The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02794

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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
I volume 55-Number34 Two Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, August 20,1982
t fr*dS*oc**l
By MaM M Cants
Price 50 Cents
Chief of Staff Assures:
There's No Such Thing as a Secret Israeli Vacuum Bomb
JTA Feature Service
In a special interview, Chief of Staff Gen.
Rafael Eitan has denied press reports that
Israel had used a "vacuum bomb." He
said: "There is no such thing as a vacuum
bomb. A local paper which wrote last week
that Israel had evoled a plan to secure its
own soldiers from the effect of a vacuum
bomb just shows ignorance. There is, to the
best of my knowledge, no such thing as a
vacuum bomb."
Eitan suggested that the "vacuum bomb
story" might have been invented to explain
away the surprising accuracy of Israeli
bombings.
The Chief of Staff said the dispersal of
the PLO among several countries after the
Beirut withdrawal would reduce its capa-
city to harm Israel, though isolated terror-
ist actions abroad, carried out by small
groups of four or five terrorists, might con-
tinue.
ithdrawal Seems Just Hours Away
Differences Said to Be So Narrow That
They Have 'Almost Disappeared9
By special invitation. Rabbi Roy A. Walter of Congregation
Emanu El in Houston, Tex., joined Ringling Brothers and
' Barnum and Bailey Circus as a guest clown during a recent
matinee performance. Following the show, Rabbi Walter, along
with Cantor Larry Charson, conducted a Havdalah service for
\the cast and crew of "The Greatest Show on Earth," Boss
Clown Chuck Sidlow assists Rabbi Walter with his guest clown
transformation.
Empire State Law
Will Adjust Wife's
Legal Disability
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) -
^A civil measure designed to
I ease a centuries-old disabi-
lity imposed on the obser-
Ivant Jewish wife whose
husband refuses to give her
la Jewish divorce decree,
called a get, has been ap-
proved by both houses of
the New York State Legis-
ature.
The bill, believed to be the first
of its kind in American law, is a-
waiting certain signature by Gov.
Hugh Carey, Assemblyman
Sheldon Silver, author of the
measure, said. The measure will
become state law when the go-
vernor signs it expectedly before
the end of the month.
Silver, a Democrat-Liberal re-
Continued on Page 13-A
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
All remaining unre-
solved issues preventing a
full Israeli approval of the
proposed plan leading to
the evacuation of the Pales-
tine Liberation Organiza-
tion from Beirut have been
removed except for Israel's
demand that the PLO re-
lease immediately a cap-
tured Israeli pilot and the
bodies of nine Israeli sol-
diers killed in fighting in
Lebanon, political sources
say here.
Israel's concessions on a num-
ber of points in the plan proposed
by special U.S. envoy Philip
Habib was reported at the con-
clusion of the weekly Cabinet,
meeting when Cabinet Secretary
Dan Meridor said that there were
"prospects" for an Israeli ap-
proval of the agreement and that
Israeli officials had shown
"flexibility" when meeting with
Habib for two-hours prior to the
Cabinet session.
ISRAEL'S ONE final demand,
which political sources said here
was "an absolute must" before
full approval, calls for the PLO to
immediately release Aharon
Achiaz, an Israeli pilot captured
by the PLO and believed held in
west Beirut, and for the PLO to
release the bodies of nine Israeli
soldiers killed in the Litani
operation in Lebanon three years
ago and in the current fighting.
There were indications from
Beirut that the PLO would meet
this demand and arrange for the
transfer through Red Cross inter-
mediaries. But sources here said
that the agreement leading to the
PLO withdrawal could fall or
stand depending upon the PLO's
implementation of the release of
the bodies and the one pilot.
One issue that had prevented
Israel's agreement to the U.S.
plan concerned the deployment of
the multinational force which is
to take up positions between the
departing PLO and Israeli troops
around the beseiged Lebanese
capital.
ISRAEL REPORTEDLY
agreed that the French forces
making up part of the multina-
tional force should take up posi-
tions simultaneously with the de-
parture of the PLO. Israel had in-
sisted that the international
force, which will include Italian,
U.S. and French forces, enter
Continued on Page 2-A
Begin-Sharon Rift
Is Defense Minister
Running His Own War?
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Premier Menachem Begin
expressed what Israeli
newspapers say was unusu-
al criticism of Defense Min-
ister Ariel Sharon at a
Cabinet meeting. But the
Premier's remarks, the
papers noted, were muted
and indirect.
The Prime Minister's office has
denied that his criticism was, in-
deed, directed at Sharon. But
commentators continued to insist
that Sharon was the target for
Begin s barbs.
According to press reports,
Begin criticized "certain Chris-
tian circles in Lebanon who had
dismissed the Philip Habib ne-
gotiations as fraud and decep-
tion," adding that they "had no
right to describe the plan for the
PLO exodus from west Beirut in
that manner."
THE PAPERS pointed out
that there had been little, if any,
reports of such remarks Dy
Gen. Sharon
Lebanese Christian leaders. But
Israel officials known for their
close links with Sharon, who fre-
quently give background brief-
ings in his name, have in recent
days quoted "most authoritative
sources" as using those terms of
criticism for Habib's activities.
Sharon's critics claim that the
Defense Minister is, in any event,
opposed to a peaceful PLO de-
parture from west Beirut under
Continued on Page 11-A
Paris Police Find Terrorist's Marais Section Shoot-Out Weapon
PARIS(JTA) French police sources re-
vealed that one of the weapons which was
used in the terrorist attack on Goldenberg's
restaurant in the heart of Paris' traditional
Jewish quarter last week has been found.
The Polish-made WZ-63 submachinegun
was found Friday in the Bois de Boulogne in
Fingerprints and Alt
western Paris. Fingerprints have been found
on the weapon, and French police are current-
ly checking with several west European coun-
tries trying to establish the identity of the at-
tackers. -
BALLISTICS TESTS have already proved
that this weapon had indeed been used in the
attack on Goldenberg's in which six people,
including two American citizens were killed,
and some 22 others were wounded. The same
Continued on Pane 12-A _____


l i lun. riuguSL i.\J, 1 TOi

State Dep't. Believes
Major Issues Resolved
Differences 'Disappeared'
Withdrawal Seen Hours Away
By HELEN SILVER
x W ASHINGTONH JTA)
The State Department
has said that it appeared
that "most of the outstand-
ing issues" in the negotia-
tions for the evacuation of
.he besieged PLO terrorists
in west Beirut have been
resolved.
Alan Romberg. the Depart-
ment deputy spokesman, gave
that summary at the Depart-
ment's regular press briefing,
hawing it on the meetings of
special Presidential envoy Philip
Habib with officials of Israel.
Lebanon and the Palestine Liber-
ation Organization over the
weekend and last week.
REITERATING that the
United States wanted all foreign
forces to withdraw from
Lebanon, Romberg said that
"following the resolution of the
Beirut situation, we will be look-
ing to the overall Lebanon situa-
tion with the objective of helping
to establish a Lebanese central
governmental authority through-
out the territory of Lebanon." a
goal he indicated required "with-
drawal of all foreign forces."
He said "our view is clear that
we would want all foreign forces,
including the Israelis, to leave
Lebanon." He added that he
could not comment on the ques-
tion of the withdrawal of the
Syrian forces from west Beirut,
on which Israel has insisted.
Romberg was asked why
Secretary of State George Shultz
met on Capitol Hill with Senate
Majority leader Howard Baker
IK.. Term.) He replied that Presi-
dent Reagan and Shultz "have
discussed on several occasion and
at on what might be done," in the
context of "the broader Middle
East question," to address "not
only the entire Lebanese question
but also the Middle East peace
process."
ROMBERG SAID that in
those discussions. Reagan asked
Shultz to "seek the views of
members of Congress. He is now
actively engaged in doing that."
Shultz attended a Senate Repub-
lican leadership luncheon today
to seek the views of the Republic-
an Senators "on the Middle East
situation, particularly the Pale-
stinian question"
Asked about restoration of
bask services to west Beirut,
Romberg said that "water has
been flowing to the city for the
last several days and we under-
stand that the Israel Defense
Force has permitted Internation-
al Red Cross medical convoys to
enter the city." He said the
United States "continues to
notice there are problems in as-
suring regular deliveries" to west
Beirut "of fuel supplies.' He
added "we are working on this
problem, particularly with
respect to assuring delivery of
fuel to hospitals."
Romberg was asked about a
report that Israel's Defense Min-
ister Ariel Sharon had indicated
he wanted to visit Washington,
presumably to confer with U.S.
officials about the situation in
Lebanon, but had been refused an
invitation. Romberg said that the
question of such a visit by
Sharon had been raised.
HE SAID that while the
Reagan Administration felt that
"Minister Sharon is welcome at
any time," the point "was made
clear, however, that Ambassador
Habib is our negotiator and has
the confidence of both the Presi-
dent and Secretary (of State) and
communication with Washing-
ton." Romberg said "that is
where the focus on that particular
discussion rests."
Romberg said he had no details
on why Sharon wanted to come
but that reports about a "frosty
reaction to the possibility of a
Sharon visit here were "not ac-
curate."
Cob tin tied from Page 1-A
Beirut only at the final stages of
the evacuation.
Israel continues, however, to
maintain that the countries par-
ticipating in the force provide Is-
rael with assurances that the
multinational force will not be
used as a shield for the PLO if the
evacuation is interrupted for any
reason.
Deputy Foreign Ministry
Yehuda Ben-Meir told Israel
Radio that Israel insists that as-
surance will be provided by the
three countries that if the PLO
does renege on its commitment to
depart from Beirut, the multina-
tional force will stand aside and
not act as a shield.
"This is a solid commitment by
the U.S., and we will have to have
it by other participating coun-
tries." Ben-Meir said. He noted
that the PLO had dropped its
previous demands which included
its request for a political office to
remain in west Beirut, the incor-
poration of some contingents of
the PLO as part of the Lebanese
army, and an Israeli withdrawal
prior to the evacuation of the
PLO forces.
FRENCH FOREIGN Minister
Claude Cheysson reportedly con-
veyed a commitment to the Is-
raeli government that if the
evacuation is disturbed or should
ease at any point, the French
forces will withdraw. U.S. and
Italian officials have reportedly
conveyed a similar understand-
ing.
The other concession Israel
agreed to is the presence of a
small United Nations observer
force. There are currently some
20 such observers serving with
the UN units staffing buffer
zones. The United States favors
at least a symbolic UN observer,
presence in the evacuation
process, to show some inkage be-
tween the evacuation, the in-
ternal force and the U.N.
According to the statement re-
leased by the Cabinet following
its session Sunday. Israel has in-
ADL Satisfied'
Watt's Letter Incident Deemed 'Closed'
NEW YORK-U.S.
Secretary of Interior James
G. Watt has admitted that
he had "made a mistake" in
sending a letter to the
Israeli ambassador linking
Jewish community backing
for his energy policies and
Administration support of
Israel.
At a meeting with leaders of
the Anti- Defamation League of
B'nai B'rith at the agency's New
York headquarters, the cabinet
official expressed bis apologies
and admitted that the American
Jewish community had "every
right to be urw>t "
ADL NATIONAL chairman,
Kenneth J. Bialkin, who said the
meeting with Watt had been ar-
ranged weeks ago, prior to disclo-
sure of the June 17 letter to Israel
Ambassador Moshe Arens, said
Watt's remarks were made "with
great sincerity and in good faith,
and we consider the incident
closed."
The Interior Secretary explain-
ed to ADL leaders that he seeks
support for his energy policies
from every segment of American
society from farmers to the
users of America's national park
recreational facilities and that
he had no intention of singling
out the Jewish community.
Watt declared that his primary
goal is to make America energy
self-sufficient and to remove its
dependence on Arab and OPEC
oil sources. He declared that the
fact that this country imports 40
percent of its oil supplies is an
"intolerable" situation.
AMERICAN ENERGY inde-
pendence, the Interior Secretary
DIVISION OF SCHREIBER INDUSTRIES
SOL SCHREIBER, PRESIDENT AND CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
YOUR COMPLETE OFFICE SUPPLIER SINCE 1933
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CORAL GABLES
272 Valencia Ay*
Coral Gables. Fla.
went on, is vital for the pursuit of
U.S. foreign policy interests and
is also important for the State of
Israel.
Bialkin said ADL shares the
Interior Secretary's conviction
that America must have a strong
energy policy, and "we appre-
ciate his dedication and efforts to
achieve that goal."
Watt, in defending his energy
policies, asserted that the United
States possesses enough oil re-
serves in publicly owned on-shore
and off-shore lands to meet this
country's energy needs.
"EIGHTY-FIVE percent of
America'8 untapped oil wealth is
on publicly owned lands." he
said. "Two-thirds of that is off-
shore, and much of the new oil is
expected to be found off Alaska's
coast."
The official told ADL leaders
that the Interior Department's
five year oil and gas leasing pro-
gram, announced Jury 21. was
designed to "accelerate develop-
ment of oil and gas on the na-
tion's outer continental shelf. He
stressed that this would be car
ried out under stringent en-
vironmental safeguards."
7C7 QC1Q Watt accused h critics of put-
I J/ "OJ lO tfng partisan political considera-
tions ahead of their duty to en-
sure American energy depend-
ence.
sisted that "a check be made of
the lists of terrorists to leave
Beirut and Lebanon." This was
apparently an indication of a
softening on the Israeli position
that a full list be presented to Is-
rael of the estimated 6,000 PLO
fighters who are expected to
evacuate Beirut.
Israel claims that the total of
evacuees is around 13,000. This
figure would include, presuma-
bly, members of the Lebanese
leftist groups and the Syrian oc-
cupation forces.
THE EVACUATION is ex
pected to begin at the end of this
week or the early part of next
week unless unexpected develop
ments arise, in which case,
sources here noted the military
option remained open to see that
the PLO evacuation does take
place-
Meanwhile, in Beirut, Leba-
nese Prime Minister Shafiq al
Wazzan said after meeting with
Habib that differences on the
evacuation plan had "narrowed
until they have almost disap-
peared
PLO evacuation
week.
andthatheexpecudtu.
to begin uS,
In
said
Cairo, Egyptian office
the long-stalled talks?
autonomy for the Palestinians Z
the west Bank and Gaza Stri
would not be resumed until Isr2
has completed its withdraw.!
from Lebanon. The offickh
hinted that there would also haw
to be a change in Israels bjtT
preUtion of the Camp David ac
cords outlining the proposal for
Palestinian self-rule.
SYRIA, meanwhile appeared
to affirm that it will stay in Leba.
non where its force have been
since 1976 under a mandate from
the Arab League. "Syrian forces
belong to the Lebanese legality.
They are legally present in
Lebanon and will defend their
presence against anti-Israeli
threats," state-run Damascus
radio said. There was no mention
of Beirut, indicating that Syrian
forces might be ready to quit
Beirut while not pulling out en-
tirely from Lebanon.
IDF Tries to Uncover
Identity of Dead Soldiers
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
The Israel Defense Force is
trying to clear up the
mystery of the identity of
Israeli soldiers buried by
the Jewish Community of
Damascus last month,
whose names as reported
by the Syrians to the Inter-
national Red Cross have
proved to be those of
soldiers still living and
serving with the Israel
army in Lebanon.
The army spokesman has said
that eight soldiers are reported as
still missing from fighting on the
estern sector of the Lebanon
front. The men. officially assum-
ed to be prisoners of the Syrians,
include six members of ground
troops and two members of a
phantom jet crew shot down on
July 24.
THE EIGHT do not include
the driver of a water tanker which
strayed by error into Syrian-held
territory last week and who is
presumed to have been captured
by the Syrians. The drivers
partner is reported to have escap-
ed by commandeering a taxi and f
ordering the driver to take him
back to Israeli-held territory.
The army spokesman pointed
out that the foreign press and
television reported last month
that t 'Damascus Jewish com-
munit nad buried four Isreli
sold it. in the Damascus Jewish
ceretery.
The Syrians gave the Red
Cross the names of three of them
but upon investigation these
proved to be the names of three
living soldiers currently serving
with the Israel Defense Force.
THE ARMY is now trying to
clear up the mystery of how the
Syrians obtained these names
and the identities of the soldiers
buried in the Damascus ceme-
tery. The army is also trying to
find out what happened to the
other men listed as missing
Israel hopes to recover the one
Israeli pilot held by the PLO in
west Beirut, whose release Jeru-
salem is demanding as part of the
deal whereby PLO terrorists will
be allowed to leave Beirut.
Riverside
Riverside Memorial Chapel,Inc. Funeral Directors
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Dade County Phone No. 531 -1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
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West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Carl Grossberg, President
Alfred Golden, Executive Vice President
Leo Hack, V.P., Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish
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-J


/|fei/vs Briefs
Generals See 'Little' Civilian Damage
Friday, August 20, 1982/The Jewish Floridian Page 3-A
ByJTA Services
TEL AVIV Five retired
merican army generals who
Ive just completed a tour of Is-
let and Lebanon at the invita-
Lq of the Anti-Defamation
taeue of B'nai B'rith say they
Ere amazed by what they des-
Hbed as 'relatively little civilian
age" caused by the fighting
[Lebanon.
[Harry Kinnard, a former com-
jiding general of the U.S.
my Combat Development
Lmmand. said that, compared
[anything in his military exper-
V Jnimal. His statement was sup-
Irted by other members of the
fcup which included George
ft ton. son of the World War II
Richard Carr; Sidney
; and Lewis Perlstein, a
Imber of the U.S. Armv Na-
Inai Advisory Hoard.
Intilsrael Rally
reported in Rio
{10 DE JANEIRO An es-
aated 300 PLO supporters par-
lipiitfd in an anti-Israel rally in
i center oi the city last Friday,
participants shouted anti-
trust slogans and denounced
aeli Premier Menachem Begin
Defense Minister Ariel
aron. When a group of Bnai
Jiva youngsters sought to dis-
bute leaflets depicting PLO
ocities. they were attacked by
crowd. Leaders of the rally
[led off a scheduled march on
U.S. Consulate after police
suaded them not to stage the
kest march.
The rally, which was sponsered
some leftwing groups, includ-
the illegal Communist Party
some members of the Peace
\v/ movement, was denounced
Katan Kezwan. president of
Lebanese League in Brazil. In
Statement published in Jornal
Brasil, he termed the leaders
jthe rally as "false spokesmen"
pause they are "supporting the
[0 and terrorism." The rally
been advertised as "a mani-
tation for peace in Lebanon."
)ld Sharon Fire,
sgin Advises
Jerusalem Premier
Inachem Begin has called on
T)inet ministers to "hold the
against Defense Minister
|el Sharon in order to preserve
unity of the government at
i delicate state of the negotia-
te to get the PLO forces out of
panon.
Begin sought to cool down
npers over the weekend follow-
t the confrontation between the
bisters and Sharon at a Cabi-
meeting last Thursday, a
eting that was described as
' most tense and bitter session
~ held.
Sharon, who found himself al-
jBt completely isolated at that
Ision. was under fire for the
vy bombardment of west
fnit earlier in the day, a bom-
Id ment which almost all the
listen criticized as not in ac-
uance with government decis-
Jypt Honors Peace
let. Shamir Says
2RUSALEM Egypt has
Ijored its peace treaty with Is-
despite recent strains over
war in Lebanon, Foreign
lister Yitzhak Shamir told Is-
1 Radio. Nevertheless, after a
eting several days ago with
ypt's Ambassador to Israel,
kd Mortada, Shamir conceded
tl?ere were "certain prob-
u> the relations between
| two countries.
1 Foreign Minister indicated
Israel was displeased with
Touro Synagogue, the oldest Jewish House of Worship in
North America dedicated in 1763 will be honored by a U.S.
commemorative postage stamp to be issued Aug. 22. in New-
port, Rhode Is Designed by Peter Harrison, the master ar-
chitect of the colonial era, and described as one of the most per-
fect works of colonial architecture, Touro has become a symbol
of tolerance and religious freedom largely as a result of a letter
written to Newport's Hebrew congregation by George Wash-
ington in 1790.
anti-Israel comments in the hgyptian leaders, but empha-
Egyptian news media and by sized that Egypt remained loyal
SENATOR
JACK GORDON
MAKES STATE GOVERNMENT
WORK TO HELP YOU STAY HEALTHY
To summarize his record:
Hospital Cost Containment Board.
Generic drugs.
Medicare assignment notice.
Anti-junk food in schools.
Support of Nurse Practitioners.
Program for preventive health.
Itemized patient billing
(doctors and hospitals).
PUNCH 57
TO RE-ELECT
JACK
GORDON
OUR EFFECTIVE SENATOR
DEMOCRAT DISTRICT 35
pdpolod JACK GORDON COMMITTED G HIRSCH, TRIAS
to the peace treaty. "We don't
see any signs of a deterioration of
the peace relations" between the
two countries, Shamir said.
Another Anti-Israel
Incident in Italy
ROME Police officials in the
village of Terni have arrested a
local grocery store owner for
"slandering a foreign state,"
after he placed a sign outside his
shop saying "Zionists are not
welcome herewe are for the
Palestinians."
The incident which incited the
store owner to place the sign, oc-
cured after Israeli tourists from
the nearby village of Piediluco,
where six Israeli atheletes are
participating in the International
Canoeing Championship, ventur-
ed into the shop to purchase
several bottles of mineral water.
In the store they confronted
the owner who was reading a
newspaper with an anti-Israel
slant on the situation in Beirut.
The Israelis defended the Le-
banon action saying "We are
fighting a war of defense, not ag-
gression." After the Israel's pur-
chased their water and departed,
the store owner said he "discov-
ered" that two liquor bottles were
missing, and he was sure it was
the Israelis who had taken the
bottles.
Peres Says French
Proxy is a'Friend'
NEW YORK Shimon
Peres, head of Israel's Labor Par-
ty and leader of the opposition in
the Knesset, defended Israel's in-
cursion into Lebanon in an ad-
dress last Friday to the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major
American Jewish Organizations.
Peres said he regard-
ed French President Francois
Mitterrand as "a friend of Israel,
the most knowledgeable French
leader ever, both ;n heart and
mind." He recalled that the
French President had paid a
"friendlv visit" to Jerusalem.
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Phone: 949-2121
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- -ftc -*-n me .rewisn "rwnuian / trusty', August 20, IWfii

Israel Does It AgainTurns Victory Into Defeat
The price to Israel of the war in Lebanon
has been incalculable It is no longer a ques-
tion of negative pub he relations. Now, it is a
problem of frank anti-Israel sentiment. And
of rank international anti-Semitism.
At week's end, it seems that the war is
winding down. Shimon Peres, chairman of Is-
rael's Labor Party, following a meeting with
President Reagan in Washington last week,
told reporters that Israel could easily have
taken West Beirut in 24 hours, but that for
humanitarian reasons his country withheld its
military force in favor of a political solution to
be hammered out by U.S. Envoy Philip
Habib.
Whether or not his 24-hour assessment is
accurate, we are hard put to understand what
Israel achieved in adopting this strategy.
Once the decision was made in Jerusalem to
commit to war, then there could be only one
conclusionvictory. If nothing else, Vietnam
has taught us that waging a war to achieve a
political solution is the same as losing the
war.
That is our view of what has occurred, now
that it seems that the war is all but over.
Even the "total destruction" of the PLO in
Beirut would hardly have guaranteed the end
to a PLO presence in the Middle East. But a
PLO march-out from Beirut, even all of Le-
banon is a guarantee that the history of the
occurrence will be rewritten within months to
recast it as a PLO victory.
In this context, we are reminded of the fate
of Egypt's Second and Third Armies at the
end of the 1973 Yom Kippur War, both armies
surrounded and hopelessly defeated by Israeli
forces to the north and the south of the Suez
Canal. At the moment of the assassination of
President Anwar Sadat in October, 1981, he
was reviewing his annual military parade in
Cairo in celebration of Egypt's 1973 victory.
What could Israel have lost in pursuing a
total victory in Beirutthe favor of the world
press? The friendship, say, of France or Eng-
land or West Germany? A pat on the head
from the U.S. State Department? It has none
of these things in any case.
What does Israel win now in acceding to
the pressure of the Reagan Administration
and "saving the face" of Yasir Arafat and the
Syrians? It wins a new foothold for French
forces in the Middle East, who will be the first
of the international units arriving to patrol
the ceasefire. It wins a humiliating withdraw-
al simultaneous with the withdrawal of the
PLO and the Syrians on equal terms.
Those Fancy French
When would-be assassins made their at-
tempt on the life of Israel's Ambassador to
Great Britain Shlomo Argov, the police gave
chase and caught them. Lucky? Well, per-
haps.
But the murder by terrorists in Paris many
months ago of Israeli envoy Jacob Barsiman-
tov and the repeated bombings of Jewish in-
stitutions and the terrorist slaughter of Jews
and non-Jews accidentally in the neighbor-
hood of their activity leave French authori-
ties baffled. Unlucky? Well, perhaps.
In fact, following the shootout at the Gold-
enberg restaurant in the Marais section of
Paris a week ago Monday, police found and
detained eight persons of the notorious left-
wing A.D. organization with a strong Arab
base suspected of perpetrating that murder-
ous operation. They were released for lack of
evidence of implication.
The very next day, after their release, Wed-
nesday of last week, members of that same
terrorist organization struck again, this time
at a building housing commercial firms linked
with Israel and a Jewish-owned bank, causing
heavy damage and seriously injuring a
passerby.
The French are really no more selfish in
their national interest than any other Euro-
pean people. What makes them so sleazy,
however, is their imperiousness, their unre-
lenting pretention to cultivation and morality
about which they ceaselessly lecture the rest
of the world.
At the same time, their anti-Semitism has
been irrepressible in the face of modern Euro-
pean history. In this, they remind us of the
Russians and the Poles whose ignorant
medievalism, however, is more understand-
able given the oppression under which they
live.
We find small hope in the flood of state-
ments issued by international organizations
and personalities deploring the events in
France. They are senseless. French authori-
ties appear determined "to find no evidence."
The agony of French selective morality will
not be assuaged by these statements. The far
more bewildering turn of events is the simul-
taneous selection of the French as the first
force to enter Lebanon in the coming disen-
gagement in Beirut.
For that is the same as leaving a contingent
of PLO or Syrian forces behind.
(Publisher's Divisiveness
Few American news media have told the
true story of the war in Lebanon. All of them
are guilty of a kind of nauseating partiality
that recast the war on their own romantic
terms weaving a work of fiction devoid of the
Realpolitik sinuously involved and.projectiae
instead a Grimm's fairy tale of women and
children in agony.
But the Miami News went one step further
than other papers and other television pro-
ducers of staged events cast as news, both in
Miami and elsewhere, in a cartoon by Don
Wright published on Aug. 13.
In this cartoon, Prime Minister Begin is in
telephone confrontation with President Rea-
gan who threatens "stiff reprisals" if Israel
doesn't stop "bombarding West Beirut." The
ultimate reprisal is revealed when Begin asks:
"You would do that? You would cut off water
to Miami Beach?"
We are well aware of the News' editorial
position on Israel, which is led at the point by
syndicated columnist Carl Rowan, whose spe-
cial viciousness out-Youngs Atlanta Mayor
Andrew Young. We had long thought of car-
toonist Don Wright in the warmest terms,
chuckling at his genius with special delight.
But sweet Wright has turned sour of late to
match the opportunistic editorial intensity of
those at the helm of the Miami News who
should know better. Wright's latest specimen
of raunchiness is an affront to the South Flor-
ida Jewish community. It lives in the (unhap-
pily) ancient past when Miami Beach had a
flourishing South Beach Jewish community,
these days replaced by other ethnic groups in
huge proportion.
What was the rationale for this post mor-
tem zinger of his. which the editorial honchos
of the News bought hook, line and sinker?
What was it but to question the patriotism of
American Jews and to taunt them in their
moment of current despair over the war in Le-
banon?
We resent the cartoon as no other because
it takes on a local flavor that is rank, offensive
and uncalled for. Two years ago, the publisher
of The Miami News received a coveted
Brotherhood Award from the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews. We suggest he
return it, especially now that he is making
hay in the media marketplace of community
divisiveness.
The Real America Is Still Alive
BRETTON WOODS, N.H.-
An Arab in kef ay ah looks
from the balcony of his suite at
the Inn here across the road and
up toward Mt. Washington
where, at the hotel in 1943, some
40-odd nations met to stabilize
the international monetary
system after World War II predi-
cated on the price of gold at $35
anoz.
All of that is changed. These
days, gold sells for ten times
that, or thereabouts. And, in ret-
rospect, the Allied powers
achieved nothing but a reprieve
from violence now turned into
global terrorism. As for the Arab
peering from his balcony hardly
40 years later up toward the hotel
on Mt. Washington, his presence
at least for me contributes to
making the brisk 60-degree sum-
mer breeze even brisker. Colder.
I GET the sense that his
analytic eyes beneath beetling
brows assess the worth of the
mountain and of the historic ho-
tel, and that he is preparing in his
mind to make an offer for the
whole shebang.
Araby is everywhere that
was my obsessive feeling as I
flew north some three weeks ago.
Here, it strikes me that from the
post-World War II Gold Stan-
dard, we have come to an Oil
Standard with infinitely greater
intimidations. But driving day
after day in New England since
then, through Maine and New
Hampshire and Vermont, the
feeling dissipated. The Arab on
the balcony was but a momen-
tary lapse into obsessive fears
from the new hope and vigor I
have been imbued with here. Or
until newer fears of even more
immediate challenges to the na-
tion's well-being took over after
that.
In fact, I should like to report
that America is alive and well
and living in New England. And,
I suspect, in other sach tradition-
al enclaves elsewhere in the mid-
dle and great noV&wast In re-
cent years. South- Plonda has
joined the peripheral geographic
areasthe states along the
Mexican border and the Califor-
nia coast to become a part of
the cutting edge of our national
discontent, where cultural and
Continued on Page 13-A
Jewish Floridiaxi
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Friday. August 20,1982
Volume 55

1ELUL5742
Number 34


. .v.v.'. .v.v.'.vv.-.w.v.v..vwj>'
UNESCO Rewrites History
Accepts PLO View of Middle East
Friday. August20. J82y,Th6 Jewifa Floridian Pagefl-A
NEW YORK (JTA) -
he B'nai B'rith Interna-
onal condemned resolu-
Ions passed last week in
exico City at the United
ations Educational,
Jentific and Cultural Or-
anization conference on
iltural policies which at-
mpt to "rewrite the his-
ry" of Israel and foster
talitarian control over
lture.
Philip Lax, chairman of the In-
mational Council of B'nai
'nth, who headed the organiza-
in's delegation" to the con-
rence, said at a press conference
re that the resolutions "en-
urage states to sanction a sin-
e culture, denying all others
y right to exist, much less
rive."
HE NOTED that two of the
solutions adopted were inspired
. the Palestine Liberation
rganization. One ">f the resolu-
ions, Lax said, equates Zionism
ith racism, and the other calls
UNESCO to assist the PLO,
ii organization committed to
ie destruction of a member of
c United Nations (Israel), in in-
nting a cultural history of the
wish people to the Palestinian
;ilis. thus ignoring the Bible
d a 4,000-year historical record
tich indicates that the Arabs
me to the area in the seventh
ntury.
"It is quite clear that a Pales-
nian consciousness has emerged
recent years," Lax said. "But
e PLO seeks to give that con-
iousness an exclusive pedigree
ignoring Jewish roots."
"IT ATTEMPTS to give
alestinians the cultural achieve-
of practicallv every other
pie who have inhabited the
stern shore of the Mediter-
nean, including prehistoric,
morite. Canaanite, Phoenician,
gyptian, Philistine, Hebrew,
ramean, Greek, Roman, and
hristian."
The B'nai B'rith leader said
"nowhere does the PLO
ntion that the only national
lture in Palestine over the last
000 years has been Jewish."
The B'nai B'rith delegation
arned at the beginning of the
nference that the PLO might
tempt to deny or falsify Jewish
story. It cited a statement by
LO chief Yasir Arafat in 1980,
the last UNESCO general con-
ence, in which he transformed
Paul from a Jaw from Tarsus
a Palestinian Arab.
"In cynical disrespect of the
tellectual integrity of the dele-
tion assembled, the PLO is
seeking to expand this fraud
Ito
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to cover all of recorded history."
Lax said. "This cultural
scavengry is particularly dis-
tressing because it will become a
reference in the future."
IN EQUATING Zionism with
colonialism and racial dis-
crimination. Lax said, a
UNESCO conference has "for the
first time sanctioned the
promulgation of a lie." The PLO-
inspired resolutions and other
resolutions which called on
UNESCO to "propagate" culture
and for states to controll "cul-
tural activities" were opposed by
the United States and other
democratic countries. They were
aDDroved. hovever, by the
majority of Soviet, Arab and
Third World countries.
But the UNESCO conference
did produce a resolution which
the World Jewish Congress,
which was also represented at the
parley, viewed as beneficial to
Soviet Jewry and Jews in Arab
lands. The resolution, submitted
by the U.S., calls for "freedom of
religion."
The measure had its basis in a
draft formulated by the WJC
delegate, Dr. Leon Kronitz.
According to the text, the
resolution declares that restric-
tions on the free exercise of reli-
gious activity are "against the
interest of the individual, the
member states, and the inter-
national community."
KRONITZ, who is the execu-
tive vice president of the
Canadian Zionist Federation and
chairman fo the WJC Cultural
Commission explained that the
aim of his draft was to reinforce
existing measures in support of
minority cultural rights which
would include those of Jews in
the USSR and other countries.
In negotiating the text with
various delegations, agreement
was reached that the U.S. repre-
sentative would submit the
resolution and that its co-spon-
sors be of a broad-based charac-
ter. Among those co-sponsoring
the resolution were Nigeria,
Sudan, Britain, Egypt and
Australia.
Florida Secretary of State George Firestone (left) discusses the
current Mideast conflict with Israeli Consul General Joel Arnon
during a recent meeting in Tallahassee. The Israeli diplomat
visited the Florida capital to brief Firestone and other govern-
ment leaders on Israel's presence in Lebanon. Arnon heads the
Israeli consulate general office in Miami, which opened earlier
this year. In March, Israel joined the Florida Consular Corps, a
49-nation group of foreign countries with diplomatic offices in
Florida.
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FIRST MINUTE/1ADDITIONAL MINUTE

t->-- '


r-age^-A Tfie Je^iin Floridian Friday. August 20. 1982
Receiving Master of Social Work degrees for
their agency work done in Florida, and
course work completed during the summer
months in New York City, are Emily S.
Rosenthal (center) of Miami who worked
last year with the Jewish Family and Chil-
dren 's Service in Miami, andJodi Lynn Sam-
son of Hollywood, who worked with the Jew-
ish Community Centers of South Florida in
North Miami Beach. Making the presenta-
tion is Dr. Solomon Green, associate dean of
Yeshiva University's Wurzweiler School of
Social Work.
Headlines
Reform Would Sit 'Shiva' Over Denial
"We'd sit shiva," says Gerard Daniel, presi-
dent of the Reform World Union for Progressive
Judaism, when asked what he and other Reform
Jews would do were the Law of Return amended
to deny Israeli recognition of non-Orthodox con-
versions.
Daniel is a 66-year-old industrialist who spent
10 years in Israel, before the founding of the
state, after leaving his native Germany. He now
lives in New Rochelle. N.Y. Such an amendment
to the Law of Return, he asserts, would be "disas-
trous for the Jewish people."
Daniel maintains that the effect of a narrower
interpretation of the Law of Return would be
"devastating" not only in places like Argentina.
Brazil and Europe, where there is high intermar-
riage, but also in better-organized Jewish com-
munities in the U.S.
An action directly beneficial to Soviet Jewry
and Jews in Arab lands emerged from the meet-
ing of UNESCO in Mexico City with submission
of a resolution giving firm support to "freedom of
religion" and respect for "cultural identity." The
resolution, submitted by the United States, had
its basis in a draft formulated by the delegate of
the World Jewish Congress, Dr. Leon Kronitz,
and supported by numerous other delegations, in-
cluding several Muslim states.
According to the text, the resolution declares
that restrictions on the free exercise of religious
activity are "against the interest of the indivi-
dual, the member states, and the international
community." Adoption of the resolution came at
the end of the World Conference on Cultural
Policies which had been in session for two weeks.
the behavior of the economy for the coming fiscal
year." Since a budget does not become effective
until nine months after being recommended by
the President, a balanced budget amendment
would make it extremely difficult for the nation to
respond quickly to changing economic circum-
stances, they asserted.
Ludwig Jessdson. a leading industrialist and
philanthropist, has been elected associate chair-
man of Bar-Ilan University's Global Board of
Trustees.
Election of Jesselson. chairman of Phillip
Brothers and executive vice president of Philbro
Corporation, took place at the Global Board's an-
nual meeting at the University in Ramat Gan. Is-
rael. Phillip Stollman of Detroit, chairman of the
Global Board, made the announcement.
Mrs. Jane Stern of New York, president of the
American Board of Overseers, was reelected vice
chairman of the Global Board.
The National Council of Jewish Women has
moved to urge the Federal government to main-
tain enforcement of nursing home regulations.
NCJW signed on to a statement issued by the
National Citizens' Coalition for Nursing Home
Reform to Secretary of Health and Human Ser-
vices Richard Schweiker which urged the govern-
ment "to maintain its leadership and fulfill its
responsibilities in working to assure a high qual-
ity of care and life for the nation's 1.3 million
nursing home residents."
The American Jewish Congress has announced
its opposition to the balanced budget amendment
backed by the Administration.
In a letter to President Reagan, Jeffrey Cohen
and Michael A. Pelavin. co-chairmen of the Jew-
ish organization's commission on urban affairs,
said that "available avenues" already exist to]
balance the budget. A balanced budget amend-
ment would lead to "inflexibility" in economic'
policy-making at the federal level, they added.
They pointed out that the federal budget "is
essentially a forecast of expectations based on
programs, objectives and judgements concerning
Rabbi Joseph P. Sternstein. president of the
American Zionist Federation, singled out the
American television networks for "setting a new
standard of shallowness in news coverage of the
war in Lebanon."
He said that "While newspaper coverage of
events has often shown balance and depth and
debated the complex problems that led up to the
war. network television has failed entirely
through incompetence or neglected entirelv
through intention, to cite and analyse the factors
which brought about the current military situa-
tion."
He alleged that network cameramen filmed
rubble in Lebanon that was caused before the cur-
rent Israeli military operation, misleadingly attri-
buting it to the Israelis. He alleged that some ear-
ly war pictures of families fleeing with their be-
longings were actually families heading back
home to the South, rather than fleeing from the
Israeli advance, as was implied.
President Reagan has appointed Michael Rich-
"> Gale as Deputy Special Assistant, serving in
the Office of Public Liaison under Elizabeth Dole.
Mr. Gale will act as liaison to the American
Jewish community and will be responsible for ad-
vocacy briefings, meetings and conferences for
the Office of Public Liaison.
The Office of Public Liaison is President Rea-
gan's major outreach program at the White
House. Its mission is to ensure that the views of
key groups are considered by the President in
developing his agenda.
Gale has been a legislative liaison for the
American Israel Public Affairs Committee in
Washington. D.C. since the late fall of 1980.
Israel Has Few Friend
Left in W. Germany
s
By FREDO SACHSER
London Chronicle Syndicate
DUESSELDORF -
Judging by official state-
ments, comments in the
mass media and public
reactions, Israel has only a
few friends left in West
Germany. The general atti-
tude on Israel's policy and
her operations in Lebanon
is highly critical and even
hostile in some parts of the
country.
The view appears to be preva-
lent among the West German
public that what Hitler did to the
Jews. Menachem Begin, the Is-
raeli Prime Minister, and Israel
are now. in a way. doing to the
Palestinians.
Indeed, some sections of the
West German public would ap-
pear to relish what they believe is
an opportunity to whitewash the
Germans in respect of the Nazi
past by drawing hazardous com-
parisons between the Nazi era on
the one hand, and the statements
and decisions of the Begin
Government on the other.
THE WEST German Govern-
ment sharply condemned the Is-
raeli invasion of Lebanon, and
the Social Democratic Party's
executive committee has criti-
cized her operations there.
Two leading members of the
Free Democratic Party. Manfred
Vohrer and Juergen Moellemann.
have called for economic sanc-
tions against Israel and asked
the Government to stop all finan-
cial aid to Israel until she with-
draws from Lebanon.
In West Berlin. Ruediger
Pieper, the chairman of the Free
Democrats' youth section
that it should be made cle
Israel's "aggressive griM
leaders that what he called t
pobxy of genocide against
Palestinian people would no
met by silence by the Ger
people.
The West German Evan
Church voiced deep concer-
and Catholic bishops appeal^
the parties to stop figh:ing j
emphasizing that the Pale^
ians had a right to exist lik*i
Israelis.
IN SOME university g
mostly Leftist student or
tions. helped by Palestii
groups. staged' a.-.ti-Is
demonstrations, and in Rren
the words 'Zionist rr.urden.
were daubed on the ails of i
synagogue by unknown
viduals.
The police in Duesselda
found leaflets condemning
reels genocide of the Palest
ian people'' after a bomb
ploded at a branch of the Ar.
can Chase Manhattan Bank.
casualties were reported,
damage was estimated at 116.01
pounds.
In Hanover, a Protesu
youth group called off an
change program with a Tel A
youth club on the ground that!
rael was responsible for the mu
der of tens of thousands of in
cent Lebanese civilians
West Kendall Synagogue
Seeks Experienced Heb-
rew Teacher For Hay
Class-Monday & Wed-
nesday Afternoons--No
Sundays. Call Steve
Kraus At Temple Samu-El.
382-3668
Positions Available
Religious Hebrew
School Teachers,
3 days weekly, with large
prestigious congregation in
South Dade.
Call Tova 238-2601.
Israelite Center Temple
3175 S.W. 25 St. Miami
Conservative Family Temple
High Holy Day Tickets Available
Members: $20 Non-Members: $30
Family Membership $125.**
Cemetery Priviledges Available
Rabbi Solomon H. Wa I den berg Cantor Hyman Lifshin
For further information call:
445-1529
Beth Israel Synagogue
in Beautiful Bellingham, Washington
Seeks a
SPIRITUAL LEADER
Vj time position with salary and benefits totalling
$20,000. Must be capable of serving as rabbi, cantor.
and teacher for established unaffiliated
congregation of 70 families with conservative-reform
learnings. Beautiful university city of 45,ooo within 1 Vi
hr. drive of Seattle and Vancouver, B.C., on Puget
Sound, near mountains. Apply with resume, and four
reference sources including present employer, to:
Henry Levine, M.D.
1400 Broadway,
, Bellingham, Wa. 98225


Friday, August 20, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 7-A
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Page8-A
Floridian Friday. August 20. 1962

Filling in Background
Second Paris Blast Rocks Office Building
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) A
powerful bomb explosion
late last week damaged a
building housing commer-
cial firms linked with Israel
and a Jewish-owned bank.
A passerby, a woman walk-
ing her dog, was seriously
injured.
Police believe the attack was
carried out by the extreme left-
wing Direct Action organization
which assumed responsibility for
four explosions and several
machinegun attacks against
Jewish or Israeli installations in
France during recent days.
The blast, 48 hours after six
people were killed and 22
wounded in a terrorist attack in
the heart of Paris' traditional
Jewish quarter, further increased
the atmosphere of shock and dis-
may. French officials said the
Eight terrorists in the hands of Paris police
were released for want of a link to the attack in
a Jewish restaurant The next day, they struck
again.
government had taken all neces-
sary measures to try and prevent
further violence but warned that
in a democratic country such as
France, these measures might
not always be sufficient.
THE BOMB exploded shortly
after 1 a.m. outside an elegant of-
fice building only a few hundred
yards from the city's main
avenue, the Champs Elysee.
Police investigators said they
found inscriptions on an adjacent
building calling for "the immedi-
ate and unconditional withdrawal
of the Israeli fascists from Leba-
non'' and warning that "if the
Palestinians are forced to leave
Beirut, we shall kill the Zionists
financiers and propagandists
working for its i Israel's) cause.
The inscriptions were signed
"AD," the initials of the Direct
Action (Action Directe) or-
ganization.
Eight of its members were pre-
viously detained for questioning
but later released after police
found nothing linking them to
the first attack.
France, and especially the
Jewish community, still reels
from the first terrorist attack.
Grief and Outrage'
French Consul Hears Angry Charges
By YITZHAK RABI
NEW YORK -(JTA)-
A 15-member delegation of
Jewish leaders, represent-
ing the Jewish Community
Relations Council of New
York, met here with the
Deputy Consul General of
France Paul Guyomard to
express "grief and outrage"
over the anti-Semitic ter-
rorist attack in Paris in
which six persons were kill-
ed and 22 wounded. The
meeting was held at the
French Consulate and last-
ed 45 minutes.
Rabbi Israel Miller, vice presi-
dent of the JCRC, which is an
umbrella organization of 33 Jew-
ish organizations in the metro-
politan area, told reporters after
the meeting that the delegation
stressed to the French official the
feeling "of grief and outrage that
we and our hundreds of thous
ands of our constituents feel at
the barbaric assaults on Mon-
day."
THE DELEGATION, Miller
said, called on the French
government to "spare no effort"
to apprehend those responsible
Miller also said that the dele-
gation pointed out during the
meeting that the French govern-
ment's policy toward the PLO
and the anti-Israeli comments by
French officials, including Presi-
dent Francois Mitterrand's com-
parison of the war in Lebanon
with the World War II massacre
of 642 people by the Nazis in the
French town of Oradour-sur-
Glane. created an atmosphere
which could have encouraged ter-
rorist acts against Jews in
France.
"It is time that French officials
recognized that anti-Israeli and
anti-Zionist attitudes can no
longer be separated from anti-
Semitism." Miller declared. He
added that the delegation de-
manded that the French govern-
ment should increase its protec-
tion of its Jewish citizens to
avoid future atrocities against
them.
ACCORDING TO Miller, the
Deputy Consul General was
"sympathetic and promised to
convey the delegation's protest
to the French government. He
also said he would transmit the
delegation's view that the climate
and atmosphere in France, which
has been in-creasingry anti-Israeli
since the start of the war in Leb-
anon, must be changed and that
anti-Semitic incidents must
stop" in France.
Another participant at the
meeting. Malcolm Hoenlein. ex-
ecutive director of the JCRC. told
the Jewish Telegraphic Agency
that the French Deputy Consul
said he cannot draw a "linkage
between the PLO and the inci-
dent" of early last week.
Hoenlein said that the Jewish
leadership in New York will con-
tinue to put the issue of anti-
Semitic incidents in France on
the agenda and will not let it slip
away as was done after the attack
on Rue Copemic synagogue in
1980 and the murder of the Israel
diplomat. Yoacov Bar-Simantov.
a few months ago.
Temple Beth Raphael
1545 Jefferson Avenue
Tel 538-4H2
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and messages of sympathy and
solidarity continue to arrive at
local Jewish institutions and the
Israel Embassy.
SEVERAL HUNDRED dem-
onstrators massed in front of
the Israel Embassy at the call of
the French section of the Israel's
Herut Party. The demonstrators,
who waved Israeli flags, shouted
slogans charging President Fran-
cois Mitterrand with respon-
sibility in the first attack.
The demonstrators also ac-
cused the French media of having
'poisoned the climate" and
creating an anti-Semitic atmos-
phere which enabled the terror-
ists to strike." The press and
television are charged with hav-
ing presented partial and strong-
ly distorted reports from Leba-
non, according to the demon-
strators.
Young Jews also personally
assaulted reporters and television
crews covering the demonstra-
tion. The press photographers
union decided not to submit any
pictures for publication to protest
being manhandled by the demon-
strators.
THE IRAQI Embassy in Paris
was meanwhile seriously dam-
aged by a powerful explosion
which according to initial reports,
wounded two people and set afire
several adjacent buildings. Police
said a powerful bomb was hidden
in a parked car outside the build-
ing in cne of the city's luxurious
residential areas. The bomb went
off just as thousands started
gathering inside and in front of
the city's main synagogue for a
special service in memory of vic-
tims.
TAPES
CARTONS
HANGERS
POLYETHYLENE
BUSINESS FORMS
TAGS LABELS
BAGS BOXES
WIPES
Rabbi Sholom Tendler has
been appointed Rosh Ha-
Yeshiva of Yeshiva University
in Los Angeles. Rabbi Ten-
dler, 38, received his doctorate
in Talmudic Law from the Ser
Israel Rabbinical College in
Baltimore and rabbinical or-
dination from the Rabbi
Moshe Feinstein. He has been
a senior administrator at
YULA since 1980.
Greek
Anti-Semitism
On Rise
AMSTERDAM (JTA) -
Pro-government newspapers in
Greece are engaged in an unpar-
alleled anti-Semitic campaign,
such as a charge that Jews are
behind vast forest fires that have
plagued Greece, according to the
Athens correspondent of NRC
Handlesblad. the leading Dutch
daily.
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Friday, August 20,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
France Mum
Won't Respond to Begin's Attack
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) -
France is determined not to
lanswer Israeli Premier
iMenachem Begin's charges
that the French govern-
Iment and media are respon-
sible for having encouraged
in atmosphere of anti-
iemitism which culminated
Jn the killing of six people
and the wounding of 22 by
_ terrorist hit squad in the
ieart of this city's Jewish
quarter.
A government spokesman said
hat "the (Lebanese) situation is
precarious to be endangered
Ly charges and counter-charges
Ln an international level." The
[pokesman said, however, that
President Francois Mitterrand
Lould probably express his
Middle East nolicv next when he
tddresses the nation on televi-
sion. The French are scheduled to
provide the backbone of the in-
emational force to be stationed
west Beirut to supervise the
vithdrawal of PLO and Syrian
orces and ensure their safety.
BUT FRANCE'S news media
ave been less discreet. Most edi-
Drials continue to blast Begin
nd accuse him of "meddling in
trance's internal affairs." Most
iitorials also imply that Franco-
graeli relations have reached a
ew low.
The French have expressed
|shock" by what media com-
entators here say was a call by
legin for France's young Jews
|to form their own militia." The
sraeli Premier, reacting to tne
brrorist atrocity, said that if jthe
fri'in h government is unable to
stest its Jewish citizens, he
jjould not hesitate to call on
[Vance's Jewish youth to do so
nemselves. He never referred to
I militia."
However, even most Jewish
immunity leaders have express-
strong reservations on Lb is
ibject. Chief Rabbi Rene Sirat
as called on the Jewish youth
|not to give in to provocations."
lain de Rothschild, president of
lie central organization of
trench Jews (CRIF). stressed in
fepeated radio and television In-
brviews that the Jewish com-
munity will continue to entrust
H safety to the "government
nc! normal authorities."
EVEN MAVERRICK Jewish
pder Henri Hajdenberg, who
eads on activist splinter group,
ewish Renewal, said he is op-
osed to Jewish self-defense
foups.
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SIMONE VEIL, former
Minister of Health and
former President of the
Ruo European Parliament,
also come out strongly
against Begin's call She
said she is 'vehemintly op-
posed' to any form of self-
defense, even on an in-
dividual basis.
Simone Veil, a former Minister
of Health and former Preeident'of
the European Parliament, also
came out strongly against
Begin's call. She said she is "ve-
ehmently opposed" to any form
of self-defense, even on an indi-
vidual basis.
Opposition parties have closed
round the Mitterrand Adminis-
tration on this issue. Most op-
position leaders also support tne
government's Middle East policy
and its decision to take part in an
international force.
MEANWHILE, Jewish com-
munity leaders, who gathered to
pay tribute to the victims of the
attack, are also trying to smooth
down tempers and calm the more
virulently outspoken members of
Jewish youth movements. Prime
Minister Pierre Mauroy, who at-
tended the services of Paris' main
synagogue, was booed by part of
the crowd as he left. Other poli-
tical leaders fared just as badly.
France's Jewish community
had previously supported tHe
Socialists and especially Mitter-
rand. It has still not mended its
fences with the former Gaulliat
majority, now the opposition".
And Jewish leaders privately ex;
press their fears that the Jews
risk finding themselves isolated
and cut off from all major politic-
al parties and organizations.
After visiting wounded Israel soldiers as a participant in EL
AL's Entertainers Program Shalom to Israel '82, actor Peter
Strauss (right) meets with Prime Minister Menachem Begin
and EL AL's chairman of the board Nachman Perel (left).
State Dep't. 'Deplores' Violence
Against Jews, Institutions
WASHINGTON (JTA) The State Department
has deplored the terrorist bombing of a building in Paris
which housed offices dealing with Israel, and a Jewish-
owned bank.
Noting that this was the sixth incident in recent days,
Department spokesman Alan Romberg said that "We de-
plore this series of barbaric acts against, innocent individ-
uals which have already cost many lives. We are confident
that the French government is taking all possible actions
to apprehend those responsible and to prevent any further
or future incidents."
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Page 10-A The Jewish Floridian Friday. August 20, 1962
Justice Dep't. Asked:
Find Source of Phony Newspaper Ad
NEW YORK-The
American Jewish Congress
has asked the Department
of Justice to investigate the
source of funds used to
place an anti-Israel ad-
vertisement in major news-
papers across the country
by a group calling itself
"Concerned Americans for
Peace.''
In a letter to Attorney General
William French Smith, the exec-
utive director of AJCongress,
Henry Siegman. suggested that
funds for the July 11 advertising
campaign may have come from
Arab sources and may involve
violation of the Foreign Agents
Registration Act or other federal
law.
"Concerned Amehcans for
Peace," which spent more than
$120,000 to finance the advertis-
ing campaign, listed a fictitious
Los Angeles Post Office box as
its address
INDIVIDUALS involved in
placing the advertisement have
so far refused to reply to any in-
quiries about the source of fund-
ing or the nature of the sponsor-
ing group
Questions regarding the legiti-
macy of Concerned Americans
for Peace'- were triggered as a re-
sult of its listing of six relief orJ
gamzations in its advertisement,
suggesting their endorsement of
the ad's anti-Israel content. The
relief agencies included the
American Red Cross. American
Friends Service Committee. U.S.'
Committee for UNICEF, Church
World Services of the National
Council of Churches. CARE and
Save the Children Federation.
The relief groups issued a joint
statement denying they had
authorized the use of their names
in an anti-Israel campaign and
expressing 'dismay'' at being
linked by the ad's sponsors with
"direct criticism of one of the
parties in the current Lebanese
conflict."
INQUIRIES by the agencies
and reporters also revealed no
record of the existence of "Con-
cerned Americans for Peace'- and
found that the post office box
listed by the group was fictitious.
According to Bernard Hodes.
head of the advertising agency
that was recorded as officially
placing the ad. the placement was
actually made by Pat Howard, a
member of bis firm, acting in a
private capacity, at the request of
Copley Lane Capen. another ad-
vertising agency in Sherman
Oaks. Calif. The Copley agency
denies it was involved.
However, prior to the place-
El Al Workers Bar Airport Entry
To Members of Agudat Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) -
Several hundred employes
of El Al barred entry to the
Ben Gurion Airport ter-
minal building to .a few
dozen black-garbed mem-
bers of Agudat Israel last
week.
The demonstrators shouted
that if the Aguda did not allow
them to work on the Sabbath and
allow other Jews and non-Jews
wishing to fly on Saturdays to do
so. "then we will not allow the
Aguda. who are anti-Zionist and
who do not serve in the army, to
fly on any other day.''
GABY SALZMAN. spokes-
man for the El Al workers com-
mittees, said their protest and
ban was not against religious
Jews, but only against Agudat
Israel members "who can be
easily identified by their black
kapotas (long coats) and streimei
(fur hats)."
The passengers and their wive*
and children barred from entry to
the terminal building until police
forced a way open, but only after
many had already missed their
flights. screamed that the El Al
workers were behaving "just like
the goyim like Nazis they
are anti-Semites."
The workers spokesman said
that they had achieved their aim
of drawing public attention to the
problem of the Aguda-imposed
halt to Sabbath flights by El AL
Salzman denied there had been
any selektzia of passengers into
categories, saying it was the
Aguda Israel members them-
selves who were creating a split
within the ranks of Jewry.
Selektzia was the concentration
camp term used by the Nazis to
divide inmates into groups, for
death or life. Some of the Aguda
members had described the scene
at the airport as a "Nazi-like
selektzia.
THE EL AL workers action
sparked off a violent row in the
Knesset, where National
Religious Party member Israel
Melamed declared: "Today we
are all kapota wearers." Haim
Druckman called the workers
action "open anti-Semitism.''
Deputy Foreign Minister Yehuda
Ben- Meir tried to get the Knesset
to recess for 15 minutes as a sign
of protest at the airport incident.
Meanwhile. the Knesset
Economic Committee unani-
mously recommended to the gov-
ernment that it reconsider its de-
cision to halt El Al flights on
Saturdays beginning Sept. 1.
Both the coalition and opposition
members of the committee sup-
ported the recommendation. Gad
Yaacobi. chairman of the com-
mittee, said that if the ban on
Saturday flights is not lifted. El
Al will gradually cease to exist,
with' an annual loss of Si.25
billion Shekels.
ment of the "Concerned Ameri-
cans for Peace" advertisement,
Paul Copley, a principal of the
firm, had attempted to reprint in
newspapers across the country an
advertisement hostile to Israel
signed by a group of San Fran-
cisco area residents that had ap-
peared in a June 23 edition of the
San Francisco Chronicle. The
coordinators of that ad declined
to give Mr. Copley permission to
reprint the ad the AJCongress
learned-
THE 'Concerned Americans
for Peace" ad reprinted signifi-
cant portions of text from the
San Francisco advertisement.
Both Copley and Howard have
refused to respond to inquiries
about their reported role in the
placing of the "Concerned Amer-
icans for Peace" ad or the source
of its funding.
Advertising officials of news-
papers that ran the advertise-
ment said they depended on veri-
fication documents supplied by
Howard and signed by a "Craig
Lane." supposedly president of
"Concerned Americans for
Peace." Attempts to locate Lane
or to determine whether he ac-
tually exists have been unsuc-
cessful.
The only newspaper to ques-
tion the authenticity of the ad
was the Christian Science Moni-
tor. Its advertising department
called the relief organizations
listed in the advertisement. On
learning that permission had not
been given for the agencies'
names to be used, the newspaper
rejected the ad. The Monitor
passed along its information to
the Los Angeles Times which ran
the advertisement, omitting the
names of the relief organizations.
SIEGMAN SAID a major
deception has been perpetrated
against the newspapers involved
and their readers."
He suggested the funds used to
finance the ad campaign may
have been of Arab origin, noting
a similarity between the "Con-
cerned Americans for Peace" ad
and those openly sponsored by
Arab groups. He also cited the
refusal of those placing the ad to
divulge who paid for it even
when asked to do so by the news-
papers they victimized" as fur-
ther reason for suspicion con-
cerning the source of funds and
the ad's sponsorship.
Attempts to use "misrepresen-
tation and deceit" to hide the real
sponsors of a propaganda effort
carried out on behalf of a foreign
power carries with it "the most
serious implications." Siegman
noted. "Agents for foreign inter-
ests have every right to press a
particular point of view on the
American public. But they must
do so within the confines of U.S.
laws."
The AJCongress official asked
the Attorney General to investi-
gate the source of funds for the
"Concerned Americans for
Peace" advertisement and to de-
termine whether any violations of
law occurred.
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JERUSALEM-From August
5. the Israeli consumer is being
faced by large price increases
which will serve to finance the
war in Lebanon. This results
from the Government of Israel's
decision to transfer a sum of 1.34
billion Israeli Shelels I so me $50
million I from the budget for sub-
sidizing basic commodities to the
defense budget.
As a result of the cut in subsi-
dies, the following price increases
have come into effect: milk and
its products. 36 percent: public
transportation, postage and tele-
phone. 25 percent: bread, cooking
oil. meat and eggs. 15 percent.
The prices of gasoline and other
petroleum products have already
been increased last week by 24
percent.
Spokesman of the Israel
Economic Mission in New York.
Uri Oren. stated that the cut in
subsidies and increases in prices
resulted from the law concerning
the financing of the cost of.
"Operation Peace for Galilee"
which was passed last week.
The law specifies that bv April
30. 1983. some 40 billion Israeli
Shekels tsome SI .5 billion! will be
raised from the following sour-
ces: a comulsory loan at the rates
of 4 to 6 percent of income: in-
crease of the value added tail
rate, from 12 to 15 percent: im-l
position of a $26 tax on foreign I
travel: a surcharge on imports.
As part of the financing pack-1
age called for by this law, thel
government undertook to cut iu I
expenditures by 5 billion Israeli |
Shekeks. The reduction in s
dies is part of the overall cut i
government expenditures. Nenl
week, the Minister of Finance.
Yoram Aridor, will bring befoul
the government a program for I
the remaining 3.66 billion Israeli |
Shekels required reduction in |
government expenditures.
Oren said that the fiscal bur-1
den of the war, which will amount |
to some $1.5 billion by April:
1983. will be the equivalent oi I
more than 7 percent of Israel's^
annual Gross National Product.
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TEL AVIV UTAl U.S.I
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Rift Reported
Is Sharon Running His Own War?
Friday, August 20,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11 A
250 Arrive From U.S. To
Begin Semi-Military Training
Continued from Page 1-A
the terms of President Reagan's
special envoy, preferring to
attack the PLO forces and forc-
ing them out by a military defeat.
The latest indication of this
attitude was in an interview with
an Israel Television correspond-
ent in Beirut after his lengthy
meeting with Habib. Sharon
stressed that "no agreement"
had been reached by Habib with
anybody on a planned withdraw-
al of PLO forces, mainly because
no Arab country had agreed to
accept them, apart from a small
number who might be taken by
Jordan, Egypt or the Sudan.
"THEY HAVE nowhere to go
at this moment," Sharon said in
the interview, "Because there is
no Arab country willing to accept
them, there is no arrangement at
this moment, no agreement, or
any possible deal." He added
that the PLO is on the verge of
removal, one way or another."
Sharon's statement came even
as Begin said in Jerusalem that
he had accepted a proposal by
Habib that an international force
move into west Beirut, as part of
a plan to get the PLO forces out
of the city and then out of
Lebanon altogether after most
but not necessarily all of the ter-
rorists withdraw.
Although Sharon's popularity
among Israelis has increased
since the war in Lebanon began
June 6. his popularity in the
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Cabinet has been diminishing.
Some Cabinet ministers feel that
the Cabinet is not in control of
the situation, that Sharon, and
not the Cabinet as a whole, is
making arbitrary decisions re-
garding the tactics and strategy
of the war.
THE ISSUE was raised obli-
quely at a Cabinet meeting when
ministers pressed Sharon with
detailed questions about the
advance of the Israel Defense
Force earlier that day to capture
the Beirut international airport.
The ministers were apparently
unaware at the time of their
meeting of the massive extent of
the IDF's bombing and shelling
of west Beirut that day.
Sharon contended that the
IDF's advance was a "local tacti-
cal action" in response to the ter-
rorists breaking the ceasefire. He
apparently argued that the ad-
vance was covered by the long-
standing decision-in-principle
that Israel will not agree to a one-
sided ceasefire and that Israel's
response to PLO violations would
not necessarily be directly related
in scope or in area to the precise
violations.
Meanwhile, a group of reserv-
ists recently released after fight-
ing in Lebanon told a press con-
ference in Jerusalem that they
had delivered to Begin a docu-
ment signed by more than 2,000
front line reservists asking that
Sharon be removed from his post
because servicemen no longer had
confidence in him.
IN ANOTHER development
dealing with the PLO departure
from west Beirut, Foreign Minis-
ter Yitzhak Shamir told the
Knesset Foreign Affairs and
Security Committee that there i
were some indications that the
PLO was prepared to leave, but
the problem remained of where
they would go. A fierce debate is
reported to have taken place be-
tween Shamir and opposition
Labor Party members of the
committee about the correct
policy to be instituted in the
Beirut area.
Former Premier Yitzhak
Rabin, had said at the line that
since no Arab countries would
accept the beleaguered PLO
forces, his proposals for their
temporary stay in the Tripoli
area in northern Lebanon should
be seriously considered, instead
of being rejected out of hand by
the government.
TEL AVIV (JTA) A
group of some 250 young men
and women from the New York
area have arrived in Israel and
begun semi-military training for
a few days before serving as
volunteers in settlements on the
Golan Heights from which many
regular members have left their
work to answer their reserve call-
up orders. Another group of 250
is due to join them next week.
The 500 American Jews who
have volunteered are mainly be-
tween the ages of 18 and 30, but
there are also some married
couples in their late 40s who have
also joined the group. All partici-
pants are paying their own fares
to and from Israel, but their stay
in Israel is being borne by the
kibbutzim where they will work.
Jews from the U.S. and other
countires have always volun-
teered to help the kibbutzim and
fanners in Israel in previous
I wars. But this is the first time
they are also being offered a form
of basic military training. This,
however, is of greater psy-
chological value to the partici-
pants than it is of actual mili-
tary value to the army.
Meanwhile, an Israel radio and
television day-long phone-in do-
nation and auction sale program
raised 142 million Shekels (just
under $6 million) for the army
The record figure was well above
.he minimum SI million hoped
for, and even more than the most
optimistic figure of $2 million or
$3 million mentioned by some
officials.
Voted Most UNQUALIFIED Judge
Faske Still Seeks Second Term
We Can Do Better
ELECT E. SHAPIRO *
Official results of the April 1982 Bar Poll Sent to Dade
Lawyers & Judges show that Incumbent Judge Adele
Segall Faske was voted most unqualified of ALL Circuit
Judges seeking re-election this year.
A/KMGeneSlMIe
Pd. Pol. Brr> Coloring
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-
Page ffl-A The Jewish Meridian / Friday, August 20,1982

..
Continued from Page 1 A
weapon, or highly similar is believed to have
been used in the attack on Israel's Ambassa-
dor to Britain Shlomo Argov last June, and in
the attack against a Vienna synagogue last
August.
Police officials remained perplexed as to the
circumstances of the discovery, questioning
why the attackers would leave the weapon in
a relatively exposed area as the Bois de Bou-
logne where it would undoubtedly be found.
Nevertheless, the discovery of the weapon
the first significant clue police officials have
in the search for two men, believed to be 0f
Middle East origin, who are responsible for
the attack on the restaurant.
Rift With U.S. Vexes Him
But Peres Says 'It Will Pass Away'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON -
(JTA) Shimon Peres,
chairman of Israel's oppo-
sition Labor Party, said
last week that while he was
concerned about the recent
difficulties between Israel
and the United States, he
relieves if the Lebanese
situation is resolved peace-
fully, the "rift will pass)
away."
Peres said that during a 30-
minute meeting with President
Reagan at the White House the
President told him that negotia-
tors were "very near solving" the
problem of getting 9ome 6,000
PLO terrorists to evacuate
Beirut.
Peres said that the meetings
with Reagan and earlier with
Secretary of State George Shultz
at the State Department were
"very friendly." He said Reagan
had not expressed any "dis-
pleasure" with Israel. Peres, who
also met with Defense Secretary
Caspar Weinberger at the Penta-
gon, said the only message he
would bring back to Israel from
Washington was of "friendship
and cooperation.
PERES SAID he expressed to
Reagan his "regret" for the loss
of life in Lebanon. But he noted
Sportsman
Cancel Visit
BONN (JTA) A west
German sport organization,
Hessischer Sport Jugend, can-
celled a visit of an Israeli sports
delegation to Frankfurt because
of the war in Lebanon. Formerly,
members of the West German or-
ganization visited Israel and were
hosted there by a sports associa-
tion.
While the move of the
Hessischer Sport Jugend was
aimed at showing displeasure
with Israel's policy in Lebanon, it
also reflected the concern of the
authorities over providing proper
security.
Shimon Peres
that Israel wants a peaceful solu-
tion and has allowed the negotia-
tions to go on for eight weeks,
even though militarily it could
have taken over all of Beirut in 24
hours, in order to allow for a
peaceful solution.
Peres said that Shultz had
pointed out that some of the
Arab countries are concerned
about Israel's intentions in Leba-
non the sooner the better," Peres
said.
He said he agreed with Reagan
when the President told him that
the Lebanese situation has
opened an opportunity for the
"continuation of the peace
mementum in the Middle East."
The Israeli official said he
stressed that "we feel the time
has come to solve the Palestinian
problem."
He said he told the President
that the weakening of the PLO
may encourage the residents of
the West Bank and Gaza Strip,
and perhaps Jordan as well, to
participate in the negotiations for
a settlement of the Palestinian
question.
PERES STRESSED that
there is a need to "return to the
Camp David agreement, not to
lose the Egyptian participation. I
think it is tremendously import-
ant that Egypt continues to play
a key role in continuing the peace
process." He said that because of
improved relations between
Jordan and Egypt, Egypt
may be able to bring Jordan into
the negotiations.
As for the negotiations for the
PLO evacuation from Beirut,
Peres said that the agreement
has been worked out except for
the detials. He said that Syria
Jordan and Iraq have agreed to
take some of the terrorists, but
Egypt's agreement is conditional
on solving the Palestinian prob-
lem. This will take a long time,
Peres noted.
Shortly after Peres' meeting
with Reagan, the White House
issued a statement welcoming the
Israeli Cabinet's approval in
principle of a U.S. plan to end the
crisis in Lebanon.
THE STATEMENT, issued
by Deputy Press Secretary Larry
Speakes. said, "We welcome the
Israeli assessment as an essential
element in getting the problem
solved in Beirut. We are en-
couraged by the momentum and
the peace process continues to
build. .
The statement added: "We re-
main cautiously optimistic that
outstanding issues can be worked
out It is our belief that nego-
tiations and best move forward
when the ceasefire is carefully ob-
served by all parties.
(In New York, JTA corres-
pondent Yitzhak Rabi reported
that Peres told a luncheon meet-
ing of the United Jewish Appeal
at the St. Regis Hotel, "I believe
that as Jews we are not in-
terested in governing 1.2 million
Palestinians (on the West Bank
and Gaza Strip) against their
will." He warned that if the
"domination" of Israel over the
Palestinians continues, Jews
could one day become a minority
in the Jewish State.
(Peres said, however, that al-
though Israel has to find a solu-
tion to the Palestinian issue, it
will never agree to negotiate with
the PLO or to the establishment
of a Palestinian state between Is-
rael and Jordan. He said the
Palestinian problem should be
solved through negotiations be-
tween Israel, Jordan and the
Palestinians.
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UN Truce Force Mandate
Will Be Extended
By YITZHAK RABI
UNITED NATIONS (JTA)
- Secretary General Javier
Perez de-Cuellar recommended
that the mandate of the United
National Interim Force in Leba-
non (UNIFILI be extended for
two more months. The current
mandate of the force which was
last extended by the Security
Council June 18, Thursday.
In a report to the Security
Council, de-Cuellar said that ex-
tension of UNIFIL's mandate
was requested by the Lebanese
government. He pointed out,
however, that an extension was
needed in view of the present
situation in Lebanon.
"The overall situation in the
area," the Secretary General re-
ported," remains uncertain and
fraught with danger." De-Cudl*
said that he had been in COOMm
touch with the government of U
banon, which had indicated that
in the existing circumstance
UNIFIL should continue to bt
stationed in the area for an addi-
tional period of two months,
pending further consideration of
the situation in Lebanon by the
Security Council.
The Secretary General said
that UNIFIL has been "deeply
engaged in extending protection
and humanitarian aid to the
civilian population in Lebanon
He added: "There is not doubt in
my mind that the presence of
UNIFIL has provided an impor
tant stabilizing and moderating
influence in south Lebanon dur
ing these difficult weeks."
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Friday, August 20, 1982 / The Jewish Floridiar* Page 13-A
I JUST LOVE THESE
SCIENCE FJCTiON SHOWS...
Leo Mindlin
Real America Is Still Alive
Continued from Page 1 A
linguistic change rapidly engulfs
and overturns the temper of
Imerica so that the atmosphere
ecomes heated, volatile and
jften desperate in the more
phlegmatic Anglo-Saxon mind.
IT IS precisely the absence of
lis intemperate cutting edge
ere in New England that I find
soothing, even therapeutic.
Shakespeare, in The Tempest,
t'uks of men who "doth suffer a
ea-change/ Into something rich
nd strange."
At Bretton Woods, and later in
Franconia Notch, it is, of course,
mountain-change. I get the
^ense in memory returned of pas-
jral weeks spent at Murren in
Switzerland, high over Lauter-
brunnen that, from our own bal-
cony, the Jungfrau and the Eiger
eemed deceptively eager to be
niched by just reaching out our
liands to them.
From another balcony of ours
pi the Notch, the mountains are
.entler, but no less inviting, no
ess divine and awe-inspiring. If
he history of Bretton Woods is
hot in them, neither is the failure
If Bretton Woods. Nor is there
lie inscrutable eye of Araby ap-
raising its worth. These moun-
lins and all that has occurred
pon them are beyond history.
hey are eternal, temperate,
riceless. They are not for sale.
THIS SAME immortal quality
amps the face of the New Eng-
ender everywhere. There is a
panite quality to the chin of the
ghthouse-keeper at Pemaquid
oint in Maine. I see it as well in
ners at a tiny fish house on the
Jet at Boothbay Harbor, also in
'nine; in the determined talk of
art shopkeeper in Damariscot-
i. here in New Hampshire; and
1 the face of.a farmer standing
par his huge flfedpile he is beef-
g up againetihf coming winter
st outside of^Jtowe, in Ver-
ont.
I Surely, all of this is America as
bee the whole nation was, a
Ithering of independent people
aided by the Protestant virtues
Old Testament theology with
hich a Jew, given the right con-
tions, can feel some affinity,
bme sense of harmony, a unity
Tiether with the wild northeast
i or the enduring mountains.
[Driving past village after vil-
f$e. church after church, town
ky hall and library one upon
other in serene assemblage, I
literally forced to notice the
lence of even a single cross,
tier on houses of worship or in
> cemetery.
[THIS IS the world of the Puri-
who, from the beginning of
Reformation, fled the power
the papacy with the kind of
ir one would have thought only
pew could feel, a Jew stul steep-
ed in the terrifying menace of the
Inquisition, the Romanist
slaughter in the name of some
strange, divine love.
This is the world that set the
stage for the life of a mighty
American nation freed from such
repulsive absolutist religious
doctrines that popped out the
eyes of dissenters as though they
were so many cherries, that
stretched and cracked the bones
of disbelievers on the wrack.
It is not that there was no ab-
solutism here of another kind
from the very beginning, or that
there is no absolutism here of
some sort even today. H.L.
Mencken characterized the New
England Puritan as living in con-
stant nerve-shattering fear that
sometime, somewhere there
exists a Protestant who is exper-
iencing pleasure.
STILL, driving through this
part of America, I am forever
conscious of being away from the
cutting edge of unhappy change.
More, I am increasingly fearful
that the cutting edge follows
usfrom Florida, from Texas
and New Mexico and Arizona,
from the coast of California. It
follows us to bring back the
creches and the crosses, the
plaster casts of gods and saints
and madonnas, to overwhelm the
nation in an eradication of the
present and a resurrection of the
past.
I share this seeming paranoia
with New Englanders along the
way. They do not know what I
am talking about. "It is because
you do not live on the cutting
edge of such hideous change," I
tell them. "It is because all of
what I describe seems so distant
from you, a mere news broadcast
on the radio or TV."
Is it my own xenophobia, my
sense that suddenly the air chill-
ed even more dramatically when I
saw the Arab in kefayeh at
Bretton Woods? Or when I be-
held in my imagination angels
and crosses suddenly affixed to
the modest, seemingly anony-
mous gravestones in the cemeter-
ies hugging the roadsides of the
New England mountains? Or set
upon the unpretentious steeples
of clapboard chapels in the towns
and villages?
ALTHOUGH they will not
agree with me here, I think not.
My fear is not an irrational fear,
and the granite chins of the recal-
citrant New Englanders I meet
make me fear for them, too. And
for the nation as well.
No, they are not for sale, these
people. They are not for sale as
say, South Florida is for sale. But
is the granite in them strong
enough to withstand the erosion
of the medieval horde storming
the national bastion south and
west? On the answer to this ques-
tion depends our future. I lay my
own money on their insouciant
indifference to the challenge, as if
nothing can move these moun-
tains and the great sea beyond to
become something other than
what they are and have always
been.
The grim fact, however, is that
I hardly remember ever winning
a bet before.
ALL I can hope for with a cer-
tainty is that if there is to be a
turnabout at all, a rededication to
our national identity, a revivifi-
cation of the American character
to the exclusion of alien dilutions
and diminutions in the civil liber-
tarian name of the "right" others
have to make these tests of our
integrity as a people and to wreak
with force and havoc these
changes upon us, then the turn-
about will occur here.
It is not a matter of what the
New Englander will do to cling to
the noble national character of
yesterday which he lives, unlike
most of us elsewhere, in all of his
todays too. It is a matter of what
he will not do. It is not a matter
of what he will reject. It is a mat-
ter only of what he will not accept.
Depend upon nothing in the
cutting edges of our national
change, South Florida included.
Nothing but for exploitation.
And for cowardice.
Colombia Said to Be Considering
Purchase of Israeli Kfir Fighters
By JAIME REIBEL
BOGOTA (JTA) -
Colombia will buy a squadron of
either French Mirage-50 or Isreli
Kfir fighter jets, it was reported
here by the leading daily, El
Siglo. The sale of the 12 planes is
conditional upon the speed of de-
livery. According to the report,
Israel Aircraft Industries has of-
fered to deliver the Kfirs within
two months France has said it
would need nine months to
satisfy the terms of the contract.
The Colombian Air Force is
under pressure to strengthen its
defense capability in light of a
long-simmering border dispute
with Venezuela, which last year
acquired 24 American-made F-16
interceptors. If Bogota purchases
the Kfir, it will become the third
South American country, joining
Ecuador and Argentina, to incor-
porate the Israeli jet into its air-
force.
Divorce Equity
New York Law Will
Adjust Wife's Disability
Continued from Page 1 A
presenting Manhattan's Lower
East Side, told the Jewish Tele-
graphic Agency that the bill was
the product of months of careful
drafting to avoid any possibility
of conflict with the Constitution-
al church-state separation doc-
trine.
Under Jewish religious law
(halacha) a wife refused a get has
the status of an Agunah,and may
not remarry religiously even after
winning a civil divorce.
SILVER explained that the
principle behind the bill is that "a
matrimonial action is an action in
equity. One of the doctrines of
equity is that the court should
leave the parties with equal
status." He added that the mea-
sure permits one party to allege
that "if this (divorce) court dis-
solves this marriage, civilly 1 will
have a barrier to remarriage."
The barrier will be the husband's
refusal to give his wife a get,
though the measure makes no re-
ference to that religious action.
The measure provides that
when one party to a civil divorce
action complains of a barrier to
re-marriage imposed by the other
party, the issue may be submitt-
ed to a fact-finding and mediation
panel which will have the func-
tion of determining whether such
a barrier exists and, if it does,
whether either party can remove
it.
The measure provides for the
judge hearing the divorce case to
name the panel which can make
recommendations for removal of
the barrier. The panel is thus an
agency of the court. The court
may, at its discretion, withhold a
final judgement on the civil di-
vorce if the party seeking the di-
vorce in such cases, the Jewish
husband fails to comply with
the recommendation of the panel
presumably to give his wife a
get.
THE PANEL has 30 days to
make its recommendation. To
avoid legal problems, the
measure was written to withhold
intentionally any authority for
the judge to hold in contempt the
divorce party rejecting the
panel's recommendations. The
clout the judge can exercise for
the wife of a recalcitrant Jewish
husband is to refuse to give him
and his wife a civil divorce.
Silver was asked what recourse
the wife has if the judge, exercis-
ing his discretion, gives the hus-
band and wife a civil divorce des-
pite his panel's recommendations
that the civil divorce be withheld
on grounds the wife will have a
barrier to re-marriage.
Silver replied that, under stan-
dard procedures in the State
Supreme Court, which has juris-
diction in divorces, the wife can
appeal to the next highest state
court, the appallate division.
Prof. Aaron Twerski, a Hofstra
law professor who is chairman of
the Commission on Legislation
and Civic Action of Agudath
Israel of America, an Orthodox
agency, helped draft the legisla-
The court may withhold
final judgment on the civil
divorce if the party seeking
the divorcein such cases,
the Jewish husbandfails
to comply with the recom-
mendation of the panel
presumably to give his
wife a 'get.'
tion. Calling the measure "a low
profile resolution to a high profile
problem," Twerski said the draf-
ters "very studiously stayed
away from the question of a
court-coerced 'get' to avoid gett-
ing into the thicket of halachic
questions."
ALSO CONSULTED on the
measure were such rabbinical au-
thorities as Rabbi Moshe Fein-
stein, president of the Union of
Orthodox Rabbis of the United
States and Canada, a world auth-
ority on halacha; Rabbi Jacob
Kamenecki, dean of Yeshiva
Tin ah Vodaath of New York; and
Alan Dershowitz, a Harvard law
professor and expert on civil
liberties law.
Approval of the bill in the as-
sembly was by 132 to six. The
measure was introduced in the
State Senate by Sen. Martin
Connor, also a Democrat-Liberal
from the Lower East Side, where
approval was unanimous.
Orthodox leaders said that
only in recent years have marri-
ages in the cohesive Orthodox
community begun to break up in
significant numbers, bringing an
increase in complaints of unethi-
cal conduct by parties to divorce,
mostly on the part of husbands.
THERE HAVE been wide
spread reports that such hus-
bands are denying "gittim" to
their wives, sometimes out of
spite, and sometimes to coerce
wives to sign away rights to pro-
perty, child support and main-
tenance of civil divorce actions.
Silver said there are an estim-
ated 150.000 Orthodox Jewish
women in New York State alone,
who are civilly but not religiously
divorced, adding that some have
been waiting as long as two de-
cades for a "get." He said the
new measure will not help any of
the 150,000 "but it may help
others in the future.
It may also help a much smal-
ler number of Orthodox hus-
bands, who assert they are denied
religious divorces by wives who
refuse to accept a "get." Rabbis
said women also are using the
"get" for leverage in civil settel-
ments, though halacha provides
options to men not available to
women.
Rabbi Moshe Sherer, Agudath
Israel president, said "we hope
this bill will have the effect in the
Orthodox Jewish community of
discoraging coercion and black-
mail in divorce procedures."
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**age 14:^ fhe Jewish fibridTan Friday, August 20, 1982
Russians in America
'
Revive Brooklyn's Brighton Beach
By ANNELISE ORLECK
NEW YORK-Since the
Soviet Union opened its
doors to Jewish emigration
in 1972, over 150,000 Soviet
Jews have left for the West.
In the first few years, the
overwhelming majority,
motivated by strong Zion-
ist leanings, moved to
Israel. Recently, increasing
numbers of Soviet Jews
have found their way to
America's shores.
Although it was largely the re-
sult of demonstrations by Ameri-
can Jewry that the United States
Government pressured the Sov-
iets to let Jews out. many new
immigrants report feeling unwel-
comed by their American Jewish
counterparts.
"In the Soviet L.rion they
looked at us and said. You can-
not be Russian with such a Jew-
ish face Here in America they
look at us and say. You cannot
be Jewish, because vou look and
act and speak like a Russian,'"
said Sasha Cirotin. a recent
Soviet immigrant.
IN BROOKLYN, New York s
Brighton Beach, where 25.000
Soviet Jews now live, the com-
munity is closely knit. On any
Friday or Saturday night, one
sees Soviet young people in silks
and satins, leather jackets and
slinky black dresses out for a
night at the disco. After only a
few years in this country, they
speak English with little or no
accent. They are becoming
Americans.
According to Cirotin. an im-
portant factor in determining the
Soviet Jewish experience in
America is the desire to integrate
into American life. Sixty years of
Soviet repression left many im-
migrants disconnected from their
Annelise Orleck is a free-
lance journalist, presently
writing a book on the Jews
of Brighton Beach.
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But those who helped bring
them here are angered by their
resistance to Jewish customs.
Jewish past. Since coming to
America, many have been reac-
quainted with their Jewish heri-
tage.
"Soviet Jews cannot be over-
fed Jewishness like any starving
person cannot be overfed with
food. American Jewry must help
them overcome their nostalgia for
the USSR by filling the vacuum
in which nostalgia grows with
Jewish art in Russian and Yid-
dish. This allows them to grow
into their Jewish identity at the
same time as they learn to parti-
cipate in the American way of
life."' Cirotin said.
Sophie Spector. formerly an
English teacher at the Pedagogi-
cal Institute in Odessa, now
teaches English to Soviet senior
citizens in Brighton Beach.
"All of my work here." she told
me. "every step that I take is to
bring my people over to thinking
in a positive way. There are many
people who would like to go back
to USSR, because human mem-
ory is such that people only re-
member what is good and forget
the bad things.
"THEY REMEMBER that
their friends are there, their
language is there, their home city
is there. You have to think about
happiness. I tell them, because if
you remember that the friends
you left in Russia are afraid to
say that they are Jews, must give
their children Russian names, are
not even allowed to go to syn-
agogue or to speak Yiddish, then
you will feel that you were very
lucky and that you must be hap-
py to be there."
Indeed, her students do seem
happy to be in this country
"I love America," replied one
steel greyhaired woman with
very red lips. "I have my own
apartment, pension. My son is an
engineer. My grandson works
with computers. America is a
very beautiful country."
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Another answered with tears in
her eyes. "I wanted to see all
America. I went to Los Angeles
and Florida and Philadelphia.
Now my husband is dead. I don't
want travel anymore. I only want
that my son in Moscow will
someday come to America with
my grandchild. They taught him
to write English, my grandson.
He writes. Grandma 1 love you
very much. 1 pray they can one
day come too.' "
THESE COMMENTS bring to
light several issues. First, there
are still at least 200.000 Jews
who have applied for a visa and
been denied. Some entire families
have been lucky enough to get
out. but many others have had to
leave spouses and children be-
hind.
The second problem is one of
overtraining. Said Cirotin: "This
is the most highly educated im-
migration wave ever to hit Amer-
ican shores." Many of the Soviet
Jews who have come in the last
ten years are professionals: doc-
tors, engineers, professors.
As a result, there are doctors
now working as house cleaners or
companions. An economics pro-
fessor works as kitchen help in a
kosher catering hall. Engineers
drive taxi cabs. And though some
regret their decision to leave the
USSR most will tell you, "Its
okay. My children will be Ameri-
cans."
As newcomers in a community
of elderly Jews the Soviet Jews
have caused some resentment in
Brighton Beach. Their flashy
clothing and heavy makeup as-
tounds many of the old fashioned
immigrants raised in an older
Russian-Jewish tradition that
valued modesty and frugality.
THE RESISTANCE that the
Soviets have shown to Jewish re-
ligious customs-like keeping
kosher and observing the injunc-
tion not to work on Jewish holi-
days-not only angers but hurts
many of those who saved their
pennies for years to "give the
Jews of the Soviet Union a
chance to come where they could
live as Jews."
The hardest adaption problems
are faced by those in middle age,
too old to change, too young to
stop working.
Living in neighborhoods like
Brighton Beach and Miami
Beach, they are finding that they
still remember the Yiddish they
were afraid to use for half a cen-
tury. As one woman told me hap-
pily the day she received her citi-
zenship, "I was always meant to
be American." .
Following recent talks in Washington with President ReaB
and other Administration officials, Israel's Foreign Affnfeta
Yitzhak Shamir (right} met with the Conference of President
of Major American Jewish Organizations in New York. Left '
Yehuda Hellman, executive director. Center is Julius Berrna
chairman of the Conference of Presidents of Major American
Jewish Organizations.
Miami MD in Exchange
With Soviets on Nuke War
Dr. Jay Kerzner. a member of
the Miami Chapter of Physicians
for Social Responsibility and
International Physicians for the
Prevention of Nuclear War. re-
cently returned from an inter-
national congress of cardiology in
the USSR.
While attending the confer-
ence. Dr. Kerzner participated in
an interchange with Soviet
physicians on the subject of nu-
clear war. Part of this inter-
change included an appearance
by three American physicians on
Soviet television in which they
discussed the medical conse-
quences of nuclear war.
According to Dr. Kerzner.
"There is widespread concern in
the Soviet Union about nuclear
devastation. It is important to
note that the same things that
physicians are saying in this
country are being said in the So-
viet Union.
In fact, there is a world move-
ment of physicians emerging,
those inside the USSR included,
whose aim is to alert physicians
and the public worldwide of the
mortal peril posed by nuclear
weapons."
Both Physicians for Social
Responsibility, an American or-
ganization, and International
Physicians for the Prevention of
Nuclear War. an organization
with members from over 30 coun-
tries, work toward the prevention
of nuclear war and the elimin-
ation of nuclear weapons.
Dr. Kerzner, a member of both
organizations, believes that ;
dialogue "must be estaulished
with the USSR" and other na-
tions as to the medical effi
nuclear weapons.
Differences between political
systems cannot be resolved bv
the use of nuclear weapon- A,
all know that there would be no
winners in a nuclear war in .-..,
the USSR and the United States,
The general impression I took a-
way from this meeting is that
both Eastern and Western physi-
cians concur on the non-surviva-
bility of their repective societies
in the event of a nuclear war.
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Leaders Hear Envoy s Expression of France's 'Deep Sorrow'
WASHINGTON (JTA)A delegation of the Confer-
ence of Presidents of Major American Jewish Organiza-
tions told Acting French Ambassador Claude Harel that
the recent wave of anti-Semitic outbreaks in France was
not an internal French matter but symptomatic of a
"rapidly-spreading infection'" that deeply concerns Jews
the world over.
The delegation comprising Julius Berman, chairman,
and Yehuda Hellman, executive vice chairman of the
Presidents Conference, suggested that France, "as a mat-
ter of policy should publicly condemn PLO terrorism by
name, whether it takes place in France or anywhere on
earth."
. IN REPLY, Harel expressed his government's "deep
' sorrow" at recent events in France and promised to trans-
mit the Preisdents Conference message to French Foreign
Minister Claude Cheysson. He added, however, that he
was doubtful the French government would publicly con-
demn the PLO.
Hyman Bookbinder, Washington representative of the
American Jewish Committee, accompanied the Presi-
dent's Conference leaders in their visit with Harel, which
lasted 75 minutes.
Three ways to avoid
taking a bath
with an inefficient
water heater.

r
One of our three WitMMse
several hundred dollars. Our water heater incentive program applies to
customers who replace or modify their current electric water heaters with
either 1) a solar water heater, 2) a water heating heat pump or 3) a heat
recovery unit. All three are designed to save electricity.
An FPL Home Energy Audit will determine if you qualify and how much
you can save. Then we'll help cover the cost of purchase and installation of
the new system. Water heaters must meet our standards and be installed by
a participating dealer/contractor. In most cases, payment will be in the form
of a Watt-Saver certificate redeemable with the contractor.
Will everyone benefit from Watt-Wise incentives?
\fes.
These incentives are less costly than the oil necessary to generate the
electricity wasted by inefficient homes. Every 600 kilowatt-hours of electricity
not used is a barrel of oil no one has to pay for. This also helps us postpone
the building of expensive power plants. The less oil we use, and the less new
building we have to do, the more we can help hold the line of everyone's
electric bill.
For more information, or to arrange for a Home Energy Audit, send us
the coupon or call the Watt-Wise Line in Dade at 223-W-A-T-T, in Broward at
463-W-A-T-T.
The Watt-Wise Products Program. Another way we're working hard at
being the kind of power company you want.
I'd like more information on the following
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? Water Heating.
? Cooling & Heating.
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? I would like to have an FPL Home Energy
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Name______________________________
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City________________
FLZip_
Daytime Tel____________________
Mail to: Energy Conservation Department
Florida Power & Light
RO. Box 529100, Miami, FL 33152
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ffi>ace for Galilee"
Knesset Faction in Bitter Fight
American Altitudes
Have Changed Very Little
By GIL SEDAN
JERUSALEM (JTA)
_ The Labor Alignment
Knesset faction is embroil-
ed in a bitter internal fight
over the role it has played
during "Peace for Galilee"
operation. During a meet-
ing of the faction there were
mutual recriminations over
the lack of party clarity on
this issue and criticism that
the public statements of
some of its leaders blurred
differences between the
Alignment and the Likud
coalition.
Yair Tzaban of Mapam spark-
ed the fight when he demanded
the establishment of a state
inquiry commission to investi-
gate the various aspects of the
war in Lebanon. But Labor Party
leader Shimon Peres rejected the
demand, saying that it was too
early to conduct such an investi-
gation, that the proper time
would be when the war ends.
TZABAN'S DEMAND was
similar to one issued last week by
Moshe Shahal, the chairman of
the Alignment Knesset faction.
He was reacting to a report on
Israel Radio that a senior army
officer, briefing soldiers on the
first day of the war, stated that
the goals of the campaign went
far beyond the stated aim of the
government to establish a 40-
kiolmeter buffer zone between the
PLO terrorists and Israel's
northern border.
The officer reportedly said that
the real aim was for the Israel
Defense Force to go all the way to
the Beirut-Damascus road and to
create "a new order" in
Lebanon."
Shahal said that only a state
inquiry commission could find
out whether this was the "deci-
sion of one person without the
knowledge of the government, or
whether this was a Cabinet deci-
sion which was kept from the
Knesset." Shahal said the senior
officer's statement conflicted
with Premier Menachem Begin's
statement of the objectives of the
war when it began June 6.
AT THE Alignment faction
meeting Yehezkel Zakai asked
that the party demand that De-
fense Minister Ariel Sharon be
dismissed. Peres rejected this,
saying: "If we ask for his dismis-
sal we will play into the hands of
the Premier. Begin wants to cast
the entire responsibility (of the
conduct of the war) on the De-
fense Minister, but the entire
Cabinet is responsible. It is for
Begin himself to resign."
Yossi Sarid, a leading Labor
Party dove complained that the
stand of the party on the war was
not clear. He blamed Peres for
not having stressed the diffe-
rences between the Alignment
and the government coalition.
Peres urged the Knesset fac-
tion members to adopt a unified
stand in representing the Align-
ment and to avoid public diffe-
rences of opinion. But this went
unheeded. Coming out of the
meeting, Peres said that during
the infighting he maintained a
low profile on the differences with
the government. He departed af-
terwards for France, leaving
behind him what one faction
member described as a bitter and
torn Knesset faction.
DURING HIS 24-hour visit to
France, Peres will meet with
President Francois Mitterrand,
Prime Minister Pierre Mauroy,
Interior Minister Gaston Defferre
and leaders of the Jewish com-
munity. Sources here said Peres
was not carrying any message
from Begin and had not been
given any assignment by the
Israeli government.
Local BBYO Salutes Israel
at World's Fair
Twenty-two youth leaders
rom Florida Region B'nai B'rith
Youth Organization recently at-
tended the 1982 Southern Area
BBYO Machon held at Camp
Blue Star in North Carolina.
The program for the Southeast
portion of the United States was
coordinated by Susan Samberg
from Hollywood and Brian Bom-
stein from Coral Springs. Both
are recent past presidents of
Florida Region B'nai B'rith Girls
and Aleph Zadik Aleph, respec-
tively. The director for the
Machon program was Steve
Klein, the Florida Region BBYO
Director.
At first, the day at the World's
Fair in Knoxville, Tenn., was just
going to be an added bonus to the
, Machon Program. However, two
weeks before the start of Machon,
the director, Steve Klein, was
| told that, at the Fair's Saudi
Arabia exhibit, Middle East
maps completely omitting Israel
were being distributed daily to
| thousands of visitors.
This information triggered a
I series of telephone conferences
with the leaders in the Knoxville
I Jewish community, the Anti-
Defamation League Regional Of-
fice in Atlanta, the International
j BBYO shaliach, Joe Perlov, Cot-
ton States regional BBYO direc-
tor, Rachel Shankman, and the
two BBYO youth leaders,
Stephen Rosen and Beverly Sil-
verstein, who were coordinating
[the Southern Machon's visit to
|the Fair.
The major issue was not only
now to counteract the Saudi
Arabian "map," but whether the
[BBYO Southern Machon delega-
tion should take an "action
Btand" during its World's Fair
Tint
The Machon staff and youth
[leadership decided that BBYO
"hould take advantage of the
presence at the Fair of 85 BBYO
nembers and their staff from
londa, Georgia. South Carolina,
^orth Carolina, Tennessee,
ouisiana, and Texas.
Suggestions for action in-
cluded a demonstration at the
Saudi Arabian exhibit, a TV and
Newspaper press conference,
mass distribution of literature
and correct maps and, finally, the
plan that everyone liked.
Everyone worked quickly to
breathe life into the idea of mak-
ing a positive statement about
Israel to the World's Fair
visitors. Steve Klein rented booth
space, and then arrangements
were made to have Israeli
materials shipped from national
BBYO in Washington, which in-
cluded official Carte maps of the
Mid East, bright posters, tourist
brochures, pamphlets which ex-
plained Israel's history, and a
supply of "I Love Israel" but-
tons, colorful banners, balloons,
and flags, all celebrating Israel,
which were provided by the Israel
Programs office in Miami.
An advance team of youth and
staff gathered tables and chairs
from the Knoxville Jewish Com-
munity Center and were ready to
greet the two bus loads of BBYO
Machon participants as they ar-
rived from Camp Blue Star.
Everything was in place, includ-
ing the inspiritng Hebrew
melodies on the BBYO Sings cas-
sette player.
The BBYO Israel Booth at the
World's Fair became the focal
point of the day. Hundreds of
visitors to the Fair stopped to
talk, take literature and buttons,
and to say, "so glad there is an
Israeli Booth."
All day long, teams of staff and
Machon youth volunteered to
"cover" the booth. Members of
the Knoxville Jewish community
rallied round the Booth too.
The best was yet to come.
Every BBYO Machon member
came to the booth for a "check-
in" and Song Fest. Instead of
taped music, the voices of 100
BBYO youth and staff, led by
Artie Gumer, music specialist,
were singing the best of BBYO
Sings. Within minutes, a crowd
of visitors gathered to enjoy the
music and the magic of the cele-
bration. The Hatikvah melody
ended the Song Fest.
NEW YORK Ameri-
can attitudes toward Israel
have changed very little in
the past year despite the
misgivings Americans have
expressed on the Israeli in-
vasion of Lebanon.
This is a major conclusion of an
analysis by the American Jewish
Committee of a poll conducted for
Newsweek Magazine by the
Gallup Organization and report-
ed in the Aug. 16 issue of News-
week. The analysis was done by
Geraldine Rosenfield of AJC's
Information and Research De-
partment.
The poll, which was based on
telephone interviews with 752
adults on Aug. four and five, con-
tained three questions whose
answers were compared with
answers to the same questions in
a survey conducted a year ago.
WHEN ASKED if they had
become more sympathetic or less
sympathetic to Israel in the past
year, 32 per cent of the respon-
dents in the current poll said they
were more sympathetic, an in-
crease of 3 per cent over the 1981
poll. Those who said they were
less sympathetic to Israel totaled
41 per cent in the current poll, an
increase of 3 per cent over the
1981 poll. Those who said they
were less sympathetic to Israel
totaled 41 per cent in the current
poll, an increase of 4 per cent over
1981.
Commenting on these figures,
Rosenfield noted that "the small
percentages who moved from one
attitude to another would seem to
cancel each other out, indicating
that actually very little change in
people's sympathies had oc-
curred, notwithstanding the
Lebanese action."
A similar question was asked
concerning attitudes toward the
Palestinians. In the current poll,
28 per cent of the respondents
stated they were more sympathe-
tic to the Palestinian position
than they had been a year before.
This was an increase of 6 per cent
over the 1981 poll. At the same
time, 40 per cent of the current
poll stated that they were less
sympathetic to the Palestinians,
an increase of 4 per cent over
1981.
ROSENFIELD, in her
analysis, pointed once again to
the fact that these small percent-
age changes indicated that
people's attitudes had not
changed very much. She noted,
however, that "Americans, by a
plurality of 40 over 28 per cent,
are not sympathetic to the Pale-
stinian position.
The third question in which a
comparsion was made with the
1981 responses had to do with
whether or not the United States
should favor a Palestinian state.
In the current poll, 37 per cent of
respondents said yes, and 45 per
cent said no. This represented an
increase of 6 per cent for those
who believed In favoring a Pale-
stinian state, and an increase of 1
per cent for those who wt.
against it. The AJC analysis
noted that despite a somewhat
greater increase in the yes votes,
"those who say no exceed those
who say ves bv 8 per cent!"
Two questions directly related
to the current situation in
Lebanon were juxtaposed in the
current poll, and elicited what
would appear to be some conflict-
ing responses.
IN ANSWER to a question as
to whether they approved or dis-
approved of Israel's sending its
military forces into Lebanon, 60
per cent of the respondents said
they disapproved, while j 30 per
cent approved, and 10 per cent
said they did not know.
However, when asked if the
Israelis were justified in sending
troops into Lebanon to stop the
rocket attacks on Israeli settle-
ments and to remove PLO forces
from Lebanon, 47 per cent of re-
spondents said they were justi-
fied, and 41 per cent said they
were not. "One must assume,"
Rosenfield stated, "that 13 per
cent of those of disapproved of
Israel's military action in
Lebanon nevertheless considered
it justified."
Another question in the poll
asked what the United States
should do concerning the Israeli
incursion into Lebanon, and gave
a choice of six possible actions.
Twenty-seven per cent of pre-
spondents opted to suspend
military aid to Israel for the time
being; 16 per cent voted to sup-
port Israel's actions; another 16
per cent would pressure" the
Israelis diplomatically; and still
another 16 per cent would per-
manently cut off aid to Israel!
ROSENFIELD noted that re-
cent press reports on these
figures had lumped together the
27 per cent that wanted to sus-
pend military aid for the time be-
ing and the 16 per cent that
wanted to cut it off permanently,
and has stated that "43 per cent
felt the US should suspend or cut
off military aid to Israel." She
stated that the use of the 43 per
cent figure was "misleading,"
The final question in the poll
asked whether the United States
should talk directly to the PLO
i as the representative of the Pale-
stinian people. Of the respon-
dents, 48 per cent said yes, 42 per
cent said no, and 10 per cent did
not know.
Tourist Travel to Israel Up
The Latin American Jewish Community of Miami held its first
annual gathering on behalf of the State of Israel Bonds Organi-
zation and were honored by Dade County commemorating
Latin American Jewish Community Day. Pictured (left to
right) are Dade County Commisssioner Barry Schreiber; Dr.
Moises Rub, Chairman of the Israel Bonds Latin Atiuricam
Campaign; Mrs. Rub; Dade County Commissioner Jorge
Valdes and George Flesch, a special representative of Isrel
Prime Minister Menachem Begin.
NEW YORK-Some 140,000
American tourists visited Israel
during the first six months
(January-June) of 1982, a 6 per-
cent increase over the same
period of 1981.
Uzi MichaeU, Israel's Commis-
sioner for Tourism for North
America, said I that "We
are delighted with this news,
especially in view of the tremend-
ous media coverage devoted to
the fighting in Lebanon."
He added that Israel tourism
officials are gratified that their
efforts to reposition Israel as a
travel destination for Americans
of all backgrounds and interests
are bearing fruit and that the
continuing flow of American
tourism to Israel "reflects the
public knowledge that, despite
the headlines, the situation with-
in Israel is calm and conducive to
traveling."
gjewisln Floridiaitx
Miami, Florida Friday, August 20,1982 Section B


- *k ..-,

Jewish High School Hook up
With Federation Agencies
M*. Hornreich Prexy of Beach Opti-Mrs.
The Jewish High School re-
cently announced cooperative
ventures with three Federation
agencies.
"'We have adopted a policy of
working. wherever possible,
with the established agencies of
the Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation so that our school can bene-
fit from the tremendous resour-
ces, experience and professional-
ism of the agencies'* said Rabbi
Louis Herring, principal of the
Jewish High School.
Rabbi Herring feels strongh
about "avoiding unnecessary
duplication of services within the
Jewish community." He also ex-
pressed concern" for compromis-
ing the quality of services that is
often the result of ad hoc ar-
rangements made with part time
people working in highly sophis-
ticated fields."
The Jewish Family and Chil-
dren's Service has agreed to pro-
vide the Jewish High School with
the full range of services that
they have developed over the
years in the community. By re-
ferral through a liaison officer,
Jewish High Shcool students will
benefit directly from the estab-
lished network of services.
In addition. Mount Sinai Hos-
pital has entered into a formal ar-
rangement with the Jewish High
School by which Ruth Farkas, a
registered nurse, will not only be
available to handle emergency
and other general medical situa-
tions, but will also coordinate a
medical health and educational
program at the school. The pro-
gram will include a CPR training
course and lecture series.
The third agency of Federation
that has entered into a formal
agreement with the Jewish High
School is the Jewish Vocational
Service. JVS will provide the
school with a college and voca-
tional guidance expert who will
be located at the school, conduct-
ing tests and evaluating those
tests on an individual basis with
each student in the upper grades.
The college guidance counselor
will be under the direct supervis-
ion of Jewish Vocational Service
and will draw on the resources of
JVS in assisting the students to
make their career choices. In ad-
dition, JVS has been responsible
for developing a school screening
process that wili be introduced in
the 1963-84 academic year.
Liebman Invited to Give Papers
Prof. Seymour B. Liebman,
historian and author, and founder
and honorary life president of the
Jewish Historical Society of
South Florida, has been invited
to deliver two papers at the 44th
International Congress of Ameri-
canists at the University of Man-
chester, England, on Sept. 5 to
10.
His first paper will be on "The
Jews of Argentina, Chile, Peru
and Mexico." The second paper
will be on "Two Centuries of
Jewish Women in Mexico" which
will be delivered at the sym-
posium sponsored by the
Mexican National University.
In October, Leibman will con-
duct a seminar at the Hebraic
and Jewish Studies of the
University College in London.
The subject of the seminar will be
"The Jews of Latin America."
The historian's latest book.
New World Jewry, 1493-1825:
Requiem for the Forgotten, is to
appear at the end of this month,
by Ktav Publishing House.
Mrs. Beverly (Arthur) Horn-
reich has been elected President
of the Opti-Mrs. Club of Miami
Beach. The installation gala will
be held at the Konover Hotel
Sept. 11.
Mrs. Hornreich'8 husband,
Arthur, will be her installing offi-
cer. He was an active member of
North Shore Optimist Club for 25
years and on the board for 20
years and was a past president.
Mrs. Muriel (Lawrence)
Weston, past president, will be
Chairperson for the evening. An
original skit will be written and
narrated by past presidents Mrs.
Mickey (Murray) Sonnett and
Mrs. Bernice (Gene) Troop.
Mrs. Hornreich is a charter
member of Opti-Mrs. Club and
active in the club for 25 years.
Was Recording Secretary a few
years. Corresponding Secretary
and Vice President for two years.
She has been a legal secretary for
31 years. She is a member of
North Bay Village Jewish Center
and member of other organize-
Horrowitz JWV
The Abe Horrowitz Ladies
Auxiliary No. 682. JWV. will
hold their regular breakfast
meeting on Sunday, Aug. 22 at
9:30 at their building, NE 19
Place and 160 Street, North
Miami Beach. After the meeting,
a birthday party is scheduled at
the Greynolds Park Manor Reha-
bilitation Center, for residents
having birthdays in August,
hosted by Claire Natter, Chairla-
dy-
The Auxiliary will host the
JWVA Dade County Council
quarterly meeting at the
Auxiliary building on Sunday.
Aug. 29 at 9:30 a.m.
Mrs. Beverly (Arthur) Hornreich
tions. She has a son Myles and
four granddaughters who are
residents of Dade County. She
resides with her husband in
North Bay Village. They are resi-
dents of Miami Beach since 1946.
Robert Jackson,
Mr.
past
president of North Shore (w
timist Club will install the off
cere and Board of Directors.
Other officers elected are Vir.
President, Bobby pfcjg
Miller: Treasurer, Betty (Alfred
Gottlieb: Recording Secretary
Bernice (Gene) Troop: Corr
ponding Secretary, Norm.
(Stanley) Kur: Social Secretari*
Mrs. Edith (Arthur) Leibowib
and Mrs. Dorothy (Julius) Miller.
The Board of Directors are
The Mesdames: Sydelle (WiL
liam) Blatt, Claire (Jonas) Brot-
man, Dorothy (William) Carmei
Charlotte (Perry) Chester. Norms
(Edwin) Henig, Beatrice (Sami
Hirsch, Helene (Robert) Jackson
Edith (Warren) Katz. Carol
(James) Levenson, Jeff (Milton)
Olkin, Lillian (Sydney) Olkic
Geri (Melvin) Peters. I rent
(Louise) Pilzer, Anne (Leel Pines
Helen (Jack) Segal, Mickey
(Murray) Sonnett, Esther
(Martin) Steiner, Muriel
(Lawrence) Weston and Honor-
ary Board Members Molly
(Stanley) Peal and Mitzi (Bennol
Webster.
Rabbi Kronish Reports on Visit
Rabbi Leon Kronish, national
campaign chairman of the State
of Israel Bonds Organization will
report to Jewish community
leaders on his recent trip to Israel
and Lebanon.
Rabbi Kronish has met with
top Israeli leaders both in gov-
ernment and in industry and was
taken on a personal tour of the
war zone in Beirut. The report
meeting will take place on Tues-
day, Aug. 24, 5 p.m., at the Omni
Hotel, Ballroom Floor, Miami.
In a message from Israel to
Gary R. Gerson, Israel Bonds
general campaign chairman.
Rabbi Kronish noted the impor-
tance of the report meeting by
explaining that the Israelis are in
great need of American support
and especially American dollars
as sent through the Israel Bonds
program.
He said that he will return to
Miami with a first hand view of
conditions as they really are and
will be meeting with members of
the local media.
Beth Shalom Opens
Foundation School
Jewish Aged Home Awarded Grants
Temple Beth Sholom Founda-
tion School, Miami Beach, is
making finishing touches on its
playground for its fall opening,
covering nursery and kindergar-
ten between the ages of two and
five years. A new program for
children 15 months for two years,
called Primetime. will again be
offered.
The school year will open with
the annual popcorn party on
Tuesday, Sept. 7, according to
the director, Anita Koppele
Community Corner
Nanette R. Simon, assistant secretary of Jefferson Bancorp,
Inc., and an officer of Jefferson National Banks, has been select-
ed by the Miami Shores Business and Professional Women's
Club as its 1982 "Woman of the Year." She also serves as re-
cording secretary of the organization.
Dr. Richard Glaser has been elected president of the Dade
County Optometric Association for the ensuing year. Other
officers and trustees include Dr. Jerry Palmeiro, Dr. Edward
Teacher, Dr. Robert Grand, Dr. Barry Eichenbaum, Dr. Gerald
Enerfeld, Dr. Bruce Heiken, Dr. Allyn Jacobaon, Dr. Felix
Monde jar and Dr. Michael Margaretten.
Lakes Division. National Council of Jewish Women, will hold
a luncheon-card party on Wednesday, Sept. 1 at the JWV Build-
ing, North Miami Beach.
The Professional Coin Dealers Association will hold a two-day
coin show on Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 21 and 22, from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. at the National Guard Armory, North Miami.
Mesh, Dick, Cherkas and Co., a Coral Gables-based certified
public accounting firm, has announced that Howard A. Mesh, a
partner in the firm, has been elected to a three-year term on the
Executive Committee of the Private Companies Practice Section
of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountant. Byron
Cherkas, a partner, has been appointed to the Research Devel-
opment Committee of the Mailman Center for Child Develop
ment.
The 200-bed skilled nursing facility to be built on the Miami
Jewish Home and Hospital for the Aged's campus will be de-
signed by The Gruzen Partnership, the Architectural Selection
Committee has decided.
Miami Jewish Home and Hos-
pital for the Aged has been
awarded $20,000 to develop an
educational program addressing
such issues as crime against and
drug abuse among the elderly.
To begin July 1983, this grant
along with three others awarded
by the Area Agency on Aging
will focus specifically on concerns
of older adults.
The Home will receive a grant
for a two-day seminar, "The
Changing World of Volunteer-
ism" to be held Sept. 29 and 30.
An "artist in residence" pro-
Beth Din Office
Of Florida
RABBI
DR. TIBORH. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Servicing Local, and foreign
countries.
1532 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
Tel: 534-1004 or 672-0004
gram will also be instituted,
made possible by the Florida En-
dowment for the Arts. Beginning
in the fall, residents will have a
chance to learn new art skills
from a seasoned artist. This
marks the first grant of this typ-
ing being awarded to a facility
other than an educational instit-
ution.
Open House
Temple Adath Yeshurun will
hold open house for new members
on Sunday, Aug. 29 between 10
a.m. and 2 p.m., according to
'Rabbi Simcha Freedman, spiritu-
al leader of the Congregation,
who will speak. Officers of the
Congregation and school staff
will answer questions.
Tonight, give your chicken a marvelous marinade
^
.*,*. *.
FOR SALE:
Modern flat 4 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, large living
room, built In kitchen, on
Mount Carmei. Beautiful
view to the sea. P.O. B.
814, Haifa, Israel.
Tel. 04-332107.
k...-.. ..-.->........
.-.-.<
Polynesian Chicken
I (2to to 3 lb.) broiler-fryer
chicken, cut up
1 dove garlic, crushed
% cup water
V cup salad oil
2 tablespoons lemon juice
Cook
it with
GULDEN'S
Combine crushed garlic, water, salad oil, lemon
juice, Gulden's* Spicy Brown Mustard, salt, chili
powder and sugar. Pour over chicken pieces in large
bowl and refrigerate for several bourspr over-
night, turning chicken once or twice. Drain and
reserve marinade. Preheat broilerfor 10 minutes.
2 tablespoons Gulden's*
Spicy Brown Mustard
2 teaspoons salt
to teaspoon
chili powder
to teaspoon sugar
Place chicken, skin side down in broiler pan. Place
8 to 9 inches from heat. Brush chicken with mari
nade and broil 20 minutes on one side, basting with
marinade every S minutes, 'nirn; brush with
marinade and broil IS to 20 minutes on second
side, basting every 5 minutes. Serves four.
The Mustard good enough to cook with
lUik :. .'-'-
'.'
**w


frnm The Middle East
ie Great Communication Swindle
Friday, August 20, 1982 / The Jewish FJoridian Page 3-B
By CARL ALPERT
HAIFA In recent
Iweeks, the Western world
lhas been treated to one of
the major brain-washing
experiences in recent his-
tory. Via television, radio
and press the public has
been subjected to a huge
swindle in the communica-
tion of information from the
iiddle East.
Whether the systematic misin-
formation that has been dissem-
inated is the result of deliberate
and malicious anti-Israel influ-
ences, or of a breakdown in Is-
rael's public relations program, is
for the moment not important.
The fact remains that an inac-
urate. distorted report of what
das been going on in Lebanon has
jcontributed to a completely er-
Ironeous conception of Israel's ob-
jectives and actions.
IT HAS been said that a cam-
era does not lit, but everyone who
has ever clicked the little machine
knows full well that the camera is
liighly selective, recording only
i inn it is aimed at, to the exclu-
sion of all else.
You can judge the accuracy of
vhat you read and saw and heard
recent weeks by asking your-
elf if your local media of com-
nunications gave any kind of
prominence to the following:
While focusing on Israel's
^iege of Beirut, did any major TV
etwork or news agency make it
tlear that the PLO had hijacked
i entire city and was holding its
opulation hostage, as they had
previously held all of Lebanon
hostage?
Were there any pictures of
the cheers and tears of relief with
vhich Lebanese village after vil-
lage greeted the Israelis who had
eed them from terrorist occupa-
tion?
Did any of the scenes of
'ads packed with refugees make
clear that many of these were
ebanese villagers now making
|heir way back home to southern
ebanon, from which they had
}ed after the terrorist invasion
egan seven years ago?
Was there ever any adequate
correction or apology when it was
ultimately revealed that the early
PLO claims that Israelis had kill-
ed thousands of civilians was
shown to be a figment of Arab
imagination, cooked up by
propagandists to prejudice the
public?
Did you see the breathtaking
pictures of the enormous under-
ground depots of weapons and
ammunition and heavy equip-
ment which the PLO had been
stockpiling for its future massive
assault against northern Israel?
Who reported how PLO
armed guards prevented civilians
from getting food supplies from
the UNRWA warehouses in Beir-
ut?
Was there adequate and full
explanation that some of the re-
cent full-page ads in American
papers, presenting utterly false
statistics on Lebanese casualties,
were in fact hoaxes, and that the
prominent organizations presum-
ed to have endorsed the ads dis-
avowed such signatures?
Did TV prominently feature
the Red Cross ship at Junia, de-
liberately shelled and hit by PLO
guns?
Did anybody know how
many Israeli soldiers had been
killed and wounded because they
refrained, under orders, from fir-
ing on civilians?
Were there any pictures of
the corpses of Lebanese patients
in the Sidon hospital, whose bod-
ies had been drained of blood to
provide transfusions for wounded
PLO terrorists?
Did TV take its viewers up
and down dozens of streets in
Sidon, untouched by battle, in a
city where selected pictures made
it appear as if the whole city had
been razed?
Were there any closeups of
the truly awesome damage done
to buildings in Damour, so that
viewers could see the weeds
growing out of the ruins ruins
created by the PLO when they
had seized the city long before
and had massacred many of the
Christian population?
Did the media of commun-
ication make anything of the fact
that the PLO had turned Leb-
anon into a center of interna-
tional terrorism, where trainees
ibbi Freedman on UJA Israel Trip
Rabbi Simcha Freedman,
piritual leader of Adath
(feshurun in North Miami Beach,
Jjill participate in a Rabbinic
pabinet UJA Mission to Israel
nd Lebanon from Aug. 22-27 at
he invitation of the Israeli gov-
nent.
Rabbi Freedman is one of 300
abbinic leaders from through-
out the country who have been
elected for their efforts on behalf
|>f their communities and Israel
> serve in the Rabbinic Cabinet.
He served as president of the
Rabbinical Association from
1980-1981 and received the Out-
standing Rabbinic Leadership
award at the General Assembly
of the National Association of
Federations of Jewish Agencies
in Chicago in 1980. Rabbi Freed-
man is listed in the Who'e Who
in World Jewry" published last
year.
Rabbi Freedman will accomp-
any some 40 other rabbis in this
mission. He will meet with Israel
leaders and have the opportunity
to speak with local Lebanese
leaders and private citizens.
Dr. Lehrman Returns From Israel
Dr. Irving Lehrman will report
on a six-week survey Mission to
[Israel and Lebanon Saturday
^lorning, Aug. 21, during the
iabbath service at Temple
Smanu-El, Rabbi Lehrman, is
cheduled to return Friday after-
noon.
Rabbi Lehrman, who was ac-
companied on his trip by Mrs.
ehrman, maintains a year-round
residence in Jerusalem. He
visited Beirut during this
summer's trip, and conferred
with top politicial and military
leaders of Israel.
Dr. Lehrman is national vice
president of the Zionist Organi-
zation of America, chairman of
the board of governors of the
State of Israel Bonds Organiza-
tion for Greater Miami.
Bell Project is Under Way
Southern Bell has begun i
150,000 construction project on
lawthorne Avenue Between 77
lid 86 Streets to improve service
> customers in the Miami Beach
I The project, expected to take
fo months, consists of building
three new manholes and laying
about a quarter mile of plastic
pipe house telephone cable. Any
traffic problems along Haw-
thorne Avenue should be
minimal, according to Southern
Bell spokesman John Thomas.
came from the German Bader-
Meinhof Gang, the Italian Red
Brigades, the Japanese Red
Army, the Irish Republican
Army, and other lesser known
bodies from other countries? Did
any of this get through to West-
ern public opinion?
Did the PLO permit any pic-
tures to be taken of its terrorist
"heroes" as they hid behind
women and children to fire their
guns into the Christian quarters
of Beirut?
Public opinion has been dis-
turbed by the fact that civilians
are falling victim in Israel's at-
tempts to root the terrorists out
of Beirut. But where was that
public opinion during the recent
bloody civil wars in Lebanon,
when thousands of Christians
were massacred, as the terrorists
took over? Is there a double stan-
dard? And where is the sense of
proportion?
When this is all over, there
are many questions that intelli-
gent people will be asking, and
many explanations that the
media of communications will
have to give if they wish to retain
public confidence.
Enjoying a Sunday brunch at The Eden Roc Hotel, Cabana and
Yacht Club are four generations of the Cowan family. Attend-
ing the brunch in honor of Mrs. Lea Segal's 80th birthday are
(left to right): Leo Cowan and Janet Cowan; their son Michael
Cowan, his wife Sheri Mazur Cowan and their daughter Brooke;
Mrs. Segal; and Sheri's mother, Mrs. Barbara Mazur.
Temple Zion to Hold Forum
Temple Zion will hold a "Sum-
mer Forum" On Aug. 20, follow-
ing late Friday night services.
Miami Attorney Gary F. Canner
and his wife, Joan, will be guest
speakers. The Canners recently
returned from a three-week Israel
tour as part of an American Jew-
ish Congress group and will dis-
cuss first hand impressions and
views of Israel at the onset of the
Lebanon crisis.
Maxwell House' Coffee
Is A Warm Welcome.
"Breaking bread" as a symbol of
peace, friendship, warmth and hos-
pitality is a tradition that is as old as
the Bible itself.
Although far from being as old as
the Bible, Maxwell House Coffee
has been pan of that tradition for
over a half a century. The reason is
simple: the full-pleasant aroma and
great tasting,
satisfying flavor of
Maxwell House
blends right in with the good food
and hospitality that is part of
inviting people into your home.
So, no matter what your preference
instant or groundwhen you pour
Maxwell House you pour hospi-
tality. At its wannest... consistently
cup after cup after cup.
K Certified Kosher
l A living tradition in Jewish homes for over half a century i
\


Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, August 20,1982
Miami Beach Mayor Norman Ciment awards Walter Folk (left)
Chairman of the Board, Lincoln Savings, and Flora Aranson,
Manager of the Miami Beach office, a Lincoln Day Proclama-
tion for their recent co-sponsorship of a Free Concert at the
Theatre of Performing Arts. The evening of Music featured the
Youth Band of Israel.
Donoff Assumes IAFP Presidency
Craig Donoff, tax attorney and
partner in the North Miami
Beach firm of Donoff and Kern,
P.A., has been elected president
of the South Florida chapter of
the International Association for
Financial Planning, Inc. (IAFP).
Donoff, who served in 1981-82
as vice president in charge of pro-
grams, assumed the office from
Robert E. Spielman, who be-
comes chairman of the IAFP's
board of directors.
Other officers elected for 1982-
83 are: Neil Schwartz, CLU.
membership vice president;
Joseph Zax, program vice presi-
dent; Patrick Michaud, educa-
tion v-p; Morris Richman, CPA,
treasurer, Irene deCamp-Ultimo.
CLU, secretary; and Joseph
Ross, CFP. ethics officer.
Directors include Scott Kranz,
William Brown, Richard Cahlin,
CPA, Robert Carey, Tom Don-
nellan. Herbert Hertner. Bettie
Janis, Peggy Madorsky, CPA,
Charles Obsusin, Raymond
Pastor, Gloria Pearson, CPA,
Ann Rodis. Dorlene Shane, CFP,
Craig Donoff
Margaret Starner, Arne Them-
men, Richard L. Tomlinson and
Frank Siberio.
The IAFP sponsors the College
for Financial Planning through
the University of Miami, which
offers a curriculum leading to the
Certified Financial Planner
(CFP) designation.
AmeriFirst Opens North Shore Office

Miami Beach Vice Mayor Sy
Eisenberg will join AmeriFirst
President Thomas R. Bomar and
Sally Peisner, assistant vice
president and manager of the
North Shore Office, in a ribbon-
cutting ceremony opening at the
new North Shore AmeriFirst on
Tuesday, Aug. 24 at 10 a.m.
The new office, located at 7353
Collins Ave is housed in a two-
story building which AmeriFirst
has completely renovated and
modernized, except for the his-
toric and interesting Art Deco
facia over the entranceway. This
has been carefully restored and
preserved in its original form,
adding an interesting and attrac-
tive touch to the North Shore-
Collins Avenue area.
Israeli Parents
to Hold Meeting
The Association of Parents of
American Israelis are inviting
parents who have children living
in Israel to attend the next meet-
ing of the organization at the
Jewish Federation Building, on
Sunday. Aug. 29 at 1 p.m.
Guest speaker will be Allan
Milstein. new regional director of
Aliyah Center. Newly elected
officers are Symme Price, presi-
lent; Frieda Oster, first vice
president; Harry Zeigler, second
;ce president; Leo Oster. trea-
surer; Bernice Gerstenfeld. re-
cording secretary; and Regina
Greenhili. corresponding secre-
tary
Sally Peisner
The opening day ribbon-cut-
ting activities will get underway
with the presentation of colors by
North Shore Post 677 of the Jew-
ish War Veterans at 10 a.m. and
area residents are invited to at-
tend. Free gifts, bagles with
cream cheese and coffee will be
served until 4 p.m. Refreshments
will be served from 10 a.m. until 4
p.m. Tuesday through Thursday
of the grand opening week.
" AmeriFirst is pleased to open
a new branch in the North Shore
community. We have an experi-
enced and eager staff ready to
serve customers in any of six lan-
guages English. Yiddish.
French. Spanish, Polish, and
Russian and we look forward
to meeting our new neighbors
and invite them to stop by our
newly restored Art Deco-styled
office." commented Sally
Peisner. manager of the Ameri-
Firstoffice.
Senator Hawkins
Reveals Katz
Appointment
US Senator Paula Hawkins
announced the appointment of
Herbert D. Katz, of Hollywood,
as a member of the U.S. Holo-
caust Memorial Council.
Appointed by President
Reagan, Katz will be one of 65
other Council members, 55 of
whom are presidential ap-
pointees, ten are members of
Congress.
The U.S. Holocaust Memorial
Council was formed in 1980 to
oversee the construction and
operation of a national Holocaust
Memorial Museum. The Coun-
cil's functions also include the
formation of an educational
foundation and a Committee on
Consciousness. Once every year
the Council leads the nation in a
Days of Remembrance as a com-
memoration of the Holocaust
the annihilation of six million
Jews by the Nazis during World
War II.
"I am so pleased that a man of
the caliber of Herbert Katz was
chosen by the President to serve
as a member of this distinguished
council," Senator Hawkins said.
"Mr. Katz has been for many
years an active member of the
Jewish community and his ex-
pertise will certainly be appre-
ciated by the Council."
Katz, the president of Sajik
Corporation, a real estate
management and development
firm, will serve a five year term
on the Council. A graduate of the
University of Pennsylvania and
Harvard Law School, he moved
to South Florida in 1955 where he
practiced law for 20 years.
Mr. Katz is a member of the
Republican Jewish Coalition, a
member of the Board of Directors
of the Broward County United
Way and is actively involved
with the United Jewish Appeal.
Gail Harris
Mrs. Sam Adler
Adler and Harris Chain
Federation Tuesday
Greater Miami Jewish Federa-
tion Women's Division President
Maxine Schwartz and Division
Community Education Vice
President Sandi Simon have an-
nounced the appointment of
Bunny Adler and Gail Harris as
chairwomen of Federation Tues-
day, the Women's Division
annual community education
event, scheduled for Nov. 16 at
the Carillon Hotel. Miami Beach.
It was also announced that the
area representatives for the day
will be: Janice Miller, Miami
Beach; Helen Berne, North
Dade: Marl in Arky and Rosetta
Bierman, South Dade, and Laurie
Turner, Southwest Dade. Sheila
Weiss has been named to repre-
sent the Business and Profes-
sional Women Board.
Mrs. Adler, a Miami Beach
resident, has been an active
leader of the Women's Division
for several years, and, earlier this
year, served as chairwoman of
the Peacesetter Cruise Commit-
tee. She has led several Federa-
tion and UJA Missions to Israel
and served as Women's Division
Missions chairwoman, as well as
Benefactor chairwoman for the
Division's 1979 Combined Jewish
Appeal-Israel Emergency Fund
and overall Nominating Commit-
tee chairwoman for 1979.
A Miami Beach resident, Gail
Harris has been active in
Women's Division affairs, sen.
ing as Women's Division
Secretary, Miami Beach Board
Chairwoman, Miami Beach
Patron Chairwoman and Chair-
woman of this year's seventh
annual Women's Division
Retreat.
The Federation Tuesday pro-
gram will focus on American pol-
itics, with speakers from the poli-
tical arena discussing the lobby-
ing system, the immigration sit-
uation in South Florida and other
topics. In addition to the daytime
event, a portion of the program
will be presented in the evening
at Erev Federation Tuesday,
which will be held at the Federa-
tion Building.
Weizman Branch
Opens Season
The Chaim Weizman Branch
343 will hold their first meeting of
the season on Monday. Aug. 23
at 1 p.m. at the American Sav-
ings Bank. Lincoln and Alton
Roads, according to Isadora
Hammer. president. Sendor
Kaplan, former consul to Israel
from Cuba and associated with
the Greater Miami Jewish Feder-
ation, will be guest speaker.
Helen Scolnick will conduct a
musical program.
EMPIRE
THE PREMIUM
KOSHER
CHICKEN!
If you can t hnd a fresh Empire Chicken, put some boxes of Fresh-Frozen Empire
Chicken pieces in your freezer. Then you'll be prepared to serve a good home-
cooked meal at any time ... for your family and special guests. Remember, everyone
should eat Empire Chicken at least once a week.
KOSHER
Empire
POULTRY
ACCEPTED AND
PREFERRED WORLD-WIDE!
Empire Kosher Poultry. Inc. 1-800-233-7177 Telex. 84-2538


One Man's Opinion
The Overheated Issue Abortions
Friday, August 20,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
IA Seven Arts Feature)
A 10-to-7 Senate Judiciary
Committee vote for Sen. Orrin G.
Hatch's anti-abortion proposal is
being hailed by right-to-life fortes
as a long step towards the even-
tual outlawing of all abortions. It
would allow the Senate to do
away with abortions by a simple
majority vote.
The Hatch plan and others,
notably those projected by
Senators Jesse Helms and Bob
Packwood, are vigorously op-
posed by many who view them as
efforts to undermine the United
States Supreme Court decision of
1973 (Roe v. Wade). That ruling
held that the right to have an
abortion is an aspect of the right
to privacy protected by the due
process clause of the Constitu-
tion.
IN THE battle over this key
social issue, one finds an interest-
ing array of opponents. One is
Dr. James James Wyngaarden,
confirmed by the Senate in April
as the new director of the
national Institute of Health.
Clearly at odds on the issue wifh
President Reagan,. Dr. Wyn-
gaarden has said: "I believe the
abortion decision should be an in-
dividual decision. I believe in
freedom of choice.
In a recent poll conducted by
the Associated Press-NBC News,
75 percent of those questioned
said they opposed'' a constitu-
tional amendment allowing Con-
gress to ban abortions. Fifty-
seven percent indicated they
agreed with this* statement:
"Every woman who wants to
have an abortion should be able
to have one."
When the National Coalition of
American Nuns, claiming 1,800
members, met in May, the group
expressed support for a woman's
right to make a choice for or
against abortion. The Catholic
Coalition voted also to oppose the
CTUDI0
f2*AtawVXMZ
-gcttiw

Continental
Cuisine
FRED JOSSI
welcome*
you Sac* 'o
h.s renowned
STUDIO
RESTAURANT
lor a unique
Lidding eper>ence
Watch your 'able to your
-nood m one ol 5 nd'vduai
'oomi The Tent.
Wine Cellar Studio Place
Piqaiie S i s Cnaiet
Fine Entertainment
At the Piano
Also violin playing
(or your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
(private Lunchaont arranged)
ENJOY COCKTAILS IN
"THI GROTTO"
MOST MAJOR
CREOIT CARDS
HONORED
2340 SW 32 Avt.
445-5371
closed Mondays
constitutional amendment pro-
posal to outlaw abortions despite
the fact the Catholic bishops
have voiced preference for the
amendment approach.
What, then, of the Jewish com-
munity?
STRONGLY supported by all
but two of the 11 national agen-
cies identified with the National
Jewish Community Relations
Advisory Council, Hundreds of
Jewish women are ,' petitioning
their congressmen, to vote
against proposed Human Life
Amendments and bin's. They see
the current drive as an undercut-
ting of freedom of choice as well
as a violation of the principle of
church-state separation.
The argument haa been ad-
vanced by many rabbis that anti-
choice legislation runs counter to
Halacha. They point out that
Jewish Law regards the fetus as
potential life only and'jooks upon
its claims as secondary to those
of the woman carrying -it. In
sharp contrast to Catholic teach-
ing which prohibits abortion even
when the woman's life is at stake,
Jewish tradition has,held that
preserving the potential mother's
life is the primary consideration.
The NJCRAC, with minority
dissent noted, has recommended
that Jewish community relations
agencies make public .^heir advo-
cacy of freedom of choice regard-
ing abortion and their opposition
to restrictions of that freedom by
denial of public funding of abor-
tions or unreasonable Intrusions
on the privacy or unreasonable
restraints on the freedom of preg-
nant women to make, personal
choices as to abortion. %
THE JEWISH organizations
and many others see in the-cur-
rent rush to press for-'constitu-
tional amendments on selective
social issues the potential corro-
sion of the Constitution itself.
This note of alarm is echoed in
fears about the outcome of calls
for constitutional conventions in
31 states. (Congress is mandated
to summon a convention if peti-
tioned to do so by two-thirds of
the states.) '
Put to use as a lever for pro-
ducing national amendments
mandating budget balancing,
outlawing abortions, and .opening
the way for programs of prayer in
the public schools, state consti-
tutional conventions raise many
doubts and fears. Once the loose
cannons start to operate in state
capitols, basic American rights
guaranteed by the U.S. Constitu-
tion may be obliterated.
Turkey Does About Face on
Arab Boycott of Israel
NEW YORK A Federal in-
vestigation, initiated by a com-
plaint from the American Jewish
Congress, has led to a change of
policy by the Turkish govern-
ment regarding Turkeyls cc
operation in Arab boycott efforts
against the State of Israel.
Earlier this year, public adver-
tisements by Turkish state agen-
cies requesting companies to bid
>n construction and equipment
contracts in Turkey, financed by
a Saudi Arabia investment fund,
explicitly barred bidders who did
not observe anti-Israel boycott
requirements established by
Saudi Arabia and other Arab
states.
SPECIFICALLY, the offend
ing clause stated that no bidders
would be considered "who are not
within the scope of the boycott
resolutions of the kingdom of
Saudi Arabia and the League of
Arab States."
As a result of Treasury De-
partment intervention, Turkey
has now agreed to eliminate such
a requirement from all future bid
solicitations, according to John
E. Chapoton, assistant secretary
of the Treasury for tax policy.
The inclusion of a provision in
some Turkish government
agency bid solicitations limiting
bidders to those acceptable to
Saudi Arabia was cited in a series
of letters in February and March
to Secretary of the Treasury
Donald T. Regan by Will
Maslow, general counsel of the
AJCongress and editor of its
publication, Boycott Report.
IN WRITING to Regan,
Maslow noted that if such a boy-
cott clause requirement repre-
sented Turkish government
i policy, U.S. law required that
'Turkey be added to the U.S.
government's statutory list of
countries participating in the
Arab boycott of Israel. Further-
more, under the law, American
companies complying with boy-
cott-related requirements would
jeopardizing their tax benefits.
The Treasury Department in-
vestigation, noted Chapoton in a
July 14 letter to Maslow, dis-
closed that no evidence had been
found that Turkey itself requires
participation in or cooperation
with the Arab boycott of Israel.
The inquiry revealed that the
clauses barring bidders on the
Arab blacklist were interested at
the request of the Saudi Arabian
Fund for Development, which fi-
nanced the Turkish projects in
question. Chapoton informed
AJCongress that Turkey has ad-
vised that "the offending lan-
guage will not appear in future
Turkish bid invitations."
He also noted that because
Turkey has normal diplomatic
and commercial relations with Is-
rael and does not maintain or
participate in the anti-Israel boy-
cott policy, it does not belong on
the U.S. government's list of
boycotting countries.
,
Improve and Protect
Recreational Salt Water Fishing
Pro-Fish Inc. has been formed by local Dade County recrea-
tional fishermen to politically counter the strong lobby and
heavy financial donations placed by the commercial fishing in-
terests to local and state elected officials to influence their vot-
ing on all commercial fishing issues.
Pro-Fish Inc. is dedicated through political action to improve
and protect the quantity and quality of recreational salt water
fishing in Dade County waters.
Pro-Fish Inc. intends to raise over $50,000 during the next
year to be used solely to help elect officials that are Pro-Fish for
recreational and tourism purposes. Donations will come from the
'/ million recreational anglers in Dade County. Pro-Fish Inc.
will be the political watchdog for Dade recreational fishermen.
Numerous studies have shown that recreational fishing is
worth much more economically to South Florida than commer-
cial fishing.
Donations will be appreciated from all concerned citizens.
Pro-Fish Inc.'s first order of business is to push the passage of
the anti-mackeral netting ordinance currently before the Dade
County Commission. The passage of this ordinance will stop the
large mackerel netters from outside Dade County from cleaning
out the mackeral schools when they reach Dade waters. The final
hearing is Septermber 7, and we need all voter's support to con-
vince some of the Dade Commissioners of the importance of this
proposed ordinance.
This ordinance will intentionally not effect local commercial
fishermen.
The officers of Pro-Fish Inc. are:
President
Secretary
Treasurer
Capt. Bob Lewis
J. O'Hara Smith
Paul Leader
Phone: 261-3952
Phone: 592-6680
Pro-Fish Inc.
P.O. Box 5417
Hialeah, Fla. 33014
HIGH HOLY DAY SERVICES
LIMITED NUMBER OF
RESERVED SEATS AVAILABLE
ROSH HASHANAH 6 YOM KIPPUR SERVICES
CONDUCTED BY
RABBI LOUIS M. LEDERMAN
CANTOR MOSHE FRIEDLER AND CHOIR
RABBI JOSEPH A. GORFINKEL
TEMPLE BETH MOSHE
2225 NE 121 St., NORTH MIAMI
891-5508
r
Beth David Congregation
Miami's Historic First Jewish Congregation
COMPREHENSIVE RELIGIO CULTURAL PROGRAMS
HAVUROTFELLOWSHIPS FULL YOUTH ACTIVITIES
FULL RELIGIOUS SCHOOL PASTORAL COUNSELLING
UNIQUE CONSERVATIVE DAY SCHOOL
Quality Nursery Programs
inquries into Our Family Membership welcomed
(Special reduced membership fees for young
couples and singles age 32 and under)
2625 S.w. 3rd. Avenue 7500 S.W. 120 Street
854-3911 238-2601
David H. Auebach, Rabbi
Dr. Sol Landau, Rabbi Emeritus
William W. Lipson, Cantor
Seldon G. Mills, Exec. Director
M. Kaspi-Silverman, Ed. Director
Audrey Dillaman, Day School Principal
Milton S. Freeman, Ritual Director
Donald R. Tescher, President
(OYAL HUNGARIAN EffiRESTAURANT
Serving most delicious food
at reasonable prices
Our 36th Anniversary Year
731 Washington Ave., Miami Beach 538-5401
Fraa Salt Parking Now Available
loaoaooocaBBrti
Cloaaa Monday Saturday
tooooooOBIWoo
Rosh Hashanah
Kol Nidre
Yom Kippur
High Holiday
Singles Celebration
TEMPLE ISRAEL OF
Greater Miami
137 NE 19 Street
Friday, September 17.1982 8:00PM
(Oneg Shabbat To Follow Services)
Sunday, September 26,1982 8:00 PM
Monday, September 27,1982 11:30 AM
Cantor: Rachelle Nelson
Rabbis: Haskell Bernat
Jeffrey Salkin
For Reservations Call 573-5900
Ages 21 SO Welcome
$75.00 Donation To Temple Israel
I


"V-
P*.. Hh*+ml* Fknj^n/Fridy; Ap^lB, |9^

-
^_... .
ESSSSOur Pantiy Pas
Tta/e
Everyday Low Piic
750-ML BOTTLE
Hif- Buy only what
won na*d!
Wines $999
you need!
U.S. CHOICE BEEF CHUCK BONELESS
UnderMade
$
(SAVE 60CI
-199
POUND
SUNNYLAND 16-OZ PKG.
MEAT OT BEEF
Jumbo Franks
$169
U.S. CHOICE BEEF LOIN (SAVE 1 30)
Whole Beef
Tenderloins
' GARDEN FRESH SNAPPY
Green Beans
(SAVE 50C)
16-OZ BTLS FAYGO ASSORTED
Diet ^'-"i'-***
CUT AND
WRAPPED
FREE
$969
3
(YOU PICK)
LB
49* 4/$l
^m ^^ ^^^Tm ^^L (save it
i a on n i ^^^
POUND
PANTRY PRIDE ALL MEAT
ASSORTED SLICED LUNCHEON MEATS
1
(SAVE 50c)
CANADIAN SO TURBOT HADOOCK bAVh
Rsh Filets...... 81.59 ao
Party Pack
$J69
12-OZ
PKG
CRUNCHY FRESH (LG 90 CT
Green Peppers
TOPS IN VITAMIN "A" GARDEN FRESH
Carrots
750-ML. BTL LIEBFRAUMILCH
Blue Nun
$399
(SAVE 70)
one AT FOR STEWS SOUP
3 LBS > OVER
1.39 40
Chuck......... lb 1.79 20
GRADE -A- FROZEN DRUMSTICKS OR
Turkey Wings .. lb .49 20
FLA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
[3 BREAST OTRS 1 LEO OTRS W/ BACKS 3 qiBLET PKOS I
Lots Of Chicken .59 10
LOUIS RICH-FRESH SLICES
Turkey Breast..., a 3.29
(SAVE 30e)
SAVE
FLORIOA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH
BONELESS ANO SKINLESS
Chicken
DisaiU........ .. 2.69 30
PANTRY PMOE ALL BEEF
Mkkjet Solans' pkg 1.99 26
KAHNS 8-OZ PKO
Sendwtch Spread .59 20
AMERICAN KOSHER FRANKS OR
Knock wurst 1.99 44
HEBREW NATIONAL MIDGET SALAMI OR
,2f5I2.49 30
OSCAR MAYER MEAT OR BEEF
Meat or Beef
Sliced Bologna VSi 1.19 18
49
2 LB
BAG
AOO ZEST TO SALA0S'FRESH SAVE
Fla. Avocados 2 for 1.00 is
ASSORTED COLORS FRESHLY CUT
Floral Bouquet bunch 1.59 10
NEW JERSEY GROWN- U PICK
Plum Tomatoes .49 10
GARDEN FRESH U-PICK
GREEN ZUCCHINI
Squash..........,. .29 10
(GOOO FOR PCKLINOl OR IN A SALAO
Kirby Cucumbers .39 10
US \ ALL PURPOSE WHITE
.....5 BAG >89 1 0
PERSONAL CARE
TWO 24 02 BOTTLES IN TWW PACK SAVE
Scope Mouth wash 4.57 ei
1 OZ SOLID 2 5 02 ROLL ON
OR 4 OZCAN SPRAY
Sure Deodorant 1.97 73
FINESSE REGULAR OR EXTRA BOOY
Conditioner .... 'bl 1.47 52
PANTRY PRIDE
ASjHWlll.......BOTTLE .59
--OZ TUBE OR 7OZ BOTTLE
REG OR CONOITION FORMULA
Head & Shoulders 1.67 58
LARGE SUPER SELECT |0 COUNT)
.. 3 for .59 40
DEI MONTE (LARGE 6 SIZEl
FLOWN FROM HAWAII BY JET
1.69 10
Yogurt KSi
BREYERS 32 OZ CUP (SAVE 30e)
Plain QQ(:
SAVE
...';' .79 40
MMUTEMAD
GAL
PANTRY PWOE
SEALTEST SMALL CURD 12-OZ CUP
(SAVE lo
Cottage1
69
JUS SQUEEZE 0
HALF .J^g
SORRENTO ITALIAN
^1.59
SAVE
10
Floral & Gift Boutique
ONLY AT STORES HAVING BOUTIQUE DEPTS
EASY TO CiROW ----------
Bonsai $14.99
Tree JlTTs*v'
APPETIZERS
AVAILABLE ONLY AT STORES
HAVING SERVICE COUNTERS
NATURAL WHITE MEAT CATERING
Turkey g
HALF LB
$169
J^^ {SAVE 88C
SAVE
FINEST QUALITY
Jack A M
li .99 .21
FLEISCHMANN S CORN OH
MINIATURE ASSORTED COLORS
FRESHLY CUT
ILB
. PKG
.89 20
$1 00)
BUNCH 1.79
18 OZ jm^
. BOWL .47 1 2
PILLSBURY BUTTERMtK OR
BUTTER TASTIN HUNGRY JACK
FRESHLY CUT
160Z
CUP
.89
10
DEANS FRENCH
Onion D|p...
KRAFT
Cheez Whiz------jar
PANTHY PUCE ASSORTED FLAVORSSJAJSS STYLE
Yogurt.......3^ 1.09 38
2 SOZ
CONT
.79
i BUNCH
SEALTEST
80 1.09 10
o^1.19
BOROEN FROSTED
Choc Shake 2 ~
REGULAR OR NO SALT FRSN06MP MHXJE T
SOZ .
. PKG .10
10
10
16
MED HIGH LIGHT MED WATER
HANGMG BASKET
Boston Fern
LOW LIGHT 8 NEANTHE
EACH
1.59
4.99
.. .each 4.99
0T CHEAP IFOR REPOTTING PLANTS!
BUNYOtfS
4<1T
. BAG
.49
THORNAPPLE VALLEY
CHUNK OR SLICED OLD FASHIONED
Uverwurst......i 1.59 40
MRS RESSLER S SMOKED
Turkey Breasts .V.1.19 20
PAULY BRAND SWEET
Munchee Cheese, 1.49 20
KITCHEN FRMM
Potato SsJad .79 10
SUCED TUN PASTRAMI Oft
Com'd Beef Rnd. 2.09
OVEN FRESH
BBQ Chickens l. 1.59
on



I
Wd^, AitiwMi^j^i*^
PageT-B
the Test!...
You Mare!
PRICES GOOD THURS.. AUG. 15 THRU WED.. AUG. 25, 1982
cPride
CHI -'' .-.....M
.'
libby's
Vegetables
3 ways in our Grocery Department
Save on National Brands, Save More on Pantry Pride
Brands, Save Even More on Generics!
40 )Z BOTTLE*
t
PANTRY PRIDE
xaftBBQ
Sauce $139
SAVE 20)
10 JT. PKG. BES PAK
1
GENERIC HEAVY DUTY LIQUID rSZ'"' rn,uc .
Laundry Detergent Mayonnaise
$^ 79 32z jar QQ^
64-OZ. BTL. WHITEHOUSE
64-OZ
JUG
lYash Bags
i*vE3oo QQ
GENERIC
Facial Tissue
32 OZ JAR
(SAVE 20e)
PLANTATION PRIDE46-OZ JAR
(SAVE 26)
BOX OF
200
Kosher
T^ (SAVE 44) ^^ I M.mP
Apple
$J49
40-OZ. BTL SUNSWEET
Prune Juice
$119
REGULAR OF
WITH PULP
(SAVE 14)
1
B\ PAK TALL (PKG. OF 15)
ien
FOODS
SI ASSORTED FLAVORS SAVE
iYogurt .'^1.29 36
BTE
I 'box .80 60
pv Pmoe cut on French
.8 29
I SHOESTWNO
i Fries... ^ .59 .24
CHCCOLATEJ/AMLLA. BANANA
.bo? 1.89 30
: majo
.79 20
f V PRIDE COFFEE
GENERIC TALL
Kitchen Bags
GENERIC
Long Grain Rice
GENERIC
is-ct
BOX
l IF!
BAG
3JOUJUM80 PAPER *JME ^ Mr. Big Towels ... 1.49 .20 ^^j*hJ'-emonaoe
save pium w paste o" crushed twinic Mixes. .
Pope Tomatoes ^ .88 11 ^'^LiP,^."u,,-liEM2:A^-,r^l
LAESTRELLAMAR.A **apCl SHS1 DflnKS 01 2.29 40
COOkieS 3 ~- **<* '^02 SQUEEZE BOTTLE
GENERC
Napkins '?&
l GAL
. JUG
QENEWC STEMS 1 PIECES
Mushrooms ..
GENERIC
Black Pepper.
GENERIC TAGLESS
Tea Bags.....
GENERIC
Paper Towels
GENERIC
4 02
. CAN
402
. CAN
100CT
BOX
GIANT
. ROLL
.79 40
.89 50
.89 eo
.69 /o
.48 65
.69 36
.991 oo
.55 34
* 1.19 1.26
1 ROLLS
FRUIT PUNCH GRAPE OR ORANGE IN GLASS BOTTLE
Hi-C Drink.....VoSf
PANTRY PRIDE
,46 OZ
CAN
.20
.99 io
GLAD TALL
ISCT
. BOX
Kitchen Bags
KITTV WHITE
CatUtter ....
PANTRY PRIDE LONG GRAIN
Woe..........5."1.39 20
20 LB 4 -
BAG 1.7V .46
Gulden's Mustard .79 10
BACK TO SCHOOL
.69
1.00
CatUtter
GENERIC P Dish Detergent
25 bal! 1.59100
FYNE SOFT-2 PLY WHITE OR ASSORTED COLORS
Bam Tissue .: .89 30
DELTA
Corned Beef
200 COUNT
Flier Paper.......
. 32 70COUNT
Theme Books 2 for
9C0UNT
BicPens.........
14COUNT
.'2c?n1.19 .10
20 COUNT
Theme Books
3202
BTL
PANTRY PRIDE TWIN PACK
REGULAR OH OIP N CHIP
.59150 Potato Chips
7VOZ
BAG
.79 10
.. .69
.. .79
PACKAGED
BAKED GOODS
BMBIAMU
OuatWySSMSiMM
**m 3*0 < me m St
- aiNKMM
. WA.IMISM
% 33*711 Si
*is ITU*,
B am o 1 mm a.
Oninitii*,
L*MB-CTUaMi
000 3a* DIM Htta*
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MIMUt-WHUI
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MBMmIIMM
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Own 3M 1WM a
n mum mm 3IACH
MUM CM ft 3 NE 19 Am
ME12M3I IBM 3M
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MooM. 0 I 3m VaiMn
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1910S Ft! Nn II|3)1M
IfmimmmmBBm
ktotit
Ml Pirn 9
well DciUJble tJi^I%ference in Cash
US Ms 'IS
or
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
S/ttrE^''''
GUARANTEED
^vc^hrakrm^oMrmiinxtt\mnmMmmrr,imMf*mmktiinyM
Meal Indmg w > ana* DOUBLE THE DIFFERENCE ca*i
Ju purer 25 a*m nm UaUng 32000 or man (nolurjing man
product and Mm tiat rawara sn aMMonal putcMm) On* on* 5 Men
] purera may ba rnduoaa BB oornpanaon
Bnng your Far*y Pnd* riniiii up* and tr odor wi pnon on m.
ti^amrmmmmUPmrnrfPridmmnattmKkmnlommwmttmyyouOoiiSi
MM3M
l'J'i,(,/lJ'|l'
!
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
Rye Bread
COCONUT OR CUNAMON
Pecan Twirls 2 Ge
IDLER S JEWISH OMON
Rye Bread.
1 C FRENCH TWINS OR
20-OZ OA___
, LOAF .89 20
PK0
.73 12
VELVET CREME PLAIN OR
...5?l .59 .20
Most stores
open
illlp:
8am 'til 11pm daily
All stores
open Sundays
I


- -
Page 8-B The Jewish Floridjan / Friday, August 20,1982
Downright Angry
Faith In Israel Has Subsided
By YORAH KESSEL
London Chronic'* Service
Israelis are bewildered,
bothered and downright
angry about what is almost
universally condemned as a
failure of Israel's informa-
tion effort during the war in
Lebanon.
Argument about who is to'
blame and the motives, pure or
otherwise, of the world's press
and electronic media continue tc
rage. A wide variety of reasons
are preferred. But there is little
agreement as to why or how
things went so wrong. There is
only unanimity on the fact that
they did.
A debate in the Knesset's pres-
tigious Security and Foreign Af-
fairs Committee and a sympo-
sium staged by concerned jour-
nalists and public relations peo-
ple have added to the chorus of
explanations, recriminations and
doubts about the efficacy of Is-
rael's information machinery.
SOME ATTRIBUTE part
of the failure to in-
nate anti-Israel feeling, in-
cluding "latent anti-semitism."
Others blame technical inca-
pacity. But there is widespread
agreement that those who plan-
ned the military facet of the oper-
ation thoroughly and well in ad-
vance, gave little thought to this
vital aspect of modern war.
There are some, like Labor's
Haim Bar-Lev, who throw up
their hands in despair. He was
heard to say caustically in an
aside during the Knesset debate,
"Woe to anyone charged with ex-
plaining Israeli policy as it un-
folded in the second phase of the
war. It was Mission Impossible.''
Most of those who have spoken
out failed to get to grips with the
fundamental issues. Dr. Eliahu
Ben-Elissar, the chairman of the
committee, (and being mentioned
as the possible next Israeli Am-
bassador to London), delivered a
sharp broadside against the
Foreign Ministry. It had failed,
he said, to keep correspondents
abreast of the nuances and devel-
opments in Israel's war strategy.
FOR THE Foreign Ministry,
its director general, David
Kimche, delicately sought to
shift the attack, insisting that
the Ministry received all its in-
formation from and was subor*
dinate to the Army spokesman's
department.
"We had no authority to pub-
lish facts and figures on our own;
Only those which were supplied
to us. The Israel Defense Forces'
said categorically that it would
not put out any figures regarding
casualtiescivilian, terrorist or
Israel's own casualties until
they had been thoroughly check-
ed and double-checked. This"
meant that, in the crucial first
stage, we had no figures at all."
Dr. Yehuda Ben-Meir, the
Deputy Foreign Minister, while,
admitting certain lapses, urged
that there be no hysterical blan-
ket condemnation. Israel had
largely succeeded in two of its
.three main information objec-
tives.
THESE WERE in getting
across in a convincing manner
the purpose of Israel's campaign
and in convincing friendly coun->
tries, especially the United
States, to share Israel's war!
sims: the destruction of the
PLO's military capacity, its phy-
sical expulsion from Lebanon'/
and the need to assist in the crea-
tion of a stable Lebanese Govern-
ment. ,". |
"Only in conveying the con-1
duct of the war have we had diffi-1
culties, some of which are simply
objective and unavoidable."
Ehud Olmert, a young Likud
politician.who is being tipped as
a possible deputy minister with
responsibility for information,
amplified the pressures and "ob-
jective difficulties" confronting
any Israeli information effort.
"If one attacks, then it is in-
evitably harder to explain the
motives for war. In a democratic
state, there is free access. Cover
age of the debate raging inside'
Israel on the merits of the war;
has meant that expression of the'
Government line has been less ef:
fective.
"THE WORLD has high
expections of us. There
is a double standard regarding
Israel. We should not be para-
noid, and I do not accept the pop-
ular conception that much of the
world is potentially anti-Semitic.
But we cannot ignore that such
innate hostility does exist in
some quarters.
"There is a basic bias agains^
this Government, this Prime
Minister and this Defense Minis-
ter, so that, by and large, people
outside have a negative percep-
tion of their actions, whatever
they do."
In contrast with this view/
quite another was presented by
Simcha Dinitz, of the Labor
Party and a former Israeli Am-
bassador in Washington.
He spoke of the "fog of war" in
which the Israeli military deliber-
ately enshrouded the operation in
its opening stage. This self-im-
posed and perhaps understand-
able silence gave the enemy a
monopoly at the start.
"The exclusion of all foreign
correspondents and the limited
facts given to them in the first
week meant that that there was a
totally one-sided source of infor-
mation, pictures and statistics. It
takes ages to break down that
first impression, however distort-
ed.
THEN, said Dinitz, there was
a readiness in the Western world,
even in countries normally
friendly to Israel, to absorb anti-
Israel information. He had a
number of explanations for this.
"Two which are often mention-
ed and must be given some cre-
dence are latent anti-Semitism,
and Arab influence through oil
and petrodollars." But to accept
that, and just that, "lets our-
selves too easily off the hook."
In recent years, Israel's image
has also been sorely eroded by
her policy in the territories, by
the way the autonomy idea has
been quibbled over and whittled
down and by the devaluing of
positive facets of Israeli society. ,
"Whether these policies were'
right or wrong, one cannot ignore
the fact that they created a new
attitude towards Israel and that
faith in Israel has subsided," said
Dinitz.
Finally, Dinitz mentioned the
lack of a real consensus within
Israeli society for the broader
and expanded objectives of the
war. "Because of this debate and
the fact that these doubts were
reflected abroad, the Govern-
ment's arguments are not seen as
too solid."
WHATEVER view there
might be of Dinitz' arguments,
there is broad national agreement
about the need for greater co-
ordination between all the var-
ious groups engaged in the infor-
mation field, although not neces-
sarily on the need for an informa-
tion ministry.
But, given all the arguments
and recriminations, there is little
honest soul-searching on one car-
dinal point and scant recognition
that there is a major practical
lesson to be learned from it: War,
especially when fought across
areas of civilian habitation, does
have terrible aspects.
Horrified though they may be
by the extent of suffering caused
by the war, very few Israelis real-
ly appreciate just how much im-
pact the television pictures and
newspaper descriptions have had
abroad, particularly when they
are of the plight of ordinary men,
women and children.
Israeli strategists have not yet
assimilated the fact that one of
the key weapons influencing the
impact ot contemporary wars is
the television cameraa lesson
which has probably also not been
learned at Sandhurst or West
Point.
ihe Jfeuiisfa FI'PiriHIiinun
rUrMfi Mm! Ctaplttt laflisa-Itvisk !.;
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jiddish LanguageWell,
Alive and Thriving
Friday, August.20,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
iv BEN GALLOB
enthusiasm, attendance
. of representation at the
Inference in Montreal of
rid Council on Yiddish
jdish Culture were the
the Yiddish language
9nly alive and well but
[than 300 delegates came
cent conference, and 200
[came from countries out-
th America. Authors Eli
iid Isaac Bashevis Singer
nong the leading figures in
?Id of Yiddish who were
Imbers and breadth of re-
jtion, the Montreal con-
Er surpassed the first two
9 of the World Council
Israel. Aside from the
elegates, local Jews came
numbers to conference
[open to the public.
Lermer, chairman of
il arrangements commit-
|N THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
>ADE COUNTY,FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 12-MM
Division 01
ire:estate of
[alexhersch
| Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The adrrlnlstratlon of the
Istate of ALEX HERSCH de-
eased. File Number 82-6422, li
ending In the Circuit Court for
[lade County, Florida, Probate
vision, the address of which
73 West Flagler Street,
.li.nr.i Florida. S31S0. The
Inames and addresses of the
personal representative and
[the personal representative's
I attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
12) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom noUce
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualific-
ations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurisdic-
tion of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on August 20, 1982
Tonle Lleberman
Personal Representative
68 5th Avenue
NY. NY 10003
Attorney for Personal
Representative.
GALBUT. GALBUT MENIN,
PA.,
909 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach. Florida, 33139
Telephone: 672-3100
18047_________August 20. 27 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 62*478
Division 02
NRB: ESTATE OF
EVELYN K. PHILBROOK.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
istate of EVELYN K. PH1L-
1ROOK deceased. File
lumber 82-6478. is pending In
Circuit Court for Dade
uunty, Florida. Probate Dlvl-
Bon, the address of which Is
lade County Courthouse, 73
Vest Flagler Street. Miami Fl
B130. The names and address
of the personal representa-
ve and the personal repre-
entatlve's attorney are set
^rth below.
| All Interested persons are re-
tired to file with this court,
([1THIN THREE MONTHS OF
4E FIRST PUBLICATION
THIS NOTICE: (1) all
lms against the estate and
any objection by an Inter-
red person to whom notice
s mailed that challenges the
^lldlty of the will, the quallfic-
jlons of the personal repre-
ntattve, venue, or jurtsdlc-
i of the court.
^LL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TS NOT SO FILED WILL
JREVER BARRED.
Jblication of this Notice has
I on August 20, 1982 Copy
William H. Gibberson
I Personal Representative
2125 A lamanda D rive
1 North Miami. FL 33161
rORNEY FOR PERSONAL
VRESENTATIVE:
4AELA DRIBIN
Arthur Godfrey Road
. Box 402099
ni Beach. PL 33140
pThone: 1305)532-4721
\ugust 20. 1-7 1982
; ,:.;>-.. .-.;.........
tee, said he estimated that nearly
1,200 Jews came to a Saturday
night symposium on the spiritual
heritage of East European Jewry,
held at the Jewish Public
Library. That event was a repeat
of the turnout of the previous
night when Singer read from his
works at an Oneg Shabbat, ac-
cording to the Canadian Jewish
News.
In Paris, the prestigious Sor-
bonne is giving courses in
Yiddish to more than 400 stu-
dents, the conclave was told by
the dean of the Jewish studies
department. Prof. Itzack Var-
shavsky. Another item from
France was a report on the pub-
Continued on Page 11-B
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 2 12413
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
HERIBERTO 1IKVI A,
Petit loner-Husband
and
XIOMARA ABAD.
Respondent-Wife
TO: XIOMARA ABAD
Calzado del Cerro No. 1603
LaHabana. Cuba
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for Dissol
uUon of Marriage has been
filled against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any. to It on
A. KOSS. ESQ. attorney for
PeUUoner. whose address Is
101 N.W. 12th Avenue, Miami
Florida 33128, and file the ori-
ginal with the cleric of the
above styled court on or before
September 17. 1962; otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
peUUon.
This notice shall be published
once week for four consecutive
weeks In THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court of Miami,
Florida on this 16 day of
August, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By: N.A. Hewett
As Deputy Clerk
A. KOSS, ATTORNEY AT
LAW, P.A.
Attorneys for Petitioner-
Husband
101 N.W. 12th. Avenue.
Miami, Florida 33128
Telephone: (305(326-8844
Attorney for PeUUoner
(Publish) A. Koss
18060 August 20, 27
Sept. 3, 10 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUITCOURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 82 1082* FC 26
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ANTONIA DELGADO.
Petitioner-Wife,
and
JAIRO DELGADO.
Respondent-Husband
TO: JAIRO DELGADO
Respondent-Husband
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to it on
DAVID M. SOSTCHIN. attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress Is 2121 Ponce de Leon
Boulevard, Suite 460. Coral
Gables. FL 33134 USA, and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 10. 1982; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded in the complaint or
peUUon.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 28 day of July,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
I lad. Cou m iv Florida
ByK.Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
DAVID M.
SOSTCHIN ESQUIRE
2121 Ponce de Leon
Boulevard. No 450
Coral Gables FL 33134
Telephone. 444-8383
Attorney lor Petitioner
10028 August 6,13,
20, 27. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO. 12 10*71 FCI4
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
DIEUVERT BERNARD.
Petitioner Husband
and
BERNADETTE GOMAN
BERNARD.
Respondent-Wife
TO: BERNADETTE GOMAN
BERNARD
PeUte Riviere
du Borgne
c-o Germain Roy
Petit Hours
du Borgne
Haiti. West Indies
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a peUUon for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on LAW
OFFICE OF LLOYD M.
ROUTMAN. attorney for
PeUUoner, whose address Is
Suite 615. 7900 NE 2nd Avenue.
Miami, FL 33138, and file the
original with the clerk of the
above styled court on or before
September 10, 1982: otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
peUUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secuUve weeks In the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 30 day of July,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. Self ried
As Deputy Clerk
I Circuit Court Seal)
Lee R. KravlU, Esq.
LAW OFFICE OF
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN
Suite 615,
7900 NE 2nd Ave.
Miami, FL 33138
Telephone: (3051767-8800
Attorney for Petitioner
18928 August 6.18;
20. 27.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO 82-11501
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
The marriage of
PROFILIO SOLI VER.
Petitioner-Husband,
and
CLEANTE SOLI VER,
Respondent-Wife.
TO: CLEANTESOLIVER
154 Pollclinlque
del'Avenue
Chris tophe,
Port-au-Prince
Haiti
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any, to It on
ARTHUR H. LIPSON, attorney
for Petitioner, whose address is
1516 N.W. 167 Street. Suite 216,
Miami. Fla. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Sep-
tember 3, 1982; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 29 day of July,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By Clarlnda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
18024 August 6.13;
20, 27. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name ASO-
CIACION MEDICA DE GRA
DUADOS DE UN1VERS1-
DADES ESPANOLAS T
EXTRANJERAS PREMIO
PERIODISTICO DR. GUIL-
LERMO MARTINEZ MAR-
QUEZ" at 1797 Coral Way,
Miami. Florida 33145 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
Dr. Manuel A. Alzugaray
18020 August 6,13;
20. 27,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Na-
ture's Wonders at 8040 North
Kendall Dr.. Miami. Fl 33156
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida
JohnT. Cole. Jr..
Owner
18006 July SO;
AugustO. 13,20. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name DA-
VID J. WEINER, DM D at
9720 S. W. 8th Street, Miami.
Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
DAVID J. WEINER.
D.M.D..P.A.
BY: DAVID J. WEINER.
D.M.D.
SCOTT F.
BARNETT. P.A.
BY:
SCOTTF. BARNETT
Attorney
P.O. BOX 640405
Miami. FL 33164
18015 July 30:
Augusts. 13.20. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Justl-
language Audiovisual Center at
8374 S.W. 40 St., Miami, Fla.
33185 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
H'lorlda
EllyJusUnlanl.
Owner
18027 August 6.18:
20. 27,1982
INTHECIRCUITCOURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
Flit Number 12*500
Division 03
IN RE: ESTATE OF
LEO STEIN.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the
.stale of LEO STEIN de-
ceased, File Number 82-6500, Is
pending In the Circuit Court for
Dade County, Florida, Probate
Division, the address of which
Is Dade County Courthouse. 73
West Flagler Street, Miami,
FL 33130. The names and ad-
dresses of the personal repre-
sentaUve and the personal rep-
resentative's attorney are set
forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualific-
ations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurist lcUon
of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
PubllcaUon of this NoUce has
begun on August 20,1982
Tamara Chaakes
Personal Representative
FLAGSHIP NATIONAL
BANK OF MIAMI
Trust Division-Miami Beach
P.O. Box 524209
Miami, FL 33152
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
SPARBER, SHEV IN. ROSEN
SHAPO AND HEILBRON
NER. P.A.
One S.E. Third Avenue. 30th
Floor
Miami. Fl 33131
Telephone (305) 358-7990
18051 August 20, 27 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-10967 FC 10
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CLAIRE BECKETT
Petitioner-wife
ALV1N RAYMOND
BECKETT
Respondenl-husband
TO: ALVIN RAYMOND
BECKETT
8 Woolwich Drive
Kingston 3, Jamaica
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. K any, to It on
LOUIS R BE1.1.ER. ESQ., at-
torney for PeUUoner, whose
address Is 420 Lincoln ltd .
Suite 238, Miami Beach. Fl.
33139, and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 31.
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 23 day of July.
1983
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K Selfrted
AsDeputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seal i
18W1 July30.
August 6. 13, 20. 19,'L'
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name of
SOMETHING EXTRA AT
RIVE GAUCHE at 1968 N.E.
123rd St. North Miami. Florida
33181 Intend to register said
name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
PAULS. BERGER, ESQ.
Attorney for
THE EMOTIONAL
OUTLET. INC.
44 West Flagler St.
Miami. Fl 33130
(306)374-4385
The Emotional
OuUet. Inc.
Judith Rosen
President
:
18062
Aug. 20,27;
SeptS. 10, 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
Civil Action
No. 82-12347
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
JUAN MANUEL BURAYA.
Petitioner -hiisluui.1
and
MARIA LUISA ONTIVEROS
Respondent-wife
TO: MARIA LUISA ON-
TIVEROS
Nicaragua 3.
Madrid 16. Spain.
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that an acUon for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to on
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ, at-
torney for PeUUoner. whose
address Is 2153 Coral Way,
Suite 400. Miami. Florida. USA,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before September 17,
1982: otherwise a default will
be entered aglnst you for the
relief demanded In the com-
plaint or peUt Ion.
This notice shall be publlsehd
once a week for four consecu-
Uve weeks in THE JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 13th day of
August. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By N.A. HEWETT
As Deputy Clerk
ARMANDO GUTIERREZ, ES-
QUIRE
2153 Coral Way, Suite 400
Miami, Florida 33145
305-358-04M
Attorney for Petitioner
18048 August 20. 27
September3, 101982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name S I A
INVESTMENTS, a partnership
at 7406N.W. 41st Street. Miami,
Florida Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
MARIANITOS. CHUA
EDWINS CHUA
AMEI.ITAS. CHUA
ARISTKDKS S. CHUA
MABELS. CHUA
DEBBIE S. CHUA
JEANETTES CHUA
EI.KNITAS. CHUA
VINCENTS. CHUA
DENNIS S CHUA
HARVEY D FRIEDMAN
Attorney for S I A INVEST-
MENTS, a Partnership
18006 July 30;
Augusts, 13.20, 1982
NOTICt JNl/lK
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name LIMA
BODY SHOP at 4165 N.W
132nd Street Lot 19-20 Opa-
Locka, Florida 33054 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
OSVALDO AMADOR
LIMA
i802t' August 6,13;
20, 27, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
THELMA'S HATS at 927 Lin-
coln Road-oulte 217 Inlands to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade Countv, Florida.
THAT'S THAT D>
Sandra Jacob.
President
\ttomey for
THAT'S THAT. INC
V\ EISS k v. I
120 Lincoln Road
349
Miami Beach, Florldu 33 19
18013 July 30,
August 6. 13. 20 10M
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A3*en*y for Pet-saurr
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aa* -.
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CT>cSOF irni
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n esc a* BcntEcn
Baaaance Caanwaa
TOC Ajtx NClli _E_ aa: .
EW3CZ MAT bock
~ Km my aaad aad
IN TM CIRCUIT COUT Of
THE CLCVEMTM JUCICiAt
Cl CUIT IN AM O FO
&CMCVAL
AJIISOtCTKM
CXVIStOM
'.AilWOB'DHK
DIM THEMAKKMECir
OEKAXX> PJCHAKSj
rUjf-.AA R1CHARL,
KtaecnOrt Wife
TO TlJjf.A PJf.-HAPX,
RJ'^TIIIIIIH
U
Bourgnc Has;
wnccor
P'.'BUCATIOM
TO*. ARC HEKEBT H/n
PTCL> OtAi a PcOOee For Dto-
MMMi Of UArmi* baa bt
ni*4 aammc you and row sra
rW|MX*4 lo rr a CJ397 of your
A/lwr H> F>Ad( 10 MU4 M>
JUor. on patltMncf Atternry
'it/JpSiZ T RAMJUtL JCJ<|
y Til. BtKA/n* Bulldka it
We* FlActer Mrwrt Miab-.:
none* BlMi Aad (Ut Ok Ooa^
oaj Answer or PlMtdmc 0". the
Offte* of tto* Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 17 0A7 of
eptember 1M3 If you fall to
do ao ktdgmaat by drfaolt will
be U*r. AA^inrt you lor the
reilef lerr.Ar>le4 x. m^3 peti
Uon
DONE AND ORDEREXi At
Miami. Dade County, Florida
thtsllOAyof Aufuet. lMQ
RICHARD f BRISKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
BY: M. J. Hartiwtt
Deputy Clerk
1AM1 Aufuatao. J7.
September a. 10. :*M
OT ICE O* ACT KM
COMSTIUCTI *C SEB^ICE
'MO"CM>Earrr,
IMTMC CltCUITCCXltTOf
THE ELS/EMTM JUfMClAL
CIBCUITOF FLOVIOA. IN
AMD FOd OAOE COUNTY
CIVIL ACT KM
HO B-12277
ACTIOM FO DtSSOtirriOM
OF WA( IACC
RE THEMARRJArUEOF
OMAR COJICE PCIO >
r wraoee a*i
27tB A
da v.:v. aad
-at the cwrk
IM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IHAHD FOR
DA DC COUNTY. F LOR I DA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE HO: O IHUFC 11
NOTICE ir
PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
DORA INE8 HEN AO
DE GOMEZ-RAMIREZ
Petitioner
And
RUBEN DARIO
GOMEZ-RAMIREZ
Respondent
TO: RUBEN DARIO
GOMEZ-RAMIREZ
Resident Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY notified
that a Petition (or Dissolution
of MAiTlagc has been filed
agAlxurt you and you are hereby
required to serve a copy of your
answer or other pleading to the
Petition on the Petitioner
Attorney. HARVEY D ROG-
ERS, whose address is iaoi
N w 17th Avenue. Miami.
Florida. MIX and file the orig-
inal with the Clerk of the above
styled Court on or before this
3rd day of September. 1M2. or a
Default will be entered against
you.
DATED THIS day of July
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Clerk
By: K. Selfrled
Deputy Clark
iii JuryFJ;
Augustt. U 20, 1MB
CONCEPCXOSl BEN.-TEZ
ReacncdeaK
TO COSCEPCTON
BBJUlBi
Reatdeaee dmieii
TOC ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIEL thai aa arbor, far Dtaec-
aomc. of MamAge aas been
r_ agajnat you asd you are
required to serve a copy of your
JtBe* >-* -i--/ v. .'. vr.
M CrMCAa L*r-
tor f iriTici wi
Uad tmmii
Mis1 Flat
INe engMMi
the above styled court on or be
Jr-re tepterr.oer '.' i*i -jt---
edae a defaolt wii> be entered
against you for the reftef de-
manded te the rnmpfcunf or pe-
TIMS notice ehaii be puboshed
once each week for lour corv
secutrve weeas m THE JEW-
ISH FLORID D\N
WTTNESS my hand and the
seai of said court at MMwci
Florida on thM 12 day of
August :M2
RICHARD P BRINKER
AiClerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
< Circuit Court Seal <
DEL-VALLC
LAW OFFICES. PA
ltSO Southwest 27th A ve .
MiAmi. Florida sae*
Telephone Xd 1 4s-772
Attorney for Petmonar
1*012 --------
IN THE CiRCurT COURT OF
THE ELEVEHTM JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 0-17177 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF AAARRIA6E
Of RE TnezAmagecc
REXtTR-
Auc-UBt2A.27.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IHAHD FOR
DA DC COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. EM2RU FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The MarrlAg* Of:
LAIS3E.NA JEAN LOUIS,
Petitioner Wife
and
DIEUVENT JEAN LOUIS.
Respondent Husband
TO: DIEUVENT JEAN
LOUIS.
MArtlsaant 21 No. 2S
Portau-Prtnee
HalU
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
TOU. DIEUVENT JEAN
LOUIS. Respondent H 1 .
are hereby notified to serve a
copy of your Answer to the Pe-
tition For Dtaaoeutlon of
rlage filed against you.
Lalasena Jean Louis attorney
GEORGE NICHOLAS ES-
QUIRE 12 N W 12th Avenue
Miami. Florida UlM and file
original with the Clerk of Dm
Court on or bafor BipHintm
10. lMn. oUierwMe the PeOHaa
will be confessed by you
DATED Qua 1* day N
August 1MB
RICHARD P BRINKER
CLERK
By M J Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
SUSAN ATNTLL,
PiaiiiHint-Wde
TO W
Bj
TOO ARE HEREBY NOTT
FTEL _: ac aeooB far Dkasa-
fcanaa of MimiNU has been
jed agamat you aad you are
required '. serve a copy of your
wnttec Bieknaae. -4 any itsot
ARTHUR H LIPSON ASoraey
avPaOawaar wnoseaddressm
ins n w -jn st. Suae as.
VL-aan Fkv aad fi> -Jie ortg>
na, with the cierk of the above
atyied court on or krtui 1 Sep-
jt!T.br 10 1MB otherwise a
defaaJt win be asaered agaaast
r"" lor the reoef demaaded M
the eosoptaic: orpetstoa.
WTTNESS my Band and the
atal of aald court at Mlam:.
Florida on Ous ;; day of Au-
aaat-lMB
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
ByM J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
August II, 2*. 27
September! :M3
NOTICE JUKI
F '.' C-S NAME _AN
v/nct -- -:x-r:
*---- *-j* -- .-i->m
.=<3tr 3 te. "-r.<- -^- r I?
LAN CaSetar-a a: r: r. E 4 Aie-
taaas m reaps^er tAJt -ae
-~ -j* On of 3m ~i iad
rj.r J L sMCkayatj T.-.rr^.
CARLOS M MENT-EZ. Esq
Attorney lor
aa^AXBO KERN ANT. EZ
2MM a 4 awj
HHIEAri FV.r-.de
v^jta 2T
tepr--erl :: .MB
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAN
NOTICE IS HEREBY
;.~X.s =at 2 ^dermgsed.
laadar tM> Bc~_cuj -,a=*
AGUE. ORGANO OTX^AL.
ASOCIACTOW MEDICA DE
GRADU ADOS LE VNTVEBJB-
DADES ESPANOLAS T EX
THAN.'ERAS at ITFT Corai
Way S W Bad Street **~'
Florida BIAS kajajaB M
register said name wtth the
Or* of the Circa* Court of
Lade County Fionda
Dr Miil A, traig-iray
URU August! U
2A2T
r r.LXC
>. a: Mar. N Mrc
Lreet **"- Ffirjaa aad
aare ^.turua.*r7 ses as
_. < ;:J| :- ] XJrawl
tm 111 g w rm
P M aajuM aa reaarwsd aPatz
Boat el ?ag ? _-
Raarti or LwJsCaancy Tor-
MB
N paar *M EVN>^E MAT
-^:c r_ v.2u _-; !>-- 1--
^- : -.'. i_- : ._- :
serve a tap* 1
^ -- .<
-cee I > 1 a LXS > a
- -* ;------".*.:
:- ii'- kawBal
*r a.- a r-
- -i:i- ce -a_ :- ;>.: .-:
aw 1 ^.r fci^ 4 caa>
ecir-re veesj n =e E :5-r
PIjORLLLAN
4 at? :t a_-j^
rcuzt;
RTCJiART: r BRJNXXR
Ai Cara Cirr^: Cot.-.
LadeCoosty Flanda
Bj E -e^r-ac;
aj Lupati dark
?-:nalt. .-la=e?. e-sc
MwdMas RWMRaBaaa
JOB N :- Stree-.
Ma.-: ran*BLB
ltd-, so,
OFMAds a.ti *
!* MaSXLa^eTf
xhnii late
aUNS
I "Lt. _A.2
^Cf f ATP it_- *
fTTfl Kjemcatra-^-
aeat ^ema.T*"
BBC ARE aKR3i v-
r.TZ. 2a; as aai
ix rr vt
Nt* j .^,
"'ftii f
avnary Mr Feri nrer e^^
a !aae H !
?*erMi
"7*4
- ~ >:
rawaVJR -,
SaaaeMR
Tttrarinri MS **-av:~
A-^arary Mr PetXKcer
a_4-jh :i
M r :w
Aaguat U, 2. 27
September!, 1MB
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUOICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA
INAMDFOR
DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.BVlRMe
FAMILY DIVISION FC II
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF Mill (AGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
WTLLLAMS INGRAHAM
and
MARLAJ INGRAHAM
TO MARLAJ
INGRAHAM
M Jamestown Road
R D No 1
Randolph
New York 1*772
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Marriage has
been filed and commenced m
thM court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It on
SAMUEL S SOROTA Attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is lOOO NX lath Ave-
nue suite No 227. North Miami
Florida WltO and file
with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore August 11. 1MB. otherwise
a default will be entered
against you tor the reuef
prayed for bi the complaint or
pe*_t>-^,
WTTNESS my hand and the
of said Court at Miami
Use 23 day of Jury.
1MB
RICHARD P BRINKER
as Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
by K Setfned
As Deputy Clerk
CVcult Court Seal,
1M JteySO:
August*. 12.20, 1MB
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE '^ HEREBY
GIVEN that 3m underagned.
dMinag la nagigi k hiiemii
^"der _-. r.r-.-uxj ran*
L Baaery a: as- ;j At,
Miami F~. aaandi to register
end same with the Clark of BM
Clreurt Court of Dade County
AEFBaaertM awa
Bernard Formac
25 pereaat kwereat
RubsaFurmac.
23 per c em Interest
Harold Ac kermarav
29 percent interest
Ernesto FMcher
29 percent Hue rest
* JutyBJ.
August* 12 20 1MB
NOTICE UNOEt
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE 3 HEREST
*aii'i 1 -Ji e=gage N
aadar the f.-rtruous -a.e TOL-
LCN AiSOCLATES at IM 5 *
B Are Ms.-. Fionda BUS
asaadi vi regaaer aaid a~
w*k the Clark of the Ctrc-_-.
Court of Dade Ci satj Flanda
HUGHTOLDEN Owmer
MTLESG CTPEN Eaa
A:varaey for Asaocac:
CTPEN A CTPEN
iS Arthur Goatrry Read
Ma- 3ea--- F^rvdaB:*-:
la*M AugtMtU 2-
Seaaetaberl. 1MB
-----------HvTIclUNMl----------
F ICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE B HEREBY
GI.XN that the joderagned
desirtng to engage M bustness
under The Oeotjous name
EASTERN HOSIERY INC at
12H) Burlington St OpaLocka
Fla BOM intends to register
aaid name wtth the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade Count*
Florida.
Pres Isaac Murals
August* U
2*. 27.1MB
NOTICE UHDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned desuing
to engage in business imasr the
fictitious name MR DO NUT at
BOO Southwest (7th Avenue.
Miami Florida B1M intends to
register said name wtth the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
CHARLES L HARRIS
d-b-aMR DONUT
BY Charles L Harrlsa
BOLTON. WEST A BOLTON
Attorney tor
Charles L Harrtss
2330 N E 171 Street
North Miami Beach.
Fla 331*0
IMC* July 30:
August 13. 30.1M2
NOTKE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(WITH PR OWE* TY1
IH THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOB DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
Ho.at-rtMirt)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
LNRE Trie Mirran of
ada mavis b land in
BBJa
aad
RAF AE L MANUAL
BLAND in
Husband
TO RAFAEL MANUAL
BLANDLN
CajJe Saa GabrMt
QumtaLeVe
ruaa La Fionda
Caracas Venaauela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dtaeo-
a*Ma of Mamage has baas
fUad against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
STANLEY M NEWMARK. at-
lorney tor PeUtjoner whose
addreaa M btOO South Dadeland
Boulevard. Suite 300 Miami
Florida 331M aad fUe the ongl
nal with the clerk of the above,
styled court on or before Sep
tember 17. i*B; othervrtae a
default will be entered against
you tor the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition
ThM notice shall be published
once each weak far four con-
axutrre wee*, ta THE JEW-
ISH FLORID LAN
WTTNESS my hand and the
eau of aald court at Miami
Florida on Uus 10 day of Au-
gust 1M2
RICHARD P BRINKER
AiClerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K Setfned
Aa Deputy Clerk
1 Circuit Court Seal,
STANLEY M NEWMARK
Eaq
1*00 South Dade land Blvd.
Suite**)
Miami. Florida a 194
Attorney for Petitioner
Augustll.il. 27.
Septembers. 1M2
NOTICE OF AC'ON
CONSTRUCTIVE SE8.ICE
(NO FROFETY
IN THE CIRCUIT CO. B'OF
THE ELEVENTH jwCClAl.
CIRCUIT OFF LOR DA IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTK3H
NO B-13KT FC
FAMILY DIVISION
NOTICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
L> RE THE RLABR] i.zZOF
a: ncsnrr; .tn
PrtBaer-A
LEEJOHNSON
Reapondea: Hau.t
TO LEE JOHNS-, s
M Ferry Road
OMSaybrooa
Coaa M7S
YOU ARE HERE3T NOTI-
FIED that a peo&oc tor L-ja>
of your aa.ap aai
led aad rreaceg x
xta court aad you are rec,Ared
to sere* a copy of ywar vrsa
iN lenses if any x >
LLOTD M ROUTMAN ESQ
far Petanner waoet
sa Sutte < J TOC XI
Avanoe Mam; FL BIB.
and 0M the ongana. -- tM
cierk of the above styied court
on or before September :o
1MB otMrrwae a defa~: sill
be entered igtaat you tor tM
reuef prayed tor a the com-
This Booce shall be pu~ined
four con-
secutHe weak* a the ,"E*ISH
FLORID LAN
WTTNESS my band And at
anal of aud court at Miami
Florida on (MM 10 day of Au-
gust. 1MB
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Cart. OrcaR Court
Dade County. Fionda
ByM J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
Circuit Court Seai
LLOYD M ROUTMAN E
SatteSia.
Ta NE 2nd Are
MaffllFLUia
alaaaai tor Peuooner
IS. 20.17;
r! IMS
HOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAN
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the uaderagnea
dasinng to engage a buauveM
under the Octttloua name i*
aea Jordan and Bast Litlk
BMxb Book tn Florida at P 0
Box 4O30W Miami Be* Hi '-
SSltO intends to regtater aid
name with the Clerk of tn Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County
Florida.
Toby Leboerttx, Owner
Auguitll 20.111
Septermberl IBJ*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE O HEREBT
GIVEN that the ^^Hf**?*-
desirtng to engage tn budn*-
under the OcUUoua name I"J
amencan Motor Corp ? ""I
N W R SI. Miami F.orw
331*4 intends to faaSMsj
rm. with the Oark.o< J^
cult Court of Dade County.
Florida-
Rene Rodxlguet
AMjuatlDrr
Sa|>UrnaarS.10.1


Yiddish Language
reil, Alive and Thriving
Continued from Page 9-B
i-ation of the first major French-
Edish dictionary after many
lrs of preparation.
iThe first annual Herschl Ro-
L'feld Award, named for the late
i ntreal Yiddish leader, was
minted to Joshua Fishman.
festiniruished University Re-
parch Professor of Social Science
fvpshiva University for his 800-
U study of the 1.000 year
*wry of Yiddish, "Never Say
*ie."
J Avrum Shumreh, head of the
[iddish SUte Theater in War-
Lw told the delegates how the
Wish government supports a
ludio with a staff of 120. which
Ives three performances weekly
T Warsaw and travels to perform
I smaller communities. He ad-
mitted that many members of the
Liences must make use of ear-
hones for translations into
Wish.
I The delegates were told that a
holem Aleichem school had been
parted in Melbourne, Australia,
Tmeet a growing demand for in-
fete*
S=i
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Slree!
[Tel 261 7612
struct ion in Yiddish. The Austra-
lian government, like that of
Canada, has adopted a policy of
multi-lingualism and helps sup-
port the Melbourne school, as
well as a Yiddish radio program
broadcast four times each week.
Gerald Godin, the Quebec
Cultural Minister, and Charles
Caccia, the federal Manpower
Minister, who substituted for
Jim Fleming, the Multicultura-
lism Minister, pledged the sup-
port of their governments for
Yiddish. The federal government
contributed a $5,000 grant to the
Canadian Jewish Congress Com-
mittee on Yiddish to help cover
the cost of the conference, the
News reported.
Both the Quebec and the feder-
al government provided help for
publication of the Canadian Jew-
ish Anthology, a history of
Yiddish culture in Canada. Writ-
ten by Jacob Zipper and Chaim
Spilberg, the book was formally
launched at the conference.
Godin, wearing a "I Love
Yiddish" button, said Yiddish
was like "a small river which
flows into an ocean," contribut-
ing not only to the history of the
Jewish people but to that of man-
kind in general-
Younger participants, in the 25
to 40-year age group, were well
represented at the conference.
They held their own workshop,
plenary meeting and Shabbaton.
Most of them came from New
j York but there were also younger
| representatives from Brazil,
France and Israel.
Two founders of the Charlotte
Yiddish Institute in North
Carolina Baila Pransky, a
native of Boston, and Cuban-
born Rose Luski reported that
the Institute has become a major
project of the 4,000-member Jew-
ish community since it was es-
tablished four years ago.
MONUMENTS INC
Open Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avenue
Phone 266-2888
For Sale
2 Graves, good location
reasonable price Star of David
Memorial Park, Miami.
Call altar 4:30 P.M.
672-1141
Obituaries
SPIELMAN
Samuel, 81 of Miami Beach. Mr. Spiel-
man waa a concert pianist and the City
Concert Pianist (or Miami Beach (or
over IB years. He Is survived by his
wife, Geraldlne. daughter, Geraldlne
Brondn; and two grandchUdren. Ser-
vices were held August IS at Rubln-ZU-
bert.
UNGER
Samuel Myer. 81. Miami. Mrs. Unger
had made his home In Miami for the
past 32 years, coming from Atlanta,
Georgia. He was a practicing CPA for 61
years and a member of the Finance
Lodge of B'nal B'rlth and Beth Kodesh
Synagogue. He Is survived by his wife,
Kstelle. sons, Joe N. Unger, Miami, and
Dr. Paul B. Unger, Melbourne, Florida:
and six grandchildren. Services were
held August 13 at Gordon with Interment
at Mt. Nebo.
SHAPIRO
Irvln. A resident of Miami (or 37 years.
He was one of the founders of Barons
Men's Clothing Chain and a member of
Temple Beth David. He Is survived by
his wife, Dorothy; sons, Steven, of West
Palm Beach, and Fred, of California,
daughters. Ivy, of California, and Lorl,
of Miami; and (our grandchUdren. Ser-
vices were held August 18 at Riverside
with Interment at Mt. Nebo.
HELLER. Sophie, 72, Miami August 13,
- Levltt-Welnsteln.
MARGOLIS, Max, 80, Bal Harbour, Au-
gust 12, Riverside.
ROK, Bernardo (Benny) 20. North
Miami Beach, August 13. Riverside.
SHAPIRO, Benjamin H 86, Miami
Beach, August 12, Riverside.
COOK. Isldoe, 86. Miami. August IB.
Levltt-Welnsteln.
EDELSON. Kate. 67, North Miami
Beach, August 16, Riverside.
GREEN, Michel (Mickey), Miami
Beach.
SANDERS, 02, August 8. Riverside.
LEDERMAN, Mollye, 81. August 9,
Levltt-Welnsteln.
OZERSKY, 42. August 11, Riverside.
GREENWALD, 71. August 12. River-
side.
UNGER, Samuel. 81, August 13, Gor-
don.
KELLY, Sam, 72. Miami, August IS.
Gordon.
SILVERSTEIN. Charlotte, Miami
Beach, Blasberg.
FEINGOLD, Isidore, Miami Beach.
August 16. Rubln-Zllbert.
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MARKOVICH
Oscar, Miami Beach passed away Aug
16. He had been a Miami resident (ot
over 40 years. He Is survived by his
wife, BeUe; daughter. Marjorle Glaub- '
man; brothers, Morris and Max Marko
vlch; slaters, Kate Greene and Margie
Markovlch, seven grandchildren and
three great grandchildren. Services
August 18 at Riverside with Interment
at Mt. Nebo.
RUDOLPH
Oulda E., 66, of Kendall. Florida. Bom
In Philadelphia. Mississippi, she had
lived In Miami (or over 26 years and had
worked (or the U.S. Attorney General's
Office. She Is survived by her daugh-
ters. Sandra Kodlsh. of Paulina. New
York. Faith Bemat of Ft. Lauderdale.
and Rhonda Rose of South Miami; son.
Michael Rudolph of California; brotner,
Max Tolbert, of Oklahoma; and five
grandchildren. Services August 19 at
Riverside.
FREEDNER, Harold J., Bay Harbor,
Rubln-Zllbert
MOSKOWITZ.Davld, Miami Beach,
August 16. Rubln-Zllbert.
NACHT. Edward A.. 86, Miami Beach.
August 16, Riverside.
STERN, Rose, Miami Beach, August 13.
MENDELOW, Leah, 84. North Miami
Beach, August 16, Riverside.
NADLER, Anne, Miami Beach, Levltt-
Welnsteln.
SANDERS, Charles. 79. Miami. Levltt-
Welnsteln.
SIGAL. Luis, 66, Miami Beach. August
16, Riverside.
KAPLAN, Max. 96, Miami Beach
August 16, Gordon.
SKI.NICK. Israel. 94. Miami Beach,
August 16, Gordon.
SHAPIRO, Isadore, 88, Miami, August
18, Gordon.
SILVERSTEIN. Benjamin. Miami
Beach. Blasberg
STIRMAN. Ida Mare. Miami Beach.
August 18, Rubln-Zllbert.
BENSON. Belle Linda. 66, August 8,
Blasberg.
SABEAU. Ell, 78. August 8. Levltt-
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Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
~T*os sAafe aet Am Asg e*er thee uhom the Lord thy
f>jd thai! ckoote ome, -om emote thy brethren"
'Deut 1715)
SHOPETIM
SHOPET11I Judge* aad officer* shak thou make thee m ail
tT *** vakli the Lord thy God giveth thee, tribe by tribe:
aad they thaQ judge the people with righteous judgment .
Thou halt not plant thee an Aaherah of any kind of tree beside
the akar of the Lord thy God. which thou soak make the*
Neither *halt thou set thee op a ptUar. whkh the Lord thy God
heteth" (Deuteronomy 1618-22/ "At the mouth of two wk-
neeses. or three witnesses, hall be that is to die be put to death:
at the mouth of one wknaas he bail not be put to death
(Deuteronomy 17 67 If there arise a matter too hard lor thee m
judgment thou shak arise, and get thee up unto the place
which the Lord thy God shall choose And thou shak do
according to the tenor of the sentence, which they shall deck re
unto thee from that place which the Lord shall choose"
(Deuteronomy 17 H-9i If. like the other nations, the children of
Israel in Canaan should desire a king. "Thou shak in any wise
set him king over thee, whom the Lord thy God shall choose:
one from among thy brethren shak thou set king over thee: thou
mayest not put a foreigner over thee, who is not thy brother.
Only he shall not multiply horses to himself Neither shall be
multiply wives to himself Neither shall he greatly multiply
to himself silver and gold He shall write a copy of thai law in
a book, out of that which is before the priests the Levkes. And k
shall be with him. and he shall read therein all the days of his
bfe: that he may learn to fear the Lord his God" (Deuteronomy
17.15-19). The children of Israel may expect prophets to rise in
the Promised Land, men of God like Moses himself. "And it
shall come to pass, that whosoever will not hearken unto My
words whkh he shall speak in My name. I will require k of him"
(Deuteronomy 18.19/. How may the Israelites distinguish a true
prophet from a false one? When a prophet speaketh in the aaaaa
of the Lord, if the thing follow not, nor come to pass, that is the
thing whkh the Lord hath not spoken: the prophet hath spoken
k presumptuously, thou shalt not be afraid of him"
(Deuteronomy 18.22/. The portion also treats of the ckies of
refuge. It cites the speech that the priest and officers are to
make to troops before battle, and states the laws of warfare that
apply to any city not of the seven Canaanite nations. The
portion ends with the regulations dealing with the heifer offered
as atonement when a slain parson is found in the field and the
identity of the murderer a not known.
(Tk* f*cwrim *f tat weekly
wsea "TIM Oraeatc History ef me
TssMir, l J. published by Shessesf.
UM, Hew Yrli, NY 1S03I j**p*
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Young Israel
For Sunny Isles
The recently formed Orthodox
Young Israel Synagogue of Sun-
ny Isles has been granted affili-
ation by the National Council of
Young Israel Rabbi Ephraim
Sturm. Executive Vice President
of the National Council, an-
nounced.
Ted Garner, is president of the
erw New Young Israel branch.
Other officers include Charles
Skupsky. chairman of the board:
F.manuei Lasser and Chaim
Gamel. vice presidents: Harry
Gartner, treasurer and Adotph
Fishman. secretary. A com-
munity-wide membership drive is
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Full Text
waab'.v.v-vviw*-.?.-..,-.v
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FfidMy, August 20. l82y-The Jewirt Floridian PageS-A
UNESCO Rewrites History
Accepts PLO View of Middle East
NEW YORK (JTA) -
jie B'nai B'rith Interna-
wial condemned resolu-
ons passed last week in
Texico City at the United
fations Educational,
cientific and Cultural Or-
_iization conference on
jltural policies which at-
Cmpt to "rewrite the his-
kry" of Israel and foster
[talitarian control over
alture.
I Philip Lax, chairman of the In-
Irnational Council of B'nai
frith, who headed the organiza-
nn's delegation to the con-
Erence, said at a press conference
kre that the resolutions "en-
lurage states to sanction a sin-
\e culture, denying all others
ty right to exist, much less
Irive."
|HE NOTED that two of the
solutions adopted were inspired
the Palestine Liberation
tganization. One ->f the resolu-
bns, Lax said, equates Zionism
|th racism, and the other calls
UNESCO to assist the PLO,
organization committed to
destruction of a member of
United Nations (Israel), inin-
Inting a cultural history of the
Jwish people to the Palestinian
abs. thus ignoring the Bible
Id a 4.000-year historical record
Wh indicates that the Arabs
ne to the area in the seventh
fitury.
|"It is quite clear that a Pales-
nian consciousness has emerged
recent years," Lax said. "But
PLO seeks to give that con-
|iousness an exclusive pedigree
ignoring Jewish roots."
["IT ATTEMPTS to give
aii'si miiins the cultural achieve-
ents of practicallv every other
ople who have inhabited the
stern shore of the Mediter-
Jnean, including prehistoric,
jrite, Canaanite, Phoenician,
yptian, Philistine, Hebrew,
amean, Greek, Roman, and
aristian."
[The B'nai B'rith leader said
at "nowhere does the PLO
Bntion that the only national
jlture in Palestine over the last
years has been Jewish."
|The B'nai B'rith delegation
irned at the beginning of the
iference that the PLO might
empt to deny or falsify Jewish
btory. It cited a statement by
LO chief Yasir Arafat in 1980,
[the last UNESCO general con-
ence, in which he transformed
Paul from a Jaw from Tarsus
i a Palestinian Arab.
^'In cynical disrespect of the
ellectual integrity of the dele-
tion assembled, the PLO is
seeking to expand this fraud
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to cover all of recorded history."
Lax said. "This cultural
scavengry is particularly dis-
tressing because it will become a
reference in the future."
IN EQUATING Zionism with
colonialism and racial dis-
crimination, Lax said, a
UNESCO conference has "for the
first time sanctioned the
promulgation of a lie." The PLO
inspired resolutions and other
resolutions which called on
UNESCO to "propagate" culture
and for states to controll "cul-
tural activities" were opposed by
the United States and other
democratic countries. They were
aDDroved. hoi ever, by the
majority of Soviet, Arab and
Third World countries.
But the UNESCO conference
did produce a resolution which
the World Jewish Congress,
which was also represented at the
parley, viewed as beneficial to
Soviet Jewry and Jews in Arab
lands. The resolution, submitted
by the U.S., calls for "freedom of
religion."
The measure had its basis in a
draft formulated by the WJC
delegate, Dr. Leon Kronitz.
According to the text, the
resolution declares that restric-
tions on the free exercise of reli-
gious activity are "against the
interest of the individual, the
member states, and the inter-
national community."
KRONITZ, who is the execu-
tive vice president of the
Canadian Zionist Federation and
chairman fo the WJC Cultural
Commission explained that the
aim of his draft was to reinforce
existing measures in support of
minority cultural rights which
would include those of Jews in
the USSR and other countries.
In negotiating the text with
various delegations, agreement
was reached that the U.S. repre-
sentative would submit the
resolution and that its co-spon-
sors be of a broad-based charac-
ter. Among those co-sponsoring
the resolution were Nigeria,
Sudan, Britain, Egypt and
Australia.
Florida Secretary of State George Firestone (left) discusses the
current Mideast conflict with Israeli Consul General Joel Arnon
during a recent meeting in Tallahassee. The Israeli diplomat
visited the Florida capital to brief Firestone and other govern-
ment leaders on Israel's presence in Lebanon. Arnon heads the
Israeli consulate general office in Miami, which opened earlier
this year. In March, Israel joined the Florida Consular Corps, a
49-nation group of foreign countries with diplomatic offices in
Florida.
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392
313
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163
130
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FILES


ne oMwisn r icnaian Ktlffay, August 20, iy2
Israel Does It AgainTurns Victory Into Defeat
The price to Israel of the war in Lebanon
has been incalculable It is no longer a ques-
tion of negative public relations. Now, it is a
problem of frank anti-Israel sentiment. And
of rank international anti-Semitism.
At week's end, it seems that the war is
winding down. Shimon Peres, chairman of Is-
rael's Labor Party, following a meeting with
President Reagan in Washington last week,
told reporters that Israel could easily have
taken West Beirut in 24 hours, but that for
humanitarian reasons his country withheld its
military force in favor of a political solution to
be hammered out by U.S. Envoy Philip
Habib.
Whether or not his 24-hour assessment is
accurate, we are hard put to understand what
Israel achieved in adopting this strategy.
Once the decision was made in Jerusalem to
commit to war, then there could be only one
conclusionvictory. If nothing else, Vietnam
has taught us that waging a war to achieve a
political solution is the same as losing the
war.
That is our view of what has occurred, now
that it seems that the war is all but over.
Even the "total destruction" of the PLO in
Beirut would hardly have guaranteed the end
to a PLO presence in the Middle East. But a
PLO march-out from Beirut, even all of Le-
banon, is a guarantee that the history of the
occurrence will be rewritten within months to
recast it as a PLO victory.
In this context, we are reminded of the fate
of Egypt's Second and Third Armies at the
end of the 1973 Yom Kippur War, both armies
surrounded and hopelessly defeated by Israeli
forces to the north and the south of the Suez
Canal. At the moment of the assassination of
President Anwar Sadat in October, 1981, he
was reviewing his annual military parade in
Cairo in celebration of Egypt's 1973 victory.
What could Israel have lost in pursuing a
total victory in Beirutthe favor of the world
press? The friendship, say, of France or Eng-
land or West Germany? A pat on the head
from the U.S. State Department? It has none
of these things in any case.
What does Israel win now in acceding to
the pressure of the Reagan Administration
and "saving the face" of Yasir Arafat and the
Syrians? It wins a new foothold for French
forces in the Middle East, who will be the first
of the international units arriving to patrol
the ceasefire. It wins a humiliating withdraw-
al simultaneous with the withdrawal of the
PLO and the Syrians on equal terms.
lenting pretention to cultivation and morality
about which they ceaselessly lecture the rest
of the world.
At the same time, their anti-Semitism has
been irrepressible in the face of modern Euro-
pean history. In this, they remind us of the
Russians and the Poles whose ignorant
medievalism, however, is more understand-
able given the oppression under which they
live.
We find small hope in the flood of state-
ments issued by international organizations
and personalities deploring the events in
France. They are senseless. French authori-
ties appear determined "to find no evidence."
The agony of French selective morality will
not be assuaged by these statements. The far
more bewildering turn of events is the simul-
taneous selection of the French as the first
force to enter Lebanon in the coming disen-
gagement in Beirut.
For that is the same as leaving a contingent
of PLO or Syrian forces behind.
I Publisher's Divisiveness
Few American news media have told th
true story of the war in Lebanon. All of the
are guilty of a kind of nauseating partiality01
that recast the war on their own romantic
terms weaving a work of fiction devoid of th
Realpolitik sinuously involved and.projectin
instead a Grimm's fairy tale of women and
children in agony.
But the Miami News went one step further
than other papers and other television pro-
ducers of staged events cast as news, both in
Miami and elsewhere, in a cartoon by Don
Wright published on Aug. 13.
In this cartoon, Prime Minister Begin is in
telephone confrontation with President Rea-
gan who threatens "stiff reprisals" if Israel
doesn't stop "bombarding West Beirut." The
ultimate reprisal is revealed when Begin asks
"You would do that? You would cut off water
to Miami Beach?"
We are well aware of the News' editorial
position on Israel, which is led at the point by
syndicated columnist Carl Rowan, whose spe-
cial viciousness out-Youngs Atlanta Mayor
Andrew Young. We had long thought of car-
toonist Don Wright in the warmest terms,
chuckling at his genius with special delight.
But sweet Wright has turned sour of late to
match the opportunistic editorial intensity of
those at the helm of the Miami News who
should know better. Wright's latest specimen
of raunchiness is an affront to the South Flor-
ida Jewish community. It lives in the (unhap-
pily) ancient past when Miami Beach had a
flourishing South Beach Jewish community,
these days replaced by other ethnic groups in
huge proportion.
What was the rationale for this post mor-
tem zinger of his, which the editorial honchos
of the News bought hook, line and sinker?
What was it but to question the patriotism of
American Jews and to taunt them in their
moment of current despair over the war in Le-
banon?
We resent the cartoon as no other because
it takes on a local flavor that is rank, offensive
and uncalled for. Two years ago, the publisher
of The Miami News received a coveted
Brotherhood Award from the National Con-
ference of Christians and Jews. We suggest he
return it, especially now that he is making
hay in the media marketplace of community
divisiveness.
Those Fancy French
When would-be assassins made their at-
tempt on the life of Israel's Ambassador to
Great Britain Shlomo Argov, the police gave
chase and caught them. Lucky? Well, per-
haps.
But the murder by terrorists in Paris many
months ago of Israeli envoy Jacob Barsiman-
tov and the repeated bombings of Jewish in-
stitutions and the terrorist slaughter of Jews
and non-Jews accidentally in the neighbor-
hood of their activity leave French authori-
ties baffled. Unlucky? Well, perhaps.
In fact, following the shoot-out at the Gold-
enberg restaurant in the Marais section of
Paris a week ago Monday, police found and
detained eight persons of the notorious left-
wing A.D. organization with a strong Arab
base suspected of perpetrating that murder-
ous operation. They were released for lack of
evidence of implication.
The very next day, after their release, Wed-
nesday of last week, members of that same
terrorist organization struck again, this time
at a building housing commercial firms linked
with Israel and a Jewish-owned bank, causing
heavy damage and seriously injuring a
passerby.
The French are really no more selfish in
their national interest than any other Euro-
pean people. What makes them so sleazy,
however, is their imperiousness, their unre-
The Real America Is Still Alive
BRETTON WOODS. N.H.-
An Arab in kefayah looks
from the balcony of his suite at
the Inn here across the road and
up toward Mt. Washington
where, at the hotel in 1943, some
40-odd nations met to stabilize
the international monetary
system after World War II predi-
cated on the price of gold at $35
anoz.
All of that is changed. These
days, gold sells for ten times
that, or thereabouts. And, in ret-
rospect, the Allied powers
achieved nothing but a reprieve
from violence now turned into
global terrorism. As for the Arab
peering from his balcony hardly
40 years later up toward the hotel
on Mt. Washington, his presence
at least for me contributes to
making the brisk 60-degree sum-
mer breeze even brisker. Colder.
I GET the sense that his
analytic eyes beneath beetling
brows assess the worth of the
mountain and of the historic ho-
tel, and that he is preparing in hia
mind to make an offer for the
whole shebang.
Araby is everywhere-that
was my obsessive feeling as I
flew north some three weeks ago.
Here, it strikes me that from the
post-World War II Gold Stan-
dard, we have come to an Oil
Standard with infinitely greater
intimidations. But driving day
after day in New England since
then, through Maine and New
Hampshire and Vermont, the
feeling dissipated. The Arab on
the balcony was but a momen-
tary lapse into obsessive fears
from the new hope and vigor 1
have been imbued with here. Or
until newer fears of even more
immediate challenges to the na-
tion's well-being took over after
that.
In fact, I should like to report
that America is alive and well
and living in New England. And,
1 suspect, in other snch tradition-
al enclaves elsewhere in the mid-
dle and great norChwjst. In re-
cent years. South" Florida has
joined the peripheral geographic
areasthe states along the
Mexican border and the Califor-
nia coast to become a part of
the cutting edge of our national
discontent, where cultural and
Continued on Page 13-A
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Friday, August 20,1982
Volume 55
1 ELUL6742
Numbers*