The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02804

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
Volume
55_ Number 44
Three Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, October 29,1982
rwtnmn ttwmmemm
Price 50 Cents
November Nostradamus
After the Voting, What to Expect on
Capitol Hill Next Wednesday Morning
Hang Tough for Vielory
By MORRIS J.AMITAY
What should friends of
Israel look for on Election
Night, next Tuesday? The
1982 Races for Senate and
House involve a number of
contests of unusual in-
terest, some of which are
still too close to call.
Strong Israel supporters in the
Senate who should have little
trouble being reelected for a six-
year term are: Ted Kennedy of
Massachusetts, Henry "Scoop"
Jackson of Washington, Pat
Moynihan of New York, Spark
Matsunaga of Hawaii, and Bill
Proxmire of Wisconsin, along
with Republican John Heinz of
Pennsylvania.
A FEW of Israel's Democratic
backers in the Senate are having
a tougher time but should pull
out victories. Howard Metzen-
baum of Ohio, who is staving off
a late challenge from a State
Senator; Paul Sarbanes of Mary-
Continued on Page 7-A_______
' '-'t-L
Sen. Kennedy
Sen. Chiles
I
Rep. Fascell
Right-Wing
Posters Paper
Hate Over LA
v;. ,-v;:;:V:-^;^v;y--.,/^:<
ADL Concludes
Networks Were Unfair in Their
NEW YORK (JTA)-
1 The Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith has
made public its study of
television network coverage
of the war in Lebanon.
The study, based on data
gathered for the ADL by media
specialists. Garth-Furst Interna-
tional, Inc. acknowledges the
networks 'desire for truth and
accuracy'' in news coverage and
the "inherent difficulties" in war
reporting. It nevertheless cites
numerous examples of errors
Lebanon Stories
found in examining tapes of the
evening news broadcasts of the
three major networks CBS
NBC and ABC from June 4 to
Sept. 1. The report covers only
the tapes from this period.
ACCORDING TO Kenneth
Bialkin, ADL's national chair-
man, "the following factors con-
tributed to our perception of a
lack of balance in the news
media's handling of Israel's
actions in Lebanon:"
Inflated casualty figures re-
ported and not corrected, as well
as other factual errors.
Melodramatic portrayals of
Israeli censorship.
Lingering and graphic daily
coverage of the wounded and suf-
fering that overwhelmed or
overlooked the political, histori-
cal and military context of the
situation.
Continued on Page 15-A
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
The appearance in the Los
Angeles area of a series of
six wall posters linking a
proposed state handgun
registration measure to
Nazi atrocities committed
against Jews in the Holo-
caust may be the work of a
group with ties to the ex-
tremist rightwing and
virulently anti-Semitic
Liberty Lobby organiza-
tion, according to an official
of the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith in
Los Angeles.
The posters have appeared on
traffic control boxes on main
boulevards in Westminster and
Huntington Beach and just last
Monday outside the headquar-
ters of Californians Against
Street Crime, the group cam-
paigning for passage of the mea-
sure known as Proposition 15,
which would require state resi-
dents to register handguns and
restrict future sales in the state.
THE BLACK and white
posters show photographs of
Nazi storm troopers, stacked
bodies of victims killed in the
concentration camps and Nazi
Continued on Page 14-A
Shadowy Figure
Of Abu Nidal
Behind Rome
Terrorism?
By LISA HI I.I.l(i
ROME (JTA) Abu
Nidal, a shadowy figure in
the rogues gallery of Pales-
tinian terrorists, has
emerged as the prime sus-
Report
from
Rome
pect behind the machine-
gun and grenade attack on
Rome's main synagogue
which took the life of a two-
year-old child and wounded
37 other men, women and
children.
Italian police, investigating
Continued on Page 3-A
Israel Determined to Demand Security Arrangement with Lebanon
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON
IJTA) Israeli Foreign
Minister Yitzhak Shamir
has made it clear that
purity arrangements for
the Israel-Lebanon border
m"st be worked out be-
tween Israel and Lebanon
before the Israeli army will
withdraw from that coun-
try.
He stressed this to reporters
after an hour-long meeting with
Secretary of State George Shultz
at the State Department, at
which he was briefed on Lebanese
President Amin Gemayel's meet-
ings earlier with President Rea-
Shamir Reveals
gan and other Administration of-
ficials.
SHAMIR, at Shultz's request,
briefed the Americans on his visit
to Costa Rica. The Israeli For-
eign Minister appeared less op-
timistic than he was when he met
with Shultz last week over the
chances of an early withdrawal of
Israeli, Syrian and Palestine
Liberation Organization forces
from Lebanon.
He had said, after talking to
Shultz previously, that he hoped
an agreement on withdrawal
could be reached by the end of the
year. Asked later, if he still felt
that was possible, he replied, "I
cannot say."
But Shamir said, "I believe we
are going to solve the problem."
He indicated that Israel would
like to see a Lebanese-Israeli
working committee make
Continued on Page 10-A
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Supplement. .Special Insert


. r*_ t\ -
Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, October 29. 1982

~ivu --
The Swedish revisionist, Ditlieb Felderer,
questions the veracity of Anne Frank's
diary. Anne is shown at right. Left is the
home in Amsterdam where she and her
family hid out from the Naiis, and where she
wrote the diary.
Propaganda Spiurs Invitation
A.
By DR. IAN BARNES
London Chronicle Syndicate
In January of this year. Joseph
Pearce, editor of the National
Front youth magazine Bull-
dog," was sentenced to six
months imprisonment for incit-
ing racial hatred. The issues of
the magazine cited as evidence
for the prosecution carried ma-
terial from national newspapers
reporting crimes or mistakes in
hospitals by medical staff by
colored or Asian people, under
such headlines as "black crime."
To combat this "situation,"
magazine editorials encouraged
readers to "join the white army,"
"smash the multiracial society,"
and to "fight for white power."
The case mirrors similar trials
in France concerned with race-
hate and incitement to murder.
"Bull-dog's" clarian call for race
war is likely to recruit volunteers
only when an economic and intel-
lectual climate is such that anti-
democratic and neo-Nazi ideas
can find a response among
segments of the population.
"Bulkiog"-style literature can
cause damage to society out of all
proportion to its circulation.
Extreme right-wing ideas are
being inserted into society to
build a constituency hospitable
to racist, anti-Semitic, anti-par-
liamentary and extreme national-
ist values.
THESE COMPRISE a direct
challenge to a liberal heritage
which allows freedom of speech
even in its most repulsive form.
Consequently, it is necessary to
explore and understand the "re-
visionist" strategy underpinning
racism.
Neo-Nazi revisionism is a
pseudo-academic technique
wherein "intellectuals" of inter-
national Nazism seek to divest
themselves of the overwhelming
evidence of Nazi atrocities, the
Holocaust, and war crimes perpe-
trated by the Gestapo and SS
during the Third Reich. Revis-
ionism confronts this past,
hoping to whitewash and vindi-
cate Nazism, by rewriting his-
tory, denying the Holocaust as a
"hoax" invented by a Jewish
conspiracy bent on world
domination, and attacking Allied
war leaders as being the real war
criminals.
This self-deceptive process is
well-funded and internationally
organized spawning texts, spon-
soring conferences and utilizing
the services of liberal academics,
apparently deceived by the
"scholastic credentials" of the
revisionists. Furthermore, ex-
treme right-wing political organ-
izations promote and purvey
these new versions of history to
the unformed minds of a youth
to Join Rising
'White Army9
separated from the Second World
War by over a generation.
NAZIS REALIZE that repos
session of the past is an im-
portant element of political and
cultural struggle. Their rewritten
history is an assertion of their
identity and their beliefs and is a
central political strategy foster-
ing a revitalized consciousness in
the search for a political voice.
The extreme right, therefore,
use rejigged "facts" to interpret
their own history, injecting pre-
judice which overshadows real-
ity. This binds Nazis into a
mythology from which they can-
not escape lest they lose their
identity; the defense of their re-
written past simultaneously
dupes and imprisons them.
Generally, revisionism con-
ducts a propaganda campaign
against Jewish communities,
racial minorities, and Israel. A
revamped "Protocols of the
Elders of /.ion" points out a mas-
sive Jewish conspiracy seeking
world domination by encouraging
colored immigration and misceg-
enation to dilute the power of
"white blood." Hence, "Bull-
dog's" calumny that "colored
immigrants can seriously damage
your health."
The Holocaust, the six million,
and genocide are proclaimed a
"hoax"; Germany was innocent
of starting the Second World
War; Hitler was an anti-Commu-
nist .protecting Western civiliza-
tion in a crusade against Soviet
aggresion; and the death camps
were a fabrication designed to ex-
tract reparations from a con-
science-stricken West German
Government as a basis for an Is-
raeli State.
THUS, the major thrust of re-
visionism is political hostility to-
wards Jews, Israelis and Zion-
ism, as well as whitewashing the
Nazi regime. At the same time,
an anti-American strain accuses
the U.S.A. of fighting the "wrong
enemy" in the Second World
War; and the Allies perpetrated
the real "atrocities" of that
period: the British initiation of
civilian saturation bombing in
May, 1940, and the nuclear
strikes against Japan.
The particular function of re-
visionism is designed to present
Nazism in a positive light, and to
eradicate German guilt by show-
ing that Jewish plots have vic-
timized Germans and Pales-
tinians. It is both a denial and a
vindication of anti-Semitism.
Allied "atrocities" are intended
to "exonerate" Nazis by a com-
parative strategy, and this goes
deeper.
There have been three anti-
Churchill moves: the bombing of
Coventry, the "murder" of Gen-
eral Sikorsky, and the new alle-
gation that he advocated drench-
ing Germany with anthrax
bombs. These accusations may
not be Nazi inspired, but they are
in a similar vein to Nazi allega-
tions, and certainly play the Nazi
game.
THE POINT is that if Chur-
chill was such a reprehensible
person, then Hitler cannot have
been that bad. Hence, together
with the other conjectures, what,
they ask. is wrong with Nazism?
Revisionist literature is ex-
tensive. In 1950. Paul Rassinier's
"The Drama of European Jewry"
questioned the number of Holo-
caust deaths, claiming the six
million as an inflated figure; an
extensive Jewish emigration
from Germany, Poland and
Central Europe between 1933 and
1939 was not taken into account.
Christopherson's "Auschwitz:
Truth or Lie?" asserts that its
author was in that camp during
1944 and disclaims all knowledge
of the ovens, suspecting that
they were erected after the war,
presumably to provide evidence
at Nuremberg. The Swedish re-
visionist, Ditlieb Felderer, ques-
tions the veracity of Anne
Frank's diary, while Diwald's
1978 revisionist history of Ger-
many incorporates lies arguing
that the Birkenau ovens were
used to control typhoid, and that
the Dachau gas chambers were
unused "test models."
THESE GRIM fairy tales
would be laughable but for a
novel revisionist tactic. Two phe-
nomena illustrate a policy of gen-
erating a "revisionist school of
history" to compete with real
history: Butz's "The Hoax of the
Twentieth Century" and the Ins-
titute for Historical Review
(IHR).
Butz strove to discredit the
Holocaust in a subtle and sophis-
ticated manner by writing with a
veneer of scholarship. The style
of the book creates the impres-
sion of seriousness and objectiv-
ity. The inclusion of exhaustive
footnotes and a large bibliog-
raphy all contribute to a scholar-
ly image, as does confronting es-
Continued on Page 14-A
Hassan Offers Israel
Land For Peace Proposal;
Said to be Speaking
For Arab Nations
WASHINGTON King
Hassan of Morocco in effect
Saturday said that Israel
can have peace with the
Arabs only at the expense
of giving up more land.
Speaking on behalf of the
Arab League countries,
Hassan declared that the
Arabs "want to live in
peace with Israel."
On the other hand, he warned
that "there will be no recognition
of Israel" until Israel returns to
its pre-1967 borders. In effect,
Hassan offered peace only if the
Israelis return to the borders as
set forth following the War of
Independence in 1948.
OBSERVERS were quick to
note that the Moroccan king
appeared to be going further in
his offer of peace than any other
Arab leader in the past and
wondered to what extent his
proposal in fact represented the
position of the Arab League
nations.
But they also said that it
appears that the Arabs are tired
of the continued warfare and
would prefer to call it quits on
their own terms.
Hassan's statement here in
effect reflected his sentiments in
a meeting with President Reagan
on Friday, which he and four
other Arab League leaders at-
tended. Hassan said that "a new
phase" is now opening in the
ongoing Arab-Israeli conflict,
which "is no longer a conflict of
force but of law and rights."
HE SAID that his presence, as
well as the presence of the other
Arab leaders, was proof of the
Arab desire for peace. But. he
cautioned. "There are some
conditions that have to be
fulfilled for this to happen.
Prior to his Saturday press
conference here, the White House
was already issuing statements
of optimism based on President
Reagan's meeting with the Arab
leaders the day before.
Officially, the Arab delegation I
headed by King Hassan had
come to Washington to explain to
Reagan the eight-point
declaration adopted at an Arab
League summit meeting in Fez
Morocco last month. One of these I
points has been "interpreted" as I
an offer to recognize Israel's right
to exist.
BUT OTHER points em
phasize the establishment of an
independent Palestinian state
under the direction of the
Palestine Liberation
Organization. Essentially, at
least two of the eight points are
in conflict with President
Reagan's own peace proposal of
Sept. 1. It was Hassan's offer of
peace-for-land on Saturday that
spurred the earlier cautious
reserve of Administration
spokesmen on Friday.
Asked at the Saturday press
conference whether the Fez
declaration meant recognition of
Israel. Hassan said: "Paragraph
seven means and shows the will
of all Arab states to have war
come to an end with all the states
of the region." This in turn
means Israel's movement back
into the 1967 borders:
"When we establish these
borders on the basis of the pre-
1967 situation, we must say these
are the borders of Israel. We
must say it undeniably. Israel
then can say that it is living in
peace with security."
Of King Hussein of Jordan,
Hassan declared that the Arabs
regard the ongoing talks between
Jordan and the PLO with an eye
toward federation as "an ab-
solute necessity."
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Following the bloody terrorist attack on the
Rome synagogue on Oct. 9 in which a young
child was killed and over 30 others seriously
wounded, the Simon Wiesenthal Center or-
ganized a major protest rally recently in
front of the Italian consulate in Los Angeles.
Report from Rome
Participants included students and faculty
from Yeshiva University of Los Angeles,
Holocaust survivors and representatives
from the Rabbinic Zionist Council of Califor-
nia and Young Israel.
Is Abu Nidal Behind Synagogue Attack?
Continued from Page 1-A
the latest terrorist assault on
Italian Jews, appear to have con-
firmed that the weapons used
were of the same type as those
employed in attacks on Jews and
others in Paris, Brussels, London
and Vienna in the last two years,
I all of them attributed to the Abu
Nidal gang.
FORENSIC experts have
identified fragments from Soviet-
made F-I Grenades at the scene
of the attack. They say the 9 mm.
bullets extracted from the vic-
I tims wer fired from Polish-made
Maszynowy PM63 submachine-
guns, a weapon rarely found in
the West but common in the
I eclectic arsenal of Middle East
terrorists.
French police are cooperating
*ith the Italian authorities in
this case, and presumably the po-
! lice of other countries. Abu
i Nidal's terrorists were implicated
| in a similar attack on the Jewish
community center in Vienna in
the summer of 1981 and in the
murder a few months earlier of a
Vienna City Council member
known to be friendly to Israel.
Nidal, whose present where-
abouts are unknown, is also
alleged to have been responsible
'or the assassination of at least
one Palestine Liberation Organi-
zation representative in Europe.
L.M WAS supposedly "con-
demned to death" by a PLO
court in 1974. According to
reports here, Nidal's gang works
tandem with various European
errorist groups on an interna-
tional scale and probably has
bases in most European coun-
tries.
Meanwhile, the anger of Italian
Jews against Pope John Paul II
and top government leaders who
received PLO Chief Yasir Arafat
in Rome last month is subsiding
slowly, but not their bitterness
and grief. The reception accorded
Arafat and the Italian, media's
harsh criticism of Israel's actions
in Lebanon is widely believed by
Jews to have created the climate
for violence against Jews.
Rut Jewish leaders and intel-
lectuals are now reminding the
community that those responsi-
ble for the attack on the Rome
synagogue were probably the
same Palestinian terrorists who
perpetrated similar outrages long
before the war in Lebanon and
long before Arafat's audience
with the Pope.
Israelis, Palestinians Exchange
Fire in Eastern Sector
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) Israeli
soldiers and Palestinian terror-
ists exchanged fire for several
hours in the eastern sector of the
Lebanese front. No Israeli
soldiers were injured in what a
military spokesman described as
the most serious breach of the
ceasefire in Lebanon in a month.
Army sources said the ex-
change began when snipers
behind Syrian lines opened fire on
Israeli positions near Yanta, 22
kilometers east of Lake Karoun.
Israeli soldiers returned the fire
which escalated to machinegun
and rocket exchanges. The
sources said the Israelis limited
their fire to the immediate area
from where they were being at-
tacked in order to avoid an erup-
tion of fighting along the entire
eastern front.
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Friday, October 29, 1982 / The Jewish Florkiian Page 3-A
Israel's Aid Request of U.S.
To Total Record $3 Billion
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel has submitted an
aid request to the U.S. gov-
ernment for the coming
fiscal year which totals $3
billion. The request was
presented in Jerusalem by-
Finance Minister Yoram
Aridor to U.S. Ambassador
Samuel Lewis, and a simul-
taneous submission was
made in Washington.
The request is identical to that
put forward last year, when the
figure eventually approved was
$2.2 billion. Proposals in Wash-
ington to increase that figure by
another $425 million have been
shelved recently due to the Leba-
non war.
THE ISRAEL request breaks
The incident was the second
since Palestinian terrorists fired
rockets and small arms at Israeli
positions north of Amik on the
eastern front. An army spokes-
man said the fire was returned,
and no Israeli soldiers were hit.
But one Israeli soldier was
slightly wounded a day earlier
when he was caught in cross fire
between battling Druze and
Christian factions near the town
of Aleh.
Meanwhile, Israel and foreign
journalists have protested a new
army order barring them trom
driving Israeli vehicles in
Lebanon without an escort of
army jeeps. The army, for its
part, has refused to provide
escorts. Israel TV has to rely on
film provided by U.S. and other
foreign networks to report on
Beirut.
?
down into $1.25 billion in civilian
aid. which Israel seeks as an out-
right grant, and $1.75 billion in
military aid. which Israel seeks
half in grant form and half in loan
form.
In explanatory material ac-
companying the aid request. Is-
rael says its civilian balance of
payments deficit is likely to
widen by half a billion dollars in
the coming fiscal year. (But this
will be set off, it is hoped, by a
decrease in military imports.)
Israel says it plans to keep un-
employment down to below five
percent of the labor force, and.
while inflation will top 130 per-
cent in.the coming year, it will
hopefully decline steadily there-
after. Israeli officials regard the
new aid request as something of a
test of U.S. support and sym-
; pathy which some experts believe
have been seriously eroded by the
Lebanon war.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. October 29. 1981'

Voting Tuesday
Along with the rest of the nation, South Florida
goes to the polls next Tuesday to vote for a variety of
important national, state and local issues. Our own
ballot is long and complicated, and it is hoped that an
informed citizenry will have the information on its
fingertips to make their choices clearly known when
they enter the voting booth.
Or should we say if they enter the voting booth?
Judging from our most recent local elections here
in September, we come away askance with the
awareness that fewer than 30 percent of our qualified
electorate bothered to show up at the polls.
Some people argue that it is specious to reason
that it is not important whom or what you vote for,
only that you vote. The suggestion is that an ill-in-
formed citizen might just as well stay home.
Our own feeling in the matter is that people who do
go to the polls, know pretty much what the issues are
and who the best candidates are to represent them.
We may not always agree with their choices, but the
fact is that voting is the cornerstone of the American
democratic process.
Here, better than elsewhere, we can readily say,
"Use it, or lose it." We trust South Florida will heed
the advice and erase by their many numbers the
wretched low record they set last time out.
The Hassan Statement
Morocco King Hassan's statement last weekend
that the Arab League nations are ready to accept the
existence of Israel is at variance with the facts. In the
first instance, he seems to have gone further than
any single Arab leader heretofore in offering
recognition.
So that the statement causes us to wonder
whom Hassan is speaking for, or whether in fact he is
speaking for anyone at all.
More than this, the statement is grudging in its
spirit, however much further it has gone than, say,
the eight-point declaration of the Arab nations
meeting at Fez in Morocco last month who addressed
themselves to this very same issue. And if Hassan's
statement is grudging, it is not hard to imagine how
recalcitrant the eight points at Fez were.
But whether the Hassan statement does or does
not in fact represent the feelings, beliefs and
determination of the Arab League nations, it is
unacceptable for other reasons. It is predicated not
on another one of those "simple" peace-for-land
offers, but on the Rogers peace plan of the early
Nixon years in the White House. In effect, its
purpose is to sweep Israel back into the borders that
were established following the Israeli victory in their
1948 War of Liberation.
Having failed to destroy Israel at that time, the
Arabs have since then waged a systematic and
persistent war of attrition against Israel, resulting in
wars in 1956 (Sinai-Suez), 1967 (the Six-Day War),
and 1973 (the war launched against Israel by that
brave and peaceful humanitarian, Anwar Sadat, on
Yom Kippur of that year).
Not to mention the latest campaign waged by
Israel in Lebanon to root out and send into exile the
largest part of a Palestine Liberation Organization
phalanx there that not only disturbed the peace in
Lebanon, but in Israel as well.
And having failed in all these attempts, Hassan
now talks about the "new phase" in Arab-Israeli
relations based "no longer (on) a conflict of force, but
of law and rights."
In other words, what the Arabs couldn't win on
the battlefield, now they are determined to win by
"diplomacy."
Hassan's explanation of the Fez eight-point
declaration is, in itself in large part, at variance with
President Reagan's own peace proposal of Sept. 1.
Even the President recognizes that there is no
recognition of Israel in the Fez declaration. This does
not mean that the Reaganites are not determined to
press for their own land-for-peace deal, a plan little
better so far as Israel is concerned than the
Rogers deal on the Fez fizzle.
More than ever, Israel needs our support to
weather the storm. Unfortunately, so far, it has had
all too much back-biting, not only from Israelis
themselves, but from American Jews without the
guts to speak up for the Jewish nation they profess
to love.
On Going Back to Beginnings
GAINESVILLE. Fla. It
has rained for more than one solid
day with the fierceness of rains in
New England, where the skies
turn leaden, almost black, dump-
ing their despair in sheets of
driven water.
It quit as suddenly and arbi-
trarily as it began. The sun
shines now. and there is a brisk
cold in the air that turns the city
as dry as it was wet only hours
ago.
The trees are mostly changed
into the skeletons of their late fall
and coming winter, but here and
there you still see a blaze of
golden leaves turning red before
your eyes. The panoply of bril-
liant hues, which like Shakes-
paara reminded us. "do paint the
meadows with delight." is a mere
sideshow to the display nature
stages in Maine or Vermont.
BUT GAINESVILLE is north
for a Miamian. far enough north
to make the difference in tem-
perature and the splendor of flora
>&&&m%m&ss^^

1
s
Mindlin
1 "" i
v:::^^^^:::::^^^^:<<^x^^:?^s^KW^Ps$
and fauna which declaim change
from the monotony of Miami's
blasted, fetid heat and humidity
the sameness of flat and burn-
ed-out land framed in a new and
unrelenting concrete.
We are just back from a simple
hike around the Devil's Mill-
hopper, a state geological site, in
fact a huge sinkhole which form-
ed when a cavern roof collapsed.
Curiosity-seekers first
discovered the site more than a
century ago and visited it for the
coolness within the sink
though the brisk weather after
the rain makes this characteristJ
of the sink a trifle uncomlorubb
Stdl the iush growth ,Xns
and the streams tumbling down
the steep slope give you the sense
of being more than in a miniature
forest.
SOMEHOW, the Devil's Mill
hopper recalls for me a visit m
Tintern Abby in Wales, a church
ordered destroyed by Henry VIM |
in the mid-16th Century when he
separate Britain's religious
establishment from the Bishop of
Rome's and went into that busi-
ness on his own.
The poet William Wordsworth
celebrated the historic site in a,
poem he wrote after a visit there
on a walking tour with his sister
Dorothy. The ruined cathedral!
left as little more than a skeleton
after Henry's men were done with
it to celebrate their new Protes
tantism. evokes a sense of awe in
the face of history, and hence a
return to the primordial.
At the Devil's Millhopper.
there is the same sense for me. a
return to beginnings, which the
end of the blinding rain and the
return of sun and sky and brisk
cool air began in the first place.
I guess that what I feel at this
glorious sinkhole is delight with
something I see how things
were during a simpler time, when
the closeness between men and
nature made men more indepen-
dent, more self-reliant, more
friendly when called upon, in the
end less hostile and suspicious
and even malevolent than they
are today.
INDEED, these are the
characteristics of men in big
cities, where culture gives way to
crime, where the best in human-
ity dies day by day before then
lentless assault of the worst.
Perhaps in Gainesville, as in any
hamlet, where there is a more
iK'nign process of attrition of the
best in us. I was set up for our
hike at Devil's Millhopper.
Here, in this city, it was less
of a hop backward to the past
than Miami can ever offer again
where, more and more, the worst
reigns supreme. At the Devil's
Millhopper. yesterday descended
upon us in a blanket of comfort.
and in the natural order recall-
ed.
KBG Vs. Mossad
Untold Story of Russian Power
"Open Sesame!" and at the
press of a button inside the com-
mand center of a Soviet sub-
marine a heavy underwater steel
gate rises soundlessly. With
ultra-modern rock drilling and
excavating machines the Soviets
built, one of the biggest secret
underground military bases on
the Lebanese coast near Sidon. In
the concrete steel reinforced
shafts and tunnels, the Israelis
discovered to their utter amaze-
ment a command center with
computers, gigantic underground
caves filled with highly-modern
weapons and complete protected
storage installations for nuclear
arms.
According to the latest in-
formation from Beirut, these
radiation-protected tunnels were
built by East German techni-
cians. Each section, separated
from each other by steel doors,
can only be opened by a coded
master card and reveals a mass of
surprises.
ALL THIS began on a rainy
Tuesday on November 13, 1979,
in Moscow when PLO Chief Yasir
Arafat conferred with Soviet
Minister for Foreign Affairs An-
drei Gromyko. "Comrade
Gromyko, I have only light wea-
pons with which my PLO face the
Israelis, but the Israelis have re-
ceived the most sophisticated
Translated from 'Presseblatt:
Nachrichten Aus Israel.'
This report was sent to South Florida from Israel by
Suzanne Pomeranz, daughter of Robert E. Pomeranz, who
lives with his family in Sanford N.C. Suzanne's uncle, Nat
Pomeranz, is a resident of Hollywood Fla., and he
transmitted the report to The Jewish Floridian as
originally titled in 'Nachrichten Aus Israel' as 'Mossad
Versus KGB.' Suzanne has been living in Israel for the
past few years and will shortly return to Sanford to marry
a Canadian specialist in Middle Eastern affairs.
armaments from the Americans
. Surely our struggle has a cer-
tain importance for you, for if you
are equipping us, the battle is in
truth directed against America
... I assume in this we share a
main objective ..." (from notes
of captured documents).
As usual, Gromyko heard the
words of Arafat expressionlessly
These words were passed on to
the Politburo, and finally an
"emergency plan" was worked
out by the general staff of the So-
viet armed forces.
From that moment, everything
functioned much faster than Are-
Continued on Page 12-A
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Friday. October29. 1982 12 HESHVAlWj
Volume 55 Number 4-


Friday, October 29, 1982 The Jewish Flondian P iff* -r>-A
Arab Agents Challenge Aid to Israel
By BORIS SMOLAR
\ massive and ugly
propaganda campaign is
L being developed in this
country by Arab agents
and pro-Arab elements to
influence Congress to vote
against giving American
aid to Israel. The campaign
is being carried through
large advertisements in
newspaper in 50 cities.
I he basic text of the costly ad
is the same for all the newspapers
accepting it not all newspapers
accept it. recognizing its mah-
ciouslv misleading contents -
but the text is slyly adjusted to
each city to appeal to innocent
Americans locally.
Asserting that Israel "spent
B.5 billion in three weeks to kill
people in Lebanon." the inciting
ad asks provocatively whether
the money given to Israel could
not be "better spent"- for the
benefit "f the population of the
city where the advertisement is
I carried. The ad is placed by a
l,Tnup calling itself American-
Arab Anti-Discrimination Com-
mittee and gives an address in
Washington. It urges the readers
"to write or call Congressmen
and Senators to stop American
foreign aid to Israel."
THE CAMPAIGN obviously
speculates on the fact that the
forthcoming session of Congress
will have a substantial number of
new representatives and senators
who might be influence by voters
in the cities where they are cur-
rently running for reelection. The
Arab propaganda machine is
clearly figuring that its ad may
influeence also older members of
both houses of Congress who are
not up for reeled ion this year but
are confused about Israel because
of the Lebanon issue.
The expensive advertisement
- which is obviously funded by
Arab oil governments and by
^ome American firms dealing
with these governments does
not mention, naturally, that Arab
countries are also receiving sub-
stantial financial aid from the
United States.
Nor does it mention the fact
that the Palestine Liberation Or-
ganization is being financed by
Saudi Arabia to the tune of $1
million a day. and that the Soviet
government is according to a
''port by :h.'Central Intelligence
\gency allocating about $200
million annually for "national
liberation" movements abroad.
the largest part of which goes to
the PI.O for terrorist activities.
NATIONAL JEWISH or
Kanizations are mobilizing them-
selves to fight this Arab cam-
paign. Because the inciting Arab
ad is focusing on sensitive issues
through a local approach, the
Ann.Defamation League of B'nai
" rith has alerted its regional of-
nces across the country to react
"i the form of a letter to the
Mitor campaign in any news-
Paper in their region carrying the
deceptive ad.
"he U.S. government is com-
mitted to Israel for the year 1983
2? the Fore'gn Aid Bill (HR
WTO). The bill provides for $1.7.
million in military assistance and
'85 million in economic support.
" has already completed the
congressional committee
process, and is awaiting action on
he floor of both the Senate and
the House when Congress re-
sumes its session. A congres-
sional debate on the bill is antici-
pated this fall.
It is feared that there may be a
tendency on the part of some
members of Congress to take a
position that Israel needs less in
terms 0f military supplies and
equipment because of the demon-
tratmn of Israel's strength in
ine war in Lebanon. Jewish
leadership is therefore preparing
itself for working with President
Reagan and Congress to insure
the support of the request of close
to $2.5 billion for Israel in grants
and loans in the 1983 budget.
THERE IS special need now to
demonstrate to the American
public and to Congress that it is
in America*s interest to maintain
militarily and economically a
strong Israel as the only demo-
cracy in the Middle East upon
whom the U.S. can depend to th-
wart Moscow's ambition to make
inroads into the area. The Krem-
lin has already gained strong in-
fluence in Syria and Iraq. In the
Lebanon war alone. Israel de-
feated two surrogates of the So-
viet Union the PLO and Syria
thus weakening Soviet in-
terests in the area.
With the PLO and their sup-
porters now choosing Washing-
ton as their real battlefield. Jew
ish leaders fear that while Israel's
operation in Lebanon resulted in
the military destruction of the
PLO. pro-Arab petrodollars may
obtain a PLO victory in the U.S.
Members of Congress are
aware of the close ties that have
existed for years between the
PLO leadership and the Kremlin.
At least 70 summit meetings
have taken place during the last
five years between the PLO top
leaders and Soviet military com-
mand.
THE COMPLETE backing of
the PLO by Moscow and its
satellite countries in the United
Nations and at every interna-
tional forum is also well known.
The PLO representative to the
UN. Zehdi Terzi. has admitted in
an interview, carried by the Pub-
lic Broadcasting Service, that
Palestinian terrorists are getting
training on a regular basis in the
Soviet Union.
It is estimated by competent
authorities that approximately
I.(KM) I'LO terrorists were trained
in the last few years in Soviet
training camps in the use of
weaponry, sabotage tactics, ex-
plosives, terror and guerrilla war-
fare In the current operations in
Lebanon. Israel captured
thousands of weapons supplied
by the Soviet government to the
--.


, *0-
HP
NO
P^ '. ;, \\JB*\
SO WHAT ELSE IS NEW?
PLO. including enough heavy ar-
tillery pieces to furnish six
brigades, many Katyusha rocket
launchers, tanks and anti-tank
missiles, armored personnel car-
riers and more than 4.000 tons of
ammunition.
The PLO has made it very
clear that it stands against the
United States. Its security chief.
Abu Ayad. openly stated in an
interview quoted by the Asso-
ciated Press that the PLO would
have allowed the Soviets "a
thousand bases' against the
United States if it controlled
land.
IN LIGHT of the intention of
the PLO to secure control of the
West Bank and the Gaza area,
now held by Israel, and declare
itself a government in these terri-
tories, it can be realized by every
thinking American what the
United State stands to Ins, to t he
Soviet Union by cutting military
and financial support U) Israel.
Gaza, which lies on the shores of
the Mediterranean, can easily be
converted into a Soviet naval
base, if the PLO succeeds m
reaching its goal ol establishing
an indendent Palestinian state
Bell Introduces
heWorld ByThe Minut*
NEAR EAST $2.21X80'
EUROPE $l42*/80
UNITED KINGDOM H25776
NovvYxi Can Dial aVMinule Overseas Call.
Have family or friends in Israel,
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:NGDOM iRfiAND


$.08

5

n .
'37
78
I
00
80

:
Discount
.
...
58
19
95
CARIBBEAN Al LAN TIC
Discount
Economy
'68
126
101
13
85
68
them, or almost anywhere else in the world,
at low one-minute rates. The 3-minute
minimum call is no longer
in effect except in
countries that are not
dialable.
This chart gives you
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rates, the lower rates tor
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and the new calling times
I Standard, Discount, and
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...
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in
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5pm
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lorn
7am- 4pm
I0pm-7am
SOUTH AMERICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
. //
.08
166
18
89
71
7am-1 pm
Ipm-IOpm
'0pm-7am
NEAR EAST
Standard
Discount
Economy
368
2 76
221
1.33
100
80
8am -3pm
9pm-8am
3pm-9pm
CENTRAL AMERICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
262
197
1.57
13
85
68
5pm-llpm
8am-5pm
II pm-8am
AFRICA
Standard
Discount
Economy
289
217
173
I 48
111
89
6am-l2Noon
12Noon-5pm
5pm-6am
INDIAN OCEAN
Standard
Discount
Economy
522
392
313
217
1.63
1 30
6pm-lam
lam-Ham
llam-6pm
For countries thot ore not dialable. there's o 3-mmute minimum ond roles ore somewhat higher
fXtereni role schedule* apply to Conodo ond Menrco Check with your local operator
Federal eose to ot 1% 's odded on all colls billed m the United Stores____________________
day or night even to
I countries that never had
I reduced rates before.
No International
Dialing in your area.' You
still get the new 1-minute
dial rate as long as special
operator assistance is not
| required.
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less than ever before.
Want to know more?
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HRST MINl:Tt/tAPI>ITIONAl MINITF


*-ae|6-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 29, 1982
$5 Million Drive
To Rescue Polish-Jewish Artifacts
LOS ANGELES (JTA) -
The Union of American Hebrew
Congregations launched a $5 mil
Uon drive here this week to res-
cue, restore and reacquire long-
lost documents and artifacts rep-
resenting 1,000 years of Polish-
Jewish history.
The funds will go toward the
UAHC's Polish Judaica project,
initiated last year following the
signing of a unique cultural ex-
change agreement between the
Reform Jewish group and the
University of Warsaw.
Dr. Armand Hammer, presi-
dent of Occidental Petroleum
Corp., served as chairman of .the
$500-a-plate dinner in the Beverly
Wilshire Hotel attended by 600
guests.
HAMMER CALLED the
UAHC-Polish agreement "a
breakthrough because for the
first time a Communist nation.
Poland, has agreed contractually
with an American Jewish
organization to provide Judaic
object*, manuscripts and art.
much of which has been inacces-
sible to Western scholarship." He
continued:
"The agreement will serve also
as a model to other nations, par-
ticularly those within the Com-
munist sphere, hopefully en-
gendering additional religious
and cultural exchange and sig-
nificant humanitarian gestures."
Dr. Maury Leibovitz of New
York, president of the Knoedler
Galleries and co-chairman of the
dinner with Guilford Glazer, an-
nounced that the UAHC would
issue a limited edition of 300 full-
size, full-color facsimile reproduc-
tions of the Kalonymus Codex,
an illuminated Bible manuscript
in Hebrew and Aramaic dating
from the year 1238 that is re-
garded as one of the oldest and
most beautiful treasures of Jew-
ish religious art. A limited edition
of 300 copies at $5,000 each will
be published.
KALONYMUS CODEX was
one of 20 works of rare Jewish art
from Poland on exhibit at the
dinner. It will move to the Skir-
ball Museum of the Hebrew
Union College Jewish Institute of
Religion in Los Angeles, where
'Accountability' Called
'Hypocritical' by Theologians
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NEW YORK- (JTA) -
A group ol 14 Christian
theologians, most of them
long-time supporters of
Israel, issued a joint state-
ment declaring that "the
voices of conscience" call-
ing for the "establishment
of accountability" regard-
ing the role of Israeli au-
thorities in the massacre of
Palestinians in west Beirut
refugee camps "are mixed
with a chorus of cynicism,
hypocrisy and bigotry."
The theologians, members of
the Israel Study Group, stated:
"The history of anti-Semitism
demonstrates that the world has
too often remained silent in the
face of atrocities except when
Israel stands accused. We have
observed that people who in the
case of Hiroshima,
Nagasaki, as in the case of
I My Lai and Cambodia and the at-
rocites committed by the PLO,
have remained silent, are now
stridently raising their voices in
condemnation of Israel. We have
observed also that little or no
criticism has been levelled
against the real perpetrators of
' the massacres, the Phalangists, a
Christian militia."
NOTING THAT "many of the
Jewish sister and brothers in the
U.S. and Israel have called for an
accounting for the massacres in
Lebanon regardless of where the
blame may fall," the theologians
stated that they stand with "our
Israeli friends" as they "endure
this painful soul-searching" and
at the same time "we as Chris-
tians confess our own sins of
silence, hostility and indifference
which have so often contributed
to these tragic situations."
Among those who figned the
statement at the Israel Study
Group's semi-annual meeting in
Weston Priory, Weston, VT.
several days ago, were Sisters
Rose Thering and Ann Patrick
Ware, Prof. John Pawlikowski,
Rev. Edward Flannery, and Rev.
Isaac Rottenberg.
RELGO.INC-
Religious & Gift Articles
Israeli Arts & Crafts
Hebrew Books Judaica
Paper Backs
Records & Tapes
O0#ft SunOMv
1507 Whingtoa Avenue. MJB.
more than 100 articles of Polish
Jewish art, on loan from various
Polish institutions to the UAHC,
will be on display through
December.
Many of the works of Polish
Judaica were thought lost or des-
toryed in the Holocaust. Rabbi
Alexander Schindler, president of
the UAHC. told the dinner
guests:
"We cannot bring back the
martyrs of our people, or restore
the burned scrolls and precious
manuscripts that have been lost
forever. But through this historic
agreement we can and will carry
out our proud obligation to pre-
serve, for today and for the years
to come, the precious fragments
of a vanished world. In doing so,
we will more vividly remember,
more fullv comprehend and more
nobly honor the vitality: and
genius of one of the great com-
munities in our people's history."
SINCE THE agreement was
signed. Schindler reported, the
project has been broadened to in-
clude the restoration and recon-
secration by teh UAHC of Jewish
cemeteries in some 400 cities and
towns in Poland, as well as the
restoration of several syna-
gogues, the furnishing of a new
synagogue in Lublin and the con-
struct ion of a .Jewish chapel at
the site of the Maidenek concen-
tration camp.
Rabbi Philip Hiat. assistant to
the president of the UAHC.
negotiated the agreement with
Polish church, governmental and
university officials during several
trips to Poland. He pointed out
thai while the UAHC is a Reform
Jewish group, it has invited Con-
servative and Orthodox rabbis
and scholars to join in the work of
"rescuing and restoring the art.
artifacts, historic documents and
treasures of Polish Jewry for the
entire Jewish people."
The exhibition, which goes on
vijw in Los Angeles will
be returned to Warsaw for the
40th anniversary of the Warsaw
Ghetto uprising next April.
Later, the collection will be sent
to Israel, where it will be on view
at Bet Hatefutsot, the Museum
of the Diaspora, in Tel Aviv.
.V* i
Admiral Hyman E. Rickover, USN (ret.), is shown planting A
tree in the Jewish National Fund's American Independent}
Park in Jerusalem during his recent visit to Israel as u guesto/T
Herut USA. Admiral Rickover said the high point of his tript
uas "seeing the fruits of JNF's land development and affort-t
station work." Shown with Admiral Rickover is his wife]
Eleonore, who accompanied him on his trip.
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Sunday November 21, 1982 12:00 Noon
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JNF Strengthens Israel Strengthen the JNF


.F&Z2
No vember Nostradamus
What to Expect on Election Night
Continued from Page 1-A
,j who seems to be clearly
Ed Don Riegle of Michigan,
2 Dennis Deconcini m Arizona,
ta!. become the favorites
, election, along with
LfSrSSr Robert Byrd of
S Virginia and Lloyd Bentsen
J Texas, who are maintaining
long leads. In the same cate-
"g are Jim Sasser of Tennessee
JndLawton Chiles of Florida.
Closer races are predicted for
Democratic Freshman George
SB of Maine, and Senator
Quentin Burdick of North
Dakota.
Republican stalwarts Lowell
Weicker of Connecticut and Dave
Durenberger of Minnesota are in
see-saw races and the outcomes
bear watching election night. The
results of the crucial Connecticut
race will probably be the first in.
REPUBLICAN Senate friends
of Israel who look good for reelec-
tion at this point are John Dan-
forth of Missouri and Bill Roth of
Delaware.
There are a number of Chal-
lengers running for the Senate
who have expressed positions
supportive of Israel and stand a
reasonable chance of election.
They are Democratic Gov. Jerry
Brown of California who is in a
very tight race but appears to
have momentum in his favor;
Chic Hecht. the Jewish former
Republican State Senate
minority leader, who is mounting
a strong challenge in Nevada;
Democratic Julius Michaelson,
the Jewish former Rhode Island
attorney general, who is running
hard; and Jeff Bingaman of New
Mexico, who may pull off an up-
set.
In a few races, the supportive
Senate challangers are clearly be-
hind but may have a long shot
chance at victory. Republican
Haley Barbour, running in Mis-
sissippi, is looking better each
day. Democrat Ted Wilson in
Utah is still running hard. Demo-
crat Jim Guest in Vermont has
made good progress, and Wyom-
ing Democrat Rodger McDaniel
is conceded an outside chance. In
these races, however, they are
clearly underdogs trying to un-
seat popular incumbents.
There are a number of Senate
races where both candidates are
strong supporters of Israel.
Notable examples are in New
Jersey where Rep. Millicent Fen-
wick and Frank Lautenberg are
facing each other. A similar
situation occurs in Delaware
where Dave Levinson is running
against Senator William Roth.
Jewish State Senator Harriet
Woods has been strongly chal-
lenging Senator Danforth, al-
though her prospects are not con-
sidered good.
TURNING TO the House of
Representatives, there are literal-
ly hundreds of Israel's supporters
running for reelection or chal-
lenging for the 435 seats. But
some races take on considerable
importance due to selected
factors such as the candidates
seniority and influence in Con-
gress, a position on a key Com-
mittee dealing with Foreign Af-
fairs legislation, an opponent's
record on Israel-related issues,
and the closeness of the races.
In California, Democratic Rep.
Phil Burton is running in the
toughest campaign in his long
career as an influential supporter
of Israel. At this time, he is neck-
and-neck with his opponent.
First-term Rep. Sam Gejden-
son of Connecticut, a member of
the Foreign Affairs Committee,
seems to be staving off a strong
challenge from his 1980 oppo-
nent.
A race of considerable impor-
tance has shaped up in Florida,
v here a senior member of the
I'oreign Affairs Committee and
strong friend of Israel, Rep.
'Dante Fascell (D), is being
strongly challenged by Re-
publican Glenn Rinkler.
TWO RACES of significance
are taking place in Illinois. Senior
House Member Sid Yates (D),
who sits on the important For-
eign Operations Appropriation's
Subcommittee, is facing strong
opposition but should pull out a
win. The second, a race of un-
usual interest, Dick Durbin (D)
challenges Rep. Paul Findley (R).
Findley, a longtime spokesman
for the PLO and ranking
Minority Member of the Foreign
Affairs Subcommittee on the
Middle East, has been out-
spokenly critical of Israel. Durbin
has a good chance of defeating
Findley, which would be a major
accomplishment in the House.
Maryland is the scene of a raci
of considerable interest wher4
veteran Chairman of the Appro-
priations Foreign Operations
Subcommittee Rep. Clarence
Long (D), a staunch Israel sup
porter, looks like a winner at this
time, but not for certain.
A New York race which will
impact on legislation effecting
Israel is between two incumbent
Congressman forced to run
against each other due to redis-
tricting. Rep. Ben Gilman, a
senior Republican member of the
Foreign Affairs Committee, is
running against Rep. Peter
Peyser (D) who has also been
supportive. But keeping Gilman
on the Committee is a priority,
given its anticipated composi-
tion.
-;>,:... i -.v.v.v' .*.' v'.. -:'<
Friday ,October-29,r9827Tfie Jewish Floridian Page7-A
Dulzin's Reelection to
Chairmanship Said to be Assured
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Leon Dulzin, chairman of the
World Zionist Organization
Executive, is virtually assured
for reelection to the post at the
forthcoming Zionist Congress
here in December. Lengthy nego-
tiations between the parties have
resulted in agreement that both
Dulzin, a leader of the Liberal
Party wing of Likud, and WZO
treasurer Akiva Levinsky who is
a Labor movement representa-
tive, will keep their respective
positions.
Nagging doubts among some
political circles here and Zionist
circles abroad about whether the
Congress should be postponed
have finally been swept aside by
Premier Menachem Begin him-
self. At a meeting with Likud
leaders. Begin ruled this week,
according to a report in Haaretz,
that the Congress be held as
scheduled.
The interparty backroom
agreements provide for a slight
decrease in Likud-affiliated rep-
resentation (from 168 to 175 dele-
gates) and a slight rise in Labor-
affiliated delegates (from 123 to
150). Mizrachi will drop from 77
to 60, reflecting the National Re-
ligious Party's savage mauling at
the 1981 Knesset elections in Is-
rael. The General Zionist Con-
federation will go up from 113 to
120.
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Guest Speaker
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Israel's Minister of Information
to Washington, D.C.
Sunday, December 19,1982 at 6:30 p.m.
Fontainebleau Hilton Hotel
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
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F .-
Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 29,1982
Reagan Initiative
Earns Plaudits Among Cairo Officials
First Israel Envoy to Egypt
Lauds Operation in Lebanon
By JUDITH KOHN
CAIRO (JTA) Egypt
has extended an official
welcome to the Reagan
Middle East peace
initiative, according to a
report by the state-run
Middle East News Agency.
The position of the
Egyptian government was
conveyed to U.S. Secretary
of State George Shultz in a
letter submitted to the U.S.
Ambassador in Cairo by
Foreign Minister Kamal
Hassan Ali.
Egypt had previously stated
that it saw positive elements in
the Reagan initiative, but the
message sent to Shultz would be
the first official Egyptian
response to the plan.
ACCORDING to the MEN A
report, the letter also expresses
reservations about some aspects
of the plan and requests that a
number of its points be clarified.
The communication to Shultz
coincided with the arrival of
British Foreign Minister Francis
Pym in Cairo, where he discussed
the Reagan initiative and other
proposals for a Middle East
settlement with President Hosni
Mubarak and Foreign Minister
Ali.
In a press conference, Pyir
said that although the Egyptians
had a "number of reservations on
matters of details," he discovered
in Cairo "an absolute determina-
tion to found a peace making pro-
cess on the Reagan initiative."
He added, in response to a ques-
tion, that he found no significant
difference between the approach
of Cairo and that of Damascus to
the Reagan plan. Pym held talks
in Syria before travelling here.
"I THINK (the Syrians) are
approaching it in a very wise
way," the Foreign Minister said,
noting that Syria might par-
ticipate in a delegation of Arab
League representatives to
Washington where they will
consult with U.S. officials on the
initiative later this month.
"President Mubarak." Pym
said, "is totally clear that this is
the right basis on which to
proceed. The Syrians take a more
reserved view about it, and they
wish to discuss it with the heads
of state of other Arab countries in
Washington, before they come to
a conclusion... In other words,
they are taking a very considered
approach and I believe
that's a very wise way to
proceed."
Behind the Facts
Why
Arab Countries Pulled Back
On Israel's Ouster from UNations
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS -
(JTA) Only a few days
before Israel's credentials
were scheduled to be
presented for approval in
the General Assembly, the
Arab countries retreated
from their decision of two
weeks ago to seek Israel's
suspension from the
Assembly.
According to reports here, the
shift was decided upon at a closed
meeting of the 21 members of the
Arab League recently. The
decision not to seek Israel's
suspension meant in effect that
the Arabs succumbed to
American pressure and the
warning from Secretary of State
George Shultz that if Israel were
expelled from the Assembly the
U.S. would walk out of it and
terminate its payments to the
world organization.
ANOTHER REASON for the
Arabs' retreat, according to
diplomats here, was that a move
at this time to suspend Israel
would be incompatible with
President Reagan's Middle East
proposals and the declaration the
Arab states adopted at their
summit meeting in Fez, Morocco
last month. That declaration
urged guarantees for countries in
the Mideast. The Arabs view the
Fez declaration and Reagan's
proposals as generally positive
steps.
Instead of seeking to exclude
Israel from the Assembly, the
Arabs have decided to issue a
joint statement condemning
Israel for what they contend are
repeated violations of the UN
Charter and its defiance of
Security Council resolutions.
Arab and Moslem delegates held
long consultations on the text of
the statement presented to the
General Assembly Monday when
the credentials of Israel and other
member-states were offered for
approval.
The Arabs' decision to drop the
suspension bid did not come as a
surprise here. Apart from Libya
and Iran, which spearheaded the
suspension drive, all the Arab
countries seemed to be aware of
the grave consequences such a
move would have on the UN as
an organization in general and to
the Arab cause in particular.
THE U.S. contributes 25
percent of the UN's annual
budget of $600 million. If the
U.S. withdraws its financial
support, the UN will lose its
ability to operate effectively.
Secretary General Javier Perez
de Cuellar also made it clear to
the Arabs that suspending Israel
would be a severe blow to the
UN's prestige and would curtail
dramatically its humanitarian
programs for Palestinian re-
fugees.
Diplomats here said, however,
that the drive to deny Israel its
credentials will probably come up
again next year during the 38th
session of the General Assembly.
conflict and said Reagan's plan
closely resembles the position of
the European Economic Com-
munity as it was expressed in the
Venice declaration of June, 1980.
That declaration included a call
for the PLO to be "associated"
with the Mideast peace
negotiations.
WITH REGARD to the Syrian
stance on negotiating with Israel,
Pym acknowledged that he found
no change of positions in
Damascus. But he said the
Syrians'view was that "if, as they
hope there is going to be, a
peaceful solution can be achieved,
then that solution will be with
someone, and therefore, in that
sense, they acknowledged the
existence of Israel."
In his discussions with
Mubarak and Ali. Pym said he
found his country and Egypt at
one with respect to their aims of
seeing a strong and independent
Lebanon, self-determination for
the Palestinians and security for
all parties.
He added that both Egypt and
Britain also found "the need for
Israel to change her attitude and
behavior." Noting the support
the Reagan plan has among
Israel's opposition, and in the
Jewish communities of England
and the U.S., Pym said, in
response to a question, that he
hoped "wiser counsel will
prevail," and that Israel would
reconsider the American plan.
SPEAKING ON other Middle
East developments, the Foreign
Minister expressed satisfaction
over the meeting between PLO
Yasir Arafat and King Hussein of
Jordan. But he said there would
be no meeting between himself
and the PLO chief in the near
future. "First we want them to
play their part," Pym said, "in
recognizing the rights of Israel
and the existence of Israel, and
abandoning terrorism."

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TORONTO (JTA)
Israel's incursion into Le-
banon was defended here
by Eliahu Ben-Elissar,
chairman of the Knesset
Foreign Affairs and Se-
curity Committee and Is-
rael's first Ambassador to
Egypt. He told some 1,400
delegates and guests at-
tending the B'nai B'rith
International convention
that Israel's military action
in Lebanon was necessary
for the elimination of the
PLO infrastructure and
gaining the security of Is-
rael.
Ben-Elissar stated that the Is-
raelis now want to leave Lebanon
as soon as possible. Complete
withdrawal will take place as
soon as the remnants of the PLO
forces and Syrian army depart,
he said. Ben-Elissar, who said his
address was a message from Is-
raeli Premier Menachem Begin,
stated that Jews have learned
painfully from a long history that
all Jews are responsible for the
survival and well-being of each
other.
"WE HAD to enter Lebanon
for one main reason," he said.
"The PLO had turned Lebanon
which used to be an indepen-
dent sovereign state into a
PLO state, not to make it a new
Palestine, but to make it the base
for attacks on Israel."
Citing the huge caches of arms
and miles of tunnels discovered
under and around Beirut, Ben-
Elissar asked: "Should Israel
have left to the PLO the opportu-
nity to choose the time of at-
tack?" He added that he did not
believe that the PLO could have
defeated Israel but it could have
caused many casualties. "How
many casualties should there
have been before we should have
responded?" he asked. Israel, he
said, cannot afford the luxury of
gambling with its security
Ben-Elissar criticized the
Western press as biased, dis-
honest and unprofessional in re-
porting the Lebanese war. He
accused the press, by its report-
ing, of provoking outbursts of
terrorism against Jews in Europe
and elsewhere. "I don't accuse
the world of anti-Semitism but
how do you explain what k
happening?" he asked.
BEN-ELISSAR told the B'nai
B'rith audience that the Begin
government wants to adhere to
the Camp David agreements and
opposes any plan that alters
them. Israel cannot give any ter-
ritory to Jordan or PLO leader
Yasir Arafat, he said. Seeing
what the PLO has done in Leba-
non, just imagine what it would
do in an area completely under its
control," he declared.
In response to a question from
a B'nai B'rith delegate he said
that Begin stands ready to go to
Damascus or Amman to discuss
peace with Syria or Jordan, once
those nations recognize Israel.
Aliza Begin Back
In Intensive Care
JERUSALEM (JTAI -
Doctors at Hadassah Medical
Center have ordered Aliza Begin
back to the intensive care ward of
the hospital. The Premier's wife
was admitted to the hospital on
the eve of Yom Kippur. suffering
from severe respiratory
problems. She was discharged
from the intensive care ward and
transferred to the general ward
after her condition improved last
week. Over the weekend,
however, Mrs. Begin"s condition
deteriorated again. A hospital
spokesman described her con-
dition as stable. Premier
Menachem Begin has postponed
a visit to Zaire because of his
wife's illness.
Ifs Easy to Feel Like a Milon
Without Spending a Dime
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filled with furniture. Or maybe its
a garage filled with tools. Or a closet
filled with clothes.
It might not be worth much to you,
but to us it's worth millions. Its worth
medicine and medical supplies lor
indigent residents of the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged.
Everything you donate to the
Douglas Gardens Thrift Shops is
tax-deductible Of course, we will be
glad to pick up your merchandise at
your convenience. A licensed
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Call the Douglas Gardens Thrift
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Harold Beck, President
Aaron Kravitz. Chairman,Thrift Shop
Committee
Fred D. Hirt. Executive Director


Friday. October 29, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
We must
re-elect Congressman
Dante Fascell!
Here is an excerpt from Moment that
states clearly why we must do everything
humanly possible to re-elect Dante Fascell:
HOUSE FOREIGN AFFAIRS
Dante Fascell (Dem.-FL),
who will be second in
seniority on the commit-
tee faces a tough race
from newscaster Glenn
Rinker. Fascell is very
close to the Miami Jewish
community, an astute
legislative strategist, and
with the loss of Bingham
and Derwinski, would be
perhaps Israel's most
important ally on the
committee in the next
Congress. Fascell's district
has been shifted, with a
concomitant loss of some
Jewish neighborhoods.
This is one of the most
crucial races of Jewish
concern this year.
Send Florida's
strongest asset in Washington
back to Washington.
Vote to re-elect Dante Fascell
19th Congressional District.
Democrat. Punch #16

pd lo> by Dime FmccII Campaign Co-t"tuc George Korge !'


.*f**#*\ ^^J^i^-F4^ilBn';Wdv.-0 Postcard mailed anonymously from behind
the Iron Curtain reminds the world that
After Reagan s Vow
Rooul Wallenberg has not been forgotten.
Wallenberg's Memory Seems on Wane
Nearly one year after the
President of the United
States voiced a commit-
ment to the Wallenberg
family on behalf of the
American people to "do
everything in our power" to
find the truth about the
fate of this great humani-
tarian, a postcard was
bravely mailed by an
anonymous source from be-
hind the Iron Curtain, re-
minding the world that he
has not been forgotten.
The card, now in the posses-
sion of the Simon Wiesenthal
Center in Los Angeles, was
mailed from Leningrad, USSR, to
King Carl Gustaf XVI of Sweden
and then forwarded to the Inter-
national Wallenberg Committee
in Stockholm. On the message
portion of the picture postal card
the words Raoul Wallenberg Lebt
(lives) are printed with a rubber
stamp.
OFFICIALS OF the Wiesen
thai Center were contacted by the
Wallenberg Committee and were
asked to make "every effort" to
bring this information to the
American public.
"This latest communication is
an indication that the plight and
legacy of Raoul Wallenberg can-
not be stifled even by the
strict Soviet regime," a spokes-
man for the Wiesenthal Center
said.
Wallenberg, 70, is a former
Swedish diplomat credited with
saving thousands of Hungarian
Jews during World War II. He
was subsequently arrested by
Former Miami Rabbi Thumps
For Reelection of Rep. Fascell
A former Miami rabbi, who
was for several years director of
Hillel Foundation on the campus
of the University of Miami, has
come out in support of Rep.
Dante Fascell in his reelection bid
to the United States House of
C52
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SAM SCMCHTM. 0mr Maim J'
Representatives next Tuesday.
Rabbi Stanley Ringler, director
of community affairs for B'nai
B'rith Hillel Foundation in
Washington, D.C., declared that
"the election of 1982 is crucial.
Members of the Jewish commu-
nity who reside and vote in the
19th Congressional District must
demonstrate now more than
ever" that they are behind Fas-
cell.
Ringler, in a letter to the
Greater Miami Rabbinical Asso-,
ciaton, and writing "as campaign
manager for Fascell and as a vice
president of Beth David Congre-
gation," noted that Fascell
should be reelected "not just be-
cause he is a friend of the Jewish
community and one of Israel's
chief supporters, but because he
is an effective and outstanding
member of Congress."
Said Ringler: "His service to
the entire community is one of
which we call all be proud." He
said in his letter that Fascell "is
an extraordinarily respected and
influential Congressman on
Capitol Hill He is a man of
integrity and dependability."
Soviet occupying forces in 1945
and has not been heard from
since.
As a further reminder of Presi-
dent Reagan's pledge made dur-
ing the citizenship ceremony at
the White House on October 5,
1981. members of the House For-
eign Affairs Committee, led by
Rep. Tom Lantos (D., Calif),
urged the President in a letter
bearing 31 signatures to honor
the commitment made on behalf
of the U.S. to the quest for Wal-
lenberg's freedom.
REPS. JACK KEMP (R. NY.)
and Millicent Fenwick (R., N.J.)
joined Rep. Robert Doman (R.,
Calif.) and the 28 other congres-
sional members who signed the
letter in stating: "This is an ap-
propriate time to reaffirm our
commitment to a man who exem-
plifies those ideals which we, as
Americans, hold sacred. We urge
the administration to take all
possible steps to locate Raoul
Wallenberg and secure his return
to freedom."
Statements of support were
also made separately by members
of the U.S. Foreign Relations
Committee, led by Sen. Clay-
bourne Pell ID., R.I.)
Rabbis Marvin Hier and Abra-
ham Cooper, dean and assistant
dean of the Weisenthal Center,
urged that "no door should re-
main unopened and no avenue
unexplored in our search to learn
the truth about Raoul Wallen-
berg."
FINESEUCTION
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Israel Determined To G^\
Security Arrangement
With Lebanon
Continued from Page 1-A
security arrangements for south
Lebanon and work out an agree-
ment on withdrawal. Presuma-
bly, he has in mind a committee
similar to the Israeli-Egyptian
working committees which made
arrangements during the peace
process between those countries.
However, a senior U.S. official
said later that the problem is not
the arrangements for withdrawal
but Israel's demand for a formal,
written agreement with the
Lebanese government. He said
Gemayel and other Lebanese of-
ficials talked in Washington of
rebuilding the "national consen-
sus" in their country, and this
rasied problems of how far Leba-
non could go toward a formal
agreement with Israel.
THE U.S. official also indi-
cated that Lebanon does not
want a formal agreement because
it might hamper its efforts to ob-
tain financial aid from other Arab
countries.
The next step in the process
will be the return of Morris
Draper, the special U.S. nego-
tiator for Lebanon, to the Middle
East. He was expected to go to
Lebanon first and then visit Is-
rael and Syria and, possibly,
Saudi Arabia, according to an of-
ficial here.
Meanwhile, Shultz was
scheduled to make a formal call
on King Hassan of Morocco,
chairman of the Arab League,
who arrived here for a meeting
with President Reagan.
Hassan, accompanied by the
Foreign Ministers of Syria,
Tunisia, Saudi Arabia, Jordan
and Algeria, and by the Secretary
General of the Arab League,
Chedli Klibi, had a working lunch
at the White House with Reagan
Friday, followed by a meeting
with Shultz. They met with
Vice President George Bush later
in the day.
A SENIOR Administration of-
ficial, briefing reporters on these
meetings, said they were not
negotiating sessions but an
"exchange of views on how best
to restore momentum to the
Middle East peace negotiations."
He said the Arab League dele-
gation sought "clarification" on
President Reagan's peace initia-
tive, while the Administration
sought clarification of the com-
munique issued at the Arab
League summit conference in
Fez, Morocco last month.
In particular, the official said,
the U.S. would like to know if the
implications in the plan proposed
by King Fahd of Saudi Arabia
last year and in the Fez
communique, that the Ar.
willing to recognize and I
peace with Israel, are actu
Arab view. "If this is
meant, why not just say J]
official said. He said it i '
for the Arabs to "come outnl
closet on this issue. J
THE OFFICIAL stressed
Reagan s proposals were
at broadened Arab particii
in the Middle East peace
"Negotiations for peace
take place around the table
tween Arabs and Israel
said. He observed that
tions cannot be between
and the Arabs and the U.S.
Israel, but the U.S. can
pate in negotiations at t
with Arabs and Israelis.
The official also stressed
all negotiations must bebasi
United Nations Security Co
Resolutions 242 and 338
the Camp David accords.
noted that the negotiations
in two stages, the first being
autonomy talks which the U.!
now trying to revive and. a
transition period following
plimentation of an autoi
agreement, a final stage of
talks.
He said Reagan in his I
speech, did not outline a [
only proposals to facilitate I
autonomy talks and suggestio
that could form the basis!
just peace settlement. Theoffkj
stressed that the Presid
proposals aimed at getting I
Arab countries to join
autonomy talks.
Publisher Levy
Dead in Paris
At Age 83
PARIS-I JTAI-Robei
Calmann-Levy, one of Frana|
best known publishers
headed the family book empi
for over 40 years, died Oct. I
the age of 83. He was the thi
generation owner-manager oft
Calmann-Levi publishing empi
and the man who brought I
French readers the books
Arthur Koestler.
Arendt. Jules Isaac and Jacqw
Ellul, a combat pilot with i
French Air Force during W
War I. He was an officer int
legion of Honor and was awa
the Militatry Cross for his I
time activities.
RuneWebber
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For 1982
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Friday, October 29, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Pagell-A
Sharon Urges World Jewry to Support Israel
By DAVID LANDAU
I JERUSALEM- 1 Defense Minister Ariel
-Lgron called on world
KrJ to support Israel in
Sistence on meaningful
iurity arrangements m
C Lebanon. Sharon
E his caU in an address
1000 United Jewish
inpeal leaders from the
J Jed States attending
LuJA's Campaign Lead-
yjp Gathering in Israel
jstweek.
[Sharon met with the group at
L West Bank settlement of
foana. The gathering is led by
ElA national chairman Robert
Lp and president Herschel
Blumberg.
[ SHARON TOLD the UJA
leaders that if Israel "does not
stand firm now ... we may
reach the same situation that we
had before the war" in Lebanon.
"Nobody wants to move the
Israeli troops out of Lebanon
more than we do ourselves," he
assured the visitors who re-
sponded to this with warm ap-
plause.
"But it would be a major
mistake if after so many
sacrifices and so many casualties
we were to move back without
solving the problem of the threat
of terrorism (returning to)
Lebanon."
Standing on a hilltop in
Elkana, from which the Gush
Emunim settlers and visitors
have a wide view of the entire
coastal plain a spot where
Sharon frequently brings visitors
to explain his security views,
even though no UJA funds are
spent on the West Bank the
Defense Minister blamed the free
world for compromising with ter-
rorism instead of fighting terror-
ism. This was an allusion to the
receptions given to PLO leader
Yasir Arafat by leaders of West
European nations, including the
Vatican.
IN FACT, even as Sharon was
making this point, Foreign Min-
ister Claude Cheysson of France
was preparing to fly to Tunisia to
meet with Arafat as part of what
French Foreign Ministry officials
described as France's regular and
frequent contacts with all parties
involved in the Mideast conflict.
Sharon declared that Israel
was determined that no "terrorist
bases, headquarters, units"
operate against her out of
Lebanon ever again. He said that
if the U.S. was really interested
in peace in Lebanon, it could
ensure that the Beirut govern-
ment signed a formal peace
treaty with Israel "or at least
start a peace process." Many in
the audience applauded him and
pressed him for autographs.
The UJA gathering began
Monday evening at Modlin, the
ancient birthplace of the Mac-
cabees. The group proceeded di-
rectly there after arriving at Ben
Gurion Airport to meet with
President Yitzhak Navon.
THE PRESIDENT dwelt on
the Rome terror attack, recalling
Italy's many past kindnesses to
its Jewish community. He noted
that Jews were not persecuted
under Mussolini's fascist regime,
and that Italians were coopera-
tive after the war with Jewish
"illegal" immigration efforts to
Palestine. He called on Jews
aborad to express solidarity with
Italy's Jews who were speaking
out against current manifesta-
tions of anti-Semitism in their
.country.
In an official UJA statement,
the purpose of the gathering is
defined as: "To demonstrate
world Jewry's support of the
people of Israel and the solidarity
of the Jewish people around the
world. They also want to see and
hear at first hand what the situa-
tion in Israel really is, and what
the feelings and reactions of the
Israeli people and their leaders
are to the recent, troubling
events.
Refugees Won't
Go Back Home
JERUSALEM HJTAI- Do-
zens of Palestinian refugees who
visited Israel under special
permission from the IDF refused
; to return to south Lebanon when
their entrance permits expired
: and hid in Arab villages in Israel,
i Israel Radio reported. They said
they would rather be jailed in
Israel as illegal residents than
return home to face Christian
threats and violence.
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Of Our
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Dade
Browand
New Barnett signs are springing up all over. We now do business
with more people than any other bank around. And you
have more places to do your banking.
arnett
3anX
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age
he
Jewish Flondian Frula\ October 29. 1982
*
Arab World Needs Mubarak
More Than He Needs Them
By DAVID HAROUNOFT
London Chronicle Syndicate
Despite, or even because
of, the war in Lebanon,
President Mubarak has
demonstrated that the
Arab world needs Egypt
perhaps even more than
Egypt needs its Arab
neighbors. It looks as ii
the policy initiated by the
late President Sadat is now
paying off.
President!Mubarak is now at
: he center of the diplomatic
stage, acting as a trusted inter-
locutor not only between the
United Slates and the Arab
world, hut also between the Arar
world the PLO and Israel.
It waa widely assumed that
unci Egypt recovered the Sinai
the faintest raising of tension in
I he region would be exploited as a
pretext lor Egypt for evading the
' amp David peace process.
YET DURING the initial
-tages < t the war. a number of
prominent Egyptian officials
attempted i<> play down the mag-
nitude > t the conflict. They de-
scribed i he Israeli armored thrust
into Lebanon as merely part of a
plan i" capture and divert the
Litani waters to Israel a
curious theory long-held by
former Foreign Minister Riad.
The Lebanese war raged, an Aral)
ipitai was besieged and finally
invaded, and Cairo responded
merely with routine calls for an
Israeli withdrawal. It was only
after the Sabra-Shatilla massacre
hat President Mubarak recalled
Saad Mortada. his ambassador to
Israel, for "consultations."
Arab states like Jordan. Saudi
\rabia and even Syria appeared
to look lor Egyptian diplomatic
intervention in order to preserve
ome vestige of credibility in the
face of their military impotence,
and the rising tide of local funda-
mentaliem. This diplomacy came
n two forms: the draft Franco-
Egyptian resolution to the UN
securit) Council during the inva-
lon. and latent coordination with
i he IS Administration in
presenting President Reagan's
peace plan on the Middle East.
Significantly, Egypi is the
only major Arab country to have
scape) Billing rebuke by the
PLO. And throughout the war
'he PLO representative. Ahmad
Sidqi Dajani. maintained the
most cordial relations with the
Egyptian government.
ARAB OBJECTIONS to
Egypt's formal return to the
Arab fold stems from Egyptian
determination to maintain a
dialogue and normal relations
with Israel. The plain fact that
Egypt has gained more for the
A-ab cause through negotiations
in pledging Israel to grant some
form of Palestinian self-
determination, is slowly being
borne in on its neighbors. The
conclusions of the recent Fez
Summit underline this point.
President Mubarak is now
facing internal pressure that will
have a direct bearing on which
way Egypt goes from here. The
expected appointment of a vice
president is going to be an im-
portant indicator. Kamal Hassan
Ali. the present foreign minister,
is seen as the favorite. If he is ap-
pointed, the foreign policy
launched by Sadat and taken
over by Mubarak is likely to con-
tinue uninterrupted.
Another runner has emerged in
the person of Aziz Sodqi. a
former minister of industry
under Nasser. The source of
much speculation, he has been
seen regularly at public functions
with senior government officials.
The announcement of Sodqi's
possible appointment by Mub-
arak can be viewed as an attempt
to reconcile the ruling National
Democratic Party with opposi-
tion elements.
THE EGYPTIAN president
has only latterly come to appre-
ciate that his efforts in greater
democratization must inevitably
lead to some kind of power
sharing with the country's small
but vocal opposition. And. on the
evidence of the increasing circu-
lation of the various radical party
organs, such opposition is grow-
ing.
Khaled Mohieddin's Unionist
Progressive Party, for example,
is likely to attract potent support
on two of his party"s major
planks. First, rapid action to halt
Egypt's declining economy,
which would entail in turn, re-
versing Sadat's "Open Door"
policy that led to a catastrophic-
rise in imports (Israeli exports to
Egypt amounting to S13 million
in 1981 are a likely target). Sec-
ondly, a break in realtions with
Israel.
Mubarak is alert to pervasive
fears that the 1977 food riots may
be repeated this time with fun-
damentalist participation. He has
already authorized legislative
measures to curb imports, by de-
manding that traders produce
documents showing the non-
availability of local goods before
imports are authorized.
Chiles Says Lebanese Problems
Are Far from Being Solved
South Florida leaders were
guests at a reception in honor of
U.S. Sen. Lawton Chiles at the
home of Judge and Mrs. Irving
Cypen last weekend.
Expressing their support of
Chiles' candidacy in the cam-
paign he is running in next Tues-
day's election, they expressed
special satisfaction at Chiles'
comments following the cessation
of hostilities in Lebanon.
"For years now. Lebanon has
been torn by civil war. bickering
internal factions, foreign troops,
and the PLO. It seems we seldom
see good news there without a
tragedy following at its heels.
Recently, though, the situation
has quieted down a bit. Israel has
pulled its troops out of Beirut, to
be replaced by Lebanese civilian
and military authorities. In the
meantime, peacekeeping forces
from Italy, France, and the
United States have had a stabili-
zing effect.
"Things appear to be looking
up again, as they were before the
brutal murder of Lebanon's Pres-
ident-elect, Bashir Gemayel. Life
there is as close to normal as can
be expected under the circum-
stances. Israel's northern settle-
ments are free from the threat of
a PLO terrorist and military pre-
sence across the border. At the
very least, the guerilla group has
had the wind knocked out of it."
But Chiles warned that "The
problems in Lebanon are far from
being solved, though. The
chances of quickly concluding a
peace treaty with Israel are less
under the new President than
they were under his brother. And
the tensions in Lebanon are deep-
rooted and strong. Amin
Gemayel does show promise
toward being able to draw the
different factions together. If he
can also maintain a cooperative
attitude toward Israel, we may be
back on track.
KGB Vs. Mossad
Untold Story of Russian Power
Continued from Page 4-A
fat had imagined. On an almost
daily basis, but at least three to
four times per week, there were
now military contracts between
the Soviets and the PLO.
THEN X-DAY arrived. June 6.
1982. Within 72 hours, the vic-
torious troops of Israel conquered
all of Southern Lebanon. The
world comdemned this "inva-
sion" as unjustified aggression,
hut this same world knew
nothing of the intensive research
carried out by the Israel Secret
Service, the Mossad who were
racing in competition with the
KGB for according to all the cal-
culations of the Mossad. the
Kremlin would have been able
perhaps already in August of this
year to launch from this secret
super command center a literal
Near East Holocaust, with the
word Holocaust being in this case
an understatement.
Unchallengable information
has established the fact that this
Soviet investment was not dedi-
cated to the aims of the Pales-
tinians and their desire for an in-
dependent local state. The So-
viets merely manipulated the
hate-filled and reckless Pales-
tinians and international terror-
ists as a convenient wedge or as a
jumping board in Lebanon for all
out offensive against the Arab oil
powers.
Israel's Mossad. partly operat-
ing by the universal and religious
association of the Jews, is oppos-
ing the Soviet KGB whose agents
are largely drawn by crystallising
the idea of the class struggle.
Faith rather than ideology was in
this case an advantage. The
Government of Israel was in-
formed in good time. At first, no
one was preprared to believe this
"open sesame" story. But now
experts state: "Israel stood on
the threshold of a Final Solution"
carried out by the PLO. whose
chief Arafat was already being
labeled as a "new Hitler."
THE NUMEROUS photo
graphs of Arafat above large and
correctly drawn swalikas were
discovered in numerous PLO
headquarters, including one so
called UNWRA school, much to
the amazement of the Israelis.
The western world stood
directly before the Third World
War and for both catastrophes.
Lebanon, just to the north of Is-
rael, had been selected as a
switching point. Once again, Is-
rael's lighting campaign carried
out a successful preemptive
strike and paralyzed the as yet
non-operational secret bases at
the last moment.
At this time. Israel's top
security Secret Service personnel
are translating and deciphering a
vast quantity of Russian docu-
ments found in methodical filing
systems behind steel doors.
There were plans for every
imaginative military operation
and for all regions, maps of areas
occupied or to be occupied,
harbor maps and accurate under-
sea plans. This ultrasensitive
military nerve system is now be-
ing exposed.
THE DOCUMENTS include
lists with names of more than
2.000 Europeans and Americans,
serving as a so called "Pales-
tinian foreign legion." There are
also numerous "personal black-
mail files" which were designed
to support the PLO cause
politically and financially. To the
general amazement, a large pro-
portion of these personalities
turned out to be American. There
was also a documentational
library of all international terror-
ist activities under the guidance
of Moscow.
But most alarming are the
missile documents and the
storage facilities for nuclear war-
heads. On the outside, that is to
say on the coast above, proud
PLO fighters guarded the rock
ent races but deep underwater.
unseen by these Arabs. Soviet
submarines moved in and out. for
the heart of this secret complex
was quite unknown to the PLO.
Special radar equipment and a
protected electronic communica-
tion system surveyed this com-
plex and could be takfJ
any moment.
But why did Moscow tju,
SklkandadPtapas8^
tion? This question cause,
ous concern for western i
experts, since it would
that:
The conflict did D
clusively concern Israel anil
Palestinians, but was aimed]
the oil powers and the UsJ
and that turthermore
It could now be ex
that there are other secret!
of the Soviet Union, for in
in Syria or Norway, and i
elsewhere. Who could kiu,
not every country has a i
service that can compare with I
reel's Mossad.
TODAY EXPERTS th
out the world ..re begin,.,,,.
understand why Israel acted*
such determination and didi
stop at the 10 km line, and:
all why it did not ceasecomU
including the siege and horobi
ment ot Beirut until
thing was under control. ThelL
raeli victory may have delaveil
general war for a number i
years.
The loss of life in Leb
which is to hi deeply
may have prevented an ato.
holocaust against Israel andi
rest of the world Every d,i
discoveries in Sidon and Be
silenced even the most extn
opponents oft hi- war.
"Itena's
spirited
message is an
inspiration
to us all."
-TEDDY KOLLEK,
Mayor of Jerusalem
Beautifulh reflective of
everything about Bens
Bhunberg... Exudes a
warmth and strength of
spirit, a surging creativity.
and a W ill to live that will
put all readers into her
debt:'NORMAN
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Jf
Vy,
f the sixth annual Negev Award dinner of
merican Associates, Ben-Gurion Univer-
y.at the Hotel Pierre in New York recently
Heft to right) Shlomo Gazit, president,
Gurion University of the Negev, Mrs.
and Col. Jehiel Elyachar, Jane Fonda,
Robert Arnow, president, American As-
\nna
sociates, Ben-Uurion University of the
Negev. Mrs. Elyachar holds the Negev
Award, an ancient pottery jug, dating back
to the period prior to the Persian invasion.
Fonda admires her special award a Roman
glass perfume bottle from ther era of 63
BCE.
-leadlines
Strongman Says Libya to Quit UN
The World Jewish Congress reports that
bvan strongman Col. Qadhafi has informed UN
rretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar that he
requesting the withdrawal of his country from
! United Nations and is calling on other nations
do the same.
According to the UN Office of the WJC,
Jdhafi addressed a letter to Prez de Cuellar early
week in which he states: "I shall call on my
btry to leave this organization and shall do my
nost in this connection to incite all the small
i also to leave th is A ssembly.''
Dadhafi cites his "lack of confidence" in the
as the motive behind his decision. He has re-
nted that his letter be circulated to the mem-
s of the UN (ieneral Assembly.
eane J. Kirkpatrick, U.S. permanent repre-
ktative to the United Nations, will receive the
VI American Mizrachi Women Distinguished
Hie Service Award at the annual Mizrachi New
New Jersey region scholarship dinner at the
Udorf Astoria Hotel Dec. 5.
Joining in the tribute to Mrs. Kirkpatrick will
Israel's Consul General in New York, the
Inorable Naphtali Lavie.
the dinner is one of the major events on the
^Wyearly calendar. Funds raised in connec-
i with the dinner help pay for the educational
extra-curricular needs of disadvantaged
dents in AM W's network of 13 schools and so-
I welfare projects in Israel.
i dinner is part of a series of regional events
nned under the guidance of regional co-chair-
nen Rhoda Miller and Norma Holzer.
lloshe Arens, Israel's Ambassador to the
Fed States, and Zevulun Hammer, Israel's
pter of Education and Culture, will be guests
p>nor at the American Zionist Federation's
biennial convention Nov. 7-9 at the
owack Lodge in Spring Glen. N.Y., it was
punced by Ruth Jacobsoh, chairwoman.
Jstain the Vision, Strengthen the Reality" is
[theme of the convention which is expected to
persons from across the country. A
two-four year slate of officers will be elected
phe convention. Outgoing president is Rabbi
fph P. Sternstein.
nbassador Arens will be keynote speaker and
us on present American-Israeli relations.
fe^Uf^e DePartmenf8 Office of Public In-
lk ,ms they've been investigating cover-
jnarges (regarding U.S. government agencies'
PK8"ng Nazi war criminals into the U.S., then
I is, ?k Protectin8 them) for some time... The
h ,' thev did nothing except sit on
"as in the past."
declares a retired Immigration and
^aiization Service Counsel in Charles Allen
article "A Review of John Loftus' Allega-
' in the just released Fall issue of the Jew-
I,, ,ran' ,Jonn ^ftus, a former employee of
iJa, Apartment's Office of Special In-
Ihi? -w?' stunned the nation on May 16,1982,
7 W Minutes" television program with
fc American government agencies' giving
fuary to Nazi war criminals in the U.S.
Chester. N.V., youth, president of the Ex-
ploring program of the Boy Scouts of America,
has been named one of four 1983 national youth
representatives of the 4.4-million member or-
ganization.
David R. Greenfield, 19, son of Mr. and Mrs.
Jerry R. Greenfield, joins young people from
three other areas of the country representing the
BSA at a variety of major programs during the
73rd anniversary year.
The annual Scouting anniversary celebration is
scheduled for the week of Feb. 6 under the theme,
"Catch the Scouting Spirit." Greenfield was
elected to his post as national Explorer president
last March during an Explorer convention in
Philadelphia. He serves in this capacity for a
vear.
World rank pianist Artur Rubinstein failed to
appear at the Oct. 18 dinner in his honor given by
supporters of the Weizmann Institute of Israel in
New York. Explanation was that the pianist was
"not strong enough to travel" from his Geneva
home. The Maestro's son, Broadway actor John
Rubinstein, represented his father at the dinner at
the Waldorf-Astoria.
Chairpersons of the American Committee for
the Weizmann Institute of Science. Elga K. Stul-
man and Maks Birnbach made the announcement
after receiving the news from Institute president,
Prof. Michael Sela, following his visit with the 95-
year-old Maestro late last week.
The dinner program featured young Israeli
violin virtuoso Shlomo Mintz in a command per-
formance at the special request of Maestro
Rubinstein. Zubin Mehta, musical director of the
New York and Israel Philharmonic Orchestras,
and arts patron Avery Fisher, honorary co-chair-
man of the Weizmann tribute to Rubinstein, ad-
dressed the 1,200 dinner guests.
Avner Yaniv, director of the Institute for Mid-
dle Eastern Studies and chairman of the Jewish-
Arab Center, both at Haifa University, has been
appointed visiting Israeli professor at George-
town University for 1982-83.
Annually since 1976, a distinguished Israeli
professor has joined the faculty of Georgetown's
Department of Government through the support
of the Jewish Community Council of Greater
Washington and Georgetown University.
A native of Jerusalem, Yaniv was previously a
visiting academic in both England and Germany.
He was a lecturer and later senior lecturer in the
Department of Political Science, Haifa Univer-
sity, from 1973 to 1979. From 1973 to 1975, he
was director of a research project on the European
Community at the Jerusalem Van Leer Institute.
The National Foundation for Jewish Culture's
second annual Playwriting Award for the best
unpublished play illuminating an aspect of Jew-
ish life or experience has been awarded to Crispin
Larangeira for his play. "Whispers."
Over 15U plays were submitted to this competi-
tion which seeks to encourage playwrights "to in-
vestigate the richness of the Jewish heritage in its
manv facets and to offer the community new
works which reflect fresh perspectives on Jewish
lite and culture."
Friday. October 2\>, 1982 The Jewish Floridian Pa- 13-A
Smolar Offers Insights
Into European History
By MORTON I. TEICHER
Jewish Floridian Book Editor
In the Service of My People, by
Boris Smolar: Baltimore,
Baltimore Hebrew College,
1982. 299 Pp.
The Annenbergs, by John
Cooney: New York, Simon and
Schuter, 1982,428 Pp. $ 18.95
Both these books deal with
colorful Jews in the publishing
business. The resemblance ends
there. Smolar gives us autobigra-
phical sketches of his work as a
foreign correspondent and direc-
tor of the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency, an organization known
to readers of this paper by the
initials JTA. which appear at the
beginning of many dispatches.
Cooney gives us a biography of
Moses and Walter Annenberg,
publishers of newspapers and
magazines.
Smolar was born in Russia in
1897 and came to the United
States at the age of 22. Five years
later, in 1924, after studying
journalism and working briefly
for the Jewish Daily Forward, he
joined the Jewish Telegraphic
Agency and remained with that
organization until he retired in
1967. For many of those 43 years,
he was stationed overseas, most
notably in Moscow from 1928 to
1930 and in Berlin from 1932 to
1937. He also sent news stories
from London. Paris. Warsaw,
Bucharest, Palestine and Israel.
THE FIRST half of Smolar s
book is devoted to his exciting
experience in Russia where he
had the asset of fluency in the
language. This gave him special
opportunities not only to report
the news but also to make it.
Episode after episode describes
his experiences with Soviet of-
ficials, including the secret police,
as well as with Russian Jews in
Moscow. Leiningrad, Kiev,
Odessa, Turkestan, Uzbekistan
and Bukhara. Not immodestly,
Smolar takes credit for the aboli-
tion of the Jewish sector of the
Communist party.
Smolar's experiences in Nazi
Germany entailed encounters
with the Gestapo and his eventu-
al deportation in 1937. Briefer
sections of the book tell about
persecution of Jews in Poland
and Rumania and the establish-
ment of Israel.
Throughout. Smolar places
himself at center stage, claiming
an influence over events which
may be somewhat desproportion-
ate. Nevertheless, he has inter-
Books in
Review
eating stories to tell, and he tells
them well.
WHILE THE story of the An-
nenbergs also begins in Europe
with the birth of Moses Annen-
berg. it quickly moves to the
United States where all the
action and there is much action
took place, except for Walter
Annenberg's service as our Am-
bassador to England.
Miamians will be particularly
interested in the chapter which
describes Moses Annenberg's ex-
periences as publisher of the
Miami Tribune during 1936 and
1937 and his association with
Meyer Lansky.
A fair picture is given of
Moses Annenberg's ties to orga-
nized crime, his conviction and
prison term for income tax
evasion and the efforts by his
son, Walter Annenberg. to
redeem the family reputation.
Unlike Smolar, the Annenbergs
are shown to have little connec-
tions to their Jewish origins.
Both books are will written and
worth reading.
Russian Jews Circumcized in Chicago
CHICAGO (JTA) More
than 1,000 Russian Jewish men
and boys who have settled in the
Chicago area have been cir-
cumcised through the voluntary
services of several ritual cir-
cumcisers, according to the
Friends of Refugees of Eastern
Europe.
Mrs. Yitzchak Kosofsky,
president, said the Rev. Noah
Wolff was one of the cir-
cumcisers who had been in-
strumental in obtaining the
participation of Mount Sinai
Hospital in FREE's circumcision
service. Rabbi Shmuel Notick,
FREE executive director, said
that since the start of the
program, the circumcisers,
doctors and the hospital have
donated $1 million in facilities
and support staff help.
He said Bethesda and
Highland Park Hospitals also
have made their facilities
available to FREE for the
program.
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 29, 1982
-

Rewriting History
Invitation to Join 'White Army'
Continued from Page 2-A
tablished authorities on the
Holocaust and making acknow-
ledgements to the Imperial War
Milllll. the Dutch Red Cross,
and official U.S. archives.
More dangerously. Butz cites
evidence used by the prosecution
at Nuremberg, thereby display-
ing "balance.*- He criticized and
rejects other anti-Holocaust writ-
ers" allegations that Nazis on
trial at Nuremberg testified to
the existence of extermination
camps after torture; concedes
that SS Einsatzgruppen may
have murdered civilians: does not
defend (ierman anti-Semitism:
and admits that perhaps one mil-
lion Jews died during the war
a devious stroke.
The book purports to be schol-
arly, plausible and reasonable
and. to the non-historian, accept-
able.
BUTZ'S TECHNIQUE
symbolizes the new revisionist
methodology: an attempt to be
"objective" aimed at a readers
critical faculties, inviting the sur-
render of common sense. Revis-
ionism's "scientifically based"
investigations are compared with
"subjective" official history. Re-
visionists are. therefore, con-
structing a new. alternative
"school." thereby breeding an in-
tellectual enviornment which
causes confusion, doubt and ob-
fuscation to such an extent that
new generations might be unable
to distinguish historical truth
In this way. inherently evil
political ideologies might become
more acceptable or remain un-
questioned. In strengthening
their myths, fascists and Nazis
can enter into existing reality via
them, and then perhaps trans-
form reality according to the
myths.
A second important feature of
revisionism is the current, coor-
dinated extremist campaign
emanating from the U.S.A. and
Britain. The California-based
Institute for Historical Review,
with its quarterly journal and
British outlet, the Historical Re-
view Press, is posing a threat to
democracy and history.
JNF Official Reported
Among Wounded in Rome
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM JTA) A
Jewish National Fund official
was one of the two Israelis who
were among the wounded at the
Rome synagogue terror attack
early in October, the JNF here
has announced. Max Shamgar,
55, until recently served as JNF's
emissary in Rome. He returned to
Israel to take a position in the
JNF's CouncD of Teachers and
was visiting Rome briefly on a
special JNF assignment when he
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was wounded. The other Israeli
hurt in the attack was Prof.
Jacob Sarroonetta, a Hebrew
University don.
In a cable to Chief Rabbi Elio
Toaff, JNF Chairman Moshe
Rivlin wrote, in part: "The
Jewish National Fund in Israel,
whose emissary and whose
supporters were among those
hurt, sends its wishes of en-
couragement and consolation to
our brothers in Italy. We will
work together to uproot the
pestilence of anti-Semitism, to
consolidate the State of Israel
and to strengthen the Jewish
people and preserve its existence
and honor everywhere."
American P
Israeli
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F1YIAIXEHLEALT HILTON.
4441 Collins Avenueon the Waterway, Miami Beach.
IT HOLDS academic-sounding
revisionist conventions: at
Northrop University, Los Ange-
les, in 1979: at Pomona College,
in 1980: while a third, for 1981, at
the University of California's
Lake Arrowhead Conference
Center, was banned. Instead, the
Los Angeles Hacienda Hotel's
International Room was booked
under a different name.
This right-wing masquerade
thus gained entrance to two rep-
utable institutions winning an
academic cachet by association.
Convention representatives
derived from America. Australia.
France. Sweden. Britain. Asia and
Arabia.
The importance of the conven-
tions lies in the inclusion of gen-
uine academics and men claiming
academic affiliation. Dr. Austin.
App. author of "The Six Million
Swindle" and a former as-
sociate professor of English at
LaSalle College. Philadelphia:
Dr. Arthur Butz. of Northwest-
em University: and Dr. Robert
Faurisson. of Lyons University,
are among those who have at-
tended.
THE OFFER of a $50,000 re-
ward to anyone who could pro-
vide proof that the Nazis had
gassed Jews, and a $25,000
reward for a bar of soap produced
from Jewish fat. illustrate the
Institute's general trend of
thought.
The third convention included
a paper entitled "Axis Involve-
ment with Arab Nationalists,"
and Issa Nakhleh. head of the
Palestine-Arab delegation in New
York, spoke of Zionist genocide
against Palestinians, demon-
strating a growing united left-
right front against Jews and Is-
rael. A similar anti-Zionist cam-
paign can be seen in the British
National Front's opposition to an
"expansionist Israel" and the
British Movement's claims that
Jews forcibly seized Arab land by
capitalizing on "alleged atro-
cities" during the Second World
War.
Eight-Wing Posters
Pepper Los Angeles
With Hate Material;
Guns Mix With Nazi PaJ
Continued from Page 1-A
execution victims. One par-
ticularly horrifying poster con-
tains a photograph of a Nazi offi-
cer with a pistol to the head of an
elderly man who is sitting on the
edge of a mass grave filled with
corpses. The poster declares in
bold letters. "Gun Registration
Equals Mass Extermination."
Other posters, for example,
show two youths being hanged
and the words. "Gun Registra-
tion Equals Youth Extermina-
tion." Another poster showing
the bodies of death camp victims
stacked in a pile, states: "Get On
the Bang Wagon Register
Your Guns." Still another pic-
tures Nazi troops and the phrase.
"First Register Their Guns, Then
Register the Jews. "
The group which is officially
campaigning against Proposition
15. Citizens Against the Gun Ini-
tiative, has denied any connec-
tion with the posters.
ROBERT GLASSER, assis
tant regional director for the
ADL in Los Angeles, told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency in a
telephone interview that the
posters contain two small mark-
ings that might disclose the iden-
tity of the organization that has
circulated them.
Glasser said that there are two
types of markings in the bottom
right hand corner of some of the
posters. One type, he said, is a
small sized capital letter "A"
surrounded by a larger capital
letter "G." He said it was unclear
as to what this symbol repre-
sents.
But another smybol on other
posters has a picture of a small
head of a cobra with the mouth
forming the letter "C" and then
the word "COBRA." Glasser
pointed out that this an
not been used before, as far a
ADL knows. However
pointed out that there j.
organization called CORg
which is led by a man who I
extensive ties to the
Lobby organization.
La
COBRA is an acronvrn
Citizens Opposing Bigotry
Racism in America, a LosAL
based organization headed
Aric Leavitt. Glasser told
JTA. Leavitt. according
Glasser. is listed on the natk
board of policy for Lil
I^bby. the anit-Semitic ,.
group headed by Willis Carto.
GLASSER ALSO noted tk
Leavitt is a strong supporter
California State Senator JoL
Schmitz. an ultra-conservath
Republican who caused an upre
last year when he said at a leg-
lative hearing that opponentsofi
measure to outlaw abortion J
California appeared to him as",
sea of hard Jewish and (arguable
female faces" and are "murder]
ous marauders." In a letter L
May to a local newspaper in tl
Los Altos area, Leavitt wrote I
Jews as "dual loyalists''
money changers.''
While Glasser noted that thtl
evidence pointing to a COBRAl
Liberty Lobby association is cif
cumstantial. he said the Lib
Lobby is known to have linked |
self to conservative issues so
as gun control, abortion
prayer in public schools.
Glasser also pointed out th
the photographs used in
posters are duplications
original photographs and thatl
the printing process for thel
posters is highly professional. M
said the ADL office is trying u|
trace the original photos
their origin.
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Friday, October 29, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A'
A.
[continued from Page 1-A
I simple, nondimensional re-
1 ne of PI-0 Posturm8 and a
of critical analysis of the
iure and background of the
|0 role
fclALKlN SAID he and other
fL officials have already met
h executives from CBS. NBC
h ABC to discuss some of the
Lulties and consequences of
'nine fast-breaking events.
Liallv when they occur in
Lav places" The study, he
Eared, raised "larger" ques-
1 concerning media news
Sorting.
"The American media," it
points out, "are no longer mere
spectators they have become a
factor in shaping public opinion,
and. in some cases, U.S. foreign
policy. In light of these develop-
ments, do the media need to for-
mulate a new set of responsibili-
ties toward the viewing public or
are they on the right track
already?"
The "greatest inaccuracies"
were found to have occurred in
reporting casualty figures in
June, particularly during the first
10 days of the month when Israel
did not release casualty figures.
In July and August there was an
improvement in reporting of
casualties, the study noted.
OFTEN, it went on, the net-
works provided casualty totals
without a source or based on a
biased source, the Palestine Red
Crescent, an arm of the PLO, but
neglected to report updated
figures provided by observers
such as the International Com-
mittee of the Red Cross.
On the subject of censorship,
the study concluded that
although Israeli censorship was a
factor in network reporting,
treatment of it 'was overplayed"
and "went beyond normal jour-
nalistic practice."
Turning to the question of
balance and fairness, ADL said
"the issue is extremely difficult
to place in perspective." adding
that "we believe that all of the
networks, no matter unwittingly
or unconsciously, contributed to
some distortions and lack of
objective perspective in their
coverage of the war."
The ADL said it recognizes
that evaluating the fairness of re-
porting political and military
events raises the issue of whether
any such evaluation can be
wholly free of subjective consid-
eration. Bialkin added, "We wish
to record our awareness of the
difficulties which the news media
experience in seeking to fulfill
their responsibilities."
Settler Stabbed
JERUSALEM (JTA) A
Jewish settler in Kiryat Arba.
Zvi Segal, was stabbed in the
back as he walked through the
Arab market in Hebron Wed-
nesday. He also had his pistol
stolen in the attack. Despite his
wound. Segal was able to reach
the Machpela Tomb and alert
IDF soldiers there. A curfew was
imposed on the area.
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. October 29. 1982

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Sharon Tell Inquiry
Jommission There Was No
Anticipation of Massacre
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) It was assumed that when
Israel sent the Christian Phalangist forces into the Sabra
land Shatila camps in West Beirut that there would be ci-
Ivilian deaths, Defense Minister Ariel Sharon told the
Judicial commission of inquiry Monday.
"No one thought they (the Phalangists) would behave
we behave," he said. "But it is a very far cry from that
Lssumption to the anticipation of a bloody massacre .
None of us, myself included, ever for one moment in our
Lorst dreams anticipated or feared a horror like that."
This distinction between
anticipation of some
civilian casualties and anti-
cipation of a massacre saw
one of the key themes in the
public testimony of Sharon
before the commission of
inquiry. He gave evidence
|in open court for more than
wo hours before chairman
Justice Yitzhak Kahan
buled that the rest of his
[evidence would be held
Ibehind closed doors.
ftiAr. _.:...
THE DEFENSE MINISTER
said that no one in Israel, at any
level of dicision-making, raised
the thought of a potential
massacre in prior consultations
concerning the entry of the
Phalangists into the camps. This
statement, he said, included
Deputy Premier David Levy's
remark at the Sept. 16 Cabinet
meeting referring to a possible
massacre. Sharon said Levy had
"not opposed" the decision to
send the Phalangists in.
Sharon said Israel's purpose in
sending the Phalangists into the
two camps they were also
slated to enter a third Beirut
camp. Kafahani had been to
spare Israel Defense Force lives.
He recalled a long-standing
Cabinet policy decision from the
second week of the Lebanon war
to involve the Christian forces in
the fighting and said the decision
to send them into the camps was
the "military implementation" of
that political decision.
He noted in response to tough
questioning from commission
members that Phalangist partici-
pation in prior actions during the
war had been satisfactory from
the standpoint of their behavior
- "very reasonable" was how he
described it.
SHARON CONCEDED, how-
ever, that in the years of civil
war before the IDF's entry into
Lebanon there had been in-
stances of Christian massacres of
Palestinians, citing Tel El-Zaatar
119761 as an example. He
remarked in an aside that Amin
Gemayel, now Lebanon's Presi-
dent, has been actively involved
| m that episode.
Sharon said the aim of the
IDF's entry into west Beirut
jtlf in the wake of President-
Elect Rashir Gemayel's assassin-
ation was "to crush" the remain-
ing (2,000) PLO terrorists there
and prevent them regrouping,
with the help of sympathetic left-
wing militias, and retaking key
| areas of the city.
"We did all that was humanly
possible to prevent civilian casu-
alties," Sharon said of this IDF
action that had been decided on
by himself, Premier Menachem
Begin and Chief of Staff Gen.
Rafael Eitan at midnight, Sept.
14. several hours after the bomb
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon
blast that killed Bashir Gemayel.
Regarding the massacre on the
night of Sept. 16 and Sept. 17 and
18, Sharon said he first heard of it
from Eitan, who phoned him at
his home on Sept. 17 at 9 p.m.
Eitan reported he had just
returned from Beirut where he
had given orders at noon that day
that the Phalangists be removed
from the two camps by 5 a.m. the
following morning (Sept. 18) and
that additional Phalangist forces
be prevented from reaching the
camps.
EITAN HAD told him that
civilians had been killed "beyond
what had been expected. "Sharon
recalled. Eitan had used the term,
"they over did it," he told the
commission.
Pressed by Justice Aharon
Barak why, having learned of the
killings. he permitted the
Phalangists to stay on till the
next morning, Sharon said that it
is hard for an armed unit to with-
draw fast from a built-up area
where fighting is in progress.
This was especially the case with
the Phalangist forces who lacked
communications equipment.
A subsequent phone call to him
at 11:30 p.m., on Sept. 17, from
Israel TV correspondent Ron
Ben-Yishai. with second-hand
reports from soldiers of killings in
the camps, had added nothing
Sharon said. It simply corrobor-
ated Eitan's information and
he (Sharon) was satisfied with
the actions taken by Eitan and
reported to him earlier.
THE DEFENSE MINISTER
said he had tried to phone Begin
during the morning of Sept. 18,
but the Premier was in
synagogue as it was Rosh
Hashanah There were discus
sions that morning with Eitan
and with Foreign Ministry Direc-
tor General David Kimche, and
Sharon stressed the IDF had
been ordered "to stop it, to pre-
vent further (Phalangist) forces
getting in and to drive those in,
out."
After the story hit the new
media later that day, Sharon re-
Continued on Page 7
Federation Tuesday Will
Feature Prof. Haim Snaked
Professor Haim Snaked, interim director of the Center for Advanced Internationa sJu^s,^Jh*
University of Miami, will be the keynote speaker at Federation Tuesday, the Greater Miami JwWi
Federation Women's Division's annual education day. chairwomen Bunny Adler and Gail Hams an-
nounced.
The program. "Womanpower '82: The Political Challenge," will take place at the Carillon Beach
Hotel on Nov. 16 from 9:30 to 2.
The ramifications of Israel's Operation Peace for Galilee will be probed by Professor Snaked in a tlak
entitled "After Lebanon: An Insider's View." The professor previously taught at Hebrew University
of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv University. Queens College, York University, and Carleton University.
The program's other featured speaker. Lynn Cutler, will talk on "Apathy to Activism A
Woman's Personal Journey.'' A current candidate for U.S. Congress in Iowa. Cutler is former vice
chairperson of the Democratic National Committee.
The event will also include a panel discussion of the legal and ethical questions raised by immigra-
tion. Panel members will include Ira Kurzban, past president of the Associstion of Immigration and
Nationality lawyers. Rabbi Irving Lehrman. spiritual leader of Temple Emanu-El Stanley Marcus.
U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Florida, and Neal R. Sonnett. president of the Dade County
Bar Association.
Pepper Featured
As Emanu-El Speaker
Congressman Claude Pepper,
Florida House Speaker Pro Tern
Barry Kutun. Dade State Attor-
ney Janet Reno, and State Rep.
Michael Friedman will be the
featured speakers at the Annual
Government Panel Brunch of the
Men's Club of Temple Emanu-El
Sunday at 10:30.
Miami Beach City Commis-
sioner Bruce Singer, an officer of
the Men's Club, will serve as
chairman of the day, Edward
Weiner, president, announced.
Israeli Soldier Killed]
TEL AVIV (JTA) The army spokesman said
that an Israeli soldier was killed, together with a
Lebanese civilian, when a bobby-trapped car ex-
ploded in the Lebanese town of Bahamdoun on Fri-
day. The vehicle was set to explode near a local gas
station at an IDF water supply point. On the eastern
of the Lebanese front an Israeli soldier was slight-
ly wounded by sniper fire east of the village of Kfar
Kuk.
I a Nil U' A.MlD SIOWS
dfewislhi Floridian.
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[Miami, Florida-October 29,1982 Section B
" Use your Jordan Marsh charge card. American Express, Diners Club.
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South Dade Council of B'nai
B"rith and several former recip-
ients of the Dade County Out-
standing Citizen's Award recent-
ly met at the Four Ambassador
Hotel to plan the upcoming 33rd
annual presentation of the award
at an Oct. 29 luncheon. Chairman
of the luncheon, Dr. Reuben
Sorkin. said that Dante Fascell
will be the principal speaker.
The Dade County Outstanding
Citizen's Award was established
in 1947 by B'nai B'rith to honor a
man and woman annually who
are judged to have performed the
most outstanding civic service
for the community.
The nominees and their sponsors ape
Carlos Arboleya. Interamerlcan
Chamber of Commerce of Greater
Miami: Lourdes P. AgulU. Uga Contra
El Cancer. Hlllard Bun" AvrutU.
Rotary Club of Miami. Rona Bar-
Uestone. National Association of Social
Workers; Ronald Bergman. Mental
Health Association of Dade County. Inc
Rlaine Bloom. Central Jewish Agency:
Mr. Arthur Conn, sponsored by the
Brotherhood of Temple Beth Am; Carol
Courshon. United Family and Child-
ren's Services: Judy Drucker. Temple
Beth Shalom; Faye Dugas General
Federation of Women's Clubs: and Mr.
and Mrs. Ronald Esserman. Mrs. Emily
("ummlngsand Mrs Marge Pearlson.
Also nominated were. Kay Fahrlnger.
Jackson Memorial Hospital: Albert
Friedman. Archie Stone: Rose F
Gallon. American Friend's Service: Al
Golden. Central Jewish Agency; Jeff
Goldstein. Hillel Jewish Center; Ada
Gordon. Hope Center for the Retarded.
Charles Hadley. Metropolitan Council of
Senior Citizens; Marshall Harris. Hear-
ing and Speech Center. Vivian Isaacs.
Florida Association of Workers for the
Blind. Ruth Kassewitz. Mental Health
Association of Dade County. Inc;
Barbara Koven. University of Miami
Alumni Association: Ira J. Kurzban.
Haitian American Community Associa-
tion, and Raul Masvldal. Encuentro
Cubano
Mignon Medrano. Cuban Museum of
Arts and Culture. Inc. Elizabeth
Metcalf. Girl Scout Council of Tropical
Florida. Mercy Miranda. Cuban
Women's Club. Ed Newman. South
Florida Blood Bank. William G Oliver.
United Family and Children's Services;
Athalie Range. Martin Luther King
Committee. Archie Terry Roberts,
United Handicaps of Florida: Officer
Jay Rogers. Robert Jenkins. Jr.;
Herbert Schurowltz. Leo Stelnman;
Ruth Shack. Jewish Community Cen-
ters of South Florida; Lily Stone. Amer-
ican Mlzrachl Women. Florida Council;
and Pearl Stretton. B'nai B'rith Women.
Torah Chapter No 1484; were also
named
Tapestry Exhibit Shown At Louvre
Will Open At Temple Israel In Nov.
Page 2-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, October 29, 1962
B'nai B'rith Award Nominees Named Awards Given To
7 Businesswomen
The 1982 Professional
Business Women's Award was
presented to seven South Florida
executives Monday at a reception
of the Professional Women's
Executive Committee.
Honorees included Adele
Mann, senior vice president of
Jefferson National Bank,
Nanette Roberts Simon,
assistant corporate secretary and
administrative assistant to the
chairman of the board of Jef-
ferson Bancorp, and Eloise
Walker, legal secretary of Kelly,
Black. Black and Earle, PA.
Carole C. Barber, office ad-
ministrator of Podhurst, Orseck,
Parks. P.A., Dorothy Casper,
mental health counselor. Shelley
Portnoy, account executive of
WTVJ, and Irene Rayman,
insurance agent for National
Planning Corporation were also
honored.
Kenneth Schwartzes
To Speak At Next
'Israel Update!'
Maxine E. and Kenneth J.
Schwartz will be the featured
speakers at the next "Israel
Update!" on Thursday evening
at 7:30. The series of educational
community forums is sponsored
by the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the Aventura
Jewish Center.
Mrs. Schwartz is president of
the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation Women's Division, as
well as a member of the
Federation Board of Directors
and a former national board
member of the UJA Women's
Division. Mr. Schwartz is a
member of the UJA National
Campaign Policy Board and
Miami delegation chairman of
"The Gathering" mission that
recently returned from Europe
and Israel.
The next "Israel Update!"
forum is scheduled for Wed-
nesday, December 1. All forums
will be held at Aventura Jewish
Center.
ORT Has "Games Night"
Women's American ORT Dade
South Region will hold the
second annual "Games Night" at
Don Carter Lanes on Saturday,
Nov. 6 at 8:30. Mary Ellen
Peyton, region president, stated
that the proceeds will benefit
ORT schools.
A reception will be held at
Temple Israel exhibiting the
latest works of international
artist Mordechai Ardon on Nov.
4. The exhibit. "Present at the
Creation," consits of a series of
10 six by nine feet tapestries that
tell the artist's interpretation of
the story of Creation. Gene
Massin, Miami artist and profes-
sor in the University of Miami
Art Department, will narrate.
The tapestries took four years
to weave and have been shown at
the Louvre as well as in major
cities throughout the U.S. Miami
is the last stop before they are re-
turned to Israel to permanently
hang in the Rotunda of the
Shaare Zedek Medical Center in
Jerusalem.
The American Committee for
Shaare Zedek Medical Center has
been responsible for the two-year
tour and the Southeast Regional
office is sponsoring the Miami
Exhibit. Chairmen of the event
are Donald Kahn and Sidney L.
Olson.
Members of the planning com-
mittee are of Temple Israel and
the American Committee for
Shaare Zedek Hospital, includ-
ing:
Mr. and Mrs. Lous Aronson. Florence
Balaban, Rabbi Haskell Bemat. Mr.
and Mrs. Jerome Blenenfeld, Cantor
Jacob Bornsteln. Mr. and Mrs. Hyman
Chabner. Mr and Mrs. Isidore Den-
burg. Mr. and Mrs. Mark Denburg.
Evelyn Denmark. Ms. Rocky Futter-
man. Philip Goldln. Mr. and Mrs. Jer-
rold Goodman. Mr and Mrs. Harry
Kahan. Mr. and Mrs. Donald Kahn. Mr
and Mrs. Eugene Massin. Mr. and Mrs.
Sidney Olson. Isabel Zimmerman, and
Dr. and Mrs. Mathew Zuckerman
Federation Forum Begins At Beth Am
Broadcaster and educator Nor-
man Ornstein will discuss the po-
litical implication of the congres-
sional elections at the first Feder-
ation Forum Sunday, Nov. 7 at 7
p.m. at Temple Beth Am. The
discussion series is sponsored by
the South Dade Branch of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion.
Ornstein is political editor of
the PBS series The Lawmakers,
editorial consultant for PBS and
WETA-TV, and political analyst
for National Public Radio's All
Things Considered and Morning
Edition. He has appeared on the
McNeil-Lehrer Report, the Today
Show. Nightline. and CBS Morn-
ing News.
Professor of politics at Catholic
University. Ornstein is also visit-
ing scholar at the American En-
terprise Institute for Public
Policy Research. He has lectured
in Cuba. Egypt. Spain, Turkey,
England, Iran, the Soviet Union,
Italy, and Canada.
The Federation Forum series is
chaired by Susan Fuller, a
member of the South Dade
Branch Board of Directors.
Beth Din Office
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Tel 534-1004 or 672-0004
FOR SALE
HALLANDALE 2 Bedroom. 2 Bath
corner Apt. Furnished. 5 minute
walk to shopping mall & Shul.
Call 454-9976 no Sabbath calls.
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buyer BVi mtg. Owner Shul's -
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JeffSchiff
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Dade Builders iflgf
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Roofing
State Licensed & Insured New Roofs Beat Your Best Offer
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Room Additions
14 x 24 Deluxe Family Rm $9250.00.
Swimming Pools
Custom Pools At Wholesale Prices.
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FRED JOSSi
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Watch your 'able to our
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Also violin playing
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OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(private Luncheons atrangati)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
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MOST MAJOR
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HONORED
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445-5371
closed Monday*
The Jerusalem Plaza During the
'Peace For The Galilee' Operation
JERUSALEM The swimming pool at the Jerusalem Plaza
Hotel became the setting for an evening of entertainment for
wounded soldiers in Jerusalem. Sarale Sharon, well-known
Israeli television star conducted a sing-along together with the
soldiers with songs of the Israeli people.
The soldiers arrived together with their families, some in
pajamas, some in wheel-chairs and some in ambulances, having
come directly from the hospital. On arrival their sad expressions
soon changed to a smile and before long they were clapping and
singing with all their might.
Families of wounded soldiers in Hadassah and Shaare Zedek
hospitals, were invited by W.E. Martens, General Manager of
the Jerusalem Plaza Hotel, to stay at the Jerusalem Plaza, free
of charge for an unlimited period. During some 45 days, 40 un-
fortunate families took advantage of this offer.
For further information please contact: Orna Ben Ami, Direc-
tor of P.R.; Jerusalem Plaza Hotel; Telephone: (02) 228133.
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Commissioner of Agriculture
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Paid Political Advertisement Paid lor by Colin English, Campaign Treasurer


Friday, October 29, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
{Hebrew Home for the Aged's President Leonard Zilbert, left,
{presents Secretary of State and Mrs. George Firestone with the
[Home's "Man and Woman of the Year" award at its 25th
{Annual Charity Dinner at the Konover Hotel. Zilbert noted
{Firestone's effots on behalf of "Florida's most valuable natural
resource its senior citizens" and named an infirmary at the
Worth Dade facility in their honor. Dade County Mayor
{proclaimed "Nola and George Firestone Day in Dade County"
{and the City of Miami made a similar proclamation.
South Floridian Named To National
Social Security Advisory Council
HHS Secretary Richard S.
ISchweiker announced the appoit-
jment of Carlos J. Arboleya, vice
[chairman and chief operating of-
Ificer of Rarnett Bank of South
[Florida. NA. to the Social
[Security Advisory Council, which
I review the Medicare program
|and provide a report by July of
[next year. The 12 man council
[will he chaired by Otis R. Bowen,
|MD. professor of family medicine
[at Indiana University School of
[Medicine and former governor of
Indiana.
By law, an independent advis-
tary council is named every four
[years to review the status of the
[Social Security trust funds.
[Council members represent em-
Iployers, workers, the self-
|employed and the general public.
Other council members Include:
iichard W Rahn of Washington. D.C.
flee president and chief economist
Chamber f Commerce of the united
Slat, s lames D. McKevltt of Washing-
ton, D.C, director of federal leglslaUon,
National Federation of Independent
Business; Stanford D. Arnold of Lan-
ding, Mich., secretary-treasurer, Mi-
chigan Building and Construction
Trades Council (AFL.-CIO); Alvln E.
Heaps of New York, president, Retail,
Wholesale and Department Store Union
ilAFL-CIOI; Karl D. Bays of Evanston.
[III., chairman of the board and chief ex-
ecutive officer, American Hospital
Supply Corp.; Kenneth M. McCaffree of
ttllel School Dinner Chairmen Chosen
Carlos.I. Arboleya
Seattle, businessman and reUred pro-
fessor of economics. University of
Washington; Samuel H. Howard of
Nashville. Tenn.. vice president and
treasurer. Hospital Corporation of
America.
Also included are James Balog of New
York, senior vice president, Drexel,
Uumham. Lambert; Linda H. Alken,
RN. of Princenton, N.J., vice president
for research, the Robert Wood Johnson
Foundation; David W. Christopher of
Pittsburgh, partner In charge of Pitts-
burgh office, Price Waterhouse & Co..
C Joseph Stetler of Washington, D.C
law firm of Dlcksteln, Shapiro and
Morln.
Irving Canner, executive vice
president of the Samuel Scheck
lillel Community Day School,
Announced that Mr. and Mrs.
eph Golden, Mr. and Mrs.
<1ax Rothenberg, and Dr. and
Irs. Laurence Weiss will serve
co-chairpersons for the
chool's Annual Dinner Dance on
Saturday, Nov. 13 at the Beth
Torah Congregation, North
liami Beach.
"This year's gala event marks
he Bar Mitzvah celebration,"
|tated Mr. Canner, who also
erves as Hillel's Finance chair-
Ban. The dinner will honor Dr.
Wax and Rhoda Lipshitz. Rabbi
fcipshitz, spiritual leader of Beth
Forah, helped form the school in
Joseph and Henni Golden
ve on Hillel's Board of Gov-
C?'^iGP,deni8 a Past pres-
ent of Beth Torah Congrega-
T. He has served as Youth and
executive vice president and is a
past president of the Southeast
Region of United Synagogue of
America. He has also served as
North Dade chairman of the
Combined Jewish Appeal.
Max and Saundra Rothenberg
are members of Hillel's Board of
Governors and he currently
serves on the executive board as
vice president at large and on
the executive board of Congrega-
tion for 14 years and served
on the executive board of the Na-
tional Association of Synagogue
Administrators. Saundra is a
past president of American
Mizrachi Women.
Dr. Laurence and Judy Weiss
are members of the Board of
Governors. Dr. Weiss serves on
the executive board as Ways and
Means vice president and is a
member of the Steering Commit-
tee. Judy is the immediate past
president of the school's PTA.
Opportunity for Professional
Sales & Promotion
of travel program. Need dynamic, personable,
enthusiastic self-starter with good Jewish
community contacts in Fla. Have car willing
to travel in state. Part time November through
March.
If Interested Call:
Dade 57&4330 Broward 7634177
Gains New Endorsements
Rothenberg Sweeps
Dade Bar Poll Over
Alfonso Sepe, 2tol
Former Florida assistant At-
torney General Arthur Rothen-
berg this week gained powerful
new endorsements in his county-
wide campaign for election as
Dade County Judge in Tuesday's
non-partisan voting. After
eliminating Miami Beach attor-
ney Leon Firtel in the primary,
Rothenberg faces only Alfonso
Sepe in the Nov. 2, non-partisan
general election.
Final results of the August,
1982 Dade Bar Poll which
polled all Greater Miami judges
and attorneys on their ratings of
the two candidates gave
Rothenberg a decisive victory
over Sepe, who resigned under
fire as a circuit court judge mid-
way through his term in 1975.
Sepe was voted unqualified by
43 percent of the judges and at-
torneys, a better than two-to-one
loss to Rothenberg, who was
found unqualified by only 19 per-
cent and rated qualified by 81
percent in the official Bar Poll.
Rothenberg also picked up
valuable new endorsements to
add to those of The Miami
Herald, Miami News, Miami
Beach Sun-Reporter, Hialeah
Home News, Miami Times,
North Miami Beach Leader,
North Miami Sun and Coral
Gables Sun-Reporter, all of which
endorsed Rothenberg for both the
primary and general elections.
Former Chief Justice of the
Florida Supreme Court Arthur
England; Dade County Bar
Association president-elect Neal
Sonnett; and Greater Miami
Crime Commission chairman
Warren Wepman gave Rothen-
berg their total support.
Former Miami Beach Chamber
of Commerce past presidents
William Shockett and Leon
Manne joined Greater Miami
Chamber presidents Hank Green
and Bill Colson in endorsing
Rothenberg over Sepe. Orange
Bowl president Charles Kimbrell
and former Circuit Court Judge
Irving Cypen announced their
support of Rothenberg.
Government leaders also
flocked to Rothenberg's team,
headed by Mayors Norman
< iment of Miami Beach. Howard
Neu of North Miami and Marge
McDonald of North Miami
Beach. Vice Mayor Malcolm H.
Fromberg of Miami Beach, senior
international vice president of
B'nai B'rith, and North Miami
Beach Councilman Robert Taylor
endorsed Rothenberg.
Others who are serving on the
Rothenberg campaign committee
include Harriet Green, national
vice president of the American
Zionist Federation and of Pioneer
Women-Na'amat; Gerald Sch-
wartz, past president of the
South Florida Zionist Council
and the Miami Beach Lodge of
B'nai B'rith; Harry B. Smith,
past president of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation; and
Anne Ackerman, leader of Point
East Hadassah and Jewish Na-
tional Fund organizations.
Rothenberg campaign chair-
man Irwin J. Block, former chief
assistant to Dade State Attorney
Richard E. Gerstein, said much
of Rothenberg's support "is in
recognition of Arthur's distin-
guished service as Executive As-
sistant Public Defender of Dade
County, as assistant United
States Public Defender, assistant
Dade State Attorney and as as-
sistant Attorney General of
Florida."
Joining the campaign team for
Rothenberg are Beach Commis-
sioner Alex Daoud, president of
the American Federation of
Rothenberg
Senior Citizens; Mayor Edward
Burke, former Florida Secretary
of State Jesse McCrary and
Alfred Duran. Others include
Raul Masvidal, Howard Galbut,
former Senator Richard Petti-
grew; Mike Simonhoff; attorneys
David Nevel, Mel Black, Stephen
Cypen and Sandy D'Alemberte.
Dade Public Defender Bennett
Brummer, Patricia Seitz, Hugo
Black, Jr., former Beach Mayor
Melvin Richard, banker William
Schusel, Beach Bar Association
past president Donald Klein,
Robert Paul, former Dade Coun-
ty Judge Roy Wood and Florida
Bar governor Theodore Klein
added their names to the Rothen-
berg endorsement list.
Block said free rides to the
polls anywhere in Dade County
are available by telephoning 531-
1174. The voting booths will be
open from 7 a.m. until 7 p.m., and
anyone still in line at the closing
hour will be permitted to vote,
campaign coordinator Gerald
Schwartz asserted.
Pd. Pol. Adv.
Gerald Schwartz Vice President
of Beach Chamber of Commerce
L
Gerald Schwartz, president of
a Miami Beach-headquartered
fund raising, public relations and
advertising agency, was installed
as vice president of the Miami
Beach Chamber of Commerce
Monday night at the Chamber's
62nd annual installation dinner
and dance. A capacity crowd of
civic and business leaders at-
tended the $100-a-plate function
at the Doral Beach Hotel.
Dr. Irving Lehrman, rabbi of
Temple Emanu-El of Greater
Miami now in his 40th year of
service to his congregation, was
honored by the Chamber as
"Man of the Year" for 1982. He
was Introduced by Barton S.
Goldberg, president of Jefferson
National Banks and past presi-
dent of the Miami Beach Cham-
ber of Commerce.
Ira Giller, partner in the Miami
Beach architecture and planning
firm of Norman M. Giller and
Associates and immediate past
president of the Kiwanis Club of
Miami Beach, was installed as
president-elect by Mayor Nor-
man Ciment.
Guests of Arthur H. Courshon,
board chairman of Jefferson Na-
tional Banks who recently served
as national chairman of the most
successful Democratic Gala in
the party's history, included
Mayor Ciment; Vice Mayor Sy
Eisenberg; incoming Vice Mayor
Malcolm H. Fromberg, senior in-
ternational vice president of
B'nai B'rith; Commissioner Alex
Daoud, president of the Ameri-
can Federation of Senior Citi-
zens; Commissioner Bruce
Singer; Commissioner and
former Mayor Leonard Haber;
and Commissioner Leonard
Weinstein.
Schwartz is serving his fifth
term as vice president of the
Beach Chamber. He served under
former Chamber presidents Leon
Manne and Joseph A. Nevel.
Nevel was presented with an
award for distinguished service
by incoming president Jan
Pfeiffer. Executive vice president
Doc Baker was honored for 25
years of service to the Chamber.
Gerald Schwartz currently
serves as Southeastern regional
director of the American Friends
of Haifa University. This week he
attended a national dinner of the
Haifa University organization
honoring United States Ambas-
sador to the United Nations
Jeane Kirkpitrick. Edmund
Abramson is president of the
Florida Chapter of the American
Friends of Haifa University, and
serves on its national board of
directors. Dr. Lehrman is a na-
tional trustee of Haifa Univer-
sity.
Schwartz, a member of the na-
tional board of the American
Zionist Federation, is past presi-
dent of the Miami Beach Lodge
of B'nai B'rith and former na-
tional Israel Bonds chairman for
B'nai B'rith.
A graduate of the University of
Miami and of North Carolina
State University, Schwartz is a
member of the executive commit-
tee of the Urban League of
Greater Miami. He also is on the
board of governors of Barry Uni-
versity, vice president of the
Civic League of Miami Beach, an
active member of the Greater
Miami Chamber of Commerce
and an accredited member of the
Public Relations Society of
America and of the PRSA Coun-
selors Academy.
Schwartz is national director of
the American Committee for the
Tel Aviv Foundation, of which
Dr. George S. Wise is president.
Felice Schwartz, his wife, is
executive vice president of the
Gerald Schwartz Agency, which
coordinates public relations for
Touche Ross and Company, the
Big Eight accounting and finan-
cial management firm.
Pd.Adv.


T> ** *
F
a
t
Page 4 H The Jewish Floridian Friday. October 29. 1982
Mizrachi, Bonds Honor Frances Jacob*
American Mizrachi Women
and the St:.r A I rael Ronds Or
ganizalinn will tribute Frances
Horowitz Jacobs at the annual
Mizrachi Bondwithlsrael
Luncheon on Sunday. Nov. 14. at
11:30. in the Cotillion Room of
the Eden Roc Hotel.
According to Luncheon Chair-
man Florynce Breeh, "Mrs. Ja-
cobs is richly deserving of the
Woman of Valor Award which is
given only to those who have
demonstrated the deepest of
loyalty to Israel and the Jewish
people."
Mrs. Jacobs is a vice-president
and member of the National
Board of the American Jewish
Congress and is a member of the
Benefactors' Club and the Na-
tional Women's League of the
Jewish Theological Seminary.
She is vice president of the Sho-
shanna Chapter, American Miz-
rachi Women, presiding presi-
dent of the Sisterhood of the Gold
Coast Synagogue, and a Founder
of the Hadassah Medical Center
in Jerusalem and Beth Aliyah
School for Orphans sponsored by
American Mizrachi in Israel.
Lilv Stone is chairman of the
-
Frances Jacobs
Israel Bonds Mizrachi Lunch-
eon, a former Woman of Valor
Award recipient and Regina
Wang is president of the Florida
Council of American Mizrachi
Women. Special guest will be Lt.
Danny Tadmore, an Israeli
soldier who recently served in
Lebanon.
New B'nai B'rith Lodge To
Receive Charter Saturday
Dr. Aaron Perlman of South
Dade will be sworn is as president
of the new B'nai B'rith Medical
Lodge No. 3168 on Saturday at a
7:30 dinner at the Kings Bay
Yacht Club. The new lodge will
receive its charter and swear in it
officers. Miami Beach Vice
Mayor Malcolm H. Fromberg,
senior vice president of B'nai
B'rith International, will be the
installing officer and principal
speaker. Bert Brown, past presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith District 5,
will serve as master of
ceremonies.
Other charter officers include
Di Melvin Becker, Dr. Wayne
Tobin, Dr. Robert Goldwyn, and
Dr. Michael Ozner, Vice presi-
dents, Dr. Alan Swartz, Vice
president and treasurer, and Dr.
Stanley Cannon, secretary.
Zvi Krugliak, B'nai B'rith re-
gional director, directed the in-
formation of the lodge.
Dr. Aaron Perlman
Dr. Perlman is a cardiologist
and former chief of staff at
Baptist Hospital. He is a member
of AZA, the B'nai B'rith high
school organization, and the
B'nai B'rith Youth Organization.
Na'amat Plans Events Hillel School
PTA Plans
A review of the autobiography,
Golda Meir, and of other books
written about the former prime
minister of Israel will be given by
Sophie Weissman at the Paid-Up
Membership Luncheon of the
liana Chapter of the Pioneer
Women-Na'amat on Monday at
noon in the auditorium of the
Winston Towers 100 Building,
according to Liilian Hoofman,
president and Chairman of the
event.
A report on the recent
Southeast Area Leadership
Conference will be given by
Bertha Liebmann, president of
the chapter and vice president of
the South Florida Council, on
Wednesday at a meeting of
Masada Chapter, at 12:30 in the
civic auditorium of the American
Savings and Loan Association on
Washington Ave., Miami Beach.
Adult Education At
Beth Sholom Begins
Temple Beth Sholom's Adult
Education program begins on
Monday at 9:30 a.m. when Rabbi
Leon Kronish, spiritual leader,
opens his weekly Bible series on
the theme "Torah Treasurers."
Rabbi Harry Jolt, auxiliary
rabbi, will open the series "Re-
viewing the Book of Books" at 11
a.m.
Book reviews offered on
Thursdays by Arlene Ditchek
and Lana Goldberg will begin
this week at 9:30 a.m. The course
"Many Faces of Judaism" will be
given on Thursdays at 11 a.m. by
Rabbi Jolt.
For Chanukah
The Samuel Scheck Hillel
Community Day School, North
Miami Beach, will hold a Chanu-
kah Mini-Boutique in the school's
Friedman-Uhlar Auditorium,
Sunday, Nov. 7 at 10 a.m. to 4
p.m. The annual event, sponsored
by the PTA, will offer a variety of
gift merchandise for the entire
family as well as for the home.
Coordinating the vendors la Trudy
Frankl who also serves as the Special
Projects vice president of PTA. Ways
and Means vice president Is Rochelle
Baltuch. President of the school's PTA
Is Rochelle Daniels. Other officers are
Judy Zemel. "rogram vice president.
Roberta Karen. Corresponding secre-
tary. Nancy Zombeck and Dee Renlck.
recording secretaries. Miriam Gins-
berg, treasurer, Judy Weiss. Immediate
past president, and Raquel Scheck, PTA
advisor.
The Board Committee chairpersons
are Carla Klein,. Sylvia Sperber. and
Tova Courtney, New Parents Coffees,
Donna Goldberg and Monica Our land,
Candy Sale. Marsha Flngerer and
Vivian Hammerman, Chanukah
Chavurah, Judy Rafofaky and Judy Sll
verman. Cookbook, Joyce Botton,
Luncheon and Fashion Show, Susan
Koslovsky, Passover Candy Sale, Jan
Goldmann. Passover Wine Sale, Wendy
Kravltx and Sandra Bloom, Summer
Reading Book Fair, Shirley Oenad and
Barbara Zlv, Hospitality. Lorelei Ennls,
Library, Judle Rothenberg, All-
Occasion Cards, and Lorraine Mltzner,
Class Motkers.
Board Members at Large are Alvtna
Duffner. Helen Cohan. Gall Spatz,
Shery 1 Levy and Michelle Tarsia.
Forte Towers To Gather
Forte Towers Hadassah will
meet on Monday, Nov. 8 at the
1200 West Ave. Auditorium.
Muriel Kovinov, Rose Mencher,
Florence Glatter, and Gladys
Stone will read quotes from the
Bible.
New Adath Yeshurun Members Welcomed
Temple Adath Y' ;hurun will
hold a Welcome New Member"
Sabbath at services Friday to be
conducted by Rabbi Simcha
Freedman and Cantor Ian
Alpern. Congregation President
Morris N. Katz and Membership
Chairman Goldy Lowy will greet
new members, and an Oneg
Shabbat will follow the service.
New members include Mr. and Mrs.
Bernard Maxsteln, Mr. and Mrs.
Norman Lleberman. Mr. and Mrs. Lev
Peshchanltsky. Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Coopersmlth. Mr. and Mrs. Ruby
Cassel, Mr and Mrs Michael Garllck.
Mr. and Mrs. Herman Friedberg, Mr.
and Mrs. Steven Kolber, Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Wagenfeld, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph
Sathan. Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Green-
steln, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Brozlnsky,
Mr and Mrs. Morris SUverman. Mr.
and Mrs Warren Blatt. Mr and Mrs.
Jaime Behar. Mr and Mrs Nathan
Greenberg. Mr. and Mrs Judah
Angard. and Mr. and Mrs Samuel
Click
Also honored are Mr. and Mrs.
Frederick Porges. Judge Joseph and
Judge Frances Farina. Mr. and Mrs
Gary Magnus. Mr and Mrs. Scott
Justin, Mr and Mrs. Bruce Nabat. Mr
and Mrs. Gustave Miller. Mr. and Mrs.
Morris Brodaky. Mr. and Mrs Nathan
Radzlnskl, Mr and Mrs. Mark Baer,
Mr and Mrs. Barry Slegel, Mr. and
Mrs. Alan Gorovsky. Mr. Morris Malm.
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Greenhill. Milton
Hart. Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Cohen, Dr.
and Mrs. Lee Hertz. Mrs. Sonne Finkel
steln. Erna Schlndler. Mr. and Mrs.
Richard Israel. Mr. and Mrs. Karl
Hershman, Mr. and Mrs. Edward Graff,
Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Becker. Mr. and
Mrs. Nathan Greenspan, Mr. and Mrs.
Leonard Schwalh Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd
Axelrod. and Isldor Lavender.
Aliyah To Hold Auction
Aliyah Chapter of Hadassah s
second Annual Auction, with
auctioneer Jim Gall, will be held
on Saturday. Nov. 6 at the South
Dade Jewish Community Center.
The preview hour is from 7 to 8
p.m.. and the bidding will start at
8:15.
Arlene Sh.ipiro Susan Krlitm.
and Mrs Jack Wulkan Mr*1"*
Yitzhak N.itiv. Dorothy y?d "'
Mr and Mrs Philip Vova MrJ
Dennis Berger Mr and Mrs w?"
KusUn. Mr. and Mrs Zlsia Srhw ***
Mark J. Morris. Mr and Mn ,'"?'
Segall. Mr and Mrs WniardFriiS**
Mr. and Mrs Morris Sllbenn M?T.
Mrs Bruce Nable. Mr and Mr, v"1"
Goldapple, Mr and Mrs Samueiu
ter, Irving Zelchner Mr "Ed ft
Howard Levlnson. Mr and v2
Leonard Umana. Mr and Mrs rw?
Rosenberg. Deborah Rower |t>"5
Mrs. Louis Lubowicz. and Mr sjidul
Paul Mendelsohn will ajan he honor,"
Mr and Mrs Barry Barak v- ...
Mrs Milton Silber Mr and ?
Vemon Ela. Mr. and Mrs nS
Stelger. Max Reitman. Mr and u,?
Joseph Roth. Mr and Mrs .J'
Willis Mr. and Mrs Milton HeUe"7
and Mrs. Jack Studnlk. Alfred Uo
Mr. and Mrs Leonard Robblni It...
Cullen. Mrs. Edith Helman Mr 2
Mrs. Morris Zalla. Mr and
Richard Fien. Mr and Mr, fi
Kahan, Marc Polllck. Mr and to
Steven Sarnoff. Ms Karen Dubowa,
Mllsteln. Mr and Mrs Marvin Sttirth
Dr. and Mrs. Stanley Skooit Mr &
Mrs. Leigh Needelman RobeM
berg and Patricia Etkln. Lt Col Hun
Lbner. Dr and Mrs Jay Gottlieb u.
Ruth Rosenfield. and Mr and Mrs
Murray Zoland are also new members
The delicious, nutritious Noah's Ark
of pasta-shaped animals kids love!
Moms and kids go lor Zooroni two by two' Kids thirm Zoorrjm
looks as great as it tastes And since Zooroni is vitamin-
enriched pasta simmered in lots ot yummy tomato sauce ana
tangy cheese. Moms love to pair up with it, too1
Marti A. Rothenberg of Ken-
dall has been appointed assis-
tant attorney general of the
State of Florida, assigned to
the criminal appeals division
in the Miami office of Attor-
ney General Jim Smith. She is
the wife of attorney Arthur
Rothenberg, himself a former
assistant attorney general.



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From The Rabb/'s Pulpit
On Rededicating Our
New Year's Resolutions
By RABBI BARRY
TABACHNIKOFF
Bet Breira, Kendall
President, Greater Miami
Rabbinical Association
The Holy Day season is always
a time of good intentions. We
make our resolves with the best
of intentions. Yet as the weeks
pass, our sincerity faces the test
of reality. Conflicting demands
are made upon our energies. Our
resources are finite after all we
cannot give to "every worthy
cause." and we cannot be ex-
pected to respond positively "to
every request."
Our time also, is precious
there is hardly enough time to be
with family and friends why
does the Rabbi expect to see me
"more regularly?"
THE COINCIDENCE of a
national football strike un-
derscores more vividly the
multitude of conflicting interests
that bombarded us on all sides. It
is amazing that the absence of
football in our lives has not left a
gap. There are enough remaining
interests to fill the newspaper,
occupy our weekends and still
maintain a significant list of
"things I'll do when I have
time."
It is sad to think that our
Jewish identity should fall into
that category, "things I'll do
when I have time." Far better
that football or tennis would fall
into that compartment! For the
essence of our existence is found
in our religious heritage.
How quickly we forget the
imagery of "The Book of Life."
How slow we are to fulfill the
pledges made in the emotional
shadow of Kol Nidre. Perhaps
this is the perfect opportunity to
review our progress during the
past month. Let this be an oc-
casion when we adjust the
priorities in our lives.
1.1 RESOLVE to maintain my
"Jewish concerns" all year long.
Being Jewish is not seasonal.
Although the Days of Awe may
come once a year, our task of
Jewish living extends throughout
the year. Our adherence to
Jewish values and ideals is a
daily concern and requires our
constant attention.
2. I resolve to grow in my
"Jewish understanding." This
means that I will set aside time
and energy to Jewish study. I
will encounter my Jewish
heritage through formal study
and private reading. There are a
variety of magazines, books,
classical sources and con-
temporary resources that can
excite us and expand our
horizons. Now is the time to
explore and expand our
awareness.
3. I resolve to "get more in-
volved." The variety of Jewish
causes should excite us rather
than become an excuse for
inactivity. Israel, now more than
ever, needs our support.
Synagogues never turn away a
volunteer they have an infinite
need for worshippers, students,
helpers. How many fraternal
organizations and philontropic
outlets we have within our
community and worldwide.
Let us renew our best resolves
and fulfill our God-given
potential. Together we will give
and receive strength, un-
derstanding and blessings for the
good of Israel, Judaism and
ourselves.
Principals in the two-day, annual leadership conference of the
Southeast Area of Pioneer Women-Na'amat held last week at
the Deauville Hotel include, from the left, Felice Schwartz, vice
president of the South Florida Council of Pioneer Women,
Harriet Green, national vice president of the American Zionist
I Federation, Dr. Bernard Schechterman, former chairman of the
department of politics and public affairs at the University of
Miami, and Mildred Weiss, chairman of the conference and
member of the national board of Pioneer Women-Na'amat
Leaders of 40 clubs, chapters and councils of the Women's
Labor Zionist Organization of America participated in the
[gathering which was addressed by Consul General Joel Arnon
\ofIsrael
New Discount Pharmacy Open
FEDCO, Inc.
Has opened its newest discount pharmacy at
654 N.E. 128th Street in North Miami
Although the Federal Discount Store at this address has
been serving the people of the North Miami and North
Miami Beach area for several years, the pharmacy is a
brand new addition. Management promises the same
everyday low discount prices at this new location that
prevail at all other Fedco-Federal Discount Stores. Check
prices on prescriptions by telephone at 891-0016. The ad-
dress again is 664 N.E. 128th Street in North Miami,
across from Publix.
Friday, < h-tolier 29. 1982 The Jewish Floridian Pa#R 5-B
Miami Beach Vice Mayor
Malcolm H. Fromberg was re-
cently elected senior interna-
tional vice president of B'nai
B'rith, assuming office at the
31st general convention in
Toronto last week. Fromberg,
who had served as one of
seven international vice presi-
dents in the United States,
has achieved the highest posi-
tion ever attained by a
Floridian.
Jewish War Vets Plan
Veterans Day Ceremony
Murray Solomon Post 243 of
Coral Gables and Dade County
Council of Jewish War Veterans
will hold their annual Veteran's
Day Ceremonies at the graveside
of Murray Solomon at Star of
David Cemetery on Sunday, Nov.
7 at 11a.m.
The program will com-
memorate veterans who died in
U.S. military service or who died
following military service in the
U.S. Armed Forces.
Participants will include Al
Constantin, post commander,
Abe Rosen feld, county com-
mander. Secretary of the
National Executive Committee
Mike Schechter and Past
National Commander Ainslee R.
Ferdie.
THE OTHER SIDE OF THE HOLOCAUST:
New publications project to record
Scandinavians' rescue of the Jews
An editorial project to assure an accurate authoritative record
in English of the efforts of the Norwegians, Swedes and Finns to
shelter the Jewish communities of Scandinavia from the Holo-
caust in World War II has been announced by the Thanks to
Scandinavia Fund.
According to Victor Borge, national chairman of the Fund,
the first in a series of monographs will be an account of the res-
cue of Norwegian Jews by that country's underground move-
ment during the Nazi occupation. It has been written by Oskar
Mendelsohn, the historian of the Norwegian Jewish Community
and himself a survivor, with a foreword by the Hon. Louis A.
Lerner of Chicago, former American Ambassador to Norway.
This will be followed by similar publications on wartime de-
velopments affecting the Jews in Sweden and Finland, based on
new research arranged by the Fund.
Professor Steven Koblik, head of the history department of
Pomona College, CTaremont. California, has devoted a sab-
batical year at the University of Lund to exploring the recently
.opened Swedish archives for the period.
Dr. ilannu Rautkallio, executive director of the Foundation
for Higher Education and Science Policy in Helsinki, will under-
take the Finnish project.
Both scholars are highly regarded as specialists in the coun-
tries and periods concerned.
All three monographs will be given the widest possible distri-
bution through synagogues, libraries and other outlets.
Thanks to Scandinavia was founded in 1963 to preserve the
example of the bravery and humanity of the Scandinavians dur-
ing the Holocaust years. It has so far raised and spent more than
$1,000,000 to provide study opportunities in America for young
Scandinavians in appreciation; and is now working to establish
a permanent endowment fund for the purpose.
"We consider it very important to make certain that there is
the widest possible public knowledge of the courageous conduct
of the people of Denmark. Norway, Sweden and Finland during
that tragic period," Mr. Borge explains.
"We agree that new generations must never forget the possi-
bility that mankind can fall again into the depths represented by
the Holocaust.
"At the same time, we must also keep alive the awareness
that decent men and women are capable of taking a stand
against evil, even at the risk of their own lives.
"What the Danes did during those difficult years is already
well known through many books and films, both scholarly and
popular. The courageous actions of the other countries have not
been as well documented and this is the reason why this new edi-
torial project is being undertaken."
Thanks to Scandinavia has its offices at 660 Madison Avenue,
New York, NY 10021. Contributions to support the Fund's
scholarship and publication programs are tax deductible.
Jewish Committee To Present Award
Vets Hold Flea Market
Jewish War veterans Auxiliary
Harry H. Cohen Chapter 723 will
hold a flea market, cake sale, and
fashion show on Sunday, Nov. 7
at the Surfside Civic Center,
Marion Bezner, publicity
chairman, announced.
Raul Masvidal, chairman of
the board and president of
Biscayne Bank, has been chosen
to receive the American Jewish
Committee's Institute of Human
Relations Award on Nov. 30 at
the Hyatt Regency Hotel.
Paul Cejas, chairman of the
Dade County School Board and
president of Miami Savings and
Loan, and Metropolitan Dade
County Commissioner Ruth
Shack will head the dinner chair-
persons Shepard King, president
of the Miami Chapter of the
American Jewish Committee, an-
nounced.
Jft You Are Cordially Invited to Attend
JLWtSH
"TSBT Jewish National Fund
Morton Towers
Annual Tribute Banquet
Sunday, November 14,1982
12:00 Noon
Konover Hotel
5445 Collins Ave., Miami Beach
Irving Garfoer
Chairman
Outstanding
Entertainment
Lou Aronson
Co-Chairman
Kosher Cuisine
For Reservations: Etta Aronson
672-5928 Ticket Chairman
JNF Strengthens Israel Strengthen the JNF


T>-.
1
a
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, October 29, 1982
Bondar Elected To Head
Cuban-Hebrew Bonds Division
Morris Bondar, of Miami, has
been named president of the
Cuban-Hebrew Division of the
State of Israel Bonds
Organization for the 1982-83
campaign. Gary R. Gerson, Israel
Bonds General Campaign
chairman, announced.
Bondar will head an effort to
achieve $2 million in Israel Bond
sales to be sent to the Jewish
State for economic development.
Bondar has been active in the
Israel Bonds campaign 15 years.
He serves on the Board of
Directors of the Cuban Hebrew
Congregation and is a Founder of
Hadassah. He has been active
with the Hebrew Academy of
Miami Beach and the Farband.
Morris Bondar
Friedman Received Highest
UM Honor: Order Of Merit
Albert Friedman of Coral
Gables received the University of
Miami's highest honor, the Order
of Merit Award, at a luncheon in
the home of University President
F.dward T. Foote II on Sept. 11.
Mr. Friedman was given a
diploma and a gold medallion.
The Order of Merit was
established by the UM Board of
Trustees in 1957 to recognize
achievement. Mr. Friedman is
the 46th recipient of the honor.
Mr. Friedman is a charter
member of the President's Club
at the university, a founding
member and director of the
Citizen's Board, a life member of
the Alumni Century Club, a
founder of the Alumni Inter-
Fraternity Advisory Council,
trustee president of the Zeta Beta
Tau fraternity, and founder of the
Albert H. and Rose Friedman
Medical Research Fund.
Professor and Mrs. Jacquin
Bierman of Miami Beach will
be guests of honor at the
eighth anniversary dinner of
Talmudic University of Flor-
ida on Sunday, Nov. 21 at the
Crown Hotel. William G.
Mechanic has been appointed
chairman of the dinner by
President Rabbi Yochanan
Zweig and Murray Berkowitz,
chairman of the board
Wise Hadassah Meets
Wise Chapter of Hadassah's
next luncheon meeting will be
held on Tuesday at the Ocean
Pavillion Mezzanine at 11:30
a.m. and will be about the
Hadassah Medical Organization
in Israel. Presidium President
Gertrude Sosna will conduct the
meeting.
Heaven forbid you should
ever need
more medicine than this.
But, if you should, isn't it good to know
there's a hospital where your tradition is our tradition?
Mount Sinai Medical Center of Greater Miami
has received international acclaim for its
scientific studies of the curative properties of
chicken soup. We're the ones who have proven
what your mothers and grandmothers have
insisted all along: There's a lot of healing
power in that steaming bowl!
But, we all know there are times when
illness or injury demands services which only
a hospital can provide. For more than thirty
years. Mount Sinai Medical Center has been
the hospital to which the community looks for
state-of-the-art health care.
At Mount Sinai, we know that caring is as
important as curing. We care not only for your
physical well-being, but your spiritual comfort
as well, no matter what your race, creed or
color. We understand and honor tradition
That's why, for example, we provide
candelabras for Shabbat. a kosher kitchen for
those who choose, and religious services
for every holiday on our closed-circuit TV
system.
At Mount Sinai, we not only understand
your personal culture, we gladly become
a part of it. And we also understand what
is needed to provide the highest quality in
health care. Our modern facilities, our
sophisticated technology, and our expert,
dedicated health care team combine to
create an environment in which medicine is
practiced at the forefront of science.
SPECIALLY FOR
SINGLES
Are you an assertive Single? Whether the answer is yes or no vo
are still interested in information about other Singles. What are th
doing? Where are they meeting now? How do I become a part 0i ,!y
RESPECTABLE Singles action? "*
To help you with answers to these questions, The Jewish Fiorina
is Introducing an advertising directory, "Specially for Singles of"
fering the opportunity for paid advertisements to be published as
Singles individuals and organizations send them to us. We rely 0n
the integrity of those who will be seeking advertising space that then
activities are henestly described and that they perform a worthy ser
vice for serious Singles. We cannot, however, assume responsibility
or incur obligation for material in these columns. THE Jewish
FLORIDIAN RESERVES THE RIGHT TO REFUSE ANY AD FOR ANY
REASON.
Replies must be directed to the individual advertiser and not to the
newspaper.
Rate information is available by written inquiry to The Jewish
I Floridian. P.O. Box 012973. Miami. Florida 33101. Attention. Mary
Morgan._________^________________________
JEWISH AMERICAN LATIN SINGLES (30-55)
and United Family & Children Services, a UNITED WAY AGENCY, are
sponsoring the Seminar "BEING SINGLE AGAIN' November 3-8:30
PM. Donation $4.00 (includes social hour-wine refreshments) CUBAN
HEBREW CONGREGATION-1700 Michigan Avenue, Miami Beach
Community Corner
Temple Menorah's Art Auction, previously planned for Oct.
28, has been rescheduled for Nov. 4 at 7:30 in the Temple Social
Hall. Co-chairwomen Susan Rosenstein and Martha Wnserstein
announced. ______
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged,
Douglas Gardens, and the South Florida Blood Service will host
B special Blood Drive on Oct. 29. from 1 to 4 p.m. at the Mi-
Jewish Home. The public is invited to donate blood.
lami
Mount Sinai Medical Center
4300 Alton Road Miami Beach, Florida
The Epilepsy Foundation of South Florida will meet
Wednesday at South Miami Hospital at 7:30 to discuss types
and treatment of epilepsy. A film will be shown.
Bobbie St. Jean, nursing assistant at the Miami Jewish
Home and Hospital for the Aged, received one of 20 S500
scholarships awarded nationwide to nursing assistants tol
further their education towards becoming Licensed Practical ,
Nurses. The American Health Care Association sponsored the:.
awards. ______
The North Miami Westside Property Owners Association
and the Keystone Point Homeowners Association are spon-
soring the third annual City Wide Flea Market in North Miami
on Sunday. Nov. 7 from 10 to 4 at Griffing Park.
Mount Sinai Medical Center is sponsoring a daylong
seminar on gynecological laser surgery for physicians and
nurses on Friday. Oct. 29.
Douglas M. Spatz, son of Herman E. and Sharon M. Span I
of North Miami Beach, completed basic training at Fort Knox, *
KY. He is a graduate of North Miami Beach Senior High School. I
Larry Foreman, a director of the Learning Workshop, Inc. I
and a law student at Nova University, has been appointed by |
the Board of County Commissioners to serve as a member of the I
Dade County Commission for the Advancement of the!
Physically Handicapped.
______
The Opus III Singers performed for the Junior Auxiliary of I
the Jewish Home for the Aged, marking the beginning of the I
2fith consecutive musical series sponsored by the Chase Federal I
Savings and Loan Association.
Florida State Association of B'nai Brith will hold their*
Winter Institute of Judaism in Titusville Monday. Dec. I.'
through 16. The featured scholar-in-residence will be Rabbi Ma\ S
David Eichhorn.
Outgoing President W. D. ChUders appointed Senator Jack 1
Gordon to serve on the Task Force on Competition and Lot i
sumer Choices in Health Care, which was created bytheWB
legislature to study ways to make health costs more affordable
for the average citizen.
Miami-Dade Community Colleges Lunchtime Lively Arts
Series presents the Kodaly String Quartet at noon on weu
nesday at the New World Center Campus Auditorium.
Joseph Wallis. vice president and senior trust office' o
Jefferson National Bank, will be the guest speaker at the muu
Beach Executive Clubs Ladies Day Luncheon Thursuay
noon at Embers Restaurant.
Temple Menorah is hosting a series of Adult Programs. On
Tuesday Rabbi Meyer Abramowitz will teach B.ble Study Class
at 9:30 a.m.
Carol Schneider Jacobs and Frances Schwartz GiUer. James
Madison High School of Brooklyn alumni, are planning a e
reunion of Floridian Madisonians on Sunday. Jan. 9 at noon.
Dade County Commissioner Barry D. Schreiber. by
unanimous vote, has been elected to serve as vice mayor of Dade
for the next six months.


Friday, October 29, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
Sharon Tells Inquiry Commission That There Was No Anticipation of
A Massacre When Israel Sent Phalangists Into Beirut Camps
Continued from Page 1
called, he had ordered a full-scale
report to be submitted to him by
the army.
Sharon spoke in a small lecture
hall at the Hebrew University
west Jerusalem campus, with 45
selected pool reporters from local
and foreign media intently noting
his every word. His wife, Lily,
and close aide Uri Dan attended
the session, too.
BEFORE THE evidence
began, the commission allowed a
five-minute photo opportunity
for scores of camermen who were
later ushered out to make way for
reporters. No ordinary members
of the public were allowed in.
The Defense Minister had pre-
pared a set speech, beginning
with a defense of the Lebanon
war and the wide-ranging assault
on the PLO. He read this out and
it was plain he expected the com-
mission then to adjourn the pro-
ceedings to behind closed doors.
(He had insisted on the right to
appear in open court saying he
had "nothing to hide," but in his
speech he noted that he had much
to say of a secret nature.)
Commission chairman Kaham
and Justice Barak were plainly
not prepared to fall in with
Sharon's stragegy and they
began presenting him with
tough, detailed questions about
Christian-Palestinian relations in
Lebanon, Israel's anticipations,
and more. Repeatedly. Sharon
said he would prefer to answer
behind closed doors and re-
peatedly the commission insisted
on an answer, even if incomplete,
in open court.
We can't stop crime in
Dade County with weak judges,
We need someone strong.
We need Sepe.
And these organizations and individuals agree:
Dade County Police Benevolent Association, Inc.
Fraternal Order of Police. District 6
Fraternal Order of Police. Coral Gables Lode No. 7
Dade County Council of Fire Fighters
Metropolitan Dade County Association of Fire
Fighters No. 1403
Miami Association of Fire Fighters. Local No. 587
Dade County Council of Senior Citizens
Voters. Inc.
Concerned Citizens of Northeast Dade. Inc.
Voters and Taxpayers League
Abrams. Ray
Adair. Sylvester R.
Former Justice of the
Peace
Adker. Ann-Marie
AI.t Stan
Al|* ndre. Jose
Allen. Charles
Allen. Susan
Altman. Harry
Bat kcr. Icannic
Balaban. Henry L..
Former Circuit Court
Judge
Batteim. Bruno
Bawnew. Gregory A.
Bialeck. Melvin
Block. Jack. Mayor of
South Miami
Bradley Edith B.
Burgeta, Carrie.
Rresident. Democratic
Women's Club
Burgess. Clyde
Campbell.J.W.
Campo, Manuel. M.I).
Chadroff.Sy
Cobdny. Mike. Former
MayH of North Miami
American Federation of Senior Citizens. North
Dade Chapter. Inc.
Aventura Political Action Committee
Owners & Residents Association of Sunny Isles
South Florida AFL-C10 and all its affiliated unions
United Teachers of Dade/Tiger C.O.PF.
Teamsters Local Union 769
Transport Workers Union. Local 291
American Federation of State. County &
Municipal Fmployees(AFSCME Local 1363)
Miami Board of Realtors
Gold Coast Chapter. Association Builders &
Contractors. Inc.
Latin American Public Health Association
Baptist Ministers Council
The Miami Times
La Nacion
Los Tiempos
Coniglio. RhilipJ.
Dardts. Martin K. Former
Chief Investigator.
State Attorney a Office
Dean. Nathaniel (Tannie)
Ik-Bella. Deborah F
De Gibaja Gil
Demartino. Nick
Dembeii, Michael
Demos, Angelo R
De Pedro. Angel
Eaford. Marcella
Ewing. Beverly
Farber. Morris
Farer, Herman
Fergis, Christ A.
Ferguson. Dr. Thomas
Ferro. Simon
Fiik her. David
Fmkelstein. Bill
Fisch. Phyllis K.
Fisch. Ramon B
Fischer. Clara
Floyd. Robert I... Former
Circuit Court Judge*
Former Mayor of
Miami
Freefie Id. Charles
Freefield. Marian
F'relani. Enzin
Friedman. Dale
Foxworth. Raymond
Frazier. Eufaula
Garber. Barry L.
(idler. Sieve
Gersh. Sid
Gerstcin, Richard E.
Former State Attorney
Gold. Murray
Goldberg. Allen
Goldman. Mitchell
l.oldslcin.Barry
Gonzalez, Sergio L.
Gonzalez. Ronald
Goodhart. David. Former
Circuit Court Judge
Goodman. Harry
Good man. Sidney J.
Haber. Dr. Leonard. City
Commissioner *
Former Mayor of
Miami Beach
Harlnett. Beth
llighsmilh. Shelby.
Former Circuit Court
Judge
Houston. Dr. J.M.
Hocller. Julia FVodray .
Intriago. Charles
Jdbara. Ronald
Jacobson. Louis
Johnson. Ellen
Kat her. Myra
Katzman. Louis
Kay. Bunny
Kirschner. Philip
Kleinberg. Amy
Kogan. Stephen J.
Logan. Willie.Jr.. Former
Mayor of Opa-locka*
State Represcntalive-
Elect
Lee. Thomas E.Jt.
Former Chief Circuit
Court Judge
Lealie, Brian Hal
Manzini. Nicolas A.
Magram. Paula E.
Maryanoff. Neil I.
Maxwell. Michael J.
Meek. Carrie P. Sta(e
Senator
Miller. David
Miller. Helen L.. Mayor
of Opa-locka
Muhammad. J. Akbar
Myers. Kenneth M
Former State Senator
N.iim.in. Julius
Nil hols, Barbara J.
Pearson, Ray H.. Former
Circuit Court Judge
Peskoe. Irving. Mayor of
Homestead
Phillips, Mattye Jones
Pitts. Freddie Lee
I 'ol.unkin Nat
Raab. Rabbi David
Rabin. Edward E.
Raiford. Ramon
Reaves. Jefferson St.
S(a(e Representative
Elec(
Reboso. Manolo. Former
Ci(y of Miami
Commissioner
Regna. Daneen
Reinhardt. Nancy
Kicciardelh.J. Rick
Rizzo. Guy T.
Robertson. Piedad F
Robinson. Joe T.
Rose. David
Rosin. Fran
Rosen. Sidney
Rosen. Harold. Former
Mayor of Miami Beach
Kosenthal. Alan
Ruvin. Harvey. County
Commissioner
Sams. Jr.. Murray
Sadin. Edward
Schusel. WilliamJ.
Sellers. Charles W.
Sewell. Kathy
Shevm. Robert L.. Former
Attorney General of
State of Florida
Silver. Mary
Silver. Warren S.
Smith! Charles E.
Smith. James E
S(arr. Fern
Stem. Dr. Judith
S(einer. Rubin
Stern Erwin
Stirrup. WD-Bill"
Stuart. Don-en. North Bay
Village City
Commissioner
Taykir. Gladys
Tejon. Anita
Tomasini. Peter Tom
linger. Joe. Former
President of Dade
County Bar
Vogel. Paul. Mayor of
North Bay Village
\ i, II.,,'. n I II I'
Waller. Roberta
Watner. Max
Webb Doris W
Weiller. Mike M.
Weinberger. Joseph
Weinslein Leonard.
Miami Beach City
Commissioner
Wellington. James W.
Wikler. Dr. Simon
Wright. Sonny
Young Burton. Former
President of The
Florida Bar
Young. David H.
Young Sheila
Zajac. Caroline
Zemlock. Albert J.
Zilberl. Leonard
Elect
Al Sepe
County Court
Judge-
Punch #129
Pd. Poi- AaK.
'


Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian Friday. October 29, 1982


Pantry Pride has Everyday Lxy
Prices all over the store...no
need to stock up. Bonus Buys
too. Fill your pantry at our
Pantry. Overall we save you
m mm GUARANTEED
more on
i
it
^0 _. :* >^^i m^t -c* V- "* ^**'
PRICES AND COUPONS
GOOD OCT. 28NOV. 3. 1982
cPnde
SERVICE DELI
HANSEL 5 3RETEL
Bologna
(SAVE 20C)
HALF
LB
$129
1
SAVE
2.09
*S 1.39
Mr
L8
DVfcN f RES**
BBQ Chicken 1.69
i:
-
Turkey Ham
^1.49
DAIRY & DELI
(SAVE 30C)
LOWFAT SMOOTH N CREAMY OR
CALIFORNIABREAKSTONE S
Cottage
16-OZ
CUP
89
Light N' Livery
SAVE
3 co>s i99 42
.A -^1 -.
. OH. 4
40
1.89 4c
Variety Pak ....
.-'li-vf-' y tt.tr
Plumper Franks
Ml.'"' **C
Sour Cream .....
..........I .89
1.19 40
1.69
.79 20
Country Single*
^PERSONAL CARE?
16-CW B'.-S*MO0 O* CONOTONt" SAVE
BG OEM* J Cf> "TU BOO"
.....1.07 32
: -.. I -.t "
.1.29 70
X>~SO. S-*TCMes ASSOWMtNT 20 CT PW
1.47 32
H(CCiS---L-S0>CAPSAS'2C- BH
CoM Remedy........1.97 52

Ladies*
Choice
Deodorant
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Whole
Fryers
3 LBS. AND OVER (SAVE 50*)
Fresh
Ground
U.S. CHOICE BEEF ROUND BONELESS (SAVE 50C)
Bottom
Round Roast
BOTTOM ROUN0 STEAK BONELESS. LB. S1.90
SAVE
Lots of Chicken............ .49 20
Rump Roast................ 2.29 50
Eye Round Roast........... 2.99 ?c
Sizzlean................... 1.59 40
Fresh Sliced
Turkey Breast............1 2.69 so

Bottom Round.............. 1.59 40
.V 2 ~_:-5E
$-69
LB.
FAMILY PAK MEATS
Buy Big Save More!
3 LBS. & OVER
Cube Steak. 2.69
Stewing Beef 1.89
SAVE
Round........ 1.99
...
Combo Pkg.. 1.79
Fryer Combo 1.19
TtOMS 3t*'S H*;' .--
/
(SAVE 30)
HEAD
Western
Cauliflower
(SAVE 50<) U.S. NO. 1 ALL PURPOSE
Yellow
Onions
(SAVE 30) U.S. NO. 1 ALL PURPOSE
White
Potatoes
(SAVE 70C) CRISP AND JUICY
Mclntosh
Apples
BONUS
BUY
wmgmmmmmmmmmm**t


Friday, October 29, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
DOUBLE THE
m
CASH
if we
save you more!
PLAIN OR SELF-RISING
Gold Medal
Flour 5
(WITH $10 PURCHASE AND COUPON BELOW)
32-OZ. BOTTLE
Heinz
Keg O' Ketchup
(WITH S10 PURCHASE AND COUPON BELOW)
SUNSHINE-BONUS PACK (SAVE 40C)
BONUS
BOY
. 17'2-OZ. PKG. ^^%7
$419
$J69
99*
PACK
PACK
PACK
Chip-A-Roos Cookies
12-0ZBTLS (SAVE 1.60) KfflH
Stroh'sBeer. 12
12-0Z. CANS (SAVE30) JM
Old Milwaukee Beer ^6
FROZEN LITTLE EARS (SAVE 70C) M*Mm
Birdseye Cob Com*sa 8
DELTA (SAVE 10) ^^ m m*^f*
Delta Paper Towels *ntou 39
SENECA (SAVE 209) a||Q
Seneca Apple Juke ^.^M.
ASSORTED FLAVORS (SAVE 25C) ^m ^^ mm >
Ritz Sodas O ^.c^ot
JIFFY (SAVE.9) _____ ^
Com Muffin Mix 4
SEVEN SEAS VIVA ITALIAN (SAVE 10) mg /
Salad Dressings M KOC
(SAVE 20)
Mr. Big Paper Towels 3
GREAT FOR PIES! Vtf^B*
Libby's Pumpkin .*<* Kfv
6$J49
FOR A
12-OZ. CANS
$-100
8v2-OZ. BOXES iMV
59*
. 8-OZ. BTL. mW +mT
R0LL $149
PACK JL,
12-OZ. CANS ASSORTED FLAVORS (SAVE 40)
nK
FINE
WINES
PEPSI LIGHT. MOUNTAIN DEW.
SAVE
"% 2.99100
.amhuuSCO ROSAIO BIANCO
Riunrte Wines
VIA reisling on
Cabernet...........'50bu 1.99 26
LtBFRAUMILCH
Black Tower........'"ft. 4.19 so
Bun. inov vin rose Rhine Chabus or pink chablis
Carlo Rossi Wines ....3 *" 5.991 oo
Diet Pepsi or
Pepsi E3
$ ji9 m
2 LITER
BTL
(SAVE 644)
PRICES AND COUPONS
GOOD OCT. 28NOV. 3, 1982
cptide
[/ BAKERY
Brown & Serve
__ .. TWIN ROLLS CLOVERLEAF
Rolls --party^ke .
2/QQC
PANTRY PRIDE ^^mmW ^^AW
PKG OF 12 ^m^ ^"^^
Raisin Bread------
English Muffins 2
PUMPERNiCKSl
Adler's Bread
AUNT MAWA"
Angelfood Bar
A \ C ITALIAN OR
French Bread
16 02
LOAF
10 01
LOAF
8 0*
. BAR
SAVE
.89 10
802
.LOAF
.99
.69
.89
.59
19
16
20
12
FROZEN
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Seatte
MRS SMITH $
SAVE
Seattest Sherbet 1.19 26
Pumpkin Pie .
PANTfl> PRl0
Whipped Topping
MINUTE MAID-REG OR WITH P
Orange Juice
26 OZ 4 Jtf\
box 1.49 40
8 0Z
BWl
12 OZ
CAN
.59 38
.99 20
24-02 on
. BAG .89 20
PANTR* PHIDE
Dinner Fries
SWANSON DINNERWHITE OR DARK MEAT
Fried Chicken b8. 1.19 24
FREEZER OUEEN-COOK IN POUCH
3 boMH.09 25
2 -1.00 18
.69 30
PANIRV PHIDE MIXED
DOWNXFLAKE BUTTERMILK OR HOMEMADE
Waffles.........pkq
CLIP AND
VALUABLE COUPON tM R&9
SAVE 48$
PLAIN OR SELF-RISING
Gold Medal ms^-s
I Flour
15-LB BAG
LIMIT ONE BAG WJHS^O ORDER EXCl TOBACCO PRODUCTS
MG
49
GOOD OCT 28NOV 3 1S82
I
I
VALUABLE COUPON
SAVE 66c
syjisi i
Bi,7^lS
J 32-OZ BTL."
I Heinz
| Keg a Ketchup
LIMIT ONE BTL WITH $10 OHOEREXCL TOBACCO PRODUCTS
GOOD OCT 28-NOV 3 1982
79!



Page 10-B The Jewish Floridiah / Friday, October 29,1982
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"Lift up now thine eye and look for all the land which]
thou seest to thee will I give it, and to thy seed for ever"
LEKLEKHA
LEK LEKHA At the command of God, Abram left Haran
and journeyed to Canaan. There God appeared to him and said:
"Unto thy seed will I give this land" (Genesis 12.7). There was a
famine in the land of Canaan, and Abram took his household to
Egypt. On his return, he and his nephew Lot separated peace-
ably, Lot choosing to settle in the plain of Sodom. In the battles
between the northern kings and those of the plain of Sodom, Lot
was captured. Learning of his nephew's plight, Abram armed his
followers and pursued Lot's captors. He defeated them and res-
cued his nephew and the other captives from Sodom. God made
a covenant with Abram to give him and his seed after him the
land of Canaan ("The Covenant between the Parts"). When
Abram's wife Sarai saw that she was barren she gave Hagar. her
handmaiden, to Abram as wife. Hager bore Abram a son, who
was called Ishmael. At God's command, Abram changed his
name to Abraham, and his wife's name to Sarah. He was cir-
cumcized. together with all the males of his household.
(The recounting ol the Weekly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History ol the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. wollman
Tsamir, SIS, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis-
tributing the volume.)
Yiddish Culture Winkle
Yiddish Culture Winkle will
hold a meeting on Thrusday
morning, Nov. 11, at 10:30 at
Temple Ner Tamid, Miami
Beach, Chairman Joseph Bern-
haut announced. Dora Meisel will
speak on Yiddish poet and essay-
ist Avram Reisen. "The World
Anne Banowitz, in memory of
her late husband, Benjamin
Banowitz, donated a facility
that will be used by Israeli
ORT students to develop and
complete their technical
graduation projects.
Mitzvah
MICHAEL FRUiTMAN
. Michael Scott Fruitman, son of
Paul and Barbara Fruitman of
North Miami, will be called to the
Torah as Bar Mitzvah on Satur-
day at Temple Menorah.
Michael will chant the same
Harf torah that his father chanted
in Oct. 1955 at B'nai Israel in
Elizabeth, New Jersey.
Michael is in the eighth grade
at Miami Country Day School.
He is the grandson of Miriam
Ross of Miami Beach and
Mildred Cohen of Bay Harbor
Islands. He is the greatgrandson
of Ida Tepperman of West
Orange, NJ, formerly of Miami
Beach.
Sisterhood Card Party
Temple Beth Raphael
Sisterhood will hold a card party
and luncheon at the Temple on
Nov. 11 at noon.
Hadassah Book Review
Bay Harbor Chapter of
Hadassah will meet at noon on
Monday, Nov. 8 at the First
Nationwide Bank for a book
review by Florence Scheiner,
Publicity Chairman Ruth Klein
announced.
MARC AMDUR
Marc Amdur, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Neal Amdur, will be called
to the Torah as a Bar Mitzvah on
Saturday, October 30, at Temple
Beth Sholom of Greater Miami,
at 10:45 a.m. Dr. Leon Kronish
will officiate.
Marc is a student of the
Confirmation class of 5744.
BEN HELLER GREENMAN
Ben Heller Greenman, son of
Richard and Bunny Greenman,
will be called to the Torah as Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, Nov. 6 at
Beth David Congregation.
The celebrant is a student in
the Beth David Hebrew School
and is in the ninth grade at Pal-
metto Junior High School. Ben is
in the National Junior Honor So-
ciety and is co-editor of Lancer
and Debate.
Mr. and Mrs. Greenman will
host the kiddush following the
services in honor of the occasion.
Jose Ferrer opens the season
for Players State in Ronald
Norwood's 1981 Broadway
play. The Dresser on Nov. 5,
running through Nov. 28.
Women's League To Have Mission In Israel
Members of the Women's
League for Israel New Leader-
ship Mission will leave for Israel
from Florida and New York on
Nov. 8. The mission will be led by
President Marilyn Schwartzman
and will include Linda
Anopolsky, Marsha Berg,
Barbara Cohen, Sandy Cosen-
tino, Harriet Lainer, Roz Man-
delbaum, Trudy Miner, Carol
Schwartz, Cecile Fine, Lorraine
Frost, Annette Kay, Muriel
Lunden, Roseanne Zubow and
Florida Representative Ruth
Sperber.
Martin Gilbert
Beth Sholom Lectures Begin
Temple Beth Sholom, in its
Sixth Annual Sunday Omnibus
Series, will present lecturers in
the fields of politics, literature,
religion, history, and journalism.
Martin Gilbert, official bio-
grapher of Sir Winston Churchill,
will open the series on Sunday,
Nov. 7 at 10:30 a.m. in the Tem-
ple Sanctuary. His topic will be
"Jewish Resistance in the Holo-
caust: Some Unknown Heroes."
Thr Jewish Horidfap
IforlM mi -plti- Iiflitk.itvish Wt.fci,
Piintmd In Englieh
HfO WmWHmm to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
may keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world.
Enclosed please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
Q 1 Year $18.00 D 2 Years $34.00
LOCAL SUBSCRIPTIONS ONLY
Name:,
Address:.
.Apt. No.:.
City:.
State:
am Checks PmaMateTMS JeTWISM PkOHIDiAM")
p.o. mm ei nn. mii. pmtm* tei
.lea aa*nrlm eg warn toaetvaece.
Israel Goldberg wil] b..
citationist, and Lois Yav.
conduct the musical nZ.
companied by Shmuel S
Israeli. Yiddish, and
songs will be performed.
uiihi -r-_ rr---> r-""j^^__ __ |
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting Time: 6:22
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Frl., 8:15 pm
Sat., 8:30 am
Sat., 6:30 pm, Mlncha Service
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saltzman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchinskv. Cantor
Frl., MS pm. Jutfd Merl, ol Board ol Directors,
rill be gueat speaker.
Sisterhood Oneg Shabbet
^^5at^45am,Krdushv^ltrjik>e>.
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami-667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate
Rabbi
Frl., 8:1 5 pm regular service
Rabbi Herbert Baumgard will preach on
theme "Mow to Win Friends."
Fn 10 pm, Service lor Singles only with
same sermon. Co-sponsored by Jewish
Federation end Beth Am singles groups.
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way: 2625 S.W. 3rd Avenue
South Oade. '500 S.W. 120th Street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
South Oede Chapel
Frl., > pm, Oneg Shabbal Discussion.
"Ask th Rabbi".
Tuee., 8:30 pm, Arthur Tallelbaum ol Antl-
Dalamallon League: "Anti-Semitism Today."
Coral Way Sanctuary
Sal.. 9 am. Shabbal Services with Rabbi David
Auerbech and Cantor William Lipeon.
Bar Mitzvah, David Rothberg.
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 858-6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Frl., 6:30 pm
Sat., 8:45 am and 5 pm
Sat., 6:30 pm and 5 pm
Daily Mlnyan Services,
7:45 and 5 pm
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St. N.Miami, Fl 33181
891-5508 Conservative
Only Temple In North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Gorfinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Frl., 8 pm
Sat., 9 am, Bar Mitzvah,
Jay Spwak
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave., M.B. Fl. 33139
Tel. 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjemin Adler
Frl., 6:15 pm
Sat., 8:30 am
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. S 41st St. 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kronish, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Conviaer
Frl.. 8:15 pm, "la Chrla Benny In Moral Anguierrr'
Sat.. 10:45 am. Bar Mttnah. Marc Andur
Sun., 10:30 am. Opening Brotherhood Brooaiost
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A. Lipschitz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscay ne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon SchWf
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phonei_: 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Office
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvi Adler, Cantor
Sat Mom. Service 9 m
Dr. Irving Lehrman will ajaaa.
at 10:3ir
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETHEL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive. Miami Be
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiii
TEMPLE ISRAEL
Of Greater Miami
M/am/'s Pfonaar Aaform Congrapittofl
137 N.E. 19th St., Miami, 573-5900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskell M. Bemai
Asst. Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Salkin
Soloist: Rachell Nelson
Fit, 8 pm, "My Name I,..."
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd. Reloral
Coral Gables 667-565?|
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Fri., 8:15 pm
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 5349776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
EDWARD BARON, Cantor
Sat., 9:30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
820-75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Sat., 9 am
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Carlyle Ave.,
Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovitz
Cantor Edward Klein
Frl., 6:30 pm
Sat., 8:45 am
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
15410 SW 75 Circle Lane
Miami, Fl. Moeterniomodwl
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 382 33431
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE22Av
North Dade's Reform Conongto*
Ralph P. Kktgsley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Shulkes, Cantor
Barbara S. Ramsay, Administrator
Frl, 8:15 pm. Worship Senrlc.
Sat.. 10:30 am. Bar Mitzvah, Steven SI.**.
Torah Portion lakh-Lakh.
Genesis 12:117:27
HaHoreh-lealeh 80:27-41:11
TEMPLE ZION ConV77',i
8000 Miller Dr. 27J,Z31'
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro. Rsbbi
Frl., 8:15 pm. Sabbath Services.
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro s topic
"Dare We Believe?
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 183rd St., N. Miami Beech. JgJ
847-60a4. Harold Wlshna, "cu"",7
Franklin D. Kreutter. regional presr*"-___
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park, 3"
NW 82 Ave., IMMQ J
33166, 582-4792. ****}*
Llttman, regional director
.;-..-.


Friday, October 29,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 1 IB
'3
FEDERAL DISCOUNT PHARMACY
45 N.E. 1st Avenue Miami, Florida
I
k>
^^^^H
is New Life Award, presented to those who have survived
ftfolocaust and become active in Jewish communal service,
I present to Peter Goldring (left) by Dinner Chairman
\idSchaecter at the annual State of Israel Bonds New Life
PERSONNA*
wer
aver
For Women
2 Shavers
89c
ASPERGUM
ner.
Cherry
or
Orange
",,>' Flavor
16'sS1.2940'ss2.39
SAVE TODAY
to (TRACE
rSorI) SUPER H
BRECK
Shampoo
Normal
21 oz.
DURATION
Mentholated
Vapor
Spray
Vi oz. I -
DURATION
Decongestant
Nasal Spray
Duration
"'' NASAL SWAT
y,oz?1."
1oz.
3.
39
$2-39
BLUESTRATOS
Cologne
1Voz.s4.89
4.25oz.s6." '
After Shave Lotion
1Voz.s4.M
4.25oz.S5.69
rnnbers of the South Dade Jewish Community Center Book]
hCommittee, from left, Carol Cantor, Laurel Shapiro, Karen\
\ner, and Susan Kafka, plan the 2nd Annual Celebration of\
\ish Book Month.
Immigration Problems To Be Addressed
The immigration situation in
uth Florida will be addressed
Federation Tuesday, the
Inual community education day
ynsored by the Greater Miami
wish Federation's Women's
fusion to be held Nov. 16 at the
irillon Beach Hotel.
[Entitled "Give Us Your Tired,
urPoor. 1H901982: A Jewish
nma," a panel of local at-
leys and clergy will discuss
I and ethical questions raised
by immigration. Panel members
will include Ira Kurzban, past
president of the Association of
Immigration and Nationality
Lawyers, Rabbi Irving Lehrman,
spiritual leader of Temple
Emanu-El, U.S. Attorney for the
Southern District of Florida,
Stanley Marcua. and Neal R.
Sonnett. president of the Dade
County Bar Association.
For further information, please
call the Federation Women's
Division at 576-4000.
MISS
BRECK
HAIR SPRAY
Regular
Unscented
Super
Super Unscented
Soft Hold
Ultra Hold
f^rjW
12 oz.
@M$p*r
STICK
Deodorant
%$>**>
SOLID
Anti-Perspirant
Deodorant
After Shave
Lotion
4.25 oz.
S2.99
8.5 oz.
s5.19
1
Far
Judaica Classes College Credit
High School Administrator
W>bi Shimon Azulay and Youth
TOgram Director Dr. Sandy An-
on. directors of the Central
Igency for Jewish Education^
ludaica High School, have an-
>nced that Judaic Studies
isses are now in progress and
fn Miami-Dade Community
foUege New World Center
dits. Twenty college credit
feses now exist at JHS.
I The JHS of the Central Agen-
I is completely funded by the
Plater Miami Jewish Federa-
jn and Is open for registration
"Jewish students in 11th and
Pa grade. Carla Spector is the
T ege CTedit coordinator.
*th Am Hosts Youths
lleople Beth Am'8 BAFTY
f"1 Club 9, Beth Am's Ninth
pde Youth Group, will host a
pdership Conference for
putheast executives and board
Pembers Of l.emnl<> vnulh
After
Shave
Lotion
Cologne
3oz.
3oz.
s2."
From left. Dr. Sandy Andron,
Judith Averback, and Rabbi
Shimon Azulay
Hebrew Academy
Women Dedicate
New Library
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy Junior-Senior
High School Library was
dedicated in the memory of
Eleanor Stern, former five-term
president of the Hebrew
Academy Women. The unveiling
of the memorial took place on
Wednesday. Hermia Reinhard is
rtn^'wITS a banquet m" president, and TUlie Yates is
'tume ball Saturday night. {ibrary chairman.
1...T executives and board
pmbers of temple youth groups
Fy afternoon through
aay morning. The three day
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PW music, leadership
ffWg, and a banquet and
rrlair n!nk(
Excedrin
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8oz.
$2.59


P.rro IQn
^
TV^ T~J_L v>t j:__
T7 1 1^
' a^e i_-ii i he .Jewish Hondian Friday. October 29, 1982
"Let's Talk" Program
Major changes are coming to the telephone industry. And
although that day is several months away, the Bell System has
begun an information effort to explain to the public the reasons
behind what will be taking place in the telecommunications
industry.
The changes are a result of Federal Regulatory rulings and the
modified Consent Decree ending the U.S. Department of
Justice's Anti-Trust suit against the American Telephone and
Telegraph Company. Under this agreement, AT&T is to divest
itself of Southern Bell and the other 21 operating companies.
John Thomas, Southern Bell Manager here, said. "The theme
of our new information program is "Let's Talk,"' and we want to
do just that. The program is designed to encourage a person-to-
person communications process a dialogue between our
customers and the company.
The program is being announced in advertisements appearing
in national publications and in customers" bills in the company's
four-state area.
Using a toll-free phone number listed in the ads, the public
will be able to ask Southern Bell employees about the modified
Consent Decree and the impact of divestiture, as well as any
personal concerns they may have about their future relation-
ships with the company.
Thomas said. "Our customers need to be fully informed about
how they will receive phone service in the future. Because the
changes in our business are so complex and are occurring so
rapidly, we felt we had to take an approach which provided
immediate, person-to-person communication."
He said that calls can be made to the "Let's Talk" number
800-555-5000 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. on weekdays.
Besides answering questions by phone, the company will also
be offering the public a free booklet. It covers events leading to
the recent and coming changes and describes some of their
impact on consumers.
Thomas said, "The "Let's Talk" program is intended to let
our customers know as information becomes available
what changes to expect in the telecommunications industry and.
where possible, how the changes will affect them. The program
will also help us identify concerns that customers have about
doing business with the Bell System, and it will provide a means
of responding to those concerns on a continuing basis."
Sharon's Battle With Media
By HUGH ORGEL
And GIL SEDAN
TEL AVIV. (JTA) De-
fense Minister Ariel Sharon's
running battle with the media
and with groups of army reser-
vists has erupted anew. The
issues involved, though unre-
lated, have brought demands
that he apologize to soldiers who
say they were maligned by
Sharon or his spokesmen.
The Defense Minister, accom-
panied by Chief of Staff Gen.
Rafael Eitan. met with editors of
leading newspapers to "set the
record straight" about a re-
serve paratroop brigade which
Sharon claimed was not called to
action in Lebanon last summer
because of low morale. The
brigade was, in fact, called up
twice for combat duties, as Eitan
himself confirmed. Sharon ac-
knowledged yesterday that it had
performed with "courage and
efficiency."
But he insisted that misgiving
as to its fighting capabilities were
justified at the time because of
"unbridled" media criticism of
the war in Lebanon that may
have affected morale. Press reac-
tion to Sharon's attempted re-
conciliation was summed up in a
Maariv headline which said
"Hard Feelings Continue."
The other issue stemmed from
the announcement by Army
Advocate General Dov Shefi last
week that eight soldiers, includ-
ing officers, will go on trial before
a regional military court on
charges of mistreating the Arab
population on the West Bank and
that two other officers would be
relieved of their dutires in the
Hebron area.
The charges that the soldiers
used violence against local Arabs
were made by reserve officers
who are members of the Peace
Now movement at a press confe-
rence in Jerusalem last May.
A Defense Ministry spoke-
sman accused Peace. Now of
political motives. But the charges
were investigated nevertheless in
what the army insists was
routine procedure. The Peace
Now reservists claim the court
martial vindicates them and are
demanding an apology from
Sharon. The paratroopers are de-
manding the same.
Members Vusit Site Of The Massacre
By DAVID LANDAU
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The three members of the judicial
commission established to deter-
mine whether Israel had any cul-
pability in the massacre of Pale-
stinians in west Beirut last
month, visited the scene of the
killings Sunday. The commis-
sion, headed by Chief Justice
Yitzhak Kahan of the Supreme
Court, consists of Supreme Court
Justice Aharon Barak and Gen.
(ret.) YanahEfrat.
Escorted to Beirut by Deputy
Chief of Staff Gen. Moshe Levy
and other senior officiers, they
viewed the Sabra and Shatila
refugee camps where the
massacres occurred Sept. 16-18
from the points where the Israeli
army had observation posts at
the time. The army has since e-
vacuated Beirut.
The commission is expected to
begin informal hearings before
the end of this week in a build-
ing provided for the purpose on
the Hebrew University campus in
west Jerusalem. A permanent
staff of lawyers and investigators
assigned to the panel by the
Justice Ministry and the police,
is already at work sifting through
material made available from the
army, government agencies and
individuals.
Last week the commission
called for all pertinent document*
and on individuals with
knowledge of the events to come
forward. The panel has judicial
powers to subpoena witnesses
and document.0. It 13 not yet
known whether any of its ses-
sions will be open to the press.
Sepe Receives Award of Merit
The Florida ("rime Prevention
Commission has awarded Al Sepe
their Award of Merit for his
"contributions to the war on
crime.''
Donna Shepherd, executive di-
rector of the Florida Crime Pre-
vention Commission, presented
the award and said. "This cita-
tion and Award of Merit is issued
by the Florida Crime Prevention
Commission as a measure of ap-
preciation on behalf of a grateful
State and our citizens who seek
to prevent crime and violence by
education and protective
measures to reduce the ability of
felons to invade our community
and endanger life and property."
AI Sepe is a candidate for
County Court Judge on the Nov.
2 ballot.
Shepard further stated that the
award was presented "because of
many years of community service
on behalf of the principles of law
and order both during many
years in the State Attorneys
Office and as a Circuk f
Judge .nDadel-ountv-ShJj
eluded, stating. Your ser^
ai permanent reminder to aiul
that our community is a LJ
and safer place to "live fo.
selves and our children becaLl
your tireless efforts on bfl
law enforcement. '
Future Otim Assisted
Twenty future olim, members
of the North American Aliyah
Movement, from seven different
states, three of which were of
Miami, embarked on a fact find-
ing mission to Israel recently, ac-
cording to Allan Milstein dir
torof the Israel Aliyah Cento
M.am,. NAAMs seminal
Israel provide people who plaJ
move to Israel information
suitable hvmg places, jobs etc'
The Ideal
Chanukah Gift
ii m .iiiiTT

J Subscription Order Form
SPEGIAL EtiftNDKAtt EIFT GARB
SENT IN YQDR NAME
$18.00 for the first one-year
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MAIL TO:
Jewish Floridiaxi
P.O. Box 012973
Miami, Florida 33101


Friday, October 29.1982 The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
iblic Notice
OF
AL
-THECIRCUIT COURT
liltiVINTMJUOICI
LoECOUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
fwiiioner-Wife
L and
-BEPHSAfNDERS
KLaidtnlHusband
I^TCEO/ACTION
|,nr ARE HEREBY
mFIED that a Petition for
-ohition of Marriage has
Tnjed against you. and that
r required to aerve a
L tf your Response or
Vf 10 the Petition upon
ESwMr'l attorneys. 311-
* Silver. Attorneys at Law.
,1126 150S.E. 2nd Avenue,
,! Florida 33131. and file
-original Response or Plead-
Lihe office of the Clerk of
{Circuit Court on or before
Ljdy of November, 1882. If
i toll to do so. a Default
rtnent will be taken against
Ctor the relief demanded In
IpellUon
)ATED at Miami. Dade
tv, Florida, this 29 day of
-Cimoer. 1882.
[RICHARD P. BRINKER
Ichrkof the Circuit Court
By C.P Copeland
Deputy Clerk
October8. IS;
22,29. 1982
, notice of action
Instructive service
[ (noproperty)
lthe circuitcourtof
jleeleventh judicial
ilrcuitof florida, in
(nd FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 12-15592
, FAMILY DIVISION
JTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
hE The Marriage of
J.IA ESTHER
UNACUERO.
petitioner
WBERTO
illREZLLEPEZ.
spondent.
IHERIBERTO RAMIREZ
LLEPEZ
Residence Unknown
OU ARE HEREBY NOT1-
|D that an action for Dlsso-
pn of Marriage has been
I against you and you are
bired to serve a copy of your
ben defenses, if any, to it on
LVIN J. ASHER, ESQ.. al-
ley for Petitioner. whojK
en Is 1850" S"W. 8th Street.
I206. Miami. Florida 33138,
[(lie the original with the
i of the above styled court
fcr before November 19th,
|; otherwise a default will
rilered against you for the
" demanded in the com-
|k or petition.
NESS my hand and the
lol said court at Miami,
J on this 15 day of Octo-
E.
UCHARDP BRINKER
JsClerk. Circuit Court
iDadeCounty, Florida
ByN.A.Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
October 22, 29;
November 8,12.1982
OTICE OF ACTION
fSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
J(N0 PROPERTY)
|HE CIRCUITCOURTOF
^ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CUITOF FLORIDA. IN
TFOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 8215182
f^THE MARRIAGE OF;
?NEDUARDO
fZALEZ.
"band,
J-IA GONZALEZ,
Ue.
DIUAGONZALES
Jdificlo 35. Apt. 5
flaHabana
lvana, Cuba
J ARE HEREBY NOTI-
Ml an action for Dlsso
loi Marriage has been
mm you and you are
IWtowrveacopyofyour
* 1efen.es, if any. to llon
J L Carrlcarte, p.a
F 'or Petitioner, whose'
lla241N.w.7thStr.eT
| Florida 33128, and file
EKL2?1 me clerk o
[ styled court on or be-
overnber 12, 1982; other-
t"efaul, win be entered
'you for the relief de-
m the complaint or
iceahallbepubU.hijd
F12? for four con-
\m ?mM at Mlam'.'
lS,0,to 7 **y S
IprtSeal)
t/i Street
Morida 33128
^'305,649-7917
""Petitioner
October 15. 22.29-
Novembers, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTME CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
NO. 87 -14759
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE; THE MARRIAGE OF
IRENE PENA,
Petitioner-Wife
and
CARLOS F. PENA.
Respondent-Husband
TO: CARLOS E. PENA
ISO Metros norte de la
Pulperla
Santa Maria.
San Pedro monies de Oca.
San Jose, Costa Rica
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an action for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defenses. If any. to
It on A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 101 N.W. 12th
Avenue. Miami, Florida, and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before November 5. 1982;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the re-
lief demanded In the complaint
or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 29 day of Sept
! tember. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
A. KOSS, ATTORNEY AT
LAW, P.A.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami, Florida 33128
Attorney for Petitioner
18186 October 8, 15;
________.____________22, 29, 198:
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-7483
Division PROBATE
IN RE: ESTATE OF
GLORIA BADER
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of GLORIA BADER. de-
ceased. File Number 82-7483, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Fl. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
snetatlve and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 18, 1982.
Personal Representative:
Harold Bader
2333 Brlckell Ave.
Miami. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
RICHARD J. BURTON, ESQ.
3810 Blscayne Boulevard,
Suite 300
Telephone: (306)876-2473
l~lSifll_______October IB. 22.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious names
Transport Adjusting Service,
BUI EUs Furniture Service. BUI
Etis interior Designer at 18962
NE 4 Ct.. North Miami Beach,
Fl 33179 Intends to register said
names with the Clerk of tl
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
The EUs Company, owner.
18189 October IB. 22. 29;
November 8. 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious named)
Continental Seamless Gutter at
3860 West 4 Ave. Hialeah. Fla.
33012 lntend(s) to register said
Iname(a) with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
FRANK MARTINEZ, owner
18190 October IS. 22.29
Novembers. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name EL
TIGRE MEAT AND PROVI-
SIONS at 18O0 North Miami
Avenue. Miami Florida 33136
Intends to register said name
with the. Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
LA MONTINA, Inc ,
Manuel Alonso, President
18188 October 18. 22, 29
Novembers, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of A-
EAST COAST APPLIANCE
SERVICE. INC at 4030 N.
Miami Ave in the City of
Miami. Florida. Intends to reg-
ister the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
21st day of October, 1982.
EAST COAST APPLIANCE
SERVICE. INC.
By Leonard Schaffran
President
Fredrlc A. Hoffman
Attorney for Applicant
Smith at Mandler, P.A.
1111 Lincoln Rd. Mall.
8th Floor
Miami Beach, FL 33139
18228 October 29;
_____ Novembers. 12,19, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 82-15779
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
OSCAR SANCHEZ,
Petitioner,
and
CECILIA SANCHEZ,
Respondent.
TO CECILIA SANCHEZ
264 Preakness Avenue
W. Peterson, N.J.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that an acUon for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your written defense. If any, to
it on MELV1N J. ASHER,
ESQ.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1880 S.W. 8th
Street, Suite 208, Miami,
Florida 3313B. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 12, 1982; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 8 day of October
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C.P. COPELAND
As Deputy Clerk
October IB, 22. 29
______________Novembers, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 82-1570*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ROBERTO ALVAREZ.
Petitioner-Husband
and
ADRIANA ALVAREZ.
Respondent-Husband
TO: ADRIANA ALVAREZ
Avenlda No. 39
No. 10623
entre 106 y 108
Marlanao, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
A. KOSS, ATTORNEY AT
LAW. P.A., attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 101 N.
W. 12th Avenue, Miami. Flor-
ida 33128, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before No-
vember 19, 1982; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORID IAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 19 day of Octo-
ber, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A u Cle rk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW, P.A.
101 N.W. 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida S3128
Telephone: (306)328-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
(Publish)
ROBERT D. SHAPIRO, ESQ.
18203 October 22, 29;
November 6.12.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
HUDSON ARMS APTS. at 420
- 18th Street, Miami Beach,
Florida 33139 intends to regis-
ter said name with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida.
MILDA, INC.
L.M. Duzevlc, Pres.
18187 October 8.19':
"" 29.1982,
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name La
Luz Dlvtna at 108 S.W. 22nd
Road. Miami. Fla 33129 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Mariano M. MarUnez
18212 October 29;
Novembers. 12. 19.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name A at J
Carpets at 2374 SW 128 Ct..
Miami. Fl 3317B intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Alfredo Palrot, owner
18214 October 29;
Novembers. 12. 19.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
Las Fuerzas del Gran Poder at
106 S.W. 22nd Rd. Miami. Fla.
33129 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Mariano M. Martinez
18211 October 29;
______ Novembers. 12, 19.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOr *OPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 8J-15106
FAMILY CIVIL
DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
RENAN DEMETREO
QUINONES.
Petitioner,
and
DAISY HAZEL
ORTIZ QUINONES.
Respondent.
TO: Daisy Hazel
Ortiz Qulnones
(Addressand
whereabouts unknown i
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on David
E. Stone, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
Stone, Sostchln A Gonzalez,
P.A.. 1401 W. Flagler Street,
Suite 201, Miami, Florida 33136,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 12,
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In The Jewish
Floridlan.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 7 day of
October. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal)
David E. Stone
Stone, Sostchln and
Gonzalez. P.A.
1401 W. Flagler Street.
Suite 201
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18178 October IB, 22,29;
Novembers, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious names
SOMETHING SPECIAL
CHOCOLATES" and "SKOR-
MAN ENTERPRISES" at 8100
S.W. 81st Drive, Suite 240,
Miami. Florida 33143 Intends to
register said names with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Larry Skorman. owner
Joel A. Savltt
Attorney for Applicant
017662 Octobers, IB;
22.29.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Fronteraa del Alma at 106 S.W.
22nd Rd.. Miami. Fla. 33129
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
MARIANO M. MARTINEZ
18213 October 29;
Novembers. 12.19, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
HAPPY FACES, at 7S41 SW 146
iv i Miami. Florida 33158
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Myrna Ui wnan
- Owner
18168 Oct. 8, IB,
22 9P, 1WH9
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
Case No 82 15993
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE TO APPEAR
(BY PUBLICATION)
In Re: The Marriage of
MAGELLA JOSEPH
MILLERET.
Petitioner Wife
Vs.
HENRY CLAUDE
MILLERET.
Respondent-Husband
TO HENRY CLAUDE
MILLERET
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY re-
quired to serve a copy of your
Answer to the Petition for Dis-
solution herein on the petition-
er's attorneys. Murray z.
Klein. Esq 610 Israel Discount
Bank Bldg.. 14 NE. 1st Ave-
nue. Miami. Fl. 33132 and file
the original In the offices of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before November 29, 1982 or
said cause will be taken as con-
fessed by you.
Dated: this 22 day of Octo-
ber. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
N A Hewett
Deputy Clerk
18230 October 29;
Novembers. 12. 19, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
I THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
I CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
No. 82-138S3 Div. 27
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
WILLI CONSTAN JOHN.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
JOYCE ANN JOHN.
Res nnn dent-Wife.
YOU, JOYCE ANN JOHN,
residence unknown, are re-
quired to file your answer to
the petition for dissolution of
marriage with the Clerk of the
above Court and serve a copy
thereof upon the petitioner's
.attorney. MarUn Cohen. Esq .
622 S.W. 1 St.. Miami. Florida
33130, on or before November
29. 1982. or else petition will be
confessed
Witness my hand and the seal
of this Court, at Miami. Dade
County Florida this 22 day of
October. 1982
Richard P. Blinker
Clerk. Circuit Court
By A. Mlnguez
Deputy Clerk
.18229 October 29.
Novembers. 12. 19,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the flcUtlous name
Graiver Corp. d-b-a Nobel
School at 14880 NE 6th Ave-
nue. North Miami Beach. Fla.
33162 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Clr
cult Court of Dade County.
Florida.
David Cohen, President
18232 October 29:
November 8. 12, 19,1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 12 14754
GENERAL JURISDICTION
DIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SARAH RICHARDSON.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
ROLAND RICHARDSON,
Respondent-Husband
TO: ROLAND RICHARDSON
West End
Freeport, Grand Bahama
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been filed against you and you
are required to serve a copy of
your Answer or Pleading to
said petition on petitioner's at-
torney, GEORGE T. RAMANI.
ESQ.. Suite 711. Blscayne
Building. 19 West Flagler
Street, Miami, Florida 33130
and file the Original Answer or
Pleading In the Office of the
Circuit Court Clerk, on or
before 6th day of November.
1982. If you fail to do so. judg-
ment by default will be taken
against you for the relief de-
manded in said petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami, Dade County, Florida,
this 29th day of September.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Circuit Court Clerk
ByN.A.Hewett
Deputy Clerk
18168 October 8. IB;
22, 29, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 82-14784
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: MARRIAGE OF
MELVIN SANCHEZ
SOMARRIBA.
Petitioner-Husband
and
AMALIA ENGRACIA
SANCHEZ SIERRA.
Respondent-Wife
TO: Amalla Engracla Sanchez
Sierra ,
VlaIJbertadF882
Managua, Nicaragua
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a Petition for
Dissolution of Marriage has
been fUed against you. and that
you are required to serve a
copy of your Response or
pleading to the Petition upon
the Petitioner's attorneys.
Silver A Silver, Attorneys at
Law, Suite 1326. 160 S.E. 2nd
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33131,
and fUe the original Response
or pleading in the office of the
Clerk of the Circuit Court on or
before the 8 day of November,
1982. If you fall to do so, a De-
fault Judgment wUl be taken
against you for the relief de-
manded In the Petition.
DATED at Miami. Dade
County. Florida this 29 day of
September. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By C.P. Copeland
Deputy Clerk
18164 October 8. IS;
22,29.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 82-15451 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ARMANDO RULL.
PETITIONER
and
VICTORIA TORRES
deRULL
RESPONDENT.
TO: Victoria Torres
da Run
Sastre No. 22
Mariana de la Torres
Santiago de Cuba
Oriente.Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
MILTON C GOODMAN, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 19 West Flagler
Street. Suite 820. Miami. Flor-
ida, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November
19. 1982; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 13 day of Octo-
ber. 1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByM. J. Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Milton C. Goodman. Esq.
Attorney for Petitioner
Suite 820
Blscayne Bldg.
19 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33130
Telephone: 379-188B
Attorney for Petitioner
18194 October 22. 29;
Novembers, 12.1982
NOTICE UNDER
' FICTITIOUSNAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
POLLO RIKO at 1980 West 80
Street, Hialeah, Florida, 33012
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Marina Manrique
18202 October 22. 29;
Novembers. 12,1982
AFFIDAVIT UNDER
FICTITIOUS
NAME STATUTE
STATE OF FLORIDA
COUNTY OF DADE
881
The undersigned, under oath.
says; It Is the Intention of
undersigned to engage In a
business enterprise under the
fictitious name of GREEN-
TREE DEVELOPERS located
at 128SB S.W. 72nd Street in the
city of Miami. Dade County.
Florida.
Those interested In said en-
terprise, and the extant of the
Interest of each, Is as follows:
DENIEL RFTTER.
TRUSTEE
Interest 100 Percent
18201 October 22. 29;
November B, 12.1982
/ NOTICE UNDER
I FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
1 NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Sun-
Signs of Miami at 383 E. 1 Ave..
; Hialeah. Fl. 33010 Intends to
i register said name with the
'Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Francisco Blanco,
owner
18172 October IS. 22. 29;
November 8. 1982


Page 14. B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 29,1982

Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 82-13002
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
BENILDES ESCALONA
DE LA PAZ.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
NORMAN DE LA PAZ
Respondent-Husband.
TO: NORMAN DE LA PAZ
Residence unknown.
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTI-
FIED thai an action lor Dlsso
lutlon of Marriage has been
filed against yuu and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written del crises, If any, to it on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
P.A., attorney for Petitioner,
whose addi-ess is 2491 N.W. 7th
Street. Miami. Florida 3312S.
and file t:it- original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before November 12.
19(9; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW
1SH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 7 day of
October. 1982.
E.B LEATHERMAN
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal l
ALBERTL
CARRICARTE. P.A.
Attorney for the Wife
2491 N.W 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33125
Telephone (3061649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
18179 October 15. 22. 29
Novembers, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
NAOMI JEWELS at number 36
N.E. First Street, in the City of
Miami, Florida, intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit. Court of
Dade County, Florida'
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
6 day of October. 1982.
NAOMIONN
JOSHUA II MANASTER,
ESQUIRE
Attorney for Applicant
18183 October 15, 22,29;
Novembers. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 82 12002 0*
FAMILY CIVIL DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
BRENDA JEANNE HULL.
Petitioner,
vx.
RANDOLPH S. HULL.
Respondent.
TO: MR. RANDOLPH S
HULL
137 Cedar Street
Cliff side. New Jersey 07010
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dis-
solution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a coov of vour written
defenses, if any, to it on Stone.
Sostchln A Gonzalez. P.A., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 1401 W. Flagler
Street. Suite 201, Miami,
Florida 33135 and file the
orginal with the clerk of the '
above styled court on or before j
November 12, 1982; otherwise a ,
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in The Jewish
Floridian.
WINTNESS my hand and
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 8th day or Octo-
ber, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
David E. Stone of
Stone, Sostchin A Gonzalez,
P.A.
1401 W. Flagler Street,
Suite 201
Miami. Florida 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18186 October 15. 22. 29;
Novembers, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name!si
Dance-Drama Workshop. In-
ternational Series, and Inter-
national Theatre Benefit at 69
N.W. 26th Avenue. Miami.
Florida Intend! s) to register
said namels) with the Clerk of
the Circuit Court of Dade Coun-
ty. Florida
Ballet Spectacular, Inc.
a non-profit Florida
corporation
By: Francis Mayvtlle.
President
18204 October 22. 29,
November 6,12. 1982
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUOICIAl
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CASE NO. 82 17041
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
ALDO CORDOVA,
Plaintiff,
vs.
PEDRO RAFAELCALANA
and JUAN DIAZ
Defendants.
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: Pedro Rafael Calana
1866 West 62 St.
Hlaleah. Fla.
TO: Juan Diaz
95 West 52 St.
Hlaleah. Fla.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action to foreclose a mort-
gage on the following property
In Dade County, Florida:
The West 390 feet of the South
y, of the South % of the S.E. fc
of the N.E. % of Section 11,
Township 56 South, Range 38
East. Dade County, Florida,
has been filed against you and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any, to it on Leon G. Nichols,
plaintiff's attorney, whose ad-
dress is 7486 S.W. 8th Street,
Miami, Florida S8144, on or be-
fore November 13.1982. and file
the original with the clerk of
this court, either before service
on plaintiff's attorney or Im-
mediately thereafter; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition r
DATED !hls 8 day of
October. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
i .if the Court
Mlnguez
as uty Clerk
181^ October 15. 22.29;
Novembers, 1982
INTHE CIRCUITCOUPT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82 8254
IN RE ESTATE OF
FRANK JAMES EVANS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO All. PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of FRANK JAMES
EVANS, deceased. File Num-
ber 82 8284, is pending In the
Circuit Court for DADE Coun-
ty. Florida, Probate Division,
the address of which is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The personal represen-
tative of the estate Is NORA
EVANS, whose address Is
5928 (afford Avenue, Hun-
tlngton Pa-k, California 90255.
The name and address of the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative.
All persons interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
PROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
| BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: October 22.1982.
Nora Evans
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
FRANK JAMES EVANS
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
IRAS. SILVER
Suite 1336.
150S.E. 2nd Avenue
Miami. Florida33131
Telephone: (306)374-4888
18198 October22. 29,1982
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-7U
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
REUBEN H. PEARLMAN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of REUBEN H. PEARL-
MAN, deceased. File Number
82-7916. Is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which is 73 W. Flag
ler Street. Miami. Florida. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2| any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice
has begun on October 22.1982
Personal Representative:
ANNE B. PEARLMAN
151 N.E. 52nd Street
Miami. FL 33137
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Ronald M. Friedman,
Esquire
370 Minorca Avenue.
Suites
Coral Gables. FL 33134
Telephone: (3051446-6800
18199 October22. 29.1982
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-8242
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ARTHUR MINIKES. a-k-a
ARTHUR B. MINIKES.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of ARTHUR MINIKES.
deceased, File Number C2-8242.
is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is Dade County Court-
house, 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. FL 33130. The names
and addresses of the personal
representative and the per-
sonal representative's attorney
are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (11 all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an In-
terested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on October 22. 1982.
Personal Representative:
HELEN MINIKES
800 Bayvlew Drive
North Miami Beach.
FL 33160
Attorney for Personal Repre-
sentative :
SPARBER. SHEVIN. ROSEN,
SHAPO HEILBRONNER,
P.A.
One Southeast Third Avenue,
No. 3060
Miami. FL 33131
Telephone: (306)368-7990
18207 October 22. 29, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE .
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 82-15183
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JOSE ENRIQUE VERA.
Husband- Petitioner,
and
OBDULIA YERA.
Wife-Respondent.
TO: OBDULIA VERA
Residence address
unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
P.A.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2491 N.W. 7th
Street, Miami, Florida 33126.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or heforeNovember 12, 1982;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 7 day of
October, 1982.
E. B. LEATHERMAN
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByC.P.Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE. P.A.
Attorney for the Husband
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33125
Telephone: (306)649-7917
Attorney for Petitioner
18177 October 15, 22, 29;
Novembers. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
CAFE MARCEL at 2911 Grand
Avenue, In the City of Miami,
Florida, 33133, Intends to regis-
ter the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
30 day of September, 1982.
CAFE CHAUVERON
AT MA YFAIR. INC.
Tallanoff A Rubin
2699 S. Bayshore Drive
suite eoo-c
Miami. Florida 33133
Attorney for Applicant
By: George J. Tallanoff. P.A.
18200 October 33.29;
November 6.13.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Hud-
son Arms Apts. at 430 16th
Street. Miami Beach, Florida
33139 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Mllivoi Duzevlc. Owner.
18196 October 22. 29;
November 8. 12. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE ELEVENTH
JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
NO. 82-9795 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
MARY L. LONGMIRE,
MARY L. BROWN
Petitioner-Wife
and
LISTON BELL. JR.
Respondent Husband
TO: Mr. Llston Bell, Jr.
General Delivery
Hemingway. South
Carolina 29664
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
ALAN H. MILLER, Esq., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 10871 Caribbean
Blvd.. Suite 306 Miami, Florida
33189. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before November 5,
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once a week for four consecu-
tive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and seal
of said court at Miami, Florida
on this 4 day of October, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: AMINGUEZ
As Deputy Clerk
Alan H. Miller. Esq.
10871 Caribbean Blvd.. Suite
305
Miami. Florida 33189
Attorney for Petitioner
18169 October 8,15,
33. 29,1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 82 15748 FC
FAMILYIDIVISION
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
NICOLE METZ
Petitioner
and
EMILE G. METZ
Respondent
TO: EMILE G. METZ
1 Rue D'Armenonvllle
78017 Parts France
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are requir-
ed to serve a copy of your writ-
ten defenses. If any, on
ROBERT M. ZIEJA. ESQ. At-
torney for Petitioner, 633 N.E
167 St.. North Miami Beach. Fl.
33162 on or before November
19, 1982, and fUe the original
with the clerk of this court;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you. Dated'
October 19, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Circuit Court Clerk
ByM.J. HARTNETT
As Deputy Clerk
October 22.29
Novembers, 12. 1982
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, COUNTY
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-7*40 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEAH N. SHINE.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of LEAH N. SHINE, de-
ceased, File Number 82-7660
CP04. Is pending In the Circuit
Court for Dade County, Flor-
ida. Probate Division, the ad-
dress of which Is 73 West Flag-
ler Street, Miami, Florida
33131. The name and address of
the personal representatives
and of the personal representa-
tives' attorney are set forth be-
low.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with the court
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE: (1) all claims
against the estate and (2) any
objection by an Interested
persons to whom notice was
mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfl
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue or Jurisdiction
of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this notice of administra-
tion:
WARRENS. SHINE.
Personal
Representative
A. JAY CRISTOL. Personal
Representative
Atlornev For Personal
Representative:
CRISTOL. MISHAN
It SLOTO
300 Blscayne Boulevard Way
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone. (305)379-1792
BY:JAMES R. SLOTO
18196 October 22. 29. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
Cohen & Cohen at 622 S.W. 1st
St.. Miami. Fla 33130 Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Herman Cohen
Martin Cohen. Partners
18171 October 8, 15;
22. 29, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
The Drapery Company (not In
corporated) at 13331 S.W.
80 Street, In the Countv of
Dade, Florida, Intends to regis-
ter the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
8th day of October. 1982.
DAVID DERNIS
PAMELA DERN IS
SANFORD F. DERNIS
Attorney for Applicant
10700 Caribbean Blvd.,
Suite 314
Miami. Florida 33189
Telephone: (305)233-3735
18184 October IS, 22. 29;
Novembers, 1982
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 82 15258
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
ORLANDO VENEGAS
PetlUoner
and
LUZ MARIA VENEGAS
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LUZ MARIA VENEGAS
Residence Unknown.
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, on
ROBERT M. ZIEJA, ESQ., At-
torney for Petitioner, 633 N.E.
167 St.. N.M.B.. Fl 33162 on or
before November 12, 1982, and
file the original with the clerk
of this court; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you.
Dated: Octobers, 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
by Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
18187 October 16, 33,30;
November 6,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
Family Moving and Storage at
10066 Winding Lake Rd., Apt
101, Sunrise, Fla. 33320 Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida,
incorporation
Of Broward
By: Anthony Calamela, Pres
18173 October 15.22. 29;
Novembers, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTiru.
CONSTRUCTIVE^,,
(NO property.1"
INTHE CIRCUIT COUBT.i
THE ELEVENTH J&1
CIRCUITOF FLORID*',Vl
AND FOR DADE count!I
CIVIL ACTIONI YT
_._ NO. 82-15180
^LIMBA^A^^O'I
RODRIGUEZ
Wife,
and
JSE ANTONIO
RODRIGUEZ.
Husband.
TO: JOSE ANTONIO
RODRIGUEZ
60 Baldwin Street
New Brunswick
N.J. 08901
YOU ARE HEREBY Nrm I
TOD that an action fiSSSl
ution of Marrlag. ha. ",
filed against you and vou"
required to serve ,,,|,C0,*7,
written defenses v 'W
ALBERT 1. iA
'' a"orm,y '" Cftltioner I
whose address is 2491 N w m I
Street, Mian,,. Fl. 33138 Z\
file the original ith the clerk
of the above styl.,,, uurt 0 i
before Novemhi-i 12, jjjj
otherwise a default will be
entered against vou for ih,
relief demanded in the co-
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each wees for (uur con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 7 day of
October. 1982.
B. B. LEATHERMAN,
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByC. Moore
As Deputy CU-rk
(Circuit Court Seal 1
ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE. P A
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33125
Attorney (or Petitioner
Telephone: (3051649-7917
18176 October 15.22,29;
November 5.1962
leg
Decease
Nl
, ADM1
|tO*LL P
Ess.
I vot A1
IrffiD U>at
Ess
upending
lit* D'vl-
Lien U
I uiirni- '
Ehmij
yp s
|uioiy I
Ucrw!
mine >n
al r*
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 8215342
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MAKRIAUEOF
WESNELJOSKI'H,
Petitioner-Husband
and
PHYLLIS M JOSEPH,
Respondent-Wife
TO: PHYLLIS M.JOSEPH
Address & Residence
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a petition for Dlsso
lutlon of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to it on LAtt
OFFICE OF LLOYD M
ROUTMAN attorney for Peti
tinner, whose address is Suite
615. 7900 NE 2nd Avenue.
Miami, FL 33138 and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
November 17, 1982; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed (or In
the complaint or petition.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 12 day of Octo-
ber, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal 1
LAW OFFICE OF
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN
Suite 815.
7900 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18191 October 15.22.29,
November 5.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITINANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA '
Case NO. 82-13752 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
MONIQUE PIERRE LOUIS
PetlUoner
and
LUCJANU1ER
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LUCJANUIER
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution 0.
marriage has been Hied
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any,
ROBERT M. ZIEJA, ESQ.. At;
torney for Petitioner, 633 N
167 St.. N.M.B.. Fl 33162 on or
before November 19, 1982, and
file the original with the clem
of this court; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered againn
you.
Dated: October 19, 1982.___
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk
byM. J.Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
18206 October 22.29,
November 5.12.1982


11 ^&^>Y$(if&
Friday, October 29, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
THic.eu.TeouT
rnilNTY, FLORIDA
Division o<
I-Rr ESTATE OF
| Pfe
ltt ^ OB DEMANDS
P^t THE ABOVE ES-
I^InD AU- OTHER
l^ONS INTERESTED IN
I^Irfhereby NOTI-
^rcounTy. Florida. Pro-
w n.ltmon the address of
"JL representative of the
ISSTn DORBITT GINS-
*RG whose aortress is 2202
Ka Bend. Apt G-J. Coco-
l*ak. Florida 33066. The
SLrSd address of the per
frepresentative's attorney
I ut *t forth below
All persons having claims or
iMiundi against the estate are
S3 WITHIN THREE
SoNTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
nth the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
my claim or demand they may
hive Each claim must be In
' writing and must Indicate the
I ms lor the claim, the name
uid address of the creditor or
Mi agent or attorney, and the
mount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due, the date when it
mil become due shall be
suted. If the claim is con-
tingent or unliquidated, the
nature of the uncertainty shall
be stated. If the claim Is
secured, the security shall be
described. The claimant shall
deliver sufficient copies of the
claim to the clerk to enable the
clerk to mall one copy to each
personal representative
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
' FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenge the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of thi' personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice ol Administra-
tion October 29. 982.
Dorrltt (Jinsberg
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
EARLSTONE
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
SOL ALEXANDER
3121 Ponce deLeon Blvd.
Coral Gables. Florida 33134
Telephone: (305)446-9887
18234 October 29;
November 5, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FORDADECOUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No 83-15252 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JAY RAYMOND
| DICKINSON
Petitioner-Husband
and
VALERIE DICKINSON
Respondent-Wife
[ TO: Mrs. Valerie Dickinson
residence unknown
Last known
mailing address:
c-o Mrs Rosemary
Volklng, Jr.
RR3, Box 52 B
Qultman,
Mississippi
*JH> ARE HEREBY NOTI-
' 1ED that an action for Dlsso-
| ution of Marriage has been
med against you and you are
squired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to it on
, *H. Miller, Esq., attorney
nLreUUoner' whoae address Is
!" Caribbean Blvd., Suite
a. Miami. Florida 33188, and
"i* the original with the clerk
ot the above styled court on or
'ore November 29. 1882;
otherwise a default will be
2E* against you for the
relief demanded In the com
Plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
2J. ..each week tor tour
I* *eeks In THE JEW-
WITNESS my hand and the
ju Of said court at Miami.
be? iw20n UU" H cto
WCHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
l01rDade County. Florida
'Circuit Court Seal)
f'8,"" Miller, Esq.
i""lcarlbbean Blvd.,
Suite 306
lami. Florida 33189
telephone (305) 238-1080
uJ.mpy 'or Petitioner
,mi October 29;
Novembers, 12,19.1982
FELDMAN
Fay. 73, of Miami for the past six years
coming from Detroit, passed away
October 28. She is survived by her
husband Dr. Nathaniel, two daughters,
Joan Schwartz of Miami and Elaine
McClaln of Tuscon, Ariz., brother Harry
Tushman of Birmingham. Mich., and
four grandchildren. David. Randy,
Jeffrey, and Steven Schwartz. Grave-
side services and lntermant were held
October 27 at Star of David Memorial
Park. Arrangements by Riverside.
RAPPAPORT
Samuel. 70. 27 year resident of Miami
Beach originally from NY, died October
26 He is survived by wife. Edith, son.
Michael, daughter. Ellen Anderson,
grandchildren, Arlo. Zachary, and
Alexis Rappaport and Jaclyn Anderson,
and three brothers, Harry. George, and
Jerry. Services were held October 28 at
Riverside.
SIMKOVITZ
Eva, 76. of Miami Beach, passed away
October 28. She was a member of the
Cuban-Hebrew Congregation of Miami
and was active helping orphaned Jewish
children. She was a member of the
South Florida Council of Pioneer
Women. She Is survived by her sons
Leonardo and Jaime, grandson Phillip,
and a brother, Israel. Funeral services
were held at Riverside on October 27.
FINE, Mlna, 84. October 17. Blasberg.
FADAR, David, October 18. Riverside.
SANDERS, Belulah, 88, October 21.
Riverside.
GOLLIS, Lester A, 64, North Miami,
October 27. Riverside.
WINDERBAUM. Cella, 87, Miami.
October27. Riverside. Mt. Nebo.
FEINSTEIN. Mary Elizabeth,
Maltland, Fla. Mt. Nebo.
KEMPNER. Molly, 72, October 28.
Riverside.
JCC Plans Area Events
The Michael-Ann Russell Jew-
ish Community Center's Early
Childhood Development Center is
sponsoring Tel Aviv Medical
School graduate Dr. Samson
Pregen to discuss child care and
development on Wednesday at
10:15 a.m. and the Dade County
Fire Department to teach chil-
dren fire safety at 7:30 p.m.
The South Dade center will
hold a women's workshop. "A
Natural You." on Friday, Oct. 29
at 9:45 that includes yoga and
exercise, Melody Roadman dis-
cussing "Image Awareness for
Today's Women." and lunch.
BURACK
Morton. 68. of Surfslde for 20 years
coming from New Haven. Conn., passed
away October 22. He was an attorney
and Is survived by three brothers, David
of Miami. Leonard of Bal Harbour, and
Arnold of Cheshire. Conn. Graveside
services and Interment were at Mt.
Nebo Cemetery on October 24. Gordon
was In charge of arrangements.
EDELMAN
Henry, 82, Miami Beach resident for 40
years coming from New York, died Oc-
tober 23. He Is survived by his wife Syl-
via, children. Edith and Arnold Straus.
Ginger and Ben Shechter. grandchil-
dren. Skip. Robin. Susie. Phil. Hank,
and Joanne, nieces and nephews. Mr.
Edelman was the owner of several
retail shops on Miami Beach before he
retired. He belonged to Temple
Menorah and was an officer In the Sea-
coast Towers East Men's Club. Services
were held October 24 at Riverside.
GARRETT
Jane, Miami Beach resident for 27 years
orgllnally from New York City, dledOc
tober 22. She was a graduate from
Hunter College and Is survived by son
Richard, sister Helen Rosenthal, and
grandson Jonathan. Services were held
October 24 at Riverside.
LEVINE
Gussie. 33 year Miami resident original-
ly from New York, passed away. She Is
survived by her daughter Estelle
Freund, two grand-daughters and two
great-granddaughters, and sister Ethel
Baron of North Miami Beach. Private
services were held.
SCHAUER
Minnie, a 40 year resident of Miami,
passed away She was the wife of Mor-
ris, mother of Jerry of Davle. Irwln of
Woodbrldge, Va and Rita Gross of
Miami, grandmother of five, great-
grandmother of two, sister of Irving
Feuer of Plantation and Gussie Feldon
of Miami Beach. Services were held Oc-
tober 24 at Riverside with Interment at
Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
HANOVER
Irving, 82, resident of Miami Beach for
38 years, formerly of New York, died.
He was the father of Nelson of New York
City. Services were held October 24 at
Riverside.
MILLER
Isidore. 94, Miami area resident since
1965 and formerly of Chattanooga,
Term., passed away. He Is survived by
sons Samuel Miller of Coral Springs,
Sidney Miller of North Miami, daughter
Bertha Bimbach of North Miami Beach,
five grandchildren, and six great-
grandchildren. He was a member of
Temple Emanu-El and was active in the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
Services were held October 24 at River-
side with Interment at Mt. Sinai Ceme-
tery.
Obituaries
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
HOWARD KANDEL It ASSO
CIAT2S at 7441 Wayne Avenue.
Miami Beach. Florida 33141 In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
HOWARD KANDEL
100 percent Owner
HARLAN STREET. PA.
Attorney for
HOWARD KANDEL
18210 October 29
Novembers. 12.19. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
TED MARTIN ORCHESTRAS
at 2371 N.E. 193rd St., In the
City of No. Miami Beach,
Florida, intends to register the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
29th day of October, 1982.
Ted Martin
Enterprises, Inc.
a Florida Corporation
by: Ted Martin, President
18238 October 29;
Novembers. 12.19.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
FORTNEY ASSOCIATES at
number 8307 S.W. 142nd Ave.,
Suite E-204, In the City of
Miami, Florida. Intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
2Sth day of October, 1982.
(s) Claire Popescu
Fredrlc A. Hoffman
Attorney for Applicant
Smith A Mandler. P.A.
P.O. Box A
Miami Beach, FL 33119
18233 October 29;
Novembers, 12. 19,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name WON
TON RESTAURANT at 14006
W. Dixie Hwy.. North Miami.
Fla. 33161 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
CARLOS M. MENDEZ. ESQ.
Attorney for
Great Family Corp.
14006 W. Dixie Hwy.
North Miami. Florida 33161
18203 October 29
Novembers. 12, 19,1982
TWERY
Rose Anna. 88. North Bay Village
resident for 28 years formerly of
Chicago, passed away She organized
the local Hadassah chapter and Is
survived by son Raymond of N.C.. four
grandchildren, brother Morey Berlow.
and sister Sara Remain. Services were
held October 21 at Riverside with in
terment at Mt Nebo Cemetery
SCHRAGER
Clara. 78. of Miami, passed away
October 21. She had been a Miami
resident from 1924 to 1927 and from 1938
to present. She was a member of
Mizrachl Women's Organization.
Beloved mother of Donald I Sophie)
Schrager. cherished grandmother of
Joseph. Joshua and Sarah Schrager
Services were neld October 22 ai Uordon
Funeral Home with Interment In the
Jewish section of Woodlawn Memorial
Park. Contributions in memory may be
made to the Mizrachl Women's
Organization.
Ilenlamir.. 67. Miami resident since 1949
coming from Mass.. passed away
October 19 He Is survived by his wife
Jeanette, daughter Irma Pollans of
Miami, grandchildren Elyse and Sherrl.
sister Irene Polofsky of Miami, two
step brothers and two step sisters He
was a member of Jewish War Veterans
Post 243 Services were held October 21
at Riverside.
Irving, 86. 2B year resident of Miami
coming originally from Brooklyn. NY.,
passed away October 19. He was a
founder and member of Anshe Ernes
Congregation and a member of Work
men's Circle. He Is survived by his wife
Esther, brother Abraham of West Palm
Beach, and sister Esther Garland of
Hallandale. Funeral services were held
October 21 at Gordon Funeral Home
with interment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
NELKIN. Anna, 78. October 12. Gordon.
MARCUS. Ann, 78, October 12. Bias
berg.
SPERO. Sidney. North Miami Beach.
October 17.
SWARTZ. Bernard. 57. Miami, October
28. Riverside.
GLASS. Anna. 80. Miami Beach. Octo-
ber 28. Rubin Zilbert.
LEVINE. Ro8e.92. Miami, October 24.
WEINBERG. Irving,October 28
COV1N, Robert, October 26.
EGLOW1TZ. Louis. Miami Beach. Octo
ber26. Rubin-Zilbert.
KAHN. Rose. 89. Miami, October 26.
Riverside Star of David.
PINSKY, Mollle. 88, North Miami
Beach, October 26. Riverside.
SPEISER, Yetta, 87. October 11. River
side.
METZL. Olga. 98. October 11. Gordon.
ATT1AS, Saada. 64. North Miami, Oct.
21. Gordon.
ALTENHAUS. Solomon. 90, North
Miami Beach, Oct. 22. Menorah
Chapels.
LINTON. Oscar. 68, Miami Beach, Oct.
22. Gordon.
HIALKOWICZ. Joseph, 66. Miami
Beach. Oct. 24. Riverside.
CHUCHEM. Israel Jimmy. Miami
Beach. Oct. 24. Riverside
FRIEDMAN. Anna, 91. Miami Beach.
Rubin-Zilbert.
KOPPER, Tessie, 82. North Miami
Beach. Oct. 24. Riverside.
NEIDERMAN. Herman, Miami Beach.
Oct. 24 Blasberg
NIEDERMAN. Mary. 70. North Miami
Beach. Oct. 24.
GELB
MONUMENTS INC.
Open Every DayClosed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888

&
fi 0
KS0
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Stroo'
Tel 261 761?
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC.
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd
18840 West Dixie Hwy
Represented Uy > Levitt, r.u.
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76th Rd.. Finest Hills, N.Y.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL <*
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Three Generations of our
Family Serving You in
Dade The Broward
Miami Beach Guaranteed Hallandale
1701 Alton Road Pre-Arrangement. 10 & Dixie HwY
538-6371 No Money In Advance 456-4011
*.


PaKel6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, October 29,1982


Bar-Ilan University Day on Miami Beach was proclaimed by
Mayor Norman Ciment, left, in honor of the annual Con-
vocation and dinner to be held Oct. 31 by the Florida Friends of
liur-llan University to confer Honorary Fellowships upon Rep.
William Lehman and philanthropist Nicholas Morley.
Accepting the Proclamation are Peter Goldring, president
Florida Friends of the Bar-Ilan University, and Cherna
Moskowitz, vice president. Bar-Ilan University is in Ramat
Gan. Israel, a sister city to Miami Beach.
Local War Vet Women Assume National Posts
Carol Gold, president of thi
Department of Florida Ladies
Anviliary Jewish War Veterans
U.S.A., attended the 55th annual
convention of the National
Auxiliary at Kiamesha Lake.
N.Y. where she accepted tro-
phies.
Florida's candidate for nation-
al office, immediate past Depart-
ment President Ceil Steinberg,
was elected national conductress
and appointed national commun-
ity relations chairman.
Other Floridians elected to na-
...WAKIED...
CONDO WD SOCIAL GROUPS
WHO WENT TO HIVE mi!
ANNOUNCING
A IOF VAMatFl Of 111 iw.n TOLRS
# *
BLRI REYNOLDS DINNER THEATER
MLSICIANA SUPPER CLL'B
TOURS OE PALM BEACH AND
MUCH MUCH MOREV
-fiuraiifioniiiM imimmii
< '<- I t I *IV, P AJ M HXM
WCS^ PALM BfMH 1U>
(305) 655-MOO
t 41 I rH(PUIM.IPUNM<>>H
CALL *OVt OOATTOa/v
msi DATtS HAVl AUtLADY / N SOLD
tional committees were past Na-
tional Presidents Bertha K.
Greenberg and Ceil Schwartz,
past Department Presidents
Rose Rosenberg and Claire New-
man. PNP Rose Schorr was
appointed national insurance
chairman, and PNP Frances
Wapnick. national leadership
chairman.
United Way
Reports
Campaign Figures
Volunteers for the United Way
i of Dade County reported at a
Mid-Campaign Report Luncheon
that they have raised $8 million,
or 52 percent of the $15.4 million
goal set. for the 1982 campaign.
General Campaign Chairman
John Benbow told volunteers
"The final five weeks of this cam-
paign depend on our efforts to
broaden our base of support. We
must seek out first-time dona-
tions. We need new dollars.
"In this year when unemploy-
ment is at a 40-year high, a suc-
cessful campaign means that you
exhaust every opportunity to
raise every penny available. It
means that we use all our energy
to tap every possible resource in
the community." he added.
United Synagogue Convention
Chairmen Announce Events
SUPER
FUND
RAISER!
KAFTANS
EASY SELL
ONE SEE
FITS ALL
W VARIETY
OF COLORFUL
PATTERNS A
FABRICS
SWFT ALONG
LENGTHS
Abo Available Tot. H.. Aaraaa
tIgt Swaalera. Novrl twa
CM or write
KAUFMAN'S
1010 Arch St.
Phil.. PA 19107
(215)922-6638
Send For Catalog
Sidney L. Olson, Miami Beach
business executive and
philanthropist, was elected to
the Board of Overseers of the
Albert Einstein College of
Medicine at a Board meeting
in New York City recently.
The college is part of a 22-acre
medical complex in the Bronx,
N.Y.
Marshall Baltuch and Marlene
Lusskin, chairmen of the South-
east Regional United Synagogue
of America's Biennial Convention
have announced details of the
convention's program which will
be held Oct. 29 through Nov. 1.
Mort Siberman, president of
AIPAC, will present an update
on Israel, and Rabbi Arnold
Goodman, president of the Rab-
binical Assembly, will discuss the
role of the Rabbinical movement
within the structure of the Con-
servative movement. "What the
United Synagogue of America is
Doing Right Now for You" will
be led by Simon Schwartz, imme-
diate past president of the United
Synagogue National Organiza-
tions, and Henry Shor, national
chairman of JNF, will report on
United Synagogue national news.
Information on Camp Ram ah of
New England will be presented
by Debra Hirschman, director.
Workshops will be held on the
"Nuts and Bolts of Synagogue
Administration." and the topics
will be New Trends in Cummuni-
cation and Management, Ritual,
Fundraising. Single Parent
Families, and Adult Congrega-
tions.
Baltuch is president of Beth
Torah Congregation and serves
Marshall Baltuch
as executive director of the
Samuel Scheck Hillel Community
Day School. He is a founding
member of the Jewish Youth
Directors Association and a
member of the Principals and
Administration Council of the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation and of the Afternoon
School Education Scholarship
Committee of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. Baltuch is
chairman of the United Syna-
gogue Commission on Jewish
Education for the Southeast Re-
gion and will be installed as vice
Marlene Lusskin
president ot the Southeast!
gion at the convention.
Lusskin is on the boardl
Temple Sinai, has been a
president of the Florida Bn
of the Woman's League, and
member of ORT and B'n'aiB'h
She is chairman of the AJ
Congregation Commissionf
Southeast Region and has;
as a Regional Youth and
tional chairman. She is ,
president of the Southeast,
gion and will be reinstalled at|
convention.
C
Pictured above at the Eru
Ritual Ceremony, from left,
are Joseph Rack man. lay
chairman. Eruv Commission,
Hon. Consul General of Israel,
Joel Anton, Rabbi Tibor H.
Stern, Rabbinical Chairman
Dov Duvayewshy, Rob Park-
ins, City Manager of Miami
Beach, Mayor Norman Ci-
ment holding the Eruv, and
Abraham Galbut, co-chair-
man. The Eruv is functioning
in central Miami Beach.
Pictured right is Rabbi Stern
presenting Eruv bread to Dr.
Elias Hershman, president of
the Alexander Gross Hebrew
Academy. Rabbi Menachem
Raab, president of the Rab-
binical Council of America,
Florida Region, Rabbi
Solomon Schiff Greater
Miami Jewish Federation
Community Chaplaincy Serv-
ice, and Mayor Ciment, prime
sponsor of the Eruv, are also
pictured
CAJE Sponsors Teacher Workshops
The Eighth Annual Day associate director, CAJE, Susan
School Teachers In-Service Rubin. MSW. Jewish Family
Institute workshops, sponsorec Services, Rabbi Normal Lipson.
CAJE.
Dade. Rabbi Yoasl Heber
Mall UP**
Elsenberg. KiJj
by the Central Agency for Jewish
Education and the Council Of
Principals and Administrators,
will be held Monday at 9 a.m. at
the Hillel Community Day
School, North Miami Beach.
A program designed for
teachers, highlights will include
Cults and Our Children, Methods
in Teaching Bible. Newspaper in
the Classroom, Computers in
Education, and Are You
Listening?
Faculty for the institute in-
clude Abraham Gittelson.
Marlene Mitchell,
principal. South Dade Hebrew
Academy. Abraham Finkelstein.
Jewish Agency, Rabbi Stanley
Bronfeld. Rabbi Alexander Gross
Hebrew Academy, instructors
from the University of Miami and
Florida International University,
and other CAJE staff.
Other lecturers Include Audrey
DUlaman, principal. Beth David
Solomon Schechter Day School. Dr.
Michael Goldstein. Rabbi Louis
Herring, principal. Jewish High School
ot South Florida. Yossl Shochat, CAJE.
Rowena Kovler. principal. Lehrman
Day School. Sam Lasko. headmaster
Jewish Junior High School ot South
Larry Lltt. Gary o...-
Kamlnsky, Alma Kemp. Miami "..
Gene Greeniwelg. CAJE. *" 1
Zucker. North Miami Sr. High school
Serving to coordinate the PW" |
Sharon
are Raabl Raab and -
Horowitz. FUEL a^'"".^!
and displays will be arranged b> saw.
Cole, assistant principal. Beth SW*-^|
Day School, and Charlotte
teacher. Rabbi A. Uross
Academy.
PerlA
Hrtrf
Nutrition Talk at ORT
South Seas Chapter jj
Women's American pKI ,,.
feature nutritionist. Shirl tan
on Tuesday at noon at I^P
Adath Yeshurun. North Miami
Beach.


October 1982
ampaign
Opening
Dinner
larviii Hamliseh
December
Seeond
General Alexander Haig, Jr.
Pacesetter
Dinner
November
-Third
1983 CJA-IEF
Campaign filekofff
Supplement to the Jewish Floridian, Section C. October 29.1982


mammon ^-vi-~
Page 2
Federation, October, 1982

1
Contents
CAMPAIGN PAGi
The 1983 CJA-IEF Campaign seeks to meet the needs of world J
in this time of particular crisis. 1
General Alexander M. Haig will appear as key note speaker at 1
Campaign Opening Dinner on December 2.
Volunteers are sought for Super Sunday, the Combined Jewish!
peal-Israel Emergency Fund's foremost outreach program.
PACESETTERS/NEW GIFTS/
VOLUNTEERS PAGI
Composer-musician Marvin Hamlisch will highlight the Pac
Dinner on November 23.
The New Gifts Division takes a new approach in drawing com
involvement.
YOUNG ADULTS
DIVISION PAG]
Seventy five YAD members participate in the UJA National Sii
Mission to Israel.
PLANNING AND
BUDGETING PAGI
New challenges await the Planning and Budget Committee du
1982-83.
P&B Director Nathan Skolnick retires after a decade of servic
Greater Miami Jewish community.
COMMUNITY
PROGRAMS
PAGI
The Jewish Junior High School of South Florida provides a
dimension in community-based Jewish education.
Three new directors take charge of the Jewish Community Cenb
South Florida branches.
CAMPAIGN
LEADERSHIP
PAGES 8
SOVIET JEWRY
PAGE
A report on the state of refuseniks from recent visitors to the!
Union.
WOMEN'S
DIVISION

PAGE
Honorees at the upcoming Lion of Judah Luncheon will be the i
Women Pacesetters.
Women and Politics will be the theme of the November 16 Federati
Tuesday program.
The Business and Professional Women's Board will host a sp
"Erev Federation Tuesday'" program.
SPECIAL PROJECTS/
YOUTH PAGE
Federation initiates the Holocaust Memorial Center of Greater Mia
TheB'naiB'rith Youth Organization offers local programming:
teens.

This material was prepared for
The Jewish Floridian Supplement
October 29,1982 by the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
president
Norman H. Lipoff
Executive vice President
Myron J. Brodie
Chairman, Public Relations committee
Eli Timoner
COUNCIL OF JEWISH FEDERATIONS
H
ISRAEL
PAGEl
A CJA-IEF funded program provides tutorial services for und
privileged youth.
Falasha immigrants to Israel receive help in adapting to their
country.
SOUTH DADE
BRANCH
PAGE l
New facilities and new programs highlight the beginning of a new ye
for Federation's South Dade Branch.
Broadcaster and educator Norman Ornstein will address the fir
"Federation Forum."
CALENDAR
PAGEll
FOUNDATION OF JEWISH
PHILANTHROPIES PAGE)
Charitable Remainder Trusts offer a unique means of prov"""!
charitable funds, while earning income.
.: ..v.- .
.



Federation, October, 1982
Page 3
BE THERE When It Counts
This year, the Combined Jewish AppeaMsrael
L ,oncv Fund is calling on the Greater Miami
"SSmunity to -BE THERE" to aid Jews
Jl circumstances of need. BE THERE for the
o|e of Israel who face the greatest economic
"-me since the creation of the Jewish State.
The Jews of Greater
iMiami must redouble their
efforts to do even more on
behalf of Jews
[everywhere.'
[|This fiscal crisis threatens the state of humani-
tarian services in the Promised Land, upon which
thousands of Jews are dependent. It is now a
Lestion of whether each of us is willing to reach
ho the core of our individual identities as Jews and
luniie to aid and comfort the people of Israel in
| their time of need.
BE THERE for the Jews of the Soviet Union,
Itthiopia. Arab lands and other nations of oppres-
sion because they still count on us. BE THERE
llor destitute and troubled Jews across the globe
Iwho count on us for support.
' BE THERE for the Jews of Greater Miami -
the elderly, the young, the handicapped, the in-
firm and those in all circumstances of need who
depend upon our support of social services, which
face drastic federal budget cuts and rising opera-
tional costs.
"The Jews of Greater Miami must redouble
their past efforts to do even more on behalf of
Jews everywhere in this time when they are most
dependent upon them,'' said CJA-IEF General
Campaign Chairman Aaron Podhurst. "We must
exceed all our past efforts, providing our brothers
and sisters with all the support each of us can."
In response to those increased needs, the 1983
CJA-IEF Campaign Steering Committee has in-
troduced a new strategy for gifts that will provide
an unprecedented amount of support for social
services in Israel.
Greater Miami Jewish community members are
being asked to give the maximum support possi-
ble by increasing the amount of their 1983 gifts to
the regular CJA campaign by a minimum of 10
percent. This gift will provide human services
both at home and abroad.
In addition, they are being asked to participate
in a Special Israel Emergency Fund, which wUl be
composed of additional one-time gifts of at least
33 and one-third percent of 1982 pledges. The pro-
ceeds of this special fund will be provided directly
to Israel to support vital social services which
might otherwise suffer severe cutbacks due to the
Israeli economic crisis.
* We are one people with a
common heritage and
responsibility. We intend
to BE THERE when it
counts most.'
"As Jews who have inherited and accepted a
tradition of generosity for the needy, we are
pledged to do our utmost for our people," Pod-
hurst said. "In accepting the Land of Israel as the
centrality of the Jewish spirit, we must not fail to
respond to the needs of Jews in the Promised
Land. We are one people with a common heritage
and responsibility. We intend to BE THERE
when it counts most."
Haig Highlights Campaign Opening Dinner
General Alexander M. Haig, Jr., the former
Isecretary of state who has emerged as one of
IIsrael's staunchest supporters in the United
(states, will give the keynote address at the
{Campaign Opening Dinner of the 1983 Combined
Ijewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund, Thursday
[evening, December 2 at the Fontainebleau-Hilton
I Hotel.
The Campaign Opening Dinner will be the
Ikickoff of the Greater Miami Jewish community's
leffort to raise more money on behalf of Jews in
[Israel. Greater Miami and communities
(throughout the world than has ever been raised in
la single campaign. General Campaign Chairman
[Aaron Podhurst stressed that the results of the
Idinner will begin the momentum that will lead to
[maximum support of the people of Israel,
[humanitarian services for the Jews of Greater
[Miami and the needs of Jews around the globe.
A minimum gift of $1,000 to the 1983 CJA-IEF
f-'ampaign is required to attend this crucially
nportant event.
Haig was sworn in as secretary of state in
January 1981 and served in that ranking foreign
olicy position until his resignation three months
ago. Since his departure from public life, Haig has
Repeatedly stated his support for Israel, par-
jticularly during the Operation Peace for the
jalilee, Israel's military operation in Lebanon.
"When we are true to Israel, we are true to
ourselves. Haig said in a September 14 address.
The peace process will only move forward if there
General Alexander Haig, Jr.
is a spirit of cooperation between Israel and the
United States."
Haig currently serves as a consultant for United
Technologies, a leading military contractor, and is
a senior fellow at the Hudson Institute, a research
center.
Haig, a graduate of the U.S. Military Academy
at West Point, was serving as Army vice chief of
staff when President Nixon appointed him in May
1973 to rebuild the White House staff. Although
this was to be temporary duty, Nixon sub-
sequently named him White House chief of staff
and he retired from the military after 26 years of
active service.
The recipient of a master's degree in in-
ternational relations from Georgetown University,
Haig's military assignments included service in
Japan, Korea, Europe and Vietnam. He has held
numerous high-level positions in the Pentagon,
and was appointed supreme military commander
in Europe, a post he held from 1975 through 1979
in which he was responsible for the integrated
military forces of NATO.
The Campaign Opening Dinner is being chaired
by Bunny Adler, a prominent member of the Na-
tional Women's Division Board of U J A and of the
Executive Committee of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation's Women Division. Adler also cur-
rently serves as 1982 Federation Tuesday chair-
person and held the post of 1982 Pacesetter Cruise
chairperson, along with numerous other positions.
"It is vital that members of the Jewish com-
munity turn out to the Campaign Opening Dinner
in large numbers, so that we may begin the 1983
campaign with a mass statement of commitment
to the needs of the Jewish people," said General
Campaign Chairman Podhurst. "It is an opport-
unity for the leaders of our community to set an
example of concern and unity."
For further information about the Campaign
Opening Dinner, call Martin Barasch at 576-4000.
Super Sunday Volunteers Sought
Super Sunday, the Combined Jewish Appeal-
W u Emer8encv Fund's massive phonathon on
pwjH of human services for world Jewry, has
loecome the Greater Miami Jewish community's
poor of love, drawing thousands of volunteers
no actively participate.
volunteers are now being sought to become
Involved in the 1983 Super Sunday program,
fh'cn will be held on January 23 from 9 a.m. to 9
Pm. at Temple Israel of Greater Miami.
In 1982, more than 2,600 Super Sunday
Jolunteers raised $1.4 million on behalf of Jews in
Mrael Greater Miami and communities through-
put the world. Super Sunday Co-Chairmen Lydia
JOldring, Fran Levey, David Rosenbaum and
jerald K. Schwartz said a larger number of
Munteers is sought this year to help meet the
"owing social service needs of Jews worldwide.
i iUper Sunday represents the single largest
unteer program presented during our yearly
. Paign," said CJA-IEF General Campaign
^an Aaron Podhurst. "On that day, we
ut to the Jewish community for their
jWjwt to ease the plight of Jews in need. Super
uay is a program that reaches the grassroots
1 heater Miami .Tow
Miami Jewry.'
For
J?*P* information contact Debbie Pollana at
oration 57fi-4nnn .i.u. 070
"on. 576-4000, extension 278.
SUPER SUNDAY
BETHERE
Temple Israel of Greater Miami, 137 N.E. 19th St. on January 23.
Name___
Address.
(City)___
Phone__
_(SUte)_
JHomeL
___(Zip).
.(Office).
I will be representing
Organization
.Synagogue
.GMJF Women's Division
.Agency
.Youth Group
On Super Sunday I would like to be a
_____Phone Volunteer
.Non-Phone Volunteer
Please indicate the session or sessions you prefer-
______9 a.m. to 12 noon 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
. 3 p.m. to 6 pm.
. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m.
1 p.m. to 4 p.m.
We'll be in touch with you shortly to confirm all details regarding your Super Sunday
participation-in the meantime, thanks for volunteering!
CLIP AND MAIL TO: Super Sunday
GMJF
4200 Biscayne Blvd.
Miami, Fla. 33137



Page 4
Federation, October, 1982
Hanilich to Serenade Pacesetters
World-renowned composer, musician and con-
ducU>r.Marvin.Hamlisch;will give a 'special per
tormance at the Pacesetter Dinner, the gala open-
ing event for contributors of a minimum of
Emergence
Tuesday evening. Nov. 23 at the Fontainebleau-
Hilton Hotel.
Margin Hamlisch
$10,000 to the 1983.Combined. Jewish Appeal.-1s-... "Wp: ye.made a .concerted effort to draw ,*,
reel Emergencv -FOnd. which' will'be held on people of importance and prominence to this fir,.
event of our Pacesetter Division for the 19*
campaign." said Pacesetter Dinner Chairman
Marilyn K. Smith, vice president of the Greate-
Miami Jewish Federation. "The Pacesetters are
those people whose private achievements are
matched only by their sense of responsibility to
their fellow Jews. We are confident that such
individuals will be responsive to the particular
needs of our brothers and sisters this vear
Hamlisch s impressive list of credits includes a
Pulitzer Prize and nine Tony Awards lor a
Chorus Line." Academy Awards and Grarnrnv
Awards for "The Sting" and 'The Waj We
Were." and recognition for his musical score of the
film "Ordinary People" and the Broadway show
"They're Playing Our Song."
Prominent members of the Greater Miami Jew-
ish Federation serve as leaders of the levels within
the Pacesetter Division. Federation Vice Presi-
dent Samuel I. Adler and Immediate Past Presi-
dent Harry A. (Hap) Levy are co-chairmen of the
S100.000+ level, and Board members Michael
Adler and Jeffrey Berkowitz hold the chairman
and vice chairman's positions, respectiveh. of the
$10,000-824.999 category.
Additionally. Federation Vice President Donald
E. Lefton serves as chairman of the S25.000-
S99.999 Vanguard Division, which will be partici-
pating in the Pacesetter Dinner.
The Pacesetter Division raised S10.5 million in
gifts for the 1982 CJA-1EF Campaign, with S3.5
million raised at the initial Pacesetter Dinner.
CJA-1EF General Campaign Chairman Aaron
Podhurst said he expects this year s Pacesetter
gala to set a new high standard to begin the 1983
campaign on a trend of record breaking achieve-
ment.
"Our Pacesetter Division traditionally has led
the way for the Greater Miami Jewish community
in terms of demonstrating commitment to
humanitarian services." Podhurst said. In this
time of particular need on the part of world Jewry,
we are confident that this division will indeed set
the pace oi generosity."
For further information about the Pacesetter
Dinner, contact Michael Fischer at Federation.
576-4000. extension 274.
New Gifts Division Initiated


In order to generate increasingly successful
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
campaigns, the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
has formed the New Gifts Division, an innovative
plan to substantially increase participation in the
campaign throughout the Greater Miami Jewish
community.
4 The whole concept is very
exciting and very
challengingthe potential
is certainly there.'
Headed by Co-Chairmen Forrest and Leroy
Raffel. the purpose of the New Gifts Division is to
reach out to the non-contributor, and to involve as
wide a spectrum as possible in the campaign.
Despite the success of the campaigns mounted by
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation,
demographic studies indicate that less than 30
percent of Jewish households in the United States
make a campaign gift and approximately 80
percent of current contributors are over the age of
55.
While no precise goals have been established, it
is the basic aim of the division to attract a new
base of givers which will constitute 8 to 10 percent
of the total campaign by 1985 and 20 percent by
1987. To realize these ambitions, under the
leadership of the Raffels, the New Gifts Com-
mittee has developed a modus operandi that is
now being put into practice.
"The whole concept is very exciting and very
challenging the potential is certainly there,"
enthused Forrest Raffel. "We think they (non-
contributors) haven't made a gift because they
haven't been asked. It's just a question of
reaching them in some way and then we'll suc-
ceed."
Noting that past Federation campaigns have not
adequately approached new Jewish households
moving into Dade County. Leroy Raffel said the Wl
New Gifts Division is part of a national effort to
increase the number of committed Jews.
"My impression is Federation campaigning has
had impressive success with its existing and on-
going active contributor prospects." he explained.
"These people have their level of giving, they've
been effective workers and the campaign has
shown significant progress. However. Miami,
along with every other large community, has not
begun to reach out to uncommitted Jews."
An analysis of current campaign statistics
reveals that roughly 25 percent of the Jewish
households in Dade County made a gift to
Federation last year. Excluding $10,000 and over
contributors, who constitute a significant portion
of the campaign, the average gift is $303.26.
Using this information, it becomes obvious that
the New Gift strategy can give the campaign a
tremendous boost. If 10,000 new givers con-
tributed to the campaign over the next several
years, a potential additional $3 million could be
raised without even considering a fresh influx of
large gifts. However, even if 20,000 new givers
participated in the campaign, it would still
'We look upon this New
Gifts effort as an effective
new opportunity to expand
the base of the Federation
campaign.'
represent less than 50 percent of the eligible
households in the county. In addition, the New
Gifts Division hopes to generate new Pacesetter
gifts ($10,000 and upl as part of its effort to
broaden the base of the campaign.
Based on Dade County's Jewish population of
approximately 250.000, the per capita giving to
the campaign averages approximately $>o.
The New Gifts Division believes $100 per capita
giving, which many other cities have met and
exceeded, is attainable within the next five years.
"We look upon this New Gifts effort as an ef
fective new opportunity to expand the base of the
Federation campaign and its associated ac-
tivities," concluded Leroy Faffel.
&:##:W#:*:W:w^^
::-
Federation Peoplepower
Peoplepower is one of the keys to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's success story. The
Federation counts on a smooth flow of information
and material to the Jewish community to
maintain a well organized campaign and system of
communications. In great part, this flow is the
result of the work produced by a cadre of
dedicated volunteers who give of their time to
personally aid Federation programs.
Federation volunteers gather several times a
week to combine their efforts on behalf of the
Jewish community. The Volunteers Department,
headquartered in the Federation Building, 4200
Biscayne Boulevard, plays an integral part in the
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign, which is about to begin its 1983
season.
Each volunteer gives as much time as he or she
is able; some dedicate one day a week, while
others work in the volunteers office several times a
week. If you are interested in participating in this
crucial undertaking, please call Gert Schner at
576-4000, Ext. 251.
WEWWMM^'UUIIOOOOOOO^
..-.


Federation, October, 1982
Page 7
Young Adults Experience Isra
On Summer Singles Mission
A delegation of 75 young leaders of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation shared a feeling of unity
with the people of Israel, as they joined 450 other
Jewish singles from 64 American Jewish com-
munities on the Hatikva Sholom La'Galil
Solidarity Mission.
The Greater Miami delegation composed the
largest community group on the 10-day mission
and raised $81,970 for the 1983 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Kmergency Fund Campaign. This
represented a 177 percent increase in support over
the gilts raised during the 1981 summer singles
mission.
One interesting thing about a national mission
is that you get a sense of Jews throughout Ameri-
ca feeling as one." said national mission chairman
Jack Levine. a Hoard of Directors member ot the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation. "There is a
certain exchange of feelings that makes this kind
of experience special."
The mission participants gained particular in-
sight into the events and national sentiment in Is-
rael regarding Operation Peace for the Galilee.
The young leaders, all of whom are between the
ages of 25 and 40. were briefed by top Israeli
leaders, visited sites of importance to Israel dur-
ing the crisis in Lebanon and viewed Israeli life
from an unusual perspective.
We were able to give 450 people a very positive
Israel experience, which became more relevant be-
cause of the crisis while we were there." Levine
said. "We didn't want to get to Israel and not get
a sense of the crisis."
After planting trees in Modi'in. the birthplace
of the Maccabees, in memory of the fallen soldiers
of Operation Peace for the Galilee, the mission
participants participated in a Yizkor Service at
the Kiryat Shaul Military Cemetery in Tel Aviv.
The participants also met with wounded sol-
diers at the Tel Hashomer Military Hospital
rehabilitation center and burn unit. As part of the
rehabilitation process, the young American
leaders played basketball with recent amputees.
"We saw the situation from a human point of
view,'' Levine said. "We met a doctor who had
served at the hospital before the war and was now
back as a patient. We saw Israelis, Syrians and
Lebanese civilians receiving the same treatment."
A visit to 11 of the development towns that are
receiving support as part of Project Renewal,
through which the Greater Miami Jewish com-
munity provides special support to the depressed
town of Or Akiva, was a highlight of the mission's
third day. The participants met residents of the 11
towns aided by the program and brought Ameri-
can sporting equipment for the children.
We brought bats, baseballs, frisbees and other
sporting equipment that kids have in the United
plates, and spent some time teaching these kids
now to play American sports," Levine explained.
The mission reunited and proceeded to the Gali-
[ where the participants crossed the "Good
"nee into Lebanon to view Beaufort Castle, a
mi used by the PLO as a staging ground for at-
"cks on Israeli settlements prior to Operation
the Galilee- In the evening, the Ameri-
PmVT8 joined by 10'000 ctizens of the North-
!? Galilee in the Kiryat Shmona Town Square.
mayor of Kiryat Shmona presented Levine
in a medal "that was like a key to the city." The
mass event received a great deal of media atten-
tion throughout Israel.
D,Ur'nK tr>e course of the trip, the participants
bv t h k kibbutz"n to ease the work backlog left
tLp thusands of civilian-soldiers involved in
rr ese miutary operation, and joined Is-
us ui civil guard duty. Other highlights of the
"P included Kabbalat Shabbat services and per-
sonal prayer at the Western Wall in Jerusalem,
m a torchlight ascent and mountaintop cere-
ny at the ancient Israelite fortress Massada.
Young Adults Division members gather at Miami International Airport before departing on
their flight to Israel. Anne Monique O'Hayon served as Florida regional chairman of the Sum-
mer Singles Mission, with Susan Cohen and Michael Katz serving as Miami Mission co-chair-
men.
Mission participants view a sculpture outside the Yad Vashem Holocaust Memorial in
Jerusalem.
Levine stressed that the importance of young
leadership mission to Israel stems from the fact
that such programs "build continuity within the
Jewish community," providing young adults with
experiences and knowledge vital to the future of
American Jewry.
"For me, the most important thing about lead-
ing a mission is viewing Israel through others'
eyes, through the eyes of first-timers, knowing
that you had a role in molding Jewish conscious-
ness," Levine said. "These missions broaden per-
sonal involvement in the Jewish community and
build commitment that will be there for a life-
time."
Levine began recruiting and organizing the
Hatikvah Mission in December 1981, coordinating
the most successful summer singles mission ever
sponsored nationally. As past chairman of the
GMJF Young Adults Division and an active
member of the Council of Jewish Federations Na-
tional Committee on Leadership Development, he
has been in the forefront of local 1 national
activity.
"Jack exemplifies the high caliber of young
leaders who have emerged from the intensive pro-
gramming of our Young Adults Division," said
Norman H. Lipoff, president of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation. "His energy and activism on
behalf of the Jewish community are exceeded only
by the depth of his commitment.
In evaluating the GMJF Young Adults
program, Levine cited the fact that Greater Miami
drew the largest delegations on the summer
mission and to the UJA National Young.
Leadership Conference held earlier this year in
Washington, D.C.
"Miami is by far in the forefront of programs for
young adults and young leadership," he said.
"You can tell when you have a delegation the size
of the one on this most recent mission.
Another National Singles Mission will be
departing for Israel on December 26 and returning
on January 5. David Perkins, a leader of the
GMJF Young Adults Division, will be serving as
Southeast regional chairman of this trip.
The Young Adults Division will offer a series of
varied programs during upcoming months. Con-
tact Milton Heller at 576-4000, extensi-r. 284 for
further details.


to^^j&V&feu -1
Page 4
Federation, October, 1982

H Planning and Budget Panel
Faces Kcw Challenges
In examining the ever-changing needs of tht
Jewish community, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation conducts an annual planning and
budget process which analyzes in detail local
human needs and the program of services
provided by Federation's family of agencies.
This complex and crucial task is assigned by the
Federation Planning and Budget Committee,
which is co-chaired by Federation Vice Presidents
Samuel 1. Adler and Goldie Goldstein.
One of the main challenges facing the Planning
and Budget Committee in conjunction with the
Demographic Study Committee during the up-
coming year will be a detailed analysis of the 1982
Demographic Study of the Greater Miami Jewish
community. The Study, undertaken a year ago
under the chairmanship of Jesse Cas selhoff, is
expected to be completed in first draft form on
November 15. Its findings are the result of
questions asked of more than HOC Jewish
households in Dade County.
The Committee will review the data submitted
by the study team to determine the implications of
demographic changes on the quality and types of
services needed by and provided to the Jewish
community.The Committee's recommendations
will deal not only with alterations in existing
programs, but also may result in proposals for the
creation of new programs to serve new needs.
The Planning and Budget Committee has
initiated discussions with leaders of Federation's
family of agencies to determine the manner in
which the planning and budgeting process should
be altered to best serve agency programs. The
existing subcommittees involved in this process
include Group Services, Individual and Health
Services, and Education, Culture and Religion.
The Committee has completed arrangements for
a new program to aid the availability of Jewish
education through the creation of scholarships for
congregational Hebrew schools. This task will be
carried out by the Central Agency for Jewish
Education.
Additionally, the Planning and Budget Com
mittee expects to become involved in projrram
that will be of benefit to single-parent JeSI
households in Dade County.
As the Federation Gardens housing complerl
prepares to accept applicants for subsidized!
apartments for the elderly, the Planning and
Budget Committee, together with the agencies isl
preparing full-scale programming to be provided
on a regular basis.
-The decisions of the Planning and Budget
Committee bear critically on the effectiveness of
the programs offered by Federation through its
family of agencies," said Norman H. Lipoff
president of Federation. "There is nothing more
important than the work carried on by the
dedicated men and women of this vital committee.
They represent the basis upon which we are able
to provide services and outreach to the Jewish
community."
Skolnick Retirement Announced
After more than four decades of Jewish com-
munal service Nathan Skolnick will retire as
director of plannig and budgeting for the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, effective Nobvmber
15, GMJF Executive Vice President Myron J.
Brodie announced.
Skolnick assumed the planning and budgeting
directorship in 1972, after serving as executive
director of the Jewish Federation of Greater
Bridgeport, Conn., for nine years. Under his
stewardship, the GMJF Planning and Budgeting
Department has developed into an efficient means
of measuring the Jewish community's needs and
establishing resulting Federation support.
"Nathan has been instrumental in our effort to
be most responsive to Greater Miami Jewry,"
Brodie said. "His professional leadership in the
planning and budgeting processes has been
prominent in the development of Federation's
ever-strenthening bonds with its family of
agencies."
Born in Russia, Skolnick is a recipient of a
Bachelor's and Master's Degree in sociology from
the University of Minnesota, and he also received
a Master of Science Degree in community
organization from Columbia University. He
served with the National Jewish Welfare Board
for seven years and he was director of New York
City's USO Operations from 1951 to 1954. He also
held the position of assistant director of the
Milwaukee Jewish Federation. In Miami he was
chosen president of Nutrition Programs for the
Elderly of Dade County, Inc.
"Looking back over the last 10 years, I'd like to
think we really created a 'family of agencies,' "
Skolnick said in reflection on his decade of service
to the Greater Miami Jewish community. We
engaged in a conscious effort to plan together,
based on a common desire to meet needs. We were
able to provide more services for more people, with
less duplication of services. We really began to
think like a family."
In trying to recall some of the highlights of the
changing scene in the Greater Miami Jewish
community over the past decade, Skolnick cited a
number of significant developments.
Nathan Skolnick
"Services to pre-school and elementary school
children sponsored by local agencies and
synagogues have proliferated. This is especially
true in terms of day care for children of working
mothers." Skolnick added, "Looking at the other
end of the spectrum, there has been a number of
senior citizens who have utilized them. Miami has
been commended repeatedly for setting up a
model plan of meeting the needs of elderly Jews."
and statewide.
Turning his attention to other program areas,
Skolnick pointed out the unprecedented growth of
health-related services among local Jewish
agencies. This is true both in terms of service and
building facilities.
He also called attention to extensive coverage of
the needs of college students in campuses, local
"The growth in our local universities during the
last ten years and the increments ot Jewish
student numbers on campuses statewide have
stimulated increased attention to their needs bv
Florida Jewish communities. The creation of a
statewide organization to provide programing to
Jewish students has served as an example for
other states throughout the country."
The improvements and deepening quality of
Jewish education throughout the area was noted
by Skolnick with some satisfaction. Most
recently, he pointed to the creation of both the
senior and junior high schools, sponsored by the
community, as unique throughout America. He
also identified the increase in adult Jewish
learning, both formal and informal, as a good sign
for the future of Jewish life in this area.
Summing up his thoughts, Skolnick said,
"What has happened in the past ten years should
really be regarded as a foundation upon which to
build a Jewish community which strives for a
sense of greater Jewish identity, deeper in-
volvement in the concerns of our fellow Jews and a
further commitment to the preservation and
enhancement of Jewish living throughout this
area and in other communities around the
country."
Skolnick cited accomplishments in the areas of
services for the elderly and Jewish education as
the greatest advances of the past decade within
the Federation family.
In the area of Jewish education, Skolnick
commended the Central Agency for Jewish
Education and its development of new projects for
Jewish youth.
"We have witnessed a real change in the
standards for Jewish education," Skolnick said.
"Parents in Greater Miami now expect first
quality Jewish education and won't accept
anything less. Those are the types of programs
developed by CAJE."
Brodie announced that Skolnick will continue to
serve Federation as a senior consultant on both
Jewish Federation Housing programs and the
Jewish Demographic Study on a part-time basis
following his retirement in mid-November.

jrciter Miami Jewish Federation President Norman H. Lipoff (from left),
nuard Division member Haim Wiener and Admiral Hyman Rickover pose
mg the first Vanguard meeting, held at the home of Norman Braman.
i- !.....
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women s Division recently held its
annual Leadership Parlor Meeting, which was highlighted by an address by
the Honorable Yitzhak Ben-Ari, Ambassador of Israel to the Democratic
Republic of West Germany. Among those who attended the event were Heft to
right) Aaron Podhurst, Campaign Chairman of the 1983 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal-Israel Emergency Fund; Sue Helfman, Parlor Meeting Chairwoman; Ellen
Mandler, Women's Division Campaign Chairwoman; Maxine E. Schwartz.
Women s Division President, and the Honorable Yitzhak Ben-Ari.


Federation, October, 1982
Page 7
Jewish Junior High Adds
Kew Educational Dimension
r several years of careful planning and
ton the Greater Miami Jewish com-
tv U added yet another precedent to its
i,t of credits: the Jewish Junior High School
EWh Florida, the nation's first such in-
Jndent school that is not affiliated with an
sting day school or synagogue.
ISince opening its doors in September for its
Lral school year, the classrooms of the newly
tructed building, located on the campus of the
1 ,k Hade Jewish Community Center on SW
B Avenue, have been filled with 76 eager
Eoth and eighth grade students studying a
L-ulum in general and Judaic subjects.
hnonsored by the Greater Miami Jewish
Sration which allocated $113,000 to the school
year and in cooperation with the Central
ncv for Jewish Education, the school is offer-
varied biend 0f modern intellectual pursuits
[the arts, sciences, humanities and language
nst a backdrop of traditional and lasting Ju-
Jjc values.
[The Jewish Junior High School of South
lorida is an independent entity with its own
iard of Directors, headed by President Barry
iss. The school was conceived about three years
,o by an ad hoc committee of the Central Agency
[' Jewish Education, which decided that an in-
fcendent junior high school was needed to com-
Ement the Jewish High school that was being
tiined for North Dade. That vision was finally
flized in August when the dedication of the new
lior high building took place.
I Everything is new it's like a new baby being
Ira. remarked Samuel H. Lasko, the school's
bdmaster. "This is an independent Jewish
Lior high school created by the community and
relates to the entire community."
Lasko. who moved to South Florida to accept
I new position, has 20 years of teaching and ad-
Inistrating experience in the field of Jewish edu-
lion, having served as director of the Beth
Eloh Community Day School in Baltimore,
kryland. principal of the Hebrew Academy of
Je Capital District in Albany, New York and
ticalional director of the BMH Synagogue in
Inver. Colorado. But even after so many years of
lucational experience, Lasko calls his present job
pemost exciting challenge I've ever had in my
i... There is a constant dedication to excel-
Students at the Jewish Junior High School of South Florida peer through their microscopes
during a science class.
pee.
The goals the school has established for its
pdents set it apart from most typical junior high
pools. The institution's stated philosophy is
at a child of this generation has a right to pur-
the height of scholastic excellence. The ques-
tioning curiosity and searching mind should be
encouraged and stimulated. To accomplish this
the student requires an environment of intellec-
tual endeavor, emotional warmth, and teaching
which is creative and sensitive. The Jewish Junior
High School of South Dade has been established
to fulfill these purposes. It invites the Jewish child
to participate in a search for the multicolored
spectrum of knowledge and understanding which
is his heritage as a human being and as a Jew."
Lasko stressed that the junior high years are
critical for adolescents because students of that
age "undergo dramatic physical, emotional and
intellectual change and what they experience in
these transitional years forms an important influ-
ence on the rest of their lives."
A team of eight educational professionals from
the University of Miami Graduate School of Edu-
cation and Allied Professions designed the
General Studies curriculum for the school, in ac-
cordance with standards set by the State of
Florida and for accreditation by the Southern
Association of Colleges and Schools. The Judaic
curriculum was developed by Lasko, in conjunc-
tion with fellow staff members and the Central
Agency for Jewish Education.
President Barry Ross pointed out that the
faculty's combined experience totals close to 100
years. In fact, he said only one negative opinion
has been voiced by board members and students'
parents: that they, in their own childhoods,
missed the opportunity to attend a school like the
Jewish Junior High School.
Noting that the school has no formal ideolog-
ical affiliation in its Judaic studies, Lasko ex-
pressed hopes that the institution will become
something greater than just a center of learning.
He believes that the junior high has the potential
to be a vital, unifying force in the growing South
Dade Jewish community.
"We are taking a communal orientation
towards religion," Lasko said. "We are going to
be one of the most important forces in the South
Dade Jewish community. We will do our part to
help continue building a cohesive Jewish com-
munity."
JSTew Directors Join JCCs
[A wealth of experience in the social service field
upled with a desire to introduce new programs
interest to the community are the common
|reads shared by the three new branch directors
the Jewish Community Centers of South
orida(JCC).
,/e're looking forward to
I very successful year of
povative programs and
kreased membership for
he centers.'
1 m excited that three bright young people
W chosen our community in which to share
'f talents," said Dade County Commissioner
W Shack, president of the JCCs. "I expect they
psome fresh answers to old problems."
he JCCs, composed of a central administration
three branch centers, are where Jews of all
s- of any congregational affiliation or none, can
ie to satisfy a wide range of needs and in-
sts. From pre-school programs on up to
'ices and activities for senior citizensand for
W age and situation in betweenthe JCCs are
Hal resource dedicated to community service.
We're delighted to welcome the new directors
l^iami and to our staff," said JCC Executive
pctor Miriam Zatinsky. "We're looking for-
ward to a very successful year of innovative
programs and increased membership for the
centers."
Victor Levitt, appointed as director of the
South Dade JCC in mid-August, brings a broad
and varied background to his job. A native of
Brooklyn, N.Y., Levitt has worked professionally
in the development and supervision of social
service programs, grant development and
management, program consultation to Jewish
agencies, the administration of employment,
counseling and English language programs for
refugees.
"The center is not a one-man operationit
is a team effort of the community, lay leadership
and professional staff," Levitt said. "I see my role
as that of facilitator in this partnership of staff
and the Jewish community to provide responsive
and high quality programs in South Dade.
Appointed as director of the Miami Beach JCC
in June, Jerome Libbin has extensive experience
in Jewish communal service. He comes to the
Greater Miami community from Binghamton,
N.Y., where he served as assistant executive
director of the Jewish Community Center of
Broome County, which offers the same type of
social, cultural and educational programs as the
South Florida JCCs. Earlier in his career, he was
the assistant health and physical education
director of the Worcester Jewish Center of
Worcester, Mass.
Noting that he finds the South Florida weather
"refresing" and its residents "warm and frien-
dly," Libbin said he is "enjoying the challenge of
the new job and looking forward to a super year.
I 'm finding the people involved with the center are
very dedicated and enthusiastic. I'm looking
forward to a growing year, both in activities and
membership."
The center is not a
one-man operationit is a
team effort of the
community, lay leadership
and professional staff.'
North Dade's Michael-Ann Russell JCC is also
under the helm of a new director, Alan Zucker-
man, who joined the staff in August. He was
formerly employed in Philadelphia, Pa. as the
director of planning and development at the
Opportunities Industrialization Centers, Inc. He
has also served as a private consultant in com-
munity development, employment and training,
and was a project director at the Center for Social
Policy and Community Development at Temple
University.
"I'm looking forward to the challenge ahead of
me," Zuckerman commented. "I hope to make the
center responsive to the needs of the North Dade
Jewish community."


Norman H. Llpofl
President. GMJF
1983 CJA-IEF Campag
Aaron Podhurst
General Chairman
Edmund Abramson
Vice Chairman
Sheldon Quran
Vice Chairman
Cal Kovens
Vice Chairman
Sidney Olson
Vice Chairman
Marilyn K. Smith
Vice Chairman
-
Michael M. Adler J"rey Berkowltz
Chairman, $lO,000-$24.999 Vice Chairman, $10,000 $24,999
Pacaaetter Division Pacaaatlar Division
Kenneth J. Schwartz
Chairman,
Worker Training
Maxina E. Schwartz
Praaldent,
Women's Division
Bunny Adler
Chairman
Campaign Opening Dinner
/
I
Bernardo Batievsky
Chairman
Latin American Division
i:
A
Howard Frank
Chairman,
Accountants Division
Harvey Friedman
Chairman. Special Qlfta
Ellen Mandlar r*. Rotoort Marlln
Chairman, Woman'i Division Chairman, Dontlata Division
Alfred Golden
Co-Chairman, Hi-Rises
Robert J. Martin
President,
Young Adults Division
Lydia Goldrlng Frances B. Lavay
Co-Chairman, Super Sunday Co-Chairman, Super Sunday
Forrest Raf(el
Co-Chairman, New Gifts
Leroy Raffel
Co-Chairman, New Gifts
David Rosenbaum
Co-chairman, Super Sunday
David Schaecter
Chairman, Missions
L. Jutos Arkln
Rabbi Haskell Bernat
Mlkkl Futarnlck
Edward Harris
Joseph H. Kantar
Steven Kravitz
4*
MB^aBMeMaMaBBBBBBBBBMBBBMaBBajJ|


f j|o Steering Committee *
Norman Braman
Chairman, Fast Start
Philip T. Warren
Chairman, National Fly-in
Samuel I. Adler
Co-chairman, $100,000 +
Pacesetter Division
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Co-chairman, $100,000 +
Pacesetter Division
Howard Scharlln
Chairman, $50,000 ?
Inside Washington
Myron J. Brodle
Exec. Vice President, QMJF
K
?*>
-\
I
Donald E. Letton
Chairman, $25,000 +
Vanguard Division
ip*]|*
T
v-
Richard Berkowitz Louis Berlin Dr. Jay Ellenby Dr. Phillip Frost Dr. Harry Qralf Dr. Alan Qraubert
Vice Chairman, Chazak Chairman, Co-Chairman, Physicians Co-Chairman, Physicians Co-Chairman, Physicians Co-Chairman, Physicians
Young Adults Division and Osteopaths Division and Osteopaths Division and Osteopaths Division and Osteopaths Division
t
Gerald Schwartz
Co-Chairman, Super Sunday
Kenneth Hoffman
Chairman, Chazak
Ezra Katz
Chairman
UJA Young Leadership Cabinet
Sid Levin
Co-Chalrman, ACE Division
Elaine Sllversteln
Co-Chalrman, ACE Division
Joel Levy
Chairman, Boards & Trust
EdShohat
Chairman, Attorneys Division
Sandi Simon
Coordinator
Healing Arts Division
Gulllermo Sostchin
Chairman,
Cuban Hebrew Division
Jack Weinsteln
Chairman, Food, Restaurants
and Hotels Division
Harry Weltzer
Chairman, South Dade
Richard Zlnn
Chairman, Bullde
and Allied Trades Dlvi ion
Hk
Jeff Lefcourt
Leonard Lurla
William S. Ruben
Isaac Sklar
(In formation)

*

Eric B. Turetaky


Page 10
Federation, October, 1982
/
A Slim Chance for Jews
in the Soviet Union
An up-to-date report by recently
returned members of the South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry
How would you feel if you were not allowed to
practice your religion or be in possession of books
pertaining to your religion? Would it bother you if
you were not allowed to practice your cultural
heritage, send your children to the university or
receive permission to leave the country? The
following are true stories which are shocking but
sadly true. We have changed the names in order to
protect these Russian Refuseniks, but names
aren't essential, the cold facts are.
Husbands and wives will
be told that they have to
divorce before they receive
permission (to emigrate).
In most cases, the family
members never see each
other again.
A Refusenik is a person who has applied for a
visa to leave the Soviet Union and has been
refused. Some have applied and have never been
given any official reply. These people are not
categorized in any manner; they are left in a limbo
situation. All lose their jobs as soon as they apply
for a visa. Occasionally someone is not fired but is
demoted to a lesser position. This extends to their
spouses and family most of the time.
They are monitored by the KGB secret police via
listening devices (bugs) in their apartments; then-
neighbors complain and inform to the KGB of any
visitors or attempted gatherings and they are
followed and harassed by the KGB. The
Refuseniks sometimes suffer beatings and im-
prisonment. The Soviet regime is especially cruel
in that it splits family units apart by possibly
allowing one member of a family to leave the
country and promising that the other members
will eventually receive permission. Husbands and
wives will be told that they have to divorce before
they receive permission. In most cases, the family
members never see each other again.
Refuseniks told of one couple that finally
received permission to leave. They were told to sell
their furniture, belongings and give up their
apartment. The couple were seated on the Aeroflot
plane, ready for take-off, when KGB agents came
on board the plane and took the couple off saying
the visa office had made a mistake. These poor
people had to return to the city with no
belongings, no living quarters, no furniture and of
course, no jobs.
The Soviets are now stripping Refuseniks of
their academic degrees and either demoting or
firing them. Jewish children may not attend any
institution of higher learning such as a university.
In previous years, the Soviet Union had allowed
thousands to leave the country. This year only a
handful were allowed. The people who did come
out in the past few months were so few that the
Vienna office serving as a clearing house for
Refuseniks was forced to close. Besides severely
constricting the flow of emigration, the Soviet
Union has cut down on the flow of mail in and out
of the country and on international telephone calls
as well. Thus, in every way, conditions are wor-
sening for Jews in the Soviet Union. Soon, they
will be completely cut off from the West.
We recently spent some time with Refuseniks
inside Russia; their stories are grim. Anatoly, a
mathematician, was demoted from a highly
specialized position. He is very weary of his
treatment and has waited almost seven years
since he first applied for permission to leave and
was refused.
Vladimir, a biologist, had much the same story
to tell and they both decried the fact that they are
not allowed access to up-to-date information in
their fields from around the world.
Mikhail, former employee in the food industry,
has been waiting nine years since he first applied
for a visa and ha been refused numerous times.
To make matters worse, he hasn't seen his wife
and children for seven years. In order for them to
leave, he was forced to divorce his wife. The
authorities promised that he would be permitted
to join them in a year, but they have never given
him permission.
Boris, an engineer, has been arrested and im-
prisoned many times for speaking out against this
discrimination, for trying to help other Refuseniks
and for teaching Hebrew. He has been waiting
eleven years for a visa.
Samuel, a dentist, is destitute. His wife is
seriously ill, and they survive through the kin-
dness of friends and relatives.
Aron, an engineer, has been waiting for ten
years to emigrate. His parents were allowed to
leave when he first applied and he has not seen
them since they left Russia. Since losing his job he
has been harassed and questioned by the KGB.
His wife was detained overnight and beaten by the
KGB several months ago. Just recently, Aron was
also beaten as a reminder that the KGB is still
watching him. He earns a little money doing odd
jobs, but goods are scarce even if he had enough
rubles to make purchases.
Yakov, a construction engineer, and his family
try to keep Kosher and observe the rituals. It is
difficult to find some proper foods and when they
are not obtainable, the family does not eat.
Because they have to practice their Judaism in
secrecy Yakov only wears his kepah on his head
when he is at home or at friends' homes as he does
not dare to do so on the street. His menial job as a
janitor is in jeopardy because the authorities say
he is "overqualified" for that job.
Jew is considered a nationality in the Soviet
Union. Because of this, Jew is prominently typed
on their passports even though it denotes a
religious appellation to us. Jewish citizens of the
Soviet Union are therefore the only citizens to
have their religion on their passports. They are
also the only "nationality" that is not permitted
to speak their own language (Hebrew), not per-
mitted to possess Hebrew books and not permit-
ted to practice any of their culture, such as Bar
Mitzvah. Every other nationality has these privil-
eges except for the Jews.
Since losing his job, Aron
has been harassed and
questioned by the KGB.
His wife was detained
overnight and beaten by
the KGB several months
ago.
With all these things considered and many more
terrible things not mentioned, all of the
Refuseniks felt that the next step of the Soviet
government and the KGB could well be a yellow
star to be worn by every Jew. Furthermore, they
felt that it would be entirely possible for a "final
solution" to happen to them. It is interesting to
note that the KGB has a large special section
devoted entirely to the Jewish "problem." This
repression is even stronger in other parts of the
Soviet Union such as the Ukraine.
The Refuseniks, without exception, implore all
Western Jews to help them. They feel that we are
their only hope. Living as they have been, they are
brave, courageous and extremely grateful and
appreciative of any effort extended on their behalf.
Time is running out. We must not forsake them,
especially with emigration closing it's gates. This
time, we can save our fellow Jews. We must not let
this chance go by.
S
,*****


Federation, October, 1982
Page 11
|jew Women Pacesetters to be
tiiored at Lion of *I u < I a 11 Luncheon
ire being finalized for one of the gala
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation
Division, the annual Lion of Judah
i, which this year will pay special tribute
b'men Pacesetters, those individuals who
binimum gift of $10,000 to the 1983
(Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund.
hat promises to be truly memorable, the
)ecember 5th luncheon will be held
rnival Cruise Lines' Mardi Gras, which
[graciously donated by Lyn and Ted
the event. The day will be highlighted
esentation of the Pacesetter Judaica
and Medallions to Pacesetters and
lah pins to Trustees, a fashion show by
ic. ot Hal Harbour, and an address by
fst speaker Sylvia Hassenfeld.
of .Judah Luncheon is held annually
i's Division Trustees, women who make
i gift of 85,000 to the Combined Jewish
Kmergency Fund. The Trustee
is the distinctive Lion of Judah gold
Ibol that has been adopted by several
|is around the country.
acesetter Judaica Sculptures and
are original works of art created ex-
tbe Greater Miami Jewish Federation
by renowned Miami artist and
Snneth Treister. The great personages
ted in the four Pacesetter Judaica
series are those who have contributed
to Jewish theology, thought and
i of modern Israel.
jst prestigious luncheon will surely be
lost exciting and spectacular events of
lpaign," enthused Pacesetter-Trustee
Paula Friedland "In these critical
imperative that we demonstrate our
it to provide humanitarian services to
" i !>'"V'"
The Lion of Judah Luncheon goes afloat this year aboard the Carnival Cruiselines' "Mardi Gras. "
"It's going to be a beautiful day, and a special
opportunity to salute the Pacesetters,*' added
Pacesetter-Trustee Co-Chairwoman Gloria
Scharlin. "We'd especially like to thank the
Arisons, whose unparalleled generosity is making
it all possible."
Sylvia Hassenfeld of Providence, Rhode Island,
is National Vice Chairman of United Jewish
Appeal and Past National Women's Division
Chairman of UJA. In 1974, she led the first
Women's Division mission to Auschwitz, and in
1977 was the Division's first representative to
visit South America. Mrs. Hassenfeld was the
first woman to become a member of the Jewish
Agency's Board of Directors, she is a member of
the UJA Board of Directors and Executive
Committee, and serves on the American Israel
Public Affairs Committee.
For further information about this exciting
event, please call the Federation Women's
Division office at 576-4000.
olitieal Theme at Women's Division
"Federation Tuesday9 on JSTov. 16
LNPOWER "82: The Political
will be the theme of this year's
[Tuesday, the annual education event
by the Greater Miami Jewish
> Women's Division, to be held on
16 at the Carillon Beach Hotel, Miami
|s program, which will run from 9:30
1 p.m., will examine the workings of the
>litical process, the current situation
| the role women can assume in politics,
ration to South Florida, stated
1'uesday Chairwomen Bunny Adler
rris.
fications of Israel's Operation Peace
"lilitary campaign will be probed by
Professor Haim Shaked, who will
ter Lebanon: An Insider's View."
laked, interim director of the Center
ced International Studies at the
)f Miami, is a renowned authority on
j affairs, having previously taught at
liversity of Jerusalem, Tel Aviv
Queens College, York University and
|iversity.
pier, Democratic candidate for U.S.
Iowa's third disctrict, will speak
thy to ActivismA Woman's Per-
w. A former vice-chairperson of the
National Committee, Cutler is
counting her second bid for a
seat, after being narrowly defeated
>mposed of local attorneys and clergy
I the legal and ethical questions raised
pon into the nation. Panel members
Ira Kurzban, past president of the
of Immigration and Nationality
Lawyers; Rabbi Irving Lehrman, spiritual leader
of Temple Emanu-El, Miami Beach; Stanley
Marcus, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District
of Florida, and Neal R. Sonnett, president of the
Dade County Bar Association.
Working closely with Mrs. Adler and Mrs.
Harris on the arrangements for Federation
Tuesday are: Women's Division President Maxine
E. Schwartz; Community Education Vice
President, Sandi Simon; Janice Miller, Miami
Beach Representative; Helen Berne, North Dade
Representative; Marlin Arky and Rosetta
Bierman, South Dade Representatives; Laurie
Turner, Southwest Dade Representative, and
Sheila Weiss, Business and Professional Women
Representative.
Registration for the program, which includes a
full luncheon, will begin at 8:45 a.m.
Approximately 1,000 people are expected to at-
tend this forum, the key educational event of the
year sponsored by the Women's Division.
For information and reservations, please phone
the Federation Women's Division office at 576-
4000.
;*:-:-:-:*:-:*:-:*>xw^
B&P Women Host
v.
8
s
'Erev Federation Tuesday9
The Business and Professional Women of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's
Division will host Erev Federation Tuesday, an evening edition of the Women's Division
Federation Tuesday program designed especially for working women, on Monday. Novem-
ber 15 at 7:30 p.m.
The program, which will deal with the American lobbying system and the woman's role in
politics, will be held at the Greater Miami Jewish Federation building, 4200 Biscayne
Boulevard, Miami. Lynn Cutler. Democratic candidate for U.S. Congress in Iowa's third
district, will speak about "Apathy to ActivismA Woman's Personal Journey." Sara
Ehrman, Political Education Director for the American Israel Public Affairs Committee,
will discuss how to be an effective lobbyist.
For further information, please call the Federation Women's Division at 576-4000.
S
(IftflfflPffiMiuiJiyu^


Page 12
Federation. October, 1982
Holocaust Memorial Center Formed
..
As the years pass it becomes more obvious that
the Holocaust was a watershed in Jewish and
world history. In order to memorialize the six mil-
lion Jews who perished at the hands of the Nazis
and eternalize the lesson the Holocaust has carved
into every Jew's soul, the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation has created a Holocaust Memorial
Center.
The center formed this past summer, will
implement the recommendation of the Federation
Holocaust Memorial Committee to establish a
"living memorial" to sensitize the community to
the tragedy of the Holocaust.
"Greater Miami, as one of the fastest growing
Jewish communities in America and a city that
has one ot the largest groups of Holocaust sur-
vivors, is an appropriate location fc- a living
memorial to the six million Jews who died in the
Holocaust, said Federation President Norman H.
Lipotf. "Through the resources ana prog-ams that
can *- developed at the center, we can perpetuate
:he memory and bear witness to the six million
lew- who perished in the Holocaust.'"
Noting that the Holocaust was an event unique
o the Jewish people. Marc Pollick. the executive
iirector of the center, said he envisions the
planned memorial, which will be housed in its own
milding. to be comparable to the Yad Yashem
Memorial in Jerusalem.
"I envision a unique multi-purpose facLity of
.;>cal and national prominence, which would focus
on memory and education.'" Pollick said. 'We've
taken the pulse of the community and found that
there is tremendous support for a project of this
magnitude.
"The memorial will serve as a center for in-
formation and resource material." Pollick con-
tinued. It will include a library and media cenUr:
it will serve as a central repository for students to
gain a better understanding of the Holocaust; it
will house oral histories, films, film strips and
various other materials that relate to all facets of
the Holocaust. It will serve as a vehicle to educate
the community. Jewish and non-Jewish, so that
the story of the Holocaust is never lost and that
the message of the Holocaust remains indelibly
.mpnnted upon the hearts of all people.''
Pollick detailed some of the ongoing projects
the center is involved with, including the
collection of Holocaust related memorabilia and
the sponsoring of lectures on the Holocaust.
The center recently received 5.000 documents
dealing with the Polish Jewish community during
the Holocaust, which were donated by Dr. Julius
Kuhl. consulate official at the Polish Embassy in
Berne. Switzerland from 1938-45, who now lives in
Miami Beach.
"This generous donation of valuable documents
constitutes a major store of archival material from
this period.'' Pollick said. "Top Holocaust
scholars such as Dr. Yehuda Bauer and Dr. Walter
Lacquer believe they are a very important find."
The center sponsored a luncheon and lecture
with Bauer last month and the renowned
Holocaust authority is scheduled to speak to
Holocaust Memorial Center Director Marc Pollick I from left). GMJFExecutiie I ice Presii
Myron J Brodie and Rabbinical Association Executive Vice President Rabbi Solomon ScK
affix a mezzuzah to the doorpost of the newly opened Holocaust Memorial Center Office.
several Federation leadership groups. On October
18. the center sponsored a program at the
University of Miami entitled. "Faculty Seminar
on the Holocaust: Issues and Skills in Teaching
the Holocaust." which featured Dr. Bauer as its
keynote speaker. Next month, beginning on No-
vember 16. the center will sponsor a photographic
exhibit. "Auschwitz Revisited 1981'' by Dr.
Norman Morrison, which will be on display on the
second floor of the Federation building.
Another program the center is assisting is the
effort by the Gold Coast Council B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization to collect six million pennies,
representing the six million Jewish victims of the
Holocaust. "A penny, a life." is the motto of the
endeavor, and plans call for a display of the
pennies when the goal is attained.
Pollick said the center is seeing any and all
Holocaust related artifacts, art work, diaries,
poems, survivor documents and photographs for
eventual display in the memorial facility, which
will include a museum and archive. The center has
already established an extensive library and
research center.
The center also intends to sponsor programs in
community education involving public lecta
series, film series, survivors' speakers bureau, i
journeys to visit Holocaust sites and major citi|
in Eastern Europe.
Pollick comes to Miami from New Englan^
where he was pursuing his PH.D. in Holocau
Studies from Boston University and studyii
with Elie Wiesel. He has lectured at Yad Vash
in Jerusalem, and in 1979 he led a "Journeyi
Conscience to Eastern Europe and the deal
camps, a trip that was featured in an Er
award winning documentary narrated by
Asner.
"I'm finding the job of developing the cenia]
very stimulating and challenging. Pollic
commented. "I'm also glad we're located in
Federation building because it's given me th
opportunity to make use of the many resoun
offered by the agencies it houses."
The Holocaust Memorial Center welcon
consultations regarding any Holocaust reiatd
programs, subjects dealing with anti-Semitisnu
Eastern European Jewish life. For further ill
formation, please call the center office at R
4000.
BBTO Offers Programmatic Activities
By DAVID ROSEN
In Hebrew, the toast "L'Chaim" means "to
life!" But for over fifty Jewish teenagers in South
Florida, the word has another definition
commitment.
Established as the Community Service Com-
mittee of the Greater Miami Council B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization, the L'Chaim Committee is a
strong voice of the community's Jewish youth.
The committee was founded in late April of 1981,
when BBYO members Steve Hacker and Richie
Sand held their first meeting with about 15 people.
Just back from the High School in Israel program,
they felt the need for an organization that could
serve as an outlet for extensive service projects by
local Jewish teens beyond those that they were
involved in through their chapters or club af-
filiations.
"We wanted to give the Jewish youth a chance
to express their desire to do community service,"
said Sand, who now heads the committee.
Since its first meeting, the group has enjoyed
favorable publicity of their projects. This has led
to a substantial increase in membership and a
stronger commitment from those already in-
volved.
"We are very pleased with the increased par-
ticipation, but work still remains the issue here,"
explained Sand. "We only want people who are
willing to commit themselves to hard work."
The long range goals of L'Chaim are three-fold.
The first is to teach the necessity of Jewish
identification through participation in organized
Jewish youth activities. "As Jews, we cant afford
to be silent," said one member. The second goal is
that of Jewish education and involvement.
L'Chaim tries to bring program ideas to BBYO
and all organized youth serving groups. Lastly,
the group is constantly striving to strengthen ties
with Israel.
Zionism plays a large part in L'Chaim's ac-
tivities. Since approximately three-quarters of its
members have gone or are going to Israel, a lot of
stimulus is received from that area. In fact. Sand
considers his trip to Israel to be the catalyst
responsible for the formation of the committee.
Among some of L'Chaim's more notable project
are: its involvement in the Federation s Nursff
Home program and its aid in collecting 6.000.W
pennies for a BBYO Holocaust Memorial proje
in Gold Coast Council Florida. Members aU
funded a free screening of the movie "Exodus I
the South Dade Jewish Community Centaj
Money for the film's rental was raised throu
L'Chaim candy sales.
Presently, plans are in the works for the group I
lead a community-wide Federation youth can
paign, which will be executed by Jewish teenage" |
all over Miami. A substantial impact can be ma|
by this campaign, one which Sand hopes W
the community to recognize the potential ben
Jewish youth. "We want everyone to kno in
the youth are out there, doing their part, he saw j
In order to qualify for participation in L Cha
one must already be a member of a rec0S
Jewish youth group and of high school igracn*
12) age. More information about the grouP
how to join a Jewish youth group is avails
253-7400, the BBYO regional office.
i


Federation, October, 1982
Page 13
A Program wi t h UTo Losers
m is a pretty little girl of 11 and because
i is all her parents think a little girl should
L is falling behind badly at school. Helen is
tractive 18-year-old a recent immigrant to
1 from Chicago, and a highly motivated So-
| Sciences student at the Hebrew University of
Jisalem. Nira and Helen were a natural pair.
Lai at 9 is a shy, solitary child, with an unex-
d talent for sketching. Raphy from a kibbutz
i north of Israel is studying Management at
. University and in his free time he is a
pted amateur artist. They were another
E
Homo's father left home soon after his son was
and 10 years later the boy has the unwel-
1 distinction of being the most unmanageable
k school. David, a sturdy ex-paratrooper and
fan Education student at Hebrew University,
[natural role model and authority figure for a
[used and belligerent child.
Ke program which made these matches is
Ln as Peyrach. an acrostic of the Hebrew for
Itorial Project" and a word which means
|wer." In five years Peyrach's student partici-
Its have grown from the three '"crazies" who
inated it to 6.000 young men and women in
frersities all over Israel.
jometimes the pairs are obvious," says Arik
Jer, who is one of Peyrach*s 25 Jerusalem coor-
Jtors. "Other times we go more by instinct and
the 900 Hebrew University pairings of un-
raduates with disadvantaged Jerusalem chil-
last year, only 40 didn't "take." The other
met at least twice a week throughout the
at the university, or school, or the child's
he student's home to do schoolwork or go
trips to museums, concerts, sports events in
pity and hikes in the surrounding countryside.
pe three original founders of Peyrach were
oral students at Israel's prestigious Weiz-
Institute. and their idea was that children
economically, socially or culturally disad-
laged homes would greatly benefit from a one-
pe relationship with a university student. The
ents, they reasoned, would develop an active
involvement during their university years.
I thus graduate as better citizens. The three
pann students started working with three
olchildren. showed that their idea could suc-
and then approached Israel's Ministry of
Ration to expand the program nationwide.
Sagi. Hebrew University's Director of Pro-
for Community Involvement, has been as-
Ited with Peyrach since the beginning
pn it was a little embarrassing to be asso-
i" he says. "At first no one though it would
i The image of the Israeli student was of a
Absorbed young adult, just released from

Peyrach pairs are carefully thought out, with university undergraduates and disadvantaged
school children matched for background and interests. This unique program at Israel's seven
universities is partially funded by support of the Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund.
three years of army service and intent upon com-
pleting his studies and starting his life as quickly
as possible. Many Israeli students are already
married and virtually all of them are working their
way through college, so no one expected them to
find the extra hours each week."
But Peyrach is a program that somehow
manages to be all things to all people. Take 11-
year-old Shumlik from Jerusalem's Shmuel
Hanavi neighborhood. The long-awaited first son
born to Iraqi parents after nine daughters, he has
never quite sorted out whether he is the prince ol
his family or its scapegoat and he has grown up
into an aggressive and uncooperative child, often
in trouble for hitting his classmates and teachers.
Arik Heller was Shmulik's Peyrach tutor, and
for the child it was a dream come true. Heller was
someone and a man, at that to talk to, ex-
plore the city with, and be his friend.
For Heller, it was initially a challenge and later
an unmixed pleasure as he won Shmulik's trust
and led him into the world outside the cramped
three-room apartment where Shmulik has no room
or even a bed of his own. "He needed an ear so
desperately," says Heller. "Once he had it. he
opened like a flower.
Shmulik's teachers more than welcomed
Heller's involvement. Shmulik's geography needs
attention," Heller would be told. Or: "He's got a
math test coming up he needs study."
An additional incentive for each tutor is a
scholarship worth half his tuition, which this year
will amount to $250. The scholarships are partially
funded from the proceeds of the Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund Campaign cam-
paigns.
For the universities, too, Peyrach is an unquali-
fied success. It enables them to provide students
with a fuller education than the merely academic.
Their graduate psychology students counsel Pey-
rach tutors. Their Schools of Education conduct
practical research projects on the program, and
they are taking the universities into the com-
munity. Workshops, films, and parties are held for
Peyrach children and their tutors, and despite
severe budgetary cutbacks, the universities sup-
port Peyrach materially as well as morally.
Falashas Integrate into Israeli Society
nnslated from the Hebrew from the magazine
Iispacha, organ of Histadrut in America)
r Falasha children complain: "In Ethiopia
fere considered as whites. Here, they say we
llack." There are many problems. The Aliyat
W department of Israel and the World
Mrut office of Jerusalem is making a special
I to integrate the Ethiopian Jewish children
[the general stream of life in Israel, in the
r and in their everyday relationships with
children.
M supervisors of Aliyat Hanoar say: "We
TW knock down the barriers that separate the
pha children from the other youths. At the
| tune we do not want to show favoritism to.
Falasha children."
I a special seminar held in Ashdod, Israel, the
jPian elders told the Aliyat Hanoar depar-
It of their trials in Africa and how they are
g their traditions in Israel despite the
pps they are experiencing while adjusting to
Pew lives.
N the experiences of the elders, the officials
Parning how to guide the children through
their adjustment period to a new way of life in
Israel, and yet at the same time to keep their
traditions and customs.
Both the older and younger Falashas are
showing a strong will to absorb all the new in-
formation they are receiving. Experience has
shown that it is better to treat the Ethiopian Jews
as a group and not as individual families. They
have a sense of unity. Falasha women were in-
structed in household management. Their children
were given special classes in school with attention
directed towards their special needs.
The social workers were pleased that the
Falashas were very willing to receive advice, help
and instruction. The Falashas say that they have
complete faith in those who want to help them,
but they ask that they do not make promises that
they cannot fulfill.
For example, there were plans for a summer
camp program for the children of the Ethiopian
Jews, of the Georgian Jews from Russia, and the
Jews of Indian ancestry. The program didn't work
out very well because the other children were
asking why the Ethiopian Jews were black and
why thev had different customs. The Falasha
children were offended because they did not want
to have their problems be a subject of con-
versation.
After that experiment, the officials of Aliyat
Hanoar started to treat the Falashas as a separate
youth again. The teachers in the Ashdod schools
said that the Falasha children were usually very
polite, quiet and studious.
In spite of their good behavior, the other
children kept their distance from the Falasha
children at first, mainly because of the external
differences and customs of the Falashas. But
slowly, due to the efforts of the social workers and
teachers, the attitude of the other children
changed.
The young Falashas opened their hearts to their
young friends in school and told of their lives and
miseries in Ethiopia. Thus, an atmosphere of
understanding and friendship was forged.
It is of interest to note the words of one young
Ethiopian boy: "If I don't respect myself, others
will not respect me." These words are worth
remembering.


Page 14
Federation, October, 1982

A Year of Growth for the
South Dade Branch
The growth in involvement in activities of the
Jewish community in South Dade is reflected in
the expansion of programs planned for the coming
year by the Greater Miami Jewish Federation's
South Dade Branch.
South Dade Branch Chairman Mikki Futernick
emphasized that there remain many Jews who
may be attracted to Federation for the first time
by new programs to be offered during the up-
coming year.
"Our objective this year is to introduce as many
people as possible to Federation and its agencies,"
Futernick said. "We hope to acquaint them with
the cultural side of Judaism and to encourage
them to have a stake in the survival of the Jewish
people."
In order to facilitate the growth of new
programs, the South Dade Branch office has
moved to larger quarters on the campus of the
South Dade Jewish Community Center.
Additionally, David Goodman has been hired to
serve as South Dade campaign director. Good-
man's efforts are expected to supplement the
programmatic and administrative duties of South
Dade Branch director Michael Meyer.
Futernick said efforts will be made to attract
new Federation members and program par-
ticipants from particular geographic areas and
professions. She cited the Crossings, Caravel and
Calusa as three particular neighborhood.1 from
which greater Jewish involvement could be drawn.
"We believe there are many young people living
in these areas who have sincere concerns about the
needs of the Jewish community," she said. "1 hese
people may be attracted to our programs once we
make clear to them the types of services provided
by Federation and its family of agencies."
Futernick also said special emphasis will be
placed on attracting doctors and dentists to
become involved in South Dade Branch activities.
Hospitals have been approached to assist in
arranging such programs, she said.
The South Dade Branch Board of Directors
reflects the high quality of involvement and
leadership already provided by Jews in that
GMJF Vice President Donald E. Lefton answers questions at a Mideast forum, sponsoredl
Federation s South Dade Branch.
section of the county, Futernick said. She noted
that both recipients of the 1982 Stanley C. Myers
Presidents Leadership Awards, Sydney Newmark
and Kenneth Hoffman, are board members and
have demonstrated particularly strong com-
mitments to Federation and other programs of
vital need to the Jewish community.
Futernick also said that efforts on behalf of the
1983 Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency
Fund Campaign are expected to achieve un-
precedented success under the chairmanship of
Harry Weitzer. Major campaign events are
planned for February 17 at the Kings Bay
Country Club and March 12 at the Lowe Art
Museum, she said.
A major thrust of the South Dade Branch's!
educational outreach program is the newlyl
initiated "Federation Forum" series, which will
offer discussions with experts in fields of interest!
and concern to the Jewish community. The firstl
program of this series will be presented on Sunday!
evening, November 7 and is described in the|
article below.
"The topics to be discussed at the Federation!
Forums have implications for all of us in the!
Jewish community," Futernick said. "I hope that!
these programs, which are being offered free of I
charge, will interest new members who share our |
concerns for a strong Jewish community."'
Broadcaster to Address 'Federation Forum'
Norman Ornstein
The complexion of American politics and
resultant national and international policies could
face radical changes this year, depending on the
results of the 1982 Congressional elections. Any
such shifts in policy direction would have major
effects on United States policies toward Israel and
world Jewry.
"The Implications of the 1982 National
Congressional Elections for the American Jewish
Community and Israel" will be the topic of
discussion at the first of a series of "Federation
Evenings," sponsored by the South Dade Branch
of the Greater Miami Jewish Federation. This
forum will be held on Sunday, November 7 at.
7:00 Pvm. at Temple Beth Am, 5950 North Kendall
Drive.
Educator and broadcaster Norman J. Ornstein
will provide his analysis of the challenges and
issues facing the Jewish community following
Flection Day. Ornstein serves as political editor
for the Public Broadcasting System series The
Lawmakers, editorial consultant for PBS and
WETA-TV, and political analyst for National
Public Radio's All Things Considered and
Morning Edition. He also has appeared on the
McNeil Lehrer Report, the Today show, Nightline
and the CBS Morning News.
The recipient of a Ph.D. from the University of
Michigan, Ornstein is a professor of politics at the
Catholic University of America and visiting
scholar at the American Enterprise Institute for
Public Policy Research. He has lectured in Cuba,
Egypt, Spain, Turkey, England, Iran, the Soviet]
Union, Italy and Canada. He also has spoken atl
colleges and universities, and to groups of federal!
executives, business professionals and foreign I
visitors. He also lectures regularly for the Office of 1
Personnel Management and the Brookingsl
Institute, and has conducted seminars for I
Congressional Quarterly on elections. Congress j
and lobbyists.
Susan Fuller, a member of the South Dade
Branch Board of Directors, serves as chairperson |
of the Federation Forum.
For further information, contact the South Dade |
Branch Office at 251-9334.
f
For information about Jewish singles events occurring
throughout Dade County call:
THEJASSLINE
573-J ASS
It's a seven-day-a-week service, sponsored by
the Jewish Association Serving Singles,
that provides a recorded listing of major events geared to
singles of all ages.
J ASS is a program of the Jewish Community Centers of South Florida
and the Greater Miami Jewish Federation.


Federation, October, 1982
Page 15
Calendar
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 1
The 8th annual Day School Teachers In-Service
Workshop will be held today at the Hillel Com-
munity Day School, 19000 NE 25th Avenue,
North Miami Beach. Credit toward professional
growth in both general studies areas is being
offered to all teachers attending. Sponsored by the
Central Agency for Jewish Education (CAJE) and
the Council of Principals and Administrators, this
annual program presents a broad spectrum of
professional and content-type workshops and
seminars. For more information call the CAJE
office at 576-4030.
MONDAY. NOVEMBER 1
Women's American ORT is having an open region
board meeting at the Kendall library, 97th Avenue
and Kendall drive today. Mort Silberman,
president of the American Israel Public Affairs
Committee (AIPAC) will be the guest speaker,
discussing Israel and Lebanon, from 10:30-11:30
a.m. followed by "The Link and the Chain," a film
about a French Jewish community. For more
information call Mary Ellen Peyton at 251-7932 or
Loisbeth Emanuel at 231-1937.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 4
Federation leaders Maxine E. and Kenneth J.
Schwartz will be guest speakers at the Aventura-
Turnberry Isle education seminar at 7:30 p.m. at
the A ventura Jewish Center, 2972 A venture
Boulevard, North Miami Beach. The theme of the
forum will be "Israel Update." The event is co-
sponsored by the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and the A ventura Jewish Center. For
more information call Irving Kalman at 576-4000
ext. 216.
FRIDAY. NOVEMBER 5
The Little Children's P.A.C.E. Strings Concert
will be held today at 12:30 and 1:45 p.m. at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC. Reservations are
required. Call Gail Karp Adler at 932-4200 for
information and reservation requests.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER6
Tonight is games night at Don Carter's Kendale
Lanes. 13600 North Kendall Drive. Sponsored by
Women's American ORT, the evening will feature
different games of chance with all proceeds going
to the World ORT Program. Tickets are $10 in
advance and $12 at the door, which includes
admission and chips. For more information and
tickets, call Laurel Shapiro at 266-3444 or Cindy
Faberal 235-0476.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 7
Norman J. Ornstein, political editor for the PBS
series The Lawmakers, editorial consultant for
I'HS and WEYA-TV, and political analyst for the
National Public Radio's All Things Considered
and Morning Edition, will discuss "The
Implications of the 1982 National Congressional
Elections for the American Jewish Community
and Israel,' at the first of a series of "Federation
Forums." The event is sponsored by the South
Uade Branch of the Greater Miami Jewish
Federation and will be held at 7 p.m. this evening
at Temple Beth Am, 5950 North Kendall Drive.
There is no charge for admission. For more in-
formation call the South Dade branch, 251-9334.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 7
An intergenerational picnic, sponsored by the JCC
leens will be held today at Noon at the South
uade Jewish Community Center. The cost is $3
'or teens and friends and $2 for senior adults. All
Proceeds will go toward the Summer Camp Fund
jor t>enior Adults. For more information call the
*>uth Dade JCC office at 251-1394.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 7
"J ^atin Auxiliary of the Miami Jewish Home
w Hospital for the Aged will be having a family
o^nch this morning at 10:30 at the Home. New
members are welcome. For more information call
Cornelia Philipson, 751-8626 ext. 189.
WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 10
Jj annual membership luncheon of the Rabbi
gander S- Gross Hebrew Academy Women wUl
Tftiuf at noon in the Temple Emanu-el Ballroom,
$20 a1f.hin8ton Avenue, Miami Beach. Lunch is
;nf' wn'ch includes a fashion show. For more
formation call Charlotte Rose at 532-6421 ext.-
THURSDAY. NOVEMBER 11
The Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged is having a Founders Dinner this evening at
6:00 at the Home. For more information contact
Steve Rose, 751-8686 ext. 178.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 11
The Old Cutler Chapter of Women's American
ORT is sponsoring a talk given by Dr. James
Flanders who will be discussing "TV as a Member
of the Family" today. For more information call
Linda Schneider at 251-4259.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Eye care will be the topic of discussion at the
Coral Gables Women's American ORT meeting at
Temple Judea in the Gables today. Dr. Emanuel
Pushkin will be the guest speaker. The meeting
starts at 12:30 p.m. For more information call
Estelle Berman at 856-3638.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14
The Kendall Lakes Chapter of women's American
ORT is having a bagel and lox membership break-
fast this morning. The cost is 99 cents. For more
information call Laurel Yelvington at 387-4547.
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 14
For those of you who don't want to leave your
home this morning, the Southwest Chapter of
Women's American ORT is delivering "Lox
Boxes" for breakfast. The cost is $8.50. They will
be delivering in the Southwest section, from Miller
Road South only. For more information call
Nancy Guerrera at 385-5111.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 15
The Business and Professional Women of the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's
Division will host Erev Federation Tuesday, an
evening edition of the Women's Division
Federation Tuesday program designed especially
for working women this evening at 7:30 p.m. The
program, which will deal with the American
lobbying system and the woman's role in politics,
will be held at the Federation building, 4200
Biscayne Boulevard. For more information, call
the Women's Division at 576-4000.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16
The continuing education program entitled
"Sensory Impairment," will be conducted today
at the Miami Jewish Home and Hospital for the
Aged from 8:30 a n. through 12:30 p.m. For more
information call Eleanor Almquist at 751-8626
ext. 190.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16
The Greater Miami Jewish Federation Women's
Division will sponsor its annual community
education program, Federation Tuesday, from
9:30 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. at the Carillon Beach Hotel
on Miami Beach. This year's program will feature
prominent speakers discussing the Middle East,
the American political process and the im-
migration situation. The public is invited to at-
tend. Registration is $25 per person, which in-
cludes the full program and luncheon. For further
information call the Women's Division office at
576-4000.
NOVEMBER 17-21
The second annual Jewish Book Fair is
scheduled for this week at the Michael-Ann
Russell JCC and the South Dade JCC. Included in
the week's activities are featured Jewish authors,
a large Judaica book sale for adults and children, a
used book sale with over 3,000 books, a Women's
Day and a Children's Day. For more information
call Ann Kravitz at 932-4200 regarding Michael-
Ann Russell activities; and Marsha Botkin at 251-
1394 regarding South Dade activities.
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18
Persons afflicted with diabetes, their families and
friends are invited to join the Diabetes Club at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC. Membership in the
club is free and open to the public. The Club is co-
sponsored by the Michael-Ann Russell JCC,
Mount Sinai Medical Center and the Greater
Miami American Diabetes Association. For more
information call Ruth Farkas, R.N., at 932-4200
ext. 242.
SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 20
An Israeli Sing-A-Long will be held tonight at the
Michael-Ann Russell JCC, 18900 NE 25th
Avenue, North Miami Beach. The fun begins at
8:00 p.m. with Israeli accordionist Ami Gilad
leading the songs. Lyrics will be projected on color
slides. Coffee and cake will be served. The cost is
$1.50 for JCC members and $3 for non-members.
For more information call Ann Kravitz at 932-
3206.
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 23
Famed composer-musician Marvin Hamlisch will
give a special performance at the Pacesetter
Dinner to be held at the Fontainebleau-Hilton
Hotel, Miami Beach. This gala event is open to
contributors of a minimum of $10,000 to the 1983
Combined Jewish Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
Campaign. For more information, contact Michael
Fischer at Federation, 576-4000, ext. 274.
MONDAY, NOVEMBER 29
The Morton Towers Chapter of Hadassah will be
sponsoring a luncheon for the Hadassah Medical
Organization today at Temple Emanu-el, 1701
Washington Avenue, Miami Beach. For tickets
and information call 672-0061.
Throughout the Month
Registration for the Sixth Annual Chanukah
Run, sponsored by the Michael-Ann Russell JCC
and the JCC Pacers, is taking place now through
December 16 at the JCC, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue,
North Miami Beach. The eight-mile run, which
attracted 3,000 people last year, is scheduled for
Sunday, December 16, at 8 a.m. The entry fee for
the race is $5 and must be received by December
16. For registration forms and more information
call Jerry Lushack, 932-4200.
Chair exercises for armchair athletes aged 60-
years and up are conducted on Fridays, 10-10:30
a.m. at the Senior Adult Trailer at the Michael-
Ann Russell JCC, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue, North
Miami Beach. For details call Melody Leeds, 935-
2440.
Persons with a history of heart disease or those
who risk developing heart disease are invited to
participate in the Cardiac Rehabilitation Program
conducted by the Michael-Ann Russell JCC and
Mount Sinai Medical Center. The program is a
medically prescribed exercise and health
education program and is held three times each
week at the JCC, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue, North
Miami Beach. A physician's referral and clearance
is required to participate. For more information
call Ruth Farkas, R.N. or Jerry Lushack, 932-
4200.
The South Dade Jewish Community Center's
Macabees and Macabettes is a program which
teaches fathers and their children, kindergarten
through third grade, how to establish a closer,
more meaningful relationship. The group meets bi-
monthly and the program stresses quality time
together for fathers and their children. The cost is
$35. For more information call 251-1394.
The South Dade Jewish Community Center
offers after school programs for children three
years to sixth grade, in drama, cooking, ceramics,
tennis and more. Transportation from several area
schools available. $15-$20. For more information
call 251-1394.
S
Listing for Jewish Community Calendar
| i
(Please Print or Type)
The deadline for December events is November 8. 1982.
Organization.
Event_______
Place,
Date_
Your
Title_
_Time_
l a.m. () p.m.
name.
.Phone No..
MAIL TO:
FEDERATION
Public Reltations Dept.
Greater Miami Jewish Federation
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137


Page 16
Federation, October, 1982
i

fi
Charitable Remainder Trusts
By JAMES R. SLOTO, Esquire
Our last issue contained an excellent
article on the charitable lead trust, a vehi-
cle by which a donor may provide that
present income from a trust should pass to
charity for a number of years, after which
time the trust principal would pass to ben-
eficiaries of the donor's choice. Perhaps
you found appealing the concept of
dividing income and remainder interests,
but you would prefer to personally enjoy
the income from such a trust for the rest of
your life and pass the principal upon your
death to a charity such as the Foundation
of Jewish Philanthropies of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation ("Foundation").
If so, you should make an appointment
with your tax advisor to discuss either a
charitable remainder annuity trust or a
charitable remainder unitrust.
Charitable Remainder Annuity Trust
A donor during his lifetime may irrevo-
cably transfer assets to a trustee who
annually pays to the donor a fixed dollar
amount for life. Such a trust could also
provide for income for the donor's survi-
vor for life. The donor determines at the
outset the annual fixed dollar amount he
(and his survivor, if applicable) will receive.
In order to obtain certain tax benefits, the
annual amount must be at least 5 percent
of the initial fair market value of assecs
used to fund the trust. The sizeable income
tax deduction available to the donor in the
year he creates the annuity trust is deter-
mined by the value of the charity's right to
receive assets upon the donor's (or survi-
vor's) death. Upon the donor's (or survi-
vor's death, the trust assets would pass to
the charity.
Example: Mr. Levy creates a charitable
remainder annuity trust with $100,000
cash. The trust will pay him $7,000 annu-
ally (in quarterly installments) for the rest
of his life from the original $100,000 and
any income earned by the trust. After life-
time payments are made, the remaining
assets in the trust pass to the Foundation
for the purpose intended by Mr. Levy.
If Mr. Levy is 73 years of age when he
creates the trust (for himself only) he
would receive a federal income tax deduc-
tion of $55,814, which amount is deduc-
tible up to 50 percent of his adjusted gross
income during the tax year in which the
trust is funded. Any amount not deduc-
tible in the year the trust is funded is
deductible over the following five years
(up to 50 percent of adjusted gross income
each year) until exhausted. Special deduc-
tion limitations apply if the trust is funded
with long-term appreciated securities.
Annual payments to Mr. Levy are sub-
ject first to ordinary income tax to the
extent of the trust's ordinary income, then
capital gain to the extent of the trust's
capital gain, then tax-exempt income to
the extent of the trust's tax-exempt
income and finally, as a tax-free distribu-
tion of principal.
One special advantage of the annuity
trust is the certainty of annual distribu-
tions. The income beneficiary will receive
an unvarying dollar amount each year,
which may be attractive to donors who
fear an economic downturn. The disadvan-
tage to this certainty is if the devaluation
of the annual distribution, i.e. the fixed
annual distribution provides no protec-
tion against the inroads of inflation. To
\
James R. Sloto
OuR?fc>pes
Foundati
Foundation of
Jewish Philanthropies
of the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
many donors, this risk makes the annuity
trust highly unattractive in today's
economy.
Charitable Remainder Unitrust
A charitable remainder unitrust is very
similar to a charitable remainder annuity
trust. The most important difference is
that the amount paid to the donor is not
necessarily the same each year. The reason
for this is that the unitrust annually
returns a certain percentage (at least 5 per-
cent) of the total amount of the trust
assets.
Unlike the annuity trust, the unitrust may
provide that only the income earned by the
trust is to be paid out in the years when
the trust earns less than the percentage it
should otherwise pay out. The unitrust
may also provide that amounts not paid to
the donor because of small earnings in any
particular year (below the mandated per-
centage) shall be made up in later years
when the earning are in excess of the
mandated percentage. One other
worthy difference between the uniL
and the annuity trust is that additd
property may be added to the unitj
after it is created.
Example: Mr. Levy's unitrust pro\
that he is to receive 7 percent of the
market value of the unitrust assets
year payable quarterly. Mr. Levy funj
the trust with $100,000 cash so he recel
$7,000 the first year. One year la]
the unitrust assets are worth $150,0(
Mr. Levy receives $10,500 ($150,000
percent).
The special advantage of the unitrusj
that the amount of the annual payme]
will increase as the value of the tr
increases, thereby providing a he
against inflation. The major disadvant
of the unitrust occurs when assets dep
ciate. If the value of the trust decreas
so will the annual distribution,
requirement that trust assets be vali
annually may present difficulties whtJ
the corpus of the unitrust is made up]
property such as real estate or closely he
stock.
Like the annuity trust, the unitrust pjj
vides the donor with a sizeable charitafc
deduction in the year the trust is creat
Conclusion
Both the annuity trust and the unitnu
provide vehicles for those who woul
presently like to make a sizeable contr
bution and have a lifetime income. BoJ
trusts are generally exempted from federa
income taxes unless they have unrelatet
business income. Payments can be favor
ably taxed, depending on the nature of thJ
trust property. Income and corpus an!
allocated to the annuity or unitrust distrij
butions under a "four tier" system that
first pays out current and accumulat i
ordinary income, then capital gains, thenl
tax-exempt income and finally corpus.
The donor will not realize any capit
gain upon transfer of appreciated propertj
to either an annuity trust or unitrust.
However, the donor will have the advan-
tage of taking his charitable deduction
based on the appreciated value of the
donated property.
When the donor is the only beneficiary
(or in a two-life annuity is not survived by
the second beneficiary), the trust is not
taxed to the donor's estate. If there is a
survivor beneficiary, only the value of the
survivor's right to lifetime payments
(computed at the donor's death) is subject
to tax in the donor's estate.
9
I
::
1
Criminal Justice Bond Issue
rJl!*. Gr?*ter Mia?l ft?** Fe*ratk>n hihly conscious and concerned about the safety of Dade
County citizens, and takes an active interest in the security and well-being of the community. Thus, the
Federation is a sponsoring organization of Miami Citizens Against Crime.
,kM^C ^ ^P^!!?1 itSD8V,PPu-or ^Criminal Justice Bond Program, which will be appearing on
the November 2 Election Ballot. This public issue would provide $200 million for improvement of law
enforcement facilities in Dade County through 1995.
Among the faculties that would benefit from the passage of the Criminal Justice Bond Program are the
prisons, which would be expanded through new construction and renovation; the courts, which would
gain a variety of new and renovated structures; and the police, who would obtain new and renovated
stations.
JSJS 2tizen8 A^inS/ ?oTime *" 2fti that this is a ,on8-rnge bond issue, which would provide new
facilities over a period of 12 years, and has stressed that this ballot decision will have long-term con-
sequences for the people of Greater Miami and their safety.
&:::::*::%%%a^^


Full Text
j|n Steering Committee
Myron J. Brodle
Exec. Vice President. GM JF
-
4 -
Norman Braman
Chairman, Faat Start
Richard Berkowitz
Vice Chairman, Chazak
Philip T. Warren
Chairman, National Fly-in
Louis Berlin
Chairman,
Young Adults Division
Samuel I. Adler
Co Chairman, $100,000 +
Pacesetter Division
Dr. Jay Ellenby
Co-Chairman, Physicians
and Osteopaths Division
Harry A. (Hap) Levy
Co-Chairman, $100,000 +
Pacesetter Division
Dr. Phillip Frost
Co-Chairman, Physicians
and Osteopaths Division
Howard Scharlln
Chairman, $50,000 +
Inside Washington
Dr. Harry Qraff
Co-Chairman, Physicians
and Osteopaths Division
Donald E. Lofton
Chairman, $25,000 ?
Vanguard Division
Dr. Alan Graubert
Co-Chairman, Physicians
and Osteopaths Division
Gerald Schwartz
Co-Chairman, Super Sunday
Kenneth Hoffman
Chairman, Chazak
Ezra Katz Sid Levin
Chairman Co-Chairman, ACE Division
UJA Young Leadership Cabinet
Elaine Sllversteln
Co-Chairman, ACE Division
Joel Levy
Chairman, Boards 4 Trustees
Ed Shohal
Chairman, Attorneys Division
Sandl Simon
Coordinator
Healing Arts Division
Quillermo Sostchln
Chairman,
Cuban Hebrew Division
Jack Weinstein
Chairman, Food, Restaurants
and Hotels Division
Harry Weitzer
Chairman, South Dade
Richard Zinn
Chairman, Builder
and Allied Trades Dlv. on

Jeff Lefcourt
Leonard Luria
William S. Ruben
Isaac Sklar
* (in formation)
Eric B. Turetsky


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.
Norman H. Lipofl
President, QMJF
Aaron Podhurtl
General Chairman
Michael M. Adler
Chairman, S10.0O0-S24.999
Pacesetter Division
Howard Frank
Chairman,
Accountants Division
1983 CJ A-IEF Campaisl
Edmund Abramson
Vice Chairman
Jeffrey Berkowitz
Vice Chairman, $10,000 $24,999
Pacesetter Division
Harvey Friedman
Chairman, Special Gilts
Ellen Mandler
Chairman, Woman's Division
Dr. Robert Marlin
Chairman, Dentists Division
Sheldon Guren
Vice Chairman
Kannath J. Schwartz
Chairman,
Worker Training
Alfred Golden
Co-Chairman, Hi-Rises
Robert J. Merlin
President,
Young Adults Division
Cal Kovens
Vice Chairman
Sidney Olson
Vice Chairman
Maxine E. Schwartz
President,
Women's Division
Bunny Adler
Chairman
Campaign Opening Dinner
h fc
Lydla Goldrlng Frances B. Levey
Co-Chairman, Super Sunday Co-Chalrman, Super Sunday
Forrest Raffel
Co-Chalrman, New Gilts
Leroy Raffel
Co-Chalrman, New Gifts
Marilyn K. Smith
Vice Chairman
I
Bernardo Batievsky
Chairman
Latin American Division
'T
David Rosenbaum
Co Chairman, Super Sunday
David Schaecter
Chairman, Missions
L. Jules Arkln
4
Rabbi Haskell Bemat
Mlkkl Futemlck
Edward Harris
Joseph H. Kanter
*
Steven Kravitz