The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02796

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
THE
C 55Number 36 Two Sections
I)
Miami, FloridaFriday, September 3,1982
* fndSKocfl
ByM*IIMCnt
Price 50 Cents

Sharon Sees Start of New
2ra of Peace in Middle Eas
mi. Sharon
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon of Israel
stressed here last weekend
beral Era Ending
Will U.S. Stop
Old Immigration
5LSA A. SOLENDER
%ht Baltimore Jewish Times
nt by Special Arrangement
erican immigration
has not exactly been
ling issue for most
Lhese days. When the
Policy?
subject has come up at all
in ordinary conversation,
opinion has often tended to
polarize at one or another of
two rather simplistic ex-
tremes: either "fling the
gates open" or "slam the
gates shut."
The latter opinion seems
to gain favor the closer one
comes to Florida or Cali-
fornia and their environs,
where Jews, in common
with many other Ameri-
cans, have joined in raising
the alarm over recent heavy
influxes of Hispanic illegal
aliens from the Caribbean
and Mexico.
Jewish organizations, by and
large, have been moving warily
as a debate over immigration
both legal and illegal has been
heating up. The Simpson-Mazzoli
Bill, a sweeping immigration re-
form plan, passed the Senate last
week and was widely expected to
receive quick approval in the
House. The issues raised could
not be boiled down to the easy
open-or-shut gates rhetoric. In-
stead, nitty-gritty compromises
about precisely how wide the
gates should be open or shut
and what to do about the
people who slip under or around
Continued on Page 6-B
that the Middle East is on
the verge of a new era of
peace with the military and
political defeat of the PLO
and asserted that Israel has
not been at war with the
Palestinian people but with
the PLO terrorist organiza-
tion.
Addressing 600 delegates
attending the North American
Leadership Conference of the
Israel Bond Organization at the
Washington Hilton Hotel,
Sharon also defended his stra-
tegy in Lebanon and asserted
that it had been approved by the
Cabinet every step of the way.
HE WAS particularly caustic
in his remarks about the way the
news media had inflated figures
of civilian casualties in Lebanon
during the Peace for Galilee oper-
ation which began June 6, while
forgetting the number of casual-
ties Israel suffered during the
many years of PLO terrorist
activities. He said there were
some 2,000 civilian casualties in
Lebanon and that 350 Israeli
Secretary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger: he's off on
Mideast trip this Week.
soldiers were killed and 2,000
wounded during the "Peace for
Galilee" operation.
Sharon rejected media reports
that 600,000 Lebanese civilians
had been left homeless as a result
of the Israeli action. He said this
was baseless because the total
population of southern Lebanon
is 625,000, and many villages
were not touched by Israel's mili-
tary operation.
Sharon said that between 1975
and 1982, the PLO killed 110,000
Lebanese civilians and wounded
more than 300,000, mostly Chris-
tians. "No one said a word,"
Sharon declared, "and only one
small nation, Israel, came to their
rescue."
THE DEFENSE Minister
compared that number of dead to
the 55,000 U.S. soldiers killed in
Vietnam which, he said, caused
an "earthquake" in the United
States. He added that Israel
"made a tremendous effort to se-
cure lives" in Lebanon, "but
people must remember that the
I'l.O used the civilian population
as hostages they kept women
and children at the doors and the
windows to make it harder for our
troops to move in."
Sharon said Israel's largest
casualties were not caused in the
fighting against Syrian tanks, or
against sophisticated Soviet
SAM missiles, but in the fighting
along the coastal plain where the
terrorists held the civilian popu-
Continued on Page 2-A
Cabinet Meeting Firm
Israel Says 'No' to Reagan Moves In
Support of Another Palestinian State
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
- The Cabinet Sunday
flatly rejected suggestions
attributed to the Reagan
Administration supporting
the idea of a demilitarized
independent Palestinian
state on the West Bank and
the Gaza Strip.
The cabinet acted after hearing
a report on the talks by Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon with Ad-
ministration officials in Wash-
ington. According to the report,
one of the ideas suggested to
Sharon was the proposal for such
a Palestinian state.
Observers said the report
seemed to confirm Israeli fears
that the Reagan Administration
was considering new ways to
break the impasse over the au-
tonomy talks called for in the
Camp David accords. It appeared
that the Reagan Administration
apparently has not yet formalized
specific ideas to get the stalled
autonomy talks resumed but the
understanding here is that the
wind is blowing in a direction
"not in accordance with the
Camp David accords."
SHARON REPORTEDLY
was informed that the Reagan
Administration hoped to use the
Israeli success in Israel's "Peace
for Galilee" operation in Lebanon
to convince Premier Menachem
Begin's coalition that Israel was
militarily powerful enough to
deal with any problems a Pales-
tinian state might pose.
But the consensus at the Cabi-
net session was that not even a
demilitarized Palestinian state
Continued on Page 6-A
Moj. Haddad
?w That Christian's Long War is Over
Haddad Fears Israel is Finally Abandoning Him
Maj. Saad Haddad, commander of the Christian militia,
who helped Israel keep its border with southern Lebanon
clear of PLO terrorists for the past seven years, expressed
concern that he will now be abandoned bv both Israel and
Lebanese President-elect Bashir Gemayel.
In an interview with Israel Radio, Haddad said that
since the war began in Lebanon June 6, he had met only
once with Israel Defense Minister Raphael Eitan, and no
Israeli political leader sought to meet or consult with him,
unlike before the fighting started when he was always
called upon by Israeli leaders.
HADDAD SAID he had wanted to assist Israel in its
advance through southern Lebanon, and had even been
allowed to move his tanks and armed soldiers forward
with the Israelis, but his forces were halted at Damour,
Continued on Page 6-A .
urn Goldmann to foe Buried on Mount Herfel. 2-B


Page 2-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 3, 1982
Filling in Background
Gamayel Promises PeaceNo Pushing
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
Bashir Gemayel, Presi-
dent-elect of Lebanon, held
several secret meetings
with Israeli leaders recent-
ly, including some in Tel
Aviv, during Israel's
"Peace for Galilee" opera-
tion, Mooriv reported.
Quoting foreign sources,
Mooriv said Gemayel met
several times with Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon.
According to the paper, Gem-
ayel began his series of secret
visits to Israel in 1976. He met
with various Israeli personalities,
including Labor Party chairman
Shimon Peres who at the time
was Defense Minister in the gov-
ernment of Yitzhak Rabin. In
1976, when Peres launched the
"good fence" policy along the
border with Lebanon and extend-
ed Israeli aid to the Phalangist
forces in Lebanon, Gemayel
visited Peres at his borne in Tel
Aviv.
ACCORDING TO another
report, as yet unconfirmed, the
Israelis early in July arranged a
meeting between Gemayel and
Maj. Saad Haddad, the leader of
the Israeli-backed Christian mili-
tia. That report said the two
Christian leaders arrived at an
understanding regarding spheres
of influence in Lebanon which is
now controlled by the Israel De-
fense Force.
This meeting, too, was unpub-
licized. As a rule, Gemayel care-
fully kept his distance from the
Israelis during the war in Leba-
non and declined to provide the
IDF with any political or military
assistance. The Israelis reported-
ly expected Gemayel to employ
his Phalangist forces to complete
the drive that IDF had begun in
Lebanon to oust the PLO terror-
ists. But Gemayel left that task
for the IDF.
With Gemayel's election to the
presidency, Israel would like him
to sign a peace treaty. Gemayel
reportedly told an Israeli person-
ality a few days ago in Beirut
that he intends to sign "a peace
treaty with Israel within six or
seven months." But in public an-
nouncements, including the one
he made following his election,
Gemayel said the new govern-
ment would have to decide on
signing a peace treaty.
ACCORDING to Maariv,
Gemayel asked the Israeli per-
sonality not to rush things and
push him into an early peace
treaty. Gemayel reportedly ex-
pected the personality to under-
stand the difficulties he was fac-
ing with rival factions and com-
munities in Lebanon and with
neighboring Syria which opposed
his candidacy and election.
Sources in Jerusalem express-
ed satisfaction with Gemayel's
election, but would not go beyond
the very general statements is-
sued by Premier Menachem
Begin and the Foreign Ministry
wishing him success in his efforts
to reestablish Lebanese sover-
eignty and independence, pre-
cisely because of the problems
the President-elect is facing.
Mideast experts in Israel noted
that Gemayel's election portend-
ed a significant change in the life
of Lebanon, with prospects for a
strong and stable central govern-
ment. Gemayel, the experts
pointed out, won by a majority
vote in Parliament despite death
threats and terror against De-
puties voting for him.
THEY NOTED as well that
even the U.S., which was skepti-
cal of Gemayel's chances, is now
expressing satisfaction at his
election. Within hours of Gemay-
el's election, President Reagan
sent him a congratullatory mes-
sage and the White House said
the U.S. would "work closely
with the new government in the
complex and difficult task
ahead."
The acts of violence which fol-
lowed Gemayel's election the
houses of 15 Deputies who had
participated in the election were
blown up by leftists indicated
that internal strife and factional
rivalry could heat up into another
civil war. Various elements in the
country Shiite and Sunni
Moslems, leftwing groups, seg-
ments of the Christian communi-
ty are not ready to accept a
Maronite Christian leader of the
right wing Phalangist Party and a
man who is considered a "colla-
borator" with Israel as the Presi-
dent of their country.
Sharon's Vision
Beginning of New Era of Mideast Peace
Continued from Page 1 -A
lation hostage.
He told the Israel Bond leaders
that "there was no collusion be-
tween the United States and Is-
rael when we went into the war,"
as many have charged. However,
now after the war, Israel and the
U.S. share "common targets and
goals: expulsion of the PLO,
withdrawal of foreign forces
the terrorists, Syrians and Israeli
troops. We would like to bring
our troops home as early as pos-
sible." Another goal, Sharon
said, would be "peace between
Israel and Lebanon and the nec-
essary security arrangements
along our northern border."
Sharon said "one of the real
contributions of the war was that
the Israelis learned the secrets of
the Soviet SAM missiles, and we-
eliminated the main center of
world terrorism in Beirut. We
brought the situation to where it
will enable us to build a strong
central government." He added:
"I believe we are facing peace
with Lebanon. I believe we are
going to start a renewed dialogue
with the Palestinian Arabs."
THERE WAS tight security
around the hotel where Sharon
was speaking. Outside the hotel
three demonstrations were held.
Most of the protesters were
members of the Nov. 29 Coali-
tion, representing nearly 100
groups, including some Jews,
who opposed Israel's action in
Lebanon.
Placards protesting Israel's in-
vasion of Lebanon were waved by
about 50 members of American
Jews Opposed to the Invasion of
Lebanon. A counter-demonstra-
tion of about 30 members of the
Zionist Organization; of America
and Americans for a Safe Israel
gathered to support Israel and
Sharon.
Police said one demonstrator
was arrested for disorderly
conduct and a second was cited
for a minor traffic violation
during the three-hours of the pro-
test, marked mostly by shouting.
On Friday, Sharon met for 45
minutes witb Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger, a meeting
that was described later as "cor-
dial" by the Pentagon. After
meeting with Weinberger,
Sharon met for almost two hours
with Secretary of State George
Shultz.
EMERGING FROM his meet-
ing with Shultz, Sharon told re-
Argentina Said to be Planning
Purchase of 22 Israeli-Made Jets
BUENOS AIRES- (JTA)-,
Argentina is negotiating the pur-
chase at 22 Mirage jets from
Israel in order to rebuild its Air
Force after losing the war with
Britain over the Falkland Islands
last June, it was reported by the
English-language daily, the
Buenos Aires Herald.
During the recently concluded
war, the Air Force was the only
branch of the Argentine military
that performed effectively, albeit
with great losses. As its toll of
lost planes mounted, Argentina
procured 10 Mirages from Peru
which it incorporated into its air
offensive along with the Israeli
Kfir and the French Super-En
.endard jets, outfitted with
Exocet missilpe.
porters, "I had a good meeting"
with the Secretary of State," dis-
cussing the situation in the Mid-
east, after the expulsion of the
PLO terrorists from Beirut which
is taking place now. I believe that
we are facing a new era now in the
Mideast. We are much closer to
overall peace."
Meanwhile, the White House
announced that Weinberger
would visit Lebanon, Israel and
Egypt this week, the first
Cabinet-level officer to visit the
area since the outbreak of the war
in Lebanon. His trip was decided
last Thursday by President
Reagan. Administration officials
said it was Weinberger's idea to
visit the 800 marines in Beirut
who are there together with 8001
French and 532 Italian troops to
oversee the evacuation of PLO
terrorist and Syrian forces from
the city.
Officials added that while in
the area to accept a long-standing
invitation to visit Israel, he will
also visit Egypt to balance the
trip to Israel. Administration of-
ficials added that Weinberger
was not charged with any par-
ticular diplomatic mission.
IN EGYPT, Weinberger was
expected to focus on the fate of
the long-stalled Palestinian auto-
nomy negotiations with Israel.
But Egypt has ruled out further
autonomy talks until Israeli
troops leave Lebanon and Israel
halts building settlements on the
West Bank.
This declaration was made last
Friday in a letter by Amre
Moussa, acting head of Egypt's
delegation to the United Nations,
to UN Secretary General Javier
Perez de Cueller. The letter called
on the U.S. "in particular" to
urge Israel to adopt a new course
and "prepare the ground for a fair
and just settlement" in the Mid-
east. The U.S. has been seeking
for some'time to get the autono-
my negotiations off dead center. j
Going to the Polls Tuesday?
Be Sure Your Answer's 'Yes'
Miamians will be going to the polls on Tuesday
Sept. 7, to vote for a variety of candidates in races
ranging from the Florida State Legislature, as a re
suit of the recent redistricting, to judgeships and
Dade County Commission. The ballot is long, and in
many cases the issues are complex. Registered
voters should take this opportunity to exercise their
franchise.
Histadrut Committee Makes Plans
To Protect El Al Workers' Future
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA)
The Histadrut has decided
to set up a special commit-
tee to plan future moves to
project what they term the
future of both the El Al na-
tional airline and its em-
ployes, in the face of the
government decision to halt
Sabbath and Jewish holi-
day flights.
Both the labor federation's
central committee and the El Al
workers were in an angry mood,
following action by the airline
management in summoning a
strong police detachment to oust
workers from the management
building at Ben Gurion Airport
where they had kept Transport
Minister Haim Corfu locked up in
the office of El Al Board chair-
man Nahman Perl while they
were meeting, pounding on the
door to halt the conversation.
THE WORKERS have ac-
cused the management of not
being firm enough in opposing
the government decision, which
they claim will damage the airline
financially, merely to preserve
the Begin coalition. ...
The worker's action followed
the decision by the Knesset Fi-
nance Committee to approve the
Cabinet's action to ban El Al
Sabbath flights beginning Sept.
1.
Premier Menachem Begin
agreed to the shutdown under in-
tense pressure from Agudat I.
reel, a member of his coalition B
Al representatives warned thai
the shutdown would cause the
struggling airline to lose an esti-
mated $40 million annually a
loss that could mean the end of B
Al.
The police, who brought up a
large detachment of the tough
border police and water cannons
to disperse the angry El Al work
era at the airport, arrested eight
members of the airline's workers
committee after the incident in
the management office but re-
leased them later to avoid a
threatened general walkout of all
airline workers.
THE AIRLINE is working
now. Management reported the
"normal number for this time of
the year" of cancellations of
bookings. It had been feared that
talk of industrial unrest following
the Cabinet decision, strengthen
ed by an 11-10 vote in favor of
Sabbath shutdown by the Knes-
set Finance Committee last week.
would scare passengers off re-
serving future flights with El Al.
Among the steps reportedly
considered by Histadrut. at the
urging of the El Al workers com-
mittee and the committee of re-
presentatives of the major indus-
trial enterprises, are the enforced
closing of -the airport on Satur-
days and a possible general
strike, especially of enterprises
which normally have to work on
Saturdays, such as the electric
corporation and the telephone
service.
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News Briefs
TJ.S. Denies Support of Palestine State
Friday, September 3, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
JTA Ftalun Syndic*
WASHINGTON The State
iDepartment has denied that U.S.
lofficials proposed a demuita-
Irized Palestinian state" on the
West Bank and Gaza Strip to
Israeli Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon during his visit here last
Iweek. We have made no such
oposals and did not make such
proposal during Sharon's
visit," State Department John
Hughes said.
The Israeli Cabinet at its meet-
ing Sunday flatly rejected the
idea of a demilitarized Palestin-
an state. The Cabinet acted after
nearing a report on talks by
JSharon with Reagan Administra-
tion officials. According to the
eport. one of the ideas suggested
Sharon was the proposal for
feuch a state.
Hughes stressed that the U.S.
Hoes not agree with Sharon's
Contention that Jordan is the
Palestinian state. "The Reagan
\dministration, like its predeces-
ior, supports the territorial
ntegrity and unique and endur-
ng character of Jordan," he
bdded.
I Israel Shoots Down
[Syrian MIG Over Beirut
BEIRUT Pieces of a Syrian
HG-25 "Foxbat" were seen fall-
ng over the Christian port city of
lounieh north of here when
Israeli jets shot down the MIG,
he Israeli military command
aid in Tel Aviv Tuesday.
According to Israel, the plane
vas on a Syrian photographic
mission in Lebanese airspace.
The Voice of Lebanon Radio
aid that the MIG 25, supplied to
Syrians by the Soviet Union,
gashed into a building in Rabieh,
vhich is just seven miles north-
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east of Beirut. The pilot was seen
parachuting to safety.
The radio said that Israeli war-
ships off the Beirut coast fired
surface-to-air missiles at the
plane just before Israeli jets
scrambled for a dogfight.
Argov's Hands, Legs
Are Totally Paralyzed
JERUSALEM Doctors
treating Ambassador Shlomo
Argov said he is suffering a total
paralysis of his hands and legs,
an impairment of one of his
lungs, slight difficulties in sight,
and his powers of concentration
and memory are impaired.
Argov, Israel's Ambassador to
Britain, was shot in London June
4. The terrorist attempt on his
life precipitated the "Peace for
Galilee" operation.
Doctors Aharon Beler and
Alexander Magore said all the af-
flictions were the result of brain
damage suffered during the at-
tempt on Argov's life. However,
the doctors said the envoy's in-
tellectual capacities have im-
proved remarkably. Argov was
able to hold conversations for
about 15 to 20 minutes at a time,
they said. He is undergoing reha-
bilitation through psysiotherapy
and drug therapy and there is no
longer any danger to his life, the
doctors reported.
French Rabbi Says
Terrorists 'Destabilize'
NEW YORK Chief Rabbi
Rene Sirat of France, in the
United States for the first time
since the recent wave of terrorist
attacks on Jewish and Israeli in-
stallations in France, said here
that the elements responsible for
these actions are part of an orga-
nized effort to "destabilize
Western democracies."
"The Jewish community of
France has been singled out for
attack," Sirat, speaking in
French, said through an interpre-
ter at a news conference held
under the auspices of the World
Jewish Congress American Sec-
tion. "I am not sure of the reason
but probably because ... it is a
community that affirms its Jew-
ishness." _
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Lebanese Delegation
Meets With Shamir
JERUSALEM A delegation
of five Lebanese intellectuals met
here with Foreign Minister
Yitzhak Shamir. The delegation,
the first such group to visit
Israel, included Thomas
Mouhanna, dean of the faculty of
philosophy at the University of
Beirut, and Robert Ghanem,
President of the Supreme Court.
Some members of the delega-
tion told Shamir that they sup-
ported a peace agreement be-
tween Israel and Lebanon. But
Walid Khazan, one of President-
elect Bashir Gemayel's advisers,
said it was up to the new govern-
ment to decide this issue.
Gemayel, himself, made a similar
statement last week after he was
elected. Shamir told the group
that it is now possible to advance
along the road to peace now that
the PLO has been destroyed mi-
litarily and politically
Mondale Says Terrorists
Must Be Combatted
WASHINGTON Former
Vice President Walter Mondale
told the closing session Sunday
of the North American Leader-
ship Conference of the Israel
Bond Organization that "no
President should intimidate,
threaten or undermine the
security of Israel." He added that
"the present Administration
makes a mistake not to empha-
size the Camp David agree-
ments."
Mondale also urged the ap-
pointment of a high-level senior
official in the Reagan Adminis-
tration to continue the Camp
David process and stressed that
"the time has come for an inter-
national campaign against ter-
rorism."
Israel Okays UNRVYA
Aid to Lebanese
JERUSALEM Some 8,000
tents will be shipped this week
from Pakistan to Lebanon by the
United Nations Relief and Works
Agency to help solve the immedi-
ate housing problems of Palestin-
ian refugees in southern
Lebanon, Yaacov Meridor, min-
ister in charge of the refugee pro-
blem in Lebanon, told reporters
here.
Meridor, who is also Minister
of Economics, said there are some
30,000 refugees without adequate
housing in the area under Israel
control. They are from refugee
camps in Sidon, Rashidiye and
Tyre. The refugee camps, which
Israel said contained armed Pale-
stinian terrorists as well as
refugee families, were heavily da-
maged in the fighting.
Jewish Delegation Meets
WlthShultzlnD.C._________
NEW YORK A delegation
of Jewish leaders who met with
Secretary of State George Shultz
and members of his staff for more
than two hours in Washington
last Thursday afternoon urged
the United States to influence
Jordan to join the Middle East
peace process and to help "find
Palestinians who represent their
people" to negotiate with Israel.
Julius Merman, chairman of
the Conference of president of
Major American Jewish Organi-
zations, who headed the 13-mem-
ber delegation, told the Jewish
Telegraphic Agency that Shultz
was most interested in hearing
the views of the Jewish leaders.
"We made it clear to him that
the PLO had been destroyed not
only militarily but politically as
well," Herman said. "We stressed
that it is important that the PLO
will not be dealt with in any
way."
At UN
Shamir
To Address
Assembly
On Sept. 30
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
Foreign Minister Yitzhak
Shamir of Israel will arrive in
New York at the end of next
month to attend the 37th session
of the UN General Assembly, the
JTA has learned. Shamir is
scheduled to address the Assem-
bly on Sept. 30. two days after
his arrival here.
During his visit in New York.
Shamir is expected to meet with
various delegates and Foreign
Ministers who will be here for the
Assembly session, which official-
ly opens Sept. 21.
Diplomats at the UN predicted
that Israel is going to face
a "very tough" campaign against
it, even tougher than in previous
years in view of the war in Leb-
anon and the continuing occupa-
tion of part of Lebanon by Israeli
forces. In that context, diplomats
said, the Arabs are probably
going to demand the suspension
of Israel's credentials to the As-
sembly and would press for Se-
curity Council meetings to seek
sanctions against Israel.
According to some diplomats,
the Arab anti-Israeli offensive at
the UN this fall will be even more
"ferocious" than in the past be-
cause the Arab countries will
want to cover up for their failure
to assist the PLO in its war with
Israel in Lebanon. "It is not un-
likely that even Iran and Iraq,
which are currently at war would
join forces together to attack Is-
rael at the UN," one diplomat
noted.
- I: \ I \ u \
I ~. ^ I
The Ten Ipst Qans of Israel?
The Highland Scots, so the story goes, have laid claim to being
dependents of the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel. Whether they really are or
we'll never know. But one thing we do know for sure is that the first
Jews of modern times came to Scotland in the 1600's, found it much
to their liking, and settled there.
Once established, the settlers undoubtedly discovered one of
Scotland's most famous pleasures, J&B Rare Scotch. Carefully
blended from a selection of the finest scotches, J&B has such a
smoothness and subtlety that it can truly be said to whisper. No
wonder it's become the favorite scotch here in America. Serve
J&B to your tribe, clan or mishpocha. One delightful sip will see
the start of a tradition that will never be lost.
not,
MM NMMe Th PmUnfon Cwp NY
]&R It whispers.


*


Dr. Goldmaim's Passing '
In his last years as an elder statesman of world
Jewry, Dr. Nahum Goldmann made a wide variety of
controversial remarks about Israel that won him the
praise of some Jews and the animosity of others.
\ But Dr. Goldmann, who died on Sunday at age 87,
was no stranger to controversy throughout his life. It
was Dr. Goldmann, who after devoting the lion's
share of his younger years to Jewish survival in the
Hitlerian holocaust, and who played a leading role in
the founding of the State of Israel, later spent his en-
ergies debating with David Ben Gurion over who was
a Zionist.
Ben Gurion believed that no Jew who refused to
make aliyah was a Zionist. Dr. Goldmann, quite
simply, cried "Bunk!"/'
\ In his declining years, even but a few months ago,
Dr. Goldmann expressed his growing concern that
Israel had taken a "wrong turn" away from the loft-
ier principles of its reemergence out of the ashes of
the Nazi era.
\ Whatever position Jews may take about Dr. Gold-
mann now that he is gone, there will be unanimity on
at least one issue. He was as surely an architect of
the modern Jewish State as any other Zionist, a man
who helped Jews, both Israeli and non-Israeli, sur-
vive their holocaustic experience and rise once again
to positions of world prominence and prestige.
Arafat's 'Victory'
Yasir Arafat's departure from Beirut suggests
that his posturing before the world press about his
"magnificent victory" can not be long sustained as a
series of incidents worth reportingnot even by that
press, whose corrupt reporting of the war in Lebanon
now leaves it in the lurch.
Arafat has been defeated, at least in Lebanon, and
he knows it. If he did not know it when he agreed to
leave, surely he knew it on his way to Tunis via
Greece, when he had time to mull over his last re-
quest, refused by the Israelis, that he be allowed to
leave Beirut with all the diplomatic honors accorded
a statesman.
If nothing else, old Yasir sure tried to pull off yet
another piece of stagecraft, and he failed. Diplomatic
honors? For what? The PLO chief's main claim to
fame these days is that he held out longer against the
Israelis than any other Arab nation, or combination
of nations, or forces in the past.
Of course he did. He was holed up smack in the
middle of civilian centers the Israelis were loathe to
destroy. Such cowardly tactics deserve no diplomatic
honors. Not even the corrupt world media, with their
bastions of fiction-writers and photographers pur-
porting to be reporters, will be able to make much of
this Yasir Arafat "victory."
Not, at least, for the moment.
.
Your Voter's Duty
Miamians go to the polls on Tuesday to vote for a
lengthy ballot and some complex issues behind them.
The usual complexity of the ballot is made even more
so by the recent redistricting, which has forced races
in the Florida State Legislature for Senate and
House.
Predictions by election officials several weeks ago
suggested that many potential voters would be left
high and dry by their failure to register.
The problem now is, what percentage of our com-
munity's qualified voters will in fact exercise their
franchise on Tuesday. There really is no need for us
to underscore the importance of voting,
believe everyone knows that.
What we must underscore, however, is the need for
voters not to give into a sense either of inertia, indif-
ference or the belief that their single vote can not
matter. Nothing could be further from the truth.
(Jewish Florxdian
OFFICE ud PLANT-ISO N.E. 6th St.. Miami. FV 33132 Photw: 373-460.".
P.O. Box 012973. Miuni. Florida 33101
FRED K. SHOCHET LEO MINDLIN SUZANNE SHOCKKT
Editor and Publisher Associate Editor Executive Editor
Tin Jewish Ftoftdton Dom Not Ouar.nl*. The Ka.hruth
CM The Herchs.idlee Adv.rtH.d In II. Column.
Published Weekly Every Friday linn 1927 by Tha Jewish Floridian
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TaaaosaaMc Agency, Sena*) Art. Feature Syndicate. Worldwide New. Service. National Editorial
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years$49 00Supplement issue (Local Area) Last Friday each month (10 Issues) Sept.
j.rne *3 50 Out of town, country1, upon request -
Friday, September 3, 1982
Volume 55
16 ELUL5742
Number 36
War and the Space World ofJ.ft
THE PRESUMABLE end of
the war in Lebanon is a fearful re-
minder that there has been no
victory except, in the longterm,
by the Palestinians. But no war is
ever really won other than within
the context of several decades,
during which the "loser" re-
groups his forces into something
new and often more fearful than
before.
In contemporary terms,
Egypt's defeat in the Yom Kip-
pur War was a clear example of
this kind of resurrection to tri-
umph. And now, nine years later,
the PLO rises from the ashes of
Beirut, like Phoenix, to fly else-
where and become another form
of monster in a future already ac-
celerating itself into the present
far more rapidly than our worst
nightmares foretell.
NEITHER THE everyday Is-
raeli, who prays for peace, nor the
everyday Palestinian, who
dreams of a homeland, has any-
thing to do with Realpolitik, ex-
cept when it kills them in the vio-
lence of war. And even if it
doesn't kill them, even if they are
spared, it is a foregone conclusion
that Realpolitik will nevertheless
recreate their destinies to the ul-
timate frustration of both their
prayers and their dreams. Real-
oolitik, indifferent to people and
concerned only with power, at
best puts them on hold for death
another day.
That is why ordinary people,
people outside the arena of
power-play, increasingly invest
their hopes elsewhere than in the
treachery of governments. As an
alternative to religion, which
raised their eyes to heaven in the
first place, they now embrace *
ence fiction, which also raS
their eyes to heaven and aw?
from the blood-stained earth Th
worldwide spate of flying sau *
sightings is best understood this
way.
The difference between tfjbk.
and science fiction is an imrjm
tant one because it is gecrX
accommodate the needs of <2
time. The metaphysical urge to,
ward an ultimate spiritual exoer
ience exists in both as a funda
mental human need to escape the
violent world into something
more ennobling, more peaceful
and capable of being embraced.
BUT THE batting average of
religion in the past is ziltch in any
of these departments. In fact re-
ligion, if one judges by its hU
tory, has been as demeaning
warlike and exclusionary to
man's search for love as Realpol-
itik ever was.
Science fiction, on the other
hand, offers new possibilities of
hope, and with far less fairy tale,
which the rational mind finds dif-
ficult to accept in the escape al-
ternative served us by religion.
Comes now "E.T." No wonder
the film is so popular. All we have
to do is believe, and we're on our
way in short order and without
all the entangling alliances with
ancient superstition to which so
much of ritualistic religion is na-
tural heir. Or so we think, for
Steven Spielberg, theproducerof
"E.T.," has in reality thrown usa
spitball. The character, E.T., is
no Pied Piper, as Spielberg would
have us surmise, marching us off
to some spiritual consummation
free of charge.
If we want to escape the absur-
dities of life on Earth in 1982, we
must pay homage to his science
fiction hero baptized in the an-
cient mythology of Christendom.
Spielberg, in effect, serves his
burdgeoning audiences a smor-
gasbord of outer space cult ism
steeped in the sauce of crucifixion
and resurrection. It may not be
apparent at first glance, but the
facts are incontrovertible.
E.T. ARRIVES on earth to do
simple things. Peacefully, he
gathers Earth's flora and fauna
to take back to his waiting space-
Continued on Page 13-A
Egypt's Role
For All The Bluster, Pact Still Holds
By ROBERT M. EVANS
One of the remarkable
things about the Israeli mi-
litary operation in Lebanon
is a story little reported and
commented on. The Israeli
peace with Egypt has held.
This peace treaty is a
cornerstone of American
Middle East policy. It is
the first peace between Is-
rael and a former Arab
enemy. The Israeli entry
into Lebanon subjected it
to the severest of tests.
Would Egypt react to
Lebanon by breaking its
peace with Israel? Cairo
took the position of denun-
ciation without renuncia-
tion. Egypt has denounced
the invasion but did not
renounce the peace treaty.
In Cairo, foreign ministry offi-
cials express anger at Israel.
Egypt has joined France in UN
resolutions critical of Israel. But
Egyptian ministry officials say
that the country will not abandon
the peace process.
IN CAIRO, Western officials
report no apparent erosion yet in
Robert Mayer Evans is a
former foreign corres-
pondent for CBS News.
He was the CBS Bureau
Chief in Moscow cover-
ing the USSR. In the
Middle East, he has
worked in Israel as well
as Lebanon, Egypt,
Saudi Arabia, and other
Arab and oil countries.
He is currently a jour-
nalist and a professional
speaker for the meeting
market.
President Hosni Mubarak's sup-
port. But they also comment that
Mubarak must do three things to
survive;
He must master Egypt's
economic morass enough to show
improvement in living condi-
tions. Under Sadat, Egyptians
criticized their own economy as
benefiting primarily Egypt's
upper and wealthy class.
He must maintain internal
security enough to control the
country without resorting to
what one official described as the
brutality under both Sadat and
Nasser.
with Israel without eroding
Egypt's sense of dignity. Egypt's
leaders must not see the peace
agreement as making them a
mere tool of Israel, nor must they
seem to be a dinghy bobbing in
Washington's wake.
ONE STRONG inducement for
Egypt to continue the peace pro-
cess is American foreign aid. U.S.
aid to Egypt this year will be .
around one billion dollars, and is
divided roughly as follows:
$250,000,000 of it goes for
food. American agricultural sales
help keep starvation from
Egypt's door.
$350,000,000 of it goes to
finance the purchase of American
equipment and technology.
$300,000,000 of it goes into
the construction of seaport facili-
ties, sewers, water supplies, tele-
phone systems, cement plants.
$100,000,000 of it goes into
health services, agriculture
development, research, family
planning.
In the years immediately fol-
lowing Camp David, U.S. foreign
aid to Egypt greatly expanded
Early foreign aid policy had ob-
vious directions: Do it visibly.
and do it rapidly. The Egypt""1
He must preserve the peace Continued on Page 13-A
1
v.v.




Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 6-A
Black Basketball Player Williams
Cabinet Votes to Halt El Al Flights
Tel Aviv Team Star Says He's Convert Beginning This Weekend
By HASKELL COHEN
NEW YORK (JTA) -
For the second time in three
years, the Maccabi Tel
Aviv basketball team has
experienced the conversion
' of an American-born Black
player. Earl Williams,
formerly a member of the
Detroit Pistons, arrived
this week in Israel and told
the press he had become a
member of the Jewish faith
and had taken as his Jewish
name Eliezer Ben Abra-
ham.
In 1978, Aulcie Perry, a player
I from New York, who had played
I for several years with the Mac
cabi team, became a convert after
[study with a Beth Din (rabbinical
I court) in Brooklyn, headed by a
I Rabbi Chaim Rabinowitz. Perry's
(conversion became a hot religious
land athletic issue when the vali-
[dity of that conversion was chal-
lenged by two major American
I Orthodox rabbinical organ iaz-
|t ions.
THE DISPUTE led to warn-
lings from the Agudat Israel that
lit might leave Premier Mena-
Ichem Begin s coalition if Perry's
naturalization certification was
[not rescinded by the Interior
Ministry, controlled by another
Icoalition partner, the National
Religious party.
The athletic-related issue arose
Jfrom a rule that each team in the
Israeli National Basketball Lea-
|gue (NBL) may bring in one non-
Israeli player of Jewish birth and
one of non-Jewish birth.
When a non-Israeli player of
non-Jewish birth, as in the case of
Perry, became a convert, his ac-
Ition made room for acceptance bv
Ian NBL team of another non-Is-
|raeli player, in Perry's case, an
opening on the Maccabi Tel Aviv
team.
THE TEL AVIV team there-
upon imported Williams, who has
pince been a star player. Israeli
pports experts said they had
assumed that now that Williams
has converted to Judaism, he
Belgians Look
For Hitler
Book Publisher
BRUSSELS- (JTA) Belgian
authorities were reported to be
peeking to learn the
identity of the publisher of a re-
print of Hitler's Mein Kampf to
determine whether the republica-
pon is a violation of Belgian law.
Dries van Agt, the Dutch For-
eign Minister, said in The Hague
that he had asked the Dutch Em-
oassy in Brussels to check re-
ports the Hitler opus had been
reprinted in Belgium and was on
pale in supermarkets in Flanders
p Belgium. A reprint was confis-
cated in The Netherlands in 1974
pn grounds that material advo-
cating racism and xenophobia
"were illegal.
Dutch authorities were report-
I to be afraid that the reprints,
eheved to be on sale in Flemish
Lie?'Um' miht into the
Netherlands.
Anti-Semitic and racist mater-
Ms are violations of Belgian law
put Belgian Justice Ministry
ources said the publisher could
rgue that Mein Kampf was of
"sat historical value, and that he
ad .ssued the reprint for that
Bason.
The sources said that a decis-
Ehi?rkWhether to Prosecute the
Publisher would have to come
IW ,h pfse5utor of th "ea
there it b00k was on sa,e or
Lin* I Was P"nted, the latter
"SbSSn for the -"*
I
leaves a spot on the team for a
non-Jewish player. In fact, Wil-
liams conversion left an opening
which was filled by Jack Zimmer-
man, who was graduated from
Dayton (Ohio) University and
played international contests
with the Maccabi Tel Aviv team
last season.
Israeli cage teams also may,
for international competition,
add a player who need not be
Jewish. But he can play only in
international contests, not in
local ones.
Williams has turned out sur-
prisingly to be a highly aggres-
sive player, whose tactics have
offended many Israeli cage fans.
Williams has a tendency to bait
opposition players. Some of the
more mild-mannered Tel Aviv
fans find such tactics contrary to
their ideas of "smart basketball."
IN AN international game last
year, with a leading team in
Greece, Williams struck an oppo-
sition player, touching off a riot
that involved the whole Maccabi
squad.
Williams' aggressive style.
both on and off the court, has
surprised former NBL coaches
who have had the opportunity to
work with the new convert and
who are startled to learn about
his conversion. "This can't be the
Earl Williams I used to know
when I was affiliated with the
Detroit Pistons during Williams'
stay there," said one former as-
sistant coach. "It just doesn't sit
right with me."
Sports observers noted with
interest that the Maccabi five not
only lead the NBL every season
but also have managed to lead
the League in conversions of non-
Jewish players. There is a third
convert, Jim Boatwright, a form-
er Mormon from Utah.
The Hapoel Tel Aviv team, the
Tel Aviv Maccabi team's fiercest
competitor, which initially blew
the whistle on the question of
Perry's conversion, also was dis-
closed this week to have a con-
vert as a player. Lavon Mercer,
the star Pivot player of the Ha-
poel team, has undergone conver-
sion and is now a Jew. Mercer has
been an NBL star for the past
three seasons.
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
The last formal hurdle to
the Cabinet's decision to
ban Sabbath flights by El
Al has been removed with
the Knesset Finance Com-
mittee vote 11-10, to halt
the flights. The ban goes
into effect Sept. 1. El Al
planes will be grounded
from dusk Friday to dusk
Saturday and on other re-
ligious holidays.
Premier Menachem Begin
agreed to the shutdown under in-
tense pressure from Aqudat Is-
rael, a member of his coalition.
Representatives of El Al had
warned that the shutdown would
cause the struggling airline to
lose an estimated $40 million an-
nually, a loss that could mean the
end of El Al.
AS SOON as the Committee's
decision was made public, El Al
workers shouted abuse at Trans-
port Minister Haim Corfu. Hun-
dreds of El Al employes assem-
bled at Ben Gurion Airport, de-
claring they continue to cam-
paign against the ban. Workers
committees from industries
promised solidarity with the El
Al workers.
Corfu said after the Finance
Committee's meeting that the
airline might not suffer severe fi-
nancial loss despite the shutdown
on the Sabbath and religious hol-
idays. He did not specify how
this would be possible. Corfu said
the airline workers are opposed to
the decision because their income
would be reduced since they
would no longer work on Satur-
days.
"If they wish, they can still
operate El Al on a profitable ba-
sis," he said, "and it will be one
of the better work places also in
the future."
But Labor Alignment Knesset
member Gad Yaacobi, chairman
of the Knesset Economic Com-
mittee, said the decision on the
ban was the result of religious
coercion. He added that the move
to halt Sabbath flights was a bad
mistake and that it will be regret-
ted for a long time to come.

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197
157
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148
111
89
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392
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217
163
130
For countries thai ore not diotable, there's o 3-minute minimum and rotes
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FIRST MINUTE/tADOITONAL MINITE




Page 6-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 3,1982
Neo-Nazis Behind Terrorism
Austrians Aimed for Satmar Rabbe
By MONIKA BRENNER
And REINHARD ENGEL
VIENNA (JTA) A
series of bombings aimed at
Jewish personalities, one of
them the visiting Satmar
Rebbe, and shops owned by
Austrian Jews has been
planned and implemented
by neo-Nazis, Austrian au-
thorities indicated..
Two men, one a wanted West
German right-wing terrorist,
have been apprehended, but
neither has made any confession
so far. Police say the evidence
against them seems firm.
THE BOMBINGS started last
Winter, when an explosive device
was deposited in front of the'
Vienna apartment of Chief Rabbi
Akiba Eisenberg. He and his wife
were not home when the device
detonated. Only the apartment
door was damaged.
In mid-June, a similar bomb
attack was made on the home of
Simon Wiesenthal, head of the
Nazi Documentation Center in
Vienna. Wiesenthal and his wife
were home at the time but neither
was hurt in the blast.
Two weeks later, a bomb deto-
nated at the apartment of
Alexander Giese, a television
journalist, but no one was hurt.
Two weeks ago, a bomb exploded
in Salzburg in front of a clothing
shop owned by an Austrain Jew.
A few days later, another bomb
went off in front of another shop
in Vienna of the same company.
In Salzburg, the bombers left
leaflets at the store which said,
"Do not buy in Jewish stores."
LAST WEEK, a memorial for
victims of the Holocaust in
Vienna was desecrated with
swastikas. A Jewish-owned bank
in Vienna was hit by a Molotov
cocktail. Last Friday, a bomb
which failed to go off when its
trigger mechanism malfunction-
ed was found in a Vienna park.
An explosives expert in the
Viennese police department said
the failed bomb was by far the
most powerful in the series. He
said all of the bombs were either
pressure devices or iron tubes
filled with gunpowder and alarm
clock triggers. Police suspect all
the bombs were made by the
same individual or group.
What police called a "comedy
of crime" got considerable atten-
tion in Austrian media. Norbert
Burger, leader of the rightwing
National Democratic Party
(NDP), called a press conference
to announce he would make
known the identity of one of the
wanted terrorists. The Police im-
mediately took Burger into
custody for interrogation. A few
hours later. Ekkehard Weil, 33,
wanted in West Germany as a
neo-Nazi, was arrested.
INTERIOR Minister Erwin
Lane said he believed Buger had
made his public gesture out of
fear that police would have found
Weil at the home of an NDP
functionary. Lane said Austrian
police had proof that Weil, who is
wanted internationally for terror
acts in West Germany, has been
in Austria for more than a year,
housed and supported by NDP
members. Weil is also suspected
of a bank robbery in Austria two
years ago.
Police said that Weil and
another arrested suspect, Attila
Bajetec, 23, a Hungarian appre-
hended last Sunday, have denied
any connection with the bomb-
ings. But police officials said they
have ample evidence against both
Weil and Bajetic.
The threat against the Satmar
Rebbe, Moshe Teitelbaum, was
made known to Austrian authori-
ties last week. Teitelbaum had
been vacationing in the Austrian
mountains. Police responded by
tightening security measures at
Semmering, Teitelbaum's vaca-
tion place. Last Sunday, the
Satmar Rebbe left for his home in
Brooklyn.
WITH ONE exception, which
was not disclosed, the names of
the intended victims of the bomb
plantings were contained in a hit
list circulated in West German
neo-Nazi Circles. The list was
leaked to an Austrian newspaper
earlier this year.
Initially, the police had pur-
sued the theory that the bombing
efforts were the work of Palestin-
ian terrorists. But after the
arrests of Weil and Bajetec, the
police indicated they were fairly
certain that West German 'and
Austrian rightwingers were re-
sponsible.
Now That His War Is Over]
Haddad Fears
Israel Cools Off
Continued from Page l-A
oath of Beirut, apparently at the request of PhalangjJ
leader Gemayel. aumi
Haddad seemed to feel that he might now be abandon
by Israel, which will seek to work only through GemayJ
who might in turn seek to reduce any apparent depen
dence on Israel for his own political purposes. "Basr^i.
my friend, and we work together," Haddad told Israel
Radio. "But I am a soldier, not a politician. He is a politj.
cian with ambitions."
THE CHRISTIAN MILITIA commander said, "I
sure I have done my best and done my duty. I did notfol
tray my friends or my country. But I am now somewhat
worried that Israel may take the wrong steps. I care forI
israel as well as my own country. You cannot forget the I
past seven years."
Haddad added that it appears to be the fate of many
Lebanese leaders to live abroad when their duties to their
own country are ended. "Maybe I should retire and go live
in Israel," he said wistfully. "I have no political ambi-,
tions. I don't want to be a president. I know only soldier- i
' JTA Feature Syndicate
Israel Says 'No'
To Support of Another Palestinian State
Continued from Page l-A
was a subject for negotiations.
As one minister put it, "How
long would that state remain de-
militarized?"
Sharon reported that Secretary
of State George Shultz, with
whom he met last Friday, reiter-
ated the United States commit-
ment to Israel's security but re-
portedly gave "wide ranging in-
terpretations" to the Camp Da-
vid accords.
When Sharon repeated to
Shultz Israel's opposition to a
Palestinian state, Shultz report-
edly replied that the United
States, too, opposed the creation
of "an armed and dangerous
state." That comment by Shultz
was understood here as a hint
that the Reagan Administration
was moving toward acceptance of
an independent demilitarized
Palestinian state.
SHULTZ REPORTEDLY
spoke of the need to make an ef-
fort to induce Jordan to join in
the Mideast peace talks, as an
Arab country "which should
have a vital role in the Camp Da-
vid process." Shultz was under-
stood to have said he felt
bringing Jordan into the talks
was still possible. This remark,
too, was interpreted in Jerusalem
as a hint of a possible United
States effort to bring new part-
ners into the peace process, pre-
sumably on Israel's behalf.
Premier Menachem Begin said
that if the Americans, or Egypt,
for that matter, sought to intro-
duce basic changes in the Camp
David accords, Israel would con-
sider itself free of its obligations
under those accords. This was
considered by observers as a hint
that Israel would no longer
regard itself as limited in acting
to annex the West Bank and the
Gaza Strip.
Begin told the Cabinet meeting
that the Egyptians were trying to
bring into the autonomy negotia-
tions a document which had been
rejected by then President Carter
at the talks at Camp David from
which the Camp David accords
emerged. It was generally agreed
in Jerusalem that Israel would
not lose out if the autonomy talks
were adjourned indefinitely, as
the Egyptians have threatened.
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Friday, September 3, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
Begin Optimistic War Over
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
p^ier Menachem Begin has
expressed optimism that with the
departure of the Palestine Liber-
al Organization from Beirut
proceeding as scheduled, the
military stage of the war in
Lebanon has concluded. But
Begin said that this should not be
taken as an indication to others
that Israel has foreclosed the
possibility of other military
actions.
At a meeting of the Knesset
Security and Foreign Affairs
Committee, Begin said Israel has
no intention to attack Syria,
whose occupation force continues
to occupy parts of eastern
Lebanon, or Jordan, which
warmyly welcomed several
hundred of the first PLO
evacuees from the Lebanese
capital. The Israeli Premier re-
mained firm on his position that
if attacked, Israel would not
hesitate to return fire.
The committee meeting was
also the scene of sharp exchanges
between Begin and opposition
Labor Party leader Shimon
Peres, who charged that the gov-
ernment had no need to go
beyond the originally stated in-
tentions of the "Peace for
Arafat Goes to Greece;
Wanted Air Escort Out
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
PLO Chief Yasir Arafat left
Beirut Monday aboard the
Greek cruise ship Atlantis,
bound for Athens where he
was expected to meet Greek
leaders before going on to
Tunis.
No confirmation was available
here of a Yediot Aharonot report
that Israel had rejected a pro-
posal by Arafat that he be ac-
corded a farewell suited to a head
of state. According to this report,
\rafat had demanded that he be
allowed to sail aboard a French
naval vessel, with an air escort of
American jet fighters.
ARAFAT WAS driven to the
Beirut port area in a bullet-proof
limousine, surrounded, by French
troops and with a bodyguard of
his own PLO men. The ship
aboard which he sailed to Greece
was escorted by naval vessels of
the international force to ensure
his safety.
Before leaving for the Beirut
port, Arafat met with Lebanese
leftwing leaders at the west
Beirut home of leftist Druze
leader Walid Jumblatt.
Just before Arafat left by sea,
some 1,200 members of the
Syrian army's 84th Armored Bri-
gade left in a road convoy bound
for Damascus, together with
some of its tanks aboard giant
tank transporters. Although pro-
Syrian troops have been among
previous convoys, this was the
first group of actual Syrian sol-
diers to leave Beirut.
ISRAELI OFFICERS and of-
ficials said the evacuation was
going faster than scheduled and
might be completed by Thur-
sday.
While the evacuation was pro-
ceeding, an Israeli soldier was
wounded when his patrol vehicle
ran over a mine in the eastern
sector. Members of the patrol
came under fire from Syrian-held
territory. Fire was returned, the
army spokesman said.
Galilee" operation were to push
the PLO out of rocket and ar-
tillery range of Israel's northern
border settelments, an estimated
distance of 25 miles.
PERES CONDEMNED the
bombing of west Beirut, saving
the action, joined with the block-
ades imposed by the Israel De-
fense Force around the Lebanese
capital cutting off water supplies,
has caused damage to Israel's in-
ternational image. He said that
at no time during the Labor
Alignment governments of the
past had civilian targets been
bombed.
Begin used the opportunity at
the committee meeting to settle
scores that have developed be-
tween the two factions concern-
ing the war effort. "One cannot
speak today of the Alignment,"
he charged. "Every member of
your faction is expressing a dif-
ferent view."
Begin explained that Israel
had no intention originally to
move into west Beirut but said
that if the government had de-
clared so publicly, the PLO would
have not been pressured to
evacuate the capital. He accused
the Labor Alignment of failing to
view the actions in Lebanon in
proper perspective and not being
able to admit to the govern-
ment's achievements in ridding
I^ebanon of the PLO.
BEGIN SAID he could cite
"tens of examples" of where the
Labor governments "did just the
same" as his Likud leadership
acted in the Lebanon action. But
Peres replied: "Why even the
Deputy Premier demanded the
dismissal of the Defense Minis-
ter," Ariel Sharon.
According to Begin, no minis-
ter had made such a demand in
the Cabinet. But Peres retorted,
"Although the name has not been
publicized, I believe the jour-
nalists who wrote that these
comments were made by a senior
minister." There have been in
recent weeks reports that the
' Cabinet was sharply divided on
the 10-hour bombing Sharon
had ordered on Aug. 12 which
continued until President Reagan
called from Washington demand-
ing that the bombing cease.
Meanwhile, Labor MK Yossi
Sarid said the entire war was un-
necessary and repeated his earlier
demand for a commission to be
formed to study the "develop-
ment of the war." Sarid said that
as a result of the Lebanon action,
the PLO may have strengthened
its political standing and terror-
ism may increase. He contended
the PLO was militarily weak in
Lebanon prior to the Israeli
action.
BEGIN SAID, "If you con-
vince your own party to make
such a demand officially the com-
mission will be erected in 24
hours, but it will also look into
the behavior of some opposition
members during the fighting."
Begin also charged Peres with
having "sold" his ideas of Israeli
concessions on the West Bank
during his recent visit to the U.S.
Begin said Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger has already
begun initiating proposals in that
direction.
Nevertheless, Begin said Israel
would soon resume the long-
stalled negotiations for Palestin-
ian autonomy on the West Bank
and Gaza Strip. He said,
however, that Israel would not
accept Egyptian dictations,
which was an apparent response
to a statement published by
Egyptian President Hosni
Mubarak calling for a halt to Is-
raeli settlement policies in the oc-
cupied territories.

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Page 8-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 3,1982
\
t
Paris Report
France, Egypt Have Own Peace Plan
PARIS (JTA) An
effort to launch a joint
Franco-Egyptian Middle
East peace plan got under-
way here at a 90 -minute
meeting between Egyptian
Minister of State for For-
eign Affairs Boutros Ghali
and French Foreign Minis-
ter Claude Cheysson.
The essence of the effort, Ghali
told reporters after the meeting
at Quai- i'Orsay, is to find "an
overall political solution" to the
Palestinian problem. Ghali said
that the expulsion of the PLO
forces from Lebanon was not a
solution to the Palestinian prob-
lem, which is the right of the
Palestinian people to self-deter-
mination.
ACCORDING to both French
and Egyptian sources here, the
Cheysson-Ghali meeting was
characterized by a "remarkable
degree" of understanding by
both sides of the steps required to
achieve a comprehensive settle-
ment of the Mideast crisis.
Although both sides refrained
from detailing the elements of
what was dubbed "a renewed
Franco-Egyptian diplomatic ini-
tiative" on the Mideast in general
and the Palestinian problem in
particular, it is believed that both
countries will soon publish an up-
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date version of their joint draft
resolution submitted to the
United Nations Security Council
on July 2.
The draft, which was criticized
by Israel, calls on Israel and the
PLO to mutually recognize each
other, thus providing the founda-
tion for the long-range solution of
the Palestinian problem.
The Unites States rejected the
draft when it was presented to
the Security Council, but sources
in Paris express the hope that the
U.S. will reconsider the draft, at
least in its updated version, in
view of "the new voices coming
these days from Washington."
THIS REFERRED the recent
declarations by Secretary of
State George Shultz and Defense
Secretary Caspar Weinberger,
both of whom have stated that a
solution of the Palestinian prob-
lem is a priority issue.
Ghali told reporters here that
"certain aspects of the (joint
France-Egyptian) plan must now
be brought up to date" and that
the governments of both coun-
tires "are coordinating their
views. We are quite flexible and
must consult with the United
States and other countries con-
cerned."
He added he felt Washington
was reassessing its Mideast
policy and that Egypt would seek
to explain aspects of the crisis to
the Reagan Administration.
Egyptian and French diplo-
matic sources say one aim of the
joint draft resolution is to save
face for the PLO after its defeat
in Lebanon. While Egyptian
diplomats emphasize that the ex-
pulsion of the PLO forces from
Lebanon was a "short-sighted"
approach, French diplomats pre-
fer to tread more gingerly in as-
sessing the situation.
THE FRENCH are more sen-
sitive to the evacuation process,
which they consider to be fragile,
because their troops are in Leba-
non as part of the international
force along with American and
Italian troops overseeing the
withdrawal of the terrorists. The
French, therefore, use more
moderate language when dis-
cussing what they call the "post-
Beirut options."
Nevertheless, Cheysson, in an
interview published in the daily,,
Sud Ouest, stated: "We believe
that negotiations must be held
with the Palestinians, and for
these negotiations the only
known partner is the PLO. The
Americans do not say that, or are
not in a position to say that, be-
cause of their commitments to
Israel."
However, Cheysson noted an
important development on the
part of the U.S. with the stance
taken by Shultz. The U.S. Secre-
tary of State said in an interview
on NBC-TV's Meet the Press
program that the Camp David *
peace process can be interpreted \
in many ways and that the Pales-
tinians should have a role in de-
termining the conditions under
which they live. This was seen as
a reference to some form of Pales-
tinian participation in the peace
negotiations process.
CHEYSSON'S reference to the
PLO as the "only known part-
ner" for the negotiations with the
Palestinians was in contrast to
the statement President Francois
Mitterrand made. In meeting
with Israel's Labor Party leader
Shimon Peres, Mitterrand called
for the "participation" of the
PLO in the Mideast peace
process as "one element, among
others."
In his television appearance
later, the President said France
would continue to seek a state for
the Palestinians, but refrained
from saying that the PLO is the
"sole representative" 0f th
Palestinian people. e
The updated Franco- EfrvDtian
draft resolution will probably ^
cus on an effort to modifv
Security Council Resolution 242
by replacing the characterization
of the Palestinians as "refugees"
as is now contained in Resolution
242. The joipt draft is also,S"
to call for some sort of PLO "Dar
ticipation" in the peace process
although it is not clear what the
dimensions of this "participa.
tion would be.
Meanwhile, French and Egyn.
tian diplomats are waiting for
further clarifications from the
U.S. on the views expounded by
Shultz and Weinberger before
they make public their updated
version.
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Friday, September 3, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV(JTA)An allegedly armless
child, whose picture is reportedly displayed
on President Reagan's desk as a symbol of
suffering in Lebanon, turns out to be a boy,
not a girl as alleged, with both arms intact.
The child, identified as four-month-old Eli
Massou, whose mother is 16 years old, was
discharged from the hospital a few days after
the picture was taken.
ACCORDING TO THE caption ac-
companying the United Press International
photo distributed throughout the world, it
was a picture of a baby girl swathed in band-
ages after both arms had been blown off by a
misdirected Israeli bomb. The child was seen
held in the arms of a nurse.
After a news report that Reagan had pub-
licized the picture as a symbol of suffering in
the Lebanon war, the Israel medical corps
started to track down the infant and the nurse
holding him.
the nurse and the doctor who treated the baby
were found, and sworn depositions were taken
from them. The child was tracked down along
with his mother in a Lebanese village where
they had taken refuge after they were both re-
leased from the hospital.
ACCORDING TO THE medical report, one
of the infant's arms was broken in a bombing
raid. The arm and his face were also slightly
burned. His mother was also slightly injured
in the raid and his father was killed. Doctors
said the child was completely swathed, as
shown in the UPI photo, because that is the
standard procedure of dealing with an infant
whose arm has been broken to prevent un-
necessary movement during medical treat-
ment.
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.'

Page 10-a The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 3,1982
Shultz Confident
PLO Exit to Conclude Without Hitch
By KEVIN FREEMAN
And HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON-(JTA)-
Secretary of State George
Shultz said he was confi-
dent that the evacuation of
the Palestine Liberation
Organization from the port
of Beirut would continue as
scheduled despite the
hitches.
Shultz. appearing on
NBC-TVs "Meet the Press"
program last week confirmed re-
ports from BEIRUT THAT Is-
rael had blocked a Cyprus-bound
vessel with PLO evacuees be-
cause they had jeeps and other
military equipment aboard.
AT THE SAME time, Defense
Secretary Casper Weinberger
charged that Israel had no right
to block the departure of the ship
from Beirut, contending that the
port "is suDDOsed to be under the
control of the French." Appear-
ing on the CBS-TV "Face the
Nation" program, Weinberger
described the problem as a "little
glitch. Twenty jeeps seem to be
the major part of the dispute,"
Weinberger said, adding, "It's a;
lawyer's dispute."
Shultz, questioned on a num-
ber of Middle East issues, includ-
ing the stalled autonomy nego-
tiations and Israeli settlement
policy on the West Bank, refused
to be drawn into criticism of Is-
rael. He said he did not want to
leave "a tone that all problems"
in the region are "created by Is-
rael."
He said, for example, that Is-
rael's settlement policy on the
West Bank is "not constructive,"
a phase which he said has been
amplified before by President
Reagan. When pressed for his
opinion of the settlement policy,
Schultz said he agreed with the
president.
THE SECRETARY of State,
in his first television interview
since taking office, said that Is-
rael continued to remain a true
friend of and ally of the United
States. "I believe, "Shultz said,
"that in all the things that we do,
we must be always cognizant and
careful about the security of Is-
rael."
At a press conference, Shultz
also said that despite the Israeli
action in Lebanon, U.S. -Israel
relations remain strong. "We are
completely committed to the
support of the security of Israel."
But he acknowledged that there
were "strains" in relations be-
tween the two countries during
the past two months, and "there
were some occasions when it
seemed to us that the Israeli mili-
tary actions were excessive and
we said so." However, Shultz
added: "Underneath it all, the re-
lationship between the U.S. and
Israel remains a strong one."
He also said at his press con-
ference, that there was "no ques-
tion" that relations between the
U.S. and the Arab states had
been strained "as they have seen
the suffering in Lebanon and the
great destruction in Beirut."
WHILE SHULTZ, in his TV
interview, would not detail what
he termed the Administration's
"ideas" toward reviving the long-
stalled negotiations for Palestin-
ian autonomy on the West Bank
and Gaza Strip, he said that for
there to be a "genuine peaceful
outcome" that is widely accepted
in the region, other countries
would have to be involved in the
negotiations. He would not clar-
ify which other countries would
be needed to participate or how
they would be brought ihto the
peace process.
Shultz said the Camp David
framework along with UN
Resolutions 242 and 338, the bed-
rock of U.S. policy toward the
Middle East, continue to be an
"ample basis and a good basis for
any ongoing negotiations."
He pointed out that Richard
Fairbanks, a State Department
official, continues to provide
asistance on the negotiating issue
and said that it remains to be
seen whether he would appoint
anyone as a special U.S. negotia-
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tor to the autonomy talks when
they are revived.
SHULTZ SAID that success
in the negotiations "involved
delicate interplay between the
processes that are involved and
the substance you are trying to
achieve." He said the Camp
David process can be interpreted
in many ways and that negotia-
tions were crucial for a resolution.
He added that the Palestinians
should have a role in determining
the conditions under which they
live, obliquely referring to some
form of Palestinian participation
in the negotiation process.
At his press conference, Shultz
also said the Administration was
forming its own views on the is-
sue of Palestinian self-rule on the
West Bank. He said the Camp
David process had "lots of room
for ideas."
He said "the prospects for
peace, particularly in the light of
the conflict in Leb-
anon. should convince people
that if there is any genuine pros-
pect for peace it should be seized,
and perhaps that would be an in-
centive for everyone to give and
take and try to construct some-
thing that might work."
SHULTZ SAID that the
Syrians promised to leave when
asked to do so by the Lebanese.
He indicated that the process will
take time, and that the Adminis-
tration is seeking a process
whereby the Lebanese govern-
ment "increasingly takes con-
trol."
The Secretary of State, who
succeeded Alexander Haig on
July 16, described Habib as a
"truly great American," and we
"owe him a wonderful debt of
thanks."
President Reagan sent a tele-
gram to Habib after a Rose
Garden Press conference, prais-
ing his envoy for his efforts in
achieving a settlement to the
Beirut crisis. "Yours is truly a
sterling achievement," the Pres-
ident said. "You have succeeded
against staggering odds."
EARLIER, Ragan said that
the 800 marines who will partici-
pate in the evacuation of PLO
forces from Beirut will play a
"carefully limited non-combatant
role." He said if the marines are
shot at they would be removed
immediately. "In no case will our
troops stay longer than 30 days,"
he said.
Reagan said the withdrawal
"will set the stage for the urgent
international action required to
restore Lebanon's full sovereign-
ty, unity and territorial integrity,
obtain a rapid withdrawal of all
foreign forces from that country,
and help ensure the security of
northern Israel." He called for
swift action under the Camp
David peace process to "resolve
the Palestinian issue in all its as-
pects."
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swelling of hemorrhoidal tis-
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Tests hy doctors on nun-
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Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 11-A
Renick and
Tweedledum
Plummer Won't
Bo It! But...
CAN BLOCK THE
COMING WASTE
P TAX INCREASES
AND SERVICE
CUTS!!
SbeiHianu Herald
August 19, 1982 %
V .uVuui tUls
".\>ia *\*',wl1 ru sa>>
>dd this to an
over-budget Metro-rail
a nearly-broke hospita*
system, and you get
huge property tax
increases, battered
roads, and refugee
problems- unless..
"A State
Lottery can
Bring a
Generation
of Tax
Relief TO
Bade
County and
Florida."
Strike a Double Whammy at
the Uninsured Clunkers on
Our Roads!
H.
___ Eirhard Lewis will propose two
strong measures. First, mandatory auto
liability insurance with teeth. You wont
be able to get an auto tag without it. and
if a policy is cancelled, the insurance
company must notify the state. A Florida
Highway Patrolman will come by and pick
up the motorists auto tag. Second, re-
institution of auto inspection. Eliminate
long waiting lines by exempting cars less
than two years old.
About Richard Lewis...
s
Tweedledum and Tweedle-de* *! 'Mum'
>n iwM'Idfi. pr>r. or thiim mini.1!
dl/frnl hut pra.'Lilly llif am; n.-rl> ln>irl'"I
pair [humiTi.us 'ml' In< appar flr ..ppii* nlrkn.im. i Hn.l.-i an-1 B.-ii'minl. with lywrHh-*
'o tblr miulral r!lr> -l-ri of firwf.v I rait "r'.
for a hrtll not3
111.' K.IIKloIll llllll-i- I III IHlllillA
nl' Ihi' Knuli-li I..iiii;u,iui-
Vote for a Generation of
Tax Relief...
Elect Richard C.
Forget the Famous Names With
The Tired Promises!
____ n the first day he's a state senator.
Richard Lewis will start the machinery
rolling.to create a state lottery, modeled
after the most successful lotteries already
in use in 16 other states. Such a lottery,
with income returned to the county of
origin, could bring us a generation of tax
relief. Richard Lewis believes. Experts
estimate the income could be $350
million state-wide, or $60 million for
Dade. That's the equivalent of 30^ of
what Dade homeowners are paying in
property taxes today!
__on of a former FBI agent and a
graduate of Dartmouth College and the
University of Miami Law School. Richard
Lewis also received a degree in Taxation
from the graduate Law School of New
York University. Lewis. 40. served as
assistant professor of Business law at
Lehigh University in Bethlehem. Pa. He
has been in private practice of law in
Dade County since 1968. He and his wife.
Micki. have both been inducted into the
Societv of Founders of the University of
Miami. They live in South Dade with
their three sons, ages 15. 12 and 9.
LEWIS
State Senator, District 39 Democrat South Dade
i
I'lIKM


12-A
Tr*f,
3.U8Z
EXPERIENCE
FAIRNESS DIGNITY
By Far, the best prepared to be Judge
ENDORSED BY
Richard AJhadeff
Mickey Balsam
Peter Cohn
Joseph Glazer
Sidney Goodman
Monty Gordon
Gail Jaffee
Sheldon Lelchuk
Sam Leff
Ben Levine
Max Mickelson
Leslie Peiken
Mitch Potter
Ira Pozen
Dan Roth
Saul Roth
Lawrence Schantz
Joseph Schwartz
Donald Tescher
Andrew Tibor
Stanley Weiner
Harold Zeeman
of Temple Beth Shalom
of Congregation Ohav Shalom
of Temple Ner Tarn id
of Aventura Jewish Center
of Gold Coast Synagogue
of Bet Breira Synagogue
of Temple Judea
of Temple Menorah
of Temple AJath Yeshurun
of Mogan David Congregation
of Beth Torah Congregation
of Temple Sinai
of North Bay Village Jewish Center
of Temple Beth Am
of Beth Jacob Synagogue
of Temple King Solomon
of Temple Emanu-EI
of Temple Beth Moshe
of Beth David Congregation
of Temple Zamora
of Temple Bnai Zion
of Temple Shir Ami
Member:
Temple Adath Yeshurun,
Hadassah, and
B'nai B'rith Women
Countywide Election Sept. 7
DADE COUNTY JUDGE punch 228
"Start Your Da
|..l i-.j Al


Leo Mindlin
Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A

For All Mubarak's Bluster,
War and Space World of E. T. Pact With farael stm Holds
Continued from Page 4-A
Lf, go that, presumably, he may
fcdv them later at leisure. De-
eied in his collections, he flees
he armed, jackbooted adults of
C community who understand
nthing new (and divine) except
j kill him as an alien and an ene-
J Fearful of capture and harm.
It's spacecraft races away,
Ving him behind True to the
"turn that "a child shall lead
Bern" enter now Eliot, an
lart tiling who becomes Disciple
|o 1 to this peaceful voyager
om space. Eliot's name, linguis-
dly related to Elihu, in He-
-w means "God is He." Also,
Wver you spell the name, and
fere are several popular varia-
Jons, all forms of Eliot begin
Ijth "E" and end with "T.
from the beginning, he is elected
I carry on the faith after the end.
[in any case, Eliot befriends
|.T., helps him to hide and
tthers a clan of bicycle-riding
isciples around their new space
fcd. Like Peter and Paul and the
fest. who were mainly fishermen,
bese young folk are simple crea-
ures easily able to understand
l "miracle" of E.T.'s arrival on
th and just as easily willing to
Jiallenge the Establishment in
(is behalf, in their case in the
T>rm of parents and the insensi-
pve community at large.
A DOMINANT link between
!.T. and his disciples is food in
he same way that it was between
esus and his disciples, and that
read and wine are in current
Ihristendom. For E.T., it is
In Toronto
Reese's, the popular kid-candy.
Only the incredulity of the
adults, who are forever bogged
down in their debilitating strug-
gle with daily routine, fail to dis-
cover this form of communion.
They resist the beguiling quality
of E.T., who in short order shows
an astonishing array of divine
powers. E.T. can communicate
with his disciples telepathically
even to the point that, at least
Eliot, feels what he feels. He has
them perform magnificent feats
of telekinesis (the flying bicycle
scenes) to the astonishment and
frustration of the disbelieving
adults, whose own world order is
rooted in Newton instead, where
things are pinned down and pre-
dictable in their behavior.
E.T. also performs miraculous
acts of healing when Eliot is ill in
the same way Jesus was purport-
ed to have done. And he invokes
one of the ten plagues upon a
confused biology teacher, a sur-
rogate for the bourgeois system,
that God visited upon the Egypt-
ians when they refused to let His
people go.
IN THIS case, hordes of frogs
escape a classroom session in an-
atomy where a mass dissec-
tion of imprisoned frogs is about
to begin. Eliot refuses to partici-
pate when he sees the resem-
blance between his frog and E.T.,
and he lets his own "specimen"
escape as an inspiration to the
other students to do the same
who, of course, weren't looking
forward to their acts of murder in
the first place. The liberated
frogs wreak havoc on the unini-
Former SS Commandant
Remains in Jail
On His Own Volition
TORONTO (JTA) -
former SS corps com-
nandant, Albert Helmut
lauca, remains in jail on
kis own volition despite a
lecision of a three-judge
Canadian Federal Court of
Vppeal which rejected an
Application for a reversal of
lower court decision
Mich would have released
kim on $150,000 bail for an
Ixtradition hearing here
fept. 20.
I Officials said Rauca refused to
W the earlier decision, by Just-
us Wilson Griffiths, which would
ve allowed Rauca to go free on
fu. because he was afraid to
fve jail. Rauca was arrested
?re June 17 for allegedly taking
PjLJJ1 th wartime slaughter of
P.500 Jews in the Kovno ghetto
\ Lithuania. He was arrested at
* request of the West German
pvernment, which wants him
Itradited to be tried on the mass
lurder charge.
ION JUNE 21, he was granted
U, which his attorney, William
TOT, said he could afford, but
chose to remain in jail, rather
an leave and stay with friends
Ptil the extradition hearing. He
K-ided not to leave jail for fear of
Pdangering both them and him-
! No information has been
ade available as to why Rauca
lso fearful for his safety that he
piers to remain in jail.
J At the hearing sought by rep-
isentatives of the West German
pvemment and the Canadian
Jewish Congress, arguments
were submitted that Rauca posed
a threat to the safety of the com-
munity and that there was a risk
he would jump bail and not ap-
pear at the extradition hearing.
Justices John Uris, Darrel
Heald and G. S. Cowan, in up-
holding Justice Griffiths' deci-
sion to allow Rauca to be free on
bail pending the deportation
hearing, ruled there was "no
evidence" that Rauca "poses a
menace to the public" and that
"sufficient safeguards may be
built to ensure his appearance" at
the Sept. 20 hearing.
OBSERVERS POINTED out
that the hearing by Griffiths and
the appeal hearing which upheld
freedom on bail for Rauca was
not a pointless set of legal actions
because, under Griffiths' initial
ruling, Rauca could leave the jail
whenever he chose to do so.
The appeals court concurred
with Griffiths' ruling which held
that the Canadian Bill of Rights
recognizes specifically "the right
to reasonable bail and pro-
vides that no one charged with a
criminal offense should be de-
prived of the right to bail or in-
terim release without just cause."
Griffiths ruled that Rauca was
"a good Canadian citizen" and a
hard working citizen since he ar-
rived in Canada in 1950 and had
no criminal record in Canada.
David Matas, a Winnipeg at-
torney active in the Canadian
Jewish Congress, said Rauca's
arrest marked the first time Can-
ada had acted to help extradite
an alleged war criminal.
tiated teacher, his anatomy ses-
sion and the school at large.
The wicked adults, who have
not been washed (baptized) in the
new knowledge, seek to "crucify"
E.T. when they finally discover
his existence and fail to under-
stand him. Like the Romans be-
fore them, they hound poor E.T.,
who now longs for one thing-
"home."
"Home" is in the heavens, to
which he points both nostalgical-
ly and meaningfully in the same
way that all the Hebrew pro-
phets, and then Jesus, pointed
heavenward to identify the King-
dom of God.
Spielberg's humor has E.T.
save himself by radioing "home"
on a machine he improvises from
garage junka sop to science.
But Earth's technologists finally
trap E.T., in his own lair, Eliot's
home a clear echo of the Last
Supper and the internecine be-
trayal by Judas who suffers from
a variety of bourgeois maladies,
including the melancholic belief
in a Kingdom of God on Earth. In
contemporary terms, this is the
vanity of scientific excellence
whose ultimate dream is Earthly
perfection. The technologists see
E.T. as a specimen (like the frogs
in the classroom) and seek to ex-
amine his innards for biological
edification.
ALL OF Eliot's family by now
have long since become fervent
E.T. disciplesexcept for his
mother who knows nothing of
E.T.'s existence or divine pur-
pose until the crucifixion in the
end, a virgin birth if ever there
was one.
E.T.'s death presumably af-
firms the indifference of "home"
to his fate and evokes the me-
mory of Jesus' reading of the da-
vidic "My God, why have you
fc*ejken me?" as death comes to
him on the cross.
Not unexpectedly by now, a
miraculous resurrection occurs as
E.T. revives in his coffin, a scien-
tific cylinder in a grotto of oxy-
genated plastic. Unknown to his
disciples and the others, "home"
has contacted him on his junk ra-
dio, and he is ready to ascend to
his heavenly father. Appropriate-
ly, his heart suddenly glows red.
Catholic lore depicts Jesus this
same way.
"STAY," pleads Eliot, who
will miss the fun here so fiercely
once E.T. is gone. "Come," E.T.
invites Eliot to join him in the
waiting flying saucer, a left-over
drawing from another Spielberg
production, "Close Encounters of
a Third Kind." Both refuse to
give in, but E.T. touches Eliot's
brow and promises always to be
there anywayanother one of
E.T.'s miracles-to-come and a sig-
nal sign that fcliot has been spe-
cially chosen to carry on the
faith. The spacecraft ascends,
and we are left to believe that,
somehow, mankind will be better
off than it was before his arrival
and brief sojourn on Earth.
Spielberg's film spins itself out
on a theme involving the struggle
between Earthly divorce (Eliot's
mother's and father's separation
of recent vintage from which she
suffers inordinately) and union
with the cosmica rejection of
physical (sexual) love in favor of
spiritual union with the divine,
an allegoric nostrum for man's
ills that is a specialty item in
Christian doctrine.
"E.T." will stay with all the
Eliots who believe because what
there is here on Earth, whether in
Beirut or on the machinegun-torn
streets of Paris, is just too much
to reckon with. Still, as beguiling
as it appears at first glance, know
what you will be seeing when you
enter the film world of "E.T." It
is neither as simple nor as naive,
buzz-words for "heart-warming"
to Main Street America, as it ap-
pears to be.
Continued from Page 4-A
people were to have an immediate
sense of benefit in daily life from
cooperation with Uncle Sam.
MORE RECENTLY, foreign
aid policy has altered to reflect an
Egyptian choice of economic
goals:
Decisions on projects are
delegated to the village level,
with decision making on im-
provement of life done by local
populations directly affected.
New sources of electric
power production will soon be
generating as much power as the
Aswan Dam. Built by the USSR
under Nasser in the 1960's, the
dam has had a succession of
problems. One of the latest is the
deterioration and break-up of
Soviet turbines in the dam's
power generators. They are being
replaced by an American firm,
Allis Chalmers.
Port facilities and docks in
Alexandria are being improved
and expanded. This increases ex-
port and trade potential with
Western Europe and the United
States.
Cement plants are being
built. This is vital in a desert land
that grows few trees for wood for
its construction industry.
The telephone system is
improving. A half decade ago
Cairo telephoning was difficult in
good weather, impossible in the
rain. Westerners report that with
more phones and more lines, the
telephone system is improving.
THERE IS A large program of
military assistance as well. Am-
erican arms and equipment have
several goals' Modernize the
Egyptian army; satisfy the gen-
erals who support Mubarak;
replace aging and obsolete Soviet
military equipment from the
1960's.
There are also plans to build an
American military base at Ras
lianas on the Egyptian Red Sea
coast near the Sudanese border.
Egypt will not allow permanent
American forces to be stationed
there, but facilities will be avail-
able to the new American Rapid
Deployment Force for military
response in the Persian Gulf, if
needed.
All of this military and eco-
nomic effort in Egypt has result-
ed in a large expansion of the
American Embassy. Incredibly
enough, the U.S. Embassy in
Cairo is the second largest Amer-
ican diplomatic mission any-
where in the world. Only the em-
bassy in London is larger.
IT RAISED interesting but
disturbing parallels with Iran
and the fall of the Shah. Are we
building a massive American
presence in Cairo just as in the
late 1970's we had similarly built
in Tehran?
Embassy Cairo denies the
parallel. Admittedly, the U.S.
sells a lot of military equipment
to the Egyptians. There is a mili-
tary presence to train Egyptians.
The economic AID program is
large. All of this requires a large
and growing administrative ap-
paratus to run it. But the total
U.S. presence in Cairo is much
smaller than it had been in
Teheran. There ia fees conetuc-
tion and fewer Americans com-
panies on the ground in Egypt.
There are an estimated 3,000
Americans in Embassy Cairo.
With dependents, military, and
corporate representatives, the
total of Americans in Egypt is an
estimated 10,000. Under the
Shah, Americans in Iran were
some 40,000.
There is evidence in Cairo of
bitterness toward both Israel and
the United States over the inva-
sion of Lebanon.
ONE OF Egypt's foreign
policy goals today is reaccept-
ance by Arab states and readmis-
sion to the Arab League in the
wake of the peace treaty with Is-
rael. But Egyptian officials have
said that they feel "had" and
"used" by Israel as a result of the
Camp David accords in the wake
of the invasion into Lebanon.
Egypt has "frozen" the normali-
zation process with Israel.
President Hosni Mubarak cri-
ticizes Israel publicly in speeches.
He repeats the critique in meet-
ings with Westerners.
One unexpected result of the
Lebanese fighting has been a
sharp improvement in Egypt's
relations with the PLO.
APART FROM talk about
Lebanon, there appears to be a
wide perception in Egypt that
peace with Israel has been good,
even very good for the country.
Ministry officials admit its
positive benenrts. Shop-keeprers
repoert better business from
more tourism. A taxi-driver
driving tio the air-port apologizes
for the endless arteries of cars,
saying that five years ago before
the peace there was not as many
vehicles on the Cairo streets.
Parenthetically, a reporter
cannot help but note that five
years ago the Cairo traffic
seemed just as insanre and
impossible as a t present.
The plain facts of Egypt's cir-
cumstances today are staggering.
When Anwar Sadat became
president in the early 1970's there
were 30 million Egyptians.
When Hosni Mubarak became
president in the early 1980's,
there were 44 million Egyptians.
In 1982 the Egyptians will
spend over $5 billion for food im-
ports. Food subsidies in the cur-
rent financial year will come to
one fourth of Egypt's GNP; from
22 per cent to 28 per cent. The
cost of Egyptian defense, accord-
ing to the International Institute
of Strategic Studies, will run ap-
proximately 50 per cent of
Egypt's GNP. Therefore, three
quarters of the entire GNP will be
spent on just the twin items of
defense and food.
For Hosni Mubarak and some
Egyptian leaders, an economy in
such straits can only be a recipe
for revolution either Com-
munist or Islamic. More conflict
with Israel by denouncing a
peace treaty over Lebanon is not
the way for Egypt to correct it.
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Page 14-A The Jewish Plondiau Friday. September 3. 1962
war Powers Act

Reagan Complies in Report to Congress
Tourism Minister Predicts
Post-War Rise in Travel to Israel
By HELEN SILVER
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) President Reagan
has sent to Congress the
report required under the
War Powers Act for em-
ploying United States
marines in Beirut in con-
nection with the continuing
evacuation of PLO forces
from that city.
Slat* Department spokesman
John Hughes explained that "the
War Powers Resolution calls for a
report to Congress whenever
United States forces equipped for
combat enter foreign territory. It
also requires a report when
United States troops are intro-
duced into hostilities or into a
situation where imminnent in-
volvement in hostilities is clear!>
indicated by the circumstance*
... A report is required when
either or both of these situations
occur. "
HE ADDED: The War
Powers Resolution does not
require that the report cities a
specific subsection of the resolu-
tion; rather, it requires that the
Congress be provided full infor-
mation concerning the circum-
stances necessitating the intro-
duction of United States forces,
the authority under which such
introductions are placed, the es-
timated scope and duration of the
involvement, and other informa-
tion relevant to Congressional re-
sponsibilities.
"The report which the Presi-
dent transmitted today fulfills
the requirement of the law by
providing the Congress full infor-
mation concerning the circum-
stances of the deployment in
Beirut."
Hughes stated that "the Presi-
dent's judgment aa to the possi-
bility of hostilities was based
upon careful consideration of the
facts and circumstances in-
volved. As indicated in the
report, the arrangements worked
out by (special Presidential
envoy Philip) Habib were design-
ed to insure that the multination-
al force will be able to perform its
functions without interference,
and particularly the agreement
between the United States and
Lebanon expressly rules out
combat responsibilities for our
forces."
HUGHES SAID that there
had been a careful plan of safety
arrangements for the multina-
tional force and with the French
advance contingent in Berut for
several days, the United States
bad had an opportunity to see the
implementation of the safety as-
surances
He stated "the departure plan'
for the PLO forces so far has
beer, implemented successfully
without interference, so. based on
all these factors, the President
concluded that while isolated acts
of violence cannot be ruled out.
there was no reason to expect
that United States forces would
become involved in hostilities.'
Hughes said some 800 United
States marines went into
Lebanon on time and took up
their positions very quickly with-
out incident. A group of 563 PLO
terrorists left Beirut by sea for
Syria. He said the decision to
send the PLO men by sea instead
of land was not linked to reports
of fighting in Lebanon. He said.
"It is simply that the parties
themselves, for a variety of oper-
ational and technical reasons on
the ground, elected to go by sea."
ASKED WHETHER the
United States had received a re-
quest to assist in the rebuilding
of Lebanon, Hughes stated that
"the thinking here is to consider
such a request. I do not think
there has been a formal request,
but there have been consulta-
tions. The United States has
been very interested in this hu-
manitarian endeavor. We do not
have a final assessment of the
amount that will need to be chan-
neled into short-term and longer-
term reconstruction in Lebanon."
Hughes said "much of the
technical and financial resources
for reconstruction will come from
the Lebanese private sector but
we do foresee a continued need
for assistance from other coun-
tries, from various private
sources and international agen-
cies, as well as the United
States."
Regarding a statement by
former Undersecretary of State
George Ball in the New York
Times, that Israel, "the aggres-
sor," should pay the cost of re-
building Lebanon, and the U.S.
"should deduct the cost of that
help from our annual subsidy to
Israel," Hughes said there would
be no official response to that
proposal.
HUGHES SAID, "It seems to
Leningrad Refusenik Irina Jacobson
Given Permission to Leave Russia
SAN FRANCISCO (JTA) Leningrad refusenik
Irina Jacobson has received permission to leave the Soviet
Union. Jacobson, the widow of the famed choreographer
Leonid Jacobson, worked with the Kirov Ballet Theater
until her husband's death. Irina Jacobson, a refusenik
since 1980, will be leaving the Soviet Union with her 28-
year-old son, Nikolai, on Sept. 10.
rrraMTLY7ACOBSrr^HER
{the^milyjao
me that both the President and
the Secretary of Scatet have
made clear that Israel is a true
and valued friend and that one
would consider Israels needs as
Israel s needs and not link them
to whatever else might be done to
other countries in the area."'
Hughes added that "in its rela-
tions with each country, the
needs of each country should be
looked at as individual needs."
Hughes was asked whether
United States naval ships were
accompanying PLO evacuation
vessels to protect them from
attack from Israel. Me replied
that the evacuation plan indicat-l
ed that U.S. ships would, if re-l
quested, escort the commercial!
vessels taking the PLO men out.
Hughes said. "On the basis of
our extensive discussions with'
the Israeli government concern-1
ing the evacuation from Beirut,
we have every confidence that|
everything will go smoothly, as it
has so far. but as a matter of
common prudence, we have been
asked to assure safe passage of
the evacuees while en route to
their destinations and provision
of United States naval escort is
part of that request by the
parties involvtd." He said there
were no objections from Israel to
this procedure.
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK-(JTA)-Abra-
ham Sharir. Israel's Minister of
Tourism, predicted that once the
Lebanese crisis is peacefully re-
solved which, he said, is a "mat-
ter of a few weeks,'' American
tourists will be able to go on
pakcage tours to Egypt. Israel
and Lebanon."
Addressing some 120 travel
agents from the New York area at
a reception at the Regency Hotel
here, the Israeli Minister said
that in fact in recent weeks the
Lebanese-Israeli border has been
open for tourists from both coun-
tries.
He said that Amencar. to**,
can come now and VJlt 7
pyramids in Egypt, thee caJZ
visit the Holy Places m EJ
and from there continue a i*^..
the casinos of Lebanon ~
Sharir said, however thai u
June 6. has reduced the numb*
of American tourists tc Israel bt
about five percent this suW
compared with the sa.-e pentf
last year. He said -.hat nm
would-be tourists were scared bs-
cause of the war in Lebanon and
wrongly thought that I ~rael *as
an unsafe place to visit
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The Airline of Israel


Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 15-A
POLICEMEN'S ORGANIZATION
SUPPORTS COUNTY
COMMISSIONER BAROARA CAREY
g*
WHICH CUUHTY COMMISSIONERS
SUPPORT THEM IH THEIR FIGHT
AGAIHST CRIME IH DADE COUNTY.
THAT'S WHY
THE DAOE COUNTY POLICE

ENDORSED COUHTY
COMMISSIONER RARBARA CAREY.
YOU CAH EHDORSE
HER, TOO, WITH YOUR VOTE
SEPTEMRER 7.
Keep a Good
Commissioner Working
For You
Retain Barbara
.
*>


- J
Pagel6-A The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 3,1982


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Zapped!' Producer Apple Makes Good in Hollywood
Inspired by His Photographer-Father
Art Apple, Jeff's Star Is Rising Fast
Jeffrey D- Apple, pro-
ft of ''Zapped!/^ the
any comedy produced by
Apple-Rose for Embassy
Pictures, and opening Fri-
day in Miami theatre, has
undertaken his first theat-
rical feature with the same
zeal and creativity that has
served him well in a variety
of undertakings.
Having worked in documen-
taries promotional films, and
shorts in various capacities as di-
rector of photography, writer, di-
rector and producer, Apple was
bom and brought up in Coral
Gables.
INSPIRED by his photo-
erapher-father, Apple's interest
in photography led him to New
York University, where he en-
tered their film school after a
brief foray into engineering.
Watching a film being shot ui
Washington Square on the NYU
campus, Apple's decision to work
in film was reinforced and he
decided to specialize in cinemato-
graphy.
APPLE BROKE into the pro-
fessional world by shooting film
for a land development corpora-
tion while still attending school.
At 20, he had started his own
production company.
Coincidentally, attending sev-
eral of the same classes at NYU
Robert J. Rosen thai who
Taking time out during filming of 'Zapped!'are (left to right) Jeffrey Apple, producer of the
film; actor Scatman (Mothers, who plays the role of Dexter James; Lisa Apple, assistant to
the producer; and Jan Leighton, who plays the role ofEuster.
was
worked as production manager
on Apple's first feature assign-
ment as a cinema tographer, and
who is now the director and co-
writer of' Zapped!.''
Apple is not the only member
of his family besides his father in
the business of photography and
production. The children of Ar-
thur and Dorothy Apple, who live
on quiet Maggiore Street in the
Gables, all seem to have a hand in
it.
There is Lisa Apple, who
serves as a production assistant
in "Zapped!" A graduate of Coral
Gables High School, she later
earned a degree in graphic design
at the University of Miami.
Then there is Larry Apple, lor
years involved in publishing with
the distinguished firm, McGraw
Hill, who is now president of As-
sociated Photographers of Miami
and whose work in murals and
other specialized photographic
assignments make the firm an in-
ternational organization.
Arthur Apple founded the firm
here some 37 years ago.
AS FOR Jeffrey Apple, back in
1971 he was already producing
commercials shorts, and in 1974,
without ever having worked as an
assistant, he was accepted into
the union as a full cameraman.
His credits as a director of photo-
graphy include the features
"Without Last Rights,'' 'Viva
As Cleopatra," and several
shorts and documentaries includ-
ing "Presenting Joanne Wood-
ward."
His producer-director credits
include more than three hundred
commercials, promotional films,
and several provocative docu-
mentaries, including "There's a
Place For Us," a documentary
shot in Israel starring Barry
Newman; "In War and Peace We
Are One," a TV movie starring
Martin Balsam shot in Israel and
Florida; and "Pepsico-Pele," the
story of Pele, the Brazilian soccer
champ.
IN ADDITION these days, he
is producer of the Metro media
cable network "Satellite Shop-
per," which appears nationwide.
Apple has won awards for his
efforts from the U.S. Industrial
Film Festival, the U.S. Public
Relations Conference, and New
York University.
"Zapped!" stars Scott Baio,
Willie Aames, Felice Schachter,
Heather Thomas, Robert Man-
dan and Scatman Crothers. Jeff
Apple served as producer, and
Robert J. Rosen thai directed
from the script he co-wrote with
Bruce Rubin. The Apple-Rose
production is an Embassy Pic-
tures' release.
Abramowitz Heads Bonds
Awards Committee
Spain Grants Naturalization
Privileges to Sephardic Jews
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz,
[spiritual leader of Temple
Menorah and chairman of Special
Events for the Israel Bonds Or-
ganization, will head a special
committee to elect recipients of
the Israel Bonds New Life
I Award.
The New Life Award will be
[presented jointly by the Govern-
ment of Israel and the State of
Israel Bonds Organization at a
community-wide dinner to be
| held on Oct. 14 on Miami Beach.
The awards have been present-
| ed three times previously and are
[reserved exclusively for those
I who have survived the Nazi holo-
I caust, have been reborn to a new
I life in the United States and have
[distinguished themselves in com-
imerce and in industry, philan-
thropy, volunteer services, the
arts or education.
Rabbi Abramowitz formerly
served as Miami Beach chairman
of the President's Commission on
the Holocaust.
A community-wide search is on
for New Life nominees and to this
date several have been received
by the Israel Bonds office. The
committee, headed by Rabbi
Abramowitz, will review the no-
minations and determine which
men or women most closely meet
the criteria to receive the awards
on Oct. 14.
Rabbi Abramowitz called for
organizational and synagogue
support for the New Life Award
and asked that any additional
nominations be sent to him in
care of the Israel Bonds office.
Federation Women's
Division to Sponsor
'Learn-In' Lecture Series
The Business and Professional
Vomen of the Greater Miami
|le wish Federation's Women's
Jivision is sponoring a three-
lecture "learn-in" series entitled
[The American-Israeli Jewish
f-onnection."
Open to the entire community,
fe initial lecture in the series, on
Jhursday, Sept. 16, will be made
lv Oded Ben-Hur, Vice-Consul of
>' Israeli Consulate in Miami,
Jho will discuss "Power and Pol-
I'cs in the Middle East and
America."
On Thursday, Sept. 23, Dr.
Bernard Schechterman, Profes-
sor of Politics and Public Affairs
at the University of Miami, will
lecture on "Decision Making in
Israel," which will deal with the
structure of Israel's government,
its political process and the
workings of the Knesset.
The final session in the series,
on Thursday, Sept. 30, will exa-
mine American political senti-
ment towards Israel and its
stance regarding the current con-
flict in Lebanon.
All lectures will be held from 7
to 10 p.m. at the Greater Miami
Jewish Federation Building.
iJewislb Floiridtian
liami, Florida Friday, September 3,1982
Section B
LONDON (JTA) A
change in provisions re-
garding acquisition of citi-
zenship in Spain, approved
unanimously by the
Congress of Deputies,
grants special privileges to
Sephardic Jews, it was re-
ported here by the Institute
of Jewish Affairs, the re-
search arm of the World
Jewish Congress. The bill
Graham Names
Goldstein to
UJSL Council
Florida Gov. Bob Graham has
announced the appointment of
Goldie R. Goldstein to the Uniter'
States Holocaust Memorial
Council.
Mrs. Goldstein, of Bay Harbor,
is executive vice president and
volunteer director of the South-
eastern Florida Holocaust Mem-
orial Center and is a member of
the National Board of the Council
of Jewish Federations.
She received a Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree from Barry Univer-
sity in 1979.
The United States Holocaust
Memorial Council is a private or-
ganization created for the estab-
lishment of an annual observance
of the Holocaust Days of Re-
membrance. The Council is also
planning a national Holocaust
Museum and Educational Foun-
dation in Washington, D.C.
Reception Honoring
Sen. Lawton Chiles
A reception honoring Senator
Lawton Chiles will be held Wed-
nesday, Sept. 8, from 7 to 9 p.m.,
at the Sheraton River House.
Senator Chiles is seeking a third
term in the United States Senate.
now goes before Spain's
Senate.
According to the IJA, the new
legislation would significantly
ease residence requirements of
Sephardic Jews for naturaliza-
tion. The IJA noted that "the
proposed measure is regarded not
only as a recognition of the con-
nection of the Sephardic with
Spain but also as an act of repa-
ration for the wrongs of 1492,
"the year of Jewish expulsion
from Spain"
AT PRESENT, the Spanish
civil code stipulates a 10-year
residence requirement for
naturalization. The proposed
amendment, however, states:
"Two years will suffice in the
case of nationals of Latin Ameri-
can countries, Andorra, Philip-
pines, Equatorial Guinea or in
the case of Sephardim who are
able to produce proof of their
status."
A certificate of the Federation
of Jewish Communities in Spain,
member community of the WJC,
will be sufficient to prove Seph-
ardic status.
The actual impact of this
amendment on the numbers of
Sephardic Jews who would
benefit will probably not be very
great. Most Sephardic Jews re-
siding in Spain, who came from
French or Spanish Morrocco, or
Tangiers, have been residents in
Spain for more than 10 years and
mostly have already acquired
Spanish citizenship.
However, the IJA observes
that it is not the first time that
Spain has shown her special
attachment to the Sephardic
Jews. During World War II, the
Spanish government assisted
them in several Nazi-occupied
countries.
In one instance, Spain even
succeeded in obtaining the libera-
tion from the Belsen concentra-
tion camp of 365 Sephardim de-
ported there from Salonika, and
permission for their emigration to
Spain. Similar rescue efforts for
Sephardic Jews were also made
after the war in countries where
they found themselves in dis-
tress.
Gertrude Pallot, Norton Tire
Chairman-Emeritus, Passes at 80
Gertrude D. Pallot died
Monday in Coral Gables. Mrs.
Pallot, 80, was chairman-
emeritus of Norton Tire Co.
The widow of Louis Pallot, who
founded Norton Tire Co., she was
named chairman after he died in
1972. She retired only last year.
Mrs. Pallot came to the United
States as a child from Russia,
near Riga, where she was born.
She married Louis Pallot in 1922,
and they moved to Miami from
Connecticut in 1924, founding the
Norton Tire Co. that same year.
Mrs. Pallot was a member for
36 years of Temple Beth Sholom.
Her other affiliations included
membership in the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation, Ameri-
can Technion Society, Hadassah
and Douglas Gardens Women's
Auxiliary of the Jewish Home
and Hospital for the Aged.
During World War II, she was
a Red Cross ambulance driver.
Mrs. Pallot is survived by her
sons, Norton and Ronald; a
daughter, Barbara Katzen; two
sisters, Ann Cantor and Dora
Perlman; a brother, Abe Safft,
and eight grandchildren.
Services were Wednesday, 10
a.m., at Blasberg Funeral Chapel.
The family suggested donations
in her memory be made to the
Greater Miami Jewish Federation.







'
Controversial Zionist
Nalium Groldmanit to foe
Buried on Mount Herfcl f h
port of the United States for the
1 Dr. Nahum Goldmann,
the fiery and often contro-
versial world Zionist leader,
died Sunday in a hospital in
Bad Reichenhall, West
Germany, near the Aus-
trian border. He was 87
years old. He was to be
buried Thursday on Mount
Herzl among the founders
of the State of Israel.
According to a hospital
spokesman, Goldmann came to
the small Bavarian village for a
cure earlier in August. He was
hospitalized a week ago for a viral
infection. The immediate cause
for his death reportedly was due
to pulmonary collapse. His wife,
son and secretary were with him
at the time of his death.
In Paris, where Goldman had a
home, Le Monde, the country's
leading newspaper, announced
Goldmann's death in a three-col-
umn article on the front page.
Messages of tribute were issued
by leaders of various French pol-
itical parties, and similar mes-
sages were issued by Israeli offi-
cials and leaders of Zionist and
Jewish organizations around the
world. Most of the messages de-
scribed Goldmann as a world
statesman who helped shape the
destiny of the Jewish people, and
as a man bluntly honest and firrr
in his convictions.
Goldmann was a prominent
member of virtually every inter
national Zionist and Jewish or-
ganization since coming into pro-
minence in 1927 when he was first
elected a member of the Zionist
Actions Committee and served as
one of the members of the Politi-
cal Commission which negotiated
with the British government of
Ramsey MacDonald after the
publication of the Passfield
White Paper by Britain.
HE WAS co-founder of the
World Jewish Congress in 1949
and its president until 1978 when
he was succeeded by Philip
Klutznick, Goldmann was also
president of the World Zionist
Organization from 1956 to 1968;
the Memorial Foundation for
Jewish Culture; the Conference
on Jewish Material Claims
against Germany; and Beth Hat-
efutsoth in Tel Aviv, the Nahum
Goldmann Museum of the Dias-
pora.
Goldmann was frequently at
odds with Israel's leaders, both
Labor and Likud. Some of his
fiercest controversies were with
Premier David Ben Gurion over
the relationship between the
Jewish State and the galut and
on the issue of who was a Zionist.
Ben Gurion insisted that only
those who had made aliya could
be considered Zionists; all others,
at best, could be considered as
"lovers of Zion" or "friends of Is-
rael," but not Zionists. Gold-
mann contended that one need
not make aliya to be a Zionist.
IN ONE famous debate with
Ben Gurion in the 1960's, Gold-
mann pointed out that not every
Jew can adhere to the 613 mitz-
vot and that observing only 612
did not diminish a person's Jew
ishness. By the same token, he
argued, many Jews could not
make aliya, but this did not di-
minish their Zionism if they
fought for its basic principles
outside Israel. Goldmann, him-
self, divided his time in recent
years between France and Swit-
zerland where he had homes.
Goldmann was also involved ir
a sharp controversy with Loui:
Pincus when the latter was chair
man of the World Zionist Organ-
ization. In the early 1970's, when
many Soviet Jews began to seek
exit visas, Pincus maintained
that all Jews should leave the So-
viet Union because the very na-
ture of the Soviet regime restrict-
ed their freedom to live and f unc-
Natum Goldman
tion as Jews. Goldmann contend-
ed that not all Jews want to
leave, and that for those who opt
to remain, the campaign of world
Jewry should be to demand that
the Soviet government allow
those Jews to live as Jews.
GOLDMANN was an unyield-
ing opponent of the government
of Premier Menachem Begin. He
recently accused Begin of tor-
menting anti-Semitism with the
Israeli invasion of Lebanon and
described Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon as a wild man who terror-
ized the Cabinet as well as Beirut.
Goldmann ran into a storm of
criticism when he, Klutznick and
former French Premier Pierre
Mendes-France issued a joint
statement last month calling on
Israel and the PLO to mutually
recognize each other to achieve
peace in the Middle East.
He managed throughout the
years after the State of Israel was
founded to irritate almost every
Israeli leader he dealt with. When
Adolf Eichmann, the Nazi leader,
was brought to trial in Jerusalem
in 1961, Goldmann said the jury
should include judges from every
country that the Nazis had occu-
pied. The idea was not well re-
ceived.
He accused the government of
Levi Eshkol of failing to under-
stand Arab psychology and
charged it with major mistakes in
conducting military reprisals and
with incompetence in dealing
with the Soviet Union whose
government. Goldmann always
felt, could be swayed by rational
arguments rather than by pres-
sure.
.
HE ALSO often warned that
Western governments would one
day grow tired of having to deal
with Israel's security problems
and would abandon it in order to
get on with other world economic
and political problems. He was
also at odds with leaders of Jew-
ish communities in the diaspora
for being more concerned as he
nut it with fund-raising than with
consciousness raising.
During World War II, Gold-
mann was a prime force within
the Zionist movement in the
United States, tirelessly arguing
for America's help in the creation
of a Jewish homeland.
In fact, Goldmann had en-
dorsed a controversial British
government proposal in 1937 that
recommended dividing Palestine
into both Arab and Jewish
states. Although many Jewish
leaders bitterly opposed such a
partitioning of Biblical Palestine,
Goldmann argued that a sover-
eign state in even a small part of
Palestine was preferable to a sit-
uation in which immigration a
matter of life or death for thou-
sands of refugees from Germany
and potential refugees from
Eastern Europe was increas-
ingly subject to restrictions by
Britain.
A NUMBER of historians give
credit to Goldmann for his in-
tense lobbying of the Truman
Administration for support of the
so-called Partition Plan to estab-
lish an independent Jewish State
in Palestine. Final, strong sup-
plan helped lead to the establish-
ment of Israel in 1948.
Perhaps just as controversial
as Goldmann's advocacy of the
British plan to partition
Palestine into Arab and Jewish
states in 1937 was his insistence
following World War II that the
German government pay
reparations to both Israel and
victims of the Holocaust.
Goldmann's position on this
issue faced vehement, passionate
opposition from many within the
Jewish community who argued
against any contact with a coun-
try whose policy just a few years
earlier was genocide. But Gold-
man felt it was the duty and the
right of the Jewish people to
make some claim for material
restitution from Germany and.
more importantly, to establish
the principle that states have a
moral if not legal duty to make
some restitution for crimes com-
mitted in their name against a
weaker people.
For months, Goldmann pur-
sued secret preliminary contacts
with German statesmen, includ-
ing Chancellor Konrad Adenauer.
These meetings eventually led to
the formal negotiations that re-
sulted in the historic Reparations
Agreement of 1952.
In that document, Germany
promised to pay 3.45 billion Ger-
man Marks to the State of Israel
as partial compensation for the
financial burden of rehabitating
survivors of Nazi persecution
who had settled there. Part of the
indemnification 450 million
Marks was to go to individual
victims of the Nazis and for Jew-
ish cultural and educational pur-
poses.
THE ONLY child of Solomon
and Rebecca Goldmann Nahum
was born in Poland in 1895 but
grew up in Germany where his
father was a writer and teacher of
Hebrew. At age 15. Goldmann
the
participating actively a
educational work.
Awarded his law dem*. ^
the University of He3el*
ldmann and SJJjN
ist
Jacob Klatzkin a few
later founded the" Eahkol 8
lishing Company. Their /*
oissue a new Jewish enqj
pedia incorporating the mo?J
vanced research of Jewish ?
lars all nvor t.k. -~U m *fc
Encyclo.
lars all over the world.
Ten volumes of the
pedia Judaica were pubSBu
German and two in Hebrew h!
fore the regime of Adolph Hi.it
halted the undertaking '!
forced Goldmann to flee to Swi
zerland. Following World WarJ?"
which Goldmann spent in Ameri
ca. he resumed his project aid
expanded it to include an Erie
lish-language edition. The 15.'v*
began writing articles in
Frankfurter Israelitisches Fami-
lienblatt, a popular weekly in the umVworrhasTe^n'de'scrihS
German Jewish community. It "the most important JewX?
was at this time that the teenage ,ishin event of the 20 h
Goldmann began making speech- lury v"
es at early Zionist meetings and jta FtatunSyndics,
cen-
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*
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The full-pleasant aroma and great-
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:: ;
. r ._- _.
Pri^ay. September 3,1982. JBfcftfb WtfHm Page SB
v.vv.v
Dick Gerstein Backs
Judge Milt Starkman
judge Milton Starkman, past president of Trophy Lodge of
H'nai B'rith, this week soared into a huge lead in his bid to be
elected Dade Circuit Court Judge in Tuesday's non-partisan,
tountywide voting.
Recently honored by Beth Torah Congregation for civic and
religious community leadership. Judge Starkman also was
endorsed by The Miami Herald, Miami Beach and Coral Gables
Sun Reporters, North Miami Beach Leader, North Miami Sun
and North Bay Village Community Newspaper.
Judge Starkman was found highly qualified by the April and
August, 1982, Uade Bar polls after four years as Dade Judge
and earlier service as North Miami Beach municipal Judge.
Dade County Judge
Cardonne-Dienstag
A member of Temple Beth Moshe, Pioneer Women-Na'amat
and lladassah, Judge Gisela Cardonne-Dienstag this week was
endorsed by The Miami Herald after being voted far better
qualified than the only candidate opposing her retention as Dade
County Judge, Group9.
Gerald Schwartz, campaign coordinator, and Burton Young,
campaign chairman for Judge Cardonne-Dienstag, emphasized
that Murray Klein, opposing the judge, is NOT a judge and is
not related to any of the three incumbent judges named Klein.
Judge Kaye Highest
In Dade Bar Poll
Hanked by the August, 1982 Dade Bar Poll as the leading
Dade Circuit Court Judge his rating also surpassed that of
any other circuit court contestant or incumbent Judge Robert
I'. Kaye this week widened his lead for Tuesday's judicial elec-
tion.
Richard E. Gerstein, Judge Kaye's campaign chairman,
stressed that Tuesday's voting is county wide, non-partisan and
final, since there are only two candidates in Judge Kaye's Group
12.
Judge Kaye was endorsed strongly by The Miami Herald.
Miami Beach Sun-Reporter and virtually every other newspaper
and organization. He is a member of the Jewish War Veterans of
the United States, and the American Zionist Federation.
Sidney Shapiro Has
Lead Over Durant
The Miami Herald this week strongly recommended the
candidacy of North Miami Beach City Attorney Sidney Shapiro
lo replace incumbent Joseph Durant. The Herald was joined in
endorsing Shapiro by the Miami Beach and Coral Gables Sun-
Reporters.
Shapiro, who earlier had won the endorsement of the United
Teachers of Dade County, Commissioner Ruth Shack, former
Sen. Kenneth Myers, Comm. Malcolm Fromberg and the AFL-
CIO, also was endorsed by the Hialeah Home News.
Vice President of both Hadassah Associates for Greater
Miami and of the Miami Beach Symphony, Shapiro was found
qualified by a better than two-to-one margin.
Arthur Rothenberg
Tods Sepe, Firtel
Former Honda Asst. Attorney General Arthur Rothenberg
easily outdistanced Alfonso Sepe and Leon Firtel this week in
the li)82 Uade Bar Poll, whose results were announced by the
Dade County Bar Association. Arthur England, former Chief
Justice of the Florida Supreme Court, endorsed Rothenberg.
Former Executive Assistant Dade Public Defender.
Rothenberg also served as a prosecutor under Richard E.
(ierstein. Gerstein endorsed Rothenbers. ,
A former Asst. United States Attorney. Rothenberg also was
endorsed by The Miami Herald, and Miami Beach Sun-Reporter.
Goldstein Widens
Impressive Lead
Former Dade Assistant State Attorney Stanley Goldstein
this week added the endorsement of The Miami Herald after
Goldstein was voted the most qualified candidate for Dade
County Judge in the August, 1982 bar poll of the Dade County
Bar Association.
Goldstein, whose 85 percent rating outdistanced all in-
cumbents and aspirants for both circuit and county court, also
was endorsed by the Hialeah Home News, Miami Beach Sun-
Reporter, North Miami Beach Leader, North Bay Village
Community Newspaper, North Miami Sun and the AFL-CIO.
Judge Stettin Backs
Judge Leo Adderly
Judge A. Leo Adderly this week was rated the most qualified
Dade County Judge in the August, 1982, bar poll and was
strongly recommended for election by The Miami Herald.
Former Judge Herbert Stettin, campaign chairman far Judge
Adderly, again pointed out that the Bernard Jaffe opposing
Judge Adderly is NOT the incumbent Judge Jaffe, is not related
nd NEVER ha. served as a judge.
Judge Adderly, endorsed by Richard E. Gerstein, David
Nevel. Malcolm Frnmharcr rriei Own. Gerald Schwartz and
former Judge Irving Cypen, also won the backing of the AFL.
Auguit tut. MM
our
opinion
We recommend these
people for the bench
Election of Dade County's Circuit and County
Court judges is on a non-paitisan basis, with the
Sept. 7 election certain to be decisi\e in at least
eight of the 10 contests, or those with only two
candidates.
Circuit judges will serve six years and County
judges four, and great care should be taken to
choose men and women who will serve
impartially and with a balanced concern for the
rights of both individuals and society.
The Sun-Reporter endorses for judgeships
those who either have demonstrated on the bench
or in their public and private legal careers a
combination of fairness and firmness.
Circuit Court
Group 5 Sidney Shapiro. The well-respected
city attorney of North Miami Beach has extensive
experience in the state and federal courts. His
opponent has a history of bizarre decisions during
a controversial term, resulting in unprecedented
and severe criticism by the appellate court. We
recommend Sidney Shapiro without reservation.
Shapiro
Kaye
Group 12 Judge Robert P. Kaye. Selected by
the Judicial Nominating Commission and
apponted by Gov, Bob Graham. Judge Kaye is
universally regarded as a "tough" judge. This is
in keeping with the public's desire in the face of
the high level of crime. Formerly a senior
prosecutor for the Dade State Attorney. Judge
Kaye is the superior candidate.
Group 18 Judge Milton Starkman. Four years
as a Dade County Judge have earned Judge
S* rkman a reputation for diligence and judicial
: -mperament. Earlier service as a North Miami
beach municipal court judge, coupled with more
than 20 years of diversified private practice
further qualify him for promotion. Judge
Starkman is the clear choice.
County Court
Group 9 Judge Gisela Cardonne-Dienstag.
Appointed by Governor Graham after selection
by the Judicial Nominating Commission. Judge
Cardonne-Dienstag brings exceptional
qualifications to the bench. Her opponent Murray
Klein has campaigned solely on the recognition of
a last name shared by three incumbent judges. To
insure rejection of the "name game." we urge a
vote for Judge Cardonne-Dientag.
Group U Arthur Rothenberg. Experience as
former Executive Assistant Dade Public
Defender and Assistant Attorney General of the
State of Florida make Rothenberg a highly
qualified candidate He also served with
distinction as Assistant State Attorney under
Richard E. Gerstein. One of his opponents
resigned as circuit court judge midway through
his term: The other lacks sufficient experience.
We strongly endorse Rothenberg.
nrl ool. advertisements
Cardonne-Dienstag
Adderly
Group 13 Judge A. Leo Adderly. A firm selecton
of both Governor Graham and the Judicial
Nominating Commission, Judge Adderly has
achieved a reptuation for leadership in both
public and civic service. His 17 years as attorney
and judge make him a top candidate. His
opponent. Bernard Jaffe who shares the same
name as a popular incumbent judge, has nothing
else to recommend him for the judiciary.
Group 19 Stanley Goldstein. A balanced legal
career as a top prosecutor in the Dade State
Attorney's office and as a defense attorney
followed his 14 years as a law enforcement
officer. Stanley Goldstein also has unusually
strong credentials in community service, and is a
strong choice over two opponents for an open
seat.
FREE
RIDES
To The
POLLS
531-1174
w*. ri -*.
Goldstein
THE MIAMI HERALD RECOMMENDS
s' SHAPIRO
CIRCUIT COURT Punch 186
THI MIAMI HIIALD RICOMMINDS
Robert KAYE
CIRCUIT COURT* Punch 193 ...
THE MIAMI HERALD RECOMMENDS
JUDGE
Milton
STARKMAN
CIRCUIT COURT Punch 198
THI MIAMI HERALD RICOMMINDS
JUDGE Gisela
COUNTY COURT Punch 215 ,..
THE MIAMI HERALO RECOMMENDS
miiiiiviiiisi;
For COUNTY JUDGE Punch 220
miMIAMJHMALOl
: ADDERLY
COUNTY COURT* Punch 224 ,-.
THI MIAMI HfRAlDOfCCMMfNOS
GOLDSTEIN
COUNTY COURT Punch 233


rage 4-H lne Jewish r londian tnday, September 3,1982
The Attitude of the Press is Anti-Semitic, Blatant

By MEIR DAVID
-Mike Oren is bitter. He
was with one of the first
crack paratroop units
which went into Lebanon,
and he cannot reconcile the
war he saw at such close
range with the war portray-
ed by the media.
"We were under strict order1
-o go into villages that we knew
were held by the PLO and the
Syrians and to wait until we were
fired on before we started shoot-
ing," he says. "Even then we had
to identify the sources of fire
before we could shoot back in
case we injured civilians.
"I was in battles where I saw,
no more than three of four hund-
red yards away, terrorists and
Syrians running to take up their
positions in houses. And yet we
had to go in without firing,
knowing they were waiting for
us.
"DO YOU KNOW what that
feeling is? I lost friends,
comrades, because of our concern
for civilians. I saw what we did.
"At the time it was frustrating
and a lot of the guys were
angry but in retrospect it was
the only way to be. The Israel
Defense Force has to be different
from any other army in the
world."
Mike Oren was with the first
troops to reach East Beirut:
"The bells were ringing, people
were out in the streets in their
best clothes they were cheer-
ing, waving, throwing bags of
pita, rice, roses to us. We were
just sitting on our machines with
our mouths open in amazement.
Some of the guys had tears in
their eyes. We couldn't believe
it."
Mike. 27. a New Yorker who
came on aliya four-and-a-half
years ago. returned from
Lebanon to his home in Jerusa-
lem to find that Israel was being
villified as the destroyer of inno-
cents.
El Al Offers New
'Sunsation W
Package
EL AL Israel Airlines an-
nounces a limited-time offer on
flights that includes roundtrip
airfare and hotel for 13 nights in
Israel for only $899. This com-
plete two-week package offers
accommodations in Tel Aviv at
either the Concorde or the Tal
Hotels and-or in Jerusalem at the
Jerusalem Tower Hotel. Vouch-
ers will be issued for all 13 nights
and length of stay in each city
can be mixed at the passengers'
discretion.
"SUNSATION
areas follows:
II" packages
Tour No. 1: Departure Sept.
8 Return Sept. 22. Tour No. 2:
Departure Sept. 9 Return
Sept. 23, Tour No. 3: Departure
Sept. 15 Return Sept. 29, Tour
No. 4: Departure Sept. 16
Return Sept. 30, Tour No. 5: De-
parture Sept. 22 Return Oct. 6
Tour No. 6: Departure Sept. 23
Return Oct. 7
Packages should be referred tc
by number when booking depar
tures.
The package cost per child
under 12 sharing same room with
adult is S625, based on one child
per room.
Conditions include a seven-day
advance purchase, $160 single
supplement, $100 cancellation fee
and no refund for unused land
services.
Contact EL AL or your travel
agent for details.
" I CALLED my folks in New
York The first thing they said
was. How could you have killed
so many civilians?' And they are
Zionists! But all they knew was
what they had read in the
newspapers and seen on televi-
sion.
"When I told my father what
we had done he was really sur-
prised. He was in the United
States Army in World War II
and took part in the invasion of
Europe. He said that when U.S.
troops were taking a town, they'd
flatten it completely if a single
sniper opened fire.
"I thought at first it might
have been different if foreign
journalists had been allowed to
come with us into battle and see
for themselves the way the IDF
behaved. They'd have seen that it
was just not true that the towns
were strewn with bodies.
"I WAS the first Israeli soldier
in Tyre and in two days I saw one
civilian casualty. I saw for myself
a hospital that turned out to be
full of terrorists and the Red
Cross wouldn't let us in because
it was sheltering them.
"But when I read reports in
Newsweek comparing Beirut
with the Warsaw Ghetto and the
rest of the press so violently anti-
Israel. I'm not so sure that hav-
ing reporters with us would have
helped. I've discussed it with my
friends and we've all come to the
same conclusion the attitude
of the press is anti-Semitic. Bla-
tant.
"I believe the press is out to
get this country. Frankly, I
wouldn't put anything passed
them. Before this war. I couldn't
understand why Israel was so
gun-shy about journalists. But
now I can see why we are forced
to adopt an armadillo stance.
"WHAT DISTURBS me most
is that the press we get has a pro-
found affect on the way people
vote in Oklahoma and the way
people vote in Oklahoma deter-
mines how many bullets we get to
fire.
"When I was in Beirut with
people cheering and waving, I
was sorry that the press wasn't
there with us to see it. But now I
think they'd probably have writ-
ten that behind every cheering
Lebanese was an Israeli soldier
holding a gun to his head!''.
Israel Scene
Mike Oren "The attitude of the press is anti-Semitic. Blatant'
you never had h
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Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
^
AN
APPEAL
TO THE FAIRNE5S
AND COMMON SENSE
OF DADE COUNTIANS
FROM
MAYOR
CLARK
Keep a courageous commissioner
working for you
Keep George
About a year ago. the Dade County Commission selected
George Valdes to fill a vacancy on the commission.
George Valdes was born in Cuba, and has lived, worked
and raised his tamily in Dade County tor the past twenty years.
He has been a good county commissioner-lighting to
strengthen our law enlorcement agencies and hold down taxes
He has been a good county commissioner- not only tor the
Cuban-Americans who make up nearly 40% ot the population
ol Dade County but have never before been represented in our
county government but for EVERY citizen of Dade County
George Valdes lives in the small West Dade city of Sweetwater. a
predominantly Latin community which he previously served as
mayor Recently a slate of Cuban-Americans who COULD NOT
speak any English tried to take over the Sweetwater city
government in a municipal election George Valdes could have
kept quiet and not antagonized his fellow Latin-Americans But
he spoke out He said:
"An elected official who does not speak English is an insult
to this nation."
The slate lost, and today the people of Sweetwater are NOT
governed by officials who speak only in a loreign language
That took courage and patriotism by George Valdes-the kind
ol courage and patriotism we need on the Dade County
commission On Tuesday I urge you to vote lor a good county
commissioner and a good American George Valdes
Your Dade County Commissioner
Paid Political Advertisement


Page ft-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 3,1982



Liberal Era Ending
Will U.S. Stop its Traditional Immigration Policy?

Continued from Page 1-A
the gates, have had to be ham-
mered out, sometimes with signi-
ficant trade-offs among contend-
ing interests.
ON THE surface, Jewish inter-
ests seemed little threatened by
proposals to cork up U.S. bor-
ders. Few, if any, Jewish illegals
have been coming into the coun-
try. The infamous McCarran-
Walter Act, with its quotas
favoring immigrants from north-
ern Europe, was finally repealed
in 1965. Soviet Jews have been
admitted here with the status of
refugees from oppression; thus
they have been exempt even from
existing quotas. Others have
come in under special provisions
for family reunion.
But public and congressional
reactions to some elements of
Simpson-Mazzoli raised some
warning signals in the situation,
arousing thoughtful observers
from what some have character-
ized as a Jewish complacency
about immigration. Not only the
current debate, but also the
entire matter of Jewish attitudes
towards immigration deserves a
close look.
In the post-Holocaust period, a
widespread conviction developed
among Jews that the Jewish peo-
ple would find it in their long-
t term best interests to support the
most generous and liberal immi-
gration policy for America. The
concept of an "open door" or
"open gates" policy achieved a
status close to folk wisdom in the
Jewish mind. The popular litany
went:
HAD THE pre-Holocaust
American immigration laws been
more liberal and humane, had
FDR been a true friend of the
Jews, had America lived up to its
4 claim to be a refuge for the op-
pressed, had the American Jew-
ish leadership in the 1930s and
1940s put the interests of their
European brethren above their
own ambitions for acceptance as
"true" Americans then, per-
haps, the Holocaust might not
have happened as it did, or might
not have claimed all of the many
millions who perished.
Sources of Jewish liberal views
on immigration may be traced
even further back in Jewish lore:
"Remember that thou weas^ a
bondman in the land of Egypt,"
is the refrain in Deuteronomy
that recurs throughout the Pass-
over seder. "If there be among
you a needy man, one of thy
brethren within thy gates, in thy
land which the Lord thy God
giveth thee, nor shut thy hand
from thy needy brethren; but
thou shalt surely open thy hand
unto him, and shalt surely lend
him sufficient for his need in thai
which he wanteth."
The humane, poetic appeal of
this concept is being questioned
by some Jews today. Not merely
in cocktail party chatter chal-
lenging the status of black Hai-
tians as brethren, but also among
serious students of American
society.
THIS IS not 1938 but 1982.
America is no longer the expan-
sionist society that it was in the
1820s when a large influx of peo-
ple was welcomed to populate
open spaces. We do not have the
great industrial city and port city
expansions which developed in
the 1880s and continued to open
up great opportunities even after
World War II.
Can the Jewish conscience
burdened with the memory of the
Holocaust assent to anything
{ less than the most generous and
liberal immigration policy with-
i out becoming, well, un-Jewish?
On the other hand, must our
compassion for the oppressed
peoples of the world require of us
that we accept the idea of Cuban
jails being emptied out by Fidel
Castro at our expanse? In seeking
a just policy for U.S. immigra-
tion, must we agree to the ab-
sorption of Mexican, Haitian and
..............
In the post-Holocaust period, a widespread conviction has developed
among Jews that the Jewish people would find it in their longterm best in-
terests to support the most generous and liberal imigration policy for
America.
Asian poverty? At what point
does generosity deteriorate into
national suicide?
THE CLIMATE for a dis-
passionate debate over an opti-
mum immigration policy is far
from ideal right now. But per-
haps there is never an ideal time.
The current furor over Haitian il-
legals was preceded by equally
angry, and lingering, dissension
over Cubans. Mexicans, Domini-
cans and various Asians. And the
inflamed discussions about the
influx of illegals from south of the
U.S. border have not left Ameri-
can Jewish interests totally un-
scathed.
Unencumbered by a Jewish
conscience, Joseph Nocera (an
editor of the highly regarded
Texas Monthly) published a pro-
vocative, though not unsympa-
thetic article about current Sov-
iet Jewish immigration in the
May edition of Harper's Maga-
zine. He raised a hard question
that some thoughtful American
Jews and the Israeli govern-
ment, for its own reasons have
also been asking.
Why is a Soviet Jew with a
visa for Israel regarded by the
U.S. as a refugee from oppres-
sion. Why is he entitled to enter
this country with virtually no
wait, no anguish and no messy
paperwork, while almost no other
class of people in the world is now
accorded this status?
STATED IN more currently
relevant, and emotionally loaded,
terms, the question might be
posed this way: Why is a Soviet
Jew with a visa to enter Israel,
which very much wants him,
classified as a refugee from op-
pression when a black Haitian
with a visa for nowhere is regard-
ed as an illegal alien?
Nocera does not really be-
grudge Soviet Jews their entry
into the United States. What he
really wishes to address, from a
basically liberal point of view, is
the generally recognized muddle
in U.S. immigration law and
enforcement. The Simpson
Mazzoli Bill has been aimed at
controlling illegal immigration, a
generally agreed upon objective
among liberals and conservatives
alike right now. But it is also in-
tended as a reform of existing
regulations for legal immigration.
That's why the recent political
give-and-take among contending
interests has been taking place.
The New York Times, which
editorialized in favor of the pas-
sage of Simpson-Mazzoli without
substantive tampering, says its
provisions are "adjusted as deli-
cately as a clock." Introduced by
Sen. Alan Simpson (R., Wyo..)
and Kep. Romano. Mazzoli
(D., Ky.), the bill wa/voted out
of committee in the Senate with
only one dissenting voice, that of
Sen. Edward Kennedy
(I)., Mass.). He unsuccessfully
introduced several amendments
further liberalizing amnestypro-
visions and extending due pro-
cess for illegal immigrants such
as the Haitians.
ON THE RIGHT, Sen. Jesse
Helms (R., N.C.) introduced
amendments intended to sharply
reduce amnesty and legal re-
course provisions for the illegals.
His amendments also failed. The
full Senate eventually voted to
grant somewhat broader amnesty
to millions of illegal aliens, grant-
ing permanent resident status to
those who came before 1977, and
temporary residence for those
who arrived after 1977 and before
1980, with the possibility of up-
grading the latter status to per-
manent residence after three
years. Permanent residents may
apply for citizenship after five
years.
The measure also contains con-
troversial provisions for creation
of a national work eligibility card,
penalties for employers who hire
illegals, and increased enforce-
ment at U.S. borders.
Some Jewish groups,' notably
the Anti-Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith, are strongly op-
posed to such matters as employ-
er penalties and worker identifi-
cation cards, and they aide with
civil rights and Hispanic groups
in opposing them. What concern-
ed a broader coalition of Jewish
groups was Title II of Simpson-
Mazzoli, which received con-
siderably less publicity than the
controversial amnesty and
employment measures. Title II
imposes a ceiling of 425,000 on
legal immigration. It retains spe-
cial provision for family reunions
and for refugees from oppression.
A THREAT TO the status of
Soviet Jews coming here as
well as to others who might be
classified as refugees arose
when Sen. Walter Huddleston
(D., Ky) introduced an amend-
ment which would have included
all immigrants legal and il-
legal, as well as refugees under
that rigid ceiling of 425,000.
There was a certain glib appeal
to the Huddleston proposal. Un-
employment is running at about
9.8 percent nationally. It would
not be the first time economic
distress was being blamed on
foreigners. But if people like
Huddleston were sincerely con-
cerned about jobs being lost to
foreigners, observers thought
that they ought to have focused
their attention on illegal
migrants, rather than lumping
together two different kinds of
people. Refugees are trying to
escape from persecution; immi-
grants either wish to be reunited
with their families or to seek bet-
ter opportunities in a new land.
The Senate defeated the
Huddleston amendment. Unless
the House unexpectedly turns
ugly, it is generally believed that
Simpson-Mazzoli will pass there
as well, without major changes.
Had the Huddleston amendment
or something like it passed, po-
tential new Soviet Jewish move-
ment might have been caught up
in an American immigration
crunch.
RIGHT NOW the flow of Jews
outside the USSR has been slow-
ed to a trickle by the Soviet gov-
ernment. Even so, Soviet Jews
have been choosing to come to
the United States in much great-
er proportior kan those going to
Israel. Even an attempt to bu
feet, coerce the Soviet Jew's if
using their visas for Israel -T
denying them support fJ*
HIAS (the HebreW ImnJ?
Aid Society) unless EFB
close relatives in the U.S -_ E*T
ed to deter them from their deter
mination to come here Tkl
turned to the anti-Israeli SatnS
Chassidic organization for help
Since Soviet Jews have been
opting to come to the U.S. an in
crease, in their numbers would
have undoubtedly complicated
the entire U.S. immigration
equation in the event of the im
position of a rigid immigration
cap for all classes of people such
as Huddleston proposed. Family
reunion cases might also have
been affected, especially if the in-
flux Of illegals continued un-
checked. One could even conceive
of the Soviet Union manipulating
Jewish emigration in order to sow
dissent here.
Several Jewish organizations,
including the American Jewish
Committee, the Anti-Defamation
League of B'nai B'rith. HIAS,
and the Council of Jewish
Federations joined a broadly-
based network called Citizens
Committee for Immigration Re-
form which specifically opposed
the Huddleston Amendment.
That was relatively easy because
its imposition of a single, rigid
numerical ceiling threatened con
stituents of almost all religious
and national interest groups.
THE NETWORK stopped
short of endorsing Simpson-
Mazzoli. though, partly because
no one could be sure what the bill
might look like in its final form,
partly because unanimity did not
exist insofar as broad amnesty
provisions, the establishment of
sanctions against employers or
the establishment of worker iden-
tification cards was concerned.
An American Jew. confronted
with today's immigration morals,
may very well find himself
plagued by a special dimension of
conflict, there is. of course, the
tragic Holocaust history There is
also acute awareness of today's
painful economic realities yet
those who barred the Jews from
entering in the 1930s also cited
economic distress as a reason.
There is. further, a certain
ambivalence developing about
the Soviet Jews who have been
settling here.
A thoughtful Jew may find
himself forced to ask two ques-
tions: "What's a just policy?''
and "What's good for the Jews?"
Then he may find himself con-
fronted by a third: "Are the an-
swers to the first two questions
compatible with one another?"
FOR DR. Irving Greenberg,
director of the National Jewish
Resource Center in New York,
the only supportable policy for
Jews must be the most liberal
policy. He characterizes Jewish
resistance to this as "a conflict
between two psychological
realities: our Jewish memory and
our contemporary complacency.'
Anyone possessed of a Jewish
memory, he observes, must re-
cognize in the arguments for
limiting immigration "literally
the same language that was used
in the 1930s." Besides economics,
there are references to the "poor
quality" of the immigration and
an underlying view of the new-
comers as "outsiders."
"Anybody with a Jewish mem-
ory who hears this language has
to shudder," Greenberg says.
HE BELIEVES Jews ought to
be in the forefront of demanding
liberal immigration policies. But
he recognizes that such a position
has Its price: "The Jew will have
to trade off a little less social and
economic affluence and a litue
less security in the neighborhood
in return for the extra secunty
that this pluralism is the key to
our permanent acceptance in
America, as opposed to being
scapegoated and turned on."
Greenberg's position >
founded upon a fundamentally
optimistic view of America s ca-
pacity to absorb those who wisn
Continued on following pg*


....
Friday, H^mbur3%miri The Jewieh Jto/Kfcwv. .**> 7-
--------------------'.SVi*>''. 'i .- V '.M-----.. V, l,. i '. I i. i '.....
Will UJSL Stop its Immigration PoUcy?
Continued from preceding page
to come here. "Simply flinging
open the doors would obviously
be self-defeating," he observed.
gut we are considerably short of
that. Obviously, given the
chance, all of Haiti and Central
America would like to move here.
But I think the fear that they are
about to swamp us in premature.
I think it's an underestimation of
the capacity of the American eco-
nomy and society. When we get
to such a dangerous point, we
need controls; but we're not at
the swamping stage. Our eco-
nomy can still handle lots of
these people."
Leonard Seidenman, executive
director of United HIAS, is re-
ceptive to a generous but limited
immigration policy. "We are con-
cerned with the fact that America
can't absorb all of the oppressed
people of the world. That's
important, because all of them
want to come if they can. We can
work within the concept of some
kind of selectivity, but we need a
structure set up that works
fairly."
HE INDICATES that he
favors a policy in which "a sub-
stantial annual determination" is
set and "the figure won't be
taken from the sky but has to be
rational."
Seidenman faults Joseph
Nocera in his Harper's article for
failing to take account of the act-
ual legal status of Soviet Jews.
"Just because you have a coun-
try to go to doesn't render you
not a refugee," he observed.
The situation for Soviet Jews
is that in order to leave on an Is-
raeli invitation, they must re-
nounce Soviet citizenship. They
come out of the Soviet Union on a
travel document which is not a
passport not a document you
can return on. More specifically,
the Jews have had to pay a sub-
stantial fee to renounce Soviet
citizenship. Thus, they are state-
less, and therefore well within the
internationally accepted defini-
tion of a refugee, and equally well
within the category of persons
eligible for special entry into the
United States as refugees under a
1980 law. They cannot return to
I he country of origin."
FURTHERMORE, the "fic-
tion" that Nocera identified re-
garding the country which issues
a visa not being the place that the
refugee is bound for, has plenty
of precedent in history. Raoul
Wallenberg, during World War
II. got people out of Nazi-con-
'I trolled countries under the "fic-
tion" that they were going to
Cuba and other Central American
nations which had no intention of
taking them and where they had
no intention of going.
"The important point,"
Seidenman says, "is that the
Soviets are violating the Helsinki
Accords, which they signed, and
which allow for free immigration
and family reunification."
PROF David Sidoraky of Col-
umbia University in New York,
specialist in political philosophy
and ethethical theory, as well as
an active leader in Manhattan
West Side community affairs,
approaches the question of immi-
gration from a somewhat dif-
ferent perspective. Some classify
Sidorsky among the "neo-conser-
vatives," although he might
challenge that label.
"AN OPTIMUM policy," he
says, "is one which is concerned
with the dynamics of a culture,
the recognition of resources with-
in that culture, the recognition of
what America wants to stand for
in the world, the recognition of
the political situation, the recog-
nition of what an urban-sub-
urban society can adjust to in
terms of volatility."
Sidorsky is not content with
the liberal position that the
American infrastructure is still
capable of absorbing just about
anyone who can get here. "That's
true," he says, "but at what
price?" While America contin-
ues to be a very dynamic society,
it is no longer dominated by what
he calls an "immigrant ethos."
"John Lindsay (former mayor
of New York City) used to say,
'New York is a great city for wel-
coming people. People come to
the city and the city is an educa-
tor. It educates you to be able to
make it. Then, if you make it, you
move to the suburbs,' Sidorsky
recalls.
The concept of the city as an
educator in an immigrant ethos,
he continued, means that the
landlord serves as one kind of
educator he educates you to
pay your rent and not drink it up,
or you'll be homeless. The grocer
is another educator: you pay
your bill or you don't eat. The
boss also educates you: you come
on time or you lose your job.
"THESE ARE the urban edu-
cators in an immigrant ethos.
There is a city It's tough. It's a
sweat shop. And for a million il-
legal immigrants in New York
ISRAELI
DIARY
The clearest statements ever of nine
prominent Israeli leaders from very
liberal to very conservativeabout the
Palestinians, the P.L.O., Camp David as
well as American and Israeli mistakes.
Interviewed by Stanley Rosenblatt,
nationally known trial lawyer are:
Former Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin,
Labour Party leader Shimon Peres,
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek, Am-
bassador to the United States Moshe
Arens, Former U. N. Ambassador Gen-
eral Halm Herzog, and right wing
Knesset member Geula Cohen.
Wpbi2 WPBT, Channel 2
11:00 P.M., Monday,
September 6,1982
From the
Public Broadcasting Service
- i -.-.
City who don't quality for wel-
fare, it's that way today," Sidor-
sky says.
"But in a welfare ethos," he
continues, "it's different. A per-
son from Alabama, by coming to
New York, can raise his income
40 percent, just by moving.
With low rent, he can double it.
The landlord doesn't educate
him. In a welfare system if his
teenage daughter has a child, she
may get her own apartment. The
hard education is no longer in
force."
Can the two cultures welfare
and immigrant coexist?
"They do. A million illegal
aliens are living in New York,
none of them eligible for welfare.
They're working. Some, of
course, are working the drug
trade! But not all. Also, New
York has another million people
on welfare. So this creates an in-
teresting problem. I don't believe
you can have sustained immigra-
tion and a welfare ethic. You need
a work fare ethic," he concludes.
SIDORSKY BELIEVES that
it is possible to recognize princi-
ples for limitation of immigra-
tion; that the principle of kinship
to people already here is one
which can be sustained, and that
the principle of potential contri-
bution by the immigrant or re-
fugee to the society can be fairly
cited.
And if such principles are put
into play, where will that leave
the Jews?
"In good condition," Sidorsky
believes.
The Simpson-Mazzoli immi-
gration reform bill will probably
become law within the next
couple of weeks. This does not
mean, however, that the debate
over an optimum U.S. immigra-
tion policy has ended. It probably
never will end.
Simpson-Mazzoli set into
motion a complicated system in-
volving concurrent operation of
many wheels and cogs. The new
legal immigration cap is 425,000,
which some estimate to have
been the influx last year; others
say last year's influx was
800.000: still others, who include
unregistered illegals in their esti-
mates, put the count well above a
million.
THE AMNESTY provision
failed to satisfy those who
wanted a crackdown, and also
failed to satisfy those who called
for even more generous treatment
of those who have already come
here and settled. Perhaps the lack
of satisfaction on both sides indi-
cates that a successful compro-
mise has been drawn; even so the
situation still has explosive po-
tential.
The success of the Simpson-
Mazzoli compromise depends
heavily upon future enforcement
of U.S. border regulations. Some
doubt that the Administration
will properly fund the Immigra-
tion and Naturalization Service.
[Others seriously doubt that the
U.S. southern border can ever be
effectively sealed. Another argu-
ment is that Americans are so
softhearted, despite occasional
hard talk, that they usually de-
cide to award sanctuary to those
who have had enough energy and
determination to get themselves
here.
Economic realities will un-
doubtedly continue to have their
?ffect.
The debate is far from over.
What must end, though, is
American Jewish complacency
or sentimentality about immi-
gration. Jewish interests are in-
variably affected by U.S. immi-
gration policy, however oblique-
ly. In the hammering out of spe-
cifics now and in the future, we
owe it to ourselves to be informed
early, and thoroughly, about
what's afoot and the implications
of whatever is enacted.
All Publication Rights He served
Conservation, Lower Fuel Prices,
Will Reduce Fuel Adjustment
Energy conservation combined
with lower fuel oil prices will
produce a lower fuel adjustment
charge and lower overall bills for
Florida Power and Light
customers beginning in October.
A spokesman said customer
conservation contributed to the
lower fuel adjustment because
"the kilowatt hours that are con-
served are the most expensive
KWH's (oil-fired), not the least
expensive (natural gas and nu-
clear)."
He went on to say that, even
though the Company has added
70,000 customers since last
summer, "we've only experienced
a slight increase in electrical con-
sumption." He noted that the
average residential customer this
July used 1,132 KWH, four per-
cent less then last year's 1,185
KWH.
"The total bill for 1,000 KWH
still remains more than $5 less
that at this same time last year,
even after two rate increases," he
said.
Jewish Community Leader
Judge Starkman Has
Major Endorsements
Judge Milton I. Starkman,
past president of his B'nai B'rith
lodge who was honored recently
by Beth Torah Congregation for
his service to the community,
this week swept all major en-
dorsements in his campaign for
L)ade Circuit Court, Group 18.
Judge Starkman wsa strongly
recommended and endorsed by
The Miami Herald, Miami Beach
Sun-Reporter, The Jewish Times,
the Coral Gables Sun-Reporter
Hialeah Home News, North Bay
Village Community Reporter,
North Miami Beach Leader,
North Miami Sun and countless
more individuals and organiza-
tions.
Judy Starkman, wife of the
popular Dade County Judge and
an active Hadassah member,
noted that the support of com-
munity leaders "is most heart-
warming." She said signed en-
dorsements for Judge Starkman
have been received from former
Dade State Attorney Ricahrd E.
Gerstein, former Circuit Court
Judges Irving Cypen and Her-
bert Stettin, former Florida Bar
president Burton Young and
Dade Public Defender Bennett
Brummer.
Gerald Schwartz, past presi-
dent of B'nai B'rith and the Zion-
ist Council of South Florida, who
is serving as Judge Starkman's
campaign coordinator, said
"Judge Starkman has been a life-
long supporter of his com-
munity and his people. His
record as legal counsel of the
American Federation of Senior
Citizens, as a B'nai B'rith presi-
dent, as a Mason and a Shriner
all reflect his dedication to civic
service."
Judge STARKMAN
Harriet Ureen, Pioneer Women
Council president, endorsed
Judge Starkman along with
Anne Ackerman, Irwin J. Block.
Mayor Norman Ciment, Vice
Mayor Harry Cohen, former Rep.
Sandy D'Alemberte, r'ommis-
sioners Alex Daoud an Malcolm
H. Fromberg, former Rep. Mur-
ray Dubbin and Vice Mayor Sy
Eisenberg.
Judge Starkman, now a direc-
tor of Harmony Lodge served as
president of Trophy Lodge, and
was vice chairman of the Florida
Israel Committee of B'nai B'rith
headed for two years by Gerald
Schwartz. Judge Starkman also
is active in the City of Hope or-
ganization.
Others endorsing Judge Stark-
man include former Jewish War
Veterans national commander
Ainslee Ferdie, Rep. Elaine
Gordon, Commissioner Leonard
Haber, Milton Hornstein, School
board member Dr. Michael Krop.
pd. poi adv.
URGENT PUBLIC AUCTION
Ordered By One Of The Major U.S. Banks
High Quality Knotted Oriental Rugs
ON BEHALF OF ONE MAJOR U.S. BANK WE HAVE BEEN COMMISSIONED TO LIQUIDATE A
LARGE INVENTORY OF ORIENTAL RUGS COMPLIMENTED WITH OTHER GOODS OF EQUAL
VALUE CONTRACTED IN AFGANISTAN, PAKISTAN. EX-IRAN. TURKEY. CHINA, TIBET ETC.
THESE GOODS WILL BE SOLD BY AUCTION
AT
BekAn8 Movln8 Storage Fri> s^ 3 at 8 pm
view at 7 pm
650 N.W. 1015th St.
Exit N.W. 103rd St. off I-95 2 blocks north
Miami
PIECE BY PIECE REGARDLESS OF COST IN ORDER TO MEET PARTIAL MONETARY OBLIGATIONS OF THE IMPORTERS WHO ARE UNABLE
TO FULFILL THEIR IMPORT COMMITMENTS AS PREVIOUSLY AGREED WITH THE BANK. UNDER THE BINDING AGREEMENT WITH ALL
THE CONCERNED PARTIES. THE IMPORTERS HAVE BEEN FORCED TO ACCEPT THE FINANCIAL LOSSES. THIS AUCTION IS OPEN TO THE
PUBLIC. AS WELL AS. DEALERS AND DECORATORS. wi umc
TERMS: Cash or check
Dryua/Auctloneer Liquidators (201) 227-6484
Oriental rugs will be given away as door prizes.


rage o-n i ne jewisn r loncuan. t riaay, September 3, lySiJ


Synopsis ol the Weekly Torah Portion
"And now. behold, I have brought the first of the fruit of the
land, which Thou, O Lord, hast given me"
(Deut. 26.10).
KI TAVO
KI TAVO "And it shall be, when thou art come in unto the
land which the Lord thy God giveth thee for an inheritance .
thou shall take of the first of all the fruit of the ground and
shall go unto the place which the Lord thy God shall choose to
cause His name to dwell there. And the priest shall take the
basket out of thy hand, and set it down before the altar of the
Lord thy God and thou shalt set it down before the Lord thy
God, and worship before the Lord thy God When thou hast
made an end of tithing all the tithe of thine increase in the third
year thou shalt say before the Lord thy God: 'I have put
away the hallowed things out of my house, and also have given
them unto the Levite, and unto the stranger, to the fatherless,
and to the widow ... I have not transgressed any of Thy
commandments, neither have I forgotten them' (Deuteronomy
26.1-13). "And it shall be when ye are passed over the Jordan,
that ye shall set up these stones, which I command you this day,
in mount Ebal, and thou shalt plaster them with plaster. And
thou shalt write upon the stones all the words of this law very
plainly" (Deuteronomy 27.4-8). The portion goes on to treat of
the blessings and curses with which Moses charged the children
of Israel: for further emphasis, the covenant made in mount
Horeb is reaffirmed in Moab.
(Til* recoc.rting el the Weekly Portion ol the L upon "The Graphic History ol Hi* Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, SIS. published by Shengold The volume It available at 75 Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president ol the society dis
trioutlng the volume.)
Bar/Bat Mitzvah
FAITH ROTHMAN
Faith Rothman. daughter of
Harriette and Bert Rothman, will
be called to the Torah as a Bat
Mitzvah on Saturday morning,
Sept. 4, at Temple Zion.
DAVID ROSENBERG
David Rosenberg, son of Mr
and Mrs. Sheldon Rosenberg, wil.
be called to the Torah as a Bar
Mitzvah on Saturday morning.
Sept. 4. at Beth Torah Congrega-
tion. Rabbi Max A. Lipschitz will
officiate.
The celebrant is an eighth
grade student at Highland Oaks
Junior High School and is a
member of Beth Torah *s Harold
Wolk Religious School Pre-Con-
firmation class, and an active
member of the Kadimah group at
USY.
Among the guests attending
will be Mr. and Mrs. Harry Ros-
enberg, David's paternal grand-
parents.
JEWISH
WORSHIP HOUR
Rabbi Carl Klein of the
Hallandale Jewish Center,
Hallandale. will appear on
the Jewish Worship Hour,
Sunday at 8 a.m. on Channel
10.
1
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"Prompt & Dramatic Relief"
For: Depression & Insomnia.

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Box #2445 M.B. Fl. 33140

Ner Tamid
Men's Club
The Men's Club of Temple Ner
Tamid will hold a breakfast
meeting on Sunday, Sept. 5 at
9:30 a.m. in the Sklar Auditor-
ium at the Temple. Guest speaker
will be Dr. Eugene Labovitz,
spiritual leader. David S. Meyer
is Men's Club President.
Gordon Roofing
and Sheet Metal
Works, Inc.
1450 VW. 21st Street
Phone: ttS-8287
Hull- vmir ruof repaired noil.
you ii ill save on a neu ruaf later
"Satisfactory Work by
Experienced Men"
Special moments call tor special planning Turn a nice
day with the family into an occasion and serve them
Sort Brand Decaffeinated Coffee Why Sonio Brand7
Purely and simply, it s 100% real coffee with all the
great taste you want from your coffee, yet it's 97%
caffem-free So. you and your family can enjoy all the
SonkpS Brand you want and you'll always get the
satisfying flavor that only 100% real coffee can give
SonKp* Brand- 100% real coffee-and tastes it'
That s what makes it special1
K CERTIFIED
KOSHER
-v^v Enjoy \bur Coffee
_ V** and Enjoy Vburseli
* m a regtsie'ed trademark of Gene-ai Poods
i
c Ge-wa Foods Corporation lie
David Green Appointed
Youth Director of Beth Torah
Beth Torah Congregation an-
nounces the appointment of
David Green as their new full-
time Youth Director. Mr. Green
has a Bachelors Degree in His-
tory from the University of
Maryland: an MA in Jewish Stu-
dies from Baltimore Hebrew Col-
lege; an MSW from the Univer-
sity of Maryland School of Soh.i
Work and an MA from iS
University. mgh
He has also been employed,,
the Cantor-Administrator Z
Beth Sholom Community Cent*
in Bethlehem, Pa. since 1977 J*
many or his duties at the Cent,.
related to young people
Synagogue Listing
Candlelighting Time: 7:18
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
1025 NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Froedman
Cantor Ian Alpern Conservative
Daily 7:30 a.m.
Evening 6:30 p.m.
Shabbos 8:30 a.m.
Shala Seudot 7:00 p.m.
Bar Mitrvah. Eric Elster
AVENTURA JEWISH CENTER
2972 Aventura Blvd. Miami. Fl.
935-0666 Conservative
David B. Saltzman, Rabbi
Lawrence Tuchinsky, Cantor
Friday Services 8:15 P.M.
Saturday Services 8:45 A.M.
Weekdays 8:30 A.M. 5:15 P.M.
TEMPLE BETH AM Or. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Mim.-667-6667 Senior Rabbi
Morton Hoffman. Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein. Associate Rabbi
Frl. 7 30 pm
Rabbi Baumgard will speak on
"It it Really Possible 10
Begin All Over'"
Sal. morning. Bac Milneh. Michael Grail.
Bat mitrvah Rachel Socol t
Sandra Demit
r3ETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way -'625 S.W 3rd Avenue
Soi ihOade 75O0S W 120th street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Friday. 8 p.m. South Dade Chapel
Saturday. 9 a.m. Coral Way
Shabbat Services Conducted by
Rabbi Oavid H. Auerbech
e. Cantor William W Upton
TEMPLE EMANU-EL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman. Rabbi
Zvi Adler, Cantor
Sat. morn. Service 9 a.m.
Dr. Lehrman will preach at 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Pinetree Drive, Miami Beach
532-6421
Cantor, Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Fit Eve. 7 p.m. Sat9a.m
TEMPLE ISRAEL Of Greater Miami
Marfs Pioneer Hetarm CongraoaDcri
137 N.E 19th St, Miami. 57*5900
9990 N. Kendall Or, 585-5055
Senior Rabbi: HaskeH M. Bemat
Asst Rabbi: Jeffrey K Salkm
Cantor: Jacob G. Bornstein
Fn S pm Rabbi Bemat will ditcuti
"Report Irom Lebanon. Part 2
Time lor the world to Repsnt "
TEMPLE JUDEA
5500 Granada Blvd.
Coral Gables
Michael B. Eisenslat. Rabbi
Fn 8 p m
Retorm
667-5657
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tel. 5344776
DR. DAVID RAAB. Rabbi
SOL ROTH. President
Services Frl. 7:30p.m. Sat9:30m
BETH 'vODESH
Moobm Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 8584334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Worship with ut during High Holy Oayt.
Membership and tealt available now
TEMPLE BETH MOSHF
2225 N.E. 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
8915500 Conservative
Oi.ly Temple m North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Godinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Fri service; Up m
Sal services H a rr
TEMPLE MENORAH
820 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowitz
Cantor Murray Yavneh
Friday Services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday Services at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Cartyte Ave,
Miami Beach, 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovttz
Cantor Edward Klein
Friday services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday services at 8:45 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave. M.B., Fl. 33139
Tel. 5384112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Melber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
Daily Service 8 a.m. 7:15 p.m.
Ft.day 7:15 p.m. Saturday 8:30 a.it
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41 st. St. 538-7231
Or. Leon Kronish, Rabbi Liberal
Cantor David Conviser
Fn. Evening 8:15 p.m.
Sat. morn. 10:45 a.m.
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947 7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A Lipschitz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec. Director
Frl. Evening Service 8:00 p.m.
Sat Morning Service 8:30 a.m.
Daily Services: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
Sat.. Sept. 4,
Bar Mitzvah David Roaenberg
-RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION-
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Schiff
Executive Vice President
Religious Inlormation
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone 576-4000
Rabbinical Association Office
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
8460 SW 154 Circle Court #111
Miami. Fl Modern Orthodox
Rabbi Warren Kasztl 3820898
Sabbath services 9:30 a.m.
Fri. 7 p.m.
Sat. 9:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave
North Dade s Reform Congregation
Ralph P. KJngsloy. Rabbi 932-9010
Jukan I Cook. Associate Rabto.
Irving Shufces. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay, Administrator
Sabbath eve services 8:15 p.m.
(7:30 p.m. first Friday of month)
Sabbath morning services 10:30
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 2712311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Beniamin Dickson. Cantor
Minyan Services Mon a Thur 7 am
Sabbath eve Services 8:15 pm
Sabbath Services 9:00 am
Ouettt Are Welcome
Register Now. For Religious Schools
Kindergarten Thru Confirmation
FrtwBut I'ransporlalton ToAndt'"m
The Kendall Lakei Area
--------SOUTHEAST AMioN'
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
' nj NE 163rd SI N Miami Beach Fl ""
947 6094 Harold Withna. executive director
Erannin 0. KreuUer, regional pre*id*ri-
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Ooral Executive Office Park. 3785
NW 82 Ave.. Su.te 210, Miami. Fl.
33166. 592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Littman. regional directo' _


WPBT to Present High Holiday Specials
2, Miami's
Public Broadcasting Service net-
work affiliate, will televise two
High Holiday specials,
Abraham's People" on Sunday,
Sept. 12 at 5 p.m., and
"Thoughts On A New Year" on
Thursday, Sept. 16 at 8:30 p.m.
"Abraham's People" an infor-
mative one-hour documentary
traces the history of the Jews in
the Middle East through inter-
views with scholars.
"Thoughts On A New Year" is
a half-hour documentary about
the Jewish New Year, which
examines the many meanings
and traditions of the High Holy
Days of Rosh Hashana and Yom
Kippur.
The latter special includes in-
terviews with Rabbinical Associ-
ation of Greater Miami President
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff and
Vice President Rabbi Solomon
Schiff, Director of the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation's Com-
munity Chaplaincy Service.
B'nai B'rith Meetings
Chapter No. 1288, House, University
Lincoln
B'nai B'rith Women, will hold a
regular meeting on Wednesday,
Sept. 8. 11:30 a.m. at the 100
Lincoln Road Club Room.
Coral Gables Lodge No. 1682,
B'nai B'rith District Five, will
hold their meeting on Tuesday,
Sept. 14 at 8 p.m. at the Hillel
of Miami,
Loral Gables, according to Lenny
Lucas, president. Guest speaker
will be Oded Ben-Hur, Vice Con-
sul. Israeli Consulate.
Or Ohm Single Service
Temple Or Olom will hold a
late Friday night Single Service
on Sept. 3. at 10 p.m., followed by
a social.
County Court Judge P#U2NH
Friday, September 3, 1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
National Asthma Chapter
Meetings Scheduled
The Breath of Life Chapter of
National Jewish Hospital-Na-
tional Asthma Center will hold
their first meeting on Sept. 13.
The North Dade B reward
Chapter will hold their first meet-
ing on Sept. 14 at the West Dixie
Bowling Lanes.
The Lorber Chapter will hold
their meeting on Sept. 14 at 10:30
a.m. Guest speaker will be Laura
Krall.
For more information, call the
National Asthma Center.
MICHAEL R.
BLYNN
DADE COUNTY NEEDS HIM
COUNTY COURT JUDGE
GROUP 19 PUNCH 232
Michael R. Blynn
His Wife
Esther Levy Blynn
And His
hree Blynn-tzes
The Peoples Choice
for The People's Court"
ENDORSERS
Rabbi Louis Lederman,
Temple Beth Moehe,
North Miami
Alfred Bieley, Atty.
Ms. Peggy Bieley. V.P.,
American Savings
Si H. Bloom, Jr., Atty.
David Burstyn, Atty.
Ronald L. Buschbom, Atty.
Mr. William L. "BUI" Conder,
Associates Realty
Ms. Delores "Dee" Conder,
Associates Realty
Sam Daniels, Atty.
Ms. Heather Denman
A. Norman Drucker, Atty.
Harvey D. Friedman, Atty.
Mr. Harry Gurwitch
Mrs. Harry Gurwitch
Ellen R. Heimlich, Atty.
Mallory H. Horton, Atty.
former Florida Appellate
Court Judge.
Third District
I rw in'Kaufman, Atty.
Mr. Robert Kemper
Mr. Robert Kushner
Mrs. Louis Lederman
Jay Levy, Atty.
Ms. RocheUe Bea Malek
Ms. Joan S. Miller,
Robert B. Miller, Atty.
MIAMI BOARD of REALTORS
Mr. Charles Mindlin, Atty.
Joseph H. Murphy, Atty.,
former Mayor, Coral Gables,
Florida
Joseph H. Murphy, Jr. Atty.
NATIONAL ORGANIZATION FOR
WOMEN. N.O.W.
Mr. Howard Neu, Mayor
City of North Miami
Mr. Antonio D. Otero, President,
Hialeah Board of Realtors
Mrs. M. Athalie Range, Director,
Range Funeral Home
Stuart Rapee. Atty.
Mr. James L. Riley
Robert A. Romagna, Atty.
Mr. Neil Schiff
Building Contractor,
Trustee, University of Miami
Ted Silver, Atty.
Guillermo Sostchin, Atty.
David Stone, Atty.
Ronald G. Stone, President,
Comprehensive Pensions Corporation
Richard Waters, Mortgage Broker
Richard E. Winstel. Atty.
Mr. Edward J. Wolis. Realtor
Mr. Sonny Wright, Realtor
EDUCATION:
Dane County Public School*
University ol Miami
Bachelor's and Master's Degree
In Business Administration
Florida International University-
Master ol Science
University ol Miami-
School of Law-
J.O. Degree
LEGAL EXPERIENCE:
State Attorney's Office,
State of Florida
City Attorney's OH ice
City of Miami Beach
Associate with Law Firm of
U.S. Congressman
Claude Pepper
Now heads his own general
practice with
Law Offices In
Dade A Broward Counties
EDUCATEDEXPERIENCEDQUALIFIED
pd. Pol. Adv.
SELECT Q. HOLMES BRADDOCK %*&8X%tf
Quality /^fter-School Care programs in all of our elementary schools
Increase Parent-Teacner -Child interaction to help children master
their basic skills
Continued aaVococy of improved vocational and adult education programming
Continued ads/ooqey < bilingual programs ihaf will give all ywnqstera an
eo^ual oppor+umt-y for employment- .^

Paid Pol Adv.
VOTE PCX %B5apdock"
on Sepj-eoiber 7H,
T:


Page 10-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, September 3, 1982
Lowe-Levinson v
Exhibit
Temple Beth Sholom's Lowe-
Levinson Art Gallery will open
the season with an exhibition fea-
turing artist Florette S. Semi-
gran's hand woven Talleisim-
Tallitot on Sunday. Sept. 12,
from 4 to 6 p.m., according to
Judy Drucker, Cultural Arts Di-
rector.
Live-In, Non-Smoker, Non-Drinker With
Refernces To Care For Older Gentleman.
Light Housekeeping; Light Cooking
(Kosher). Prefer Driver With Current
License. Room, Board & Salary. North
Miami Beach Area.
Call Nan: 685-8451
Pictured at a recent planning meeting for Temple Israel Sister-
hood's Book Review Series are (left to right, front row) Jane
Goldberg, Janice Miller, Candace Ruskin, president of the Sis-
terhood; (back row) Millie Wasman, Betty Schwartz, and
Harriet Bulbin, The series will be held on Tuesdays at 10:15
a.m. and will begin Nov. 9.
Kosher Catering
New York Style
Giant Ice Sculptures
UNIQUE CUSTOM LIGHTING EFFECTS
On Or Off Premises
Exclusive Caterers To:
Temple Zion and Temple Or-Olom
call BETH-HARJNC.
BET-HER, INC.
592-5280
591-2559
WE CATER
to the
BAR MITZVAH
YOUNG MAN
EMPIRE
THE PREMIUM
KOSHER
CHICKEN!
If you can't find a fresh Empire Chicken, put some boxes of Fresh-Frozen Empire
Chicken pieces in your freezer. Then you'll be prepared to serve a good home-
cooked meal at any time... for your family and special guests. Remember, everyone
should eat Empire Chicken at least once a week.

KOSHER
Empire
POULTRY
ACCEPTED AND
PREFERRED WORLDWIDE!
Empire Kosher Poultry, Inc. 1-800-233-7177 Telex. 84-2538
HE LED THE FIGHT FOR
Landlord/Tenant Reforms
Stricter Criminal Statutes
Insurance Company Regulation
Consumer Protection Legislation
Environmental Protection
Child Abuse Laws
-*


1
Hadassah Meetings
Stephen S. Wise Chapter of
Hadassah will hold a luncheon
meeting -on Tuesday, Sept. 7 at
11:30 a.m. at the Ocean Pavilion
Mezzanine.
The Haim Yassky Chapter of
Hadassah will hold the first
meeting of the season on
Wednesday, Sept. 8, at 1 p.m.,
with social hour and refresh-
ments at noon. Guest speaker
will be Ruth Rosenberg, member
of Educations and Community
Relations Committee.
The Morton Towers Chapter of
Hadassah will meet on Monday.
Sept. 13, at 11:30 a.m. at the
American Saving Bank, Alton
and Lincoln Roads, Miami
Beach. Refreshments will be
si -\ed.
Porte Towers Chapter of Had-
will hold their monthly
meeting on Monday. Sept. 13. at
n at the West Avenue Au-
ditorium, Miami Beach. The
Towers Womens Social
i In I) Choral Group will perform
n concert.
The Renanah Chapter of
Hadassah will hold its first meet-
ing of the season on Monday,
Sept. 13, at the Miami Beach
Jewish Community Center. A
mini lunch will be served at 11:30
a.m. with the meeting starting at
noon. Harriet Cohen, president of
Renanah, who is now attending
the National Convention of
Hadassah in Jerusalem, will give
a report on the convention.
The Naomi Chapter of Hadas-
sah will hold their general
meeting on Monday, Sept. 13, at
8:30 p.m. at the Tamarind
Apartments Clubhouse, 112th
Avenue and North Kendall
Drive. The guest speaker repre-
senting Florida Power and Light
Company will speak on "FPL -
Lite."
Beth Torah Sisterhood
The Mollie Kahaner Sisterhood
>f Beth Torah Congregation will
hold its first meeting of the
season on Wednesday. Sept. 8 at
8 p.m. in Deakter Hall at the
Temple.
Stanley Rosenblatt
to Lead Discussion
at Beth David
Stanley M. Rosenblatt, a local
attorney and the host of the PBS
series Israeli Diary will discuss
"Israeli Diary: Analysis and
Postscript" preceding Selichot
Services on Saturday night, Sept.
11 at 10:30 p.m. at Beth David
Congregation.
In addition to his law practice,
which is devoted exclusively to
trial work in the civil field with
emphasis on medical malpractice
and products liability, Mr. Ro-
senblatt has found the time to
author 3 books: The Divorce
Racket, Justice Denied and Mal-
practice And Other
Malfeasances.
Mr. Rosenblatt has appeared
on' the Television programs
David Frost, Dick Cavett, David
Susskind. NBC Monitor and
A ISC Good Morning America. He
hosted the prime time PBS series
Within The Law. This was fol-
lowed by Israeli Diary, a series of
11 programs in which he inter-
viewed prominent Israeli leaders
and one Palestinian.
Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 1 IB
INTRODUCING
THE FLAGLER FEDERAL
NEW, FAST MATURING
7-DAYCD
MINIMUM DEPOSIT-120,000
FLACLgPm
FESsFAL
r>l
ESEE
EFFECTIVE THROUGH SEPT. 4 1982
ADDITIONAL DEPOSITS PERMITTED AT ANY TIME
FEDERAL REGULATIONS REQUIRE A PENALTYFOREARVfRUTHDRAINAL
INITIAL DEPOSITMUSTREMAININACCOUNTFOR M BAYS
YOUR SAVINGS ARE INSURED TO $100,000
BY AN AGENCY OF THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT
SAVIflGS & LCAri /xsscu/uicn
VISIT ANY OF OUR 28 CONVENIENT OFFICES IN BADE, BROWARD OR PALMBEACH
COUNTIES. OR CALL 377-1711 IN BADE, S25-1SS7 IN BROWARD


Page 10-B The Jwih BmUW v-iA~~ o-
u-------1------o i (ion
Page 12-B The Jewiah Floridian. Friday, September 3,1982
U.S. CHOICE BEEF ROUND BONELESS
Btm. Round (SAVE9o,
Steak ^grj
pouno ^L
U.S. CHOICE BEEF RIB
WHOLE OR HALF IN CRY-O-VAC
Mb Eye $1399
(SAVE $1.00) %^FPOUN0
FLA. OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH _
Lots Of Chicken
3 BREASTS ,* ^Sa^T^
& 3 LEG QTRS Ml M %/t
W/ BACKS ^11 ^^1
3 GIBLET PKGS ^P^^W
(SAVE 20) ^^FPOUND
U S CHOICE BEF ROUNO EVE ROUNO BONELESS SAVE
Round Roast___lb 2.99 so
US CHOICE QENUME
AMERICAN SHOULDER ARM
lb mtm3 90
U S CHOICE QENUME AMERICAN LAMB
Shoulder Roast lb 1.59 30
U S CHOICE BEEF me SMALL ENO BONELESS
Mb Steak.......lb 4.391 00
FU3PJDA OR SWPPED
PREMIUM FRESH
LB 9kf 20
TYSON CMC NQUICK WITH CHEOOAR 12 OZ PKG
Patties or Hoagtes 2.49 20
Blue Bonnet
Margarine
ISA
Pick from our
loos* displays.
Buy only what
you need!
:ho+ce genuine amercian
whole or sirloin half
lamh (Saveboc)
Leg $-189
POUND
1
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
THIGHS. BREASTS, DRUMSTICKS
1
19
Fryer Combo
(SAVE 20)
POUND
KNEIP U.S. CHOICE BRISKET OF
Corned Beef SAVE 50>
$-179
POUND
KNBPUS WSPECTED.
BONE-M. 6-6432 STEAKS
4.LB
BOX
1
SAVE
9.99
(U---------------'---------------V3
Family Pack
Meats!. .
Buy Big. .
Save More!
3 LBS 1 OVER-U 3 CHOICE
Beef save
Cube Steaks LB 2.89 10
3 LBS i OVERU S CHOICE BONELESS
Stewing
Beef............lb 1.89 10
3 LBS i OVER
Ground
Chuck..........lb 1.79 10
3 LBS 4 OVER
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED
PREMIUM FRESH
1.00
KNE*> U S HSP EIGHT 6 02 STEAKS
T-BoneSteaks 12-, 00
KNEIP U S INSP BNLS 8-8 02 STEAKS
Strip Steaks... 4eo 12" 100
KNEIP U S WSP BNLS 16-402 STEAKS
Mb Eye Steaks .ioS 13" 100
KNEIP U S WSP BEEF 16-402 PATTIES
...So!! 8.19 100
KNEIP US WSP ALL BEEF 16-4 02 PATTIES
Deluxe Patties .. ioS 7.291 oo
KNEIP U S INSP FLAVOREO 16-4 02 PATTIES
Beef Patties .... km 6.19 1 oo
Fryer
Quarters
3 LBS i OVER
ON COR BREADED PATTIES LB
.49
10
10
Chicken or
Chuckwag*nl.49
APPETIZERS
AVAILABLE AT STORES WITH SERVICE COUNTERS
"U-PICK'-CRUNCHY. FRESH
Green
Peppers SAVE 0t>
LARGE
80 COUNT
LB
49
"U-PICK -GARDEN FRESH
Firm
Cucumbers (save 200
3/59'
INT t#te7
LARGE
80 COUNT
LG 6 S2 -JET FLOWN TOP OUALITV
DEL MONTE HAWAIIAN
SAVE
ea 1.89 10
SALAO SIZE-FIRM RIPE
Tomato..
2 IN PKG CRISP FRESH
,6:G .49 20
. .PKG .59 .10
GARDEN FRESH
Carrots.......2.,,': .49 10
ADO ZEST TO SALADS
Fla. Avocados 2 for .89 42
MOUNTAIN GROWN JUICY AND FLAVORFUL
Bartfett Pears B .59 10
U PICK -US 1 ALL PURPOSE
Yellow Onions .. lb .25 04
NATURAL FRESH BUV I JAR AT REG PRICE > GET I FREE'
Italian Dressing 1.79
SEALTEST LOW FAT
LIGHT N' UVELY
uuni m lively Ma*] (>AVb oUC) "L-L- """un"!- j^^i^^.i. ^v/*,
S2 *i ySSjmv*
ASSORTED FLAVORS
ALL NATURAL MM (SAVE 50c)
24-OZ
CUP
KRAFT SOUCE2E
Parkay........
SAV8 6-COUNT PKO
English Muffins
KRAfT
PKO mJW .10
10
Yogurts
OSCAR MAYER SUCEO MEAT
Variety Pack... ^ 1.99 so
SLICED THW PASTRAMI OR SAVE
Com'd Beef Rnd. VI 2.09
FINEST QUALITY JACK 1 JH.L
SAVE WHITE OR YELLOW
12
LB
20
.30
1.39 20
!Le3.49 so
4.0 AF
SOZ
PKO
1.09
ITO WHOLE MILK
SUNNY OCLIOHT FLOWOA
CitrusPunoh ..:r
MJNUTE MAC
if 1.79 .20
20
HEBREW NATIONAL
99 20 Knookwurst ^ 1.99
.40
.50
Prutt Punch
64 OZ
. cont
HORME. SLICED GENOA OR
20 Hard Salami p?g 1.19 20
SUCEO OR CHUNK NORWEGIAN JARLSBERG
Chain.........ill.1t 20
CREAMY SMOOTH
French Brie LB 1.39 20
KITCHEN FRESH COLE StAW OR
Potato Salad... l. .79 10
HOT WEATHER TREAT
Fresh FruK Salad h .89 20
OVEN FRESH1 .
BBQ Chickens .. 1.89 10
IN-STORE BAKERY
ONLY AT STORES HAVING FRESH BAKERIES
LARGE ONION ROLLS OR (SAVE 20C)
Large 1NSPKG QQC
Kaiser Rolls B&
JEWISH STYLE WITH OR WITHOUT SEEDS SAVt
Rys Bread.....each .89 oe
HOT-PLAW OR WITH POPPY SEEOS
Fresh Begets 8 ^ .99 20
CHOCOLATE OR YEUOW
Cupcakes .... 2 for .89 .10
DEUCKXJS APPLE DANISH
Pockets......2-0, .98
6PIECES IN BOX-SOUTHERN STYLE
Fried Chicken 3.89


ii --- .imk m..t-----11.1. m___:j:__ D^ 1 K.P
Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewish Floridim PagelS-B
a* high prices
or Low Prices!
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Ritz Sodas
(SAVE 25C)
-as
cans b9t9js*f
r8gular or smokey
Heinz BBQ Sauce
*jm* 2o)
16-02
BTL
59
KOSHER OR PROCESSED
Vlasic
Pickles $f 19
1
46-02
JAR
FROZEN FOODS
OR P#*K PANTRY PNOE
2it-02
CANS
SAVE
.59
I (FROM PEPPEHOGE FARM,
~"t REUBEN IN RYE OR SUCED BEEF SANO
1.99
.40
E REGULAR OR OAHY
Whip.....bowl .79 .20
LEE FAMILY
Cake ..."-581.99 so
Y FWOE CUT OR FRENCH
Beam 2 St .89 .29
VANILLA OR BANANA
JEU*CMOC VAA
OrffeeRJch
"X0F1.89 30
12
.69 20
t S '?' am
--*>* 79. St
|I >o* (SO I5M
" N* 7m i
* "n 1 s* m a*
unite 1 iojjsi
Ml Coiwufc,
n"MiMini*i
:"**-CUllliiio
. hw Soum Oi Higito*
0"* % Cm,, BM
Mai OAMil-w Miami
**' M ItM "* "> c MM
i wt Siei hmv
HEY IIKATMC
DlMOO KM 1 H1IMO0 0
N MIAMI N MIAMI MAC*
MMm.GM Or 1 W 19 Ax
W l?3"J Sr lS.sc >M
'UuSrn Stan* (few
XW'AxllJ*lSl
MtaKniMElNnSl
inn iw ma*
, WUMCAC*
*NORou< ISMlSl
CMMAiWMMMSNM
gll*flMI7l^ijl
'9m Si CMM.it N M
MMftMUMOBISMM
flu Gantr i a,
Xomjn), 0. 1m* mwin
""9 at 9411 s,,HI
MAllAMOAti-MOlirVWIOO
OwWmMW
1510 5 >M H| HOUymx
7700 hohim< 8ouW.no
urwiir
Mi Pin 1 Sioooiifl Cent*
BAIMTN1M
US to 1 iSSuSt'it:
Make Pantry Pride Grocery Dept your
for summer's last big holiday.
-r. i
WHITE 9"
Paper Plates
100-cT.
PACK
99
FRENCH'S
Mustard
(SAVE 20)
24-02.
BTL
79
D)PN OR REGULAR
Pantry Pride
Potato
8-02
PKQ
79
HEIN2
Ketchup
(SAVE 20c, $-|5g
44-02
BTL.
1
PLANTATION PRIDE
Sweet Relish
8-02.
JAR
59
Chips
Schaefer
PAK I I JBj
(SAVE 40)
SAVF
5'. 01 BUCKET
Don Juan
.79
ASSORTED FLAVORS
DietFeygo
l.OO
19
GENERIC
Paper Towels
GENERIC
Bleach.......
GENERIC
Rice.......
Giant
. ROLL
1 GAL
JUG
3 LB
BAG
JREAMOFCOCONUI
....'381.99 .20
MOUNT AW CHABLIS BURGUNDY NECTAR ROSE
Afcnaden Wine '5 b 4.691 30
LEMON LIME ORANGE OR FRUIT PUNCH
Sqwtncher.. 2 %? 1.00 4e
JAMBOREE
. jar .99 30
100-CT
BOX
IAMBRUSCO ROSATO BIANCO
Rlunlte Wines "<2.99wo
WHITEHOUSE
Apple Juice
PANTRY PRIDE
Mayonnaise
.".31.49 26
32 OZ
. JAR
.89 30
GENERIC TAGLESS
Tea Bags..
GENERIC
Ti.cm.jmI DM|l.h '6 oz
owvmi iKMisn jar
f.-OZ BOX GENERIC DINNER A
wise & wnooco
GENERIC 30 GALLON
Trash Bags.....8?
GENERIC WHITE
Facial Tissue. 20^x
GENERIC HEAVY DUTY IIOUI0 LAUNDRy|
'--------------- 84 OZ
i^exengenr..... aa
GENERIC
Apple Juice
YetiP>
.55
.69
.89 .50
34
12-02
CANS
300 COUNT PKG FYNE
Paper Napkins
PANTRY PRIOE LONG GRAIN
70
69 30
.79
1.49
.55
8 LB
BAG
10-OZ
JAR
DON JUAN
Salad OMvee
SWEET SUE
Whole Chickon
CORONET
Jumbo Towels ,
OuP.y ItAVl
1.39
40
34
1.79
1.29
40
PANTRY PRIDE
Lunch Bags.
CINNAAION GRAHAM DOUBLE CHOC
PEANUT BUTTER 12-OZ PKG
2-90-CT
PKOS
1.99
.69
1
20
20
16
10
.18
.20
BIRDSEYE LITTLE EARS FROZEN
Com on the
Cob JEM
8$139
PKG BBBSB FUO tl LLO SPRITI
Tab or E3
Coca-Cola
QUART CAN 10 W 40 (SAVE 99)
Cam 2 sTWfc
Motor Oil ea ZFZ#
PACKAGED
BAKED GOODS
PANTRY PRIDE
Hamburger or
Hot Dog Rolls EHH
H. 0/
NO RET
BTIS
GUARANTEED PERSONAL CARE
_____ ^ *0UA NET REGULAR OR SI1PFRHO. n *lNr lAVt
Double the Difference
In Cash!
I* you can i*xJ low* ovsra* prices this wee* ai any l^g
onw M aervict Supermarket m your local trading area ^O;
Paniry PrxSt wi pay you DOUBLE THE DIFFERENCE ^g
*> cash Jual purchase 25 drftsrani items lolafcng ^S
S20 0X> w mora (*ciung meet products and dams ^ thai reojuva an axMioruH purchasa) Only ona of aach ^*c>
itam nvrcNited tmt b included tn lha comparison -s-o
6rrg yotn P.mtfy P..oe regisier lape i*nd lha other $o
marhai t pico* on ino e.v:t s*ns 'lems to Panirv Pride ^^
.mo it Ih.-- loi.tf .% to** we n p.iv yoti DOUBLE THE ^^,-
OiFFERENCE .n ,-.,n 2>:
*OUA NET REGULAR OR SUPERhOLD
Hair Spray.....&
REG OR ANTl PERSPIRANT DEOOORANlj
BrutSoHd.....^
MOUTHWASH
\3 BTL
SKIN CREAM
i-OZ
. .TUBE
Cortizone5
15 OZ BTL NORMAL OILY REOULAR
OR XTRA BO0Y FABERGE ORGANIC
A NO
CONDITIONER
.99
1.09
1.49
1.89
.99
50
.80
50
60
.50
PKGS
OF 6
PECAN FUDGE
Brownies
PANTRY PRIDE
(SAVE 46C)
1802
. LOAF
A I C ITAUAN SPOLETTES OR
rt.ilni. BmL RKO
unwn itone .. .of6
AOLER S JEWISH
Rye Breed ....USBj
-'
^ QUANTITY RIGHTS RESERVED
"" U- 0MEYEH S J
English Muffins for
Most stores
open
8am 'til 11pm daily
All stores
open Sundays
YouPij
.99.10
.89
.75
.69
1.00
AVf
.10
18
16
^4


Page 14-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 3,1982
Pioneer Women
Pioneer Women-Na'amat will
ring in their new organizational
year with a series of meetings and
lectures highlighting the High
Holy Day8 and the Middle East
in the first weeks of September.
Well known Zionist leader and
lecturer, Leon Segal, will open
the first meeting of the season for
the Beba Idelson Chapter,
Wednesday, Sept. 8 at 12 noon
with a speech on the current situ-
ation in Israel and Lebanon. He
also will install the new officers at
the session to be held at the
Pioneer Women offices, 605
Lincoln Road, Miami Beach.
Reserve For The
High Holy Days
traditional services
i
BRING YOUR FAMILY
OUR HOUSE
THE HOLIDAYS!
t th Ineomparabli
Indoor a Outdoor Tennis Indoor A Outdoor Pools
Robert Trent Jones Golf Course. Poolside Lunch
Hearth Club Saunas A Co-Ed Whirlpool Spa Jogging
Indoor Mini-Golf A Gym Boating A Fishing On Our Lake
Indoor Disco Roller Skating Entertainment A Nile Club
Children s World A Pool. Day Camp A Teen Program
vM0rEL (914) 647-5'00 NYC |2'?I947 44?8 IN MONTRHl ,5Ui 688 '000 )
\ T0LI FREE CALLS IN All STATES EXCEPT NEW YORK DIAL 800-4JI0152 /
SHE MERITS
RE-ELECTION!
TO CIRCUIT COURT
GROUP 6
Adele Segall
FASKE
SrjeJJfiamiHeratt
..*.
In Group 6:
Incumbent Adele Segall Fuke con-
tinues to exude the good humor, creativ
ity. and common sense (hat are so im-
portant in the Juvenile Division in which
she serves. Her erfectiveness in helping
to redirect young people who have
strayed is undiminished In contrast, her
opponent displays an unbecoming will-
ingness to change names and thus
ethnic identities (or personal advan-
tage
Those who know her
support her.
Cuban American Lawyers Political
Action Committee
Florida Crime Prevention Commission
Aventura Political Action Committee
United Teachers of Dade/TigerCOPE.
Owners & Residents Association
of Sunny Isles
Sophisticated Gents Political Action
Committee, Inc.
Concerned Citizenr of Northeast Dade, Inc.
United Transportation Union
Miami Board of Realtors
Dade County Council for Senior Citizens,
Metropolitan Dade County Association of Fire
Fighiers No. 1403
Dade County Council of Fire Fighters
Miami Association of Fire Fighters. Local 587
Dade County Police Benevolent Association
Fraternal Order of Police, Dis'nct 6
Fraternal Older of Police, Miam. Loage No. 20
South Florida AFL-CIO
Miami Herald
pd. pol. adv.
Sarah Kaufman is Chapter presi-
dent. Hostesses will be Sarah
Kerbs and Mildred Frank.
The Eilat Chapter will open the
upcoming season with the in-
stallation of their new officers
and board members in their new
meeting place, on Thursday,
Sept. 9, 10 a.m., in the communi-
ty room of American Savings and
Loan Assoc., 828 Washington
Avenue, Miami Beach.
Joseph Goldstein, life member
of Friends of Pioneer Women,
will preside over the installation.
Chapter vice president and newly
elected cultural chairman. Ana
Cohen, will speak on the meaning
of the High Holy Days and Rita
Goldstein will reader songs per-
taining to the holiday in Yiddish
and Hebrew: according to Faye
Brut'ker. incoming president.
"Up-Date Lebanon anti Israel"
will be the topic ui lecturer, Leon
Segal's speech at the first meet-
ing ot the l982-'83 season lor the
Kinneret Chapter of Pioneer
Women Na'Amat. The meeting is
scheduled tor Sunday, Sept. 12 at
12 noon at their new meeting
place, Temple Menorah Social
Hall, according to Rita Adoff,
chapter president.
Sisterhood to Meet
Temple Or Olom Sisterhood
will hold an end of the summer
meeting on Wednesday, Sept. 8
at 8:30 p.m. at the Temple. Re-
freshments will be served.
Owner Wants Offers
On this spacious 4 Bedroom, 4 Bath Home. Close to
31st street.
Merrill Lynch Realty/Cousins
667-4815
Becky Frank Terry Qattone
279-7171 (Ev.) 554-4228 (Ev.)
You'll never
know how good
borscht can be...
Until
you've tried
Golds
A HOLIDAY TRADITION
olds
*SCHT
WHAT IS A JUDGE MADE OF?
o,
'NE PART
TRADITION...
Vice-President, Alexander S. Gross Hebrew Academy
Member and directorYoung Family League
of Temple Emanuel
Past director, Young Adults Division, Greater Miami
Jewish Federation
Member and lormer officerK'oach Lodge B'nai B'nth
Leon and his Rabbi, Irving
Lehrman of Temple Emanuel
o>
'NE PART
EDUCATION AND
HARD WORK...
Educated at the University of Florida where he
received his Bachelor's Degree in Business
Administration and the University of Miami School of
Law from which he graduated in 1972.
Leon has been a practicing attorney in Dade 10 years
President-elect, Miami Beach Bar Association.
O
NE PART
FAMILY...
Son of Irving and Ruth Firtel, long time residents
and civic leaders in Miami Beach
Leon with wife "Sugar"
Eisenman Firtel, their daughter
Lauren and dog, Scarlet.
ON SEPT. 7th ELECT
LEON
firte:
COUNTY COURT JUDGE
VOTE SEPT. 7 GROUP11 punch #219
PD POL ADV LEONARD WEINSTEIN. CAMP CHRU


Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 15-B
\enberg, an assistant to Raoul
during his rescue of several
(ungarian Jews during World
taks at a recent commemoration
the Simon Wiesenthal Center in
Is to mark the 70th birthday of the
Reason
former Swedish diplomat. Mrs. Donnenberg,
a native of Sweden, described how she helped
Wallenberg prepare fake Swedish documents
for distribution to Jews to save them from
being deported to the Auschwitz death
camp.
dimes
;ing Can Cause Damage to Muscles
rs that challenge conventional wisdom
and health, researchers at the Tech-
rtmerit of Biology in Haifa have found
Exercise the rough equivalent of
[can cause damage to muscles, reduce
id protection of body cells, and put
^ures on kidneys.
tests showed exercise to have a
ct on muscles of young animals, it
nderable damage to those past middle
for middle aged muscles and en-
nixed, depending on the individual.
d Gershon, head of the research team
I the Technion Department of Biology,
' hat the experiments were carried out
' mice, and not humans. But he adds
alts should not be ignored in relation'
lings.
tug, a former member of the U.S.
Representatives, will deliver the key-
i at the 55th annual convention of the
lies' Auxiliary, Jewish War Veterans
I States.
pnt ion, in conjunction with the Jewish
s, will take place at the Concord
nesha Lake, N.Y., on Sept. 6 to 12.
Presidents Elaine Mass and
nonstein are chairman and co-
3 event
the list of guests will be Robert
inistrator of the Veterans Adminis-
actress and comedienne, Kaye
is currently starring on Broadway in
Penzance."
unent rabbinic leaders urged the over
attending a National Council of
convention from throughout the
[exercise more care and demand more
in buying kosher food in the
[today.
iMoshe Tendler, a Talmudic scholar
w- of biology at Yeshiva University;
olems arising from advances in food,
he practical application of Halachic
changing standards of business;
affect the kashruth standards of
and sold under well-known rabbi
on today. 1
Clared that many products which aw
^Bpted as kosher because of their,
! not up to the kashruth standards
oonly in most Orthodox homes.
I and Mexican-American teen-agers
on. Tex., returned home from Israel
"t more than the traditional souve-
i acquired a closer understanding of
, a firsthand look at how Israel has
ng while fighting a war in Lebanon,
experience of life on a kibbutz.
rosited Israel under the auspices of
"nternship Program, the brainchild
of Congressman Mickey Leland and J. Kent
; Friedman. The program, now in its third year, is
| designed to help make youngsters from inner-city
I minority groups more fully aware of a part of the
j world that has been foreign to them by exposing
, them to its culture, history and diverse religious
I aspects.
The students, all about to enter their senior
j year in high school, spent six weeks in Israel,
I living in the homes of Israeli families, studying at
; the Leo Baeck School, touring the country, seeing
' its many ancient religious and historical sites.
The Kresge Foundation of Troy, Mich., and the
j Pew Memorial Trust of Philadelphia, two of
America's most prestigious foundations, have
granted Brandeis University more than half a
million dollars towards the construction of the
new Leonard L. Farber Library and the expansion
and renovation of the Jacob Goldfarb Library.
The trustees of the Kresge Foundation ap-
proved a $300,000 challenge grant, and the Pew
Memorial Trust announced a gift of $250,000.
Both grants supply a boost to the library cam'-
paign which, as Brandeis President Marver H<:
Bernstein noted in a letter to Alfred H, Taylor,
president of the Kresge Foundation, "constitutes
Brandeis' highest priority at this time."
Official dedication of Phase II of ORT-Israel's
1 "pinnacle" institution of learning, the ORT
: School of Engineering on the campus of the He-
brew University of Jerusalem, will take place on
Sept. 13, according to Beverly Minkoff, national
president of Women's American ORT, who will
i head a Women's American ORT delegation to th'e
Jerusalem ceremony.
Mrs. Minkoff said that the ORT School of
i Engineering is "the most advanced and sophisti-
cated vocational and technical education institu-'
tion not only in the 100-school ORT -Israel net-
work but in the entire 800-school global ORT
(8ystem."
Phase II is the Mechanical Engineering
I Complex and will include advanced industrial,
I nuclear and mechanical instrumentation techno-
logies, mechanical engineering, as well as a tech-
nical teachers' seminar. *
Ambassador Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, United
States permanent representative to the United
Nations, will receive the HIAS Liberty Award at
a luncheon at the Waldorf-Astoria in New York
on Sept. 12. At the same luncheon, HIAS will
present its Masliansky Award to Harold Fried-
man, leader in Jewish communal affairs.
In announcing the awards this week, HIAS
president, Edwin Shapiro, explained that the Li-
berty Award is given each year to an individual
"in recognition of his contribution toward the fur-
therance of freedom and justice." The Masliansky
Award, established by the family of Rev. Zvi
Hirsch Masliansky, a founder of HIAS and leader
in Jewish immigration affairs, is presented "in re-
cognition of notable humanitarian service for the
cause of refugees and immigrants."
PHARMACY
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Page 16-E The Jewish Floridian. Friday. September 3, 1982

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2315-200


University of Miami Appoints Fogel
^mard .) Fogel has been < 1*' fLkaaV. ida." I>.Fnl <.;^
Friday, September 3, 1982 The Jewish Floridian Page 17-B
nr Bernard J. Fogel has been
med vice president for medical
Hairs and dean of the University
Miami School of Medicine, by
resident Kdward T. Foote II.
frhis is one of the most impor-
nt appointments I will have
de as President of the Univer-
y of Miami." said Foote. "A
aduate of the School, who has
eal most of his career on its
culty and as an administrator,
,r Fogel has encyclopedic
nowledge of the Medical Center,
L challenges ahead, local and
Global, in addition to impressive
Lfessional credentials," Dr.
foote said.
His ability, imagination and
lifectious zest for pursuing ex-
igence in teaching, research and
finical care make him a rare find
i head any medical school. That
> will continue leading ours is
Suse for great confidence in its
Eture," he added.
Dr. Fogel, a nationally recog-
ized researcher, educator and
rfministrator, has been associa-
with the School of Medicine
Lr 25 years, as a student, pedia-
fic house officer and faculty
ember, as well as associat<* dean
Dr. Bernard J. Fogel
for medical education, admis-
sions and research.
"One of the year's most impor-
tant activities has been the
School's continued efforts to
work closely with the Public
Health Trust in creating one of
the nation's foremost medical
centers responsive to the needs of
the public and private sectors of
Dade County and South Flor-
Carol Gold Heads Delegation
To JWV Convention
I Mrs. Carol Gold, president of
j Department of Florida-Ladies
bxiliary. Jewish War Veterans
I the USA. will head a con tin -
nt of delegates to their Nation-
Ladies' 55th annual conven-
In. Sept. 6-12. at the Concord
ptel, Kiamesha Lake, N.Y.
nong those attending from
prida will be officers and chair-
auxiliary presidents and
kmbers, county council presi-
nts. past national presidents
now living in Honda, past de-
partment and county presidents.
Florida's candidate for nation-
al office is Mrs. Ceil Steinberg, a
past department of Florida presi-
dent, and wife of the immediate
past national commander Irvin
Steinberg.
Guest speaker will be Bella
Abzug, former member of the
U.S. House of Representatives. A
banquet honoring their national
president, Bernyce T. Ford, will
be held.
I0YAL HUNGARIAN HERESTAUI
Serving most delicious food
at reasonable prices
Our 36th Anniversary Year
731 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 538-5401
Fm Sail Parking Now A va liable Closes Monday t Saturday
4
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I

e*Pv
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a
ida, "Dr. Fogel said.
The Peruvian National Council
for Science and Technology in-
vited President Foote and Dr.
Fogel to visit Peru in March. As
a result of that trip, several coop-
erative educational and research
programs have been initiated as
part of the School's International
Medicine Program.
Dr. Fogel begins his term as
vice president and dean on the
eve of the School of Medicine's
thirtieth anniversary.
"In conjunction with the thir-
tieth anniversary, we have em-
barked on a program to triple the
School's endowment," he said.
"By the time the School offically
celebrates its birthday on Nov.
19, we will have reached that
goal." This will increase the med-
ical school's endowment by $12
million.
STUDIO
Continental
Cuisine
' FREOJOSSI
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STUDIO
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10' S unique
dining eper ence
Via'ch vour 'aoie to your
"*iooO >n one o' 5 "d'vduat
'oomi The Tent
/Vine Cellar Stuflo "lace
P'jane Swiss Cnaiet
Fin* Entertainment
At the Piano
Also violin playing
lor your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(private Luncheons arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
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MOST MAJOR
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Jeffrey Waxman thinks Dade
County residents deserve
belter judicial performance
FACT 1: JEFFREY WAXMAN'S opponent received the fourth
largest number of unqualified votes in the recent Dade
County Bar Association's Annual Evaluation of the 15
Criminal-Division Circuit Judges.
FACT #2: MR. WAXMAN'S opponent again 2 months later ranked
in the lower third as to the number of unqualified votes
received when the Citizens' Crime Commission of
Greater Miami polled the 15 Criminal Court Judges
FACT #3: MR. WAXMAN'S opponent's experience in the past ten
years has been limited to the criminal area. And fads
#1 and #2 indicate his level of performance.
FACT #4: MR. WAXMAN is in his tenth year of the practice of law
in Dade County and has experience in the Criminal
Division. Civil Division. Probate Division, and the Juve-
nile Division of the Circuit Court.
QUESTION:
WHO IS MORE QUALIFIED?


Pagel8-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 3,1982
Southern Bell
Hadassah in Jerusalem Hears Top Brass at Convention "Jjj ^%
JERUSALEM Over
2,000 Hadassah delegates
filled the Binyanei
Ha'ooma auditorium for
the opening session of the
68th national convention
meeting here through Sept.
2. This was the first major
national convention to be
held in Israel since "Opera
tion Peace for Galilee"
began.
The President of the State oi
Israel, Yitzhak Navon, received a
standing ovation as past presi-
dent. Rose E. Matzkin, presented
him with the Henrietta Szold
Award, Hadassah's highest
honor. Among previous reci-
pients of the award were Eleanor
Roosevelt, Harry S. Truman,
Hubert J. Humphrey, David
Ben-Gurion and Golda Meir.
Samuel W. Lewis, U.S.
Ambassador to Israel, left a
meeting between Ambassador
Philip Habib and Defense Minis-
ter Arik Sharon to attend the
convention. He told the dele-
gates, "You have come to this
country when there has been a
Engagement
KahnWiskup
Renee' Lynn Kahn
KAHN WISKUP
Mr. and Mrs. William J. Kahn
of M ait land, announce the en-
gagement of their daughter,
Renee' Lynn, to Mark Alan
Wiskup of Jacksonville, son of
Mr. and Mrs. Leon Wiskup of La
Crescenta, California.
Renee' is a third generation of
daughters born in Miami. She is
the daughter of the former Fran
Spector, the granddaughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Irving Spector, and
the great-granddaughter of the
late Mr. and Mrs. S.J. Spector.
The bride-elect graduated from
the University of Florida where
she received her masters degree,
and is a speech pathologist at
Cherokee School in Orlando.
Mark graduated from the Uni-
versity of California and North-
estem University where he re-
ceived his masters degree in
broadcasting. He is the business
reporter for WJXT, Channel 4, in
Jacksonville.
A November wedding is
planned.
)1 JT3
Beth Dm Office
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
Tel 534-1004 or 672 0004
More than 2,000 p*^
now delivering the new \B
Southern BeUdirectoryfkS
and businesses in Dade Count,
"Delivering our new jWj
ls no small task," says SouJS
Bell spokesman John TW?I
" It took 250 railroad cars ta2
the directories to Miami uj*\
are delivering up to IOOOOoUlI
rectories per day. We nlm,
deliver a total of nearly 3 milU
the Yellow PuJ
rui ID A
books.'
Included m
for the first time is a civic
which contains a list of common!
Leading players in the Middle East and the'
world campaign to advance human rights
are addressing 2,000 delegates and guests at
Hadassah's national convention meeting in
Jerusalem Aug. 25 to Sept 2. U.S. Am-
bassador Samuel W. Lewis (second from left)
spoke at the opening plenary session, along
with Israel President Yitzhak Navon (left),
who received Hadassah's highest honor, the
Henrietta Szold Award Max Kampelman
(second from right), U.S. Ambassador to the
Helsinki Watch Committee (the Conference
on Security and Cooperation m Europe),
spoke at the Human Rights Plenary with Is-
rael Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir on
Saturday evening, Aug. 28. &"***"*
Minister Menachem Begin (right) addressed
the closing session on the night of Sept. 1.
All sessions were scheduled at the Binyanei
Ha 'Ooma, the Jerusalem Convention ten-
ter.
ty organizatkjns in Dade (W,
Also m the Yellow Pages are*'
movable discount coupons whirkl
were introduced last year. TW
coupons offer customers
SlViBj
great trial and also a great vic-
tory. Congratulations."
BEFORE DELIVERING the
keynote address, Frieda S. Lewis,
the national president of Hadas-
sah, asked the audience to rise in
a tribute to the soldiers of Israel
who had fallen in "Operation
Peace for Galilee." She said that
they had fought "not only to free
the northern border of Israel from
terrorism, but to extirpate one of
the most vicious centers of
terrorism in the world for the
benefit of all free men."
The Henrietta Szold Award ci-
tation to President Navon de-
scribes him as a "poetic writer,
Zionist leader and idealist, (who)
exemplifies the best qualities of
the Jewish people."
In accepting the award. Presi-
dent Navon recalled that in 1913
his father had been employed by
Hadassah to set up a soup kit-
chen in Jerusalem. After running
it for 22 years, his father was
compelled to close it down be-
cause Henrietta Szold, the found-
er and head of Hadassah, had no
more funds for it.
"Tonight," he said, "I am ac-
cepting this award in memory of
my father as compensation for 22
years of service and of sadness
and happiness on the job." Mrs.
Matzkin announced that Presi-
dent Navon had declined the
check which accompanies the
award, asking instead that
Hadassah plant a dunam forest
of 200 trees. The Jewish National
Fund presented him with a cita-
tion for the forest.
PRIOR TO THE plenary,
Jerusalem Mayor Teddy Kollek
welcomed the 2,000 Hadassah
volunteers at the Western Wall,
where Sgan-Aluf Arie Braun, Is-
rael Defense Forces chief cantor,
sang.
Deborah Kaplan of Bayonne.
N.J., national convention chair-
man, presided over the session.
The plenary session, which open-
ed with the presentation of the
colors by Youth Aliyah students
from the children's village of
Hadassah Neurim, concluded
with "Songs of Israel" by the Is-
rael Army Cantors Choir.
at area merchants thmuahS
Miami. '
This year's white
directory contains custoi
guide pages designed to answB
customers' questions about using
their telephones. These pa,
cover everything from where you |
can pay your phone bills to hot,
to make international calls.
Directories will continue to be I
delivered throughout the am
over the next few weeks, accord-
ing to Thomas.
Enjoy Your Golden Age In An
Atmosphere of Luxury
and Comfort
Operated by
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Now, discover Miami's
freshest new restaurant. The
Veranda in the new Miami
Marriott Airport Hotel.
A civilized setting for
business, pleasure ana great food
twenty-two hours every day
from b a.m. until 4 a.m. In the
tradition of the worlds great
cafes, it's casual, elegant, uniaue.
With lots of free parkins, as well.
Visit the Veranda. Where
good food and good ideas flourish
in a year 'round summer garden.
When Marriott does it,
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ik
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Presenting
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oiftooS
Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewiah Floriflian Page 19-B
PUTTING CRIMINALS IN PRISON IS A
PROSECUTOR'S JOR.
READ WHY FOUR WELL-KNOWN
FEDERAL AMD STATE
PROSECUTORS ARE SUPPORTING
THE RE-ELECTION OF
CIRCUIT JUDGE JOSEPH DUR ANT!
I Robert Rust
Assistant U.S. Attorney,
1957-61. Assistant
county prosecutor,
1963-66. U.S. Attorney
Southern District of
Florida, 1969-77
C Richard E. Gerstein
Dade County State
Attorney for 21 years.
Elected six times by
the voters of Dade
County.
"We spent a good portion of our
adult lives representing society in
the war against lawbreakers. We
were responsible for sending many
criminals to prison. We believe
strongly in punishment as a
deterrent to further crime. We are
strongly supporting the re-election of
Circuit Judge Joseph Diirant,
because we believe him to be a man
of absolute integrity and total
fairness."
O William A. Meadows
Former assistant state
attorney, prosecutor in
60 capital cases.
Former circuit judge.
Former U.S. Attorney
4 Neal R. Sonnett
Former assistant
United States Attorney
for Southern District of
Florida. Served as
chief of criminal
division.
A Strong, Courageous Judge Is a Vital Link
in the War Against Crime
Re-elect Circuit Judge Joseph


Page 20-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 3,1982
Public Notice
,"ot'ce of action
constructive service
(no property)
in the circuit courtof
the eleventh judicial
circuit of florida, in
and for dade county
Civil Action
No. 13 1323*
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOEIN RE THE
MARRIAGE OF
ELE US CAVIN.
Petitioner-Husband
and
TREVA R. WHISBY CAVIN,
Respondent-Wife
TO: TREVA R. WHISBY
CAVIN
Address and Residence Un-
known
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If anv. to It on
Lloyd M. Routman. Esq. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whoa* ad-
dress Is Suite 818. 7800 NE 2nd
Avenue. Miami, FL 33138 and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Oct. l, otherwise a de-
fault win be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 31 day of
August. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
BY: C.P. Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PETITION-
ER
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN, ESQ.
Suite 618, 7000 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami. FL 33138
18081 Sept. 3,10.
17.24. 1882
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY' FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82 6573
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ANNG BORNSTEIN,
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of ANN G BORN-
STEIN, deceased, File Number
82-6573. is pending In the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is Dade
County Courthouse. 73 W. Flag-
ler Street. Miami. Florida
33130. The personal represen-
tatives of the estate are ROSA-
LEE KLEIN, and PHYLLIS B.
FIX, whose address Is c-o
DONALD M. KLEIN, 407 Lin-
coln Road, Miami Beach. Fla.
33138. The name and address of
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due, the date when it
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mil'
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS. DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: Septembers, 1882.
s- KOSALEE KLEIN
s- PHYLLIS B. FIX
As Personal Representatives
of the Estate of
ANN G. BORNSTEIN
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVES:
KLINE, MOORB A
KLEIN, P.A.
407 Lincoln Road
Miami Beach, Fla 3S1S8
Telephone: (SOB) 538-4771
rS.10.lMB
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
Ne.t2.l324*
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
EPRENE ETIENNE.
Petitioner Husband
and
MERCTLIA ELOI ETIEN-
NE.
Respondent-Wife
TO: MERCILIA EUO
ETIENNE
Fontamara
Ruelle Duran NO. 36
Port-au-Prince, Haiti, W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY
NOTIFIED that a petition for
Dissolution of your Marriage
has been filed and commenced
In this court and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. ESQ.
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address is Suite 615. 7800 NE 2
nd Ave. Miami, FL 83188 and
file the original with the clerk
of the above styled court on or
before Oct. 1. otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for for the relief prayed for
In the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court of Miami.
Florida on this 81st day of
August 1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
BY: C.P.Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
ATTORNEY FOR PETITION-
ER
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. ESQ.
Suite 615, 7800 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami, FL 33138
18080 Sept. 3,10.
________________ 24, 1882
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT 6f"
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY FLORIDA
CASE NO.82-13141
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
Marcel Ettiene
Petitioner-Husband
and
Rolande Ettiene
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
Respondent-Wife
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU. ROLANDE ETTIENE.
are hereby notified to serve a
copy of your Answer to the Pe-
tition For Dissolution of Mar-
riage filed against you, upon
MARCEL ETTIENE'S attor-
ney, GEORGE NICHOLAS,
ESQUIRE, 612 N.W. 12th Ave-
nue, Miami, Florida 33136, and
file original with the Clerk of
the Court on or before October
1. 1882; otherwise the Petition
will be confessed by you.
DATED this 30 day of Au-
gust. 1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
CLERK
By: N. A. Hewett
Deputy Clerk
18087 Septembers, 10;
17.24.1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 12 13230
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MARIE CLEMANCE
HAMILTON.
Petltloner-Wlfe
and
AUSTIN HAMILTON,
Respondent-Husband
TO: AUSTIN HAMILTON
District Eastern
Union Village
Nassau, Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, if any, to It on LAW
OFFICE OF LLOYD M.
ROUTMAN, Attorney for
Petitioner, whose address Is
Suite 615, 7800 NE 2nd Ave..
Miami. FL S31S8, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
October 1, 1882; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published'
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 81 day of Au-
gust. 1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByC. P. Cope land
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Law Office of
Lloyd M. Routman
Suite 616.
7800NE2ndAve.
Miami. FL SUM
Attorney for Petitioner
ISM Septembers. 10;
17,34,1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 13 1323 5
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FENELANTOINE,
Petitioner Husband
and
ALINE GREFFIN
ANTOINE,
Respondent-Wife
TO: ALINE GREFFIN
ANTOINE
2 Avenue NE
BOLLOSSE No. 46
Port-au-Prince.
Haiti, W.I.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses, If any, to it on
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN, ESQ.,
attorney for Petitioner, whose
address Is Suite 616. 7800 NE
2nd Avenue. Miami, FL 33138,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 1, 1882;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 31 day of Au-
gust, 1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByC. P.Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LLOYD M.
ROUTMAN, ESQ.
Suite 815.
7800 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner
18082 Septembers, 10;
_________________________17, 24, 1882
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO 42 13326 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
PAULIN JEAN
Petitioner Husband
and
MARIE T. JEAN
Respondent-Wife
TO: MARIE T.JEAN
Residence unknown
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU. MARIE T. JEAN, are
hereby notified to serve a copy
of your Answer to the Petition
For Dissolution of Marriage
filed aealnst vou. upon PAU-
LIN JEANS attorney.
GEORGE NICHOLAS, ES
QUIRE. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33138, and file
original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before October 1.
1982; otherwise the Petition
will be confessed by you.
DATED this 1 day of Septem-
ber, 1882.
RKHARD P. BRINKER
CLERK
By: M. J Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
18084 September3, 10;
________________________17.24, 1882
NOTICE OP ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA' IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 13-13004
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of:
ARCILIO GEORGE
OCHIL. Husband-Petitioner
and
MARIA REGLA OCHIL,
Wife Respondent
TO: MARIA REGLA
OCHTL
Residence
address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to it on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
P.A., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2481 N.W. 7th
Street, Miami, Florida 33125,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 1. 1882;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded In the complaint or
petlUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 25 day of Au-
gust, 1882.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE. P.A.
Attorney for the Husband
3481 N.W. 7th Street
Miami, Florida SSl 28
Telephone: 648 7917
1807* Septembers, 10;
17. 24, MBS
INTHE CIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY' FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVSION
File Number 12 5441
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
PAULINE SOLOMON.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of PAULINE SOLOMON,
deceased. File Number 82-5641.
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which is Dade County Court-
house, 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cation of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Personal Representative:
HAROLD SOLOMON
16 Durham Street
Nashua.
New Hampshire 03063
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
CYPENACYPEN
By:
MICHAELA.
DRIBIN, ESQ.
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
P.O Box 402098
Miami Beach. FL 33140
Telephone: (3051532-4721
18088 September 3, 10.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
CAL'S RESTAURANT at 6010
N.W. 22nd Avenue, Miami.
Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
NEALIE YOUNGBLOOD
GEORGE GILBERT
Attorney
One Lincoln Road Bldg.
Miami Beach. Florida 33139
18054 August 27;
September3,10,17, 1882
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
inder the fictitious name Nep
une Aots. at 6881 Carlvle Ave-
nue. Miami Beach, Florida in-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
SonlaZlelonka
Michael Zlelonka
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS SmSSL
GIVEN that the ItaSSSSJ
desiring to mmmEEX*
under the flcUUcV. .VmTH
Bernstein at 1901 rW*J
Leon, Coral Gables, FL li.l*
intends to register tsM iX*
with the Clerk of Bte cSSS
Court of Dade Count^VioHS"
by: Joel Bernstein pa
Septemberl 10.
17.24.i8S2
owners
September3.10;
17,24,1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA' IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 12 13005
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
NELLY VARGAS.
Wife.,
and
HUGO VARGAS.
Husband.
TO:HUGO VARGAS
Carre ra 30 No. 2244,
Apt. 512
Bogota, Colombia
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
P.A., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address is 2481 N.W. 7th
Street. Miami. Florida 33125,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 1st. 1882;
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 25 day of Au-
gust. 1882.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk .Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By V. Bark ley
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
ALBERTL
CARRICARTE. P.A.
2401 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33126
Attorney lor Petitioner
18078 September S, 10;
17. 24. 1882
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LA*
NOTICE IS herVU
GIVEN that the undent!
desiring to engage tnh"'^"1-
under the Sctttlou. ".'
g8e' East at 3383 NE ."?
North Miami Beach, iflfij
Intends to register said .
with the Clerk of' STdSi
Court of Dade CountrFlortd."
BageU East. Inc., Owner
1806O tMOrgl""UnPr"
SeptemberS.foTlSi
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name For
tune Exchange Club at io
Kane Concourse, Suite 202 Bay
Harbor Islands. Fl 33151 in
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Clrculi
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Bruce M. Singer,
Vice President
18056 Auguat27;
Septembers, 10. 17.1882
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NOPROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA IN
AND FOP DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
No. 83-13159
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
JOSE I. AYALA,
Petitioner,
and
MIGDALIA AYALA,
a-k-a
MIGDALIA TORRES
ACEVEDO.
Respondent
TO: MIGDALIA AYALA
MIGDALIA TORRES
ACEVEDO
Victor Rojas No 1
Calle B. No. 307
Areclbo.
Puerto Rico 00612
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that a Petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been files and commenred in
this Court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to it on CAR-
LOS M MSNDEZ, K.-.| Attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is 2985 W 4th Avenue.
Hialeah, Florida. 33011!. and file
the original with the Clerk ol
the styled Court on or before
October 1. 1882; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief prayed for In
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week, for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami,
Florida, on this 31 dav of Au-
gust 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
CARLOS M MENDEZ.
Law Offices
2985 W 4th Avenue
Hialeah. Florida 33012
Attorney for Petitioner
GUSTAVO GARCIA-
MONTES, ESQ
18085 September 3.10;
17, 24.19S2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA' IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.12-13143 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
The marriage of
DAVID A. CLARKE,
Petitioner-Husband,
and
GLORIA ELIZABETH
CLARKE.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: Gloria Elizabeth
Clarke
P. O. Box F2543
Cabot Drive
Freeport, Bahamas
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has bee"
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to it on
ARTHUR H. LIPSON. attorney
for Petitioner, whoseaddressu
1515 N.W. 167 St., Suite a.
Miami, Fla., and file the 0flS>
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Octo-
ber 1. 1982: otherwise a default
will be entered against you for
the relief demanded in u
complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and v*
seal of said court at W*f-
Florida on this SO day of ah-
^MOlARDP.BRINKBB
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Fiords
By M.J. Hartnett
Ad Deputy Clerk
(aMUrtOOUrt?Stemb.rS,lO:
TTSm


feWc Notice
I* NOTICE UNDER
eiCTITIOUS NAME LAW
, NOTICE IS HEREBY
frlVEN mat the undersigned.
1 wiring to engage In business
I Met the fictitious name of
IjSSp LIVELY SHOES AT
Ktfl'l Plaxa. 18819 Bls-
l^nV Blvd.. in the City of
Iwiml Florida. Intends to reg-
Vttr the ld name wtth ""
In'rt of the Circuit Court of
ImdeCounty, Florida.
I Dated at Miami. Florida, this
lll day of August, 1982.
'm NANKIN
SHOE STORE. INC.
By (s) Franklin J. Nankin
(s)Selma Nankin
(s) William S. Nankin
is) Edward K. Nankin
Owner's Names)
r,idric A. Hoffman
tllorney for Applicant
fcnlthi Mandler. P.A.
Jill Lincoln Road Mall.
1th Floor
fiuml Beach, FL 33139
August 27;
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. (2-12590
ACTION FOR ADOPTION
IIN RE:
IjOSEPH MARTIN
ISCHOENBAECHLER
Petitioner
land
Itimothy e. dwyer.
Respondent
): TIMOTHY E. DWYER
1275 Harrison
San Francisco,
California 94103
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Adoption has been
lied against you and you are
tqulred to serve a copy of your
vrltten defenses, if any, to It on
AX A. GOLDFARB, attorney
J Petitioner, whose address is
|9 West Flagler Street, Miami,
Florida, and file the original
vlth the clerk of the above
kyled court on or before Sep-
ember 24. 1982: otherwise a
efault will be entered against
ou for the relief demanded In
he complaint or petition
[ This notice shall be published
lice each week for four con-
eutlve weeks in THE JEW-
BH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
Ml of said court at Miami,
horlda on this 18 day of Au-
nt, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By C. Moore
As Deputy Clerk
Srcuit Court Seal)
AX A. GOLDFARB
(West Flagler Street
llami. Florida
ftomey for Petitioner
August 27;
September 3. 10, 17.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
. (NO PROPERTY)
IINTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
ITHE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO 82 12966 FC
ACTION FOR
ADOPTION
(Stepparent)
Jl THE MATTER OF THE
|JEROME
ADISON, Petitioner
LARRYDONNELL
COGDELL
co Roberta King
9101 N.W. 13th Court
Miami, FL 331BO
VOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
IED that an action for Adop-
pn has been filed against you
Id you are required to serve a
>y of your written defenses,
lany, to It on Sol Alexander
"lorney for Petitioner, whose
dress is 3121 Ponce De Leon
vd. Coral Cables, Florida,
Jd file the original with the
?rk of the above styled court
I or before October 1, 1982;
eerwlse a default will be
red against you for the
lief demanded in the com-
klnt or petition.
Tils notice shall be published
e each week for four con-
uuve weeks In THE JEW-
IFLORiDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
II of said court at Miami,
?rlda on this 25 August, 1982.
CHARDP BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByM.J.Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
cult Court Seal)
September 8.10;
t!)^TT1.0USNAMELAW
K? IS HEREBY
KL at ""> undersigned.
heV f."8"8*" ln business
fcP JSg&S name of
"ADA MUSIC CO. at 5840
pa Avenue, Suite 7B,
"I Beach, Florida SS140 in-
m"SSS"Z aald name
n,A.<21REARIX)N
"LD ROSEN. ESQ
hey for *
^REARDON
Wncoln Roa^
[ Beach, Florida, 83189
Septembers, 10;
IT. 34. 12982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 92-12024 FC 22
FAMILY CIVIL
DIVISION
NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
MIRIAM F. VDSL,
Petitioner.
and
ALEJANDRO VTJCL,
Respondent,
TO: Alejandro Vlel
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage haa
been filed and commenced ln
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on Henry
Leyte-Vldal, Esq., attorney for
Petitioner, whose address is
1401 West Flagler Street.
Miami, Florida 88185, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 24, 1982; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for ln the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks ln Jewish
Florldlan.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on this 23 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Henry Leyte-Vldal, Esq.
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami, FL 33136
Attorney for Petitioner
18073 August 27;
September 3, 10.17.1982
A
Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewish Floridian t-ge 21-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
VJIJF."VEN JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
____ No. 12-12347
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
JUAN MANUEL BURAYA.
Petitioner-husband
and
MARIA LUISA ONTIVE ROS
Respondent-wife
JO: MARIA LUISA ON-
TI VEROS
Nicaragua 3,
Madrid 16, Spain.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to on
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 2153 Coral Way,
Suite 400. Miami, Florida. USA.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 17,
1982: otherwise a default will
be entered aglnst you for the
relief demanded ln the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be publlsehd
once a week for four consecu-
tive weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 13th day of
August. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N.A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ, ES-
QUIRE
2153Coral Way. Suite 400
Miami, Florida 33146
305358-0444
Attorney for Petitioner
18048 August 20, 27
September 3, 10 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Pasta
Wholesalers No. III. Inc. d-b-a
Hagliaccl Restaurant at 1569
Sunset Di., Coral Gables, Fl
33143 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida
Pasta Wholesalers
No. III. Inc.
Rlcardo Ubaldo Sarina.
Pres.
18081 Septembers. 10;
17. 24. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA'IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. Ill 3007
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
GEORGINA TOMAS.
Wife
and
RAUL TOMAS,
Husband.
TO: RAULTOMAS
Residence
address unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
ALBERT L. CARRICARTE,
P.A., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 2491 N.W. 7th
Street, Miami, Florida 33125,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before October 1st, 1982;
otherwise a default will be en-
tered against you for the relief
demanded ln the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami,
Florida on this 26th day of Au-
gust, 1962.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By V. Barkley
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
ALBERT L.
CARRICARTE. P.A.
Attorney for the Wife
2491 N.W. 7th Street
Miami. Florida 33128
Telephone: (306)649-7917
18078 September 8,10;
10, 17, 24.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. (2-129 33
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
SALVADOR GARCIA.
Petitioner,
and
JOSEFINA CAMPO,
Respondent.
TO: JOSEFINA CAMPO
Calle Mayla Rodriguez
No. 687-Apt. 4
Vlbora, Havana, Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
MELVIN J. ASHER, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 1860 S.W. 8th Street.
Suite 206. Miami, Florida 33136,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 24.
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded ln the com
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 23 day of Au-
gust, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N. A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18067 August 27;
Septembers. 10.17, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned, '
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name 46TH
STREET LAUNDERMAT at
687 N.W. 46th Street, Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
WASH AND GAME, INC.,
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for
WASH AND GAME, INC.
19062 August 27,
September3, 10, 17, l92
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 92-12791 F.C.
FAMILY DIVISION
ACTION OF DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ALVING. WILSON,
AND
GEORGIA A. WILSON
TO: GEORGIA A. WILSON
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
MELVIN J. ASHER. ESQ.. at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address is 1860 S.W. 8th Street,
Suite 206, Miami, Florida 83186,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 24,
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded ln the com-
plaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of aald court at Miami.
Florida on this 19 day of Au-
gust, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By N. A. Hewett
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18061 Augusta?;
Septembers, 10.17,1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 92-1685
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
ALBERTA DILLARD
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of ALBERTA DILLARD.
deceased. File Number 82-1686,
Is pending ln the Circuit Court
for DADE County, Florida.
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 78 Flagler St..
Miami, Floriaa 33130 The
names and address of the per-
sonal representative and the
personal representative's at-
torney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 27,1982.
Personal Representative:
BrendaY.DUlard
3158 N.W. 60th Street
Miami, Florida 83142
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
LEO PLOTKIN, P.A.
8603 South Dixie Highway.
Suite 308
Miami, Fla.
Telephone: (806)661-6066
18065 August 27;
September 3.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
FILE NO. 12-5412
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SOPHIE ZOOTA.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
SAID ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of SOPHIE
ZOOTA. deceased, late of Dade
County, Florida, File Number
82-5412 is pending ln the Circuit
Court ln and for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is 3rd Floor,
Dade County Courthouse, 78
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 33130. The personal
representative of this estate Is
Sol Zoota, whose address la
1076 Miami Gardens Drive, No.
609, North Miami Beach. Flor-
ida 33179.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be ln
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim Is
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim la contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persona Interested ln the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
. DATED at Miami. Florida on
! this 29th day of July, 1982.
Sol Zoota
Aa Personal Representative
of the Estate of
SOPHIE ZOOTA
Deceased
First publication of this notice
of administration on the 27 day
of August. 1982.
ALAN JAY LEWIS, Esquire
Of Law Offices of
FROMBERG. FROMBERO,
ROTH, GROSS, COHEN,
SHORE A BERKE, P.A.
Suite No. 800,
2600 E. Hallandale
Beach Blvd.
I Hallandale, Florida 83009
!Telephone: (806)940-0709
Attorney For Personal
Representative
18066 August 27;
Septembers, 1982
i !' i
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITIN ANDFOR
DAE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 92 127*1
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
QUEEN E. STEWART
Petitioner
and
LOUIS E.STEWART
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: LOUIS E. STEWART
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, on
ROBERT M. ZIEJA. ESQ.. At-
torney for Petitioner. 633 N E
167 St.. N.M.B., Fl 33162 on or
before September 24, 1982, and
file the original with the clerk
of this court; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you.
Dated: August23. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk
by C. Moore
As Deputy Clerk
18068 August 27;
________Septembers. 10.17.1882
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 92-6619
Division 94
IN RE: ESTATE OF
CHRISTOPHERE. GIBBS
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the administration
of the estate of Christopher E.
Glbbs, deceased. FUe Number
82-6619. Is pending ln the Cir-
cuit Court for Dade County,
Florida, Probate Division, the
address of which Is 73 West
Flagler Street. Miami. Florida.
The personal representative of
the estate Is Dolores James
Glbbs. whose address Is 2766
S.W. 22nd Ave., mlaml, Florida
33133. The name and address of
the personal representative's
attorney are set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to file
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be ln
writing and must indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons interested ln the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration haa
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS,
AND OBJECTIONS NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion: Augusts?, 1982.
DOLORES JAMES GIBBS
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Christopher E. Glbbs
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE:
Keith W. Saks
2701 S.W. LeJeune Road
No. 401
Coral Gables. Florida 83184
Telephone: 446-3911
18064 August 27;
_______________Septembers, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
. GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage ln business
under the fictitious name of
NANKIN'S at Midway Mall,
l 78S3 W. Flagler St.. ln the City
j of Miami, Florida, Intends to
l register the said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dated at Miami, Florida, this
19th day of August, 1982.
NANKIN
SHOE STORE, INC.
By: (s) Franklin J. Nankin
(a) Selma Nankin
(s) William S. Nankin
(s) Edward K. Nankin
(Owner's Names)
Fredric A. Hoffman
Attorney for Applicant
Smith A Mandler. P.A.
1111 Lincoln Road Mall
8th Floor
Miami Beach, PL 33199
lMOSO August 27;
September 9,10.17,1989
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, Fl ORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 9? 5790
Division o
IN RE: ESTATE O
JENNY MARSCt: \K,
Deceased
NOTICE Or
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of JENNY MAKSCHAK.
deceased, File Numner 82-6790,
Is pending ln the Circuit Court
for Dade Count > Florida,
Probate Division, the address
of which Is 73 Wei Flagler
Street. Miami. Florida 33130
The names and h 'esses of
the personal representative
and the personal representa-
tive's attorney an set forth
below.
All Interested per ns are re
SHired to file with 'nls court,
'ITHIN THREE MONTHSOF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection 1>> an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, tne qualifi-
cation of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AM OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARKED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 27, -82
Personal Representative:
HENRY NORTON
Suite 1201
19 West Flagler street
Miami, Floridn 13130
Attorney for Personii i
Representative:
HENRY NORTON, KSQUIRE
1201 Blscayne Bulldi"g
19 West Flagler Str
Miami, Florida 3313u
Telephone: 374-31H
18069 August 27;
_______________Septei ->erS, 1982
NOTICE OF ACT (ON
CONSTRUCTIVE SFRVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 92-12271' 09
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
NATALIA CALO de CURDI
PETITIONER
and
JORGE DANIEL CURDI
TO: JORGE DANIEI
CURDI
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HERF.ilY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you an i you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If a-'y. to it on
DEL-VALLE LAW OFFICES.
P.A.. ATTORNEY 1 OR Peti-
tioner, whose addn Is I960
Southwest 27th Avenue. Second
Floor, Miami, Florida 38146,
and file the origin/, with the
clerk of the above stvied court
on or before September 24,
1982; otherwise a d*iault will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded ln the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week foi tour con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 24 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida.
By A. Mlngi.
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DEL-VALLE LAW
OFFICES, P.A.
1960 Southwest 27th Ave.
Second Floor
Miami, Florida 3314.'
M. CHRISTINA
DEL-VALLE, ESQ.
Attorney for Petitioner
18074 August27;
Septembers, 10,17,1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO. 92-12898
NOTICE OF ACTION
IN RE: THE ADOPTION OF
a minor child,
By; JAME8 AHNdi..
QUILL IAN.
Petitioner and
Stepparent.
TO: LARRY FRANKLIN
WALDORFF
Residence Unknown
NOTICE: A Petition ior Adop-
tion has been filed naming you
aa the natural father of the
minor child. You are required
to serve a copy of your objec-
tions, if any. on LIEHF.RMAN
A BENJAMIN, attorneys for
Petitioner, at 8900 S.W. 107th
Avenue, Suite 208, Miami, FL
SS176, on or before September
24, 1982. The original in to be
filed with the Clerk of this
Court either before service on
Petitioner's attorney or imme-
diately thereafter; otherwise a
Final Judgment of Adoption
may be entered without your
consent.
DATED, In Miami. Florida,
on August 24, 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
CLERK
of the Circuit Court
BY: C.Moore
Deputy Cleri
18072 August 27;
Septembers, 10,17,1982



_--I


Page 22-B The Jewish Floridian. Friday, September 3,1961
J
Public Notice
NOTICE O. ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 2-1227*
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
MANUEL ALVAREZ
PETITIONER
and
LUZ MARIA
SUAREZ-FIGUEROA
RESPONDENT
TO: MARIA
SUAREZ-FIGUEROA
Edif Iclo 13 Apt. SOD
Habana Del Bate,
Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dtaao-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
DELVALLE LAW OFFICES,
P.A.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 1BB0 South-
west 27th Avenue, Seconc
Floor, Miami, Florida 83146.
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 17,
1982: otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW i
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and th<
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 12 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown;
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DEL-VALLE
LAW OFFICES, P.A.
1960 Southwest 27th Ava.,'
Second Floor
Miami. Florida 33146
Telephone: (806)446-0272
M. CHRISTINA
DEL-VALLE. ESQ..
Attorney for Petitioner
18043 August 20. 27;
Septembers, 10,19821
TO:
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 2-12222 FC
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
GERALD RICHARD.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
FLORA A. RICHARD.
Respondent-Wife
FLORA RICHARD
Rue Government
No. 33
Bourgne, Haiti
NOTICE OF 1
PUBLICATION ,
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe-
tition on petitioner's attorney,
GEORGE T. RAMAN I. ESQ.,
Suite 711, Blscayne Building, IB
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130 and file the Origi-
nal Answer or Pleading In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 17 day of
September. 1982. If you fall to
do so. Judgment by default will
be taken against you for the
relief demanded In said peti-
tion.
DONE AND ORDERED ati
Miami, Dade County, Florida,
this 11 day of August. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk i
Dade County. Florida
BY: M. J.Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
18041 August 20. 27 L
__________Septembcr3.10.182
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF h
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION 1
NO. 12-12117 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The marriage of
REX ATWLLL.
Petitioner-Husband,
and*
SUSAN ATWILL.
Respondent-Wife. |
TO: Susan A twill
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you arel
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to Won
ARTHUR H. LIPSON. attorney:
for Petitioner, whose address la
1616 N.W. 167 SL. Suite 216.
Miami, Fla., and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Sep-
tember 10. 1982; otherwise al
default w111 be entered against |
you for the relief demanded lr
the complaint or petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 11 day of Au-
gust. 1982. I
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clark. Circuit Court
Dads County, Florida
By M. J.Hartnett
Aa Deputy Clerk
18068 August 13. 20,27;
___________ Septembers, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION'
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 2-122a
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE ,
IN RE: THE MARRIAGEOtf:
HERLINDO A. AQUINO. .
Petitioner,
and
MANCELLY ,
ORELLANA AQUINO.
Respondent
TO: Mancelly
Orellana Aquino
llCalle. 8AAvenlda
Barrio Las Palpas.
Puerto Barrios
Guatemala, Guatemala
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on R A
DEL PINO, attorney for
Petitioner, whose address la
1401 Weat Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 33136, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 17, 1982; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 12 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
R. A. del Pino, Esq..
1401 West Flagler St.,
Miami, Florida 33136
Attorney for Petitioner
18044 August 20i''2T;!
Septembers, 10. XU3
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 62-12277
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
OMAR CONCEPCION
Petitioner
and
CONCEPCION BENITEZ
Respondent
TO: CONCEPCION
BENITEZ
Residence Is unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you arel
required to serve a copy of your i
written defenses, If any, to It on
M. CrlsUna Del-Valle. attorney |
for Petitioner, whose address Is |
1960 Southwest 27th Avenue, I
Miami, Florida 33146, and file
the original with the Clark of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 17, 1982; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or pe-
tition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the i
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 12 day* of
August, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
A s Cle rk, Circuit Court i
Dade County, Florida
(Circuit Court Seal)
DEL-VALLE
LAW OFFICES, P.A.
I960 Southwest 27th Ave..
Miami. Florida 33146
Telephone: (305)446-0272
Attorney for Petitioner
18042 August 20.27; '
_________September 3.10.1982
INTHE CIRCUIT
THE ELEVENTH
CIRCUIT IN A
DADE COUNTY.
CASE NO. 2 12053 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
LAISSENA JEAN LOUIS,
Petltloner-WLfe
and
DIEUVENT JEAN LOUIS,
Respondent-Husband
To: DIEUVENT JEAN
LOUIS.
Martlssant 21 No. 28
Port-au-Prince.
Haiti
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU, DIEUVENT JEAN
LOUIS, Reapondent-Huaband,
are hereby notified to serve a
copy of your Answer to the Pe-
tition For Dissolution of Mar-
riage filed against you, upon
Lalssena Jean Louis' attorney,
GEORGE NICHOLAS, ES-
QUIRE, 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida S31S6, and file
original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before September
10, 1982; otherwise the Petition
will be confessed by you.
DATED this 10 day of
August. 1983.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
CLERK
By: M J.Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
18036 August 13. 20, 27;
September 3, 1982
NOTICE UNDER >
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 18 HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In busuieaB
under the fictitious name of
Step Lightly Shoes at Loeh-
mann'a Plaia, 18819 Blacayne
Blvd.. In the City of Miami.
Florida, lntenda to register the
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
Dated at Miami. Florida, this
19th day of August, 1982.
NANKIN
SHOE STORE. INC.
By: (s) Franklin J. Nankin
(a) Selma Nankin
(slWllllamaS. Nur.kln
(a) Edward K. Nankin
(Owner's Names I
Fredric A. Hoffman
Attorney for Applicant
Smith A Mandler, P.A.
1111 Lincoln Road Mall,
8th Floor
Miami Beach, FL3S1S9
180S9 August 27;
Septembers. 10.17.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
'Berol Fabrics'' at 3388 NW 7
St.. Miami, Fl S3126 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Berol Originals. Inc.,
Owner
Bernabe Ramirez, President
18067 August 27;
Septembers. 10,17,1982
NOTigfUN^'-R
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name 46TH
STREET RECREATION at693
N.W. 46th Street, Miami, Flor
Ida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit of Dade County, Florida.
WASH AND GAME, INC.
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for
WASH AND GAME, INC.
18063 August 27;
September 3, 10, 17 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 82-12*13
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION!
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
HERIBERTO HEVIA,
Petitioner-Husband
and
XIOMARA ABAD,
Respondent Wife
TO: XIOMARA ABAD
Calzado del CerroNo. 1603
La Habana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlasol-i
utlon of Marriage has been!
filled against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your'
written defenses. If an/, to It on
A. KOSS. ESQ. attorney for,
Petitioner, whose address Is
101 N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami
Florida 33128, and file the ori-
ginal with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 17, 1982; otherwise!
a default will be entered '
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once week for four consecutive
weeks In THE JEWISH ,
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the I
seal of said court of Miami, |
Florida on this 16 day of i
August. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER '
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: N.A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
A. KOSS. ATTORNEY AT
LAW. P.A.
Attorneys for Petitioner
Husband
101 N.W. 12th. Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33128
Telephone: (306)326-8844
Attorney for Petitioner
(Publish) A. Koss
August 20, 27
LaVJaUIMi
NOTICE OF ACTION /)
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY) i\>
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT Of
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COU NTV i
CIVILACTION
NO. 2-122*3
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION ,
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ELIEELMALEH.
and
REBECCA ELMALEH.
TO: REBECCA ELMALEH
131 Ml Morrison St..
Sherman Oaks,
California f ..
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlssor
lutlon of Marriage has bean'
filed against you and you are
required to serve a) copy of your
written defenses, If any, to ltlbn
Cypen A Cypen. attorney'
for Pet It lonei, whose addresf Is I
826 Arthur Godfrey Road.
Miami Beach, Florida 38140, ,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 17, i
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded in the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks in THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Mi..mi,
Florida on this 12 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByC. P.Copeland
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
Wayne A. Cypen. Esq.
Cypen A Cypen
826 A rthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
Telephone: (306)632-4721
Attorney for Petitioner
18046 August 20. 37;
__________Septembers, 10. I9f
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name PIP-
IAN Cafeteria at 3101 E. 4 Ave-
nue. HIALEAH. Florida In-
tends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
Eladlo Hernandez
CARLOS M. MENDEZ, Esq.
Attorney for
ELADIO HERNANDEZ
2985 W. 4 Ave..
HIALEAH. Florida
18046 August 20. 27;
September3.10. 1982
M
---------NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name of
SOMETHING EXTRA AT
RIVE GAUCHE at 1968 N.E.
133rd St. North Miami. Florida
33181 Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
PAULS. BERGER. ESQ.
Attorney for
THE EMOTIONAL
OUTLET, INC.
44 Weat Flagler St.
Miami. Fi. 33130
(800) 874-4386
The Emotional
Outlet, Inc.
Judith Rosen
President
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 0-4391
NOTICE OF
COMPLAINT
IN RE:
ARTHUR HIGHTOWER
Plaintiff.
and
OLA MAE WILLIAMS, et al..
Defendants.
TO: OLA MAE WILLIAMS
526 Foster Road
Hallandale, Florida
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-'
FIED that a NOTICE OF COM-
PLAINT has been filed and
commenced In this court and
you are required to serve a
copy of your written defenses.
If any, to it on R. A. DEL PINO.
ESQ., attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 1401 Weat
Flagler Street. Miami, Florida
Suite 301. 33136. and file the
original with the clerk of the
above atyled court on or before
September 34, 1983; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for in the complaint or
petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the Jewish
Flortdlan.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 34 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By A. Mlnguez
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
R. A. DEL PINO. ESQ.
1401 West Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33186
Attorney for Petitioner
18070 AutTuat27;
Septembers, 10,17,1982
18062
Aug. 20.27;
_S!Pt3,10.19S2:
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW-
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Joint
Venture Productions, Inc., db-
aClty View Records at P. O.
BOX 6486 Hlaleah. Fla. 88014
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Oscar J. LLord.
President
Joint Venture
Productions. Inc.
Agent for
City View Records
Maria LLord
18075 <. August 27;
Septembers, 10,17,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
PROPERTY
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-4634 FC 12
IN RE:
THE MARRIAGE OF,
EUNICE MAY
RODRIGUEZ,
Petitioner-Wife,
and
OSCAR RODRIGUEZ.
Respondent-Husband.
NOTICE OF ACTION
WITH DESCRIPTION OF
REAL PROPERTY
PROCEEDED AGAINST
TO: OSCAR RODRIGUEZ
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution has
been filed against you and a
prayer contained within the
Petition requests the Court to
award that certain property
owned by you and your wife
EUNICE MAY RODRIGUEZ,
as tenants by the entireties,
located at: 2401 N.W. 93rd
Street. Miami, Florida, and
more particularly described
aa:
Lot 9 In Block 6 of GULF AIR
ESTATES, according to the
Plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 40. Page 11 of the Public '
Records of Dade County. Flor-
ida.
to your wife. EUNICE MAY
RODRIGUEZ as lump sum ali-
mony, and you are required to
serve a copy of your Response
or Pleading on RONALD
HABER. petitioner's attorney,
whose address is: 1S63 N.W.
16th Street. Miami, Florida, on
or before September 17. 1982. If
you fall to do so, Judgment by
default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition.
This notice shall be published
once a week for four (4) con-
secutive weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
Dated this 6 day of August,
1982, at Miami, Dade County.
Florida.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K. Selfrled
Aa Deputy Clerk
RONALD HABER, Esq.
Attorney for Petitioner
1363 N.W. 16th Street
Miami, Florida 33136
Telephone: (305)324-8060
18037 August 13, 30, 27;
September 3, 1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name TOL-
DEN ASSOCIATES at 130 S.W.
36 Ave.. Miami. Florida 33135
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
HUGH TOLDEN. Owner
MYLESG. CYPEN. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
CYPEN* CYPEN
836 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach, Florida 33140
10004 August 13, 30, 37;
September3,1983
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(WITH PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 2-7154(01)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
ADA MAVIS BLANDIN
Wife,
and
RAFAELMANUAL
BLANDIN,
Husband.
TO: RAFAELMANUAL
BLANDIN
Calle San Gabriel
Qulnta. La Ve
gutia La Florida
Caracas. Venezuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any, to It on
STANLEY M. NEWMARK, at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 9400 South Dadeland
Boulevard. Suite 300. Miami,
Florida 33166. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Sep-
tember 17. 1982; otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
aecutlve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 10 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clark, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K. Self rled
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
STANLEY M. NEWMARK.
Eaq.
9400 South Dadeland Blvd.
Suite 300
Miami. Florida 38168
Attorney for Petitioner
18036 August IS. 30.37;
September S. 1983
con?tTr'u^v*S'on I
(NOPROPEBTv,V,Cl
NO. 2-1 Mm
FAMILY DlVltifu. i
NOTICE FOR DIUqluI
ofmarrTaoVH
RE:THEMARRUcrJ
HKRUNTOA.AQlmS.*
Petitioner, AS|lJ1N0, '
and
MANCELLY OREm.,,,
AQUINO, U!'U-ANA
Respondent
TO:ManceUyOreU*n.
Aquino
llc*u.8AAvenldt
Barrio Las Palps.
Puerto Barrios
Guatemala, Cusw.,.
YOU ARE HEREBY S
FIED that a petition lorn,,
luUon of your MarrUiTi*l
been filed and eonaZsja.
Uus court and you are SJJ
to serve a copy of your .39
defenses, If any. toltogRTl
DEL PINO, attorney Z ail
tloner. whose address i, ,21
Weat Flagler Street m9
Florida S31S6. and file uW,
nal with the clerk of thVthil
styled court on or before oil
r*r 1 182; other*!*?**!!
will be entered again* Ja
the relief prayed for in Zi
complaint or petition. J
Thla notice shall be Ma.
once each week for four <
secutlve weeks In JEWli
FLORIDIAN. "
WITNESS my hand m I
seal of said court at Ills
Florida on this 26 day 1,
gust, 1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
ByA.Mlnguei
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
R. A. del Pino. Eaq.
1401 Weat Flagler Street
Miami, Florida 33135
Attorney for Petitioner
18071 AuguitrJ
Septembers, 10,17,1
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIU.
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA,III
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 62-12081 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
ALIXSIMI!.!!. \
JOHNSON.
Petitioner-Wife
and
LEE JOHNSON.
Respondent-Husband
TO: LEE JOHNSON
84 Ferry Road
Old Saybrook.
Conn. 06475
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for DUs>
lutlon of your Marriage Ui
been filed and commenced a
thla court and you are require!
to serve a copy of your wrilta
defenses, if any. to It a
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN, EJft.
attorney for Petltoner, whoa
address is Suite 615, 7800 M
2nd Avenue. Miami, FL 3318,
and file the original with Ik)
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September It,
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief prayed for in the coj
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be pub
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and IN
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 10 day of A
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
Aa Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By M. J.Hartnett
Aa Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN. Eaq
Suite 616,
7900 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami. FL 33138
Attorney for Petitioner '
18039 August 13,30,27;
September 3,1882
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersized,
desiring to engage in buslne-
under the fictitious^name *
sica Jordan and "Best LUUe
Black Book in Florida alFO
Box 403098. Miami Beach, FL
SS140 intends to ljj Jg
name with the Clerk of Uiewr
cult Court of Dade County.
Florida. __ __
Toby LebowlU. Own"
10003 August^
_______Septa rmberj^
NOTICE UNDER ,
FICTITIOUS NAME IA*T
amerlcan Motor Corp
N.W. 96 St.. Miami. >'"g
3S166 lntenda tores-lswr
name with the; Clerk of W
cult Court of Dade low
"^.UnaRcdrlr-x
September MO.!""


Community Corner
Tj,e Miami Ileostomy and Colostomy Association will hold
heir meeting on Sunday, Sept. 12 at 2 p.m. at Mount Sinai
itedical Center's employee cafeteria. There will be a discussion
tnostomies.
Guy J. Greenwald, son of Mr. and Mra. William M.
h-enwald of Miami, recently completed a U.S. Air Force ROTC
Md training encampment at Plattsburgh Air Force Base, N. Y.
Army Pvt. Robert D. Levison, son of Katie L. Levison-
Pennington of Miami, has completed basic training at Fort
onard Wood, Mo.
The Barbara Gillman Gallery presents an exhibition of
aintings. sculptures and drawings by Florida artist Kenneth
SSha The opening reception to meet the artist will be held
aturday. Sept. 11 from 7 p.m. until 10 p.m.

Synagogue Cemetery Board
Admits Price Fixing
Vancouver 1 pricing practices for funerals
[Vancouver synagogue, which
ortedly has a monopoly on
rish funerals in Vancouver,
come under provincial in-
Jtigation, according to a
lalogy professor at the Uni-
fcity of British Columbia.
of. Werner Cohn said, in a
hii:.um to Michael Hanson,
ctor of Trade Practices in
oria, the provincial capital,
immediately upon bereave-
a Jewish widow in Van-
ver must sign an "uncon-
Inable" contract to get a
pral for her husband,
)HN SAID the contract ob-
tes the signer to pay
Itever charge the cemetery
Vd of Schara Tzedeck decides
after the funeral has taken
le. The bereaved person, on
ling, knows only that there is
naximum charge of $7,500.
In said that the practice
Runted to a requirement to
i a blank check. Cohn said his
^plaint invoked the Trade
ptices Act under which
lison can investigate and force
nges in consumer transac-
ted Diamond, chairman of the
(etery board for the past 42
, told ihe Vancouver "Sun'
th- complaint was factually
j-ct but contended that "our
fcrnej^spuill and we have a lot
MONUMENTS INC.
*n Ewy Day Clostd Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888

ie
d

**


A-0^
of upkeep" in maintaining the
cemetery.
Cohn said there are about 75
Jewish funerals a year in Van-
couver. Under Jewish religious
law, the body must be washed
ritually by the Chevra Kadisha
and two of its members sit with
the body until the time of the
funeral. They are paid fees,
Diamond said. Diamond said no
person has ever been charged the
maximum $7,500. He said the
average cost in 1981 was $2,600.
He said the highest fee was
$5,000. He said when a poor Jew
died, there was no charge and
that when a rich Jew died, the
charge was a little higher than
the average.
THE BOARD'S decision to re-
quire an approved contract de-
veloped from loss by the
synagogue of a civil action in
1952 when the Royal Trust Co.
protested a $3,000 funeral charge
to the estate of a Jennie
Mclntyre, Diamond said.
It was argued at the trial which
followed that Mrs. Mclntyre,
who had been born Jewish, had
not led a particularly Jewish life.
Diamond said the estate was ac-
cordingly billed extra for her
funeral. The courts ruled that, in
the absence of a contract, the
charges were excessive and re
duced the fee to $400
The congregation then drew up
a contract form, which provides
that a fee cannot be more than
$7,500 but sets no minimum,
Cohen said

:
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
Tel 261-7612
APPLEBAUM
Arln Stscey of Miami passed away Au-
gust 26. Arln waa a second grade student
at Plnecreat Elementary School, a Girl
Scout Brownie, a member of Beth David
Synagogue and a life member of Hadas-
sah. She Is survived by her parents, Ray
and Fredrlca Applebaum; brother,
Alan; paternal grandmother. Bessie
Applebaum; maternal grandparents
Maurice and Phyllis Blelch; aunt and
uncle, Myron and Lana Applebaum;
cousins, Bart, Bart and Martin Apple-
baum. Graveside services and Inter-
ment held August 26 at Mt. Nebo Ceme-
tery. Arrangements by Gordon Funeral
Home.
ARNOLD, Rena, 83. Bay Harbor, Sep-
tember l. Riverside.
GOLDSTEIN, William. North Miami
Beach. AugustSO. Levltt-Weinsteln
JOSEPHER. Herman, North Miami
Beach, August 31, Levitt Welnsteln
PERLIK. Evelyn Fox, 92, Miami
Beach. September 1. Riverside
ROSENBERG. Irving, 77, Miami
August 31, Gordon.
STEPENOFF. Louis. 67, North Miami
Beach, September l, LevlttWeln-
stein.
BIEDERMAN, Marilyn. 51. North
Miami, September 2, Levltt-Wein-
steln.
DIAMOND. Joseph. 89, Miami Beach.
September 2. Levitt-Welnsteln.
LINDEN, Steven Mark, 20, Miami, Sep-
tember l, Riverside.
PR1TIKIN, Louis L., 92. September 1,
Riverside.
KOPP, Frieda A., Miami. Riverside.
KRIEGER, Max, North Miami Beach,
Blasberg.
WAGMAN, Joseph. Miami Beach, Au-
gust 26, Hiihln 7.1 Ihert
BARKAN, Abraham, August 26, River-
side ,
GOLDBERG, Rose, Miami Beach, Au-
gust 27, Rubln-Zllbert.
HOFFMAN, Rose, Miami Beach, Au-
gust 27, Blasberg.
KRAVETZ. Anne, 72. Miami. Riverside.
REGENSTREIF, Abraham, Miami
Beach, August 27, Blasberg.
STARK, Martin. Miami Beach, Blas-
berg.
TECOT, LotUe. 77. Key Blscayne,
Gordon.
ASKOWITZ, Rosella, Miami. August 29
Riverside, Mt. Nebo.
FINKELSTEIN. David, Miami Beach,
August 29, Rubln-Zllbert.
PANKEN, Isldor, 89. North Miami. Au-
gust 29, Levltt-Weinsteln.
PEARLMAN, Dr. Reuben H., Miami,
August 27, Riverside.
CITY MEMORIAL AND
MONUMENT. Inc.
7610 N E 2nd Avenue
Miami Florida 33138
EVELYNSARASOHN
Oltice 759 1669
Res 4326b15
Would you like
another Jewish
funeral home
in your area?
Suggest locations.
Employment opportunities.
Call or write.
Slant $ros Jnc.
Funeral Home
Forbes and Craft Avenues
Pittsburgh. PA 15213
TV 412 682-4000
ktfc Alan M. Blank
President and Supervisor
Three Generations of
Distinctive Service
Friday, September 3,1982. The Jewish Floridian Page 23-B
Obituaries
PRASCHNIK
Julia S.. 81. of Miami Beach, passed
away on Sunday. She is survived by her
brother, Herman, and sister. Francis, of
New York. Services were held at River
side Memorial Chapel. 1930 Alton Rd ,
on Wednesday, Sept. 1. Rabbi David
R*ab officiated.
PERLIK
Ethel Fox Perllk, 93. of Miami Beach.
She was a native of New York City and
had been a resident of South Florida
since 1944. She was a co-founder of the
Hadassah Group in Brooklyn. N.Y. She
is survived by her children. Dr. Sidney
and Florence Fox. Evelyn and Fred
Manset, Stanley and Harriet Fox, her
9on-lnlaw, Ralph and June; sister,
Bess; 21 grandchildren, 13 great-grand-
children and six great great grandchil
dren. Services were held Sept. 1 at Riv-
erside Chapel with Interment at Mt.
Sinai Cemetery.
PALLOT
Gertrude I)., died on August 80. 1982
She was Chairman Emeritus of the
Board of Directors of Norton Tire Co.
and a pioneer Mlamlan, moving to
Miami with her husband. Louis. In 1934.
She waa a member of Temple Beth
Shalom. Greater Miami Jewlah Federa-
tion. American Technion Society, Had-
assah and Douglas Gardens Women's
Auxiliary. Survivors Include her chil-
dren. Norton Pallot (Gloria), S. Ronald
Pallot (Gloria), Barbara Pallot Katsen
(Howard); eight grandchildren, Steven.
Ann Laurie. John, Stephanie, Jayne,
Lynn. Bruce and David; three great-
grandchildren. Lisa Beth. Michael and
David Gregory; two sisters, Ann Cantor
and Dora Perlman, and a brother, Abe
Safft. Funeral services were held Sep-
tember 1. at Blasberg Chapel, 72071 St.,
Miami Beach, with Interment at Mt
Nebo Cemetery. Contributions In her
memory may be made to the Greater
Miami Jewish Federation.
Broward County's oldest, largest and most
reliable is now Dade County's newest and
most beautiful with the largest Jewish staff
at 209th Street on Biscayne Boulevard.
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada
and ail South Florida cemeteries from chapels
in North Miami Beach, Sunrise, Deerfield Beach
and Margate.

U'rimny .'#*,/*// 'f,.nt,n>u/y Mine* /S9&
ORTHODOXREFORMCONSERVATIVE
IKE GORDON, F.D.-JAMES B. GORDON, F.D.
HARVEY GORDON, F.D.
famil y o wned a opera ted 858-5566
MO SW 13 AM
When a loss occurs
away from home.
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
18840 West Dixie Hwy
Represented by a, Levitt, r.U.
New York: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76th Rd.. Forest Hills, N.Y
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Rd.
RUBIN-ZILBERT
MEMORIAL
CHAPEL x
Murray Rubin, F.D.
Three Generations of our
Family Serving You in
Dade The omy Broward
Miami Beach Guaranteed Hallandale
1701 Alton Road Pre-Arrangements 1 & D'*'e Hwy.
538-6371 No Money In Advance 456-4011


'^r,^^^,<^i'itS^^
-*
u------nn t
NORTON
SINCE 1924
TIRE CO.
.v. ,.
.3 k
SAFETY
SERVICE
CENTER
.
YA J
SO. FLORIDIANS
iLFGoodrich

/
LIFESAVER XLM
STEEL
BELTED
SEE
P155/80R13
.*
*
7,
P165/80R13
P175/80R13
n
P185/80R13

P195/70R13
P205/70R13
P205/70R14
P175/75R14
P185/75R14
"S^M
PRICE IF.E.X
49.19
51.18
53.05
54.45
55.50
57.15
62.17
51.88
57.15
1.53
1.69
1.78
1.92
1.98
2.14
2.23
1.83
2.04
RUM
0 .eiurn
1 *IM*'2 vou< TZU comme-cai vm
EIFGoodrich
BELTED CLM
P-METRIC POLYESTER CORD, GLASS BELTS
P155/80B12
*v ^j&Z&tt*~ % P165/80B13
P155/80B13
P175/80B13
ot pu-cwse aj d Mia,ds **
EXPERIENCE & INTEGRITY
Since 1924 Norton Ttre Co. has offered quality
brands, competitive pricing, last & efficient service.
T/A high tech specialist store managers, certified
mechanics, personal integrity plus guaranteed
satisfaction. You pay no extra for our service and
experience
P185/ 80613
P175/75B14
P185/75814
P195/75B14
P205/75B14
P215/75B14
31.49
31.97
33.81
35.75
37.93
38.79
39.88
41.82
42.92
P225/75B14
P155/80B15
P165/80B15
P205/75B15
P215/75B15
P225/75B15
FOR FOREIGN ft MOST DOMESTIC
SMALL ft INTERMEDIATE CARS
SIZE
155SR12
PRICE
155SR13
165SR13
175SR13
29.98
32.55
35,62.
37.36
[165SR14 I 38.25
|175SR14 I 39.54
[185SR14 ,42.86
155SR15
165SR15
36.04
39.46
F.E.T
1.53
1.61
1.80
2.02
1.85
2.04
2.28
1.82
1.98
P235/75B15
44.25
46.57
35.75
37.44
44.14
45.60
47.78
50.10
LESTHa
ASK ABOUT OUR FREE 8 POINT SAFETY CHECK-UP
DISC BRAKE
SPECIAL
Install new disc pads
Resurface rotors Install
new seals Repack bearings
Check calipers Check system Inspect
master cylinder Add fluid as required
Adjust and bleed as required Check and
adjust rear brakes Road test
F.E.T.
1.49
1.44
1.50
1.63
1.69
1.70
1.79
1.95
2.07
2.20
2.35
1.68
1.83
2.15
2.34
2.46
2.65
SIZE
P195/75R14
P205/75R14
P215/75R14
P225/75R14
P195/75R15
P205/75R15
PRICE
62.17
64.85
66.01
70.58
65.20
67.42
P215/75R15
P225/75R15
P235/75R15
69.99
72.56
77.83
FLORIDA
HEADQUARTERS
FORALLBFG
FE.XI
2.18
2.34
2.48
2.68
2.33
2.47
2.59
2.78
3.01
%j mw. i&W
HIGH TECH"
RADIALS
50,60 & 70 SERIES WIDE
and the new T/A COMP
CERTIRED MECHANICS Most of our me-
chanics have been TESTED and CERTIFIED by
the National Institute for Service Excellence. They
are available at any of our stores listed below with
a star (*).
FOR MOST
AMERICAN A
FOREIGN CARS
GET OUR
PRICE ON
DRUM BRAKES
30,000 MILE GUARANTEE
OIL CHANGE, FILTER
AND LUBE \
UP TO 5 QTS. OF PREMIUM \
OIL NEW OIL FILTER COM-1
PLETE LUBE
FOR
MOST
U.S. PAS-
SENGER
CARS*
LKUfT
TRUCKS
ENGINEERED FOR SMALLER CARS"
. BULK
tuff"
*o
WE SERVICE NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
DADE: Export/Wholesale
1666 N.W. 82 /We. 593-7040
NORTON
TIRE C
CORAL GABLES HIALEAH/PALM SPRINGS MILE
lird & Douglas Road 446-8101 1275 49th St 822-2500
* NORTH MIAMI t MIAMI AIRPORT
13360 N.W 7th Ave 681-8541 N.W. 25 St & Milam Dairy Rd 593-1191
SAHTT
anna
We honor MASTER CARD VISA
AMERICAN EXPRESS.
DINERS'.US
* N. MIAMI BEACH
17O0 N E 163rd St. 945-7454
? MIAMI BEACH
1454 Alton Road 672-5353
* SOUTH DADE
9001 S Dixie Hwy 667-7575
CUTLER RIDGE
20390 S Dixie Hwy. 233-5241
T PT. LAUOERDALE
1740 E Sunrise Blvd 463-7588
PLANTATION
381 N State Rd 7 587-2186
TAMARAC
LAKE PARK/N. PALM BEAO
532 N Lake Blvd 848-2544
t DEERFIELD BEACH
2265 W HHIsboro Blvd 427-6
+ FT. PIERCE
* WEST MIAMI
..fM^nB^U5^5* 441 & W Commercial Blvd 735-2772 2604 South 4th St 464-8020
KENDALL DR./HIGATE SOUARE t TAMARAC t VERO BEACH
17-0128 N Unrvers.ty Dr at McNab Rd 721-4700 755 21st Street 567-1174
* HOMESTEAD
30100 S Federal Hwy 247-1622
* POMPANO BEACH
3151 N Federal Hwy. 943-4200
T W. HOLLYWOOD WEST PALM BEACH
497 S State Rd 7 987-0450 515 South Dixie 832-3044
t DAVtE St Rd S4 just west of UrwerHty Dr. 473-4700
DAYTONA BEACH
907 Voiusia Ave 255-7487
* NAPLES
2085 E Tamiami 1r. 774-4443


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