told the committee of
Liry that Draper had called
n to warn Israel against allow-
t the Christian militia into the
nps. The Kashdan testimony
s believed to have made public
i first official U.S. reaction to
e events at Sabra and Shatila.
I According to the Washington
lost. Draper's call preceded by
Ely hours the statement by
resident Reagan in which he ex-
ressed his "outrage and revul-
bn" to the massacre.
feres Charges Likud
Vith Smear Campaign
I TEL AVIV Labor Party
Ihairman Shimon Peres has ac-
Lsed Likud of launching a
pmear campaign" against Labor
i the basis of a two-part column
ublished in the New York
imes.
I Peres said at a press conference
hat Likud ministers and spokes-
len arc accusing Labor of stab-
pig Israel in the hack and invit-
; foreign intervention in its af-
irs because the Times' editorial
ki> editor. Max Frankel. re-
Vnil to Opposition spokes
in who wore allegedly urging
li' Reagan Administration to
U.S. aid to Israel as the only
tans of ousting Premier Mena-
Icm Begin's government.
Seminary ot America and chair-
man of the Foundation for Con-
servative Judaism in Israel, and
Dr. David Gordis, the Founda-
tion's executive director, ad-
dressed 2,000 delegates attending
the national biennial convention
of the Women's League for Con-
servative Judaism.
Cohen said, "There is already
religious pluralism in Israel, but
we are seeking to make that
pluralism perceived. Above all,
the Conservative Movement is
concerned to see that the
authoritarian hold that the
Orthodox rabbinate exercises
over many aspects of Jewish life
and institutions is broken, allow-
ing other forms of religious ex-
pression to gain official recogni-
tion and legitimacy."
Fate of El Al Airlines
Put Off Again
TEL AVIV A vote on the
fate of El AI was deferred when
the airline's shareholders decided
at a special meeting to continue
deliberations this week. El Al is
98 percent owned by the govern-
ment. It has been grounded for
nearly two months.
The meeting was called to vote
on whether to put the company
Vorld Has Lost Its
ense of Shame -Cuomo
[NEW YORK Governor-
|ect Mario Cuomo told a State
Israel Bond audience here that
I appears the world has lost its
P* of shame" when it
mam Israel "by standards
harsh to be used against
ers."
Cuomo addressed some 400
or. government, business and
nmunal leaders at a testi-
Mal dinner at the Sheraton
ntre in honor of Morton Bahr.
} president of the Communica-
p Workers of America. More
1 *1 million in Israel Bond
les was produced at the dinner
[support of Israel's economic
felopment.
he Governor-Elect decried the
F that "indignation is heaped
T* Israel while Cambodia com-
auto-genocide punish-
PH are demanded of Israel
f a self-proclaimed emperor
[Africa willfully decimates his
fP'e Israel is threatened
P expulsion from the United
If'ons while the ayatollahs send
fton into mine fields."
Dnservative Jewry
Ngg Campaign
HAMESHA lake, n.y. -
nservative Judaism's new ac-
le Program in the spheres of re-
r" and education in Israel is
a at strengthening pluralism
r^Lj0Untry and guaranteeing
I freedoms assured its citizens
I'srael a Declaration of Inde-
Pat'nce Conservative leaders
Plared here.
,kGerson Cohen. chancellor
tie Jewish Theological
into voluntary liquidation, with
possible sale to private interests,
or to reorganize it on a reduced
scale under severe austerity
terms proposed by management.
Those terms would invest
management with sole authority
for running the airline with vir-
tually no input from employes.
The week-long suspension of
discussions has given both
management and labor time to.
amend or accept the terms. The
tension between labor and
management was underlined by
the strict security that sur-
rounded the shareholders meet-
ing.
Defense Ministry Shuns
West Bank Guidelines
JERUSALEM The Defense
Ministry has dissociated itself
from guidelines recently issued
by the West Bank civil adminis-
tration instructing regional
governors to undermine the po-
litical influence of pro-Jordan
Arab leaders in the territory. The
document raised angry protests
in the Knesset from coalition as
well as opposition MKs.
A statement released by the
office of the Coordinator of
Activities in Judaea and
Samaria, a Defense Ministry
bureau, said the guidelines had
no validity They were issued by
Col Vigal Karmon, acting head
of the civil administration. But
according to the Coordinator's
office, neither it nor the Defense
Ministry as such had any part in
drafting the orders or knowledge
of the discussions which led to
them.
Karmon's initiative was widely
interpreted as a measure to coun-
ter a perceived rapprochement
between Jordan and the Palestine
Liberation Organization.
SPD Legislation Against
Neo-Nazi Propaganda
BONN The Social Demo-
cratic Party (SPD), now in the
opposition, has reintroduced
legislation aimed against neo-
Nazi propaganda which was re-
jected a month ago when the
SPD headed West Germany's
governing coalition government.
The draft bill which would
close loopholes in existing anti-
Nazi laws, was killed in the
Bundesrat, the upper house of
parliment, controlled by the
Christian Democratic Union. The
CDU is now the governing party.
The proposed legislation would
give state prosecutors the power
to try persons who publicly deny
that Jews were persecuted by the
Third Reich or that the Holo-
caust occurred. It would impose
tighter restrictions on the import
and distribution of Nazi propa-
ganda material produced abroad
and limit the sale of reproduc-
tions of material thai ''',| i
N iGen
Talks Between Israel,
Lebanon Deadlocked
JERUSALEM The com-
mencement of talks between Is-
rael and Lebanon over with-
drawal, security and normaliza-
tion is still hamstrung over pro-
cedural problems. A meeting be-
tween Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir and U.S. special envoy
Morris Draper here failed to
break the deadlock. Israeli
sources said they were hopeful
nevertheless that the talks with
Lebanon would get under way
before long.
President Reagan's newly-ap-
pointed special ambassador to
the Mideast, Philip Habib, who
was involved in working out the
plan for the evacuation of the
PLO forces from west Beirut, left
the U.S. for the Mideast. He will
apparently focus first on the
question of the withdrawal of the
Syrian. Israeli and the PLO
forces from Lebanon but is also
expected to lend his weight to the
effort to launch talks between
Israel and Lebanon.
Violinists Perform
TEL AVIV (JTA) Seven
of the world's greatest violinists
will perform at a week-long
"Hubere-mania" here between
Dec. 12 to 19 to mark the centen-
ary of the birth of Bronislaw
Huberman, the violin virtuoso
who founded the Israel Philhar-
monic Orchestra 50 years ago.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday. November 26,1?82
- i i i i i-< i ruTt ii i > i i
mummmuuam
I
Shuitz's inaugural Flourish | When Will the Attacks in the U.S. Begin?
s
The issue at three West Bank universities where
Israel asked for a faculty "loyalty oath" can not be
compared to "McCarthyism," as Secretary of State
George Shultz declared last week. The issue is not
academic freedom, but aiding and abetting terrorist
acts against a democratic ally.
In fact, comments Morris J. Amitay, whose politi-
cal columns appear in The Jewish Floridian, the
teachers were not asked to sign "loyalty oaths" at
all. Says Amitay, all they were asked to do was
"pledge not to aid an organization dedicated to the
violent overthrow of Israel and actually at-
tempting to do so."
We agree. And Amitay comes specially-equipped
to know, not only as a columnist and Washington
observer these days, but also as a consequence of his
previous long tenure with the America Israel
Political Action Committee there.
Amitay conjectures that the Shultz, press confer-
ence remarks are a bellwether of new Administration
policies geared toward confrontation with Israel.
Indeed, the distinct possibility is that Shuitz's ob-
servations during his conference were a last -minute
substitute for the inauguration of these policies
intended to be made by President Reagan during his
talks with Prime Minister Begin talks cancelled
when the Prime Minister suddenly flew back to Israel
when his wife, Aliza, died.
What seems to be occurring these days, is a
sudden toughening of American foreign policy
toward Israel, but we agree with Amitay that "Israel
is unlikely to cave in, the Arabs are unlikely to come
to the negotiating table, and the U.S. interest in a
genuine peace is unlikely to be advanced."
All except, of course, for the media, whose new
anti-Israel mode will give them something to raise a
fuss about. Intransigence, and that sort of thing. In
this, the Administration will serve at least some
purpose.
Thank You, Rabbi Shapiro
Fifty years of service in any cause is a long time.
For a rabbi, it represents the sum total of his life's
experience in behalf of Judaism. At least that's the
case with Rabbi Max Shapiro, who will be honored
by the community on the accasion of his retirement
as spiritual leader of Beth Kodesh Congregation at
ceremonies at the Dupont Plaza Hotel next week.
Before his tenure at Beth Kodesh, Rabbi Shapiro
served in the pulpit of Beth David Congregation. In
all of those years, he has seen the births, confirma-
tions and marriages of an untold number of congre-
gants. He has witnessed, in an intensely personal
way, as well as a spiritual leader, their tragedies and
deaths.
And Rabbi Shapiro has seen vast changes in the
community he has served in those five decades
especially symbolized by the fact that Beth Kodesh,
his final pulpit, is situated smack in the middle of
Little Havana.
In turn, the community will be preaching to the
Rabbi next week, when they attend the ceremonies in
his honor. Metro Mayor Steve Clark has already an-
nounced a Rabbi Max Shapiro Day. But the South
Florida Jewish community needs no special incentive
to congratulate him.
Those whom he has, as a Rabbi, inaugurated into
life, into Judaism, into marriage their numbers
should be sufficiently large to turn out in force to
say, not farewell, but Thank You.
I
$
5
I
|
I
1

West Germany Calling
To say that Israeli Premier Menachem Begin and
West German Chancellor Helmut Schmidt had a
falling out may be an understatement. After a series
of bitter personal exchanges last year, diplomatic
relations between the two countries fell to a new low
,and reconciliation seemed far off in the distance.
Schmidt's position in the Middle East dispute,
supporting the nearly dead European Economic
Community Venice Declaration of 1980 calling for
the "association" of the PLO in peace negotiations,
did not sit well in official Israeli leadership circles.
But now with the fall of the long ruling Schmidt
coalition government and the rise of Helmut Kohl,
leader of the Christian Democratic Union, initial
indications are signaling toward a time of better
relations between the two governments.
.
........-..xxx:x:^^
HOW LONG will it be before
American Jewish citizens and in-
stitutions are the objects of
regular terrorist attack? The
question is not whether but
when.
There is little reason to assume
that these attacks will not occur
sometime soon. They have been
happening everywhere else, and
with special frequency in Europe.
Why not here?
For the American Jewish com-
munity to avoid the issue is to ig-
nore the facts. Sixteen European
Jewish communities held a closed
session of the World Jewish Con-
gress European Branch at the be-
ginning of November to deal with
the lethal quality of the terrorism
directed against them.
A MAJOR report at the ses-
sion was delivered by Frank
Perez, director of the State De-
partment's Office for Combatting
Terrorism. In his intelligence
evaluation, Perez told the Euro-
peans that terrorist attacks
against Jews and Israelis "have
I
g:
i
I
O
Miiidlin
>x-: been more lethal than other ter-
rorism."
Perez said that "over three-
quarters of the attacks were
carried out by Palestinians."
Perhaps the most stunning sta-
tistic in the OCT report is that
from January. 1981 until Sep-
tember, 1982 there were 104
attacks by terrorists against Is-
raeli and Jewish targets.
Of this number, which excludes
attacks in Israel proper or on the
West Bank, more than 20 percent
were staged in France and Italy.
Altogether, 26 countries have
suffered them.
ALTHOUGH fully half Eh. I
tacks were directed 5*
raek citizens or interests ah, H
the fact is that Jewf ft
other countries have been S i
ized by Palestinian tCg*
no other reason than that ik I
frighten them and others L*
from supporting Israeli causes
The OCT report indicates that
'nail, some 400 people have fii
wounded and 25 killed, andp!
told the Europeans that j\
half of the attacks ocanST!1
Western Europe. m
At a time when the for,,
policy section of the State El
partment seems perfectly willin.
to see Israel go down the dram
its Office for Combatting Terror
ism emphasizes the especiallv
brutal nature of terrorist attack!
directed against Jews generally
and Israelis specifically. Appar
ently. the reality of the terrorism
has nothing to do with official
American willingness to knuckle
under and do business with it.
Particularly emphasized by the
OCT is the fact that, in all it,
tabulated statistics, almost 60
percent of these attacks were
directed against people, not
property. Furthermore, better
than 65 percent of the attacks de-
liberately set out to cause as
many casualties as possible.
They were no mere scare tactics.
ANTI-DEFAMATION
League of B'nai B'rith has just
issued a report of its own on this
very question. The ADL opened
its European office in Paris two
years ago. and the report covers
the period from Autumn. 1980 to
the same period in 1982.
The ADL's statistics are con-
fined to Europe only and cite 73
bombings and shootings. Since
the attacks are perceived as part
of the Israel-Arab conflict, police
investigations tend to be limited
in scope. In fact, in only one case
has there been an arrest the
Vienna Synagogue bombing of
August 29, 1981.
According to the ADL, there is
a common thread running
through the fabric of this terror-
ism the use of the same arms
Continued on Page 13-A
Carl AI pert
The Lady Wanted to Be an Engineer
HAIFA The lady
wanted to be an engineer,
but fate decreed otherwise.
Instead, she carved out an
unusual career in the army,
and then became the first
woman to head a major
bank in Israel. Those are
only the bare details in the
story of Dvora Tomer, who
as head of a mortgage
bank, never in her life fore-
closed a mortgage. There is
more to the story than that.
Her family brought her to
Israel when she was only one year
old. Her father was a house
painter, and the family resources
were limited. At the age of 14 she
was already a member of the
Haganah. Her ambition was to
enroll at the Technion and
become an engineer, but the
expense was more than the
family could bear. On the eve of
her compulsory military services,
in 1949, she took a chance course
in economics, just to fill the time.
"I WASN'T even quite sure
what economics was all about,"
she said, but once the course
began she found that it appealed
to her. She was able to combine
her military service with univer-
sity studies, and majored in stat-
istics and management. Then,
back into the army she went. In
1955, she was assigned to the
office of the financial adviser to
the Army Chief of Staff,
becoming assistant to the head of
the office and reaching the rank
of Colonel.
GHQ noted that the slightly-
built woman had a talent for
finance, for human relations and
for administration. In 1970, she
was appointed to the highest post
a woman can hold in Israel's
Defense Forces, commander of
the Women's Corp (Chen) a
position she held for three years.
Private industry then
beckoned. Completely free of any
political background or af-
filiation, and indeed apolitical in
her views, she nonetheless ac-
cepted invitation to join the staff
ot Israel's Labor Hank, Bank
Mapoalim, as director of savings
accounts. Within a few years, she
became head of Mishkan. a Bank
Ilapoalim affiliate, and the
second largest mortgage bank in
the country, with a present
balance sheet in excess of
$350,000,000. That was not the
end.
EARLIER THIS year. Dvora
Tomer was elevated to the post of
deputy managing director of the
entire Bank Hapoalim complex^
Higher than that, no womanhjd
ever risen before in Israels
financial world.
The lady is a banker, but one
would never suspect that washer
profession. She is quiet, pleasant,
Continued on Page 10A
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Out ol town, country, upon request.
Friday. November 26,1982
Volume 55
10KISLEV5743
f .b"r|


"" -id i [ '
Friday, November 26,1982 /"Fhe Jewish Ploridmn Page B-A
France Saying Warm Things About Israel These Days
But Apparently Busy Selling Arms to All Arab Comers
By DAVID HAROUNOFF
French President
I Francois Mitterrand s
foreign policy contrasts
with his predecessors in
That the Socialist Govern-
Lents approach to the
Arab-Israeli conflict has
een the novel convergence
of political expendiency
with moral conviction.
-Security" and "justice"
i are the key words, the
[former term relating to
Israel's needs, the latter to
the demands of the Pales-
tinian Arabs.
Since taking office, President
I Mitterand has sought to achieve
these goals by earning Israel's
trust. His visit to Jerusalem in
early March went some way to
| demonstrate his sincerity.
This was soon followed by a
round of visits from the Foreign
Ministers of Italy. West Ger-
many and Britain. This symbolic
ending of Israel's isolation from
Western Europe was largely at
Mitterrand's instigation. He has
also assisted in Israel's efforts to
normalize relations with a
number of African states par-
| ticularly Zaire.
THE REPERCUSSIONS of
I this policy are already being felt.
Arab financiers who flocked to
Paris during Giscard d'Estaing's
reign at the Elysee Palace are
| now searching for pastures new.
Several Gaullist deputies have
I voiced concern about the possible
withdrawal of Arab investments
from such leading companies as
I the Credit Commercial de France
banking group and the Creusot-
ILoire steel corporation. Mitter-
I rand's pledge to fight the Arab
[commercial boycott of companies
[trading with Israel (and the pres-
ence of Communist Ministers in
I his cabinet I has heightened Arab
suspicions.
Pressure is now growing from
lousiness sectors and the defense
[establishment for an end to the
[President's diplomatic efforts in
[seeking Arab-Israeli conciliation
land a return to the pro-Arabist
[stance that colored his
predecessor's Government. One
lol the key advocates of this new
[lobby is Defense Minister Charles
lllernu.
Hernu recently revealed that of
|the total arms export sales in
11981 amounting to $5.2 billion.
Borne S4 billion worth of weapon
jry was purchased by Arab ar-
mies. This year for example, Iraq
Bnd France negotiated the sale of
SI billion package deal for
Howitzer surface-to-air missiles
land warplanes. plus a further
pwO million deal for heavy guns
ind communications equipment.
UNDER THE previous French
dministration, Iraq became
f'rance's second largest oil
pupplier, and in tum France
Placed the Soviet Union in
Icertain aspects regarding arms
pupplies.
Similarly, Saudi Arabia's
Uneasiness in having to battle so
Kl against America's pro-Israel
obby each time it required arms,
prsuaded the regime to purchase
french-made helicopters and
Nssdes to the sum of $3.5 billion
1981 In the two preceding
rears, Saudi arms purchases
counted to 20 percent of total
f "men sales. France has also
rmerged as a major supplier to
*f Gulf States, Tunisia,
"orocco and Jordan.
Today, France is surpassed
Pn|y by the Soviet Union as the
Pc'Pal arms supplier to the
2*d World. This is mainlv
bm-W*' non'al'8ned and even
L jV*16"1 developing states do
r1 "ke to be seen as too closelv
Pleated with the United
r^.s It follows that the French
1Uon in the international arms
Distance between France (President Mitterrand) and Israel (Prime Misister Begin) emphasized at dinner
table durning Mitterrand's last visit to Jerusalem.
market is likely to be enhanced to
the extent that France supports
the Arab cause.
This is the message that
Societe Nationale Industrielle
Aerospatiale (SNIAS) the
state company responsible for the
arms export trade has been
trying to convey to the Elysee.
Its influencial director is none
other than General Jacques
Mitterrand. the President's
brother.
OPERATION PEACE for
Galilee should have provided an
ideal opportunity for President
Mitterrand to perform a volte-
face on Israel. Political con-
siderations, however, prevailed
over economic aspirations,
particularly French opposition to
Syrian ambitions in the Levant.
In view of France's sympathies
and traditional links with
Lebanon, dating back to 1918.
Syria's long held belief that Leb-
anon comprises part of "Greater
Syria" is viewed with suspicion.
The issue of terrorism has also
damaged Franco-Syrian rel-
ations. The Quai d'Orsay blamed
Syria for the murder of the
French ambassador to Beirut a
year ago. and for a spate of
terrorist attacks in and against
France, culminating in last
April's bomb explosion at the
newspaper premises of Al Watan
al Arabi (the Arab Homeland)
an anti-Syrian Government
organ.
Many French officials may be
relieved that one of the major
consequences of the I^ebanon war
has been the undermining of
Syrian influence in the region.
Franco-Syrian friction could,
however, be the last remaining
obstacle to France's reemergence
as champion of th eArab cause.
London Chronicle Syndicate
65 Years After the Soviet Union's Revolution
Continued from Page 1-A
names (sometimes, their na-
tionality) or have been complete-
ly assimilated into their environ-
ment.
It is open to debate whether
discrimination against Jews is
due to anti-Semitism, to "dis-
trust" because of relatives
abroad, or to Middle East policy.
What is certain, however, is that
the promotion difficulties experi-
enced by some categories of Jews
have created a feeling of second-
class citizenship.
It is also indisputable that
young Jews experience problems
entering certain academic bodies
and other institutions. They are,
in short, worried about their fu-
ture.
Addressing an official delega-
tion of the French Socialist Party
in May, 1956, the Soveit leader,
Nikita Khrushchev, declared:
"At the outset of the Revolution,
we had many Jews in the leader-
ship of the Party and of the
State. They were educated,
maybe more revolutionary than
the average Russian.
"IN DUE course, we have
created new cadres. Should the
Jews want to occupy the fore-
most positions in our republic
now. it would naturally be taken
amiss by the indigenous inhabi-
tants. The latter would ill receive
their pretensions, especially as
they do not consider themselves
less intelligent or less capable
than the Jews.
"Or. for instance, when a Jew
in the Ukraine is appointd to an
important post, and he surrounds
himself with Jewish col-
laborators, it is understandable
that this should create jealousy
and hostility towards the Jews.
But we are not anti-Semites.''
Fate of Jews a Super-Complex Problem
Anti-Semitism in the Soviet It stems from socio-economic de-
Union is not of a racial character, velopments and varies from one
The anti-Jewish passion that the Kremlin seeks to stir up is
shown in the cartoon printed on the front page of 'Peretz, 'the
Ukrainian 'humor' magazine obtained by the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry. It shows a Streicher-like Jewish figure, along
with a gun-toting Nazi, under a harness bedecked with a Star
of David and dollar signs. They are pulling (not seen) a garbage
cart labelled 'anti-Sovietism' and 'cold war.'
region to the other. It has po-
litical implications, too.
THE VIOLENT anti-Israel
and anti-Zionist campaign now
being waged in the Soviet Union
is being used by anti-Semitic ele-
ments for their own purposes. No
one would have believed years
ago that literature published by
official Communist publishing
houses would spread anti-Jewish
propaganda.
Another factor which has an
important bearing on the position
of the Jewish population is their
location: few Jews work on the
land and most reside in major
cities. But from many occupa-
tions they are gradually being
pushed out.
This is an historical process,
which is likely to be aggravated
by economic problems within the
State and political tensions pre-
ceding the end of the Brezhnev
era. The lessons of the Polish
crisis are being taken seriously in
the Soviet Union.
The Jewish emigration move-
ment, which reached its peak in
1979 with the departure of 51.000
Jews, has halted, but it is likely
to be revived as a result of in-
ternal pressures in the various re-
publics and the grave problem of
divided families (during the last
decade 150,000 Jews left the
USSR).
THE INEVITABILITY of the
emigration process does not
mean, however, that one can. or
should, ignore the various factors
facilitating or hampering it.
To keep the doors of the Soviet
Union open, ^. .:nle is a vital
Continued on Page 8-A



Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, Novnber 26,1982
UJE GIVE YOU
CREDIT FOR YOUR AGE
Announcing the
20% Senior Discount.
For years, we've given you
special vacation rates, weekend
specials, dinner discounts and
lots of other good reasons
to stay with us. But,
beginning October 1st.
we're really going to
spoil you.
You Only Have to Be 55 to
Get 20% Off Your Hotel Bill.
From October 1st through
January 31st*a great time to
see FloridaHoward Johnson's
participating lodges will offer
all senior citizens a 20% room
discount And thafs not all.
You'll Even Get a 10% Discount on Your Dinner.
Not just a 20% discount on your room, but
10% off your dinner, too. For participating lodges
and more information on the way we treat senior
citizens, call toll free 1-800-654-2000, and
ask for the Senior Double Discount offer, or
bring this ad to a participating Howard
Johnson's Motor Lodge.
At Howard Johnson's, we give
you credit for the things
that count most

HOtUARDjOUnSOli?
All rooms subject to availability. *Offer not valid December 20 through
January 2, or in conjunction with any other Howard Johnson's offer.
C Howard Johnson Co. 1982
"T


Friday, November 26,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Bleak Future for Marriage-Prone
Sharon Didn't Have Okay To Allow
Seen to Need Better Than Singles Bars Phalangists into Refugee Camps
By BEN GALLOB
It all began when mem-
I bers of the Jewish Educa-
I (ion Council of Seattle, at a
(meeting a little over two
vears ago, projected a bleak
future of fewer and fewer
Jewish children to educate
unless the growing rate of
nixed marriages among
Seattle's young Jews could
I be slowed down.
They decided that one way to
Lach that objective was to make
it possible for more marriageable
Jewish young men and women to
meet and get acquainted under
I auspices more dignified than sin-
Ides bars. They noted that in
I current circumstances of Jewish
I mobility and Jewish community
fragmentation, many Jewish sin-
gles are neither members of a
synagogue nor involved in Jew-
|fchcommunity activities.
So they set about developing a
I Jewish Singles Computer Dating
I Service. Its JEC sponsors assert
I that the JSS can be credited with
at least five known marriages,
according to the Jewish Trans-
[cript of Seattle.
THEY REPORTED that since
I the JSS began functioning, near-
llv 1.000 Jewish singles from
I Portland. Ore. to Vancouver,
IBritish Colombia have joined the
Icomputer service. The JEC has
[received many glowing reports of
[male-female friendships made
I through the dating service.
Kay Pomerantz, JEC director,
| said most Jews enrolling in the
JSS are 24 years old and older,
[with many in their late 20s and
[early 30s. She said JSS partici-
Ipants currently are evenly
[divided between men and women.
[She said many singles are par-
Iticipating from smaller towns,
[where the problem of finding
[suitable Jewish dates is most
Isevere.
She also reported that one
couple who met and married
through the JSS were both from
Seattle. The others have all been
intercity linkages. The first mar-
riage Evolving from the JSS serv-
ice was a Portland-Tacoma link-
ing. A couple married this sum-
mer involves a second marriage
for the woman, who has children
from her first marriage. The new
^usband is from another city and
his bride said that without the
help of the JSS, she almost cer-
tainly would never have met him.
MS. POMERANTZ said there
are probably other marriages in
which the JSS was a factor that
the JEC sponsors have no in-
formation about.
Sandy Dorr is a volunteer who
took over the job of JSS director
last November. She said that
smce then, the JSS has almost
doubled its list of names by in-
icreased publicity and member -
|ship expansion efforts.
Mauroy Will
Visit Israel
PARIS (JTA) Prime
^mister Pierre Mauroy will visit
srael next year and attend the
winning ceremonies between the
*rench city of Lille and Israel's
u, Maury told Safed Mayor
H0*f Nahmias, with whom he
earlier this week, that he will
PJW Israel as soon as possible
w the countrywide forthcom-
8 municipal elections next
I arch Mauroy is Mayor of Lille.
Nahmias said the Prime Minis-
r also told him that the Franco-
'srael dialogue will soon resume
and that the Franco-Israel
j ,l"ral commission, whose sche-
med meeting last June was
Postponed by the French govern-
ment, because of the war in
'eoanon will soon be reconvened.
Ms. Dorr said that the stigma
once attached to the idea of dat-
ing by computer does not apply
to the JSS service. She said more
Jews with a wider range of in-
terests and more age groups are
starting to use the service. She
reported a recent trip to Van-
couver where she met with local
rabbis to discuss the JSS. She re-
ported that Vancouver Jewish
men want to meet Seattle Jewish
women.
Ms. Dorr said the JSS has be-
come an accepted way for Jewish
singles to meet singles of the op-
posite sex, particularly for those
who would not ordinarily attend
events for singles or general Jew-
ish community programs. She re-
ported she had contacted all of
the local synagogue offices and
the Jewish Community Center
and that all of the offices are
directing inquiries from Jewish
single newcomers to the JSS. She
said the JSS sends application
forms to the newcomers.
AN UNMARRIED Jew from
California, who has lived in Seat-
tle for eight years, has never
made any special effort to meet
eligible Jewish women, has not
been affiliated with a synagogue
and has not attended Jewish
functions, Ms. Door reported.
Now he is thinking seriously
about getting married and has
found the computer service an ef-
fective way to meet Jewish
women. He said that in only
about two months, he has re-
ceived the names of about ten
Jewish single women.
According to the Transcript,
the JEC has a private fund made
up of contributions from several
Jewish "angels," who subsidize
the dating service and no public
funds are used. Ms. Dorr stressed
that the service is absolutely con-
fidential and participants see
only the names of other persons
with whom names are exchanged.
Names are fed into the com-
puter in Los Angeles and the
service provides up to five names
and telephone numbers each
time, and three computer runs, at
two-months intervals, for any
Jewish single, 18 years and older,
for a $20 fee.
A newsletter is sent out with
each computer run, giving par-
ticipants undated information
and informal news about the
service. Ms. Dorr said the JSS
has a telephone system which
takes messages around the clock.
By JTA Report
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Communications Minis-
ter Mordechai Zipori con-
tended Friday that Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon did
not have retroactive ap-
proval of the Cabinet when
he allowed Christian
Phalangists to enter the
Sabra and Shatila refugee
camps in west Beirut last
Sept. 16.
Zipori's testimony before the
commission of inquiry into the
refugee camps massacre contra-
dicted Premier Menachem
Begin's assertion before the com-
mission two weeks ago that deci-
sions taken at a June 15 Cabinet
meeting were sufficient
authorization for Sharon to act
three months later without prior
consultation with the full Cabi-
net.
RESPONDING to a question
from Gen. (res.) Yona Ephrat, the
military member of the three-
member panel, Zipori said the
Cabinet decided on June 15 that
the Israel army should not enter
west Beirut.
But according to Zipori, that
could not and should not be in-
terpreted as a mandate for send-
ing in the Phalangists. as Sharon
later did. Zipori elaborated on the
June 15 Cabinet meeting when
the commission went into closed
session. However, he testified at
the open hearing that news of the
Phalangists' entry into the refu-
gee camps did not trigger a
"warning light" in his mind or in
the minds of most of his Cabinet
colleagues when they met in
emergency session the night of
Sept. 16.
Zipori said he was out of the
Cabinet room briefly when
Deputy Premier David Levy ex-
pressed his fear that the Phalan-
gists would wreak vengeance on
the Palestinians in the refugee
camps.
Zipori said he first learned of
the massacres from a journalist
friend on Sept. 17 but was unable
to contact the heads of military
intelligence and general security
services to confirm the reports.
He said he telephoned Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir sug-
gesting that he check the reports
himself, to which Sharmir re-
plied, "I heard you," Zipori said.
u
JEWISH
rwnorw.
mno
You Are Cordially Invited to Attend
^etUcated to the 20tA tS&vnv&eMxxAty of 0U* SPibleb ^Ou in <*?&uie4
Guest Speaker
e^fc 3WICSI (fifl
M.
His Excellency Harry Hurwitz
Israel's Minister of Information
to Washington D.C.
Ernest Samuels
President, Point East
Vice President JNF of Greater Miami
Sunday, December 19,1982 at 6:30 p.m.
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel
Rabbi Irving Lehrman
Chrmn.JNFFdtn
Outstanding Entertainment
JNF Strengthens Israel
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Chrmn. JNF Exec. Board
For Reservations:
Jewish National Fund
420 Lincoln Rd Miami Beach
538-6464
Abraham Grunhut
Pres. JNF Gr. Miami
Kosher Cuisine
Strengthen the JNF


U~ o *

Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 26,1982
65 Years After Revolution
Fate of Soviet Jewry Still Super-Complex Problem
Continued from Page 5-A
factor, and Jewish leaders would
be wise to further this process.
They should also acknowledge
the fact that the Soviet Union
has recognized the specific
character of the Jewish situation
and the special status of Israel a&
the national center of the Jewish
people.
Emigration from Russia dur-
ing the post-war period is esti-
mated at 400,000 out of a total
population of 262 million (1979
census). In addition to Jews,
some 80,000 to 90,000 Germans
and 10,000 Armenians have been
allowed to leave, as well as a
number from other nationalities.
Jews, have thus been treated
as a special category, not easy for
the Soviets when one bears in
mind the emigration pressures
from other quarters and Mos-
cow's close relationship with the
Arab States.
Scanning the past 65 years,
one sees that the Soviet record
regarding Israel is not entirely
negative. It was, after all, Rus-
sian political and military assis-
tance that greatly assisted in the
establishment of the Jewish
State in 1948. And the Soviet
Government, despite its close
links with the PLO, has never
supported the latter's aim of des-
troying Israel.
THE JEWISH world must
acknowledge these historic facts
while yet denouncing the Com-
munists' unprecedented cam-
paign of misinformation and
vilification.
Indeed, according to reliable
sources, Russia's leaders are con-
scious of the mistake they made
in June, 1967, when they broke
off diplomatic relations with Is-
rael. They would like to put the
clock back, but it is not easy for
them, especially after the events
in Lebanon.
Jews as a collective entity have
no status in the Soviet Union.
Their position differs from that of
other nationalities. They are a
minority in a country based on
territorial units, whose character,
at least formally, is determined
by the majority nationality resid-
ing in each of the 15 Soviet So-
cialist republics.
While remaining an important
element in Soviet society, es-
pecially in the major cities, they
live as individuals. There is no
Jewish representative body, no
association of synagogues, no
Jewish schools, or literary or his-
torical societies, no facilities for
studying Jewish history. There
are no links with other Jewish
communities (even in other Com-
munist countries), no Jewish
memorials, no commemmoration
of Holocaust anniversaries.
WHAT IS the reason for this
suppression of Jewish identity?
The ideological basis of the So-
viet Union's assimilation policy
concerning the Jews was laid
down by Lenin:
"The Jewish question is this
assimilation or separateness. The
idea of a Jewish nationality is in
conflict with the interests of the
Jewish proletariat, for, directly or
indirectly, it engenders in its
ranks a mood hostile to assimila-
tion, a 'ghetto mood"' flskra,
October 22,1903).
Soviet Jewry is. officially con-
sidered a nationality, but a great
discrepancy persists between law
and reality. This is one of the
major reasons for the schizo-
phrenic attitude in the Soviet
Union towards the Jewish com-
munity.
This duality of approach does
not exist as far as religion is con-
cerned. In his famous article,
"Socialism and Religion" (1905),
Lenin wrote: "Religion is one of
the forms of spiritual oppression
which everywhere weighs heavily
upon the popular masses,
crushed by their perpetual work
for others, by want and loneli-
ness."
HE NEVER changed his views
on this subject. Religion, he said,
must be a private matter as far as
the State was concerned, but the
Communist Party must be com-
mitted to an anti-religious Strug-
gle.
In reality, the position of Jew-
ish believers is worse than that of
others because of the campaign
against Israel and fear of Jewish
links with the Western world.
Every synagogue is treated as
a separate unit. There is no train-
ing of rabbis in the Soviet Union.
Jewish "houses of prayer" are
not allowed to have contacts
abroad, a privilege granted to
Christian and Moslem bodies. In
the future, "small concessions"
are possible, but no change is
likely in the general situation.
The Soviet policy against
Zionism has deep roots in Lenin's
teachings. The leader of the
November Revolution fought
hard against any form of na-
tionalism. For him, the Zionists
were responsible for diverting the
Jewish workers' attention from
the struggle for Communism, a
view clearly developed by Lenin
during his years of underground
activity in Western Europe.
There was another factor,
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Lenin wrote: "There are hun-
dreds of millions of Asians who
are now ceasing to be objects of
colonial expoitation and becom-
ing active participants in the de-
cision on the fate of the world."
He looked at the Arab world as
an ally in the struggle against the
West.
THE BALFOUR Declaration,
moreover, was interpreted as an
act of British colonialism, and the
basis for the campaign of opposi-
tion against the Zionist move-
ment was thus laid during the
years of Lenin's regime.
The "assimilation" policy
towards the Jews is strengthened
by pragmatic considerations. The
number of Russians is declining
in the Soviet Union and is ap-
proaching 50 per cent of the total
population. The transformation
of Jews into Russians is thus an
important demograhic considera-
tion.
Other factors militating
against "Jewish national cul-
ture" are motivated by fears of
Israel's influence, the impact of
links with Jews in the Western
world, and the universal charac-
ter of the Jewish spiritual heri-
tage.
There are exceptions. It is a
mistake to dismiss lightly the
significance of Moscow's "So-
vietish Heimland," an important
Yiddish publication, and the
limited number of Jewish theatre
performances.
Anything which can be done to
expand the present cultural
activities should be welcomed. It
is important, therefore, to nego-
tiate with the Soviets in concrete
terms, not in generalities.
MEMORIES OF THE "dark
years" of Stalinism and the Nazi
Continued on Page 13-A
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At CJFWF Assembly
Friday, November 26,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
A Call for World Jewish Partnership
T>
Continued from Page 1-A
people and the centrality of Israel
in Jewish life"; "The ingathering
of the Jewish people in its his-
toric homeland, Eretz Israel,
through aliya from all coun-
tries"; "The strengthening of the
State of Israel which is based on
the prophetic vision of justice
and peace"; "The preservation of
the identity of the Jewish people
through the fostering of Jewish
nd Hebrew education and of
Jewish spiritual and cultural
values"; and "The protection of
Jewish rights everywhere."
Dulzin said that in line with
this program, "aliya and its pro-
motion are a top priority and
should be on the agenda of every
Jewish community organi-
zation." Another top priority, he
said, is Jewish education, formal
and informal.
FOCUSING ON aliya, Dulzin
aid that a strong Israel "re-
quires more Jews. Our economy
needs the skills of Jews from the
Western world." In addition,
aliya is not only important for Is-
rael "but also for diaspora com-
munities. It strengthens links to
Israel and Israel is linked to the
diaspora with bonds of family."
Among the common tasks
facing Israel and the diaspora,
Dulzin cited the need to rescue
Jews in distress in the Soviet
Union and Ethiopia. He pledged
that Israel "will bring all
Ethiopian Jews to Israel."
Regarding the "tragic
situation" of Jews in the USSR,
he warned that "if neshira (drop-
out) continues to grow it will hurt
Jewish emigration." He rejected
the idea that Soviet Jews are ref-
ugees. "They have a place to go,
and that place is Israel," he de-
clared. "The road from the Soviet
Union should be to Jerusalem
and not to New York or Paris or
" ^rj^ondon."
REGARDING Jewish educa-
tion, Dulzin said that "a major
task is to assure that Jews re-
main Jews. We are losing our
people to assimilation and inter-
marriage. In the old days it was
hard to be a Jew but Jews re-
mained Jews. Today it is easier to
be a Jew but it is also easier to
disappear as a Jew into the gen-
eral scene. I have my own defini-
tion of who is a Jew. A Jew is
i a^one who helps his children remain
^V^Jew."
He stressed repeatedly that it
is imperative "to maintain the
unity of the Jewish people de-
spite differences we may have."
He noted that while many things
divide us, what "unites us is Is-
rael." Dulzin did not spell out
what differences he had in mind,
but hinted that the differences
were over the war in Lebanon.
He indicated this when he
noted that Israel is deeply in-
\> ^l~ ICP1'""* in sorting out the tragedy
of the women and children who
were killed in the refugee camps
in west Beirut. He said that after
the Yom Kippur War Israelis
called for a commission of inquiry
to investigate the lack of pre-
paredness. "They were investi-
gating themselves," he said.
"Now the investigation is about
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other people."
Citing his dream for Israel's
future, Dulzin said he wants an
Israel that exemplifies morality
and Jewish principles. "We do
not want to become another
Sparta and be known for our
military strength," he declared.
ROBERT LOUP, general
chairman of the United Jewish
Appeal, who also asdressed the
forum which dealt with Israel-
diaspora relations, castigated the
media for its "wild distortions"
of the war in Lebanon, with its
highly exaggerated and uncon-
firmed stories about the numbers
of people who were killed or made
homeless.
He charged that the media was
guilty of "bigotry and even anti-
Semitism" in its use of "code
words such as 'genocide,' 'holo-
caust,' and 'Nazis' to describe Is-
rael's action in Lebanon." Loup
said that the media "missed the
real story the real sacrifice Is-
raeli soldiers made not to harm
civilians in Lebanon."
The UJA leader pointed to the
sharp contrast between the media
coverage of the Sabra and Shatila
camps massacres and the media
insensitivity to the deaths of
Jews at the hands of terrorists.
Citing by name major news-
papers, wire services, TV net-
works and columnists in this
country which produced reams of
copy about the massacres but
paid scant, if any attention to
Jewish victims around the world,
Loup declared:
"WHERE WERE the media
when a Jewish woman was killed
in Antwerp, an Israeli diplomat
murdered in Paris, and an Israeli
Ambassador wounded in Lon-
don? Does any president have on
his desk a photo of Stefano
Tasch, the two-year-old child who
was killed in Rome when the
synagogue was bombed?"
This last was an apparent ref-
erence to the photo President
Reagan allegedly kept on his
desk of the Lebanese child who
was described in the caption as
armless but which UPI, which
distributed the photo worldwide,
later conceded had been mislabel-
ed. Medical reports showed that
the infant suffered a broken arm.
The photo was used to symbolize
the suffering of the Lebanese
people during the war.
Loup also stressed the need for
unity between American Jewry
and Israel. He said that this
unity was being manifested de-
spite questions and concerns over
Israel's policies. "I am gratified
by the willingness of our people
to give to UJA's Israel's special
fund and the 1983 general cam-
New Rail Road Inaugurated
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israel's newest railway line was
officially inaugurated Wednesday when the first train
travelled from Tel Aviv to Kiryat Gat, over a new track
and parts of a rebuilt track along an old right-of-way.
THE NEW LINK involving 12 miles of completely new
embankment and track from Ashkelon to Kiryat Gat plus
restoration of the Ashkelon-Ashdod line, part of the old
Palestine-Egypt railroad, is intended to speed and serve
potash and phosphate exports from the Dead Sea to Ash-
dod Port, bypassing the overloaded Lydda junction.
paign," he said. "If we don't raise
money, won't Israelis also feel
that we don't understand them?"
ANOTHER SPEAKER at the
forum was Simcha Destel, an
Ethiopian Jew. He told the aud-
ience that in Ethiopia today "it is
very hard to live as a Jew. Jewish
schools are closed by the order of
the government. Teaching He-
brew is prohibited by the govern-
ment. Jews are not allowed to
meet together even in small
groups of three. There is no com-
munications between villages.
We are becoming more and more
isolated. We cannot wait much
longer." In a fervent plea to the
audience he declared: "Bring us
home to Israel." Destel said he
was a free man because of the
help he received from the Los
Angeles Jewish Federation and
the Jewish Agency of Israel.
Bell Introduces
The World B/The Minute
NEAR EAST $2.21X80'
EUROPE $1.42*/8Q
UNITED KINGDOM *\25?76
NowNou Can Dial a Hvlinute Overseas Call.
Have family or friends in Israel,
Europe, or the UK? Now you can dial
Overseas Rate For Dialable Countries
Dial Rate
Region
Rale levels First rrmute Additional minute Hours
UNITED KINGDOM/IRELAND
Standard
Discount
Economy
$208
156
125
$1.26
.95
76
7am-lpm
1 pm-6pm
6pm"-7am
EUROPE
Standard
Discount
Economy
2.37
1.78
1.42
1.33
100
80
7am-lpm
1 pm-6pm
6pm-7am
PACIFIC
Standard
Discount
Economy
4.22
3.17
2.53
58
19
95
5pm- 11pm
10am-5pm
11 pm-IOam
CARIBBEAN/ATLANTIC
Standord
Discount
Economy
168
126
1.01
SOUTH AMERICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
2.77
208
1.66
1.13
85
68
1.18
89
71
NEAR EAST
Standard
Discount
Economy
3.68
276
2.21
1.33
100
80
CENTRAL AMERICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
2.62
1.97
1.57
1 13
85
68
AFRICA
Standord
Discount
Economy
289
2.17
1.73
1 48
1.11
89
INDIAN OCEAN
Standord
Discount
Economy
522
3.92
3.13
217
163
130
For countries 'hot ore not dialable, there's a 3-minute minimum and rales ore somewhat higher
DiHerent rale schedules apply to Conodo ond Mentco Check with your local operotor
Federal excise ton ot 1% is odded on oil colls billed m the United Slates
them, or almost anywhere else in the world,
at low one-minute rates. The 3-minute
minimum call is no longer
in effect except in
countries that are not
dialable.
This chart gives you
the new 1-minute dial
rates, the lower rates for
each additional minute,
and the new calling times:
Standard, Discount, and
Economy.
Bargain rates are
available 7 days a week,
day or nighteven to
countries that never had
reduced rates before.
No International
Dialing in your area? You
still get the new 1-minute
dial rate as long as special
operator assistance is not
required.
"Hello World" costs
less than ever before.
Want to know more?
Call our International
Service, toll free:
1 800 874-4000.
4pm-IOpm
7om-4pm
I0pm-7om
7am-lpm
Ipm-lOpm
I0pm-7am
8am-3pm
9pm-8am
3pm-9pm
5pm-11pm
8am-5pm
II pm-8am
6am-12 Noon
12Noon-5pm
5pm-6am
6pm-lam
lam-Ham
llam-6pm
Bell BringsThe World Closer


.....


/
Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 26,1982
Lady Wanted to Be an Engineer,
And Then She Turned to Banking
Continued from Page 4-A
modest, soft-spoken; she is
motherly, but not matronly, and
possesses an air of obvious ef-
ficiency.
She consented to our interview,
but hastened to protest that she
was not a prodigy or a wun-
derkind of any kind. To the
contrary, she told us, she had not
even been first in any of her
classes just an ordinary
student, though it appears that
the advances in her career were
based on recognition of genuine
ability, rather than on any luck.
SHE IS not a crusading
feminist, and believes that
women must find the golden path
between family's home and
career. She does not favor women
over men, nor lean over back-
wards against them. Still, when
in the army, she was responsible
for righting certain injustices. In
the early days, men were given
enlistment grants women not,
until she changed the policy.
Career soldiers were given help in
obtaining an education, and sht
insisted that the same benefit be
extended to the girls.
She recalls when, not so very
long ago, women's signatures
were not accepted on mortgages
in Israel, not even as co-signers.
Women who want a career
should not do so at the sacrifice
of family life, she feels. Under-
standing is required by husband,
by the children, and by the
employer as well. Conflict can be
avoided if acceptance of major
outside responsibilities is
deferred until the children are old
enough not to miss their mother's
personal care and attention.
Banking in Israel is highly
competitive, and we asked her
what, in her opinion, distin-
guished Bank Hapoalim from the
others.
IN THE first place, she said, it
seeks to provide banking services
where most needed, and was the
first to open branches in
provincial and border towns even
where there was little commercial
motivation. And in the second
place, it puts the accent on
service to the small depositor
the wage earner. Thus, it
initiated in Israel the privilege of
end-of-month overdraft for wage
earners.
"Is it true," I asked, "that you
have never foreclosed on a
mortgage?"
Dvora Tomer laughed. "It's
true, but neither have most other
bankers in Israel. In this country
every mortgage is underwritten
by three guarantors, and if the
mortgage holder cannot pay,
somebody else will. So there are
no evictions."
"And have you ever regretted
that you did not study
engineering?"
Again she laughed. "I did the
next best thing. I married a
Technion graduate in Civil
Engineering."
Neither of her two children,
ages 20 and 24, is interested in
either banking or engineering,
but they have reached an age
which does free their mother to
accept major responsibilities as
the highest ranking woman
banker in Israel.
Hussein Presents Peace Plan
To Mitterrand in Paris
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) King Hussein of Jordan has
presented the Arab peace plan to President Francois
Mitterrand and later said the French and Arab positions
have many points in common. Hussein, who led a seven-
member Arab delegation, including a PLO representative,
later said "France has examined our plan in a positive and
constructive way."
THE ARAB plan, drawn up at the recent Fez
summit conference, calls for a mutual recognition by
Israel and the PLO and for the Palestinian organization's
participation in future peace talks.
Hussein, who is due to lead the delegation to Moscow
and Peking next, said that the Arab states will continue
to press their case while exploring the possibilities offered
by the American peace plan as outlined by President
Reagan in September.
The Arab delegation consisted of the Foreign
Ministers of Syria, Morocco, Algeria, and Saudia Arabia
as well as the PLO's Farouk Kaddumi and Arab League
Secretary General Chedli Klibi.
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Sympathy-Protest Rabbi
Avitol Sharansky, wife of Prisoner of
Conscience Anatoly Sharansky who is in the
second month of a desperation hunger strike
in Russia's Chistipol Prison, visits Rabbi
Avraham Weiss (left) in the midst of his six-
day sympathy fast at the Soviet UN
Mission, organized by the Student Struggle
for Soviet Jewry. Joining the discussion is
Eli Saddan (right) from Israel's Shomer Achi
Anochi (I Am My Brother's Keeper) Soviet
Jewry movement.
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Fred D. Hirt, Executive Director


Friday, November 26, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
>r Party Said to Be Seeking Cut in U.S. Aid
Continued from Page 1-A
t Jewish settlements in each
Ivery part of Eretz Israel."
iBORS OFFICIAL
fesman accused Shamir of
ng against the opposition.
Party Chairman Shimon
asserted that no Laborite
Lade the comment to Frank-
Jsecretary-General Haim
|v assured a radio inter-
\x that "no one in our party
have said anything so
J or so vicious." Barlev said
limself had not met with
Frankel. He raised the possibility
that F rankers report might be "a
provocation" but refused to
specify who might have been res-
ponsible for such a provocation.
But Justice Minister Moshe
Nissim (Likud-Liberal) told
reporters that Frankel was
"credible" and had plainly
written what he did because he
had been satisfied it reflected "a
trend" within Labor.
Nissim noted that Frankel had
told the Post that he "would not
have written this article unless I
was convinced that the view was
widespread and that it was
deeply felt It was not just
one crackpot. I was startled to
find how widespread the view
was." Plainly, Nissim said,
Frankel had met with several
leading Laborites and the view he
reported was a trend in their
thinking.
THIS WAS "an unpreceden-
ted scandal," the Justice Min-
ister continued. "See to what ter-
rible lengths they are prepared to
go just to try and get back into
power. .
Meanwhile, a group of Jewish
US. state legislators, members
of the National Association of
Jewish Legislators, currently
visiting Jerusalem as guests of
the Knesset and the World Zion-
ist Organization, told the JTA
that if Congress decided to cut
aid it "would be disastrous" for
Israel.
Several of the legislators
pointed out that it would be
virtually impossible to restore
the aid once Congress cut it. The
lawmakers said that in their
meetings with Labor Party
figures they had not heard the
kind of sentiment as that
reported by Frankel.
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Christians Eye Greater Dialogue With Israel
DATbDI
WASHINGTON
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'
''
Friday, November 26,19& / lite Jewish Floridian Page 13:A
Author Limits Readers' Expectations
MORTON I. TEICHER
iish Floridian Book Editor
rash on American Jew-
History. By Henry L.
li Albany, N.Y.: SUte
ity of New York Preaa,
lPp
s a wise author who finds a
0 limit the expectations of
rfers. Feingold has done so
illy by calling his book "A
La This tells us immedi-
fnot to look for definitive
[book study of American
ih history, even though
eld is a fine historian who is
iitly capable of writing such
k. What he gives us instead
iat the title promises a
lentary on American Jewish
book consists of 14 essays,
iding on its own, and not
in strict chronological
Despite his profession,
old is no slave to time as
rganizing principle of his
Therefore, he is free to
each topic in some depth
ut worrying about whether
it follows in direct se-
from the preceding
IS enough of a historian,
er, to start with early
Jewish explorers and
s, following this with brief
ents on Jews in the
Dr. Teicher
Colonial period and in the
American Revolution. His next
chapter on the German Jews in
America takes us from the early
immigration, starting in about
1820 to the refugees from Hitler
who came during the 1930's
This group greatly enriched
our country with their scientific,
intellectual and artisitc talents.
Feingold reminds us that our
shortsighted immigration policy
sharply restricted the number
who were saved, condemning the
vast majority to death at the
hands of the Nazis. Is there a
lesson here for us as we struggle
to fashion an intelligent immi-
gration policy today?
The book contains incisive
chapters on each of the three
movements in American Jewish
religious life as well as a brilliant
chapter on what Feingold calls
" Israel ism-Zionism: A New Civil
Religion." He points out that for
most American Jews, helping
and supporting Israel comes
close to the top of the list of what
one must do to be Jewish. But
this is not Zionism in the classical
sense, since American Jewish
commitment to Israel does not
include the obligation to settle
there. Feingold traces how we
reached this present position as
we moved from anti-Zionism to
non-Zionism to Zionism without
aliyah, which is our uniquely
American interpretation and
which Feingold labels Israelism,
a new civil religion.
THE ESSAY on anti-Semitism
in America gives us some comfort
in pointing out that anti-
Semitism here has never been
official government policy but
Feingold warns against com-
placency, noting the comparabili-
ty between our current condition
and that of German Jews in the
1920s and early 1930's.
There are excellent chapters on
the ghetto, the Yiddish theatre,
the Jewish labor movement,
American Jewish organizations,
Jewish power, Jewish interest in
foreign affairs and Jewish sur-
vival.
Feingold's conclusion clearly
illustrates the high degree to
which this book is well written
and filled with insight: "In the
end, we are compelled to recog-
nize that the American Jewish
condition is at once desperate and
full of hope. Has it ever been
otherwise with this people?"
lew Translation
'Kethubim' Rendered into Hebrew
By
INKLIN D KREUTZER
[Writing Kethubin. New
station by the Jewish
llication Society of
krira. Philadelphia: Jewish
llication Society. 624 Pp.,
195.
Jewish Publication So-
of America has now corn-
its "new translation" of
Irish Bible with the print-
The Writings Kethu-
|Previously, the Torah, or
ooks of Moses, was trans
|n 1962, and thereafter, the
lets was translated in 1978.
importance of the entire
lation is that it is rendered
ly from Hebrew into En-
fcnd sidesteps all prior Jew-
bd non-Jewish translations
Icurrent, contemporary lan-
| as oppoesd to the usual
pal dialect."
EN THOUGH very famous
Bes sound sacrilegious, the
[can easily identify with
biblical writings as Psalms,
ps, and the Books of Job
bther.
Guest reviewer Franklin D.
Kreutzer is a Miami attorney
and president of the Southeast
Region of the United Syna-
gogue of America.
This new translation has the
benefit of three United States
trained biblical experts asso-
ciated with Hebrew University in
Israel and Brandeis University,
who were assisted by that great,
contemporary novelist, Rabbi
Chaim Potok, who acted as liter-
ary consultant and coordinator,
and whose flair can be seen occa-
sionally in the translation. He
viet Jews Complex Problem
TOtinued from Page 8-A
Pination period remain
I among the older Jewish
fUon in the Soviet Union;
|nave made their children
V with their tragic experi-
Joss of close relatives is
Wt and this makes the re-
Fn of families such an ur-
|uman problem. It is esti-
'hat there are today over
refuseniks" in the Soviet
; '"jny of history is that the
of assimilation increases
national consciousness.
temitism strengthens Zion-
entiments. The pro-PLO
la U ^PS tHe ISrael faCtr
nd d'scrimination increas-
es the desire to leave the Soviet
Union.
It may be a paradox, but it is
nevertheless true that Kremlin
policy under Lenin, Stalin,
Khurshchev and Brezhnev has
created a Jewish problem of a
specifically Communist variety
and the present Communist
leaders have no idea how to solve
it.
Throughout the ages, Jews
have survived persecution, dis-
crimination and attempts at
spiritual annihilation. Sixty-five
years after the Lenin revolution,
history is repeating itself.
No one can predict the future.
As long as there is peace, there is
hope for Soviet Jewry. But the
threat of a third world war could
lead them to catastrophe.
was consulted when the scholars
were unable to agree on the
translation.
The revered 23rd Psalm now
reads. Though I walk through a
valley of deepest darkness, I fear
no harm," as opposed to the time
honored, "Even though I walk
through the valley of the shadow
of death, I fear no evil." The
famous phrase of the 13th Psalm,
"How long O Lord wilt though
forget me for ever?" reads in this
new translation as "How long, O
Lord; will You ignore me for-
ever?"
The translators consulted
many known and unknown
biblical sources, including the
Dead Sea Scrolls and several re-
cently discovered Arabic manu-
scripts, in order to obtain ac-
curate translations of biblical
period phraseology. The objec-
tive was to accurately translate
the "flavor" of the document.
AN EXAMPLE of this is that
Jewish woman, who has tradi-
tionally been described in
Proverbs, 31, as "A woman of
valor who can find?", has now
been reinterpreted as a Jewish
housewife who devotes herself to
domestic duties and is translated
as "What a rare find is a capable
wife!" Will this now be quoted at
Mother's Day gatherings?
Time honored verbiage and old
phrases never die, but they do
fade away with'the memories of
those of us that are getting older.
Our children will learn the new
phraseology and will begin to
make their own memories and the
scholarly task of interpreting and
translating our great Jewish
biblical books will pass to
another generation.
Jews associated with the Con-
servative and Reform Move-
ments will find it easy to adjust
to this accurate translation, how-
ever, those with a traditional out-
look may well find it impossible
to adjust. Regardless, everyone
should take the opportunity to
read this "current," unabridged
edition so that the books of the
past will have current relevancy
and meaning and be under-
standable.
Dentists, Witkoff and Hauptman,
Awarded College Fellowships
Two South Florida dentists
have recently been awarded Fel-
lowship in the American College
of Dentists. Both are members of
the East Coast District Dental
Society, its affiliate groups and
many other professional so-
cieties.
Dr. Fred Witkoff practices in
Coral Gables and is chairman of
Aesthetic Dentistry Section of
the Dade County Dental
Research Clinic. He is a staff
member of Mt. Sinai, Cedars of
Lebanon and Variety Childrens
Hospitals. Dr. Witkoff has
served as Florida State chairman
of the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith. He is also a
published poet listed in the
International Who's Who in
Poetry.
Dr. Joel Hauptman practices
p\ Mia'mi Beach and is chairman
iof diagnosis and treatment plan-
ning at Mt. Sinai Dental Clinic
and is on staff at Dade County
Dental Research Clinic. Dr.
Hauptman also serves as chair-
man of the Council on Dental So-
ciety Services for the Florida
Dental Association.
The American College of Den-
tists was organized in 1920. It
recognizes through Fellowship
those who have contributed to
the advancement of the profes-
sion and humanity. Fellowhsip in
the College is by invitation.
Leo Mindlin
When Will Terrorism Hit
U.S. Jewish Community?
Continued from Page 4-A
in Paris, London, Brussels and
Rome. The report identifies "A
Polish W2-63 machine-pistol and
Czech or Soviet-manufactured
'banana' grenades."
THE STATE Department
OCT study of the terrorism notes
that over three-quarters of the
attacks in the last two-year peri-
od were carried out by terrorists
from Guatemala, Colombia,
France, West Germany, Italy,
Greece and Japan.
Speaking of these terrorists,
the ADL report observes that
"Allied terrorist movements are
alleged to have held ceremonies
to transfer arms used in previous
assaults in order to demonstrate
their international solidarity and
mark their defiance of anti-ter-
rorist investigations..."
Furthermore, "Each (att-
ack! has lasted between two
and four minutes and has come
toward the end of religious serv-
ices on the Sabbath or Jewish
festivals ..."
For the American Jewish com-
munity to wait for a Pearl Harbor
of terrorism on its own shores is
folly in the extreme. The threat
won't go away because it is
ignored. "It can't happen here"
was said in another context at
another time, but it did. It can
happen here again.
THE BURDEN on us all is
doubly heavy. At a time when
major church institutions are
finally coming officially to regret
their silence during the genocide
plot of Hitler against the Jews,
the silence throughout the world
in the face of this new terrorism is
equally deafening. And, since no
other segment of the American
community is similarly threat-
ened, we can expect neither un-
derstanding nor support in our
own dalayed agony here.
In fact, the fictionalized
reporting of the war in Lebanon
has turned the nation's sympath-
ies away from Israel and there-
fore away from its Jewish sup-
porters. The State Department's
OCT report on the special peril
that Palestinian terrorism holds
for Jews internationally does not
dull its sympathies for an Arab
triumph.
It may well be because of these
sympathies, all the more pro-
nounced since the advent of
George Shultz to the State
Department, that attacks against
American Jews and their institu-
tions have not occurred up until
now. The new Reagan Admin-
istration Arab tilt holds the line.
But should Israel decline to be
intimidated by it and not change,
say, its West Bank policies or its
attitude toward a Palestinian
state, then we can look for
trouble ahead on the basis that
the Arab revolutionaries have
given up on America as a source
of workable pressure on Israel.
And then, it will be more
apparent than ever that the
burden can not be shifted from
our anxious shoulders where it
rests unallied. We must face it
squarely alone.
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'age 1 IA The Jewish Floridian Friday. November 26. 1982
Can Prove Leo Frank Innocent'
Now Atlanta Petitions for His Pardon
Continued frum Page 1-A
focal point of the most remarka
ble event in American Jewish
history Leo Frank was lynched
by a howling Georgia mob that
dragged him front jail.
THE LYNCHING set off a de-
bate which even today can be
passionate, hateful, and to some,
fear-inducing. The event sparked
the founding of the Anti-Defama-
tion League, and brought into the
air some of the great guns of
Jewish legal artillery, including
one of the founders of the Ameri-
can Jewish Committee, the emi-
nent jurist Louis Marshall.
Yet, some do not know Leo
Frank. However, in Atlanta,
there are many who do. They re-
member the trial, they remember
the Chief of Police going through
the Jewish quarter telling them
that unless they stayed indoors
he couldn't guarantee their safe-
ty
These people, many of whom
had just recently risked" life and
limb on the high seas to save
their futures from the Czar won-
dered, if only for a brief, terror-
stricken while, if their futures
were to end in a town until then
known only for what General
Sherman did to it. In that brief
moment. Leo Frank lost his life in
modern America's only pogrom.
THE EVENTS are the stuff
from which novels grow. In fact
novels, historical articles, lec-
tures, and movies did grow from
the Frank case. Few trials in his-
tory have caused such sustained
interest and consternation. It
was a script made for Hollywood
a Jewish factory manager, a
black during segregation days, a
pretty white Protestant child, a
demogogic politician and a COO-
sious stricken Governor.
Israeli Victim Buried
TEL AVIV IJTAI The
funeral of the last Israeli victim
of the explosion which destroyed
the Israeli military headquarters
in Tyre recently was held in
Haifa. Cpl. Amram Shitrit. of
Acre was on guard at the en-
trance of the building at the time
of the explosion.
2 HOURS ME Of SURSHMK DAILY
fW SCHECHTER S
IffiBBEM
Mmr KOSHER HOTEL
flaT@GLATT
-TOUR HOUK AWAY fKOM HOI*!"
Me nearby buttataaa ahade our
heated <<*< water poo*, patio and
private aand* baecrt Fro* parkins.
NfaTfO TMfMPfUIK WMMI
MacaaamMfBaMaru
. CStSSTVSSAeiSAUM
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- an cATimaauoam
531-0061
97*. to Ml* Ste MAMMACH
Phone: I30U S31-OOtl .
SAMSCWCHTHI.lhwMrH J
One thing was for sure. Mary
I'hagen was dead, but who did it?
Was it the black man. to get
money for drink? Was it the Jew,
to get money to go to the brothel
across the street? Much was sus-
pect throughout the trial. In fact
the only other certainty besides
Phagen's death was Frank's
death, occasioned by Governor
Slaton's being so unsure of the
court's decision based on the
facts as be saw them that he
commuted Frank's death sen-
tence and set off the raging mob
that went to revenge the honor of
bttk Mary.
The hanged Frank was re-
covering from a wound inflicted
by a prisoner who nearly suc-
ceeded in slitting Frank's throat
with a razor blade. Slaton's
career died along with Leo Frank.
HOW THE modern request for
pardon came to be is equally as
fascinating as is the Frank story
itself. There had been a 13-year-
old eye-witness. Alonzo Mann.
Through a variety of suspect cir-
cumstances. Mann's testimony
was never taken. He lived for 70
years with his guilt and suddenly
unburdened himself. But to
whom? To Nashville Tennessean
reporter. Jerry Thompson.
Mann had followed Thomp-
son's expose on the Ku Klux
Klan. In one part of it. Thompson
mentioned the Frank case. Mann
could no longer bear it. Gravely
ill with heart disease, he called
Thompson and said. "I cant go
to the grave with this knowledge.
I must unburden my soul."
Thompson flew to North Carolina
and grilled Mann so extensively
it would have made Perry Mason
proud It nearly killed Alonso
Mann.
Having worked with me on the
Kkin story and knowing that I
had spent eight years in Atlanta.
Thompson called me one night
and said. "Swear you won't re-
veal what I'm going to tell." So I
swore. "I can prove Leo Frank is
innocent" This time I swore dif-
ferently. "Jerry, you better be
damm sure. People still come to
blows in Atlanta over that trial."
FOR THE next several weeks.
Thompson did what will be
known as the definitive research
on the Leo Frank case. He and
his colleague. Bob Sherbourne,
became obsessed. They proved
that Mann was telling the truth,
and the Nashville Tennessean on
Sunday March 7, 1982 thun-
dered: "An Innocent Man was
Lynched."
Thompson flew to Atlanta and
addressed a packed, hushed,
crowded Jewish Community
Center. His iron-clad research
and his passion to see justice
done infected several community
leaders who rallyed to the leader-
ship of a prominent local native
lawyer, Dale Schwartz. It became
a cause celebre, an issue in the
Governors race.
On September 17. 1982, the
letter quoted above, signed by
representatives of ADL, AJC,
and the Jewish Federation, was
addressed to the Honorablt
Mob ley Howell. chairman
Georgia State Board of Pardons
and Paroles.
THE UNPRECEDENTED re-
quest for a posthumous pardon
ended by saying. "We submit our
application to you with the same
motivation that impelled the
Georgia Senate to adopt Senate
resolution 423 in its 1982 session:
to finally right an historic injus-
tice by exonerating Leo Frank,
thereby demonstrating that our
legal system can indeed be called
upon to find the ultimate truth
and proclaim it. This case
presents a rare opportunity for us
to obliterate a terrible stain
which history has ascribed to the
Georgia Judicial system because
of the injustice done to Leo
Frank. We should not let this op-
portunity pass. We believe, as we
know you do. if following the
biblical injunction. 'Justice.' Jus-
tice thou shalt pursue."
But will the Parole Board
grant the pardon? Should it? At
best it's no better than an even
bet. The Board would have to
make decisions based on testi-
mony given by people long since
dead save Mr. Mann who is ill. In
doing so, it would again bring
face to face, or at least, story to
story, the relatives and friends of
Leo Frank and family, the rela-
tives and friends of Mary
Phagen. and the relatives and
friends of flame throwing United
States Sen. Thomas Watson.
MOST TROUBLING of all is
an unstated but obvious fact. If
Lao Frank isn't guilty, someone
else is The Board may be unan-
xious to open that can of worms.
Yet who was guilty is not the is-
sue here. The issue is who wasn't
guilty. Justice demands at least
that question be answered. I
doubt few care to pursue who was
guilty.
Half-Century of Service
Fifty years of service in the Miami rabbinate are markedl
Rabbi Max Shapiro, (left), as he receives a proclamation fr
Metro Mayor Stephen P. Clark. Rabbi Shapiro will be hona.
at a testimonial at 8p.m., Nov. 30, at the Dupont Plaza How
(See story. Page 1-B).
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A STATE THEATRE OF FLORIDA
/
SEE JOSE FERRER in THE DRESSER
4
THE DRESSER
By Ronald Harwood
November 5-28
A play for all who
rejoice in the troditions
of the theatre
Florida Premiere ot the
1981 Broadway Hit.
FALLEN ANGELS
By Noel Coward
February 4-27
Dazzling wit and sophis-
ticated insanity in a tole
ol romantic hilarity
Coward at his Very Best.
FIFTH OF JULY
By Lanford Wilson
December 3-26
Wilson continues the
funny, touching saga ol
the Tdlley family (first
seen inTolley s Folly)
A Broadway Winner in Its
South Florida Premiere.
THE SUBJECT
WAS ROSES
By Frank D. Gilroy
March 4 27
A beautifully -crafted,
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fornify life Pulitzer Prize
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Titles'order of productions sub|ect lo change
KEY EXCHANGE
By Kevin Wode
January 7-30
This recent off-
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Friday, November 26,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
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A Rabbi Longs for the Time When
Judaism Was a Commitment to Life
Kirk Douglas To Speak At
Weizmann Institute Dinner
ByLlSARUBENSTEIN
R-bbi Max Shapiro of Beth
[!S Congregation will offi-
fretireonNov.30atatest>-
;.i dinner in his honor at the
Ct Pa Hotel. He will
Ethe rabbinate after 50 years
hervice.
[,,. been here long
K* to have seen the changes
^synagogues among 11.000
^ in 1932 have become today
i temples serving in thehun-
ds of thousands of South
fioridians-
I The 75-year-old rabbi misses
L past when Miami's Jewish
Lmunity was smaller closer,
U more involved with their
Enples. when Judaism was a
lav of'life- Jews today, Rabbi
Ihapiro believes, must reclaim
Ed revitalize their lost Jewish
Jentity-
[speaking of his disappoint-
ments, the rabbi says, "Despite
Lltiple synagogues and in-
Vased memberships, we see a
tneration of card-holding mem-
Jers without commitment and
kyalty Attendance is low."
[After all. Rabbi Shapiro knew
l, benefits of growing up in the
lart of Brooklyn's tightly-knit
fcwish community where religion
las the way of life. His father
tas an orthodox rabbi there, and
t too knew the closeness of Po-
nd's Jewish community, where
: grew up. Rabbi Shapiro's
andfather taught David Ben
lurion there.
] Remembering the religious in-
|rest and vitality of earlier
les. Shapiro feels that rabbis
Jay often "spread themselves
kin." As he sees it, speaking to
luditorium-sized audiences and
leing involved in too many out-
I synagogue activities perpetu-
jte the trend toward alienation.
io reawaken honest interest, one
pust concentrate on smaller
oms and smaller numbers, he
iserts.
Rabbi Max Shapiro
Rabbi Shapiro suggests that
young rabbis concentrate on their
own congregations and hold
small, weekly discussion groups
to stimulate interest. He himself
had to learn this lesson.
The rabbi joined Beth David
Congregation in 1932. Between
then and 1955, not only did he
lead the 800-family congregation,
he was also the first president of
the Greater Miami Rabbinical
Association, founder and presi-
dent of the Zionist Council of the
Greater Miami and the Miami
Zionist districts, and presidetnof
the Jewish Welfare Bureau,
which later became the Jewish
Family and Children's Service.
He helped organize Sholom
Lodge of B'nai B'rith, was a dele-
gate to the World Jewish Con-
gress, and served on the Third
Army Advisory Board. He is a
founder of the Zionist Organiza-
tion, the Labor Zionists, and the
Zionist Council, and taught
Greek and Roman history at the
University of Miami.
Rabbi Shapiro was president of
the Jewish Family Advisory
Board during World War II and
was a board member of the Na-
tional Conference of Christians
and Jews. He spent 40 years on a
radio panel discussion program
with priests and ministers and 30
years with the Alan Courtney
program. He has received cita-
tions from WIOD, Dade County
School Board, and the City of
Miami.
Despite all this activity in
these many fields of communica-
tion, feeling overwhelmed and
unable to reach his congregation,
Rabbi Shapiro retired from Beth
David in 1955 and even planned a
change of career. But with time
he realized where he wanted to
be.
He resumed his career at the
smaller Beth Kodesh Congrega-
tion, and under him, the 100-odd
dwindling families there doubled.
But despite that success, the
rabbi remains dissatisfied. "The
condition is the same every-
where," he says. "There is pes-
simism everywhere."
Indeed, his best memory of 50
years is "the optimism of the
people in 1932 despite the depres-
sion. Hitler, and closing banks.
People always had hope," he re-
members.
Other happy moments oc-
curred in "the isolated cases
when someone who had never
shown any real interest returned
to Judaism and came back to the
synagogue," the rabbi concludes.
Dade County Mayor Stephen
Clark will chair the dinner in the
rabbi's honor, and Jerome
Weinkle will co-chair.
CJA-IEF Gala Featuring
Haig To Draw 1,500
Fifteen hundred persons are
kpected to attend the Greater
piami Jewish Federation's Cam-
Bign Opening Dinner of the 1983
ombined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Jmergency Fund, which will
ature General Alexander M.
laig, Jr. as keynote speaker. The
Kent will be held Dec. 2 at the
fountainebleau Hotel.
"We are extremely pleased
Jiat so many individuals will be
lining us for the dinner and
pmmitiing themselves to the
rovision of quality social serv-
|es for world Jewry," said
linner Chairman Bunny Adler.
I Dinner participants make a
Minimum pledge of $1,000 to the
1983 CJA-IEF Campaign, which
lids more than 50 humanitarian
prvice agencies in Greater
piami. in Israel and throughout
pe world.
Haig is an outspoken support
' of Israel and her alliance with
! United States.
Serving with Adler in the coor-
nation of the dinner are Atten-
Jordan to Enter Autonomy Talks
By DAVID LANDAU
, JERUSALEM (JTA) -
former Premier Yitzhak Rabin
Proposed that Israel undertake a
P1" month freeze on new settle-
ments in an attempt to induce
Jordan to join the long stalled
Autonomy talks. According to
jabin, interviewed on Israel
adio, there is little chance of
Progress in the talks unless
(Ionian enters the peace process.
A settlement freeze could pro-
Kirk Douglas, actor, director,
producer, and supporter of Israel,
will be the guest of honor at the
Florida Division of the American
Committee for the Weizmann In-
stitute of Science of Israel's 1982
dinner to be held Saturday eve-
ning, Dec. 11, at the Fontaine-
bleau Hotel. Prof. Michael Sela,
Institute president, will address
the guests.
Douglas will speak about his
experiences in Israel last summer
during the filming of the movie
"Remembrace of Love," in which
he stars and which will be aired
on national television in Decem-
ber. Douglas spent his off-days
visiting wounded soldiers at
Hadassah and Tel Hashomer-
Sheba hospitals, and also toured
Lebanon and Beirut.
He also visited the campus of
the Weizmann Institute of
Science in Rehovot as a guest of
Prof. Sela. Douglas' interest in
the Institute began with a visit to
the Weizmann campus in 1964.
Douglas received the Medal of
Freedom, America's highest
civilian honor, from President
Reagan in 1981, following two ci-
tations in the Congressional
Record for promoting interna-
tional understanding as a good-
will ambassador for the United
States. Before that, the French
Government made him a com-
mander in the Order of Arts and
Letters.
| As good-will ambassador on
behalf of the U.S. Senate Depart-


'
s+
/
*^ I
g1
i >
Kirk Douglas
ment and the U.S. Information
Agency, Douglas traveled to
Europe, Asia, and Latin America
between 1963 and 1977 and to
Japan, China, and Hong Kong in
1982.
"Remembrance of Love" will
air on Monday evening, Dec. 6,
from 9 to 11 p.m. The movie was
filmed entirely on location in
Jerusalem, Tel Aviv. and
Caesar ia.
Douglas' acting career spans
35 years and 68 films and in-
cludes portrayals of Vincent Van
Gogh, Spartacus, and Ulysses.
Col. M. J. Diskin serves as
director of the Florida Division of
the Weizmann Institute, and Jay
Weiss is general chairman.
"eJewislfo FloridliainL
Miami, FloridaFriday, November 26,1982
Section B
(mm
Alexander M. Haig
dance and Table Captains Chair-
man Steven J. Kravitz, Arrange-
ments Chairman Marcy Lefton,
and Program Chairman Dorothy
Podhurst.
vide King Hussein with the extra
measure of strength he needs to
resist hardline pressures from
within the Arab world, said
Rabin, a leader of the opposition
Labor Party.
He maintained that there is a
"precedent" for a settlement
"freeze," citing Premier Mena-
chem Begins agreement to a
three month freeze during the
Camp David talks as a gesture
toward other Arab parties.
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Fage 2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 26,1982
Federation Members Featured On
PartirinAnt.s nf r.rM Ciraater a.m.
Participants of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's
recent tenth anniversary Com-
munity Mission to Prague,
Czechoslovakia and Israel will be
featured on "Still Small Voice," a
television program sponsored by
the Rabbinical Association of
Greater Miami on Sundav at 7:30
,ai>d Sam
Micki
atoizenberjr will Hio
j.ghts of LS%*g
Solomon Schiff. d- *
erations Community SL i "
Service, will host yChapl>
For tAe Golden Anniversary Assembly of the
Council of Jewish Federations held in Los
Angeles Nov. 10 to 14, delegates were pro-
vided with the opportunity to visit the
Simon Wiesenthal Center, North America's
largest Holocaust Center. Pictured are (left
to right) Jill Stecher, Outreach Associate,
explaining one of the museum's exhibits to
delegates from Miami: Rabbi and Mrs.
Solomon Schiff (Rabbi Schiff is director of
chaplaincy of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and executive vice president of
the Rabbinical Association of Greater
Miami); Mrs. Michael Meyer; and Rabbi and
Mrs. Barry Tabachnikoff of Congregation
Bet Breira. The Wiesenthal Center and its
Holocaust Museum are located on the
campus of Yeshiva University of Los
Angeles.
CAM Jewish Book Group to Convene
"Judaism as a Civilization" by
Mordecai Kaplan, philosopher,
will be reviewed by the Central
Agency for Jewish Education's
Great Jewish Books Discussion
Group on Thursday from 1:30 to
3:30 p.m. at the Miami Beach
Public Library Auditorium.
Samuel Reiser, founder of and
consultant to the discussior
group, noted that "The purpose
of the group is to stimulate the
mind and heart of the Jewish
community through considera-
tion of challenging Jewish books.
The works of David Kaplan have
been praised and criticized, but
never ignored."
Coordinating the program at
CAJE is Rabbi Norman S
Lipson, director. Institute for
Jewish Studies, and Abraham J.
Gittelson, associate director.
"Judaism as a Civilization"
will be reviewed by Rabbi Elliot
Skidell, Reconstructionist
Seminary graduate, whose
ideology is based on Kaplan's
thinking.
Hadassah To Gather
Bay Harbor Chapter of
Hadassah will meet at noon on
Mondav. Dec. 13 at the First Na-
tionwide Bank, Ruth Klein, pub-
licity chairman, announced.
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And Grandchildren
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State Rep. Elaine Gordon
NCJWPlan Child
Care Luncheon
National Council of Jewish
Women, Greater Miami Section,
will hold a 12th annual Child Care
Luncheon on Wednesday. Dec. 15
at 11:30 at the Miami Hyatt Re-
gency, Del Rubin, past president
and luncheon chairman, an-
nounced.
"In 1980 in Dade County over
8,000 child abuse and neglect
cases were reported. Therefore,
the proceeds of this event to re-
member will help implement,
finance, and support Council's
many projects on behalf of chil-
dren and youth including our ex-
citing new project Charlee,
acronym for Children Have All
Rights: Legal, Educational,
Emotional," Rubin stated.
Kent Hayes, co-director of the
"Charlee" program, will speak,
and State Representative Elaine
Gordon will be presented the
.Hannah G. Solomon Award.
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Friday, November 26,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
TpI Aviv U. Friends Chair Filled Yeshiva Friends Hebrew U. Event Features Dinitz
*^ _...... i_ 11 o *___ iQ71ml Q7Q
- Wiener, real estate de-
, .r has been named chair
f the Southern Region of
encan Friends of Tel Aviv
. Lrsitv succeeding Norman
Ti iooff president of the Great
Miami Jewish Federation.
With his extensive knowledge
,srae| and its educational
Lipoff said, "Haim
r is the ideal Miamian to
[5, American Friends into a
Lseason of success."
I Wiener sponsored the Tel Aviv
levelopment Fund and is active
the Greater Miami Jewish
federation. Rabbi Herbert Fried-
Ln national president of Amer-
LnFriends of Tel Aviv Univer-
said that "Wiener has
a great asset to his com-
,,/. His intelligence,
Crength. and commitment will
i doubt bring forth important
ichievements in learning and
derstanding."
A resident of Miami Beach,
Viener planned local develop-
ent activities on behalf of the
Iniversity. He serves as chair-
tan of the board of American
iquity International Corporation
If Miami and helped develop
poinciana Island Yacht and
acquet Club and Club Atlantis
[n Miami Beach. He was also in-
volved in development of the
ilimosa, King Cole, Arlen
kouses, and Aventura.
oven
Unity-
Haim Wiener
He currently is working on
Two-Worlds Hotel Meridien, a
hotel and condominium project to
be located between the Doral and
Fountainebleau hotels.
Born and educated in Israel,
Wiener served with Israel's dip-
lomatic mission to Columbia and
founded corporations to market
securities and real estate in Latin
America, Europe, and the Far
East.
mds To Honor Beth Sholom Couple
An annual Beth Sholom-Israel
bonds Tribute Dinner will be
eld Monday evening, Dec. 13, at
|:30 at Temple Beth Sholom to
onor Harold and Alice Vinik,
Iho will receive Isreal's Gate of
Jerusalem Award. Vinik, temple
(resident, has been active on be-
alf of the Israel Bonds Or-
anization.
Dinner Chairman Gary R.
Lierson, temple member and
pneral campaign chairman of
[he Israel Bonds Organization.
loted that "both Harold and
Mice are richly deserving of such
high honor because of the leader-
ship role they have played with
STUDIO
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Sponsor Lectures
Florida Friends of Yeshiva
University will sponsor a first
annual Issues of Our Times semi-
nar series beginning Wednesday
with a lecture by Dr. Erich Gold-
hagen on American-Israeli Rela-
tions.
"It is our goal to advance the
well-being of the South Florida
community by giving people the
opportunity to attend lectures by
Yeshiva graduates and faculty
members," explained Chaim H.
Friend, southeastern region de-
velopment director.
"The New York-based Univer-
sity boasts approximately 300
alumni in South Florida who
serve the community in a profes-
sional capacity, including doc-
tors, lawyers, and social workers
among many others," he added.
Goldhagen currently lectures
at Harvard University's Assoc-
iate Russian Research Centre and
has worked in the field of Prose-
cution of Nazi Crimes.
Morton Towers
Men Elected
Sid Gersh was elected
president of Morton Towers
Men's Club with Ben Sweetow
elected vice president, Sam
Drapkin, financial secretary and
treasurer, Sam Stocknof, corres-
ponding secretary. Jack Frank,
recording secretary, Frank
Kaminsky, sergeant at arms,
Harry Kroll, sergeant at arms,
and Isaac Knoll, chaplain.
The board of directors now in-
cludes Louis Aronson, William
Corbin. Marcel Dreyfus, Irving
Garber. Phillip S. Glass. William
Gorfinkel, George Groschefsky.
Frank Gudwin, Joe Goodman,
Isaac Knoll, Robert Litt, Jack
Meyrowitz, Harry Plissner.
Murray Portny. Jack Reichman,
Sam Rudkin, Joe Schoeman, Moe
Schuchman, Irving Silver, Eric
Weiner, and Eddie Rosenberg.
Alice and Harold Vinik
countless organizations in our
community."
Vinik served on the executive
committee of the American
Friends of Hebrew University, is
u member of Jewish War Vet-
erans and the Veterans of
Foreign Wars, and is a past
chancellor commander of the
Knights of Pythias.
Mrs. Vinik has been a
volunteer with the Russian
Immigrant Resettlement
Program and is a member of
Hadassah and the National
Council of Jewish Women. She
serves on the board of directors of
the Women's Division of the
Greater Miami Jewish Fed-
eration and received the Woman
of Valor Award from American
Friends of Hebrew University.
Rabbi Leon Kronish, Temple
Beth Sholom spiritual leader and
Israel Bonds national campaign
chairman, stated, "We are very
proud of Harold and Alice for all
they have done for our temple
and for this community and are
very proud that our annual Israel
Bonds Dinner will be dedicated in
their honor."
Special guest speaker will be a
commanding officer of the Israel
Defense Forces.
POOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC
American Friends of Hebrew
University, Hollywood-Hallan-
dale and Greater Miami Chap-
ters, will hold an Annual Aca-
demic Conference at the Konover
Hotel Dec. 7. Educational ses-
sions, a luncheon, and workshops
will highlight Israel's former
Ambassador Simcha Dinitz and
Professor Yehuda Bauer, aca-
demic chairman of the Institute
of Contemporary Jewry of the
Jerusalem-based university.
Donald E. Lefton, Greater
Miami Chapter president, and
Nathan Pritcher. president of the
Hollywood-Hallandale Chapter,
noted that the conference will
"unite Miami and Hollywood-
Hallandale communities and
strengthen their common goal to-
wards their endeavor of aiding
Israel's foremost institution of
higher learning."
Ambassador Dinitz, currently
a university vice president, will
speak on "Politics and
Prophecies in the Middle East."
He was born in Tel Aviv and
served as Israel's ambassador to
the U.S. from 1973 to 1979.
Otto Stieber, chairman of the
State of Florida for the American
Friends of Hebrew University,
said of the conference's second
siH-aker. Professor Bauer. "He is
the world's leading authority on
the Holocaust and anti-Semitism
and will have a great deal to tell
us about the current problems we
are facing, which must be over-
come."
Pritcher and Lefton added,
"The Hollywood-Hallandale and
Greater Miami chapters are
proud to contribute to the growth
and maintenance of Hebrew Uni-
versity."
Federation Accountants
Hold Cocktail Party
The Accountants Division of
the Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation will sponsor a cocktail re-
ception on Monday at 5 p.m. at
the Four Ambassadors Hotel.
Sidney Kess. CPA, attorney, and
teacher, will speak.
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Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 26,1982
JNF Gala to Tribute Me Ami,
Israel, Miami's Sister City
Dr. Irving Lehrman, chairman,
and Abraham Grunhut, presi-
dent, Jewish National Fund of
Greater Miami, have announced
that the JNF Annual Tribute
Banquet will be held Sunday,
Dec. 19 at the Fountainebleau
Hotel and will be dedicated to the
20th anniversary of the dedica-
tion of MeAmi, Israel.
"In view of the challenging
times, and in view of the in-
creased responsibilities thrust
upon the JNF as a result of re-
sent developments in Israel, the
JNF of Greater Miami is launch-
ing a five year redevelopment
program in Miami's sister city in
Israel, MeAmi," Lehrman stated.
The city was dedicated by a
delegation headed by Dr. and
Mrs. Lehrman and Zev W.
Kogan, JNF Southern Region
president and originator of the
sister city idea. Among the par-
ticipants were Judge and Mrs.
Herbert Shapiro. Mrs. Irving
Cypen, Mrs. Barrett M. Rot hen -
berg, Mr. and Mrs. Gershon
Miller, Dr. and Mrs. Meyer
Matks, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Pen-
chansky, Miriam Press, Bernard
Silver, Selma and the late Johann
Berman. the late Martha and
Peter Heller, and the late Ezra
Finegold.
"The most moving experience
was the exchange of Torahs,"
Lehrman said. "The delegation
brought a Torah from Miami and
brought a Torah back from
MeAmi, thereby exchanging an
oath of continued support for
MeAmi."
"Strengthening MeAmi as a
link in the JNF chain of settle-
ments was badly needed for fron-
tier security." Lehrman con-
tinued. "The delegates saw with
their own eyes the Jordanian
troops besides the highway with
full armor. At the dedication,
many Israeli soldiers supported
by tanks were present, and Air
Force planes were flying over-
head."
Among the Israeli officials
participating were JNF World
Chairman Ambassador Jacob
Tsur, Minister of Police Bichor
Shitrith, Gideon Hausner, prose-
cutor of Adolph Eichmann, and
Abba Hushi, mayor of Haifa.
Today MeAmi has a clinic,
hospital, kindergarten, schools,
and a university. The JNF re-
cently established a Hall of Fame
there to mark MeAmi's 20th an-
niversary and the names of
donors will be inscribed there.
"The JNF invites the public to
the Annual Tribute Banquet to
join and share in the work of re-.
deeming, reclaiming, and up-
building the land of Israel,"
Grunhut asserted.
Voters Inc. Elected New Officers
Voters Inc. held an 18th
Annual Installation and Dinner
recently at the Konover Hotel
Harry Levy was reelectec
president and chairman of the
board.
A. Neil Composto was elected
first vice president, Stanley M.
Brody, second vice president,
Alfred I. Bleemer, third vice
president, Lillian A. Conte,
treasurer and secretary.
The board of directors now
consists of Alfred I. Bleemer,
Stanley M. Brody, Bennet H.
Brummer, Dade County public
defender, A. Neil Composto,
Temples, JCC
Have Talks, Music
South Dade Midrasha, consor-
tium of local synagogues and the
Jewish Community Center of
South Dade, will hold the second
in a series of lectures and con-
certs at Temple Samu-El on Sun-
day morning, Dec. 5 at 10:45
featuring Steve Simenowitz play-
ing Hebrew, Yiddish, and Jewish-
American folk-rock music.
The next presentation of the
series will feature Rabbi Harold
Kushner speaking on the book
When Bad Things Happen to
Good People on Tuesday eve-
ning, Jan. 11 at 8.
Harry Levy
Lillian A. Conte, Richard E.
Gerstein, Myron Gold, Morris
Guberman, Barry Kuten, Florida
state representative, Joseph W.
Malek, William CTNeil, III,
Harold Rosen, Bruce M. Singer,
Miami Beach city commissioner,
Dr. Michael Sossin, Harry J.
Son/., Paul B. Steinberg, Douglas
Stevens, Leonard O. Weinstein,
Miami Beach city commissioner,
and Leonard Zilbert.
Bennet H. Brummer installed
the officers and Harry Levy
installed Brummer.
531-6092
10 AM to 6 PM
Perfect Parties
with all the frills...
At no frills prices!
Weddings Parties Banquets*
Affairs to Remember
25 to 350 persons
Open bar receptions with elaborate
hot and cold hors d'oeuvres
Sumptuous dinner
Champagne toast and wine service
throughout dinner
Dessert and beverage
Floral centerpiece each table
Luncheons 6k Dinners available
to Organizations and Business
Groups at Special Prices
Sans Souci/Versailles
Ocean, 31st to 35th Streets
Miami Beach, Florida
Beth Shalom
Shows Photos
Of Israel
Photographer Micha Bar-Am's
"Images of Israel," a retros-
pective, will be shown at the
Lowe-Levinson Art Gallery of
Temple Beth Sholom through
Dec. 14, Judy Drucker, temple'
cultural arts director, announced.
The exhibit will also be shown
in New York. Washington, and
Los Angeles, and the Washing-
ton showing will be part of a gala
honoring Nancy Reagan and
Aliza Begin.
Bar-Am served as photogra-
pher for the Israeli Army's of-
ficial magazine and covered the
Six Day War. He is an associate
photographer of Magnum
Photos, the news agency formed
during World War I, and a
photographer for the New York
Times.
Temple Israel
Honored 129
New Families
Temple Israel of Greater
Miami, celebrating its 60th year
of Reform Judaism in South
Florida, honored 129 new mem-
ber families at a Shabbat Dinner
last Friday at the temple's down-
town facility.
"Temple Israel's new member-
ship this year exceeds all recent
years," Rabbi Haskell Bernat,
spiritual leader, stated.
Families were greeted and
hosted by members of the board
of trustees and membership com-
mittee. Burton Kahn, president,
said, "We are gratified that the
temple, now in its 60th year, is
continuing to be a strong institu-
tion for Greater Miami."
Rabbi Jeffrey K. Salkin is ass-
istant rabbi.
Home Names Woman Of The
The Greater Miami Women's
Auxiliary of Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, Douglas
Gardens, will hold a Building
Fund Luncheon Tuesday, Dec. 7
at noon at the Dora! Hotel in the
Starlight Room honoring Mrs.
Irving Cypen as "Woman of the
Year," Chairperson Myra Farr,
announced.
Mrs. Irving Lehrman will give
the invocation and Mrs. Sol
Silverman will report on the
Building Fund Project.
Dr. Irving Lehrman of Temple
Emanu-El and Mr. Fred Hirt.
executive director of the Home,
will speak, and Judge Irving
Cypen will make the "Women of
the Year" presentation.
The Mai Malkin Orchestra of
the Doral Hotel will furnish
music.
Mrs. Irving Type
Welcome Back One And All
GRAND RE-OPENING
Our Sixth Winter Season.
Free Soup And Beverage Until Dec 9th
With Every Sandwich or Steak.
Only Freshly Cut Meats Served.
FIHESELECTIOII #tJ*fi&t&t+
HOME COOKED M^T^S*^*.
MEALS
restmjrmt;
^ TARE-HOME t
Vimoo |10o/0
^*- I0FF
N
NEW
LOW
PRICES
"uf.wilWITH
lvcmsmsm! THIS
)j WSHE< AD
SIGHT! BU IS J
d-
STHN^S DITH UMUI TOT! ffn
ORTHODOX RABBINICAL COUNCIL OF SOUTH FLORIDA
3700 SHERIDAN AVENUE MIAMI BEACH. FLORIDA 33140
865-9851 __673-0115
7 Kislev, 5743
23 November, 1982
As the majority of Orthodox Pulpit
Rabbis of the Greater Miami Jewish
community, we are compelled to
announce that after having our
representatives, who are well versed in
the laws of Eruv, inspect portions of
this Eruv, we have found it to be
constructed in a manner that is not
acceptable according to Jewish Law.
Within a few weeks an announcement
will, G-d willing, inform the
community of the actual and proper
completion of this Eruv. Until such
time we must reiterate that the
supposed Eruv of the Indian Creek-
Biscayne Bay area does not conform to
Halacha and one is not permitted to
carry at this time in any open area on
Miami Beach during the Sabbath.
*)
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RABBI ELIVAHU OAVI*
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RABBI AAAON LIEBEAMAN
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dv


Israel Bonds Rallied
Support At Area Events
American Mizrachi Women held an annual Bond-with-Israel
Luncheon to pledge support for Israel through the Israel Bonds
program. Frances Horowitz Jacobs was presented the Woman
of Valor Award. From left are Rose Shapiro, president,
Shoshana Mizrachi and Coral Gables Business and Professional
Mizrachi; Regina Wang, president of the Florida Council of
Mizrachi Women; Howard Klein, Israel Bonds executive
director; Frances Jacobs; Florynce Breeh, luncheon chairman;
and Ida Sussman, co-chairman.
Area Pioneer Women
Hold Chanukah Events
Masada Chapter of Pioneer
Women-Na'Amat will have a pre-
Chanukah meeting on Wednes-
day at noon in the auditorium of
the American Savings and Loan
Association, Miami Beach.
The film "Women Build a
Land" will be shown, Bertha
Liebmann, president, announced.
Golda Meir Chapter will hold a
Chanukah Luncheon on Sunday,
Dec. 5 at the Shelborne Hotel at
noon.
Seymour B. Liebman will talk
on the Middle East, and soloist
Sophie Kemper, accompanied by
Ida Spitzkoff, will perform holi-
day music, Program Chairperson
Rose Abels announced.
Hospital Women
To Meet
South Florida Women's Com-
mittee of Shaare Zedek Hospital
will hold a Kosher dairy luncheon
at noon on Dec. 9 at the
Casablanca Hotel. Rebbetzin
Helen Felman will speak, and a
candle lighting ceremony and in-
stallation of officers will follow.
^ 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
>\ ff-
**&&

The Jack Taylor Foundation has donated funds to Cedars Med-
ical Center to be used to buy new equipment for the Head and
Neck Diagnostic Suite. Charles Fotsch, executive director, an-
nounced With the new gift, Mr. and Mrs. Taylor become hos-
pital benefactors. Dr. Victor D. Dembrow was the originator of
the Head and Neck Suite.
Temple Sinai Hosts Tulane Professor
Art Auction Planned
Temple Adath Yeshurun Sist-
erhood will hold an Annual Art
Audi n at the Temple, North
Mian Beach, on Sunday, Dec. 5
at 8 p.m., with preview hour at 7.
Eurpean Art Gallery is coordi-
nator.
Dr. Joseph Cohen, professor of
English Literature and director
of the Jewish Studies Program at
Tulane University, will speak on
"The American Jewish Literary
Renaissance" at Temple Sinai
Friday, Nov. 26, Saturday, and
Sunday.
"Jewish Literary Reflections in
the American Mirror" will be
given Friday evening during erev
Shabbat services and "The
American Jewish Woman' \
Literary Progress Report" will be
given Sunday morning at 10.
Both lectures will take place in
the Feinbloom Sanctuary.
"The Uses of Enchantment:
Jewish Mysticism in Contempor-
ary Fiction," to be held Satur-
day, is by invitation only.
Part of the temple's Adult Ed-
ucation activities, the Scholar-in-
Residence program is in its
fourth year.
Henny Nortman received the State of Israel Scroll of Honor for
her role as Israel Bonds chairman of the Miami Beach Region of
Hadassah. The region achieved $500,000 of Israel Bonds sales
at the annual Hadassah Bond-with-Israel Luncheon. Howard
Klein presented the award
Maxwell House* Coffee
Is After Shopping Relaxation.
Residents of Aventura-Turnberry gathered to support Israel
through Israel Bonds at a breakfast in honor of Gertrude and
Simon Bressler and Sally and Al Fishman who were presented
fattl'i Gates of Jerusalem Medallion. From left are the
Bresslers, Jack Bellock, chairman of the event, and the Fish-
nans.
TWIN CITY GLASS CO
cumanthd Mts not* noms-nmmrM* w
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Plate ft Window Glass Replacements
1220 16thSt.,M.B.
'Corner 16th & Alton)
Visit our Snowroom 673-2961
24 Hour Emergency Service
Shopping for a "good buy" has be-
come one of Americas favorite pas-
times. It's always fun to find new
things, see the new fashions and
perhaps pick up something new for
the house or family.
Another favorite pastime is to come
home from shopping, kick off the
shoes and relax with a good cup of
coffee. Maxwell House* Coffee. The
full-pleasant aroma and great-
tasting, satisfying flavor is
the perfect ending
to a busy shop-
ping day. Espe-
cially when
relaxing with
a close friend. The good talk. The
good feelings. The warmth are some
of the things that go along with
Maxwell House? Perhaps that's why
many Jewish housewives don't shop'
for Maxwell House? They simply
buy it. It's the "smart buy" as any
balabusta knows!
So, no matter what your prefer-
ence instant or ground when
you pour Maxwell House" you pour
relaxation. At its best.. .consis-
tently cup after cup after cup.
AXWEU
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A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century.


....
'
Pg6.. ina Jewish Floridian Frldm^No^01^1962
Beach Rabbi To Speak At
New York Yeshiva Gathering
Rabbi Mordechai Shapiro of
r,iyjn-tftion Beth Israel of
Mmiui Reach will speak at a ga-
thering of his alma mater. Beth
Medrash Govoha. the "Lake
wood Yeshiva." on Sunday. Dec.
! at the Sheraton Centre Hotel in
New York City.
Beth Mod rash Govoha em-
braces network of yeahiva high
HBMll and post graduate instit-
ution* in Philadelphia. Toronto.
IVuver. and Los Angeles. The
l^akewood. NY parent institu-
tion enrolls 1,000 graduate and
fellowship level students
This will be the first dinner
siikv the loss of Rosh Yeshiva
l*reskient Harav Hagnon Reb
Shneur Kotler
Rt M Mdi#nM Shapiro
Olson Named To Einstein Overseers
BMMB l Olson, founder of
OtoM FWviromcs. was elect *i to
>o Kin stein College of Medicine's
Bawd ot Overseers at a recent
Svirxl meeting in Ne* York He
ill he installed at the college's
\ iual Achievement Award
P inner IVmce on Sunday at the
RmmnMI Hotel by \>c Norman
I MM president if Yeahix a I'm
>ecsit> IV l .4mm wdl present a
Dial inituished Achievement
V*rd to Obon and address
> \ ~>W1 .J/w
Secretary-
Receptionist
SVi*"*V
">TTCtfrJ|#l'Tl 5f*.-"*
Call 864-1349

lU
IV *r Ml Cufc
***S. 4.SC OTA
"-
guests
Olson is chairman of Fkrida
Friends of \lbert Einstein
College of Medicine and a
member of the executive commit-
tee ot the Florida Friends of
Yeshiv a I'niversity
K*rB M. Dannin of Middle-
tou-n. R.I.. Hadassah Sation-
al Service Committee member,
uill speak to Hadassah's
Queen Esther Chapter on Dee.
13. Triton Towers Chapter on
Dee. 14. Region Associates
brunch on Dec. 15. and Inter-
A -tf-rk-u* Chapter on Dec 16.
M's. Joseph Kestenbaum.
president of the Miami Beach
FMjHMj announced.
FPL Alerts Customers to
Energy Assistance Funds I
Florida Power & Light Company is alerting its customersth.
nearly $17 million in federal energy assistance funds soon ?.
available
This month, customers are receiving a bill insert wiyrk
plains this year's Low-Income Home Energy Assistant
Program (LIHEAPI under which qualifying families can **
federal funds to help with then- energy bills. Florida's jjuV
administered bv the State Department of Health and ReM*
tative Services (HRSI. will be in effect from November*
through December 27. 13
"FPL will help HRS administer the assistance program h
providing applications at all our local offices HRS reprwe?
tatives also will be available in many of our offices to ttsm
customers in completing the application." said Aletha Pit*.,
FPL's Consumer .Affairs Coordinator. "Application, ajowfli-
available at all HRS offices *
HRS will determine eligfcuity for the energy assistance fnak
Those families or individuals now receiving Aid to Faniee wjfc
Dependent Children, food stamps, supplemental securer aeon*
or certain veteran's benefits generally qualify.
LI HEAP applicants must have a verified mcorae which does
not exceed the State's poverty level: S390 per month fcrt ntfe
person: $518 per month for two people. S64T per aot-J: for
three: and S775 per month for a family of four
"FPL's support of HRS reflects the company ? aes^etobe
responsive to all oar customers not just those afci irve good
payment histories." Player said "This support cf H Fffl j partof
our companv s AID Program, to provide assistance, m-
formation and direction in meeting customers spec*, tmk
Brighten Your
Gift Books
mi
B. Dalton Bookseller stocks a full
selection ofJudaka books perfect
for holiday gift-giving. Stop by your
nearest B. Dalton today for these
titles and manv more. Happv
Hanukkah!
Holiday With
B. Dalton!
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Wm\M
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i ri
^S^fe



Friday, November 26,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Louis and Bessie Stein
Jewish Home To Install Officers
Officers and members of the
.uoard of directors of the Miami
I Jewish Home and Hospital for
I the Aged will be installed at the
I Home's Annual Meeting and
Dinner-Dance on Dec. 5 Co-
I chaired by board members Bess
[and Lou Stein, the event will be
[held in the expanded Ruby
| Auditorium.
"This year's Annual Meeting
is in celebration of life with
Idignity for senior adults
throughout South Florida," said
Irlarold Beck, president. "In 36
|years the Home has grown with
support and creative fore-
rets Hold A Breakfast
Norman Bruce Brown Ladies
I Auxiliary 174 and Post, Jewish
I War Veterans, will hold a joint
] Thanksgiving breakfast on
ISunday at the Israelite Center
|Tempfeat9:30a.m.
Individual business meetings
I presided over by auxiliary Presi-
dent Belle Swartz and post
I Commander Alex Greenwald will
I follow.
B'nai B'rith Hosts
Weekly Friday Forums
B'nai B'rith Lodge 1591 spon-
sors weekly forums every" Friday
[at noon at the 100 Lincoln Road
Social Club, President Gershon
|S. Miller announced.
Federal Magistrate Judge
iHerbert Shapiro and Richard
IPrager. travel agent, will speak
iNov. 26, and Miami Beach Com-
Imissioner Bruce Singer and
iRabbi Irving Lehrman of Temple
|Emanu-El will speak Dec. 3.
JCC Features Sports
South Dade Jewish Communi-
ty Center will sponsor a Kickoff
Sunday on Dec. 5 featuring
pports activities starting at
1:30. A brunch will be served.
sight of its leadership into a 376-
bed geriatric care center with
community outreach programs
that provide services to 19,000
participants each year."
Mildred Siegel, president of the
Resident's Council, will greet
guests on behalf of residents.
Howard Neu, mayor of North
Miami, pictured, and Alex
Rosenfeld, North Miami
Beach attorney, host South
Florida Speaks, a weekly
series on controversial topics
available to cable television
households in North Dade and
Storer Cable subscribers in
Broward. The program is
cablecast Tuesday nights at 8
on Storer channel P929.
Jewish American Latin Singles (J.A.L.S.) 30-55
Presents wine-cheese party with "tenor Roberto Camuno in Concert"
December 1st 8:30 PM. Cuban Hebrew Congregation 1700 Michigan
Avenue, Miami Beach Donation $4.00.
Information 558-8330 / 868-4034
-arlos J. Arboleya will receive
We State of Israel Peace
iedallion at a tribute dinner
Wonsored by the Israel Bonds
Wganization on Sunday, Dec.
]2 at the Omni Hotel
Ameri
can ***
Israeli
LARQE SELECTION OF
TALAISIM IN WOOL or RAYON
SEDURIM-SKULLCAPS
Everything lor all yoar around
Specializing In Bar Mltzvah Sots
1357 WASHINGTON AVE.,
MIAMI BEACH
Phono: S31-7722 .
There's no better way
to spread Holiday Magic
in more delicious ways
than with Publix Food
Gift Certificates. And
holiday shopping is
easy for you, too. Just
stop by the customer
service counter at
your nearest Publix.
where shopping is a pleasure Publix




J
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 26,1962
.-<*
Wedtknp
FOHLENWEINBERGER
Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Fohlen. of Columbus,
Ohio, formerly of Cincinnati, announced the
marriage of their daughter, Cathy Lee to Barrett
Neil Weinberger of Miami.
The wedding took place at Adath Israel Syna-
gogue of Cincinnati on Nov. 25. Rabbi Sidney
Zimmelman of Adath Israel and Rabbi David
Auerbach and Cantor William Lipson of Congre-
gation Beth David of Miami officiated.
Cathy Lee*s sister, Carol Harris of Cincinnati
was Matron of Honor, and bridesmaids included
Wendy Cooper of Columbus, Debra Fohlen of
Cincinnati, Cynthia Weinberger and Ellen Wein-
berger, both of Miami, and Kathryn Cohen of
Cincinnati.
Brother of the groom, Marc, was best man.
Ushers included Stephen Fohlen, Jerald Harris,
Michael Cooper, and Benjamin Schulman.
After a honeymoon in Israel and England, the
couple will reside in Miami where Barrett is a
third-year law student at the University of
Miami. He is currently with the law firm of Smith
and Mandler, P. A. Cathy is a teacher at Beth Da-
vid Solomon Schecter Day School.
Mrs. Cathy Lee Weinberger
BffiSfiBI ^^^^
^m ^ABP* ~ l^H 9 > a
r *vM| Fil i^ci ts
r M t c? fl
U

Judge Milton Friedman installed new PROPS officials at their
24th annual installation luncheon at the Eden Roc Hotel re-
cently, National Founding PROPS President Jerri Kruger
Pollak announced. The new officers are, from left, Mickey
Novach, treasurer, Laney Sheldon, president, Lyda Fairbanks,
second vice president, and Francesco Lefkowitz, secretary.
Bunny Osborn was elected first vice president.
Baltimore couple seeking to rent an apartment for the
month of February near Orthodox
Synagogue/preferrably Skylake. Write details to
Shavrick, c/o The Jewish Floridian, P.O. Box 012973,
Miami, Fla. 33101.
Sign this $10 check
and itsyours.
.>



FIALLLI
Wfle^cnEsipness
Hi l I _l
vsssr 0&AZEZ
order of
i /o.oo
rs/vm
Dollars
Memo
OfEXPR&S Acer
\
:'ujmv..tL,.. l.
, VMId only when depolfd In a new Chexpfen cnecklncj account wltn tlOO minimum tmam
> vm ^m \rj ,
W .- MM U*
HiFlaglerFederal'sgifttoyouwhenyou
open a CHEXPRESS interest-bearing checking account.
FLACLEF
four savings are
insured to S 100.000
by an Ao/ency of the
Federal Government
v
.,
FE2EFAL
Clip and sign the above check and bring It to any Flagler Federal office.
It's valid currency when you open a CHEXPRESS Interest-bearing
checking account with SI00 There's more...
If you open your CHEXPRESS account with $500 Instead of $100,
we'll pay you 5'/.% Interest on your funds and assess no service charges.
There's still more...
If you open a CHEXPRESS account and. at the same time, open a
DIRECT DEPOSIT, IRA or KEOGH account, (or deposit $10,000 In any
account) we'll assess no service charges and your checks will be free,
normally a $4.21 charge.
Now that's one heck of a good deal. In fact, three hecks of a good
deal.
Free cash, three deals and more smiles per dollar than you'll And
anywhere. There's always more at Flagler Federal.
''M
SAVIIIGS a LEAH ASSOCIATIOn p
Visit any of our 29 c
call 377-1711 In
ilantoWlce* In I
525-1557 In I
t. Broward or Palm Beach Counties.


Community Comer
n'nai B'rith Sholem Lodge 1024 will have a Chanukah Party I
12, President Andrew Tibor announced.
The Ladies Auxiliary of the Miami Beach Hebrew Home for
eAged will have a Chanukah celebration on Sunday, Dec. 12 '
1:30p.m.
Hdar Chapter of American Mizrachi Women will meet on
1 gsday, Dec. 21 at noon for a Kosher Luncheon. Anna Brandt
j Helen Weias will be honored.
______ __ i
Miami Dade Community College's Lunchtime Lively Arts!
ries presents Fanny Kemble: "That Shakespeare Lady" atj
onon Wednesday at Gusman Cultural Center.
Beth Kodesh Congregation's Men's Club Breakfast will be
Mi Sunday, Dec. 5 in honor of Cantor Leon Segal for his 13th
Ear with the congregation.
Hanna Senesch Chapter of Hadassah will have a Luncheon I
ting at noon on Monday, Dec. 6 at the Seville Hotel.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jewish Community Center will |
ve a Chanukah Family Festival on Sunday, Dec. 12 from noon I
j4p.m.
Chai Chapter of American Mizrachi Women will be hold on
Lnnual Bazaar Sunday, Dec. 5 between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. at the |
Executive National Bank's parking lot on Kendall Drive.
The Men s Club of Temple Judea will hold an All That |
Hitters evening on Saturday, Dec. 4, from 6 to 11 p.m. with pro- |
ds to benefit the temple.
| The Ceramic League of Miami will hold a 33rd Annual Fair at I
epical Park on Saturday and Sunday, Dec. 4 and 5, from 10 |
lm. to 5 p.m. =
The Israeli Chassidic Festival '82, with music, dance, and I
ongs. will be featured at the Miami Beach Theatre of the Per- =
brming Arts on Saturday, Dec. 25 at 8:30 p.m. and Sunday, =
.26 at 7:30 p.m. =
[Congregation Shaare Tefillah of Kendall will hold a Chanukah I
lorkshop and Gift Shop on Sunday, Dec. 5.
(Beth Torah Congregation Men's Club will hold an Art Show j
pesday from 7 to 10 p.m.
iLehrman Day School of Temple Emanu-El will hold a book I
" Friday. Dec. 3, Monday, Dec. 6, and Wednesday, Dec. 8.
[Temple Beth Moshe Sisterhood is sponsoring a Bazaar :
nday, Dec. 5 from 9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the temple.
[Temple Emanu-El opened a new Temple Library opposite the j
He Lehrman Youth Center.
[The Epilepsy Foundation of South Florida will meet Wed- |
Nay in the First Floor Conference Room of the Main Building =
|bouth M lami Hospital from 7:30 to 9 a.m.
[Young Israel of Sky Lake will present Shifra Hoffman, lee- I
*er and columnist, speaking on Jewish Survival Sunday at 8 =
i m the Main Sanctuary.
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Temple Emanu-El
Honor Roll
Students Named
Honor roll students of
Lehrman Day School and Temple
Emanu-El religious school have
been announced by Carol Green-
berg, president, and Dr. Irving
Lehrman, rabbi of the Miami
Beach congregation.
Those achieving the Rabbi's Honor
Roll from the religious school include
Leslie Cypen. Adam Epstein, Dana
Mne, Stuart Grossman, PhlUipe
Moncarz. Jamie Orlowsky, Joshua
linger. Jennifer Channing, Jennifer
Cypen. Gregg Fine, David Grossman,
Jeffrey Harris. Jodl Muskat. Michael
Musical. Brian Pachter, Melissa
Channing, Alexander Dlx and Gregory
Frehllng. *
Students named to the Derech Eretz
Honor Society from the religious school
include Ronald Basade. Scott Bloom,
Jonathan Burns. Leslie Lubln. Jennifer
Bolotln. Jay Burns, David Cohen,
Steven Diamond. Adam Elegant, Adam
Horowitz, Stuart Kessler, Frank Sch-
wartz, Richard Steinberg, Ellsa Wolln.
Jennifer Burns, Steven Fredericks
Robert Lleberman. Raphael Cohen, and
Michael Taklff.
Lehrman Day School pupils achieving
the Rabbis Honor Roll are Jana
Axelrad, Ellsa Behar, Melissa Waisey,
Igor Zllberman, Ezrl Shechter. Carla
Berens, Lisa Friedman. Belly Nleman,
Teddy Rosenblatt. Dawn Wechsler.
Paola Hadlda, Llzette Kabak. Joshua
Lee, Vanesa Maya, Adrlana Peljovlch.
Beverly Schwartz, Leonard Scott
Feuer. Jeannette Egozl, Esther Diana
Feuer, Salo Kozolchyk. Shaun Meller.
Art Miizcs. Glla Chesnoff, Benjamin
Doranz, Lizette Gurman, and Elizabeth
Week.
I-ehrman Day School students named
to the Derech Eretz Honor Society In-
clude Jonathan Cowan. Alleen Israel.
Ava Lefkowitz. Amy Wallace. Elaine
Waserstein. Michele Ergas, Cara
Gentile, Marc Sklar, Gil Kaganas,
Herschel Gerson, Matthew Schloss,
Lilly Shapiro, Danny Waserstein,
Esther Kassln, Annette Berens, Romlna
Mcrezowskl, Rhonda Mltranl, Vanessa
Niven. Zeke Rosenfeld, Jessica Waisey.
Gina Wigoda, Nicole Botton, Lynn
Labarta, Jacky MeJIachowlcz.
Krtstopher Taplln, Arl Kaganas,
Alberto Azulay, Stephanie Berman,
Dahlia Chesnoff, Andrew Feldman,
Eric Fishman, Jason Gordon, Diane
Israel, Maurice Kassln. Denlse Percal,
Ronnie Perells, Arlene Raijman. Joey
Rose, Dov Bensman, Rebecca Ergaa,
Konny Flnvarb, Paul Foster, Carolyn
Friedman, Martin Hadlda, Alex
Horowitz, Susan Israel. Michelle Kuper,
Kochelle Moncarz, Bryan Sherman,
Jacqueline Welner. Alexander Yahr,
Jason Zelcer, Merritt Berghash, Nicole
Donln. Darren Greenwald, Nathan Kflr.
Peter Klein, Dlna Mltranl, Lisa NIven.
Meredith Sonson, Art Schantz, Bellna
Surujon, Henry Welntraub, Tanla
Haber, Damond Horowitz, Bryan
Rosenfeld, and Cara Walker.
Mizrachi To March
Florida Council of American
Mizrachi Women will march for
funds to help disadvataged chil-
dren in Israel on Dec. 7, Child's
Day Chairman Blanche Cantor
announced.
Regina Wang, president, has
designated the day as the be-
ginning of the annual Mother and
Father in Israel Project whereby
members symbolically adopt a
child in Israel.
Temple Hosts Fireman
Temple Ner Tamid Men's Club
11 will hold a monthly breakfast at
9:30 on Sunday, Dec. 5 in the
i temple auditorium.
Inspector Jack Richardson of
the Miami Beach Fire Depart-
ment will speak on "Fire Preven-
tion and Rescue." A film will be
shown and a discussion will
follow, Dr. Eugene Labovitz,
rabbi, and David S. Meyer,
Men's Club president, announc-
i ed.
Aliyah To Hold Bazaar
Aliyah Chapter of Hadassah
vill have an annual Holiday
Shopping Bazaar on Wednesday
it Kalian High School from 7 to
10 p.m.
Ii There will be booths featuring
landicraft wares, stationary,
,oys, lucite, clothes, hot foods,
and desserts. All proceeds will
benefit the Hadassah Medical
Organization.
Ein Karem Plans Gala
Ein Karem Hadassah of Star
Lakes will hold a gala Hadassah
Medical Organization Luncheon
on Dec. 7 at noon at Temple Beth
Torah, Ann Field and Blance
Avuch,
Friday, November 26,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
The Jewish National Fund Pays
Tribute to Ernest Samuels
President of Point East and
Vice-President JNF
A Tribute to Ernest Samuels on his 75th Birthday, November
22, 1981 Presented by Gerald T. Wetherington, Chief Judge of
Dade County, at the Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel.
The romance of America, of its growth and development, of
the opportunity it afforded to the generations of yesteryear and
today all of these are embraced in the life of the beloved and
revered Ernest Samuels.
Ernest came to this cherished land at an early age and dreamt
of freedom and personal accomplishment. His determination and
dedication led to the achievement of his dream.
He is a self-educated man who helped his family, his com-
munity and his nation. He believes that each person is entitled
to the fruits of his labor and the right to live with dignity. After
40 years of labor as a successful businessman, he retired and
came to Miami. Ernest Samuels is a man who was meant to
serve his fellow man. When he became a condominium owner, he
assumed the role of leadership in this concept of shared living.
He inspired his neighbors to join together to battle for condo-
minium reform. Point East became the battleground that was to
elevate Ernest Samuels to new heights. As president and
manager of Point East, with its 1,266 condominium units and
2,500 residents, he helped to create the conditions that made this
complex an outstanding example of cooperative living in the
State of Florida.
In 1975, Governor Askew named him to the newly-created
Condominium Advisory Board where he served as chairman for
three years. Subsequently, Governor Graham appointed the now
distinguished elder statesman to the Health and Rehabilitative
Services Advisory Council of the 11th District on which he is
presently serving. He has been most active in the United Way
and also in the Heart Fund of Dade County. As a Jewish leader,
he has shared in the movement to support a free and democratic
Israel.
Now in his 75th year, he continues to provide leadership in all
of these diversified activities. He is a man of knowledge, action,
compassion, concern and dedication to the dignity and freedom
of the individual.
Ernest, on behalf of your many friends and admirers, let me
wish you many more fruitful and fulfilling years. Happy birth-
day, Ernie Samuels.
ERNEST SAMUELS
The romance of America is exemplified in the life of our
Honoree today. The beloved and revered Ernest Samuels.
Born in Hungary in the early years of the twentieth century,
he dreamed of freedom and personal achievement and realized
his dream, by coming to America in 1921 at the age of 15. Like
so many before him he was determined not only to take the free-
doms and opportunities of America to attain self-achievement,
but to cherish this land and to give it the best within him. His
life therefore mirrors that determination and that dedication.
Soon his English was splendid and he sought to educate him-
self, become productive and help his community and his people.
As a young man, he entered the business field and built a fine
furniture manufacturing business catering to Hotels, Res-
taurants, Clubs, Institutions and Schools. He was a fine em-
ployer and saw to the needs of his employees, believing implicit-
ly, that each person is entitled to the fruits of his labor and the
right to live with dignity. He married the woman he loved and in
whose home they made him one of the family. His loving wife
Rose was helpmate, sweetheart, companion and supportive of all
his efforts to serve the broad community. After 40 years of
exemplary achievement in the business world, he retired and
came to Florida to live. He did what thousands of others did, he
bought a condominium. Not only was the word new, but the en-
tire concept of shared living was a challenge. In no time at all he
became a fighter against the abuses inherent in condominium
laws and took on the role of leader against these abuses.
Management contract that tied owners to developers for 25
years: Recreation leases that bound owners to 99 year bondage
A'ith escalation clauses. He became the leader for condominiums
-eform and the Community he leadPoint East became the
jattle ground that was to elevate him to leadership in all of
Florida and won for all condominium owners their rights to be
jqual under the law. Through his efforts a new body of law
was adopted by the State of Florida, that gave freedom, dignity,
equality to all condominium owners. As President and manager
of Point East, with its 1,266 apartment units and 2,500 residents
he created the condition that made of this complex the best
example of cooperative living and giving in the State of Florida.
Because of his achievements former Governor Askew named
him to the newly created Condominium Advisory Board in 1975
and he served as its chairman for three years and completed a
four year term. Travelling throughout the state to try to resolve
the problems inherent in cooperative living.
Governor Graham apointed him to the Health and Rehabilita-
tive Services Advisory Council of the 11th District, where he is
serving at the present time.
As the leader of Point East he has been for years chairman of
the United Way Campaign and his condominium set the exam-
ple for full cooperation for the United Way. He also serves as
chairman of the Heart Fund of Dade County.
Above all he is dedicated to the well being and survival of the
State of Israel, the only true Democracy in the Middle East and
the unwavering ally of the United States. He serves as Vice
President in the South Region of the Jewish National Fund, the
Agency that made the land of Israel possible. He is a leader fo>
Israel Bonds, and the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel J Emr
gency Fund. He is a World War II Veteran, having served in the
United States Army for two years.
Now in his 76th year he continues his leadership in all of tfa
diversified areas, spelling out the overall interests and qualil
of true leadership, knowledge, action, compassion, concern ai
dedication to the dignity and freedom of the individual. Enu.
Samuels believes totally in the Declaration of Independence thi
cieated the U.S. of America, and his life exemplifies the actip i
that makes that document a reality. sponsor*)


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 26,1982
V
i*4^+ r >*?! Fefewtion Leader
?%?%! ?*?; Hosts Israel Forum
Tenor Luciano Pavarotti, who cames to South Florida for a two-
concert appearance for the JND Concert Foundation, is shown
with Marcy Lefton and Rabbi Leon Kronish of Temple Beth
Sholom,
Telecommunications World Event To
Be Held In Bal Harbour
A Global Telecommunications
Conference, Globecom '82, will be
held at the Sheraton Bal Harbour
from Nov. 29 through Dec. 2.
Southern Bell spokesman John
Thomas said, "This major world
class gathering of experts on
telecommunications is coming to
South Florida at a very timely
point in history since the Bell
System is nearing divestiture.'*
Sponsored by the Institute of
Electrical and Electronics
Engineers. the conference's
theme will be "Communications-
A Synergistic Technology" and
will feature participants from
Asia, Europe, Latin America,
and cities throughout the U.S.
In 48 sessions, 275 papers will
highlight changes occurring in
telecommunications.
Aaron Podhurst, General
Campaign chairman of the 1983
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Emergency Fund, will speak at
"Israel Update," an educational
forum sponsored by the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation and the
Aventura Jewish Center. The
event will be held on Wednesday
at 7:30 p.m. at the Aventura
Jewish Center.
Podhurst will discuss the
recent Miami mission to Wash-
ington and prospects for peace in
the Middle East. He is a vice
president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation and former
president of Temple Sinai.
Miamian Reelected
To Head
Chautauqua
Harold M. Malin of Miami was
reelected to a two year term to
the National Federation of Tem-
ple Brotherhoods-Jewish
Chautaugua Society's executive
board at a recent 29th Biennial
Convention. Owen Wyman of
Hollywood was elected assistant
treasurer.
Malin is a past president of
Temple Beth Am Brotherhood
and a past member of the temple
board of directors. He is JCS
chairman and active in the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
Wyman has served as presi-
dent and executive vice president
of Temple Beth El of Hollywood
and also was brotherhood presi-
dent.
Carl Andelman and Dena Greenfield, residents ofStarL
North Miami Beach, will receive the Israel Scroll ofu\
Award at a Salute to Israel on behalf of the Israel fij
Organization, Sol Epstein, chairman, and Fran Soss AtmM
chairman, announced. The event will be held at the Stnri
Social Hall on Dec. 5 at 9:30 a. m.
Chabad Lubavitch To Have Chanukah Fa
Chabad Lubavitch will sponsor
a Miami Beach Chanukah Fair at
Muss Park on Sunday, Dec. 12
beginning at 11 a.m.
Highlights of the event will be
the lighting of a large Menorah
and the singing of Chanukah
songs.
Rabbi Joseph Kessla
Rabbi Joseph Biston, Chabtd]
tivities director, areincha
arrangements. Rabbi Ab
Korf is regional director.
Toras Ernes Will Honor First Grads YoitnQ ,sraei Alds JNF
An annual Melave Malka of
Toras Ernes Academy of Miami
will be held on Saturday evening,
Dec. 11 at 8 at the Crown Hotel,
Chairman Abbey Berkowitz an-
nounced.
The evening will honor 13 boys
and girls of the first graduating
class of Toras Ernes, and enter-
tainment will be provided by the
school chorus, under the direction
of Shulamit Atkin.
Dr. Norman A. Bloom is presi-
dent and Rabbi Tzvi Glass is the
principal of the academy, which
serves from nursery through
ninth graders in Dade and south
B roward counties.
STILL SMALL VOICE
Channel 7. Sunday, 7:30
a.m. Rabbi Solomon Schiff of
Beth El Congregation, will
host.
A First Annual Young Israel of
Sky Lake Breakfast for the Jew-
ish National Fund and in honor of
the State of Israel will be held
Sunday at 9 in the temple Social
Hall.
Rabbi Dov Bidnick will speak,
and Cantor Jacob Tambor will
provide music.
AMERICAN HOME CARE
7 Day
24 Hr. Service
Certified and Licensed Nursing Professionals
We Accept
MasterCard Visa Major Insurance
For The Finest In Quality Home Care
Dial
274-7195
8700 N. Kendall Dr.
The Lennar Center
Medical Staffing Services T.M.
providing Quality Health Care Treatment
* ATTENTION
Beis Medrash Lomdei Torah
463 Arthur Godfrey Road (Second Floor)
Annouces the opening of the
Institute for Torah Studies
In addition, we are offering weekly classes
at the following regular times
Daf Yomi6 a.m.-7 a.m. by Rabbi S. Roth
Coffee will be served (starts Nov. 26th)
Tues. eve.:l 8 p.m.-9:30 p.m. TalmudTracute Maakoe
Wed. eve.: 8 p.m.-9:30 p.m. Jewish Law and Chumash
Sun. eve.: 8 p.m.-9:30 p.m. TalmudTracute Brachos
Maariv at 10
We are a dynamic new study group designed to serve the
needs of the Jewish Community, regardless of age or
background. Learning sessions in the Talmud or Bible are
held On a strict one-to-one basis (chavrasos).
For further information, please call evenings |
538-3687
Hours: Sunday Thursday-7:30 -10:00 1
No Charge '
&
c >
vroj.i
e J?af>Bi ~7l/exancfer
.i.j//i Jlnnua/ xde,
~He8rew Zftcademy
4
yf tree can stand a/one.
Our ScAoo/van no/, we need your help. "
A.
Dr. Elias Herschit
holding its 35th Annul |
HEBREW ACADEMY PLANS SCHOLARSHIP DINNER
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy wiU be
Scholarship Dinner on Sunday. December 19. 1982 at the Konover Hotel on mwi
Beach. The theme of this years dinner is trees: Trees that nurture and bear BBUg
that are nourished by strong solid roots. In keeping with that theme the scnoo.
decided to honor some of the roots of the institution, the Founding Mothers.
Ida Appel
Hortense Andron
Shirley Berkowitz
Rose Bienenfeld
Eva Binder
Fanny Broad
Barbara Ciment
Regina Ciment
Irma Ehrenreich
Ruth Firtel
Bessie Galbut
Rose Genet
Ruth Mermelli Gilman
Shirley Gross
Pauline Grandwerg
Sylvia Katz
Jean Kimmel
Rose Lauer
Belle Lehrman
Rose Lobel
Bertha Makovsky
Frances Makovsky
Rebecca Merwitzer
Eva Osheroff
Dorothy Rosen
Gloria Rosner
Becky Reinhard
Gertrude Shapiro
Virginia Silverberg
Bea Spolter
Grace Stern
Lillian Stone
Ida Wessel
Sylvia Zemel
These women were involved in every aspect of the school, from its humble JW"JJJJ[
its first real edifice on 6th street untU the time it moved into the campus
Dr. Elias Herschmann, President of the Rabbi Alexander S. Gross .Hebr** w b
calls upon the members of the Jewish community of the greater M*ami* Quality
these Founding Mothers by attending the dinner on December 19- -a#*
Jewish education in Miami has been enriched as a direct result of these w
said Dr. Herschmann. Let's show them our gratitute." -|
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy is fully accredited by "fltf
Association of Colleges and Schools, providing both secular and '^Sncation and 54]
the highest quality. Tuition covers only three-quarters of the cost ot eau ^iio*
of the student body receives some form of financial assistance. Thereiore. ^ ^ |
to a successful scholarship dinner to ease the financial burden. The lila -^p
scheduled to begin with cocktails at 6 p.m. and dinner at 7 p.m. The oo
per couple. Reservations may be made by calling the school at 532-6421.


Friday, November 26,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
Bar/Bat
\Mitzvah
DAREN STABINSKI
1 Alan Stabinski will be-
L Bar Mitzvah on Saturday
Lie Emanu-El. Dr. Irving
man wUl officiate.
t celebrant is an eighth
, audent at Lehrman Day
ol and is in the gifted pro-
h there. He plays the piano
hikes football and tennis.
I has made the honor roll
i times.
icial guests will include Mr.
rs Solomon Zelonker and
md Mrs Morris Stabinski,
idparents. and Mr. and Mrs.
ChiFalkson. great-grandpar-
L and Mrs. Luis Stabinski
[host the Kiddush following
Ices in honor of the occasion
a reception Saturday at
] Country ^h"0-
JOELSIMKA
fl Steven Simka, son of Mr.
Irs. Abe Simka. will be
to the Torah as Bar Mitz-
bn Saturday at the Israelite
fcr Temple. Joel is in the
i grade at Rabbi Alexander
Hebrew Academy and was
for his Bar Mitzvah by
Solomon Waldenberg,
ual leader of the Center.
Ihonor of the occasion Joel's
|ts will host an Oneg Shab-
i Friday evening and a Kid-
| Sunday morning. A dinner
temple Saturday evening
So be held.
of tonw guests attending
lie Joel's sister and brother -
, Mr. and Mrs. Judah Segal
heir sons, coming from Rock
d. 111. Family members from
Bnd Md. will also attend.
)NALDGINSBURG
Ginsburg, son of Rita
JKdwin M. Ginsburg, will
i a Bar Mitzvah on Satur-
norning at Temple Judea,
I Gables.
nald is an active seventh
\r at Southwood Junior
School and has been a
|nt of the Temple Judea
pus School since beginning
vish education. He is
king in the footsteps of his
p, Lynn and Susan, who
ne Bat Mitzvahs at Temple
in 1978 and 1980. Family
riends will further celebrate
Donald at a "Western"
Saturday night in the
We social hall.
is the grandson of Ruth and
[Zion Ginsburg of Miami
and Dorothy Kaplan and
Ite Leon Kaplan of Miami.
Srebnick
Ginsburg
Blynn
Robin
Gifted Program. He is also a
member of the advanced band at
North Miami Junior High School
where he is second chair clarinet.
Special guests include his twin
sisters, Sharon and Elisa Blynn,
and relatives and friends from
across the United States, includ-
ing Jeremy's grandfather and
grandmother, Mr. and Mrs.
Aaron Levy of Washington, aunt
and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Steven
ADAM GREENE
Adam Jason Greene, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Greene,
will be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah Saturday at 9 a.m. at
Temple Zamora.
The celebrant was a student at
the South Dade Hebrew
Academy for six years and at-
tends Arvida Junior High School
in the eighth grade. He was a
member of Kadima, Young
Judea, and the Temple Youth
group and serves on his school's
Yearbook staff and the American
Youth Soccer Organization.
Mr. and Mrs. Greene will host
the Kiddush following services in
honor of the occasion and a re-
ception and dinner at Temple
Zamora on Saturday evening.
Special guests will include Dr.
and Mrs. Alfred Gross, Mr. and
Mrs. Irving Grundman, Mrs.
Rosalie Greenblatt. Dr. and Mrs.
Richard Moscowitz of N.Y., Mr.
and Mrs. Joseph Pines of N.J.,
and Mr. and Mrs. Julius Pines of
Md.
IANMIKELHAGEN
Ian Mikel Hagen, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Manfred M. Hagen, will
be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah Saturday at 9 a.m. at
Temple Ner Tamid, Miami
Beach.
The celebrant is a student at
Nautilus Junior High School in
the eighth grade. Ian enjoys
playing the organ for his family
and friends and plays baseball
with the North Shore Optimists.
Mr. and Mrs. Hagen will host
the Kiddush following the serv-
ices in honor of the occasion and a
reception at the Doral Hotel.
Special guests will include
grandmothers, Mrs. Ester Hagen
and Mrs. Ruth Schoenowitz,
Ian's brother, Gustav, coming
from Houston, and, coming from
Detroit, cousins. Mr. and Mrs.
Ted Kahn and their daughter,
Linda and Mrs. Irene Shelby.
Coming from Baltimore is cousin,
Mrs. Ruth Alper and daughter,
Lynn. From New York, Uncle
Herb Schoenowitz and daughter.
Tav and Mr. and Mrs. Sidney
Selsky, of Tampa, with son, Ian
and daughter, Renee, will also at-
tend.
ELIZA ANN SREBNICK
Eliza Ann Srebnick. daughter
of Saul and Marita Srebnick, will
become a Bat Mitzvah Friday
evening, Nov. 26 at Temple
Menorah. Rabbi Mayer Abramo-
pynopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"And he dreamed, and behold a ladder set up on the earth
' 'he top of reached to heaven; and behold the angles of God
rnding and descending on it"
(Gen. 28-12).
VAYETZE
BTZE On his way to Haran, Jacob lay down to rest at a
* where God appeared to him in a dream promising to be
1 mm and to give the land to him and his seed after him. Ris-
_ the next morning, Jacob lifted the stone on which he had
r and set it up as a pillar. He called the place Beth-el mean-
lljouse of God" and vowed to serve God there when he re-
Bed to his father's house. The Lord would be his God.
Haran Jacob worked twenty years as a shepard for Laban
even years for his first wife Leah, seven years for his second
Rachel, and six years for the sheep. His wives gave him
r maid servants Bilhah and Zilpah as wives. Jacob's four
es bore him 11 sons: Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan,
ma\\, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, and Joseph; he also
I one daughter named Dinah. At God's direction, Jacob
Red home to his father's house. On the way he met the
Is of God.
I*' "counting ol the Weekly Portion of Hit Law it extracted end basea
'he Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage." edited by P. wollman
'" 15. published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
[,',"'" Y ork, NY. 003fl Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
"ln9 the volume.)
witz will officiate.
Eliza attended the Hebrew
Academy until the sixth grade
and is an eighth grade student at
Ransom Everglades School.
Mr. and Mrs. Srebnick will
host an Oneg Shabbat following
services in her honor. Eliza will
host a gala garden party for her
friends at her home Sunday
evening.
SCOTT ROBIN
Scott Andrew Robin, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Robin, will be
called to the Torah as Bar Mitz-
vah Saturday morning at Temple
Or Olom.
The celebrant is a student in
the Temple Or Olom Pre-
Confirmation Class and attends
West Miami Junior High School
in the eighth grade.
Scott enjoys fishing, football,
and wrestling and is captain of
his school's Concert Band. He
received a fine arts ribbon for
piano accomplishments at the
Youth Fair and played the
bassoon in the Dade County
Honors Music Festival. His
social studies project won a blue
ribbon in a school contest.
Mr. and Mrs. Robin will host
the Kiddush following services in
honor of the occasion and a
reception Saturday evening at
the Sheraton River House.
Special guests will include
grandmothers, Rose Robin and
Fannie Rodman, and relatives
and friends from New England
and Baltimore, including Leon
Rubin, Ida Leven, Dr. James
Pickar, Adele Cherry, Roberta
and George Silberberg, the Mel
Godstein family, and the Stanley
Olstein family.
FORTUNEE ROMANO
Fortunee Romano, daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Israel Romano, will
become Bat Mitzvah Friday eve-
ning. Nov. 26. at 8:15 at Temple
Tifereth Jacob. Hialeah.
Fortunee will conduct the serv-
ice and will chant the prophetic
portion of the Sabbath. In her
speech, she will point to equal
rights enjoyed by women in
Judaism throughout the ages.
JEREMY M. BLYNN
Jeremy M. Blynn, son of Mr.
and Mrs. Michael R. Blynn, will
be called to the Torah for his Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday at Temple
Beth Moshe, North Miami.
Jeremy was the valedictorian
of his Hebrew School graduating
class and received awards in ex-
cellence at the Dade County
Science Fair for "Water Taste
Preferences in South Florida."
He is the only person his age to
receive recognition from the
South Florida Historical Society
and the Tropical Audubon So-
ciety for contributions aimed at
environmental preservation. He
was presented the Key to Dade
County by Ralph Renick and
Commissioner Ruth Shack at the
Tropical Audubon Society
Awards Banquet last summer.
Jeremy is editor of a cartoon
magazine developed by the Dade
County Junior High School
" Levy of Washington, and great-
grandmother, Mrs. Steven La-
Valle, great-aunt, Mrs. Louis G.
Mann, cousin, Ms. Tekla Mann,
all of California. Mr. and Mrs.
Robert Demner and cousins, Mr.
and Mrs. Morris Biederman, all
of New York, will also attend.
A Kiddush luncheon following
services will be sponsored by the
parents and Mr. and Mrs. Aaron
Levy. Jeremy will celebrate with
his friends later in the da v.
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting Time: 5:09
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947 1435
Rabbi Slmcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpem Conservative
Frla:1S
Sat, 6:30 em. Bar Mitzvah.
Adam Smith
Sal. 7 pm. Bel Mitzvah,
Felice Miller
Deny Mlnyene 7:30 em 5 pm
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saltzman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchlnsky. Cantor
Fri.,t:1Spm
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Mlami-667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate
Rabbi
PH. Ml pm, Rebel Baumgerd will epeek
on "Whet'e Heppenlng In MiamiA Review of
My Fourteen Yeers on the Dade Community
Reletlona Board "
Sat., 11:15, Sermon: "A Ladder to Heeven"
B'nal Mitzvah, Steven Cleln, Lewrence Mote.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Corel Wey: 2S2S S.W. 3rd Avenue
South Dade 7500S.W. 120th Street
RABBI DAVIO H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Dade Chapel
Fri., pm, Oneg Shabbat Olecutalon: "Aak
the Rabbi." Sat.. 10 em. Junior
Congregation Service a
Coral Wey Senctuary
Sat, 9 am, Bar Mitzvah,
Robert Lawrence Phlllpeon
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler. Cantor
Late Frt. Eve. Sera. pm
Of. Irving Lehrman will preach on
"Do Vou Take Your Bleeelnoe lor Granted?"
Sat. Mom. Sera. am
Sermon el 10.30
Bar Mitzvah, Daren Alan stibineki
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
5326421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schift
TEMPLE ISRAEL Of Greater Miami
Miami* Ptonr Reform Congrwgmtion
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami. 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr., 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskell M. Bernat
A.st. Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Salkin
Cantor.Jacob G. Bornsteln
Student Cantor. Rachelle Nelson
Fri., pm, Downtown. Rabol Selkln
"The Family la a Fortreaa
Kendall, Story Sermon by Rabbi Bernat
TEMPLEJUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reform
Coral Gables 667 5657
Michael B. Elsenstat. Rabbi
Frt., 6:16. Seooeth service
Sat. Bar Mrtzvah. Donald Olneburg
Weekly Torah Portion Vayetze
Qeneele 28:10-32:3
______ Hallareh Hoeea 12:13-14:10
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101S.W. 12Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Fri.. 8:15 pm. Rabbi Shapiro will deliver
poet ThankagMng meeaage:
"Eaay To Say Thank*!"
Sat 6:45 am end Spm
Dally Mlrtyan Sen, 7:48em and Spm
Sun, 8 em and 5 pm
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami, PI 33181
691-5508 Conservative
Only Temple In North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorf inkel
Dally services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Fri., Spm
Sat., t am
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave.. M.B. Fl. 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41 st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Conviser
Fri., 8:15, r>. Leon KronMh wW epeek on
-Can We Provide Free Jewteh Education?"
Set, 10*6 am. Bat Mitzvah. EUen Cheryl Woe
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Fri, V15 and 8 pm. Bat Mitzvah,
Ellee Scheck
Set, 8:30 am and 5:18 pm
TEMPLE KINO SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
EDWARD BARON, Cantor
Fri.. 7:10 pm
Sal. 9:30 em
TEMPLE MENORAH
820 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Frt.. Bat Mitzvah. Eliza Ann Srebnick
Sat., 9 am
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Frl..S:15
Sat, 8 45,9 am. Bar Mitzvah.
Ian Mikei Hegen
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
15410 SW 75 Circle Lane
Miami, Fl. Modern Othodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 382 3343
Fri, 5:15 pm. Sabbath Seralcee
Bat. B:30 em end 5:30 pm Mlncha
Dally Morning Mlnyene, T a Th 6 45 am.
MWFTam
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley, Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frt, 8:15 pm. Worahlp Service: Dr. Cohen to
Speek on "The American Jewleh Literary
Renaleeence Sat, 10:30 am. Bar Mitzvah,
Andrew Fine. Douglae Negier
Torah portion Veyetze Oeneela 28:10-32:3
Hallerah Hoeea 12:13 14:10
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schift
Executive Vice President
Re ous Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Office
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Mlnyen Seralcee Mon. A Thura. 7 am
Sebbeih Eve. Servicea 8:15 pm
Sabbath Seralcee 8 em ___
Queete Are Welcome f' "V\ \
ThankagMng Day Mlnyen. S am Fit, Dr.
Sheptro'e topic: "Gratitude or OUgatlofl?"
Sat, Bet Mrtzveh. LMIen Me: -
Queer Cantor Paul Ooloateln.
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 163rd St, N. Miami Beach. Fl '62
947 8004. Harold Wiahna. executive director
Franklin 0 Kreutzer, regions- president
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Pa'x. 3785
NW82Ave.. Suite 210. Miami Fl.
33166, 592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Llttman, regional director


Pagel2-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 26,1982
;.


FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue Miami, Florida
LISTERINE
The Miami Achievement Hall of Fame, sponsored by Junior
Achievement, will hold a Seventh Annual Business Leadership
Hall of Fame Dinner on Wednesday at the Hyatt Regency
Hotel at 7 p.m.CarlosJ. Arboleya, left, vice chairman and chief
operating officer of Barnett Bank of South Florida, N.A., the
late Kirk A. London, center, founder of American Bankers
Insurance Company and American Bankers Life Insurance
Company, and Leslie O. Barnes, right, president, chief
executive officer, and chairman of the board of Ryder Systems,
Inc., will be added to the Hall of Fame at the dinner.
Home Women To Meet Mizrachi To March
Anti-Persplrant
Deodorant
Greater Miami Women's
Auxiliary of Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged at Douglas
Gardens will hold a luncheon
meeting Tuesday at the Seville
Hotel at noon.
Susan Thomas, director of
community relations, will speak
on Myths and Facts of Aging,
and Mollie Silverman will
preside.
NCJW To Convene
Lakes Division, National
Council of Jewish Women, will
have a membership meeting Dec.
1 at 11:30 a.m. at the Golder.
Glades Masonic Lodge.
Sophie Weissman will review
the book "Brandeis," and a
Chanukah celebration will follow.
Florida Council of American
Mizrachi Women will march for
funds to help disadvataged chil-
dren in Israel on Dec. 7, Child's
Day Chairman Blanche Cantor
announced.
Regina Wang, president, has
designated the day as the be
ginning of the annual Mother and
Father in Israel Project whereby
members symbolically adopt
child in Israel.
Galil To See Film
Galil Chapter of American
Mizrachi Women will hold a
Member Bring a Member and
Paid-Up Membership Luncheon
on Monday, Dec. 6 at noon at
Young Israel Synagogue.
A film, "Rondezvous with
Freedom." will be shown.
The Ideal
Chanukah GiSt___
sJewislh Floridian
Subscription Order Form
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_


'.k. firtltloui name
sK.NCatl14SW17
J^ister 'd n*m|!
f SS of the Circuit
^adV^nty. Florida.
Decembers. 1983
-Sffii-cTgUlT COURT
nioECOUNTY. FLORIDA
*SoMTE DIVISION
File Number MW89
Division 03
IlKRE: ESTATE OF
1 BV1NG THALER
"SomcBor
ADMINISTRATION
L /? PERSONS HAVING
Saws or demands
ISSSST THE ABOVE ES-
InTE AND ALL OTHER
IrtiBONS INTERESTED IN
HofXHEREBY NOTI-
Inrn that the administration
IwaLER, deceased. File
KEnbcr BMW. U pending in
Id* Circuit Court for Dade
Itainty Florida. Probate D1W-
ETttM address of which Is 78
lw.,1 Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida 33130 The personal
IwUsentatlve of the eaUte If
IKS! WILLIFORD.
D. address 1. 5720 N.W.
Illltti Street, Hlaleah, Flortda.
TV name and addresa of the
personal representative's at<
tomey are set forth below.
I All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
ITION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
Kurt a written statement of
_iny claim or demand they may
nave Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis (or the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
Eui agent or attorney, and the
unount claimed. U the claim la
lot yet due. the date when it
ill become due shall be
.laled. If the claim Is contin-
ent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
Baled If the claim Is secured,
Die security shall be described
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
jderk to enable the clerk to mall
me copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons interested in the
Btale to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
keen mailed are required,
r'ITHIN THREE MONTHS
ROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
IMS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
Challenges the validity of the
Decedent's will, the qualified
pans of the personal represen-
jalive. or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
IND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
1LED WILL BE FOREVER
MED.
Date of the first publication
I this Notice of Admlnlstra-
on: November 26,1082.
Frances Wllllford
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
IRVING THALER
Deceased
Attorney for personal
epresentative:
Kwitney.Kroop A
Tchelnberg. P.A.
0 Lincoln Road, Suite 512
Hiami Beach. Florida 33138
Telephone: 538-7575
I18284 November 26;
Decembers. 1082
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
i.... 'NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
I T.H,jj ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. 12-1704* FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTIOI
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
FRANCISCO JOSE PEREZ
Petitioner-Husband
uid
MARIA ELENA
PEREZ
Respondent-Wife.
-> MARIA ELENA PEREZ
2322 30th Street S.W.
Apt. No. 7
Wyoming, Mich. 40500
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
E*. "''t an action for
dissolution of Marriage has
*en filed against you and you
* required to serve a copy of
-our written defenses, if any. to
C on MELVIN J, ASHER.
gy< attorney for Petitioner,
nose address Is 1850 S.W. 8th
fig*- S"lte 206. Miami,
"orlda 33135, and file the
E* Wth the clerk of the
fin?Vtyled court or before
r"> December, 1082; other-
"" a default will be entered
gainst you for the relief
fcutton ta "" comPlalnt or
WITNESS my hand and the
,?' ad court at Miami.
T-ovember, 1082
RICHARD P. BRINKER
* Clerk. Circuit Court
Oade County, Florida
yM. J.Hartnett
Aa Deputy Clerk
2^" Court Seal)
November 10, 36;
Decembers, 10,1082
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 82 laoas
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GLADYS M.
DE LA CRUZ-CARRO
and
MAXIMO CARRO
TO: MAXIMO CARRO
Address Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
DEL-VALLE It NETSCH. PA.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 1060 S.W. 27 Ave.
Miami, FL 33146. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
December 27, 1082; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLO RIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17 day of No-
vember, 1082.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal!
18282 November 26;
December 3,10,17,1082
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 82-8(17 (03)
IN RE ESTATE OF
BERNARD H. PALLANT,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration
of the estate of BERNARD H.
PALLANT. deceased, late of
Dade County. Florida. File
Number 82-8887 {031 Is pending
In the Circuit Court In and for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 3rd Floor, Dade County
Courthouse, 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 33130.
The Co-personal representa-
tives of this estate are Joseph
L. Pallant and Rhona S. From-
berg, whose address is 4000
N.E. 2nd Avenue, Miami, Flor-
ida; 1001 N.E. 105 Drive. N.
Miami Beach, Fl respectively.
The name and addreas of the
attorney for the Co-personal
representatives are set forth
below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due, the date when it
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
DATED at Miami, Florida on
this 18th day of November.
1082.
Rhona S. Fromberg
Joseph L. Pallant
As Co-Personal
Representatives
of the Estate of
BERNARD H. PALLANT.
Deceased
First publication of this notice
of administration on Ue 26 day
of November, 1082
Lynn W. Fromberg, Esquire
of Law Office of Fromberg,
Fromberg. Roth, Gross,
Cohen, Shore* Berke. PA.
420 South Dixie Highway.
Third Floor
Coral Gables, Florida 33148
Telephone: 305-666-6622
Attorney For
Co-Personal Representatives
jgggg November 26:
December 3,1082
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12 5510
Division M
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MOLLIE ETENOOFF,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of Molile Etengoff, de-
ceased, File Number 82-5510, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 73 W. Flagler Street, Miami,
Flortda SSI SO. The names and
addresses of the personal rep-
resentative and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) ail
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 28,1(83.
Personal Representative:
LawrenceB. Etengoff
c-o Henry M. Waltikln.
Atty.
P.O. Box4146Sl
Miami Beach, Flortda 33141
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
HENRY M. WAITZKIN
740-71st Street
Miami Beach, Florida SS141
Telephone: (806)866-0858
18201 November 36;
________________December 8,1082
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OAOE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 17 14545
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ESMERALDA REYNOLDS,
and
GEORGE REYNOLDS,
TO: GEORGE REYNOLDS
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
I >KI. V AI.I.E & NETSCH. PA.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is 1060 S.W. 27 Ave.
Miami, Fla 33145. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
December 27, 1082; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17 day of No-
vember. 1082.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
18283 November 26;
December 3,10, 17,1082
Friday, November 26,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 2-H7l
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: JOSE MARTIN
AGUILAR.
and
MARIA MARLENE
DEFARIAS
TO: MARIA MARLENE
DEFARIAS
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
BRAZIL
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
M. CHRISTINA DEL-VALLE,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1060 S.W. 27 Ave.
Second Floor. Miami, Florida
33145. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before December
10, 1082; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 5 day of Novem-
ber, 1082.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM. J.Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
M.CRISTINA
DEL-VALLE. ESQ
DEL VALLEfc NETSCH. P.A.
1060 S.W 27 AVE.
MIAMI. FLORIDA 33146
Telephone: (305)448-0272
Attorney for Petitioner
18266 November 12,10. 26;
December 3.1082
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number S2-M61
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
BESSIE IRENE
CARMICHAEL
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of BESSIE IRENE
CARMICHAEL, DECEASED.
File Number82-8261, Is pending
In the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Di-
vision, the address of which Is
Dade County Courthouse, 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida SS1S0. The Personal
representative of the estate is
BETTY FRANCIS BRYANT,
whose addreas is 12276 N.W. 10
Avenue, Miami, Florida. The
name and address of the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when it
will become due shall be
staled. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim la secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jectiona they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administration
November 10, 1082
BETTY FRANCES BRYANT
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
BESSIE IRENE
CARMICHAEL
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
ALBERT W. GUFFANTI, P.A.
1401 N.W. 17th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33126
Telephone: (30_ iS35-0040
18273 Novel Jber 10, 26, 1082
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 13 1175
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ABRAHAM SWARTZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of ABRAHAM SWARTZ,
deceased. File Number 82-8175,
Is pending in the Circuit Court
for DADE County, Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which Is Dade County Court-
house, 78 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida S31S0. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an in-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 26.1082.
Personal Representative:
GERALD SWARTZ
626 Treasure Boat Way
Sarasota. FL SS670
MIRIAM ABRAMSON
235 Belmont Avenue
Pembroke. Ontario, Canada
JACK ANKUS
5560 La Gorce Drive
Miami Beach. FL SSI40
Attorney for Personal Rep-
resentative:
CYPEN*CYPEN
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
P.O. Box 402000
Miami Beach. FI. SSI40
Telephone: (3061532-4721
November 36;
Decembers. 1082
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
OAOE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12-StSS
Division 02
.NRE: ESTATE OF
HYMAN FINE
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
ate of HYMAN FINE. DE-
CEASED. File Number 82-6866.
is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida.
I mli.iu Division, the address
of which Is 73 West Flagler
Street, Miami. Florida 33130.
The names and addresses of
the personal representative
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney are set forth be-
low.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (II all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
UK FOREVER BARRED
Publication of this Notice has
begun on November 12. 1082.
Personal Representative:
JEAN RUBINSTEIN
l&ScennaRoad
Beverly, Mass.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
ABRAHAM A GALBUT.
ESQUIRE
GALBUT. GALBUT A MEN1N.
P A.
0O0 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33130
Telephone: 672-3100
IK263 November 12. 10.1082
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 61-272
IN RE ESTATE OF
MIRIAM PANN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of MIRIAM
PANN, deceased, File Number
81-272, Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Flor-
ida, Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 78 West Flag-
ler Street, Miami, Florida,
Dade County Courthouse.
Miami, Florida 33131 The
personal representative of the
estate is EMERICH KATZ and
VERA KATZ. whose addresa is
1035 Park Avenue, Miami
Beach, Florida. The name and
addreas of the personal repre-
sentative's attorney are set
forth be low.
All persons having claims or
demands agalnat the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be in
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due. the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
* Uds NoUce of Administra-
tion: November 19.1083.
EmertchKatz
VeraKaU
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MIRIAM PANN
Dec i' sed
ATTORNEY FOR PERSO r- \L.
REPRESENTATIVE:
EUGENE J. WEISS. Q-
UIRE
407 Lincoln Road.
Penthouse N.E.
Miami Beach. Florida SSI:
Telephone: 584-4721
18281 November 10.26 .82



Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, November 26, 1982


Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civ Action No 82 17237
NOT ICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
ANA CECILIA
SAI.DARRIAGACUARTAS.
Petitioner,
and
Kl BEN DARIOCUARTAS.
Respondent
TO: Ruben DarloCuartas
Calle 49-A, No. 4646
Of Iclna No. 203
Edlflc lo Sojesperanza
Madellln, Colombia
No. 31 654
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to In
on R.A. del Pino, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la
1401 West Flagler Street, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before December 17, 1882;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief prayed for In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 16th Day of
November. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal)
By CLARINDA BROWN
As Deputy Clerk
R.A. DEL PINO, ESQ.
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida 33130
Attorney for Petitioner
18278 November 19.26
December 8.10.1M2
NOTICE OF ACTIONi
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 82 1*818
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
RAMON GONZALEZ,
Petitioner,
and
FE BANUL GONZALEZ,
Respondent.
TO: FE BANUL GONZALEZ
Leon Albemas No. 38
Remedlo,
Las Villas. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on '
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is I860 S.W 8th Street.
Suite 208, Miami. Florida 33135.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 10,
1982: otherwise a default will
he entered against you for the
relief lemanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8 day of Novem-
ber. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C. P. Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Sea)
18366 November 12.1. 26;
______________Decembers. 1962
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 61-676
Division 02
INRK ESTATE OF
JOSE KKRNANDEZa-k-a
JOSE FERNANDEZ
LOPEZ,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING'
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE
ESTATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that the ad-
ministration of the estate of
Jose Fernandez, a-k-a Jose
Fernandez Lopez, deceased.
File Number 81-876. is pending
In the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate
Division, the address of which
Is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 33130. The
personal representative of the
estate is BERTA ROMAGOSA
DEL NODAL, whose address Is
11013 S.W. 38th Lane. Miami,
Florida 33165. The name and
address of the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due, the data when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of
Administration: November 26.
1982.
BERTA ROMAGOSA
DEL NODAL
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
JOSE FE RN AN DEZ a-k-a
JOSE FERNANDEZ LOPEZ.
Deceased.
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
NATHANIELL. BARONE. JR
6361 Sunset Drive
Miami. Florida 33143 ,
Telephone: (305)662-2004
18285 November 26 >
Decembers, 1982 j
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT!
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case No 82 17401 FC
IN HE The Marriage of:
MARIE ANDREMENE
THOMAS ,
Petitioner-Wife
and
ANDRE JULES THOMAS,
Respondent-Husband
To: ANDRE JULES THOMAS
Residence unknown,
shall serve copy of your An-
swer to the Petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS, attor
ney. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida. 33136. and file
original with Court Clerk on or
before December 27. 1982:
otherwise a default will be
entered.
November 18. 1982.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: M J. Hartnett
18288 November 26;
Decembers. 10.17.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
BORGEN BRAND at number
13464 SW 90 Te rrace. in the City
of Miami. Florida, Intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida. Dated
at Miami, Florida, this 25th day
of October, 1982.
FLORIDA FRESH FRUIT
AND VEGETABLE CORP.
BY: JORGE BORGEN,
President
LAMCHICK. G LUCKS MAN A
JOHNSTON
By: BRUCE LAMCHICK
Attorney for Applicant
10651 North Kendall Drive
Suite 217
Miami, FL 33176
18264 November 12.19.26
December 3.1682
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOB
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO: 62-17616
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE The Marriage of
JACQUES VICTORlN
Petitioner.
and
MICHELENE VICTORlN
Respondent.
TO: MICHELENE
VICTORlN
Residence 6jejB696 -
YOU ARK HEREBY NOT!
FIED that a Petition for Dlsso
lution of Marriage has been
Bled and Lumimmlng m this
and you are required to serve a
copy of your written diraan If
any to It on ANDREW H.
BOROS. Attorney for the PeU
tioner. whose sortie tm MM
Biscayne Blvd., Miami. Flor-
ida 83138 and Ola original with
the Clerk of the above-styled
Court on or before December
17,1982 otherwise a default will
be entered against you tor the
release prayed for In the Com-
plaint or Petition.
WITNESS MY HAND AND
THE SEAL OF SAID COURT
ON NOVEMBER 10.1982.
RICHA RD P. BRINKER
as Clerk of said Court
K Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
18271 November 19. 26;
)ecember3.10, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
No. 12 20426
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
CHARLOTTE VOGEL,
Plaintiff.
vs.
VECO, etal.
Defendants,
TO: AVERRORS, INC.
Re: Lot 2. Block 1, THE TWINS
according to the Plat thereof,
as recorded In Plat Book 94.
Page 82, of the Public Records
of Dade County. Fla.
a-k-a 6616 S. W. 186 Court.
Miami. Fla
YOU are hereby notified that
a mortgage foreclosure has
been filed against you and
others by the plaintiff in the
above styled cause In the Cir-
cuit Court In and for Dade
County, Florida, and you are
hereby required to serve a copy
of your answer or pleadings
upon the plaintiff's attorney.
Herman Cohen. Esq., 622 S. W.
1st. Street. Miami. Fla 53130,
and file the original answer or
pleadings with the Clerk of the
above Court, on or before De-
cember 17,1982. If you fall to do
so, a default judgment will be
entered against you for the re
lief demanded In the mortgage
foreclosure.
Witness my hand and the seal
of this Court, at Miami. Dade
County, Florida, this 15 day of
November, 1982.
Richard P. Brlnker
Clerk. Circuit Court
By: A. Minguez
Deputy Clerk
18275 November 19. 26;
Decembers. 10.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION I
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 62-17141 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RODOLFO RAMBAUT.
Petitioner,
and
TERESITA DE JESUS
MACHADO,
Respondent.
TO: TERESITA DE JESUS
MACHADO
Crtstlnal22
Entre Esperanza y San
Agustln
La Palma. Arrollo Naranjo
Habana, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dissol-
ution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1850 S.W. 8th Street.
Suite 206. Miami, Florida 33136.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before December 27,
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this IS day of
November, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A MINGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18287
November 26.
Decembers, 10.17 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAl
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 62-17060
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MYRA INEZ SANCHEZ
Petitioner-Wife
and
LUCIANO SANCHEZ
Respondent-Husband
TO: LUCIANO SANCHEZ
Address and
residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage, has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses, if any. to
it on LOUIS R. BELLER. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 420 Lincoln Road,
Suite 238. Miami Beach, Flor-
ida 33139. and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before
December 27, 1982 otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 17 day of No-
vember. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. MINGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
18279 November 19. 26;
Decembers, 10.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW ,
NOTICE IS HEREBY1
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
BIOCONDITIONER
FACILITY at 260 West 63rd
Street. Miami Beach. Florida,
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
MARC A. FLITTER. M.D.,
P.A.
JOEL BERNSTEIN
Attorney for Applicant
Spencer. Hass-Periman,
Hoffman. Bloom A Bernstein
1901 Ponce de Leon
Boulevard
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
18280 November 19,26
Decembers. 10.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
CIVIL FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 62-17224
IN RE: The Marriage of
GLENDA OGBARA.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
KAMAL OGBARA,
Respondent-Husband.
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
TO: KAMAL OGBARA
34 Docemo Street
Lagos, Nigeria
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed and commenced In this
Court and you are required to
serve a copy of your written de-
fenses, if any, to it on Bruce.
Lamchick. LAMCHICK.
GLUCKSMAN A JOHN8TON,
Attorneys for Petitioner, whose
address is 10651 North Kendall
Drive. Suite 217, Miami,
Florida 33176. and file the
original with the Clerk of the
above-styled Court on or before
Dec. 17. 1982. otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con- -
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of said Court at Miami. Florida
on this 16th day of November.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Clerk of the Court
By: C. MOORE
As Deputy Clerk
BRUCE LAMCHICK. ESQ.
LAMCHICK. GLUCKSMAN A
JOHNSTON
10681 North Kendall Drive
Suite 217
Miami. Fl S3176
Attorneys for Petitioner
18277 November 16. 26; )
December 3.10.1982
ION
ELEVENTH CIRCUIT COURT
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FC Case Ne. 62-171UFC
IN RE: The Marriage of
ORLANDO CESAR ABELLA
Petitioner Husband
ANDREA J. NAVA ABELLA
Respondent-Wife
TO: Andrea J Nava Abe 11a
121 Echandla Street
Los Angeles,
California
shall serve copy of your
Answer to the Petition tor Dls-
sotution of Marriage upon
GEORGE NICHOLAS,
Attorney, 613 N. W. 12th
Avenue. Miami, Florida, StlM.
and file original with Court
Clerk on or before Dec. 17,1682.'
otherwise a default will be en-'
tared. Dated: November 16,'
1963.
RICHARD BRINKER
By: M. J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clark .
16374 November 16, St;
December S, 10,1982
NOTICE uNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
TED MARTIN ORCHESTRAS
at 2371 NE. 193rd St.. In the
City of No. Miami Beach.
Florida, intends to register the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
25th day of October. 1982.
Ted Martin
Enterprises. Inc.
a Florida Corporation
by: Ted Martin, President
18235 October 29;
Novembers. 12.19,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name MIL-
LER MEAT A FISH MARKET
at 1S445 S.W. 66th Street.
Miami, Florida 33175 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
V.A V. MEAT
MARKET. INC.
18259 Novembers, 12;
19. 26, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
ABC Building Agency at 3560
Blscayne Boulevard. Suite 200,
In the City of Miami. Florida.
Intends to register the said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
28th day of October, 1982.
HAZOR TRUST
By: Malcolm H. Neuwahl,
as Trustee
CALUSA TRUST
By: Bruce B. Packman,
as Trustee
TEQUESTA TRUST
By: Dennis Glnsburg,
as Trustee
Dennis Glnsburg, Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
Packman. Neuwahl A
Rosenberg
Suite 608.
Brickell Concours
1401 Brlckell A venue
Miami. Florida 33131
18354 Novembers, 13;
16.36,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business'
under the fictitious name
TONY DISTRIBUTOR CO. at',
3058 N.W. 29th Street. Miami. |
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
ANTHONY SUAREZ
LESTER ROGERS. ESQ.
Attorney for owner
1464 N.W. 17th Avenue
Miami. Florida 33125
18261 Novembers. 12;
16. 26, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action No. 82 17055
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
HUMBERTO NOVALES
Petitioner-Husband
and
MARIA LUISA
ARBOLEYA GARCIA
Respondent- Wife.
TO: MARIA LUISA
ARBOLEYA GARCIA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 420 Lincoln Road,
Suite 379, Miami Beach. Fla.
33139. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before December
17, 1982; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this IS day of No-
vember. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A. Minguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
420 Lincoln Road-
Suite 379
Miami Beach, Florida MIS*
Telephone: (806)681-0361
Attorney for Petitioner
18272 November 19.36;
December 8,10,1683
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE
IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
engage tn business
under the fictitious name
desiring to
MONACO at 6670 Sunset Drive,
Suite 314, Miami. Fla. 66176
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
INCOMEX U.S.A.. INC.
BY: ZEEVVKJDOR,
President
18390 November 26
December 8,10.171669
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
..NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
JULIO'S LAWN MAIN-
TENANCE at 1720 N.W. 124th
Terrace, Miami. Florida 33167
Intend to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
JULIO URIBE
Daniel Z. Averbook. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant'
18368 November 12,19.26
Decembers, 1982
CIRCUIT OF flor^'H
. NO 82 U,,4
^Petltlor.rMu^RAj
HELENJ TERRY
DUPERA,
___RePono>nt W|f.
TO:HELENJ
TERRY IH,.ERA
Address & Resident,
Unknown ,
YOU ARE HEREBY Mr-. I
FIEnthatape,KrM
lution of your MarrU-ZI
been filed and commfel
tola court and you are 2M
to serve a copy of your wntal
defenses. If any. to ,,~"|
LLOYD M ROlTMAsL"!
attorney for Petitioner whll
address is Suite 615 7900M*I
2nd Avenue. Miami. FLBnil
and file the original wit), u*|
clerk of the above styled caw I
on or before December kd
1982; otherwise a default ml
be entered against you for th* I
relief prayed for in the cm
plaint or petition wl
This notice shall be publubi* I
once each week lor (our cog f
secutive weeks In the JEWBH
FLORIDIAN. w
WITNESS my hand and Um
seal of said court at Mum I
Florida on this 27 day of Ota I
ber. 1982. '
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Clrtult Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. Selfrled
As Deputy Cterk
(Circuit Curt Seal)
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN, ESQ
Suite 615.
7900 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami, FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18236 November 5,11;
__________________________.*.l*
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO 82-16746
IN R E: the marriage ol
BARBARAOUKA
Petitioner
and
CAMILLE Ol'KA
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: CAMILLE OL'KA
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED list
an action fur dissolution of I
marriage Has been DM
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your j
written defenses, if any. a |
ROBERT M. ZIEJA. ESQ.At-
torney for Petitioner, 633 NX
187 St. N.M.B.. Fl 33162 on or
before December 10, 1982. and |
file the original with the clerk
of this court; otherwise a dr
fault will be entered against |
you.
Dated: Nov. 5.1982
RICHARD P BRINKER. |
Clerk
byC.P COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
18276 November II.
December 3,10,199
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVES
that the undersigned, desiring to
engage in business under the
fictitious name VALSER POR
CELAIN LABORATORY, At _
32970S.W. 210Ave HomesteAi
Fla. 33034 intendstoregUteruiH
name withtheClerkoftheClrculi
Court of Dade County. Florida
Valentin Serrano,
Owner
18269 November II. a.
Decembers, 10. lr
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
IN THE CIRCUITC0U6T
F*
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
C6MN0.6MMS1FC
FAMILY OIVISI0N
IN RE: The marriage of
James Edward Owens,
husband,
and
Anne Frances Owens.
wife.
TO: James Edward Oweni
whose residenceilr
1203 Shore Club Drive.
St. Clalr Shores,
Mich. 48080 ._.._.
You are hereby *******
petition for mm****.***
riage has been filed fffMJ"
byAnne Franc. Owew *
and vou are required to ser"
you/arawer to the pdHW
Walter J.Mlgoskl, attorney W
Etitloner, 14299 NX
ecayne River Drive. EMJ
Fla. 33161. and file the **
in the office of the clerk of ^
cult court on or before D'm
ber 3. 1982. Um***fZ
Judgment by default will "
taken against you.
Dated November 1.19H.
Richard P Brlnker
Clerk of the Clrcu" Court
Dade County. Flor"
by M.J. Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal) Q
18260 Noverribe^rs."^


Yew AZF Vice President Elected
' ,, Schwartz of Miami ..sbMBsI^.
, and Kendall has been
na^onal vice president of
San Zionist Federation.
Uident of a South Florida
Eolations, advertising, and
i the national board of
j0f the AZF for the past
rars Schwartz is a former
bt of the Zionist Council
5 Florida, past president
j Presidents Council of the
la Organization of America,
f^nber of the Friends of
|lr Women, and southeast-
CLnal director of the Amer-
VFnends of Haifa University
nond M. Patt, a Brooklyn
In**, was elected president of
|AZF at the group's seventh
' iial Convention held this
b in Spring Glen, N.Y.
Gerald Schwartz
Richard Rubinson was
bid president of the medi-
staff of Cedar's Medical
^.ter for 1982-83.
idassah Sets Agenda
|laim Yassky Chapter of
Hassan will meet Wednesday
(noon at Byron Hall, Miami
Ich for a Chanukah program.
[he chapter's Eye Bank
pcheon will be held Tuesday,
at the Carillon Hotel at
rOlom Hosts Reporter
emple Or Olom will feature
|hy Lynn Grossman, staff
er for the Miami Herald, at a
kkfast at the temple on
Iday.Dec. 5 at 9:30.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
oen Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266 2888

IS*
do*
>*"
6 0 t i
S:':0
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261 7612
United Way Ends '82
Campaign At Party
United Way volunteers
aised a record $13,509,822
to meet community human
service needs during 1983,
General Campaign Chairman
John R. Ben bow announced
at a Thanksgiving Celebra-
tion marking the formal
completion of the 1982 cam-
paign. '
Held Nov. 23 in the Omni
International Ballroom, the
dinner honored the year's
fundraising efforts and out-
going Chairman Benbow. In
his farewell speech, he high-
lighted special campaign ac-
complishments, the "com-
mitments, perseverance, and
extra efforts of people in the
community."
Beth Sholom Hosts
Oded Ben-Bur
Vice-Consul General of Israel,
Oded Ben-Hur, will be the guest
speaker at Temple Beth Sholom
Brotherhoods monthly breakfast
program on Sunday, at 10:30
a.m., Aaron Farr, program chair-
man, and Perry M. Fabian, presi-
dent, announced.
Ben-Hur received his
bachelor's degree in political
science and Middle East studies
from Tel-Aviv University and in
1982 was appointed vice consul.
Men's Club to Recruit
The Men's Club of Young
Israel of Sunny Isles has started
a campaign to recruit new mem-
bers. President Charles Skupsky
will be aided in the effort by Jack
Fogler. Hillel Price, Eli Steinfeld.
and Max Wein.
Teen Center Opens
A Teen Center is now open on
Wednesday evenings from 7 to
9:30 at the Miami Beach Jewish
Community Center for seventh
through twelfth graders. Upcom-
ing activities include movie
nights, guest speakers, art pro-
jects, dances, sports, and a snow
ski trip.
Obituaries
Friday, November 26,1982 / The Jewish Floridim Page 16-B
Jana Wiener, 45, of Beth Torah
Vets To Plan Party
The Abe Horrowitz Ladies
Auxiliary 682. Jewish War
Veterans, will meet on Sunday.
Nov. 28 at 9:30 a.m. at the Post
building, President Phyllis Shaw
announced.
Plans will be finalized for the
Channukah Latke party to be
held Dec. 16.
Wise Plans Luncheon
Stephen S. Wise Chapter of
Hadassah will hold an Annual
Founder's Day Luncheon for Ha-
dassah Medical Organization on
Monday, Dec. 6 at 11:30 at the
Ocean Pavillion.
Florence Scheiner will be the
guest speaker, and Patricia Gayle
will entertain, Gertrude Sosna
and Esther Berman announced.

t+!SSr>
*A
OORICK
Wtnnlfred, 73, of North Miami Beach,
coming to Florida 34 years ago from
New York, passed away November 18.
She la survived by son, Joel C. of
Potomac, MD; daughter, Brenda Thur-
man of North Miami Beach; brother,
Louis WInfield of North Miami Beach:
and five grandchildren. Services were
held November 31 at Riverside.
LOWE
Harry, 78, 14-year resident of North
Miami Beach originally of Louisiana,
died November 20. He Is survived by
wife, Rose: sons, Gerald and Marshall,
both of Louisiana: grandchildren,
Mlchele, Marjorle, Michael. Debra,
Steven, and Jeffrey: and brother, Sol
Kglowitz. He was a member of B'nal
B'rlth Brandels Lodge and Phythlans
Point East. Services were held Novem-
ber 22 at Riverside.
LASER
Raymond of North Miami Beach, com-
ing to FL In 1968 from Chicago, died
November 19. He Is survived by wife,
Gladys' sons. Gary of Chicago and
Marty of Miami: four grandchildren:
brother. Meyer; and sisters. Ann Chap-
man, Lillian Cohen. Pearly Berlin, and
Jean Schults. all of Chicago, and Myrtle
Fox of Miami. Services were held
November 21 at Riverside.
SEGAL
Ida, 88, of North Miami Beach, coming
from Boston 20 years ago. passed away
November 18. She Is survived by
husband, David: sons, Perry and
Benjamin of Mlramar; daughter.
Blanche Kinsley of Milwaukee: sisters.
Lorraine Miller and Lena Miller of
Swampscott, MA; seven grandchildren;
and three great-grandchildren. Services
were held November 19 at Riverside.
KOPPLE, Frlttie, Miami Beach,
November 14. Rubln-Zllbert.
KURLANDER, Herman. 78. North
Miami Beach. November 12.
POST. Marlon. November 14. River-
side.
SCHATZBERG. Sara. Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert.
We Hope
You Never Need Us
But If You Do
Call Mrs. Evelyn Sarasohn
City Memorial
&Monument, Inc.
7610 Northeast 2nd Avenue
759-1669 ____
Jana Wiener, 45, resident of
Miami Beach, passed away. She
was founder of the Foundation
for the Preservation of Hazanut
and Preservation of Hebrew
Liturgical Music in Tel Aviv and
a member of Beth Torah Congre-
WIENER
Jana, 46. resident of Miami Beach, wife
of Halm, mother of Mlrtt and DanU:
daughter of Jacob and Clla Barf.
Founder of the Foundation for the Pre-
servation of Hebrew Liturgical Music In
Tel Aviv, member of Beth Torah Con-
gregation. Contributions In her memory
may be made to CongregaUon Beth
Torah. Jana Wiener Memorial Fund.
Services were held November 19 at Riv-
erside Chapel with Interment at Lake-
aide Cemetery.
BRENNER
Dora. 83, a 19-year resident of Miami
Beach formerly of NY., passed away
November 17. She Is survived by son,
Joel Brenner; daughter, Fay Balmuth.
five grandchildren: two great-grand-
children: and brother, Joseph Frank.
Riverside was in charge of
arrangements.
KRAVITZ
Sarah E., 70, of Miami died November
17. She Is survived by her husband,
Harry; son, Morton of Philadelphia;
daughter, Marlene Rosenblatt; brother.
Jack Manhoff; and three grand
children. She was a member of Temple
Beth El for 40 years. Funeral services
were held November 8 at Riverside
Chapel.
vAY, Molse, 88, November 7. Riverside.
ECKSTEIN. Ruth.93, November 11.
SHORE. Jeanette Paul, 82. November
11. Riverside.
ELIAS. Benjamin. North Miami,
November 12. Blaaberg.
SCHULTZ. Abraham. Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert.
GREENBERG. Dora. North Miami
Beach, November 12.
S1LVERMAN, Harry. Miami Beach.
November 19. Rubln-Zllbert.
KURZBAN, Samuel B., North Miami
Beach. November 21. Riverside.
TANNEY, Samuel. Blaaberg-
JACOBS. Lillian, Miami, November 21.
Rubln-Zllbert.
KORNFELD, Harry A.. 76. North
Miami Beach, November 22.
ROSENBERG, Milton. Miami Beach.
November 28. Blaaberg
FABRTTZKY. Elizabeth. Miami Beach,
November 19. Rubln-Zllbert. Mt.
Nebo.
YANOWITZ, Minnie Krovetz. 78,
November 19. Gordon
KASMAN, Bessie, Nortn Miami Beach,
November 23.
VEVITAN. Sarah, 98. North Miami
Beach, November 22.
BERGER. Murylln A., 60, Surfalde,
November 19. Riverside.
BERMAN. William, November 19.
Blaaberg.
MEZRAHI, Samuel N.. Miami Beach.
November 10, Rubln-Zllbert.
gation.
She was the wife of Haim,
mother of Mirit and Dania,
daughter of Jacob and Cila Sarf.
Services were held Nov. 19 at
Riverside Chapel.
Alterman, Beth
David Director
David Alterman, 71, executive
vice president of Alterman
Transport Lines, died November
22 at his Coral Gables home.
He was a resident of Dade
County for 35 years and was a
director of the Hialeah Miami
Springs Rotary Club and Beth
David Synagogue. Earlier this
year, he was named Man of the
Year by Traffic World Magazine.
He is survived by wife, Lucille;
son, Roy; daughter, Diana
Hatcher; a brother and a sister;
and two grandchildren.
Services were held on Nov-
ember 24 at Beth David Synago-
gue. Interment followed at Star
of David Cemetery.
LESMIN
Manya, a Miami Beach resident for 86
years coming from Chicago, died
November 22. She was the aunt of Saily
and Lou Levitt, Marlon Freedman.
Jerome Sklar, Roslyn and Lawrence
Pressner, Walter Sklar. and many
great-nieces and nephews and a 0MW
Sreat-nlece. Services were held
ovember 28 at Blaaberg Chapel.
FOX. Stanley. 76. Miami. November M.
Riverside.
GUTMAN, Rose. North Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert.
ROSS, Maynard B.. 89, North Miami.
November 24. Riverside. Mt. Nebo.
SITTENFELD. Edith
SOHMER. Rubin. Miami Beach.
November 24. Rubln-Zllbert.
FOGEL, Minnie. Miami Beach,
November 12. Rubln-Zllbert.
HERZ, Kill.-. 87, Miami Beach,
November 14. Gordon.
HOCHMAN. George, 80, Miami,
November 14. Riverside.
mki.nick, Abraham. Miami Beach.
Rubln-Zllbert.
OPPENHEIM, Ida G., Miami Beach,
November 16. Riverside. Star of
David.
ROSEN, Dr. Maurice S., Miami Beach.
November 14 Rubln-Zllbert.
BERDUGO. Isaac. Miami Beach.
November 12. Riverside.
BLOCK, Edward, North Miami,
November 12. Blaaberg.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
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Broward County
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538*6371 No Money In Advance 456*4011


i iic ucRisu r lunuiou/ i uunv, iiuvemuer zo, ivoz
THE FLORIDA FRIENDS OF
YESHIVA UNIVERSITY
IS PROUD TO PRESENT
ITS FIRST ANNUAL
OUR TIMES
SEMINAR SERIES
Wednesday, December 1st
"American/Israeli Relations Today"
Speaker: Dr. Erich Goldhagen
Dr. Erich Goldhagen, a lecturer at Harvard Uni-
versity's Associate Harvard Russian Research Cen-
ter, is best known for his research at the Center
for the Prosecution of Nazi Crimes.
The teshiva University graduate served as a
consultant on European affairs to both the Ameri-
can Committee and the president of the World
Jewish Congress during the 1960s. Dr. Goldhagen
is in the process of writing a book entitled The
Genocidal Mind, adding to his long list of books
and articles already published.
Monday January 3rd
"Introduction to Jewish Medical Ethics''
Speaker: Dr. Fred Rosner
Dr. Fred Rosner is the director of medicine at the
Queens Hospital Center in New York and professor
of medicine at the State of New York University at
Stony Brook. A graduate of Yeshiva University's
Monday February 7th
Who Shall Live And Who Shall Die''
Speaker: Rabbi J. David Bleich
Rabbi J. David Bleich is a professor of Talmud at
Yeshiva University and a professor of Jewish law
Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Dr. Rosner has
written about and lectured extensively on hema-
tology, Jewish medical ethics, Jewish medicine and
Jewish medical history.
He has co-authored (along with Rabbi J. David
Bleich, the third seminar speaker) the widely-ac-
claimed book on Jewish medical ethics entitled,
Jewish Bio-Ethics.
and ethics at the University's Cordozo School of
Law. In addition to collaborating with Dr. Fred Ros-
ner (the second seminar speaker) on the book
Jewish Bio-Ethics, Rabbi Bleich is also the sole
author and editor of many books and publications
on Jewish law and ethics.
Monday March 7th
"Jewish Mysticism-Secrets Of Our Times''
Speaker: Rabbi Benjamin Blech
Rabbi Benjamin Blech, assistant professor of
Yeshiva University's James Striar School of General
Jewish Studies, has given more than 100 talks
across the U.S., Israel and Europe. He received the
1971 coveted "Outstanding American Educator
award in recognition of his far-reaching efforts and
influence worldwide. In addition. Rabbi Blech has
served on many committees since he became or-
dained in 1956 at the Rabbi Isaac Elchanan Theo-
logical Seminary at Yeshiva University.
FLORIDA FRIENDS OF YESHIVA UNIVERSITY composed
of graduates and non-graduates alike supports the New
York-based University in appreciation of the many skilled
and talented graduates that return to serve the South Florida
community
Founded in 1886, Yeshiva University is the oldest and largest
university under Jewish auspices and has always operated
under the philosophy that a great educational institution can-
not stand apart from its environment. It is firmly committed
to advancing the well-being of the Jewish community and the
nation using all resources available.
In keeping with that tradition, the Florida Friends of Yeshiva
University is proud to bring the University's resources closer
to the South Florida community through the "Issues Of Our
Times" seminar series.
ALL SEMINARS ARE FREE OF CHARGE AND OPEN TO
THE PUBLIC. Each begins promptly at 8 p.m. at the Konover
Hotel (5445 Collins Ave., Miami Beach). Special provisions for
parking will be arranged.
FOR RESERVATIONS or more information on the first
annual "Issues of Our Times" seminar series, please contact.
Mr. Chaim H. Friend
Director of Development-Southeastern Region
Florida Friends of Yeshiva University
"Issues Of Our Times" Seminar Series
220 71st Street, Suite 212
Miami Beach. Florida 33141
(305)861-3365
SEMINAR SERIES COMMITTEE
Rabbi Yaakov Sprung (Chairman)*
Ms. Sneryl Bellman*
Rabbi Edward Davis*
Comm. Sy Eisenberg
Dr. Philip Frost*
Mr. Mauncio Gluck*
Mr. E. Peter Goldnng
Mr. Leo Hack
Rabbi Warren Kasztl*
Rabbi Barry Konovitch*
Dr. Max Upschitz*
Dr. Randy Makovsky*
Rabbi Menachem Raab*
Judge Steven D Robinson
Comm. Barry Schreiber*
Dr. Josepn A Singer*
Dr. Edward N. SmoJer*
Dr. Charles Sprung
Dr. Charles Weiss*
Mrs. Charles Weiss
Mr. Marvin Zalis
Dr. Matthew Zuckerman
Mrs. Matthew Zuckerman
alumni of Yeshiva


1MB
November 1982
4Wlicit we are
true to Israel
we are true
to ourselves/
General Alexander
M. Halg, Jr.
Campaign
Opening Dinner
December 2,1982
BE THERE
Supplement to the Jewieh Floridinn, Section C. November 26.1982


Page 2
Federation, November, 1982
Contents
This material was prepared for
The Jewish Florldlan supplement
November 26,1982 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Blscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida SS137
president
Norman H. Upoff
Executive vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Public Relations committee
Eli Timoner
CAMPAIGN PAGEl
Hundreds of prominent members of the Greater Miami J i u
munity will attend the Campaign Opening Dinner wihTtTCOln"
Alexander M. Haig, Jr. lin ^eral
Or Akiva. Miami's twin city in Israel through Project Renewal
a new dental clinic. ^
YOUNG ADULTS I
DIVISION PAGE 4
YAD undertakes its most ambitious effort ever on behalf of th 100
CJA-IEF Campaign. w 1983
Young singles gather and learn during a weekend "Advance1
Duck Key.
SUPER SUNDAY
event at
PAGE 5
Super Sunday promises to be the greatest single community outreach
effort ever held on behalf of the CJA-IEF Campaign.
MISSIONS PAGE 6
The recent Community Mission to Israel experiences the excitement
and atmosphere of the Promised Land.
FEDERATION HOUSING/ j
HIGH SCHOOL
IN ISRAEL PAGE 7
Senior citizens begin to move into the newly opened Federation
Gardens complex, the second Federation-sponsored facility of its kind
The High School in Israel offers a special Adult Course, which offers a
unique study experience in Israel.
SPECIAL ISRAEL
EMERGENCY FUND PAGES 8 & 9
Meet some of the people who benefit from your support of the Special
Israel Emergency Fund.
SOVIET JEWRY
PAGE 10
Anatoly Shcharansky faces death in Soviet prison as he carries on a
lonely hunger strike.
The Women's Plea for Soviet Jewry will unite all Jewish women's
organizations on behalf of refuseniks and prisoners of conscience.
WOMEN'S DIVISION
PAGE 11
A new Chazaka Program is initiated to encourage activity by women
in the work of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
The December 5 Lion of Judah Luncheon will pay special tribute to
women Pacesetters.
The Business and Professional Women draw a diverse group of par-
ticipants and address the special needs of working women.
FOUNDATION OF JEWISH
PHILANTHROPIES
PAGE 12
Timing can be extremely crucial in making your charitable contribu-
tion while yielding a 1982 tax deduction.
SOUTH DADE
PAGE 13
The South Dade Branch Advisory Committee reviews proposals about
the future needs and services to be offered.
The Jewish Vocational Service dedicates a new branch facility in
South Dade.
CAJE
The Central Agency for Jewish Education's library presents a series
of displays designed by local day school students.
Federation establishes a scholarship program to aid needy students
who wish to attend synagogue schools.
CALENDAR
PAGE 15

COUNCIL OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS
ssjr^.


Federation, November, 1982
Page 3
Campaign Opening Dinner
Generating Excitement
t,itement and anticipation are building as
of the most prominent members of the
" Miami Jewish community await the
So Opening Dinner of the 1983 Combined
J5 Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, which will
r^id on December 2 at the Fontainebleau-
on Hotel.
. neral Alexander M. Haig, Jr., the former
tary of State who has emerged as a highly
j advocate of the State of Israel, will be
note speaker at the dinner.
ticipants in the Campaign Opening Dinner
ke a minimum pledge of $1,000 to the 1983
li-IEF Campaign. Dinner Chairman Bunny
ler explained that the anticipated record at-
dance at this first event of the campaign year is
^ted to start the Jewish community's efforts
[behalf of social services at an all-time high,
(ting a trend for the remainder of the year.
^General Haig 9aid it best by stating, 'When we
true to Israel we are true to ourselves,' Adler
"We must be true to Israel by doing all we
j to preserve the human service programs that
r people so desperately need. Thousands of Jews
oughout the world are counting on our support.
at is why the success of the Campaign Opening
oner is so crucial."
\lso serving as coordinators of the dinner are
rangements Chairman Marcy Lefton, Program
airman Dorothy Podhurst, and Attendance and
pie Captains Chairman Steven Kravitz.
Jeffrey Lefcourt and Susan Helfman have
epted vice chairmanships of the dinner. Ser-
g as additional volunteers for attendance and
file captains are Elaine Ross, Joan Malin, Mitzi
nter, Elly Wolff, Jackie Traurig, Pat Feldman,
inette Aerenson, Marvis Schaecter, Adele
urence, Marlene Kohn, Lisa Sharf, Marlene
n. Debby Edelman, Hazel Cypen, Mary Rose
[plan and Wendy Kravitz. Additionally, 160
pie captains will be taking active part in the
npaign Opening Dinner.
t'We must maintain and let the world know of
r unity of purpose and concern for Israel and the
Table Captain Luncheon meetings for the Campaign Opening Dinner were held at Federation in order to
boost attendance for the event. Presently, there are over 160 table captains. Shown above are (standing
from left) Federation leaders: Dr. Robert Marlin, Robert Merlin, Fern Blum, (seated from left): Dorothy
Podhurst, Jeffrey Lefcourt.
Jewish people," said General Campaign Chairman
Aaron Podhurst. "A large turnout at the Cam-
paign Opening Dinner will make it clear that we,
the Jews of Greater Miami, are determined to
stand with our fellow Jews, now and always."
For more information and reservations about
the Campaign Opening Dinner, call Edyth Geiger
or Martin Barasch at Federation, 576-4000.
Or Akiva Gains New Dental Clinie
.he people of Or Akiva the Greater Miami
.wish Federation's Project Renewal community
I Israel have something to smile about. And
links to the new dental clinic the town now has,
I those smiles will show off healthier teeth.
Earlier this month, during a visit to Or Akiva
| the Federation's community mission, the new
Die was dedicated, a day that marked the intro-
tion of the finest in dental care to the com-
nity. Equipped with the most modern medical
oipment and staffed with professionals and
(lunteers trained in the latest techniques, the
facility promises to be a model in dental care
| the entire country.
[The old facility was the worst," said Edward
Mler, DDS, a Miami dentist who has been super-
ping the establishment of the new facility. "We
w have a spanking brand new facility. This
oic will have equipment better than my own of-
|The opening of the clinic and a day care center
f the latest direct investments by the Federa-
k in Or Akiva, one of 160 seriously distressed
ighborhoods that are being revitalized by
poject Renewal. Last year, the GMJF allocated
129,751 to Or Akiva, which is located one kilo-
Vter east of Caesarea, midway between Haifa
Edward Caller, DDS
and Tel Aviv. Project Renewal is designed to help
neighborhood residents plan and implement the
rev italization of their own communities.
-.it J
\Akiv
a s new dental clinic
A dentist for the past 30 years, Galler is a
charter member of American Dental Volunteers
for Israel, a New York City-based organization
that has been promoting dentistry in the Jewish
State. He first visited Or Akiva two years ago and
pointed out that the community has gone through
many positive changes, including upgraded utili-
ties, educational and social service programs.
Galler visited other dental facilities in Project
Renewal communities to assess their programs,
and he enlisted the assistance of Dr. Benjamin
Lappen, Project Renewal's liaison in Israel, to
help plan the clinic. Both of them found that the
need for improved dental care was a basic medical
need that had to be addressed.
"The people in Or Akiva were neglected for so
long this community needs this help so des-
perately, helping them makes you feel like a mil-
lion bucks," Galler said. "They are extremely
receptive to this kind of help."
In addition to the typical dental work that will
be performed at the clinic, which should be fully
operational by the spring, Galler pointed out that
it will educate residents about preventive mea-
sures in oral hygiene. He said the people of Or
Akiva, who primarily come from North Africa and
the Middle East, have no conception of simple
habits such as the brushing of teeth.
"We're going to put an American prevention
program in place that will be a model for the rest
of the country. In eight or nine years, they'll have
half the dental problems they have now."
Galler said there is a serious shortage of West-
ern trained dentists, and although the new clinic
will have a staff dentist, Galler and a coterie of fel-
low professionals drawn from Dental Volunteers
for Israel will donate their services to ensure the
best possible care.
"The town has improved so much in the past
couple of years I can't get over it," Galler said,
reflecting on what the future holds for Or Akiva.
"I'm really excited about this clinic because we're
doing something concrete, something you can see.
It's something that can be duplicated all through-
out Israel by communities like Or Akiva."


^^-,.~".
Page 4
Federation, November, 1962
YAD Intensifies 1983
Campaign Effort
Although it is still in its opening
stages, the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund is sure to get an
extra added boost this year due to the
strategies being put into practice by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
Young Adults Division (YAD).
'We must do whatever we
can to contact the thou-
sands of uncommitted
young Jews in the commu-
nity and bring them within
the fold of the committed.'
In order to generate a more successful
campaign, YAD is making every effort to
reach out to non-contributors in the
Greater Miami Jewish community and to
involve as wide a spectrum of young
people as possible through the formation
of a young business and professional
campaign. Last year, YAD raised nearly
$500,000 towards the Combined Jewish
Apeal-Israel Emergency Fund and,
judging from the pace which has evolved
to date, this year's campaign should in-
crease significantly.
"The focus of the campaign is to bring
in as many young people as possible,"
said YAD Campaign Chairman Louis
Berlin. "We must do whatever we can to
contact the thousands of uncommitted
young Jews in the community and bring
them within the fold of the committed."
Young Singles
'Advance' During
Educational Event
More than 65 young singles participated in an
intensive learning and social experience during the
Fifth Annual Weekend Advance of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Young Adult Division
held at the Indies Resort Marina.
"We call it an advance, instead of retreat, be-
cause we plan to move forward," explained event
chairman Susan Berger. "That was the true spirit
of the weekend."
The program incorporated a series of discus-
sions led by scholar-in-residence Rabbi Norman
Lipson, director of Jewish studies for the Central
Agency for Jewish Education, and companionship
of new friends who participated in numerous
leisure activities at the Duck Key resort.
Lipson's discussions dealt with the topic "It's
Hard to Be a Jew! But Is It Really?" and involved
sessions about Jewish poetry, humor and other
facets of heritage and religion.
The recreational activities included a barbeque,
trips, communal meals and other events of in-
terest.
"The object of the annual advance is to encour-
age young Jews to become closer by sharing a
very positive experience," said YAD Chairman
Bob Merlin. "We hope that this experience will
provide participants with the opportunity to meet
new people and become more acquainted and in-
volved with Federation and the Young Adults Di-
vision."
For information about upcoming events of the
Young Adult Division, contact Milton Heller at
Federation, 576-4000, extension 284.
The YAD campaign got off to a flying
start during the summer months, Berlin
pointed out, on the United Jewish Ap-
peal Singles Mission to Israel. Seventy
people from Miami went on the trip, the
largest single delegation on the mission,
and they pledged a total of $80,000.
"It was an absolutely phenomenal in-
crease; last year the figure was $30,000,"
Berlin said.
On the heels of such a positive begin-
ning, a system was devised through the
new young business and professional ef-
fort to reach as many new people as
possible, well beyond the current mailing
list of 1,200 names. Berlin said the YAD
ranks were split up according to in-
dividuals' occupations, and members are
going to solicit new people within their
respective professions.
"In the past, there was no carefully
organized attempt to get new people in-
volved," Berlin explained. "What we're
doing now is working to identify the new
young people we can approach."
The YAD steering committee members
have, on the average, doubled their gifts
this year, Berlin said. "It has taken the
lead for setting the pace of the campaign.
We challenge the rest of the Federation
to do the same."
In the coming weeks, YAD will J
represented by about 50 people at Z\
Campaign Opening Dinner, an event that
requires a $1,000 minimum gift to tkl
CJA-IEF to attend. On December l3
Grove Isle, YAD will sponsor an Advan.'
ce Gift Reception for young business and!
professional people. There will be a $3ri;|
minimum gift per person or couple to the
CJA-IEF required to attend this func
tion.
The YAD steering commit-
tee members have, on the
average, doubled their gifts]
this year, Berlin said.
Other upcoming events include I
another singles mission to Israel, leaving
December 26. YAD is also enlisting
people to help staff the phones on Super
Sunday, the CJA-IEF's massive phon-
athon on behalf of human services for I
world Jewry.
Other key leadership in the YAD cam-1
paign include YAD Chairman Robert
Merlin, and Debbie Oltchik and Susan
Sirotta, who are heading the Super Sun-1
day effort.
For more information on these or any
other YAD activities, please contact Milt
Heller at Federation's YAD office, 576- J
4000.
Miguel Assor with his father, Issac
A young man recently took his first
step into adulthood by proving his
commitment to Jews in need throughout
the world. Miguel Assor recently sent a
check representing 10 percent of his Bar
Mitzvah gifts to the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
In sending his gift, Miguel indicated
his particular concern for humanitarian
services in Israel and explained that he
pledged to submit the funds to the 1983
CJA-IEF on the day of his Bar Mitzvan.
"When we received your check and
your note I knew that you must be a very
considerate and caring young man.
wrote 1983 CJA-IEF General Campaig^
Chairman Aaron Podhurst in response
Miguel's gift. "I feel that your paren
must have taught you well the concept
tzedakah."


Federation, November, 1982
Super Sunday: Bigger
and Better than Ever
Page 5
/

* v*
lydia Goldring
Frances B. Levey
David Rosenbaum
Gerald K. Schwartz
Super Sunday, the Combined Jewish Appeal-
llsrael Emergency Fund's massive outreach
(program on behalf of human services for world
Ijewry, will be bigger and better than ever this
year. This important event, to be held at Temple
Israel of Greater Miami, is expected to heighten
ommunity involvement in the campaign and the
Challenges facing Jews across the globe.
Many more organizations, agencies and
Ivnagogues will be involved in the coordination
nd activities of Super Sunday, which will be
aking place from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Among the
irganizations and agencies serving on the Super
Sunday executive committee are B'nai B*rith
louth Organization, B'nai B'rith Men, B'nai
p'rith Women. Pioneer Women. Central Agency
or Jewish Education. High School in Israel,
Coung Judea. Mount Sinai Medical Center,
University of Miami Hillel, Jewish Association
wving Singles. Jewish Vocational Service,
Jladassah, Community Chaplaincy Service,
Jewish High School of South Florida, Jewish
lunior High School of South Florida, Jewish War
leterans. Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for
the Aged, National Council of Jewish Women and
ORT.
The 12-hour event will be catered by the Jewish
Vocational Service Kosher Kitchen program.
The event's Expo Center, which features
displays and demonstrations by Jewish
organizations and agencies, also promises to
provide a wider range of ongoing programs in
Greater Miami, offering a graphic display of the
Jewish community's unity of purpose and con-
cern.
Prominent celebrities, political leaders and per-
sonalities also will be participating in the Super
Sunday schedule of events. Among those expected
to join the activities are Senator Lawton Chiles
and Congressmen Dante Fascell and William Leh-
man.
One new area of emphasis is the participation of
Jewish youth organizations which have been
approached to provide their maximum in-
volvement. Youth group members will have made
their commitments to the 1983 CJA-IEF Cam
paign prior to Super Sunday and will take active
part in the program.
"On Super Sunday, we reach out to our fellow
Jews in Greater Miami, by appealing to their
sense of generosity and the traditional Jewish
values of caring for our brothers and sisters
worldwide," said General Campaign Chairman
Aaron Podhurst. "The Jewish community has
been responsive in the past, but we are hoping
that our phone calls will be particularly productive
this year when the needs of our people are par-
ticularly great and the depth of our commitment
must be at its maximum."
More than 2,600 Super Sunday volunteers
raised $1.4 million for the 1982 CJA-IEF Cam-
paign. The chairmen of the 1983 event, Lydia
Goldring, Frances B. Levey, David Rosenbaum
and Gerald K. Schwartz, expect even greater
community participation to exceed all previous
Super Sunday accomplishments.
For more information about Super Sunday, call
576-4000, extension 278.
BE THERE. And bring a friend.
1983 Super Sunday
Executive Committee
Irene Baros
Tim Cohen
Maurice Donsky
Dr. Robert Ennis
Sid Fagin
Howard Feinberg
Pat Feldman
Abe Franklin
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Joel Friedland
Hope Fuller
Morris Futernick
Al Golden
Philip Goldin
Harriet Green
Alex Greenwald
Claire Greenwald
Gene Greenzweig
Leo Hack
Robbie Herskowitz
Kenneth Hoffman
Norma Jay
Phil Kates
Bruce Kaye
Rabbi Morris Kipper
Bruce Klasner
Kitty Levy
Norman Lipoff
Rabbi Norman Lipson
Ellen Mandler
Bluma Marcus
Penny Marlin
Aida Mitrani
Eli Mitrani
Monique O'Hayon
Deborah Oltchik
Sidney Olson
Terri Packar
Aaron Podhurst
Dianne Raulson
Rose Rice
Gerald Robins
Milton Samuels
William Saulson
Marvis Schaecter
Barbara Schwartz
Maxine Schwartz
Aley Sheer
Susan Sirotta
Vivian Smolarchik
Charlie Sokol
Guillermo Sostchin
George Spitzer
Brenda Stein
Susan Thomas
Eric Turetsky
Steven Weisberg
Harry Weitzer
SUPER SUNDAY
BE THERE.
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
137 N.E. 19 Street
Volunteer Registration Form
Name.
Address
City
.Zip Code.
_Phone_
I Will be Representing:
Youth Group ______
Synagogue _
Organization
GMJF Women's Division ----------------------------
On Super Sunday I Would Like To Be A:
( ) Phone Volunteer ( ) Non-Phone Volunteer
Please Indicate the Session(s) You Prefer:
( i 9 a.in. 12 noon
111 a.m. -2 p.m.
I ) 1 p.m. 4 p m. I ) 3 p.m.-6 p.m. I ) 5 p.m. 9 p.m.
Session Includes Registration & Training.
Return thi l form to:
Super Sunday
GMJF
4200Biscavn*PW
Miami. Florida 3b 137


Page 6
Federationn November, 1982

Community Mission Experiences
the Promised Land
An emotionally charged, intellectually
stimulated Community Mission to Israel returned
to Miami earlier this month after sharing a very
special group experience in the Promised Land.
The 92 mission participants spent 10 days
traveling throughout Israel, meeting the people
and learning about their lives, history, hopes and
aspirations. The program was chaired by Greater
Miami Jewish Federation leaders Marcy Lefton
and David Schaecter.
"This was, from a standpoint of participation
and involvement, one of our largest missions
ever," Schaecter said. "Being in Israel at this
particular time was very significant. Israelis arc
feeling the pain and sorrow of events in Lebanon,
and it was very important to have been there at
this time. It was an emotionally difficult, yet
exhilarating experience."
Most of the participants also traveled on a
three-day mini-mission to Czechoslovakia, which
provided special insight into a once-thriving
Jewish community, which suffered the
devastation of Hitlers murderous attack on the
Jewish people.
"The fact that genocide was perpetrated to that
extent throughout Czechoslovakia was so ap
parent because of the lack of Jews in a country
that was once home," mission participant Dr. Ted
Wolff said. "For those few Jews who remain, the
atmosphere is so repressive that it makes life
extremely difficult."
The Jewish population of Czechoslovakia has
shrunk from several million before World War II
to 10,000 today, most of whom are elderly. The
majority of the young Jews have become
assimilated.
Among the points of interest seen by the
mission participants in Czechoslovakia was a
museum of Jewish religious items that had been
collected by Hitler to show the artifacts of a
people he hoped to annihilate. Several of the
mission participants said they felt as though they
were viewing the last days of Judaism in that
country before the disappearance of all the Jews,
which they said probably will occur within the
decade.
"It was like hearing about the glory of Rome or
Greece, like hearing about some long dead
society," Lefton said. "It was treated like past
history, something that once was but is no more,
which in Czechoslovakia will soon be the case. We
saw the stark reality that Hitler did his job in
creating a Judenrein."
The mission then proceeded to Israel where the
entire group was united. One of the first stops was
to an absorption center in Beer Sheva, where
Falashas, black Jews from Ethiopia who had lived
under the most primitive conditions in that
country, were learning about life in a modern
society.
David Schaecter
"In this case, you're talking about taking
people from dark ages and bringing them into a
life in modern Tel Aviv," Lefton explains. "It's
like suddenly entering the 20th Century. It's a real
culture shock for them."
The mission also visited Or Akiva, the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Project Renewal
community which Miamians are helping to
develop into a modern community with funds
matched by the Israel government. The par-
ticipants saw a health clinic, daycare center and
dental clinic built with Miamians' support, and
enjoyed a performance presented by the children
of Or Akiva.
"It's one thing to give your money. It's quite
another to see the marvelous things they're doing
with it," said Robbie Herskowitz. "It gave people
an idea that what they're doing is really wor-
thwhile."
After crossing the border into Lebanon, the
participants saw the cities of Sidon, Tyre and
Nabatiya, and traveled to Beaufort Castle, which
had served as a launchpoint for PLO terrorist
attacks before the Israelis ousted the terrorists in
"Operation Peace for the Galilee." Several of the
mission members commented that their ob-
servations confirmed the lack of accurate in-
formation provided by the press in regard to the
Israeli military action and the care with which the
Israel Defense Forces pursued the defensive
Marcy Lefton
Community Mission participants depart for Israel from the Miami International airport.
action.
"The trip into Lebanon was fascinating," Wo
said. "The distinctions were extremely appa
in regard to the reports provided by the pressi
what we saw. There was a very dramatic
ference. There was visible evidence of the precisk
and care with which the Israelis carried out th
attacks. The people there were so glad to see us."
"It looked like business was carrying on i
usual in Lebanon," Herskowitz said. "Wet
with the people and saw what really took pla
Other highlights of the mission included visinj
to kibbutzim, hospitals, the excavation site and|
museum of the Dead Sea Scrolls, Tel Aviv i
other points of interest. The participants sharedil
moving experience atop the mountain fortress oil
Massada, where Jewish zealots fought valiantlyU|
hold off advancing ranks of Roman troops l
died with dignity rather than face enslavement!
The mission also spent Shabbat in Jerusalem,]
where they held services at the Western Wall i
visited various historical and modern sites.
"A large part of the trip had to do with the f
pie who shared a very special experience,"
skowitz explained. "Everyone was like brotha
and sisters. We all felt really close to
another."
In a demonstration of their convictions
support for Israel and the Jewish people.
mission participants pledged a total of $840,001
the 1983 Combined Jewish Appeallsn
Emergency Fund Campaign, representing
than a 50 percent increase above their combu
gifts last year.
"When you take people on a mission, the)1
the wonders, the problems and the pluses
Israel," Lefton said. "Nothing tells the story'
Israel better than a mission. Until you undersir
and see the dreams, you can't understand
reality. It gives you quite a perspective ol Je
history."
Some of the mission participants said they1
participated in previous missions and gauiea m
pleasure and inspiration from them that
decided to join this most recent trip.
"I'm very committed to the idea of missions'
the most direct and effective way of seeing;
experiencing Israel," said Wolff, who is aW" I
of Federation's Missions Steering Coitus j
"I've been on two other missions and eacn
come away with strong feelings." ^.
Other missions will be held throughout 1**. J
including the December 26 TOWI"
Mission, which offers a 10-day PJ"%
Israel. For more information about we
Singles Mission, contact Milton n* ^_
Federation. 576-4000, extension 2P4. r ^i
information about other missions cai
-Btttmrjerg: arc-woo, emmtoii 2W.


Federation, November, 1982
Page7
Senior Citizens Move into
Federation Gardens
Tenants are now moving into their new resi-
dences at Federation Gardens, the new 110-unit
South Dade apartment building providing subsi-
dized housing for the elderly which has opened
Igeveral months ahead of schedule, announced
Samuel I. Adler, president of Jewish Federation
| Housing, Inc.
The new apartment dwellings are located on a
Iseven-acre section of the 28-aere College Park
[Trust property owned by the Greater Miami Jew-
lish Federation, at the corner of 112th Avenue and
|S.W. 112th Street. Adler called the opening of
IFederation Gardens a major accomplishment
Iwhich illustrates Federation's commitment to
I supply affordable and secure housing to low-in-
Icome senior citizens of the Greater Miami com-
Imunity.
"These new apartments are based on the suc-
Icessful model of Federation Towers on Miami
iBeach," Adler noted. "Our senior citizens helped
[build our community into what it is today. It is
lour responsibility to help provide housing to those
[whose incomes would deny them a decent place to
llive."
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation's desire
Ito help provide adequate housing to the elderly
Iwas initially addressed by its Commission on the
Elderly, which created a task force several years
lago to study the problems facing the community's
[senior Jewish population. An outcome of the
study was Jewish Federation Housing, Inc., a
num-profit corporation formed to build and operate
IFederation Towers, the 11-story Miami Beach
building for the elderly which opened three years
go.
The living units in the new complex are all one-
bedroom, and ten units are designed to accommo-
date handicapped residents. On-site facilities in-
clude a library, lounge, crafts room, game room,
neeting room and a dining and social hall. Al-
though each apartment has a kitchen, there is also
i large central kitchen for the preparation of com-
nunal and holiday meals.
"As delighted as we are about the opening of
Federation Gardens, we are sorry that so many
ople could not get an apartment; we received
bver 700 requests for the 110 units," Adler said.
['But we were very fortunate to have the leader-
ship capable of expanding our housing resources.
Ve are grateful, too, for the assistance of a federal
housing and Urban Development Department
oan. Federation Gardens will give our seniors a
ow-cost and secure living environment and an op-
ortunity to take advantage of a rich social and
kultural life."
Ruth Garfinkle and her daughter Gail are shown the blueprints of the new Federation Gardens complex
Federation Information and Referral Service Director Martha Cohen.
Kow Is
the Time
There has never been a more important time to
pay your pledge to the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund. Israel faces a severe
fiscal crisis, threatening the fabric of life of its
handicapped, infirm, needy, elderly, youth and
families. Humanitarian service programs in
Greater Miami and Jewish communities through-
out the world are faced with major cuts in funding
due to faltering national economies. Now is the
tune for us to BE THERE for hundreds of
thousands of our fellow Jews who need us.
CJA-IEF Cash Chairman Harry A. (Hap) Levy
has stressed the importance of an immediate
influx of cash to support vital services for Jews at
home and abroad.
Additionally, he explained that regulations of
the U.S. Internal Revenue Service require that
outstanding payments be received by the CJA-
JEF Campaign or be postmarked no later than
December 31, 1982 to qualify for 1982 tax
deductions. All payments postmarked after
December 31 will be received as 1983 payments,
Levy said.
"It is personally advantageous and important
to thousands of our brothers and sisters world-
**M that pledges be redeemed now," Levy said.
I he result of prompt payments will be the
!2n*7)-ofai of the Greater Miami Jewish
federation'8 role as the central agency of hope for
Jews in need. The need for our commitment has
never been greater."
Adult Course Offers
a Learning Experience
You're never too old to learn more about your
Jewish heritage. That's the approach taken by the
Hijrh School in Israel Adult Course, which offers
22-day educational experiences in Israel.
"The program is exciting, emotional and ex-
tremely entertaining, along with being a learning
experience," said Gloria Friedman, chairman of
the High School in Israel Adult Course. "It
utilizes the excellent permanent staff of our high
school program, which is based at the Mosenson
Regional High School located in Hod Ha'Sharon,
15 miles northeast of Tel Aviv."
In addition to a session of the Adult Course that
departed for Israel earlier this month, another trip
has been scheduled from April 24 through May 16.
Program participants are housed at the Dan
Hotel, a five-star facility in Tel Aviv used as a de-
parture point for the many field trips and activi-
ties offered.
The trip proceeds in chronological order of Jew-
ish history, beginning with discussions about
Abraham at Tel Gezer, the home of the founding
father of the Jewish faith.
"We see the destroyed palaces, we see the
historical sites and we are taken to the original
points upon which our cultures evolved,"
Friedman said. "We have to know where we've
been to know where we're going. We have to know
who we are as a people to be prominent in the
community and understand what we strive to
become."
Among the subjects studied along the course of
the program are history, culture, philosophy, psy-
chology, and archaeology, she said. The program
allows time to "touch base with Israeli relatives"
and includes participants from cities throughout
the United States.
Program participants must be in good general
health, Friedman said, noting that a large per-
centage of the trips involve walking.
"You really have to walk through and touch
many of these places to truly experience them,"
she explained.
One prominent event that will take place during
the April program will be the dedication of the
Harvey and Gloria Friedman Dormitory and the
Harry and Ruth Wohl Dormitory on the Mosen-
son Campus. In addition to Gloria Friedman's
involvement in the Adult Course, her husband, a
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Board of Direc-
tors member and Special Gifts chairman, is a
former president of the High School in Israel pro-
gram. Thus, they are being honored through the
dedication of the new dormitory facility, which
will house 40 students.
Another new feature of the adult trip will be an
advanced course for persons who already have
participated in the basis course. Gloria Friedman
explained that prior to the initiation of the ad-
vanced course, adults were limited to one-time
participation in the overall course.
For more information about the Adult Course,
contact the High School in Israel Office at 576-
3286.



Page 8
Federation, November, 1982

Peter's Story
By JOAN SILBERSTEIN
HAIFA, Israel It is 10 o'clock at night
when I meet Peter Bech. Thin. Sun Tanned.
Gloriously healthy looking.
Except that he is lying in a bed in a room in
Rambam Hospital.
One of 1000 young Israeli soldiers, together
with Lebanese civilians and even Syrian and
PLO prisoners, who were treated at Rambam
in the first 30 days of Operation Peace for
Galilee the mission to free northern Israel
from 14 years of PLO katuysha attacks,
ambushes, physical and psychological terror-
ism.
Peter Bech, a paratrooper, did not para-
chute into southern Lebanon. He entered by
land, in a convoy of Zeldas, armored person-
nel carriers.
'I was hit and I dived out of
it, the way you'd dive off a
board into a swimming
pool. I couldn't walk or
run, so I just rolled away,
as far as I could, about
10-15 meters. It happened
so fast.'
"Outside of Sidon," he says, "we went
through a village. Not so little. Quite a large
place, very long and narrow. It was a pretty
place. The people came out to welcome us.
They threw rice, for good luck. My friends
and I, we were standing up in the back of our
Zelda, out in the open from the waist up. We
were moving slowly and sometimes had to
stop for a moment. We could see their faces
and they were talking to us, but we couldn't
understand them. We could see their eyes,
though, we made some kind of contact with
them. They would smile. We would smile. We
gave chocolates to the children.
"Ten meters after we passed through the
end of that village, out on a dirt road, we were
ambushed by terrorists. We got hit by RPGS,
portable anti-tank rockets. Our Zelda caught
fire. I was hie and I dived out of it, the way
you'd dive off a board into a swimming pool. I
couldn't walk or run, so I just rolled away, as
far as I could, about 10-16 meters. It hap-
pened so fast. Every man tried to save
himself. There was a lot of shooting and
smoke and the Zeldas started to explode.
"I found myself alone in a field, a dry field,
with an orchard on one side. Both my hands
were hit. There were bullet holes. My bones
were sticking out. I got hit in the shoulder,
too. There was a lot of blood. An RPG is
meant to destroy a tank, so think what it does
to a man. I had my gun on me, but I couldn't
move my hands to get it. They're going to
find me and kill me, I thought, and I tried to
pull out a grenade, but I couldn't use my
hands. I was just lying there. I saw half of
one foot was gone. It was two o'clock on a
sunny afternoon and I was scared I would die.
"It was a cold scene. Very cold and
strange. After maybe 20 minutes, my friend
Shimshom crawled out under fire and came to
me. They got me, I told him. They got me
really hard. I can see it, he said. 'I'll get
help.' After a while, four guys came with a
stretcher and carried me out. They took me
and some others back to the edge of that
village we'd just come through. At least we
weren't out in the open there and that's where
I got my first medical treatment. Then they
drove us to some spot where a helicopter
could land and the helicopter came and
brought us here to Rambam Hospital."
I don't know what to say or do when Peter
stops talking. He's not crying, but I am, I
fiddle with my tape recorder to hide my face
from him. Offer him a cigarette, light it for
him and one for me. We smoke in silence for a
moment. I keep seeing Peter Bech's five good
toes on a dirt road somewhere, without the
rest of him.
"You don't seem to be angry," I finally
say. "Why aren't you angry?" Incredibly,
Peter smiles.
"I was one of the lucky ones. Very, very
lucky. Just in our Zelda, of the eight of us,
seven were wounded. One was killed. I'm not
religious. But I believe that for a Jew, Israel
is the only place. When I came here from
Vienna, I went to kibbutz. I worked with the
animals, helping the veterinarian. I worked
on the land. That's how I learned what it is to
be an Israeli, to feel what life is all about here,
to become part of it.
"I'm not angry at Israel or at anybody be-
cause I'm not 100 percent anymore. It's part
of the price we have to pay. No one lives here
without going through the bad times, the
hard times."
What makes it worth it to Peter all he
went through, all he still has in front of
him. ?
4I'm not angry at Israel oj
at anybody because \\
not 100 percent anymore
It's part of the price wi
have to pay.'
He searches for the right words. Then:
"It's a question of standards," he says
you're born here, or if you come to live heret
I did, then you have to give as much as yo,
can to make it better here. Stronger. Even!
you're a student and you come for th
summer, if you work in the fields, in th
orange groves, you give something.
Israel gives to you. Everyone changes here, L
a good way I think. It's a simple, hardbu
very beautiful way of life. And young
like me, who give our feet, the guy in the I
behind you, who is blind now because heL
his eyes we're Jewish. That's what w]
have to give to have a country of the Jews."
Peter Bech stops talking. It is nearly i
night. He is tired. But he has transfer
something to me. Strengthened me. He is;
force for life. Jewish life.
Peter Bech, an immigrant to Israel from Vienna, receives care at Rambam Hospital in Haifa, Israel m
released from Rambam, he must undergo further surgery and a long rehabilitation process before he r
return to his kibbutz and his work as an assistant to a veterinarian.
1 ,t "^H^^^^^K ^^_
y -
w
m *^f|g?-
Sara and Aryeh find dignity, employment and shared'
perience in the Hameshakem Sheltered Workshop mJt
salem. The program's nationwide staff of 200 caT's'i
more than 6,000 disabled persons. The program isfuna*>
in part through the Special Israel Emergency Fund.


Federation, November, 1982
Page 9
Sow More Than EverThe Case for 1983
You can make a difference in the lives of Jews in
Israel. The handicapped, the infirm, the elderly, the
young, they all count on support provided through the
Special Israel Emergency Fund, a one-time effort to
help Jews in need at this time of financial crisis in
Israel.
By supporting the Special Israel Emergency Fund,
in addition to your Regular Campaign gift, you are
aiding a full range of humanitarian services that might
otherwise face severe cutbacks or terminations.
These are just two descriptions of services affected
by your Special Israel Emergency Fund gift. There are
thousands of other persons in Israel who also are coun-
ting on you.
"There Are Jews in All My Songs"
By JOAN SILBERSTEIN
IjERUSALEM, ISRAEL At 10 o'clock
l a Thursday morning, an ordinary work-
liy I enter a factory. Within half an hour, I
I as if I am in a synagogue. Because of the
tging. Because of the loud brave, sad songs
[Jewish men and women who carry our col-
tive history in their voices.
[Picture this room, a large, bare open floor.
lore than 150 physically, emotionally or
jentally handicapped people are seated at
k tables. Six to a table. Four. One. All
s. In all conditions. One thing in common:
ley need help.
mere are Jews in all my
pngs,' Sara says. And in
er songs, I hear a parade
them pass by, from
[OOO years ago, from
lay, crossing the snows
Russia, the severe moun-
ts of Turkey. Walking
Israel.
[Like them, another 6,300 Jews are cared for
pughout Israel in Hameshakem sheltered
prkshops for rehabilitation of the handi-
PPed. It costs $14.8 million annually for
*c maintenance of these programs, includ-
**5.5 million in subsidies from the Jewish
*cy. These funds do not cover the cost of
'construction, purchase of new machinery
tuning of specially qualified technical
[The people I see before me are all busy. But
Twhat?
I By hand, they are making file folders. Sold
In!? ^overnment of Israel, to the Ministry
IDefense. Two hundred thousand a month,
nth in and month out. Not a very dazzling
"Ration, but useful.
begin to walk past the work tables. A
toan smiles, inviting me into her life.
Who is this woman?
I ^ra," she tells me. An immigrant from
ussia. Her hair is dark, her eyes spark when
* tells me that for 15 years she was a singer
Russian television. She does not mention
1 plue numbers on her arm, from a concen-
Wlon camp The other details spill out one
after the other. In her 40's. Divorced. Three
children. A daughter in school. Two sons in
combat in Operation Peace for the Galilee.
And she, Sara. Why is she here in this shel-
tered workshop, Hameshakem? High blood
pressure. A heart condition. Battered nerves.
She lacks the physical stamina to put in an
eight-hour day, five and a half days a week in
the competitive, open market. Here, she
works from 7:30 in the morning till 1 in the af-
ternoon, with half an hour break for tea. She
receives National Insurance, a pension,
medical insurance and a salary of about 80
cents an hour. Subsidized, all of it.
Why does she not sing on Israeli television?
There is no place for her not on the one
and only channel Israel has.
Well, then, will she sing for me and let me
record her voice on my tape recorder?
Yes, Sara will sing. In Russian. Bucharin.
Georgian. Uzbeki. Turkish. -x
But where, in a sheltered workshop, with-
out disrupting the work of 150 others?
In Jerusalem, anything is possible. We
walk out behind Hameshakem, to stand in a
stoney little alleyway between two buildings.
"There are Jews in all my songs," Sara
says. And in her songs, I hear a parade of
them pass by, from 2,000 years ago, from to-
day, crossing the snows of Russia, the severe
mountains of Turkey. Walking to Israel. I
hear Jews, singing. Surviving.
When we return to the workshop, Sara asks
that I play my tape back for her. Mr. Pesler,
Israel Director General of Hameshakem, and
Mr. Veeder, Jerusalm Regional Director, join
us and indulge this request.
Sara's song fills the room. Like a magnet,
her music pulls others to her table. They are
from many countries, some wearing the
flowered summer dresses or striped pajama-
like trousers and shirts of Arab lands from
which they came, some in the heavy wool
pants, sweaters and peaked workmen's caps
of Eastern Europe.
There is a spontaneous outpouring of joy.
Two dozen men and women come to sing with
Sara, to dance and sway and snap their fin-
gers even to send out the high ululating wad
of the North African and Far Eastern Jews.
Their smiles are so real, their mouths so bril-
liantly proud with gold teeth that I forget
where I am, in a room where every person is
hurting.
Unexpectedly, from behind, a man taps me
on the shoulder. A short man, about 60,
wanting something very badly.
"Please," he says, "I want to sing the Kol
Nidreforyou."
In Jerusalem, anything is possible. Even
this most somber, this holiest of holy songs
can be sung in the middle of a sheltered work-
shop where the work of the day is making file
folders.
'After Auschwitz, only I
was left. When I came to
Israel, I .got married. For
26 years we were together.
Then my wife became para-
lyzed and six years later,
she died.'_________________
Aryeh and I retreat to a storage room.
There are grey metal shelves ranked along the
walls, boxes stored all along their length and
height. We stand in an aisle, facing each
other. Aryeh plants his feet firmly on the bare
floor. He strikes a proud stance that makes
him taller.
"I was a cantor," he tells me. "In Hun-
gary. Before the war. Before Auschwitz. I
used to love the land, I was a gardener, too.
But then I started having trouble with my
kidneys. It was from lying in the snow, in the
rain. My mother, my father, they didn't sur-
vive. After Auschwitz, only I was left. When
I came to Israel, I got married. For 26 years
we were together. Then my wife became
paralyzed and six years later, she died. Since
then, away from here, sometimes I feel I'm
left alone, alone like a fly on the wall."
Without another word, Aryeh begins to
sing the Kol Nidre. And, through his singing,
connects himself to his past, when he was
young and there was Redemption. Like Sara,
who sang for me just now in the alleyway, he
becomes a Jew in all his pride and glory. The
singing pours through the empty storage
room and through me.
And into the workshop. The dancing fades
away. The tape recorder is turned off. Sara
comes to the doorway of the storage room and
stands listening. Behind her, other faces
gather.
Still flushed with the joy of their dancing.
But quiet now, reflecting the slower cadence
of sorrows past and pride emergent. Listen-
ing. Remembering. Sharing hurt and
healing.
No, Aryeh is not alone like a fly on the wall.
Not here, at Hameshakem.


Page 10
Federation, November, 1982
Speak Out for Shcharansky
On Yom Kippur eve, Soviet Prisoner of Con-
science Anatoly Shcharansky began an indefinite:
hunger strike in the notorious Chistopol Prison to'
protest against an official blockade of his mail and
visits by his family. No one has heard from
Shcharansky since January, and his mother Ida
Milgrom has been turned away twice from at-.
tempts to see him at the prison in April and July.
Mrs. Milgrom stated, "In January when I last
saw him, he looked like a virtual skeleton. A long
fast means inevitable death. I don't think he will
survive."
After hearing the news about her son's hunger
strike. Mrs. Milgrom met with two prison
authorities, charging them with responsibility for
Anatoly'8 deteriorated physical condition and
holding them morally responsible for his hunger
strike. At that point, the authorities told her that
they would not let Shcharansky die.
Shcharansky, a mathematician and chess
master, had become the unofficial spokesman of
the Jewish emigration movement in the USSR
until his arrest on March 15, 1977. On July 4,
1974, he married his beloved A vital. The following
day, she was forced out of the Soviet Union and
has not seen her husband since. She is now living
in Jerusalem where she spends every waking
moment working for Anatoly's release.
After Shcharansky was arrested for "treason"
in 1977, he was held incommunicado for sixteen
months, and ultimately sentenced in July 1978 to
thirteen years of forced labor in camps and exile.
In 1981 alone, he spent over half the year in
solitary confinement and prison cells.
In a statement by A vital, she said: "Jews
around the world have fasted for one day, Yom
Kippur, but Anatoly has begun an unlimited
hunger strike to protest against his complete
isolation from the outside world. Because of his
deteriorating health and appeals to the Kremlin to
no avail, he decided to declare a hunger strike."
On September 27, State Department
spokesman Alan Rom berg declared: "We wish to
emphasize how thoroughly we deplore the Soviet
authorities' desperate decision. We call on Soviet
authorities to reconsider their treatment of Mr.
Shcharansky and restore his ability to be allowed
to communicate with friends and relatives."
Anatoly's former prisonmate Joseph Men-
delevich, now living in Israel, describes a hunger
strike in a Soviet Prison.
A hunger strike formally begins when a prisoner
conveys a declaration of his intention to strike to
the prison authorities. The prison director calls in
the prisoner and declares that the Soviet regime
does not recognize such an act, and thus it is
illegal. "You're allowed to not eat as much as you
want," he explains, "but we must carry out our
obligations to give you food according to
regulations."

Anatoly Shcharansky
Despite the inmate's refusal to eat, guards
bring food to the cell, so the sight of it will
stimulate him. They deliberately keep the hunger
striker with other prisoners who are eating as
usual so they can say, "how do we know if you're
hunger-striking or not? We're serving food as
usual. Your rations are right next to you." The
prison authorities show total lack of concern for
the issues for which the prisoner is hunger
striking. They seek only to persecute the prisoner
and convince him to give up.
The next step is official disinterest in the
hunger strike, and the accusation that this is an
anti-Soviet act warranting criminal punishment.
Because he is so weak, the hunger striker cannot
work. He's then accused of refusing to work, and
can be incarcerated for 15 days in solitary con-
finement in a cement box with no bed, table or
window, and with only a hole in the floor for
sewage. After these measures, many hunger
strikers cannot withstand the physical and
psychological pressure and give up.
If the strike continues, a doctor eventually
comes to visit the prisoner, but any layman could
diagnose that the striker is on the verge of
exhaustion. The doctor's role here is not to help
but to exert additional psychological pressure. In
harshest terms, he describes how a hunger strike
harms all of one's internal vital organs. He i
this many times.
At this stage, the striker is isolated for I
entire day in a solitary confinement cell. He i3|
allowed to see friends, but KGB agents persi/
coming to intimidate him. Next comes a peria
total neglect. The hunger striker is led to belj
that the authorities consider him dead. Accon
to the regulations, biological deterioration hai
in, and artificial feeding must be implemente
the next stage.
The guards enter the cell, throw the prisona
the floor and put him in handcuffs, chains i
straightjacket. They force open his mouth ...
special instrument. The assault costs the pris
a few broken ribs and teeth. A tube is put in I
mouth with direct access to his stomach and 1 j
calories of liquid food is poured in. If the hui
striker stops the flow by pressing the tube i
his teeth, the tube is then shoved up his nose.
This type of feeding harms the
metabolism and causes painful headaches
stomach aches. As it is given between longbr..
it forces the prisoner to start his hunger sc
over again many times. This course of actio
much more painful than a continuous hti
strike, as the amount of food given at one fon
feeding is not enough to allow the body to I
ction. This form of artificial nutrition is a n
fierce, sophisticated form of torture. It is a tortj
that perpetrates serious degeneration of the 1
However, cases are known where, thanks I
public support, the hunger striker withsta
these hardships and reaches his objectives.
Shcharansky's situation has never been md
critical or desperate. He needs our suppoj
Demand that Ida Milgrom be allowed to visit!
son. Demand that Anatoly Shcharansky
allowed to join his wife in Israel.
Send letters to:
Ambassador Anatoly Dobrynin
Soviet Embassy
1125 16th Street, N.W.
Washington, D.C. 20036
Col Malofeyev (Chistopol Prison Director)
Uchr. 5110-1 UE
Moscow, USSR
Letters of support to:
President Reagan
White House
Washington, D.C. 20500
Anatoly Shcharansky
Chistopol Prison
Moscow, USSR
Secretary of State George Shultz
Department of State
Washington, D.C. 20520
Women's Plea for Soviet Jewry
Links Jewish Community
Greater Miami's annual Women's Plea for
Soviet Jewry, which displays the community-wide
support for efforts to halt Soviet goverment op-
pression of Jews, will be held on Friday, Dec. 10,
International Human Rights Day, at the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation building.
The event will be convened this year by the
Jewish War Veterans Ladies Auxiliary and co-
sponsored by all national and local Jewish
women's organizations. The program is scheduled
to begin at 9:30 a.m., with a full array of speakers
and discussions.
In keeping with the programmatic theme,
"Light Their Way to Freedom," students of the
Jewish High School of South Florida will perform
a Chanukah candle-lighting ceremony in honor of
Soviet Jewry, refuseniks and prisoners of con-
science.
The speakers will include the Rev. Tommy
Watson of the First Baptist Church of Perrine, a
leading opponent of human rights violations in the
Soviet Union; Greater Miami community schlicha
Rena Genn, who recently met with dozen of
"refuseniks" in the Soviet Union, and South
Florida Conference on Soviet Jewry Chairman
Hinda Cantor, who also recently returned from
Russia where she spoke with numerous Soviet
Jews.
c0^H
*%gT0
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff, president of
Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami
introduce the program. Rabbi Simcha Vtm
spiritual leader of Temple Adath Yeshurun
Soviet Jewry activist, will present a new progj
of postcards to be sent U.S. Secretary oi
George Shultz on behalf of jailed JJ
Conscience Anatoly Shcharansky who a M
threatening peril while languishing in "
prison.
A Dade County proclamation doclaring^the*
as "Women's Plea for Soviet Jewry Day J"
delivered by a prominent member of theioctug
eminent.
"We cannot afford to be silent or to
Soviet Jews when their human_ rights an
infringed on a daily basis," said Ceil Sttji I
chairwoman of the event. "We cannotJWJJI
by while Jews like Shcharansky are unpr^en,
We must speak out. That is why the w .
Plea is so important as a communal *2J5?
a reminder that we remember and are ^
For more information about the J[JJ[J*i]
for Soviet Jewry, contact MyrnaUman i
ation, 576-4000, extension 291. This evert
to the general public.



Federation, November, 1982
Page 11
Chazaka Builds Kew Lead erskip
I by the success the Greater Miami Jew-
rferation's Chazak Program has enjoyed
the past three years, the leadership of the
n Women's Division has taken the
w'to create a Chazaka Program exclusively
Chazak" means strong, and the program is de-
Uo encourage young women to take a more
role in Federation work. By attracting
neople who share the concern of aiding
JJewry the Federation will continue to grow
JJ. responsive to the needs it seeks to meet.
(the Chazaka program is strengthening the
nitment of Federations female leadership,
! in turn will enhance the quality of the Com-
i Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
mpaign and help provide a strong cadre of lead-
s (or the future. The program's central concept
shared commitment and responsibilities
Bduces a challenging opportunity for partiei-
mts, as well as significant growth for future
EjA-IEF campaigns.
[This is an important opportunity for us to
ate women for the campaign and to develop
^re leadership," said Amy Dean, chairwoman
ithe Chazaka program.
The essence of the Chazaka concept is a set of
nmitments by Federation and the 15 program
jticipants designed to strengthen the leadership
ftheGreater Miami Jewish community.

Amy Dean
Federation has agreed to provide the following
to Chazaka participants:
An intensive educational process to sig-
nificantly raise the level of Jewish consciousness
of the participants.
A learning experience wherein participants
become conversant with Jewish needs locally, na-
tionally, in Israel, and worldwide.
An 11-day study mission in Israel.
In exchange for these Federation commitments,
each Chazaka participant agrees to:
Attend six orientation and training sessions
between October 1982 and January 1983.
Participate in a special 11-day study mission
in Israel from January 9-20, 1983.
Solicit 10 prospects of their choice on a face-
to-face basis within 10 weeks of their return from
the mission.
Attend all follow-up report meetings after re-
turning from Israel.
Make a minimum commitment to the 1983
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
of $1,000.
Unlike other missions to Israel, Dean pointed
out that the Chazaka trip is designed with a very
specific purpose in mind.
"The mission participants come back with
valuable information they can use in the cam-
paign," she explained. "It's a purely educational
mission."
For additional information concerning future
Chazaka Programs please call the Federation
Women's Division at 576-4000.
Lion of Judah lunchcoii to Honor
]$ew Pacesetters on Dee. 5
The Lion of Judah Luncheon, which this year
|will honor new women Pacesetters, is going afloat
Sunday Dec. 5 aboard Carnival Cruise Lines'
iMardi Gras. One of the gala events of the Greater
[Miami Jewish Federation Women's Division, this
lyear's affair will be highlighted by the presenta-
tion of the Pacesetter Judaica Sculptures and
iMedallions to those women who make a minimum
gift of $10,000 to the 1983 Combined Jewish Ap-
|peallsrael Emergency Fund.
The day will also feature the presentation of
Lion of Judah pins to Trustees, a fashion show by
iMartha Inc. of Bal Harbour and an address by
special guest speaker Sylvia Hassenfeld, national
|vice chairman of United Jewish Appeal.
The Lion of Judah Luncheon is held annually
Women's Division Trustees, women who make
i minimum gift of $5,000 to the Combined Jewish
(Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund. The Trustee
^trademark is the distinctive Lion of Judah gold
pin, a symbol that has been adopted by several
(Federations around the nation.
"It's going to be a very memorable day, and a
fiance to honor the Pacesetters," said Pacesetter-
ustee Chairwoman Paula Friedland. "We want
i thank Lin and Ted Arison for their generosity
|in donating use of the March Gras for the day."
"This is an important day for the Women's
Division members to demonstrate their commit-
jment to provide humanitarian services to world
Jewry," added Pacesetter-Trustee Co-Chair-
Iwoman Gloria Scharlin.
I, The Pacesetter Judaica Sculptures and Medal-
lions are original works of art created expressly for
** Greater Miami Jewish Federation by re-
Powned Miami artist and sculptor Kenneth
leister. The great personages commemorated in
*e series are those who have contributed im-
measurably to Jewish theology, thought and the
""ation of modern Israel.
I. Guest speaker Sylvia Hassenfeld is past Na-
tional Women's Division chairman of UJA, she
the first Women's Division Mission to Ausch-
*?t.z. and was the Division's first representative to
ait South America. Hassenfeld was the first
*oman to become a member of the Jewish
^gency's Board of Directors. She is a member of
JJA's Board of Directors and Executive Commit-
*e, and serves on the American Israel Public Af-
P^fs Committee.
The Lion of Judah Pin
Federation Business and
Professional Women
por further information about this exciting
pImIH^6111. please call the Federation Women's Divi-
. .
8n office. 576-4000.
It may only be three years old. but the Business
and Professional Women of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Women's Division now plays
an integral role in the Combined Jewish Appeal-
Israel Emergency Fund and other Federation
activities.
The Business and Professional Women, under
the leadership of Chairwoman Amy Dean, encom-
passes Jewish women of all ages and careers and
strives to meet the needs of working women who
wish to take part in Federation activities.
Throughout the year, the group sponsors educa-
tional meetings, and participates in leadership de-
velopment functions and the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign.
"We're attempting to reach out to the commun-
ity's working women whose special needs were not
addressed in the past," Dean said. "It was felt
that these women did not just want to be involved
in campaign, they also wanted educational and
leadership activities. We have been tailoring a lot
of the daytime programming for the evening.
We're actively pursuing interested people."
In addition to its campaign efforts, the
Business and Professional Women hosted a lead-
ership parlor meeting this fall and Erev Federa-
tion Tuesday, an evening edition of the Women's
Division Federation Tuesday. The public is in-
vited to its board meeting on Dec. 7; in February
it will host leadership development sessions, and a
minimum gift event is planned for March.
The leadership of the Business and Professional
Women includes: Vice Chairwomen Adele
Laurence, Sonia Miller and Carol Rose: Secretary
Susan Kleinberg and Nominating Committee
Chairwoman Nancy Bloom, who chaired the group
during its formation.
For further information about the Business and
Professional Women, please contact the Federa-
tion Women's Division, 576-4000.


Page 12
Federation, November, 1982


I
The Timing of Your
Year-End Contributions
By DENNIS GINSBURG ^^^, :::.::. considered to have been made u
. A =*--^^^. ::: date the stock is transferred on the\
As December 31 approaches and we A*:*^ of the corporation. Because this
each put the finishing touches on our M-.-****?: \ :: could very possibly be after Dec 31
year-end income tax planning, it becomes A 1 the deduction would thus "^
increasingly important to make our ^^M ^^B| available for the current year, we wo
December charitable contributions in a H ^_ ^jfcf ^_^_^^^^__^__
manner designed to yield a tax deduction '"* K^ ^^
for 1982 and not 1983. Therefore, while ^^ T ImAm fr* m lr
we hope that your generosity is shown j \ MM ^ P^age LO HiaKe 3. COntj
throughout the year, for the many of us A ^k^^ A bution is not Sufficient
who inevitably procrastinate, we present "mm^ 4- U 11 1
a summary of those rules which are most Support a Charitable dedu)
relevant in determining the time at ^ tiOIl irrespective of VOl
which a tax deduction may be taken for ^^^^ r 1
gifts to the Foundation of Jewish Philan- ^jjh accounting method.
thropies (the "Foundation"). ^^H| ^M W^B deduction is allowed 01
^^|^& ^^ m|^H to the extent, and for
It becomes increasingly ^H^R ^B f^H year, there is an actual pai
important to make our ^m^Bm ^m I^^M ment of money or transf;
December charitable con- DrnmumtAwg ofnronertv
j.?*_._ a.s___a_ m --------------- j sufficient to support a charitable deduc- vx H1 VHCX u.7
tributlOn in a manner de- tion irrespective of your accounting _________________________
Simed tO Vield a tax deduC- method. A deduction is allowed only to
- x 1A00 a 4. moo the extent, and for the year, there is an urge you to contact your tax adviso
tlOn IOr i\)oZ ana not lyoo. actual payment of money or transfer of before making a transfer in this manner]
_______^t___m_^ property. However, since the deduction Transfer of Real Estate
will be allowed only in the year of Ordinarily, a transfer of property is e(
payment, the use of appreciated or fective for tax purposes at the tin

Ou
OuRfldpes
^*- Foundat
LTA<5e
Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies
of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
In General
Whether you use the cash or accrual
method of accounting, a charitable
deduction may be taken only in the tax
year that a contribution is actually made.
However, under certain circumstances:
(1) an accrual method corporation may
take a deduction for amounts not paid
during its tax year if payment is made by
the 15th day of the 3rd month following
the close of such year; and (2) an estate
or trust may elect for income tax pur-
poses to treat certain amounts paid in a
tax year as having been paid in the im-
mediately preceding year.
Ordinarily, a contribution is made at
the time the property is delivered to the
foundation. This rule will not apply if
the gift is dependent upon the perfor-
mance of some act or the happening of
some event, or if the gift once made may
be defeated by such act or event, unless
the possibility that the charitable gift
will not occur is so remote as to be
negli*. hie.
Pledge
A p! -dge to make a contribution is not
depreciated property to satisfy a prior
pledge of a specific dollar amount will not
cause the donor to recognize gain or loss.
Payment By Check
A charitable contribution made by
check is deductible in the taxable year in
which it is delivered or mailed provided
the check is honored by your bank in due
course and there are no restrictions as to
the time or manner of its payment.
Transfer of Securities
The date upon which a contribution is
allowed for a gift of securities depends
upon the manner in which the gift is
handled. If you deliver, without any con-
ditions, a properly endorsed stock cer-
tificate to the Foundation or any of its
authorized agents, the time of the con-
tribution is the date of delivery. If in-
stead, a properly endorsed certificate is
mailed and received in the ordinary cour-
se of the mails, the time of contribution is
the date of mailing. However, be
forewarned, if you deliver the certificate
to a bank or broker who is acting as your
agent, or to the issuing corporation itself
or its agent, for transfer into Foun-
dation's name, the contribution is not
possession of the property and thel
benefits and burdens of ownership arel
transferred. However, in several cases, a I
transfer of real estate has been held to bel
effective for purposes of the charitable
deduction at the time a properly
executed deed to the property was
delivered to the charitable donee.
There are of course other properties
which may be gifted to the Foundation
and other means by which to make gifts
(for example, by authorizing your bank
to make a transfer to the Foundations
bank account). We have limited our-
selves, however, to those gifts that are |
most commonly made.
Remember our discussion has dealt
with the subject of when a contribution
is deductible for income tax purposes..
The amount of the deduction you may j
claim for gifts to the Foundation may
depend upon the type of property, i
value and the extent to which the tax
laws will allow you to reduce your incon*
subject to tax. With regard to all of tne*
matters, we would advise you to conta
your accountant or attorney.


Federation, November, 1982
Page 13
S. Dade Panel Reviews
eeommendations for the Future
nowth of the Greater Miami Jewish oom-
Ifgnd its expansion in the South Dade area
"necessitated the provision of increased serv-
Jnthe portion of the community. This concern
Lbeen reviewed by two major committees of the
r Mian" Jewish Federation and will be the
of discussion by the Federation South
^Branch Advisory Committee.
Ill Capital Needs-Long Range Planning Com-
K as well as the Planning and Budget Com-
j'of Federation have considered methods of
rting expansion of social services within the
gji Dade Jewish populace. Until the findings of
i Demographic Study are available, no defini-
,plans will be made nor any action taken. The
h Dade Advisory Committee, which is com-
| of agency, organization, temple and at large
lentatives, will meet on Dec. 14 to begin an
lysis of possible further service and facility
sin South Dade.
|"0ur Advisory Committee will be in a par-
glarly effective positionsto conduct this analy-
F said South Dade Branch Chairman Mikki
.nick, who chairs the panel. "Our members
1 agencies know which caseloads are falling off
I which need attention. We have a particular
'standing of the needs in this area. The com-
e also hopes to minimize duplication through
reful review."
|Among the chief needs mentioned by Futernick
i the expansion of the facilities at the South
i Jewish Community Center. Such a recom-
odation has been made by the Capital Needs
Mikki Futernick
panel, which has proposed the construction of a
73,475 square foot facility that would include
nursery school classrooms, an auditorium, a gym-
nasium, numerous special activity rooms, a health
club, offices, a board room, a library and various
other rooms.
"Considering our current demands, the JCC
facility is inadequate to serve our growing needs,"
Futernick said. "For example, we don't have a
pool large enough for a team or for all the people
who want to use one. We desperately need a Jew-
ish library like the one uptown (at the main
Federation Building)."
Futernick also stressed the importance of creat-
ing branch offices in the South Dade area for
Greater Miami's Jewish social service agencies,
particularly those in the Federation's family of
agencies. This aspect of Jewish communal growth
is mentioned prominently in the Capital Needs re-
port, with a model of office space provided for ren-
tal by six particular agencies and organizations.
The Jewish Vocational Service recently took such
a step when it dedicated a new South Dade
facility on November 17.
"We receive services from these agencies from
their present locations," Futernick said. "By
bringing new facilities to South Dade, these agen-
cies will be able to localize their services and will
become even more effective for this area of the
country."
Once formally released, the Demographic Study
will provide a clear picture of the demographic
makeup of all parts of the Greater Miami Jewish
community. Futernick noted that the results of
the study will provide the Advisory Committee
with an accurate data from which to determine the
current state and future trends of South Dade
Jews, and the services they will require.
JVS Dedicates South Dade Office
Joel Lev
gentiiiian Jewry Is
topi of Discussion
[Argentinian Jewry: Yesterday, Today and
" will be the topic of discussion at a
mber 8
program to be held at the Greater
-- i""^iuiii hj ue neiu ai bus uiw
ln?'cu,wish Federation South Dade Branch,
V} aW 102nd Ave. The program, which will
p at 8 p.m. is co-sponsored by the South Dade
flm Community Center and the GMJF South
Pe Branch.
iJJ weaker, Dr. Gary Frank, is an adjunct
P'essor of international studies at the Institute
pter-American Studies of the University of
j> and has taken active part in many
Rations and agencies in Greater Miami. He
1 jounding president of the South Dade Hebrew
paemy and is a leader of the South Florida
P'erence on Soviet Jewry.
gnk has written two books on U.S. foreign
Cr ln Argentina, "Struggle for Hegemony in
" America: Argentina, Brazil and the U.S.
8 the Second World War" and "Juan Peron
, aprujUe Braden: The Story Behind the Blue
L also nas authored articles on Soviet.
p and Argentina.
EL.moje information about this program,
rta Michael Meyer, director of the South
Bfanch of Federation, 251-9334.
The Jewish Vocational Service has brough some
of its counseling programs directly to the South
Dade community by opening a branch office and
dedicating the new facility on Nov. 17. The JVS, a
member of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
family of agencies, already supplies vocational re-
habilitation, services for the elderly, and refugee
and community services through its offices in
Miami and Miami Beach.
"In its 23 years of service to this community,
the Jewish Vocational Service has initiated and
provided vital programs which benefit and help
direct the lives of thousands of people," said
Federation Secretary Joel Levy in a message at
the dedication. "The JVS plays an important role
in the lives of our elderly, of our jobless, of our
refugees, and of the many who have been touched
by the dedication of this vital agency's leadership
and staff"
The new JVS branch will provide career and
educational counseling and other programs for
Jews in South Dade. These services will be offered
in conjunction with other projects already availa-
ble through the JVS.
Levy noted in his message that the need for the
JVS branch and other social service facilities in
South Dade has resulted from the growth of the
Greater Miami Jewish community into that sec-
tion of Dade County. He said the growth comes
with a communal obligation to care for Jews in
need, regardless of their geographic location.
"With our communal growth comes the respon-
sibility of providing services necessary to Jews in
need within the frontiers of Jewish life," Levy
said. "Our obligations must be vast and far-reach-
ing. Our commitment to our fellow Jews in need
must extend to all of our brothers and sisters in
Greater Miami who are in distress or living in un-
fortunate circumstances."
Levy extended congratulations, on behalf of the
Officers and Board of Directors of Federation, to
JVS President Robert Levenson, Executive
Director Kugene Greenspan and all of the
agency's leaders, expressing the importance of the
new facility to the entire Jewish community.
For more information about the JVS South
Dade branch, call 235-9482. Call 576-3220 for in-
formation about services in other parts of Dade
County.
For information about Jewish singles events occurring
throughout Dade County call:
THEJASSLINE
573-J ASS
It's a seven-day-a-week service, sponsored by
the Jewish Association Serving Singles,
that provides a recorded listing of major events geared to
singles of adages.
J ASS is a program of the Jewish Community Centers of South Florida
and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
L,


Page 14
Federation, November, 1982

CA JE Library Displays the
Wisdom of Youth
Throughout the school year, the library at the -
Central Agency for Jewish Education will display
the work of the ever expanding day schools in
Dade County.
This exhibition has been established with the
expectation that parents, teachers and school per-
sonnel will visit the Central Agency for Jewish
Education and see the elaborate displays of the
best of the work that the youngsters of the Dade
Day Schools can offer.
The first school to show its work is the Beth
David Solomon Schechter Day School. This dis-
play, begun in October and extending through
November, features art, posters, diaramas and
artifacts from grade one through six. Happily, the
range of materials is very wide. Each grade has
written pn;>ers, designed posters, collated books
and report a covering their school curriculum from
biblical heroes to vertebrates and invertebrates. A
particular, charming section is a series of pam-
phlets call' -'1 "What is hot" and What is cold."
A most interesting aeries of posters captioned
"Living a Brit" has exceptional thoughts with
short Hetrew and English explanations of the
definition.1- >f the role of a brit in the lives of these
students. To highlight the child's understanding
of a brit as an agreement or covenant, each child in
the display contributed an individual page of a
chart about a brit made with another child in his
class or family member. The agreements range
from keeping the student's room clean to promises
to fellow scouts.
All show an understanding of the internaliza-
tion of the studies the youngsters are involved
with in their schools.
Parents, students and teachers in other schools
are invited to see the different works in the CAJE

m
"*
-**
.w
>
*%
kl
% i
Mh
k
library. The schedule for the year includes these
dates:
October to mid-November, 1982 Beth David
Solomon Schechter Day School; November Jew-
ish Junior High School of South Florida; Decem-
ber Toras Emes Academy of Miami; January
1983 Jewish High School of South Florida;
February Samuel Scheck Hillel Community Day
School; March Lehrman Day School; April
Rabbi Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy^
May Sinai Academy.
The Central Agency for Jewish Education is I
cated on the street floor at the Greater Mia
Jewish Federation Building, 4200 Biscayne Blvd
School displays will be on exhibit throughout th
school year.
Synagogue School Fund Established
Committed to the belief that all Jewish children
are entitled to a Jewish education regardless of fi-
nancial means, the Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion has established the Synagogue Sup-
plementary School Scholarship Program.
Developed over the course of the past year by
Federation's Committee on Educational Scholar-
ships, the program is intended to aid financially
needy families whose children attend or wish to
attend synagogue schools on the pre-bar/bat
mitzvah level.
Administered by the Central Agency for Jewish
Education (CAJE), the program has received
$18,000 in funding from Federation for scholar-
ships in the 1982-83 school year. Eligibility to par-
ticipate in the program, which will grant partial
tuition scholarships, shall be based on the financi-
al need of the families and enrollment in a
synagogue educational program for two or more
days per week.
"Education has always been one of the keys
behind the continued strength and vitality of
Judaism throughout the ages," said Federation
President Norman H. Lipoff. "It is important for
Federation to take whatever steps are necessary
to provide a Jewish education to all children in our
Greater Miami community,"
The need for such a scholarship program was
initially expressed by members of the Rabbinical
Association of Greater Miami. The Federation
committee that designed the program was
composed of members of the Rabbinical Associa-
tion, representatives from interested synagogue
schools, CAJE, and Federation. The committee
was chaired by Glen Weinberger.
The synagogues participating in the program
are: Beth Moshe Congregation, North Miami;
Beth Torah Congregation, North Miami Beach;
Temple Adath Yeshurun, North Miami Beach;
Temple Sinai of North Dade, North Miami Beach;
Temple Or Olom, Miami; Temple Samu-El,
Miami; Bet Breira Synagogue, Miami; and Tem-
ple Judea, Coral Gables.
"The best way to secure a strong Jewish future
in our Greater Miami community is to ensure that!
all our children receive a quality Jewish educa-f
tion," said CAJE President Helene Berger. "Fed-
eration has taken a significant first step to provide|
a Jewish education to those in need."
In designing the scholarship program, the Fed-I
eration committee recognized that synagogues!
generally attempt to enable needy families to I
become members and provide a Jewish education I
for their children. It is hoped that the program, [
which will disburse the grants directly to the in-!
volved synagogues, will enhance the ability of the I
synagogues to provide Jewish education to in-j
creased numbers of children.
"The economic situation is reflected in Jewish!
education," said CAJE Executive Director Gene
Greenzweig. "It is vital that we provide help to
parents so they can sent their children to Jewish]
schools."
For more information about the Synagogue!
Supplementary Scholarship program, please call |
CAJE at 576-4030.
Consul iicneralJoel Anton was the guest speaker at "Israel Update," one of
a series of three lectures co-sponsored by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
and the A ventura Jewish Center. The event was held at the Aventura Jewish
Center, u here an overflow crowd was briefed on current Israeli affairs. Pictured the special guest at a recent Vanguard Division meeting, .
from left: Rov Sager, president of the Aventura Jewish Center; Consul General division of $25,000 and over contributors to the CJA-IEF. Shown with b *
Joel Arnon; Rabbi David Saltzman, spiritual leader of the Aventura Jewish from left are Federation leaders Alex Halberstein, Bernardo Batievsny
Center; and A. Fred Hirsch, board member of the synagogue. Haim Weiner.
Yitzhak Shamir, Foreign Minister of the State of Israel, (second from Wj"J
ird Division meeting, the newly form*


Federation, November, 1982
Page 16
jjESDAY, DECEMBER 1
Podhuret, General Campaign (^airman of
tS Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
Si Fund Campaign, will be the guest
it the Aventura-Turnberry Isle education
r at 7:3 Pm- at fc*ie Aventura Jewish
wttli Aventura Boulevard. The theme of
Lm is "Israel Update." The event is co-
by the Greater Miami Jewish
,n and the Aventura Jewish Center. For
"formation call Irving Kalman at 576-1000
LJ16-
.pRSDAY, DECEMBER 2
Secretary of State Alexander Haig, Jr.
te the keynote speaker at the Greater Miami
Federation's 1983 Campaign Opening
m this evening at the Fontainbleau-Hflton.
noteworthy event, which officially kicks off
1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel
pncy Fund Campaign, is open to Con-
ors of a minimum of $1,000 to the 1983
MDaiRn Cocktails begin at 6:30, dinner at 7:30.
forinore information, contact Edyth Geiger at
federation, 576-4000 extension 310.
ATURDAY, DECEMBER 4
.wregation Shaare Tefillah of Kendall will be
aiding its annual Judaic art auction this evening.
I event starts at 8:30 and will be held at 15410
75th Circle Lane, Kendall. For more in-
U0n call 382-3343.
)AY, DECEMBER 5
sisterhood and educational committee of
)ongregation Shaare Tefillah of Kendall are
ponsoring a Chanukah workshop and Chanukah
loutique today. There will be performances by the
dldren of the Hebrew School. For more in-
nation call 382-3343.
UNDAY, DECEMBER 5
I Chai Chapter of American Mizrachi Women
have their annual Bazaar at the Executive
nk, Kendall Drive and 97th Avenue, today from
la.m. to 5 p.m. There will be gift items, plants,
toys and clothing for men, women and children.
for more information call 531-5344.
NDAY, DECEMBER 5
South Dade Midrasha, a consortium of local
IPynagogues, and the Jewish Community Center of
uth Dade are co-sponsoring a family concert at
emple Samu-El, 9353 SW 152nd Avenue, this
iming at 10:45. Steve Simenowitz will be
tured in a concert of Hebrew, Yiddish, and
fewish-American folk-rock music. For ticket
ormation, or any questions concerning the
idrasha, please contact Rabbi Lipson at CAJE,
764030.
JESDAY, DECEMBER 7
Mesivta Women of Greater Miami will hold
heir annual membership luncheon today at 12
wn. Admission is $15. The luncheon will be at
he Sea Gull Kosher Steak house on Miami Beach.
for more information call Mrs. Entin at 534-6453.
JESDAY, DECEMBER 7
Panel Reno will be the guest speaker at the Forte
forum lecture series today at 1 p.m. The topic she
W be discussing is "The Goals and Objectives of
* Criminal Justice System." Admission is free.
w West Avenue, North Building, Forte Towers
Auditorium, Miami Beach. For more information
Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
JESDAY, DECEMBER 7
U 'Vnerican Physicians Fellowship Inc. for
'edicine in Israel is holding an organizational
""eting this evening at 7:30. They will be electing
v officers and showing a film about Israel.
ere will also be a social hour with refreshments.
meeting will take place at Wolfson
^tlitonum in Mount Sinai Medical Center. For
e information call Dr. Isaac Knoll at 672-3601.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8
l^entinian Jewry will be the topic of discussion
Icr lat a lecture sponsored by the South Dade
loda lecture entitled "Argentina Yesterday,
t*"y and Tomorrow" reviews the situation in
yj*"?y that has the third largest Jewish pop-
*oon m the world. This enlightening lecture be-
M at 8:00. For more information call 251-1394.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 8
Young Adult Communication Workshop,
cning listening and communication skills to
6r enhance your personal and professional
ac'onships, will be held this evening at 7:30 at
aouth Dade JCC, 12401 SW 102nd Avenue.
r'more information call 251-1394.
Calendar
THURSDAY, DECEMBER 9
The South Dade JCC Jogging Club is holding its
first organizational meeting this evening at 7:30.
For more information call 251-1394.
FRIDAY, DECEMBER 10
The Early Children's Department of the South
Dade JCC is hosting a Chanukah party at 11:00
this morning for the little ones. For more in-
formation call 251-1394.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 12
The Miami Beach JCC is having a Chanukah
party today at 610 Espanola Way, Miami Beach.
An afternoon of fun and entertainment is planned
including latkes, song and dance by the
"Swinging Singles" and children of the Pinetree
Family Center. The fun starts at 1 p.m. and
reservations must be made by December 9. For
more information call 534-3206.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 13
The Mount Scopus Chapter of Hadassah will be
holding an H.M.O. luncheon today at the Doral
Beach Hotel in the Regency Room. There will be
prizes and entertainment. The fun starts at noon.
For more information call Ethel Reisman at 534-
7071.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 13
The Torah Chapter of Hadassah will be holding a
Chanukah meeting today at 12:30 at Temple
Zamora, 44 Zamora, Coral Gables. Shirley Wolfe,
director of the educational resource center of the
Central Agency for Jewish Education will speak
on "Giants in American Jewish History." For
more information call Dorothy Spector at 667-
9901.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 14
The Forte Forum lecture series continues today
with Dr. Leonard Haber as the guest speaker. He
will be discussing "The Psychology of Hap-
piness." This important and educational lecture
begins at 1 p.m. at 1200 West Avenue, North
Building, Forte Towers Auditorium, Miami
Beach. Admission is free. For more information
call Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 15
Senior adults are invited to join in a Chanukah
celebration today at 1 p.m. in the Senior Adult
Trailer. There will be music, singing and refresh-
ments. For more information call the Michael-Ann
Russell JCC at 932-4200.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 19
Allan Milstein will be the guest speaker at the
Association of Parents of American Israelis
regular meeting today. The meeting starts at 1:30
p.m. and will be held in the Federation building,
4200 Biscayne Boulevard. For more information
call Symme Price at 864-3932.
SUNDAY, DECEMEBR 19
This sixth annual Chanukah Run begins this
morning at 8:00. An eight mile run, this event
attracted more than 3,000 people last year and
registration runs through December 16. For more
information call the Michael-Ann Russell JCC at
932-4200.
SUNDAY, DECEMBER 19
The Vered Chapter of American Mizrachi Women
will be sponsoring a family boat ride on the Island
Queen today. Refreshments will be sold. For more
information call 531-5344.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 20
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC is sponsoring a
College Night this evening beginning at 8:00.
College students home for winter break will have a
chance to meet other young adults also home from
various schools around the country. For more
information call the Michael-Ann Russell JCC at
932-4200.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21
The first annual "Journey Through Culture"
lecture series, sponsored by the North Dade
Midrasha Committee of the Central Agency for
Jewish Education, begins this evening with Blu
Greenberg, noted author, speaking on "The
Rebirth of the Jewish Family." The lecture begins
at 8:00 at Temple Adath Yeshurun, 1025 NE
Miami Gardens Drive. For more information call
Sharon Horowitz at CAJE, 576-4030.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 21
"Are the Arabs Buying South Florida?" will be
William Gralnick's topic of discussion today at
the Forte Forum lecture series. The lecture starts
at 1 p.m. and admission is free to the public. 1200
West Avenue, North Building, Forte Towers
Auditorium, Miami Beach. For more information
call Elsie Rubin at 673-1979.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22
The Chai Chapter of American Mizrachi Women
will be holding a latke party this evening at 8:00.
Two Israeli films will also be shown. The party
will be held at the home of Genia Offenbach, 8840
SW 104th Street. For more information call 531-
5344.
WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 22
The Geula Chapter of American Mizrachi Women
will hold a Mother- In-Israel Chanukah
Celebration at 8:00 this evening at the Jefferson
National Bank, Arthur Godfrey Road Branch,
Miami Beach. For more information call 531-5344.
TUESDAY, DECEMBER 27
The Beth Israel Congregation will be holding a
meeting in memory of Jack Bash, the
congregation's past president. The entire com-
munity is invited and refreshments will be served.
The meeting starts at 8:00 tonight and will be held
at the synagogue, 770 Chase Avenue, Miami
Beach. For more information call Mignon at 538-
1251.
MONDAY, DECEMBER 27
The Roney Plaza Chapter of B'nai B'rith Women
is having a monthly meeting this afternoon at
1:00. Philip Goldin, Executive Director of Temple
Israel, will be the guest speaker discussing
"Community Services of the Jewish Federation."
This worthwhile and informative meeting will be
held at the Roney Plaza Social Hall. For more
information call Mrs. Goldin at 532-1520.
Throughout The Month
"Scrolls of Fire," an exhibition presenting 52
illustrated accounts of the Jewish struggle for
survival through the ages, will be open from
December 1 through December 5. Written by
Israeli poet Abba Kovner and illustrated by
Israeli painter Dan Reisinger, the texts are based
on historical material and composed in the style
and spirit of the given period. Scrolls of Fire is
open from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. daily. For more in-
formation call the South Dade JCC at 251-1394.
The South Dade JCC will sponsor a Winter
Mini-Camp from December 20 through December
31. The camp is for pre-schoolers through 6th
graders. This all day camp begins at 9 a.m. with
fun, field trips and sports through 4 p.m. For more
information call the South Dade JCC at 251-1394.
The Miami Beach JCC will sponsor a ten day
Winter Camp program for children ages five
through 12 from December 20 through December
31. Field trips to such places as the Museum of
Science, Planet Ocean and many other exciting
places of interest are planned. Registration
deadline is December 13. For more information
call 534-3206.
The Michael-Ann Russell JCC will also be
sponsoring a number of different winter camp
programs. For specific information call the JCC at
932-4200.
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for January events is December 14,1982
Organization,
Event_______
Place_
Date_
_Time_
I a.m. () p.m.
Your name.
Title_______
.Phone No._
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Relations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137


Page 16
Federation, November, 1982
Be There with the people of Israel.
Be There with Jews in need
in Miami and around the world.
Be There on Super Sunday.
To stand strong for Jews everywhere.
To work for everything you believe in.
Be There when it counts.
What:
A massive phone-a-thon
being sponsored by the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
Where:
Temple Israel of Greater Miami
137 N.E. 19th Street
Need:
Volunteers to handle phones.
To stuff envelopes. To sort pledge cards.)
In short, To Be There When It Counts.
Goal:
lb reach out and unite
our fellow Jews in a show of solidarity
that will help the people
of Israel and keep the spirit
of Jewish brotherhood alive
everywhere on earth.
Bea
Super Sun
volunteer!
Call the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
at 576-4000 today!
!


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