The Jewish Floridian

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Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

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Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02797

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
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Jewish weekly
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Full Text
THE
Volume 55Number 37 Two Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, September 10,1982
!(*1SCMI
yMaMWCam*
Price 50 Cents
Christian Describes View of 'New' Lebanon's Future
All Divisions Must Go
With Going of 'Invaders
Bishop George Haddad of Tyre in Lebanon is
shown receiving representatives of the
American Jewish Joint Distribution Com-
mittee during their recent tour ofJDC relief
and rehabilitation programs in southern
Lebanon. JDC Board Chairman Donald M.
Robinson, of Pittsburgh, and chairman
of JDC's Area Committee for Moslem Coun-
tries, Herbert H. Schiff of Columbus, are
shown discussing the needs of the commun-
ity with Bishop Haddad. JDC programs in
southern Lebanon are funded by special
donations received from the American Jew-
ish community.
By ROGER EDDE
London Chronicle Syndicate
It is time to move boldly
and quickly towards radical
solutions in the Middle
East which provides, secur-
ity for all Sates in the re-
gion. The unity and sover-
eignty of Lebanon can only
be achieved if Lebanon be-
comes a permanently
neutral and disarmed State
that is, neutrality
guaranteed by the super
powers and assured by the
presence on Lebnese soil of
a multinational force. .
Disarmed neutrality for Leba-
non is a solution of last resort.
Neutral Lebanon is compatible
If No Peace Treaty
with Lebanon's history, its geo-
graphical location and its politi-
cal tradition. Alignment abroad
has brought disintegration at
home.
ONLY A DISARMED and
neutral Lebanon can permanent-
ly end the cycle of violence which
has claimed the lives of so many
innocent victims. A permanently
disarmed and neutral Lebanon
would require:
e Total departure of all foreign
forces presently occupying Leba-
non;
e Complete disarmament of
Lebanon within its international-
ly recognized boundaries, the
Lebanese Army transformed to
fill the vacuum left by the disin-
tegration of its internal security
forces;
e International guarantee of
Continued on Page 15-A
Sharon Warns of New Buffer Zone
KIRYATSHEMONA-
Israel's Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon told a cheer-
ing crowd here Monday
that Israel's position in
Lebanon will change dra-
matically if President-Elect
Bashir Gamayel fails to
sign a peace treaty.
Sharon said this would mean
"a different status" for southern
Lebanon. "We will secure a 40-50
kilometer (25-30 mile) wide secu-
rity strip to keep it clear of artil-
lery pieces and a threat of terror-
ist activity," he warned.-
At the same time, leftist Leba-
nese militias and their Palestin-
ian allies claimed responsibility
for the abduction of eight Israeli
soldiers in eastern Lebanon.
Israel believes the Syrians are
responsible and has warned Syria
of military reprisals.
A LEFTIST Beirut newspa-
per, al-Liwo, in a statement noted
Israel Wants 25-30 Miles
Past Northern Border
Streisand's Dream, 'Yentel,'
Finds Her More Approachable
By DAVID NATHAN
London Chronicle Syndicate
"Yentl" is an Isaac
Bashevis Singer story
about a girl who disguises
herself as a boy in order to
be allowed to study the
[Holy scriptures. For some
16 years, Barbra Steisand
has had a burning desire to
play this erudite transves-
tite in a film. She is now a
substantial part of the way
through the movie which is
being made in England and
Czechoslovakia.
This is rather odd because in
Czechoslovakia no Jewish child
of either sex can study the Holy
scriptures, as the authorities do
not allow the teaching of Hebrew.
Streisand is striving to re-
create Polish stetl life as ac-
curately as possible. She could
not make the film in Poland be-
cause of "difficulties." So, some
60 miles from Prague, they have
built the village of Yanev" from
the farm and three houses that
made up a place called Rozytly.
THE REMNANTS of the
once-flourishing, thousand-year-
old Czech Jewish community
have been happily working as ex-
tras, playing minor roles in what
Continued on Page 14-A ____
that a joint militia had "ar-
rested" the soldiers near the Is-
raeli-held mountain village of
Bhamdoun, 15 miles east of Bei-
rut.
Sharon's earlier announcement
of the event reported that the sol-
diers were abducted last Satur-
day being Israeli lines in the
eastern Bekaa Valley.
"Israel has 20 ways to retaliate
against Syria for this act," said
Deputy Prime Minister David
Levy, who warned: "If we
wanted to, we could carry out
much broader and more sophisti-
cated actions."
At Kiryat Shemona, Sharon
declared: "We are not begging
for a peace treaty, but it is our
right and duty to make sure that
there will be a peace treaty be-
cause a peace treaty is a factor in
our security.
Gen. Sharon
"WE HAVE made it clear to
the Lebanese leaders that if their
government signals peace, Leba-
non will be united."
Meanwhile, the Palestine Lib-
Continued on Page 14-A
As Money Dries Up
Abandoned Jews in Brooklyn's Decaying Areas Grow
ByBENGALLOB
NEW YORK -(JTA)-
The number of aged and a-
bandoned Jews in Brook-
I'yn s decayed and decaying
neighborhoods continues to
[grow as resources to relo-
cate them to safer sections
shrink, according to Rabbi
Yisroel Rosenfeld, execu-
tive director of the Crown
Heights Jewish Communi-
ty Council in that borough.
Rosenfeld told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that his Sep-
tember, 1981 estimate of several
thousand such abandoned Jews,
living in squalor and fear in
Brooklyn's Brownsville, Bedford-
Stuyvesant, East New York and
East Flatbush sections, had been
expanded by a variety of factors.
HE SAID there was no way of
knowing how many such enfee-
bled elderly Jews are now trap-
ped in the decayed hulks of build-
ings in such sections of Brooklyn.
But Rosenfeld said, partly be-
cause of the recession and for re-
lated reasons, decaying sections
are growing and so is the total of
beleaguered Jews. He told the
JTA that the number of Jews
who once had funds to help the
Community Council also was
shrinking, in part because of the
impact of the recession.
Rosenfeld said most of the for-
gotten Jews were widows but
Continued on Page 10-A
'The Pletzel in Paris: Before the Terrorist Attacks. Page 4-A


un__aan m
______________:-" -. -"--"

Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 10,1982
Filling in Background
Israel Rejects Reagan's Initiative
...
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Israel's Cabinet, sum-
moned into special session
by Premier Menachem
Begin, has rejected uncon-
ditionally President Rea-
gan's call for a "fresh
start" in the Middle East
peace* process and defied
one element of the Presi-
dent's plan by announcing
that Israel would continue
to set up settlements in the
West Bank and Gaza Strip.
Begin interrupted a vacation in
Nehariya, in response to Presi-I
dent Reagan's nationally-tele-
vised speech on his "fresh start"
plan, to convene the Cabinet for
its bristling rebuff to the Presi-
dent. The Israeli press predicted
an imminent new low in Ameri-
can-Israeli relations.
THE STATEMENT issued af
ter the Cabinet meeting, read by
Cabinet secretary Dan Meridor,
called the Reagan plan a blue-
print for suicide for Israel and
said it was inconceivable that Is-
rael could ever accept it.
The President repeatedly
stressed the United States com-
mitment to Israel's security as he
called for a halt to Israeli settle-
ments in the occupied areas as an
essential element to the creation
of trust by the Palestinian in-
habitants in Israel's commit-
ment, in the Camp David ac-
cords, to autonomy for the Pales-
tinians.
In an apparent effort for a
balanced position, Reagan said
the United States would not ac-
cept a Palestinian state in the
West Bank and Gaza and equally
would not accept Israeli annexa-
tion of the disputed areas.
Reagan proposed, as a possible
alternative, some kind of linkage
between the occupied areas and
Jordan, which has seized the
West Bank in Israel's 1948 War
of Independence, and lost it to
Israel in the Six-Day War.
THE CABINET statement
said the positions relayed to
Begin in Reagan's name, a
reference to a letter the President
sent to the Premier Tuesday,
much of which was leaked in Is-
rael ignored or contradicted the
Camp David accords. The con-
tent of that letter was spelled out
by the President in his televised
address.
The Cabinet statement said
that "since the positions of the
United States government devi-
ates to a serious extent from the
Camp David accords, contradict
the accords, and are liable to
cause a serious danger to Israel,
to its security and future, the
government of Israel decided
that, on the basis of these posi-
tions, it will not enter any nego-
tiations with any element." Rea-
gan reiterated that, for his
government, the Camp David ac-
cords were the only possible
framework for peace talks.
The Cabinet statement con-
tinued: "The government of Is-
rael is ready to resume without
any delay the autonomy talks
with the governments of the
United States and Egypt the
signatories to the Camp David
accords as well as with other
countries and elements which
were invited to participate in the
talks."
THE STATEMENT specified
the areas which, in the Cabinet's
view, contradicted the Camp
David Accords. These included
the status of Jerusalem which
the President said should remain
undivided, with its final status
subject to negotiations the
settlements freeze proposal, the
Prime Minister Begin
autonomy-Jordan proposed link-
age, and the handing of control of
security to the Arabs in the terri-
tories for the period of autonomy.
At the Cabinet session, Begin
reportedly said Reagan's plan
was worse than the plan U.S.
Secretary of State William
Rogers posed in the early 1970's
which called for "insubstantial"
border changes in Israel's bor-
ders. Begin quoted former Pre-
mier Golda Meir who said at the
time that anybody who would ac-
cept the Rogers plan would be a
traitor. "The same policy should
apply to whoever adopts the
Reagan plan," Begin said.
The Cabinet said that if the
Reagan proposal had been imple-
mented, "nothing would have
prevented King Hussein (of Jor-
dan) from inviting his new friend,
Yasir Arafat," chairman of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion, "to come to Nablus and tell
him: rule. This would have be-
come the Palestinian state which
would have allied itself with the
Soviet Union, and arming itself
with all modern weaponry. The
PLO did that in Lebanon, creat-
ing a state within a state. Why
would there by anything to pre-
vent the PLO from doing the
same in Judaea and Samaria."
MERIDOR indicated that the
ministers were unanimous in re-
jecting the Reagan proposals.
Deputy Premier David Levy said
the eventual outcome of imple-
mentation of Reagan's "fresh
start" would be a Palestinian
state even if that was not the
Reagan Administration's inten-
tion.
He said the Reagan proposals
were a deviation from the Camp
David Accords and Israel would
not be a party to the "distortion"
of those accords. He charged that
the President's plan was "one-
sided and anti-Israel." He
stressed Israel was not seeking a
confrontation with the United
States but rather was trying to
avoid one.
Tourism Minister Avraham
Sharir expressed disappointment
that the Reagan Administration
did not consult with Israel prior
to the President's speech, es-
pecially since the Reagan Ad-
ministration did consult with
Jordan, which Sharir described
as "an ill-fated move."
The President said nothing
about an approach to Jordan in
the many talks with Arab diplo-
mats Secretary of State George
Shultz has had since taking of-
fice, particularly after it became
overwhelmingly clear that Israel
was determoned to drive the PLO
and its terrorist allies out of Bei-
rut.
YITZHAK BERMAN, the En-
ergy Minister, called the Rea-
gan initiative an "error," not
necessarily because of its com-
ponents but because Reagan was
trying to determine now possible
solutions which should be dis-
cussed only after the interim five
year period of autonomy.
The Camp David accords pro-
vided for creation of conditions
for fre pWtions in the West.
M-0-1O82 M-
Bank and Gaza officials to exer-
cise governmental authority for
five years of self-rule, after which
negotiations would be held on the
final disposition of the territories.
Berman said Israel and Egypt
had the right to define the fate of
the territories after the five-year
autonomy period but that the
Reagan Administration, by try-
ing to do so now, was losing its
credibility as an "honest broker."
He did not clarify this remark but
it was seen as reference to the
fact that Reagan had moved from
being a mediator in the Mideast
peace process to being a partici-
pant in determining its course.
Ministers at the Cabinet ses-
sion criticized Shimon Peres, the
Labor party chairman, who
visited the United States last
month. The ministers charged
that in recent meetings with Rea-
gan Administration decision to
seek to link the occupied areas in
some form with Jordan.
THE LABOR PARTY
promptly issued a response say-
ing it would not be "tantalized"
by the attempts of Begins Likud
party to "smear" the Labor
Party's name. The Labor Party
statement said that it had
presented its own peace plan, ad-
vocating a settlement with Jor-
dan over the West Bank, at the
time it was in power and that it
continued to stand for that plan
now when it was in the opposi-
tion.
"The demagoguery attempts
of the Likud leaders indicate a
basic lack of understanding of
substance of democracy and of
the fact that the Israeli society is
an open society," the Labor
Party declared.
Shevah Weiss, an Alignment
member of the Knesset, said the
Reagan plan indicated support
for the Allen plan, a reference to a
proposal by the late Labor For-
eign Minister Yigal Allon, under
which Israel would have with-
drawn from sections of the West
Bank heavily populated by Arabs
but maintaining an Israeli
security belt along the Jordan
River, plus pockets of Israeli
security forces near Israeli popu-
lation concentrations, meaning
the Jewish settlements.
VICTOR SHEMTOV and
Imrin Ron, leaders of Mapam,
said the Reagan plan had "posi-
tive elements" and should be ex-
amined seriously. Similar posi-
tive reactions came in from
smaller leftist parties.
Haim Druckman, a Nationa'
Religious Party Knesset deputy,
called on the Begin government
to prove through "action" that it
rejected the Reagan proposals,
specifically, by annexing the
Arab territories.
The Reagan plan was also
criticized by the Israeli ministers
because it was presented to Israel
without prior consultation, while
the Reagan Administration did
consult with Egypt, Jordan and
Saudi Arabia.
The first Arab reaction came
from a Egyptian official, Saad
Mortada, Egypt's Ambassador
to Israel. Speaking on the Voice
of Israel, Mortada said the Rea-
gan initiative indicated a positive
trend by the Administration
towards a solution of the Pales-
tinian problem.
He said the Reagan initiative
might lead to resumption of the
autonomy talks, which have been
in a state of suspension for some
three years. As its latest condi-
tion for resuming the talks,
Egypt has demanded Israel's
total withdrawal from Lebanon.
A spokesman for the Egyptian
Foreign Ministry in Cairo refused
to react to the Reagan plan, on
grounds that the Egyptian
government was now "reviewing
the plan."
9-10-82 M0-10-82
"Dad, wtwt exactly to peace?"
The si*
Habib Wins Nation's
Medal of Honor
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) Special Presidential
envoy Philip Habib returned to Washington Tuesday to
receive the Medal of Freedom, the nation's highest
civilian award, from President Reagan at the White
House.
Habib, who helped negotiate the removal of the
Palestine Liberation Organization terrorists from west
Beirut, also discussed the situation in Lebanon with the
President and Secretary of State George Shultz.
AT THE State Department, deputy spokesman Alan
Romberg said it was not known whether Habib, who was
brought out of retirement by Reagan to deal with the situ-
ation in Lebanon, would return to the Middle East. White
House deputy spokesman Larry Speakes said that Habib
would be at the President's "disposal."
The award was given to Habib for his relentless effort
in resolving the latest Middle East crisis against
"staggering odds," a White House spokesman said.
Reagan flew back to Washington from vacation in
California to make the presentation on the South Lawn of
the White House.
HABIB LEFT Beirut last week after the completion
of the evacuation of Palestinian guerrillas from the
Lebanese capital and flew to Rome. He was to have
traveled to Paris this week for a few days of vacation
before returning to Washington.
The French Foreign Ministry said Monday that
Habib had been called back to Washington immediately
and wpuld not make a stopover in Paris.
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Itfc what makes us Jews.
_


Filling in Background
Reagan Presses for Jordanian W. Bank
Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Reagan
has proposed an "American
peace initiative" for the
Middle East in which he
made it clear that the
United States defines
auto mo ny for the Pales-
tinians on the West Bank
and Gaza Strip as,"self-
government" and believes
it can best be achieved in
"association with Jordan."
"It is the firm view of the
United States that self-govern-
ment by the Palestinians on the
West Bank and Gaza, in associa-
tion with Jordan, offers the best
chance for a durable, just and
lasting peace," the President
said in a nationally-televised
address from California where he
was vacationing.
REAGAN ALSO stressed that
the U.S. will not support an "in-
dependent Palestinian state" or
Israel's "annexation or perman-
ent control" over the West Bank
and (iaza. He urged the Palestin-
ians and the Arab states to re-
cognize the State of Israel, and
declared that "Jerusalem must
remain undivided" with its final
status agreed upon through neg-
otiations.
Reagan also called for an im-
mediate freeze by Israel of Jewish
settlements on the West Bank.
Indeed the immediate adoption
of a settlement freeze by Israel,
more than any other action could
create the confidence needed for
wider participation in these (the
autonomy) talks," he said.
Further settlement activities is
in no way necessary for the
security of Israel and only dimi-
nishes the confidence of the
Arabs that the final outcome can
be freely and fairly negotiated."
The President's speech, which
he said marked the completion of
the evacuation by the Palestine
Liberation Organization from
Beirut, was his first outline of a
Mideast policy since taking
office. He said that full details of
his proposal which followed two
weeks of discussion here and
abroad, were presented this week
by the U.S. Ambassadors to
Israel. Egypt, Jordan and Saudi
Arabia.
THE DETAILS presented in a
letter by Premier Menachem
Begin Tuesday sparked a furor in
Israel and caused Begin to sche-
dule a special Cabinet meeting. It
was believed here that Reagan's
hastily scheduled television ap-
pearance was an attempt by the
President to make his proposals
President Reagan
public before the Israeli govern-
ment acted.
Reagan stressed that the U.S.
approach is based "squarely on
the principal that the Arab-Israel
conflict should be resolved
through negotiations involving
exchange of territory for peace.
This exchange is enshrined in
United Nation Security Council
Resolution 242 which in turn is
incorporated in all its parts in the
Camp David agreements."
Throughout his address,
Reagan stressed the U.S. contin-
uing commitment to Israel's
security. He said when the final
border is negotiated between
Israel and Jordan, "Our view on
the extent to which Israel should
be asked to give up territory will
be heavily affected by the extent
of true peace and normalization
and the security arrangements
offered in return."
He seemed to imply that
Israel's withdrawal would not be
to the pre-1967 borders which he
noted had left Israel only 10 miles
wide and with most of its popula-
tion in artillery range from its
enemies. "I am not about to ask
Israel to live through that
again," he said.
REAGAN SAID, "The United
State Dep't. Says Exodus
Of PLO Finally Over
WASHINGTON State Department spokesman
Alan Romberg has announced that with the departure of
nearly 700 PLO terrorists by ship to Tartus, Syria, on
kept. 1 the evacuation of the terrorists, which began Aug.
21 has-ended.
He said that during this 12-day period, ap-
proximately 8,300 PLO members left Beirut. This in-
i iSrT 3,86 who went to s3rria 1'100 to Soutn Yemen
1.000 to Tunisia, 850 to North Yemen, 600 to Algeria, 500
to the Sedan, 260 to Jordan and 130 to Iraq.
r u ^O terrorists were transported aboard eight
Ureek and Cypriot merchant ships which made a total of
n anSK from Beirut' Romberg said. In addition to the
.d00 listed, the International Red Cross took ap-
proximately 175 sick and wounded terrorists to Cyprus
and Greece aboard the hospital ship Flora. Also, 2,600
members of the Palestine Liberation Army and 3,600
Syrian troops left Beirut for Syria by land.
States will oppose any proposal
from any party and at any point
in the negotiating process that
threatens the security of Israel is
ironclad. And I might add, so is
mine."
At the start of his talk, Reagan
said that Americans should be
"proud" of the outcome in
Lebanon since the "peaceful" de-
parture of the PLO "could never
have been taken without the good
offices of the United States and
especially the truly heroic work of
Philip Habib.
"The Lebanon war, tragic as it
was, has left us with new opport-
unity for the Middle East,"
Reagan said. "We must seize it
now and bring peace to this
troubled area so vital to world
stability while there is still time."
HE SAID the first step is to
rebuild Lebanon because "a
stable and revived Lebanon is es-
sential for all our hopes in the
region," but '->ost of his talk was
concentrated on the autonomy
negotiations. Reagan noted that
the departure of the PLO drama-
tizes the "homelessness of the
Palestinian people. He said that
the Camp David agreements call
tor addressing the "legitimate
rights of the Palestinians."
The President said two lessons
can be learned from the Lebanon
war. "First the military losses of
the PLO have not diminished the
yearning of the Palestinian
people for a just solution of their
claim" he said. "Second, while
Israel's military successes in
Lebanon have demonstrated that
its armed forces are second to
none in the region, they alone
cannot bring a just and lasting
peace to Israel and her neigh-
bors."
He continued, "1 call on the
Palestinian people to recognize
that their own political aspira-
tions are inextricably bound to
recognition of Israel's right to a
secure future. And I call on the
Arab states to accept the reality
of Israel and the reality that
peace and justice are to be gained
only through hard and fair direct
negotiations."
Selichot Saturday Eve
Inaugurates Holy Days
Selichot, midnight penitential prayer services, will
officially launch this year's High Holy Day season in
synagogues throughout South Florida this Saturday
at midnight. The special services, a plea for repen-
tance, set the tone for Rosh Hashanah and Yom
Kippur and the launching of the Hebrew New Year
5473.
Erev Rosh Hashanah this year will fall on Friday
night, Sept. 17, to be followed by prayer services
Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 18 and 19. Some Liberal
and Reform congregations will observe the holiday
with services on Tuesday only. Yom Kippur begins
with the awesome Kol Nidre service on Sunday
night, Sept. 26.
For a listing of special Sabbath and Selichot
midnight services this weekend, see Sec. B.
UJA Reports Major
Response to Needs
Following Lebanon War
NEW YORK-(JTA)-The
spirited and substantial response
by American Jewry to the vastly
increased humanitarian needs of
Israel's people as a result of the
costly "Peace for Galilee" oper-
ation is continuing in force, Unit-
ed Jewish Appeal president
Herschel Blumberg reported pa
his return from Israel with the
second UJA Special Prime
Minister's Mission.
The mission's participation
leaders from 50 American Jewish
communities pledged more than
$5 million to the 1983 UJ A-com-
munity Regular Campaign and
Israel Special Fund, an increase
of some 63 percent over contribu-
tions by the same donors last
year.
Mission delegates unanimous-
ly endorsed a "Declaration of In-
tent" introduced by Lee Javitch
of Harrisburg, Pa. In it, they
pledged to "return to our horfle
communities to assume responsi-
bility to mount a Special Fund
campaign, over and above dur
regular campaigns, that will at-
tempt to raise $200 million for
transmittal to the Jewish Agency
for the humanitarian programs
that the Agency provides for Is-
rael's people."
The 1983 UJAcommunity Is-
rael Special Fund seeks a mini-
mum of $200 million as American
Jewry's share of meeting the
costs of health, education, youth
care and absorption programs
being reassumed by the Jewish
Agency from public bodies in Is-
rael. These programs originally
were the responsibility of the
Agency but had been reluctantly
yielded to Israel's people in the
past decade because of shortfalls
in funds from annual campaigns.
The UJA series of weekly mis-
sions to Israel will continue
through mid-September, Blum-
berg said.
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Page 4-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 10,1982
State Dep't Briefing
The State Department is scheduling a special
background briefing on the "Israel situation this
week (Thursday). As always, the object is to say one
thing after having done another.
President Reagan's new "peace initiative" clearly
is designed to erase Israel's achievement in Lebanon,
the rousting out of the PLO. The President's
television address to the nation on Sept. 1 talked
about what was achieved in Lebanon and gave all
the kudos to special envoy Philip Habib, the U.S.
Marines and the other PLO exodus -overseeing forces
in Beirut, including the French and Italians. No
mention of Israel, of course.
That is just the beginning. The "initiative" itself
brooks no more Israeli settlements in the territories
and the status of Jerusalem to be decided by sub-
sequent negotiation. That Israel has repeatedly
declared that Jerusalem is its eternal capital, that it
is non-divisible henceforward and non-negotiable,
means nothing to Mr. Reagan, who calls Prime
Minister Begin's reaction to his Sept. 1 address and
the announcement of 11 new settlements in Judea
and Samaria as "most unwelcome."
I In effect, the Reagan Administration, sparked by
the Bechtel Corp.'s George Shultz as Secretary of
State, is enlartrine the parameters of the Camp David
accords: Object, to wring more concessions out of.
Israel. And it is pretending that what Israel achieved
in Lebanon was not achieved at all.
* Hence, the injection of new strength of purpose
into the depleted blood stream of the PLO and Yasir
Arafat, the Fidel Castro of the Middle East. Hence,
the hypnotizing of King Hussein into accepting a
negotiating status for the "West Bank," which he
would promptly turn over to the PLO and Arafat
were Israel to give him half the chance.
I Will the State Department say any of these things
in its briefing this week? As we see it, not hardly. The
presentation is likely to be the same kind that any
PLO'nik offers to any U.S. television correspondent
who naively asks whether the Palestinians are ready
to accept the existence of Israel.
In short, while the U.S. State Department and the
Reagan Administration say they are happy with
what happened in Lebanon, they are prepared to
return it all to the status quo ante.
Amputation Operation
1 The Begin decision to move in the direction of
establishing more settlements in Judea and Samaria
is the only one possible in the wake of these
developments. It is a stern answer to an American
foreign policy determined to amputate Israel down to
the sliver it was in 1948. There is to be no booty for
the victor in any of the Israeli wars since then but
no punishment for an Arab world determined to push
Israel into the sea yesterday, today, tomorrow,
whenever it will be able to.
The Begin decision also comes on the heels of
Labor Party chairman Shimon Peres' own "peace
initiative" in Washington the other week in his
meetings with President Reagan. Whatever Peres
said there, we doubt that the Labor Party or even
Mr. Peres himself will be as "giving" in new con-
cessions demands as the Reagan Administration
hopes or as obliging in relinquishing Jerusalem as
the Arabs insist upon in the world of Bechtel.
Still, the impression is that Peres will be that
obliging. And so comes the new torrent of
Nostradamus predictions in the general press. Mr.
Reagan wants to topple Mr. Begin.
Mr. Begins settlements reply suggests that he will
be a tough bolder to sweep out of the way on
Washington's drive toward the Israeli amputation
operation.
Sweeping Out Past: Little Buried

Jewish Floridian
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June 13 50 Out of town, country^ upon request
FOR A LONG time, they wen
getting in my way. And so, the
other day I cleaned out my files.
In fact, I rid myself of them en-
tirely 25 years of patient clip-
ping and sorting and saving of
news reports. And scholarly
studies and plain propaganda
pieces. And vicious hate mail
filled with threats which even
now can raise the spectre of fear
the kind written in multi-col-
ored inks or just plain scribbled
in the margins of copies of one
column or another of mine that
had stirred the psychopathic
rages in the stark recesses of a
bigot's brain.
A plain case of excess ego en-
couraged me to save the personal
correspondence letters from
the high and the mighty, some of
whom have long since gone to
their great reward, and whose
end makes Shelley's "Ozymand-
ius" all the more pertinent.
I DO NOT despair that they are
dead, leaving me abandoned in
my own "might" by association.
Only, I sense a sort of sadness
that what was once so important
to me had begun to get in my
way, and that now I have buried
it all like so much excess baggage
the personal files in toto, ex-
cept for the letters which I still
keep, not for what they mean or
-AntisemiHsm isafiwch internal affair/
say, but because of who wrote
them. Somehow, I suspect, even
these will join the rest of the junk
in short order. There's no sense in
being egotistical about ghosts.
In fact, the files were like a cof
fin which I exhumed, the dead
past, which can seemingly never
be revived They hung upon my
neck like ail property does after.
while.
After a while, you wonder
whether you own the property, or
the property owns you, and as
the years go by, the realization
grows stronger that it is the
property that owns you. You re-
sist ridding yourself of it because
it is "yours," but slowly it chokes
you, and you come to wish you
didn't have it from the very
beginning, and you certainly
don't want it around anymore.
SO WITH THE files, which
had gotten in my way. I almost
never referred to them anymore, 1
like to think, mainly because they
were so outdated. Really, like an
old sofa or chair, they were dead
the same way that some of the
letter-writers are now dead.
Still, this severing of ties with
a long-gone past was very in-
structive. There were "personal
enemies" in those files: Adam
Clayton Powell and Billy James
Hargis. J. Edgar Hoover and
Huey Newton. Bill Hendrix and
Merwin K. Hart. Russell Majfuire
and Herbert Marcuse. Kurt
Georg Kiesinger and David A.
Noebel. H. Rapp Brown and
Stokely Carmichael. George Lin-
coln Rockwell and B.F. Skinner.
Alfred Lilienthal and Ahmed
Shukairy. LeRoi Jones and
Charles de Gaulle.
And then there were ominous
files like "Black Power," "Soviet
Anti-Semitism," "Treblinka,"
"Viet Cong," "National Social-
ism (See Nazi)," "Ku Klux
Klan," Hashemite Kingdom,'
"Liberty Lobby," "John Birch
Society," "Gulf of Tonquin,"
"USS Liberty," "Musrara (See
Jerusalem)," "Berlin Wall.''
I CAN go on and on, but the
point is that some of my enemies
Continued on Page 13-A
Edwin tytan
'Pletzel' Before the Terrorist Attacks
Friday, September 10,1982
Volume 55
-
22ELUL6742
Numbers'/
PARIS The
Pletzel, the Paris Jewish
quarter, was once an East
European ghetto where
100,000 people spoke
French with a Yiddish ac-
cent. It covered a sizeable
part of the city stretching
from the Place de la Repub-
lique, where Zev Jabotin-
sky used to speak in pre-
World II days in the local
Jewish "Palace," the Hotel
Modern, to the Rue Saint
Paul, where poor Jews
made a living hawking alte
sachen, alte shiech (old
clothes, old shoes).
Today, it is a sentimental
memory to which people return to
try and remember how their par-
ents or their grandparents once
lived when they first arrived in
France from somewhere east
Poland, Rumania, Russia.
The Pletzel is a maze of narrow
alleys and winding streets, far
from the glitter of the Champs
Elysees or the skyscrapers which
line the banks of the River Seine.
It is filled with dark courtyards,
where the sun rarely shines, and
small, modest shops.
IN ITS center, La Rue des
Rosiers, where terrorists struck,
killing six people and wounding
22, there still are half a dozen
kosher butchers, a Hebrew book-
shop, two or three Jewish
restaurants and an old woman
who sells of Fridays the tradi-
tional chalot.
In between the remaining
Jews, live and work Paris' new
poor: immigrants from North
Africa and Spain. The shoemaker
who resoles the shoes and boots
of the neighborhoods's residents
is from Portugal; the locksmith is
from Auvergene, France's poor-
est province.
The Pletzel is a museum, and
Jo Golden berg's restaurant, with
its hot pastrami and chicken
soup, is its main exhibit. The res-
taurant was also the scene of the
terrorist attack.
"People could not live if they
did not know their roots," says
anold Jew who has lived here
since before the war. "The rich
Jews, those who now live in the
posh sections, and have villas in
the country, spend their holidays
on the Cote d' Azur and drive big
Mercedes, they all have to come
back here from time to time,
where it all started, to remember
who they are."
THE OLD MAN, a regular
client at Goldenberg's, comes in
every day with his copy of the
local Yiddish paper, Unser Wort,
to drink a glass or two of vodka.
He has his own theory of why the
killers struck on the Rue des
Rosiers.
"They did not come to kill
Jews. They could have found
more Jews and easier to hit in the
center of the city or in the Jewish
suburbs, like Sarcelles or Plessy.
They came to kill a dream. Yes
monsieur, a dream. They wanted
to erase the past. They want us to
be just like them, people with no
past and no future."
The Pletzel is filled with past
history. Jews first started set-
tling in what was then a suburb
of medieval Paris back in the
11th century, and after Philip
Augustus expelled the Jews from
France they returned to the area
in 1198.
THE RUE des Rosiers was
named at the time "La Rue des
Juifs," the street of the Jews, and
on the site of the synagogue,
where President Francois Mitter-
rand came to attend services for
the victims two weeks ago, stood
a famous yeahiva where in the
early days of the 13th century,
Yudah Ben Isaac, known as Sir
Leon of Paris, used to teach.
The pletzel is Jewish history
Every street, every corner, is
somehow linked with the past.
After the Jews were definitely
expelled from France in 1394. the
Pletzel emptied itself as if leprosy
had struck. The streets were
barely inhabitated till the early
part of the 18th century when the
rich Jewish businessmen from
Metz and Alsace started return-
ing.
By royal permission, they
Continued on Page 6-A


Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 6-A
Reagan Proposals Called
'First Step' in 'Serious5
Initiative for Peace
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) The State Depart-
ment said that President
Reagan's proposals for a
Middle East peace which he
outlined in a television ad-
dress last Wednesday was
the "first step" in a "very
serious initiative by the
President."
But Department spokesman
John Hughes was vague in how
the Administration would
proceed with the initiative except
to say that it will involve a very
energetic diplomatic process. He
said the Arab states are studying
the proposal but there has been
no official reaction from them, as
yet.
As for the Israeli reaction,
Hughes refused to call the Israeli
Cabinet decision a rejection of the
proposals. He said the U.S. was
"not disappointed nor surprised
by the Israeli reaction since there
are different interpretations of
the Camp David accords and the
peace process.
BUT SECRETARY of State
George Shultz. interviewed on
ABC-TV's "Good Morning
America.'' said there were so
many things in Reagan's speech
that he could not see a "total re-
jection" of them by Israel. "It's
hard for me to believe that Israel
would reject the ideas of peace,"
Shultz said.
"It's hard for me to believe
that Israel would reject the idea
that it should be recognized by
their neighbors as a state that is
a reality. It's hard for me to
believe that they would reject the
pledges of support for their
security that the President
gave."
Shultz said that the purpose of
the President's proposals was to
draw people to the peace table."
He implied that the continued
creation of Israeli settlements on
the West Bank hampered this.
If the Israelis insist on settling
the West Bank, they have in
effect, annexed it," he said.
That's the wav the Arabs
look at that. So I think that if
what is wanted is a chance for
peace is people at the bargain-
ing table beyond those that are
there now then there has to be
some statement of intention to
negotiate about what's going to
happen in the West Bank and
Gaza.
WHILE NOTING that
Reagan called on Israel to put a
freeze on new settlements,
Hughes refused to comment on
whether the settlement issue was
included in the Camp David a-
greements. He said the President
made his proposal on a freeze to
facilitate the peace process.
"There is nothing inconsistent
with Camp David in encouraging
any state to take an action which
he (Reagan) believes will
facilitate the peace process,"
Hughes said.
A major aim of the President's
speech was to encourage the
Palestinians and Jordan to enter
the autonomy negotiations.
Shultz, in his television inter-
view, said that King Hussein of
Jordan is taking Reagan's pro-
posals "seriously" and is study-
ing them, but "has made no com-
mitments."
Shultz said that if Hussein
joined the talks, "presumably he
would speak, at least intially, for
the Palestinians." At the same
time, the Secretary said, "There
are Palestinians on the West
Bank who somehow should be
represented." But he stressed
that whoever represents the
Palestinians must be accepted by
them as legitimately" their
spokesman. "It isn't reasonable
to expect the Palestinians to go
along with representation by
them by somebody picked by the
Israelis." he said.
BUT SHULTZ rejected the
contention by the TV interview,
that the Palestinians consider the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion as their representative.
"What Palestinians?" he asked.
"Where has there been a vote on
that? There are all sorts of fac-
tions within the PLO. There are
various ways in which the Pale-
stinians mav very well represent
themselves. '
At the same time, Shultz
stressed that the U.S. will not
conduct any direct discussions
with the PLO until they meet the
conditions that have been set
down since 1975.
Meanwhile, Shultz was ex-
plaining the President's propos-
als at separate briefings for
groups of Arab Americans and
American Jewish leaders.
Nicholas Veliotes, Assistant
Secretary of State for Near East
and South Asian affairs, was ex-
plaining the proposals to Ambas-
sadors of the Arab League coun-
tries. One purpose of Reagan's
speech was to present his propos-
als before the Arab League meets
in Fez, Morocco, Sept. 6.
Our Readers Write
Carl Rowan Should Take
A Trip to the War Zone
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
Columnist like Carl Rowan, the
cynical gentleman who is con-
stantly complaining about one
thing or another, may be respon-
JSf Jot triggering the spate of
anti-Semetic attacks. People like
him who call Israel "ruthless"
and a "monster" should take a
trip to the war zone in Lebanon
and see for themselves the
Lebanese victims of the PLO who
are pushed out front while the
PLO cowards are in hiding.
Let them see that the PLO are
forever sniping at the Israelis,
which provokes the latter to
strike back. Let them see for
themselves the pregant girls be-
tween 14 and 18 who were raped
by the PLO "monsters" For
Israel Says No
Begin Plans for 11 Settlements
JERUSALEM Em-
phasizing its sharp rejec-
tion of President Reagan's
new "peace initiative" in
the Middle East, Israel has
announced that it will build
11 new settlements in the
near future in Judea and
Samaria (the West Bank),
and made a solemn promise
never to return the territory
to Jordan.
In a letter to President Rea-
gan, who was vacationing in
California at the time, Prime
Minister Menachem Begin de-
clared that "What some called
the West Bank, Mr. President, is
Judea and Samaria, and this sim-
ple historical truth will never
change."
ADDRESSING the President
as "Dear Ron," Begin explained
that "Judea and Samaria will
never again be the 'West Bank' of
the Hasheroite Kingdom of Jor-
dan."
Begin, obviously angered that
the Reagan Administration had
failed to consult with Israel be-
fore the President offered his
"peace initiative" on television
on the night of Sept. 1, and before
he forwarded his proposals to
Jordan and Saudi Arabia, Begin
argued that the President's
declaration that the United
States remained opposed to a
new Palestinian state in the dis-
puted area was irrelevant.
"True, you declare that you
will not support the creation of a
Palestinian state," he wrote to
Reagan. "But such a state will
arise of itself the day Judea and
Samaria are given to Jordanian
jurisdiction.
"UNDER NO circumstances
shall we accept such a possibility
ever arising which would endang-
er our very existence."
Reacting to the letter, which
the Prime Minister signed
"Menachem," Mr. Reagan,
speaking in Santa Barbara, de-
clared: "The United States will
not alter its stand on settlements.
We will persist in our efforts to
help Israel understand how
damaging its settlements are to
the peace we are all trying to
achieve and how seriously we
take this issue.
Meanwhile, Agriculture Minis-
ter Simcha Ehrlich explained
that the decision to approve the
new settlements was not con-
nected to the Israeli rejection of
Reagan's peace plan. Rather, it
was part of a long-term plan.
Under a master plan, three set-
tlements will be built immediate-
ly at Ginat, Kochba and Susya on
the "West Bank." A fourth set-
tlement is scheduled for Gaza at
Alei-Sinai- An additional seven
settlements are being held on the
back burner for lack of funds.
ACCORDING to Science
Minister Yuval Ne'eman, plans
are in the offing for raising the
Jewish population in these terri-
tories to 100,000 by 1986.
President Reagan, in his Santa
Barbara statement, called Is-
rael's decision "most unwel-
come." He added that his
Administration's peace initia-
tives as set forth in his Sept. 1
television address "remain un-
changed." Secretary of State
George Shultz called the Israeli
decision "not consistent with the
objective of peace.
Fashion-Buyers
In Tel Aviv
TEL AVIV (JTA) Over
150 fashion buyers from coun-
tries throughout the world, but
mainly from Britain and contin-
ental Europe, have gathered at
the Tel Aviv Hilton Hotel for Is-
rael's fashion week. On display
are a variety of fashions for the
summer season of 1983. Fashion
Week organizers report that
"satisfactory" sales were effected
on opening day, Monday.
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TV Live Show-Movies
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seven years, this has been going
on, not by the Israelis, but by the
PLO and Syrians who have de-
vastated Lebanon.
As for Israel being "ruthless",
Rowan, of an ethnic group who is
more literate than the average (or
should be), ought to realize that
so much of the propaganda about
Israel by the guerrillas are poiso-
nous lies.
Why doesn't he open his mind,
if dot his heart, and learn the true
facts of why Menachem Begin is
doing a yeoman's joba job that
only the Israelis can doto try to
wipe out a cancer that is afflict-
ing the entire world.
LYNNE GILBERT
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Night descends, prayers begin, the candles lit,
apples dipped in honey, rounded challah loaves,
the shofar sounds, the circle is completed.
May we ail be inscribed in the Book of Life
for a healthy, happy, prosperous and peaceful new year.
bank leumi le israel -mit'i pn
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With over 385 branches in Israel


Q~ nn n
Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 10, 1982
Report From Paris
'Pletzel' Before the Terrorist Attacks
Continued from Page 4-A
could at first just spend the night
m the capital "if necessary,*' and
the first Jewish inns opened. The
first Paris inn serving kosher
food officially opened in 1721 not
far from where Goldenberg's eat-
ery now stands. The first syna-
gogue, offically recognized as
such, opened in 1788 as the
French Revolution was already
brewing.
THE FOLLOWING year, af
ter the fall of the Bastille. Paris'
Jews, not more than 500 souls at
the time, appealed to the revolu-
tionary parliament, the Consti-
tuent Assembly, to be recognized
as full French citizens and in-
habitants of Paris. On January
28, 1790 their petition was grant-
ed, and not far from the Rue des
Rosiers, on the Rue du Roi de
Sicile. where Meir's Inn stood at
the time, the Jews gathered to
drink lee hum and to sing "La
Marseillaise."
It was from the start of the
19th century that the Pletzel
started to grow as more and more
Jewish emigrants arrived. Every
morning, the night trains from
Eastern Europe, Russia, Ruman-
ia, and the Slav Provinces of
Austria, used to stop at the
"Gare de 1 'Eat" and a human
mass of poor, unshaven and un-
washed Jews would disembark.
The Pletzel was only a short
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walk from the station. Many of
them settled near the Place de la
Republique which in popular
speech became the Pletzel, the
place where the rich Jews, or
those on their way up the doc-
tors, the lawyers, the prosperous
shopkeepers lived.
THE DREYFUS affair in the
early 1890's was their first shock.
The widespread anti-Semitism
provoked by Edouard Adolphe
Drumont, the leading spokesman
of French anti-Semitism under
the Third Republic, was their
second shock. Neither, however,
affected the mass immigration
which reached its peak between
the two world wars.
It was in the 1930's. despitt
the threat rising in Nazi Ger-
many, that the Pletzel Jew felt at
his best. France was prosperous
and the Jewish community's
standard of living improved fast,
even faster than that of the ma-
jority of France's inhabitants.
They also could fully live and ex-
press their Jewishness.
In the Pletzel kiosks, half a
dozen Yiddish dailies were on
sale, Jewish pastry shops lined
the area's chic avenue, Boulevard
de la Republique, and two Jewish
theaters played for full houses.
The elegant and the rich used to
meet for tea at the Hotel Modern,
where political meetings were
also held.
THE DREAM was shattered
vith the outbreak of the war it
turned into a nightmare on July
16. 1942 when the French police,
acting on the Nazis' orders,
started their big roundup. Some
12.384 people, including some
4,000 children, were arrested and
deported to Maidanek. Most of
the arrests were carried out in the
Jewish Pletzel where the poor
and middle class still Uved.
It was there, where every
building housed dozens of Jewish
families, that the police came at
night. The hunting ground, in
this huge concentration of Jews,
was the best. Slowly, as the war
dragged on, and more and more
people were arrested and deport-
ed, the Pletzel started to empty
itself. By the end of the war, only
a tew thousand Jewish families
remained, many in hiding. The
survivors came back. Many re-
turned to their former homes,
tried to find their former busi-
nesses, to renew their lives. The
spell was broken, however. The
Pletzel was never to be again
what it had been.
As life returned to normal and
the Jews became reintegrated
into the country, many left their
former homes for richer or better
surroundings.
. IN THE EARLY 1950's and
1960's North African Jews start-
ed arriving, but again they opted
for other areas where their fami-
lies already lived: Belleville, in
the north of Paris; the Rue de
Faubourg Montmartre, where
many Israeli yordim also settled:
or the outlying suburbs where
modern state-subsidized housing
was available, with modern bath-
rooms and central heating.
It is only near the Place de la
Republique that many Jews still
live, but here. too. life has chang-
ed. The old kiosks with the Yid-
dish papers have disappeared.
The Jewish theaters have closed
down, and even the Hotel
Modern has this year been con-
verted into Paris' new Holiday
Inn with air-conditioned rooms
and a hamburger cafeteria.
To the south of the formerly
Jewish area remains a typically
Jewish Business district: La Rue
du Sentier, the heart of the gar-
ment district. Thousands of Jew-
ish-owned shops and small fact-
ories, where the clothes which
have made Paris fashion famous
all over the world are designed
and sewn, are located here.
BEHIND THE labels of fa
mous couturiers and fashion
houses, are the men who once
lived and worked in the Pletzel.
From time to time they get into
their big black cars to drive
round the corner and get back to
the past.
Jo Goldenberg's restaurant
was such a jump into time a
jump into an era when the Pletzel
was filled and bursting with Jews
who thought they never had it so
good.
a i
i
i^:^''il.\'
&&*$& y
tf;v
i^>*m> K I
Vega*

/ :** NX
^,v- %^*-t
: -JM
We're going horn* we're not. we are. we're not. we are .
OgqenatHM
Israeli Victims of PLO
In U.S. to Tell Story
WASHINGTON -
JTA) Three Israeli citi-
zens who have been victim-
ized directly or indirectly
over the years by the Pales-
< tine Liberation Organiza-
tion arrived here to begin a
two-week tour of eastern
U.S. cities to tell the Amer-
ican public "what the PLO
is all about."
"We feel we have to tell what
the PLO is all about," Ankie
ASpitzer, whose husband was
one of the 11 Israeli athletes kill-
ed at the Munich Olympics in
1972, said. "It is being portrayed
here" by the U.S. media "as an
organization of freedom fighters,
and we feel this is not accurate.
We think they are one big killing
machine."
AT A PRESS conference at the
Israel Embassy here, Spitzer was
joined by Yossi Hochman, whose
wife and two children were killed
in a 1978 coastal road terrorist
attack and in which he lost the
lower part of his legs; and Preeti
relgo. Inc.*
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Records & Tapes
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Sylvia Arroyo, whose two chil-
dren were killed in a grenade at-
tack in January, 1971 in the Gaza
Strip.
The three are all members of
the Israel-based Organization of
Victims of PLO Terror, which
claims a membership of around
2,000 people, plus many other
members who are relatives of
PLO victims. The three Israelis
stressed that they came here at
their own expense to tell their
stories to the American people,
but not to make political state-
ments.
But Spitzer, while indicating
she was not here for political
statements, said "we do support
the actions of the Israel army in
Lebanon against the PLO terror-
ists."
SHE EXPRESSED "frustra-
tion" that the emphasis is on
what is going on now and people
seem to forget what these people
have done in the past and what
initiated" the Israeli action into
Lebanon.
Earlier, the three Israelis
demonstrated across from the
White House for an hour distri-
buting to passersby handouts
and a booklet describing PLO
atrocities committed in Lebanon
Michael Gale, the White House
liaison to the Jewish community,
said he would describe the pur-
pose of their mission to President
Reagan.
Peres Says He Doesn't
See Mitterrand As
French Anti-Semite
PARIS (JTA) Is-
rael opposition Labor Party
leader Shimon Peres said
here after meeting with
President Francois Mitter-
rand that he did not believe
France was a center of ram-
pant anti-Semitism.
"I myself believe that there
may be anti-Semites in France,
but Prance herself is not anti-
Semitic, neither by culture,
neither by philosophy, nor by
tradition,'' Peres said after a 90-
minute meeting with the Presi-
dent.
Peres arrived here at the-invi-
tation of Mitterrand in an effort
to relieve the strains developing
between Paris and Jerusalem in
the wake of several terrorist
attacks against Israeli and
Jewish-owned installations, cul-
minating in the terrorist attack
on Goldenberg's restaurant in the
heart of Paris' traditional Jewish
quarter.
ISRAEL HAS blamed France
for having "created an anti-
Semitic climate" because of its
support for the PLO in the Leba-
non fighting. Premier Menachem
Begin issued a sharply worded
attack on the French government
last week.
Peres said he was confident
that the strain in relations be-
tween Israel and France has been
eased by his visit "because what
was necessary was a clarification
and not just an exchange.'' He
added: "I think when polemics
are overtaking politics we are all
in trouble."
Peres said that Mitterrand
provided a detailed account of
the government's efforts to
combat the surge of terrorism in
France. Mitterrand later made a
television address to announce
new anti-terrorism measures and
clafify French policy in the Mid-
dle East.
Peres, who is an old friend of
Mitterrand from the Socialist In-
ternational, said France and Is-
rael have similar views in the
Middle East except for the issue
of a Palestinian state and the role
of the PLO in the region.
DURING THEIR meeting,
which was described as "ex-
tremely friendly," Mitterrand re-
affirmed France's willingness to
contribute to a peaceful evacua-
tion of the PLO forces from
Beirut but emphasized that all
foreign armies the Israelis,
Syrians and the PLO must
withdraw from Lebanon.
As for the long-range political
solution of the Palestinian prob-
lem, Mitterrand called for the
"participation" of the PLO in the
negotiating process as "one ele-
ment, among others."
There was no insistence on his
part for recognizing the PLO as
the "sole representative" of the
Palestinian people, nor did he re-
peat the traditional French call
for a Palestinian state.
qpQQCjtfi
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Konover
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SERVICES ON PREMISES
Kosher Meals Available at Surcharge.
Early Registration Suggested: 865-1500
turnover hc Hotel
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ft'J


Friday, September 10.1982. The Jewish Floridian Page7-A
>*

Warning: The Surgeon General Has Determined
That Cigarette Smoking Is Dangerous to Your Health.
9mg."taf". 0.7 mg. nicotine av. pei cigarette by FTC method.


D..
Page8-A The Jewish Flondian Friday. September 10. 1982
derad 14,000 members o(t^,.
derground resistance
w.rv-4 lUat U*, ,_. i r.
'Butcher of Lyons' Manages to Avoid Extradition S?SSf3
Bj PAUL HOFFMAN
LA PAZ. Bolivia iJTA) -
Chancellor Augusta: Saavedra
has allowed a West German ex-
tradition request for the notor-
ious Nazi war criminal Klaus
Barbie, known as "The butcher ot
Lyons." to pass to the jurisdic-
tion of the civilian judiciary, thus
almost surely guaranteeing a ser-
ies of legal maneuvers by Bar-
bie s lawyers which will enable
the former gestapo commander to
avoid being prnwuml for his
war-time activities.
By declining to intervene at a
mmxsterial level. Saavedra has
inlnalj mrA the same fate
for Germany s extradition re-
quest as that encountered by a
French dam 10 yean ago. In
1972. France pressed for the ex-
tradition of Barbie, whom it twice
condemned to death in
for war crimes committed :
French Jews and resistance
members, through normal Bob-
vian judicial channels.
IN A DRAWN out series of
legal maneuvers instituted by
Barbie s lawyers. France had to
first prove that he was the same
person as Klaus Ahman. the as-
sumed name by which the former
Nazi was known and under which
he had illegally acquired Bolivian
citizenship
Once this hurdle was deared
the case moved slowly through
the lower courts until it finally
reached the Bolivian Supreme
Court in 19T4. The Supreme
Court denied the request, due to
the lack of an extradition treaty
between the two nations. Subse-
quent French appeals to then
acting-President Gen. Hugo
Banzer to reverse the ruling were
turned down by the military
strongman-
Germany has based its request
for extradition on a detention or-
der against Barbie by a criminal
tribunal in the city of Augsburg
that claims he was responsible for
the death in 1944 of a French citi-
zen named Kemmler.
THE FRENCH Armed Forces
Tribunal, a military war crimes
judicial commission set up after
World War II to prosecute Nazi
war criminals, has determined
that Barbie commanded aGesta-
po unit based in Lyons that mur-

Informed diplomat* ,0^
here who have requested *-,
mity maintain that the denial ,
the French request bv the !
ernment. was directly uak^
Barbies close ties with hirhl
placed Bolivian military (^
It is widely known in BohuaZ
one of the most feared ad\TsT
in torture and interrogation ta*.
mque attached to the Bol^
Mmistry of the Interior theT
temal security bureau during^
1950s and 1960 s. was aGwai
immigrant and ex-soidier r.anwj
Klaus Ahman

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Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
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*
PigelO-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 10,1982
As Money Dries Up
Weinberger in Israel Woi
Destitute Jewish Numbers Growing Change
8 Much
Continued from Page 1-A i
that there were also widowers
and some elderly couples. He said
the elderly Jews do all of their
shopping, banking, medical visits
and socializing to the extent
that their physical conditions
permit before 2 p.m., when
they lock themselves in their
miserable apartments for the
night.
At that hour, Rosenfeld ex
plained, the neighborhood chil-
dren finish their attendance at
the public schools, and the elder-
ly Jews are deeply fearful of
being out of doors after that
hour. He said they have been
taunted, beaten and robbed by
the children.
HISTORICALLY, as the
neighborhoods fall into decay and
their Jews fled, the last to leave
were the Orthodox Jews, who
needed such institutions as syna-
gogues within walking distance
of their homes, yeshivas, mik-
vehs, and kosher butchers and
food shops. They left relucttant-
ly, but they left.
The Jews who remained either
did not want to leave neighbor-
hoods no matter how danger-
ous they had become in which
they had lived most of their lives,
or could not, though all vestiges
of Jewish life and institutions
had long since disappeared.
Rosenfeld said that, in June,
1977, the Community Council re-
ceived a $95,000 demonstration
grant from the federal Depart-
ment of Health, Education and
Welfare (HEW) for a full-scale
service and relocation project for
the elderly in the Brownsville,
East New York and Bedford-
Stuyvesant sections.
THE PROJECT, started in
September, 1977, enabled the
Community Council staff to find
and serve more than 300 elderly
Jewish residents and to relocate
53 of them to safer areas. Since
the grant was for a demonstra-
tion project, the fact that HEW
officials praised it as an out-
standing performance did not af-
fect the rule that, as a demon-
stration, the project could not get
additional HEW funds.
Rosenfeld said the Community
Council tried to follow the advice
of federal officials to seek local
funding to continue a clearly suc-
cessful program and turned to
New York City officials. But New
York was then having its own fi-
nancial crunch and could not
help.
Meanwhile, earlier in 1977, the
Community Council received a
six-month $5,000 grant from the
Federation of Jewish Philanthro-
pies of New York for a similar
project to find, provide services
for and relocate Jewish elderly in
the Brooklyn slum areas. Rabbi
Rosenfeld said that success in
that modest project led to a re-
newal of the Federation grant,
again at $5,000 for another sue
months, and two additional
renewals in 1978 and 1979 at an
annual $12,000 funding level.
WHILE FUNDS were avail
able, he said, the Community
Council relocated about 10 elder-
ly Jews each year. Since October,
1978, he said, service and reloca-
tion efforts have been funded by
small grants obtained by the
Community Council from "any
source we can find." Currently,
Rabbi Rosenfeld told the JTA,
the Community Council is re-
locating two to three elderly Jews
about every two months. But
hundreds, perhaps thousands,
need to be helped to safe neigh-
borhoods, he stressed.
Rosenfeld said that there was
no way of knowing, or even esti-
mating, how many such elderly
and abandoned Jews are living in
isolation in the areas the Com-
munity Council seeks to serve.
A major problem is the dis-
parity in rents between the bat-
tered apartments in which the re-
located Jews had lived and the
rents commanded by suitable
apartments in safer neighbor-
hoods. Community Council staff
members routinely apply for fed-
eral Section 8 rent subsidies for
the elderly Jews they manage to
relocate.
THE BUREAUCRATIC rou-
tine of clearance for such pay-
ments can take as long as a year,
Rabbi Rosenfeld declared, and
meanwhile, the Community
Council somehow finds funds to
make up the difference. At the
same time, the standards for
eligibility of the poor for Section
8 subsidies are being tightened as
part of the Reagan Administra-
tion budget cuts.
The Crown Heights Jewish
Community Council, an affiliate
of the Metropolitan New York
Coordinating Council on Jewish
poverty, has two offices and a
senior citizens center. A staff of
12 carries out the Community
Council's varied programs.
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By OIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
Moshe Arens, Israel's Ambas-
sador to Washington, said he
does not anticipate any signifi-
cant political developments re-
sulting from U.S. Defense Secre-
tary Caspar Weinberger's visit to
Israel last week.
Arens told reporters on his
arrival at Ben Gurion Airport
that the main purpose of Wein-
berger's visit was to "strengthen
'the ties between the two coun-
tries." He said he did not expect
any concrete results, such as the
resumption of the shipment of
American jet fighter aircraft to
Israel, suspended by the Reagan
Administration during the war in
Lebanon.
THE ISRAELI envoy also
predicted that there was now a
good chance for the Syrian forces
in Lebanon to leave the country,
thus clearing the way for the
Israel Defense Force to withdraw
its troops. Israel has said its
withdrawal is conditional upon
Syrian withdrawal from
Lebanon.
Arens arrived here to brief
officials on the Weinberger visit,
which came after lengthy,,,
byArenetopersuadefheX
Secretary to visit Israel ^
tag to reports. Sources herTi
cated that Arens Staffil
good working relations^,1
Weinberger and. as a result
Defense Secretary?s j.'-
toward Israel has mellowed
For Weinberger, it was hist
visit to the Jewish Stat* i
visited the U.S. marines JU
helping oversee the evaeuj
the PLO from LebanonT^
visited Egypt. He met '
Premier Menachem Begin
Nahanya where Begin was
tioning.
Weinberger went to R*
Friday. President ft
Mubarak said he anticipfl
some new ideas for a setteln
of the Middle East situation!
Weinberger.
Mubarak said that his posj
not to accept the evacuatim-F
terrorists from Beirut, un
their evacuation was part of,
overall settlement of the ?L
stinian issue, was instrument^
having brought about a change]
the American view toward i
Middle East.
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call 0theThrift Shop
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PM


Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Here's a golfer's dream vacation vi I la
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including no membership dues for 5 years
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2515-200


.
'
Page 12-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 10,1982
New Tensions
Reagan Demands Settlements Freeze
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
New tensions in the rela-
tions between Israel and
the United States have de-
veloped as President Reag-
an, in a letter to Premier
Menachem Begin, de-
manded a freeze on Jewish
settlements on the West
Bank and Gaza Strip, a halt
to the expansion of existing
settlements, and full link-
age between Jordan and the
West Bank.
Israeli leaders, caught by sur-
prise at this development, ex-
pressed anger not only at the de-
mands but also at the timing,
just as the last group of PLO and
Syrian forces left west Beirut and
as Begin was scheduled to meet
with U.S. Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger later that
very day.
ISRAELI OFFICIALS viewed
Reagan's message as constitut-
ing a new American policy
toward the autonomy negotia-
tions and the Palestinian
problem, and as challenging the
basic principles of Israeli policy
on those issues. Israeli officials
also viewed the timing of Reag-
an's letter in the context of the
upcoming summit conference of
Arab nations, noting that the
U.S. seemed to want to make it
clear that it does not intend to
waste any time to solve the Pal-
estinian issue which was pushed
to the top of the international
agenda by the war in Lebanon.
The understanding of senior
political sources in Jerusalem
was that Reagan issued his de-
mands as a precondition for the
resumption of the autonomy
talks. If true, the sources said,
Israel would not agree to resume
the autonomy talks on the basis
of Reagan's demands. The
sources also pointed out that Is-
rael would have to seriously
study Reagan's letter to deter-
mine if the message constitutes a
Secretary Shultz
deviation from the Camp David
accords.
It was recalled that U.S. Secre-
tary of State George Shultz told a
television interviewer a week be-
fore that the Camp David process
can be interpreted in many ways
and that the Palestinian should
have a role in determining the
conditions under which they live.
This was seen as a reference to
some form of Palestinian par-
ticipation in the peace negotia-
ting process.
SHULTZ, at a press confer-
ence in Washington last month,
also stated that the Camp David
accords had a "lot of room for
ideas" and that the Reagan Ad-
ministration was forming its own
views. He said the Administra-
tion expected to be moving on the
issue of Palestinian rights, but
did not elaborate at the time.
- Begin told a Cabinet meeting a
week ago, in response to Egyp-
tian officials who were saying
that Israel was maintaining a
narrow and restricted interpreta-
tion of the provisions of the
Camp David agreements, that
Israel would not feel bound to ad-
here to the accords if Egypt tried
to change its dimensions.
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However, at least one Israeli
official was quoted as saying:
"As far as we are concerned, we
stick, and we shall stick to the
Camp David accords." According
to this concept, only the autono-
my issue should be discussed at
this stage. Any other ideas, such
as Jordanian linkage to the West
Bank, should be discussed only
after the mechanisms for autono-
my have been settled and au-
tonomy is in effect for five years,
according to the Israeli view.
A KEY question at this stage
is whether Reagan's points are
academic or operational. If the
Reagan Administration insists
that the demands raised by
Reagan be implemented, Israel
will undoubtedly reject them, and
a confrontation will be unavoid-
able, Israeli political sources said.
The issue of Reagan's letter
figured prominently in the talks
Begin held last week with Wein-
berger.
According to political analysts,
the outcome of the session was a
foregone conclusion: it decided to
expand existing settlements and
establish new ones. In fact, the
new town of Maale Adumim,
located on the road linking Jeru-
salem with the Jordan valley
town of Jericho, was dedicated
immediately in a festive cere-
mony.
Deputy Prime Minister David
Levy, addressing a crowd of
several thousand people at the
dedication of Maale Adumim,
sharply criticized any attempt to
halt Israeli settlements activities,
saying Israel will not allow the
establishment of a Palestinian
state on the West Bank.
HE SAID not even a message
from Reagan would deter Israel
from building the Land of Israel.
This issue is not negotiable be-
cause it is a problem of survival
on which Israel's future and that
of its children and their children
depend.
. Addressing himself to Reagan,
from afar. Levy said: From time
At time we hear things which con-
tradict this (the demands in
Reagan's letter), and we would
prefer to work in concert with
you. But if you do not want coop-
eration and wish to act freely,
you cannot impose your will on
us if it involves our security and
survival." Levy added that there
would be "settlements in all parts
of the Land of Israel because it is
essential for our security.''
Beyond reactions attributed to
political sources, there were reac-
tion from political parties. Yuval
Neeman, leader of the Tehiya
Party and Minister of Science
and Development, whose party
recently joined the government
coalition, said his party would
demand that the government
make the settlements in the
occupied territories a priority
issue in response to Reagan's
demands.
LIKUD KNESSET member
Ehud Olmert said Israel would
not tolerate any "deviation" from
the Camp David accords. He
added, however, that he was not
certain the U.S. has yet shaped
an overall comprehensive Middle
East policy. "In the past there
were messages, cables, letter
from the President, and even-
tually the practical policy was
not identical to some of the
demands and threats," Olmert
said.
Labor Alignment dove Yossi
Sarid welcomed Reagan's mes-
sage as positive. He said the
American initiative could rescue
the Mideast from a dangerous
situation and felt that the Labor
Party would not object to a
strong Jordan-West Bank
linkage. Party chairman Shimon
Peres had no immediate com-
ment. A party spokesman said
Peres was seeking'no^
information about Reagan'
sage before issuing a wltemj
Israel's Ambassador to i3
ington .MosheArens,who,
Israel to participate in th*
Weinberger had with ,
leaders, said he knew notW
the Reagan message beforeTj
sent. e'1
He told the Knesset S
and Foreign Affair CommJl
that he was not surprised^
message because he had il
under the impression for J
time that the U.S. Woum1
focus its Mideast ]
promoting the prompt J
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a*WiHW?SW.''*BP?i
Sweeping Out the Past:
Not Much Is Buried
atinued from Page 4-A
^mo longer enemies, for now so
^v of them are either dead or
1 -"since forgotten. In some ln-
^^js I had to read the con-
i Kof many of these files to re-
fill myself what they were
( who these enemies once
, wd why I had written so ar-
|y against them in the first
"J What used to get me into a
\ about them, suddenly seem-
ime on rereading, even vul-
Je in the cadaverous old
folders,
a moment, I could even
t these former enemies,
, or still alive, as parents,
idparents, benign and loving,
led by ills and toothless -
ideological fangs long since
a so that now they were
shades of their own past.
iere on the floor, seated in an
inche of spewed-out folders,
uld feel a sudden sense of
nth for them, a feeling that
and death level us all, the
imandius types and even the
ful of the earth who walk on
through life to their unher-
demise.
JF COURSE, there were hero-
bo, suitably initialed: FDR,
', JFK. And the more mun-
William 0. Douglas, J.
irt Oppenheimer, Albert
tein, David Ben Gurion.
is Joyce, Abba Eban, Jorge
Borges.
rniehow, the heroes are hard-
recall in retrospect than the
_ies. Evil is always more
ipelling than virtue. If there is
agony in this recollection at
it is that both friends and
ies in the end suffer the
iefate.
ith grow dim in the recesses
mind in the sense that the
_ation or revulsion I once
|toward them all, the venera-
or even outright hatred and
impt, are no longer there.
have fused into a past irrel-
t to the historical process.
HAT I learned from this
ling process is what, of
pe, I have always known.
lory is a flow of events largely
lated to individual personali-
lexcept in the short term.
p Hitler and Josef Stalin, for
f pie. without a doubt shifted
course of human events in
(lifetimes. But from today's
ctive, some 35 or 40 years
what did they really
ve?
en more pointed questions:
1 did we really achieve by
pying Hitler, other than re-
pg things in the short term?
I would we have achieved
I if we destroyed Stalin and
Sovietism, too, when we had the
chance?
Here, the lesson of history is
that events themselves are not
much different from the individ-
uals who we once believed had
shaped them. In my clippings of
a quarter-century ago I have now
buried, China still fears the So-
viet Union. North Korea still eyes
South Korea with uncontrollable
desire. The Arabs still plot Is-
rael's destruction. Mankind still
doesn't know what to do with
atomic power. The U.S. still ex-
pects (cautiously) Moscow's ulti-
mate demise.
And more: Israel still fights
wars, wins them on the battle-
field and loses them in Washing-
ton. Formosa still vows to regain
Mainland China. The Russians
still maintain 40 divisions of
troops on the Chinese border
(only the number has changed for
the higher). Japan is still angry
about America's growing eco
nomic protectionism, convenient-
ly ignoring its own as an irritant
to others. Fidel Castro still frus-
trates the U.S. State Depart-
ment. The Politburo still vows it
will overtake and bury us. A
newsman can save last year's
headlines and use them over
again tomorrow.
REALLY THEN, I have bur-
ied nothing. And whether I have
kept files on them or not, Richard
Nixon experiences yet another
resurrection. Another Saudi
sheikh succumbs. King Hussein
makes one more wrong choice.
The past is forever reborn on
tomorrow's front page. Or next
year's. Then why the sense of
sadness I feel?
It is not so much the passing of
time itself I mourn. Rather, it is
the fact that the events of time
passed and past have been re-
vealed in all their triviality. To
have catalogued them so faith-
fully in files as if the information
they held for me would be val-
uable at some future date was an
act of sheer vanity.
It was an act that, I thought
then, gave meaning and value to
my own potential experience as a
journalist. Write a piece about
today, and have at your finger-
tips in ready files the history of
yesterday to illuminate it. Now, I
feel otherwise. Liberating myself
from these files offers a fresh
start as an act of freedom from
the commotion of life in its end-
less, noisy repetitions so that the
imperceptible motion of life for-
ward, if there is any at all, may be
clearly apprehended on its own
terms, untainted by past errors in
human judgement. That is where
the meaning of being lies.
Or is that vain, too?
agan Initiative Violates Accords
By YITZHAK RABI
YORK-(JTA)-Dr.
Israel's Minisister of In-
declared that President
is new peace plan for the
ft is clearly "a deviation
Parture from the letter and
pf the Camp David agree-
essing a jointly sponsored
!P conference of the
Jewxsh Congress and the
Tue Council of America,
Lu L Hyatt Hotel ***},
[ho has been the head of
pel delegation to the
T*n autonomy talks,
gve been suspended since
TO, said that Reagan's
|"> his televised speech
^el stop its settlement
1 the West Bank and
[absolutely not included
^ip David agreements.''
IKRMORE, Burg in-
sflR*
Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
ERENCE OF PR
F MAJOR m J
1
i.- *+
A map of Lebanon flanks the dais as Israel
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon addresses the
Conference of Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations. Left is Yehuda Hell-
man, executive vice chairman of the Confer-
ence. Center is Julius Berman, chairman.
Gen. Sharon told the Presidents Conference
that Israel's campaign in Lebanon had
brought Middle East peace closer by elimi-
nating the threat of the PLO.
Women in Rabbinate
Most Already Placed in Pulpits
sisted, the issue of Jerusalem,
which also was discussed by Rea-
gan, "is not mentioned in the
Camp David agreements."
"We cannot accept that
(Jewish) settlements (in the West
Bank and Gaza) are an obstacle
to peace," Burg declared, ad-
ding," Eretz Yisrael cannot be
restricted to our children."
Burg points out that Israel's
position on Jerusalem was made
clear during the Camp David
talks to all the participants in
formulating the agreements and
there was nothing ambigues a-
bout it.
Burg complained that in his
speech Reagan did not give Israel
the credit it deserves for reaching
a peaceful solution to Beirut. He
charged that Reagan's speech
"give vitamins and hormones to
the PLO," which was defeated by
the Israel Defense Force.
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
Seven of 12 women ordain-
ed last May and June as
Reform rabbis have been
placed in pulpits, three
have accepted appoint-
ments as Hillel Foundation
staff members, one has
been named as a youth
leader and one remains un-
placed, according to the
Jewish Telegraphic Agen-
cy's annual survey of place-
ments of newly ordained
women rabbis.
The situation for two women
ordained last June as Recon-
structionist rabbis is unique in
the 10-year history of the Recon-
structionist Rabbinical College in
Philadelphia. Rabbi Susan
Schnur of Trenton, N.J., and
Rabbi Nancy Fuchs-Kreimer of
Stanford, Cal., were both preg-
nant at their ordinations.
RABBI Fuchs-Kreimer, who is
married to Seth Kreimer, is ex-
pecting the couple's first child
this winter and is serving tempo-
rarily as rabbi of the Manhattan
Reconstructionist Havurah. She
expects to continue in that posi-
tion through the upcoming High
Holy Days and thereafter until
the birth takes place.
Rabbi Schnur, who is married
to Leonard, Fishman, was much
closer at her ordination, to giving
birth, and placement for her was
accordingly postponed. She gave
birth to a boy on Aug. 7.
The 12 new Reform rabbis and
the two Reconstructionist rabbis
bring to 61 the total number of
women ordained since Sally Prei-
sand was ordained in 1972 by the
Hebrew Union College-Jewish
Institute of Religion, the Reform
higher education and rabbinical
seminary, as the first woman
rabbi in American history.
RABBI Donna Berman of Val-
ley Stream, N. Y., was named solo
rabbi at Port Jewish Center in
Port Washington, N.Y., bringing
to eight the number of women
Reform rabbis holding solo
rabbinic posts, describing pulpits
of congregations too small to
need more than one rabbi.
The new ordainees who have
accepted posts as assistant
rabbis are: Amy Perlin of Wash-
ington, DC, at Beth El Hebrew
Congregation in Alexandria, Va ;
Miriam Biatch, of Studio City,
Cal., at Congregation Rodef
Sholom in San Raphael, Cal.;
Deborah Zecher of Monroeville,
Pa., at Westchester Reform
Temple in Scarddale, N.Y.
Also, Lenore Bohm, of
Atlanta, Ga., at Temple Beth
Israel in San Diego; Dena Fein-
gold, of Janesville, Wise., at Con-
gregation Shalom in Milwaukee;
and Deborah Hirech, of Chicago,
at Temple Beth El in Great Neck,
N.Y. Rabbi Bohm is the first
woman rabbi in San Diego and
the first Atlanta woman to be-
come a rabbi.
DEVORAH JACOBSON of
Surfside, Fla., has been named
associate director of the Hillel
Foundation of Washington
University in Clayton, Mo. Pat-
ricia Karlin of Plantation, Fla.,
has been named associate direc-
tor of the Hillel Foundation at
the University of California at
Los Angeles. Sally Finestone of
Clifton Forge, Va., has been
named to the staff of the Hillel
Foundation at Cincinnati
University.
Rabbi Ruth Sohn of Teaneck,
N.J., has been appointed director
of the Jewish Association of Col-
lege Youth at Columbia Univer-
sity in New York City. Rabbi
Julie Wolkoff of St. Louis Park,
Minn, has not been placed yet,
according to Rabbi Stanley
Dreyfus, placement director at
the Central Conference of Ameri-
can Rabbis, the Reform rabbi-
nical organization.
In June, 1981, Rabbi Debra
1 lac hen, who holds a part-time
solo pulpit at Congregation B'nai
Shalom in Westborough, Maine,
became the first woman rabbi in
the United States to give birth
while holding a pulpit, according
to the current issue of "Reform
Judaism," the official publication
of American Reform Judaism. As
a mother, according to that
report, Rabbi Hachen has met
her rabbinical duties without
much difficulty, saying her con-
gregation "has been terrific"
.about her son.
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Page 14-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 10, 1982
Ventel'
Streisand Approachable These Days
Continued from Page 1 A
was once their way of life, ex-
tending warm hospitality to the
visiting actors and renewing their
acquaintance with Miss Strei-
sand who was there on a recon-
naissance four years ago.
On her first night in Prague, a
Saturday, British actress Miriam
Margolyes went to the Alt-
neuschul with a friend, a psycho-
logist she had known at univer-
sity who was attending a con-
ference in Prague. A non-Jew.
"There were very few people
there," said Miriam, "barely a
minyan. They were very welcom-
ing and after the service they in-
vited us into a back room for a
meal of boiled eggs, tomatoes and
bread. They sang wonderful old
Yiddish songs, beating the table
with their fists in rhythm. No
women, just six or seven men.
Some of the tunes I recognized
from shul, but mostly they were
strange to me. They wanted me
to sing something, and I felt so
ashamed because I had nothing
to offer them."
A SENSE of oppression
weighed on the Western actors
and a sense of shame too when
they were told that the Czech
authorities had insisted that the
extras and Czech technicians and
crew must not share the location
food flown out from England.
"It was an unedifying sight,"
said Miriam, "us eating and them
watching us. They were shocked
by the amount of food we had and
by what we wasted. We were in a
luxury hotel, handsomely paid
with big expenses. All around us.
was oppression and drabness.
I'm a socialist and I feel shaken
by it."
Equally shaken was Jack
Lynn, a big, bearded English
actor who, though technically a
Jew through his mother, has,
never considered himself to bei
one as he was baptized as a child
and received no Jewish education
of any kind. All the same, he has
played a couple of Jewish roles on
television as a rabbi in Jack
Rosenthal's play, "Bar Mitzvah
Boy" and in "The Dybbuk."
LIKE MANY of the others, he
visited the Terezin (Theresien-
stadt) concentration camp, near
Prague. "I broke down," he said.
"Thank God some of the younger
members of the cast got me out.
For the first time in my life,
though I still can't feel some-
thing I was not brought up to
feel, I wanted to shout out loud,
tell everybody, that I was a Jew.
"Some of the extras had con-
concentration camp numbers tat-
tooed on their arms. I said to one
of them, 'Well, at least it isn't as
bad as the Germans.' He said,
'There are more ways than one of
getting rid of us. Hitler did it
openly. We can't teach our chil-
dren, so in a couple of generations
there'll be no Jews left here.'
"I'm very glad I went but I
never want to go back."
Streisand could not face going
to Terezin but asked some of the
others what it was like. Nor could
the Jewish wife of the unit's still
photographer; her grandparents
had been killed there.
Egypt, France Renew
Their Own Initiative
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Egypt and France have re-
newed their efforts here to stir in-
terest in their jointly sponsored
plan which calls on Israel and the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion to mutually recognize each
other and let the PLO participate
in negotiations for the solution of
the Palestinian problem.
The Egyptian Ambassador,
Amre Moussa, in a letter to
Secretary General Javier Perez
de Cuellar, circulated here but
dated Aug. 26, asked that the
Egyptian Franco draft resolu-
tion be resubmitted for a vote in
the Security Council.
The joint Egyptian-French
draft, which details the new plan
by the two countries, was first in-
troduced July 28 in the Security
Council, but it was held in
abeyance because of strong
American and Israeli opposition
and due to an emergency resolu-
tion which was introduced in the
Council July 29 demanding an
end to Israel's siege of Beirut.
The Egyptian envoy reintro-
duced the provisions of the new
initiative which calls on the
Security Council to: "Reaffirm
the right of all states in the
region to existence and security
in accordance with Security
Council Resolutions 242 (1967);
Reaffirm the legitimate national
right of the Palestinian people,
including the right for self-deter-
mination with all its implications,
on the understanding that to this
end the Palestinian people shall
be represented in the negotia-
tions and, consequently, the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion shall be associated therein;
Call for the mutual and simul-
taneous recognition of the parties
concerned."
Dipolmatic sources confirmed
that consultations were under-
way between members of the
Security Council on a possibility
of an official Council meeting to
vote on the resolution. Egyptian
and French officials reportedly
met with U.S. diplomats here to
discuss the issue.
Yiddish actress Anna Tzel-
niker was able to communicate
more easily with the local people
than anybody else. "The fact is,"
she said, "that there are hardly
any young Jewish people to teach
Hebrew to. Some were allowed to
emigrate and went to Australia,
Canada and America. Parents are
allowed to visit them and they
come back. There are some
youngish people here and they
are in the professions. There are
Jewish doctors and lawyers, but
they don't particularly think of
themselves as Jewish. The elder-
ly daven in the Altneuschul, but
I found that only the very, very
old spoke Yiddish. The others
spoke German though. Some are
quite happy with their lives there
and some would just say freig-
nisht don't ask."
IT IS NO secret that, in the
past, Streisand has been ac-
counted a very difficult lady to
work with. Indeed, books have
been written about it. Well-at-
tested stories include the one
about the cast and crew of a
Hollywood film she worked on
organizing a parting present a
one-way ticket to New York.
It was all either a pack of lies,
or there has been a radical
change. No one has a bad word
for her; indeed, the good words
pour out in torrents. Her opening
speech to her cast was: "Thank
you for being part of my dream"
(to make "Yentl"). After which
they were all her devoted ser-
vants.
She has treated even small-
time, unknown actors as if they
were human beings and has
aroused passionately protective
feelings in every breast. On one
very hot day, playing a scene
with an actor, an acolyte rushed
up during a break to hand Strei-
sand a glass of cold water. She
shared it with the actor. This
probably says less about Miss
Streisand than it does about
other film stars, but it certainly
impressed the actors.
"She may have been all they
say in other films where she was a
star and acted as such," said
Anna Tzolniker, "but in this film
she is the producer, director, co-
writer (with Jack Rosen thai) and
star, and she's sticking her little
neck out. She has so much to lose
if things don't go right. What-
ever it is, I can't praise her
enough, both as an artist and as a
colleague."
jm
If There's No Peace Treaty,
Israel Will Demand Buffer
Continued from Page 1-A
era t ion Organization's No. 2
man, Abu Iyad, returned to Tri-
poli where some 5,000 PLO fight-
ers have vowed not to relinquish
control. "Let's see if Bashir
Camayel will send his army
(against us)," he said. Returning
from a trip to Syria where he had
gone as part of the last guerrilla
evacuation from Tripoli, he said:
"I have not come to say goodbye
but to repeat that the fight
continues against the Israelis.
We will remain here."
At the same time, Israel has
asked to International Red Cross
to investigate the abduction of
the eight soldiers after the post in
which they were standing guard
at Bhamdoun was found empty,
with footprints of the missing
soldiers at their abductors
leading into Syrian-held territory
in the Bekaa Valley.
Syria currently has an estim-
ated 25,000 troops in the Valley,
plus some 10,000 Palestinian
guerrillas. The Syrians are ac-
cused of building up their
strength there at the same time
that the Israelis say they will not
leave Lebanon before Syria does
first.
?
w
r
In Jerusalem, at the Wall of Life Plaza on the Hebrew
ty's Mount Scopus campus, overlooking the Old Cityofji
lem are 1982 Caravan members (left to right) Mrs. JanM
Steve Lawrence, Vidal Sassoon and Jan Murray. ""
Richmond Resignation Brings
Jewish Members Down to 25
WASHINGTON-(JTA)-The resignation of
Fredrick Richmond (D., N.Y.) brings the number of 2
in the House of Representatives down to 25. Richmond]
signed after pleading guilty to evading nearly $50.00
income tax payments, possessing marijuana and iliec
paying $7,420 to a Navy employe who helped obtl
business for the Brooklyn Navy Yard. Richmond wasf
elected to Congress in 1974 and served a Brooklyn.
that while largely Black, also included the Br
Heights area and parts of the heavily HasidicWiUil
burg area.
Twenty seven Jews were elcted to the House in
But one, Gladys Spellman, suffered a heart attack be
the election and remained in a coma. Her seat was vai
after the new House was sworn in on January 1981.'
are six Jews in the Senate, two of whomSens. Hov
Metzenbaum (D., Ohio) and Edward Zoririsky
Neb.) are up for reelection this year. .
r
i
THE
FAMILY JACOBS'^KOSHB
Re,r9inertainrnent
? SScJAOoU Owner-Managem*^ J
Temple Beth Raphael
1 ti\
Rabbi
Jehuda Melber, D.D.
1545 Jefferson Avenue
Tel 538-41X2
Cordially Extends
An Invitation
To Our Friends & Neighbors
To Worship With Us For The
**4
Cantor
Benjamin Adter
and Choir
High Holy Day Services
Sept 18-19Sept 27
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Limited Membership At Reasonable Rate
Office-Hours-Daily ^ ,.
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Please Mention This Ad


8 '.^)hr'! rmibfo
Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 16-A
Christian Politico
Says All 'Invading' Forces Must Leave 'New' Lebanon
ntinued from Page l-A
joo's permanent neutrality;
[Establishment 0f a multi-na-
| force acceptable to all con-
J parties in Lebanon to as-
"iieutrality, including U.S.
, in the 25-mile area north of
i border. The predominant
[in other parts of Lebanon
be played by French
K
I The enforcement of demo-
te procedures which would
jit the free election of a cred-
iLebanese leadership.
FURTHER progress in
[Middle East peace process is
lersibly tied to a stable and
solution for Lebanon,
i depends on the reestablish-
of Lebanon's territorial in-
ky and sovereignty.
lebanon, at the geographic
t of a region in a state of war
1948, signed an armistice
ement with Israel that form-
recognized the existing
paries between Lebanon and
ti-
de neutrality of Lebanon
ns peace and security for Is-
vithout risking the exclusion
ebanon from the Arab com-
ply until negotiations pro
i a comprehensive settlement
ke Arab-Israeli conflict.
or Israel. Lebanese neutrality
be a "state of peace." No
ni'sc leader, not even a
onite President, could carry
Iburden of being isolated by
|Arab world. We just could
andle it, especially given the
lomic burden of reconstruc-
putrality would amount to a
) peace with Israel without
Deed to negotiate and sign a
treaty. Such a formula
|d probably be acceptable to
of the Arab States, since it
1 have pacified Lebanon.
JDAY, Lebanon is basically
ed. The danger we face is that
hay be asked to pay the price
[leasing President Assad of
a. or Prime Minister Begin of
'1, or the Christian militias,
may be encouraged to be-
' that I hey could establish
rule and dominate Lebanon
the help of the Israeli mih-
I ni a chine.
I is worth remembering that
Mar.mites are no more than
ercent of the Lebanese and
Phalangists, at best, 6 per-
In a parliament of 99 mem-
the Phalangists have no
} than seven members,
the past, the Moslems of
non asked: How can we be
pi between Israel and the
world? Today, if they ask
we tell them that neutrality
ential to maintain the unity
fcbanon, but also to preserve
jnon from further occupa-
nt0 have every Moslem and
Palestinian left here pro-
against revenge and mas-
^ERE HAS been a real shift
Moslem Lebanese. The
Priority now, as it was not
f s in the past, is to conserve
Pon. They used to hesitate
?en their Lebanese identity
heir Arab identity.
at we tll them today is:
are Lebanese, and we are
Ibut we have to be Lebanese
|Jou Moslems of Lebanon
Ven let down by the Arabs
you were smashed, first by
Mestinians, second by the
s. and third by the Israelis.
' no other priority except
tnership with the Chris-
f Lebanon."
[for the Palestinians in
X it is unrealistic to ex-
it, tomorrow, they will be
u. j ?.hance of going home.
Wd like to see that, and we
I whatever we can, diplo-
ly and politically, to pro-
P because we think that
ation between the Pales-
Roger Edde is moderate
Christian political and
scion of one of
Lebanon's most influ-
ential families. In this
article, he outlines his
plans for a neutral, dis-
armed Lebanon.
tinians and the Israelis is the key
factor in the acceptance of Israel
in the Arab world.
Israel could impose peace on
every Arab country, maybe, by
force but not acceptance and,
insofar as the Israelis do not have
acceptance, they have nothing.
THOSE PALESTINIANS
who came into Lebanon after
1970 and who have Jordanian
and other passports, or whose
families live in Syria or other
Arab countries, should go and
join their families. Perhaps 50
percent of the Palestinians in
Lebanon today have family con-
nections outside Lebanon.
This is a matter for negotia-
tion. What we would not do is to
throw them into the sea. What we
do need to do is to give those Pa-
lestinians who remain in Lebanon
the chance to live a dignified life.
We will never accept that they
go back into the camps, that is
certain. We do not want time
bombs around our cities ever
again. We would like them to be-
come a real, productive economic
force in Lebanon. And they could
be.
We need a labor force in Leba-
non. Before the war, we imported
250,000 to 300,000 workers week-
ly from Syria and this work force
used to go home every weekend.
taking their money back into
Syria. This was an economic bur-
den, because there was a perma-
nent bleeding of hard currency
out of Lebanon into Syria.
THE PALESTINIANS could
fill this gap. It will require tech-
nical education and adaptation,
perhaps an Arab "Marshall
Plan" to help the needy among
the Palestinians, the Shia Leban-
ese and others in the south who
have had their homes destroyed
and lost everything.
I am not talking about aid but
the opportunity, through private
investment, to work and to give
those who will invest this money
a chance to have it back with in-
terest.
They should start to invest
some money in productive econo-
mic fields. There has been enough
investment in arms, in subver
sion and in speculative foreign
markets.
I It is time for Arab money to be
invested where the Arab destiny
lies, in the future of the genera-
tions in Lebanon, among the Pa-
1 lestinians and the Lebanese who
are today enraged with the failure
of the Arab world to halt their
bleeding.
In only two places in the whole
Middle East were there demon-
strations in support of Lebanon
a small one in Cairo and a
missive.one in Tel Aviv.
PLANNING
ON MOVING
TO ISRAEL?
HOW WONDERFUL
Call me, Esther, 635-65541
and let me quote you1
rates. Also local moving &J
long distance moving!
anywhere in the U.S. orj
overseas.
A.B. VAN LINES INC.
(of Miami)_
Happy
5743
From The
Airline That
Began In
5688.
Pan AmAbu Can't Beat the Experience:


Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 10,1982
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Talmudic University
Holds Torah Workshop
Talmudic University of Florida
I wui open its ninth annual Yomim
NorainT Torah Workshop Sun-
rfav Sept. 12, with an 8 a.m.
morning service at the Alfred and
Sadye Swire College of Judaic
Studies on the Miami Beach
| Campus.
The event is held in prepar-
ation for the upcoming High
| Holy Days.
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig, presi-
dent and Rosh HaYeshiva of
Talmudic University will of-
ficiate during the all-day program
which will be highlighted by an 8
lpm. Tcshuva Assembly, also
slated for the Swire College main
I auditorium.
Rabbi i'ibor Stern at Jacob C.
Icohen Community Synagogue,
will lecture on Maimonides, at
lg:45 a.m. The entire program,
Rabbi Zweig said, is geared for
laymen and for congregational
lleaders as well as for graduate
land undergraduate students of
ITalmudic University.
Rabbis Phineas Weberman of
lOhev Shalom Congregation and
Sheldon Ever of Agudath Israel
I Hebrew Institute will lead an
111:30 a.m. Teshuva (Repentance)
[Overview, following a 90-minute
[period of traditional Beit
|Hamedrash (individual) study.
Rabbi Avraham Chaim Feuer
[of Ohr HaChaim Congregation,
[will speak at a 12:15 p.m. lecture,
["Reflections on the Yomim
[Noraim (High Holy Days)."
An afternoon session of Indi-
I vidual study begins at 2:30 p.m.,
followed by a 4:46 talk on "Per-
spective of Reprentance," by
I Rabbi David Lehrfield of
Kneseth Israel Congregation. At
J 4:15 p.m.. Rabbi Zev Leff of
Young Israel of Greater Miami
Congregation, will give an
analysis of "The Concept of
Teshuva."
Rabbi Zweig
Rabbi Stern
The 8 p.m. closing session will
feature Rabbi Dov Bidnick of
Young Israel of Skylake Congre-
gation, Rabbi Zweig and Rabbi
Mordechai Shapiro of Beth Israel
Congregation. They will offer
commentaries on the observance
of the High Holy Days both in
the home and in the synagogue.
Rabbi Jerry Burstyn is executive
director of the academy.
Judaic Studies Presents
Speech by Jewish Author
Elie Wiesel, acclaimed as one
of the most gifted and sensitive
writers of our time and an out-
standing voice for the human
conscience, will speak at the
University of Miami Wednesday,
Sept. 15, as part of the Judaic
Studies Program lecture series.
His talk on "A Jew Today:
The Jewish and Human Condi-
tions, will be given at 8 p.m. in
Room 226 of the Whitten Student
Union.
Born in Hungary, Wiesel is a
survivor of Auschwitz and
Huchenwald and is a renowned
spokesman for the Jewish people.
Ihe holder of honorary doctor-
ates from many academic institu-
I ons, he serves presently as
chairman of the United States
Holocaust Memorial Council.
Socialists Plan Initiative
To Find Solution
Elie Wiesel
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
Socialist International
officials said they will try to
launch a diplomatic initia-
tive to find a global solu-
tion to the Palestinian pro-
blem. This comment was
made in Lisbon after a Soc-
ialist International delega-
tion led by former Portu-
guese Premier Mario
Suarez returned from a
study trip to Beirut. The
International includes
Israel's Labor Party and
Lebanon's Progressive
Party headed by Druze
leader Walid Jumblatt.
Suarez, who met in Beirut with
PLO leader Yasir Arafat, said he
"did not appear a beaten man. He
still seems determined to lead his
people to what he sees as their
just aims." Suarez, who also met
in Lebanon with most of the
country "s prominent political
figures, stated that "conditions
(now) exist for steps forward in
the search for a solution to the
Palestinian problem."
ANOTHER MEMBER of the
Socialist delegation, French
party national secretary in
charge of international affairs,
Jacques Huntzinger, caused a
storm when he said that the de-
struction of Beirut "is horrible,
worse than anything we
imagined." He said "the films
shown on French television were,
it anything, less than the truth."
City of Hope
Hosts Speakers
Luncheon
The City of Hope will hold its
yearly workship for the elected
officers and chairmen of the 38
South Florida chapters on
Mondav. Sept. 13, at 10 a.m. at
Valley's on Oakland Park
Boulevard, Fort Lauderdale.
Florence Ehrlich. chairman of the
Miami Beach area, will host the
seminar and speak on member-
ship.
Other officers will speak on a
variety of subjects which concern
the City of Hope: Rhoda Ehrlich,
purpose and proven fund raising
methods; Rose Miller, publicity,
education and organizing; Sylvia
Shapiro, Project HEAL and the
bulletin; Phyllis Seigel, new fund
raising; Max Fruchtman, golf
tournaments; Mabel Zimmer-
man, donors; Stanley Gittelman,
expansion; Evelyn Seiden and
Rachel Hoffman, trustees, an-
dEllen Hartley will give a secre-
tary report-
Lunch will be served at 12:30
p.m., and Molly Bloom will give
the invocation.
* 1 < I
If16 ('.uban Hebrew Group of the Greater
IMiami Jewish Federation held a dinner at
Vhe Casablanca Hotel on Miami Beach to
devaluate the 1982 CJA-IEF campaign and
elect new leadership for the 1983 campaign.
rrom left: Dr. Isaac Cohen, secretary 1982
campaign; Isaac Sklar, outgoing president;
Guillermo Sostchin, campaign chairman for
1983; Yoshua Sal Behar, chairman Young
Adult Division; Henry Percal, campaign
director; Max Garazi, chairman Sephardic
group, and Sender M. Kaplan, Cuban He-
brew campaign associate.
Huntzinger s statement has
caused a furor in Jewish circles as
he was previously known as the
head of the party's pro-Israel
wing. After a trip to Israel last
month, he distanced himself from
the French party's official line
and espoused Isreal's cause.
Election Results
The Dade County voters elected incumbents Barry Schreiber,
Barbara Carey and Ruth Shack, to the Metro Commission, while
Christina MacKenzie and George Vaides face a run-off election
October 5. On the Dade School Board, incumbent Ralph Renick,
Democrat, was re-elected without opposition, and Democrat
William H. Turner was returned to office, with G. Holmes Bard-
dock, facing Republican Mamie Pinder in the November 2
general election.
Circuit Court Judges elected were Sidney B. Shapiro, Adele S.
Faske, Robert Kaye, with Harold Solomon and Milton Stark-
man in runoffs. County Judges elected were James Rainwater,
Murray Klein, A. Leo Adderly, Leah A. Simms and Stanley
Goldstein, with Arthur Rotenberg and Alfonso Sepe in run-
offs.
The State Senate seat in Dist. 35 went to Sen. Jack Gordon.
Senator Gwen Margolis and Senator John Hill, both Democrats,
won re-election. House member Roberta Fox, a Democrat, and
Jim Brodie, a Republican, will oppose each other in the general
election. In Senate Dist. 39, Democrats Larry Plummer and in-
cumbent Richard Renick will face each other in a second
primary. Richard Bach was the Republican winner.
The State House Democrat winners are Ron Silver, Mike
Abrams, Elaine Gordon, Mike Friedman, Barry Kutun, Hal
Spaet, Bob Reynolds, William Oliver, John Cosgrove, L. Diaz-
Balart, Art Simon, Dexter Lehtinen, Larry Hawkins, and Joe
Allen. Democrats facing runoffs include Joe L. Kershaw, Jef-
ferson Reaves, Vashti Armbrister, James Burke, Ben Cowins,
Willie Logan, Ed Cardounel, Nicholas Ventura, Don Gruber,
Elizabeth Metcalf, Gene Flinn, Tim Murphy, Charlene Carres,
l and Bill Flynn. Republican winners are Roberto Casas, Hum-
berto Cortina, Teresa Ashkar, Scott McPherson. Republicans in
runoffs are Raul Pozo, Ueana Ros, Ed Cardounel, Nicholas Ven-
tura, Willy Bermello, Armando Bucelo, Franz Arango, and
Steve Ascencio.
Gerald Lewis won a third term as Florida comptroller. Demo-
cratic Gov. Bob Graham and L.A. (Skip) Bafalis, a Republican
congressman, will set up a November showdown for governor.
Jim Smith was re-elected attorney general.
U.S. Rep. William Lehman won a sixth term, and Glenn
Rinker won the GOP nomination and will oppose Democrat
Dante Fascell.
March of Dimes Selects New
Chairman of Board
Thomas L. Green, Senior Vice-
President of Jordan March, has
been appointed to assume the
chairmanship of the Board of Di-
rectors for the March of Dimes
Birth Defects Foundation of the
South Florida Chapter, which in-
corporates both Dade and
Monroe Counties. He has been a
member of the Board since 1975
and has served as both Vice-
Chairman and Campaign Chair-
man from 1980-1982.
Mr. Green, received his AB
from Dartmouth College and his
MBA from Tuck School of Busi-
ness Administration at Dart-
mouth. After serving as a Cap-
tain in the U.S. Army, he re-
turned to merchandising and
completed the Executive Train-
ing Program at Macy's New
York. He held several merchan-
dising positions with Macy's be-
fore joining Jordan Marsh of
Florida in 1962. Mr. Green served
as General Manager of the Dade-
land and Miami stores. In 1974
he was named as Vice President
of Sales and Promotion and be-
came Senior Vice President in
1978.
Mr. Green comes to his new
post with a wide range of com-
munity involvements, including
divisional chairman of the United
Way; Chairman of the Advisory
Board for The School of Fashion
Design and Merchandising De-
partment of Miami-Dade Com-
munity College; and service on
the Board of Directors of The
American Cancer Society, the
Community Television Founda-
tion, and Temple Israel of
Greater Miami.
Joining Mr. Green as chapter
officers are Joseph M. Schmidt,
vice chairman; Julio Rumbaut,
secretary, and Jack Silver, treas-


Thomas L. Green
urer. Executive committee
members include Albert F. Col-
lard, Dr. Charles R. Bauer, Lou
Creekmur, Dr. Lionel Goldstein,
Lucille M. McGinnis, Alan Ros-
enthal, Rae Small, William J.
Stirrup, Ramon a M. Thompson
and Susan R. Kleinberg.
New members elected to the
Board of Directors are Michele R.
Clawson (Mrs. Patrick), Sonny
Hirsch, Ms. Lee Padnick, Harry
Langerman and Mike Newcdmb.
Assuming the position of Ex-
ecutive Director of the South
Florida Chapter is Mrs. Barbara
(Bobbie) L. Gilstrap. Mrs. Gil-
strap has been associated with
the March of Dimes for 11 years
as a staff member, volunteer and
member of the Board of Direc-
tors.
Joining Mrs. Gilstrap as new
staff members of the community
service coordinators are Bruce A.
Gillmore and Arthur Goldberg.
^Jewish Flor idiam.
[Section fi
Miami, Florida Friday, September 10,1982


Page 2 B TheJcwiahFloridian. Friday, September 10,1982
Norman Klein to be Installed As
President of Temple Sinai
Normal Klein will be installed'
as President of Temple Sinai of
North Dade before Selichot serv-
ices at the North Dade Reform
Congregation on Saturday night,!
Sept. 11. The evening will also be
marked by a special presentation!
to Aaron Podhurst, who has,
served as President of Temple
Sinai from 1978 to 1982.
Mr. Klein, a Miami Lakes resi-
dent who has practiced law inj
North Miami Beach for 17 years]
has been a member of North!
Dade's Reform Congregation for
16 years. During that time he has
served on its Board of Directors,
most recently in the role of Vice
President of Administration.
He and his wife Alice, were
honored by the congregation
several years ago during the an-
nual Combined Jewish Appeal
dinner. The Kleins have two chil-
dren, Felicia, age 17, and Mat-
thew, age 14. Both became B'nai
Mitzvahs at Temple Sinai. Felicia
was in the Confirmation Class in
1980, and Matthew will be con-
firmed in 1983.
Norman Klein
Also to be installed with Mr.
Klein as Vice Presidents are Mr.
George Berlin, Membership;
Mrs. Susan Rachleff, Ways and
University of Miami Names New Dean
A former chief financial officer
at the Department of Defense has
been appointed as the Dean of the
Dr. Jack R. Borsting
School of Business Administra-
tion at the University of Miami.
Dr. Jack R. Borsting, Assis-
tant Secretary of Defense and
Comptroller, will assume his post
at the start of the spring seme
ster in January. Within his 20-
year academic career, Dr. Bor-
sting was Provost and Academic
Dean at the Naval Postgraduate
School in Monterey, Calif., a pro-
fessor and chairman of the de-
partment of operations research
and administrative sciences, a
visiting professor at the Univer-
sity of Colorado at Boulder, dis-
tinguished professor at the
Oregon State University and an
author of scholarly publications
dealing with high level decision-
making.
Commenting on Bursting's ap-
pointment, UM President
Edward T. Foote, II, said. "Dr.
Chabad House Holds
High Holy Day Service
Chabad House of North Dade
will be conducting traditional
High Holy Day services at the
upstairs clubhouse of the Villa
Dorado Townhouse, by Rabbi
Casriel Brusowankin, director of
Chabad House, and Cantor Osher
Weinstein.
Beth Din Office
Of Fiorida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Tel: 534-1004 or 672-0004
Borsting brings to us a rare mix-
ture of experience as a leader,
from serving in almost every
leadership position one can hold
in an academic institution to
bearing national responsibility
for a multi-billion dollar public
budget..."
Means; Dr. Melvyn Drucker,
Educatibn and Youth; Mr.
Richard Slavin, Finance; and Dr.
Jack Berne, Administration.
To be installed as newly elected
Trustees are: Dr. Robert Layton,
Mr. Bernard Dubrow and Mrs.
Judy Silverman. Continuing to
serve on the Board as Trustees
are: Paul Barnett, Murray Blatt-
man, Michael Edelman, Ira
Gelber, Dr. Barry Glassman,
Marjorie Sanford, Billy Saster,
Cynthia Greene, Melanie Kaleky,
William Lehman, Jr., Donald
Lockshin, Leslie Peiken, Forrest
Raffel, Helen Sternberg, Robert
Sugarman and Aaron Podhurst,
Immediate Past President.
Elected as Trustees Emeritus
were Past President Kenneth J.
Schwartz and Mr. Sam Bloom,
who join Mr. Ralph Hallander in
that honorary position.
Also on the Board of Trustees
by virtue of their Presidencies are
Mr. Leo Katz, President of
Brotherhood; the Sisterhood
Presidential Consortium, Judy
Silverman, Jane Shuster and
Binnie Rosen; and Adam Glass-
man, President of SNFTY, the
Synagogue's Youth Group.
The evening will begin with a
Social and the appearance of
three musicians who gained free-
dom from the Soviet Union. It
will culminate at midnight with
the Congregation's annual serv-
ice of Selichot.
ill "if ii
El At Airlines Moves Office
After 21 years at the same location, El Al Israel Airline. -
moving to new offices at 407 Lincoln Road, Suite 4-B Mi W
Beach. The telephone number remains 532-5441. The L
effective Sept. 1. ""
In announcing relocation of the offices, Southeastern Region
Manager, Mr. Shlomo Lichtman said the move to more modern
facilities was necessitated by increased services to travel
agencies and the traveling public.
El Al flies two weekly flights connecting Miami with Tel Aviv
and daily 747 jumbo flights from New York to Tel Aviv, most of
them non-stoD.
With G. Washington's9 Seasoning
and Broth they won't be frugal
with your kugel!
6. WASHINGTON'S
GOLDEN POTATO KUGEL
If no one's clamoring tor your
kugel, it's time you brought it to
the attention of G Washington s
Golden Seasoning and Broth
G. Washington's is more than a
flavor enhancer. It's a complete
seasoning Its special blend of
herbs and spices flavors your
kugel in more ways than one
Just mix in G.Washington's
Seasoning and Broth before
baking and you'll have a kugel
to kvell over!
K Certified kosher and Pirve
3 cups grated potatoes,
drained
3 eggs, well beaten
2 packets G. Washington's
Golden Seasoning and Broth
Combine all ingredients, mix well Place in greased Vh\ quart baking dish
Bake in 350 F oven for 1 hour or until brown Serve hot Serves 6 to 8
V> cup potato flour
4 tablespoons melted butter
3 tablespoons grated onion
ft teaspoon baking powder
'iteaspoon pepper
..j
PHILADELPHIA BRAND
CREAM CHEESE
SPREADS
HAPPINESS
AROUND
PHILADELPHIA BRAMfr'L
In some circles that's nothing short of perfection.
But then you have the devotees of bialys, pumpernickel,
onion rolls, rye, whole wheat and mat/ohs who
will positively insist that Kraft "invented" the famous
PHILADELPHIA BRAND Cream Cheese flavor just for them'
PHILADELPHIA BRAND Cream Cheese, traditional
style or soft style in a handy serving cup. They're
from Kraft so you know they're guaranteed. And Kosher.
The Cream of Cheese -PHILADELPHIA BRAND Cream Cheese
i


Temple Bet Breira
Dedication Sunday
United States Congressman
Dante Fascell heads a list of fed-
eral, state and county officials
who will participate in the
dedication of Temple Bet Breira,
9400 SW 87th Ave., on Sunday at
2 Dm.
Fascell will be joined by Flor-
ida Secretary of State George
Firestone and Metropolitan Dade
County Commissioner Ruth
Shack for the dedication of this
unique structure which will be
the new home of the 400-member
congregation.
Situated on four acres in the
Kendall area and costing $1.5
million, the temple, designed by
award winning architect Charles
Sieger, will house 10 classrooms,
a library, social hall-sanctuary, a
new preschool program, High
Holy Day services, regular
weekly services and offices.
Prior to the building of the
20,000-square foot structure, Bet
Breira, which was founded on
July 4. 1976, met in several
locations. Friday night services
were held in the Killian Pines
United Methodist Church; Sab-
bath School was held at the Ken-
dall Church of God; some school
classes were held at Devonaire
F.lementary and High Holy Day
services took place at Gusman
Hall on the University fo Miami
campus.
Because of the assistance Bet
Breira has received from other re-
ligious groups in housing these
programs and services, several
interfaith groups will be honored
at the dedication.
"The dedication of this syna-
gogue is an outstanding commu-
nity event," said Bet Breira
Kabbi Barry Tabachnikoff. "We
have had the help and friendship
<>f many people during these
Temple Samu-El
Installs New Officers
Lawrence R. Metsch will be in-
stalled as president of Temple
Saniu-El at Friday night serv-
ices. Kabbi Edwin P. Farber will
install the officers and Board of
Directors for the 1982-83 year at
the 8:15 p.m. services.
Officers being installed at the
Friday night services are:
Howard Rosenbloom, Executive
Vice-President; Judith Goldman.
Membership Vice-President;
Michael C. Slotnick, Education
Vice-President; Jeffrey Liebson,
Ways and Means Vice-President;
Abe Koss, Building Fund Vice-
President; Barry H. Wright,
Ritual Vice-President; Leonard
Alan Shubitz, Treasurer; Marc
rme, Financial Secretary;
Regina Zelonker, Recording
Secretary and Addie Unterlack,
Corresponding Secretary.
Board Members being installed
are: Gail Brenner, Paul Fried-
nder, Arnold Gitten, Arthur
Goldman, Gene Gomberg, May-
nardA.Gross,: Wilbur Heine,
Harvey Judkowitz, Paul Kade,
Umrue Kantor, Henry Kaufman,
Martin E. Levine, Jack Levinson,
Oobbi Levy, Jill Liebson, Nor-
man Marinoff, Linda Martin,
^usan Metsch, Harry Milder,
Jack Miller, Martin Resnick,
Michael Rosenberg, Janet Rubin,
ivan Safra, Karen Shenberg, Jan
Shostak. David B. Unterlack,
Joseph Weisberg and Ira Zager.
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff
years. We want to share this
joyous day with them and the
entire community."
Friday, September 10,1982 The Jewish Floridian.....Page 3-B
New Miami Beach Hotel Opens, Offers Special Services
Arthur H. Bant has been
named General Manager of the
new Barcelona Hotel of Miami
Beach.
Since assuming the position in
July, Mr. Bant has introduced
extensive renovations through-
out the Hotel. The dining room
and two lobby areas have been
redecorated. The spa complex
which houses a Swedish sauna,
steam room and message facili-
ties has been reopened. It has
been announced that Mr. Leo
Gartenberg, formerly the owner-
manager of the Pioneer Hotel and
Country Club in the Catskill
Mountains, will serve in the
capacity of resident host for the
1982-83 season.
Guestrooms at the New
Barcelona are all centrally air
conditioned with T.V., private
bath and shower; many have ter-
races. Facilities include a pool-
side coffee shop, sundry shop, 3
free tennis courts and free park-
ing on the premises. The hotel
features a large heated swimming
pool surrounded by upper and
lower sundeck areas, 400 feet of
private, sandy beach and free
chaise lounges at the pool and
beach areas. An entertainment
program featuring well-known
stage personalities as well as
movies, games, and dancing to a
live orchestra has been establish-
ed. Services are held daily in a
well appointed Synagogue.
Two Glatt Kosher meals are
served daily, with three on the
Sabbath and during Holidays.
Special diets are followed.
The New Barcelona Hotel is lo-
cated at 44th street and Collins
Avenue, 3 blocks from the Arthur
Godfrey shopping area and adja-
cent to the Fontainebleau Hilton.
Board of Governors Chooses New Members
Miami Beach Vice Mayor Sy
Eisenberg and Gerald Schwartz,
president of a public relations
and advertising agency, have
been elected to the Board of
Governors of Barry University.
Announcement of their election
was made by Sister Jeanne
O'Laughlin, O.P., president of
the university headquartered in
Miami Shores.
Eisenberg, vice president of
Dash Air Lines, is an investment
banker and real estate broker
who has served as president and
director of several public cor-
porations.
Schwartz, chairman of the
board of Nova Canaveral Corpor-
ation, is a member of the board of
directors of the Urban League of
Greater Miami, vice president of
the Miami Beach Chamber of
Commerce and former associate
director for Florida of the
National Conference of Chris-
tians and Jews.
Enter the Mazel Tov Sweepstakes
Win a$l,000 catered party from Maxwell HouscfCof fee!
Let Maxwell House put $1000 towards the cater-
ing of your next special occasion We'll make it a
glorious anniversary! A beautiful bar mitzvahf A
wondrous wedding! An affair with family and
friends you'll always remember! Maxwell House
is the perfect coffee to help you share the warm
A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century
feelings of those special occasions because it's al-
ways 'Good to the Last Drop" So make 5743
even happier fill out the entry form
and enter the Mazel Tov Sweepstakes
from Maxwell House today!
OFFICIAL RULES
1. Each entry must De accompanied by the in-
nerseal Irom a iar ol MAXWELL HOUSE' Instant
Coffee or a 2" square from the plastic lid ol a can
of ground MAXWELL HOUSE" Coffee or MAX-
WELL HOUSE" A.0.C Coffee or the words
MAXWELL HOUSE' printed in block letters on a
3" 5" card Entries must be on the Official Entry
Blank or a 3" x 5" card and mailed to: Mazel Tov
Sweepstakes. General Foods Corporation. P0
Box 3660. Grand Central Station, New York. New
York 10163
2. NO PURCHASE REQUIRED TO ENTER
SWEEPSTAKES.
3. Entries must be lirst-class mail, one entry per
envelope, postmarked no later than January 4,
1963 and received by January 11.1983
4. Winner will be selected in a random drawing,
on January 18. 1983. from all entries received
prior to the deadline The drawing will be con-
ducted by Joseph Jacobs Organization. Inc an
independent organization whose decision is
final In the event the winner declines the prize or
if for any reason the prize cannot be awarded
after the initial drawing, a supplemental draw
mg(s) will be held to award the prize Winner will
be notified by mail Taxes on the prize are the sole
responsibility of the winner The odds of winning
depend on the number of entries received
S. Prize consists of one Grand Pnze S1.000 to
cater your parly. Prize will be awarded upon the
receipt ol bill from caterer
I. This sweepstakes is open to all residents of the
United States who are 18 years of age or older.
except employees (and their families) of General
Foods Corporation, its advertising agencies,
subsidiaries or affiliates, or Joseph Jacobs
Organization Inc Sweepstakes subiect to all
Federal. State and local regulations Void where
prohibited by law
7. For the name of the winner, send a self-
addressed, postage-pa Name. P0 Box 399u Grand Central Station,
New York, New York 10163
MAZEL TOV SWEEPSTAKES
OFFICIAL ENTRY FORM
NAMf.
innaccc
city
VTATf 7!P
MAIL TO Enlnn Mazel Tov Swecpttaket General Foods Corporation P.O. Box 9660 Grand Central Station New York, New York 1016S mutt be rnnt'ed by January 1i t9ti


**** kvaau.a.1 .
I -***j UC|ilCUll^l
\J. ataSUafa
JCC Interest Classes Begin for Fall
The South Dade Jewish Com-
munity Center, 12401 S.W. 102
Avenue, will offer classes and
workshops at the Center begin
mng in September. All courses
are open to the public.
Women's Workshop: "A Na-
tural You" Fri. Sept. 10, 9:45
a.m. to 12:30 pm. Co-ed Yoga -
Mon. Sept. 13, 8 p.m., 8 weeks.
Aerobic Exercise Tuee. and
Thurs., Sept. 14, 6 to 7 p.m., 8
weeks. Aquacise Tues. and
Thurs., Sept. 14, 7 to 8 p.m., 8
weeks.
Modern Dancercise -- Tuee.
and Thurs., Sept. 14, 9 to 10 a.m.,
8 weeks. Basic Oil Painting
Wed., Sept. 15 7:30 to o:30 p.m. ,
8 weeks. Photography for Begin-
ners Thurs., Sept. 16,8 p.m., 3
weeks. Bridge Duplicate Game I
Every Monday, 11:30 a.m. to
3:30 p.m.
The Michael-Ann Russell Jew-
ish Community Center, N.E. 25
Ave., will also offer a variety of
enjoyable classes and workshops
Lichtman Named
El Al Regional
Manager
Lichtman
Shlomo Lichtman has been
named Regional Manager,
Southeastern United States by
El Al Israel Airlines. He replaces
Zvi Redlich who served in that
position for the past five years
and has been reassigned to the
headquarter offices in Tel Aviv.
Mr. Lichtman has been with El
Al for the past 22 years and
brings with him a diverse back-
ground in commercial areas of the
airline industry. He has held
senior positions in management,
marketing and sales in the Israel
Branch and Head Office in Israel
and in the North American New
York offices.
Born in Vienna, he emigrated
to Israel with his family and was
educated in Jerusalem. He holds
a Masters Degree in Law from
Hebrew University.
Mr. Lichtman will be based in
Miami and supervise sales and
marketing activities for the
states of Florida, Georgia, South
Carolina, Mississippi and
Alabama. He is married and has
a daughter, Vered, completing
her studies toward a Masters
Degree at Tel Aviv University.
Jewish Education
Association Has
First Meeting
First membership meeting of
the year for the Association for
Jewish Special Education will be
at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sep-
tember 15, at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Building.
Temple Sponsors
Chat With Candidates
The Jewish Women's Political
Caucus of South Florida will have
a meeting for a chat with the can-
didates after the Primary, Sun-
day, Sept. 12, 2:30 p.m. at Tem-
ple Israel.
at the Center beginning in
September. The courses are open ;
to the public and include drama, I
photography, calligraphy, kosher
cooking, bridge and the stock
market.
On Sunday, Sept. 12, the
Michael-Ann Russell Jewish
Community Center (JCC) will
open its doors to preview its out-
standing health and fitness facili-
ties and wide array of enjoyable
programs and special events
scheduled for Fall.
The public is invited to partici-
pate in the fun at the JCC Open
House, 18900 N.E. 25 Avenue,
North Miami Beach, from 1 to 4
p.m.
Several guided tours of the
JCC are scheduled to provide a
look at the Center's indoor air
conditioned facilities including a
six-lane, 25 yard pool, four
racquet ball courts, 12,000 square
foot gymnasium with basketball
courts, weight room and univer-
sal equipment, a second story
banked, rubberized track
measuring one 16th of a mile, and
men's and women's shower and
locker room faculties.
A walk around the grounds of
the JCC will reveal nine lighted,
newly resurfaced true court ten-
nis courts, two baseball
diamonds, a football-soccor field,
swimming pool with separate
diving well, three paddleball
courts and a track two-thirds of a
mile in length.
Demonstrations and displays
illustrating many of the JCC's
Fall programs and special events
for children, teens, singles, adults
and senior adults will be ongoing
during the afternoon.
Children attending the Open
House will be welcomed by CP
the robot who will direct them to
the 32 5- seat Katz Auditorium for
a special showing of the movie
"Popeye" starring Robin Wil-
liams (TV's Mork), beginning at
1 p.m. After the film kids can
participate in an arts and crafts
workshop.
While the children are com-
fortably occupied, parents and
visitors are free to tour the JCC,
enjoy a class demonstration,
register for Fall programs, ask
questions and discuss member-
ship opportunities with a member
of the JCC staff or board of direc-
tors.
For more information call Ann
Kravitz, 932-4200.
Television Personality
Speaks at Hadassah
Business Meeting
WPBT, Channel 2. He is a grad
uate of Miami Beach Hurt,
School, a magna cum laude grad-
uate University of Miami and the
author of three books dealing
with the legal system. He has ap-
peared on the David Susskind
David Frost and "Good Morning
America" shows.
Charity Group Holds
Planning Meeting
The Association for the Ad
vancement of the Mentally
Handicapped will meet on
Wednesday, Sept. 15 at North
Miami Beach Senior Hit-h
School, 7:30 p.m. Dr. Robert
Wolk, Board President, has an
nounced that Ann Bishop an
chorwoman for WPLG-TV will be
the featured speaker. Elections
will be held at the meeting, and
Betty Grundwerg, Executive Di-
rector, will discuss the services
the group offers to the mentally
handicapped adults of the com-
munity.______
Stanley Rosenblatt
Ko'ach, the business and pro-
fessional chapter of Miami Beach
Region of Hadassah will hear
Stanley Rosenblatt, local attor-
ney, at their first meeting of the
1982-83 year, Tuesday evening,
Sept. 21, at 8 p.m., in the Tavern
Room of Jefferson National
Bank, 301 Arthur Godfrey Road,
Miami Beach.
Mr. Rosenblatt is the host of
"Israeli Diary" aired locally on
Who says kugel
has to weigh a ton?
Mueller's egg noodles make kugel
deliciously light!
IS
A kugel doesn't have to lie like lead in
your stomach.
With Mueller's light-tasting egg noodles
you can create a perfect holiday kugel.
Light. Tender. Delicious.
And Mueller's quality egg noodles have
been a Jewish tradition for generations
because they're so light. (Your grandmother
might have used them in her own kugel!)
For a delicately delicious holidayTcugel
your family will loveand for loads of other
holiday dishesjust remember the red,
white and blue colors that say Mueller's
egg noodles.
PS. Remember to try light Mueller's
spaghetti and macaroni, too!
J2.-.. N
Crusty-Topped
I
I
I
I
I
1
I
I
Noodle Kugel
I package (6 ounces) cream
cheese, softened
vi cup parve margarine.
softened
1 '* CUps sug.li
8 eggs, well beaten
4W cups milk
2 teaspoons vanilla
I teaspoon lemon jui
Dash salt
8 ounces Muellers egg
noodles
1* cup graham cracker
crumbs
lice ^^^f W cup parve marg
softened
argarine.
.1
teaspoon cinnamon
Beal together cream cheese and margarine: add sugar; mix well
Blend ineggs Stir in next four ingredients. Meanwhile, cook
nuodlesas directed; drain; combine with cheese mixture: pour
into 13"x 9" x 2 baking dish. Mix graham cracker crumbs and
cinnamon, sprinkle on lop of noodles. Bake at 350"F about I'.
hours oi until browned and crusty on top. Allow to cool at least
I
I
I
I
to cup light brown sugar
8 slices canned pineapple,
well drained
2 eggs
to cup cooking oil or melted
parve margarine
1 cup sugar
to teaspoon salt
Upside-Down
Noodle Kugel
I
I
I
to teaspoon cinnamon
I tablespoon lemon juice
to teaspoon grated
lemon rind
t ounces Mueller's egg
*"noodles
to cup finely cut dried fruits
(apricots, prunes, dates)
to up raisins
to cup chopped nuts
Coat a 9 square pan with margarine; sprinkle with brown
sugar Cut pineapple slices in half; place on sugar mixture In
large bowl, beat eggs ami oi I with next five ingredients. Mean
while.cook nocdles as directed: drain; stir into egg mixture
Add remaining ingredients: toss well Spoon into pan. Bake
40 to 50 minutes al J50*F until set and golden brown. Lei
imm-------------------------_ ,. r ,f. ,..,>..-. ,- ,i ,, ( n^-, i ------------- i iap ...^,.^^.-.1... m.i ii -iiiiAju into pan. diki
V30 minuu.-s;,cut in squares lo serve. K> to 12 servings 40 lo 5n minutes al J5CF until set and golden brown. Let
_ stand 5 minutes; loosen with spatulii and invcn over serving M
aaaal aaaaal saaaal sal bbibbi aaaaai aaaaa. ^bbP^bbW- '' '''"'' gW
latBaaB Ml wm wm aV W


Judy Drucker Honored As
:ecipient of Outstanding Citizen
Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewiah Floridian Page6-B
City Dedicates Memorial
Fieldhouse in Player's Honor
[ 1(jy Drucker, long-term
J Beach resident and coor-
wr of the Temple Beth
.oloro Great Artists Series, will
[honored by the City of Miami
Lh as the first recipient of the
^standing Citizen of the Year
lard.
[Miami Beach Mayor Norman
Lent and members of the City
Umission will be on hand as a
Ltrait of Drucker is unveiled on
Lday, Sept. 13 at the Theater
[the performing Art. Ceremon-
I will begin at 4:30 p.m., an in-
ation-only reception follows
E unveiling.
|Beach Commissioner, Dr.
ionard Haber, proposed the
ard during a City Commission
eting in February of 1982. At
I time, Haber said he felt the
jiual award for Outstanding
linen of the Year should go to a
raon who "really does some-
ng remarkable to make our
es better." Saying that
ucker met the criteria, he then
Judy Drucker
made a motion, adopted by the
City Commission, to designate
her as the first recipient of the
Award. "The work of Judy
Drucker over the past 15 years in
enhancing the quality of our lives
RETAILER Thucoupon
s redee maoie (or (ace
va'*eand 7< handling
(nidges orovided ai lot-
o*i it is received on a
retail le o' the product
specified herein You mail it
to Sun-Diamond Growers
oiCaiiforma PO BoxHW
Clinton Iowa 52734 On re-
quest you must
SjDpiy invoices
provrgsuff'-
: ent stock
3-rchasescov.
M11M3 1DSS12
(or redemption Other
use constitute* fraud
Coupon may not be 2
Assigned or transferred p
Customer must Dtiy ^
*r>y sales Ux Void o
where prohibited ^
taxed iitenwrequired^
or restricted by taw O
Cash value 1 20* Good
only m U S A
Offer limited to
or.eiojpor.per
purchase COU
PON EXPIRES
December 31
19RJ
"
RETAILER Th,s coupon
16 e to*'ace va j
.-.
Mvcdonareu
'"e^'oc-crscr' '
n You mail it to Sun- ^
Damono Growers o'Cai'for-
-a PO Box'404 Clinton low*S2734
3" 'equest
11 sup-
. -.ocr*
Swffi-
f'Mt0CPur-
^ases cover.
7QMSD lOObEb
:rd few reoemp-
c" Ot-^e* use consti-
tutes fraud Coupon may
not ce assigned or trans-
ferred Customer must pay
any sa es tax Void where
prohtb'ted taxed license
neqj*'ed o"fSt' N
If. 1 20C Gocooniy
mUSA O0e<
Kd to one
ctxjpo" per pur-
i-mt COU-
PON EXPIRES
December J!
1963
RETAILER This
coupon is redeem-
able for face value
and 7f handling
charges provided as
follows it is received
on a retail sale of either
product specified herein
You ma.l n to Sun-Diamond Growers of Cali-
fornia. PO Box H(M Clinton. Iowa 52734 stixted by lav.
un request you
must supply m-
wOKes proving
sufficient stock
purchases cov-
ering coupons
M11M3 105550
submitted for re-
demption Other .
use constitutes fraud
Coupon may not be
assigned or trans- Q
ferred Customer must u
pay any sales tax Void
where prohibited taxed, q
icense required or re-
Cash value 1/201 Good only
m U S A Offer
limited to one
coupon per pur-
chase COUPON
EXPIRES De-
cember 31.1983
When your family wants a snack, treat
them to the natural sweetness and wholesome
goodness of Sun-Maid" Raisins.
Sunsweet" Prunes and Sun-Maid* or
Blue Ribbon" Figs.
Enjoy And save.
SUN-DIAMOND GROWERS
OF CALIFORNIA
K. CERTIFIED KOSHER
.n-Diamond Growers ot California 1982
and in developing our City into
something that is the envy of
every city across the country, de-
serves recognition from our com-
munity," says Haber.
Drucker has lived in Miami
Beach since 1941. She watched
the City of Miami Beach grow
and as a musician felt that she
"wanted to contribute to the
City's cultural image." She has
brought such world renowned en-
tertainers to Miami Beach as the
American Ballet Theater, Martha
Graham Dance Company,
Leonard Bernstein, Mikhail
Baryshnikov, the New York Phil-
harmonic, Israel Philharmonic,
Laciano Pavarotti, and other
1 artists too numberous to men-
tion. Commenting on the award,
Drucker says "I am very touched
by this. One goes on working and
never really believes that there is
anybody out there that appreci-
ates it. When something like this
happens, it makes it all worth-
while that's why I love Miami
Beach."
Drucker's portrait will hang in
TOPA in a specially-designated
area set aside for recipients of the
Outstanding Citizen of the Year
Award.
The City of Miami Beach will
dedicate the Robert L. Michnoff
Memorial Fieldhouse on Friday,
Sept. 10, beginning at 7:30 p.m.
The Fieldhouse is located at
Flamingo Park's Memorial Field,
11th Street and Alton Road.
The building is named in
memory of Robert L. "Bobby"
Michnoff, who died in an airplane
crash two years ago at the age of
26. Bobby Michnoff grew up on
Miami Beach, playing on the
Miami Beach Hi-Tides football
team. He was selected as an All-
City tackle for the Beach in 1972.
His father, Dr. Donald
Michnoff, a local dentist, began
receiving donations for the field-
house from friends and relatives
shortly after his son's death. In
the last two years, Dr. Michnoff
raised over $96,000 to build this
memorial to his son. The City of
Miami Beach added 926,000 to
the fund to defray the cost of
bringing utility lines over to the
budding, located at the west end
of Memorial Field. Local ar-
chitect Peter Blitstein, donated
the plans for the building which
was constructed by the Cat
Kovena Construction Company.
The building houses separate
locker rooms for teams playing at
the Park. Prior to its construc-
tion, both teams shared the same
facility.
City officials will be on hand
for the dedication and ribbon
cutting ceremonies which will
take place before the kick-off of
the Miami Beach High and North
Miami Beach High football
game. Both teams will partici-
pate in the ceremonies.
Bank Opens New Branch
Intercontinental Bank announces the inauguration of its new
South Dade Branch.
Ribbon cutting ceremony of the new branch located at 13696
South Dixie Highway (U.S. 1), will take place on Friday, Sept.
10 at 6 p.m. The branch will be open for business on Monday,
Sept. 13.
The announcement was made by President Charles A.
Whitcomb, who added. "The new branch, with eight teller
windows, plus convenient drive-in-tellers will offer complete
personal and business services to this thriving community."
BrimW
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Page6-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 10,1982
West Bank, Gaza Village
Leagues Termed As Israeli
u
By KEVIN FREEMAN
NEW YORK -(JTA)-
Two leading Palestinian
figures from the West Bank
and Gaza Strip have accus-
ed the Israeli-backed Vill-
age Leagues of acting as
Israeli "collaborators" and
at the same time reiterated
support for the PLO as the
legitimate representative of
the Palestinian people.
"The PLO is the official repre-
sentative and spokesman of all
the Palestinian Arabs wherever
they live in the world," said Elias
Freij, Mayor of Bethlehem, in an
appearance via satellite from
Israel on the NBC-TV Meet the
Press program. He said that the
PLO is the accepted representa-
tive organization of the Palestin-
ian people.
RASHID SHAWA, former
mayor of Gaza, who was ousted
recently from his position by the
Israeli authorities, said also that
the PLO represented the Pale-
stinian people. In response to a
question that Israeli authorities
differentiate between the PLO
and the Palestinian people,
Shawa said that since the PLO
represents the Palestinians, "we
are part and parcel" of the PLO.
The program featuring the two
Palestinian personalities was
scheduled for an earlier broadcast
date, but according to reports,
Israeli authorities had refused
Shawa permission to travel to the
United States. Freij contended
that he, too, had been denied per-
mission to travel to the U.S.
Israel said that Freij's claim was
false.
Both Freij and Shawa accused
the members of the Israeli-
backed Village Leagues of the
West Bank as being "collabora-
tors" and that these Palestinians
who participate in the Leagues do
not represent anyone.
SHAWA SAID Defense Min-
ister Ariel Sharon's recent de-
clarations that Israel will not
allow a Palestinian state on the
West Bank is "absolutely reject-
ed by Palestinians." He said the
Palestinian people are entitled to
a home, to self-determination and
a "state of our own."
Freij, a more moderate Pale-
stinian official, reitered his call
for the reciprocal, mutual and si-
multaneous recognition of the
Palestinians by the Israelis. He
said there was a need for a poli-
tical dialouge between the two
peoples but that unfortunately,
there have been only negative re-
sponses to his calls from Pale-
stinian leaders and Israeli of-
ficials.
Both Palestinian officials re-
jected the autonomy proposals
under the Camp David accords
Hospital Host
Ward Party
This Saturday, the West
Miami Post and Auxiliary 223
JWV will host a Ward Party
jointly at the Veterans Hospital,
NW 12th Ave. and 16th Street.
The Post and Auxiliary members
attending will have the party for
the fourth floor patients. Stella
and Mike Pearlman are the chair-
men for the Auxiliary and Post.
Mrs. Charlotte (Murray) Mittler
is Auxiliary President and Nor-
man T. Levine is Post Command-
er.
JEWISH
WORSHIP HOUR
Kabbi Norman N Shapiro
lot" Tempif /ion. Miami, will
[appear on the Jewish Wor-
p Hour. Sunday, at 6 a.m.
on Channel 10.
unless, as Shawa said, it contain-
ed full autonomy with an eventu-
al goal of self-determination and
statehood. The former Mayor of
Gaza said Palestinians will not be
a "party to sign a submission to
give up everything to Israel."
FREIJ CALLED for a Pale-
stinian state on the West Bank
and Gaza with East Jerusalem as
the capital. Shawa, though not as
clear, appeared to indicate that
he accepted a similar proposal,
with a state on Palestinian soil on
the West Bank and Gaza.
Meanwhile, King Hussein of
Jordan said that he hoped pro-
gress can be made on a resolution
to the Palestinian question in the
aftermath of the Lebanon war. "I
hope that the world and the
United States in particular, con-
centrates on this issue with all
those desirous of seeing progress
towards the establishment of a
just and durable peace for it to
come about," Hussein said in an
interview via satellite from
Amman, Jordan on the ABC-TV
This Week with David Brinkley
program.
Hussein reiterated his support
for the Palestinian cause and re-
jected recent Israeli statements
that Jordan already is the Pale-
stinian homeland.
"I BELIEVE Jordan has
always associated with the Pales-
tinian hopes and aspir-
ations. That does not mean in
any way the issue is resolved."
He said that Jordan has provided
a home for Palestinians while the
issue of the Palestinian homeland
is being resolved.
Regarding the Jordanian
ouster of Palestinians in 1970 in
what has become known as
"Black September" when thou-
sands were killed in bloody fight-
ing with the Jordanian armed
forces, Hussein said the struggle
at that time "was between law
and order and chaos and anarchy
. This was an experience that
was a very sad one for all con-
cerned."
r"seum,
Mr. and Mrs. Ted Arison at a reception at Lowe nn mi
hosted by the Board of Trustees, to highlight the activities of
the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts. The
Arisons established the Foundation last Oct. with a gift 0fU
million. More than 150 exceptionally talented young artists
have received $400,000 in cash awards for their achievements in
music, dance, writing, theater and visual arts.
For Sale-Distress Oppty.
7000 sq. ft- DELI/Splty. Grocery/CATERING
BUSINESS In High Income Atlanta, Ga.
Neighborhood Near Major Regional Mall.
Owner undercapitalized.
Call Wm. S. Goldberg (404) 3521853 Bkr.
At one time, it was the custom to leave loaves of Challah or' 'Showbread'' on
the Temples altar, and to give the "rosh" or head of the dough to the priests.
Today, the dining table is an altar, and a small piece is removed from each loaf of
Challah and burned as a symbolic offering to the priests.
Homemade Challah is a warm tradition made simple, with HFII MANN'S/
BEST FOODS Real MayonnaiseThe Kosher Mayonnaise.
ihir m mi
CHALLAH
7 1/2 cups (about) unsifted flour
1 /4 cup sugar
2 pkg active dry yeast
1 tspsalt
1 1 /2 cups warm water (120"F to 130F)
1 /2 cup HELLMANNS/BEST FOODS Real Mayonnaise
4eggs
1 tsp poppy seeds
Grease 2 baking sheets. In large bowl stir together 2 cups
flour, sugar, yeast and salt With mixer at medium speed,
gradually beat in water: beat 2 minutes. At low speed
beat in 2 cups flour, Real Mayonnaise and 3 eggs Beat at
medium speed 2 minutes Stir in enough flour (about 3
cups) to make soft dough Knead on floured surface 10
minutes or until smooth and elastic, adding flour as
needed Place in greased bowl; turn greased side up.
Oover with damp towel; let rise in warm place 1 hour or
until doubled Punch down; divide into thirds. Let rest 10
minutes From 1 /3 of dough form 3 (14") ropes Place
side by side on baking sheet Braid loosely; pinch ends
Repeat with another 1 /3 o' dough, place on second bak-
ing sheet Rom remaining 1 /3 of dough form 6 (16")
ropes Make 2 braids Place small braids on top of large
braids; tuck ends under Cover with towel; let rise 1 hour
or until doubled Beat 1 egg slightly, brush on loaves
Sprinkle with poppy seeds Bake in 375 F oven 35 min-
utes or until browned and loaves sound hollow when
tapped on bottom Cool Makes 2 loaves.
QUICK BANANA CAKE
2 cups unsifted flour
1 cup sugar
1 tsp baking soda
1 /2 tsp salt
1 cup mashed'ripe banana
2/3 cup HELLMAUNS BEST FOODS
Real Mayonnaise
1 /4 cup water
1 1/2 tsp vaniiia
1 /2 cup finely cnopped nuts
Grease 9" x 9" x 2" baking pan Stir together
first 4 ingredients Add next 4 ingredients. With
rmxer a! med-um speed beat 2 minutes Stir m
nuts. Rjur into prepared pan Bake in 35
oven 35 to 40 minutes or until cake tester in-
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Makes 9 _
imaHBAiu
wi .1 s BESI FOODS By either name
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HELLMANN'S/BEST FOODS CARF3 FOR THE KOSHER KITCHEN.


Current Efforts to Inject
Religion Into Public Schools
Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B
NEW YORK Current
efforts to inject religion in-
to the public schools pose a
serious danger to freedom
of religion, the entire Bill of
Rights, and the balance of
powers between the three
branches of Government,
warns a report just issued
by the American Jewish
Committee.
Moreover, declares the report,
titled "The Fourth 'R': Religion
in the Public Schools," these ef-
forts "fueled partly, but not
exclusively, by the religious 'New
Right' constitute a "major
campaign" to "erode the wall of
separation between church and
state erected by the framers
of the Constitution.''
WRITTEN by Samuel Rabi-
nove, director of the Discrimina-
tion Division of AJC's Domestic
Affairs Department, "The
Fourth' R' "is part of an ongoing
series of "Pertinent Papers" on
current social issues being pub-
lished by the department.
National director of the de-
partment is Seymour Samet, and
national chairperson of the
Domestic Affairs Commission is
Richard L. Weiss
Pointing to President Reagan's
proposed constitutional amend-
ment to permit voluntary organ-
ized prayer in public schools,
Kabinove asserts that this pro-
posal, like other recent attempts
to legalize prayer in the schools,
violates the principle of separa-
tion of church and state because
public schools, being tax-
supported, "are clearly state in-
stitutions."
FURTHERMORE, continues
Kabinove, prayer in public
schools can never be really volun-
tary.
What eight-year-old.' "says
the paper, quoting from a recent
column in the Washington Post,
' is going to raise his hand
and (say he has a) constitutional
right to be excused?' "
It is pure sham,' continues
the booklet, in a quotation from
another Washington Post
column. "to contend that in
such circumstances prayer and
meditation' can be made volun-
tary' ..."
Because the Supreme Court
has repeatedly ruled against ef-
forts to introduce prayer and reli-
gious instruction into the public
schools, continues Rabinove,
the religious New Right' has
launched a drive to accomplish
its goal in another way by
Hadassah Meetings
Southgate Chapter of Hadas-
sah will hold its first regular
meeting on Monday, Sept. 13, at
I p.m. at the Southgate Terrace
Koom, according to Shirley Ros-
enberg, president.
The Lincoln Chapter of Hadas-
sah will hold the first meeting of
the year on Monday, Sept. 13 at
noon at 100 Lincoln Road Club-
f I?6" rannie Smith is President
of the chapter.
Aviva Chapter of Hadassah
win hold its opening meeting on
fonay-Sept. 13,at9:45a.m.at
the Kendall Acres Condominium
Uubhouse. Guest speaker will be
""a Cedan from the Success
Motivation Institute.
An "Evening Special Interest
hnUUp- as been formed and will
T a'ts opening meeting on
Tutsday,Sept.14at7:15 *mat
DBH2PeCJal^vents Room ^ the
Uadeland Burdines Store. A
ashion show will be held. Re
reshments will be served.
seeking legislation to curtail the
power of the Federal courts to
rule on school-prayer cases origi-
nating in the states."
THESE PROPOSED laws, he
declares, "threaten to upset the
delicate balance of powers be-
tween the executive, legislative
and judicial branches of Govern-
ment set forth in the Constitution
a balance that has been the
cornerstone of this country's po-
litical system almost from its be-
ginnings as a nation."
Furthermore, he emphasizes,
these measures could lead to less
stringent enforcement of Consti-
tutional protections: "Sponsors
of these laws obviously feel, with
good reason, that many state
courts will enforce Constitutional
rights with less vigor and effec-
tiveness than their Federal
counterparts.
"The U.S. Supreme Court as
well as Federal lower courts
. have traditionally been more
receptive to claims of Constitu-
tional rights than have state
courts, and also more effective in
implementing these rights .
State judges (are) less free from
political pressure and far
more vulnerable to the public
mood (than are Federal judges)."
STRESSING THAT the First
Amendment, which mandates the
separation of church and state, is
"first and foremost a safeguard
for the minority against the ty-
ranny of the majority," Mr.
Rabinove states:
"If Congress were to enact a
law barring the Supreme Court or
other Federal courts from review-
ing cases involving school prayer,
no provision in the Bill of Rights
would ever be truly secure again.
For any time that a decision of
the Supreme Court or a lower
Federal court seriously offended
a majority of both Houses, the
jurisdiction of the Federal courts
to hear the issue would be elimi-
nated."
Another effort to involve the
public schools in the teaching of
religious doctrine, continues Mr.
Rabinove, is 'the powerful drive
to discredit the theory of evolu-
tion in the public schools and to
compel the schools to teach
'scientific creationism' the
Biblical account of creation."
"Despite the effort to cloak
'scientific creationism' in scienti-
fic garb," argues Rabinove,
"there can be no serious question
that it is a religious doctrine."
RABINOVE contends that
public schools should teach
"common core values that are
broadly shared by religious be-
lievers of all denominations and
secular humanists as well," but
adds, "for reasons of law and na-
tional harmony, those lessons, in
the public school classrooms,
may not be couched in religious
terms .
"The men who framed the
Constitution were painfully
aware of what happened to 'here-
tics' and 'dissenters' in the many
lands where church and state
were joined and the historic
documents that helped shape the
First Amendment warned that
tax-supported religion would cre-
ate enmity and endanger free
don.
"Religious teaching belongs in
the home, the church, the syna-
gogue and the parochial school,
but not in the public schools of
this country."
Adath Yeshurun
Sisterhood Meets
The Sisterhood of Temple
Adath Yeshurun will hold its first
monthly meeting on Wednesday,
Sept. 29. at 8 p.m. at the Temple
Social Hall. Featured will be
Shirley Peters, radio commenta-
tor. Refreshments will be served.
Moe Levin
Unveiling
The Chaim Weizman Branch
343, Farband Labor Zionist
Alliance, will hold the unveiling
for Moe Levin on Sunday, Sept.
12 at 10 a.m. at the Mt. Sinai
Cemetery, Isadora Hammer,
president, announced. Rabbi Irv-
ing Lehrman will officiate at the
services, with Dr. Sol Stein and
Judge Zev Kogan in attendance.
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Pae8-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 10,1982
The Soviet Union and the PLO
By Terrene* Prittfe
London Chronicle Syndicate
The development over
the past ten years of rela-
tions between the Soviet
Union and the PLO has
been a spasmodic rather
than organic process. The
Russians burned thier fing-
ers badly over the 1967 war
and were later ejected from
Egypt. Thereafter, the So-
viet leaders have been su-
premely cautious in the
main Middle East area of
conflict, while strengthen-
ing ties, influence and ac-
tual presence on the peri-
phery thus in Libya,
Ethiopia, South Yemen and
Afghanistan.
The f ratridical conflict between
the Syrian and Iraqi Ba athist
Parties has made it impossible to
find a viable alternative ally to
Egypt. This is why the Soviet
leaders have turned to the PLO
as a substitute for a Middle East
State.
TEN YEARS ago, the Rus-
sians began regular arms deliver-
ies to the PLO to enhance its nui-
sance value; they began to give
consistent backing to PLO de-
mands to secure a sovereign
Palestinian state. All sorts of
signs of recognition of the PLO
followed. In 1974 its leader, Yasir
. Arafat, was first invited to Mos-
cow and then, with Soviet back-
ing, to New York to speak in the
UN General Assembly.
In 1975, the PLO set up an of-
fice in Moscow, and in 1977 train-
ing bases in Southern Russia.
Since then Soviet-PLO relations
have been steadily strengthened,
culminating in October, 1981, in
the logical granting of full diplo-
matic PLO status in Moscow, in
return for full PLO backing for
Soviet participation in a recon-
vened Geneva Peace Conference. I
Arafat's right-hand man, Abu
Iyad, declared that the "decision
of the Soviet Union to recognize
our office in Moscow as an em-
bassy signifies recognition of the
State of Palestine before its'
birth." and the same spokesman
declared on August 17, 1981: "If
we had the capability to sign a
treaty with the Soviet Union, we
would have signed a thousand
treaties; and if we controlled land
we would have allowed the Sovi-
ets a thousand bases, because we
ate dealing with a foe stronger
than Israel, the United States."
IN AN interview broadcast by
Voice of Palestine on October 21,
1981, he enumerated four joint
aims for the Soviet-PLO entente
to establish a sovereign Pales-
tinian State, under PLO control;
to strengthen the Soviet-PLO al-
liance; to induce all Arab nations
to "lift their embargo" on diplo-
matic relations with Moscow;
and to work for revolution in the
Middle East based on PLO
Marxism and its "pan-Arab posi-
tion."
Finally, on January 6, 1982,
Abu Iyad added a fifth joint aim.
This was for the Soviet Union
and the PLO to induce Jordan
and Syria to open battlefronts
against Israel "so that all Arab
revolutionaries can fight the
Israeli enemy.
For, "The only way open to the
Arab revolutionaries is fighting
and then all friends, the first of
whom is the Soviet Union, will
side with us without fighting,
not one inch of land will be re-
turned from the Golan or Pales-
tine through diplomacy,
memoranda or protests."
Not one of Abu Iyad's state-
ments was modified by Arafat.
Three of them were singled out
by Israel for particular attention
"The Chosen...
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that joint objectives include
the realization of PLO aims by
force, the spreading of the PLO
neo-Marxist gospel of revolution
in the Arab world, and the estab-
lishment of Soviet military bases
in whatever preliminary Pales-
tinian state may be established.
IS SHOULD be recalled, too,
that the PLO have laid claim to
the whole of the Kingdom of
Jordan. The reasons are demo-
graphic, because 60 percent of the
population of Jordan are Pales-
tinians, and ideological, because
the Palestinian "revolutionary
idea" presupposed the demise ol
the Ha she mite Monarchy. So far
at least, there has been no ex-
plicit Soviet Admission of direct
involvement in destroying the
Kingdom of Jordan, but the So-
viet Union must regard the
survival of the Hashemite
Monarchy as inimical to its own
concepts.
The most recent explicit PLO
resolution calling for the King's
overthrow was made in the Pal-
estine National Council on April
15, 1981; it was publicly ap-
proved by Yasir Arafat as being
"our brand of democracy, and we
are proud of it."
So much for joint Soviet-PLO
objectives. What the outside
world has failed to grasp is the
astonishingly close collaboration
which has sprung from them.
Since March, 1978, Arafat has
paid at least four, and possibly as
many as six visits to Moscow. In
addition, he has had at least two
meetings with Soviet Foreign
Minister Gromyko in Damascus,
in March, 1979 and January,
1980. His meetings with Ambas-
sador Soldatov in Beirut have
become matters of regular
routine, generally monthly.
When Soldatov is not available,
Arafat travels to meet the Soviet
Ambassador in Damascus. Close
liaison with the Soviet Union is
further maintained through
Arafat's subordinates.
THE RUSSIANS are very,
very interested in the PLO, and
their use of it is, finally, a link in
the field of subversion. The PLO
reaps the benefits of unstinted
Soviet aid, in military training,
procurement or arms, political
schooling, administrative co-
ordination, and expertise in sub-
versive action and techniques.
Estimates of the number of
PLO members trained in the So-
viet Union and other East Euro-
pean countries vary between
1,000 and 3,000. But Soviet arms
and instructors have been avail-
able for PLO camps inLebanon,
Libya and South Yemen as well,
and PLO members have in turn
been used to train terrorists from
Africa, South and Central
America, and Europe.
No comprehensive conclusions
can at the moment be drawn from
the intimate interlinking of the
PLO with the Soviet Bloc. The
PLO ia of course useful while it
remains a terrorist organization
as an agent of disruption. A PL()!
controlled mini-Palestine consist.
ing of the West Bank and Gaza
would be much more valuable.
FOR A STATE so small and
scattered, so economically un-
viable and politically immature,
would be a "natural" Soviet
client even more so since PLO
leaders believe, mystically and
mistily, in Arab "revolution."
What has been happening in
Central America could be re-
peated in the Middle East; an in-
dependent "Palestine" would
play the part of Nicaragua The
ways in which a poor and
basically helpless state could be
manipulated would be legion.
Here, then, may rest the explana-
tion of the inordinate interest of
Moscow in Arafat and his hench-
men. Of only one thing can one be
sure: that interest will continue.
Or Ohm Men's Club
Temple Or Olom Men's Club
will hold a breakfast meeting on
Sunday, Sept. 12 at 9:30 a.m. at
the Temple. Guest speaker will be
Howard Freedman who has just
returned from Israel and will give
a "Report from Israel." He will
speak of his experiences as a
member of the Israel paratroop-
ers. Mr. Freedman has been liv-
ing in Israel for several years.
Celebrate 5743
with a taste of tradition!
S
Manischewilz
QUALITY JEWISH FOOOS SINCE 5649
Produced under strict Rabbinical supervision B
For Kashruth Certificate write:
Board of Rabbis. P.O. Box 214. lersey City. N| 07303
***?!?


i*n ** o r .
V '
Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewiah Ftoridian PageB
HAMMOND-MARCUS
Dr. and Mrs. Daniel O. Ham-
mond of Miami, announce the en-
gagement of their daughter, Sara
Leah Hammond, to Mitchell Neil
Marcus, son of Claire Marcus,
executive director of the Green-
wich Jewish Federation in Green-
wich, Conn, and H. Robert Mar-
cus, former partner and commo-
dity trader with Mintz, Marcus &
Co. of Wall Street, and his wife,
Audrey Flack, photorealist
painter, all of New York.
Sara was bom in Miami, at-
tended Miami Beach Senior
High, Oberlin College, and re-
ceived a degree from Boston Uni-
versity. She is currently a profes-
sional singer in New York. She is
the daughter of native Miamian
Rosemond Rubin Hammond,
painter, and Daniel O. Ham-
mond. MD, gynecologist and is
the granddaughter of the late
Oida C. Rubin and the late Jo-
seph Hammond.
Engagement
Mitchell, a native New Yorker,
received a degree from North-
western University. He holds a
seat on both the New York Com-
modity Exchange and the New
York Mercantile Exchange and is
currently a commodities trader
for the firm of Mintz, Jaffe, Gold
& Co., Wall Street.
The couple will be married in a
private ceremony at the home of
the bride's parents in Miami this
month. The bride's sister, Helen
Hammond Goldstein of Miami,
will be matron of honor. The
groom's uncle, Allen Reiter, an
attorney >'n New York, will serve
as best man. Rabbi Brett Gold-
stein of Temple Shir Ami, West
Kendall, the bride's brother-in-
law, will officiate.
The bride and groom will be
honored at the wedding by the
attendance of their grandparents,
Mrs. Katie Hammond of Miami
Beach, and Raphael Marcus of
Hamden, Conn. Friends; and
relatives from New York, Massa-
chusetts, California, Maryland,
Pennsylvania and Georgia will be
attending.
After a European honeymoon,
the couple will make their home
in New York.
TV Anchorperson Featured At
Jewish Organization Luncheon
CTUDI0
Continental
Cuisine
fued jossi
welcomes
you Sack 10
1'S reno*ned
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
for a unique
,: ,' "j experience
Via'cn your 'able io your
nood m one or 5 ."dividual
'OOmj The Tent.
Afme Cellar. Siudio Place
'gane Sws Cnaiei
Flna Entertainment
At tha Piano
Alto violin playing
for your plaaaure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
IP'watt lunchaona arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THf GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREOIT CARDS
HONORED
2340 S W 32 A ve.
445-5371
closed Mondavi
Sally Fitz, anchor-woman for
WCKT (Channel 7) News, will be
the guest speaker Tuesday, Sept.
14, 11 a.m. at the meeting of the
Women's Committee of Jewish
Family and Children's Service in
the Belle Plaza Social Hall, 20 Is-
land Avenue, Miami Beach.
Frances (Mrs. Norman M.)
Giller of Miami Beach, chairman
of the publicity committee, said a
petite luncheon will be served.
Mrs. Birdie (Bernard) Nemer-
off, president of the Women's
Committee, said the JFCS has
initiated a program of counseling
and psychological help for deaf
students. Counseling for teen-
agers, adults and children con-
tinues.
The Women's Committee
began the program for the deaf in
May, and the initial reaction has
been so favorable that the com-
mittee will continue to fund the
program on an ongoing basis,
Mrs. Giller said.
The Women's Committee also
is sponsoring a mobile office of
the JFCS; a van that transports
counselors to various locations
around Dade County for sche-
duled appointments for those un-
able to go to the three area of-
fices.
Sinai Brotherhood Welcomes Officers
Mr. Leo Katz will be installed
as President of Temple Sinai
Brotherhood at Sabbath Eve
services at Temple Sinai of North
Dade on Friday evening, Sept. 10
at the 8:15 service. Rabbi Ralph
P. Kingsley, spiritual leader of
the congregation will preside at
services together with Cantor
Irving Shulkes.
Together with Mr. Katz, New
Brotherhood officers to be in-
stalled are: Vice Presidents,
Marvin Kaleky, Peter Gelbwaks,
Manny Deren, David Parish;
Teasurer, Barry Podolsky; Se-
cretary, Stan Greene; Past Presi-
dents Council, Marvin Dorn,
Jack Birnholz; Trustees, Bernie
Israelite Center Temple
3175 S.W. 25 St. Miami
Conservative Family Temple
High Holy Day Tickets Available
Members: $20 Non-Members: $30
Family Membership $125.**
Cemetery Priviledges Available
Rabbi Solomon H. Waldenberg Cantor Hyman Lifshin
For further information call:
445-1529
Dubrow, Bob Goldberg, Irving
Leopold, Norman Leopold, Paul
Luskin, Marvin Moss, Jack
Pasternack, Joseph Peiken, Cliff
Schulman, Peter Segall, Bob Su-
garman, Jerry Walder and Hy
Wiener.
Fashion Show
Congregation Bet Breira Sis-
terhood will hold a fashion show
Thursday, Sept. 15, at 8 p.m. at
the Temple. The review will fea-
ture fashions by Sheila Natasha
Friedman.
Selichot Services on Sept. 11
will begin at 10 p.m. with coffee
and cake proceeding the service.
The Have Infant Gifts, Jewelry, Personalized
Wallets, Gifts For The Home....And
Traditional Judaica Items. Daily:
Don't Miss It! 10-1 and 2-5
Closed Saturday Fri. & Sun.
1051 North Miami Beach Blvd.
947-7528
10-1
You'll neyer
know how good
borscht can be...
Until
you've tried
Golds
A HOLIDAY TRADITION
olds
*SCHT
Kosher Catering
New York Style
Giant Ice Sculptures
UNIQUE CUSTOM LIGHTING EFFECTS
On Or Off Premises
Exclusive Caterers To:
Temple Zion and Temple Or-Olom
can BETH-HARJNC.
BET-HERJNC.
592-5280
591-2559
Jarlsberg.
It's a big
wheel with
all lovers of
fine cheese.
The flavor of Jarlsberg" Brand Cheese is as natural as the Norwegians who
make it The full. rich, distinctive, nut-like taste makes it a favorite for noshing,
nibbling, serving with fruit or wine, and using it in your recipes. Jarisberg.
Every good store carries it.
Also enjoy Ski Queen* Brand Gjetost cheese, Nokkelost
spiced cheese and many other Tine cheeses from Norway.
c 1980 Nor$e(n0 Foods mc Slumlord CT 06901


PagelO-B The Jewtah Floridian. Friday, September 10.1982
V
ESJgj Save Cash-Sh<
i: i
4
cRrfcfe
I i
PRICES GOOD SEPT. 9-SEPT. 15
U S CHOICE BLLF CHUCK
Boneless Egg
Shoulder r -
Things to Eat- C
HICH AND FLAVORFUL '
California
EXTRA LAMi.l
27 SIZf
GARDEN f MESH
Tender
Broccoli
BO
(SAVE 20)
79
-<\i
Choose Pantry Pride for Choice Beef & Grade "A" Poultry
MEAT DEPARTMENT
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Lots O' Chicken
3 BREASTS
U.S. CHOICE
WHOLE OR POINT HALF
& 3 LEG QTRS
WITH BACKS
3 GIBLET PKGS
(SAVE 20
4Q* Brfeket$199
M\ SjdFPOUND (SAVE 60c) Jm POUND
Football Season's Here!
TAILGATE-ing or TV-ing...
Smart Fans Start at Pantry Pride
The "ALL
AMERICAN"
16 PIECES OF LUSCIOUS
Southern Fried Chicken
1 POUND OF DELICIOUS CHUNKY
Potato Salad
1 POUND CREAMY SHREDDED
Cole Slaw
1 DOZEN FRESH
Dinner Rolls
$A99
ALL
FOR
ONtr
9
"Goal Post
Party Tray"
Your guests will cheer both you and the team
when they dig into this beautifully garnished
tray of BOILED HAM. COOKED SALAMI. J 4 J
BOLOGNA. WHITE TURKEY ROLL and
AMERICAN or SWISS CHEESE Also Includes
pickle spears, olives and sweet gherkins At
this special low price you'll be leading the
cheering yourself
SERVES 10 TO 12 PEOPLE
3
OUND
U.S. CHOICE BEEF LOIN
Tenderloins
(WHOLE IN ^ ajaaa^. i^a*.
CRY-O-VAC) S ^P /^"l
(SAVE 1.00)
(NO SUBSTITUTIONS AT THESE PRICES]
MEAT OR BEEF
POUND
MtMi un Btrr _<_
Oscar Mayer HI
Weinere$-|89
SAVE
U S CHOKE BEF CHUCK
REG OB THICK CUT
(SAVE 50) 16-OZ
PKG
TYSON
Turkey Wings
US CHOICE
BeefC
RAEFORO-F RESH FILLETS
Turkey
TYSON 12-OZ PKC
FILLETS
Cnickon
lb 2.29 so
lb .49 10
lb 1.39 20
lb 2.59 20
lb 3.39 40
Fried Chicken ^1 2.39 eo
PANTRY PRIOE
SLICED ALL BEEF
,pklI1.49 .20
AMERICAN KOSHER
Franks or
Knockwurst
,,2pSS1.99 so
' FAMILY PAK MEATS v
Buy Big Save More!
II S CHOICE IROASTS STEAKS STEW BEEFl
Combo Pak
Beef Shoulder .. lb 1.89
3 LBS & OVER-FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
THIGHS BREASTS ( DRUMSTICKS
Fryer Combo Pkg... lb .99
3 LBS > OVF.R-U S CHOICE
Beef Cube Steak 2.89
3 LBS i OVERPANTRY PRIDE
Great Ground Beef LB .99
3 LBS OVER-U S CHOICE BONELESS
Stewing Beef.......lb 1.89
3 LBS 1 OVER-FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
Fryer
1.
PARTY SNACKS OR HERRING IN CREAM SAUCE
."3*1.89
SILVER SPRINGS-PREPARED CREAM BEET
.12r .69
Vita Herring
9-
.40
10
PANTRY PRIDE (SAVE 20c)
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Swiss Style
Yogurts E2
100% PURE CHILLED
Tropicana El
Orange Juice
$139
^^ (SAVE 56c)
AVAILABLE AT STORES
WITH SERVICE COUNTERS
HLBHhW NA1IONAL
Salami or
Bologna I
PICK YOUR OWN
GARDEN-FRESH
PRODUCE
JUCY a FLAVORFUL-MOUNTAIN GROWN
BardettPeersS ^ .99 10
SALAD SIZE-FIRM
Ripe TomatoesC .49 10
U S No 1 ALL PURPOSE WHITE
Poteto .... 10b 1.39 40,
DEL MONTE JET FLOWN TOP QUALITY HAWAIIAN
Pineapples > 1.89 10
GARDEN FRESH-TOPS IN VITAMIN A"
Carrots.......2..\ .49 .10
FRESH-ADOS ZEST TO SALADS
Fla. Avooadoe 2for .89 49
U S No I ALL PURPOSE UPICK
Yellow Onions .. lb .23 oe
U S No 1 ALL PURPOSE WHITE
Potatoes......5 bg .89 20
CRUNCHY FRESH LG 0 CT UM0K'
Green Peppers.. lb .49 20
kt
TEMPTEE WHIPPED
Cream
8-02.
. CUP
(SAVE 30)
89<
JACK S JUL FINEST OUAUTY
KRAFT PHILADELPHIA SOFT
BOZ
. PKG
SAVE
.14
KRAFT CRACKER BARREL-SHARP OR FXTRA SHARP
Cheddar Sock. 1.99 36
saroento deluxe mozzarella ^
~- .... pkg 1.69 10
SAROENTO
Qoud
nuaunv
Ctn
PANTRY
.. lb 3.19 .10
.10
9WOZ
. PKO
64-OZ
CARTON
BREAKSTONE'S LOWFAT. SMOOTH
OR CAUFORNIA q (SAVE 20{
vJieese .. cupjy^ mhm,
SMOKED
BORDEN SAVE Tiaiau
Egg Nog......."<31.S9 Vo Turkey
FISHERS-PART SKM 10 OZ PKG
Longhorn Chssss. 1.69 20
PANTRY PRIDE-SLICED NATURAL
Swiss Cnseee .. pkg 1.09 10
KRAFT SOFT MARGARINE
Parkay ...... 2 c8up1 .79 .10
PANTRY PRBE
TOP QUALITY
LARGE 2'.-INCH
Freestone
B- MAR WHITE MEAT
Turkey Rot
NUTTY FLAVOR AUSTRIAN
lb 1.39 .40
save IN-STORE BAKERY
ONLY AT STORES HAVING FRESH BAKERIES
CRISPY mm (SAVE 40)
-89*
PKG ^b#B)b#
SAVE
ib .99 .20
w -o Onion
lb 1.19 10 R0||3
DELICIOUS
*1.19 20
12
IB
.79 .10
CUP
WMI .10
. PKO
RE0OWF
Cresni Topping ont 1.19 10
CHOPPED OR SHREDDED
Cols Stew..
!!< WHITE. WHEAT OR OMON
Pita Pi
OWMPREBH
. .002
JEWISH STYLE CORN OR
1-89 .20 Onion Rye.....32 .98 .04
__ TASTE TREAT ONE DOZEN
" -79 .10 Mml Csfcs Donuts .1.09 10
OVEN FRESH
-89 .10 Apple Pie......each 1.89 .10
FRESHLY MADE
-1-89 Mac. 4 Cheese .1.89 40
PRI
ft.
*
An
Cora
Am

ua
Jin
'220
.


Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 11-B
> at the Pantry...
' Great Ways to Save!
cPride
'HIOA FRO/f N
HLOUI AH
jntry Pride I Schaefer
Orange Juice I Beer
>LUM W/ PASTE OR CRUSHED
Pope Tomatoes
28-OZ
CAN
88
1ELTA
Corned Beef
(SAVE 30C) ^
12-OZ
CAN
1
MINI S MOO I HI I M I IB
REG OH DIM MINKl'.I OMANC.t
Dr. Pepper or
Seven-Up
Save more on your total food bill or
well double the difference in cadi!
iEGULAR OR LOW CAL
)CEAN SPRAY
79
(SAVE 12C)
Cranberry
BTL. JL
FROZEN FOODS
SSORTE0 FLAVORS 1 OT CTN
SAVE
1.19 26
, CAN mlW .20
.2^11.00 .38
|AKTRY PRIDE
raffles...
RTSEYE UTTU- EARS
Com......"of! 1.39 so
i For One .'& .89 eo
(SAVE 50c)
Mustard
24-OZ. BTL.
PANTRY PRIDE
Grapefruit isavebo
Sections EQC
20c OFF LABELDISH 0ETEROENT 32 OZ BTL OAVC
Palmolive LJqukJ. 1.69 o
'5 LB BAG
Colossal Rice.....3.79 eo
MARINA
Vegetable ON btl 2.99 70
MT RHINE CMENIN BLANC OR FRENCH COLOMBARO
AJmaden Wine s B'.n 4.691 20
TASTY
Heinz Ketchup "i 1.69
SMOOTH OR CRUNCHYPANTRY PRIDE
Peanut Butter "^1.79 32
Juice
32-OZ^"^B^"W
BTLlj^fa^
REGULAR OR WITH PULP
Sunsweet isave io>
Prune ifof\$
CHICKEN. BEEF. MUSHROOM OR PORK
Ramin Pride
Soups 4/$-|00
(SAVE 56c) 3-OZ
CANS a-BLi
THINS, RINGS, STICKS OR LOGS
Pantry iSo- w)
Pride 2/QQ^
Pretzels 0*9
BES PAK TALL
Kitchen Bags
99*
(SAVE 30C)
15
COUNT
' On PINK PANTRY PRIDE
2 -12-OZ
CANS
59
FUNTIME SANOWICH
Glad Bags
STEMS 1 PIECES-PANTRY PRIDE
SO-CT AA
BOX aW
45
3201 .69 .20
1 Hteh.... ctn
^PPERlOOe FARMOCU S-SCRAMBLED EQOS W BACON
'..'.31.79 .30
WHITEHOUSE NATURAL
WHITEHOUSE REGULAR
Ilad"'006 '"** XU S-CHVZN
24aSI1.00 .83
.asj-25 .69 is
. JAR .69 16
I v. 30X
SWEET 5UE
1.79 .30 Whole Chicken c?n 1.99 ,6
VOZ PKQ CAPRI SUN APPLE FT PUNCH, LEMONADE OB
iye Pees 2 for 1.09 .17 Orange Drinks for 2.29
GENERICS
GENERC You Pay SAVE
Paper Towels .%ri .56 .34
GENERIC Hce.........3 bag .89 50
GENERIC TAGLESS Tea Bags.....,00& .99 ,00
GENERIC OWNER 7'. OZ BOX Mac a Cheese 3 for .79 .40
J0 GAL GENERIC Trash Bags.....S 1.49 ,00
GENERIC Facial Ttosus 00b& .55 .34
GENERIC HEAVY-DUTY LOUI0 LAUNORY |% 94 02 ivoiorgom 1.79 ,
GENERIC COCKTAIL 64 OZ JUG Cranberry Juice 1.69 .60
GENERIC 400-CT 1 PLY Bath Tissue.4 ^ .77 48
GENERIC Cat Utter 25 1.59 2M
PANTRY PRIDE
ieoz
JAR
100
, CT
Grape Jelly ..
T OZ SWEETHEART IMAGE
CoMCups ...
PANTRY PRIDE TWIN PAK-DIP 01
Potato Chips.,
LAMBRUSCO ROSATO OR BIAN
Rhinlte Wines
PERSONAL CARE
11 OZ BTL OR 3-OZ TUBE
PrsU Bhampoo.,
REG OR UNSCENTEO DEODORANT
Ban Roll-on ... an.
TABLETS
Bufferln
REG OR SUPERHOLD-PUMP
VKaks.........5btl
oo-ct
BTL
I 2SOZ
TUBE
You Ply (AVI
1.87 .62
1.67 .42
2.27 .40
1.67 .46
1.39 .40
REGULAR OR NATURAL
. ree Top
Apple Juice
(SAVE 34d
PACKAGED
BAKED GOODS
CINNAMON GRAHAMS,
DOUBLE CHOCOLATE OR
PEANUT BUTTER
Sunshine
PRICES GOOD SEPT. 9SEPT. 15
CULM IMk
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15I0S Fa!'lllTHa
?nHa%aoala
arnui
la, Pant
Specialty foods for the
HOUD
AYS
US W UWJm
The traditional Rosh Hashona dinner is one of the ways to welcome in the new
year. To help you prepare (or this festive event, most Pantry Pride stores will
carry a full selection of fresh ROOT PARSLEY. DILL and PARSNIPS in our
Produce Departments.
Our Grocery Departments will offer GEFILTE FISH, BORSCHT, SCHAV and a fine
selection of traditional WINES.
Look for loose SCHMALTZ HERRINGS. CHOPPED LIVER. CHOPPED HERRING
aa well as fruited and plain CHALLAS m our Appetizer Departments. Jars of
PLAIN and BEET HORSERADISH can be found in the Drtry cases and our frozen
meat case boasts a fine selection of EMPIRE brand CHICKENS and TURKEYS.
>'.ja4oM90M &r.i
MEYERS APPLE CINNAMON NATURAL
GRAIN OR SOURDOUGH
Muffins.....2*Sft
KP4SPY CREME APPLE BLUEBERRY
LEMON OR CHERRY
Pnylt Pies ... 3 pkgs
FRENCH TWINS OR STEAK
A&CRoUs
ONION PUMPERMCKUE
ONE
. PKG
VELVET CREME
20-OZ
, LOAF
BOX
.ore
VanPf
.99
.73
.89
SAVt
.31
.36
lH
JO
.10.
Most stores open
8am 'til 11pm daily
All stores
open Sunday


.
Pagel2-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, September 10,1982
l IMH
National Foods/Beverages
Spinach Rice Bake Sorrento Ricotta Dip
2 cups cooked rice
1 cup (8ozs.) Breakstone's
California Style Cottage
Cheese
1 10-oz. pkg. frozen chopped
spinach, cooked, drained
2 eggs .
Vt teaspoon salt
Dash of pepper
Combine rice, cottage cheese,
spinach, eggs and seasonings.
Spoon into greased 11% z 7'/i-
inch baking dish. Bake at 350
degrees, 30 minutes.
6 to 8 servings.
1 cup Sorrento
Ricotta Cheese
Vt cup sour cream
Vt teaspoon onion salt
' 4 teaspoon dry mustard
V* cup tomato juice
1 teaspoon lemmon juice
2 tablespoons catsup
1 teaspoon soy sauce
Fold together Ricotta Cheese and
sour cream. Sprinkle onion salt
and mustard over mixture;
blend. Add tomato and lemon
juices, catsup, and soy sauce.
Mix well. Chill and serve. Yields
1 Vt cups.
"Philly" Cheese Bell
J&B Whispers
L'Chaim
Delight your guests during this
festive holiday season with these
refreshing "recipes" from J&B.
i
Classic Whisper
2 oz. J&B Scotch, or
to taste
Lemon peel
Over ice cubes in an Old
Fashioned glass, pour J&B. Stir
well. Twist lemon peel over glass,
then drop in.
1 8-oz. pkg. Cracker Barrel Brand Sharp
Cheddar Flavor Cold Pack Cheese Food
1 8-oz. pkg. Philadelphia Brand Cream Cheese
Parkay Margarine
2 teaspoons chopped pimiento
2 teaspoons chopped green pepper
2 teaspoons chopped onion
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
Vt teaspoon lemon juice
Combine cold pack cheese food, softened cream cheese and 2
tablespoons margarine, mixing until well blended. Add remain-
ing ingredients; mix well. Mold into bell shapes, using two cold
pack containers coated with margarine or lined with plastic
wrap. Chill until firm. Unmold. Garnish with chopped parsley
and pimiento strips, if desired.
Yields two bells.
Country Style Soup from Maxwell House Holiday Side Dishes
Frosted Whisper
\V* oz.. J&B Scotch
Vt oz. white creme de menthe
Mint sprig
Pack a cocktail glass to top with
finely crushed ice. Combine J&B
and liqueur, then pour slowly
over ice in prepared glass- Pop
mint sprig on. Serve with short
straws.
1 raw beet, peeled and shredded
One-third cup water
1 pound lean beef, cubed
3 cups beef stock
2 cups water
1 Vt teaspoons salt
'/cup coarsely grated carrot
Vt cup coarsely grated turnip
1 small onion, chopped
2 tablespoons vinegar or to taste
1 tablespoon tomato paste
1 tablespoon parve margarine
V% teaspoon sugar
1 16-oz can sliced or shredded beets, drained
(juice reserved)
1 cup shredded cabbage
1 bay leaf
Freshly ground pepper
Dill sprigs (garnish)
Combine raw beet and water and let stand for several hours.
Combine beef, stock, water and salt in large saucepan and sim-
mer, skimming surface frequently, until meat is fork tender,
about 1 Vt to two hours.
While meat is cooking, combine carrot, turnip, onion, vinegar,
tomato paste, parve margarine and sugar in small saucepan.
Cover and simmer about 15 minutes, checking occasionally to be
sure mixture isn't too dry. Add canned beet juice and cabbage
and cook 10 minutes.
When meat is tender, add vegetable mixture, canned beets,
bay leaf and a few grindings of pepper and cook until heated
through. Add undrained raw beet. Taste and adjust salt and
vinegar as necessary. Ladle soup into bowls and garnish with
dill.
Makes two servings.
'Light' Cheesecake With Blueberry Glaze
% cup low-fat Friendship Cottage Cheese
2 tablespoons corn starch
2 eggs, separated
8 ounces low-fat Friendship Plain Yogurt
6 tablespoons granulated sugar, divided
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 tablespoon corn starch
1 cup orange juice
2 cups blueberries
In a large mixer bowl, beat together cottage cheese and corn
starch until well mixed. Add egg yolks and beat until well blend-
ed. Add yogurt, 4 tablespoons of the sugar and the vanilla; beat
until well blended.
In a small bowl beat egg whites until foamy. Gradually add
remaining 2 tablespoons sugar; beat until stiff peaks form. Fold
into cheese mixture. Pour into a lightly greased 9-inch spring
form pan. Bake in a 350-degree oven for 40 minutes or until firm.
Cake will be about one inch high. Turn off heat. Leave cheese-
cake in oven with door ajar for one hour. Refrigerate several
hours. Top with blueberry glaze.
To make blueberry glaze, blend in a small saucepan one table-
spoon corn starch with orange juice. Stirring constantly, bring
to a boil over medium heat and boil one minute. Cool. Arrange
blueberries over top of cheesecake. Spoon glaze over fruit.
Refrigerate one hour, or until set.
Serves eight.
Saucy Broccoli
1 tablespoon Breakstone's
Butter
1 tablespoon flour
'/ cup milk
'/ teaspoon salt
Dash of pepper
Vt cup (4 ozs) Breakstone's
Tangy Style Cottage
Cheese
1 hard-cooked egg
1 10-oz. pkg. frozen broccoli
spears, cooked, drained
Make a white sauce with butter,
flour, milk and seasonings. Stir in
cottage cheese and finely chop-
ped egg white. Pour over broc-
coli, sprinkle with finely chopped
egg yolk.
4 servings.
Variation: Substitute 2
medium tomatoes, halved and
broiled, for broccoli spears.
Mazola Meichel
Green Beans With Lemon Chive
Sauce
'.4 cup finely chopped onion
1 tablespoon chopped f reeze-
dried chives
1 tablesppon lemon juice
'/ teaspoon salt
2 pounds whole greens
beans cooked and drained
one-third cup Diet Mazola
Margarine
In small saucepan melt mar-
garine over medium heat. Stir in
onion, chives, lemon juice and
salt; heat thoroughly. Toss with
green beans. Makes 8 (about Vt
cup) servings.
White Cake
212 cups unsifted enriched
cake flour, fork stirred
before measuring
l'/ cups sugar
1 tablespoon baking powder
1 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon salt
4 egg whites
1 cup skim milk
Vt cup Mazola corn oil
1 teaspoon vanilla
Grease bottoms of 2 (9-inch) layer
cake pans. Line with waxed
paper. In large bowl of electric
mixer stir together flour, Vt cup
of the sugar, baking powder and
salt; set aside. Beat egg whites in
medium bowl of electric mixer
until soft peaks form when beater
is raised. Gradually beat in re-
maining V* cup sugar until mix-
ture forms stiff peaks; set aside.
Add milk, corn oil and vanilla to
flour mixture and, using medium
speed of mixer, beat just until
smooth. Fold in egg whites. Turn
into prepared cake pans. Cut
through batter with spatula to
remove large bubbles. Bake in
350 degree oven for 30 minutes or
until cake springs back when
touched. Cool in pans 10 minutes.
Remove from pans and cool on
wire racks.
CoffeeNut Bars
2 tablespoons freeze-fried
or instant Sanka Brand
decaffeinated coffee
1 tablespoon hot water m
1 cup unsifted all-purpose v*i
flour 4#"
Vt teaspoon double-acting
baking powder
Vt teaspoon salt
'/teaspoon baking soda
% cup chopped pecans
one-third cup butter or
margarine
Vt cup granulated sugar
Vt cup firmly packed brown
sugar
1 egg, slightly beaten
1 teaspoon vanilla
Dissolve coffee in water; set
aside. Combine flour, baking
powder, salt, baking soda and
pecans. Melt butter in saucepan.
Remove from heat and thorough-
ly mix in the sugars; cool slight-
ly. Stir in egg and vanilla. Add
flour mixture alternately with
dissolved coffee, mixing well af-
ter each addition. Spread evenly
in greased 8-inch square pan.
Bake at 350 degrees for 30 to 35
minutes. Cool in pan. Cut into
bars and sprinkle with con-
fectioners sugar, if desired.
Makes 2 dozen cookies.
Fillet of Sole
With White Grapes
1 lb. sole fillets
2 tablespoons butter
6 large mushrooms, sliced
small bunch of seedless grapes
Vt cup Friendship Sour Cream
Vt cup mayonnaise
Juice of 2 lemons
Preheat oven to 350 degrees.
Generously butter au gratin or
similar shallow dish. Arrange fish
fillets in dish. Melt butter in
small saucepan over low heat.
Add mushrooms and saute until
softened. Add grapes, stirring
gently. Add remaining ingredi-
ents and blend well. Spoon over
fish.
Tent with foil and bake until fish
is flaky and sauce is heated
through, about 20 minutes.
Serves 4.
Milchig Casserole
From the Chef
1 teaspoon salt
1 medium-sized eggplant,
sliced Vt" thick
Vt cup cooking oil
Vt cup chopped onions
2 cans (15 oz. each)
Chef Boy-ar-dee
Cheese Ravioli
in tomato sauce
1 cup grated Mozzarella
cheese
Salt eggplant slices; place waxed
paper over them; weight with .
large platter for 15 minutes. Dry
slices with absorbent paper. Fry*p
eggplant slices in cooking oil,
drain on absorbent paper. Saute
onions lightly. Arrange a layer of
fried eggplant on top of Cheese
Ravioli; then, sauteed onions.
Sprinkle with half of grated Moz-
zarella cheese. Continue layering:
Cheese Ravioli, eggplant slices,
then cheese. Bake uncovered for
20 minutes in 350 degree oven or
until cheese is golden. Serves 4-6.


St PnC
> I .....- io llW '
Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 13-B
ffer Holiday Suggestions
t

Fish Chowder
Makes four servings
ncooked potato cubes
I iced carrots
p>arsely chopped onion
rd cup sliced celery
Ircorns
af
hter
Ige (12 onnce) frozen fillet of cod, thawed
y.'i stick) Fleischmann's Margarine
Unsifted flour
ons salt
i skim milk
I parsley
Hoes, carrots, onion, celery, peppercorns and bay
water to cover in large saucepan to a boil. Reduce
immer 15 minutes. Add fish. Simmer 15 minutes or
akes easily with a fork. Remove fish, vegetables and
Boil broth until reduced to one cup. Meanwhile, dis-
cerns and bay leaf. Break fish into chunks,
rgarine. Blend in flour and salt. Stir in skim milk and
th. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly until
Ties to a boil. Add fish and vegetables. Heat through,
tarnished with parsley.
IServ.
Holiday Gift Cake
i pkg. Philadelphia Brand Cream Cheese
IParkay Margarine
tips sugar
ispoons vanilla
pps sifted cake flour
aspoons baking powder
i well-drained chopped maraschino cherries
> chopped pecans
> finely chopped pecans
pps sifted confectioners' sugar
espoons milk
ae softened cream cheese, margarine, sugar and vanilla,
itil well blended. Add eggs, one at a time, mixing well
addition. Gradually add 2 cups flour sifted with ba-
ler; mix well. Combine cherries and chopped nuts with
! flour; fold into batter.
a 10-inch Bundt or tube pan; sprinkle with finely
nuts. Pour batter into pan. Bake at 325 degrees, one
|20 minutes. Cool five minutes; remove from pan. Cool
Py. Glaze with mixture of confectioners' sugar and
lish with cherries and nuts if desired.
ke Ahead: Bake cake; wrap securely in moisture-
f wrap. Freeze. When ready to serve, thaw at room
are for 24 hours in moisture-vaporproof wrap.
Cook It With Gulden's
' Delightfully seasoned fish dish
2 tablespoons finely
chopped onion
2 tablespoons margarine or
cooking oil
2 tablespoons flour
1 cup milk
Vt teaspoon salt
'/teaspoon dUl weed
(optional)
1 teaspoon lemon juice
'/teaspoon pepper
1 tablespoon Gulden's (R)
Spicy Brown Mustard
Vt package (10 oz. size) frozen
cod, flounder or halibut
fillets; thawed, cubed; or
2 fresh thin fillets
approximately 5-6 oz. cubed
3A cup cooked cubed
potatoes (2 medium, raw)
3A cup soft bread crumbs
2 tablespoons margarine,
melted
Paprika
Saute onions in margarine, add
flour, stir. Remove from heat,
add milk; return to heat. Stir
constantly until thickened. Add
salt, dill weed, lemon juice, pep-
per and mustard. Add fish and
potatoes. Pour into a IVi quart
casserole. Mix bread crumbs and
butter and paprika; sprinkle on
top. Bake in 350 degree oven for
30 minutes. Serves two.
Kasha Honey
Bread Pudding
3-5 cups diced Wild Winds
Kasha and Honey Bread
(fresh or stale), crusts
trimmed off
3 cups warm milk, or 2 cups
milk plus 1 cup half n half
V* teaspoon salt
3 eggs, separated
One-third to '/> cups sugar
(or V* -one-third cup
light honey)
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
'A cup freshly-grated nutmeg
Grated rind and juice of
'/i lemon
'/ cup raisins (optional)
Soak bread and milk for about 15
minutes. Combine egg yolks,
salt, sugar, vanilla, nutmeg,
lemon juice and rind and raisins.
Pour egg yolk mixture over the
soaked bread and stir mixture
lightly with a fork until well
blended. Whip egg whites until
stiff and fold them into the bread-
custard mixture. Pour the pud-
ding into a baking dish. Set the
dish into a pan of hot water and
bake the pudding in a preheated
350 degree oven about 45
minutes.
Asparagus Salad
3A cup Mazola corn oil
Vt cup lemon juice .
l'/i tablespoons sugar
1 teaspoon salt
Vi teaspoon tarragon leaves
Vt teaspoon thyme leaves
'/> teaspoon oregano leaves
'A teaspoon pepper
Vt clove garlic
2 Pounds fresh asparagus
Measure corn oil, lemon juice,
sugar, salt, tarragon, thyme,
oregano and pepper into jar. Add
garlic. Cover and shake well.
Chill, then remove garlic
Trim scales and tough ends from
asparagus. Wash asparagus well.
Cook in 2 inches boiling salted
water in covered deep narrow
pan, just until tender. Carefully
drain and arrange in large
shallow dish. Pour Vt cup dress-
ing over asparagus; reserve re-
mainder to use as desired. Cover
and chill asparagus several
hours. Serve on lettuce, garn-
ished with tomato wedges and
Hellmann's real mayonnaise, if
desired. Makes 4 servings.
Old Fashion Tomato Bisque
Makes 9 servings
2 cans (1 pound each) tomatoes, drained
2 beef bouillon cubes
1 tablespoon sugar
2 teaspoons salt
1 teaspoon onion powder
'/teaspoon basil leaves
Vt teaspoon white pepper
1 bay leaf
Vt cup parve Fleischmann's Margarine
Vt cups unsifted flour
4 cups skim milk
Cut one cup drained tomatoes into large pieces. Combine re-
maining tomatoes and liquid, bouillon cubes, sugar, salt, onion
powder, basil leaves, pepper and bay leaf. Simmer 30 minutes.
Remove bay leaf. Force mixture through sieve.
Melt margarine over low heat. Blend in flour. Gradually stir in
milk. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until mixture
comes to a boil. Remove from heat. Gradually blend in tomato
mixture, stirring briskly. Add tomato pieces. Return to heat.
Stir constantly until hot.
180 cal-Serv.
Tetley Teaberry Punch
A fruit-flavored punchmuch favored by the young set.
1 quart water
V* cup loose or instant tea or 12 tea bags
1 quart cold water
2 (6 oz. each) cans frozen lemonade concentrate
2 (6 oz. each) cans frozen limeade concentrate
2 cups cranberry juice cocktail
2 (28 oz. each) bottles ginger ale
Bring one quart water to a boil in a saucepan. Remove from
heat. Immediately add tea. Cover. Brew five minutes. Stir, then
strain into punch bowl containing one quart cold water. Stir in
frozen concentrated fruit juices and cranberry juice. Place block
of ice or ice cubes in punch. Add ginger ale just before serving.
Makes about 5 quarts.
If using instant tea, simply combine the powder with 2
quarts cold water in a punch bowl. No need to boil water and
brew.
Yom Tod Treat
chicken bouillon cube
1 'a cups boiling water
1 small onion, thinly sliced
'/cup butter or margarine
2 tablespoons flour
1 package (10 oz.) Birds Eye Italian style
vegetables in sauce
1 can (7 oz.) tuna, drained and coarsely flaked
2 cups hot cooked small shell macaroni or spaghetti
1 tabelspoon grated Parmesan cheese
Dissolve bouillon cube in boiling water; set aside. Saute onion
in two tablespoons of the butter in saucepan until tender. Blend
in flour; gradually stir in bouillon. Cook and stir over medium
heat until thickened. Add vegetables. Bring to a full boil over
medium heat, separating vegetables with a fork and stirring fre-
quently. Add tuna. Reduce heat; ribver and simmer two minutes.
Combine macaroni, remaining butter and the cheese. Serve tuna
mixture over the macaroni. Makes three cups tuna-vegetable
mixture plus macaroni or three servings.



y.
Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 10, 1982


Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"Ye are standing this day all of you before the Lord your
God; your heads, your tribes, your elders, and your officers"
(Deut.29.9).
NITZAVIM
NITZAVIM "Ye are standing this day all of you before the
Lord your God that thou shouldest enter into the covenant
of the Lord thy God and into His oath which the Lord thy
God maketh with thee this day; that He may establish thee this
day unto Himself for a people, and that He may be unto thee a
God, as He spoke unto thee, and as He swore unto thy fathers,
to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob. Neither with you only do I
make this covenant and this oath; but with him that standeth
here with us this day before the Lord our God, and also with him
that is not here with us this day The secret things belong
unto the Lord our God; but the things that are revealed belong
unto us and to our children for ever, that we may do all the
words of this law" (Deuteronomy 29.9-28). "I call heaven and
earth to witness against you this day, that I have set before thee
life and death, the blessing and the curse; therefore choose life,
that thou mayest live thou and thy seed" (Deuteronomy 30.19).
"And Moses wrote this law, and delivered it unto the priests
. and unto all the elders of Israel"
(Deut. 31.9).
VAYELEKH
VAYELEKH "And Moses went and spoke these words unto
all Israel. And he said unto them: 'I am a hundred and twenty
years old this day: I can no more go out and come in: and the
Lord hath said unto me: Thou shalt not go over this Jordan. .
And Moses called unto Joshua, and said unto him in the sight of
all Israel: 'Be strong and of good courage; for thou shalt go with
this people into the land which the Lord hath sworn unto their
fathers to give them; and thou shalt cause them to inherit it. .
' And Moses wrote this law, and delivered it unto the priests the
sons of Levi, that bore the ark of the covenant of the Lord, and
unto all the elders of Israel. Now therefore write ye this song
for you, and teach thou it the children of Israel; put it in their
mouths, that this song may be a witness for Me against the
children of Israel" (Deuteronomy 31.1-19).
(The recounting of the Weekly Portion ol the Law it extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History ol the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman-
Tsamir, $1$, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president ol the society dis
fributing the volume.)
Wedding
Hebrew Academy
The Rabbi Alexander S. Gross
Hebrew Academy's 35th Instal-
lation Dinner will take place on
Sunday evening, Sept. 12, in the
ballroom of Temple Moses.
The new school year brings a
record enrollment for the aca-
demy, "more than we have had in
the past five years," reported I.
H. Abrams, Chairman of the Ex-
ecutive Committee, "as well as an
outstanding Executive Commit-
tee and Board of Directors to
handle the many items of impor-
tance pertaining to maintaining
this most prestigious school."
Dr. Elias Herschmann will
again head the Board of Directors
as President, along with Dr.
Morton Lieberman as Chairman
of the Board; Seymour Reinhard,
assistant chairman of the board;
I. H. Abrams, chairman of the
executive committee, president
emeritus; Mayor Norman Ciment
and Irving Firtel, and George
Kimmel, assistant chairman of
the Executive Committee.
Honorary Vice Presidents are
Charles Fruchtman, Henry Pen-
chansky, Mendell Selig, William
Elects New Officers
Silverstein, Oscar B. Schapiro
and George Feldenkreis.
Senior Vice Presidents are Je-
rome Bienenfeld and Oscar Mam-
ber. Vice Presidents are Richard
Bloom, Dov Dunaevsky, Leon
Firtel, Gerald Ness, Dr. David
Reinhard, Michael Reinhard;
Barry Schreiber, Bonnie Slavin,
Mike Weiller and Nathaniel
Zemel. Hyman Chabner, Treas-
urer; Gertrude Shapiro, assistant
treasurer; Dr. Frank Stein, secre-
tary; Hermia Reinhard, assistant
secretary; Harold Litwin, record-
ing secretary; Dr. David Galbut.
corresponding secretary; Joseph
Wiesel, financial secretary; Dr.
Douglas Slavin, assistant finan-
cial secretary; Moses Grund-
werg, auditor; Dr. Martin Brody,
medical advisor.
The Executive Committee con-
sits of Howard Bienenfeld, Louis
Chibnik, Dr. Norman Ditchek,
Yecheskel Greenbloim, Dr. Joan
Harris, Dr. Martin Kalish, Judge
Alan Kuker, Dr. Herbert Lerner,
Dr. Randy Makovsky, Shale Nis-
kin and Rabbi Albert Schwartz.
Reserve For The
High Holy Days
traditional services
V
BRING YOUR FAMILY
TO OUR HOUSE
FOR THE HOLIDAYS!
ac *?> inoomparebla I
Fallsvii
Indoor A Outdoor Tennis. Indoor & Outdoor Pools
Robert Trent Jones Golf Course. Poehtide Lunch
K63rth Club. Saunes a Co-Ed Whirlpool Spa. Jogging
Indoor Mini-Gait Gym. Boating a Fishing On Our Lake
Indoor Disco Reavr Skating. Entertainment a Nrte Club
Children's World A Pool. Oay Camp A Teen Program
<
HO'EL (914) 647-5100 NYC (212) 947 44? IN MONTREAL 1514)611-7000/
TOLL FREE CALLS IN ALL STATES EXCEPT NEW YORK DIAL 800-431-0152 /
tvjfjbj
W
Mrs. Richard Hoffman
Mizrachi Women
Elect New
Representative
Mrs. Regina Wang, president
of the Florida Council of Amer-
ican Mizrachi Women, announces
the appointment of Marjorie
Green as Florida field representa-
tive. She will be responsible for
the formation of new chapters in
Florida and will act as adviser to
the 23 existing chapters.
Mrs. Green is a graduate of
Bay Path Junior College and
Teachers Institute for Women.
She has been involved in Jewish
Organizations on an administra-
tive level for the past 20 years
and has served on the National
Board of Women's Branch of
UOJCA as president of the Phil-
adelphia and Connecticut region,
chairwoman of the Board of
Akiva Hebrew Day School,
Southfield, Michigan, and has
held the office of vice president of
three Mizrachi chapters.
WIDOM HOFFMAN
Ilisa Joy Widom, daughter of
Rita Swichkow and the late
Robert Widom of Miami, and
Richard William Hoffman, son of
Alvin and Betty Hoffman of
Cleveland, Ohio, were married
Aug. 27 at Temple Beth Am.
Rabbi Herbert Baugard offici-
ated. A reception was held at
Sheration River House.
The bride s attendants includ-
ed Elizabeth Pearson, Marica
Finkel, Debra Sharp and Leslie
Books.
James Marshall was best man,
with Mitchell Widom, Glenn
Widom and Howard Schnitz as
ushers.
The bride wore a Renaissance-
style gown with full puffed
sleeves, and the entire bodice and
sleeves of Aleucan lace were hand
embroided in seed pearls and
beads.
Hiaa is a graduate f
State and John Marshall Sc
of Law, Cleveland State l
sity, and will practice in r
Richard is a graduate of |
State and is currently atu
the University of Toledo
of Law.
Jaf-jt-rbaa.T
B'nai B'rith
Women Meeting |
North Shore Chapter No.i
B'nai B'rith Women. wiUk
meeting on Monday. Sept
noon at Surfside Conunu
Center. Guest speaker wj
Phyllis Lax, followed by a |
tion and answer period.
r
-tractf**!?
t>t}*9fcsl<
For the holidays. |
serve Gold's with
meat, fish and fowl.I
Gold's adds m\
extra-flavor to
ketchup, mustard
and mayonnaise
... All without
adding calories.
FREE RFClPEBOOKl
Send stamced sen
addressed enveiow ii
Gold s B-iv" NY iij|
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Chicken
If you can't find a fresh Empire Chicken, put some boxes of Fresh-Frozen Empire
Chicken pieces in your freezer. Then you'll be prepared to serve a good home-
cooked meal at any time ... for your family and special guests. Remember, everyone
should eat Empire Chicken at least once a week.
ACCEPTED AND
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Empire Kosher Poultry. Inc. 1-717-436-2131 Telex. 84-2538
"Empire Kosher Poultry is Proudly Distributed by:
Mendelson, Inc.
Miami Beach
(305) 672-5800


Friday, September 10,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 16-B
Bar/Bat
Mitzvah
JEFFREY MITNICK
i, Jeffrey Mitnick, son of Mr. and
Imr. Jules Mitnick, will be called
L the Torah as Bar Mitzvah on
Isept Hi am- at TemPle <*
|oiom.
The celebrant is.a student in
he Judaica School and is an
iehth grade student at Arvida
Junior High School. He has re-
vived honors in math and is
Live in USY, and the Tamiami
fark Khoury League ball team.
Mr. and Mrs. Mitnick will host
reception at the Temple's Social
all following the service in
lonor of the occasion.
Special guests will include Mr.
nd Mrs. A. Luski from North
harolina, and Mr. and Mrs. K.
Mitnick from Maryland.
ERIC WEICHSELBAUM
Eric Weichselbaum, son of
Irs. Kochelle Weichselbaum.
kill be called to the Torah as a
tar Mitzvah on Saturday
Drning, Sept. 11, at Temple
linai.
MARK KRONFELD
Mark Kronfeld, son of Mr. and
Irs. David Kronfeld, will become
Bar Mitzvah at Temple Beth
loshe. Saturay morning. Rabbi
ouis M. Lederman will officiate
nd Hazzan Moshe Friedler will
bant the Sabbath liturgy.
Mark is an eighth grade stu-
leni at North Miami Jr. High.
Je excells in all sports.
In Mark's honor, his parents
kill sponsor the kiddush follow-
(ig the services.
STEPHANIE ILENE
FREEDMAN
Stephanie Ilene Freedman,
aughter of Dr. and Mrs. Robert
[reedman. will be called to the
forah as a Bat Mitzvah on Fri-
ay evening at Temple Beth
loshe. Rabbi Louis M. Leder-
ban will officiate and Hazzan
jtoshe Friedler will chant the
abbath liturgy.
The celebrant is an eighth*
^ade student at Miami Shores
reparatory school. Stephanie
[as the winner of a school award
ft creative writing and is an
ptive member of the Kadimah
supatUSY.
In Stephanie's honor, her
arents will sponsor the Oneg
nabbath following the services.
Torah Gift Shop
{Offers Israeli Dolls
The Mollie Kahaner Sisterhood
th Torah Gift Shop of North
ami Beach is featuring Nam-
Israeli-made dolls. Lolly
bllman is the director of the
shop, and Betty Joy Field is
Sisterhood Gift Shop Chair-
man, working under the direc-
f> on co-Presidents, Ellen
pnerand Arlene Keil.
Cantor Honig at
Tifereth Jacob
or Abraham D. Honig will
( H the High Hoi] Day
": Tempi,- Tifereth Ja-
Rabbi
> at ham H. Zwitm
Garbuz
Freedman
Minsker
JONATHAN ERIC
MINSKER
Jonathan Eric Minsker, son of
Mr. Joel Minsker and Mrs. Susan
Morton, will be called to the
Torah as a Bar Mitzvah, Satur-
day, Sept. 11, 9 a.m. at Beth
David Congregation.
The celebrant is a student in
the Beth David religious school,
and is in the eighth grade at Pal-
metto Junior High.
Mr. Joel Minsker and Mrs.
Susan Morton will host a recep-
tion in honor of the occasion at
Miss Florida Yacht.
LAWRENCE IRA GARBUZ
Lawrence Ira Garbuz, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Garbuz, will
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday, Sept. 11,
10:30 a.m. at Temple Emanu-El.
The celebrant is in the eighth
grade at the Lehrman Day School
and has been on the Rabbi's
Honor Roll serveral times. Ht
received a gold and silver medal
in the AMI test and has received
a number of ribbons from the
Dade County Youth Fair for lit-
erature.
Mr. and Mrs. Garbuz will host
in honor of the occasion on Sun-1
day at Temple Emanu-El. Special
guests will includes grandparent
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Garbuz,
California; Mr. and Mrs. Lionel
Garbuz, California; Mr. and Mrs.
Joe Lunsky. South Africa; Mr.
and Mrs. Howard Lunsk, New
Jersey; and Mr. and Mrs. Chaim
Rubin, Puerto Rico.
Groundbreaking ceremonies for the AmeriFirst Federal branch
at 71st Street and Collins Avenue included (left to right) Tom
Omar, chairman of the board of the financial institution, Metro
Commissioner George Valdes, Metro Commissioner Barry
Schreiber, and Florida Goldcoast Chamber of Commerce Presi-
dent Peter Cohn
Housekeeper-Companion
Sabbath observant woman, preferably
Hungarian speaking background, to maintain
Miami Beach 1-bedroom apartment for elderly
woman. Take full charge 24-hour day sleep-in
basis, including cooking, cleaning, shopping,
etc. Permanent basis effective mid-late Oc-
tober. Reply P.O. Box 1161, Berkley, Michigan
48072.
Margate
Fleischmann's Margarine would like
to show you how much healthier
traditional cooking can be with
June Roth's Loiv Cholesterol Jewish
Cookery. In it you'll find favorites
like noodle kugel and blintzes made
the sensible way. Fleischmann's
Margarine can be part of your
,i cooking Fleischma
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from 100 V corn oil. It
K Certified Kosher
Low Cholesterol Jewish Cookery from
I Fleischmann's Margarine. A $3.95 value for
onlv Si.95 plus $1.00 postage and handling
j with the front label from any package
| of Fleischmann's Margarine. Write to:
i Fleischmann's Margarine Cookbook
P.O. Box 198
I Teaneck. New Jersey 0768b
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Whether you prefer regular
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Fleischmann's Sweet Unsalted
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Fleischmann's Gives Every Meal A Ho! id ay Flavor.


.
Pagel6-B The Jewish Florkiuuj. Friday, September 10,1982
Public Notice
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THC CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADS COUNTY
Civil Actieei
Nc.lMJlH
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MAR Rl A6EIN RE: THE
MARRIAGE OF
ELXUB CAVIN.
Petitioner Husband
and
TREVA R. WHISBY CAVIN.
Respondent Wife
TO: TREVA R. WHISBY
CAVIN
Address and Residence l.'n-
known
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your MarrUge
has been filed and commenced
In thla court and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defense* If anv. to It on
Lloyd M Routman. Eaq. attor-
ney for PeUUoner, ahon ad
dreaa is Suite OB. 7900 NE Sad
Avenue, Miami. PL SUM and
flic the original with the dark
of the above ityled court on or
before Oct 1, otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
Thla notice shall be published
once each weak for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my band and the
seal of amid court at Miami.
Florida on thla Si day of
August. 1883.
RICHARD P BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY CP Copeland
Aa Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PETITION-
ER
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. ESQ.
Suite 15, 7900 NE 2nd Ave
Miami, FL 33138
18091 Sept. S. 10.
17.34.1983
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-573
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANN G. BORNSTEIN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE :
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of ANN G BORN-
STEIN. deceased. File Number
82-8573. is pending in the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County.
Florida. Probate Division, the
address of which Is Dade
County Courthouse. 73 W Flag-
ler Street. Miami. Florida
33130 The personal represen-
tatives of the estate are ROSA
LEE KLEIN, and PHYLLIS B
FIX. whose address is c-o
DONALD M KLEIN. 407 Lin
coin Road. Miami Beach. Fla
33139 The name and address of
the personal representative"*
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or1
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBUCA
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to fUe
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim is
not yet due. the date when it
will become due shall be
stated If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated If the claim is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative
All persons interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITH-. THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE to f any ob-
jections they may nave that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of .he court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion S#ptember3. 1982
s ROSALEE KLEIN
s- PHYLLIS B FDC
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
ANN G BORNSTEIN
Dec eased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSON '
REPRESENTATIVES:
KLINE MOORE s>
KLEIN PA.
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach. Fla. 33139
: (1001938-4771
Septembers. 10. IMS
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
Nc 82-13248
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EPRENE ETIENNE.
Petitioner Husband
and ____
MERCTLIA ELOI ETIEN-
NE.
Respondent Wife
TO: MERCTLIA EUO
ETIEN NE
Fontamara
Ruelle Duran NO. M
Port au Prince, HalU. W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
in thla court and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address la Suite SIB. 7900 NE 2
nd Ave. Miami. PL SUM and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Oct 1. otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for for the relief prayed for
in the complaint or petition.
Thla notice snail be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my band and the
seal of said court of Miami.
Florida on this Slat day of
August IMS.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: C P Copeland
As Deputy dark
ATTORNEY FOR PETITION-
ER
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. ESQ.
Suite 61B. 7900 NE 2nd Avc.
Miami. FL 33138
18090 Sept S. 10.
24. 1982
IN I HE CIRCUIT COURT 6f'
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY' FLORIDA
CASE NO 82 13141
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE The Marriage Of:
Marcel EtUene
PeUtloner Husband
and
Rolande EtUene
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
Respondent-Wife
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU. ROLANDE ETTDENE.
are hereby notified to serve a
copy of your Answer to the Pe-
tition For Dissolution of Mar-
riage filed against you. upon
MARCEL ETTEENES attor-
ney. GEORGE NICHOLAS.
ESQUIRE. 813 N.W. 13th Ave-
nue. Miami. Florida 33138. and
file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before October
1. 18*2. otherwise the PeUUon
will be confessed by you
DATED this 30 day of Au-
gust. 1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER
CLERK
By: N A. Hewett
Deputy Clerk
18087 Septembers. 10:
17.34.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 12112 30
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIE CLEMANCE
HAMILTON.
PeUUoner-Wlfe
and
AUSTIN HAMILTON
Respondent-Husband
TO: AUSTIN HAMILTON
District Eastern
Union Village
Nassau. n-fc-
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FTED that a petmon for Dtsso-
luuon of year Marriage has
been filed and SEsssMfMBsM in
this court and you are required
lo serve a copy of your written
If saw to it on LAW
OF LLOYD M-
ROUTMAN
Sasste 81* 7M8 NE 2nd Ave
MMsaL PL SIM. and me the
oflgmeJ with the clerk of the
shove styled court <
October 1. II
fault will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for in
the complaint or peutlon
This notice shall be published
once eacn week for four con
secuUve weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this II day of Au-
gust. 1MB.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC. P Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal)
Law Office of
Lloyd M. Routman
Suite 819.
7900 NE 2nd Ave
Miami. FLS3138
Attorney for PeUtloner
18093 Septembers. 10:
17.34.1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
INOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 82 11235
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FENEL ANTOINE.
PeUtloner Husband
and
ALINE GREFFIN
ANTOINE.
Respondent-Wife
TO: ALINEOREPPIN
ANTOINE
3 Avenue NE
BOLLOSSENo 48
Port-au-Prince.
Haiti. W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petmon for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. ESQ..
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address U Suite 815. 7900 NE
2nd Avenue. Miami FL 33138.
and Ola the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October l, 1983:
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for tour con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this SI day of Au-
gust 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC. P.Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal i
LLOYD M.
ROUTMAN. ESQ.
Suite 818.
7900 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18093 Septembers. 10:
17.34. 1983
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO 82-13324 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
PAULIN JEAN
Petitioner-Husband
and
MARIE T. JEAN
Respondent-Wife
TO: MARIE T JEAN
Residence unknown
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU. MARIE T JEAN, are
hereby notified to serve a copy
of your Answer to the PeUUon
For Dissolution of Marriage
filed acainst vou. upon PAU-
LIN JEAN'S attorney.
GEORGE NICHOLAS. ES
QL IRE. 812 N W 13th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33138. and file
original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before October 1.
1983: otherwise the PeUUon
will be confessed by you.
DATED this l day of Septem-
ber. 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
CLERK
By M. J Hartnen
Deputy Clerk
;-v4 September 3. 10;
________________________17.24. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 12-13004
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE The Marriage of:
ARCTLIO GEORGE
OCHIL. Huaband-PeUtloner
and
MARIA REGLA OCHIL.
Wife-Respondent
TO MARIA REGLA
OCHIL
Residence
address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
ALBERT L CARRICARTE.
PA attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2491 N W 7th
Street. Miami. Florida 33123
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 1. 1M2:
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secuUve weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 39 day of Au-
gust 1983
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal >
ALBERT L
CARRICARTE. P A.
Attorney for the Husband
2491 NW. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33125
Telephone: 849-7*17
18078 Septembers. 10;
17. 34.1989
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY'FLORIDA
PROBATE Dl VSION
File mt***r 82 s*4l
Division 83
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAULINE SOLOMON,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of PAULINE SOLOMON,
deceased. FUe Number82-5841.
is pending in the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida-
Probate Division, the address
of which is Dade County Court-
house. 73 West Flagler Street
Miami Florida 38130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
AU interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court
WITHIN THREE MONTHSOP
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OP THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(3) any objection by an inter-
ested person to whom noUce
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cation of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Personal Representative
HAROLD SOLOMON
18 Durham Street
Nashua,
New Hampshire 03083
Attorney for Personal
RepresentaUve:
CYPENACYPEN
By:
MICHAEL A
DRIBIN. ESQ.
838 Arthur Godfrey Road
P.O Box402099
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone 1309) 933-4731
18088 September 3. 10.1H2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in buatnen
under the flcUUous name of
CAL'S RESTAURANT at 8010
N.W 22nd Avenue. Miami.
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
NEALIE YOUNGBLOOD
GEORGE GILBERT
Attorney
One Lincoln Road Bldg
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
18004 August 27;
September3. 10.17. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
inder the ficUtious name Nep-
ine Acts, at 6961 Carlvie Ave-
nue. Miami Beach. Florida in-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
Sonia Zlelonka
Michael Zielonka
NOTICE UNDER
sS!2?ow"3wu-
2- -ESS.
Bernstein st 1801 ?onV*
Leon. Coral Gables. n.%*
intends to WtSSTtS ,2j*
with the Clerk of ?<*
Court of Dade Omm^fSS?
^JoelBe^VpT*
I808 8l*mber3,io.
"3*1982
owners
September 3.10;
17.24.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA' IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.83-13885
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF:
NELLY VARGAS.
Wife,
and
HUGO VARGAS.
Husband.
TO: HUGO VARGAS
CarreraSONo 2344.
Apt 512
Bogota. Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
fUed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. U any. to it on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
PA., attorney for PeUtloner.
whose address is 2491 NW. 7th
Street Miami. Florida 33129.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 1st. 1M2:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or peUt ion.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con
secuUve weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 39 day of Au-
gust. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByV Berkley
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal I
ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE. PA.
2491 N.W 7th Street
Miami, Florida 33139
Attorney for PeUtloner
ISBN Septembers. 10;
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME La*
NOTICE BEAM*.
GIVEN that ft, mSSSS
desiring to engage u, bu^
"" the ficnuoua !?
North Miami Beach. Fl jj,,,
intends to register said rm
with the Clerkof Sf&S.
OourtofD^c^tTn^'
Bagels East Inc., Owner
Stuart Morghueta.p^
^^* August n
Septembers. iq.Tt iS.
17 34.1883
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage in buatneai
under the flcUUous name For
tune Exchange Club at ion
Kane Concourse. Suite 202 Bay
Harbor Islands. Fl SUM in-
tends to register said namf
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. F lortda.
Bruce M. Singer.
Vice President
1MM August*?;
September S, 10.17.1N3
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA'IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
N*>. 83-13159
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOSE I AYALA.
PeUtloner.
and
MIGDALIA AYALA.
a-k-a
MIGDALIA TORRES
ACEVEDO,
Respondent
TO: MIGDALIA AT ALA.
a-k-a
MIGDALIA TORRES
ACEVEDO
Victor Rojas No. 2
CalleB. No 307
Areclbo.
Puerto Rico 00812
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a PeUUon for Disso-
lution of your Marriage hat
been flies and commenced In
this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any. to it. on CAR-
LOS M. MENDEZ Esq Attor-
ney for PeUtloner. whose ad-
dress Is 2989 W 4th Averaje,
Hialeah. Florida. 33012. and file
the original with the Clerk of
the styled Court on or before
October 1 1982. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week, for four con)
secuUve weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami.
Florida, on this 31 day of Au-
gust 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Countv. Florida
CARLOSM MENDEZ
Law Offices
2985 W 4th Avenue
Hialeah Florida 33012
Attorney for PeUUoner
GUSTAVO GARCIA-
MONTES ESQ
18085 September3.10;
17. 24 1932
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 13-13143 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
The marriage of
DAVID A CLARKE
PeUUoner-Husband.
and ____
GLORIA ELIZABETH
CLARKE.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: Gloria Elisabeth
Clarke
P. O. Box F2543
Cabot Drive
Freeport Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an acUon for Disso-
luUon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
ARTHLRH LIPSON. attorney
for PeUtloner. whose address is
1519 N.W 187 St.. Suite 218.
Miami. Fla.. and file the ort
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Octo-
ber 1. 1982; otherwise a deiu
wlU be entered against you for
the relief demanded in
complaint or peUtlon
WITNESS my hand and w
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 30 day of au-
gU,RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. FlorlM
ByM.J HartnetU
Ad Deputy Clerk*
(Circuit Court Seal i .-
18086 *+*%&


jblic Notice
HSffiQEP
LuE CIRCUIT COURT OF
IELEVENTH JUDICIAL
BCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
l"n FOR DADE COUNTY
""ciVILACTION
NO 82 12276
LoN FOR DISSOLUTION
J 0p MARRIAGE_____
Ik THE MARRIAGE OF:
f^uEL ALVAREZ
Petitioner
Karez-figueroa
bESPONDENT
I^AREZ-FIGUEROA
JEdl(lclol2Apt.306
IrtabanaDelEste.
W ARE HEREBY NOTI-
l that an action (or Dlsso-
,i of Marriage has been
I against you and you are
bred to serve a copy of your
len defenses, If any, to It on
I-VALLE LAW OFFICES,
I attorney for Petitioner.
I address Is I960 South-
27th Avenue, Second
L Miami, Florida S3148,
[file the original with the
I of the above atyled court
hr before September 17,
\ otherwise a default will
htered against you for the
J demanded In the com-
t or petition.
Us notice shall be published
I each week for four con-
live weeks In THE JEW-
S'LORIDIAN.
JTNESS my hand and the
I of said court at Miami,
Ida on this 12 day of Au-
118S2. .
IlCHARD P BRINKER
Ms Clerk, Circuit Court
IDadeCounty. Florida
By Clarinda Brown,
As Deputy Clerk
butt Court Seal)
LVALUE
[OFFICES, PA.
Bouthwest 27th Ave..
fid Floor
hi. Florida 3314S
tfione: 13061 445-0272
1R1ST1NA
tVALLE.ESQ..
ney for Petitioner
August 20. 27 j
September3,10.1982
HE CIRCUIT COURTOF
(ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
llRCUITIN AND FOR
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 82 12222 FC
THE MARRIAGE OF
*ALD RICHARD,
eutloner-Husband,
pRA A. RICHARD,
espondent-Wlfe
ILORA RICHARD
lue Government
to 33
ourgne, Haiti
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
I ARE HEREBY NOTI
| that a PeUUon For Die-
i Of Marriage has been
against you and you are
red to serve a copy of your
fcr or Pleading to said pe-
lon petitioner's attorney,
*GE T. RAMANI. ESQ.,
111. Biscayne Building, 19
iFlagler Street. Miami,
la 33130 and file the Orlgl-
fcswer or Pleading In the
of the Circuit Court
on or before 17 day of
nber, 1982 If you faU to
I judgment by default will
fen against you for the
I demanded in said petl-
HE AND ORDERED at
I, Dade County, Florida.
Iday of August. 1982.
1AKDP BRINKER
-lrcult Court Clerk
ade County, Florida
3Y:M.J.Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
August 20, 27;
Sept<"tiber 3, >Q, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT OF
ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
'FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
J No 82 12(15 FC 25
ION FOR DISSOLUTION
1 OF MARRIAGE
I The marriage of
IRT RAYMOND LYN
^loner-Husband
and
rtAINELYN
ndent-Wlfe
harm sine Lyn
Residence Address
n
tJ ARE HEREBY NO-
J> that an action for Dla-
?n of Marriage haa been
-gainst you and you are
pd to serve a copy of your
oefenses, If any. to Ron
PR H. UPSON. attorney
puoner, whose addreaa la
f.W 167 St.. Suite 216,
L f lorlda, and file the
II with the clerk of the
atyled court on or before
B'W: otherwlae a
(win be entered against
I we relief demanded In
Vuiint or petition.
TNESS my hand and the
said court at Miami,
I, 1982th1* 7 JKA5?JE- BRINKER
|Clerk, Circuit Court
>d County, Ftortda
J ByK.Selfried
I As Deputy Clerk
September 10.17 .24,
October 1.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION I
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 12-12248
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE'
HERL.1NDO A. AQUINO,
Petitioner,
and
MANCELLY ,
ORELLANA AQUINO.
Respondent
TO: Mancelly
Ore liana Aquino
11 Calle.HAAvenida
Barrio Laa Palpaa,
Puerto Barrios
Guatemala, Guatemala
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Dlaao-
lutlon of your Marriage haa
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on R. A.
DEL PINO, attorney for
Petitioner, whose addreaa Is
1401 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 3313S, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 17, 1982; other-
wlae a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petiUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLO RIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 12 day of Au
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
R. A. del Pino. Esq.,
1401 WestFlaglerSL.
Miami. Florida S31S5
Attorney for Petitioner
18044 August 20. *;
Septembers. 10, 1M2
-r(r
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 12-12277
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
OMAR CONCEPCION
Petitioner
and
CONCEPCION BENITEZ
Respondent
TO: CONCEPCION
BENITEZ
Residence Is unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to it on
M. Crlstlna Del-Valle, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
I960 Southwest 27th Avenue,
Miami. Florida 33148. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 17, 1982; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 12 day* of
August. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal)
DEL-VALLE
LAW OFFICES, P.A.
1950Southwest 27th Ave.,
Miami, Florida 33146
Telephone: (3051 446-0272
Attorney for Petitioner
'8042 August 20, 27:
September 3, 10,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictlous name Jessica
Jordan and "Beat Little
Bachelor Book in Florida" at
P.O. Box 402098, Miami Beach.
FL 88140 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Toby Lebowltx, Owner
10003
September 10,17, 24;
October 1,1982
PRIVATE FOUNDATION
ANNUAL REPORT
The annual report of the pri-
vate foundation of The Louis
Schwartzman Scholarship
Fund, required to be filed
under section 6080 of the Inter-
nal Revenue Code. Is available
for public Inspection at Its
office 3122 Pine Tree Dr.,
Miami Beach, Fla. 33140 on
business days from 10 sum. to 4
p.m. by any citizen, upon re-
quest, within 180 days after this
publication.
JACOB KATZMAN
Chairman of the Trustee
18102 September 10,1982.
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS HAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
Step Lightly Shoes at Loeh-
mann's Plaza, 18819 Biscayne
Blvd.. In the City of Miami,
Florida, Intends to register the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
19th day of August, 1982.
NANKIN
SHOE STORE. INC.
By: (s) Franklin J. Nankin
(a) Selma Nankin
(a) WilliamsS. NurJtln
(a) Edward K. Nanldn
(Owner's Names I
Fredrtc A. Hoffman
Attorney for Applicant
Smith A Mandler. P.A.
nil Lincoln Road Mall.
8th Floor
Miami Beach. FL 33139
18069 August 27;
Septembers. 10.17.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 82-12248
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
HERI.INDO A. AQUINO,
Petitioner,
and
MANCELLY ORELLANA
AQUINO.
Respondent.
TO: Mancelly Ore liana
Aquino
11 Calle, 8A Avenlda
Barrio Laa Palpaa.
Puerto Barrios
Guatemala. Guatemala
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any. to it on R. A.
DEL PINO, attorney for Peti-
tioner, whose address Is 1401
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33136, and file the orlgl- -|
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Octo-
ber 1, 1982; otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief prayed for In the
complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 26 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
R. A. del Pino. Esq.
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33136
Attorney for Petitioner
18071 August27;
Septembers, 10,17,1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 12 12413
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
HERIBERTO HEVIA.
Petitioner-Husband
and
XIOMARA ABAD.
Respondent-Wife
TO: XIOMARA ABAD
Calzado del Cerro No. 1603
LaHabana, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dissol-
ution of Marriage haa been
filled against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to Ron
A. KOSS. ESQ. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
101 N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami
Florida SS128. and file the ori-
ginal with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 17. 1982; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once week for four consecutive
weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court of Miami.
Florida on this 16 day of
August, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: N.A Hewett
Aa Deputy Clerk
A. KOSS, ATTORNEY AT
LAW, P.A.
Attorneys for Petitioner-
Husband
101 N.W. 12th. Avenue,
Miami, Florida 33128
Telephone: (306)326-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
(Publish) A. Kosa
18060 August 20, 27
Sept. 3. 10 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION (l
i CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY) J'l
' INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOP
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNT*
CIVIL ACTION
I NO. 81.12241
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIEELMALEH,
and
REBECCA ELMALEH.
TO: REBECCA ELMALEH
13150 Morrison St..
Sherman Oaks,
California
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
i required to serve a) copy of your
written defenses, if any, to itbn
Cypen A Cypen. attorney
for Petltlonei. whose addrest is
826 Arthur Godfrey Road.
Miami Beach, Florida 33140,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 17.
1882; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 12 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByC.P.Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Wayne A. Cypen, Esq.
Cypen A Cypen
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
Telephone: (306)532-4721
Attorney for Petitioner
18046 August 20, 27;
____________Septembers, 10.19*3
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name PIP-
IAN Cafeteria at 3101 E. 4 Ave-
nue. HIALEAH, Florida In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dad? County. Florida.
Eladlo Hernandez
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, Esq.
Attorney for
ELADIO HERNANDEZ
2985 W. 4 Ave..
HIALEAH, Florida
18046 August 20, 27;
Septembers, 10,1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 80-4341
NOTICE OF
COMPLAINT
IN RE
ARTHUR HIGHTOWER
Plaintiff,
and
OLA MAE WILLIAMS, et al.,
Defendants.
TO: OLA MAE WILLIAMS
526 Foster Road
HaUandale, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a NOTICE OF COM-
PLAINT has been filed and
commenced In this court and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses,
if any, to It on R. A. DEL PINO,
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 1401 West
Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
Suite 201. S31S6, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 24. 1982; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the Jewish
Floridlan.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 24 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
R.A.DEL PINO. ESQ.
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami. Florida SSI36
Attorney for Petitioner
18070 August 27;
September t, 10.17.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
' DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-7028
Division 01
IN RE: ESTATE OF
1 MORRIS FEINBERG.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
estate of Morris Felnberg, de-
ceased, File Number 82-7028, Is
pending in the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division,the addreaa of which
is Dade County Courthouse, 73
. West Flagler Street, Miami, Fl
33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentative and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
| OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
j claims against the estate and
I (2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challanges the
validity of the will, the qual-
ifications of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdtc-
. tlonof the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OB-
JECTIONS NOT SO FILED
WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Publication of this NoUce haa
begun on September 10. 1982.
Personal Representatives:
IDA K. FEINBERG
JOSEPH FEINBERG
c-0 Ida Felnberg
61S Ocean Drive,
Key Biscayne, Fl 33149
Attorney for Personal
Representative
SPARBER, SHEVTN,
ROSEN.SHAPOA
i HE 11. Hit ON NEK. P.A.
' One Southeast
Third Avenue, No. 3050
Miami, FL 33131
Telephone: (305)368-7990
18103
____________September 10,17 19*38
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82 13537
, ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
I IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
TERESITA VELEZ-
NARANJO
and
IVAN DARK) VELEZ
TO: IVAN DARK)
VELEZ
Residence unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
Del-Valle Law Offices. P.A.,
attorney for Petitioner, whoae
address Is 1960 Southwest 27th
Avenue, Miami, Florida 33145,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 8, 1982;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida onthls 7 day of Septem-
ber, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By V. Berkley
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Del-Valle Law Offices
Attorneys for Petitioner
i960 Southwest 27th Avenue
Second Floor
Miami, Florida 38146
Telephone: (306)446-0272
Attorney for Petitioner
18104 September 10,17,24;
October 1.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW-
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Joint
Venture Productions, Inc., d-b-
a City View Records at P. O.
BOX 6486 Hlaleah. Fla 33014
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Oscar J. LLord,
President
Joint Venture
Productions, Inc.
Agent for
City View Records
Maria I.Lord
18075 August 27;
Septembers. 10,17,1982
I
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
"Berol Fabrics" at 3383 NW 7
St.. Miami, Fl 33125 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Berol Originals. Inc.,
Owner
Bernabe Ramirez. President
18067 August 27;
Septembers. 10.17.1982
NOTICRrUH^R
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name 46TH
STREET RECREATION at693
N.W. 44th Street, Miami, Flor-
ida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit of Dade County, Florida.
WASH AND GAME, INC.
HARVEY O.FRIEDMAN
Attorney for
WASH AND GAME, INC.
18063 August 27.
September 3, 10. 17 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCU IT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DAOE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
N0.62-135S4
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
DANIEL GONZALEZ,
. Petitioner-Husband
and
IROSARIO MARTINEZ
GONZALEZ
ITO: ROSARIO MARTINEZ
GONZALEZ
anon Sandla St.
Brownsville.
Tex 78620
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to Ron
DANIEL GONZALEZ, whose
address Is 1209 Old Dixie Hwy
Homestead. Fl 33030. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore Octobers, 1982; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN. WITNESS
my hand and the seal of said
court at Miami, Florida on this
8 day of September, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Lola H. Currier
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DANIEL GONZALEZ
1209 Old Dixie Hwy.
Homestead, Fl 33030
Telephone: 246-7667
18108 September 10.17,24;
October 1.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLOR IDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12 7189
Division (04)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SAM BERGENTHAL
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of SAM BERGENTHAL.
deceased, File Number, is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County. Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
is 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the quallfl
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on September 10. 1982.
Personal Representative:
CAROLE SHAW
6249 V anal den Avenue,
Tarzana, Calif. 91356
HAYS A GRUNDWERG
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Moses J. Grundwerg
Suite 900,
21 S.E. First Avenue
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (306)371-4419
18109 September 10.17.1982
| INTHECIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-11 SOI
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MA R I AGE
IN RE:
The marriage of
PROFILIO SOUVER.
Petltlone r-Husband,
and
CLEANTE SOLIVER.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: CLE ANTE SOLIVER
164 Pollcllnlque
del'A venue
Chris top he,
Port-au-Prince
Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to Ron
ARTHUR H. UPSON. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address Is
1616 N.W. 167 Street. Suite 216.
Miami. Fla. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above -
styled court on or before Sep-
tember 3. 1982; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded la
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on this 29 day of Jury,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarinda Brown
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18024 AugustO, 18;
20.27, 1982


a or rr? "re;." '"/-""""'--r-rr~*a*t':mJvaaa01t*y!'<****''
1
Public Notice
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
STEP LIVELY SHOES AT
Loehmann's Plaza. 18819 Bls-
cayne Blvd., In the City of
Miami, Florida. Intends to reg-
ister the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
18th day of August. 1882.
NANKIN
SHOE STORE. INC.
By: (s) Franklin J. Nankin
(s)Selma Nankin
(s) Williams. Nankin
(s) Edward K. Nankin
Owner's Names) i
Fredrlc A. Hoffman
Attorney for Applicant
Smith Mandler. P.A.
1111 Lincoln Road Mall,
8th Floor
Miami Beach, FL 33138
180B8 August 27;
----------^r'llilrfr MO-17.1882.
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL1
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY !
CIVILACTION
NO. 82 12580
ACTION FOR ADOPTION
IN RE:
JOSEPH MARTIN
SCHOENBAECHLER
Petitioner
and
TIMOTHY E. DWYER.
Respondent I
TO: TIMOTHY E. DWYER
1276 Harrison
San Francisco,
California 84103 I
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlsso-1
lution of Adoption has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
MAX A. GOLDFARB. attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
18 West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Sep-
tember 24, 1882: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 18 day of Au-.
gust. 1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By C. Moore
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
MAX A. GOLDFARB
18 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida
Attorney for Petitioner
18063 August 27:
Septembers, 10, 17,1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT 01
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL,
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82 12966 FC
ACTION FOR I
ADOPTION
(Stepparent)
IN THE MATTER OF THE
JEROME
MADISON. Petitioner
TO: LARRYDONNELL
COGDELL
c-o Roberta King
9101 N.W 13thCourt
Miami. FL 33150
YOU ARK HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Adop-
tion has been filed against you
and you are required to serve a
cop) of your written defenses.
If any, to it on Sol Alexander,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is .'(121 Ponce De Leon
Blvc Coral Gables. Florida,
and file the original with the.
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 1, 1882;
otherwise a default will be-
entered against you for the I
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISHFLORlDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 25 August, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M. J. Hartnett
Aa Deputy Clerk
|__(CircuitCourt Seal)
18077 Septembers. 10;
NOT IC E O F ACT ION -
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION .
NO. 12-1201* FC-22
FAMILY CIVIL
DIVISION
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MIRIAM FVIEL,
Petitioner,
and
ALEJANDRO VIEL,
Respondent.
TO: Alejandro Vlel
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced in
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any. to It on Henry
Leyte-Vldal, Esq.. attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
1401 West Flagler Street,
Miami, Florida 33136, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 24, 1882; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In Jewish
Florldlan.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami, I
Florida on this 23 day of Au-
gust, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Henry Leyte-Vldal. Esq.
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami, FL 33136
Attorney for Petitioner
18073 August 27;
September 3,10, 17,1981
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Pasta
Wholesalers No. III. Inc. d-b-a
Pagliaccl Restaurant at 1669
Sunset Dr.. Coral Gables. FI
33143 Intc is to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Pasta Wholesalers
No. Ill, Inc.
Rlcardo Ubaldo Sarlna.
Pres.
18081 Septembers. 10;
17.24. 1982 \
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
STRADA MUSIC CO. at 5840
Collins Avenue, Suite 7B,
Miami Beach. Florida 33140 in-
tends to register said namt
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
JACK REARDON
HAROLD ROSEN, ESQ.
Attorney for
JACK REARDON
420 Lincoln Road,
Suite 330
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
18080 September3.10;
17. 34,12982 ,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA' IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO 82 13007
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
GEORGINA TOMAS,
Wife
and
RAUL TOMAS,
Husband.
TO: RAUL TOMAS
Residence
address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an action for Dlsso |
lution of Marriage has beery
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE.
P.A.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2491 N.W. 7th
Street, Miami, Florida 33125.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 1st. 1982;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 25th day of Au-
gust. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By V. Barkley
As Deputy Clerk
(CircuitCourt Seal)
ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE. P.A.
Attorney for the Wife
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33125
Telephone: (306) 649-7917
18078 Septembers, 10;
10.17.34.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY) I
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF '
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN j
AND FOR DADE COUNTY I
Civil Action
No. 12-11347
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JUAN MANUEL BUR AY A
Petitioner-husband
and
MARIA I.LISA ONTIVEROS
Respondent-wife
TO: MARIA LUIS A ON
TIVEROS
Nicaragua 3.
Madrid 16. Spain.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlsso-
lution of Marriage has been'
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to on
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 2153 Coral Way.
Suite 400, Miami, Florida, USA.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 17,
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered aginst you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be publlsehd
once a week for four consecu-
tive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the |
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 13th day of
August. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N.A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ. ES-
QUIRE
2153 Coral Way. Suite 400
Miami. Florida 33146
305-358-0444
Attorney for Petitioner
18048 August 20. 27
September 3. 10 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82 12133
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
LN RE: The Marriage of
SALVADOR GARCIA,
Petitioner,
and
JOSEFINACAMPO,
Respondent.
TO: JOSEFINACAMPO
Calle Mayla Rodriguez
No. 887 Apt. 4
Vlbora, Havana, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1850 S.W. 8th Street,
Suite 208, Miami, Florida 33135,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 24.
1882; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and th<
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 23 day of Au
gust, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18067 August 27;
September3, 10.17, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name 46TH
STREET LAUNDERMAT at
687 N.W. 46th Street, Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
WASH AND GAME, INC.,
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for
WASH AND GAME, INC.
18062 August 27, f
Septembers, 10, 17, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 12-12701 F.C.
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION OF DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ALVIN G.WILSON.
AND
GEORGIA A. WILSON
TO: GEORGIA A. WILSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action tor Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to It on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ., at
tomey for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1860 8.W. 8th Street.
Suite 206, Miami. Florida 33136,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September M,
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 19 day of Au-
gust, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18061 August 27;
Septembers. 10.17.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
SOMETHING EXTRA AT
RIVE GAUCHE at 1968 N.E.
123rd St. North Miami, Florida
33181 Intend to register sale
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
PAUL S. BERGER. ESQ.
Attorney for
THE EMOTIONAL
OUTLET. INC.
44 West Flagler St.
Miami, FI. 33130
(806)374-4336
The Emotional
Outlet, Inc.
Judith Rosen
President
18062
Aug. 30,27;
Sept J,.10.1982
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY' FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
PROBATE NO. 82 4325
DIVISION 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
MARGARET L. FUSSELL.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING;
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST SAID ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS INTER-
ESTED IN SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that the administration
of the Estate of MARGARET ,
L. FUSSELL. deceased, late of '
Dade County. Florida, has
commenced in the captioned
proceeding.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file i
any claims and demands which I
you may have against the Es-
tate and to file any challenge to
the validity of the Last Will and
Testament offered for probate,
If any. or any objection to the
qualifications of the Personal
Representative, venue or Juris-
diction of the Court, with the
Court. Dade County Court-
house. 73 West Flagler Street.
Miami. Florida 33130, WITHIN
THREE MONTHS FROM THE
DATE OF THE FIRST PUBLI-
CATION OF THIS NOTICE OR
YOUR RIGHT TO DO SO WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
First Publication of this No-
tice on the 10 day of September,
1982.
Mary E. Robinson
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MARGARETL. FUSSELL
Deceased
3461 N.W. 175th Street
Carol City.
Florida 33065
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE :
HERBERTJAY
COHEN, P.A.
9400 S. Dade land Blvd.
Suite 300
Miami. Florida33156
Telephone: 1305)668-0401
1R096 September 10, 17, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DAE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 82 12741
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
QUEEN E. STEWART
Petitioner
and
LOU IS E. STEWART
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LOUIS E. STEWART
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of'
marriage has been filed,
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, on
ROBERT M. ZIEJA, ESQ.. At-
torney for Petitioner, 688 N E
187 St., N.M.B.. Ft 88162 on or
before September 24, 1982, and
file the original with the clerk
of this court; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you.
Dated: August23.1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk
by C. Moore
As Deputy Clerk
18068 August 27;
Septembers, 10.17,1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY' FLORIDA
CASE NO. 82-13424
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
MARGARETHTHEBAUD,
Petitioner-Wife
and
DUMOND THE BAUD.
Respondent-Husband
To: DUMOND THEBAUD.
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU, DUMOND THEBAUD.
Respondent-Husband, are
hereby notified to serve a copy
of your Answer to the Petition
For Dissolution of Marriage
filed against you. upon Peti-
tioner's attorney, GEORGE
NICHOLAS. ESQUIRE. 612
N.W. 12th Avenue. Miami.
Florida 33136, and file original
with the Clerk of the Court on
or before October 8. 1982:
otherwise the Petition will be
confessed by you.
DATED this 2 day of Septem-
ber. 1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
CLERK
By:C. Moore
Deputy Clerk
18020
September 10. 17, 24;
October 1.1982
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT
IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY' FLORIDA
General Jurisdiction
Division
Case No. 82 9827 CA 16
NOTICE OF
ACTION
S.D.A. CORPORATION,
Florida Corporation.
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM BERRY and
NADINE BERRY,
Defendants.
TO: William Berry and
Nadlne Berry,
his wife
Residence Unknown
You are hereby noUfled that
an action to foreclose a mort-
gage upon the following
described property In Dade
County, Florida:
Lot Four (4) in Block twelve
(12) of BERKELEY MANOR,
SECTION TWO as recorded In
Plat Book Sixty-Eight (68) at
F'age Sixty-Two (82) of the
Public Records of Dade
County, Florida,
has been filed against you, and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses
to wit. if any, on Elliot L. Mil-
ler. Plaintiff's attorney, whose
address Is 935 Arthur Godfrey
Road, Suite 305, Miami, Flor-
ida 33140 on or before October
16th, 1982, and to fUe the origi-
nal with the Clerk of this Court
either before service on Plain-
tiff's attorney or Immediately
thereafter, otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded In the
Complaint of Plaintiff for the
foreclosure of Plaintiff's mort-
gage
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this Court this 2nd day of
September, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
as Clerk of
the Circuit Court
by K. Selfrled
Deputy Clerk
18019 September 10,17. 24;
October 1,1982

NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name U.S.
Medical Products. Inc. at 11381
S.W. 129 Court. Miami. Fla.
33186 intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
George Qulntoy,
Owner
18021 September 10. 17, 24;
October 1.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
LEFF PESETSKY & ZACK,
P.A. at 1367 NE 162 St., North
Miami Beach. Fla 33182 in-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Samuel I. Left,'
President
18098 September 10. 17. 24;
October 1.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring
to engage In business under the
fictitious name ALL METAL
FABRICATIONS and DYN-
AMIC DISTRIBUTORS at 9821
South Dixie Highway Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Evening's De-Light. Inc.
9621 South Dixie Highway
Miami, Florida
Zemel and Kaufman. P.A.
Attorney for EVENING'S
DE LIGHT, INC.
18095 September 10.17.24;
October 1,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
NANKIN'S at Midway Mall,
7833 W. Flagler St.. In the City
of Miami, Florida. Intends to
register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
19th day of August, 1983.
NANKIN
SHOE STORE, INC.
By: (s) Franklin J. Nankin
(s)Selma Nankin
(s) Williams. Nankin
(s) Edward K. Nankin
(Owner's Names)
Fredrlc A. Hoffman
Attorney for Applicant
Smith A Mandler. P.A.
1111 Lincoln Road Mall
8th Floor
Miami Beach. FL SUM
18060 August 37;
September 1,10,17,1882
_ CICUlT|NTiHll>tl
JEANGALT^M
tOrSSSo^tS,
11614 217th Sir*?*11
uCabr,a Bag?J
NOTICE BT
YOU, BuWoAirffil
led < anil
hereby notified to t,
of your Answer to ih7,
For Dissolution of ]L
filed against you uomi
GAUTHIERs "*!'
GEORGE NICH0U*
QUIRE, 612 N.W $u J
Miami. Florida 331* 21
orglnal with the Clerkil
Court on or before new"
1982; otherwise thTh
RICHARD P. BRLNK
CLERK I
By:M.J.HARTNETtj
DeputyClerk '
18105 September 10, j.
0ctoberi|
NOTICE UNDER ,
FICTITIOUS NAME Ul
NOTICE is HBrS1
GIVEN that the undenf
desiring to engage uibm
under the fictitiousnamd.
amerlcan Motor Corn ui
N.W. 96 St.. Miami,>
33186 Intends to registers
name with the Clerk of tun
cult Court of Dade C
Florida.
Rene Rodriguet
18040 ma
September!,,
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVI0
(NO PROPERTY!
INTHE CIRCUITCOUDtJ
THE ELEVENTH JUOICIs
CIRCUITOFFL0RI0A,IL
AND FOR DADECOUNTll
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-12278 FC-W
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTld
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE*!
NATALIA CAL0 be CIMI
PETITIONER
and
JORGE DANIELCURDI !
TO: JORGE DANIEL
CURDI
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY!
FIED that an action for D
lution of Marriage hai I
filed against you and yw
required to serve a copy ofji
written defenses. If any, ton!
DELVALLE LAW 0FF1CI
P.A., ATTORNEY FOR I
tloner. whose address U l
Southwest 27th Avenue :
Floor. Miami. Florida i
and file the original with t|
clerk of the above styledni
on or before September I
1982. otherwise a default i
be entered against you torH
relief demanded In the i
plaint or petition.
This not ire shall be publa
once each week for four c
secutlve weeks In THE .1
ISHFLORlDIAN.
WITNESS my hand anil
seal of said court at Mi
Florida on this 24 day of 1
gust. 1982
RICHARD I' BRINKER |
As Clerk. ClrcuitCourt
Dade County, Florida
By A Minguei
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal!
DEL-VALLK LAW
OFFICES. P.A.
1950 Southwest 27th Ave
Second Floor
Miami. Florida :148
M. CHRIST N \
DEL-VALLK KSQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
18074 Augnsw
September3,10.li.a1
IN THB CIRCUIT COURT*
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN ANDFOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIM
FAMILY DIVISION
CASEN0.B-1JW
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: THE ADOPTION OT
a minor child,
By; JAMES ARNOLD
QUILL IAN,
Petitioner and
Stepparent.
TO: LARRY FRANKLIN
WALDORFF
Residence Unknown
NOTICE: A Petition lor *?
Uon has been filed naming
as the natural father I "
minor child. You are rjqjj"
to serve a copy o your J
tlons. U any. on UEBEWUJ
* BENJAMIN. tto'MJii'
Petitioner, at 8800 B*fl
Avenue. Suite 208, tfwl*
33176. on or before M
24. 1982. The original !
filed with the Clerk eMj
Court either before wrvMJ
Petitioner's ttorney orJ^
dlately thereafter; oth*"
Final Judgment st y
may be entered wlthoul
consent. rrf
DATED, in Miami. '**
on August 24.1982 -
RICHARD P BRINKS"
CLERK
of the Circuit Cou"
BY: C.Moors
Deputy Clei*^,.
September S^OlU*
18072


ti-Semitism
Uy,d$tittEm''ft;'ft82. The Jewish Flor
in Switzerland
rTAMARLEW
JENEVA -(JTA)- A
cter is beginning to
Qt Switzerland, the
cter of anti-Semitism,
current expression
es the form of blistering
icks against Israel's
fernment and its policies
he Middle East, partic-
Hy its "Peace for
plee" operation.
hese attacks, couched in
kical terms, invariably spill
r into attacks against Jews.
/many Swiss, Israel and Jews
one entity, two sides of the
L coin, and an attack against
[is simultaneously an attack
the other; a critism of Israel is
(used as an excuse to criticize
_ in this country for any
lestic problems.
RONICALLY, the Swiss were
Jer known to be particularly
fjewish. One of the reasons is
, the Swiss Jewish com-
[lity is small, and Swiss Jews
-ntain a very low profile. There
Isome 20,000 Jews in Switzer-
J of a total population of some
[million. The largest Jewish
hmunities are in Geneva and
turich.
lut the war in Lebanon
ught whatever unconscious
I-Semitism there was to the
\ and made implicit anti-Simi-
explicit. This development
Icross the board, from left to
It, from politicians to the
page citizen. Examples
und.
the largest agricultural co-
pative in the country, Migros,
i of whose directors is Jewish,
recently under attack by
le farmers for selling tomatoes
loo low a price, thereby engap
ir unfair competition with
late farmers. At the same
p. a soda water bottling fac-
which is owned by Migro-
burned down under suspi
I circumstances. How did
translate into anti-Jewisn
|ngi'
GROUP OF Swiss men dis-
pirit; the war in Lebanon were
Iheard saving. Look at what
l\ are doing in Lebanon.
ft re doing the same in this
"ntrv Create trouble wherever
W arc After all. Migros is in
lish hands, and look at the
oli-ms there."
|hev continued to mention
all the large department
<* in Geneva the Grand
Isagc. I'harmyca Principal and
Bette are owned by Jews
pen is true.) But from this
concluded that Jews own or
trol the major enterprises in
Icountry and thereby exploit
Christians.
he Socialist Party in Geneva
ed forces with the Communist
ly to collect signatures for a
jtion requesting that the
M government reconsider its
1to buy arms from Israel and
[break diplomatic relations
the Jewish State. In addi-
the Communist Party pub-
d an article attacking the
fdent of the State of Israel
3s and the Untied Jewish
eal, saying that he was col-
"g money for Premier
achem Begin and his govern-
t and therefore was acting
st the best interests of
zfnand.
MERT DUBOULE, a
cal Party member of Parlia-
who is the president of the
i-'srael Friendship Associa-
'" Geneva, has been
psea by anonymous phone
I and threatening letters
fng him to discontinue his
srael activities.
^th Raeli, Israel's consul in
said that during the fight-
ing in Lebanon the Embassy re-
ceived letters every day denounc-
ing Israel. Some were anony-
mous, while others were signed
with epithets.
Some letters stated, "What a
shame Hitler did not finish off all
the Jews." Others said, "It's a
pity that only five Jews were
killed in Rue des Rosters in
Paris." This was a reference to
the terrorist attack on Jo
Goldenberg's restaurant in Paris'
Jewish quarter earlier last month
where six people were killed and
22 wounded. None of the dead
was Jewish. In Geneva, graffiti
include hate messages such as
"Begin-Hitler," "Dirty Jews,"
and "Jews-Murderers."
MRS. RAELI said that anti-
Israeli editorials in the nation's
press and photographs claiming
to show that the devastation in
Lebanon was caused by Israel has
provided legitimacy for anti-Is-
raeli and anti-Semites to come
out of the closet and express their
feelings publicly.
One example of what might be
termed media incitement to
hatred was a recent talk show on
Swiss radio where the host of the
program was reading from Hit-
ler's Mein Kampf. Each time he
read a passage which contained
the word "Jew" he substituted
that with the word "Palestinian,"
and for the original word "Jews"
he said "Palestinian nation."
The Jewish weekly, Israeli-
tische Wockenblatt. has de-
manded a public explanation of
his from the director of the radio
station and is planning legal ac-
tion.
THE WAR in Lebanon has
also taken its toll among those
who supported Israel. A woman
phoned the Israeli delegation to
the United Nations in Geneva
and asked to speak to an Israel"
official She reportedly told the
'official: "I have always been a
fervent supporter of Israel and
have visited your country several
times. But now I am totally op-
posed to Israel s conduct in Leba-
non, and my feelings have turned
against Israel. 1 am not the only
one who feels that way. Many of
my friends feel exactly as 1 do.
We no longer support Israel and
will not again visit Israel."
The harshest critics of Israel
are Swiss youth between the ages
'I 5 and 20. Their criticism of
Israel spills over into attacks
against Jews. Not infrequently,
Swiss youth can be overheard
saying: "Maybe Hitler was right
after all to want to exterminate
the Jews when we see what they
are doing in Lebanon."
This mood and these senti-
ments are becoming more per-
vasive and open. A specter is in-
deed haunting Switzerland, a
country which boasts of having,
among other accomplishments, a
policy of neutrality that has kept
its troops from becoming in-
volved in foreign wars since 1515,
a balanced budget, almost full
employment, religious tolerance,
and a democratic political system
in existence longer than in any
other country in Europe.
SHERMAN,
Murray 79. of Hallandale pund away
Sept. l. He U survived by hla wife, Rae.
on, D.V. Spencer Sherman of Califor-
nia, a brother Herman of New York and
aUter Roae PhllUpa of California
Murray waa acUve In the DeSoto Park
Men's Club. Service! were held Sept 1
at the Levltt-Welnsteln Memorial Cha-
pel In Hollywood, Florida with Inter-
ment In New York.
ANOLER
LJJa Bridges. 69. resident of Miami since
1984. passed away Sept. 6. She la sur-
vived by two brothers, Browning and
Davis Bridges, both of Miami. Services
were held Sept. 8 at Van Orsdel Coral
Gables Chapel, Miami.
BROWN
Lillian Elaine. 73, of Miami, died Sept.
2. She was a resident of Miami for 42
years, coming from Cleveland, Ohio.
Survivors Include her husband Sol, son
Marie of Orange, California, daughter
Judith Covln of Miami, grandchildren.
Gregg. Doug. Bethany and Pamela;
sisters Betty Munvls and Jean Ljuidla.
She waa a member of Temple Samu-Bl,
and Hadassah. Services were held held
Sept. Bat Riverside.
GOODKOWSKY
Jeannette. a resident of Miami for the
past fifty years. An acUve member and
former officer of the NaUonal Council of
Jewish Women, mother of My ra Farr of
Miami Beach and Sally Goldman of
Surfslde. grandmother of Harvey Farr
and Daniel Goldman. Services were
held Sept. 3 at Riverside Chapel with In-
terment at Mt. Nebo Cemetery.
KAHN. Charles, 79. of Miami Beach,
Septembers.
WILLINGER, Adolph. 87, North Miami
Beach, Levltt-Welnsteln.
BLOCH, Edward H.. 84, Bay Harbor Is-
lands, August 31. Riverside.
HUBERMAN, Jack. Miami, August 30,
Gordon.
PEPPER, Irving, 156. North Miami
Beach, Gordon.
WETZERBERGER, Joseph. Blasberg.
MONUMENTS INC.
Opn Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888

4 i ft. i. Li
llllllf
& 50
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 NorthwPSt 3rd Street
Tel 261-76I2
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned ana operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIE S. BLASBERG MICHAEL C. BLASBERG
Obituaries
SCHULTZ
Betty Jane, 68, of Miami Beach, passed
away Sept. 4. She la survived by her
husband Dr. Julius SchulU. who Is the
President of Papanlcolanu Canem- Re-
search Institute and sister Margaret
Splane.
LA-NO
Dr. Joseph, 76, of Miami Beach. He was
a resident of Miami Beach for IS years
after moving from New Jersey, where
he practiced Internal medicine for 35
years. He attended medical school in
Prague, Czechoslovakia and was the
founder and first president of Medical
and Dental Association of Greater
Miami Beach. He was also a member of
B'nal B'rith and B'nal Zlon. He la sur-
vived by his wife Elaine, two daughters,
Adelene and Roberta and five grand-
children. Services and Interment were
.'conducted Sept. 6 at the Riverside.
ELLIN,
Cella. 78, of Miami Beach pasaed away
August 31. A 16-year resident, formerly
of New York, she la survived by hus-
band, Nathan: son, Morton, daughter.
Rose Klarman; grandchildren, Richard
and David Ellin, Michelle and Larry
Klarman; brother, Murray Anzek; and
sister, Ray Schwartzman. Services
were held Sept. 2 at Riverside Chapel,
Alton Road.
FELDMAN, Arthur, 72. September 1.
Levltt-Welnsteln.
ALKOFF, Bertha Flshman, 94, Miami
Beach, September 4, Levltt-
Welnsteln.
BERGENTHAL, Thomas Samuel, 76,
Surfslde, Septembers
SKOLKIN, Ann, Miami, Riverside.
BERNFELD, Anita, Miami Beach,
Rubln-Zllbert.
l.K.r'F. Benjamin. North Miami Beach,
September 4.
NAOLER, Muriel.
OFFEN. Samuel, 78. Miami, September
3, Gordon.
GOLDSMITH, Augusta, Miami Beach.
HYTNER, Lilly, Miami. Rubln-Zllbert.
SCHULMAN, Lillian, North Miami
Beach, September 3, Riverside.
DAVIS, Ada. Miami Beach, Rubln-
Zllbert.
OOOOKOWSK
Jeanette. M. mother of Myra Farr of
Miami Beach, and Sally Goldman of
Surf aide, pasaed away September 1. aha
waa a naUve of Russia and was a Miami
resident for the past 60 years. She waa
an acUve member and former officer of
the NaUonal Council of Jewish Women.
Other survivors Include two grandchil-
dren, Harvey Farr and Daniel Gold-
man. Services were held September 8 at
Riverside Chapel with Interment at ML
Nebo Cemetery.
ROSENBERG
Bobbe, 43, native of Miami, paaaed
away on September 6. A former school
teacher, she taught at Blue Lakes Ele-
mentary and South Dade Hebrew Aca-
demy. She Is survived by her husband
Michael, two children, Michael and
Sally Indgln, her parents Joseph and
Belle Bern of Miami, and a sister Toby
Rosen thai Services were held at Gor-
don Funeral Home on September 9.
TEICHER
Sam, 86. Miami Beach, died September
7. Survivors Include his sons. Dr. Mor-
ton Telcher and Gerald Telcher. seven
K rand children and 11 great-grandchil-
dren. He was an active member of the
Jacob C. Cohen Synagogue and the Res-
taurant Employers Union, Local No. 1.
Chapel services were conducted on Sep-
tember 9 with Interment at Riverside
Memorial Park.
ERMAN. Helen, September 3, Rubln-
ZUbert.
HALEM, Bertha. 82. North Miami
Beach, September 3. Riverside.
HALPERN. Rose, Miami Beach. Rubin
Zllbert.
LEVINE, Jeanette. 82, Miami Beach.
September 2. Riverside, Mt. Nebo.
MAZO, Anne Flnkle. Miami Beach,
September 5. Rubln-Zllbert.
MICHAELS. Rosa F., Miami Beach.
September 2. Riverside.
TOBACK, Charles, 69, Miami. Septem-
ber 2. Riverside.
ETTINGER, Jack. 84. North Miami
Beach, August 28, Riverside.
AKERSTAIN, Sablna, 76. August 29,
Riverside.
MANNING, Shirley. 82, August 30.
Riverside.
LEVINE. Jeanette. 82, August 31.
Riverside.
TOBACK. Charles, 69, September 1,
Riverside.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
18840 West Dixie Hwy
Represented by y Levitt, KL>
New York: (2121 263-7600 Queens Blvd A, 76th Rd., Foresl Hills, N.Y
Broward County
925-3396
1M21 Pembroke Rd.
Funeral Director
Past President Jewish Funeral
Directors of Amarics
7?0SEVENTY-FIRST STREET
Funeral Director
865-2353 miami beach. Florida 33ui
Meno&h
CtjapdS
and their staff
extend to you, our friends,
a healthy and happy
new year.
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Weissman
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Polinsky
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Goldstein
Mr. and Mrs. Jack Salz
Mr. and Mrs. Albert Schatz
Dr. and Mrs. Myron "Mike" Klein
Mr. and Mrs. Gary Glass
Mr. and Mrs. Mark Ginsberg
Cantor and Mrs. Joseph Labovitz
Marion Dack
Jonathan Fuss
Scott Cuttler
Morris Funk
Michael Jacobson
Stuart Schlinsky
a o a o o o a


*
"rtge"20-"B ^fKe'JewtslTFlondiaii. Frifliy, September iu, iwjz

Temple Beth Am Opens Religious School
Temple Beth Am will open its
Religious School on Saturday
and Sunday morning, Sept. 11
and 12. Children from kindergar-
ten through the eighth grade will
attend these sessions. Ninth
graders through high school will
attend on Monday evening, be-
ginning Sept. 13. Ninth and tenth
graders are preparing for confir-
mation. Eleventh and twelfth
graders are preparing for college
credit in association with the
Central Agency for Jewish Edu-
cation.
Synagogue Listing
Candlelichting Time: 7:11
TEMPLE AOATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Fraedman
Cantor Ian Alpam Conservative
Daily 7:30 a.m.
Evening 6:30 p.m.
Shabbos 8:30 a jn.
Sit. morning. Bar Mltnsh. Gregory G.H.,
Sl night. Slichol Social Hour 10p.m.
Some**, 12 p.m.
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Avantura Blvd. Miami, Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saltzman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchlnsky, Cantor
Friday Services 8:15 P.M.
Saturday Services 8:45 AM.
Weekdays 8:30 A.M. 5:15 P.M.
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Mijm.-667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate Rabbi
Frl. :1 a p.m h.doi Baumgard win apeak on
"Will lalah'a Dream ol International Paaca
Evar Coma TruaT'
SaUnomlng, B'nal Mltnan, Adam Schati
and Michai Hochman.
Bat Mltnah, Amy Baih Kalian.
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Av
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvl Adler. Cantor
Sat. mom. Servica-9 a.m.
Or. Lehrman will preach at 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor. Rabbi Sokxnon Schtff
Frl Eve. 7 p.m. SaL 9 a.m.
Panoramas of Progress
TEMPLE ISRAEL Of Greater Miami
nfairi Honaar fiatarn Qavejpeui
137 N.E. 19th St. Miami, 573-5600
9880 N. Kendall Dr. 595-5055
Senior Rabbc Haskaa M. Berne.
Aeat Rabbt Jeffrey K. Safcin
Cantor: Jacob G. Bornstain
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral War 2*291W. Ird Aoonua
South Dado 'WO aw. 12001 Straot
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. UPSON
Friday, 8 pm South Dade Chapel
Saturday, 9 am Coral Way
Snaooai Sarrtcaa Conduetad by
Rabol DavM M Auarbach
a Cantor William W. Llpaon
BETH KODESH
Modern Traditional
1101S.W. 12Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 85*6334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin Executive Secretary
WoraMp with ua during High Holy Oaya,
Mombarthlp tnti t llbla now
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 N.E. 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
8915508 Conservative
iinly Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedtor
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A Gorf inkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
FrLaranlng p.m.
Rabbi Lodarman will apaak on
"Tha Coiranant la Foraar."
Sat. morning 9 a.m. Rabbi Ladarman
jrtlUpaaJ^r^ojjbHcJaadjno^MhaJorjl^
TEMPLE JUDEA
5S0O Granada Blvd. neform
Coral Gabies 867-5657
rvfchael B Baenstal Rabbi
Frt..p.m.
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd TeL 534*776
DR DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
SOL ROTH, President
Services Fri. 7:30p.m. Sat 9:30 am
TEMPLE MENORAH
820 75th St., Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Canto Murray Yavneh
Friday Services at 8:1 S p.m.
Saturday Services at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE NERTAMIO
7902 Cartyte Ave.,
Miami Beach, 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovto
Cantor Cdwatd Klein
Friday services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday services at 8:45 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave. M.B., Fl. 33138
TeL 538-4112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
Daily Service 8 a.m.-7:15 p.m.
Fi .day 7:15 p.m.-Saturday 8:30 a.m
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41st SL 538-7231
Dr. Leon Kroniah, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Comrtser
Fri. Evening 8:15 p.m
Sat. morn. 10:45 a.m.
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
8460 SW154 Circle Court fl 11
Miami. Fl. Modem Orthodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 382-0698
Sabbath services 9:30 a.m.
Frl. 7 p.m.
Sat. 9:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLESINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade's Reform Congregation
Ralph P. KJngaley, Rabbi 932-9010
Jufan L Cook, Associate Rabbi
Irving Snufkes, Cantor
Barbara & Ramsay, Administrator
Sabbath eve services 8:15 (OR.
(7:30 p.m. first Friday ol month)
Sabbath morning services 10:30
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Upschitz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Fri. Evening Service 8:00 p.m.
Sat Morning Service 8:30 a.m.
DaiyServices:7:30a m-5:30p.m
Sat.. Saoi 11. Bar Mltzvan. Salh Nadtar
I RABBINICAL ASSOCIATTOfr
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon ScrWff
Executive Vice President
Religious Informatio.i
Concerning Greater Mie"
Houses of Worsha;
Phone:576-4000
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Beniamin Dickaon. Cantor
Minyan Services Mon A Thur 7 am
Sabbath eve Services 8:15 pm
Sabbath Services 9:00 am
n Quaata An Walcoma
Register Now, For Religious Schools
Kindergarten Thru Confirmation
Fm Bum Transportation To And From
TUKndtUUkmArm
SOUTHEAST REGION
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 163rd St.. N. Miami 8a.cn. Fl. 33162
947 ao*4 Harotd Wlahna. aaacutlva dlraclor.
Franklin D. Krautzar. raglonal praaldant.
Torah Hadassah
Installs Officers
The Torah Chapter's Rose
Lauretz will be installed for a
third term of office on Monday,
Sept. 13, 12:30 p.m. at Temple
Zamora. Installing officer will be
Gloria Friedman, and newly
elected officers are: Rose Lau-
retz, president: Lee Stiglitz, ad-
ministrative and membership
vice president: Miriam Saffer apd
Ann Goldstein, education vice
presidents: Dora Hill and Lillian
Conrad, program vice presidents;
Ricky Caminiti, fundraising vice
president; Sadie Fritz, treasurer;
Helen Barson, membership dues
Kcretary; Jeanne Fishman, fi-
mncial secretary; Pearl Silver-
nan, corresponding secretary;
/era Fiedler, recording secre-
ary; and Ann Goldberg, parlia-
nentarian.
UNION OF AMERICAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Ooral Executive Office Park, 3785
NW 82 Ave., Suite 210, Miami, Fl.
33166,592-4792. Rabbi Lewla C.
Llttman, regional director
The official opening of "Pano-
ramas Of Progress" on Monday,
Sept. 13 will be hosted by Secre-
tary of State George Firestone.
This travelling exhibition, co-
sponsored by the Historical As-
sociation of Southern Florida,
displays panoramic photographs
taken in Dade County in the
1920's which are contrasted with
modern pictures of the exact sites
photographed by the same type
of antique equipment. This
exhibit has been prepared by the
Museum of Florida History and
funded by the Florida Endow-
ment of the Humanities, i
Golden Age
Club Holds
Open House
The Golden Age Friendship
Club of the South Dade Jewish
Community Center will welcome
back members and invites those
interested in joining the Club to
attend an open house at the JCC
on Sunday, Sept. 12 at 12:30 p.m.
A free brunch will be served. For
reservations, contact Esther
Kessler, Senior Adult Supervisor.
The Golden Age Friendship
Cluib is open to adults 60 years
and older. The 125-member group
meets every Sunday at the South
Dade JCC to participate in
planned programs including
films, speakers, entertainment,
field irips and socials.
Women's ORT
Old Cutler Chapter, Dade
South Region of Women's Amer-
ican ORT will open the season on
Wednesday, Sept. 15, 10 a.m. at
the home of Paula Woolf. Guest
speaker will be Chuck Dowdle,
Channel 10's sportscaster, who
will speak on the "Basics of
Football from the Women's Point
of View."
Kendall Lakes Chapter Wom-
en's American ORT will hold a
paid-up membership covered dish
dinner on Thursday, Sept. 16, 7
p.m., Lake Village Club House.
Ruth Siegel is in charge of reser-
vations.
New Bank
Branch Opens
Capital Bank, expanding its
operations in Dade County,
opened a ninth office at the cor-
ner of Southwest Eighth Street
and Southwest 29th Avenue in
Miami on Monday, August 30.
"This branch at 2800 S.W.
Eighth St. will serve a vital, ac-
tive commercial and consumer
market," says Abel Holtz, foun-
der, chairman and president of
the Miami-based bank.
PHARMACY
7605 Washinglon Avenue Jusf Sou'h of Itncofn fin
NATIONAL BRANDS EVERYDAY PRICES 53155V
Tylenol ^fr^j
Extra Strength Capsule
50's
3.49
Ben Gay
Ointment
5oz.
3.79
Johnson's
Baby Shampoo
20 oz.
3.
49
Johnson's
Baby Shampoo
lloz.aW.
39
Johnson's
Baby Oil
i 16 oz.
3.
29
Johnson's
Baby Wash Cloths
60's
2.
36
Johnson's
Swabs
300's
1.
69
Signal
Mouthwash
32 oz.
2.
49
Polident
Denture Cleanser Tablets
84's
2.
49
Dentu-Creme &*&"! -| 49]
Denture Toothpaste
* 3.9 oz
Dentrol
Liquid Denture Adhesive
Py-co-Pay ^
Softex Toothbrush ^^
Natural or Nylon
1.
19
Ludens
Cough Drops
3pak
.69


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