The Jewish Floridian

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Material Information

Title:
The Jewish Floridian
Physical Description:
63 v. : ;
Language:
English
Publisher:
Jewish Floridian Pub. Co.
Place of Publication:
Miami, Fla

Subjects

Subjects / Keywords:
Jewish newspapers -- Florida   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Newspapers -- Miami-Dade County (Fla.)   ( lcsh )
Genre:
newspaper   ( marcgt )
newspaper   ( sobekcm )
Spatial Coverage:
United States -- Florida -- Dade -- Miami

Notes

Dates or Sequential Designation:
Began in 1927?
Dates or Sequential Designation:
-v. 63, no. 20 (May 18, 1990).
General Note:
Editor: Fred K. Shochet, <1959>.
General Note:
Description based on: Vol. 5, no. 47 (Nov. 25, 1932).

Record Information

Source Institution:
University of Florida
Rights Management:
All applicable rights reserved by the source institution and holding location.
Resource Identifier:
oclc - 35317254
lccn - sn 96027667
ocm35317254
System ID:
AA00010090:02793

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Jewish Floridian (Palm Beach, Fla. : 1982)
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Preceded by:
Jewish unity
Preceded by:
Jewish weekly
Succeeded by:
Jewish Floridian/the Floridian newspaper


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Full Text
THE
foluma 55Number 33
Two Sections
Miami, FloridaFriday, August 13,1982
* >mic*n
IiMiIOC Price 50 Cants
Begin Has Accepted
International Force to Help Move PLO
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) Premier Menachem
Rcgin accepted a proposal that a projected in-
ternational force would move into west Beirut, as
part of a plan to get the PLO forces out of the city
and then out of Lebanon altogether, after most
hut not necessarily all of the terrorists withdraw.
it was reported by Israel Radio The proposal had
been put forward several days ago by U.S. special
envoy Philip Habib.
Begins action came shortly after he told the
Cabinet meeting that he had received "an im-
portant letter" from U.S. Secretary of State
George Shultz on developments in Lebanon. The
details of Shultz's letter were not made available.
According to Israel Radio. Begin left the
Cabinet session while it was still in progress to
draft his reply to Shultz. apparently with Cabinet
approval, to ensure its dispatch and arrival in
Washington before Habib had time to make any
further suggestions in his meetings this afternoon
with Erench. American and Lebanese officials in
Beirut to discuss details of the proposed in-
ternational force and the timing of its
deployment.
France. Italy Ready With Troops
Reports from Paris said two regiments of crack
paratroopers were on stand-by orders to go to
Beirut to supervise the evacuation of PLO forces.
Reports from Rome said the Italian government
also agreed to send a mechanized battalion to join
the French regiments. Both governments said
they would give the go-ahead sig.ial for their
Continued on Page 5-A

THE U.N. KJESPONS6S
Argov Returned
To Israel
By HUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTAI -
Shlomo Argov, Israel's Ambas
sador to Britain, returned tc
Israel and is now being treated ir
the neurosurgical department of
the Hadassah Hospital in Jeru
salem after two months of treat-
ments in a London hospital
following the attack on him June
3 which sparked off the war in
Lebanon. Argov suffered severe
head injuries in the attack.
Argov was taken from the
London hospital to the airport to
board the El Al jet under tight
security precautions. He
travelled to Israel on a stretcher,
accompanied by his wife, a doctor
and a nurse.
Argov expressed pleasure at
being home again. He will still re-
quire an extensive period of
treatment and rehabilitation for
the partial paralysis he is said to
suffer.
Murder Squad Kills 6
A Terrorist Atrocity in Paris
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) A terrorist squad hit at the heart of
^ans' traditional Jewish quarter, the Mara is section, killing six
jple and wounding 15 more, some of them seriously. Four
frrorist opened fire on customers eating lunch in the city's best
wwn Jewish restaurants and then fired on fleeing shopkeep-
rs and passersby. Monday's attack was the deadliest carried
it in recent years against a Western Jewish community.
Eyewitnesses told the Jewish
elegraphic Agency that the
>mmando hit-team, described as
Irab-looking," were "out to kill
many of us as possible. They
iot at everyone and at every-
ing." A kosher butcher who
^as about to open his shop for
:h said. 'T hid behind a car.
d even then they shot at me.
" ey wanted Jewish blood."
Police say the attack "is ob-
:>usly connected with the Leba-
Bse crisis," but investigators do
Dt know as yet whether the ter
Mists were Palestinians or
rhether they belong to the ex-
ae leftwing Direct Action or-
Inization which carried out a
iber of anti-Israeli and anti-
iwish attacks.
These included the bombings
a Jewish shop which imports
is from Israel, a bank former-
owned by Israeli shareholders
the Rothchild family, and a
owned by an Israeli diplomat.
ere were no casualties in these
ridents. Direct Action is be-
lieved to have ties to the PLO,
the Red Army Faction of West
IMS. Shocked
By Anti-Semitic
Incident in Paris
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The United States expressed its
shock (at what it called an
anti-Semitic "act of violence" in
Paris. "We are shocked and
deeply saddened by this tragic
and despicable act of violence,"
State Department deputy
spokesman Alan Rom be r said.
"Our hearts go out to victims
The United Suites deplores this
cowardly act and understands it
is by far the worst anti-Semitic
incident in Paris in recent days."
Rom berg added that "we hope
that the perpetrators of this
crime and brought to justice
swiftly."
Germanyand the Red Brigade of
Italy.
Eyewitness Accounts
According to some eyewit-
nesses, the attack started after 1
p.m. Four men, waiting in the
Goldenberg restaurant, known
for its traditional Jewish cooking,
suddenly drew out from under
their coats submachineguns and
sprayed the large restaurant and
delicatessen store. The res-
taurant is in the heart of the Rue
de Hosiers. Par' old Jewish quar-
ter in which poor Jews have lived
for more than 100 years.
tw
if
ther eyewitnesses
said that
other men, stationed outside
the restaurant, opened fire as
soon as they heard the initial
shooting. Police believe, however,
that only four terrorists were ac-
tually involved in the attack.
The terrorists continued shoot-
ing while running through the
maze of narrow alleys, leaving
behind a trail of wounded and
dead. There are three women
among the six killed.
Police stationed in front of a
nearby synagogue. La Syna-
gogue de la rue des Pavees, went
into action as soon as they heard
Continued on Page 6-A
U.S. Says
'Critical' That Cease-Fire
be 'Scrupulously Observed'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
The Reagan Administration
stressed that it is "critical" that
the ceasefire in Lebanon "be
scrupulously observed" because
of the progress that special envoy
Philip Habib is making toward
getting the PLO terrorists to
leave Lebanon.
"It is our view that there is
momentum and that Ambassa-
dor Habib has made substantial
progress the past few days in
working out the practical ar-
rangements for the PLO depar-
ture from Lebanon." State De-
partment Deputy spokesman
Alan Rom berg said.
"If the ceasefire holds, we can
have a negotiated solution,"
Romberg continued. "Thus it is
essential that all sides to the con-
flict exercise the utmost restraint
and scrupulously observe the
ceasefire. We trust that all
parties will cooperate to support
Ambassador Habib s mission."
Peres Visits Miami
Labor Party leadeatShimon Peres visited Miami Wednesday
for several hours and said he would "strive to stress uniting ele-
ments" in public appearances in the U.S. over the next 10 days
where he will take part in Israel's emergency appeal. During the
visit, he will meet with Vice President George Bush, Secretary
of State George Shultz and other Administration and Congres-
sional figures in Washington.
Anti-Israel Attitude in France
JERUSALEM (JTAI -
The Foreign Ministry spokesman
expressed shock and anger at the
terrorist attack in Paris. The
spokesman said the anti-Israel
attitude adopted by the French
press and communications media
had contributed to the atmos-
phere which encouraged such
atrocities. Leon Dulzin. Jewish
Agency and World Zionist Orga-
nization chairman, described the
attack as a "record in anti-Jewish
and anti-Israel terror."
Evacuation Plan
Schedule provided by Lebanese officials:
Israel receives list of names of departing PLO
guerrillas and destination.
First guerrillas, the wounded and disabled, leave
by sea for Jordanian port of Aqaba via French ships
provided by Lebanon. They will take "side arms
only."
Eastimated 1.000 to 1.500 Syrian troops leave
for home.
Guerrillas leave Lebanon port of Tripoli and
Bekaa Valley.
'Multinational force, subject to Lebanese
authority, arrives after exit of moat of PLO. It will
withdraw immediately if fighting erupts or PLO
balks.
Lebanese army starts taking up peacekeeping
duty on "D-Day phis 16" after last guerrillas
leave.


Lebanese Diary
By JOSEPH FINKLESTONE
London Chronicle Syndicate
He stood like a schoolboy
in the street, tall. slim.
lonely, with a puzzled look
on his face. It was the face
almost of a child, and I
wondered whether he yet
had any need of a razor.
But this was no ordinary
street and Yossi was no
child, not even a schoolboy,
but a member of Zahal. the
proud, tough Israel Defense
Forces.
He and a few other Israeli
soldiers, some of them looking as
young as he. had joined a group
of Christian militiamen of Bashir
Oemayel. in blockading a street
leading to West Beirut and the
PLO and Syrian strongholds He
had been given orders to ensure
that while anyone who wanted to.
even Palestinians, could leave, no
one could enter, neither men. nor
foodstuffs
OCR EYES met. and Yossi
clearly felt a strong need to ex-
press his views on the war. his
hopes, his frustrations His
Hebrew was voluble and expres-
sive, pouring out of him in one
long outburst, without pause, in
a flat voice, yet so strangely
moving that I found myself try-
ing to hold back tears.
Why is the world so much
against us? Cant you do more to
explain to them what really has
happened in Lebanon? Don't you
see how we are received by the
population? Look what the Arab
terrorists did to an Israeli am-
bassador walking in London. Is it
right that a Jew. any Jew, would
not be able to walk freely in any
city in the world?
"We had some very tough bat-
tles to get here. It had to be done
but now we are getting a bit
bored. We want to go back home.
We are sorry for our parents. My
mother and father did not get my
letters because our post office is
so bad. No. you need not take a
message for them Other people
have already done so But please
do a bit of hosbarxx (education) for
us. Believe me we need it"
TWO HOURS before our
arrival at the hillside near
Behamdon there had been heavy
shelling by the Syrians. Two
vehicles had been hit. but nobody
had been injured The Israeli
troops were resting near their
tanks, relaxed and chatting
amiably with each other
On a small table near the hill-
side 1 noted several uddunm
"Some of the boys here are from
yeshivot. my military escort
told me I noted that some of the
boys were wearing kippot One of
them was looking through bino-
culars at the Syrian position* a
short distance away
The tanks looked heavy and
forbidding. During the long cam
Jerusalem Dr. Khalil Turbai, director of a hospital in
Beirut, visits wounded Lebanese children receiving treatment
in the Orthopedic Department at the Hadassah University
Hospital. These young patients are among the stream of
Lebanese treated at Hadassah and other Israel medical facili-
ties since the "Good Fence" policy between Lebanon and Israel
began in 1975.
OFFICE SUPPLIES
EQUIPMENT
DIVISION OF SCHREIBER INDUSTRIES
SOL SCHREIBER. PRESIDENT ANO CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
YOUR COMPLETE OFFICE SUPPLIER SINCE 1933
BROWARO
463-9680
757-8513
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Miami. Fie
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Miami, Fia
MIA. BCH.
1606 Wash. Ava.
Miami Beach. Fia
CORAL GABLES
272 Valencia Ava.
Coral Gabies. Fla.
M-B-1MZ
paign. which had started near
Tyre, they had smashed all PLO
and Syrian resistance. Syrian
crews had left their Russian
tanks, the pride of the Soviet
armed forces, and run for their
lives, in some cases even leaving
the engines running.
UNEXPLODED shells were
still around us and we were told
to walk gingerly. We needed no
further persuasion but the boys
lying in their sleeping bags on the
ground looked as if they were on
a weekend picnic. One of them
picked up a twisted piece of metal
which was lying near him "Look
at this, "he said in mock alarm,
"did somebody put this here de-
liberately?" He knew very well
where it had come from and how
closely he had excaped injury.
The young soldiers crowded
around me. We talked about
football, and they immediately
asked me why I was not at the
World Cup games in Spam and
did I think that England had a
chance to win. They appeared
doubtful
An amiable, low-key discussion
on the war developed. One soldier
wondered whether Israel should
devote so much effort to making
Lebanon a viable country again.
"This is not a country, this is a
chaotic assembly where everyone
fights everyone else And if we
get them to make peace they will
soon start fighting again."
AS IF TO emphasize this
point, there was a bud explosion
near by "No. they are not shoot-
ing at us The Christians and the
Druzes have been shouting at
each other down below, said a
young officer. Nobody knew why
the shooting had started and
nobody really cared. In West
Beirut they are reliably said to be
over 190 different armed groups
and it is doubtful whether anyone
could fully explain whom or what
i hey are doing, or how they relate
to one another.
Another young soldier disa
greed with this v but there
d> not really any argument The
other soldiers did not even par
iicipate but went on chatting
about personal matter- I >ne was
reading a book There was an at-
mosphere of calm the lx>> s kn-w
preciselv what their task was and
the Syrians were a nuisano
which they would take care of.
There was \igilance but no
dramatization ot any kind
h was difficult to associate the
boys with their kippot and m ilunm with the heavy tank-
The) clearly would be so much
more at home studying at yeshi
M>1 let they had fought with a
skill which overwhelmed the I'LO
with their Jordanian and Syrian
allies, full of threats and boasts
and loud-mouthed vituperation
HEAVY CLOUDS enveloped
the hillside, and the light began
to tall as we left the quiet peace-
ful scene which could soon give
way to a fierce encounter The
boyi were still chatting amiablv
together in small groups while a
few MM trying to snatch a short
nap I felt a strength and self
confidence among these boys
which nothing could shatter
Major Avner Talmon is tall,
lean, boyish looking and likes to
smile. Unlike other soldiers
whom I met that day. he spoke
excellent Knglish. As a major of
>ne of the crack units of the para
troopers he was very proud of his
men's achievements and he was
'teen to tell me about them
Though only 2H and looking
ven younger he was the first op-
ralional officer of his unit com-
manded by Colonel Ya-Ya. a
nickname for an officer whom he
clearly admired
"Our brigade landed north of
Sidon. the only one to do so by
sea. We were the ones who con-
quered Damur, the formerlv
Ma-uia
Christian town which the PLO
transformed into their base Af-
terwards we walked to Heirut
through three very difficult bat-
tles with the Palestinians. Jor-
danians. Libyans and Syrian-
including their commandos Our
most difficult battle was against
a force which was composed of
Libyans and Syrians There was
a hell of a battle as we moved in
side U> cut the Beirut-Damascus
road and cut the enemy off from
their supplies
ONK CROSSROADS at Kabar
Shamun near Beirut had six
roads leading from it. The
Syrian! sent in their so-called
Suicide Battalion together with
Libyan armor The Syrians were
ordered to fight to the death
W hen an armv i- given such an
ordiT.it the quickest way to
make sure thev w ill lose VA h> tell
your troops to die They want to
lire.
We beat I hem. and we did not
lose mans people The suicide
men did not all die. lK-lie\e me
W took man) ot them In all the
(allies we lost only ti\e men and
| et u was our job to go before the
armour and open the road la
them Ours i- the most profes-
sional unit in the 1DI- and that
means ihe looked at me with a
broad -milei the most profession
al outfit in the world Ml the men
are \uiunteer- and we choose
only one in ten of the applicant-
Evaf) one ot our i ommandos is a
little general
The I'LO put up a fight, but it
did not last long Alter one or two
hour- thev began to run In some
places the fi^hl lasted onlv ten
minutes In Damur e actual*
had a very eas> tight thev m\
ran away The Syrian t'ougatl
hard only at the crossroad* at tan
Damascus Beirut road but nnihl
they too ran. leaving their until
in running order
"BEFORE ever) batik, i
checked if thev were civilians
the area and tried to av them bv giv ing them a i banc*w
escape. Afterward- .ven a
Moslem and Dru/e vu.agnw;
learned how badlv tin synaat |
and I'LO occupier- had '-riavtf
(iirls were raped and Ufa (tens!
ally was made verv aitticuit TW
villager- were re. Mlfajl
-aw u-
Being with :r.< m i>n
soldier- even for a -r. -. time. 1
wa- protoundh unpn ed by
their -trvngth-of character, tbar
"determination" t> rehtatrl Mima
tarag- e v-en-nrthe nv> Wrrth nt
situation Israel ithi
golden youth, un.
tu lent. human. nderfttl
soldier-, modest I
left them. I tound u difficult U>
avoid expressing mj : :rauoi
tor them One w.m;.
to pray that all the -
the**- youngsters v.
lead to a permameni ;
xet one knew veil that tat
chances <>! this happening ert
indeed slim The world I :.!l had
probably never Men hr eoual of
the soldi. leli De-
fense Forces It is n A
als and the colon.. rtaai)
not the politician- erhi -ire tat
great men of Israel but tat
young boys The\ -ill tat
praise and admiration
Riverside
Re'S.ae S*emo"alCrvaoei..r>c Fune'a1 D.rr
Miami Beach/Miami/North Miami Beach
Dade County Phone No. 531 -1151
Hollywood/Ft. Lauderdale (Tamarac)
Broward County Phone No. 523 5801
West Palm Beach: 683-8676
Carl Grossberg. President
Alfred Golden. Executive Vice Preside^*
Leo Hack. V.P.. Religious Advisor
Keith Kronish

Sponsoring the Guardun Plan P'e-Arranged Funeral
Tradition.
Itfs what makes us Jews.
M-llll!


Pro-Israel and Pro-PLO
Students Clash on Campus
Friday. August 13, 1982 / The Jewish Floridiah Page 3-A
By ADELE ASHER
JOHANNESBURG, (JTA)
r Student meetings at the Uni-
Ursity of the Witwatersand were
banned last week after clashes on
jampus between Israeli and pro-
f>LO members of the Black Stu-
dents Societ (BBS). The ban was
Announced by the university's
Lcademic and administrative re-
tistrar who would not say for
low long the ban would remain in
kffect.
A meeting of the South African
1 ".mii of Jewish Students
ISAUJSI to have taken place
is part of the focus on Israel
\ irk was also cancelled.
ASAU.IS spokesmen told the
Jewish Telegraphic Agency that
in an effort to defuse the tense
situation they had a week earlier
challenged the Moslem Students
Association (MSA) to a formal
debate to tackle the issue in a
non-violent, intellectual debate.
The MSA refused the challenge,
stating they would debate only
when Israel recognized the PLO
as the legitimate representative
of the Palestinians, would give
the Palestinians a homeland, and
withdrew from Lebanon.
Thunderous Applause Greets
Racial Slur
At this stage the BSS embaced
the PLO cause with vigor. At
a BSS-proPLO solidarity meet-
ing a week ago and again at the
MSA campus rally, attended by
some 500 sympathizers, the guest
speaker was one Rev. Lubbe, a
Christian, who adopted a viru-
lently anti-Jewish stance. The
slogans, "Unholy Alliance of
South Africa, United States of
America and Israel," and
"Zionism is racism equals
apartheid" stirred the feelings of
his audience.
The ultimate racial slur
"What a pity Hitler only killed
six million of them" evoked
thunderous applause. This led to
the fracas at the conclusion of the
meeting when the clench-fisted
Moslems and Blacks, chanting
"viva the PLO," clashed with
thousand Jewish students who
had attended a pro-Israel rally
nearby.
Twelve university students
were suspended in connection
with the clashes when security
men had to separate the BSS and
the Jewish students, reasons
given for the suspension included
using insulting language, punch-
ing, provocative behavior and
disobeying an order of Vice
Chancellor D.J. Du Plessis.
Du Plessis had to intervene in
the protest, and begged the stu-
dents to refrain from violence.
When he asked them to disperse
they were reluctant to do so and
he consequently handed some of
them over to security officials.
The students now face a hearing
by a disciplinary committee
which will determine their future.
U.S. Veto Of Soviet Measure
UNITED NATIONS. (JTAI
Israeli officials here appeared
.atisfied with a United States
Leto of a Soviet-sponsored resol-
ution in the United Nations
urity Council last Friday
rhich called for an international
nbargo on military aid to Israel
ftT a debate in which Israel's
\mbassador Yehuda Blum called
the voting "a day of shame and
nfamy"
The Soviet resolution, which 11
Duncil members. including
prance, approved, and on which
hree nations including Britain
abstained, proposed that a
iotal arms embargo should con-
tinue "until the full withdrawal of
Israeli forces from all Lebanese
erritory." The other two ab-
staining nations were Zaire,
which recently resumed diploma-
tic relations with Israel and
Togo.
The debate included some of
the harshest exchanges in the
history of Security Council ef-
forts to grapple with the Mideast
deadlock. French support for the
resolution embittered the Israelis
and evoked Blum's denunciation
of the day as one of "shame and
infamy," a charge that led
French delegate Phillippe Louet
to say he was dumbfounded.
Hamilton Whyte, the British
delegate, who joined in the
criticism of Israel's military
thrust into Lebanon, said Britain
did not believe the Soviet resolu-
tion would make any positive
contribution to Middle East
peace and that Britain decided
not to add its veto to the resolu-
tion because this might send "the
wrong signal" to Israel.
Although Lichtenstein vetoed
the Soviet proposal, he urged
Israel to accept the action sought
by the Security Council in a re-
solution adopted unanimously,
which was rejected by Israel's
Cabinet: a total ceasefire a halt in
Israel's siege of West Beiut.
Lichtenstein also echoed a
Council resolution adopted by a
vote of 14-0 with the U.S. ab-
staining, that Israel yield the
military gains it made when it
moved into West Beirut.
Council members voting for
the Soviet draft, in addition to
France, were: the People's Re-
public of China, Guyana, Ireland.
Japan. Jordan. Panama, Poland,
Spain, the USSR and Uganda.
Mo she Arens
Ariel Sharon
Bond Leaders Confab In
Washington Aug. 26-29
An-nell,
Hotel
Strictly
Kosher
*
Report Begin
Criticized Sharon
3 Full Course Meals Daily
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ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV. (JTA) Premier*
Mtnachem Begin expressed what
Israeli newspapers said was
unusual criticism of Defense
Minister Ariel Sharon at the
Cabinet meeting. But the
Premier 9 remarks, the papers
noted, were muted and indirect.
The Prime Minister's office
denied that his criticism was. in-
deed, directed at Sharon. But
commentators continued to insist
that Sharon was the target for
Begins barbs.
Israel Defense Minister Ariel
Sharon and Ambassador to the
United States Moshe Arens will
be the principal speakers at the
1982 International Leadership
Conference of State of Israel
Bonds, which will be attended by
Jewish leaders from the United
States and Canada in Washing-
ton. D.C. on Aug. 26-29. it has
been announced by Sam Roth-
berg. General Chairman of the
Israel Bond Organization.
Mr. Rothberg reported that
conference delegates will review
the progress of the emergency
$100 million Development for
Peace cumpaign undertaken by
the Israel Bond Organization to
offset the impact on Israel's
economy of the hostilities in
Lebanon.
They will complete plans to in-
tensify the emergency effort
which will culminate during the
High Holy Day Appeals for
Israel Bonds to be conducted in
some 1,100 synagogues in the
United States and Canada.
He added that the internation-
al conference will serve as a
"major expression of North
American Jewish communities'
unity with Israel at a time when
its people are making major
sacrifices to assure the security of
the Galilee and advance the
chances of peace and stability in
the Middle Fast."
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immm$mmmmimmmmmmmmimmm9fmmm
Editorals
Clearing Muddled Waters
The announcement by the American Jewish Com-
mittee that it will begin a project designed to study
the relationship between the American Jewish com-
munity and the State of Israel is both timely and
warmly welcomed. While the war in Lebanon un-
ravels, the importance of the role of American Jewry
in Israel has become increasingly clear. The support
for Israel remains unswerving but complicated. Thus
the project can help relieve any ambiguity and bring
into focus a discussion of critical issues facing both
communities.
The project, to be known as the Institute on
American Jewish-Israeli Relations, is described by
Bertram Gold, executive vice president of the
AJ Committee, as "an American-based centered en-
terprise that will seek to understand the relationship
between American Jews and Israel. It will identify
areas of tension and delineate opportunities to
achieve a more effective interaction between them. It
will also undertake specific programs both in the
United States and in Israel aimed at improving un-
derstanding between the two communities."
Gold took over the role of the director of the Insti-
tute following his retirement Aug. 1 from the
AJ Committee after 15 years of service as an execu-
tive.
Some areas under consideration for study are the
question of religious pluralism and its significance
for Israel and American Jewry; common elements of
identity between American Jews and Israel; the
American Jewish community's relationship to Is-
raelis living in the U.S.; and the dissent within Israel
and within American Jewry. Nonetheless, a compre-
hensive look at many issues affecting the two com-
munities, both of which realistically depend on one
another, would help clear the sometimes muddied
waters. The AJ Committee's Institute is a note-
worthy endeavor and the American Jewish com-
munity should anxiously await its studies.
Slanted News
While Israel has fought a war against the PLO in
Lebanon, it has simultaneously fought an ongoing
struggle with the American media. Since the Israeli
incursion on June 6, columnists throughout the
country have become instantaneous experts on the
Middle East, psychologists examining the changing
psyche of the Jewish State, responsive to the whims
of the PLO and instantly aware of the destruction
that has been inflicted upon Lebanon .which actually
began long before Israel walked across the border.
At the same time, correspondents covering the war
have been provided information from official news
agencies for the Palestinians, the Syrians, and
| spokesmen for the Israel governments. The informa-
l tion disseminated from the PLO's official news
I agency and that of the Syrian government have been
| flooded with erroneous reports and even outright lies.
For example, the Syrian news agency reported at
jlj the earlier stage of fighting that it had shot down
% some 19 Israeli aircraft in a dogfight.over the Bekka
i Valley. In fact, Israel did not lose a single aircraft
;:; but inflicted numerous losses on the Syrian air force.
% The news nevertheless made front pages of interna-
i;i tionally recognized newspapers.
g Another source of controversy has been the official
& figures on those killed and rendered homeless issued
^ by the International Red Cross. The IRC claimed
% 10,000 dead and 600,000 persons rendered homeless
;| by the Israeli action. While these figures have been
jji hotly contested by the Israeli government, which
& claim the figures to be exaggerated tenfold,
I the figures nave nevertheless been used as a props
| ganda tool for the PLO to sway public opinion in
their favor and reported extensively.
While this type of journalism is being practiced,
the other newspapers have noted in dispatches from
Jerusalem that articles have been subjected to mili-
tary censorship. Although the news from Israel is
censored, the news from the Syrian government and
the Palestinian news agency is laced with fallacies.
But the Americans reading, viewing and listening to
the news, the portrayal of Israel is tainted and other
parties appear innocent, and worse, appear credible.
A Holocaust Hero


:::
I
*
%
i
I
i
::
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
It ia almost incredible how in-
terest has grown in the United
States during the last few years
in the case of Raoul Wallenberg,
the Swedish businessman who
saved thousands of Hungarian
Jews from the Nazis near the end
of World War II. only to end up
in a Soviet prison after the Red
Army marched into Budapest in
January 1945. American Jews,
but not only Jews, have been ab-
sorbed by the case ever since it
was discovered several years ago
that Wallenberg might still be
alive and still a prisoner of the
Soviets.
Most American Jews had
probably never heard of W alien
berg before Annette Lantoe. her-
self a Hungarian Jew who owes
her life to Wallenberg, organized
an American committee in his
support in 1978. Yet there are al-
most unanimous approval when
last year her husband. Tom. who
was also rescued by Wallenberg
and is now a Democratic Con-
gressman from California, intro-
duced a resolution making the
Swede an honorary citizen of the
United States. In a White House
ceremony last October, President
Reagan signed the legislation
giving Wallenberg an honor that
had only been extended previous-
ly to Winston Churchill.
I believe that the explanation
for this phenomenon is very sim-
ple. The history of the Holocaust
is replete with the record of
governments, statesmen and
others who failed to act when
hey could have done something
to save Europe's doomed Jews.
So when we hear the story of a
man. who risked his life for Jews
for no other reason than -
were fellow human being, _2
tures our lmmigination ssj i
stores our faith in humanity
The Wallenberg case ^
sparked the publication this ?
of a plethora of books The uZ
which I read are WaU,h*
The Man in the Iron ft**-?
i^u? i}?"?,. ,Prent**-Hal]?
VVaUenberg. by K.t, Mt
Random House): and R*3
WaHenberg: Angel of rJ"*
fr ^Py.1""'" 'Prom,.
theus Books).
All three can be recommendid
to s reader who wants to kno
more about this interesting story
All had access to the bat*
material, particularly the H_
lenberg family correspondenct
and all. but particularly Lest*.
and Rosenfeld. provide the back-
ground to the Holocaust needec
to understand the Wallenberg
mission.
But all bring something ferent to the story because of
their own background Lester, i
journalist who writes for The
Jewish Week, has probably the
most compact book. Her aruck
in The New York Tune* Majr>
zine on Wallenberg is rreditec
with bringing the case, which was
by then becoming familiar m the
Jewish community and to some
public officials, to a wider audi
ence.
Marlon does the bt job of
bringing alive the personality of
Wallenberg A journalist and
naturalized L'.S. citizen, -he was
bom in Hungary, and her
parents, both journalist, were im-
prisoned by the Communist
government there. She devotes i
great deal of space to the inner
workings of Soviet Last Euro-
pean prisons and labor camps
Kosenfeld. editor of Martyr
dom and Resilience, a periodical
devoted to the Holocaust, makes
a major contribution by detailing
how the Papal Nuncio. Moo
signer Angela Rolta as well v
the Swiss envoy, also helped r
Continued on Page l.'l-A
How Far Will the Iranians Go?
By TONY LEHMAN
London Chronicle Syndicate
How far Iran will go in
its counter attack into
Iraq's oil-producing region,
is a question that must be
causing great concern in
the Gulf states, the Arab
world as a whole and the
U.S.A.
Throughout the Gulf war. the
ability of the Iranians to resist
the Iraqi invasion has been con-
sistently underestimated. Now
that the Khomeini-inspired
soldiers of the Islamic Republic
have finally crossed the border
into Iraq, it would be foolish to
look for an imminent Iranian
pull back
INDEED, faced wilh unpre-
dictable Iranian-style religious
fanaticism, there is a fear and un-
certainty about the possible con-
sequences and final destination of
the Iranian forces advance.
In the weeks before its attack
on July 13. Iran made no secret of
its intention to push into Iraq.
The war in Lebanon was an op-
portunity to make preparations
while the eyes of the world were
turned elsewhere.
President Saddam Husseins
attempts to bring the war to an
end by announcing the with-
drawal of all Iraqi troops from
Iranian territory on June 20 and
offering passage across Iraqi ter-
ritory for Iranian troops to go to
the aid of the Palestinians in
Lebanon were contemptuously
dismissed. For the Iranian au-
thorities, this was merely a trap
sprung from continuous cooper-
ation between the Iraqi regime
and international Zionism
aimed at the liquidation of the Is-
lamic force*
AYATOLLAH Khomeini con
tinues to insist on the collapse of
President Hussein s Ha at hist re-
gime Islamic officials stress the
need to "liberate the Muslim
Iraqi people" most are Shi ites
like the Iranians "and save
them from the tyranny of the
Iraqi regime."
There is no doubling Kho-
meini's aim. expressed when the
war started in 1960. to topple the
Iraqi president. But the decision
to enter Iraqi territory in order to
achieve this may date only from
last May when the Iranian port
city of Khorramshar was recap-
tured.
Hussein's knack of holding on
to power, and undercutting oppo-
sition, was an incitement to the
more militant mullahs in Iran
who favor exporting the Islamic
revolution on the tips of Iranian
Tony Lerman is a research
officer of the Institute of
Jewish Affairs in London.
bayonets Shiite holy places ir.
Iraq at Najaf and Karbal
some 2-300 miles north west of
Basra make a convenient focu-
for Iranian ambitions in Iraq
The Iraqi will to resist an Iran
lan advance is weakened IM
many months of war and the re-
versas earlier this year President
Hussein's own position will be-
come more and more insatun
while Iranian pressure il main
lained a serious blow to his
prestige would be the cancella-
tion or postponement of the non
aligned summit plwined tor Sep-
tember.
Other circumstances must also
be making things look black for
the Iraqis: reports of Shut*
unrest inside the country, claims
in some quarters that the Soviet
Continued on Page LI A
Jewish Floridiar*
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SUBSCRIPTION RATES in Aovanca (Local Araaj Ona yaar-IUOO Taro "a"-**4" Vj?
raara-MSOO-Suppiamant .va nocai Araai l*ii Pnday aac" rnootn MO iai v
Juna U SO Out 01 loam, country, upon raquaai
Friday. August 13. 1982
Volume 55
24 AB 5742
Volume 33


v .*
Friday, August 13, 19&2 /The Jewish Floridian Page 5-A
International Force to Help Move PLO
Continued from Page 1-A
troops to enter Beirut only if all the parties agree
to the latest proposal by Habib.
Israel had originally insisted that the in-
ternational force enter Beirut only after all the
terrorists had left. But PLO leaders had
demanded that the force move in before any PLO
fighters left to ensure their safety from Israeli
attack during the evacuation. Begin reportedly
stressed in his reply to Shultz that Israel could
not accept any unilateral moves, especially by the
French whose stance at the United Nations
j^ouritv Council has left Israeli officials aghast.
Defense Minister Ariel Sharon and Foreign
Ministry Director General David Kimche left for
Beirut after the Cabinet meeting to confer with
Habib on the latest developments.
Cabinet Not Unanimous
On Beirut Situation
The Cabinet, at its meeting, was reportedl}
divided in its assessment of the present situation
in Beirut. According to reports, some ministers
were "cautiously optimistic" that the PLO will
leave Beirut, others, led by Defense Minister
Ariel Sharon, fear a trap.
The feelings were prompted by reports from
Beirut that the PLO may begin leaving the
besieged city "by the middle" of this week.
Former Lebanese Prime Minister Saeb Salam. a
key negotiator in the effort to evacuate the PLO
from Beirut, told reporters that Syrian President
Hafez Assad finally agreed to accept the PLO
forces after the PLO formally asked him to do so
in writing. This removed a major obstacle
blocking the evacuation of the PLO.
Another mediator. Lebanese Prime Minister
Shafig Wazzan. said after meeting with Habib
that he was "cautiously optimistic" that the PLO
would begin to withdraw. He also said that Habib
was "completely satisfied with the positive res-
ponses" from the PLO to calrifications the envoy
has sought on the issue of withdrawal.
The PLO's proposal was relayed to Israeli
officials in Jerusalem. Responding to the
proposal, one senior official was quoted as saying,
"For the first time we could say that there may be
something here after all." But Israeli officials
emphasized that Israel remains skeptical of PLO
intentions because the proposal did not contain a
specific timetable for withdrawal, which Israel
has demanded.
Sharon's supporters in the Cabinet, who decline
to be identified by name or affiliation but hide
behind the description as "authoritative sour-
ces." claim that Habib has misled Israel, and
possibly the U.S. State Department as well, by
over-optimistic appreciations of the situation.
Some of Sharon's critics claim he does not want
the PLO to leave Beirut, preferring an all-out
assault on them in west Beirut to wipe them out
and prevent a rebirth of the PLO movement
outside Beirut or outside Lebanon.
Cabinet Rejected UN Observers
The Cabinet held a f ve-hour emergency night
session and rejected a demand by the United
Nations Security Council that UN observers be
stationed in and around West Beirut to monitor
the ceasefire situation. The Cabinet also rejected
calls, including one by President Reagan, for
Israel to withdraw its troops to the lines before
the Israel Defense Force advanced in West
Beirut. The U.S. repeated its demand for a pull-
back.
Thus, despite mounting American pressure on
Israel, the Cabinet stuck to its previous policy of
tightening the encirclement of Beirut while
allowing Habib "another opportunity" to pursue
his mission through diplomatic means.
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Page 6-A" Tin Jewish Flondian Friday. August 13. 1982
Calls for Inquiry
That U.S. Had Harbored
Nazi Collaborators
By MARK JOFFE.
Jewish Exponent Staff
Reporter
PHILADELPHIA (JTA)
The former Justice Depart-
ment investigator who recently
revealed on national television
that the government has har-
bored hundreds of Nazi col-
laborators urged a crowd of 250
here to ask their Congressmen to
open an inquiry into his findings.
Speaking to members of Brith
Sholom and the Coordinating
Committee on Vital Jewish is-
sues, John Loftus said. It's time
that the American people have
the truth put before them."
While working for the Justice
Department's Office of Special
Investigations. Loftus uncovered
a covert operation, conducted by
the State Department's Office of
Policy Coordination, in which
hundreds of Byelorussian Nazi
collaborators had been recruited
for countenntelligence work in
the Soviet Union after World
War II.
Many of the Byelorussians
were later smuggled into the
United States and given
clearance to obtain U.S. citizen-
ship. Loftus believes that there
are currently more than 300 Bye-
lorussian Nazi collaborators liv-
ing in this country, a figure he
considers "s very conservative
estimate."
The Tip Of The Iceberg
And that may be only the tip of
the iceberg "I personally believe
that the problem is not limited to
Byelorussians, that there are
other ethnic groups recruited in a
similar fashion.'' said Loftus. He
ia also concerned that such
operations continue to this day
"1 was given permission by the
CIA to say this much: thai the
leader of a modern group of war
criminals was recently given
sanctuary in the L.S..'' he said.
Ixiftus believes that war
iTiminals living in the United
States today should be prose-
cuted and stripped of their
citizenship It s sbsurb to think
that somehow the horrors of the
Holocaust could ever be atoned
for by punishing one or two
Nazis." he told reporters in a
press conference prior to his talk.
But he added, "We have to set an
example for all time, that men
who kill children shall never go
free-
According to Loftus. there are
currently 27 cases against 3x-
Nazis pending in federal court as
a result of the Justice Depart-
ment's investigators. But he cau-
tioned that such litigation is
enormously complex," and
would not necessarily produce
convictions.
That process first involves su-
ing in federal court to strip a Nazi
collaborator of his American
citizenship, a process Loftus des-
cribed ss tantamount to conduct-
ing a murder trial 30 years after
the crime. The problem is that
many of the witnesses are either
dead or living in the Soviet
Union. And the Soviets have
furnished eyewitness testimony
for the atrocities in every country
except Byelorussia, Loftus noted.
One war criminals have been
exposed and stripped of their
citizenship, deportation proceed-
ings can begin. But the process
rarely get that far. Loftus had
worked over a year on a case
against Stanislsu Stankevitch. a
Man collaborator who directed
the brutal massacre of 6,500 Jews
in a Byelorussian town in Octo-
ber. 1941. and had later been
smuggled into the United States
by military intelligence.
"We had prepared a case
against Stankevitch containing
his confessions, his admissions of
Nszi background, and were ready
to prosecute, then discovered
that Stanislsu Stankevitch had
just died." Loftus told CHS T\ -
Mike Wallace on the May 16 edi-
tion of "60 Minutes."
It was that setback, and a de-
sire to return to his law practice,
that prompted Loftus to leave
the Special Investigations last
summer. But his mien -: in the
project continues: he will be dis-
cussing the investigation with
members of Congress.
New Two Hour Film
By GIL SEDAN-
JERUSALEM UTAl A
new 120-minute film, depicting
the Btrocities committed by the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion in Lebanon during its partic-
ipation in the seven years of civil
war there, has been produced by
the Israel Film service, a depart-
ment of the Ministry of Educa-
tion and Culture.
Yigal Ephrati. the film service
director, said the Foreign Minis-
try, the Jewish Agency and
Keren Hayesod have already
purchased 200 copies of the film
"The Meanng of Liberation" and
expressed the hope that the total
number of sales will reach 500.
He expressed confidence that
Jewish Federations in North
America and Christian support-
ers of Israel also would buy the
film
The film as put together in
response to strong anti-Israel
criticism touched off by Israel's
move into Lebanon. The film,
which describes in a low-key
style, the history of the takeover
by the PLO of large parts of Leb-
anon, has been prepared in
English. French. Spanish and
German language versions.

!*' social WOBjj;*
SiS ~~SS3S-
? |BT|MC0BS.O.n.r-M.n.g.'"" ,
A Terrorist Atrocity in Paris
Continued from Page 1 A
the first shots. Policemen started
chasing the terrorists but lost
track of them in the old quarter.
One policeman, a plainclothea de-
tective, was seriously wounded
by one of the quarter's residents
Police ssy the detective, sta-
tioned near the synagogue, drew
his gun to trade fire with the at-
tackers when one of the residents
apparently taking him for a ter-
rorist, shot from a window with a
hunting rifle. The officer was
wounded in the face and the uni-
formed police who were on the
spot first tried to give him first
aid. The window sniper has not
yet been identified and police are
conducting a house-to-house
search to find the gun.
Within minutes after the at-
tack, the street, in which the
wounded and the dead were still
lying, filled with people. As am-
bulances started to reach the
spot, hundreds of Jews took to
the street shouting "revenge"
and accusing the French govern-
ment of "encouraging the terror-
ists" by supporting the Palestine
Liberation Organization in
Beirut.
"(President Francois) Mitter-
rand and (Foreign Minister
Claude) Cheysson are quilty."
people shouted outside Golden-
berg s. Others wept. Doctors and
police bad to disperse the crowd
to evacuate the wounded.
The Israel Embassy issued a
communique Naming the PLO
for the attack and stressed that
Israel's action in Lebanon ^.
undertaken to try and en.
world terrorism from iu beak
Beirut. Jewish and non-jZ.
organizstions and ^
parties also condemned tbjT
tack.
A special representative d
Mitterrand. Elysee Palace chrf
of staff Jean-Louis B.anco >
an aide to Premier Pierre slsaZ
came to the site to expreat Z
governments sympathy lntenw
Minister Gaston Defferre ffe, L
Paris from Marseilles u soon H
he was informed of the attack to
personally supervise the faveA
gallon
President Mitterrand andSuj
attend memorial services.
Richard Gerstein
Former State Attorney Dade County
Rocky Fomerance
Former Miami Beacn Chief o' Ra*ice
Dick Rocky
Gerstein and Pomerance
Speak Out For Jack Gordon:
'XJver the years Jack Gordon has always been counted on to support law and justice.
and the people who enforce it. As a State Senator. Jack Gordon, has worked hard to
provide the funds for more police, more prosecutors, more equipment, more /ails. .
AND. he supported the Dade County Association of Chiefs of Police position on gun
control (Bill HB34) while his opponent voted against the police position.
We need him, so...
PUNCH 57
AND
RE-ELECT

OUR EFFECTIVE SENATOR
DISTRICT 35 DEMOCRAT
pd pex 00 JACH GOSOO* COMMTTEt 0 H*S(M. TAS


Friday, AugustXX&&/.JfoJevQ&Ftori4*v P*g 7:A
ERA Wounded But Not Dead fn5!;f"?me? J oI* ^but
By ROBERT E. SEGAL
IA Seven Arts Feature)
Pollsters tell us that two of
every three Americans, when
asked how they regard the Equal
Kights Amendent, would like to
see it approved. Indeed, one of
ihe most recent soundings indi-
i cates a slightly higher proportion
I of men favor it than do women.
Hut now that proponents have
last the battle because only 35 in-
stead of the required 38 state leg-
islatures voted for the proposal,
fighters for women's rights must
regroup.
Advice is coming in from all di-
rections. Phyllis Schlafly. who
personifies feminine opposition to
ERA. is tickled pink. She and her
STOP ERA key workers in 41
slates figure the battle for the
proposed Amendmend XXVI is
over. Heralding her personal
victory at a press conference in
the federal building named for
Everett Dirksen. a long time sen-
atorial foe of civil rights legisla-
tion, she hoisted a victory flag,
proclaimed ERA dead, and re-
ferred to the defeat as a great
plus for the nation.
It may come as a surprise than
to foes of ERA that Senator Bob
i'ackwood (R. Oregon) and Paul
E. Tsongas (D. Mass.) have
already jumped ahead with plans
to revive the issue. In the Senate
Judiciary Commit tee and in other
key Congressional bastions, the
renewal movement is stirring.
Statesman who foDow trends
artfully realize that when
leanor Smeal. president of
\< >V\ l National Organization For
Women) says the 200.000 enroll-
ed in that unit are seeing a
million dollars a month rolling in,
th> are impelled to listen.
Besides, they know a promis-
ing issue when it takes shape.
Thej won't forget that the drive
i to achieve not only political
equality but also economic equal-
ity for women is now nearly 60
[ years old.
Nor are they unmindful of the
I tact that the amendment
probably would have been at-
[tached to the Constitution by
Inow had it not been for the recent
vise of the New Right, paced by
It he Moral Majority, and other
|lon-es determined to put their
stamp of approval or disapproval
Ml socio-political concerns of the
iy Many contend that the Con-
stitution should not be cluttered
up with a special blessing for
women's rights while, paradoxi-
cally, they are determined to end
bortions and get prayers in
public schools by the same a-
"iifndment route.
What to do then'
One Harvard sage. Professor
I'aul A. Freund. who started his
limb to legal wisdom as a clerk
Mr Justice Brandeis. recom-
nends that efforts should be fo-
jrused on legislation against sex
'iM-nmm.itKm under the 14th
Amendment's equal protection
lause. His advice is valued by
lany who regard him as a giant
the unending battle for
linority rights.
In this time of recovery from
lefeat. ERA leaders seem inclin-
Explo$ions Damage
Bank, Offices
By EDWIN EYTAN
PARIS (JTA) An Israeli
nk and the offices of a French
.mpany which imports Israeli
lade electronic equipment were
lightly damaged by two ex-
plosive devices. No one was hurt,
nd the police said they have not
determined whether bombs or
and grenades were used by the
Ittackers who left behind leaflets
lying, "Palestine will win."
ed first of all to follow Jack
Kennedy's prescription for pro-
gress after a setback: "don't get
mad; get even." Thanks to the
strength of their campaign to
politicize their movement at
many levels, they are bent on
electing more women to office at
city, state, and national levels.
They are encouraged by the fact
that Chicago, Houston, and San
Francisco now have mayors of
the their preferred gender in
office.
They also have made a hit list
of more than 200 male officehold-
ers who opposed their cause; and
they have interesting news for
them.
President Reagan is clearly
targeted should he decide to seek
re-election. ERA leaders will not
forget that the 1980 platform on
which he campaigned turned
abruptly away from 40 years of
supporting their proposal. They
hold sharply in focus the protest
of Republican Committee Co-
Chairman Mary D. Crisp, who,
when her party leaders abandon-
ed the amendment, warned "We
are about to bury the rights of
over 100,000,000 American
women under a heap of plati-
tudes. '' This was right before she
left the dais.
"Equality of rights under the
law shall not be abridged or
denied by the United States or
any state on account of sex," is
the proposed amendment. It's
not adjoined to the Constitution
yet. But there are stirring days
ahead.
The Plight of the Falashas
WASHINGTON (JTA) -
Rep. Barney Frank (D. Mass.),
testifying before the House Sub-
committee on Human Rights,
urged Congress and the Admin-
istration to focus attention on the
human rights violations com-
mitted against Ethiopian Jews.
Aa a result of the hearing, the
first time ever any
body of Congress has met to dis-
cuss the plight of the Falashas,
the subcommittee will press the
State Department and U.S.
Embassy officials in Ethiopia to
give greater priority to the
Falashas, Frank said.
"The victims of historic dis-
crimination, including enslave-
ment, forced conversions and
land confiscation, the Ethiopian
Jewish community has faced a
constant struggle to sustain its
ndeniity and has steadfastly
overcome the obstacles which
they have endured over the cent-
uries." Frank told the subcom-
mittee.
Frank said reports coming out
of Ethiopia say the Falasha pop-
ulation in the country is less than
25,000. Evidence of religious per-
secution and cases of torture, im-
prisonment and the closing of
schools were passed on to the
subcommittee by Frank.
"It is an important step for-
ward that a subcommittee of the
Congress has granted recognition
to this unforturnate and ex-
tremely disturbing situation,"
Frank testified.
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Fage/B-A.' TheJewTihFlbiHuM*
/ i'-
13,1982
MM
A na lysis
November U.S. Senate Race
By MORRIS AMITAY
MARYLAND
In this report, Morris J.
Amitay continues his brief
analysis of the November
U.S. Senate races which
he began here several
weeks ago Amitay is a
former counsel for AIPAC
in Washington, DC.
The reelection campaign of
Democratic Sen. Paul Sarbanes is
one race of unusual importance.
Sarbanes is an important and in-
fluential member of the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee
and its Subcommittee on Near
East After the loss in 1960 of
three friends from the Commit-
tee. Church. Javits. and Stone,
the Sarbanes race emerges as a
high priority.
The major GOP challenger in
the September primary is former
U.S. Rep. Larry Hog an Judging
from Hogan's record in the
House, he is not expected to be
particularly favorable. The Sar-
banes race has been targeted by
many national conservative
groups, who will pour a lot of
money into Maryland to defeat
Sarbanes. Hogan is expected to
wage a vigorous campaign, but
Sarbanes is the favorite.
MASSACHUSETTS
Sen. Edward Kennedy is run-
ning for reelection to a fourth
term in the Senate. While his vic-
tory is not in doubt. Kennedy will
put a great deal of effort into the
campaign to enhance his status
as a contender for the 1984 Dem
ocratic Presidential nomination.
A long-time supporter of Israel.
Kennedy has been very active in
the last few years opposing arms
sales to Israel's foes and support-
ing a strong U.S.-Israel relation-
ship.
Kennedy is challenged by Re-
publican businessman-inventor
Raymond Shamie In his last
Senate race. Kennedy won with
70 percent of the vote, and politi-
cal analysts will be looking at the
size of his margin on election
night.
MICHIGAN
Incumbent Democratic Sen.
Don Riegle was thought to have a
serious reelection problem at this
time last year. The changing
economic situation in Michigan
and the failure of popular Repub-
lican Ciov. William Milliken to
enter the race have combined to
make reelection much more likely
for Riegle. The GOP frontrunner
is former U.S. Rep. Phil Ruppr.
who did not distinguish himself
as a particular friend of Israel
Riegle. on the other hand, has
built a record of strong support
for a close U.S.-Israel partnership
with vocal opposition to arms
sales to Israel's foes and support
for U.S. foreign aid to Israel.
While the Michigan race is far
from over, most analysts believe
that Riegle will win.
MINNESOTA
Incumbent Republican Sen.
David Durenberger is running for
reelection after filling the un-
expired term of the late Hubert
Humphrey for the past four
years. The September 14 Demo-
cratic primary will most likely see
department store heir Mark Day
ton emerge as the challenger.
Durenberger has built a solid
record of support for legislation
favorable to closer U.S.-Israel
lies and actively opposed the F-
15 enhancement package to
Saudi Arabia. Durenberger is
considered a comer" in GOP
circles and holds a commanding
lead at this time in the polls.
However, the race is expected to
tighten up.
MISSISSIPPI
In a state where political
analysts have tended to concede
the Senate election to 25 year
Democratic veteran Sen. John
Stennis. a new GOP candidate.
Haley Barbour. vice chairman of
the Mississippi GOP. is raising
significant funds for his cam-
paign and has sought to build a
relationship with Mississippi's
small but active Jewish commu-
nity. Stennis has always gone
down the line with the incumbent
Administration on Middle East
policy, and has not been accessi-
ble. Stennis' age and Republican
inroads in Mississippi could
make this an interesting race.
MISSOURI
First term Republican Sen.
John Danforth is running for re-
election and is a heavy favorite in
this generally Democratic state.
He has an outstanding record on
issues of concern to the American
Jewish community, with the ex-
ception of his vote in favor of the
1978 sale of F 15s to Saudi
Arabia, which he has described as
his toughest vote. In 1981. Dan-
forth reversed himself and
strongly opposed the sale of
AW ACS and F 15 enhancement
equipment to the Saudis. As of
now. there were 11 Democrats
entered in the Aug 3 primary,
with Jewish State Sen Harriet
POC Released From
Labor Camp
NEW YORK-(JTA)- Gri-
gory Geishas a Leningrad ac-
tivist who completed a two-year
sentence in a labor camp for draft
evasion, has been released and
returned home, it was reported
here by Theodore Mann, chair-
man of the National Conference
on Soviet Jewry Cieishas was in-
terned at the L'hkta labor camp,
an isolated region more than 900
miles from his home and family in
Leningrad. Mann said.
Geishas first submitted his
application for permission to
emigrate to Israel in December
1978 and was immediately ex-
pelled from an institute where he
was a second-year student.

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On The Ocean at 43rd Street
Woods emerging as the early
frontrunner.
MONTANA
Incumbent Democratic Sen.
John Melcher is running for a
second term against Republican
Larry Williams, an investment
counselor. Williams narrowly lost
to Senator Max Haucus in 1978
and has the personal finances to
make this a close race.
Melcher has not distinguished
himself as a particularly strong
supporters of Israel, although in
1978 he did vote against the sale
of F-15s to Saudi Arabia. Since
then, he has not voted for foreign
aid legislation and in 1978 voted
in favor of the AW'ACS. There is
no reason to believe Williams'
record would be any better.
NEBRASKA
First-term Jewish Sen. Ed Zor-
insky il> i is running for reelec-
tion in Nebraska. A member of
the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee. Zorinsky is being
challenged by former Vice Com-
mander of the Strategic Air Com-
mand James Keck (Rl Zorinsky
is one of the two Jewish Senators
who voted in favor ot the sale of
AW'ACS and F-15 enhancement
equipment to Saudi Arabia.
In Zonnsky's case, it was espe-
cially odd after his vote against
the sale in the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee before the
floor vote. Last fall. Keck also
announced his support for the
AW ACS sale, but he has in-
dicated he would vole for foreign
aid Zorinsky has consistently-
voted against foreign aid. Zorin-
sky is clearly ahead at this point.
United Jewish Appeal 1982 National Chairman Robert E Lou
(right) accepts a check for $10 million from Mrs. Laurence A
-h, president of the UJAFederation of Jewish Philanthr*
of Greater New York, and William Kahn, Federate
Tisch,
pies oj ureater new xor*. ana rvuiiam Kahn, Federation
executive vice president. A special session of the Federation's
Executive Committee voted to advance the sum immediate^
against a total allocation of $25 million for emergency purpose,
of the Jewish Agency for Israel.
Britain Promises Sweden to Help
Ascertain Truth of Wallenberg's Fak\
LONDON (JTAI Britain
has promised Sweden its help in
making renewed efforts to ascer-
tain the truth about the fate of
missing diplomat Raoul Wallen-
berg, the legendary savior of
Jews in Hungary during the Nazi
occupation of that country in
World War II
Malcolm Rifkind. Parliamen-
tary Undersecretary at the For-
eign Office, gave Sweden an "un-
qualified assurance' that Britta
would respond "as helpful ud
constructively as possible to my
initiative taken by the Swedish
government in which they feel we
could perform a useful role with
others in seeking a resolution of
this great tragedy Wallenberg
has been missing in the Soviet
Union since his arrest in Bud*
pest in January 1946 If alive.be1
would be 70 years old Aug 4
PUT YOUR
BODY
WHERE
\OUR
HEART IS.
This year put your body
wrtere your heart is Because
this year when you nave
the time of your life m Israel
you'll be grving her
what she needs most-
support strength and love
So go waierskitng on the Sea
of Galilee, play tennis m Tei Avrv.
o wander trie streets of
an exotic Jerusalem bazaar
Come to Israel
You'll be doing more than just
warming your body You'll be
taking a vacation tnat will
warm your soul
ISIWEL RIGHT NOW.
t
, a ft0
1


Friday, AugUBt 13, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-A
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BBBSal
BaaaBaBaaaaaaBaaaaBaaaSBBaaai
1A 11>, Jewish Pteridtan Friday. August 13, 1982
Letters to the Editor
Will Not Serve Peace Cause
EDITOR. The Jewish Floridian
It is incredible to realize that
the United States and Europe are
doing everything possible to
rescue the remaining elements of
the PLO. It also is amazing that
this rescue, if it takes place, will
not serve the cause of peace nor
will it accelerate any resolution of
the Palestinian issue.
Why is it that every time Israel
attempts to eliminate this terror-
ist scourge, not only from its bor-
ders but as a threat to Western
society, the nations of Europe
and our American State Depart-
ment rush to the defense of the
PLO? The PLO which has
wreaked havoc on Lebanon, as-
sassinated American ambassa-
dors and Israeli Olympic
athletes, and which has made in-
nocent children the main targets
of their wanton attacks now is
being elevated to a position of
credibility by the inane reasoning
of our American foreign policy.
America abuses its friendship
with Israel, applying a vicious
and cruel double standard to this
only democracy in the Middle
East. Is it because Israel has no
allies other than the Jews of the
Diaspora and fleetingly, the
government of the United States,
that the Arabists in the State
Department and on the White
House staff feel that pressure can
be placed on Israel at any time?
Why is it th-t pressure is not
placed on Syria, a satellite of the
Soviet Union, and the PLO. the
brutal terrorist arm of Syria?
Why is it that pressure is not
placed on King Hussein, who is
the minority ruler of Jordan,
whose people are 65 percent Pal-
estinian? Why did King Hussein
and the Arab nations aligned
against Israel never call for a
Palestinian State before Israel
dared to win the Six-Day War?
Could it be because Jordan, with
its Palestinian population, is the
Palestinian State? Why is it that
the United States, in its lust for
Saudi Arabian oil and subserv-
ience to the international oil com-
panies, is not demanding that the
Saudis join actively in the peace
process?
Why is it that no Arab nation
will accept the remnants of the
PLO? Is it because they too are
fearful of this terrorist plague
within their borders? Is it be-
cause the Palestinian problem is
one which the Arab nations have
never addressed and have no in-
tention of addressing so long as it
represents their tragic spearhead
against the legitimate existence
of the State of Israel?
Why does the Christian world
remain so anti-Israel even as the
Christian population of Lebanon
is liberated by Israel? Why does
the world not cry out against the
horrors of the Iraq-Iran War; or
the Syrian slaughter, in the City
of llama, of more than 30,000
men. women and children who
dared to seek religious freedom
from an oppressive minority
which holds political power? Is it
because as a democratic nation,
looking to the West, Israel is vul
nerable to the abuses of the press
and media which are prohibited
from working and reporting
freely in any Arab nation?
Why does American foreign
policy rush to aid its implacable
enemies while consistently trying
to break the back and the spirit of
its closest ally? The misguided
message of President Reagan,
warmly greeting the openly anti-
America Foreign Minister of
Syria along with the Saudi For-
eign Minister, of the steps of the
White House, while the Presiden-
tial staff was denigrating Israel
before the media, is frightening
to contemplate. Unlike any other
nation in recorded history, Israel
has been prevented from finding
a peaceful, legitimate existence
among the nations of man. This
tragedy can be placed directly on
the shoulders of American for-
eign policy which now. rapidly, is
abandoning its ally.
There are the very dangerous
rumblings of not too subtle anti-
Semitism, masked in the form of
anti-Zionism, sweeping through
the State Department, the Pen-
tagon and even Congress and the
White House. Is it that Israel,
alone against the world's nations,
is not being allowed to achieve its
goals of security and peace be-
cause the non-Jewish world is in
shock that form the ashes of the
Holocaust Jewish warriors have
demanded their nation. Israel?
Why is the United States not
using the opportunity provided
by Israel, by the sacrifice of a
small nation, to re-structure the
Middle Fast situation to the
benefit of America, to bring our
so-called Arab friends into the
peace process. Israel's armed
forces, its citizen army, have in-
flicted a crushing defeat on
Soviet weaponry and Soviet sur-
rogate forces. Why then is Amer-
ica reinforcing the goals of the
Soviet Union in the Middle East?
STATE OF
ISRAEL BONDS
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The courage, the strength, the
resolve, the idealism and the
pride of the Israeli nation makes
it a giant reaching high above the
hypocrisy of Europe and the
American State Department.
Israel is a democratic nation
which will not go away. It is the
homeland of the Jewish people
forever. It is the strongest and
most dedicated ally of the United
States. Israel is our friend, a
friend which even today is de-
fending democracy with the
blood of her precious young peo-
ple, her.future generation. Why
are we seeking to abandon her?
J. Frederic Blimtein. PhD
EDITOR. The Jewish Fbridian:
On the night of August 12.
1952. 24 leading Soviet Jewish
poets and writers were led to the
basement of Moscow's Lupianka
prison. There, they were executed
the culmination of a brutal
campaign to eradicate Jewish
culture in the USSR during Stal-
in's regime.
August 12 is much more than a
bitter memory. Thirty years
later, in August of 1962. although
murder is now "unfashionable."
repressive measures against
Jewish expression are still the
norm. The Soviet Union is the
only country with a large Jewish
population without a single
Jewish school for children. Even
private teaching of Hebrew in
homes, in small groups of three to
six people, has resulted in har-
assment and imprisonment.
The newest KGB tactic is that
of stripping academic degrees
earned by Jewish scientists who
request to go U> Israel. How can
you erase acquired knowledge? In
the USSR, I guess, simply by
saying. "If you want to go to Is-
rael, we're taking your degree
away.''
After several years of a slight
opening of the doors, emigration
is down to a virtual trickle. In
August of 1979. 4.000 people
were allowed to leave. I f the trend
of this year continues, then no
more than 1H0 will leave in the
month of August. 1982.
The reverberations of that in-
famous night of August 12. 1952.
are still being felt amongst So\ let
Jews. They are not free to learn
about their past and are unable to
carve out a future; is it any
wonder so many want to leave?
HINDA CANTOR
Chairman
South Florida
Conference on Soviet Jewry
EDITOR. ThvJeuish Flondian:
The last few weeks of national
media coverage have deeply dis-
tressed me Israel has been por-
trayed as using brutal force
against civilians in Lebanon. The
PLO has been described as
moderates seeking a just solu-
tion to the "Palestinian prob-
lem. In fact. Israel has done no
less or no more than the United
States or any other democratic
country would do when its citi-
zens are being attacked that
is, defend them.
The PLO has used civilians as
shields for their terrorist activi-
ties. Israel has tried to keep
civilian casualties as low as pos-
sible. How many times in modem
warfare have nations requested
civilians in the line of an immi-
nent attack to leave in order to
reduce civilian casualties? I be-
lieve that a fair definition of "de-
fense" would include rooting out
terrorists who have continuously
bombed and rocketted your
country's men. women and chil-
dren.
Israel should be thanked, not
condemned by free people all over
the world, for helping to
eliminate terrorism and creating
the possibility of a free and
peaceful Lebanon.
JOEL REINSTEIN
Fort Lauderdale
EDITOR, The Jewish Floridian:
I am sure that you are aware of
the fact that this past weekend
the Divine Light Mission con-
ducted their "festival" here on
Miami Beach at the convention
center.
I decided that Iwould go and
see what was happening there
and I would like to say how proud
I was of our Lubavitcher
Chassidim.
The only Jewish group in
evidence were the Lubavitcher
Rabbis and their wives. They had
a mobile parked right in front of
the convention center Tilled with
drinks and refreshments and they
invited many of the the young
misguided Jewish adults who
came to worship the Maharaj Ji.
These were people whose own
religious leaders were not able to
satisfy. For example I heard one
young man tell one of the Luba-
vitchers that after his mother
died of cancer he went to his
rabbi, who was conservative and
asked him to guide him and help
him to find (. d The Kabbi told
him that he himself did not know
how to find O-d and advised him
to go search. Well, he did and
ended up in the Oivine Light
Mission.
I feel that the Jewish commun-
ity cannot afford this |0S8 ^
ever nothing is being done iJT
estabhshment. including
tion. They did not eve?fSfe'
necessary funds to help .'S^
bavitch group m the.r cour, J*.
efforts. u,a8Wn|
The Lubavitcher couple, '
an entire Shabbos g?,**
talking and working w^'H
young people. Showing them?
Judaism is full of love Wmu*>
Rabbi Brusowank.n who a-*
the Lubavitch efforts to <*
cults is a wonderful person faS
warmth and understanding H.
Ahavas Yisroel just bean^fS
his face. I watched him work*
was inspired by his pat,***
compassion. His entire bm3
should be given full ,"*'
their efforts deserve our heljT^
Hadaau AJa I
EDITOR, TheJeu.shFlon^
The most puzzling factor abo.1
the so-called Anfit-lfcCU
Statement is that the pro-PLC
crowd is trying to jam a stat*
ment by Arafat down Israel,!
throat, and he does not speak iJ
the PLO. Any pronouncement!),!
Arafat is worthless without iS
adoption by the ruling counsel A
the group and a change in ml
charter.
We have had the undisciplmaJ
and amorphous nature of t*l
PLO well-demonstrated on TYB|
interview after interview showil
that he cannot control any groupl
within the group, nor even the al
dividuals running around m|
their Kalashmkovi.
And, as Barbara Tuchman has
recently pointed out. the Arabs
do not intend negotiating nil
Israel, but state time and agul
that they want the United Stata j
to pressure Israel into -urrends
on their terms.
They do not want t<> negotiau
their demands, but proclaim that
the U S. cannot deal w ith Arafat
unless they negotiate with ha-
face-to-face. But. of course, that
is the Middle East
ARTHIRR0TH
Israeli Planes Bomb PLO Batteries
ByHUGHORGEL
TEL AVIV UTAI The
Israel Air Force today bombed
PLO artillery batteries deployed
within a Syrian-controlled area
east of Beirut. The army spokes-
man said the batteries are located
in the Tarshish hilltop area
nearly 20 miles east of Beirut and
are the source of intensive
shelling on Israeli army positions
near the Druze town of Aleh. just
south of the Beirut-Damascus
highway
The spokesman said that with-
in west Beirut, fierce artillery and
tank fire exchanges had been in
progress since dawn, when the
terrorists opened fire on Israeli
positions near the National Mu-
seum. The Israelis returned shell
for shell.
Lebanese radio broadcasts as-
serted that Israeli units pressed
forward from the area they hold
at the Hippodrome race traci
extending their penetration awl
west Beirut, where tbtj
clamped a steel ring around
to r*.(XX) PLO terrorist > and s*
urn troops.
In the afternoon \ir Fore*
planes shifted their targets to the'
terrorist-occupied Zabra quart*
and to the Bourj Al Marajnehw
ugee camp area, a center of PLC
troops and weapon v from hic:
the terrorists had been firing ar
tillery shells, mortar tximbs anc
Katyusha rockets at Israe-
troops. The refugee i amp as re-
ported to be empty former civilian users. lem<
only the terrorist fighters thert
The Air Force attacks on tht
west Beirut areas reinforced j
raeli ground shelling during >
morning made m response to tar
ronst shelling during the n#
and this morning
r

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* .
MMMBHHi^HMB.awHHBBBBHBai
The Jewish Floridiari PVfty Ang.* 13. iftga \
Frieda S. Lewis, national president of
Hadassah. presents a limited edition port-
folio of three signed lithographs of the Tree
of Life by Jacques Lipchitz, to Nancy
Reagan at a White House tea in honor of the
Headlines
Women's Zionist Organization of America's
70th Anniversary. The famed sculptor based
the lithographs on his final monumental
work, which he made for the Hadassah Uni-
versity Hospital on Mount Scopus in Jerusa-
lem.
Hyatt to Retire as NCCJ President


Dr David Hyatt will retire as president of the
National Conference of Christians and Jews in
October. A search committee has been meeting to
select his successor
The 66-year-old Hyatt has been president of the
"\ ear old human relations organization since
January 1. 1973. He joined the NCCJ in 1964 as
national director of public relations. In 1968 he
was named vice president for public information,
and in 1965 executive vice president. He served as
a press attache to the American Embassy in
Pakistan during a leave of absence from the Con-
ference from 1963-65
Dr Hyatt is a founding sponsor of the Interre-
ligious Task force on Soviet Jewr> a member of
the Executive Board of the American-Israel
Friendship League, and a member of the Board of
Directors of the United Nations Association of
1 hi- United States
Two attorneys. Jeffrey N. Cohen and Michael
Pelavin. have been named national co-chairmen of
the commission on urban affairs of the American
Jewish Congress, it was announced by Howard
M Squadron, president of the organization
Cohen, a Washington. D.C. resident, is chair-
man of the board of .INC Enterprises, a real estate
deveW>pment firm based in the capital district. He
is a graduate of the Wharton School of Commerce
and Finance at the University of Pennsylvania
and the Columbus School of Law at Catholic Uni-
versity Cohen is a member of the national board
of trustees of the AJCongress
(Vlavin. a resident of Flint. Mich is a member
of the law firm of Pelavin. Pelavin and Powers,
and a trustee of the National Health and Welfare
Mutua! Fife insurance Association. He is chair-
man of the committee on small cities of the Coun-
cil >>! Jewish Federations
A couple who fled Nazi Germany, built a new
life in Jerusalem and devoted their energy and
skill"- to it' defense and development, are respon-
sible for the endowed Chair in Cancer Research
and I. xpenmental Medicine at the Hebrew Uni-
versity of Jerusalem
I !.. University's leaders gathered recently to
honor Mrs Mice Menkes and to inaugurate the
Siegfried and Alice Menkes Chair which she es-
tablished in her own name and that of her late
husband
The (hair I first incumbent. Prof. Reuven Las-
ko\ lectured on his work in developing better de
hnsa against disease through research on the
production of antibodies and the recognition of
cancerous cells.
Some 350 teen-agers from over 100 communi
tie* in the Eastern United States and Canada will
attend a week-long Eastern Torah Leadership
Seminar at Camp Moras ha. LakeComo. Pa., from
Aug 24 to 30.
A group of 40 senior citizens from the nearby
Block Vacation Center will participate in pro-
grams with the teen-agers. Cults, drugs, and the
family are some of the subjects scheduled for dis-
cussion in small study group* of 20 students each.
The Seminar is one of a series of summer and
winter retreats designed to give Jewish youth a
better understanding of themselves and their reli-
gion by providing a total experience in Jewish
living
The American Jewish Committee has released a
64-page report on a "no-holds-barred" sympo-
sium convened to discuss the challenge that the
right to freedom of religion is not fully guaranteed
to Jews in Israel "
I-eading university professors, rabbis, jurists,
politicians, community workers, and others who
attended the AJC sponsored meeting in Jerusa-
lem also debated how the variety of religious
experience in American Jewish life might find ap-
plication for religious pluralism in Israel.
The AJC report on the discussion. The Status
of Religious Pluralism in Israel, is rounded out
by five key articles on the subject published in
Israel in recent years
The problem of religious pluralism in Israel is
that it is a problem, declares Dr If. Bernard
Kesnikoff. director of the American Jewish Com-
mittee's Israel Office in an intorduction to the
report He cites as one example the fact that at
least two chief rabbis of metropolitan cities in Is-
rael had published announcements in the press.
on the rva of the High Holy Days, forbidding
the faithful" from worshipping in non-Orthodox
-\nagogues and forbidding them to have any-
thing to do with them
A World Jewish Congress delegation, headed
by the Chief Rabbi of France, has intervened with
French governmental authorities to insure the
preservation of a threatened Jewish archaeologi-
cal -ite recently discovered in the city of Rouen.
I-ast month, the ruins of a medieval Jewish
home were accidently discovered in the city of
Rouen during construction of an underground
parking lot on the site After discovery of the
find. Prof Norman Gold of the University of
Chicago, a specialist on the history of the Jews of
France in the Middle Ages, contacted the WJC
French Section to underscore the historical value
of the discovery and the importance of insuring
its preservation.
The full Senate Finance Committee conducting
hearings on President Ronald Reagan's tuition
tax credit proposal has heard a plea for the Con-
gress to pass the measure by Prof. Laurence
Katz. chairman of the Campaign to Relieve Inde-
pendent Education of Agudath Israel of America.
In addition to the national Orthodox movement.
Prof Katz also represented a coalition of groups
in support of tuition tax credits, representing
more than five million children in private schools
In his testimony. Prof Katz told the Senate
panel that the Administration's Educational Op-
portunity and Equity Act of 1982. S 2673. meets
all the tests that the organization has established
when it first advocated tuition tax credits for
parents on non-public schools nearly two
ago.
Tuition Tax Credits
Injurious And
Unconstitutional
WASHINGTON Tui-
tion tax credits for families
of children attending pri-
vate schools would violate
the constitutional doctrine
of church-state Separation
and would be unfair to the
poor and injurious to public
schools, according to
Senate testimony by an
American Jewish Congress
official.
In a statement before the
Senate finance Committee.
Nathan Z Dershowitz. director of
the organization s commission on
law and social action and head of
its legal staff, said that while the
AJCongress recognizes the im-
portance of non-public schools,
particularly those associated
* ith religion, the proposed tui
lion tax credit, which is backed
by the Administration, would
threaten religious schools with
government interference More-
over, he said, it would not in-
crease accessibility by poor and
minority students to non-public
schools.
UNDER THE tax credit pro-
posal, the Internal Revenue Code
would be amended to allow par
ent.s of a child in a non-public
schools to deduct 50 percent of
the school's tuition up to a
maximum of $500 from their
federal income tax.
Although the bill seeks to
preclude supervision of church-
related schools, there is no escape
from the fact that, when the fed-
eral government legislates tax
benefits, its also imposes obliga-
tions. Dershowitz said.
He cited the bill's provisions
barring benefits to students at-
tending schools which are not
non-pmtit or which discriminate
on the basis of nice, color, or na-
tional origin. The Internal
Revenue Service, he explained,
would lie obliged to monitor each
institution named in income tax
returns to make certain they were
non-profit, and the L S Attor-
ney-deneral "would have to un-
dertake enforcement of the anti-
bias provision, a task which will
involve government agencies in
extensne supervision of institu-
tions receiv inn government aid."
THE \J( ONC.RESS official
also noted that the revenue loss
Ul the federal government result
ing from tuition tax credits would
hurt public schools by drawing
away additional funds from them
'at a time when federal aid to
public education is being sharply
cut.
Dershowitz said that the Jew
ish commitment to religious edu-
cation a strong. an0 lhi[
Jewish community mauiu-
day schools for a lar numix^
its children. But he pointy,
that his organization is _
less opposed to tuition tax",
because "it would provide)
assistance where no proven"!
exists, as in the case of
families whose children uxl
non-public schools hut wouldi
open the doors of the non-o
schools to the poor
He said. Approximately 1
third of the tuition tax
would be distributed to f
with incomes of over tU
and that children from
families would generate a s)
credits twice as large as theirr
resentation in the schooi-i
population
Children in fam;.* -
comes of less than $.VU0U
generate a share only about
fourth as large as their repre
ation in the school -ap-
pointed out The poor
simply not able to match the
percent lax credit w it h their cm!
funds

If
DERSHOWITZ d.-missed tkB
argument that tuitmn tan
would foster healthy come
between public and non-|
schools as "paradoxical and. il
worst, hypocritical He mciI
comparison of the two s\ was not valid
"While the public schoolscal
not be selective in accepting u|
dents, the non-public schooal
can." he declared
"W hue the public schools hw|
great difficulty in expelling 1
child for serious misbehavior afl
non-public schools do not
public schools are mandated 37I
law to prov ide lor the inteiieT.*!
ally and physically handicapped [
the non public school* do Ml
operau under familiar r In short, public *,
provide equal education for al
children Surely public schwtl
should learn what they car. (neT
their non-public counterpart)
Hut tuition tax credit* are wf
necessary tor this result
DERSHOWITZ told
Senate Finan.. CommrtteJlMJ
since y-l percent ol r>n-ptaaj
schools are apooeored b> rej
gious organizations -
stuutional questions arisi
He said tbeSupn
held that tuition :..>
unconstitutional, and that w*l
the church state xparattf
clause of th. 10: tutpn AMJ
not prohibit all forn
aid to non-pub.. dB-jl
dose prohibit aid that either*'
vances or inhibits a region or*
suits in "excess^, p-vernnw
entanglement with re
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fV


A Holocaust Hero
Continued fr*m Page 4- A
thousands of Jews in Bud a
Rosenfeld provides newly
ised Vatican documents that
that Kotta acted on behalf
Cope Pius XII. While the evi-
ce does not exonerate the
from the charges that he
Id have done more to save
is, it certainly adds a new ele-
H to the debate over the
?'s behavior.
Wallenberg, who, if he is still
|e. would have been 70 on
jst 4. was a young Swedish
nessman when he was
[!.,! by the U.S. War Refugee
I to go to Budapest.
ned with funds from the
Refugee Board and the
encan Joint Distribution
imittee and listed as a
iish diplomat, he went to
^gary in July. 1944, at a time
thousands of Hungarian
the last major European
ii-h group still out of the
death camps, had already been
sent to AushwiU
Working outside the Swedish
Embassy, Wallenberg provided
both real and false passports to
thousands of Jews. He dealt with
Eichmann and with the Hun-
garian Iron Cross and personally
showed up when Jews were in
danger of being deported, to res-
cue them by using sheer bravado
and personal courage alone.
Wallenberg must have thought
his mission was nearing a suc-
cessful end when the Soviet army
entered Budapest and he went
out to meet them. He was ar-
rested and has never been seen
again. Since 1957, the Soviets
have continued to maintain he
died in 1947. But in recent years
there have been reports by re-
leased Soviet prisoners that they
have seen him.
Yet the most shocking aspect
of the Wallenberg story is the
failure of the Swedish govern-
How Far Will the
Iranians Go?
Continued from Page 4-A
n is supplying Iran with
i through Syria, and the Leb-
crisis which makes the
ect of concerted Arab help
doubtful than ever.
tWEVER, Iran's difficulties
in guarantee Iranian success.
r.mian intentions depend on
[complicated internal mac hi
:>n- of conflicting religious
Ira, their realisation turns on
t>r> which would prevent the
lians from seriously contem-
jng advancing any further
Basra.
lit' Iraqis are now. after all,
ting on their own territory.
lalthough morale may be low,
|i soldiers will probably fight
greater effectiveness in
fise of their homeland.
Be Iranians will have to ex-
their lines of communication
supply. Whilst they have
llv succeeded in replenishing
military hardware, their
fnt complement of arms is
pr suited to defensive warfare
mi" infantry attack, than
the more swift-moving operation
required to capture large tracts of
territory.
THE WESTERN Gulf states
have formed a defensive alliance
within the (lulf Cooperation
Council and this body, which en-
couraged Egyptian arms sales tc
Iraq, has little alternative but to
bolster President Hussein while
the Iranian threat to the stability
of their regimes remains. It is in
this framework that the U.S.
could exert some influence its
relationship with Saudi Arabia
has become even more significant
with the appointment of George
Shall / as Secretary of State.
While Saddam Hussein sur-
vives, serious military opposition
to the Iranians will continue. If
he falls, the (lull states could,
perhaps, sue for a compromise,
with promises of a huge repara-
tions package (the Iranians have
demanded $150 billion). Alterna-
tively, the Iranians might reject
any such blandishments and
simply press ahead with the re-
gional expansion of the Islamic-
revolution.
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*
ment and other countries, includ-
ing the U.S. to press the Soviet
Union for his release. His mother
and stepfather carried out a con-
tinuous campaign to seek help
and after their deaths the task
has been taken over by his half-
brother and half-sister.
But until recently they had lit
tie help from their own govern-
ment or even the Wallenberg
family, the most prestigious in
Sweden. Efforts to enlist aid from
such persons as Dag Hammers
jkold, a fellow Swede, when he
was United Nations Secretary
General, and Henry Kissinger,
when he was Secretary of State,
proved fruitless. Even Israel and
the Jewish community was little
interested until recently.
Simon Wiesenthal, the Vienna-
based Nazi-hunter, has taken up
Wallenbergs cause in recent
years and has declared he con-
siders "it even more important to
try to find out what happened" to
Wallenberg than to find Nazi war
criminals. There is hope with the
granting of U.S. citizenship, even
though it has no legal interna-
tional bearing, that there will be a
greater effort by the U.S. govern-
ment to press Moscow for in-
formation.
After all, all of us, and not just
Jews, owe this man much. Kati
Marton notes that after Wallen-
berg arrived he found that the
Jews had stopped believing in
their future, they felt abandoned
by the world. He sought to build
up their confidence and his mere
presence was a morale booster.
"Wallenberg proved that intelli-
gence and courage can be as con-
tagious as apathy and fear." she
wrote. It is a lesson we should all
learn.
220 Palestinian
Youth Released
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTA) About
220 boys between the ages of 12
and 15, who were captured by the
Israel Defense force during the
fighting in Lebanon, were re-
leased to the International Red
Cross (IRC). The youths had
been captured after they fought
Israeli troops with Soviet-made
rocket-propelled grenades.
Some of them told Israeli re-
porters that they had been
shanghaied by the Palestine
Liberation Organization while on
school outings and forced to
serve with the PLO.
The IRC had arranged to
collect the youths Sunday, and
buses were standing by to take
them away from a prison camp
the Israelis had erected outside
Sidon.
y, August 13.1982 /f The Jewish Floridian Page 13-A
------------ ^S I I -----'
Lawmaker Recalls Measure on
Jewish Religious Divorce Because
Governor Intended to Veto It
By BEN GALLOB
NEW YORK (JTA) As-
semblyman Sheldon Silver II) ,
Manhattan) said he had recalled
a measure, sponsored by him and
approved by both the Assembly
and Senate of the 1982 Legisla-
ture, on the problem of Jewish re-
ligious divorces because Govern-
or Hugh Carey's office had in-
formed him the Governor in-
tended to veto it.
Silver also told the Jewish Tel-
egraphic Agency that he in-
tended to introduce a new bill in
the 1983 Legislature similar to
one he had sponsored, also ap-
proved by both houses, to pro-
vide time off for observance of re-
ligious holidays by Jewish and
non-Jewish teachers. Carey
vetoed that bill. Silver withdrew
the divorce ("get") bill also.
Carey had been advised by his
counsel that both measures were
unconstitutional. The religious
holiday time-off measure
provided that teachers in the
New York City public school
system could deduct leave credits
from accumulated sick leave to
observe religious holidays.
Under its provision a New
York City public school teacher,
who wanted to take time off for
observance of a day holy to his or
her religion, could deduct without
penalty up to eight days in a
school year from sick leave accu-
mulated in past school years.
Silver said objections to his
measure were filed with the Gov
ernor by the State Commissionei
of Education, the Public Em
ployes Relations Board and
Mayor Edward Koch of New
York City. They contended the
matter was one for collective bar-
gaining and not a matter for leg-
islation.
WB1 Try To Prove
Hill's Constitutionality
The "get" measure was a civil
bill designed to ease a centuries-
old disability imposed on the ob-
servant Jewish wife whose hus-
band refuses to give her a Jewish
divorce (a "get"). An observant
Jewish woman is barred from
marriage unless her husband
gives her a "get."
Believed to be the first law of
its kind, the measure provided
that when one party to a civil di-
vorce action complained of a
barrier to remarriage imposed by
the other, the issue could be sub-
mitted to a fact-finding and me-
diation panel, appointed by the
judge hearing the divorce suit,
which would have had the func-
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whether either party would re-
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Silver told the JTA that, in
making plans to the "get" bill, he
had received a statement on its
constitutionality from Alan Der-
showitz, a Harvard University
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Silver said the effect of his re-
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mains un persuaded by the
planned Dershowitz analysis and
vetoes the bill, he (Silver) will
move to introduce a similar mea-
sure in the 1983 Legislature when
perhaps a new Governor will see
the matter differently. Carey has
announced he does not plan to
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t*g14-A Tha Jnrafa Floridkn / Friday, August 13,1982
Why Jews Intermarry and What Reformed Judaism is Doing About It


Aa Interview With Rabbi San-
ford Seltzer of the U AHC
The increasing rate of inter-
marriage among American Jews
was one of the major factors that
impelled the Union of American
Hebrew Congretgation to adopt
its program of "Outreach' to the
non-Jewish community last year.
In a recent interview. Rabbi San-
ford Seltzer of Boston, who
directs the Task Force on Reform
Jewish Outreach, discussed the
extent of the problem and de-
scribed the UAHC's approach to
non-Jewish partners of mixed
marriages.
Q. What is the rate of inter-
marriage today?
RABBI SELTZER: Based
upon the best data we have, at
least one third of all marriages
involving Jews seem to involve
persons who come from another
religious background. Of that
figure, fewer than 30 percent of
the non-Jews convert to Judaism.
Yet half of those who have not of-
ficially converted indentify them-
selves as Jewish.
Q. When did the rate begin
rising?
Sehaer: According to the Na-
tional Jewish Population Survey,
the intermarriage rate remained
stable during the first hah* of this
century, rising slightly from 2
percent in 1900 to about 6.7
percent in 1960. In the past thirty
years, however, it has risen to
over 30 percent.
Q. How do you account for
that?
Sehaer. Between 1960 and
15*80. a number oi phenomena oc-
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curred. One is what I call the
triumph of civil or public religion
in the United States. We glorify
the United States as God's
chosen nation. What becomes
important on the American scene
is s belief in God and an accep-
tance of America's manifest
destiny. What becomes less im-
portant, therefore, is how you ex-
press that belief in God. Whether
you're a Protestant, a Catholic,
or a Jew is leas important than
the fact that you believe. The
great hymns of America, such as
the "Star Spangled Banner." in-
voke God and America's
manifest destiny.
The second verse, which we
rarely sing, says, "Then conquer
we must when our cause it is just,
and this be our motto, in God is
our trust." The "Pledge of Alleg-
iance," "America the Beauti-'
ful." "God Bless America," and
"My Country Tis of Thee" are all
hymns. Consider also the fact
that whenever a President is in-
augurated, a priest, a minister,
and a rabbi are present to invoke
God's blessing. According to the
concept of civil religion, we'are all
alike, we all believe the same
things.
Secondly, during this 30-year
period when interfakh marriage
rose sharply, Jewish ethnicity,
flowered. The emergence of the
State of Israel normalized the
Jewish sense of self. We became
like everybody else, having a
country, a language, and an
army.
In addition. Jewish organiza-
tions worked effectively to alter
pejorative attitudes and delete
negative statements about Jews
in Christian theological writings.
In 1970 the Catholic Church
issued a Papal letter permitting a
priest to officiate at the wedding
of a Catholic to a non-Catholic
partner either alone, with a
minister, or with a rabbi, if the
Catholic partner agrees to expose
the child to Catholicism not
raise the child a Catholic just
expose the child. That revolu-
tionary doctrine came on the
heels of the realization that
Catholics are the fastest inter-
marrying group of any religious
grouping in the United States.
A third factor in the upsurge of
intermarriages is the counter-cul-
ture of the late '60s and 70s. and
its attack on organized religious
authority. A whole generation
rebelled against institutions
both secular and religious. Indi-
vidualism became the dominant
motif of that period. Many Jews
began to aay, "Don't tell me what
Judaism demands from ma, I will
use it to satisfy my needs." Thus.
when a Jew and a non-Jew aak a
rabbi. "Can you marry ua," and
the rabbi says. "I can't," they
don't understand what the rabbi
is talking about. They're saying,
"We want to be married in terms
of our needs, you're telling us
about some religious absolutes
that no longer have any bearing
on our lives." Traditions have
lost their hold; secularization and
privatization have become the
order of the day.
When a couple comes to the
rabbi, more often than not. the
Jewish partner begins the con-
versation by saying. "Mary or
Chris knows that 1 would never
agree to convert to her faith, but
she has agreed to become
Jewish." Often behind this state-
ment is the assumption that Jews
today define themselves more as
an ethnic than a religious group-
Converting to another religious
tradition is simply unacceptable
to Jews who identify with their
Jewishneas in non-religious
terms. If fact, fewer than 2 per-
cent of Jews marrying non-Jews
become Christian or Moslem as a
consequence of that marriage.
Q. How does the UAHC out-
reach program address these
phenomena?
Seltzer: Jews feel comfortable
marrying non-Jews and retaining
their Jewishness. They see no
conflict between the two and
don't understand the rabbi's
refusal to conduct a mixed mar-
riage. But the Jewish parents
often go into a panic and say. get
that person converted, or at least
get a rabbi to officiate at the
wedding. Yet. when a non-Jew
comes to the rabbi without
romantic involvement and says.
I'd like to be Jewish because I've
studied Judaism and I find it
meaningful, many born Jew get
concerned and upset. We are re-
luctant to welcome somebodv
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who wants to become a Jew when
there's no romantic involvement.
When Rabbi Schindler an-
nounced that part of the outreach
program was directed to the reli-
giously nonpreferenced, there
was a tremendous furor in the
Jewish community. Some said it
would be an open invitation to
evangelists to proselytize among
Jews. Theologically they are
bound to evangelize, regard less
of our activity. Others said, we
worked assiduously with liberal
Protestant groups to reach an
understanding that neither of us
would proselytize the other. But
there was another reason which
was not articulated. Since, in the
United States Jews are not very
religious, we get upset and em-
barrassed when converts to
Judaism are more observant and
more religiously involved in the
synagogue then are born Jews.
Q. What is the position of the
Reform rabbinate on the question
of officiating at mixed marriages?
Seltzer: The Central Confer-
ence of American Rabbis has
been consistent in its official
statements and policies on the
subject, beginning in 1909. when
the first statement was issued,
and reiterated in 1973. when the
CCAR called upon its member-
ship not to officiate at mixed
marriages. However, the 1973
statement did grant each Reform
rabbi the right of personal inter-
pretation and the right of consci-
ence. People say. if the rabbi will
only marry these people, every-
thing will be okay. How do we
know? We have no data, only the
well-intentioned attitudes of
some people who feel that this is
a way to guarantee Jewish conti-
nuity and Jewish survival. In my
opinion, if we encourage rabbis to
officiate at mixed marriages, we
will accelerate the intermarriage
process by reinforcing civil reli-
gious, ethnicity, and the privat-
ization of religion.
Q. What is the role of the Task
Force on Reform Jew,,., J
reach in all of this"- h *|
the increasing percent an 35
who were marrying norV,
but we didn't kno* Jg*
about the problem The R
movement was converting,
to Judaism but was not
cienUy sensitive to iheir nee
why they were becoming Jw
to their expectations of
Jewish community We
to expose the non Jewish i
to Judaism. We war conce
about the children of mixed i
riages. We felt that ,t w uneu
undo the old misconception tkT,
Jews were a private club And,
the Task Force was created hi
virtue of the Outreach promo,!
being the creation of a relinj
body and not a secular bodv ]
are saying to Jews and non'j*
alike that we speak out of a a..
text of a practicing Jewish trad
tion. a commitment to (lod. Ir>|
el. and Torah. and that what !
do is being done for the purpoJ
of strengthening the religion. I
community.
We are not amtished with avi'
religion and ethnicity as the tall
mark of the Jewish people; fW|
no longer prepared to abide tsl
the privatized kind of reiigwnl
expression that plays secondfij
die to the secular world, andal
will seek to build a Jewish coal
munity that emphasizes its rt|
gious roots
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S5T
Mobil Oil Pledges $15,000 To JDC
WASHINGTON (JTA) In
response to a letter by Robert
Zweiman, national commander of
the Jewish War Veterans, the
Mobil Oil Corporation is donat-
ing $15,000 to the American Jew-
ish Joint Distribution Committee
to help the people of Lebanon, it
was announced by the JWV. Ac-
cording to the announcement,
Jack Hayes, manager of Middle
(Cast public affairs for Mobil Oil,
telephoned the JWV here to say
the money was on its way to the
JDC.
Hayes said this donation was a
conseuuence of Zweiman's letter
to W.P. Tavoulareas, president of
Mobil Oil. In the letter, Zweiman
questioned the omission of the
JDC in Mobil's recent widely cir-
culated ad, "Who's Listening to
the People of Lebanon?" The text
of the ad expressed concern for
the Lebanese and urged
Americans to join Mobil Oil in
contributing humanitarian aid
for "medical supplies, food and
clothing."
It asked people to contribute
"to one of the many groups now
seeking such fund," and listed
seven charitable organizations:
American Friends Service Com-
mittee, American tted Cross,
CARE, Church World Services of
the National Council of Churches,
Save the Children Federation,
U.S. Committee for UNICEF.
and Catholic Relief Services.
Zweiman observed in his letter
that "the failure to mention JDC
reflects negatively on the integri-
ty of the ad." In response, Hayes
explained that the ad, which ran
July 2, used only the agencies
that Mobil was aware of at the
time: the omission of JDC was
unintentional. Although Mobil
would not be running the ad
again, Hayes stated Mobil would
contribute $15,000 to the JDC in
lme with contributions already
given to charities listed in the ad.
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Will everyone benefit from Watt-Wise incentives?
Yes.
These incentives are less costly than the oil necessary to generate the
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Page 16-A The Jewish Floridian Friday, August 13. 1982


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American Red Cross Allowed to Visit PLO Prisoners
By DAVID LANDAU
JKRUSALEM (JTA)
Israel's agreement to allow repre-
sentatives of the International
Red Cross to visit Palestinian
prisoners captured in Lebanon
won an approving comment from
a Reagan Administration
emissary here. "A wise decision,"
said M. Peter MacPherson, the
President's personal representa-
tive for disaster aid to Lebanon,
after he was informed of the
gesture by Foreign
Yitzhak Shamir.
Minister
ilewigfa Floridian
Miami. Florida Frida> August 13. 1982
Section B
Marine B. Schwartz Ellen Mandler
Marilyn K Smith
Federation Women to Attend
National UJA Conference
Maxine E. Schwartz, Ellen
Mandler and Marilyn K. Smith
will participate in national
United Jewish Appeal con-
ferences in New York City on
Aug. 16 and 17
Maxine E. Schwartz, president
A Federation's Women's
Division, was recently appointed
an honorary member of the UJA
Rabbinical Cabinet, the group's
first non-clergy member. At the
Rabbis' upcoming conference.
she will present a special seminar
on means of achieving 100 per-
cent participation of a syna-
gogue's membership in local
Federation campaigns. An active
leader of the Women's Division.
Mrs. Schwartz was a co-chair-
woman of this year's Super Sun-
day drive, former Women's
Division Campaign Chairwoman
and Community Education Vice
President, and is a member of the
Federation Board of Directors.
Ellen Mandler. Women's
Division Campaign Chairwoman,
will take part in the annual
Headquarters Cities meeting of
the national UJA Women's Divi-
sion. At this conference, cam-
paign leaders from Women's
Divisions throughout North
America will be discussing the
key issues involved in the 1983
campaign. Mrs. Mandler is cur-
rently a member of the Federa-
tion Board of Directors and has
served as Women's Division
(ommunity Education Vice
I President and chairwoman of
Federation's Community Rela-
i ions Subcommittee on the Mid-
[die East and Foreign Jewry.
Marilyn K. Smith, a Federa-
te >n Vice President and an
1500 Educators
Gather for CAJE
Fifteen hundred Jewish Edu-
Icators will meet at Brandeis
I niversity near Boston, MA,
from Aug. 15-19 for the Seventh
, Annual Conference on Alterna-
tives in Jewish Education. The
participants, ranging in ideology
from Orthodox to secular, will in-
[clude rabbis, Hebrew and day
[school teachers and principals,
[youth and campus workers, ad-
1 ministrators, researchers, writ-
ers, artitsts and interested lay
persons. For four days they will
| share pedagogic expertise and
discuss fundamental issues in
| Jewish education.
This year's conference will
focus on the issue of building
[coalitions between educators and
[lay persons to enhance the pro-
"fssion and role of Jewish educa-
tion in the community. Small dis-
jssion groups will seek to de-
velop strategies to make Jewish
lucation a higher communal
Uriority.
Executive Committee member of
national UJA's Women's
Division, will also attend the
Women's Division Headquarters
Cities meeting, where she will
conduct several seminars. Mrs.
Smith. Associate Chairwoman
and Pacesetter Chairwoman of
the 1983 Combined Jewish Ap-
peal-Israel Emergency Fund and
a member of the Federation
Board of Directors, has served as
Campaign Chairwoman and
Community Education Vice
President of Women's Division.
MacPherson, Administrator
for the Agency for International
Development agreed with Shamir
that it was "a humanitarian act.''
Shamir explained that Israel does
not consider it a duty under in-
ternational law to allow the Red
Cross access to the prisoners who
are suspected members of the
Palestine Liberation Organiza-
tion.
THEIR OFFICIAL status is
detainees, not prisoner of war.
since Israeli refuses to recognize
the PLO as anything but a ter-
rorist organization and as such it
cannot posses a legitimate army.
According to unofficial estim-
ates, Israel now holds 8.000-9.000
PLO suspects. Most are confined
to a special detention camp in
south Lebanon. Officials here
have not indicated what Israel
intends to do with them.
Only a small number of those
who were directly involved in ter-
rorist acts could be brought to
trial. If convicted, they would
only increase Israel's prisoner
population which is already swol-
len to the bursting point.
Chief of Stuff Gen. Rafael
Eitan has indicated that if an
when a new government is set up
in Lebanon, most of the captives
will be turned over to the
Lebanese authorites. Should
Christian Phalangist allies cont-
rol a new Lebanese government,
the prisoners could expect to fare
mush worse than they would
under detention by Israel. The
Phalangists have old scores to
settle with the PLO.
Congressman Dante Fascell (D-Fla), second from left, greets
Israeli Foreign Minister Yitzhak Shamir during the letter's
recent visit to the House Foreign Affairs Committee. Shamir
was in Washington to participate in high-level meetings with
U.S. government officials, including the House and Senate
Foreign Affairs Committees, regarding the crisis in Lebanon.
Fascell, a long-standing supporter of Israel, is a high-ranking
member of the House Committee.
Earlier Atrocities
Jewish communities in Western Europe have been the
target of several attacks on recent years:
March 27, 1979 33 people, mainly Jewish students,
were wounded after a grenade was thrown into a Jewish
youth hostel in Paris.
Jury 27, 1980 A 14-year-old boy was killed and 20
people wounded in Antwerp. Belgium, while waiting for a
bus to take them to Summer camp.
October 3, 1980 Four people were killed and nine
wounded by a bomb explosion outside the Paris liberal
synagogue on Rue Copernic.
August 29, 1981 Two people were killed and 17
wounded by a three-man commando team who attacked
the Vienna synagogue.
August 20, 1981 Three people were killed and
scores wounded by a bomb explosion in the center of
Antwerp's Jewish Quarter.
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2-B TW
maMmaaamamaman
Flondian Friday August 13. 1962
Federation Holocaust Memorial
Project Established
Tme Project m anaaia. sot sad
ail Holocaust related aHaarireral-
artifacts.
ar. worm
SUTVTVOr
nomi Project
tader ihe Warifriaap of Project
Executive Director Marc
Lbe newty tnrsaarl
to imrikrait the reccec
of the Federauoe
Holocaust Memorial Committee
to itaNiih a tnraaj memorial
to saaeeuze the rnsnnanrmy to the
tragedy of the Hoaocauet-
poesns.
pbotoejapas for e* entua. >
the piaaaed faculty, wtuck
>nal will serve
center for minimal am aoc
matenai. PoJhck aaad.
It will include a library and
aaadai center c will serve as a
central repository for Mariano of
ail ace* to gam a better under
; of the HobcaiaK will
obbbb. faun strips and
ncerr materials that
to all facets of the Ho*>
lt ill an 11 as a veaadeto
the romra unity Jewisc
and nan Jew ah. so that the story
of the Hninraust is never lost and
the man act of the Hok>
k rCHaVsaaVM aattQMwDlV UBpaTTflCaSO
> the hearts of all people.
a museum ana an
Project aisc puvat to
coasa unity sdu-
jacaaaj pubhc iecture
?BBS series, a survivor s
bureau, and joornrys to
vent Holocaust sates and major
cause m Eastern Europe
An authority on the subject.
Polbck wl! receive hsPhD b
Holocaust Studies form Boston
Lmvermy. where he stodwd
sntfe Eke WaeseL He was employ
C as a lecturer at Yad Vi
and as 1979 he led a
of Conscience to
Europe and the death
The trip was featured ai
sy Award winning tesrvt-
i documentary narrated bv Ed
he has lectured aad
at South Ftondaof
thesr journey
The Holocaust Memoruu Pro-
ject
gardaag any
programs, subjects
aWa>wteaMBW| or
European Jewish life
The Project is temporarily lo-
cated at the Greater Miami Jew-
ash Federation
that the Holocaust was
auque to the Jewuc
Polick said he eavanons
the planned memorial wham will
be housed in as own building, to
be comparable to the Yad
Vashem Holocaust Memorial sa
Jerusalem
pur
1 envtsaon a unique I
pose faculty of local and
prominence, which would focus
on memory and education.
V e ve taken the pulse of the
cDBBaauasty aad found that there
at ticanendous support for s pro-
ject of this magnitude.
The Project will operate in coo-
junction with Southeast Florida
Holocaust Meanonal Canter at
Florida International Unrrersay
which is collecting oral
from Holocaust survivors
Singles Share
Holiday Services
Rabbis Condemn Terrorist Attack
The Rabbinical Association of Greater M
u condemning the terrorast attack
ias
upon

aasf ,
Jew* a i
aad a Jewish asaghhnrhuuj a Para n!
in the name of the AssocaWV/**
president. Rabbi Bam Tabss^auhoff of Temple Bet BW kU
as executive vice president. Rabbi Solomon Sckxff dnrLT
the Greater Miami Jewish Federation Chaplaincy
The dastardly attack m Puna raeukiJ m the murder of.
least six people and the wounding of more than 20 otaer peon-
The terrorist attack followed several other anti-Sem^c tsbsZ
m Parts over the weekend
These barbaric acts underscore the marnnsment of a viae aad
powerful cadre of terronsts to murder sad aaaam Jews r*rev
Uarj may be m Israel or anywhere ease m the word TW
training and support of these terronsts have been proven, it
emanate from the PLO whose armed headquarters are m Bam
It thai fact wham has brought the Israeli armed forces ate
, to root out the source of thai terrorism
We call for prayers to be rented m all synagogues dunng Sab-
bath services Friday night aad Saturday. Aug 13 aad U fca-
those anarderrft and wounded m thai attack as wet u tin,
faasanes We cal upon the French authorities to mobaue tZ of
as efforts to apprehend and prosecute the perpetrator* af Jttm
to make all efforts poasabfc to protec-. u J*
attacks
We call i
Israel in ha
Bent
V* e further call for a
and to work for the
can Irve in peace and setutatj
sJ people of good wul to understand and support
to root oat the source of work} lemona a
) put an end to a^ :*-nrac
of a society m wfcjce i^ peope
Bond Leaders Attend Sessions
A check for SS.300 has been awarded to the Mtami-Dade
Community College Foundation. Inc b\ the \ a than \famlow
Educational Foundation. The donation will support 18
scholarships. The check was presented to college President
Robert McCabe 'left/ {>> Benjamin Gould 'right), on behalf of
the Bayshore S*~:ice Club which administers the Sfandou
Foundation funds Also on hand for the presentation was Mrs
Gould
Council Educators to Hold Sessions
Temple Israel of Gi
Miami will offer Jewish si
the ages of 21-50 the op-
of sharmg the High
single per
Lmanu-El wul have a
reserved section for
in the Theatre of Per
Arts during the High
HoK Day Services
More max sX synagogue and
day schooi nursery and utter
garten teachers from South
Florida will partaripate m the
semt-annuai All-Day Prosessaona.
Growth Institute sponsored by
the Jewish Council of Eerty
Childhood Educators and the
Central .Agency for Jewish Edu-
cata>n to be head on Tuesday.
Aug 24. from 9 a.m to 3 30 p m
at Temple Beth Shalom. Holly
wood-
Arlene
JCECE
The Iass>
-RELGO. IM
Saskasous a G an
vae- *-s 4 Z'f
-' Books juOa-ci
aper Bac>s
!*ecoras 4 'apes
n
of an
proaches and strategies to en-
hance thesr instructional skills
In adds; ion, the entire day
the bonds of ool-
between the teacners
Miami all the way to West
Beach.
An innovation in that year s
program will be two sesaaons head
lor Early Childhood Education
Directors
Additional officers include
Judy Kuntz. Regional Vice
President (South Dadei Arlane
Leibomxz Regional Va Prest^
dent North Dade-Miami Beach
Gladys Schlescher Regional Vice
President 'Broward Room
Euenberg. Reaponai Vice Presh
dent iPalm Beech-Boca Ratoni.
Shirley Schiff Treasurer Gads
Ashbai. Recording Sscretsrv
wuh Shirlev Cohen. Chairperson
of the Ail-Day Institute
Barry Uiurersity
Writing Center
Barry University starting a
writing center thai fall. The cen
t-r will be manned by volunteers
who wul draw upon their experi-
ence and background to provide
free consultation on
any stage of
Anyone interested in becoming a
Barry writing adviser may call
the office of the Dean of the
School of Arts aad Sciences
More tnan two dozen the Greater Mauni State of Israel
Bonds Ogamzauon wul attend
the 19&2 laterueooaal Israel
Bonds Leadersau]
Washington. DC Thei
whach will attract world audsn
of the Israel Bonds Organizatam.
wj] take place Aag M -
Gary R Gerson. general cam-
paign chaannan of the Israel
Bonds Organization, noted that
pnnapel conference speakers will
be Israel Defense Muuster .And
Sharon and Israel s Ambassador
to the Limed States Moahe
Arens. Gerson reportaa that con-
ktagaf wiJ revapw the
of the emergency 31
BBBahon Devekxauent for Peace
rampaarn uadartaken by the
Israel bond Organ iratmr to
offset the impact on Israels
economy of the rmafilitaw in
Leoanon
BBtsaeify the emergeac-. no?i
which will man mar i z^n* tfe
High Holy Day Appear C
son said and we expect uoa>
response i= L. eta
He added that the .steraatia
al conference wui ter% m i
major expreasaoc Nora
American Jewwr; :.--.^.ues
unity with Israet a: i use ran
its people are rr.xt r.j asv
sacrifices to assure tne secarxj of
the Gahlee and aaS aaai 'j
rhanraa of peace saaj tsoakrs
the Middle East
Tnev
complete plans to
JEWISH WORSHIP H(XR Rabbi Jacob 5 o-w Temple B nai Z.-t. V Beach, wui sppra-* Jewish Worship H day at am on Channel
YOU can be SURE of frat BEST at
TOCfcf'S BONDED FRUIT SHIPPER
Now Sfipomg fionCa S r~me/$t Fruit
221 Navarre Coral Gable*
Baskets & Gifts
TeL a*vj:15
7^-r ira
Bth Dn Office
Of Florida
RABBI
DO TIBOfl H. STERN
Senior Orthodox Rabbi
ALL LEGAL
RABBINIC MATTERS
Senc>ng uxsi and roreaon
1532 KSasiwiqton *enue
W 8*c- Fionda 33139
T* 43*-004or6r2O004
4144 Chase Avenue. MB
Rabbi Leon Kronish. D.D.
David Conviser. Cantor
Services every Friday evening at 8:1!
and SfiaDOat morning at 10.45
Registration now accepted for
our scnocH For LMng XKUrsm
Early Childhood Program
ages 3 to 5 years
Kindergarten to
Confirmation Class
Judaica High School
Weekly afternoon Hebrew classes
anwised call 53*-7231
Torah
10
Of Our Unique Kingeryarten
And Pre-Schooi Program
THOU SHALT HAVE
newly remodeled classrooms math
religious training iazzercse
full/haif day program reading
transportation drama
babysitting arts & crafts
You Be The Witness...
Join Us At An Open House On Sunday.
August 15,1982 10 a.m. -12 noon
1051 No. Miami Beach Blvd.
North Miami Beach
Mtnam loroer.
Education Director
947-7528


Friday. August 13, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 3-B
AJ Committee Honors Consul
|Neil Alter, chairman of the
tnerican Jewish Committee's
Lreign Affairs Commission,
Lit' a presentation of apprecia-
Cn to the Honorable Grace Car-
ijal. Consul General of Costa
ca. Joined by members of the
mmission. the presentation
ok place at the Consulate. A
mission of Jewish life in Costa
ca followed.
|Mr. Alter, Senior Vice Presi-
Int for Flagship Hank's Inter-
Itional Banking Group said
at Costa Rica has a long and
jrageous history of democratic
ditions. This is all the more
Itraordinary in light of the po-
Bcal turmoil and non-
Jmocratic history of her Central
lerican neighbors. While the
(wish population is barely one
nth of one percent the people
ive led a secure, Jewish exist-
Alter explain**! that when
Costa Rica's new President Luis
Alberto Monge assumed office he
ordered that the Costa Rican
Embassy be placed in Israel's
capital. Jerusalem. While it is
customary for embassies to be in
the capital city, most nation's,
bowing to Arab pressure, locate
their embassies in Tel Aviv not
Jerusalem.
Alter also said, "we will never
forget the strong condemnation
by Ambassador Fr. Nunez of the
U.N. in voting against this in
tumour resolution.''
"We here in Miami who have
so many friends and business as-
sociates from Central America
wanted to share our gratitude
with the people of Costa Rica
through their official representa-
tives. "
Education Program at Beth Torah
^n open house is planned for
iday. Aug. 15. from 10 a.m. to
i noon for the Early Childhood
kucation Program of Beth
rah Congregation, North
uni Beach. They are now ac-
ting applications for nursery
isses. junior kindergarten and
idergarten classes, for a full
y program. Children from the
es of two and a half to five of
th members and non-members
the Congregation will be
zht under the direction of
trained and experienced teachers,
supervised by Mrs. Miriam
Lober, Educational Director.
Mrs. Ossie Elfenbein, Mrs. Joyce
Frand. Mrs. Johanna Bronsztein,
and Mrs. Harriet Spitzer are
members of the staff.
Baby sitting service will be
available for working parents.
Newly remodeled classrooms and
restrooms with the latest in
equipment, facilities and decor
have been completed to house the
Early Childhood students.
TalmudicU Starts
Academic Year
The 1982-83 academic year of
Talmudic University of Florida,
opens Friday morning, Aug. 20.
at the main campus on Miami
Beach.
Registration is under way in
the Raymond Rubin Memorial
Building, learning center for the
Alfred and Sadye Swire College
of Jewish Studies of Talmudic
University.
Rabbi Yochanan Zweig, presi-
dent of the university, said that
the principal building of the edu-
cational institution has been
completely refurbished, and that
the upgrading of all physical
facilities "should greatly enhance
the atmosphere for study of Jew-
ish and general studies for stu-
dents from the freshman class
through postgraduate work."
Rabbi Jerry Burstyn. execu-
tive director of the university,
said summer activities will
continue at Talmudic University
until the opening of the new
school year. Classes are held
daily in Talmud.
Rabbi Zweig personally leads
the classes, which are designed
for those with all levels of know-
ledge of the Talmud, the post-
Biblical commentaries on the
Torah. Every Thursday, even-
ing Rabbi Zweig and other
members of the Talmudic U.
Faculty provide instruction in
Bible class.
\dath Yeshurun Auxiliary Services Judge Starkman
Barry Konovitch will lead the
Luxiliary services for the High
Joly Days at Temple Adath Yea-
irun. according to Rabbi
limcha Freedman, spiritual
ader and Morris N. Katz. presi-
ent of the Congregation.
Rabbi Konovitch was born in
Jew York City in 1942. He re-
lived his rabbinic ordination
am Yeshiva University's Isaac
Hanan Theological Seminary
1967. He studied archeology
tider Professor Yigal Yadin at
he Hebrew University in Jerusa-
and participated in ex-
ivation research at Masada and
lerodion. Rabbi Konovitch has
sited Jewish communities
ound the world including Euro-
t. Eastern Europe, Asia. Middle
at. South America, Central
rierica and Africa.
Barr\ Konovitch
Irthodox Union Appoints Director
tabbi Nochum Aber has been
)inted Regional Director for
Southern Region of the Or-
dox Union, it was announced
week.
labbi Aber. who will adminis-
the Region from an office in
imi. has an extensive back-
jnd of working with youth.
has taught Yeshiva High
tool in St. Louis. Miss., while
maintaining an active role in the
Orthodox Union's Midwest Re-
gion.
In his new position. Rabbi
Aber will be responsible for all
Orthodox Union-National Con-
ference of Synagogue Youth ac-
tivities in the South, and will be
working to develop programming
and membership throughout the
area.
Honored
Four hundred leaders attended
a breakfast at the Marco Polo
Hotel in Sunny Isles endorsing
Judge Milton Starkman, in his
campaign to be elected Dade Cir-
cuit Court Judge, Group 18. Ben-
nett Brummer. Dade Public De-
fender, and Richard E. Gerstein.
former Dade State Attorney, led
the gathering. Judge Starkman
has served for the past four years
in both the criminal and civil di-
visions as Dade County Judge,
and formerly was Municipal
Court Judge of North Miami
Beach.
Beth Shalom Opens
Foundation School
Temple Beth Sholom Founda-
tion School. Miami Beach, is
making finishing touches on its
playground for its fall opening,
covering nursery and kindergar-
ten between the ages of two and
five years. A new program for
children 15 months for two years,
called Primetime. will again be
offered.
The school year will open with
the annual popcorn party on
Tuesday. Sept. 7, according to
. the director. Anita Koppele.
Rabbis Proclaim 'Synagogue
Mobilization Month'
In a community-wide effort to increase memberships in area
synagogues, the Rabbinical Association of Greater Miami has
proclaimed the month of Elul (the last month of the Jewish
calendar year) as "Synagogue Mobilization Month" to begin
Friday. Aug. 20 and end with the ushering in of Rosh Hashanah
on Friday evening. Sept. 17.
The announcement was made by the Association's President,
Rabbi Barry Tabachnikoff of Temple Bet Breira and its Execu-
tive Vice President. Rabbi Solomon Schiff, Director or
Chaplaincy. Greater Miami Jewish Federation.
"Synagogues have always been the traditional center of con-
tinuity in Jewish life in every community," Rabbi Tabachnikoff
said "It is the house of assembly and learning as well as the
house of prayer. During Synagogue Mobilization Month, we
urge all people who are not presently affiliated with a synagogue
to participate actively in the richness and beauty that syna-
gogues offer."
The Rabbinical Association is offering information on Ortho-
dox, Conservative and Reform synagogues throughout the com-
munity to help guide residents. For information, please contact
Rabbi Solomon Schiff at the Rabbinical Association office.
Joel Arnon (right). Consulate General of Israel for the U.S.
Southeastern Region. Briefs Florida Treasurer and Insurance
Commissioner Bill Gunter Heft) on recent events in Lebanon.
Arnon was in Tallahassee recently to discuss Mideast develop-
ments with the Florida Cabinet.
AmeriFirst to Lend $25Million
close within 90 days."
AmeriFirst is Florida's largest
real estate lender and has been a
leader in designing innovative
leading programs. The new offer
in no way preempts or affects the
availability of the full range of
first and second mortgage
programs available at all Ameri-
First Mortgage Corporation of-
fices throughout the sta'.
TWIN CITY GLASS CO
CUAtAHTttD MfMOftS tTOM nomS FMNWTMf TOPS
AMTiouf and humid mmotts
Plate ft Window Glass Replacement*
'0 16th St.. MB Visit our Showroom 673 296
'Corner 16th & Alton) 24 Hour Emergency Serv.ce
Joe Reppert, senior vice presi-
dent of AmeriFirst Mortgage
Corporation, announced today
that AmeriFirst is making avail-
able to Florida home buyers S25
million in 30-year, fixed-rate
mortgages at 15'a percent. The
loans will be available at all
AmeriFirst Mortgage Corpora-
tion offices statewide.
"In a real estate market where
fixed-rate mortgages have not
played a major role for some
time, this is good news to home
buyers. With the pent-up
damand for housing. I anticipate
the market will react positevely
to this news and the $25 million
will be committed in less than 30
days." Reppert commented. He
further emphasized that the offer
is available for a "limited time
only" and that all loans "must
NEW YORK UTA) Two
hundred members of the national
board of Hadassah are now leav-
ing for Israel as the advance
guard of 2.000 members and
guests who will attend the na-
tional convention in Jerusalem
from Aug. 25 to Sept. 2
ibeJteiirJudUEIoinidiriQun
ri<
'?
Beth David Congregation
Miami's Historic First Jewish Congregation
'COMPREHENSIVE RELIGIO-CULTURAL PROGRAMS
IHAVUROT-FELLOWSHIPS FULL YOUTH ACTIVITIES
(FULL RELIGIOUS SCHOOL PASTORAL COUNSELLING
UNIQUE CONSERVATIVE DAY SCHOOL
Quality Nursery Programs
inquries into Our Family Membership welcomed
(Special reduced membership fees for young
couples and singles age 32 and under)
2625 s.w. srd. Avenue 7500 S.w. 120 Street
854-3911 238-2601
pvld H Auebach. Rabbi
. Sol Landau. Rabbi Emeritus
liamW Lipson Cantor
ldon G. Mills, Exec Director
M Kaspi-Siiverman. Ed. Director
Audrey Dillaman. Day School Principal
Milton S Freeman. Ritual Director
Donald R. Tescher. President
Prinfd in English
/fisAW/Gt/rrteAter/ssi*/
mW O Ww CftfaflaT to receive THE JEWISH FLORIDIAN every week that we
may Keep abreast of the Jewish News in our community and throughout the world.
Enclosed please find check. Enter my NEW subscription for:
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i|KHIm pravMa i



Page 4-B The Jewish Floridian Friday, August 13.1962
I
PHARMACY
160S Washington Avenue 7usf Sou'h of Lincoln Rood
NATIONAL BRANDS EVERYDAY PRICES 81-SsS
Dr Donald Feldstein
Ted Arison, (right) on* of the newest members of the State of
Israel Bond Canal Founder* Club, receh-es his plaque from
Israeli Naval Commander Michael Eldar. Israel Bond Canal
Founders consists of people who make at least $100,000 in Bond
purchases to go towards the building of the proposed Mediterr-
anean to Dead Sea Canal
Community Corner
The Agudath Israel Hebrew Institute. Miami Beach,
marked its 31st anniversary, Saturday. Jury 30.
The Miami Beach Jewish Community Center will sponsor a
soccer clinic for boys and girls, grades 3-6 and 6-8. at Nautilus
Junior High School soccer field on Aug. 23 through 26 from 6:30
p.m. to 7:30 p.m.
Alex Kormu, Ana Miller. Assy C. WOpea. Eleee ft Rosen
and Hedda E. Litwin. from this area, are participating in the
fifth annual "Singles Convention" sponsored by the American
Jewish Congress, now taking place in Israel The convention will
combine tourism, meetings with government officials and
political leaders, and panel discussion with single Israelis of the
same age, interest and occupations.
Temple Or (Mom Social Club will hold s boat ride on
Saturday. Aug. 21.
Hindi Diamond, editor of Industria Turistica, has been
notified that she will be included in the current issue of World's
Who's Who of Women published in London.
Airman David L. Alderman, son of Alaa G. Alderman.
North Miami Beach, has been assigned to Keesler Air Force
Base. Miss., after completing Air Force basic training.
The problems of coping with spouse, money problems, kids,
or life in general, will be the subject of special guest lecturer.
Stan Fireman. MSW. a social worker from Mount Sinai Medical
Center, at the Miami Beach Jewish Community Center Monday.
Aug 23st7:30p.m
The Jewish Women s Political Caucus of South Florida will
hold s rally to meet the newly endorsed candidates st Wain-
wrtght Park in the Large Pavillion on Sundsy. Aug. 22 at 12
noon Laurel Shapiro and Barbara Hollander are co-chairmen
A meeting on the Therapeutic Foster Home Program for
persons interested in becoming professional foster parents will
be held on Thursday. Aug 26. at 8 p.m. Elaine Getiow is project
coordinator and Joanne Dickinson is counselor
The Four Ambassadors Hotel recently hosted a tour and
travel reception in the Tropical Ballroom for 250 members of
Miami's travel industry The occasion offered members of the
local travel industry and opportunity to review the renovations
completed at the Four Ambassadors Hotel complex.
Intercontinental Hank Expands
Intercontinental Bank an
nouncea the expansion of the
facilities of its Surf side Branch
The announcement was made by
Charles A Wrutcomb. President
of the Bank, who added that.
"The expansion is made in
response to the continous growth
of that dynamic business area '
The Surfside Branch was inau
gurated in May of 1977 at 9644
Harding A venue. Surfside.
The branch, with four teller
windows, had a lobby beautifully
decorated in a color scheme which
departed from the traditional
earth colors of the other bran
In 1979. the physical faculty of
the Surfside Branch was doubled
Two walk-up windows
added and the schedule of hours
were extended to better serve the
needs of the neighborhood. In
July of 1980. the branch intro-
duced its "Ride to the Bank "
service. By establishing this new
service, the bank made daily
transportation easily available to
all persons wishing to take ad-
vantage of the Bank's facilities.
With this announced new ex-
pansion. "The branch has three
tunes the size of its original
office." declared Russell K.
Thirkell. Manager of the Branch,
who added that "to mark this im-
portant occaasion. a reception lor
suthorities. customers, and
friends will be held on Thursday.
Aug. 12, from 6 to 8:00 p.m at
the branch
Donald Feldstein)
Appointed AJC
Vice President
Dr. Donald Feldstein. social
planner and administrator, has
been appointed the fourth Execu-
tive Vice President in the 76-year
history of the American Jewish
Committee, it was announced by
Maynard I. Wishner. AJC s Na-
tional President.
Dr> Feldstein, who was named
to the post after a yearlong, na-
tionwide search, will head the
agency's 360-member staff, with
.offices in 33 cities in the United
States, as well as in Jerusalem.
Paris and Mexico City-
He succeeds Bertram H. Gold,
who is retiring after 16 years, hut
who will continue to be associ-
ated with the Committee as Di-
rector of its newly formed Insti-
tute on American Jewish Israeli
Relations. Previous Executive
Vice Presidents were John Slaw-
son, who served for 24 years and
now holds the title of Executive
Vice President Emeritus, and the
late Morris Waldman. who joined
the agency in 1928 with the title
if Executive Secretary sod was
named to the newly created post
of Executive Vice President in
1943 shortly before he retired.
Immedistely prior to assuming
his new post at AJC. he was
Executive Vice President of the
Jewish Community Federation of
Metropolitan New Jersey, one of
the largest federations m the
country Poor to that, he spent
five years as Executive Director
of Communit> Ser\ ice> for tht
Federation of Jewish Philan
thropies of New York
Lesley Ann Klaus man, a 1981
honors graduate of the Uni-
versity of Florida with a BS in
advertising, has been selected
as assistant marketing
director for Omni Internation-
al Miami, marketing director
Rudy Milian announced. Part
of her new duties at Omni will
be to organise and oversee
special promo tions.
Ban
Anti-Perepirant Roll-on
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Efferdent
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60s Aa
96
Ultrex
by Schick Cartridge
10's
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M


Friday. August 13, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 5-B
A Vacation with
Oceanic
By BRUCE BAFF
It would appear that
cruises are fast becoming an
in" vacation for a good
many reasons. Perhaps it's
the easy pace of shipboard
life. Or not having to deal
with airport hassles or hotel
check-ins. Personally. I find
the service one receives on
board ship is easily the best
part.
This wonderful sense of
being pampered round-the-
clock was certainly evident
during the seven-day cruise
my wife and I just took on
Home Line's S.S. Oceanic,
which sails from New York
every Saturday through
Nov. 13.
Focua on Food
The good life at sea. to
many, is synonymous with
the seemingly endless pro-
cession of food you encount-
er. Indeed. I must confess
that the idea of dining four or
more times a day without
consulting your pocketbook
ls rather appealing! As a case
in point, passengers on the
Oceanic not only enjoy three
bountiful sit-down meals
ouch day but other gastro-
nomic interludes as well.
Karly risers, for example,
often require "tide-you-over"
uuillon and sandwiches at
11-a.m. AC four o'clock, it's
tea and pastries, then there's
the not-to-be-missed Mid-
night Huffet. a nourishment
-<> necessary that it actually
liegins a full half-hour earlier,
at 11:30. I P.S.. night owls on
the Oceanic are served pizza
at 1:30 a.m. and then again
at 2 a.m.)
Hut life does exist
.'BJABJ'.--bexQJui.ihfidin-. .
JJ >Wfc room. In fact. Natalie
and I quickly discovered an
intriguing array of shipboard
entertainment none more
than a minute's walk from
our cabin. The Oceanic s
Sun-Way Topics newsletter,
neatly tucked under our door
each day. carried a conven-
ient hour-by-hour schedule of
activities. These ranged from
a mid-morning lecture of self-
hypnosis (ironically, "losing
weight was a popular
reason for attending) ... to
complimentary dance in-
struction ... to recently-re-
leased movies screened in the
ship's own cinema ... to
Say It In Italian language
classes. Clearlv. one could
a Difference:
Cruise To Bermuda And Nassau
The Britannia Beach HoW part of the ParaoT Wtmt HI
and Casino, which aiao mctuoss tha ParadiM Island HoM and
Paradiaa Island Casino. Facilities, includs a three mas sand
Beach two swimming pools snd 12 tennis courts with night
kghta
easily stay active almost
every minute of every day.
Or. of course, you can simply
do nothing but relax; the
choice is entirely yours.
Jewel-like Bermuda .
Uptempo Nassau and
Paradise Island
Days two and four, respec-
tively, on this particular o-
ceanic cruise were spent vis-
iting these quite different
ports of call. And though
both have much to offer, 1
confess a certain preference
for Bermuda's very special
ambiance.
Since our time in Bermuda
was limited to just eight
hours, wf promptly located a
motorbike rental agency jost
a short walk from where our
tender ties up. After several
trial runs'' down a quiet
Ida street, we headed west
along Bermuda's lovely
south shore, where un-
crowded pink-tinted beaches
sweep on for miles and miles.
Our destination: Horseshoe
Bay. one of those picture
postcard sports that must be
seen to be believed.
A leisurely lunch here was
followed by a refreshing
swim in crystal-clear aqua-
marine water. As we rode
Iwck into Hamilton later in
the day. past lush island
vegetaUOO like oleander and
Few Jews in Nassau and Bermuda
Nassau in the Bahamas: Although the Bahamas were first
settled by the British in 1620, few Jews appeared on the scene
until the 1960s. Certainly a major factor here was the island's
thriving gambling casinos. Soon to arrive also were groups of
professionals who found that Nassau's international banking
and corporate headquarters afforded challenging opportunities.
Although Nassau's Jewish community numbered about 40
people a dozen or so years ago, present estimates run to perhaps
half this number. I 've also been advised that the Nassau Hebrew
Congregation, a 50-seat Ashkenazic Conservative synagogue
formerly situated in the Hoffer Building, at 372 Bay Street, has
Bad|y been disbanded. Those Jews that remain travel either to
Freeport for services at the Freeport Hebrew Congregation or to
one of several cities in Florida.
Visitors today can view an old Sephardic cemetery dating
back to 1860 which occupies a section of the public cemetery.
You'll find it located at the corner of Lovers Lane and East
Shirley Street, adjacent to St. Matthew's Church.
Bermuda: As Bernard Postal and Malcolm H. Stern point out
in their "Tourist's Guide to Jewish History in the Caribbean"
published by American Airlines, "Bermuda is perhaps the only
West Indian territory in which no Jewish community ever took
root. Nowhere on Somerset. Ireland, St. George or Great
Bermuda, the four chief island collectively known as Bermuda,
has there ever been a permanent synagogue. Neither is there a
Jewish cemetery, although records show Jews in the Bermudas
in the 17th century.
According to these same two authors, "... during the two
decades prior to the American Revolution, a syndicate headed
by Moses and Jacob Franks was the largest purveyor of supplies
to Bermuda's British forces."
It's estimated that leas than a dozen Jews today live on the
island.
hibiscus, bougainvillea and
poinciana, I remembered
that Mark Twain had sum-
med up Bermuda by saying.
"You go to heaven if you
want I'll just stay right
here."
Nassau, on the other hand,
represents a blend of British
tradition. American influ-
ence and native customs. If
you re like most people,
you'll probably begin your
shopping at the famous
Straw Market (reputed to be
the world's largest) in Raw-
son Square. Here you can
watch Bahamian craftswom-
en weave and plait unique
straw items such as hats,
handbags, dolls and place-
mats.
You'll also want to visit
Paradise Island, which is
Imkeil to Nassau by a bridge
over the harbor. This is the
spot tor enjoyable tennis or
golf or even parasailing.
One of the largest casinos in
the Caribbean is also located
here, and amid beautiful
tropical surroundings.
Another must-see attraction
is the lavish one and a half
hour international Le Cab-
aret review at the Britannia
Beach Hotel. I Incidentally.
this is all part of Resort In-
ternational's new Paradise
Island complex, which also
includes the Paradise Island
Hotel.)
The Bahamas Ministry of
Tourism's "People-to-Peo-
ple" program, which was
brought to our attention
through an informative talk
the day before we docked in
Nassau, affords an opportu-
nity to learn firsthand about
local Bahamian culture and
traditions. Very simply, the
idea is to match you up with
a host family sharing similar
interests. Passengers wish-
ing to participate completed
a short questionnaire which
was then given to a People-
to-People" coordinator cruis-
ing with us. The feedback we
received from several
couples, by the way. was
highly favorable.
Good Vacation Value
When you come right
down to it. cruising probably
offers one of today's best va-
cation packages. Just think:
you're on a floating resort
where most everything is
paid for upfront. including
your room, all meals and
shipboard entertainment,
the only extras are drinks,
tips and shore excursions.
I'm also impressed by the
fact that everyone on a ship
like the Oceanic receives the
same attentive service
even if your accommodations
are more modest, on a lower
deck. No wonder many con-
sider a cruise so very appeal-
ing these days. Of course,
some people like myself
find the lure of the sea reason
enough for taking a cruise. I
suppose the gentle motion of
a ship has something to do
with it. And witnessing
those magnificent sunsets
and sunrises from deck.
There's also a certain tran-
quility one experiences
knowing you're surrounded
by hundreds of miles of o-
cean ... far from television,
telephones and the daily
pressures of life.
For my money, the ship is
the vacation even if it
never drops anchor. Yes.
cruising is truly a vacation
with a difference. Try it
and vou'll see!
Dade County Judge Harvey
Baxter has been elected vice
president of the Conference of
County Court Judges of
Florida, representing the third
judicial district. Judge Baxter
moves up from a position as
director of the statewide con-
ference, representing Dade
County. County Judge Calvin
R. Mapp was elected to re-
place Judge Baxter as di-
rector. Other new officers in-
clude Dade County Judge
Bernard R. Jaffe, executive
secretary; Dade County Judge
Marvin H. Gillman, treasurer;
and Collier County (Naples)
Judge Hugh D. Hayes, Jr.,
secretary.
Public Relations Consultant,
Beverlye Keusch Weinberger,
ahs been named vice chairman
of the Miami Beach Visitor
and Convention Authority.
She has served with the cur-
rent Board since her appoint-
ment last December and pre-
viously completed a two-year
term as the first women
named to the policy-making
panel.
r NEW FOR THE HIGH HOLY DAYS 5743^
$
--
The Shof ar That Lost Its Voice
by David B Fast illustrated by Marlent Lobell Ruthen
The day before Rosh Hashanah young Avi races home t<>
practice blowing the shofar for the children s service only
to find that no sound conies out. As he searches tor the
reason, he suddenly finds himself within the shofar
where he discovers a magical world of enchanting music
and ethical principles that teaches him the meaning oi
Rosh Hashanah
Intended for young readers ages nine through
twelve The Shofar That Lost Its Voice is written
simply but with a profound message for both
parents and children.
$6.*5 hardcover
48 page*
HAHC Order Dept.
838 Fifth Ave.. NY, NY 10021
No. 103500 Please send me
copies of The Shofar Thai Lost Its Voice at
$6.95 per copy. (Postage and handling. $.75 per copy.)
I have enclosed total payment of $
Name
Address __
City
State
Zip
Please be sure to enclose a check payable to the UAHC whh your order.


BBBMaBBBBBahsni
Page 6-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, August 13,1982

cPtide
US i/HOICt BEEF CHUCK BLADE
F'ARKAY QUART ERS
Chuck
Roast
Or Double The
I SWEET PEAS CUT GREEN BEANS.
CREAM OR WHOLE KERNEL
16 OZ CANS
SAVE40C SAVE30CI
Margarine Seedless Libby
I Grapes O Vegetables
PARKAY
ISAVE30C
SAVE 21C Is
pound U IL&2 I ^fX5 ^Ihpwir
PKGS ^-----------------------1 I ^^^ K-^0>
2/99^ 69< 2/89<
Count on Us for
the Best in
U.S. Choice Beef Cuts,
Top Quality Lamb,
Pork & Poultry!
rifjuil LAMBRUSCO ROSATO BIANCO
Fruits & Riunite *>"<- ^
^aSfSS Wines
ou pick from
Loose Display!) (save 700
(CUTS ONLY) SWEET RED RIPE
Watermelon
10*
(SAVE 44)
SALAD SIZE FIRM (6 IN PACK)
FLORIDA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH U S CHOICE GENUINE AMERICAN
(3 BREAST & 3 LEG QTRS. W/ BACKS (WHOLE OR SIRLOIN HALF)
LotsO' r^,, Lamb <-flOQ
Chicken^OC Legs SJW
CM (SAVE 20C) ^^T^^IB O (SAVE 70C| ""^ B
U S CHOICE BEEF ROUND (WHOLE IN US CHOICE BEEF ROUND BONELESS TOP
c^^c^wrappedfbee, Round ______ Ripe Tomatoes
Kdm$159 steak $269 5QC
(SAVE 20C) JKm L|____ fl I LB ^^ Bj^P
CRUNCHY FRESH (LARGE 90 COUNT)
Green Peppers
49
U S CHOICE (WHOLE IN CRY-O-VAC)
(CUT & WRAPPED FREE)
U.S. CHOICE BEEF BLADE
Chuck
$299
PLUM. W/PASTE OR CRUSHED 28 OZ CAN
Pope Tomatoes
(SAVE IK) ^L^SP ?sJB^BT ~*
WHITEHOUSE REGULAR OR NATURAL
Apple Sauce
69<
i
25 OZ JAR
(SAVE 16C)
REGULAR OR SCENT
$-169
JL
(SAVE 30*)
U.S. CHOICE BEEF CHUCK (SAVE 30)
Boneless
Clnderblade Roast
U-PICK
(SAVE 20)
Lysol Spray
$279

(S
PU
S
80
L'
IB
'Al
1 8-OZ CAN
(SAVE 20c)
LOW IS CALORIESIUPCKi
SAVE
U 8 CHOICE BONELESS 3 LBS I OVER SAVE u S CHOICE
. LB 1.99 .20
3 LBS I OVER
Qround Chuck .. lb 1.89 20
us^hbpcctco frvwo
CMckon Uvara.. lb .89 .30 us choice
FLOROA OR SHIPPED PREMIUM FRESH FRYER WHOLE OR POINT HALF
(BREASTS. DRUMSTICKS THOHSl
SAVE
Oxtails.......lb 1.39 40
Egg Plant .39 PERSONAL CARE
SAVE
Drykftaa.......,5bl1.87 32
GARDEN FRESH TOPS IN VITAMIN A
2,8 ._ ROLL ON REG OR UNSCENTED
BAG .59 .10 *-------------
GAROEN FRESH CRISP 2 IN PKG
DEL MONTE HAWAIIAN JET FLOWN
TOP QUALITY (LARGE 6 SIZEl
FLA FRESH ADO ZEST TO SALADS
2/1.00
BREAKSTONE SMOOTH. CREAMY
OR CALIFORNIA 24 OZ
Cottage
OWT NATURAL SUCES
MRS FjMRT
OZ
__ SHAMPOO OR CONDITIONER
" M 2 iiST......1.67 3V
4 QA AOORN REGULAR EXTRA HOLD
EA llOV 10 ULTRA HOLD SOFT "
Hair Spray.....82 2.27 42 --
US l ALL PURPOSE WHITE / /^^^f I BtlWi JTAii^ v^^C^i* **
10 e 1.59 40 J^V 5rWtfM&^ Ap
8NOV.
8i
aggJtfg!S'lXl|--T OO AVaIaBiToNlTaTstORES Jjg
Nttoa u.Mingi jar .W 40 HAVING SERVICE COUNTERS
U S l AU PURPOSE WHITE
5 LB
SAVE oscar mayer
pkg 1.69 .20 Vailaty Pack... pko
LOU* MCHUCID OVEN ROASTED
SA3VoE IN STORE BAKERY
SAVE
HEBREW NATIONAL
antrv mm mxm t-oz pko
'& .79 10 Turkay
. iq1.39 .20 CRISPY
ONLY AT STORM W FRESH BAKERIES
or
1.29
LYKIS MOT OR BEEF BOLOONA OH
PANTRY PRJOI WHOU MtK
IPARTSKiM 1*0Xf~
LYKIS MAT OR
SauMTtl
OZ
'pkg1.09 16
(SAVE 20c)
,YKE MEAT OR BEEF
.20
OOLORSO OR WHITE U-OZRKO
JONES OiuOOUS
ALL READY IS M
1.99
3fl.89
(Pranks) pko 1.09 40
CHUB .89 .1 0
French
Bread 7QC
HALF
LB
LOR*A#*-LOW M SALT
BWIII V
MRS RESSLERS
FOR
NfW-*WJURY^LL
PANTRY PRKX
HatfAHaff
-RC*CANA 'OOHPURf
OrapafruttJutoao .89
SAVE
.10
2.09 40
..'lb 1.99 ifjg
.. VJ1.18 40
UQChlokin ...l.1.89
PINT MA
.... CONT lOV
HEBREW NATIONAL MI0GET BOLOONA OR JEWISH STYLE WTTH OR W'OUT
MMgatSalami VkT2.49 30 RyaBraad......ea
SMMflUflP chocolate covmeo qat plavob iacm
ClataWan'i Idakra........2 for .89 .10 Chlx oil a SUok
0T t 4 A OVENPREBH IiptciMVEOETAJJLE | ROLL
l-3.2o PMohPIt each 1.89 .10 ChlckanWnnarEACHl.
.79 .10
30


Friday, August 13,1982 /The Jewish Floridian Page 7-B

In Cash!
PRICES EFFECTIVE THURS.,
AUG. 12 THRU WED., AUG. 18
WE GLADLY REDEEM YOUR
FEDERAL FOOD STAMPS
REGULAR OR L(OKI
6 \2 0Z CANS
MR HIC..IUMMO 3U\ PK
Old ~ Paper
MilwaukeeKM Towels
TAP, SPRITI SDC.AH I lil I SPRITF
MM PIBB SUGAR FRI I MR PIBB
I R SCA.Ofi (iPK I2 0Z CANS
Coke bi
.AVI ;'i<
Ir. BIG
TOWELS
'AVI VIC'
WHITE HOUSE 64 OZ BTL
Apple
Juice>
SAVE26C: ft
'/APPLl
JUICE
$169 $149 $169 $149
_^H ^^L .^^L (NOT AVAILABLE I .^^L
I IN FT PIERCE1
JTATION PRIDE
Kosher
Dills
(SAVE 44t)
46 OZ JAR
$119
PLANTATION PRIDE
8 02 JAR
Sweet Relish
SweT ^Jm
i REGULAR OR DIP N1 CHIP
tfVOZTWIN PAK
f'ANTRY PRIDE
'otato
Chips
Save 3 ways in our Grocery Department!
Save on National Brands, Save more on Pantry Pride
Brands, Save Even More on Generics!
GENERIC 160 CT
Napkins
69
GENERIC 1 GAL JUG
PANTRY PRIDE 46 OZ CAN
(SAVE 60C)
Bleach Pineapple Juice
'Pi w -save loo^y ^ V^**
(SAVE 706)
GENERIC 3-LB BAG
Rice
FRUIT PUNCH. GRAPE. ORANGE
(SAVE 50*)
89<
Hi-C
64 OZ GLASS
(SAVE 20C)
99<
79
GENERIC STEMS t PIECES
FROZEN FOODS
SAVE
1.60 30
BREYER S ASSORTED FLAVORS
..las Cream
Waffle......
PANTRV MB 8H068TWNQ
French Fries
Mfl SMrTH'S
ApplePle......".31.49 so
WOWCROPREQ OR PUNCH
4boxeS .80 43
20-OZ mrg%
bag .59 24
CMA8US RHINE BURGUNOv OAVt
V1N HOSE OH PAISANO1 S LTR
Carlo Rossi Wine 3.39 so
LIESFRAUMILCH7SO ML BOTTLE
Black Tower Wine 4.19 to
.48 65
.69 36
.77 48
.991 oo
.55 .34
.85 84
PANTR. PRIOE SMOOTH OR CRUNCHY
Peanut Butter .."1.19
Kitchen Bags
BOX 1.15
PANTRV PRIOE
Snack Crackers .59
OENERC
Blac
OENERC
GENERIC TAOLESS
Tea Bags
OENERC GIANT ROLL
4-OZ
. CAN
4-OZ
. CAN
4-ROLI.
, PACK
100CT
BOX
.".1.79
25LB
SAVE
.10
32
10
46
SAVE
1.19 .10
100
CT
PANTRV PRIDE GRAPE CHERRY
ORANGE FRUIT PUNCH OR LEMONAOE
KITTY WHITE
CatUtter .
PURINA CHUCK WAGON
Dog Food......".7.69 40
SUNSHINE
ChipARooe .99 20
SUNSWEET REG OR W PULP
Drink Mixes
ORANGE APPLE FRUIT
LEMONADE 10 PACK
CAN
1.19126
Capri Sun Drinks 2.29 40
26
,40btl1.19
14
GENERIC ASSORTED FLAVORS
2LTR
, BTL
NORTHERN ASSORTED COLORS
Napkins........'2? 1.25 15
PANTRY PRIOE LONG GRAIN
Rice.........
5 LB
GENERIC
CatUtter.....
OENEPJC Pf4K
Dish Detergent
GENERIC
Baby Powder
GENERIC HEAVY DUTY LAUNDRY
Dry Detergent .
, BAG 1 .39
WISHBONE SOUR CREAM W BACON
OR SOUR CREAM W HERBS 8 OZ BTL
2iiS 1.591.00
20
.59 40
KING COLE DARK RED
Kidney Beans 3 1.00
DISTILLED NATURAL. PURtFIED
Crystal Water .69 10
SUNSHINE
Cheez-tts......"l .77 ie
CHABLIS RHINESKELLER RHINE OR ROSE
320Z .591.50
BTL
.89 30
24btl 1.291.70
"&i .091.10
FYNE SOFT 2 PLY WHITE ASSORTED
4 ROLL
. PKG
CANNED VEGETABLES-SWEET PEAS CUT GREEN BEANS
CREAM OR WHOLE KERNEL CORN
' Colony Wines
KIR BY
Black Beans .
GULDEN'S SQUEEZE BOTTLE
Mustard.....
lVr 3.991 30
15-OZ
i CAN
12 0Z
BTL
.69
.79
.10
.10
Ubby's 2
REALEMON
Lemon Juice
32-02
BTL
_ Baa
Perner^
Water
06
PACKAGED
BAKED GOODS
PANTRY PRIDE 100% WHOLE
Wheat Ei
E3lwOCl 591
16-OZ
LOAF
OjMHniWJtMA*
W MtlllUM
cawIM I K 7M ft
MMIMMm
I* iMiM.lt* M
MWlMailMliN
M* 4KWT**
CM I *> I7 km
U-MOIM4M
* i ow
H OM Or t Ml M
IMMMtMITBa*
. U0010 DM rrm
MMiMU|-KWUi
Ml*. IIU |,MI u^^^a
IMMMDl
h mxm-n mu-mioi
Ha* 0*9 or twig**
NEIZMft IftK IM
rimTiiSffi *
____l'4tM____
iM-WUSBfi
rMllwiMlM
HALLAIIOALI-IIOUTWOOO
OTWMT
U.fttMlMMIAlOM'
Ul NO lltMlMW
SAVE
SALVE
O m |B9 --^- JlJ" nun*"** M 4MMW* rtam* Manny 12000 or more (nduding nwd
JWVr. >-^ produce tnd n m* rnn m aaMonw purcnaai] Only on. o( aacti
*" -'^ purcriB may m ncfciOM m m. oompanaon
SAVE '^ Bong you< Paney Pna. naM> ap. vw m. onw mwiw i pric on m.
.cll.m.rl^llol^r,Prio4nOrlm^loli.lo*IIDr,YCjDoool.
GUARANTEED
you can lind Maa> ovanMI pneaa m at my orn IfJMll" row
. Pantry Pro. DOUBLE THE DIFFERENCE cam
SAVE
SAVE ^".'
!
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
SAVE
ME
3for .99 .36
APPLE BLUEBERRY CH6RBY
OR LEMON PC 4-OZ PKG KMSPY KREME
Fruit Ptes.....
APPLE. CINNAMON SOURDOUGH
OR NATURAL GRAMPK OF 6
Meyer's Muffins 21.99 .27
AOLER'S JEWISH
SSajaj nail Mil 10oz
fiye oreea.....loaf
A4C ITAUAN BPOLFTTl OR
unwn itons.....of0
Most stores
open
8am 'til 11pm daily
All stores
open Sundays




Page 8-B The Jewish Floridian / Friday, August 13,1982
Synopsis of the Weekly Torah Portion
"Thou shalt set the blessing upon mount Gerizim, and the
curse upon mount EbaV
(Deut. 11.29).
REEH
RE'EH "Behold, I set before you this day a blessing and a
curse: the blessing, if ye shall hearken unto the commandments
of the lx>rd your God, which I command you this day. and the
curse, if ye shall not hearker." (Deuteronomy 11.26). When the
Israelites enter Canaan, six tribes are to stand upon Mount
Gerizim and bless all those who will keep God's commandments,
and six tribes are to stand on Mount Ebal and curse all those
who will disobey God's commandments. Sacrifices are to be of-
fered only in the place that God shall choose. He who wishes to
offer a meat sacrifice which he may eat. and lives too far from
the proper place of offering may slaughter the offering in his own
house, but it will not be considered a sacrifice. He must be care-
fid not to consume any of the blood. Those who incite others to
idolatrous acts are to be exterminated. The portion goes on to
state the rules defining purity and impurity in regard to
animals, fish and fowl the basic ritual dietary laws. The
portion also contains the rules regarding tithes, money
moratoria, a prohibition on interest, and regulations regarding
the Hebrew slave, the first-born of animals, and the three
pilgrim festivals.
(The recounting ot Iht Weakly Portion of the Law is extracted and based
upon "The Graphic History of the Jewish Heritage," edited by P. Wollman
Tsamir, SIS, published by Shengold. The volume is available at 7S Maiden
Lane, New York, N.Y. 10031. Joseph Schlang is president of the society dis
tributing the volume.)
CAMOffers Teaching Courses
Rabbi Norman Lipson, Insti-
tute of Jewish Studies Director of
the Central Agency for Jewish
Education released the schedule
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
OADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82 5538
Division 0)
IN RE: ESTATE OF
SOLOMON FRENKEL
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The administration of the es-
tate of Solomon FRENKEL,
deceased, File Number82-5538,
Is pending In the Circuit Court
for Dade County. Florida. Pro-
bate Division, the address of
which Is 73 West Flagler Street,
Miami. Florida 33130. The
names and addresses of the
personal representative and
the personal representaUve's
attorney are set forth below.
All Interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (1) all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or Jurlsdic-
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this NoUce has
begun on August 8, 1982.
Personal Representatives:
Chaim M. Halberstam
701 Empire Boulevard
No. IA
Brooklyn.
New York 11213
Mendel Preter
I960 Marseilles Drive
No. 405
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:.
JOSHUA D.
MANASTER. ESQUIRE
708 Flagship Center
777 Brlckell Avenue
Miami. Florida 33131
Telephone: (305)374-6762
18025 Augusts, 13,1962
of courses for the third semester
of its Teacher Training Institute.
Beginning Aug. 16 and runn-
ing through Aug. 20, CAJE
will be offering courses in "Edu-
cation: Micro-Teaching" given
by Mrs. Malvina Liebman and
"History: American Jewish
History" given by Dr. Abraham
Atkin.
"Though the courses are pri-
marily geared toward those ob-
taining teaching licenses in reli-
gious and day schools," Rabbi
Lipson stated, "the classes are
open to individuals in the com-
munity wishing to increase their
know ledge._________\__________
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
CASE NO. 82 12053 FC
FAMILY DIVISION
IN RE: The Marriage Of:
LAISSENA JEAN LOUIS.
PeUUoner-Wlfe
and
DIEUVENT JEAN LOUIS,
Respondent-Husband
To: DIEUVENT JEAN
LOUIS,
Martlssant 21 No. 28
Port-au-Prince,
Haiti
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
YOU. DIEUVENT JEAN
LOUIS. Respondent-Husband,
are hereby noUfled to serve a
copy of your Answer to the Pe-
UUon For DlssoluUon of Mar-
riage filed against you. upon
Laissena Jean Louis' attorney.
GEORGE NICHOLAS. ES-
QUIRE. 612 N.W. 12th Avenue.
Miami, Florida 33138, and file
original with the Clerk of the
Court on or before September
10. 1982; otherwise the PeUtlon
will be confessed by you.
DATED this 10 day of
August. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
CLERK
By:M. J. Hartnett
Deputy Clerk
18035 August 13.20, 27;
September 3,1982
Bar Mitzvah
Joel Benarroch
JOEL BENARROCH
Joel Benarroch, son of Mr. and
Mrs. Marc Benarroch, will be
called to the Torah as a Bar Mitz-
vah on Saturday, Aug. 14, at
Congregation B'nai Sephardim.
The celebrant is a seventh
grade student at John F. Ken-
nedy High School.
Special guests for the occasion
will include Rabbi Yahia and
Mrs. Benarroch of Morocco, Mr.
Jacob Baror, Mr. Simon Benar-
roch of Paris, France: Mrs. Es-
ther Benarroch of Geneva, Switz-
erland: Mr. and Mrs. Isaac
Abeckjerr of Miami: Rabbi and
Mrs. Salomon Benarroch of
North Miami; Mr. and Mrs.
Gerard Frej of Paris, France; Mr.
and Mrs. Moses Pariente of
Spain, Mr. and Mrs. Jack Le-
guem of Paris, France, Mr. and
Mrs. David Bendavid of Mon-
treal, Canada; Dr. David Baror of
Denver, Colo, and Dr. Daniel
Abeckjerr of Atlanta, Ga.
A kiddush will be held follow-
ing the services in honor of the
occasion.
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82 5923
Division 04
IN RE: ESTATE OF
EPHRA1MF.
MANDELCORN
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
The adminlstraUon of the es-
tate of EPHRA1M F. MAN-
DELCORN. deceased. File
' 'Number 82-5823, Is pending In
the Circuit Court for DADE
County. Florida, Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street, Miami.
Florida 33130. The names and
addresses of the personal rep
resentative and the personal
representative's attorney are
set forth below.
All interested persons are re-
quired to file with this court,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS OF
THE FIRST PUBLICATION
OF THIS NOTICE: (II all
claims against the estate and
(2) any objection by an Inter-
ested person to whom notice
was mailed that challenges the
validity of the will, the qualifi-
cations of the personal repre-
sentative, venue, or jurlsdlc-
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS AND OBJEC-
TIONS NOT SO FILED WILL
BE FOREVER BARRED.
Publication of this Notice has
begun on July 30.1982.
Personal Representative
Samuel P. Mandelcorn
4560 Royal Palm Ave.
Miami Beach. Florida
Attorney for Personal
Representative:
Moses J. Grundwerg, Esq.
Suite 900,
21 se First Ave.
Miami. Fla. 33131
Telephone: 1306)371-4419
18017 July 30;
August 6.1982
jiji^J^imbSbii^^un
rUrUa't Ntit (!! Ii|lisiJ.wisi Wt.il*
Printed in English ,
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P.O. on 01-1*7). Miami, Florida 13101
Refutations provide s*scrlatMM Be paM In advance.
.IWV Auxiliaries Plan Events
The West Miami Auxiliary and
Post No. 223, Jewish War Veter-
ans, announces its night club
nite, Saturday. Auk. 14 at 9:16
p.m. at the Place Pigalle. Thelma
and Sidney Potlock are in charge.
There will be dancing and enter-
tainment.
The Four Freedoms Ladies
Auxiliary No. 402, Jewish War
Veterans, will hold a party at the
Variety Childrens Hospital on
Thursday, Aug. 19 at 2 p.m.
where they will distribute gifts to
the children. Ruth Geoghegan is
president. Lillian Lazar, Rose
Meyers and Dorothy Jabin will
host the party.
Synagogue
Listings
Candlellghtlng time: 7:39
TEMPLE ADATH YESHURUN
102S NE Miami Gardens Drive
North Miami Beach 947-1435
Rabbi Simcha Freedman
Cantor Ian Aloern Conservative
Dally 7:30 a.m.
Evening 6:30 p.m.
Shabbos 8:30 a.m.
Bar Mitzvah of Daniel Bergman
Shala Seudot 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE EMANUEL
1701 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach
Dr. Irving Lehrman, Rabbi
Zvl Adler. Cantor
Sat. morn. Service-9 a.m.
Or. Lehrman will preach at 10:30
HEBREW ACADEMY
BETH-EL CONGREGATION
2400 Plnetree Drive, Miami Beach
5324421
Cantor, Rabbi Sotomon Schilf
Frt Eve. 7 p.m. Sat. 9 a.m.
TEMPLE BETH AM Dr. Herbert
5950 N. Kendall Dr. Baumgard
S. Miami-667-6867 Senior Rabbi
Morton Holfman, Associate Rabbi
Robert Goldstein, Associate Rabbi
Frt.. 8:15 pm 9abosth eve service*
Rabbi Mollm.n will
speak on "E.T."
BETH DAVID CONGREGATION
Coral Way: 2625 S.W 3rd Avenue
South Daoe 7500 S w 120th Street
RABBI DAVID H. AUERBACH
CANTOR WILLIAM W. LIPSON
Friday, 8 p.m. South Dade Chapel
Saturday, 9 a.m. Coral Way
SrtebbSt Services Conducted by
Rabbi oevid m Asjsriash
Cantor William W. Llpeon
BETH KODESH
Modem Traditional
1101 S.W. 12 Ave.
Rabbi Max Shapiro 8584334
Cantor Leon Segal
Rose Berlin-Executive Secretary
Daily Minyan Services-7:45 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Saturday 8:45 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m.
TEMPLE ISRAEL CM Greater Miami
rVfarnrs Pioneer Astorm Congmgaton
137 N.E. 19th SL, Miami. 5735900
9990 N. Kendall Dr.. 595-5055
Senior Rabbi: Haskell M. Bemat
Asst Rabbi: Jeffrey K. Salkin
Cantor: Jacob G. Bornsteln
Fri. ( pm, Rabbi Salkin will discuss
"Is the Silver Screen a Smoke
Screen lor Bigotry?"
TEMPLEJUDEA
5600 Granada Blvd.
Coral Gables
Michael B. Eisenstat. Rabbi
Frt.. 8 p.m..
Reform
867-5657
r'!
TEMPLE KING SOLOMON
910 Lincoln Rd. Tet 534-9776
DR. DAVID RAAB, Rabbi
SOL ROTH. President
Services Frl. 7:30 p.m. Sat .30*.m.
TEMPI F BETH MOSHE
2225 N.E. 121 St. N.Miami. Fl 33181
891-5503 Conseivative
Only Temple in North Miami
Rabbi Louis M. Lederman
Cantor Moshe Friedler
Rabbi Emeritus Joseph A. Godinkel
Daily services 8:15 a.m. 5 p.m.
Fri. services 0 p.m.
Sal. services S a.m.
TEMPLE BETH RAPHAEL
1545 Jefferson Ave. M.B..FI. 33139
TeL 5364112
Rabbi Dr. Jehuda Metber
Cantor Benjamin Adler
Dally Service 8 a.m. 7:15 p.m.
Friday 7:15 p.m.-Saturday 8:30 a.m
TEMPLE BETH SHOLOM
Chase Ave. & 41st. SL
Dr. Leon Krontoh, Rabbi
Cantor David Conviser
Fri. Evening 8:15 p.m.
Sat. morn. 10:45 a.m.
538-7231
Liberal
TEMPLE MENORAH
820 75th St.. Miami Beach 33141
Rabbi Mayer Abramowltz
Cantor Murray Yavnah
Friday Services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday Services at 9 a.m.
TEMPLE NER TAMID
7902 Cartyte Ave.,
Miami Beach, 33141
Rabbi Eugene Labovrtz
Cantor Edward Klein
Friday services at 8:15 p.m.
Saturday services at 8:45 a.m.
SHAARE TEFILLAH OF KENDALL
8460 SW 154 Circle Court #111
Miami. Fl. Modern Orthodox
Rabbi Warren Kaszti 382-0898
Sabbath services 9:30 a.m.
Fri. 7 p.m.
Sat. 9:30 a.m. and 7:30 p.m.
TEMPLE SINAI 18801 NE 22 Ave.
North Dade s Reform Congregation
Ralph P. Kingsley. Rabbi 932-9010
Julian I. Cook, Associate Rabbi
frying Shuikes. Cantor
Barbara S Ramsay. Administrator
Sabbath eve services 8:15 p.m.
(7:30 p.m. first Friday of month)
Sabbath morning services 10:30
BETH TORAH CONSERVATIVE
CONGREGATION 947-7528
1051 N. Miami Beach Blvd.
Dr. Max A UpschHz, Rabbi
Zvee Aroni, Cantor
Harvey L. Brown, Exec Director
Frt. Evening Service 8.-00 p.m.
Sat Morning Service 8:30 a.m.
Daily Services: 7:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m.
RABBINICAL ASSOCIATION-
OF GREATER MIAMI
4200 Biscayne Boulevard
Miami, Florida 33137
Phone 576-4000
Rabbi Solomon Scniff
Executive Vice President
Religious Information
Concerning Greater Miami
Houses of Worship
Phone: 5714000
omej.
TEMPLE ZION Conservative
8000 Miller Dr. 271-2311
Dr. Norman N. Shapiro, Rabbi
Benia.-nin Dlckson. Cantor
Minyan Services Mon & Thur 7 am
Sabbath eve Services 8:15 pm
Sabbath Services 9:00 am
Quests Are Welcome
Register Now, For Religious Schools
Kindergarten Thru Confirmation
wamtamam
UNITED SYNAGOGUE
OF AMERICA
1110 NE 163rd St., N. Miami Beach. Fl. 33162
47-6094. HeroM Wlshna. eiecutlve director.
Franklin 0. KreuUer. r uN.6N6PAidMicAN
HEBREW CONGREGATIONS
Doral Executive Office Park, 3785
NW 82 Ave., Suite 210, Miami, Fl.
33166,592-4792. Rabbi Lewis C.
Llttman, regional director


Friday, August 13, 1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 9-B
ilic Notice,
JTtice of action
Itructive service '
no property)
tCIRCUITCOURTOF
FlEVENTH JUDICIAL
fUlTOF FLORIDA, IN
fpOR OAOE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
uq 82-10*71 FC 14
Iamily division
tE FOR DISSOLUTION
f0F MARRIAGE
I THE MARRIAGE OF
J.VEBT BERNARD.
Ititloner-Husband
Inadette GOMAN
Guard,
lipondent-Wlfe
ERNADETTE GOMAN
ERNARD
letite Riviere
-iBorgne
to Germain Roy
letit Bourg
iu Borgne
Haiti, West Indies
I ARE HEREBY NOTI-
fthat a petition for Dlsso-
J of your Marriage has
filed and commenced In
Jourl and you are required
Jve a copy of your written
lies. If any. to It on LAW
ICE OF LLOYD M.
p-MAN, attorney for
oner, whose address la
(616, 7900 NE 2nd Avenue.
til. FL 33138, and file the
.mil with the clerk of the
ft styled court on or before
ember 10. 1882; otherwise
efault will be entered
ist you for the relief
I for In the complaint or
lion.
his notice shall be published
i each week for four con
[live weeks in the JEWISH
DRIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
11 of said court at Miami,
Irlda on this 10 day of July.
[RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dsde County, Florida
By K. Self rted
As Deputy Clerk
cult Court Seal)
> R Kravitz, Esq.
KW OFFICE OF
3YD M. ROUTMAN
lite 615,
)NE2ndAve.
ml FL 33138
Slephone: (306)787-5800
Attorney for PetlUoner
Augusta, II;
20. 27, 1982
|N THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR OADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 12 11 Ml
| ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
he marriage of
PROFILIO SOLIVER.
Petitioner-Husband.
Id
SANTE SOLIVER.
tespondent-Wlfe.
: CLEANTE SOLIVER
164 Pollcllnlque
del'A venue
Chrlstophe.
Port-au-Prince
Halt!
rOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
tD that an action for Dlsso-
[ion of Marriage has been
against you and you are
bulred to serve a copy of your
Htten defenses. If any, to It on
ITHUR H. LIPSON. attorney
] Petitioner, whose address Is
|5 N.W. 167 Street. Suite 216.
l-'l.i and file the origl-
fwith the clerk of the above
fd court on or before Sep-
per 3. 1962: otherwise a de-
wlll be entered against
for the relief demanded In
lomplalnt or petition
pTNESS my hand and the
of said court a.t Miami,
lida on this 29 day of July.
|1ICHARD P. BRINKER
\sClerk, Circuit Court
| Dade County, Florida
By Clarinda Brown
As Deputy Clerk
run Court Seal i
August 6, 13;
20. 27. 1982
Jll CIRCUIT COURT OF
lELEVENTH JUDICIAL
RCUIT IN AND FOR
iCOUNTY,FLORIDA
I Case No. 82-10*67
Family division
e marriage of
ICE KNOTT SMITH
floner
SMITH
ondent
JTICE OF ACTION
AVID SMITH,
ky Road District
[ttle London, P.O.
lestmoreland,
rmalca W.I.
ARE NOTIFIED that
tlon for dissolution of
ge has been filed
you and you are re
I to serve a copy of your
\.-de,en"e' u ">". on
jtTM. ZIEJA. E8Q..At-
ffor PeUtloner, 6SS N E
N.M.B., Fl SS162 on or
August 20, 1982, and file
Jinal with the clerk of
Urt; otherwise a default
entered against you.
I July 19.1982.
"*RD P. BRINKER.
Clerk
j Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
July 28, 80:
August 6, 13, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name DA-
VID J. WEINER, D.M D. at
9720 S W 8th Street. Miami.
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida
DAVID J WEINER,
D.M. D.. PA.
BY : DAVID J. WEINER.
D.M.D.
SCOTT F.
BARNETT, PA.
BY:
SCOTT F. BARNETT
Attorney
P.O. BOX 640406
Miami. FL 83164
18016 July 80:
____________AugUSt6,18,20, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Justl-
language Audiovisual Center at
8374 S.W. 40 St.. Miami. Fla.
33166 Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Klly Justlnlani,
Owner
18027 Augusta, 18;
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Para-
dise Beach Club at 15976-15096
Ave.. Miami Beach, Fl. Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
De.de County, Florida
Jonathan D.Beloff,
As Trustee
17986 July 28. 80;
Augusta, IS. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Spe-
cial Kind of Lady Boutique at
18115 Biscayne Blvd.. North
Miami Beach. Fl 33160 Intends
to register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida
Marfer
Enterprises. Inc..
Owner
1*>3 July 28, 80;
Augusta, 13, 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
Cs.eNo .82 10*21 FC
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
SARMUKH SINGH,
PetlUoner-Husband
and
JASWANT KAUR SINGH.
Respondent-Wife.
TO: JASWANT KAUR
SINGH
Village and
P.O. Chhapar
Dlst. Ludhlana
Punjab. India
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a Petition For Dis
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe-
tition on petitioner's attorney,
GEORGE T. RAMAN I. ESQ..
Suite 711. Biscayne Building. 19
West Flagler Street. Miami,
Florida 38130 and file the Origi-
nal Answer or Pleading In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 20 day of
August. 1982. If you fall to do
so, judgment by default will be
takne against you for the relief
demanded in said petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County, Florida,
this 19 day of July. 1982
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County, Florida
BY Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
17996 July 23. 30;
August 6, 13. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name Mi-
chael Brodv d-h- Hardware
and Fastener Mfg. Inc. at
18957 NE 3 Ct.. Miami. Fl 33179
intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County. Florida.
Michael Brody. Owner
0180005 July 23. 30;
August 6. 13, 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name ASO-
CIACION MEDICA DE GRA
DUADOS DE UNIVERSI-
DADB8 ESPANOLA8 T
EXTRANJERAS "PREMIO
PERIODISTICO DR. OUIL-
LERMO MARTINEZ MAR
QUEZ" at 1797 Coral Way.
Miami, Florida 38146 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dr. Manuel A. Alsugaray
18020 August 8,13;
20. 27.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name Na-
ture's Wonders at 8040 North
Kendall Dr., Miami. Fl 88156
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida.
John T. Cole. Jr.,
Owner
18006 July SO;
August 6, 13,20, 19*2
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
AGUE, ORGANO OFICIAL
ASOCIACION MEDICA DE
GRADUADOS DE UNIVERSI
DADES ESPANOLAS Y EX-
TRANJERAS. at 1797 Coral
Way IS W 22nd Street) Miami,
Florida 33145 intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
Dr. Manuel A. Alsugaray
18019 Augusta, IS;
20,17. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82 10947 FC 10
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: The Marriage of
CLAIRE BECKETT
PetlUoner wife
and
ALVIN RAYMOND
BECKETT
Respondent-husband
TO: ALVIN RAYMOND
BECKETT
8 Woolwich Drive
Kingston S, Jamaica,
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for Dlsso
luUon of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, If any, to It on
LOUIS R. BELLER, ESQ., at-
torney for Petitioner, whose
address Is 420 Lincoln Rd.,
Suite 2S8, Miami Beach. Fl.
33139, and Hie the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 81.
1982; otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In Oie com-
plaint or peUtlon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secuUve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 23 day of July.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By K. Self rted
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18007 July SO;
August 6. 13.20.1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
CASE NO. 82-10920FC
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
THEVILMERV
ROSULME,
Petitioner-Husband,
and
ROSE MARIE ROSULME.
Respondent-Wife
TO: ROSE MARIE
ROSULME
RESIDENCE ADDRESS
UNKNOWN
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a Petition For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe-
tition on petiUoner's attorney,
GEORGE T. RAMANI. ESQ..
Suite 711, Biscayne Building. 19
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 33180 and file the origi-
nal Answer or Pleading In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 20 day of
I August. 1982 If you fall to do
so. judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded in said peUtion.
DONE AND ORDERED at
. Miami, Dade County, Florida,
. this 19 day of July. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
BY: Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
17996 July 23, SO;
Augusta. IS. 1982
NOTICE U.4DER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name My
Place at 107 NE 79 St.. Miami,
FL Intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County,
Florida.
Sara Denhard.
Owner
17980 July IB, 28, SO;
__-< Augusta. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
Case No. 8I-W04 FC-15
FAMILY DIVISION
In re the marriage of
PATRICIA DANTZER
PeUtloner
and
ALBERT G.
DANTZER III
Respondent
NOTICE OF ACTION
TO: AlbertG.
DanUerHI
933 Kmmaus Ave
Allentown.
Penna. 18103
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that
an action for dissolution of
marriage has been filed
against you and you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. on
ROBERT M. ZIEJA. ESQ., At-
torney for PetlUoner, 833 N E
187 St.. N.M.B. Fl 83182 on or
before August 27. 1982, and file
the original with the clerk of
this court; otherwise a default
will be entered against you.
Dated: July 19, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER,
Clerk
by K. Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
July 23. SO;
IN THE Cl RCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
, CaseNo.tJ.iowi FC
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF
FAITH ADORNA.
PeUtloner-Wlfe
and
JOSEPH ADORNA
Respondent Husband
TO: JOSEPH ADORNA
12*8 Homestead Ave.,
Apt 8-A
Bronx,
New York 10462
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI
FIED that a PeUtlon For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe-
UUon on peUUoner's attorney.
GEORGE T RAMANI, ESQ.,
Suite 711, Biscayne Building, 19
West Flagler 8treet. Miami.
Florida SS1S0 and file the Ortgl
nal Answer or Pleading In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 20 day of
August. 1982. If you fall to do
so, judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded In said peUUon.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Florida.
this 19 day of July, 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County, Florida
BY: Clarinda Brown
Deputy Clerk
1797 July 23. 80;
_______________August 6.13.1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name S I A
INVESTMENTS, a partnership
at 7405 N.W. 41st Street, Miami,
Florida intends to register said
name with the Clerk of the Cir-
cuit Court of Dade County.
Florida.
MARIANITOS. CHUA
EDWIN S. CHUA
AMELITAS. CHUA
ARISTEDES S. CHUA
MABELS. CHUA
DEBBIE S. CHUA
JEANETTES CHUA
ELENITAS. CHUA
VINCENTS. CHUA
DENNIS S. CHUA
HARVEY D. FRIEDMAN
Attorney for S I A INVEST-
MENTS, a Partnership
18006 July 30:
August 6. 13.20, 1982
NOTICE UNUl"
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name LIMA
BODY SHOP at 4185 N.W.
132nd Street Lot 19-20. Opa-
Locka, Florida 3SOS4 intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida
OSV ALDO AMADOR
LIMA
18029 August a. 13;
20.27,1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name
THELMA-S HATS at 927 Lin-
coln Road-Suite 217 Intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County, Florida.
THAT'S THAT, INC.
Sandra Jacob,
President
Attorney for
THAT'S THAT. INC.
WEISS A WEISS
420 Lincoln Road
Suite S49
Miami Beach, Florida 33139
18013 July SO;
August 6. 13, 20.1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82.10834 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
MARTA CASTRO
PETITIONER
and
LUISRIVAS
RESPONDENT
TO: LUISRIVAS
RESIDENCE UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
DELVALLE LAW OFFICES,
P.A., attorney for PetlUoner.
whose address is i960 South-
west 27th Avenue. Miami, Flor-
ida 33145, and file the original
with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Au-
gust 20, 1982; otherwise a de-
fault will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or peUUon.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 18 day of July
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk, Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByM.J.Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal I
DEL-VALLE LAW
OFFICES, P.A.
1950 Southwest 27th Ave.
Miami. Florida SS148
Telephone: (806) 446-0272
M CRISTINA
DEL-VALLE. ESQ.
Attorney for PetlUoner
17991 July 23. 80;
Augusta, IS. 1S82
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT, IN AND FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number u-nn
Division 02
IN RE: ESTATE OF
HERBERT M. FUENTES.
Deceased
FORMAL NOTICE
BY PUBLICATION
TO:HERBERTOJ.
FUENTES
ADDRESS UNKNOWN
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a PeUUon for Ad-
ministration has been filed In
this court and you are required
to file your written defenses to
the peUUon with the clerk of
this court and to serve a copy
thereof not later than Septem-
ber 3, 1982, on petiUoner's
attorney, whose name and ad-
dress Is: Lawrence Natlnaky,
10700 Caribbean Blvd.. Suite
212. Miami. Florida 88189. If
you fall to do so, judgment may
be entered In due course upon
the peUUon.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of this court on August 5,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
Clerk of the Circuit Court
By Cornell Robinson
As Deputy Clerk
18030 Augusta. 13. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO 82 10826 FC II
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE: THE MARRIAGE OF:
ANTONIA DELGADO.
Petitioner-Wife
and
JAIRO DELGADO
Respondent-Husband
TO: JAIRO DELGADO
Respondent-Husband
Residence Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an acUon for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any. to it on
DAVID M. SOSTCHIN. attor-
ney for PeUUoner, whose ad-
dress is 2121 Ponce de Leon
Boulevard. Suite 450. Coral
Gables. FL 83134 USA. and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore September 10. 1982; other-
wise a default will be entered
against you for the relief de-
manded In the complaint or
petition.
This noUce shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 28 day of July.
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade Coulnty, Florida
By K Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DAVID M.
SOSTCHIN, ESQUIRE
2121 Ponce de Leon
Boulevard, No. 450
Coral Gables, FL SSI 34
Telephone: 444-8888
Attorney for PeUtloner
18023 August e. IS;
20,27,1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADE COUNTY, FLORIDA
PROBATE DIVISION
File Number 82-4728
Division 04
IN RE ESTATE OF
MANUEL A. MENDKZ.
Deceased
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND AIX OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the adminlstraUon
of the estate of MANUEL A.
MENDEZ. deceased. File
Number 82-4728. Is pending In
the Circuit Court for Dade
County. Florida. Probate Divi-
sion, the address of which is 73
West Flagler Street. Miami.
FL 33180. The personal repre-
sentative of the estate is
MARIA A. MENDEZ, whose
address is 12960 S.W Third
Street. Miami. FL. The name
and address of the personal
representaUve's attorney are
set forth below.
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate are
required, WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE, to fUe
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of
any claim or demand they may
have. Each claim must be In
writing and must Indicate the
basis for the claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney, and the
amount claimed. If the claim la
not yet due, the date when It
will become due shall be)
stated. If the claim Is contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty shall be
stated. If the claim Is secured,
the security shall be described.
The claimant shall deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable the clerk to mall
one copy to each personal re-
presentaUve.
All persons Interested In the
estate to whom a copy of this
NoUce of AdminlstraUon has
been mailed are required,
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE, to file any ob-
JecUons they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent's will, the qualifica-
tions of the personal represen-
taUve, or the venue or jurtsdlc-
Uon of the court.
ALL CLAIMS, DEMANDS.
AND OBJECTIONS NOT 80
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED.
Date of the first publlcaUon
of this NoUce of Admlruatra-
Uon: Augusta. 1982.
Maria A. Mender
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
MANUEL A. MENDEZ
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
DAVID M. SOSTCHIN, Esq.
2121 Ponce de Leon Blvd.
No. 450
Coral Gables. FL 33134
Telephone: 444-8383
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURTOF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA, IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTION
NO. 82-10892
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION

OF MARRIAGE
IN RE:
RAUL ROMO
PETITIONER
and
NEKEIDA
ARIAS-SEPULVEUA
RESPONDENT
TO: NEREID A
ARIAS-SEPl l.VEDA
MARTA ABKKU 112
COLON. MATANZAS.
CUBA
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marn.li:>- has been
filed against you a you are re-
quired to serve a copy of your
written defenses, i: an v. to It on
DEL-VALLE LAW OFFICES
P.A.. attorney for Petitioner,
whose address Is 1960 South-
west 27th Avenue. Second
Floor. Miami, Florida 33145,
and file the original with the
clerk of the above styled court
on or before August 20, 1982;
otherwise a default will be
entered again you for the relief
demanded in the complaint or
peUUon.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
Florida on this 19 day of July,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By Lola H. Currier
As Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal)
DEL-VALLE LAW
OFFICES. P.A.
1960 Southwest 27th Ave.,
Second Floor
Miami. Florida SS146
Telephone: (805)445-0272
M. CRISTINA
DEL-VALLE ESQ.
Attorney for PetlUoner
18000 July 28. SO;
August 6.18.1982


-------1 _______
P*gel-B Tbe Jewish Florkfiac Friday. August 13. 1982
_
Public Notice
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
T HC m LEVENTXJ JOtCl AL
CIRCUIT in MO F-CR
oaoc county Florida
m B- OENCRAl
JURISDICTION
orvtstCM
NOTICE RV
PUBLICATION
PHTLLUCOraYN
D AMAAO MaRXN as*
VICTOR DIAZ.
TO DaMAsCMARIN:
VKTOKD1AZ
TOU ARE tm.RZ.STT NC/n
FIED that a flUOw fc
a.nd Btoek of
AMES-DEL PLAT OP JET
FEPJ PARK according to the
Plat thereof at rorM B
Plat Boos Pat of Dm
PaMtc Records of Dade
OIj Florida.
DATED July IS 19*2
RsenardP Bnutr
Ctart Circuit Court
ByK Setfned
Deputy Clerk
:"* July 22 M
< 12 IMS
NOTICE OF ACT KM
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(MO PROPERTY)
IMTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OP FLORIDA, Ms
AMD FOR DAOE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.S2-1M29
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
." RE THE MARRIAGE
"JF DO ROTHY HOW ARD.
PETITIONER
and
ARTHUR HENRY
HOWARD.
RESPONDENT
TO: ARTHUR HENR Y
HOWARD
USE North Street
Dothan. Alabama '
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage haa been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defense*. If any. to It or
HOWARD HILL BENNETT
attorney for Petitioner, whoe*
address 11 :* West Fiag.ei
Street. Suite 520 Blscayne
Bldg Miami. Florida 33130-
4489. and file the original with
the clerk of the above styled
court on or before August 30.
10*3. otherwise a default will
be entered against you for the
relief demanded In the com
plaint or petition
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 20 day of July
1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByC. P Copeland
At Deputy Clerk
(Circuit Court Seal,
HOWARD HILL BENNETT
Attorney for Petitioner
Suite 530 Blscayne Bldg
19 West Flagler S'.rwl
Miami. Flonda 83130-4469
Attorney for Petitioner
Telephone 379-1885
17990 July 23.30
_______________Augusta. 13 19*2
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AND FOR
OADE COUNTY FLORIDA
FAMILY DIVISION
CASE NO *7 I0I43FCI3
NOTICE BY
PUBLICATION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE Of
r ORAINK! HENA0
GOMEZ RAMIREZ
Honor
*n DARIO
GOMEZ-RAMIREZ
Reationdenl
TO RUBEN DARiO
GOMEZ RAMIREZ
Resident Unknown
YOU ARC HEREBY notified
that a Petition for Dissolution
of Marriage hai been filed
against you and you are hereby
required to serve a ropy of your
answer or other pleading to the
Petition on the Petitioner
Attorney HARVEY D ROG-
KI'.S. whose address Is: 1401
N W 17th Avenue. Miami.
Florida. 33125. and file the orlg
uutl with the Clerk of the above
styled Court on or before this
3rd day of September. 1982. or a
Default will be entered against
you
DATED THIS 26 day of July.
VMS
RICHARD P. BRINKER.
Clerk
By: K Selfrled
Deputy Clerk ,
1A012 July 30;
Auguste. 13.20. 1982,
IN TMR- CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
Ci RCurT IN AMD FOR
DADCCOUMTr FLORIDA
wEMERAL
-JiSOCTrON
3-.SC*
CASC NO (M6VM PC
3 RE THE MARRIAGE Of
DORA STELLA PaTTNO
r "_-_.- r: w-J
;a:me ? >-.>
r-*a^nrj)*n. -uaasat
TO JAIME PATTR -
RESIDENCE ALLRESt
VNKNOWN
NOTICE or
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
PIED that a rums For Dta-
sssBCkaa Of Manage aas beea
*_*d agazst you and you are
required to serve a cost/of yourj
sr or Plead=r.g to %*..'. pe
on pe sooner t attontey
GEORGE T raman: esg.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Mttanl Dade County Fionas
Jus : day of July 1M2
RICHARD P BRINKER
CtrcuM Court Clerk
Dade County Florida
BY Oartnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
:79M July23 30
_______________Assrust*. 13 1RW
IM TNECIRLUII LOUR I OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN ANO FOR
DADE COUNTY. FLORIOA
GENERAL
JURISDICTION
DIVISION
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OP
GERTHA ALCENA
GERMAIN
Petrtioner-Wtfe
and
EDDY JOSEPH
GERMAIN.
Respondent Husband
TO EDDY JOSEPH
GERMAIN
Ruelle
No. 19
:e Haiti
NOTICE OF
PUBLICATION
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FTED that a Petition For Dis-
solution Of Marriage has beer.
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
Answer or Pleading to said pe-
tition on petitioner'! attorney.
GEORGE T Raman: ESQ. .
Suite 711. Blscayne Building. 19
West Flagler Street. Miami.
Florida 13130 and file the Origi-
nal Answer or Pleading In the
Office of the Circuit Court
Clerk, on or before 20 day of
August. 1982 If you (ail to do so.
Judgment by default will be
taken against you for the relief
demanded in said petition.
DONE AND ORDERED at
Miami. Dade County. Florida,
this 19 day of July. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER.
Circuit Court Clerk
Dade County. Florida
BY Clartnda Brown
Deputy Clerk
17999 July 23. 30.
Auguste. 13. 1982
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(NO PROPERTY)
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
ANO FOR OADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
no n-iosio
ACTION FOR
DISSOLUTION
OF MARRIAGE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
FLORA C.
HERRERA MOYA
PETITIONER
and
FRANK DE JESUS MOYA
RESPONDENT
TO
FRANK DE JESUS MOYA
WHOSE RESIDENCE
I.S UNKNOWN
rOC ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlaso-
n i,l Marriage nas D-en
filed agalntt you and you are |
r-quir*-d to nerve a copy of your
written 'iefenses. if any. to It on |
DEL-VALLC law OFFICES.|
I' A attorney lor petitioner.
a note address Is 1950 South-
west 27th Avenue. Second
Floor Miami. Flonda 33145.
and file the original with the
l lorh of the above styled court
on or before August 20 1982:
otherwise a default will be
entered against you for the,
relief demanded In the com-j
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con
secutlve weeks In THE JEW-
ISH FLORIDIAN.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami
Florida on this 13 day of July.
1982.
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida.
By C. Moor
As Deputy Clerk
i Circuit Court Seal i
UK1. VALUE LAW
OFFICES. PA.
1950 Southwest 27th Ave.
Miami. Florida 33146
Telephone: (306)445-0272
M CRISTINA
DELVALLE.ESQ
Attorney for Petitioner
17984 July 23, 30.
August 6.13. 1982
IM THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT IN AMD FOR
DADC COUNTY FLORIDA
71 NEST FLAOLER ST
MIAMI FLORIDA
PRORATE DIVISION
PRORATE
MO fi'WCB
IN RE ESTATE OF
lAME EL KALiNSKT
notice or
ADMINISTRATION
TO ALL PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST SAID ESTATE AND
OTHER PERSONS INTER-
ESTED IN SAID ESTATE
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that the 1 foaMani tllna
of Ote Estate of SAMUEL KAL
IN5KY ill c I Mil Mis of Dade
County Florida.
tacea m a
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED AND REQUIRED to file
any claims and demands which
you may have tgaater the Es-
tate and to file any chaDenge to
the validity of the Last WlD sad
Testament ottered far probate
if any or any objecooa o Oat
of the Personal
>-_ *- Jt -..- ;..-j
of the Court, with tbe
Court. Dade County Court
noose Miami. Florida 33130
WTTHTN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE OR YOUR
RIGHT TO DO SO WTLL BE
FORE VE P. BARRE D
First puhhVstlm of thie No-
tice on the U day of
FAT KALINSK Y
At Personal Representative
lSMl Blscayne Boulevard
No Miami Beach. Florida
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
RE PRE3ENTATIVE
Paul SUberberg Esquire
Wemgoid Berman Koemer
A SUberberg P C
The Chrysler Building
408 Lexington Avenue
New York. NY 10174
Telephone 213iRU-llU
BsM August 13 20 1MB
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 13-13117 FC
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE. The marriage of
REX ATWILL.
Petitioner Husband,
and
SUSAN A TWILL.
Respondent Wife
TO Susan Atwiil
Residence Address
Unknown
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Disso-
lution of Marriage has been
filed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses. If any. to It on
ARTHUR H LIPSON. attorney
for Petitioner whose address is
1515 N W 167 St Suite 21.
Miami. Fla and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Sep-
tember 10. 1982. otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded In
the complaint or petition.
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami.
Florida on this 11 day of Au-
gust. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
By M J Hartnett
As Deputy Clerk
18038 August 13. 20.27;
September 3,1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIOA
INANDFOR
DAOECOUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO.tMOfM
FAMILY DIVISION FC
NOT ICE FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
IN RE THE MARRIAGE OF
WILLIAMS INGRAHAM
and
MARLAJ INGRAHAM
TO: MARLAJ.
INGRAHAM
99 Jamestown Road
R D. No. 1
Randolph.
Now York 14772
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that a petition for Disso-
lution of your Mfrrlage has
been filed and commenced In
this court and you are required
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any, to It on:
SAMUEL S SOROTA, Attor-
ney for Petitioner, whose ad-
dress is: 16300 N.E. 19th Ave-
nue, suite No 227. North Miami
Beach. Florida 33162 and file
the original with the clerk of
the above styled court on or be-
fore August 31. 1982, otherwise
a default will be entered
against you for the relief
prayed for In the complaint or
petition
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said Court at Miami.
Florida on this 23 day of July,
1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
at Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
by: K. Selfrtad
As Deputy C%rk
(Circuit Court Seal)
18009 July 30:
Auguste. 13.20. 1982
IN THE CIRCUIT COURT
FOR
DADC COUNTY FLORIDA
PwOSATE DIVISION
Fee llillir 83-718
D nasaO
IN RE ESTATE OF
JOSEPH 5CHMTER
NOTICE or
AD MTNI5TRA TION
TO a" PERSONS HAVING
CLAIMS OR DEMANDS
AGAINST THE ABOVE ES-
TATE AND ALL OTHER
PERSONS INTERESTED IN
THE ESTATE YOU ARE
HEREBY NOTIFIED that tbe
nil laaaitmi of tbe estate of
Joaenh fli aim mi deceased.
FlU N^asber 83-7*8 03 J
peadsr-g _-. C--r^: CRaaS SSI
Lode County Florida. Probate
DBMatoc. \Tjt address -t r.c-
Dade County Courthouse 73
West FtegMr Street. Miami
Florida. 331J8 The persona.
-epreser.iaave of the estate is
Rose Schmler hues address
a lrTW N E Sad Ave North
Miami Boach. Ficnda. 13009
Tbe name and address of tbe
personal representative t
anemey are sat forth below
All persons having claims or
demands against the estate axe
required. WITHIN THREE
MONTHS FROM THE DATE
OF THE FIRST PUBLICA-
TION OF THIS NOTICE to file I
with the clerk of the above
court a written statement of .
any claim or demand they may
have Each claim must be in
writing and must indicate the
basat for tbe claim, the name
and address of the creditor or
his agent or attorney and the
amount claimed If the claim is
not yet doe. the date when it
will become due shall be
stated If the claim It contin-
gent or unliquidated, the na-
ture of the uncertainty Niall be
stated. If the claim Is secured
the security shall be described
The claimant arum deliver suf-
ficient copies of the claim to the
clerk to enable tbe clerk to mail
one copy to each personal re-
presentative.
All persons interested in the
estate to whom a copy of this
Notice of Administration has
been mailed are required.
WITHIN THREE MONTHS
FROM THE DATE OF THE
FIRST PUBLICATION OF
THIS NOTICE to file any ob-
jections they may have that
challenges the validity of the
decedent t will, the qualifies
Uons of the personal represen-
tative, or the venue or jurisdic
uonof the court.
ALL CLAIMS DEMANDS
AND OBJECTION'S NOT SO
FILED WILL BE FOREVER
BARRED
Date of the first publication
of this Notice of Administra-
tion July 30.18*3.
Rose Schmler
As Personal Representative
of the Estate of
Joseph Schmler
Deceased
ATTORNEY FOR PERSONAL
REPRESENTATIVE
Gary F fanner
Schmler. Canner A Glasser
American Savings Bldg .
Suite 611
2900 E Hallandale
Beach Blvd
Hallandale. FL 33009
Telephone 945-1586
18011 July 30:
August6. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
L Bakery at 8879 SW 107 Ave .
Miami. Fl Intends to register
said name with thtCierk of the
Circuit Court of Baft* County
Florida
AAFBakene. ir,.
Owner
Bernard Forman.
25 percent interest
Rubin Furm an.
25 percent interest
Harold Ackermann.
25 percent interett
Ernesto Fischer.
25 percent interest
18010 July 30.
August 6. 13.20 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned,
desiring to engage in business
under the fictitious name
EASTERN HOSIERY INC at
1288 Burlington St.. Opa Locka.
Fla 33064 intends to register
said name with the Clerk of the
Circuit Court of Dade County
Florida
Pres. Isaac Mizrahi
1*091 Auguste, 13.
20. 27. 1982
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that the undersigned, desiring
to engage In business under the
fictitious name MR DONUT at
2300 Southwest -7th Avenue.
Miami. Florida 33166 intends to
register said name with the
Clerk of the Circuit Court of
Dade County. Florida.
CHARLES L HARRIS
d-b-a MR. DONUT
BY: Charles L. Harrtit
BOLTON. WEST* BOLTON
Attorney for
Charles L. Harrlss
2320 N E 171 Street
North Miami Beach.
Fla.33160
18009 July 30;
Auguste. 13, X, 1982
NOTICE OP ACT KM
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
FROPERTY
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA. IM
ANO FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 82-434 FC II
IN RE
THE MARRIAGE OF
EUNICE MAY
RODRIGUEZ.
Petitioner-Wife
and
OSCAR RODRIGUEZ
Respondent Husband
NOTICE OP ACTION
WTTH DESCRIPTION OF
REAL PROPERTY
PROCEEDED AGAINST
TO OSCAR RODRIGUEZ
Residence Unaaow
YOU ARE NOTIFIED that a
Petition for Dissolution has
been filed against you and a
prayer contained wtthto tbe
Petition requests tbe Court to
award that certain property
owned by you sad your wife
EUNICE MAT RODRIGUEZ,
at tenants by tbe tntlrstMa.
located at 24*1 N W 83rd
Street Miami Florida, aad
more particularly described
ss
Lot in Block 5 of GULF AIR
ESTATES according to tbe
Plat thereof as recorded in Plat
Book 40 Page 11 of the Public
Records of Dade County Flor-
ida.
to your wife EUNICE MAT
RODRIGUEZ as lump turn ali-
mony and you are required to
serve a copy of your Response
or Pleading on RONALD
HABER petitioner t attorney,
whoae address is 1393 N W
16th Street Miami. Flonda, on
or before September 17. 1882. If
you fail to do so. Judgment by
default will be taken against
you for the relief demanded In
the Petition
This notice shall be published
once a week for four '4> con-
secutive weeks m the JEW'ISH
FLORIDIAN
Dated this 6 day of August.
1882 at Miami Dade County.
Flonda
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk Circuit Court
Dade County. Florida
ByK Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
RONALD HABER Esq.
Attorney for Petitioner
1353 N w 18th Street
Miami Florida 33125
Teie phone 13081 324-8060
1*037 August IS. 20. 27.
September 3.1983
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that the undersigned.
desiring to engage In business
under the fictitious name TOD
DEN ASSOCIATES at 130S.W.
38 Ave Miami. Florida 33139
Intends to register said name
with the Clerk of the Circuit
Court of Dade County, Florida
HUGH TOLD EN, Owner
MYLES G CYPEN. Esq.
Attorney for Applicant
CYPEN A CYPEN
825 Arthur Godfrey Road
Miami Beach. Florida 33140
10004 August 13.20. 27:
Septembers. 1863
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SERVICE
(WITH PROPERTY)
INTHE CIRCUIT COURT OF
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA. IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVIL ACTION
NO 3 7154(01)
ACTION FOR DISSOLUTION
OFMARRIAOE
LN RE The Marriage of
ADA MAVIS BLANDIN
Wife,
and
RAFAEL MANUAL
BLANDIN.
Husband.
TO RAFAEL MANUAL
BLANDIN
Calle San Gabriel
Quinta. La Ve
g-uua La Florida
Caracas Veneiuela
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTI-
FIED that an action for Dlsto-
:-;;on of Marriage has been
:;.ed against you and you are
required to serve a copy of your
written defenses, if any to It on
STANLEY M NEWMARK. at
tomey for Petitioner, whose
address is 9400 South Dadeland
Boulevard. Suite 300. Miami
Florida 33158. and file the origi-
nal with the clerk of the above
styled court on or before Sep-
tember 17. 1982: otherwise a
default will be entered against
you for the relief demanded in
the complaint or petition.
This notice shall be published
once each week for four con-
secutive weeks In THE JEW
ISH FLORID IAN
WITNESS my hand and the
seal of said court at Miami,
r lorlda on this 10 day of Au-
gust. 1982.
RICHARD P. BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County, Florida
By K. Selfrled
As Deputy Clerk
'Circuit Court Seali
STANLEY M NEWMARK.
Esq.
9400 South Dadeland Blvd.
Suite 300
Miami. Florida 33156
Attorney for Petitioner
18036 August 13. 20. 27;
Septembers, 1982
CONSTRUCTIVE Sti?,,,
INO'tOtsS l(I
"M THE CIRCUIT C0utTlJ
TME ELEVENTH^.1*!
CIRCUIT OF FLORIDA1,.1
AND FOR OADE coStn
CIVIL ACT .Ok"
NO 83-16833 FCJJ
FAMILY 0IVIS.O*
ACTION FOR OUSoCuTi
_ OPMAR8.a IN RE MAP_-
JOHNNYDAV
Petitioner
and
BRIGITTERaVMaVv
DAVIS
Reaper, der.-.
to bp.:g:tte b.. Taw
DAVIS V>
Bcrrr-.i.-_- s.-. .
"-ninuiiiL
WestGerma.-.
YOU ARE HER'tST Sort I
FI ED that at action for Da"1
lution of Mamas. ., !
** agajaot you sad km,
reesdredlo serves cceVt*
written defe.-jei ^ "
MARSHALL B FISHER
tomey for Penaoner
address is Suite joc ,
Duoe Highway u^~ f
33136. and file the cnr-_-Aiv
the clerk of the tier, ItvL
court on or before SettemsM
10 1982. other.-.*, deCl
will be entered aga_-jt j^Zl
the relief demar.'Jta in
mtnnMkat or petaior.
This notice tmu. be pubu__
once each wees for .'our i|
secutlve weeki THE jral
ISH FLORIDIAN '
WITNESS my hand and i
seal of said court : Mittv,
Florida on this 38 day of Juijfl
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk Clrcm: Court
Dade County Florida
ByK Seifned
As Deputy Citrk
Circuit Court Seal
MARSHALLB
FISHER. ESO.
Suite 308.
8856 S Dixie Hwy
Miami. Florida 33156
Telephone 306 4N-5S27
Attorney for Petitioner
1S022 August".
20 27.11
NOTICE OF ACTION
CONSTRUCTIVE SEHVICf
(NO PROPERTY
IMTHE CIRCUIT COURTOI
THE ELEVENTH JUDICIAL
CIRCUITOF FLORIDA.IN
AND FOR DADE COUNTY
CIVILACTI0N
NO. 83-12861 FC
family division
notice for dissolution
op marriage
in re: the marriage of
alixsqclun
JOHNSON
Petitioner-Wilt
and
LEE JOHNSON
Reaponder.t-Hutband '
TO. LEE JOHNSON
M Ferry Road
Old Sayfcrook
Conn 08478
YOU ARE HEREBY NOT!
FIED that a petition for DUs>
lutlon of your Marriage lui
been filed and commenced a
this court and you are requlrH
to serve a copy of your written
defenses. If any. to It
LLOYD M. ROUTMAN, ESft.
attorney for Petltoner, whoa
address U Suite 615 7900 NI
2nd Avenue. Miami. FL SSltt
and file the original with tin
clerk of the above styled couit
on or before September 10
1882: otherwise a default will
be entered agalntt you for
eiief prayed for ir. the c
plaint or petition.
This notice shall be publliMi
once each week for four o
secutlve weeks in the JEWISH
FLORIDIAN
WITNESS my hand and 0*
teal of said court at Mismi.
Florida on this 10 day of An
gust. 1982
RICHARD P BRINKER
As Clerk. Circuit Court
Dade County Florida
By M J Hartnett
AsDeputvClerk
Circuit Court Seal i
LLOYD M ROUTMAN Eiq
Suite 615.
T900NE2ndAve {
Miami. FL3313S
Attorney for Petitioner
1S039 August IS. 20.*
September 3.11
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HEREBi
GIVEN that the undersoil
desiring to engage ir. Duaine"
under the fictitious name J"
sica Jordan at P O Box 40*w
Miami Beach. FL 331*0 inten*
to register said name with w
Clerk of the Circuit Court"
Dade Countv Florida
Toby LebowiU. Owner
10003 August 13. 20.r
Septembers, !*
NOTICE UNDER
FICTITIOUS NAME LAW
NOTICE IS HERf,!I
GIVEN that the undersign*";
desiring to engage in buslnes.
under the fictitious nme
Smithy's Diamond Setter at
Seybold Bldg., Suite 738.
NE First Street. Miami, For
Ida. 33132 intends to NgR*
aaid name with the Cler< W
Circuit Court of Dade count)
Florida. .
Charlie Smith Jr
17986 Ju'>f '.mm
August 6.13,1Ki'


Weinstein and Sons
Friday, August 13,1982 / The Jewish Floridian Page 11-E
Cheryl Seiden, Nancy Kahn Passes
Join Menorah Chaples Policewoman
Lpnorah Chapels of South
tffito now affiliated with The
zinal Weinstein and Sons, one
Chicago's oldest Jewish
Lieral firms.
iThrough its association in Chi-
ra with Piser Menorah
Mpels. The Original Weinstein
C Sons has become affiliated
fcth Menorah Chapels' facilities
Sunrise. North Miami Beach,
erfield, Margate and West
i Beach.
[Established in 1890. The Origi-
I Weinstein and Sons is a
.nilybased firm that has been
IChicago's Jewish community.
I Harold "Hershey" Weinstein
ings Menorah Chapels his long
|0fessional experience and a
[cord of outstanding community
vice.
IA graduate of the University of
lichigan and Northwestern Uni-
Irsity Law School, he waa.
med the first Man of the Year
r Chicago's Budlong B'nai
Frith Lodge for the Israel Bond
ive.
\>e
*X
ffc to
u r.-tie
\&
d<
.
8T:0
Mount Nebo
Cemetery
5505 Northwest 3rd Street
|Tel 261-7612

*r+

A part-time resident of Holly-
wood, Weinstein has been a
member of the Workmen's Circle
for 50 years. "With direct associ-
ation with Menorah Chapels," he
noted, "we now have five chapels
to serve families in Florida."
WALLACH
Gertrude. 83. of Miami Beach. She was
a native of New York and had been a
resident here for the past 56 years. She
la survived by her son, William of
Miami Beach. Services were held Au-
gust 5 at Riverside with Interment at
Mt. Nebo.
SANDERS
Sally. A 42 year resident of Miami
Beach, formerly of New York City. She
la survived by her son, George; sister,
Minna Zimmerman, of New York City,
and sister-In-law, Mildred Levy, of Hal
landale. Services August 8 at Riverside
with interment at Mt. Nebo.
SMITH
Lucy Raskin, 72. of North Miami Beach
on August B. A resident here for 14
years, coming from Brooklyn, N.Y. She
was a member of B'nal B'rlth. She Is
survived by her husband. Moses; sons,
Lawrence A. Smith, New York, and
Robert B. Smith, Fort Lauderdale; six
grandchildren, and sisters, Eva Levitt
and Anne Klelman, Los Angeles. Serv-
ices were held August 6 at Riverside.
SHESLOW
Julius. 82, Miami Beach, passed away
August 7. He was a native of Poland,
coming here 11 years ago from New
York City. He was a board member of
Ohev Shalom CongregaUon, Miami
Beach; a member of B'nal B'rlth, and
the Masons. He la survived by his wife,
NetUe; son. Everett A. of Short Hills,
N.J.; daughter. Seena Cowan of New-
burgh, N.Y.; five grandchildren; two
great grandchildren; brother, Jack
Sheslow; and sister. Fannll Hash, both
of New York. Services were held In New
York. Arrangements by Riverside.
BENSON
Linda passed away August 6. She was a
resident of Miami Beach for more than
25 years, coming here from Huntlngton,
W.V. She was a former teacher and a
life member of Hadassah. She Is sur-
vived by her husband, Morris B. Ben-
son. Services were held August 8 at
Blasberg Chapel with Interment In Mt.
Nebo.
JACOBY
Philip, 70, of Miami Beach. He was a
native of Russia and had lived In South
Florida for many years. He was a
builder of the Israel Hlstadrut Founds
tion, the American Mogen David for Is-
rael. ORT and former sexton of Temple
.Ner Tamld. He Is survived by hi* wife.
Sylvia, of Miami Beach; son, Dr. Irving
Jacoby of Worcester, Mass., daughter,
Deborah Feldman, of Fort Lauderdale;
and one grandchild. Services were held
August 6 at Riverside.
SCHLAKMAN
Benjamin, 81, of North Miami Beach
passed away August 6. He was a resi-
dent of Miami for 17 years, coming here
from Boston. Mass. He is survived by
his sons, Charles, Coral Gables, and Je-
rome, Boston, Mass.; sisters, Doris
Schlachman. and Belle Mandril. Phlla
delphla. Pa., and five grandchildren.
Services were held August. 9.
EISLER. Kate C, North Miami Beach.
July 30. Rubln-Ztlbert.
LEVY, Dorothy, July 29, Riverside.
SINGER, Jeanne. Miami Beach. Rubin
Zilbert.
WEBER, Rose R., 90. Miami. July 29,
Riverside.
BOGNER. Bertha. 76. Miami,
COHEN. Sam. Miami Beach. Rubln-Zll-
bert.
GREBNBERG, Dorothy. Miami Beach.
JuivM) Rubln-Zllbert.
TIKOFSK Y. Melissa Jo, 19, July 30.
FRANKEL. Pearl. 70, Miami Beach.
August 1, Riverside.
GINSBURG, William. North Miami
Beach, August 1, Menorah Chapels.
SCOLNIK, Betty. 86, North Miami
Beach, August 1, Levltt-Weinsteln.
EDELMAN. Irving, 86, North Miami
Beach, Gordon.
LOPATIN. Jennie, 81. Miami Beach,
Gordon.
FISHMAN, Dr. Moses, Miami Beach,
Rubln-Zllbert.
JOSEFSON. Hasi. Rubln-Zllbert.
SCHIFFRIN. Albert, Bal Harbour.
August4. Riverside.
LONDON, Jack. 82. Key Biscayne, Au-
gust 4. Gordon.
LURIO. Sidney F.. Miami Beach. Au-
gust 4, Rubin Zilbert
Services were held July 30 for
policewoman, Cheryl Weiner Sei-
den, 33 of Miami, who died July
28. She was shot twice on the
evening of July 14 when she was
off duty and returning home after
dining out with two neighbors.
Seiden was born in New Bri-
tain, Conn, and graduated from
Central Connecticut State Col-
lege. She had graduated from the
police academy and was a police-
woman for seven and a half years.
She worked in security at Jack-
son Memorial and then became a
detective. She was the first
Metro- Dade policewoman ever to
have been shot to death.
Survivers include her husband,
Mark; parents, Milton and Eve-
lyn Weiner; a sister, Susan Wei-
ner Pruitt; and a brother, Billy
Weiner.
Riverside Chapel was in charge
of arrangements with graveside
services at Star of David Memo-
rial Park. >'
SCHINDER
Eva (Chav) of Bay Harbor. A resident
for 25 years, formerly from Philadel-
phia. Treasurer of the National Council
of Jewish Women, Bay Harbour Divi-
sion. She is survived by her husband.
Harry; son, Bernard (Ellen) of Holly-
wood; daughter, Judith (Martin) of
North Miami; five grandchildren, and
one great-grandchild. Services August
12 at Riverside.
SCHWARTZ
Alexander, 88, of Miami Beach. He was
a native of Hungary and had resided In
South Florida for the past 17 years. He
worked for the United States Govern-
ment. He Is survived by his wife, Hilda,
and brother, Harry. Services by River-
side.
RAND
Tillie. 79, of Miami passed away August
9. She had been a resident of Miami for
the past 30 years, coming from Passalc,
N.J. Mrs. Rand was a member of Had-
assah, Farband, and the National Coun-
cil of Jewish Women. She Is survived by
her daughters, Sandra Gerson of Miami
and Harrlest Isaacson of Savannah,
Ga., and four grandchildren. Services
were held August 11 at Gordon with in-
terment at Mt. Sinai.
REINHERZ
Helen K 80. of Miami. She was anaUve
of New York and had been a resident
here for the past 26 years. She Is sur-
vived by her daughter. Elaine
(Richard) Wolf son of Coral Gables, and
two grandchildren. Services were held
August 11 at Riverside.
CHERNOFF, Morris, Miami Beach,
August 5. Rubln-Zllbert.
EDELSCHICK, Minnie, Miami Beach.
FRUCHTER, Margaret, 79, North
Miami Beach. August 5. Levltt-
Welnsteln.
KRUMBEIN. Cecelia. Miami Beach,
Blasberg.
LIPTON, Ruth, Miami Beach. Bias
berg.
MENDELSOHN. Yetta, North Miami
Beach, Blasberg.
RICHER, Zara, Miami Beach. Bias
berg.
BENDER, Abraham. August 6, Levltt-
Weinsteln.
GREENBERG, Rlssa, North Miami
Beach, Rubln-Zllbert.
HAMMOND, Sophie. 89, North Miami
Beach, Auguste, Levltt-Weinsteln.
GOODMAN, NetUe B., August 8, Rubln-
Zllbert.
PANKIN. Jack. Miami Beach. Blas-
LICHTENSTEIN, Henry. 81. North
Miami Beach. August 8, Riverside.
WINIKOFF, Sydney, 71. Blasberg.
BERLOWE, Cora, 82, North Miami
Beach, August 12, Levitt-Weinstein.
LEDERMAN, MoUye, 71, North Miami,
August 9, Levltt-Welnstein.
LEWIS, Samuel. Miami Beach. August
10. Rubln-Zllbert.
OZERSKY. Anita C, 42. formerly of
Miami, August 11, Riverside, Mt.
Nebo.
TOPF. Sedney, Miami Beach. August
11. Rubln-Zllbert, Star of David.
GOLDSTEIN. Samuel, 83, August 3,
Rubln-Zllbert.
KASSEL. Yetta, 83. August 5. Levltt-
Weinsteln.
NIEDERMAN. Sarah. 74. August 6.
Rubln-Zllbert.
Through years of dedicated service,
we have become the largest Jewish
Family owned and operated
Funeral Chapel in Florida
FUNERALS AVAILABLE THROUGH "THE ASSURED PLAN"
LARRIE S. BLASBERG
Funeral Director
Psst President Jewish Funeral
Directors ot America
720 SEVENTY FIRST STREET
MICHAEL C. BLASBERG
Funeral Director
865-2353 miami beach, florid* 33141
Nancy Kahn, one ot the origi-
nal founders of the Juvenile
Diabetes Research Foundation,
was killed outside of New Orleans
on July 9.
Mrs. Kahn, an executive board
member of the Diabetes Research
Institute, a free-lance photo-
grapher, was on her way to the
National Convention of Profes-
sional Photographers in Las
Vegas.
She is survived by her hus-
band, Miami attorney Martin D.
Kahn; two daughters, Kelli Bar-
field and Leigh Marumsrud; and
three stepchildren, Patricia, Jill
and Robert Kahn.
WARSHAW
Shirley, 64. Miami, on August 2. She had
made her home here for the past 38
years, coming from New York City. She
was a member of The Asthmatic Home
of Denver, Colo., honorary member of
The Leukemia Society and The Social-
ites. She Is survived by her husband,
Myron; sons, Barry. Miami, and
Richard. Tallahassee; daughters, Joy
Peters and Lorl Thorpe, Miami; sisters,
Muriel Harries. New York City, and
Terry Solomon, Miami, and six grand-
children. Services were held August 4
with arrangements by Gordon Funeral
Home.
SCHUMAN
Ethel RAM year resident of Miami,
formerly of New York City. She Is sur-
vived by her son, Robert D.. Blscayne
Park; son-in-law, Dr. Edward G. Je-
russ. Coral Gables; two grandchildren;
and brother, Maurice Rabblno, New
York City. Services were held August 8
at Riverside with Interment in Star of
David.
LEVIN
Samuel. 65, of Miami passes away Au-
gust 10. He had made his home In Miami
for the past 31 years, coming from
Lakeland, Fla. He was a member of
Temple Zlon and past president of its
Men's Club. He Is survived by his wife.
Zena; children, Elaine (Daniel) Katz.
Miami and Mark Kevin. Miami; broth-
er. Irving Levin, Richmond. Va.; sis-
ters. Sarah London. Newport Richie,
and Fannie Francis, Deland, Fla.; and
two grandchildren. Services were held
August 11 at Gordon Funeral Home with
interment at Mt. Nebo.
ABAD1. Joseph
CARROAD, Benedict, North Miami
Beach, Blasberg.
EFFRON. Manny, 73, Miami, August
12, Gordon.
MINOGA, Mark. 82. Miami Beach. Au-
gust 11. Rubln-Zllbert.
ODZE, Lewis, North Miami Beach.
Blasberg.
SHARP, Nathan, Bay Harbor, August
11. Blasberg.
SPILL. Martha, 83, North Miami Beach.
August 11, Riverside.
GOLDSTEIN. Samuel. Miami Beach.
Augusts, Rubln-Zllbert.
KAUFMAN, Alice Dell, North Miami .
Beach, August 3. Levltt-Weinsteln.
Nancy Kahn
WINIKOFF
Sydney, 71, international Industrialist
and philanthropist died Thursday. July
.29. at his home In Miami Beach, Flor-
ida. He was president and owner of
Champion Type Works, Sometset, Flor-
ida and the Florida Pipe and Nipple Co..
Hlaleah. Florida, and past president
and owner of the Pittsburgh Nipple
Works. He also served for seven years
as US Counsel to Guatemala and retired
ten years ago. He Is survived by his
wife. Mary: three sons, Stanley A. and
Stuart F.. both of Pittsburgh. Pa. and
Arnold W. of Minneapolis, a daughter,
Zlta W. Bell of Salt Lake City. Utah; two
sisters, Ruth Drobnes of Palm Beach.
Florida and Lee Kosowsky of Tamarac,
Fla.; and several grandchildren. Inter-
ment was held In Temple Slnal Memori-
al Park. Plum Boro. Pa. with Blasberg
Chapel in charge of arrangements.
ROSENBLATT
Michael. 82, of Miami. He was a native
of Russia and a resident here for 30
vears, commit from New York. He was
a member of The F.AA.M. U.S. Power
Squadron. The Miami Beach Fisher-
nan's Association and Temple Emanu-
El. He Is survived by his wife, Rose, of
Miami; son. Aaron (Gloria) of Teaneck,
N.J.; daughter. Bess Susman of North
Bay Village; four grandchildren;
sisters, Molly Welnrlb (Harry) of
Spring Valley. NY., and Sylvia Brand
of Houston, Tx. Services were held Au-
gust 4 In Brooklyn, N.Y. with arrange-
ments bv Riverside.
MONUMENTS INC
0p*n Every Day Closed Sabbath
140 SW 57th Avepue
Phone 266-2888
Broward County's oldest, largest and most
reliable is now Dade County's newest and
most beautiful with the largest Jewish staff
at 209th Street on Biscay ne Boulevard.
945-3939
Serving chapels throughout the U.S. and Canada
and all South Florida cemeteries from chapels
in North Miami Beach, Sunrise. Deerfield Beach
and Margate.
When a loss occurs
away from home.
mm BROTHERS
FOREST PARK CHAPEL, INC
Here and in New York,
to assure swift and
understanding service.
Dade County
949-1656
Broward County
925-3396
1921 Pembroke Re.
18840 West Dixie Hwy
Represented by y Levitt, KL)
NewYork: (212) 263-7600 Queens Blvd & 76th Rd, Forest Hills, N Y


Israel was the classroom for these fiie par-
ticipants im the 1982 Spring Semester of Tei
Alu. University's Overseas Student Pro-
gram From left, Judy i'nger. daughter of
Mama and Joe L'nger. Miami. Susan
Greene, daughter of Carole and John Greene.
Miami. Judy Ginsberg, daughter of Sondra
and Richard Ginsberg Philadelphia; Robin
Lev*, daughter of Paula and Joel Levy.
Miami; and Julie Roth, daughter of Ro's-
marie and Stanley Roth. Miami, discovered
Israeli people end n~a-r ^rst-hand ichile
taking suck ::_--- sj Petroleum Diplo-
macy Ifaea Pot act znd zKe Arab-Israel
Conflict.
Judge Kaye Receives Award
b*ae County Circuit Court
Judge Robert P Kaye hu been
presented tbe 1962 Award of
Merit of the Florida Crime Pre-
vention Gmniineakin. according
to D M Sheppaid. director of
tbe Tallahassee- headquartered
organization.
Jud^e Kaye. who was ap-
pointed last year by Governor
Bob Graham after selection by
the Judicial So mm* ting Com-
oaanon. Judge Kaye. chvf of the
major crimes division of Dade
State Attorney Janet Reno s of-
fice at the time of his appoint-
ment, was selected for contnba-
uons to our community, and
more specifically to our system
'A criminal justice.'
Judge Kaye. who is a candi-
date to retain his seat in Group
12 in the Sept. 7 election is a
member of tbe Jewish War Vet-
erans.
AuivaPUmeer Opens Season
A discussion of the Israeli mili-
tary operation in Lebanon will
highlight the first meeting of the
new organizational year of the
Aviv a Chapter of Pioneer Women
Wednesday. Aug. 16. at 12 noon
at tbe Jewish War Veterans
building. 15947 S.E. 19th Place.
North Miami Beach.
Etta Sesden. past president of
the chapter of Pioneer Women-
Na'amat. will report on the cur-
rent Middle East crisis and on
other aspects of Israeli-American
relations, according to Eve Golin,
program chairman.
Gisela Gutter, president of
Aviva and vice president of the
South Florida Council of Pioneer
Women-Na amat. said the ses-
sion Wednesday also will cele-
brate the birthday of Zionist
leader Jean Goldstein, a mfnbw'
of the chapter.
Senator Gordon Wins Endorsement
State Sen. Jack D. Gordon
(Democrat. Miami Beach) has
won the endorsement of the
Florida Student Association and
of the State Council of Student
Body Presidents in his campaign
to be reelected in District 35.
subject to the Sept. 7 primary.
The district includes Miami
Beach. North Bay Village. Key
Biscayne. Coconut Grove. Little
Havana and Overtown.
Sen. Gordon, who is President
Pro Tern-Designate of the Florida
Senate and has served in the
Senate for the past ten years, was
cited by the Florida Student As-
sociation for his support of the
state's higher education pro-
grams.
The association officially re-
presents the 130.000 students of
Florida's state university
system. The FSA is headquarter-
ed in Tallahassee.
Students Score in Israel Test
Gerald Goldfarb. president of
Temple Zion announced the
winners from the Religious
School taking the 12th anr.ua'
AMI knowledge of Israel Quiz
Those included Faith Rothman.
winner of the Gold AMI Pin;
Ronald Welch, and Taman
Yamshon, winners of the Silver
AMI pins. Winners of the Bronze
AMI pins are Joel Lucoff. Jan
Pasternak. David Rosenthal.
Gary Semel. Glenn Shapiro, and
Paul Sheldon.
Approximately 60 percent of
the students taking the test
scored high enough to win the
pins for the 1981-82 academic
year.
Rhoda Kissel, a resident of the
Miami Jewish Home and
Hospital for the Aged, models
an outfit in the Douglas Gar-
dens Fashion Show, as Arts
and Crafts Supervisor Jeri
Mitchell looks on.
Robert S. Heller M.D. has re-
cently been appointed as Di-
rector and Chief of the Radia-
tion Oncology Department at
Cedars of Lebanon Health
Care Center. Prior to his ap-
pointment at Cedars, Dr. Hel-
ler was Associate Director of
the Radiation Center at Hol-
lywood Memorial Hospital.
Kose Named
School Principal
Appointment of Michael Kose
as principal of the religious
school and director of youth ac-
tivities of Temple Emanu-El was
announced by Carol Greenberg.
president of the Miami Beach
congregation, and by Lawrence
Schantz. chairman of the board of
education of Temple Emanu-EL
Schantz also announced that
the weekend classes of the reli-
gious school will be held on Sat-
urdays, rather than on Sundays
as in previous years.
Kose. is a former principal of
Beth Israel School of Jewish
Studies in Milwaukee, and also
was principal of Morristown
Jewish Center in Morristown.
NJ. Both are Conservative syna-
gogues. He also was director of
the Hillel Foundation at the Uni-
versity of Georgia in Athens.
Kose received his BA degree
from Yeshiva University in New
York, and earned master's de-
grees from both New York Uni-
versity and Kean College in
Union. NJ. He lived for three
years in Jerusalem, and studied
at the Hebrew University of Je-
rusalem. He served in the Israel
Defense Forces.
tsm
Continental
Cuisine
FRCOJOSSI
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i 'e'-c-ied
STUOIO
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mmmj CfBar S P' j*i'e S* si Caassi
FkM En t arta in man t
AI tha Piano
Also violin playing
for your pleasure
OPENS AT 5 P.M.
iprnraM Luoemon* wmgadl
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FILES


THE
>lume 55Number 33
Two Sections
*
Miami, FloridaFriday, August 13,1982
* www
hiwncim
Price 50 Cants
Begin Has Accepted
International Force to Help Move PLO
By GIL SEDAN
And HUGH ORGEL
JERUSALEM (JTA) Premier Menachem
lk>gin accepted a proposal that a projected in-
ternational force would move into west Beirut, as
part of a plan to get the PLO forces out of the city
and then out of Lebanon altogether, after most
but not necessarily all of the terrorists withdraw,
it was reported by Israel Radio. The proposal had
been put forward several days ago by U.S. special
envoy Philip Habib.
Bagin'l action came shortly after he told the
Cabinet meeting that he had received "an im-
portant letter" from U.S. Secretary of State
George Shultz on developments in Lebanon. The
details of Shultz s letter were not made available.
According to Israel Radio, Begin left the
Cabinet session while it was still in progress to
draft his reply to Shultz, apparently with Cabinet
approval, to ensure its dispatch and arrival in
Washington before Habib had time to make any
further suggestions in his meetings this afternoon
with French, American and Lebanese officials in
Beirut to discuss details of the proposed in-
ternational force and the timing of its
deployment.
France, Italy Ready With Troops
Reports from Paris said two regiments of crack
paratroopers were on stand-by orders to go to
Beirut to supervise the evacuation of PLO forces.
Reports from Rome said the Italian government
also agreed to send a mechanized battalion to join
the French regiments. Both governments said
they would give the go-ahead signal for their
Continued on Page 5-A
Argov Returned
To Israel
By HUGH ORGEL
TEL AVIV (JTAI -
Shlomo Argov, Israel's Ambas
sador to Britain, returned tc
Israel and is now being treated ir
the neurosurgical department ot
the Hadassah Hospital in Jeru
salem after two months of treat-
ments in a London hospital
following the attack on him June
3 which sparked off the war in
Lebanon. Argov suffered severe
head injuries in the attack.
Argov was taken from the
London hospital to the airport to
board the El Al jet under tight
security precautions. He
travelled to Israel on a stretcher,
accompanied by his wife, a doctor
and a nurse.
Argov expressed pleasure at
being home again. He will still re-
quire an extensive period of
treatment and rehabilitation for
the partial paralysis he is said to
suffer.
Murder Squad Kills 6
A Terrorist Atrocity in Paris
By EDWIN EYTAN
>ARIS (JTA) A terrorist squad hit at the heart of
ris' traditional Jewish quarter, the Marais section, killing six
)ple and wounding 15 more, some of them seriously. Four
rorist opened fire on customers eating lunch in the city's best
[>wn Jewish restaurants and then fired on fleeing shopkeep-
and passersby. Monday's attack was the deadliest carried
in recent years against a Western Jewish community.
Eyewitnesses told the Jewish
tgraphic Agency that the
Imando hit-team, described as
b-looking," were "out to kill
my of us as possible. They
at everyone and at every-
A kosher butcher who
about to open his shop for
eh said, "I hid behind a car.
even then they shot at me.
wanted Jewish blood."
)lice say the attack "is ob-
isly connected with the Leba
crisis," but investigators do
[ know as yet whether the ter
Its were Palestinians or
ther they belong to the ex-
e leftwing Direct Action or-
tation which carried out a
Iber of anti-Israeli and anti-
sh attacks.
lese included the bombings
Jewish shop which imports
is from Israel, a bank former
rned by Israeli shareholders
the Rothchild family, and a
[owned bv an Israeli diplomat,
were no casualties in these
ents. Direct Action is be-
lieved to have ties to the PLO.
the Red Army Faction of West
US Shocked
By Anti-Semitic
Incident in Paris
WASHINGTON (JTAI -
The United States expressed its
shock (at what it called an
anti-Semitic "act of violence" in
Paris. "We are shocked and
deeply saddened by this tragic
and despicable act of violance,"
State Department deputy
spokesman Alan Romber said.
"Our hearts go out to victims
The United States deplores this
cowardly act and understands it
is by far the worst anti-Semitic
incident in Paris in recent days."
Romberg added that "we hope
that the perpetrators of this
crime and brought to justice
swiftly."
Germany and the Red Brigade of
Italy.
Eyewitness Accounts
According to some eyewit-
nesses, the attack started after 1
p.m. Four men, waiting in the
Goldenberg restaurant, known
for its traditional Jewish cooking,
suddenly drew out from under
their coats submachineguns and
sprayed the large restaurant and
delicatessen store. The res-
taurant is in the heart of the Rue
de Hosiers. Par' old Jewish quar-
ter in which poor Jews have lived
for more than 100 years.
ther eyewitnesses said that
9
twPother men. stationed outside
the restaurant, opened fire as
soon as they heard the initial
shooting. Police believe, however,
that only four terrorists were ac-
tually involved in the attack.
The terrorists continued shoot-
ing while running through the
maze of narrow alleys, leaving
behind a trail of wounded and
dead. There are three women
among the six killed.
Police stationed in front of a
nearby synagogue. La Syna-
gogue de la rue des Pavees, went
into action as soon as they heard
Continued on Page 6-A
U.S. Says
'Critical' That Cease-Fire
be 'Scrupulously Observed'
By DAVID FRIEDMAN
WASHINGTON (JTAI -
The Reagan Administration
stressed that it is "critical" that
the ceasefire in Lebanon "be
scrupulously observed" because
of the progress that special envoy
Philip Habib is making toward
getting the PLO terrorists to
leave Lebanon.
"It is our view that there is
momentum and that Ambassa-
dor Habib has made substantial
progress the past few days in
working out the practical ar-
rangements for the PLO depar-
ture from Lebanon." State De-
partment Deputy spokesman
Alan Romberg said.
"If the ceasefire holds, we can
have a negotiated solution,"
Romberg continued. "Thus it is
essential that all sides to the con-
flict exercise the utmost restraint
and scrupulously observe the
ceasefire. We trust that all
parties will cooperate to support
Ambassador Habib's mission."
Peres Visits Miami
Labor Party leadewShimon Peres visited Miami Wednesday
for several hours and said he would "strive to stress uniting ele-
ments" in public appearances in the U.S. over the next 10 days
where he will take part in Israel's emergency appeal. During the
visit, he will meet with Vice President George Bush, Secretary
of State George Shultz and other Administration and Congres-
sional figures in Washington.
Anti-Israel Attitude in France
JERUSALEM (JTA) -
The Foreign Ministry spokesman
expressed shock and anger at the
terrorist attack in Paris. The
spokesman said the anti-Israel
attitude adopted by the French
press and communications media
had contributed to the atmos-
phere which encouraged such
atrocities. Leon Dulzin, Jewish
Agency and World Zionist Orga-
nization chairman, described the
attack as a "record in anti-Jewish
and anti-Israel terror."
Evacuation Plan
Schedule provided by Lebanese officials:
Israel receives list of names of departing PLO
guerrillas and destination.
First guerrillas, the wounded and disabled, leave
by sea for Jordanian port of Aqaba via French ships
provided by Lebanon. They will take "side arms
only."
Eastimated 1,000 to 1,500 Syrian troops leave
for home.
Guerrillas leave Lebanon port of Tripoli and
Bekaa Valley.
Multinational force, subject to Lebanese
authority, arrives after exit of most of PLO. It will
withdraw immediately if fighting erupts or PLO
balks.
Lebanese army starts taking up peacekeeping'
duty on "D-Day phis 16" after last guerrillas
leave.


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